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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02353
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 1, 1981
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02353

Full Text














USPS 518-880


FORTY-FOURTH YEAR, NUMBER 18
L


THE


STAR


Industry Deep Water Port Fine People- Safest Beaches in Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, JANUARY 1, 1981


20 Per Copy.


1980 .. An Interesting, Eventful and Busy Year


It has been an interesting, an eventful and a
busy year during the past year here in Gulf
County. Crisis after crisis and good news seemed
to highlight the year, along with history being
made in several areas.
The year saw the county suffer six deaths
on its highways: a large number of deaths to the
families involved, but one of the safer highway
years for the county. Port St. Joe had a City
Commissioner, John Robert Smith, die in office
and his widow appointed to take his place. The
City has been in a running controversy with the
Environmental Protection Agency all year with
the EPA giving the City all the time it needed to
meed EPA standards as the year was winding
down. Elections set precedents in the county at
every turn and the county suffered through a


beginning on creation and construction of a
major deep water port here in Port St. Joe. Even
though the City has historically been a seaport,
there have been no public docks for the past 40
years for the carrying on of seaborne commerce.
Planning and possibly sore construction on the
project is scheduled to be carried out during the
coming year.
SEVENTH-A water well being dug was the
seventh most important story of the year.
Digging a water well doesn't seem a very
exciting event, but this particular well, dug near
Dead Man's Curve near Indian Pass, will supply
water to property developers on St. Joseph
Peninsula, allowing that picturesque stretch of
land to be developed.
Primary deterrent to development of the


Dredge boat working in St. Joseph Bay. -Star photos


strike by workers at Sylvachem..
Judging the 10 top stories for the year in the
county was no easy task. All the stories vied for
the top spot in the ratings. Judging the year as a
good year was easy to do, since all but three of
the 10 top stories were informing county
residents of good news rather than bad.
In-the editor's opinieor,-heten-top stories in
1980 were the ones which follow below in capsule,
form.
FIRST-Elections seemed to capture the
most attention in the county in the past year,
with firsts being experienced on every hand.
The County saw the most constitutional
officers in history stepping down, with four of the
six deciding not to run again. This means the
county will be staffed by four new officers
starting tomorrow.
Also, the county became a two-party county
on a local level for the first time in history.
Republican candidates were seeking office in
two local offices for the first time, Also,
Republicans set up headquarters here and
conducted a lively campaign, again, for the first
time.
SECOND-The second most important story
could have also been the first.
After two years of apprehension on the part
of the County, Florida Power Corporation
announced, as the year was winding down, that
Gulf County would be the location for its next
generating plant construction, some time in this
decade. The new plant will mean many new jobs
for the county.
THIRD-The third story could have also
been the first. In the editor's opinion, the
dredging of the entrance to Port St. Joe harbor.
and funding for dredging the harbor itself, was
the third most important story.
Dredging of the entrance and funding for the
harbor kept the port here from becoming
inactive because it could not handle the large
ships which now come into the harbor. The
dredging was also necessary for the continuation
of efforts to create a deep water port here for
foreign shipments and also for servicing of
Florida Power's fuel shipment anticipated
needs.
Approval of the dredging came after a two
year fight with Florida's Department of
Environmental Regulation for a permit to place
the spoil in the Bay.
% FOURTH-The fourth most important story
had to be the strike at Sylvachem. The 12-week
work stoppage started in June of last year and
was marred by several shootings, which caused
dismay and disapproval on both sides of the
picket lines.
FIFTH-The fifth rated story in importance
for the year was the revolution here in Gulf
County over property values. The State
Department of Revenue told the Property
Appraiser that Gulf's values were not nearly
high enough and the department demanded they
be properly declared on penalty of not having the
property rolls accepted.
The first attempt to get the rolls approved
met with rejection by the state and an order to go
over the entire rolls and come up with a realistic
valuation.
Action by the state caused a considerable
delay in sending out tax notices by all taxing
bodies in the county and made it impossible for
governing bodies to collect any tax money at
the end of the fiscal year in October as they
normally do.
The rolls were finally approved the middle of
December and agencies are now feverishly
working up budgets in order to get the tax bills
out shortly after the first of the year.
SIXTH-The sixth story in order of
importance was the validation of $50 million in
revenue bonds by the Gulf County Port
Authority. The bond issue is scheduled to be sold
sometime in January and will finance a


choice waterfront property in the past has been
due to a lack of potable water. After several
ideas on how to provide water to the peninsula
were considered, the well was the final decision.
It is now in operation and property on the
peninsula is selling for development..


Pickets march on Sylvachem.


This area could be a considerable financial
boost for Gulf County as a whole all because of
a water well.
EIGHTH-The next most important story in
the year was the decision by the County
Commission to bond its secondary road revenues
to pave many streets throughout the county. The
program re-surfaced many streets in the county
which were badly in need of a new surface, built
several needed new streets and replaced a
bridge at Indian Pass, which has been
inadequate for many years.
The $2.3 million program is just now being
completed.
NINTH-Number nine on the list of
important stories is the United States Census
report. The report said the county had lost
population in the past .10 years, with the
population now pegged at less than 10,000. A
subsequent count placed the census at 10,451,
with both Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka losing
population according to the report.
Both the early and the newest estimate of the
Census Bureau is being challenged by the
county, Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka as being
inaccurate.
TENTH--The last story on the top 10 list is
the story of Port St. Joe's new water treatment
plant being completed and going into production.
The new treatment plant took the City off the
St. Joe Paper Company Canal and made the City
dependent on water wells as its source of supply.
The new wells and the new treatment plant
doubles the supply of treated water available in
the City.
CLOSE SECOND-A close candidate for the
year's most important stories was the announce-
ment by St. Joe Paper Company that it would
spend several millions of dollars in moderniza-
tion of the paper mill here. Considerable work
has been going on most of the year, but the big
push in construction and up
-grading will start in the new year, when a major
project of installation of a new energy saving
boiler is to begin construction.


Looking at the important headlines for the
year, the editors came up with this sampling of
how it was, month by month, during 1980.
JANUARY
Dredging of the harbor entrance was
approved for the first of about four times in the
year .. Two accidents were reported over the
Christmas holidays The City took under
consideration allowing modular homes to be
constructed in certain areas A junk
ordinance put the County Commission on the hot
seat.. Horace W. Ariail was the county's first
traffic fatality of the year. Louisiana-Pacific
announced plans to construct a new chip plant
near Port St. Joe Experiments would be
carried out with horseshoe crabs in St. Joseph
Bay for medical purposes.
FEBRUARY
The Sharks won the Gulf Coast basketball
championship The School Board started
plans for a new Wewahitchka Elementary School
... 23 cases were reported on the Spring Court
docket... DER again agreed to a dredging plan .
Boyles re-opened their store in Port St. Joe ...
A County ordinance made it impossible to dump
poisonous wastes in Gulf County Petitions
were started to limit property values ... Ground
was broken for a branch of the Wewahitchka
State Bank here in Port St. Joe.
MARCH
Voters took their first of many trips to the
polls in the Presidential Primaries and voted for
President Carter and Ronald Reagan in the two
parties ... Ward Ridge decided it wanted to do
away with its incorporation... Work was started
on a $2.3 million road paving program in the
county Gulf County gave a seven percent
wage hike in the middle of its budget year .
Port St. Joe's new water treatment plant went
into operation ... Laura Geddie, Edwin Ramsey
and Otis Stallworth were named to membership
on the Port Authority.
APRIL
Developers at St. Joseph Peninsula decided
to sink a water well on the mainland to supply
water to the property sites Students
constructed a registration stand at the Old
Cemetery gazebo ~.. Department of Natural
Resources revealed plans to fence the swamp
: bordering the.Apalachliole-River. Their attempt .
was stopped by 16cl Interest In the matter ...
Raffiel Fisheries announced 'plans to start
building boats commercially at their site on the
Gulf County Canal... A truck driver died at the
wheel while travelling west on Highway 98 near
Highland View The Dixie Youth program
fielded 16 teams for the new baseball season ...
Brian Dolohite was the county's top speller, with
Tommy Ford coming in second ... Dr. Elogio
Vizcarra opened his medical offices for practice
here in Port St. Joe.
MAY
A Port St. Joe man, Airman William B.
Tootle, was involved in the hostage rescue
attempt in Iran... Shark baseball went into the
Sectional play-offs with Century and lost, 4-0 ...
Micky Bateman, Nathan Peters, Jr., James B.
Roberts and John Robert Smith were candidates
for election to the City Commission with Roberts
and Smith winning. The City of Port St. Joe
was cited by EPA for violation of emissions from
the Wastewater Treatment Plant Mexico
Beach wants to send its sewage to Port St. Joe
for treatment ... A huge flag was donated to
Port St. Joe High School by the city's civic clubs
and raised in a public ceremony. Two boys
were bitten by rabid raccoons near Simmons
Bayou ... Willie Calvin Brown was sentenced to
99 years for holding up the Wewahitchka Jr.
Food Store ... National Guard members were
sent to Miami to help control riots there ... The
Library's bookmobile was discontinued because
of lack of funding Port St. Joe High School
graduated 103 seniors Veteran Property
Appraiser Samuel A. Patrick died at age 72.
JUNE
St. Joseph Telephone Company installed its
25,000th telephone in its system .. Wewahitchka
High School graduated 53 seniors ... A 12 week
strike started at Sylvachem .. Contracts were
finally let for dredging the entrance to St. Joseph
Bay Nudes invaded county beaches in the
Indian Pass area.. The financial pinch began
to hit county governments... Congressman Earl
Hutto made a request and had approved a grant
of $1,056,000 for dredging the harbor basin in St.
Joseph's Bay ... J. C. Belin was named by Gov.
Bob Graham to the State Council of 100... C. W.
Brock was appointed to serve out the term of
Samuel A. Patrick ... Gulf County holds up the
Corps of Engineers Apalachicola River dredging
plans until 'it could get some problems
straightened out on the river in Gulf County.
JULY
County gets first evidence in probable delay
in tax receipts ... Daniel R. Gustafson, Detroit,
was the county's first beach drowning victim in
many years... Howard Creek opened a new fire
station with a public fish fry ... 20 sign up for
election on opening day... The temperature hit
100 degrees for the first time in 1980 on July 7 ...
Millie Lyles becomes Gulf's first Republican
local candidate... Snipers hit struck Sylvachem
three times with rifle fire... David Rogers, City
Patrolman, charged with burglary Bus
service was discontinued to Port St. Joe by
Trailways.
AUGUST
Hurricane Allen alerts Gulf County Jan
Hammock rides her bicycle from Port St. Joe to
Bar Harbor, Maine... Property Appraiser turns
in first make-shift property roll which was
turned down ... Census report says Gulf County
had less than 10,000 population ... Herman Dean
led the U.S. Navy Band in a concert as guest
conductor. Rev. J. C. Odum retired after 27
(Continued on Page 4)


A New Order




Assumes Office


Faces In Courthouse Change


There'll be four new faces in
places of leadership in the
Gulf County Courthouse to-
morrow morning when the
seat of county government
opens for business following
the New Year holiday.
Clerk of the Court George Y.
Core, Tax Collector Harland
Pridgeon, acting Property Ap-
praiser Charles Brock and
Elections Supervisor, Dessie
Lee Parker have all tendered
their resignations to Governor
Bob Graham, effective the
last day of 1980.
The officers all decided to


step down early in order to
allow their successors in office
to begin their tenure of office
on the first of the year.
Governor Graham has al-
ready appointed the newly
elected officers to these var-
ious positions to take over on
Friday.
Jerry Gates will be Clerk of
the Court tomorrow. Eda
Ruth Taylor will step into the
Tax Collector's position;
Joyce Williams will be the
Property Appraiser and Cora
Sue Robinson will be the
county's new Elections Super-


visor.
This is the largest exchange
of constitutional officers in the
Gulf County Courthouse since
the county was- founded in
1925, with four out of the six
officers being changed.
All of the new officers were
to have been installed on
January 5, but the retiring
officials stepped down early
because of language in the
retirement law. Staying on
into a new year would have
affected the retirement situa-
tion of the retirees.


Birth On Highway Marks


Otherwise Quiet Holiday


Gulf County had a safe
holiday week end, even though
the Florida Highway Patrol
was apprehensive about the
long holiday and the possibil-
ity that a lot of people would
be hurt and killed on the
highways.
FHP trooper Bill Godwin
told The Star Monday, "We
didn't even have a fender
skinning. We didn't even write
a ticket the entire week end."
The Gulf County Sheriff's
Department and the Port St.
JoeyPolice' Department said"
about the same thing.
City patrolman James
Graves said, "We arrested
one drunk, but it was the day


before Christmas Eve".
Sheriff Ken Murphy said,
"We didn't have anything
except one of my men helped
deliver a baby on the Dixie
Belle curve on Christmas
Eve."
While the week end was full
of non-suspense for the aver-
age citizen of Gulf County, it
wasn't so for Mr. and Mrs.
Walter K. Johnson of Port St.
Joe.-
The Johnsons were in Apa-
jachicnla .,eating a. holiday
meal on Christmas Eve, when
Mrs. Johnson suddenly realiz-
ed it was time for her to make
tracks to the hospital.
While enroute from Apala-


chicola to Panama City, Mrs.
Johnson or more properly,
the baby could wait no
longer about the time the
family car made it to about a
mile north of Highland View.
The Sheriff's Department
was called and the Ambulance
Service was called. The baby
nearly beat them there.
The Sheriff's deputy, Arnold
Tolliver, and the ambulance
service personnel, Sheila Har-
per and Catherine Ramsey,
delivered the baby, wrapped it
in swaddling clothes and sent
it on its way to the hospital.
Mother, baby, Deputy Tolli-
ver and ambulance service
volunteers are all doing fine.


T. S. Singletary was 90 years
of age on Monday of this week.
His family got the jump on his
birthday and gave him an
at-home party on Sunday, with
three of his four children in
attendance, along with sever-
al of his grandchildren.
Singletary has been a fix-
ture here in Port St. Joe for
about as long as Port St. Joe
has been here.
Singletary came here with
the railroad right after World
War I and has been here ever
since.
Singletary is living history
of Port St. Joe. He built the
first telephone system here in
the city, starting back in 1923,
when the railroad decided
they needed communications
with their men and along their
line to Chattahoochee. Single-
tary said he installed the first
telephone in the city in 1923,
when he put the phone in the
Patton home in Oak Grove.


Rates for various fire insurance coverages
in Port St. Joe in Gulf County outside the
protected area will be lowered between 11
percent and 48 percent starting January 1,
1981 as a result-of improved fire protection
services, Insurance Commissioner Bill
Gunter has announced.
This will include all areas outside the city
limits of Port St. Joe served by the Port St.
Joe fire department.
The approximate rate reductions are due to
a recent reevaluation of fire protection
facilities by the Insurance Services Office
(ISO) which gathers statistical data used by
more than 350 insurance companies in
developing fire insurance rates, he said.
Gunter said the ISO filed the classification
change and the reduced rates with his office
recently.
.ISO bases its evaluation on the mobility of
fire departments, water supplies, fire de-
partment communications and fire safety
controls. The lower the classification, the


Only recently, the phone com-
pany announced the installa-
tion of their 25,000th set
installed after that beginning
by Singletary.
Singletary worked for both
the railroad and telephone
companies back in the early
days, expanding the system
up the railroad line all the way
to Chattahoochee in the early
days of the company.
Later, Singletary severed
his connection with the rail-
road and worked solely for the
phone company, serving as
construction foreman until his
retirement.
Helping Singletary celeb-
brate his birthday were his
daughters, Mrs. Virginia
Mayes of Islamorada, Mrs.
Martha Strickland of Islamo-
rada and Dorothy Burge of
Port St. Joe, a grandson, Mr.
and Mrs. Albert Strickland of
Lake Wales and two grand-
daughters, Mrs. Mike McVay
and daughter Suzie, and Gin-


lower the insurance rate.
Gunter said ISO assigned Port St. Joe
(outside the protected area) a seven
classification down from eight suburban. A
suburban classification is an area outside city
limits that may be reclassified when it
becomes eligible for city fire department
services.
As a result, rates on homeowners coverage
will be reduced approximately 11 percent for
masonry homes and 33 percent for frame
structures. The rates for fire coverage only on
dwellings will decrease about 20 percent for
masonry and 48 percent for frame homes.
The rates for commercial fire coverage On
businesses will go down approximately 22 to
33 percent, depending on the type of
construction, Gunter said.
The new rates apply only fqr insurance
companies that use the ISO advisory rates.
Policyholders who buy their fire coverage
from companies that don't use the ISO
guidelines probably will not experience the
same reductions.


ger Burge.


Builder of City's Phone


System Marks 90th Year


Area Insurance



Rates Going Down


!1 II


moo











Editorials and Opinions


THURSDAY, JAN. 1, 1981


Ransom Demand Labels Iranians As Kidnappers


Now we get down to the nitty-gritty of it.
It's a matter of money and not principle.
As a matter of fact, it's a matter of $23
BILLION in money to satisfy the Iranians.
They're not interested at all in our repentance
from being what they term war-mongers and
imperialists.
Really, $23 billion in United States dollars
would salve over a lot of feeling one had been
taken advantage of by a larger country.
While the Iranians have been mouthing off
about our apoligizing, releasing the Shah's
money in this country to Iran's bank account
and asking us to swear never again to involve
ourselves in their country and its operation, all
the while they were interested only in money.
But wasn't that evident in the charges they
make against us for a barrel of oil which costs
them 45c to produce?
No longer is Iran affecting any semblance
of having:their pride hurt. No longer is the
nation showing any evidence at all of being
taken advantage of and being embarrassed by
it.
Iran has now taken the step from being a
nation which felt it had been wronged and


taking the only steps they knew to right wrong,
to a common, everyday criminal. They are
now telling the world they are kidnappers and
they are holding our people for ransom and not
an apology.
Kidnapping is a serious offense in most
nations of the world. So. Whatever happened to
the U.N.? Doesn't this fall in their scope of
duty? Can't we expect the U.N. to intervene for


A new year is as good a time as any to
make a new beginning, or pledge to keep what
we already have going, going.
Here in Port St. Joe and Gulf County, we
had some good news as the old year was
winding down, with the announcement by
Florida Power Corporation that we would be
the site for their next power plant.
But it will take more than that for us to
have a good year, or a good decade. It's going
to take something we're not used to doing


us in this matter, since we are spending our
hard-earned money to keep that exercise in
futility afloat?
We think our country should insist the U.N.
or the world court intervene in this evident
case of unlawful action and do their thing. If
they don't, we should immediately pull out of
the organizations and tell them to look
elsewhere for their spending money.


around here; cooperation from everyone to
make our city and county a place in which
people would want to come and live.
Florida Power or a half dozen other
providers of jobs could locate in Gulf County,
but if we're not pulling together, trying to
improve our place of living, then we're not
going to be very attractive to new people. Not
only that, but we won't be a very attractive
place for our own maturing young people to
stay and live.


The United States has been patient too long
in this matter. Iran wouldn't put up with this
problem for this long if their people were being
held hostage here in the United States. On
second thought, they probably wouldn't care.
A good resolution for the new year for our
government should be to begin positive action
to get the kidnapping victims back home where
they belong.


It's true, many of our young people leave
Gulf County because they can't find a decent
job here in order to support their families. We
would venture to say that just as many leave
because we can't cooperate with one another
and make our county and city a progressive
and comfortable place in which to live.
Let's vow, in 1981, to quit the bickering, the
selfishness, and cooperate with one another to
make this the most selected spot in Florida in
which to live.


Letter Writer


Mis-Interprets Us


Dear Editor:
- After reading your editorial
column in THE STAR'S Nov.
. 1980 edition concerning...
"No more busing to achieve
racial balance in the Nation's
schools Maybe now the
:people interested in good
:education for the blacks can
:spend some of their time
trying to do necessary things .
rather than worry about what
color the students are," I felt
an urge to express myself!
Those comments may be
taken in a variety of ways. I
am one of those people you
refer to being concerned about
a good education for blacks,
but I am also as EQUALLY
Concerned about ALL children
regardless of their skin color!
Additionally, I am sure most
"sincere" people are not
concerned about colors of
children. We have no control
of our colors and I am sure
God has his reasons that I care
- not to question!!
It appears that the busing
: issue is one of your idiosyn-
7 crasies. Furthermore, it
would not surprise me if some
one suggested revitalisation of
the George Washington Sch-
ools in North Port St. Joe in an
attempt to "send all those
blacks back across the
tracks!!" Your column eluci-
dates much more than what's
printed.
Nonetheless, let me say with
dignity and pride that as a
product of that one-time insti-
tution, I personally enjoyed
my school days. Every
teacher Mrs. Mae Bell
Whitley, Ms. Lula Wilson, Mr.
Charles Osborne, Ms. Sue
Cooper and others, just to


name a few exemplified
skills to motivate the less
motivated' as well as the
motivated. I can not recall any
student being over-looked be-
cause they felt that they just
couldn't make it or would not
advance beyond high' school.
Those teachers cared and they
encouraged!! Students part-
icipated in most extra-
curricula activities with pride
because they felt a part of the
total school. I, for one, did not
care about attending the sch-
ool across the tracks even if
the opportunity had been
available. George Washington
High School did turn out some
very good products!!
Contrary to thought, most
black parents are not con-
cerned with whom their child-
ren attend school. Their pri-
mary concern is that their
children acquire the same
educational programs, mat-
erials and quality instruction
as any other child, let it be
within an all black setting or
in an integrated situation.
Additionally, blacks need
representation on commis-
sions and boards in order to
voice their wants and wishes.
They should be encouraged to
participate in the system that
sets standards and regulate
their tax dollars. However, as
long as the zoning in Port St.
Joe is masterminded in a way
that prohibits minority re-
presentation, there will be a
limited understanding of what
blacks want and little known
of their aspirations.
Legally, there is an alterna-
tive that would promote and or
guarantee blacks participa-
tion of their city's governing


bodies; but why force a group
to fight for a representational
right?! How much must be
endured before an unfortunate
situation occurs? It's quite
transparent from past act-
ions that some people fear
change and would like to
remain in the "dark ages"!
For generations past and
those to come, life for our
children and our children's
children are not going to be a
utopia. And on the other hand,


situations and circumstances
are not going to completely
change until the HEARTS and
MINDS of those who manipu-
late the system is willing to be
fair, understanding and
possess a degree of knowledge
and willingness that will en-
able them to work with ALL
kinds of people for the better-
ment of society!
Respectfully,
Mrs. Lenora Peters Gant


Town Is Shutting


Down for New Year
.W e tT


Most of the town will be
shut down for the New
Year holiday Thursday,
with the notable exception
being all of the super
markets, which will be
open.
Most local businesses use
the New Year holiday for
Inventory purposes, but
there will be a few open
here and there along Reid
Avenue.
Both the Wewahitchka
State Bank and the Florida


First National Bank closed
Wednesday at noon and
will remain closed until
Friday morning. The Post
Office also closed its win-
dows Wednesday at 12:00
noon and will remain clos-
ed until Friday. The Post
Office delivered the mail
Wednesday as scheduled.
Both the City Hall and
the Gulf County Courthouse
will be closed all day New
Year day and open for
business as usual on Fri-
day.


In-- n a tlon.

my.

in England, a "trolley" is likely to be a tea wagon.


We re Finally Over Christmas... Time for Hog Jowls and Blackeye Peas


IT'S ALL OVER. The tree is taken
down, most all of the icicles have been
swept out, though one still clings here
.and there. The packages have all been
unwrapped and a place found for what
came in them. The meal is all eaten but
the stuffed feeling remains. We'll still
be eating Christmas dinner for the next
week ... possibly until we cook Up the
pot full of black eyed peas and hog jowl
for New Year's day. The relatives have
6all gone home after a delightful time
and visit. Almost everything I have to
do to' prepare for next week's paper
production starting up Monday mor-
ning has been done.
Now, I'm going home, kick off my
:shoes, rear back in my recliner which
fits me perfectly and have myself a
:recuperative nap.
A fine and fitting end for the
:Christmas season.
: I'll need the nap and the week of
- recuperation to get in shape for the
bowl games which will be played on the
day of our next publication date.
S+ + +
: EVEN AS HECTIC as our Christ-
mas always is, we still didn't have to go
through the same thing President
Carter did. Just sending out the


Christmas cards Carter sent would
have put me in the loony bin for a time.
The President and his wife sent out
120,000 Christmas cards this yule
season.





ETAOII






Can you imagine licking 120,000
envelopes? Can you imagine signing
your name on and placing 120,000
Christmas cards in an envelope? Can
you imagine having to pay for 120,000
Christmas cards and 120,000 15c
postage stamps? Just the cost of the
stamps comes to $18,000.00.
That's quite a Christmas!

ALL OF THE KIDS and their kids
came to our house on Christmas Eve for


supper ahd opening of Christmas gifts.
You get that many Ramseys in a room
together and you have a room full, no
matter what size the room is.
I believe I must have the nosiest


grandchildren in the world. Even the
dog ran under. the couch, placed his
front paws over his ears and stayed
there for the duration. He didn't show
his face before we went to bed that
night. The next morning, he was curled
up on the small rug in front of the
fireplace where he likes to lay, looking
as if he had almost recovered from the
disturbance the night before.
Which is more than I can say for


At Christmas time, when all the
kids and grandchildren come at one
time, there are some advantages to be-
ing nearly deaf in one ear. It helps you
to withstand the shock.











I HAD MY HOLIDAY graced with
the letter you see printed on this page. I
like to get letters, even if they aren't"
exactly complimentary at times.
In this case, the lady who wrote
either didn't want to get my thought on
the matter, or failed to see what was
between the lines, or I didn't make
myself plain enough. In all likelihood, it
was the latter reason. In reality, I
couldn't agree with her philosophy
more if I had written her letter myself.


Dear lady, what I was getting at
was that I was glad the government
will now quit wasting all that energy
and manpower trying to figure out
ridiculous busing plans just to make
sure every school has a like proportion
of black and white students. Maybe.
now, they will expend that energy
trying to come up with a program
which will educate the kids in the
schools, whether they are black or
white. That is the crying need.
It's no deep, dark secret that both
blacks and whites are woefully lacking
and to place so much attention to a
matter like busing, while the kids are
spending day after day in school and
not even learning to read and write the
English language nor become compe-
tent in mathematics seems to me to be
a crime.
Speaking for Gulf County, I person-
ally think the best thing which has ever
happened to Gulf County schools was
the elimination of a double system, no
matter how equal or unequal the
system was. The fact remains, money
was wasted in maintaining a double
system merely to separate the races
which was needed far more in
providing the basics of an education.


That may be the hard-hearted way of
looking at it, but it needed to be looked
at in that way as well as the fact that
the separate facilities were definitely
not equal.
Busing never educated a child or
presented anything except a reminder
that, in a deep-seated theory there
existed some difference between colors
and that difference may well be
superior and inferior to one another.#
There needs to be no vestige of
difference and we felt busing and other
such artificial means of integration
promoted rather than diminished that
feeling.
A child who is interested in getting
an education will get it no matter what
his circumstances ... even segregated
schools. It's those who are not
particularly interested the system has
to worry about. Their matriculation
through school with some success
comes from the guidance of good
teachers. We have always felt that the
difference between a good teacher and
a bad teacher wasn't the abundance or
lack of knowledge, but the knack to
-make a child who wasn't particularly
interested in school to become interest-
ed in learning.


St. Joseph's

Bay Tides

High and low tides for St.
Joseph's Bay for the upcom-
ing week are shown in the tide
table below, furnished by the
U. S. Weather Bureau in Apa-
lachicola. Times are based on


a 24-hour clock, and height is
feet above or below the mean
water line.


Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.


Time Low Time High
539 -.1 1926 1.0
557 -.3 1954 1.1
626 -.4 2030 1.2
701 -.5 2106 1.
740 -.6 2143 1.4
815 -.6 2221 1.4
857 -.6 2300 1.4


THE STAR


PAGE TWO


Good A Time As Anyfor A New Beginning


VIIN,.. Q. POSTOFFICE BOX308
SAJ SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
PHONE 227-1273 IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR, $6.0o SIXMONTHS.,4.00
Published Every Twrsday at WiiIams Avee., Port St. Joe. Florida PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 OUT OF COUNTY-ONE YEAR, $10.00 OUT OF U.S.-ONE YEAR, $12.00
By The Star Publishing Company
SassJoe 24TO ADVERTISERS-In caste o error or emissions in m.a sments. the publishers do-* e hld
S Wesley R..Ramsey ......... Editor and Publisher SECONSOCLASSPOSTAGE PAID them selves able for damage further than amount received for such advetemet
-WS William H. Ramsey ............ Producmtion Sut. AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDAUe M y weige Te
....... The spoken wordisgivenscmat""n"tion; the printedwod is ti tf B lly ighedTlipokenword
Frenchie L Ramsey ............ Office Manager barely sses; the printed word roughly convinces. The spoken wordi lost; the prited word remnais
Shirley K. Ramsey .................. Typesetter


I








6"Trees" Will

Be Program

for January

Club Meet.
Mrs. Ethel Bridges will
speak on "Flowering Trees
and Shrubs" at the January
8th meeting of the Port St. Joe
Garden Club. Mrs. Bridges
will talk about how to grow the
trees and shrubs that help
clean up the air and purify the
water.
Rochelle Jackson, Jonnia
Sykes, and Polly Sowers are
the hostesses for next Thurs-
day's meeting of the Garden
Club at two p.m. All members
are invited to bring foliage
arrangements for display.
Interested ladies are cord-
ially invited to attend.

Reception

To Honor

Retiring

Supervisor
The children and grand-
children of Mrs. Dessie Lee
Parker are honoring her with
a Retirement Reception at the
St. Joe Library from 3 6 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 2. All friends are
invited to come by and have a
cup of coffee.
Mrs. Parker is presently
serving as Supervisor of Elec-
tions and did not seek re-elec-
tion in the September pri-
mary.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. PAGE THREE


do


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Children's Jackets


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Fall and Winter Shoes


Kathleen Hope Lyles Fred Russell Carr


Engaged


Mr. and Mrs. William Lyles School in May, 1981.
have announced the engage-
ment of their daughter, Kath- The prospective bridegroom
leen Hope Lyles to Fred is a 1980 graduate of Port St.
Russell Carr, son of Mr. and Joe High School and presently
Russell Carr son o Mr ano -in the U.S. Air Force stationed
Overs. Richard Careet. all at Shaw AFB, South Carolina.
Overstreet.
The bride-elect will grad- The wedding plans are
uate from Port St. Joe High incomplete at this time.


1 -T3


222 Reid Ave.


Port St. Joe


- I


2


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With

HANNON INSURANCE

Agency, Inc.

The Insurance Store Since 1943

Auto Home Business Life

Flood Bonds Mutual Funds
8:30 til 6:00 Monday through Friday
21 Reid Avenue Phone 227-11.
We are HERE to Service What We Sell


ROY SMITH, Agent


MEXICO BEACH


3 bdrm., 2 ba. home of brick & redwo
construction (fully insulated), pli
shop & office .(or 4th bdrm.), cen. h&
sunken liv. rm., sep. din. rm. & break
fast nook. Generous stor. inside & o01
Patio, sundeck, outside grill, can
frontage with boatdock rights. Lan
escaped, fantastic unobstructed view
Gulf. Includes carpet, drapes, stove
refrig. Total 1,800 sq. ft. 43rd St.
Charming permanent or vacatic
home, nice residential area, 3 bdrm
glass porch, boat house, too mai
extras to list. Completely furnishe
20th St.
New 2 bdrm. duplex on beach sid
completely furn. Good rental proper
or two family retreat. 41st St.
For discriminating buyers only. Th
custom built home has all the want
features, Lg. rms. includes 3 bdrm.,
ba., 2 car garage, great rm., kitchen
screen porch, cen. h&ac, on 2 lots. 36
St.
Stilt house, 2 bdrm., near good fishing
nice secluded lot not far from beach
Hwy. 386A.
"Cadillac of Mobile Homes"-Price r
duced Take advantage
the owner's improvements and beg
instant living in this homemake
dream. Furnished, storage bldg., ne
h&ac unit. Must see. 8th St.
Two story cottage with sun deck, 11
bdrm., equipped kit., heat pump & a
storage bldg., downstairs unfinishe
Landscaped lot. Virginia Ave.
Lovely brick home on 3 lots-ne
beach. Lg. 4 bdrm. 2 ba. with all extra
Landscaped, fenced yard. Sea St.


33


FRANK HANNON, Agent


ERA

PARKER REALTY
Hwy. 98 at 31 st St.
Mexico Beach, Fla. 904-648-5777
"Real Estate Specialist for Over 30 Years". Call us for-I
information on these as well as a large inventory of lots
Deluxe 1980 Redman mobile home on P
approx. one-third acre lot. 2 bdrm., 2
od ba., comp. furn. and ready for new New Listing.
us owners with a taste for quality. Also in- family into th
ka, cludes 2 Ig. decks, 2 star. bldgs., small down !
ik- security light, sprinkler system & out- at 12 percent
ut. door shower. End of 5th St. free-standing
_al _plus dishwa-
id- Enjoy magnificent view with unique dryer, fenced
of floor plan designed for living mostly up- house. Call f
& stairs overlooking the beach. Kit., den prestigious h
with fp, 2 bdrm., ba. upstairs; 2 bdrm.. escaped lots. 3
ba., laundry and storage downstairs. with plenty a
on Hwy. 98 at 5th St. activity. Scre
1., age and carp
ny Small mobile home with extra room on
,. ideal lot. Furnished. 2 blks. from Gulf. Immaculate,
Fortner Ave. lots in nice
located to s<
le, Beachside duplex. Good investment. 2 McClellan Av
rty bdrm. & 1 bdrm. apt. Completely
furnished. Hwy. 98 & 29th St. Bargain price
bis corner lot, n<
ed Great starter home or vacation retreat. WE
2 Cozy 2 bdrm. blk. home, completely Mini-farm, 3
m, remodeled. Carpet, cypress panelling, extra Ig. rms
th cement drive, Ig. sun deck. Storage south of Wew
bldg., kit. appliances. Great location.
Reasonable priced. 26th St. Cl
1g, Efficiency ui
h. Luxury mobile home, short walk to nice 2 bdrm.
beach. Sun deck, porch. Must see to with cen. h&a
appreciate. Priced in the low 20's. 4th floors, storage
re- St. Superb locati
of St. and Hwy.
On Nice and spacious family home on Ig.
rs landscaped lots. 3 bdrm., 2 full bal., Rare Busine
ew built in kit., snack bar. Fla. rm., carpet, vestment pac
cen. h&ac, corner Fla. Ave. & 3rd St. vice center, 7
house. Involve
Ig. cial lots, primn
Ic, 2 bdrm. duplex, furnished, 1 blk. from this thriving
Id. beach. Furnished. Hwy. 98 at 27th St.
8 unit Motel
ST. JOE BEACH living quarter
ar Double-wide mobile home on 2 nice lots. ready for new
is. 3 bdrm. Make an appointment to see Beautiful gul
this one. Selma Ave. ment.


Harvey's


Announce

Betrothal
Mr. and Mrs. Clennis
Harvey of Port St. Joe have
announced the engagement of
their daughter, Angela Mich-
elle Harvey, to Ronald Deme-
trice Mitchell, son of Mr. and
Mrs. William Mitchell, Sr. of
Marianna.
Miss Harvey-is a Port St.
Joe High School graduate. Her
fiance is a Marianna High
School graduate. They both
are presently attending Chip-
ola Jr. College.
Final plans will be an-
nounced at a later date.


MISS ANGELA MICHELLE HARVEY


ORT ST. JOE
St. Joe. Move your
is 3 bdrm. home by paying
pmt. and owner financing
interest. House has 9 rms.,
g fireplace, kit. appli. apple.
sher, washing machine,
back yd. and Ig. storage-
or details and appt. 9th St.
ome on 3 beautifully land-
3 bdrm. brick construction
of room for comfort and
eened porch, double gar-
let. 17th St.
3 bdrm. frame home on 2
neighborhood. Centrally
school, churches & town.
ve.
OAK GROVE
e 3 bdrm. frame home-
ear school.
EWAHITCHKA
bdrm., 2 ba., c.b. home.
s. 5 acres of land, 6 mi.
va.
COMMERCIAL
nit motel with pool, plus
liv. quarter and office,
i, wood panelling, terrazo
e bldg. 3 commercial lots.
on, easy terms. Corner 46
98.

ss Opportunity. This in-
kage includes an auto ser-
7 unit motel and a 2 bdrm.
ving a total of 6 commer-
ie location. Come on by for
business.
plus nice 2 bdrm., 2 ba.
rs. Business operating and
w owner to step right into.
f view. Call for appoint-


January FASHION clearance





SMen's, Women's

and Children's

:" ::Fall and Winter



SClothing '


W and Shoes a



25% to 50% off



Wednesday, Friday and

Saturday


%b9 Costin s

Port St. Jo
....^T


e


h


NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING
Of Members of Citizens Federal
Savings & Loan Association of Port St. Joe
The annual meeting of members of Citizens Federal
Savings & Loan Association of Port St. Joe, will be held
on WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1981, at 2:00 O'Clock
PM., E.S.T., in the office of the Association at 401 Fifth
Street, Port St. Joe, Florida, for the purpose of electing
directors for the ensuing term, and to transact any
other business which may legally come before said
meeting.
C.J.STEVENS,JR.
Secretary-Treasurer
Citizens Federal will be closed for business at 12:00
O'Clock noon on Wednesday, January 21, 1981, in order
to hold the annual meeting of members.

Citizens Federal
Savings and Loan Association
of Port St. Joe


411-










PAGE FOUR THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 1, 1981


DIRECTIONS!

When you have a prescription filled
by a registered pharmacist, or buy a
non-prescription drug, follow the di-
rections on the package. Many
times, failing to do this can lead to
serious complications. If you have
the slightest doubt about whether or
not to take any non-prescription
drug, check with your doctor first.

BUZZETT'S
Drug Store
317 Williams Ave. 229-8771
Plenty of Free Parking
Your REXALL Store


Shoots His


Christmas


Present
Jamie Lester killed this big
8 point buck on December 26,
weighing between 135 and 140
lbs. and having a rack spread
of 16 inches. This was the best
Christmas present that a 14
year old can have if he loves to
hunt.
Above is Jamie and his
father, Bo John Lester of
Wewahitchka. Jamie is also
the son of Joyce D. Williams of
Port St.-Joe.


lr lL rSTABLISHEo 1904/ I .m VR]0SOE
OVER 150 STORES
BSTABISHEO1904SERVING THE SOUTHEAST


R eti res supervisor, Bobby Burkett, maintenance
superintendent at the plant. Bo Boyette, plant
W. C. Wilson, left, retired after 20 years of manager, was present at the presentation.
service at Basic, Inc., last week. Wilson was Both of the plant supervisors wished Wilson
presented a fishing rod and reel by his well in his retirement years. -Star photo


1980...


years of service as pastor of Long Avenue
Baptist Church ... Raffield Softball went to
the National Tournamentfor the seventh year
in a row and placed fourth nation-wide .
County schools opened with 2,334 students
reporting ... Sylvachem strike ends after 12
weeks.
SEPTEMBER
6,946 were registered to vote in the *first
primary election... Wewahitchka Mayor, Ed
Bandjough, resigned his office with Faye Cox
appointed in his place Four new
constitutional officers were elected in Gulf
County 4,462 cast their votes in the first
primary ... Natural gas lines were extended
to Mexico Beach.
OCTOBER
Ward Ridge votes, re-electing John Rich,
Sr., Allen V. McCulley and Lewis W. Taylor,
ending a controversy on whether or not to re-
main incorporated Port Authority
approves validation of $50 million revenue
certificates to finance port development.
EPA calls on City to defend itself in violation
notice... City, County file with HUD for fund-
ing of improvement projects ... No tax bills
in 1980 ... George Tapper named by Presi-
dent Carter to National Advisory Committee
on Oceans and Atmosphere... County voters
have a two-party choice locally for the first


OBITUARIES:


Funeral Services H<


for Hazel Helms, 7


Mrs. Hazel Helms, 79,
passed away Wednesday night
in Municipal Hospital. She
was the widow of the late H.E.
"Hubby" Helms. She was a
member of the Wewahitchka
First United Methodist
Church, and was a resident of
Gulf County for the past 40


(Continued from Page 1)


time County wants to abolish the Dead
Lakes Management body.
NOVEMBER
Gulf County votes Democratic locally and
nationally Commissioner John Robert
Smith dies suddenly and his widow appointed
to fill his seat on the Commission ... Skull
found at Simmons Bayous in two feet of water
... James Tankersley named chairman of the
County Commission ... 76 answer charges on
court plea day City notified it must come
up with spoil site for harbor dredging .
Paula Besore named Homecoming queen ...
Retirees George Core, Harland Pridgeon and
Dessie Lee Parker honored by Courthouse
gang. I
DECEMBER
First step taken by Commission to extend
City limits. Census count changed to 10,451
for county, 3,981 in Port St. Joe and 1,684 in
Wewahitchka... Florida Power Corporation
chooses Gulf County as the site for its next
power plant. Property rolls accepted with
18 percent increase City given time to
meet requirements by EPA City sets
tentative mill rate at 5.2466 Students
improving in assessment tests Leslie
Costin named Junior Miss ... School Board
hikes millage by .45 mill for construction
purposes.


years.
Survivors include: two
daughters: Sarah H. Broxton,
Pensacola and Mary E. Smith,
White City: one son, Jimmy
H. Helms, Wewahitchka; one
sister, Jaura Coley, Pensa-
cola; one brother, M. F.
Locke, West Palm Beach;
seven grancdhildren and eight
great grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
at 11:00 a.m. EST Saturday at
the White City Baptist Church
conducted by the Rev. James
Pate with Billy Joe Rish
assisting. Interment followed
in the family plot, Jehu
cemetery. The body lay in
state at the Comforter Fun-
eral Home, Port St. Joe, from
2:00 p.m. EST Friday, until
one hour before service time,
Saturday. All services were
under the direction of the
Comforter Funeral Home.

Services Held

In Bonifay for

Gene Steverson
Gene Steverson, age 48, died
while at his place of employ-
ment on December 17, from an
apparent heart attack.
Funeral services were held
for Steverson on Saturday,
December 20, from the First
Baptist Church in Bonifay.
He is survived by his wife,
Pat Steverson; three sons,
Michael Steverson, Larry
Simpson and Jason Steverson
and three daughters, Cathy
Simpson, Debbie and Felisha
Steverson, all of Port St. Joe;
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H.
L. Steverson of Bonifay; two
Bonifay and Margaret Worley
of Miami and two brothers,
Donald Steverson of Tallahas-
see and Ron Steverson of
Sneads.

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WCRF life. A lifed filled

with JOY, PEACE AND HAPPINESS.

JESUS CAME TO GIVE THAT NEW

LIFE. John 10:10, John 3:16

WORSHIP WITH US.
1601 LONG AVENUE
BIBLE STUDY ....................... 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .............. 11:00 A.M.,
CHURCH TRAINING............... 5:45 P.M.I
EVENING WORSHIP ............... 7:00 P.M.I
WEDNESDAY ........................ .. 7:00 P.M.

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A.M ............................ "The Will of God"
P.M. ............ "Who Is Wise?", James 3:17-4:17

REV. TED M. CORLEY
Pastor


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THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 1, 1981 PAGE.FIVE




Regents Recommend 4-Year University of at UWF


The Bpardof Regents public
hearing on Task Force recom-
mendations for the State Uni-
versity System heard Pen-
sacola civic leaders strongly
recommend the expansion of
the University of West Florida
to a four year institution.
Speaking to a capacity
crowd in the Commons Tues-
day (December 16) Ed Addi-
son, president of the Chamber
of Commerce and Gulf Power
Company head, lead off the
public comments and opinions
segment of the hearing follow-
ing reports from Task Force
representative on university
structure, Dr. Roy McTarnag-
han, vice chancellor, SUS,
which was the prime concern
in the hearing agenda.


Addison presented to the
board a resolution from the
Chamber of Commerce sup-
porting a strong and auto-
nomous PJC and UWF and
supporting the creation of a
four-year curriculum at UWF.
"Commitment to economic
development in this area is
real," he said. "One of the
things an industry looks at in
trying to locate in a commun-
ity is the quality of its
educational institutions. They
find here now that we have
two quality institutions. It's
our belief that the establish-
ment of a four-year university
with a curriculum that
includes high technology will
help even more to bring those


industries to our area."
Additional community
leaders speaking out in favor
of expansion included Pensa-
cola mayor Vince Whibbs and
Frank Adams, deputy city
manager and president of the
national UWF Alumni As-
sociation.
"We shouldn't consider our
wants, but the needs of our
community," Whibbs said.
"Our gratitude and loyalty
run deep to both institutions,
but the real question is: what
do we need today? The
University of West Florida
will provide a real need."
Whibbs added that a viable
four-year university in Pensa-
cola would help bring in and
keep in "those bright young
minds that will contribute to
the future of our community."
He said he feels ihe expansion
of UWF will help deter poten-
tial students from leaving the
area to attend larger institu-
tions.
Adams quoted governor Bob
Graham as saying, "... the
addition of lower divisions to
upper division universities
affords a significant opportun-
ity for the regents to formu-
late goals and policies for
undergraduate education.. "


Adams also said that he
feels Florida needs a small
public university and that
Panhandle area students need
an alternative to the two-plus-
two arrangement. He then
read -a resolution passed by
the Executive Committee of
the UWF Alumni Association
endorsing expansion of the
University and expressing op-
position to the once proposed
merger of UWF with Florida
State University.
In addition to the comments
by pre-expansion community
leaders, Dr. William Maloy,
BOR member who presided
over the hearing, announced
that a letter from attorney
Fred Levin had been received
for consideration by the
Board. Mr. Levin wrote the
letter on behalf of community
leaders N. Ray Tipton, James
Baroco and himself, and these
gentlemen were the first to
endow professorships at the
University.
"Universities traditionally
have been instrumental in
regional economic develop-
ment. What makes them in-
strumental is their quality as
academic institutions. Estab-
lishing a four-year curricu-
lum, to the extent it improves


academic quality, will im-
prove the University's con-
tribution to growth in eco-
nomic sophistication and im-
pact," Levin said.
In his opening remarks,
Maloy brought the audience
up-to-date on the progress of
the SUS, what he called
"marked accomplishments
achieved through the
cooperative efforts of the
Board of Regents, Universi-
ties, State Board of Education,
the Legislature, and the
people."
"Funds provided by the 1980
Legislature for competitive
adjustments for faculty salar-
ies advanced Florida to 16th
among the states in salaries
paid faculty in public institu-
tions statewide," he siad. He
also added that Florida ranks
20th nationwide in library
holdings and recorded a 16.7
per cent increase in sponsored
research funds last year.
"Florida universities also
placed high on merit scholars
enrolled, private giving, and,
through legislative appropria-
tions, scientific and tech-
nological support of industry
and development of special
emphasis programs," Maloy
said.


The prime topic of interest
locally was the proposed ex-
pansion of UWF into a four-
year university, and a number
of Pensacola community lead-


My Friends:


ers were on hand to voice their
support of this proposal.
Expressing opposition to the
expansion plan from PJC
were Dick Fulford, chairman


of the Board of Trustees, Dr.
Ed McCracken, Okaloosa-
Walton Junior College and
other members of the PJC
faculty and staff.


THANK



YOU!


I understand the 119,157 votes you gave me on November 4th
are the most ever given a non-presidential candidate in the
First Congressional District.
I am deeply humble and grateful for this fine support. God
has wonderfully blessed our district and I ask for your con-
tinued prayers that I may serve America and North West Florida
well in the days ahead.
Nancy and I wish you all the Joys of the Holiday Season.





S a


U F


- E U


Start the New Year off
r yRight With Our

SSuper


D *


a v &


Fine Fare Soft 4 Roll Package
BATHROOM TISSUE


I Jim Dandy
SCORN MEAL


5 Lb. Bag


Quick or Regular 5 Pound Bag
JIM DANDY GRITS
Tropicana / Gallon
ORANGE JUICE


I Carnation Pkg. of 12 1 -Oz. Envelopes
HOT COCOA MIX


$1.25

$1.39

$1.29

$1.28


SvEvyD Wh YuSpA91 e


12 Oz. China Doll
Blackeye Peas
Bath Size Mild
Jergen's Soap
s 1 18 Oz. Nestle
$1 19Cookie Mix
32 Oz. Smucker
39c Grape Jelly


2/69c
4/$100
$149
$139


20 Ib. 95 16 Ouncem
201lb. $595Coffeemate$169


Uncle Ben's
Rice s Ib. $299
Long Grain or Wild
Uncle Ben's RICE
Fine Fare Smooth
PEANUT BUTTER


29 Oz. Hunt's
Pear 's


99"


60z. $1S9
3 Lb. $299


OLEOMARGARINE
Mrs. Filbert's
1 Lb. Pkg.
91/2 Oz. Butter-Me-Not 2/ 2C
Canned Biscuits/Y8


0 & a U


0 a


U m


0 0


* *


0





a


0 .


9 .


0 9.


Country Style
LOIN RIB Lb.$1.09
Dilmore Country Lb $ 5
SMOKED 59
SAUSAGE b.


Tender Skinned Deveined
BEEF LIVER


Favorite


Sliced Bacon

12 Oz. Pkg.

Center Cut
PORK CHOPS Lb.59


Our Best Small 3-Down
TENDER SPARE RIBS


Lb.


Lb.$1.39


Choice Tender
T-Bone Steak
Choice Tender
Rib Eye Steak


Lb. $399

Lb. $368


Boneless Sirloin Steak


Choice Tender

6 Lb.


88


Choice Chicken
Breast, Legs
Gizzards, Livei


Quartered Chicken
Breast
Legs





Choice Chic.
Wings Lb.49


BACKS C
NECKS Lb.L1

SLb.79


Country Cousin
FRENCH FRIES


29


5 Lb.
Bag


24 Oz. Morton
Apple Pies
24 Oz. Mrs. Smith's
Pecan Pies


99C
$179


3(Pz. Sara Lee 1
Pumpkin Pies 159


* a a
U 0 U


Golden Ripe

Bananas


a *a
5Lbs.


1 Lb. Cello
Carrots I87


Greerj Head


9 a


9


GRAPEFRUIT


6


SMALL TANGERINES
LARGE TANGERINES
Washington State Red or Gold
DELICIOUS APPLES
Tender Yellow
FRESH SQUASH


Fresh Firm
RIPE TOMATOES


Firm Florida Grown
FRESH EGG PLANT
Canadian
WAXED RUTABAGAS


For $100


13 For 49'
Doz. 79C


Lb. 49
Lb. 490
Tray 99
Lb. 59
Lb. 190


3Pound


0 -


* a

Va0'~


Maxwell "F
House ll iFFEE

68 $ 88
W/$20 W/$10
Order Order
or More or More


I
~*iup.


1 Lb.
Bag


a


9


9 m 9


~9-


P


0


0


J


0 0


8(










PAGE EIGHT THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 1, 1981


B. MILLER REALTY



E.B. MILLER REALTY


We're Here For You..T


We would like to thank all of



our Clients, both Buyers and Sellers


for their cooperation and interest this


past year.


You may feel our slogan "we're


here for you" is a bit too much. We


don't think so. Sure we want to


make a profit, all forms of Business


except the government had better


make a profit or they're bankrupt.


However, after the profit motive is


recognized we really do want to serve


you whether you're interested in


selling or buying. If selling, we want


you to obtain a fair market value on


your property. If buying, we want


you to find the property you desire in


the right location and at a fair price.


We wish Gulf County and


N


I/


Jim Clement Ass

648-5482


Rhond


Mexico Beach


a peaceful and


prosperous


1 New Year!




E. B. Miller Broker


Office 64875011



Patty Miller Realtor Assoc.



Sandra Clenney Realtor Assoc.

229-6310


oc. Natalie Shoaf Assoc.


227


la Heath Secretary


-1498


Lot for sale by owner at
Selma Street, St. Joe Beach.
75x180' plus. Call 648-8954.
tfc 12-25

For Sale by Owner: 3 bdrm.
block house with 2 baths.
Located on Long Ave. near
schools. For more information
call 227-1313 after 5 p.m.
tfc 11-14

Beacon Hill, two lots, fenced
yard, 3 bdrm., 1 ba. double
wide trailer. $25,000. 229-6961
or 648-8971. tfc 9-25





* 3 rooms of carpet, good
condition. Best offer, you haul.
648-5640 anytime. ltc 1-1

Utility rack for long wheel
base truck. Phone 229-6842.
Itc 11

Butler's Greenhouse and
Nursery on Bay St. on St. Joe
Beach has all kinds of potted
plants, shrubbery, potting
soil, fertilizer. Pear trees,
kumquat, satsuma orange,
grapefruit, pecan and palm
trees. 648-8926. Itc 1-1

10 piece dining room set for
small room, single bookcase
bed, top of line Beauty Rest
box springs and mattress. Call
229-6244. ltp 1-1

AVON
To Buy or Sell
For Gulf or Bay counties. Call
collect 871-1649 or write Dist.
Sales Mgr. Margaret Rick-
man, P. O. Box 10403, Parker,
FL 32401. tfc 8-21

1977 Marietta mobile nome,
2 bdrm, 2 ba., 1g. master
bdrm. with double vanity and
stepdown tub in bath, cen. air,
economical nat. gas heater &
range. Will sell furnished if
desired. 229-6758 or 648-5063.
tfc 10-23





EQUITY I
If you are a home owner, you
could be eligible to borrow up
to $50,000 and you could use
the money for any purpose.
Call us today 769-1535 James
H. Crews, Licensed Mortgage
Broker, 6242 E. Hwy. 98,
Panama City. tfc 12-4

The V.F.W. will meet every
second Tues. and fourth Thur-
isday of each month at Paul-
ine's Rest. at 7 p.m. tfc 5-31


There will be a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe
Lodge No. 111, F. &. A.M.
every first and third Thursday
at 8:00 p.m.
JOE ST. CLAIR, W.M.
J. P. Cooley, Sec.

R.A.M.-Regular convoca-
tion of St. Joseph Chapter No.
56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd Mon-
days, 8 p.m. All visiting com-
panions welcome.
E. E. WEEKS, H.P.
E. William McFarland, Sec.

The Disabled American Vet-
erans, Port St. Joe Chapter 62,
will meet the first Tuesday
and third Thursday of each
month at 7 p.m. at Pauline's
Restaurant. tic 9-4





LOST: Australian Blue
Heeler cattle dog, 5 month old
puppy, color gray. Lost in St.
Joe. Call John White at
227-1366. Itp 1-1


Wanted to Buy: Used Christ-
mas trees. Call after the 25th.
648-8310, ask for Maurice.
Itp 1-1






Yard Sale, Friday and Sat-
urday, 9:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Many items including two
bicycles, one 3-wheel. 218
Second St., Highland View.'
Itp 1-1

Yard Sale, Hwy. 98 and Bay
St., St. Joe Beach, Friday and
Saturday, January 2nd and
3rd, 8:00 until. ltc 1-1

Yard and Garage Sale, four
families! Everything under
the sun! Nic-nacs, lots of
ladies size 14 clothes, house-
wares, books, furniture. Lad-
ies, come during the ball
games! 209 9th St., Quarles'
house. Thursday, Jan. 1st,
2:00 until dark. Friday, Jan.
2nd, all day. Maybe Satur-
day! Itp 1-1






Large 2 bedroom trailer at
St. Joe Beach for rent. Call
229-8939. tfc 12-18

Thames Hotel, day, weekly,
monthly rates. 302 Reid Ave.
229-8723. tfc 11-13

No need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
227-1251. tfic 10-23

Furnished 2 bdrm. house,
auto. heat, no.pets; furnished
large one bdrm. apt., auto
heat, no pets. 229-6777 after 7
pm. tfc 11-8

For carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vac, the portable steam car-
pet cleaning system. Avail-
able at Western Auto, phone
227-1105, 219 Reid Ave.
tfc 3-16

Two bedroom apt. and
campers for rent on Beach. By
day, week, month or year. Ski
Breeze Camp Sites. Call 229-
6105. tfc 11-20


FOR RENT
Mexico Beach
St. Joe Beach
Furnished cottages,
from $140 per mo. to
$300 mo.
Marguerite Wainwright
Realtor
648-8220
900B E. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach


2 furnished apartments,
Main St., Wewahitchka. 639-
5843. tfic 10-23





1973 Ford pickup truck, long
wheel base. Good for parts.
$350. 648-5315 or 648-8926.
Itc 1-1

When washing natural-bris-
tle .brushes, a little alum
in the final rinse water
can revive sluggish bristles.


FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned persons Intend to register
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf
County, Florida, four weeks after the
first publication of this notice, the ficti-
tious name or trade name under which
they will be engaged in business and in
which said business is to be carried on,
to-wit:
S & L LAND CLEARING AND FILL
DIRT, 412 Monument Avenue, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456.
Owner: Charles H. Stephens, Sr., 50
percent; and Curtis C. Lane, 50 percent.
Wt 12-11
BIDNO.WWP1j6
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida,
requests bids for one (1) Variable Speed
Drive. Specifications may be obtained
from the City Clerk's Office, P. 0. Box A,
Port St. Joe, Florida. Bid opening to be
held January 20, 1981, at the regular
meeting of the City Commission.
By: L. A. FARRIS,
City Auditor-Clerk 2t 12-25
BIDNO. 2t
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida,
requests bids for one (1) Garbage Truck.
Specifications may be obtained from the
City Clerk's Office, P. O. Box A, Port St.
Joe, Florida. Bid opening to be held
January 21, 1981, at the regular meeting
of the City Commission.
By: L. A. FARRIS,
City Auditor-Clerk 21 12-25
BID NO. WWP1SS
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida
requests bids for one (1) Motor.,Specifi-
cations may be obtained from the City
Clerk's Office, P. 0. Box A, Port St. Joe,
Florida. Bid opening will be held
January 20, 1981, at the regular meeting
of the City Commission.


By: L. A. FARRIS,
City Auditor-Clerk

IN THE CIRCUIT COU
FOURTEENTH JUDICI
IN AND FOR GULF COI
IDA


2t 12-25

IRT OF THE
IAL CIRCUIT
UJNTY,FLOR-
IN PROBATE


in Re: The Estate of
GEORGE W. ESTRIDGE,
deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the administration of the estate of
George W. Estridge, deceased, file
number 80-29, is pending in the Circuit
Court of Gulf County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is Gulf
County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. The Personal-Represientative is
Willie Lee Estridge, whose address is P.
0. Box 392, Wewahitchka, Florida 32465.
The name and address of the Personal
Representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or demands
against the estate are required WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE, to file with the Clerk
of the above Court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may have.
Each claim must be in writing and must
Indicate the basis of the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim Is not yet due, the date when it


will become due shall be stated. If the
claim is contingent or unlliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be stated,
If the claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to the Clerk
to enable the Clerk to mail one copy to
each Personal Representative.
All persons interested In the estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of
Administration has been mailed are
required within THREE (3) MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objections they may have that
challenge the qualifications of the
Personal Representative, or the venue
or jurisdiction of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS, AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: December 25,
1980.
-s- WILLIE LEE ESTRIDGE
-s- WILLIAM J. RISH
303 Fourth Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
904"229-8211
Attorney for Personal Representative
2t 12-25

FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned persons Intend to register
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf
County, Florida, four weeks after the
first publication of this notice, the
fictitious name or trade name under
which they will be engaged In business
and In which said business is to be
carried on, to-wit:
ST. JOSEPH BAY CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY
P. 0. Box 277
Port St. Joe, Florida
Owner: William S. (Biff) Queares, III
4tc 1-1


BID NO. 261
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida,
requests bids for one (1) Portable
Asphalt Recycler. Specifications may be
obtained from the City Clerk's Office, P.
0. Box A, Port St. Joe, Florida. Bid
opening to be held January 20, 1961, at
the regular meeting of the City Commis-
sion.
By: L. A. FARRIS,
City Auditor and Clerk
2t 1-1

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR.
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
CASE NO. 80-208
ST. JOE PAPERMAKERS FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff,
Vs.
EARL M. MARTIN, JR.,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment dated
December 18, 190, in Case NO. 0-208 of
the Circuit' Court of the Fourteenth
Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County,
Florida, In which ST. JOE PAPER.
MAKERS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
of Port St. Joe, Florida, Is the Plaintiff
and EARL M. MARTIN, JR., of
Marietta, Georgia, Is the Defendant, I
shall sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash In the Lobby at the front door of
the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St.
Joe, Gulf County, Florida, at 11:00 A.M.


until 2:00 P.M. (Eastern time) on
January 12, 1981, the following described
property set forth In the Order of Final
Judgment to-wit:
East 100feet x 140feetof Lot Four (4)
In Block "B" Bayview Heights Addi-
tion to Highland View, Florida, re-
corded In Official Records Book No.
15, Page 186, on file in the Office of
the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf
County, Florida.
DATED this the 19th day of December,
1980.
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Susan E. Bigelow, Deputy Clerk
(SEAL) It 1-1


ENERGY IS EVERYTHING.

You can save a bundle of
money right in your own
home.
When you waste energy at
home, you not only hurt your
state and your country, you al#
hurt yourself and your family.-
Because you're literally
burning up money that could be
used for a lot of other
worthwhile purposes.
Here are six easy ways for you
to save energy at home.
1. Have a home energy audit to
discover how you may save
thousands of dollars on
energy costs in the 80's. Call -
your local power company.
2. Keep your cooling-heating
thermostat set no lower than
78* in summer, no higher
than 65 in winter.
3. Keep your water heater set no
higher than 120* (140 if you
use a dishwasher). Wrap it
with an insulating blanket.
And turn it off when you're -
away for weekends.


4. Keep outside air out by
caulking and weather
stripping doors and
windows.
5. Increase the amount of
insulation where you live.
Use window shades, trees
and awnings to encourage
natural cooling.
6. Send for Florida's tips on
how to save money and
energy at home.
Write: Save it at home,The
Capitol, Tallahassee, Florida
32301.
In today's world, energy is
everything. Save it at home.
Save it, Florida.






SAVE ITFLORIDA.
This message brought to you by The
Governor's Energy Office and this
publication.


aVFE


ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work Welding
506 First Street
Phone 229-6803
Machinist on duty all day
everyday
Carpentry Work Done
Reasonable Rates
JimmfJohnson
Phone 229-8757
tfc 2-2
Complete Wood Shop
Custom Cut Lumber
Want to Do It Yourself?
Then come see us for Stan-
ley tools, hardware, paneling,
paint, lumber.
Earley's Hardware &
Building Supply
Hwy. 98 W. 227-1763
tfc 8-5

CAREFOOT SEPTIC TANK
Septic Tank Cleaning
Phone 229-8007
tic 11-30

BEACH MOBILE HOME
SERVICE
Supplies & Service
Call 6488363
tfc 8-21

Psychological services for
anyone with problems in day-
to-day living. Gulf County
Guidance Clinic, Port St. Joe.
227-1145. (24 hrs.)


Church Supplies
Music Records Tapes
S Rubber Stamps
Hospital & Funeral Flowers
Gifts Bibles
Sound Studio Recording
Service

7-O0AKS
GOSPEL SUPPLIES
115 Hunter St., Oak Grove
Port St. Joe, Fla.
227-1325
< ^CjL.9-tl


JAMISON ELECTRIC
24 Hr. Service
Residential, Commercial,
Rewiring, Repairs, Ser-
vice Change.
1406 Long Ave.
229-6516
tic 11-1


Sears Catalog Sales

227-1151
Leon Pollock. Owner
410 Reid Avenue




RED CARTER'S GUN SHOP
Port St. Joe Beach
Gunsmithing Blueing
New & Used Guns Scopes
tfc 10-2


Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday 4:00 P.M. EST
St. James Episcopal Church


JOE BETSEY-The name
that's synonymous to paint-
3 ing. Call 769-7368. 5t 1-1

FOR TRACTOR WORK
Call 229-8939 or 648-5306
tfc 8-14


Fishing Tackle

Hurlbut Supply
306 Rteid Ave.


MISSING

Since Dec. 25th, our brown 8 white


LOODHOUND

Last ee ba f iad .

If f d as n,2C7al F.

Whitfield at 229-8715.


kills bugs for
up to six months,
and moves you about $100 year
in cost pest control serves.
Use of Sprayer free with
purchase of Rid-A-Bug
HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St Joe Florida


PUBLIC NOTICES











OPEN


Deter ge.nt
TIDE
49 Oz. Pkg.


I with $10 Order


Charmin


TISSUE


4 Roll Pkg.


C


Limit 1 Pkg. with $10 Order


Martha White ,7
FLOUR


C


Liquid Deergeat
U19 W k l
IVORY
2i21 8
89.1^J


TOWELS


bir)l


Kraft
Orange or
Grapefruit


hi Moi Whou Krnl
CORN


Lykes Power Pak
Franks


Nu-Kris Sliced
Bacon


i i


Rebel Brand
Fresh Pork


Sausage


Fresh Pork


Neckbone, Feet
Maws, Liver
I-- "d -


Salad


ma'


39
mm


Fresh Sliced Beef


Liver


Fresh Pork


Chit-lins


Fresh Green
Cabbage


Cauliflower Blend


TV Frozen
California
or Broccoli


$


20 Oz.


09


D Monle Cmm Sty g
CORN

17 -


2
17..


JUICE


$


64 Oz.


-mmul


OU







- WE'RE FEATURING "AMERICA'S BEST"...AND THAT MEANS COM PARE


AMERICAS FINEST QUALITY MEATS,


* Friendly
*Low Low
* Quality a


QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED


$ 68S


ROAST

$ 58
lb.


TABLERITE LEAN HEAVY

Pork Spare Ribs
TABLERITE LEAN


Pork Steaks
ItTABLERITE PORK
Neck Bones


\:^F


TABLERITE THICK OR THIN
Sliced Bacon


Ib.


98C

$138


. lb. i

. U lb. -


a a


OLD SMITHFIELD HOT OR MILD PORK


Sausage Rolls
OLD SMITHFIELD L
Wieners (SUGAR FREE) 1z. 98u
TABLERITE IEG. OR BEEF R
Sliced Bologna A. 1
BRYANS s. Sl s
Juicy Jumbos .. pkv.


lb.
* pkg.


YKES SALAMI OR
Spiced Luncheon.
RIEGEL ENDLESS LINK
Smo. Sausage
IUNNYLAND SLICED
Cooked Ham


38


lb.a
pkg.


.980
b.$168
-b-
b$ 168
.... $238
***pkg. --


DLI


oUNTS O 14 RONCO VERMICELLI OR THIN 2. o.. TROPICANA $ 119
Stewed Tomatoes ....2 .. 1 Spaghetti .......... .2 1 ORANGE JUICE 19
HUNTS S) H15, WISHBONE tm 69 APPLE JELLY
Tomato Sauce .......2 cans 79 1000 Isle Dressing ..... l. 69* APPLE JELLY
HUNTS "" VAN CAMP B m GRAPE JELLY YOUR 9oz.
HUNTS 12oz. VANCAMP 300 BII GRAPE JAM CHOICE Glass U
Tomato Paste... . ... 59 Pork & Beans ........ cn CHO
HUNTS 46 oz. MARTHA WHITE SELF-RISING A 5 l t.
Tomato Juice .....:.. 79 Corn Meal ............ Bag*13 Trash Can Liners.. p


__ _








UA-.-----
Service

Prices
nd Variety


DAVID RICH'S IGA


Foodliner


IGA


ORANGE JUICE
ORE IDA REG. OR WITH ONIONS
Tater Tots .....
SALUTO ASSOnw It:)
.PartyPizzas .....
MORTON
Assorted Dinners.
IGA (WITH SNAPS),
Field Peas.....
IGA WHOLE OR
Cut Okra.........
EDWARDS ASSORTED
Condensed Pies..


12 oz.
S CAN


2 aUmUa aUO's 2


S U minUS


S .


EU U U U U U U

* U U U U U U U

* U U U EU U U

* U U U U U U U


59e


2 lb.
pkg.
33 oz.
size
11 oz.
size
16 oz.
pkg.
16 oz.
Pkg.
34 oz.
size


DAIY DPARMEN


We Will
Be Open


All
New


Day
Year's


Day for
Your
Shopping
Convenience


QUARI


U.S. POSTAGE
Ue PAMD
Paufmt No. a


Prices Good
Dec. 31 Jan. 6


IGA VEGETABLE

MARGARINE
rERS


LB.
PKG.


SUNNY DELIGHT
PUNCH ......


S oz. 89C
. size


BIG COUNTY 10 ct.
GOODN'BUTTERY .U cans


KRAFT ddd Ch
Shredded Cheese ,o.


69"


SEALTEST oz. $
Light N' Lively Yogurt 3 ,s-.


IGA 8 o. plkg.
Cheese Spread Singles,.


89*


IGIA HAMBURGER .OR NOT DO00 UA FESH


Buns... 2 og
IGA KING SIZE SANDWICH
Bread .2L.av
IGA PETITE
Rolls .


lUo
$109

69"


Tooth Paste Tuo
OLD SPICE REG.-MINT
Shaving Cream. s
COMTREX1
CAPSULES pkg.


$93
$149
$179


Rich's Produce Is Always Freshest


Sweet


Sweet
TANGERINES

22 1

52 2"
Sweet


TANGELOS.
sweet Juicy
ORANGES..

TANGELOS.
Florida
GRAPEFRUIT
Fancy Del Monte
BANANAS..


* 51b.bag

% %bu. bag


* % bu. bag

* 5 lb. bag


aEaE


Because We Haul Our Own


Tender

GREEN BEANS
Fresh /$
CAULIFLOWER Heads 1


$100oo

$095

$295


Florida Vine-Ripe
TOMATOES
Cello
CARROTS
Cello
RADISHES
Fancy Shelled
PECANS


3b. tray99
*.3 Ib. tray %~


Green .
CABBAGE 2reds


3 Ib.
Stray'


88


. bag 29C

. bag 15

$3. 390
* qt. jar


g- tray


Fresh
TURNIPS,
COLLARDS,
MUSTARD
Bunch
$fll9


Crisp

Iceberg Lettuce


... Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka


PILLSBURY
Biscuits


00


FROZEN FOOD DEPARTMENT










PAGE TWELVE THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 1, 1181


Tired of Pruning That Unsightly


GCCC Offering Courses


In Wewa and St. Joe


Shrub? Plant A Dwarf V


After many years of pruning
the llgustrum, arbor-vitae and
spreading juniper from the
front door welcome mat,
homeowners have come to
realize and appreciate the
advantages of dwarf plants.
In search of replacements
for overly large doorway
plots, plant breeders have
introduced many new and
exciting and very useful
dwarfs and dwarfs they
are compared to our
larger, more common shrub
plantings which commonly
reach six and eight feet high
and wide.
In the nursery trade a dwarf
plant is one three feet or less
in ultimate height. The home-
owner, or grower, music plailiO
with the ultimate height or
size in mind so as to allow
ample and ultimate growing
room and to eliminate the
constant chore of pruning to
keep the plant in proper
perspective.
Dwarf plants are best used
in small, detailed areas where
they will be observed at close
range, such as patio and


entrance areas. The small
sizes are not significant in
back borders or distant plant-
ings or without close observa-
tion. Popular dwarfs are in
demand along walk areas,
beneath low windows and
walks and in close conjunction
with detailed gardens, and
planter box plantings. .
The wide versatility and'
adaptability of dwarf plants
add to their popularity. There
are dwarfs adaptable to fully-
shaded areas, open sun, pot
and tub plantings, clipped
borders, ground-covers, and
for formal and informal plant-
ings. Because of their size,
they mix well in group or mass
plantings or in combination
with other plants. The dwarf
plant, too, can be used as a
single specimen or accent
plant.
Many of the larger stand-
ards now come in "dwarf
models." One can grow dwarf
junipers, pyracantha, nan-
dina, pittosporun, gardenia,
bamboo, barberry, sasanqua,
crape myrtle, pomegranate,
yucca, and holly.
There are dwarfs which


Striped Bass


Stocked In River


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service's Panama City field
office reported that 12,500 Gulf
Coast Race striped bass,
approximately six inches in
length, were stocked in the
Apalachicola River in Nov-
ember, 1980.
According the Edouard
Crateau, project leader at the
Service's Panama City office,
these fish were the offspring of
a pair of native striped bass
captured in the Apalachicola
River on April 30, 1980. The
captured stripers were trans-
ported approximately 300
miles to the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service hatchery in
Welka, Florida where they
were artificially spawned and
raised to approximately six
inches. According to fishery
biologist Crateau, this was the
first time these native stripers
were artificially spawned
after many such attempts
over a twenty-year period.
The Gulf Coast Race striped
bass was once commonly
found in Gulf Coast rivers
from Louisiana to the Su-
wannee River in Florida and
now, other than incidental
reports, only occurs in Flo-
rida's Apalachicola River. Ac-
cording to Ed Crateau, this
fish exhibits characteristics


which eneble it to tolerate the
warmer Gulf Coastal water
and attempts to stock the
Atlantic strains have been
relatively unsuccessful.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service has also stocked ap-
proximately 12,500 of these
native striped bass in the
Pascagoula River, Missi-
ssippi. Additional fingerlings
are being retained at Service
hatcheries in Louisiana, Ark-
ansas and Florida for future
broodstock.

APPRECIATION
We would like to express our
appreciation for the prayers,
thoughts, cards, and other
expressions of love shown us
during the illness of Jerry
Collins. Jerry is home and
continues to improve daily. A
special thank you to the men
at the St. Joe Paper Co. for
their kindess and the folks of
the Honeyville Methodist
Church and the White City
community.
We know that prayers have
been answered and for this we
thank God.
Mrs. Debbie Branch Collins
Mr. and Mrs. W.W. Collins


First

Presbyterian Church
Sixteenth Street and Forrest Park Avenue
Phone 227-1756
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE ........ 10:00 A.M.
ADULT SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS .... 11:00 A.M.
Study in the Gospels, Wednesday 7:00-7:45

Welcome to Everyone
JOHN M. STUART, Pastor
Phone 2294857



FIRST

BAPTIST CHURCH

Corner Third Street and Baltzell Avenue
REV. BILL HEATON, Pastor
AL YANCEY, Minister of Music


SUNDAY SCHOOL......................
MORNING WORSHIPSERVICE .........
CHURCH TRAINING ....................
EVENING WORSHIP SERVICE .........
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) .......


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
6:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.


"Come and Worship God with Us"


prefer dense shade, such as
holly fern, fatsia, aucuba,
dwarf azaela, mahonia, holly
malpighia, and vinca, while
others prefer a sunny ex-
posure, such as junipers,
hollies, barberry, pome-
granate, crape myrtle, pyra-
cantha, and lantana. Still,
there are some dwarfs which
are not particular at all and
will grow in sun or partial
shade. These include the pop-
ular dwarf yaupon holly,
many hollies, nandina, japan-
ese black pine, japanese
purple honeysuckle, Indian


hawthorne, boxwo
sporum, coontie,
sasanqua.
For that special
specimen planting,
dwarfs which make
tub or pot plants for
poolside, patio are
which are most
include: holly fer
dwarf bamboo. The
of the hardy dwai
and tubs is that
tolerate winter coni
doors and do no
shifting or lifting to
areas come winter


variety

ood, pitto- Some dwarfs which reward
and dwarf the grower with seasonal
blooms include: dwarf azalea,
accent or cuphea, dwarf sasanqua,
there are dwarf gardenia, dwarf crape
e excellent myrtle, pomegranate, lan-
r entrance, tana, Japanese purple honey-
eas. Those suckle, and Indian hawthorne,
adaptable Others produce attractive
rn, fatsia, fruit or berry, such as some of
advantage the dwarf hollies, mahonia,
rfs in pots and pyracantha. Many of
they will those which did not flower or
editions out- fruit display rich colorful
t require foliage, as do aucuba, senecio,
D protected dwarf nandina, and some of
the dwarf junipers.


Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege will offer a wide variety
of courses in Gulf County for
the upcoming spring
semester, according to Dean
of Instruction Bob McSadden.
Courses will be taught in
Wewahitchka and Port St. Joe
at each of the respective high
schools with the spring sem-
ester beginning on Jan. 8.
In Port St. Joe, classes
offered will be Freshman
English I and Principles of
Accounting I at 6:30 on
Tuesday nights and Western
Civilizations II and Introduc-
tion to Government at 6:30 on
Thursday nights.
In Wewahitchka, Principles
of Bank Operations will be


taught at 6:30 on Tuesday
nights.
Students may register for
any of these courses at the
GCCC Panama City campus


on Jan. 6 or at the first
meeting of each class.
For more information, call
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege at 769-1551.


000


TWA


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NEW BETHEL
African Methodist Episcopal Church
146 Avenue C Phone 227-1213
Rev. James W. Williams, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL .................. 9:30 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................. 1:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ................ 6:00 P.M.
"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man OUr Brother"


First United

Methodist Church
Constitution and Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe, Fla.
JOHNIE W. McCURDY, Minister

CHURCH SCHOOL ................. 9:45A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ............... 11:00 A.M.
EVE~IING WORSHIP ................ 7:00 P.M.
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP 5:30 P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) .. 7:30 P.M.


.


THIE STAR, Peft St. Joe, Fla.. THURSDAY, JAN. 1, 1981


PAGE TWELVE