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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02398
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: November 12, 1981
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02398

Full Text














USPS 518-880


- HE STAR


FORTY-FIFTH YEAR, NUMBER 11


Industry-Deep Water Port- Fine People- Safest Beaches In Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1981


County Pres




$3.1 Million


Homecoming Queen


Miss Paula Besore, last year's Homecoming Queen,
places the crown on a radiant Gaynell Stephens in
halftime ceremonies in Port St. Joe's football stadium last
Friday-night. Selected from a field of 11 candidates, Miss
Stephens will reign as ,Homecoming Queen at all high


school functions until next year, when her successor will
be chosen.
Miss Stephens is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Stephens of 301 Fifteenth Street. --Star photo


Gulf County's Commission
will present a budget lowered
by nearly 25 percent from last
year's financial plan and
featuring a millage reduction
of just slightly more than a
half mill.
The Commission will pre-
sent, in their public budget
hearing next Monday evening,
a budget calling for some
$3,138,838.37 and a mill rate of
6.66.
Last year, the county budget
was set at.$4,865,864.91 and a
mill rate of 7.128.
Several items of the budget
were reduced and more were
increased, but the large de-
crease which was largely
responsible for the reduced
budget this year was the
completion of a road paving
project last year.
The County had a program
underway last year to do some
$2.2 million in paving from
secondary funds last year.'
This item isn't in the budget
this year, except for an item of
$430,017 under Secondary
Road and Bridge. This one
item serves to reduce the
budget by $1.5 million.
In the several funds, two
sizeable reductions are re-
flected and several smaller
ones. Most of the increases
were kept inside the Commis-'


Gulf Has Worst Forest Fire Year


.".Gulf -County-has. had its.
worst forest fire year in
history in 1980 and is on its
way to equalling or bettering
that record in 1981", District
Forester J.,B. Brooks report-
ed to the Gulf County Com-
mission Tuesday morning.
In making his annual report
to the Commission, Brooks
stated .Gulf County had some
17,232 acres of forestlands go
up in smoke during fiscal 1980.
The County has 380,000 acres
of woodlands, according to
Brooks.
The Forester blames such
things as lack of rainfall


sion's five percent increase
guidelines, but even there,
some deviation was evident.
The largest single reduction


from last
General
the budge
by some:


See complete breakdown
county budget on page 11.


in the budget was in the
Capital Outlay fund, which
showed a reduction of $81,000

Hwy71

Paving

Bid Let
Sealed bids for the resur-
facing of 11 miles of State
Road 71 in Calhoun County
were opened by Florida
Department of Transporta-
tion officials Wednesday,
October 28.
The apparent low bidder
was Gulf Asphalt Corpora-
tion of Panama City for
$972,358.84.
The area of construction
stretched from the Gulf
County line northerly to
State Road 275 north. Con-
struction will take about
150 days to complete. The
contract will be awarded,
within 45 days. The DOT
district office has thirty
days to issue the work.
order after the contract is
awarded.


Isome.30 inches..below the
average of 80 inches for the
year. This year isn't much
better, with drought condi-
tions still prevailing.
"If we didn't have the help
of large land owners in
suppressing and fighting for-
est fires for the past year or
two, we would be in a terrible
situation", Brooks said. The
Forester went on to say the
Forestry Service was attempt-
ing to get into a position to
where they didn't have to rely
so heavily on land holders,
lumber companies, pE per
(Continued On Page Three)


Indian Maid's Skull Returned


Gulf County Sheriff Ken Murphy is shown turning over
a package containing the skull of a young Indian woman to
Chief Mack White, principal Tribal Chief of the Southeast
Indian Confederacy on Wednesday of last week. With White
are Tribal Vice Chief Harry Peel of Dothan, Alabama, left
and Chief Little Big Heart of Mexico Beach, second from left.


The skull, found last fall in the Simmons Bayou area by
two young boys will be put in safe keeping by the Southeast
Indian Confederacy until a planned ceremonial dedication
service and burial can be performed. The Indian
Confederacy wants to hold the ceremony and the burial near
the spot where the skull was first found. --Star photo


Crisis Is Over...

Water Flows Again As Gates Are Removed


The lar
reflected
Bridge F
jump frox
to $596,09(
for an inc
Fine an
was close
increase c
St. Jose
Tupelo F
were inci
over last;
fighting e
districts.
ually levied
es of fire f
District ji
$19,081. T
hiked froi


ending




Budget

year. The Catch-all GENERAL FUND
Fund, the largest in In the catch-all General
et, was also reduced Fund budget, which covers
$60,000. everything from fighting for-
est fires to paying a jury
commission, the increases ;
of proposed out-numbered the reductions
by one. There were 18 items
which showed increases and
17 which were reduced. .
The Commission was apply- :
rgest increase was ing their five percent increase
in the Road and limit here, also, but theorule
Pund which saw a didn't always stick.
m $525,413 last year The largest reduction in the.
0 in the present plan General Fund was County
crease of $76,000. Commissioners, administra-
nd Forfeiture fund tive, which was lowered by
e behind within $107,000 to a total of $165,402
f $22,000 to $414,542. for the new year. The largest
Bph Fire Control and increase was in the Clerk
ire Control Districts Circuit Court, County Court
reased considerably and Recorder, which was
year to purchase fire hiked by $19,000 to $104,656.
equipment in the two
The funds are us- The smallest amount of
ed to pay for expens- increase' was in the library
fighting only. St. Joe operations which was set at
umped from $9,957 to $36,286, $2,000 more than last, :
Punelo District was year.


m $9,199 to $14,889.


(Continued On Page Three)


Governor Bob Graham revived the
defunct Dead Lakes Water Manage-
ment Board Wednesday afternoon of
last week while The Star was running
off copies of the paper telling what
devastation lack of a board was causing
for the Port St. Joe area.
Named to the board were Calhoun
County Commissioners Donnel Whit-
field and Clayton Shiver and Gulf
County school teacher Jerry Kelly and
Harland Pridgeon, former Tax Collec-
tor and long-time advocate of the Dead
Lakes dam, both of Wewahitchka.
The new members had barely been
sworn in and filed their papers with the
state of Florida when they met to make
a motion to remove the drawdown gates
at Wewahitchka and let the water of the
Dead Lakes flow south.
The Board decided to remove the
gates, at least temporarily, to remove
any further attempts at 'vandalism
which the drawdown structure has
suffered in the past month. During this
time, unidentified persons have bent


and removed parts of the structure and
sabotaged the gates so they could not be
raised, or opened, with the structure
mechanism.
Pridgeon, interpretating this move
as a permanent thing, immediately
tendered his resignation, to the Dead
Lakes body, even though he had been
appointed only about 15 minutes.
Pridgeon said he didn't want to be a
part of tearing out the drawdown.
The other members of the board
said they believed the lakes needed to
be lowered at the present time but they
would not be in favor of any permanent
changes to the situation as it is now
until some in-depth studies could be
made to determine what would be best
for the future of the lakes.
The dam was built in the first place
to maintain a constant water level in
the lakes, which are fed by the Chipola
River, which also furnishes water for
the industrial complex in Port St. Joe.
The drawdown was installed later to
allow the lakes to be drained periodi-


cally in an attempt to control water
weeds clogging the lake.
With river water levels at an
all-time low, someone slipped into the
drawdown area two weeks ago and
sabotaged the structure so the gates
* would slam shut -and could not be
opened with tlfe mechanism. This cut
off the water south of. the dam and
caused the lower Chipola River to drop
drastically.
The water shut-off and sudden drop
of water levels is what created the
crisis in Port St. Joe last week.
Thursday of last week, after the
Dead Lakes Water Management Board
decided to open the drawdown struc-
ture, cranes were brought on the site
and the entire gates to the structure
removed. The gates were brought to
Port St. Joe and stored at the
Courthouse to prevent any further
damage to them.
There are three schools of thought
(Continued On Page Three)


Clerk of the Court Jerry Gates, left, administers the oath Kelley and Harland Pridgeon last Wednesday afternoon at
of office to newly appointed Dead Lakes Water Management the site of the Dead Lakes drawdown facility.
Board members Donnell Whitfield, Clayton Shiver, Jerry -Photo courtesy Gulf County Breeze


201 Per Copy J


Gulf Pines

Hospital Name Is Changed
Richard H. Malone, 'Executive Director of Baptist
Medical Center, along with J. Larry Read, Associate
Executive Director of Baptist Medical Center and R. M.
Castle, interim administrator of Municipal Hospital
announced this week that Municipal Hospital has been
re-named Gulf Pines Hospital,, effective immediately.
An employee-medical staff contest resulted in 28
entrants submitting 77 names. "The participation from
everyone here was fantastic",.said Castle, "and we are so.
pleased to have such thoughtfulness go into all .of the
many submitted names".
The winners are Mrs. Ruth McClamma, Mrs. Anita
Register, Mrs. Colorado Jones and Dr. Shirley Simpson.
They received a gift from Baptist Medical Center at noon
on Thursday, November 5 in the lobby area.


Help!


Police Catch Burglars
Gulf County Sheriff Ken Murphy and Port St. Joe
Police Chief Roy Robinson this week agreed on an opinion
that a recent series of burglaries in the Port St. Joe area
are being caused by a gang of thieves who have come into
th ,areajrce ,.41p6
The law enforcement officials said the most recent
burglary operation by the thieves was made last
Thursday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Tapper on
Constitution Drive, where $500 in cash was taken and an
attempt made to take a quantity of silver pieces. The'
officials surmise that the thief or thieves were apparently
frightened off by the return home of Mrs. Tapper, since
several pieces o( silver were removed from a cabinet and
placed on a table as if to be piled up to be taken away.
This was the last in a series of burglaries, all of which
have used the same manner of operation.
Sheriff Murphy and Chief Robinsin are seeking to
enlist the help of everyone in Port St. Joe to spot the
burglars in operation if they make another attempt. They
ask that any suspicious person or persons lurking or seen
to be around a home should call either the Police or
Sheriff's Department immediately. 'We have people on
patrol", Murphy said, "who can answer the call
immediately."
Murphy and Robinson emphasized that the quickest
way to stop the burglaries is for the people to help with
surveillance of homes in the city.
Sheriff Murphy said the "neighborhood watch" will
assist the law enforcement officers very much. Murphy
asked that if residents see any vehicle or anyone not
belonging in the neighborhood, the police or Sheriff should
be called immediately.
Sheriff Murphy said, "We would rather check out 100
false alarms than have this happen again. Also, if anyone
receives a series of phone calls that are suspicious or
someone knocks on your door asking for an address, call
immediately."
"If the thieves are professionals, and we think they
are, they make in the vincinity of $100,000 a year by
simply going into people's homes while they are away,
usually in the day time, taking the most valuable items
and leaving the rest", the officers said.,
The thieves usually determine if anyone is at homeby
telephone or knocking on the door. Two or more will go
inside the house while the automobile is being driven
around the area, waiting to pick them up after the
burglary has been accomplished.


-












Editorials and Opinions


THE STAR
PAGE TWO THURSDAY, NOV. 12, 1981


S-. 7 There was no valid reason for
-Port St. Joe and south Gulf County
being in the predicament they were
.last week over water.
It's true we haven't had a
Normal amount of rainfall this year.
-^One amateur weather observer even
Said we are in the sixth year of a
seven year drought. We may be.
S'Even so, we have plenty of water for
-our needs, even though the Apala-
',ehicola River is at its lowest point in
recorded history.
,. There are many, including us,
.E who think the low water situation on
2i the Apalachicola River has been
IS contrived by the four dams on the,
EJ tributaries to the river. The low
d" water situation for 'south Gulf
.County last week was contrived.

The matter should have never
2. come about. The whole shortage was
g caused because someone slipped in
| at night and closed the gates of the
drawdown at the Dead Lakes,
shutting off the water flow. The
gates had been opened tp lower the
water level in the lakes to kill water
J weeds. Someone didn't want the
lakes lowered.
= The water crisis should never



OIur Grec

-. We have grown accustomed to
people fussing about little old Port
St. Joe. When they are growing up
the kids all say, "I'll be glad when I
get grown so I can get away from
this dinky place". Then, they all
drift back either permanently when
they get the opportunity or they
come back r'eglarly to visit the old
home town..
Even the grown ups complain
about the small town with nothing to
do, no place to go and very little
going on. That is, they complain in
this manner until circumstances
take them away for a while whether
for a vacation or a transfer or just a
short business trip to some far and
large city.
Then it's, "I sure am glad to get
back home. I wouldn't live in that
place for all the cows in Texas".
Let a stranger come to Port St.
Joe and he doesn't usually stay long
enough to see what the town and the,
people are really about. Others rave
about the quiet place in which to live
.and bring up children.

S Two weeks ago, when the




Who Would E

I THOUGHT, SURE, that just as
soon as we went to press with our lead eve
story last week, it would start to rain wh
just as the, paper hit the street last her
Wednesday night. It even looked like buc
rain as the papers started to come off
the press about 5:00 p.m.
Mother nature held off and let us


here at The Star have our headline with
its drama for a few hours before it
cleared up and didn't rain the first
drop.
The Dead Lakes Management
Committee was being sworn in and
having their first meeting just about the
time the presses started to roll and
their first order of business was to
agree to remove the gates from the
drawdown at the Dead Lakes to let Port
St. Joe have some water before we all
went dry down here.
We all appreciate the water.
The gates were removed and
brought to the Courthouse for safe
Skeepingso nobody could sabotage them
even further. When things get right,
they will be put back in place and will
have a committee in charge of their
operations.


riv
to,
mi|

mi
Par
adu
the
spe
wa'


1


have happened because the Gover-
nor of Florida had not appointed a
Dead Lakes Management commit-
tee, even though he had the names
he eventually appointed last Wed-
nesday, in an emergency situation,
on his desk for his signature of
appointment for nearly five months.
Failure on the part of the
Governor's office to act over a
period of nearly five months caused
our water crisis. Had the Governor
acted in a reasonable length of time,
there would have been an official
committee in charge of the Dead
Lakes and their management would
have been carried out in an orderly
manner rather than being "manag-
ed" by whomever could sneak in at
night and do what they wanted to the
drawdown gates.
Not. only did the delay in an
appointment decision cause us a
near crisis here in Port St. Joe, it
also cost the county a great deal of
money it didn't have to spend.
The bill to repair the sabotage to
the drawdown structure and the
expense involved in coping with the
impending crisis will run into a
sizeable piece of change. All because
of procrastination.



test Asset

executives from Seminole Electric
came to town to be dined and fawned
over by the local people, they were
amazed. They couldn't believe the
people were so friendly and suppor-
tive. They didn't know a place like
Port St. Joe existed ... or so they
said, and the had no reason to make
the observation.

All of this is to say that we have
a lot going for us here in Port St. Joe
and Gulf County as a whole. Not
many places in ,the world today
afford such an easy and uncompli-
cated place to live in. Seminole
Electric officials found this out and
it will probably work to our
advantage in the years to come.

When the Chamber of Com-
merce gets down to the business of
attracting someone to Port St. Joe,
they usually point out attributes like
climate, beaches, schools, churches,
low taxes (yes, they are much lower
here than many places in Florida)
and water access to raw materials.

The best thing we have going for
us is our people and our way of life.

We need to appreciate it more.


Water Crisis Need



Never Have Been


system. The Lutheran church
became the state church in
Germany. The Presbyterian
church was the state church in
France and the Anglican
(Episcopal) church became
the state church in England.
Then, these state churches
taxed the people to support the
churches. These state church-
es also practiced discrimina-
tion and milder forms of
persecutions against mem-
bers of the non-state churches
in their respective nations.
Even though the Protestant
Reformation liberated non-
Catholics from the earlier
'abuses of the powerful union
of state and church persecu-


tions, that reformation left
many of the old abuses in the
new state churches. This new
state-church relationship
swept the old world.
SO
It was from this background
of continued persecution by
the state-churches of Europe
that the early colonists fled to
America. But believe it or not,
the early American colonists
brought some of the evils of
state churches of Europe to
America. The dominant
churches in the early colonies
began to establish their own
churches as the state churches
of the colonies. Even in
America there was religious


persecution by the state
churches- but it was not as
severe as that in protestant
Europe. However, it was a
form of union between the
church and the state.
THE REAL BREAK
The memory of the dreadful
persecution of the state
churches of Europe and the
contemporary evidences of it
in the colonies, prodded our
founding fathers to determine
that they would, one and for
all time, effect a complete
break between the church and
the state.
Thus, they decreed in the
First Amendment to the Con-
stitution that "Congress shall


make no law respecting an
establishment of religion, or
prohibiting the free exercise
thereof." This marked the
real break between the official
union of a government and a
church (denomination).
America did it!
WHAT DOES IT MEAN?
Does the first amendment
mean that America was de-
nouncing God or religion?
Does this mean that the
government of America was
divorcing itself from God- or
wanted no part of God? Nol A
thousand times NO!
Then, what does it mean?
Here it is-
(Continued On Page Three)


.ver Have Expected A Old Fashioned Water War In Gulf?

The Apalachicola gets low almost when all the'streams would ry Panhandle, where there is water had erupted, there could have been, at least 10 different attractions I
ery fall. The water level falls -and. completely up. Not a dro atof r almost everywhere, except where you some shooting. distract my inspection tour.
,en it does, the favorite joke. around could be found on the surface of e need it. The great Panhandle water war + .
rei,"fI you're going fishing, take a ground, except for a muddy puddle in Some of the people who live above isn't over yet. It won't be, either, until, I WAS PUTIMNG out papers 11


cket of water along to pour in the




ETAOI






er." Now, the advice is going around
"Keep your bucket of water, you
ght need it before the week is out."
I WAS HALF RAISED in the
id-west and half raised here in the
handle. Ninety-nine percent of my
lt life has been spent right here in
Panhandle. During the few years IF
ent in the mid-west, I never saw a
ter war. I saw the dry times come


the bottom of some ponds.


I have read many Zane Grey books
when I was a young'un growing up and
their stories of the range wars. Most of
the range wars were fought over water
and who had the rights to the water
coming down a small creek. People
killed over the water and its use.
While I never witnessed a range
war over water during my short time in
the mid-west, I have now seen it here in
Gulf County, in the heart of the


the Dead Lakes dam apparently


wanted to keep the Chipola River water
all for themselves. Thankfully, most of
the people who live north of the Dead
Lakes dam saw the need and were
willing to share the water coming
through the lakes.
THE RIVER WATER war never
got to the shooting stage, but it could
have. There was talk of violent action
against certain areas. If the violence


we get enough rain to bring things back
to normal around the two rivers which
flow through Gulf County.

I WENT DOWN to St. Joe Hard-
ware Friday afternoon to visit their
new building during open house. I went
down for the purpose of looking over
their new building and the airy and
spacious arrangement of their mer-
chandise. I wanted to see what it felt
like to walk through a St. Joe Hardware
without having to turn sideways to get
through.
I went down for that purpose until I
was way-laid by Dot (Costin) Magidson
and Marie Costin at the refreshment
table. They started getting me to
sample the variety of home-made
cookies they were serving for refresh-
ments. I sampled 10 different varieties
before I gave up what was turning into
a most enjoyable visit.
I will just have to go back later to
see the store building when there aren't


to


in'


Mexico Beach last Wednesday evening
when I ran into a couple in the Mexico
Beach Grocery. Just as .I laid the
papers on the counter, the man said,
"Oh, here's The Star. I'll have to get us
one so we won't have to wait a week to
read it".
Mrs. Guilford, who operates the
grocery in the afternoons then intro-
duced the couple to me and me to Mr.
and Mrs. J. W. King of Gulfport, Missis-
sippi. They were delightful people
because they said they read The Star
'regularly and enjoyed it.
The Kings are retired from a
tractor dealership in Gulfport and have
a week end home at Mexico Beach.
They subscribe to The Star, which is
sent to their home in Gulfport. They
then send it to a daughter in Tulsa,
Oklahoma or another daughter in
Germany after they get through
reading it.
That little old paper does get
around.


TIDES
High and low tides for St.
Joseph's Bay for the upcom-
ing week are shown in the tide
table below, furnished by the
U. S. Weather Bureau in Apa-
lachicola. Times are based
on a 24-hour clock, and height


is feet above or below the
mean water line.


Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs.


High Ht. Low
2217 1.8 748
2303 1.9 850
2353 1.9 949
1048
44 1.9 1145
131 1.7 1231
223 1.5 1313
309 1.3 1338


Ht.
-.2
-.3 r
-.3
-.4
-.3
-.2
.0
.2


By REV. ADOLPH BEDSOLE
Pastor, Wewahitchka
First Baptist Church
"Congress shall make no
law respecting an establish-
ment of religion, or prohibit-
ing the free exercise thereof."
So goes the wording of the first
amendment to our Constitu-
tion. The framers of our
Constitution placed this first
amendment in our Constitu-
tion to protect us from the
organic union of state and
church.
BACKGROUND
The Protestant Reformation
came as a result of the
pressures and persecutions of
non-Catholics in Europe. With
the union of the Catholic
church and the governmental
powers of the day there
emerged a mighty force to
dominate and control the
churches. The Catholic church
became the state church and
non-Catholics were considered
rebels or "heretics". All the
people were taxed to support
the state church but non-Ca-
tholic churches received no
tax money to operate their
churches- nor did they seek
that tax money.
The Dark Ages came when
the religious-political powers
of the church and state united
their powers to force the
"heretic" churches back into
the fold of the "mother"
church. The demands of the
church were executed by the
powers of civil government to
force non-Catholics back into
the Catholic church. Prison,
torture and death was inflict-
ed on "heretic" churches and
their members. Fox's "Book
of Martyrs" gives graphic
details of this tragic period.
Under court orders, dread
inquisitions were held and
victims were burned, be-
headed, stretched on racks. As
revealed in Fox's book, unbe-
lievable methods of torture
were. devised and executed on
men, women and children.
Not only was there religious.
persecution by the state' and
church united, but there was
also political, economic and
intellectual persecution.
The Renaissance was the
awakening of the persecuted
in the old world. It was the
throwing off of the tyranny.
Thus, the protesters arose and
demanded reforms in both
church and government.
Among the most prominent
leaders of the Protestant
Reformation were Martin
Luther and John Calvin. The
reformation was successful to
a degree. The strangle-hold of
the church-state power was
. broken.
There emerged from this
struggle the Lutheran church
in Germany, the Presbyterian
church in France. Other na-
tions also came forward with
non-Catholic churches.
BUT
The reformers did not make
a complete break with the old
;i


Watching the World Go By


Ours Is "One Nation Under God"


SiTHF TAR POSTOFFICE BOX 308
" .T E/ T PHONE 227-1278 SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
vS'4-.t -t PORT ST. JOE., FLORIDA 32456 IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR. $8.00 SIX MONTHS, IN-COUNTY, $5.00
Plit1dEy 1 rl. n. lWM rAm Pod SL Jo Flor kl OUTOFCOUNTY-ONE YEAR. $12.00 OUTOF U.S.-ONE YEAR. $14.00
SBy7MSiwPulMeligCmpy __ _-__________________
Sol.c. lgP.l.atTS-..lon, fd35$ -TO AVEIMSERS--n case of nor or omissions in adverlsamants. the publishers do not hold
Wesley R. Ramsey .......... Editor and Publisher SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID e liable tor damage It than ammt received for such advertisement.
AW William H. Ramsey Production Supt. AT PORT ST. JOE nFLORIDA ntnInt d s thoughtully weighed. The spoken word
Frenche L Ramsey ............... Office Manager----- l ~ te; | printed won thoMughl con inces.The spoken word I lost; the printed word remains.
Shirley K. Ramsey ................... Typesetter









Crisis Is Over


in the Dead Lakes area, which has
surfaced with the recent lack of water.
One group says the dam and drawdown
structure should be removed and the
'river allowed to flow naturally. Another
group wants the structures left in place
and the water level manipulated to
control water weeds. The other group
wants the gates left closed so the lake
will maintain a constant level.
The group which wants the water
level managed seem to be in the
majority.
The matter over what to do with the
Dead Lakes and its structures has been


a brewing controversy over a period of
the past few years, ever since all
memberships to the Management
Board expired and the committee
ceased to exist. At that time, nobody
was in charge of the lakes and had the
authority to manipulate any of its
structures. The scarce water supply at
present has really set the matter off
when the factions involved began
toying with the structure and endan-
gered the water supply south of the
dam, causing potential problems for
those depending on the water.
The problem still isn't over, as the
low water situation still exists, the dam


Worst Fire Season


mills, etc., for their fire
protection services.
Brooks told the Commis-
sion, and asked for their aid in
securing appropriations which
would allow them to meet the
conditions which now prevail
in the state, by up-grading
their manpower, equipment
and communications in Qulf
and other counties in the state.
STREET RE-NAMED
Wimico Drive, or more
properly, the west end of
Wimico Drive, was re-named
Sealey Drive in memory of
Jim Sealey, one of the first
settlers of White City Tues-
( day.
Faced with a petition signed
by residents of Wimico Drive
opposing the move and the
Sealey family wanting the
change made.
A compromise was finally
reached, and the east end of
Wimico Drive is still Wimico
Drive, while the west end is
now Sealey Drive.
Even this compromise did-
n't come off too easily, as
Commissioners Billy Branch


and Doug Birmingham voted
against the change.
ENERGY SAVINGS
Ivey Bailey of Blountstown
asked the Board to consider
installation of a device which
would manage .the electric
energy use, resulting in a
savings in the power bill.
Bailey reported the device
sells for approximately $16,000
but the county can install the
system on a share basis, with
the firm and the county
sharing, equally, the savings
which result over a period of
five years. Bailey said, his
survey showed the county'
should save approximately
$22,000 a year at the present
power rates.
Bailey said his firm guaran-
teed a 10 percent savings and
projected up to a 29 percent
savings.
The Board decided to get
some more information on the
system before making a deci-
sion.
APPROVE BONDS
The Commission approved
an industrial bond issue for


County Budget-
Increases in the General $36,000. Agricultural Exten-
Fund budget, other than those sion program, $25,438, up
already listed include: $4,300.


Clerk, County Commission,
$47,379., up $3,000. County
Attorney, $9,175, up $1,400.
Property Appraiser, $82,-
871, up $10,000. Tax Collector,
$96,491, up $4,200. Supervisor
of Elections, $30,711, up $9,700.,
Election Expense, $14,433, up
$1,300. Courthouse operations,
$125,779, up $13,000. County
Service Officer, $15,456, up
$3,200. Building Inspection,
$13,600, up $2,500. Medical
Examiner, $5,000, up $2,500.
Mosquito Control, $169,462, up


Watchin
1. That the government
would not use tax money to
support any church of any
denomination; 2. That the
government would not extend
special favors to any denomi-
nation or church; 3. That no
church or denomination
should have any official legis-
lative or judicial powers in the
political arena; 4. That no
church or denomination
should have legal powers to
enforce its will on other
churches or denominations, or
non-church people; 5. That the
government would not allow
the free exercise of a church

Christmas

Parade Is

Scheduled
Port Si. Joe's merchants
, and the Kiwanis Club have
started making plans for the
annual Christmas parade,
which will be held in Port St.
Joe on Saturday, December 5
at 10:00 a.m.
Al Ray is heading up a
committee of Kiwanians who
have accepted the responsibil-
S ity of securing floats and other
entries for the parade and
setting up the order of the
entries in the parade line.
Ray says he is already
receiving inquiries concerning
entries to the annual event and.
he is currently making up a
list of prospective out-of-town
entries to contact. He says he
is planning for at least three
bands in the parade as well as
many other interesting
events. Ray says anyone who
wishes to enter a float or other
item in the parade should call
him at the Port St. Joe City
Hall, 229-8261.
The merchants, in addition
to contacting Santa Claus for a
visit to Port St. Joe on the
'parade date, is offering cash
prizes to' the best three
non-commercial floats enter-
Sed. The prizes will be $100.00
for first prize; $75.00 for
second prize and $50.00 for
third.


For the largest part, hikes in
budgets were brought .about
by increased wages for county
employees, insurance for em-
ployees, energy costs, state
retirement percentage in-
crease and some official sal-
ary increases set by the State
Legislature..
TAX INCREASES -
Along with the budget hear-
ing Monday, will be hearings
for tax increases to finance
the new budget.
One hearing will be to


us.


iatt


(Continued From Page One)


is still there and the drawdown gates
are wide open allowing the lakes to
drain. Some who keep records say the
lakes have dropped over two feet in the
past few days.
There is still one authorized
member who has never been appointed
as yet and one member has resigned
from the Board.
Like the Dead Lakes situation,
however, the water situation here in
south Gulf County has been temporarily
solved with the appointment of the
Managent Board members last Wed-
nesday.


(Continued From Page One)


Central Gulf transportation
company, which will build the
new coal handling facility
here in Port St. Joe.
The bond issue will .be for
$20 million and will not
encumber the county in any
way. The bond issue is a paper
procedure which allows the
firm to sell bonds at a lower
rate of interest which will be
tax free to the purchaser of the
bonds.
The bond money willbe used
to finance construction of the
coal facility here.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business matters,
the Commission:
-Cancelled its November 24
meeting because of Thanks-
giving.
-Appointed Commissioners
Eldridge Money, Jimmy Gort-
man and Billy Branch to the
Property Adjustment Board,
to serve with School Board
members Paul Sewell and
Fred Greer.
-Heard Attorney William
J. Rish report that Property
Appraiser Joyce Williams had
written the State Department


of Revenue, stating it was her
wish not to oppose an action
filed by the county to chal-
lenge her budget.
-Heard a request from
Raymond Lopez of St. Joe
Beach, that the County. stop
burying drain pipe for people.
The County has been burying
pipe for people who purchase
the pipe.
-Heard a request from
Road Superintendent Lloyd
Whitfield. that the Board ac-
cept his retirement effective
December 31. Whitfield has
served the county for more
than 31 years.
-Had an approval from
DOT approving a 4-way STOP
at the intersection of Niles
Road and Garrison and au-
thorization of "No Through
Truck" signs to be placed at
each end of Garrison. Avenue.
-Heard two requests from
Commissioner James Tank-
ersley to request a wayside
park from DOT for the beach-
es area and to oppose a move
to shipped in frozen TV-type
dinners for the senior citizens
program.


(Continued From Page One)


increase property taxes by
eight percent. It's true the
county is lowering the millage
to be levied with the new
budget, but the law doesn't
consider this a rate reduction
unless the new mill rate
brings in less money than the
old rate. In this case, the new
mill rate will bring in eight
percent more money than the
old rate because of property
valuation increases, which is
,considered a tax increase..
'The other tax increase hear-
ing is on the tax rate increase
for the St. Joseph Fire Control
District. This mill rate was
increased from .073 last year


(Continued From Page Two)


or denomination to be hin-
dered.
THERE IS A DIFFERENCE
There is a distinct differ-
ence between-
The separation of church
and state AND the separation
of the nation from God.
The Preamble to our Consti-
tution pointedly reveals that
our founding fathers not only
recognized God but that they
recognized the nation as sub-
servient to God.


"One nation under God",
they said. You can't misunder-
stand those simple words.
From the background ind-
cated above, one can under-
stand why our founding
fathers were concerned about
the separation of church and
state.
From the words "one nation
under God" one should under-
stand their recognition of God
and their dependance upon
Him.


Noreg


is foreign


to






Nomr


what make, model, or year
of foreign car you drive NAPA has the re-
placement parts. From the easiest to the
hardest to find parts, we have them in
stock. If they aren't on our shelves, we can
usually get them from our huge distribu-
tion center within 24 hours. So remember.,
for quality foreign car parts at the
best price available come to your local
NAPA store.



,- ST. JOE
4NAPA AUTO PARTS
4N P HYour NAPA Dealer
201 Log Ave.
Phce' 2'-M-8222


to .3 in the new *budget. The
county is allowed to levy up to
.5 mill in each of the fire
control districts.


OBITUARIES:
Idmm


THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 12


Sister of Local Residelits Dies In Pennsylvania


Mrs. Mary E. Davis, 66, of
11 Fairview Avenue, East
Stroudsburg, Pa., died Mon-
day, November 2. Mrs. Davis
was a former resident of Port
St. Joe. She was a registered
beautician in two states, Penn-
sylvania and Florida. She was
a member of the Order of
Eastern Star; a member of
Heroines of Jericho, and was
of Presbyterian faith.
Mrs. Davis is survived by:
her husband, Booker T. Davis
of East Stroudsburg, Pa.; one
son, Dr. John E. Simmons, III,
of Hartford, Conn.; one
daughter, Mrs. Altamese Can-
non of St. Petersburg; one
sister, Mrs. Earnestine
Chester of Port St. Joe; four
brothers, Damon Peters and

VFD Election
Overstreet Volunteer Fire
Department will hold election
of officers in January,
If you would like to place
someone's name in nomina-
tion, please contact Pres. Troy
Davis at 648-5153 or attend the
December meeting.. This
meeting will be held the
second Tuesday of December
at the Overstreet Community
Building.

Gospel Sing
A gospel sing will be held at
the White City Assembly of
God Church on Saturday,
November 14 at 7:00 p.m.
Featured will be The William-
son Family from Crestview.
Everyone is invited to
attend.
NOTE OPF APPRECIATION.
. I would like to express my
deepest appreciation to the
Gulf County Ambulance
Squad, Dr. Vizcarra, and the
personnel at Municipal Hos-
pital. The prayers, cards,
flowers and visits meant so
much.
Thanks again, and God bless
all of you.
Alma Allen


Nathan Peters, Sr., both of relatives.
Port St. Joe, Corrie Peters of
Tallahassee, and Lewis Funeral services were h
Peters, Jr. of St. Petersburg; Saturday at 2:00 p.m. in
three grandchildren, Lolita, New Bethel A.M.E. Church
Yvette and Wendell Cannon; Port St. Joe, with the R
one great grandchild; and Jamting. Intermentfollowed
numerous sisters-in-law, Forest Hill Cemetery in F
nieces, nephews and other St. Joe with Eastern S


Services Held La

Robert B. Gillesp
Robert B. Gillespie, 66, of
Mexico Beach, died Thursday,
November 5 at Bay Memorial
Medical Center. He was a
native of Ohio and had spent
several years here. He was a
retired machinist and had
taught Sunday School as a
member of Beach Baptist
Chapel of St. Joe Beach.
Survivors include: his wife,
Esther, of Mexico Beach; two
sons, Wayne Pike of Chipley,
and Charles Gillespie of Sid-
ney, Ohio; four daughters,
Mrs. Charlene Hand, Mrs.


eld
the
hof
ev:
ici-
in
'ort
tar


Rites.
Services were under the
direction of Gainer Funral
Home, Panama City.

Services Held
for Jimmie King


Funeral services were held
st Friday for Wednesday, November 11, for
Jimmie King, 56,'who died on
ie, Age 66 November 5, in the Veteran's
ge Hospital in Lake City. The ser-
Clara Cummins, both of Sid- vices Wrie held at 2:00 p.m.
ney, Ohio, Mrs. Dorothy yesterday at the Philadelphia
Moses of Hawthorne, and Mrs. Primitive Baptist Church.
Katherine Chiles of Belle Survivors include: Mr. and
Fontaine, Ohio. Mrs. WillieUnderwood of Port
St., Joe; a brother, Herring
Services were held Friday King of Beacon, N.Y.; two
at 2:00 p.m. at the Beach sisters, Mrs. Lucile Holland of
Baptist Chapel of 'St.' Joe Miami, and Mr. Josie White
Beach with Rev.-- WilliamJ;-eWhi
Beach with Rev. William of Havana; two nieces, Ms.
Smith officiating. Burial was Willie Mae Lee of New York,
in Plattsville Cemetery of N.Y. and a nephew, Harvey
Plattsville, Ohio ,. .dgins of Port St.Joe.
All arrangements were. Comforter Funeral Home
under the direction of Gilmore was in charge of all arrange-
Furieral Home. ments. .


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With

HANNON INSURANCE

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The Insurance Store Since 1943


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Tax-free


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interest toward,your tax-free total.
Insured savings up to $100,000. There is
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Florida


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Roll over your 6-month CD penalty free.
You can redeem your Florida Nationafl'. -'I
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ieee U81II~
LENDER


1981 PAGE THREE


1---


of
ter









THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 12, 1981


Connie Stoutamire Becomes Bride


of Willia
A candlelight ceremony
:united Connie Frances Stouta-
:mire and William Wayne
.McKiernan in marriage Oct.
,10 at the First Pentecostal
-Holiness Church in Port St.
;:Joe. Reverend William Wilson
.performed the double ring
':service.
The bride is the daughter of
-.Mr. and Mrs. Davis Stouta-
jmire of Port St. Joe.
The bridegroom is the son of
''Mr. and Mrs. Robert L.
:McKiernan, also of Port St.
-Joe.
: Carol Cathey, organist, and
Jo O'Barr, soloist, performed
.nuptial music for the wedding.
The bride was presented in
-marriage by her parents and
:escorted to the altar by her
father. She selected a gown of
bridal white organza and
Venise lace. Her bodice fea-
itured a Victorian neckline
accented with pearled Venice
:lace, bishop sleeves trimmed
Sin- lace cuffs. The skirt,
:fashioned in a natural waist-,
Sline, fell in tiers of organza
.:edged inlace toa chapel train.
To complement her gown, the
bride chose a fingertip length
mantilla veil of French illu-
rsion which was enhanced in
delicate Venise lace appli-
q.es. She carried a cascade of
r' S nlte, pink and burgundy silk
oses interspersed with ribbon
nd .greenery
Sir-Lori Earnest, of Panama
:0.y, served as maid of honor,
hand Debbie Earley, sister of
Sthe bridegroom, served as
I* Matron of Honor. Bridesmaids
y.eere Sheila Stoutamire, Mar-
da Stoutamire, sisters of the
bride, and Diana Sealey.
The bridegroom's father
served as best man. Grooms-
men were Phil Earley,
brother-in-law to groom, Greg
Summers, Phillip Dykes and
S John Wright.
Lisa Fitch served as flower
girl. Ring Bearer was Chris
Simmers. a
S.Following the ceremony, a


m Wayne McKiernan


reception was given by the
bride's parents in the social
hall. Lewanna Patterson and
Brenda Wood served the
bride's cake; Paula Ward and
Ann Ward served the groom's
cake; Pam Summers presided
at the punch fountain; and
Nancy Stoutamire, sister of


the -bride, kept the bride's
book. Director of the wedding
was Charlotte Pierce.
Floor hostesses were Rita
Todd and Tina Money.
After a wedding trip to
Franklin, N.C., the couple will
reside in Port St. Joe where
the bridegroom is employed


with Waste Water Treatment
Plant and the bride with St.
Joe Papermakers Federal
Credit Union.
A rehearsal dinner was held
Oct. 9 at the First Pentecostal
Holiness Church Social Hall. It
was hosted by the bride-
groom's parents.


Present Youth to Library


How long since you have
visited your Public Library?
Of course, if you are a
"regular" this question does
not apply. Your library is a
source of so much diversified
information.
If you have small children,
or a small niece, nephew, or
grandchild and they have
reached "reading age," why
not introduce them to the
fascinating world of books?
Books are a marvelous stimu-
lant to the brain. They do
make us think. They do
increase our vocabulary.
Your library has books on
trades and crafts, needlework
and sewing to mention just a
few of the varieties. It also has
"swap" books!
If you have not already done


Christmas

Bazaar

This weekend, Friday and
Saturday, will be a gala
opportunity for your Christ-
mas shopping. The ladies of
the First Presbyterian Church
at 16th and Woodward have
been bury preparing a won-
derful shipping experience for
you. You must see this wide,
wide world of hundreds of gift
selections for those special
needs of yours.
You may shop in comfort in
the Church parlours. There
will be free coffee and tea, and
you may purchase cakes and.
cookies to enjoy as you visit
with friends and neighbors.
The beautiful church sanc-
tuary will be open for your
viewing. There will also be
intermittent and beautiful
organ solos each day.
This is the first year of. a
Christmas Bazaar which over
the years will become a
Christmas time institution in
Port St. Joe. You are invited to
-be a part of this great
beginning. Make it a date. The
First Presbyterian Church at
16th and Woodward this Fri-
day and Saturday between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.


Mr. and Mrs. McKiernan


so, you are urged to turn in library system. You may use and return them to your local
your old library card for the your library card to check out library, according to Mrs.
new kind which is being books anywhere in the North- Rachel Griffin, Library Ad-
introduced into the regional west Regional Library System visory Board, Wewahitchka.


Gulf County Health Clinics


Change Daily Schedules
prssre)-:0 t- 400p_ .


pressures) 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.,
family planning, by appoint-
ment only.
Tuesday: Medicaid screen-
ings by appointment only.
Wednesday: School visits in
e m.rnIng. -Anf- A L- '- AAy_


The Gulf County Health the Health Department on an
Department has changed its interim basis.
clinic schedules for both the In Port St. Joe, the clinic
Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka schedule is as follows:
clinics, according to County Monday: 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.,
Administrative Assistant, who general clinic (immuniza-
is directing the operations of tions, weight checks, blood


Humphries Speaks


to Rotary Meeting
Commander Dave Humph- youth involved in the training.
ries, director of the Naval Humphries said 40 of the
Junior ROTC program in Gulf participants this year are
County high schools, present- female.
ed a program of information Humphries pointed out that
concerning the program to the one of the graduates of the
Rotary Club at their regular system is now a student at the
meeting last Thursday. U.S. Naval Academy, and
Commander Humprhies several have joined the var-
said the program, which was ious military services.
started five years ago in Port "Serving in the NJROTC
St. Joe High School, has since aids those young people going
been expanded-to Wewahitch- into service by advancing
ka High School also, with 119 them in rank immediately
upon induction. They still
Bake Sale at must take basic training, but
-their pay is at an advanced
Parish House rate", he said.
The local group has taken
St. James Episcopal Church part in drill team appearances
EYC will be sponsoring a bake in various activities through-
sale and rummage sale Satur- out the Panhandle, has taken
day, November 1 from 9:00 many trips to military bases
a.m., to 3:00 p.m. and provided honor guards at
The sale will be conducted several important functions in
at the Episcopal Parish House North Florida.
on Sixth Street. Humphries presented sev-
eral slides of the group in
Hanna's Mark action from Pensacola to
Jacksonville.
Anniversary Guests of the club were Dr.
Wrayne Hendrix, Wheelettes
Mr. and Mrs. Ira E. Hanna Rene Barton, Yvette Watson,
celebrated their 60th Wedding Becky Bateman, Sherry Hug-
Anniversary on Saturday, gins and Tonya Cross and
November 7th, at their home NJROTC cadets Seth Howell
in Altha. and John Cassani.


;Trees and Shrub Fare



Better If Planted In Winter


By Roy Lee Carter
County Extension Director .
, With winter fast approach-
ing, it soon will be time for.
major tree and shrub planting
Sand transplanting. There are
several advantages in plant-
ing during November and the
Svinter, instead of waiting until
spring. The plants are not
actively growing during this
time and less apt to be'injured
by shock from planting. Too,
the weather and moisture
during the winter season is
very conducive to good plant
S adjustment as well as good
working weather for the gar-
dener.
h Winter planting of trees and
,- hrubs allows the plants to
* become well established prior
to spring growth and the
bloom and prior to summer
heat. -Research shows that
roots of plants continue to
grow and to develop during
mild winter days, even though
foliage does not.
. You will find also that your
nursery has a good stock of
plants during the fall and
winter, and too, he can give
you more time and attention
during this season, whereas he
cannot during the rush of
spring.
The success of your land-
scape will depend greatly on
your ability to select plants
which will fit your particular
landscape need and situation.


Trees are always a must in
most landscape whether their
purpose is for shade, wind-
breaks, food, setting or. at-
mosphere, to add color and
beauty with bloom and foli-
age, or to add esthetic and real
estate value to the property.
The ideal landscape tree


CASEY WHITE

Cute Two
Casey White, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Perky White
celebrated her second birth-
day Saturday, November 7.
Lots of friends and relatives
were there to help Casey
celebrate this special occa-
sion.
Casey is the granddaughter
of Mr. and Mrs. John White
and Hershel Harrison and the
great-granddaughter of Mrs.
Ollie Harrison.


does not exist. irees wmcn
have a desirable feature and
those that are undesirable. A
tree may have beautiful flow-
ers in the spring, followed by
undesirable fruit or seed pods
in the fall. If a tree is a fast


A-. --f ro.-r, it.- ;+ -, I.. ho hUEIlU


grower, it may also ue brittle
and short-lived.
All trees have advantages
and disadvantages, thus your
selection must be carefully
(Continued On Page Five)


WISH YOU COULD...

HEAR BETTER!

ATTEND OUR
BETTER-HEARING CLINIC
THURSDAY, NOV. 12 9-5
FRIDAY, NOV. 13- 9-5
AND SAT., NOV. 14 9-1

Have your hearing electronically tested by a
factory trained Hearing Air Specialist. Fact-
filled pamphlets on hearing loss and what
can be done to conserve the hearing you still
have will be available FREE of charge.

INTRODUCING....
CUSTOM IN-THE-EAR
* The aid specially built for
your loss.

* Fits your ear and your ear
alone.

* The aid so inconspicuous
it's hard to tell you are even
wearing one!

SPECIAL! BATTERIES 1/2 PRICE
When you buy one pack of batteries during
the workshop you will receive a second pack.
FREE.
Refreshments will be served. Aid you are
cordially invited to bring a friend with you.


CAMPBELL'S

DRUG STORE
210 REID AVENUE
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
Please call ahead for an appointment to avoid waiting.
Call Collect if not in St. Joe, Ask for Ruby
227.1224


Sur-Way Electric

411 Reid Avenue


Commercial, Residential

Remodeling and

Service Work

CHARLES SOWELL

26 Years Experience
Licensed and Bonded

Call Shorty at

229-6798


;-^T----


PAGE FOUR


the morning, 1:00 to 4:00 oy
appointment only.
Thursday: Medical clinic by
appointment only from 8:30 to
11:30. From 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.,
by appointment only.
Friday: Closed to public for
reports and state meetings.
WEWAHITCHKA CLINIC
In Wewahitchka, clinic
schedules will be as follows:
Monday: 8:30 to 11:30, fam-
ily planning by appointment
only. 1:00 to 4:00 p.m., general
clinic (immunizations, weight
checks, blood pressures).
Tuesday: School visits in the 0
morning. 1:00 to 4:00 p.m., by
appointment only.
Wednesday: Medicaid
screenings by appointment
only.
Thursday: 8:30 to 11:30, by
appointment only. 1:00 to 4:00
medical clinic by appointment
only.
Friday: Closed to public for
reports and state meetings.

CARD OF THANKS
The 1981-82 Sophomore
Class of Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr.
High School would like to
thank St. Joseph Telephone
.and Telegraph Co. for the use
of their truck and trailer.
Even if we didn't win first
place, thank you.
And a special thanks to
Willie and Mary Helen Renfro
for all their support.
Love,
The Sophomore Class










Follow Your


Nose to Sale


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 12, 1981 PAGE FIVE


ticket of David Groom Friday evening, as
Wi ?sly' er Groom was declared the winner of a free
W ins ryer Whirlpool clothes dryer in the grand opening
open house of the new St. Joe Hardware
Bobby Costin, left, checks the winning building on Williams Avenue. --Star photo


Beach Baptist Chapel


Schedules Revival Services


Revival services will begin
at the Beach Baptist Chapel
Sunday with the David E. Rich
and Family evangelistic team
leading in the special revival
emphasis.
Special services will con-
tinue each night through Fri-
day.


The revival team presents
the gospel with puppet pro-
grams, ventriliquism, gospel
illusions, gospel chalk talks,
music and special seminars
conducted throughout the
week.
Rev. William E. Smith,
Pastor, and the church mem-


bership issue an invitation for
everyone to attend any or all
of the services.
The Beach Baptist Chapel is
located at the corner of
Alabama and Columbus
Streets in St. Joe Beach.
A nursery will be provided.


Brownies Camp Out


Any Port St. Joe probiscus
in good working order will
lead any Port St. Joe resident
inexorably to the hall of St.
Joseph's Catholic Church on
Sunday, November 22. The
sweetand heady odor of home
made baked goods will tell
such noses that the women of
the Catholic Church are again
having a bake sale. Goodies
will be purveyed following the
10:30 a.m. Mass.
In addition to the sale of the
vaunted delicacies, to cap off
the weeks' Thanksgiving fes-
tivities, there will be a raffle
of a work-of-art afghan. Truly,
a keepsake heirloom, the
handknit blanket is done in
shades of deep burgundy and
rose pink, the colors made
more lush by the intricacy of
the pattern. Tickets for the
afghan raffle are available
from any member of the St.
Joseph Altar Society, and will
be sold on Reid Avenue on
Saturday, November 14 and
November 21. Location of the
sale booth and display of the
lovely throw is at the the
Ready Crafts Shop. Donations
are $1.00 each.
All area residents are urged


to yield to temptation, follow
their noses, and partake of the
pastries and what have you at
the Church hall on 20th Street
on Sunday, November 22. And,
of course, to buy a ticket to
win the snuggly, beautifully-
made afghan.

Harvest

Rally at

New Bethel
The members of New Bethel
A.M.E., Church will be cele-
brating the Thanksgiving Sea-
son with a Harvest Rally,
Sunday, November 15. The
services begin with Sunday
School at 9:30 a.m. Eleven
o'clock service will have as its
guest speaker Mr. Hubert
Thomas. The speaker for the
six o'clock service will be Mrs.
Ruth Dumas.
Rev. James Williams, Pas-
tor and Mrs. Christine White,
chairperson invite everyone to
worship with them on this
occasion.


These Brownie Scouts spent the night camping out at St.
Joseph's State Park recently. The Scouts are members of
Brownie Troops 242 and 305.


Trees...
considered points for consi-
deration in choosing the prop-
:er tree should include the
following:
1. Be sure the tree you
choose will fit your landscape
need. For example, fast grow-
ing for quick shade, broad and
spreading for shade, dense for
a windbreaker or for screen-
ing or attractive blooms for an
Accent.
2; Know the tree you select
and its growth requirements.'
Know the tree's ultimate size
and plant accordingly. Does
the tree require special soil
(dogwood and redbud acid
soil)? Does the tree have
serious insects and diseases
and will require routine main-
tenance.
3. Be sure the tree is tolerant
of your local weather condi-
tions. Will it tolerate Florida's
summer heat, or is it too
tender for northern and cen-
* tral Florida winters?
4. Do you want an evergreen


(Continued From Page 4)
or deciduous tree? Decidous
shade trees are recommended
as they allow the desirable sun
when void of leaves in the
winter, whereas an evergreen
tree may be desirable for
screening..
5. Consider overhead lines,
underground waterlines,
septic tanks, etc. as well as
walks.
6. Know the tolerance of the
tree to salt spray. The South-
ern Magnolia Cajeput tree and
, the live Oak are a few among
the group of trees tolerant of
salt spray:
7. Jastly, obtain a quality
tree from a reliable nursery-
man, and plant it in a
carefully prepared spot, fol-
lowing good horticultural
practices as to proper soil,
location, exposure, watering
and spraying so that your
investment in the tree is not
lost through carelessness and
lack of planting.


Brownies from Troops 242
and 305 of Port St. Joe recently
camped out at St. Joseph's
State Park at the Peninsula.
Carol Durham, leader, and
Bunny Miller, co-leader, with
the help of Mr. and Mrs. Eddie
Smith, Linda Moree and
Sherry Bowen, supervised the
girls in their camping
endeavor.
Attending the camp-out
were: Carolyn Stephens, Ann
Cantley, Pamela Bowen,
Kellie Moree, Andrea Mc-
Culley, Angel Barr, Kristy
Smith, Krista. Turner, Molly
Skipper, Dana Stripling, Brei-
da Burns, Rachel McCulley,
Maria Perry, Lisa Atkins,
Susan Minger, Cheyenne God-
frey, Debbie Monteiro, Donna
Durham and Theresa
Mongold.


THANK YOU,
WITH LOVE
To my brother, John with
love who since 1967 has
lived with Jesus above.
I have fond memories of
his childhood days.
His smiling face and
loving ways.
How we hated to see him
'go, to fight the enemy
in a foreign land.
But, oh how proud of him
we are to know that he
made that brave and
unselfish stand.
What he suffered we will
never know and oh how
we miss him so.
To him the price he paid
was small for the
freedom of us all.
So to my brother, John,
and the many, many
others.
Thank you, with love.
SISTER


-1539


WANTED: FOSTER HOMES
for Retarded Clients
Must meet health and safety standards and
become licensed by the State, Pay ranges
from $252 $361 per month per client. For fur-
ther information contact Clara Poteat, Deve-
lopmental Services Program Office, 450
Jenks \venue, Panama City, Florida. Phone
799-. .31.
4tc 10-22


Now,health is no barrier

to lifeinsurance protein


for people to80


with our remarkable, new


lSui-A-Matic Plan.


There's no physical necessary that's why we call this exciting
life insurance plan Sure-A-Matic "SAM" for short.
No one between the ages of 35 and 80 can ever be turned
down because of physical disability.
What a wonderful way to have peace of mind. For all the details
call your Independent Life Agent today and ask about "SAM".

Independent Life
The Total Way of Life Company

224 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe (904) 227


I





"'S


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


THURSDAY, NOV. 12. 1981


4 bdrm.,2 %ba., 6-yr. oldtri-
lievel stucco home. 2,600 sq. ft.
including garage. Central h/a,
: 0'x175' lot, partial chain link
: ence. Range, intercom, dish-
S:washer,. trash compactor,
-w: ,../w carpet, 2 porches. Price
S ,000 with assumable mort.
,of $34,000 at 9% percent. Par-
Etial owner financing. Location
,816 Marvin Ave. Phone 482-
S :3079 forappt. tfc 11-5
SIParkwood Mobile Home
:located on 11/5 acres of land
Sat Overstreet with well & sep-
'tic tank. Trailer has central
; 'heating and air conditioning. 2
S b.,drms., 1 ba., custom built
"and utility shed. Has water
softner and filter with 20 yrs.
.guarantee. For more informa-
tion contact Jimmy Gilbert at
r648-5057. 4tp 11-5
S Two bedroom house forsale.
229-8570. tfc 10-18
4bdrm., liv. rm., din. rm. Ig.
.T:edn and kitchen, utility rm.,
storage, dbl. carport, lg.:
screened in back porch, on 2
lots. 1605 Monument Ave. Call
: 229-8654. tfc6-5

5 yr. brick home, 3 bdrm., 2
Sba., liv. rm., din. rm., fam.
rm., breakfast area, ch/a,
range, refrig., dishwasher,
Fla. rm., 2 cargarage w/open-
er, 18'x36' pool,: cypress
privacy fence, shallow well
pump. Cypress Ave. Call
.029-6401 for appt. tfc 11-12


5% acres, 6 miles south of
V Wewahitchka. $900 for equity
a: nd assume $107.00 a month
payments at 10% interest.
229-8597. ,ltp 11-12





Information on ALASKAN
and QVERSEAS jobs. $20,000
to $50,000 per year possible..
Call 602-941-8014, dept. 8636.
4tp11-5


3. 5 *
Dinners, First Born Church,
: located on Avenue E, Nov. 13.
Price $3.00. Country fried
steak or fried chicken, potato
Salad, rice & gravy, collard
: greens or string beans, corn-
.- 7.bread & rolls, tea, cake.
ltp 11-12
*,- l 'h -








S900 HIGHWAY 98 -
S PORT ST. JOE
Reduced, negotiable, assumable-
12.5% 1st mortgage on this executive
type home for the man on the move.
See this to appreciate. 100 Mimosa.
S No. 1029
528 7th St. 2 bdrm plus sm. ex. rm.,. 1
be., fireplace, big kitchen, screened
porch, carport. Owner finance 25%
down, 12% interest. No. 103.
Price Reduced to $29,000. 1305 Mar-
vin Ave., 3 bdrm., 1 ba.. home in good
location; fenced back yard, gas heat.
carport, storage shed. No. 104.
4 bdrm., 2 ba., with 2 A/C, gas heat, on
2 lots, carpets, drapes incl., stainless
steel siding, chain link fenced back.
yd. Only 12,000 down, balance at 12%
over 10 years. 506 8th St. No. 105.
Lg. house, 3 bdrm., 1/ ba.. liv. rm.,
din. rm., & kitchen combo, carport,
newly painted thruout. 1501 Monu-
ment. No. 106.
Office or store bldg., income proper-
ty, 1 side open, 1800 sq. ft. on Reid
i Ave. Owner fin. No. 107.
3 bdrm., 1 bea. home w/swimming
pool & 6' privacy fence. Call for more
Information. Ward Ridge.

OAK GROVE
401 Madison, 2 bdrm., 1 ba., partially
furnished, chain link fence, $10,500.

OVERSTREET
3 bdrm., 1 bea. trailer with attached
trailer, also I travel trailer, 1 acre of
S land, $12,500. No. 501.

WEWAHITCHKA
2 bdrm., 1 ba. frame house financing
available. $11,300.00. No. 601.
17.8 acres east side of Hwy. 71 north
of downtown. May divide into 5-6 acre
plots. No. 602.

CYPRESS LODGE
4 miles from Wewa on Dead Lakes.
Complete campground at $395,000.
Owner finance. Lots from $4,500 to
$8,500, other parcels available.


BACK YARD SALE: 2
families, adult clothing, re-
cord player, kitchen items,
furniture, books. 510 8th St.
Friday and Saturday. ltp 11-12

GARAGE SALE: Thursday,
Friday and Saturday, 8 to 5
o'clock. 600 Marvin Ave. Itc

YARD SALE: Fri., Nov.
13th, 622 Madison St., hours 9
to 4. Men's, women's,
children's and baby's
clothing. Dishes, ceramics,
bicycle, records, T.V.'s, misc.
items. If rain, cancelled.

GARAGE & YARD SALE:
Ya'll come to 1111 Palm Blvd.,
Friday, 13th & Sat.,I 14th,
: could be' your lucky day.
Several families with lots of
worthwhile items.

GARAGE SALE: "Wednes-
day Special, Nov. 18th". 9-6.
Knick knacks, odds & ends, Ig.
men. and women's clothes.
1904 Juniper. ltp 11-12

YARD SALE: 4 families. 9
to 3:00, Sat., Nov. 14. White Ci-
ty, Hwy. 71. Furniture, house-
hold items, jewelry, sports
items, women's clothes, sizes
12-16, men's clothes. All items
priced to sell. tp

YARD SALE: Friday, 8-5 at
Inez' Ceramics, 226 4th Street,
Highland View. 1tc 11-12


YARD SALE: 1616 Long
Avenue. Friday and Saturday,.
9:00 :- ?; Books, clothing,
dishes and misc.
Huge Yard Sale and Bazaar,
Friday and.Sat., 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. at 1st Presbyterian
Church, 16th at Woodward. A
wide, wide world of new gifts
for Christmas featuring pot-
pourri as gifts together with
packets of ingredients and
*.how tomake yourown. Beau-
tiful porcelains, catnip mice,
interesting knitted and
crocheted novelties, many
kinds of Christmas decora-
tions, special toys, original
paintings, ceramics and a col-
lection of plants along with the
usual yard sale items. There
will be free coffee and tea.
Shop inside and enjoy
yourself.,




The most consumed food in
U.S.: fluid milk and cream.


1980 14x70' mobile home. 3
' bdrm., 2 ba., completely fur-
nished, energy-saving double
windows. Down payment and
take up payments. For more
info -call 229-7269 or 648-5995
after 5 p.m. ltp 11-12

Interested in World Book
Encyclopedia? Call 229-8173
after 5 p.m. 3tp 11-12

One. 120 gal. upright gas
tank, $75 firm. 648-5643.

One well boat, trailer and
approx. 600 yds. gill net, $550.
229-8779. Itpl11-12

71 Sunliner motor home, 24',
sleeps 6. Self-contained, good
conrd. thruout. 44,000 miles.
$6,000 firm. Mexico Beach.
648-5662. tfic11.12

1978 Honda CX-500. Excel.
cond. 6,000 miles, one owner.
$2000 firm. 648-5662. tfc 11-12

Honda Express, 610 actual
miles, $275. 1202 Monument
Ave. 229-8601. Itp 11-12

CB's, antennas, CB supplies
for the hunter. Radio Shack,
K&D TV & Sound. tfc ll-12


For Sale or Trade. One RC
plane with engine and 6 ft.
glider 'with 4-channel Craft
controls. Will trade for good
table saw or radial arm saw.
648-5106. ltp 11-12

14' boat, 40 h.p. Mariner
motor with electric start, al-
ternator, battery and
galvanized tilt trailer. Phone
229-6048. Itp 11-12

Remington model 700, de-
luxe BDL 243 cal. Very good
cond. Weaver scope and
mounts, also sling. $325. Call
227-1219, ask for Becky, Mon. -
Fri.,.8-4. ltp11-12

One complete twin bed,
maple finish, one chair,
several formals, and lots of oil
paintings. Call Dell Fadio at
229-8421. ltp 11-12


Table with 4 chairs, made of
white oak barrels w/uphol-
stered swivel chairs, good
i cond. Cost over $500, will jell
for $200. Very heavy, you haul.
648-813, Mexico Beach.
2tc11-5

16' Rowing Dory, complete.
Call Fred Buskens, 229-8035.
tfc 10-22


ST. JOSEPH BAY REALTY

i E. B. MILLER, REALTOR IKE DUREN, REALTOR


- MEXICO BEACH P. O. BOX 13332


ST. JOE BEACH
NEW LISTING: 1980 Champion
mobile home (12x48'). 2 bdrm.. 1 ba..
on nice lot (75x150'). Oak Street.
$8,500 down assume existing mor-
tgage.
Beautiful 3 bdrm., 1 ba. modern
design home wiheated swimming
pool. Enjoy the view of Gulf from side
deck. Call us today to see what you're
missing! $115,000.
3 bdrm.. 1 ba. house on 2 Ig. lots.
wood fenced yd., Oak & Americus.
$47.000. No. 201.
Gulf St.. 3 bdrm. 1 b house, on 2 Ig.
lots with fireplace. 16x32' swimming
pool, wood fenced around It. only
$55,000.:No. 202.
Partially finished house $19,000. 1
bik. from beach, 3 bdrm.. 1 be. Adja-
cent lot also available. No. 204.
1 bdrm. 1 ba. trailer. 75x150' lot.
$12.500. Pineda St. No. 205.
2 bdrm.. 1 ba. trailer w. fireplace. lots
of fruit 'trees 1 blk. from' beach.
$19,000. No. 208.
St. Joe Beach has a Ig. selection of
lots for $1,000 down & 12% interest.
New Ll7tlI: Attractive 3 b 1 ba
brick~ hL0 2Igb For-
met Iio L kit
chen vA g Mra.U e ch.

BEACON HILL
3 bdrm., 1 ba. mobile home on 2 lots
completely enclosed w a wooden
fence, $25,000. No. 801.
1 or 2 bdrm. cottage. 3rd Ave. near 6th
St. Only $25,000. No: 803.
3 bdrm., 1 ba. on 3 lots, fireplace.
newly carpeted. $36,000. No804.

ACREAGE
Bay Front. 5 acres on state road 30
near Presnell's, 251' on bay frontage.
No.701.
Almost 2 acres on waterfront
atWetappo Creek, $27,000. No. 702.
Shady lot at Howards Creek. $3,000.
No. 703.


.64


MEXICO BEACH
Reduced to $18,500.2 acres plus 2
trailers and Ig. shed. 3. biks. from
beach. No. 301.
2 bdrm. duplex, sundeck & good view
of the beach. $49.000 owner financ-
ing. 20% down. No. 302.
4 bdrm.. 2'ba. cen. hia. Ig. liv. rm., 2
formal din. rms.. den w/fireplace on 2
lots canal location with boat dock.
No. 303.
Grand Isle. 3 bdrm.. 1 ba. wood
privacy fence. cen.ihla wheat pump,
Ig. garden area. only $48,000. No. 304.
1 bdrm. duplex on Hwy. $38.500. 20%
down, owner finance. No. 305.
2- beautiful lots 75x112' ea.. total
150x112'. Nice and grassy with septic
tank.
2 bdrm.. 1 ba. home overlooking the
Gulf just across hwy. Hwy. 98 & 3rd
St. $44,000. No. 306.
3 bdrm.. 2 be. stucco house, liv. rm..
din. rm. & kitchen combo, nice lot par-
tially furnished. $47.500. 6th St. No.
308.
Nice 2 bdrm.. 2 ba. home on Hwy. 386.
can see Gulf from yd. $52.000.
Move in with low down payment. Only
$250 mo. pmts. on existing mortgage.
3 bdrm. frame house on 4th St.
$25.900.
Duplex. brand new. 2 bdrms.. I ba.
each side. unfurnished. 7th St.
$47.000.00.
Excellent rental opportunity. Attrac-
tive 2 bdrm., 1 ba. duplex, located on
39th St. Furnished. close to Gulf.

HOWARD CREEK
Perfect getaway place or comfortable
permanent home. 12x60' mobile
home on 1 acre. chain link fence &
chicken or turkey pens. Ig. screen
porch, fruit trees. 3 wells. Priced
eight .

CAPE SAN BLAS
Bayslde, two 100' lots on the bay.
$13,500 each.


SERVICESa


Three houses for sale, to
tear down or move. 513, 515 &-
517 Third Street, Port St. Joe.
Call Emory Stephens at
229-6803 or 229-8840 after 5
p.m. 2t 11-12
1977 Yamaha Chapie 80cc,
automatic, 900 miles, like new.
$450. 648-5494. tfc 10-29
36' shrimp boat, 671 Detroit
diesel, single rig. 229-8570.
tfc 10-18

Hey, Santa! Is Christmas
slipping up on. you? Why not
let House of Lloyd help fill
your Christmas list, while you
sit in your warn toasty house
and make plans for your
special night!
' $20.00 worth of merchandise
is yours-just for inviting
others to see our wonderful
gifts. Plus, there's many other
ways to increase your buying
power.
Let House of Lloyd and
Carol Durham at 229-6676, be
your Santa's helper. Besides-
isn't this the year the elves go
union? 6tc 10-22






The John C. Gainous Post
10069, Veterans of Foreign
Wars will hold its regular
meeting at the St. Joe Motel,
Port St. Joe, the second Tues-
day and the fourth Thursday
of the month at 7:30 p.m.

The Disabled American
Veterans, Port St, Joe Chapter
62, will meet the first Monday
each month at 7:30 p.m. at St.
Joe Motel. tfc 6-41


One bedroom furnished
trailer for rent at St. Joe
Beach. 648-5306. tfc 10-8
Seasonal rentals. 2 beach
.cottages at Beacon Hill. For
more information call 648-5312
after 6 p.m. 3tc 10-29
Bachelor unit, furnished all
utilities paid, Beacon Hill. Call
648-5000 or 648-8398. Itc 11-12

Apartment for rent at Mex-
ico Beach on beach side. Year
round rent available. Call
648-8215. tfc 11-5

Mobile home sites, efficien-
cy apt. and campers for rent
on beach. By day, week,
month or year. Ski Breeze
Camp Sites. Call 229-6105.
tfc 6-4

For carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vac the portable steam
carpet cleaning system.
Available at Western Auto,
phone 227-1105, 219 Reid Ave.
Thames Hotel, day, weekly,
monthly rates. 302 Reid Ave.
229-8723.
3 bedroom house on 7th St.,
Port St. Joe, furnished.
648-5306. tfc 10-22

No need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
227-1251.




1971 Pontiac 4 dr. sedan.
Can be seen across from fire
station, Williams Ave.ltp 11-12


R.A.M.-Regular convoca- 1970 Volkswagen. Call and
tion of St. Joseph Chapter No.dicker 227-1403 or 227-1785.
56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd Mon- r 2-1 '- "
days, 8 p.m. All visiting20om., 1976 (ats B1 $850.
panions welcome.2.-"5 ... ......,14,
E. E. WEEKS, H.P. 229495 or229-7272. ltpll-12
E. William McFarland, Sec. ..


The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
V.F.W. meets the second
Tuesday and the fourth Thurs-
day of each month at 7:30 p.m.
in the Florida Power Lounge.

There will be a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe
Lodge No. 111, F.&A.M. every
first and third Thursday at
8:00 p.m
R. C. CHANDLER, W.M.
J. P. Cooley, Sec.


Deluxe pickup truck, 4x4, a.t.,
a.c., am-fm radio. Below
N.A.D.A. Book price. 229-8414.
ltp 11-12

1978 Datsun 510, 30-31
m.p.g., $4,000 or best offer.
648-5944 or 648-8244. 2tp 11-5


Walls washed and cleaned
by husband and wife, also in-
terior and exterior painting,
windows cleaned, reliable
workers. Mr. Sollars. 227-1490.
4tp11-5
ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work Welding
506 First Street
Phone 2294803
Machinist on Duty All Day
Every Day
FOR TRACTOR WORK
Call 229-8939 or 648-5306
tfc 8-14
Air Conditioning Heating
Refrigeration Appliance
Parts and Service
DANIELS SERVICE CO.
Electric Plumbing -
Appliance Repair
All Brands
Norris Daniels
Phone 229-8416
106 Bellamy Circle
tfc 4-16

Frozen mixed fruits, served
partially thawed, make a
quick, elegant dessert. Add
sliced bananas, diced ap-
ples or mandarin oranges.


COSTIN INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
All Forms of Insurance
322 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8899
tfc 11-12


PAT'S MATS & FRAMES
Custom picture framing
and matting. Also frame
needlework. You no longer
have to drive to Panama
City. A member of the Pro-
fessional Picture Framers
Assoc. 407 7th St., Mexico
Beach. Hrs: 9 a.m. *7 p.m.
ES.T.., Wed. Sat. Sun-
days by appt. 648-8914.
tfc 11-5


UTZ Electronic's Repair
Licensed Work on Anything
That Pertains to Electrical
T.V., Radios, Stoves, Refrig-
erators, Dryers, Washing
Machines, Etc.
Phone 648-5346
4tp 10-29


Advertise Your Service
in the

Susiness & Seaice Tiectoiur

Send $10 to Chamber of Commerce,
Box 964, or call 227-1223 between 9-11:30


Paid for by Wewahitchka State Bank


8-*5011


MONTHLY .
RENTALS t
Nice selection of houses & apts. row
available for rent. Call for more ito.
Deluxe almost new 3 bdrm., 2iba.
brick home in Port bt. Joe for lease.


GULF AIRE
Spanish design 2 story, 4 bdrm.. 2' /
ba., Ig. den. liv. rm. w/fireplace. dble
garage. 10/4%% assumable mortgage.
Some beautiful lots still available at
11'/6% interest, 25% down.

Jones Homestead
4 bdrm.. newly remodeled Ig. kitchen.
1 '/i acres, completely chain link fenc-
ed. $48.500.
3 bdrm.. newly remodeled home on Ig.
lot. $5.000 down. balance over 20 year
period.

COMMERCIAL
Highland View 3 well placed lots
on U.S. 98. Room for most any type
business including parking space.
Approx. 183 ft. on U.S. 98.
Fully equipped store bldg. on 31/
acres on Hwy. 30. will finance. No.
401.
Convenience store St. Joe Beach
1.536 sq. ft. on 1 / lots w/concrete
slab floor for expansion. No. 402:
2.700 sq. ft. building on First St. in
Port St. Joe on 3 lots, No. 403.
2 lots on Reid Ave. 60'x90'. No. 404.

ASSOCIA TES -
AFTER HOURS
ARCHIEBARBEE ........ 648.5392
PAULETTA CAMPBELL ... 648977
JIM CLEMENT ,....... .. 6485482
-ALISA DUREN ........... 648.5636
BOB & JEAN FALISKI .... 229-66553
RHONDA HEATH ........ 227-1782
BREND RUSHING WOOD 227.1689
MARSHA YOUNG .. ... 848-5248


The Sewing Room
1P, fS 410A Reid Ave. NOTIO
,p Port St. Joe, Fla. AS
"Quality Fabric at Affordable Prices"




A good buy at $12,900. 12% owner
financing available. 523 3rd St.

Four bedrooms, 2 baths, fireplace,
good cond.., 1466 sq. ft. plus a storage
shed. Recently installed aluminum
siding. This one should go quickly at
$23,000. 519 Fourth St.

Lg. duplex Each apt. contains 3
bdrms. and 1 bath. One apt. com-
pletely furnished and the other par-
tially furnished. All for $45,000. 1616
Long Avenue. $10,000 down with
owner financing available at conve-
nient terms.

Excel. investment as vacation retreat
or primary residence. Indian Pass
Beach. Assumable mortgage & owner
financing available. $37,500.

HANNON

INSURANCE AGENCY
FRANK HANNON, Broker


Roy Smith Associates
221 Reid Avenue


Karen King
227-1133


WAUNETA'S
BOOKKEEPING
Complete Bookkeeping Service
Including All Required
Tax Forms
Reasonable Set
Monthly Fee
Wauneta Brewer
116 Monument 229-8536
p25tp6-D
Psychological Services for
anyone with problems in day-
to-day living. Gulf County
Guidance Clinic, Port St. Joe.
227-1145 (24 hours)

Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday, 4:00 P.M., E.S.T.
Tuesday, 8:00 P.M., E.S.T.
Al-Anon
Tuesday, 8:00 P.M., E.S.T.
St. James Episcopal Church
BEACON FABRICS
Sewing Notions & Patterns
Hwy. 98 at Beacon Hill
Hrs.: 9:00-5:00 E,S.T.
tfc 8-6

Carpentry Work Done
Reasonable Rates
Jimmy Johnson
Phone 229-8757
tfc2-2

RED CARTER'S GUN SHOP
Port St. Joe Beach
Gunsmithing Blueing
New & Used Guns Scopes


Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151

Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reid Avenue



ST. JOE CUSTOM

BUILDERS





) -Commercial Building
- -Residential Building
--Cabinet Work


GLEN F. COMBS
227-1689

P.O0. BOX 456
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
t.. 7-2


AVON Buy or Sell
Call district manager, Claudia
Walters, Panama City,
871-5523. tfc 10-8


CAREFOOT SEPTIC TANK
SERVICE
Tanks Cleaned and Portelet
Service
229-8007

TV & RADIO REPAIR
B&J Electrical &
Electronics
510 1st St., Port St. Joe
Phone 229-8075
In Wewa on Tuesdays
tfc 7-30


B&J ELECTRICAL
Residential Wiring,
Air Condition Repair
and Installation
Phone 22-89075
tfe 7-30

CARPENTRY & CONCRETE
18 Yrs. Experience
Ira J.Nichols
319 6th St., Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
9SO2294235
tfc6-4


Church Supplies
Music Records Tapes
Rubber Stamps
Hospit & Funeral Flowers
Gifts-Bibles
Sound Studio Recording
Service
7-OAKS
GOSPEL SUPPLIES

115 Hunter St., Oak Grove
Port St. Joe, Fla.
227-1325

-- -------










Going Fishing?
Stop here first
for a complete
line of

Fishing Tackle

Huribut Supply
306 Reid Ave.


"I think it was something I Ofe."



kills bugs for
up to six months,
and soves you about S 100 yea y
in costly pest coi trol services.
Use of Sprayer free with
purchase of Rid-A-Bug
HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port StL Joe. Floridat


TAFLINGER PAINTING
(Interior and Exterior)
Pressure Cleaning for Grime and Mildew
ALSO COOL SEALING MOBILE HOME ROOFS
WILL COOL MOBILE HOMES 15-20%
FOR FREE ESTIMA TE
Call 229-8977 or 648-8369


THE STAR
306-08 Williams Ave.


PAGE SIX


k
pmm









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 12, 1981


Mrs. Sarah Turner's class room door received the second
place selection for its "Wash away" theme.


Outdoor Burning Has



Charred 500,000 Acres.


Outdoor burning is a touchy
mA subject these days for. the
Florida Division of Forestry,
and if you don't know why, you
This intricate float, built by the senior class, won first must not have lived in Florida
place in the float contest in the Homecoming Parade Friday the past 15 months.
afternoon. More than a half-million


The Sophomore Class took second place
in the Homecoming parade' float contest
Friday afternoon. Below is the Junior Class


entry, which took third place in the float
competition.-Star photos
-Star photos


acres of wildlands have burn- try," notes Bethea. "More ing."
ed over that period, and people mean more chances of A pamphlet containing
almost all of the 14,000-plus accidental and careless fires. rida's forest fire laws
fires were started by man. A It also means more land open burning regulations
large number of them were clearing, more drainage of available from Division
illegal fires and the Division of normally wet areas, more Forestry offices statewide
Forestry has begun a crack- residential encroachment into it can be obtained by writi
down on that. forested areas." Florida Division of Fores
"The state laws says all "It all adds up to the fact Fire Control Bureau, Col
fires that burn any forest, that people have just got to use Building, Tallahassee,
grass, woods, wildlands, restraint with outdoor burn-' 32301.
marshes or vegetative land-
clearing debris are illegal
unless authorization has been Beach Chamber of Commerce
obtained from the Division of ..
Forestry and adjacent resi--flansDmner On November l6
dent landowners are notified -'
of the intention to burn The Mexico Beach Chamber follow at 7:30.
beforehand," says State For- of Commerce will have a
ester John Bethea Thanksgiving covered dish Special guest will be
"Although it seems like the dinner on Monday, November James F. Fantaski from
fire season has been going for 16, 6:30 C.T. The meeting will dall Air Force Base.
a year now, actually we are -
just now entering the time of
the year when we traditionally
have the most forest fires,"
Bethea said. "So it is extreme-
ly important that everybody
knows the laws concerning
outdoor burning, and that they ,
abide by them." PA
"The Division of Forestry is
going to do everything in its
power to see that we don't
have a repeat of last year,"
the state forestry director
added. "If it takes an increase Mexico Bea
in arrests and fines to get
folks' attention, then we are
prepared to do that."
Violation of Florida's forest FOR SALE: 1981 3 bdrm., 2 ba. furnished mobile
fire laws is punishable by up to home (4'x70'. Assumable loan. To be moved to
five years in prison, a $5,000 your lot
fine, or both. your lot .
"People should keep in
mind, too, that a fire that
meets the legal requirements
when started becomes an
illegal fire if it gets out of
control, and the landowner
who starts such a fire is liable
for the damages it causes,"
Bethea said.
"Several factors led up to
last year's destructive forest
,fire problem and all of them
still exist," Bethea warns.
"The foremost factor was an
extreme shortage of rain and
we're still lagging well below
normal in all parts of Florida MEXICO BEACH. 2 bdrm., stilt house short distance
except the extreme southern from beach. Downstairs is partially finished and could
area. The discouraging thing easily be converted into a duplex. Call for complete in-
is that we don't expect this formation. 26th St.
problem to improve anytime
soon because we have just
finished what is traditionally
our rainy season."
Other factors influencing '. .
the increase in fires mostly
involve Florida's rapidly ex-
panding population.
"We're one of the fastest
growing states in the coun-


Flo-
and
s is
n of.
e, or

try,
lines
Fl.


Go!.,
Tyn'-


Carl White's room won third prize for this imaginative
door, which says, "This stuff just kills me."
Honorable mention went to Commander Humphries'
NJROTC class room, Mrs. Carol Cathey's room, Greg
Burch's art room and Bill Parker's welding class.
--Star photos



GULF COUNTY GUIDANCECLINIC -
SUICIDE PREVENTION
CRISIS COUNSELING
EMERGENCY EVALUATIONS
E 24MHOUR-V
EMERGENCY SERVICES
CALL 227-1145


I

FIRST

BAPTIST CHURCH

Corner Third Street and Baltzell Avenue
REV. BILL HEATON, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL .............. 9:45 A.M.
'MORIfNGdWORSFIIPSERVICE'.....;:.. 1 :00A.M:
CHURCH TRAINING ................... 6:00P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP SERVICE ............ 7:00 P.M.
-PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) .......... 7:00 P.M.
"Coine and Worship God with Us"
**^iiii- M^^B flAiflP ^""


[ER ,:REALTY



Hwy. 98 at 31st St.

ach, Fla. 9041648-5777


"Real Estate Specialists for Over 30 Years":
Call us for information on these as well as a'
large inventory of lots and other homes.













INDIAN PASS. 2 bdrm. stilt house with magnificent Gulf
view. Approx. 100 yards from beach. Good income pro-
perty. Indian Pass Beach Subdivision.






a..:,' 1


Gal. 5:22-23

0 /
Y


TEMPERANCE
S
'U
2
'U


1000NES


HIGHLAND VIEW

CHURCH OF GOD

"Where Jesus Christ Is King
& God's Love Is An
Everflowing Fountain"
SUNDAY SCHOOL ...... 10:00A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ... 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .... 6:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY EVENING 7:00P.M.
Pastor Ira J. Nichols


HIGHLAND VIEW. Handy man's special. House that has MEXICO BEACH. Comfortable cottage with sundeck,
had fire damage in need of repair on 2 nice lots. 1st screened porch, on lovely landscaped lot. One Ig. bdrm.,
Street.ba., kitchen, liv. & dining combo upstairs. Downstairs
Street. ready to be finished into bdrms., ba. or what ever the
need. Virginia Ave.


Main Office 648.5777 Branch Office 229-8493
Cathey P. Hobbs, Associate Britt Pickett, Associate


The First
Pentecostal Holiness Church

2001 GARRISON AVE.- PORT ST. JOE
Invites You to Worship with Them
Ernest A. Barr, Pastor
SERVICES
SUNDAY SCHOOL ...................... 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................... 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .................... 7:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT ...................7:00 P.M.


PAGE-SEVEN









PAGE EIGHT THE STAR, Port St. Joc, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 12, 1981



B Demons
OWNERS ARE ADVISED TO
PROTECT THEIR CATS Edge Sharks




t~-khrd-r~nt ni aala ai~i yio


He may have lost his shirt in the effort ( his second of the
night) but Chris Adkison picks up a first down despite
Michael Newman's efforts to stop him. -Star photo

The fastest bird alive is called, appropriately, the swift.
It is capable of speeds of more than 200 miles per hour.


Friday'

Fired up by the Homecom-
ing celebration, the Port St.
Joe Sharks came close to
handling the Bonifay Blue
Devils, who have been giving
other teams in the Panhandle
fits this season.
The Devils hammered out
138 yards on the ground and
rode the effective passing
combination of Mike Russ to
Poitierist White for another 84
yards to put the Sharks down,
13-7 last Friday.
The Sharks seemed to be
pacing themselves like a
boxer going in a 15-round bout
Friday night, even though it
was evident the Sharks game
plan hadn't been planned that
way. It was mid-way of the
third period before the Sharks
came up with their first down
of the game and mounted what
was to turn into a scoring
drive in the middle of the
period.
Meanwhile, the Devils had
already put 13 points on the
board in the first half and had
to spend the second half
scrapping around mightily to
defend their slim lead.
It was the Devils second
possession in the first period,
when they managed to place
the' first points on the board.
For the second time in the
ballgame, Mike Newman
picked off a Chris Adkison
pass on the Shark 37 yard line
to put the Devils in striking
distance of the goalline. After
Devil quarterback tried three
straight passes which manag-
ed only twoyards of gain,' he
kept the ball himself and
snaked his way through the
middle of the field to the goal
line and the TD. Charles Bush
kicked the extra point and the
Devils were in the lead, seven
to nothing.
The Devils opened up the
second half on their own 30
yard line, but a Shark face-
mask call, a Russ to Drew
Short pass for 29 yards and a
Shark interference call on a
interception of a Russ pass
had the Devils on the Shark 10
'yard line and first and goal.
The Sharks held, with Ashley
Abrams getting in two tackles


, 13-7

on the Devils last two plays
from within the two yard line.
With only 47 second left on
the first half clock, the Devils
put their last points on the
board when Russ hit his
favorite target of the night,,
White, for a 30 yard scoring
play. Bush's kick was low and
the Devils had 13 points, all
they would get that night.
The Shark defense really
came alive in the second half
'with Chris Adkison, Kip Alt-
staetter and Ashley Abrams
spending about as much time
in the Devil backfield as the
Devil's quarterback, Russ.
Three times in the second
half, Russ was sacked for
losses and twice the Sharks
stopped the Devils on fourth
and short situations.
With 3:37 left in the game,
the Sharks had the ball for the
last opportunity at pulling
ahead in the game. Starting on
their own 18, the Sharks.came.
to the line of scrimmage with
the fans fully expecting them
to mount a drive, after their
last period of heads-up play.
But on the second play, the


TOUCHDOWN! Alan Sisk, on the ground, right, puts May (66). Mark Wester is 52, Jake Tankersley 77 block while
the ball into the end zone for the Sharks with a block from Pat Kip Altsteatter signals for the touchdown, giving the referee
a little help (he needed it). -Star photo


Sharks fumbled a snap and the
Devils recovered. They kept
the ball until there was only
1:01 on the clock and the
Sharks on their own 16 yard
line before, they gave it up
again.
Then it was too late.
FRIDAY NIGHT
Tomorrow night, the Sharks
will travel to Wakulla to meet
the highly successful War
Eagles. Although the Eagles
have had a fine season and the
Sharks have had their troubles


at times, the game tomorrow
will decide which of the two
teams advances in the state
play-off system toward the 2-A
championship.
THE YARDSTICK
Bonifay PSJ
First downs .15 4
Rushes, yards 52-138 25-65
Passing yards 84 57
Return yards 52 38
Passes 16-8-0 20-6-2
Punts, avg. 4-38 5-36
Fumbles, lost 4-0 2-1
Penalties, yards 3-35 6-80


Anthony Harris caught this huge 40 pound
red fish last Thursday near the Coast Guard
Station on St. Joseph Peninsula. Harris said it
took him 30 minutes to land the huge red fish.


In Elizabethan England the spoon was such a novelty that
people carried their own folding spoons to banquets.


Gators Wipe Out Freeport, 50-0


:The Wewahitchka Gators
ranked up Steve Stripling
last Friday night and got back
un the winning track after a
50-0 shellacking from Baker
the week before.
SThe Gators used three
tpuchdowns by Stripling, two
I y Harold Williams, one by
Andrew Gainer on an inter-
bepted pass and one by Tim
Price to bump Freeport fur-
ther into the loss cellar by 49-0.
The Gators are now 7-2 on
the season, having lost only to
Baker and Century:
:Williams put the Gators on
She scoring binge with his first


quarter score on a one-yard
plunge through the middle.
Stripling chalked up one of his
three TD's later in the period
on a one-yarder. Tim Price
added one point with an extra
point kick to give the Gators a
13-0 lead at the end of the first
period of play.
Stripling again broke loose
in the second period, to score
on a 17-yard dash, with Price
adding, the extra point to give
the Gators a 20-0 half-time
lead.
The Gators really broke the
game open in the third period,
when Stripling,.Williams and


I 7, I nileJ el il.t urcC
Constitution and Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe, Florida
i ^JIMMY SPIKES, Minister
-;CHURCH SCHOOL ."...... ................ 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................. .... 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ...................... 7:30 P.M.
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP .......... 6:30 P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) ........... 7:30 P.M.



NEW BETHEL
*African Methodist Episcopal Church
146 Avenue C Phone 227-1213
Rev. James W. Williams, Pastor

SUNDAY SCHOOL .................. .... 9:30 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .. ...... ....... 11:00 A.M.
SEVENING WORSHIP : ................. .. 6:00 P.M.
"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man Our Brother"



First


Presbyterian Church
Sixteenth Street and Forrest Park Avenue
Phone 227-1756
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE ............ 10:00 A.M.
ADULT SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS ......... 11:00A.M.
Study In the Gospels, Wednesday 7:00-7:45

Welcome to Everyone

JOHN M. STUART, Pastor
Phone 229-6857


Gainer all crossed the goal
line, ,carrying the football to
add tdothe growing Gator
score. Stripling started off the
third period with a sparkling
50-yard run to pay-dirt. Price
kicked the extra point. A few
minutes later, Williams, tuck-
ed in a 19 yard pass from Chris
Thomas, which covered 19
yards and a touchdown. Again
Price kicked the extra point.
Gainer closed out the third
period scoring when he inter-
cepted a Freeport pass and
brought it 30 yards to the goal
line. Thomas ran across with
the two extra points, and the
Gators had a 42-0 rout of
Freeport.
But, they weren't through
yet.


Tim Price, who had
putting his scores on the
with his toe rather tha
usual hard running, go
the act in the last period
raced 21 yards for the G
final score of the ev
Price also kicked the
point.
The Gator defense
Freeport to only 68 ya
offense for the night,
first downs, which came
ly from Gator penalties
recovered one of two fut
Freeport's only shining
for the night was 96 ya
return yards.
NEXT FRIDAY
Tomorrow night, the (
will travel'to Earnest W
close out their season


. been
board
an his
it into
od and
'ator's
ening.
extra

held
rds of
seven
most-
os and
mubles.
light
rds of

Gators
ard to
i. The


Public Notices -

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT. FOURTEENTH representative, or the venue or jurisdic-
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF tion of the court.
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJEC-
FLORIDA TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
CASE NO. 81-36 FOREVER BARRED.
IN RE: The Estate of Date of the first publication of this
CORY NELSON. Notice of Administration: November 12,
Deceased. 1981.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION isa JANE NELSON
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR As Personal Representative of me
DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE Estate of Cory Nelson. Deceased.
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS IN-
TERESTED IN THE ESTATE: ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the REPRESENTATIVE:
administration of the estate of CORY Isa ROBERT M. MOORE
NELSON. deceased, File Number81-36. is P, 0. Box 248
pending In the Circuit Court. Gulf County Port St. Joe. Florida 32456-0248
Florida, Probate Division. the address of (904) 229.8181 211112
which is Gulf County Courthouse.Port St.
Joe. Florida 32456. The personal NOTICE
representative of the estate is JANE NOTICE
NELSON, P. 0. Box 573. Wewahitchka. The Survey of Federal General Revenue
Florida 32465. The name and address of sharing Expenditures. Form RS-9F. en-
the personal representative's attorney ding September 30. 1980. and its suppor-
are set forth below. ting documentation is available at the Ci-
All persons having claims or demands ty Clerk's Office. Municipal Suilding. Port
against the estate are required. WITHIN St. Joe. Florida rom the hours of 800
THREE (3) MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF am. until 5:00 p.m.. Monday through Fri.
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS day, for examinations.
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of the above CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
court a written statement of any claim or By: L. A. FARRIS.
demand they may have. Each claim must City AuditorlClerk It 11-12
be in writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and address of
the creditor or his agent or attorney, and
the amount claimed. If the claim is not yet
due. the date when it will become due MARRIACE
shall be stated. If the claim is contingent MfR I
or unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim s
secured, the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of th' claim to the clerk to enable
the clerk to mall one copy to each per-
sonal representative. Gulf County Gui
All persons interested in the estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of Ad- 311 Willia
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS Port,
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. to file Call227.1145
any objections they may have that Call 227-1145
challenges the validity of the decendent's
will, the qualifications of the perso.r'


Gators will be trying to end
their season with an 8-2
record.
THE YARDSTICK
Wewa F'port
First downs 12 7
Rushes, yards 40-214 35-70
Passing yards 93 -2
Return yards 49 96
Passes 9-6-0 8-1-3
Punts, avg. 1-26 5-30


Fumbles, lost
Penalties, yards


1-1 2-1
8-88 2-20


Panhandle

Marathon Sat.
The Panhandle Runners
Club Half Marathon will be
held Nov. 14 at 8:00 A.M., at
the Tyndall Air Force Base
Gym. Registration is at 7:00
A.M., with an entry fee of
$3.00. The course is flat-paved.
Trophies will be awarded to
the male and female overall
winners, with ribbons pre-
sented to the first three
finishers in the eight age
divisions. No T-Shirts will be
given.
For more information call
265-6765 or 265-9648.

Highland View
Title I To Meet

The Title I Program at
Highland View Elementary
will hold its second meeting of
the school year on November
17 at 1:30 p.m. in the Reading
and Math Lab.
All Title I parents who have
children being served by the
Highland View Elementary
School and all other interested
parents are encouraged to
attend.


AND FAMILY

SELLING


dance Clinic, Inc.
ims Avenue
St. Joe
for Appointment


GOOD LUCK!

Big Shark Team

and Coaches
We Are Behind You!!!

Kathy and Deborah


HIGHLAND VIEW

METHODIST CHURCH

Corner 4th & Parker Ave.
Invites You to Worship Services
Rev. Paul Griffin, Pastor
SUNDAYSCHOOL ...................... 10:00 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .................. 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .................... 6:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY ................. 7:30 Prayer Meetings
Nursery Provided














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:PAGE TEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 12, 1981


MINUTES

of the


If C

VA


countyy Commissi4


o.n


The Board of Coun
"mission of Gulf Count
da, met September 24
Special budget sessi
advertised, with the f
members present. Cl
James L. Tankersley,
AJimmy 0. Gortma
Douglas C. Birmingha
Present was Clerk
Gates, Sheriff Ken
"and Administrative A
Tommy Pitts.
The meeting came
at 7:00 p.m.
Comm. Gortman op1
meeting with prayer
"Clerk led the pledge
legiance to the flag.
Oscar Redd, Squad
-presented the budget
Wewa Ambulance
amountt of $17,856.30
:.discussion, Comm. B
ham moved the Boar
Stively adopt the Wewa
lance budget in the am
7$17,856.30, a 5 percent i
.over the. previous
:--Comm. Branch second
motion and it passed
-mously.
Miss Catherine R
Squad Chief, present
budget for the St. Joe
:laimce Squad in the am
$27,280.00. After disc
,.Comm. Branch mov
Board tentatively gran
-Joe Ambulance Squs
'percent over last yea:
get of $17,765.00 and
.the request for comn
tions equipment som
else provided the fu
"available. Comm. Mot
:ended the motion and it
unanimously.
''Charlie Presley pr
the budget for the cou
'"operations in the
amount as the previous
S$112,173.00 for the cou
in Port St. Joe and $7,31
the old courthouse in
'hitchka, except the req
S, one additional employee
S courthouse in Port St.
salary of $9,214.00 pe
After discussion,
Birmingham moved th
tentatively adopt the
; courthouse operations
as the previous year a
S one additional employ
salary of $8,014.00 pe
Comm. Gortman second



Public

Notiees
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOU
JUDICIAL CIRC.QIT OF THE S
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF Q
CASE
ST. JOSEPH LAND AND DEVEI
COMPANY, a Florida Corporati
Plaintiff,
vs.
DONALD M. CHAGLE and Wife,
L CHAGLE, SAMUEL ANGEL
BETTY J. ANGEL, RONALD E.
and Wife, MARY S. GOODIN,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DONALD W, CHAGLE a
SHIRLEY L. CHAGLE
2120 Harmony Way
Evansville, Indiana
SAMUEL M. ANGEL and VW
TY J. ANGEL
. R.R. 4,. Orchard Rd.
Evansville, Indiana
RONALD E. GOODIN and Wif
S. GOODIN
* R.R. 13, Box 150-A, Copperl
Evansville. Indiana
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
foreclose the mortgage on the
property in Gulf County, Florida
A pojtfon of Fractional Secti
Township B South, Range 11
Gulf County. Florida, being
P. particularly described as fo
; Commencing at the NE cor
Fractional Section 13, Town
SSouth, Range 11 West; the
S051' W along the East line o
Section for 2,078.10 feet to a
SJPC concrete marker, their
8909 W 712.86 feet to a 4"x4
concrete marker for the po
beginning; thence S 051' W p
with said East line of Secti
S 500.QOfeet to a4"4"SJPCcc
market( thence N 89s09 W
feet t a 6"x'6" SJPC co
marker on the East Right-i
Line of Long Avenue Exti
thence N 0'51 E along said Ri
way Line 100.00 feet; thence S
E 400.00 feet; thence N 0o51 E
thence S 8909' E 100.00 feet
S' Point of Beginning; containing
acres, more or less.
has been filed against you and yi
Squired to serve a copy of you
defenses, if any, to it, on Fred N
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose ad
408 Long Avenue, Port St. Joe,
and whose post office address
Bpx 447, Port St. Joe, Florida 32'
on or before November 23, 1981,
the original with the Clerk of th
either before service on Plain
torney or Immediately thereafter
wise a default will be entered aga
for the relief demanded in the Co
WITNESS my hand and the se
Court on October 26th, 1981.
JERRY GATES, Clerk of Court
S Gulf County, Florida
By: Tanya Allen, Deputy Clerk

FICTITIOUS NAME
sNotice is hereby given that pur
Section 865.09, Florida Statul
undersigned person intends to
with the Clerk of the Circuit Co


County, Florida, four weeks after
pqublication of this notice, the i
name or trade name under which
: be engaged in business and In wh
business is to be carried on, to-w
PAT'S MATS AND FRAME
407 7th Street
Mexico Beach, Florida
Bay County
Pat Bowen, Owner


ty Cornm- motion and it passed unani-
y, Flori- mously.
1, 1981 in Evan Williams, Fire Chief,
on, duly and David E. Richardson,
following Secretary-Treasurer, pre-
hairman sented the budget request for
Eldrige the Beaches Volunteer Fire
Branch, Department in the amount of
n, and $6,000.00. After discussion,
am. Also Comm. Branch moved the
Jerry Board advertise to increase
Murphy, the millage in the St. Joe Fire
assistant Control District to three-
tenths of one mil since there
to order are now more fire depart-
ments in the district and the
ened the present millage brings only
and the about $1,000 per fire depart-
e of al- ment which will hardly pay for
the insurance on the vehicles
d Chief, and volunteer firemen.
for the Comm. Money seconded the
in the motion and it passed, unani-
). After mously.
3irming- Comm. Birmingham moved
d tenta- the Board advertise to in-
a Ambu- crease the millage in the
aount of Tupelo Fire Control District to
increase three tenths of one mill to be
year. used to purchase fire fighting
ded the equipment for the district.
I unani- Comm. Gortman seconded the
motion and it passed unani-
amsey, mously.
ted the Russell Foster, Director,
e Ambu- and Nolan Treglown, Chair-
nount of man of the local library board,
ussion, presented the local library
ved the budget request in the amount
it the St. of $24,948.00. Comm. Birming-
id a 5 ham moved the Board tenta-
r's bud- tively grant the request in the
budget amount of $24,948.00, a 5
munica- percent increase over the
replace previous years budget in the
nds are amount of $23,760.00. Comm.
ney sec- Gortman seconded the motion
t passed and it passed unanimously.
Mrs. Verna Totman, Di-
'esented rector, presented the budget
irthouse request for the Gulf County
same Senior Citizens Program in
is year, the amount of $4,000.00.
irthouse Comm. Money moved the
41.00for Board tentatively grant the
Wewa- budget request in the amount
uestfor of $4,000.00, a 33 percent
ee at the increase over last year's
Joe at a budget of $3,000.00. Comm.
.r year. Gortman seconded the motion
Comm. and it passed unanimously.
e Board William C. Sullivan and Stan
e same Davis, Panhandle Health
budget Systems Agency, presented
ind hire the annual report of the
ee at a agency and requested the
r year. Board fund $1,386.00 of the
ided the agencies budget for the pre-
sent year. Comm. Branch
moved the Board tentatively
approve a budget request of
$1,386.00, the same budget as
the previous year. Comm.
Gortman seconded the motion
and it passed unanimously.
Mrs. Tunnie Miller, Pan-
handle Alcoholism Council,
TATE OENTH presented the budget request
COUNTY. for her agencyin the amount
NO. 81-220 of $2,750.00. Comm. Branch
LOPMENT moved the Board table a
on, decision on this matter and the
other requests of the mental
SHIRLEY health board until Monday
and Wife, night. Comm. Money sec-
GOODIN onded the motion and it passed
unanimously.
Edwin Ailes, presented the
nd Wife, budget request for the Guid-
ance Clinic in the amount of
$3,000.00. Comm. Branch
moved the Board tentatively
ife,. BET. approve a budget in the
amount of $2,625.00, a 5
percent increase over the
previous year's budget of
e, MARY $2,500.00 for the Guidance
Clinic. Comm. Money sec-
ne Rd. onded the motion and it passed
unanimously.
action to Administrative Assistant
o: Tommy Pitts presented the
ion 13, budget of the Health Depart-
West., ment in the amount, of
more $32,032.17, the same amount as
onerof the previous year. Comm.
ship 8 Branch moved the Board
nce s tentatively grant 'the budget
of said request. Comm. Birmingham
8"x6" seconded the motion and it
nSJPC passed unanimously.
int of Upon motion by Comm.
arallel Birmingham, second by
on for Comm. Branch and unani-
oncrete
oo.oo0 mous vote, the Board denied
ncrete the budget request of the West
of-Way Florida Resource and Con-
antion: servation Development Pro-
ghtof-09' ject in the amount of $150.00.
400.00oo Pursuant to invitation to
to the receive sealed bids, opened at
g 2.066 the meeting of September 22,
ouare re 1981, to furnish insurance
r written coverage to the county, the
i. Witten. following bids were awarded
dress is as recommended by Admini-
Florida, strative Assistant Tommy
is P.0. Pitts. Comm. Birmingham
and file moved the Board award the
is Court, bid for workmen's compensa-
tiffs at- tion to Risk Management
ir; other- Services in the amount of
ainst you $23,324.00 as the lowest and
implaint.
al of this best bid. Comm. Money sec-
onded the motion and it passed
unanimously. Comm. Birm-
ingham moved the Board
award the Group Health
4110-29 Policy to Florida Municipal
Health Trust Fund, in the
rsuantto amount of $32.05 employee
teas, the and $54.75 dependants as the
register lowest and best bid. Comm.
urt, Bay Birmingham moved the Board
the first award the blanket accident
ictitious policy to Costin Insurance
which said Agency in the amount of
vit: $2,380.00 as the lowest and best
s bid. Comm. Money seconded
the motion and it passed


unanimously. Comm. Birm-
ingham moved the Board
4t10-29 award the Blanket bid-Tax


Collector's Office to Pish
Management in the amount of
$41.00 as the lowest and best
bid. Comm. Money seconded
the motion and it passed
unanimously. Comm. Money
moved the Board award the
money and securities bid-
Clerk's Office to Hannon In-
surance Company in the
amount of $51.00. Comm.
Birmingham seconded the
motion and it passed unani-
mously. The Board did then
table consideration on the
other bids until Monday night,
September 28th, to allow Ad-
ministrative Assistant Pitts
time to meet with the insur-
ance agents concerning the
bids.
Comm. Branch moved the
Board increase the Property
Appraiser's 1980-81 budget of
$78,925.00 by 5 percent. Comm.
Money seconded the motion
and it passed unanimously.
There being no other busi-
ness, the meeting did then
recess until Monday after-
noon, September 28th, at 5:00
p.m.

The Board of County Com-
mission of Gulf County, Flori-
da, met September 28, 1981 in
special budget session with
the following members pre-
sent: Chairman James L.
Tankersley, Jimmy 0. Gort-
man, William R. Branch,
Douglas C. Birmingham, and
Eldridge Money. Also present
were Sheriff Ken Murphy,
Administrative Assistant
Tommy Pitts, and Clerk Jerry
Gates.
The meeting came to order.
at 5:00 p.m. Comm. Gortman
opened the meeting. with
prayer and Clerk Gates led the
pledge of allegiance to the
flag.
Mrs. Tunnie Miller, Coun-
selor, Panhandle Alcoholism
Council, presented the budget
request of the council in the
amount of $2,750.00. After
discussion, Comm. Branch
moved the Board increase the
agency's budget by 5 percent
over the previous year's bud-
get of $2,000.00. Comm. Money
seconded the motion and it
passed unanimously.
Carl Ericsson, Director,
Mental Health Board, pre-
sented the budget for the
Mental Health Board. He told
the Board that the Supreme
Court of Florida had ruled that
counties were responsible for
county indigents hospitalized
under the Baker Act. After
discussion, Comm. Branch
moved the Board table the
budget request of the Mental
Health Board to allow time to
discuss this matter with the
attorney. Comm. Birmingham
seconded the motion and it
passed unanimously.
Comm. Birmingham moved
the Board rescind all motions
concerning the acceptance of
insurance bids made at the
previous meeting of Septem-
ber 22, 1981, and start over
anew at the meeting tonight.
Comm. Gortman seconded the
motion and it passed unani-
mously. '
After discussion, Comm.
Money moved that the Board
grant all employees a 5
percent pay raise, which
would help keep the county
budget under the total 8
percent limit increase im-


posed by the legislature.
Comm. Branch seconded the
motion and it passed with
Comm. Money, Birmingham,
Branch, and Gortman voting
aye. Comm. Tankersley voted
no, stating he would like to
also hold taxes down, but he
felt the pay raise should be at
least 7 percent.
Comm. Branch moved the
Board accept the low bid in
each category of insurance
coverage, said bids previously
opened the meeting of Sep-
tember 22, 1981, provided that
each bid meets the specifica-
tions as advertised by the
Board. Comm. Birmingham
seconded the motion and it'
passed unanimously, to-wit:
Workmen's Compensation,
Hannon Ins. Co., $22,848.00;
Buildings and Contents, Risk
Management, Inc., $4,285.00;
Group Health Policy, F1 Muni-
cipal Health Trust; Blanket
Accident Policy, Costin Insur-
ance Company, $2,380.00;
Public Employees Bond, Risk
Management, Inc., $41.00;
Money and Securities Broad
Form, Hannon Ins. Co.,
$51.00; and Comprehensive
General Liability, Risk Man-
agement, Inc., $21,951.00. Rob-
bie Costin, Costin Insurance
Company, then announced to
the Board that he was with-
drawing his bid on the blanket
accident policy. The Board
then awarded the bid to Risk
Management, Inc. in the:"
amount of $3,149.00 as the next
lowest and best bid.
Comm. Gortman moved the
Board adopt the job classifica-
tion system .as amended,
excluding the pay scale, until
such time as the Board has
time to further study the pay
scale. Comm. Money second-
ed the motion and it passed
unanimously,
Reggie Tisdale, Barrett,
Daffin and Carlan, Inc., and
Tommy Pitts, Administrative
Assistant to the Board, discus-
sed with the Board the pro-
posed Beaches Water System.
The main topics of discussion
were whether the Board want-
ed to require a front foot
assessment which would re-
duce the monthly bill and if
the Board wanted to install
their own well at the beaches
or bring water from the City of
Port St. Joe. The Board
agreed to look further into
these matters before making a
decision.
There being no further
business, the meeting ad-
journed.


HIGHLAND VIEW


BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of Fourth St. & Second Ave.

Welcome Friend

SUNDAY SCHOOL ....................... 9:45 A.M.
WORSHIP SERVICE ........... 11:00 A.M. & 7:30 P.M.
CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) ............. 6:30 P.M.
MID-'WEEK PRAYER (Wednesday) .......... 7:30 P.M.

Nursery Provided BRO. JERRY REGISTER





We Have A
Place for You!



For Bible Study and Worship
Join Us at The Friendly Place


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
5:45 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.


Long Ave. Baptist Church


1601 LONG AVENUE
MARK DONNELL
Minister of Music and Youth


BIBLE STUDY ......................... :
MORNING WORSHIP ...................
CHURCH TRAINING .. ..................
EVENING WORSHIP .................. .
W EDNESDAY ....................... . .


TED CORLEY
Pastor-


Music Group At Methodist Church Nov. 22


HIS AMBASSADORS will be
in the Por:t St. Joe, Sunday,
November 22. This highly
talented vocal and instru-
mental group is appearing at
the First Methodist Church.
In the past few years of HIS
AMBASSADORS' ministry
they have traveled 500,000
miles around the world. This
tour' will take the group
another 75,000 miles through-
out the United States, Canada,
Great Britain, Scandinavia
and Continental Europe.
Mixing sacred hymns and
contemporary Christian
music with equal capabilities,
HIS AMBASSADORS provide
a varied program of music,
testimony of God's love, and
the evidence of the happiness
you can find by knowing Jesus
Christ.
You certainly will not want
to miss this excellent musical
ministry, so make your plans
now to see and hear HIS
AMBASSADORS at, First
Methodist Church on Sunday,
Nov. 22 at 7:00 p.m.


Save
On


23 Years Experience
WE REPAIR ALL
Major Appliances


Air Conditioners
Refrigerators Freezers
Electrical- Plumbing


We Service: *
Natural & LP Gas
Electric & Oil Heaters
Beat the cold front... have
your heating system check-
ed TODAY!!!


DANIELS SERVICE COMPANY
Phone 229-8416 Port St. Joe


4Costs


NOTICE OF





PUBLIC HEARING





The Board of County Commission of


Gulf County, Florida, has tentatively

adopted a measure to increase its pro-

perty tax levy by 8 percent.



All concerned citizens are invited


to attend a public hearing on the tax in-

crease to be held on November 16,

1981, at 7:00 p.m., E.S.T., at the Gulf

County Courthouse.



A FINAL DECISION on the proposed


tax increase will be made at this

meeting.


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS


GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


By: Jimmy 0. Gortman, Chairman









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 12, 1981


PROPOSED GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1981-82


NOTICETO TAXPAYERSOFGULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
Pursuant to Section 129, Florida Statutes, 1971, NOTICE is hereby given that the
Board of.County Commissioners, of Gulf County, Florida, has adopted a tentative
budget for the several County funds, including Federal Revenue Sharing for the
fiscal year beginning October 1,1981, and ending September 30, 1982; pursuant to
Section 129.01 (2) (B), both the receipts and appropriations division reflect the ap-
proximate division of expenditures between county-wide expenditures and non-
county wide expenditures and the division of county revenues derived from or on
behalf of the county as a whole and county revenues derived from or on behalf of a
municipal service, taxing unit, special district, unincorporated area, service area,
program area, or otherwise not received for or on behalf of the county as a whole;
that said Board will be in session on Monday, November 16,1981, at 7:00 p.m., for
the purpose of hearing complaints from any person or persons, firm or corporation
that are dissatisfied with said budget, to-wit:
SUMMARY BUDGET
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1,1981
AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30,198
GENERAL FUND:
Ethimated Revenues:
StaterFunds-Miscellaneous .............................. 17,519.00
licenses and Fees.-Local .................................... 14,000.00
Taxes- ReaiEstate and personal property...................... 916,195.00
Mmquitofunds-City .......................................... 8,000.00
Federal Funds-Miscellaneous ................................. 25.00
Ren it ................... ................................. ... 17,500.00
Donations ..................................................... 5,000.00
Fees- Clerk CrcultCourt ...................................... 10,150.00
Fees-Clerk County Court ..................................... 6,000.00
Fees-Tax Collector ...................................... 28,000.00
Fees-Property Appraiser .................:............... 10.00
Fees-Supervisor otRegistration .................9......... 90.00
M miscellaneous ... ........................................... 50.00
Total Estimated Receipts ............................. $1,118,799.00
Less% ........................................... 55,939.95
95%ofEstimatedRecelpts .............................. $1,062,859.05
Cash Balance Forward ................................ 207,235.00





Drivers Abuse


Turn Law


More and more drivers
continue to abuse the right on
red law said the Florida
Highway Patrol recently.




Menu

Gulf County

School Lunch
Monday, November 16
Sloppy Joe, French fries,
orange juice, cake and milk.
Tuesday, November 17
Battered dipped fish, cab-
bage slaw, baked beans,.hush
puppy and milk.
Wednesday, November 18
Spaghetti with meat sauce,
green beans, tossed salad,
buttered roll and milk.
Thursday, November 19
Chicken, rice with gravy,
turnip greens, spiced beets,
cornbread and milk.
Friday, November 20
Hot dog, French fries, sliced
peaches with peanut granules,
cinnamon crispy and milk.

Menus are subject to change
due to the availability of foods.


"Permission to turn right on
red was granted by the state
legislature in most of the
states; however, unless more
drivers make the right turn
correctly, there may be an
effort to do away with the
law," said Colonel Eldrige
Beach, Patrol director.
"It is only permissable
where there is no sign prohi-
biting it and can .only be done
after first coming to a com-
plete stop. Also all pedestrians
and other vehicles proceeding
as directed by the traffic light
must be given the right-of-
way."'
"A driver on a one-way
street may also make a left
turn onto a one-way street
having all traffic proceeding
to his left; however, the driver
turning left must first come to
a stop and yield to other
vehicles and pedestrians pro-
ceeding lawfully with the
traffic light."
"The right turn on red law
was passed to speed up traffic
as weil ab to conserve
energy," concluded Beach,
"but as with other traffic
laws, it requires the coopera-
tion of every driver to make it
work for the safety of all
concerned."


Thinking
About Going Solar?

Here are some suggestions for you to consider if you
are thinking about installing a solar water heating
system in your home or business.
Assess your energy needs. Determine if a solar
water heating system will be cost-beneficial for
your situation. Information to help you make such
an assessment is available from the Florida Solar
Energy Center and the Governor's Energy Office.
Take your time in selecting a system that will be
right for you. Obtain-several estimates.
Be sure the system you choose is sized correctly for
your use. Hot water needs should be analyzed to
assure.proper sizing of the system.
Determine a contractor's qualifications. Find out
how many systems the contractor has designed and
installed. Get references from people who have had
systems installed and are satisfied. If possible,try to
inspect the contractor's previous work.
Buy locally if possible. Local companies are more
interested in protecting their reputations.
Beware of advertisements that offer "fantastic long-
term-guarantees" or "maintenance-free" systems.
Get a written estimate of performance and energy
savings, and insist on a written contract and a writ-

Make sure the system has
been certified by the
Florida Solar Energy
Center.
Don't try to install a sys-
tem yourself unless you
have the necessary
plumbing and carpentry
skills and tools.
Remember that the 40% federal income tax credit
and state sales tax exemption help keep down the
price of installing a solar water heating system.
Additional information is available by writing -
"SAVE IT, FLORIDA"
The Capitol
Tallahassee, Fi 32301
So remember, when you're going to work and on the road,-
slow it down; when you're at home, turn it off; together,
we can turn things around. The more each of us does, the
v more energy independent Florida will be. Remember,
energy is everything .....


wISAVE IT FLORIDA.


Total Receipts & Balances .......... ................ $1.270,094.05
Estimated Expenses:
County Commissioners-Administrative ................. $ 165,402.93
Clerk-County Commission ........ ..................... 47,379.04
County Attorney ....................................... ... 9,175 42
Property Appraiser .................................... ...... 82,871.25
Tax Collector ... ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 96,491.85
Tax Adjustm ent Board ....................................... 5 .00.
Clerk Circuit Court County Court & Recorder ................. 104,656.86
Circuit Court Operations ....................................... 6,949.00
County Court ......................... ..... .. ... 1.350.00
Jury Com m mission ................................... .. ..... .... 200.00
Court Reporter .................................... .. .... 2,951.30
Supervisor of Elections ................................... 30,711.29
Election Expense .............. .......................... .... 14,433.00
Courthouse Operations ....................................... 125,779.69
County Building-Wewa ................7..3........... 7.341.00
County Planning ....... ................ .. ...... ...... 5000.00
Publicity ...................................................... 1,500.00
County Service Officer ..................................... .. 15.456.26
Fire Control ........................... ... .................. 9,660.00
Building Inspection ............................................ 13,600.00
Medical Examiners Contract .................................. 5.000.00
M mosquito Control .............................................. 169.462.79
Guidance Clinic Contract ................................ 2,62500
Activity Centerfor Retarded ................................... 2,188.00
M ental Health ...................... ........... .............. .. 5,480.00
Panhandle Alcoholism Contract ................................ 2,100.00
Senior Adult Programs ..................................... 4,250.00
Tubercular Care ............................................ 270.00
Ambulance Service Wewahltchka ......................... 17,856.30
Ambulance Service-Port St. Joe ............................. 18,653.25
County Medical Planning .................................... 1.761.00
M edicaid- Hospital ................................... ... .. 23.797.00
Medicaid -Nursing Home ............................. .... 12,318.00
Library Operations ......... ......... ..... .... ..... .. 38,286.00
Agricultural Extension Program ........................ ... 25,438.69
Forestry Program ............... ................. . ... 1.000.00
Total Appropriations ................................. $1,069,894.92
Reserve for Contingencies ........................... .. 60.000.00
Reserve for Cash Balance ................... .... 140,199.13
TOTAL ............ ............ $1.270,094.05
FINE AND FORFEITURE FUND:
Estimated Revenues:
Taxes-Real Estate and personal property .................... $ 223,845.00
Fines, Assessments and fees ................................. 44,764.00
Civil defense Matching Fund ................................. 13,712.00
Federal Revenue Sharing ..................................... 116,454.00
Miscellaneous ................... .................... ....... 48.00
Total Estimated Receipts ......... .................. $ 398,823.00-
Less 5% ............................................. 19,941.00
95% of Estimated Receipts ......................... 378,882.00
Cash Balance Forward ................................ 35,135.79
Total Receipts & Balances ........... ........... $ 414,017.79
Estimated Expenses:
Sheriff's Budget .............................................. $ 376,433.63
Civil Defense Budget ................. ..................... 18,019.87
Educational Studies ......................................... 750.00
Total Appropriations .................................. $ 395,203.50
Reserve for Contingencies .......................... 9,000.00
Reserve for Cash Balance............................ 9,814.29
TOTAL ............. .................... 414,017.79

COUNTY ROAD AND BRIDGE FUND:
Estimated Revenues:
RacingTax ............... .......... $ 211,500.00
Gasoline, Fuel Oil and Road Tax ............................. 265,969.00
State Rends Revenue Sharing, Mobile Home Tax ............. 73,884.00
Total Estimated Receipts .............................. 551,353.00
Less % ....... ...... ............................ 27,567.5
95% of Estimated Receipts............................. $ 523,785.35
Cash Balance Forward ............................... 72305.06.
Total Receipts & Balances..... ...................... $ 596,090.41
Estimated Expenses:
Salaries & Benefits ............,............................... $ 370,077.51
Road Construction Cost ......................................... 38,771.00
SEquipm ent .................................................... 540.75
General Operation& Maintenance ........................... 143,096.15
Total Appropriations ................. ............. 50,487.41
Reserve for Contingencies .......................... 36.05.00
Reserve for Cash Balance.......................... 9,553.00
TOTAL ......... ...... ............. $ 596,090.41
SECONDARY ROAD & BRIDGE FUND:
Estimated Revenues:
80%of 5thand6thCentsGasTax ................. ....... $ 311,100.00
TotalEstimated Receipts .............................. $ 311,100.00 -
Less 5% .......................................... ...... 15,555.00
95% of EstimatedReceipts ............................ $ 545.00
Cash Balance Forward .............................. 134,700.00
Total Receipts & Balances ............................. S430,245.00
Estimated Expenses:
Salaries............. .....................................$ 2,000.00
Construction Supplies.......................................... 30,000.00
Professional Engineering ...................................... 10,000.00
Road and Bridge Construction ............................... 100,425.00
Debt Service-Bonds & Interest & Reserve .................... 287,820.00
Total Appropriations .............................. $ 430,245.00
Reserve for Contingencies ............................. -0-
TOTAL ........................................ $ 430,245.00
COURTHOUSE AND JAIL BOND & INTEREST DEBT SERVICE FUND:
Estimated Revenues:
Taxes-Real Estate and Personal Property ..................... $ 62,721.00
Total Estimated Receipts .............................. 62,721.00
Less5% ................................................ 3,138.00
95% of Estimated Receipts .............................. 59,585.
Cash Balance Forward ............................ 12,063.35
Total Receipts &Balances ........................... $ 71,648.35


Estimated Expenses:
RetireBonds .................................................. $
Inte rest ................... .............................. ...
Paying Agents Fee .......: ..... .............................
Total Appropriations .............................. $
Reserve for Contingencies .............................
Reserve for Cash Balance..............................
TOTAL .. ................ ..... ................ $


32,000.00
35,305.00
350.00
67,655.00
3,993.35

71,648.35


COURTHOUSE AND JAIL BOND & INTEREST RESERVE FUND:
Estimated Revenues:
Cash Balance Forward ............................ $ 71,462.39
Total Receipts & Balances ............................. $ 71,462.39
Estimated Expenses:
Reserve for Cash Balance.............................. 71,462.39.
S TOTAL ....................... ................ $ 71,462.39


CAPITAL OUTLAY FUND:
Estimated Revenues:
Cash Balance Forward ....... .....................
Estimated Exmenses:


$ 19,002.47


Equipment: Mosquito ControlDept. .............................. $ 19.,002.47
Total Appropriations ............ ............. $ 19,002.47
Reserve for Contingencies............................. -0-
Reserve for'Cash Balance .............................. -0-
TOTAL....................................... 19002.47
OAK GROVE WATER AND SEWER BOND, INTEREST & RESERVE FUND:
Estimated Revenues:
Net Income- Water and Sewer Revenue .................. \...... $ 5,917.50
Racing Tax Trust Fund ........................................ 3,700.00
Total Estimated Receipts ............................ $ 9,617.50
Less 5% ......................... ... .... ......... .... 480.87
95% of Estimated Receipts ......... ............. 9.136.63
Cash Balance Forward ................................ 1.275.50
Total Receipts & Balances ............................. $ 10,412.13
Estimated Expenses:
Retire Bonds ..................... .. .................... $ 1.0.00,0
Interest .............. .......... ................. 6.815.00
Reserve ....................................................... 876 48
Total Appropriations .................................. $ 8.691.48
Reserve for Contingencies .............. .......... 800.00
Reserve for Cash Balance ............................ 920.65
TOTAL .......................... ......... ... S 10.412.13
FIRE STATIONS BOND, INTEREST, AND RESERVE DEBT SERVICE FUND:
Estimated Revenues:
Rnce TrackFunds.............................................. 1,500.00
Total Estimated Receipts .............................. 1.500.00
Less% .............................................. 75.00
95% of Estimated Receipts ......... .................. $ 1.425.00
Cash Balance Forward ........2....................... 2.435.00
Total Receipts& Balances ......... ................... 3860.00
Estimated Expenses:
RetireBond .. ................................................ 500.00
Interest ..................................... .................. 715.00
Total Appropriations ...................... ...... $ 1.215.00
Reserve for Contingencies .................. .. 106.00
Reserve for Cash Balance ........................ 2.539.00
TOTAL ........ ...... .......... . 3.860.00


STATE I & STATE II MOSQUITO CONTROL FUND:
Estimated Revenues:
Mosquito Funds -State l ..................................... $
Mosquito Funds-State II ... ... ......... ....... ...
Total Estimated Receipts ...
Less 5% ........
95% of Estimated Rrcelpts ..... .. $


15.000.00
15,060.03
30,060.03
1,503.01
28.557.02


Cash Balance Forward ............ ............
Total Estimated Receipts & Balances ........... ... $
Estimated Expenses:
Mosquito Control -State I Operating Expenses ........ ... $
Mosquito Control State II Operating Expenses ...............
Total Appropriations .............................. $
Reserve for Contingencies ............................
Reserve for Cash Balance ......
TOTAL ......... ... .. .... $
ST. JOSEPH FIRE CONTROL DISTRICT FUND:
Estimated Revenues:
Taxes Real Estate and Personal Property .......... ......... $
Total Estimated Receipts ................ $
Less 5% ..... ................... . .......
95% of Estimated Receipts ........................... $
.Cash Balance Forward ............ ..........
Total Receipts & Balances ........... .............. $
Estimated Expenses:
Operating Expenses: Fire Departments .................... $
Commissions to Appraiser and Collector........... .....
Insurance ...................................
Total Appropriations ................................ $
Reserve for Contingencies ..........................
Reserve for Cash Balances .............................
TOTAL ...................... $
TUPELO FIRE CONTROL DISTRICT FUND:
Estimated Revenues:
Taxes-Real Estate and Personal Property ............... $
Total Estimated Receipts ..... ..................... $
L ss 5% ........................... ........ ......
95% of Estimated Receipts .............................
Cash Balance Forward ...............................
Total Receipts & Balances ........................... $


5,999.24 OAK GROVE WATER AND SEWER RACE TRACK
34,556.26 GUARANTEED ENTITLEMENT FUND:
Estimated Revenues:
14.658.84 Racng Tax .. .... ...........
16,897.42 Total-Estimated Receipts... ...................
31,556.26 Less5% .
3,000.00 95% of Estimated Receipts ...... .............
-0- Cash Balance Forward ............................
34.556.26 Total Receipts & Balances ............................


18,507.00
18,507.00
925.35
17,581.65
1,500.00
10,081.65
17,715.00
120.00
1.056.00
i8,891.00
190.65
-0-
19,081.65


6,620.00
6,620.00
331.00
6,289.00
8,600.00
14,889.00


Estimated Expenses:
Operating Expenses: Fire Department...................... $ 300.00
Commissions to Appraiser & Collector ...................... 150.00
Equipment ......... .. ............. ...... 14,000.00
Total Appropriations ............................. $ 14,450.00
Reserve for Contingencies ......................... 439.00
Reserve for Cash Balance......................... -0-
TOTAL ............ ... 14889.00
OAK GROVE WATER AND SEWER REVENUE AND EXPENSE FUND:


Estimated Revenues:
Water and Sewer Sales ................... .................
Total Estimated Receipts ............................
L ess5% ...............................................
95% of the Estimated Receipts .....................
Cash Balance Forward .. ...................
Total Receipts & Balances... ................
Estimated Expenses:
Depreciation .. .. .....................................
Net Income-Bond, Interest, Reserve .........
Total Appropriations .............................
Reserve for Contingencies .............................
Reserve for Cash Balance .........................
TOTAL ........ : ................ .... ............
FEDERAL REVENUE CARING:
Estimated Revenues: Interest ....... .... ..... .......
Federal Revenue Sharing ..........................
Total Estimated Receipts .........................
Less5% ....................... ......................
95% of Estimated Receipts ...................
Cash Balance Forward ....... ..............
Total Receipts & Balances ...... ...................
Estimated Espses:
Equipment: Ambulance ......................................
Equipment: Fire Departments... ..................
Fine and Forfeiture Fund: Budgeted Transfer ... .........
Fine and Forfeiture Fund: Equipment .....................
Health and Recreation .................... .....
Total Appropriations .................................
Reserve for Contingencies ...........................
TOTAL ........................................


$ 7,265.00
$ 7,265.00
363.00

68.00
$ 6,990.00
$ 699.00
6,291.00
$ 6,990.00
-0-
4-
$ 6,990.00

$ 1,100.00
145,688.00
$ 146,788.00
7,340.00
$ 139,448.00
28,000.00
$ 167,448.00

$ 7,800.00
3,000.00
116,454.00
14,300.00
9,450.00
$ 151,004.00
16,444.00
$ 167,448.00


Estimated Expenses:
Transfer to Oak-Grove Water & Sewer Bond, Interest
and Reserve Sinking Fund .....................................
Total Appropriations ..................................
Reserve for Contingencies ......
Reserve for Cash Balance ............................
TOTAL .......... . ... ................

HOWARD CREEK FIRE DISTRICT:
Estimated Revenues:
Taxes- Real Estate and Personal Property .....................
Total Estimated Receipts .............................
Less5% ...............................................
95% of Estimated Receipts .............................
Cash Balance Forward ................... ............
Total Receipts & Balances .............................
Estimated Expenses:
SOperating Expenses ..................... .................
Total Appropriations .................................
Reserve for Contingencies .............................
Cash Balance Forward ................................
Total Receipts & Balances ............................
OVERSTREET FIRE DEPARTMENT:
Estimated Revenues:
Taxes -Real Estate and Personal Property .....................
Total Estimated Receipts ..............................
Less5% .. : .. ..................... ....
95% of Estimated Receipts .............................
Cash Balance Forward ................................
Total Receipts & Balances .............................
Estimated Expenses:
Operating Expenses ... ......................
TotarAppropriations ..............................
Reserve for Contingencies ............................
Cash Balance Forward ..............................
STOTAL .............. ...............


$ 3,700.00
$ 3,7o.00
185.00
$ 3,515.00
3,701.60
$ 7,216.00

$ 7,201.00
$ 7,201.00
15.00
-0-
$ 7,216.00


$ 1,500.00
$ 1,200.00
60;.00
$ 1,140.00
-0- :
$ 1,140.00
$ 1,000.00
$ 1,000.00
140.00
-0-
$ 1,140.00


$ 1,0200.00
$ 1,200.00
60.00
$ 1,140.00
-0-..

$ 1,140.00
$ 1,000.00
$ 1,000.0
140.00
4..
1 1,140.00


1981-82 BUDGET RECAPITULATION AND VILLAGE LEVY :
FUND TOTAL MIULAGE
General ....................................... $1,270,0 0.05 4.91
StateI and State n IIMosquito Control ........... 34,556.2 .0
Fine and Forfeiture............................ 414,017.79 12
County Road and Bridge ....................... 596,090.41 .0
Secondary Roadand Bridge ....4:............... 4,245.00 .0
CapitalOutlay .............................. 19,002.47 .0
Courthouse and Jail Bonds and Interest......... 71,648.35 .35
Courthouse and Jail Bonds &Interest Reserve .. 71,462.39 .0
Oak Grove Water& Sewer Bond, Interest &
Reserve ........................ .... 10,412.13 .0
Oak Grove Water and Sewer
Race-Track Guaranteed Entitlement ........ 7,216.00 -.0
Oak Grove Water and Sewer Revenue Expense 6,990.00 .0
Fire Stations: Bonds, Interest & Reserve 3,860.00 .0
Federal RevenueSharing .................... 167,448.00 .0
TOTAL............................... ,103,038.85 6.46
Health Department ............................ 35,799.52 .2
Total County-Wide.................... $3,138,838.37 6.66
Special Fire Districts:
OverstreetFireControlDistrict ............ $ 1,140.00 .24
Howard Creek Fire Control District ....... 1,140.00 .23
St. Joseph Fire Control District ............ 19,061.65 .3
TupeloFireControl District ............... 14,889.00 .3
TotaSpecial FireDistricts ............ 36,250.65 1.07
NOVEMBER 12,1981
BOARDOF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
JIMMY O. GORTMAN, CHAIRMAN
ATTEST: JERRY GATES, CLERK


NOTICE OF






PUBLIC HEARING






The St. Joe Fire Control District of


Gulf County, Florida, has tentatively


adopted a measure to increase its pro-


perty tax levy by 156 percent.



All concerned citizens are invited


to attend a public hearing on the tax in-


crease to be held on November 16,


1981, at 7:00 p.m., E.S.T., at the Gulf


County Courthouse.



A FINAL DECISION on the proposed


tax increase will be made at this


meeting.


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS


GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


By: Jimmy 0. Gortman, Chairman


PAGE ELEVEN







PAGE TWELVE THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 12, 1981


State Hunting Season Opens Saturday, November 14


Landowners are people too
and hunters are reminded to
:be considerate of them when
planning outings during the
general hunting season which
:begins November 14 in Flori-
da.
"Private landowners should
.be contacted ahead of time by
hunters to get permission to
Senter private property
throughout the hunting sea-
'son," said Lt. Col. Brantley
-Goodson, director of the Divi-
sion 6f Law Enforcement for
'the Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission.
He also reminded hunters to
be familiar with all rules and
:regulations before taking to
the field and particularly
those concerning wildlife
* management areas.
Goodson encouraged hunt-


ers to enjoy their outings this
season but be careful to
protect the natural beauty of
Florida's wilderness setting,
ensuring that they and other
hunters properly dispose of
ammunition boxes and other
throw-away items.
"Florida is fortunate to
have the wide range of wildlife
to harvest each year. This is
due not only to proper man-
agement of the resources, but
also to the spirit shown by
sportsmen in complying with
regulations and respecting the
lands on which they hunt," he
said..
The November 14 opening
will see the start of the
antlered white-tailed deer sea-
son, with a daily bag limit of
two, a possession limit of three
and no season limit. Permits
for taking of antlerless deer


are available on some private
properties. Hunters are en-
couraged to contact their
nearest regional office of the


Commission for details.
Also opening will be the
second phase of the mourning
dove season, with all day


hunting allowed, beginning
one-half hour before sunrise to
sunset. The daily bag limit is
12 and the possession limit is
24.
The turkey season also
opens with the taking of only
gobblers in Leon, Gadsden,
Wakulla and Jefferson coun-
ties in the Northwest Region
(no other turkey hunting al-
lowed in remaining counties of
the northwest region).
Also opening will be the
bobwhite quail season in all
areas of Florida with a daily
bag limit of 12, a possession
limit of 24 and no season limit.
The gray squirrel season will
open with a daily bag limit of
10, possession limit of 20 and
no season limit.
Fox squirrel season opens
except in Lee, Hendry, Palm
Beach, Monroe, Collier, Brow-


Sportsmen Have

Array of Hunt


Opportunities


Florida sportsmen have a
vast array of hunting oppor-
tunities available this fall.
They can hunt on open private
land, on Type I or Type II
wildlife management areas,
private hunting preserves and
even on some national wildlife
refuges.
"Three of the state's nation-
al wildlife refuges will be open
this fall for duck and coot
hunting," said Fred Stanberry
of the Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission.
"In this area, the best bet
for sportsmen who want to try
refuge hunting is that offered
by the St. Vincent Refuge in
Franklin County," Stanberry
said. An archery hunt is slated
for November 19-21 and a
primitive weapons hunt De-
cember 16-18. A maximum of
450 permits will be issued for
the archery and 300 permits
for the primitive weapons


ard and Dade counties with a
bag limit of two, a possession
limit of four and no season
limit.
Wild hog season begins only
in those areas they are
considered legal game, on
some wildlife management
areas and in Palm Beach and
Alachua counties. There is no
season limit for wild hogs, but
there is a daily bag limit of one


and a possession limit of two.
The black bear season
begins in Columbia and Baker
counties only in the Northeast
Region. The daily and season
bag limit is one bear.
Regulations and seasons for
the taking of wildlife may
vary on wildlife management
areas and may differ from
statewide regulations. Sports-
men are asked to contact their


nearest regional field office of
the Commission for details.
Toll-free telephone numbers
for use by sportsmen to
receive information regarding
the hunting season or to report
wildlife law violations are
Lakeland, 1-800-282-8002;
Ocala, 1-800-342-9620; West
Palm Beach, 1-800-432-2046;
Lake City, 1-800-342-8105 and
Panama City, 1-800-342-1676.


SKIP



NOVEMBER



19th.
On November 19, we'd like you to stop smoking cigarettes for 24 hours.
It's worth a try. Because if you can skip cigarettes for a day,
you might discover you can skip 'em forever.







THE GREAT AMERICAN
SMOKEOUT
American Cancer Society *


EC~ I~
U-.
LEN~J


hunt. Permits will be issued on
a first-come, first-served
basis at the Island check
stations. Legal game will be
feral hogs of any size, or sex,
white-tailed deer (one. of ei-
ther sex) and bearded tur-
keys.
More information on the St.
Vincent hunts can be obtained
by writing the Refuge Mana-
ger, P.O. Box 447, Apalachi-
cola, Fl. 32320.


~da~4~eua44


New Federal regulations provide a tax break
for ALL savers. Here are some outstanding

features of this exciting program:

Up to -$2,000.00 interest TAX EXEMPT on joint
returns and up to -$1,000.00 for individual re-
turns.

A LOW minimum investment ('$500.00)

A ONE year maturity

You may convert your existing six month CD
(wholly or partially) into an All Savers Certifi-

cate WITHOUT PENALTY.

Federal regulation provides for a substantial
interest penalty and loss of tax exemption for

early withdrawal.



WE PAY THE HIGHEST RATE OF

INTEREST THAT MAY BE OFFERED.

Please stop in for complete details.




Wewahitchka State Bank


MEMBER
FDIC


Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka


Sure, Saturday, November 14 marks the
Start of the general hunting season when
everyone and his cousin will be heading for
,the woods after deer. But to a dedicated group
:of sportsmen, that date means something
:else- a chance to once again match wits with
S.those winged wonders known as doves.
Mourning doves are the most hunted and
most harvested migratory game bird in North
S America, and say some experts, the most
Frustrating. Nothing can be more humbling
:than sitting on the edge of a field trying to
; down one of these speedsters. A fall dove
Shoot is perhaps one of the South's most
:honored traditions.
November 14 marks the start of the second


.Houseman

Completes

His Basic
Airman Milton Houseman,
Jr., son of Milton Houseman
Sr. of 149 Avenue G, Apalachi-


RuliK

Left i


phase of dove hunting with shooting hours
between then and November 29 from one-half
hour before sunrise to sunset. Those hours
will also hold true for the third phase,
December 12 through January 4.
Being a migratory bird, dove hunting
regulations are established by the federal
government and enforced by state wildlife
agencies. To ensure complete compliance,
with these regulations, hunters are urged to
contact their nearest Gaine and Fresh Water
Fish Commission office for a copy of the
current migratory game bird regulations.
Offices are located in Tallahassee, Panama
City, Lake City, Ocala, Lakeland and West
Palm Beach.


cola, and Ollie R. Houseman
of 134 Avenue D, also of
Apalachicola, has completed
Air Force basic training at
Lackland Air Force Base,
Texas.
The airman, who is remain-
ing at Lackland for specializ-
ed training in the security
police. field, studied the Air
Force mission, organization


and customs and received
special instruction in human
relations.
Completion of this training
earned the individual credits
toward an associate degree in
applied science through the
Community College of 'the Air
Force.
He is a 1981 graduate of
Apalachicola High School.


Over 80% found newspaper advertising most helpful for information
on prices, where to shop and sales!


'Si


WASHINGT( 67% of Weekly readers surveyed read the Classifieds!
suprme cow
. reglato. aa
ea stin 84% of Weekly readers surveyed read the other Advertisements!
ti um ba, a' 1

mn M0 of Weekly readers surveyed read AdvertisilnsRaf!


W Ai s72.5% of Weekly readers surveyed read Grocery Ads before shopping!
tion wa
It In cm
BAy, te Over 40% of Weekly readers surveyed read Clothing Ads before buying!
etudy tm ih
tea ts 70% of Weekly readers surveyed read Real Estate ads when buying!

uiS! EDITORIAL FIGURES:
The L 51% of Weekly readers surveyed get most information on State Events
been an e*.
ths. from their newspapers!.
A num'
.v^Ote tua 72.5% of Weekly readers surveyed get most ocal Information from

amn their newspapers!
Uvenes

Bypa As with other surveys, newspapers didn't win everycategory in competition with
other media. But, THESE STATISTICS DO SHOW VERY POSITIVE EDITORIAL

AND SALES DATA FORWEEKLY NEWSPAPERS.
I

resolve
bible for
emfption
_=m, ^ THIS IS WHY WE FEEL WE ARE IMPORTANT TO YOU!
feetiveness
marketed.&
last P

orted THE STAR
SOn
the
de
tI, Phone 227-1278


lie



ntact
cant em-
kera and
Into's ISO
aded a
,ficeSun-
,the con-
lng for
latloins.
Swill not
Atve pay
ier plants,
agreement
ra' pay last
Icialssaid.
'iion organ-
4 in Roa-
Lars, ex-
ntract
,.lations
aoanoke
*or the
e," Bush
war with
/ears. I'min
a over and
t to still
ais com-
s 3,000
roanoke
n back
getting
ludes two
eases that
g the past
000 work-
n plants,
Roanoke
an 8.5
tive to
bout 10
activee
..t pay In.
197 for
Roanoke
average of
'aid the
ide any
,efits at
ive recog-
n in our
he com.
.re union
Stevemns
-eed to
.di con-


Hunters Have A Second


Chance At Doves, Too


WHY PEOPLE READ

U WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS.


ENJOY TAX-FREE



INTEREST WITH



THE NEW



ALL SAVERS



CERTIFICATE


-7


I


__j


MEIN













Prices Effective November 4 -10.1981
Umit Rights Reserve None Sold To Dealers

All Flavors
LRC COLAS


I ~t#j


U .U


Mother's Best

FLOUR


5 lb. bag C
limitlw/$1089
or more add. purchase exc. fob & i


STORE HOURS: M-Th, 8:00 7:00
Fri. & Sat, 8:00 8:00
Sunday, 9:00 6:00
Home Owned & Operated
by Brad Johnson


Want the Right Price?


Pick the


Right Place!


AllVaieisof
FRIT-AIE
A. A-


Lb.6


81GROUND 18 l
BEEF ...1



QUARTERS L
(Sm ia P ar 5 Favoite) Boneless S3iloi Tip


#**W 1Vailue'12mi8. $ 29
I t$A Bb,.., 9P6 ALL MEAT FRANKS $
1%GEb ," a .. WHOLE.HAMS '. $
No Deceptive Meat Bundles, Just Choice Quality Freezer Meats at
L ow, Low Prices. Stock Up This Week at Piggly Wiggly!!"
(Cut A
.U.S.D.A. Choice Whole Wrapped U.SD.A.Choice WHOLE
BEEF LOINS e 3 RIB EYES Lb. 88
Yields T-Bones. Porteriouse & Sirloin Steaks. Yields Rib Eye Steaks, 12 b.Avg.
45-50 lb. avg.
U.S.D.A. Choice Whole Boneless Super Select
S S.D.A. FradeRA BEEF CHUCKS PORK LOINS
WHOLE FRYERS Yield n Cu $148
Yields .Bnis. Chuck. $148 $13/
00 Roasts, Bnls. Shldr. J Lb.
70 lb. Roasts, All Meat Stew & Ground Chuck. Lb.
case 90 |b. avg. Cut & wrapped free. (Cut &Wrapped Free) 14-17 lb. avg.


AmolAi


SUGAR


Limit 1 with $10 or More Purchase Exc. Cig. & Tob. A
Piknik
MAYONNAISE


32 oz.89
Limit 2


! FRESH PRODUCE
Specials


Russet BAKING
POTATOES
$10 lb69


DAIRY DEPARTMENT
Specials
Good Value Country
PATTIES

5 For$100


FROZE FOO


FROZEN FOOD
Specials
Morton Chicken, Turkey,
Mac. & Choeese
POT PIES

3For$100


Washingtm State Delicios Kraft T.V. 2 Lb. Pkt
RED Buttermilk $129 CRINKLE A
APPLES 2.1 BISCUITS p1 POTATOES
Sweet Trpicma Pre EcKedzie
Zipperskin f ORANGE $149 BROCCOLI 55 c
TANGERINES .i. JUICE ..64cLi SPEARS .,8L
Frsh T.V. Mild or Medim T..
BROCCOLI or CHEDDAR $ 59 ORANGE e
CAULIFLOWER 99 CHEESE 10. L JUICE 99


Piggly Wiggly
ICE MILK


2Gal. 89


Hickory Smoked WHOLE

PICNICS,
...*.S ed Pic.i.s . . 1lb. 7


Red Labl eA Donald Duck Sugar AddedM $110 119=1 Chicken 3/$100
KARO SYRUP .. .A S9 ORANGE JUICE 46 VIENNA SAUSAGE /
D** $ 15 DoI M DO"ck46 0- f dI "'s r
COCONUT.. ,14.. 1 GRAPEFRUIT JUICE 99 FRUIT COCKTAIL .. 69
Swan Down 4115 Big 303 size 29 etie c1 i
CAKE FLOUR.. 32.L 1I TOMATOES .. ,r,99 BABY FOOD ... 4..L1
All Vanet f Smuk ..e COLLARDSm 1 err
WALNUTS _TURNIPS 3m43.alor- $1 JR. BABY FOOD ... L28


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