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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02380
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 9, 1981
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02380

Full Text















USPS 518,880

FORTY-FOURTH YEAR, NUMBER 45


THE


STAR


Industry Deep Water Port Fine People Safest Beaches In Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1981


201 Per Copy


1 DER Refuses Permit


-,. tI. sF. *Then Softens Position, Giving City Time


Tom Stallings,. Mexico Beach Water wiring to the disabled water pump, which was
Superintendent, is shown working on the struck by lightning Friday. -Star photo


Lightning Knocks Out


Mexico BeachWaterPlant

24lHoursOn

Week End
Mexico Beach had a house
full of visitors over the July
Fourth holiday and no water
for them to take a bath or
get a cool drink of water.
T jn n~ann. ;


This electrical service board, containing switching
apparatus for the Mexico Beach water pump, was seriously
damaged by the lightning which, put the system out of
operation. -Star photo


-at;
bad lightning storm here on
the coast, lightning struck the
Mexico Beach water works,
putting the system out of
action for nearly 24 hours.
Lightning entered the sys-
tem, burning up the electrical
system and the pump motor to
the water plant.
Workmen worked through
,the night Friday and all day
Saturday, to get the water
back on Saturday afternoon at
about 2:30 p.m.
Mexico Beach called in the
Rowe Drilling Company of
Tallahassee to provide a new
pump motor and technicians
from the City of Port St. Joe to
get the service back into
operation.
The motor on the pump was
changed and wired direct to
the fuse panel to put the pump
back into action until the
switching mechanism could
be re-built..


Jacksonville Firm Hired


to Audit City's Records


The City of Port St. Joe
received an unexpected jolt
last week, when the Depart-
ment of Environmental Reg-
ulation notified the City that
they would deny a request for
an operational permit for the
Wastewater Treatment Plant.
The City had applied for the
permit, upon expiration of the
previous permit, last month.
Robert V. friegel, who has
recently assumed the duties of
District Manager of the North-
west District, Gulf Breeze,
notified the City last Thurs-
day, by letter, that the permit
would be denied for several
reasons.
Kreigel gave the City 14
days to answer his letter and
its charges.
The main charges levied
against the City were that the
plant had gone over its BOD
limits in five of the last 17
months. The plant is allowed
5,529 pounds of BOD per day
under its operation limits. The
letter also charged that the
City had gone over its limits of
suspended solids effluent in
seven of the past 17 months.
The plant is allowed 12,810
pounds of suspended solids
effluent per day.


These two problems have
.been a bone of contention
between the City and the DER
for some time, now, and were
the main thrust for an extend-
ed study called for by the
federal government. The
study, costing some $125,000
and carried out over a period
of nearly two years, was
designed to come up with
ways to correct what the DER
says is an excessive emission
of the BOD and suspended
solids effluents.
The City has also attacked
the limits allowed for the local
plant from two avenues. Lim-
its for the local plant are far
more stringent than a similar
plant in Bay County, issuing
the same kinds of effluent. The
City feels the local limits
Should be the same as similar
plants all over the nation,
.which would allow the local
plant to come in compliance
100 percent of the time with no
problem.
The City has also challenged
the DER method of measuring
the City's effluent. Plant man-
ager. Bob Simon pointed out to
the City and its engineers
some time back that the DER
was using one measuring


method and the City was using
the methods set out in the
plant's temporary permit in
measuring the effluent limits.
"By the measuring method set
out in our permit, we are
largely in compliance, even
though we do go over on
occasion with unusual operat-
ing conditions caused by one
of the local plants, using the
plant, starting up or ceasing
operations for a time. This
action causes an unusual


stress on the plant which
cannot be helped." Simon also
pointed out that other plants
have these same problems
under the same circum-
stances.
SPECIFICS GIVEN
In their letter, the DER
representatives claim "The
high suspended solids in the
Port St. Joe effluent has
caused a significant sludge
build-up in the Bay, which
extends one to three miles


seaward from the Gulf County
Canal entrance."
Simon refutes this by claim-
ing the DER made no on-site
samplings in the bay. "We
have kept daily records in the
bay since before the plant
went into operation. The wafer
quality is far better today than
it was before the plant started
up. The charge that we are
building up sludge is ridicu.
(Continued on Page 2)- "


Nelson Hit-Run Victim

Third Traffic Fatality of Year


Richard Lingo Nelson, 35, became
Gulf County's third traffic fatality of the
year early Saturday morning, the victim
of a hit and run motorist.
Nelson was a resident of Route 1,
Wewahitchka.
According to Gulf County Sheriff en
Murphy, Nelson was struck by an unknown
driver at about 2:00 a.m., Saturday
morning on the Dalkeith Road. He was
dead when officers arrived at the scene,
after being notified of the accident by a


passing motorist, who found Nelson lying
on the road.
According to Murphy, Nelson wap-.'
apparently walking south on Dalkeith.
Road, when he was struck from behind.
Sheriff Murphy said there are still no clues
as to who was driving the vehicle which
struck Nelson.
Trooper Bill Godwin of the Florida
Highway Patrol, is investigating the fatal -
accident for the Patrol, who investigates
all fatal highway accidents.


Board Takes Aim At Drugs


,40qcs qS-lProbemIDiminishing IW .G d


Recently, School Board
member Paul Sewell expres-
sed a concern at a School
Board meeting to take steps to
eradicate any use or trafficking
in drugs in the county's two
high schools.
Tuesday afternoon, the
Board addressed the matter,
with high school principals
Edwin Williams of Port St. Joe
and Clayton Wooten of Wewa-
hitchka adding their input to
the discussion as to just what
the school system could do .to
control the problem.
What Sewell thought was a
big problem at the two high
schools was labeled as a minor
problem by the principals and
getting less and less with each
school year. Principal Wil-
liams told the Board that the
past school year had the
cleanest drug record of any
year since he has been with
the school system. "We have
only a small problem with the
use of drugs at Port St. Joe


High School and an increasing
participation by the students
themselves in controlling the
problem".
Williams said the students
themselves are policing the
drug traffic at the school.
The School.Board was dis-
cussing the way school offi-
cials could legally enter school
lockers in search of drug
contraband in a manner which
would stand up in court..
Both principals said that if
they suspected drugs being
kept in a locker, they just call
in the student who has been
assigned the locker and tell
him to open it for inspection.
"So far, we haven't had any
problem getting students to
open the lockers", Clayton
Wooten said. Wooten went on
to point out, "The students
who are pushing marijuana at
school don't use the lockers
unless they are very dumb or
new in the business". Wooten
said if a kid is selling or using


the drug they keep it in their
cars, which takes a search
warrant to enter or hidden in
some out of the way place at
school.
Williams said he has had
cause to search only "four or
five" lockers all year long.
Wooten said he has also had
to search only a very few
lockers, substantiating their.
claim that the use is diminish-
ing at school to a very rare
thing.
Attorney Cecil Costin advis-
ed the School Board that
searches by school officials of
lockers without a search war-
rant might provide the techni-
cality to get anyone caught
with the drugs free on techni-
calities if the case went to
court. He suggested getting
students to sign a permit slip
when the locker is assigned,
giving the school officials
permission to search the lock-
er if they are suspect.
Wooten pointed out that the


lockers were the property of
the school. He said he felt the
law gave them the right to
search if the one using the
locker is suspected of having
drugs. "If I read the law
correctly, this is given as just
cause", Wooten.added.
Costin asked, "What do you
do if a student refuses to let
you look in his locker?"
Williams retorted, "I'll tell
you what I did do. I called the
student's mother to the school,
and she told the pupil to open
the locker. There was nothing
there."
Both principals stressed the
fact that the problem was
vanishing in Gulf County
schools, but felt they should
have some legal access to
suspected lockers. Wooten
then suggested that Costin
prepare them a form for a
student suspected of posses-
sion of the drug to sign, giving
permission to search his or
her locker.


Costin said that would prob-
ably be the best way to deal
with the problem.
Still, the Board didn't come
up with a statement of policy
for searching lockers, prefer-
ing to wait until Sewell wasi
present at a meeting to enter
into the discussion. Sewell was
absent from Tuesday's meet-
ing.
Board member, Waylon
Graham said, "Sewell seemed
to be disturbed about the
problem as having great pro-
portions in our schools and I
would like to have him here to
give us any specifics he might
have in the matter before we
make a final decision."
Attorney Costin agreed with
Graham, saying, "If you have
a bad problem here, you need
some teeth in your actions. If
you don't have a big problem,
the way you are doing it is
probably best. But if you find
(Continued on Page 2)


The City Commission spent
nearly two hours Tuesday
night interviewing auditing
Firms to do the City's annual
audit and engineering firms to
do design work for the Waste-
water Treatment plant.
# After taking an unusually
long time to come up with last
year's audit by the firm hired
for the job last year, the
Commission decided to
change auditors this year and


came to an informal agree-
ment with Touche Ross and
Company of Jacksonville
Tuesday night. The City will
work up a contract with the
firm in the next few weeks and
sign with the Jacksonville
firm for a limit of $25,000. The
City will pay for only the time
and expenses involved in the
audit, not to exceed the $25,000
figure. The audit will encom-
pass all the City's operations,


Wewa Couple Face


Pot-Growing Charge


Undercover investigators of
the Gulf County Sheriff's
Department arrested James
Merritt, age 61, and his wife
Mary Evelyn Merritt, age 63,
both of Wewahitchka, for
possession of marijuana with
S intent to manufacture.
According to Sheriff Ken
Murphy, the arrest occurred
after information was re-
ceived that the couple was
Allegedly growing and selling
marijuana at their home on
Stone Mill Creek Road. Only a
small quantity of marijuana
was found, mostly in the form
of debris in the heater vents,
between the sheets in the
bedroom, in the oven of the


stove; and in the vacuum
cleaner bag.
The couple was arraigned
before Judge-David Taunton
and bond was set at $5000
each.
Sheriff Murphy said, "We
are receiving a lot of informa-
tion from the citizens of Gulf
County in reference to loca-
tions of drug pushers, and the
only way the law enforcement
can be effective is by having
full corporation of the people.'
It is gratifying to see the
people of Gulf County joining
together with law enforce-
ment officers to help combat
this serious problem."


general operations, hospital
and Wastewater Treatment
Plant.
Touche Ross said the audit
would require about 90 days to
complete.
Jones, Edmunds and Asso-
ciates presented their creden-
tials, seeking the job of
designing certain changes in
construction which are needed
at the Wastewater Treatment
Plant. The firm has done some
advisory work for the City in
the past.
PLAN APPROVED
The Commission gave its
final approval to the City's
Comprehensive Plan Tuesday
night, and sent the document
on to the State of Florida.
The plan was drawn up as
an edict from the State of
Florida, outlining the future
use of all land within the City
in the foreseeable future.
The plan essentially follow-
ed a comprehensive plan
drawn up several years ago by
the City and guidelines outlin-
ed in the County's plan, which
was also completed and for-
warded to the State this
month.
The plan was prepared for
the City by the Apalachee
Planning Council.
One change was made in the
plan before it was given final
approval. Mrs. Zola Maddox
(Continued on Page 2)


Land Fill Sit Fa insists on the expensive daily, coverage. This particular site is all used up,.
Land Fill Site Faces Closure according to Mosquito Control Department manager, Tommy Pitts, which
manages the land fill sites. The garbage shown here at the land fill has been:
This land fill site is located east of Oak Grove and is scheduled to be closed dumped alongside the access road to the land fill, making an unsightly mess
within a few short months by Gulf County at the direction of the Department of and making it hard to gain access to the site by those who would use it.
Natural Resources. The land fill site as shown here is just after a long holiday Alongside the road is about the only place left to dump garbage since the site is
week end, in which the site hasn't been cleaned up for four days. The DNR all used up. Gulf County is taking bids on huge trailers to place at the site for
wants every land fill site covered every day and irresponsible dumping of garbage collection, after which it will be taken in the trailer to another land fill
garbage all over the area by people, as shown here, is one of the reasons DNR site and buried. -Star photo


..














Editorials and Opinions


THE STAR
PAGE TWO THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1981


Mon and Dad Face


Re o-n ibi.ltl.


As of the first of this month,
Florida has taken a tougher stand
o- n juvenile crime, making it
-tougher for a juvenile to get off
-e ott free when he decided to show
S-society just how tough he really is.
SOne of the main items in the
bill which we believe will help in
M entering juvenile crime is making
. parents responsible for damages
z up to $2,500.
Now, if a juvenile goes into a
building, a park, or a public place
and tears up the facilities, just to be
tearing up something, momma and
daddy will have to pay up. If the
law can't curb such vandalism with
' arrests and supervision, digging
into the pocket books of their
parents should have a lasting
effect.
We don't have much crime
Around here. It's a lot to us, but
S compared to other places, we are
Almost crime-free.
"We are bothered, when we are
Sbothered, by kids and adults


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The United States Post Office
seems determined to give us the
git of a new nine-digit zip code.
WVen after the powers of Congress
said "no" the Postal Serviceseems
adamant in its introduction to foul
up mail delivery more.
Mail delivery was pretty good
before the zip code came along and
fouled things up. You could pretty
well be assured of receiving a letter
mailed anywhere in the United
States within at least three days.
Oftentimes, the delivery, was bet-
ter. '
Then the five-digit zip code was
installed to put added zip to the
mail delivery and the system has
degenerated now to the point that
one doesn't know when or if he will
receive a letter.
SWe can see other problems


tearing up what has been provided
for the public to use and enjoy. It's
hard to keep plumbing working and
intact in public places. It's hard to
keep flowers and shrubs planted on
the streets and in the cemeteries,
because of vandalism.
One particular instance stands
out in our mind. When Forest Park
was built between Tenth and
Eighth Streets, a nice monument
was placed at the entrance, with a
bronze plaque on top. We defy you
to find even a small piece of the
concrete foundation on which the
monument was placed. First the
plaque was removed. Then, bit by
bit,' the concrete post it was
mounted on has been chipped
away.
Now, if the kids are caught,
momma and daddy can be required
to pay for the damage.
Some good old fashioned "rea-
soning" at home will probably take
care of the problem then.


with the newly proposed nine-digit
zip code other than the logistics of
delivery of the mail.
First, there comes the chore of
memorizing one's address. We can
foresee Port St. Joe's code being
something like, 32456-7892. That
might not be too hard for us to
remember, since we will live here
and use it all the time. But how
about others? How will they ever
remember such a long number?
You'll be asked, "What is
your zip?" You, of course will
answer, "32456-7892."
"How do you spell that?"
Then you're stumped.
Think of the problems the
nine-digit number will cause mem-
ory courses like Dale Carnegie.
Dale Carnegie teaches mem-
ory by association. They would
teach you to remember Port St. Joe
by thinking of a friend named Joe
floating in a canoe, tied in port, or
some such example.
What kind of an association
picture can you engrave in your
mind for 32456-7892? The new zip
code may get the mails out of the
doldrums. We may begin to be able
to count on the post office once
more to deliver our mail before it
becomes history. Who knows, the
miracle may happen and steer us
right back to the three cent stamp
again.
But, how are we going to
explain it to Dale Carnegie when
the nine-digit zip puts him out of
business?


DER Refuses Permit (Continued from Page 1)


lous", he said.
The sludge pond, which
removes up to 92 percent of
the suspended solids from the
water before it is turned out
into the bay is only about four
feet deep on an average, after
*'A


all these years of operation.
The pond covers only seventy
acres.
The DER letter also claims
there.is a decrease in the
number of species found in the
bay and implies that the


reduction of marine life is
caused by the plant operation.
The City is challenging this
claim by pointing to the fact
that St. Joe Paper Company
put their effluent (now 94
percent of the plant's effluent)
.. ... j


Jacksonville Firm


(Continued from Page 1)
had requested that her proper-
ty on St. Joseph Bay be
identified as recreational pro-
perty. Property on all sides of
the Maddox property is zoned


as industrial property.
EXTEND WATER SERVICE
Robert Nedley, represent-
ing St. Joe Paper Company,
requested the City to extend
the water service on Garrison


Board Takes Aim


(Continued from Page 1)
evidence through search, you
need to have an iron-clad case
or your efforts will all be in
vain."
Even though they were
concerned with any drug
problem which might be pre-
valent in the schools, the
School Board seemed to be
relieved at the statements of
the principals that the drug
traffic just wasn't much of a
problem at Gulf County
Schools.


Principal Williams told The
Star, "If the problem is there,
we know it. We can tell just
how bad it is by the actions of
the students. Those kids who
would never use the stuff keep
us advised pretty well about
what is going on and we can
tell also by the actions of the
students when it is being used
even though we might not be
able to find out where the
source is. So far as we can tell,
drugs are being used very
little at our schools."


Avenue to lots 5, 6 and 7 in
block 90, which is just south of
the Pentecostal Holiness
church. The lots are already
served by sewer.
The Paper Company will
pay for the installation of
water service to the three lots.
ORDINANCE
Attorney William J. Rish
said he had been in contact
with the State Attorney con-
cerning putting more teeth in
the City's leash law. Rish said
the State Attorney had given
him several alternatives and
reported he would have them
drawn up in memo form for
the Commission to study in the
very near future.
The City has expressed a
desire to toughen the ordin-
ance with several reports
recently of vicious dogs at-
tacking people.


into the Bay for 40 years
without treatment and marine
life abounded then, especially
shrimp.
CORRECTIVE ACTION
The main part of the letter,
seems to be that the City' has
not provided DER a schedule
for corrective action to be
provided if federal funding is
not available. Since the City
only received the report of
what needs to be done last
month, the City feels this
charge is a bit hasty on the
part of DER, since the report
has not even been presented to
DER or EPA as yet.
MEET WITH DIRECTOR
Tuesday afternoon, repre-
sentatives of the City met with
Richard Sublett, who is one of
the higher executives of DER,
here in Port St. Joe to discuss
the letter and the pending
denial of the operating permit.
After the conference, Sub-
lett conceded the City had not
had time to take any actions
after the study has been
completed. He pointed out that
there is a good possibility
there will be no federal
funding available to do any
renovations of the plant, sug-
gested as needed by the study.
He said the DER just wants to


know what the City's plan for
renovation will be if they are
forced to make any changes
with local money.
Sublett told the City repre-
sentatives that DER would
give the City ample time to
work out a plan and make#
some decisions before they
feel it necessary to come down
hard on the City.
City attorney William J.
Rish advised the Commission
Tuesday night to start playing
hard-ball with DER. They are
making demands against the
City which are not fair in
keeping with the demands
they are making of other
similar plants.
Rish told the Commission
that he negotiated with Sublett
earlier in the day and gained
permission for the City to put
off any decision on a permit as
long as the City is negotiating
with the Pensacola office over
the DER requirements.
As things stand now, the
City will be operating the
plant for a time without a
permit and no threat of
impending fines hanging over
the head of the city until some
agreeable method of measur-
ing and effluent limits can be
reached between the City and
DER.


When You

MY OLD EYEGLASSES wore out
the other day and I had to go see Wesley
Grace and get me some more.
I have only been wearing glasses
Sfor about five years and I wasn't aware
That the lenses would wear out . .
Literally lose all their magnifying value.
SNow I know they will. My old glasses
Sgot sq they would hardly magnify at all.
: I know that is what happened because I
Haven't changed eyes. I still have the
,: same ones I was born with.
S The new glasses aren't much
. better, though. There are still things
they won't magnify. If I get too far
- away from what I'm reading, they'll
- blur the type. It's just hard to get good
Glasses anymore glasses you can see
through as good with them as you could
Before you started wearing them.
Maybe it's the advances made in
Testing eyes which causes the problem.
I NOTICED Wesley Grace doesn't
Examine eyes the same way he did
when I first got my glasses back five
years ago. I can tell the difference, too.
My first glasses worked fine. I could see
Almost as good as new through them.
The second pair was just a little worse
Sand these are even harder to manage.


Get Too Scientific You Lose Something In the Translation


Getting back to Wesley's way of
examining eyes and how his procedure
has changed: back when I got my first
pair of glasses, Wesley had a compli-
cated procedure he went through before





ETAOI1






he finally announced that I needed
some help with my'seeing.
He put a machine in front of me, put
~p all types of charts and used film
strips which projected letters and
figures on a screen, which I had to view
through a machine.
After he did all this, he pulled the
clincher. This last maneuver was the
one I think actually determined what
kind of glasses I needed, if indeed I
needed them at all. In a very


professional and learned manner,
Wesley told me to "Look outside at that
pine tree over on the other lot. What do
you see on the second limb from the
bottom?"


weeks ago, he eliminated the frog in the
tree test and now I have glasses I have
to wear all the time.
I think he ought to go back to it.
+++-


'. '. ,


: '" "*- "; '

.. ..... ... .


"That's easy", I said. "It's a bird".
What else stands in trees?
He triumphantly advised me,
"That proves it, you need glasses.
That's a tree frog sitting on that limb".
AFTER A BIG argument, we
finally went outside to the tree to look
and see. Sure enough, it was a tree frog.
S I got my glasses, and they worked
pretty well. I could see good with them
and fairly well without them.
The last time I went td Wesley, two


THE OTHER DAY I got into my
car to go home and there on the seat sat
a sack filled with fresh tomatoes.
The donor just slipped in and left
the tomatoes and ran. He or she needn't
have done that. The tomatoes were
good and I was glad to get them, so why
all the secrecy? It's true, they were sort
of knotty tomatoes. They weren't
picture taking material from a stand-
point of size, but they looked like


tomatoes and they tasted like tomatoes.
I'm running a sort of contest with
all the tomatoes and other things I have
been on the receiving end of this
produce season. I'm keeping tabs of all
the tomatoes, peas, corn, egg plant,
squash, etc., and I'm going to give a
prize for the best tasting produce I
receive. The winner will get something
valuable, like an old used offset
newspaper plate, or something.
+++
MY BUDDY, Mrs. M. Small,
George Small's mother from Scotland,
sent me a card the other day, all the.
way from her home in Scotland.
Several years ago, Mrs. Small said
I must be a Scotsman because of my
last name. She even sent me a copy of
the Ramsay coat of arms from
Scotland. (The name spelling was
probably changed when the Ramsay's
were driven out of Scotland).
This past week, I received another
card from Mrs. Small, with a picture of
the Ramsay Memorial in Edinburgh.
The picture next to this column shows
the Ramsay which was standing atop
the memorial.
Notice the resemblance?


TIDES

High and low tides for St.
Joseph's Bay for the upcom-
ing week are shown in the tide
table below, furnished by the
U. S. Weather Bureau in Apa-
lachicola. Times are based
on a 24-hour clock, and height


is feet above or below the
mean water line.
High Ht. Low Ht&
Thurs. 809 1.0 1952 .
Fri. 736 1.2 1811 .4
Sat. 751 1.3 1826 .2
Sun. 815 1.4 1851 .1
Mon. 848 1.5 1919 .0
Tues. 917 1.6 1948 .0
Wed. 956 1.7 2027 .t
Thurs. 1033 1.7 2101 -.1


Poor Dale


No Chance

Prince Charles and Lady
Diana aren't even married
yet, and already they're hav-
ing trouble.
The papers the other day
said Lady Diana would not
promise to obey in the mar-
riage ceremony.
If a prospective king can't
get this declaration out of his
woman, what chance do us
common men have?


I,


THE STAR -- POSTOFFICE BOX 308
H w V* A PHONE 227-1278 SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR. $8.00 SIX MONTHS. S.o00
Published Every Thursday at 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida OUT OF COUNTY-ONE YEAR. $12.00 OUT OF U.S.-ONE YEAR. $14.00
By The Star Publishing Company ..
SShecondClass Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 TO ADVERTISERS-in case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold
Wesley R. Ramsey .......... Editor and Publisher SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such advertisement.
A s Willeiam H. Ramsey Production Supt. AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
" WSp William H. Ramsey Production Supt. AT PORThe spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word Is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word
Frenchle L. Ramsey .............. Office Manager barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.
Shirley K. Ramsey ................... Typesetter L


.. .................. . 1 11 . .... ..... m I- -


;1









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1981 PAGE THREE


Amateur Radio Operators Form


Group to Aid In Communications


Amateur radio operators,
better known as "Hams", met
last Thursday night to form an
association of interested op-
erators in the Gulf County
area.
The purpose of the group is
to support a new communica-
tion system, which has been
put into operation by the
volunteers at their own ex-
pense and to assist the com-
munity in times of emergency,
such as a hurricane or other
disaster.
The group would like to
thank Sheriff Ken Murphy for


his assistance in the new
communications project and
invite other interested Hams
or persons interested in be-
coming amateur radio op-


erators to the next meeting,
which is scheduled for July
28th, at 7:00 p.m. at the
conference room of the Gulf
County Sheriff's Office.


Persons interested and de-
siring other information may
contact Dick Lamberson,
chairman of the group, or Jim
Buchanan, treasurer.


Men's Softball Tourney Overstreet VFD


Scheduled for July 18th


The Big Rock Softball Team
will be hosting a double
elimination men's softball
tournament on Saturday, July
18th. The tournament will be
held at the complex in Port St.


Joe, behind the High School.
Entry fee for the tourna-
ment will be $60.00 and two
Blue Dot softballs.
Interested persons should
contact Big Rock at 227-1771.


To Meet Tuesday
The regular monthly meet-
ing of the Overstreet Volun-
teer Fire Department will be
held at the Overstreet Com-
munity Building on Tuesday,
July 14, at 7:30 E.S.T.


ROTARY OFFICERS-Left to right: John Miller, Crawford, retiring secretary and George Core, treasurer.
secretary; Bo Boyette, president, presenting a past -Star photo
president's pin to past president Richard Zyski; Bill


Bo Boyette Is Installed As New


4 President of Local Rotary Club
Bo Boyette took over the
leadership of the Port St. Joe
Rotary Club lastHas $580,000
succeeding Richard Zysli,
who completed his year of Altate Has 580,000
service.
club as vice-president withtI
George Core, treasurer and
John Miller, secretary.
Directors for the coming Allstate Insurance Com- University System Improve- munities in which
year will include Bill Lyles, panies have invested more ment. are located. Like
Wesley R. Ramsey, Richard than $580,000 in bonds in Gulf "It is Allstate policy to we will share in
Zyski and John Miller who will County, according to William support the growth and de- and prosperity o
be starting two year terms A. Holloway, the companies' velopment of areas in which munities."
and Leon Pollock, Bill Craw- Associate Vice President for we do business by investing in
ford, Frank Pate and Mark Florida. local communities," Holloway Allstate Insura
Tomlinson, starting the last Gulf County investments said. "We are a corporate wholly owned s
year of their two year terms. are part of more that $586 citizen in each of the com- Sears, Roebuck'
George G. Tapper was ap- million in bonds held by
pointed to head the Charity Allstate in 63 counties in rr ians Enj
Ball project. Florida. Kiwa Enjoy
President Boyette appointed The companies' bond invest-
Bill Crawford to head up the merits in Gulf County included Past P
Club Service program; Leon the Gulf County Board of Film s of PaSt Projec
Pollock to direct the Vocation- Public Instruction, Holloway
al Service relationship; said. The Port St. Joe Kiwanis grams, which
George Tapper to be in charge Other Allstate bond invest- Club took a stroll down crowds. The cl
of Internation Service pro- ments in the state have memory lane at their meeting wrote, produced,
grams and Rev. Dave Fer- assisted the Florida State Tuesday, enjoying some of the built the sets for
nandez to direct Community Turnpike Authority, Florida .projects of past years indul& tions which wer
Service activities. State Outdoor Recreational ed in by the club. annual event by
Guest of the club was Cecil Development Council, and The highlight of the pro- The films wer
Cullip of Americus, Georgia. Florida State Commission for ram was the showing oft
gargm was the showing -ofGaonBzet


State Insurance Rep. Here

On 1st Thursday of Month
Bill Gunter, State Insurance call 904-763-4601 in Panama
Commissioner announced re- City. The office is located at
cently that 900 people contact- 231 E. 4th Street, Panama
ed the Panama City Service City, and provides services for
Office during the month of Bay, Gulf, Franklin and
June. Walton Counties.
The Service Office assisted Additionally, a representa-
in the recovery of $117,609.00 tive of Commissioner Gunter's
which was returned to policy- Office visits Port St. Joe each
holders. first Thursday of the month.
Citizens with questions and The representative will be in
complaints about insurance the County Judge's Office
can receive assistance by from 10:30 A.M. until noon.
EI


several short films taken at
Kiwanis Club minstrel pro-
grams which they produced
and acted in during the 1950's.
The club put on the shows in
the '50's, putting a great deal
of work into the preparation
and production of the pro-


Ulf


h our offices
* all citizens,
Sthe growth
f these com-

nce Co. is a
subsidiary of
& Co.




Its
drew huge
ub members
acted in and
r the produc-
e a popular
the club.
re shown by


Elizabeth I of England
owned 3,000 gowns.


A SALAD-COOL AS THE SEA


ad.


When the temperature climbs high on the thermometer
and the humidity is termed by all as:"certainly sticky,"
everyone looks for all things-cool.
In our daily lives in summer, everything possible should
be cool. Food, too, can be cooling-like a chilled salad
that combines green grapes, mandarin oranges and pine-
apple chunks with tuna. When topped with Goldfish
Crackers, this Fruited Tuna Salad is a lovely main dish
that tastes and looks appealing to all ages.
If guests (or simply a too-hot family) are ready for a
relaxing interlude and a cooling repast, this refreshing
salad will be perfect despite the humidity.
Instead of rolls on a hot day, serve additional Goldfish
Crackers sprinkled on each salad serving. The Goldfish,
as the name implies, are tiny fish-shaped crackers, flavored
with Cheddar Cheese, Parmesan Cheese or Lightly Salted.
FRUITED TUNA SALAD
2 cans (6 1/2 ounces each) chunk style tuna, drained
1 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons chopped scallions
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 cups sliced celery
2 cups stemmed green grapes
2 cups fresh or canned pineapple chunks
1 can (11 ounces) mandarin oranges, drained
Boston lettuce leaves
1 package (6 ounces) Pepperidge Farm Lightly
Salted Goldfish Crackers
In a bowl mix tuna, mayonnaise, scallions, lemon juice,
celery, grapes, pineapple and oranges. Chill. When ready
to serve, line a salad bowl with lettuce leaves. Spoon in
salad. Sprinkle with Goldfish Crackers. Sprinkle each
serving with more Goldfish Crackers as salad is served.
9 Makes 6 servings.


*Sofa -
0 Chair -
i*.S. -


July Furniture Savings!

THESE ARE OUTSTANDING VALUES SHOP EARI.


Casual Comfort
Durable And Easy
To Keep Fabric
That Is For
Carefree Living


S299
$169
-239


" BUYALL
THREE


$688


Sleeper (Custom Order) 6*^

WOOD DINETTES
PINE OR MAPLE FINISH

a f
Ii4P4k1B


7 PC.
PINE OR $377
MAPLE FINISH


toteementof


Conditional


After the Close of

Business June 30, 1981


Assets
Mortgage Loans and Other Liens on Real Estate ...............
All Other Loans .........................................
Real Estate Owned and In Judgment .......................


$10,188,047.71
367,710.62


Loans and Contracts Made to Facilitate Sale of Real Estate ...... 40,652.34
Cash on Hand and in Banks ................... ........ ... .. 889,674.86
Investments and Securities ............. .................. 119,965.56
Fixed Assets Less Depreciation ............................ 87,490.06
Deferred Charges and Other Assets ......................... 1,420,288.54
TOTALASSETS ......................................... $13,113,829.69


Liabilities and Net Worth
Savings Accounts ........... ...................... $11,517,911.68
Advances from Federal Home Loan Bank ....................
Other Borrowed Money .. ............. .................
Loans In Process .. ....... ..................... * *
Other Liabilities ............. ............ ....... .. .... 212,699.50
Specific Reserves ............... ...... ........... .. *
General Reserves ........ ............... .................
Surplus .... ........................... .......... 721,901.98
TOTAL LIABILTIES and NET WORTH ..................... $13,113,829.69

SAVINGS ACCOUNT INSURED TO $100,000.


CITIZEN'S FEDERAL

< Savings and Loan Association
L of Port St. Joe
LENDER 401 Fifth Street Phone 227-1416 I---


r r I----------I rMittf ir - f -----------------------9S ff9S


---------------------t-----t---------------------f ------


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*Ox*


FURNrTURE CO.











THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1981


Double Ring Ceremony Unites


Kathy Dickson and John Arnold


Kathy Dickson became the
bride of John Faulk Arnold in
the Methodist Church in
Greenwood at eight o'clock in
the evening on Saturday, June
20.
. Dr. Albert Folds, recent
minister of the church, per-
formed the double-ring cere-
mony.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wm.
Dickson Sr. of Greenwood and
the groom's parents are Mrs.
Jean F. Arnold and Mr.
Lucien'T. Arnold of Beacon
Hill.
Grandparents of the bride
are the late Forman J. Dick-
son and Mrs. Annie Clara
Dickson of Greenwood, and
the late Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert
G. Allen of Trixie, Kentucky.
The groom's grandparents
are the late, Mr. and Mrs.
Jessie T. Faulk of Pensacola
and the late Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey T. Arnold of Lexing-
ton, Kentucky.
Myriads of burning white
tapers cast a soft glow of
candle light illuminating the
sanctuary where the vows
were exchanged.
A gold cross flanked by two
tall white tapers were placed
on the communion table.
Two brass candle trees
fitted with white tapers inter-
spersed with jade and palm
greenery and four tall wicker
baskets containing sunburst
arrangements of white and
lavender gladioli, greenery,
and white mums were placed
on either side of the rostrum.
The altar railing was draped
with greenery and lavender
bows with hurricane lamps
placed at intervals. Two tall
hurricane lamps marked the
center.
In the foyer on a marble-
topped table stood a tall white
anniversary candle which the
couple will light on each
anniversary.
As the guests assembled,
Virgil Oswald, organist, pre-
sented a program of nuptial
selections.
After the two mothers were
seated Mrs. Frank Shepard
saig "Oh, Promise Me" by
Dekauen, accompanied by
Mr. Oswald. Mrs. Shepard
also sang "The Wedding
Song" and as the couple knelt
at the altar she sang "The
Lord's Prayer". Wagner's tra-
ditional "Bridal Chorus" from
"Lahegrin" and the reces-
sional "Wedding March" by
Mendelssohn were used.
The lovely bride was es-
corted down the aisle by her
father. She was radiant in a
long formal white gown de-
signed of sheer angelskin
organza and silk floss Venice
lace over soft taffeta. The
gown featured a lace scal-
loped Queen Anne neckline.
Elaborate lace patterns cov-
ered the elongated fitted
bodice which extended below
the natural waistline. Lace
motifs formed the small cap


sleeves. Accenting the lace the bride and Miss
detail on the bodice were hand Shubrick, friend of the
placed baby seed pearls and Each of the attendant
iridescent sequins. The back identical gowns of sof
of the gown featured a row of seta in deep lavender
silk, hand covered buttons dyed-to-match silk
that extended down the back lace featuring a higl
of the lace covered bodice to neckline over a sheer
below the waistline. The skirt D'Esprit yoke. Lace
was edged with silk Venice encircled the V-point ns
lace flowers and flowed into a of a slightly off the sh
full chapel length train, bodice and crossed on o
To complete her bridal to meet the waistline
outfit the bride chose a waltz well-fitted natural wa
length single layer veil of was further enhanced
illusion flowing from a man- flounced peplum and a
tilla headpiece lavishly cov- fabric tie belt. A full


- .


47T


F-.


*;a,',
L


Mr. and Mrs. John Arnold


ered with silk Venice lace
accented with seed pearls.
Handclipped lace motifs were
scattered along the back of the
veil and the rolled hemline.
The bride's cascade bouquet
was fashioned with white
bridal roses, miniature lav-
ender carnations, stephanotis,
Interspersed with dainty gyp-
sophila and centered with a
white orchid and tied with
white satin streamers tied in
love knots. In her bouquet the
bride carried a gold pocket
watch belonging to the
groom's father. The bride
wore a friend's pearl necklace
and earrings, a blue lace
garter and her father gave her
a six pence for her shoe.
The bride chose for her
maid of honor her sister,
Krissy Dickson. Matron of
honor was Mrs. Allen Peca-
rino, sister of the groom.
Bridesmaids were Mrs. Chuck
Dickson, sister-in-law of the
bride, Mrs. Richard Arnold,
sister-in-law of the groom,
Miss Nancy Allen, cousin of


SALE


















C.Jr l M No Dow
with Appi













S TV Souni

Your Radio Shack
501 Reid Ave.- Port S


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rove











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d


De
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aler
I


slender skirt complete
gowns.
All carried nosegay
quets of miniature cam
stephanotis and gypsop
shades of purple and lay
with accents of white.
wore matching flower
their hair.
Junior bridesmaids
Miss Angela and Miss
Arnold, twin nieces c
groom. They wore long
of light lavender with (
orchid flowered print.
featured puffed sleeve
full flowing skirts. Eac
ried small nosegay bot
identical to the other
tendants. They wore ma
flowers in their hair.
Flower girls were
Dickson, niece of the
and Breeze Pecarino, ni
the groom. They wore
cotton long dresses ma
princess lines. The p
sleeves, neckline and he
were trimmed in lace.
colored satin ribbons ti
back and flowed to the
line. They carried small
wicker baskets of s
flowers and wore a band
the same flowers in theii
All attendants wore
bracelets, a gift front
bride.
The bridegroom chos
brother, Richard Arnol
best man. Groomsmen
Chuck Dickson, brother
bride, Allen Peca
brother-in-law of the gi
Phillip Arnold, nephew (
groom, Johnny Scheffei
Carlos Beard, friends o
groom. Lee Herring serve
ringbearer and carri
small white satin pillow
med in ribbons and lac
wore white tuxedoes
white shirts edged in !
der.
For her daughter's we
the bride's mother chc
deep blue floor length
made on straight lines.
the sleeveless dress she
a capelet made of flov
double Gorgette.
The groom's mother w
floor length two piece go
gray sleeveless floor-le
coat with wine designs co
mented the A-lined
sleeveless gown. Both w
white orchid corsage.


-r. .. 1 .


Retired Persons To


Meet On Monday


Marcia Mrs. Annie Clara Dickson,
Sbride. grandmother of the bride,
ts wore wore a two piece street length
t Tina- dress of light green double
r, with knit. She wore a corsage of
Venice white carnations
h Irce The wedding was directed
* point by Mrs. Roy Deloney.
D fully Miss Michelle McDonald
eckline and Matt Herring distributed
boulder the wedding programs.
ne side RECEPTION
e. The Following the wedding cere-
aistline mony, the bride's parents
by a entertained the wedding party
double- and guests at a reception in'
length the fellowship hall of the
church.
S Near the entrance to the
S spacious hall, guests register-
ed at a round table covered
with a white cloth. The bride's
S book and a single white candle
adorned the table. Miss Paula
Benton and Miss Sherri
Thompson, friends of the
bride, attended the bride's
book.
S Mrs. Jerry Shubrick wel-
comed and introduced the
Guests to the receiving line.
The reception hall featured
three long tables with floor-
length satin skirts overlaid
with lace. The lace was caught
up in the center with white
satin ribbons and lily-of-the-
valley.
The bride's cake centered
the bride's table. Three
branched silver candelabrum
holding lighted white candles
S and interspersed with white
*' silk orchids, flanked the cake.
Dainty hand made mints and
nuts were served from silver
S bowls.
After the bride and groom
cut the traditional first slice,
the cake was served by Mrs.
David Turner, aunt of the
bride and Mrs. Lee Willis,
Friend of the bride.
On another table was placed
a large silver punch bowl on a
silver tray, centered by a
single six-branched silver can-
ed the delabrum. On the other end
was the groom's square three
y bou- layered cake. Mrs. Pat Dun-
ations, can, Mrs. Rosie Parramore,
hila in and Miss Debbie Daigle,
vender friends of the bride, served at
They this table.
ers in The buffet table was cen-
tered 'with a large silver
were epergne holding a massive
Ashley arrangement of fresh spring
of the flowers and fruit. Silver trays
gowns and compotes held a wide
deeper selection of party foods and
They dainties were served. Miss
s and Sandra Hardy and Miss Lisa
h car- Lawrence, friends of the
uquets bride, did the hospitalities at
er at- this table.
thing Large wicker baskets of
glads, mums and carnations
Patty completed the decorations in
bride, the fellowship hall.
ece of Mrs. Cheryl Etheridge was
white in charge of the reception.
ide on All those serving wore cor-
uffed sages of white carnations with
imline white ribbons.
Multi- Dana Fowler, Katie Jane
led in Shepard, Sara Parramore and
hem- Karen Shepard gave out rice
white bags. Annette Shepard gave
spring out thank you scrolls. All
eau of carried wicker baskets and
r hair. wore long dresses.
gold For a going-away outfit the
a the bride wore a fashionable soft
white cotton dress featuring a
%e his rolled bateau neckline ac-
d, as cented with a front applique of
were an embroidery design
of the splashed with turquoise and
irino, mauve. The split sleeves were
room, edged with turquoise. The full
of the swing skirt featured a flounc-
r and ed hemline picking up on one
of the side and was finished by a
red as rolled turquoise hemline and a
ed a matching ribbon tie belt. She
trim- wore white accessories and
e. All the orchid from her bouquet.
with For a wedding trip the
laven- young couple motored to
Miami where they were to
adding board a boat for a cruise to the
ose a Bahama Islands.
gown After the wedding trip they
Over will be at home in Venice, La.,
wore where the groom is employed
vered by the Dowell Division of Dow
Chemical Company.
'ore a Out-of-town guests were
wn. A from Kentucky, Ohio, Louisi-
ength ana and Florida.
impli- REHEARSAL DINNER
wine Mrs. Jean F. Arnold,
ore a mother of the groom, hosted
an informal dinner at Duff's in


The St. Joseph Bay Chapter
of the AARP will meet in the
cool conference room of the
Port St. Joe Library on
Monday, July 13th, at 2:30
P.M.
An interesting program has
been arranged featuring Mrs.
Pam Perry, RN, who is
Director of Patient Care for
the Gulf County Home Health
Care Agency. There will be an
opportunity for questions.
As usual the refreshments
will be super and the visiting
time will be important. If you
are 55 or over you are invited
to this fastest growing group
in Gulf County. That is 2:30

Dothan after the rehearsal on
Friday night.
Members of the two fami-
lies, members of the wedding
party and some out-of-town
guests enjoyed the occasion.
Each guest was invited to
select their own favorite foods
from a large selection served.
The groom used the occa-
sion to give the men of the
wedding party a gift he had
personally selected for each
one.
BRIDESMAIDS' BRUNCH
Mrs. Jerry Shubrick and
Miss Marcia Shubrick enter-
tained the bride and her
attendants and both mothers
at a bridesmaids' brunch on
the day of the wedding. The
guests were served iced juice
on arrival.
The bride gave each of her
attendants a gold bracelet
featuring a thin gold chain
with a floating heart.
As a gift from Marcia and


Almonds Transform Ice Cream
Into Spectacular Dessert
.. I .'* H -


escape mne summer neat wltn cool Aumona coconut anowoaus.
With summer heat making baking a chore, everyone needs
a cool and refreshing fancy dessert that can be made in minutes.
This delightful recipe teams up almonds and coconut to make
plain ice cream an elegant confection.
Almond Coconut Snowballs are quick and easy to make -
simply roll scoops of your favorite ice cream in flavorful toasted
almonds and coconut. Almonds make this extra convenient since
they come ready to use.
Besides being convenient, almonds are versatile use them
in other family favorites for an exciting new twist. Adding al-
monds to ice cream makes a lot of sense because they transform
it into an extra special dessert without adding any special costs.
Since almonds are so nutritious, you can serve Almond Coconut
Snowballs confidently, knowing that the almonds are contribut-
ing valuable vitamins and minerals necessary for a balanced diet.
Once the Almond Coconut Snowballs are made, you can keep
them, covered, in the freezer up to a week, ready to serve at a
moment's notice. Drizzle your favorite topping over the Snowballs
for a delicious make-your-own sundae treat. Include almonds and
ice cream on your shopping list today you'll be glad you did
tomorrow.
ALMOND COCONUT SNOWBALLS
Y4 cup blanched slivered 1 pint ice cream (vanilla,
almonds, toasted chocolate or strawberry)
% cup shredded coconut, Sauces
toasted
In medium bowl, combine almonds and coconut. Scoop ice cream
into 6 balls; roll each in almond-coconut mixture, pressing to
coat. Freeze firm. Store up to a week covered with aluminum
foil or plastic wrap. Serve frozen, topped with choice of sauce.
Makes 6 ice cream balls.


~PL crasaG r 18"" -asrnP iaa oI4~


Sale Starts Friday, July 10 thru Sat., July 18
HOURS: 9:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M., E.S.T.
WE WILL BE CLOSED JULY 19 AUGUST 4


Beacon Hill, Hwy. 98


Old Van Horn Building


P.M., July 13, Port St. Joe
Library.

Cathey Thursbay

Ralph Hobbs To

Wed Tomorrow
Cathey Parker Thursbay
and Ralph Benjamin Hobbs
invite their relatives and
friends to share their wedding
ceremony Friday, July 10th,
at 7 o'clock C.S.T. at the First
United Methodist Church in
Mexico Beach and the recep-
tion to follow at the home of
the bride's parents.

Mrs. Shubrick, Kathy was
presented with a table lamp
featuring a solid glass base
which will be filled with her
shell collection.
Ten guests enjoyed the
occasion.
COOKOUT DINNER
On Wednesday before the
wedding, John and Kathy
were honored with a cookout
at the Dickson's cottage at
Beacon Hill. Mr. and Mrs.
David Turner, aunt and uncle
of the bride, and Mr. and Mrs.
Mike Sims, friends of the
bride, hosted the cookout. All
are from Hamilton, Ohio, in
Florida for the wedding.
The young couple, with
friends and family members,
were served grilled steak,
baked potatoes, corn on the
cob, salad, bar-b-que bread
and fresh fruit.
After rice bags were made,
about 25 relatives and friends
of the couple enjoyed a bonfire
on the beach.


--:~;.,~.. in I. r.r..,,. - N,. r-~r .r. r - ; r.., .


PAGE FOUR


t


B I EACON





Classic 60" Wide, Reg. $2.97 45" Wide, Reg. $4.97 45" Wide, Reg. $2.97 45" Wide, Reg. $2.97
GINGHAM PRINTED EYELET Hawaiian Prints Tropical Prints

Yd$1.93 d.$3.23 d.$1.93 .$1.93

45" Wide, Reg. $1.97 60" Wide, Reg. $3.97 Poly 60" Wide, Reg. $3.97 Single 60" Wide, Reg. $1.97
Poly-Cotton Prints Poly SHARKSKIN GABARDINE COTTON KNIT

Yd.$1.28 Yd.$2.58 d.$2.58 ,,$1.28

Cotton 60" Wide, Reg. $2.97 Plain 45" Wide, Reg. $1.88 Single Poly, Reg. $1.29 One Table
STRETCH TERRY BROADCLOTH KNITS Assorted Fabrics

Yd.$1.93 Yd.$1.22 Y,84C Marked Way Down


First

Presbyterian Church
Sixteenth Street and Forrest Park Avenue
Phone 227-1756
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE ............ 10:00A.M.
ADULT SUNDAY SCHOOLCLASS ......... 11:00A.M.
Study in the Gospels, Wednesday 7:00-7:45
Welcome to Everyone
JOHN M. STUART, Pastor
Phone 229-6857


OWN


1-ml-I


KATIE MOCK BILLY G. GODWIN


Engaged

Mr. and Mrs. James C. Mock of Port St. Joe announce the
engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter,
Katie to Billy G. Godwin, son of Mrs. Grace Joyner of
Atmore, Alabama.
Wedding vows will be exchanged Saturday, July 25 at
7:00p.m., in the Long Avenue Baptist Church of Port St. Joe.
All friends and relatives of the couple are invited to
attend the ceremony and reception to follow in the church
social hall.
"Human felicity is produced not so much by great pieces of
good fortune that seldom happen, as by little advantages that
occur every day." Benjamin Franklin



Sur-Way Electric

411 Reid Avenue


Commercial, Residential

.Remodeling and

Service Work

CHARLES SO WELL

26 Years Experience
Licensed and Bonded

Call Shorty at

227-6798





$395 Special


Thursday Night,

July 9

REAL PIT BAR-B-QUE

1/2 Chicken, Baked Beans, Cole Slaw,
Garlic Bread
With Tea or Coffee
Take Out Orders Available

Will Have Plenty of This

Try Our Homemade Desserts



PAULINE'S


RESTAURANT
412 Reid Avenue


Em











Women of

Church Met

July6
Mrs. Harold Beyeo of Mex-
ico Beach was hostess to the
Presbyterian Women of the
Church Monday, July 6.
Mrs. Norman Sulzer gave
the devotional, based on
Isaiah 42:1-9 and 61:1-3. Mrs.
Sulzer stated that as Israel
was the "chosen" of God as a
covenant to the people, a
servant to carry justice to all
nations and to liberate the
oppressed, today we are cal-
led to be the servants of God.
The circle presented a
large-print book, "Anatomy of
An Illness" by Norman Cou-
sins, to the Gulf County Public
Library.
The dates of the bazaar and
yard sale were changed to
November 13 and 14.
Mrs. Stiles Brown will be
hostess for the August meet-
ing. Mrs. John Robert Smith
will give the devotional.

Guidance Clinic

boardd to Meet
The Board of Directors of
the Gulf County Guidance
Clinic, Inc. will hold its
regularly scheduled meeting
on Tuesday, July 14, at 7:00
p.m, E.D.T.
The meeting will be held in
the Clinic Conference Room at
311 Williams Avenue in Port
St. Joe.


SElegant Entertaining is
yours with our cool and
tangy Gazpacho Shrimp
Mold. It combines the Span-
ish favorite, vegetable-crisp
Gazpacho, and succulent
shrimp in a shimmering
main-dish salad.
Beneath this glamour is
an abundance of sensible
eating. Gazpacho Shrimp
Mold is high in protein
(shrimp and hard-cooked
eggs) and low caloried (fresh
vegetables in a tomato juice-
broth aspic). Add crisp and
crunch to the meal with
Triscuit wafers, made with
,Iredded whole wheat. And,
"'esto, you have a magical,..
summer luncheon or supper
that charms the eye and de-
lights the palate.
GAZPACHO
SHRIMP MOLD
Shrimp Layer:
1 3/4 cups water
2 envelopes instant chicken-
flavored broth
1 envelope unflavored
gelatin
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 pound medium shrimp,
shelled, deveined and
cooked*
Gazpacho Layer:
1 3/4 cups water
1 envelope instant chicken-
flavored broth
2 envelopes unflavored
gelatin
1 cup tomato juice
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
2 to 3 drops liquid hot pep-
per seasoning
1/2 cup diced cucumber
1/2 cup diced green pepper
1/4 cup sliced scallions
3 hard-cooked eggs,
quartered
Lettuce .leaves
Triscuit wafers
1. Lightly oil 6%-cup
mold.
2. Make Shrimp Layer: In
medium saucepan, combine
1 cup water and instant
broth. Sprinkle gelatin over
mixture; let stand 5 minutes.
Heat over very low heat,
stirring constantly, to dis-
Mipve. Stir in remaining
Water and lemon juice.
3. Refrigerate until mix-
ture is consistency, of un-
beaten egg white, about 20
to 30 minutes. Arrange
shrimp in bottom of mold;
gently spoon gelatin over
shrimp; chill 10 minutes.
4. Make Gazpacho Layer:
In medium saucepan, com-
bine 1 cup water and instant
broth; sprinkle gelatin over
mixture; let stand 5 min-
utes. Heat over very low
heat, stirring constantly, to
dissolve. Stir in remaining
water, tomato juice, wine
vinegar and pepper season-

Gulf County

Cancer Society

Says Thanks
The South Gulf County unit
of the American Cancer Soci-
ety would like to thank every-
fme for their help and dona-
%nis to the 1981 crusade.
Anyone not contacted dur-
ing the recent crusade for
funds may send their donation
to the American Cancer Soci-
ety, in care of Maxine Robin-
son, 228 Eighth Street, Port St.
Joe.


ing. Refrigerate until mix-
ture is consistency of un-
beaten egg white, about 30
minutes. Fold in cucumber,
green pepper and scallions.
Spoon into mold; chill 4
hours or overnight.
5. To' Serve: Dip mold
quickly into hot water and
invert onto serving platter.
Garnish with eggs and let-
tuce. Serve with Triscuit
wafers. Serves 6.
*Or 1 (10-ounce) package
frozen medium shrimp,
thawed.


414 Reid Ave. Phone 229-6195
"adco il l ,ea fa~ R"


SVets Office Will


iClose Friday


Gulf County Veterans Ser-
vice Officer Fred Kleeb will be
attending a seminar at the
medical, center at Lake City
VA Hospital Friday, July 10.
The seminar is structured to
acquaint Service Officers with
members of the staff at that
hospital who have key respon-
sibilities in health care deliv-
ery by face-to-face discus-
sions.
Kleeb is normally in Wewa-
hitchka on Friday of each
week. Due to his attendance at
the seminar, Kleeb will not be
in Wewahitchka tomorrow.
In addition to meeting staff
members, the seminar will
acquaint Kleeb with several
clinical services offered by the
hospital. He will be acquaint-
ed with the several clinical
departments; the medical
center's role in herbicide
(agent Orange) examina-
tions; tours of the treatment
areas, nursing home care and
endoscopic studio.
The Lake City hospital is the
facility the Gulf County office


Jim McCullough, operator of the Mexico Beach Service
Center was presented in award by the AAA Motor Club last
Wednesday for excellent service to members of AAA for the
past six years. The award was presented to McCullough by
Paul S. Lewis, manager of the Peninsula Motor Club, a
division of AAA. -Star photo


uses to send veterans who
desire treatment. Patients
may also go to other veterans
hospitals if they desire.

Ladies Are

Selling Flavor
The Ladies Auxiliary of the
Highland View Church of God
is selling Happy Home flavor-
ings, available in lemon, clear
and regular vanilla, butternut
and almond, for $1.50 per
bottle.
To order, please call 229-
6235.

Attend Pageant
Mr. and Mrs. George Coop-
er of Port St. Joe and
relatives, W. H. Lavar of
Tavares, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph
Dawson of Mt. Dora, Dr. and
Mrs. Henry Redd of Lakeland,
all attended the Miss Florida
Pageant in Orlando recently.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1981


Classified Advertising Pays Off with Results


23 Years Experience
WE REPAIR ALL
Major Appliances
Air Conditioners
Refrigerators Freezers
Electrical- Plumbing


Summer Is Almost Here, Get Your
Air Conditioners 1 f
Cleaned, Serviced,
New Filter 5
Call Now Before the Rush Pius Parts


DANIELS SERVICE COMPANY


Phone 229-8416


Port St. Joe


Sof



when.


D bunal


Serves


It's nice to earn interest on your
checking. But it's not so nice having to
worry about your balance all of the time.
Switch to our hassle-free checking account.
You earn interest on checking (NOW) with none of
the hassle. No minimum balance on checking.
And no service charge.
Keep $1,000 or more in your savings and earn
the highest rate allowed by law. Earn the same rate
on the money in your checking account, no matter
what the balance is. It's free checking that's
hassle-free.


Florida National
at Port St. Joe


5,"


With $500 in your savings account, you can
enjoy hassle-free regular checking. There's no
minimum balance in checking. And you still get
the highest interest rate allowed on your savings.
With either plan you have an automatic
friendship with Tillie the Alltime Teller. You can
bank when you want to, not when you have to.
24 hours a day. 7 days a week.
There's free checking. And then there's
hassle-free checking. We give you both. Stop
in and see us for details.



a fl 504 Monument Avenue, Port St. Joe,. Florida 32456.
Bank -- -
9Bank-904/229-8282
Auto Bank: Highway 98, Port St. Joe Beach, Florida 32456,
904/648-5896


0 1981, Florida National Banks of Florida, Inc./Member FDIC.
Tillie the Alltime Teller is a registered trademark. /Equal Housing Lender.


II


ELEGANT ENTERTAIN ING


Why be a


N
U U.


Little Girl's Heart
Is Broken -
Dog Gone
Shih Tzu, white and black
hairy female dog. Answers
to'name of Muffins. Lost
late Saturday afternoon in
area of 16th St. Call
229-8094.


you can



relax with



hassle-free;



checking?

g "'S


N.


-AK


'


:'3
i
r-















i












i


Happy

"Special 8th"

Birthday, Kyle

We Love You,
Daddy


and Mama m


I -----------------


PAGE FIVE


-
;J


C,


'
eI~
:
:
;p.


.4 02










PAGE SIX


All-Stars Lost


First Round


Port St. Joe's all-star team
was scheduled to play Tri-City
Last night in their second
appearance in the District
Dixie Boys tournament being
held here in Port St. Joe.
Port St. Joe lost to Tri-City,
.7-0 in the first round of play
Monday night, and faced an
up-hill battle in the double
S elimination tournament.
All of Tri-City's runs, Mon-
day night, were unearned. A

Revival Starts

Monday, July 13
The pastor and members of
the Philadelphia Primitive
Baptist Church will begin
their revival services on Mon-
day night, July 13, and runfor
S one week.
Prayer service will begin at
7:00 and preaching will start
at 8:00.
Everyone is invited to come
and join in the services.

Retired Teacher

Meet Monday
The Retired Teachers of
Gulf County will meet with
Mrs. Lea Johnson on Monday,
July 13, at 3:00.p.m.
Mrs. Johnson will present
slides of her trip to Europe.

An Ode to

Overstreet
We have a fire department,
you know,
We need some people to make
it go.
You love your family, this we
know.
So get on the truck and make it
roll.
We want to help you all we
can,
But trucks won't get it without
the men.
The women are very impor-
tant, too,
They make up the other half
of the crew.
So talk to all of the people that
you know,
Our Fire Department wants
to grow.
This is the last line of this
dit ty.
Fire can kill and it is a pity.
By: C. C. Ferry

Art Show In


Panama City
*The 20th Bay Annual Art
Show sponsored by the
Panama Art Association will
be held August 9-28, at the
Marina Auditorium, Panama
City. This exhibit will include
paintings; sculpture, drawings
and graphics. All entries must
be original. $1500 in awards
will be presented.
Ruth Dryden Deshaises,
Professor of'Art and head of
the Art Department at Talla-
hassee Community College
has been invited to judge the
entries and select the winners
of the 20th Bay Annual Art
Show.
All adult Florida Panhandle
artists are invited to exhibit.
Entries will be received at the
Marina Auditorium, August
3rd, between the hours of 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.
For further information and
entry blanks write: PAA, Box
883, Panama City, Fl 32401 or
entry forms can be picked up
at the Bay Humanities Center,
4th and Luverne or local art
supply stores within the area.


Fireworks Draws Crowd


One of the best received happenings in Port St. Joe recently, was the fireworks display
presented on the shores of St. Joseph Bay Saturday night. Estimates of more than a thousand
people gathered in the park at the end of Fifth Street and along Highway 98 all the way. out to
the hospital to witness the display which lasted for nearly an hour. The display was furnished
by the City of Port St. Joe and the Volunteer Fire Department set off the several items in the ..


mental error in the third presentation. In the photo at top and top right show some of the showers of pyrotechnics
inning, plus two hits, and bottom photo, the firemen place the pieces in "mortars" for shooting.
errors, allowed the Tri-City
team to score six unearned
runs. The Tri-City catcher had
the third hit of the game off
Port St. Joe's Chris Butts,
when he hit a homer in the
fourth inning. Butts gave up
only one earned run and no
walks in his loss.
Tri-City had three hits in the
game.
Port St. Joe's hitters could
not find the ball and marked
up only one hit in the game.
Jeff Clayton had a single for
Port St. Joe.
Tuesday night, Marianna
pushed Tri-City into the losers
bracket with Port St. Joe,
defeating them 9-4.
.If Port St. Joe gained a
victory over Tri-City Wednes-
day night, they must play
Marianna two games, and win
both, to gain the District
championship.
If Port St. Joe lost last night,
Tri-City must play Marianna
again and win two straight
3 games to win. Marianna has
only to beat Tri-City once to
win the tournament, provided
Tri-City won over Port St. Joe
Wednesday.



Plants Need Care Before



You Leave On Vacation


Many of you will probably
be going on vacation within
the next few weeks. It is
important to get your land-
scape and garden plants in
order prior to departure for
vacation.
During a one to two week
period away from home, con-
siderable damage may be
experienced by plants if care
is not provided. This is espe-
cially true for plants growing
in containers- both indoors
and outdoors. If asked, a
neighbor will probably check
on the plants while you are
gone. It is important to give
this person proper instruc-
tions on the needs of each
plant. Needs may vary con-
siderably and a friend may not
have the same type of sensi-
tivity for plants as the owner.
A little time spent in ready-
ing your home for your
absence may spare many
extra hours of work upon your
return. Perhaps the following
checklist will be helpful:
Place your outdoor potted
plants in a shady location.
This may be near the side of a
building having a northern
exposure or within the pro-
tective cover of a heavy
foliage plant.
Potted plants may be placed
in the ground up to the rim of
the container. A thick layer of
mulch will conserve moisture
and reduce the number of
waterings needed while on
vacation.


When caring for indoor
plants, place them in a room
which receives indirect light.
Direct sunlight will dry the
soil quicker. Do not leave
plants' in a darkened room,
because leaf drop will surely
result. The last thing to do
before leaving on a trip is to
thoroughly soak the plants. If
the vacation extends over a
two-week period, move house
plants outdoors and sink pots
in a shaded and cool garden
bed.
Mow lawn just prior to
leaving, if possible. An unkept
lawn is a tell-tale sign that no
one is at home, as well as
being bad for the lawn grass to
get out of hand. Perhaps mow
a'little shorter than usual if
your stay will be long. Water
the lawn well prior to leaving,
or make provisions for sprink-
lers to be turned on. Treat for
chinch bugs and-or fungus, if
signs of these pests are
present.
dive garden beds and
plants, particularly those re-
cently planted, a final and
good soaking prior to leaving.
It will help to mulch plants
with leaves, pine needles,
compost or bark to conserve
moisture.
Cut flowering annuals just
before leaving. Annuals which
go uncut will soon cease to
bloom. Plant food is used to
nourish developing seed in-
stead of production of new
flowers and foliage.


Give plants a good spraying
or dusting to protect against
harmful insects and diseases.'
Provide a good over-all
weeding prior to departure. If
weeds are allowed to go to
seed while away, you can
expect a much harder job of
weeding laterin the season, or
next year when the seeds
sprout. Weeds also rob desir-
able plants of food and mois-
ture.
Harvest all ripened or
nearly ripened fruit and veg-
etables prior to leaving. Veg-
etables will continue to pro-
duce if harvested often. Make
arrangements with a neighbor


to harvest and water the
garden in payment for veg-
etables and fruit.

CARD OF THANKS
I wish to thank everyone
who was so sweet and nice to
me during my stay in the
hospital- Dr. Simpsonw 'the
nurses, Mr. Zyski and every
one who works at the hospital.
Thank you for the prayers,
visits, flowers, cards and
every kindness. I love each
and every one of you, my dear
friends. Thanks to all many
times.
Leslie Spillers


WE HAVE HARD TO GET PARTS FOR BOATS, LAWN AND
GARDEN EQUIPMENT, TRACTORS, MOTORCYCLES, TRUCKS
AND AUTOMOBILES AVAILABLE DAILY FROM OUR NAPA
DISTRIBUTION CENTER.

St. Joe Auto Parts Gold Hat Auto Parts
201 Long Avenue Highway 71
Port St. Joe, Fla. Wewahitchka, Florida
229-8222 639-5711



The First
Pentecostal Holiness Church

2001 GARRISON AVE. PORT ST. JOE
Invites You to Worship with Them
Ernest A. Barr, Pastor
SERVICES
SUNDAYSCHOOL ...................... 9:45A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................... 11:00A.M.
EVENINGWORSHIP ................... 7:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT ..................... 7:00 P.M.


s. In the


Tennis Anyone?9


Before you try to get in
the Tennis swing, stop
by our store and get
yourself properly equip-
ped.


* Racquets
* Balls
* Shorts, Shirts
* Accessories
We handle most of the brand
names you know.


The Athletic House


323 Reid Avenue


Phone 229-6805


ire.stone




OUR BEST



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Deluxe Champion what makes the bias-ply Deluxe Cham-
polyester cord pio"" ur hst-sein tire. t's backed
poyeser cor y 80 years of Firestone know-how.


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6.00-12 Blackwall.
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Whitewalls extra. '5-rib tread.


Pate's Service

Phone 227-1291 219 Monument Ave.


*. .V


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1981


NEW BETHEL
African Methodist Episcopal Church
146 Avenue C Phone 227-1213
Rev. James W. Williams, Pastor
SUNDAYSCHOOL ...................... 9:30 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .................. 11:00A.M.
EVENINGWORSHIP ................... 6:00 P.M.
"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man Our Brother"


T--- --.--


I


----A.











It's The Peak Season

For Florida Seedless Limes


Summertime is lime time
and right now Florida
seedless limes are becoming
very plentiful in local
markets.' This season Flor-
ida lime growers, who pro-
duce 90% of the limes grown
in this country are antic-
ipating an excellent crop of
this tropical fruit. Unless
Mother Nature plays tricks,
inflation weary consumers
can expect Florida seedless
limes to be the best citrus
bargain in the supermarket
this summer.
Both sweet and tart at the
same time, the versatile'
lime adds cool, sprightly
flavor not only to beverages,
but also to appetizers, main
dishes and desserts. Because
limes bring out the natural
flavor of foods they are the
perfect'flavor enhancer. Try
adding a juicy wedge of lime
to iced tea, diet sodas'or
sparkling mineral water for
perky flavor. And remem-
ber, Florida limes have no
seeds!
Food that looks good tastes
even better. And Florida
seedless: limes; make the
prettiest garnishes. When
cut into plump, colorful
wedges sliced into cool,
Sgracefl wheels or grated in-
to emerald sprinkles, limes
guarantee extra appetite ap-
peal.
This time of year low-
calorie fare is always
welcome. Crisp, crunchy
raw vegetables, with their
array of rich color make
beautiful appetizers for the
hors d'oeuvre hour. Always
serve juicy lime wedges
along with fresh vegetables
so guests can squeeze on ex-
tra flavor. For a perfect ac-
companiment try this Limey
Country Cottage Dip. Whirl-
ed in the blender until
creamy smooth this dip is a
flavorful companion for veg-
etables and crisp crackers.,
Or try spooning a dollop on
baked, potatoes for, a deli-
cious, low-calorie topping.
A juicy squeeze of seedless
lime brings out the delicate
flavor of fresh fruits, too.
Summer melons, especially
cantaloupes, take on added
distinction when served with
a big squeeze of lime. Emer-
ald Lime Fruit Sauce is an
easy, elegant way to dress-
up simple desserts. Serve as
a dip or as a sauce for a
medley of fresh summer
fruit. Keep Florida seedless
limes on hand and you'll find
their sprightly, tropical
flavor and cool, green color
demonstrate their versatili-
ty from breakfast through
dessert.


Florida seedless limes give this vegetable dip
and fruit sauce a sprightly, sweet-tart tropical
flavor.
LIMEY COUNTRY COTTAGE DIP
cup fresh Florida lime juice
(about 2 medium limes)
% teaspoon grated lime peel
1 tablespoon honey
1 cup cottage cheese
Y4 teaspoon dried dill weed
% cup finely chopped cucumber, drained
Salt to taste
Cayenne pepper to taste
Measure lime juice and .peel, honey and cottage cheese
into container of electric blender. Blend until smooth. Turn
into bowl. Mix in dill weed, cucumber, salt and pepper. Chill
for several hours to blend flavors. Serve as a dip for fresh
raw vegetable pieces, chips and crackers, or spoon over split ,
baked potatoes. Makes about 1% cups.

EMERALD LIME FRUIT SAUCE
1 cups dairy sour cream
2 teaspoons grated lime peel
3 tablespoons fresh Florida lime juice
(about 2 medium limes)
3 tablespoons maple or maple-flavored syrup
Y teaspoon ginger .
Thoroughly mix all ingredentB irf Wl; CHil 2 to 4 hours
to blend flavors. Serve as a dip or sauce for fresh fruits.
Makes about 1% cups, (AFNS)


Florida leads the fifty states
in the percentage of its
population which, is 65 or
older, but its actual number of
elderly citizens puts the state
in third place after California
and New York.
The 1980-81 edition of "Older
People in Florida: A Statisti-
cal Abstract" shows that there
were 1,510,000 Floridians 65
and older in 1979, or 17.6
percent of the state's total:
population. California's
2,243,000 elderly are 10.1 per-
cent of the resident total there
and New York's 2,095,000
represent 11.8 percent of the
population in that state.
By county in Florida, Char-
lotte led in the percentage of
its population aged 60 or older,
with 52.2 percent according to
April 1,1979, estimates. Other
counties with a high percent-
age of elderly were Sarasota
(44.8 percent); Pasco (44.1
percent); Citrus (42.2 per-
cent); Manatee (40.1 per-
cent); Pinellas (39.5 percent);
and Lake (35.1 percent). The
lowest percentage of elderly in
relation to total population is
in Okaloosa' County, where
only 7.8 percent of the resi-
dents are 60 or older.
One table in the new book's
population section compares
percentages of older people by
county in Florida and selected
other states. Between 1970 and
1977, nine Florida counties had
an increase of 75 percent or
more in their 65-and-older
populations, the highest being
Collier County with a 126.8
percent increase. Only a few
counties in other states
showed similar growth in the
concentration of older people
(three counties each in Alaska
and Virginia, four in Nevada
and one each in Arizona,
Arkansas, Louisiana, New
Jersey, New Mexico and'
Utah.)
A broad range of statistics
and information about older
people can be found in the
272-page volume just publish-
ed by" the University- o"
Florida's Bureau of Economic
and Business Research and


Florida Gas Transmission




Applies for Rate Increase


the Center for Gerontological
Studies.
The "Older People in
Florida" reference book is a
companion volume to the
Bureau's annual "Florida Sta-
tistical Abstract" and in-
cludes sections on population,
income, employment, vital
statistics and health, housing,
transportation, social insur-
ance and welfare, quality of
life, and health, education and
cultural services as they
relate to the elderly.
A sampling of information
in the new book includes the
following:
Income: The latest avail-
able estimates (1975) by
county for Florida families
with heads of household aged
65 or older show Hendry
County leading in median
income for elderly families,
with $12,722. Sarasota
County's median family in-
come for this age group is
$10,453 and Palm Beach
County's is $10,085. All three
are well above the statewide
median family income for this
age group of $8,571 in the same
year.
Employment More than
one-fourth (28.6 percent) of
the black males in Florida
aged 65 or older were in the
labor force in 1970, compared
with 16.7 percent of white
males in that age group and
.15.8 percent and 7.1 percent of
the elderly black and white
females, respectively.
Counties with the highest
percentage of their elderly
population in the labor force
were Jefferson, where 45.5
percent of white males 65 and
older were employed: Glades,
where 77.8 percent of elderly
black males were employed:
Hendry, with 17;8 percent


employment among elderly
white females; and Hardee,
with 58.7 percent employment
among elderly black females.
Vital Statistics and Health:
The leading cause of death for
Floridians 65 and older in 1978
was diseases of the circula-
tory system, which accounted
for 58.8 percent of deaths in
that age group that year
compared to 50.5 percent for
the general population of all
ages. "Neoplasms" (tumors)
accounted for 21.6 percent of
deaths among the elderly and
all other causes accounted
individually for 6.9 percent
(diseases of the digestive
system) or less, down to 0.1
percent for homicide and
congenital anomalies.
Transportation: As of Janu-
ary, 1980, 1,099,271 Floridians
65 and older had active drivers
licenses and of this number,
329,587 were aged 75 and older.
Social Insurance and Wel-
fare: Medicare hospital in-
surance reimbursements to or
for persons 65 and older in
Florida increased from
$532,041,000 in 1975 to
$955,594,000 in 1979. Retired
workers in Florida received
average Social Security
monthly benefits of $298.11 in
1979. Among other Sunbelt
states, only Arizona's $301.71
and California's $298.63
average monthly benefits
were higher. The U.S. average
in 1979 was $294.27.
Quality of Life: With 151.3
persons per square mile in
1979, Florida had a greater
population density than any
other Sunbelt state. Among
populous northern states, New
Jersey had 935.7 persons per
square mile of land area.
Massachusetts had 698.7 and
New York, 356.0.


"Older People in Florida,
1980-81" may be ordered from
University Presses of Florida,
15 N.W. 15th St., Gainesville,
Fl32603. The new volume sells
for $11.50 alone but may be


dIMVl



LL
ERIENDL'

~LLcF


ordered with the 1978 volume
at a cost of $15.00 for the pair.
Florida residents should add
four percent sales tax and all
orders should add $1.00 for
postage.


A
Summer
Celebration!!
We're Having One At
ong Avenue Baptist Church


COME JOIN US

Summer Revival, July 19th-July 22nd
SERMON TOPICS:
A.M. ............ ............ "The Ascended Lord"
P.M. ...................... "The Mountain Tops"

BIBLE STUDY .......................... 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................. 11:00A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING .................... 5:45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .................... 7:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY .......................... 7:00 P.M.

Long Ave. Baptist Church


TED CORLEY
Pastor


1601 LONG AVENUE
MARK DONNELL
Minister of Music and Youth


Continental Group's Florida
Gas Transmission Company
this week filed a rate-increase
application with the Federal
Energy Regulatory Commis-
sion designed to increase the
Company's annual revenues.
by approximately $14.2 mil-
lion.
Florida Gas Transmission
owns and operates a major
interstate natural gas pipeline
system extending from South
Texas to near Miami, which is
the sole supplier of natural gas
to peninsular Florida.
W. J. Smith, President of
Florida Gas Transmission,
said the higher rates are
necessary because of the
Company's substantial invest-
ment in new pipeline facilities,
principally those required to
attach new offshore gas re-
Sserves in 'he Gulf of Mexico,
and increases in labor and
other operating and main-
tenance expenses. Smith said
the proposed rates. would
provide an over-all rate of
return of 13.28 per cent, which
would result in a return on
common equity of 17 per cent.
Of the additional revenues,


Public Notice
NOTICE
NOTICE. IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida, at Its regular meeting on
Tuesday, July R8, 1981, at 700 P.M.,
E.D.T.. in the County Commissioners
Room In Gulf County Courthouse, Port St.
Joe, Florida, will consider the adoption of
an ordinance with the following title:
AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO THE
PURCHASE OF PERSONAL PRO-
PERTY MADE OF PRECIOUS MET-
ALS BY DEALERS WITHIN GULF
COUNTY; PROVIDING FOR THE
KEEPING OF CERTAIN RECORDS;
'PROHIBITING THE DISPOSAL OF
CERTAIN PERSONAL PROPERTY
WITHIN SPECIFIED PERIOD OF
TIME; PROVIDING FOR THE FILING
OF CERTAIN REPORTS; PROHIBIT-
ING CERTAIN TRANSACTIONS
WITH MINORS; PROVIDING FOR
4 THE ARRANGEMENT OF CERTAIN
STOCKS; PRESCRIBING PENAL-
TIES; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECT-
IVE DATE. -
Dated this 2nd day of July, 1981.
BOARD of COUNTY COMMISSIONERS,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: James Tankersley, Chairman
Attest: Jerry Gates, Clerk


$8.7 million would be derived'
from the 36 distribution com-
panies that resell natural gas
to residential, commercial
and industrial customers in
Florida, and $5.5 million from
Florida Power & Light Com-
pany for gas-transportation
charges.


The effect of the proposed
rates on the average Florida
residential customer's gas bill
is estimated to be about 30
cents per month, Smith said.
In its filing, Florida Gas
Transmission requested that
the FERC permit the new


rates to be collected effective
August 1, 1981, subject to'
refund. Under normal prac-
tice, the Commission is ex-
pected to suspend the effective
date for five months and allow
the rates to be collected
beginning January 1, 1982,
also subject to refund.


Stamp Benefits Changed


The U.S. Department of
Agriculture has announced
proposed rules that would
change the way. food stamp
benefits are calculated in the
initial month of application.
The changes are designed to
reduce program costs and
better target program bene-
fits to an applicant's actual
needs.
Rules now in effect allow
people who qualify for benefits
to receive a full month's
allotment whether they apply
on the 2nd or 28th of the
month, Assistant Secretary of
Agriculture Mary Jarratt
said. "This sometimes results


N


in households receiving bene-
fits retroactively and provid-
ing them food stamps for a
period of time for which they
have already purchased
food," she said.
Under one option of the
proposal, people who apply for
food stamps after the 15th day
of a month would only receive
a half month's allotment. This
proposal would save $210
million annually in food stamp
costs.
Under the second option of
the proposal, food stamp
benefits paid in the first month
of eligibility would be pro-
rated on a daily basis. This


option would save $420 million
annually.
Jarratt said the proposal is
in line with the Department's
efforts to reduce program
spending and make the pro-
gram more accountable. Ap-
proximately 23 million people
currently participate in the
program each month and
receive $995.4 million in food
stamps.
This proposal appeared in
the May 22 Federal Register.

"Total abstinence is easier
than perfect moderation."
St. Augustine


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well Witdh


HANNON INSURANCE

Agency, Inc.

The Insurance Store Since 1943


Auto Home Business Life

Flood Bonds Mutual Funds

8:30 til 6:00 Monday through Friday


221 Reid Avenue


SPhone 227-1133


We are HERE to Service What We Sell


ROY SMITH, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent


ERA


PARKER REALTY


Hwy. 98 at 31st St.

Mexico Beach, Fla. 904/648-5777 L


"Real Estate Specialists for Over 30 Years". Call us for information
on these as well as a large inventory of lots and other homes.


MEXICO BEACH. Two story cottage with sundeck. One
Ig. bedroom, equipped kitchen, heat pump and alc,
storage building. Downstairs unfinished. Landscaped
lot. Virginia Ave.


(. - j '.;, -...
.: .. ..- .. ,

WEWAHITCHKA. Mini-Farm. 3 bdrm., 2 ba. concrete
block home. Has extra Ig. rooms and many extras. 5
acres, 6 miles south of Wewahltchka.


MEXICO BEACH. Lovely brick home on 3 1Ots, near
beach. Large 4 bdrm., 2 ba., carpet, landscaped, fenced
yard. Separate brick garage and storage. Sea St.


DOUGLAS LANDING. Modern home, 3 bdrm., 2 ba.,
carpet, ceiling fans, large play room. Assumable mor-
tgage.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1981


Florida Third In Nation




With Residents Over 60


Four bedrooms, 2 baths, fireplace,
good cond., 1466 sq. ft. plus a storage.
shed. Recently installed aluminum
siding. This one should go quickly at
$25,000. 519 Fourth St.

Lg. duplex Each apt. contains 3
bdrms. and 1 bath. One apt. com-
pletely furnished and the other par-
tially furnished. All for $45,000. 1616
Long Avenue.

Excel. investment as vacation retreat
or primary residence. Indian Pass
Beach, Assumable mortgage & owner
'financing available. $3-7,50.

HANNON

INSURANCE AGENCY
FRANK HANNON, Broker
Roy Smith Associates Karen King
221 Reld Avenue 227-1133


HIGHLAND VIEW

METHODIST CHURCH
Corner 4th & Parker Ave.
Invites You to Worship Services
Rev. Paul Griffin, Pastor
SUNDAYSCHOOL ...................... 10:00A.M.
MORNING-WORSHIP ; .................. 11:00A.M.
EVENINGWORSHIP ................... 6:00P.M.
WEDNESDAY ................ 7:30 Prayer Meetings
Nursery Provided


_1.~- -` --


T


r


PAGE SEVEN





' i '1 o


PAME TWELVE THE STAR. THURSDAY. JULY 9. S"1
S *************************
IN WASHINGTON *
WITH

EARL

HUTTO E
C u,.*
: ************ ***********
" Consumer Price Index


I have received many calls
and letters asking questions
about the Consumer Price In-
dex and the purposes it serves.
The CPI has been with us since
1919, but over the years it has
grown in its scope arid impor-
tance to consumers. Today it is
the mosi widely used measure
of inflation, and changes in the
S CPI affect the incomes of a
: significant portion of the na-
tion's population.
Originally, the Consumer
SPrice Index was formulated to
provide a measurement for ad-
Sjusting wages in the ship-
building industry. The index
.'was initially prepared on a
semi-annual basis; to meet the
:needs of today's continuing
- and rapid inflation, the report
is published monthly.
The function of the index is.
to measure the changes in
prices of a fixed bundle of
Goods and services over- time.
Approximately 400 individual
items and 85 different cities are
:considered in compiling the in-
dex. Currently, the year 1967 is
Used as the base period. Thus,
: if in October 1979"the CPI was
reported to be 225.4, that
: means that a bundle of goods
which cost $100 in 1967 would.
have cost $225.40 in October
..1979.
By measuring the prices of
the same bundle of items every
month, the CPI functions as an
indicator of inflation. The rate
of inflation can be gauged by
-: calculating the percentage
change in the index level be-
Stween two given points in time.
For example, between October
1978 and October 1979, the
index rose from 200.8 to 225.4,
a percentage increase of 12.2.
Thus, the rate of inflation dur-
ing that .one-year period was
12.2 percent.
The -.Bura,; _of,. Labor
Statistics now publishes two
consumer price indexes. Each
measure is geared toward dif-
ferent population sectors with
:- differing purchase habits. One
' index, for urban wage earners
and clerical workers, is
Designated CPI-W. The price
Index for all urban consumers
Sis called CPI-U. In addition,
indexes are available for 28


metropolitan areas and four
additional regions.
Several factors may affect
the accuracy of the CPI, and
have been the cause of some
dispute; debate centers par-
ticularly upon the treatment of
homeownership costs. Since
1953, the CPI .has included a
measurement of homeowner-
ship costs, including purchase
price, mortgage interest, in-
surance,. property taxes, and
maintenance and repair costs.
Unlike most items included in
the CPI, a home provides
benefits to its owner over an
extended period of time. Yet
the index treats dwellings in
exactly -the same manner as
every other item. The CPI
ignores the factor of home
value, appreciation as well as
the effect of federal tax
benefits on mortgage interest
and property tax payments.
Furthermore, housing price
data is compiled for the index
only on homes insured by the
Federal Housing Administra-
tion only six percent of the
housing market.;
It is important to under-
stand the. functions -and
limitations- of such an im-
portant economic indicator as
the CPI. It is the key to
understanding the true value of
changes in the purchasing
power of the dollar and ensu-
ing adjustments in income.
Peach Preserves
This week Nancy selected a
recipe by Mrs. J. J. Pickle,
wife of a Representative from
Texas.
7 firm peaches
boiling water
grated rind of Vz orange
juice of 2 lemons
S6 cups sugar
Drop peaches in boiling water
a few seconds to facilitate peel-
ing. Cut peaches in small pieces
and pack firmly to measure 1 I
quarts. Mix all ingredients and
cook slowly, stirring fre-
quently, 35 to 40 minutes or
until syrup is thick.. Pour in
sterilized jars and seal while
hot. Makes 3V2 pints.


IGA CHEESE SPREAD


SINGLES
KRAFT MIRACLE 6 STICK
Margarine


IGA Biscuits .-MLKos-
SSEALTEST LIGHT 'N LIVELY

Cottage Cheese .
KRAFT

Velveeta Cheese.


* a a


ILK


*


*


80Z.
PKG.


4 can
pak

12 oz.
ctl.

pb.
pkg.


79


696


79g*


$169


I DN'TOVELOO THSEGOODBUS.


Hamburger or Tuna Helper BETTCROCKER ..... *
Carnation Coffee Mate .:.............. ".j"ar
1 oz.
Van Camp Pork & Beans .............2 .as
Delmonte Green Beans CUT OR FRENCH STYLE . . .2 cans
IGA Fruit Cocktail ..................... .
I0 oz.
Jp ^ Heinz Relish (swEET ORHOT ) . . . 2 jars
SSunshine Hydrox Cookies ........... g.
SHawaiian Dry Punch-Mix (iAK~nTs .. . . .
Ivory Liquid . . . . . . ..............

.7 oz.
SGeneral Mills Bugles Snacks . . . .
Friskies Buffet Cat Food 3 lazn.
.. . . cans


891
$119.

99*
880

68*
990
991
$219
$149

79*
99c


Windex Pump Spray.... 79"
Spray & Wash .... ... ............ .. $1
lpr yl& Wall.. .ll... ..l..l.. size


IGA
Du2i
IGA GET
Sane
IGA OLD FA
Brea



MORTON

DI
IGA
Grin

IGA

Pet

Bro




Gille

Gille
GILLETTE
Atra


Come to Rich's IGA for the Freshesl


Vegetable

Variety in vegetables is ex-
tremely important for good
nutrition, and each kind of
vegetable has a different
nutritional plus. So instead of
staying with a few tried and
true favorites, experiment
with Marinated Vegetables
and discover a whole new
world of eating goodness.
Depending upon local avail-
ability and price, the vegetable
combination is a personal
choice carrots, zucchini,
cauliflower. Cooked briefly in
Sa zesty dressing made with
Good -Seasons old fashion
French salad dressing,, there
is little loss of vitamins, and
since the dressing mix contains
San assortment of fine herbs
and spices, no additional sea-
:soning is required. Served
with cottage cheese and a
bran muffin, the light lunch
Sis complete.
Marinated Vegetables
1/4cup lemon juice


Variety


Plate


1/4cup salad oil
1 envelope old fashion
French salad dressing
mix
1/2 cup water
1 cup raw carrot sticks
I cup raw zucchini sticks
1 cup cauliflower florets*
Lettuce leaves
Cottage cheese
*Or use 1 cup raw turnip
sticks.
Combine lemon juice, oil
and salad dressing mix in cruet
or jar with tight-fitting lid.
Cover and shake well. Add
water and shake again. Com-
bine prepared dressing and
vegetables in saucepan. Bring
to a boil; reduce heat and
simmer 4 minutes. Cool slight-
ly, cover and chill about 3
hours. Drain and serve on
lettuce with cottage cheese.
Makes about 3 cups vege-
tables or 2 entree servings.
Note: Vegetables may be
stored in refrigerator for as
long as 3 weeks.


ICE COLD WATERMELONS


lb.
* U U U pkg.


HDAIRY:VDEPARTMENT


Bflr,


v -






. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1


'oodliner


RI


I


A


BULK RATE
U. S. POSTAGE
8.4' PAID
SPermit No. 3
Wewahitchka, Fla.


.. Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka


Prices Good
July 8-14, 1981


a I 1 .


Sticks..

vi h Bread


ION .
*;-.*;- 3


I a.. F


2Pkgs.
. of 6


3 3 .*. 3 .


.a sa.. .a.a.a ....a a


sal


24 oz. 7
loaf

20 oz.
loaf


" I I II I "


RtY, CHICKEN, SALISBURY STEAK

ERS o
"l SIZE


Cut Potatoes

WHOLE ORCUT . .

am Pie (ASSTD) .

I Speak GREEN GIANT


eAtra..

e Trac II

azor ...


A, Your
ler for


. : A


2 lb.
* a pkg.
10 oz.
S. p pkg.
14Ioz.
* 3 size
10 oz.
a pkg.


* I '


Pkg. of

Pkg. of
331333333 15


* .


I...


.s from
ie by today!


I 29 TABLERITE LEAN:

GROUND BEEF(3 LBS OR MORE)
l i TABLERITEEE BEEF BONELESS
Bottom Round Steak ,. .. .. ... .. .............
i a TABLERITE BEEF BONELESS
| Top Round Steak . ..... ........ .. .... ........ .
TABLERITE LEAN
S Beef Cubed Steak . .. .. ... . . . . . . .....
TABLERITE BEEF BONELESS
Sirloin Tip Roast. ... . .... ... C.. ..... .....
TABLERITE BEEF BONELESS
h Sirloin Tip Steak'. . .. . . . . . . . . . ....
S TABLERITE FRESH
Center CutPork Chops................. ...........
S TABLERITE FRESH PORK
Country Style Ribs ..... ... . . ............
PREMIUM GRADE
E Whole Fryer Legs or Thighs ................ ....
PREMIUM GRADE ..... .t.
i Frier Drumsticks ...... ..................
SKED m,.
S Pork Hocks EXCELLENT FOR SEASONING ...... ..................
LYKES OLD FASHIONED <
SLiced Bacon .. ....... . .... ...... . . .
IGA TABLERITE ROLL
Pork Sau'sa'ge m m . . . m m. ... m.. . .
SUNNYLAND REGULAR. THICK OR ...
fq *-: BeetfBologna..;' .'V *. '.i ...'i -'..-,'.
G GWALTNEY
S GreatfDogs ..... ....... ... .. .... .........
59 IGA TABLERI
Party Assortment .... .. m m. ,@. m. . . ........
12 0n


* . u each w

Save Money by Shopping Our


GENERIC PRODUCTS
PORK & BEANS ..3ocn ...U.... 3/89"
TOMATOES ..3.3C ........ 3/$1.19
TOMATOSAUCE N. 33. ....... 2/88'
PEACHESN .2A a.............. 6
APPLEJUICE, ... ........... $1.19
APPLE or GRAPE JELLY 2b........ 88C
STRAWBERRY PRESERVES 2. $1.19
MACARONI & CHEESE N.... ..... 41$1
TEA BAGSloooon ............. 93
VEGETABLE OIL, .......... $1.69


cl Avabl In Ti Are

traduce Specils Available In This Area


calIFlda . . .


ES Sweet Georgia

lnicy, Fb. v1iRipe


E.680


... 2/$1

Lg.Tra,$1.00


TS ..... 3a388

k . ...... Stalk 59


POTATOES U.S. No.1Round Whte 1 Lb.$1.99

FRYING OKRATender ..... .Tray,88

YELLOW SQUASH Tender .. LTay88

VIDALIA ONIONSs-wta.. .. 3Lb..88


CABBAGE GreenHead


... 2Hads1.00


Fresh Homegrown Old Fashioned

FIELD CORN


6 Ears


or Bushel


$1


. .... $6.95


138
1 LB.


Ilb.


Ib. $


INNW


THE STAR, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1981 PAGE THIRTEEN

Get New. House

Plants for Nothing


BY ROY LEE CARTER
County Extension Director
Most homeowners are look-
Sing for an economical way to
replace or increase their
selection of house plants. One
way is by propagation. Propa-
gation, which is the word for
reproducting plants, often
scares people, but it should
not. Simply, it means obtain-
ing new plants from old ones
and there are several ways
this is done- all relatively
simple. Many different plant
parts can be used, including
seeds, leaves, stem pieces,
bulbs and root pieces. Most
house plants can be propa-
gated from at least one of
these plant parts.
There are two- basic
methods of plant propagation-
sexual, by seed and vegetative
or asexual, by means of some
vegetative part such as shoot,
root or leaf.
House plants are seldom
propagated from seed, most
house plants, particularly
foliage plants, are not grown
in an environment conducive
to flowering. The inadequate
light, high night temperature
and low humidity found in
most homes does not favor the
build-up of carbohydrate
needed to initiate flowers.
Therefore, few of the plants
flower and produce viable
seed.
The most common and
satisfactory method to pro-
pagate house plants is from
cuttings. A cutting is a portion
of a plant taken from a parent
plant. There are many types
of cuttings, but the most
commonly used are those
made from stems and leaves.
Leaf cutting is of two
types, those where new plants
arise from the leaf blade, such
as sansevieria (snake plant),
rex begonia and kalanchoe
and those where the roots and
shoots arise from the base of
the petiole such as African
violet and Gloxinia.
Sanevieria leaves may be
cut into sections about two to
three inches long and stuck in
a moist rooting medium (mix-
ture of t peat and , sand)
about one inch. It is important
that the section remain right
side up. Roots and a shoot will
form the section and should be
removed from the leaf section
when it is three to four inches
high. The variegated Sanse-
vieria will not reproduce true.
to type using this method. To
retain its characteristics, it
must be propagated by divi-
sion of the original plant.
Leaves of Rex begonia and


other fibrous begonias develop
young plants from their pri-
mary veins. Make small cuts
across the larger veins on the
undersurface of the leaf. Then
lay the leaf right side up on a
moist medium. Use hair pins
or wire to hold the leaf in
contact with the medium, new
shoots should appear in about
two weeks. When the new
shoots are two to three inches
high they can be transplanted.
African violets and Glox-
inias can be propagated using
entire leaf. (leaf blade plus
petiole) cuttings. Cut the leaf
from the plant leaving 1 to 1%
inches of petiole attached to
the leaf. The leaf cutting
should be stuck into the
rooting medium only deep
enough to keep the cutting
upright, and at an angle.
Most house plants root well
from a stem cutting. Cutting
of four to six inches in length
should be taken from healthy,
vigorously growing plants.
Make a clean cut about Y4 to %
inches below a node (joint)
with a sharp knife. Avoid
crushing the stem. Remove
leaves from one to two inches
above the cut end of the
cutting. This is easier to stick
and reduces water loss from
the cutting.
To hasten rooting, you can
dip the cut end in a rooting
hormone. Stick the cut end of
the cutting in a rooting
medium about 1 to 1% inches
deep and firm the medium so
that the cutting remains up-
right.

Christian Society
To Meet Sat.
The Concern Christian So-
ciety will hold their regular
business meeting this Satur-
day, July 11, at 4:00 p.m., at
Thompson Temple Holiness
Church. Elder Dixon will be
the host pastor.
All members are encourag-
ed to meet. Meetings are
important.

Names Left
Off Honor Roll
Names left off the final
honor roll for Port St. Joe
Jr.-Sr. High School included:
Elizabeth Pollock, Grade 12,
all A's and B's for 6th Six
weeks and Second Semester;
and Ricardo Evans, Grade
Seven(VE.), all A's and B's
for Second Semester.


Spaghetti Shrimp Marinara is a unique recipe which
typiies the old saying, "a little fish goes a long way". Only
pound of shrimp is used. This should mean a savings, keep-
ing still another resolution!
For a special seafood dinner try Spaghetti Shrimp
Marinara soon.
SPAGHETrI SHRIMP MARINARA
pound peeled and devein- 1 teaspoon salt
ed shrimp, fresh or frozen % teaspoon dill weed, (op-
1 package (8 ounces) spa- tional)
2 ei, h cookedeggs 1 undiluted evaporated
2 hard-cooked eggs iA
3 tablespoons margarine or 1 cup water
oil
3 tablespoons all-purpose 1 can (8 ounces) tiny peas,
flour drained or % cup cooked
2 teaspoons lemon juice (op- frozen tiny peas
tional) /4 cup sliced ripe olives
Thaw shrimp if frozen. Cook spaghetti as directed on
package label. Cut eggs into quarters lengthwise and
crosswise. Melt margarine in saucepan over low heat. Stir in
flour, lemon juice, salt, and dill weed, if desired. Stir in milk
and water; cook, stirring constantly, until smooth and
thickened. Fold in shrimp, eggs, peas, and olives. Cook 3 to 4
minutes or until shrimp are opaque. Serve on spaghetti.
Makes 4 servings.
For additional free recipes write: Seafood, DNR, 3900 Com-
monwealth Blvd., Suite 905, Tallahassee, FL 32303. (AFNS)


THE ^FINS ULR^^fIT MEAT MONEYCANBUY


:8a~mn~n


r'


0












PAGE~~~ TE TR ot t oFn HRSAJL ,18


New Listing: 100 Mimosa Ave. Lovely
brick home, 3 bilrm., 3 bath. 2 car
garage on 2 .ots, geo-thermal
heating/cooling system, lots of ex-
tras. Shown by appt. only.

528 7th St. Owner will finance 25 per-
cent down, balance at 12 percent. 2
bdrm. plus m. ex. rm. 1 ba. Woodbur-
ning fireplace In llv. rm. Lg. eat-in kit-
chen. Back& front screened porches.
Carport. $17,000. No. 112.
Executive Home: 2 story, 4 bdrm., 2'/
ba.; carpeting, outstanding quality
drapes, ig. lot, fireplace, 2 car garage,
cen. h&a. Shown by appt. only to
qualified buyers. One of the nicest
homes in town. No. 114.


Plenty of room. 4 bdrm., 2 ba. with 2
a/c, gas heat, on 2 lots, each 50x175'.
Carpeting and drapes Included, near-
ly new stainless steel exterior siding.
'Room for Ig. garden In back yard, sur-
rounded by chain link fence. 506 8th
St. No.116.
Lg. roomy, sturdily built older home
with 5 bdrm., 2 be., 2 screen porches,
front and rear, chain link fence en-
circles property. Ideal for Ig. family.
216 7th St. No. 115.
2 bdrm., 1 ba. home on fenced lot, Lv.
rm. w fireplace, din. rm., remodeled
kitchen, utility house in back, new
can. h&a. Call for more information.
527 10th St. $25,000. No. 106.


Owner says sell. 3 or 4 bdrm., 1 ba.,
frame home with a new roof arid fenc-
ed yard. Only $12,500.00. Call for
appt. today. No. 105.
104 21st St. Beautiful brick home, 3
bdr m. -a 0 r Iarage pl=ce'
den. f'Mt b k Lke color
schen M sa late.
$55,000. No. 103.
Offlie or store bldg. One side leased,
other open for new tenant. Income
property priced right. 1800 sq. ft. on
Reid Ave. Owner financing.
3 bdrm., 1 ba. home In good location.
Fenced back yard, gas heat, carport,
store: shed, reasonably priced. 1305
Marvin Ave. No. 113.


SSIFEII


I REA ESATEFOAL I


4 bdrm., liv. rm., din. rm. 1g.
den and kitchen, utility rm.,
storage, double carport, ig.
screened in back porch, on 2
lots. 1605 Monument Ave. Cah
229-854. tfc6-25

Three consecutive lots in
Ward Ridge. Call 2294474 for
details. 4tp6-25

2 bdrm., 1 ha. house on
Wimico St. in White City. In-
cludes window unit a/c, car-
port, 1g. shed, screened in
front and back porch, and new
deep well. Partially carpeted.
Cal 228971 or 229855 for
more information. 3tp6-25

: House and two lots for sale
b y owner in White City. 3
bdrm., ceramic tile bath, in-
.ludes 1g. building that can be
used for carport, boat storage.
Call after 8 p.m., 2296537 or
jay2298344. tfc5-21

By Owner: 3 bdrm., 2 ba.
home for sale. Stone-stucco.
Veteran may assume this
9%% VA loan. Phone 227-1839.
agpgit8


House for Sale: 523 Third
Appraised at $16,000, aski
$13,000. 229-6672
404/375-4019. 4tc7



HEL WATE


Part-time companion
wanted for 76 year old lady.
Prefer own transportation,
references. For interview, call
648-8362. 2tc7-9
The Town of Mexico Beach is
accepting applications from
qualified individuals for the
position of part-time Building
Inspector. Contact Coun-
cilman Robert L. Timmons or
Town Hall 904/648-5700.
3tc6-21



Wanted to Rent: 3 or 4
bdrm., I or 2 bath (respective-
ly), for year round rental. Will
consider option to buy. Mexico
Beach or St. Joe Beach area.
904/648327. tfc5-14


S. Distressed- buildings at-: CERAMIC MINIATURE
ng facotry. All structural steel CRAFT CENTER
or carries a full factory Opened June 8
7-2 guarantee. All parts will be in- 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
ventoried prior to shipment. Greenware, bisque, finished
Smallest bldg. approx. 1200 sq. products, paints, supplies.
ft. Will sell cheap. Call 1-800- Classes and individual
2480321 or 1-800-2484065 or lessons. Certified Duncan
call 1-517-263-8474. teacher.


20 h.p. Mercury outboard
motor. $00. 229-6932. tfc 7-9

Metal tool box for fleet-side
pickup; one set of 15" hub-
caps; one set of 5-lug and one
set of 6-lug Chevrolet wheels;
one 8-track auto tape player.
Call 6485427.

1980 Yamaha 400 special
motorcycle. Call 648-5499 after
six p.m. 2tc7-9

100 gal. propane gas tank,
$50. Call 648-127. tfc 6-18

1981 JOHNSON MOTORS.
Full line in stock. Sales and
Service, Marquardt's Marina,
Hwy. 98, Mexico Beach, FL
32410. 904/684900.
4te 6-11


648-8262
Be Creative! Check our
large supply of greenware and
other supplies. Country
Charm Ceramics, Hwy. 386,
Overstreet. 6488903. tfc 6-1
Used upright piano, good
cond., $500. 227-1568 after 5
p.m. tfc6-ll

AVON
Buy or Sell Avon
Call Vera Morrow 763-7170
4tc 6-11

Single bed, mattress, box
springs, oak headboard. Also
150 gal. drum. Call 227-1234.
tfc 7-2

A single integrated circuit
computer chip can contain
the electronic capacity
of 100,000 vacuum tubes.


Truck and camper for sale,
1972 Ford, both in excel, cond.'
New tires on truck. Cen.
h&a/c, sleeps 5 or 6. Phone
229-6837. 2tp 7-9

1980 Courier truck, lwb,
5-spd., 2.3L engine, white, red
interior, actual mileage,
14,000. $5,400.639-2874. ltc7-9

Surplus Jeeps, cars, and
trucks available. Many sell for
under $200.00. Call 1-312-742-
1143, ext. 9939 for information
on how to purchase.
4tp7-9

1978 F-100 Ford pickup,
short wheel base 2x4, 300 6.
cyl., big tires, chrome wheels,
chrome roll bar. 229-8821.
tfc 7-9
1980 Buick Regal Limited.
Job transfer, must sell. Like
new, 13,000 miles, 2 dr., velour
deluxe seats, am-fm cassette
stereo, air cond., power steer-
ing, power brakes, auto.
trans., dark blue. 18 to 23
miles per gal. $6,995. Call
227-1105, 9 to 6, 648-8328 even-
ings. tfc 7-2
1974 AMC Hornet, am-fmn,
Cragar mags, 6 eyl., $1,500 or
best offer. 229-8176. Indian
Pass, ask for Sam.
2tc 7-2

1972 Dodge Van Tradesman,
100 V8, auto transm., $1,150.00.
Call 229-8000 after 5 p.m., or
see at 813 Marvin Ave., Port
St. Joe. tfc6-25


It takes 32,000 flowers to
make one pound of saffron.


Two bedroom furnished
house for rent on Canal St., St.
Joe Beach. Located in first
block from beach. Can be seen
Saturday and Sunday, July 4
and 5. 904/482-3884.
2t7-2
For carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vac the portable steam
carpet cleaning system.
Available at Western Auto,
phone 227-1105, 219 Reid Ave.

Mobile home sites, efficien-
cy apt. and campers for rent
on beach. By day, week,
month or year. Ski Breeze
Camp Sites. Call 229-6105.
tfc6-4

No need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
227-1251.

Thames Hotel, day, weekly,
monthly rates. 302 Reid Ave.
229-8723.
For Rent: 5 room house on
g. -lot. Nice neighborhood.
Adults only, middle age pre-
ferred. Call 227-1565. tfc 7-9




YARD & GARAGE SALE.
Monday and Tuesday, July 13
and 14. Corner of 3rd St. and
2nd Ave., Highland View, 2
story yellow house. Many
items including 2 bicycles, 1.
3-wheel bike and some fur-
niture. tp 7-9

YARD SALE: Ward St., St.
Joe Beach. July 10 & 11th, 9
a.m. until. ltp 7-9


BINGO, Mexico Beach
Volunteer Fire Department
Ladies Auxiliary. Every Mon-
day night, starting at 7 p.m.
CST, Fire Station, 14th St.,
Mexico Beach. tfc 7-9
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
V.F.W. meets the second
Tuesday and the fourth Thurs-
day of each month at 7:30 p.m.
in the Florida Power Lounge.
tfc 7-2

There will be a regular cor-'
munication of Port St. Joe
Lodge No. 111, F.&A.M. Every
first and third Thursday at
8:00 p.m.
R. C. CHANDLER, W.M.
J. P. Cooley, Sec.
The Disabled American
Veterans, Port St. Joe Chapter
62, will meet the first Monday
each month at 7:30 p.m. at St.
Joe Motel. tfc 6-4

Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday, 4:00 P.M., E.S.T.
Tuesday, 8:00 P.M., E.S.T.
Al-Anon
Tuesday, 8:00 P.M., E.S.T.
St. James Episcopal Church

R.A.M.-regular convoca-
tion of St. Joseph Chapter No.
56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd Mon-
days, 8 p.m. All visiting com-
panions welcome.
E. E. WEEKS, H.P
E. William McFarland, Sec.




LOST: ShihTzu- white and
black, hairy dog. Answers to
name Muffins. Is a female
dog. Lost late Saturday after-
noon in the area of 16th St. Call
229-8094 or 648-5112. ltp7-9


1907 Long Avenue. Well located, 4
bdrm. home, Ig. den, partially,
carpeted, cen. air cond., oven range
and drapes included. Nice lot with
chain link fence, around backyard.
No. 110.
1501 Monument. Excel. location w a
1600 sq. ft. house completely refur-
bished. 3 bdrms., 1% be., liv. rm, din.
rm., den & kitchen combo, carport,
utility rm. If you need more room In a
fine home, this is it. No. 108.
513 4th St. Excellent, comfortable 2
bdrm.. 1 be. home. Most suitable for.
anyone needing a compact home
:with low utility costs. Nice lot with
chain link.fence. No.107. ..,:. ,,
-


MEXICO BEACH
Reduced for Fast Sale. Beautiful Perfect Beach Home Overlooking the 2 bdrm. duplex, very cute, sundeck Immaculate, 3 bdrm., 1 ba. house
trees surround this nice 2 bdrm., 1 ba. Gulf. Cute 2 bdrm., 1 ba home with and good view of the beach. Will go with a wooden privacy fence, Ig.
mobile home located on nice land- full kitchen, fam. rm. and nice screen- fast at $49.000. Owner will finance, garden plot. Can. h&a with an
escaped lot and close to Gulf. Corer ed porch. Just across the hwy. from 1 bdrm. duplex on hwy. $38,500. economical heat pump, well In-
Tenn. & Ga. St. Also, addt'l taller the beach w;lh great view. $47.000. Owner will finance for 20% down. slated, see this jewel today.$48,000.
which could be a 1 bdrm. apt. Hwy. 98 & 3rd St. No, 410. No. 404.
$19,500.00. No. 403. -Call today to see this 1 bdrm., 1 ba,
SBeautiful modern 2 bdrm., 1 be. brick trailer on 75'x150' lot at St. Joe Only $10,000 down gets this 3 bdrn.,
Deluxe 4 bdrm., 2 be. home with can. home close to Gulf. Less than 2 yrs. Beach. $12,500: No. 212. 2 full ba., Ig; llv. rm., din. mn & kitchen.
h&a, canal location with boat old. Lg. fam. rm. with cathedral beam- Real nice fully glassed In Fla. rm. On
dock--I. liv. cm., 2 formal dining ed ceiling, modern kitchen wlJenn-air Cute & neat. 2 bdrm. 1 be. partially 2 lot re nice neighborhood.
rms. and comfortable den with range. Full carpeted. Priced $47,500. furnished mobile home. Come In to- 55 00 total price.
fireplace on 2 lots. Call for appt. No. 12th St. No. 408. day to see this buyl $22,500. Corner
40. __of 5th & Florida Ave.

ST. JOE BEACH
This spacious brick home has lovely Priced to sell. bdrm., 1 ba. trailer w Perfect for large family 4 bdrm., 1 ba. Complete this partially finished
natural wood Interior, 3 lg. bdrms., 2 fireplace, on beautiful lot w fruit trees home w ig. fam. rm. with adjoining house at only $19,000 and turn Itlinto
ba., den w magnificent view of Gulf. for only $19,000. About 1 bik. from porch. .Full kitchen w eating bar. a $30-35,000.home. Great locatlpn, 3
25' kitchen.din. rm., 1i. llv. rm. w beach. Call for appt. today. No. 200. Addt'l 1 bdrm. apt; for additional in- bdrm., 1 ba., liv. rm, din. rm, kitchen,
fireplace, fenced dog run In back, Beautiful 3 bdrm., 1 / ba. brick home, come. Owner financing available. No. garage with utility rm., only I blk.
huge bay windows, sun deck. swimming pool, 2 car garage, Ig. 210. 'from beach. Adjacent lot also
Located on east side of Hwy. 98. Call porch. Fantastic buy at only $75,000. available. No. 207.
today. No. 209. With good assumable mortgage. St.
Joe Beach.


BEACH LOTS
A large selection of excel. bldg. lots
in Mexico Beach. St. Joe Beach,
Beacon Hill, Gulf Aire lots. No. 90.1.
St. Joe Beach-Lg. selection of
beach lots-for less than $1,000*
down you can own your own. Call to-
day. No. 900.
Only beach front lot left on the bay
between town and Tyndall. 168' of
frontage, 164' on Hwy. 98, approx.
300' deep, good investment or loca-
tion for a beach cottage. No. 902.


JONES
HOMESTEAD
Country living, close to town. 4
spacious bdrms., newly remodeled.
ex. Ig. kitchen, 1/a acres completely
fenced w new chain link, dog pens,
plenty garden space, numerous fruit
trees and all close to town. Ideal for
#children, farm or nursery. Call today
on this one. $48,500. No. 109.


ACREAGE
200' on Intracoastal Canal, 3.7 acres.
% mile from paved Hwy. 386. A
beautiful property for anyone Weho
wants to tie up his boat In his own
backyard. $30,000. No. 800.
Almost 2 acres fronting on Wetappo
Creek. High and dry w horseshoe
bank overlooking creek. Owner may
subdivide. $27,000. No. 804.
SShady lot at Howard Creek. Just a
few minutes walk from the boat lan-
ding. $3,000. No. 805.
Perfect acre in Overstreet for your
new home. High, no marsh. Not far
from the Intracoastal Canal. $3,500.
No, 80.


CAPE SAN BLAS
Gulf Frbnt. 70' on the Gulf. 90' deep,
beautiful view with fishing and sun
bathin gin your front yard. A real buy
at $14.000. No. 11.
Two gorgeous dry acres of tall pines
and shrubbery with 205' fronting on
the hwy. and bay. Just beyond the old
salt works marker. Owner will sell all
or 100' on either side. Financing
available. No. 10.
BAY FRONT
5 acres on St. Rd. 30 near Presnell's.
251 feet on Road. 800 feet to bay.
Beautiful view for bayfront home.

BEACON HILL
3 bdrm., 1 ba. mobile home, on 2
beautiful high and dry lots in Beacon
Hill, property completely enclosed
with a wooden fence, plenty of space
for kids or dogs. $25,000. No. 301.
Nice 3 bdrm. home on 3 lots. Fam. rm.
. with fireplace, w.w carpet, Privacy
fence. Priced $36,000. No. 304.
Across street from the Gulf on Hwy.
98. This 2 bdrm., 1 ba. frame home
sits on bluff for better view of Gulf.
Apt. building in back can be rented
out for addt'l income. Call today for
appt. $39,500.

Cute as a button. Ideal for beach cot-
tage. 1 or 2 bdrm., 3rd Avenue near
6th St. Secluded yet close to the
beach, Call to see this one today.

GULF AIRE
Charming Spanish design 2 story, 4
bdrm., 2%. ba., Ig. den, liv. rm. w
fireplace, din. rm., dbl garage on
beautiful ulf Aire lot. Best of all a
10/%% assumable mortgage.


HIGHLAND VIEW
Super nice, custom built double-wide
on 3 lots, beautifully landscaped cor-
ner lot. Storage house, carport, .2
patios, 3 bdrm., 2 ba., fully carpeted.
completely furnished. This is one of a
kind and one Of the finest we have
ever listed, reduced $6,000 for a quick
sale.
COMMERCIAL
Fully equipped store bldg. w Ig. com-
mercial cooler, counters, display is-
lands etc. on 3'/5 acres on Hwy. 30,
plenty of rm. for expanslbn on a
mobile home park, will finance. No.
701.
Business for Sale: Convenience
store, St. Joe Beach, corner of Bay &
Americus. 1,538 sq. ft., 10 dr. walk-in
cooler, paved driveway on 1% lots w
concrete slab ready for expansion or
other business. Call for details. No.
700.
2,700 sq. ft. building on First St. In
Port St. Joe on 3 lots. Ideal for
warehouse or small business. Use
part of It and rent the rest Presently
has tentants. Plenty of room for ex-
pansion. Priced rights Call for more
information. No. 702.
2 fine business lots oh Reid Ave. 60'
total width by 90' deep. Includes 'I/ of
brick wall on north side, reducing
construction costs.

OVERSTREET
Two beautiful 'V/ acre lots at Wetap-
po Estates, not far from the Canal. No
mobile homes. Financing available.
No. 011.
3 bdrm., 1 ba. trailer with attached
trailer, also 1 travel trailer, all on 1
acre of land. $12,500.


648-5011 or 648-8220


E. B. MILLER, REALTOR


IKE DUREN, REALTOR


P. 0. BOX 13332 MEXICO BEACH, FL 32410
900 HIGHWAY 98- MEXICO BEACH


OAK GROVE
A real bargain at only $12,000. 2
bdrm., 1 be., eat-in kitchen, screened
front poroh. Metal shed In back yard.
503 Madison. No. 100.
2 bdrm., 1 ba. partially furnished
home including range & refrlg. Chain
link~ fenced yd. w shed In back.
$10,500. 401 Madison St.
WEWAHITCHKA
Great buy for young couple. 2 bdrm.,
1 be. frame house. Minimum down
pmt., financing available. $10,700.00.
17.8 acres still left oh east side of
Hwy. 71, just north of downtown. May
be purchased in 5 to 6 acres plots.

1 acre with half-in garden, has 2
mobile homes joined, with 4 bdrms.,
and 2 ba. Needs just a little work and
you'll have a showplace. Beat the
high price of food with this mini-farm.
Only $17,000.
CYPRESS LODGE
4 miles from Wewa on Dead Lakes
New Listing: Right on lake. 14 rental
units. 2 main Ig. houses, fully equip-
ped restaurant, boathouse for 25
boats. 9 boats and motors go too.
Owner will finance. $395.000.
Reduced. House and acre of ground.
376' on water front. 3 wells and 3 sep-
tic tanks. Only $30.000.
$11,000 lot and trailer. Owner will
finance with $2,500 down.
$11,000. A-frame river hut and lot.
Owner will finance.
Lots from $4,500 to $8,500.


ASSOCIATES-
AFTER HOURS
PAULETTA CAMPBELL .... 648-8977
JIM CLEMENT ........... 648-5482
SANDRA CLENNEY ...... 229-6310
ALISA DUREN ............ 648-5635
BOB & JEAN FALISKI ..... 229-6553
RHONDA HEATH ......... 227-1782
NATALIE SHOAF ......... 227-1498
MARSHA YOUNG ........ 648-5248


Pool and patio furniture
dealerships available. No
franchise fees. Florida's
largest growing TPC fur-
niture manufacturer look-
ing for dealers and
distributors. Minimum in-
vestment. No liabilities.
Great return on money.
Call 814-683-2217.
3tc7-9



67 County


Maps In


StateBook

Specially prepared mul-
ti-colored publication con-
taining the 67 county maps
of the State of Florida is
now available ... 154 large
pages, size 16" x 11" . .
minutely detailed fine line :
maps. The book of maps
may be obtained for $7
from: Bureau of Maps,
P.O. Box 5317, Tallahassee,
FL 32301.
'Fishin' Holes'
The location of 500
charted inshore and off-
shore fishing spots in
Florida can be found in the
112-page "FLorida's Chart-
ed Saltwater Fishin'
Holes." Included for each
hole is a discussion of
water depth, species of fish
there, best season to fish
and what baits and lures to
use. Please allow 4 to 6
wepks for delivery. Remit
$4.00 per copy to Bureau of
Maps-Charts, P. O. Box
5317, Tallahassee, FL
32301. (AFNS)


S-RI r


Furniture upholstery and
new custom upholstery furn-
iture (fabric and
naughahyde). Work
guaranteed. Call Louise Var-
num, 227-1469 or 653-8056,
Apalachicola. tfc 7-9

Teenager wants babysitting
on St. Joe Beach. Call 648-5413.
Itc 7-9

Psychological Services for
anyone with problems in day-
to-day living. Gulf County
Guidance Clinic, Port St. Joe.
227-1145 (24 hours)


"Art is man added to I
Francis
SAW FILING
Will Also Sharpen Sc
and other Edge
Carlos Miles
112 1st St. Highland
2296552


YARD WORK DO
Mowing, raking, cl
weeding. Phone 229-8
2:00p.m.

AIR CONDITION
& REFRIGERATE
All Work Guarant
Call John Hill
229-6035


Air Conditioning Heating
Refrigeration Appliance
Parts and Service ,
DANIELS SERVICE CO.
Electric Plumbing -
Appliance Repair
All Brands
Norris Daniels
Phone 229-416
106 Bellamy Circle
tfc 4-16
ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work Welding
506 First Street
Phone 229-6803
Machinist on Duty All Day
Every Day


WAUNETA'S
nature." BOOKKEEPING
s Bacon Complete Bookkeeping Service
Including All Required
.issors Tax Forms
s Reasonable Set
Monthly Fee
dView Wauneta Brewer
116 Monument 2298536
6tp 6-l11
Patching and Cool Sealing
)NE Mobile Home Roofs
leaning, Bleaching and washing if
952 after necessary.
tfc 6-11 Residence 64369
AskforRudy
INr.G 4t6-18


Onm


, lF


uN
'ed RED CARTER'S GUN SHOP
Port St. Joe Beach
Gunsmithing Blueing
tfc6-25 New & Used Guns- Scopes


Tu A Full Line of
Best Quality

STUNG OIL

Paints

Varnishe


CO ,tC Enamels
At A Good Price
At A Good Price


Get A Free Estimate From
Professional Painters and
VARTUNG PAINT
and Compare

Call or See Al Smith


229-8827


CARPENTRY & CONCRETE
18 Yrs. Experience
Ira J.Nichols
319 6th St., Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
904/229-235
tfc6-4

Carpentry Work Done
Reasonable Rates
Jimmy Johnson
Phone 229-8757
tfc2-2

St Joseph Bay

R e s id e n tia l \Sr l
Commercial





W. S. (Biff) Quarles
CUSTOM HOMES-
REMODELING


ST. JOE CUSTOM

BUILDERS






--Commercial Building
-Residential Building
--Cabinet Work


GLEN F. COMBS
227-1689
P. O. BOX 456
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
tfc 7-2
-4* --


s


Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151

Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reid Avenue


BEACON FABRICS
Sewing Notions & Patterns
Hwy. 98 at Beacon Hill
Hrs.: 9:0-5:00E.S.T.
tfc 8-6
FOR TRACTOR WORK
Call 229-8939 or 648306
tfc 8-14


Church Supplies
Music -Records Tapes
Rubber Stamps
Hospital & Funeral Flowers
Gifts Bibles
Sound Studio Recording
Service

7-OAKS
GOSPEL SUPPLIES

115 Hunter St., Oak Grove
Port St. Joe, Fla.
227-1325


2IIy ST. JOSEPH BAY REALTY
=F2L PORT ST. JOE


"Ithnk it woas something I oe."



kills bugs for
up to six months,
ond soves you bout $100 yearly
in co sry pest co trol services.
Use of Sprayer free wi
,purchase of Rid-A-Bug "
HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St Joe. Florida


w


PAGE TEN


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1981


Iq
te
:f













Prices Effective July 814, 1981


OUR DOW I

YOU MONEYs
1. EVERYDAY MONEY SAVING DOWN PRICES.


PRICES SAVE


TWO WAYS


2. SPECIAL DEEP CUT MONEYSAVING PRICES.


IMPORTED STONEWARE
THREE BEAUTIFUL PATTERNS AVAILABLE THROUGH
dI OUR ECONOMICAL FEATURE-OF.THE-WEEK PLAN...
/N ON SALE ech TS,
X-^\ THIS WEEK: ^Nm9C


Mety Bef
SHORT RIBS
Tender Le.
PORK STEAK


$149
... 149
.. . Lb.


ROLL SSAUSAGE .19
Market Pak
SLICED SLAB BACON
AU Meat or Bt
GOOD VALUE FRANKS
Lyke"Ameran Quality"
COOKED HAM .....


All Met or Bef
LYKES BOLOGNA ..


CHUCK STEAK
SWIS ShouTEAK
SWISS STEAK


"inM
ALL


$189
. Lb. J


. .


MEAT STEW


. .. . . .U
ni

mBEii


. . .-m


.m.m ... ..m


$ 199
Lb. $1
$ 189
Lb.A


.$1.19

.$1.19


o. $2.29
.. $..$l69


NECTARINE!
BROCCOLI


s 2L..$1 LEMONS
. .Bu99' ROME AP


. Doz.79


NPLES PLbO E 89 E -a1


9) 2 m21$11E_.$


CLOSED SUNDAY
FOR INVENTORY


__C_


I


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Qt. Seneca
APPLE JUICE ...


SURE JELL


a a a


12 Oz. Manco
CORNED BEEF


* .


50 Ct. 9" Dixie
PAPER PLATES
12 Oz. Swift Premiums Chicken & Pork
LUNCHEON MEAT
10% Oz. Jergen's
LIQUID SOAP ...
65 Oz. Arm & Hammer
DETERGENT ....
PEb.FECTIO RICag
PERFECTION RICE


Mason
PINT JARS ..

SNACK LINKS


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S77

Pkg.69
$169

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3/$D

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PIES
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CAKES-
OFEERICH
COFFEE RICH


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1 Lb. Blue Bonnet


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Peaches

3 Lbs.$1i0(
Lbs. r.,390,


BOX .............$9.95


Margarine


5 Ct. Butter Me Not
CANNED BISCUITS ... 3188c


Medium Vidalia
Sweet Onions2Lb.88
10 Lb. Bags ICE CHER
ICE COLD Go. Frnh
WATERMELONS .. PLUM
No Brand 7% Oz.
Mac. & Cheese 4/t
No Brand 15 Oz.
Pork&Beans 387
No Brand 48 Oz.
Vegetable Oil s i


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Cream Corn


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Favorite 12'Oz. Pkg.
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THE STAR,Prt St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JULY 9, 11


Coal Slurry Pipeline


COALSTREAM PIPELINE COMPANY

\ Subsidiary of Continental Group l::


Is Bein
A proposed coal slurry
pipeline that would transport
coal from Appalachian and
linois Basin producing areas
toelectric generating plants in
the Southeastern U.S. could
save electric utilities up to $54
billion (in inflated dollars),in
coal transportation costs be-
tween 1988 and 2007, a study
released,r6cently discloses.
The study, conducted by
A.T. Kearney, Inc., Manage-
ment Consultants, for Conti-
nental Group's Coalstream
Pipeline Company subsidiary,
details Kearney's findings of
railroad rates allowed under
the provisions of the Staggers
Rall Act of 1980 and compares
them to potential coal pipeline
rates developed for Coal-
stream by Flhor Ocean Ser-
'vices, Inc.
.Both sets of rates apply to
projected deliveries of 54
million tons of coal annually ;
from the Huntington, West
Virginia and Shawneetown,
Ilinois areas to 16 selected
generating plants in Georgia
and Florida over the 20-year
period beginning in 1988, the
earliest date that the proposed
pipeline could be in operation.
Allen D. Dorris, President of
Coalstream Pipeline Com-
pany of Winter Park, which
would construct and operate
the 1,500-mile pipeline, said
the project requires the enact-
ment of federal eminent-
domain legislation permitting
coal pipelines to acquire
rights-of-way across private t
property. a
Such legislation, he said, is I
expected to be introduced in a
Congress soon. Existing legis-
lation has provided eminent- c
domain rights to railroads, as a
well as to natural gas pip- M
lines, for many years, Dorris
said.
Kearney's analysis, he said,
indicates that without the
possibility of coal pipeline
competition, U.S. railroads
would be free to set rates in a
relatively noncompetitive en- i;
vironment. d
If, however, eminent- o
domain legislation is passed
and the Coalstream Pipeline is 5
built, the savings id coal w
transportation costs could be a
as much as $54 billion over the i
20-year period. t-
Even if the pipeline were not
built, the report says, just the
threat of slurry pipeline com-
petition following enactment
of eminent-domain legislation
would probably result in coal
transportation savings arising
from the potential competition
between the railroads and the
proposed pipeline.
As the study points out, the
principal reason coal trans-
portation costs would be signi-
ficantly lower by pipeline than
by rail is that pipelines are
largely capital-intensive and
less sensitive to the effects of
inflation than the more labor-
intensive railroads, Dorris
said.
"Once a pipeline is in the
ground,"he explained, "its
cost are largely fixed. Vari-
able operating costs subject to
inflation, such as labor, fuel
and supplies, represent a
relatively small portion of
total pipeline costs. Thus the
transportation savings that
would accrue from the pipe-
line in comparison to rail costs
would increase over the
years."
Although the Kearney study
addresses the first 20 years of
the pipeline's operations, the
Coalstream system would
have a design life of 40 years,
Dorris said. Therefore, the
potential total transportation
cost savings would be far
heater over that period than
the 20-year savings quoted in
the study.
Dorris said that if eminent-
domain legislation is passed in
161, the necessary permit-
ting, financing, purchase of
rihts-of-way, and construc-
tion of the Coalstream Pipe-
line will take about six years

Public Notices
SOLD FOR STORAGE FEES
Know all men by these presents, that I,
Larry B. Johnson, Jr., of 501 Monument
Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida, as party of
the first part, by virtue of an execution by
me, levied upon the goods of a 1957
Number Super Snipe, V/N 88104834,
.black In color, was sold to Mrs. Pauline
Bums, of Rt. 3C, Jones Homestead of
Gulf County, Florida, and In conlsidera-
tion of the sum of $00.00 for storage fees
after abandonment of three years by Mr."


Blake McBride of 7270 Gary Avenue,
Miami, Florida..
Party of the second part, the receipt
whereof Is hereby acknowledged, has
granted, bargained, sold, transferred and
delivered, and by these presents does
grant, bargain, sell, transfer and deliver
unto the said party of the second part, his
heirs and assigns the goods.
To have and to hold the same unto the
said party of the second party.
3t 6-25


g Proposed
to complete. He said the jiit, Dorris said. This
project, by far the largest and which would help m,
most ambitious of all coal growing demand for
pipelines presently planned or can steam coal abroad
proposed in the U.S., would use the slurry proce
cost approximately $3 billion would add 10 to 15 mill
if built in 1981. of coal per year
A coal-export facility lo- Coalstream volumes.
cated somewhere on the Continental Group
Atlantic coast of the South- international pack
eastern U.S. is planned as a forest products, insuraj
part of. the Coalstream pro- energy company.


facility,
eet the
Ameri-
I, would
ss and
ion tons
to the
is an
aging,
nce and


Created For Kids


Exports
From
Offshore
Facility


.~~:'SY ~9~F


/


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Parties are always fun, and no group is more receptive to
hem than a group of neighborhood children. Whether it's
in official' birthday or an impromptu gathering of the Little
league stars, a handy pantry of convenient foods always is
in asset. Orange Party Punch with a Frozen Ring Mold is full
of satisfying flavor. The ice mold is made first. Then, using
orange flavor unsweetened soft drink mix, prepare the punch.
Carefully set ring mold into the punch bowl. Sunny, golden
and just right with moist and chewy brownies made from a
nix or your favorite recipe.
Orange Party Punch
1 envelope Kool-Aid 1 can (6 fl. oz.) frozen
orange flavor concentrated orange
unsweetened soft juice, thawed
drink mix .2 quarts water with ice
2/3 cup sugar cubes
Frozen Ring Mold
Add soft drink mix, sugar and concentrate to water and
ce in large punch bowl; stir until soft drink mix and sugar are
dissolved. Add Frozen Ring Mold. Makes about 2-1/4 quarts
or 18 servings.
Frozen Ring Mold. Pour a layer' of cold water into 4- or
-cup ring mold. Arrange orange and leron slices in the
rater and freeze until almost firm. Continue adding water
nd fruit, freezing each layer until almost firm, until mold
s full. Freeze until firm. To unmold, dip to rim in hot water
o loosen; then invert into punch bowl.


GULF AUCTION SERVICE

648-8251
Col. T. R. Williams, Auctioneer
Greater Gulf Area
Farms Estates
Call Us for Fund-Raising Idea&.




HIGHLAND VIEW

BAPTIST CHURCH
Comer of Fourth St. & Second Ave.
Welcome Friend
SUNDAYSCHOOL ................... 9:45A.M.
WORSHIP SERVICE ........... 11:00 A.M. & 7:30 P.M.
CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) ............. 6:30 P.M.
MID-WEEK PRAYER (Wednesday) .......... 7:30 P.M.
Nursery Provided BRO. JERRY REGISTER



First United

Methodist Church

Constitution and Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe, Florida
JIMMY SPIKES, Minister
CHURCH SCHOOL .............. ....... 9:45A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .................. 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ............ ........ 7:30P.M.
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP .......... 6:30P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) ...... ..... 7:30 P.M.


Gal. 5..2-23


Y'
S TEMPERANCE 2
K IU
u i Ul _i
S 2

GOODNESS

FAITH


HIGHLAND VIEW

CHURCH OF GOD

"Where Jesus Christ Is King
& God's Love Is An
Everflowing Fountain"
SUNDAYSCHOOL ...... 10:00A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ... 11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .... 6:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY EVENING 7:00P.M.
Pastor Ira J. Nichols


EJ:iii;::: COAL PRODUCING AREAS


UNDERGROUND PIPELINE SYSTEM


i an important


word at


...welcome to

Quality Printing
We've been serving this fine commun-
ity and the surrounding area for over
a quarter of a century. We have many
fine customers and we believe one of
the reasons for this is the emphasis
we place on quality. It's, a big thing
with us.


Creatve layout

starts the ball rolling

Here's where ideas are turned into
blueprints. Your graphic communi-
cations needs will be put into a visual
form by our art department. These
experts in creativity will add the
touches which insure that your print-
ing will be unique and a good repre-
sentative of you and your business.


5he


Star


Precise reproduction

is my department


After the art has been created, if is
turned into film negatives in our
camera department. The finest equip-
ment and many years of experience
guarantee that every nuance of the
artist's skill is captured.


Quality control

all the way


People who think that printing Is the
simple act of putting ink on paper
should visit our press department.
These precision machines represent
many, many thousands of dollars of
investment and require years of train-
ing and experience to properly ope-
rate. It is at this point that the efforts
of many professionals comes together
into a recognizable form, and the
extra attention'to quality control pays
off.


Phone 227-1278


The proof is in the

finished product.

After passing through the press de.
apartment, the job proceeds to the
bindrey department. Here it is folded,
stitched, trimmed, and any other final
requirements are added. It is at this
point that it receives a flnal Inspec-
tion. Quality is very Important with


THE STAI

Publishing Company


us. It represents one of our most
treasured assets. .our reputation.
When the job has been completed to
the satisfaction of both ourselves and
our customer, it is packed and made
ready for immediate delivery. All
plates and negatives are filed away In
case a re-run Is required. (This can
represent a sizable savings to our
customer.)
We are proud of our facilities and the
services we have to offer. If you have
any questions or need additional In-
formation, please call us.






306 Williams Ave.


PAGE FOURTEEN


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