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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02355
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 15, 1981
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02355

Full Text














USPS 5184-880


FORTY-FOURTH YEAR, NUMBER 20


THE


Temperature COI


Reaches A


Record LowOW
Temperatures took a record nosedive for The Gulf County Commis-
this time of the year in Port St. Joe the first of sion turned down the request
the week, nipping tender vegetation, freezing of funds under the proposed
standing bodies of water and tingling toes and budget for 1981 Tuesday,
fingers. telling the departments they
According to the Apalachicola station of would make no payments over
the United States Weather Bureau, Monday and above the 1980 budget
and Tuesday temperatures set a record for limits until their budget has
that. day in lows. been finalized.
Beginning Sunday, when the cold was The County normally makes
expected to slam into Florida, the mercury quarterly releases of funds to
hovered at 31 degrees. Then Sunday night, the all courthouse offices funded
wintry winds pulled the thermometer down to under their jurisdiction and
19 degrees. The previous low for that day was had instructed the' various
in 1962, when a low of 27 degrees was agencies to work under the
recorded. 1980 budget limits until a new
Monday night saw the temperature dip budget is finalized and tax
even further to 17 degrees, besting the bills sent out.
previous record of 24 degrees for that day in Both the Tax Collector and
1962. Property Appraiser had re-
Wednesday, the reading was still a cool 45 quested that their January
degrees. draw be on the basis of their
The icy winds froze water pipes, wilted requested budget rather than
poinsettias and other tender flowers and the lesser amount of last
caused heaters to work overtime. For the first year's quarterly budget.
time in several years, Pattons Bayou at the Commissioner Doug Bir-
south edge of the city limits was frozen over, mingham observed, "All de-
but not hard enough for anyone to ice skate. apartments were instructed to
The unseasonably cold weather was get- by with their interim
caused by a Siberian cold air mass which .buIdget until we get this budget
slammed into the eastern part of the United matter settled. The interim
-States, stretching from the Canadian border budget should be binding
to Key West, with freezing temperatures without having to come back
reported even as far south as Miami. to us until a new budget is
Don't put your coats away yet, as there is set."
Ice covered branches on a tree Tuesday morning after hard freeze still more to come, according to the weather Commissioner Gortman
Monday night. -Star photo reports. said, "We can't give some-
thing we don't know we will
have."
Birmingham said the Coun-
ty is bound to treat all offices
Bdalike, and he didn't see how
Other county could come up with
.the funds to give a quarterly
BrC draw to all departments based
S their newbudget request at
The ~Board -of .Dir~tors .of T a.Hah&osee.-emOeria4& Re.- -HpiteIe.-'of -America;-'toiv- -- local use vf c fPor tilr "tlfg-'t1lrme. TA X-blg-ttfH-"
Municipal Hospital will meet gional Medical Center and an plolte Afays of improving, area. haven't been sent out and
today with representatives of. executive'of the Voluntary upgrading and encouraging The Board with T. probably won't be until some
M. Mustian, administrator of
TMII and Ed Timmermon, a
consultant for the VHA.


Rescue workers remove Daryl Ward and pronounced dead
Robert Carlson from the two-car collision on hospital.
Highway 98 last Friday night. Carlson was


on arrival at Tyndall
-Star photo


4Bay County Man Killed, Local

Man Hurt In Hwy. 98 Wreck


A Port St. Joe man was
taken to a Bay County hospital
with fractures, cuts and ab-
rasions and faces charges of
driving on the wrong side of
the road in an accident Friday
night in which a Bay County
man was killed.
According to Florida High-
way Patrol Trooper Herschel
Hill, Daryl Ward, 23, of Port
St. Joe was injured when his
car crashed head-on into a
second vehicle driven by


Robert Carlson, 26, of Panama
City. Carlson was killed by the
crash.
Hill said his investigation
showed Ward was travelling
toward Panama City about
three miles west of Mexico
Beach on Highway 98, when
his car struck the Carlson
vehicle, which was travelling
toward Port St. Joe. The
accident happened at ap-
proximately 10:15 p.m.
Hill said indications are that


Ward's vehicle was on the
wrong side of the road at the
time of the accident.
Carlson was taken to Tyn-
dall Air Force Base hospital
by a Tyndall rescue team and
pronounced dead on arrival by
doctors there.
Ward was taken to Bay
County by Pori St. Joe Volun-
teer Ambulance Squad, where
he was treated for his injuries
and hospitalized.


For the past two years, the
Board has explored various
ways to make the local
hospital more attractive and
more effective for meeting
area medical needs, as well as
trying to arrange for the
hospital to pay its own opera-
tlons.
Mustian and Timmermon
are being brought in to get a
fresh viewpoint of the opera-
tion here and give the Board
the advantage of their consid-
erable experience in hospital
management.
The team will tour the
hospital, examining all facets
of the operation, making a
thorough study of the com-
plete operation.
The meeting will take up
most of the morning today,
with a discussion period be-
tween the visitors and the
Board over lunch.
The Board has expressed as
its aim improvement of the
local hospital and its services,
already on a par or above the
operations of most hospitals
the size of Municipal in the
state of Florida.
The meeting today is ex-
pected to be the first of several
with experts in the hospital
field to be conducted over the
next several months.

Clerk's Office

Open At Noon
Jerry T. Gates, Clerk of the
Circuit Court, announced'.this
week that the Office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, will
be open to the public between
the hours of 12:00 and 1:00
p.m., E.S.T., Monday through
Friday. The office had pre-
viously been closing during
the lunch hour, but will be
open now to better serve the
public.


Ward Ridge Asks Suit Be Dropped


Attorneys for the City of
Ward Ridge filed a request for
dismissing a petition which
has been placed before the
courts to dissolve the city
Charter of Ward Ridge. The
petition was filed in Gulf
County Circuit Court last
Wednesday to quash the at-
tempt to dissolve the Ward
Ridge city charter and make it
just another community in the


county..
Proceedings had been initia-
ted by a petition submitted on
behalf of several residents of
the small community in
March of. last year and
hearings on the matter were
set up by the Department of
Community Affairs in June of
last year.
In asking that the proceed-
ings be dismissed, the Ward


Ridge city attorneys cited in
their petition that the initiat-
ing pleadings themselves
were insufficient and not in
accordance with several Flor-
ida statutes.
The petition to dismiss also
states that signatures and
addresses of the signors of the
petition do not show that the
signatures and addresses of
those signing have been veri-


fied with the voting list of Gulf
County.
In filing their petition, the
attorneys also asked that a
summary judgment also be
given in favor of maintaining
the City of Ward Ridge on the
grounds that the petition to
dissolve the City was not
according to Florida law and
cites several statute chapters
as evidence for their claim.


STAR


20' Per Copy


0


mission Turns




n Fund Advance


time in February. Until that
time, the county is operating
on a bare minimum of funds.
Clerk Jerry Gates also
observed that if an advance is
given now and cuts are made


The County received an-
other promise this week, but it
was a promise that no re-
surfacing of Highway 71 would
be done in the near future.
A letter from Senator Pat


"'Until we set millage and adopt a
figure, we still don't have a budget
... to disburse funds from."
-Birmingham


in the final budget, the Board
would face problems in the
future.
Birmingham agreed with
Gates saying, "Until we set
village and adopt a figure, we
still don't have a budget."
NO PAVING
For the past six or seven
years, the County Commission,
has been putting the finger on
the' Florida Department of
Transportation to re-surface
Highway 71 from Cypress
Creek to Blountstown. On
more than one occasion, the
county has been promised that
this will be done.


Thomas informed the Board
that there was no money
available to do the job at
present.
This means Highway 71 will
continue to deteriorate for the
near future at least.
In other traffic matters, a
letter from the Department of
Transportation informed the
county a traffic light was not
needed at the intersection of
Highway 22 and Highway 71 in
Wewahitchka.
The county had asked that a
survey for the light be made
by the DOT.


PURCHASE
The County Commission had
to make its second emergency
purchase in the past two
months Tuesday. Two months
ago, the Board had to pur-
chase 'an ambulance for the
Wewahitchka Squad when one
of their vehicles became in-
operable and the second am-
bulance undependable. The
Board purchased a vehicle
directly in an emergency
situation to get an ambulance
back in service in the north
end of the county.
Two weeks ago, the same
thing happened to one of the
ambulances serving the Port
.St. Joe area, and Tuesday,
Commissioner Doug Birming-
ham made the motion, sec-
onded by Jimmy Gortman and
passed unanimously to go
through the same emergency
procedure and put a new
vehicle on the road in south
Gulf County.
The Commission was plan-
ning to purchase a new vehicle
for south Gulf during the fiscal
year, but the problems with
the old vehicle speeded up
their plans.


FFS Has Seedlings Available


Friday, January 16, is ARBOR DAY in
Florida.
The Panama District, Division of Forestry,
will offer seedling packets for sale again this
year on ARBOR DAY, beginning at 9:oo a.m.,
in Bay, Gulf, Calhoun, Liberty, and Franklin
-Coaetie-sPacketwiicontain {our varieties.
two seedlings of each species.
Each packet is priced at $1.00.


"Miss Zola" sports her new "Shark" hat, and holds'
a bouquet, while her son, Dave, holds a plaque presented
her last Friday. With the honoree are her granddaugh-


Packets will be on sale at Reid Avenue at
State Road No. 71 'in Port St. Joe.
Purchases will be. limited to two packets
per customer in order to reach maximum
number of customers. Packets not sold on
- Arbo.BDay-wil be seld-the following week at
the Panama District Headquarters, 715 W.
15th Street in Panama City.


ter, Eva Maddox and Waylon Graham, Quarterback
Club president.


"Miss Zola" Maddox was 91 years of age Saturday,
and she still owns a season ticket to the Shark football
games, with her seat on the very top row of 'Shark
stadium. She still attends every home game, unless, of.
course, the weather is too cold or too bad for her son,
Dave, to get out and take her to the ball game. "Miss
Zola" doesn't drive after dark anymore.
This interest in her local schools and their activities
earned her the designation as "Number One Fan" of the
Sharks last Friday in a short ceremony prior to the
basketball game with Florida High School. The
presentation of a plaque, a purple hat to replace her
ever-present black one and a large bouquet of flowers
were presented to "Miss Zola" by the Quarterback Club
president, Waylon Graham, prior to the game, which
was played at 12:30 last Friday before the entire student
body.
The students expressed their appreciation for "Miss
Zola's" support by giving her a standing ovation for her
interest.
"Miss Zola" has been interested in Port St. Joe
schools for a long time. She started teaching here in 1915
as a young lady on her first teaching assignment. When
the principal of her school went to World War I in 1917,
she took over that position.
She left Port St. Joe for three years in 1917, to teach


in other Northwest Florida communities. She married in
1920 and came back to Port St. Joe and started teaching
again in the local schools in 1926. She taught
continuously through the late 1930's. After her
retirement in the late '30's, she taught and substituted in
the county school system until she was 70 years old. In
1938, her son played on the first football team and played
in the first band Port St. Joe High School ever had.
"Miss Zola" and her husband, the late Fred
Maddox, have lived in the same location since their
marriage.
In her first teaching assignments, grades one
through eight were taught in the same room. In her early
days, her pay was $25.00 per month and $8.00 of that was
used to pay room and board.
The quarterback club presented "Miss Zola" with
a large bronze plaque for her dedication to the school
functions which was inscribed, "Presented to Mrs. Zola
Maddox Number one Port St. Joe High School Shark
football fan, by the Port St. Joe High School Quarterback
Club, January, 1981."
The faculty, staff and student body of the high school
presented her with a bouquet, with the presentation
being made by Principal Edwin Williams.
A purple hat with a big "S" emblem on the front
was presented to "Miss Zola" by David Bray.


Industry Deep Water Port Fine People Safest Beaches in Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1981


Sharks Number 1 Fan


Still Attends Every Game at At Age 91


L











SEditorials and Opinions


THE STAR
PAGE TWO THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1981


School Is A Waste of Time If Students Don't Learn


Nationally syndicated columnist James
Kilpatrick came to the defense of Florida's
secondary school students last week in a
scathing article which was labeled, "Dis-
patches from the Loony Front", and labled as
lunacy the present attempt in court to strike
down Florida's requirement that high school
students be able, to pass the student
assessment test before he or she (black or
white) receives a diploma.
Kilpatrick said, "Down in Florida, the
Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals is
considering whether the state can require of
: its high school graduates, as a condition for
receiving a diploma, that they be able to read,
write and do elementary numbers."
Florida's test would measure competency
in certain basic skills, as Kilpatrick puts it,
"like reading an application for a driver's
license or making change from a $10 bill."
Most students can probably count change
from a $10 bill, but we feel the rub comes in
reading the written problem on the exam
which asks the question concerning how much
change should be given back from a $10 bill
after a certain purchase. The students cannot
- read-a basic in any endeavor in these United
States.
Florida's students have four chances to
pass the test. If they fail at every shot, they


can return to high school for a fifth year of
study, or they could settle for a certificate of
completion instead of a diploma. Most parents
today had to make passing grades to receive a
diploma, without the aid of special tests.
Florida's students also receive special
remedial classes for those portions of the test
they cannot pass. So, every opportunity is
made to prepare the student for and see that
he' passes the test.
Kilpatrick calls the Florida test "a model


of moderation." This means, in his viewpoint,
that the test is really too easy as a standard of
requirement.
Kilpatrick ends his piece on Florida by
stating, "In this field of racial equality, reason
has yielded to nuttiness. Attorneys for black
students have challenged the law, on the
grounds that some of the black seniors
attended segregated second-grade classrooms.
10 years ago. Therefore it is unfair and
discriminatory to ask them today to subtract


$7.62 from $10.00. So cruel a requirement may
affect their hearts and minds in a way unlikely
ever to be undone. Diplomas, everyone?"
Mr. Kilpatrick stated what a lot of people,
both black and white have been thinking but
couldn't put into words so succinctly. What is
the use to go to school for 12 years, if, at the
end of that period of time, a student cannot
reasonably be expected to be able to do
elementary reading, writing and arithmetic
before he is awarded a diploma?


Several Events Are Responsiblefor High Taxes


From what we read in area newspapers,
Gulf County tax payers aren't going to be the
only ones in Florida who are in for a surprise
when they get their tax bills this year. It
seems the other shoe has fallen in almost
every county in Florida. We have been
reading about the same problem which Gulf
faces up in Calhoun county for the past month
or two. The people up there are unhappy.
We can appreciate the feeling. When
people voted in October to put a $15,000,
homestead exemption in the Constitution, they
flocked to the polls in droves, figuring a vote


for the amendment would all but eliminate
taxes against their homestead. The fine print,
which most people failed to read, pointed out
that the exemption could only be applied after
a piece of property was put on the valuation
rolls at 100 percent of market 'value. Then
along came the State Revenue Department,
under orders from Governor Bob Graham and
refused to accept any assessment roll which
wasn't up to their definition of fair value.

There lies the culprit.
One paper we read even went so far as to


ponder on just what the tax question in Florida
this year would do.for the Governor's chances
at re-election next year. When next year's
election rolls around, the ink will hardly be
dry on the second check for high taxes
generated from high property values when the
Governor must toss his hat in the ring or step
down.
We just thought we had an interesting
election in 1980 just wait until 1982. We
predict the chore of paying taxes is going to
gain the attention of voters as to qualifications
around election time, rather than popularity.


Watching the World Go By -


Bible Prescribes Penalty


By Adolph Bedsole
Pastor, Wewahitchka
First Baptist Church
:A recent news article re-
vealed that opponents of the
death penalty are marshalling
all their forces and froth in a
revived crusade against the
death penalty for any and all
crimes. No new arguments
can be made against the death
penalty they have been
worn threadbare over the
years. So, America can expect
only the same old frothy
broken record.
One favorite worn out cliche
which they are polishing ,and
brandishing again is that THE
DEATH PENALTY IS BAR-
BARIC. The implication is
that those who favor it or
implement it are BARBAR-
IANS. Why not take an honest
look at this charge?
Really, this insidious charge
is a blatent assault on God!
But, the hurlers of this charge
lack the intestinal fortitude to
be honest and say that their
charge brands God as bar-
baric.
Two Bible accounts reveal
.God as the one who executed
people in the flood and at
Sodom. The Bible also pre-
scribes the death penalty in
the Old Testament for a
number of sins and crimes.
Do the opponents of the
death penalty today dare call
God a BARBARIAN, or ony of
his acts BARBARIC? This is
exactly what they are doing -


but in a sneaky sort of way. A
logical examination of this
argument reveals that, to be
honest and consistent, they
MUST believe that of God
also. But they haven't had the
courage to say it yet! They
will!
Apparently, in all their
pray-ins, sit-ins, sleep-ins,
candlelight vigils and
marches, little or no concern
is given to the victims and
their families. Murder, tor-
ture, rape, dismemberment of
bodies and other heinous,
BARBARIC and atrocious act,
:- gets nary a tear, nor. a
candle, nor a prayer for the
VICTIM as they perform to
the grandstands of the news
media.


The American people are
fed up with the mad slaughter
of hundreds of men, women
and children every year.
Ultimately, the thinking of the
people will revail.
So, as you watch the world
go by in the next two decades,
try to answer two questions:
What is more barbaric than
for a group of people to
completely ignore a little girl
who is brutally raped re-
peatedly, dies slowly and then
her body is cut up and thrown
is a garbage can then for
that group to demand that the
barbarian who did it, be
delivered from the death
penalty?
Just who is being barbaric
in this issue?


Getting to Know You


Dear Editor,
As I reflect over the last six
months that we have lived in
Port St. Joe my heart is full of
gratitude toward all the
wonderful people wo have
met. I can't tell you how
pleasently surprised we were
to find the folks here so
friendly and helpful.
Where else can you find a
town where the sheriffs wave
at you as they pass? Or such a
small community having
Napa's first stock-computer
in the state of Florida. Such
warmth and efficiency makes
us very happy to be here.


Thanks to the churches that
welcomed our. visits. Thanks
to new friends that would call
or visit before we felt lonely.
Thanks to the students that
made our daughter feel wel-
come. Thanks to all those
people that have helped, and
continue to help, us make this
our home.
It was no surprise, to me, to
find that while I spent Christ-
mas in Arkansas I was
homesick for Port St. Joe. I
and my family look forward to
getting to know more of you.
A Newcomer


Monday's record low temperatures (for January 12) almost made an ice
skating rink out of Patton's Bayou near the Hospital Tuesday morning. The
temperature dipped to 17 degrees Monday night, glazing the bayou over with
ice. It isn't a novelty around here for small bodies of water to freeze on occasion
in the winter time, but when the bayou freezes over, it's cold! Even though the


small creek was frozen over, there were no takers for an ice skating party. The
reason for this was that the icy winds whipping in across the bay would do the
same thing to fingers and toes that it did to the water. Besides, the ice wasn't
thick enough. -Star photo


January Half Gone... Racing Toward the Dreary Month of February


DON'T LOOK NOW but today
marks the middle of the first month of
the new year of 1981. That means half of
the first month of the year is already
gone. I thought last year whizzed by,
but this one has already started off in
overdrive:
We're going to have to do some-
thing to slow things down. I'm going to
get back up on my soap-box and lobby
for an eight day week. With an eight
day week, rather than two weeks of
January gone, we would still be less
than two weeks into the month, and I'd
feel a little more comfortable about the
whole thing.
With an eight-day week, we could
all have an extra day each week off
from work. If we're going to go to all the
trouble to put another day in the week,
there's no use to waste it by making it a
work day. That's my problem now; it
takes too many work days each week to
keep the bills paid and I don't get
enough time to get my garden ready for
spring.
One remedy for the fast-moving
months was made by some writer the
other day in one of the dailies when he
supported doing away with the month


of February and dividing up the days in
February among the other months.
That would work fine, if we didn't
put the extra days in months which are
practically useless for anything except





ETAOII






filler on the calendar, anyhow. That
was his gripe with February. To him, it
was just a month to fill up the calendar
and had no other use at all.
In a way, he's right. All a body can
do in February is try to keep warm. It's
unfit to get outside; there's no holidays
except a couple of president's birth-
days, and we have even bundled them
up together and call them President's
Day. February has Valentine Day, a
day on which you are supposed to give


your sweetheart flowers.
Isn't that a gas? Here we have a
day to give our sweetheart flowers right
smack in the middle of the month which
is most unlikely of all the months to be


able to grow flowers. The only place
you can get them is in the hothouse,
through the florists.
DIVIDING UP THE days of
February will be OK by me if we can
put them in May, June, October and
maybe even early November.
To me, these are the best times of
the year and deserve more attention
than we give to them. We really ought
to move Thanksgiving to February, if


we have to keep it anyway. At least we
would have a holiday with mostly
indoors activities during a month when
all you can do is stay indoors.
If we have to fill up the Thanksgiv-


ing slot with something, move the Super
Bowl there.
I know how we got into this mess
with our months and their holidays.
That Roman emperor who came up
with the calendar must have appointed
a committee to come up with a plan for
dividing the year up into slices. It looks
just like the work of a committee.

SPEAKING OF COMMITTEES, I


see where newly elected President
Ronald Reagan has come up with
nominees for the Energy and Education
departments, both departments he said
in his campaign he was going to
abolish.
Appointing the department heads
doesn't excite me, because even if they
were to be abolished, there should be
someone there to oversee the work of
winding down their work.
The fly in the ointment is that both
appointees have stated they do not
intend to stand by and see their
departments shut down.
Who's going to win? Reagan's
campaign claim or the determination of
the department heads to keep their
little niche in Washington running?

WE WERE SUPPOSED to have
had a cold, cold week end. We've been
flirting with cold weather for the past
two weeks now, and with it here in the
middle of the first month of the year,
it's time for it to turn winter here in the
Panhandle.
Well, it turned cold over the week
end, right on schedule... or at least we
all thought it was cold... until the week


end was over.
Then it DID get cold. Even for one
of those Yankee states, it was cold.
When you get thermometers play-
ing around in the 20's here on the
shores of St. Joseph Bay, and the wind
blowing 15 miles per hour out of the
north like it was Monday, if a person
has a spare pair of long-johns, he'll dig
them out or freeze.
We bore up under it at our house
We made Cecil Costin happy by burning
that gas central heater and Frenchie
was made happy because she had a
good excuse to keep the fire going in the
fireplace. Every time I looked up, I'd
see her coming in the door with an
arm-load of wood. Don't get the wrong
idea; she didn't have to carry in wood.
There was plenty lying in the wood box
right beside the fireplace to last the
night. But Frenchie likes to see that
fireplace burn, so she carried in the
wood to make sure it didn't go out for
lack of fuel.
Cecil would have been happier if
the woodpile had given out, because
with the fireplace going, the heater
wasn't turned up quite so high.
And we still have February to go.


POSTOFFICE BOX 308


-- X o SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
PHONE 227-1278 IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR, $6.0 SIXMONTHS,4. 00
Published EveryTmursdayat306 WlliamsAvenue. Prt St. Joe. Florida PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 OUT OF COUNTY-ONE YEAR, 10.00 OUT OF U.S.-ONE YEAR. $12.00
By The Star Publishing Company
Second-ClassPstag Paid at Pelt S. Joe. lrida 32456


9%r- Wesley R. Ramsey ....... Editor and Publisher
William H. Ramsey ........... Production Supt.
Frenchie L Ramsey ............ Office Manager
Shirley K. Ramsey ................. Typesetter


SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID
AT PORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA 324M


TO ADVERTISERS-in case el error or emissions in advertsemens,


tearely asserts; theariated word thereughty ceavinces. The spoken word is lost; Site prialed Word remains.


St. Joseph's

Bay Tides
High and low tides for St.
Joseph's Bay for the upcom-
ing week are shown in the tide
table below, furnished by the
U. S. Weather Bureau in Apa-
lachicola. Times are based on
a 24-hour clock, and height is


feet above or below the mean
water line.


Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs.


High Ht. Low Ht.
1846 1.2 443 -.3
1928 1.3 522 -.5
2017 1.4 608 -.7
2104 1.4 658 -^
2150 1.4 743 .
2235 1.3 830 -.7
2317 1.2 909 -.5
2359 1.0 948 -.4


Ice Skating Anyone?


ripfiv Q'U'A uIJ


-


L












Cousins


FPC Asks for Rate Increase- Celebrate


The Public Service Corn- ition for a rate increase.
mission has scheduled hear- In April Florida Power
ings for January 14-16 and requested a rate increase of
20-23 in Tallahassee on Flo- $99 million and asked that the
rida Power Corporation's pet- commission grant an interim


Highland View GCCC Offering

PTA Will Meet Estate Study


The Highland View PTA
will meet January 19 at 7:30
p.m. Everyone is urged to
attend and help finalize plans
for the chili supper, to be held
in February.
Spice sets are still available
and can be purchased by
calling 229-8372.


Indians to

Name Princesses
The public is invited to
attend an Indian celebration
Sunday, January 18, (after
lunch) at the Howard Creek
Baptist Church. Five Chiefs
representing five tribes will be
in attendance some coming
from Alabama. A ceremony
naming three new princesses
will be a big event for the
evening.

OBITUARIES:


A real estate salesmanship
course will be offered in
Apalachicola beginning Jan-
nary 20, sponsored by Gulf
Coast Community College.
The course will be taught by
Leon R. Bloodworth and is
open to all interested persons.
Those wishing to take the
course should call 653-9765 in
Apalachicola for more infor-
mation.


Archery Hunt
Four late season archery
hunts have been set for Joe
Budd Wildlife Management
Area near Tallahassee.
Archers will be allowed to
hunt legal game, including
deer of either sex, February
7-8. 14-15, 21-22, and February
28 March 1.


rate increase of $61 million.
In July the PSC granted an
interim increase of $54.6 mil-
lion. The interim increase was
reduced to $40.4 million in

CARD OF THANKS
The family of Mozelle Gain-
nie wishes to express- their
gratitude to the many people
of Port St. Joe for the many
contributions that they made
to make her final days very
memorable ones. We can't
name all of you at this time,
but, may God bless every one
of you.
Georgie Gainnie
Jimmy Gainnie
Mike Gainnie


CARD OF THANKS
No words could express our
thankfulness for. all the kind
deeds done for us during the
illness and loss of our sisters
and aunts. The food, cards,'
flowers, visits and most of all
your prayers were so greatly
appreciated. God bless you
every one.
The families of
Mrs. Myrtle Davis
and
Mrs. Sally Hill


Services Monday for Archie Davis


Mr. Archie Cecil Davis, 82,
of Port St. Joe, passed away
Saturday night in a Panama
City Hospital. He was a native
of Washington County and a
long time resident of Port St.
Joe. He was a Mason and a
member of the Long Avenue
Baptist Church.


Survivors Include: two sons,
:Harold Davis, St. Petersburg,
R.W. Davis, Miramar, one
brother, Ellis P. Davis,
Thomasville, Ga., one sister,
Rachael Hoskins, Overstreet,
nine grandchildren and one
great grandchild.
Funeral services were held


- Public Notices -


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY. PROBATE DIVISION.
FILE NO. 81-2
IN RE: The Estate of
MYRTLE W. DAVIS,
deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
. ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
U N.INT.RESTED IN THE'ESTATE:
YOO ARE NOTIFIED thal the admin.
Istration of the Estate of Myrtle W.
Davis, Deceased, file number 81-2, Is
pending In the Circuit Court for Gulf
County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Gulf County Court-
house, Port St. Joe, Florida. The
personal representative of the Estate is
Billy Joe Rich, Sr., whose address Is 109
Alien Memoripl Way, Port St.-Joe,
Florida. The name and address of the
personal representative's attorney are
as set forth below.
All persons having claims or demands
against the Estate are required WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE
'._,OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the Clerk of
the above Court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may have.
Each claim must be in writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the creditor or his
agent or attorney and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due, the
date when It will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contingent or un.
liquidated, the nature of the uncertain-
ty shall be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the claim to
the Clerk to enable the Clerk to mall one
copy to the personal representative.
All persons interested In the Estate
with whom a copy of this Notice of
Administration has been mailed are
required, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objection they may have that
challenges the validity of the Decedent's
Will, the qualifications of the personal
representative or the venue or jurlsdic-
tion of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has begun.,
Date of the first -publication of this
Notice of Administration: January 15,
1981.
-s- Billy Joe Rich, Sr.
Personal Representative of the Estate of
Myrtle W. Davis
-s-. Mel C. Magldson, Jr.
S321 Reid Avenue


Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
904-22944
Attorney for Personal Representative
4tc 1-15
STATE OF FLORIDA, COUNTY OF
GULF.
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that on the
sixth day of January, 1981, pursuant to a
Writ of Execution Issued In the Coun-
ty Court of Gulf County, Florida, Case
'Number 80-205 In the cause of POONAI
AND POONAI, M.D.. P A, PLAIN.
TIFFS, VS. KYLAR AND HELEN
HAMILTON, DEFENDANTS, I, KEN
MURPHY, SHERIFF OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA, have levied upon
the property of the defendant, to-wit:
1 1975 Plymouth Fury, red in color
with a black vinyl roof, 2-door, Serial
Number RP23KSG183360
On the 10th day of February, 1981, at
Two O'Clock (2:00) (EST) In the after.
noon on the steps of the Gulf County
Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, and I
will offer for sale said property for cash
to the highest bidder, subject to all prior
liens, if any, to satisfy said Writ of
Execution.
-s- Ken Murphy, Sheriff,
Gulf County, Florida
4t 1-15
FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice Is hereby given that pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned persons intend to register
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf
County, Florida, four weeks after the
first publication of this notice, the ficti-
tious name or trade name under which
they will be engaged in business and in
which said business is to be carried on,
to-wit:
S Taflinger Painting
712 Woodward Ave., Box 641
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Owner, Ivan Taflinger
4tp 1-15
FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned persons intend to register
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf
County, Florida, four weeks after the
first publication of this notice, the
fictitious name or trade name under
which they will be engaged In business
and in which said business is to be
carried on, to-wit:
Andy Construction Co.
Rt. 3, Box 239
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465
Owner, Fred M. Clayton
4tc 1-15


Begin the New

Year with a new

life. A lifed filled


with JOY, PEACE AND HAPPINESS.

JESUS CAME TO GIVE THAT NEW

LIFE. John 10:10, John 3:16

WORSHIP WITH US.

1601 LONG AVENUE

BIBLE STUDY ........................ 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP................... 11:00 A.M.,
CHURCH TRAINING .................... 5:45 P.M.,
EVENING WORSHIP ................. 7:00 P.M.,
WEDNESDAY ........................... 7:00 P.M.


Long Ave. Baptist Church


A.M. .............................. "The Will of God"
P.M. ................... "Introduction to Philippians"

REV. TEDM. CORLEY
Pastor


at 2:00 p.m. Monday at the
Long Avenue Baptist Church
of Port St. Joe, conducted by
the Rev. J.C. Odum. Inter-
ment followed in the family
plot, Holly hill Cemetery. All
services were under the di-
rection of Comforter Funeral
Home of Port St. Joe.


Last Rites

Held for

Mrs. Baker


Mrs. Gladys Baker, 60, of
Port St. Joe, passed away
Thursday in an Apalachicola
Hospital. She was a native of
Alabama and a long time
resident of Port St. Joe.
' Survivors include: tw sons,
Earley Lewis, and Jimmie L.
Lewis both of Port St. Joe; one
daughter, Dorothy Butler of
Port St. Joe; one sister,
Lonnie Acree of Dothan, Ala.;
two brothers, Walter S. Acree
of Dothan, Ala., Jessie Acree
of Port St. Joe; one daughter-
in-law, Patricia Lewis of Port
St. Joe; one son-in-law, Willie
Lee Butler of Port St. Joe,
seven grandchildren and one
great grandchild.
Funeral services were held
Monday at the First Born
Church of the Living God of
Port St. Joe, conducted by the
Junior Bishop E.D. Dixon.
Interment followed in Forest
Hill Cemetery. All services
were under the direction of
Comforter Funeral Home of
Port St. Joe.

HELP WANTED: Manager,
male, for local business spec-
ializing in built-in fireplaces
and wood burning heaters.
Contact Perry J. McFarland
at The Homestead, 107 2nd St.
after 5:00 P.M. or on Satur-
day.


Monday, Jan. 19 with gravy, lima beans, carrot
Spaghetti with cheese and stick, buttered roll and milk.
meat sauce, tossed salad, Thursday, Jan. 22
green beans, buttered garlic Fried Chicken, mashed
bread and milk. potatoes with gravy, turnips
Tuesday, Jan. 20 with roots, buttered roll and
Turkey sandwich, cheese, milk.
lettuce, tomato, pickle, but- Friday, Jan. 23
tered corn, cake and milk. Hot dog, french fries, mixed,
Wednesday, Jan.21 vegetables, sliced peaches,
Country fried steak, rice cookie and milk.


Install Officers

The Port St. Joe Masonic Lodge 111, F&AM held its
installation of officers recently for the upcoming year.
DisFict Deputy Grand I ster Joe Pippin installed the new
officers. Carlton Chandler was installed as the Worshipful
Master.

Pictured from left to right, are: J. J. St. Clair, Sr., Senior
Deacon; Joe Pippin, District Deputy Grand Master; Sammie
Williams, Senior Warden, Everette McFarland, Marshall;
Carlton Chandler, Worshipful Master; Ken Murphy, Jr.
Warden; Tommy Pitts, Jr. Deacon; J. L. Sims, Treasurer
and Jim Cooley, Secretary.



Highland View Garbage Pick-Up

Tri-County Refuse

Service
Wishes to Announce That as of January 4th, we
bought out Mr. Jim Harrison of Highland View,
Garbage Business

We Are Trying to Continue

Service to Each Customer

If we have missed you, please call

653-8653 653-8976 653-9446


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1981 PAGE THREE


HOW TO CUT YOUR


WATER HEATING COSTS
Thanks to the people at Florida
IN IHALF Power, your air conditioner can save
you money on hot water That's right. Florida Power
pioneered a heat recovery system which'uses the discharged heat
from your air conditioner to heat your water.
The unit is small and can be addeu to central air conditioning
or a heat pump by a qualified air conditioning contractor
And depending on how much hot water your family
uses. it could cut your water 9,
heating costs in half Flrida
Ask your air conditioning Florida
contractor or Florida obwer P wOw
where to get one.

We're putting our eneiy to work for you.


IE D
101i~


----------- ----- -










THE STAR. Port St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1981


"How Do I Get My Child to Behave?"


Is Answered In Parenting Course


The January program of the
St. Joseph Bay Chapter
Daughters of the American
Revolution will be. based on
National Defense, with Mrs.
James B. Roberts as Chair-
man. The Chapter has secured
as speaker of the day Com-
mander David W. Humphreys
of Port St. Joe and Panama
City.
The Chapter meeting is
scheduled for Wednesday
noon, January 21, for a
luncheon meeting at the Gar-
den Center on Eight Street,
with Mrs. Charles Brown as
Regent, and hostesses, Mrs.
Kilbourn, Mrs. W. R. Fite,
Mrs. Gannon Buzzett and Mrs.
Thomas Alsobrook.
The second emphasis of the
January meeting is on DAR
Schools, with concentration
at this time on the Kate
Duncan Smith School at


SPROUD GIRL SCOUTS hold their two first place ribbons Sandy King, sneila Lucas, Marci Stripling, Kelly Lattner and_
-won recently at camp. From left to right are: DeAnn Young, Hope Lane. -Star photo,



Local Cadettes of Troop



:245 Win Blue Ribbons


The recognized Girl Scout
Troop 245 recently traveled to
Apalachee Bend's Camp For
All Seasons to participate in a
weekend of competition and
.fellowship. This year's Ca-
:dette Camporee included
:.events in ten categories which
:were designed to help the
:troop members meet various
skill requirements and earn
:awards. Events were: Ar-
:ranging natures Beauty (a
:minimum of six non-flowering
Sitems must be included), First
:Aid (use of seven triangular
bandages), Trial Signs (use of
eight trail signs and map
sketching), Knots (five dif-
ferent knots), Roman Chariot
iace (use of Silvia compasses
to calculate and follow a
course or trail), Evironment
(identification of ten local
wildlife and plant life items)
Emergency Rescue Methods
Demonstrate 10 different
ways to carry a victim) and
Communications ( a 5-minute
skit or other presentation with
emphasis on Scout Spirit and
the development of citizen-
ship, character and personal
fitness). Members of troop 245
earned the Blue Ribbon for
best nature arrangement.
They also brought back one of
only three blue ribbons
awarded for high scoring in
the overall competition, mak-
ing them the only troop to
bring home two blue ribbons.
Next year they are hoping to
bring home to Wetappo the
coveted Red-White-Blue Rib-
bon for top scoring in every
event. This Camporee was

Robert Raffields

Celebrate 50th
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L.
Raffield will be honored on
their fiftieth Wedding An-
niversary with an Open
House. It will be held at the
Highland View Assembly of
God Church Social Hall on
Monday, Jan. 19, from 7:00
till.
" All friends and relatives are
cordially invited to attend.

Amanda Phillips

Has Birthday
Amanda Leigh Phillips,
daughter of Randy and Cindy
Phillips, celebrated her first
birthday on January eighth.
A party was given in honor
of the special event at the
home of her grandparents
-:apt. and Mrs. H.L. Cassani.
-She is also the granddaughter
.of Mr. and Mrs. Bob Phillips.


directed by Mrs. May Carol
Bennett and her First Class
Senior Scout Troop of Panama
City Fl. There were 85 scouts
from the fifteen counties sup-
ported by the Apalachee Bend
Girl Scout Council in Atten-
dance.
Cadette Troop 245 is now
participating with other
Apalachee Bend Scouts in the
Reader's Digest QSP maga-
zine and record sale and their
annual calendar sale. They
have the large wall calendars
and the handy pocket calen-
dars which make excellent
gifts for friends, relatives and
business associates.
Officers and members of
this troop are Hope Lane,
President, DeAnn Young, Vice
President; Sandy King, Secre-
tary; Marcy Stripling, trea-
surer; Kelly Lattner, Tele-
phone Chairperson; and
Sheila Lucas, Historian.
Leaders are Mrs. Reva Lane
and Mrs. Ruth Lucas. They
are sponsored by the Pres-
byterian Church of Port St.
Joe.


Did you ever ask yourself
why your child was misbe-
having or why your discipline
technique did not help? Can
you communicate with your
child as well as you woulk like
to? Did you ever say, "This
child is driving me crazy," or
"How do I get good be-
haviors?" These are concerns
and questions that all parents
raise.
Ned Ailes, Executive Direc-


Municipal Hospital Births


The following births were reported by
the Municipal Hospital during the month
of December.
Jonathan Edward Richardson, born
December 4, 1980 at 9:33 a.m., weighing
11 Ibs. 10 oz. Son of Mr. and Mrs. David
Richardson, of St. Joe Beach.
Latrika Janay Quinn, born December 6,
1980 weighing 6 Ibs. 3 oz. born at 8:39 p.m.,
Farica Shanay Quinn, born December 6,
1980 weighing 4 lbs. 13 % oz., born at 8:43
p.m. Twin daughters of Cheryl and Billy
Quinn r .,.of Port St. Joe,.
Michael Albert Davis, born December
7,1980 at 1:07 a.m., weighing 9 lbs. 8 oz.
Son of Debra and Glenn Davis of Port St.
Joe.
Jamie Lemar Clayton, born December
9, at 9:31 a.m., weighing 9 lbs.,7 oz.
Son of Mr. and.Mrs. Donnie Clayton of
Port St. Joe.
Amanda Christine Estes, born Dec-
ember 9,1980 at 7:29p.m., weighing 6 lbs.,
10 ozs. Daughter of Rebecca Estes of


Cox Family Appearing


At Oak Grove Assembly


The singing Cox family will
be ministering at the Oak
Grove Assembly of God this
Sunday morning, January 18.
The Cox Family represents a
unique sound is gospel music.
Their style is not that of the
traditional gospel quartet nor
the electric sound of gospel
rock, but rather a contem-
porary sound with appeal to
all ages. Listening to them
sing, one becomes aware of


their obvious intent on wor-
ship. Whether the setting be a
church-group, high school, or
a massive concert audience;
the deep spiritual experience
and commitment of the Cox


Family reaches out to touch
the listener deep in his soul.
Pastor Fernandez invites you
to come and enjoy the singing
ministry of the Cox Family,
January 18, at 11:00.


FORMER STATE ATTORNEY

LEO C. JONES
and
MARTHA A. "SISTA" BLACKMON

FORMER ASSISTANT STA TE ATTORNEY
FORMER ASSISTANT U.S. ATTORNEY
ANNOUNCE
OPENING OF LAW OFFICES
JONES AND BLACKMON
LAWYERS
ON W 23rd. St. Bldg. D
Panama City, Fla. Ph. (904) 763-6651
GENERAL PRACTICE
STATE AND FEDERAL
CRIMINAL LAW FAMILY LAW
Personal Injury amid Wrongful Death


Eastpoint.
Lakeythia Shavette Filmore, born
December 10, at 6:56 a.m., weighing 6 lbs.
5 oz. Daughter of Drucilla Filmore of Port
St. Joe.
Tannis Jasmine Coachman, born Dec-
ember 12, at 6:04 p.m., weighing 7 lbs. 4%
oz. Daughter of Paula Coachman of Port
St. Joe.
Jessica Leanna Williams, born Dec-
ember 12, at 5:20 a.m., weighing 8 lbs. 2
oz. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse
Williams of Wewahtichka..
Timothy- Carson O'Bryan Jr., born
December 25, at 3:38 p.m., weighing 6
lbs. 14% oz. Son of Tim and Nancy
O'Bryan of Apalachicola.
Bennie Lee Yon, born December 31, at
2:50 a.m., weighing 7 lbs. and 13 oz. Son
of Edna and Glen Yon of Apalachicola.
Tracy Trudell Watkins, born December
31, at 7:16 p.m., weighing 7 lbs. 12 oz.
Daughter of Charles and Eileen Watkins
of Apalachicola.


tor of the Gulf County Guid-
ance Clinic, Inc. has an-
nounced a "Parenting Skills
Program" designed to assist
parents with such questions
and concerns. The course will
begin on Tuesday January 20,
1981 from 10:30 to noon. The
program will be conducted at
Port St. Joe Elementary Sch-
ool on six consecutive Tues-
days.
Ailes stated that "These


Grant, Alabama. Mrs. Paul
Johnsen, Chairman of DAR
Schools, is asking all mem-
bers to bring to the meeting
any articles suitable for sale
in the school "Thrift Shop"
clothing, books, toilet articles,
school supplies, etc. This is a
project that is most important
to the school.


programs are not for parents
with 'problem children' but
instead, the programs are
offered for 'average parents'
who are interested in learning
more about parenting." Ailes
said, "Program topics will
include: discipline, effective
rules, developing confidence,
motivating good behavior, un-
derstanding misbehavior and
communicating with child-
ren."
"Being a parent is probably
one of the most difficult,
confusing, frustrating and
also rewarding experiences
most of us will take on," Ailes


said. He added, "We get to be
better parents because we
learn the skills and because
we work at it. I believe that
this program is one way that
concerned parents can add to
their abilitiess"
All interested participants
are -requested to register in
advance by calling the Clinic
at 227-1145. Collect calls will
be accepted at this number.
This program is sponsored by
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege and is offered at no cost to
the public. Reading materials
and a certificate will be given
out to everyone who completes
the program.


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415-416 Reid Ave.
Phone 229-6195
I -j


To ACmdr. Humphreys

To Address DAR


First
Presbyterian Church
Sixteenth Street and Forrest Park Avenue
Phone 227-1756
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE ........ 10:00 A.M.
ADULT SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS .... 11:00 A.M.
Study in the Gospels, Wednesday 7:00-7:45

Welcome to Everyone
JOHN M. STUART, Pastor
Phone 229-857


C.ls


Saving Is





NOW

More Important
Than Ever




Get the savings
habit at your 7 to 7,
6 days a week bank


St. Joe Branch

Wewahitchka State Bank
529 Fifth Street Phone 229-8226


First United

Methodist Church
Constitution and Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe, Fla.
JOHNIE W. McCURDY, Minister

CHURCH SCHOOL .................. 9:45A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ...............11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ................ 7:00 P.M.
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP 5:30 P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) .. 7:30 P.M.


HOME FURNISHING CENTERS
FURNITURE APPLIANGC8 FLOOR COVERING o HOME ENTERTAINMENT
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,---~....1I------


r


PAGE FOUR


-.-:. .= ? .. ... .


k


L









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1981 PAGE FIVE


Retiring


H.V. Elementary


Planting

Arbor Day is being observed
at Highland View Elementary
School' today, January 15, at
1:00 p.m., with a special
program and tree planting
ceremony, according to Prin-
cipal Kenneth Herring.
More than 200 students will
attend the program which will
include select readings and
songs of "America the
Beautiful", and God Bless
America". While a portion of
the program will be given to
the history of Arbor Day, the
importance of trees to all
people will be stressed.
Forests are a unique and
renewable resource and are
vital to the protection of the
water supply, and for pro-
viding abundant raw material
to industry. Trees have aes-
thetic values otherwise undup-
licated, and the forest affords
shelter and food for wildlife.


Trees

Thousands of useful products
came directly or indirectly
from Florida forests.
Florida was among the first
states ever to observe a Tree
Planting Day in 1886. All
states observe Arbor Day,
though some on different
dates. Florida's official Arbor
Day is the third Friday in
January.
Special literature on the
importance of conservation
was made available by the
Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services Division of Forestry
to all schools requesting it.
Following the program, stu-
dents will take part in planting
trees shipped from Division of
Forestry nurseries. The small
trees were offered at no cost to
Highland View Elementary
School and to all other school
in the state.


Milton Chafin, shown above right, retired
on January I after 42 years of service with St.
Joe Paper Company. Chafin was a paper millf
Superintendent at the time of his retirement.
e started with the mill in November, 1938 as
a car loader in the shipping department and


worked his way up to his position at the time
of his retirement. Shown presenting Chafin
with his retirement papers is Harold
Quackenbush, production superintendent at
the local mill.
-Star photo


Fun Day Tomorrow At


Port St. Joe Garden Club


Mrs. Ethel Bridges, state
landscape design critic, dis-
cussed "Flowering Trees and
Shrubs, and Native Trees" at
the January 8th meeting of the
Port St. Joe Garden Club.
Mrs. Bridges gave the pur-
poses for planting trees. As
climate control, wind breaks,
and air purifies. She told of the
.800 types of trees native to
our country, their uses to
improve our lives, and re-
minded her listeners that now
is the time to plant bare root
trees and shrubs. Mrs.
Bridges told the garden club
members that the mature size
of plantings is very important
in placing plantings, and to be
sure to consider whether or
not to plant evergreens, palms
h.r trees and shrubs to attract
birds. Think of tre that are
deciduous for summer shade,
and winter solar heat. Mrs.
Bridges reminded the Garden
Club that man cannot live
without trees.
President Mrs. M.P. Huie
introduced three new mem-


bers Mrs. Chester Crymes,
Mrs. Ted Corley, and Mrs.
J.C. Culpepper and welcomed
them into the Port St. Joe
Garden Club.
During the business meeting
a petition to propose national
legislation to provide a Na-
tional Garden Week the first
week in June was enthusias-


tically approved and signed.
Mrs. Huie announced a special
garden club fun day on
Friday, January 16th at 11
a.m. Come, bring a sandwich.
Mesdames Rochelle Jackson,
Jonnia Sykes, and Polly
Sowers hostesses served de-
lightful refreshments to 24
members.


A. V. Bateman, shown above left, stepped of 1942 as a chart changer in engineering. He
down In retirement on January 1 from his has been instrument foreman since March 1,
position as instrument foreman with St. Joe 1978. Shown with Bateman is Bob Faliski,
Paper Company. Bateman, a veteran with St. department superintendent. -Star photo
Joe Paper, went to work with the mill in May


Father Appointed


for St. Joseph's


Most Reverend Archbishop
Rene Garcida, administrator
of the Pensacola Tallahassee
archdoiceae, has appointed a
new. Pastor for ,St. Josepl;'
Catholic Church, Port St. Joe.
He is the Reverend Paul E.
Stewart, who began his new
duties January 2.
Reverend Stewart, a native
of Baltimore, Maryland, was
ordained in 1973 in Jackson-
ville, Florida. He is a graduate
of Mount St. Mary's, Norwood,
Ohio and last served as
Assistant Pastor of the St.
Thomas More co-Cathedral
Tallahassee. Among his cur-
rent duties for the Arch-
diocese are: moderator for the
Diocesan Council of Catholic
Women; member of the Arch-
diocesan Youth Commission,
and Spiritual Director of the
Cruscillo movement. -
St. Joseph's Parish will
honor Reverend Stewart with
a reception on Sunday, Jan-
uary 18, from three to five
p.m. in the Parish Hall.
Refreshments will be served
and all area residents are
invited to attend and greet the


newly-appointed pastor.
Reverend Stewart replaces
the Reverend Fausto Stamp-
iglia, who has recently been
named Episcopate Vicat!f
the Archdiocesan Rural Mini-
stries and Pastor of St.
Teresa's Catholic Church,
Sunny Hills, Florida.


Rev. Paul E. Stewart


mu
By PAT ALONZO

Acrylic Carpets

Long Wearing
The appearance and texture
of acrylic carpets is much like
wool carpets. Acrylics are
reknown for their wearability,
resistance to soiling and stain-
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proof, and moth proof.
Acrylic fiber is manufac-
tured from a synthetic polmer
composed of at least 85
percent by weight of acry-
lonitrile, which is a liquid
derivative of natural gas and
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the fact that acrylic carpets
are high quality.
Price and quality are avail-
able from our store. Shop
today and compare our prices
with others. We know that you
will be pleased.







of Port St. Joe
204 MONUMENT AVE.
PHONE 227-1199


Square Dancing Is


Fun for Everyone


The St. Joe Sunshiners, a
Port St. Joe-based square
dance group, will continue its
open house this Thursday
night, January 15, for anyone
wishing to learn how to square
dance.
Square dancing is one of the
oldest forms of entertainment

Bowman Is

UWF Graduate
Kenneth Dale Bowman, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Martin
Bowman of Port St. Joe, was
one of 1,004 students to receive
a bachelor's degree from the
University of Florida in the
January 5 graduating class.
Bowman received his de-
gree in the field of education.


available and is an excellent
means of healthful exercise. It
has become one of the most
popular forms of dance, being
performed in virtually every
country in the free world.
The open house will be held
at 8:00 p.m., at the Stac
House, located on 8th Street in
Port St. Joe. Anyone wishing
to learn to square dance, or
just observe is urged to
attend.

Con. Christian
The Christian Concern
Society, will present its
monthly musical program this
Saturday, January 17, at 6:00
p.m. at Smith Chapel Holiness
Church with the Elder Asleen
Johnson, Host Pastor.


^Dge*f**.e*D#e*e***D*e**e***#DD#*e#*****9Da*"*u'u

The First
Pentecostal Holiness Church
2001 GARRISON AVE. PORT ST. JOE
Invites You to Worship with Them
Ernest A. Barr, Pastor
SERVICES S
SUNDAY SCHOOL ..................... 9:45 AM
MORNING WORSHIP ................ 11:00AM b
EVENING WORSHIP ................ 7:00 PM' "
WEDNESDAY NIGHT................. 7:00PM

esg.#*W*. **fa esse sesesess#*#* **** s *CUs:


NEW BETHEL
African Methodist Episcopal Church
146 Avenue C Phone 227-1213
Rev. James W. Williams, Pastor

SUNDAY SCHOOL .................. 9:30 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................. 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .................6:00 P.M.
S"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man OUr Brother"










PAGE SIX THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1981


Female Sharks Prove to Be Tough


Species with Their 6-1 Record


The 1980-81 Girls Basketball 49-29 last Friday in their gym
Team is having a great season in a conference game.
thus far. They are looking at a They will play Rutherford
6-1 record and have created on Friday, Jan. 16, in Panama
some big up-sets. They opened City.
up with a 47-22 up-set over The girls team is under
Panama City Rutherford and estimated by many teams,
came back the next week and fans and people all around.
gave Panama City work horse They practice long and hard
girls of Bay High a 44-40 just to make a great showing
up-set. They won over Chat- whether they win or lose. They
tahoochee 57-35 and lost to attempt to show that Shark
Havana 30-43. Pride in every game. They are
The girls basketball team coached by Carmena Fennell
'came back from the Havana Morgan, who has worked with
loss and beat Wewa 51-9. The the girls basketball team for
teams' biggest win and high- the past two years. This is her
est scoring came Tuesday, third season. The girls team
January 6, when they cre- has won two district titles
amed the Wewa Gators' Girls under Coach Fennell.
Team by a score of 113-13. The The team has. nine players
team defeated Florida High returning from last year.
Demons Girls by a score of Shelia Farmer who has set


and broken the school record
for most points scored in a
girls game of 39 points and she
also set a school record for the
longest shot made, which was
from half court to give the
Sharks a 53-51 victory over
Mosley with seconds on the
clock. Shelia is averaging 18
points a game this season.
Michelle Russ is one of the
better defensive players for
the team, and is averaging 15
points this season. Candye
Woullard has improved
greatly and is averaging 12
points and rebounds a game.
Bertha Harris is averaging 15
rebounds and six points this
season. Veronica Beard is
averaging eight points. June
Foxworth is averaging eight
rebounds a game. Angie


News of Sharks' First Loss



Is Greatly Exaggerated


Bryan is averaging four points
a game. Brenda Bailey is
averaging two points and
Bonita Robinson is averaging
five points a game.
The new members of the
team are Donna Singletary,
who is averaging four points a
game, Lorraine Thomas, who
is averaging ten points a game
and six rebounds and Tiffany
Burns, who is averaging two
points a game.


GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM-Front
row, left to right: Angle Bryan, Michelle
Russ, Shelia Farmer, Donna Singletary and
Brenda Bailey. Second row: Bonita Robinson,


Candye Woullard, June Foxworth, Lorraine
Thomas, Tiffany Burns, Veronica Beard and
Coach Carmena Fennell Morgan.


Your good health, for instance, can't
be bought. bu owe it to yourself
and your family to safeguard it. Your
biggest helper in thisimportant ven-
ture is your family Doctor. Don't wait
until aches and pains put you on the
sick-list. Visit him regularly for
check-ups and advice. And if you
should need a prescription order
filled, rely on our pharmacist. His
friendly, prompt and knowledgeable
service wil help keep that one preci-
ous possession money can't buy
. your good health!

BUZZETT'S
Drug Store
317 Williams Ave. 229-8771
Plenty of Free Parking
Your REXALL Store


Mark Twain once reported,
S"The reports of my death have
been greatly exaggerated A
report in the Panama City
:News-Herald Tuesday mor-
ning that the Port St. Joe
-Sharks had suffered their first
defeat of the season at the
hands of the Bay High Torna-
does was equally as exagger-
ated. The Sharks edged the
'Tornadoes, 61-59 in overtime
to keep their perfect record
for the season intact.
The Sharks were behind by
three points at half-time Mon-
day night, but came back with
a two point margin in the third
period and one point in the last
quarter to tie the game up,
56-56 at the end of regulation
play.
As the game went into
overtime, the teams were still
tied as the overtime period
wound down to 42 seconds.
Franklin Thomas was fouled
and sank both his foul shots to
put the Sharks ahead by two.
Bay's Brown came down the
court and sank a field goal to


tie the game once more. Jerry
Filmore was fouled and sank
the second of his two free
throws to put the Sharks
ahead again. Bay's Brown
countered with a single free
throw to tie again. Then, with
only two seconds left, Ricky
Larry sank a field goal to give
the Sharks their two point
lead. Bay tried to counter by
rolling the ball in on the floor
down the court, to keep the
clock from starting. An alert
Roland Givens jumped on the
ball like a football fumble and
held it to run out the clock and
win the game for the Sharks.
Jerry Filmore was high
man for the Sharks with 20 big
points. John Pittman added 19
and Ricky Larry had 18, as the
Sharks three big guns were all
tuned up for the big game.
Bay had R. Howard and S.
Harris high with 13 points
each and S. Hollowell with 10.
John Pittman led the Shark
defense with 21 rebounds.
Filmore added 12 and hit six
for seven free throw attempts.


Score by quarters:
Port St. Joe 11 12 12 21 5-61
-Bay Hi 11 15 10 21 3-59
PORT ST. JOEr-Larry, 7-4-
18; Pittman, 8-3-19; Givens,
0-0-0; Thomas, 0-2-2; Garland,
1-0-2; Filmore, 7-6-20.
Last Friday, in a noon
game, the Sharks took an easy
win over the Florida High
Demons, dumping the Talla-
hassee team, 76-59.
Coach Jim Belin emptied his
bench, giving every man on
the squad a chance to play.
The Sharks had a command-
ing 43-29 lead at half time and
had enough points to win the
game by the end of the third
period.
Ricky Larry scorched' the
nets for 25 points to lead the
Shark scoring. John Pittman
had 18, Daryl Garland and
Jerry Filmore had 11. points
each.
Tyson led the Demons with
16 points.
Score by quarters:
Port St. Joe 21 22 21 12-76
Florida High 10 19 14 16-59
PORT ST. JOE-Larry, 12-
1-25; Pittman, 9-0-18; Givens,
2-1-5; Thomas, 0-0-0; Garland,


5-1-11; Filmore, 3-5-11; Adki-
son, 2-0-4; Roberts, 1-0-2;
Jenkins, 0-0-0.

Saturday night, the Sharks
will still be playing in the big
leagues as they host Mosley of
Panama City at 7:00 p.m;
Monday, the "Sharks will host
Apalachicola and Tuesday
night, the team travels to
Rutherford in Panama City.


Sharks Are

Ranked

Fourth
Port St. Joe's undefeated
Sharks have finally broken
into the top 10 state rank-
ings this week, being se-
lected as the number four
team in the state.
Wakulla County had the
number one position nailed
down until the Sharks
knocked them out of the top
slot a week ago. The War
Eagles are now in the
number three position.


Ashley Abrams Named

To All State 2nd Team


All state football honors
were handed out last week in


900 B East Highway 98
Mexico Beach, Florida


BEACON HILL
Very attractive 3 BR, 1 ba. home on 3
Ig. lots. Modern kitchen and fam. rm.
with fireplace. Wall to wall carpet.
Priced right at $35,000.

Take advantage of this rental invest-
ment. Duplex within-walking distance
of the Gulf. Call for details. Priced
$29,500.
MEXICO BEACH
Well constructed, 3 bdrm., 2 ba. brick
home with modern kit., fam. rm. with
stone fp, cen. heat & air, modern flour-
escent lighting, plenty of storage.
Priced in mid $40's.
Looking for Your Beach Home?
Cute 2 bdrm., 1 ba. home with full kit-
chen, fam. rm and Ig. screened sun-
porch overlooking Gulf. Hwy. 98 & 3rd
St. Let us show you this one today!

Freshly lhtehi2 B 1 ba. home
ig. scre n .t walk to
Gulf. Pr

Beautiful modern 2 BR, 1 ba. brick
home close to Gulf. Lg. fam. rm with
cathedral beamed ceiling. Completely
furn. kit. with Jenn-Alr range. Fully
carpeted, cen. h&a. Priced $55,000.

Stop and look at this attractive buy!
Nice 2 BR, 1 ba. mobile home located on
corner lot. Addt'l 1 BR, 1 ba. trailer
with liv. rm, kitchen combo. Furnished.
Priced right.


IKE DUREN,
Broker-Salesman


Cute 3 BR,,2 ba. mobile home on nice
lot. Located on 4th St. Priced affordably
at $18,500.
Very peaceful and close to fishing this
attractive 2 BR, 1 ba. stilted home
Priced $32,500.

Attractive 3 BR, 2 ba. brick home with
great rm., screened-in porch and dbl.
car garage. Priced $69,500.,

Mexico Beah. Attractive 3 bdrm., 2 ba.
stilted ho~w te fa rm. with
fp, dining dePtttfta with lots
of storage. Owner will finance.

PORT ST. JOE
Tastefully decorated 3 bdrm., 1V2 ba.
home on 1 acre. Modern kit., dbl.
carpoet, Ig. sun porch. Close to church
and schools. Priced $59,500.
ST. JOE BEACH
Attractive 2-story with Gulf view. This 3
BR, 1V2 ba. home has fam. rm. with fp,
convenient kit., lots of storage and close
to beach. Owner fin. available. Priced
$35,000.
Newly p d rpet BR, 1 ba.
cottage, grneo labama
Ave. ar arRe f.cupancy.

Nice 3 BR, 2 ba. mobile home located on
Gulf St. Cen. h&a, short walk toGulf.
Priced affordably at $21,500.


MARGUERITE WAINWRIGHT
Realtor-Appraiser


648-8220


ALISA DUREN,
. Realtor-Associate


voting by coaches from all
over the state. Port St. Joe's
Sharks didn't place a man on
the mythical first team of the
offensive and defensive all-
state squads, but the Sharks
placed Ashley Abrams on the
second defensive team.
Abrams was a stand-out for
the Sharks in both offense and
defense throughout the sea-
son.
The Sharks' main running
back, Rozelle Jenkins, up
against some stiff competi-
tion, received an honorable
mention for the offensive
running back selection.


"Real Estate Specialists for Over 30 Years". Call us for information on
these as well as a large inventory of lots and other homes.


MEXICO BEACH


BEACH SIDE-TwO bdrm. furnished brick home,
Includes dishwasher. Excellent retirement home or
year round income property. Desirable location near
jetties and beach. 42nd St.


DESIGNER HOME-For family with discriminating
tastes. Words inadequate to describe this lovely 3
bdrm. home, 2 full baths, kitchen equipped with newest
innovations, including microwave oven & compactor.
Call for an appt. Florida Avenue.


PORT ST. JOE


LOVELY BRICK home near school has everything you
could want. New carpet, modern kitchen, fireplace
PLUS a newly installed pool and privacy fence.
Cypress Ave.


Move your family into this 3 bdrm. home by paying
small down pmt. and owner financing at 12 percent
interest. House has 3 bdrm., free-standing fireplace,
kit. appliances plus dishwasher, washing machine,
dryer, fenced back yd. and Ig. storage house. Call for
details and appt. 9th St.


Battery
Maintenance free!


$~995
$^22FM-48

12-VOLT EXCHANGE


ERA*


PARKER REALTYr

Hwy. 98 at 31 st St.
Mexico Beach, Fla. 904-648-5777


GULF AUCTION SERVICE

648-8251,
Col. T. R. Williams, Auctioneer

Port St. Joe Area


I


.I-
















































Live within walking dis-
tance of beach in a furn. 3
bdrm., 1% ba. mobile home
on 75'x112' corner lot. Utility
shed in back with washing
machine. 2 blks. from beach
at a nice affordable price-
$17,500. No. 402.


Owners have custom built
interior of mobile home for
beach living. 2 bdrms., 1
ba., with wood burning fire-
place. Also has outdoor
patio and shed for boat on
beautifully landscaped lot
anda half. Call for an appt.
to see this beach get away!
No. 200.


SUPER BARGAIN: 3 bdrm.
1 ba. mobile home on 75'x
150' lot, first $10 500 gets it,
can be assumed for a low
down pmt. No. 201.


WEWAHITCHKA
It's A Start! 3 bdrms., 1 ba.
r e aouse good iz
lot, utility sh h
a-c units are all part of the
bargain plus it's been well
taken care of. 5 miles south
of Wewa, off of Hwy. 71.
Great Price at only $18,000.

ACREAGE
200' on Intracoastal Canal,
3,7 acres. % mile from
paved Hwy. 386. A beautiful
'property for anyone who
wants to tie up his boat in
his own backyard. $30,000.
No. 800.
Approx. 1% acres, located
at Mexico Beach. City water
available. No. 801.
Cleared 8.5 acres on 386
near Overstireet. Owner will
finance 50 percent at rea-
sonable rate of interest. No.
802.
Almost 2 acres fronting on
Wetappo Creek. High and
dry with horseshoe bank
overlooking creek. Owner
may subdivide. $27,000. No.
804. -4
Shady lot at Howard Creek.
Just a few minutes walk
from the boat landing.
$3,000. No. 805.
Perfect acre in Overstreet
for your new home. High, no
marsh. Not far from the
Intracoastal Canal. $3,500.
No. 806.


OVERSTREET
Two beautiful % acre lots at
Wetappo Estates, not far
from the Canal. No mobile
homes. Financing avail-
able. No. 011. -

Beautiful brand new 3 bdrm
2 ba. home on 6 private
acres. Modern "country"
living at its best. Priced in
the mid 50's. No. 012.


MOBILE HOME

Mobile home for sale. 24'x
56', 3 bdrm, 2 ha., partially
furnished, cen. h&a, excel
cond. Only $12,500. No. 021.


E.B. MILLER REALTY


"We're Here For You.


PORT ST. JOE


1101 Garrison 3 bdrm., 2
ba., on 1 Ig. lots. Plenty of
rm, Ig. den, sprinkler sys-
tem. A real buy at $39,000.
No. 102.
3 bdrm., 2 ba. home, Ig. liv.
rm., Ig. den with numerous
cabinets and storage, chain
link fence, shallow well &
pump, storage shed. Ready
for occupancy. $37,500. No.
104.
Executive Home: 2 story, 4
bdrm., 2% ba., carpeting,
outstanding quality drapes,
g. lot, fireplace, 2 car
garage, cen. h&a. Shown by
appt. only to qualified buy-
ers. One of the nicest homes
in town. No. 114.


Excel. opportunity for a
young couple to own their
own home and have income
from the property paying
the mortgage. 3 furnished
rental units in addition to
main house. Owner financ-
ing available. Come find out
the details! $46,000. No. 100.

$3,000 down gets you into
this doll house. 2 bdrms, 1
ba.,- hardwood flo anith

125'x170'
with t house and
s8 bdg. Best buy in
town-ideal for retirees or
newlyweds. $22,500 full
price. 521 10th St. No. 105.


Beautiful executive home
on 3 landscaped lots. 3 Ig.
bdrms., 28' living rm., gar-
age and dbl. carport. Lots of
extras, including Ig. screen-
ed Florida rm. and 2 work-
shops. 602 17th St. $59,500.
No. 107.
2 bdrm., 1 ba. home on
fenced lot. Living rm. with
fireplace, din. rm., remod-
eled kitchen, utility house in
back, new cen. h&a. Call for
more information. 527 10th
St. $25,000. No. 106.
523 Third St. Owner will fi-
nance. 3 bdrms., 1 ba.
Carpeted liv. rm. with pic-
ture window. $14,000. No.
111.


Homemakers Dream--3
bdrm., 1 ba. home, fully
carpeted, separate din. rm.,
Ig. den, has drapes, refrig-
erator, stove, dishwasher.
Nice Ig. lot. 1910 Cypress
Ave. Assume existing loan
or refinance at $37,500. No.
101.

528 7th St. Owner .will
finance 25 percent dbwn,
balance at 12 percent. .2
bdrms. plus small extra rm.
1 ba. Woodburning fireplace
in liv. rm. Lg. eat-in- kit.
Back & front screened
porches. Carport. $17,000.
No. 112.


& refrigerator included in
low, low price of $24,500. No.
405.

3 bdrm., 1 ba., kitchen-din-
ing combo. Comfortable liv.
rm. w fireplace in excel.
location on beach side of
U.S. 98. Boat storage or
garage can be locked. 31st
St. No. 400.


Deluxe 4 bdrm., 2 ba. home
with cenr. h&a. Canal loca-
tion with boat dock-lg.
liv. rm, 2 formal dining rms
and comfortable den with
fireplace on 2 Ig. lots. Call
for appt. No. 406.


PRICED TO SELL 2
bdrms., 1 ba., liv. rm., din.
rm, kitchen, cen. h&a, well
insulated, utility house and
fenced in back area. Locat-
ed 1 blk. from beach on
Canal St. $22,500. No. 205.


PROFESSIONALLY DEC-
ORATED: 2 bdrm., 1 ba.,
stilt house in the pines,
comp. furnished. This doll
house is on a 75'x150' lot
with an aluminum utility
house and a playhouse for
the kids. .No. 206.


COMMERCIAL
Fully equipped store bldg.
with g. commercial cooler,
counters, display islands
* etc. on 3% acres on Hwy. 30,.
plenty of rm. for expansion
on a mobile home park, will
finance. No. 701.
Business for Sale: Conven-
ience store, St. Joe Beach, -
corner of Bay & Americus.
1,536 sq. ft., 10 dr. walk-in
cooler, paved driveway on
1% lots w concrete slab
ready for expansion or other
business. Call for details.
No.700.
30'x90' commercial lot on
corner of Reid Ave. and 5th
St. Across alley from city
hall. Priced right and owner
will finance. $12,000. No.
703.


CAPE SAN BLAS
Gulf Front, 70' on the Gulf,
90' deep, beautiful view with
fishing and sun bathing in
your front yd. A real buy at
$14,000. No. 11.
Two gorgeous dry acres of
tall pines and shrubbery
with 205' fronting on the
hwy. and bay. Just beyond
the old salt works marker.
Owner will sell all or 100' on
. either side. Financing avail-
able. No. 10.


BEACH LOTS
A large selection of excel.
building lots in Mexico
Beach, St. Joe Beach, Bea-
con Hill, plus Gulf Aire lots.
No. 901.
St Joe Beach Lg. selection
of -Beach Lots for less
than $1,000 down you can
own your own. Call today.
No. 900..
Only beach front lot left .on
the hay between town and
Tyndall. 168' of frontage, 164
ft. on Hwy. 98, approx. 300'
deep, good investment or
location fora beach cottage.
No. 902.
Beacon Hill Four lots
together 3 blks. from
beach, great buy at only
$3,500 each. Hurry and Ca
Today! No. 903.


E. B. MILLER, REALTOR

PATTY MILLER, Realtor Assoc.




648-5011 R


28th St.-2 comp. furnished
1 bdrm. apts. on valuable
lot. Beautiful view from 3rd
lot back from beach. No.
401.
Comfortable smaller 2
bdrm. home 1% blocks from
beach. Carpeted, cen. heat


Complete this partially fin-
ished house at only $19,000
and turn it into a $30-$35,000
home. Great location. 3
bdrms., 1 ba., liv. rm, din.
rm, kitchen, garage with
utility rm. only 1 block from
beach. Adjacent lot also
available. No. 207.
DREAM HOUSE: This
beach cottage is perfect for
the retiree or bachelor, 2
bdrms & den or 3 bdrms.
and 2 baths, on U.S. 98
across from beach, unusual
design, practically new,
fenced, cen. h&a, immacu-
late. $42,500. No. 208.


BEACON HILL
Gracious living can be
ours as you view the Gulf
__ brn he sundeck. of this
spacious 2 story 4 bdrm. 2
ba. home; also has Ig.
living, dining kitchen com-
bo overlooking the sparkling
gulf waters. Excellent fi-
nancing by owner. No. 300.
Plenty of space--2% lots
fenced enclose this 3 bdrm.,
2 ba. home with lg. liv. rm,
din. rm. & pleasant bright
kitchen. Extra tie ins for
trailer rental if desired.
Assume existing loan and
owner financing. $82,000.
No. 302.

3 bdrm., 1 ba. mobile home,
on 2 beautiful high and dry
lots in Beacon Hill, property
completely enclosed with a
wooden fence, plenty of
space for kids or dogs.
$25,000. No. 301.


INDIAN PASS
Be protected by Century
21's Home Protection Plan
when you purchase this
lovely 3 bdrm., 2 ba., cen.
h&a, fully modern home
only 1 blk. from beach.
$40,000. No. 602.
Observe the beauty of the
Gulf! This newly construct-
ed stilt beach home has
observation deck for view-
ing and sunning. 2 bdrms.,
insulated thruout. Call for
more info. $39,500. No. 601.



GULF AIRE

Beautiful New Home. Rock
front with fireplace 3
bdrm., 2 ba., fully carpeted
with all drapes. Cathedral
ceiling, cen. h&a, sizeable
existing mortgage which
can be assumed. Owner
transferred-by appt. only.
No. 203.

Only a few front lots left!
Over 35 lots have been pur-
chased in this planned com-
munity. Prices will increase
soon. 11 percent financ-
ing. Invest for appreciation
or build now.


MOBILE HOME LOT: 75'x
150', 1% blks. from beach,
ready to move your mobile
home on, all utilities are in,
well, septic tank, power
pole, etc. No. 202.

This spacious brick home
has lovely natural wood
interior, 3 Ig. bdrms., 2
baths, den with magnificent
view of Gulf. 25' kitchen-din-
ing rm, Ig. liv. rm. with
fireplace, fenced dog run in
back, huge bay windows,
sun deck. Located on east
side of Hwy. 98. Call today.
No. 209.


JONES
HOMESTEAD
Country living, close to
town. 4 space bdrms.,
newlyvemoed ex., 1g.
kitchen, 1% acres complete-
ly fenced with new chain
link, dog pens, plenty gar-
den space, numerous fruit
trees, and all close to town,
ideal for children, farm or
nursery. Call today on this
one. $48,500. No. 109.

WHITE CITY
2 yr. old stone & stucco
home. Modern, easy to heat
& cool. Stone fireplace in
den. 2 full baths, 3 bdrms.
Small carpeted. Modern, effi-
cient kitchen with built-in
range top and wall oven.
Pishwasher. Lg. 100'x165'
lot with plenty of garden
space. Charles Ave. No. 022.

HIGHLAND VIEW
Plenty of room in this 3
bdrm. home, Ig. closets, 1
ba., liv. rm., kitchen & din.
combo, utility rm., garage,
den. $29,500. No. 500.
Over % acre of good earth
goes with this 4 bdrm.
home, including 2 story
barn to house your garden-
ing tools. Grape arbor,
pecan tree & chain link
fence are all here, plus
extra apt. adjoining main
house which can be rented.
$28,000. No. 501.

OAK GROVE
$7,500 total price on, this
sturdy 1 bdrm. mobile
home, has extra child's
room or great room; on
corner lot with a pick-up
camper body for extra -tor-
age. Owner will finance'No.
108.
2 lots, chain link fence,
grass, landscaping, stor.
sheds, carport. 12x65' mob-
ile home in excel. cond. with
cen. h&a. A most comfort-
able arrangement. No. 110.

Do it yourselfer's dream: A
little elbow grease and you
could easily double your
investment in this 2 story, 4
bdrm., 2 kitchen home.
Could e made into 2 apts.
Large lot with plenty of gar-
den space on a dead end st.
Utility house included at
$13,500. No. 103.


AFTER HOURS
JIM CLEMENT 648-5482
Associate
SANDRA CLENNEY 229-6310 NATALIE SHOAF 227-1498
Realtor Associate Associate


route 3, Box 167A Port St. Joe, Fla. 32456

1829 Hwy. 98 MEXICO BEACH


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1981 PAGE SEVEN





ANT ADSIJ


FOR RENT
Mexico Beach
St. Joe Beach
Furnished cottages,
from $140 per mo. to
$300 mo.
Marguerite Wainwright
Realtor
648-8220
900BE. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach

Large 2 bedroom trailer at
St. Joe Beach for rent. Call
229-8939. tic 12-18





Wanted to Buy: Needed im-
mediately: Mobile home, pay
for like rent, limit $125.00 per
month. Write to, with details,
M&A, P. 0. Box 464, East-
point, FL 32328. ltp 1-15


For Sale or Rent: 4 bdrm.
home with recently fenced in
front yard and new roof. In
need of some minor repair,
but considering city expan-
sion an excellent investment.
(Only selling due to job).
$19,000 firm or rent for $180.00
per mo. with references and 1
month rent deposit in ad-
vance. See by appt. at 521 9th
St. Call 229-8948. 3tp 1-8

Lot for sale by owner at
Selma Street, St. Joe Beach.
75x180' plus. Call 648-8954.
tfc 12-25

Beacon Hill, two lots, fenced
yard, 3 bdrm., 1 ba. double
wide trailer. $25,000. 229-6961
or 648-8971. tfc 9-25




Perfection 45,000 btu re-
verse-flow wall furnace, ex-
cellent condition. $200. 229-
6157 after 5 p.m. Itp 1-15

One pkg. unit electric heat,
10 k.w., 2 ton cooling unit, $450.
Includes the return, and some
12" pipe, thermostat. Call 227-
1777. 2tp 1-8

Maple den furniture, good
cond. Zippered, cushioned
sofa and chair. Call 227-1565.

300 gal. stee4 fuel tank with
wall furnace, 25" color TV
with rotary & antenna, desk &
chair. Call 227-1848. ltp 0

AVON
To Buy or Sell
For Gulf or Bay counties. Call
collect 871-1649 or write Dist.
Sales Mgr. Margaret Rick-
man, P. O. Box 10403, Parker,
FL 32401. tfc 8-21





2 bedroom furnished apart-
ment at Mexico Beach. $135
per month. Call 229-8630.
ltp 1-15

3 bedroom unfurnished
house at 523 Third St. 229-6672.

Nice 2 bdrm. furn. down-
stairs apt. for rent on 216% 6th
St. All electric kitchen appli-
ances. Couple only. Call 229-
8663. 2tc 1-15

Thames Hotel, day, weekly,
monthly rates. 302 Reid Ave.
229-8723. tfc 11-13

No need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
227-1251. tfc 10-23
Furnished 2 bdrm. house,
auto. heat, no pets; furnished
large one bdrm. apt., auto
heat, no pets. 229-6777 after 7
pm. tfc 11-8

For carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vac, the portable steam car-
pet cleaning system. Avail-
able at Western Auto, phone
227-1105, 219 Reid Ave.
tfc 3-16

Two bedroom apt. and
campers for rent on Beach. By
day, week, month or year. Ski
Breeze Camp Sites. Call 229-
6105. tfc 11-20


RED CARTER'S GUN SHOP
Port St. Joe Beach
Gunsmithing- Blueing
New & Used Guns Scopes
tfc 10-2


rw COVE I

229-6699 !

229 8th St.
Port St. Joe
\ggnggjguieuSDDDS^


The V.F.W. will meet every
second Tues. and fourth Thur-
sday of each month at Paul-
ine's Rest. at 7 p.m. tfic 5-31

There will be a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe
Lodge No. 111, F. & A.M.
every first and third Thursday
at 8:00 p.m.
JOE ST. CLAIR, W.M.
J. P. Cooley, Sec.

R.A.M.-Regular convoca-
tion of St. Joseph Chapter No.
56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd Mon-
days, 8 p.m. All visiting com-
panions welcome.
E. E. WEEKS, H.P.
E. William McFarland, Sec.

The Disabled American Vet-
erans, Port St. Joe Chapter 62,
will meet the first Tuesday
and third Thursday of each
month at 7 p.m. at Pauline's
Restaurant. tfic 9-4

EQUITY I
If you are a home owner, you
could be eligible to borrow up
to $50,000 and you could use
the money for any purpose.
Call us today 769-1535 James
H. Crews, Licensed Mortgage
Broker, 6242 E. Hwy. 98,
Panama City. tfic 12-4




Six family yard sale, Fri.,
Jan. 16th and Sat., Jan. 17th,
9:00 a.m. Mexico Beach, 208
Tennessee St. Just follow the
signs. Depression glass, dish-
es, clothes, household items,
plants, furniture and misc.
items. ltp 1-15

In-Home Sale, 404 Madison
St., Oak Grove, Thursday
only, starts at nine a.m. All
types dishes, beds, linens, etc.
Also would like to buy a double
bed and chest of drawers.
229-6762. It 1-15

Yard Sale, Saturday, Jan.
18th, 9:00 a.m. till. 527 7th St.
Items include: toys, games,
boy's clothes, size 12, Ig. .&
small ladies clothes, includ-
ing winter coats. Glassware,
pottery, whatnots, tools, and
many more useful items.


Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday 4:00 P.M. EST
St. James Episcopal Church

St. Joseph Bay
Constrcico






W.S.Biff) Quarles
CUSTOM HOMES-
REMODELING
229-8795











Going Fishing?
Stop here first
for a complete
tine of

Fishing Tackle1

Hurlbut Supply
30 Reid Ave.


MEXICO BEACH


ST. JOE BEACH


"Ithink it wo> something I o@t"



kills bugs for
up to six months,
and oves you obout $100 yoerl
in costly pest control services.
Use of Sprayer free with
purchase of Rid-A-Bug
HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St Joe& Florida


Applications are .being ac-
cepted by the Gulf County
Senior Citizens Association,
Inc. for the position of book-
keeper 8 hrs. per day, 5 days
per week. A high school educa-
tion with training and experi-
ence in bookkeeping are mini-
mum requirements. The book-
keeper will be required to
prepare the payroll, to main-
tain monthly, quarterly, and
year-end reports; to prepare
all reports according to feder-
al requirements; to meet the
financial obligations of the
project with promptness; re-
port appropriate financial
matters to the Project Direc-
tor and the Board of Direc-
tors, and provide further as-
sistance to either as they may
require.
Applications will be accept-
ed through Friday, January
16th, 1981, and may be obtain-,
ed at the Gulf County Senior
Citizens Association office at
Avenue D and Peters Avenue,
Port St. Joe. This is an equal
opportunity employer.
2t 1-8

Needed: News-Herald car-
riers for north Port St. Joe:
Call Mr. Cox for information,
229-8019. 2tc 1-15






FOUND: Hunting dog in
vicinity of Lake Wimico. May
claim by describing and pay-
ing for food and ad. 227-
1363. It 1-15





FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned persons intend to register
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf
County, Florida, tour weeks after the
first publication of this notice, the
fictitious name or trade name under
which they will be engaged in business
and In which said business is to be
cartled on, to-wit:
ST. JOSePH SAY CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY
P.O. Box 277
Port St. Joe, Florida
Owner: William S. (Biff) Quarles, III
4tc1-1


JOE BETSEY-The name
that's synonymous to paint-
ing. Call 769-7368. 5tc 1-1

BEACON FABRICS
Sewing Notions & Patterns
Hwy. 98 at Overstreet
Hrs.: 9:00-5:00 E.S.T.
Closed Sun. & Mon.

JAMISON ELECTRIC
24 Hr. Service
Residential, Commercial,
Rewiring, Repairs, Ser-
vice Change.
1406 Long Ave.
229-6516
tfc 11-13
Complete Wood Shop
Custom Cut Lumber
Want to Do It Yourself?
Then come see us for Stan-
ley tools, hardware, paneling,
paint, lumber.
Earley's Hardware &
Building Supply
Hwy. 98 W. 227-1763
tfc 8-5

CAREFOOT SEPTIC TANK
Septic Tank Cleaning
Phone 229-8007
tfc 11-30

BEACH MOBILE HOME
SERVICE
Supplies & Service
Call 648-8363
tfc 8-21

Psychological services for
anyone with problems in day-
to-day living. Gulf County
Guidance Clinic, Port St. Joe.
227-1145. (24 hrs.)


Church Supplies
Music Records Tapes
Rubber Stamps
Hospital & Funeral Flowers
Gifts Bibles
Sound Studio Recording
Service

7-OAKS
GOSPEL SUPPLIES
115 Hunter St., Oak Grove
Port St. Joe, Fla.
227-1325
1fe4l


I


|-


STATE OF FLORIDA, COUNTY OF
GULF.
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE Is hereby given that on the
7th day of January, 1981, pursuant to a
Writ of Execution Issued in the County
Court of Gulf County, Florida, Case
Number 80-167 in the cause of CHARLES
AND MINNIE PRICE, PLAINTIFFS,
VS. LAMAR AND JULIE CAUSEY,
DEFENDANTS, I, KEN MURPHY,
SHERIFF. OF GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA, have levied upon the proper-
ty of the defendant, to-wit:
1 1966 Chevrolet Truck, white in
color, Serial Number C3636A122537
On the 10th day of February, 1981, at
Two O'Clock (2:00) (EST) in the
afternoon on the steps of the Gulf County
Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, I will
offer for sale said property for cash to
the highest bidder, subject to all prior
liens, if any, to satisfy said Writ of
Execution.
-s- Ken Murphy, Sheriff,
Gulf County, Florida
4t 1-15
PUBLIC NOTICE
There will be a meeting of the City
Commission acting as the Port St. Joe
Planning Board, (LPA) in order to
receive public comments on the pro-
posed comprehensive plan. Copies of the
plan may be reviewed at the office of the
city clerk. The meeting will be held In
city hall at 8:00. P.M., E.S.T. on
February 3, 1981.
3t 1-15

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR.
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 80-56
CITIZENS FEDERAL SAVINGS AND
LOAN ASSOCIATION OF PORT ST.
JOE, a corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHARLES D. HARVEY, et al., -
Defendants.
CASE NO. 80-37
,MERIT LOAN CO., INC., of Florida,:
d-b-a MERIT FINANCE CO., Plaintiff,-
vs.
CHARLES 0. HARVEY, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to a Final Judgment of Fore-.
closure dated January 8, 19t1, and'
entered in Civil Cases number 80.56ahdcr
80-37 of the Circuit Court in and for Gult
County, Florida, wherein Citizens Fed-.
eral Savings and Loan Association of-
Port St. Joe is plaintiff in case number'
80-56, and Merit Loan Co., Inc., of:
Florida Is Plaintiff In case number 80.37,
and Charles D. Harvey and wife, Judith.
L. Harvey and Merit Loan Co., Inc., of
Florjda are Defendants In case number
80-56, I will sell to the highest and best
G bidder for cash at the front door of the
Gulf County Courthouse In Port St. Joe,
Firoida, at 11:00 A.M., E.S.T., on the
30th day of January, 1981, the follow-
ing described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment.
Lots Nine (9) and Ten (10), Block
Two (2), Stebel Heights Subdivi ion,
as per plat on file in the Office of the
Clerk of Circuit Court.of Gulf County.
DATED THfS-1th -daye of January,
A.D. 1981.
-s- Jerry Gates,
Clerk, Circuit Court
Gulf County, Florida
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) 2tc 1-15


ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work Welding
506 First Street
Phone 229-6803
Machinist on duty all day
every day
Carpentry Work Done
Reasonable Rates
Jimmy Johnson
Phone 229-8757
tic 2-2

FOR TRACTOR WORK
Call 229-8939 or 648-5306
tic 8-14



SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!









Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
Leon Pollock, Owner
410 Reid Avenue
'I


I SRVIES








A Il


.4


a a lb.


TABLERITE BEEF ROUND-BONE
D Shoulder Roast


U U U U U U U U U U


TABLERITE BEEF
DWhole Beef Loins...........


TABLERITE LEAN
Center Cut Pork Chc
TABLERITE LEAN
Country Style Back
PREMIUM GRADE
Fryer Quarters (LEGSORB
SUNNYLAND
Hotel Sliced Bacon
LYKES REG. OR BEEF
Wieners..........
LYKES
Red Hot Sausage..
GWALTNEY
Chicken Franks ...
OLD SMITHFIELD HOT OR MILD
Pork Sausage Rolls


)ps

Bon

REASTS)


* a. .

es .

U U U U U


1


* U U U U U U U

* U U U U U U U


1
9


8 n a a1


$158

$189
Ib.
$178
lb.

lb. $1 8
Ib. I

2 oz.9
pkg.

12 oz.
pkg.

-2 oz.


I BKEY EPA T EN -


Massengill Medicated.
Aqua Fresh Toothpaste
Sucrets (Aduts,C.Child.Mnt,Rog)


9*z
*5 s ize52
4's 0z.
* tube
24 cl.
*..Pko.


991
g99
$139


IGA
Dunkin Sticks ....
IGA
Petite Rolls ......
IGA
Old Fashion Bread


0 @
5 0** 2
a a a a 6 2,


pa s$1 19


20oz.$1 29


at

~getfodo4~oJoIM


I ELH& BAUY ID








DAVID RICH'S IGA


B1ISLIR1WI
U.S. Pf~eAGE I
8.4e PAID
wowwaht;m.I~


Foodliner


... Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka


Prices Good Jan. 14
- Jan. 20. 1980


.PRICED RIGHT


I.;


J#

md rwA0


RONCO THIN OR VERMICELLI $
Spaghetti a2 : Is.

SPAGHETTI SAUCF 7
Ragu... a .. "a:c 7Z

IGAKRISPY 9
SALTINES ox4
F bFODx


KRAFT
Grape Jelly .....
PINK BEAUTY
Salmon .......
KRAFT
1000 Isle Dressing
TETLEY
Tea Bags .......
IGA
Family Napkins ..
LIQUID CLEANER
Pine-Sol .......
CLEANSER
Comet .........
~."* T < ~'


jar
15%oz. $ 199
Euo.16~$ 19
btl.


S ...
. B .
* 2
..2


X $199

Pkg. 59*
:,15 99
14 oz. 7
cns 79


IIRY IPRT EN


IGA BLUE BONNET
ORANGE JUICE 3:. 99 MARGARINE
IGA KRAFT
Crinkle Cut Potatoes ......... pkg. CHEESE D. EDDR (YOUR
CHEESE OR COLBY CHOICE)
AoA 12 oz. KRAFT
Assorted Pizzas ... ........ ize. M Shredded Cheese OZZA
MRS. SMITH'S IGA
Apple Pies .. ............ I n:$..1 e,,A BUTERMILKOR


-- -or- .......
BIRDS EYE
CUT OR WHOLE OKRA ......


l2e:oz


$1


DIMlUUits SWEETMILK. .
SEALTEST LIGHT N' LIVELY
Cottage Cheese..


a a


ELLA OR
A a 5 a


8 oz.
. pkg.


* SB...... *..
* *. 3***~ *U3


129


4 can
pak.
,12 o. 9
cOn


Large Sunkist

LEMONS /-69
i '


Fresh Florida Bulk
CARROTS


3 b.
tray


...


69


Lg. Bunches
TURNIPS, COLLARDS, MUSTARD


Red Bliss Pontiac Best Grade
SEED POTATOES 10


Because We Haul Our Own

Kiln Dried Ga. Red 3 b. tray $ 00

SWEET POTATOES $
Full Line of
FERTIUZER, GARDEN SEED


lb.$239


Tray Pak
RADISHES


. .a mmaa.a


Extra Fancy
Red Delicious Apples


tray 10

. Ib. 39


Golden Del. Apples bag 69
Mix or Match

Florida Iceberg
LETTUCE

Green Head
CABBAGE


4


[Bpoi"


Rich's Produce Is Always Freshest


6


4 .


;:.


lb.


I o. 11






Here's the Key to

BG SAVINGS!

SGGLY


Piggly Wiggly
the FIRST


To Bring You


Dinnerware Promotion
Tableware Promotion
Produce Truck Sale
AND NOW
wn Pricii


PORK & BEA

3" 1


SunsetOd"


'/2 gal


5Lb.
Bag


Jim Dandy
GRITS


29


$


Gatorade .32 oz. 59


A1I


mole


Grade A Fryer Part
BREAST,
THIGHS, Lb.
DRUMSTICKS


88C


Fresh Pork


NECKBONES, FEET,
MAWS, LIVER


Lb.


Rath Pork
Hot or Mild
PORK
SAUSAGE Lb


Good Value
All Meat or
BEEF
FRANKS


Fresh Skinned
and Deveined
BEEF
LIVER


Lb78


17 oz.
LeSueur Peas
6 oz.
Starkist Tuna
Luzianne
Tea Bags 100oo


Corn Flakes 24 oz .
12 oz. $1 2
Armour Treet 1
Kraft $12
Mayonnaise 32 oz. 1
Large Roll
Scott Towels 79
Gerber
Baby Food 412 oz. 16


Crisco Oil 48 oz.
Bryan 3 Oz.
Potted Meat 21
Jiff 18 Oz.
Peanut Butter $1
Mrs. Traylor
Dumplings 12 oz.


Florida Navel
.0, ORANGES


Med. Yellow Onions .... 3 lb. bag 89
Sno-White Cauliflower.... Head 99C


$F
5 For


10 Lb. Round White
POTATOES $179
Sunkist
LEMONS...... Doz. 89C
Western or Bosc O/$o00
PEARS...... oa


Washington State Red Delicious
APPLES


Cold Power
'ERGENT


t4 I1


4
5

)c
0



Assorted Varities Frozen
TOTINO PIZZAS

12 Oz. 09


97
49


RC COLAS


Plus Deposit












MINUTES
of the


Board of Public Instruction


12-80 The meeting was called to IlI. PERSONNEL
The Gulf County School met order with the invocation by On recommendation of the
in regular session on the above Sewell and followed by the Superintendent, motion by
date with the following mem- Pledge of Allegiance. Greer, second by Sewell, 'he
bears present: Waylon Gra- I. APPROVAL OF MINUTES board unanimously approved
ham; Paul Sewell; Ted Whit- On motion by Sewell, second the following personnel mat-
field; Fred Greer. by Whitfield, the minutes of ters: I
Chairman Raffield was ab- November .4, and November Accepted a letter of resig-
sent. 18, 1980 were read, corrected nation from Jane Walker,
The Superintendent was and approved, effective December 1, 1980;
present. II. HEAR FROM PUBLIC Appointed Carolyn Turner



Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


HANNON INSURANCE

Agency, Inc.

The Insurance Store Since 1943


Auto Home Business Life,

Flood Bonds Mutual Funds
8:30 til 6:00 Monday through Friday

221 Reid Avenue Phone 227-1133

We are HERE to Service What We Sell

ROY SMITH, Agent FRANK HANNON, Agent
..I.... ....II


to a teaching position at Port
St. Joe High School for the
remainder of the 1980-81
school year;
Approved Winston Wells be
assigned as Principal Desig-
nee at Highland View Elemen-
tary School for the 1980-81
school year;
Approved Janice Gainer for
a guidance aid position at Port
St. Joe High School for the
remainder of the 1980-81 sc-
hool year;
Accepted the resignation of
Pat Stripling as secretary at
Wewahitchka High School,'
effective October 3, 1980;
Accepted the resignation of
Phyllis Gortman as Bus driver
for Wewahitchka High School;
Accepted the resignation of
Rebecca Hunt as part-time
lunchrom worker at Wewa-
hitchka Elementary School;
The appointment of a lunch-
room worker for Wewahitchka
Elementary School was tabled
until the January meeting;
Approved Roy Whitfield be
employed with maintenance
Department as county-wide
pest control for three hours
per day;
Approved Thelma Lewis be
employed as custodial worker
at Port St. Joe Elementary
School for six hours per day;
Approved Franciane "Mor-
gan be employed as oi job
training at Port St. Joe High
School as a custodian for three
hours per day;
Accepted Lula Wilson's let-
ter not to retire at.the end of
the 1980-81 school year; 5'
Accepted Frank Barnes'
letter regarding his plans to
apply for retirement effective
July 1, 1981; '
IV. ELECT MEMBERS OF
TAX EQUALIZATION AND
WEWAHITCHKA REdBEA-
TION COMMITTEE
The board elected Ted Whit-
field and Waylon Graham to


serve on the Tax Equaliza-
tion Board and Fred Greer to
serve on the Wewahitchka
Recreation Committ ec.
V. TRANSPORTATION
On motion by Greer, Second
by Sewell, the board "unani-
mously voted yes to approve a
parents request for transpor-
tation inside tuo-mile limit.
A written request for a new
pupil stop was considered. on
motion by 'Greer, second by
Sewell the board voted to
establish a stop at this time.
VI. RESOLUTION SUP-
PORTING SALARY IM-
PROVEMENTS
On recommendation of the
Superintendent, motion by
Greer, second by Whitfield,
the board unanimously voted
yes to adopt a Resolution in
support of the Cabinet's goal
that the average teacher's
salary in Florida will rank
nationally, as compared to
other states in the top 25th
percentile.
VII. BID MATTERS
Bids were received on Cer-
tificates of Deposits from
Wewahitchka State Bank and
Florida First National Bank.
On motion by Sewell, second
by Whitfield, all voted yes to
accept the highest and best bid
of the Wewahitchka State
Bank. Copies of all bids are in
file in the Superintendent's
office.
VIII. STUDENT MATTERS
On recommendation of the
Superintendent, motion by
Greer, second by Sewell, the
board approved that David
Weeks withdraw from Port St.
Joe High School and enter
Gulf County Adult Institute.
IX. BUDGET MATTERS
Copies of each cost center
budgets were distributed, no
action necessary.
X. SUPERINTENDENT'S
REPORT
On recommendation of the


WedoesdaELEGANT





14* TM SmYA 1f'~ n


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1981


PAGE ELEVEN


School News...

Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School

BY LESLIE COSTIN


It's finally six weeks time
again. This marks the end of
the first semester at Port St.
Joe High School. Students will
be taking tests on Wednesday
and Thursday of this week.
Good luck to everyone on their
tests!


Our basketball gym floor
has recently been painted and
refinished. We are lucky to
have such a nice school and
gym, we should be proud of it!
Friday during school the
Sharks hosted the Florida
High Demons in our gym.
-Junior Varsity and Varsity
teams won their games. Con-
gratulations!
The Varsity basketball team
is now 10-0, after beating Bay
High Monday night. Keep up
the good work Sharks!
Juniors and Seniors,, the


registration deadline for the
February 14, 1981 administra-
tion of the ACT test, is
January 16, 1981.
The 1981 wrestling team has
begun their season. Watch for
time and place of wrestling
matches, and come support
the Sharks!
Students will be happy to
know that they will have a
holiday on Friday, January 16,
1981. The purpose of the
holiday is for a teacher
work-day. Have a nice long
weekend students!


Low Income Residents May


Apply for Heat Assistance


Low-income Florida res-
idents can begin applying now
in Bay, Calhoun, Franklin,
Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Jack-
son, Leon, Liberty, Madison,
Taylor, Wakulla and Wash-,
ington counties for grants
from the Low Income Energy
Assistance Program.
The program, authorized by


the federal Home Energy
Assistance Act of 1980, is
designed to help low-income
families and individuals offset
the rising cost of heating their
homes this winter. Payments
will be made to individual
households and operators of
some housing projects on
behalf of their eligible costs.


Lime Helps Control


Available Nutrients


by
Roy Lee Carter
County Extension Director
Plants require at least 16
different elements. Three of
these are: carbon, hydrogen
and oxygen that are supplied
to the plants from the air and
water. The other 13 are
generally supplied to the
plants from -the soil. The
availability of these soil-
supplied nutrients are greatly
controlled by soi4 reaction; the
pH of the soil, the acidity or
alkalinity of the soil.
.The availability of most of
these essential elements to
plants is at its highest within
the pH range of 6.0 to 7.0 This
is true for the major plant
nutrients nitrogen, phos-
phorus and potassium and
the secondary elements -
sulfur, calcium and magne-
sium.
Of these six elements phos-
phorus is most effected by soil
pH. As the pH drops below pH
6.0, the very acid range,
other elements such as iron
and aluminum combine with
phosphorus. The availability
of phosphorus to plants is also
reduced in very alkaline soils,
at pH values above 7.5. At this
range calcium reacts with
phosphorus to reduce its avail-
ability. This reduction of


Superintendent, motion by
Greer, second by Sewell, the
board unanimously approved
maintenance and repair pro-
jects for the 1980-81 school
year.
XI. PAYMENT OF BILLS
(to be in official board book)
XIII. ADJOURN
There being no further
business, the meeting ad-
journed to meet again on
January 6, 1981 at 5:30 p.m.
ATTEST:
B. WALTER WILDER
GENE RAFFIELD


phosphorus availability is not
as great as in acid soils.
The effect of pH is just the
opposite with all of the micro-
nutrients except molybde-
num. Iron, magnese,. boron,
copper and zinc are more
available to plants in acid soils
than in limed soils. In fact,
liming sandy soils to a pH of
7.0 is not a desirable practice.
'It can create deficiencies of
micronutrients such as mang-
anese, boron, zinc and in some
cases iron:
So to be sure the essential
plant elements is your soil are
being efficiently taken-up by
plants, use lime properly.
Have your soil tested and
apply lixme only when needed
and only iq the amount
recommended..


The Department of. Health
and Rehabilitative Services,
which is administering the
program, estimates that more
than 500,000 low-income house
holds in Florida may be
eligible for aid. A total of $19.7
million in heating-assitance
grants will be distributed in
the state.
To qualify for assistance,-
households must meet in-
come standards based on:
family size and total cast
income of all household mem-
hers. Income limits will begin;
at $316 per month for air
indidual and increase for-
larger households.
People interested in apply-
ing for the low-income energy-
assistance program must do
so by Jan. 30. Applications are
available at all local Health
and Rahabilitative Services
offices and at other agencies
that serve low-income people,
especially agencies that serve
elderly, handicapped and mi-
grant people. All applications
must be recieved by Health
and Rehabilitative Services or
be postmarked on or before
midnight Jan. 30.
Applications will be notified
by mail whether they are
eligible for assistance, health
and Rehabilitative Services
officials said all notices should
go out by March 15, For
further information, call 487-
1759 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.


COMPLTETOUR
NEW COT J FTI
WrIH THESE MATCHING
ACviS ORY PTFP S
These accessory sets are on sale
*during the entire program with no
purchase requirement. Add as many
of these pieces as you like to complete
your collection. Then enjoy the new,
refreshing look these elegant stainless
patterns will bring to your table!


ACMmSSOV4Y SETS
SET OUR SPECIAL
PRICE


1. 4 Iced Tea Spoons
2. 1 Pastry Server
1 Gravy Ladle
3. 2 Tablespoons
1 Cold Meat Fork
4. 1 Sugar Spoon
1 Butter Knife
SPierced Tablespoon


ONLY

$2999

PER SET
No Purchase
N sMrWy


'I ________________________________________________________________


PLACE SEATING

ONL


NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING
Of Members of Citizens Federal
Savings & Loan Association of Port St. Joe
The annual meeting of members of Citizens Federal
Savings & Loan Association of Port St. Joe, will be held
on WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1981, at 2:00 O'Clock
PM., E.S.T., In the office of the Association at 401 Fifth
Street, Port St. Joe, Florida, for the purpose of electing
directors for the ensuing term, and to transact any
other business which may legally come before said
meeting.
C. J. STEVENS, JR.
Secretary-Treasurer
Citizens Federal will be closed for business at 12:00
O'Clock noon on Wednesday, January 21, 1981, in order
to hold the annual meeting of members.

Citizens Federal

Savings and Loan Association
of Port St. Joe


Gulf Accounting Service, Inc.

321 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe


Accounting Tax Returns


Bookkeeping


Financial Reports



Short Form Tax Return



$7.51 before February 1



Phone 229-6332


L~ar~-IPIIL~ _-;uu I


.-* ** '"-




f t11


U


*


9 *


*1---


N


AT CANT BEAT' PRICES !


Lipton Limit with $10.00 Order

Tea Bags coun


99


12 1-Ounce Packages Carnation
HOT COCOA MIX .


10' Ounce Fine Fare
TOMATO SOUP.


$1.28


. 3 .


a3a 3 a 3.a ..a a.


5 Lb. Bag Jim Dandy
QUICK GRITS.............. $1.039
Hi Dri Large Rolls
PAPERTOWELS................59


3 Ounce Jar Nestea Limit 1 with $10 Order or More
NESTEA INSTANT TEA.


3 Pound Jar Fine Fare This Is A Super Bargain
PEANUT BUTTER .......


$1.99


$2.99


Meritao
Sweetheart Bread.
S 7/4 Oz. Brach's Thin
CHOCOLATE MINTS


12 Ounce China Doll
BLACKEYE PEAS .
24 Oz. Morton House (Meal for 2)
BEEF STEW .......
19 Ounce Packages
* OREO COOKIES.....
16 Oz. Kraft 1000 Island
SALAD DRESSING...
S6 Ounce Hunt's
TOMATO PASTE ....
5 Lbs. Jim Dandy
, CORN MEAL ......
Oal. Prestone
ANTI-FREEZE


.. 2/$109


99'


a 2 .


2/69
$1.19
$1.59


24 Oz. Hershey's
CHOCOLATE BOTTLE
No Return A.&W. (& Sugar Free)
ROOT BEER .....60
24 Oz. Fine Fare
SALAD MUSTARD ...
32 Ounce Fine Fare
APPLE JUICE ......


$1.19 Mrs. Filbert's Golden '/4's
3/99c MARGARINE


$1.49
4/$100


*6


590
69c


Lb. 69


Pillsbury
$1.25 Oatmeal Raisin Cookies $1.49
4 Pak Pillsbury Buttermilk I OLz Shredded
99 BisCountry Style 88es
$4.99 Biscuits 88 Cheese


S'*r~rav Svlea av a S eM eaa-ySv M e ta aeway Save more -)t Sl~vewdy -


0 .


* U


9 a


Sav oe vr ayWe o hpAtS ew


I


I II r I-


Dairy Items


_ _


p


< *'"


~srs~





U

~


Limit 2 Doz.
$ 10 Order or


U U


U U *~


a 9-


SJumbo Eggs


Doz.
with
More


. .. .....i lmkd


'Shank & Butt Ham ...Lb.. 99C
HAM STEAKS ..... Lb. $1.59
ILykes Fully Cooked I I
Halves Party $ 99

Hams Lb.


Choice Tender Sirloin


:Choice Tender Rib Eye
STEAKS 4


Select Skinned Deveined
Beef Liver ......


:"Center Cut
Pork Chops...
Country Style
Loin Ribs ....
Fresh
Ox Tails......
Meaty Rib
Stew Beef....


99


Lb99
wasU9*1


L. $1.79


Lb.
*Em.


$1.19


. $1.29


Lb.
* U U


$1.39


Whole or Half

Slab Bacon


Sliced Free


Pound


5 Pounds or More '
Ground Chuck Lb.$1
Flavorite 12 Oz. Pkg.
SLICED BACON 88
Bef onue reash1 $2.69


Beef Tongues Frsh. $2.69
Smoked Pork Chops 4b$2.19
FRESH HOG MAW 49c
FRESH PIG FEET Lb. 39C
PIG TAILS, EARS k- 59'
Power Pak Franks 06CQ
Power Pak Bologna cl46
Sliced Smoked Picnics Lb88
Fresh Ham Halves 4.$1.39
Apalachicola Oysters .-$2.69


" Country Cousin
FRENCH FRIES
Pound 9
Bg a$1.29


Washington State
Red or Gold. Del.

)plesLb.


\rs, Trayler's Homemade
DUMPLINGS 12oz.
Doz. Fine Fare
lazed Donuts
Oz. Birdseye
ool Whip
z. Minute Maid
range Juice 2/
aers
arlic Bread


$159

990
790
88119
$119


I0

69c
69


Green Head 2 /8 8C Fresh C
Cabbage 2/18 Broccoli Bu. 0


Fresh
Rutabagas


Fresh
Cauliflower


Lb. 25'


Lb. 99


0 .


9 0


a 9 a


-


C U


*


0 r


S-.


The
Best Dressed
MEAT CASE
In Town


9


vr .


,


lI


91


dl


0


J


*E









PAGE FOURTEEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1981



Market Value of Gul


The market value of agri-
cultral products sold by the 42
farms in Gulf County was $2.3
million for 1978 or an average
of $55.904 each, up from $1.4
million in 1974 with an accom-


The Thursday Night Ladies
League bowled for the first'
time in the new year January
8 with the following results:
On lanes one and two St. Joe
Furniture won three from
Renfro. Diane Weeks' 184



Alcohol

Is Top

Killer
It has been estimated that
half of the people who die in.
traffic crashes die as a result
of one of the drivers using
excessive amounts of alcohol
said the Florida Highway
Patrol today.
Colonel Eldridge Beach,
Patrol Director said, "Ap-
:paretnly the old admonition of
'If you drive, don't drink,'
failed to convince drivers
involved in many crashes."
: "Possibly a better warning
would be for people to learn
their limit. With the body
burning up about one ounce of
alcohol per hour, drinkers
should pace themselves up to
their limit."
It has been proven that
;some people are physically
affected with only one or two
drinks while others can handle
more. A beer is usually
compared to a one ounce
drink.
"With Florida setting an
all-time high traffic deaths in
1980 with just under 3,000
people, and half of those killed
as a result of alcohol," said
Beach, "our drivers need to
take stock of their driving
habits before it gets worse."


paying increase in produc-
tion costs, according to a
preliminary report of the 1978
Census of Agriculture re-
leased recently by the Bureau
of the Census.


game was 40 pins over her
average. Teamates Peggy
Heacock was 34 pins over
average with a 173 game and
Toby Gray bowling with a 124
average had a 150 game and
Brenda Mathis picked up the
eight-ten split. They bowl for
St. Joe Furniture. On Renfro
Trudy Pate bowling with a 138
average had a 165 high game
and 454 series. She picked up
the 2-7-10 split, nice bowling
Trudy.: Team mate Cheryl
Elder's 151 game was 39 pins
over her average and Mar-
garet Moore's 131 game was 29
pins over her average.
Highland View Motors and
The Sandpipers split the wins
on lanes three and four.
Carolyn Wright and Marian
Deeson both had a 173 game -
and Irene Burkett bowling
over her 121 average with a
154 and 152 games for the
Sandpiper's. On HVM's Mary
Whitfield was high with a 182
game and 512 series. Bertha
Clayton had a 179 game and
Sandra Brock's 169 game was
.39 pins over her average.
On lanes five and six
Murphy's won three from
Earley's Hardware. Lou
Mork's 163 game was high.
Team mate Ginnie Laurimore
was 36 pins over her average
with a 152 game. Sharon
Shearer with a 112 average
had a 143 game. Earley's
Joyce, Margie and Wanda
practiced for next week!
Also just practicing on lanes
seven and eight were Pepsi
Cola and Dollar General.
Pepsi Cola had a lot of luck on
their side and won three.
Graice Schultz's 142 game was
the only one worth mentioning
for Pepsi. On Dollar General
Lillian Anderson picked up the
3-7-10 split -(maybe next
week).
STANDINGS:
Pepsi Cola 50% 13%
HVM 45% 18%
St. Joe Furniture 42 22
Sandpipers 38 25%
Murphy's 32 32
Dollar General 20% 41%
Earley's Hardware 14 50
Renfro' 13 49


HOMELITE


11GHTWEIGHT


XL2 CHAIN SAW

MAKES CUTTING

TWICE-AS-EASY





r FRONT TRIGGER
For control on small
jobs like pruning.,













REAR TRIGGER
For leverage on big
jobs like cutting
firewood or lumber.
. T Trademark of Homellte, a division of Textron Inc.



St. Joe Hardware

Phone 229-8028 203 Reid Ave.
L- .1


While the value of gross
sales rose, the farmers' costs
also climbed since 1974. For
example, expenditures for fer-
tilizer for 1978 were $392,000
compared to $378,000; costs of
gasoline, diesel and ,other
petroleum products were 135,-
000 compared to $124,000.
Farm energy costs of all types
totaled $143,000 for 1978. The
estimated market value of
machinery and equipment per
farmincreased from $47,593 to
$52,410.
Of the total farms in the
county, seven had gross sales
of $20,000 or more and 32 had
sales of under $10,000. Farms
operated by individuals or
families represented 86 per-
cent of the total: farms
operated by corporations ac-


If Agricultural
counted for 5 percent. Other results of the census bu
Some 98 percent of the opera- show the 42 farms counted in
tors owned all or part of the 1978 had a average size of 1,104 qu
land they operated. acres. For 1974, 31.farms were tio
In 1978 the average age of a counted with an average size $1
farm operator was 52.6 yrs. of 1,931 acres. The land in pr
Since 1974 the proportion of farms totaled 46,366 acres in al
operators listing farming as 1978 and 59,867 acres in 1974. th
their principal occupation Crops were harvested from
changed from 42 percent to 33 13,091 acres in 1978 and 8,405 co
percent. acres in 1974. da
'Data in the reports for The inventory of cattle and pr
acreage and inventories for calves changed from 6,379 in da
1978 and 1974 are 'generally 1974 to 4,050 in 1978; the fr
comparable; however im- number of hogs and pigs of
proved coverage in 1978, es- changed from 379 to 365. 18
pecially of small farms, Acreage of crops harvested st
should be taken into consider- for 1978 and 1974 were as ag
action in making direct comrn- follows: soybeans, 11,307 tu
prisons of farm counts. Dol- acres vs. 7,087 acres; hay, 653 fa
lar values have not been vs. 219 acres. Production of va
adjusted for changes in price soybeans for 1978 was 278,300 ag
levels, bushels compared to 152,300 p


Products Climbing


ishels in 1974.
The figures are for farms
;alifying under the defim-
on: Any place from which
,000 or more of agricultural
products were sold, or form-
ly would have sold, during
e census year.
The agriculture census was
inducted in 1979 to obtain
tta in the nation's farm
production and sales for calen-
>r year 1978. Information
om the farm census, the 21st
a series which began in
40, will be used by federal,
ate and county agencies,
agricultural colleges, agricul-
ral and business groups and
rmers to help make a
variety of decisions about
agricultural programs and
policies.


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Bowling


FIRST

BAPTIST CHURCH

Corner Third Street and Baltzell Avenue
REV. BILL HEATON, Pastor
AL YANCEY, Minister of Music
SUNDAYSCHOOL ..................... 9:45A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE .......... 11:00 A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING .................... 6:00 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP SERVICE ........ 7:00 P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ....... 7:00 P.M.
"Come and Worship God with Us"


fD