<%BANNER%>
The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02351
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: December 18, 1980
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02351

Full Text














USPS 518-880


FORTY-FOURTH YEAR, NUMBER 16


THE


STAR


Industry Deep Water Port Fine People Safest Beaches in Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1980


20' Per Copy


Left to right: Junior Miss and the Spirit of Junior Anchors. The beautiful young ladies were selected at the
Miss, Leslie Costin; first runner-up, Paula Besore; second Junior Miss Pageant Saturday night. -Star photo
runner-up, Pam Lowry and Most Talented, Sydna



Leslie Costin, Junior Miss


Crowned at

Pageant

Saturday
Junior Miss Dianne Graham placed
the Gulf County crown on the head qf
Miss Leslie Costin, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Ashley Costin Saturday night in
the annual Junior Miss pageant,
sponsored by the Port St. Joe Jaycees
in cooperation with the United States
Jaycees Junior Miss program.
Miss Costin will reign throughout
the coming year with her title. In
addition, she will be going to Pensacola
in February of next year to compete in
the Florida contest to select a Junior
Miss to represent the state in the
national finals to be held in Mobile,
Alabama.
In addition to her title, Miss Costin
was also selected by the judges as the
candidate with the best spirit of the
group of contestants.
First runner-up in the contest was
Paula Besore. Second -runner-up was
Pam Lowry. Sydna Anchors was
selected by the judges as the best
talent.
The 15 young ladies in the contest
were judged on poise and appearance,
fitness, creative and performing arts,
and a personal interview with the
judges.
Serving as master of ceremonies
for the pageant was Tom Lewis, of
Channel 13 News.


Last year's Junior Miss, Dianne Graham, presents a bouquet of roses to
Port St. Joe's new Junior Miss, Leslie Costin. -Star photo


City Given Time to




Meet Requirements



Burping Pond Is the Problem


Jim Patrick, Chief Com-
pliance Officer of the En-
vironmental Protection Agen-
cy Atlanta office, told a
representative group from
Port St. Joe last Thursday that
his department must issue
some kind of an order against
the City for exceeding its legal
limits of outfall from the
Wastewater Treatment plant.
Patrick said, "We must, by
law, issue you some kind of an
order, but since the City has
cooperated in trying to locate
the source of this problem and
has expressed a willingness to
correct it when the source is
found, I think it only proper
that we allow you to give us a
schedule of the progress you
hope to make in the matter."
In effect, Patrick told the
City of Port St. Joe they would
be put on orders to clean up
the effluent, but would be
allowed as mdch time as was
needed to do the job, so long as
reasonable progress was be-
ing made.
The City had been "invited"
to the EPA office in Atlanta by
EPA to discuss the problem.
Representing the City at the
meeting last Thursday was
Commissioners Tom S. Colde-
wey, Wesley R. Ramsey,
attorney William J. Rish,
plant manager, Bob Simon
and three members of the
engineering firm currently
studying the plant to come up
-"with recotmiunendations-tofend
off the ire of the EPA.
Rish acted as spokesman for

Early Star

For Next

Two Weeks
Subscribers to The Star
will be receiving their
paper a day early for the
nest two weeks, according
to the publishers.
The paper will be printed
a day early for the next two
weeks in order to receive
mail distribution before the
Christmas and New Year
holidays.
The early publication
dates will require that all
news and advertising be in
the office of The Star by
noon Monday to insure its
being published in the
current week.
The Star will go to press
on Tuesday afternoon each
of the two weeks.


the City and explained to the
EPA officers that the City was
mostly in compliance with the
limits set by EPA and had
gone over the limits only on
occasion and never to any
great degree. Rish said that
only during the past week had
engineers put a handle on
what was causing the exces-
sive emissions of suspended
solids and BOD on occasion.
"They have given us a solution
off the top of their head, but
still must study their latest
findings to come up with a
definite solution to the prob-
lem."
Patrick replied that he was
sympathetic with the situation
and noted that the plant was at
a disadvantage since its limits
were for domestic effluent and
not paper mill effluent which
is not quite so rigid. "Mostly
you are treating paper mill
waste, but saddled with dom-
estic limits", Patrick said.
The EPA executive went on
to say he would request the
City to furnish his office with
plans to correct the problem
and a time schedule for doing
so. "We must issue an order of
some kind, and we will make it
as lenient as possible consi-
dering the circumstances. We
just need to have something in
writing."
Joel Newton, vice president
with Russell and Axon, the
engineers on the job of coming
up with a cause and solution
noted to Patrick the problem
(Continued on Page 2)


Pridgeon Taking


Early Payment

Gulf County Tax Collector Harland Pridgeon said this
week, his office will take estimated payments on the 1980 tax
roll, even though the tax bills have not been sent out yet.
Tax bills have been delayed this year due to a refusal of
the State Revenue Department to accept the Gulf County .
Property Appraiser's roll and because of delay caused by an
. October state-wide vote on a constitutional amendment
which would increase the homestead exemption rate.
Pridgeon said, "Many people have been wanting to pay
on their taxes to take advantage of the deduction in their
federal taxes this year, but they couldn't because the bills.
have not been sent out." Pridgeon's office has now made
arrangements to accept estimated payments on the taxes
with the balance being paid when the tax bills are sent or
refunds being made on'over-payment at the same time.
The early payments may be made.in an amount equal to
the 1979 taxes paid or an amount the Tax Collector deems to
be a more accurate representation of the taxpayer's current
tax liability.
There will be no discounts allowed on the estimated
payments, but the discounts will be allowed when the amount
of total taxes is levied after the first of the year. The new tax
rolls will be billed when the tax roll is determined after
certification for collection by the Department of Revenue
and the legal steps have been taken by the taxing bodies.
Tax bills will probably not be sent out until February at
the earliest, since the new state TRIM bill requires a waiting
period of 30 days for public hearings to be conducted after the
budgets of the taxing bodies have been made up. The budgets
cannot be completed until the Property Appraiser's roll is
formally accepted by the State Revenue Department.


City Sets Tentative Millage Rate


The City Commission tenta-
tively set its millage rate at
5.2466 for the 1981-81 tax year
and gave the go-ahead to
establishment of a perpetual
care cemetery for Port St. Joe
Tuesday night in its regular
meeting.
The tentative tax rate would'
reflect a 7.73 percent increase
in the millage rate over last
year and would bring in
approximately $50,000 more in
tax revenue.
Last year, the city collected
$305,819 in ad valorem taxes.
The new rate would bring in


approximately $355,862.
Most of the increase in
revenue would go to meet
higher prices for materials
and increased labor costs as
well as off-set an anticipated
reduction in revenue sharing
receipts from the state and
federal government.
The Commission has tenta-
tively set a financial plan
totaling $905,631.00 for the'
fiscal year, but nothing is
definite, pending a final ac-
ceptance of the county proper-
ty rolls by the State Revenue
Department. ,


Even with the increase,
there are no frills in the new
budget. The only capital out-
lay item of any size is the
proposed purchase of a new
garbage truck. Most of the
increase is to pay for the
higher cost of supplies and
labor.
CEMETERY
For better than a year, now,
the Commission has been
making plans to establish a
perpetual care cemetery ad-
jacent to Holly Hill Cemetery.
A tract of five acres has
been aside initially to be


developed and already clear-
ing work has been started on
the site.
Tuesday night, the Commis-
sion tentatively set a charge of
the lots, with $300.00 per lot set
on a pre-need purchase and
cost of $400.00 for at-need
purchase. The cost of the lots
would pay for perpetual care
of the cemetery.
The new burying ground
would have restrictions as to
construction of gravesites and
limits placed on coverings
over graves.
Revenues from lot sales


would be placed in escrow and
the expense of care for the
cemetery paid for with inter-
est earned on the escrow
funds.
The Commission decided
Tuesday night to go ahead and
plat the cemetery and get it
ready for occupancy in the
near future.
Plans have also been made
for expansion of the cemetery
in the future when the need
arises.
PLAN ACCEPTED
The City was notified this
(Continued on Page 4)


College Night Big Success


Dan Smith of Gulf Coast Community
College answers questions of Michael Roney
at "College Night '80" conducted by Gulf
County Schools last week. About 250 Gulf
County juniors and seniors attended the
information program and had their questions
answered by representatives from colleges
from Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, Missis-
sippi and Florida. In all, 36 colleges were
represented at the function.


Reaction to the program, designed to
acquaint students with what is available nla
institutions of higher learning was excellent
on both the part of the students and the
college representatives.
The program was opened with an
invocation by Rev. Ted Corley, pastor of the
Long Avenue Baptist Church and entertain-
ment was furnished by the St. Joe Singers and
the Band of Gold stage band.


Students Improving In State Assessment Tests


Elementary students scored better
than high school students, but both
scored high in the most recent results
revealed from the Florida State Student
Assessment Tests, which arrived in the
office of School Superintendent, Walter
Wilder, last week.
All Gulf County students in grades
3, 5; 8 and 11 were given the tests which
measure mastery of basic skills in
reading writing and mathematics in
October, 1980. Additionally, tests were
administered to students in grade 12


who previously had failed one or both
sections, or who had moved into the
county since the last testing.
Wilder revealed that 98 percent of
the 198 juniors tested county-wide
passel the communications portion of
SSAT-II (formerly called the Function-
al Literacy Test), tying the average of
the 1979-80 eleventh grade. However,
their performance on the mathematics
section dropped one point from last
year's 77 percent.
Of the 197 juniors taking SSAT-I,


the basic skills test, 85 percent passed
communications while 81 percent pas-
sed mathematics. This compares to 84
percent in communications and 85
percent in mathematics averaged by
last year's eleventh graders.
The present third, fifth and eighth
graders out-did the eleventh grade
students by gaining over their 1979
counterparts in both communications
and mathematics. In communications
the students went from 90 to 92 percent
and in math, from 93 to 94 percent.


Grade five advanced from 85 to 88
percent in communications and from 84
to 87 percent in math. Eighth graders
improved from 83 to 84 percent in
communications and from 80 to 82
percent passed in mathematics.
Wilder stated, "We are extremely
proud of the steady improvement
shown each year since 1977 by our third,
fifth and eighth graders. Until the
present, this had been the case with the
juniors. State Education Commissioner
Ralph Turlington had predicted SSAT-


II results might not improve this year
since the eleventh graders knew all
along that the test would not count for
graduation. We would hope this would
not lessen the motivation to succeed;
however, it could be a factor in the
lower mathematics score."

Implemented in 1977 under man-
date of the Florida Legislature, pas-
sage of SSAT-II was initially intended
as a requirement for graduation. Since
then, as a result of a class action suit,
Federal District Judge George Carr


ruled in July 1979 that passing the test
in order to receive a diploma would not
be required until the 1982-83 school
year. Further appeal was scheduled
before the Fifth Circuit Court of
Appeals in Atlanta on December 15.
Wilder went on to add, "Weaknes-
ses identified through test data are
remediated in regular classes, as well
as in the elementary and secondary
compensatory programs. Parents of
students who need special help will
receive periodic notification as to
student needs and progress."


I I --e











Editorials and Opinions


THURSDAY, DEC. 18, 1980


Anti-Gun People Are Getting In Their Licks


We swore we would say nothing in this
week's paper about the shooting of John
Lennon, one of the Beatles, who lived a
life-style which one couldn't say conformed
with the natural style of gentlemen and
gentlewomen.
The death of Lennon has already used up
more inches of copy space in newspapers
about the land than the shooting deserved,
when there are so many other things to report.
Taking of a life is always serious business,
but John Lennon's death was blown all out of
proportion. We feel the untimely death of an
18-year-old young man here in Gulf County
just a couple of weeks ago was just as
important and as tragic a loss as was John
Lennon, but he received nothing like the
publicity.
The only reason we bring it up now is that
the do-gooders are now on the war-path to cry
out for gun control with the goal in mind of
taking hand-guns off the market. We could
build just as good a case against the
automobile, since it kills far more people than
guns each and every year.
It could be that we should also mount a
crusade for the abolition of bath tubs from the
everyday market. Put them under the counter
-and regulate their sales and use severely.
There is cause to do so. More people are killed


in bath tubs than in any other appliance in the
modern home today.
It could be that, while we are about it, we
should regulate thai all buildings be built on a
ground level or be accessible by elevators,
since steps are surely a dangerous thing to
people. They fall on them every day and suffer
debilitating back injuries as a result.
Regulating guns simply because one is
used to kill a person in a seeming senseless
manner, while we allow the other death traps
to propogate and even encourage their use is


like swallowing a camel and straining at a
gnat.
If a man was so intent on killing John
Lennon that he would borrow money to
purchase a plane ticket from Hawaii to New
York City for the purpose of doing John lennon
in, how would lack of hand-gun or trouble
obtaining one stop him? There are knives,
garrotes, poison substances, even hands to
strangle with, easily accessible and Lennon
would be just as dead.
We think a good case against controlling
guns is borne out in the case of explosives.


Their sale is highly regulated. One can't even
purchase a firecracker without penalty of
being nabbed by the law and charged with a
crime. Still, explosives are the favorite tool of
terrorists today and they seem to be able to
obtain an unending supply.
Guns protect as well as destroy and we
can't see where those who would take them off
the market can justify, without a doubt, their
case against them.
If we're going to abolish tools of sudden
and violent death, let's be honest about it and
go after the automobile first.


Agency Taking A Reasonable Attitude


We've had harsh words to say about those
bureaucrats who seem to be wanting to stifle
the United States with their rules 'and
regulations. Some of them do go overboard in
applying their interpretation of the regula-
tions.
An experience with such an agency last
Thursday caused us to be placed in a position
of having good things to say about some of our.
regulation agencies: one Mr. Patrick with thed P
United States Environmental Protection
Agency, in particular.
The City of Port St. Joe was called before


the EPA recently because of a violation,
though only slight, with its Wastewater
Treatment Plant. The call, a form letter,
hinted of dire penalties if the violation were
not corrected.
Upon facing Mr. Patrick at the EPA office
in Atlanta last Thursday, the representatives
from the City met a courteous man who
seemed to want to work with the City in
correcting the problem and seemed to have no
interest in applying any penalties.
Patrick was willing to let the City set its
own time-table for correcting the problem,
provided the City started to make some


attempt at correction.
Since the cause and correction of the
problem was only recently made known from
engineers, it was a perplexing problem to the
City Commission as to what to do to correct a
matter of unknown cause.
The environmentalists of EPA understood
that and seemed willing to work with the City
and not cause us a hardship.
We think that is the proper attitude for any
public agency. Given time, all our problems
can be solved. Unreasonable demands serve
only to spawn resentment.


Given Time


(Continued from Page 1)


with the effluent limits and
pointed out he felt the City
should have paper mill treat-
ment limits which would mean
the plant would be out from
under the present attention of
EPA. "The plant has always
met paper mill effluent limits
as set out by EPA", Newton
said.
The engineer went on to
point that the plant settling
lagoon had as much as seven
feet of suspended solids in the
tIrm of sludge built up in the
bottom of the pond. "Dredging
of a portion of the pond and
re-locatingfour of the aerea-
tors in. the pond should alle-
viate the pi-oblem. "It has in
other paper mill settling
ponds" he said. Newton
pointed out that dredging
would stir up the sludge and
c.use the suspended solids
and BOD effluent to dumb
* drastically for a time until it
settled out from the disturb-
ance of dredging, if that is
done. Patrick said he realized
this and EPA would allow the
violation for the period of time
necessary to do the work.
REPORT TO
COMMISSION
In a report to the City
-Commission Tuesday night of
this week, Newton advised the
Commission that dredging
and re-location of some of the
aereators might solve the
problem. He said his firm was
making further studies of the
problem, pointing out that any


solution made at the present
should be aimed at a perman-
ent solution of the problem.
"Even a temporary solution
is going to -be expensive,
estimating a correction cost of
some $80,000. "Whatever is
done should be done on a
permanent basis to cut costs
as much as possible by not
having to do something
twice", he said.
Newton said his firm would
study the situation further and
come up with a recommenda-
tion sometime in January as
well as a report to make to
EPA as to time and.scope of
the correction work. "We're
probably looking at about a
year to get the plant in full
compliance", he said.
Newton told the Commission
the biggest problem was that
load in the-plant was continu-
ing to climb. "Each entity
using the plant is putting in
more effluent today than they
were when it first went on line.
As a result, the present lagoon
is too small for the volume you
now have."
Newton went on to point that
even so, the plant was doing a
very good job. "You're not
that far out of compliance",
Newton said. He pointed out
that with in November the
suspended solids count 'was
only 49 with an allowable limit
of 44 and the BOD count was
only 28 with an allowable limit
of 26. "This came in a time of


turmoil in the plant caused
when the paper mill shut down
for a few days, which violently
disturbs the operation of the
plant digestive system."
"Your problem is that when
the plant flow is disturbed, the
pond burps, causing the solids
and BOD to rise to the top and
go out through the effluent. We
have to find some way to
prevent the burps."
Newton went on to say that
with his considerable exper-
ience with this type plant, the
local facility was operated
more efficiently than 90 per-
cent of the plants he knew of.



Last Call

for Letters

to Santa
It's the last call for
getting in those letters to
Santa Claus for publication
in next week's paper.
The letters will be set up
in type on Friday of this
week and placed in the
pages for printing on Sat-
urday morning.
Kids who wish to have
their letters published in
the paper should have them
in The Star office by this
afternoon.


If You Visit New Atlanta Airport Be Sure to Put Your Walking Shoes On


I'VE BEEN WANTING to see At-
lanta's new airport; but I wasn't parti-
culary wanting see it like'I did last
-Thursday.
S I was one of the group which went
Lto Atlanta last Thursday to answer a
summons by the Environmental Pro-
:tection Agency to come talk with them
-about problems the City is having with
-its suspended solids limits at the
Wastewater Treatment Plant. The
-plant is putting out its limit and even
golhg over on some occasions, when the
:Iegal limits of introduction to the plant
.1have not been reached. The EPA
:wanted to know why.
- Plant manager Bob Simon, attor-
i!ey Billy Joe Rish and Commissioner
:Tom Coldewey and myself went on a
republicc bird to Atlanta for a two-hour
=meeting last Thursday afternoon.
: : The meeting was not nearly so bad
:as we expected, since the City's
engineersrs came up with what they think
-:s thq cause of the problem and a
-probable solution about two days before
the City was to appear before EPA. So
*ve were loaded.
: Coming home that evening was
something else. We were scheduled to


catch a plane at 6:00 for the return trip
and on arriving at the airport found our
plane had been re-scheduled for 7:30. It
finally left Atlanta at 8:15.
During this long wait, Tom Colde-




ETAOI






wey, who has gone through the new
airport several times since it has been
completed, took all of us on a tour of the
new facility.
About the only way I could describe
it is BIG! As a matter of fact, they
have a sign on the front door which
says, "Welcome to the largest airport
in the world."
There are escalators by the dozens
and moving sidewalks and automated


trains to help take some of the walking
burden away, but don't ever expect to
go through Atlanta airport without
walking your legs off.
We were riding down one of the


escalators with a crowd riding up the
opposite machine and we all heard one
man remark, "I feel like I have walked
to Houston!"
We took advantage of every ride,
but still, the next day, I felt like I had
been playing in a football game the day
before from all the walking we did.
THE BUILDING itself is very plain
but they have used every space and
made the huge facility as convenient as


possible. Still, if you have reason to go
there, wear a pair of sensible walking
shoes. You'll need them.
I HAVE BEEN asked to print a


message of mercy here.
It seems Rev. Johnie McCurdy,
who gets lost between home and the
church, was fishing last week with Rev,
Ernest Barr and lost his fishing rod.
Johnie just mis-laid it, overboard, in 20
feet of water and all the praying he and
Rev. Ernest could do couldn't get it to
rise again.
Johnie, who has a thing about
fishing, needs another fishing reel and


rod. While he lost a Zebco, he wants a
Daiwa for a replacement.
Since it is so close to Christmas and
Rev. Johnie suspects there is no Santa
Claus, he will have to depend on the
good graces of his constituency at the
Methodist Church or some of his two or
three friends to come up with a new
one.
Otherwise, he is going to have to
buy another one himself, and then he
would have to resort to the Zebco again.
Johnie, if you get two or three rods
and reels as a result of this piece,
please consider how you came about
your good fortune and share.. with
the writer.

THE COURTS IN CHINA are
suffering from their unaccustomed role
of meting out "justice".
Last week, the court lost its hold on
order in the proceedings, which is
attempting to justify a guilty verdict
against the Gang of Four.
Demanding justice in a system they
helped to create while doing away with
justice, the Gang is kicking up a fuss in
court, especially Jiang Qing, Mao's
widow. She put up such a fuss last week,


she had to be dragged from court.
When she was presiding, in her
hey-day, there -would have been no
dragging from court. There would have
been no court. If there had been a court,
there would have been execution at the
first signs of a disturbance.
Poor Gang of Four. When the shoe
is on the other foot, it is sure to rub a
blister.
PRESIDENT REAGAN'S honey-
moon is probably the shortest in history
for any newly elected president.
He finally named his cabinet late
last week and he is already receiving
the second-guessing of political writers
for some of his selections.
Reading the credentials of the new
cabinet caused me to think he picked a
pretty good cabinet. There's hardly any
carry-over from the Washington crowd.
-Since God delegated the most
important job in the world to amateurs
- the raising of children it's just
possible that Reagan's selection of
amateurs to do the job of running the
government might turn out well.
We hope so. We could use some "well"
in government.


St. Joseph's

Bay Tides

High and low tides for St.
Joseph's Bay and their respec-
tive heights, given in feet, are
shwon in the tide table below.
The information is furnished


by the U. S. Weather Bureau
in Apalachicola.


Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.


Hi Ht. Low Ht.
1956 1.3 533 -.2
2033 1.5 614 -.4
2112 1.6 659 -.6
2158 1.6 748 -
2242 1.6 835 -.
2324 1.5 921 -.6
1007 -.5


TiHE STAR


PAGE TWO


WIN, U A POSTOFFICE BOX 308
S- T H E ST A R SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
PHONE 227-1278 IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR, $6.00 SIXMONTHS,$4.00
Published Every Thursday at 3 Williams AveMue. Port St. Joe. Florida PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 OUT OF COUNTY-ONE YEAR, $10.00 OUT OF U.S.-ONE YEAR,.$12.00
By The Star Publishing Company
SSecon-CsPostagePa tPortStJ. Florida324s TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers doet hold
Wesley R. Ramsey.........Editor and Publisher SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID Ithemselves liable for damage further than amount received for such advertisement.
WSWilliam H.Ramsey.......... Production Supt. AT PORT ST. JOE.FLORIDA 322 w.rd
William H. Ramsey ........... Production Supt. AT R st. JE, FLORIDA 256 The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughlfully weighed. The spoken ward
Frenchie L. Ramsey ............ Office Manager barety asserts; me printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed wol remains
Shirley K. Ramsey............... Typesetter


.r


J








rilE STAR. Port.St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY, DEC. 18, 1980


OBITUARIES:

Services for Walter Richardson


Members of Cynthia Belin's fourth grade class at Port St. Joe Elementary
d I* School entertained the rest of the school this week with a Christmas play. Shown
Students In Christmas Play are the students in their costumes as they take a last curtain call.
S-Star photo




'Modernizing to Conserve Energy


Noel Phillips, project coor-
dinator for St. Joe Paper
Company, told the Rotary
Club about the current mod-
ernization program presently
under way at St. Joe paper.
Phillips spent 14 years in
Ireland with St. Joe, in their
plants in that country before
coming to Port St. Joe.
The main project in the $50
million program will be instal-


Adolph Bedsole
There is another de-
linquency in America far
more deadly than "youth
delinquency". It is more soph-
isticated delinquency-more
subtle, deeper entrenched,
better concealed, more ar-
rogantly defiant.
4 It is Adult Delinquency. It is
more deadly than youth de-
linquency because it sires and

Post Office

Plans Closing
Port St. Joe's Post Office
will close at noon next Wed-
nesday and remain closed
through Christmas day, ac-
cording to Postmaster Len
Collier.
Collier ,said the office will
also close at noon on New
Year's eve and be closed
through New Year day.
The office will be open for its
regular hours on each Friday
after the holidays.


lation of a new boiler which
will utilize bark and waste
wood products at the mill for a
fuel, in addition to coal and oil.
"We haul off about 32 tons of
bark and waste wood an hour
at the mill because we pre-
sently have no use for it",
Phillips said. "When this new
boiler goes into operation
about December of 1982, we
can. use this waste as a fuel
C-


exploits much of the delin-
quency of youth.
While teen-age crime is
escalating, it is often the adult
powers in the shadows. that
quietly promoted and direct
teen-age crime and delin-
quency.
The teen-age user and
pusher of drugs is at the
bottom of the totem 'pole-
pawns for the higher ups on

Christmas At


and save up to 1,200 barrels of
oil per day in our operation."
Phillips said that after the
boiler is activated, the mill
will be purchasing waste wood
and bark to use as a fuel to
supplement its own supply.
In addition to the new boiler,
the company is installing
additional chip unloaders for
truck and rail carriers. The
use of chips at the mill has


the pole. Adults produce and
distribute it to their youth
SLAVES.
Who manufactures and sells
liquor to parents who become
drunkards and abuse their
children into lives of delin-
quency? Every distillery pro-
ducing alcoholic beverages is
owned and operated by adults.
Every retail outlet-bars, rest-
aurants, grocery stores, filling
stations,-is owned and oper-
ated by adults. Many adults
bring liqour into their homes
and by example teach the


Church of God Jaycees Will


The Church of God at 319 6th
St., Highland View will be
having a Christmas program
on Monday, December 22 at
7:30 p.m. The Children of the
church will do a pantomine of
the night of the birth of Jesus.
Next, the young people will be
putting on the play, "No
Pillow for His Head."
Pastor William Touchton
invites everyone to come
watch this inspiring program.


TRY US FIRST!
WE HAVE HARD TO GET PARTS FOR BOATS, LAWN AND
GARDEN EQUIPMENT. TRACTORS, MOTORCYCLES, TRUCKS
AND AUTOMOBILES AVAILABLE DAILY FROM OUR NAPA
DISTRIBUTION CENTER.

St. Joe Auto Parts Gold Hat Auto Parts
201 Long Avenue Highway 71
Pert St. Joe, Fla. Wewahitchka, Florida
229-8222 639-5711


The Joy of the

CRIENDD christmas Season Is
'ItCv" Jesus,

God's Gift to Mankind.
Won't You Accept This Gift Today?
John 3:16, Acts 16:31

WORSHIP WITH US.
1601 LONG AVENUE
BIBLE STUDY ............... .......... 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................ 11:00 A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING ..................... 5:45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ................... 7:00 P.M.
W EDNESDAY ............... ......... .. 7:0& P. ..

Long Ave. Baptist Church
"Unto Us Is Born... A Saviour
A.M. ....................Which Is Christ", Luke 2:8-14
P.M. ....................."APlan for Evangelism"
REV.TEDM.CORLEY
Pastor


Entertain
The Port St. Joe Jaycees
will be giving away a gas
bar-b-q grill Saturday, De-
cember 20, as an incentive to
receive donations for their
Toys for Tots program.
The Jaycees furnish a
Christmas party complete
with a visit from Santa Claus,
a party, shopping tour of the
city and toys presented to
underprivileged children of
Gulf County.
The party will be. held on
Saturday.

Missionettes

Wrapping Gifts
The Oak Grove Assembly of
God Missionettes will have a
gift wrapping stand at the
Port Theatre this Friday, Dec.
19, from three to six p.m. The
stand will be open Saturday
and Monday from 10 a.m. to
four p.m.

CARD OF THANKS
We would like to take this
opportunity to express our
thanks to our many friends
and relatives for all their kind
acts during the death of
our brother, Clyde Rich. "
Thanks for the many flow-
ers, cards, food, phone calls
and especially their prayers.
May God bless each of you.
The Family of Clyde Rich.

Papa's Love Letter
by Vera Burge
I am with the Lord mama,
please don't worry about me,
Because with Jesus I am
happy and I'm free.
At these gates of pearl, and
streets of gold,
Again someday, your hand
I'll hold.
What I see here mama, is a
glorious sight.
There's no fear, no dark-
ness, no night, because here
Jesus is the light!
Oh! mama you know I love
you and I'm waiting here
above you.
Tell my family and friends
that call,
Here. there's love enough,
and peace enough for all


expanded to the point where
present unloading facilities
are not sufficient to keep up
with the traffic.


conservation of energy and
this savings of 1,200 barrels of
oil per day is a significant
savings as well as the other
energy savings our improve-


When the work is all finish- ments will make."
ed, production should be .
boosted some 100 to 150 tons. First Baptist
per day. "The additional,
production is not our primary Children's Choir
goal", Phillips said. "What we ..
are mainly looking at is Will Perform


The Children's Choirs of
First Baptist Church will be
presenting a program of
Christmas music Sunday
afternoon, December 21, at
5:00 p.m. in the church
auditorium. Also singing will
be the youth choir and ensem-
bles.
This program has been
scheduled at this time to allow
as many as possible to attend
and then be out in time to
attend their own church serv-
ices.
The public is cordially invit-
ed to come and hear these
children and youth present the
special music program said Al
Yancey, Minister of Music.
Bill Heaton is Pastor of the
church.

Announcing the seventh
edition of THE GREAT
TIDE, written by Rubylea
Hall, was republished re-
cently by Mrs. Eunice H.
Brinson, is now available
again which would make a
wonderful gift for Christ-
mas. Upon request these
books can be wrapped and
ready for mailing by call-
ing Mrs. Brinson, 229-8663.
The Great Tide books
will be on sale at the fol-
lowing places: Pauline's
Restaurant, Can pbell's
Drug Store, Sugar Plum
Tree, The Star, Gulf Sands
Rest., M.B., Fiesta Food
and Gift Shop, M.B., Mexi-
co Beach Grocery, M.B.,
The City Drug Store, Read-
y Arts and Crafts, and
McNeill's Store, Indian
Pass.
2t 12-18


children to drink.
Prostitution and white slave
gangs are owned and operated
by adults--with teen-agers
their most prized victims.
It is obvious that porno-
graphy and sensual movies
stimulate many young people
to become immoral and delin-
quent. This multi-billion dollar
racket is owned, produced,
operated and distributed by
delinquent adults.
We are told that theft,
misappropriation of funds,
fraud and embezzlement in
business and government
amounts to multiplied billions
of dollars each year. Adults
are the culprits!
Robbery, rape, murder,
breaking and entering and
defiance all are usually on the
daily TV menu. This becomes
a training school for teen-age
criminals. Adults write the
scripts, produce the shows,
operate the stations! Thus,
adults teach teen-agers just
how to become criminals.
Youth delinquency is a
major problem that demands
urgent attention at once. But
don't you think it is time for
society to be honest and
confess that delinquent adults
are the greatest contributors
to youth delinquency in our
nation.
So, as you watch the world
go by, take a long honest look
at the entire people. Then, I
think you will decide that
young people generally are
doing quite well for the chance
they have had--at the hands of
delinquent adults!


Y3f

FOR


205-07 Reid Avenue


Walter Brownlo Richard-

Clyde Rich

Dies In

Marathon
Clyde Rich, 72, of Marathon,
passed away Wednesday, Dec-
ember 10 in Marathon, follow-
ing a long illness. He was a
former resident of Port St.
Joe, and worked for the St. Joe
Paper Co. He was a resident of
Marathon for many years
prior to his death.
Survivors include: his wife,
Mrs. Emmaline Rich, of
Marathon; four sons: Larry
Rich, of Marathon, Ronnie
Rich of Marco Island, Charles
Rich of Marathon, Clyde Rich,
Jr., of Marathon; one bro-
ther, Ernest J. Rich of Port
St. Joe; two sisters: Mrs.
Lucille Sheffield of Port St.
Joe and Mrs. L.Z. Henderson,
of Port St. Joe, and fifteen
grandchildren,
Funeral services were held
at 3:00 p.m. E.S.T. Sunday at
the First Baptist Church of
Port St. Joe, conducted by the
Rev. Bill Heaton, and the Rev.
R.D. Zetterower.
Interment followed in the
family plot, Holly Hill Ceme-
tery. All services were under
the direction of the Comforter
Funeral Home.


ON SALE

In Time for the Holidays


OVER 100 ITEMS

TO CHOOSE FROM

AT


Port St. Joe, Fla.


son, 70, of Port St. Joe died
Monday in a Panama City
Hospital. He was a native of
Chuckey, Tenn. and had been
a resident of Port St. Joe for.
the past 40 years. He was a
member of the First Baptist
Chruch of Port St. Joe and was
a retired employee of St. Joe
Paper Co.
He is survived by his wife,
Bernice Richardson of Port St.
Joe, one son, Alan Richardson
of Port St. Joe. one daughter,


Mrs. Linda Straub of Brook-
field, Conn., three sisters and
one brother of Johnson City,
Tenn., and five grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday at2:00p.n. E.S.T.
in the First Baptist Church of
Port St. Joe with Rev. Bill
Heaton officiating. Interment
was held in the Holly Hill
Cemetery.
St. Clair Funeral Home of
Port St. Joe was in charge of
arrangements.


James Kelley, 49, Died

Friday After Long Illness
James L. Kelley, 49, of thur, Clinton, Oklahoma, Ida
Jones Homestead, passed Mae Rogers, Oregon; one
away Friday morning in a granddaughter, Virginia Ann
Panama City hospital follow- Kelley, Indian Pass.
ing an extended illness. Funeral services were held
He was a native of at 2:00 p.m. E.S.T. Monday at
Oklahoma, and lived in the the Oak Grove Assembly of
Port St. Joe area for the past God Church, conducted by the
28 years. He was an employee Rev David Fernandez, Rev.
of the St. Joe Paper Co. and a Lawrence Cox, and Rev. Jack
Veteran of the Korean War. Strader. Interment followed in
Survivors Include: his wife, the family plot, Holly Hill
Mrs. Wilma Kelly, Jones Cemetery. All services were
Homestead; one son: Billy under the direction of the
Kelly, Indian Pass; two Comforter Funeral Home.
daughters: Vickie Kelly,
Jones Homestead; Wanda
Whitfield, Howard's Creek; Congratulations
two brothers: Billy Kelly,
McCloud, Oklahoma, Gene Ken & Betty
Kelley, Tecumseh, Okla- Ke &
homa; two sisters: Ada Au- On Your 25th
Wedding Anniversary

Best Wishes,
Dewey & Mary




-' ,4 .


KIll


:



II


Phone 227-1251


Just Watching the World Go By


Citizen's Federal

Savings and Loan Association



Will Close at

12 Noon,

Christmas Eve,


Wednesday, Dec. 24



The Office Will


CLOSED ALL DAY


Friday, Dec. 26


For Posting Dividends


TELL CITY


America's No. 1 Choice In Early American Furniture


St. Joe Furniture & Appliance Co.


4 O


PAGE THREE









THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY, DEC. 18, 1980


Sharks Still Winning; Trounce



Chattahoochee and Havana


1980-81 Grapplers
The 1980-81 Wrestling Team of Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School is ready to
begin competition following the Christmas holidays. Their first match will be
January 8 against Rutherford of Panama City, there. The first home match will
be the following day, Jan. 9, against Wakulla. Wrestling coach, Chris Earley,
said that this year's team will be strengthened with the return of 13 young men


Public Notices


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
IN PROBATE
IN RE: The Estate of
MARY M. HATCHER,
deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:D
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the administration of the estate of Mary
M. Hatcher, deceased, file number 80-26
is pending in the Circuit Court of Gulf
County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Gulf County Court-
house, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The
Personal Representative is Charles H.
Hatcher, whose address is Route 1, Box
58, Wewahitchka, Florida 32465. The
name and address of the Personal
Representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or demands
against the estate are required WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE, to file With the Clerk
of the above Court a written statement of
any claim or demand they r.may have.
Each claim must be in writing and must
Indicate the basis of the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim is not yet due, the date when it
will become due shall be stated. If the
claim is contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty sha!l be stated.


If the claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim to the Clerk
to enable the Clerk to mail one copy to
each Personal Representative.
All persons interested in the estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of Admini-
stration has been mailed are required
within THREE (3) MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file any
objections they may have that challenge
the qualifications of the Personal Repre-
sentative, or the venue or jurisdict on of
the Court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS, AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: December 18,
1980.
-s- CHARLES H. HATCHER
-s- WILLIAM J. RISH
303 Fourth Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
904-229-8211
Attorney for Personal Representative
2tc 12-18


Sportscaster Howard Cosell
is also a lawyer.


First

Presbyterian Church
Sixteenth Street and Forrest Park Avenue
Phone 227-1756
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE ........ 10:00 A.M.
ADULT SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS .... 11:00 A.M.
Study in the Gospels, Wednesday -7:00-7:45

Welcome to Everyone
JOHN M. STUART, Pastor
Phone 229-6857



Pete's Air Conditioning

and Refrigeration

25 Years of Experience

Service On Commercial and
Residential Equipment Heating

and Sheet Metal Work

Expert Service

Phone 229-6446


week by Apalachee Regional
Planning Council that its
recent request for a Block
Grant had been filed with the
grant people after the pro-
gram had been accepted as
viable by the APC. The grant
was approved by APC for
$1,642,000 and forwarded to
federal agencies for approval
or disapproval.


Santa Wil


Main St. Q
Santa Claus will be on Main
Street in North Port St.. Joe
Saturday from 10 a.m., to 3
p.m., sponsored by the Plan-
ning Board. Christmas and
spiritual music will also be
provided,during the day.
In preparation for the day of
Santa's visit, the Planning
Board will sponsor a clean-up
of Main Street by the citizens
from 1 to 3 p.m., Friday. All
citizens are asked to come
help with the clean-up work.


from last year's squad.
Front row, left to right: Ricky Kibler, John Cassani, Marull Johnson, Keith
Mock, Scott Howell, Tommy Johnson, Mike Parsons and Andy Dyer. Kneeling,
from left: Tommy King, Mike Sweazy, Gerald Shearer, James Campbell, Billy
Gainous, Jim Hamby, Seth Howell, Jed Campbell, Tony King and Kris Cozart.
Standing, from left: Wayne Corbell, Billy Williams, Brent Moore, Jay Hanlon,
Andy Wilkinson, Billy Deeson, Billy Johnson, Tim Pope, Mark Mork and
Richard Ramsey. -Star photo

(Continued from Page 1)


The Planning Council's let-
ter said it would be approxi-
mately 30 days before it would
be known whether or not the
project would be funded.

The grant would remodel
sub-standard homes to meet
energy requirements and in-
stall proper drainage facilities
in the North Port St. Joe area.


11 Be On


saturday
Santa will be visiting with
the children under the Christ-
mas tree.
The Planning Board is also
providing fruits and goodies
for the elderly as a part of
their program to make Christ-
mas merry for everyone.
Members of the Board are
Brother C. Bailey, chairman;
Mrs. Tishia Bell, Mrs. Emo-
gene Hopps, E. L. Fleming,
Johnny Bess and Howard
Garland.


Super Sale

Wilton
Cake Supplies


20%

OFF


Sale Ends
Christmas. In
Stock Items Only


Ready


Arts and Crafts


223 Reid Ave. Port St. Joe


PORT ST. JOE-Larry, 11- I ..,
5-27; Pittman, 9-4-22; Givens,
1-0-2; Thomas, 0-0-0; Garland, --------
2-0-4: Filmore, 4-3-11; Adki-
son, 0-3-3; Roberts, 0-2-2;
Pace, 0-2-2; Jenkins, 0-2-2.
Friday and Saturday nights,
the Sharks will be hosting a '
Christmas tournament, with ':. '
two games on tap each night.
Entering the tournament '
will be Mosley of Panama
City, Wewahitchka, Trinity
High of Montgomery, Ala.,
coached by former Port St.
Joe athlete, Ken Whittle and
the Sharks.
Friday night at 7:00 p.m.,
Mosley and Wewahitchka will
kick off the tournament. At
8:30, Port St. Joe will meet
Trinity.
Saturday night, the losers of
Friday's game will play at
7:00 p.m., and the winners will ---
meet on the hardwood at 8:30.

"Consistency is the last re- ,
fuge of the unimaginative." e n
Oscar Wilde Ken Whittle will coach Trinity in
Christmas tourney.
UN


PROPERTY TAX NOTICE

The 1980 Tax Roll will not be certified for collection prior to
January 1, 1981. Payments of estimated taxes will be allowed by
those taxpayers who tender payment to the Tax Collector on or
before December 31, 1980.
The Tax Collector will accept payment of estimated current
taxes based upon an amount equal to 1979 taxes levied or an amount
the Tax Collector deems to be a more accurate representation of the
taxpayer's current tax liability.
Discounts shall not be allowed on payments of estimated taxes,
but shall be allowed on the amount of total taxes levied, determined
at the time the tax roll has been certified for collection and final
tax-notice receipts are issued.


HARLAND O. PRIDGEON,
GULF COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR


City Sets -


qw


PAGE FOUR









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, DEC. 18, 1980


DAR Celebrates True Spirit o Christmas Final Wedding Plans
. Mrs. Effie C. Crawley an- event of Saturday, De<


The True Spirit of Christ-
mas, "Peace, Joy and Good-
will," in a Colonial Williams-
burg setting, was celebrated
at the home of Mrs. Barbara
Watts at the annual Yuletide
party given by the St. Joseph
Bay Chapter, Daughters of the
American Revolution.
The beauty and color of
Christmas began in the beauti-
fully decorated entrance way
where Mrs. Watts', her
daughter Miss Susan Watts,
dressed in Christmastide rpd,
and Mrs. Charles Brown,
Chapter Regent, greeted the
guests.
Mrs. Thomas Owens ush-
ered the guests into the large
family room where the focal
point was the registration
desk, a small, old drop-leaf
type, held the chapter's guest
list. A large brilliantly lighted


Christmas tree attracted at-
tention. It was trimmed with
garlands of popcorn and fresh
cranberries with a golden
Madonna figure near the
crown. Festively wrapped
packages and a basket of pine
cones with a red bow were
placed at the foot of the tree in
keeping with the old fashioned
theme of the early Colonies.
Around the fireplace, the
length of one entire wall, were
placed old decoys of Canadian
and native geese. The walls
were hung with handpainted
water colors and pastels of
various scenes of local water-
fowl. Pots of red and gold
poinsettia transformed the
room into the spirit of the
season, reminiscent of the
meaning of that flower ac-
cording to the old Christmas
legend.


MISS DIANE MARIE FREEMAN


Engaged.


Mr. and Mrs. Robert Free-
man Jr. of Port St. Joe,
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Diane Marie to
Kris Furstenberg, the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Furst-
enberg of Billings, Montana.
The bride-elect was a 1978
graduate of Port St. Joe High
School and attended Ogle-
thorpe University in Atlanta,
Georgia. She is a member of
Delta Zeta Sorority.


The bridegroom-elect was a
1976 graduate of Quantico
High School in Quantico, Vir-
ginia and a 1980 graduate of
Oglethorpe University, At-
lanta, Georgia, with a BBA
degree and P major in Ac-
counting. He ls a member of
Kappa Alpha Order
fraternity.
A spring wedding is plan-
ned.


The guests were then ush-
ered by Mrs. Ashley Costin
and Mrs. Charles Norton into
the living and dining rooms,
opened ensuite, which con-
tained antiques of the Federal
Victorian and Classic periods,
These beautiful and interest-
ing pieces had been in the
homes of Mrs. Watts'
maternal and paternal grend-
parents. Old fashioned bou-
quets of multicolored roses,
locally grown and presented
especially for the party by Mr.
and Mrs. Ernest L. Hendricks,
were placed on low, marble-
topped tables, giving a festive
air suiting the occasion.
The dining table, overlaid
with a handsome old cutwork
linen cloth, was centered with
roses in shades of Christmas
red in a silver filigree bowl.
The silver coffee service was
attended alternately by Mrs.
James Roberts, Mrs, Roy
Smith amd Mrs. Wayne
Stevens. Serving tables of old
spool and oak leaf cluster
design held nuts, canapes and
hors d'oeuvres in shapes of
Christmas wreaths and Santa
Claus arranged in cut glass
compotes and bowls. Yew
branches interspersed with
red roses and magnolia leaves
centered each table.
The guests were shown to
other parts of the beautiful
home which also were furn-
ished in mellow antiques.
Some of the furnishings on
display were French arm-
oires, ornate cabinets, a
highly polished brass bed and
other interesting pieces of the
motif of the late 1800's. Mrs.
Watts was assisted in caring
for her guests by her mother,

Sing for

Garden

Clubbers
The St. Joe Singers, com-
posed of Serena Guillot, Lindy
Moore, Kelly Johnson, Sharon
Watson, Steve Yancey,
Michael Roney, and Donny
McArdle, under the Direction
of Miss Ann Aldridge, sang
"Oh Holy Night", "Do You
Hear WhatJ. Hear", "I Saf
Mommy Kissing Santa
Claus", and "Jingle Bell
Rock" at the Thursday lunch-
eon meeting of the Port St. Joe
Garden Club. Mrs. Stiles
Brown read the Christmas
scripture from Luke.
President Mrs. M.P. Huie
welcomed members and
guests, and introduced the
many guests in the Christmas
adorned Garden Center.
A petition from the National
Garden Club was read. The
The club voted to support the
petition calling for a National
Garden Week in the spring.
Hostesses for the large
gathering were Mesdames
Bobby Jackson, John Stuart
and Stiles Brown.


Mrs. Richard Porte. Mrs.
William Quarles and Mrs.
Charles B. Smith.
Out of town guests were:
Mrs. Ollie Shipman, Mrs.
Edward Ryan Hayes, Mrs.
Franklin Nott, Mrs. V.M.


Mission Group III of the
First United Methodist
Church of Port St. Joe met
Tuesday, December 16 at 7:30
in the home of Mrs. James
Harrison. Mrs. Harrison's
home was beautifully deco-
rated with fresh greenery,
poinsettias, red berries and
candles.
The program, provided by
Mrs. Wayne Taylor, consisted
of Christmas carols sung by
the group. Accompaniment on
the piano was provided by
Edith Stone.

Beach Garden

Club Enjoys
Xmas Dinner
The Sea Oats and Dunes
Garden Club held its Christ-
mas luncheon in the Mexico
Beach Chamber of Commerce
building on Tuesday, Dec-
ember 9, with more than thirty
members in attendance. This
was the President's party, and
three officers of the Club, 2d
vice-president Maxine Pitts,
secretary Rella Wexler, and
advisor Ruth Nance, joined
with president Louise Kessel,
to take care of the decorations
and the delectable foods
served.
There were many door
prizes which were donated by
merchants. Members ex-
changed gifts and, though
early in this month, the party
was a festive one.
The January 13th meeting
will be held in the Chamber
building at 9 a.m. Central
time.


Hoffman, Jr., Mrs. John How-
ard, Mrs. J.I. Philyaw, Mrs.
J.V. Gander, all of Apalachi-
cola; Mrs. William Green and
Mrs. Carver Byrd of Magnolia
Bluff; Mrs. Dave Gaskin of
Wewahitchka; Mrs. W.B. Dye,

Jvj


Members prepared christ-
mas plates, consisting of
homemade bake goods, to be
given to the elderly and shut
ins.


Mrs. J.T. McNiell, and Mrs.
Francis M. de Buhr all of
Indian Pass; Mrs. Hazel
Thomas and Mrs. Marvin L.
Hale of Mexico Beach and
Miss Margaret Counts of
Winter Haven.


ounces the final wedd
plans of her daughter, Pam
Loraine Coney, and Mic
Jeffery Leslie, the son of
and Mrs. Charles Leslie, al
Port St. Joe.
The ceremony will be












! See Our

Poinsettias

Norfolk


ling
nela
hael
Mr.
ll of
an
redvl


member


20, at 3:00 in the afternoon at
the Zion Fair Missionary
Baptist Church.
Relatives and friends of the
couple are cordially invited to
witness the ceremony and
share in the couple's joy.
L : **


I








Large Variety

- Bromelliads

Island Pines
and Many Others
r _


Miss Susan Watts, Mrs. Charles Brown recent Christmas meeting of the DAR. The
and Mrs. Barbara Watts greeted guests at the meeting was held in the Watts home.


Mrs. McNeill Hosts Historians


The St. Joseph Historical
Society met Saturday, Dec-
ember 13th, with Mrs. Betty
McNeill, president, presiding.
Mrs. Eunice Brinson re-
ported that the public respond-
ed enthusiastically to the joint


Garden-Historical Club's open
house on Sunday, December
7th, with 100 guests attending.
Wayne Childers explained
to the group the results of the
soil check made of the old
cemetery area. He secured


information as to appropriate
type of fertilizer as well as
timing for their application.
Mr. Childers was very gladly
assisted in this project by the
County Agent, Roy Lee
Carter.
116 out of state people
registered at the old cemetery
from November 1 to Dec-
ember 11. They were from the
following states: North Caro-
lina, Michigan, Pennsylvania,
Illinois, Alabama, California,
Ohio and Missouri.
The register contains nu-
merous complimentary re-
marks from the visitors.


Ming's.


0 0


Greenhouse and Nursery

648-8907 St. Joe Beach

MERRY CHRISTMAS

To All
m^itfe"s ^ : *>--ause Jk3/- A ns ra.J s&-7 ~-0 <~f s<


Ladies' and Men's


Watches


1,0%-40%


If It's
Jewelry
You
Need
We
Have It!


Discounts


Thursday through Sunday
of This Week
Store Hours til Christmas

Mon.-Sat., 9-6


Thames Jeweler


302 Reid'Avenue
* .K..i


ON
r -l-^d


Pre-Christmas Stereo Sale



Everything Must Go!



Due to Overstock




10 /O Discount

on Everything!


K&D TV & Sound


301 Reid Ave.


Equipment by FISHER


Port St. Joe, Fla.


Mrs. Harrison Hostess

to Mission Group II


DIAMONDS


A Forever Gift


to sparkle up

someone's Christmas


~e~i~d r~YIlk


I I


0 Ijl


PAGE FIVE






*wpm

Merr Chistasa

New Yar.o llOu


0


HA 1 LB. 98
A:,,


MAXWELL HOUSE
COFFEE
(LIMIT 1 WITH 10" OR MORE FOOD ORDER)
$189
LB.BAG
PILLSBURY
FLOUR
(LIMIT 1 WITH *10" OR MORE FOOD ORDER)

5 LB.BAG 58
DUNCAN HINES
CAKE .
MIXES

18 OZ.PKGS 686
MUCHMORE
SLICED
BACON $ 28

LB. PKG.


USDA GRADE-A
HEN TURKEYS AVERAGE m..........


LB. 78,


GWALTNEY BONELESS TURKEY HAM ..... L. 1B
BONELESS SMO. BUFFET HAM (RIEGEL) .... .. .. 238
TABLERITE LEAN GROUND BEEF .......... LB. $14
STANDING RIB ROAST(10"cut)TABLERITE . . .LB 98
MuCHMORE SLICED BACON .... .......... ..$128
PORK SAUSAGE ROLL Sunnyland(HOTORMILD) . . LB.$138
SUNNYLAND REG. OR BEEF WEINERS ...... 'SK $128
20 oZ. $1 7
LYKES RED-HOT SAUSAGE ............... PKG.


PORK CHOPS TABLERITE '4 Sliced ..
PORK CHOPS TABLERITE Center Cut


a ,


A
f^.


. .. LB. $ 18
* LB. I 1M


7-


BSH 91 SL


China Doll Dried
BLACKEYE
PEAS Pkg.


a:


II vAv


a

9;
~9
.e
0
~ 0


S-
n*.-*


BUSH NAVY BEANS,
BUSH BLACKEYE PEAS,
BUSH PINTO BEANS,
BUSH GREAT N. BEANS,
BUSH CHILI HOT BEANS,
SHOWBOAT SPAGHETTI,
SHOWBOAT PORK & BEANS


IGA FRUIT COCKTAIL.. 303 Cons 59*
Tropicana ORANGE JUICE ', Gallon 88"


BORDENS EGG NOG
KRAFT MARSHMALLOW .
KRAFT
MARSHMALLOW CREME .......


32 oz. $129
CTN.
PKGS. 990
7oz. 99*
SIZE 9


JIFFY CORN MUFFIN MIX. 4 '.. 88
CONDENSED MILK (EAGLE BRAND). CAN 991
SNOWFLAKE COCONUT (GA).. KG. $19
IGA HEAVY DUTY 25 FT.
ALUMINUM FOIL ............ ROLL 8


PET RITZ

PIE SHELLS

TOTINA PIZZAS


TROPIC ISLE
COCONUT..
BIRDS EYE
COOL WHIP


SZ49'
.. SIZE

S OZ.
. CTM. U 7


2 SHELL

. . 12 Oz.
IGA SPEARS
BROCCOLI ...
HANDY PAK
CRINKLE CUTS ..
IGA
OCEAN PERCH


19c

99
..-59*

5 LB.$1 9
PKG. 1
LB.
PKG.


~C"~g~""" rJe~CT~;~


Y.~)~'p~;


1..


ill.,










S. s
*~ 0


DAVID RICH'S IGA

Foodliner.... Port St. Joe and Wewalh


BULK
U.S. POSTAG9I
S8.4CPAID
PaI"t No. !
Wwwabitchk. "ii


Prices Good Dec. 17 Dec. 30


SHOP HERE FOR...


O


0


Fe


KRAFT SOFT 69
PARKAY CS O. !
/ KRAFT PHIL. 0o
CREAM CHEESE SIZE
SEALTEST LIGHT N' LIVELY
COTTAGE CHEESE 'SIZI
iev;^


CHEESE DINNERS .......3'Oz- 990
IGA SLI-CRUSHED No'
PINEAPPLE.............. CS 69, .
LIPTON 2 PK
ONION SOUP MIX .......... g 69*- "7G.
CAIRO BEAUTY 12 n "*'O
SALAD DELIGHTS ....... JAR 79" % ,if 2le
SWANSDOWN A
CAKE FLOUR............. 89' -".
TETLEY
TEA BAGS .............. 'P1" 'K .
PI KLED PEA.... ,. ,," ," '


. ,


BREAKSTONE
SOUR CREAM
IGA
CINNAMON ROLLS .
PILLSBURY ASSORTED
COOKIE MIX .


':izi 8,90

15,OZ 129


0 0


David Rich's IGA Would
Appreciation to ouus;
Patronage throoughus t
by giving y,
SThree Chances



.ur itmas
very Monday
,Free Ev
Cafned Ham 1
Every Saturday
Free Smoked H
wil a i..-- *00dH


1 0 Port St. an We*
o "o- "ewaitc
0"Register every time you.Come
S0 Shatore. No purchasee nece
O and have a happy holido
0 y -"


0


Look What

Will Buy!!


GIVE FRUIT FOR
CHRISTMAS
4i Bu. Bag
ORANGES ..... $2.95
/4!' Bu. Bag
NAVELS $3.75
Fla. Sweet
TANGERINES Box $7.95
Florida
ORANGES..a Box $7.50
White
GRAPEFRUIT Box $7.95
Box
PINK GRAPEFRUIT$8.25
Fla. Sweet
TANGELOS Box $9.95
Delicious
RED APPLES... $9.95
*W.S. Extra Box
Fancy Apples $14.95


Tray String Beans
S3 Ibs. Kumquats .
2 Heads Green Cabb;
Tray Sweet Tangelos
3 Ibs. Sweet Potatoe
2 Heads Cauliflower
3 Avocados ........
20 Tangerines......
5 Navel Oranges....
3 lbs. Tomatoes ..
2 Heads Lettuce ...

TURNIPS, Bunches $1 19
MUSTARD, COLLARDS "
W.S. Red or Gold Del.
APPLES Ib. 49


Lg. Variety .
FRUIT CAKE MIX, NUTS, RAISINS
Shelled Pecans $ 90
Shelled Pecans ar 39


*


t4.0"


'' AT ITS BEST!


0


0 0- 1419


like to shoW our
tomers for their -
he Year of 1980


A Week
m ek


Dinner
'ry Thursday
Free
rurkey

r in
kka. 0
=.in o 0"
;Sary o







0
** '-.*
.









p --







I.

^ "11
f,, "";|
**' ***-


*


ditchka


8









PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY, DEC. 18, 1980


School


News ...


Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School

BY LESLIE COSTIN


4 .-, _- .
Congratulations to the Jun-
ior Varsity and Varsity Bas-
ketball teams for their fourth
win last Friday, against Hav-
ana. Keep up the good work
Sharks!
The girls' basketball team
beat Chattahoochee last week


with a score of 57-35, but lost to
Havana on Friday. This
brings their record to 3-1.
The 7th and 8th grade
basketball teams defeated St.
John's last Thursday night.
The score of the games was
47-20 and 80-42 respectively.
The annual Student Council
Christmas Ball will be held on
December 22, from nine
o'clock at the Centennial
Building. Students in grades
9-12 are invited. The occasion
will be semi-final.
There will be a girls'


basketball game during school
on Thursday at 1:00. The
Sharks will host the Wewa
Gators. The student body will
be invited to attend this game.
There will be a Christmas
program for the student body
on Friday, December 19, at
10:15 a.m. The Reverend J. C.
Odum will be the guest
speaker.
The Christmas Edition of
the Purple Wave is on sale
now for 25 cents. If you would
like to buy one, see any purple
Wave staff member.


Firm Praises Rod Herring


Rodney Herring son of Mr.
and Mrs. Kenneth Kerring of
Port St. Joe, has been honored
by the Southwestern CL ipany
of Nashville, Tennessee. Last
summer, Rodney won special
recognition for individual ef-
fort by winning The Superstar
Sales Case. This premium
award is presented to those
students in the Southwestern
Program who work 80 hours
and make 180 demonstrations
each week of the summer
program. The Southwestern
Program gives young people
the opportunity to learn to
communicate with other

School will be dismissed
Friday, December 19th, at
12:30. Students, faculty, and
administration of Port St. Joe
High School, have a safe,
enjoyable holiday. Until next
year ................. . .


people, run their own busi-
ness, and make'money-to pay
their own way through col-
lege.
The Southwestern Company
has expressed deep apprecia-
tion in having Rodney Herring
is the Summer Program and
looks forward to having him
back next year.
While in competition with
thousands of students from all
over the United States Rodney
earned the company's coveted
Top Sales award for ranking
in the top percentage of
student dealers in personal
sales.
Rodney has been asked to
return as a Student Manager
in the company's summer
program. His selection was
announced after consideration
in the areas of initiative,
self-motivation, and deter-
mination.
Rodney Herring is a 1979


graduate of Port St. Joe High
School and is now attending
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege.

Church Plans

Xmas Program
The youth department and
Sunday School of Philadelphia
Primitive Baptist Church
will present its annual Christ-
mas program, Sunday morn-
ing at 11:00 a.m.. Pastor G.H.
Wilson and Superintendent,
Boykins are inviting everyone
to come out and unjoy this
service which is under the
direction of Mrs. Doris Morn-
ing and Miss Jennifer.

John Madison Randolph,
grandson of Thomas Jef-
ferson, was the first baby
born in the White House.


Enl


I


pecaThe Fish House

RESTAURANT

SHRIMP CREOLE
English Muffins, Slaw, Molded
Cranberry Nut


All You Can Eat $350

Thursday, December 18
5to 10 P.M., CST

Merry Christmas! We'll be closed
Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.
Chris and Cuyler King
Mexico Beach, Florida









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, DEC. 18. 1980


Bowling


Net

The Thursday Night Ladies
Bowling League met Dec-
ember 11 with the following
results: On lanes one and two
the Sandpipers won four from
Dollar General. Marian Dee-
son's 204 game and 495 series
was high for the Sandpipers,
nice bowling Marianl Team
mates Carolyn Wright had a
193 game and 491 series and
Irene Burkett's 174 game was
52 pins over her average. For
Dollar General Rhonda Gain-
ous had a 152 game (32 pins
over her average) and Lillian
150 game was also 32 pins over
her average.
On lanes three and four
Earley's Hardware swept four
from Renfro. Earley's Joyce
Gainous was 47 pins over her
average with a 177 game.
Margie Martin was 32 pins
over her average with a
I0 game. For Renfro Trudy
Pate had a 168 game and 465
series.
Highland View Motors took
four from Murphy's on lanes
five and six. For HVM Nett
Henderson was high with a 165
game and 451 series. Sandra
Brock was 31 pins over her
average with a 159 game and
then had a 153 game and 441
series. On Murphy's Ginnie
Laurimore's 391 series was 48
pins over her average. Team
mate Roxann Lamb was 35
pins over her average with a
135 game.


On lanes seven and eight St.
Joe Furniture won three
games from Pepsi Cola.
Peggy Heacock bowling with a
138 average had a 165 game
and 470 series. Team mate
Brenda Mathis had a 165 game
and picked up the 3-7 split.
Toby Gray was 24 pins over
her average with a 146 game.
(Diane Weeks took it easy on
her old team mates.) Kay
Katynsky was Pepsi's high
bowler with a 154 game and
419 series. Pat Sasser had a
147 game.
STANDINGS:
Pepsi 44% 11%
HVM 39% 16%
St. Joe Furniture 38 18
Sandpipers 33% 22
Murphy's 25 31
Dollar General 19% 36%z
Earley's Hardware 12 44
Renfro 12 44

Society to Give
Christmas Music
The Concern Christian Soc-
iety, will have A Musical Pro-
gram entitled "Give Me My
Flowers While I Yet Live" this
Saturday, December 20, at
6:00 p.m. The program will be
held at the Church of God and
Christ, with Elder O.J. Stall-
worth as host pastor.


NEW BETHEL
African Methodist Episcopal Church
146 Avenue C Phone 227-1213
Rev. James W. Williams, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL ................. 9:30 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................. 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ................. 6:00 P.M.
"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man OUr Brother"





St. Joe Branch

Wewahitchka State Bank



Will be Closed


12:00 Noon on Christmas

Eve thru Christmas Day

and

at 12:00 Noon on New Year's

Eve and thru New Year Day


Come by -
and enjoy Fruitcake and Coffee
with us through the Holidays


Floridians Favor Research for Energy
GAINESVIILE Floridians That's one of the findings of from windfall profits taxes tickets received support from such research. said they would rely on
overwhelmingly endorse the a statewide energy attitude should be used for research to just about half of the respond- Most people in the study-85 government information and
recent passage of a windfall survey conducted by the Uni- help enrd IT d =Indon. .r on ents with 37 percent opposing percent-feel there should be only 18 percent would rely on
profits tax on oil companies versity of Florida's Institute foreign o'%, to reip the poor it and the remainder being an increase in production of information from the oil com-
but despite current tough of Food and Agricultural pay uielh uL Uy ubi1h ou to undecided. gasohol. panics.
financial times they prefer Sciences (IFAS) with partial provide a tax cut for all U.S. The 55 m.p.h. speed limit Respondents indicated that Respondents were chosen at
that money from the tax be funding from the Governor's taxpayers. received the approval of al- 40 percent of Florida's citizens random from lists of state
used to find alternate energy Energy Office. Three out of four FLoridians most 82 percent of the re- rely most heavily on the licensed drivers. A similar
sources rather than provide Over 2,300 Floridians were responding said that windfall spondents. Expansion of nu- media in forming their energy study was conducted by IFAS
tax cuts. asked in the study if money taxes shond e parmarri for clear power plant construction opinions. About 29 percent 15 months earlier.


Tips Count In


Reporting Social


Security
People who work' in jobs
where they receive cash tips
can earn valuable social sec-
urity protection through those
tips, David Robinson, Social
Security Field Representative
for Gulf County, said recently.
But, they can earn this
protection only if they report
those tips to their employer
as the law requires Cash tips,
when added to regular wages,
can mean higher cash benefits
for the worker and his or her
family in the future,. Robinson
said.
Cash tips amounting to $20
or more in a month in a
person's work for one em-
ployer count for social sec-
urity. Tips received in a form
other than cash do not count.
A person who splits or
shares tips with others where
he or she works should count
only the amount he or she
finally receives. If the em-
ployer charges a service
charge and divides it among
employees, the part received
is not a tip. It is a part of
regular wages and should not
be reported.
A worker is required to give
his or her employer a written
report of tips if they add up to
$20 or more in a month. The
report is due within 10 days
after the end of the month, but
an employer can require
reports more often.
Forms 4070 (Employee's
Report of Tips) are available
at any Internal Revenue Serv-
ice Office to make reports.
Booklet 5635 is available at the
same office for workers to
keep a record of tips and
reports.
Other forms can be used if
they contain the same infor-
mation.
If tip reports are incomplete
or late, the worker may have
to pay a penalty amounting to
one-half of the social security
taxes due. A worker who does
not report all tips to his or her
employer will have to report
them directly to the Internal
Revenue Service on Form 4137
when his or her Federal
income tax return is filed.
More information about
cash tips is contained in the




Now 200 years old, the
Iron Bridge over the Severn
River in Shropshire, England,
was the first bridge to be
constructed entirely of iron.


Wages
leaflet, "Social security and
cash tips." Free copies can be
obtained at the Panama City
Social Security Office, located
at 30 West Government Street.
The telephone number is
769-4871.


I

'S


alternate energy research.
Only 19 percent favor a tax
break for Americans and 7
percent support a plan to help
the poor pay utility bills.
"This seems to indicate a
stong feeling toward getting
money allocated for exploring
and initiating energy alterna-
tives," said Dr. Lionel Beau-
lieu, Extension rural
sociologist who conducted the
study.
Gas rationing proved to be
an unpopular approach to
solving the energy problem
with only 30 percent saying it
was okay but another 20
percent refusing to register an
opinion. The new surcharge
being tacked onto speeding


drew a 2-1 approval. Four out
of five respondents approved
offshIore oil drilling.
Also, almost 80 percent of
those returning the question-
naires approved the federal
government's efforts to re-
gulate temperatures in com-
mercial and public buildings.
About 55 percent of those
responding said they favor a
"gas guzzler" tax on cars
which fail to meet a miles-per-
gallon mandate. Tax breaks
for one-car families, however,
did not receive such favorable
support.
One research area which
found favor among the resi-
dents was the development of
synthetic fuels. Only 17 per-
cent said they were against


NEE CRDIT
"' g ioS


FIRST

BAPTIST CHURCH

Corner Third Street and Baltzell Avenue
REV. BILL HEATON, Pastor
AL YANCEY, Minister of Music
SUNDAY SCHOOL ................... 9:45A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE ......... 11:00 A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING .................. 6:00 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP SERVICE ......... 7:00 P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ....... 7:00 P.M.
"Come and Worship God with Us"


NOTICE

EFFECTIVE
NOVEMBER 17, 1980 thru JANUARY 16, 1981
ST. JOSEPH TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY
WILL INSTALL A

Color Phone Extension (Desk or Wall)
For Their Subscribers

Without Service Connection Charges

You need only to pay a small monthly
extension charge of $1.65 per month for
residence extensions or $2.00 per month
for business extensions.

Contact Your Local Telephone Business
Office Today For More Information


St. Joseph Telephone &


Telegraph Company


7'r- 11


p

fi


ti





*
&


ClOSED CHRISTMAS A!--


Christmas


Bama
MAYONNAISE


Limit 1 with
$10 Order


T.V. Grade A USDA
SELF-BASTING


16 Lbs. & Up
Limit 1 with $10 Order


YOUNG TURKEYS
10-14 Lb. Avg ....... Ib. 89


Old Fashioned Red Rind


HOOP CIHEEE-Ue;b.


Alabama King or Dixie Lily
CORN MEAL


5 Lb.
Bag


C


DAIRY ODS


Grade A


LG. EGGS


Doz.


Kraft


1 Lb. Swift's
BUTTER
T.V. 8 Oz.
CREAM
CHEESE


ORANGE or
GRAPEFRUIT $ 29
JUICE '/ Gal.


69


1 Lb. Blue Bonnet
MARGARINE


2/$1


FROZEN FOODS a __________________


Good Value

PIE SHELLS


Meadow Gold 5
ICE CREAM $
V* 0


Assorted
Chef Boy Ar Dee
PIZZAS


2/$1


The Orginal Fresh Sliced
Fresh Apalachicola Jimmy Dean BEEF
OYSTERS SAUSAGE LIVER
Pint $269 Lb. $138 Lb.78





Friday Night On0


Fresh Grade A Limit 2 Bogs with. $10 Order Soft & Pretty
WHOLE C BATHROOM 0
FRYERS 39. TISSUE
FR Limit 1 I
Bama
96m C Fresh
Mayonnaise 69 TOMAT(
Limit I with $10 Order
Piggly Wiggly C e C onfectioner's 10X
SALT 5 SUGAR
Limit 1 with $10 Order


99c


A A


A a


0 0


Kleenex


PAPER
TOWELS


2/


Big Rolls


98


1/2 Gal.


I


$199





*
P0

p
I


*


us


IC


*
&


Friday Night, Dec. 19-7
Regular Sale In Effect During Moonlight Sale


* *


S


10 PM


Del Monte


10


'A
p.
I


CATSUP


32
Oz.


Limit 1 with


h $10.00 Order


Tender Choice Boneless
CHUCK ROAST


Fresh Pork
Liver, Maws,
Feet, Neckbones
Lb. 58


Pork
Chitterlings


10 Lb.
Bucket


$599


$188
Lb. I


Nabisco
VANILLA
WAFERS


New Gernic
BACON
Lb. $128


12 Oz.


Nabisco
SALTINE
CRACKERS


1 Lb.
Box


Golden Flake
POTATO CHIPS


Twin
Pack


SALE


- December 19

Pure Cone
S49 SUGAR $169
h $10 Order Limit I with $J10 Order
$ Fresh Ground 3 Lbs. or More
ES / Hamburger 99


2Lbs.$00


Round White


10 Lbs.


POTATOES


89C


produce gpmCA


Fresh Florida
TANGERINES


18/$


Florida


ORANGES
Red or Golden Delicious


APPLES
Fresh Crisp
CELERY
10 Lb. Round Whi
Potatoes


1


49


Stalk 39
te
$118


ORANGES
.18/$100
Fresh
LETTUCE
Head 49


SZ


S
& &


79c


79C


Ab


__











THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, DEC. 18. 1980


Exterior Planters Can be Joy or Grief


Exterior planters which
flank many contemporary
homes may prent a thing of
beauty or a problem of poor
plant choice and poor plant
health.
Perhaps the best solution in
choosing the best plantings for
planters is to plant permanent
dwarf evergreen plants which
provide year-round attractive-
ness, then supplement the
planting with seasonal flower-
ing or foliage plants for a
seasonal accent.


The home gardener will
often miss a planting date,
thus-the area which is to be
accented remains void' for the
season. Without permanent
plantings, the winter season
too presents a time of void for
the planter.
Over the past several years
plant breeders have developed
outstanding dwarf plants
which are very adaptable to
limited planting areas, such
as the planter. The home-
owner has a wide selection


from which to choose, yet his
or her choice must be made
with regard to the growth
conditions of the planter, such
as whether the planter is well
drained, is it deep or shallow
and is it in sun or shade?
Do not overplant. Allow
ample room for ultimate plant
size and eliminate later prun-
ing or removal of plants. Keep
the planting simple, neat and
attractive, yet avaoid mono-
tony.
Due to location, some plant-


ers are not conducive to opti-
mum plant production. Those
beneath overhangs of the
home receive little rainfall
and must be watered by hand.
Planters against west brick
walls absorb much summer
heat. Many planters have poor
drainage and others have very
poor soil.
The springtime gardener
prefers plants which demand
very little care and attention
such as: Dwarf nandina,
yucca, dwarf yaupon holly,


lantana, daylilies, dwarf pom-
egranate, confederate jas-
mine coontie or japanese
purple honeysuckle.
Planters in shade may be
enhanced with aucuba, fatsia,
fatshedra, Indian hawthorne,
dwarf azalea, ajuga, coontie
or holly fern.
For the planter which re-
ceives part sun and part
shade, the gardener may
choose from dwarf yaupon,
dwarf hollies, Indian haw-
thorn, liriope, vinca, confed-


erate jasmine, dwarf gard-
enia, Japanese black pine,
dwarf sasanqua or japanese
purple honeysuckle.
Plant choices for the planter
are numerous, yet its success
depends upon selecting the
proper plant for the existing
growing conditions, Every
planter should be attractively
planted so as to require low
maintenance at a reasonable
expense.


PAGE TWELVE


Patrol Predicts 46 Will


Die In Christmas Holiday


, TALLAHASSEE-It is predicted that 46
people will die in Florida traffic accidents
during the 102-hour Christmas holiday period
said the Florida Highway Patrol today.
This year's official countdown begins at 6:00
p.m., Wednesday, December 24, 1980 and
ends at midnight, Sunday, December 28.
Colonel Eldridge Beach, director of the
Patrol said, "Drivers face greater dangers of
vehicle accidents during the month.of
December than any other month of the year.
The spirit of Christmas should extend to our
attitudes about driving and walking by being
courteous."


The 19th century composer Giuseppe Verdi wrote an
inspired choral work, "Stabat Mater," at the age of 84.



First United


Methodist Church
Constitution and Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe, Fla.
JOHNIE W. McCURDY, Minister

CHURCHSCHOOL ................... 9:45A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ...............11:00A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ................ 7:00 P.M.
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP 5:30 P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) .. 7:30 P.M.




I IT'S THAT TIME AGAIN- -
COOLER WEATHER IS COMING!
Have Your
Heating Equipment
I Cleaned, Oiled, Adjusted and Checked
I Out for Maximum Efficiency and Safety.
Don't Be Satisfied with Just Having the
Pilot Light Turned On.
CALL BILL WHITE AT

St. Joe Service Co.

229-6914 .
Expert Service On Gas, Electric or
Central Oil Furnaces
24 Hr. Service 24 Yrs. Experience






Patty's


Paperback Books

Now Open


USED BOOKS
For Less Than Half Price

We Sell or Trade

1001 Monument Ave.
Open 10 AM to 5 PM,
Monday thru Saturday


Beach said a maximum number of troopers
will be patrolling in an effort to curb
accidents, fatalities and injuries during the
holiday period. There were 52 people killed in
traffic crashes during the Christmas holiday
period last year with careless driving being
the leading contributing cause with 15, There
were 11 drivers that had been drinking and
two while intoxicated.
Colonel Beach concluded by saying, "With
the coming holiday periods in which alcohol is
freely served, every person who has a chance
to prevent one of their drinking relatives or
friends from driving should take the
opportunity to do so and help save a life."


Starting

Holidays

Friday
School officials have an-
nounced that south Gulf Coun-
ty schools will be dismissed
early Friday afternoon, Dec.
19, to begin their Christmas
holidays.
Dismissal times are: 12:20,
Port St. Joe Elementary,
12:30, Port St. Joe High and
12:50, Highland View Elemen-
tary School.
Students will resume class-
es at the regular time, on
Monday, Jan. 5.

Amn. Coulson

Is Promoted
Marie N. Coulson, daughter
of Jason Dykes of 206 Duval
St., Port St. Joe, Fla., has
been promoted in the U.S. Air
Force to the rank of senior
airman.
Airman Coulson is a legal
services specialist at Wright-
Patterson Air Force Base,
Ohio.

The Delaware River was
originally called "South
River" by the Dutch settlers
in the mid-17th century.


221 Reid Avenue


ROY SMITH, Agent


Phone 227-1133


FRANK HANNON, Agent


Local citizens met recently
as a steering committee forming
plans for a local chapter of
American Association of Re-,
tired Persons in Gulf County,
to include citizens of Mexico
Beach, and Bay County.


Overstreet

VFD Elects

Officers
The Overstreet ygpunteer
Fire Department held their
regular monthly meeting Dec-
ember 9, and elected new
officers for the coming new
year. They are as follows:
President Troy Davis, first
vice president Waymond
Hanlon, second vice president
- Elmo Sanders, fire chief -
Bud Jones, Secretary and
treasurer Sharon Jones.
The next meeting will be
held January 13, 1981, all
interested persons please
come.


- Public Notices -


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
CASE NO. 80-28
IN PROBATE
IN RE: The Estate Of
DOROTHY ELIZABETH SHANNON,
deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE NOTI FIED that the admin-
istration of the Estate of Dorothy
Elizabeth Shannon, deceased, File Num-
ber 80-28.is pending in the Circuit Court
of Gulf County, Florida, probate divi-
sion, the address of which is Gulf County
Courthouse, Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk,. Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The
personal Representative of the Estate is
Charles W. Norton, 103 St. Joseph Drive,
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The name
and address of the Personal Represent-
ative's attorney are set forth below.
. All persons having claims or demands
against the Estate are required, WITH-
IN THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE, to file with the Clerk
of the above Court a-written statement of
any claim or demand they may have.


Each claim must be In writing and must
Indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the creditor or his
agent or attorney and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due, the
date when It will become due shall be
stated. It the claim Is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim is
secure, the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the Clerk to enable
the Clerk to mail one copy to the
Personal Representative.
All persons interested in the Estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of Admini-
stration has been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE, to file any objection
they may have that challenges the
validity of the Decedent's Will, the
qualifications of the Personal Repre-
sentative or the venue or Iurisdictlon of
the Court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS, AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARREDh.
Publication of this Notice has begun.
DATE of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration is December
11, 1980.
-s- CHARLES W. NORTON,
Personal Representative
FRED N. WITTEN
ATTORNEY AT LAW
408 Long Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
904-229-8253
2t 12-11
FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned persons intend to register
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf
County, Florida, four weeks after the
first publication of this notice, the ficti-
tious name or trade name under which
they will be engaged in business and in
which said business is to be carried on,
to-wit:
S & L LAND CLEARING AND FILL
DIRT, 412 Monument Avenue, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456.
Owner: Charles H. Stephens, Sr., 50
percent; and Curtis C. Lane, 50 percent.
I 4t 12.11

FICTITIOUS NAME NOTICE
Notice is hereby given pursuant to
Florida's Fictitious Name Statute that
the undersigned intends to register with
the Circuit Court Clerk, Gulf County,
Florida, the fictitious trade name under
which the undersigned will be engaged
in business, as follows:
BUSINESS NAME: THE ATHLETIC
HOUSE; BUSINESS LOCATION, 323
Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456; BUSINESS OWNER: Ronald
Wayne Parrish, 50 percent, and Kay
Parrish, 50 percent.
4tc 12-4


Gulf County

SchoolLunch



Menus


Monday, Jan. 5
Cheeseburger with bun,
french fries, catsup, mustard,
pickle, orange juice, oatmeal
cookie and milk.
Tuesday, Jan.6
Braised beef or pork on rice,
turnips with roots, buttered
cornbread, fruit cup and milk.
Wednesday, Jan. 7
Corn dog, french frie-,
english peas, brownie and


milk.
Thursday, Jan. 8
Chicken, rice with gravy,
green beans, buttered rolls,
fruit cup and milk.
Friday, Jan. 9
Pizza, buttered mixed vege-
tables, sliced peaches, cookie
and milk.
Menus may change without
notice due to the availability
of foods.


Discussions were led by Mr.
Howard Ogden, Panama City
A.A.R.P. officer, stressing the
primary purpose of this serv-
ice group.
Every person 55 years of
age and older is urged to
attend the next meeting to
learn of the benefits available.
Every person who is already a
member of the National
A.A.R.P. in this area is also
cordially invited to attend.
The next meeting to learn
more about this new organiza-
tion will be held in the meeting
room of the Port St. Joe
Library at the County Build-
ing Complex on Highway 71,
on January 12th at 2:30 p.m.


CARD OF THANKS
I wish to thank my many
friends for the love and
kindness shown me while I was
in the Municipal Hospital. I do
appreciate the care and atten-
tion given me by the doctor
and the entire nursing staff.
W.H. Walsh


Port St. Joe


Thursday, Friday and Saturday

December 18, 19, 20


10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.


09 _-


ERA


PARKER REA

Hwy. 98 at 31 st St.

Mexico Beach, Fla. 904-648-5
"Real Estate Specialist for Over 30 Years". Cal
information on these as well as a large inventory
offered for sale in Mexico Beach and surro
areas. Rentals weekly or monthly.


MEXICO BEACH


Small mobile home with extra room on
ideal lot. Furnished. 2 blks. from Gulf.
Fortner Ave.
New 2 bdrm. duplex on beach side,
completely furn. Good rental property
or two family retreat. 41st St.

For discriminating buyers only. This
custom built home has all the wanted
features. Lg. rms. includes 3 bdrm., 2
ha., 2 car garage, great rm., kitchen,
screen porch, cen. h&ac, on 2 lots. 36th
St.
Enjoy magnificent view with unique
floor plan designed for living mostly up-
stairs overlooking the beach. Kit., den
with fp, 2 bdrm., hba. upstairs; 2 bdrm.
ha., laundry and storage downstairs.
Hwy. 98 at 5th St.

Stilt house, 2 bdrm., near good fishing,
nice secluded lot not far from beach.
Hwy. 386A.

"Cadillac of Mobile Homes"-Price re-
duced Take advantage of
the owner's improvements and begin
instant living in this homemakers
dream. Furnished, storage bldg., new
h&ac unit. Must see. 8th St.
Two story cottage with sun deck, 1 Ig.
bdrm., equipped kit., heat pump & ac,
storage bldg., downstairs unfinished.
Landscaped lot. Virginia Ave.
Lovely brick home on 3 lots-near
beach. Lg. 4 bdrm. 2 ba. with all extras.
Landscaped, fenced yard. Sea St.


Beachside duplex. Good investment. 2
bdrm. & 1 bdrm. apt. Completely
furnished. Hwy. 98 & 29th St.

Great starter home or vacation retreat.
Cozy 2 bdrm. blk. home, completely
remodeled. Carpet, cypress panelling,
cement drive, Ig. sun deck. Storage
bldg., kit, appliances. Great location.
Reasonable priced. 26th St.
Luxury mobile home, short walk to
beach. Sun deck, porch. Must see to
appreciate. Priced in the low 20's. 4th
St.
Nice and spacious family home on Ig.
landscaped lots. 3 bdrm., 2 full bal.,
built in kit., snack bar. Fla. rm., carpet,
cen. h&ac, corner Fla. Ave. & 3rd St.

Charming permanent or vacation
home, nice residential area, 3 bdrm.,
glass porch, boat house, too many
extras to list. Completely furnished.
20th St.
2 bdrm. duplex, furnished, 1 blk. from
beach. Furnished. Hwy. 98 at 27th St.

BEACON HILL
New .stig. Super Buy. On Bluff. Per-
manent r tejviewf ll if -
cludes oIa fl : roper-
ty to b yb retreat.

ST. JOE BEACH
Double-wide mobile home on 2 nice lots.
3 bdrm. Make an appointment to see
this one. Selma Ave.


LTY,



777
I us for on
of lots tok".no
fundingg

PORT ST. JOE
New Listing. St. Joe. Move your
family into this 3 bdrm. home by paying
small down pmt. and owner financing
at 12 percent interest. House has 9 rms.,
free-standing fireplace, kit. appli. appl.
plus dishwasher, washing machine,
dryer, fenced back yd. and Ig. storage
house. Call for details and appt. 9th S

Prestigious home on 3 beautifully land-
scaped lots. 3 bdrm. brick construction
with plenty of room for comfort and
activity. Screened porch, double gar-
age and carpet. 17th St.
Immaculate, 3 bdrm. frame home on 2
lots in nice neighborhood. Centrally
located to school, churches & town.
McClellan Ave.
OAK GROVE
Bargain price 3 bdrm. frame home-
corner lot, near school.
WEWAHITCHKA
Mini-farm, 3 bdrm., 2 ba., c.b. home.
extra Ig. rms. 5 acres of land, 6 mi.
south of Wewa.
COMMERCIAL
Rare Business Opportunity. This in-
vestment package includes an auto ser-
vice center, 7 unit motel and a 2 bdrm.
house. Involving a total of 6 commer-
cial lots, prime location. Come on by for
this thriving business.
8 unit Motel plus nice ; bdrm., 2 ba.
living quarters. Business operating and
ready for new owner to step right int
Beautiful gulf view. Call for appoint-
ment.


The first adding-printing machine was invented in 1891
by William S. Burroughs', a bank-clerk who had suffered
a breakdown from overwork.


HIGHLAND VIEW

BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of Fourth St. & Second Ave.

Welcome Friends
SUNDAY SCHOOL .................... 9:45 A.M.
WORSHIP SERVICES ..... 11:00 A.M. & 7:30 P.M.
CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) ......... 6:30 P.M.
MID-WEEK PRAYER (Wednesday) .... 7:30 P.M.

Nursery Provided BRO. JERRY REGISTER


Plans Formed for


Chapter of A.A.R.P.


Year In and Year Out You Will Do Well With


HANNON INSURANCE

Agency, Inc.

The Insurance Store Since 1943


Auto Home Business Life

Flood Bonds Mutual Funds
8:30 til 6:00 Monday through Friday


We are HERE to Service What We Sell



















ftc


V" Classified Advertising Pays, Ask Our Advertisers


Ontiu
V21


E. B. MILLER REALTY
JONES
HOMESTEAD


GULF-AIRE
The first home now for sale in Gulf Aire.
Deluxe 3 bdrm., 2 bath, carpeted, drapes,
fireplace, cathedral ceiling, central h&a.
Large existing mortgage can be assumed.
By appointment only.


Owner Says Sell Now! Price reduced from
$44,500 to $39,000. This solid home as 1,920 sq.
ft. It would cost $57,600 today to build brand
new at $30 a square foot, not counting the lot
and a half in an excellent location. Land area
totals 127 ft. on Garrison and is 180' deep.
Room for large garden, swimming pool,
tennis court or whatever. If you need more
room, a nicer home, or change in locale, this
is a real bargain. 1101 Garrison. No. 102


PORT ST. JOE
NEW LISTING: Ideal home.-21
for newlyweds, retired, or gsh
small family. Clean and lie
neat as a pin, 2 bdrm., 1 ba. ce
hardwood floors, with built abl
ins. This home has been well
maintained. Beautiful 125'x 4 b
170' lot with a boat house be
and storage bldg. Assum- boa
able loan and owner will lor
finance balance after small goo
down pint. Call to see this ty"
one today. 521 10th St. str,
$22,500. No. 105.
Cle
Homemakers dream-3 wit
bdrm., 1% ba. home, fully mo
carpeted, separate dining Oal
rm., Ig. den, has drapes, gas
refrig., stove & dishwasher. final
Nice large lot. 1910 Cypress
Ave. Assume existing loan
or refinance at $37,500. No. Be
101 21's
whe
Payments on this 3 bdrm, 1 lov
ba. home are only $138.77 h&U
monthly. Take advantage of onl
owning your own home. The $40,
rooms are large and have
been recently painted. Obt
There's 1,111 sq.Ift: of living Gu
area Owner will finance at edr
10 percent interest. 523 ser
Third St. No. 111. and
ate
Bargain for handyman. 3 infc
bdrm., 1% ba. fenced yd,
unique design. Assumable
loan,' With a little elbow
grease this could be a show-
place. $19,500. 1508 Long 200
Ave. No. 113 3.7
.. pai
Corner lot with nice 3 pro
bdrm., 2 ba, house. Lg. liv. wai
rm & comfortable den; his
Chain link fence, stor. shed, No.
shallow well and pump. 619
Marvin Ave. $37,500. No. 104 Pri
aci
Take root in a 2 bdrm, 1 ba. Ov
home on fenced lot. Liv. rm. to i
with fireplace, din. rm, re- /2.
modeled kitchen, utility
house in back, new cen. h&a AlI
Call for more info. 527 10th We
St. $25,000. No. 106 dry
--- ove
Beautiful executive home ma
on THREE- landscaped lots. 804
3 Ig. bdrms, 28' liv. rm.,
garage and double carport. Sh
Lots of extras, including Ig. Jus
screened Fla. rm. and 2 froi
workshops. 602 17th St. No. $3,0(
107. $59,500.
Pel
Nice shady city lot, 516 7th for
Street. ma
528 7th St. -2 bdrms., plus 1 No.
small child's rm, 1 ba., liv.
rm with fireplace, dining &
kitchen combo, front APl
screened porch, unfurnish- at
ed. $17,000. ava
Excel. opportunity for a
young couple to own their
own home and have income
fiom the property paying 5m
the mortgage. 3 furnished Hw
rental units in addition to fran
main house. Owner financ- size
iag available. Come find out wit
the details! $46,000. No. 100. win
wel
Executive Home: 2 story, 4 onl
bdrm., 2 ha., carpeting,
outstanding quality drapes,
Ig. lot, fireplace, 2 car
garage, cen. h&a. Shown by Mol
appt. only to qualified buy- 56'.
ers. One of the nicest homes fun
in town. con

OVERSTREET
Two beautiful % acre lots at
Wetappo Estates, not far
from the Canal. No mobile
homes. Financing avail-
able. No. 011
Beautiful brand new 3 bdrm
2 ba. home on 6 private
acres. Modern "country"
living at its best. Priced in
the mid '50's. No. 012

648-5011


OAK GROVE
ots, chain link fence,
ass, landscaping, storage
eds, carport. 12x65' mob-
home in excel, cond. with
n. h&a. A most comfort-
e arrangement. No. 110.
drms., 2 kitchens, could
used at 2 apts. or a
arding hose. Room ga-
e for te-. entire family,
d gardd6space and utili-
housei Quiet dead end
eet. $16,000.00. No. 103.
an and sharp, 1 bdrm.
h child's rm, fully furn.
bile home on corner lot in
k Grove. Well insulated,
s central heat. Owner will
dance, $7,500. No. 108.
INDIAN PASS
protected by Century
s Home Protection Plan
en you purchase this
ely 3 bdrm, 2 ba., cen.
a, fully modern home
y 1 blk. from beach.
,000. No. 602.
serve the beauty of the
If! This newly construct-
stilt beach home has bb-
vation deck for viewing
I sunning. 2 bdrms, insul-
d thruout. Call for more
o. $39,500. No. 601


ACREAGE
' on Intracoastal Canal,
acres. % mile from
'ed Hwy. 386. A beautiful
operty for anyone who.
nts to tie up his boat in
own backyard. $30,000.
800.

ce cut $10,000.00 for 8.5
res on Hwy. 386 near
erstreet. Cleared. Wants
sell. Owner will finance
No. 802.

most 2 acres fronting on
tappo Creek. High and
y with horseshoe bank
brlooking creek. Owner
y subdivide. $27,000. No.

ady lot at Howard Creek.
st a few minutes walk
m the boat landing.
00. No. 805
rfect acre in Overstreet
your new home. High, no
rsh. Not far from the
racoastal Canal. $3,500.
.806

prox. 1 acres, located
Mexico Beach. City water
liable. No. 801.


VEWAHITCHKA
iles south of Wewa, off of
y. 71, cute 3 bdrm., 1 ba.
me house located on good
e lot, utility shed goes
h house, gas heat, 2 a.c.
dow units, very clean &
l kept. Great price at
y $18,000.

MOBILE HOME
bile home for sale. 24'x
3 bdrm., 2 ba., partially
niushed, cen. h&a, excel.
d. Only $12,500. No. 021.

E. B. MILLER, REAl


DON'T FENCE ME IN-
This 1/ acres is already
fenced in with a new chain
link fence. Raise your own
food'in an ex. Ig. garden
spot. The exceptionally Ig.
kitchen is 12'x18' with a new
range & refrig., dbl. sink
and new butcher block coun-
ter top. 3 of the 4 bdrms. are
12x14', the other one is
14x14. Ideal for the Ig.
family. Call today to see this
lovely home. No. 109.
$48,500.

ST. JOE BEACH
2 bdrm., 1 ba. trailer with
woodburning fireplace and
outdoor patio located on
beautifully landscaped lot
and a half with many fruit
bearing trees. Can be seen
by appt. $23,000. No. 200.

3 bdrm., 2 ba. beauty on 2
lots, extra insulation thru-
out, carport, storage bldg.,
chain link fence. Less than 2
yrs. old. Will sell below re-
placement cost. (Ponce de
Leon). $47,500. No. 204

This most attractive beach
home is located 1 blk. from
beach and is priced to sell. 2
bdrms., 1 ba., liv. rm., din.
rm., kitchen, cen. heat, well
insulated, utility house and
fenced in back area. Canal
St. $22,500. No. 205.

Absolutely immaculate,
charming beach cottage,
professionally decorated &
fully furnished with superb
taste. 2 bdrm., 1 ba. and kit-
chen is a homemaker's
dream. On stilts among the
pines. 75'x150' lot. $38,950.
No. 206

Use your own skills and
imagination to complete a
partially finished house. 3
bdrms., 1 ba., liv. rm, din.
rm, garage with utility rm.,
only 1 block from beach. Ad-
jacent corner lot also avail-
able. $19,000. No. 207
Super nice beach cottage, 2
bdrm. den, or 3 bdrm., 2
ba. on U. S. 98, across from
beach. Unique design. Car-
pet & vinyl floors. Lg. utili-
ty rm, board privacy fence.
Sharpest cottage on beach.
$42,500. No. 208
Need more room? Beautiful
beige brick home on east
side of Hwy. 98. Lovely nat-
ural wood interior. 3 Ig.
bdrms., 2 baths, den with
magnificent view of Gulf.
Huge bay windows, sun
deck. Fenced dog run. 25'
kitchen-dining rm., until. rm,
very Ig. living rm with fire-
place. No. 209.

SACRIFICE, Owner says to
reduce the price on this 3
bdrm., 1 ba. mobile home
located on a 75x150 lot, 1
blks. from the beach. It was
$12,500 now $10,500 for a
quick sale. Don't miss this
super bargain. Present loan
can be assumed. No. 201.
75'x150' lot, 1 blocks from
beach, includes well, septic
tank, and power pole. Nice
garden spot, ready to move
your mobile home on. No.
202.
COMMERCIAL
Business for Sale: Con-
venience store, St. Joe
Beach, corner Bay & Ameri-
cus. 1,536 sq. ft., 10 door
walk-in cooler, paved drive-
way on 1 lots with con-
crete slab ready for expan-
sion or other business.. Call
for details. No. 700

30'x90'. commercial lot on
corner of Reid Ave. & 5th St.
Across alley from City Hall.
Priced right and owner will
finance. $12,000. No. 703

3% acres, close to town,
with store bldg., fully equip-
ped, including Ig. commer-
cial cooler, counters and is-
land shelving. Plenty of
room for expansion. Owner
may finance. Make offer.
No. 701.


LTOR


We're Here

ForYoux.





HIGHLAND VIEW
This spacious house has 3
roomy bdrms. with dbl.
closets in ea. rm, 1 ba., liv.
rm, kitchen & din. combo,
den, single car garage, utili-
ty rm. $29,500. No. 500.
Plenty of rm, indoor and
outdoor. 4 bdrm. unfurn.
home on over % acre of
good land. Pecan tree,
grape arbor and chain link
fence. Extra liv. rm. & bath
apt. adjoining. Big plus is a
barn, 2-story. Equip. to
farm 1g. garden area. All
this for only $28,000. No. 501.

MEXICO BEACH
Valuable property on beacn
side-3rd lot from beach!
Completely furnished dup-
lex on 28th St. 1 bdrm., i ba.
on each side. Call for more
info. $47,000. No. 401

Live within walking dis-
tance of beach in a furn. 2
bdrm., 1 ba. mobil home
on 75'x112' corner lot. Utili-
ty shed in back with wash-
ing machine. 2 blks. from
beach at a nice affordable
low price-$17,500. No. 402.
2 bdrm. comfortable well
built home 1 blocks from
beach. Carpeted, refrig. &
stove, cen. heat, on 50x125'
lot. $24,500. No. 405
2-3 bdrm. mobile home on
attractive fenced lot 2 blks.
from beach. Completely fur-
nished including washer &
TV. EXTRA 56' screened
rch! EXTRA 40' boat
house. Available immedi-
ately. No. 406.

BEACH LOTS
A Ig. selection of excel.
bldg. lots in Mexico Beach,
St. Joe Beach, Beacon Hill,
plus Gulf Aire lots. No. 900.
Gulf Aire Excel. invest-
ment potential. Buy now,
build later or let it increase
in value each year. Only a
few front lots left.
168' Gulf front, 164' on U.S.
98, over 250' deep. Ideal for
investment or unique loca-
tion for a beach home. No.
902.
CAPE SAN BLAS
Two gorgeous dry acres of
tall pines and shrubbery
with 205' fronting on the
highway and bay. Just be-
yond the old salt works
marker. Owner will sell all
or 100' either side. Finan-
cing available. No. 10
70' on the Gulf, ideal build-
ing site, beautiful beach for
front yd., no traffic, great
surf and fishing. Bargain at
$14,000. No. 11

BEACON HILL
2 story house with sun deck
on U.S. 98, gives you a
beautiful view of the Gulf.
Completely furns, deluxe 4
bdrm., 2 ba. home. Ready
for occupancy. $65,000. No.
300

New Listing: 3 bdrm., 1 ba.
mobile home, on 2 beautiful
high & dry lots in Beacon
Hill, property completely
enclosed wth a wooden
fence, plenty of space for
kids or dogs. $25,000. No.
301.

WHITE CITY
1067 sq. ft. living area plus
enclosed garage. New
house, stone & stucco out-
side. Carpeted & vinyl thru-
out. Beautiful barn wall
panelling. 3 bdrm., 2 ba.,
modern kitchen includes
built-in range and wall over,
dishwaser. Located on 100x
165' lot on Charles Ave. Can
be seen anytime. Call today.
No. 022.


PATTY MILLER, Realtor Assoc.


AFTER HOURS
JIM CLEMENT 648-5482
Associate
SANDRA CLENNEY 229-6310 NATALIE SHOAF 227-1498
Realtor Associate Associate

Route 3, Box 167A Port St. Joe, Fla. 32456

1829 Hwy. 98 MEXICO BEACH


Two bedroom house in Oak
Grove, $7,500.00. Call 769-8826
in Panama City or 229-8254.
4tc 12-4

For Sale by Owner: 3 bdrm.
block house with 2 baths..
Located on Long Ave. near
schools. For more information
call 227-1313 after 5 p.m.
tfc 11-14

Beacon Hill, two lots, fenced
yard, 3 bdrm., 1 ba. double
wide trailer. $25,000. 229-6961
or 648-8971. tfc 9-25




ASSISTANT CASHIER
Applications are being ac-
cepted between 1:00 and 4:00
p.m. from Wednesday, Dec. 17
through Friday, Dec. 19, for
the position of Assistant Cash-
ier at the Wewahitchka office
of Gulf Coast Electric Cooper-
ative, Inc. Applicant must be a
high school graduate with six
months experience as a cash-
ier or the equivalent including
the ability to operate a 10-key
adding machine and typewrit-
er. Applicant must enjoy
working with the public.
For further information,
call Roy Barnes, 639-2215 or
265-3631. Equal Opportunity
Employer. 2tc 12-11






1969 Chrysler New Yorker, 1
owner, bought new in 1970, low
mileage, 36,652. In good cond.,
loaded. 229-8429. tfc 12-4





Large 2 bedroom.trailer for
ren t St. Joe Beach. 229-8931
or 648-5306. tfc 12-18

Very nice furnished one bed-
room house with Ig. porch at
St. Joe Beach. 229-6663.
tfc 12-18

For Lease: downtown Apa-
lachicola store building,
approx. 1,000 sq. ft. Call 653-
9656 for information. 3tc 12-4

Thames Hotel, day, weekly,
monthly rates. 302 Reid Ave.
229-8723. tfc 11-13

No need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
227-1251. tfc 10-23

Furnished 2 bdrm. house,
auto. heat, no pets; furnished
large one bdrm. apt., auto
heat, no pets. 229-6777 after 7
pm. tfc 11-8

For carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vac, the portable steam car-
pet cleaning system. Avail-
able at Western Auto, phone
227-1105, 219 Reid Ave.
tfc 3-16

2 furnished apartments,
Main St., Wewahitchka. 639-
5843. tfc 10-23

For Rent: 2 bdrm. furnish-
ed house. Call 229-8570.
2tc 12-11

Trailer space, full hook-up
229-6449. tfc 9-11


FOR RENT
Mexico Beach
St. Joe Beach
Furnished cottages,
from $140 per mo. to
$300 mo.
Marguerite Wainwright
Realtor
648-8220
900B E. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach

Two bedroom apt. and
campers for rent on Beach. By
day, week, month or year. Ski
Breeze Camp Sites. Call 229-
6105. tfc 11-20


Nice dinette set with table
and six chairs, reasonable.
227-1531. Mrs. Porter.
itp12-18

SINGLE BARREL SHOT-
GUNS Get them at Red's
Gun Shop, corner of Alabama
and Atlantic, St. Joe Beach.
ltc 12-18

Pecans for sale, $1.00 lb.
648-5006. 1tp 12-18

Christmas kittens; they are
ugly but playful and loving.
FREE and will deliver. 229-
8803. 1tp 12-18

1979 Honda 750F, $2,300.00.
Call 648-5148. ltp 12-18

350 Honda 1972, with extra
frame and motor. $175.00. 229-
8803. Itp 12-18

SINGLE SHOT 22 RIFLES
-Get them at Red's Gun
Shop, corner of Alabama and
Atlantic, St. Joe Beach. ltc 18

Poulan Chain Saws, General
Electric and Maytag auto-
matic washers, all new; we
will deliver to St. Joe and
vicinity, all at real low bar-
gain prices. Economy Cash
Store, Apalachicola.

1979 Honda XL75, call after 5
p.m. 229-6969. tfc 12-11

Size 11 man's Masonic ring,
antique. For more informa-
tion, call 229-8793. 2tp 12-11
Let me do your Christmas
baking. Call 229-8079, Mrs.
Lollie. ltc 12-18
AVON
To Buy or Sell
For Gulf or Bay counties. Call
collect 871-1649 or write Dist.
Sales Mgr. Margaret Rick-
man, P. 0. Box 10403, Parker,
FL 32401. tfc 8-21
1977 Marietta mobile home,
2 bdrm, 2 ba., Ig. master
bdrm. with double vanity and
stepdown tub in bath, cen. air,
economical nat. gas heater &
range. Will sell furnished if
desired. 229-6758 or 648-5063.
tfc 10-23


"The heart has its reasons
which reason knows nothing
of." Blaise Pascal


No. 1 Drive In Theater
Apalachicola, Florida
Friday Saturday
Dec. 19 and 20
"ALLIGATOR"
Brand new exciting movie!
We wish our theater
patrons a MERRY
HOLIDAY SEASON!
One Duncan Fife dining
room set includes table with 1
leaf, 6 chairs, china cabinet
and buffet. Also mahogany
bedroom set, double bed,
chest of drawers, dresser with
stool. Call 227-1731. It 12-18





Garage Sale, 445 2nd Ave.,
Highland View, across from
Inez' Ceramic Shop. 3 fami-
lies, clothing, odds and ends,
handmade doll furniture. Sat-
urday, 9 to 5. 2tc 12-11

Yard Sale: Saturday, Dec.
20th, 9-5. All handmade craft
items, some antique pieces.
Clothes at give away prices.
New microwave oven and lots
of other things. Vera Burge,
216 7th St. ltp 12-18

Yard Sale: Saturday, Dec.
20th, 9-5. All handmade craft
items. Off West Highway 98 in
Highland View, 104 Bayview
Drive. It 12-20




Want to buy lot for mobile
home. Write to Fred Robert-
son, Rt. 2, Box 245, Lot 25, Gulf
Breeze, FL 32561, or phone
982-5927. 4tp 12-4


EQUITY I
If you are a home owner, you
could be eligible to borrow up
to $50,000 and you could use
the money for any purpose.
Call us today 769-1535 James
H. Crews, Licensed Mortgage
Broker, 6242 E. Hwy. 98,
Panama City. tfc 12-4
The V.F.W. will meet every
second Tues. and fourth Thur-
sday of each month at Paul-
ine's Rest. at 7 p.m. tfc 5-31

There will be a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe
Lodge No. 111, F. & A.M.
,every first and third Thursday
at 8:00 p.m.
JOE ST. CLAIR, W.M.
J. P. Cooley, Sec.

R.A.M.-Regular convoca-
tion of St. Joseph Chapter No.
56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd Mon-
days, 8 p.m. All visiting com-
panions welcome.
E. E. WEEKS, H.P.
E. William McFarland, Sec.

The Disabled American Vet-:
erans, Port St. Joe Chapter 62,
will meet the first Tuesday
and third Thursday of each
month at 7 p.m. at Pauline's
Restaurant. tfc 9-4







Wanted in Mexico Beach
area: 3 or 4 bdrm. home,
unfurn., -year round. Possible
option to buy. Call A. Towle at
El Governor Motel, 904-648-;
5757, Dec. 6 thru Dec. 26 or
write P. 0. Box 256, Mexico
-Beach, FL 32410. 2tp 12-11


WANTED TO BUY:


Drum set in good condition.

Contact 227-1278 from


8:30 5:30 Monday Friday.


I SERIES


Carpentry Work Done
Reasonable Rates
Jimmy Johnson
Phone 229-8757
tfc 2-2

Alcoholics Anonymous
Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Sunday 4:00 P.M. EST
St. James Episcopal Church

Complete Wood Shop
Custom Cut Lumber
Want to Do It Yourself?
Then come see us for Stan-
ley tools, hardware, paneling,
paint, lumber.
Earley's Hardware &
Building Supply
Hwy. 98 W. 227-1763
tfc 8-5

CAREFOOT SEPTIC TANK
Septic Tank Cleaning
Phone.229-8007
tfc 11-30

BEACH MOBILE HOME
SERVICE
Supplies &: Service
Call 64-8363M
tic 8-21

Psychological .services for
anyone with problems in day-
to-day living. Gulf County
Guidance Clinic, Port St. Joe.
227-1145. (24 hrs.)


Church Supplies
Music Records Tapes
Rubber Stan ips
Hospital & Funeral Flowers
Gifts-Bible s
Sound Studio Recording
Service I


GOSPEL SUPPLIES
115 Hunter St., fak Grove
Port St. Jop, Fla.
227-1325
t ~~tfirt9l


JAMISON ELECTRIC
24 Hr. Service
Residential, Commercial,
Rewiring, Repairs, Ser-
vice Change.
1406 Long Ave.
229-6516
tfc 11-1


ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work Welding
506 First Street
Phone 229-6803
Machinist on duty all day
every day


3 FOR TRACTOR WORK
Call 229-8939 or 648-5306
tfc 8-14


SEARS IS AS CLOSE AS
YOUR TELEPHONE!


bL


- I


, .* .' '1


''' :





.
0
I,


000"


DelMonte Whole Kernel or
Cream Style

CORN


3/


PE


/!


17 Oz. Cans


Limit 3 Cans with $ 10.00 Order
or More


Limit 3 Cans with $10
Order or More


i
=1


*1 I


, Christmas Tree & Package Decoratie


v -For Christmas baking
Nuts Candied Fruit


R- Limit I with $10 Order
Light Crust

Flours


Bag


In Bogs
CHRISTMAS CANI


*


18" Reynolds Alum.


FOIL


Heavy Duty


S4 Roll Pkg. Hi Dri


Tissue


88


79


Big Tate Instant
Mashed Potatoes
16 Oz. A
Pkg. 6 ,

Swanson's
Chicken Broth


Oil 199


Philadelphia Crea
Cheese
Crescent
DINNER ROLLS
Barber's
EGG NOG


'. G&W
PIZZASS


im


30 Oz. Sara Lee
.. PUMPKIN PIES
J. Birdseye
1 COOL WHIP


8 Oz.


8oz. 790
Quart $l.19


99c
$1.59


8 Oz. 79C


Brownberry
Stuffing Mix
Soz. 49


,F Extra Large
EGGS

Doz. 89


3


14' 1 Oz.
Cans $lJm.00


No. 303 Del Monte /c
Green Beans 0/oo


25 Oz. Lucky leaf
Apple Juice
32 Oz. Smuckers
Grape Jam


750
$149


7/4 Oz. Kraft
Mac & Cheese 39


16 Oz. Bartlett
Pear Halves


Uncle Ben's Conv
RICE


18 Oz. Nestle
Cookie Mix
S16 Oz. Penny
t Dog Food


0 *


69'


rerted
5 Lb. $299


$119


4/99c


Fresh Bunch
GREEN ONIONS


Bch. 39


Fresh
CRISP GREEN PARSLEY
Select
RED BLISS POTATOES
Fresh
TENDER MUSHROOMS
Fresh Package
GREEN LEAF SPINACH
Fresh Juicy g
HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLES


-N
I


~& .b~)
I


17 Oz. Cans


;I


L\-%


:41I


K


a a U a
a a a


I Dairy Items I


=L"


De.nt.hleKrnlo


in Food


.m


IT


~(


*


O


AKL-19: A A; ko 14,






Kraft

MIRACLE

WHIP


Specials for


100 Free Groceries
To be Given Away Dec. 23


Weekly Drawings Every Tues. & Fri., 5:30 P.M.


16 Lb. Avg.-Swift Prem.
Butterball
TURKEY


4.,"


16 Lb. Avg. Lykes
Sugar
Cured Ham


Separate Drawings to Be Held Each
Tuesday and Friday at 5:30 P.M.
Non-winning Tickets will be Dumped
Into GRAND PRIZE DRAWING
Box After Each Weekly Drawing
No Purchase Necessary
Register At Least Twice Each Week
to be Eligible for All Drawings


Everyone Would Appreciate A Gift of Meat for Christmas


U.S. Choice Whoe Sirloin


10 Rib Eye Steaks


10


Our Best 'A' Grade WHOLE

FRYERS


Lb59C


Frying Chicken Quartered Chic.
Chicken Winks b.49b59
c Fr ihin a _ni e LEGS .


Backs, Necks


Lb. 15'


Frying Chicken
Uvers, Gizzards Lb. 79


U. S. Prime
SIRLOINS Ib.
U. S. Prime
T-BONES lb.
U. S. Prime
PORTERHOUSE Ib.
U. S. Prime Standing
Rump Roast lb.
5 Pounds or More
Ground Chuck lb.


$288
$288


$179


Choice Chic.
Breast, Thighs q7
Drumsticks Ib.
Choice 3
Rib Eye Steak Ib. $368
Skinned, Deveined
BEEF LIVER Ib. 8800
Sunnyland b $29
Roll Sausage b. 1


Fresh Pork
NECKBONES


68 HOG MAW 39
$16 PIG FEET...... Lb. 9


Boneless


Sirloins


1


12 Oz. Ea.
Lbs. Ea.


10 lb. GrndChuck


Lb. $1.68
$26.99
$35.00
$14.99


Pork Chops 1
| -^, ..*Lb.


Favorite Sliced
Bacon


12 O


. 88

999


$ 19
$Lb.5


$ 88


Freshest ,vODUC


Pkg. Vine Ripe Small

tomatoes
C Fresh
Pears Lb. 69'
Fresh
Pineapple $139
Fresh
C. Cranberries Lb. 89 0*


In Town


00


Canadian
Rutabagas 4L/1


Fresh Juicy
Red Grapes
Fresh
Cocoanut


Fresh Green
1.39 Tender Pole Beans


Lb. 69'
68C


Lb: 69


I '
Stl


4-5 BUSHEL BOX $7.95 d
Juicy Tangerines ,
Wash. St. Red or Gold-BOX $14.95
Delicious Apples
1-4 Bushel Bag
Regular Oranges
1-4 Bushel. Bag
NAVEL ORANGES


$8.75
5/$100
4/$100


3 Pound Bag
Ib. 99' EATING APPLES


Fresh Holiday Citrus


Christmas Box
MIXED FRUIT
4-5 BUSHEL BOX $9.95
NAVEL ORANGES
4-5 BUSHEL BOX $7.95
White Grapefruit
Large Hamlin-4-5 BUSHEL BOX $7.95
Regular Oranges


-


- a


a a U a 1


0 .


16 Oz.
Jar


Plenty of Christmas
NUTS and CANDY
;


4


Country Style


Loin Ribs L
Fresh
Whole Hams

Hormel 3 Lbs.
ICan Hams


3 Lb.'

T

29
49
99


Fresh Cabbage
Lb. )QC


24/1100
Ib. 49
$2.95
$3.75
$1.19


We Ha ve
eia,
Swift Vrem. Butterball

turkey
8 to 22 Lb. Avg.
The Best Money Can Buy
Bu y


0 &





a 0









PAGE SIXTEEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY. DEC. 18, 190


Florida's Farmlands Vanishing


J more nostalgic parts of the bazaar was this
N ostals g old wood cook stove, mounted on a truck,
Na baking biscuits and cooking home-made chili,
Oak Grove Assembly of God Church held which the ladies were serving. Here, Mrs.
an old fashioned bazaar at the Christmas Faye Gardner is taking a piping hot pan of
Parade last Saturday morning. One of the biscuits from the oven. -Star photo



GCCC Station Schedules


Christmas Programs


WKGC-FM will wish its
listeners "Merry Christmas"
this month with a variety of
special programs. From Dec-
ember 16-24, THE SPIDER'S
WEB will feature "A Christ-
mas Carol" by Charles Dic-
kens each weekday evening at
6 p.m. CT. On Sunday, Dec-
ember 21 at 6 am, NPR
Concert Hall will feature
Minnesota's St. Olaf Choir,

Troopers Do

More Than

Make Arrests
TALLAHASSEE Troopers
do more than just arrest
speeders said the Florida
Highway Patrol recently.
During the first six months
of 1980, 309,419 arrests were
made but in the same period,
124,293 stranded motorists
were given assistance. Also,
808 emergency messages were
delivered, of which most were
notification to relatives that
someone in their family had
died.
Records show that 65,103
accidents were investigated,
614 stolen care were re-
covered, 1,053 persons were
given first aid and 664 wanted
persons were apprehended.
In-depth investigations of
traffic deaths accounted for
34,180 hours by FHP Traffic
Homicide Investigators. Riot
and mob activities called for 4,
738 hours of duty for troopers.
Colonel Eldridge Beach,
Patrol Director said, "We
receive occasional complaints
by motorists that they were
unable to find a trooper when
they needed one but as seen in
the above six-month statistics,
troopers' duties vary widely."
"Troopers are patrolling the
highways to help and protect
motorists, therefore, anyone
needing assistance while
traveling is urged to contact
the nearest patrol station or
patrol car," concluded Beach.


performing works ranging
from the 16th century German
master Heinrich Schutz, to
20th century works by F.
Melius Christiansen, director
of the choir from 1941-68.
Christmas Eve day and
Christmas day will be filled
with Christmas music spec-
ials. On the 24th at 5:36 p.m.:
"NIGHTWATCH", a different
kind of Christmas story. This
half-hour radio play drama-
tizes an unusual aspect of the
Christmas story. Set on a
slave ship in the Sea of
Galilee, "Nightwatch" opens
as the ship drifts aimlessly,
separated from its fleet follow-
ing a battle.
"A RENAISSANCE
CHRISTMAS" will be fea-
tured at 6:30 p.m. The Boston
Camerata Singers will be
heard singing renaissance
music from Spain, Italy,
France and Germany.
Then at 8 p.m. WKGC
presents Handel's "Messiah",
in a live performance as it was
originally heard in the 18th
century. Performers are
Michigan's Ars Musica Baro-
que Orchestra and the Col-
legium Musicum Chorus un-
der the baton of Edward
Parmentier.
At 10 p.m. Fred Calland
hosts "A COLLECTOR'S
CHRISTMAS" featuring re-
cording from his own vast
collection.
On Christmas morning at 9
listeners will hear the
"FESTIVAL OF NINE LES-
SONS AND CAROLS", a live
broadcast from England of the
world-famous Kings College
Choir combining readings of
.biblical Christmas lessons
with traditional carols.
Karl Haas will have a
special edition of AD-
VENTURES IN GOOD MUS-
IC at 11 a.m.
At 12:30 p.m. a one-hour
adaption of James Thurber's
"THIRTEEN CLOCKS" a
delightful fairy tale for child-
ren and a mischievous parody
for adults.
SPIDER'S WEB will feature
"A Down East Christmas" at
6 p.m. with two stories told by


Maine residents.
On Christmas night at 7
p.m.: "A CHRISTMAS
CAROL". Thea Musgraves's
operatic treatment of the
Dickens classic is heard in its
1979 world premier production
by Norfolk's Virginia Opera
Association.
WKGC-FM90 is non-profit,
non-commercial and is a
service of Gulf Coast Com-
munity College.


MARIANNA, Florida is
continuing to make ins in
sales of agricultural products,
both at home and abroad, but
Commissioner of Agriculture
Doyle Conner sees urban
encroachment on farmlands
as a threat to future agricul-
tural growth.
Conner urged the Florida
Agricultural Advisory Council
Thursday to offer its wisest
guidance to the Legislature
which is expected to take up
the problem of preserving
farmland at its next session.
Conner said that Florida
sales of farm products com-
pared with No. 13 three years
ago. And foreign sales of,
Florida food products have
risen to $515 million in 1979
from $147 million in 1972, he
said.
But the commissioner cited
a convergence of urban pro-
blems with increased con-
straints on farming as posing
potentially a new migration
from cities to the countryside.
This would further reduce the
amount of land production,
and slow the expansion of
marketing, barring new sci-
entific breakthroughs.
Urban pressure on farmland
is greater in Florida than in
most other states, Conner
said, and greatest in. Dade
County, which according to a
national lands study has lost
35 percent of its farmland to
other uses in the last decade.


Florida's overall loss of
farmland to development
between 1967 and 1977 was 10
percent, Conner said. This
loss, if continued, could "seri-
ously damage Florida's agri-
cultural base in just a few
years," he said.
Some of the land loss in the
past has been offset by gains
in productivity, but the rate of
productivity growth has been
flattening out in recent years,
Conner said. Higher prices for
farm products would provide
an incentive to continue farm-
ing, he added, but also would
invite foreign competition

Christmas

Parade Sat.

at H. Creek
The Howard's Creek Vol-
unteer Fire Department and
the Ladies Auxiliary will
sponsor their first annual
Christmas parade on Sat-
urday, Dec. 20th, at 9:30 CST.
The parade will include a visit
from Santa with candy for the
children and other floats.
Immediately following the
parade will be an open house
at the Fire Department trail-
er. Coffee and cake will be
served. Everyone is cordialy
invited to attend.


with cheaper products.
Conner cited rising crime
and other urban problems as
reasons to flee the cities, and
rising farm costs and pressure
from lenders as inducements
for farmers to sell out to
developers. "It appears that
something other than market
:forces is needed to keep
farmalnd in production," he


said.
How to preserve agii-
cultural land threatened by
urbanization poses a major
problem for the legislature,
and the solution is going to
require hard decisions, Con-
ner said.
The Legislature may not be
able to stop urban enchroach-
ment, but it should plan and


channel development into
areas less appropriate for
farm production, Conner sug-
gested.
He called on the council to
work on recommendations to
legislative committees to try
to maintain as much of
Florida's agriculturally-pro-
ductive land as possible and
preserve it for its best use.


The First
Pentecostal Holiness Church
2001 GARR ISON AVE. PORT ST. JOE
Invites You 6t Worship with Them
Ernest A. Barr, Pastor
SERVICES
SUNDAY SCHOOL ..................... 9:45 A.
MORNING WORSHIP .................. 11:00AM
EVENING WORSHIP .................. 7:00 PM
WEDNESDAY NIGHT ............... 7:00 PM
*gessass#e*DeDEs*gess s*ss *es gssesses *ge#segtiswe


Dollar General

312 Reid Avenue



Store Hours

During the Holidays

Week Days

9 A.M. to 8 P.M.

Sunday

1 to 6 P.M.

Merry Christmas and A Happy
New Year to all