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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02577
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: April 18, 1985
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02577

Full Text










r I


USPS 518-880

FORTY-EIGHTH YEAR, NUMBER 33


THE TAR
Industry-Deep Water Port-Fihe People-Safest Beaches in Florida
*PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 1985


Pumping


More


(0115TITUTIO

250 Per Copy


Water


Beach Using 100,000 Gallons Per Day


Water treatment plant manager, Theo
Johnson reported to the City Commission
Tuesday night that the new communities on
the Port St. Joe water system were usir-
an average of 100,000 gallons of water pei
day.
Questioned by Mayor Frank Pate as to
how much the attachment of the Beaches
and Highland View water distribution
systems to the Port St. Joe treatment plant
was affecting output, Johnson gave the
100,000 gallon answer. Johnson said the
addition of the two communities to the
treatment system had caused no problems..
One potential problem was headed off
Tuesday before it became a problem. The
Commission agreed to install, a special
telephone line and alarm system on the
City's main 500,000 gallon storage tank near
Niles Road to provide constant monitoring of
the water supply in the tank at all times.


Carla Harder holds a young lamb which was donated
to the Port St. Joe Elementary School petting zoo last
week. -Star photo

Lamb Joins Other

Animals at Zoo
In places where they raise the critturs, spring brings
'a scene complete with baby lambs gambolling about and
the sheep getting ready for shearing.
HTi.r in GilfC r it q qhpApn ei nn-tlv q v ,v4ltxf


Commissioner James B. Roberts had
become alarmed about a month ago by the
lack,. of storage facilities on the Beach
system "If they have an accident in the
middle of.the night with their main line, it
could suck all our storage facilities dry
before anyone realized there was a prob-
lem", Roberts-said.
His alarm led to contracting with St.
Joseph Telephone and Telegraph Company
for the.special line and the alarm system.
A report on an inspection of the City's
older storage tank at 10th Street and Long
Avenue spurred the Commission into calling
for bids to repair and repaint the .tank.
About a month ago, the City had
received warnings that catwalks and some
sway bars on'the tank were unsafe, when a
firm was inspecting the tank for installation
of a rust preventative system.
Re-painted about six years ago, the tank.


Three Men Jailed;



Face Drug Charge


Said to be Only Part of Good

Size Operation In St. Joe Area


-y." .Three men were arrested
This past week, Carla Harder of Panama City here in Port St. 'Joe on
observed part of the rites of spring and at the same time, Thursday of last. week; in
tried to remove part of the novelty sheep are to'Gulf what Sheriff's Department
County, by donating a young lamb to the Port St. Joe. Chief Deputy Mike White
Elementary School.petting zoo. Carla is the daughter of terms an "on-going investi-
the late H. G. Harders of Panama City who had, his gation",
"Crittur Farm" as his hobby. The lamb came from the Three men-two of Port St:
... Hatder_."'.Critur-F-rm" and,.wjlUjoin -a. host-of -.ther. ..,. Joe ald_.a.third. fromBoi.-
animals in the petting zoo to be viewed, petted and cared fay-were arrested in the
for by the students at the school. action which is described by
the zoo was established two years White as being only about a
S Since the zoo was established two year ago, third of a ring which is doing
several animals have, been donated by individuals, the big business with drugs .in
Game Commission and business firms. Port St. Joe and along the
Superintendent of Schools Walter Wilder says the beaches. "There are some
school system receives $1,500 a year to finance the zoo more in this; ring out there
operations which is designed to give the students a sense. which we are after", White
of responsibility as well as making the animals available said. "If they want to test us
to them. The students do all the caring for the animals and stay in operation, we
all year long. have a place out here at the
jail for them", the Deputy
said.


High School Receives Area Honor for,

Their Report to Parents Publication


Port St. Joe High School
l'eceived honors this month
from the Florida Education
Council and the Sunshine
State School Public Relations
Association as having the
best annual report to parents
in the Panhandle.
The report, a mandatory
publication published by
every school district in Flor-
ida, was sent to the parents of
every child in the school.
Not only did the school
win the honor of having the
best annual report, theywere


also' presented a $300 award
for' the report, which was
judged "outstanding" by
teachers, administrators,
PTA members and other
judges who met in Orlando to
judge submissions from
schools throughout Florida.
According to Superinten-
dent of Schools, Walter Wil-
der, the Panhandle region
includes 18 counties and 293
schools, from Monticello to-
the Alabama state line.-
According to Wilder, the
reports were judged on their


informativeness and. read-
ability. Barbara Shirley,
Gulf County's director of
instruction, said the manda-
tory reports contain statis-
tics on test results, enroll-
ment figures, student-
achievements, fiscal infor-
mation, program improve-
ments and goals for future
improvement.
The report was designed
and printed for the school by
The Star Publishing Com-
pany.


Arrested were Michael. Port St. Joe. "The firm was
Ray Speights, 27 and Earl' ot involved in the operation;
Hunter, 25, both of Port St. just their driver", White
Joe and Benny Brown, 27, of said.
Bonifay. Speights was char-
ged with the sale of cocaine The operation was similar
and-marijuana.; Hunter was to a mail order business. "A
charged with conspiracy to customer would put in his
sell marijuan..arnoale. of. 'der a[ the bridge and
marijuana and possession of several phone calls would be
a'firearm during the com- -made to suppliers which
mission of a felony and resisted in the goods being
Brown was charged with delivered to the customer at
conspiracy to sell cocaine the bridge", White said.
and sale of cocaine. At the time of the control-
White said the investiga- led purchase of drugs, Dep-
tion of the sale ring started uty White, States Attorney
about three months ago as a investigator Jim Buchanan,
joint venture by the Florida Richter and Port St. Joe
Marine Patrol, Port St. Joe Police Patrolman James
Police Department, State Graves converged on the
Attorney's office and the Bay point of the transaction and
and Gulf County Sheriff's made the arrest.
departments.
"The investigation started White said the three were
when Marine Patrol officer dealing in marijuana primar-
Bucky Richter learned of the ily, but some cocaine traffic-
involvement of the three in ing was also reported.
the sale operation", White Iadditiontothearrests,
said. the officers confiscated an
The three men were ar- 18-wheeler truck owned by
rested at about 5:00 p.m., L-P and released later in the
Thursday when undercover day, several ounces of mari-
agents succeeded in making juana 'and cocaine, a 1982'
-a buy of drugs from the trio. Plymouth Duster and a .25-
The arrest was made at the caliber pistol.
Highland View bridge, where
Speights was employed as a -'
bridge tender and was said to
be the main point for'sale of
the illegal substances.
White said Brown was Lakes .
accused of transporting the
drugs into Gulf County in a The Northwest Floric
truck he drove for Louisiana postponed a public h
Pacific Company here in yesterday, to hear testimi


was said by the inspector, Billy G. Norris of a
Chipley tank maintenance firm, that the
outside of the tank was in fair condition, but
that the inside needed painting.
In addition, the inspection showed
several struts needed repair and painting, a
catwalk under the tank needs to be repaired
and rebuilt and that several sway rods need
repairing.
The Commission decided to call for bids
to do a complete overhaul and re-painting of
the tank.
STATE REPORT
Mayor Frank Pate asked Johnson if he
had seen a recent report sent out by the State
Board of Health asking all communities to
inspect their water to see how much fluoride
could be added to the various systems for
health reasons.
Johnson said he hadn't seen the report
but told Mayor Pate, "We have plenty of
fluoride in our water from natural sources.
We don't need any more". Bob Simon,
superintendent of the City's Wastewater
Treatment Plant, which does much of the
testing and laboratory work for both
systems, corraborated Johnson's statement.


"The well water we are now using has plentyI
of fluoride from natural sources in it to
provide any health benefits desired by the
state."
SIDEWALK WORK
Clerk Alden Farris said a check had
been received from Bay St. Joseph Care
Center home office to help repair the
sidewalk on Long Avenue torn up' by the
construction of the health care center.
The City had requested the center to
purchase the cement for the replacement of
the sidewalk and the City would do the
installation.
Farris said the check, for $2,500, had
arrived and the City will get to work on the
project in a short while.
Public Works Superintendent Martin
Adkison also said he would begin work in a
few days with construction of barricades at
the ends of the footbridge crossing the
Patton's Bayou drain ditch between 17th and
18th Streets on Palm Boulevard. Several
people have alerted the Commission to the
fact that children are darting across the
(Continued on Page 5)


Port St. Joe firemen check the ballast of a faulty fluorescent light which set off an alarm
at Port St. Joe High School Saturday evening. --Star photo


Faulty Ballast Trips Alarm
Port St. Joe's volunteer Fire Depart- cause of the alarm was found to be only a-
ment was alarmed Saturday evening when a shorted out ballast in a fluorescent light'
fire alarm was sounded for Port St. Joe High fixtire.


School.
Although the school property is ade-
quately surrounded by fire hydrants, a blaze
in the building would be a formidable
challenge to the department.
When firemen arrived at the scene, the


Smelly and smoky, but not all that
dangerous if given quick attention.
In the photo above, firemen are shown
taking care of the light which caused the
alarm to be set off.


Dam Hearing Delayed


la Water Management District
hearing, scheduled to begin
ony from both sides concerning


removal of the Dead Lakes dam. The hearing was
postponed because of an action filed by opponents of thq
dam removal in order to allow them more time to
compile information and evidence to support their
position. The opponents had originally been given
until April 4 to file their information, but instead said
they had not had sufficient time to properly prepare
their case.


Supporters of dam removal say, "We're basically
ready to go with the hearings. Our evidence and
testimony is ready".
Spokesmen for the Water Management District say
the earliest date, now, for the public hearing will be
during the month of June, when two days can be allowed
on the calendar. If more time is necessary to hear all
evidence in the matter, a second session will be held
sometime after July 4.
The hearings were formerly scheduled to be
conducted Wednesday through Friday of this week.


Highland View Gives Its Approval

Wants County to Take Over and Operate Water System


"looking after all these people". Joe is also the official
goodwill ambassador for thecity and is officially in charge
of showing off the City fire trucks to classes from local
schools who want- to see the apparatus up close and first
hand. Here Joe is shown demonstrating one of the City's fire
pumpers to a third grade class from Port St. Joe
Elementary School early this week. -Star photo


There wasn't a single dissenting
voice at a special public meeting held
last Thursday, when residents of
Highland View urged Gulf County to
take the necessary steps to take over
control and management of their
water system.
The system has gradually fallen
into a state of dis-repair due to
improper supervision for the past few
years. A month ago, the state health
department issued warnings that
residents should boil the water before
it was used. Just recently, the
community has been placed on The
Beaches supply system, using treated
water from Port St. Joe, but still the
system was under the guidance of a
commission made up of volunteers
appointed by the Governor of Florida.
There have been no appointments


made in several years and most of the
commission had ceased to function.
Only Martin Adkison, Port St. Joe
superintendent of public works and
Virgil Lipford continued to try and
keep the system operating in their
spare time. Lipford was not even a
member of the commission, since he
moved out of the community some
four months ago.
Under a county takeover, the
system's operation would be assumed
by the county, including paying off a
$78,000 debt still owed for construction
ef the plant some 20 years ago.
Adkison said the debt was financed at
three and a half percent interest.
Ann Woods, a resident of High-
land View probably expressed the
feelings of the community best when
she stated, "What we want is


somebody to manage that system so it
works".
That was the reason for the
County Commission suggesting they
take it over in the first place.
The fact that the new source of
supply for the new system was
increasing the water bills consider-
ably in Highland View didn't seem to
alarm the residents in attendance at
the meeting. Most seemed to under-
stand that part of the problem with the
old system was that it was not
charging enough to pay for running
the operation .properly.
The County Commission will
petition the Florida Legislature to
abolish the old Highland View water
district commission and turn control
of the district over to the county
government in the current session of
the Legislature.


DJoe Demonstrates
Joe Badger, a long-time employee with the City of Port
St. Joe, has an official honorary position with the City as
well as taking care of his regular job, which Joe says is,


a











Editorials and Comments


THE STAR


THURSDAY, APR. 18, 1985


Hey! Congratulations,
Highland View for making the only
reasonable decision which could be
made concerning your water sup-
ply.
You say you had no choice. You
say there was no other decision to
make. We agree with you; but in
years past, such a situation hasn't
stopped people from demanding
something different from
threatening to toss people out of
office if they didn't accomplish the
unreasonable or the unreal for
2 them. No matter that it can't be
done, many citizens in the past
have demanded unreasonable solu-
tions to problems which aren't
soluable with reasonable solutions.
It was refreshing to see the
: people of Highland View realize
- that if they were going to have
good, safe water, they were either
: going to have to haul it in from
'some other source, or they were
going to have to pay the tarif it,
would take to bring good water to
them. They chose to pay, realizing
it was a reasonable rate for what
they were receiving.
With a community which had
historically paid a small amount
for water, it was with a little
apprehension on our part that the-
County Commission held the public


The Japanese are a diligent lot
and we could take a lot of lessons
from them. They make a little go a
long way and-waste nothing. They
? also take just as much advantage
as their adversaries allow and use
it to their benefit.'
For years, the Japanese have
', been flooding the American market
place with consumer -goods, elec-
tronics, automobiles and other
goods while denying American
manufacturers free access to their
ow n markets. As a matter of fact,
the Japanese have made it impos-
sible for American goods to be sold
in their country.
We can't blame them for this
lop-sided situation. If Americans
will stand still for the stand-off and
be willing to sacrifice the thou-
sands of jobs purchasing Japanese
goods by this lop-sided deal, we can*
blame only the Americans. There-
is nothing' wrong with a battle in a
free market, but this situation with
Japan would be like Marvin Hagler
stepping into the ring with his.
hands tied. He would get his brains
beat out, just as we are.
The situation has eroded to the


hearings last Thursday night to see
what Highland View residents
wanted in the way of water service.
Of course, they already had water
service of the type demanded by
the Departmental Environmental
Regulation. The catch was that the
cost was higher. *
It has been our experience that
when you go to messing with a
person's pocketbook, you are
treading around in dangerous
territory. The people of Highland
View recognized the fact they had
been receiving water at an unrea-
listic price and they put their
unanimous stamp of approval on
the charge they would have to face
in the future. After it was explained
what every penny of the charge
was going for, the people realized it
was a reasonable amount and went
for it.
Your water bill may be more
now than you have ever paid,
Highland View, but the only thing
you have .to worry about now-so
far as water. is concerned-is
paying the bill. As tough as that is,
it isn't nearly 'so traumatic as
worrying about whether the supply
is going to be there when you turn
the spigot on or if it will be safe to
use once you get it in the house.


point where Congress seems ready
to pass some sort of protectionist
legislation to shut off Japanese
imports if they will not allow us the
same easy access to their markets.
As we said, we don't blame the
Japanese for the situation, we
, blame the Americans.
'- I" "

Short Takes from

the News
-We see where the law down
in Playalinda Beach near Titus-
ville, is closing down a beach which
was mostly used by nudists. It
seems the beach is attracting
criminals and spawning a crime
wave. We don't know what sort of
crimes are being committed, but it
would appear the people there are
at least safe from pick-pockets.
-Sports fans were- in awe of
Bruce Sutter, Atlanta Braves relief
artist, when he fanned the side for
two innings in the first two games
of the season to preserve Brave
wins. For a $4 million salary, why
should one be surprised?


Kesley Colbert's Country Column


Walt Sure Must'a Loved A Parade


Congratulations



Highland View


sock or two and roll them up
into a tight ball, get a little
black electrician tape and
wrap around it a time or two
and you are ready for action.
Great thing about sock
baseball is you couldn't hit it
too far so you could play it
almost anywhere-you
didn't need a big field-and
you didn't have to worry
about breaking a window.
Of course every Easter
vacation we'd spend a lot of
time over at Everette's Lake'
hitting those little tiny rocks
out into the lake with a saw-


ed off broom handle. Then
someone would find a flat
rock and he'd skip it across
the lake and the "skipping
contest" would be on. We
often wondered; with all the
rocks that we either hit or
threw into that old lake, why
we didn't fill it up. Nicky
Joe, who was a little older
than the rest of us, told us
that at night the fish would
swim the rocks over to the
shallow water and then the
frogs would bring them out
of the water and put them
back on the bank. Now, I


didn't think for a minute that
could be true but still I won-
dered why the lake didn't fill
up. Ricky wanted to know
how the fish carried the
rocks.
Shucks, sometimes we'd just
go out into the field and
throw dirt clods at a tree.
Sometimes we threw the dirt
clods at each other. You
haven't lived until you've
been hit in the back of the
neck with a good size dirt
clod thrown by someone who
could really chunk it. Those
days taught me to chunk and


When me and Ricky and
Bobby and Nicky Joe and the
rest of the guys were about
nine or 10 we had some good
Easter vacations. We'd get
so excited about being out of
school-I tell you, we didn't
really plan a whole lot, we
just knew that school was out
and we were going to have
some fun.
We'd usually start out the
first day of vacation playing
sock baseball. Now, if you
never played sock baseball,
your upbringing just might
not be complete. Take an old


When the Tax Man Comes and Goes, Everything Else Goes with Him


I NOW KNOW what a chicken
feels like to be plucked. I even
understand what a sheep experiences
when he is sheared. It is no longer a
mystery as to how a goat feels after it
has bc-en milked or a catfish that has
found out that was more- than just a
fat, succulent worm lying on the river
bottom.
The tax man has been here. He
came with his big money vacuum and
paid me a visit Monday. When he left,
. I had nothing left and he had hardly
enough to buy a dozen hammers for
the Air Force.
I tried to argue that it was hardly
worth his stopping by for and
certainly wasn't worth pausing in his
busy routine Monday to collect. He
insisted on paying me a visit, anyhow.
"Every little bit helps" was the
Uncle's theme on Monday.
I could give about as little as
anybody.
We emptied out the old coffee can
on the top shelf of the cupboard, dug
up the fruit jar from out of the back
yard, broke the piggy bank, cashed in


our discount pizza coupons and took
the $5.00 bill out of my shoe and still it
wasn't enough.
The Uncle has an insatiable
appetite when it comes to collecting


during the last hour of the last day of
the tax paying .period. Uncle Sam
doesn't give discounts or ray interest
for early payment, so he gets mine at
the last possible minute.


ETA OI. SHRDLU

By: W(


money from those of us who slave all
year long to recover from the last visit
of the tax man, only to have our
balance become unbalanced when the
tax man cometh.
+++++ +
I DIDN'T GIVE UP without a
struggle, however.
The tax return has been made out
for at least a week, but it was mailed


contribution.
DON'T GET ME wrong. I'm
happy to pay taxes. It's just giving up
the money which bothers me. Here we


esley R. Ramsey


Uncle Sam is a great one to
charge us interest if we're late
making our payment. He is right on
the spot with that move. If the Uncle
were as astute at handling the money
he wrenches out of us each April 15, as
he is in charging us interest, there is a
great possibility our tax bills would be
less. We might all even have a couple
of dollars left after the annual


work all year long to build up a
balance in the old bank account and
then spend it all in a second, with
Uncle Sam. -
Considering that if we didn't have
to pay taxes, we wouldn't have
anything or have earned anything to
pay taxes on, I suppose it is sort of a
backward privilege to pay our taxes.


It's also gratifying to see how
much we get back for our taxes paid
in. There's Amtrak service (which I
have never used): there's the Armed
Forces (who buys those $750 ham-
mers): there's the IRS (which most of
us could do without); there's free mail
for our Senators and Representatives
and there's financing for that all-i
important study on the mating habits
of the Pathagordian frog.
When you think of it...we get a
bargain from our taxes.
+++++ +
MOST OF US pay our taxes sort of
begrudgingly because we have all
heard of the rich man who doesn't pay
any taxes because he has a battery of
experts hired to figure out the
loopholes for his earnings and invest-
ments.
Paul Harvey almost made me feel
sorry for those rich men who don't pay
taxes the other day. I didn't give up
my game plan of becoming a
millionaire someday, you understand,
but I felt sort of sorry for those who


have made it to the pinnacle most of
us aspire to.
Paul Harvey said if the rich men
of the United States paid in ALL they
made-not just a percentage, like the
rest of us-but, all of what they made,*
it would only be enough money to run
the United States for two and a half
days.
Imagine that!
Something's wrong somewhere.
Either it costs too much to run this
country or there are not near so many
rich men as I thought there were and
they don't have quite as much money
as they would have you believe they
have.

I THINK THE next time the tax
man comes around making his annual
fund drive, I'm going to have the
answer which gets me out of embar-
rassing positions time and again.
When they come to my place looking
for money, I'm just going to tell them,
"I gave at the office".


-THE STAR-
Published Every Thursday at 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
By The Star Publishing Compqny
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Wesley R. Ramsey .......... Editor and Publisher
William H. Ramsey Production Supt.
Frenchie L. Ramsey .............. Office Manager
Shirley K. Ramsey ................... Typesetter


POSTOFFICE BOX 308
PHONE 227-1278
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456


SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE


IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR. $10.00
OUT OF COUNTY-ONE YEAR. $15.00


SIX MONTHS. IN COUNTY $800
SIX MONTHS. OUT OF COUNTY $1000
OUTOF US -ONE YEAR, $16.00


TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions In advertisements. the publishers do not hold
SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such advertisement.
AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
The spoken word is given scant attention: the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word
barely asserts: the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Tides
The tide action in St.
Joseph's Bay is shown in the
tide table below. High and
low tides for each day of the
upcoming week are listed in
their respective columns.


High Low
Apr. 18 8:30a.m. 2:09a.m.
4:26p.m.
Apr. 19 8:34a.m. 5:40p.m.
Apr. 20 8:56 a.m. 6:41p.m.
Apr. 21 9:21a.m. 7:35p.%.
Apr.22 9:53a.m. 8:24 p.m.
Apr.23 10:29a.m. 9:12p.m.
Apr.24 11:13 a.m. 10:15 p.m.
Apr. 25 12:02 p.m. 11:12 p.m.


* ,t -h*; n..t--..*.


COLBERT
duck.
On the hot afternoons we'd
go swimming down at Sugar
Creek. We'd swim at the
deep hole and we'd walk
across those flat rocks in the
shallow part. Sometimes we
played chase across that old
swinging bridge and some-
times we'd get someone out
in the middle of that old
bridge and we'd get at both
ends and try to shake him off
the bridge. It was probably
20 or 30 feet to the rocks
below and it would have
busted a guy up pretty good
if he had fallen and we were
kind'a dumb to be doing
something like that but it
sure was fun. Except for the
(Continued on Page 3)

Letters to the

Editor

Give Kids Our
Support
Remember when someone
said, "Give you two cents for
your thoughts?"
Well, if attacking little
boys and girls at a little
league ballgame are your
thoughts, then keep them to
yourself!
How about saluting these
little people for their dedica-
tion, hard work and perform-
ance in front of an overly
critical crowd?
We are able to record their
strikes, hits and runs; can
we record the feelings of
these boys and girls playing
their hearts out for us (the
parent)!
How about a little encour-
agement, a kind word, or a
pat onthe back. There may,
come a day when our
children say, "Let's see
what you can do, Mom,
Dad." What will you look
like when this happens?
It's up to you, folks! Put
your money where your
mouth is. Let's be a good ex-
ample for sportsmanship.
We get splinters in our bot-
toms sitting on the
bleachers, do we want to put
splinters in their spirit?
If we aren't for them, who
will be?
Sincerely,
For Them

Urges Help
For Museum
Dear Sir:
It gave me a jolt to learn
that Tallahassee has made
cutbacks in the maintenance
(Continued on Page 3)


PAGE TWO


Our Own Fault


I _


I I


r_








THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, APR. 18, 1985 PAGE THREE


0 OBITUARIES

'Cecil E. Glass
Cecil E. Glass, 84, passed
away Friday in Bay Medical
Center following a long ill-
ness. He was a resident of
Wewahitchka for the past 77
years, and had been a mail
carrier for 52 years. He
attended the Glad Tidings
Assembly of God Church and
ran Glass's Grocery Store for
many years.
Survivors include: his
wife, Rena Glass of Wewahit-
chka; 'six sons, Cecil E.
Glass, Jr. of Port St. Joe,
James Carl Glass of Blounts-
town, J. H. "Preacher"
Glass of Wewahitchka, Ken-
neth Glass of Pensacola,
Joseph Glass of Colorado
Springs, and Johnny Glass of
Wewahitchka; six daughters,
Louise Keith of Wewahitch-
ka, Katheryn Oliver of We-
wahitchka, Sally Mae Ever-
den of Wewahitchka, Ina
Culpan, Pearl Foster, and
Betty Williams, all of Wewa-
hitchka; 32 grandchildren;
and 26 great grandchildren..
Funeral services were held
at 2:00 p.m. CST Sunday at
the Glad Tidings Assembly of
God Church with the Rev.
Bob Claycomb officiating.
Interment followed in Cy-
press Creek cemetery.
All arrangements were un-
lt der the direction of Comfort-
er Funeral Home, Wewahit-
chka Branch Chapel.

Irene Allen
Mrs. Irene Odessa Allen,
81, died 'Tuesday, April 9 at
her home. She was born in
Pensacola and later moved
to River Junction. She moved
to Port St. Joe in 1931.and
was a member of the First
Born Holiness Church of the
Living God.
Survivors include: three
S" daughters, Mrs. Annis Lee
Andrews, Mrs. Eva Mae
Fennell, and Mrs. Vera Mae
Allen, all of Port St. Joe;
three sons, Theodore Allen of
Miami, Willie Jeremaih Al-
len, and James Frankie
Allen, both of Port St. Joe; 17
grandchildren; and 17 great
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
Saturday at 2:00 p.m. at the
Thompson Temple Church of
the Living God. Interment
followed in Forest Hill Ceme-
tery, .
S-9' "'All arrangements were un-"
der the direction of Comfort-
er Funeral Home.

Mattie Burke
Mrs. Mattie R. Burke, 62,
of Panama City died late
Saturday evening in a Pana-
ma City hospital. Mris. Burke
was a native of Caryville,
and. had been a resident of
Panama City for. the past
eight years, coming from St.
Joe Beach. She was a home-
maker and a member of the
Ladies Auxiliary of .the
V.F.W. No. 2185.
Survivors include: two
daughters, Mrs. Betty Jane
Johnson of Panama City, and
Mrs. Glenda Burke of Pana-
ina City Beach; her parents,
Monroe and Bessie Beck of
Highland View; one sister,
Mrs. Barbara Creel of St. Joe
Beach; one brother, Elzie
Williams of Highland View;
two grandchildren, four nie-
ces and three nephews.
Funeral services were held
at 2:00 P.M. EST Tuesday in
the Beach Baptist Chapel of
St. Joe Beach, with-r the Rev.
William Smith officiating.
Interment followed in Holly
Hill Cemetery of Port St. Joe.

E. R. Morgan
Edward Burton Morgan,
69, died Friday at his home in
Wewahitchka. He was a
resident of Wewahitchka for
the past 2% years, and had
been a long time resident of
S Marianna.
Survivors include: one
S daughter, Barbara Jean
White of Atlanta, Georgia;"
one son, Barry Morgan; one
brother, William Washington
Morgan of Chipley; five
S sisters, Jessie Pearl Gray of
Douglas Landing, Mariam
Bright and Dorothy Lee
S Lawrence, both of Marianna,


Ophelia Knighton of Norfolk,
Va., and' Myrtle Estelle
Green of Georgia.
Graveside funeral services
were held Monday at 3:30
p.m. CST at the Piney Grove
Cemetery near Alford with
the Rev. Gerald Fowler
officiating. Interment follow-
ed.
All arrangements were un-
der the direction of Comfort-
er Funeral Home, Wewahit-
chka Branch Chapel.

S.E. Helminger
Samuel E. Helminger, 73,


of Beacon Hill, Mexico
Beach, died late Monday
evening after.a short illness.
Survivors include his wife,
Mrs. Ruth Helminger of
Beacon Hill; two daughters
and sons-in-law, Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Harris of At-
lanta, Ga., and Mr. and Mrs.
Michael Vigoda of Milford,
Conn.; one sister, Mrs. Law-
rence Myers, of Wabash,
Ind.; 10 grandchildren; and
six great grandchildren.
In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that dona-
tions in his memory be sent
to the Lung Association.
All services are under the
direction of the Comforter
Funeral Home.


Kesley

guy in the middle.
Now I know you're not go-
ing to believe this but some-
times we had fun doing
nothing. We'd just lay out in
the backyard on our backs
and watch the clouds go by.
You know, when the clouds
were "good" you could see
all sorts of animals and peo-
ple and things in them. Why,
I once saw John Wayne
riding a horse plain as day in
one of those clouds. A few
minutes later my brother
saw an elephant in that same


(Continued from Page 2)

cloud. John Wayne kind'a
faded but I never did see the
elephant. How long has it
been since you did some
cloud watching? I mentioned
it to my boys once but they
thought the idea stunk more
than one of Nickey Joe's old
fish stories. ;
I remember one year at
Easter vacation Ricky and
his parents went on a trip.
We couldn't believe it! We
didn't know you could go off
during that time-we jpst
thought you got out of school.


As I stood by last-week
watching the Walt Disney
Easter parade I couldn't
help but think of Ricky, Bob-
by and the rest of the gang.
How does that song go-"If
they could only see me now".
Back in the old days we
never dreamed Easter. vaca-
tion was supposed to be like
this. First day we were at
Disney World they had three
parades. I got to thinking
maybe this was somebody's
idea of an Easter vacation,
but it wasn't mine. I got to
thinking about throwing dirt
clods and hitting rocks with
a broom handle,
Maybe we were right after


Urges Help
(Continued from Page 2)
of our Constitution Museum.
This unique property is hal-
lowed ground and deserves
continued care. More publici-
ty and activity at the Mu-

all. Maybe you're not sup-
posed to take a trip at
Easter, you're just supposed
to get out of school and have
fun.
Besides, you don't have to
stand in line to get in Sugar
Creek.
Respectfully,
Kesley


seum would compensate for
the funds spent to maintain
the high standard.
Could it be that plans are
underway-to eventually have
this restful oasis sold to an
avarice developer, who
would remove the giant trees
and turn the green grass into
cement parking lots?
If St. Joe citizens allow this
historical shrine to be gob-
bled up because of the whims
of outside bureaucrats, then
they must prepare for pos-
sibly another picturesque
area to be included on the
chopping block. Perhaps the
old cemetery will be next on
the. list.


The Historical Society of
this town has long been
vigilant and active to pre-
serve the historical land-
marks of this area: If the
heritage of the Museum and
the surrounding property is
worth saving, let the younger
generation speak up now and
join those who have lived
here for decades.
Yours sincerely,
Marjorie Parker



*7EAFLRD


JPAkA


STOCK WILL

BE SOLD I

ITO THE BARE WALLS


^*,.*







PAGE FOUR THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, APR. 18, 1985


Gaynell Stephens Becomes Bride


of George Robert Jones March 30


Marion Gaynell Stephens
and Charles Robert Jones
were united in marriage on
March 30, at the First Baptist
Church in Port St. Joe. The
Rev. Howard Browning per-
formed the candlelight,
double ring ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Charles H.
Stephens, Sr. of Port St. Joe.
She is the granddaughter of
Mrs. Dixie Donalson and Mr.
and Mrs. Grover C. Stephens,
Sr., all of Bainbridge, Ga.
The bridegroom is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. Troy W.
Jones, Sr. of Port St. Joe. He
is the grandson of Mrs. May
Bell Lee of Vincent, Ala., and
Mr. and Mrs. Mack Jones of
Panama City.
Nuptial music was per-
formed by Mrs. Sharon Wat-
son, organist, Mrs. Melinda
Arnold, pianist, Miss. April
SStephens, -soloist, and Ron
Kegley, soloist.
The bride was given in
marriage by her parents and
escorted to the altar by her
father.
Miss Lynn Stephens, sister
of the bride, was maid of
honor. Miss Debra A. Jones
and Miss Donna L. Jones,
:sisters of the groom, and
Miss Nancy Wright and
Cindy Marshall, all, of Port
St. Joe, served as brides-
maids.
Troy W. Jones, Sr:, the
bridegroom's father, was
best man. Usher-groomsmen
were Troy W. Jones, Jr.,
brother of the bridegroom, of
Sylacauga, Ala.; Chuck Ste-
phens, brother of the bride, of
Port St. Joe; Ashley Jones,
cousin 'of ,the bride, of Bain-


bridge, Ga.; Joe F. Part-
ridge, Jr. of Pensacola; and


Thomas E. Vandavender of
Port St. Joe.


U


'I -\


MR. AND MRS. JONES


Following the ceremony a
reception was given by the
bride's parents in the social
hall of the church. Attending
the bride's table were Miss
Hope Lane and Miss Alyson
Guilford of Port St. Joe. Miss
Kim Tedder of Bainbridge,
Ga. attended the bride-
groom's table, and Miss Lori
Ray of Port St. Joe served
punch. Attending the buffet
table and serving as floor
hostesses were Mrs. Elaine
Handley, Mrs. Betty Sue
Wright, Mrs. Kathleen Grace
and Mrs. Donna Ray, all of
Port St. Joe.
The wedding was directed
by Mrs. Jeri Ashcraft of Port
St. Joe. The reception was
directed by Mrs. Jeanette
Jones, aunt of the bride, of
Bainbridge, Ga.
After .a wedding trip to
Callaway Gardens in Pine
Mountain, Ga., the couple
will reside in Dothan, Al. The
bridegroom is employed by
Unijax,' Inc. of Dothan, Al.
The bride is employed by the
Troy State University
Branch of Dothan.
A rehearsal dinner was
held March 28, at the Long
Avenue Baptist Church so-
cial hall by the bridegroom's
parents.
A miscellaneous shower
was hosted March 12 at the
First Baptist Church social
hall by Mrs. Elaine Handley,
Mrs. Jeri Ashcraft, Mrs.
Trixie Rich, Mrs. Marguerite
Farris, Mrs, Donna Ray,
Miss Phyllis Cumbie, Mrs.
Pauline Pendarvis and Mrs.
Electa Frary.


.


MR. AND MRS. RABON

Reception to Honor Rabons

On Golden Anniversary


Robert and Ruth Rabon
would like to invite all their
friends to help them cele-
brate their Golden Wedding
Anniversary on April 20 from
2:00 until 5:00 P.M. The event
will be held at the Florida
Power Lounge in Port St.
Joe, and is being given by


their children: Alice and
Richard Lee, Betty Ruth
Lowe, Marilyn McClain, An-
nice and Harry Lewis, Jim-
mie and June Rabon, and
David and Annette Rabon.
No gifts, please! A money
tree will be decorated if you
wish to help.


Senior Citizens Plan Fund

Raiser In Wewahitchka


On Saturday, May 4,. an
auction in Wewahitchka will
raise funds for two programs
of the Gulf County Senior
Citizens Association. The lo-
cation will be at the Cafeteria
building of the old Elemen-
tary School, corner of 2nd
Street and E. River Road in
Wewahitchka.,
Proceeds from the. fund
raiser will purchase materi-
als for curtains for the Wewa
Senior Center located in the
Cafeteria. The participants
will make the curtains.
The proceeds will also go to
match state funds brought
into Gulf County for .the
Community Care for the
Elderly Program which
serves homebound older per-
sons who might otherwise
have to go into a nursing


-New Craft S

for Business

SCarolyn H'tamon announced
Sthe opening of a new business
on the beach. Carolyn's Craft
House, 123 DeSoto'Street, St.
Joe Beach, is now open to
offer a variety of craft and
needlework supplies. The
shop features materials for
counted cross stitch, candle-
wicking, stencilling, basket-
making, soft sculpture, basic
crafts, and others. She plans
to add a line of artists'


Mrs. George Victor Spurgeon


kept the bride's book, Mrs.
Ken Bateman and Mrs. Ruth
Barfield attended the buffet
tables featuring a cham-
pagne fountain.
. The wedding was directed
by Tim Ard. The reception
was directed by Mrs. Nor-
man F. Allemore, Jr.
After a wedding trip to the
mountains of North. Carolina
na, the couple will reside in
Panama City Beach. The
bridegroom is employed in
the tile business in Panama
City Beach. The bride is


employed at Bay Point Yacht
and Country Club in Panama
City Beach.
A rehearsal dinner was
held March 23 at Gulf Sands
Restaurant in Port St. Joe. It
was hosted by.Gary Lark.-
A miscellaneous shower
was hosted March 3 by Mrs.
Terri Alien in Graceville.
A miscellaneous shower
was hosted by Diane Sherer
on March 10 in Panama City
Beach.


Teen Seminar for Girls


There will be a Teen Age

Care Center
Needs Plants
The Activities Department
of Bay St. Joseph Care
Center is in need of plants for
the residents. Any type of
plants will be appreciated. If
anyone would like to contri-
bute, you may drop them off
at the Nursing Center at 220
9th St., or call 229-8244 and we
will pick..them up.


Seminar at 11 A.M. Saturday,
April 20 at Motel St. Joe. This
seminar is for young ladies
between the ages of 10 and 19.
Guest speaker will be Jean
Day, who has a Bachelor of
Science Degree in Nursing.
Lunch will be served for a
small fee.

"If you pick up a starving
dog and make him prosper-
ous, he will not bite you.
This is the principal differ-
ence between a man and his
dog." Mark Twain


home or other institution.
Nearly $1,000 must be raised
by June 30 to bring in about
$60,000 in state funds for the
operation of this county wide
service from July 1, 1985
through June 30, 1986.
The auction will provide
food, fun and a flea market,
too. More donations of sal-
able items are needed. Call
639-9910 in Wewa and 229-8466
in Port St. Joe for pick-up of.
your donations or more infor-
mation.
The Gulf County Senior
Citizens Association is a
private non-profit agency
offering multiple services to
the older citizens of Gulf
County using local, state and
federal funding. All dona-
tions are tax deductible.

hop Opens

at Beach
.supplies in the near future.
A schedule of classes is
available at the shop or by
calling 648-8671. The shop will
be open for business Tuesday
through Friday 10:00 until
5.30, and Saturday 10:00 until
4:00.

The Dutch once believed
that if a stork built its nest
on the roof of your house,
it meant the best of luck.


Melanie Dawn Vickers and
George Victor Spurgeon
were united in marriage on
March 24 at the First United
Methodist Church in Port St.
Joe. The. Rev. Al Harbour
performed the candlelight;
double ring ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of
James H. and Patsy S.
Vickers of. Panama City
Beach; She is the grand-
daughter of Mrs., Myrtle
Vickers of Tallahassee and
Mrs. Lola Mae Sims 'of
Marianna.
The bridegroom is the son
of. Mrs. Wilma Spurgeon of
Waiukeegan, Ill. and the late
George Spurgeon. He is the
grandson of Mrs. L. S.
Spurgeon of North Little
Rock, Ark. and the late L. S.
Spurgeon.
Nuptial music was per-
formed by Mrs. Jo O'Barr,
soloist and Mrs. Alisa Walk-
er, pianist.
The bride was given in
marriage by her parents and
escorted to the altar by her
father. She wore a designer
formal-length gown of can-
dlelight bridal satin overlaid
ivith silk organza. The high
Victorian neckline of Alencon
lace motifs and seed pearls
was complemented by an
off-the-shoulder sheer yoke
of English net. The gown
featured Queen Anne sleeves


S FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH


Shavefe ow, S


S tlieat wiou m
I 4 Iosni tou. r


Sunday Worship 10 am
AdNursery Available
Adut School ... Lam
ASTORAL COUNSELING
227-1756


of satin and fitted English net
fashioned with Alencon lace
motifs and seed pearls which
ended in extended points
over the hands. Seed pearls
and re-embroidered Alencon
lace on English net over
bridal satin accented the
fitted bodice which led into a
Full skirt edged with fluting
attached by Alencon lace.
The skirt flowed into a
cathedral train bordered
with fluting and Alencon lace
on the silk organza over
bridal satin.
For her headpiece, she
wore a matching picture hat
of fluting and Alencon lace
.with an attached full-length
veil of English illusion net.
She carried a silk bouquet
of peach roses, interspersed
with' jasmine and ivory car-
nations and edged with varie-
gated English ivy and ivory
lace falling into a cascade of
ivy and ivory satin ribbons.
Karin McAllister of Rome,
-Ga. was maid of honor. Mrs.
Diane Sherer of Panama City'
Beach was matron of honor.
Best man was Larry Joe
Gamble.
Gary Lark was the grooms-
man and usher. Norman
Allemore was the usher and
candlelighter,
Following the ceremony, a
reception was given by the
bride's aunt and uncle, Mr.
and Mrs. Norman F. Alle-
more, Jr. at Gulfaire Town-
house in Port St. Joe Beach.
During the reception, Mrs.
Ferrel Allen attended the'
bride's table, Mrs. Terri
Allen attended the bride-
groom's table, Julie Allen.

Auto And
Homeowners
Insurance
JEAN MALLORY
639-5322 Wewahitchka
or
785-6156 Panama City


Muetoapoltan
LuFO.AIkb I AL FiLMIMi kIl

Complete om Furnishings...
FURNITUREUE CO.


Episcopal Women Plan

Reception for '85 Seniors


The Episcopal Church
Women (ECW) met Monday
afternoon, April 1 in the
Parish Hall of St. James'
Episcopal Church. The rec-
tor, Rev. Jerry R. Huft,
joined the membership in the
opening prayer.
Many items of business
were covered during the
meeting conducted by the
president, Margaret Reining.
In the absence of the secre-
tary, Sheila Mahlkov record-
ed the minutes and read the
minutes from the previous
meeting. The fund raising
luncheon and card party
originally planned for late
April has been postponed
until this fall. The women
wishing to attend the Dio-
cesan Spring Fellowship Day
Tuesday, April 23 at St.
Mark's, Troy, Alabama
should contact Ida Copen-
haver for further details. The
membership voted to support
the purchase of new altar
linens. Louise Coldeway,
chairman of the Altar Guild,
will secure the linen. There
followed a discussion of the
membership concerning op-
tions for the support of
various charities and pro-
jects.
The members present in
addition to Mrs. Mahlkov,
Mrs. Copenhaver and Mrs.
Coldeway were Monica
Stofe, Alice Core, Virginia
Owens, Helen Quackenbush,
Anne Shoaf, Mary Daughtry,


Bobbie Thomas, Jackie Huft,
Sara Fite, Alice Kunel, Fran-
ces DeBuhr and Lee Johnsen.
Mrs. Reining said the ECW
"will meet next 'on Monday,
May 6 at the Parish Hall at 3
P.M. to plan the annual
reception for the Port St. Joe
High School graduating seni-
ors, their families, and
friends.

Project

Graduation

Progressing

Plans for Project Gradua-
tion, "our first reunion"
party, have really taken off.
Coordinators of the event are
very pleased with the dona-
tions that have been received
to date.
Any individual contribu-
tions .should be made to
Audrey Anderson at Florida
First National Bank, Local
merchants will be contacted
soon for door prizes.
A list of donors and door
prizes will be posted at the
Port St. Joe High School. A
general meeting of all com-
mittees will be held in the
school Commons Area Mon-
day, April 22 at 7 p.m. All
parents are invited to attend.
Senior ticket sales will
begin on Friday, May 3.


REGISTRATION


Faith Christian School

A Christian Approach to Education
* *.


Saturday, Apr. 27, 10 a.m. 1 p.m.
Corner of 20th St. and'Garrison Avenue
229-6707
* *

Register for,
1985-86 School Year,,
3-year Kindergarten Grade 8
*

Summer Session June 10 July 19
K-5 through Grade 6
Phonics, Reading, Math,
Language Arts
................iiiiiiiiiiiii ii ii* i ii ii" "N"'i"'""


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA

401 REID AVE.
PHONE 227-1277


*Odd Sofas *Odd Chairs *Recliners

oComplete Table Sets *Odd Tables eDinettes

*Bedroom *Bedding *Pictures *Lamps

*Accessories *Odds and Ends

*Scratched Dented




Every item not in Danley's display program for

1985 will be priced to sell fast



NO LAYAWAYS DELIVERY MUST BE TAKEN

AS SOON AS POSSIBLE



FIRST COME FIRST SERVED
All items subject to prior sale due to many one of a kind


HURRY Don't miss the items you want
......AT GREAT SAVINGS......


SMiss Vickers Weds

George Spurgeon


Floor Sample



Liquidation


I. 1


Heating & Air, Major Appliance Repair
Plumbing & Electrical Work
229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle
' ER0007623, RF0040131, RA0043378 tf 1119


HIGHLAND VIEW

BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of Fourth St. and Second Ave.
Welcome Friend
SUNDAYSCHOOL .......... .... ........ 9:45 A.M.
WORSHIP SERVICE ........... 11:00 A.M. & 7:00 P.M.
CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) .............. 6:00 P.M.
MID-WEEK PRAYER (Wednesday) .......... 7:30 P.M..
Nursery Provided JIMMY CLARK, Pastor


'.. ,










Pumping (Con

bridge and out into the street in front of
traffic and causing a dangerous situation at
the bridge.
Adkison said his crews would construct a
barricade at each end of the bridge to cause
traffic to stop and turn before coming out
into the street.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business matters, the Commis-
sion:
-Issued an expression of appreciation to


Rella Wexler, member of the Sea Oats and Dunes Garden
Club, shows off some of the fine horticultural specimens.

Beach Flower Show

Draws 100 Entries


Members and guests of the
Sea Oats and Dunes Garden
Club deemed their recent
flower show very successful.
Nearly 100 viewed the entries
with much pleasure. The
various arrangements in the
Artistic Division showed in-
genuity and originality. The
Horticulture Division had
many entries of lush foliage
and blooms. Despite the deep
freeze in January there was a
good showing of annuals and
perennials. The show chair-


Bikers Will Be Riding
to Raise Money for St.
The "Wheels for Life" A gr
Bike-a-thon is scheduled for being ai
Saturday, April 20. The ride thusiasr
starts at 9:00 a.m. and will success!
continue until 12:00 noon at mation c
the Port St. Joe High School 648-8314.
track.
Riders, must bring their CARD (
sponsor forms. Please fill out We w
the registration and have sincere
parent or guardian's signa- many f:
ture. Refreshments will be for their
available to all riders, and our timid
Larry's Bike Shop will be The F
there to help with any The
necessary bike repairs. and


man, Ruth Nance, was ably
assisted by Vice-President
Jayne Kleeb. The tremen-
dous cooperation of all the
club members and some
willing husbands made this
an outstanding event in the
club's history.
We would like to thank the
following for lending us ma-
terials used in staging this
show: Gilmore Funeral
Home, Port St. Joe Garden
Club and Chamber of Com-
merce Club of Mexico Beach.


Saturday
Jude's
eat Bike-a-thon is
anticipated. Your en-
m will make it a great
! For further infor,
call Mrs. Joy Ailes at

OF THANKS
wish to express our
appreciation to the
friends and, relatives
r help and kindness in
e of sorrow.
family of Bruce Jones
Jones
Leslie Family


O UMINUM

MOBILE
HOMES


* CARPORTS
* SOFIT(EVES)
* SOLAR
ROOMS
* ROOF OVERS


* GUTTERING
* PATIOS
* SCREEN
ROOMS
* SKIRTING


871-4501
BRIDGES PANAMAA CITY


5925
BOAT
RACE RD.


The Board of Directors of
the Gulf County Guidance
Clinic, Inc. wishes to publicly
express appreciation to the'
following Gulf County chur-
ches, businesses and service
organizations for their recent
financial contribution to the
Clinic: Florida First Nation-
al Bank at Port St. Joe,
Mount Carmel Baptist
Cliuirch, New Bethel A.M.E.
Church, Port St. Joe Lions
Club, St. Joe Paper Contain-
er Division, St. Joseph Tele-
phone and Telegraph Com-
pany, and the Sylvachem
Corporation. These generous


i 4> c. s3 <43

1 CHURCH of CHRIST
Twentieth Street and Marvin Avenue
SUNDAY SCHOOL ... ................... 10:00 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .................... 11:00 A.M.
6 EVENING WORSHIP .... . .. . . 6:00P.M.
WEDNESDAY EVENING...... ............ 7:00 P.M.
STEVE STUTTS, Evangelist .
4>. 41. 41. ,il. 41> 4'-


for Summer Living


Elegant Cost Iron Furniture
Group features heavy gouge ornamental cost iron,
finished with 2 coats of durable enamel undercoat,
topped with a gleaming white finish.
Settee .................. $99.95
Side Chair............ $59.95
Arm Choir............. $79.95
Cocktail Table ........... $49.95 .
O WE FINANCES
4-PIECE SPECIAL P-01AI'Thd9
~.= L' J I WE DELIVER |
Cl $26890 0nI I iO ""* |
OVER0ST E Series T WE CARESS
Regular $289.80 E

If A k Abou U
(0LISHED 1 VISA




HOME FURNISHING CENTERS
PUMRNITUR APPLIANCES PLOO COVEMINO *H4OME E*TNTTAINIMENT
OVER 200 STORES SERVING THE SOUTHEAST


STEVE RICHARDSON, Owner
Phone 229-6195


JACOB TANKERSLEY
Jacob Is Two
Jacob Tankersley cele-
brated his second birthday
with a clown decorated party
at the home of his parents,
Danny and Janis Tankersley.
Helping Jacob share in the.
fun were Nicholas, Julia and
Ann Comforter, Andy and
Renee Shoaf, Krystal
Tharpe, Becky and Debbie
Earley, Lindsey and Julie
Nobles, Jana Lipford, Sara
and Brenda Moore, Joseph
and Laura Etheridge, 5oyce
and Travis Baxley, Dustin
and Kim, Powells, Kristen
and Vicki Abrams, Heida and
Cynthia Wells, Aunt Paula
Gaskin, Mee-Maw and PaPa
Schweikert, Gran and Grand-
daddy Tankersley, and Big
Moma.


tinued from Page 1)

the Police Department for its long investiga-
tion and work with other agencies in
cracking the drug distribution ring in the
Port St. Joe area last week.
-Purchased a pick-up truck from St.
Joe Motor Company for $8,094.81. Tommy
Thomas Chevrolet was the low bidder at
$7,849.61, .but the St. Joe Motor bid was
accepted because it was felt it would be the
best bid for the City, due to having to take the
vehicle back to Panama City for warranty
service.


T1
tow
bui
hai
cra
ma
old
boy
sho


donations will assist the tau
Clinic in helping others. ma
The Guidance Clinic is a
private non-profit agency -
established to meet the men-
tal health needs of the local
community. Without regular
financial support, the Clinic
cannot operate. Much more
support is needed. Busines-
ses, service organizations,
dchuiches, ariad individuals F-
are urged to offer contribu-
tions at any time.

ACS Needs

Volunteers
Volunteers are needed to
help with the door to door
crusade by the American
,Cancer Society. The cam-
paign will get under way on
Saturday, April 27. A break-
fast at the First United
Methodist Church social hall
will be the official start of the
fund campaign activities.
The Cancer Society oper-
ates solely with volunteer
support, who distribute in-
formation to every home and
solicit funds to keep the
various activities of the
Society in operation.
Crusade chairman Steve
Richardson and his assistant, V
Rev. Al Harbour, are asking
you to give a few hours of
time to help in this year's
crusade. Volunteers may
reach Richardson by phone
at 229-6195 or Rev. Harbour
at 227-1720 or 227-1724.
Volunteers may come by
the kick-off breakfast on
April 27 to offer their ser-
vices.

CARD OF THANKS
We would like to thank Mr.
Edward Creamer for the
lawn swing he donated to the V
residents of Bay St. Joe Care
Center. Everyone has enjoy-
ed it very much.
Thank you very much for
your generosity and thought-
fulness.
The Residents & Staff
of Bay St. Joseph
Care Center


THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, APR. 18, 1985 PAGE FIVE

Heart Association Organizing Friday
The American Heart Asso- become a member is wel- Calhoun County Unit will be
ciation will be holding an come to attend. on hand to answer any
organizational meeting at Ms. Jean Van Berger, questions.
Bay St. Joseph Care Center Executive Director of West For more information you
Friday, April 19, at 3:00 p.m. Florida, and Steve Hogue, may call the Nursing Center
anyone who would like to Director of Bay, Gulf and at 229-8244.


CLOSE OUT SALE


OF QUALITY BEDDING
All 1984 Covers Must be Sold
All Odds & Ends
All Greatly Reduced Some at
FANTASTIC SAVINGS!!


' "NATIONAL BEDDING". Re
Reg.
Price
Full Sets Monticello Foam ... '279.95
Queen Set Value Pedic ...... '549.95
King Set XL Posture Zone.... '949 95

"ROYAL BEDDING" Reg.


Full Mattress Only- Royal Comfort ..........
Full Set Envogue ....... ............ . .
Twin Foundation only Royal Princess ........


Pictured in front of the General Store: Birmingham, Jamie Baker, Dewayne Lay-
Left to right-bottom to top; Devon Avrigian, ton, Mr. Bryan Baxley, Ingrid Muina, Brandi
Monica Weeks, Heather Whitfield, Michael Armstrong, Amy Waldorff, Kelly Nations,
McCorvey, Philip Goodwin, Angela Good- Danielle Gillis, Kim Burns, April Weeks,
rich, Kye Bidwell, Holly Herring, Matthew Holly Hays and Katrina Nunery.


On Tues


Class Takes A Trip

dav. March 19 Village. Westville was creat- what life was like in 1850.


ed and developed as a center
of "living history" of the
1850's period. It was built to
show the people of today


twenty students from Wewa-
hitchka Elementary School
traveled to Lumpkin, Geor-
gia to visit Westville 1850's


"SIMMONS BEDDING"Reg.
Price
Queen Set Golden Value .....1 549.95
Queen Set Maxipedic Delux .. '679.95
Full set- Maxipedic BackCare '799.95
Full Set Beautyrest ........ '719.95
Queen Set Beautyrest ...... $799.95
Twin Set Beautyrest Commemorative. '579.95
Full Set- Beautyrest- Commerative .. 759.95
Queen Set- Beautyrest Commerative '919.95


Price
'199.95
'739.95
'199.00


SALE
$12911
$24995
$4999


SALE
$9900

$35000
$6900


SALE
$29900
$39900
$45900
$37900
$44900
$29900
$39900
$49900


The students toured the
vn, visited the authentic U
ildings and tried their
nd at several crafts. The
aftsmen guided the girls in
king a quilt square and an *
fashioned yarn doll. The Phone 227-1251 0 0
ys visited the blacksmith e
op where the blacksmith 205-07 Reid Ave.
eight each of them how to
ake a nail.





Benjamin Moore Paint Sale

AT EARLY'S HARDWARE.....THRU APRIL 22


S "" I Protective Finish.
N Lustre Finish, MOORGLO" LATEX Protective Finish.
sting Durability. HOUSE & TRIM PAINT
Long Lasting Colors OUR
In A Soft Gloss Finish. HIGHEST

%U QUALITY
a EXTERIOR

Benjamin PRODUCTS

ffsj PAINTS I


I^ n/r -BRUSHES, ROLLERS and

10% OFF DROPCLOTHS




Har B d Su


Guidance Clinic Thanks

People for Contributions


You are cordially invited
to attend the
Grand Opening
of
Carolyn's Craft House
123 DeSoto Street
St. Joe Beach
Saturday, April 20, 1985
10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m.
Featuring a variety of craft
and needlework supplies.


201 Reid Ave.


* *.-'*. M







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, APR. 18, 1985


WHEN YOU EAT
IS ALSO IMPORTANT
If you are skipping breakfast, it could be
upsetting your whole daily balance of food intake.
This is even true if you are on a diet. By morning
you have already used up two thirds of the energy
* supplied by your evening meal. By mid-morning
there is nothing left and you could drag most all day
long.
W"* What about vitamins? We believe a properly
* planned vitamin supplement can be important and
we carry a complete stock of vitamin products
S made by reputable manufacturers. But, they are in
no way a substitute for a well balanced daily diet.
Start your day off right. You could feel better for it.
I w "A GREAT MANY PEOPLE ENTRUST US
with their prescriptions, health needs and other
* pharmacy products. We consider this trust a
privilege and a duty. May we be your personal
family pharmacy?"



BUZZETT'S DRUG STORE
Free Parking Drive-In Window ,
229-8771 317 Williams Ave. Port St. Joe .

"iiiIa Diay,.Ei all j ,


They Called It


Basketball

Much to the chagrin of the Key Club, composed of juniors
and seniors of Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School, the faculty
team wasn't "over the hill" or a bunch of "old men". In an
exciting game Tuesday afternoon, the faculty displayed that
they still have the touch, and can dribble and shoot from the
field easily yet.
The Key Club used the event as a fund-raiser for the
organization, playing ig in front of the assembled student body
and other interested on-lookers. Last year the Key Club pur-
chased a trophy case for the school in which to display the ac-
cumulated trophies won by the Sharks over the years. In
order to do this, and to cover expenses of the state Key Club
convention, the club borrowed money, and are still holding
fund-raisers to pay off last year's debts.
In the photo at left, the teams are shown on the court as
two players battle for a loose ball.


Sharks Win Twice; End Home Season Friday

Meet Florida High In Double Header; First Round of Play-offs Next Thursday


Port St. Joe's Shark base-
ball team picked up two wins
over the past week, edging
Bay High and walloping
Wewahitchka. ,
: Thursday afternoon of last
week, the Sharks scored on a
sacrifice fly by Jay Rish in
the fifth inning to score
Richard Ramsey from third
and give the Sharks a 6-5 win
over the Tornadoes.
The Sharks used three
pitchers and a two-run homer
'by Chris Butts in the first
Sinning to power their victory.
: Mitch Bouington started on
'the mound for the Sharks,
:giving up four runs on five
hits, two strike-outs and a


walk in two innings. Stacy
Strickland came on in the
third and gave up only one
hit, striking out three in his
three innings of work. Mick-
ey Gainnie finished up the
game on the hill, allowing
one run on two hits, for his
first save of the year.
Butts' big two-run homer in
the first was the biggest blow
of the game. Randy Wilder
rapped out two singles in
three trips to the plate and
Jay Rish had two singles and
his game winning sacrifice
fly, in four turns at bat.
Line Score:
PortSt. Joe 2 0 1 2 1 0 0
Bay High 2 2 0 0 0 1 0


FIRST UNITED

METHODIST CHURCH
22nd Street Mexico Beach
CHARLES M. PARKER and
DAVID L. TAUNTON, Ministers
WORSHIP SERVICE ............... 9:00 A.M., C.S.T.
CHURCH SCHOOL ................ 10:00 A.M., C.S.T.
.CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday)...................



NEW BETHEL
African Methodist Episcopal Church
146 Avenue C Phone 227-1213
Rev. Theodore Andrews, Pastor
SUNDAYSCHOOL .................... 9:30 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................... 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ................... 6:00 P.M.

"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man Our Brother"


Monday afternoon
Sharks met their
rival, Wewahitchka a
ned the Gators, 13
Sharks scored five rui
.second inning to cling
game. The Gators jum
to a big four run first
but could manage
single run in the th
fourth innings for
maiinder of the game
Mickey Gainnie sta
the gbund for the Sha
was hit on the foot
second inning .by
screaming line drive
to leave the game.
Bouington came on i
and picked up the win
two innings of work.
ton gave up two hits
run while striking ou
Gators and walking
Chris Butts came
relief in the fifth inn:
Stacy Strickland finis


Eye
Openers
by Wesley
Grace


VISUAL SKILL
Vision is a complex
tion, more than just ti
ty to see objects or
clearly from a distan
near. When natural d
ment is less than p
skills can be further d
ed and improved by
sional treatment.
Some of the visua
which can be perfectc
improved include:
Tracking-the abi
follow a moving obj
curately and smooth
Fixation-The abi
quickly and accu
locate and see (wit
eyes) a series of star
objects in sequence, s
a column of figures.
Focus change-The
to quickly look from
near or vice-versa
incurring momentary
In a complete eye
nation, deficiencies ii
basic skills-and ot
can be uncovered an
rective procedures
mended.
Brought to You As
Community Service

DR. WESLEY GR
OPTOMETRIST
322 Long Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florid
227-1410


game, coming on in the
seventh.
Paul was the losing pitcher
for the Gators.
Both Kyle Pippin and
Mitch Bouingt.on had perfect
days at the plate, hitting
twice in two trips at bat.
Pippin pounded out a double
for one of his hits. Jim Norton


n, the
county
nd skin-
-6. The
ns in the
nch the
nped off
t inning,
only. a
ird and
the re-
e.
irted on
rks, but
in the
Norris'
and had
Mitch


n relief Gulf County Sheriff Al
i for his Harrison told the Kiwanis
Bouing- Club Tuesday he has given a
and one top priority to the program of,
it three ridding the county of drugs
g two. available to children.
Sheriff Harrison said it was
on in his opinion that at least 25
ing and percent of the youth in Gulf
hed the County schools have at least
experimented with or tried
drugs at one time or another.
"It is my intention to concen-
trate on, drying up this
market", Harrisongtold the'
Club. The Sheriff said 'he
would mount a two-pronged
attack of education and en-
forcement to dry up the drug
- market. "I need help in
- accomplishing this task", the
-x func- Sheriff said. "I need the help
he abili- of the youth and the parents .
letters .. particularly the youth", he
ce or at pointed out.
levelop- As a number two priority,
perfect, but one which he plans on
evelop- starting in just a short while
profes- is the establishment of a
proes place where the kids "can go
1 skills and talk, play their car
ted" or radios and be in a safe
environment". Harrison said
lity to that at present kids have
ect ac-
ty Rifle Club
rately rT i
h both Thanks
tionary
such as The members of the Gulf
Rifle Club would like to thank
ability the people of 'the community
far to for the support of the Barbe-
without que held April 13. A few
blur. errors were made, being the
exami- first one, but the mistakes
n these are known.
thers- The winners of the 20 lb.
id cor- hams were as follows: Torch
recom- Williams, Lewis Taylor,
Bryan Middleton, Mr. Fead,
SA Cliff Smith, and Paul Ram-
9 by sey. Sheriff Al Harrison won
the pistol medal, and the
ACE novelty shoot. John Fadio,
Jr. was the winner of the trap
medal.
Thanks again for the out-
la standing support.
"A loafer always has the cor-
rect time." Kin Hubbard


and Tim Wilder each went
two-for four at the plate.
Shipman was the leading
hitter for the Gators, with
two singles and a double in
three at bats and Green with
two for four.
Line Score:
Port St. Joe 2 5 1 3 2 0 0
Wewahitchka 4 0 1 1 0 0 0


The Sharks will finish out
their regular season schedule
at home Friday evening with
a double header against
Florida High in Shark Stad-
ium. The first game starts at
6:00 p.m.
Saturday, the Sharks will
close out the season against


Marianna in the Jackson
County city.
Thursday of next week, the
Sharks will enter the District
Tournament in Tallahassee,
meeting Florida High in their
first game at 1:00 p.m.


nowhere to go park and just
talk. "They are a nuisance at
the convenience stores, the
parking lots and various
places where they hang out,
but my plans are to try and
establish a place near the
Courthouse, which is lighted,
fenced in and free of drugs
and alcohol. I think the kids


need this and I'm going to try
and get it for them",
Guests of the club were Ira
Hill, John Walters, E. E.
Roberts and Charlie Davie of
the Panama City Kiwanis
Club, Key Clubbers Jill
SStrait, Monica French and
Paula Ward and Andy An-
derson of Arkansas.


BOB'S SMALL ENGINE
REPAIR
648-5106
Lawn mowers, tillers
& chain saws
Free pickup & delivery
within 10 miles
4tc3/14


One Day Denture Service
Laban Bontrager, D.M.D.
BRISTOL, FLORIDA
.. announces the addition of a new service
for denture patients. With a lab on the pre-
mises, it is now possible to,get dentures in -
one day. Repairs and relines are also
available on a same day basis. Prices are
from $285.00 and up for full upper and lower
dentures. Medicaid and private insurance
plans are welcomed.
FOR AN APPOINTMENT
Call 643-5417


NAPA's BEST NOW AT


SPEIAL PRICES
REBATE COUPONS AVAILABLE AT SERVICE COUNTER


PATE'S SERVICE CENTER.


Sheriff Harrison Wants


Place for Youth to Park


PAGE SIX







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, APR. 18, 1985 PAGE SEVEN


Tomatoes Popular with Gardeners but Need Care


BY ROY LEE CARTER
County Extension Director
The one vegetable that
almost all backyard garden-
,ers include in their gardens is
the tomato. So we usually
spend quite a bit of time on
this crop. If you've followed
our advice so far, you should
have healthy, vigorous toma-
to plants well on their way to
producing high quality fruit.
Staking and pruning are
fine tuning gardening techni-
ques. They are not absolutely
necessary. They certainly
won't make up for deficien-
cies in fertilizer, water and
mulches, or an inadequate
spray program. But, ,they


Doug Kent, Environmen-
talist with the Gulf County
Health Department, this
week released a list of
requirements by the State
Health and Rehabilitative.
services for organizations
dispensing .food at fairs,
carnivals and on the street.
"We have had misunder-
standings from these re-
quirements in recent months
over these new regulations
and this new release by the
Health Department should
clear up some of the ques-
tions concerning serving and
handling of food consumed.
by the public", Kent said.
The new code, listed as
"Florida Code 10D-13" lists
types of food which may be
sold from temporary facili-
ties and the manner in which
the booth must be built to
comply with HRS regulations
and how the food must be
prepared and dispensed.
"The entire new code is


Gulf County
School Lunch


MENU


Monday, April 22
Corn dog, orange juice,
) 'arly peas, -cakl, and iiillCK
Tuesday, April 23
Shepherd's Pie, broccoli
with cheese sauce, pear
salad, buttered roll, and
milk.
Wednesday, April 24
Fried chicken, pineapple
and cheese salad, rice with
gravy, green beans, rolls,
and milk.
Thursday, April 25
Battered dipped fish,
French fries, baked beans,
sliced bread, cake, and milk.
Friday, April 26
Barbeque beef on bun,
buttered corn, fruit jello,
brownies, and milk.
Menus may change without
notice due to the availability
of foods.


*
U


CARTER

can enhance the quality of
the tomatoes your plant
produces. I will cover these


designed to protect the public
from food which has impro-
perly prepared, served or
stored", Kent said. "Here in
Florida climates, food which
tends to spoil will spoil very
quickly if not properly cared
for. This could prove very
dangerous to anyone eating
food which become contam-
inated from improper hand-
ling", Kent said.
Generally those organiza-
tions which desire to set up a
food booth may do so fairly
easy if they are to dispense
meat patties (hamburger or
sausage), hot dogs, cured
meat products, pasta pro-
ducts such as spaghetti, raw
oysters, boiled shrimp, pre-
viously battered chicken and
fish portions or flour mix
products, such as pancakes
or waffles.
Other foods and their pro-
per handling must be cleared.
through the Health Depart-
ment before they become a
project.
Even these popular "food
booth" items must be safely
stored to Health Department
specifications, prepared on
equipment which is kept
clean and sanitary and from
a booth which has been
constructed to Health De-

Overstreet VFD
Frying Fish
The Overstreet Volunteer
Fire Department is having a
Fish Fry Saturday, April 20
from 3 p.m. to 6'p.m. EST at
the Fire Department. "All
you can eat", 12 yrs. and
above, $3.00; six yrs. thru 11
yrs., $1.50; anl no charge for
children under six years of
age. The meal will consist of
fish, hush puppies, baked
beans, cheese grits and cole
slaw.
All proceeds will go to-
wards the purchasing of
badly needed equipment.
Your participation will be
greatly appreciated.


Mexico Beach
Clean-Up
The City of Mexico Beach,
in cooperation with the Sea.
Oats and Dunes Garden Club
and the Mexico Beach Ki-
wanis Club, does hereby
proclaim Saturday, April 20
as Mexico Beach clean-up
and beautification day.
The City will provide trash
bags and trash pick-up for
the event. The Kiwanis Club
will provide large item pick-
up by contacting Cathey's
Hardware on the 20th (648-
5242).
For more information con-
tact Rella Wexler, 648-8985 or
.City Hall, 648-5700.

Lupus Meeting
There will be a regular
Lupus meeting at Gulf Pines
Hospital in the conference
room on Thurday, April 18,
tonight, at 7:00 P.M.

SUPPORT YOUR
LOCAL MERCHANTS
SSHOP AT HOME


procedures in some detail,
explaining how and why
they're done. My information
was provided by Extension
vegetable specialist Jim Ste-
phens, with IFAS of the
University of Florida.
Staking tomato plants, as
they grow, will keep the fruit
off the ground and conserve
space in the garden. Staking
also makes it easier to
cultivate and harvest toma-
toes, and it helps prevent
some fruit rots.
First, a few words of
caution about staking. You
must be careful to avoid
plant root injury when you
drive the stake into the


ground.
One method of staking,
which seems to work well, is
to use one-by-two wooden
stakes, about six to eight feet
long. Drive these about two
feet into the soil, keeping
them three to four inches
from each plant. As the
plants grow, tie them to the
stakes with string, soft twine,
or strips of rags. You'll
probably need to make be-
tween four and six ties during
the growing season. Always
be sure you. make the ties
below the fruit clusters.
Some popular tomato va-
rieties which benefit from
staking are Floradel, Tropic,


apartment specifications. Florida before making plans


Kent said it would be a
wise thing for churches,
organizations or groups plan-
ning to operate a food booth
to contact the Health De-
partment and learn. of the
requirements of the State of
(


to get into a food booth
project.
"We'll be glad to cooperate
with any organization and
help them to comply with the
law in their endeavors"
Kent said.


Indian River, and Manapal.
Those which do well un-
staked include Walter Tropi-
Red. Homestead, and Flori-
da-One. Floramerica may be
staked or unstaked. ,
Pruning is the process of
removing the small shoots
that develop between the leaf
stem and the main plant
stems. Removing these
shoots, or suckers, reduces
the total number of fruit that
your tomato plant will pro-
duce. But it causes the fruit
that are produced to be
larger.
I Tomatoes should be pruned
about once a week. It's best


METHODISM
Pbr'lwoCentbiles
UVPROCLABOIG
ElGrace and Freedom


to prune by hand. Holding a
shoot firmly between your
thumb and forefinger, bend it
to one side until it snaps.
Then, pull the shoot off in the
opposite direction. Reversing
the direction is necessary to
prevent injury to the leaf axil
or the main stem.
When you prune, leave two
or three stems for plant
development. Be careful not
to disturb the fruit buds,.
which appear just below the
point where the leaves are
attached to the leaf stems.
Staking and pruning are
beneficial steps in tomato
culture. As we said, staking


1st United
Methodist Church
Constitution & Monument
Port St. Joe, Florida


CHURCH SCHOOL ................... .
MORNING WORSHIP .....................
EVENING WORSHIP. .................
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP ........
CHOIR REHEARSAL(Wednesday)-.........


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
7:00 P.M.
6:30 P.M.
7:30 P.M.


certain, varieties keep fruit
off the ground, reducing
some disease problems. And,
it helps conserve space in the
garden. Pruning removes
some disease; problems.
Pruning removes the small


side branches, called suck-
ers, which form between
main stems and leaf stems.
While pruning reduces the
total number of fruit, it
stimulates development of
larger tomatoes.


State Sets New Rules for Handling


Food to be Eaten by the Public


Sur-Way Electric

411 Reid Avenue


Commercial, Residential

Remodeling and

Service Work

CHARLES SOWELL
REG. NO. ER-004631
26 Years Experience
Licensed and Bonded

Call Shorty at

229-6798


Pastor, Alvin N. Harbour, Jr.


/I GOOD
"1-EASONS
to see your good
neighbor agent









CAR HOME
LIFE HEALTH

BILL WOOD
411 Reid Ave.
229-6514 or 229-6103
Like a good neighbor.
S State Farm is there.




STATE FARM
INSURANCE COMPANIES
Home Office.: Bloomilgto., illmoi.


THE PULPIT OF THE CITY


First Baptist Church
Port St. Joe, Florida
SUNDAY'S SCHEDULE
9:45 ........ Bible Study (all ages)
11:00 ..... Worship (Live WJBU-AM)
6:00 ............ Church Training
7:00 ................... W orship

HOWARD BROWNING
Pastor


I


- -


,,


RON KEGLEY


-s.i.*~rt li~~ .... *r .....


IB









GOTM T&


* GOOD 'N FRESH
* GOOD 'N FRIENDLY
* GOOD VARIETY
* GOOD SERVICE
* GOOD LOCATION


I' ~


I'~


No'Imi[W


QUANTITY
RIGHTS
RESERVED


Fi I


IIi IIII ,L..I


USDA Choice Tablerite Beef
BONELESS Family Pak
SHOULDER
ROAST
u.$138
L.B. I


USDA Choice Tablerite Beef'
BONELESS (Family Pak)
CHUCK
STEAK
B.$148


Tablerite Center Cut
(Family Pak) LOIN
PORK
.CHOPS

$1 68


USDA Choice Tablerite Beef
(Family Pak)
CUBED CHUCK
STEAK

LB.$199


Tablerite Lean
(5 Lbs. or More Pkg.)
GROUND
BEE9

Lb. 99'


Tableirte Lean
(5 Lbs. or More)
GROUND
CHUCK

Lb148


USDA Choice Tablerite Beef Country Skillet Country Skillet
BONELESS Family Pak Family Pak IGA Tablerite Bryan's Juicy, Beefy
STEW SPLIT FRYER FRYER SLICED SUNNYLAND JUMBO
BEEF BREAST WINGS COOKED HAM WIENERS FRANKS
$178 O 128 58 $198 $100 $168
LB. LB. 10z 12o. oB.


Lykes Meat or Beef
SLICED
BOLOGNA

B 41 8


Sunnyland Fresh
Breakfast
LINK
SAUSAGE


SLICED
(Family Pak)
SLAB
BACON
$129


FLANDERS
5 POUND BOX
BEEF
PATTIES

$299


Register's
Family Pak
SMOKED
SAUSAGE
LB.179


Tablerite Thin Sliced
(Family Pak)
Breakfast Pork
LOIN CHOPS
$178
LB-*. 1


D T E O H" I C E S N


Armour Beef Stew ...................... 24oz.
Arm our Plain Chili.......................... isoz.
Armour Chili w/Beans...... .............. 15oz.
Martha White Corn Muffin Mix ............. 47, oz.
Van Camp Pork & Beans ................ .2 16oz.
French's Mustard (Bonus Pak) .. . . ...... 28 oz.


$165
$121
$100
$100
787
87'


IGA Fruit Cocktail....
IGA Y.C. Peach Slices
IGA Sandwich Bags..
IGA Tall Kitchen Bags
, IGA Aluminum Foil...
Fantastik E-Z Spray ..


. . . . . 17oz.
. . . . . ... 17oz.
.... . . . . 80 ct.
. . . . . ..... 30 ct.
. . . . .. .. 75'oz.
. . . . . . 22 oz.


H


II:


79"
69"
49*
$139
$1 39


- 11 *1 ; o.~r~ n~


AL


a ip./A rd I "/


a iPoa r- "


soil









DAVID
Foodliners .


RICH'S
205 Third St. Port St. Joe
. Hwy. 71 Wewahitchka


KRAFT PARKAY
MARGARINE FAB
QTRS. DETERGENT
1 LB. 49 oz.

9 $119

WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE
DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE

FROZEN FOODIDEPT.


- ROPICANA
ORANGE JUICE..
Whip Topping .......
-ORE IDA SHOESTRING
"Potatoes ............
rr- STILLWELL CUT
'Okra ............ ... .


12 oz.


$129


z. 691
20 oz. $1


16 oz.


ggac:


IGA
ICE CREAM
% gallon. $ 39
rounds
MEADOW GOLD 12 Pak $ 29
Twin Pops ...


F 111111


IGA
SUGAR
5 LBS.


88,
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE
DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE


(QUANTITY RIGHTS
RESERVED)


I BKER IDEART


IGA
Dunkin Sticks..2 6 Pak
IGA
Chick. Rolls .... 32 ct.
IGAGIANT
Bread.... . 24oz.


$169
79g
89*


BULK RATE
U. S. POSTAGE PAID
Permit No. 3
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
PRICES IN THIS AD GOOD:
APRIL 17-23, 1985
DOULE ISCUTSPCA


IGA
MAYON-
NAISE
32 oz.


690
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE
DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE


DAR EPRMN


SHEDD'S SPREAD 169
CTRY. CROCK... 3 bs.
PILLSBURY 99*
Biscuits .... ....... .
SEALTEST 99
Sour Cream ......... 16 z.
SEALTEST LNL
cot. Cheese .. .... 16oz. .


Wht I Se el


,White Seedl ess, ;
Emperor or Black Ribier,

GRAPES .


lb.


Western Cantaloupes...... each I f

Crisp Green Celery .... 2stalks69

Fancy Florida Tomatoes ... pound 89


BELL PEPPERS,
CUCUMBERS
tr99C
1g. tray


CELLO BAGS
Red Radishes, Carrots
and Green Onions

/1490


BROCCOLI


* *


Iceberg
LETTUCE
Green Head
CABBAGE


0 .


3 Lb.
tray
U U U U U U


Florida Juicy
ORANGES
Florida Pink or White


5 pound bag


99'

$179


GRAPEFRUIT


0 0 0


. p *l .-_ = -l .-l..-.--n.-. -----.~- -.. '-L-


Red


bunch


2.$100


Fresh Tender
YELLOW
SQUASH


I


kL





a A. "/, e


.-I .I rriSnrwyL1UF-1Zlli l.lr~cwday~r~ur .,~o~- urrc~. r--) ~p~wru~U. ~LILIIL~ ~u, :.. r ~







PAGE TEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, APR. 18, 1985




MINUTES... School Board


The Gulf County School
Board met in regular session
'on March 5, 1985 at 5:30 P.M.
in the Gulf County Court-
house in Port St. Joe. The
following members were pre-
sent: Oscar Redd, Waylon
Graham, Ted Whitfield,
James Hanlon. Board mem-
ber Raffield was absent.
Chairman Redd presided
and the meeting was opened
with prayer by Graham and
followed by the Pledge of
Allegiance.
A group of citizens from
the Overstreet area met with
,the Board expressing con-
cern that Ms. Livern Ayers
was having difficulty control-
ling students and providing
safe transportation to' and
from school.
Robert Keels met with the
Board to discuss the possi-
bility of an air conditioner
being installed on the bus
that transports students to
the handicapped center in
Panama City. The Board
directed the Superintendent
to investigate the cost of
adding the air conditioner
and it will be discussed at the
next, meeting,
Nathan Peters, Jr. met
with the Board expressing
appreciation to the Guidance
staff at Port St. Joe High
School and committee that'
provide parents with their
children's progress through-
out the school term.
On motion by Whitfield,
second by Hanlon, the Board
unanimously approved the
minutes of February 5, 1985.
The Board reviewed cor-
respondence. No action ne-
cessary.
The Board reviewed the


procedure for hiring non
instructional personnel. On
motion by Hanlon, second by
Graham, it was the unani
mous vote of the Board that
job openings would be ad
vertised in one issue of the
local papers.
On motion by Graham
second by Hanlon, the Board
unanimously approved the
following personnel matters:
Approved the following ad-
ministrators for re-employ-
ment for the 1985
ment for the 1985-86 school
year: Temple Watson, Direc-
tor School Food Service &
Special Programs: .Harry
Herrington; Coordinator Sup-
port Services; Barbara Shir-
ley, Director of Instruction;
Helen Ramsey, Director of
Special Services; Care)
:Floore, Coordinator Main-
tenance & Custodial; James
McInnis, Coordinator Adult
School; Edwin Williams,
Principal Port St. Joe High
School; Gerald Lewter, Prin-
cipal Port St. Joe Elemen-
tary School; Howard Blick,
Principal Highland View Ele-
mentary School; Jerry Kel-
ley, Principal Wewahitchka
Elementary -School.
Authorized the Superinten-
dent to inform all annual
contract teachers that the
Board cannot, at this time,
renew their contract for the
1985-86 school year;
Approved -that James
Cleckley's employment be
increased to five days per
week, 8 hours per day at $4.0C
per hour at Wewahitchka Bus
Barn until such time as
Morris Shavers is able to
return to work;
Approved the employment


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BROWN INSURANCE AGENCY
P. 0. Box 897
Port St. Joe, Florida

DICKIE BROWN, .A. 229-8981




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2 TEMPERANCE ,.
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S i & God's Love Is An
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SUONDAYSCHOOL..... 10:00 A.M.
GOODNESS MORNING WORSHIP .. 11:00A.M.'
EVENING WORSHIP ... 6:00 P.M..
FAITH WEDNESDAY EVENING 7:00 P.M.
PASTOR C. W. WHITAKER








Retirement Center
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mmm .uu ^ I -*- r **iitiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiitiimiiiimm itimtM


Affordable Residential Care for the
Elderly
OPEN HOUSE Sunday, April 21
from 3 to 5
All meals, laundry, linen, personal care ser-
vices included with activities, support and
security.
For more information call:

(904) 526-3191

710 3rd Avenue
Marianna, Florida 32446
904/526-3191


Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
IN RE: The Marriage of
HAROLD W. HOLLOWAY;
Husband-Respondent,
- and
PATRICIA JEAN HOLLOWAY,
Wife-Petitioner.
o: NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: HAROLD W. HOLLOWAY
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
5 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for the dissolution of your marriage to
Patricia Jean' Holloway has been filed.
You are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, on Fred N. Wit-
ten, Petitioner's Attorney, whose ad-
dress Is P. 0. Box 445, Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456, on or before May 3,1985,
and file the original with the Clerk of
this Court, either before service on Peta-
tioner's Attorney or immediately there-
after, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded In the Petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court, on March 26, 1985.
JERRY T. GATES,
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
By: ls/ Tonya Knox, Deputy Clerk
4tc3/28
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Notice Is hereby given that an elec-
tion will be held on May 14, 1985, pur-
suant to Ordinances Number 156, 157
and 158, dealing with the approval or
disapproval of franchises proposed to
be granted to Florida Power Corpora-
: tion, St. Joseph Telephone and Tele-
graph Company and St. Joe Natural
Gas Company, Inc.
L A. Farris,
City Auditor/Clerk 6t 414
., ".' NOTice
Persons wishing to file as candidates
in the City of Port St. Joe election to be
held May 14, 1985, for the following of-
fices, must do so on or before April 24,
1985:
MAYOR-COMMISSIONER
COMMISSIONER, GROUP I
COMMISSIONER, GROUP II
Forms for filing are.available in the
City Clerk's Office, Municipal Building,
Port St. Joe, Florida.
CITY of PORT ST. JOE
By: /s/ L A. Farris,
City Auditor/Clerk St 3121
NOTICE
Absentee Ballots for the Regular
Election to be held May 14, 1985, may
be requested in person, by mail or by
telephone at the City Clerk's Office,
Port St. Joe, Florida, If you come within
the purview of definition of an "absent
elector." Absentee Ballots will be mail-
ed, delivered or may be voted In person
as soort" 'ds Ballots are printed im-
mediately following Candidate
Qualification Deadline which is April
24, 1985. If there Is a Run-Off Election,
Absentee Ballots may be requested
beginning May 15, 1985. Completed
Absentee Ballots must be received in
the City Clerk's Office by 7:00 P.M.,
E.D.T:, May 14, 1985, for the Regular
Election and by 7:00 P.M., E.D.T., May
28, 1985, If there Is a Run-Off Election.
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
By: // L A. Farris,
City Auditor/Clerk 81t3/21

FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
Sto Section 865.09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned person intends to register
"with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf
County, Florida, four weeks after the
first publication of this notice, the fic-
titious name or trade name under which
he will be engaged In business and In
which said business is to be carried on,
to-wit:
GULF MACHINE COMPANY
S Rt. 1, P. O. Box 678
Highway 71 South Five Miles
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465
OWNER: Ray Smith
4tc4/4


James Hanlon of Port St.
Joe won the Master (40 and
over) Diet Pepsi 10,000 meter
run held in Panama City
Saturday, April 6. A total of
158 runners finished the
course. Hanlon finished 9th
overall with a time of 32:03.


David Parker of Panama
City won the male overall
with a time of 31:54.
Hanlon is now eligible for
Diet Pepsi 10,000 meter re-
gional competition to be held
in Atlanta, Georgia later this
year.


Pvt. William Davis Graduates
from National Guard Course


Army National Guard Pvt.
William E. Davis, son of
William P. Davis of 1309
Marvin Ave. and Helen M.
Davis of 301 Iola St., both of
Port St. Joe, has graduated
from the Army quartermas-
ter and chemical equipment
repair course, a seven-week
training program at Aber-'


President, Wewahitchka Ban
Boosters requesting assist-
ance in purchasing new band
uniforms for the next school
year. On motion by Whitfield,
second -by Graham, the1
Board voted unanimously to
make the Band Boosters a
loan of a portion of the
purchase price with the Band
Boosters re-paying the loan
over a three year period of
time. This is to be a 1985-86
expenditure.
On motion by Whitfield,
second by Graham, the
Board unanimously ap-
proved a junior high softball
program be implemented at
Wewahitchka High School.
On motion by Whitfield,
second by Hanlon, the Board
accepted the lowest and best
bids on Automobile Mechan-
ics Federal Project as fol-
lows:
Bear of Florida, no award;
Coastal Auto Parts,
$13,157,69; Dryden Educa-
tional Sales, no award; Gold
Hat Auto Parts, $5,669.95;
Heindel Industries, $416.50;
D. C. Jaeger, $11,333.00;
Repfro Auto Parts, $906.92;
Sexton Auto Parts, no
award; Singer, no award; St.
Joe Auto Parts, $493.45.
On motion by Graham,
second by Whitfield, the
Board unanimously ap-
proved Superintendent Wild-
er to participate in an
Organizational and Manage-
ment Study in Wakulla
County School District on
March 6-8, 1985. The Board
also approved for Oscar
Redd to attend a Legislative
Skills Workshop in Tallahas-
see on March 10-11, 1985.
There being no further
business, the meeting ad-
journed .to meet again on
April 2, 1985 at 9:00 A.M.,


deen Proving Ground, Md.
The student was taught
how to maintain small en-
gines, laundry units, stoves,
heaters and chemical equip-
ment.
He is a 1984 graduate of
Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High
School.


N

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of Gene Goldsmith for the
position of auto mechanics
aide at Port St. Joe High
School;
Accepted the resignation of
Sara Joe Wooten as teacher
at Wewahitchka High School.
effective March 15, 1985;
Approved the employment
of Carolyn Turner as English
teacher at Wewahitchka
High School for the remaind-
er of the 1984-85 school year.
On motion by Graham,
second by Whitfield, the
Board approved for Jim
Whittington to attend night
school.
The Board reviewed each
cost center's budget. No
action necessary.
On motion by Graham,
second by Hanlon, the Board
voted unanimously that the
bills be paid.
The Board reviewed a
letter from Pat Hartley,



Public


favorable inflation and inte-
rest rate outlooks combined
with current prices on many
stocks provide the potential-
for long term investors to
realize meaningful apprecia-,
tion of some of the trends in
the current market."
Gesling cautioned that
there is no guarantee that


these trends as he sees them
today, will stay in force or
the past will be a guide to the
future.
Chopin is reported to have
worn a beard on only one
side of his face. "It doesn't
matter," he is supposed to
have said, "the audience
only sees my right side."


Dick Gesling, an invest-
ment.broker with A.G. Ed-
wards and Sons of Panama
City gave the Mexico Beach
Kiwanis Club his predictions
for a continued rise in the
stock market over the next
few years, last Thursday.
Gesling said the market
had experienced a strong rise
since the end of 1984. "The
question is, is this just
another rally or is it the
beginning of a possible multi-
year move?" Gesling quer-
ied.
In answering his own ques-
tion, the speaker said several
indicators are falling into
place which support the
thought of a materially high-
er stock market move for
the next few years.
Gesling said these indica-
tors are: a material decline
in inflation; higher cash flow
as a result of depreciation
changes in the 1981 tax laws,
downward pressure on long
term interest rates; and the
price-earnings multiple on
stocks which are now tending
to rise.
The investment broker re-
ported, "In our opinion, the


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MORNING WORSHIP .................
CHURCH TRAINING ...............
EVENING WORSHIP ..................
W EDNESDAY.................... .


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
5:45 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.


Long Ave. Baptist Church
"1601 LONG AVENUE


DANIEL W. DUNCAN
Pastor


MICHAEL HANDY
Minister of Music
& Youth


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


HANNON INSURANCE

Agency, Inc.

The Insurance Store Since 1943

Auto Home Business Life

Flood Bonds Mutual Finds

8:30 till 6:00 Monday through Friday


221 Reid Avenue


Phone 227-1133


We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


ROY SMITH, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent


NOTICE


NOTICE AND APPLICATION FOR

ALTERNATIVE PAYMENT OF 1985

REAL ESTATE TAXES BY INSTALLMENT

Section 197.0155, F.S. allows an alternative plan for payment of real estate taxes. A taxpayer
who elects to pay taxes by the installment method shall make payments based upon an esti-
mated 'tax which shall be equal to the actual taxes levied upon the property in the preceding
year.
THE PAYMENT SCHEDULE SHALL BE AS FOLLOWS:
First Installment Payment: One quarter of the total estimated taxes discounted 6%. Pay-
ment shall be made not later than-June 30, 1985. A taxpayer
must make the first installment payment in order to participate
in this plan.
Second Installment Payment: One quarter of the total estimated taxes discounted 4V2%. Pay-
ment shall be made not later than September 30, 1985.


Third Installment Payment:


Fourth Installment Payment:


One quarter of the total estimated taxes plus one-half of any
adjustment pursuant to a determination of actual tax liability
discounted 3%. Payment shall be made not later, than De-
cember 31, 1985.
One quarter of the total estimated taxes plus one-half of any
adjustment pursuant to a determination of actual tax liability.
No discount. Payment shall be made not later than March 31,
1936.


If you have not received an application to pay 1985 taxes by installment and it is
your intent to exercise your rights under this law, then please complete the appli-
cation below arid mail or file with your' county tax collector prior to May 1, 1985.
The absolute deadline for filing the application is April 30, 1985. Any application
filed after April 30 will not be considered. The postmark on application mailed to
the tax collector shall determine if the application was timely mailed. Additional
application forms may be obtained from the tax collector's office as listed below:


Mail completed application to:


EDA RUTH TAYLOR
1000 FIFTH STREET


N

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C

E


Tax Collector


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456
- ----------,. -----------_ DETACH -----------------------
IF YOU DESIRE TO PAY 1985 TAXES BY INSTALLMENT, PLEASE SIGN, DATE, COMPLETE PROPERTY
IDENTIFICATION NO. AND RETURN THIS'APPLICATION TO YOUR COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR PRIOR
TO MAY 1, 1985. UPON RECEIPT, THE TAX COLLECTOR SHALL MAIL YOUR FIRST NOTICE OF PAY-
MENT DUE, WITH INSTRUCTIONS. IF YOU HAVE NOT RECEIVED YOUR FIRST NOTICE BY JUNE 15,
1985, CONTACT THE TAX COLLECTOR'S OFFICE.
I TO BE COMPLETED BY TAXPAYER I


I hereby make application to participate in the install-
ment payment plan for the 1985 tax year.


SIGNATURE .


Name
Address


Phone Number


Property I. D. No.
Legal Description as it Appears oir the 1984 Tax No-
tice Receipt:


DATE


Please Print


NOTICE
Florida Law requires that your estimated taxes must be more than $25.00 in order to participate in the Install-
ment Payment Plan. If your estimated taxes for 1985 are $25.00 or less you do not qualify for this plan.
You must make the first installment payment not later than. June 30th in order to participate in this plan.
Once you have elected to participate in the installment payment plan by timely paying the first payment you are
required to continue participation for the tax year. If you elect to discontinue participation you will not be en-
titled to receive the discounts provided by Law. Installment payments that become delinquent shall be paid with
the next installment payment. Discounts shall not be allowed on delinquent payments.
------- -------------- DETACH ---- -------------
If you have any questions, please contact the Tax Collector's Office at the following locationss:
....... 1'000 FIFTH STREET COURTHOUSE


PORT ST -JOE, FLORIDA 32456


S Phone Number 2 2Y-6 10


Broker Speaks to Club


Hanlon Wins Race


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Panama City
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uAddress







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, APR. 18, 1985


Leisure Is Godly Pursuit


By The Rev. Jerry R. Huft
Rector, St. James'
Episcopal Church
Port St. Joe, Florida
Historians and political
scientists have shown us that
our modern social order is
literally built on hard work.
Archeological research has
indicated how workers in
Mesopotamia and Egypt (the
cradle of our civilization)
joined together to build pre-
historic irrigation projects.
The resulting organization,
and division of labor made it.
possible for a small number
of farmers to provide ample
food for large numbers of
city dwellers.
Since the number of farm-
ers decreased, they became
vulnerable to attack, and
their commodities could be
stolen. Armies to defend
property became a necessity,
along with the many skilled
workers who supplied their


needs.
Military officers, metal
smiths, weavers, lawyers,
scribes, potters, builders,
and scores of other trades-
men began to flourish. Since
the family was the only social
structure known, the trades
were identified with family
guilds, and became heredi-
tary. Thus the class system
was born.
Their complex economy
required records, store-
houses, currency, and trade
agreements. Over the cen-
turies, the system remained
basically the same, with
local modifications. In fact,
when we look at our own
society, we can see that we
retain several elements of
their social order.
The human race has a
record of capitalism which
can be dated as early as 6,000
B.C. But it wasn't until our.
own century that a German.


sociologist, named Max Web-
er, produced a theory which
said that the economic suc-
cess of Protestant groups in
Europe was due to their work
ethic.
Weber connected Protest-
ant economic success with
the Calvanrstic notion that
proper attention to.: one's
religious duty would produce.
the blessing 6f God fori men.;
Calvanism seemed to teach'
that being thrifty and work-
ing hard would make a
person efficient and prosper-
ous in a worldly vocation.
Prosperity was seen as a
confirmation of ofie's elec-
tion, or salvation.
Weber believed that since
hard work and success were
thought to be the visible
signs of an invisible salva-
tion, people worked harder to
attain success. The theory
became known as the "Pro-
testant Work Ethic."
Most modern historians
and economists take issue
with Weber's ideas, but I
suspect that many people
live their lives as though they
were true. After all, it is
easier for many of us to
dedicate our waking hours to
our secular jobs than it is to
spend time with those we say
we love. And we can always
justify our preoccupation
with our occupation by.say-
ing, "I'm really working this
hard for the sake of my
family and fellow workers."
Some people literally be-
come martyrs in their own
frantic work drive. The
stress symptoms of this drive
are. often related to over-
indulgence in other areas of a
person's life. -We sit too
much, eat too much, don't
bend or walk enough, we
smoke our 'lungs out, our
resulting high blood pressure
blows out our vascular sys-
tem, and finally our hearts
give up the fight.
I am acquainted with sev-
eral individuals who have
spent the equivalent to years
of wages for the treatment of
preventable stomach, nerve,
respiratory, and vascular
diseases- all because they
were driven by a consuming
personal work ethic.
I can't find any evidence
that the families and co-
workers of these folks are a
bit better off for-their efforts. .
The shallow motives and
rationalizations we create to


,21


Ph. 229-6374


RE ES 325 Reid Avenue


justify our endless toil seem
shallow when we consider
their effects on health and
inter-personal relationships.
The Bible cites numerous
examples of how God sees
the need for rest and leisure
time activities. The proper
use of rest is a godly pursuit.
In Genesis 2, we read how
' God did his work in six days
and rested on the seventh. On
the seventh day he neither
worked nor made anything
new. He simply took time to
enjoy the fruit of his labor.
In Leviticus 23, God told
Moses that his people were
only allowed to work six out
of seven days. On the
seventh, they were to join in
a "Holy Convocation." In
other words, they were to.
take some time to worship
together, then, they could
enjoy the Lord's Sabbath,
with their families. Accord-
ing to the biblical formula,
one seventh of our. tiTe
should be devoted to worship
and pleasant pursuits with
our families.
We can derive some good
advice from Mark, chapter
six as well. In this text we see
how the disciples had all been
working hard at their voca-
tion. One day they gathered
around Jesus to report on
what they had been doing and
teaching. When Jesus dis-
covered that their schedule
was so cramped and full of
appointments that they
didn't have time to eat a
proper lunch, he insisted that'
they get in a boat and slip
away to an isolated place for
a rest.
There seem to be two
biblical principles which
point us toward a balance"
between work and leisure.
First, it is our vanity that.
makes us work too much
(Psalm 127:2). Realizing that
too much work is useless.will.
spur a thoughtful person on
to find ways to get their work
done within the limits of a
reasonable schedule.
Secondly, if the things we,
occupy ourselves with are
not being done for the glory
of God, our motives are,
wrong (1 Cor. 10:31). A full
realization of this fact would
modify all of our work habits.
Have you taken stock of the
balance between work and
-'leisure: in your fife? Try.-
answering these statements:
with either true or false. It
may surprise you to see how
your 'attitude toward work
affects your whole life. .
1. The number of hours I
work are not a burden to my
family or me.,
2. I schedule time for daily
devotional periods and week-
ly workshop.
3. I don't feel uneasy when
.I have a day off.
4. I have enjoyed recrea-
tional activities with family
or friends in the past week.
5. I have enough time for
proper exercise, and I use it.
6. I take an annual vaca-
tion.
Congratulate yourself if.
you answered "true" to all
six statements. But if one or
more of these statements
was not true for you, maybe
today is a good day to start
evaluating your own work
ethic.


SRe.g. *450"
Complete Set of Wicker...30000
Eastlake Reg. '219.95
Victorian Oak Dresser .... $10000
Reg. '179.95
VANITY DRESSER ......... $9995
*eg. *79.95
OAK TWIN BED............ 5500'
Large Reg. '325.00
ANTIQUE WALNUT DRESSER $20000
SReg. '49.95 3
OAK SCHOOL DESK........ $3500
Reg. '189.95 1 B
8-DRAWER CHEST ....... 11995
Reg. '199.95
Sold Oak WASH STAND ... $12500
Reg. '129.95
SOLID MAHOGANY DESK.... $7500
Reg. '129.95
OAK FERN TABLE.........$800
SReg.'359.95
OAK SLEIGH BED..........19995
Reg. 575.00
OAK HALL TREE......... $45000
SReg. '189.95
SOLID MAHOGANY CHEST $10000
ALL THE ABOVE ITEMS HAVE BEEN
REFINISHED & ARE READY TO GO IN
YOUR HOMEII


Our Backroom Sale Consists
of Pieces that Need Some Work
but Priced to Make Jt Worthwhile q
Complete Duncan Phyfe 0
TABLE & 6 CHAIRS $15000
White
BREAKFAST TABLE....... 5000

6-DRAWER CHEST ........ 4500

CHINA CABINET ..'..:... $4500

OAK TABLE ............ $5000 '

OLD TIME RCA VICTROLA .. $7500
Assortment ODD
CHAIRS .......... $5 & *10..
ANTIQUE
VICTORIAN RECLINER ... $5000

WALNUT OFFICE DESK ..... $400
Jenny Und $ 00
TWIN BED ............ 2000

VANITY DRESSER ......... $5000
Also We Have Approximately
53' of DISPLAY SHELVING for Sale


WE WOULD LIKE TO THANK the people in Port St. Joe and
Apalachicola for helping to make our business a success in more u
ways than one. We have enjoyed the last year of making new friends
and meeting new people. We are going to continue operating our
Refinishing Shoppe on Highway 98. and are presently making plans to
get new equipment Into do any kind of stripping that you would want.
AGAIN OUR THANKS for your support in our furniture store. And
we ask for your continuing support in our Refinishing Shoppe.
JOHN & RENEE, Owners
>p aii a.<*. 11 paf a a. a ^ i^ ^>.


BY ANNETTE MINGER

This week wraps up the
fifth six weeks at Port St. Joe
High. Six weeks tests will be
given April 18th and 19th.
Only one more to go, stu-
dents.

Parenting

Skills

Program
Edwin R. Ailes, Executive
Director of the Gulf County
Guidance Clinic, Inc. has
announced that the Clinic-
will be conducting a "Parent-
ing Skills Program" starting
Thursday, April 25. Classes
will be held at the Clinic
building at 311 Williams
Avenue in Port St. Joe. The
program will be conducted
from 7:00-8:30 P.M. (East-
ern) for six consecutive
Thursday night sessions.
In describing the program,
Ailes stated that "these
classes are for any parent
who wants to improve or add
to their parenting skills."
Ailes said, "Program topics
will include: "discipline, ef-
fective rules, developing con-
fidence, motivating good be-
havior, understanding mis-
behavior, and communi-
cating with children."
"Being a parent is probab-,
ly one of the most difficult,
confusing, frustrating and
also rewarding experiences
that most of us will take on."
Ailes said. He added, "We
get to be better parents
because we learn the skills
and because we work at it.
We believe that this program
is one way that concerned
parents can add to their
abilities."
All participants interested
in the "Parenting Skills
Program" through the Clinic
are requested to register in
advance by calling the Clinic
. at 227-1145. Collect calls will
be. accepted at this number.
Those not able to register in
advance will be allowed to
register on the night of the
program.
-The Gulf County Guidance
. Clinic "Parenting Skills Pro-
gram" is a Community In-
structional Services activity
sponsored by the Gulf Coast'
Regional Coordinating Coun-
cil. These classes are free to
the public. Reading materi-
als and a certificate will be
given out to everyone com-
pleting the program.

Bostick Ends
Basic Training
Army National Guard Pfc.
Kevin B. Bostick, son of Vera
E. and Charles Bostick of 353
South St., Wewahitchka, has
Completed basic training at
Fort Knox, Ky.
During the training, stu-
dents received instruction in
drill and ceremonies, wea-
pons, map reading, tactics,
military courtesy, military
justice, first aid, and Army
history and traditions.
He is a 1983 graduate of
Wewahitchka High School.


ANNETTE MINGCR
Seniors, the Annual Staff
needs a list of all the clubs
and activities in which you
have participated from


Public

Notices
NOTICE OF LOCAL LEGISLATION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of Intent
to apply to the 1985 session of the
Legislature for a local bill which would
amend Chapter 61"2212, Laws of
Florida (Highland View Water and
Sewer District) to provide that the
governing board provided for In Section
4 and Section 5 of said law shall be the
Board of County Commissioners of
Gulf County. Said amendment will
abolish the present appointed board.
DATED this 18th day of April, 1985.
BOARD of COUNTY COMMISSIONERS,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Is/ Eldridge Money, Chairman
it 4/18
NOTICE OF REGULAR
7 MUNICIPAL ELECTION
Notice is hereby given that the first
primary of the election of the following
will be held at the City Hall Fire Station
In the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, on
Tuesday, May 14, 1985: One Mayor-
Commissioner, One Commissioner
Group I and One Commissioner. Group
I. The polls will open at 7:00 A.M. and
will close at -P -E-D.When_
there are more than two candidates for
any one office and neither shall receive
a majority of the total votes cast for
such office, then another election shall
be held two weeks from the date of the
first election, or May 28,1985, at which
time the two candidates receiving the
largest -number of votes in the former
election shall be voted on again.
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
By: Is/ L A. FARRIS,
City Auditor/Clerk 4t4/18
PROPOSED CONTRACT
NO. AP-CXtles-7
INVITATION FOR BIDS
PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to the provisions of Section
10 of' the Clayton 'Antitrust Act that
Apalachicola-"Northern Ralftoad' Cornm
pany requests bids on Proposed Con-
tract No. AP-CXtles-7, providing for the
purchase of 48,000 concrete crossties.
-Bids in the. form prescribed should be
submitted to:
B. R. Gibson, Jr.,
Executive Vice President
Apalachicola Northern Railroad Co.
Post Office Box 250
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
no later than 12:00 noon local time on
May 1, 1985, at which office and im-
mediately thereafter the Bids submit-
ted will be received and opened by the
above officer. Apalachicola Northern
Railroad Company, reserves the right to
reject any or all Bids and to accept any
part of any Bid. Specifications, Form of
Bid and other details of the Proposed'
Contract No. AP-CXtles-7 may be ob-
tained from the above address.
APALACHICOLA NORTHERN
RAILROAD COMPANY 2t4/11


DAYH U
TIME-DW


AW


Shark Review

News of Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High


grades nine through twelve.
This list needs to be turned in
to Letha Rice or Lesley
Wilder by Friday, April 19. If
this list is not. turned in your
name will not appear in the
directory.

Saturday, April 20, the
annual Jr.-Sr. Prom and
Banquet will be held at Port
St. Joe High. The theme for
the Prom this year is Tropi-
cal Splendor. Excitement
abounds as everyone pre-
pares for this exciting event.

Now is the time of year
when new Keyettes are cho-
sen. Any girl who will be a
Junior or a Senior next year


TV WORTH WATCHING


Over 140 Enterainment choices each month on
HBO and TMC. Save $24.00 a Year on Our Combo
Rate. Call today!

ESSEX CABLE TV


Mexico Beach 648-5964


and who is interested in
becoming a Keyette should
write a letter telling why they
wish to be a Keyette. These
letters should be turned in to
Paula Ward or Alyson Gull-
ford as soon as possible.

Seniors, tickets for Project
Graduation will go on sale
Friday, May 3. The price is
$10.00 for each Senior and
$5.00 for dates who are
non-Seniors. Tickets will be
sold every Friday beginning
May 3 through May 24 during
lunch.

Until next week, this is
Annette Minger hoping you
have a good one.


Buy Your

Installed Phones

and Save $$
Residential customers and non-complex
business customers, you may purchase your
inplace single line telephones at the follow-
ing prices:

Rotary Dial ................ $16.00 plus tax
Touchtone ................. 25.00 plus tax

This amount can be budget billed (added to
your telephone bill) over one, two or three
months.
Your purchase will decrease your monthly
bill by the amount you are being charged to
lease these telephones from the Telephone
Company.
To take advantage of this offer, you should.
contact your local Telephone Company
Business Office.

ST. JOSEPH TELEPHONE

& TELEGRAPH

COMPANY

Port St. Joe, Florida
P. O. Box 220 (904) 229-7231


Highland View Motors, Inc.
603 Highway 98 Highland View Port St. Joe
Phone 229-6999
a a
81 Olds Cutlass Supreme........ 4995
2-dr., am/fm, p/s, p/b, auto., air, cruise con.
82 Ford LTD 4-dr. ..... ...... $4995
am/fm stereo, cruise c., p/s, p/b, auto., air
82 Ford Futura 4-dr. ............ 3995
6 cyl., am/fm stereo, cruise, p/s, p/b, auto., air

81 Ford Crown Victoria 4-dr...... $3995
Am/fm stereo, elec. windows, elec. seat,
.cruise, p/s, p/b, auto overdrive, air
81 A.M.C. Spirit 2-dr. .......... 2795
6 cyl. R, p/s, auto., air cond.
79 Ford T-Bird 2-dr............. 2995
am/fm, p/s, p/b, auto., air cond.
79 Monte Carlo 2-dr............ $3395
Am/fm, cruise, p/s, p/b, air cond., auto.
79 Mercury Marquis 2-dr. ....... 3395
R, p/s, p/b, auto., air cond.
79 Ford Country Squire S/W...... $2395
Am/fm, cruise, p/s, p/b, auto., air
78 Pontiac Sunbird ............ $1895
6 Cyl., am/fm, p/s, auto., air cond.
79ChevWoletChevette 4-dr...... 1895
4 cyl., am/fm, auto.
77 Ford LTD 4-dr............. $1395
P/s, p/b, auto., air cond.

77 Pontiac Grand Prix 2-Dr....... $995
77 Plymouth VolareSta. Wagon ... $1195
6 Cyl., auto., pi/s, air cond.
81 Chevrolet Pickup ........... $4795
Swbam/fm, p/s, p/b, auto., air cond.
81 GMCickui,.,. ......... $4395
Lwb, R auto., p/s, air cond., 6 cyl.
75 Ford Pickup s/w/b ........... $995
V-8,,automfatic
74 Chevrolet Pickup ........... 695
Lwb, V-8, auto., p/s

79 Chevrolet Pickup ..........$. 2495
6 cyl., swb
72 Datsun 4-dr................ 595
Runs Good
78 Plymouth Sport Fury ......... $995
2-Door


e and Refii ,


/ PShoppe


We Are Getting Outof the'
RETAIL FURNITURE SALES. '
Everything in the store marked down to cost or below. All items sold as is. At
these prices everything is cash and carry. No lay-a-ways. No free delivery. No
refunds. 4% service charge for Visa and MasterCard.
COME SAVE LIKE NEVER BEFORE ON ANTIQUES
& GOOD USED FURNITURE FROM APRIL 18 thru 30th


HDAY
TIMEIlD


..


mmmmmwm


PAGE ELEVEN


"wier-W -W'







NO


NEED TO Fold, Staple, Bend, Collect, Lick, Stick, Cut 01
COME ON TO SAVEWAY WHERE YOL

SE.,i'MEAT VALI
A E : -A.., Shank Portion ,

QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED A M


Cm


TURKEY HAM HALF
b.1.39
CENTER HAM ROAST or STEAK ........ Ib. 99'
WHOLE or BUTT HALF HAM ........... Ib. 880
LYKES PARTY HAM HALF .......... lb.1.88


TRUCKLOAD MEAT SALE!1 .
FILL YOUR FREEZER!!
Center Cut PORK CHOPS(Family Pak) lb.l 1.69
3 Lb. CANNED HAM ............... 5.99
SLICED SLAB BACON(FmilyPak) ........ Ib.$1.29
ASSORTED PORK CHOPS ............ Ib.990
HYGRADE COOKED HAM..... .... ooz.159
BAR S ALL MEAT FRANKS .......... .12oz.88C
FARMHOUSE SLICED BACON . 12 oz.99


m

I


GATO RAD E


- 32 oz. btl. -


c


Fresh Celery.


a .n. a


Fresh Fancy Mushrooms
Red Delicious Apples...
Calif. Navel Oranges ...


. stalks for 88
. package 99
. 31b.bag99
. .... 4for88


SPRING CLEANING
32 Oz. GIa Cl1 e an
WINDEX........ 19
28 $1 89
TOP JOB ......... $ 89
28 O. $169
MR. CLEAN ....... 19


PRODUCTS SALE!
21 OL.
COMET ........
16 Oz.
SPIC& SPAN. ...
ANY
Broom or Mop....


DAIRY DEPT


5 Count Butter-Me-Not
Merico Biscuits...
-M a oBimscui


64 Oz. Tropicana FRUIT PUNCH
Lemonade ....
16 Oz. Breakstone
Sour Cream...


79'
99C


41t$1o


4 Pak 10 Cent Real Valiu
BISCUITS .. .


1 Lb. Real Value
Margarine


a s


79C
/$100


21$100
.W88
50o,


/BAI(ERPA
/ B AE iF 2 Scrambled Eggs,
DONUTS APPLE FRITTERS BREAl
LONG JOHNS -JELLY DONUTS
BIRTHDAY CAKES BREADS 8"PrC.
ASSORTED SANDWICH WITH F
CAKES BARBER
E SLAW CARROT SALAD CONGEALED
NI BANANA PUDDING %J
4 b Chocolate or Vanilla I O* .i


.f -


I -%
I
~ I.-,
Si):.


Fresh 3 Lbs.
Yellow

SQUASH


'


Frest
Pok


FresI

ID


I I I I r I I I --- I ICs I


- P r


r


I I I


i:





2









it, Paste, Book, Cuss, Discuss or Redeem To Get Your Savings

R SAVINGS ARE IN REAL MONEY.

I Extra Lean Boneless
CHUCK ROAST H E PceT
E-O &PATED Prices Good


Ib.


Bonel"e $159
Shoulder Roast Ib..!


Family Pak ALL BEEF
Ground Beef ....


Fill Your Freezer, Have A Party, Stock Up, Give A Gift But

DON'T MISS THESE MEAT PRICES!
Cut-p ERHOLS

FRYERS
(2 Extra Backs & Giblets) ,w


MINI- b
Drumettab- ib.488


A I, Fet
Neks
am tik


Ib.


Family Pak Chicken
Breast .
Family Pak Choice
Drumsticks
and Thighs..
Jlfti- -


99C


USDA Good
T-Bone Steak


All Meat
SStewBeef


$269
Ib. 2


$149
~ i .... .. l.. ::


rarm rresn
Fancy VEGETABLES
RA
FRESH CUCUMBERS ....... 4for99 |
FRESH 1Ib. bag CARROTS......... 4forl00
ancy 1 .
leans ..2 Ibs. *1. FRESH

:ancy Bunch Msa

' OCCOLIW
_. U[,'=12 IF.7+']Y


s, Bacon or Sausage and A Biscuit
FAST WITH SAVEWAY


d Chicken Box


$599


MCH FRIES
If BEEF each1.99

Cold Sandwiches



,00l ri l F
^'E ^P^^ ^9^^ .t~v iiiiii'is ihi 11,1,, \i~i J '< 'i/'ii,, /y|]']i" j
48^ ^ gc ^^


Ready
0 0 0 0 You At i


to Serve 29
6:00 A.M. V


Meat 2 Vegetables. Bread
PLATE LUNCH


Different Menu
Each Day


I2.79


DELICIOUS LUNCH MENU
THURSDAY: Fried chicken, lasagna, bbq ris.
FRIDAY: Fried chicken, chicken & dumplings,
ham & scalloped potatoes.
SATURDAY: Fried chicken, chicken pot pie.
MONDAY: Fried chicken, spaghetti & meatballs, cube
steak.
TUESDAY: Fried chicken chicken & dressing.
WEDNESDAY: Fried chicken, beef stew, roast beef.


EVERYDAY LOW PRI'
We Have A Large Variety of
NO BRAND PRODUCT
13 Oz.
RICE KRISPIES ....
32 Oz.
WISK LIQUID......


8 Oz. Puffed Chese, CrumKly Chese, Nache Tortilb Cips
REAL VALUE SNACKS


35 Oz. P.P. SUNLIGHT
Dishwasher Det.....


$139 RY L
CRYSTAL LIGHT


$129


46 ox. Canmplkl
TOMATO JUICE


U..
mm..


99C
$298

99C


FROZEN FOODS
Jeno's, Totino or Mr. P's

Pizza Jamboree ..... 19


Real Value 3 Lb. 69A
CRINKLE CUT FRIES .......69c
10 Oz. Sunvale Carton 3 1$14
STRAWBERRIES ..... I1.UU
Several Varieties 11 oz.
BANQUET FROZEN DINNERS 79
Real Value 1% Ib. bag 2 /9 9
SHOESTRING POTATOES 199


green Glant Assorted c
Vegetables In Sauce ....... W
SOUTHERN FARM 5 Lb. Bags
FROZEN VEGETABLES
At At Excellent Prices
Speckled Butter eans, Broccoli Cuts, Baby Umas, Cut Okra,
Peas wSnaps, Blackeyed Peas, Brded Okra, W.K. Corn


lb.179


? JENO'S,.
TOTINO
MR. P'S.


BIG PIZZA SALE!


-


ii


..*


I


m-69"'








PAGE FOURTEEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, APR. 18, 1985


classified Ads
,,x#,..f'lt.l'................................................................. .I


FOR SAEII -


For Sale by Owner: on lot
& 1, near schools, cypress
fence, lawn pump, 3 bdrra., 2
full baths, liv., din., kitchen
& den with fireplace, ceiling
fans throughout. Many other
extras. Must see to appre-
ciate. Call 229-8732 after 5
p.m. 2tp 4/11
House for Sale: Brick, 3
bdrm., 2 full baths, screened
porch, insulated doors & win-
dows, 12'x16' utility house,
103 Yaupon St. By appt. only.
229-8079. tfc 4/11
Bargain! Excellent starter
home. 3 bdrm., 1 ba., located
on Ig. lot, near schools. 1315
Long Ave. Terms available.
Call today. 229-6827. tfc 3/7


FOR SALE
5.68 acres land at Over-
street. Located on State
Road 386, 4 miles from
public beach, 1 mile from
boat landing on Inter-'
Coastal Canal. 3 acres on
one side of 386, 2.5 on other
side with over 1,000 feet of
road frontage. Could be
divided into four nice
building plots.-A bargain at
$4,500 per acre.
McNEILL COASTAL
PROPERTIES, INC.
Realtor
Phone 2294-6537 or
648-8248 for more
information
S.. tfc4/18


Indian Pass Beach
For Sale by Owner
Magnificent 2900 sq. ft. year
round. home on 7 acres
with 236 ft. of Gulf frontage.
Boardwalk to beach, yard &
gardens. 400K, 70K down,
owner finance options
involving less land available
down to 180K with 1 acre.
Call 904/576-2934.
tfc 4/4
Mobile home: 24' wide, 60'
long, 4 bdrm., 2 ba. 6n lot.
Shed and stor. room. Very
reasonable. Call 229-8832.
4tp 4/4
3 bdrm. house, 10 lots, 2
wells,. 3 sgptic tanks,
$25,000.00. 6 a.mi. to 6 p.m.,
227-1456, night 227-1514.
tfc 4/11
House'at St. Joe Beach: 3
bdrm., 2 ba.,. cen. h&a, den
with stone:f.p., built-in appli-
ances, chain link fence, 2'
blocks from beach. CAll
648-5257. 2tp4/11





There will be a regular
communication of Port St.
Joe Lodge No. 111, F.&A.M.
every first and third Thurs-
day at 8:00 p.m.
Norman M. Martin, W.M.
Billy D. Barlow, Sec.
pd.thru12/84


FOR SALE OR RENT:
Under Construction: 3 units 800 sq. ft. per
unit, cen. heat & air, insulated doors & win-
dows, carpet, 2 bedroom, refrig. & stove.
3rd St. Highland View -- Completion
May 1, 1985
For further information contact Kenny at
229-6509
tfc 3/28



HANNON REALTY, Inc.
(904)227-1133
FRANK HANNON, Broker NOW OPEN ON SATURDAY
SALES ASSOCIATES
Evenings and Weekends: .
Margaret Hale 648-5659
Frances Chason-- 229-8747 Roy Smith
Bo Boyett 648-8936 Marsha Young.
Donnie Lange 229-8208
HOMES
PORT ST. JOE
Port St. Joe: Good rental property, 2 bedroom, 1 ba. $24,000.
New Listing: Port St. Joe. Nice residential neighborhood. 3 bedroom, 2
bath. $55,000.
Port St. Joe: Large house & lot, plenty of room; 4 bdrm., 1 '/ 'bath, $35,000.
New Listing: Unique executive home on Ig. wooded lot. 3500 sq. ft. with 4
BR Including luxurious master wing. Fireplace, totally energy efficient.
3 bedroom, 1 bath, $29,000.
3 bedroom, 1 bath, $32,000..
Oak Grove: 3 bdrm., 1 ba., outside storage. Only $17,000.
Close to town, newly remodeled, 3 BR, 2 bea. $31,000.
Nice 2 BR 2 ba, den, wet bar, fireplace, deck, many extras. 806 Garrison.
$48,500.'
Good location 4 BR 3 ba. 3,000 sq. ft. brick veneer home, cen. h/a, fireplace.
Only $95,000.
3 BR, 1 ba;at 1610 Long Ave. $29,500.
Quiet neighborhood, frame 3 BR, 2 be, den, separate dining rm, carport,
utility rm. $44,500. :
Good ietiremeni home, 2 BR 1 ba. masonry, $47,500.
Close to-schools, 3 BR, 2 ba, fenced back yard. $51,000.:
Ward Ridge; brick 3 BR 2 ba. assumable mortgage, $46,000.
White City: Mini-farm, pond 3 BR 1 ba. $40,000.
Howard Creek: 3 BR, 2 ba. doublewide trailer, partially furnished, corner lot.
$27,900.
Howard Creek: Large 2 story 5 BR 2 ba Franklin stove, screen porch, util.
room, $47,900.
Cape San Bias: Large great room, screen porch, 2 bedroom, 3 bath.
$168,500. 1.5 acres. gulf-front.
Cape San Bias: Lovely 1500 sq. ft. energy efficient protected walkway to
beach, 2 car garage. $225,000.
Cape San Bias: Great room, screen porch, 2 bdrm., 3 be. $168,500.
* THE BEACHES
St. Joe Beach: Excellent view 2 BR 2 ba, deck, $125,000.
St. Joe Beach: Large brick 3 BR 2 ba., fireplace, deck, spring fed pond.
energy efficient, $88,000.
St. Joe Beach: Ocean view, fronting Hwy. 98, corner lot, 3 BR, 2 be., deck,
screen porch, $64,500.'Owner financing.
St. Joe Beach: Stilt house 2 BR 1 2i ba., den or study, until. rm., carport:
$69,500.
RESIDENTIAL LOTS
St. Joe Beach: Corner lot, cleared, 75'x150', $9,500.
Stonemill Creek Area: 40 acres, cleared land, $40,000.
Gulf Airs: Gulf front 65'x180', $55,900.
Cape San Bias: Gulf front 2.34 acres, $100,000.
St. Joe Beach: 1 block from water, 3 lots together 50'x125' each. Total price
$45,000.
Mexico Beach: 100'x100' with water hook-up only $8,800.
Ward Ridge: One lot 75'x150', $6,600.
Howard Creek: % acre, $1,500.
Indian Pass: High and dry, $11,500.
Jones Homestead: 2 acres, $8,400.
TOWNHOUSES
Highland View: 3 townhouses, 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Each $35,000.
Gulf Pines: Duplex, 3 bdrm., 3 ba. each side. $176,000.
Cape San Bias Beach: 2 BR 2V Aba. $80,000.
St. Joe Beach: New 2 BR 1/2' ba. on Hwy. 94, unobstructed view of Gulf,
dedicated beach, furnished, $63,500. Unfurnished $52,700.
COMMERCIAL LOTS
Excellent Location: Downtown Port St. Joe store, 2,700 sq. ft. $50,000.
White City: One acre near canal, $33,300.
Overstreet: Two acre plots on Intercoastal Canal $16,000 ea.
Port St. Joe: Downtown 60'x90' corner lot, $18,000.
IN


LOOK! Mary Kay pro-
ducts on sale! Everything
must go and is reasonably
priced. Plus facial. For appt.
call 227-1542.
Telephone answering
machine, $50; 3M desk top
copier in excel. cond. $150.
Call 653-9214. 3tp 4/18
1973 Sportsman 11, 14'
trihull boat with 65 h.p. Mer-
cury. motor, Dry Dock
trailer. Call 648-5196, $1,300.
Boat & trailer. 14' Ken-
nedy craft sq. bowed boat
w/excel. trailer. $695. Call
229-8850. 2tc 4/11
Utility trailer, good cond.
$325. Call 227-1490.
22' Trembly gill net boat &
trailer, with 600 yds. of gill
net, two sizes, 18' shrimp net
& 2 scallop drags. Asking
$3,500. See Jerry or Neal
Garrett, or call 229-8018.
2tp 4/18
New Atari 660 XL com-
puter, $100. Call 648-8245.
1985 Yamaaha 225DX
3-wheeler, like new. 229-8696.
New: Yamaha 550
Endura,low mileage, still
under warranty, excel. cond.
Call after 5 p.m., 648-8822 or
648-5351. 3tc 4/18
30 gal. electric water'
heater, like new. $30. Phone
648-5279.
LAWN FURNITURE
Swings, swing frames, pic-
nic tables, lawn chairs, set-
tees, and children's picnic
tables. Call 639-2860.
tfc 3/21
$25.00 REWARD
for Any Sewing Machine
We Cannot Repair
SPECIAL $9.95
to clean, oil and adjust ten-
sion on your sewing mnach-
ine. We guarantee your
machine can sew on any
fabric.
The Sewing Room
410A Reid Avenue
227-1151
tfc 6/7
Boat for Sale: 28' Owens,
350 Chevrolet engine, stove,
ice box, v-berths in the front,
good cond. Fiberglass up to
water line. 648-8508 between
5410 p.m. tfc 3/14

STEEL ROOFING
& SIDING
SAmerican Made
from $9.95 per sq. based on
size, style & qty.
GOLDIN IND., INC.
Gulfport, MS
601-896-6216
4tp 4/4

FREE Bible study at home
by mail. What does the Bible
say about God, Christ, salva-
tion and eternity?. You can
study in your home with no
cost and no visits unless you
request. Write: Bible Study,
P. 0. Box 758, Port St. Joe,
FL t.fp1/14
12'x65' mobile home in
good cond. $5,200, move it or
rent where, located. Large
shaded lot. Corner Gulf &
Alabama, St. Joe Beach.
Call 229-6005. 6tp 3/21

TRY
WATKIN'S
PRODUCTS
-. 229-6023
'tfc 3/7

Century 21
St. Joseph Bay Realty
Realtor,
904/648-5716
New Listing: 2 rental
houses & 1 trailer space on
4% lots in Oak Grove. In-
vestment $27,500.
Cypress Avenue
Port St. Joe
1888 sq. ft. brick & stucco, 3
bdrm., 2 bath, fireplace,
many extras. $89,000.
*
SPECIAL BUY
2108 Juniper Ave.,
Port St. Joe


Absolutely beautiful 3
bdrm., 2 baths, formal liv.
rm. & din. rm. Den, fire-
place, dbl. garage. Many
other extras. By appt. only.
k


30 gal. electric water
heater, $25. Call 648-5907.
2tp 4/11





Fully furnished 1 bdrm.
cottage w/glassed in porch.
Available now. 421 Coronado
St., St. Joe Beach. Come see
or phone 648-8918. tfc 4/18
Nice 3 bdr. unfurnished
house in St. Joe. Beautiful
location. Call 229-8909 or
229-8749.
One bedroom furnished
apartment. Available May
15. 1505 Monument Ave.
tfc 4/18
For Rent: Furnished apt.
at Mexico Beach. 2 bdrm.,
redecorated, Ig. yard, nice
location, yearly rental $275
per month. Call after 6 p.m.,
648-5246. 2tc 4/11
For Rent: Unfurnished
apartment for rent, plush 2
bedroom, cen. air & heat,
new construction located in
nice neighborhood. Monthly
rate $280.00. Available April
1. 227-1689. tfc 3/21
Mobile home lot, 1%
blocks behind Jr. Store, St.
Joe Beach. Call 229-6961.
tfc 4/4
Mobile home lot for rent:
Rustic Sands Campgrounds,
800 15th St., Mexico Beach.
648-5229. tfc 3/28
Nice 2 bedroom mobile
home, no pets. Rustic Sands
Campgrounds. 648-5229.
tfc 3/28
No need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture,
227-1251.
Room for Rent: by day,
week, month. Air cond., TV..
Thames Hotel. 229-8723. 302
Reid Ave. tfc 7/5
Unfurnished 2 bedroom,
1 bath stilt house at Mexico
Beach with large pecky
cypress great room. $350 mo.
year round with $100 deposit.
Call 648-5349 or 648-5194 after
5. No Pets. tfc 2/28
For Rent: Mini-warehouse
storage. For more informa-
tion call 229-6332. tfc 1/17


Applications are being
taken for local security job.
Experience preferred, but
will train. 19 years of age
and up. Call between 9 & 3
p.m., 229-6154.
GOVERNMENT JOBS.
$15,000-$50,000/yr. possible.
All occupations. Call 1-805-
687-6000 ext. R-6859 to find
out how. 3tp4/18

EARN UP to $5,000 month-
ly ad a Real Estate foreclo-
sure rep. No license or ex- -
perience required. National
Company provides complete
assistance. For info call:
317-839-8900, ext. 2533.
2tp4/11

FOR QUICK RESULTS,
SELL IT WITH A
CLASSIFIED AD


Custom Drapes & Blinds


40% off
Nowat Danley's


Large In-Store Selection
of Samples for You to Choose from



Hagan Painting
Contractor
Quality Work at Affordable Prices
Commercial & Residential
Pressure Cleaning for Grime & Mildew
FREE ESTIMATES


Yard Sale: Friday and
Saturday, Santa Anna St., St.
Joe Beach. Also '74 Dodge
van,
Yard Sale: Nic Nacs,
books, clothes, misc. kitchen
items, furniture. 8:00 1:00,
Columbus St., 'St. Joe Beach,
Sat., April 20.
Yard Sale: Sat., April 20th.
Lots of children's clothes,
jeans, toys, camper shell.
Good prices. 1911 Cypress
Ave.
Two family garage sale:
Sat., 8:30 2:00 p.m., April
20th. 1 day only. Location:
909 20th St., Port St. Joe.
Big Yard Sale: Sat., April
20, Young's Motel, Mexico
Beach. Stereo with 2 speak-
ers, lots sheets, pillowcases,
adding machine, jeans, new
t-shirts, lots of tools.
Carport Sale: April 19 and
20. Large lady's clothes,
children's 'clothing, bike,
lamp, toys. 9:00 a.m. to 2:00
p.m. Corner Palm Blvd. &
10th St.
Yard Sale: Friday, April
19. All kinds of items. Fur-
niture, clothing, ceramics,
etc. 309 Avenue E, from 8:00
until
Garage Sale: 4 families,
Sat., April 20. Books,
clothing, wooden doors, used
carpet & many other trea-
sures. From 9 a.m. until.
Corner of 28th St. & Hwy. 98,
Mexico Beach.
Yard Sale: Sat., April 20 at
228 6th St. from 8:30 5:00.
Household goods, collec-
tibles, play pen, walker and
other misc. items.
Yard Sale: 1301 McClellan,
8-5, Friday and Sat. Clothes,
shoes, adults & children's,
baby items, curtains, prom
dresses, size 5, 9 and 12. Plus
much more. Call 229-6152 or
229-6014.'
Garage Sale: Sat., April
20, 9 till 3. China, 1977 mini
monotr home, silverware,
much more. North Lake
Estate, Mexico Beach, 15th
St. & Hatley Drive.


WANTED: Old toys from
1950 back; old costume
jewelry, glass beads & gold
& silver. Call 227-1370.
2tc 4/18
Want to Buy: Cash for
mobile home tires and axles.
We remove. Call collect
904/576-8672. 15tp3/21





"BUSINESS MAN"
Open Steel Building
Dealership. High Potential
Profits Available
Part-time or Full Time
In Your Area.
Call WEDGCOR
303-759-3200
ext.2407

TAKE AFLORID
U..'j


1976 Cougar XR-7, low
mileage for this yr. car, a/c,
a/t, p/b, p/s, 351 V-8 engine,
$2,500. Call 229-8997 8:30 to
5:30; after six call 229-6343.


For
Ambulance
Service

Call
227-1115.


68 VW camper, 304 15th St.
Call 227-1770.

1971 Chevy Nova, auto.
trans., 2-dr., big motor, good
cond. $475. 1976 Mercury
Bobcat, 2 dr. std., trans.,
good cond. $475. Call after
5:30 p.m. 648-5433, James E.
Hay.
ltc4/18
1976 Ford 302 F100, wooden
bed, long wheel base,
manual, 1g. tires, great mill
truck. $350 or best offer. Call
229-6604. ltc 4/18


ADVERTISING PAYS
ASK THE MERCHANTS
WHO ADVERTISE WITH US


1975 pickup with camper
shell, auto. trans., body &
engine in good cond. Call
227-1206. tfc4/11


MEETING NOTICE
American Legion Post 116
meets 1st Monday each
month at 7:30 p.m.
American Legion Building
Corner of Williams Ave.
& Third St.
Albert Thames,
Commander
Jarrell Smith, Adj.
tfc 2/14/85


SEVIE


LAWN SERVICE
Mowing, Raking, Trimming
Clay Thomason
227-1866
2tc 4/18
JACK OF ALL TRADES
Home Maintenance Repair,
Automotive Repair & Paint-
ing. Clear up and Hauling.
Home painting, interior &
exterior. Wheel Balancing.
Reasonable Rates. Call
648-8746. tfc 4/18
Yards cut or raked. Trees
cut or trimmed. Call Tommy
Johnson at 2294829 or Randy
Wilder at 229-8128.
4tp4/18
Will babysit in my home.
Monday through Friday.
Preferably one year and up.
229-6055.
JOE ADAMS
CONSTRUCTION
Any Type Building
Commercial Residential
State Lic. No. RG0027009
Located across from Health
Dept.
408 Long Avenue
229-6380
tfc 4/18


Going Fishing?
Stop here first
for a complete
line of

Fishing Tackle
HURLBUT SUPPLY
306 Reid Avenue


FOR YARD SERVICE
Call Tommy Ford
227-1206 tfc 4/4
We buy, sell and trade us-
ed furniture. Get good prices
for your unwanted furniture.
Country Peddler. 229-8966.
Psychological Services for
anyone with problems in
day-to-day living. Gulf Coun-
ty Guidance Clinic, Port St.
Joe. 227-1145 (24 hours).


THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Open 7 Days A Week;
'Mon. Fri., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sat., 8 a.m. 6 p.m.
Sun., 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
tfc 1/6


Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday, 4:00 P.M., E.S.T.
Tuesday, 8:00 P.M., E.S.T.
St. James Episcopal Church
Thursday, 7:00 P.M., C.S.T.
Wewa Medical Center


COSTIN INSURANCE
AGENqY, INC.
All Forms of Insurance
322 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-889.9
tfc 1/6


Wauneta's
Accounting &
Income Tax
Accounting & Income Tax
Service Small Business
Individual
Monthly Accounting
Wauneta Brewer Pat Hohmai
Owner Donna Cannon Assistant
Assistant
228 Reid Ave.
Phone 229-8536


SEWING & ALTERATIONS:*
at Home
1317 Long Ave.
Port St. Joe,
229-8829
4tp3/28:


, ST. JOE CUSTOM
BUILDERS




-Commercial Building
-Residential Building ,
-Cabinet Work'
Gen. Con. RG 0033843

GLEN F. COMBS
227-1689
P. O. BOX 456
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
Stfc'-2


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!


Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151


Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reid Avenue


SPACEVIEW
SATELLITE
SYSTEMS
(FCC Licensed
Technicians)
SALES, SERVICE
& INSTALLATION

-227-1590


,nk 11 was something I ate

md.a ug

kills bugs for
up to six months, GULF

and saves you about $100 yearly SATELLITE
in costly pest control services. SYSTEMS
Use of Sprayer free with
purchase of Rid-A-Bug SALES, SERVICE
HURLBUT SUPPLY CO. & INSTALLATION
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe. Florida 229-8171



The Sewing Room
410 A Reid Avenue OTI
011s"o Port St. Joe, Florida OA
"Quality Fabrics at Affordable Prices"




REEVES FURNITURE &

/ REFINISHING SHOPPE
325 Reid Avenue REFERENCES Phone 229-6374
Call and Talk to Us About Getting
Your Furniture Refinished to Look
Like New. We Buy and Sell Used
Furniture.
Your Western Union Representative


LARRY HAGAN
Phone 648-8729


ri


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