<%BANNER%>
The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02565
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 24, 1985
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02565

Full Text













USPS 518-880


FORTY-EIGHTH YEAR, NUMBER 21


THDeep Water Port- S afest Beaches in Florida
Industry-Deep Water Port-Fine People-Safest Beaches in Florida


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1985


25C Per Copy
_J


It WAS Cold!!


Mercury Reported Plunging to 50


Temperatures took a sudden and
dramatic drop here in northwest Florida
Sunday, placing the entire northern'
two-thirds of the state in a deep-freeze.
Temperatures here in Port St. Joe
reached a record, when they dipped to
around six or seven degrees, with a wind
chill factor of minus 30 degrees. There is
no official temperature kept in Port St.
Joe, but reports have been received
from serious weather watchers of'
thermometer readings as low as five
degrees early Monday morning.
During the evening Monday, televi-
sion stations in the area were interrupt-
ing their programs to bring temperature
readings which started at 17 degrees just
after dark to around 10 degrees at 11:00
p.m.


Frigid temperatures didn't catch
residents of Port St. Joe unprepared.
According to local law enforcement
officials, the only damage caused by the
extreme cold was a broken power line in
the St. Joseph Peninsula area.
.Here in the City,. sleet pelted the
vicinity for about a half hour Sunday
afternoon, beginning about 3:30. The
frozen rain pellets gathered in small
pockets on roof-tops, on cars, etc., but
didn't cover the ground.
Monday morning was a world of ice
. here along the shores of St. Joseph Bay.
The Star took the picture Of the
Wewahitchka State Bank's sign at 8:30,
after the sun had been out for nearly an
hour and the sign still read 10 degrees.
For Port St. Joe, that's cold!


Seek Action on




Single Member




District Plan


Wewahitchka Group Says It Doesn't

Want to Go Into Court Action


Charles Bostick of Wewahitchka, made
his second pitch to the County Commission
to change the county's voting procedure to
a single member district type government
Sto replace the present at-large method of
voting on Commissioners. Although it was
his second trip to the Commission and they
still didn't turn over the county's voting
system to comply with his request, Bostick
stated he would be back.
The Williamsburg community resident
had appeared before the Commission back
in August of last year and made the same
request, just a few days 'before the
primaries started. The Commission turned
him down then because Florida law dictated
the method of voting .for government
representatives used by the county. At the
time, Bostick wanted the local election
delayed until a single-member district
system could be put into place.
In arguing for the need of a single
member district system, Bostick asked
what progress had been made toward
changing over the county system. He said
under the present system, "We sometimes.
don't see our representatives in county
government from one election to another".
Bostick said his particular area is also
plagued by drainage problems and other
lack of services.
Commissioner Billy Branch remarked
that "There are plenty of mostly white areas
in the county that have drainage problems
'just as bad as yours. There's nothing we can
"dq about them.."
Attorney William ,J. Rish advised the
Board the law had been changed governing,
voting procedures since Bostick was last
before the Commission. "A Constitutional
Amendment was approved in the last
election which allows a county to go to the
. single member district -method if it is
appi'oved in a referendum by county
voters."
"It won't pass on a referendum",
Bostick said. "You seem to be understand-
ing, intelligent gentlemen. Would it benefit
anyone to carry this thing through the
courts'?" Bostick then went on to say he
didn't wish to go to court with the matter,
stressing the fact "It wouldn't benefit
anyone" to force the county to spend all that
money and effort.
Commissioner Doug Birmingham made
a motion, which was approved unanimously,
that the county put: the question of single
member districts on the ballot at the next
election.
"That's too far. off", Bostick said.
"That's 20 months from now. Besides, a
referendum would never pass in Gulf


County. When can you let me know your
decision. When will you consider the
request?"
Chairman Eldridge Money told the
petitioner, "I have heard several white
people say they approved a single member
district type government, too. I think such a
referdum would have a good chance of
passing".
The debate went on for several more
minutes, with Bostick wanting the Commis-
sion to take action on making the change
themselves, and the Commission saying
they would support putting the question on
the ballot at the next election.
"How many of you would vote in favor
in such a.referendum?" Bostick asked.
He received no direct answer, but Clerk
Jerry Gates summed up the situation by
saying, "I think the Commission is saying,
they couldn't fulfill your request even if they
wanted to. The law doesn't allow them to.
All they can do is put the question on the
ballot or react to any court action you of-
anyone else may bring about."
Bostick still insisted he didn't want to
go to court, and left the meeting saying he
would keep in touch with the Commission onft
the matter.
BEACH WATER
Commissioner Owens advised the Board
the beaches water system would begin
serving at least some of its customers in
"about 10 days or two weeks and we need to
take some steps now to secure the services
"of someone to read meters and make minor
repairs" .
Commissioner Branch said he would
like to contract the Service out so "we can
select someone who can do the work and
wants to work only part time as we need.
him". Branch said, "If you want to
advertise for such a person rather than just
contract for such services, it's all right with
me, but we need to get it done."
SThe Commission agreed to take bids for'
the service at the February 12 meeting and
in the meantime revue the estimated
charges for the system to see if all services
are being paid for by income.
CHANGE PERMIT CHARGES
Building inspector, Dewayne Manuel
said he has felt all along the small single
family builder is paying too much for
permits and the large builder gets too much
of a break on the present building permit
and inspection fees.
To rectify the situation, Manuel intro-
duced a new schedule of fees and charges
(Continued on Page 8)


Strained Relations Surface


Wewa
New Gulf County Sheriff Al
Harrison and Wewahitchka
Police Chief Jonathan Glass
tried to put rumors they were
fueding to rest this week
without really saying there
was no cause for suspecting
unrest between the two de-
partments.
Enmity between the two
law enforcement officers was
reported by area news media
following a meeting by Sher-
iff Harrison with the Wewa-
hitchka City Commission last
week in which Harrison says
he merely stated his position


What started out, as a
racoon hunting trip for two
friends, ended in tragedy for
one and the other being
lodged in Gulf County Jail on
a charge of second degree
murder.
Saturday evening, Ricky
Alan Harper, 30, of White
City and Clyde Douglas Yeo-
mans, 31, of Douglas Land-
ing, left Kirkland's Landing
at White City in the early
evening, headed for the Lake
Wimico vicinity to go rac-
coon hunting. During the
evening Harper and Yeo-
mans visited with several


Police Chief,
in providing part of the law
enforcement for the north
Gulf County town. The media
interpreted Harrison's state-
ment as "throwing down the
gauntlet" in law enforcement
jurisdiction when he declar-
ed to the Commission he
would make the decision who
would represent his depart-
ment in the Wewahitchka
area and he would make the
decision as to their operation
and investigation methods.
In a telephone conversa-
tion with both officers this
week, both expressed a wil-


acquaintenances and friends
who were camping on a
houseboat near Lake Wim-'
ico.
The friends said the two
young men left the houseboat
at about 10:30 p.m., headed
back to Kirkland's Landing.
Harper had expressed a need
to return home to put anti-
freeze in his vehicles.
Apparently, between the
time the two men left the
houseboat and before they
reached the landing, an
argument started. As the
argument progressed, Yeo-
mans allegedly shot Harper


Sheriff, Say They'll Do Their Job
lingness to work with the "I just told the City of cooperation.
other .and both saying they Wewahitchka I wanted to to know wha
had a job to do and they were work with them to give good was so I cou
going to do it. law enforcement but that I men when n
The report of a fuss be- would make the decision complaint w
tween the two law enforce- about who worked the Wewa- hitchka City
ment officers erupted out of hitchka area and when they want to ke
an apparent disagreement worked it. I told them I would together."
over jurisdiction, cooperate 100 percent, but "I am notv
Sheriff Harrison said the that I could not be dictated to I'm wanting
Sheriff's Department has al- about the operation of my law enforced
ways done all the serious responsibility. I would have said.
investigating in the county to make those decisions." Chief Glas
and they would continue to do Harrison said he ap- problems. "
so unless the Cities in the preached the City Commis- any. trouble
county secured their own sion of Wewahitchka in an County Sher
investigating people, attitude of conciliation and in all these y


nine times in the back and
side with a .22 caliber rifle.
Harper fell over the side of
the boat into the Intracoastal
Canal and Yeomans came on
to the landing to get help.
Members of the .Gulf Coun-
ty Sheriff's Department, the
Florida Marine Patrol, the
Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission, the
State Attorney's office and
the Florida Department of
Law Enforcement converged
on the site where Harper's
body went into the water.
Sunday morning, Harper's
body was found floating near


Lake Wimico by the search-
ers.
Monday, Yeomans was ar-
raigned before Gulf County
Judge David Taunton and
charged with second degree
murder. Second degree mur-
der is the charge placed
against a defendant when the
act hasn't been deliberately
planned.
Yeomans is being held in
Gulf County Jail without bail.
According to Sheriff Al
Harrison, the shooting is still
under investigation by Chief
Deputy Mike White.


"I just wanted
it their schedule
ld fill in with my
needed. I have no
with the Wewa-
* PD, and I just
eep us working

wa iing a battle.
to provide good
ment", Harrison

ss said he had no
I have never had
with the Gulf
iff's Department
'ears and I'm not
n to n. 1 n.v.


going to nave any now. I nave
my job to do and duty to
perform and I'm going to do
it."
Glass admitted the situa-
tion wasn't as good as it could
be. He said in the past he has
worked almost as another
Deputy Sheriff, even though
he is employed by the City of
Wewahitchka. "When they
needed me, I was there. Now,
I'll confine myself solely to
the City. Still, if the Sheriff
needs me outside the City, all
he has to do is call, and I'll be
glad to respond."
Glass said he would stay
out of the way of the Sheriff's
department until the current
situation cools down. "I'm
here to maintain law and
order in the City of Wewa-
hitchka. I'm not going to let
anything get in the way of
that", Glass said.


Tree Seedlings
Friday was no typical Florida day, but it
was Arbor Day in Florida and the Florida
Forest Service was selling tree seedlings for
planting.
Forest Ranger, Buddy Layfield, who
held the seedling sale here in Port St. Joe
reported the sale went "real well" in spite of
the cold and windy day. "We sold 200
packets of seedlings by noon", he said.
Layfield said the annual tree seedling sale is


Popular Item
always a successful project by the Forest
Service here in Port St. Joe.
In the photo above, Ranger Layfleld is
shown writing out a receipt to Richard
Logan and Major Sullivan, both of Beacon
Hill, who have just made purchases of the
seedling packets.
"I was glad they sold fast", Layfield
said, "so I could get in out of this cold
wind." -Star photo


-ookIs~


Yeomans Arraigned Monday

Faces Second Degree Murder Charges In Rickv Harper Killing













Editorials


and Comments


THE STAR


THURSDAY, JAN. 24, 1985


Not O


NAbout

7 Neither columnist James Kil-
:patrick nor the Wall Street Journal
seem very optimistic that the
current effort at disarmament
talks being engaged in by us and
the Russians will pay very large
dividends.
Kilpatrick calls the story of the
two super powers getting together
to talk a "no story", meaning there
might be a lot of bombast and
rhetoric there, but there is no
substance to it. The talks will
amount to nothing, Kilpatrick
feels.
The Wall Street Journal is even
more pessimistic than is Mr.
Kilpatrick over the outcome of the
talks. The Journal said, "Between
1925 and 1941, the U.S.S.R. signed
15 non-aggression or neutrality
treaties. It broke, denounced or
violated 11. Between 1950 and 1980,
Moscow signed 18 alliances; it
violated 15, among them the
Helsinki agreements."
- What the Journal is saying is, if
the Russians and our negotiators
were to agree wholeheartedly with
ia set of do's and don't's which
might be promulgated in the talks,
there isn't much chance the Soviets
,will live up to the treaty.
We suppose that is right.


(The following interesting edi-
:t.orial was in last week's Blounts-
-town County Record. We're re-
:-Zprinting it here to provoke your
.thinking. -Ed)

:: 'Not too long !ago- the only
peoplee who could vote for a county:
"commissioner from District One in
-Calhoun County were those who
lived in the district. This situation
-continued long after some of the
-districts had far less than' their
'share of the voters. (That was one
'fifth, of course.)
"In plain English, this meant
:'that a man elected by a very small
percentage of the voters in our
county could decide what. was
going to happen to the majority. It
clearly was unfair, and opened the
way for many possibilities of bad
government.
"After, a long period of trying
_ to right this situation, the people of
:Calhoun County succeeded in divid-
Sing the county into districts of.more
Nearly the same population, and
giving all the people a chance to
vote for all the commissioners.


timistic



Talks


Certainly, history has proven the
Soviets have not been very reliable
supporters of their word unless the
word happened not to clash with
whatever they wanted to do at the
moment..
We also recognize that the
Soviets would like for the talks to
end on the note of allowing them to
do what they 'want to do and
regulate us. Right now, they are
insisting we pull missiles out of
eastern Europe while no mention is
made of them pulling back theirs.
We have no naivete toward
them even hinting at an agreement
which would be anything except
beneficial to their desires at the
expense of our own. The Soviets are
interested in only one people-
themselves. Their negotiators
could care less about whether or
not we are satisfied.
For this reason, we will not
think harshly of our negotiators
when, after two days or two
decades of talking-however long it
takes--our people come home with
nothing more written down on a
piece of pretty paper than they had
when they left Washington. At
least, as long as they are talking,
we're hot fighting.


This change was looked on as a
great change for the better. (It
was, too.)
"Currently we read a great
deal about single member district
voting. Essentially, this is the bad
_ system we were able to' rid
ourselves of many years ago. Were
we wrong? Was our forward step a
bad thing for us?
"We do not think so. Since the
decisions of the commission affect
all, all should vote upon the
commissioners. That does not
seem arguable to us.
"So, despite the fact that
currently one is branded as back-
ward and heartless to be against
single member district voting, the
new wave is wrong. Should it
become general, a board member
will nave only his constituency to
satisfy. And what satisfies them
may be wrong for the bulk of the
people. It will not be good.
"We admit that we are not too
concerned about what is popular.
We are concerned about what we
consider right. We hope that you
. are too.


And Now
By Kesley Colbert
Sp far this trip wasn't ex-
actly hitting on on all
six-I'd come to the Smoky
Mountains to interview these
mountain folks about the
early settlers in this little
mountain valley area seem-
ingly cut off from civilization
for years and years. I never
did even find out why it was
named Cades Cove. I gues
Mr. Cades was one of the
first to settle here. Well, I have
was enjoying the sightseeing that
(except for the weather) but that
the interviews weren't ex- adzes
actly something you'd want plows
to write home about. As a took a
matter of fact I hadn't ac- and y
tually talked to anyone who
lived in this cove. To be per- (
fectly honest and not count-
ing George who volunteered
to drive.me up here, I'd been
here for a half a day and
hadn't seen anyone.
I guess you could say that
my prospects went from
slim to none as I stepped out
of the car in front of John
Cable's grist mill. A hundred
years ago this little com-
munity of buildings was the
center of activity in Cades
Cove. One glance around the
place on this bleak January
day told me it was as
deserted as all the other
places me and ole George
had stopped. Those thought-
ful National Park folks had
built a visitor center and
comfort station adjacent to
the mill site. Those same
thoughtful folks had put a
sign up on the visitor center
saying that it was closed
from November 1 through
April 30.
Now, if this story was un-
folding in front of you on
your T.V. screen in the form
of a mini-series, we've now
come to the part where the
camera zooms in real close
and as I pull my hat down
over my ears and button the
top button on my coat you
can see the determined look
on myface to carry out my
assignment. Well this ain'ta
mini-series and I didn't have
a hat or a coat and deter-
mination is not my long suit,
so I took one look around and
ran to the closest shelter I
could find. As I ducked under
the roof of an old blacksmith
shop I could see George sit-
ting patiently in the car. He
had the engine running and
the heater on high now ole
George knew how to handle
the snow and the cold.
I looked at the big built-up
fireplace in that blacksmith
shop. Man, what a fireplace.
It warmed me up just look-
ing.at it. You know, I bet you
that years ago the smitty
that ran this shop had looked
out from under that roof in
the middle of a hot July af-
ternoon with sweat running
down his face and wished
that it would start snowing
just as it was this day. I'll
also bet you that he was a big
man. He would have had to K


- the Conclusion


Kesley
been to have worked
forge and hammered
hot iron into axes,
knives, bull tongue
s, etc. You just know he
a lot of pride in his work
ou can also figure that


he fully realized how vital
his work was to this com-
munity. As I stared at that
fireplace I could feel the
sweat running down my face
as if half the cove ,was
gathered around watching
me forge a graceful candle-
stick for Mrs. Cable. This
spell was kind'a broken
when I realized it wasn't
sweat running down my face
-the snow in my hair was
starting to melt.
" I ran down to the next
building which was the barn
and one look at that old barn
and you knew this Cable
fellow was a well-to-do
gentleman. The barn was


about 3 times the size of his
house and I don't care where
you hail from, that's one
sure fire sign of prosperity.
The loft in this one -would
have held tons and tons of
hay. I was tempted mighty
strong to find me a stick gun
and climb up in that loft I
would have been Gary
Cooper in "High Noon". But,
shucks, ole George might
have come looking for me
and he already thought I was
about two bricks shy a load
anyway, so I gave the idea
up. But I bet the Cable
children had spent hours and
hours up here. I wonder
which one of them got to be


Gary Cooper ....
As I made my way over to
the mill I could see the
.wooden race built to bring
the water to the giant water-
wheel on the side of the
building. I was a little dis-
appointed to find the big
wheel was not turning today.
But as I examined that big
wheel and how it was con-
nected to the gears inside
which in turn moved the.
giant millstones that crush-
ed the corn I could see the in-
genuity of these people that
we so often refer to as simple
folks. I don't know how "sim-
ple" this mill was, but I
know it turned corn into
meal which could be made
into bread or grits or hominy
(Continued on Page 8)


When It Gets Really Cold In Florida, Strange Things Likely to

WAS IT COLD DOWN at your So-called dumb animals, are re-~ The Star, with the temperature the cold weather would have been a stayed in by the fire where all sensible Pr
place the first of the week? It sure was sourceful devils, aren't 'they? pegging out at 15 degrees, on a welcome adventure. As a matter of persons stay when the weather gets to inl
down at ours. It was so cold, even the ++ + ++ bicycle! fact, I distinctly remember roaming hovering around down in the teens, in
k,.,+, t.. h ti f M ANWHILE B~ ACK AT the I couldn't understand whether or around in the outdoors when it snowed ++ + ++ ter


before, the night was over Sunday
night.
It was so cold we let Houdini the
cat spend the night inside. Ordinarily,
Houdini hunts the outside at about
bedtime and spends his nocturnal
hours prowling, or whatever former
tomcats do at night. I say, "former"
because Houdini is now an "it" cat.
Sunday night, either Houdini used
his animal sixth sense and realized it
was hovering near 10 degrees outside,
or he stuck his nose out during one of
those trips outside for another log to
put in the fireplace. At any rate,
Houdini let it be known in no uncertain
terms he intended to use all the wiles
at his command to stay indoors. I
couldn't blame him.
When I woke up the next morning,
in a cool bedroom, there was Houdini
snuggled up in the blanket between
Frenchie and I, managing to keep
warm.


icebox, when I came to work, I


not he was all that eager to get to work


ETAOIN ySHRDLU

L By: W(


learned to re-assess the word "dumb"
when applied to animals. Houdini
instictively went to the warm spot in
the house. Since school was out the
next day because of the cold, my two
,oldest grandsons started trickling in
to work here at The Star. One of them
(and the desire not to let you know
about his self preservation instincts in
such situations prevents me from
saying which one) came riding in to


here back in the late 50's. It was 15


esley R. Ramsey


or whether he was just after some of
the early morning tid-bits usually
found here at The Star most mor-
nings.
Anyhow, here he came, riding in
on a bicycle after riding nearly a mile
into the north wind.
I don't know how he took it.
I admit to being a creature of
comfort, now. There was a time when


degrees on that morning, too, but I
was out making pictures, ignoring the
cold.
A few years later the snow and
bitter cold came back and I was out
again in the cold, doing my thing with
a camera.
This time. I left all that foolish-
ness up to John Ford and Willie.
They're both vigorous and young. I


ALL DAY LONG Monday, people
were arguing about how cold it got.
Some said it was down as far as six
degrees. A couple said they checked
their thermometers before day Mon-
day morning and at least two said
theirs read eight degrees. Some
reported temperatures as low as six.
Officially, I believe it was about seven
or eight.
Whatever it was, I just had to take
someone else's word for it. I did not go
out to check a shivering thermometer
before day Monday.
To me, it doesn't matter how cold
it was. After it gets below 20 degrees,
it all feels the same to me. I can work
up just a good a shiver at 19 degrees as
I can at nine. My feet get just as cold
at 25 degrees as they do at five. When
the thermometer gets below 30, I
spend my energies trying to keep
warm.
I read in the papers where the


deg


Happen
resident's inauguration was held
floors because it was too cold outside
Washington, D.C., where the
mperature was reported at eight
agrees Monday.


He should have planned that
inauguration to be held in Port St. Joe,
Florida... let us stress the Florida. At
noon on Monday, it was a warm 15
degrees. I imagine the parade would
still have felt a bit of a brisk breeze
hitting them in the face, had they been
marching up Reid Avenue Monday
morning.

THE UNUSUAL FLORIDA wea-
ther even affected our Florida team at
the Super Bowl. After receiving the
reports of how cold it was getting
Sunday evening and how cold it would
be Sunday night, the Dolphins just
started shivering from the thought
and "froze".
Even the thought of that shower of
sleet we had Sunday afternoon is
enough to make any true-blue Flori-
dian huddle up for comfort and pray
for the middle of July.to come at once.


Tides Not Available


STHE STAR POSTOFFICE BOX 308
W lNH S A PHONE 227-1278 SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
PORT ST. JOE, FLOPIDA 32456 INCOUNTY-ONEYEAR 1SO 00 SIX MONTHS IN COUNTY $800
Published Every Thursday at 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida OUT OF COUNTY-ONE YEAR. 5 00 SIMONTHS OUTOFCOUNTY $16 00
By The Star Publishing Company
Second-Clas sPostage Paid at Port StJoe, Fiorida 32456
SSecond.ClassPostagePadaPortSJoe, Florida 32456 TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold
Wesley R. Ramsey.......... Editor and Publisher SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such advertisement.
WSch William H. Ramsey............. Production Supt. AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA The spoken word is given scant attention: the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word
Frenchie L. Ramsey ............... Ofice Manager -. ...barely asserts: the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.
Shirley K. Ramsey . . . . Typesetter


Information for the tide
changes in St. Joseph's Bay
are not available this week.
The information has to be ob-
tained from the National
Ocean Service in Washing-
ton, D. C. on a yearly basis.
Thc tidal information book
for 1985 for the East Coast of
North and South America


from which we derive the
tidal information for our
area was requested over six
weeks ago, but as of this date
has not been received,
We will begin publishing
the tides for the bay as soon
as the information is receiv-
ed in our office.


PAGE TWO


Are You Concerned?





I


..









S"Aunt Bell" Will be Honoree at


Special Recognition Day Sunday


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 24, 1985 PAGE THREE
*


Racheal Arrie Bell DuBose
was born in Tift County,
Georgia about five miles
from Tifton, Georgia to Ra-
cheal and Thomas Jackson in
the year 1910. She was the
youngest of nine. children.
Her father was a rice mill
operator and unfortunately
passed away at the age of 60
when Aunt Bell, as we know
her today, was only eight.
Her mother then moved the
family from the farm and
settled in Tifton, Georgia for
about three years. Then the
family moved to Savannah,
Georgia where Aunt Bell
grew up. She lost her mother
when she was twenty years
old.
In 1937, she came to Port
St. Joe- one reason was
because her oldest sister and
her family were living in St.
Joe. Her sister was very ill at
the time and Aunt Bell came
to offer whatever assistance
she could. She started work-.
ing with Mr. and Mrs. Miles
Hurlbut at this time. In 1945
Aunt Bell decided to go into
business with the Hurlbut's
in a clothing store known as
IMiouchette's Style Shop. This
,was located next to the Port
Theatre. In 1949 she opened
her own private kindergarten
on Eighth Street and worked
-with children until 1974.
There were approximately
1390 children who attended
Jack and Jill Kindergarten,
During this time she had -
several helpers. Among them :
were: Mrs. Eleanor Hoker,
Mrs. Bob Fox, Mrs. Dot
Elizey, and Lou .Ann Rowe.
She and Mrs. Hoker also
operated a kindergarten in
Wewa. Because of her hus-


band's illness (Uncle Em-
mette) she had to close her
kindergarten. But she con-
tinued to help Mrs. Ida Ethel
Brown with her kindergarten
for a year and a half.
In 1951 Aunt Bell and Uncle
Emmette helped to organize
the Highland View Baptist
Church. This was begun as a
Mission from the First Bap-
tist Church. She joined the
Pentecostal Holiness Church
on Garrison Avenue in 1961,


where her support to the
church and dedication as a
youth worker and children's
church teacher has become
invaluable. Her love of God
and the people of our com-
munity has been proven time
and time again as she
devotes her time, money and
energy to helping others
during times of tragedy and
misfortune, no matter what
the personal sacrifice. She
has also worked as a volun-


teer with the public school
system for .312 years. We
know she is one of the most
loved ladies in our communi-
ty, and hope each of you will
come and help us celebrate
"Aunt Bell Day" Sunday,.
January 27 from 3 p.m.-5
p.m. in the social hall of the
Pentecostal Holiness Church
on Garrison Avenue, Please
come join us in saying
"Thanks Aunt Bell, We Love
You".


All Fall and Winter Clothing and Shoes SACRIFICED MUST MOVE OUT to
make room for SPRING and EASTER Clothing and Shoes!




SAVE40% o 75 Of


Episcopal Bishop Visits


Parish This Weekend


The Rt. Rev. Charles F.
.Duvall, Bishop of the Episco-
pal- Diocese of The Central
Gulf Coast will visit St.
James' parish in Port St. Joe'
on January the 26th and 27th.
The parishioners from St.
John The,Baptist Mission in
Wewahitchka will join the St.
James' congregation in a
casserole dinner at 6:00 P.M.
(EST) on Saturday the 26th,
and they will attend the 11:00
A.M. Confirmation service
the following morning.
The casserole dinner on
,Saturday will be followed by
the Annual Parish Meeting.
.At this meeting the congrega-
tion will approve a final
budget for 1985, elect three'
new members to serve on the
vestry, and hear reports
from the Church officers.
Bishop Duvall will preach
at the 7:30 A.M. and 11:00
A.M services, as well as
confirm six new members of


'"Aunt Bell Day"

Sunday, January 27
3 to 5 P.M.




















First Pentecostal Holiness Church
FELLOWSHIP HALL
Garrison Avenue F
St
In


the congregation on Sunday'
morning. The bishop's visit is
anticipated with great plea-
sure by the yoked congrega-
tions of St. James' and St.
John's. These two Churches
are served by The Rev. Jerry
R. Huft of Port St. Joe.
The congregations of St.
James' and St. John's, along
with Trininty Church in
Apalachicola, form the ex-
treme southern boundary of
their diocese. Mobile, Ala-
bama is the see city, or place
from which the bishop pre-
sides, for The Diocese of The
Central Gulf Coast.
The Episcopal Church is a
branch in the world-wide.
Anglican Communion. There
are about 3 million Episcopa-


lians in the United States.
The Episcopal Church
exists for one reason, to
continue the ministry begun
by Jesus Christ. That minis-
try was, and is, simply the
announcement of the Gos-
pel- the Good News. The
Church welcomes its visitors.
Guests are desired, and
made to feel comfortable
without embarrassment.


CARD OF THANKS
Our family wishes to thank
everyone for the flowers,
food, love offerings, etc.
given at the death of our lov-
ed one, Marion Whitfield.
The Whitfield Family


OBITUARIES:' Mrs. Whitfield

Funeral Services Tues. Dies Jan. 10


for Ricky Harper, 30


Ricky Harper, 30, died
suddenlyJanuary 19. He was
a native and lifelong resident
of White City. He was em-
ployed by Sylvachem Cor-
poration and was a member
of the White City Baptist
Church.
He is survived by his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bill
.Harper of White' City; a
brother, Billy Glen Harper of,
Panama City; two sisters,
Sheila Harper of.,,Panama
'-City and Kari Harper of


White City; a niece; a
nephew; and two grand-
mothers, Mrs. J. 0. Ogle of
Quincy and Mrs. Ruby Har-
per of Meridian, Mississippi.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday at 11:00 AM at the
White City Baptist Church
with the Rev. James E. Pate
officiating. Interment follow-
ed in Jehu Cemetery in
Wewahitchka.
All arrangements were un-
derthe. direction of' Comfort-
er Funeral Home. '


Woodrow Wilson Walker

Succumbs to Illness


Unusual Sight
Icicles hanging to the ground from trees is ndt the normal sight one expects to see in
lorida (even in the northern part). The coldest weather in a century turned many trees in Port
t. Joe into ice sculptures as homeowners turned on their water to prevent the lines from freez-
a sI -h- I i s i Q L d P 1 +U -


g, and to create such beauties


SENIOR CITIZENS

HEARING TESTS SET



CAMPBELT'S DRUG
Port St. Joe, Florida

Hearing tests using electronic equipment will be given
Friday, January 25th from 10-12 noon. Licensed hearing
aid specialists will be here..
These tests have been set because many senior citizens
suspect they have trouble hearing and understanding.
Use of the latest electronic equipment will indicate
whether there is such a problem and if it can be elec-
tronically helped. Some of the causes of hearing loss will
be explained, and diagrams of how the ear works will be
available for those senior citizens interested.
Everyone should have their hearing tested electronically
at least once a year. Everyone having trouble hearing
clearly, even those who wear hearing aids and those told
nothing could be done, should have a test with the latest
method of hearing correction.
FREE electronic hearing tests will be given on:
Friday, Jan. 25th from 10 till 12 noon at
CAMPBELL'S DRUG, Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Please call 227-1224 for an
appointment to avoid waiting.
All service and testing done by qualified specialists.
WATSON HEARING AID CENTER
DOWNTOWN MARIANNA, FL 904/482-4025
E _


Woodrow. Wilson Walker,
66, of White City passed away
Monday evening, January 21
after a long illness. He was
retired from St. Joseph Tele-
phone and Telegraph Com-
pany, and had been a resi-
dent of Gulf County for 37
years.
He is survived by his wife,
Betty Walker, of White City;
a son, Woodrow W. Walker,
Jr. of White City; two
daughters, Katie Dobbins of
Overstreet, and Becky Sey-
mour of White City; 6ne
hrnther G. S Walker. Jr. nf


Bonnie Parker of St. Joe
Beach; one aunt, Bell Dubose
of.Port St. Joe; eight grand-
children and five great
grandchildren.
Funeral services will be
held this afternoon at 2:00
p.m., in the chapel of Gil-
more Funeral Home with
Rev. David Fernandez offi-
ciating. Burial will be in the
family plot at Pleasant Rest
Cemetery at Overstreet.
All arrangements were by
Gilmore Funeral Home.


Funeral services were
held Saturday morning for
Marion Luellen Whitfield,
age 50, of Chipley, who died
Thursday, January 10. The
services were held at the
Sandhills Community
Church, with Rev. T. C.
Moon officiating, assisted by
William Touchton. Inter-
ment followed at Pleasant
Rest Cemetery, Overstreet,
with William Touchton
presiding at the gravesite.
She is survived by her hlus-
band, Warren C. Whitfield;
two sons,;Clarance W. Whit-
field and Darrell M. Whit-
field, a daughter, Dawn W.
Kirkland of Port St. Joe; her
mother, Juanita Given; a
brother, Billy Given and a
sister, Ann Wood of Port St.
Joe; one grandson, Warren
C. Whitfield II and a grand-
daughter, Anna Marie
Kirkland.
Brown Funeral Home of
Chipley was in charge of all
arrangements.

For Ambulance
Service
Call

227-1115 .


s as this.. Star photo ,
Sylvester, Ga.; one sister, a

OBITUARIES: CHURCH of CHRIST'

Walter Armstrong, 75, Dies Jan. 20 + Twentieth Street and Marvin Avenue
Walter E. Armstrong, 75, Holly Hill Cemetery. was in charge of arrange- MORNING WORSHIP........ 10:00 A.M.
of Highland View died Sun- Gilmore Funeral Home' ments. M EVENING WORSHIP.................... 6:00 .M.
day, Jan. 20 at Gulf Pines WEDNESDAY EVENING.................. 7:00 P.M.
Hospital following a long R f T P te
illness" Hewhad lived in Rites for Travis enters STEVE STUTTS, Evangelist
Highland View for the past 37
years and was retired from Travis J. Peters, 57, passed er Funeral Home, Wewahit-
....-.... awa Saturdav at his home in chka Branch Chanel 4.' 41' l I- -- I


St. Joe rPaper Co.
He is survived .by his wife,
Estelle, of Highland View;
three sons, Clarence *W.
Armstrong of Panama City,
Benjamin F. Armstrong of
Wewahitchka, and Ricky E.
Armstrong of Monroe, La.;
four daughters, Lois Jeanette
Armstrong and Melba D.
Peak, both of Highland View,
Betty Sue Hanlon of Wewa-
hitchka and Sarah J. Byrd of
Sikeston, Mo.; seven bro-
thers, Henry Armstrong of
Columbus, Ga., J. W. Arm-
strong of Michigan, J. L.
Armstrong of Clearwater,
Clyde Armstrong. of Enter-
prise, Ala., and Hilburn
Armstrong, Wilburn Arm-
strong and Ralph Armstrong,
all of Hartford, Ala.; five,
sisters, Myrtice Snow of
Oldsmar, Merle McClure of
Marianna, Margie Phillips of
Clearwater, Myrtle Peoples
of Montgomery, Ala., and
Ruth Webb of Dade City; 11
grandchildren and one great-
grandchild.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday at 3 p.m. EST at the
Church of God in Highland
View, with the Rev. C. W.
Whitaker and the Rev. Ira
Nichols officiating. Burial
was in the family plot of


Honeyville following a long
illness. He was a native of
Wicksburg, Alabama and
had lived in Honeyville since
1967. He was retired from the
U. S. Navy and'owned and
operated Honeyville Grocery
Store. He was a member of
the Tupelo Masonic Lodge
No. 289 F & AM and was a
member of the Honeyville
Methodist Church.
He is survived by his wife,
Joyce S. Peters; his son,
Mickey Ray Peters; his
daughter, Janet Gail Peters,
both of Honeyville; two bro-
thers, T. J. and George
Peters, both of Dothan; six
sisters, Metha Chalker and
Lucille Tindell, both of Do-
than, Mabel Havard of Pen-
sacola; Betty Smith of Pana-
ma City, Bonnie Johnson of
Fountain End, N. C., and
Slim Williford of Atlanta.
Funeral services were held
Monday at 2:00 p.m. CST at
the Honeyville Methodist
Church with the Rev. Earl
Capps and David Taunton
officiating. Graveside 'Ma-
sonic. rites followed in Ro-
berts Cemetery.
All arrangements were un-
der the direction of Comfort-


W~I


I








PAGE FOUR THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 24, 1985
: ..


Mrs. Archie Gardner, second from left, DAR National Defense Chairman, presents a
United States flag to Brig. Gen. Donald Delauter. Gen. Delauter spoke to the DAR recently.
Looking on are Mrs. Delauter, extreme right, and Mrs. Shirley Burkes, secretary to the
general, at left. -Star photo


History


Armed f
Brigadier General Donald
R. Delauter, Tyndall Air
Force Base, was speaker for
St. Joseph Bay Chapter
Daughters of the American
Revolution's National De-
fense luncheon meeting Wed-
nesday, January 16, at the
Garden Center.
Addressing the record
crowd of guests and mem-
bers, the general chose as his
pertinent subject "The His-
story of Women in the Armed
-Services". He cited many
instancess of .the service and
bravery of women in war,
including as follows:
Margaret Corbin, who took
her husband's post when e
was killed at the Battle of
Fort Washington, November
'16, 1776 and Deborah Samp-
son, who disguised as a man
enlisted in the War of Inde-
pendence for three years;
In the Civil War, nurses,
spies and guides Belle Boyd,
Rose O'Neil Grenau and
Harriet Tullman, and Nurse
Clara Barton who later
founded the' Aiericari Red
SCross;
In the Spanish American
War a corps of 500 nurses
organized by the pAR which





Music by Cu
Southernei


of Women In the


Forces Delauter


"Get Ready Now for Sesquicentennial"

Adkins Tells About Important Role of Old


St. Joseph In Panhandle's History
Area historian, George Aa- tory", the speaker said. in Florida had their begin- ments for the past year,
kins of Blountstown, told the Adkins pointed out there nihg here in St. Joseph. As Childers said it appeared as -.
St. Joseph Historical Society were two or three things the proof of his claim, the if the Society had been
Friday night it isn't too early local society could do to speaker read from the Cal- successful in securing the
to begin planning for the publicize this important part houn County records where original copy of the State's
Sesquicentennial of St. Jos- of Florida's history prior to several parcels of land and Constitution for placement in
eph and Calhoun County. the Sesquicentennial cele- homes were sold for taxes the Constitution Museum
"Before you know it, 1988 bration. "You can promote which were owned by some of here. The copy was located
will be here and the 150th having a movie made of the the most famous names of last year in the attic of a
anniversary of Calhoun cou- beginning of the area. This Florida then and now. "After home being demolished in
ty will be here and it all part has as interesting a the disasters which hit the Palatka. "It looks as if we'll
started right here in old St. beginning as most any por- area, they just lost interest in have it part of the time and
Joseph". tion of our nation. It's ripe for the place and let their land part of the time it will be kept
Adkins said Port St. Joe a movie. It would make a go". in Tallahassee", Childers
should be vitally interested in good film." OFFICERS NAMED said.
celebrating Calhoun county's Adkins also advised the President, Wayne Childers
anniversary since the county Society to start' work on announced the names of the The President also report-
was started at old St. Joseph, locating descendants of the officers to lead the Society ed that a set of train wheels
which was once part of original signers of Florida's during the coming year and had been secured from Her-
Calhoun County and the only first Constitution here and gave a report on Society man Jones and Allen McCul-
town of any size in the locate descendants of some accomplishments for the ley from the railroad which 'i
county. of the families who lived here past year. served old St. Joseph and the
Adkins advised the Histor- at the time. "The descend- Officers who will serve wheels will be placed in front
ical Society the old city was ants are still around. Every- during 1985 include, Wayne of the museum. The Society
the hub for all the history body didn't diein the yellow Childers, president; Betty has also secured two parcels
which affected the area fever epidemic or get killed McNeill, vice-president; of land from the U.S. Gov-
between Apalachicola and St. by the storm. There are Maurell Cumbie, secretary; ernment to be used for public GEORGE ADKI
Andrew and north to the descendants out there and Mae Dean, treasurer and parks and has started work ... Guest Sp
Alabama line. "What hap- you ought to find them." Edith Stone, parliamentar- on establishing a small park L.
opened here, affected all. of Adkins pointed out that ian. adjacent to.the Gulf County
North Florirda and its his- many old and famous names In reporting accomplish- Courthouse. I GOOD


led to the formation of the America which, had been
Army Nurse Corps in 1901 flown over the Capitol.
and later the Navy Nurse General Delauter is com-
Corps; mander of the 23rd North
In World War II there were American Aerospace Com-
11,000 nurses in the Navy, mand Region and Tactical I
51,000 in the Army, 2,000 cited Air Command Division which
for bravery under fire; includes the airspace from
WACS, WAVES, SPARS and Norfolk, Virginia to Laredo,
served first in the United line.
States, then were allowed to The general's wife and his
serve in U. S. territories; secretary, Mrs. Shirley
48,000 women were in ser- Burkes, came to the meeting
vice during the Korean War with him and were guests of
and 7,500 were actually in the chapter.
Southeast Asia during the
Vietnam War. L R ay
General Delauter explain- Lori ,
ed that in November, 1967
after President Lyndon John- Pat R ggs
'son signed the bill elimi-
nating restrictions on mili- Engaged
tary service by women, the d
services were truly inte-
grated. 9.4,percent or 199,000 Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Ray
are in service now, 11,000 are are proud to announce the ,
officers, including three engagement of their daugh- Mrs. Charles Brown, extreme r
generals. The general pre- ter, Lori Ann to Senior of office to new officers for St. J
dicts women will become an Airman Donald Patrick They are, from left: Wayne Ch
ever greater percentage. Riggs of Scottsboro, Alabama
Mrs. Archie Gardner, LoIri is a 1983 graduate of_. .
Chapter National Defense Port St. Joe High School, andl. t5 g f 1j
Chairman, introduced the is presently employed at I.' j u ti1 u g
speaker and presented him a Panama Machinery and Sup-
Flag of the United States of ply Company. i* A *
Pat is a 1980 graduate of
Scottsboro High School, and ill A id
is.the son of Mr./and Mrs.
Billy W. Riggs of Charleston, The Gulf County Guidance wil
Sance West Virginia. He is current- Clinic, Inc. will be conduct- P.I
ly serving in the United ing two "Parenting Skills bui
rtis Davidson and the States Air Force, stationed at Programs" on Thursday, lian
Elmendorf Air Force Base in January 24 and Thursday, A
rs from' Tallahassee Anchorage, Alaska. January 31. Both programs Ail


Feb. 9, 1985 9:00 1:00 a.m.
PER COUPLE $15.00 -
St. Joseph's Bay Country Club
DOOR PRIZES HORS D'OEUVRES
TICKETS AND INFORMATION CALL
227-1757 t 117


Final Plans Revealed for

Kennedy Ard Wedding


Final wedding plans have
,been set in the marriage
uniting Michele Kennedy and
Tim Ard.


Cold
2 C\-V Logic
/"/ Would Have

S You Take
/ Advantage of
This Sale!





We're Clearing Out All Our

Fall and Winter

Merchandise


1 e 50% off
Cosmetics and Hair Care Products
Are Not Included In Sale

Early Spring Fashions Are Now Arriving



For Him or Her

Start the Year Off
With A New Look!


SFor Appointment Call


229-8153 /1


The wedding will take
place Saturday evening at
7:00 at the Oak Grove
Assembly of God Church. No
local invitations were sent,
but all friends and relatives
are cordially invited to at-
tend.
Michele is the daughter of
Major and Mrs. James C.
Kennedy of Columbus, Ga.
Tim is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Herman Ard of Port St.
Joe.

FOR QUICK RESULTS,
SELL IT WITH A
CLASSIFIED AD


hme
sio
wil
vio
.rul
tiv
des
opl
chi
im]
rer
ria
ant
ch(
gra
on
'I
the
a
Sei
by
Co
ing
vid
am
sio
the


eight, administers the oath
oseph Historical Society.
elders, president;' Betty


McNeill, vice president; Maurell Cumbie, secretary; Mae
Dean, treasurer and Edith Stone, parliamentarian.
-Star photo


Skills Program


In Childrearing


llbe from 7:00 P.M. to 8:30
M. (EST) at the Clinic
ilding located at 311 Wil-
ms Avenue in Port St. Joe.
According to Edwin R.
es, Executive Director of
Clinic, topics of discus-
n during these programs
I be preventing misbeha-
or, establishing effective
es, and disciplining effec-
ely. The programs are
signed to give parents an
portunity to learn new
ld rearing techniques and
prove their skills as pa-
its. Ailes, a licensed mar-
ge and family therapist
d certified school psy-
ologist, will lead the pro-
ams and answer questions
parent-child issues.
These classes are free to
e public. The programs are
Community Instructional
rvices activity sponsored
the Gulf Coast Regional
ordinating Council. Read-
materials will be pro-
ted, and there will be
nple opportunity for discus-
n. Further information on
programs can be obtain-


ed by contacting the Gulf
County Guidance Clinic, Inc.
at 227-1145.
Cindy's Dolls
Will Perform
Cindy's Darlin' Dolls will
perform for the half-time of
the Port St. Joe- Grand Ridge
basketball game on Friday
night.
Beginner classes will per-
form a dance routine with a
basketball. Intermediate and
advanced classes will per-
form a hoop baton routine.
Come and enjoy their per-
formance.


'tREASONS
to see your good
neighbor agent


CAR *HOME
LIFE HEALTH

BILL WOOD
411 Reid Ave.
229-6514 or 229-6103
Like a good neighbor.
State Farm is there.


H -i
STATE FASM
INSURANCE COMPANIES
Ho.. offl..: Bloo.lslo.. ull..t.


-I


888gs~glagSs a~wrra~~.~~m:Mmm-


CLYDE WHITEHEAD, Jr.
ACCOUNTANT


TAX SERVICES
CORPORATION INDIVIDUAL
PARTNERSHIPS
SPECIALIZED HANDLING OF IRS AUDITS

ACCOUNTING SERVICES
SMALL BUSINESS and
INDIVIDUAL SERVICE
TAX & FINANCIAL PLANNING
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
901 Garrison Avenue
Port St. Joe, Fla.' Phone 229-8994
k..maum, fte~a;rt--.MII


Begin the Year

with

Fitness In

SMotion


Mon. & Thursday nights 5:30-6:30
Tues. & Thursday mornings 9:30-10:30

INSTRUCTOR: GRETCHEN WYNN
CHOREOGRAPHER: CARRIE KEITH
AFAA Certified Professional Aerobic Instructor
TRANSFORMING AN ORDINARY, REPETITIOUS ROUTINE
INTO AN EXHILARATING MIND, MOOD & BODY WORKOUT
MONTHLY RATES
1 Class Per Week $7.00
2 Classes Per Week $13.00
3 Classes Per Week $17.00
4 Classes Per Week $19.00
$2.00 for Individual Classes
Centennial Building
Call 229-8180
GRETCHEN WYNN 3tp12/6.12/20,1/3


---


nu'tr iia n sa


:NS
weaker

"17.


-------


... -F


jr


*"


b~B


229-8153












Memorial Tree Planting In


Observance of Arbor Day


Someone has said, "You and their importance to
can't say 'trees' without mankind. In a recent issue of
smiling." If you think you the state garden club maga-
can, just try it! zine, "The Florida Garden-
When the time for the er", we learn that more than
annual celebration of Arbor 5000 products are derived
Day draws near, one is more from trees, ranging from
inclined to think about trees acids to zithers- and I quote,
"Because trees are so im-
.- portant to mankind a separ-
S ate day, Arbor Day, has been
.a ^set aside in America as a
celebration to trees". This
special celebration dates
back many, many years, and
countless trees of great beau-
ty today owe their existence
to that custom. The state of
Florida is blessed with more
than 250 kinds of native
trees- more than any other
state than Hawaii.
By Florida law, Arbor Day
is observed each year on the
third Friday in January. This
is always an important day to
the Port St. Joe Garden Club,
and is celebrated by its
members each year. This
year, members participating
included Mrs. Don Ashcraft,
Allise Leann Adkison president, Mrs. Agnes Cul-


New Arrival
Mr. and Mrs. Chris Aaron
Adkison announce the birth
;-of their daughter, Allise
Leann Adkison on December
10, 1984 at Bay Medical
Center in Panama City. She
weighed 7 lbs. 9 ozs., and was
211 inches long.


STUDY IN.
ENGLAND
THIS SUMMER

Four weeks at
Cambridge University

**Earn 6 credit hours (audit,
pass/fail, or credit
**Join other students from
30 countries for courses
on

BRITISH CULTURE,
HISTORY, POLITICS
**Summer Term B (July
1-26)
**Board in residence at a
university college
**Join excursions to places
of special interest
*Enjoy the lively social and
intellectual atmosphere'
of Cambrid.ge in July

COST $1,150
includes tuition, room & board

For additional information,
contact

IAN C. BARKER
Assistant to the President
Gulf Coast Community College
Panama City, Florida
769-1551, ext 327
GCCC is an equal opportunity
institution
3tc 1/24


pepper, Mrs. John Blount,
Mrs. H. W. Griffin, and Mrs.
Bobbie Hallinan. At ten
o'clock on Friday morning,
January 18, these able gar-
deners planted four beautiful
dogwood trees on the grounds
of the Garden Center on
Eighth Street, the home of
the Garden Club. Three of the
trees were white and one of
them pink. They were placed
in the memory of Mr. Paul
Johnsen and Mr. Kenneth
Bateman, and, both Mrs.
Johnsen and Mrs. Bateman
were present for the plant-
ing. The pink dogwood was
the gift of Mr. and,.Mr's.
Leonard Belin, and the
others the gifts of Mrs.
Ashcraft, Mrs. Hallinan, and
Mrs. Griffin. In the planting
of these trees is a message to
the people of Port St. Joe and
surrounding areas- "Before
January is over, take time
out to plant a tree!'" because
"Like children, trees offer
promise for the future. They
are the way of insuring that
tomorrow will be beautiful


and that life will go on."
Thanks to Mrs. Ralph
Nance of Mexico Beach for
much of this information.

First Birthday
Chad Harlan Haddock cele-
brated his first birthday on
January 17th with his pa-
rents, Harlan and Donna
Haddock and sissy, Jamie.
Also on hand for his Care
Bear Party were his grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Loyd
Pitts, Mr. and Mrs. Eldridge
Haddock, and many other
relatives and friends.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 24, 1985 PAGE FIVE


Flower Show Workshop Slated


At Sea Oats Garden Club Today


The Sea Oats and Dunes
Garden Club will conduct a
workshop on January 24 at
9:00 AM CST at the Chamber
of Commerce Building. This
is a two-fold workshop.
Ruth Nance, Master
Judge, Florida National
Council of Flower Show
Judges, will conduct the first
half and will present criteria


Women s Guild Learns to

Arrange Church Flowers

St. Margaret's Guild met gave many helpful tips of
Monday afternoon in the flower arranging, as well as
Parish Hall of St. James' suggestions for types of ..
Episcopal Church. Alice flowers and greenery, while E
Core, president of the Guild, making several sample altar es
presided and Ida Copenhaver arrangements. Guild mem- Ice Castl S in Florida?
was the' hostess for the bers expressed their appre-
afternoon. Thirty ladies were citation to Mrs. Dodson, The sub-freezing temperatures in the early part of the'week here in our normally sunny
in attendance including stating that they found the and mild Florida gave homeowners a chance to create ice castles. The Steve Hattaways of Gar-
guests from Trinity Episco- session most instructive and rison Avenue left the sprinkler running on the iron grillwork at the entrance to their home
pal Church, Apalachicola enjoyable. creating this winter wonderland of ice.
and St. John's Episcopal
Church, Wewahitchka.
The program was present-
ed by Peggy Dodson of St.
Christopher's Church, Pen-
sacola, who demonstrated
church flower arrangements.
Mrs. Dodson is a diocesan
resource person and an ex-
pert in teaching her art form
to non-professionals. She

Baton Classes
Held Weekly .
Baton classes are held 1985 is here.
each Monday and Tuesda atJAMIS(
the Centennial Building forALM-
girls ages three and up. To 1984 covers
sign up come by during the
following class times: Mon-
days, 3:30-4:30; Tuesdays, ,
5:00-6:30.
Class instruction includes
jazz dance, fundamental ba-
ton twirls, basic strut, andC
much more.


CARDOF THANKS
A special thanks to our
very fine. local V.F.W.,
D.A.V., and American Le-
gion Post for their considera-
tion and kindness shown to
myself and my wife during
my recent stay in the V.A.
hospital in Gainesville.
Also my thanks to Fred;
George, Albert and Mary,
Momma and Uncle Bob-
Billy Joe; Rudy and Dot;
Bro. Pate and Donna for
their special friendship and
love. Thank you again and
God bless each of you.
Tommie Layfield

CLASSIFIED ADS
GET RESULTS!


necessary for entrants to
follow in submitting entries
to the flower show to be held
by the club in April. In
addition the members will
make and fill valentines
which will be distributed to a
local nursing home.


Revival


Members are asked to
bring small suitable items to
use as fillers and also a
brown bag lunch. Drink will
be provided. If you are
unable to attend please send
your donations with another
member.


- Revival


Harold Taunton
REVIVAL SPEAKER
Preaching Teaching Singing


JAN. 27 thru FEB. 1
7:00 P.M. each night


FIRST PENTECOSTAL
HOLINESS CHURCH
20th Street and Garrison Avenue


.STATEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION
St. Joseph Telephone & Telegraph Co. has filed with the
Federal Government a.Compliance Assurance in which
it assures the Rural Electrification Administration that it
will comply fully with all requirements of Title VI of the
Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Rules and Regulations
of the Department of Agriculture issued thereunder, to
the end that no person in the United States shall, on the
ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded
from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be
otherwise subjected to discrimination in the conduct of
its program and the operation of its facilities. Under this
Assurance, this organization is committed not to
discriminate against any person on the ground of race.
color, or national origin in its policies and practices
relating to applications for service or any other policies
and practices relating to treatment of beneficiaries and
partlciapnts including rates, conditions and extension
of service, use of any of its facilities, attendance at and
participation in any meetings of beneficiaries and par-
ticipants or the exercise of any rights of such benefi-
ciaries and participants in the conduct of the operations
of this organization.
Any person who believes himself, or any' specific class
of individuals, to be subjected by this organization to
discrimination prohibited by Title VI of the Act and the
Rules and Regulations issued thereunder may, by
himself or a representative, file with the Secretary of
Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250, or the Rural Elec-
trification Administration, Washington, D.C. 20250, or
this organization, or all, a written complaint. Such com-
plaint must be filed not later than 180 days after the
alleged discrimination, or by such later date to which
the Secretary of Agriculture or the Rural Electrification
Administration extends the time for filing. Identity of
complainants will be kept confidential except to the ex-
tent necessary to carry out the purposes of the Rules
and Regulations.
it 1/24







PAGE SIX THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. TIIURSDAY, JAN. 24, 1985


WJBU Going Country


Again


Local Radio Station WJBU-
AM (1080) will begin the
broadcast day Monday,
January 28 with an all new
format, and a new General
Manager. Elmer Rogers,
well known radio personali-
ty, has assumed the General
Manager's role, and an-
nounced a change of broad-
casting from the present rock
music to country and gospel.
Rogers, born and reared in
Jackson County, is no stran-
ger to Gulf Countians. He is


- best known for his thirteen
year show,, Sunday Morning
Gospel Get Together. Rogers
brings many years of experi-
ence to his new position. He
says he wants WJBU to be
Gulf County's station, with a
motto of "Gulf County's Only
Radio Station, Serving Gulf-
County and the Surrounding
Area."
Monday through Friday
each week will feature the
following: Marilyn Miller


with country music, inter-
views, news, weather and
sports; Howard Browning
with gospel music, devotion-,
als; local news, sports, wea-
ther and church news; and
Charlie Scott with country
music, news, sports and
weather.
Everyone's favorite, Kes-
ley Colbert, will be spinning
country classics on Saturday
morning. Sunday will include
Sunday Morning Gospel Get


Together, and Dr. Earl Bai-
ley and his popular "This
Believing World."
Bill Lyles, after a long
absence, returns to the sta-
tion as salesman, promotion,
and part time announcer.
Karen Minger will fill the
position of station secretary.
The station will continue


with many of the broadcasts
of local interest. Some fa-.
vorites are the coaches'
show, business news, good
news with Charlie Scott, live
broadcast of services from
. First Baptist Church, and
many others. Any news of
local interest to aired should
be sent or phoned to WJBU.


Successful Students
In October all third and fifth graders in the state participated in the Florida Statewide
Assessment Test. Highland View Elementary is proud to announce that it had 11 fifth graders
and 12 third graders who successfully passed every standard in both the communication and
the mathematics sections of the test. Hats off to these students for a job well done.
Pictured above are the third graders who successfully mastered the test: from left, back
row: Kandi Ward,-Shelly Fettinger, Megan Dean, Vic Sellars and Josh Colbert. Front ro*:
Matt Hanna, Dana Maige, Kendra McDaniel and Michael Strickland. Not pictured are Jennifer
Clark, Faye Gilbert and Joni Peak.
Fifth graders who mastered all portions of the test are shown in the photo below. Front
row, from left: Jeanet Hale, Angel Barr, Christy Hawkins and Andrew Rutter. Back row, from
left: Dawn Fontaine, Laura Nelson, Adam Miller, Randy Ramsey, Ryan Clark and Dana
Swatts. Not pictured is Shannon Smith.


"The Lady :wjth
Gulf County school raising money With $918.80.
children recently par- Other schools',totals were as
ticipated in, a variety of follows:
events in an effort to raise Port St. Joe High $741.75;
money to aid in the Statue of Port St. Joe Elementary -
Liberty restoration project. $604.56; Wewahitchka High -
Fund raising activities took $153.60 and Highland View
place at each school with a Elementary $117.29.
grand total of $2,536.00 col- Activities which took place
lected.. included: bake sales,
Wewahitchka Erementary dances, jump-a-thon, read-a-
School took top honors in thon, faculty/student basket-
M -


.l METHODISM
FbrTwIoCenturies
SPROCLAMING
Grace and Rreedom


1st United
Methodist Church
Constitution & Monument
Port St. Joe, Florida


. CHURCH SCHOOL ....... ...........
IMORNING WORSHIP ........ .........
EVENING WORSHIP .................
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP ......
CHOIR REHEARSAL(Wednesday) .......
Pastor, Alvin N. Harbour, Jr.


9:45 A.M..
11:00 A.M..
7:00 P.M.,
6:30 P.M..
Z:30 P.M.


ball game and a "Fun Fri-
day". Students brought in
money received from family
and friends, as well as funds
retrieved from their piggy
banks.
School children across the
nation are participating in
this project to restore and
renovate the Statue of Liber-
ty which has felt the ravages
of time and the elements.


V.F.W. to Meet
There will be a meeting of
the John C. Gainous Post
10069 V.F.W. on Jan. 24 at the
Post Home in Highland View,
.115 5th Ave., at 7:30 P.M.
The Commander of Post
10069 would like to have the
new members who have not
been sworn in yet attend the
meeting so he can give them
the oath. All members are
asked to attend this meeting.


FICO Farms Will Market


Blueberries and Pecans


Tom Stevenson, manager
of FICO Farms here in Gulf
County, told the Kiwanis
Club Tuesday, of the com-
pany and its operations.
FICO, is the acronym for
Farmers Investment Com-
pany, which has operations
in California and Arizona and
headquarters in Tucson.
In the western operations,
the company. is heavy into
pecans, growing some 5,000
acres of the nuts, producing
some 10 million pounds a
year. The company main-
tains its own shelling and
packing operations, selling
their products mainly to
Sara Lee, Bama and Plan-
ters.
Water is becoming a criti-
cal commodity in Arizona
with the growth of urban
areas. "You don't grow any-
thing in Arizona without
irrigating it and it's becom-
ing more and more expensive
to irrigate and harder to get
permits to dig wells".
Originally, the Gulf County
operation, which covers
some 28,000 acres, was cen-
tered in small grains. Chang-
ing markets and other coun-
tries getting into grains with
cheaper labor and govern-
ment subsidies has made this
market too competitive for
the marginal operations pos-
.sible here in Gulf County.
Here we have the problem of
too much water for many:
grains."
Stevenson. said. another
reason -lte market is no
longer so attractive is that
the United States can feed
itself on one quarter of the
wheat it is presently produc-
ing.
Presently FICO is shifting
its operations from a small
grain operation to a special-
ized crop producer. "We're
going with pecans since we
already have so much know-!
ledge of this crop", Steven-


son s
farm
pecan
more
As
FICO
the p
ries.
acres
to get
next s
the fa:
harve
10,000
per i
matui
potent
of aro
per yi
Stev

CI
In

Leo
hasse
count
Club
of thi
their.
and i
:.Cos
ges ii
and a
requi
by th
find h
dedu(
been
Cos
exam


Eye
Openers


Wesley Grace k


MUSCLES
Q. How do the eye muscles
affect how one sees?
A. There are six muscles at-
tached to the outside of
each eye. These muscles
constantly move the eyes
to determine what
reaches the retina. The
image formed on the
retina is transmitted to
the brain by the optic
nerve. For accurate
sight, the muscles of each
eye must work as a well-
coordinated team, so that
the images received by
the brain from each eye
are coordinated.
In mild cases of poor mus-
cle control, a person
usually compensates by
exerting extra effort to
force the eyes to see as. a
team. This extra strain
may cause headaches and
fatigue.
In more severe cases, the
patient may experience
double vision. Eventually
the brain tires of seeing
different images, or the
same image twice, and
shuts out the image
received from one eye.
Unless coordination of the
eye muscles is improved
with visual training, in-
creased seeing dif-
ficulties will interfere
with occupational, educa-
tional and recreational
activities.
Brought to You As A
Community Service by

DR. WESLEY GRACE
OPTOMETRIST
322 Long Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida
227-141Q


said. He reported the
has planted 500 acres in
i trees and will plant
as time goes on.
an additional crop,
is getting heavy into
Production of blueber-
"We have planted 200
of blueberries and hope
our first small harvest
spring". Stevenson said
rms has expectations of
sting from 8,000 to
pounds of blueberries
acre when the trees
re. "We're looking at a
tial blueberry harvest
und two million pounds
ear".
renson said FICO is


making plans to get into the
packing and marketing of the
blueberries catering to both
the fresh and bulk markets.
"You can freeze blueber-
ries and keep them very
successfully for up to two
years", Stevenson said.
Stevenson said that at
present, the farm operation
has 25 permanent employees,
"but as we diversify more
and get heavier into blueber-
ries and pecans, our labor
force should increase consid-
erably."
Guests of the club were
Key Clubbers Annette Min-
ger, David Anderson, Jay'
Rish and Teresa CQzart.


PA Explains Changes

1985 Income Taxes


onard Costin, a Talla-
,e Certified Public Ac-
ant, spoke to the Rotary
Thursday, telling them
ings to look out for in
tax program this year
n the coming few years.
stin said present chan-
in methods of. deduction
allowable deductions can
re a close examination
e tax payer, or he will
himself not being able to
ct some things he has
able to in the past. ,
stin said one prime
aple was the'deduction of


automobile. "If you use your
car for both business and
personal use, you have to
keep a detailed log of the
automobile's use and declare
the log is correct at tax time.
Other major changes have
come about in real estate
depreciation, capital gains,
installment buying and sell-
ing and '.'many other activi-
ties most of us engage in
every day".
In the near future, the
speaker said he sees the
personal 'exemption being
(Continued on Page 8)


:sy :;.*.--;- ;.-- ; -


Heating & Air, Major Appliance Repair
Plumbing & Electrical Work
229-8416 or 227-1954 106 Bellamy Circle
ER0007623, RF0040131, RA0043378 *fc 1119


Gal 5:22-23'



Z TEMPERANCE
cc ul
U. UJ .-_
2 W
0 B
GOODNESS

FAITH


HIGHLAND VIEW

CHURCH OF GOD
319 Sixth St, Highland View
"Where Jesus Christ Is King
& God's Love Is An
Everflowing Fountain"
SUNDAY SCHOOL..... 10:00 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .. 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ... 6:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY EVENING 7:00 P.M.:
PASTOR C. W. WHITAKER


THE PULPIT OF THE CITY


First Baptist Church
Port St. Joe, Florida


9:45
11:00
6:00
7:00


SUNDAY'S SCHEDULE
......... Bible Study (all ages)
..... Worship (Live WJBU-AM)
............. Church Training
. . . . W orship


HOWARD BROWNING
Pastor


RON KEGLEY
MusiclYouth


; "" ...... "-.- '-. Y """""" ......... ......... "" .................. .... .... '- '-'*,-1- --;- "- ........ .. --" .....-..............- .1 -










llI sHere's The Key to
V our SAVINGS!

Inventory Poer Car
Shows We 1982

Have too Many Station Wag......
Used Cars In Stock. 1978 Mercury $ Q

We're Going to Move Zephyr ..... Uvv '
Them Out At Savings! 1976 Ford
f { 1976 Ford
| PINTO ..... 6|
NADA Price '4025 A
81 Ford Escort S/W 09 1973 Chev. $ Q

F150 NADA Price '5125 IMPALA
81 Ford Pickup... 9951970 Che.
F15iO NADA Price '5250 $5 CAMAR
81 Ford Pickup.. ....$399 A

F150 4x4 NADA Price '5325 1970 f
80 Ford Pickup .... PONTIAC ... .0

. 4 Door NADA Price '3550
79 Ford LTD ..... 1995

SNADA Price '3125 2450
78 VW Scirocco ...




U ^ While You're At It Shop Our
Large Inventory of New Cars & Trucks





St. Joe Motor Co. .
Phone 227-1336 322 Monument Ave.
; ; ;;~~. .......;.;.*.. ;.;.;.;...;.;....... .




REQUEST FOR

PROPOSALS

The Board of County Commission of Gulf

. County, Florida, is requesting proposals from
interested persons to provide the following ser-
vices for the Beaches Water System.

Meter Reading, Light Maintenance,
Disconnect and Reconnect Services

This service is to be provided for approx-
imately 500 customers at start up. ALL in-
terested persons should submit their proposals
in the form of a sealed bid to the Clerk of the
Circuit Court no later than 5:00 p.m. on
February 8, 1985. The proposals will be opened
by the Commission at 9:00 a.m. on the 12th day
of February, 1985.


Eldridge Money, Chairman
2t 1/24







5. :.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 24, 1985


PAGE SEVEN


3 bdrm., 1 ba. house, cor-
ner lot, new roof, re-finished
inside. $28,000. Call 229-6044.
40 acres at Stonemill
Creek. Call 227-1241 or
229-8033. ltc 1/24
3 bedroom, 2 bath, large.
den, fully carpeted, dbl. car-
port, chain link fence on 2
lots. Located in Port St. Joe.
Call 648-5804 days, 6484-8414
evenings. tfc 7/19
Extra nice home in good
location. 3 bdrm., 2 ba., cen.
air, dbl. carport, kitchen
equipped, utility room, 2
lots, 1g. grape arbor. Contact
Ed Ramsey, 229-8?37.
75'x175' residential lot on
SMarvin Avenue. Call
229-8578. 3tc 1/10
Beach house at Indian
Pass. 5 bedroom, 2 bath, cus-
tom built, cypress, on 1 acre.
$180,000. For sale by owner.
Call 904/385-7000.




Huge Yard Sale: 4
families. Lots of baby items,
children's clothes & house-
hold items. Sat., 9 till 3.
Everything price after
1:00. Corner 2nd St. & 4th
Ave. Beacon Hill. NO EAR-
LY SALES!




1978 Chevy van. Call
648-5242. ltc 1/24
1983 Mozda GLC. $500
down, take over payments.
Call 227-1639 or 229-8512.
1983 Chevrolet Cavalier
CS, a.c., ps., p.b., am/fm

648-5497. 2tc 1/17




Wanted to Rent: 2
bedroom house with stove &
refrigerator furn. Beaches
area. Reasonable rates.i
904/648683. 4tp 1/17



There will be a regular
communication of Port St.
Joe Lodge No. 111, F.&A.M.
every first and third Thurs-
day at 8:00 p.m.
Norman M. Martin, W.M.
Billy D. Barlow, Sec.
pd. thru 12/84


Misc

One used 30 gal. electric
water heater, counter
model, works well. Phone
229-6965 after 5:30 p.m.
tfc 1/24
Say, have you been looking
for a great cleaning pro-
duct? Very concentrated, a
little goes a long way. Why
not give Amway a try?.
Please call 227-1542.
Full canopy bed,
bedspread, pillow shams,
curtains & chest, $100, real
nice. Bedroom set, $75. Call
229-6859 or 229-6221.
12 cu. ft. GE refrigerator,
$50. Phone day 227-1813 or
nights 229-6108.
Everest Jennings Star-
liner wheel chair, $250.
Lumax folding walker, $20.
Call 227-1750.
351 Windsor Ford motor
rebuilt by school, $400 or best
offer. Call 227-1789 between
8:30 p.m. & 10 p.m.
1,000 ft. of white oak
tongue and groove flooring.
Also one 735 sq. ft. frame
house. Call 229-8806.
1983 24'x52' double wide,
1152 sq. ft.'3 bdrm., 2 full
baths, carpeted, shingle
roof, masonite siding, $2,000
and take over payments or
nothing down and take over
payment without appliances.
Call 648-5264 after 7:00 p.m.
4tp 1/17
1982 Suzuki GS 550L, 2
nolan helmets. Take over
payments of $84 mo., fi-
nanced at Paper Co. Credit
Union. Call 648-5264 after
7:00 p.m. 4tp1/17


TRY
WATKIWS
PRODUCTS
229-6023
4tp/V10
1980 Magnolia 24'x70'
mobile home. NADA value,
$26,000.00. Loan value
$21,270.00. Asking $20,000.00.
Call 229-6353 after 5 p.m.
Trampoline, round 13 ft.
diameter, mat is 3 years old,
600 lb. capacity, excel. cond.
$230. Call 229-6962.
tfc 12(24
Kabota tractor with diesel
engine, bush hog, disc, culti-
vator & planter. Plow Horse
tractor with 5 h.p. motor.
Call 229-6803 or 229-8840.
tfc 12/6


-m Iisc.
FO SL


$25.00 REWAI
for Any Sewing Mai
We Cannot Repa
SPECIAL $9.!
to clean, oil and adju
sion on your sewing
ine. We guarantee
machine can sew on a
ric.
The Sewing Root
410A Reid Avenu
227-1151

For all hardwood fir
call 229-8757 after 4 p.

STEEL ROOFING
SIDING
American
From $9.95 per s(
Based on size, style
GOLDIN IND., IN
Gulfport, Ms 601-896

4" thick foam rubber
to fit queen size bed
mattress covers.
229-6343 after 6:00 p.m





For Rent: Mini-war(
storage. For more in
tion call 229-6332. t

No need for wet cE
Dry clean them with
Use rooms right away
machine. St. Joe Fur
227-1251.
For Rent: Casa DI
Townhomes & Cotta
bdrm. cottage or 2
townhouse fully furn.
tv, no pets. Only mile
Port St. Joe on Hwy.
joy the beach and be
town, too. Call Wanda
for- our eLOW:-WI

RATES. 648-8446.
Beach house for rer
nished. Call 648-5306. 1





Part-time Clerical
tion. The Gulf County
Health Unit is accept
plications for a par
clerk. Job will consist
ficient typing, filing, a
ing telephone, taking
sages and other c
duties as assigned. M
plications? to: Helen
tgomery, 502 Fourth
Port St. Joe, FL 32456

SAY YOU SAW
IN THE STAR


HEPWATE


RN needed as instructor
RD for nurse aid course to begin
chine March, 1985 at Bay St. Jos-
ir eph Care Center. Part-time
95 position' thru -Bay County
ist ten- School Board. Contact Judi-
mach- ty Howell at 229-8244.
your 2tc 1/24
ny fab- The Northwest Florida
Superintendent's Associa-
m tion has a professional pos-
ie ition available. The position
title is Director, Panhandle
tfc 6/7 Management Development
rewood Network. The minimum re-
m. quirement is a master's de-
;fc 11/8 gree with at least three (3)
years administrative experi-
3 & ence. The major responsibi-
lity for this position will be to
Made direct the activities of an ad-
q. ministrative training pro-
& qty. gram for seventeen school
qC. districts in the panhandle.
3-6216 Position will be full time
5tp 1/3 with salary range of $30,000
to $35,000.
er pad Deadline for filing applica-
, with. tion is February 15, 1985. For
Call further information, contact
-. the PAEC office at 411 West
Boulevard, Chipley, Florida
or telephone (904) 638-4131.
2t 1/24
Group Home Supervisors
-couple to live in and serve
house as supervisors to 8 Develop-
forma- mentally Disabled Males
fc 9/27 residing in Group Home in
arpefs North Port St. Joe. Interest-
HOST. ed applicants should contact
y. Rent the Gulf County Association
iture. for Retarded Citizens, P. 0.
nu Box 296, Port St. Joe, FL
229-6327. 2tc 1/24
el Mar DAY CARE TEACHERS
ages, 1 NEEDED
bdrm. GUlf County Guidance
, color Clinic, Inc. is accepting ap-
98. Efrom plications for two (2) teacher
98. En- positions for the Clinic's
lT After-School Day Care Pro-
atoy .gram. These positions pay
tfc" 0/4 .35 'pero hour and "require
four hours of work after
nt, fur- school each day. This is an
tfc 12/6 educational and social pro-
gram for school-age students
f only. Min. Req. are: H.S.
diploma or equiv. Applicants
with college coursework
hnd/or experience will be
Posi- given preference. A current
Public health assessment and inser-
uig ai- vice training will also be re-
ing ap- quired. Apply in writing to:
rt-ti of e Edwin R. Ailes, Executive
nswer- Director, Gulf County
nswer Guidance Clinic, Inc, 311
clerical s- Williams Ave, Port St. Joe,
ac a FL 32456. Equal Opportunity
SMon- Employer. 2t/17
Street, GOVERNMENT JOBS.
$15,000 $50,000/yr. possible.
All occupations. How to find.
IT Call 805-687-6000, ext. R-6859.
/ 4tpl/3


14' wide 2 bdrm. trailer,
nice location on St. Joe
Beach. Garbage pickup and
yards cut by owner. For in-
formation call 648-5361.
For Rent: New 2 BR, 1
bath, cen. h&a/c, furnished,
no pets. Beacon Hill, 1 block
from Gulf. Call 648-5432.
2t cl/17
2 bedroom, 1 bath cottage
at Mexico Beach, beachside,
near pier, fully equipped,
completely remodeled. $185
monthly. Call 904/385-7368.
8tc 12/13
Apartment on Mexico
Beach, furnished, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, carpet, all
elec. kit., ch&a, cable TV
and water included. No pets.
$300 per month. 648-5903 bet-
ween 9 a.m. & 5 p.m.
tfc 12/13
One bedroom mobile home
for rent. Rustic Sands Camp-
grounds, 648-5229. tfc 11/15

Mobile home lot for rent at
Rustic Sands Campgrounds.
Call 648-5229. tfc 11/15

Room for Rent: by day,
week, month. Air cond., TV.
Thames Hotel. 229-8723. 302
Reid Ave. tfc 7/5


RENT


steam carpet cleaner
with HEATER and the
VIBRATING POWER
NBRUSHO
ONLY


finishing touch
201 Monument Ave.
Phone 227-1199 or 227-1190

Century 21
St. Joseph Bay
Realty
BEACH RENTALS
14 miles from Tyndall Air Force Base.
Townhomes and cottages for rent by the
month. Furnished and unfurnished.
Some weekly throughout the winter.
Contact Century 21, St. Joseph Bay Real-
ty, Inc., Realtor, 904-648-5716.
Boardwalk $450 mo.
3 bdr. Hwy. 98 S) Bch, Wtrfrnt. Fur.
Carrols Folly Apts. $285/mo.
2 bdr. Miramar Or Mex Bch Wtrft. Fur.
iGulf Aire Twnhomes$500/Mio.
3 bdr. Hwy. 98 Gulf Aire Bch, Wtrft. Fur
Gulf Winds Apts. $285/mo.
1 bdr. Hwy. 98 Mex Bch, Wtrfit. Fur.
Sail-away Duplex's $500/mo.
.3 bdr. Hwy 98, S Bch, Wtrft. Fur.
Sanddollar Houses $275/mo.
2 bdr. Hwy. 98 Beacon Hill Wtrft. Fur.
Sanddollar House $300/mo.:
3 bdr. Hwy. 98 Beacon Hill, Wtrft. Fur.
Cee Bee Duplex $'195/mo.
2 bdr. 28th St. Mex Bch, Bchside, Fur.
!Drifting Sands
House $480/mo.
4 bdr. 34th St. Mex Bch, Bchside, Fur.
Gulf View Twnhouse $425/mo
2 bdr. 42nd St. Mex Bch, Bchside,
Fur. (1 year lease)
Leah Apts. $155/mo.
1 bdr. 28th St. Mex Bch, Bchside, Fur.
Pier Point Apts. $350/mo.
*2 bdr. 37th St. Mex Bch, Bchside, Fur.
Retreat House $350/mo.
2 bdr. 42nd St. Mex Bch, Bchside, Fur.
Sandpiper Houses $355/mo.
3 bdr. Circle Dr. Mex Bch, Bchside, Fur.
Warren James No. 1
Townhouse $350/mo.
2 bdr. 32nd St. Mex Bch, Bchside, Fur.
Gulf Terrace $200/mo.
2 bdr. Hw. 98 & 29th St. Furn.
Surfer II $175/mo.
1 hdr. efficiency, Hwy. 98 & 31 s St. Fur.
Sea Gull Twnhomes $400/mo.
2 bdr. Hws. 98. St. Joe Bch. Furn.
Bales House $275/mo.
2 hdr.. 1st St., St. Joe Bea.h.
HarrejI Triplex $400/mo.
2 bdr. Gulf Aire Sub. SI Bch, Unfur.
(1 yr. lease)
Gulf View Twnhs $400/mo.
2 bdr. 42nd St. Mex 8ch, Bchside,
Unfur. (1 yr. lease)
Overholt Triplex $375/mo.
2 bdr. Gulf Aire, SI Bch Unfur. 1 yr. leas
Smith Triplex $300/mo.
2 bdr. Gulf Aire, SI Bch Unfurn.
Smith Triplex $325/Mo..
2 bdr. Gulf Aire, SI Bch Furn.
Thornton Duplex $300/mo.
2 bdr. Gulf Aire, SI Bch, Unfur. 1 yr leas
uparee Trailer $165/mo.
/analSt.
MINI WAREHOUSES
6x12 $30.00/mo. plus tax
12x12 $45.00/mo. plus tax
12x24 $85.00/mo. plus lax or
$78.00 mo. with a 6 mo. lease


SEVIE


Will keep children in my
home, weekday and week-
ends also. For more infor-
mation call Deborah Justice
at 229-8580.
Experienced maintenance
crew now available for fix-
up, paint-up, clean-up,,haul-
a-way jobs. Call today!
Carpentry, electrical,
plumbing. No job too small.
229-8341. 2tp 1/24
Need your house painted or
repaired? Call Willie Bur-
rows, 2294846. 4tp 1/17
PIANO TUNING
and Minor Repairs
Local, Reasonable Service
648-8245
3tp 1/10



Need house painted or
yard work done, call Jerry
Peak, 229-6671 after 5 p.m. *
pd. thru Jan. 85
Psychological Services for
anyone with problems in
day-to-day living. Gulf Coun-
ty Guidance Clinic, Port St.
Joe. 227-1145 (24 hours).
We buy, sell and trade us-
ed furniture. Get good prices
for your unwanted furniture.
Country Peddler. 229-8966.
tfc 10/25

COSTING INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
All Forms of Insurance
322 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tfc 11/1



H. L. ALLEN & SON
General Contractor
New and Remodeling
All Types
'25 Yrs. Experience
648-5080,
or P.C. 763-2924


Going Fishing?
Stop here first
for a complete
line of

Fishing Tackle
HURLBUT SUPPLY
306 Reid Avenue


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!


Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151

Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reid Avenue


Housecleaning. Call after
5, Lois Hastings. 648-8274.
4tp 1/10



The Star Is Your Local
XEROX
REPRESENTATIVE
306 Williams Ave.


Copies
Copies
AVAILABLE AT
THE STAR
306 Williams Ave.
Port St. Joe


THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 2294954
Open 7 Days A Week
'Mon. Fri., 8 a.m. 8 p.m.
Sat., 8 a.m. 6 p.m.
Sun., 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or drop/off
tfc 11/1


Wauneta's
Accounting &
Income Tax
Accounting & Income Tax
Service Small Business
Individual

Monthly Accounting_
Wauneta Brewer, Pat HoiUan
Owier Assstant
220 Reid Ave.
Phone 2294-536


Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday, 4:00 P.M., E.S.T.
Tuesday, 8:00 P.M., E.S.T.
St. James Episcopal Church
Thursday, 7:00 P.M., C.S.T.
Wewa Medical Center

SAY YOU SAW IT IN
THE STAR!!


St. Joseph Bay
Cponstncto
*Residential





W. S. (Biff)Quarles
CUSTOM HOMES
MULTI-FAMILY
229-8795
RG0040048



ST. JOE CUSTOM
BUILDERS





-Commercial Building
-Residential Building
-Cabinet Work
Gen. Con. RO 0033843 .

GLEN F. COMBS
227-1689
P.O. BOX 456
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
tic 7T2



"I think it was something I ate.



kills bugs for
up to six months, GULF

and taves you about $100 yearly SATELLITE
In costly pest control services.
Use of Sprayer free with SYSTEMS
purchase of Rid-A-Bug SALES, SERVICE
HURLBUT SUPPLY CO. & INSTALLATION
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida 229-8171



The Sewing Room
410 A Reid Avenue
ppj1c- Port St. Joe, Florida I s

"Quality Fabrics at Affordable Prices"




H&R BLOCK
The Income Tax People
Personal & Business Tax Preparation
CLOSED MONDAY
TUESDAY FRIDAY 9:30 11:30 a.Im.
1:00 7:00 p.m.
SATURDAY 10:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m.


For Appointment
229-8307
or 229-8998


411 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe
Florida


8tc 1/10


HANNON REALTY,! Inc.
(904) 227-1133

FRANK HANNON, Broker
SALES ASSOCIATES
Evenings and Weekends:
Mgaret Hale 648-5659 Roy Smith
Frances Chason 229-8747 Karen King
Beo Boyett 648-8936 Marsha Young
Donnie Lange 229-8208
NOW OPEN ON SATURDAY
HOMES
Port St. Joe: Nice neighborhood, brick, 3 bdrm.. 2 bath. dbl. carport. store.
rm/workshop. $55.500.
St. JoeBeach: Custom built, many extra features. 3 bdrm.. 2 bath. f.p.. deck.
Ig. lot, spring-fed pond. $88,000.
Howards Creek: Almost new double-wide trailer, partially furnished. 3
bdrm.. 2 bath. f.p.. nice corner lot. $27.900.
Ward Ridge: Brick. 3 bdrm.. 2 ba.. assumable mortgage. $46.000.
lort St. Joe: Recently redecorated. 3 bdrm., 1 ba.. deck. separate workshop.
corner lot. walk to town. $24,000.
Port St. Joe: Executive home. excellent for entertaining. 4 bdrms.. 2 baths.
3000 sq. ft.. f.p.. Ig. living area. $95.000.
St. Joe Beach: Ocean view, corner lot. 3 bdrm., 13/. bath. deck. screen
porch, reduced to sell at $64,500. Owner financing.
Port St. Joe: Good for investment. 4 bdrm.. 2 ba.. only $29.500.
Port St. Joe: Starter home or rental property. 3 bdrm.. 1 ba. $29.500.
Howards Creek: Lg. 2-story. 5 bdrms.. 2 baths. Franklin stove, screen porch.
util. rm. $47,900.
Jndian Pass: Single family home. 2 bdrm., 1 ba.. Ig. liv. rm.. din. rm.. $38.000.
Port St. Joe: Quiet neighborhood, frame. 3 bdrm.. 2 ba.. den. sep. dining.rm..
carport. until. rm., $44.500.
St. Joe Beach: Stilt house. 2 bdrm., 1 /2 bath. den or study. until. rm.. carport.
$69,500.
St. Joe Beach: Beach house. 2 bdrm.. frame. f.p.. screen porch. $79.000.

RESIDENTIAL LOTS
Mexico Beach: Already has water hook-up, 100'x100', only $8,800.
Ward Ridge: Two lots. 75'x150' each. $6.600.
Gulf Aire: Wooded lot, 65'xl 15',. $26.500.
Bluerldge Mountains: 1 acre, $6.250.
Howards Creek: '% acre, $1,000.
Indian Pass: High and dry, $11,500.
Jones Homestead: 2 lots, $8,400.
TOWN HOUSES
St. Joe Beach: New 2 bdrm., 1 VI ba., on Hwy. 98, unobstructed Gulf view.
dedicated beach, furnished $65,300; unfurnished $52,700.
COMMERCIAL LOTS
White City: One acre near canal, $33,300.
Overstreet: Two acre plots on Intercoastal Canal, $16,000 ea.
Port St. Joe: downtown, 60'x90' corner lot, $18,000.


Custom Drapes & Blinds


Now at


Danley's


Large In-Store Selection
of Samples for You to Choose from


,REEVES FURNITURE &
REFINISHING SHOPPE

325 Reid Avenue REFERENCES Phone 229-6374
Call and Talk to Us About Getting
Your Furniture Refinished to Look
Like New. We Buy and Sell Used
Furniture.
Your Western Union Representative


227-1590
IIa it niI ununitisll II Ilelll ilillin esmlII l n Uli ll tiii ni


__


- -L"~1 r- '~""~"'~ ~~' I""'~'~'~""";


magmums


71


gR


00,


t:







PAGE EIGHT THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 24, 1985


e .M = I

KEEP CHILD RESISTANT U
CONTAINERS-CHILD O
RESISTANT
The purpose of dispensing medicines in what are
called "child resistant" containers is to substantially
cut down and try to prevent the ever increasing *
number of accidents involving children and drugs.
But, this purpose is defeated when a child is given an
empty medicine container with which to play.
W It does not take a child too long a time of
experimentation to figure out how to get an empty
container open. The next time it could be one that is
full. Give your children a break and buy that extra
time a child-proof container gives you when they I
haven't had a chance to find out how it works.
"A GREAT MANY PEOPLE ENTRUST US
with their prescriptions, health needs and other
pharmacy products. We consider this trust a
privilege and a duty. May we be your personal
family pharmacy?"



BUZZETT'S DRUG STORE
Free Parking Drive-In Window
a 229-8771 317 Williams Ave. Port St. Joe &

M'M.M-a ,MIai WE fll g.


p
t
F


Port St. Joe's Sharks didn't
dlay their best game against
he Blountstown Tigers last
Friday night, but they still


came out on top of a 71-64
game with a team which
normally gives the local
quintet all it can handle, year
after year.
The Sharks had a nine
point lead at half time and
hung on during the second
stanza, allowing the Tigers to
gain only two points on their
lead in the third quarter.
The Sharks had three play-
ers scoring in double figures
with Michael Pittman scor-
ing a game-high 24 points.
Durey Cadwell contributed
17 points to the total and
Doug Robinson put 16 points
through the nets.


D districts (Continued from Page 1)


based on square foot measurements rather
than estimated costs of a building. "When a In othe
.man who is going to build his own house sion:
comes for a permit, -he doesn't know how -Agre
much it will cost. Sometimes his permit financial
reflects a much higher cost than he has in Gates said
;the house." Clerks rec
Manuel said the schedule he had worked doesn't lea
::up would just about equal the current financial w
.charges, but would make the application
more equitable by treating the builders all -Appr1
.,alike and putting the fee on the ones who sections by
'cause the extra work from the department dent, Bob I
:and require several inspections. adequate,
l Commissioner Owens suggested they Pleasant R
'amend the document immediately to on Road F
exempt small storage sheds, porches, -Appr
patios, etc., on private single family homes appreciation
:from the need to secure a permit. Owens' donating se
,suggestion passed unanimously. the Courtho


S Keslevy (Continued from Page 2)

and I even hear tell some of down behind the house; you
'-those mountain folks could know the kind with the
make a potent beverage out, spaces between the logs tc
of it. It seems to me it didn't help the drying. Heck, I
::matter if it was .simple or didn't even need to walk
complicated to them-just down there as I grew up with
as long as it worked. one just like it in my back-
I could see the men gather- yard.
ed around the. mill discuss- We drove past the Hamf
ing the news of the day. They Tifton place and the Cartel
didn't have Dan Rather but Shields cabin and in no time
-they did have a 2.week old at all we were out of the
newspaper that someone had cove, headed down the
brought over the mountain mountain. George said
from Maryville so they were "What did you think of Cades
in pretty good shape as far Cove?"
as news went in those days. "I kind'a hate to go; feel
As I started back for the like I'm leaving some olc
car I saw an old corn crib friends; I also dread getting


Copies
Available at
The Star
306 Williams Ave.
Port St. Joe


OTHER BUSINESS
r business matters, the Commis-

ed to approve of the hiring of a
officer by Clerk Jerry Gates.
additional work placed on the
ently by the state of Florida
ve him time to properly do the
work of the county.
oved an inspection trip of bridge
Road Department Superinte'n-
Lester. The sections, if they are
would be bought to replace the
,est Road bridge and the bridge
ive.
moved the writing a letter of
n to the McNeill family for
ven palm trees to be planted on
house property.


U.
e
0
I
k
h
I-

p
t
e
ie
e


acK home andu acing my
editor with the fact that I
couldn't get a story up here
because there wasn't anyone
left to interview and
George, next time I come,
I'm bringing my hat and
coat."
Respectfully,
Kesley


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
22nd Street Mexico Beach
CHARLES M: PARKER and
DAVID L. TAUNTON, Ministers


WORSHIP SERVICE ................ 9:00 A.M., C.S.T.
CHURCH SCHOOL ............... 10:00 A.M., C.S.T.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday)...................



First

Presbyterian Church
Sixteenth Street and Forrest Park Avenue
Phone 227-1756

SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE ............ 10:00 A.M.
ADULT SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS .......... 11:00 A.M.
Welcome to Everyone





Sur-Way Electric

.411 Reid Avenue


Commercial, Residential

Remodeling and

Service Work

CHARLES SO WELL
REG. NO. ER-004631
26 Years Experience
Licensed and Bonded

Call Shorty at

229-6798


Gene Bess led the Tigers
with his 18 points. The Tigers
-had four members of their
squad shooting in double
figures.
SCORE BY QUARTERS:
Port St. Joe 22 18 14 17-71
Blountstown 14 17 16 17-64
"PORT ST. JOE-Pittman
11-2-24; Cadwell 7-3-17; Bax-
ter. 3-2-8; Robinson 7-2-16;
Jenkins 2-0-4; Harris 1-0-2.
B'TOWN-B.ess 8-2-18;
Banks 6-2-14; Maines 7-0-14;
Koonce 5-1-11; Godwin 3-1-7.
The Sharks were scheduled
to travel to Panama City
Monday evening to meet the
Rutherford Rams. Due to the
cold weather, the game was
postponed to a later date.
SHARKS 91, APALACH 85
Ordinarily, the Sharks
.have a pretty easy time with
Apalachicola, when it comes
to playing basketball. Tues-
day night, even though the
entire Shark squad had a
chance to play, the Franklin
county team made a contest
of it and lost to the Port St.
Joe Sharks by only six points,
91-85.
Apalachicola is making its
capabilities on the hardwood
court felt through their sche-"
dule this year, but they still
weren't enough for the im-
proving Port St. Joe team.
The Sharks out-scored Ap-
alachicola both periods dur-
ing the first half, but Apala-
chicola came back in the
second half to tie the Sharks
in the third period and take a
nine point bulge in the final


Tips On Producing Good


Crop of
BY ROY LEE CARTER
County Extension Director
There are several species
of American type grapes
- native to the southeastern
United States. These include
the muscadine cultivars
(varieties) and several other
species -of slip-skinned
grapes- so called because
the entire ball of flesh slips
from the skin when the fruit
is squeezed. These grapes
have tough skins and flesh,
and are seedy. The tender-
fleshed, seedless European
type grapes are not adapted
to the southeastern United
States. Hybridizing pro-
grams have resulted in Am-
erican cultivars much better
than the native types. My,
information for this article
was provided by Extension
Fruit and Nut Specialist Dr.
Tim Crocker, of the Univer-
sity of Florida's Institute of
Food and Agricultural
Sciences.
The grape produces on long
branches- called cones of
previous season's growth. A
great many of these cones
must be removed each year,
and the others cut back
rather severely. For com-
mercial production, no fruit
crop has such a demanding
pruning requirement; how-
ever, satisfactorily pro-
ducing fruit.for the home or
local market requires a
much less exacting program.
Grape arbors, often used to
landscape an area, require
.that canes be thinned out and
cut back only occasionally to
prevent too dense a growth.
This is a good time to prune
your grape vines if it is
needed. A good rule of thumb
is to prune everything off the
vine less than '/s inch size.
Adapted cultivars tolerate
a wide range of soils. Cul-
tural practices, such as fer-
tilizing, irrigating and con-
trolling pests, are not un-
usually demanding.
Grapes (bunch and musca-
dine) should be fertilized at


Rotary
(Continued from Page 6)
increased to $2,000 and other
major changes in the tax
picture, such as the introduc-
tion of at least a modified
version of the flat rate tax.
Costin said he also felt
Congress would introduce a
tax against unemployment
compensation payments.
Guests of the club were
Police Chief Bob Maige, Bob
Fleming, Dusty May, all of
Port St. Joe, Dusty Wolters of
Gainesville and Wheelettes
Helen Singletary and Lynn
Aman.


Grapes Annually
the rate of 1.5 lbs. of 10-10-10 Muscadine Grape Varie-
for each year of age with a ties: Southland, dark color,
maximum of 5 lbs. per plant self-fruitful; Cowart, dark
applied in late February. If color, self-fruitful; Magoon,
heavy rains occur in March dark color, self-fruitful; Hig-
and April apply another gins, light color, self-unfruit-
pound of 10-10-10 for each ful;, Dixie, light color, self-
year of age with a maximum fruitful; Regale,' dark color,
of three pounds per plant- in self-fruitful; Fry, light color,
mid-May. "-self-finfruilful, Jumbo, dark'
Bunch Grape Varities: color, self-unfruitful; Carlos,
Lake Emerald, light color, light color, self-fruitful;
self-fruitful; Blue Lake, dark Welder, light color, self-fruit-
color, self-fruitful; Stover, ful.
light color, self-fruitful; Con- When self-unfruitful varie-
quistador, dark color, self-, ties are being planted, it is
fruitful; Daytona, red color, necessary to include at least
self-fruitful; Suwanee, light one self-fruitful variety for
color, self-fruitful. pollination.


FOR IMPORTS I& SMALL
AMERICAN CARS
* Enhances overall
performance.
Long tread mileage.
Excellent fuel economy.

NOW $A')49
.ow s42491
ONLY 2 155-13
Reg. 1511


ALL-SEASON RADIAL
* Clings to wet roads.
* Plows through snow.
* Precise, accurate handling.
* Up to 60,000 miles of tread
life (with proper care).
ONLY $81 42
ONLY 195-14
Reg. s9260


Williams 9-10-28; McIntyre class 2A team in the state, far in the young
1-0-2; Lockley 3-0-6. whom the Sharks met, in in the Coliseum.
Vernon, in their first regular will hostthe stat
The Shark r ,,,,, n 9 ,,, season game. one ranked 3-A te


the season, losing their first
game played this year in a
Christmas tournament held
in Panama City and to
Vernon, the third-ranked


COMING GAMES
Friday night, the Sharks
will be at home for what
could be the best game thus


season here
The Sharks
e's number
cam, Grand


Ridge at 6:00 p.m.Tuesday of
next week, it doesn't get any
easier, as the Sharks take the
road to Marianna for a 7:00
EST game.


1AMICREH EN


PATE'S SERVICE CENTER

216 Monument Avenue Port St. Joe Phone 227-1291 BuckleUp ForSafety!


Defeat Blountstown and Apalachicola


Sharks Take Two More Cage Wins


period.
The Sharks had a 15 point
lead at half time and gave the
reserves some playing time
for the rest of the game.
The Sharks set a record for
themselves thus far in the
season. The team gathered 22
fouls for the game; the most
fouls the team has had
charged against it in a long,
long time. Even with the
large number of fouls, Tony
Thomas was the only player
to foul out in the game.
Shark veteran Durey Cad-
well paced the team in
scoring, with his 28 points,
Josh Jenkins added 15 points
and Dexter Baxter had 12.
Sean Williams led Apala-
chicola with 28 points and
Chris Lane added 20.
SCORE BY QUARTERS:
Port St. Joe 23 26 21 21-91
Apalachicola 14 20 21 30-85
PORT ST. JOE-D. Thom-
as 2-1-5; Pittman 4-1-9; Cad-
well 11-6-28; Baxter 6-0-12;
Robinson 3-0-6; Jenkins 7-1-
15; Harris. 0-2-2; T. Thomas
2-0-4; Anthony 1-1-3; Watson
0-2-2; Butts 1-3-5.
APALACH-Philyaw 4-2-
10; Jones 9-1-19; Lane 7-6-20;
*Organizing
There will be an organiza-
tional meeting of all Gulf
County citizens who are
interested in joining the
Search and Rescue Auxiliary
of the Gulf County Sheriff's
Department on Tuesday,
February 5 at 8:00 p.m. EST
at the County Jail.
All interested persons are
invited to attend.


ALL ALUMINUM NO RUST
CONSTRUCTION


DOG BOXES


$10000 OFF

Fits Full Size or Mini Pick-Up Trucks




$St. Joe Auto Parts

201 Long Avenue Phone 229-8222


a.


~Sj~


I ''


CLOSE OUT SALE


b












Shark Review

News of Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High


BY ANNETTE MINGER
The basketball team really
proved themselves this past
week by conquering two of
their rival teams. Their first
victory for the week was over
the Rutherford Rams. The
Sharks beat the Rams by a
score of 91 to 65. Their second
victory of last week occurred
Friday when the Sharks beat
the Blountstown Tigers by a
score of 71 to 64. The Sharks'
next game will be Friday the
25th when they take on Grand
Ridge here in the Sharks'
gym.

The basketball was also
good to the Lady Sharks this
past week. The girls' team


defeated Wakulla the early
part of last week. Congratu-
lations girls!

- The wrestling team also
id well this past week. They
defeated Wakulla for their
first victory of the season.
The next match for the
wrestlers will be here on
Wednesday against the. Ru-
therford Rams.

Last Tuesday the ninth
-graders were proVided a.
special treat by the faculty..
They were treated to a
special dance in their honor.
The reason the ninth graders
were given this dance was
because their class raised the
most money out of all the


BY ANNETTE MINGER
classes at Port St. Joe High
to go toward the preservation
of the Statue of Liberty. Way
to go Freshmen!

Last Saturday night the
Fellowship of Christian Ath-
letes presented a .special
program in the Commons


- Public Notices-


NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED.BIDS
The Boardof County Commission of
Gulf County will receive sealed bids
-'from any person, company, or corpora- .
'tlon interested in Installing, for the
tCounty the following described moni-
'toring wells.
Four 14). Two inch i2 t PVC monitor-
ing wells at Buck Horn Lanahli site,'
Gulf County Flionaa These wells will
be approximately sixty Ieel (60') deep.
"Specitications on fle in Clerk's Of-
W .f cee. .
Bids will be received until 9 o'clock,
A.M., E.S.T...February 12, 1985. at the
officeof the Clerk of Circuit Court, 1000
Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456.'
The Board reserves the right to reject
any and all bids.
BOARD of COUNTY COMMISSIONERS,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
.By: Is/ Eldridge Money, Chairman
2t 1/17


IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT
-COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DIS-
*TRICT OF FLORIDA
MCA Civil No. 84-2072
.THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
Plaintiff, .
vs.
WILLIAM FILMORE and
'RUTH FILMORE, Defendant
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
under and. by virtue of a final decree of
foreclosure rendered on December 19,
1984 by the United States District Court
for the Northern District of Florida.
Panama City Division, in the case
above styled in favor of the Plaintiff, the
undersigned appointed in said decree
'will on February 8, 1985 at 12:00 p.m.-in
front of the Gulf County Courthouse
,- door in Ihe Cityo01 Porl Sl Joe Floriaa
ole'lor -ale and sell at Public outc ry lo
the highest bidder for cash the follow-
ing property, situate, lying and being in
:Gulf County. Florida, described as
follows:
Commnencing at Ihe Norilneast cor-
S ner ol Section I and running
Inence South a-dislahce"ot'7 00
Sfeel. inence 88433 Wesl a
distance. ol 61904 leet, Ihence
South 01'27' East a distance of
652.50 feet to point of beginning;
thence South 01*27' East a
Distancee, of .80.00. feet: thence
South 8833' West a distance of
150.00 feet; thence North 0127'
West along the East right of way of
Apollo Street a distance of 80.00
feet; thence North 88'33' East a


distance of 150.00 feet to the point
of beginning. said property lying
the Northeast one quarter of Sec.
tion 1. Township 8 South. Range 11
SWest, Gulf County. Florida. said
property being further described
as Lot 2, Apollo Street. Port St.
Joe. Florida.'
For additional- information concern-
ing the above property, contact the of-
fice'of the U.S. Attorney. telephone no.
(904) 434-3251.
Sale subject to confirmation of the
court.
Method of payment: Postal money
order or certified check. made payable
to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten per-
cent of highland acceptable bid in cer-
tified check or cashier's check will be
accepted and balance due within 48
hours.
DATE: 1-9-85 "
W. L. "Mac" McLENDON
UNITED STATES MARSHAL
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA
By: /sa Sheila R. Pope.
4tc1/17

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR.:
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY. .
Case NO. 84-248
JOY A. JOCELYN, formerly known as
Joy A. Sedgwick,
Plaintiff.
vs.
EDWIN FRIEND,
Defendant.
.NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:-EDWIN FRIEND
Rt. 2,' Box 65C
Gairisville, Georgia 30506
.YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to
quiel and confirm tne ltile o Piaintilft.
in and to lands in Gull County. Florida.
more particularly described as follows
ILots 5 and 7, Block 41, Unit No. 2,,
St. Joe Beach, Florida, according
to the official plat thereof on file in
the Ollice of CleinK o Circuit Court.
Gull Courny. Florida
tia 0 bWehr lled.against yoU. and-yoU,are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any, to it. on Fred N. Wit-
ten, attorney for plaintiff, whoSe'ad-
'dress Is 408 Long Avenue, Port St. Joe,
Gulf County, Florida, on or before
February 6, 1985, and' file the original
with the Clerk of .this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs Attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this


NEW BETHEL
African Methodist Episcopal Church,
146 AvenueC Phone227-1213
Rev. Theodore Andrews, Pastor

SUNDAY SCHOOL .................... 9:30 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .................... 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ..... ............. .6:00 P.M.

"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man Our Brother"



^We Want You
To BeA Part of
i The Friendly Place


BIBLE'STUDY. . . .. .. .... 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .......... ...... 11:00A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING .................. 5'45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP..................7:00P.M.
WEDNESDAY ....................... 7:00 P.M.


Long Ave. Baptist Church
1601 LONGAVENUE
' DANIEL W. DUNCAN
Pastor


Area at the High School. Mr.
Steadman Shealy, former
quarterback for the Crimson
Tide, gave a short presenta-
tion on how being an athlete
and being a Christian inter-
twine. Mrs. David Fernandez
and her daughter, Lisa Fer-
nandez, provided entertain-
ment. Mr. Craig Pippin also
provided sifiging for this
presentation. These people
provided their listeners with
a very enjoyable show.

Students at Port St. Joe
High received a special sur-
prise Monday morning. They
received the news that school
was cancelled for Monday
the 2,1st, due to the excessive-
ly cold weather. Needless to
say, this news started the
week in a good way, accord-
ing to the students.

Until next week,. this is
Annette Minger hoping you
have a good one!



Area Students
d-11 W_ W -


Court. this January 2. 1985. On Dean's List
JERRY GATES. "
CLERK OF COURT Forty-one Gulf Coast Com-
GULF COUNTY.. FLORIDA munity College students have
By: /s/ Towan Peters, Deputy Clerk b een named to the Presi-
4t1113 been named to the Presi-
dent's Honor List for the fall
1ID NUMBER 303 of 1984.
The City of Port St. Joe. Florida. re-' According to Gulf Coast
quests bids for one (1) MAGNETIC 'President Dr. Larry W. Ty-
LOQWMETER. one. (1) SIGNAL CON- ree the list includes all
VERTER. one (1) RECORDER. and one
(1) INDICATOR TOTALIZER. Specifica- full-time students enrolled
tions may be obtained from the City for 12 or. more' hours who
Clerk's Office. P. 0. Box 278. Port St. earn a nt average of
Joe. Florida 32456. Bid opening will be earn a grade point average of
held February 19. 1985. at 8:00 P.M.. 3.90-4.00.
EST. In the Municipal Building at the Students from Port St. Joe
Regular Meeting of the City. Commls included osn the President's
sion:.."included, e dent's
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE. List were Dennis K; Arnold,
By: /I/ L. A. Farris. Lori K. HIinote, and Sherri S.
City Auditor/Clerk 2t 1/17 McInnis.
PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT A r n
NOTICE OF COMPETITIVE SELECTION Angela Jor an
The Board of County Commissioners A g l J
of Gulf County, Florida hereby gives On D mean's List
notice, that It wtll'conduct a selection
procedure for a Consulting Engineering Angela Jordan, grand-
firm, pursuant to Florida State Statute Lm
287.055 (The Consultants Competitive -daughter of Mrs. Latnar
Negotiations Act) for Engineering ser- Jordan of Port St. Joe, has
vices necessary for projects.proposed,, been named to the Dean's
Including but not necessarily limited to Listfor winter quarter at
solid waste disposal, highways List for winter quarterat
bridges, and storm drainage. The Mercer University Atlanta
Engineering services, required riny in- College o Arts and Sciences.
clude, preliminary engineering rs rts, Sm
feasibility'studies, cot estiae Some 240 students' made the
design, preparallon of plans and Dean's List at the private
specillcatinns. assistance during bid- college.
ding, anda olessional services during Tg qualify fo
construction and preparation of permit To. quality for.n the Dean's
Applications. List, a student must maintain
S First Planned Project Rebuild Plea. at least a 3.60 grade point
sent Rest Cemetery Bridge. ,a
All'Consuiting Engineers wishing to average out of a possible 4.0
be considered hhall submit a letter ofl on 12 or more -quarter hours
i' interest. stating the firm's qualllica of work.
tions and background. including stan
darW form 254 ;' f'Vr '9 I- s 4
% -.Loeters o interestlandQualllficatlns O S t
should be sent to
Boaro Ot County Commissioners Ft. Benning
Gull County
1000 5th Street Army Chief Warrant Offi-
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
: The Board of County Commissioners cer Woodrow A. Jones, Jr.,
willlappointacommitteeand'reviewthe son of'W. A. and Bonnie M.
qualifications submitted. This commit- Jones of 706 First St., Port St.
tee will select not less than three .
a ualtilled firms concerning Ine pioDos Joe has arrived for duty at
ea assignment Selection acts shall Fort Benning, Ga.
consider the firm's professional per- JOn e an aviator wi the
sonnel. past performance willingness Jones, an avator wi
to meet time and budget requirements. 197th' Infantry Brigade, was
location, and current work 'load. All previously assigned in Seoul,
firms submitting qualifications will be South Korea
notified In Writing of the Committee U
decision. Following further contact by His wife, Mary, is the
the Board of County Commissioners, daughter of George W. Baker
the Board will select a minimum of f Perryville, Md-
th'ree. firmns,, ranked in order of o erryie
preference, for the negotiation of an He is a 1979- graduate of
Engineering Contract. Port St. Joe High School.
Five (5) copies of letters of interest
should -be submitted postmarked not
later than February 12. 1985, at. 9:00 ( A
A.M.,EST. Leslie Cosin Is
Dated this 14th day of January, 1985.
is/ ELDRIDGE MONEY, Chairman, Press Intern
Board of County Commissib 2t/24 '
211/24 Leslie Costin, daughter of


PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE' IS HEREBY G,VEN 'hat the
CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA.-at its meeting
on the 5th'day of'February, 1985. at 8:00
'P.M. (Eastern Time) in the Municipal
Building. 5th Street, Port St. Joe,
Florida. will consider for adoption an
Ordinance with the following title:'
AN ORDINANCE FIXING AND
REGULATING THE HOURS. OF
SALE OF ALCOHOLIC AND IN-
TOXICATING BEVERAGES IN THE
CITY.OF PORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA;
PROVIDING PENALTIES FOR VIO-
LATION THEREOF: REPEALING
ORDINANCE NO. 145. CITY OF
PORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA. AND
ANY OTHERORDINANCE IN CON-
FLICT THEREWITH: AND PRO-
VIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
All interested parties are invited to
attend and be heard. Copies of said Or-
dinance are on file at the Office of the
City Clerk and may be 'ospecied oD me
public'during normal wokiing nouisa
CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
PORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA
By: s/ Frank Pate. .
Mayor/Commissioner
ATTEST;: s/ALDEN FARRIS.
City Auditor/Clerk 111/24


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


HANNON INSURANCE

Agency, Inc.

The Insurance Store Since 1943


Auto Home Business Life

Flood Bonds Mutual Funds

8:30 till 6:00.Monday through Friday


221 Reid Avenue


Phone 227-1133


We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


ROY SMITH, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent


Mr.. and Mrs. Ashley M.
Costin of Pqrt St. Joe, has
been awarded an internship
in Governor Bob Graham's
Executive Press Office.
Leslie will complete her
studies at Florida State Uni-
versity in Tallahassee this
Spring. She is majoring in
Political Science and Com-
Imunications.

Scholarship
Applications
Junior and. senior class
high school students who are
interested in applying for
$1,000 college scholarships
should request applications
by March 15, 1985 from the
Educational Communica-,
tions Scholarship Founda-
tion, 721i N. McKinley Road,
Lake Forest, Illinois 60045.
To receive an application,
students should send a note
stating their name,.address,
city, state and zip code,
approximate grade point
average and year of gradua-
tion. Fifty award winners
will be selected on the basis
of academic performance,
involvement in extracurricu-
lar activities and need for
financial aid.

Auto And
Homeowners
Insurance
JEAN MALLORY
639-5322 Wewahitchka
or
785-6156 Panama City


Metpolitan
Meopolitan eallysaandsbyy)O.
UFEHtAL A L.MAi tMLHOAmRLii t"nii


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 24, 1985 PAGE NINE


Monday, January 28 Wednesday, January 30 milk.
SSchool Battered dipped fish, cole Chicken with rice, fruit Friday, February l
slaw, green beans, sliced cup, broccoli with cheese, Pizza, sliced peaches, mix-
1 bread, cookies, and milk. rolls, and milk. ed vegetables, cookies, "and
|- LUlcen Tuesday, January 29 Thursday, January 31 milk.
Sloppy Joe, cheese wedge, Hamburgers, lettuce, to- Menus may change without
SM enlS applesauce, buttered corn, mato, pickles, French fries, notice due to the availability
and milk. peanut butter cookies, and of foods.




High School Honor Roll Listed

Edwin G. Williams, Princi- Holloman. mire, Carl White, Jr. McFarland, Annette Minger,
pal, Port St. Joe Junior- Tenth grade: Howard Ri- Eleventh grade: Lynn Kyle Pippin, Brad Pridgeon,
Senior High' School releases chards.- Aman, Joanne Marie Fam- Letha Rice, Garrett Roberts,
names for the third six weeks ALL A's and B's bro, Michelle Holloman, San- Paula Ward.
and semester grading Seventh grade: James An- dra King, Sharon Miller.
period: derson, Larry E. Byrd, Willi- Twelfth grade: Angel Bar- ALL B's
THIRD SIX WEEKS am K. Ford, Timothy Keri- bee, Kris Cozart, Kenneth Ninth grade: Lasagna A.
ALL A's gan, John Moore, Amanda Crowe, Hope Lane, Tim Quinn.
Eighth grade: Wendy L. Thomas, Christopher Venk-
Groos. ler. __ __ __ __ __ __ _
Ninth grade: Melissa D. Eighth grade: Stacy L.
Hollomanr. Barnhill, Karl C; Bowen, Custom Plum bing
Tenth grade: Howard. Ri- Lance M. Campbell, Timothy
chards. G. Davis, Wendy L. Groos, J. Installati
Twelfth grade: Angela Lee Johnson, Mitchell K. Installation
Barbee, Kyle Pippin. McChristian, George E.
ALL A's and B's Newsome, Cyrus ,;. Riley, New Construction
Seventh grade: James An- Jr., Hannon C. Smith, Kristin N o rt
derson, William Ford, Josh- Lee Totman, Robeit J. Van- Single & Multi-Family Dwellings
ua Holloman, Amanda Pietersom, Christopher S.
Thomas. Wahl, Chris M. Walding. ST O K E S
Eighth grade: Karl Bowen; Ninth grade: Jennifer
Lance Campbell, Timothy Anne Allred, Chris 0. Brock-
Davis, Lee Johnson, Michael man, Susie Chambers, Shan-
Lewter, Mitchell McChristi- non M.' Frickey, Guy Brad-
an, Daniel: Moree, George ford Hall, Michelle S. Hicks,
Newsome, Kimberly Os- Lisa R. Mahlkov, Scott M. 648-353
borne, Michael Ramsey, Cy- Pritchett, Doris K. Sander, P. 0. Box 274
rus Riley, Hannon Smith, Linda Diane Segers.
Kristin Totman, Robert Van- Tenth grade; Kimberly Mexico Beach, Florida
Pietersom, Chris. Walding. Emfinger, Gregory Parker, RF0042744
Ninth grade: Chris Brock- David Staab, Nancy Stouta-
man, Christine Falbe, Candy _____
Foster, Shannon Frickey,
Michelle Hicks, Lisa Mahl- of
Sander. Wave Your Ol Roof

Tenth grade: Twila.Burns,
Kimberly Enfinger, Robert.
Quarles, David Staab, Nancy G v
Stoutamire` Ann Tramon-
tana, Laura VanPietersom, Corrugated Asphalt Roofing and Siding.
Jeri Lynn Wilder. Ideal for new roofing or re-roofing
Eleventh grade: Lynn Eight colors (silver, white, red, green, blue, brown, V' I
Aman, Joanne Marie Fam- tan, black)
bro, Dawn Grace, Michelle Insulates against heat and noise
Holloman, Tony Kemp, San- Roofing and siding that won't rust or corrode
dra Kig, Carol Lewald, Stronger and easier to install than shingles
Sharon Miller. Goes up fast, like metal! l ll
Twelfth grade: JulieAllen, *It's perfect for mobile homes, roofing, skirting,
Tw i n barns, stables, arenas, sheds, carports, homes,
Kris Cozart, Alyson Guilford, warehouses, and covers just about everything!
Tim McFarland,,Hope Lane, '.Easy to Install No special tools Colors In Stock
Annette Minger, Brad Prid- Do It yourself Red, Brown'
geon, Letha Rice, Garrett Lightweight, flexible sheets (18 Ibs. per sheet)
Roberts, Paula Ward. Lifetime-limited warranty ,: J -E
ALLB's ..(1
Twelfth grade: Dante Mc- ".,ST 1"t s"q
Gee. The LI.feilineo.ing

IRSTSEMESTER EARLY'S HARDWARE & BUILDING SUPPLY
ALL A's .
Eighth grade: Michael R. Hwy. 98- Highland View Phone 229-8232
Ramsey. "
Ninth grade: Melissa D.


Citizens' Federal

Savings and Loan

Association

of Port St. Joe

After the Close of Business December 31, 1984


Assets
Mortgage Loans and Other Liens on Real Estate ................... $17,219,316
All Other Loans ... ....... . .. .. 340,951
Loans and Participations Sold ................ . .... (200,884)
Loans and Contracts Made to Facilitate Sale of Real Estate. ....... 51,449
Cash on Hand and in Banks . . . ....... ....... . . 1,971,205
Investments and Securities . . . . . . . . . 183,779
Fixed Assets Less Depreciation . ..................... .... ..152,657
Deferred Charges and Other Assets ........................... .. 32,132

TOTAL ASSETS . . .. .. . . . . . . ... $19,750,605


Liabilities and Net Worth
Savings Accounts ............................................ $18,119,444
Advances from Federal Home Loan Bank ........................ ---
Other Borrowed M oney .......... ..............................
Loans In Process ........................ 76,185
Other Liabilities........ .... ........... ................. 125,398 :j
Specific Reserves ..................................... ..... -
General Reserves ............................................ .661,317
Surplus .. ................................................ ... .. 768,261

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NETWORTH ........................... $19,750,605

Member: Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation
Member: Federal Home Loan Bank System:
SAVINGS ACCOUNT INSURED TO $100,000.


OFFICERS DIRECTORS
C. G. COSTIN. SR.. President C. G. COSTIN, SR. E. F. GUNN
CECIL G. COSTIN. JR.. Executive Vice President and CECIL G. COSTIN, JR. FOREST A. REVELL
Attorney FRANK HANNON DWIGHT MARSHALL, JR. _
FRANK HANNON, Vice President DAVID B. MAY
JAMES E. CREAMER, JR.. Managing Officer/Sec.-Treas.
CAROLYN YOUNG,. Asst. Secretary/Treasurer OTHER PERSONNEL
FAYE TARANTINO. Branch Manager EDITH GODFREY RUTH W. PATTERSON
JANICE BROWNELL RANZA COX
VIRGINIA CREAMER. PAM KNOX



CITIZENS FEDERAL SAVINGS

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION .
401 Fifth Street P. 0. Box 368 Phone (904) 227-1416 .:
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA ;


llllls11*lllllllaB11(1111111(111110


I I II I


.'








I F IIIO


It's C old Outside but You'll

I Warm Welcome at Saveway


Specials for
January 23 thru January


Family Pak Chuck
CUBED

STEAK


29


EA


9


Boston Butt Pork
Roast..
Delicious PORK
Steak..
100% Lean Pork Strip
Filets ..


b$109

Lb.79

Lb.$179i


100% Lean Pork
Cubes..'
Boneless Pork
Loin Roast.
100% Lean Tenderized
PORK CUBE
Steaks.


Boneless Rolled 9 o:ure
.$18 Chuck Roast $169 i


Lb.$ 49


Boneless Extra Lean
Oven Roast


Lb.179


:.Ours
1N.


" f indFQtr.u23


FROZEN FOODS
^^ ^ ^ ^ '- .i -'" 'i


17 Oz.
Pepperidge Farm Cakes
5 Oz.
Banquet Bil N Bags ...
4 Ears
Fine Fare Corn ......
12 Oz. Bright & Early
Breakfast Beverage ..


. .9. *OSOSO


. . .
~ ~ ~ ~ 0006006


$159

7/79

990
59C


KELLOGG'S
FRUIV
16 Oz. KRAFT DRE
15 oz. Van Camp[Ne
2 lb. Hungry Jack C
8 oz. Betty Crocker-
14 oz. Kraft Deluxe
9 oz. Blue Boy Solid
4 oz. PAM SPRAY fo
6 oz. B&B SLICED M
3 oz. SUGAR FREE J1
10 lb. FINE FARE CH
'5 oz. Orville Reden
REAL VALUE
CATS


Maxwell House


COFFEE


$
1 Lb.
Can


Limit 1 with $10
Food Order


I

d~ *~,

K!


DELI/B


r Fresh Each Morning at 6:00 A.M.

DOUGHNUTS


full dozen


C


/ 2 Scrambled Eggs, Grits or Fries,
.Sausage or Bacon, Biscuits and 3 Donut Holes
BREAKFAST PLATE.....
. We Made 'Em Ourselves
__ ^ Fresh PIES


......


EACH


Cold
P


$
*- .


I- .


MENOW


I_


L


FREEZER BEEFSSALEE


2












indA




VALUES

Our Best Choice

Sirloin STEAK


Lb. .


loice
ye SO U.13


loicw
Strips .$409


ALL MEAT
Stew Beef. Lb $169


USDA Good Beef
Chuck Steak Lb.139


;UT AND WRAPPED LIMITED QUANTITY
Whole
Loin $165 Beef Sirloin L.$ 39


DOPS 15 oz.pkg. a


AY


GEORGE W. DUREN, Owner & Manager
510 Fifth Street Port St. Joe, Florida
Limit Rights Reserved Cigarettes & Tobacco Products Excluded In
Limit Deals USDA Food Stamps Accepted


IK


Quartered
FRYER THIGHS

lb. 35,


DRUMSTICKS
and THIGHS.......


Assorted
PORK
CHOPS


lb.59'


BULK U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
Permit No. 65
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


CARRIER ROUTE
"PRE-SORTED
OCCUPANT P. 0. BOX__


3Lt
3 Liter


farm fresh


Neckbones, Pork Feet,
Turkey Wings, Drumsticks, Necks ..... lb. 33

DAIRY PEPT.


GS (1000 Island, Italian, French, Creamy Buttermilk)
rleans Style KIDNEY BEANS ...
lete Buttermilk PANCAKE MIX .


BURGER HELPER
CARONI DINNER
LET CLEANER .
Mallets ........
ROOMS ....


Y .....
0 A L .. .. . .


iers POPPING CORN


1 .39
2/89C
... 29
99'C
..... 99C
79C
... $1.49
$1.39
3/$1.79
$ 1


4 Pak Pillsbury B c t7
Buttermilk Biscuits........ 79
16 Oz. Smooth N Creamy
Breakstone Cottage Cheese 9
SOz.R
Real Value Orange Juice .. 1.49
Yoplait Yogurt... 2/99C


P .. ....b ... .. u i

32 99
32oz. btl. V


KERY


lb.
Bag $1.88
FRESH SWEET NECTARINES ............. Ib.89o
Large Juicy PINK
GRAPEFRUIT 5Jg$l .49

Fresh CELERY


Sstalks59


1 Pound Bag CARROTS ........... 4for $1.00
3 Pound Bag Red Delicious APPLES ... bag 1.09
3 Pound Bag YELLOW ONIONS ......... bag 69C
Fancy Fresh New Crop
Rutabagas .... b. 19
|


Fresh Daily
Variety of Salads
Thursday and Friday Piping
Hot CH ILl. Bowl .49
3 Pieces
Fried Chicken Boxes each 19
Sliced to Order
LUNCHEON MEATS and CHEESES


Different Menu Each Day -
PLATE LUNCH
DELI LUNC
THURSDAY
Fried chicken, meat loaf,
liver & onions.
FRIDAY
Fried chicken, fried fish,
Swedish meatballs.
SATURDAY
Fried chicken, chicken
pot pie.


S-.m
MENU


9


MONDAY
Fried chicken, stuffed
peppers, pepper steaks.
TUESDAY
Fried chicken, chicken &
dressing, pork chops.
WEDNESDAY
Fried chicken, spaghetti
& meatballs, beef stew.


RC Cola


12 Count Carnation Hot $1 2
Cocoa Mix pk,
200' Glad $4 A9
Plastic Wrap roll 1
6 oz. 9 Lives
CAT FOOD 3cans88
12 Oz. Bravo $ 4
CORNED BEEF can.I09
6/i ounce Starkist

Tuna Fsha6 .69


dwiches
toy

39

129

e99


~,~,~,)~llr~,~hlrllLkl~+;~,~u





r


.


'Rw wIR


-- --


~s~,~=L~,~,~,~~,~,,s~,~l~~,~~Ec


.............


$159








BULK RATE
U. S. POSTAGE PAID
Permit No. 3
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465


onDAVID RICH'S
Foodliners .
Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka
--




FRIENDLY PERSONALIZ-
ED SERVICE AND LOW,
LOW EVERYDAY PRICES!


S FINEST QUALITY MEAT
MONEY CAN BUY!


Prices Good Jan. 23-29, 1985


o 6YAN
WH OLORSAKHF


SUNYLA ICKRYSMKE


Sunyland Smoked
CENTER.
Ham Slices


Sunnyland Cardinal
Sliced Bacon


Sunnyland Smoked
CENTER
Ham Roast


Hormel Light & Lean
Cooked Ham


4 oz.


SESSIONS



88 oz.
EXPIRES JAN. 29, 1985
WITH 1 FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE


CHICKEN OF SEA
CHUNK

TUNA


z. O l Ib. -Ib Al.. O 6'/2 oz.
EXPIRES
WITH 1

Kraft Velveeta Cheese ......... 2 Lbs. 3"9
IGA Cheese Singles .......... .... 1 2 oz. IGA GRA
Sealtest Sour Cream............... oz. 59* LAI
EGI
$1469 DOZEN
Freezer Queen Suppers ............ 32 oz. EXPIRES
$179 WITH 1F
Ore Ida Shoestring Potatoes ........ oz, I IT



39 TII
Steak 'urn Beef Steaks............. i oz. 239 TI
M-G Olde Fashion Ice Cream ........ /, gai. 2DETE
S$129 49 oz.
M-G Ice Cream Sandwich .......... 6 Pak I EXPIRES
WITH 1 F
DONT VELOK HEE OO BYS


qQ


SJAN. 29, 1985
FILLED DOUBLE DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE
11 : I Ia


DE A
RGE

GS
JAN. 29, 1985
FILLED DOUBLE DIS0


19


COUNT


CERTIFICATE


S I TSPECIAL


)E
URGENT
JAN. 29, 1985
ILLED DOUBLE


$1 9


DISCOUNT CERTIFICATE


..3 7' oz. 88"
..37/.oz. 100
. 2 Lbs. $136
. 24 ct. $199
. 14oz. $122
. 2 Lbs. $281
. 12oz. $204
. 48 oz. $119
. 15 oz. $139
. 17 oz. $177
. 16 oz. $109


HEATHAN


VO-5 Shampoo........... s oz.
Alka Seltzer............. 36's.
Alka Seltzer Plus ........ 20's
Right Guard Deod. ....... iooz.


I AKRYIDET


IGA B&S Rolls..........2 Pams
IGA Cinn. Rolls .........2 6 Pak
IGA Giant Bread.......... 24 oz.


Florida Celery .


..................... stalk3 9


Yellow Onions ....................
Canadian Rutabagas.............


3 lb 8g~69C
pound29C


Florida Pink or White Grapefruit . 5 b. bag1.59
Fancy Bananas ...................... 3 lb. tray 99,
Georgia Sweet Potatoes .............. 3 lb. tray 88


Red or Gold Delicious
APPLES


3 lb. bag .9


CAULIFLOWER .. head tay79


I'U


$139
s2s
*2"3
*21u
$29


990
891


California
BROCCOLI


rs . . . .
.................
.................
.............
.................
.................
.................