<%BANNER%>
The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02387
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 27, 1981
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02387

Full Text













USPS 518-880

FORTY-FOURTH YEAR, NUMBER 52


THE STAR

Industry -Deep Water Port- Fine People- Safest Beaches In Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, AUGUST 27,1981


-1 .. .. P C -- r 5 -.u


Kids by the hundred show up Monday to report for the first day of the 1981-82 school year in Gulf County.


-Star photos


School Population Slightly Less Than Was Expected


Gulf County Schools opened Monday, with less students
, reporting for the first day of studies than were anticipated.
According to the office of Walter Wilder, Superintendent
of Public Instruction, approximately 2,230 students reported
for the first day. The system had expected a first day
enrollment of 2,282. Wilder said the county schools usually
have a surge of enrollment following Labor Day and he still
expects an enrollment of some 2,285 to 2,290, approximately
what was predicted when everything settles down following
Labor Day.
Wilder's office said none of the five county schools


enrolled as many students as predicted before opening day.
Port St. Joe Elementary School was closest in its estimate
with 557 of the estimated 558 students reporting.
Port St. Joe High School missed its estimate by 39
students, with 661 students of an estimated 700 students
reporting. Wewahitchka Elementary was 18 students short
and both Highland View Elementary and Wewahitchka High
School 16 short of their estimates.
"If the extra students who usually show up in September
do not show, we may face a slight reductionin staff", Wilder


said. "If the trend continues as we expect, we may have to
reduce our staff by five or six teachers next school year".
Any reductions this year will be made in auxiliary people,
according to the Superintendent.
Even so, Wilder said the schools had a good start in every
avenue except the new budget. "We started preliminary
work on our budget Tuesday and we face a giant task of
making the income and expense meet this year", Wilder
said. One of the main problems is making provisions for the
extra $50,000 a late property roll and late tax bills cost the


system last year in interest on money which had to be
borrowed to operate until tax money started coming in.
"We face some of the same costs this year", Wilder said.
The school system budget operates from July I to June 30,
while other government agencies in the county operate from
October 1 to September 30. "We still don't have a property
roll on which to base our budget this year and we are already
two months into our new budget. We will have to borrow by
October to pay salaries if we do not get some tax money
soon", Wilder said.


A trip to Tallahassee last Wednesday
by local civic and business leaders was
successful in securing the approval of the
Department of Transportation to proceed
with planning for a new high-rise bridge
across the Gulf County Canal at Highland
View.
After nearly three years of waiting for
a word of encouragement from DOT that
the bridge would be built, the assurance
finally came Wednesday afternoon, when
DOT director, Jake Varnes, gave the
DOT engineering staff the go-ahead for
engineering, establishing rights of way
and securing permits from the Depart-
ment of Environmental Regulation.
According to George G. Tapper,
chairman of the Port Authority, who
headed up the delegation to Tallahassee,
work has already started on the structure.
He said Frank Carlisle, with the engineer-
ing department in Chipley has been in
Tallahassee this week meeting with
federal and state environmental agencies
to see what they wanted included in an
environmental impact study for the new
bridge.
Engineering is already underway and
the right of way established for location of
the new 75 foot high span. Tapper said the
new bridge would be placed on the west
side of'the present draw span.
No definite date has been arrived at as
yet when construction will actually begin
because of the uncertainty of when the
engineering and permitting process will be
completed. If everything works smoothly,
construction should begin sometime next
year.
Even though Varnes approved the


start of engineering and permit work last
Wednesday, much of the work has already
been done and will shorten the preparation
procedure considerably.
It has already been decided where the
bridge will be located, that it will be 75 feet
high and will span a distance of 250 feet.
The roadway across the bridge will be
four-lane and the southern approach will
be long and high enough to allow railroad
switching tracks to be located underneath
the approach.
Much of the environmental study has
already been made by the City c' Port St.
Joe through a study conducted by their
engineers, Russell and Axon during the
recent government-required 201 study just
completed and with records of water
quality kept by the City since before the
construction of the Wastewater Treatment
plant.
LOAN APPROVAL
The thing which touched off movement
toward the construction of the new bridge
was the approval of a $250,000 loan to the
Port Authority last week by the St. Joe
Paper Company to start work on a $35
million deep sea port and seafood
processing facility in the area of the
proposed new bridge. The loan, offered by
St. Joe Paper Company, would be the
"seed money" which would get the port
project rolling. The state had promised the
bridge if the port project was started.
Tapper said the Port Authority and J.
C. Belin, president of St. Joe Paper
Company, ironed out the loan document
last week and it was scheduled to be in
Jacksonville yesterday for approval by
SJPC attorneys.


Mayhann Freed In First


Degree Murder Trial


Adopting New Method of Solid Waste Disposal




County Making Changes


Gulf County had its conver-
sion to a new land fill method
of operations delayed some
two weeks to a month Tuesday
night, when bids were receiv-
ed on several trailers to
be used for waste collection.
The trailer bids, from two
manufacturers, had a wide
price spread for what was


purported to be the same
trailer. Seeking to purchase
five of the trailers, the county
received bids of $17,480 from a
Stapleton, Georgia firm and a
bid of $24,978 from a Valdosta,
Georgia firm. The low bidder
claimed his trailer was the
same as the higher priced
model in quality and construc-


tion.
Not being familiar with the
cheaper product, the Commis-
sion decided to delay award-
ing any bids until they could
examine the cheaper product
in operation to see whether or
not it is actually what they
wanted.
The trailers, when they are
-. r


purchased, will change me
method of handling solid
waste in Gulf County. For the
past several years, the county
has been burying the waste in
five land fill sites throughout
the county, covering them
periodically.
Five years ago, the state of
Florida came along and said
the land fill sites did not meet
state specifications and would
have to be abandoned. There
is only one place in the county
in which state requirements
for land fill operations can be
met and this one place is in the
extreme north end of the
county. If the county continues
to operate land fills in the
county as they have in the
past, they will need expensive
preparation, pumping of
ground water, lining of pits,
etc. All of these requirements
made the operation too expen-
sive.
Now the county has propos-
ed a plan to the state and had


it accepted, to construct a land
fill site in south Gulf on top of
the ground, to go along with
the underground operation in
the north end of the county.
Administrative assistant
Tommy Pitts, who also heads
the landfill operation has
proposed the county place
large trailers at the present
landfill sites for waste collec-
tion. The trailers will be pulled
to one of the two approved:
sites and dumped. No private;
dumping will be allowed in the:
landfills.
These are the trailers, bid
Tuesday night.
Pitts said his department
will construct loading ramps
at the trailer sites to make
dumping in the trailers easy
for anyone.
Pitts said that after the
initial expense of getting into
the program, it will operate as
economically as the present
(Continued on Page 3) ..


Oil Laden Barge

Goes Aground Here


. .

Gulf County Administrative Assistant, trailers for solid waste collection. A deci
Tommy Pitts, looks over the specifications of will be made on the trailers within 30 d
several bids received by the county to furnish -Star p


I An oil-laden barge went
aground in the Gulf County
Canal just before reaching the
drawbridge at Highland View
Friday morning of last week.
The barge, laden with 756,-
000 gallons of fuel oil, got
caught in the current just as it
reached the bridge area and
ision side-swiped two large fishing
lays. boats of the Raffield fishing
hoto fleet before going aground just


east of the bridge. The barge
was pulled off the shore where
it had came to rest and the
pilot made it through the draw
bridge span. Then it was
caught again by the current
and ran aground again just
after it had cleared the bridge.
Gene Raffield of Raffleld
Fisheries, said the first im.
(Continued on Page 3a


On Whether or Not To Sell


Only the verdict was dif-
ferent in the second trial of
Charles Mayhann last week
for the January murder of
Michael Berry, 20, of Panama
City.
After deliberating for two
hours and 45 minutes Friday
afternoon, the jury ruled
unanimously that Mayhann
was innocent of a charge of
first degree murder in the
pistol shooting of Berry in
front of a Wewahitchka bar
and lounge.
In an earlier trial, May-
hann's case ended in a mis-
trial when the jury could not
reach a verdict.


After two days of hearing
witnesses, attorneys for the
state and for the defense gave
their closing arguments be-
hind closed doors. The argu-
ments lasted until 12:15, at
which time the case was
turned over to the jury.
Judge Larry Bodiford, who
had ordered guards posted at
the doors to the courtroom
when final arguments started
to prevent anyone going in or
out of the courtroom, also
ordered -the audience to re-
main in its seats while the jury
left the room to begin their
deliberation and while the
jury left the building after the


trial.
The trial evidence was
practically a re-play of the
last trial with Mayhann's
attorneys building a scene
showing how Mayhann was in
fear of his life as he left the
lounge that night and ran into
Berry, Rose Cox, Wayne Fel-
kins, Carl McNeil, and Billy
Whitehurst who were scuffling
in his path, making threaten-
ing gestures.
Mayhann testified that the
drunken, 225-pound Berry
came at him and he shot as a
reflex action, into the air, with
(Continued on Page 3)


Hospital Decision Coming Tues.


Municipal Hospital's board of directors made
its final inspection of facilities operated by
prospective purchasers of the local hospital
Monday of this week. The board went to
Jacksonville and St. Marys, Georgia to look at
facilities operated by Baptist Medical Center, the
final bidder for the local hospital. While in
Jacksonville, the BMC group made their offer to
the board for the local hospital.
The board was especially interested in visiting
the St. Marys hospital since it is almost exactly the
same size of the local facility and the BMC group
has owned this hospital for a year. The purpose of


the visit was to see what effect BMC ownership had
on this particular hospital in order to get an idea of
what they could expect in Port St. Joe should
BMC's offer be accepted.
BMC made an offer of $300,000 down and
$57,000 a year for 10 years for the local institution
as well as a pledge to build a new hospital here in
Port St. Joe within five years. A new hospital
would cost in the neighborhood of $9 million.
In the meantime, BMC said they would place
needed new equipment in the present hospital and
refurbish the building where it is needed, making it
a quality medical center until the new hospital is


built. They also pledged to recruit new doctors for
the hospital and either buy or construct a doctor's
office complex in the city.
The board of directors will make a decision
Tuesday, September 1 at the regular City
Commission meeting as to whether or not they
want to recommend the sale of the hospital and if
the recommendation is made to sell, one of the
firms bidding will also be suggested. A public
hearing will then be held on Thurday evening,
September 10, in the City Hall at 8:00 p.m., to give
the public an opportunity to approve or object to
the decision made by the board.


New Bridge




Approved


I


204 Per CoDv












Editorials and Opinions


THE STAR
PAGE TWO THURSDAY, AUG. 27, 1981


We think Gary Mueller, admin-
istrator of Bay Memorial Medical
Center owes the people of Port St.
Joe and Municipal Hospital Board of
Directors an apology.
Last week, on TV news, Mueller
made the statement, while being
interviewed, that the question of Bay
Memorial taking over Municipal
was dead because the directors of
Municipal wanted too much money
E for the hospital and Bay Memorial
couldn't afford it.
: The Board of Directors of
Municipal Hospital never told Bay
Memorial they wanted money for
the hospital. The Board did say they
wanted a dollar a year lease, if
that's money to Mueller and Bay
Memorial.
S Municipal's Board received an
S offer of $1 million for the hospital
during the time the Municipal Board
was waiting on a decision from Bay
S iMemorial as to whether or not they
* :ivanted to lease Municipal. The
:Municipal Board never told Bay,
-they would have to come up with
money or forget the lease deal.
The man making the $1 million
, i offer was told that the local board
was going to wait for at least two
:weeks to give him an answer on his'
$1 million cash offer because of the
pending deal with Bay. The prospec-
tive purchaser was told the local
-"Board wanted to hear any offer Bay



SU.OS. Figh

,Has America finally gotten over
i the feeling that it is like a large
S gentle giant, afraid it will hurt
someone? Are we finally at the point
min our history of the 20th century
-where we will stand up for our
Rights?
For the first time we can
remember, America has issued an
r ultimatum to one of those rinky-dink
n. .nations which delight in tweaking
our nose or pulling our tail to, "don't
M try it again!"
... Last Wednesday, the United
States put Libyan leader Moammar
"Khadafy on notice that the United
States will come out shooting every
time there is any repetition of the
type of provoked attack as occurred
last week.
As everybody knows now, the
:'Libyans had two jet fighter planes
Attack two U.S. planes on maneu-
:v ers in the Mediterranean Sea and
Sound up getting shot out of the sky
by the Americans for their trouble.
Col. Khadafy, who has been


had to offer to lease before a
decision to sell was made. The
reason for this was that the local
board was looking more for contin-
ued quality medical care than it was
for $1 million in cash.
Bay heard of the offer made to
Municipal and still agreed to table
any offer they might make to
Memorial, at their regular meeting.
This was when the local board
decided to proceed with examination
of the offers to buy rather than lease
to Bay.
If Municipal's Board had been
looking for money for the hospital,
Bay would have been told of this
when negotiations to lease first
began.
What it all seems to boil down to
is, Bay apparently wished to follow
the wishes of its board chairman,
Joe Chapman and not get involved
with Municipal in any manner. They
apparently were satisfied to get the
referrals from Municipal rather
than have any other responsibility to
the local hospital.
We don't fault Bay with not
wanting to take over the operation of
Municipal. They know best what
they can do. We do not appreciate
the official voice of the hospital
intimating that the only thing the
local board was looking for was a
chunk of money out of the hospital.
That's why we think Mueller
owes Port St. Joe an apology.



ting Back

labeled as the most dangerous man
in the world by several news
sources, seems to like to play with
dangerous toys like the attack last
week. He thrives on brink-ism.
Some may question the advis-
ability of shooting down another
nation's plane so close to their back
yard, but the act and the warning
should be enough to make Khadafy
think twice before he tries some-
thing like this again.
Had the same attitude' been
taken with Iran some two years ago,
we feel the American hostages held
in Iran for so long would never have
become hostages. They would have
been sent home.
The fact that the warning was
issued following decisive action
should be adequate warning to
everyone that America means busi-
ness.
After all, history shows that we
have had Marines in Tripoli before
for much the same reason as they
might have to go back again.


Watching the World Go By


Little Public Sympathy for Strike


We Think Port St.



Joe Due Apology


This must be the most
unbelievable demands ever
made by any group of working
Americans. Such demands
were selfish, arrogant and
criminal.
This strike actually was a
planned and premeditated
crime- a violation of a law.
Further, it was a violation of
several court injunctions
against it. And, they broke
oaths taken that they would
not strike.
These men were Federal
employees. They were re-
sponsible for the welfare of
millions of travelers every
year. Therefore this debacle
was inexcusable.
While most Americans are
sweltering under back break-
ing inflation, air traffic con-
trollers sought to further
inflate their own income.
Unions have been great
defenders of the working
people. But when unions lose
their sense of balanced values,
all working people will feel the


sting of the folly of a few.
Somebody must have done a
snow job on the members of
the air traffic controllers
union. Otherwise, how could
thousands of members have
been persuaded to violate
laws, oaths, and court injunc-
tions? How were they' per-
suaded to do that which would
subject them to fines, prison
and loss of jobs? How could
they be led to commit profes-
sional suicide when they were
already far above most work-
ing Americans in income?
It is interesting to see the air
traffic controllers calling on
other unions to come to their
aid. Few other members of
unions now make the kind of
salaries air traffic controllers
make.
Will other unions unite to
back this strike? Would unions
be willing to 'paralyze the
nation to make Uncle Sam
buckle under to these brazen
demands of one union? If so,
would this not be a tragic show


down between the unions and
the American government? If
so, and the unions should win,
would not America then be
under a dictatorship of union-
ism?
So, as you watch the world
go by for the next few weeks,
watch this new problem in our
nation. The outcome could
dramatically affect the lives


of all Americans. Unions may
be about to try to take the
American people hostages.
If air traffic controllers are
actively and solidly backed by
unionism, and if the nation is
forced to meet their demands,
the chances are that other
than unions in all areas of life
will make similar demands-
and get them.


Gates Is Alternate


to Washington, D.C.
Gulf County Clerk of the training to the Apalachicola
Court, Jerry Gates has been River.
selected as an alternate by the The testimony will pertain
Apalachee Regional Planning to work which has been
Council to testify before the authorized on the Apalac"
Public Works Committee in cola- River, dredging
Washington, D.C. sloughs, bendways, and inte
Gates will be an alternate to connecting waterways alo
Bobby Howell% Clerk of the the River. The Committee also
Court in Franklin County. acquires land for water relat-
Their testimony will be per- ed public use.


Houdini Is

I MUST HAVE the most out of
:. hape cat in town.
Houdini is a big, tough tom cat
which has been "un-tommed". He can
. take the head of most cats in his mouth
or he can chase away the biggest dog in
the neighborhood, but he's still out of
shape.
- ,My doctor has told me to walk on
my new hip, so about five or six times a
. week, I get out at night and walk up to a
Smile.
S: I have two routes which I follow.
SFor my mile walk, I go up Allen
memorial Way from the house to Palm
Boulevard, then down Palm to 20th
: Street, then to the street in back of the
: hospital and home. My short walk,
.which I take when it's about 9:30 or
S10:00 before I can get it in, takes me
from my house and around the hospital
: block and back. Mostly, I get out about
S 7:30 or 8:00after the sun goes down and
it cools off a bit.
This particular evening last week, I
" was talking the short walk about 9:30,
- when I looked back and saw Houdini
Following me. Here he came up the
street following me like a dog. Frenchie


Definitely Not In Shape to Take A Mile Stroll with Me


was along that time and tried to shoo
him back to the house, but Houdini
insisted on coming.
A car came along and Houdini took
for the woods. He's afraid of cars.




ETAOI,





Another time, a dog barked and he
started looking for the dog to discuss
matters a little bit. I called him on and
he came pattering up the street to catch
up.
By the time we got to the north side
of the hospital, Houdini was beginning
to hassle. He had to stop a couple of
times to catch his breath, but he caught
up and kept right on following on the


walk.
When I got to the front of the
hospital, Hubert Harrison was getting
into his" pick-up to go home and he
started the engine. Hubert then decided


to talk a bit to me, and Houdini, hearing
the truck engine running, took off again
in the opposite direction.
After I left Hubert and Hubert left
the hospital, Houdini once again got on
the walk path, but by this time, he was
hassling in earnest.
Then we had to carry that darn cat
for a while while he recovered from his
trip.


This went on all the way home, with
Houdini being carried a few steps and
staggering and hassling a few.
Finally, we got back to the house
and old Houdini perked up then. He


made a blue streak to the door and
darted in when I went in. He didn't stop
until he got right under the ceiling fan
in the den, which was running, then he
just spread eagled under the fan, with
his tongue hanging out. He just laid
there for about 30 minutes, recovering.
It took a whole can of cat food to
revive him after our little walk.
He hasn't followed me since.


YOU SEE SOME interesting things
out walking late in the evening.
For one thing, walking in the
evening or early night lets one take his
turn without too much vehicle traffic.
The routes I travel were selected to
avoid as much traffic as possible.
But there are bikes and walkers by
the dozen out for their constitutional
about that time of day. You never know
who or what you will run into.
One of the things which bothers me
is people cutting lawns. One evening, I
ran into Buddy Woods cutting his lawn,
right at dark.
He was in a hurry to get it cut,
probably because it was nearly dark.
Buddy was on his riding mower,
with the governors wide open, just
cutting grass. He had the headlights
burning on his mower, driving with one
hand. With the other hand, he had hold
of a push mower which he was pulling
behind, cutting two swaths of grass at
once.
I didn't know Buddy was that
energetic.
Another evening, I saw John Miller


cutting his grass right at dark andbe
had another motive in mind. He had his
mower running at the lowest speed,
with the engine going just fast enough
to keep the machine moving. I f'gurem
he was trying to convince his wife I
was cutting the lawn, but was trying f'
let dark catch him before he could get
the whole thing done.
Another particularly hot evening,
I was nearly home from my walk
and was drenched with sweat, because
it was still a hot, hot night. My route
took me by my backyard neighbor's
house, and there was Bill White fixing a
fan out in his garage. The sight of the
fan made me just that much hotter. Bill
wasn't in the best of moods himself and
I can understand why, he needed that
fan that night and the rascal had broken
down.
I walked behind the home of Robert
Nedley another hot night, and he was
outside working on his air conditioner.
The sight of Robert scared me, because
I began to think, "What if my air
conditioner isn't working when I get
home?"
It was.


TIDES

High and low tides for St.
Joseph's Bay for the upcom-
ing week are shown in the tide
table below, furnished by the
U. S. Weather Bureau in Apa-
lachicola. Times are based
on a 24-hour clock, and height


is feet above or below th
mean water line.
High Ht Low H
Thurs. 930 1.9 2000
Fri. 1028 1.8 2042
Sat. 1124 1.7 2121
Sun. 1216 1.6 2141 .
Mon. 1311 1.4 2133 .1
Tues. 236 1.0 539 .I
1427 1.2 2036 .1
Wed. .200 1.1 842 .1
Thurs. 218 1.3 1110 .'


by Adolph Bedsole
The air traffic controllers
strike grabbed the choice
publicity displays for several
days. At least they got them-
selves before the public. But
the price for that publicity
may be more than they can
afford.
It appears that most Ameri-
cans had little or no sympathy
for the strikers because of
their outrageous demands.
Also, the public will be the
victims if they are able to get
their demands.
Imagine it! Demanding an
across the board salary in-
crease of $10,000 and a reduc-
tion in working hours from 40
to 32 per week. This means a
30 percent increase in salary
for 20 percent less work.
It is reported that their
salaries range from $33,000 to
45,000 per year. This means
that the air traffic controllers
are already making two to
three times the average in-
come for American families.


_THE' STAR POSTOFFICE BOX 308
T HEWS T A R PHONE 227-1278 SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
PORTST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR, $8.00 SIX MONTHS, $5.00
Pubisblled EmY heafdy at USWOirsAvnWm. o tPSt St. Joe, FlorlIds OUTOF COUNTY-ONE YEAR, $12.00 OUT OF U.S-ONE YEAR, $14.00
Illy BThbSlarPiINdi COUMV _______________________
S co odmP lPas .a PPIdI tSJi t Flmdo3245 TO ADVERTISERS-In case of e ror or omissions In o lewti meWnt, the publishers do not hold
WelOy .......... dor and Publisher SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID u ls Iable for danmg fur~er hm aelmournt received for such dv~stlnsement.
SWilliam H. Ramsey .EProduction Supt. AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
WThe spoken wssd is given scant or ttdeion; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word
Frenchle L RamMsy .............. Office MIlanager Im-- a-t the Misted word t oroughlycomInc. The spoken word Is lost; the printed word remains.
Shiley K. Ramsey ................... Typesetter











County Making Changes


operation. Pitts said the new
method of waste collection
should be in operation by the
first of October.
The County also received
bids on a diesel truck to handle
the trash trailers at Tuesday's
meeting, but these bids will be
studied until the next meeting
before a decision to purchase
is made. The six bids received
ranged from $15,844.40 to
$17,111.89.
WHITE CITY WATER
With the county wishing to
get underway with requests
for loans from the Federal


Home Administration, a snag
has been placed in the way of
providing water systems for
the beaches and White City.
The Commission was noti-
fied Tuesday night that the
people of White City are
undecided as to whether or not
they want a central water
system.
A survey, which has been in
the process for the past month
revealed Tuesday that of those
contacted, 71 were in favor of
the system and 37 were
against. Engineering projec-
tions are that there about 170


potential water customers in
White City.
Paul Sewell, a resident of
White City, was present at the
meeting Tuesday and inform-
ed the Board that people in
White City were somewhat
confused about the system.
Sewell said some people are
not sure what the cost figures
would be. He said the main
points of concern were whe-
ther or not there would be a
front foot assessment for the
system and whether they
would be responsible for
maintenance and costs. "The


Mayhann Goes Free
his bullet striking Berry in the evening, and he was afraid standing
face, traveling upward Berry had the gun when he shooting
through the front of his head. was making his approach to believed
Mayhann said he had wit- Mayhann.
nessed the presence of a gun in The prosecution produced a Mayhi
the party earlier in the witness which said Berry was daughter


Barge Goes Aground


pact caused by the erratic
action of the barge raised one
,iof their large boats about five
'Meet out of the water. "We
expected to see the boat sink
after the impact, but luckily
the damage was slight com-
pared to what it could have
been", Raffleld said.
The barge went hard
aground on the west side of the
bridge and stayed there until
the tide came in and put it
afloat again.
U.S. Coast Guard and state
officials worked late into the
night Friday trying to get the
barge loose so it could con-

Dr. Vizcarra

New Health

Doctor
Dr. Eli Vizcarra, a physi-
clan here in Port St. Joe, was
given a contract by the state
department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services to
serve Gulf County as its health
doctor for one day each week,
replacing Dr. W. T. Weathing-
ton, who was recently trans-
f|kferred to Gadsden County by
the state.
0.I Vizcarra has already taken"
over his duties of providing
clinic services for the two
county Health Department
installations, with clinic day
at both buildings on Thursday
of each week.
Under the contract, Viz-
carra will be in the Port St.
Joe department each Thurs-
day morning and in the
Wewahitchka department
each Thursday afternoon,


tinue on its journey to St. Joe
Paper Company, where it was
scheduled to unload the fuel
oil. The barge and tug were
finally freed on high tide about
4:00 a.m., Saturday morning.
A Coast Guard spokesman
said the barge was owned by

Last Rites

for Steve

Thompson
Steve D. Thompson, 64,
passed away Monday in a
Gainesville hospital following
a long illness. He was a
resident of Highland View at
the time of his death and had
lived in this area for the past
eight years. He was a World
War II Veteran and attended
Highland View Church of God.
Survivors include: his wife,
Mrs. Elizabeth Thompson of
Highland View; one brother,
Jim Thompson of Milton; two
sisters, Emmalee Brake of
Highland View and Sarah
Skipper of Crestview; and
many nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held
at 4:00 p.m. Wednesday at the
Highland View Church of God,
conducted by the Reverend
Ira Nichols. Interment fol-
lowed in the family plot, Holly
Hill Cemetery.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Fu-
neral Home, Port St. Joe.




"The" is the most commonly
used word in written English.


people out there are afraid
they will wind up with a
system like Highland View.
They don't want that", Sewell
said.
The county engineer pointed
out to the Commission that it
was necessary to get in their
request for a loan just as soon
as possible. "There won't be
much money available next
year and it will be first come,
first served", Reggie Tisdale,
the engineer, told the Board.
Commissioner Doug Bir-
mingham wanted the Com-
mission to go ahead and apply


for a loan for the White City
system and turn it down later
if the people decide they don't
want the system.
Commissioner Billy Branch
opposed the move observing,
"We don't want the people to
feel like we are trying to force
something on them."
Branch recommended the
county write a letter to each
resident of White City, ex-
plaining the plans for the
system, then have another
public meeting to explain the
system in person. "Then we
can make the application'for


(Continued from Page 1)


still at the time of the
. Apparently the jury
Mayhann's version.
ann had taken his
r to the lounge to hear


a band play and during this
time, the victim and his party
were creating a disturbance,
drinking, scuffling and argu-
ing. It was during this time
Mayhann saw the gun in the


(Continued from Page 1)


National Marine, Inc., of
Houston, Texas. The barge
was being pushed by the tug
"National Pride" from Port
Natchez, Texas.
About a quarter of the
length of the barge went
aground on a sandy bottom.


The barge never sprang a
leak and there was no til spill
in the canal or bay. Several
Florida agencies were stand-
ing ready with environmental
protection equipment should a
leak develop in the barge, but
they were never needed.. -


group.
It was brought out in the
testimony that Berry had
unloaded the gun inside the
lounge and given it to Rose
Cox. After the shooting out-
side, Felkins grabbed the gun
and tried to open fire on
Mayhann only seconds after
he had killed Berry. The gun
was empty, saving Mayhann's
life.
Mayhann is free of the
charge of murder now, but has
stated he will feel the effects
of the trial for years and as he
recovers from the heavy ex-
pense of the two trials.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUG. 27, 1981


the loan", Branch said.
The Commission agreed to
follow Branch's suggestion.
BOAT RAMPS
For years the County Com-
mission has wanted a boat
landing outlet to St. Joseph
Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, to
no avail. Now, suddenly, the
county has two permits to
construct two landings at each
end of the large stretch of
water.
Two weeks ago, the Board
received a Department of
Environmental Regulation
permit to make changes to the
landing at the end of the
Indian Pass road to make it
useable by construction of a
small slip inland to allow
launching without interfer-
ence from the strong currents
which flow through the pass.
This week, a permit was
received from DNR and the
Corps of Engineers to con-
struct a launching site at
Palm Point, about a mile west
of Highland View.
Recently, the Commission
was successful in obtaining
permission from St. Joe Paper
Company to use the proposed
site for a landing and filed for
a permit to put it in.
The Commission has indi-
cated they will get to work on
both boating sites in the very
near future.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business matters,
the Commission:


-Received the names of a
newly appointed library board
consisting of John Miller,
George Duren, Nolan Treg-
lown, Mrs. William Quarles,
Carolyn White, Adel Jackson,
Paul Groom, J. Griffin, Sr.,
Rachel Griffin, Mrs. James
McNeill and Eldridge Money.
-Approved a request of
Commissioner Branch to re-
quest the Department of
Transportation to spend mon-


PAGE THREE


(Continued from Page 1)


master cha


V


ey designated for re-workini
the approaches to the High
land View bridge on some
other project in the county:
-Advised Raymond Lopez
that it was their practice to
bury drain pipe for people
when they purchased the pipe,
Lopez had questioned the
propriety of the county plac-
ing and covering about 100 feel
of pipe in the Gulf Aire
subdivision.


ELI M. VIZCARRA, M.D.
GENERAL PRACTICE

OFFICES *
102 20th Street, Port St. Joe
Open 2- 5 P.M., EDT
Closed Thursday afternoon
Telephone 229-8258 or 229-8259

Corner of 10th St. & Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach, Florida
Open 10- 12 A.M., CDT
Monday- Friday
Telephone 648-8274

HOME PHONE 229-8475





9't!


-PAGE FOUR


Church to

Honor Its

Pastor Sun.
Philadelphia Primitive
Baptist Church members will
honor their Pastor on Sunday,
August 30 with Appreciation
Day. Guest speaker at the
11:30a.m. service will be Rev.
Otis Walker, St. Rosa Primi-
tive Baptist, Tallahassee.
A 3:00 p.m. service will also
be held, with Rev. R.N.
Goodson, St. Mary Primitive
Baptist Church, Tallahassee,
being the guest speaker.

Mrs. Costin

Hosts UWM

Mission Two
- -. Mission Group U of the
^tfnited Methodist Church met
: in the home of Mrs. Chauncey
* Costin for the August meeting.
Nine members were present.
- Mrs. Charles Browne pre-
sided over the business meet-
ilng.
; "Religion at our Age" was
the topic of the program given
by Mrs. Browne, concluded
with a prayer by Mrs. Costin.
The place for the next
meeting will be announced
later.

Godfrey, Kelly

?Are WedAug. 7
a Mr. and Mrs. Charles L.
Kelly of Panama City, an-
nounce the marriage of their
daughter, Brenda Rena, to
James Pope Godfrey, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Elmore Godfrey
of Port St. Joe.
The marriage was solemniz-
ed on Friday, August 7. After a
trip to the Smoky Mountains,
the couple is at home in Port
St. Joe, where the groom is
employed by Basic, Inc.


Let's Crea

w -S
If you're searching for new
.wnays to add excitement to the
family's eating enjoyment,
consider a delicious Plum
r Nutty Conserve. Jot down
: "fresh plums" on your market-
K ing list. Be sure to include
a package of powdered fruit
Spectin. Promise yourself to
2 prepare this easy conserve
recipe that will complement
a good many meals.
Fruit in this freezer recipe
. isn't cooked just mixed
:7 with sugar, chopped walnuts
.1: and powdered fruit pectin.
; By not cooking the fruit,
': the flavor stays much fresher,
..closer to nature. That's a
. major reason why commercial
:,'pectin is added. It helps
--capture fresh flavor and
assures a good "set." Keep in
:A-i ind that natural fruit pectin
Ijea'eases as fruit ripens.
.-Because pectin helps a mixture
to "jell," it's necessary to
supplement natural pectin
with the commercial variety.
Refrain from making any
: recipe changes. At the time
you purchase powdered fruit
pectin, it's likely you will
see packages of liquid fruit
pectin. Do not use liquid and
powdered fruit pectins inter-
changeably. While both bring
successful results, remember
that recipes are developed for
a specific type of pectin.
Before you begin to
prepare the conserve, read the
recipe insert tucked inside the
package of powdered fruit
pectin. Follow directions for
preparing small freezer con-
tainers, of not over a pint ca-
pacity, with tight-fitting lids.
Containers as well as glass jars
should be dishwasher safe.









---
Mappil














M..bk ms ir h lprmIns aM mItl



hltatmlamy spalsMt. WaH pMs
." w M lw kslnM w *tn

SY htlM Srt t w'o b I T. ys
.. Ms, t o M..kM s.ly .th. d tm
S Fw isithn Is y uisft W kit.


St. Joseph Bay
Construction Co.
BIFF QUARLES
229-8795


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUG. 27, 1981


Sea Oats

To Begin

New Year
A covered dish luncheon will
be a feature of the first Sea
Oats and Dunes Garden Club
meeting of the 1981-82 season.
Members and guests will
meet at the Mexico Beach
Chamber of Commerce Build-
ing on September 8,11:00 A.M.
Central time.
Guest speaker will be Mrs.
Ken Parker. Her subject will
be "Edible Plant Life".
All members are urged to
attend this opening meeting.


BIRTi


Tammy Royce Butts Hubert Earl McDaniel, Jr.



Engaged


Mr. and Mrs. Royce Butts
are proud to announce the
engagement and approaching
marriage of their daughter,
Tammy Royce to Hubert Earl
McDaniel, Jr., son of Mr. and
Mrs. H. E. McDaniel, Sr. of
Sneads.
Tammy is a 1981 graduate of
Port St. Joe High School and
plans to attend Gulf Coast
Community College. She is the
granddaughter of Mr. and
Mrs. H.A. Butts of Port St: Joe
and Mrs. A. J. Barfield and
the late A.J. Barfield of
Southport.
Her fiance, a 1976 graduate
of Sneads High School and a


1980 graduate of Southeastern
College of the Assemblies of
God, in Lakeland, now holds
the position of Associate
Pastor at Oak Grove As-
sembly of God. He is the
grandson of the late Mr. and
Mrs. E.B. McDaniel of Grand
Ridge, and the late Mr. and
Mrs. Loren Campbell of Chat-
tahoochee.
The wedding will be held at
Oak Grove Assembly of God
Church September 26, at 4:00
p.m. No local invitations are
being sent, but all friends and
relatives of the couple are
invited to attend.


te Homemade Conserve


9l e . .


The recipe moves swiftly
along: the prepared fruit
mixture with pectin is stirred
for just 3 minutes, quickly
ladled into containers and
covered with lids. After
standing for about 24 hours,
containers can be stored in
the freezer up to six months.
Jam, either freshly made or
thawed from freezer storage,
can be stored in the refrig-
erator up to at least three
weeks. Refrigerate a few for
ready "sampling."
Inspired to make a variety
of fresh fruit jams and jellies?
The recipe leaflet is a good
place to start. Enjoy the
satisfaction of adding to your
stock of homemade spreads.
Plum Nutty Conserve
2-3/4 cups prepared fruit
(about 2 lb. fully
ripe plums and
1 orange)
1/3 cup finely chopped
walnuts
5-1/2 cups (2 lb. 6oz.)
sugar
3/4 cup water


1 box Sure-Jell
fruit pectin
First prepare the fruit. Pit
about 2 pounds plums; do
not peel. Cut in small pieces
then chop very fine. Measure
2-3/4 cups into large bowl or
pan. Grate the rind from
orange; measure 1 teaspoon.
Squeeze the juice from 1
orange; measure 1/4 cup. Add
orange rind, orange juice and
walnuts to plums.
Then make the conserve.
Thoroughly mix sugar into
fruit mixture; let stand 10
minutes. Mix water and fruit
pectin in small saucepan.
Bring to a full boil and boil
1 minute, stirring constantly.
Stir into fruit. Continue
stirring 3 minutes. (A. few
sugar crystals will remain.)
Ladle quickly into scalded
containers. Cover at once
with tight lids. Let stand at
room temperature 24 hours;
then store in freezer. Small
amounts may be covered and
stored in refrigerator up to
3 weeks. Makes about 7
cups or about 8 (8 fl. oz.)
containers.


Michael

Meshane Mays
Mitchel and La Nell Mays of
Panama City are announcing
the birth of their first child, a
son, Michael Meshane, on
August 11, weighing 8 pounds
and 11 ounces.
He is the grandson of Mrs.
Elva Mays and the late Artha
Mays of Hodgenville, Ky., and
Mr. and Mrs. Williston L.
Chason of Port St. Joe. He is
>the great grandson of Mrs.
Ada Hammond of Louisville,
Mo. and Mrs. Susie Chason of
Panama City.

Lawrence Luther

Copenhaver IV
Dr. and Mrs. Larry Copen-
haver announce the birth of a
son, Lawrence Luther Copen-
haver IV, born August 3 in
Pensacola.


TOURNAMENT WINNERS-Left to right, front row:
Tommy Johnson, Jim Johnson, Molly Skipper, Becky Keith,
Adam Cantley, Chris Walding and Laurie Butts. Back row:
Kip Altstaetter, Dawn Bond, Louise Parker, Jim Norton,


Tony Beard, Tommy Williams, Richard Jackson, Jay Rish
and City Commissioner James B. Roberts. Several winners
were not present for the trophy presentation.
-Starphoto


Stac House Program Fi,


Summer with Tournamo


The STAC House had 99 entries in
the ping pong and pool tournaments last
week, in age groups 7 through 17, as
they wound down their summer pro-
gram.
The Stac house 'summer program
was for elementary school age children
from 2 to 5 each day and high school age
children from 5 to 9 p.m. High school
students had a game program each
Friday evening from 5 to 10 p.m. The
participants enjoyed pool, ping pong,
chess, cards, and other table games.
Allyson Costin, Kip Altstaetter, Jim
Norton and Dawn Bond assisted Mrs.
Tom Parker, Jr., in directing the
program all summer.


Mrs. Parker, the director said,
"It was an enthusiastic summer. The
City of Port St. Joe needs to be
commended for sponsoring these activ-
ities for the children."
Winners in the ping pong and pool
tournaments were presented trophies
on Tuesday afternoon of last week.
Winners in the ping pong tournament
were: 7-8 years, Chris Walding, first
and Michael Lollie second. 10-11 years,
Laurie Butts, first and Jim Johnson,
second. 12-13 years, Jay Rish, first and
Tim Wilder, second. 14-15 years, Tony
Beard, first and Tommy Williams,
second. 16-17 years, Roy Keith, first and
Joey Hewitt, second.


"A Little Town"Is A Great


Place In Which to Live


A little town is where you
don't have to guess who your
enemies are, your friends will
tell you.
A little town is where few
people can get away with lying
about the year they were born,
too many other people remem-
her.
A little town is where people
with various ailments can air
them to sympathetic ears.
A little town is where, when
you get the wrong number,
you can talk for fifteen
minutes anyhow.
A little town is where the
ratio of good people to bad
people is 100 to 1. That's nice
to know.
A little town is where it's
hard to walk to work for
exercise, because it takes too
long to stop and explain to
people in cars who stop, honk
and offer a ride.
A little town is where city
folks say there's nothing to do,
but those who live there don't
have enough nights in the
week to make all the meetings
and social functions.


A little town' is where
everyone becomes a "neigh-
bor" in time of need.
A little town is where those
same businessmen dig deep
many times to help countless
fund raising projects.
A little town is where many
teenagers say there is nothing
to do. And are surprised to

"Griff' Has


Birthday

James Griffin "Griff" Gain-
nie celebrated his first birth-
day, July 31, with a party in
his home. Those helping Griff
celebrate were his parents:
Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Gainnie;
his big brothers, Brian, Scott
and Craig; Jason and LuLu
Gainnie, and his very special
friends, Rev. and Mrs. David
Fernandez, Luana, Lisa, Buck
and Mandy.
Griff is the grandson of
George W. Gainnie of Port St.
Joe and Mr. and Mrs. Lee W.
Morrissey of Norwood, Mass.


learn their big city peers are
saying the same thing.
A little town, when all is said
and done, is a nice place to
live.
Vera Burge


dishes


ents
Pool tournament winners include
7-9 years, Anna Burge, first and Adam
Cantley, second. 10-11 years, Jim
Johnson, first and Mickey Gainnie,
second. 12-13 years, Tommy Johnson,
first and Jay Rish, second. 14-15 years,
Robin Heacock, first and Richard
Jackson, second. 16-17 years, Scott
Burkett, first and Joey Hewitt, second.
An award was presented to the
student who had shown the best
sportsmanship and leadership during
the entire program. This award was
given to eight-year-old Becky Keith of
Ward Ridge.
Some of the trophy winners are
shown in the picture above.


Summer Clearance

Friday and Saturday
Sale Items On Display
Outside On the
Sidewalk


New Arrival of .

Designer Jeans



Now / off
Oscar De L Renta, Dianne Von
Furstenberg, Vidal Sassoon.


The Pinto Bean
Hwy. 98 Across from Duren's
Joanie Hanson and Tommie Raffield, Owners
Phone 229-8496


James Griffin Gainnie


The Keyettes Invite You to Attend A



Fashion Show
"How to Be Positive In This Negative World"



Saturday, August 29
9:30-11:30 A.M.

Commons Area, Port St. Joe High School





Day and Night-time Make-Up
Tips by Mary Kay


Hair Tips and Fall Fashions
by

The Beauty Boutique
ADMISSION: $1.00
Proceeds to go to
Keyettes
- ~ I


BEACH BAPTIST

Day Care Center

Will Keep Your Children

by the Week or Will Take

Drop-Ins

OPEN: 7:00 A.M., E.D.T.
CLOSE: 6:00 P.M., E.D.T.

Located at the Beach Baptist Chapel,
St. Joe Beach, corner of Columbus
St. and Alabama Ave.

648-5026


------------ -------- ----.---------0 ~ 40000000- ---------------------------------------

SHappy Anniversary

JAZZ-ER-CISE
Find Out What Great Fun Getting Into Shape Can Be!!
Tina Chasse, Certified Jazzercise
*0- / Instructor, would like to invite you
to a Special

Tina holds regular 1st Anniversary Celebration of
classes weekly:
CentennialBldg., JAZZ-ER-CISE in Port St. Joe
Port St. Joe, Tues.
& Thurs., 6:30 p.m. Time and Place: Centennial Bldg., 6:30 P.M., E.S.T., Sept. 8
Old Van Horn Bldg., Beacon Hill, Tues. & Thurs., 9:00 a.m., C.S.T.
i i i r rSMS MSUSr tr r fii r r Ittttttttttttt[hf r ir iii^'^" "^


. . . . . . -. ..."-" ' .... ....,-
. -p.


I




* ~ *'


Vicki Johnson Fighting


After Marrow Transplant


THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUG. 27, 1981


Vicki Johnson, a resident of
Port St. Joe, recently under-
went a bone marrow trans-
plant at Shands Teaching
Hospital in Gainesville to aid
S n combatting the leukemia
which she has been afflicted
with since July, 1979. During
the past two years she has run
the gamut of treatment for the
disease, which destroys the
blood cells of the body, which
are manufactured in the bone
marrow.
The bone marrow trans-
plant is a relatively new pro-
cedure used in treating
leukemia, in which the bone
marrow of the patient is
removed, and a donor's (in
Vicki's case, her sister, Donna
.Macbeth) bone marrow are
transplanted into the patient.
Theoretically, the new bone
marrow will begin its blood-
building function making new
red and white blood cells.
Ironically in the case of Mrs.
Johnson, the bone marrow
plant has been declared
success but she is battling a
`major setback now, as she has
G.V.H. disease. G.V.H.
disease results from the
body's organs rejecting the
new blood which is being pro-
S duced from the transplanted
bone marrow.
Even though Vicki is battl-
ing this major setback, accor-
iing to a report received Tues-
day from her husband Bob,
"Vick is still hanging on and
fighting for her life. There is a
possibility that this can be
treated with special drugs.
She has responded once but is
now stable with not much im-
provement. Vicki wishes to
thank everyone for their sup-
port and sends her love to all."
"I, too, wish to thank
everyone, especially Rev.
:Jimmie Spikes, and all the
members of our church, The
First United Methodist, for
their continued support. The
.Star paper isn't big enough for
-the thanks that should go to


the St. Joseph Telephone Co. A
special thanks to very impor-
tant neighbors, the Jim
Boykins and Ferrell Aliens. I
wish to thank Sylvachem and
Sylvachem Local 836, of which
since July, 1979, when Vicki
was first diagnosed, men and
women of that local started
giving financial help not know-
ing Vicki. Until this day the
support continues. I want
everyone to know that I am
fully committed to be with my
wife during this fight for her
life."
Mr. Johnson has been with
his wife since the beginning of


Free Estimates


'. *
* .


dc414 Reid A P t n 29-6
414 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe Phone 229-63


1


her treatment two months ago
at Shands. Depending upon
test results Vicki could be
hospitalized for two to four
more, weeks if things take a
definite turn for the better. If
the disease begins to go into
remission, she would have to
remain an additional four to
eight weeks in Gainesville, to
receive treatment as an out-
patient at Shands.
Mr. Johnson said Tuesday,
"I want everyone to know that
even though our children have
begun school in Pensacola
with relatives, and that our


By Roy Lee Carter
One doesn't have to own a
large home on an acre lot to
enjoy gardening. A balcony,
patio, or small areas around a
trailer offer plenty of room for
"Container Gardening".
The popularity of raising
plants in containers has in-
creased tremendously in re-,
cent years. Container garden-
ing is adaptable and versatile.
Practically all plants can be
grown in a pot, box, can or
jar- at least temporarily.
Plants in containers can be
moved indoors during cold
spells or simply for use as an
interior decoration. Pot gar-
dening makes it possible to
have plants you couldn't
otherwise grow outdoors for
an indefinite period.
A container plant is much
more dramatic than the same.
plant when massed with other
plants. A container creates a
special setting for a plant and
thus accentuates its qualities.
It is almost impossible for
container gardening to be
boring. Plants can be rotated
to create all types of effects.
Seasonal flowering plants can
be brought on-stage when they
are at their maximum beauty
and then removed to be
replaced with another plant.
For example, imagine how
lovely your patio could be with
spring bulbs and azaleas
followed by summer annuals
like marigolds and salvia,
then fall flowering mums and
finally Christmas poinsettias.
This is what can be done with
container gardening.


home is up for sale, that no
matter what the outcome of
things, we fully intend to
return to Port St. Joe, even if
things get lengthy in
Gainesville. Thank you and
may God bless you for your
prayers and help."
Anyone wishing to write to
Vicki may use the following
address: Vicki Johnson,
Shands Teaching Hospital,
Room 419, Gainesville,
Florida 32610. She is unable to
accept phone calls at this
time, but would enjoy the
cards.


Here is a checklist of basic
points to be considered in
container gardening..
Select a container of the
right size and shape for the
growth characteristics and
appearance of your.plant. The
container is half the picture. A
handsome plant deserves a
handsome planter and vice
versa. The container can be
practically anything- from a
tea kettle or antique pot to
clay pots or wooden boxes.
Fine ceramic and redwood
containers can be purchased
but handmade containers are
always the best since they
represent your own talent.
Even an old mailbox with
cascading petunias draping
down from the opening is a
most suitable container.
Use a porous, fast-draining
soil mix such as half peat and
coarse sand. Plants need good
drainage for growth so use a
porous mix and not a clay mix.
Also for drainage, make sure
the containers have holes in
the bottoms. If holes are not
present and can't be bored in
the containers, be very careful
with watering. Too much
water is also always worse
than too little water. Plants
grown in pots or boxes need to
be fertilized regularly during
the growing season. Watering
can readily leach nutrients
from containers so fertilize
often.
Most plants need repotting
in fresh soil mix when their
roots fill the container. This
rootboundd" condition re-
quires repotting or root prun-
ing.


Youth Day Sunday at
Smith Chapel Church of God


Smith Chapel A.O.H.
Church of God, 106 Robbins
Avenue, will be observing
their Annual Youth Day Sun-
day, August 30.
Sunday School at 9:30 a.m.
will begin the Youth Day,
followed by Morning Worship

In Memoriam
In memory of my husband
and father, although you are
gone you left footprints for us
to follow and because we loved
p you we will do our best to
follow your unforgettable
path.
Mrs. Coleman Griffin
The Griffin Family
The Betts Family
95 The Williams Family
The McGee Family


at 11:00 a.m. with guest
speaker, Minister Rufus
Wood, Jr. of Panama City, and
other out-of-town guests.
A musical program will
culminate the Youth Day at
7:00 p.m. Everyone is cordial-
ly invited to come and be a
-part of the event.

Bazaar Slated
At M.B. Church
The Mexico Beach Metho-
dist Church Ladies Prayer
Group will have a Bazaar on
September 5 at the church
from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,
C.S.T. The church is located
on 22nd Street. ,


Daniel Hughes shows off a book, "Sesame Street", which
he read this summer.


Orientation Friday for

Faith Christian School


Boat Splits
An Alabama couple had their scalloping
trip interrupted Saturday morning, when
their boat came loose from the pick-up truck
at the right of the picture and slammed into a


utility pole on Fifth Street. The day of
recreation for the pair was going all wrong.
Not only did their boat get destroyed In the
accident, but it was also drizzling rain. Likely
there were no scallops available that day
either, making it a complete bust.
--Star photo


Faith Christian School
begins its eighth year of
operation in the Port St. Joe
area. Classes. will begin for
grades K-4 through seven at
8:05 a.m., Monday, August 31.
Orientation for Kinder-
garten children and their
parents will be held on Friday,


August 28, at the following
locations: K-4, Kindergarten
Annex, 8th Street, 9-10 A.M.;
K-5, Kindergarten Annex, 8th
Street' 10:30-11:30 A.M.; and
AK-5, Faith Bible Church, 20th
Street, 10:30-11:30 A.M.
Students and parents of
students of grades one
through seven are invited to
visit their classrooms in the
new building on 20th Street
and Marvin Avenue, Friday,
August 28 from 9 A.M.-3 P.M.


Most container plants can
be brought indoors for varying
periods of time and should be
rotated to increase their use-
fulness.
Suitable plants are practi-
cally unlimited. Foliage
plants such as palms, bamboo
and philidendrous, etc. make
excellent container plants but
don't omit flowering shrubs
and trees like azaleas, crepe
myrtle, gardenias, roses and
others.


Progran

Gulf Countj children turned
out in record numbers to
participate in the 1981 bum-
mer Library Express which
offered them a full schedule of
activities and reading guid-
ance at the two public li-
braries in the county.
The theme of trains was
used throughout the libraries
all summer. Children were
invited to hop on the summer
library express and receive
reading folders, tickets to be
used as bookmarks and a
timetable of the scheduled
events in each library. More
than 200 young readers joined


the program and kept track of
the books they read over the
summer.
Both the Wewabitchka Pub-
lic Library and the Port St.
Joe Public Library had
weekly programs from June
14 through August 17. Total
attendance for these pro-
grams was over 750, the
highest children's program
attendance in recent years.
Story hours, films and puppet
shows were just a few of the
whistle stop programs the
children enjoyed.
"Moonlight is sculpture."


Before Putting Your Children On the Bus

Bring Them to The Star for Outfitting



3x5 Card Boxes, Cards and Index Plastic Rulers Note Books
Steno Pads Typing Paper Graph Paper Cadron Paper Rhg Binders
Report Covers Composition Books Filler Paper Ball Point Pens
Felt Tip Pens Markers Eraser-Mate Pens India Ink Pencils
Mechanical Pencils Rubber Cement Dictionaries Thesaurus
Liquid Paper Protractors Compass Slider Rulers Mechanical
Drawing Set

Many Other Popular and Specialized School Items





The Star Publishing Company
Phone 227-1278 Port St. Joe 306-308 Williams Ave.


SlUtMUL BBrBO4


PAGE FIVE


200 Children


Use Summer


SALE OF USED VEHICLES

The St. Joseph Telephone:
& Telegraph Co. will sell the
below listed vehicles:
Vehicle #423, 1975 Step 6y/' 6 Cyl. Truck,
S/N CCQ145A145413 Chevrolet % T.
$1,100.00

Vehicle #417,1975 Chev. /2T Step 61/2',
E/W Tool Boxes & Ladder Rack, 6 Cyl.'
S/N CCQ145A145269.

$1,375.00

Those Interested Should Contact
BERNARD 0. WESTER, Supply Manager
P. O. Box 220
Port St. Joe, FL32456
The Prices Are Fixed and Payment
Will Be Cash or Certified.

These vehicles can be seen at the
Supply Complex in Port St. Joe.
_tf c 8- 7


Container Garden Offers


Outlet for Green Thumbs


BUTLER'S RESTAURANT

Will be Closed


For Vacation and Repairs


September 7-21


C.'


Did You Know


That Badcock Home

Furnishings Is A

Complete


Carpet

Store


Mould












PAGE SIX THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY, AUG. 27, 1981


I

F


I.,.
4-'




J















I- -





.A'



'1



lt~r -








4$',.


-/,








C


h-1

4




.,' ?
'I,




hr











I,'


















1.


.m


I




Fu
city.
122M


three lots for sale in
ilachicola. $6,500. 648-5413.
2tc 8-27
our lots for sale in White
y.. C. E. Anderson. Call
B710. -2tp8-20


Three lots for sale in Ward
Ridge. Call 229-8474 for more
information. 4tp8-20
4 bdrm., liv. rm., din. rm. Ig.
den and kitchen, utility rm.,
storage, dbl. carport, Ig.
screened in. back porch, on 2
lots. 1605 Monument Ave. Call
129-8654. tfc6-5
5 yr. old Pool Home. 3 BR, 2
ba., LR, DR, Breakfast area.
Ch/a, range, refrig., drapes,
inside laundry w/sink, Fla.
rm., 18x36 pool, cypress pri-
vacy fence, 2 car garage
w/auto opener, shallow well
pump, plenty of storage. Low
70's. By appt. only. 229-6401.

House and two lots for sale
by owner in White City. 3
bdrm., ceramic tile bath, in-
dludes 1g. building that can be
used for carport, boat storage.
Call after 8 p.m., 229-537 or
day 229-344. tfc 5-21


Srnh m,


Excel. cond. 3 bdrm.. 2 ba brick home
on 1% lots, extras Fireplace carpet
thruout. fully Insulated. cen h&a/c,
built-in range, chain link fence and
carport Best of all the existing
assumable mortgage is at 9% and
owner will take a reasonable second
mortgage II needed A real opportuni-
ty. 106 Mimosa.
100 Mimosa Ave. Lovely brick home.
3 bdrm. 3 bath, 2 car garage on 2 lots,
geo-thermal healing/cooling system.
Lots of extras Shown by appi only.


Home for Sale: Stone and
stucco, 3 bdrm., 2 ba., veteran
may assume 94% VA loan.
Located in White City.
227-1839. 2tp 9-3

For Sale by Owner: 2bdrm.,
I ba. house on 2 Ig. lots in
White City. Screened in front
and back porch. Large shed.
New deep well. $20,000. Call
2294971 anytime for more in-
formation. 4tp 8-13

3 bdrm., 1 ba. house with
screen porch. $17,500. Owner
will finance. 221 7th St. Call
229-084 before 5:30. tfc 7-23




Own your own Jean Shop.
Offering all the nationally
'.k own brands such as Jor-
dache, Vanderbilt, Calvin
Klein, Sedgefield, Levi and
over 70 other brands.
$12,500.00 includes beginning
'inventory, airfare for 1 to the
apparel center, training, fix-
tures and Grand Opening pro-
motions. Call Mr. Colombo at
Mademoiselle Fashions, 313-
632-7018. ltp 8-27


Yard Sale: Beacon Hill,
Hwy. 98, Friday, 8-3. Socket
sets, nut drivers, spittoons,
clocks, knives, glasses, wat-
ches, hat bands, radios and
misc. ltc 8-27
Garage Sale: Saturday,
Aug. 29, 9:00 a.m., till. 2009
Long Ave., near Port St. Joe
Elementary. Clothes, furni-
ture and misc, items.

Yard Sale: Friday, August
28, 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Plenty of
nice children's clothes, some
adult clothing, shoes, books,
dishes, misc. 1616 Long Ave.

Yard Sale: Saturday, Aug.
29, St. Joe Beach, corner of
Gulf and Alabama. Clothes,
linen, antiques, bottles and
books. Misc. items. 4 families.

Yard Sale: Saturday, Aug.
29, 117 Monica Drive, Ward
Ridge. 9-5.

Yard Sale: Thursday and
Friday, 8-5 CST. 208 Ten-
nessee St., Mexico Beach.
Linens, clothes, books, toys,
depression glass and lots of
misc. items. Air hockey game
and beach buggy.


1 ST. JOSEPH BAY REALTY
PORT ST. JOE


528 7th St. Owner will finance 25 per-
cent down, balance at 12 percent. 2
bdrm. plus sm. ex. rm. 1 ba. Woodbur-
ning fireplace In liv. rm. Lg. eat-in kit-
chen. Back & front screened porches.
Carport. $17,000. No. 112.
3 bdrm., 1 be. home in good location.
Fenced back yard, gas heat, carport,
stor. shed, reasonably priced. 1305
Marvin Ave. No. 113.
Owner says sell. 3 or 4 bdrm., 1 be.,
frame home. Only $12,500.00. Call for
appt. today. No. 105.


Plenty of room. 4 bdrm., 2 be. with 2
sic, gas heat, on 2 lots, each 50x175'.
Carpeting and drapes included, near-
ly new stainless steel exterior siding.
Room for Ig. garden in back yard, sur-
rounded by chain link fence. 506 8th
St. No.116.
1501 Monument. Excel. location w a
1600 sq. ft. house completely refur-
bished. 3 bdrms., 1 /Y be., liv. rm, din.
rm., den & kitchen combo, carport,
utility rm. If you need more room In a
fine home, this Is It. No. 108. '


MEXICO-BEACH


Two beautiful acres plus Iwo ig.
trailers and nice size shed Three
blocks from beach Only $21.500.
Owner may IInance.
Reduced or Fast Sale. Beautiful
Irees surround this nice 2 bdr, 1 ba.
mobile me~~l on l and
scapeJ1ot a= cl otG ner
Tann.l I 1H'6 ler
whicl Kcald. Ie d bdrm apt.
$19,5 No 403

2 bdrm duplex, very cute. sunaeck
and good view of the beach Will go
fast at $49.000 Owner will finance


Deluxe 4 bdrm., 2 bea. home with can.
h&a, canal location with boat
dock-ig. tiv. rm., 2 formal dining
rms. and comfortable den with
fireplace on 2 lots. Call for appt. No.
406.
Immaculate, 3 bdrm., 1 ba. house
with a wooden privacy fence, 1g.
garden plot. Can. h&a with an
economical heat pump, well In-
sulated, see this jewel today. $48,000.
No. 404.
1 bdrm. duplex on hwy. $38,500.
Owner will finance for 20% down.


Perfect Beach Home Overlooking the
Gulf. Cute 2 bdrm., 1 ba home with
full kitchen, fam. nn. and nice screen-
ed porch. Just across the hwy.- from
the beach with great view. $44,000.
Hwy. 98 & 3rd St. No. 410.
Beautiful modern 2 bdrm., 1 ba. brick
home close to Gulf. Less than 2 yrs.
old. Lg. fam. rm. with cathedral beam-
ed ceiling, modern kitchen w/Jenn-air
range. Full carpeted. Priced $47,500.
12th St. No. 408.
A Bargain Reducedl Cute & neat. 2
bdrm., 1 ba. almost furnished mobile
home. Come in today to see this buyl
$21,500. Corner of 5th & Florida Ave.


21 h.p. Diesel tractor, disc,
bush hog, boom, turning plow
& blade. $6,000. 229-8829.
tfc 8-27

19' Fenkin boat, 120 h.p.,
OMC, 10, fish finder, engine
and out drive. In good cond.
Dry Dock galvanized trailer.
$2,995. Phone 648-5051. tfe8-27

Rhode Island Red Hens. Call
648-8257. ltp8-27

16' Cobia boat, deep V walk-
thru windshield, 80 h.p.
Johnson & trailer. $850 or best
offer. Call 229-8554 or 227-1564,
ask for Danny. 2tc 8-27

Used Noblet B-flat clarinet
in excel. cond. Seasoned wood
has great tone. A nice case
and two practice books includ-
ed. Horn has new pads &
corks. 227-1471. ltp 8-27

1977 Kawasaki motorcycle
1000, low mileage, full dress
with extras. Must sell. $1,900.
227-1783. 2tc 8-27
All wood doll furniture for
sale. See or call Odell Roberts,
557 2nd Ave., Highland View.
Phone 229-6775. 2tp 8-27


GULF AIRE
Tennis Court. Now Under Construction.
Some beautiful lots still available at
only 11h% interest.

Office or store bldg. One side leased,
other open for new tenant. Income
property priced right. 1800 sq. ft. on
Reid Ave. Owner financing.
513 4th St. 2 bdrm., 1 ba. home. Walk-
ing distance to stores, chain link
fence. Assume existing mortgage.
Owner will finance balance. Both at
good Interest rate. %/ down. No. 107.
Lg. roomy, sturdily built older home
with 5 bdrm., 2 be., 2 screen porches,
front and rear, chain link fence en-
circles property. Ideal for Ig. family.
216 7th St. No. 115.


New Lisjing: 3 bdrm., 2 be. stucco
house with IIv. rm., din. rm., kit. com-
bo, partially furnished. Located on
nice shaded lot. $47,500. Call for
appt.
New Listing: Nice 2 bdrm., 2 be. home
on Hwy. 386, 1 block from beach.
$52,000.
Special Buy: On 4th St. 3 bdrm. frame
house on nice lot. Assume existing
mortgage with pmts. of approx. $250
mo., $29,500 total.
Near the Water: Cute one bdrm.
house very close to water with
sizeable existing mortgage. $31,000.


O E BEAC I Remodeled, redone, like new 3 bdrm.,
New Lbiting: What a buyl 3 odrm. 1 ST. JOE BEACH 2 be. house. Lg. formal ilv. rm.,
fireplace. formal dn rm. 18632' Complete this partially finished Call today to see this 1 bdrm., 1 be. spacious den wlfireplace formal din.
swimming pool with vood fence house at only $19,000 and turn it into traileron 75x150' lot at St. Joe Beach. ., kitchen w plenty of cabinet
around It Gulf St. Only L55000 a $30-35,000 home. Great location 3 $12 500. No. 212 space, breakfast area & snack bar.
around it Gull Si. Only $55.000 ,* on.r c 12.500.No.212 Located on 2 lots 75x150' ea. Selmal
bdrm., 1 be., liv. rm, din. rm, kitchen, Located on 2 lots 75050 ea. Selma
You're missing out on a good garage with utility rm., only 1 bik. Perfect for large family! 4 bdrm., 1 ba. St.
assumable morigagal Pius 3 barm., from beach. Adjacent lot also home w Ig. fam.' rm. with adjoining
1. bb., 2 car g arage. 2 lots. screened available. No. 207. porch, Full kitchen w atling bar. Priced to sell. 2 bdrm., 1 be. trailer w
porch, and swimming pool $75.000. Addlt'1 bdrm. apt. for additional In- fireplace, on beautiful lot w fruit trees
Corner ro Court and Alabama come. Owner financing available. No. for only $19,000. About 1 bik. from
210. beach. Call for appt. today. No. 200.

JONES BEACON HILL WEWAHITCHKA COMMERCIAL
SFully equipped store bldg. w Ig. com-
OMESTEAD Price Reduced to $30,000.2% fenced Great buy for young couple. 2 bdrm., mercial cooler, counters, display is-
Country living, close to town. 4 lots containing 3 bdrm., 2 be. home 1 bea. frame house. Minimum down lands etc. on 3'/ acres on Hwy. 30,
spacious bdrms.. newly remodeled, with Ig. comfortable Ily. rm., din. rm., pmt., financing available. $11,300.00. plenty of rm. for expansion on a
ex. Ig kitchen, 1%i acres completely and bright airy nearly new kit. mobile home park, will finance. No.
fenced w new chain link, dog pens, Utilities also available for mobile 17.8 acres still left on east side of 701.
plenty garden space, numerous fruit home set-up on one of these lots. Hwy. 71, just north of downtown. May
trees and all close to town. ideal for Assume existing loan and owner will be purchased in 5 to 6 acres plots. Business for Sale: Convenience
children, farm or nursery Call ioday flonance balance. $5,000 down pmt. -store, St. Joe Beach, corner of Bay &
on this one. $48,500 No 109 and move in. 3rd Ave. between 3rd CYPRESS LODGE Amerious. 1,536 sq. ft., 10 dr. walk-In
and 4th St. No. 302. 4 miles from Wewa on Dead takes. cooler, paved driveway on 1%/ lots w
ACR EAG E -Right on lake, 14 rental units, 2 main concrete slab ready for expansion or
3 bdrm., 1 be. rrbille home, on 2 Ig. houses, fully equipped restaurant, other business. Call for details. No.
1.32 acres In Overstreet. $5000. beautiful high and dry lots I onBeacon motors go too. Owner will boatsinance.
_______ Hill, property completely enclosed motors go too. Owner will finance.
200 on Intracoastal Canal. 3.7 acres, with a wooden fence, plenty of space $395,000. 2,700 sq. ft. building on First St. in
S mileromav a 38 A for kidsorogs $25,000. No. 301 Port St. Joe on 3 lots. Ideal1 for
bh mile from paved Hwy 386 A for kids or dogs. $25,000. No. 301. Reduced. House and acre of ground warehouse or small business. Use
beautiful property for anyone who 376'on water front. 3 wells and 3 sep- part of it and rent the rest Presently
wants to lie up his boat in his own Priced Reduced to $37,000. Across tic tanks. Only $30,000.. has tenants. Plenty of room for ex-
backyard. S30.000 No. 800 street from the Gulf on Hwy, 98. This pension. Priced right Call for more
2 bdrm., 1 ba. frame home sits on $11,000 lot and trailer. Owner will information. No. 702.
Almost 2 acres fronting on W1iaopo bluff for better view of Gulf. Apt, finance with $2,500 down.
*Creek High and dry w horseshoe building In back can be rented out for 2 fine business lots on Reld Ave. 60'
bank overlooking creek Owner may addt'l income. Call today for appt. $11,000. A-frame river hut and lot. total wdth by 90' deep. Includes / of
subdivide $27.000.No.804. Owner will finance brick wal on north side, reducing
Shady lot at Howard Creek Just a Partially remodeled, 2 bdrm., 1 ba. Lots from $4 to 500. construction costs.
few minutes walk from Ine boat an.- home on 2 fine lots 1 bik. from beach.
ding S3,000. No. 805 Sells as is at reduced price or owner
will complete. On First St. between OAK GROVE BAY FRONT
4th & 5th. No. 305. BAYFRONT
OVERSTR EET A real bargain at only $12.000. 2 5 acres on St. Rd. 30 near Preanell's.
New Ltling: Super Buyl Neat and Cute as a button. Ideal for beach cot. bdrm., 1 be.. eat-in kitchen, screened 251 feet on Road, 800 feet to bay.
clean 3 bdrm.. 1 ba house on I acre tage, 1 or 2 bdrm., 3rd Avenue near front porch. Metal shed in back yard. Beautiful view for bayfront home.
of land. $29 500 with assumable mor- 6th St. Secluded yet close to the 503 Madison. No. 100.
tgage. Call for apple. beach. Call to see this one today.d CAPE SAN BLAS
S_______ 2 bdrm.. 1 be. partially furnished CAPE SAN BLAS
3 bdrm.. I ba. trailer with attached home including range & refrig. Chain
trailer, also I travel trailer, all on 1 link fenced yd w shed in back. Two gorgeous dry acres of tall pines
acre of land, $12500. $10,500. 401 Madison St. and shrubbery with 205' fronting on
GULF AIRE the hwy. and bay. Just beyond the old
salt works marker. Owner will sell all
BEACH LOTS Charming Spanish design 2 story, 4 INDIAN PASS or 100' on either side. Financing
bdrm., 2V be., Ig. den, Iliv. rm. w R d c f 8 f available. No. 10.
St. Joe Beach-Lg selection of fireplace, din. rm., dbl garage on Reduced from $8000 to 5.500 or a
beach lots-for less man $1,000 beautiful Gulf Aire lot. Best of all a quick sale. 75x105' lot on Indian
down you can own your own Call to- 101%% assumable mortgage. Pass close to the beach. This is a
day. No. 900. super bargain and will go fast.



648-5011 or 648-8220 AFTER HOURS
PAULETTA CAMPBELL ... 648-8977
JIM CLEMENT .......... 648-5482
E. B. MILLER, REALTOR IKE DUREN, REALTOR SANDRACLENNEY ......2296310
BOB & JEAN FALISKI .... 229-6553
P. 0. BOX 13332 MEXICO BEACH, FL 32410 RHONDA HEATH ........2271782
NATALIE SHOAF ........ 2?7-1498
900 HIGHWAY 98- MEXICO BEACH MARSHAYOUNG ........ 648-5248


Couch and recliner. See at
2101 Constitution Dr. or call
229-8700 after 5:00. tfc 8-13

Christmas Is Coming! Shop
at home this year with House
of Lloyd toys and gifts. Gifts
for all ages, with 60 under
$10.00. Individual and party
orders available. Ask how
easily you can receive $20.00
worth of merchandise plus
possible added bonuses.
Call us for a catalogue or for
information anytime. Carol
Durham, 229-6676, Port St. Joe
representative. tfc8-20
150 gal. propane tank at
Mexico Beach. 648-5386.
Itc 8-27

Mobile home for sale.
12x60', 2 bdrm., cen. h&a, par-
tially furnished. $5,000. For
more information call 229-8167
after 5p.m. tfc8-27

Miscellaneous furniture,
large Sears chest type freezer.
Call 229M434 after 3 p.m.
2tp8-27
3M VQC II Copier with
stand, paper and toner. Excel.
cond. Contact Ned Ailes, Gulf
County Guidance Clinic, Inc.
311 Williams Ave., Port St.
Joe, 227-1145. 2tc 8-27
Used upright piano, good
cond., $500. 227-1568 after 5
p.m. tfc 6-11
AVON
Buy or Sell Avon
Call Vera Morrow at 763-7170
5tc 7-30






1974 Chevy station wagon,
$800. Call 229-6621 for more in-
formation. ltp 8-27

1971 Ford Torino in good
running cond., $400. Call
229-8349. 2tc 8-27

1975 Datsun pickup truck,
good cond., $2,250. Being used
daily. Call 229-6394 after 6:00.
tfc 8-27

1980 Courier truck, like new,
14,000 miles, long wheel base,
4 speed with overdrive.
$5,450.00. 639-2874. tfc 8-20

1980 Buick Regal, $6,995.
Limited edition. Job transfer,
must sell. Like new, low
mileage. A/c, pb, ps, am-fm
cass., crushed velvet interior.
Phone 227-1105. tfc 8-20

1976 LTD, good cond., auto
transm. 648-5315. tfc 8-13

1972 Dodge Van Tradesman,
100 V8, auto transm., $1,150.00.
Call 229-8000 after 5 p.m. or
see at 813 Marvin Ave., Port
St. Joe. tfc6-25


2 one bdrm. furnished apart-.
ments; 1 furnished bachelor
apt. on beach front. Available
after Sept. 1.648-8398. It 8-27
For Rent: 3 bdrm. trailer at
St. Joe Beach. Call 227-1277 or
after 6, call 648-5273. tfc 8-6
For carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vae the portable steam
carpet cleaning system.
Available at Western Auto,
phone 227-1105, 219 Reid Ave.

Mobilmehome sites, efficien-
cy apt. and campers for rent
on beach. By day, week,
month or year. Ski Breeze
Camp Sites. Call 229-6105.
tfc6-4


Thames Hotel, day, weekly,
monthly rates. 302 Reid Ave.
229-8723.

NO need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
227-1251.






Wanted to Buy: One room
air conditioners! Needed in
the kindergarten of Faith
Christian School. Call 227-1307
or 227-1667, Vivian Bateman.
ltp8-27


The John C. Gainous Post
10069, Veterans of Foreign
Wars will hold its regular
meeting at the St. Joe Motel,
Port St. Joe, the second Tues-
day and the fourth Thursday
of the month at 7:30 D.m.
There will be a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe
Lodge No. 111, F.&A.M. Every
first and third Thursday at
8:00 p.m.
R. C. CHANDLER, W.M.
J. P. Cooley, Sec.
The Disabled American
Veterans, Port St. Joe Chapter
62, will meet the first Monday
each month at 7:30 p.m. at..
Joe Motel.
,,,


I ~~~SERIE


Likely I have painted your
neighbor's house. Do you ap-
predate a whole town behind
someone's painting? Call Joe
Betsey. Call 433-5356, Pen-
sacola. tlO/29

For all your cosmetic needs
call me for'a complimentary
facial. Margaret Hale,
648-5659. Vedora Wilson,
227-1397. 4tc8-20
Lawnmowers repaired,
automobiles tuned up, car-
buerators cleaned & repaired,
plumbing repaired, pipe and
faucets repaired, electric wir-
ing repaired, light receptacles
Installed.
Andy Anderson and
John Johnson
at Land's Landing
Wewahitchka, Florida
639-2950
4tp8-6
ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work Welding
506 First Street
Phone 2294803
Machinist on Duty All Day
Every Day
Air Conditioning Heating
Refrigeration Appliance
Parts and Service
DANIELS SERVICE CO.
Electric Plumbing -
Appliance Repair
All Brands
Norris Daniels
Phone 2294416
106 Bellamy Circle
FOR TRACTOR WORK
Call 229-939 or6485306
tfc 8-14

BOYER
Billboards & Beyond
Signs of All Kinds
Interior Exterior
House Painting
639-2874 tfc8-20


RED CARTER'S GUN SHOP
Port St. Joe Beach
Gunsmithing Blueing
New & Used Guns Scopes


OWNER RELOCATING Spacious
chain link fenced lot with 2 con-
nected mobile homes furnished.
Large garden area & fruit trees. Pric-
ed to sell-at $19,900. $8,000 down,
balance financed at 8 %. White City.

Four bedrooms, 2 baths, fireplace,
good cond., 1466 sq. ft. plus a storage
-shed. Recently installed aluminum
siding. This one should go quickly at
$25,000. 519 Fourth St.

Lg. duplex Each apt. contains 3
bdrms. and 1 bath. One apt. com-
pletely furnished and the other par-
tially furnished. All for $45,000. 1616
Long Avenue. $10,000 down with
owner financing available at conve-
nient terms.

Excel. investment as vacation retreat
or primary residence. Indian Pass
Beach. Assumable mortgage & owner
financing available. $37,500.

HANNON

INSURANCE AGENCY
FRANK HANNON, Broker


Roy Smith Associates
221 Reid Avenue


Karen King
227-1133


BEACON FABRICS
Sewing Notions & Patterns
Hwy. 98 at Beacon Hill
Hrs.: 9:00-5:00E.S.T.
tfc 84

YARD WORK DONE
Mowing, raking, .cleaning,
weeding. Phone 229-8952 after
2:00p.m. tfc6-11

CARPENTRY & CONCRETE
18 Yrs. Experience
Ira J. Nichols
319 6th St., Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
904/2294235
Carpentry Work D6ne
Reasonable Rates
Jimmy Johnson
Phone 2294757
tfc 2-2

B&J ELECTRICAL
Residential Wiring,
Air Condition Repair
and Installation
Phone 229-8075
tfc7-30


St. Joseph Bay
Construct o
RsidentiI l
C CoOerd a





W. S.(Biff) Quarles
CUSTOM HOMES-
REMODELING
229-8795



SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!


Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151

Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reid Avenue


4



I'


ST. JOE CUSTOM
BUILDERS





-Commercial Building
-Residential Building
-Cabinet Work


POR


I

4
'4
4
,4
,4
'4


<


GLEN F. CQMBS
227-1689

P.O. BOX456
,T ST. JOE, FLORIDA
tfe 7-2,


Psychological Services for
anyone with problems in day-
to-day living. Gulf County
Guidance Clinic, Port St. Joe.
227-1145 (24 hours)


WAUNETA'S
BOOKKEEPING
Complete Bookkeeping Service
Including All Required
Tax Forms
Reasonable Set
Monthly Fee
Wauneta Brewer
116 Monument 2295361
25tp6-11


TV & RADIO REPAIR
B&J Electrical &
Electronics
510 1st St., Port St. Joe .
Phone 2294-8075
In Wewa on Tuesdays
tfc7-30



Church Supplies
Music Records Tapes
Rubber Stamps
Hospital & Funeral Flowers
Gifts-Bibles
Sound Studio Recording
Service

7-OAKS
GOSPEL SUPPLIES

115 Hunter St., Oak Grove.
Port St. Joe, Fla.
227-135


Going Fishing?
Stop here first
for a complete
line of

Fishing Tackle

Hurlbut Supply
30o Reid Ave. .,.








thinkk it wos somethingI oe."



kills bugs for
up to six months,
and saves you about S100 yearly
in costly post co trol services.
Use of Sprayer free with
*purchase of Rid-A-Bug
HURLBUT sUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe Florida


TAFLINGER PAINTING
(Interior and Exterior) .,
Pressure Cleaning for Grime aod Mildew
ALSO COOOLSEALING MOBILE HOME ROOFS
WILL COOL MOBILE HOMES 15-20%
FOR FREE ESTIMATE
Call 229-8977 or 648-8369


S A I


GARG SAE MS.FRALFORET FOR RENT'


------------- -


vvv


__ __--lw


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


PAGE SIX


-


THURSDAY, AUG. 27,1981









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUG. 27, 1981


PAGE SEVEN


Bee Keeping Is Oldest


Profession St. Clair


0low,

. .














Raffield's In National Slow-Pitch Softball


; tournament For Eighth Year of Appearance
Rafflel's slow pitch softball team will travel to Moultrie, Georgia Labor some of the team members, who will be playing for the local team. From left to
Day week end to participate in the National Slow Pitch Softball tournament. right are: Wayne Parrish, coach, Danny Miller, Jerry Gaskin, Bill Dodson, Pat
RaffleMl's will be making their eighth straight appearance in the national Patterson, Jerry Guilford, Mike White, Mike Todd and Bryan Baxley. Not
tournament. Last year, the team finished fourth in the nation. Shown above are pictured are Warren Yeager, Don Ashcraft and Kenny Haddock.


FINANCING
REAL ESTATE
SIN THE 1980'S.I


Lease/Purchase
Plan:
The buyer leases
until a delayed sales
date.

Stop in. The
Neighborhood
Professionals" can tell
you more about this
and dozens of other
creative financing
ideas. Be sure to pick
up our brochure.
"Alternative
SFinancing."


I ST. J10SE1 AYV REALTY
U97001 HIghwayg 98
Mex~o BechFL 32410
90)48511

(D1901 Cetnury 21 Real Estate
Corporai~onas trustee fmr the NAF
@and m -trademarkisof Century 21
Real Estate CAorai om nf
PrinI,~d in S A
EAHOptIC
INRPENENTy
OWNED
AND OPERATED.
Equal Housing Opparf unit v 3


Japanese Reef to Be Sunk



Off of Panama City Beach
Development of recreation light years ahead of the United Within days of the sinking, a tually recommend the poter
and commercial fisheries in States. concrete rubble reef equal in tial benefits of the Japanes
the United States will get a Features of the Japanese volume to the Japanese reef reef to specific geographic
boost Friday with the sched- reef are its non-toxic quality, will be placed near it. Both regions and selected fisheries
uled sinking of a Japanese- large surface area, intricate reefs will be monitored and The reefs, technical sei
designed artificial reef six and inner structure and easy fabri- evaluated by Aquabio, Inc., a vices and manpower wer
one-half miles off Panama cation. The reefs are more private research firm that donated by Asahi, the con
City Beach. easily transported than con- was instrumental in obtaining pany that holds the re<
It will be the first of the ventional reefs and are cor- the donation of the reef units. patent.
highly sophisticated, fiber- rosion-free. Aquabio is expected to even-


glass-reinforced plastic reefs
placed in U.S. waters. A
second reef is slated to be sunk
off Jacksonville on September
1.
Representatives from 11
states, including California,
Hawaii, Texas, New York and
most of the Southern coastal
states, are expected to ob-
serve the Panama City reef
sinking. Also present will be
staff from the Florida Depart-
ment of Natural Resources
and the National Marine Fish-
eries Service which helped
finance the project.
Florida sites were selected
because of the state's commit-
ment to artificial reef pro-
grams.
Due to its heavy dependence
on the fishing industry, Japan
is considered technologically


Pastor Begins Series
On the End Times.

The Rapture The Judgement of Christ
The Marriage Feast of the Lamb The
Great Jubilation The Battle of Armageddon
The Great White Throne Judgement
What About Heaven? What About Hell?
JOIN US FOR WORSHIP
BIBLESTUDY ........................ 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .................. 11:00 A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING .................... 5:45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .................... 7:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY ......................... 7:00 P.M.
A.M................. "Armegeddon"
P.M. ............. -Great White Throne Judgement"


Long Ave. Baptist Church
1601 LONG AVENUE
TED CORLEY MARK DONNELL
Pastor Minister of Music and Youth


n-
e
ic
s.
r-
!e
1-
ef


Falls Are Major Cause


of Death

According to the National w
Safety Council, a leading fa
cause of accidental deaths in-
the nation is falls, second only m
to motor vehicle accidents. a|
In Florida slip-and-fall acci- A
dents rank as the number one P
cause of job-related accidents sa
involving state employees, pl
both in terms of frequency and ei
cost. During the last four gr
years 5,746 slip-and-fall acci- m
dents have cost the State of de
Florida more than $5.8 million in
in medical and compensation pi
expenses. In the fiscal year
1979-82, employees lost 24,362 pr


WANTED: FRAMING
SUBCONTRACTORS
If you have an adequate crew,
tools & transportation, Jim
Walter has subcontract work
available for you. We have
plenty of work in all areas.
For more information, apply
or call Butch before 9 a.m.,,
CDT daily, 769-2381.
JIM WALTER HOMES, Inc.
3303 W. Hwy. 98
Panama City, Fla. 32401
ltc 8-27

The Gulf Co. Child Develop-
ment and Learning Center will
be hiring a part-time cook. Ap-
plicants must be 18 yrs. or
older with experience in work-
ing with children. All in-
terested persons may apply at
the center located at the
Washington Recreation Site
on Ave. D and Peters St. bet-
ween the hours of 12 noon and
3:30 p.m. Deadline for apply-
ing is Sept. 14, 1981.
ltc8-27
SUBSTITUTE
TEACHERS WANTED
The Gulf County Guidance
Clinic, Inc. is seeking ap-
plicants for possible substitute
teaching positions during the
1981-82 school term. The Clinic
operates three classrooms for
children with emotional dif-
ficulties and qualified
substitutes are needed
periodically. Minimum re-
quirements include: high
school diploma and substitute
teacher certification.
Previous experience is prefer-
red. Inquiries should be
directed to: Edwin R. Ailes,
Executive Director, Gulf
County Guidance Clinic, Inc.,
311 Williams Ave., Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456. The Gulf
Couity Guidance Clinic, Inc.
is an Equal Opportunity/Af-
firmative Action Employer.
tfc 8-27


..and Injury .
ork days because of slips and at home, at play and at work,
ills. include the following:
The Insurance Depart- Never carry files, boxes or
ient's Division of Risk Man- other objects which obstruct
cement and the Interagency your view.
advisory Council on Loss Wear appropriate foot gear.
prevention have developed a Don't wear tennisAshoes on wet
ifety program for state em- tile floors. Keep laces tied and
oyees endorsed by the Gov- soles free from mud and other
rnor and Cabinet. The pro- slippery substances.
ram is aimed at reducing the Don't leave tools and equip-
umber of slip and fall acci-
ents with the dollar savings
during to the state's tax-
ayers.
Safety tips which will help
event slip and fall accidents


JOB INFORMATION
Alaskan and Overseas
employment. Great income
potential. Call 602-941-8014,
dept. 8636. Phone call refund-
able.
4tp8-13
Information on ALASKAN
and OVERSEAS employment.
Excellent income potential.
Call (312) 741-9780, ext. 4256.
4tp 8-27




SURPLUS JEEPS, CARS
and TRUCKS available. Many
sell under $200. Call 312-742-
1143, ext. 9939, for info. on how
to purchase. 4tc 8-6
1978 F-100 Ford pickup,
short wheel base 2x4, 300 6
cyl., big tires, chrome wheels,
chrome roll bar. 229-8821.
tfc 7-9





The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
V.F.W. meets the second
Tuesday and the fourth Thurs-
day of each month at 7:30 p.m.
in the Florida Power Lounge.

Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday, 4:00 P.M., E.S.T.
Tuesday, 8:00 P.M., E.S.T.
Al-Anon
Tuesday, 8:00 P.M., E.S.T.
St. James Episcopal Church
R.A.M.-regular convoca-
tion of St. Joseph Chapter No.
56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd Mon-
days, 8 p.m. All visiting com-
panions welcome.
E. E. WEEKS, H.P.
E. William McFarland, Sec.


Now there is some argu-
ment about which is the oldest
profession on earth. Joe St.
Clair, speaking to the Rotary
Club last Thursday intimated
that it is bee keeping. Accord-
ing to St. Clair, bee keeping
dates back to 15,000 years
before Christ. He said there is
ancient evidence that keeping
bees for their honey was
practiced in Spain during this
beginning of civilization.
Since that time, keeping
bees and harvesting their
sweets has been a practice of
mankind throughout history.
Even with this early begin-
ning, it was 1590 before men
started keeping bees in move-
able hives, moving the bees to
where the blossoms were in
order to allow the bees to
continue with their work.
St. Clair, who is a bee
keeper here in Gulf County,
said the swarm is made up of
one queen, workers and
drones. The queen keeps the
hive alive, laying some 12,000
to 15,000 eggs a day. The queen
lays for a year, then has to be
replaced.
Every bee in the hive has a
responsibility. The workers
gather the nectar to make the
honey and the drones fan the
eggs to keep them cool.
Each cultivated colony has
some 30,000 to 50,000 bees to a
hive and the colony will make
approximately five and a half
gallons of honey each year.
St. Clair said the worker
bees get their name honestly.
"It takes a bee some 30,000
trips to and from blossoms to
extract enough nectar for a
half pound of honey", he said.
Mechanical extraction of
honey is a comparatively new
innovation in bee keeping
according to St. Clair. Hot
knives remove the cover
from the honey comb and a
centrifuge is used to sling the
honey out of the comb without


ment out or drawers open.
Avoid Horseplay.
If you drop or spill some-
thing on the floor, pick or
clean it up immediately.
Always keep aisles clear,
place ladders securely and
walk using handrails when
going up and down stairs.
If you have questions, or
would like to comment on any
subject, write to "Straight
from Bill Gunter", Insurance
Commissioner, LL-25, The
Capitol, Tallahassee, Florida
32301.

"Civility costs nothing."
English Proverb


damage to the comb itself.
St. Clair said the tupelo
honey which is common to this
part of Florida is a unique
product of northwest Florida.
"It is not found anywhere else
except in this part of Florida",
he said. The tupelo is unique in
that it never granulates. St.
Clair said he knew of one bee
keeper who had tupelo honey


on hand which is 25 years old
and it is still just as clear as if
it had been gathered only last
week.
Guests of the club were Tom
Allerton of Jacksonville, Mark
Shine of Tampa, Judge LartIy
Bodiford of Panama City apnd
Rev. J. C. Odum of Port St.
Joe.


"Bangers" Having Volleyball

Tourney To Aid In Saving Cabana.


The "Beacon Hill Bangers"
invite you to join them in a
volley ball tournament on
August 30, 12 Noon.
The tournament is to help


save the "Cabana", and will
be held across from the
beacon light on Beacon Hill.
Your support is needed and
will be appreciated.


First United

Methodist Church


Constitution and Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe, Florida.
JIMMY SPIKES, Minister
CHURCH SCHOOL .................... 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ............. ..... ... 1:600A.M l:
EVENING WORSHIP .................... 7:30P.M.
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP .......... 6:30 P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) ........... 7:30 P.M.













Headquarters for P.E. Clothes |
Book Bags, Knapsacks A
Port St. Joe Elementary, Highland View
Elementary and Faith Christian
School Colors T-Shirts
Port St. Joe High School, Wewa High
School, Port St. Joe Elementary, High-::
land View Elementary, Faith Christian
Tennis Shoes



The Athletic House I


"Real Estate Specialists for Over 30 Years". Call us for information
on these as well as a large inventory of lots and other home s.


TI1~


323 Reid Avenue


Sur-Way Electric

411 Reid Avenue


Commercial, Residential

Remodeling and

Service Work

CHARLES SO WELL

26 Years Experience
Licensed and Bonded *

K Call Shorty at

229-6798










PAGE EIGHT THE STAR. Pert St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY. AUG. 27, 1981


Football Season Preparation In Full




Swing with Practice for Sept. 4 Jamboree


Football is coming to life at
Port St. Joe High School, with
practice of both varsity and
junior varsity squads now
under way.
Varsity players started
their practice sessions on
August 15 and the junior


iv.






I lk



















I-,P


Senior Airman
Donald W. Guillot, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Guillot
of 306 Fifth St., Port St. Joe,
has been promoted in the U.S.
Air Force to the rank of senior
airman.
Guillot is an aircraft arma-
ment specialist at Hurlburt
Field, Fla., with the 834th
Aircraft Generation Squad-
ron.
His wife, Yvonne, is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Carl
Guilford of Overstreet.
He is a 1978 graduate of Port,
St. Joe High School.


HIGHLAND VIEW

CHURCH OF GOD

"Where Jesus Christ Is King
& God's Love Is An
Everflowing Fountain"
SUNDAY SCHOOL ...... 10:00 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ... 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .... 6:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY EVENING 7:00 P.M.

Pastor- -Ira J. Nichols


high practice got underway
on Monday of this week.
Athletic director, Wayne Tay-
lor said those interested in
being a part of the junior
high may still report for the
team this week. He emphasiz-
ed that all prospective players


Dr. E. C. Prather of the HRS, gives
physical examinations to football players at
the Gulf County Health Department last


- Public Notices -


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT. FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY.
RE: The Marriage of
DAVID C. KENNEDY,
Husband Petitioner.
and
SHEREE L KENNEDY.
Wife Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: SHEREE L. KENNEDY
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you add that Petition
seeks to dissolve your marriage to Peti-
tioner. You are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to the Peti-
tion on Mr. Fred N. Witten. Attorney at
Law, P. 0. Box 447, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456, or Mr. Fred N. Witten, Attorney at
Law, 408 Long Avenue, Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either before ser-
vice on Petitioner's Attorney or im-
mediately thereafter, on or, before
September 26, 1981. otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief
sought in the Petition.
DATED this 25th day of August, 1981.


Is/Tonya Allen,
Deputy Clerk
Honorable Jerry Gates,
Circuit Clerk


4t 8-27


must have a physical exami-
nation before they can parti-
cipate.

Season tickets for the 1981
season went on sale this week
for the five home games of the
season. The season tickets; on


Thursday. David Anderson has his heart
checked while Michael Pittman and Curtis
Ray wait their turn. -Star photo


The South American country
of Brazil derives its name
from the reddish tree the
Spanish and Portugese call
brasil, and which we call
Brazilwood.
Copies
Copies

Copies

Copies

Now at

The Star
306 Williams Ave.
from
Our New
"VQC"

Copier


NOTICE TO RECEIVE BIDS
The Gulf County School Board will
receive bids until 9:00 A.M.. E.D.T..
September 8. 1981. in the office of the
Superintendent of Schools ori used 900 x
20 tires and tubes. These may be seen at
the bus shop in Ward Ridge between the
hours of 7:00 A.M. 11:00 A.M. and Noon
-3:00 P.M.. Monday through Friday except
for Labor Day. Bid forms are available at
the shop or the Superintendent's office.
The Board reserves the right to reject
any and all bids. Please mark your bid
envelope "Tires and Tubes".
B. Walter Wilder. Superintendent
2t 8-27
NOTICE TO RECEIVE BIDS
The Gulf County School Board will
receive bids until 10:00 A.M.. E.D.T.
September 4. 1981. In the office 'of the
Superintendent of Schools on incandes-
cent lights that have been declared
surplus by the Gulf County School Board.
The lights are located at Port St. Joe and
Wewahitchka. To inspect the lights in
Port St. Joe contact Carey Floors at the
School Maintenance Office, phone
229-8369. The lights in Wewahitchka may
be Inspected by contacting Mr. Clayton
Wooten at Wewahltchka High School.
In submitting bids, please state price
per unit.
The Board reserves the right to reject
any and all bids.
Please mark your bid envelope "Sealed
Bid Incandescent Light-" 2t 8-27


Clarence Birdseye, the "Father of Frozen Food," was
an inventor and explorer who first experimented with
preserving food in 1916 on a trip to Labrador.


Phone 227-1291


Returning to the coaching
staff this year will be Jim
Belin with the junior high
program, Bill Wood with the
junior high varsity, Don Rich,
junior varsity and Wayne
Stevens with the varsity
squad.

The Sharks will receive
their baptism under fire on


Friday, September 4, this
year, in Blountstown, when
they enter the fall jamboree
with Blountstown, Liberty
County and Apalachicola.
The Sharks will play two
quarters in the contest, one
against Apalachicola and one
against Blountstown.
The jamboree will start at
8:30 p.m., EST.


sale in the school office, will
cost $2.50 for each home game
and will entitle the holder to
their choice of a reserved seat,
reserved parking and ushers.
The Shark home game sche-
dule this year includes Hava-
na on September 18, Wewa-
hitchka on September 25,
Apalachicola .on October 2,
Blountstown on October 16 and
Bonifay on November 6.
The out-of-town schedule for
the coming year includes:
DeFuniak Springs, Sept. 11,
8:30 p.m., EST; Marianna,
October 9, 8:30 EST; Chipley,
October 23, 8:30 EST; Open
Date on October 30; Wakulla,
November 13, 8:00 EST and
Florida High, November 20,
8:00 EST.
Last year the Sharks had a
6-4 season, but Taylor, who is
also the head football coach,
said he is hoping for an even
better season this year. The
Sharks lost five seniors from
their squad.
Taylor said the future looks
good for the Sharks, since the
junior high team, which will
be the junior varsity this year,
was undefeated last year.
"Our varsity squad has a lot of
high expectations this year".
A corps of new coaches will
be leading the Sharks this
year. In addition to Taylor,
new coaches reporting for the
year include Shaw Maddox,
who will be coaching the
varsity backs; John Hicks,
who will handle both the
offensive and defensive lines;
and Dewayne Fisher, leading
the junior varsity teams..


Food Program
The Gulf County Child De-
velopment and Learning Cen-
ter announced the sponsorship
of the Child Care Food Pro-
gram. Under this program,
meals will be available at no
separate charge to children
enrolled without regard to
race, color, or national origin.


Firestone quality & economy!
SC F-irestonc quality at ai low price. That A
Deluxe Champion what makes the bias-ply I)luxe Chamn-
olvSter cord pn ur .stsllindir. Its hacked
volvesoer cord h5 .s0 years (if Firestonc know-how.


t$2b Fits most U.S. and impo
2 Size Black F.E.T. Sie
"A7M-13 28 .51.51 *.-5 i.S
S00-12 Hilakwall "['i5 80M )13 28 1 41 4 *4.601-151.
5-rih tread 1. r.-I 1, 1.71 1 -7115
Plus $1 39 F- T i'.14i 3 2.34 671-i5
NTINl- IN -7M -It 1 2.214 H7M-15
N.1 i -'I LG78I. i 2 .2 1.78-15
N..I... ....


rt cars! j
B.c1 F.E.T.


14l 2.36
49 *I S7
44 2.H4


MlI prices plus tax. NO TRADE-IN NEEDl)EI
Whitewalls extra *5-rih tread.


Tuesday, Sept.1 cookie and milk. .:
Tuesday, Sept. I
Lasagna, cabbage slaw, Frday, Sep
sliced peaches, roll and milk. Fish and chips, catsup
mayonnaise, pickle, sliced
Wednesday, Sept. 2 apples, bun and milk.


Luncheon meat and cheese
sandwich, mayonnaise, pickle
and lettuce, baked beans, fruit


Menus are subject to change
due to the availability of food.


Baton Lessons Donald Guillot

Being Offered Promoted to


Baton lessons, sponsored by
the Gulf County Community
Services, will begin on Sep-
'tember 1 at the Centennial
Building.
SBeginner and Intermediate
,classes will be offered for ages
'two and up.
Registration fee is $5.00,
with a charge of $10.00 per
month for the class. Contact
Cindy Belin at 229-8934.

During the 1800s artificial
pearls were made by blowing
hollow beads of glass and
filling them with a mixture
of liquid ammonia and the
white matter from fish scales.


TRY US FIRST!
WE HAVE HARD TO GET PARTS FOR BOATS, LAWN AND
GARDEN EQUIPMENT. TRACTORS. MOTORCYCLES, TRUCKS
AND AUTOMOBILES AVAILABLE DAILY FROM OUR NAPA
DISTRIBUTION CENTER

St. Joe Auto Parts Gold Hat Auto Parts
201 Long Avenue Highway 71
Port St. Joe, Fla. Wewahit cka. Florida
229-M2 639-5711


Boat Nears Completion
Raffleld Fisheries will soon launch their first fishing boat built in their new
boat building facility. The first of what is hoped to be many boast is shown here
getting its finishing touches before it is pushed outside the building to put on the top
rigging. In the photo at top left, workmen are dwarfed by the huge multi-purpose
fishing and shrimping boat. In the photo at top right, Fred Buskins, designer and
builder of the boat shows a portion of the hull material, which issolid fiberglass. In
the bottom photo, Buskins shows two of his crew how to install a portion of the aft
section of the boat. Compare the size of the propeller with six foot Buskins.


NEW BETHEL
. African Methodist Episcopal Church
146 Avenue C Phone 227-1213
Rev. James W. Williams, Pastor

SUNDAY SCHOOL .................. 9:30 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................... 11:00 A.M.
EVENINGWORSHIP ................... 6:00 P.M.

"'God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man Our Brother"


Gal. 5-22-23


Pate's Service


219 Monument Ave.


THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUG. 27, 1981


PAGE EIGHT






STORE HOURS: M-Th, 8:00 7:00
Fri. & Sat., 8:00 8:00
Sunday, 9:00 6:00


PRICES S


MONEY, TWO WAYS
MONEY SAVING DOWN PRICES. 2. SPECIAL DEEP CUT MONEY SAVING PRICES.


Prices Effective ,
August 26- Sept.1.1981


wpw ww
PIGL IGGL


1111


32 Oz. Returnable


SUGAR


$
5 lb.
bag


49


Limit 2 Bags
with Food Order


Piggly Wiggly


ICE MILK


/2 Gal.


Royal Oak Briquets


CHARCOAL


$


99


E 10 Lb.
Bag


I Bounty
TOWELS


Lg. Roll i f
Limit 2 w $10 Order or More Exc. Cig. & Tob. Products
Piggly Wiggly 1% Lowfat
MILK


$


Gal.


PAMPERS
Day & Night


12 ct .


RC COLAS


$


89


Btls.


A,.ll Meat 100% Pu[ 3eefL 28 E

-Lb.. IL
School lunch Speciala Power Pak Olde Smithfield Hot or Mild Good Value All Meat or
Good Value Salami, Bologna,
C BLoDn ,S.BRncheo FRANKS or Pork Sausage BEEF FRANKS
COLD CUTS BOLOGNA
o$148 ,12oz.59_ 98__ 12oL$119
*lr GChef Boy Ar Dee
FROZEN PIZZAS
12oz.$1.09
Good Value Spread Fresh
MARGARINE P *PEACHES
4990! 5 l. **$100
21Lb. Pkgs.8-9a *99L3Lbs.1
lls T.V. Frozen Sliced
BII WISTRAWBERRIESR
6.$10 Oz.69 C


Plus Deposit
Oven Fresh Sandwich

BREAD


P20
Oz.
Loave.


Limit 4 w Food Order


Tissue
CHARMIN


4 Roll
Pkg.


Limit 1 w $10 Order or More Exc. Cig. & Tob. Products
Mother's Best
FLOUR

5 lb. bag89
Good Value
CATSUP


32 Oz. Btl. N W
Limit 1 w S10 Order or More Exc. Cig. & Tob. Products
BABGererOD
L BABY FOOD A


I We Welcome I
I Shoppers j


Ja16
L16,A


Colonial


mm


dA -m








PAGE TEN
THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUG. 27. 1981
********** **************
* gIN WASHINGTON *
* WITH *

EARL

** HUTTO *
************** ************
Tourism Policy


To many people, the words
vacation and Florida are
synonymous. Tourism, in all
its forms, is something that we
accept as a commonplace part
of Florida living. However, the
economic impact that tourism
has on an area is often
overlooked. It was with this
economic factor in mind that
Congress recently devised the
National Tourism Policy Act
which will greatly affect the
tourism -industry in all of
Florida, including the First
District.
The purpose of the Na-
tional Tourism Policy Act is to
"promote the economic,
educational, and intercultural
contributions of U.S. tourism
and recreation industries."
Even from this general sutn-
mary, it is evident that Florida
will be one of the major areas
to benefit from this new policy.
However, there are several
specific proposals contained in
this act which will enhance
Florida's tourism directly.
One example lies in the plan
to establish facilitation services
at major U.S. ports-of-entry.
Miami is a primary U.S. port-
of-entry, meaning that the
facilities there will most likely
receive this attention im-
mediately. A second, com-
plementary proposal consists
of consultations with foreign
governments on travel and
tourism in order to expand our
industry's market. To aid in
the achievement of this goal, it
has been suggested that nine
U.S. offices be established in
foreign countries. Naturally,
the new port-of-entry facilities
could be one selling point for
American tourism.
Several much-needed
changes are now in the works
providing direct assistance to


the tourist industry. For exam-
ple, a program will be
developed to provide federal
agencies with information
regarding the needs and in-
terests of the tourist industry.
This feature of the new policy
could easily be used advan-
tageously by tourist areas
throughout the state, including
those in the First District.
Consequently, the National
Tourism Policy Act will have a
great impact on our state.
Tourism is on the rise in
Florida, and the First District
is sharing in this boom. As you
may know, Miracle Strip
Amusement Park in Panama
City Beach ranked as one of
the top ten tourist attractions
in Florida for the 1979-1980
year. I am hopeful that the new
National Tourism Policy act
will further enhance this ex-
panding Floridian industry and
enable the First District to reap
the full economic benefits of
tourism.
Shrimp Creole
Nancy's recipe this week is
by Mrs. Everett M. Dirksen,
wife of the former Senator
from Illinois.
2 cups medium white sauce
I garlic clove, cut
Vz bottle chilW sauce
I dash Tabasco
I V3 pounds shrimp, cooked,
peeled, deveined
cooked rice
Make white sauce in top of
double boiler which has been
rubbed with garlic clove. Add
chili sauce, Tabasco and bite
size pieces of shrimp. Heat
over boiling water until ready
to serve. Serve over rice.
Makes 4 to 6 servings.


The common gallinule and
rail season begins September
2 and hunters will need to head
for the marshlands of Florida
to locate them, according to
the Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission.
"Gallinules and rails enjoy
marshland habitat and are not
particular as to whethther it be
salt water -or fresh water,"
said Fred W. Stanberry, di-
- rector of the Division of


Wildlife for the Commission.
He said the bag limit for
common gallinule is 15 daily.
The common gallinule is also
known as the Florida galli-
nule.
Sora and Virginia rails have
a bag limit of 25 daily and
clapper and king rails, 15.
The rail and gallinule sea-
son will close November 10.
There is no open season on
purple gallinules.


QUALITY
RIGHTS
RESERVED


David Rich's Annual


HIND QUARTER


BEEF



SALE


7JntallfMionJ^ uU.S.D.A. CHOICE TABLERITE BONELESS
bfgiur SIRLOIN TIP ROAST

MEADOW GOLD U.S.D.A. CHOICE TABLERITE BONE-IN
MEADOW GOLD a -..-


a


BEEF LIViED...
BEEF LIVER ....p.


m


LYKES OLD FASHIONED
SLICEDBACON . . ..


HARTFIELD FARMS REG., HOT, ITALIAN
SMOKED SAUSAGE


* U U U U Lb.$2E


* U U U Lb.$2E61


S ... Lb..$2b3


S. Lb.$2.1


u.... Lb.$2i


. .*. .U. Lb.@


120o.98


b.$1.89


A *~ *


- DEL ICA TESSEN


GRADE A PEE WEE

EGGS




3

DOZEN


Deollous
Chicken Salad
8 Pc. Box with 4 Rolls
Fried Chicken
Assortd Hot
Sandwiches


I DA~IRY DPARTENT


. .


Io$ 79,

69" &Up


*U,....i


1 Layer
Red Velvet Cal

French Bread

Dinner Rolls


ke.. 2

....799


* II I *


IGA SPREAD $ 29 FREEZER QUEEN .-. $ 4 J
CHEESE SINGLES 'I SUPPERS -55'..
KRAFT PROCESSED 2 4 9g IGA FROZEN
Velveeta Cheese Lo,-$3 Orange Juice ...


PILLSBURY BUTTERMILK
Biscuits ,mm,)


..= 5


CWHSUNMYLAN lELIGHlT


infla tionM a Punch ....w...
fighter S LTEST

TREND Sour Cream


Many people are content to broil a frankfurter fast, slap it
between a bun, slather it with mustard or catsup and let it go
at that. But since hot dogs are uniquely American, they de-
serve special treatment on the Fourth of July. The addition
of zesty bottled all-purpose barbecue sauce lends a subtle yet
- spicy flavor to the franks and blends beautifully with the cheese
and bacon. And for guests who like their hot dogs "real saucy,"
have a small bowl of the same sauce ready and waiting.
Cheese-Stuffed Frankfurters
1 pound frankfurters 8 to 10 bacon slices
(8 to 10) 8 to 10 frankfurter rolls,
Open Pit barbecue sauce toasted
2 to 3 slices process American
cheese, cut in thin strips
Slit frankfurters lengthwise to 3/4 inch from each end.
Spoon 1/4 teaspoon barbecue sauce along slit in each; add 2
cheese strips to each. Wind a bacon slice around each frank-
furter; secure with wooden picks at each end. Place on grill
away from glowing coals. Brush with additional barbecue sauce
and grill, turning and basting until bacon is cooked. Remove
picks. Serve on rolls. Makes 4 servings.


t. 99SARA LEE t .
,.... ePound Cake,..., I
89o SEA PAK BREADED 14
...2*89* Fish Sticks .....

David Rich's IGA, Your':
Complete Dealer for

LARK


,,,ices start at SS20-.00


BUILDINGS.

We have all sizes from
6'x8' to 12'x50'. Come by today!


Rail Season

Opens Sept. 2


-BAKERY- ,


IGA
.2 C79. Whip Topping


ro


Nnt $149










ID


RICH'S


IG


BULK RATE
U. S. POSTAGE
8.4' PAID
Permit No. 3
Vewahitchka, Fla.


PAGE ELEVEN
THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY, AUG. 27, 1981

GCCC Courses

Offered In PSJ


Prices Good Aug. 26-Sept. 1
^T inflalionmb
W^S fIghter ^
HELLMANNS E

MAY'NAISE
QUART JAR





LIMIT 1 W $10 FOOD ORDER OR MORE


Six college level courses will
be offered in Port St. Joe by
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege during the fall semester,
which begins August 27. The
classes will be held at Port St.
Joe High School. Registration
will be the first day of class.
Classes to be offered are:
Introduction to Business:
GEB 1011, on Mondays and
Wednesday from 5:00 6:15;
Introduction to Data Pro-
cessing, COC 1201 on Tuesdays
from 6:30 9:15 p.m.;
Freshman English I, ENC
1101, on Thursdays from 6:30
-9:15 p.m.;


Western Civilization, EUH
1000, on Wednesdays, from
6:30 9:15 p.m.;
Introduction to Govern-
ment, POS 2001, on Thursdays
from 6:30 9:15 p.m.;
General Psychology,
Tuesday, from 6:30 9:15
p.m.
Anyone desiring more infor-
mation about the classes to be
offered should contact Bever-
ly Rich at 229-6044.
"Nature never breaks her
own laws.'"
Leonardo Da Vinci


Indian Summer
Extends Picnic Time.


cean Spray Cranberry Juice ...
Del Monte Pear Halves ............
abisco Ritz Crackers..........
*agless Tea Bags..................
*ravy Train Dog Food..............

F:ench's Worcestershire Sauce..


Red or Gold Delicious
APPLEgS


'C." 990
1O. 69 OO
Can D9


16 Oz.
Pkg,
100 at.
Pkg.
25 Lb.
Bag


890
$19

$799
Sl"e
$ gg


15 oz. 9O9
Btl. 99


eneic Products Save You Money
GenerIc Produc ts Sa ve You Money


I..LAUNDRY DETER

SHORTENING ...

VEGETABLE OIL.
KTEA BAGS .....

APPLE OR GRAPE
'AEADA.l. 0.. ,,UE


GREEN BEANS .....
SWEET PEAS ......


lENT


. .109


U U U U U *420z.


. .,$179
.....,.93*
* U U U U U 4801

* U U U U U 0 L


JELLY


U 2L.8


P~y.OL4TI l
.,,o..4/1s1

. 15.oz.3/89

SG. ,3/99


Fancy Tree Ripened
PEACHES ........


WHITE GRAPES .... a. 88c
Mountain GrownES et Flavor
TOMATOES ... Try$1.19


Crimp Cello
CARROTS


bag


ICE COLD WATERMELONS
SF r..Ye Fre rNew Wit F Crop ,
SOkra, Squash & Shelled Peas

CUCUMBERS


at Low Prices


14YS


..... 2bga690


Wl inllationJ
fighter )
IGA VEGETABLE
OLEO *J|
QUARTERS

3 88I


DOUBLE LUCK CUT
GREEN BEANS

A lS i88


.49 PUsat ....R
49 PLUMS


Yellow
SWEET CORN
Sweet oergla
PEACHES ..


2=$1.00
2.651.00


3,I..ty$1 .29


Sweet 88
SCUPPERNONGS ... u. 0


Green
BOILING
PEANUTS Lb.


4
f


BELL PEPPERS Tray
Frash Y.low
SQUASH L,.


TendOer Frying
OKRA


Tray


i


4


GREEN CABBAGE


,2 ~Heads


There's no cut-off time for enjoying nature and good '
eating. Many Americans are reluctant to give up the out of
doors they so dearly love so they extend their outings to
those wonderful Saturdays and Sundays during Indian
Summer. This is the time for enjoying football or hockey,
soccer, hiking or driving to nearby picnic areas for a view
of the fall foliage. The air is invigorating and appetites are
hearty so take along an easy to prepare vegetable-pasta
casserole made from broccoli and canned beef ravioli in
rich tomato sauce. It's bound to please the cook and
satisfy those Indian Summer appetites. '
EASY RAVIOLI VEGETABLE CASSEROLE
2 packages (10 oz. each) frozen chopped
broccoli -
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
1/2'cup finely chopped onion
1 medium clove garlic, crushed
1/4 cup red or green chopped peppers
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
2 cans (15 oz. each) Chef Boy-ar-dee (R) Beef
Ravioli in Beef and Tomato Sauce .
Cook broccoli according to package directions; drain
well. Add Parmesan cheese and mix well. Saute onion,
garlic and peppers in butter until lightly browned;
combine with broccoli. Place Ravioli in saucepan over low
heat; stir occasionally until thoroughly heated. Add half
of the broccoli mixture to Ravioli;, serve half for garnish.
Arrange in shallow or 1'A quart serving dish. Garnish edge
with the remainder of the broccoli. Serves 4-6.

First
Presbyterian Church
Sixteenth Street and Forrest Park Avenue
Phone 227-1756
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE ............ 10:00A.M.
ADULTSUNDAYSCHOOLCLASS ......... 11:00A.M.
Study In the Gospels, Wednesday 7:00-7:45
Welcome to Everyone
JOHN M. STUART, Pastor
Phone229-6857 "

HIGHLAND VIEW
METHODIST CHURCH
Corner 4th & Parker Ave.
Invites You to Worship Services
Rev. Paul Griffin, Pastor
SUNDAYSCHOOL ...................... 10:00A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................... 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .................... 6:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY ................. 7:30 Prayer Meetings
Nursery Provided


The First
Pentecostal Holiness Church
2001 GARRISON AVE. PORT ST. JOE
Invites You to Worship with Them
SErnest A. Barr, Pastor
SERVICES
SUNDAY SCHOOL ..................... 9:45A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP......... 1........ 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .................... 7:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT ................... 7:00 P.M.


oodliner


... Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka


DAVID RICH'S IGA ALWAYS HAS THE FRESHEST PRODUCE -
WE PERSONALLY SELECT & HAUL OUR OWN


r











PAGE TWELVE


THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUG. 27, 1981


* ~ .1.,~ ~
-, ..


Future of St. Joe Paper Locked In Court


Reprinted from the
Tallahassee Democrat
Ed Ball had been dead
barely two weeks when one of
the biggest legal battles he
fought started all over again.
Now, in the ponderous man-
ner that typifies so many
suits, the fight has resumed
over the value of the Alfred I.
duPont estate and the status of
the men who run it.
Resolution of the matter is
still weeks or months away.
The next court hearing Is set
for October 5.
In a sense, it's a classicEd
Ball struggle between private
powet and governmental au-
thority. With Ball gone, it pits
the attorneys general of
Florida and Delaware against
the controlling trustees of the
billion-doUar estate.
Or maybe it's not a billion-
dollar estate. Perhaps it's
worth closer to $640 million.
That's one of the issues
being debated in the effort by
the attorneys general to re-
move three of Ball's closest
associates from their trustee
positions.
Attorneys General Jim
Smith of Florida and Richard


Gebelein of Delaware have
asked a circuit court in
Jacksonville to remove J.C.
Belin, W. L. Thornton and T.S.
Coldewey from trusteeships.
Belin is president of the
estate's largest holding, the
St. Joe Paper Co. Thornton is
president of the Florida East
Coast Railway, which is 52
percent owned by St. Joe.
Coldewey is a former execu-
tive of St. Joe Paper.
The two state officials
charged that the estate has not
been paying enough to support
its specified objective of help-
ing cure crippled children and
aid needy elderly.
They said the trustees have
mismanaged the estate by
failing to maximize income
and have undervalued the
assets. Under an agreement
that ended a previous legal
battle, the trustees agreed to
pay at least three percent of
the estate's assets each year
to the charitable causes for
which the trust was estab-
lished.
The big issue in the complex
case is the management and
direction of the many business
enterprises the duPont estate


owns or controls.
Should the trustees focus on
maximizing income or on
building up assets?
The attorneys general chose
the former, the trustees the
latter.
The trustees pointed to a
clause in the will of the late
Alfred I. duPont that commits
them to do what they "deem
best for the conservation,
protection and betterment of
my estate."


There's nothing in the will
about maximizing income,
they said.
Last year, the Nemours
Foundation, which dispenses
the charitable money, re-
ceived $22.6 million from the
duPont estate. By the trust-
ees' reckoning, that more than
fulfilled the terms of the
agreement as their valuation
of the estate was $640 million.
Which is correct?
The trustees based their


valuation on a recent ap-
praisal of the estate's biggest
asset, the St. Joe Paper Co.,
by First Research consultants
of Miami. A mammoth docu-
ment that took three months to
prepare, it examined bit by bit
everything St. Joe owned or
operated.
It concluded, in effect, that
previous appraisals of the
value of more than one million
acres of land St. Joe owned in
Northwest Florida, Georgia


Retiring At Year's End?



Start Making Plans Now


People in the Gulf County
area who plan to retire at the
end of the year should take
some time soon to think about
Social Security retirement
benefits, David Robinson,
Social Security Field Repre-
sentative for Gulf County said
recently.
A person should apply for
Social Security benefits two or
three months before they plan
to retire. This way, benefits
can begin shortly after income
from work stops.
Before applying, a person
should get the necessary
proofs together, Mr. Robinson
said. This will save time at
application time. The first
item a person needs is his or
her Social Security card or a
record of the number.


Next, proof of date of birth is
required. Preferred proof is
an official record of birth or
baptism recorded before age
five. If this does not exist,
other proofs can be submitted.
People at the Panama City
Social Security office can tell
what kinds of evidence can be
used.
Records that might be used
include school, church, State
or Federal census, insurance
policies, marriage, passports,
employment, military
service, children's birth certi-
ficates, union, immigration
and naturalization. This is not
an exclusive list and other
records may be acceptable.
Forms W-2 (Wage and Tax
Statement) for the past two


years should be provided. A
self-employed person should
have copies of his or her
self-employment tax returns
for the past two years. These
are needed because recent
earnings reports may not be in
our records.
A husband or wife who also
plans to apply should have
about the same documents. A
marriage certificate may be
required, but it is not needed
in all cases. Information about
any previous marriages is
also required.
Birth certificates of any
young, unmarried children
should be obtained as well.
Additional documentation
may be required depending
upon the particulars of a
certain case. The people at the
Social Security office will bc
glad to answer any questions
about retirement applications.
The Panama City Social
' Security office is located at 30
W. Government Street and the
telephone number is 769-4871.


For

Ambulance

Service

Call

227-1115


and Alabama were too high.
Further, it said, the market
price of St. Joe Paper Co.
stock reflected an exagger-
ated value. There are 100,024
shares of stock outstanding,
and the estate owns 75 percent
of them. The remaining 25,000
shares are spread among 200
stockholders.
It's difficult to get a realistic
market quote on St. Joe
Paper. Traded over the count-
er but rarely traded at all, it's
quoted at $10,000 bid, $14,000
asked.
"The, stock trades like a
curio, a collectible," said
Phillip W. Moore, chairman of
First Research. "It's like a
Tiffany lamp, an antique.
Very little is in the hands of
the public. Most of those
shares were given out years
ago to select people.",
First Research estimated
the value of St. Joe Paper at
$5,500 a share.
That's not the way Smith,
the Florida attorney general,
sees it. He contended that the
duPont trustees "valued the
assets substantially below
their true fair market value
and have substantially and


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY.
CASE NO. 81-150
UNITED PRODUCTS, INC..
a Florida corporation,
laintliff,
,re
VAN JONES and wife ADDIE RUTH
JONES and STEPHEN C. BRIGHT,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:. STEPHEN C. BRIGHT
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an acllon for
foreclosure of a mortgage has been filed
against you and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, If any. to
It on WILLIAM M. ATKINSON. JR.. Plain-
tiffs Attorney. 304 Magnolia Ave., Suite 4.
Panama City, FL 32401 on or before the
2nd day of September, 1981. and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court either
before serve on Plaintltf's attorney or Imn.
mediately thereafter, otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks in
The Star, a newspaper printed at Port SI.
Joe. Florida.
DATED this 5th day of August, 1981
JERRY THOMAS GATES.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By ls/ Tonya Allen, As Deputy Clerk
418.13

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 81174
IN RE. Forfeiture of the following desp
cribed property. 1973 Monte Carlo.
Chevrolet. Serial Number
IH57H3K406278. license lag
number TBP050
NOTICE
TO Andy L Stewart
P. 0. Box 516
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a
Motion for a Rule to Show Cause will be
filed in the above styled Court why a 1973
Chevrolet Monte Carlo, tag number
TBPO50, serial number IH57H3K406278.
which was seized by the Gull County
Sheriff's Department should not be
forfeited. The anticipated filing date for
said Motion for Rule to Show Cause Is
September 18. 1981
1sf MEL C. MAGIDSON. JR
Assistant State Allorney 2t 8-20

NOTICE OF NAMES OF PERSONS
APPEARING TO BE OWNERS OF
ABANDONED PROPERTY
Pursuant to Section 13. Chapter 717.
Florida Statutes,. entitled "Florida
Disposition of Unclaimed Property Act' .
notice is hereby given that the persons
listed below appear to be the owners of
unclaimed personal or inlangible proper-
ty presumed abandoned THIS DOES NOT
INVOLVE REAL ESTATE
Account Number 0349-1980-0034. Ap.
parent Owner. Dllman. E. Richard
Informallon concerning the amount or
description of the property and the
names and address of the holder may be
obtained by any person possessing an in-
terest in the property by aadressing an in-
quiry to GERALD A LEWIS. State Comp-
troller. Abandoned Property Section.
ATTN Harry B Carson, 1401 State
Caltllol. Tallahassee. Florida 32301. (904)
487-2583. Be sure to mention the account
number BEFORE the name as published
In this notice. Unless proof of ownership
is presented to the holder by October 29
1981, the property will be delivered lor
custody to the Comptroller of Florids
Thereafter all further Lialms must be
directed to the Comptroller of Florida
GERALD A. LEWIS
COMPTROLLER
OF FLORIDA
218120

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF
COUNTY. FLORIDA. PROBATE DIVISION
FILE Number 8'-25 Division
IN RE. ESTATE OF
JOHNNIE LEE MARTIN.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR
DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS IN.
TERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the
administration of the estate of JOHNNIE
LEF MARTIN rieoeaseo. File Number
81-25, is pending in the Circuit Court for
Gulf County, Florida, Probate Division.
the address of which is Gull County
Courthouse, P. 0. Box 968. Port St Joe.
Florida 32456. The personal represen-
tatives of the estate are Levada Mereditn
and Franzora Hatcher, whose addresses
are 26 Lake View Drive. R.R. No. 3. Mary
Esther, Florida 32589, and 17810
Mackeson Court. Carson. California
90745. respectively. The name and ad-
dress of the personal representatives' at-
torney are setl forth below
All persons having claims or demands
against the estate are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have Each claim must
-e in writing and must Indicate the basis
lor the claim, the name and address of
the creditor or his agent or attorney. and
the amount claimed. If the claim is not yet
due. the date when It will become due
shall be stated. If the claim Is contingent
or unliquidated, the nature of the uncer
tainly shall be elated. If the ciairr is


secured. the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies o Ithe claim to me clerk to enable
the clerk to mall one copy to each per-
sonal representative
Al persons Interested in the estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
rrministration has been mailed are re.
qulred. WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges the validi-
ty ol the decedent's will, the qualiflca-
lions of the personal representative, or
the venue or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Date o Ithe Eirst publication of this
Notice of Administrallon: August 20,
1981
i8i Levada Merediln
1al Frenzora Hatcher
As Personal Representatives of the
Estate of Johnnie Lee Martin, deceased.
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVE
l.I Cecil G Costin. Jr
413 Williams Avenue
Port St. Joe FL 32456
Telephone 9041227.1159
2t8-20

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF
COUNTY. FLORIDA. PROBATE DIVISION
FILE Number 81-23 Division
IN RE ESTATE OF
VERNA IRWIN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR
DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS IN-
TERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the
administration ol Ihe estate of VERNA IR-
WIN. deceased Fie Number 81-23, Is
pending in the Circuitl Court for Gulf
County. Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress ofat nich is Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Filth St., Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456 The personal represen-
laive of Inse estate is JOHN N. MORGAN,
Ill.. wnose address is 3144 Orleans Way
S. Apopka. Flihoaa 32803. The name and
address ol the personal representative's
attorney are set Iorth oelow.
All persons having claims or demands
against the estate are required, WIHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. to tile with Ihe clerk of the above
court a wrillten wstemant of any claim or
demand they may have Each claim must
be in writing and must indicate the basis
lor the claim the name and address of
Ine creditor or his agent or attorney, and
the amount claimed II Ine claim is not yet
due. the dale *nen 11 will become due
shall be state i mIne claim is contingent
or unliaulidalad the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be staled If the claim is
.TcuBrd. the securlly shall be described.
Ine claimant snail deliver sufficient
copies ofl the claim to the clerk to enable
ite clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative
All persons interested In the estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministrallion has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
ThE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE. to lie any objections
they may have that challenges the validi-
ly of Ine decedent's will, the quallfica-
lions ofl Ihe personal representative, or
the venue or lursdicllon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Dale of mIne first uDIIcation of this
Notice of Administration: August 20,
1981
IbI John N Morgan. ill
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Verna Irwin deceased.
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVE
Ist Cecil G Costin Jr
413 Williams Avenue
Port St Joe. FL 32456
Telephone 904,227 1159


2t 8-20


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


HANNON INSURANCE

Agency, Inc.

The Insurance Store Since 1943


Auto Home Business Life

Flood Bonds Mutual Funds

8:30 til 6:00 Monday through Friday


Phone 227-1133


221 Reid Avenue


We are HERE to Service What We Sell


ROY SMITH, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent


Struggle

artificially discounted the ing the ouster attempt, the
value of St. Joe Paper Co. trustees charged that it is
stock below its historic selling "politically inspired," and
price..." contended that it would de-
Originally, the crippled prive Florida's crippled child-
children and the elderly in ren of part of Ball's bequest.
Delaware were the only bene- The duPont trustees said-the
ficiaries of the duPont mil- two attorneys general are
lions. More recently, the trying to bring Ball's estate
charitable umbrella spread to into the legal fray and subject
Florida. Then, Ball left nearly it to claims by Delaware as
all of his personal $75-million well as Florida.
estate to the crippled children Fred Kent St., an attorney
of Florida alone. for the trustees, said he
That has become another thought the dispute could be
point of contention. In resist- settled by December.



HIGHLAND VIEW


BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of Fourth St. & Second Ave.

Welcome Friend

SUNDAY SCHOOL ...................... 9:45 A.M.
WORSHIP SERVICE ........... 11:00A.M. & 7:30 P.M.
CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) ............6:30 P.M.
MID-WEEK PRAYER (Wednesday) ........ 7:30 P.M...


Nursery Provided


23 Years Experience Major Appliances
WE REPAIR ALL Air Conditioners


BRO. JERRY RE


* Refrigerators Freezers
* Electrical Plumbing


DANIELS SERVICE COMPANY

Phone 229-8416 Port St. Joe


FWHY PEOPLE READ


WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS.
YoIN ~Em----IA- *Et R


Laet Over 80% found newspaper advertising most helpful for information

Ruh on pries. where to shop and sales! il

Left I T

WASHINGT 67% of Weekly readers surveyed read the Classifieds!
Supreme Cow

S84% of Weekly readers surveyed read the other Advertisements!
tima have ac
to um Latr
AM. 'l 80% of Weekly readers surveyed read Advertisin Iinsertsi!
mealt, eft r

mett Is 72.5%L of Weekly readers surveyed read Groce Ads before shopping!
lion was
It is cot
Uly, tba Over 40% of Weekly readers surveyed read ClothingAds before buying!
study th ii

fe ts 70% of Weekly readers surveyed read Real Estate ads when buying!

n e"EDITORIAL FIGURES:

The L 51% of Weekly readers surveyed get most information on State Events
bees an e.
thu farto from their newspapers!
A AumfI
vocate th 72.5% of Weekly readers surveyed get most Loai Information from

and acen their newspapers!
Utvenem
medice'

u1 By As with other surveys, newspapers didn't win every category in competition with
federal b
El other media. But, THESE STATISTICS DO SHOW VERY POSITIVE EDITORIAL
the qu~
alC. AND SALES DATA FOR WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS.


-
privacy,
The l
resolve'
gible for
emotion
Cosmetic
quired pro
(ectiveness
marketed.
last PF
(:tCircuit
swered t
ofthege
On
the
de
to 1.
protee,
tion of a.


THIS IS WHY WE FEEL WE ARE IMPORTANT TO YOU!




THE STAR


Phone 227-1278


lie




ntact
mnt em '
tmm and-.
nrl's I.
aded a
flee Sum-
o the


Svepay
agreeme plants




'ars, ex-
atrad
latlona

Roanoke
for the
e," Bush
war with
rears. I'im
0 over and
ito stil
nil com-


*'Aback

bides two
Uam that.




tive to
bout 10
activee



ReaNke
Iveragee(

aid the
ide any
aefits tit
ive recog-
n in our

the eom.
.re union
S.tevens
-eed Ito
.ds con-


- Public Notices -