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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02568
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: February 14, 1985
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02568

Full Text













USPS 518-880

FORTY-EIGHTH YEAR, NUMBER 24
L._


THE STAR
Industry-Deep Water Port-Fine People-Safest Beaches in Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1985


Dredge Delay Rejected



Childers Asks for Another Spoil Site: Study of Bay


Robert Nedley rebuts claims by Wayne Childers while
Dave Maddox waits his turn to speak. -Star photo


It appeared as if Gulf County was going to get
maintenance dredging performed on the entrance to its
harbor with little or no fanfare this time. Five years ago,
local interests had to sqeeze out a permit in a period of just
over a year in order to get the maintenance work done.
Wayne Childers, Gulf County chairman of the park
planning commission, reminded interested parties of that
marathon quest for a permit five years ago, when he told
the County Commission Tuesday the county shouldn't allow
the dredging until two questions were answered. Childers
would have the County oppose placing the dredge spoil back
into the bay waters and would delay dredging until an
alternate site could be located. Secondly, he would have the
county ask for a study to see what effect such dredge and
spoil action is having on-the Bay.
Childers cited reports filed by the Corps of Engineers
when the dredging permit was issued back in 1980 as a basis
for his opinion that the fill was harmful to the bay and its*
marine life.
The Corps was finally given a permit to place spoil from
the harbor entrance dredging in the spot known locally as
the "Shark Hole". The spoil area is directly adjacent to the
spot to be dredged. The permit was given .only after
exhaustive studies were made by DER and DNR at the'
time.
Childers, in his claim the dredging method was causing
turbidity in the Bay, said it may be decreasing the seafood
.harvest in the 'bay and suggested the county needs: to
request a thorough study "to see what's happening."
Robert Nedley, a Vice-President for St. Joe Paper


Company, then took the floor telling the 'Commission,
"There have already been several studies made of the bay.
Florida Power Corporation made intensive studies of the
bay just a few years ago. The City of Port St. Joe keeps
weekly records.about what is happening in the bay to a
degree to satisfy DER. If there was any sort of danger from
this dredging plan, DER would have denied the Corps a
permit long ago."
Nedley said the county didn't need the problem it had
five years ago with getting dredging done. "Every agency
involved in the bay has.their reasons why spoil shouldn't be
placed here or there. None of these agencies stopped this
permit," Nedley said. His argument was that.it must be a
safe operation, since no objections were forthcoming.
Dave Maddox, local harbor pilot, took the floor to
repudiate some of Childer's statements. Childers had said
the currents in the bay travelled in a counterclockwise
direction, carrying silt back to the southern 'portion of the
bay and settled over an area which is an incubator for
seafood reproduction. Maddox said the currents run in the
opposite direction to, Childer's claim. "They are what
causes' part of the problem with trying to bring a ship
through: that narrow 'pass", .he said. He also offered the
opinion that fishing was better in the bay than at any time in
recent history. "Captain Carl Raffield told me they made
the largest mullet strike in St. de Bay this year that at any
time in the past. Shrimp boats can be seen in the bay now by
the dozens, rather than just now and then".
,Maddox said the Hess Oil Terminal operation was
making plans to re-open again if the channel could be


opened where fully loaded tankers could get into the dock.
"This could mean a lot, if we're needing new jobs as bad as
you say we are".
Maddox 'said the channel has to be opened if there is to
be a safe operation in and out of this harbor. "We can't
delay now and wait for studies which have been done over
(Continued on Page 3)





Wayne Childers,
Ak pictured above, has a
pensive look on his
"face as he listens to
Robert Nedley and
Dave Maddox object
to his suggestion that
S' further studies be
made in the bay for
dredging and that
another spoil site be
located.


Jail

DOC Still Has ,A Growing Lisi

Of Deficiencies for County Facility

It apparently hasn't taken Gulf to a head and be done with it", Harrison
County's new Sheriff, Al Harrison, long lo told the Commission.
realizethe-hasElerbetween the county.and ---.. ---ish- verified-Harrison's--statetnehtss--
the Department of Corrections isn't just a saying state officials are "trying to flim
matter of cleaning up a few areas and flam the county. They have a suit against
they'll be off the county's back us. Weneed to tell them to fish or cut bait,
Harrison; who was tackled by the ,one or the other, and get this matter
DOC concerning their listed deficits in settled."
the physical facilities of the county jail, Harrison said he couldn't see the
said they are still pressing the county to reasoning behind some of DOC's requests
make more and more changes. and demands. "If we had a jail full of
Sheriff Harrison said on his second people on occasion, I could see some of
day in office he would try to do what they. their demands, but not in a jail where our
(DOC) wanted and that would get them largest census is from eight to ten
satisfied and "off Gulf County's back", prisoners", the Sheriff said. "We have
Harrison told the Commission Tues- done nost of what they ask. Now they.
day, "It hasn't worked that way. The should leave us alone or tell us why."
more we do to the jail, the more- they The Sheriff expressed his chagrin at
want done.. I get interrogatories every the situation by saying, "They just keep
day from DOC about something new at on and on and on and on with their gigs at
the jail. It's getting to be a pain in the us."
neck. I don't want to go through the term Attorney Rish pointed out one area
with a constant harassment from DOC county had more demets against them
bout the conditionofour jail". after they had completed some: of the
The Sheriff said he had done most of areas of improvement than they had
the things which were on the list he was before the work was started.
handed when he went into office, "byt
the list is still .growing. They add Sheriff Harrison said his department
something hnew every day." may need some budget help before the
The Sheriff and attorney William J. end of the current year. He pointed opt
Rishsaid the problem is getting to be the communications system, which was
almost unbearable from the standpoint of installed in 1968, is getting in bad shape
trying to comply with DOC's demands and,needs replacing. He pointed out the.
and operation criteria. "They have a suit department had four vehicles which had
against us now. Let's tell them to sit down over 100,000 miles on them and three with
and talk with us .like men about the more than 75,000 miles. "We'll need to
.situation, or go ahead and take us to replace these 100,000 plus mile vehicles
court. At any rate, let's bring this mess (Continued on Page 3)


Decision Expected In March


Robbie Brunger of Apala- Commission Tuesday.
chee planning Council told Brunger has applied for the
the Gulf-County Commission grant through a state and
it may be early March before federal government program
a decision will be made on which will furnish money to
the Community Block Grant local governments to lend for
which will provide $650,000'to the purpose of establishing or
make a low interest loan to enlarging.-a firm which will
Raffield Fisheries get its bring new jobs to an area..
processing plant bach into Raffield's burned last Oc-
--produetion in a report to'th_*"--tober; idling some 100 to 125


workers who were employed
by the giant seafood handling
facility.
Under the block grant
program, the money would
be provided the county and
borrowed by Raffield. When
it was repaid, it would go into
a revolving fund to aid some
other business or industry
with capital problems..


4 Men Charged with Battery
Three Oak Grove men and offenses range from fondling Worley have been released
.one Wewahitchka man have a minor female to sexual on their own recognizance,
been arrested by the Gulf intercourse with a minor while the other two men are
County Sheriff's Department female. still in the Gulf County Jail


and charged with sexual
battery and sexual abuse 6f a
minor child.
According to Chief Depdty
Mike White, there were three
young girls 'involved in the
case, ages 11, 14 and 15. The


Arrested, were Jason
Dykes, 57, Toby Worley, 58;
Ronriie Brake, 39 all of Oak
Grove, and Hubert Prescott,
54 of Wewahitchka.
White said Dykes and


White said investigation is
still in progress in the case
and there is a good probabl-
. ity there will also be other
arrests made. The investiga-
tion is being assisted by the
Division of Youth Services.


Brunger suggested another
source for money allowing
the APC to manage the fund.
"If the planning council
handles the fund, we may be
able to get an additional $2.5
million loan for Raffield or
any other industry in our
district."
The Commission showed
interest inBrmunger's-plan but
decided to see if the extra
money is available before
changing the direction, of
their emphasis.
WANTING JOBS
Commissioner Owens, who
is director over the Misquito
Control department, reveal-
ed the Commission had re-
ceived 80 applications to fill
one vacancy advertised for
by the Department. "We've
never had response like this
before. It's just another
indication of how much im-


pact the burning of Raffield's
had on our area and how we
need to get things moving on
helping them to get started
re-building".
Commissioner Billy
Branch suggested that since
the Department had so many
applications, they should go
ahead and hire two people for
.".the-,solid, waste -compactor
station. ''he compactor was
delivered this week and
should be installed in just a
short while", Branch said.
"We need to get our people on
the site and let them get
familiar with the operation
while it is being installed."
The Board accepted the
low bid for drilling four
monitoring wells at the Buck-
horn landfill site. Clark Well
Drilling bid $1,495.00 but
wasn't clear whether that
(Continued on Page 3)


.*


A'4


Clerk of the Court, Jerry Gates, left, gives the oath of
office to new Chamber officers, Roy Smith, Robert Nedley,


Glenn Williams and Jim McNeill, III at the annual dinner
meeting Monday night. -Star photos


Commerce meeting. Retiring president, W. L. Altstaetter,
right, presents Odum with a plaque.


Sumner CofC President


Year"


used by Tavia Copenhaver McCuean
and Walt Marder of Tallahassee, who
explained the concept of the new
"Main Street" program which is
helping downtown areas in small
communities to revitalize themselves
and become vital spots in the business
world.
Port St. Joe's Merchants Associa-
tion has a target this year of getting
into the program.
Marder said four steps are needed
to bring about success in developing
the downtown area. These include
organization, promotion and advertis-
ing, design and economic restructure.
"There is only one string attached",
(Continued on Page 3)


"It was a dark and stormy night..
.".as approximately 140 Chamber of
Commerce members and guests
congregated in the Commons Area of
Port St. Joe High School to hear
year-end reports, install new officers,
name the Citizen of the Year and
devour a delicious rib eye steak
prepared by the Lions Club.
Clerk of the Court Jerry Gates
installed the new officer slate as the
last part of the program.
Gates led the new officers in
repeating the oath of office, which
seated Bill Sumner as president- Roy
Smith as vice-president; Glenn Wil-
lians as secretary; Jim McNeill, III as
assistant secretary and Robert Ned-


ley, treasurer.
Sumner, president of the Wewa-
hitchka State Bank, couldn't be
present for the installation because of
illness. He is the first president of the
organization from Wewahitchka.
Installed as new members of the
Board of Directors were Roy Smith,
Glenn Williams,, Robert Nedley and
Jim NcNeill, III.
Out-going president, Bill Altstaet-
ter said, "We didn't have an outstand-
ing year this past year, but we did
help to ppen four new business
ventures here in Port St. Joe, which
isn't bad for a town our size".
Altstaetter left most of the
program segment of the evening to be


a


t


A'


Rev. J. C. Odum Selected As "Man of the


Fred Witten, left, introduced Gulf's Citizen of the Year,
Rev. J. C. Odum, center, Monday night at the Chamber of


I


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rr


t,~6;lj


I













Editorials and Comments


THE STAR


THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 1985


Can a movement to save the
cockroach from extinction be next
on the list?
Surely this pest of all pests
which proliferates all over the
world could be in peril somewhere
:or other and we could spend billions
and keep from improving the lot of
millions to save the roach from
oblivion.
We have held back .progress
and impoving our living standard
for everything else: why not the
cockroach?
A news item in Panhandle
dailies this past week broke the
News to us that our federal
-government is embarking on a
crusade to protect the rare Perdido
Key beach mice from extinction.
How about that?
Here, civilization has put forth.
hurculean efforts almost since man
crawled out of the caves to do away
with the mouse and its larger
cousin, the-rat.
Rats and mice destroy almost
as much food throughout the world


4 $640 T(

Speaking of your tax dollars at
: ork, your tax dollar expenditures
were justified by the Pentagon last
-week. Some unthinking clod came
up with the suggestion that paying
$640 each for a toilet seat for Navy
planes was just too much.
Our recent experience with bus
toilet seats found where a few more
dollars spent for that necessity
would have been money well spent.
But $640 would be a little too much,
even for a bus lavatory toilet seat.
When it was revealed our Navy
airmen were taking a break on a
"$640 toilet seat, tfhe Pentagonii



Pay for E
If teachers over' the state of
Florida have their way, what
started out as a means of paying
extra-ordinary teachers extra-
oi'dinary Wages will evolve into
nothing more than a pay raise.
The teachers of Florida are
opposing the merit pay plan
because 'they feel it depends on
politics and the proper filling out of
an application, rather than excel-,
lence in doing one's job.


We'll a
teachers ov
word "mer
should be
the extra


ill for, the concern of the
ver the application of the
rit" and feel only merit
considered in awarding
benefits. Only in this


as humans consume. Some of the
worst diseases and epidemics
known to man were transmitted
and spread by these pesky rodents.
They have been a nuisance and a
bane to elephants and women ever
since the world began. As a matter
of fact, there was probably a mouse
or rat colony here on earth to
pester the dinosaurs when they
roamed the earth.
Now, a particular breed is
biting the dust and the wildlife
biologists are taking steps to
preserve and bring back the strain,
so we won't be without Perdido Key
beach mice.
How are they going to rejuve-
nate this rodent race? They're
going to release a male and two
females along the Panhandle bea-
ches. Before you know it, we'll be'
up to. our sea oats in Perdido Key
beach mice here in Gulf County.
The only things which multiply
faster than mice, are rabbits.
Your tax dollars at work.


ilet Seat

jumped to the rescue with the
explanation that the seats were
"special".
No doubt they were.
Lockheed Corp.,, designer of
the seats and the one installing
them in the planes agreed to bill the
Pentagon only $200 for each of the
54 seats, rather than $640. Another
hour later and Lockheed found they
could squeeze by, and still clean up
by charging only $100 per seat.
All of which goes to show, it
pays to check your super market
slip arid see what'you're paying for
thing.~iit uof fthe'OTfort section.


excellencee

manner will teachers be rewarded
for excellence and spurred on to
achieve it in their performance.
To relegate the merit pay plan
into a pay raise for all teachers-as
deserved as a pay raise may or
may not be-will only continue the
status quo. There will be no
rewarding of extra-ordinary per-
formances by our teachers.
It could be that a close look at
the program and possibly a change
here and there in the rules' and
regulations would still do what

designers of the bill intended to do.
reward teachers for better than
average performance.


Kesley Colbert's Country Column


Thank Goodness He Wasn't William Tell


Your Tax



Dollars at Work


word to her the entire yeai'. 'Well, sh
Mary E. sat right in front of never seen
me in the second grade and I in my who
was well. -on the way to didn't -
another year of not speaking anybody's
when on Valentine's Day of put a checl
1954 she drops this note over and where
her shoulder and of course it wasn't loo
alls right on my desk. I pick- note back
*d it up and was a'going to shoulder.
hand it back to her when I I could
saw that it had my name on and while
t. Well, it almost had my my corn
name on it-Mary E. had buttermilk
misspelled Kesley, but by at the table
he second grade I was get- tine's Day
ing used to that. about. Bob
I unfolded the notebook had somet
paper and read; little small
eM Kr s( / ,

t --&-t ,r v.


This is the second hardest A
job thai I've ever tried to I
quit. Told the editor last r
week that I was hanging up A
my typewriter and getting a
out of this business. He m
doubled my salary. That's 1
the fifth time since I've been I
here that he has quickly and f
graciously doubled my pay. e
When I started out several h
months ago with this column s
they weren't paying me any- it
thing. Let's see now you r
start with nothing and dou- r
ble it five times and you t
come up with what the# are t
paying me now. The editor
said he was giving me exact- p
ly what he thought my arti-
cles were worth.
I thought this week we'd
talk about why I'm not send-
ing out any Valentine's cards -N
this year. At the same time I
hope you'll understand why I
didn't send any out last year
or the year before or .
Mary E. Pendleton sat right
in front of me in the first.
grade. I don't think I said a


hoot a
anything
ole life a
want
feelings
k in all 1
n Miss
king I
over M
't wait
I was
bread
I asked
e what t
y stuff
by Brew
thing to
, tiny fa

./e ,f


. Are y


mile, I'd wings that went around
ig like that shooting arrows at people.
and I sure Ricky Hale added that he al-
to hurt ways tried to hit you in the
s so I just heart. Buddy Wiggleton said
the blanks that if he got you in the heart
Carolyn then you were in love with
threw the the person that sent him
Mary E.'s after you.
I got so engrossed in this
till lunch conversation that I put too
crumbling much cornbread in my
into the buttermilk. Everybody
I the guys knows that the secret to good
his Valen- cornbread and buttermilk is
was all the proper "mixture". I'd
ver said it still never spoken to this girl
do with a and she'd ruined my lunch.
t guy with But heck, .it didn't really
matter as I wasn't too hun-
gry anyway-I was trying to
iy nfe/ picture what a "little small
tiny fat guy with wings"
looked like. And when
nobody was a'looking I slip-
V o, ped my hand inside my shirt
and felt around my heart.
The next morning as I was


.p. SL ?E' hiIe


walking to class Buddy
caught up with me to tell me
that he heard that Mary E.


Kesley
and I were going steady. As I
walked into class I was
wondering "what's next"
and then I spied Mary E. She
had a dress on. It's the mid-
dle of, the week in a second
grade classroom in McKen-
zie, Tennessee in 1954 and
she's wearing a dress! I
quickly looked around the
(Continued on Page 3)


sPellI .


When It Comes to Filing Returns We'd Like A Return to


"Good Ole Days


PRESIDENT REAGAN spent his
birthday last week talking to us about
how strong, great and fair our nation
was and about how we could expect
even better things in the future.
President Reagan is always talk-
ing about the future, like we all had
plenty of it. That seems kind of odd to
me for a man who celebrated his 74th
birthday last Wednesday to be talking
about,the future when he evidently
-doesn't have quite as much of it as he
once had.
As a matter of fact, President

-Reagan's future is about as shaky as
-our nation's balance of trade situa-
tion. Still, both are moving along and
:seem to be strong at the moment.
I have to admire the President for
*being so confident there is a long-term
future for him, in spite of his 74 years.
He reminds me of the story which
Suse to make the rounds here in Port'
:St. Joe about the late W. C. Forehand.
= Mr. Forehand lived to be over 100
and drove his old Nash all over the
-country, slouched down in the seat
"and barely able to see over the dash.
Mr. Forehand lived a long life and was


famous for his looking into the future.
One day, as the' story goes, when
Mr. Forehand had long since passed
his 90th birthday, he stopped by one of
the local lending institutions and


Mr. Forehand was. reported to
have swelled up like a toad and left
that institution "of short vision" to try
at another place for his loan.
:4-++++ *


the language on the forms look as if it
-came from a Chinese crossword
puzzle. Mr. Reagan said the forms
should at least be easy to understand
and fill out.


ETAOINSHRDLU


applied for a loan for some of his
varied real estate holdings, to be
repaid over a 2(a year period.
Well, even though he had lived for
more than 90 years, the lending
institution took the realistic viewpoint
in the matter and felt Mr. Forehand
didn't have all that good a chance of
making it for 20 more years, so they
turned down his' request for a 20 year
pay loan.


By: Wesley R. Ramsey
L- <


ALTHOUGH I DIDN'T hear all of
Athe President's speech, I heard that
part of it where he advocated some
.type tax reform which would make it
easier for tax payers to fill out the
forms which took their money and
sent it to Washington.
Mr. Reagan said it was just too
much to expect for the government to
take the huge sums of money they
extract from the taxpayer and make


What I have problems with is the
kind of tax reform we're going to get.
In the past, every time we get a tax
reform, it winds up costing all of us
more money.
+ ++++
I DON'T REALLY know .how
serious the President is about this
business of making tax returns easier
to fill out. He seemed sincere enough
when he said it on TV. He even jutted


his jaw and tossed his head back when
he said it as if to emphasize the fact he
would see about getting that thing
done tomorrow.
If President Reagan is real
interested in getting the tax return
back into the hands of the little people
and fixing it where all us ignoramuses
can fill out the return, I can help him
out.
I just happen to have a copy of the
1913 income tax form, which was easy
to fill out and which called for a tax
rate hardly any of us would mind
paying.
Someone said 1913 was the first
year to pay income taxes! If it was,
things have certainly gone to pot since
that time. The forms have gotten
harder and harder to fill out and the
tax rate has risen higher and higher.
All of this was done by sessions of
Congress and presidents, interested in
simplifying tax forms and "reform-
ing" tax laws.
I'm not one to look wistfully at the
"good old days" since I think the
present day in which Wee live is the
best day man has ever had. But, in the


world of taxes, I have to join in the
throng which longingly recalls the
good old days.
In this 1913 tax return I have, the
tax payer had to fill out three lines of
information. There was one line for
gross income, one'for general deduc-
tions and one for net income. Then a
table showed how much tax the tax
payer owed.
If a tax payer was single, he had a
deduction of $3,000. If the tax payer
was married, he had a $4,000
deduction. Remember, this was in the
day when the average person prob-
ably didn't make $2,000 a year.
Then, the tax payer computed his
taxes at the rate of one percent on non
exempt income up to $20,000 a year.
The amount graduated to a rate of six
percent if a person made over $500,000
a year.
If President Reagan is really
serious about simplifying the tax form
and giving us some tax relief, all he
needs to do is go back to the 1913 rate
and filing form.
It'll settle everything except the
national debt.


Tides Not
Information for the tide
changes in St. Joseph's Bay
are not available this week.
The information has to be ob-
tained from the National
Ocean Service in Washing-
ton, D. C. on a yearly basis.
The tidal information book
for 1985 for the East Coast of
North and South America


Available
from which we derive the
tidal information for our
area was requested over
nine weeks ago, but as of this
date has not been received.
We will begin publishing
the tides for the bay as soon
as the information is receiv-
ed in our office.


I'


Low Tide On 4 Cold Day
Attracts Bevy of Gulls


e -5 ----


PAGE TWO


'1


S ,.. T IF .TAR "-- I POSTOFFICE BOX 308
WINN,', T H E S T A R PHONE 227-1278 SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
A PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR. $10.00 SIX MONTHS. IN COUNTY. $8 00
Published Every Thursday at 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida P OUT OF COUNTY--ONE YEAR. S15.00 SIX MONTHS. OUT OF COUNTY $1000
By The Star Publishing Company OUT OF U.S -ONE YEAR. $16.00
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 6-
a on s TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions In advertisements, the publishers do not hold
Wesley R. Ramsey ..... ..... Editor and Publisher SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such advertisement.
SEW$Spj William H. Ramsey Production Supt. AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA t.. nt ntt htn
Frenchle Ramsey.............Office Manager The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word Is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word
Shirley K. Ramsey ..................Typesetter barely asert; the printed word thoroughly convlnces..The spoken word Is lost; the printed word remains.
I I





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Air Mb 'le




I t


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 1985


PAGE THREE


Chamber
Marder said. "You'imust hire a main
street manager to coordinate all
this."
MAN OF THE YEAR
Attorney Fred Witten revealed
the selection to receive the Man of the
Year award from the Chamber as
Rev. J. C. Odum, retired pastor of the
Long Avenue Baptist Church.
Rev. Odum, who had been lured to
the meeting to give the Invocation for
the dinner, was sitting at the head
table and registered shocked surprise
when Witten announced his name as
the nominee.
Witten described Rev. Odum as
having six. qualities which he had
exercised during his more than 30
years of service to the people of this
area.
He defined the minister's life as
one of sincerity, personal integrity,
humility, courtesy, wisdom and char-
ity. "By that standard I know of no
one more successful than the Gulf
County Citizen of the Year for 1984",
Witten said.
Odum came to Port St. Joe in 1953
from Louisiana, where he had just
completed his studies at the New


Kesley Ja
soon".
(Continued from Page 2) Th
room for that "little small son ane
tiny fat guy with wings." If I approa
could just get my hands on with co
him I'd end this Valentine's reason
Day hoax forever.


Somebody had put a pic-
ture of a heart with an arrow
through it on my desk. As I
sat down I could see every-
one in the room a'laughing at
me. At least Mary E. had
enough sense not to turn
around. That was just about
the absolute worst day I ever
spent in a school house. All
the guys made fun of me all
day and the girls would look
at me and then giggle. Ricky
asked me at recess what it
was like to kiss a girl. I final-
ly caught him over by the
monkey bars and was trying
to beat the daylights out of
him when Miss Carolyn
broke up the fight. We both
had to stay an hour after
school for a whole week.
After recess Miss Carolyn
was just a talking away and I
was a'staring out the window
thinking of what my mother
would say when I got home
that afternoon and told her I
was quitting school. Sudden-


ly I re
Carolyn
question.
emharas
think it w
write 500
daydream
Mary'E.'
Lunch'
Mary E.
table. I t
to die ar
guys a'lai
She sure
began ri
love and
family; c
ed as hoi
job as sh
finer thin
I spoke
ton for tl
life. I s
Mary E.
tiny fat g

.- L: ,


Continued from Page I


Orleans Baptist Seminary at the age
of 38. Prior to entering the seminary,
Odum had been an accountant at
International Paper Company in
Panama City.
During his 30-plus years here in
Port St. Joe, Odum has gained a
reputation among all denominations
as the "pastor to the city".
RUNNELLS SPEAKER
Davage J. Runnels, Jr., a Destin
real estate broker and new president-
of the Northwest Florida Water
Management District, was the featur-.
ed speaker for the evening.
Runnels warned his audience that
waterfront property was going to
increase in value and demand and
suggested that Gulf County be pre-
pared to preserve the qualities which
are bringing people here by working
for a balance between developers'
interests and ecological protection.
"The only way you will be able to
protect your environment is to do
some proper zoning and planning now
and not wait until the aesthetics of the
area are ruined", the speaker said.
He warned, "Don't wait for


i* (Continued f


e Commission gave Sheriff Harri-
d Attorney Rish their permission to
Lch DOC and tell them to sit down
county officials and come up with a
able list of problems at the jail to

alized that Miss D re
had asked me a
Boy howdy was I
sed, and I didn't and over a
as fair that I had to At the i
I times "I will not Chairman.
n in class." It was Engineers
s fault, the harbor
results of a
was the worst of all. are availat
sat down at my study.
thought I was going Both
nd after I saw the understand
ughing, I wanted to. Engineers
was a talker she site and pr
ght in about true project sta
d marriage and a concern thi
of course she allow- channel mz
w I'd have to get a
ie was used to the
gs in life. G
to Mary E. Pendle- (Continuel
he first time in my was for the f
aid, "He missed, single well.
- the little small be clarified
uy missed." approved. IN
Haven was
Respectfully, bidder at $4
4-Kesley wells.-


Tallahassee or Washington to do it for
you. Planning will better fit your
needs and satisfy your people if it is
done locally." The speaker suggested
the planning begin by opening com-
munications between county and city
government within the county and get
them to working together to accom-
plish common goals.
"Set a reasonable density cap,
analyze your resources and come up
with a water and sewer service plan
wnich will be realistic", Runnels said.
He pointed out that the biggest
problems with growth were traffic,
water, sewer and aesthetics. Plan for
these four things and your growth will
be a pleasure instead of a pain",
Runnels pointed out.
He alerted those present of a
growth committee which will be
appointed in the future to serve the
needs of Bay and Gulf Counties. He
said these two counties were excluded
' 'from a similar .committee named by
the Governor to serve the remainder
of the Panhandle, but said it would
only be a matter of time before such a
committee would be created for this
area, also.


rom Page 1)


be corrected and arrange a reasonable
time-table to get the improvements done
and then leave the county alone. The
alternative was to tell.DOC to proceed
with their suit and bring the county into
court if they felt they had to.

dging from Page 1)

again."
urging of the members of the Commission Board,
Money said, "We'll send a letter to the Corps of
and ask that the work be speeded up in dredging
r". Money then asked Childers to gather the
ny studies which have been made in the bay and
ble to him and bring them to the Board for further
Nedley and Maddox said it was their
ling that a letter had been written to the Corps of
by proponents of the study and alternate spoil
progress had been slowed in getting the dredge
irted. Both Nedley and Maddox expressed a
iat anything should stand in the way of having.the
maintained.


rant
A from Page 2)
our wells or for a
Clark's bid will
before the job is
dutalus of Lynn
s the next low
4,920 for the four
.- .


Six engineering firms pre-
sented resumes to the County
for consideration of their
firms to represent the county
in construction projects.The
resumes will be inspected by
a committee and the best
three firms recommended tc
the Commission for the final]
choice .. .


OBITUARIES:

Jesse Luther Taunton Dies After Long Illness


Jesse Luther (Luke) Taun-
ton died Sunday night at his
home in Wewahitchka follow-
ing a long illness. Originally
from Tallassee, Alabama he
had lived the last 50 years in
Gulf County. He was retired
from the St. Joe Paper
Company, a member of the


Church of Christ, and served
in the Navy during WW II.
He is survived by his wife,
Leola Taunton .of Wewahit-
chka; his children, David L,
Taunton, Lamar Taunton,
Betty K. Bidwell, Jerry
Taunton, Johnny Taunton
and Mark Taunton, all of


Wewahitchka, Judy Harrel-
son of Tallahassee, Joe Ann
Roemer and Linda Chan of
Pensacola; his brothers and
sisters, Tom Taunton, Ida
Belle Mason, Georgia Mason,
Pauline McInnish and Lillie
Pemberton, all of Tallassee,
Alabama; 41 grandchildren;


and nine great grandchild-
ren.
Graveside funeral services
were held Tuesday at 3:00
P.M. CST at Roberts Ceme-
tery. Interment followed.
All arrangements are un-
der the direction of Comfort-
er Funeral Home.


Last Rites Set Today for Willie C. Lindsey, 76


Willie C. Lindsey, 76, died
Monday in a Panama City
hospital following a long
illness. He was a resident of
Wewahitchka for the past 32
years. He was a ,retired
employee of the Gulf County
Road Department, and a
member of the Glad Tidings


Assembly of God Church.
Survivors include: his
wife, Adelle Lindsey of We-
wahitchka; one daughter,
Frances L. Gay of Port St.
Joe; one son, Hugh Lindsey
of Wewahitchka; seven step-
children; 26 grandchildren;.
four great grandchildren;


one brother, Joe Lindsey of
Sumatra; three sisters, El-
ma Alford of Brooksville,
Edna Hordes of Sumatra,
and Mamie Hawkins of We-
wahitchka.
Funeral services will be
held Thursday at 2:30 P.M.
CST at the Glad Tidings


Assembly of God Church
with the Rev. Robert Clay-
comb and Rev. Claude
McGill officiating. Interment
will follow in Jehu Cemetery.
All arrangements are un-
der the direction of Comfort-
er Funeral Home, Wewahit-
chka Branch Chapel.


Von Paul Presnell, 61, Passes Away In Bonifay


Von. Paul Presnell, 68, a
resident of Caryville and
Simmons Bayou, Port St. Joe
died Tuesday, January 15 in
Doctors Memorial Hospital,
Bonifay. He was retired from
U. S. Civil Service with 33
years of service, a Veteran of
WW II, having served with
the U. S. Navy, a member of
Lakeview United Methodist
Church, member of Vernon
Masonic Lodge No. 164, F &


AM, member of Chipley
Chapter No. 207, O.E.S.,
member of Chipley Past'
Matrons and Past Patrons.
Survivors include his wife,
Juanita Ellis Presnell; a son,
Alvis A. Presnell of St.
Augustine; two daughters,
Miss Jane E. Presnell and
Mrs. Jacqueline Threatt,
both of Baton Rouge, La.;
three brothers, Lewisj Pres-
nell of Port St. Joe, Wayne


Presnell of High Springs, and
Bruce Presnell of Tampa;
two sisters, Mrs. Estelle
Willard of Durham, N. C.,
and Mrs. Ann Trease of San
Antonio, Tx.; an aunt, Aman-
" da .Graves of Ebro (Pine
Log); and three granddaugh-
ters.
Funeral services were held
Thursday, January '17 at 2
p.m. at Lakeview Methodist
Church with Rev. George


Scarborough and. Rev. Bill
George officiating, with
Eastern Star Rites by Chip-
ley Chapter No. 207, O.E.S.
Active Pall Bearers were
nephews: Owen, John and
Paul Presnell; Ronnie and
Leslie Cook; and Dennis
Ellis. Honorary Pall Bearers
were Masons and Eastern
Stars. Interment was by
cremation and burial-at-sea
on Saturday, January 19 at 3
p.m.


U. Williams Services for Mrs. T. J. Raffield


Died at.,

February 9
Ules Williams, 86, passed
away Saturday evening at
the Bay St. Joseph Care
Center after a long illness.
He had been a resident of
Port St. Joe for 35 years and
was a retired logger.
He is survived by his wife,
Susie Williams of Port St.
Joe; and one son, Michael T.
Williams of Miami.
Funeral services will be
. held Friday, February 15 at
S 2:00 p.m. at the Church of
, God in Christ with Reverend
. Otis Stallworth officiating.
t Burial will in the family
plot of Forest Hill Cemetery
l -with Gilmore Funeral- Home ,
in charge of arrangements.


Mrs. Merlene Raffield, 63,
died last Thursday .at Gulf
Pines Hospital. She was a
native of Bay County, and
had been a resident of Port
St. Joe for the past 25 years.
She was a member of the Oak
Grove Assembly of God
Church.
Survivors include: her hus-
band, T. J. Raffield of Port
St. Joe; two sons, Richard
Raffield of Panama City, and
Robert Gerald Raffield of
Eufaula, Ala.; one daughter,

For Ambulance
Service
Call


Sharlyene Pridgeon of We-
wahitchka; one brother,
Billy Brookins of Port St.
Joe; one sister, Sue Grassa of
New York City, New York;
nine grandchildren; and four
great grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
at 2:00 p.m. EST Saturday at


the Oak Grove Assembly of
God Church with Rev. T. C.
Ernest and Rev. David Fer-
nandez officiating. Interment
followed in Millville Ceme-
tery, Panama City.
All arrangements were un-
der the direction of Comfort-
er Funeral Home.


LIFE -'ANNUITY ACCIDENT HEALTH



BROWN INSURANCE AGENCY
P.0. Box 897
Port St. Joe, Florida

DICKIE BROWN, G.A. 229-8981


.St. Joe Furniture's


3 BIG DAYS OF OPENING SAVINGS


on VINYL CARPET Levelor or Bali BLINDS WALLPAPER
Give Her or Him a Valentine that will last for years. Now Is the time. ALL CARPET and VINYL on Sale.
Installed NOW


SNo Wax Vinyl $4 4. Saxony Carpet. *13.,
Reo. $6. x S in. $d9,esq.23 qd.'$ 99


Installed
Reg. 14.49Sq.Yd. $t 99

Residential Carpet vSq. Yd
i i


4^t4t I


NOW
Reg. '12.99 Sq. Yd. $t9 9
Sculptured Carpet Sq. d.


NOW eg. Price
Reg '.8" 182 919 2 0%

Saxony Carpet. 1 Wallpaper .U0 off
II


Check Our Selection of. 50-60%

Remnants ......... 50-bU/ooff


Hundreds of yards of carpet and vinyl in stock. Now
stocking wallpaper and handling many types of Bali
blinds, shades and vertical drapes.


Quality Furniture
and
Floor Covering
Since 1945


Thursday, February 14 9:00 A.M.


In Our New ANNEX BUILDING



109 Reid Avenue
Grand Opening Sale Thursday Saturday


Register for Free Prizes:
GRAND PRIZE


3 Days at Disney World

or EPCOT
3 Fabulous Days and 2 Fun-Filled Nights for
Two with Deluxe Accommodations. (2 accom-
panying children under 18, free)

ALSO

Free Room Size Vinyl

and Carpeting

NAME
ADDRESS
Phone Age


RULES FOR PRIZES
One coupon per person age 18 an6
over presented In person. Disne)y
World rules require applicants for
vacation to be between ages 23-60
and at least one of two must be gain,
fully employed. -.


SI


I


moor










PAGE FOUR THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 1985


Reception to Honor Neu


Pastor of Presbyterians


A welcoming reception for
Nelle Mulligan as pastor for
the Presbyterian Church and
new member of the Port St.
Joe community will be held
on Sunday afternoon, Febru-


KRISTI LAWRENCE


Kristi Is

Recognized
Port St. Joe Brownie Troop
242 recognized one of their
members at their meeting on
February 1. Kristi Lawrence,
the daughter of Steve and
Pam Lawrence, received the
title of "Brownie of the'
Month".
Kristi is currently serving
as Brownie Troop President
under the leadership of Mrs.
Bunnie Miller and Mrs. Jan
Nobles. Troop 242 is made up
of 14 girls in grades one
through three. The girls meet
on Friday of each week at the
St. James' Episcopal
Church, Troop sponsor.

Whatleys Have
A Baby Girl
Mr. and Mrs. Rob Whatley
of Auburndale proudly an-
nounce the birth of their
daughter, Emily Loveda,
born January 12 at 5:52 P.M.
in Lakeland.
Maternarl'raTdaJi fs are
* Bobby and Shirley Hicks of
Port St. Joe. Paternal grand-
parents are Mr. and Mrs.
Thurman Whatley of Auburn-
dale.


ary 17 from 2 to 4 p.m. at the
Presbyterian Church fellow-
ship hall.
Mrs. Mulligan comes to
Port St. Joe from life-long
residency in Greenville, S. C.
She has a B. S. degree from
Asheville College, a Masters
degree from Clemson Uni-
versity, and a Master of
Divinity degree with honors
from Erskine Theological
Seminary. She recently be-
came a member of the
Presbytery of Florida. ,
Nelle says she is starting
an exciting new phase of her
life after working 30 years in
the field of education, and the
loss of her husband to cancer.


She says she is intere
serving where God
her, and is grateful f
opportunity to proclaim
gospel from the pulp
within the community (
St. Joe. She is tempc
living in a new condon
at St. Joe Beach.
All ministers of the P
Joe Ministerial Assoi
and their congregation
been sent a letter of
tion to the reception
reception is open t
public and everyone
vited and encourage
come and welcome
Mulligan to the commu
Port St. Joe.


Mr. and Mrs. Bobby G.
Smith would like to announce
the engagement and approa-
ching marriage of their
daughter, Joyce Ann to Ray-
mond Edward Burrows:
Joyce is a 1982 graduate of
Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High
School and is presently em-
ployed at Kent's Fur Com-
pany.


SHARP 19" Table Top


COLOR' '


Television Sets[.


Linytron in-line picture tube
Automatic fine tune
Long life VHF tuner


Only $339.95



HOME FURNISHING CENTERS
FUNNITUNE APPLIANCE. .LOON COVE.INGO HO NTR. TAINM NT
OVER 175 STORES SERVING THE SOUTHEAST
STEVE RICHARDSON, Owner
01 Reid Ave. Phone 229-6195j


Raymond is a 1984
ate of Port St. Joe
High School, and is cu
serving in the United
Army.
"The wedding is plan
February 15 at the
Grove Assembly of
Church. Rev. Dave F
dez will perform the
mony.


'It Will C


Letter Aj

An adequate supply of "D"
Stamps and other nonde-
nominated items is available
at the Port St. Joe Post Office


Scholarship
Winner Named

Mrs. Paul Fensom, Florida
State DAR ,Scholarship
Chairman, has announced
that Christine Faas, West
Orange High School Senior
from Winter Haven, is the
Florida winner for the
$8,000.00 scholarship given
by National DAR to a high
school senior who plans to
major in the study of Ameri-
can History.
Miss Faas' application and
outstanding records and re-
commendations have been
forwarded to the National
Society DAR where they will
be contending with those
from other states and the
winner chosen.
Mrs. Jacque Price, Silas R.
Stone and William Rogers of
Florida State University
were judges.
In addition to the History
scholarship, DAR gives
scholarships in nursing and
medical therapy. These are
open to area high school
students through St. Joseph
Bay Chapter in Port St. Joe.

Wheels to be
Put at Library
Recently, The Star report-
ed the Historical Society was
making plans to place a set of
old railroad wheels from St.
Joseph's old railroad in front
of the Constitution Park
Museum. The wheels will be
located in front of the Gulf
County public library build-
ing here in Port St. Joe.

SELL IT WITH A
CLASSIFIED AD!


2


By Insurance Commissione
Bill Gunter
When the Insurance De
apartment lost 10 of its service
offices, including the Pana
sted in ma City Service Office, to
needs legislative cutbacks las
for the year, we knew we'd have t
im the find other ways to get ou
)it and message out to consumers.
of Port Our message and our ob
orarily jective are basic: We wan
ninium consumers to know how t
buy insurance without get
ort St. ting burned.
ciation If you already have an
is have insurance problem, you can
invita- get help by calling one of ou
i. The six remaining service offi
o the ces, which are located i
is in- Jacksonville, Pensacola, Or
ed to lando, Tampa, West Pain
Nelle Beach and Miami.
nity of Or, perhaps it would b
more convenient to call ou
toll-free Insurance Consume
Hotline at 1-800-342-2762. I
it's busy, keep trying- ou
hotline handles more than
5,000 calls a week.
Those of you who would
seek to prevent an insurance
problem should read on an
ask yourself this question:
How well did you protect
yourself from consume
fraud the last time yo
purchased insurance?
F .. If you're like most Floridi
ans, you probably relied onl
upon the integrity of you
insurance agent to tell yo
what coverage you need.
And for most of you, th
gamble paid off. Like othe
doo professionals, the great ma
jority of insurance agents ar
knowledgeable and trustwoi
thy, and their advice i
sound.
But for some of you, th
decision was a disaster. Yo
may have made your chec
payable to a dishonest agent
who never bothered to for
ward it to the insurance
company.
Or perhaps an agent ad
vised you to leave off
chronic condition when fil
ing out your medical history
on an application for health
insurance. When you filed
claim on the chronic illness
gradu- the insurance company de
Jr.-Sr. nied the claim and cancelle
rrently your policy.
States Or perhaps an agent tol
you that you were getting th
ned for piiiimthutm tbinobileinis~u
e Oak ance coverage allowed b
f God law, when in fact he als
'ernan- 7"slid" the costs of an option
cere- accidental death and dis
memberment policy and a
automobile club membership
onto your bill. You rdidn'
know the difference. So, yo


'ost


(ter


22


Betty Palmer, past presi-
dent of the Big Bend Lupus
Chapter will be in Port St.
Joe Thursday, February 14 to
help set up a St. Joe division
for all patients in the area
with Systemic Lupus Ery-
thematosis, commonly
known as Lupus.


r paid it.
Unfortunately, there al-
- ways will be somebody wait-
e ing to take advantage of an
- unsuspecting buyer. But, in
o most cases, these disasters
t can be prevented if consum-
o ers follow seven simple in-
r surance-buying tips:
Always ask to see an
- agent's insurance license.
It Never purchase insurance
o from anyone who can't prove
t- he or she is licensed to sell it.
Always get your agent's
n business card. Your agent's
n responsibility doesn't end
r with the sale.
i- Don't allow yourself to be
n pressured into buying in-
- surance. If an agent tells you
n the company is running a
one-day-only special, don't
e believe it.
r Comparison shop for insur-
r ance. It's possible to save a
f few dollars or more than $100
r just by choosing one com-
n pany instead of another.
Always make your check
d out to the insurance company
e issuing the policy. Never
d make a check payable to the
individual agent or agency.
t Ask your agent to go over
r your bill item by item,
u explaining which items are
required and which are op-
i- tional.
y Read your policy carefully.
r Know what you're covered
u for and what you can expect
to get from your policy.
e Finally, if you think you've
r been cheated, or if you are
- having trouble getting your
e insurance company to pay a
r- claim, or if you're having any
s other insurance-related prob-
lem, remember to call the
e Insurance Department.
u In addition, the Insurance
k Department publishes a
It number of insurance shop-
r- ping guides, which are up-
e dated annually. We offer
guides to purchasing life,
-. health, automobile, Medi-
a care supplement, homeown-
l- ers, condominium and mo-
y bile home insurance. All are
h free, and you can get yours
a by writing: Insurance Comn-
s, missioner Bill Gunter, Bu-
- reau of Consumer Research
d and Education, .LL-25, The
Capitol, Tallahassee, FI
d 32301.
e .,insurance is a complex
r-O subject and consumers can't
y be expected to know all there
o is to know about it. But if you
al follow these basic guidelines,
s- ask plenty of questions and
n contact the Insurance De-
p apartment with any problems,
't you'll be well-protected from
u consumer fraud.


to Mail


February 17


to help customers make a
smooth transition after the
February 17 Postal Rate
change.
Postmaster Robert Oliver
says, that the nondenomi-
nated "D" stamps in sheet,
coil and booklet formats
represent the new 22-ceht
First Class rate. There are
also nondenominated Postal
Cards and plenty of two-cent
stamps that, when added to
20-cent stamps, make up the
new First Class Letter Rate.
"Nobody likes to see higher
postal rates, but this increase
is moderate and justified,"
Postmaster Oliver said.
"Since the last' increase in
November 1981, the cost of


living in the United States, as
measured by the Consumer
Price Index, has gone up
almost 13 percent. The 22-
cent stamp is only a 10
percent rise."
"The nondenominated
items are available because
we estimate that stamp
inventories in Post Offices at
present will fall short of
public demand and, we want
to avoid customer inconveni-
ence," he said.
Commemorative Stamps,
beginning with the Jerome
Kern stamp, and other 22-
cent stamps, are expected to
replace the "D" stamps by
the end of March, the Post-
master said.


Mayr rak at bysth frs bx o GrlScutcokis ol I Prt t o rmGr


Mayor Frank Pate buys the first box of Girl Scout cookies sold in Port St. Joe from Girl
Scout Alana Richardson. -Star photo


Girl Scout Cookies Arrive


The Girl Scouts are on the
move again this year selling
seven delicious varieties of
cookies. As always they'll
have Thin Mints (chocolate
and mint wafers), Samoas
(caramel, chocolate and
coconut over vanilla cookie
center), Do-si-dos (peanut
butter and oatmeal sand-
wich cookie), Tagalongs (a
peanut butter and chocolate
patty), Trefoils (old-fashion-
ed shortbread) and Choco-
late Chunks (large size
chunks in large cookies).
This year a *new daisy-
shaped shortbread cookie is
being introduced called Juli-
ettes. Juliette "Daisy" Low
was the founder of Girl
Scouts in America and this
delicious delicate shortbread
cookie comes dipped in
pecan praline coating and
creamy lemon coating in


ALICIA MARIE CHRISTIE

Alicia Is Three
Alicia Marie Christie cele-
brated her third birthday on
February 11. She is 'the
daughter of Dan and Merri
Christie.
Her grandparents are
Betty Pickel, Creel Pickel,
and Bill and Jean Christie.


CARD OF THANKS
We wish to express our
sincere appreciation for the
cards, flowers, food, tele-
phone calls and other mes-
sages of sympathy sent to us
after our recent loss.
Our' special thanks to Dr.
Joe Hendrix and his staff for
their care during the extend-
ed illness.
The Family of
Irene T. Andrews


separate packages in the
new blue box.
The sale of these cookies
will enable several of the
local cadettes to go to New
York this summer; one of the
Junior troops to explore New
Orleans and Girl Scout
camps to continue function-
ing.
If your door does not get
knocked on and you- want to
buy some cookies, please


call 229-8164 or 227-1313. For
only $2.00 a box you can help
make some dreams come
true.
If you have ordered Girl
Scout cookies, they will be
delivered the week of Febru-
ary 11. Please be home when
a Girl Scout comes to deliver
your order.
Direct sales will be from
February 17 through March


DAR to Hear History

Essay Contest Winners


History Month will be
featured at the noon luncheon
meeting of St. Joseph Bay
Chapter DAR Wednesday,
February 20 at the Garden
Center.
Mrs. Wayne Biggs, History
Month Chairman, will pre-
sent the winners of the
History Monith.Es.spy.Contest
held in fifth, sixth, seventh
and eighth grade area
schools.
Presiding at the meeting,
Mrs. W. B. Dye, Regent, will
welcome. Mrs. Frances
deBuhr as a new member
and Miss Katherine Eliza-
beth Rish as a new Jr.
member.


Hostesses for the meeting
are Mrs. William B. Sim-
mons, Mrs. J. B. Roberts,
Mrs. Max Kilbourn and Mrs.
Roberta Harden.
February 14, Valentine's
Day, has been. designated
Liberty Love Day in honor of
the Statue of Liberty by
National DAR. To help "res-
cue a damsel in distress" St.
Joseph Bay Chapter mem-
bers are reminded to ask five
friends for a dollar contribu-
tion and bring this with' their
own to the meeting. This fund
will be part of the donation
National will contribute to
the repair of the Statue of
Liberty to be completed for
her 100th birthday in 1986.


Robert M. Moore


Announces


the Re-location of His


Law Office


to


324 Reid Avenue


Phone 229-8181


Any person who has Lupus
or has family members with
Lupus is invited to attend.
The meeting will be held in
the Conference Room at Gulf
Pines Hospital at 7:00 p.m.
Anyone interested is wel-
come to attend.


'1


Consumer Tips...


SMITH BURROWS


Will Wed


Lupus Chapter Plans An

Organizational Meeting


p


;^ "-,--,My" Iz lot =


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fta. THUl~RSDAY, FEB. 14, 1985


2




. . .. .


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAYT-B. 14, 1985


We Care


Services for


S 0 0


Sthe Elderly


Are you 60 years of age or.
older, homebound, and living
alone? Do you sometimes
wonder how long you might
lie there until someone found
you if you happened to fall or
had a sudden severe illness?
Do you sometimes just feel
lonely and wish someone
would call or come to see
you? Does your family
worry about you and feel that
they have to call you long
distance every few. days to
see if you are all right? Do
you know someone, a friend
or a relative, who fits that
description? The Gulf County
Senior Citizens Association,
Inc. has some programs that
can help you. A private,
non-profit agency, the Asso-
ciation has operated over the
past eight years to give a
wide variety of services to
Gulf County's older citizens.
Many of you already know of
our home delivered meals
program (also called Meals
on Wheels) and also of our
congregate meals which are
served five days each week.
at our Senior Centers in
Wewahitchka and Port St.


Senior citizens throughout
our county will soon have an,
opportunity to express their
viewpoints on some very
important issues. The Area
Agency on Aging for North
Florida will be joining our
own Senior Center to conduct
a survey on the needs and
opinions of older persons.
Anne Menard, Director of the
Area Agency, stated that the
results'of this survey will be
used to help determine what
types of services are needed
in our community.
The survey will take place
during the months of Febru-
ary and March, with inter-
views being conducted in the

Class of 1975
Plqns Rei nion .
The class reunion for the
Class of 1975 is currently
being planned. Plans are
uncertain .at this time; how-
ever, the date has been set
for the weekend of June 28
and 29.
Letters will be sent to all
classmates and prompt re-
turn is essential. Definite
plans will be written in your
letter as well as placed in The
Star, Be watching your mail,
mark your calendars and be
sure to schedule your vaca-
tion for June 28 and 29.
If you have any questions,
call Pam Parker Lawrence
at (904) 229-6639.


Joe. These and all of our
other services have the goals
of increasing your quality of
life and of helping you
remain in your own home as
comfortably and safely as
possible.
Two of our new programs
may be for you. One is
Telephone Reassurance
where a trained volunteer
can call you daily at a
prearranged time to see that
you are O.K. and to chat for a
few minutes if you wish. If
you don't answer your tele-
phone within a set length of
time your caller will put in
action an emergency plan the.
two of you have set up in
advance. If you don't have a
telephone our program will
arrange to have a Sheriff's
deputy or some other au-
thorized person stop by fre-
quently to check with you.
The second is a Companion
Program. You may already
have a telephone arrange-
ment with someone; but
would like to have someone
visit you once a week or so to
read to you, help you write
letters, play a game, or just


homes of senior citizens, and
at the senior center. All
interviewers will carry iden-
tification cards, and their
identities can be verified
through the Senior Center.
County residents .over the
age of 60 are encouraged to
take advantage of this oppor-
tunity to offer their ideas and
opinions. Please call the
Senior Center at 229-8466 to
participate or to learn more
about this survey.

School Lunch'


MENU
Monday, February 18
NO SCHOOL
INSERVICE
"-Tuesday, February 19'
NO SCHOOL
INSERVICE
Wednesday, February 20.
Hot dogs, cabbage slaw,
French fries, cake, and milk.
Thursday, February 21
Battered .dipped fish,
baked beans, fruit cup, sliced
bread; cookies, and milk.
Friday, February 22
Sloppy Joe, buttered corn,
sliced peaches, and milk.
. Menus may change without
notice due to the availability
of foods.

CLASSIFIED ADS..
GET RESULTS!!


talk with you for awhile.
Both of these programs are
free, although the Agency
always welcomes donations
and needs them to be able to
give more services to more
people in Gulf County. Crll us
at 229-8466 in Port St. Joe and
at 639-9910 in Wewahitchka if
you want either of these
services, or wish to inquire
about those or any of our
other services for the elderly.


If you would like to become
a volunteer to do some of the
calling or the visiting call us
at the same numbers to
apply. We will give you some
brief training, some on-going
supervision and provide you
with the names of persons to
be called or visited. Join with
che Gulf County Senior Citi-
zens Association in showing
our Gulf County elderly that
we care.


L4


Rebekahs Install New


Officers for the Year


Melody Rebekah No. 22
held their Installation on
January 28.
The outgoing Noble Grand,'
Jeanette Lee, welcomed
members and guests for the
evening to enjoy the installa-
tion of officers for the year of
1985. Installing officers
were: Deputy President, Ha-
zel Sims; Deputy Marshall,.
Aliene Hightower; Deputy
Warden, Rosa Taylor; Depu-
ty Secretary, Gladys Jones;
Deputy Financial Secretary,
Louise Stallings; Deputy In-
side Guardian, Jeanette Lee;
Deputy Outside Guardian,
Edna Hunter.
The new elected officers
for the year of 1985 were:
Noble Grand, Mary Lee
Pitts- Vice Grand, Joyce
Newsom; Secretary, Shirley
Webb; Financial Secretary,
Aliene Hightower.
The new Noble Grand,

Cancer Group
Will Meet
The "I Can Cope" Cancer
Support Group will meet at
Gulf Coast Community Hos-
pital's Kirby Building Febru-
ary 19 at 7:00 P.M.
The group is for the benefit
of persons who now have or
have had cancer in the past.
Friends, family and other
interested people are invited
to attend ...
The- speaker for-""this
month's session will be Dr.
Clell Warriner, a local, well
known psychologist.
Attend this meeting to
receive the support needed
for a difficult time.

MEETING NOTICE
American Legion Post 116
meets 1st Monday each
month at 7:30 p.m.
American Legion Building
Corner of Williams Ave.
& Third St.
Albert Thames,
Commander
Jarrell Smith, Adj.
tfc2/14/85


Mary Lee Pitts appointed her
other officers: Conductor,
Elizabeth Jones;' Warden,
Margaret Elaine Maige; In-
side Guardian, Jessie
Owens; Color Bearer, Mamie
Lou Smith. The new Noble
Grand introduced distin-
guished guests: District De-
puty President, Hazel Sims;
President of the Rebekah
Assembly of Florida, Jessie
Hilton of Parker; Past Presi-
dent, Margaret Land of Lynn
Haven; Appointed Officers of
the Assembly, Margaret
Elaine Maige, Warden;
'Louise Stallings, .Marshall;
Rosa Taylor, Right Herald.
Visitors frpm Panama No.
15, Friendship No. 25, Lynn
Haven No. 35, Lady Howard
No. 321 of Strathray, Ontario,
Canada; and Melody No. 22
were in attendance.
Everyone enjoyed refresh-
ments after the meeting.


WIN FIRST PLACE: These young cheerleaders from They are from left: Nancy Stoutamire, Julie Allen, Paula
Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School, along with four who were not Ward, Lesley Wilder, Tammy McGee and Laurie Butts. Not
present for the photograph due to the flu, captured first place present were Teressa Cozart, Teresa Jones, Paula Ramsey
in a cheerleading competition held Saturday in Marianna. and Sissy Burke. -Star photo


Cheerleaders Are # One


The varsity cheerleading
squad of Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr.
High School was invited to
participate in a Cheerlead-
ing Extravaganza this past
Saturday in Marianna. The
competition was open to
squads from five counties,
Bay, Calhoun, Jackson,
Washington and Gulf, and
was hosted by the cheer-
* leaders of Chipola Junior
College in conjunction with
their homecoming "festivi-
ties.


Each squad presented a
three to six minute routine,
including aspects of dance,
stunt, pyramids and cheers.
The young ladies from Port
St. Joe captured first place
in the event, followed by
Graceville in second,place
and Cottondale in third.
Members of the squad in-
clude: Julie Allen, Sissy
Burke, Laurie Butts,
Teressa Cozart, Teresa
Jones, Tammy McGee,
Paula Ramsey, Nancy


Stoutamire, Paula Ward and Lesley Wilder.

Child Abuse Seminar Slated Next
Thursday Evening at St. James


On Thursday, February 21
from 7-8:30 at the St. James'
Episcopal parish hall on
Sixth Street, the Girl Scouts
will be sponsoring a Child
Abuse Awareness Seminar.
Guest speakers will be
Ormand Harriott, Director,


Guardian Ad Liten Program
and Hariet Schwartz, Direc-
tor of Child Abuse Prevention
Program.
Any interested adult is
invited to attend. There is no .
' charge for admission.


PAGE FIVE


Aging Survey Will be

Conducted In Gulf County








PAGE SIX THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 1985


S ... 3. y .* *

IT'S YOUR HEAD a
BE CAREFUL
Today, wearing a hair-piece, styling the hair or even
having a hair transplant, is becoming very
commonplace among those men who are especially
conscious of their appearance. However, along with
I this desire for better appearance there is an even more
important need for the everyday care of the scalp and
hair.
w*r If there is a scalp problem, such as severe dandruff u
A or if there are allergies that cause a breaking out in a a
rash, a dermatologist should be consulted before
* making any changes in how you treat your hair. His
advice may help you eliminate or control any
unforseen problems that could arise. We have in stock
regularly, many products he might recommend.
I YOU OR YOUR DOCTOR CAN PHONE US when
you need a delivery. We will deliver promptly without
extra charge. A great many people rely on us for their
Health needs. We welcome requests for delivery
service and charge accounts.

Your Phone Number
YO'JR PHARMACY
PRESCRIPTION CHEMISTS
S Your Address Your City
S2-3-85

Sii~~i~y~iit~iyi~i~t: iyn


Durey Cadwell, 23, goes up for a lay-up for the Sharks.
Vernon's James Potter (23) and Kelvin Peterson (15) hope
for a rebound. -Star photos


Sharks Ranked 10th In State




Defeat Vernon 68-61


Port St. Joe's Sharks were
ranked in state 2-A's top ten
teams for the first time this
season this week.
After knocking off such
basketball giants of the Pan-
handle as Vernon, Malone,
Wakulla and losing to Grand
Ridge by only two points, the
Sharks finally gained the
attention of state-wide sports
prognosticators.
The Sharks have had an
iron-man schedule for the
past two, weeks, playing
seven games against top-
notch competition, winning
-every game. Just this past
week, the Sharks continued
their torrid pace, as the
season is on the downhill
grade.
PSJ, 68; VERNON, 61
Port St, Joe's Sharks put
the Vernon Yellow. Jackets
five points in the hole in the
first period Friday night and
kept them there, to win the
return match with the Jack-
ets.
The Sharks lost their first
regular season game against
the Jackets in Vernon and
have lost only to Grand Ridge

sinc:.
With the Yellow Jackets
making a run for it in the last
minute and a half of the
game, the Sharks salted
away the victory with both
ends of a free throw by
Demetre Thomas, then a free
throw point by Chris Butts
with 27 seconds left on the
clock. Robert Davis tried to
keep the Jackets alive with 18
seconds left, when Thomas
fouled him. Davis missed
.both attempts, leaving the
final score at 68-61.
The Sharks scored 20
points in the final period to
preserve their margin, in the
game. Durey Cadwell had
eight free throw points in the
final stanza, within the last
four minutes of the game.
Cadwell had the high-
scoring mark for the Sharks
with 25 points. Michael Pitt-
man and Dexter Baxter were
the only other Sharks scoring
in double figures with II and
10 points respectively.
Three Jackets were double
figure scorers with Sean
Green leading the pack with
12.'
The Sharks had a 32-26 lead
at half time.
The game was an emotion-
packed contest with three
Jackets fouling out in the
final two minutes. Marcus


CLOSE OUT SALE


S-RODUCTS
ALL ALUMINUM NO RUST INC.:
CONSTRUCTION

DOG BOXES



1 0000OFF
Fits Full Size or Mini Pick-Up Trucks




' St. Joe Auto Parts


201 Long Avenue


Phone 229-8222


Bland showed the tenseness
of the evening when he took a
swing at Midhael Pittman in
the final quarter when Pitt-
man stole the ball from him.
The swing earned the Sharks
an extra point from a techni-
cal foul and ended the game
for Bland.
SCORE BY QUARTERS:
Score by Quarters:
Port St. Joe 19 13 16 20-68
Vernon 14 12 16 19-61
PSJ-Thomas 1-5-7; Pitt-
man 5-1-11; Cadwell 8-9-25;
Baxter 5410; Robinson 3-0-
6; Jenkins 4-0-8; Butts 0-1-1.
VERNON-R. Davis 0-0-0;
Brown 4-4-12; Rob Davis
4-1-9; Peterson 3-0-6; Bland
5-0-10; Vann 1-0-2; Green
5-2-12; Potter 5-0-10; Ham-
mond 0-0-0; Clark 0-0-0.
PSJ, 69; MALONE, 67
Saturday night was an-
other tense game for the
Sharks, which saw the Port
St. Joe squad do almost the
impossible beat Malone in
Malone.
The Sharks trailed by just
a few points for the entire
game, trailing by their larg-
est margin of the game, 39-34.
at the half timepe~riod.
Port St. Joe's first tie in the
game came with only 18
seconds left on the clock and
Demetre Thomas tied the
score 'at 67-67 with a lay-up.
When Malone in-bounded
the ball, the Malone player
stepped on the boundary line,
turning the ball back over tb
the Sharks. The Sharks then
killed 17 seconds on the clock
and Michael Pittman drove
for the basket, passing the
ball off to Dexter Baxter who
made the lay-up, putting the
Sharks ahead by two points.
Malone didn't give up, even
though there was only one
second remaining on the
clock. Inbounding the ball theta
entire length of the court, a
Malone player went for the
shot and the ball bounced off
the rim as the final buzzer
was sounding.
Durey Cadwell had a big 22
points to pace the Shark
scoring and Michael Pittman
-was only a hair. behind with.
21 points.
Forrest paced the Tigers
with 22 points.
Score by Quarters:
Port St. Joe 19 15 16 19-69
Malone 20 19 16 12-67

Baseball

Organizing
The Dixie Youth Baseball
League will have an organi-
zational meeting for the
upcoming spring season on
Thursday, February 14 at
6:00. The meeting will be
held at the fire station on
Williams Avenue.
All coaches, anyone inter-
ested in coaching, and any
parents wishing to partici-
pate in planning are encour-
aged to attend.
Dixie Youth Baseball Re-
gistration will be held at the
Athletic House on Reid Ave-
nue from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m.
March 4-16 for boys and girls
ages eight through 14. All
new boys and girls, and all
those who played last year
must register again this year
in order to play. All new
players, must have a birth
certificate when they regis-,
ter.
Registration fee is $15.00
for thi first child, and $10.00
for each child thereafter per
family.
Minor, Major and Pony
League tryouts will be March
18-19 at 5:00 P.M. on, the
Tenth Street ball field.


Alumni Game
In what is planned to be an
annual'event, the baseball
team of Port St. Joe High
School is planning an alumni
game. All past alumni of
Port St. Joe High School who
played baseball for the
Sharks are invited to attend
and be part of the alumni
team which will play a four
inning game against the cur-
rent edition of the Sharks.
Following the conclusion
of this game, the alumni will
play a three inning game
against themselves. '
The first annual alumni


game is scheduled for March
2, at 1:00 p.m. at the baseball
complex on Gautier Avenue.
Anyone wishing more in-
formation or to sign up may
contact Rick Hatcher,
baseball coach, at 648-8174,
after 6:00, or call the athletic
department at 227-1387.


PSJ-D. Thomas 3-1-7;
Pittman 10-1-21; Cadwell 10-
2-22; Baxter 4-0-8; Jenkins
3-2-8; T. Thomas 1-0-2t Butts
0-1-1.
MALONE-Forrest 9-4-22;
Milton 7-0-14; Glover 3-0-6;
Miley 2-3-7; Hall 3-0-6; Lee-
64-0-12.

PSJ, 63; MARIANNA, 59
Port St. Joe's Sharks ended
a week of intensive play
Tuesday night, by toppling
the tough 'Marianna Bull-
dogs 63-59, in a game which
saw all five of the Shark
starters scoring in double
. figures.
The taller Bulldogs put up
a fight as the Sharks scram-
bled to maintain their lead
throughout the game. The
Sharks led at one point by as
many as 12 points over the
Bulldogs, but the 'Dogs kept
charging back to close the
gap, challenging the Sharks,.
who have defeated some
premier teams during the
past two weeks of play..
SMichael Pittman paced the
Sharks with 15 points. Durey
Cadwell, with the team's best
scoring average, pumped in
14. Demetre Thomas and


Josh Jenkins added 12 each '
and Dexter Baxter contribut- v
ed 10 to the cause.
Tim Fed was the big
Bulldog with 18 points.
Port St. Joe definitely won
the game at the foul line.
With the Bulldogs forced into
a fouling situation the .last
few minutes of the game, the
Sharks took advantage of the
free throws, making 15 for
the night. The Bulldogs had
only three charity points.
The Sharks had a 34-28 lead
at half time.
fScore by Quarters:
Port St. Joe 16 18 17 12-62.
Marianna 14 14 18 13-59
PSJ-Thomas 3-6-12; Pitt-
man 7-1-15; Cadwell 5-4-14;
Baxter 4-2-10; Jenkins 5-2-12.
MARIANNA-Long 3-1-7;
White 7-2-16; Fed 9418;
Wooden 1-0-2; Armstead 1-
0-2.

The Sharks will be on the
road for the coming week of
play, with only two games on
their schedule. Friday night,.
the team travels to Havana Dexter Baxter (15) for the Sharks and Don Brown (12).0
to metthg-ligGad- m
Sto meet the high-flying Glad- ~he Jackets both go up for a rebound in Friday's game.
iators at 6.30 EST; Tuesday
night, the team will travel to struggling Tigers, who al- when a Shark walks into the
Blountstown to meet the ways seem to come to life room.


"PIS, p






THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 1985


'How Can You Help Your Plants Recover from Cold?

Hold Off On the Pruning Activities Until You Find Out How Much Is Actually Dead


BY ROY LEE CARTER
County Extension Director
What to do to help plants,
recover from freeze dam-
age? This question is on the


Grace and Ffeedom


minds of many home garden-
ers since the late January
freeze left many plants se-
verely damaged. If this prob-
lem is new to you, you'll


1st United
Methodist Church
Constitution & Monument
Port St. Joe, Florida


CHURCH SCHOOL ....................
MORNING WORSHIP ..................
EVENING WORSHIP ...................
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP ......
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday)......


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
7:00 P.M.
6:30 P.M.
7:30 P.M.


Pastor, Alvin N. Harbour, Jr.


Custom Plumbing

Installation

New Construction
Single & Multi-Family Dwellings

STOKES

Plumbing Co.
648-8353
P. 0O. Box 274
Mexico Beach, Florida
RF0042744










Reg. SO9S

D-E-EEE Now $6599
You've earned your Wings!



r DISCOUNT SHOES.1NCOKWruATED
3123 L. Buhs. Hwy. 98 Panama City, FL 904/785-1132







REWARD

Offered for Return of



2 Cat Traps

taken from the vacant lot behind Terry's
Fried Chicken the weekend of February 1.
The traps are engraved "City of Port St. Joe".
They also have bright blue numbers "1 and
2" on the top section.


City of Port St. Joe
will give a reward for information leading
to the return of the traps.
Call 229-8247


CARTER


probably be anxious to do
something for your suffering
plants. One of the first things
you may think of is taking out
the pruning shears and cut-
ting out the dead or dying
leaves and branches. Well,


this really isn't such a good
idea. With many landscape
ornamentals, you can't tell
how much damage has been
done until the plant starts
new growth in the spring. My
information for this article,
was provided by Extension
Horticulturist Dr. Robert J.
Black, with IFAS of the
University of Florida.
With some of the more
tender landscape plants,
you'll find the cold has killed
everything above the soil
line. But many of these
plants may surprise you and
be sending up new shoots
come springtime. So don't
give up on them until warmer
weather arrives.
With azaleas the cold will
usually damage flower buds
and stems. You'll notice the


bud damage for sure at
blooming time when your
plant produces few or no
flowers. The stem damage
will usually show up later in
the spring and early summer
when some of the branches
die.
Dead wood will easily be
distinguishable from live
wood when new growth be-
gins in the spring. This will
be the time to bring out the
pruning shears and cut dead
branches as you find them.
Make clean cuts back to
living wood. This means the
cut surface should have a
smooth surface,, not a rough
one that looks as if the tissue
has been torn or pulled. Care
should be taken not to injure
the plant around the cut, or
rip or tear the bark above or


below the cut. The combium
layer, a thin layer of cells
just below the bark which is
important in wound healing,
is easily injured. Do not twist
or turn the shears as you cut
because you will injure the
plant as well as your shears.
Painting the wounds with
tree wound dressing has
lately become a controversi-
al practice. The standard
recommendation has been to
paint all wounds over one
inch in diameter with a
quality tree wound dressing
to protect the cut surface
from wood-rotting organisms
and check radial cracking
upon drying. Some research
has shown that upon expo-
sure to the sun, the protective
coating often cracks, and
moisture enters the cracks


Poster, Sticker Contest Winners


Named In DAR American


By Margaret Key Biggs
Chairman
The Saint Joseph Bay
Chapter of the NSDAR re-
minds you once again that
February is American His-
tory Month.
Last week we had a
question and answer game,
but this week we will give you
answers. All you have to do is
match Column One with
Column Two. See how much
American history you can
recall.. You may surprise
yourself:
Column One
1. Benjamin Franklin
2. George Washington
3. Thomas Jefferson
4. Crispus Attucks
5. Abraham Lincoln
6. Douglas MacArthur
7. Sybil Luddington
8. Frederic A. Bartholdi
9. Thomas Paine
10. Alexander Hamilton
Column Two
A. Designed the Statue of.
Liberty
B. Was killed in a duel with
Aaron Burr
C. Said, "I. shall return."
D. Wrote under the pen name
of Silence Dogood
&-Had-no direct descendants
F. Wrote Common Sense
calling for America's inde-
pendence
G. Was known as the rail-
splitter
H. Wrote the Declaration of
Independence
I. Is called a female'Paul
Revere
J. Black patriot who was the
first person killed by a
British soldier in the Boston
Massacre in 1770
The answers are: 1.D 2.E
3.H 4.J 5.G 6.C 7.1 8.A 9.F
I0.B
1 missed- Excellent; 2
missed- Good; 3 missed-
Fair; 4 missed- time to bone
up on your American history.
The Saint Joseph Bay
Chapter of the DAR sponsor-
ed, for the first time this
year, a poster and sticker
contest as part of a national
contest.
Students in grades five
through eight were eligible.
Every eighth grader in Mrs.
Patti Groos' classes entered.
We appreciate such grand
support.
There was not a winner on
the seventh grade level, but
other winners were fifth
grade: Scott Boykin, son of


Mrs. Wayne S. Biggs, American History Month Chairman, is
shown with poster and sticker winners: Scott Boykin and Paula Pen-
darvis of Port St. Joe Elementary School, and Danny Moree of Port
St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School.


Mr. and Mrs. Jim Boykin;
sixth grade: Paula Pendar-
vis,.daughter of Mrs. Pauline
Pendarvis; eighth grade:
Danny Moree, son of Mr..and
Mrs. Michael Moree of In-
dian Pass.
Congratulations to these
fine young people,7 and to
their teachers, Mrs. Wood,
Mrs. Blick, and Mrs. Groos.
Each student will receive a
certificate for winning on a
local level, and will compete
on a state level. If they
should win on a state level,
then they will compete on a
national level. Ultimately, if
they win on a national level,
their design will be adopted
by the NSDAR for its poster
and sticker design.
This week's essay winner
is Crystal Lynn Smith who
attends Faith Christian
School. She is a sixth grader
who is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Eddie Smith. Con-
gratulations to Crystal Lynn
who chose as her topic, "The

Need Heaters
For Elderly
The Department of Health
and Rehabilitative Services
(Aging and Adult Services) is
attempting to obtain portable
heaters and blankets to loan
to elderly people who are in
need of heating assistance.
If you wish to donate a
heater or blanket, you may
do so at the Wewahitchka
HRS Office in the old Court-
house, or the Port St. Joe
HRS Office at 224-A Reid
Avenue.


Statue of Liberty."
"The Statue of Liberty"
, The Statue of Liberty is a
symbol to all Americans of
freedom, hope, and courage.
Her torch has lit the pathway
to freedom for immigrants of
all nations.
The Statue of Liberty was a
gift of friendship from
France. The French people
raised 250,000 dollars to help
build the statue. Fredrick
Bartholdi, born on August 2,
.1834, first thought of and
designed the Statue .of Li-
berty. Bartholdi with the help
of Gustave Eiffel, supervised
the building of the monu-
ment. When it was com-
pleted, it was shipped in two
hundred fourteen cases to its
final destination. In 1885, it
was presented to the United
States by France.
The dedication day was
October 28, 1886. The Presi-
dent at the time was Presi-
dent Grover Cleveland. Sena-
tor William T. Evarts unveil-
ed the Statue of Liberty
"Give me your tired, your
poor, your hungry, your
huddled masses yearning to
breathe free." This inscrip-
tion on the statue's base is
from a poem by Emma
Lazarus. These words have
become well known through-
out the world. Their meaning
has given hope to millions of
people in suppressed nations.
The Statue of Liberty's
structure is unique. Her
waist is thirty-five feet thick.
Her right arm is twelve feet
high. Her hand is sixteen
feet, five inches long. Her
fingers are eight feet long


ilHistory
and her nose is four feet six
inches long. Her mouth is
three feet in width and her
eyes are two feet iipch IM
width, she weighs 225 tons
which is 450,000 pounds. She
is one hundred fifty-one feet
one inch high. She has a
spiral staircase which has
168 steps from the top of the
pedistal to the head of the
statue. The Statue of Liberty
is mostly made of copper
sheets.
For almost one hundred
years, the Statue of Liberty
has been in America. The
Statue of Liberty is Am-
erica's most important sym-
bol of freedom. It will take
two hundred thirty million
dollars to rebuild her. All the
money must come from
private donations. The
French people paid for its
creation in 1884. Surely, we
can raise the money to
rebuild her. The Torch of
Liberty is everyone's to
cherish. Let's keep her torch
lit.

Auto And
Homeowners
Insurance
JEAN MALLORY
639-5322 Wewahltchka
or
785-6156 Panama City


Meopolian really stands byou.
ULIlFEMALniUTOMMOML-ft MIl ilMNN


I


Expert TAX

Preparations


Corporations
Partnership
Individual


z:5-~==-


ACCOUNTING SERVICES
Small Business and Individual

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
PROFIT and LOSS STATEMENTS
TAX and FINANCIAL PLANNING

Gulf Accounting Services

312 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-6332


and accumulates in the
pockets that may occur.
However, in situations where
aesthetics are important, the
practice is justified. If a
pruning wound is to be
protected, allow it to dry
before applying the dressing.
This will improve chances of
good bonding. Examine the
coating several times the


first year. Re-treat if the
coating has cracked.
If you lose one or two of
your tender ornamentals,
don't despair. Now you have
the opportunity to add some-
thing new to your landscape.
With hundreds of plants to
choose from and mild weath-
er all year, most years, who
could complain?


Daiels' ervieCo


Heating & Air, Major Appliance Repair
Plumbing & Electrical Work
229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle
ER0007623, RF0040131, RA0043378 tfc 1119


Gal 5:22-23

o o0 /

Z TEMPERANCE n
cc N uj
S 2
o E w
GOODNESS

FAITH


HIGHLAND VIEW

CHURCH OF GOD
319 Sixth St, Highland View
"Where Jesus Christ Is King
& God's Love Is An
Everflowing Fountain"
SUNDAY SCHOOL ..... 10:00 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .. 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ... 6:00 P.M.;
WEDNESDAY EVENING 7:00P.M.
PASTOR C. W. WHITAKER


CLYDE WHITEHEAD, Jr.
ACCOUNTANT


TAX SERVICES
CORPORATION INDIVIDUAL
PARTNERSHIPS
SPECIALIZED HANDLING OF IRS AUDITS

ACCOUNTING SERVICES
.- SMALL BUSINESS and---
INDIVIDUAL SERVICE
o TAX & FINANCIAL PLANNING
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


Phone 229-8994


MATTHEWS
ner Pastor of

APTIST CHURCH
3T. JOE, FLORIDA


in Revival At



Rock
IBUES OF GOD CHURCH
ego Park Assembly of God)

ma City Mall off Highway 231
10:30 A.M. & 6 P.M.
UARY 18-20, 7 P.M.
ES:
r miraculous healing of melanoma
Tuesday at 11:30 A.M. For further
anama City.


DEWITT
Forn

FIRST B
PORT S


Will Be



The
AN ASSEM
(formerly Dir


2413 North Harris Ave., 2 blocks north of Panas
THIS SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17,
MONDAY WEDNESDAY, FEBRI
ATTENTION LADIL
Rebecca Matthews will share the testimony of he
cancer at a "Ladies Only" covered dish luncheon
details and to make reservations call 785-4545 in P


I U


901 Garrison Avenue
Port St. Joe, Fla.


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With

HANNON INSURANCE

Agency, Inc.

The Insurance Store Since 1943

Auto Home Business Life

Flood Bonds Mutual Funds

8:30 till 6:00 Monday through Friday

221 Reid Avenue Phone 227-1133

We Are HERE to Service' What We Sell

ROY SMITH, Aqent FRANK HANNON, Agent


FOR SALE

DOGWOOD TERRACE


PATIO HOMES

807 Woodward Ave. Port St. Joe
BUY NOW AND SAVE ON
Pre-Construction of Phase II -2 Bdrm. $37,500
STILL AVAILABLE
One large 2 bedroom at $43,500
Two one bedrooms at $33,500
10.85% 30 Year Fixed Mortgage
Available for Qualified First Time Homeowners
Insulated windows, heat pump, all appliances plus dishwasher, wall
to wall carpet, vinyl in kitchen and bath. Paved private parking.
SOME UNITS AVAILABLE FOR RENT

Cape San Bias Realty, Inc.
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER

Call
Bill Koran at 227-1290 or
Theresa Mashburn at 229-6916 2,tc110O


--


-OWN


PAGE SEVEN








- -~
SDO IrTAI
FRIENDLY PERSONALIZ-
ED SERVICE AND LOW,
LOW EVERYDAY PRICES!


QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED!





THIGH]S


(1 lbs o m re
PRMU FRYE

LEG


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IDON'TOVIRLOTHS


COUNTRY SKILLIET
PREMIUM GRADE
F RYER
D'STICKS
(FAMILY PAK)


L6'"12 10 Z.I I

T TC"ICKEN OF SEA
UNA 80








DAVID
Foodliners... .,a


FRZE FOO


rOTINO
PIZZAS...
Meadow Gold Y gallon
ICE CREAM


.99
.. lOoz. vV

* i


Mrs. Smith's Cherry Pie
Sea Treasure Breaded Fishsticks


26 OLb$199


Tropicana Orange Juice.....
Bird's Eye il Ears of Corn...


Dole Fruit'n Juice Bar


.0....


oL$149
12 oz 1
$199
12 ears
$169


RICH'S
205 Third St. Port St. Joe
* Hwy. 71 Wewahitchka


FEB. 13-19
- 1985


VEGETABLE 8 oz. pkg.
OLEO PATTIES..


Pilsbury
Hungry Jack Biscuits


188


0 .00000


1


64 oz.
Citrus Hill Orange Juice .......
Kreft 12 oz.
Velveeta Slices ......


8 oz.
Sealtest Sour


Cream.


loct,59
$159

$169

.59


.O... O..


BULK RATE
U. S. POSTAGE PAID
Permit No. 3
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465


MAXWELL HOUSE 79
COFFEE
LB.
EXPIRES FEB. 19, 1985
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE
IDIUBEIS U P I


0CORN
OIL
48 OZ.
EXPIRES FEB. 19, 1985
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE


$199
DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE


DOBL DICUTSEIL


PRODUCE


BANANAS



Lb. Tray


CLOROX
BLEACH


1


64 oz. i
EXPIRES FEB. 19, 1985
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT


CERTIFICATE


FAB $129
DETERGENT
49 oz.
EXPIRES FEB. 19, 1985
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE


Fresh Florida

Strawberries


pint


Chilean
White Seedless Grapes


Fancy Washington State
Red or Gold Delicious Apples


3 Ib. bag


$119

,.$139
b.119
$119


Alabama Nugget
SWEET 3lb.t

POTATOES

Stalk Celery.


88

39'


Chilean Red Plums
Cello

CARROTS


California Iceberg
LETTUCE


large tray


heads $1.00


*0 0 0


pound99


lb.
bags


Fancy Florida
TOMATOES


$1.49


- ,---uYaur~~~-


-- i..'.-. .- .'.'i-`


I*









PAGE TEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 1985


Shark Review

News of Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High


Mayor Frank Pate signs a proclamation, designating
February Heart Month. Shown are: Mrs. M. L. Christie, RN
Administrator; Dolly Brant, Activities Director and Steve
Hogue, Director, American Heart Association. Residents of


BSJCC are joining with other nursing homes throughout the
United States to raise needed dollars to combat heart disease
and stroke-the nation's number one killer.


Residents to Rock-Roll for Heart


On Saturday, February 23,
Bay St. Joseph Care Center
will be holding its first
annual Rock-Roll Jamboree
to raise funds for the Ameri-
can Heart Association.
The Rock-Roll Jamboree is
being organized to involve
nursing home residents, staff
and the local community in a
special program while
raising money .to benefit the
American Heart Association
in its fight against heart
disease and stroke.
Residents will be rocking


Public
IN Ir' CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
IN RE: The Matter of the Adoption of:
JENNY LOUISE ACREE and


in rocking chairs and rolling
in-wheel chairs to fulfill their
obligation to earn money
donated or pledged for them
by sponsors. Many other
activities are planned for the

CARD OF THANKS
Mrs. Helen Hunter and
family would like to thank
their friends and neighbors
for the flowers, food, and
loving kindness shown to
them during the loss of their
loved one, Alfred Ray Hunt-
er.


Notices -
CLEVELAND ROSS ACREE.
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: Cleveland Ross Sadler, Sr.,
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Adoption has been filed


PUBLIC NOTICE
Combination Location-Design
Public Hearing
White City Bridge on SR 71
Work Program Number 3113732
State Project Number 51020-1514
Federal Project Number BRF-131-1(13)
Gulf County, Florida
Notice fis hereby glive that-the Florida Departmnbht of'ra'drnsortationwilli hold a
Public Hearing at the Gulf County Courthouse, County Commission Room, 1000
Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, at 7:00 P.M. on March 14, 1985.
This hearing is being conducted to afford interested persons the opportunity of ex-
pressing their views concerning the location, design, social, economic, and en-
vironmental effects of replacing the bascule bridge over the Gulf Intracoastal
Waterway in White City.
Maps, drawings, National Environmental Policy data, and other pertinent informa-
tion developed by the Florida Department of Transportation; in addition to written
views received from other agencies or public officials, will be available for public in-
spection and copying at the Gulf County Parks Planning Commission, 1001 Tenth
Street (Mosquito Control Building), Port St. Joe or the Florida Department of
Transportation, Project Development and Environmental Office, Chipley. Display
material will be available at the meeting location from 6:00 P.M. until the Hearing.
Persons desirous of submitting written statements and other exhibits in place
of, or in addition to, oral
WHITE CITY BRIDGE statements may do so at the
S.R. 71 GULF CO. Hearing. Written statements
S / ,' or exhibits may be submitted
/s I/ as part of the Hearing, if
-- received at the Florida
n I- 1 -Department of Transporta-
4 a- tion, District Office, Post Of-
71 Whtec:ity- S Tow1 ..... 32428, within ten days
---- following the Hearing.
-- SEE SUNSET "F _
--o., w-.cit E E" F (1) Residence and (2)
0o businesses, will be relocated
387 by the preferred alternate.
: -- 'This Hearing is being held
pursuant to Florida Statute
ri 334.211: the Florida Action
lan Federal Aid Highway
-'- Act, 23 U.S.C. 128; 40 C.F.R.
S. Parts 1500-1508 and 23
-- -'- C.F.R. Par 771.
,PROJECT LOCATION Publish 2/14
I -_ 2/28 & 3114


FIRST UNITED

TSC METHODIST CHURI
22nd Street Mexico Beach
CHARLES M: PARKER and
DAVID L. TAUNTON, Minister
WORSHIP SERVICE............... 9:00 A.M
CHURCH SCHOOL ................ 10:00 A.M
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday)............




First

Presbyterian Church
Sixteenth Street and Forrest Park Avenue
Phone 227-1756

SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE ............ 10:
ADULT SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS ......... 11:
Welcome to Everyone




NEW BETHEL
African Methodist Episcopal Chi

146 Avenue C Phone 22
Rev. Theodore Andrews, Pastor

SUNDAY SCHOOL ..................... 9:3
MORNING WORSHIP .................. 11:0
EVENING WORSHIP .................. 6:0

"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man Our Brother"


day, fun for everyone. All
money collected will be given
to the American Heart Asso-
ciation.
CARD OF THANKS
I would like to take this
means to thank my family,
friends and neighbors for the
food, flowers and prayer
given to us during the loss of
our husband, father, and
grandfather.
Your love and support,
eased the pain.
God bless each and every-
one of you.
The Family of
Willie Carl Pate

against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your Answer'or other
response to the Petition on Petitioner's
Attorney:
ROBERT M. MOORE
P. 0. Box 248
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
and file the original thereof In the Cir-
cuit Court Clerk's Office, Gulf County
Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456,
on or before the 14th day of March,
1985. If you fall to do so, a Judgment for
the relief sought may be granted by
Default.
DATED this the 6th day of February,
1985.
JERRY GATES,
Clerk of Circuit Couti"' '"- "" -
By: Is/ Tonya Kriox,
Deputy Clerk 412/14

BID NUMBER WWTP 192
The City of Port St. Joe, Florlda,4e-
quests bids for the following:
1. One (1) LEVEL RECORDER AND
TRANSMITTER.
2. One (1) ELECTRONIC CON-
TROLLER.
3. One (1) ELECTRONIC CONTROL
'SYSTEM CONVERTER.
4. One (1) ElM VALVE OPERATOR
WITH.FLOOR STAND, STEM AND
INDICATOR.
Specifications may be obtained from
the City Clerk's Office, P. 0. Box 278,
Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. Bid
opening will be held March 05, 1985, at
8:00 P.M., EST, in the Municipal
Building at the Regular Meeting of the
City Commission.
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
By: Is/ L. A. Farris, City Auditor/Clerk
21t2/14
NOTICE OF NAMES OF PERSON AP-
PEARING TO BE OWNERS OF ABAN.
DONED PROPERTY
Pursuant to Section 13, Chapter 717,
Florida Statutes, entitled "Florida Dis-
position of. Unclaimed Property Act".,
notice is hereby given that the persons
listed below appear to be owners of
unclaimed personal or intangible pro-
perty presumed abandoned. THIS
DOES NOT INVOLVE REAL ESTATE.


Apparent Owner: Adams, F. E., Box 991,
Port St. Joe, FL 32453, account number
3089-1984-0001; Cloud, S. D.., 530 9th
St.. Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
3089-1984-0002: Coney, W. L., 162 Rob-
bins Ave.. Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
3089-1984-0003; Daniels, R. E., Rt. 1.
Hu Box 230. Wewahitchka. FL 32465,
w#l 3089-1984-0004; David, K. A., 113
Bellamy Circle. Port St. Joe. FL 32453.
3089-1984-0005: Davis, S.M., 132 2nd
Ave., .Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
3089-1984-0006: Garland, Claude, P. 0.
9rS Box 477, Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
0151-1984-0313: Gibson, W.R., Rt. 1.
.,C.S.T. Wewahitchka. FL 32465.
., C.S.T. 3089-1984-0007: Goldsburg, J. L., PO
Box 155. Wewahitchka, FL 32465.
....... 3089-1984-0008: Martin, D.S., Rt. 3, Box
43D. Port St. Joe, FL 32453,
3089-1984-0011: Matlock, G.V., Rt. 1.
Box 119. Wewahltchka, FL 32465.
3089-1984-0012: Miles, C.M., 892 Hayes
Ave.. Port St. Joe. FL 32453.
3089-1984-0013: Norris, G.J., 1910
Cypress Ave.. Port St. Joe. FL 32453.
3089-1984-0015: Puckett, George W. or
Patricia, 804 Garrison St.. Port St. Joe,
FL 32453,0224-1984-0011: Stevens, C.J.,
1312 Woodward Ave.. Port St. Joe. FL
32453. 3089-1984-0017: Thomas, W.W.,
233 Avenue F. Port.St. Joe. FL 32453.
3089-1984-0020: Watson, V.R., 557
Hayes Ave.. Port St. Joe. FL 32453.
:00 A.M. 3089-1984.0023: Webb, T. J., Box 712.
:00 A.M. Port St. Joe. FL 32453. 3089-1984-0024.
Information concerning the amount or

description of the property (such as
unclaimed checking accounts, savings
accounts, utility deposits, stocks.
bonds, insurance policies, safe deposit
boxes,. etc.) and the names and ad-
dresses of the holder of such personal
property may be obtained by any per-
son possessing an interest in the pro-
perty by addressing an inquiry to
urch Gerald Lewis. State Comptroller, Attn:
Abandoned Property Section. 202
Blount Street. Third Floor. Tallahassee.
7-1213 FL32301 (904) 487-0510. The Pensacola
telephone number for Information is
(904) 436-8520. Be sure to mention the
account number AFTER the name as
10 A.M. published In this notice. Unless proof
10 A.M. of ownership is presented to the holder
n0 P M. by April 30, 1985, the property will be
0 P.M. delivered for custody to the Comp-
troller of Florida. Thereafter, all further
claims must be directed to the Comp-
troller of Florida.
GERALD LEWIS, 21 2114
COMPTROLLER OF FLORIDA


Lisa Ray On

Dean's List

Lisa Ray, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Al Ray of Port St.
Joe has been named to the
Dean's List of High Honors at
Huntingdon College in Mont-
gomery, Alabama at the'
conclusion of the fall semes-
ter. A grade point average of
at least 3.75 on a 4.0 scale
must be attained to merit this
honor.
Huntingdon College, a Me-
thodist-related, four year li-
beral arts college is proudly
celebrating its 130th anniver-
sary and boasts an enroll-
ment of approximately 750
students.

Ron Minger

On' Dean's List
Robert D. Kersten, Dean of
Engineering at University of
Central Florida, has an-
nounced that Ronald E.
Minger has earned a place on
the Dean's List for the Fall
semester of the academic
year 1984-85.
Ronnie graduated from the


Last week was a victorious
week for the Sharks! The
basketball team won three
games last week. Mosley was
the first team they defeated.
On Friday, Vernon became
the Sharks' next victim.
Saturday night the Sharks
defeated Malone to wind up
their winning week. The next
two games for the Sharks will
be out of town. Friday, the
Sharks will travel to Havana.
Next Tuesday, the Sharks
will meet the Blountstown
Tigers. Good Luck' Team!

On Tuesday, January 29,
the Gulf County School Board
held their monthly meeting
in the Media Center at Port
St. Joe High School. Seniors
were invited to attend this
meeting to see how a school
board works. Superintendent
Wilder answered questions
from the students as to
procedure during the meet-
ing. The Board hopes to meet
itt the school again soon as to
involve the students as much
as possible.

Friday, February 8;, stu-
dents had the opportunity to
listen to a visiting scientist
from FSU speak on Spanish
and Forensic Archaeology.
Many, students took advan-
tage of this opportunity and
heard this interesting
speech.

Last Friday eight girls
were selected for the 1985-86
majorette squad-for Port St.
Joe High. Sherry Creel,
Angie Smith, Monica
French, Melissa Watson,
Lisa Handley, Kim Clayton,
Dawn Holloman, and Leslie
Landano were the eight girls
selected. Congratulations
Girls!

Saturday the Varsity
Cheerleaders traveled to Ma-
rianna to compete against
various squads from sur-
rounding counties in a Cheer-
leading competition. The
Varsity Cheerleaders of Port
St. Joe High School captured
first place. Congratulations

University with a Bachelor's
Degree in Engineering
, Electronics, Technology on.
December 14, 1984. He is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Dwight
Minger of Port St. Joe.


ANNETTE MINGER


Cheerleaders!

Governor Bob Graham has
proclaimed February 10-16
"School Volunteer Week".
The faculty at Port St. Joe
High would like to thank all
the volunteers for being so


helpful all year long. This
year has been great;.and the
faculty hopes that it con-
tinues in this manner.

Until next week, this is
Annette Minger hoping you
have a good one.


RON KEGLEY
. MusiclYouth



Cuddle Your Car

With Parts from Renfro Auto Parts


VALVOLINE
MOTOR OIL

No. 159 9
30W ,


No. 141
10W40 1.15L


No. 117
10W40 $1.20


TOOLS





Black & Decker No. 6558
Impact Wrench.... $44.95
Black & Decker No. 6523
Impact Ratchet ... $44.95
Easco No. 91525
Tool Socket Set... $21.95
Deluxe
PAINT GUN.......$54.95


HM-9065-1
BATTERY BOXES............ 4.95
By Mirax Assy. 21209 *
Mercury OUTBOARD GAS HOSE $15.95
Assy. No. 2120.7
Johnson-Evinrude GAS HOSE ... $8.95
No. 0211
6 Gal. MARINE GAS CAN .... $20.62


JACK CLOSEOUT
2-Ton Hydraulic Jack 621 10is
4-Ton -623 Hydraulic Jack $1580
6-Ton -625 Hydraulic Jack $20
20-Ton -636 Hydraulic Jack 6763


RENFRO AUTO PARTS
Phone 229-6013 401 Williams Ave.


THE PULPIT OF THE CITY


First Baptist Church
Port St Joe, Florida
SUNDAY'S SCHEDULE
9:45 ......... Bible Study (all ages)
11:00 ..... Worship (Live WJBU-AM)
6:00 ............ Church Training
7:00 .................... Worship

HOWARD BROWNING
Pastor


PAGE TEN


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, FEB-. 14, 1985








THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 1985


PAGE ELEVEN'


Mrs. Ralph Nance Tells Rotarians About Uruguay


Mrs. Ruth Nance gave the
Rotary Club a very interest-
ing program on her recent
visit to the country of Uru-
guay (which she said is


correctly pronounced 000-
ROO-GWEYE), last Thurs-
day at their regular noon
meeting.
Mrs. Nance spent a little


Oysters


Agreement Revealed fo

Management of State's


The Marine Fisheries Com-
mission acted upon proposed
recommendations for man-
agement of Florida's valu-
able oyster resources and
Apalachicola Bay, and held
final public hearings on rule
proposals for grouper, snap-
per, and queen conch during
public meetings last week in
Pensacola. The Commission
also considered possible
measures to regulate the
state's overharvested redfish
and seatrout fisheries, modi-
fied a rule proposal for stone
crabs, clarified language and
approved rule drafts for
cobia, scallops, and spear-
fishing, approved a rule
proposal that would prohibit
the use of nets in Weekley
and Herron Bayous in Es-.
cambia County, and agreed
to explore possible measures
to help southeast Florida
king mackerel fishermen.
The Commission voted to
retain the three inch size
limit for oysters and the 15
percent tolerance on under-
sized oysters, but restricted
applications of the tolerance
to oysters between two and a
half to three inches. To aid
enforcement, the Commis-
sion agreed to adopt defini-
tions for unculled oysters,
prohibit. placing oysters in
bags while at sea, and extend
the enforcement of size limits
into the shellfish houses. The
Commission further ap-
proved modifications in
areas defined as open for
harvesting in summer and
'winter for Apalachicola Bay,
and voted to change the
statewide season from Sep-
tember 1 through May 31 to
October 1 through June 30,
and the Apalachicola Bay
summer season from June 1
through October 1 to July 1
through September 30. The
Commission also voted to
reduce recreational bag
limits from four bags per
person per day to one bag per
person per day and to
support the formation by the
Governor of a management
committee for Apalachicola
Bay to help protect this
marine system.
The Commission's rule for
snapper and grouper, expect-
ed to reach the Governor and
Cabinet for final approval in
March, passed with some
changes, including the addi-
tion of mutton snapper to the
12 inch minimum size limit
set for red and yellowtail
snapper, the deletion of lane,
yelloweye, and vermillion
(or beliner) snapper from the
daily bag limit of 10 snapper



0 SEASONS
to see your good
neighbor agent









CAR HOME
LIFE HEALTH

BILL WOOD
411 Reid Ave.
229-6514 or 229-6103
Like a good neighbor.
State Farm is there.



STATE FARM
INSURANCE COMPANIES
Hoe Offkoe: BIloomlcitom. nlhto


over a month in the nation
visiting her brother who has
been a Southern Baptist
missionary to the nation for
the past 32 years. While


Resources

wide workshops to gather
further public input will be
scheduled and announced
shortly.
The next Commission
meeting will be held March
20-22, 1985 in Tallahassee,
and all rule proposals made
by the Commission require
final approval by the Gover-
nor and Cabinet.
Any questions concerning
Commission activities should
be directed to Lee Schlesing-
er, Information Officer, 2562
Executive Center Circle
East, Suite 211, Tallahassee,
Florida 32301, (904) 487-0554.


there, Mrs. Nance was given
a tour of much of South
America by her brother to
Argentina, Peru, Chile and
much of Uruguay.

"The people there consider
themselves Americans .
South Americans: and we're
North Americans", Mrs.
Nance said. "We're really.
lucky in North America. Our
continent was settled at
about the same time as
South America. We were
settled by the British who
were wanting to found colo-
nies while South America
was settled by the Spanish
who were after treasure. As a
consequence, we got the
benefit of the British culture
and laws while the South
Americans were exploited by
the Spanish for their precious
metals and stones."

Uruguay became a nation'
in 1843, two years after the
state of Florida became a
state. Mrs. Nance said the
nation is highly' literate,
providing schooling for 'all
children. "The children go to
school six days a week, with
the government providing


them uniforms and books.
They attend six years of high
school, which is the equiva-
lent of a Junior College
education in the United
States", the speaker said.
The speaker said the nation
was very clean. "There is no
litter and people help to keep
it that way."
She said the convenience
she missed the most in
Uruguay was the common


FAITH HOLINESS
CHURCH
3 miles south on C-30
SUNDAY SCHOOL ........................ 10a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP...................... 11 a.m.
SUNDAY EVENING ........................ 7 p.m.
THURSDAY EVENING ...................... 7p.m.
PASTOR, Rev. William Touchton
Everyone Welcome
4tc 2/7


American paper towel.
"They didn't have them".
she said.
Much of Uruguay's econo-
my is tied to ranching of beef
and sheep, Mrs. Nance said.
She produced several items
she had brought back with
her including the famous
Bolo, used by the Gaucho to
catch and hold man and
beast. The simple tool is
three stone balls about the


size of a pool ball, attached to
the end of leather thongs
about four feet long. The bolo
is an effective weapon, still
used by the South American
cowboy in his work.


The nation is a country of
statues: "They have a statue'
to commemorate every fam-
ous man and every important
event in their history", Mrs.
Nance said.


per recreational fisherman,-
and the deletion of the hinds
and graysby groupers from
the'daily bag limit of five
grouper per recreational fi-
sherman. The species de-
leted are small and not
considered overfished. The
rule proposal also includes.
size limits of 18 inches for
jewfish, red, Nassau, black,
gag, and yellowfin groupers
and eight inches for black
and southern sea bass, and
prohibits the use of longline
gear.
In other action, the Com-
mission passed its final rule
proposal to prohibit the har-
vest of queen conch in in
effort to protect and re-
plenish this once abundant
snail that has suffered severe
overfishing. The Commission
also decided to.remove from
the stone crab rule a one
percent tolerance level on
taking undersized stone crab
claws, deciding instead to
allow no tolerance after
hearing arguments from the
Department of Natural Re-
sources. The Commission
announced that if not allow-,
ing a tolerance created prob-
lems, it would reconsider the
matter. Both the queen conch
and stone crab rules are set
to reach the Governor and
Cabinet for approval in
March.
The Commission consider-
ed possible management
measures for redfish and
seatrout, without reaching
any definite conclusions.
However, the subject will be
discussed at the next Com-
mission meeting. A package
of proposed regulations will
b~ ufndefi serious considera-
ti in* and -will include in-
creased size limits for red-
fish of 16 to 22 inches and for
trout of 14 inches, daily bag
limits of three to five redfish
and eight to 10 trout per
recreational fisherman,
weekend closures to com-
mercial fishing, and one to
two month closures to all
harvest during spawning sea-
son for both species. State-


Surplus

Foods

Program
Lairy Wells, Director of
the Gulf County Commodities
Program has announced that
U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture surplus commodities
including cheese, butter, etc.
will be distributed to eligible
area residents on February
19 and 21. The foods will be.
distributed in Port St. Joe
Tuesday, February 19 at the
Senior Citizens Building from
2:00 EST to 4:00 EST, and on
Thursday, February 21 in
Wewahitchka at the Com-
munity. Building from 1:00
CST to 3:00 CST.
Any household whose in-
come is below the accepted
level or who can prove its
eligibility for Food Stamps,
Aid to Families with De-
pendent Children (AFDC),
Supplemental Security In-
come (SSI), or Medicaid is
eligible to receive the USDA
foods.
Documents accepted 'as
proof of eligilibity include:
Statement from Food Stamp
Office; Proof of Social Se-
curity income; Proof of
Unemployment; or Proof of
weekly or monthly income
for the household.
For further information
call 227-1735, or come by the
Senior Citizens Building or
the Civil Defense Office.


1


We Want You
To Be A Part of
The Friendly Place


BIBLE STUDY........................ 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................. 11:00 A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING .................. 5'45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ............ . . 7:00 P.M.
W EDNESDAY . . . . ...... 7:00 P.M.


Long Ave. Baptist Church
1601 LONG AVENUE
DANIEL W. DUNCAN
Pastor -


Sur-Way Electric

411 Reid Avenue


Commercial, Residential

Remodeling and

Service Work

CHARLES SOWELL
REG. NO. ER-004631
26 Years Experience
Licensed and Bonded

Call Shorty at

229-6798


..


Nylon and Suede
Lt. Blue in Sizes
5-10 with
Velco
Closing





in*


j;






V Portrait Package
MEDIUM Special
Additional portraits available
s Variety of poses and backgrounds
Groups: 50' per additional person
Poses our selection
Limit: one per person. 2 per family
V Satisfaction guaranteed
*Minors must be accompanied by a parent
Photography by Jack Nichols
SFri., Feb. 15 & Sat., Feb. 16
HOURS: 11 A.M. 6 P.M. Port St. Joe
Please Present Coupon to Photographer
All for $ 4 95 $ 95
Only 12 plus tax Deposit


NEAT VALUF"


TURKEY

Ham Halves


39


With Meat Purchase
Flanders Patties.


BONELESS
Rolled Oven Roast .
BONELESS
Rolled Chuck Roast.
Our Best FAMILY PAK
CUBE STEAK..


Wide, Clean Aisl
Space f(


. box399


.179 PORK MAW
lb.


Y EKRUT D RU MS


b$169 TURKEY NECKS


FREEZER BEEF SALE


WHOLE SIRLOIN


lb. Ib..

19 Oz. Pill

CAl


$199
Ib.


FROZEN FQQODS


Real Value
WHOLE

Tomatoes

3 ,$1 00


12 Oz.
Florida Gold Orange


8 Ounce OZARK VALLEY
Macaroni & Cheese
19.2 ECONOMY PAK
Downy Flake Waffles..
17poz.
Pepperidge Farm Cakes


Juice .. .......


488


*0000000 000

0000000000


99
$179


CASTLEBER

Real Value

Wyler's Uns

Campbell's

REX DOG F

HEFTY TRA
2 Liter NO BRAND

Soft.D


DELI/B-


r-resn tacn Morning at 6:00 A.M.

DOUGHNUTS


for


C


2 Scrambled Eggs, Grits or Fries,
SSausage or Bacon, Biscuits
BREAKFAST PLATE......
Delicious
Sausage & Biscuit


0000000


S- r~ EUD u OL~.S3vvoru~3uu 3uIiuit


-.,,,... (L^-iI~i_.r---.- _.L i -~wrt.~. r-- ,I ~.*** .-,**...--- -...r........ i ....,


F
D
Co
Diet C


$j199





Specials for
Feb. 13-19, 1985


BULK U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
Permit No. 65 r
Port St. Joe. FL 32456


CARRIER ROUTE
PRE-SORTED
OCCUPANT P. 0. BOX_


I


, Handy Displays Plenty of Parking
(our Shopping Convenience


Assorted


PORK CHOPS


0


GEORGE W.


VA


DUREN, Owner & Manager


510 Fifth Street Port St. Joe, Florida
Limit Rights Reserved Cigarettes & Tobacco Products Excluded In
Limit Deals USDA Food Stamps Accepted


Cut-Up WHOLE

FRYERS
(with 2 Extra Backs & Giblet


Lb.


C


d


I frm fresh

PRODUCE
BL
G E


EU
E C


2


Heads


Rudy Farm Mild or Hot ROLL 7
SAUSAGE .19
PORK FEET W
Turkey WINGS Ib.39


WRAPPED LIMITED QUANTITY
HIND QUARTER BEEFIb. $ 19


Quartered Thighs


* 0 0


Fryer Drumsticks ...
Livers and Gizzards..


Bryan Regular and Beef
CORN DOGS


.. l. b.39
Family Pak lb. 69


* 0 *


lb.490


pkg.


DAIRY DEPT.


Fresh Large Tray Pak


English Peas


$119


Fancy Cucumbers ......... 4forloo00
Red Pontiac Seed Potatoes. 10 b. bag $229
Fancy Broccoli ............ bunch99
Fresh Mandarin Oranges (Sweet & Juicy) 4/88
Western Cantaloupes ........ each 9


. .0 6 '


.* .


* .


BAGS (30 gal)...


INKS. .


ICERY


2Z.99
24 oz. 9


. 390


2 qt.


10/s1


10 oz./US


$788
50 lb.bag $7.8

20 ct. $


69


64 Oz. (% Gallon) 1 7
Real Value Orange Juice ... JI
a OZ. 3/$00
Breakstone Sour Cream..
4 Pak i i
Pillsbury Biscuits......... /90
24 Oz. Breakstone $ 49
Cottage Cheese .........


14 oz. Success Rice


32
15
12
24
3V2


990


Big Va


oz. Mt. Olive SWEET RELISH ...
oz. Real Value KIDNEY BEANS ..
oz. Vanish Auto BOWL CLEANER.
oz. Sunmaid RAISINS ........
lb. CRAVE CAT FOOD ........
/


riety of Bob's Feeds
......... 1.49
........ .. 39'
........... 99
. ........ 1.29
......I... 2.49


Different Menu Each Day -
PLATE LUNCH


4
I
6


DELI LUNCH F


Delicious Thick Milk


SHAKE S 190


THURSDAY
Fried chicken, lasagna,
chicken and dumplings.
FRIDAY
Fried chicken, catfish,
Swedish meatballs.
SATURDAY
Fried chicken, stuffed
potatoes.


Fried c
& meat
Fried c
dressing
Fried c
chicken


12.79
MIENU
MONDAY
chicken, spaghetti
balls, cube steak.
TUESDAY
chicken, chicken & h
ig, meat loaf.
WEDNESDAY
chicken, beef stew,
n pot pie.


. a


U-T AND
39


/ Plus


EE MIXES
'BEEF STEW.


. or C.S. Corn..

iet. Drink Mix. .

icken Gumbo ..


S0 0000


since
[AIN
IKS
prite,
loot Beer



29
19C


C


I


-


I$ :11,10M.M."Clicl
Oolp 311100R.0100300 11:111 1 11 Iola laila I O.'a Jolla 10 ll I DO: I IX I lo C C


I


I









PAGE FOURTEEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fin. THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 1985


One acre in Overstreet.
$4,200 negotiable. 648-8947.
4tp 1/31
3 bedroom, 1 bath, Duval
St., Oak Grove. $17,000. For
information call 227-1789.
4to 1/31
Extra nice home in good
location. 3 bdrm., 2 ba., cen.
air, dbl. carport, kitchen
equipped, utility room, 2
lots, Ig. grape arbor. Contact
Ed Ramsey, 229-8737.
tfc 9/13
3 bedroom, 2 bath, large
den, fully carpeted, dbl. car-
port, chain link fence on 2
lots. Located in Port St. Joe.
Call 648-5804 days, 648-8414
evenings. tfc 7/19
House in good neighbor-
hood, close to schools. Call
- 227-1595. ltc 2/14
- House for sale, 1909
Cypress Ave. Phone 639-5871.
Home for Sale
BY OWNER.
Re-decorated Ig. 3 bedroom
home with Iv. rm. and den;
fireplace and Ig. carport.
Located on fenced corner lot,
1 block. from school. 2011
Long Ave. Call 229-6673 after
4 p.m. or weekends.
2tp.2/14





On choice wooded city lot.
:BY -OWNER. 3550 sq. ft.
:New, energy efficient, 4 BR,
:-2 baths, professionally land-
:scaped, established garden,
cypress fenced back yard,
convenient double carport,
work shop, fireplace, ceiling
fans, attic fan, Pella thermo-
pane windows,, inside win-
dow shutters throughout.
$173,000. Shown by appt.
Phone 229-8989. 4tp 2/14






There will be a regular
communication of Port St.
Joe Lodge No. 111, F.&A.M.
every first and third Thurs-
day at 8:00 p.m.
Norman M. Martin, W.M.
Billy D. Barlow, Sec.,
pd. thru 12/84


Male cocker spaniel, 10
weeks-old, tan in color. AKC
registered, and has had
shots. $150. Call 648-8423.
after 5.
BASSBOAT
14 ft. Tidecraft, 50 hp Mer-
cury on new Drydock trailer,
complete with large luxury
seats, trolling motor, depth
finder, 2 tanks, 2 batteries.
$1,295.229-8989. 4tp 2/14
Sylvania color 19" T.V.,
$75; bench press, 110 lb.
weights, like new, $65; Cobra
85 cb base station with 100' of
coax cable and antenna, $75;
Odyssey TV game with 9 car-
tridges. 648-8926.
Fiberglass cap for Nissan
reg. bed pick-up. No win-
dows. Like new. Orig. $400,
asking $200. 227-1288.
Pool table, $150; large
rocker horse, $15; wedding
dress, size 8, $75. 229-6336.
tfc2/14
Singer Touch & Sew
Special zig zag sewing
machine, complete with
wood cabinet & access., $275.
Harvest gold cast: iron dou-
ble sink with fixtures, $35;
matching over the range
hood $15. Electric lawn
mower, $35. Call 229-6889.
17 ft. Searay boat, powered
with 1979 Mercury 80 h.p.
motor. Good cond. $950.,
Phone 648-5469. 2tp 2/14
To be given away, 3 pup-
pies to good home only. Call
229-6729. ltc 2/14
Canopy bed (double), 4
drawer chest, 3 drawer
dresser and mirror. 229-6387.
ltp2/14

$25.00 REWARD
for Any Sewing Machine
We Cannot Repair
SPECIAL $9.95
to clean, oil and adjust ten-
sion on your sewing mach-
ine. We guarantee your
machine can sew on any
fabric.
The Sewing Room
410A Reid Avenue
227-1151
tfc 6/7
Kabota tractor with diesel
engine, bush hog, diso,
cultivator & planter. Plow
Horse tractor with 5 h.p.
motor. Call 229-6803 or
229-8840. tfc 12/6


HANNON REALTY, Inc.
(904) 227-1133

FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES


Evenings and Weekends:
Margaret Hale 648-5659
Frances Chason 229-8747
Bo Boyett 648-8936
Donnie Lange 229-8208


NOW OPEN ON SATURDAY
FOR THE REAL ESTATE INVESTOR
Six dwellings in Port St. Joe and one in White City. Two are completely fur-
nished and four have refrigerator and stove. All seven for only $132.000.
Will not sell separately.
HOMES
St. Joe Beach: Owner financing. $12,000 lot or $14.000 with trailer.
St. Joe Beach: Excellent view. 2 bdrm., 2 ba.. deck. $125.000.
Port-St. Joe: Nice neighborhood, brick. 3 bdrm.. 2 bath. dbl. carport. store.
rm/workshop. $55,500.
St. Joe Beach: Custom built, many extra features. 3 bdrm.. 2 bath, f.p., deck.
Ig. lot, spring-fed pond. $88.000.
Howmards Creek: Almost new double-wide trailer, partially furnished. 3
bdrm.. 2 bath. f.p.. nice corner lot, $27.900.
Ward Ridge: Brick, 3 bdrm.. 2 ba.. assumable mortgage. $46.000.
Port St. Joe: Recently redecorated. 3 bdrm.. 1 ba.. deck. separate workshop.
corner lot, walk to town. $24.000.
Port St. Joe: Executive home. excellent for entertaining. 4 bdrms.. 2 baths.
3000 sq. ft.. f.p.. Ig. living area. $95.000.
St. Joe Beach: Ocean view, corner lot. 3 bdrm.. 1 /4 bath. deck, screen
porch, reduced to sell at $64.500. Owner financing.
Port St. Joe: Good for investment. 4 bdrm.. 2 ba.. only $29.500.
Port St. Joe: Starter home or rental property. 3 bdrm.. 1 ba $29.500.
Howards Creek: Lg. 2-story, 5 bdrms., 2 baths. Franklin stove, screen porch.
util. rm. $47,900.
Indian Pass: Single family home. 2 bdrm.. 1 ba.. Ig. liv. rm.. din. rm.. $38.000.
Port St. Joe: Quiet neighborhood, frame, 3 bdrm.. 2 ba.. den. sep. dining rm..
carport, until. rm., $44.500.
St. Joe Beach: Stilt house, 2 b'drm., 1 1V bath. den or study, util. rm.. carport.
$69,500.
St. Joe Beach: Beach house, 2 bdrm, frame, f.p.. screen porch. $79.000.
RESIDENTIAL LOTS
Mexico Beach: Already has water hook-up, 100'x100', only $8.800.
Ward Ridge: Two lots. 75'x150' each. $6,600.
Gulf AIre: Wooded lot, 65'x115', $26.500.
Bluerldge Mountains: 1 acre, $6,250.
Howards Creek: '/ acre, $1,500.
Indian Pass: High and dry, $11,500.
Jones Homestead: 2 lots, $8,400.
TOWN HOUSES
Cape San Bias Beach: 2 bdrm., 2'/2 ba. $80,000.
St. Joe Beach: New 2 bdrm., 1%2 ba., on Hwy. 98, unobstructed Gulf view,
dedicated beach, furnished $65,300; unfurnished $52,700.
COMMERCIAL LOTS
White City: One acre near canal, $33,300.
Overatreet: Two acre plots on Intercoastal Canal, $16,000 ea.
Port St. Joe: downtown, 60'x90' corner lot, $18,000.


Roy Smith
Karen King
Marsha Young


TRY
WATKIN'S
PRODUCTS
229-6023


Magnovox am/fm L
Solid state 4-speed r
player. Astosonic s
early American styling
offer. 1110 Long Ave
227-1240. t
'One used 30 gal. el
water heater, co,
model, works well.
229-6965 after 5:30 p.m
tf
5"x7" note card
Beacon Hill Lighthou
full color. See them a
County Public Libra
Wewa State Bank in Po
Joe. Library will re
$1.00 for each card sold

Trampoline, round 1
diameter, mat is 3 yea
600 lb. capacity, excel.
$230. Call 229-6962.
tfc
1980 Magnolia 2
mobile home. NADA
$26,000.00. LQan
$21,276.00. Asking $20,0
Call 229-6353 after 5 p.]
tf
Small families payiu
much- for health insur
Call Mutual of Or
648-8557. 41


1978 Chevette, 2 door, 4
speed with air conditioning,
am/fm cassette. In very
good cond. $1,500. Call
648-8174 after 6 p.m.


3tc 2/14
1973 Nova in good running
4tp 1/10 shape for $350 or best offer.
stereo. Call 648-8746. It
record .1973 Pontiac Catalina 400
series, V-8, a/c, heater, ps, pb, am
g. Best radio, 8 track stereo needs
e. Ph. work. Whitewall radials, 2
fc 1/31 new. Very clean, runs well.
electric Godfrey, 229-8646. Itp
hunter 1983 Mozda GLC, take over
Phone payments. Call 229-8512 or
. 227-1639. Itp 2/14
fc 1/24
c 1/24 1980 Mercury Bobcat, 4
is of speed trans., am/fm radio,
ise in door speakers, ps, pb, a/c,
t Gulf remote sport mirrors. A-1
ry or condition. 229-6503, or may
ort St. be seen 127 Hunter Circle.
receive $2,800. 2tn 2/14
,d. 1975 International Travel-
tp 2/7 all, p.s., p.b., a.c., V8, a.t.
3% ft. Ideal for pulling shrimp or
rs old, oyster boat. 87,000 miles,
cond. $750. 1969 Datsun converti-
ble, removable hardtop, 4
c 12/24 cyl., dual carb., runs good.
4'x70' Restoration started. Price
4a0l negotiable. Days 227-1798,
value nite 229-6812, ask for Bill.
D00.00. 1977 Malibu Classic, good
m. condition. Call 229-8108.
fe 1/17 4tp 2/7
ng too 1967 Ford F-100 pick-up.
.... Runs good, $750. 648-8485.


maha,
p 1/31


ATTENTION LICENSED
4-20 and 2-20 AGENTS. In-
terested in hiring two fully
licensed property and cas-
ualty agents. Guaranteed in-
come $15,48,000,0 per year.
MUST LIVE IN GULF
COUNTY. Days 674-5471,
evenings 674-8466. 4tp2/7

BS


National company looking
for satellite antenna dealers.
No experience required.
Complete unit prices $630.00
and up. Retail $1,295.00.
Phones open 24 hours. 303-
570-7800. 2tp 2/7





ONE MORE TIME
We bought another load of
new junk due to the great
response of our first yard
sale. We have more old
things for you to refinish.
Check our front room sale
for:
Tables & Chairs; Chairs,
Chairs, Chairs; Several
Antique Tables; Lovely
Light Oak Serving Cart;
old coffee table & matching
end table; baby crib; sofas,
lamps, milk glass, etc.
Folding stools, wood &
metal. Items? Too
numerous to mention all
over the front yard.
FRIDAY ONLY
9 a.m. until
229 8th St.




For Rent: Mini-warehouse
storage. For more informa-
tion call 229-6332. tfc 1/17


Century 21
St. Joseph Bay Realty
BEACH RENTALS
14 miles from Tyndall Air
Force Base. Townhomes
and cottages for rent by the
month. Furnished and un-
furnished. Some weekly
throughout the winter. Con-
tact Century 21, St. Joseph
Bay Realty, Inc., Realtor,
904/648-5716.
*
SPECIAL BUY
2108 Juniper Ave.,
Port St. Joe
Absolutely beautiful 3
bdrm., 2 baths, formal liv.
rm. & din. rm. Den, fire-
place, dbl. garage. Many
other extras. By appt. only.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
Case No. 85-13'
I. W. DUREN, LINA W. DUREN,
ISAAC K. DUREN and GEORGE W.
DUREN,
. Plaintiffs,
Vs.
DONNELL.PETERSON and Wife,
RUBY L. PETERSON,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT ..
TO: Donnell Peterson,
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an
action for the foreclosure of a Mort-
gage on real property located in Gulf
County, Florida; described as follows:
Lot Twelve (12), Block 1007, Mill- .
view Addition Unit No. 1, Gulf
' County, Florida, as per official plat
thereof on file in the Office of the
Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County,
Florida, -
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your Answer
or other response to the Complaint on
Plaintiffs' Attorney:
ROBERT M. MOORE
P. 0. Box 248
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
and file the original thereof in the Cir-
cuit Court Clerk's Office, Gulf County
Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, on or
before the 28th day of February, 1985. If
you fail to do so, a Final Judgment for
the relief sought may be granted by
default.
DATED this the 28th day of January,
1985.
JERRY GATES. -
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Is/ Tonya Knox, Deputy Clerk
4tc 1131


misc.
FOR SALE


RENT


steam carpet cleaner
with HEATER and the
VIBRATING POWER
BRUSH0oNLY
<\ ONLY


Gets carpets clean
like you've never
seen!

finishing touch
201 Monument Ave.
*Phone 227-1199 or 227-1190


I SERVICE


2 bedroom trailer, partial-
ly furnished. $125 per month.
Jones Homestead. 648-8153.
2tc 2/7
For Rent: Beachfront 2
bdrm., 1 ba. furnished house.
$250.00 till May or $375.00
year round.
*
1 bdrm., beachfront furnish-
ed apartment at $195 per
month year round.
*
Newly built house, 2 bdrm., 1
ba. unfurn. $275.00 month
year round.
Call 648-8398 or 648-8120.
2tc 2/7

For Rent: 2 bedroom un-
furnished house at Jones
Homestead. $160 month, $50
deposit. 227-1674. tfc 2/14
Trailer lot for rent:
located on St. Joe Beach. For
information call 227-1451. ltp
For Rent: 3 bedroom
apartment, furnished. 1616'
Long Ave. 227-1199.
Room for Rent: by day,
week, month. Air cond., TV.
Thames Hotel. 229-8723. 302
Reid Ave. tfc 7/5
No need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
227-1251.
For Rent: Casa Del Mar
Townhomes & Cottages, 1
bdrm. cottage or 2 bdrm.
townhouse fully furn., color
tv, no pets. Only miles from
Port St. Joe on Hwy. 98. En-
joy the beach and be close to
Town, too. Call Wanda today
for our LOW WINTER
RATES. 648-8446. tfc 1/17


H. L. ALLEN & SON
General Contractor
New and Remodeling
All Types
25 Yrs. Experience
648-5080
or P.C. 763-2924


Going Fishing?
Stop here first
for a complete
line of

Fishing Tackle
HURLBUT SUPPLY
306 Reid Avenue



SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!


Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151


Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reid Avenge


oI mlUI lIi. s ...n...... snl...nln eIuIlemls


SPACEVIEW
SATELLITE
SYSTEMS
(FCC Licensed
Technicians)
SALES, SERVICE
& INSTALLATION


227-1590
.I.IIII ..nl.ll. .lll.llll .lll41UllllHl.ll..l


Will babysit in my home.
Dependable and local refer-
ences. $1.00 per hour per
child. 227-1288.
SPRING SPECIAL
Lawn Mower Repair $19.95
plus parts. Oil changed &
blade sharpened free.
BOB'S SMALL ENGINE
REPAIR
648-5106
4tc2/14
Need your
WATER LINE INSTALL-
ED going into your home at
the beaches. Call
Bob Ridgley
648-5106
4tc 2/14 -
Experience more lovely
hands with Acrylic
Sculptured Nails. New in the
area from Las Vegas.
Call Lynn 648-8758
2tp 2/14



Psychological Services for
anyone with problems in
day-to-day living. Gulf Coun-
ty Guidance Clinic, Port St.
Joe. 227-1145 (24 hours).
We buy, sell and trade us-
ed furniture. Get good prices
for your unwanted furniture.
Country Peddler. 229-8966.
tfc 10/25

COSTIN INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
All Forms of Insurance
322 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tfc 11/1


Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday, 4:00P.M., E.S.T.
Tuesday, 8:00 P.M., E.S.T.
St. James Episcopal Church
Thursday, 7:00 P.M., C.S.T.
Wewa Medical Center

SA Y YOU SAW IT IN
THE STAR!!


St. Joseph Bay
Constnce o

Com...rclal.




W. S. (Biff) Quarles
CUSTOM HOMES
MULTI-FAMILY
229-8795
RG0040048



ST. JOE CUSTOM
BUILDERS





S-Commercial Building
-Residential Building
-Cabinet Work
Gen. Con. RG 0033643

GLEN F. COMBS
227-1689

P. O. BOX 456
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
tfc7


P ink it was something I ate."



kills bugs for
up to six months,

and saves you about $100 yearly
in costly pest control services.
Use of Sprayer free with
purchase of Rid-A-Bug
HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe. Florida


The Sewing Room
410 A Reid Avenue V
Port St. Joe, Florida a

"Quality Fabrics at Affordable Prices"


H&R BLOCK
The Income Tax People
Personal & Business Tax Preparation
CLOSED MONDAY
TUESDAY FRIDAY 9:30 11:30 a.m.
1:00 7:00 p.m.
SATURDAY 10:00 a.m. -4:00p.m.

For Appointment 411 Reid Ave.
229-8307 Port St. Joe
or 229-8998 8tc 1/10 Florida


Custom Drapes & Blinds


Nowat Danley's



Large In-Store Selection
of Samples for You to Choose


REEVES FURNITURE &

I REFINISHING SHOPPE
325 Reid Avenue REFERENCES Phone 229-6374
Call and Talk to Us About Getting
Your Furniture Refinished to Look
Like New. We Buy and Sell Used
Furniture.
Your Western Union Representative


Copies
AVAILABLE AT
THE STAR
306 Williams Ave.
Port St. Joe


CHILD CARE, home of
Cindy Touchton, reasonable
rates. Located at Jones
Homestead. Call 229-8659. *


Design, Drafting, Site
Plans, Remodeling,
Repairs, Maintenance,
New Residential
Construction
Reasonable Rates
THORNTON ASSOCIATES
648-5142
4tp2/7


THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave.22M4954
Open 7 Days A Week
Mon.,- Fri., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sat., 8 a.m.-. 6 p.m.
Sun., 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
tfc 11/1


Wauneta's
Accounting &
Income Tax

Accounting & Income Tax
Service Small Business
.Individual
Monthly Accounting
Wauneta Brewer PatHolman
Owrier Asistant
220 Reid Ave.
Phone 229-8536


==""


im


from


PAGEFOUREEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. -


THURSDAY, FEB. 14, 1985