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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02354
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 8, 1981
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02354

Full Text













THE


STAR


Industry Deep Water Port Fine People-- Safest Beaches in Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1981


20' Per Copy


Proposed County Budget Zooms Upward


Dollar Increase Is Hiked 49% In First Draft


If the present trend continues, Gulf County
tax payers will have the surprise of their life
when they receive their tax bills sometime in the
next few weeks or months. The surprise will riot
necessarily be a welcome one.
After several work sessions, the County
Commission has come up with a bare-bones
budget which will still hike the tax take by some
49 percent over last year's collections. The
tentative budget shows an increase of some
$325,817.74, most of which will have to be'
financed with higher taxes because other funds
coming in to the county are either not increased
or decreased.
S With a recent re-valuation 'of property in
Gulf County, the village increase will not be too
great. Last year, the Board levied a total of 5.005
mills. This year, the financial plan as it stands


now, calls for a levy of 7.499 mills for a 1.669
increase. The big increase comes in the amount
of dollars collected.
According to the work papers of the
proposed new budget, the biggest increase will
go to salaries, both those set by the state for
county officers and those given by the County
during the past year and not budgeted and those
promised for the new fiscal year. Another large
increase is being experienced in the higher cost
of fuel, utilities and supplies.
In short, inflation has finally caught up with
the county as it has with everyone else.
There are no new programs or extra
expenditures built into the new budget plan. The
fiscal picture which has been drawn up so far
includes just keeping the present services
operating in a manner to get something done.


INCREASES IN EVERY DEPARTMENT
Every phase of county government has been
hit by the rising costs of salaries, services and
supplies. The only phase of the county budget
which didn't see an increase was the County
Court, which is mostly financed by the state.
The part of the budget the county is responsible
for still stands at $1,385 in the proposed budget.
The largest increase in the new -proposed
budget is the Road and Bridge fund, where the
increase in wages and fuel costs was felt
strongest. Under the proposed budget, this fund
would be hiked by $82,969.43 to a total of
$479,809.86.
The second highest increase would come in the
Sheriff's Department, another operation hit
heavy by fuel and labor costs. This department is
looking at a $61,080.82 increase to a total of


$375,060.80.
The increases in salary were caused by two
increases given during last year's operation in
all departments and another promised for the
new budget year.
At the beginning of the last budget, the
Commission built in a wage hike of 6.7 percent.
In April of-last year, the Commission gave an
unbudgeted raise of seven percent. The new
budget contains another salary increase of eight
percent.
'A large portion of the budget increase was
caused by a short-fall of income from last year.
Estimated revenues didn't bring in as much
revenue as estimated. Inflation during the year
eroded income even more. Making up the
short-fall and the increase in everything is the
main villian in the proposed tax hike.


The various departments of county, govern-
ment, their increases and total budget proposal,
other than those already mentioned are: Board
of County Commissioners, up, $39,640.72 to
$272,434.06; General Fund contracts, $38,276.82 to
$133,056.41; Property Appraiser, $26,709.58 to
$71,454.00; Mosquito Control, $23,709.58 to
$141,988.70; Tax Collector, $13,328.78 to $92,-
207.22; Courthouse maintenance, $9,165.93 to
$119,506.76; Clerk of Court, $5,909.34 to $79,-
776.03; Supervisor of Elections, $896.16 to
$21,019.16; St. Joe Ambulance, $4,434.00 to
$18,700.00; Wewahitchka Ambulance, $3,750.00 to
$17,950.00; Extension Service, $3,213.87 to
$21,187.87; Clerk to Board, $3,112.16 to $42,014.16;
Veterans Office, $2,061.77 to $12,574.77; Election
Expenses, $1,016.24 to $13,373.24; County Court,
no increase, $1,385.00; Health Department,
$2,157.79 to $29,130.28.


City's New Plan



Delivered Tuesday


HUD Turns Down Application


The City of Port St. Joe
received delivery of bound
copies of its recently complet-
ed comprehensive plan from
the Apalachee Planning Coun-
cil Tuesday night, with in-
structions from the Council on
the proper way to adopt the
plan and put it into action.
The plan, included in Gulf
County's master plan, along
with a similar document for
the City of Wewahitchka, is
contained in a 160-page bound.
book along with maps, graphs
and statistics about the county
and its cities.
The plan is required by the
state of Florida and must be
adopted by May of this year.
Port St. Joe's plan is an
up-date of a plan drawn up by
the City some 15 years ago,
with the assistance of the old
Florida Department of Com-
merce. The most recent plan
is a more detailed version of
that. blueprint worked up
several years ago by the state
agency and a committee of
local people.
The City must follow three
steps in their adoption of the


Little 'Constance Elizabeth Ivey of
Eastpoint was Municipal Hospital's first
baby of the year of 1981. Arriving at 1:44
p.m., Sunday, January 4, weighing six
pounds and seven ounces, little Constance
started off the year in the hospital's
nursery department.


required document.
The first step is to hold a
public hearing for citizen
input into the plan. The City
has tentatively set this hear-
ing for February 3. In the
meantime, those interested in
the plan may see a copy in the
city office at City Hall.
The second step is to send
the plan to the state and
regional planning councils for
their review. This procedure
.can take up. to 60 days. The
third step requires the City to
adopt the plan by ordinance as
a part of the City operating
procedures.
The plan can be amended at
any time, before or after
adoption.
CHIP TRUCKS
Chip trucks driving through
the city, spraying chips all
over the streets and sidewalks
drew the. attention of the
Commission Tuesday night.
lThe problem is especially
bad on Highways 71 and 98,
where the trucks travel tc the
paper mill. Police Chief Roy
Robinson said the problem
was more evident at night


than in the day time.
Mayor Frank Pate observed
that if the City allowed the
practice to continue it would
be only a matter of a short
time before the chips stopped
up every storm sewer along
the route of the trucks.
The Commission instructed
Robinson to begin making
arrests of every chip truck
which went through the city
uncovered and spraying chips.
-.. ."This.wiiJgt4bff ttIPjipa.
in a hurry", Commissioner
James B. Roberts observed.
TURNED DOWN
The City's recent applica-
tion for $1.5 million in HUD
funds to up-grade drainage
and sub-standard housing in
North Port St. Joe was turned
down this week by HUD.
The City, along with the
county, had made application
for the grant program which
came out in the last few
months of 1980, in hopes of
getting some blighted areas
fixed up.
The City was turned down
(and probably the County will
(Continued on Page 2)


Constance is the daughter of Steve and
Janet Ivey of Eastpoint. In the photo
above, Constance is shown in the arms of
her mother as they prepared to leave the
hospital Tuesday morning.
Dr. A. W. North, local obstetrician and
gynecologist, was the attending doctor.


New County Officers Take Their Oath


Gulf County Judge David Taunton, left, gave the oath of office to the six new
county officers who started new terms of office the first.of the month. Included
in the group were four officers who will be filling their positions for the first
time. From left to right, Sheriff Ken Murphy and Superintendent of Schools


Walter Wilder are taking the oath of office for their second term in office.
Taking the oath for their first terms are: Jerry Gates, Clerk of Court; Joyce
Williams, Property Appraiser; Eda Ruth Taylor, Tax Collector and Cora Sue
Robinson, Supervisor of Elections. -Star photo


Tax Payers Flock In Wednesday



to Pay Up Before Year's End


Just as the light rain Tues-
day night provided some relief
from dry conditions here in
the Panhandle, Gulf County
governments received slight
relief from their financial
drought last week as property
owners 'rushed at the last
minutes to pay an estimated
tax bill in order to get credit
on their federal tax returns.
Tax, Collector Eda Ruth
Taylor said her office collect-
ed $117,168.71 in estimated
county and city taxes in the
waning days of 1980, with most
of the payments coming in
during the last week of the
year.
"This doesn't mean the
taxing bodies of the county
can have immediate relief
from their financial prob-
lems"., Mrs. Taylor said.'The
County, School Board and'
cities in the county have been
without tax revenues since
their last fiscal year ran out in
October due to a change in the
state's taxing .system at the
last minute and delay in
having a property assessment
roll approved by the State
Revenue Department.
Mrs. Taylor said estimated
taxes paid before the year's
end amounted to only about
five percent of what was
collected in taxes last year.
"We normally have most of
our taxes collected by the end
of the year", Mrs. Taylor said,
by people who are paying
early to get the discount on
their tax bill. This year, the
only incentive for paying was
to get credit on the federal tax
returns.
Even with tax money rolling
in during December, the fi-
nancial problems of the taxing


bodies are not over yet.
According to Mrs. Taylor, she
cannot distribute the money to
the various governing bodies
until her office receives a
certified tax roll from the
taxing entities. "They still
have to have public hearings
before they can certify their
rolls", she said.
The new Tax Collector, who
just went into office on Friday


of last week, said she can
release a portion of the money
to the various governments if
they get in an emergency
situation and give her a
written statement to this
effect. "I can't put out the
money except in an emergen-
cy until the tax rolls have been
certified", Mrs. Taylor said.
Mrs. Taylor said the tax
business will tax her office


this year trying to keep up
with advance payments, in-
stallment payments, billing
for underpayments and over-
payments on estimates. "It
will be a hectic year", she.
said.
Even with the delay in
sending out tax bills, tax
payers will have 30 days in
which to claim the four
percent discount allowed by


state law for payment within
the first 30 days after the
notices are sent out. "Still, all
bills must be paid by April 1",
Mrs. Taylor said. "After that
date, all unpaid taxes go into
delinquency and we must
advertise their delinquency",
Mrs. Taylor said.
It might be.interesting to see
what happens if the bills are
not even sent out by April 1.


Youth Spends 48 Hours In Swamp


Fifteen-year-old Grant
Sherwood of Callaway was a
happy young man at 4:30
Monday afternoon. He was
happy because at that time,
Game Commission officers
found him in Willis Swamp
after being lost for 48 hours.
Sherwood had been the
object of a search by about 30
law enforcement and game
department officers since Sat-
urday morning about 11:00
a.m., when he was reported
lost by his parents.
The Sherwoods were camp-
ing and hunting in Willis
Swamp when young Grant
became turned around and
lost in the dense swamp. He
walked out of the swamp to the
river's edge in the middle of
the morning and walked up on
some people hunting. The
people offered to take him
back to his camp if he would
just wait around a while until
they finished hunting.
Grant said he wanted to go
on back to where his parents
were and the hunters he had
approached told him which


direction to go to find an old
logging road which he could
have followed right to where
his parents were camped.
Sherwood said he never found
the road.
During his ordeal, Sherwood
slept in a stump to ward off the
chill of the night and ate


acorns to ease his hunger
pangs. When he was found, he
had a pocket full of acorns.
When game department of-
ficers located Sherwood, he
had found his way back to the
river Monday afternoon and
was crawling out on a limb
over the water to retrieve a set


hook line which had a catfish
on it.
Grant forgot all about his
raw catfish dinner when he
spied his rescuers.
The Gulf County Sheriff's
Department directed the
search for the missing youth.


Going Down In
Insurance rates in Port St. Joe in Gulf recently.
County for fire policies on businesses will be ISO ba
lowered between three percent and 14 percent fire depa
starting January 1, 1981 as a result of apartment
improved fire protection services, insurance controls.
Commissioner Bill Gunter has announced. lower the
The approximate rate reductions are due to
a recent reevaluation-of fire protection Gunter
facilities by the Insurance Services Office seven cla
(ISO) which gathers statistical data used by result rat
more than 350 insurance companies in be reduce
developing fire insurance rates, he said. frame and
Gunter said ISO Filed the classification for non-c
change and the reduced rates with his office buildings.


City


ses its evaluation on the mobility of
rtments, water supplies, fire de-
communications and fire safety
The lower the classification, the
insurance rate.
said ISO assigned Port St. Joe a
ssification, down from eight. As a
es for commercial fire policies will
ed approximately 14 percent for
d masonry structures and 3 percent
combustible and fire resistive


USPS 518-880


FORTY.FOURTH YEAR, NUMBER 19


First Baby of Year


Fire Insurance Rates


i











Editorials and Opinions


THE STAR
PAGE TWO THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1981


Taxes Will Reach All-Time High... Budget Still Tight


The Courthouse was filled last Wednesday
with people paying their estimated taxes for
the. 1980-81 fiscal year and many of them
literally had the shakes after being told what
their estimated taxes would be.
After years of trying to ward off inflation
with tight budgets, the spectre of financial
stability has finally hit in full force in Gulf
County government. Delayed purchases of
equipment to save money at the time has
resulted in an overly large amount of
equipment needing replaced; holding down
Wage increases over the past several years
-has put county employees far behind in their
purchasing power and projects put off to "next
year" are now begging to be done.
All of this has resulted in a whopping
estimated tax bill for this year.
This isn't to say there can't be some
S"economies affected and some cuts made from
.C the current estimate, but it's saying this will
be the major job of the year for those involved
-in making the budgets.
The only way we can see for the county,
the school board and the cities in Gulf County



Didn't,

S- Make It


:jear Mr. Ramsey,
On Christmas Eve, my
family and I were all gathered
at the home of my mother in
: law in Apalachicola having
.; suiler, as all the family
gathers each Christmas Eve
:t to. exchange gifts and to be
together. My then expecting
wife began to feel cramps in
her lower back so we called
the Bay Memorial Hospital
.: and were told to come on over.
As history will attest, we did
F not make it.
The pain grew increasingly
worse and at a faster rate with
each one. I called ahead to the
Gulf County Sherrifs, De-
paqrtment and asked that we
relieve an escort, I also asked
concerning a Doctor at this
hospital and was advised that
- one was not on call, It was
certain then that we needed to
be headed to "Bay". My
brother in law who followed us
claims that we made the trip
to Port St. Joe in less than
eight minutes, I do remember
upon reaching the intersection
=of Hwy 71 and 98 glancing at
the stop light turning green
:-and the speedometer pegging
65. Once over Highland View
Bridge our escort caught up
with us. But it was not long
before he was looking in his
rear-view and wondering were
we were at.
The baby decided that it
wanted to be born in Gulf
County (doesn't everyone?)
and so in the parking lot of the
: Dixie Bell Motel, in the back
seat of a 1969 Chrysler little
Brad came into the world.
I would like to at this time
publicly thank as well as
praise Officer Tolliver of the
Gulf County Sheriffs Depart-


ment, Catherine Ramsey,
Squad Chief of the Port St. Joe
Squad, and the other two
ladies who's (regrettably)
names I do not remember.
Also I would like to thank the
fine people at the Dixie Bell, I
am sure had there been time
they would have given us a
room, a bit more than what
could be said for another
Inn-Keeper some two-thou-


be too) because it had no
low-cost housing authority in
operation at this time.
When the application was
made, officials of the Apala-
chee Planning Council were
advised the City wished to
create such an authority and
asked for the council's aid in
this endeavor. The City has
had no housing authority in
the past because Port St. Joe
was ineligible for low rent
public housing because of the
average per capital income
here.
TO TAKE BIDS
The Commission decided
Tuesday night to call a meet-
ing of the three parties
involved in the operation of
the Wastewater Treatment
Plant in preparation to calling
for bids on an experimental
try at slowing down seepage,
through the walls of the dike
around the retaining pond at
the plant.
The meeting will be held
with the engineering firm
doing a study of the plant at


to hold the line with taxes this year is for some
of the services now financed by government
curtailed completely, abolished, done away
with and closed down. Some of the desirable
services we have gotten into through majority
matching funds from the federal and state
governments are going to have to go. Some of
the bargains we have been getting in
government are much like the bargains we as
individuals come across in our everyday life.
They may be bargains, but if you don't have
the money to snap them up, we must just


the present time, on January
15. A member of the engineer-
ing firm had suggested the
experiment be made.
The experiment would in-,
volve extending the foot of the
dike and placing aggregate
and a non-woven fabric mater-
ial under the toe to control the
seepage from the pond.

Plans Made

for E.M.T. Class
Anyone interested in an
EMT Emergency Medical
Technician class starting the
last part of January please
call 229-8363 and leave your
name and phone number.
Tentative plans are for meet-
ing Monday and Wednesday.
nights 7:30-10:00 with an oc-
casional Saturday meeting.
This class is offered through
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege and carries three hours of
credit. Eighty class hours are
required as well as fifty
clinical hours.


forget them until another day.
We really feel sorry for the County
Commission and the flack they are sure to get
with their proposed budget for the coming
year. We feel sorry for them, because we know
them for a bunch of penny-pinching individ-
uals who have stirred up many hornets nests
during the past three or four years by refusing
funding where it was requested when the
money wasn't available and where the
Commissioners felt the request wasn't enough
in the interest of the people at large.


Now these same Commissioners are faced
with a whopping 49 percent increase in their
budget and there seeins to be little they can do
about it, short of closing something down.
That sounds easy to do, but just let them try it
and you will see the lid blow off in some
sector of Gulf County.
The bottom line is that if we get the
service, we must pay the bill. If you desire
abolition of some service to save tax dollars,
we're sure the Commissioners would be glad
to hear from you.


There Are No More Holidays til Mid- Year


Did you enjoy your holidays? Did you get
some serious loafing in on those days off?
If you didn't get enough time off during
the holidays, we're afraid you're stuck in the
old grind for a while. A look at the calendar
shows the next day off is July 4, which is a long
seven months away. That's a long time to wait
for an extra day off.
Of course, there are a few birthdays,


sand years ago that night. We
are happy that there are still
dedicated professionals like
Officer Tolliver and the Am-
bulance squad and warm
people like those at the Dixie
Bell. My wife and I willalways
feel in their debt, and little
Brad gurgles his love. Thank
you.
Respectfully,
Walter K. Johnson


Easter and Memorial Day in between, but
down here in this part of the country, these
holidays aren't taken by anybody except
government offices. The rest of us must wait
until July 4.

This situation will be all right with us for
about the next three months when we get our
stay inside winter weather here in the


Panhandle, but after the middle of March slips
by and the days begin to warm up again, we're
going to wish we had some of these Christmas
holidays to use for a trip to the river or the
beach.
But for now, we have had enough
Saturday and Mondays to do us for a while
and we're ready to get back in the groove for a
month or two at least.


Bowl Expectations Turned Into Time of Sadness for Seminole Fans


ONE STINKING little point!
That one little point meant so much
disappointment for the Florida State
Seminoles and their fans. It caused a
flood of tears, so many down-cast
feelings and heartbreak.
That one little point meant that the
Seminoles and the Sooners of Oklahoma
iRut on the best football show of all the
howls and kept the fans glued to the
television sets even after a full day of
pigskin athletics. If the late game had
been any, of the others, except maybe
th* Georgia-Notre Dame game, I think
the viewers would have turned off the
set and gone on to bed.
.: : The one point could just as easily
have gone either way. The Seminoles
and the Sooners played on pretty even
tesii and either team could have won
by the one point.
I think that if the Sooner coaches
would devote a day or two to how to hold
io'to the football while carrying it, the
Sooners might even give' the Dallas
Cowboys a good game.
They were fast. The Seminoles
weren't as fast, but they were tough. I
told one of those gatherings here at the


office one day speculating on the game
that if Ron Simmons was healthy and
played the entire game, the Seminoles
would win. Since Simmons played only
a small part of the game and the












Seminoles lost by only one point, .I'm
going to brag on my football expertise,
which is limited to knowing that the one
carrying the ball is the one which is
most likely to score.
But, even with my limited know-
ledge about the fine points of the game,
I dearly love to watch it being played.
THE POST OFFICE has given us a


last minute reprieve on the nine-digit
ZIP code. I see now, by the papers,
where there will be a six-month delay in
putting the new number in force, which
is designed to make delivery of our mail


simpler, more direct, speedier and
easier. The new nine-digit is said to be
the completion of what was started with
the five digit number; expediting the
delivery of mail in a manner which
would be fool-proof and not quite so
technical as the old written address
means.
The reason this new innovation of
simple mail delivery has been delayed


is so people can learn to use it.
If it takes six months to learn to
address a piece of mail by the new
method, we wait with bated breath for
the confusion which will cover the land


for the first several months the new
system is in use.
INTEREST RATES came down the
end of last week. Several of the
countries' largest banks announced
they were cutting their prime interest
lending rates by a full percentage point
... to 20.5 percent.
Isn't that a relief?


ROSALYN CARTER is no longer
one of the nation's 10-best-dressed
ladies. She has fallen from grace.
According to the article I read, first
ladies are usually placed on the list of
the 10 best dressed as a matter of
courtesy and popularity of the first
lady. In most cases, past first ladies are
kept on the list for a few years if she
was particularly popular during the
term in office of her husband. This goes
on even after her husband is no longer
the President, as it did with Lady Bird,
Jackie, Betty, Bess and Amy.
Their husbands all went out of
office by means other than being kicked
out. They remained on the list.
The article said Rosalyn wasn't
particularly popular. .. even more so
than her husband .. .. and she has,
already been dropped from the presti-
gious list. Rosalyn isn't particularly
popular with anybody except the
President.
I didn't know that!

RONALD REAGAN appears to


have come up with just the reply the
Iranians needed to get them off dead
center.
Last week, the day after we did, the
President-elect called the Iranians
kidnappers and went on to say they
were barbarians.
Those barbarous Iranians didn't
like being called barbarians. They felt,
that was an insult and resulted in a
remark by the Iranian Parliament
speaker, Hojatoleslam Rafsanjani re-
plying: "You can find few people in
history as barbarous as U.S. leaders."
Rafsanjani didn't say Iranians
weren't barbarous, did he?
Anyhow, the jar Reagan gave the
situation has started the Iranians to
dealing in earnest on the hostage
question. It has also stirred the nation's
leading columnists into suggesting we
give Iran an ultimatum: "Release our
hostages or else!"
James Kilpatrick even goes so far
as to suggest that this "or else" contain
the possibility of war.
Ronnie, you seem to have done
good!


- THE STAR -


POSTOFFICE BOX 308
PHONE 227-1278


Published EveryThursday at 30 Williams Avenue Pet St. Je. Flrid PORTST.JOE, FLORIDA32456
By The Star Publishiag Company
Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe. ,Iorida 3244


Wesley R. Ramsey ........ Editor and Publisher
William H. Ramsey ............ Production Supt.
Frenchie L Ramsey ........... Office Manager
Shirley K. Ramsey ................. Typesetter


SECON-CLASS POSTAGE PAID
AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456


IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR, $6.00
OUT OF COUNTY-ONE YEAR, $10.00


SIX MONTHS. $4.0
OUT OF U.S.-ONE YEAR, S$12.00


TO ADVERTISERS-Iln ase of error or emissions in advertisements, the publishers do nt hold
themselves liable or damage Iurther than amount received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word Is MthugVhtiuy weighed. The spoken word
barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spokenword is lost; the printed word remains.


St. Joseph's

Bay Tides
High and low tides for St.
Joseph's Bay for the upcom-
ing week are shown in the tide
table below, furnished by the
U. S. Weather Bureau in Apa-
lachicola. Times are based on
a 24-hour clock, and height is


feet above or below the mean
water line.


Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.


High Ht. Low HL.
2339 1.3 933 -.6
1008 -.5
18 1.1 1030 -.3
57 .9 1038 -.1
112 .6 1007 ..0
1904 .5
1809 .7 820 .1
1819 1.0 423 -.1


City From Page 1


Port St. Joe's city pier seems to be over ankle-deep
water as low winter tides almost put the structure on
high ground early Tuesday morning. Extremely low
winter tides seem at times as if a person might wade
across St. Joseph Bay. Of course, we wouldn't
recommend you trying it. -Star photo


SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE


Air-


1% ov,


-L


. o


~Piti~r




































The children of Mrs. Dessie Lee Parker presented Gulf the Corinne Costin Gibson Memorial Library in Port St. Joe.
County with original bank.drafts on banks of Old St. Joseph, Shown in the photo are Dorothy Glisson, Assistant Secretary
in recognition of Mrs. Parker service to the county as of State, Mrs. Parker and her son, Marion Parker.
Supervisor of Elections. The bank drafts will be on display in -Star photo


Reception Honors Mrs. Parker


Mrs. Dessie Lee Parker was meeting room of the Port St.
honored with a reception Joe Branch of the Gulf County
given by her children in the Library last Friday afternoon,



For the Last Time


Harland Pridgeon wished his successor, Eda Ruth
Taylor good luck Wednesday afternoon as he prepared to
begin a full time gardening career after spending 28 years as
Tax Collector for Gulf County. Pridgeon said he is proud of
the fact that the auditors never found a glaring mistake in his
books in his entire term of office, which he assumed by
appointment after his father died between the time he was
elected and the time to take over the office in 1952.
-Star photo


Retired Clerk of the Court George Y. Core closed the safe
in his office for the last time last Wednesday afternoon, after
turning the office over to Jerry Gates, newly elected clerk.
Core said, "I've closed this safe every evening for the past 32
years". Core said he will still be around if the office needs his
* services in the future. -Star photo



First United

Methodist Church
Constitution and Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe, Fla.
JOHNIE W. McCURDY, Minister

CHURCHSCHOOL ................... 9:45A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ..............11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .............. 7:00 P.M.
METHO-DIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP 5:30P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) .. 7:30 P.M.


as she stepped down in
retirement from her office of
Elections Supervisor for Gulf
County. Mrs. Parker retired
on December 31, after 12 years
of service to the county.
In honor of her retirement,
Mrs. Parker's children pre-
sented the library with a
. plaque showing original notes
drawn on banks located in Old
St, Joseph. The display will


hang on display in the library.
Her children also presented
her with a cruise in the
Caribbean.
Mrs. Dorothy Glisson, depu-
ty Secretary of State of the
State of Florida, was present
for the affair and presented
Mrs. Parker with a plaque
from Secretary of State
George Firestone commend-
ing her for her term in office.


Mrs. Brown

Hosts

Women
The women of the First
Presbyterian Church met with
Mrs. Stiles Brown Monday,
January 5.
Mrs. Harold Beyer gave the
devotional, based on Isaiah
44:6-20 and 46:1-13, Mrs. Bey-
er used Isaiah's illustrations
contrasting the one God of
Israel who created man and
makes history, with the gods
of the Babylonians who were
made by man and therefore
powerless and capable of
being destroyed by their
maker.
Mrs. John Stuart will be
hostess for the February
meeting, Mrs. Stiles Brown
will give the devotional.

Square

Dance

Open House
The St. Joe Sunshiners, a
Port St. Joe-based square
dance group, will hold open
house Thursday night, Janu-
ary 8, for anyone wishing to
learn how to square dance.
Square dancing is one of the
oldest forms of entertainment
available and is an excellent
means of healthful exercise. It
has become one of the most
popular forms of dance, being
performed in virtually every
country in the free world.
The open house will be held
at 8:00 p.m., at the Stac
House, located on 8th Street in
Port St. Joe. Anyone wishing
to learn to square dance, or
just observe is urged to
attend.

Retired Teacher

Will Meet Mon.
The Gulf County Association
of Retired Teachers will meet
Monday at 3:00 p.m., in the
home of Mrs. Paul Johnsen,
1203 Constitution Drive.
All retired teachers in the
area are urged to attend.

Guidance

Directors Meet



THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1981


OBITUARIES:


Funeral Services Held Wednesday


for Mrs. Julia Mozelle Gainnie, 58


Mrs. Julia Mozelle Gainnie,
58, of Port St. Joe died Monday
evening. She was a native of
Wausau, Fla. and had been a
resident of Port St. Joe for the
past 35 years coming here
from Apalachicola, Fla. She
was a long time employee of
the Western Auto Store in Port
St. Joe and attended the Oak
Grove Assembly of God
Church.
She is survived by her
former husband, George W.
Gainnie of Port St. Joe, three
sons; George H. Gainnie and
James E. Gainnie both of
Port St. Joe and Michael
Gainnie of Dothan, -Ala. two
brothers, Ernest Griffin and
Robert Griffin, both of Boni-
fay, Fla. three sisters; Mrs.
Eva Mae Hall, of Bonifay, Fla.
Mrs. Nina Payne, Highland
City, Fla. and Mrs. Laverne
Burton of Port St. Joe and two
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. E.S.T.
in the Oak Grove Assembly of
God Church, with the Rev.
David Fernandez officiating.
Interment was in the Holly
Hill Cemetery.
St. Clair Funeral Home of


I I -

Kimberly Renee Guilford

Guilford On

President's List
Kimberly Renee Guilford


daughter-of-Mr. and Mrs.
The Board of Directors of Robert L. Timmons of Mexico
Gulf County Guidance Clinic, Beach, was honored, by being
Inc. will hold its regularly placed on the President's list
scheduled meeting on Tues- at Pensacola Junior College,
day January 13, 1981 at 7:00 were she is a student in the
p.m. (EST). The meeting will Dental Hygiene Program.
Assistant Secretary of State Dorothy Glisson, at left, be held in the Clinic Con- She will graduate from
presents a certificate of recognition to Dessie Lee Parker, ference Room at 311 Williams Pensacola Junior College in
retiring Gulf County Supervisor of Elections. Avenue in Port St. Joe. April.


Port St. Joe is in charge of' arrangements.


Rites for Sally W. Hill


Mrs. Sally W. Hill, 76, of
1619-A Monument Avenue,
passed away December 23rd
in Phoenix City, Alabama,
following a brief illness.
Mrs. Hill resided here in
Port St. Joe for the past seven
years, moving here in 1973
from Marianna. She was a
native of Early County, Ga.

Funeral services were held
at graveside for Mrs. Hill in
Springfield Cemetery,
Donalsonville, Georgia, at
3:00 p.m. December 24th.


Evans funeral home of
Donaldsonville was in charge
of all arrangements.
Mrs. Hill is survived by one
son, Gordon W. Hill; one
grandson, Burt Hill; two
sisters, Mrs. E.J. Rich of Port
St. Joe and Mrs. Lois W.
Thomas of Donalsonville,
Ga; four nephews, John E.
Rich, Billy Joe Rich, Sr., of
Port St. Joe, David M. Rich of
Wewahitchka, and John
Thomas of Donalsonville and
one niece, Mrs. Bobby Now-
ling, also of Donalsonville.


NEW BETHEL
African Methodist Episcopal Church
146 Avenue C Phone 227-1213
Rev. James W. Williams, Pastor

SUNDAY SCHOOL ................ 9:30 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ... ....... 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .............. 6:00 P.M.
"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man OUr Brother"



NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING
Of Members of Citizens Federal
Savings & Loan Association of Port St. Joe
The annual meeting of members of Citizens Federal
Savings & Loan Association of Port St. Joe, will be held
on WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21,1981, at 2:00 O'Clock
PM., E.S.T., in the office of the Association at 401 Fifth
Street, Port St. Joe, Florida, for the purpose of electing
directors for the ensuing term, and to transact any
other business which may legally come before said
meeting.
C. J. STEVENS, JR.
Secretary-Treasurer
Citizens Federal will be closed for business at 12:00
O'Clock noon on Wednesday, January 21, 1981, in order,
to hold the annual meeting of members.


Citizens Federal

Savings and Loan Association
of Port St. Joe


PAGE THREE









PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1981


Karen Kimmell, Robert

Heathcock Are Engaged


Monitoring Use of Energy Can


Save On Your High Utility Bills


Energy conservation is not
only a good habit, it can add
up to more money for you,
says the Florida Institute of
Certified Public Accountants.
By simply monitoring your
everyday use of energy at
home, you can accumulate
considerable savings in utility
bills. Here are some ways to
do it:
-Lower the temperature
of your hot water heater from
150 to 140 degrees and save
about 10 percent on your hot
water costs.
Use "Task" lighting,
where you keep the general
light level low, but use strong
light in specific areas, such as
in a lamp near a reading
chair.
Open your oven door as
little as possible. Every time
the door is opened, the oven
temperature drops 25 degrees.
-Don't let more than one-
quarter of an inch of frost
accumulate in the freezer
section of your refrigerator.
-Use the warmth of the
sun to heat your home: Open
your curtains during the day.
Draw them at night to keep
cold out.
Keep your air condi-
tioner's thermostat at 78 de-
grees. For every degree below
that, you raise your cooling
costs by about 10 percent.
Have your furnace
cleaned and checked to be
sure it's burning fuel effic-
iently. This can reduce your
heating costs by as much as 10
percent each year. If you've
insulated your house, you've
reduced its heating require-
ments. Your furnace may
nebd to be adjusted so it won't
waste fuel.
: Use a single 100-watt bulb
instead of two 60 watt ones.
The higher wattage bulb pro-
duces more light with about 20
percent less energy.
- Use half as much water
as you would with a regular
shower head. by installing a
rostrictor shower head, and
cUt your hot water bill by as
much as $22 per year per
family member.
Insulate your hot water
heater with a special. "blan-
ket" you can buy at a
lihardware store for 20 or 30
dollars. It will usually pay for
itself in one year.
- Insulate your heating and
cooling ducts reduce your
utility bills by up to 15 percent.
-Pack your freezer full,
even if you have to fill milk
cartons with water and freeze
them to take up empty space.
More energy is used in an
empty freezer.
Don't overload your re-
frigerator. If air can circulate


around the food, this ap-
pliance will use less energy.
Use florescent lights,
which produce more light and
less heat for the same amount
of electricity than do incan-
descent bulbs. They can last
up to 10 times longer and cost
less to use. For example, if
you use a 30-watt flourescent
for six hour a day, instead of a
100-watt bulb, you could save
about one dollar each month.
Combine the use of
flourescents, task lighting,
and the habit of turning off
lights you're not using to save
from 15 to 50 percent on your
utility bill.
Wash only full loads of
clothes, and use warm or cold
water instead of hot in your
washing machine.


Set your thermostat no
higher than 68 degrees during
the day and 60 degrees at night


Sea Oats

Will Meet
On Tuesday, January 13, at
9 a.m. central time, the Sea
Oats and Dunes Garden Club
will meet in the Mexico Beach
Chamber of Commerce. All
members and friends are
invited to hear James Over-
ton, of Panama City, speak on
beach property's yard and
garden problems.
Refreshments will be served
by hostesses Ellen Allemore,
Marion Cathey, and Eloise
Chandler.


Mr. and Mrs. Lemond Norris Daniels


Recently Wed


Kimberly Ann Rich, and
Lemond Norris Daniels, of
Port St. Joe were united in
marriage on December 31.
The bride is the daughter of
David Rich, of Wewahitchka


The First
Pentecostal Holiness Church
2001 GARRISON AVE. PORT ST. JOE
Invites You to Worship with Them
Ernest A. Barr, Pastor
SERVICES
SUNDAY SCHOOL .................. 9:45 AM
MORNING WORSHIP ............... 11:00 AM
-. EVENINGWORSHIP .................. 7:00 PM
. WEDNESDAY NIGHT .................. 7:00 PM

gmtaaegWes#e*eD sesgD eese*eDsDes#De D#M e #e#


and Mrs. Mary Helen Nolen,
of Port St. Joe. The bride-
groom is the son of the Mr. and
Mrs. Norris Daniels also of
Port St. Joe.

Montgomerys

Have Visitors
Mildred and Bill Mont-
gomery, Cindy and Steve
Sanderson and their two child-
ren, Josh and Travis from
York, Pennsylvania, were
guests of Mrs. Elizabeth Mont-
gomery during the Christmas
holidays. They also visited
with Mrs. Bernice Richardson
(Mildred's sister) and Mrs.
Betty Lewis (Bill's sister).
Mrs. Montgomery also had
her son, Jimmy and his wife,
Dorothy Montgomery from
Pensacola as her guests.


during the winter.
Turn down the heat or
turn off your central air
conditioning if no one is home
for more than three hours.
Cut your electricity bill
using low wattage bulbs in
areas where a lot of light isn't
needed, such as hallways and
foyers.
You haven't spent much
money, and you immediately
begin to save energy and
money.


Felicia Renee Leach Ernest C. Harden III


BIRTHS

Meredith Leigh
Godfrey
Mr. and Mrs. Rick Godfrey
announce the birth of a
daughter, Meredith Leigh, on
January 1, weighing 7 lbs.
11% ounces. Maternal grand-
parents are Mr. and Mrs.
George McLawhon. Paternal
grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. E.M. Godfrey III.
Maternal great grand-
parents are Mr. and Mrs. J.E.
Byrd of Panama City.
Paternal great grandparents
are Mr. and Mrs. Lindsey
Temple of Port St. Joe and Mr.
and Mrs. Godfrey, Jr., of
Knoxville, Tennessee. She was
welcomed home by her older
sisters, Cheyenne and Brid-
gette.

David Channon
Whitfield
David and Linda Whitfield
of Howard Creek announce the
birth of a baby boy, David
Channon, weighing 6 lbs. 6%
oz. at Gulf Coast Community
Hospital, on December 23.
Welcoming him home are
his sister, Joyelle, and brother
George. Proud grand parents
are Mr. and Mrs. Nellie
Whitfield of Howard -Creek .
and Mrs. Thomas Webb of
Port St. Joe, great grand
mother, Mrs. Ola Walker of
Apalachicola.

Bradford Jo-Ed
Johnson
Mr. and Mrs. Walter K.
Johnson of 521 Ninth Street
are pleased to announce the
birth of their son, Bradford
Jo-Ed Johnson at 7:05 p.m.
Christmas Eve. Little Brad
came into this world assisted
be members of the Port St. Joe
Ambulance Squad and his
father, not forgetting Officer
Tolliver of the Gulf County
Sheriffs Department. Brad
weights 8 lbs..6% oz. and is 21
inches long. His mother is the
former Betty Gilbert of
Apalachicola, daughter of
Joseph Earl (dec'd) and Sadie
Gilbert. His fathers parents is
Walter A. and Joyce
Schwartskopf. Brad has one
brother, Walter Kristopher,
and two sisters Wendy and
Jennifer.


The average pencil will
write about 30,000 words
in its lifetime.


Will Wed


Ms. Emma R. Leach of
Wewahitchka and Charles
Leach of Aurora, Colorado
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Felicia Renee,
to Ernest C. Harden III, son of
Mrs. Roberta Harden of
Wewahitchka and E.C.
Harden, Jr. of Panama City.
The bride-elect is a 1975
graduate of Wewahitchka
High School, and graduated
from Tom P. Haney School of
Cosmetology. She is presently
employed as a stylist at the
Hair Cuttery in Wewahitchka.
Her fiance is a 1973 graduate
of Wewahitchka High School,
attended Gulf Coast Com-
munity College, and grad-
uated from Tom P. Haney





















Karen Mock M


Engi

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E.
Mock of Marianna, announce
the engagement of their
daughter, Karen, to Michael
T. Dean, son of Mr. and Mrs.
H.T. (Sonny) Dean of Mari-
anna, former residents of Port
St. Joe.
The bride-elect is the grand-
daughter of Mrs. Inez Mock
and the late Charles A. Mock
of Marianna and Mr. and Mrs.
T.B. Browning of Marianna.
She is a 1976 graduate of
Marianna High School and is
employed with Continental
Telephone of the South in
Marianna.
The bridegroom-elect is the
grandson of Mr. and Mrs. J.D.
Redfern of Franklin, N.C. and
Mr. and Mrs. H.T. Dean, Sr. of

Marianna. He is a 1976 grad-
uate of Marianna High School,
1978 graduate of Chipola Jr.
College, attended Florida


Vocational-Technical School.
He is presently employed at
Eastern Marine in Panama
City.
The bride-elect is the grand-
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
M.W. Rogers of Wewahitchka,
and the prospective bride-
groom is the grandson of the
late Mr. and Mrs. Ernest C.
Harden, Sr. of Wewahitchka
and Mrs. Irene Lecks Roberts.
The wedding will be held
February 14, at 6:30 p.m., at
the Glad Tidings Assembly of
God Church in Wewhitchka.
No local invitations are being
sent, and all friends and
relatives of the couple are
invited to attend.


Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Kim-
mell of Mexico Beach have
announced the engagement of
their daughter, Karen Kath-
leen Kimmell, to Robert
Bruce Heathcock, son of
Colonel (Ret.) and Mrs.
James T. Heathcock, also of
Mexico Beach.
The bride-elect, a 1979 grad-
uate of Port St. Joe High
School, is presently attending
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege, majoring in Television
and Broadcasting.
Her fiance is a 1978 graduate
of Rutherford High School and
is presently attending Rose-
Hulman Institute of Tech-
nology in Terre Haute, In-
diana, majoring in Electrical
Engineering.
An August 22nd wedding is
being planned. Final details


will be announced at a later
date.


Karen Kathleen Kimmell


Cosmetics


Polished Amber


Saturday Night Red

European Collagen
Complex


by REVLON



Now Available At


St. Joe Drugs


236 Reid Ave.


Phone 227-1723


~C,.9:.AWIftIUID ,10,ut -~3


lichael T. Dean


aged


State University, and is em-
ployed by the City of Mari-
anna as a police officer.
Wedding vows will be ex-
changed by the couple, Feb-
ruary 28, 7:00 p.m., at the
First Baptist Church in Mari-
anna, A reception will follow
in the Fellowship hall. No


i


invitations are being sent, but
ll friends and relatives are DAY CARE FLINTSTONES
invited to attend. COLD MEDICINE CHILDREN'S

Overstreet VFD 20 Capsules VITAMINS
No drowsiness.
TO Meet Tues Our reg. $1.97. 60tans


The Overstreet Volunteer
Fire Department will hold its
regular monthly meeting at
the Overstreet Bible Church.
this coming Tuesday, January
13th, at 7:30 E.S.T.
All members are urged to
attend.


J


Saving Is





NOW


More Important
Than Ever


p


Get the savings
habit at your7to 7, to7
6 days a week bank




St. Joe Branch

Wewahitchka State Bank
529 Fifth Street Phone 229-8226


Gulf Accounting Service, Inc.

321 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe


Accounting Tax Returns


Bookkeeping


Financial Reports



Short Form Tax Return

S$5.00oo if filed

S$7. before February 1



Phone 229-6339


I


m







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1981 PAGE FIVE


Ambulance Squad Meets for Their Annual


Installation Banquet; Officers Seated


Sheila Harper, representing the Ambu- Squad Chief, for her dedicated and untiring
lance Squad, presents a'plaque of apprecia- service to the Ambulance Squad. --Star photo
tion to Catherine Ramsey, who served as


The Port St. Joe squad of the
Gulf County Volunteer Ambu-
lance Service re-organized for
the coming year of service at a
banquet dinner held last Fri-
day night at Butler's Restau-
rant.
Catherine Ramsey was se-
lected by the squad as their
squad chief for the second
year and presented her with a
plaque of appreciation for her
leadership of the past year.
Officers elected and install-
ed by County Commissioner
William Branch, to serve with
Miss Ramsey were: Sheila
Harper, first assistant; Gail
Horton, second assistant; C.
L. Sylvester, ambulance cap-
tain and Terri Lyles, supply
officer.
Barbara Weeks, one of the
mainstays of the service was
presented with a jacket as she
prepared to go on limited duty
with the service while she
attends school, training tobe a
nurse.
Branch praised the service
for its efficient and unselfish
service for the past year and
offered the cooperation of the
County Commission to meet
the emergency needs of the
county during the coming
year.


County Commissioner William R. Branch gives the oath Sheila Harper, First Assistant; Gail Horton, Second
of office to the newly elected officers of the Port St. Joe Unit Assistant; C. L. Sylvester, Ambulance Captain and Terri
of the Gulf County Volunteer Ambulance Squad. Taking the Lyles, Supply Chief.
oath are: second, from left: Catherine Ramsey, Squad Chief; -Star photo


Herring Tells Kiwanians


About Pleasure of Hobbies


Keni Herring used his own
hobbies as an illustration to
talk to the Kiwanis Club about
cultivating a hobby for enjoy-
ment in their retirement years
last Tuesday.
Herring, a breeder of pure-
bred chickens and an amateur
maker of knives, showed off
some of his handiwork and
explained some of the fine
points about chicken breeding
which made it an interesting
hobby to him.
Showing off three of his
pure-breds, a solid black
game bantam, a Cornish
bantam and a full size Cor-
nish, Herring gave the club


Catherine Ramsey, Squad Chief, presents dedicated service to the ambulance service
Barbara Weeks a jacket in recognition of her during the past years. -Star photo


FORMER STATE ATTORNEY

LEO C. JONES
and
MARTHA A. "SISTA" BLACKMON

FORMER ASSISTANT STATE A ATTORNEY
FORMER ASSISTANT U.S. ATTORNEY
ANNOUNCE
OPENING OF LAW OFFICES
JONES AND BLACKMON
LAWYERS
ON W 23rd. St. Bldg. D
Panama City, Fla. Ph. (904) 763-6651
GENERAL PRACTICE
STATE AND FEDERAL
CRIMINAL LAW FAMILY LAW
Personal Injury andd Wrongful Death


Gospel

Sing At

White City
The White City Assembly of
God Church will hold a gospel
sing on Saturday January 10,
at 7:30 p.m.
Featured singers will be
Elmer Rogers and the Calv-
ary Trio.
Everyone is cordially in-
vited to attend.
The Church will be spon-
soring a gospel sing each
second Saturday of the month
during 1981, excluding Dec-
ember.


Margaret Key Biggs


Celery was known in
many ancient civilizations.
The early chinese brewed
a medicinal tea from it
which was supposed to
cure stomach troubles.


some history on each of the
breeds and how it came about,
which made the chicken more
interesting subject other than
the base stock for a pot of
chicken and dumplings.
Herring's full size Cornish,
which had a breast the size of
a young turkey and white silky
feathers, was bred in the-
1700's as fighting chickens, but
they fizzled out in this enhdeav-
er. The Cornish is now the
foundation stock for most of
the broiler industry, Herring
said. He pointed out that the
breed would produce a pound
of meat for every two pounds
of feed, "Probably our most


efficient source of meat from
grain feeds".
Herring also showed the
club some of his knives he had
made, strictly for enjoyment
and gave some tips on how to
get into the hobby.
As he wound down his talk,
he pointed out how satisfying a
hobby can be.
Herring said he shows his
prize fowls in shows all over
the South and gives his knives
away if he doesn't want to
keep them.
Guests of the club were Key
Clubbers David Bray and
Chris Adkison.


Has Poem



Published

Margaret Key Biggs edged out 93 other
contestants to win First Prize in the Russell
Leavit Memorial Award category of the
Florida State Poets Association annual
contest open to all poets in the nation. Mrs.
Biggs also received an Honorable Mention in
the Florida State Poets category.
Adults could enter four categories
sponsored by various individuals or groups.
Mrs. Biggs has received a check and a
certificate of award for her poem, "Sea
Monster Sestina." The Russell Leavit Mem-
orial Award is sponsored by the Deland Poets'
Workshop.


Lunch Prices Rise


The Gulf County School
Board has announced that the
price of reduced price lunches
has increased to 20 cents
effective as of January 1, 1981..
This increase is the result of
late action by Congress and
the Department of Agricul-
ture.


Instructions concerning the
increase were not received by
local school districts until late
in the Christmas vacation
period. The change is brought-
about by a reduction in the
amount of federal reimburse--
ment, said local school
officials. -"


First

Presbyterian Church
Sixteenth Street and Forrest Park Avenue
Phone 227-1756
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE ........ 10:00 A.M.
ADULT SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS .... 11:00 A.M.
Study in the Gospels, Wednesday 7:00-7:45

Welcome to Everyone
JOHN M. STUART, Pastor
Phone 229-6857


Highland View Garbage Pick-Up

Tri-County Refuse

Service
Wishes to Announce That as of January 4th, we
bought out Mr. Jim Harrison of Highland View,
Garbage Business

We Are Trying to Continue
Service to Each Customer

If we have missed you, please call
653-8653 653-8976 653-9446


St Joseph Bay


W. S. (Biff) Quarles
Contractor


"--- Construction
and Remodeling

P. 0. Box 277, Port St. Joe
(904) 229-8795


FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY
through the

College of Education and The Center for Professional

Development and Public Service Continuing Studies

OFFERS A COURSE

WINTER, 1981

RED 5447 Multi Level, Multi Media Materials for Reading Instruction
4 credit hours
An intensive analysis of various reading materials, rationale behind
materials, and review of materials in use.

TIME: Thursday, 5:00 8:00 p.m., beginning January 8, 1981

PLACE: Bristol Elementary School
The Pod
Bristol, Florida

FEE: $88 for Florida residents, $248 for non-Florida residents.

Registration will take place at the first class meeting on January 8, 1981 at 5:00 p.m.

Persons interested in renewing teaching certificates and/or updating their professional
skills are invited to enroll.


I









PAGE SIX THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1981


FOLLOWTHE
DIRECTIONS!

When you have a prescrpton filled
by a registered phamnacist, or buy a
non-piescriptio drug, follow the di-
rections on the package. Mahy
times, failing to do this can lead to
serious complications. If you have
the sightest doubt about whether or
not to take any non-prescription
drug, check with your doctor first.

BUZZETT'S
Drug Store
317 Williams Ave. 229-8771
Plenty of Free Parking
Your REXALL Store


Still Undefeated



Sharks Defeat



Top-Rated War


Eagles

Tuesday, the Wakulla War
Eagles were named as the
number one basketball team
of the state in class 2-A.
Tuesday night, the undefeated
Sharks got the War Eagles on
the Sharks' home court and
probably knocked them out of
that first place position, de-
feating the Eagles, 63-54.
The Sharks had three men
scoring in the double figures


s, 63-5
as they used a hot second half
to hit the War Eagles hard and
preserve the Sharks' unblem-
ished record for the season.
The Eagles had a strong
first half and had a four point
lead at half time. The Sharks
erased the Eagles' lead in the
third period and put on a
20-point scoring splurge in the
last period to put the game on
ice.


Ricky Larry led the Shark
scoring with 23 points. William
Fillmore added 18 points and
John Pittman had 14.
Pittman led the defense with
11 rebounds and Daryl Gar-
land picked seven rebounds
off the boards.
Mills led the Eagles with his
14 points. Spears and Harris
added 10 each.


Head basketball coach Jim Belin is discussing game remain undefeated. -Star photo
strategy with his players as they battle the War Eagles, and


FHA


Making


Farm


Loans

The Farmers Home Admin-
istration is now making Em-
ergency Loans in Bay and
Gulf Counties, Farmers Home
Administration State
Director, Michael R. High-
tower, said recently. Bay and
Gulf Counties have- been
designated because of
damages and losses caused by
,drought and abnormal heat
from June 1, 1980, through
September 15, 1980.
Farmers and ranchers in
Bay and Gulf Counties who
sustained production or phy-
sical losses as a result of the
severe weather may be el-
igible to receive an
Emergency Loan from the
Farmers Home Administra-
tion. Those who have not
received an Emergency Loan
to assist them in recovering
from their loss resulting from
this disaster, may apply for
such a loan at the Farmers
Home Administration
Panama City, Florida 32401,
before the close of business on
September 17, 1981, for phy-
sical and production losses.
Individual examination will
be made of each application to
determine the type of
emergency loan benefits for
which the applicant is eligible.
Farm emergency loans.may
include funds to repair or
restore damaged farm pro-
jerty as well as reimburse
applicants for expenses al-
ready incurred for such pur-
poses. Loans based on qualify-
ing production losses may
include funds to reimburse
applicants for production ex-
penses which went into dam-
aged or destroyed crop and
livestock enterprises and to
produce new crops. Payment
terms depend on the purposes
for which the loan is used and
the applicant's ability to repay
the loan.


Helps Bring

Italian Aid
A unit of the U.S. Military,
ist Bn., 509th Airborne of
Vicenza, Italy has recently
aided the earthquake stricken
areas in southern Italy.
. A member of this group,
from Port St. J9e, is SP-4
Blanchard Tyler Smith, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Charles B.
Smith, and grandson of Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Brown.


Notice
BID NO. 262
The City of Port St. Joe,
Florida, requests bids for one
(1) 50 h.p. Motor. Specifica-
tions may be obtained from
the City Clerk's Office, P. 0.
Box A, Port St. Joe, Florida.
Bid opening to be held Janu-
ary 20, 1981, at the regular
meeting of the City Commis-
sion.
By: L. A. Farris,
City Auditor and Clerk

2t 1-8






The earliest Chinese coins.
were made in the shapes
of knives and spades, in-
dicating, experts say, that
such objects had previously


Both Sharks and War Eagles players get
ready to spring for the rebound as a Wakulla
player shoots from the outside. The entire


game was a battle under the boards.
-Star photo


Score by quarters:
Port St. Joe 14 13 16 20--63
Wakulla 12 19 12 11-54
PORT ST. JOE-Larry, 10-
3-23; Pittman, 6-2-14; Fill-
more, 7-4-18; Garland, 2-2-6;
Givens, 1-0-2; Thomas, 0-0-0;
Jenkins, 0-0-0.
WAKULLA-Spears, 4-2-10;
Harris, 4-2-10; Jackson, 4-0-8;
Oaks, 4-0-8; Posey, 1-0-2;
Mills, 7-0-14; Childress, 0-0-0;
Rosier, 1-0-2; Pijott, 0-0-0.
The Shark JV's made it a
clean sweep for the Sharks,
bumping the Eagle JV team
31-22 in the preliminary.
Marty Russ led the Shark
scoring with 15 points. Darin
Thomas had two, David Pace
six and Anthony Skanes, eight.
Harvey led the Eagles with
eight points.
Monday night, the Sharks
came back from their Christ-
mas vacation to edge the
tough Rutherford Rams, 49-48
in Panama City.
Ricky Larry had the hot
hand for the Sharks with 26
points, scoring more than half
the Sharks' total points by
himself. John Pittman, who
had nine points, was effective
on the boards, tipping in
several shots which might
have missed. Garland had
several assists in the Shark
win.
Jerry Fillmore scored a
field goal in the closing few
seconds of the game and
Rutherford tried to tie it up by,
forcing a three-point play as
the buzzer sounded. The
Sharks took no chances and
stood back to let him shoot,
preserving their one point


ERAL


PARKER REALTY


I


MEXICO BEACH
3 bdrm., 2 ba. home of brick & redwood
construction (fully insulated), plu
shop & office (or 4th bdrm:), cen. h&a
sunken liv. rm., sep. din. rm. & breal
fast nook. Generous stor. inside & ou
Patio, sundeck, outside grill, cans
frontage with boatdock rights. Land
escaped, fantastic unobstructed view
Gulf.. Includes carpet, drapes, stove
refrig. Total 1,800 sq. ft. 43rd St.
Charming permanent or vacation
home, nice residential area, 3 bdrm
glass porch, boat house, too man
extras to list., Completely furnished
20th St.

New 2 bdrm. duplex on beach side
completely furn. Good rental property
or two family retreat. 41st St.
For discriminating buyers only. Thi
custom built home has all the wanted
features. Lg. rms. includes 3 bdrm.,
ba., 2 car garage, great rm., kitchen
screen porch, cen. h&ac, on 2 lots. 36t
St.
Stilt house, 2 bdrm., near good fishing
nice secluded lot not far from beach
Hwy. 386A.
"Cadillac of Mobile Homes"-Price re
duced Take advantage o
the owner's improvements and begi
instant living in this homemaker
dream. Furnished, storage bldg., ne'
h&ac unit. Must see. 8th St.
Two story cottage with sun deck, 1 I1
bdrm., equipped kit., heat pump & ac
storage bldg., downstairs unfinished
Landscaped lot. Virginia Ave..
Lovely brick home on 3 lots-nea
beach. Lg. 4bdrm. 2 ba. with all extra
Landscaped, fenced yard. Sea St.


Hwy. 98 at 31 st St.

Mexico Beach, Fla. 904-648-5777
"Real Estate Specialist for Over 30 Years". Call us for-
information on these as well as a large inventory of lots

Deluxe 1980 Redman mobile home on
approx. one-third acre lot. 2 bdrm., 2 .
)d ba., comp. furn. and ready for 'new Newy L
is 'owners with a taste for quality. Also in- mfaily i
a, eludes 2 g. decks, 2 store, bldgs., sma d
k- security light, sprinkler system & out- at 12 per
t: door shower. End of 5th St. free-stai
ai plus dis
al dryer, f
d- Enjoy magnificent view with unique house. C
of floor plan designed for living mostly tip-
& stairs overlooking the beach. Kit., den Prestigi
with fp, 2 bdrm., ba. upstairs; 2 bdrm. escaped 1
ba., laundry and storage downstairs. with pl
n Hwy. 98 at 5th St. activity
L age and
y Small mobile home with extra room on
d. ideal lot. Furnished. 2 blks. from Gulf. Immacu
Fortner Ave. lots in
located
e, Beachside duplex. Good investment. 2 McClell
y bdrm. & 1 bdrm. apt. Completely
furnished. Hwy. 98 & 29th St. Bargain
is corner l
d Great starter home or vacation retreat.
2 Cozy .2 bdrm. blk. home, completely Mini-far
n, remodeled. Carpet, cypress panelling, extra Ig
h cement drive, Ig. sun deck. Storage south of
bldg., kit. appliances. Great location.
Reasonable priced. 26th St.
g, Efficien
h. Luxury mobile home, short walk to nice 2 t
beach. Sun deck, porch. Must see to with cer
appreciate. Priced in the low 20's. 4th floors, s
e- St. Superb
Of 42nd St.
n Nice and spacious family home on Ig.
's landscaped lots. 3 bdrm., 2 full bal., Rare B
w builtin kit., snack bar. Fla. rm., carpet, vestmei
cen. h&ac, comer Fla. Ave. & 3rd St. vice cer
house. I
g. cial lots
C, 2 bdrm. duplex, furnished, 1 blk. from this thri
d. beach. Furnished. Hwy. 98 at 27th St.
8 unit
ST. JOE BEACH living qi
ar Double-wide mobile home on 2 nice lots. ready f(
s. 3 bdrm. Make an appointment to see Beautifu
this one. Selma Ave. ment.


PORT ST. JOE
sting. St. Joe. Move your
nto this 3 bdrm. home by paying
own pmt. and owner financing
cent interest. House has 9 rms.,
ending fireplace, kit. appli. appl.
shwasher, washing machine,
enced back yd. and Ig. storage'
Call for details and appt. 9th St.
ous home on 3 beautifully land-
lots. 3 bdrm. brick construction
enty of room for comfort and
. Screened porch, double gar-
i carpet. 17th St.
late, 3 bdrm. frame home on 2
nice neighborhood. Centrally
to school, churches & town.
an Ave.
OAK GROVE
n price 3 bdrm. frame home-
ot, near school.
WEWAHITCHKA
rm, 3 bdrm., 2 ba., c.b. home.
;. rms. 5 acres of land, 6 mi.
Wewa.
COMMERCIAL
cy unit motel with pool, plus
bdrm. liv. quarter and office,
i. h&a, wood panelling, terrazo
torage bldg. 3 commercial lots.
location, easy terms. Corner
and Hwy. 98.

business Opportunity. This in-
nt package includes an auto ser-
>ter, 7 unit motel and a 2 bdrm.
Involving a total of 6 commer-
, prime location. Coine on by for
giving business.
Motel plus nice 2 bdrm., 2 ba.
quarters. Business operating and
or new owner to step right into.
il gulf view. Call for appoint-


victory.
Mathews led the Rams with
23 points.
The score was tied at
half-time, 24-24 and Ruther-
ford took the lead in the third
stanza, with a slim two-point
margin, but the Sharks came
back strong in the last period
to down the Rams.
Score by quarters:
Port St. Joe 6 18 8 17-49
Rutherford 8 16 10 14-48


PORT ST. JOE-Larry, 11-4
4-26; Pittman, 3-3-9; Givens,
0-0-0; Thomas, 0-1-1; Garland,
3-0-6; Filmore, 3-1-7; Jenkins,
0-0-0.
Port St. Jod's JV team won
their game a little easier,
dumping the Rams 34-28.
Anthony Skanes led the
Shark scoring with 17 points.
Marty Russ added 13 and
David Pace four.
Both the varsity and junior


The Gulf County School
Board will break ground next
Tuesday in Wewahitchka for
the new Linton Elementary
School expansion program.
The groundbreaking will be


varsity are undefeated on the
year.
Friday at noon, the Sharks
will play Florida High in a
conference game at 12,0
noon. Coach Jim Belin said
Sharks are playing at the
unusual time to play one game
this season before the entire
student body.
Monday, the Sharks will
travel to Bay High for a 7:00
EST game.


School News ...

Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School

BY LESLIE COSTIN


season. Junior High, Junior
Varsity, and the Varsity boys
teams are all undefeated. The.
girls are doing great also.
They have a record of 3-1.


Hope the administration,
faculty, and students of Port
St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School
enjoyed their Christmas holi-
days. Like it or not January 5,
1981 was time for everyone to
return to school.
The Sharks basketball
teams are doing great this


Good luck to all teams this
year! From Port St. Joe High
School to everyone: Happy
New Year!
That's about it for this week.


Ground Breaking


Save



your shoes...


























Let our classified pages


do the walking for you.


Take off your shoes and relax while you look through the
classified pages of our newspaper. If you want a job, or
someone to fill that job, or want to buy, rent or sell
anything from aardvarks to zeppelins, chances are that
you'll find whatever you're looking for in our classified
pages. Our classified pages do the walking for you-and
get results for those who are looking as well as those
who advertise.



The Star

306-308 Williams Ave. Phone 227-1278


been used in bartering.


held at the construction site 4
10 a.m., CST.
The Board invites the public
to attend and witness the
ceremony.


IN


mod








THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Pla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1981


"The Blue Ridge", Starring Port St.


Joe Man Singing At Beach Baptist
"The Blue Ridge", a will be Jim Wood, a 1970 Ridge" of Spartanburg, South In addition to the hundreds
nationally known singing graduate of Port St. Joe High Carolina, travels the United of personal appearances each
group, will be appearing at the School. He is the son of Mr. -States and Canada in their week. "The Blue Ridge" is
Beach Baptist Chapel this and Mrs. James Wood of Port custom built bus singing their seen by millions via their own
Friday night January 9th, at St. Joe. songs of love and happiness to syndicated TV Show "Music
7:30. Appearing with the From their home base in the thousands of fans in their FOR ALL AMERICA", plus,
group and singing lead part Sunny South, "The Blue concerts each week. heard by hundreds of thou-
sands from the 50,000 watt
voice of the Northeast,
a i WWVA, Wheeling, West Vir-
Most Insurancelim ted ginia and home of "JAM-
BOREE U.S.A.".


Since there has been an
increase in home burglaries,
consumers should be aware
that homeowners and tenants


An adult advisory council
for the Gulf County AduitU
Institute has been formed for
the purpose of determining the
needs of the community on a
continuing and systematic
basis in regard to adult
education. Throughout the
year, the council will conduct
meetings as deemed nec-
essary or helpful, with an


nowyou


policies specify certain limits
that will be paid if personal
items are stolen.
Although the standard limit


annual meeting to be held
.iltYin the spring semester.
Members of the council for
1986-81 are: A.O. Boyett, Mrs.
Myrtice Dean, James J. Mc-
Innis, Cecil R. Pippin, R.E.
Simon, Mrs. Donna E. Walker,
Joseph Walker, and Edwin G.
Williams.
The Gulf County Institute
does not discriminate on the
basis of race, religion, nat-
ional origin, sex, or handicap.
It is an Equal Opportunity
Agency.

Card of Thanks
The family of Myrtle Davis
wished to express our heart-
felt thanks to all our Mother's
friends and family for all their
kindness and expressions of
love, also thanks to the pall
bearers and honorary bear-
ers, everyone who prepared
food and all other services
during the time of our
bereavement.
Sara Senk and Sophia Webb


on the contents of your home is
50 percent of the insurance on
the dwelling, certain valu-
ables have limited dollar
amounts of coverage when
there is a loss.
Theft losses of silverware
and goldware, for example,
are limited to $1,000 in most
policies. The coverage for
theft of guns, another popular
item for burgars, also is
usually limited to $1,000. Theft
coverage for loss of coins and
money is $100.
Fine art is treated in most
policies as a part of the
contents of your home and is
insured up to the limit stated
in the polocy.
Before a loss occurs, there-
fore, you should discuss
additional coverage with your
agent. You may wish to
purchase additional coverage
on those possessions you feel
may not be adequately in-
sured.
In addition, you may need
an appraisal made of your
antiques, jewelry, fine art and
other valuables by a qualified
expert. Always keep the ap-
Spraisal with an inventory of
your personal possessions.
By taking the precaution of
preparing an accurate ac-
counting of your possessions
and maintaining adequate
coverage on your valuables,
you can spare yourself con-
siderable anguish in the event
they are damaged or stolen.


"The Blue Ridge" was
organized in 1946 and have
always been leaders in the
business of Country-Gospel
Music. With more than
seventy-five Long Play Al-
bums, plus hundreds of single
records to their credit, they
have probably recorded more
songs than any other musical
group. "The Blue Ridge"
currently records for Q.C.A.
Records, foremost in the
Recording Industry with
world-wide distribution.
Marathon Pictures chose to
feature the versatile talents of
the "Blue Ridge" in their-
color production of the feature
length movie: "Sing a Song
For Heaven's Sake". Other
than singing their own songs,
they were selected to do the
backup work on the songs
performed by the great Red
Foley, also performing their
own song, "Oh, Glory, Glory
Hallelujah", in the 1970 Ac-
ademy Award winning movie
of the year.
The inimitable "Blue Ridge
Sound" is moulded from the
bass voice of Burl Strevel, who
doubles as master of ceremon-
ies; tenor from Jerry Tram-
mel (tenor); baritone by Bill
Crowe; and the lead by Jim
Wood. The artistry of Brad
Bailey (bass); Allen Miller on
Guitar and Banjo; Steve Boyd
on drums and Bill Baxter on
the Steel Guitar, accompany
the group musically.
Put all of this together and
you could only have "The Blue
Ridge", America's most dyna-
mic- gospel contemporary
quartet.


Chapter

for Retired'


rganizing
The next meeting to learn
about a new chapter of the
American Association of Re-
tired Persons will be held in
the meeting room of the Port
St. Joe Library at the County
Building Complex on Highway
71, on January 12th at 2:30
o'clock, EST.
Persons 55 years of age and
older are urged to attend this
meeting to learn of the bene-
fits available. Those who are
members of te National A.A.-
R.P. in this area are es-
ypecjialyinvited to attend. This
includes all residents of Gulf
County and Mexico Beach,
Bay County.
Howard Ogden, A.A.R.P.
officer from Panama City will
be guest speaker.


U-


Watching the

By Adolph Bedsole larger cities. Increasing taxes
and crime will increase the
Pastor, Wewahitchka flight from cities to rural and
First Baptist Church small toWn areas,.
What does the next 20 years A young man said recently
hold in store for Wewa- that he and his wife moved to
hitchka? If there is another 20 Weahitchka because they felt
years for any of us, Wewa- is was a better place to rear
hitchka will probably ex- their child. Score One!
perience some growing pains. Also, recently a retired
couple from the north said
Even if the power plant they moved here to retire
should not be built in Gu because it was a quiet com-
County, significant growth munity, and with good
will be a norm for our little weather. Score Two!
city, AND, if and when the All ages find Wewahitchka a
actual construction on the sportsman's paradise for
plant begins, there should be hunting and fishing. Score
an accelerated growth above Three!
the norm. WHY? Citizens of Wewahtichka,
Two groups of people will your tide is coming in. It may
probably be responsible for be slow but the tide is coming
the growth of Wewahitchka in your way. Will you be ready to
the next two decades. accept them into our fellow-
ship?--Neighborhood, busi-
Increasing numbers of older ness, schools, churches, poli-
adults will come here to retire, tics.
The quiet and friendly atmos- This means that there will
phere of the small town life is need to be new lots available,
most appealing to this group. new homes to buy, new rental
Young adults who are rear- units available. A growing
ing their children will locate population produces a grow-
here until their children are ing economy in any com-
out of high school. By that mlnity.
time they will be hopelessly Churches of the area need to
"hooked" by that Wewa sand, consider NOW-will the
and just settle down here for churches be able to provide
life. facilities and the needed staff
personnel (plus volunteer
Both older and younger workers) to meet the moral
adults will be seeking to and spiritual needs of the new
escape the rat race in the people who will come to live
here in the next twently
years?


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With

HANNON INSURANCE

Agency, Inc.

The Insurance Store Since 1943

Auto Home Business Life

Flood Bonds Mutual Funds
8:30 til 6:00 Monday through Friday


221 Reid Avenue


Phone 227-1133


We are HERE to Service What We Sell


ROY SMITH, Agent


FRANK HANNON, Agent


By PAT ALONZO

We Know Our

Rug Fabrics
Rayon is a fiber which is
use4 mainly in the manufac-
ture of scatter rugs, or throw
rugs as they are known to
many people. Rayon is some-
times also used in the manu-.
facture of wall-to-wall carpet
for bathrooms. Rayon is pop-
ular because it can be dyed
many different colors.
Rayon has been known ip
this country since about 1911,
but was not used in the manu-
facture of rugs until after
World War H. As you prob-
ably already know, rayon is
the oldest man-made fiber.
Our personnel know carpet,
and the fibers used to make
carpet. Tell them your needs,
and they will be happy to
assist you in making the right
selection.






of Port St. Joe
204 MONUMENT AVE.
PHONE 227-1199


Pate's Service Center

214 Mon. Ave. Pbone 227-1291


In Paying Burglary Losses


Adult Advisory

Council Formed


NOTICE

EFFECTIVE
NOVEMBER 17, 1980 thru JANUARY 16, 1981
ST. JOSEPH TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY
WILL INSTALL A

Color Phone Extension (Desk or Wall)
For Their Subscribers

Without Service Connection Charges

You need only to pay a small monthly
extension charge of $1.65 per month for
residence extensions or $2.00 per month
for business extensions.

Contact Your Local Telephone Business

Office Today For More Information


St. Joseph Telephone &


Telegraph Company


PAGE SEVEN


World Go By
So, as we watch the world go formulated some years ago in
by, Wewahitchka may soon the business world. It is called
find itself in a new ball game. the KISS formula-"Keep It
It is time now to think and be Simple Stupid."
ready to receive it as your tide Amen! Amen!
comes in. And Port St. Joe? Wowt
A formula for success wais That will be the big bang.


Begin the New
RIEND Year with a new
WC life. A lifed filled

with JOY, PEACE AND HAPPINESS.
JESUS CAME TO GIVE THAT NEW
LIFE. John 10:10, John 3:16

WORSHIP WITH US.
1601 LONG AVENUE
BIBLE STUDY ......................... 9:45A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP...............11:00 A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING .................. 5:45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ................. 7:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY .......................... 7:00P.M.

Long Ave. Baptist Church

A.M. ......................... "The Will of God"
P.M. ..... "Un-Christian Criticism", James 4:11-17

REV. TEDM. CORLEY
Pastor














AT I EVNO IS A
PLAUE COME IN TODAY


TAJLMERITE BEEF BONE-IN
RoundS49
.Steak i


B


"MEAT Makes The Meal" .. And Since It Is The Center Of Most Menus It's Important That You
Start With The Best! You Can Always Rely On IGA Tablerite Meat You'll Be Proud Of Anytime!
Cause Your "Special" At IGA!


PICNICS
-M 4


TALRITE BOSTON BUTT
Pork 2"128
Roast .
__, o WW ^ ^ g ^. o: .. *^. *> ,-^'


lb.
Sliced . . 88
Center Sliced .. .b98.


O



0
D
U
0
-iJ



0
U
111



U
-II
-II
-II

O
O
O


Top Round Steak TABLERITE BEEF. . ...
Sirloin Tip Roast TABLERITE BEEF . . ..
Tablerite Cubed Steak............
Whole Beef Loins (CUT INTOSTEAKSFREE) .. ..
Tablerite Whole Bef Ribs (CUT INTO STEAKS F El
Lykes or IGA Sliced Cooked Ham ....
Sunnyland Fresh Link Sausage .....
Gwaltney's Great Chicken Bologna ..
Oscar Mayer Pure Beef Wieners ....
Oscar Mayer Round Variety Pak.....
Oscar Mayer All Meat Sli Bologna .
Oscar Mayer All Meat Wieners p .:
12 oz. 1
IGA Reg. or Beef Wieners ..k.. ,p.
Tablerite Lean Pork Steaks .. Ib. I
Lykes Slab Sliced Bacon ..... 91


WE'RE FEATURING "AMERICA'S BEST"...AND THAT MEANS
AMERICAS FINEST QUALITY MEATS, GROCERY & PRODUCE!


H2-b.


HANDY PAK
CRINKLE CUT
POTATOES 5!
IGA SPEARS
Broccoli .....2 oo z
IGA
Whip Topping. 2 ze
SEA PAK BREADED
Fish Sticks.... oz
BANQUET
Suppers .......3 "i


2 lb.
pkg.
9oep


991,
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PILLSBURY BISCUITS
BUTTERMILK
OR
COUNTRY 0 CT.
STYLE CANS
KRAFT MIRACLE 6-STICK
Margarine ..... 690
IGA
CHEESE SINGLES 2 z 139
SEALTEST
SOUR CREAM .2 ns 99*
SHEDDS
Oleo Spread ... size 109


0. .









DAVI

Fosd Ihr


D RICH'S IG


... PortSt Joeand Wewahitchka


Me 'cPAMD
eru PnoR1. a


Prices Good Jan.
Jan. 13, 1980


* * lIb.
. . Ib.
.* . Ib.
a a a a lb.
. . lb.

10 oz.
.. pkg.
20 oz.
* -. 3 ,pkg.
. .. *. pkg.


- U. 3
.- 3
I* I ,I


EU 3
''a


p r 3'


Ib.
pkg.
12 oz.
pkg.
8 oz.
pkg.


$ 28
$228

$22.
$268a


38
98


$1:08

$188
$218
$11


STOKELY ORANGE OR LEM
GATORADE...
CARNATION ASSORTED
Hot Cocoa Mix


-MARTHA WHITE
Pouch Mixes
DELMONTE
Green Beans
COFFEE


ON LIME


.a a U .


k a U U a


*BIX MIX
*FLAP STAX MIX mU
SCORN BREAD MIX X
CUT OR 2
FRENCH STYLE


Tasters Choice...
CAIRO BEAUTY d
Salad Delites ....
IGA
n P *CREAM OF CHICKEN or
Soup *CREAM OF MUSHROOM s s .
SUNSHINE
O ,,lSB, 'SALTED OR
BEST-PAK
Tall Kitchen Bai


LIQUID DETERGENT
Dawn .......


I H L BAI


VICKS
Nyquil ..............
VICKS,
Formula 44.......
VICKS .
Formula 44-D .......
VICKS


Vaporub .....


6 oz. $2 29
size
3oz. $6
11/2 OZ $19


* 9

2

3
* -

gS


1 a I 0


32 oz.
btl. 59
Pkg. $ 149
of 12
foPkg9
for79


16 oz.
cans


8oz.
jar 1
a9oz. 990.
jars 99
frcans 996



5ct. $119

bottle I


I BAKER DEARTEN


IGA PECAN
Spins ........ 2 o
IGA SPLIT OR BROWN N' SERVE P
Roils ...... ..2 'of
IGA GIANT SANDWICH
24BREAD .oz.
BREAD ........ loaf


$1
*1


790


W JlF's


Is Always Fresst.... Bcase We Haul Our Own


ORAwNES- 69
a *


Florida
GRAPEFRUIT

SWEET
POTATOES
Tender Fresh
GREEN
BEANS
Florida
BROCCOLI


Fancy Shelled
PECANS


69'


$100

$1


5 lb.
* bag


3 Ib.
tray


tray


TURNIPS,

GUARDSDS,
MUSTARD



$119


Delmonte Fancy

BANANAS I

Iceberg Lettuce --


Fresh Head
GREEN CABBAGE ....


Fancy
BULK CARROTS
Florida Vine Ripe
TOMATOES ...


Bunch 8


Rome Beauty


S* qt. jar


$390


.3b. tray.


3 .
. tray


3 Ib. bag


APPLES


7-


KRAFT MACARONI
& CHEESE
DINNERS 3' 9w
TROPICANA
ORANGE $ 109
JUICE ,S Im


c


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2/$1


69c

88c


V1t-I 0


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PAGE TEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1981





OJ E.B. MILLER REALTY




I i- I 21 "We're Here For You.


PORT ST. JOE
1101 Garrison 3 bdrm., 2 Excel. opportunity for a Beautiful executive home Homemakers Dream-3
ba.,on 11g. lots, Plenty of young couple to own their on 3 landscaped lots. 3 1g. bdrm., 1 ba. home, fully
rm; Ig. den, sprinkler sys- own home and have income bdrms., 28' living rm., gar- carpeted, separate din. rm.,
tern. A real buy at $39,000. from the property paying age and dbl. carport. Lots of, Ig. den, has drapes, refrig-
No. 102. the mortgage. 3 furnished extras, including Ig. screen- erator, stove, dishwasher.
----- rental units in addition to ed Florida rm. and 2 work- Nice 1g. lot. 1910 Cypress
3 bdrm., 2 ba. home, Ig. liv. main house. Owner financ- shops. 602 17th St. $59,500. Ave. Assume existing loan
rm., 1g. den with numerous ing available. Come find out No. 107. or refinance at $37,500. No.
cabinets and storage, chain the details! $46,000. No. 100. 101.
link fence, shallow well .& 2 bdrm., 1 ba. home on
pump, storage shed. Ready fenced lot. Living rm. with 528 7th St. Owner will
for occupancy. $37,500. No. $3,000 down gets you into fireplace, din. rm., remod- finance 25 percent down,
104. this doll house. 2 bdrms, 1 eledkitchen, utility house in balance at 12 percent. 2
Executive Home: a., hardwood floors with back, new cen. h&a. Call for bdrms. plus small extra rm.
Executive Home: 2 story, 4 partial carpeting. Neat and more information. 527 10th Iba. Woodburning fireplace
bdrm., 2% ba., carpeting, clean, has been well taken St. $25,000. No. 106. in liv. rm. Lg. eat-in kit.
outstanding quality drapes, care of. The lot is 125'x170' Back & front screened
Ig. lot, fireplace, 2 car with a boat house and 523 Third St. Owner will fi- porches. Carport. $17,000.
garage, cen. h&a. Shown by storage bldg. Best buy in nance. 3 bdrms., 1 ba. No. 112.
appt. only to qualified buy- town-ideal for retirees or Carpeted liv. rm. with pic-
ers. One of the nicest homes newlyweds. $22,500 full ture window. $14,000. No.
in town. No. 114. price. 521 10th St. No. 105. 111. "


MEXICO BEACH
Live within walking dis- Deluxe 4 bdrm., 2 ba. home 28th St.-2 comp. furnished Comfortable smaller 2
tance of beach in a furn. 3 with cAn. h&a. Canal loca- 1 bdrm. apts. on valuable bdrm. home 1% blocks from
bdrm., 1 ba. mobile home tion with boat dock-lg. lot. Beautiful view from 3rd beach. Carpeted, cen. heat
on 75'xll112' corner lot. Utility liv. rm, 2 formal dining rms lot back from beach. No. & refrigerator included in
shed in back with washing and comfortable den with 401. low, low price of $24,500. No.
machine. 2 blks. from beach fireplace on 2 lg. lots. Call 405.
at a nice affordable price- for appt. No. 406.
$17,500. No. 402. ----



ST. JOE BEACH
Owners have custom built PRICED TO SELL 2 Complete this partially fin- MOBILE HOME LOT: 75'x
interior of mobile home for bdrms., 1 ba., liv. rm., din. ished house at only $19,000 150', 1% blks. from beach,
beach living. 2 bdrms., 1 rm, kitchen, cen. h&a, well and turn it into a $30-$35,000 ready to move your mobile'
ba., with wood burning fire- insulated, utility house and home. Great location, 3 home on, all utilities are in,
place. Also has outdoor fenced in back area. Locat- bdrms., 1 ba., liv. rm, din. well, septic tank, power
patio and shed for boat on ed 1 blk. from beach on rm, kitchen, garage with pole, etc. No. 202.
beautifully landscaped lot Canal St. $22,500. No. 205. utility rm. only 1 block from
and a half. Call for an appt. beach. Adjacent lot also
to see this beach get away! available. No. 207. This spacious brick home
No. 200. has lovely natural wood
PROFESSIONALLY DEC- DREAM HOUSE: This interior, 3 Ig. bdrms., 2
ORATED: 2 bdrm., 1 ba., beach cottage is perfect for baths, den with magnificent
stilt house in the pines, the retiree or bachelor, 2 view of Gulf. 25'kitchen-din-
SUPER BARGAIN: 3bdrm. comp. furnished. This doll bdrms & den or 3 bdrms. ing rm, Ig. liv. rm. with
1 ba. mobile home on 75'x house is on a 75'x150' lot and. 2 baths, on U.S. 98 fireplace, fenced dog run in
150' lot, first $10,500 gets it, with an aluminum utility across from beach, unusual back, huge bay windows,
can be assumed for a low house and a playhouse for design, practically new, sun deck. Located on east
down pmt. No. 201. the kids. No. 206. fenced, cen. h&a, immacu- side of Hwy. 98. Call today.
late. $42,500. No. 208. No. 209.
JONES
WEWAHITCHKA COMMERCIAL BEACON HILL HOMESTEAD
It's A Startl 3 bdrms., 1 ba. Fully equipped store bldg. Gracious living can be Country living, close to
frolme house on a good siz h Ih m la ..A .fo nanlo .ll .., -- .i...- *]%"..a 'A.,- ..A. __ .. .


lot, utility shed, gas heat, 2,
a-c units are all part of the
bargain plus it's been well
taken care of. 5 miles south
of Wewa, off of Hwy. 71.
Great Price at only $18,000.

ACREAGE
200' on Intracoastal Canal,
3.7 acres. mile from
paved Hwy. 386. A beautiful
property for anyone who
wants to tie up his boat in
his own backyard. $30,000.
No. 800.
Approx. 1 acres, located
at Mexico Beach. City water
available. No. 801.
Cleared 8.5 acres on 386
near Overstreet. Owner will
finance 50 percent at rea-
sonable rate of interest. No.
802.
Almost 2 acres fronting on
Wetappo Creek. High and
dry with horseshoe bank
overlooking creek. Owner
may subdivide. $27,000. No.
804.
Shady lot at Howard treek.
Just a few minutes walk
from the boat landing.
$3,000. No. 805.
Perfect acre in Overstreet
for your new home. High, no
marsh. Not far from the
Intracoastal Canal. $3,500,
No. 806.


OVERSTREET
Two beautiful acre lots at
Wetappo Estates,' not far
from the Canal. No mobile
homes. Financing avail-
able. No. 011.
Beautiful brand new 3 bdrm
2 ba. home on 6 private
acres. Modern "country"
living at its best. Priced in
the mid 50's. No. 012.


MOBILE HOME

Mobile for sale. 24'x
56', 3 bdrm, 2 ha., partially
furnished, cen. h&a, excel.
cond. Only $12,500. No. 021.


wtn4 g coAmer a X cooJ er,
counters, display islands
etc. on 3 acres on Hwy. 30,
plenty of rm. for expansion
on a mobile home park, will
finance. No. 701.
Business for Sale: Conven-
ience store, St. Joe Beach,
corner of Bay & Americus.
1,536 sq. ft., 10 dr. walk-in
cooler, paved driveway on'
1 lots w concrete slab
ready for expansion or other
business. Call for details.
No. 700. -
30'x90' commercial lot on
corer of Reid Ave. and 5th
St. Across alley from city.
hall. Priced right and owner
will finance. $12,000. No.
703.


CAPE SAN BLAS
Gulf Front; 70' on the Gulf,
90' deep, beautiful view with
fishing and sun bathing in
your front yd. A real buy at
$14,000. No. 11.
Two gorgeous dry acres of
tall pines and shrubbery
with 205' fronting on the
hwy. and bay. Just beyond
the old salt works marker.
Owner will sell all or 100' on
either side. Financing avail-
able. No. 10.


BEACH LOTS
A large selection of excel.
building lots in Mexico
Beach, St. Joe Beach, Bea-
con Hill, plus Gulf Aire lots.
No. 901.
St. Joe Beach Lg. selection
of Beach Lots for less
than $1,000 down you can
own your own. Call today.
No. 900.
Only beach front lot left on
the bay between town and
Tynda=l. 168' of frontage, 164
ft. on Hwy. 98, approx. 300'
deep, good investment or
location for a beach cottage.
No. 902.
Beacon Hill Four lots
together 3 blks. from
beach, great buy at only
$3,500 each. Hurry and Call
Today! No. 903.


youts as yuu view Uwt ulf
from the sundeck of this
spacious 2 story 4 bdrm. 2
ba. home; also has 1g.
living, dining kitchen com-
bo overlooking the sparkling
gulf waters. Excellent fi-
nancing by owner. No. 300.
Plenty of space-2% lots
fenced enclose this 3 bdrm.,
2 ba. home with Ig. liv. rm,
din. rm. & pleasant bright
kitchen. Extra tie ins for
trailer rental if desired.
Assume existing loan and
owner financing. $32,000.
No. 302.
2 story house with sun deck
on U.S. 98, gives you a beau-
tiful view of the Gulf. Comp.
furnished deluxe 4 bdrm. 2
ba. home. Ready for. occu-
pancy. $65,000. No. 300.
3 bdrm., 1 ba. mobile home,
on 2 beautiful high and dry
lots in Beacon Hill, property
completely enclosed with" a
wooden fence, plenty of
space for kids or dogs.
$25,000. No. 301.

INDIAN PASS
Be protected. by Century
21's Home Protection Plan
when you purchase this
lovely 3 bdrm., 2 ba., cen.
h&a, fully modern home
only 1 blk. from beach.
$40,000. No. 602.
Observe the beauty of the
Gulf! This newly construct-
ed stilt beach home has
observation deck for view-
ing and sunning. 2 bdrms.,
insulated thruout. Call for
more info. $39,500. No. 601.

GULF AIRE
Beautiful New Home. Rock
front with fireplace 3
bdrm., 2 ba., fully carpeted
with all drapes. Cathedral
ceiling, cen. h&a, sizeable
existing mortgage which
can be assumed. Owner
transferred- by appt. only.
'Only a few front lots left!
Over 35 lots have been pur-
chased in this planned com-
munity. Prices will increase
soon. 11 percent financ-
ing. Invest for appreciation
or build now.


wown. 4 spacious nibdrns.,
newly remodeled, ex. 1g.
kitchen, 1% acres complete-
ly fenced with new chain
link, dog pens, plenty gar-
den space, numerous fruit
trees, and all close to town,
ideal for children, farm or
nursery. Call today on this
one. $48,500. No. 109.

WHITE CITY
2 yr. old stone & stucco
home. Modern, easy to heat
& cool. Stone fireplace in
den. 2 full baths, 3 bdrms.
all carpeted. Modern, effi-
cient kitchen with built-in
range top and wall oven.
Dishwasher. Lg. 100'x165'
lot with plenty of garden
space. Charles Ave. No. 022.

HIGHLAND VIEW
Plenty of room in this 3
bdrm. home, Ig. closets, 1
ba., liv. rm., kitchen & din.
combo, utility rm., garage,
den. $29,500. No. 500.-
Over % acre of good earth
goes with this 4 bdrm.
home, including 2 story
barn to house your garden-
ing tools. Grape arbor,
pecan tree & chain link
fence are all here, plus
extra apt. adjoining main
house which can be rented.
$28,000. No. 501.


OAK GROVE
$7,500 total price on this
sturdy 1 bdrm. mobile
home, has extra child's
room or great room, on
corner lot with a pick-up
camper body for extra stor-
age. Owner will finance. No.
108.
2 lots, chain link fence,
grass, landscaping, stor.
sheds, carport. 12x65' mob-
ile home in excel. cond. with
cen. h&a. A most comfort-
able arrangement. No. 110.
4 bdrms., 2 kitchens, d
be us a ts r
bo ar i an
1ore [a
good Opace and
u use. Quiet dead end
st. $15,000. No. 103.


AFTER HOURS
JIM CLEMENT 648-5482
Associate
SANDRA CLENNEY 229-6310 NATALIE SHOAF 227-1498
Realtor Associate Associate


route 3, Box 167A Port St. Joe, Fla. 32456

1829 Hwy. 98 MEXICO BEACH


UlWn


Trailer on small lot. $1,000
down, $100 per month for 10
yrs. or $6,000. 207 Madison St.,
Oak Grove. Write Brooks
Anderson, Apt. 333,1305 K. St.,
Bedford, IN 47421. It 1-8

3 lots in Apalachicola for
sale. Call 648-5413. Itp 1-8

Lot on St. Joe Beach. Pineda
St., 75'x150'. $5,000.00. 648-
8926. ltc 1-8

For Sale or Rent: 4 bdrm.
home with recently fenced in
front yard and new roof. In
need of some minor repair,
but considering city expan-
sion an excellent investment.
(Only selling due to job).
$19,000 firm or rent for $180.00
per mo. with references and 1
month rent deposit in ad-
vance. See by appt. at 521 9th
St. Call 229-8948. 3tp 1-8
Lot for sale by owner at
Selma Street, St. Joe Beach.
75x180' plus. Call 648-8954.
tfc 12-25

For Sale by Owner: 3 bdrm.
block house with 2 baths.
Located on Long Ave, near
schools. For more information
call 227-1313 after 5 p.m.
tfc 11-14

Beacon Hill, two lots, fenced
yard, 3 bdrm., 1 ba. double
wide trailer. $25,000. 229-6961
or 648-8971. tfc 9-25


One pkg. unit electric heat,
10 k.w., 2 ton cooling, $450.

One pkg. unit electric heat,
10 k.w., 2 ton cooling unit, $450.
Includes the return, and some
12" pipe, thermostat. Call 227-
1777. 2tp 1-8

Maple den furniture, good
cond. Zippered, cushioned
sofa and couch. Call 227-1565.
tfc 1-8

Small building for sale, to be
moved. Less than 2 yrs. old.
1972 Plymouth Fury IIL 648-
5665. ltp 1-8


Pickup bed for l.w.b. Chev-
rolet or G.M.C. truck. No rust,
can install and paint to match.
Call 648-8300. ltp 1-8

300 gal. steel fuel tank with
wall furnace, 25" color TV
with rotary & antenna, desk &
chair. Call 227-1848. ltp 1-8

Bothered by the neighbor's
cats, dogs, bill collectors
and unwanted guests? Have I
got a deal for you. Dober-
man bassett puppies, FREE!
Cute as a bug now, but will
grow up into fine watch dogs
and loveable pets. You may
take your choice from a varied
selection of nine; when they're
gone, there's no more. You
may call 227-1278, 8:30 5:30,
or 229-6343 after 5:30 to make
arrangements to see these
cute puppies.

1977 Marietta mobile home,
2 bdrm, 2 ba., Ig. master
bdrm. with double vanity and
stepdown tub in bath, cen. air,
economical nat. gas heater &
range. Will sell furnished if
desired. 229-6758 or 648-5063.
tfc 10-23

AVON
To Buy or Sell
For Gulf or Bay counties. Call
collect 871-1649 or write Dist.
Sales Mgr. Margaret Rick-
man, P. 0. Box 10403, Parker,
FL 32401. tfc 8-21





3 family yard sale. In High-
land View, Hwy. 98, in front of
Rag Barn. Friday and Satur-
day, 8:00 until. At give away
prices. Itp 1-8


Yard Sale, corner of I
and Hwy. 98, St. Joe I
Friday and Saturday
until.


Bay St.
Beach,
r. 8:30

ltcl 1-8


Garage Sale, Thursday and
Friday, Jan. 8th & 9th. 1901
Long Ave. 8:00 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. Clothes, dishes, toys &
many misc. items., tp 1-8


Want to Rent: 3 bdrm.
in St. Joe. 648-5413.


I

.house
It 1-8


EQUITY I
If you are a home owner, you
could be eligible to borrow up
to $50,000 and you could use
the money for any purpose.
Call us today 769-1535 James
H. Crews, Licensed Mortgage
Broker, 6242 E. Hwy. 98,
Panama City. tfe 12-4

The V.F.W. will meet every
second Tues. and fourth Thur-
sday of each month at Paul-
ine's Rest. at 7 p.m. tfc 5-31

There will be a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe
Lodge No. 111, F. & A.M.
every first and third Thursday
at 8:00 p.m.
JOE ST. CLAIR, W.M.
J. P. Cooley, Sec.

R.A.M.-Regular convoca-
tion of St. Joseph Chapter No.
56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd Mon-
days, 8 p.m. All visiting com-
panions welcome.
E. E. WEEKS, H.P.
E. William McFarland, Sec.

The Disabled American Vet-
erans, Port St. Joe Chapter 62,
will meet the first Tuesday
and third Thursday of each
month at 7 p.m. at Pauline's
Restaurant. tfc 9-4


- Fully furnished, 1 bdrm.
cottage with glassed-in porch,
bathroom, kitchen. Available
now. 207 Coronado St., Port St.
Joe Beach. Come see or phone
648-5120. 3tp 1-8

Nice 2 bdrm. furn. down-
stairs apt. for rent on 216% 6th
St. All electric kitchen appli-
ances. Couple only. Call 229-
8663. ltpl-8

Large 2 bedroom trailer at
St. Joe Beach for rent. Call
229-8939. tfc 12-18
Thames Hotel, day, weekly,
monthly rates. 302 Reid Ave.
229-8723. tfc 11-13

No need, for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture.-
227-1251. tfc 10-23

Furnished 2 bdrm. house,
auto. heat, no pets; furnished
large one bdrm. apt., auto
heat, no pets. 229-6777 after 7
pm. tfc 11-8


BEACON FABRICS
Sewing Notions & Patterns
Hwy. 98 at Overstreet
Hrs.: 9:00-5:00 E.S.T.
Closed Sun. & Mon.

JAMISON ELECTRIC
24 Hr. Service
Residential, Commercial,
Rewiring, Repairs, Ser-
vice Change.
1406 Long Ave.
229-6516
tfc 11-13

Complete Wood Shop
Custom Cut Lumber
Want to Do It Yourself?
Then come see us for Stan-
ley tools, hardware, paneling,
paint, lumber.
Earley's Hardware &
Building Supply
Hwy. 98 W. 227-1763
tfe 8-5

CAREFOOT SEPTIC TANK
Septic Tank Cleaning
Phone 229-8007
tfc 11-30

BEACH MOBILE HOME
SERVICE
Supplies & Service
Call 648-8363
tfie 8-21

Psychological services for
anyone with problems in day-
to-day living. Gulf County
Guidance Clinic, Port St. Joe.
227-1145. (24 hrs.)


SChurch Supplies
SMusic- Records- Tapes
Rubber Stamps
Hospital & Funeral Flowers
S Gifts-Bibles
Sound Studio Recording
Service

7-OAKS
GOSPEL SUPPLIES Z
115 Hunter St., Oak Grove
i Port St. Joe, Fla.
{s227-1325 t


F01 RET. PUBLIC[
NSrIE


Two bedroom apt. and
campers for rent on Beach. By
day. week, month or year. Ski
Breeze Camp Sites. Call 229-
6105. tfc 11-20

For carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vac, the portable steam car-
pet cleaning system. Avail-
able at Western Auto, phone
227-1105, 219 Reid Ave.
tfc 3-16


FOR RENT
Mexico Beach
St. Joe Beach
Furnished cottages,
from $140 per mo. to
$300 mo.
Marguerite Wainwright
Realtor
648-8220
900B E. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach


Applications are being ac-
cepted by the Gulf County
Senior Citizens Association,
Inc. for the position of book-
keeper 8 hrs. per day, 5 days
per week. A high school educa-
tion with training and experi-
ence in bookkeeping are mini-
mum requirements. The book-
keeper will be required to
prepare the payroll, to main-
tain monthly, quarterly, and
year-end reports; to prepare
all reports according to feder-
al requirements; to meet the
financial obligations of the
project with promptness; re-
port appropriate financial
matters to the Project Direc-
tor and the Board of Direc-
tors, and provide further as-
sistance to either as they may
require.
Applications will be accept-
ed through Friday, January
16th, 1981, and may be obtain-
ed at the Gulf County Senior
Citizens 'Association office at
Avenue D and Peters Avenue,
Port St. Joe. This is an equal
opportunity employer.
2t 1-8


ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work Welding
506 First Street
Phone 229-6803
Machinist on duty all day
every day


JOE BETSEY-The name
that's synonymous to paint-
ing. Call 769-7368. 5tc 1-1


FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned persons intend to register
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf
County, Florida, four weeks after the
first publication of this notice, the
fictitious name or trade name under
which they will be engaged In business
and In which said business Is to be
carried on, to-wit:
ST. JOSEPH BAY CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY
P.O 0. Box 277
Port St. Joe, Florida
Owner: William S. (Biff) Quarles, III
4tc 1-1
BID NO. 261
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida,
requests bids for one (1) Portable
Asphalt Recycler. Specifications may be
obtained from the City Clerk's Office, P.
0. Box A, Port St. Joe, Florida. Bid
opening to be held January 20, 1981, at
the regular meeting of the City Commis-
sion"
By: L. A. FARRIS,
City Auditor and Clerk
2t 1-1


'-


1976 Chevrolet %-ton pick-
up, V-8, auto. trans., power
steering & brakes. Clean & I
rust. Book price $2,925.00, my
price $1,595.00. Trade accept-
ed. Call648-8300. ltp l-8

1973 4-wheel drive Ford pick
up truck. Good for parts. $350.
648-8926 or 648-5315. Itc 1-8


HOW TO EARN
$6,000 FOR COLLEGE
WHILE YOU GO.
You can earn over $l.(x)O a ;year
with a local Anny Reserve unit
during college. Over $4.000 for 4
years. Add to this up to $2.000 in
educational assistance you receive
just for joining certain selected
units. And you've uLp to $6,000
vou could miss without Army
Reserve. It only takes a weekend
a month plus some summer train-
ing. Interested? Call your Annv
Reserve representative., in the
Yellow Pages under "Recruitiing"


MI EI "ULAY'S
ARMY RESERVE.


A small piece of charcoal
in your refrigerator can
absorb strong food odors.


Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday 4:00P.M. EST
St. James Episcopal Church

Carpentry Work Done
Reasonable Rates
Jimmy Johnson
Phone 229-8757
tfc 2-2

FOR TRACTOR WORK
Call 229-8939 or 648-5306,
tfc 8-14


E. B. MILLER, REALTOR

PATTY MILLER, Realtor Assoc.




648-5011 Re


SERVICES














tt right reserved 0 none sdd to dealer


wn Pricii


Everyday Low Prices


On These Items


Crisco .3 b. can
17 oz.
LeSueur Peas
6%2 oz.
Starkist Tuna


Parkay
Margarine.


1 b.640


Corn Fakes s oz
Corn Flakes S Oz. 45


12 oz.
Armour Treet


$124


Kraft
Mayonnaise
Del Monte


Choice Tender Fresh Lean
SIRLOIN TIP GROUND BEEF
.ROAST 3 Lbs. or More
f $248 $ 38 -
Lb. 2Lb.
Fresh Grade A Market-Pak
Fr Breast or Leg Sliced
Fryer Backs FRYER QTRS. SLAB BACON

Lb. 0Lb. 68b $ 28


Fresh
BEEF LIVER


Fresh
BEEF OXTAILS


Lb.78


$128
Lb.


Fresh Pork
Feet, Maws, Lb.
Liver, or Neckbone


Sunnyland All Meat or
BEEF FRANKS


58c


Juice


Jr. Baby Food Ea.


Ex-Absorbent Disposable
Pampers....


I


Armour 5 oz.
Vienna Sausage


Gatorade 32 oz.


Meadow Gd Read Cled
ICE CREAM


$128


Round White
POTATOES


Florida


ORANGES


5 Lb.
Bag


99


10 Lb.
Bag


Medium
YELLOW ONIONS
Fresh
AVACODOES...


Fresh Green Broccoli....
Sno-White Cauliflower .. .


3 Lb.
Bag


89'


Bunch 99C
Head 99C


Red or Gold Delicious
APPLES


. Each 79


Salad
TOMATOES..... Pt.


69'


Pure Cane


SUGAR
5 Lb. Bag


$


79


limit 1 with S10or more add. purchase exel. cig. & tob.


Martha Whte
FLOUR


limit 1 with $10or more add. ourchaseexcl.cig. & tob.


32 oz. 125


TOWELS


Iimit2 with $10or more add. purchaseexcl. cig. & tob.


270


$285


49c


59'


KETCHUP


limit 1 with $10or more add. purchase excl. cig. & lob.


D


Pdall Lffeam anuall 7 thro 13, i9al






,%EW YEAO!


4-Roll Package Hi-Dri
BATHROOM TISSUE.


. U U .a .a


Jim Dandy
CORN MEAL


5 Lb. Bag


Number 303 Cans
LeSUEUR PEAS.........


3 Ounce JarNestf e
NESTEA INSTANT TEA..


32 Ounce Returnables
RC Cola & Diet Rite


* .a


Bath Size Bars
GENTLE TOUCH SOAP


3


.2


3 Pound Jar Fine Fare
PEANUT BUTTER........ 2.99


No. 2 Cans
HUNT'S PEAR HALVES


5 Pound Bag
.'JIM DANDY GRITS
32 Ounce Jar
SMUCKER'S JELLY


12 Ounce Package China Doll
BLACKEYE PEAS ..


No Brand
DOG FOOD .......
No Brand 7V Ounce Package
Macaroni and Cheese


I Hi-Dri Large Rolls
PAPER TOWELS.....


15 Ounce Can Bush's
CHILI HOT BEANS .


..990


. $1.39
...$1.39


. .2/69"


23"
... 239
...29


s 590


S 390


100 Count Package
LIPTON TEA BAGS
All Sizes
Real Kill Bug Spray


1 Pound Box Elbow
Spaghetti or Macaroni


... m 2.69

... 15'off


...69'


16 Ounce Bottle Kraft
1000 Island Dressing $1.19


12 Oz. Kraft Amer. Single Wrap
Cheese Singles
I Lb. Fine Fare
Butter Prints
9 '/2 Oz. Butter-Me-Not
Canned Biscuits


U a g


$2.09
2/88c


0 a


* 0


3 Pound Can
Snowdrift Shortening $l.98



9


9 1


I


*


$139





a g a


(i


Whole Kernel
, or Cream Style UORN


S*


No. 303 Cans Limit 3 Cans with Specials for:
Del Monte $10. Order or More 7-Port St. Joe,


... .... .. o e


WfWiley, Roy, Sally and Bill have over 40 years experience in
: the meat business. Let us serve you and fill your special
meat orders. Call 227-1292.
Fresh Meats Always i
| We stock our cases twice daily with fresh Fryer
i" Parts; 3 times daily with Ground Meat;
. Daily with other fresh cuts of Meat, USDA
Choice Iowa Corn Fed Beef.


Tender Skinned Deveined
BEEF LIVER


Center Cut

PORK CHOPS


Pound

5 unds or More Chuck
Ground Chuck $168


Lb.


Choice
Chicken Parts
10 Lb. Bucket
Chitterlings
j Fresh Pig
SFeet, Maw
SRudy Farm- Pkg. of 6
:'Sausage/Biscuits
. Whole or Half
Small Hams


i Country Cousin
TRENCH FRIES


B. .
ld$1
ickge of 1 Doz.
laed Donuts
O Mrs. Traylor's
DUMPLINGS
4 C0ince Morton
pple Pies
4 o0. Mrs. Smith's
can Pies
I Cnce Sara Lee
umpkin Pies


.29,
99

$1.79

990
$1.79
$1.59


F E 2z.PBACON
SLICEb BACON


*1I


89C


$6.99


Lb.


39


$1.69

Lb.


USDA Choice
SIRLOIN STEAK
USDA Choice
T-BONE STEAK


USDA Choice
RIB EYES


Beef
SHORT RIBS
Whole or Half
FRESH HAMS
Smoked
PORK CHOPS


Pound Bag

pies


California Fancy
LETTUCE

Head 3


Fresh
RUTABAGAS
3 Pound Tray
TOMATOES
Fresh
POLE BEANS


Lb.$2.99

Lb.$3.39


Lb. $3.99

Lb. $1.59

Lb. $1.39

Lb. $2.19


Green Head Real Fanc
CABBAGE


2


Heads


Super Large
JUMBO NAVEL ORANGES
Super Sweet
LARGE TANGELOS
Golden or
RED DELICIOUS APPLES
Florida Navel 5 /C
NAVEL ORANGES Lge. 5/$


Eo. 29C
6/880
Lb. 49'


X-Lge.
Ea.


29'


Fresh Collards Turnips Mustard


Lb. 19
Lb. 33

Lb. 69c


SWEET POTATOES
Georgia 9
Pound J


a a a a
U U U U U U U


i t


U U U U U


e a. on- f


9g


a g


w


-m-"


.


.


* e-


9 .


0 v


0 0


,i










PAGE FOURTEEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1981


Poinsettias Easy to Root, but Need Care from Cold


After poinsettias have displayed their
colorful "bracts" for the holiday
season, cuttings from these plants can
be easily rooted for use as indoor plants
or outdoor landscape shrubs.
When poinsettias are pruned, usually
in March or April when the bracts or
leaves have faded, hardwood cuttings 6
to 12 inches long can be rooted in a
container or outdoors in the soil, says a
University of Florida (UF) ornamental
horticulturist.
"Home gardeners can root cuttings
easily by inserting about three quarters
of each woody cutting," explains Dr.
Thomas J. Sheehan, professor with the
UF's Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS), Gainesville.
Soil should be kept moist at all times.
Mulches around the cuttings will help
maintain proper moisture, soil temp-
erature and weed-free conditions for


rooting and growth.
Sheehan says tip of softwood cuttings
also can be taken from branches from
May to September. These can be rooted
under mist or in any container. Since
the cuttings are tender, it is important
that the humidity remain high around
cuttings. Covering the container with
polyethylene film will be ideal, but do
not expose it to the full sun.
"This plant grow quite satisfactorily in,
a range of soils, including sand, muck,
marl, rocky soil and clay. In spite of its
wide adaptability, the poinsettia re-
sponds well to good care," Sheehan
explains.
A complete fertilizer in which the
nitrogen, phosphorus and-potash are in
1-1-1 ratio such as 6-6-6 or 8-8-8 is
satisfactory for poinsettias. A 6-4
fertilizer should be used at the rate of
1-% pounds per 100 square feet per


application. Usually, Sheehan explains,
three applications per year are re-
commended, with the first in the
spring, the second in June and the last
in the late fall.
"This fertilizer application promotes
large bracts with good color and helps
promote growth during the winter
months. Occasionally, a fourth appli-
catioi will be required in mid-summer
if the early application is followed by
extremely heavy rains," he says.
The IFAS professor recommends
pruning poinsettias in -late winter or
early spring after blooming is over or
after the danger of frost has passed.
They could be cut back within 12 to 18
inches of the ground unless they have
been frozen below this point, in which
case they should be cut back to the "live
wood."
A compact plant may be obtained at


flowering time, rather than one with a
few long, unbranched canes, if the
plants are pruned several times during
the growing season. After the new
growth is about 12 inches long, it should
be cut back, leaving four leaves on each
shoot.
"This operation should be repeated
every time the new growth develops
until about September 10. Pruning this
manner will produce a nice compact
plant with many flowers. Pruning after
September 10 may interfere with
flowering, as these plants set their buds
after September 10," Sheehan explains.
Poinsettia bloom is affected by the
length of the day. As the days become
short in the fall, plants set their flower
buds about September 10 in Florida.
However, he explains, plants can be
prevented from flowering by artifi-
cially extending the day length with


electric lights.
This same condition may occur when
plants are growing near a street light or
around the house where they receive
light from a window or door. In such
cases, flowering will be delayed or the
plant may not flower at all.
Weather conditions also have an
effect on poinsettia flowering.
Periods of dark, rainy weather in late
September and early October often will
shorten the day enough to cause the
plants to set buds and flower early.
Commercial growers provide supple-
mental light under these conditions to
prevent bud set and flowering.


coloring of bracts. Poinsettias are very
sensitive to cold, and plants are
frequently frozen before they have had
a chance to bloom. Freezing is
particularly severe in unprotected
locations in north Florida.
Poinsettias may be used as cut
flowers if treated to coagulate the
milky sap ahd reduce wilting. This may
be accomplished by immersing the cut
end of the stem in hot water for about
one minute and then placing it in cold
water. Use care to prevent the hot
water from damaging the flowers.
An alternative treatment method is to
aiucklr sainaA e the t Andl of th A at m


q y we auL eJu or Lae soem
Sheehan says temperature also can over a flame and then place the stem
be a limiting factor in flowering in cool water. Poinsettia flowers should
poinsettias. High temperatures 70 to be cut at least 18 to 24 hours before they
80 degrees F. at night in September and are used in arrangements and stored in
October can delay flowering and the a cool place away from drafts.


.: -













Poinsettia cuttings. Hardwood (left) should be from 6'to i2
inches long; softwood (right) 4 to 6 inches long.


Monday, Jan. 12 ,
Battered Fish, buttered
grits, cole slaw, baked beans,
sliced bread and milk.
Tuesday Jan. 13
Tacos with cheese, shredded
lettuce and tomato, buttered
corn, orange half, cookie and
milk.
Wednesday, Jan. 14
Chicken and rice, turnips


The Florida Highway Patrol
recently reminded parents
and riders of Christmas mini-
bikes and go-carts that these
vehicles are regulated the
same as any other motor
vehicle if they are used on
public roadways.
Colonel Eldridge Beach,
director of the Patrol said,
"Operators of minibikes and
go-carts must be at least 15
years of .age and have a
license. Until the operator
becomes 16 years of age, he
will have a restricted license
requiring daylight operation
and he may not ride a motor
driven bike rated more than
five brake horsepower. Mini-
bike riders are required to
wear an approved crash
helmet and eye protection."
These vehicles are not rec-
ommended for use on public
roads but if they are used they
must by equipped with head-
lights, a tail light, stop light,
horn, rearview mirror and


with roots, spiced beets, corn-
bread squares and milk.
Thursday, Jan. 15
Lasagna, tossed salad,
green vegetable, buttered
garlic bread and milk.
Friday, Jan. 16
Holiday
Menus may change without
notice due to the availability
of foods.


adequate brakes. As with all
other vehicles, they must have
a current motor vehicle in-
spection sticker and license
tag.
When operating on private
property, Beach urged riders
to wear an approved crash
helemt and eye protection.
Colonel Beach concluded by
saying, "Early training may
form habits that will help
youngsters respect the need for
rules and regulations that will
carry into later years as
automobile drivers.









A cup of vinegar can
absorb cigar, cigarette
and pipe odors.


Motor Toys



Are Regulated


FIRST


BAPTIST CHURCH

Corner Third Street and Baltzell Avenue
REV. BILL HEATON, Pastor
AL YANCEY, Minister of Music

SUNDAY SCHOOL ..................... 9:45A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE ......... 11:00 A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING .................. 6:00 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP SERVICE ........ 7:00 P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ....... 7:00 P.M.
"Come and Worship God with Us"


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w ,