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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02569
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: February 21, 1985
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02569

Full Text










I#- m-


USPS 518-880

FORTY-EIGHTH YEAR, |ltBER 25


THE STAR
Industry-Deep Water Port-tine People-Safest Beaches in Florida


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 *


m


!F Promise Railroad




Crossing Repairs



DOT Chief Says Rough Situation

Will be Smooth In 2-3 Months


Motorists in. the Port St.
Joe area should have to put
up with rough railroad cros-
sings for only a short while
now.
William J. Rish, the City's
attorney, reported to the
Commission Tuesday night
he had received assurance
from Department of Trans-
portation Secretary Allen
Potter, that contracts would
be let within three months for
the repair of crossings in
Port St. Joe. :
Rish said Potter had as-
sured him the, crossings
would be replaced with the
floating rubber installations,
which have been installed in
several. crossings in recent
months, with great success.
"I think our crossing prob-
lems will be corrected in just
a few months", Rish report-
ed. The attorney had been
instructed to contact the DOT
about the condition pf the
local crossings and appeal
for some corrective mea-
sures to be taken.
The DOT has repaired the
crossings within the past
year, but the repairs still
have not solved the problem
of rough crossings.
JOIN CRUSADE
The omissionn approved
the endorsement of a cam-
'-paignlbbing promoted by-the
Florida League :f Cities to
discourage drinking .and
driving intFlorida during the
Month of March. The cam-
paign, aimed at discouraging
drivers from drinking and
driving, rather than aiming.
at punishment for the of-
fense, is to be presented in a
state-wide television cam-
paign and use other media
where television stations are
not located.
The League of Cities, of
which the City of Port St. Joe
is a' member, is running the
campaign as a public service
project.
Driving and drinking is the
leading cause of traffic*
deaths in Florida as well as
in the rest of the nation.
INSURANCE BIDS
The City received three
bids Tuesday night, to fur-
nish City employees with
health insurance. Heavy ex-
penses during the past two
years has driven the City's
group rates up to the point
where the employees say the
family coverage section of
the service is .too expensive
for them to pay for. The bids
were an attempt to get a
reduction in medical insur-
ance.
The City has been unable to
get bids from other compan-
ies or reductions in rates
over the past two to three
years because of its claims
experience.
The three bids will be
studied by a committee of


THE HOME OF Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Taylor is burned to the ground, destroying all the Taylor's belongings
shown engulfed in flames early Friday morning. The home in the process. -Star photo


Three Fires


One Destroys House-Others Turn

Out to be Dry Runs for Volunteers


The Port St. Joe area had three Mrs. Taylor, who drives a school
fires reported during the past week, bus, had already gone to work. Taylor
with only one of the alarms resulting was preparing to take his children to
in a serious blaze. school when he discovered his car
The home of Mr. and Mrs. wouldn't crank. He was walking the
Theodore Taylor burned to the ground children to the bus stop when
Friday morning, completely, destroy-' neighbors came to tell him his house
ing all the family's furnishings ahd' was on fire.
belongings, according to Fire Chief The fife was reported at about
Mark Collier. 7:30 Friday morning
The Taylor'home, located at the i
intersection of Harbor Street and Two other fire alarms had the
Clifford Sims Drive in the Millview firemen on the go, but the fires didn't
Addition, burned from unknown c -- --.do-sa.y-apreciable damage-..-,-
ses, according to Chief Collier. 'Friday evening, at 6:50, the


department was called to the home of
Tommy Webb on Iola Street in Oak
Grove where a motor, on a' major
appliance shorted out, causing smoke
and a burning odor. .
Wednesday afternoon, at about
4:00, smoke was smelled in the
Howard Garland home on Avenue G.
The Garland's couldn't locate a fire,
but called the fire department as a
precaution. An inspection of the louse
failed to turn up any fire, so it was
estimated the smell came from the
cook stove which'" ;as "in i'ie at"'th
time


Carrabelle Man Leads Police onHigh

Speed Chase Thru Residential Area


Port St. Joe Police were
involved in a high-speed
chase Saturday morning,
which resulted in a Carra-.
belle man being arrested for
reckless' driving.
According to interim Po-
lice Chief Bob Maige, Chris-
topher Parmale, a sailor
home on leave, was arrested


and charged after he was
stopped at a road block on the
south end of Garrison Ave-
nue.
Chief Maige said officer
Gregg Cole attempted to stop
Parmale on Highway. 98,-
when he entered, the city
speeding, but when Cole
turned on his siren and' red


light to stop him, Parmale
speeded up and tried to evade
the police car.
The chase proceeded down
Long Avenue to 10th Street
and down, McClellan to 16th
Street, and then to Garrison
Avenue. Maige said that the
chase involved speeds


through city residential
streets of from 50 to 55 miles
per hour.
"A road block of Sergeant
James Graves and several
Sheriff's Deputies finally
stopped Parmale at Garrison
Avenue and 16th Street",
Maige said.


. ,


City officials and employees
to determine which package
provides the best coverage
for the least cost before a
final decision is made.
FRANCHISES
With the May elections


coming up and three utility
franchises to be voted on at
the same time, Commission-
er J. B. Roberts suggested
Tuesday night a small
change should be'considered
in the franchise agreements


for St. Joseph Telephone and,
Telegraph Company and St.
Joe Natural Gas Company,
Roberts suggested the
franchises.be worded so as to
allow the application of fran-
((:onhini d on Page :13)


r IOVI


record enrolling potential voters in its
voter rolls. Gulf had 99.93 percent of its
potential electors on its rolls.-Star photo


Gulf Tops


County Has Largest Number of

Potential Electors Registered to Vote


Gulf County received state-wide
recognition last week and a plaque to.
recognize its achievement in registering
voters, according to Supervisor of
Elections, Cora Sue Robinson.
Robinson received the award at a
State Supervisor of Elections workshop
directed by the Department of State.
The plaque commemorated Gulf
County's voter registration as being the
highest percentage in the State of
Florida. Robinson said Gulf County has
an estimated 7,561 people of voting age in
the county. "We have 7,555 of them on the
voting rolls, for a percentage of 99.93",
she said. "This is the highest percentage
of registered voters, compared to
potential voters registered anywhere I
know of", Robinson said.
The county also received recognition
for its voter turn-out in the 1984 fall
elections, in which 73 percent of the
registered voters cast their ballots.


Robinson said the leader in the state in
small county voter turn-out was Brad-
ford county with 81.83 percent. "How-
ever, they have only 53 percent of their
potential voters registered, so, in people
sent to the polls, we did much better",
she said.
Robinson conducted several voting
registration drives prior to the elections
last year, taking the books to several
locations in the county and waging an
intensive campaign to have people sign
up.
In addition, the Supervisor took the
books into the schools in the county,
enrolling those qualified to register and
acquainting the students nearing voting
age with their responsibilities.
The medium, size county with the'
largest percentage of voters registered
was Sarasota with 85 percent. Charlotte
County led the larger counties with 88
percent.


A switch engine is shown above shuffling rail cars Port St. de every other day for a while. The traffic is
around at the Material Transfer plant early this week, keeping the 100 mile track of the Apalachicola Northern
making up portions of the two trains of coal being sent out of Railroad busy. -Star photo


Railroad Keeping Line Busy With


Three. Trains Dispatched Daily


The Apalachicola Northern Rail-
road will have a track full of trains
every other day for the next two to
three weeks, according to Pat Patter-
son, Traffic director for the 100 mile
short line railroad.
Patterson said the line would be
sending out three trains per day on the
run to Chattahoochee. "We'll be
running the extra schedule every
other day for the next two or three
weeks until we get caught up with coal
deliveries to Seminole Electric's
power generating plant in Palatka".


Patterson said a combination of
Material Transfer having more coal
on their stockpile than they wanted to
have and Seminole not having as
much in stock as they wanted,
prompted the extra runs of the train.
Patterson said, "We have 22
people in our transportation depart-
ment, and we have 20 of them on the
road right now. Everybody is working
until we' get through this period, in
order to keep the trains rolling."
Patterson said all three trains are
leaving in the afternoon, with depar-
tures at 2:00, 6:30 and 8:00 p.m.


Patterson said this is the first
time the Apalachicola Northern has
ever sent out three trains in one day.
"It's an unusual operation for us.
We're having to borrow locomotives
from the Seaboard line to get the
power we need to run this many trains
at once", he said.
The railroad is sending out two
100-car trains of coal and one general
freight train during the heavy traffic
days. On alternate days, a coal train
and a general freight train are
dispatched.


County Schools Not Expecting


Great Fund Increase from State


Superintendent of Schools
Walter Wilder says the Gulf
County School system isn't
doing any celebrating over
the. projected increase in
income from the Governor's
proposed budget for fiscal
1985-86. As a matter of fact.
county school officials doubt
the increase which has been
proposed for Gulf will even
pay for price increases
brought about by inflation.
According to Wilder, Gulf
County is scheduled to re-
ceive one of the smallest
increases in the state. "From
the figures we have been told
to expect under the new
program (if it is approved)
as opposed to our present


income from the same sour-
ces, Gulf county will receive
only a 5.14 percent increase
in state funds. This won't
even take care of the pay
increases and benefits we
have provided for our per-
sonnel in the last couple of
years." Wilder said.
The Superintendent said
figures available to the
School Board indicated that
Gulf would receive the 5.64
percent increase; Bay would
get 7.75; Jackson, 8.73 and
Washington, 11.73.
Figures released from the
Governor's office also indi-
cated Gulf would receive
$124,881 for maintenance and
repair of public schools in


fiscal 1985-86. Wilder said the
local district is ,presently
scheduled to receive $80,000
in this fund. "However, to
date. we haven't received
anything. The state is taking
a second look at the fund and
has reduced Gulf County's
share to $60,000.
The system is also sche-
duled to receive $34,767 for
public school science facility
improvements. This year,
the system is scheduled to
receive $12,000 for this pur-
pose.
Wilder pointed out these
funds may be used for only
the one purpose they are
ear-marked for.
Gulf schools are scheduled


to receive $5,982,393 under
the new proposed formula in.
1985-86. Wilder said this is
$319,484 more than they are
receiving for the present
year-or an increase of 5.64
percent.
"Even this figure is mis-
represented", Wilder said.,
"We actually receive only
94.49 cents out of every state
dollar which is allocated for
us. The cost of living formula
used by the state penalizes us
by this amount", the Super-
intendent said.
"We're not making any
plans for this money, yet",
Wilder said. "We'll believe
we're going to get it when we
see it."


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1985


Supervisor of Elections, Cora Sue
Robinson, shows off a plaque presented
to Gulf County last week for setting a










TIP V tP A AP


Editorials and Comments THURSDAY, FEB. 21, 1985


PAGE TWO


The statement by Robert Ned-
ley at last Tuesday's meeting of the
County Commission should have
been enough to satisfy the mind of
the most flagrant of environmen-
talist as to any inherent dangers to
St. Joseph Bay from current plans
to dredge the entrance channel to
the bay.
Nedley said, "You can be sure
-DER or DNR would not have issued
permits to the Corps of Engineers if
there was any kind of danger to the
Bay from the planned operation.
St. Joseph Bay is important to
all of us here in Gulf County and we
resent any person or persons
thinking anyone who lives here
would intentionally damage it. So
far as we know, there is nobody
who has that opinion, but let us go
on record now as saying everyone
we have ever talked to was in no
way interested in damaging the
bay and its seafood incubator.
We have also never seen
anybody advocating any actions of


.-: T I C/L/ VL /W4.V..,,C.

You can tell this year isn't an
election year here in the state of
Florida. You can tell it isn't
because the, headlines last Friday
on the daily newspapers told .of
additional taxes expected to be
introduced on an already loaded
taxpayer this coming year.
Most of the 'taxes were pre-
.sented so as to appear that they
were almost inconsequential and
we, individually, wouldn't have to
pay them.
In other words, they were the
best kind of new taxes. They were
the kind someone else pays.
Bull!
To make the extra tax package


a change nature for the bay in
which the proponents didn't have a
pretty fair idea of what affect their
project would have on the bay.
What we're trying to say is that
nobody is advocating dredging or
the particular spoil site to be used
totally ignorant of any adverse
effect it may have on the bay.
As Nedley said, however, if
there was any slight chance of
danger to the bay the Department
of Environmental Regulation nor
the Department of Natural Re-
sources would have issued a permit
for the dredging nor the spoil site.
Nedley also pointed out that
both branches of state government
were looking out for different
interests in the Bay and in so doing,
covered almost every aspect of
potential damage which might be
present.
We can be assured the permits
were not given without considera-
tion given to what the negative
results-if any-might be.


"Main Street" Sounds Good


The idea of embarking on a
"Main Street" program for down-
town Port St. Joe receives our
..wholehearted approval.
A Main street Street program
-night just be the spark we need
ibere in Port St. Joe to make our
Shopping area more attractive to
.oPur local people. Since the program
.js designed to put a spark in the
I.tocal merchants and kindle their
desire to have a hustling, bustling
7town our residents can be suppor-
Iive of, at least we'll have a nucleus
lof a start in creating an interest
city-wide.
Main Street isn't another pro-
gram made to work just because
.enough Federal dollars can be put
into the idea to make it work.


The program is locally financed
and locally operated. The only
thing which comes from govern-
ment is the idea and the directions
of how to make it work. The work
and money comes from the same
main street the program seeks to
revitalize.
Walt Marder gave the Cham-
ber of Commerce a list of four
ingredients necessary to make the
concept work and it appears the
main ingredient is the enthusiasm
and promotion by the people on
main street, themselves.
We have the start of a fine
main street here in Port St. Joe.
We're anxious to see the
suggestion get a chance to succeed
here in Port St. Joe:


JL. I W a/.v JL v%- / % *A

go down a little easier, the state
released a list of the services
around our schools the new taxes
would pay for. That's supposed to
make you welcome the new taxes
with open arms.
The list of expenditures for
Gulf County was shown and it was
presented in such a way to make
you think it was all new money the
county was getting.
Don't you believe it!
Most of the money is already,
coming our way from other
sources.
Don't be misled: every time a
tax is raised, it affects each and
every one of us.


Kesley Colbert's Country Column



Grass Abuse .. ..


I've read and heard a lot
about child abuse in the past
few weeks and I'm about as
guilty of child abuse as
anyone around. I don't spend
enough time with my
children or worse than that,
on occasion, I've been known
to ignore them completely.
Now there's a form of child
abuse you don't hear so
much about. But what I'm
a'saying here is you can
relax 'cause this is not going
to be another discussion on
child abuse as I don't feel
qualified to write on the sub-
ject. I know as a child I cer-
tainly was never abused and
it is most difficult for me to
understand some of the
stories I read concerning
this hedious crime today.
All the news regarding
abuse of children has had an
effect on my family though. I
whipped my son the other
day and he came out of the
bedroom and asked his
mother for the toll-free child
abuse hotline number. He
said I had just given him the
hardest whipping ever hand-
ed out by a father. Shucks, I
just kind'a gave him a little
reminder of who was direc-
ting traffic around our
house. As whippings go, it
really wasn't much. Now
I've already informed you
that I don't know much about
child abuse but I'm
somewhat of, an expert when
it comes to discussing real
whippings 'cause I had the
privilege of being present
when one of the finest whipp-
ings of all time was handed
out.
My older brother was
about 14 the summer he had
the trouble .with the grass.
Now, I have never thought of
Leon as being lazy and you
put him on something that he
wants to do and he'll work as
hard as anyone. I've seen
him work from morning till
dark lots of times, and never
complain. You know I think.
back dn it now ad1 I really
can't remember anything
that he wouldn't do or refus-
ed to try, except when it
came to the. grass. He
wouldn't mow the yard.
Now, you probably don't
remember those old push
mowers that had those reels
to cut the grass. The
"motor" was whoever was
a'pushing it. I was about 8 or
9 that summer and my other
brother was a year younger.
We couldn't push it and the
.chore of cutting the grass fell
to Leon. If you were a bas-
ketball fan you might say
that my Dad tossed Leon the
b a ll and he dropped it.
Although I've got to give
Leon credit, he tried. He
would tie a rope around the
bar that ran across the front
of that old mower and then
loop the other end around
David's shoulders. He plac-


ed me behind the mower and
then he'd stand off to the side
and start yelling for David to
pull and me to push. This
didn't work out too well as
we still couldn't get "it" go-
ing up hill and when we got
going down hill David
couldn't run fast enough with
all that rope tied around him
to stay out of the way. We'
must have run that mower
over David five or six times
before we finally gave that
idea up.
My dad worked 'hard all
day and he didn't get home
until about dark. For about a


week or so he'd remind Leon
that he needed to cut the
grass. Then he finally did
more than remind him, he
looked him right in the eye
and told him to cut it tomor-
row. I knew right then Leon
was in a heap of trouble ...
I tell you what, my older
brother was resourceful-
next day he got Nicky Joe to
bring his horse over and they
hooked that mower up to ole
Prince. But that didn't work
out either. The horse was too
tall or something 'cause the
mower kind'a bounced
across the yard. It spent


more time up in the air than
it did on the gorund and of
course if the wheels weren't
rolling then the reels weren't
turning. Leon tried every-
thing he could think of to get
that yard mowed; every-
thing, that is, except actual-
ly getting behind the mower
and cutting the grass. I
guess that idea never occur-
red. to him.
Dad got home about 6:00
p.m. At about 6:01 he spied-
that the grass wasn't cut. At
6:024 he marched Leon into
the bathroom and as Jerry
Clower would say he whip-


Kesley
ped him "for a while". I
mean for what seemed like
about 30 minutes Dad laid it
to Leon. I stood frozen right
outside the door 'cause I had
never been around anything
like this. My' Dad had whip-
ped me before, several
times, but I knew this was a
whipping I would tell my
grandchildren about.
(Continued on Page 3)


You Have to Handle These Temperamental Columnists with Kid Gloves


I HAVE MORE problems with my
columnists than I have with all my
money.
You take columnist Kesley Col-
bert, the country boy from Tennessee
who we're trying to tame and civilize
here in the big city. Although Kesley
has lived here in town, with indoor
plumbing and electric lights for
nearly 15 years now, he still thinks
he's dressed up for polite society when
he carries his pouch of Levi Garrett in
his iftside coat pocket rather than in
his jeans back pocket.
I mean, he's still liberally imbued
with more than a modicum of what is
generally known as the country
influence.
And, he's proud of it.
IT MUST BE BRED into column-
ists or something. All of them seem to
think they are over-worked and
under-paid even our backwoods
bard with the country habits.
Just last week, Kesley was sort of
hinting around that he wasn't paid
enough for his efforts and avowed as if


he would "turn in his typewriter" and
take a sort of sabbatical from writing
for awhile.
I didn't even think Kes knew
anything about a typewriter. I guess it


stroked a typewriter key in all the
year he has been writing his column.
Like most everyone else who
turns in copy to The Star, we get it
written with a hard lead pencil on a


ETAOIN SHRDLU

By: W


was his college education up there at
Suwannee which introduced him to a
typewriter and acqainted him with
what it'was for.
But that doesn't mean he had to
start using it.
That was why I was so surprised
when he threatened to "turn in his
typewriter" and rest a while.
Just for the record, Kes has never


dictate their column to a typesetter
and by-pass the middle man.
I tell you, Kes, you work for a
top-notch outfit here at The Star, and
you should recognize that. The


esley R. Ramsey


grocery sack. Kesley turns in his copy
sometimes on the back of an old
scoresheet. One time, he just came in,
propped himself up on a stool and
dictated the whole thing to Shirley at
the typesetter.
Here Kes is trying to find out if he
is indeed paid enough, when I doubt
there is a columnist in the country-
even in the "Grit"-who gets to


association should be' worth some-
thing.
All this talk about "turning in
your typewriter" just doesn't hold
water.
Using Kes's word, "Shucks", I
didn't even know you had a typewri-
ter.
Last month, when your pencil
wore out and you were having to hold


it with a. pair of tweezers while you
wrote, who gave you a new pencil?
Huh?
I declare, sometimes folks just
sort of get unappreciative of what you
try to do for them.
We provide a spit can with
genuine Fuller's earth in the bottom
back bty the leaning counter, where
Kes can lean, talk to Willie, chew his
Levi Garret and spit in the community
cuspidor which consists of a cut-off
plastic chemical jug, it's true; but
that genuine Fuller's earth in the
bottom makes it something special.
No filling up the spit jug with plain old
common dirt down at The Star.
+ + ++ + +
OF COURSE, KES has changed
his mind. He sort of admitted the
other day he was only kidding when he
said he was going to retire. That was
the farmer in him. The crops are
gathered and it's too soon to begin
planning on planting another, so he
naturally thinks of retiring.
Once the weather warms up, old


Kes will begin getting all frisky again
and things will get back to normal
once more.
Besides that, he hasn't enough
seniority here at The Star to quit, stop,
retire or anything else.
I have been here for 33 years now,
and if anybody quits, retires, or
"turns in his typewriter" I get first
chance at it. You'll just have to wait
your turn now, Kes. You have been
here long enough to be in the line of
progression, so you'll just have to be
patient.
Then, too, there's the fact that I,
like Kes, don't even have a typewriter
to retire. I have to rough it and do
what writing I do right straight into
the typesetter.
I don't even have someone around
to give me a bright new, nickle pencil
or a tablet to write on.
So you see, Kes, with your salary
doubled five times during the time
you've been affiliated with us here at
The Star, you're doing a whale of a lot
better than I am.


^-----------I-------

STHE STTAR E POSTOFFICEBOX308
SIN, T H E | PHONE 227-1278 SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
SPR ST OE, FLORTA 32456 IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR S1000 SIX MONTHS. IN COUNTY $8 00
PORTST. JOE,FLORIDA32456 TOFCOUNTY-ONE YEAR S15.00 SIX MONTHS OUT OF COUNTY. $1000
Published Every Thursday at 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida OUT O US -ONE YEAR $16 00
By The Star Publishing CompanyOUT S -ONE YEAR $1600
J Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold
Wesley R. Ramsey ..........Editor and Publisher SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID themslehes liable for damage further than amount received for such advertisement.
William H Ramsey .* Production Supt. AT PORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA --- -- -
WS P William H. Ramsey Production Supt. The spoken word is given scant attention: the printed word Is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word
Frenchle L. Ramsey .............. Office Manager barely asserts: the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.
Shirley K. Ramsey ................... Typesetter


Tides
The tide action in St.
Joseph's Bay is shown in the
tide table below. High and
low tides for each day of the
upcoming week are listed in
their respective columns.


High Low
Feb.21 11:21p.m. 8:36a.m.
Feb. 22 8:09 a.m.
Feb. 23 12:27 a.m. 6:36a.m.
12:08p.m. 7:23 p.m.
Feb. 24 12:18 p.m. 10:07 p.m.
Feb. 25 12:57 p.m. 11:43p.m. :
Feb. 26 1:41p.m.
Feb. 27 2:33 p.m. 12:45 a.m.
Feb. 28 3:33p.m. 1:44a.m.


No Danger


l:oiu, Tn'roz Thiq Yoar2r




4


~~: -:I::,:::::. .-


THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, FEB. 21, 1985


PAGE THREE


Kesley
(Continued from Page 2)
And boy howdy, did I learn
a lesson that day. Years
late, I returned home from.
college and found the yard
just a tad high. Mother said,
Dad was to be home about 5
o'clock. I couldn't get the
"new" lawnmower cranked.
Oh no! When my Dad'turned
into our drive he .6und his
20-year-old son down on his
hands and knees out in the
backyard pulling that grass
off with his hands. I wasn't'
taking no chances!!
Now if you're thinking
child abuse-you're nuts. My
Dad was a'raising his
children the best way he
knew how. And years later,
when my Dad was dying
with cancer, if you'd have
seen the loving way that
Leon cared for him you'd
realize that Dad's way work-
ed pretty well. The last week
of my Dad's life as I watched
them talking together I
wondered if either of them
remembered "the big whipp-
ing". Somehow I knew they
both did.
We finally got the yard
mowed back in that summer
of '56. And I guess you could
say it was about time as we
found 2 baseball bats, a
basketball and a bicycle that
had been lost since April.
Respectfully,
Kesley


City
(Continued from Page 1)
chise taxes in the future.
"We're being asked to give 30
year franchises and we don't
know what will happen in 30
years. We might need this
source of income before 30
years are up", Roberts said.
Florida Power Corpora-
tion, the third franchise to be
considered in May, currently
pays the City four percent of
its income for franchise
taxes.
The franchise, tax is paid
by the customer using the
service, so the extra charge
will not be made on the phone
and gas company franchises.
They will merely be provided
for in the agreement in case
such taxes are needed at
some time in the future.
: OTHER BUSINESS "
In other business matters,
the Commission:


5.






;lt~
1,,

'i ~

I.


Values
Property Appraiser Kesley
Colbert told the Kiwanis Club
Tuesday that Gulf County
needed a reappraisal of most
property to bring it into some
sort of standardization so far
as taxable valuations are
concerned.
"'We have had such phe-
nomenal growth at the beach
with constantly changing
valuations which have need-


s Causing
ed almost constant attention in the county th
to keep assessed vaulations owners improve
up with rapidly changing sale perty and the
values. As a consequence property values
some of the other work of flation. "It's hai
maintaining a current valua- a person who pa
tion in other parts of the his 900 square
county have fallen behind." 1958 that is now
Colbert said the biggest $35,000 after he
problem his office is having several rooms,
to contend with is the in- the outside to
creasing, vaules to property modern tastes o


VFW Will Honor Students at Di


John C. Gainous Post No.
10069 V.F.W. and Ladies
Auxiliary will honor the
Voice of Democracy winners
with a dinner this Friday,


February 22 in the Post
Home, 115 5th ave., at 7:00
P.M.
Mrs. Margaret Biggs is the
coordinator of the V.O.D. in


Thames Says Legion Dues Paid
Albert Thames, Comman- 1985 dues from state and
der of the Willis V. Rowan national sources.
Post 116, American Legion, Thames said the dues have
said this week that local already been paid to state
Legionnaires should ignore and the notices were sent out
notices asking for payment of in error.


Port St. Joe
Twenty-five stu
the contest v
Minger placing
give her speech
will be Angel
DeAnn Young
Teresa Cozart
Mention. Annett
fourth in Distri
The event is
public with a $
for the dinner.


for Gulf County's new
rrently under construc-
lustrial Road. The photo
pactor machinery being
When the compactor is


Problem
rough home- Colbert said the recently
ng their pro- instituted $25,000 homestead
increase in exemption has caused some
s through in- of the problems, but after
'd to convince values are evened out, the
aid $6,000 for homestead exemption should
foot house in be no appreciable problem
v worth some with Gulf County or any other
e has added county.
and upgraded Colbert said the higher
reflect the homestead exemption was
of today". created to solve two prob-
lems. It gave relief to people
i who were just getting by on a
inner fixed income and it forced
counties to get on the "just
High School. value" standard of valuation
dents entered to have any tax income from
vith Annette homeowners. "There was no
first. She will continuity of value among
. Also present Florida counties prior to the
Barbee, 2nd; new exemption rate."
, 3rd; and Colbert said one of his
t, Honorary main aims in office over the
te also placed next few months is to bring
ct 17. real property in Gulf County
open to the into -an equitable situation.
3.00 donation "It's going to take time",
the Appraiser said.


Welcomes New Pastor


Ernie Hendricks, a Steward at the
Presbyterian Church, is shown welcoming
Nelle Mulligan to the church as its pastor in a
reception Sunday afternoon. Mulligan is


taking over a pastorate left vacant by the
* death of John Stuart last year. Mulligan
comes to Port St. Joe from South Carolina.
-Star photo


School to Present Play


The fourth and fifth grade
classes of Faith Christian
School will present a musical
play entitled "Amazing
Grace" Tuesday, February
26. The musical will be
presented in Faith Bible
Church at 7:00 P.M.
The musical play will .be

-Agreed to investigate
purchasing a pick-up truck
through the state contract
purchase plan.
-Accepted a bid of $9,976
from Thompson Equipment
Company of Pensacola to
furnish a magnetic flow
meter and accessories for the
water treatment plant.
-Authorized Clerk Alden
Farris to attend a seminar
concerning update of com-
prehensive plans for cities to
be, held at Chipola Junior
College in Marianna. Port St.
Joe must up-date its compre-
hensive plan by 1986.


directed by Mrs. Michelle
Teat, a teacher at Faith
Christian. Tuesday night will
be a Parent-Teacher Fellow-
ship time as well. All parents
are encouraged to attend.
The seventh. grade -class


will also have science pro-
jects on display. The science
fair is under the direction of
Walter Scott. The general
public is invited to attend
both the musical and the
science exhibits.


OBITUARI ES:

James Alfred Mapes


James Alfred Mapes, 71, of
Oak Grove, passed away last
Friday evening after a long
illness. He was formerly
from Alma, Michigan, and
had lived in Port St. Joe since
1960. He was a retired'!
professional musician, a me-
chanical and consulting engi-.
neer, and was retired from
Basic Magnesia. He was also
-the6 .first ,.mayor ,.of. Mexico
Beach.
He is survived by: his wife,


SYLVANIA

For Better Viewing and Listening


M
YL~VANIAi
CStI op T


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* 25" diagonal Dark-Lite 100 black
matrix picture tube
* Electronic tuning
* GT-Matic color system
* 4" x 6" oval speaker
* New Traditional styling
* Grained Pecan finish on wood
products and non-wood materials.


* E-1000 chassis
* 19" diagonal Dark-Lite black matrix
picture tube
* Electronic tuning
* 3" x 5" oval speaker
* Telescoping dipole VHF, bowtle UHF
antennas
* Optional stands available (sold
unassembled)
* Cabinet of Walnut grain on high-
Impact plastic


* E-2000 Chassis
* Dark-Lite 100 Black Matrix Picture
Tube with Conical Field Focus
* Random Access Digital Tuning with
bl-directional scan
* 125 channel capability
* Infrared remote control with Quick
View and Mute
* StereolSAP adaptable
* Two 4" x 6" oval speakers
* Mediterranean styling


VCR
* 14 day/levent programmer
* 12 position electronic tuner
* 107 channel capability (cable-ready)
* Daily event feature
* One touch record-hours
* Electronic function, fluorescent display
panel
* Search forward/reverse
* Still, frame advance, slow motion (SLP)
* 5-function wired remote
* Auto-TVIVCR switching
* Camera remote pause jack
3 speeds, 8 hours (T-160 tape)

Full Service On Everything
We Sell


ROCHE'S Furniture & Appliances

FRIGIDAIRE SYLVANIA


212 Reid Avenue


Phone 227-1730


Martha Mapes of Oak Grove;
four daughters, Diane Spivey
of Mt. Pleasant, S. C.,
Crystal Hughey of Panama
City, Carol Carr of- Mexico
Beach, and Jodi Mapes of
Oak Grove. He is also
survived by one brother, five
sisters five randchildrpn


and five great grandchildren. Machinery arrived last week
solid .waste compactor station, cu
funeral services were held tipn ju east of Basic, Inc., on Ind
Sunday at 2:00 P.M. from the above, shows a portion of the coml
chapel of Gilmore Funeral installed by workmen at the site.
Home with Reverend R.
Larry Wells officiating. Cre- tries of Tulsa, Oklahoma or
mation was scheduled after- to the American Cancer
ward. The family suggests Society.
that memorials can be made All arrangemIents were by
to the Oral Roberts Minis- Gilmore Funeral Home.


Beatrice Coachman


Beatrice Coachman, 67,
died Sunday, February 10 at
Gulf Pines Hospital. She had
been a resident of Port St.
Joe since 1939.
She is survived by: her
mother, Mrs. Mary McKin-
nie of Chipley; two sisters,
Mrs. Claudia Harmon of
Chipley, and Mrs. Hallie B.
McFadden of Lakeland; nine
children, Mrs. Bessie Mc-.,
Nair and Willie C. Coachman
both of Los Angeles, Cal.,
Mrs. Edna L. Russ, Rev.
John L. Coachman, Mrs.
Annie Reeves and Mrs. Bea-

Rev. Lessie
The Rev. Lessie Myrl
Knee, 51, an ordained minis-
ter of the Living Word of
Faith, died suddenly Satur-
day in a Panama City
hospital. She was a long time,
resident of Wewahitchka,
and was pastor of Harvest
Time Assembly.
Survivors include: her hus-
band, Billy Knee of Wewahit-
chka; one soft, Robert Eu-
gene Knee of Wewahitchka;
one daughter, Janet K.
Campbell of Overstreet; her
mother, Winnie Mae Ross of
Donaldsonville, Ga.; one bro-
ther, Harvey Ross; one sis-
ter, Hazel Foran, both of
Marianna; and seven grand-
children.
Funeral services were held
at 2:00 P.M. CST Monday at
the Apostolic Pentecostal

Last Rites for
Lee Haliburton
aee Haliburton, 69, passed
away Monday, February 11
in a Panama City hospital.
He is survived by one
brother and two sisters.
Funeral services were held
Saturday, February 16 at the
Comforter .Funeral Home
Northside Chapel. Interment
followed in Forest Hill Ceme-
tery.
All arrangements were un-
der the direction of Comfort-
er Funeral Home.


trice Bell, all of Daytona
Beach, Ervin Coachman of
Ft. Walton Beach, Mrs. Mary
Demmings of Charleston, S.
C., and Master Sergean'
Henry L. Coachman of
Frankfort, Germany.
Funeral services were held
Saturday, February 16 at the
Zion Fair Baptist Church.
The Eulogy was delivered by
her son, Rev. John L. Coach-
man. Interment followed in
Forest Hill Cemetery.
All arrangements were un-
der the direction of Comfort-
er Funeral Home.

Myrl Knee
Church of Wewahitchka with
the Rev. Doris Corbin and
Rev. Sherry Clark officiating.
Interment followed in Jehu
Cemetery.
All arrangements were un-
der the direction of Comfort-
er Funeral Home, Wewahit-
chka Branch Chapel.

GOOD
41REASONS
to see your good
neighbor agent








CAR HOME
LIFE HEALTH

BILL WOOD
411 Reid Ave.
229-6514 or 229-6103
Like a good neighbor.
State Farm is there.



STATE FARM
INSURANCE COMPANIES
Ho.0 Of"..c: B10oo-I0glo. lW.ol.


ready, probably within two to three months, all solid waste
from the south end of Gulf County will be taken to the plant
for compacting and transfer to a landfill site in the north
end of the county. The project is a joint venture between the
City of Port St. Joe and Gulf County. -Star photo


Machinery Being Installed at Site


Cuddle Your Car

With Parts from Renfro Auto Parts








Lifetime Guarantee Munroe-Matic

SHOCK 12.95
ABSORBERS .


STHEBUMP STOPSHERE. I
-MONROE V"



VALVOLINE

MOTOR OIL

No. 159 9 Al oU
30W 99 LVLi
No. 141 No. 117 OTOR
10W40 1.15 10W40 1.20
H M.9065-1 495
TOOLS BAERY BOXES............ 95
IOULS By Mirax Assy. 21209
Mercury OUTBOARD GAS HOSE $15.95
-Assy. No.'21207
Johnson-Evinnrde GAS HOSE... $8.95
No. 0211
S6 Cal. MARINE GAS CAN .... $20.62
Black & Decker No. 6558
Impact Wrench.... $44.95
Black & Decker No. 6523 JACK CLOSEOUT
Impact Ratchet ... $44.95 2-Ton Hydraulic Jack 621 $l0s
Easco No. 91525 4-T0n-623 Hydraulic Jack 1
Tool Socket Set ... 21.95 6-Ton-625 Hydraulic Jack *20"
Deluxe 6"-Ton-6253HydrauliclJack 12676
PAINT GUN ....... $54.95 20-Ton -636 Hydraulic Jack 67"



RENFRO AUTO PARTS
Phone 229-6013 401 William Ave.


I











I
/'


~-I


-BASEBALL FEVER!
Get Ready for It at Western Auto
*. *


Little League White
Baseball Cleats
Boy's sizes 13, 1,2 thru 9 $ .
1 Pr. FREE Wrist Sweat Bands with Ea. Pr. Shoes.
*' *
27", 28", 29", 30"
Little League Aluminum Bats ... $10.88
IBASEBALL GLOVES (FWelectkonl. .. 58i9 Up
YOUiH bATTING GLOVES .............. 4.88

WESTERN AUTO
219 Reid Ave. Phone 227-1105


Thurs., Fri. Sat.,


-__-w -w~


Ph. 229-6374 REEVES


325 Reid Avenue


e Sand Refini, .
^v Shoppe "


SAVE LIKE NEVER BEFORE
on ANTIQUES and, COLLECTIBLES


We Are Sacrificing Profit to Clear Our Our Inventory In
MOST OF OUR FURNITURE
MARKED DOWN ............
* *


Order to Restock

50%


ALL ARTS, CRAFTS &
COLLECTIBLES MARKED DOWN .... 10 0O0
No Layaways On Sale Items All Sales Are Final
Also at Our Refinishing Shoppe the next 2 weeks we are 0
offering these STRIPPING ONLY Specials
SPECIALS


Regular Dining Room
CHAIRS......... 500
6-Drawer,
DRESSER ...... *4500


Dining Room
TABLESI..........3500
4-Drawer
CHEST......... $3000


DOUBLE BED .. 3000 SINGLE BED ... *200
These prices are for stripping only Painted and polyurethane finish is priced higher.
Ask about our prices on a complete refinishing job.
Prices Good February 21st through March 6 Only


YOUR AREA WESTERN


UNION REPRESENTATIVE 229-6374


w -w~- w--w- -r-w-r ~--~- -r-~-


"The Re


y ,FHA Approvec
COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL
CARPET ,nsalled 6 Yd. CAR -


4 Piece
BEDROOM SUITE
by New Orleans

$39995
5 Piece
DINETTEIE
by Davis
129995


Full Size
SLEEPER SOFA
Was *499.95

$39995


Birthday SALE





:


SBroyhill


( SPE
-1 :R
SCIO

Sole d 7
p-ric


SPECIAL
1 Table Co

550%

NEW SPRING ITEMS
Special Summer Hoster
Spring and Summ
New Fashions Ar
CALL ONE OF OUR HAIR
and Make An Appointment foi
A New Easy Hair Care Style


$699


CHEST .....
NITE STAND


$319
$129


China,
Table,
74 Side
Chairs


It's George


1.799


ARM CHAIR .....
SIDE CHAIR.....


but You
When Yc


S129
$119


Get


t


u See-


from Shopping St


*BFg~~ *~9 4 *t~ i$~s


CHESAPEAKE .4
from BROYHILL Dine In 18th Century Luxury
from BROYHILL and Comfort


Dresser,
Bed and
Mirror


kL--


~T~-


,A


r


















WA V


I' Birthday



No
Wax
Vinyl
Installed
$499n
SYd.
shion


(2)
;OFAS & CHAIRS
by Schweiger


69995


AL
"K
S -
ting

off



etics


I VISA
Master
Charge


DW IN STOCK
* Swim Suits -
Sweaters.
'ing Daily
RE SPECIALISTS

229-8153



rthday ..

9 Surprise

)ur Savings

Joe's Finest


50-60%oF

On All Fall and Winter Clothes
Sunny South, Jantzen, Health Tex,
Campus, Haggar, Etc.


3 OFF
Men's
Weather Hats and Caps
Men's Shoes


JOIN YOUR PORT ST. JOE MERCHANTS IN
CELEBRATING THE OLD FASHIONED WAY


Handy
By Micronta


Multitester


Cut
38%
2488 I
Reg. 39.95 43 Ranges
For electrical, electronic testing
and repair. Measures voltage,
current, resistance, dB. #22-204
Batteries extra ,


3-Way Car Speakers
By Realistic
Half,
Price


Reg. T
99.95
Has 6 x 9" woofer, 3" midrange,
13/4" tweeter. 120 watts capacity.
FFIiush mount. #42-1857T


AM/FM Stereo Receiver
STA-860 by Realistic

1 1n 0 0 0) 0 ) ['rrrrr.6'
65 WATTS PER CHANNEL, MINIMUM RMS INTO 8 OHMS
FROM 20-20,000 Hz, WITH NO MORE THAN 0.03% THD
'Save 19995 Reg.
$160 IV9 9359.95
Features Stereo Expander circuit for a
dramatically widened sound "image" ordi-
nary receivers can't match. #31-2097


Car Cassette Player
By Realistic


Save 695
30 6 Reg. 99.95
Features Dolby* B NR to reduce
hiss; improve dynamic range. 24
watts total output. #12-1982
*TM Dolby Laboratories Licensing Corp.


L FISHER VCR


FVH-720
VHS Video Cassette Recorder
KEY FEATURES
* FRONT-LOAD DESIGN
* WIRELESS 8-FUNCTION
REMOTE CONTROL
* 105 CHANNEL CABLE READY
Holiday
Sale Priced
Reg. s49995
S^$39995


I *. `


VHS VIDEO CASSETTE RECORDER
* 3-tape speeds with up to 8 hours record/playback (T-160 Cassette)
* Power-driven front-loading mechanism with tape-in indicator
* 105-channel cable-ready tuner
* 12 presettable channel selectors
* 9-day/i-event programmable timer with every day function
* 6 special-effect playback modes including cue, review and still (EP Mode Onlyl)
* 8-function infrared wireless remote control
* 4 digit AM/PM clock
* Dew Protection System


George's Ax Is Sh
Each a
80 PAIR
LADIES' SLACKS
Ladies' and Children's
DRESSES and SKIRTS
52% to 72% off
Ladies' Warm R
-T Children's
S752%
ALL SALES FINAL ...

300 pi
Men's,
and CI

72'

BE SURE ...
to check the
new Spring and
Summer Shoes,
Dresses and
Sportswear
arriving daily.
222 Reid J


harp and the Savings Will Thrill
nd Every Shopper!!


Ladies' and Children's
Coats, Suits, Jackets,
and Sweaters
52% to
72% off n


obes, Gowns, Pajamas
and
s Warm Pajamas
to 72% off '
NO LAY-AWAYS PLEASE, JUST SAVINGS ON EVERY ITEM!

. SHOES Children's
Women's Jeans, Knit Shirts
children's and Sweaters
% to 52% to
% off 72% off


Avenue Phone 22L-ll79


Phone 229-8723
T J r $U;l i JEWELRY 302 Reid Avenue


10%,.20%o, 40%&50%o
DISCOUNT ON JEWELRY
Big savings throughout our store. Jewelry, Watches,
Diamonds, Rings, Bracelets, Necklaces


20%o.

All Easter Dresses
Ladies' and Girls' sizes 2 to 14
Boy's Suits, Dress Pants and Shirts


OFF


On All Jeans, Lee's, Levi's
and Calvin Klein
On All CONVERSE
TFUNNI MnAWF


1/2 F
Y2 0FF


Gowns, Robes, Pajamas
Ladies' Shoes


Thursday, Friday and Saturday


COSTIN'S
Port St. Joe.


5
*,


K&D Television & Sound
301 REID AVENUE PHONE 227-1813


~g~gp~dWORWIMMOOMWANW~2r


1.1. I Cnrr~


4. `


Irii~iv


I


I


~ ","Ys;C,~40, WO-- 10;~SB&i~~J





Kimberly Kay Scarboro
and Charles W. Britt were
united in marriage February
16 at Immanuel Baptist
Church in Tallahassee. The
Reverend David T. Solomont
performed the ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of
..Mr. and Mrs. Sammy J.
Scarboro of Tallahassee. She
4s the granddaughter of Ev-
'elyn Scarboro of Monticello,
-Sam Scarboro of Tallahas-
see, The.ma Ferguson of
Tucson, Arizona and James
Braswell of Port Charlotte.
The bridegroom is the son
-of Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Britt of
St. Joe Beach. He is the
'grandson of Georgia Horn-
buckle and the late Sam
Rornbuckle of Omega, Ga.,
and the late Mr. and Mrs. C.
R. Britt, Sr. of DeFuniak
'Springs.
The bride was given in
marriage by her parents and
her father escorted her to the
altar. Her gown, designed by
the bride, featured a fitted
bodice appliqued with alen-
,con lace designs. The floor
'length gown of French bridal
taffeta displayed a dramatic
dropped back and a cathe-
dral length train, sprinkled
entirely with crystal rhine-
stones, sequins, buggle beads
and seed pearls, all individ-
ually sewn by the bride. The
wrists and hem of the gown
were trimmed with imported
maribou fur, and the leg-o-
mutten sleeves were en-
hanced with dropped seed
,pearls and crystal tear
drops.
-, For her headpiece she
Zwore- an exquisite juliet cap
Zof solid rhinestones and
--pearls from New York, The
-yeil formed a. halo of silk
:illusion gathered at the
&pown, cascading into cathe--
Aral length veiling also dot-
,ted. with rhinestones and
,pearls.
- To complete her ensemble,
she carried a, waterfall of
'cattleya. orchids, 9tephano-
,tis, and sterling ribbons
draped across an imported
maribou muff. Drop rhine-
stone earrings and solid
rhinestone pumps created
the finished polish ed- look


Shear
Perfection.
is pleased
to announce

BETTY HEATH
:has joined her
staff.

Betty welcomes her
'regular clientele as well
as- new ones-
Call 229-6911
FOR AN APPOINTMENT
312 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe


Miss Celeste Sharpe of
Tampa was maid of honor,
and C. R. Britt of St. Joe
Beach was best man.
The bridesmaids were
Miss Danita Gilbert of Indi-
anapolis, Indiana, Mrs. Tina
Ivey of Tallahassee, Miss
Julie Oates of Ocala, Miss
Tianne Turner of' Tampa,
and the junior bridesmaid
was Miss Charlene McDaniel
of Tallahassee.
Groomsmen were B. J.
Barwick of Dallas, Texas,
Shelby Best of Tampa, John
McMahon of"Fort Lauder-
dale, Bill Moody of Panama
City, Paul Sims of Panama
City, and Phillip Tanner of
Orlando. Candlelighters
were Wayne McDaniel, Jr.
and Brian Barnard, Jr., both
of Tallahassee.
The ring bearer was Mat-
thew White, nephew of the
groom and son of Mr. and
Mrs. Mike White of Port St.
Joe.
Following the ceremony, a
reception was given by Mr.
and Mrs. Sammy Scarboro at
the Governors Club. Ail food
was furnished by the Gov-
ernors Club. Mrs. Kathy
Ferrell was responsible for
the three tiered Australian
wedding cake. A seven piece
band provided entertainment
for the many guests. Both the
wedding and reception were
directed by Mrs. Mary Cam_
mack and Mrs. Hazel Ben-
,ton.
A honeymoon trip to Eu-
rope is planned. The couple
will reside in Orlando where
the groom is a medical sales
representative for Bimeco,
Inc. and the bride owns an
interior decorati ng company
called Decorating Den.

A rehearsal dinner for. fifty
guests was held Friday,
February 15 at the Killearn
Country Club.
A miscellaneous shower
was held January 30 at the
fiome of Mrs. Ellie Barnard.
It was hosted by the brides-
maids: ,
A miscellaneous shower
was hosted by and held at
r4rs. Carol McDaniel's home
-ft Februa n,'12.


One of the special meetings
of the year was held Thurs-
day, February 14, St. Valen-
tine's Day, when the Port St.
Joe Garden Club met for its
regular meeting at the Gar-
den Center on Eighth Street.
Attendance Was very good.
The Center was beautiful
with valentine arrangements

and decorations. Refresh-
ments were most enjoyable,
and the program outstand-
ing. St. Valentine's Day was
'a d ,*svvlatives[
K4 &
Me. ptogra"m tor-ib;' ay
was presented by. Roy Lee
Carter, Extension Agent for
Gulf County, his subject
being "Pest Control in the
Home and Lawn". Mr.
Carter shared with a most
interested group some excel-
lent slides showing numerous
pestswhich bring trouble to
plants and trees. Among
those shown were caterpil-
lars, beetles, grasshoppers,
leafminers, black turpentine
'beetles (which attack pine
trees), and azalea caterpil-
lars. Turf insects included
chinch bugs, web worms,
luber worms, army worms,
mole crickets and grub
worms.
in the question and answer
session following the slides,
the gardeners were advised
to destroy trees dying from
beetle attack to prevent
contamination of neighbor-
ing trees, and to spray
thoroughly at intervals to
reduce damage.
Mr. Carter said that mole
criciets are best treated' in
June, and he recommended
using plenty of Baygon, He
said, "Don't trim azaleas
until after they bloom", and
emphasized the fact that
healthy plants are less liable
to cold damage. He also said
that fertilization should be
started in April. that mole
crickets are best treated in
June; that fertilization
should be repeated in July or
August: that soil in the area
is very high in phosphorus;
and that azaleas should be
sprayed when the flowers are
about ready to fall off. An
added point that the speaker
made was that trees might be
saved by watering them just
enough to form a protective
coating of ice. ,
Another interesting feature
of the February meeting wag
the presentation of awards to
the winners of the High
School Science Fair: Jenni-
fer Jones, the Junior winner;
and Laura Van Pieterson, the
Senior winner. These special
young ladies were presented
by Miss Marian Dismuke,
who heads the Science De-
partment and promotes the
Annual Science Fair. After
the girls presented their
winning projects to the group
and explained them, Miss
Dismuke explained the pro-
cedure of the experiment and
expressed appreciation to the
Garden Club for its interest
in this program and sponsor-
ship of the two awards.


PAGE SIX


THIE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fln.THRDYFE.2,18


Miss Scarboro


pearls. Her bouquet was of
white and mauve silk flow-
ers.
A reception was held in the
den following the cer6mony.


New Shipment of






Roche's Furnibre & Appliance
212 Williams Avenue




Early S,ring

a t

Greenhouse

Ming sand, Nursery
West of Port St. Joe Highway 98.

" Bedding Plants Tomatoes & Peppers
(5 Varieties). Also other vegetable
& flowers .......................... tray8 9
" Assorted 411 Plants C
Largest Selection .................... 99 up
" Potted Geranium $150
5" pot ............................ v a.

" 611 Potted Hibiscus ...... only $395 ea.
" AZALEAS 1 gal., 1 1A gal. size $ 65
up to 21/2 ft. size plant ............... 3 ea.


Teresa Louise Ford and
DonaldJay McArdle were
united in marriage February
17 at the home of the bride's
aunts, Dr. Shirley Simpson
and. Ms. Louise Daughtry.
The Rev. David Fernandez
performed the double ring
ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Sam A. Ford,
Sr. of Port St. Joe.
The groom is the son of Mr.
and Mrs.. J. C. McArdle of
Port St. Joe.
The' bride was given in
marriage by her parents and
escorted by her father. She
wor6 a white embroidered
lace over satin gown. The
gown.featured a high ruffled
neckline, fitted bodice and
wrist-length georgette
sleeves. The gown was gently
gathered at the waist and
extended into a semi-cathe-
dral train. For her head-
piece, she wore a shoulder
length veil held. by a Juliet
cap of embroidered lace and

Tom.Gibsons,
Have Bab Y Girl
Tom and Mary Gibson
announce the birth of their
daughter, Margaret Sandifer
Gibson on February 15. She
weighed 7 lbs. 3 ozs.
Proud grandparents are
Mr.'and Mrs. Thomas Z.
Atkeson of Decatur, Ala., and
Dr. and Mrs. Thomas A.
Gibson of Scottboro', -Ala.
Great grandfather is Dr.
Thomas S. Gibson of Port St.
Joe. I


MRS.~ BRITT


.Presiding tit the business
session in the absence of the
president,, Mrs. Don Ash-
craft, Mrs. Stiles Brown
suggested that the club parti-
cipate in the Merchants Day
Celebration Saturday, March.
2. Mrs. Agnes Culpepper
reported on the recent Arbor
Dayplanting, and expressed
Appreciation to those who
gave'plants. and to those who
helped to plant them. She,
asked for day lillies and said
dstrip Was ready for planting
them. Mrs. -H. VV: Griffin


-=-/


thanked Mr. Carter for ex-
changing program dates with
her and reminded the group
that she would be presenting
in March her program on
I'M i assive Arrangements".
In conclusion a note was read
from President Ashcraft ex-
pressing regrets for her
absence and wishing the
members a'happy St. Valen-
tine's Day.
. Hostesses for, the day in-
cluded Mary Harrison,
Elaine Jackson, and Eliza-
betli'Siuart.


building with the Presbyteri-
an Church in Wewahitchka.
It is located across from the
United Methodist Church on
Main Street (Hwy. 71).


make faith commitments.
The 8 00 AM Sunday ser-
vices will continue as usual
during the preaching mis-
sion. St. John's shares a


The Rev. Jerry R. Huft,
Vicar of St. John's Episcopal
church'in Wewahitchka has
announced that a preaching
mission will be conducted
during the Lenten season.
Special services are sche-
duled for 6:00 P.M., Central
Time on Fqbruary 24, March
10, 17 and 24. There'will be no
--evening'semice on March 3-
The Vicar and Congrega-
tion cordially invite the gen-
eral public to attend the
meetings. The congregation
has begun to pray-that new
residents, and'-others who
have not found a church
.home, will take this oppor-
tunity to worship God.
The aim of the services is
to provide an atmosphere of
worship and praise that will
draw the participants closer
to God. Those who* are
already active in the Church
will be. encouraged and
strengthened by the renewal
of their faith. Those who,
because of neglect, feel dig-
tant from God will be called
to restore their relationships
with their Lord. And those
-who lack the assurance of
salvation will be lead to

FOR QUICK RESULTS,
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St. Margaret's Guild.rnet
Monday afternoon, February
18 in the Parish Hall of St.
James' Episcopal Church.
:Alice Core, chairman of the
Guild presided and Margaret
Reining was the hostess for
the afternoon.
The program, a narrated
film strip titled "Keifer
Project International", was
presented by* Jackie Huft.
:This interdenominational
self help group, with head-
quarters located in Little
Rock Arkansas promotes
.-the &velopment of animal
husbandry in foreign coun-
-tries by charitably exporting
-breeding stock to selected
:-areas of the world.


FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN Q4URCH

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The service project of
preparing containers for use
to transport altar flowers to
the ill was completed by
guild members. The ladies.
present were Helen Quacken-
bush, Betty Fensom ., Kath-
ryn Parker, Virginia Owens,'
Sara Fite and her mother
Mrs. Hetheox, Ida Copen-
haver, Mary Daughtry and
Monica Stone.
Mrs. Core announced the
next meeting of the Guild
would be held Monday,
March 18 at the rectory when
Mrs. Huft will be the hostess
and Mrs. Fensom will pre-
sent the program on St.
Patrick.

Allens" Welcome
BabY Daughter.
Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Allen
are proud, to announce the
arrival of their daughter,
Katharine, Elizabeth on Sun-
day, February 10 at 7:38
P.M. Kate weighed 7 lbs. 6
ozs. and was 2034 inches long.
She was welcomed home
by big brother, Justin and
maternal grandparents, Mr.
and Mrs. Herman Dean..
Paternal grandparents are
Mrs. Clara I. Allen of Mani-
tou Springs, Colorado and the
late Rodney F. Allen.


CARD OF THANKS
The family of the late Mrs.
Beatrice M. Coachman wish-
es to express their apprecia-
tion for the many kind acts of
sympathy shown them in the
passing of their loved one.
Words cannot convey to you
what our hearts feel within.
We Wish to give special
thanks to Rev. Alonzo Moore
and the Zion Fair family.
Special thanks to those who
contributed food and were
instrumental in arranging
the dining room.
We pray God's richest
blessings upon each of you
for being there at the needed
time. Again, our sincere
thanks.
The Coachman Family

CLASSIFIED ADS
GET QUICK RESULTS
FOR YOUR MONEY


Little I'Milss P6rt St. Joe'

Pageant.,.Is. Being Planned
The Port St. Joe 11igh division.
School Majorettes are spop-
soring the Little MissPort St. Tickets may be purchased
Joe Pageant to be, held on from any majorette or con-
Saturday, March 16, 7: 00 ET, testant, adults $2.00 and
Port St. Joe Elementary students $1.00. Proceeds will
School. go to purchase uniforms for
Categories include: Tiny. the Port St. Joe Majorettes.
Miss, ages four to six; Little Any girlsinterested in enter-
Miss, ages seven to nine; and ing should see Cindy Belin,
Pre-teen Miss, ages 10-12. Port St. Joe lbgh School for a
There will be one winner and registration form or call
two alternates in each age 2" 34.

Child Abuse Awareness Seminar.


On Thursday, February 21
from 7-8:30 at the St. James'
Episcopal parish hall on
Sixth Street, the'Girl Scouts
will be sponsoring a Child
Abuse Awareness Seminar.

Guest speakers will be


Ormand Harriptt, Director
Guardian Ad Liten Program,
and Hariet Schwartz, Direc-
tor of Child Abuse Prevention
Program.
Any interested adult is
invited to attend. There is no
charge for admission. ,


Pothos Baskets:


Official Year Round Dealer for

RED FOX
FERTILIZERS

50 Lb. $
Bogs 489 up

Quantity Prices on
Fertilizer Negotiable


We Provide
Free Delivery



Phone

229-8184

Tracy and Ming
Pierce, Owners


r'-


P,


Teresa Louise Ford and


The wedding anci reception
was directed by Mrs. Annette
Lowery.
The couple will reside in
Panama City.


Ext;iensi 'on Agentb Give.*.t)p


Preaching 1Mission~ at St.


john's Episcopal in'- ewa*


St., Marga t't Guild


101,
$895 EL







THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, FEB. 21, 1985 PAGE SEVEN


Shark Review

News of Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High


BY ANNETTE MINGER
Congratulations to the
Sharks! The varsity basket-
ball team defeated Havana
last Friday night. This week
the Sharks will play several
games. On Thursday the
Sharks will take on Bay High
at home. On Friday, the team
will travel to Panama City in
hopes of defeating Mosley.
Next Tuesday, the Sharks
will not only wind up their
week but also their season.
The last game before the
* District Tournament will be
played on February 25, when
the Sharks travel to Monti-
cello. Good Luck Boys!
Congratulations to Richard
Ramsey and to Matt Taylor.
Richard and Matt placed
second in their weight clas-
ses at the Regional Tourna-
ment in Wrestling which was
held this past weekend in
Jacksonville. Matt and Ri-
chard will leave Thursday to
go to Melbourne to compete
in the State finals. Good Luck
Matt and Richard!
Last Thursday two repre-
sentatives from Gulf Coast
came to Port St. Joe High
and talked to many interest-
ed Seniors. Those Seniors
who are interested in attend-
ing Gulf Coast need to make


MEDICARE
SUPPLEMENT
Policy Form MAXC
Helps Pay What
MEDICARE
DOES NOT PAY
IN & OUT
OF HOSPITAL.
United American
Insurance Co.
For Information
Phone 904/229-8981
or 229-6640
DICKIE BROWN
BROWN
Insurance Agency
P. 0O. Box 897
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


Rock & Roll at


Nursing Home


The Bay St. Joseph Care
Center is holding a Rock and
Roll Jamboree to benefit the
American Heart Association
this Saturday, February 23
from 10 A.M. to 4 P.M.
Entertainment will feature
Jean Etheridge. Jerry Wild-
er Band. Joe Mania B-nd,
Buddy Hamm Band. Pana-
ma City Boys' Club Break
Dancers. George Boyer,
Scott and Renee Osbourn,
Tom Garcia. and Big River


ANNETTE MINER
plans to come to the Com-
mons Area on March 7. On
this date the Director of
Financial Aide and another
representative from the col-
lege will be here to talk to
Seniors and their parents.
Last Friday the annual
Student-Teacher Day was
held at the High School. On
this day Seniors had the
opportunity to teach classes.
This day gave both the
teachers a day to rest and the
students a chance to see what
the teachers really do. Stu-
dents, student-teachers, and
teachers all enjoyed this day.
Monday and Tuesday the
students enjoyed for there
was no school on these days.
However, the week will end
with six weeks tests being
given. I hope the students
enjoyed their time off but
now it's time to get studying
for tests.
Until next week, this is
Annette Minger hoping you
have a good one.

CARD OF THANKS
We would like to express
our deep and sincere appre-
ciation to friends who re-
membered our family during
the illness and recent loss of
our loved one, Harry L. Ford.
Your expressions of love.
and concern meant so much
to us.
Mrs. Harry L. Ford
Mr. and Mrs. Tom
-Ford, Tommy
and Tyler


Cloggers.
Activities include Dime a
Dance, featuring the 20's.
50's and Punk Guys and
Gals: Kissing Booth. Fea
Market. Rummage Sale.
Coin Toss. Cake Walk. Oys-
ters on the Half Shell, hot
dogs. drinks, cotton candy
and popcorn.
The JaMrboree will be held
on the Parking Lot at the
Care Center located at Ninth
Street and Long Avenue.


Banquet Saturday Will

Mark Black History


The Association For Com-,
munity Action will hold their
annual Black History Month
Banquet on Saturday, Febru-
ary 23 at 7:00 p.m. at the
Washington Recreation Cen-
ter.
This year's featured speak-
er for the banquet will' be
Reverend Elijah Green of Ft.
Walton Beach. Rev. Green is
presently pastoring Mount
Pleasant A.M.E. Church in
Molino. He is the recipient of


many honors and awards for
his hours of community
service, the most recent'
being "The Heart of Gold
Award", presented annually
to an outstanding area hu-
manitarian.
Everyone' is invited to
come out and enjoy the food
and fellowship. For addition-
al information contact Cla-
rence Monette or Maxine
Gant.


Students In Teachers'

Shoes for Day of School


If you visited Port St. Joe
Jr.-Sr. High School on Febru-
ary 15 and saw all the boys in
suits and ties, and the girls in
high heels and dresses, boss-
ing other students around,
your eyes were not fooling
you. It was Student-Teacher
Day.
The National Jr. Honor
Society sponsors this activity
annually as. a means of
developing and demonstrat-
ing 'their leadership skills,
citizenship, and their desire
to serve. This group of ninth
graders act as assistants to
the seniors who have been
chosen by a faculty member
to teach his or her class on
that day. The student-teach-
er got a chance to be. on the
other side of the desk for a
day.
Of course, many seniors
said they would rather not
have the seat after one


experience, and the juniors
said they can hardly wait
until next year. In all, the day
was one of the greatest.

Winners Named
In Opening"
St. Joe Furniture Company
gave away two expense-paid
week ends at Disney World
and Epcot Center as grand
prizes in the grand opening
celebration of their new
"Rug Room" last week end.
Winning the grand prizes of
three days and two nights at
the Disney center in Orlando,
were Jim Johnson of 108
Sunset Circle and Lila Har-
bour, 1009 Constitution Drive.
Winners of the carpet given
away during the opening
were Grace Dees, 202. lola
Street and Alma Jones, 1311
Woodward Avenue.


Florida law stipulates the



DEADLINE




for Filing for




HOMESTEAD EXEMPTION


is March 1st, 1985.



All homeowners must file by the

March 1st deadline in order to take

advantage of Florida's homestead

exemption laws. If you have not fil-

ed for homestead exemption or

received a renewal card in the mail,

call the Gulf County Property Ap-

praiser's office.



229-6115


JUNIOR HIGH SCIENCE FAIR WINNERS: Ninth ness'"; and seventh grade, Ken Monette, "Experiments with
grade, Diane Segers, "Nature's Wondrous Elixirs"; eighth Light".
grade, Christopher Bowen, "Mold Its Growth and Useful-


Science Projects Exhibited,


The science classes at Port
St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School
presented their science pro-
jects to the judges Thursday,
February 7. -
Each student who wished
to participate in the science
fair did research and design-
ed their project according to


guidelines set up by the
Three Rivers Science and
Engineering Fair..
The selected participants
from each school .in the
county will participate in the
science fair at the Naval
Coastal System Center in
Panama City, March 7-8.


The counties participating
in the science fair are Bay,
Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jack-
son, and Washington.
The Sea Oats and Dunes
Garden Club gave a $10.00
award to Jennifer Pate for
her project, "Flowering


Plants."
The St. Joe Garden Club
gave a $10.00 award to
Jennifer Jones for her pro-
ject, "Leaf Collection" and to
Laura Van Pietersom for her
project, "Life Sustaining
Plants."


SENIOR HIGH SCIENCE FAIR WINNERS: Twelfth Miller; tenth grade, Edward Wood, "Sodium Bisulfate, Is It
grade: Connie Dixon, "Detergent"; eleventh grade, Siaron an Effective Food Preservative?"


,Food Program Sponsors
The U. S. Department of provides nutritious 'meals to areas, the program operates
Agriculture is seeking spon- children in needy areas, from May until September.
sors to operate the 1985 without regard to race, color, Under the program, meals
summer food program in national origin, sex or handi- and snacks are served to
Florida. cap, during extended school children in such places as
The summer food program vacation periods. In most schools, playgrounds and


Survivors Should

Apply for Social

Sec. Benefits Soon


Surviving dependents of a
deceased worker should ap-
ply for Social Security bene-
fits as soon as possible
following the worker's death,
James Tolliver, Social Se-
curity manager in Panama
City, said recently.
Applying promptly will al-
low benefits. to start in the
shortest possible time. In
addition, Tolliver said, some
benefits cannot be paid more
than a month before the
application is filed.
Social Security benefits
can be paid to these survi-
vors:
Unmarried children under
18, or under 19 if a full-time
high school student;
Unmarried children over
18 who were disabled before
22 and remain disabled;
A surviving widow or wi-
dower of any age caring for a
child under 16 or disabled
who gets benefits;
Widow or widower 60 or
older; '
Disabled widow or widow-
er 50-60;
Dependent parent 62 or
older.
Benefits can also be paid to
a surviving .divorced spouse
if the marriage to the de-
ceased worker lasted 10
years or more. Grandchild-
ren can get benefits on a
grandparents's record under
certain circumstances.
Before any benefits can be
paid, the worker must have
had a credit for a 'certain

Musical At
Phil. Baptist
The Matron Auxiliary of
Philadelphia Primitive Bap-
tist Church will sponsor a
musical and fellowship ser-
vice at the Church this
Sunday night at 7:00 p.m.
Everyone is invited.


amount of work covered by
Social Security. In 1985, the
amount ranges from 1V/ to
81/2 years depending on the
worker's age at death.
More information about
survivors' benefits can be
obtained at the Panama City
Social Security office, lo-
cated at 30 West Government
Street. The telephone num-
ber is 769-4871. The people
there will be glad to answer
any questions.


Copies

Available at
The Star
306 Williams Ave.


parks.
Public and private, nonpro-
fit schools and units of local,
municipal, county or state
governments may qualify as
sponsors of the summer food
program in areas where at
least 50 percent of the
children are eligible for free
or redueduced price school lun-
ches. Residential summer
camps whose enrollment in-
cludes needy children may
also act as program spon-.
sors. Qualified sponsors are
reimbursed for program op-
erating and administrative


Sought
expenses up to the current
rates of reimbursement.
To be eligible, sponsors
must: Provide continuing
service to the community;
Serve meals on a regular
schedule to children or pro-
vide meals as a part of an
organized program for en-
rolled children at camps;
and
Show they are financially
and administratively cap-
able of operating the pro-
gram.
For more information, po-
tential sponsors in Florida
should contact the Food and
Nutrition Management Sec-
tion; Florida Department of
Education; Tallahassee, Fla.
32304. Telephone: (904) 488-
7647.


Heating & Air, Major Appliance Repair
Plumbing & Electrical Work
229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle
ER0007623, RF0040131, RA0043378


AFTER-SCHOOL CHILD CARE

Learning activities, play, tutoring, snacks.


State Licensed Well Staffed

After-School Daily 2:00 6:00 p.m.

Port St. Joe Elementary Cafeteria


7


227-1145
Gulf County Guidance Clinic


Enroll Now thru March 31st

Get One FREE Week PLUS a 15% Discount
off weekly rates.


-


I








PAGE EIGHT THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY. FEB. 21, 1985


WHAT'S A
MIGRAINE HEADACHE?
The word migraine comes from the technical name
hemicrania which translated means half-a-head. This
is because in so many people the pain begins in the
center of the forehead or over one eye. It most
Commonly remains in the front of the head. Other
features common to migraines are flashing patterns
or spots in vision just before the headache, followed by
nausea and dizziness. More than twice as many women
as men have migraines.
A migraine cannot be treated like a common
headache with aspirin. It requires a different type of
drug entirely and only a physician can determine how
any one person should be treated.
"A GREAT MANY PEOPLE ENTRUST US S
with their prescriptions, health needs and other
S pharmacy products. We consider this trust a
privilege and a duty. May we be your personal
family pharmacy?"



BUZZETT'S DRUG STORE
Free Parking Drive-In Window
229-8771 317 Williams Ave. Port St. Joe
0Ilf "lI ". "I' ,,IT


Sharks Are Ranked Fifth in State


Port St. Joe's Sharks final-
ly earned a spot in the state
Class 2-A ranking this week.
after, spending the entire
season winning basketball
games from leaders in the
state and the Panhandle.


Lupus Group
Is Organized
A local group has affiliated
with the Lupus Foundation of
America, Inc. as a division of
the Florida Big Bend Chap-
ter. The name of the local
group will be determined at
the next meeting which will
be held on March 14, 7:00
P.M., at the Conference
Room of Gulf Pines Hospital.
Anyone with Lupus or who
wants to learn about Lupus is
invited to attend.


The Sharks continued win-
ning this past week. running
their record to 17-3 with
defeats of Havana and
Blountstown. as they went
into the final week of the
season.
During the season, the
Sharks were honorable men-
tion in the polls a couple of
times and" last week. they
advanced to number nine.
With the two wins this week.
the Sharks vaulted into num-
ber five position.
The Sharks will end their


regular season of play Mon-
day of next week when
Jefferson High School of
Monticello will come to town
for a 5:00 p.m. game.
Tonight, the Sharks will be
at home to Bay High in the
Coliseum at 6:00 p.m. and
travel to Panama 'City to
meet Mosley at 7:00 p.m..
EST. The Sharks defeated
both Bay County teams ear-
lier in the season.

PSJ 71, B'TOWN 62
Tuesday night, the .Sharks


Registration In March

for Dixie Youth Baseball


Dixie Youth Baseball Re-
gistration will be held at the
Athletic House on Reid Ave-
nue from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m.


Get That Gymn

Prize Rack Four Local Gymnasts


Measured
Deer hunters with trophy
: racks stashed away on the
:wall or in their freezer will
: have a chance to have those
racks officially measured
and scored February 28,
Thursday, at the Port St. Joe
Library Conference Room.
Game and Fresh Water
'Fish Commission Biologist
Tim Breault and several
other Commission personnel
'will be scoring Florida white-
tailed deer racks beginning
at 1:00 P.M.
L Florida's buck registry
was established to provide
hunters with an understand-
able record of the quality of
deer taken in the state.
Antler measurements are
based on the Boone and
Crockett (B&C) scoring sys-
tem, and require 100 B&C
inches foik typical antlers and
125 for atypical antlers. If the
measurements meet the
minimum standards, the ap-
plicant Will receive a certifi-
cate and shoulder patch in
recognition.
The largest scoring set of
deer antlers in Florida are
the property of Larry Furr of
Greensboro. Furr killed a
large 14 point buck on
January 22, 1977 in Gadsden
County that scored 168V/s.
The Commission urges any'
sportsman with an above
average set of antlers to
bring them by the Library for
scoring.



Boiled ham can be more
tender if allowed to
cool in the water in
which it has been boiled.


Qualify
Jeremy Pridgeon, Will
Sumner, Christopher Mock,
Erich Hohman, Michael
Miller, Bill Ramsey, Blake
Little and Russell Funder-
burk from St. Joe Gymnas-
tics travelled to Brown's
Gymnastics Central in Alta-
monte Springs Saturday,
Feb. 16, to compete in the
USGF Boys 1st LocalState
Qualifying Meet. The two-
day meet had 23 teams from
all over the state of Florida.
Gymnasts must have an all-
around score of 43.5 to
qualify for state competi-
tion.
Results are as follows:
Class V 7-9 age group-
Mock had an all-around
score of 29.9; Sumner had an
all-around score of 38.3; and
Pridgeon tied for ninth place
in floor with a score of 9.0, he
also tied for 8th place in
vaulting with a score of 8.25,
and scored 42.10 all-around.
Class V 10-12 age group -
Miller placed 7th in high bar
with a score of 8.35, 4th in
parallel bars with a score of
8.35, tied for' first place in
rings with a score -of 8.25,
and scored 49.60 all-around
qualifying him for state com-
petition.
Hohmanscored 48.70 all-
around which qualifies him
for state competition.
Ramsey scored -44.50 all-
around which qualifies him
for state competition.
Class IV 10-12 age group-
Little tied for 9th place in
floor with a score of 8.65, and
scored 45.70 all-around quali-
fying him for state competi-
tion also.


for State Meet

Class IV 13-15 age group- .gth-10th. The boys are coach-
Funderburk placed 6th in ed by Jennifer Hendrix, In-
high bar with a score of 5.9, dia Miller, Susan Wilder and
6th in still rings with a score Karen Kalivoda.
of 5.0, 6th in vaulting with a Classes are held at the
score of 7.5, 6th in parallel Centennial Building on Mon-
bars with a score of 5.10 and days from 5:00-9:00 EST in
captured 6th place all- Port St. Joe and on Wed-
around with a score of 35.70. nesdays at The Fitness
Gymnasts have three Center from 4:00 8:00 CST
chances to qualify for state in Wewahitchka for girls and
competition which will be boys, ages 3-15. To register
held in Lake Worth in May. call Jennifer Hendrix at
The boys' next competition 229-8907.
will be held in Largo March


March 4-16 for boys and girls
ages eight through 14. All
new boys and girls, and all
those who played last year
must register again this year
in order to play. All new
players must have a birth
certificate when they regis-
ter.
Registration fee is $15.00
for the first child, and $10.00
'for each child thereafter per
family.
Minor, Major/,and Pony
League tryouts will be March
18-19 qt 5:00 P.M. on the
Tenth Street ball field.


CLASS V COMPETITORS: Front row, left to right:
Michael Miller, Bill Ramsey and Erich Hohman. Back row,
from left: Jeremy Pridgeon, Will Sumner and Christopher
Mock.


made. it a clean sweep over
Blountstown this year. by
dumping the Tigers, 71-62 in
Blountstown. It isn't often the
Sharks defeat the Tigers in
every encounter during the
season.
Dexter Baxter was the
leader of three Sharks scor-
ing in double figures against
the Tigers. with his 17 points.
Both Durey Cadwell and
Michael Pittman added 16 for
the Sharks.
Jody Koonce led the Tigers
with 12 points.
The Sharks led the Tigers
in scoring in every quarter
Tuesday night, but still the
game was close. The Sharks
ad a 37-32 lead at half time.
Score by Quarters:
Port St. Joe 17 20 15 19-71
Blountstown 16 16 14 16--62
PSJ-Thomas 1-2-4; Pitt-
man 7-2-16; Cadwell 4-8-16;
Baxter 7-3-17; Robinson 3-2-
8: Jenkins 4-0-8: Butts 1-0-2.
BLOUNTSTOWN Banks
4-2-10; Godwin 5-1-11; Maines
5-1-11; Koonce 6-0-12; Bess
9-0-18.

PSJ 79, HAVANA 60
The flu bug, which has
been going through Gulf
County like a forest fire
through a Ti-Ti thicket these
past couple of weeks, hit the


coaching staff at Port St. Joe
High School this week, and
they are all home trying to
shake the effects of the
malady.
This situation has prevent-
ed The Star from getting any
information about the Hava-
na basketball game which
was played last Friday night.
The only information con-


cerning the game The Star
was able to obtain was the
score.
The Sharks won by a 79-60
score.
The informant at the school
wasn't even sure of who
coached the Tuesday night
game in Blountstown, but
figures were available for
that game.


Richard Ramsey and Matt
Taylor won second and third
place in the 171 lb. and 116 lb.
weight class in the Regional
Wrestling Tournament held
at Bolles Academy in Jack-
sonville this past weekend.
Richard and Matt will both
journey to Melbourne to
compete in the State IIIA
Wrestling Tournament.
Richard Ramsey will pro-
bably meet the same wrest-
ler in the finals of the state
that he faced.in Jacksonville.
"It will probably be close,
but I think Richard will win.
It was a tough match at
Bolles and I think it was a
draw, not a win for Daytona.
Seabreeze." said Coach Roy


Baysden, "and Matt Taylor
is a tough wrestler, and if
anyone beats him they will
have to be a very good
wrestler."
The State Tournament be-
gins Friday morning, Februti-
ary 22 with weigh-in at 9:00
a.m. The wrestlers will leave
Thursday morning and work
out in Melbourne Thursday
night.
According to Coach Bays-
den, St. Joe did well against
predominantly 3A schools at
Regionals, and he feels they
should make a good showing ,
at State. St. Joe placed ninth
in the 26 team Regional
Tournament.


Second Public Hearing
and Statement of
Summary of
Proposed Application
Gulf County will be holding a public hearing
on the final application to be submitted to
the Florida Department of Commerce. Gulf
County is applying to the Florida Depart-
ment of Commerce for a grant of $675,000
under the economic development category
of the Small Cities Community Block Grant
Program. The grant will be used to make a
long-term low interest loan available to
Raffield Fisheries, Inc. This will be used for
eligible activities under 24CFR 570.200/206.
Raffield Fisheries, Inc. will engage in ac-
tivities of such nature to rebuild their
recently destroyed plant. Approximately 93
percent of the funds will benefit persons of
low to moderate income in Gulf County by
insuring continual employment of 135 per-
sons. There will be no displacement of per-
sons as a result of this grant awards. If
displacement does occur, the county has
plans of helping those persons.
A public hearing to provide citizens an op-
portunity to comment on the application
will be held in the board meeting room at
the Gulf County Courthouse on Monday,
February 25th, 1985 at 5:00 p.m., EST. A
copy of the application will be available for
review at Raffield Fisheries, Inc., on the
Gulf County canal between the hours of 9:00
until 5:00 p.m., EST, Monday through Fri-
day. A copy of the application will also be
available at the Gulf County Courthouse in
the Clerk's office between the hours of 9:00
until 5:00 p.m., EST, Monday through Fri-
day. To obtain additional information con-
cerning the application and the public hear-
ing, contact Robbie Brunger of the
Apalachee Regional Planning Council in
Blountstown at the Calhoun County Court-
house or call 904/674-4571.
It 2/21


CLASS IV COMPETITORS: Blake Little, front and
Russell Funderburk.


Questionnaires Are

Mailed to Hunters


While squirrel and quail
seasons wind. down to a
March 3 closing date, the
Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission is gearing up to
mail out 36,000 question-
naires to Florida hunters.
Tom Wright, administra-
tive assistant to the Commis-
sion's director of wildlife,
said the survey is an annual
project, designed to provide
data for wise management of
this state's natural, heritage.
"The questionnaires will
tell us a great deal about how
well hunters did this year and
what we need to do to ensure
that we're providing ade-
quate recreational opportuni-
ties for outdoorsmen,"
Wright said. "From the
answers we get from hunters
every year, we learn more
about how to plan and
administer wildlife pro-
grams."
Five percent (10,000) of the
persons holding Florida hunt-
ing licenses will'be polled in a


survey to be mailed Feb. 11.
Also, 25 percent (26,000) of
the sportsmen who hold
wildlife management area
-permits will be polled begin-
ning Feb. 18.
"It's important that we get
the questionnaires back by
May 20," Wright said.
"That's when weplan to start
processing the information."
Wright said information
from the questionnaires
won't be processed in connec-
tion with the hunters' names.
"We're not interested in
knowing anything about indi-
viduals in this survey,"
Wright said. "What we do
need to know is how much
hunting was done this year,
where it was done and how
much game was harvested
by hunters."
Sportsmen who fail to
respond t9 the questionnaires
will receive second and third
notices from the Commis-
sion, urging them to send in
their answers, Wright said.


2 Wrestlers Going

To State Tourney


!*


PAGE EIGHT


TH~E STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


THURSDAY, FEB. 21, 1985







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, FEB. 21, 1985 PAGE NINE


By The Rev. Jerry R. Huft
Rector, St. James'
Episcopal Church
Port St. Joe, Fl.
Television is fascinated by
death. TV ratings are enhan-
ced by murder, and movie-
.nade slaughters entice mil-
lions of viewers. Comedians
on the nightclub circuits talk
about "killing their audien-
ces," and "slaying them in
the aisles." But when their
act goes flat, .they "die on
stage."
Ten year old boys go to
school and prowl their neigh-
borhoods dressed in camou-
flage outfits, looking like
Middle Eastern or Central
American terrorists. Plastic
weapons and war games are
big hits in the toy stores.
Girls join boys in playing
games where they pretend to
be shot, blown up, or dema-
terialized. -
Adults drive cars without
seat belts. They smoke,
chew, and snort tobacco.
Some of their popular drinks
contain a strong chemical
solvent. And they introduce a
variety of poisonous "recrea-
tional" drugs into their bod-
ies through their mouths and
veins.
. An alien to our culture
might assume that we are
morbidly anticipating death.
However, this isn't true.
While our behavior may
facilitate 'a dreadful and
premature death, few of us
really seek it.
If our alien friend could-
study us, he would discover
that we are being confused
by many voices and opinions
about life, death, and life
beyond the grave. Many
people teach with apparent
authority on these subjects,
but without the benefit of
certain pertinent facts. For
Christians, the knowledge of
,these facts bring understand-
ing and peace.
The rationalists among us
are quick to point out that
there is no evidence of life
after death. In spite of great
efforts by spiritualists, sci-
entists, and others, no proof
has ever been conjured up or
demonstrated.
But, the absence of ma-
terial evidence doesn't keep
our intuitive feelings from
telling us thatlife does go on
after death. In fact, very few
who believe that the human
personality is annihilated at
death are able to maintain
any courage of conviction as
the hour of their own death
approaches..
Anthropologists and other
students of human behavior
remind us that every known
culture has some concept of a
greater life which waits
beyond this one. Some of these
views are primitive and


undeveloped, while others
are arrived at with logical,
complex thought processes.
Most have pleasant and
inspiring aspects. But almost
all have fearful and depres-
sing features as well.
The Bible serves. Christi-
ans as the basis for their
understanding of life after
death. The creation story
informs us of how Adam was
brought forth as a mortal
being. While he truly was a
mortal, he was also won-
drously made in the image of
God. As far as Adam was
concerned, death was a pos-
sibility that could be avoided.
To avoid death, he must
make the right moral deci-
sions, based on what God had
revealed to him. Though
death 'lurked nearby, it was
escapable.
We know that Adam sinned
by not heeding the word of


Toward Und


Over 33,000 Floridians Have $8


Million Just Lying Around Idle


gotten about millions of
dollars worth .of securities,
credits or cash. Our efforts
are designed to find the
rightful owners or heirs and
return this money to them."
This year's abandoned pro-
perty list is the largest ever
reported by Lewis' office,
largely due to a new, aggres-
sive audit program. Exami-


Florida Comptroller
Gerald Lewis is looking for
33,000 Floridians who are
entitled to more than $8
million worth of unclaimed
property..
The multimillion dollar list
represents utility bill re-
funds, credited amounts
from hospital bills, uncashed
travelers checks, unclaimed
wages. or commissions,
stocks and bonds, safe de-
posit boxes, dividends,
money in savings and check-
ing accounts and other sour-
ces of property abandoned a
decade ago.


The types of property listed "P L k. -I C
as abandoned, and their o
worth, varies widely. Mark S to re
Goodman made his last 0
transaction at a North Miami
'Beach savings and loan A major Florida acquisi-
March 1974, and $26.88 re- tion by Dollar General Cor-
mains in his account. A few poratiori will benefit value-
months earlier, Rowena conscious shoppers of Port
Knowles made her last.trans- St. Joe, which already has a
action at the same institution Dollar General Store at 312
and has a savings balance of Reid Ave., President Cal
$9,874.51 remaining. James Turner, Jr. reported recent-
G. Jones left a birth certifi- ly
cate, marriage license and ,
other personal papers in hs '"On February 1, we ac-
safe deposit box at a Tampa quired the Eagle Family
bank seven years ago, On the Discount Store operations in
other hand, Kathryn and Florida," 'Mr. Turner said.
Bartram Balbralth left two "This $30 million transaction,
rings, one gold and one includes 206 retail store
silver, in their safe deposit locations throughout Florida
box at a Jacksonville bank. and a large warehouse near
Comptroller Gerald Lewis Miami.
said, "Our abandoned pro-sition and our
perty section functions like a "This acquisition and our
statewide lost and found store conversion plans mean
department. Thousands of that by mid-1985, Florida will
Floridians have lost or' for- have about 240 Dollar Gener-


LIFE. ANNUITY ACCIDENT HEALTH



BROWN INSURANCE AGENCY
P. 0. Box 897
Port St. Joe, Florida

DICKIE BROWN, G.A. 229-8981


al Stores, including the 36O
already operating in com-
munities such as Port St.
Joe," Turner added.
Nearly 1,100 Dollar Gener-
al Stores now operate in 23
states.
He said the acquisition of
the Eagle chain from Interco
Incorporated, a St. Louis-
based company, will provide
a greater concentration of


ners uncovered approxi-
mately $1 million by per-
forming audits at banks,
savings and loan associa-
tions, corporations, depart-
ment stores, hospitals, in-
surance companies and utili-
ty companies throughout
Florida.
"Our examiners have been-;
*trained to detect accounting


Dollar General

VRiS-v Fn EY lP


)eration
Dollar General Stores in
Florida than in any other
Dollar General market.
"That concentration, com-
bined with a warehouse
much closer to Florida stores
than our other facilities,
means that our Dollar Gener-
al Stores in Florida will be
better served and. bett'
stocked," Turner added.
Dollar' General is head-
quartered in Scottsville, Ken-
tucky. Its other warehouses
are there,' and in Dumas,
Arkansas. Its stock is traded
on the NASDAQ National
Market (symbol: DOLR).


errors and other ways in
which abandoned property
funds have been misidenti-
fied on financial records,"
Lewis said.
Each year, the Comptrol-
ler's Abandoned Property
Section runs legal ads in'
daily and weekly newspapers
throughout the state's 67
counties in an effort to notify
rightful owners of their aban-
doned property. This year
the list will be published
during the second and third
weeks of February.
Florida law directs the
Comptroller's office to try to
locate rightful owners or,
heirs after institutions have
held unclaimed funds for 10
years and safe deposit box
and trust department items
for seven years. .
If no owners or heirs are
found, the unclaimed balance
becomes part of the State
School Fund, a trust designed
to benefit Florida's school-
children.
Floridians who want to find
out if their name or that of a
relative is on the list should
contact one of -the area..:
offices on the Comptroller's
Office or write to Gerald
Lewis, State Comptroller,
Attn: Abandoned Property
Section, 202 Blount Street,
Third Floor, Tallahassee,
Florida, 32301, phone (904)
487-0510.


FAITH HOLINESS
CHURCH
3 miles south on C-30
SUNDAYSCHOOL .............. .......... 10a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP....; ................. 11 a.m.
SUNDAY EVENING .................. 7 p.m.
THURSDAY EVENING ....................... 7p.m.
PASTOR, Rev. William Touchton
Everyone Welcome
4tc2/7


and dark, and right and
wrong which have deter-
mined our characters in this
life will determine our nature
and destiny in the life to
come.
Rejecting the gift of God,
his Son, is a conscious choice
for darkness. And darkness
will be granted to those who
have preferred it. This choice
separates an individual from
God, both physically and
spiritually, for all eternity.
On the other hand,
choosing Jesus and turning
toward the light means more
than a simple continuation of
this present life. Such a
choice opens the door to
God's perfection through his
saving works. It includes the
restoration of the fractured
and distorted image of God,
which our nature now re-
flects. It means life, as life
was intended to be.
The1 entertainment indus-
try and those who amuse us
are indeed mesmerized by
death, ghosts, and things that
go bump in the night. They
reflect a kind of preoccupa-
tion with the subject that
seems irresistible.
As we grow older, death
becomes more than a passing
fancy or a subject of curi-


Gets Little Sober Attention


erstanding Death Is Solemn Event Which

God. His failure to obey God reason he appeared in the we become "like" angels. that people are perplexed,
brought on his eventual person of Jesus. Jesus lived, Note that he didn't say that frustrated, and confused
death. Death had not been an died and overcame death by we would be angels, but about life after death.
issue before his fall from his own resurrection. The would merely be "like" The Bible not only teaches
grace. But now, after the salvation events that are them. Christians to expect life after
image of God had been associated with his life de- Jesus drew his second death, it also teaches that a
fractured and distorted by monstrate that while death is point from an incident when resurrection body will clothe
the forces of sin, it became indeed inevitable, it is not God spoke to Moses about their human spirits. A dis-
necessary for him to die. final. The blessed hope of the Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as cover from nature illus-
resurrection awaits those though they were alive, rates this future event.
As aresultofsin, deathhas who faithfully follow Jesus though each had died long Science has learned that
overcome Adam's race. through death, into eternal before. He told the Sadducees during a mutational period of
Death now shadows life. It is life. that all of their assumptions seven years, every cell in the
the very "bondage of corrup- The Bible is restrained in and conclusions about life human body will have
tion" which separates man its comments about what after death were totally changed. The most amazing
both physically and spiritual- happens to the human per- wrong. They were wrong part of this discovery is that
ly from the- God in whose sonality between death and because they didn't know the while the body changes, the
image he was created. The the judgment day resurrec- Scriptures. And they were human character of the
willful act of turning from tion. But one argument Jesus wrong because they had not individual inhabiting the
God and listening-to other had with the Sadducees gives experienced the power of body doesn't change. In a
counsel has resulted in the some illuminating revela- God in their lives, similar way, our personali-
ominous presence of death tions on the subject '(Mark The problem of not know- ties will remain intact after
As sin affected the history 12:18-27). ing the Scripture is a univer- our spirits have been clothed
of man, it became clear that The first point in the sal dilemma. And the prob- with a God-perfected body.
God himself was the only one argument is that life after lem of not experiencing After the resurrection, we
who could restore balance to death is not the same kind of God's power is certainly will be .seen for what we
creation. The effects of death life we are now experiencing, common today, even among, really are. As with Adam, the
had to be overcome. For this When our mortal life ends, believers. So, it's no wonder moral choices between light


them, death punctuates a life
of union with God. This.
union, once interrupted by
sin, becomes restored and
issues forth peace and rest in
the secure arms of God.
Knowing the Word of God
and experiencing His power,
turns death, the final insult,
into eternal life.


We Want You
To Be A Part of
The Friendly Place


BIBLE STUDY............ . . 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ...... .......... ..11:00A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING .................. 5'45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ...........;....... 7:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY ........................ 7:00 P.M.


Long Ave. Baptist Church
1601 LONG AVENUE
DANIEL W. DUNCAN
Pastor





REWARD

Offered for Return of



2 Cat Traps

taken from the vacant lot behind Terry's
Fried Chicken the weekend of February 1.
The traps are engraved "City of Port St. Joe".
They also have bright blue numbers "1 and
2" on the top section.


City of Port St. Joe
will give a reward for information leading
-to the return of the traps.
Call 229-8247


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With

HANNON INSURANCE

Agency, Inc.

The Insurance Store Since 1943

Auto Home Business Life

Flood Bonds Mutual Funds

8:30 till 6:00 Monday through Friday


221 Reid Avenue


Phone 227-1133


We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


ROY SMITH, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent


FPC Offers


S.Gal 5:22-23


y
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STEMPERANCE
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HIGHLAND VIEW

CHURCH OF GOD
319 Sixth St, Highland View
"Where Jesus Christ Is King
& God's Love Is An
Everflowing Fountain"
SUNDAY SCHOOL..... 10:00 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .. 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ... 6:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY EVENING 7:00 P.M.
PASTOR C. W. WHITAKER


Reg. it'aW

B-D-E-EEE NOW 6599
You've earned your Wings!

Red Wngs
DISCOUNT SHOES INCORPORATED
3123 EL Bus. Hwy. 98 Panama City, FL 904/785-1132


Average

Bill Plan
January's bitter cold wea-
ther is producing higher
electric bills this month for
many Florida Power Cor-
poration customers.
To help 'customers deal
,with the seasonal peaks in
electric bills, Florida Power
offers the Average Billing.
plan. The company will aver-
age bills from the previous
year so customers can pay
about the same amount each
month. There are no sharp
increases, regardless of the
weather.
If, for example, a cus-
tomer's electric bill is $160
this month, their Average
Billing payment may be
much less, possibly $100.
Customers who have already
received their electric bill
can still go on the plan today.
Average Billing is avail-
able to year-round residen-
tial customers who have had
service at their present ad-
dress for 12 months.
Over 33,000 Florida Power
customers are on the Aver-
age Billing plan.
Customers can call their
local Florida Power office to
find out what their average
payment would be and they
can join the plan immediate-
ly.


1** [gil


I Florida
SPower
, r, p ,'C 1 P P I I ', C






THERE'S AWAYOUT OF THIS MONTHS BILL.
Feeling trapped by the weather; locked in with a higher-than-usual bill?
You may not have to pay so much. Not if you call Florida Power and ask
about Average Billing.
We'll show you what your payment would be this month if you join the
plan. And just about what to expect each month from now on.
Average Billing is a smart way to weatherproof Florida
the cost of comfort. P
Hot or cold, youi bills will stay pretty luke.

Call Florida Power to see If you can save this month with Average Billing.



To qualify, you must be a year-round resident with electric service at your present address for the past 12 months.


osity to most of us. We can
know little about death itself,
but we do experience its
effects. Loneliness, grief and
frustration are just a few of
the deep feelings it can bring.
On the other hand, there
are those who come to
understand death from a
different perspective. For


-


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Paper


Towels


DELTA


Uhile FOOD PPIC S


7OEL


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VALU


Limit 3 with $10
or More Food
Order


MEADOW GOLD
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6% oz. Real Value Chunk
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2/$100


Family Pak
Sliced Slab


Choice T-BONE STEAK...


29


Family Pak Assorted
lb. 2.99 Pork Chops


Choice RIB EYE STEAK
Choice Bnls. Sirloin Stea
ALL MEAT STEW.....
BRISKET STEW......


'S


.. 1. 3.88 Country Style Loin Ribs-
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ik Ib. 2.8 Pork Loin Roast... ..
,. b.,1.59 FREEZER BEEF SALE
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lb.... Ib39 Beef Loin Ilb. 69 1


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plo
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FROZEN FQOODS


PIZZAS


26 Oz.
Mrs. Smith's Cherry Pie
15 Oz. Crisp & Crunchy


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Mrs. Paul's Fish Fillets....


999


4 roll pkg.


8 Oz.
Real Value Whipped Topping 69


OLDFLOUR
MEDAL UR


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ALL PURPOSE
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5
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Bag


1 .~. -.--~-
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U.
v.-- '~.
WA


10V2 Oz. Campbell's
ChickI
12 oz. RI
25 oz. Wh
Cheese Pi
64 oz. Re*
12 oz. Br
Carnation
22.Oz. Dish Liquid 2E
SUNLI(


DELl /Bi
FRESH SALADS MADE DAILY
FRESH PIES MADE DAILY .. each1.99
Delicious Fountain
Milkshakes .. 59 or2$1 DRINKS.. 35, 45p, 55'
A BREAKFAST AT SAVEWAY
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2 Scrambled Eggs, Grits, Bacon
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BREAKFAST $29


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Specials
Feb. 20-26,


for
1985


BULK U.S. POSTAGE
PAIDCARRIER ROUTE
PAID PRE-SORTED
Permit No. 65 "OCCOPANT P. 0. BOX __
Port Si. Joe, FL32456 -
- .


0 <
ITA X


* Handy Displays Plenty of Parking
Your Shopping Convenience

Family Pak Choice

'ryer Drumsticks


GEORGE W. DUREN,owner& Manager
510 Fifth Street Port St. Joe, Florida
Limit Rights Reserved Cigarettes & Tobacco Products Excluded In
Limit Deals USDA Food Stamps Accepted
J--- -- -- ---____- __


Quartered

Die Legs


. Ib.99,


$1.39


"Wow 10 ... Buckt
Chitterlings 4.99

Cube Steak I$199


TURKEY HAMS .............
PORK ALL MEAT STEW .......
LYKES ALL MEAT BOLOGNA....
DUBUQUE ALL MEAT WIENERS..
BAR S TASTY DOGS..........


101a.lb~.59
lb. $1.29
1 b.$1.29~88
.....1 floz.dl98


3UT AND WRAPPED LIMITED QUANTITY


. lUSDA Choice Iowa WHOE LEST
b.$139 RIBB EYE ,b.s3" CUBE STEAK


Nooile Soup3l


. $1.88


DAIRY DEPT.


CRACKERS.


.* o .


e House Apple Sauce79_
P H vCope e M79fr2.iza


Fa Y Complete Mix for 2 Pizzas
M ItI IA 28 oz. Chef Boy Ar Dee *

Value Apple Juice


o Corned Beef

ot Cocoa Mix.


12 O. Plain or
ith Marshmallows


$189

$133


99
$139


99C


64 Oz. Real Value
Orange Juice..
12 Oz. Butter-Flavor Texas Style
Merico Biscuits
12 Oz. Kraft
Velveeta Slices


OOO


0 0


3/$100


* 0


46 oz. Mt Olive Fresh KOSHER DILLS.......... 79'
5 oz. Shield BAR SOAP .................. 4/
6 oz. Green Giant MUSHROOMS .......... $1.29
16 oz. FANTASTIC Bathroom Cleaner ........ $1.19
12 oz. NILLA WAFERS ................... .49
19 oz. CHIPS A HOY . . . . . .99


$119


00000


KERY

FRESH BAKED PASTRIE
Come See What We've Got for You!
GLAZED DONUTS ......... 1.19 doz. or 6/69
CINNAMON TWISTS ............ 25 or $100
NHONEY BUNS ................ 35or 3/$100
DELICIOUS DANISH ................. ea. 39c
CAKE DONUTS................ 25 or 6/$100
BROWNIES (2" sq.) .............. 35c or 3/$100
APPLE FRITTERS................... ea.39C
JELLY DONUTS ................25 or lo
SDONUT HOLES .......... 3dozen$119
BAVARIAN CREME FILLED LONG JOHNS .. ea. 39


Different Menu Each Day -
PLATE LUNCH. 2.79
DELI LUNCH MENU


MEAL TICKET
Avoid waiting.
Just have your card punched.


Buy 5 Plate Lunches (w~ihT,
Get 1 FREE!
Ticket good for 60 days, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Monday through Saturday
$1570 plus 78' 1648
You save $3.31
-WEWILLNOTBE RESPONSIBLE OR LOSTCARDS
*^ i 1 '-.00


S\ \ p I *, <,


THURSDAY
Fried chicken, lasagna,
meat loaf.
FRIDAY
Fried chicken, catfish,
Swedish meatballs.
SATURDAY
Fried chicken, stuffed
potatoes, red beans &
rice.


MONDAY
Fried chicken, spaghetti
& meatballs, cube steak.
TUESDAY
Fried chicken, chicken &
dressing, meat loaf.
WEDNESDAY
Fried chicken, beef stew,
chicken pot pie.


I WHOLE
.01N


Family, DPLk


A


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$139










THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, FEB. 21, 1985


- Public Notices -


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
I Case No. 84-254
WILLIAM C. SUSSMAN, TRUSTEE,
Plaintiff,
va.
GEORGE A. REDD, et al,
Defendants.
R. J. HOPPER,
Cross and Counter-Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM C. SUSSMAN, TRUSTEE,
et al,
Counter-Defendants and
Cross-.Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Ms. Catherine Taylor, Trustee, as
sole director of MULTI-PROPERTY
SSERVICES, INC., a dissolved
Florida corporation; 10-12 High
Street, Burnham, Bucks SL17JH
United Kingdom
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Counter-
Claim and Cross-Claim has been filed
against you In the above styled action,
and you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to It on
Jack G. Williams, Attorney for Cross
and Counter-Plaintiff, R. J. Hopper,
whose address Is P. 0. Box 124, 833
Harrison Avenue, Panama City, Florida
32402, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before service
on the above named attorney, or Im-
mediately -thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the Counter-
Claim and Cross-Claim.
DATED this 12th day of February,
1985.
JERRY GATES,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /1/ Tonya Krfox, Deputy Clerk
4t 2/21

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
IN RE: The Marriage of
JOEL EUGENE WHITE,
Husband, Respondent,
And
OPAL PAULINE WHITE,
Wife, Petitioner.
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: Joel Eugene White
P. 0. Box 101
Colquitt, GA 31737
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your Answer
or other response to the Petition on
Petitioner's Attorney:'
ROBERT M. MOORE
P. 0. Box 248
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
and file the original thereof In the Cir-
cuit Court Clerk's Office, Gulf County
Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, on or
before the 21st day of March, 1985. If-
you fall to do so, a Final Judgment for
the relief sought may be granted by
Default.
DATED this the 12th day of February,
1985.
JERRY GATES,
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: /s/ Tonya Knox, Deputy Clerk
4t 2/21
NOTICE
The Survey of General Revenue Shar-
Ing, Form RS-8, ending September 30,
1983, and Its supporting documenta-
tion Is available at the City Clerk's Of-
fice, Municipal Building, Port St. Joe,,
Florida, from the hours of 8:00 A.M. un-
til 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday,
Sfor examination.
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE,
By: /a/ L A. Farris, City Auditor/Clerk
11t21/1

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT'OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY. Case No. 85-12
IN RE- The Estate of
WILLIAM C. FOREHAND,
deceased.
NOTICE OF ANCILLARY
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the Estate of
WILLIAM C. FOREHAND, deceased, Is
pending in'the Circuit Court for Gulf
County, Florida, the address of which Is
Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456. Thie name and address of
the Personpi Representative and of Per-
sonal Representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are required to-
file with the Court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) All claims against the Estate
(2) Any objections by any interested
person to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the Will, the
qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue or jurisdiction of
the Court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
DATED: The date of first publication
of this Notice of Administration:
February 21, 1985.
sl/ MARILYN FOREHAND
17232 13th Northwest
Seattle, Washington 98177
FRED N. WITTEN, .
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
P. 0. Box 445
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
904/229-8253
2t 2/21


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT C
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AN
GULF COUNTY.
CASE NC
IN PR
IN RE: The Estate of
ROSA LEE PACE BYRD,
deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the Es
ROSA LEE PACE BYRD, deceas
Number 85-11 Is pending In the
Court for Gulf County, Florida,
dress of which Is Gulf Count
those, ort St. Joe, Florida 324
names and addresses of the P
Representatives of the Estate
forth below.
All Interested persons are req
file with the Court WITHIN
MONTHS FROM THE DATE C
FIST PUBLICATION OF THIS N
(1) All claims against the Esti
(2) Any objections by an Int
person to whom notice was mal
challenges the validity of the V
qualifications of the Pe
Representative, venue or jurisdi
the Court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FC
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
Notice of Administration: Febru
1985.
is/ DIANA P. JULIUS,
Personal Representative of the
of
ROSA LEE PACE BYRD,
117 Apollo Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
FRED N. WITTEN,
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
408 Long Avenue
P. 0. Box 445
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
904/229-8253


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT C
STATE OF FLORIDA, JIN'ANI
GULF-COUNTY.
-. Case N
IN PR
IN RE: The Estate of.
RICKY ALAN HARPER, Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATI
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING C
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ESTATE AND ALL PERSON
TERESTED IN THE ESTATE: .
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
ministration of the Estate of
ALAN HARPER, deceased, Ca
85-8, Is pending In the Circuit C
Gulf County, Florida, Probate D
the address of which Is Gulf
Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida
The Personal Representative
Estate Is Eloise 0. Harper, who
dress lIsRoute 1, Box 240, W
chka, Florida 32485. The-namea
dress of the Personal Represen
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claim
demands agalns the Estate
quired, WITHIN THREE MI
FROM THE DATE OF THE
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
with the Clerk of the above 6our
ten statement of any claim or d
they may have. Each claim mus
writing and must Indicate the b
the claim, the name and address
Claimant or his Agent or Attorn
the amount claimed. If the claim
yet due, the date when it will t
due shall be stated. If the claim
tingent or unliquidated, the na
the uncertainty shall be stated
claim is secured, the security s
described. The Claimant shall
sufficient copies to the Clerk to
the Clerk to mall a copy to ea
sonal Representative.
All persons Interested in the
to whom a copy of this Notice
ministration has been mailed
quired, 'WITHIN THREE (3) MO
FROM THE DATE OF THE
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
any objections they may hav
challenge the validity of the dec
will, the qualifications of the pi
representatives or the venue or Ju
tlion of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AN
SECTIONS NOT SO FILED W
FOREVER BARRED.
DATE of the first publication
Notice of Administration: Febru
1985.
Is1 ELOISE 0. HARPER as Persc
Representative of the estate of
Ricky Alan Harper, deceased.
WILLIAM J. RISH
303 4th Street
P O; Box 39
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER
904/229-8211


BID NUMBER WWTP 192
The City of Port St. Joe, Flor
quests bids for the following:
1. One. (1) LEVEL RECORDED
TRANSMITTER.
2. One (1) ELECTRONIC
TROLLER.
3. One (1) ELECTRONIC COt
SYSTEM CONVERTER.
4. One (1) EIM VALVE OPERA
WITH FLOOR STAND. STEI
INDICATOR.
Specifications may be obtain
the City Clerk's Office. P. 0: BO
Port St. Joe, Florida. 32456
opening will be held March 05. 1
8:00 P.M.. EST. in the MuI


PUBLIC NOTICE
Combination Location.Design
Public Hearing
White City Bridge on SR 71
Work Program Number 3113732
State Project Number 51020-1514
Federal Project Number BRF-131-1(13)
Gulf County, Florida
Notice Is hereby given that the'Florida Department of Transportation will h
Public Hearing at the Gulf County Courthouse, County Commission Room
Fifth Street, Port St. Joe. at 7:00 P.M. on March 14. 1985.
This hearing Is being conducted to afford Interested persons the opportunity
pressing their views concerning the location, design, social, economic, an
vironmental effects of replacing the bascule bridge over the Gulf Intraci
Waterway in White City.
Maps, drawings. National Environmental Policy data, and other pertinent inf
tion developed by the Florida Department of Transportation, in addition to w
views received from other agencies or public officials, will be available for pub
section and copying at the Gulf County Parks Planning Commission, 1001
Street (Mosquito Control Building), Port St. Joe or the Florida Departme
Transportation, Project Development and Environmental Office, Chipley. D
material will be available at the meeting location from 6:00 P.M. until the He
Persons desirous of submitting written statements and other exhibits in


WHITE CITY BRIDGE
S.R. 71 GULF CO.




_. .c 1 it Cit' -"
-- h-- .,"Tow-


-s. "..-

- -J .. --._ S -


-CT CI


,,;jpROJECT LOCATION


of, or in addition toc
statements may do so
Hearing. Written state
or exhibits may be sub
as part of the Hear
received at the F
Department of Trans
tion. District Office, Po
fice Box 607, Chipley, I
32428, within ten
following the Hearing.
(1) Residence an
businesses, will be reli
by the preferred altern
This Hearing is being
pursuant to Florida S
334.211; the FloridaA
Plan; Federal Aid HI
Act, 23 U.S.C. 128; 40
Parts 1500-1508 an
C.F.R. Par,771.
Public
2/28


FOUR-
)F THE
D FOR
O. 85-11
IOBATE


ION
state of
ed, File
Circuit
the ad-
y Cour-
456. The
personal
are set
ulred to
THREE
)F THE
NOTICE:
ate, and
rested
led that
VIII, the
rsonal
action of
ACTIONS
IREVER
of this
uary 21,


Estate









2t 2/21

FOUR-
>F THE
D FOR
No. 85-8
OBATE
ed.
ON
CLAIMS
ABOVE
NS IN-

the ad-
RICKY
lse No.
ourt for
ilvislon,
County
a32456.
of the
10e ad-
ewahlt-
and ad-
tative's
ms or
are re-
ONTHS
FIRST
E to file


"Very Pleased with Team"

Gulf Co. School

Belin Talks Basketball to


The Gulf County School
Board met in regular session
on January 8, 1985 at 5:30 PM
at the Gulf County Court-
house in Port St. Joe. The
following members were pre-
sent: Oscar Redd, Waylon
Graham, Gene Raffield, Ted
Whitfield, James Hanlon.
The Superintendent was also
present.
The meeting was opened
with Prayer and followed by
the Pledge of Allegiance.
Charles Cleckley and
Harold Thomas, auto me-
chanics instructors, met with
the Board and explained the
auto mechanics program at
Wewahitchka High School
and Port St. Joe High School.
The Board thanked Mr.
Cleckley and Mr. Thomas for
their presentation.
On. motion by Whitfield,
second by Graham, the
Board unanimously ap-
proved the minutes of De-
cember 4, 1984.
John Wright appeared and
addressed the Board relative
to his son's expulsion. Wright
stated he was not requesting
a formal hearing on this
matter. The Board agreed to.
allow his son to be transport-
ed by bus in order for him to
enroll in the adult school
program. Conditions of this
arrangement were to be
worked out during a meeting
with the Superintendent
scheduled for 8:00 A.M. on
January 9, 1985.
On motion by Hanlon,
second by Raffield, the
Board unanimously app-
proved the following person-
nel matters:
Accepted a letter of retire-
ment from James McInnis to
be effective on August 31,
1985;
Approved for Essie Hall to
return to work on January 7,
1985;
Approved extra compensa-
tory supplement for Debra
Betts as Student Council
sponsor at Wewahitchka
High School for the 1984-85
school year;
Approved full-time em-


n ,wri- Building at the Regular Meeting of the
demand City Commission.
st be in
basis of CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
s of the By: /s/ L A. Farris, City Auditor/Clerk
ey and 2t 2/14
n Is not
become NOTICE OF NAMES OF PERSON AP-'
is con. PEARING TO BE OWNERS OF ABAN-
ture of DONED PROPERTY ,
1. If the 'Pursuant to Section 13, Chapter 717,
shall b Florida Statutes;-enritlfed "Florida Dis-
deliver position of Unclaimed Property Act",
enable notice Is hereby given that the persons
ch Per- listed below appear to be owners of
unclaimed personal or intangible pro-
Estate perty presumed abandoned. THIS
of Ad- 'DOES NOT INVOLVE REAL ESTATE.
are re- Apparent Owne:. Adams, F. E., Box 991,
ONTHS Port St. Joe, FL 32453, account number
FIRST 3089-1984-0001; Cloud, S. D., 530 9th
E, to file St., Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
ie that 3089-1984-0002; Coney, W. L., 162 Rob-
edent's bins Ave., Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
personal .3089-1984-0003; Daniels, R. E., Rt. 1,
urisdic- Box 230, Wewahitchka, FL 32465,
3089-1984-0004; David,- K. A., 113
ND OB- Bellamy Circle, Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
ILL BE 3089-1984-0005; Davis, S.M., 132 2nd
Ave., Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
of this 3089-1984-0006; Garland, Claude, P. 0.
lary 21, Box 477, Port St. Joe; FL 32453,
0151-1984-0313; Gibson, .W.R., Rt. 1,
onal Wewahitchka, FL 32465,
3089-1984-0007; Goldeburg, J. L., PO
Box 155, Wewahitchka, FL 32465,
3089-1984-0008; Martin, D.S., Rt. 3, Box
,43D, Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
3089-1984-0011; Matlock, G.V., Rt. 1,
'Box 119, Wewahitchka, FL 32465,
3089-1984-0012; Miles, C.M., 892 Hayes
Ave., Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
3089-198410013; Norris; G.J., 1910
2t 2/21 Cypress Ave., Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
3089-1984-0015; Puc)kett, George W. or
Patricia, 804 Garrison St., Port St. Joe,
FL 32453,0224-1984-0011; Stevens, C.J.,
Ida, re- 1312 Woodward Ave., Port St. Joe, FL
!R AND 32453, 3089-1984-0017; Thomas, W.W.,
233 Avenue F, Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
CON- 3089-1984-0020: Watson, V.R., 557
Hayes Ave.. Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
NTROL 3089-1984-0023; Webb, T. J., Box 712,
Port St. Joe, FL 32453, 3089-1984-0024.
RATOR Information concerning the amount or
M AND description of the property (such as
unclaimed checking accounts, savings
S accounts, utility deposits, stocks,
d from x bonds, insurance policies, safe deposit
6. Bid boxes, etc.) and the names and ad-
198. a dresses of the holder of such personal
nicipal property may be obtained by any per-
son possessing an interest in the pro-
perty by addressing an Inquiry to
Gerald Lewis. State Comptroller, Attn;
Abandoned Property Section, 202
Blount Street. Third Floor Tallahassee.
FL 32301 (904) 487-0510. The Pensacola
telephone number .for information is
(904) 436-8520. Be sure to mention the
account number AFTER the name as
published in this notice. Unless proof
of ownership is presented to the holder
hold a by April 30. 1985. the property will be
. 1000 delivered for custody to the Comp-
troller of Florida. Thereafter, all further
of ex- claims must be directed to the Comp.
nd en- troller of Florida.
oastal GERALD LEWIS. 2t 2/14
COMPTROLLER OF FLORIDA
orma-
ritten IN THE CIRCUIT COURT. FOUR-
blic in- TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
Tenth STATE OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
ent of GULF COUNTY.
display IN RE: The Matter of the Adoption of:
aring. JENNY LOUISE ACREE and .
place -CLEVELAND ROSS ACREE.
NOTICE OF SUIT
orall TO Cleveland Ross Sadler. Sr..
at the Address Unknown
agents YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a
emitted -Petition for Adoption has been filed
ing, if against you and you are required to
lorida serve a copy of your Answer or other
iporta- response to the Petition on Petitioner's
ost Of- Attorney:
Florida ROBERT M. MOORE
days P.O. Box 248
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
and file the original thereof in the Cir-
d (2) cult Court Clerk's Office, Gulf County
located Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456,
ate. on or before the 14th day of March,
g held 1985. If you fail to do so, a Judgment for
Statute the relief sought may be granted by
Action Default.
ghway DATED this the 6th day of February,
C.F.R. 1985.
nd 23 JERRY GATES,
Clerk of Circuit Court
sh 2/14 By: Is/ Tonya Knox,
S& 31t4 Deputy Clerk 4t12/14


Port St. Joe High School
head basketball coach Jim
Belin told the Rotary Club
last Thursday he was "real
pleased" with the perform-
ance of the Sharks this year.
"In spite of the late start we
had, our boys have played
real well and presented
themselves as a team with
solid performance.
Belin said he. thought the


football championship in-
volvement and the delay in
starting the basketball sea-
son here in Port St. Joe had
helped rather than hurt the
performance of the team.
"The boys are not burned out
with basketball like so many
players get at the end of the
regular three month sea-
son. We didn't start basket-
ball until other teams had


I ployment for George Cox at
Wewahithcka High School
beginning January 7, 1985;
Accepted a letter of resig-
nation from Clayton Wooten
as principal at Wewahitchka
High School effective January
7, 1985. The Board tabled the
decision on Mr. Wooten's
accumulated leave until a
later date;
Approved the temporary
employment of Duane Mc-
Farland as P, E. instructor
at Wewahitchka Elementary
School effective January 7,
1985;
Approved Jerry Kelley as
temporary supervising prin-
cipal at Wewahitchka High
School with some continued
responsibilities at Wewahit-
chka Elementary School with
a supplement of $1,200.00;
Approved, on a temporary
basis, to assign Bryan Bax-
ley on full-time administra-
tive designee duties at Wewa-
hitchka Elementary School
with a supplement of $800.00,
On motion by Raffield,
second by Whitfield, the,
Board unanimously ap-
.proved the Targeted Selec-
tion i Process in reviewing
applicants for the principal-
ship at Wewahitchka High
School.
The Board discussed the
up-coming conference for
School Board-Superintendent I
Conference. No action neces-
sary.
The Board reviewed Gulf
County's Quality Instruction
Incentive Program Plan indi-
cating that Gulf County's
plan is in full compliance
with the law.
The Board reviewed cor-
respondence. No action ne-
cessary.
The Board reviewed mi-
nutes of Wewahitchka High
School Middle School.concept
Study Committee meetings
of November 13. and Decem-
ber 4. No action necessary.
On motion by Whitfield,
second by Raffield, the
Board .unanimously ap-
proved the following pro-.
gram matters:
Approved Gulf County
Educational Improvement
Project Applications for the
1984-85 school year;
Approved amendiAent to
Gulf County Master Plan for
Inservice Education for the.
1984-85 school year.
On motion by Graham,
second by Raffield, the'
Board unanimously ap-
proved that the bills be paid:
On motion by Raffield,
second by Graham, the
Board unanimously adopted
a Resolution recognizing the
outstanding achievements of
coaches, band, cheerleaders,
team, student body and fa-
culty for their enthusiasm
and spirit to win the state
Class AA football champion-
ship for the year 1984.
On motion by Raffield,,
second by Whitfield, the
Board unanimously app-
proved a contract between
the Gulf County School Board
for student transportation via
private vehicle.
The Board appointed Oscar
Redd to continue to serve on
the Small School District
Consortium for the 1984-8
school year.
The Board reviewed cor-
respondence whereby all
schools in Gulf County are
accredited by the Southern
Association of Colleges and
Schools for the 1984-85 school
year.
The Superintendent report-
ed that Highland View Ele-
mentary and Wewahitchka
High School was winner of the
$500.00 award for the highest
percentage of parents parti-
cipating in the first grading
period parent breakfast for
the 1984-85 school year.,
The Board reviewed a
follow-up report of the 1980
Gulf County Organization
and Management Study. The
report highlights the im-
provement strategies used
by the district as a result of
the study.
There, being no further
business, the meeting ad-
journed to meet again on
February 5, 1985 at 9:00 AM.

The Gulf County School
Board met in special session
on January 14, 1985 at 9:00
A.M. in the Gulf County
Courthouse in Port St. Joe.
The following members were
present: Oscar Redd, Way-
lon Graham, Gene Raffield,
Ted Whitfield, James Han-
lon. The Superintendent was
also present.
Chairman Redd presided
at the meeting.
On motion by Raffield,
second by Whitfield, it was
the unanimous vote of the
Board to accept the Superin-
tendent's recommendation


journed.


Kee Promoted


The Gulf County School. to Staff Sgt.
Board met in special session a
on. January 18, 1985 at 3:30
P.M. at the Gulf County Sabrina D. Kee, daughter
Courthouse in Port St., Joe. of John W. and Oneida
The following members were Whitley of 312 Avenue C, Port
present: Oscar Redd, Way- St. Joe has been promoted in
Ion Graham, Gene Raffield, the U. S. Air Force to the
Ted Whitfield, James Han- rank of staff sergeant. '
lon. The Superintendent was Kee is a dental assistant at
also present -e is A i -Fo s-Bs e
A motion was made by Air ce Base,
Whitfield, second by Graham Alaska, with the Air Force
to approve a request from Hospital.
Clayton Wooten for payment Her husband, Air Force
for his accrued annual leave. Tech. Sgt. Harold E. Kee, is
The motion was carried with the son of Julian Kee and
Redd, Graham, Hanlon, Carnetta Kee, both of Key
Whitfield voting YEA and West.
Raffield voting NAY. The sergeant is a 1974
There being no further Te sergea is a 1974
business, the meeting ad- graduate of Port St. Joe High
journed. School.


noarut IVIIIU-Lte


Big Turnips

The unusually cold weather in recent weeks hasn't af-
fected the size of root crops, such as turnips. When Jim Long of
Mexico Beach harvested his turnip crop, he didn't have any
good greens to go with the roots, because the cold had wilted
the tops, but he could make several meals from the roots. He's
shown holding three turnips, with a combined weight of 10
pounds. -Star photo


that Janna Goss be suspend-
ed from her position at Port.
St. Joe High School for five
days for unwillful neglect of
duty as stated in Florida
Statues 231.36 4(c). The
Board confirmed that four
and one-half of the five day
suspension shall be without
pay.
There being no further
business, the meeting ad-


been playing a month -and
we're at our peak right here
at tournament tiree.
Belin said the fan interest.
here in Port St. Joe-espe-
cially during the last two or
three years-"has been terri-
fic. This year has been great
for fan support. Our basket-
ball program has made some
money for the school athletic.
program because of the
heavy fan support."
The coach said he felt one
of the things which has built
fan interest is the fact that
the Sharks play the top talent
in basketball here in the
Panhandle now. "We play
the Malones, Grand Ridge,
Wakulla, Marianna, Blounts-
town ... teams which have a
tradition of good basketball
and our fans know they will
see an interesting game
when they come out and pay
their money." Belin said he
thought playing the top talent
in the Panhandle also makes
the Sharks a better team.
As for the Sharks this year,.
Belin said the biggest thing
the team has going for it is
quickness. "Man for man,
from front to back, our boys
are probably the quickest in
the Panhandle. We have
about a step of quickness on
any team in our area. Many
of them have quick boys. on
their teams, but none have as
many on their squad as we


1st United
I 3 Methodist Church
" ME nTOrDISM Constitution & Monument

PItSUirf Is Port St. Joe, Florida
Grace and Freedom

'CHURCH SOHOOL .................... 9:45A.M..
I MORNING WORSHIP ............... 11:00A.M..
!EVENING WORSHIP ..,................ 7:00 P:M..
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP ....... 6:30 P.M..
I CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) ....... 7:30 P.M.'
Pastor, Alvin N. Harbour, Jr.




THE PULPIT OF THE CITY



First Baptist Church
Port St. Joe, Floroda

SUNDAY'S SCHEDULE .
9:45 ........ Bible Study (all ages)
11:00 .....Worship (Live WJBU-AM)
6:00 ............ Church Training
7:00 .......... .... . Worship

HOWARD BROWNING. RON KEGLEY
Pastor MusiclYouth


Compare the prices




our competitors give


XEROX COPIERS and MEMORYWRITERS


Star Publishing Co.

PRINTERS PUBLISHERS OFFICE SUPPLIES


Rotary

do. That's our biggest attri-.
bute and we use it in every
gamee"
Belin said the biggest
weakness of the team is
height and depth. "Our tal-
lest man, now, is Terry
Thomas at six feet, two
inches. That's not very tall t6
play some of the teams we
play. The way we have to
play, we're careful to stay
out of foul trouble. We try to
stay close the first half of the
game and then we'll come at
you in the second half and
pour it on."
The coach said the first
round of the tournament
play-offs begins Thursday of
next week. He said Port St.
Joe will be entering the
District II tournament which
will be held in Wakulla.
"Right now, we're concen-
trating on winning at least
three of the games we have
left on the schedule so we will
be seeded-iumber one in the
tournament. If we get that ,
number one seed, it'll be a
definite advantage for us as a
team."
Playing in the District
tournament will be Wakulla,
Havana, Florida High,
Blountstown 'and Port St.
Joe.


SAY YOU SAW IT
IN THE STAR!


I ~- I


PAGE TWELVE







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, FEB. 21, 1985


Every Generation Is Making History for the Next
Every Is


' By Margaret Biggs
Last week Angel Barbee
brought a yellowing copy of a
newspaper to my office, and
said, "Oh, Mrs. Biggs, look at
this."
: Angel held a Shelbyville
Times Gazette very rever-
ently, for it was the John F.
Kennedy assassination edi-
tion.
Those of us who were living
during that day find it hard to


realize how long ago that
tragic event was and how
distant it seems to young
people like Angel.
When I was Angel's age,
the popular question to ask
was "Where were you when
Pearl Harbor was attack-
ed?" As an elementary stu-
dent, I had sung the song
whose title became one of the
catch phrases of World War
II: "Remember Pearl Har-
bor".


High School Class SendQ

Shands Hospital Childre


"Living Together Around
the World" booklets are


being sent to the children's
ward at Shands Hospital in


,. as. 4- 41-

CHURCH of CHRIST
Twentieth Street and Marvin Avenue ,
SUNDAY SCHOOL ...................... 10:00A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ...................11:00 A.M.
k EVENINGWORSHIP..................... 6:00 P.M. i
WEDNESDAY EVENING................. 7:00 P.M.'
STEVE STUTTS, Evangelist
1- 4.1 141- 41b



NEW BETHEL
African Methodist Episcopal Church
146 Avenue C Phone 227-1213
Rev. Theodore:Andrews, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL..................... 9:30 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ............. 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ................. 6:00 P.M. :
"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man Our Brother"



Custom Plumbing

Installation

I4ew Construction
Single & Multi-Family Dwellings

STOKES

Plumbing Co.

648-8353
P. 0. Box 274
Mexico Beach, Florida
RFW042744



CLYDE WHITEHEAD, Jr.
ACCOUNTANT


TAX SERVICES
CORPORATION INDIVIDUAL
PARTNERSHIPS
SPECIALIZED HANDLING OF IRS AUDITS

ACCOUNTING SERVICES
SMALL BUSINESS and
I INDIVIDUAL SERVICE
TAX & FINANCIAL PLANNING
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
S901 Garrison Avenue
| Port St. Joe, Fla. Phone 229-8994
Si Uk.. SO _____________________________________________________


Those students who were in
my classroom at St. Joe High
the day Kennedy was killed
have three questions to ask:
"Where were you when Pre-
sident Kennedy was killed?'
"Where were you when Bob-
by Kennedy was killed?" and
"Where were you when Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. was
killed?" *
It is hard for me to realize
that those former students
are now middle-aged adults

s Books to

men's Ward
Gainesville.
The Varying Exceptionali-
ties 7-9 History class at Port
St. Joe High School produced
picture booklets as a culmi-
nating unit activity.' The
booklets are about children
from other lands. The pic-
tures show their ways of
living. In. each booklet are
pictures of homes, foods,
,clothing, means of travel,
work and play.
The group of booklets
include "Living in Hot Wet
SRegions, Near the Poles of
the Earth, Where the Dry
Sands Drift, and Where Tall
Mountains tower."
This is the students' way of
sharing and bringing joy to
someone who is less fortu-
nate than they.
Mrs. Maxine Gant is in-
structor of the History class.

Openings In
Elderly Care
The Department of Health
and Rehabilitative Services
currently has openings in the
Home Care for the Elderly
Program. This program pays
a monthly reimbursement to
a full-time caretaker of an
elderly person.
Eligibility requirements
are: Must be 65 years of age
or older; Must have a
full-time caregiver assisting
the elderly person; Elderly
person must be homebound
and in poor health; Must
meet certain financial re-
qqirements.
SFor.more informationcon-
tact Aging and Adult Ser-
vices on Monday, Wednesday
and Friday in Port St. Joe at
229-6229, or Tuesday and
Thursday in Wewahitchka at.
639-5276.

Stripling Sent
to Sheppard
Airman Stephan M. Strip-
ling, son of Clyde M. and Pat
K. Stripling of Wewahitchka,
has been assigned to Shep-
pard Air Force Base, Texas,
after completing Air Force
basic training.
During the six weeks at.
Lackland Air Force Base,
Texas, the airman studied
the Air Force mission, orga-
nization and customs and
received special training in
human relations.
In addition, airmen who
complete basic training earn
credits toward an associate
degree through the Commu-.
nity College of the Air Force.
The airman will now re-
ceive specialized instruction
in the aircraft maintenance
field.
His wife, Renee, is the
daughter of Fred and Ruth
Attaway of Altha.


(


Years Today's Events


whose main contact with
classrooms these days is to
send their offspring to school.
While we are living history,
it is difficult to categorize it
as such. I have a half-filled
savings bond book. We stu-
dents at Troy Elementary
School made a trek to the
post office each Friday to
buy savings stamps as part
of our patriotic campaign.
Rationing stamps were an
imperative item during

Gulf School


MENU

Monday, February 25
Sliced turkey, tomato
wedge, baby limas, buttered
rolls, cake, and milk.
Tuesday, February 26
Spaghetti with meat sauce
and cheese, cole slaw, Eng-
lish peas, buttered rolls, and
milk.
Wednesday, February 27
Tacos with cheese, lettuce,
tomato, mixed fruit, kidney
-beans, cookies and milk.
Thursday, February 28
Chicken, mashed potatoes
with gravy, green beans,
rolls and milk.
Friday, March 1
Hamburgers, lettuce, to-
mato, pickles, French fries,
cookies and milk.
Menus may change without
notice due to the availability
of foods.

Girl Scouts In
Thinking Day
Saturday, February 23 at
Wewahitchka State Park, the
Girl Scouts of Wetappo
Neighborhood (Gulf County)'
will be holding their Thinking
Day event. Thinking Day is
actually on February 22, but
is usually celebrated on the
first Saturday following it.
Thinking Day is the birth-
day of Lord Baden-Powell
(who founded Scouts) and his
wife, Lady Baden-Powell
(who is the world chief
guide). In some countries
Girl Scouts are called Girl
Guides.
On this day, Scouts thinkk"
of their sister Scouts all over
the world.

Garland Goes
to Chanute
Airman Drexel T. Garland,
son of Howard and Rosa L.
Garland of 123 N. Park Ave.,
Port St. Joe has been assign-'
ed to Chanute Air Forte
Base, Ill. after completing'
Air Force basic training.
During the six weeks at
Lackland, Air Force Base,
Texas, the airman studied
the Air Force mission, or-
ganization and customs and
received special training in
human relations.
In addition, airmen who
complete basic training earn:
credits toward an associate
degree through the Commu-
' nity College of the Air Force.
The airman will now re-
ceive specialized instruction
in the fire protection field.
He is a 1980 graduate of
Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High
School.


horld War II, and I even
have some of those left. I do
not have any for shoes left,
however; I was so active in
those days that I had to use
stamps from my kinfolks to
keep myself in shoes.
Who would have thought
that so many of those every-
day items would take on such
historical significance four
decades later?
I appreciate your reading
this American History Month
column sponsored by the
Saint Joseph Bay Chapter of
the DAR. Your phone calls
and letters are appreciated.
One alert Gulf County
citizen sent me a copy of the
first column with arrows
drawn from the question-
naire to the student's essay.
There was a contradiction
about the name of the island
on which the State of Liberty
stands. "Which is right?" she
asked.
The answer is neither. The
island on which Miss Liberty
stands has been re-named,
What was once called Bed-
loe's Island is now Liberty
Island.
John Joseph Parker, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Parker
of Overstreet is the seventh
grade winner of the annual
DAR essay contest.
In his essay; John uses the

correct name, Liberty Island
as he uses an original ap-
proach:
"Statue of Liberty"
Good afternoon ladies and
gentlemen. Welcome to the
U.S.S. Parker of D.A.R.
Tours. Please have a. seat
and we will begin our' trip to
Liberty Island. On rqute I
will tell you the history of the
Statue of Liberty. I will also
describe it and explain why it
needs repairing.
The origin of the Statue of
Liberty formerly called "Li-
berty Enlightening the
World" is an interesting one.
The idea of the Statue of
Liberty was conceived by.
Edouard de Laboulaye. La-
boulaye then brought the
concept to the French gov-
ernment. The French gov-
ertiment accepted it because
they .thought it a great
symbol to the world of the
relationship between the
United States, and France.
Auguste Bartholdi designed
-it and Alexandre Effel helped
design the interior frame-
work. On July 4, 1884, it was
assembled in France and
shown to the American am-
bassadors. The Statue of
Liberty was then taken
apart, loaded into two hun-
dred fourteen crates and
shipped on the Isere to
Bedloe's Island, now known
as Liberty Island. After
arriving May of 1886, it was
assembled and placed on a
granite pedestal which was
paid for and put together by
the American people. When
all was completed it was
unveiled and dedicated on
October 28, '1886.
Dedication day of the Sta-
tue of Liberty was a raw,
drizzly day. President Gro-
ver Cleveland and most of his
cabinet attended. The har-
bour was full of steam boats
blowing their whistles so
much that anyone giving a


4


322 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-8899


ty is thirty million dollars,
but it only cost 530,000 dollars
when it was first built.
The Statue of Liberty is a
symbol of our country's
power, freedom and relation-
ships with other nations. If it
crumbles, it will be a symbol
of power crumbling to weak-
ness,; freedom giving way to
slavery, and our. relation-
ships with other nations


the Young
declining to unfriendly
terms.
Well, ladies and gentle-
men, this is the end of our
trip. It is time for you to
disembark and see the grand
lady for yourselves. I hope
this information will help you
appreciate this symbol of our
American freedom. Thank
you for traveling D.A.R.
Tours.


speech could hardly be
heard. This caused a prob-
lem because Auguste Bart-
holdi was supposed to unveil
the statue after Senator
William Evarts finished his
speech. Since Bartholdi could
not hear him, someone was
supposed to wave a handker-
chief to him when Senator
Evarts was through. The
over anxious signalman was
sure the Senator was almost
through, so he waved the
handkerchief, and the veil
dropped. The Statue of Li-
berty's face could be seen for
the first time. The crowd
went wild. It is not known if
Senator Evarts finished his
speech.
As you can see, the Statue
of Liberty is a huge struc-
ture. It is 151 feet tall
excluding the pedestal, but it
is 305 feet tall including the
pedestal. Its right arm is
forty two feet long, and its
hand is sixteen feet five
inches long with an eight foot
long index finger. Its head
* measures seventeen feet
three inches by ten feet. The
Statue of Liberty weighs
about 225 tons in all. The
pedestal rests within an
eleven point star formed by
the walls of Fort Wood. At the
Statue of Liberty's feet is a
chain with a broken shackle.
She holds a tablet in her left
arm with the date July 4,
1776, in -Roman numerals.
Something interesting about
the Statue of Liberty is that
its face is designed to look
like the face of Auguste
.Bartholdi's mother. The ori-
ginal choice for the outside
covering was bronze, but it
was too heavy so copper was
used instead, The inside
framework is made of iron.
The Statue of Liberty needs
repairing because it is falling
apart. Some of the things that
are wrong with it are as
follows: the frame of the
crown is corroded; there are
weak connections between
the arm and shoulder; it has
a hazardous handrail on the
stairs; it has a corroded and
discolored gown; the interi-
ors are hot and humid; it has
corroded lattice girders; it
has twenty-five 'thousand ri-
vets that need replacing and
has warped and buckled
frame bars. The total cost for
repairing the Statue of Liber-

Auto And
Homeowners
Insurance
JEAN MALLORY
639-5322 Wewahitchka
or
785-6156 Panama City


MeoLpolitan
Metropolitan seallystandsby)ou.
UFEILALMfiAL.FoU.InR.Lit Mi


Corporations
Partnership
Individual


I ~
2?-'


ACCOUNTING SERVICES
Small Business and Individual

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
PROFIT and LOSS STATEMENTS
TAX and FINANCIAL PLANNING

Gulf Accounting Services

312 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-6332





Sur-Way Electric

411 Reid Avenue


Commercial, Residential

Remodeling and

Service Work

CHARLES SO WELL
REG. NO. ER-004631
26 Years Experience
Licensed and Bonded

Call Shorty at

229-6798
__-^- -i^_^ _^^^
^rrT.r


It's Difficult to Realize That In Only A Few


Will Seem Distant to


FOR SALE

DOGWOOD TERRACE


PATIO HOMES

807 Woodward Ave. Port St. Joe
BUY NOW AND SAVE ON
Pre-Construction of Phase II 2 Bdrm. $37,500
STILL AVAILABLE
One large 2 bedroom at $43,500
Two one bedrooms at $33,500
10.85% 30 Year Fixed Mortgage
Available for Qualified First Time Homeowners
Insulated windows, heat pump, all appliances plus dishwasher, wall
to wall carpet, vinyl in kitchen and bath. Paved private parking.
SOME UNITS AVAILABLE FOR RENT

Cape San Bias Realty, Inc.
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER

Call
Bill Koran at 227-1290 or
Theresa Mashburn at 229-6916 2,c1/10


COSTIN INSURANCE

AGENCY, INC.

(Formerly M. P. Tomllnson Insurance Aaencv)














All Forms of Insurance
* Homeowners Auto Flooc
o BOsiness Packages Group
Hospitalization Life Boats
Pulpwood & Logging
Mobile Homes


PAGE THIRTEEN'


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
22nd Street Mexico Beach
CHARLES M: PARKER and
DAVID L. TAUNTON, Ministers
WORSHIP SERVICE............... 9:00 A.M., C.S.T.
CHURCH SCHOOL ................ 10:00 A.M., C.S.T.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) ...................




Expert TAX

Preparations


I















FOR TOTAL SAVINGS
.= .-,Z .-- -m w _d i


USDA Choice Tablerite Beef
Boneless (Family Pak)
CHUCK
STEAK


lb.


Tablerite
PORK
STEAK


IGA TABLERITE
COOKED
HAM
Sonce$198
10 ounce


USDA Choice Boneless
(Family Pak)
SHOULDER
ROAST


- -~ 1b7


Tablerite SLICED
BEEF
LIVER


USDA Choice Boneless
Shoulder (Family Pak)
SWISS
STEAK

$158
Counitr Skillet SPLIT
(Family Pak)
FRYER
BREAST

$lb 128
1b. IL


Lykes POWER PAK
SALAMI or
SPI. LUNCHEON.
.$128
Ib.


Tablerite Lean Famil
(5 Ibs. or more)
GROUND
BEEF


y Pak
ID


Country Skillet
FRYER
WINGS
Family Pak

.58


Regular or Beef
BRYAN
CORN DOGS

8 o $188
18 oz. *


USDA Choice
BONELESS
STEW
BEEF

$ 178


Hickory Smoked
PORK
NECKBONES

.68
Sunnyland's Pork
Hot or Mild
SAUSAGE ROLLS
$ 158
Ib. I


I" I C R F O S N


Ivory Liquid ( 1off) . . .. 32oz. 2$279
Campbell's Cream of Mushroom Soup no. 1 2/78C
Nabisco Ritz Crackers ....... 2oz.
Spam Luncheon Meat .......... 99
Hormel Potted Meat..... ...... .301 lo
Hormel Vienna Sausage ........ oz. 2.$ 00


1_ AKEY DPARMEN


Castleberry Brunswick Stew.
Tetley Tea Bags (/2 gal.) ......
Larsen Veg All ...........
Martha White Muffin Mix...
Pops Rite Popcorn ........
Ronco Thin Spaghetti ......


. .24 oz.
3~~1 ....lct.
B 3 3 3 16loz.
3~~~ oz.
.~ ~~ b.
.~~~ oz.


TI


89C
$175
2/991
47
43c
31$100o


IGA
Asst. Pies ..


8" $129


IGA
Wheat Bread 20oz.95


f~ 0~31~3








DAVID
Foodliners .


RICH'S
205 Third'St. Port St. Joe
* Hwy. 71 Wewahitchka


BULK RATE
U. S. POSTAGE PAID
Permit No. 3
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465
PRICES GOOD
FEBRUARY 20-26, 1985


_I irAL (U
~IAJ-Iv-l'


IGA-
PIZZAS ...
I 12 oz.
RANGE JUIC
GREEN GIANT BROCCOLI SPEARS or
russel Sproutswuer
FISH STICKS ....
EA M ...OWGOLD
WiE CREAM
MEADOW GOLD


I RR


BLUE BONNET QTRS.


NE


C


,E 99


99"


Sm m


. a M.


a m


21b4s. 3
$199
2 g.allo Jl,


ICE CREAM SANDWICH 6,pak]
32 oz.
MRS. SMITH'S APPLE PIE $299


IGA MILD, MEDIUM or SHARP.
CHEESE .. z.


KRAFT AMERICAN
CHEESE SINGLES.


$219
Ib. I


SEALTEST LNL
COTTAGE CHEESE 16oz.99
PICLSBURY .: '
CRESCENT ROLLS ct.99


FRIENDLY PERSONALIZ-
ED SERVICE AND LOW,
LOW EVERYDAY PRICES!


California
NAVEL ORANGES


8 for


00


Yellow Onions 331b.bag69


Florida White Grapefruit
Florida Pink Grapefruit
z Calif. Iceberg Lettuce .
Canadian Rutabagas .


5 lb. ba,~g $17
5 lb bag$19


* q U U
U U U U U


2 heads88
. lb. 19


SESSIONS or DOMCO
PEANUT $ '2
OIL o.2
a5 oz. 3
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE
EXPIRES FEB. 26, IMS

ii1:11*11 KN E


IGAGRADEA
LARGE
EGGS 1
DOZEN
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE
EXPIRE;aEEB 4,194U5 .. .



TIDE $ 59
DETERGENT
49 oz.
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE


EXPIRES FEB. 26, 1915


U.S. No. 1
WHITE

POTATOES


RED or WHITE GRAPES.


,1 $
lb.
bag


29


.. lb. m39


ALABAMA NUGGET
SWEET POTATOES ...... 3b.tra88


Florida Juicy

ORANGES.bag


ANJOU PEARS.


* 0 0 00


Fresh Green

BROCCOLI


99


b49


79
bunch V


t~P


mmm


.....


YT


m; i ~~ ri









PAGE SIXTEEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, FEB. 21, 1985


House for sale near launch
& store at Douglas Landing,
Wewa. 2 bdrm, back screen
porch, wrap around front
porch & attached cypress
carport. Call 871-1772.
It2/21
House situated on Bluff
overlooking Gulf, stucco ex-
terior. 3 Ig. bdrms., 2 baths,
living dining rm combina-
tion with wet bar, terrazo
flooring throughout, all ap-
pliances included. 2 car car-
port. Fully landscaped yard.
New roof and completely
renovated within past 6 mos.
Cen. a/c and natural gas
heat. Contact Mr. Richard
Azar, Atlanta, GA. Area
code 404/525-4864 between 9
a.m. and 5 p.m. for details.
,V- n .*.
3 bedroom, 1 bath, Duval
St., Oak Grove. $17,000. For
information call 227-1789.
4tp 1/31
Home for Sale
BY OWNER.
Re-decorated Ig. 3 bedroom
home with lv. rm. and den;
fireplace and Ig. carport.
Located on fenced corner lot,
1 block from school. 2011
Long Ave. Call 229-6673 after
4 p.m. or weekends.
2tp 2/14





On choice wooded city lot.
BY OWNER. 3550 sq. ft.
New, energy efficient, 4 BR,
2 baths, professionally land-
scaped, established garden,
cypress fenced back yard,
convenient double carport,
work shop, fireplace, ceiling
fans, attic fan, Pella thermo-
pane windows, inside win-
ddw shutters throughout.
All offers considered. Phone
229-8989. 4tp 2/14
Extra nice home in good
location. 3 bdrm., 2 ba., cen.
air, dbl. carport, kitchen
equipped, utility room, 2
lots, lg..grape arbor. Contact
Ed Ramsey, 229-8737.
tfc 9/13
3 bedroom, 2 bath, large
den, fully carpeted, dbl. car-
port, chain link fence on 2.
lots. Located in Port St. Joe.
Call 648-5804 days, 648-8414
evenings. tfc 7/19:


FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
Evenings and Weekends:
Margaret Hale 648-5659
Frances Chason 229-8747
Bo Boyett 648-8936
Donnie Lange 229-8208


One acre in Overstreet.
$4,200 negotiable. 648-8947.
4tp 1/31





Refrigerator/freezer 22'
Admiral, 2 door, harvest
gbld, ice maker, $200. Call
648-5643.
One bassinette, $15; 4 car
seats, 2 small, $5; odds and
ends baby clothes. If in-
terested call 229-8485.
Sharp Carousel micro-
wave oven. .Phone day
227-1813 or night, 229-6108.
Mobile home, 1966, 44x12'
Tiffany, 1 bdrm., air cond.
$2,995 or make offer.
648-8245. ltp
Mitchell Craft boat, galv.
trailer, 70 h.p. Evinrude
motor with tilt & trim. Low
hours on motor. Call
227-1791. Itp 2/21
Yellow and black
Labrador puppies, full blood-
ed.Call 229-6739. It 2/21
Boat trailer winches, power.
winch no. 712c, 1500 lb. pull,
$75; new manual winch 2,000
lb. pull $25; depth finders,
Vexilar operate on 12 v bat-
tery, $60; Ray Jeffers. no.
5005 operates on 2 -6 volt dry
batt., $30; trailer hitch with
2" ball, 3500 lb. load $12.
Prices firm. 648-5643.
1980 Magnolia 24'x70'
mobile home. NADA value,
$26,000.00. Loan value
$21,270.00. Asking $20,000.00.
Call 229-6353 after 5 p.m.
tfcl/17

$25.00 REWARD
for Any Sewing Machine
We Cannot Repair
SPECIAL1 $9.95
to clean. oil aid adjust ten-
sion on your sewing mach-
ine. We guarantee your
) machine can sew on any
fabric.
The Sewing Room
410A Reid Avenue
227-1151
tfc 6/7
Kabota tractor with diesel
engine, bush hog, disc,
cultivator & planter. Plow
Horse tractor with 5 h.p.
motor. Call 229-6803 or
229-8840. tfc 12/6
<*


Roy Smith
Karen King
Marsha Young


NOW OPEN ON SATURDAY
FOR THE REAL ESTATE INVESTOR
Six dwellings in Port St. Joe and one in White City. Two are completely fur-
nished and four have refrigerator and stove. All seven for only $132.000.
Will not sell separately.
HOMES
St. Joe Beach: Owner financing. $12.000 lot or $14.000 with trailer.
St. Joe Beach: Excellent view. 2 bdrm.. 2 ba.. deck. $125.000.
Port St. Joe: Nice neighborhood. brick. 3 bdrm.. 2 bath. dbl. carport, stor.
rm/workshop. $55.500.
St. Joe Beach: Custom built, many extra features. 3 bdrm. 2 bath. f.p.. deck.
Ig. lot. spring-fed pond. $88.000.

Howards Creek: Almost new double-wide trailer, partially furnished. 3
bdrm.. 2 bath. f.p. nice corner lot. $27.900.
Vard Ridge: Brick. 3 bdrm.. 2 ba.. assumable mortgage. $46.000

Port St. Joe: Executive home. excellent for entertaining. 4 bdrms.. 2 baths.
3000 sq. ft.. f.p.. Ig. living area. $95.000,
St. Joe Beach: Ocean view. corner lot. 3 bdrm.. 1/, bath. deck. screen
porch, reduced to sell at $64.500. Owner financing.

Port St. Joe: Starter home or rental property. 3 bdrm.. 1 ba. $29.500.
Howards Creek: Lg. 2-story. 5 bdrms.. 2 baths. Franklin stove, screen porch.
until. -m. $47,900.
Indian Pass: Single family home. 2 bdrm.. 1 ba.. Ig. liv. rm.. din. rm.. $38.000.
Port St. Joe: Quiet neighborhood. frame. 3 bdrm.. 2 ba.. den. sep. dining rm..
carport, until. rm. $44,500.
St. Joe Beach: Stilt house. 2 bdrm.. 1'V bath. den or study. until rm.. carport.
$69,500.
St. Joe Beach: Beach house. 2 bdrm, frame, f.p., screen porch. $79.000.
RESIDENTIAL LOTS
Mexico Beach: Already has water hook-up. 100'x100'. only $8.800.
Ward Ridge: Two lots. 75'x150' each. $6,600.
Gulf Aire: Wooded lot, 65'x115'. $26.500.
Blueridge Mountains: 1 acre, $6.250:
Howards Creek: % acre, $1,500.
Indian Pass: High and dry. $11,500.
Jones Homestead: 2 lots. $8.400.
TOWN HOUSES
Cape San Bias Beach: 2 bdrm., 2V2 ba. $80,000.
St. Joe Beach: New 2 bdrm., 1 '% ba., on Hwy. 98, unobstructed Gulf view,
dedicated beach, furnished $65,300: unfurnished $52.700.
COMMERCIAL LOTS
White City: One acre near canal, $33,300.
Overslreet: Two acre plots on Intercoastal Canal. $16,000 ea.
Port St. Joe: downtown, 60'x90' corner lot, $18,000.


Pool table, $150; large
rocker horse, $15; wedding
dress, size 8, $75. 229-6336.
tfc 2/14
BASSBOAT
14 ft. Tidecraft, 50 hp Mer-
cury on new Drydock trailer,
complete with large luxury
seats, trolling motor, depth
finder, 2 tanks, 2 batteries.
$1,295.229-8989. 4tp2/14


TRY
WATKIN'S
PRODUCTS
229-6023
4tp1/10
5"x7" note cards of
Beacon Hill Lighthouse in
full color. See them at Gulf
County Public Library or
Wewa State Bank in Port St.
Joe. Library will receive
$1.00 for each card sold.
4tp2/7
Trampoline, round 13% ft.
diameter, mat is 3 years old,
600 lb. capacity, excel, cond.
$230. Call 229-6962.
Htfc 12/24
One used 30 gal. electric
water heater, counter
model,, works well. Phone
229-6965 after 5:30 p.m.
tfc 1/24
Small families paying too
much- for health insurance?
Call Mutual of Omaha.


648-8557.






ATTENTION LIC
4-20 and 2-20 AGEN
terested in .hiring tw
licensed property a
nalty agents. Guaral
come ,$15;-18,000.00 p
MUST LIVE IN
COUNTY. Days 6
evenings 674-8466.
GOVERNMENT
$15,000 $50,000/yr. I
All occupations,
805-687-6000 ext. R
find out how.





IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCU
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
GULF COUNTY.


1977 Chevy Nova, new
tires, new paint job. Call Ben
Armstrong, 639-2748 or
Melba Peak, 229-6547. 2tp
Chevrolet pick-up, 1970, 6
cyl., short-wheel base. Best
offer. Contact Chief Theo
Harris or Greg Wood, City of
Mexico Beach. 648-5700 or
769-7968. ltc 2/21

1978 Chevette, 2 door, 4
speed with air 'conditioning,
am/fm cassette. In very
good cond. $1,500. Call
648-8174 after 6 p.m.
3tc 2/14
1980 Mercury Bobcat, 4
speed trans., am/fm radio,
door speakers, ps, pb, a/c,
remote sport mirrors. A-1
condition. 229-6503, or may
be seen 127 Hunter Circle.
$2,800. 2tp 2/14
1975 International Travel-
all, p.s., p.b., a.c., V8, a.t.
Ideal for pulling shrimp or
oyster boat. 87,000 miles,
$750. 1969 Datsun converti-
ble, removable hardtop, .4
cyl., dual carb., runs good.
Restoration started, Price
negotiable.. Days 227-1798,
nite 229-6812, ask for Bill.
1977 Malibu Classic, good
condition. Call 229-8108.
4tp2/7


-mG---
Lcmii*fg


4tp 1/31 YARD SALE
Girl's and toddler's clothes,
sizes 1, 2 and 3; winter and
summer clothes, sizes 6 and
7. Women sizes 12, 14. Toys,
children's books, odds and
ends. Large round chair, $25.
ENSED Everything half price after 2
TS. In- p.m. Sat., 8:30 to4. 5219th St.
S. fuly 229-6604.
wo fully1
nd cas- YARD SALE
iteed in- Sat., February 23, 8:00 till
er year. 4:00. 667 Parker Ave., High-
GULF land View. New and used.
74-542/7 Rummage Sale: 3 fami-
4tp 2/7 lies, Friday, Feb. 22, from 9
JOBS. to 2 on the corner of Highway
possible.. 98 & 17th St., Mexico Beach.
Call
.. Call Yard Sale: 803 Marvin
-6850 to Ave., Sat., Feb. 23, 10:00
tp 2/21, a.m. till 3:00 p.m. Come see
2/21 what 25,cents will buy.

* CARPORT SALE-Sat.,
Feb. 23, 9 a.m. 4 p.m. EST.
Hwy. 71 White City 5th
house on right after crossing
IT OF THE bridge. Toys, dishes,
AND FOR cameras, clothes, furniture,
odds & ends.


Case No. 85-13
I. W. DUREN. LINA W. DUREN,
ISAAC K. DUREN and GEORGE W.
'DUREN,
Plaintiffs.
Vs.
DONNELL PETERSON and Wife,
RUBY L. PETERSON.
Defendants.,
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: Donnell Peterson*
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an
action for the foreclosure of a Mort-
gage on real property located in Gulf
County. Florida. described as follows:
Lot Twelve (12). Block 1007. Mill-
view Addition Unit No: 1. Gulf
County. Florida. as per official plat
thereof on file in the Office of the
Clerk of Circuit Court. Gulf County.
Florida.
has been filed against.you and you are
required to serve a copy of your Answer
or other response to the Complaint' on
Plaintiffs' Attorney:
ROBERT M. MOORE
P. 0. Box 248
Port St. Joe. Florida 32456
and file thd original thereof in the Cir-
cuit Court Clerk's Office. Gulf County
Courthouse. Port St. Joe. Florida. on or
before the 28th day of February. 1985, If
you fail'to do so. a Final Judgment for
the relief sought may be granted by
default.
DATED this the 28th day of January.
1985.
JERRY GATES.
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Is/ Tonya Knox. Deputy Clerk
4tc 1/31



Century 21
St. Joseph Bay Realty
BEACH RENTALS
14 miles from Tyndall Air
Force' Base. Townhomes
and cottages for rent by the
month. Furnished and un-
furnished. Some weekly
throughout the winter. Con-
tact.Century 21, St. Joseph
Bay Realty, Inc., Realtor,
904/648-5716.
*
SPECIAL BUY
2108 Juniper Ave.,
Port St. Joe
Absolutely beautiful 3
bdrm., 2 baths, formal liv.
rm. & din. rm. Den, fire-
place, dbl. garage. Many
other extras. By appt. only.


Wanted: Piano in good
cond. Call 227-1620 after 3
p.m. ltc2/20


For Rent: 3 bdrm. apart-
ment, furnished, 1616 Long
Ave. Call 227-1199.
tfc 2/14
Furnished 2 bedroom, 1
bath gulf-front house, $350
yr. round. Call 648-8586 or
1-725-3616. tfc 2/21
For Rent: 2 bedroom un-
furnished house at Jones
Homestead. $160 month, $50
deposit. 227-1674. tfc 2/14
Room for Rent: by day,
week, month. Air cond., TV.
Thames Hotel. 229-8723. 302
Reid Ave. tfc 7/5
No need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST..
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
227-1251.
For Rent: Casa Del Mar
Townhomes & Cottages, 1
bdrm. cottage or 2 bdrm.
townhouse fully furn., color
tv, no pets. Only miles from
Port St. Joe on Hwy. 98. En-
joy the beach and be close to
town, too. Call Wandi today
for. our LOW WINTER
RATES. 648-8446. tfc 1/17
. For Rent: Mini-warehouse
storage. For more informa-
tion call 229-6332. tfc 1/17





There will be a regular
communication of Port St.
Joe Lodge No. 111, F.&A.M.
every first and third Thurs-
day at 8:00 p.m.
Norman M. Martin, W.M.
Billy D. Barlow, Sec.
pd. thru 12/84

MEETING NOTICE
American Legion Post 116
meets 1st Monday each
month at 730 p.m.
American Legion Building
Corner of Williams Ave.
& Third St.
Albert Thames,
Commander
Jarrell Smith, Adj.
tic 2/14/85





KEEBLER
Snack products we all use.
In your area. No selling.
Service est. Company ac-
counts from your car.
$250-$750 weekly profit
potential, requires 10-12
hours per week. $10,000
cash investment. Must
have good credit and be

bondable. Send name, ad-
dress & phone number c/o
Box 308, this paper. 2tp 2/21


Women today are on the
go, around the clock. More
of them are working than
ever before, so they need
every helpful shortcut and
timesaver they can find to
cope with today's fast-paced
lifestyles.
Once dressed however,
any number of clothing
emergencies can occur dur-
ing a hectic day. Here are
quick solutions to ten
common problems, courtesy
of Mennen:
STATIC CLING?
Wet a paper towel or cloth
with cold water and rub it
on your legs. This will rid
the static cling from the
dress or skirt once it falls
against your legs.
SWEATER FUJZZ-ON.
YQOR CLOTHES?


Experience more lovely
hands with Acrylic
Sculptured Nails. New in the
area from Las Vegas.
Call Lynn 648-i758
2tp2/14

Psychological Services for-
anyone with problems in
day-to-day living. Gulf Coun-
ty Guidance Clinic, Port St.
Joe. 227-1145 (24 hours).


COSTIN INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
All Forms of Insurance
322 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tfc 11/1



H. L. ALLEN & SON
General Contractor
New and Remodeling
S All Types
25 Yrs. Experience
o 648-5080
or P.C. 763-2924


Going Fishing?
Stop here first
for a complete
line of

Fishing Tackle

HURLBUT SUPPLY
306 Reid Avenue



SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!


Sears Catalog Sales

,227-1151

Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reid Avenue

l sumial oulolIII u ntOHH"HIIIIm'IMm lltlHtlltl nIIIIIIIIII


SPACEVIEW
SATELLITE
SYSTEMS
(FCC Licensed
Technicians)
SALES, SERVICE
& INSTALLATION


227-1590
Ililal$ uallln lllulilslllllnl illl ithll I titItil iutl itll alll lII


Put the sweater in a
plastic bag unsealed in the
freezer for 15 minutes
before wearing, and it won't
shed for the rest of the day.
HAVE A LINT PROB-
LEM?

Apply the sticky side of
scotch tape or masking tape
to the problem area and the
lint will disappear.
GREASE SPOT?
Apply powder to the area.
Wait about 25 minutes and
gently blow away, do not
rub. Leave remaining pow-
der on until you can have
the garment cleaned pro-
fessionally.
ZIPPER STUCK?
Just rub the track with
dry soap or pencil lead, and
it should glide with ease.


Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday, 4:00 P.M., E.S.T.
Tuesday, 8:00 P.M., E.S.T.
St. James Episcopal Church
Thursday, 7:00 P.M., C.S.T.
Wewa Medical Center

SPRING SPECIAL
Lawn Mower Repair $19.95
plus parts. Oil changed &
blade sharpened free.
BOB'S SMALL ENGINE
REPAIR
648-5106
4te 2/14
SAY YOU SAW IT IN
THE STAR!!


HEATH TV REPAIR
311 Madison St., Oak Grove
All Work Guaranteed
Call 227-1782 or
if no answer call 229-6911
and ask for Betty.
4tp2/21


THE LAUT'DRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Open 7 Days A Week
'Mon. Fri., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sat., 8 a.m. 6 p.m.
Sun., 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
tfc 11/1


Wauneta's
Accounting &
Income Tax

-Accounting & Income 'Tag
Service Small Business
Individual
Monthly Accounting
Wauneta Brewer Pat flohman
Owner Assistant
220 Reid Ave.
Phone 229-8536


Rub it between the palms
of your hands or put talcum
powder on the knots and
rub gently.
CAN'T FIND AN
EMERY BOARD?
Use the "striking" part of
a. matchbook to deal with:
rough or broken nails.
LIGHT LEATHER
HANDBAG OR SHOES
LOOKING DIRTY?
Just rub the scuffed or
dirty spot with nail varnish
remover .'on a piece of
cotton, wool or tissue.
PANTY HOSE
SNAGGED OR RUN?
Apply a dot of clear nail
polish or a bit of hairspray
on the area.
HEM DOWN?
For an emergency solu-
tion, use masking or trans-
parent tape until you can do
more permanent repairs
when you get to work.


We buy, sell and trade us-
ed furniture. Get good prices
for your unwanted furniture.
Country Peddler. 229-8966.
tfc 10/25


Design, Drafting, Site
Plans, Remodeling,
Repairs, Maintenance,
New Residential
Construction
Reasonable Rates
THORNTON ASSOCIATES
648-5142
4tp2/7


St. oseph Bay


W. S. IBiff) Quarles
CUSTOM HOMES
MULTIFAMILY'
229.-795
RG0040048



ST. JOE CUSTOM
BUILDERS





--Commercial Building
-Residential Building
-Cabinet Work
CGn. Con. RG 0033843

GLEN F. COMBS
227-1689

P. O. BOX456
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
tfcT7


kills bugs for
up to six months,
and saves you about $100 yearly
in costly pest control services.
Use of Sprayer free with
purchase of Rid-A-Bug
HURLBUT SUPPLY' CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe. Florida


REEVES FURNITURE &

REFINISHING SHOPPE


325 Reid Avenue


Call and Talk to Us About Getting
Your Furniture Refinished to Look
Like New. We Buy and Sell Used
Furniture.
Your Western Union Representative


REFERENCES Phone 229-6374


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
(904) 227-1133


.--


The Sewing Room
410 A Reid Avenue O
Port St. Joe, Florida ON

"Quality Fabrics at Affordable Prices"


PAGE SXTEENTHE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. -


THURSDAY, FEB. 21, 1985


SERIES


I