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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02501
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: November 3, 1983
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02501

Full Text













USPS 518-880

FORTY-SEVENTH YEAR, NUMBER 10


THESTAR
Industry-Deep Water Port-Fine People-Safest Beaches in Florida

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1983


20* Per Copy


discrimination


Notice


Sent


City


Government Form Comes As Surprise to Commission, Clerk,


City officials were startled
at their regular meeting
Tuesday night, to learn that a
notice charging the City with
employment discrimination
had been filed against Port
St. Joe by the Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity Commis-
sion office in Miami.
Clerk Alden Farris told the
Commission the first notice
or evidence of the charge his
office had seen was the notice
which arrived Friday, in the
mail, stating the City was
being charged.
"There was no specific
incident on the notice nor
have I received any notice of
any incident or reasons for
the ,filing", Farris said.
"This notice tells you all any
of us know about the charge.
We don't even know if it is
an actual charge or not."
The notice, which is a form
notice from EEOC, has two
checks affixed to a multiple
choice section as the reasons
for the discrimination char-
ges. According to the form,'
the City is being charged
with discrimination in hiring.
and promotion.
The complaint lists, Voters
League c-o E. L. Fleming as
being the complaining party.
The order is signed by
Federico Costales, District
Director of the Miami office
of EEOC .
Attorney William J. Rish
was instructed to find out
what he could about the
charge and find out if it is


valid or not.
The City had a similar
charge filed against it by the
Revenue Sharing Program a
little over a year ago, but this
charge was successfully de-
fended by the Commission.
Rish said there is a possi-
bility the latest charge has
stemmed from the charge a
year ago, except that it is
coming from a different
federal office.
INCINERATOR
E. F. Gunn told the City
Commission he had gone
about as far as he could
under his own expertise in
determining whether or not


the City's idle incinerator at
the Wastewater Treatment
Plant would handle the gar-
bage disposal problem of
south Gulf County. "I need
some professional advice and
help now and I need your
approval to spend the money
to get this help", Gunn told
the Commission Tuesday
night.
Gunn said his findings have
all been to the favor of the
City and County having the
answer to their disposal
problems in the incinerator,
but the final word and how
practical it would be to adapt
the piece of machinery to its-


new task would have to be
answered by an engineer
familiar with the operation of
incinerators.
Gunn said he would like to
secure services of an engin-
eer he has worked with in the
past to come look at the-
facility. "I can get him for
expenses, which shouldn't
run over $1,000", he said.
Gunn said such an inspec-
tion could answer such ques-
tions being asked by both
boards concerning cost of
operation, volume, amount of
labor to be involved and
other technical questions he
can't answer.


The Commission authoriz-
ed Gunn to get the answers
the boards and Gunn are
looking for.
SUMMONED
The City Commission re-
ceived a notice from the
United States Environmental
Protection Agency a week
ago, instructing the Commis-
sion to appear in their office
in Atlanta next week to
explain what was going on at
the Wastewater Treatment
Plant.
The City has been under
orders from EPA for the past
three years to make certain
changes in the plant's opera--


tion and some of these
changes are currently near-
ing completion. Another
phase, dreding sludge from
the settling pond, is about


half finished.
The letter from EPA says:
"We are also aware that the
city is making efforts to
correct the problem but we


Agreement was reached
last Thursday between the
City Commission of Port St.
Joe and the Gulf County
Commission on a price to be
charged for treated water to
supply the proposed Beaches
system.
Engineers have told the
County Commission the
cheapest and most depend-
able treated water supply
could be purchased from the
City of Port St. Joe to supply


the new million dollar system
to be built next year.
The County Commission is
asking for a price to be
charged for treated water in
order to give residents of the
Beaches area some idea of
how much treated water
from a central supply will
cost the customer.
Commission chairman,
Everette Owens said it looks
like the Commission will be
able to offer up to 5,000
gallons of water in a system
atia' c.st of .approximately
$15.00 to $18.00 per month.
"It'll all depend on how we
handle the financial end of
the project", Owens said.
Port St. Joe clerk, Alden
Farris told the County dele-
gation their Oak Grove sys-
tem is penalizing property
owners since there is no
provision made to require
property owners of rental
units to pay the monthly
charge made to retire the
construction bonds when the
property is standing empty.
"This means those who own
their own homes must pick
up the slack when it exists",
he,said.
Farris suggested the
monthly bond payments be
applied to the tax statement
to require payment when the
annual tax bill is paid. "This
way, everyone would pay his
fair share", Farris said.
Owens and Commissioner
Billy Branch said the Com-
mission would definitely con-
sider this avenue of payment
but had not come up with a


definite way of financing as
yet.
The system is to be built
with a loan and grant pro-
gram from the Federal Gov-
ernment.
WATER COST
In the Thursday meeting,
a representation from the
Port St. Joe City Commission
told the County group the
City would give them a
selling figure of $1.60 per
thousand gallons of treated
water; delivered to a master ,
meter. op.htsygte,,.,
Mayor Frank Pate told
Owens, "If we can sell you
water for less, we will do it.
The figure are quoting
you today is a maximum
figure and could possibly be
the figure in effect by the
time you start buying water.
We would rather give you a
price we can reduce later
rather than give you a price
we would have to raise in a
short while".
The Commission just re-
cently completed a cost
survey of the expense of
treating water in view of
giving the Beaches system a
price on water and for
arriving at a realistic charge
for city customers of the
water system.
Farris told the County
group this figure came to
$1.15 per 1,000 gallons for
water at the plant. "By the
time the customer gets it,
that cost has increased to
$1.45 per 1,000 and could go
higher in the near future",
Farris said.


Mayor Pate told the County
the City could not sell water
to the Beaches for the same
price as paid by city custom-
ers since part of the system
was built with ad valorem
tax dollars and it wouldn't be
fair to those who pay taxes in
the City to subsidize water
for those living outside the
City.
Pate advised the County
Commission the City has
requested an evaluation of
the City's production poten-
tia}, future needs. and plant
capacity from the Northwest
Florida Water District.
''Their report on our position
to furnish treated water will
have a big bearing on our
dealings with the county", he
said. Pate said he felt the
report would be favorable,
but to be on the safe side, any
final decision would not be
made until the report is in.


The City's dragline has been busy at
work 'this we!c, Teahf "g out and
repairing the boat launching site at the
west end of Fifth Street in the edge of St.
Joseph's Bay.
The boat launching site has become
filled in with trash and debris over the
months and a rip-rap break water has
shifted, and deteriorated over the years.
With the fall fishing season in full


attorneyy

are not aware of the details of
all the problems or correc-
tions." :
All phases of the current
(Continued on Page 3)


swing, and the speckled trout season fast
approaching, the launch site is getting
the attention of City street crews.
City Street Superintendent, Dorton
Hadden said it appears as if the entire
pier area will need to be shut down in the
near future for some extensive repairs.
"The whole area is getting pretty
ram-shackled", Hadden said. "We need
to do some repairing soon or the area
could become dangerous."


Cheerleader Bus Driver Hurt


Port St. Joe's cheerleaders
Were involved in an accident
while returning home from
the football game in Talla-
hassee last Friday night.
According to Superinten-
dent of Schools, Walter Wil-
der, there was one confirmed
injury resulting when a bus
carrying the cheerleaders
overturned about 10 miles
this side of Tallahassee.
\According to Wilder, the
Cheerleader sponsor, and


driver of the mini-bus which
was carrying the 14 students,
received a broken arm. Mrs.
Cliff Sanborn's arm was
broken in two places. She
was taken to Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital for treat-
ment after the accident.
Wilder said Mrs. Sanborn
was released from the hospi-
tal and returned home Mon-
day of this week.
One student was suspected
to have a cracked bone in his
arm, but this had not been


verified as a break at press
time.
Wilder said the accident
report to the school reported
the bus was meeting a truck
on Highway 20 when the
accident happened. The
truck suddenly left the road
and came to a stop on the
shoulder with its lights shin-
ing straight at the bus driver.
Mrs. Sanborn started bring-
ing the mini-bus to a stop and
had nearly stopped when she
saw a horse standing in the


road. Braking and swerving
the bus to miss the horse,'
caused it to roll over and.
settle on its side. The horse:
was hit a glancing blow.
All the students in the bus
were given medical exami-
nations following the acci-
dent, but none were found to
be hurt, with the exception of
Mrs. Sanborn.
Wilder said the bus was
damaged but it can be
repaired easily.


Eleven Young Ladies Candidates for Homecoming Queen
becoming time at Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High The big Homecoming parade will begin Friday school, right, are: Brandy Wood, Melissa Wood, Marcia
Friday night, and the activities will include a afternoon at 4:00 p.m., and proceed up Reid Avenue in Highlight of the Homecoming festivities will be Stoutamire, Lisa Whaley, Pam Sanborn. In the other photo
le Friday afternoon, a football game with downtown Port St. Joe. The parade will be filled with selection of the Homecoming Queen Friday night. Pictured are: Trish Tapper, Vicki Barlow, Stacey Creel, Lisa
Tallahassee and selection of a Homecoming colorful floats, decorated cars, pretty girls,. marching above are the queen candidates who will compete for the Gant, Monica Bergeron and Traci McClain. The new queen
gn for the remainder of the school year at the groups and organizations from the High School. The entire final selection, which is made by a vote of the student body. will be crowned by last year's queen, Kelly Johnson.
.. r. ". ...-. -,.. .a.. ..- i....+nnis, a n,-lmat nf the students at the high PParti'inants in the queen contest, shown above, left to -Star photo


Treated Water Offer



Made to Beach System


Clean Up LaunchSite


Christmas Parade

Planned Dec. 3

Port St. Joe's retail merchants met Monday of this
week to begin, laying plans for the annual Christmas
parade, which is a big attraction in this area.
As has been the custom in the past, the parade will
be held on the first Saturday in December with the
festivities to begin at 10:00 a.m. and features a visit by
Santa Claus to the children of the Port St. Joe, Gulf and
Franklin county area.
Letters will be sent out this week, inviting
organizations to enter floats in the parade. However,
the float competition isn't confined to just those who
receive letters. The float competition is open to any
non-profit organization such as Scouts, civic clubs,
church groups, school organizations or classes, or
service organizations such as the ambulance service,
hospital, fire departments, etc.
Prizes for the winning floats will be $100 cash for
the first prize, $75 for second prize and $50 for third
prize.
Groups who wish to enter floats in the parade may
do so by calling Al Ray at the City Hall, who is parade
chairman, or call The Star.


It's Hom
School this F
giant parade
Rickards of
Queen to rei
half-time cee


paracie production is a prouur U LUC hLuurCHrB UL LIM 11rei


jralI'ul' lto ".V. .-I.. -- ..-


,remonies of the game Friday.












SEditorials and Comments


THE STAR
THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 1983 PAGE TWO


Can't Borrow Out


of)
:" The news media has been
running stories on the financial
crunch which faces the "Third
.World" and the affect this debt
'crunch will have on the rest of the
world.
The smaller and emerging
countries are feeling the pressure
Which falls on all of us when we are
just starting out to develop a
family, a home, or a nest-egg. It's
bard and it takes all the money we
ahn make to make ends meet until
We get over that hump.
One of the things which gets
many of us into trouble is also
getting some of these Third World
nations into trouble. Their eyes and
wants are bigger than their pocket-
books and their ability to pay.
: So, they borrow. And now that
Inflation has been brought some-
*hat under control, the ability to
pay is not so good as it was once.
-' We read statistics such as
~tazil owing some $90 billion' to
foreign banks. Argentina is in hock
. the same banks for $40 billion.
Jirael owes $21.5 billion; the
Phillippines, $18 billion; Chile, $21
llion; Venezuela, $35 billion; and
Mexico, $15 billion.
=" These are big figures, but
&'thing like the figures we as
&knericans are accustomed to
walking about when we refer to the



|- Signs ,

Crisp mornings and cool nights
ae a sure sign that summer has
iin its course in the Panhandle.
Winter is standing in the wings just
Waiting to catch us in its grips for a
few months.
Each and every year, we get
plogriostications.,s ato just how
serious, how cold or how mild the
winter season will be this particu-
i r year.
We read where every sign is
ied from the thickness of the bark
ki the chinaberry tree to the color
of the hair on the woolly bear
Caterpillars.
The caterpillar theory seems to
draw the most believers. Next
cmes the thick fur on squirrels, an
increased frenzy of storing up food
by wild critters and the thickness of
the moss on the south side of trees.
There are two guys from up in
Lancaster, Pennsylvania by the
name of Sam Taylor and Arnold
Lueck whose pastime it is to look
at all these signs of nature and
follow the lore of the Indian to tell
us we will have a wild and woolly
winter ahead. They say the woolly


9ebt

debt of our own nation.
Just last week, it was an-
nounced our TUnited States of
America ended its worst year ever
for operating in the red. We
borrowed $202 billion to operate on
for just last year.
Add it up. The United States
borrowed nearly as much money
just last year, as all of these
nations owe put together.
There is one little difference.
The money our nation owes, it owes
to itself and to its people. Most of
the national debt came from
borrowing trust fund money, sell-
ing bond, and money market
certificates.
The money owed by these
Third World nations came from
banks of other nations and is owed
to them. In all likelihood, if you
examine back far enough, most of
the money owed by Mexico,
Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Israel,
Venezuela, and the Philippines, is
owed to us, also.
So, is the financial picture for
the Third World nations dangerous
to the United States? We think so;
even more so that the increasingly
large debt we owe ourselved.
You can never borrow yourself
out of debt, nor can you remain
solvent while you carry a lot of
notes for someone who cannot pay.



of Fall

bear caterpillars are the sure sign
that a hard winter is on its way.
According to Sam and Arnold
the woolly bear caterpillars (or at
least the Pennsylvania variety of
woolly bear caterpillars, (have
developed a furry coat which is
Black at the ends with a brunette
midriff, which is a sure sign of
preparation for a hard season
ahead.
We think, from what we read of
Sam and Arnold's predictions, that
is was the brunette midriff which
was the clincher. It seems that a
brunette midriff is as sure a sign of
a hard winter as one can get.
If you see a woolly bear
caterpillar here in Port St. Joe,
look and see if he (or she) has a
brunette midriff. We would like to
know if our winter here is going to
be tough enough to make extra
special precautions for; such as
buying a toupee to cover our
-increasingly bare head.
Or maybe we will just catch us
up a mess of woolly bear caterpil-
lars for warmth since they are
already ready for what is to come.


A MAN'S WORLD


No Place Like Home

BY SHAD PHANTRY


I was having lunch with,
man one day in Mobild;
Alabama when the subject
turned to the respective
towns we lived in. He had
recently moved to Mobile
and I asked him how he liked
living there. His reply was
short and to the point. He
said he liked it all right and
his wife enjoyed the shopping
malls and conveniences. He
closed by saying that it was a
heck-of-a lot better than
living in Port St. Joe. After I
cussed him out for the last
two courses, I made him pay
for the meal. And, I never
invited him to lunch again!
I'll be the first to admit
that living in a small town
has its disadvantages. In the
same breath, let me say that
the advantages outweigh the
disadvantages by about a
cord and a half of chopped
oak wood. I don't believe I


could ever be happy living in
a large town again. Let me
explain why.
Shortly after moving to our
town, our air conditioner
went out. As luck would have
it, it was on Friday night and
just about the middle of July.
The next morning I went to
the local hardware to pur-
chase a window unit, I
thought, would sustain us
through the hot week-end
and, later, act as a back-up
unit if the central unit went
out again.
When I made my selection,
I was distressed to learn that
it would take special wiring
to run the unit. It was about
eleven-thirty a.m. and the
hardware closed at noon. The
salesman-owner tried to find
someone to wire it in for me
but was unsuccessful. Final-
ly, at noon he handed me a
set of keys and told me if I


could find someone to wire it
in for me, I could just come
by and pick up the unit and
bring the keys to him on
Monday morning. Can't you
just see something like that
happening in Mobile, Ala-
bama?
Late one night, sometimes
later, my youngest son sud-
denly became ill. After we
had done all we knew to do, I
called our doctor and asked
him if he would meet us at
the hospital or his office and
examine him. "No," was his
instant reply. "I'll be right
over there!" And he was. If
you can get a doctor in
Mobile to make a house call,
I'll buy you all the cocaine in
Miami.
There are other things, to
be sure. I can call our
druggest in the middle of the
night and get prescriptions
filled. The local police will


watch my home while I am
gone for prolonged periods of
time; if Itask them to. I have
never had to ask because I
don't have anything worth
stealing. If I ever do have
anything, they will watch it
for me.
I certainly don't want to
forget the local' bankers.
They have been very gener-
ous 'and -kind to me. As a
matter of fact, they have
been too generous. I don't
know how I will ever repay
them. They are probably
wondering, too.
There are many other

Malone Named
Florida Hospita

Gulf Pines Hospital, Port
St. Joe, a subsidiary of
Baptist Medical Center is
pleased to announce that
Richard H. Malone, Execu-
tive Director, Baptist Medi-
cal Center, Jacksonville, was
installed as Chairman of the
Florida Hospital Association
October 20 at the annual
meeting of the statewide
association of 220 not-for-
profit, investor-owned and


advantages we enjoy living
here in Port St. Joe. The
main one is our friends. Our
town is like a large family;
we have our disagreements
but we are all in this thing
together, and most of us love
it. For those of you who enjoy
the fast life and excitement
of the big city I say, "more
power to you and may you
stay right ,here you are!" If
you all moved to our town, we
wouldn't be small anymore.
And, there is always the
chance that you might bring
some Yankees here with you.
P.S. I do not work for the
Chamber of Commerce.

Chairman of
1 Association
governmental hospitals.
The Association of Hospi-
tals with offices at Orlando
and Tallahassee provides
membership services includ-
ing educational programs,
research, consultation, liai-
son with government and
consumer health informa-
tion. Gulf Pines Hospital is
pleased to be represented in
this statewide organization
by the executive director,
Richard H. Malone.


May Not be Best Place to Live But It Sure Beats Many Others


ONE OF THE reasons a person
can never live in Port St. Joe without
atleast having fond memories about
the place and what it has to offer those
of us who live here, is the simple and
unhurried life. Port St. Joe and Gulf
County is just a good place to live and
offers beauty and leisure activities
which are unparalleled anywhere else
if your taste in leisure happens to be
just that ... leisure.
.. Of late, we have started being
'discovered" by those who are
loo g for exactly that leisure. It is
beginning toseem as if there are more
people looking for the leisure type life
than there are looking for life in the
fast lane. The numbers seem to be
growing of those who desperately
need to find a place where the traffic
is numbered in hundreds of vehicles
per day rather than thousands of
vehicles per hour.
Like Orlando.
Or Atlanta.
Or Miami.
We will be very generous and let
yqo have them if you want them. Even
though the people there might make


morvr money than we do here in Port
St. Joe, we have more fun going it and
more fun with what time we have left
after we have earned our living.
++++


for the Gainesville, Georgia,
"Times" who wrote a column in the
September 11 edition of that paper
entitled, "Port St. Joe Is A Better
Place Than Panama".


ETAOIN SHRDLU

By: We


BACK TO "BEING Discovered".
Almost every week, there are new
people moving into the area, building
homes, buying property, looking for a
little hide-away or a peaceful place to
settle down.
Some people are just looking for a
place to relax, temporarily, while
they spend time off the job.
One such person who has "discov-
ered" us is Don Otey, Outdoor Writer


place to relax, unwind, pick up a
scallop or two, enjoy some beautiful
sunsets and look along a beach which
hadn't been whipped to a frenzy by
thousands of feet pounding up and


esley R. Ramsey


That's pretty plain language. Of
course, we knew it all along, but likely
those folks up in Gainesville, Georgia
didn't know it until Don Otey told
them so in his column. They had
probably been coming to Panama City
right regular, thinking it was THE
place to go in the Florida Panhandle
and just the right distance from
Gainesville to be a fair drive.
It seems Otey was looking for a


down it all day long. We have just such
a place right now. If people like
Otey keep writing about us, telling
what a beautiful and peaceful place it
is, our beaches are likely to be one
mass of footprints before long, just
like the one at Panama City.
OTEY STARTS OFF his column
by saying, "I knew there had to be a
better place. The night in Panama


City had been miserable and depress-
ing. It was a night spent in an asphalt
paved campground and a morning
heralded by exhaust fumes and the
raucous sounds of rock music, the
boardwalk, and tens of thousands of
people crowding toward a minute
strip of beach".
"This was not the vacation that I
had envisioned and the vacation was
too brief, too precious, to be wasted. I
knew there had to be a better place."
"We drove the Gulf Coast until we
reached a small town called Port St.
Joe where the atlas indicated a state
park nearby. The park was situated
on a long narrow peninsula which
jutted out from the mainland like a
curving slender thumb. The road to
the park seemed to end only half way
out on the peninsula so it seemed like
a good bet."
a"When we reached the park, I got
out of the car and crossed the dunes to
the beach. Here the gentle 'surf
caressed powdery white sand. There
were perhaps a dozen people scatter-
ed about the immediate vicinity and
beyond them a seeming infinity of


empty beach and limpid blue water.
We had found a better place."
Otey goes on to sum up his column
by saying: "This area is truly a better
place for those who treasure natural
areas, but it is seeing the pressures of
expanding population and other in-
fluences of man. For sale signs have
sprouted along the peninsula like
Burma Shave signs, but the message
they give is bleak rather than
amusing. Paradise is soon to be lost."
Otey may be taking a shot in the
dark with this observation and just
expressing his own desires in a
vacation place, but evidence other
than the sprouting signs say, he's
right.
Joe Crook, assistant administra-
tor at St. Joseph State Park, the one
which Otey is writing about, told the
Rotary Club two weeks ago that St.
Joseph had claimed to the fourth most
used overnight camping state park in
the state. That's a pretty good
indication we are being "discovered".
Ready or not, others are coming
in droves to help us to enjoy our
"better place".


Tides
The tide action in St.
Joseph's Bay is shown in the
tide table below. The infor-
mation is furnished by the
U.S. Weather Bureau in Apa-
lachicola.


High Low
Nov. 310:17p.m. 6:33a.m.
Nov. 410:42 p.m. 7:46 a.m.
Nov. 511:14p.m. 8:47 a.m.
Nov. 6 9:41a.m.
Nov. 712:49a.m. 10:32 a.m.
Nov.8 1:32a.m. 11:22a.m.
Nov.9 1:14 a.m. 12:19 p.m.
Nov. 101:59 a.m. 1:10 p.m.


S-- THE STAR POSTOFFICE BOX 308
S WI PHONE 2271278 SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
4k IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR, $8.00 SIX MONTHS, $5.00
Published Every Thursday at 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 OUT OF COUNTY-ONE YEAR, $12.00 OUT OF U.S.-ONE YEAR, $14.00
By The Star Publishing Company
SSecond-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold
Wesley R. Ramsey .......... Editor and Publisher SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such advertisement.
Tc WilliamoH.oRamsey ProductionaSupt. ATrPORTtST.hJOE,tFLORIDA
Vr yisp William H. Ramsey Production Supt. AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word
Frenchie L. Ramsey .............. Office Manager barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.
Shirley K. Ramsey ................... Typesetter


j -


w










Sheriff's Report


Charged with Theft and Burglary
Several charges were filed against under the bed.
Brian Burkett, age 20, of Port St. Joe, as a Further investigation revealed that the
result of an incident that occurred at the T. 1984 Firebird-which Burkett was driving
H. Stone Memorial State Park at 2:00 a.m., had been stolen from Minneapolis, Minne
Sunday -morning. sota. Several credit cards, cameras and
According to Sheriff Ken Murphy, the jewelry, which had been reported stolen
office received a call from Captain James were also found in the vehicle.
Mock at the State Park to report a Burkett was charged with two counts of
disturbance. The incident began when grand theft, one count of burglary, one couni
Burkett and Robert A. Costin of Port St. Joe, of dealing in stolen property. He is also
were involved in a fight. Costin drove back being held for authorities in Minneapolis,
to Port St. Joe, leaving Burkett stranded. At Minnesota. Costin is charged with battery.
this point, Burkett allegedly stole a State The incident was investigated by Lt.
Park vehicle, ran into the park gate, Jack Davilla and Deputy James Mock of the
abandoned the vehicle and broke into a Gulf County Sheriff's Department and
mobile home, through a window, and was Captain James Mock, Lt. Joe Crook and
located by the officers in the bedroom, Ranger Bob Corker of the Park Service.


Georgia Man Held Under $2,000 Bond
Frank Renaldah Jones,. age 32, of residence to the tracks of a 4-wheel drive
Molena, Georgia is being held under vehicle. A search of the neighborhood
$2,000 bond for a charge of grand theft. The turned up a 4-wheel drive vehicle with a pair
incident occurred at the John Arnold of tennis shoes, which made similar tracks,
residence at Beacon Hill on October 30. in the truck. The owner of the vehicle was
Mr. Arnold was away from home for a located and later charged with grand theft
short time. When he returned, one shotgun burglary.
and two rifles were missing from his home.
Deputy Arnold Tolliver and investigator The guns were located in the house,
Phil McLeod investigated and followed the where Jones was staying, under the bed,
tracks of the defendant from Mr. Arnold's wrapped in a bed sheet.


Battery Charges Filed In Fight
Charges of battery were filed against struck Newberry in the face and took his
John Roland Wood, age 29, of Highland View wallet and car keys.


on October 30, as a result of a fight in North
Port St. Joe. John Roland Wood, Kenneth
Wood and Kenneth Newberry got into, an
argument. John Roland Wood allegedly


Deputy ArnoldTolliver investigated the
incident. Newberry's vehicle was located on-
Avenue D and returned.


There were at least 52 musicians in the family of famous composer Johann Sebastian Bach.


SIMMONS'
..^ ^^ / u r /'y .. 3 OQ u alit y N a m e "

Sale Ends Tues., Npo 8 ay, ,
Maxipedic
Special Price Offer "-


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 1983 PAGE THREE


e

,d
1,
f
t
0


e


Apply Now for waas
College Aid GIRL'S JEANS B alac of stok imlig o dresses
S20o 0 ,0o%Off
Bay, Gulf and Franklin 20 t off 1O 0%
county residents who plan on Sizes 7-14 only. Labels you will be \ Warm
attending college and desire pRroud to, wear. Savings Mporjilj e- .; .. Sleepwear and Rnob
financial aid fo ,i'ft1 ing joy. / \ + e OD
semester need to apply now Selected Group 15% ff
to assure that monetary Men'Selected Children's \ off
assistance will be available Men's, Women's and Children's Quality, warmth and selection
before January. SHOES and BOOTS
According to Gulf Coast
Financial Aid Coordinator 3 // / 0/off0/
Dan Smith, November 10th is /0 to v / O
"the latest deadline students New group... In
can meet in order to have the eludes loafers, ss
required aid at the beginning oxfords casuals
of the 1984 Spring term." inboots forut
Further information can be "*chidre. ladles &
obtained, by calling the col- chdre 222ReidAve.
lege at 769-1551, extension
224.




Board Wants Action


Would Force Treasurer to Write Expense Checks


* The Dead Lakes Water
Management board is just as
determined to force secre-
tary-treasurer Jerry Gates to
carry out his duties as Gates
is determined he will not act
in the capacity of financial
officer of the board until the
courts decide whether or not
they are a legal entity.
Gates declared a few
months ago he would not
attend any meetings of the
board or write checks for
their expenses until it could
be determined whether or not
they were an official board.
This fact came into ques-
tion in July of this year when
County Judge Jim Godwin of
Calhoun County ruled the
statute which created the
board was unconstitutional.
Gates has since asked for a
court ruling on the matter,
pledging to withhold any
funds until the decision is
made.
Gates'. status is also in
question since he is secre-
tary-treasurer of the board
under the same act which
created the Dead Lakes to
begin with. Under the act,
the Circuit Court Clerk of
Gulf County is the secretary-
treasurer of the board, au-
thorized to handle the finan-
ces of the Dead Lakes Board.
Three members of the
board, Forest Revell, Har-
land Pridgeon and William
Linton, are at odds with
Gates and the other two
members of the Board, Tom-
my Williams and Dr. Ray-
mond Layne, about whether


or not the Dead Lakes Dam
should be removed perma-
nently.


Gates insists he will write
no checks until the court acts
and the three members are


determined to take action to turn in an audit report on
force Gates to pay for past expenditures.
expenses of the board and to The fight goes on.


State Will Buy MK Ranch Land


A 1,063 acre parcel of MK
Ranches has been added to
the state's shopping list for
the purchase of sensitive
lands in the state. In drawing
up a list of 28 items, the MK
tract was number 16 on the
list and has been added to
some 7,700 acres already
spoken for in the ranch tract,
which is located in the
Howard Creek area.
The state and owners of the
Ranch, signed an option
contract Friday of last week
for purchase of the additional
land. Under the contract the
state would purchase some
8,868 acres in three parcels
which lie along and adjacent
to the Apalachicola River.
The purchase price has been
set at $335 per acre.
The MK Ranch lands be-
came a target of state
purchases some four or five
years ago, when the state
rescinded a permit and or-
dered MK to tear down
retaining dikes which kept
the River from flooding the
property. At that time, MK
gave an ultimatum to the
state to either allow the
permit to remain in force so
the land could be farmed, or
the state should purchase it.
The state has agreed to
purchase the low-lying por-
tion of the Ranch.
The entire package should-


cost the state of Florida some
$2.97 million. MK has agreed
to donate an additional 3,000
acres to the state if the main


purchase is made through
the CARL program, which
would give the Ranch owners
a tax benefit.


The ranch property is-
owned by Murff and Com-
pany of Memphis, Tennes-
see.


OBITUARIES Mrs. Lillie Garrett, 79, Dies


Curry Infant

Taken by Death

October 21
Allison C. Curry, infant
daughter of Carolyn Hall and
McArthur Curry of Port St.
Joe, passed away October 21
at Gulf Coast Community
Hospital.
Private services were held
at the family plot in Forest
Hill Cemetery of Port St. Joe.
All arrangements were hand-
led by Gilmore Funeral
Home.

NOTE OF THANKS
We wish to express our
deep appreciation to all who
have helped us during the
recent loss of our husband,
father, step-father, and
grandfather, W. I. Carden,
We thank you for your
prayers, visits, cards, food,
all the help, and expressions
of concern.
May God bless each of you.
The Carden & Dean Family


In Apalachicola Hospital


Mrs. Lillie M. Garrett, 79,
of Apalachicola passed away
October 25 in George Weems
Memorial Hospital in Apa-
lachicola. She was a retired
cook and seafood processor.
She is survived by: two
daughters, Mrs. R. L. Madi-
son of Toledo, Ohio, and Mrs.
Ocea Wynn of Apalachicola;
two brothers, 0. B. Calloway
of Toledo, and Johnny Callo-
way of Orlando; 19 grand-


children; 28 great grand-
children; and three great
great grandchildren, many
living in Port St. Joe and
Money Bayou.
Services were held Satur-
day in Apalachicola, followed
by burial in the family plot of
Magnolia Cemetery in Apa-
lachicola. I :'
All services were under the:
direction of Gilmore Funeral
Home of Port St. Joe.


Scarabin Infant Dies In

Pensacola Hospital Last Friday:


Desten Michael Scarabin,
age two days, the infant son
of Michael and Lynn Lara-
more Scarabin of Clarksville,
died Friday at Sacred Heart
Hospital in Pensacola.
Survivors other than the
parents are: a sister, Ashlea
Nicole Scarabin, Clarksville;
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
Edward Scarabin of Apala-
chicola; John Laramore, Jr.
of Clarksville, and Mrs. Edna


Laramore of Wewahitchka;
great grandparents, Mr. and-
Mrs. John Laramore, Sr. of
Clarksville, and Mrs. Velma:
Newsome, also of Clarks-
ville.

Funeral services were held 2
Tuesday at 3:00 p.m. at the ,
graveside in Travelers Rest
Cemetery in Clarksville.
Adams Funeral Home was in
charge of arrangements. .


Notice
(Continued from Page 1)

construction and the prob-
lems it is expected to correct
had been filed with EPA for
permits to proceed, so the
City is at a loss to determine
how EPA can fail to know
what is going on.
The letter gives the Com-
Smission an audience wth
John C. Lank, Environmen-
tal Engineer with EPA on
November 8.
The request was turned
over to the City's engineers,
Jones, Edmunds and Asso-
ciates of Gainesville, who
answered by asking for a
delay of the meeting until
EPA could be informed by
letter on what is happening at
the plant.
Jones, Edmunds was suc-
cessful in securing a post-
ponement of the meeting, .but
not a cancellation.
Rod Fuller, an engineer
with Jones, Edmunds, said,
"We will write them a full
history of the work in pro-
gress, what started it in the
first place and what we hope
to accomplish. Hopefully,
this will answer enough
questions that EPA will not
require the trip to Atlanta."
Fuller said the main rea-
son for the letter, in the first
place, was probably because
a new man has taken over in
Atlanta.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business matters,;
the Commission:
-Agreed to hood the City's
parking meters during the
month of December.
-Approved a call for bids
to furnish the City with a new
police car.
-Accepted the low bid-6f
Dravo Company of Saginaw,
Alabama, to furnish the City
with bulk lime for the Water
Treatment Plant.
-Approved a bid of 13
cents per pound for the
purchase of liquid chlorine
from Thompson-Hayward
Company.







PAGE FOUR THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. TiTRSDAY, NOV. 3, 1983



Carter to Address Club


The Port St. Joe Garden
Club will meet Thursday,
November 10 at 2 p.m. EST
at the Garden Center on
Eighth Street.
Roy Lee Carter, Coopera-
tive Extension Director of
Gulf County, will discuss the
planting, growing, and prun-


- Mr. and Mrs. Ed Frank
McFarland have announced-
the final plans for the ap-
proaching marriage of their
daughter, Catherine Jean
McFarland, to Gregory
Frank Pierce, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Frank J. Pierce of Port
St. Joe.
* The wedding is planned for
November 5 at 6:00 P.M.,
EST at the First Baptist


Llicillash


.234 Reid Ave.


ing of fruit and ornamental
trees in the St. Joseph Bay
area. Mr. Carter, at the close
of his discussion, will be glad
to answer questions or secure
any information regarding
problems with trees.
Mrs. John Blount, Mrs. J.
C. Culpepper, and Mrs. Em-


Church in Port St. Joe. All
friends and relatives are
invited to attend. A reception
will follow immediately in
the church fellowship hall.
A nursery will be provided
for children of guests attend-
ing the wedding.

FOR QUICK RESULTS,
USE THE CLASSIFIED


n & Beauty Boutique
Phone 229-8153


Will be Closing at 3:00 P.M.
Saturday, November 5

.. for the Pierce McFarland Wedding

Shop Early We Will be Open
As Usual Tuesday



HAVE YOU NOTICED ALL THE

- PEOPLE WHO ARE LOSING WEIGHT?

Join Our Next


WEIGHT CONTROL

PROGRAM
Starts November 8, 1983
.Sessions Every Tuesday --

'CALL TODAY TO REGISTER
227-1145
GULF COUNTY GUIDANCE CUNIC, INC.
Master the skills of effective weight
loss & life-time weight management.
2t10120


mette Daniell will be the
hostesses for this November
meeting.

Guidance Board
Monthly Meeting
The Board of Directors of
the Gulf County Guidance
Clinic, Inc. will hold its
regularly scheduled meeting
on Tuesday, November 8, at
7:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) The meet-
ing will be held in the Clinic
Conference Room at 311
Williams Avenue in Port St.
Joe.

Pres byterian


Mrs. Harold Bever of Mexi-
co Beach was hostess to the
Presbyterian Women of the
Church Monday, October 31.
Mrs. Sidney R. Brown gave
the devotional, "John the
Baptist's Parables," based
on scripture from the books
of Luke and Mark.
During the business meet-
ing members were asked to
save Campbell Soup labels
for the Mental Health Unit.
There was also a call for
volunteers to roll bandages,
make cancer pads, scrub
dresses, baby sacques and
receiving blankets, etc. for
White Cross. The first work
part was set for Tuesday,
January 3 at 1:30 p.m. EST at
the church.
Mrs. Ernest Hendricks an-
nounced a Family Night at
the church Wednesday, No-
vember 16 at 7:00 featuring a
tape by Dr. Randolph Taylor,
with the title "Peace, Let It
Begin With Me." Light re-
freshments will be served.
Mrs. Sidney R. Brown will
be hostess for the December


Stewart and

Matlock to Wed
Cindy and Julie Stewart of
Wewahitchka would like to
announce the approaching
marriage of their, mother,
Dorothy, to John L. Matlock,
father of Allen and Edwina
Matlock.
The wedding will take
place at Butler's Restaurant
Friday, November 4, at 7:00
p.m. No invitations are being
sent, but all friends and
relatives are invited to at-
tend.


THE BLUE BAY
412 Reid Ave. Phone 229-6864


Announces the Opening of

Its New York Style



Now Serving

Sicilian Pan Pizza

Neapolitan Thin Crust












REGULAR BUSINESS HOURS
G Breakfast Served 5:00 A.M. Till


Try Our Delicious Noon BuffetSandwiches

,. Choice of Meats and Vegetables
*- \


FREE FREEPEPSIEIVERY
Switch Purchase of 14" or 16"

2:30 P.M. Till 229-68 PIZZA
November 3 through November 9


Sea Oats

to Meet


Nov.


5th meeting which will be a
Christmas party and gift
exchange. Mrs. Norman Sult-
zer will give the devotional.


CL
C(



C(

at
e


Picketts Have Daughter


Boyd and Donna Pickett of
Callaway proudly announce
the birth of their daughter,
Kimberely Wynelle, born
October 25, weighing 6 lbs.
15% ozs.


8th


The November meeting of
the Sea Oats and Dunes
Garden Club will be held
November 8th at the St. Joe
Beach Volunteer Fire De-
partment, located on the
corner of Court and Alabama
Streets. The meeting will
begin at 10:00 a.m., EST.
Ruth Nance, 2nd Vice-
President, announced the
program will be on dried
flower arrangements. These
pieces will be made from fall
gathered material.

Women Meet


REGISTER GRANBERG
Couple to Wed
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Re- ster Restaurant in Panama
gister of Panama City have City.
announced the engagement Her fiance graduated from
and forthcoming marriage of Bay Hgh School in 1980. He
their daughter, Debbie Lynn currently is employed with
Register, to Kevin B. Gran- the Panama City Fire De-
berg, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Gust Granbery of Panama apartment.
City. The wedding is planned for
The bride-elect graduated November 19 at 3 p.m. at
from Port St. Joe High School Immanuel Baptist Church.
in 1982, She is presently All friends and relatives are
employed with the Red Lob- invited to attend.


r been an advocate of the senior citizens of
A p rec ation Gulf County. In her honor, a Mary Adell
Jackson Appreciation Luncheon was held
D n er Monday, October 31st, at the Senior Citizens
D inner meal site. In addition to her many friends in


Very proud grandparents
are Mr. and Mrs. Britt
Pickett of Simmons Bayou,
and Mr. and Mrs. Don
Williams of Panama City.


FISH HOUSE RESTAURANT

PRIVATE PARTIES
DINE and DANCE
Seating 100
Call 648-8950
after 4 C.S.T. and speak with Cuyler or Teresa
MEXICO BEACH




S
WEAE OU


Prescriptions are filled accurately
and quickly with the finest phar-
maceutical products available.
Call us dday or night for prescrip-
tion emergencies at: 648-5071.

Gifts Jewelry Greeting Cards
At
CAMPBELL'S ANNEX
228 Reid Avenue


Longtime Port St. Joe resident Mary the seniors -organization, Mrs. Jackson
Adell Jackson will soon be moving to Ohio to relieved tributes from School Superinten-
live with her son. Mrs. Jackson, a member dent Walter Wilder, Senior representative CAMPR I
of the Amnericanp Association of Retired Annie Dawson, Senior secretary Fran C AMPr LL'S D U G.w II T
Persons and a Stte level advisory board ,Ridgley, Reverend Otis Stallworth, Director Phone 227-1224 or 227-1 Reid
member representing the Gulf County Gerald Ream, and Master of Ceremonies
Senior Citizens Association, Inc. has long Stiles Brown.


11 V 1A COMPUTACOLOR 'FREE
11 14 PORTRAIT R

-t ithpurchase of our complete picture package
Last Chance PACKAGE ONLY
CONSISTS OF : $3.00 deposit
S2 Color 8 x 10's and $14.95 due
2-Color 5 x 7's at time of
SM and delivery
Amy Michelle Newsome 12 Wallet size plus tax

Cute One" Children, Adults,
Amy Michelle Newsome, Y ... I families, and groups to 3
laughter of Mr. and Mrs. &"
Blayne Newsome recently Before NO EXTRA CHARGE
celebrated her first birthday Christmas NO PACKAGE LIMIT
with a party at the home of
her grandparents, Mr. and BY: Barnard Potri ts
Mrs. W. T. Fulford of Monti- BY: Barnard Portraits
,ello. 4 At:
Along with her parents and At FRIDAY NO 4th
grandparents, helping Amy T COSTIN'S N V
-elebrate were several A
aunts, uncles and cousin T ,t\ST S Dept Store 10:30 till 5:30
Kimberly, all of whom help- Rid Av
d make it a special day for SGC- RSid Ave.
y.Port St Joe

WHAT WILL HAPPEN WHEN ALL CHRISTIANS ARE GONE?

WHAT ABOUT THE ANTI-CHRIST?

WHAT ABOUT THE MARK OF THE BEAST?
These and Other Questions Will be Answered As

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH PRESENTS


"PROPHETIC FILM SERIES"
November 6 through 9 7:00 P.M. EACH NIGHT

Four feature length action-packed films shown for the first time In this area on consecutive nights!
Don't miss a one!


MARK IV PICTURES
INCORPORATED
PRESENTS
A Thief
in the Night
.. and there will be
no place to hide!
*Starring PATTY DUNNING *
IN FULL COLOR
Sunday, November 6
7:00 P.M.


Monday, November 7
7:00 P.M.


Tuesday, November 8
7:00 P.M.


Wednesday, November 9
7:00 P.M.


McFarland and Pierce

Final Plans Revealed


At Mexico Beach Home


Y1








THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 1983 PAGE FIVE


SOlde Times Cookbook



To be Sold by Sr. Citizens


BY JERRY REAM
Well, Gulf County, Thanks-
giving is just around the
corner, and then its Christ-
mas season and all the
trimmings. But the hard
part, as we all know, is
selecting the right gift for
those special folks on our
shopping lists. How much to
spend? Will they like the
gift? Will they use it? Yes,
shopping is the hard part.
But this year the Gulf
County Senior Citizens Asso-
ciation is going to make that
job of selecting gifts a little
easier. All you have to do is
call 229-8466 and order your
Good Olde Times Cookbook,
and give one to each of the
folks on your Christmas list
who are really special to you.
Compiled and published by
the Senior Citizens, the Cook-
book is a 200 page assortment
of the finest recipes in the
area. Some of the recipes
have been handed down from
generation to generation and
represent outstanding old
time cooking secrets. The
Cookbook will cover all as-


pects of good meal prepara-
tions, including Breads, Cas-
seroles, Meats, Fish, Poul-
try, Salads and Dressings,
Vegetables, and Desserts.
And, as an extra feature,
each senior submitting a
recipe has their name print-
ed in the Cookbook in recog-
nition of their contribution:

Priced at a modest $5.00,
this Cookbook will be a
cherished addition to kitchen
libraries throughout the
area, and it provides an
excellent advertising outlet
to our local businesses. Radio
station WJBU has already
reserved a full one-half page
ad, and other local adverti-
sers include Marjorie Parker
your Watkins Dealer, West-
ern Auto Associate Store,
Costin's Department Store,
Hedy's Florist, Campbell's
Drug Store, St. Joe Furniture
Co. and Shear Perfection
Beauty Salon, Wauneta's Ac-
counting and Income Tax,
Phil's Service Center, also
Finishing Touch, Terry's
Fried Chicken, and Star


Publishing.
So call now to place your ad
or order your Good Olde


Times Cookbook from the
Senior Citizens at 229-8466.
You'll be glad you did.


Prophetic Films to be

Shown at First Baptist


First Baptist Church has
scheduled a "Prophetic Film
Revival" for November 6-9,
7:00 P.M. each evening.
There will be four feature
length action packed films
shown on consecutive nights.
For the full impact one would
need to attend all four,
however the films are such
that each gives a flashback
from the one proceeding.
"A Thief In The Night" will
lead off Sunday, November 6.
A very popular film viewed
by millions deals with the
coming of Christ. Thousands
have been saved because of
the witness of this motion
picture. "A Distant Thun-
der", a story of tribulation
and the end times follows
Monday, November 7. Then


"Image of the Beast" Tues-
day, and the very latest,
"The Prodigal Planet" is
scheduled for Wednesday
evening.
Everything is being done to
make the showing of these
films as effective as possible.
Dual projectors will be used
to eliminate changing of
reels midway. The sound will
be beamed through the sy-
stem in the church allowing
better quality. A nursery will
be open for children through
three years of age.
A reminder that each of
these motion pictures are
feature length (ranging from
one hour 18 minutes to two
hours 17 minutes), so sche-
dules can be made accord-
ingly. Everyone is invited to
attend each of the showings.


Homecoming Festivities


Begin with Parade Friday


Port St. Joe High School
will celebrate its 1983 Home-
coming Friday beginning
with a parade at 4:00 P.M.,
followed by the football game
at 8:00 P.M.
The honored guests for
Homecoming are all former
varsity cheerleaders of Port
St. Joe High and Washington
High. Shortly before the
parade these cheerleaders
will visit with friends and
former classmates as they
enjoy the refreshments pro-
vided by the Student Council
at the tent near the corner of
Reid Ave. and Highway 71.
The former cheerleaders will
also be honored with a
special seating section for
the Homecoming football
game.
At Shark stadium Port St.
Joe will host Rickards of
Tallahassee. During halftime
the Homecoming Court will
be presented and the new
Homecoming Queen will be
announced and then crowned
by Kelly Johnson, the 1982
Queen. The flower girl and
crown bearer will be Alyson
Williams and Jesse Colbert.

The Bus Schedule for Fri-


Art Guild Plans


Arts,


Crafts Fair
Art Guild in displaying your crafts or
nd Crafts paintings, please contact Sel-
'day, No- ma Shoemaker (648-8237) for
nina at 9 details.


day, November 4th, Home-
coming Day, will be as
follows:
12:20, North Port St. Joe
Elementary School Students
will leave Port St. Joe
Elementary School;
12:25, All other Port St. Joe


Elementary School Students
will be dismissed;
12:30, All Port St. Joe High
School Students will be dis-
missed;
12:55, All Highland View
Elementary School Students
will be dismissed.


"America remembers and
reveres her war heroes but
forgets her peace negotia-
tors. Yet what would it profit
a nation to win a war and lose
the peace?" Mrs. Nobie
Stone questioned St. Joseph
Bay Daughters of the Ameri-
can Revolution in her ad-
dress on the Treaty of Paris
given Wednesday, October
19, at the Garden Center.
This treaty, signed Sep-
tember 3, 1783, ended the
Revolutionary War.
More than two years after
the peace negotiations began
(the Americans refused to
compromise) on January 14,
1784, the treaty between the
United States and Great
Britain was ratified by Con-
gress and the war formally
ended.
"The treaty gave the
United States practically
everything asked during the
eight years of fighting. Bri-
tain recognized the Ameri-
can claim to territory as far
west as the Mississippi, as
far north as Canada and as
far south as Florida. Ameri-
can fisherman were to keep
the right to fish off the coast
of Newfoundland and the
Mississippi River was to be
open for navigation," Mrs.
Stone explained.
"Of all international settle-
ments the 1783 Treaty of
Paris has been the most
lasting and has produced the
greatest blessings for civili-


zation. It gave America the
opportunity to prove that a
constitutional republic based
on God-given rights can
flourish and endure in a
changing world- 'blessed
are the peacemakers for they
shall be called the children of
God' ", concluded the speak-
er.
Mrs. James B. Roberts
gave the National Defense
report reminding members
that while the news media
does not control what view-
ers think, through the news
programs and articles, talk
shows, etc. they can control
what is thought about.
She deplored the number of
states no longer teaching
Americanism in the public
schools. Florida schools do
require courses in America-
nism vs. Communism and
Mrs.. Roberts requested
members individually to
urge legislators to see that
these continue.


Matrons Slate

Installation

The Matron's Auxiliary of
Philadelphia Primitive Bap-,
tist Church will hold its
installation service on Sun-
day, November 6 at 11:00.
A.M. State and district offi-
cers will be conducting the
services.
These services are open
and the public is invited.


- DAR

Mrs. William Quarles, Re-
gistrar, has received notice
that Mrs. E. L. Suber of St.
George Island and Susan
Quarles Harmon are new
members of St. Joseph Bay
Chapter. She states several
papers are pending at the.
National Society headquar-,
ters.
Guests at the meeting
included Mrs. Joe McCoy,
Panama City, Florida State
Society DAR Historian, and
Mrs. Francis Moore, Caro-
line Brevard DAR Chapter,
Tallahassee.


BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Dan and Pam Wall of
Jacksonville announce the
birth of their daughter, Kath-
leen Marie, on September 25.
Grandparents are Charles
and Mary Wall of Port StT
Joe, and Wanda Leach of.
North Carolina.


Telephone Company Gets Spooky
Employees of St. Joseph Telephone and Telegraph Company decided to get into the spook
of things on Monday, October 31. Some of them are shown in their costumes in the accompany-
ing photographs, exhibiting to all that Hallowe'en Isn't just for children. -Star photos


I',
-;


GROW HAIR
At last it's here (ROOTS) the answer to your hair prob-
lem. (ROOTS) is a combination of years of experiments
and scientific research put together that every person
with short hair, thinking around edges. stubborn, bald or
split ends should know about. (ROOTS) Because of it's
natural ingredients, is safe on all kinds of hair, since
permanents, colors. ,.and relaxers damage the hair
(ROOTS) builds back what chemical has taken away.
(ROOTS) work directly on the hair roots where hair
growth begins. (ROOTS) is not a harmful drug, will not
irritate the scalp (ROOTS) has pleased thousands of
men and women all over the nation. (Money back gua-
rantee)
CAMPBELL'S DRUGS
Special Offer: Buy 1, Get 1 FREE,
(Limited Time Only)
2t 10/14 or send $18.75 to:
MALLARD BEAUTY CO.
2891 Mill Street Mobile, Alabama 36607


Jessie Franklin Beck will
celebrate his first birthday
on Friday, November 4th.
He is the son of Frank and
Dot Beck of Mexico Beach.


Public Notices
BID NUMBER 292
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida re-
quests bids for one (1) 1984 Model
4-Door Sedan to be used as a Police
Car. Specifications may be obtained
from the City Clerk's Office, P. 0. Box
A, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Bid open-
ing to be held November 15, 1983, at
8:00 P.M., E.S.T., in the Municipal
Building at the regular meeting of the
City Commission
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE,
By: /st L A. Farris,
City Audltor/Clerk 2t 11/3


Peace Negotiators Need


to be Remembered






PAGE SIX HE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 1983


Record Tree Planting Season Looms


The greening of Florida
through reforestation con-
tinues to accelerate with
signs pointing to another
record-level planting season,
during the coming winter,
forestry officials have re-
ported. .
Tree nursery operators for
the Division of Forestry,
Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Ser-
vices, reported that land-


owners have purchased two
million trees more this fall
than they had by this time
last fall. And Florida led the
nation with more than 150
million seedlings planted last
fall. Thus, they say, signs
point toward an even greater
planting season in 1983-84.
"Orders for pine seedlings
should be made promptly by
landowners, for the supply in
the state nurseries may not


Air Show Nov. 12 at


Tyndall Air
The Golden Knights, the U.
S. Army's parachute team,
will join the U. S. Air Force's
Thunderbirds Saturday, Nov.
12, for an Open House
performance at Tyndall Air
Force Base.
The Golden Knight's show
begins at noon.
Then, the Thunderbirds,
flying their red, white and
blue F-16 aircraft at low
altitude and at speeds up to
650 mph perform a variety of
aerobatic maneuvers that


Force Base
have been called' "an aerial
ballet."
The Thunderbirds show
follows the Golden Knights.
Everyone is invited and
admission is free. Gates open
at 10 a.m. Other activities
include static displays of
over 20 Air Force aircraft.
numerous exhibits and F-15
flying demonstration.
Tyndall is located on High-
way 98, 12 miles east of
Panama City.


Office Building



FOR RENT


Call 227-1111




GULF COUNTY

WILLIAMSBURG SUBDIVISION

PUBLIC HEARING

November 11, 1983 3:00 P.M., E.S.T.

Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, FL

To Discuss the Community
Development Block Grant
Proposal for a Community
Water Distribution System
Every Gulf County Resident Is Invited
The Meeting is sponsored by the Gulf
County Board of County Commis-
sioners and the Apalachee Regional
Planning Council.
If you have questions, call
Everett Owens, Jr. at (904) 229-6112 or
CaN Brown at (904) 674-4571
PLEASE PLAN TO ATTEND
2t 111/3


TAX NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the 1983 Cer-
tified Tax Roll has been delivered by the Pro-
perty Appraiser to the Tax Collector for col-
lectiori. The .1983 Gulf County Tax Roll is
open for collection beginning November 1,
1983.
The Tax Collector's Office is located in
the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Fifth
Street, Port St. Joe, Florida. Office hours are
9 a.m. until 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.
The mailing address is:
Gulf County Tax Collector
1000 Fifth Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Real-and personal property taxes levied
by the following taxing authorities will be
collected:
GulftrCpunty Board of County Commis-
sioners
Gulf County School Board
City of Port St. Joe
City of Wewahitchka
Northwest Florida Water Management
District
Tupelo Fire Control District
St. Joseph Fire Control District
Howard Creek Fire Control District
Overstreet Fire Control District
DISCOUNT SCHEDULE
4% Discount on Payments made month of Nov.
3% Discount on Payments made month of Dec.
2% Discount on Payments made month of Jan.
1% Discount on Payments made month of Feb.
Payable without Discount during month of March
Taxes Delinquent April 1
EDA RUTH TAYLOR
TAX COLLECTOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
Telephone 229-6116


last much longer, since we
sell at cost-of-production
prices," said Forest Manage-
ment Chief W. R. Helm.
Some types of seedlings sell
for only $14 per 1,000.
"We don't want to have a
single seedling left implanted
at the end of the winter
because timber is a money
maker for the landowner now
and looks certain to be in the
future."
In recent years, the timber
market has been a lucrative
one for tree owners, with
annual returns on investment
of 15 or even 20 per cent being
fairly commonplace.
"There is money to be
made in timber, for the


heads-up landowner who
pays attention to his busi-
ness," Helm said.
State nurseries near Chief-
land and Pensacola have
already sold more than two-
thirds of their trees but have
some 21 million left for
landowners. These include
some 12 million rapidly grow-
ing improved slash pines,
which will give a 15 per cent
faster growth rate than regu-
lar slash and are regularly
sold. out year after year.
Another much-demanded
pine is the rust resistant
loblolly, of which two million
remain available. One mil-
lion sand pine seedlings, an
increasingly demanded tree,


remain available, nursery
operators said.
The State Department of
Agriculture nurseries also
still have about three million'
regular slash pines, three
million regular loblolly pines
and about 100,000 laurel oaks.
Unexpectedly good germina-
tion also resulted in a large
inventory of more than one
million dogwoods, planted as
a major wildlife food tree in
wildlands and a landscape
tree in urban areas and on
public lands.
Sold out are red maple,
sweet gum, sycamore, red
cedar, live oak, and Virginia
pine, which is grown for
Christmas Tree farm plant-


Trauma Care Seminar


Gulf Pines Hospital of Port -
St. Joe will offer a one day
Seminar on November 19,
from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
(one hour lunch break, fur-
nish your own). The subject
of the Seminar will be
Assessment, Stabilization,
and Transport of the Trauma
Patient.
This Seminar is being
offered through Life Flight
from Baptist Medical Center
in Jacksonville in conjunc-
tion with Gulf Pines Hospital.
Continuing Education Units

Januie White
Has Birthday
Jamie Marie White cele-
brated her fifth birthday on
Sunday, October 23, at home
with her parents and several
other family members. She
also enjoyed a gathering of
some of her friends on the
29th at McDonald's for Hap-
py Meals, cake, ice cream,
cokes and games. Joining her
Saturday in Panama City
were Kiki Fields, Heather
Fields, Kelli Yeager, Ryan
Yeager, Kim Franklin, Amy
Goebert, Adam Griffin, Jere-
my Ard, Nicholas Sweazy,
David Byrne, Mandy Fer-
nandez and her Aunt Donna
sue.
sue Jamie is the daughter of
Harlaf i and Donna. Haddock
of Highland View.


KEVIN LEE NEAL .
Kevin Neal
Has First
Kevin Lee Neal celebrated
his first birthday Wednes-
day, October 2nd. Sh in-Will!
Kevin is the son of Joey Sherwin-Williams
Neal of Wewahitchka, and PAINTS
Debra Price Neal of Port St.
Joe. Grandparents are Troy Now At
and Betty Gay, also of Port
St. Joe, and George and Western Auto
Geneva Culpepper, of Hous- Phone 227-1105
ton, Texas.'


NEW BETHEL
African Methodist Episcopal Church
146 Avenue C Phone 227-1213
Rev. Theodore Andrews, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL.. ................ 9:30A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP.,............... 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP '...... ; ......I.... 6:00 P.M.
"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man Our Brother"


Gal 5:2223

Y '
y* *


TEMPERANCE
z
'U
a


0,ODNESSJ


door. Contact Shirley Dixon,
Gulf Pines Hospital, 227-1121,
9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday
through Friday.

Rev. Clark to
Pastor Church
Highland View Baptist
Church has called a new
pastor, Rev. Jimmy Clark of
Geneva, Alabama.
A reception will be held on
Sunday, November 6, '3:00-
4:30 p.m. at the church.
Everyone is cordially invited
to come and meet Brother
Jimmy and his family, and to
welcome them to our com-
munity.

Copies
Copies
Copies

Copies
Available At

The Star
306 Williams Ave.
Port St. Joe


ings.
In addition to the trees
produced by small landown-
ers by the state nurseries
several major wood-growing
firms also operate nurseries
to produce their own seed-
lings, frequently totaling
more than the state seedling
production.

Cub Scouts for
Beach Boys
As of November 1, boys
living at the Beaches who
will be eight years old by
December 31, or who recent-
ly turned nine, can join the
new Cub Scout group formed
just for them. And thanks to
Mr. Harrington of the School
Board, school bus transpor-
tation to the weekly meetings
has been made available.
If you know a boy who
qualifies, and is interested in
having fun while learning
new things, contact Mrs.
Trish Woodman at 648-5237.
Call today so your son doesn't
miss out on the hike planned
for this Saturday, November
5th. Fee to join is just $3, with
monthly dues of $2.


Subscribe Today
to
The Star
Phone 227-1278


8:30 till 6:00 Monday through Friday

221 Reid Avenue


ROY SMITH, Agent


For Ambulance -
Service
Call

227-1115:


Ie:aII uallniilUliinAIIIIH.mulHlu iiumuumanufimunlinnuuii nuiui iimn i

CHURCH of CHRISTI
Twentieth Street and Marvin Avenue
SUNDAY SCHOOL ..............10:00 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ........... 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ...... ....... 6:00 P.M. *
WEDNESDAY EVENING ......... ..7:00 P.M.

inuSlUJIiMaullIMI anuI nuaUi| ||uu ualn||l ||lllalalllllllllni mnaallllnll llll Ul|ll


First

Presbyterian Church
Sixteenth Street and Forrest Park Avenue
Phone 227-1756
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE ..........'.. 10:OCA.M.
ADULT SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS ......... 11:00A.M.
Study in the Gospels, Wednesday 7:00-7:45
Welcome to Everyone
JOHN M. STUART, Pastor
Phone 229.6857


Phone 227-1133


FRANK HANNON, Agent


credits have been approved'
by the State of Florida
through the Baptist Medical
Center office of Continuing
Education for Emergency
Medical Technicians, Para-
medics, Registered Nurses
and Licensed Practical Nur-
ses.
The Seminar will be held in
the Conference Room of the
hospital. Cost is $5.00 per
person, with pre-registration
required by noon, Friday,
November 18th. No registra-
tions will be accepted at the

Gulf County
School Lunch


MENU
Monday, November 7
Corn dog, French fries,
cabbage slaw, cookies, and
milk.
Tuesday, November8
Chicken, rice with gravy,
fruit cup, green beans, rolls,
and milk.
Wednesday, November 9
Fiestada, orange juice, tos-.
sed salad, cookies, and milk;
Thursday, November 10
Hoagie burger, potato sal-
ad, broccoli, pineapple cake,
and milk.
Friday, November 11
INSERVICEDAY. .
No School For Student, :
Menus may change without
notice due to the availability
of foods.
Poppy Sale
November 4
The John C. Gainous Post
10069 of the V.F.W. will hold
its annual Poppy Day Sale on
November 4.
All members of the post
and auxiliary are requested
to meet in front of Ready
Arts and Crafts Friday at
7:30 a.m., announced George
Coody, chairman of the sale.


CITIZENS FEDERAL
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION


HIGHLAND VIEW

CHURCH OF GOD
"Where Jesus Christ Is King
& God's Love Is An
Everflowing Fountain"


SUNDAY SCHOOL ......
MORNING WORSHIP ..
EVENING WORSHIP ....
WEDNESDAY EVENING .


10:00 A.M.
11:0A.M.
6:00 P.M.
7:00 P. M


Pastor Ira J. Nichols


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With

HANNON INSURANCE

Agency, Inc.

The Insurance Store Since 1943

Auto Home Business Life

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We Are HERE to Service What We Sell


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we at Citizens Federal offer something much more

substantial; 26 years of sound financial experience.


It's that experience and reputation that we put

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Talk with us today about our excellent savings

plans or about how we can make it possible for

you to own the home of your dreams.

Citizens Federal Savings and Loan serving you and your com-
munity past, present and future.
OPEN MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY EVERY WEEK







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 1983 PAGE SEVEN


Costume Winners New Brownie Troon Formed In Wewahitchka


The Port St. Joe Elementary School
sponsored a Halloween costume contest for
children this past Saturday, in conjunction
with their annual Halloween Carnival.
In the photo at top left, winners in the
pre-school through kindergarten are shown.
They are: from left, Sara Moore, second
place; John attaway and Casey Williams,
second; and Anna Gay, third. In the second
photo are the first and second grade winners.
They are, from left: Eric Ramsey, 1st; Brett
Hanson, 2nd; and Casey Witten, third. In the
top photo at right are the third and fourth
grade winners. Pictured are, from left: Lee
Cannon, 1st; George Whitfield, 2nd; and
Yolanda Taylor, third. In the photo at left are
the fifth and sixth grade winners. Shown are,
from left: Johlathan Coleman and Buck Fer-
nandez, 1st; Catherine Wood, 2nd and
Cheyenne Godfrey, third.
-Star photos


Shackleford
In Lebanon
Mrs. Carrie Shackleford
and Archie Shackleford, Sr.
have received word that their
son, Archie Shackleford, Jr.
has been sent to Lebanon.
Archie was able to call his
mother before leaving.
The Shacklefords and other
parents with young men in
that area ask that you please
remember them in your
prayers.

CARD OF THANKS
My deepest thanks and
grateful appreciation to all-
the people of Port St. Joe who
have shown so many acts of
kindness to me since my
accident. I'm glad I live in a
comnimunity'tatht.really'cares
about its people.
A special thanks to the
staff of Gulf Pines Hospital,
First Baptist Church, and the.
ambulance squad.
Sincerely,
Mary Parker

FOR BEST RESULTS
SHOP THE WANT ADS


The newly formed Brownie
Troop 192 of Wewahitchka
will be having its first
meeting on Nov. 8, at 6:30
p.m. The meeting will be held
in the lunch room at the
Linton Site. All parents are
turged to attend to register


the first through third
grades, but registration will
be closed after 30 girls unless
more leaders.
Leaders are also needed
for older girls. Training and


help is available for those
who volunteer. You are urg-
ed to call Bunny Miller at
229-8819 or Colleen Prescott
at 639-5702 for more informa-
tion.


THE PULPIT OF THE CITY


First Baptist Church
Port St. Joe, Florida
SUNDAY'S SCHEDULE
9:45 ........ Bible Study (all ages)
11:00..... Worship (Live WJBU-AM).
6:00 ............ Church Training
7:00 .................. Worship


RON KEGLEY
Music/Youth


HOWARD BROWNING
Pastor


their daughters. There is a
$3.00 registration fee which
will cover the girls' insur-
ance while she is in any Girl
Scout activity. Weekly meet-
ings will be on Tuesdays at
6:30 p.m. at the Main Street
Site. The troop is open to all
girls ages six to nine, or in


Bend Girl Scouts Kicking Off
Calendar Sales This Week


The Girl Scouts of Apala-
chee Bend are kicking off
their fall 1984 calendar sale
November 1 throughout the
Big Bend area. The sale,
which will run through De-
cember 12, will feature wall
calendars depicting scenes
from councils throughout the
U. S. and pocket calendars
for those who like to carry
their plans around with
them.
The wall calendars, which
will be sold for $1.00 and the
pocket calendars for 50 cents,
will make excellent Christ-
mas, birthday or special gift
gifts for family or friends.

Auto And
Homeowners
Insurance
JEAN MALLORY
639-5322 Wewahitchka
or
785-6156 Panama City


Metropolitan A smnds by tou.
UFE*iLALrn ALfrLOOMI(M l t ll I4NI


The monies raised from the
sale of calendars will go to
each individual troop selling'
the calendars.
Girl Scouts are an integral
part of every community in
the Big Bend area, and the
public is asked to support the
Girl Scouts by purchasing a
calendar this year.


BUSINESS MEN'S ASSURANCE

I "SINCE 1909"
Serving All Health Er Life Needs
Business & Personal I


Life Insurance Disability Income *
Group Insurance Pension Plans .*


Hospitalization
Major Medical


Special Representatives for Port St. Joe
LAFAYETTE WARREN WILIAM POLORONIS
(904) 763-1848 (904) 653-68122
PanamaCity Apalachicola


NOTICE

TAX IMPACT OF PROPERTY APPRAISAL

ADJUSTMENT BOARD

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD:

Honorable William R. Branch, Chairman, Board of County Commis-
sioners, District 3; Honorable Douglas C. Birmingham, Board of
County Commissioners, District 2; Honorable Everett Owens, Jr.,
Board of County Commissioners, District 4; Honorable Oscar Redd,
School Board, District 1; Honorable Waylon Graham, School Board,
District 4.
The Property Appraisal Adjustment Board meets each year to review
complaints regarding property tax assessment and exemptions.
The purpose of the board is to enhance fairness in property taxes by
correcting errors when they are found to exist.
THE FOLLOWING TABLE SUMMARIZES THIS YEAR'S ACTION BY THE BOARD


Column 1 Column 2 Column 3 Column 4 Column 5 Column 6

Type Number of Total Number of Total No. Reduction Loss
of Exemption Number of Assessments of Requests In Taxable Tax
Property Requests Exemption Reduced by for Value Due Dollars*
Granted by Requests the Board Assessment to Board
the Board Reductions Action

Residential 2 19 0 10 50,000 $564.35
CommercIal 0 0 0 0 0 0
Industrial
SMisc. 0 1 0 1 0 0
Agricultural 0 7 0 8 0 0
Business
Machinery &
Equipment 0 0 0 0 0 0
Vacant Lots
& Acreage 0 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS 2 27 0 19 $50,000 $564.35

ALL TAXPAYERS SHOULD BE AWARE THAT BOARD ACTIONS WHICH REDUCE
TAXABLE VALUE CAUSE TAX RATES APPLICABLE TO ALL PROPERTY TO BE
PROPORTIONALLY HIGHER.
Questions concerning the actions taken by this Board may be addressed to the
chairperson or clerk at the following telephone numbers:


CHAIRPER
CLEI


SON: William R. Branch (904) 229-6112
RK: Jerry T. Gates (904) 229-6112


If it's movies you love, watch the cable channel that lets you
choose from over 60 quality movies in November and watch
a different movie every night-The Movie Channel. O
November brings you Paul Newman in his Oscar-nominated
perfonnance as the desperate lawyer in The Verdict. Follow the
intrigue with Meryl Streep and Roy Scheider in Still of the Night.
And watch Richard Gere and Debra Winger fall in love in An Officer and a Gentleman.
November is also filled with super special features. Laugh along with this month's "Best of... the
Vintage Comedies." Your TV will be invaded by late night aliens on "The Saturday Special" and
"Sundays with Sherlock" offers you an afternoon with Holmes and Watson. So if it's movies you love,
get the only channel that's always got a movie. The Movie Channel.


GULF

CABLE TV


2t 1113


VOTE FOR



A CHANGE...



Vote for



Tom Marquardt


Group 4, Commissioner


Mexico Beach, Florida

648-8900

In November 8 Primary


The Verdicy


Stil of the Night


(Serving Port St. Joe and Ward Ridge)
503 Third Street Phone 229-8880
Port St. Joe, Florida


The Scadrlt Cla.


. I- V 1 r ---- --- w ---








PAGE EIGHT THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THUH~DAY, NOV. 3, 1983


Sharks Play Trick On Demong


Pittman Runs Wild In 20-13 District Win


Say You Saw It In The Star!


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
22nd Street Mexico Beach
CHARLES M. PARKER, Minister
WORSHIP SERVICE .............. 9:00 A.M., C.S.T.
CHURCH SCHOOL ............... 10:00 A.M., C.S.T.
CHOIR REHEARSAL(Wednesday) .. 6:00 P.M., C.S.T.



Airst Uniled Methodist Church
Constitution and Monument-Ave.
Port St. Joe, Florida
Rev. Alvin N. Harbour, Pastor

CHURCH SCHOOL .................... 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................... 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .... ............... 7:00 P.M.
METHODISTYOUTH FELLOWSHIP ...... ..5:30 P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday)......... 7:30 P.M.


Whatever Mike Pittman
did on the day before the
game with Florida High last
Friday night, he should do
before every game-and
share his secret with the
other members of the suc-
cessful Sharks. The secret
should make the Sharks
unbeatable this year, as a
team.
Pittman was a one-man
wrecking and scoring crew
against the Florida High
Demons in Tallahassee last
Friday night, as he scored
every one of the Sharks'
points in their 20-13 win over
the Demons.
Pittman ran for 80 yards on
14. carries, scored three
touchdowns, one two-point
conversion play, intercepted
two Demon passes-one for a
touchdown-had three punt
returns for a total of 95 yards
and had 70 yards of returns
called back (including a
touchdown on the opening
kick-off) by what both coa-
ches agreed was some sloppy
officiating.
Pittman, who normally
plays flanker and back-up
runner for the Sharks, was
pushed into the number one
running post Friday night,
while Coach Shaw Maddox
had running back Josh Jen-
kins'resting a tender ankle,
injured the week before.
Pittman made the most of
the opportunity.
In a preview of what was to
come all night long, the
officiating started off having
an adverse effect on the
game right from the outset.
Pittman fielded Florida
High's opening kick-off and
returned it for a touchdown,
only to have the score
nullified when one of the
referees said he saw one of


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the final time with only 39
seconds left in the third per-'
iod. Again it was Pittman,
this time with a three yard
plunge. Pittman then ran the
ball across for two extra
points.
The Demons came back
mid-way in the last period
and pushed six points across
on a busted play by Hunter
Hughes. Quarterback Ronnie
Mason juggled and dropped
the ball on a snap from
center. Hughes picked the
ball up and galloped 63 yards
for the final score of the
night, giving the Demons 13
' points for the evening, while
the Sharks had 20.
The Sharks had a scare
with a little over two minutes
to go and the Sharks with
. fourth down on their own 48
yard line. The Sharks appar-
ently had the down confused.


Above: Sidney Harris (40), Mike Pittman (34) and Mike Quinn head off Florida High's
David Palmer. Right: A familiar sight Friday night Mike Pittman running over Demons.
-Starphotos
the Sharks clipping, the sidelines for 32 yards and Shark off-side put the Dem-
, It was three minutes into the first score of the game. ons on the Shark three yard
the second period before the Butts' kick was wide of the line with a first down. Two
Sharks put a score on the mark, and the Sharks had a plays later and David Pal-
board which would be allow- six point lead. mer was in for the Demons'
ed to stay. With the Demons The remainder of the sec- score. Greg McCray kicked
on their own 32 and a first ond period was a defensive the extra point and the
down, the Demon quarter- battle, with both teams bo- Demons were in the lead, 7-6.
back faded to pass but Mike there by the penalties which The Sharks then put to-
Pittman stepped in front of the officials kept calling at gether an 80-yard scoring
the receiver, tucked the ball the objections of the coaches. drive, which was capped by a.
under his arm, and raced up The Demons opened the 24 yard scoring gallop by
second half with their second Pittman. The extra point was
attempt at an on-side kick for stopped when the Sharks
the night. On the second try, tried to run for two points,
a to rthe Demons gained posses- but the Sharks were ahead to
G a 't r sion of the ball on the Shark stay for the night.
47. David Palmer ran up the The Sharks added an in-
middle for a first down. Two surance TD five minutes
S cla re more offensive plays and a later when they scored for


Tigers

The Wewahitchka Gators,
having their problems this
year, made one of their best
efforts of the year last Friday
night and held the Blounts-
town. Tigers to only one
touchdown until the last
period before finally losing
27-6.
Andrea Garrett scored in
the second period on a
19-yard gallop for the Tigers'
only score prior to the fourth
period.
A tired Gator team gave up
21 points to the Tigers in the
last stanza, however, while
scoring one touchdown of
their own to prevent the
shutout.
Willie Brown, Chris Con-
nelly and Andrew Lee scored
for the Tigers in the final
period.
The Gators' score came in
the fourth period, when Todd
Sterzoy squirmed through
the line with a six-yard run.
The Gators had one of their
better offensive nights, with
11 first downs and 172 yards
of offense. The Tigers had 364
yard 'of offense, but, had
trouble putting their yards
together in scores.
ON THE ROAD
The Gators will be on the
road Friday night to Bristol
to tackle the Liberty County
Bulldogs.
THE YARDSTICK
Wewa B'town
Firstdowns 11 15
Rushes, yards 117 313
Passing yards 55 51
Passes 14-3-1 9-2-1
Punts 3-22 1-35
Fumbles lost 5-4 2-2
Penalties yards 3-35 11-136

Big Buck
Contest
The Panhandle Dog Hunt-
ing Association is sponsoring
a Big Buck Contest Novem-
ber 24 through January 29,
1984. The prize will be $100.00
for the biggest antlers on a
white tail, Florida deer. You
must be a member before
November 24 to be qualified
to win. Complete details will
be given at the November 17
.meeting at the Calhoun Coun-
ty Courthouse. Remit mem-
bership fees of $6.00 to Roger
A. Thomas, 206 10th Street,
Port St. Joe, phone 229-6055.

Rifle Club
Meets Today
The Gulf Rifle Club will
hold its monthly meeting at
the Welding Shop Classroom
at 7:30 P.M., November 3rd.
All members are urged to
attend to make plans for the
upcoming turkey shoot*


because they went for it on
fourth and six with ohly a
seven point lead. The pass
play fell short and the
Demons took over, driving to
the 12 yard line before the
Shark defense forced a fum-
ble and Pittman recovered
the football to end the game.
FRIDAY NIGHT
Friday night, the Sharks
will be at home for their
homecoming game. Rick-
ards, a class 3-A team from
Tallahassee will be in town
for the festivities and the
game.
THE YARDSTICK
PSJ Fla Hi
First downs 10 12
Passes 18-8-0 14-5-2
Passing yards 121 54
Rushing 30-124 48-214
Punts 3-33.3 5-36.0
Fumbles 3-3 24-2
Penalties 10-110 10-80O


vwl~S~


DEL



81z* Black White F.E.T.
A78-13 M26. MM 1.44
P15M/80013 M .1 M 1.45
B78-13 27. M 23.1 1.54
C78-14 3.M 1.5 M 1.80


Cf7-14 35'5a 1 ANoU.u,,ws-d
I"hnlprics plus tax No trade-inneeded AN Pcplu M otrd-inMlt





Pae' Sevi Center


PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 1983


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THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 1983 PAGE NINE


*Apalachicola's Annual Seafood Festival Saturday


Visitors at this year's 20th
annual Florida Seafood Fes-
tival will have a unique
opportunity to see Apalachi-
cola's history come to life on
Festival Day, Saturday, No-
vember 5. Festival guests
can take the "Historical
Walk" of the Waterfront to
see places which have played
a part in Apalachicola's
150-year history as a thriving
port. They can then stroll
through town to visit the
ante-bellum homes, and
monuments to Apalachicola
residents who made lasting
contributions to the commu-
nity and to the world. Stops


on the tour include:
Trinity Episcopal
Church- This Greek Revival
church is the purest example
of this type of architecture
still extant in Florida. It is
also one of the earliest
prefabricated buildings in
the state, having been put
together in New York, ship-
ped to Apalachicola by schoo-
ner, and constructed on this
site in 1838. The church is
fastened together entirely by
square pegs, and is still in
use today.
The Old Cotton Ware-
house- In 1838 the Apalachi-
cola Land Company reported


NERVIG TRAVEL SERVICE
to Serve the Travel needs of Northwest Florida
TOLL FREE

1-800-342-6039
AIRLINE TICKETS, CRUISES, TOURS


234A S. Tyndall Pky.
Parker, Fla.
(Next door to AIM) 6t 10/27


569 Harrison Ave.
Panama City, Fla.
(Downtown)


BILL MILLER CONSTRUCTION
NEW CONSTRUCTION REMODELING
648-8398 648-5897




HIGHLAND VIEW

BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of Fourth St. and Second Ave.
Welcome Friend
SUNDAY SCHOOL....................... 9:45 A.M.
WORSHIP SERVICE ............ 11:00 A.M. & 7:00 P.M.
CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) .............. 6:00 P.M.
MID-WEEK PRAYER (Wednesday) ........... 7:30 P.M.
Nursery Provided JIMMY CLARK, Pastor


We Want You
To Be A Part of
The Friendly Place


BIBLE STUDY ........... ......... .
MORNING WORSHIP . . . . .
CHURCH TRAINING ....................
EVENING WORSHIP . . . . .
W EDNESDAY ....... .............. . .


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
5:45 P.M.,
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.


Long Ave. Baptist Church
1601 LONG AVENUE


DANIEL W. DUNCAN
Pastor


MARK DONNELL
Minister of Music & Youth


that 43 cotton warehouses
had been completed accord-
ing to specifications. They
.were described as 30 feet in
width and three stories tall,
with heavy use of granite on
the first story. The long row
of warehouses along the
riverfront was an impressive
first sight of the town to
arriving visitors. Yet all
these massive warehouses
were inadequate to handle
the volume of cotton passing
through Apalachicola before
the Civil War, and frequently
the main streets were piled
high with the overflow of
bales of "white gold." Only
two of these warehouses
remain today.
The Raney House- An
impressive example of the
Greek Revival style, built by
cotton merchant David
Greenway Raney in 1838. The
house was turned into a
Union Hospital by northern


Eye
Openers

By Dr.
Wesley Grace


20/20 VISION AND
b SPORTS
Q. Is it necessary to have
20/20 vision to be a good
athlete?
A. 20/20 vision only means
that you can see an object
clearly from a distance of
20 feet. A good athlete
needs many other visual
skills as well, including
clear near vision, depth
perception, speed of
recognition (how fast the'
visual image is processed
by the brain), quick
visual reaction time, and
good peripheral (side) vi-
sion.
A recent study of athletes
and sports officials has
shown that many athletes
whose distance vision is
clear are deficient in the
other visual skills. How-
ever, many of these skills
can be developed. Some
outstanding athletes have
: done so!
Q. Will wearing glasses
interfere with playing
baseball and tennis?
A. If you see clearly with
your glasses and are com-
fortable with them, they
should not inhibit your
sports activities. But, as a
safety precaution, make
sure that the lenses are
either scratch-resistant
plastic or impact-resis-
tant glass, in case you
accidently get hit in the
eye by a stray ball. Many
athletes prefer wearing
contact lenses. They don't
steam up in hot weather,
slip down your nose, or
feel heavy. Contact lenses
often provide clearer vis-
sion than eyeglasses and,
since there is no frame,
there is nothing to in-
terfere with peripheral
(side) vision. Consider
one of the new types of
sports goggles for extra
protection if you wear
contacts or no glasses at
all.
Brought to you as
a community service by

DR. WESLEY GRACE
OPTOMETRIST
322 Long Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida
227-1410


wmp






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HOME APPLIANCE REPAIR


* 25 years experience
In Appliance Repair
* AIR CONDITIONING
Central & Window


* HEATING: Natural Gas,
Electric & Oil


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. All Major Models


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and FREEZERS


troops when they occupied
the town in 1863. George P.
Raney, David's youngest
son, was a state legislator
and later Chief Justice of the
Florida Supreme Court. Af-
ter David Raney died in 1881,
his daughter Mary lived in
the house. It was sold after
her death in 1914 to a doctor,
who added an office on the
north side. He sold the house
in 1939, and it served as a
boarding house until 1972.
The house is now owned by
the City of Apalachicola,
which arranged for its res-
toration, completed in 1981.
The house is now on the
National Register of Historic
Places.
Chestnut Street Ceme-
tery- Markers here date
from 1831. Soldiers of the
Confederacy are buried here,
seven of whom served with


BY ROY LEE CARTER
County Extension Director
Florida is one of the few
places in our nation where
it's possible to maintain
green lawn year-round. But,
to do this, we have to use
special winter grass. This is
because most of our perma-
nent lawn grasses fade and
lose their color in late fall. By
the time the first frost
occurs, most lawns have
turned brown. So, to keep the
lawn green, we must "over-
seed" it.
In this article I will address,
overseeding your permanent
lawn with a temporary grass,
how to get it established and
how to maintain it. My
information for this article
was provided by Extension
Horticulturist Dr. Robert
Black.
Several cool-season gras-
ses can be used for overseed-
ing. But, the best one for
Florida is ryegrass. Annual
ryegrass is most popular
because the seeds germinate
rapidly, it grows fast, is
' fairly- inexpe i'and -is
adaptable to a variety of
growing conditions. It does
well in sun or shade and it
tolerates close, frequent
mowing. If seeded heavily,
annual ryegrass can provide
a dense, beautiful winter
lawn.
Establishing a winter rye-
grass is fairly. simple. The
best time to do it is after the
permanent lawn has been
turned brown by frost. You'll
have less trouble with plant
diseases late in the fall, when
temperatures are cooler.
Start by mowing the perma-,
nent lawn extra close and
raking up all debris. Dethat-
ching at this time is a good
idea. But, if you can't de-
thatch, at least remove as
much of the dead. grass as
you can with a rake, then the
leaves, not the runners of the
roots.
Next, spread the ryegrass
seeds. You'll need between
five and fifteen lbs. 'per
one-thousand sq. ft. If possi-
ble, buy seeds that have been
treated with a fungicide. And
be sure they're fresh and
weed-free. Apply the seeds
with a fertilizer spreader. To
get the most uniform stand of
ryegrass, divide the seeds
into two applications. Sow
half the seeds in one direction
over the lawn. Then, go back
and sow the rest at right
angles to your original path.
After you spread the seeds,


GOOD
SEASONS
to see your good
neighbor agent


CAR HOME
LIFE HEALTH

BILL WOOD
411 Reid Ave.
229-6514 or 229-6103
Like a good neighbor.
State Faorm is there.



STATE FARM
INSURANCE COMPANIES
Home Office.: Bloo-l.tou. nll.ol


Pickett at Gettysburg in the
Florida Brigade. Victims of
malaria and shipwrecks also
lie here, as does world-
famous botanist Dr. Alvin W.
Chapman, who died in 1899.
Chapman House- The
home of Dr. Alvin Wentworth
Chapman (1808-99), a physi-
cian and druggist. Chapman
was also a botanist of inter-
national eminence, whose
most important work was the
classics botanic cataloging,
"Flora of the Southern
United States," published in
1860.
Sponge Exchange- In the
last quarter of the 19th
century, Apalachicola bene-
fitted from a growing Florida
industry: sponge harvesting.
Although Apalach's sponge
trade never approached the
magnitude of Key West's, it
was ranked third in the state.


CARTER


rake the lawn lightly, to help
the seeds get through the
permanent grass and make
contact with the soil.
Now it's time for watering
one of the most important
steps. The newly seeded lawn
should receive light watering
once or twice a day, until the
seeds germinate. Keep the
seeds moist, but be careful

First Hunt

Season Is

Opening

Shotguns, rifles and rap-
tors will get a workout as.
three hunting seasons open in
the state on Saturday, No-
vember 5.
As the snipe season opens,
hunters are to be reminded of
the regulations for taking
migratory birds. Shotguns
must be plugged to a three-
shot capacity. The limits on
snipe are eight per day with a
possession limit of 16. The
snipe, season will close on
February 19. Steel shot is not
required for snipe hunting.
Crow season also opens on
Saturday, November 5. Hunt-
ers may take crow with
shotguns, rifles, pistols, bow
and arrows and crossbows.
There is no bag or possession
limit. The season will close
on January 8, reopening on
weekends only from January
14 to February 19 and May 19
to October 21. Crows may
also be taken out of season,
without a permit, if they are
causing damage to trees,
crops, livestock or wildlife.
Raptors (birds of prey)
will be flying as the falconry
season for snipe opens No-
vember 5 and closes Febru-
ary 19. Falconers may also
take: mourning doves, white-
winged doves, rails, galli-
nules, woodcocks, ducks and
coots during the regular open
seasons.


By 1895, between 80 and 120
men were employed in the
sponge trade, and the city
had two warehouses for
selling sponges, one of which
is still standing.
John Gorrie Museum- Dr.
John Gorrie settled in Apa-
lach in 1833. One of his main
tasks was caring for malaria
patients. In an effort to cool
the rooms of the fever-ridden
patients, he built a "cold air
machine," the forerunner of
the compression refrigera-
tor. By 1845 he had built a
small machine that would
produce blocks of ice. Dr.
Gorrie obtained a patent on
the ice-making machine in
1851, but never made any
money on it- it sounded too
fantastic to interest manu-
facturers.' However, in 1914
the State of Florida, in
recognition of his achieve-


ments, placed his statue in
the Statutory Hall of the
Capitol in Washington, D.C.,
and his original ice-making
machine is on display in the
Smithsonian Institution. The
Gorrie Museum in Apalach,
opened in 1957, contains a
replica of his first ice ma-
chine, and clothing and arti-
facts of Dr. Gorrie's time.
Sea Dream- A 40-foot
cruiser built in the 1920's,
owned by W. F. Randolph of


pot to overwater. Overwater-
ing can wash the seeds away,
and it may add to disease
problems. Once the grass is
well established, water as
needed.
The disadvantage of estab-
lishing a ryegrass lawn. is
that you'll have to fertilize'
about once a month. The first
time, use a complete fertili-
zer, an 8-8-8 or 10-10-10. For
all other applications use a
nitrogen fertilizer.
If you fertilize properly,
the ryegrass lawn will grow
quickly and you'll need to
mow about twice a week.
Begin mowing as soon as the
grass is tall enough to be cut
about one or two inches high.
Finally, watch for a di-
sease problem known as
pythium (pith-ee-um), also
called dampling off, or cot-
tony blight. It seems to cause
the most trouble on over-
watered and over fertilized
ryegrass, especially during
spells of warm weather.


Safety and


high yields

Yours from your credit union
Saving money has never been easy. And in today's
inflated economy, it's even harder. But your credit union
can help.
At your credit union, you can set up a savings plan to fit
any need. And by using payroll deduction, saving can be
.painless. just designate the amount you want deducted
each pay period and it's auto-
matically put in your savings a
account.
And because your credit union IGH
pays higher interest than most Y
banks and savings and loans, these
small payroll deductions fast become 7 :
large savings.
Credit union savings are safe, too.
Accounts are insured to the legal maxi-
mum.
For safety and yield on your savings, turn
to your credit union family. It has the right
savings plan for you.


St. Joe Papermakers
Federal Credit Union
530 Fifth Street Phone 227*1156 -


-II1


A.

HUNTING PERMITS
For Southwest Forest Industries' Lands in Florida and Alabama
Permits for hunting privileges on more than 300,000 acres of Southwest
Forest Industries' woodlands in Florida and Alabama are now on sale at
selected locations.
Permit fees, which are used to help defray the costs of establishing and
;7, maintaining good wildlife populations, are $15. The fee is $6 for persons 15
Years of age or younger; 65 years of age or older; or who hold a state-issued
4' disability hunting license.
SJ Permits may be purchased in this area at the following:
Wewahitchka Honeyville Grocery; Kinard,- Yon's Grocery;
Blountstown Tucker's Grocery; Clarksville Keel's Grocery;
i Apalachicola Betty Sangaree, Tax Collector; Sumatra -
Parrish's Grocery
Valid state hunting license required. All applicable state laws and regulations apply.


Southwest Forest Industries
iw.$,,A-Ii Southeastern Division


Apalach, and until just re-
cently still in service. In 1942
a British oil tanker was
torpedoed by a German
submarine near Cape San
Blas, 40 miles southwest of
Apalachicola. Randolph took
the Sea Dream out immedi-
ately to look for survivors.
He found only 14 survivors of
the 47 crewmen who had been
aboard. The 14 British sailors
came back to safety aboard
the Sea Dream.


STOKES PLUMBING CO.
Professional and Dependable
Plumbing Service

648-8353
4tc 10/27


Lawns

Possible In Winter In Florida


Sur-Way Electric

411 Reid Avenue


Commercial, Residential

Remodeling and

Service Work

CHARLES SOWELL

26 Years Experience
Licensed and Bonded

Call Shorty at

229-6798
@@ W@


DAN IELS SERVICE COMPANY
Phone 229-8416 or 227-1954 Port St. Joe


n(OOQQDVVYVgg Rovfjoooooo 009000000ove


i


h&6-'l












PAGE TEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 1983


Our Sharks have done it
again, folks. With a present
record of 6-1, the Sharks
defeated Florida High last
Friday night with the score
ending in a great 20-13. Hats
off to Michael Pittman, espe-
cially, for his excellent per-
formance last Friday night.
For the school's Home-
coming game, the Sharks
will host Rickards on our
home field this Friday night
at 8:00. As usual, they have
demonstrated their "JAWS"
potential, and we are very,
very proud of them.

Port St. Joe's Junior High
7 football team defeated Apa-
lachicola's Junior High team
last Thursday evening at


Shark Stadium by a score of
12-0. They will play Blounts-
town this Thursday here at
5:00, so everyone try to come
out and support our boys.
We're proud of these fellows,
as well, and all need to come
out to support them this
Thursday.

The 9th grade has recently
chosen homeroom represen-
tatives. They are as follows:
Laurie Butts, Teresa Can-
non, Paige Johnson, Teresa
Jones, Carrie Moore, Randi
McClain, Nancy Stoutamire,
and Tim Wilder.

Congratulations are in or-
der for the following Junior
magazine salespeople: An-


ette Minger, $50.00 prize;
David Whiting, $25.00 prize;
Richard Jackson, $15.00
prize.

Congratulations to Angel
Barbee on being chosen to
represent Port St. Joe High
School in the Japan-U.S.
Senate Scholarship competi-
tion.

St. Joe High's "Band of
Gold" will go to Troy State
University this Saturday to
compete in the Southeastern
States Maching Band Festi-
val. The band has worked
hard and looks to do well.

Homecoming week is here
and the halls of Port St. Joe


- Public Notices -


NOTICE TO GULF COUNTY
VOTERS
Please check the list of names listed
below. The first group of names and ad-
dresses Is a list of those people who
were mailed purge card notices and
were returned to the Supervisor of Elec-
tions due to incorrect addresses. The
second list of names were not returned
by the post office or the voter. If your
name appears on either list and you
wish to remain a voter In Gulf County
you need to contact the Supervisor of
Elections office as soon as possible.
S-. RETURNED BECAUSE OF
INCORRECT ADDRESS
PRECINCT ONE
William C. Armstrong, Oscar D.
Chance, Jr., Joseph Andrew Glass,
- Jasper N. Lee.
PRECINCT TWO
L Chrisman, Clora M. Gatlin, Jerry
L Tannehill.
PRECINCT THREE
Talmadge Cox.
PRECINCT THREE-A
Betty Jo Sailey, Marvin Bailey, Laret-
ta Mary Rowan.
;. PRECINCT SEVEN
.Luclen T. Arnold, Lynn K. Lyles,
George B. Neel, Adele Donna Slovack.
PRECINCT EIGHT '
Marilyn C. Batson,' Lula Manoah
Buckman, Martha C. Burton, Dorothy
Mae Butler, Willie Lee Butler, Carolyn
Dawson, Robert L Dunn, Janie Kay
Dykes, Mattle Green, Thelma J.
Landers, Jululs C. LeHardy, Edna
McKenzie, Alfred M. Nettles, Laquita J.
N rrls, Dorothy Jean Owens, Fred W.
Skinner III, Stanley M. Smith, Charles E.
Tiller, Argean Ware, Mary D. Warren,
Jerry Lee.Watts, Cora L. Whitehead, Iris
N. Whittington, Edward Earl Williams,
William R. Williams, Paul R. Wright, Bill
D. Wyatt.
PRECINCT NINE
Nancy S. Bell, Joe B. Blan, Jr.,
Thomas Earl Brown, Carolyn Evon
Clayton, James F. Dandy, Connie R.
Dorman, Peggy M. Gentry, Ernest'W.
Gorham, Ira S. Gorham, Mathew Sidney
Groom, Elizabeth L Hall, Randal David
Herring, Suzanne M. Hobbs; Betty Myr-
dine Johnson, Walter K. Johnson,
Mildred B. Kitchens, Walter M. Kitchen,
Bobby Glen Lightfoot, Terry Lynette
SLghtfoot, William Warner Walker, Jr.,
Bessie Swick Wimberly, Genora James
Yancey, Joseph Alfrel Yancey.
PRECINCT TEN
Dennis Sullivan Atchison, Alex Bryan
Bell, Gayla 0. Bowen, Lawrence Daniel
Bowen, Elsie L Catrett, Roy M. Catrett,
James E. Creel, Teresa F. Creel,
Dolores Mira Hattaway, Barry Lee
House, James H. Howell, June Juanita
Ingram, Carole L Kahl, William M. Kahl,
Donna Ann LaFrance, Raymond E.
Mathis, Ronnie Clayton Raffield, David
Shelton Rogers, Shirley Ann Ropers.
PRECINCT ELEVEN
Hubert Thurmond Anderson, Barbara
Ann Beckett, George Thomas Beckett,
III, James Eugene Boddye, Joseph
Jerome Cartier, Jr., Kimberly Cherie
Chllds, Lenora Conger, Johnny Wayne
Cooley, Norma M. Coulson, Desda D.
Fields, Margie Marie Henderson,
Woodrow A. Jones, Jr., Ressale I. Lee,
Jack Levins, Mary Ellen Levins, Mildred
Louise Levins, Rosle Martha Lind,
Margaret N. Moore, Bill Hale Norris,
Jeffery David Norris, Harriett W. Pate,
Jewel W. Pittman, Faye Rhames Raf-
field, Mrs. Sarah J. Sheffield, Marlene
; Silvia, Patricia Jane Smith, Eula Maxine
W. Smith, Steve R. Taylor, Sydney C.
Taylor, David Walker, Eleanor Mae
Williams, Vadalee Williams, Mark Vin-
cent Wimberly, Michael Brannon
Wimberly.
PRECINCT ELEVEN.A
Candace N. Cassis, Richard Cassis,
Harry Louis Paul, Judith M. Paul, David
W. Scott.
NAMES NOT RETURNED TO SUPV.
PRECINCT ONE
Amy J. Borders, Bobble L. Borders,
Marlin G. Brock, James B. Brogder,
Broward Grace, Gary Lester, Donald
B ay Stephens, Jeannie Leoard
Strength, J. R. Whitchard.
PRECINCT TWO
Harold Kenneth Armstrong, Debra
Anne Bailey, Shirley Whitfield
S Cosgrove, Estelle W. Harrelson,
Patricia Ann Kemp, Billy Dave Knowles,
Archle K. Kohn, Lossle G. Morgan,
Wlllard Ledlove Moseley, Charles
Oliver, Pamela D. Owens, Ray Striplin,
Jr., Bernice Turnipseed.
PRECINCT THREE
Donnie H. Bastson, O'Neil Gautier,
Albert E. Lanier, Janie Lanier, Dewey R.
Unton, Janlece A. Striplin.
PRECINCT FOUR
Murphy D. McGhee, Carolyn Steward
Thompson.
PRECINCT FIVE
Teresa Dianne Canington, Rickey
Eugene Armstrong.
PRECINCT SIX
Robert F. Cantley, Artle Lucille Cook,
Roy W. Layfleld, Janie Aman Raffield,
Steve Thomas Sullivan.
PRECINCT SEVEN
Robert Elbert Downs, Jr., Trudle
Bridges Downs.
PRECINCT EIGHT
Michele Barnes, Kenny Barr, Willie
Lee Borders, James M. Bule, Gwen-
dolyn D. Calvin, Effie G. Crawley, Don-
nIe Cross, Eddie C. Fields, Tommy L
Gardner, Jimmy 0. Gathers, Pearile
Mae Harris, Jattle M. HIxon, Charlene
Jo Hobbs, Creolea. Howell, Johnny
James Jenkins, Jr., Ronald L Jenkins,
C. M. Johnson, Catherine Lois Jones,
Sandra Denise Jones, Diana Julius,
Patricia Julius, Robert Charles Larry,
Jr., Michael Lowery, Diane Morning,
"'-.. Joyce B. Nelson, Sonja E. Nettles,


Donald M. Nickson, Doyle Eugene Nor-
ris, Oll!e Pace, Alice F. Peters, Dorothy
N. Peterson, Hosea D. Pittman, Vivian
Quinn, .Cynthia A. Raines, Patterson
Reed, Willie Grace Riley, Thomas Sims,
Donald D. A. Skanes, Patricia W. Smith,
Timothy J. Stewart, Freddie L Thomas,
,Robert James Thomas, William W.'
Thomas, Kenneth D. Turner, Lassie V.
Ware, Barbara' Ann Watts, Mary Able
Williams, Mary D. Williams, Noah C.
Williams, Simona Kay Williams, Willie
Mae Williams, Bernard Lamont Wilson,
Lottie Grace Yarrell.
PRECINCT NINE
Sarah Ann Roberts Abbott, Phyllis
Ann Blan, Stanley Lee Brant, Stephen
Ray Brant, Teresa Lynn Brown, James
G. Burnette, Stephen D. Cloud, Scott E.
Cunningham, Donald T. Durham, Lloyd
B. Etheridge, Wanda P. Etheridge,
William Daniel Etheridge, Janet G.
Glim, Billy Glen Godwin, Margie L
Grubbs, Beulah Hatfield, Willie Mae
Lollie, V. Ethel Matlock, John Randal
Parker, Ronnie E. Robershaw, James
Thomas Smith, Maude B. Thomas,
Anita Von Ward, James Harley Ward,
Cathy Lea Weston, John Williams,
Luverne Youngblood.
PRECINCT TEN
Marvin Lee Adkins, Thomas Marvin
Blackburn, Sr., Donald Wayne Capps,
Donna Louise Capps, Debbie D.
Clayton, Dewey R. Collier, Mary R. Col-
lier, Chester R. Crymes, Cherry. Anne
Crum, Rita Sue Cumble, Mary Jane
Davis, Debra H. Earley, Regina Ellis,
JayJByron Fleming, Suzanne, L Ham-
mock, Linda A Herring. Robeft Jimmy
Hicks, Teresa Anneltte Jolley, Sue Ann
Kennington, Robert Louis Lange, Jr.,
Janet Lynn Leavins, Levy Leon Lee,
Daria Sue Lyle, Mark -Stewart Lyle,
Donald Clair McLawhon, Timothy
Palmer McLeod, James Lester Mc-
'Quaig, Julia 0. McQualg, Chester
Lamar Mathis,. Hosie .Kevin Owens,
Stephen Troy Parrish, Maydell Pettis,
William Brown Simmons III, Vicki
McGllI Smith, Ralph A. Swatts, Jr., Bob-
by Gene Taylor, Clifford John Tharpe,
Jr., William Robert Wall, Scott Craig
White, Katherine Louise Whitfield,
Joseph L. Whittington.
PRECINCT ELEVEN
Joel Denny Adams, Teresa Dale
Adams, William Bill Allen, Mary Fran
Allen, Elizabeth Elaine Atchison, Carol
Marie Barton, Jacob Chapman Belln,
Jr., Stephen Andrew Belln, Margie B.
Bennett, Maxine Benthall, Wanda
Marie Beasley, Dennis Moore Bradley,
Terri Donna Brown, Gregory Lee Burch,
Wandell E. Butler, Jerry Wayne Clift,
Loyce Theresa Counts, J. Keith David-
son, William Paul Davis, Dora M.
Dykes, Phillip Dykes, Stella Joy Dykes,
Susan Victoria Fowler, Robert Ray
Freeman, Jr., Charles Wayne Gable,
Dianne D. Gable, Grace Gay, Cynthia Jo
Gentry, Robert Crawford Gibson, Jr.,
William Roy Gibson, Nettle Brannon
Graves, Samuel Graves, Ruth Chandler
Henderson, T. W. Hlnote, Velma Hiriote,
Ethel 0. Holliday, Wanda Darlin Kelley,
Wilma Kelley, Mary L Knox, Frances E.
LeHardy, Rhonda Griner Lemacks,
Janet D. Lollie, Roy Henry Lollie, Jr.,
Sophie Lucia McKerman, David B. May,
Jr., Michael Anderson May, Eydie
Charlene Murray, Howard Wayne Neel,
Rose Marie Noble, Mary Helen Nolen,
Roy Nolen, Dennis J. Norris, Barbara
Stephens Nunery, Benjamin Fern
Nunery, Sammy C. Parker, Sr., Frank
Wayne Pate, Jae Joines Pate, Laura F.
Ramsey, Sonny Alford Ramsey,
Michael Tillman Register, George
Walter Simmons, Bertha Beatrice
Smith, Lucille Stripling, Pauline W.
Swan, Richard Gene Varnum, Fred'
Ward, Joy Rena Williamson, Mary Iris
Willilamson, Howard Steven Wombles,
Edna Wood, Phyllis Sue Wyche.
PRECINCT ELEVEN-A
Henry A. Hendry, James Michael
Mock.
it 1113

FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned persons intend to register
with the Clerk of the Circuit court. Gulf
County, Florida, four weeks after the
first publication of this notice, the fic-
titious name or trade name under which
they will be engaged in business and in
which said business is to be carried on,
to-wit:
M&B ENTERPRISES
Rt. 1, Box 205
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465
Wilmer C. Stitt, Jr.
and
MarJorie L Stitt,
Owners
4tp 10127

NOTICE OF HEARING ON
PROPOSED ORDINANCE
Notice is hereby given that the Board
of City Commissioners of the City of
Ward Ridge, Florida, will hold a public
hearing in.the Commissioners Room in
the City Hall of Ward Ridge, on
November 7, 1983 at 6:30 P.M. for the
purpose of hearing from any person or
persons on the proposed Ordinance
establishing a Flood Plain or Flood Pro-
ne Area and establishing eligibility In
the National Flood Insurance Program.
Said proposed Ordinance may be ex-
amined or Inspectdd at the City Hall or
by contacting the Mayor of the City of
Ward Ridge.
CITY OF WARD RIDGE,
By: I/s ALLEN V. McCULLEY, Mayor
Attest:
Is/ MARY E. KEITH, City Clerk
2t 10127


NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Board of County Commissioners of
Gulf County, Florida, at Its regular
meeting on November 22, 1983, at 7:00
p.m., E.S.T., in the County Commis-
sioner's Room in the Gulf County
Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, will
consider the adoption of an ordinance
with the following title:
AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO
REGULATION OF DEVELOPMENT
AND BUILDING PERMITS; RE-
QUIRING ALL DEVELOPMENT
AND PERMITS TO BE CONSIS-
TENT WITH COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN; ESTABLISHING PROCE-
DURES FOR PROCESSING AP-
PLICATIONS FOR PERMITS; PRO-
VIDING FOR PRESERVATION OF
RIGHTS AND SEVERABILITY;
PROVIDING FOR VARIANCES;
NAMING THE BOARD OF COUN-
TY COMMISSIONERS AS THE
LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY; PRO-
VIDING A PENALTY FOR VIOLA-
TION; AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
A copy of this Ordinance is on file In
the office of the Clerk of Circuit Court
of Gulf County, Florida.
BOARD of COUNTY COMMISSIONERS,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Everett Owens, Jr.
Chairman
Attest: Jerry Gates, Clerk
2t 10/27

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
CASE NO. 83-31


In Re: The Estate of
BOBBIE. LEE BORDERS,
deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED .that
the administration of the Estate of
BOBBIE LEE BORDERS, deceased,
Case No. 83-31, is pending In the Circuit
Court of Gulf County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is P. 0.
Box 968, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456.
The Personal Representative of the
estate Is Barbara Borders Whitaker,
whose address Is 2425 Ormond Avenue,
Panama City, Florida 32401. The name
and address of the Personal Represen-
tative's attorney are as set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the Clerk of the above Court a writ-
ten statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the basis for
the claim, the name and address of the
creditor or his agent or attorney, and
the amount claimed. If the claim is not
yet due, the date when It will become
due shall be stated. If the claim is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the nature of
the uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim Is secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to the
Clerk to enable the Clerk to mail one (1)
copy to each Personal Representative.
All persons interested in the estate,
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE to file
any objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the decedent's
Will, the qualifications of the Personal
Representative, or the venue or jurisdic-
tion of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS LAND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. '
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: November 3,
1983.
15/ BARBARA BORDERS WHITAKER,
Personal Representative of the estate
of Bobbie Lee Borders
WILLIAM J. RISH,
303 Fourth Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(904) 229-8211
Attorney for Personal Representative
2t 11/3

BID NUMBER 290
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida re-
quests bids for one (1) Rear Mounted
Sweeper. Specifications may be obtain-
ed from the City Clerk's Office, P. 0.
Box -A, 'Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Bid
opening to be held November 15, 1983,
at 8:00 P.M., E.S.T., in the Municipal
Building at the regular meeting of the
City Commission
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE,
By: Is/ L. A. Farris,
City Auditor/Clerk 2t 11/3
BID NUMBER 291
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida re-
quests bids for one (1) All Purpose Trac-
tor. Specifications may be obtained
from the City Clerk's Office, P. 0. Box
A, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. Bid open-
ing to be held November 15, 1983, at
8:00 P.M., E.S.T., in the Municipal
Building at the regular meeting of the
City Commission
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE,
By: /s/ L. A. Farris,
City Auditor/Clerk 2t111/3


Shark


Students Selling Tickets


for Fish Fry On Nov. 12


Scoops

from Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School


by MELISSA WOOD


High are stirring with fun
and excitement. Each day
this week, students have had
a certain, "different" style of
dress and appearance. Mon-
day, for example, everyone
wore his cutest (and some-
times spookiest), costume.
Tuesday was hat and shade
day, and so on, throughout
this week. Friday is spirit
day and students, and even
faculty, will be wearing
school colors to show our
support to the mighty
Sharks.
Several contests are and
will be going on this week at
Port St. Joe High, ranging
from the classroom door
contest, to the sign contest in
the gym, to the final and
anticipated class float con-
test to be held Friday at the
Homecoming parade. The
parade will begin at 4:00 on
Main Street. It will consist of
all class floats, the 1983-84
Homecoming Court, the Port
St. Joe "Band of Gold," and
plenty more.
The game Friday night will
begin at 8:00 with half-time
ceremonies centering around
this year's Homecoming
Court and the new Home-
coming Queen to be announ-
ced then.
The Student Council is also
sponsoring a dance after the
game for all students and
their guests.

Congratulations to the fol-
lowing on being nominated
for the following National
Merit Awards:
English- Junior High: Yo-
landa Daniels, Stacy Kemp,
Nancy Stoutamire, Wendy
Groos, Patricia Lee, Kristin
Totman, Christy McDaniel,
Michelle Hicks, Michael
Ramsey, Jody Evans, Mick-
ey Lewter, Lee Parker,
Tracy Melvin, Mitch Mc-
Christian, Howard Richards,
Tim Davis, Phillip Nedley,
and David Staab;
English- Juniors: Reed
McFarland, Chris Butts, Du-
rey Cadwell, Mitch Bouing-


Parents and friends of
Faith Christian School will
sponsor a Fish Fry in con-
junction with the Annual
Harvest Festival, November


ton, Annette Minger, Angel
Barbee, and Hope Lane;
English- Seniors: John
Casanni, Melissa Wood,
Trish Tapper, Traci Mc-
Clain, Ronda Kemp, Brandy
Wood, Pam Sanborn, Stacy
Creel, and Debbie Beasley.
Creative Writing- Jamie
Campbell, Sheila Lucas,
Brett Kelly, Letha Rice,
DeAnn Young, Sandy King,
Christy Angerer, and Paula
Ward.
Congratulations also go to
the following students on
receiving United States Na-
tional Speech and Drama
Awards: Staci Angerer, Vic-
ki Barlow, LeAnn Clenney,
Trish Tapper, Debbie Wil-
hite, Brandy Wood, and
Melissa Wood.

Here are some more new
officers for the 1983-84 school
year:
Monument Staff: Editor,
Lisa Gant; Co-Editor, Melis-
sa Wood; Secretary, Stacy
Creel; Treasurer, Becky
Moore.
Junior Honor Society: Pre-
sident, Carl White, Jr.; Vice-
President, Lisa Jones; Secre-
tary, Laurie Butts; Trea-
surer, Nancy Stoutamire.

Last Friday night, the PSJ
cheerleaders had an unfor-
tunate accident on the way
home from Tallahassee. The
mini-bus hit a horse and
turned over to its side. No one
was hurt severely, but Mrs.
Martha Sanborn is now in the
Tallahassee Memorial Hospi-
tal. She has a broken arm,
and everyone wishes her a
speedy recovery.


12 from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. at
the corner of Fifth Street and
Reid Avenue.
Students are selling tick-
ets this week in a contest for
individual winners and for
class participation. Dinners
can also be bought that day
on the site. For $3.00 you will
eat fresh mullet, home made
slaw and baked beans, hush
puppies and iced tea. There
will also be a free perform-
ance by "Juggling John" at
11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Barbeque sandwiches will
be available for sale as well
as baked goods for dessert.
Make plans to come eat at
the Faith Christian School
Harvest Festival next Satur-
day. Carry out orders are
welcomed.


Maj. Gant In

Washington

,Maj. Raymond C. Gant,
brother of Chester J. Gant,
Jr. and Annie G. Baker of
Port St. Joe, has arrived for
duty at Bolling Air Force
Base, Washington.
Gant, a dentist with the
1100th Air Base Wing, was
previously assigned at RAF
Upper Heyford, England.
His wife, Lenora, is the
daughter of Nathan and
Mary W. Peters of 154 Ave.
F, Port St. Joe.
The major received his
doctorate in 1977 from Me-
harry Medical College, Nash-
ville.

HAM & TURKEY SHOOT
The Mexico Beach Volunteer
Fire Dept. is holding a ham
& turkey shoot, Sat. & Sun.,
starting at 1 p.m. CDT,
across from Phillips 66 Gas
Station on Hwy. 98.
Ev-eryone is welcomed.
5tc 10/13


Beacon Hill. 3 bdrm., 1 ba. home
located on 3 beautiful lots, 3 sides are
fenced, includes appliances & some
furnishings.


Waterfront Shoreline Apt. Hwy. 98.2
bdrm., 1 be. waterfront furnished apt.
w/excel. potential. Great for rentals.


2nd St. Mexico Beach. Beautiful dbl.-
wide mobile home on 75'x122.2' lot w
front & back decks, fireplace with mar-
ble hearth, cement drive.


Port St. Joe. 2 bdrm., 1 bae. furnished
home on beautifully landscaped com-
pletely fenced 50'x170' lot. Owner fi-
nancing available. Quiet neighborhood,
convenient to all your in-town needs.


DOUBLEISC


"Ov er 5 .ie





C*A&
3. 6 A

$ e


34th St. Mexico Beach. Brick quadra-
plex or 2 duplexes. Beachside, ex-
cellent for rental investment. Very close
to beach. Call for more details.


4th St. Mexico Beach. 3 bdrm., 2 ba.
furnished mobile home on Ig. desirable
mobile home lot with trees. Short walk
to beach.


Advertising Gets Results!





ERA PARKER


\REALTY, Realtor

.\( ^ HIGHWAY 98 & 31st ST.
MEXICO BEACH, FLORIDA

S648-5777
1-800-874-5073 (Outside Fla.)

1-800-342-6692 (Inside Fla.).
Cathey Hobbs, Realtor-Associate
Vi I Rhonda Heath Pierce, Realtor-.
Associlate, 648-5264
Orena Miller, Associate 648-5894
S- Barbara Sullivan, Assoc. 648-5301
C/' L.. Christy Davis, Assoc. 6484-518
Donnie Lange, Assoc. 229-8751


I i










THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 1983 PAGE ELEVEN


Owner must sell 2 bdrm.
house facing bay on Hwy. 98.
Cen. h/a, 2 Florida rms., dbl.
garage, on 2 fenced lots. If
interested call 1/385-1625 or
1/877-9387, ask for Mr. Ken-
nedy. 2tc 1-3
Trailer & lot, St. Joe Beach
on Coronado St. 2 bdrm.,
screened porch & util. rm,
cen. h&a, 1 lots. Call 904/
526-3375 days or 904/526-2778
nights and weekends.
2tc 11/3
2 acre mini-farm with
remodeled mobile home.
Mobile home & equity in
land, $11,000. Assume pay-
ments on land, $96.02 per mo.
Acreage cleared, mobile
home partially furnished. 6
mi. so. of Wewa on Hwy. 71.
Will trade for motor home or
5th wheel. Call 639-5419.
3tD11/3
Lot on Coronado St., St.
Joe Beach. High & dry. Rea-
sonably priced. Call 648-5994
or 6484351. 3tc 10/27
House for Sale: 517 10th
St., Port St. Joe, $28,000.
Owner financing available
with 25% down. Call after 6
p.m., 6484-8339. tfc 9/15


Beacon Hill brick home,
overlooks Gulf; lot 120'x130';
auto/boat garage; access to
beach; block west of beacon.
Shown by appt. only. Dr.
Morley, 904/785-3641, 904/
648-5821. 7tc 10/20
At Mexico Beach. Like
new 12x70' 1979 mobile home
and lot, 3 bdrm., 2 ba., cen.
h&a, 1st class furniture,
mini-blinds, skirted. Has
12x16' deck, level with roof of
mobile home. Excel. Gulf
view. 50x150' lot. Second lot
from Hwy. 98, Fortner Ave.,
between 3rd & 4th St. Call
648-8225 or 205/735-3988.
tfc 10/13
New Home by owner: 3
bdrm., 2 ba., breakfast rm.,
great rm. cen. h&a, double
garage, inside laundry, close
to schools. Corner of Tapper
and Saunders Circle. $59,000.
Call 229-6913. tfc 10/6
For Sale by Owner: 2.6
acres on Palmetto Drive,
Overstreet. Cleared, septic
tank, deep well, power pole,
Ig. shed. Owner financing
available with 50% down.
Call 648-5094. 4tp 10/13


FOR GREAT BUYS,
SHOP THE WANT ADS


NEW ON MARKET. Brick home, 5 years old with 3 bdrm., 2 be., cen. air/heat,
fireplace, convenient to school. $48,500. Call for appt.
Lot at Mexico Beach, 150'x150', already cleared, $10,000.
NEW ON MARKET. Commercial lot in Port St. Joe, located in high traffic
area, $11,500.00.
Two BR, 1 ba. home on Garrison Ave. w Ig. carport that could be converted
to liv. area. FHA, VA terms available. At only $29,500, an ideal retirement
home or starter home.
An Ideal retreat for the sportsman and his family. 3 bdrm., 2 be. mobile
home, a total 1500 sq. ft. of living space In good cond. Only $19,600.
100' on the gulf and 100' on Indian Pass lagoon including older home on the
lagoon. Beautiful property and room enough for another home. Priced at
$135,000.
3 bdrm., 2 ba. brick veneer with new roof, and good financing. Assumable
9Y2% VA loan. Owner also willing to take back second mortgage w
reasonable down payment.
CAPE SAN BLAS
NEW ON MARKET! 2 bdrm., 1 ba. cedar home on pilings. Cedar exterior,
carpeting & appliances. Cen. h&a, located in restricted subdv., bayside. On-
ly $67,000.
Bayfront lots, $25,000. Good owner financing.
MOVE UP TO LUXURY in one of St. Joe's most beautiful neighborhoods.
Your family will enjoy the privacy of 4 bdrms., 3 be. and Ig. lot. Address
you'll be proud to have. By appointment only.

PROPERTY OF THE WEEK: Two residential lots at Ward Ridge. High and
dry, and only $11,500 for both.

Hannon Insurance & Real Estate Agency
221 Reid Ave. 227-1133 Port St. Joe
Roy Smith, Associate
Margelyn Woodham, Associate 648-8231,
Karen King, Associate


2 Walker hunting dogs,
$100 each. Call 639-5980.
100% cedar garbage can
holders double or triples.
Enclosed sides. $40 & up.
Assorted cedar lumber. Call'
648-5421. It 11/3
18' Mastermo boat with 05
h.p. Mercury and 20' shrimp
net. Call 229-8700. 2tp11/3
Dinette set, brass legs &
back with white top & cus-
hions. $100. Call 229-8423.
Cast net, monafilament 10'
long, good shape. May be
seen at Overstreet Fire
Tower, 648-5074. Itp
41 magnum Luger Black-
hawk, very good cond. $175.
Call 2294589. ltp 11/3
State-wide Homes of
Florida, Inc. '83 CLEAR-
ANCE SALE. All homes
delivered & set-up. 2 bdrm. -
$130 per mo.; 3 bdrm. $188
per mo.; 3 bdrm. double
wide $274 per mo.; 2 bdrm.
used, $5,600; 2 bdrm. used,
$3,500. Satisfaction always
guaranteed. Hwy. 231,
Panama City, Fla. 763-4657.
See Ron, Greg or Bill.
ltc 11/3
Brothers sewing machine,
brand new, $75. Call 229-8589.
20' Glastron boat with V6
Volvo, 285 outdrive foot. In-
cludes trailer, $1,800, Inquire
at St. Joseph State Park, ask
for Bob. Engine needs work.
2tc 10/27
1982 14'x64' mobile home, 2
bdrms., 1g. garden tub, cen.
h&a, with skirting. Assume
payments of $187.00 per
month. Call 648-560.tfc 10/27
One new 20' shrimp net,
also several hunting bows &
arrows. Call 227-1627. tfc 9/22
250 gallon gas tank. Call
229-664. 2tc 10/27


Sale prices on mini-
frames, sizes 3"x4" to
5"x7", custom made from
our finest mouldings, com-
plete with mat & glass.
Perfect for needlework,-
snapshots, school pictures
and small art prints. Stock
up for Christmas! Pat's
Mats & Frames, 406 7th St.,
Mexico Beach, 6484914.


ST. JOSEPH BAY REALTY
98008 EAST HIGHWAY 98 P. O. Bx 1332
U^ "MEXICO BEACH, FL 32410 i--0
72 Y REAL ESTA TE SALES BEACH RENTALS REALTOR

648-5011 Sales 648-5716 Rentals After Hours: 648-8977


MEXICO BEACH
1st St. 2 bd, 2 ba. house on ex. Ig. lot
- $74,000. _____
16th St. 2 bd, 1 ba. fenced yd, close
to beach $55,000.
Oak Ave. 3 bd., 2 be. NEW house on-
ly $62,500. ______
Maryland Ave. 2 trailers with 2 bd, 1
be. $25,000 and $22,000.
Carolina Ave. 2 bd, 1 ba. trailer only
$24,000.
1st St. -/3 acre and small 1 bd, 1 ba.
house $22,000.
35th St. 2 bd, 1 ba. house -beachslde
- only 149,000.
27th St. 2 bd, 1 be. house -$39,000.
8th St. 3 bd, 2 ba. brick -$68,500.
6th St. 2 bd, 2 ba. good VA
assumable 11%/2% only $49,000.
Nan Nook 3 bd, 2 ba. has apt. at-
Jached 1 bd, 1 ba. on 2 Ig. lots
4$80,000. __
Arizona Ave. beautiful 3 bd, 2 ba.
house w many extras, $78,000.
Florida Ave. 2 bd, 1 ba trailer (reduc-
ed) $22,000.
7th St. Beautiful double wide w
many extras, 3 bd 2 ba. $47,000.
34th St. 4 bd, 2 ba. stilt house extra
special at $104,000.
4th St. Alley 1 bd, 1 ba. $35,500.
Grand Isle 3 bd 2 ba. den 2
fireplaces, swimming pool on 2 Ig.
lots $79,000.____
BEACH FRONT
19th St. Hwy. 98 Mexico Beach 3
bd 2 ba, 1720 sq. ft., $99,900 owner
financed.
Atlantic St. end St. Joe Beach -3 bd,
2 ba. each side deluxe duplex to be
constructed $125,000 ea. side.
Beach View St. Joe Beach -2 bd, 1
ba. on hw. w/non-obstructed view
-t78,000. _____

BEACHSIDE
MEXICO BEACH
Circle Dr. duplex 2 bd 1 ba. each side
-total $89,500 great buy.
42nd St. Townhouse 2 bd, 1 '2 ba.
each side 4-$89,500 total.
41st St. To be constructed 1 bd., 1
be. top of line construction $41,500.


11800-874-5299 (out of State)


Townhouse 2 bdrm., 1 'I ba. furnish-
ed, $67,000. On 32nd St.
42nd St. 2 bd 1 be. $63,500 only
10% down at 13/2% owner financ-
ing.
Circle Dr. Sandpiper #1 3 bd. 2 ba.
brick $79,000.
Circle Dr. Sandpiper #2 3 bd 2 ba.
brick at $79,000.
Circle Dr. 3 yrs. old 3 bd 2 ba. brick
$85,000. _____
24th and 25th Sts. 3 bd 2 bath only
$68,000.
28th St. & Hwy. 98 2 bd 1 '2 be. only 3
left at $59,900 as.
42nd St. 2 bd 2'/2 bea. owner financ-
ing at $79,500 with 10% down, 13%
-20 years.
HIGHWAY SIDE -
MEXICO BEACH
Hwy. 98 and 28th St. Duplex 2 bd 1
ba. each side $55,000 total.
Hwy. 98 and 29th St. Duplex 2 bd 1
ba. each side $65,000 total.
Hwy. 98 and 29th St. Duplex 1 bd., 1
be. each side $45,000 total.
ST. JOE BEACH
Fla. Ave. 3 bd 2 ba. with 3 lots and
many extras. $52,900.
Desoto St. 2 bd 1 be. $43,000 with
owner financing.
BEACON HILL
4th Ave. 3 bd 1 bath house on 3 lots
-$36,000. ___

PORT ST. JOE
125 Bellamy Circle NEW LISTING 3
bd 1 ba. Ig. lot, good retirement or
young couple home $36,500.
1301 Constitution Dr. 4 bd., 3 ba.
beautiful home w ex. special water
view, $115,000.
510 8th St. Apartment building only
$45,000.
103 Yaupon new brick 3 bd. 2 be.
garage screened porch, extras,
$59,500. ____
9th St. 4 bd 2 ba. In good area for
$30,000.
516 9th St. 4 bd. 1 be. 11'/ lots,
$23,000.


104 Yaupon Redwood and brick 3
bd., 2 ba. $65,000.
Extra special 3 bd, 2 ba. call for more
Info $75,000, good financing.
Large Family here it is brick 5 bd., 2
be., 8 yrs. old $95,000.
You must see this to appreciate it
-Palm Blvd., 3 bd., 2 be. $689,000.
706 Woodward 4 bd., 2 ba. fenced
yd. $22,500.
1610 Long Ave. 4 bd., 1 bea. fenced
back yard, $29,000.
1306 Long Ave. 2 bd., 1 be. $29,000.
Long Ave. Duplex 2 and 3 bd. 1 be.
ea. $45,000 total.
205 Tapper Dr., Ward Ridge 3 bd..,
1'/2 be. Ig. lot nice & neat home
4-$36,000.


TOWNHOUSES
BEACHFRONT
Gulf Aire Townhomes, Gulf Aire
Beach between St. Joe Beach & Mex-
ico Beach. 2 bd., 2'/2 ba. starts at
$83,500. 3 bd., 2'/1 be. -starts at
$115,000.
Dolphin Run, Hwy. 98 & 9th, 2 bd., 21'/
be. $82,000. 3 bd., 2'.2 be., $92,000.
Sail-Away, 3 & 4 Atlantic St. end, St.
Joe Beach 3 bd., 2 ba. $125,000.
NOT BEACHFRONT
Sandcastle, 41st St., 2 bd., 1'% bae.
-$59,500 (furnished, owner financed
at $20,000 down, 12% int., 20 yrs.)
Blue Water Townhouses 28th St., 2
bd., 1'/i ba. $59,500.
Casa Del Mar Hwy. 98 & 11th St., 2
bd., 1 '/i ba. $69,000 furnished.
Warren James 32nd St., 2 bd., 1 Vi
be. $69,500 furnished.
Sea Side 14th St., 2 bd., 1'%1 ba.
479,500.
Pier Pointe 37th St., 2 bd., 1% ba.
4-$75,000. _____
Casa Del Mar St. Joseph Shores, 2
bd, 1' ba. $69,000. St. Joseph
Shores, 2 bd., 1 ba. $45,000.
Arena Del Mar beautiful duplex -Gulf
Alre subd., 3 bd., 2 be. & study,
-$95,000. ____
Marina Del Ray 42nd St., 2 bd., 1 /2
be. $52,500.____


Discount Family Home,
2325 E. 15th St., Panama Ci-
ty. Mobile Home, take over
payments, 1983, like new
cond., 14'x70', 3 bdrm., 2 ba.
Small transfer fee & assume
pmts. $196.14 per month. For
more information, call Mr.
Wells, 769;0224. 4tc 10/20

$25.00 REWARD
for Any Sewing Machine
We Cannot Repair
SPECIAL $9.95
to clean, oil and adjust ten-
sion on your sewing
machine. We guarantee your
machine can sew on any
fabric.
The Sewing Room
410A Reid Avenue
227-1151'
tfc 6/30
The Town of Mexico Beach
has declared the property
listed below as surplus to the
Town's needs and will sell to
anyone who makes the high-
est offer:
2 45 gal. fuel tanks
1 ditching machine
1 small military trailer w
steam cleaner attached
1 small gas operated en-
gine
1 adding machine
1 typewriter
40 -gals. of hydrochloric
acid
10 -gals. of O.D. paint
5 gals. of roofing cement
10"-flash card filing
cabinets
1 used lawnmower
100 2x4 ceiling tiles
(grates)
1 bushhog
1 1979 Ford police car

The following items will be
sold "sealed bid" only:
1 gas operated welder on
wheels
1 garbage truck .. ,
1 ---4-wheel drive military
ambulance (excel. hun-
ting vehicle)
1 1977 Dodge police car
2 G.E. AC generators
(45 KW-208/416 volts, 3
phase) diesel motor
"Sealed Bids" must be
marked on the-envelope; all
bids received not later than
4:00 P.M., November 4,1983.
For further information con-
tact Councilman Tom Hud-
son at (904) 648-5023 or write
Town of Mexico Beach, P. O.
Box 13425, Mexico Beach, FL
32401. The Town reserves the
right to reject any or all bids.
2t 10/27


WATKINS PRODUCTS
I229-6023
Otfc 10/27






1966 Chevrolet Impala,
good mill car. $300 firm. Call
229-6769. Itp,
1983 2 door Ford Fairmont,
low mileage, excel. cond.
Call 229-6841 after u v.m.
Like new 1982 Toyoto 4x4,
a/c, heater, am/fm, st. shift,
all terrain tires, low
mileage. Call 229-8153 or
229-8870. tfc 9/29
1976 Chevy customized
van, new paint job, new ex-
haust system, Call after 5
p.m. 229-6128. tfc 10/20




FOUND: One motorcycle
helment, may be claimed at
The Star.
REWARD FOR RETURN
OF WHITE PITT BULLDOG
Lost in Cape .area while cam-
ping Oct. 29 & 30. Dog has
brown & black circle around
1 eye and has on brown col-
lar. Answers to the name of
"Nasty". Dog is on medica-
tion. Call 904/648-8353.


For Rent: 2 bdrm. unfur-
nished duplex on beach; and
2 bdrm. unfurnished house
on beach. Call Charles at
229-8282 or after 5, call
670-8417. tfc 11/3
Office space for rent, 203
Monument Ave. Desirable
location. Call 229-8697 after 5
p.m.
3 bedroom, 2 ba., double
wide mobile home. Furnish-
ed, cen. h&a, Ig. screened
porch, on 2 lots. Comp. fenc-
ed. Lease, no pets. Call
229-6553. ltp11/3

2 bedroom apartment, un-
furnished, upstairs at 509
10th St. Call 229-6688.
tfc 10/13
For Rent: 3 bedroom trail-
er at Overstreet. 648-5306.
tic 10/13
Two mobile home lots, $55
per month. Rustic Sands
Campgrounds, 15th St., Mex-
ico Beach, 648-5229. tfc 9/1
SKI BREEZE
Camping, mobile home, 2
bdrm. apt. and campers for
rent, day, week or month. On
the gulf, beach or wooded
site. Bill and Renee Schlick-
man. Res. 229-6105. tfc 7/7
3 bdrm. house in White Ci-
ty, unfurnished. Deposit re-
quired. Call 229-6825.
4tp 10/20
Large 1 bdrm. apartment,
unfurnished, 1508 Long Ave.
Deposit required. Call
229-6825. 4tp 10/20
Furnished very nice 2
bdrm. house, auto. heat &
air, screened porch, closed
garage, fenced yd. Washer &
dryer. No Pets. Call 229-6777
after 7 p.m. tfic 10/20
Furnished small nice 1
bdrm. house, ideal for 1 per-
son. Auto. heat. No Pets. Call
229-6777 after 7 p.m. tfc 10/20
No need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
227-1251.
Room for Rent: by day,
week, month. Air cond., TV.
Thames Hotel. 2294823. 302
Reid Ave. tfc 10/27

For carpets cleaned the
way professionals do it-at a
fraction ,of the cost, rent
Rinse N Vac, the portable
steam carpet cleaning
system. Available at
Western Auto, phone
227-1105, 219 Reid Ave.




GOVERNMENT JOBS -
Thousands of vacancies
must be filled immediately.
$17,634 to $50,112. Call
716-842-6000, ext. 32261.


YARD SALE: Toys, tup-
perware, Avon products,
odds and ends. Friday, 9 to 1,
518 7th St.
Yard Sale: Baby clothes,
ladies' size 12 clothes, table,
antique chest of drawers,
$40; toys, much more. Fri-
day, 7:30 to 12. 406 2nd St.,
Highland View. Call 229-6604.
Yard Sale; Fri. and Sat.,
1602 Garrison Ave. Jeans,
husky and slims. Lots of
odds and ends. Itp


BABYSIT IN MY HOME
from 8 to 5. Ages 2 to 4 years.
Also camper shell for sale,
$100. Call 2294055. Itp
29 year old housewife
would like to do babysitting
in her home For information
call 229-8893. ltp
Babysitting in my home
during week days only. Call
for appointment. 648-8226.
2tcll1/3
Carpet Cleaning, mini-
mum drying time. Call Pete,
674-8103. It 11/3
Pressure Washing
Houses, drives, sidewalks,
concrete & brick. Wood or
paint prepping. Call Pete,
674-8103. It 11/3
Fire Wood Oak and pine
lighter. Call Pete, 674-8103.
It 11/3
McClellan Sod Farms,
centipede sod, sprinkler sysr
terns- installed. Call Pete,
674-8103. It 11/3

Walls, woodwork, and win-
dows cleaned. Also some
yard work by experienced
husband and wife. Mr.
Sollars. 227-1490.

Psychological Services for
anyone with problems in
day-to-day living. Gulf Coun-
ty Guidance Clinic. Port St.
Joe. 227-1145 (24 hrs.)


J. Walter (Jimmy)
Johnson Construction Co.
New HOmes Additions
Decks
Call Us for Free Estimates
229-8757
tfe 7/7


Wauneta's
Accounting &
Income Tax
220 Peld Ave.
Ph. 229-8536
HOURS: Monday Sat.
8 a.m. 5 p.m.
(Open during noon hour)
Open after 5 p.m. by appt.
Wauneta Brewer Pat Hohman
Owner Assistant
(Used to be at 116 Monument)


OWN YOUR OWN
DESIGNER JEAN &
SPORTSWEAR STORE. Na-
tional Company offers uni-
que opportunity selling na-
tionally advertised brands at
substantial savings to your
customers. This is for the
fashion minded person qual-
ified to own and operate this
high profit business.
$20,000.00 investment in-
cludes beginning inventory;
fixtures; supplies; training;
grand opening; and air fare
(1) person to corporate
training center. For
Brochure and Information
call 1-501-329-8327. AN EX-
CLUSIVE SHOP.


FOR QUICK RESULTS
USE THE CLASSIFIED


I think it was something I ate



kills bugs for
up to six months,

and saves you about $100 yearly
in costly poet control services.
Use of Sprayer free with
purchase of Rid-A-Bug
HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe. Florida


Yard Sale: Sat., Nov. 5,
corner of 4th & Georgia,
Mexico Beach. 8:00 12:00
c.t. Stereo stand, clothes,
dishes, small appliances,
aquarium, and lots of odds
and ends.
Backyard Sale: 2109 Long
Ave., 9 a.m. until 1. Sat.,
Nov. 5. Rain cancels.
Yard Sale: Bay St., St. Joe
Beach, 9 till 4. Thursday &
Friday. ltp 11/3

Big Garage Sale! Friday
8-4, Sat., 9-12. You don't want
to miss this sale! 1117 Gar-
rison Ave.


Air Conditioning Heating
Refrigeration Appliance
Parts and Service
DANIELS SERVICE CO.
Electric Plumbing -
Appliance Repair
All Brands
Norris Daniels
Phone 229-8416
106 Bellamy Circle
tfc 7/7
Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday, 4:00 P.M., E.S.T.
Tuesday, 8:00 P.M., E.S.T.
Al-Anon
Tuesday, 8:00 P.M., E.S.T.
St. James Episcopal Church
Phone 229-8720

Carpentry & Concrete
18 Yrs. Experience
Ira J. Nichols
319 6th St., Highland View
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
904/2294235
tfc 6/5


SHALLOW WELLS
DRILLED
Call 648-5476
.tfe10/27


COSTIN INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
All Forms of Insurance
322 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tfc 7/7



SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!


Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151


Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reid Avenue


Yard Sale: Fri., Nov. 4,206
10th St., turn by Methodist
Church. Camper shell, $100.
Baby items, ltp 11/3
Yard Sale: Sat., Nov. 5, 9
till 3. Corner Pineda & Ala-
bama, St. Joe Beach. Rain
cancels.
Yard Sale: Sat., Nov. 5th,
Santa Anna St., second block
on the right. Crafts, dishes,
clothing, etc. Cancelled if
raining.
Garage Sale: Sat., Nov. 5,
8 to 1. 1616 Palm Blvd.
Men's, women's and chil-
dren's clothing. Children's
books, household & misc.
items.


SERVICE


FLORIST & GIFT SHOPPE
St. Joseph Bay Flowers
& Gifts
319 Reid Ave. Ph: 2294343
Port St. Joe, Florida
If no answer call 229-8964
Jeri Rich Ashcraft, owner
Hrs.: 9-5:00, M, T, Th, F, S
9:00-12:00 Wednesday
tfc 7/7

ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work Welding
506 First Street
Phone 2294-6803
Machinist on Duty All Day
Every Day
12/83

THE LAUNDRY ROOM
408 Reid Ave. 229-6954
Open 7 Days A Week
Mon. Sat., 8 a.m. 6 p.m.
Sun. 10 a.m. 6 p.m.
Self service or-drop/off
tfc 10/6


St Joseph Bay


CUSTOM HOMES-
REMODELING
229.8795


Going Fishing?
Stop here first
for a complete
line of

Fishing Tackle
HURLBUT SUPPLY
306 Reid Avenue


The Sewing Room
S 410 A Reid Avenue O
P 14 1 Port St. Joe, Florida 0O

"Quality Fabrics at Affordable Prices"




REEVES FURNITURE &

/ REFINISHING SHOPPE
e s Phone 229-6374

Call and Talk to Us About Get-
ting Your Furniture Refinished
to Look Like New. We Buy and
Sell Used Furniture.



PAT'S MATS & FRAMES
406 7th Street 0 Mexico Beach, Fla.
Custom Matting & Framing of:
PAINTINGS PRINTS
PHOTOGRAPHS NEEDLEWORK

SEE OUR GIFT ITEMS
"QUOTABLES", NOTE CARDS AND ORIGINAL ART.
SPECIAL PRICES ON TOP QUALITY MINI-FRAMES

OPEN Wed. thru Sat. 10 a.m. -7 p.m. EST
Sunday 1 p.m.- 7 p.m. for your convenience
CLOSED Mondays and Tuesdays
Member Professional Picture Framers Assoc.
Pat Bowen, owner 648-8914


Now Available on Beach
Large two bedroom apartment with large
deck, refrigerator, stove, dishwasher, gar-
bage disposal, air cond. 2nd floor unit.
Also: one bedroom, with large deck, single
flood unit, w.t. paid, year round lease
available.
648-8398


. 4h fA.I^





















Homecoming



Port St. Joe vs. Rickards


PORT T. JOE SHARKS-Front row, left to right: Robert Taylor, Tony
Gathers, Robert Harris, Richard Ramsey, Sidney Harris, Jim Norton, Jimmy
Walding, Charles Byrd, Eric Parrish and Dennis Welch. Second row: Coaches
Kesley Colbert and John Hicks, Mike Pittman, Mike Quinn, Tan Smiley, Chris


Butts, Stan Peters, Josh Ji
Dennis KIzziah and Shaw
Woullard, Keith Jones, Lee


Sept. 9 St. Joe 41, Ver

Sept. 16 Open Date


VARSITY /CHEERLEADERS: Bottom row, from. left: StacI Top row, from left: Traci McClain, Danna Russ and Pam San-
Angerer; Marcia Stoutamire; Trish Tapper, captain; Paula born.
Ward; Vicki Barlow, co-captain; Lisa Whaley and Lisa Gant. -Star photo


Sept. 23

Sept. 30

Oct. 7

Oct. 14

Oct. 21

Oct. 28

Nov. 4

Nov. 11

Nov. 18


St. Joe 9, Chipl

St. Joe 42, Hav

St. Joe 40, Apa

St. Joe 33, B'to

DeFuniak 30, S1

St. Joe 20, Fla.

Rickards.....

Wakulla......

Wewahitchka.


Support the Merchants Listed on This Page. They Support Our Team, School and


kN

44
'4.4


Mt4.






144~


V:..






4...






I Vi. o,


Buzzett's Drug Store
Your Rexall Store Plenty of Free Parking
317 Williams Ave. Phone 229-8771

Citizens' Federal Savings
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
Phone 227-1416

Comforter Funeral Home
Wewahitchka 639-2271 Port St. Joe 227-1818

Costin Insurance
Your Independent Agent
Call 229-8899


COSTIN'S
Quality at Savings Phone 229-8716

Danley Furniture Co.
The Greatest Place On Worth

David Rich's IGA
Customers Are Our Greatest Asset
Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka

THE DECORATOR DEN
Complete Floral Service 227-1862
VISA and Mastercharge Available
Margaret and Tim Ard 229-8816 Jacque
Yeager 229-6056

Driesbach's Cleaners
Pick-Up and Delivery

Earley's Hardware
Hwy. 98 Highland View Phone 229-8232

Florida 1st National Bank
at Port St. Joe Phone 229-8282

Gilmore Funeral Home
Dignified, Professional Service
Port St. Joe 229-8111 Wewa 639-5602

Hedy's Florist
Flowers for Every Occasion


Hannon Insurance
and Real Estate 227-1133

K&D TV & Sound
Your RADIO SHACK Dealer

Lucille's Fashion
& Beauty Boutique
234 Reid Ave. Phone 229-8153

Miller Agency, Inc.
Chevron Products Phone 229-8081

Pate's Service Center
Firestone & Michelin Tires 227-1291

Piggly Wiggly
208 Monument Ave. Phone 227-1728

Raffield Retail Market
Phone 229-6877

Renfro Auto Parts
Phone 229-6013

Roche Furniture
209 Reid Avenue Phone 227-1730

SAVEWAY
We Specialize In Iowa Corn Fed Beef
and Fresh-As-Possible Produce


SEARS
LEON POLLOCK, Authorized Catalog
Sales Merchant

St. Joe Auto Parts
NAPA Phone 229-8222

St. Joe Drugs
Call 227-1723 for Prescription Needs
St. Joe Furniture
and APPLIANCE CO. Phone 227-1251

St. Joe Hardware
Whirlpool Appliances Phone 229-8028

St. Joe Motor Co.
Phone 227-1336

St. Joe Natural Gas
Gas is Naturally Better Phone 229-8216

St. Joseph Bay Florist
Flowers for That Happy Occasion
Cal98Call 229-8343


...i


N.















enkins, David Bearden, Marcell Johnson and Coaches X
Maddox. Third row: Adrian Lewis, Curtis Ray, Terry
McMillan, Seth Howell and David Anderson.
-Star photo




non



ey 7

ana 0

lach 0

wn 0.

t. Joe 14

High 13
* H



. . H
X4.



Community. I


SUB SHOP
Come By For A Snack Phone 227-1323 ':

Thames Jewelers
Watches Diamonds Gifts
for All Occasions

Western Auto
Your Tire Center
David B. May Phone 227-1105
Join the Winning Team at
Wewahitchka State Bank
Phone 229-8226





New


/


The Athletic House
323 Reid Ave. Phone 229-6805
Kay Parrish, Owner

BADCOCK
201 Reid Avenue Phone 229-6195
Steve Richardson, Owner

Beach Lumber Co.
Call 648-5014 for All Your Building Needs

BOYLES
Shoes for the Family
Clothing for Ladies & Children


Butler's Rest
Come by After the Game


& Lounge
Phone 227-1386


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