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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02333
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 14, 1980
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02333

Full Text
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USPS 518-880


FORTY-THIRD YEAR, NUMBER 50
I


NEKm .K U
Industry Deep Water Port Fine People Safest Beaches in Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1980


Appraiser Turns In Make-Shift Roll For Approval


Gulf County, under mandate from the State
Department' of Revenue to come up with a
realistic valuation of taxable property on its rolls,
will try to hold off any application of the state's
wrath this year by increasing the value of
property throughout the county'by 10 percent for
the 1981 tax rolls.
Acting Property Appraiser Charles W. Brock
told The Star Tuesday his office has prepared the
property appraisal rolls with the 10 percent
increase cranked in and the rolls are now
presently at a computer station in Panama City
being prepared for presentation to the State
Revenue Department. "Whether they will accept
the rolls or not is anybody's guess", Brock said. If
the Department turns down the rolls, the County
.,Appraiser's office will have to start from square
e in the process of preparing the rolls again and


throw the county tax picture into chaos.
The county held off the application of any
penalties from the state last year by increasing
property values by 20 percent and a promise to do
better this year. However, since that time, veteran
Property Appraiser Samuel A. Patrick was ill for
a long period of time and died a little over two
months ago. During that time, virtually nothing
was done to comply with the state's directions.
After Brock took over the ouixic, w i ,iaut. d
request of the County for an additional $15,000 for
the office's budget to hire extra help and try to
bring most of the roll to compliance by the state.-
The County turned down the request because of a
lack of funds. This led to Brock's move of
increasing property'values by 10 percent to try
and get a roll accepted by the state.


"WE'LL TRY TO EXPLAIN"
Brock said Tuesday he will present the rolls to
the state and "try to explain what we did and
explain the circumstances and hope they will let
us by one more year". Brock wasn't too optimistic
about his chances.
"In addition to the 10 percent increase, we
have gone over the roll extensively and corrected
the errors we could find in the short time we had to
work. Maybe they will look favorably on what we
have done."
The appraiser said, "Wedidn't have a prayer
of computing, the rolls like the Revenue
Department wanted them in the time available..
There were 10,000 parcels which needed attention
to do the job properly. Some of these parcels need
to be re-surveyed for accuracy before a final
record can be made."


IN THE .MEANTIME
In the meantime, faced with the uncertainties
of the appraisal roll, the present $25,000 school tax
exemption and the pending additional $15,000
county tax exemption to be voted on in October,
the County has made temporary financial plans to
keep operating.
The Commission has decided to adopt the
same budget as last year, with the same tax rate
adjusted by the 10 percent increase in valuation
applied by Brock, and operate on that financial
plan until' something definite is decided by the
electorate in October.
The county's budget year begins on October 1,
with tax bills due out before that.
After the voters make their decision in
October, the county will again'plan a budget based
on the new. figures to go into effect in January.


This means tax payers may have the dubious
opportunity of getting and paying two tax bills
during the coming tax year.
The Commission plans to finance their interim
budget beginning in October with carry-over funds
from the present budget, which they are required
by law to maintain, as well as receipts coming in
from state and federal'sources.
.The Commission estimates they will be forced
to operate on the interim budget for from two to
four months before they can come up with a
supplemented financial plan.
This problem isn't unique with Gulf County.
Every county in the state is being faced with the
same uncertainties in light of the homestead
exemption increase vote to be taken in October.
The Legislature, in calling for the vote, failed to
stipulate that it would not take effect until the 1982
budget year.


Census Says Gulf Is Under 10,000


Gulf County is the latest report from us.".
Florida county to be chagrin- Branch went on [to ask,'
ed by the latest census report "How many other people had
which showed the county has their forms lost and were not
lostsome2,000residents in the counted and how many didn't
last two years. even fill out the form and mail
The County Commission, it back in? We need to take
who received the report this every step to correct this
week, said in their regular figure and get -it officially
meeting Tuesday that they changed."
didn't believe it. The matter concerns the
In the 1970 ,census, Gulf Commission and-other county
County was -shown to have governments because census
approximately 10,700 people in plays a large part in allocation
its confines. A census up-date of federal and state matching
performed by the University funds and sharing funds to
of Florida a couple of years schools and government.
ago showed the county to be "This thing could cost Gulf
nearing the 12,000 mark in -County a pile of money",
population.. Branch said.
According to a report from Attorney William J. Rish
Bob Harrington, chief enum- said the county has. two
erator for tlois district, made alternatives. "You can adver-
this week, Gulf County has tise extensively for those who
only 9,860 citizens. The report feel they weren't counted in
further states Wewahitchka the ceiisus or you could make
Shas 3,162 residents Tor i'"b physical count ori your own,
reduction of 250 residents' of the people who actually live
since 1970. Port St. Joe was, in the county."
shown to have 3,790 residents Rish pointed out .that this
for a loss of 610 since 1970. same' thing happened back in
Both' communities have 1970 and the County took steps
grown considerably in the last to actually count areas in
10 years. which the census workers
0 ya. never covered. "We found
The enumerator emphasiz- entire communities which had
ed his figures were based on not been counted", Rish said.
the figures turned in on the
mail reports sent out by the Commissioner Leo Kennedy
Census Bureau the first of the suggested those running for.
year. The returned reports are office poll people they contact
supplemented by the personal to see if they were counted in
count made by the Bureau the census.
-during the census taking per- Although their first step in
'.iod. the matter is still uncertain,
Commissioner Billy Branch the Commission agreed Tues-
cited an instance in his own day morning they need to do
personal experience with the whatever they can to get the
present)fensus count. "We census report corrected.
received our form, filled it out RIVER DREDGING
-A.aliled it all in one day. Gulf County is still one of
Then, a while later, a census three along the Apalachicola
worker came around saying River which is holding up
the Bureau didn't have a ratification of a five year


dredging program for the U.S.
Corps of Engineers.
Gulf, along with Gadsden
and Liberty counties are hold-


ing up the project after
Gadsden, Jackson.and Frank-
lin counties have given their
approval.


At stake in the Gulf hold-out,
besides delaying signing of the
five-year dredging pact, is
millions of dollars which


Franklin County hopes will be
made available to purchase
land to make Apalachicola
Bay an estuarine sanctuary by


the federal government.
Franklin wants the designa-
tion, hoping this will prevent
any further utilization of the


river in their area for indus-
trial or navigational purposes.
Purchase of the property
(Continued On Page 2)


M.B. Wants to Join Gulf


For the past 10 years or so,
there have been threats, invi-
tations and suggestions float-
ing around that Mexico Beach
could, wanted to be, or might
be kidnapped into the confines
of Gulf County. At one time,
there was even talk of getting
up a trade, to trade Bay
County something for the
beach community separated
from the mainstream in Bay
County by Tyndall Air Force
Base.
Lately, the idea is beginning
to get some serious support
and Tuesday morning, the
Gulf County Commission ser-
iously took under considera-
tion placing the question of


whether or not Gulf County
would accept Mexico Beach,
on the November ballot.
Commissioner James Tank-
ersley said it was his under-
standing that Mexico Beach
wanted to become a part of
Gulf County and he would like
to see it placed on the Gulf
County ballot to see if the
county would accept them.
Attorney William J. Rish
said the final decision as to
whether or not Mexico Beach
would remain part of Bay
County or be annexed to Gulf
County would be a decision to
be made by the Florida
Legislature. "Votes by the
community saying they want


to change affiliation and by
Gulf County that they would
be accepted must be taken
before the Legislature will
consider the question", Rish
said.
BEACH WANTS MOVE
According to stories printed,
broadcast and spread by
mouth by Mexico Beach May-
or, Bob Heathcock in recent
weeks, citizens of Mexico
Beach are definitely interest-
ed.
Mayor Heathcock says Gulf
County furnished the com-
munity police protection to
augment their city police,
their children go to Gulf
County schools and Gulf Coun-


ty even provides emergency
medical services to the com-
munity.
"I feel Mexico Beach is just
wasting the tax mpney we
pour into Bay County", Mayor
Heathcock told a Star repre-
sentative last week.
The Mayor and Beach Com-
mission are making their
move based on a vote taken in
the community back in 1978 in
which the residents voted to
leave Bay County in a refer-
endum.
While the Gulf County Com-
mission was meeting Tuesday
morning discussing the mat-
ter, the Mexico Beach Com-
mission was also meeting and


Old Train Wheels Raised


Allen McCulley, Herbe{& Adkins and Pam
Jones hoist a pair of ancient railroad wheels
aboard McCulley's shrimp boat. The wheels


were found by Herman Jones, who is in the
water below after fastening the hoist about
the wheels. --Star photo


A second set of locomotive
wheels used on the old St.
Joseph railroad were brought
to the surface last Friday by
diver Herman Jones and Allen
McCulley on McCulley's boat,
Boston Lady. The first set,
which are on display in front
of the Constitution Museum,
were raised in 1960.
Jones discovered the wheels
several years ago barely pro-
truding above the sandy bay
bottom. Excavating with a
suction pump Jones found
they were lodged between two


of the pilings of the wharf that
carried the train loads of
cotton to the sailing ships.
According to Jones re-
search, by 1841 business was
very bad for the railroad
company and they soon went
into bankruptcy. Also, on
September 14, 1841, a hurri-
cane destroyed part of the
wharf. Jones believes that the
hurricane caused the wheels
to end up on .the bay bottom
and since they were no longer
needed by the bankrupt rail-
road company, no attempts


were made to raise them.
Because of their rarity and
historical value, Jones gave
the wheels to the St. Joseph
Historical Society who acquir-
ed the necessary permission
from the Florida Division of
Archives and History to raise
them, since legally the wheels
belong to the State of Florida.
Arrangements. were made
with Jake Belin and Robert
Nedley for the St. Joe Paper
Company to preserve the
wheels. Preservation will take
approximately a year. After


preservation they will be
displayed in front of the Port
St. Joe Library.
Jones is especially grateful
to Allen McCulley for risking
his small shrimp boat in a
very bad squall which caught
them on their first attempt to
raise the wheels. On the
second try the 600-700 pound
wheels strained the lifting
capabilities of the block and
tackle to their maximum.
before the wheels broke free
from the compact sand and
shells that held them.


agreed to proceed with plans
to leave Bay County and join
Gulf County.
The Beach Commission
agreed to. petition the Bay
County Commission to place
the question on Bay's Novem-
ber ballot.
WILL IT FLY?
The question now remains
whether or not the plans of the
Beach Commission will fly.
The Gulf County Commis-
sion seemed willing enough,
Tuesday, to place the question
on the ballot i4 November.
Whether or not Mexico Beach
can persuade the Bay County
Commission to place the ques-
tion on their ballot remains to
be seen.

Gulf Fugitive
Arrested In Bay
Gulf County Sheriff Ken
Murphy said Raymond Fred-
erick Grows, 24, has been
arrested by Calloway Police
on a Gulf County warrant,
charging him with the burg-'
lary of a structure.
Grows is charged with the
burglary of the Willie Joe
Fortner home in Wewahitchka'.
on November 29 of last year.
A rifle and shotgun taken
from the home were recover--
ed in Carrabelle a week after
the burglary.
Grows is being held in Gulf
County jail on $5,000 bond.


0 a


Two Shots



Fired At



Tractor

Two loads of buckshot were fired from a 12
gauge shotgun early Friday morning at a McKenzie
Tank Lines tank truck approaching the Sylvachem
j plant here in Port St. Joe, according to Sheriff Ken
Murphy. The shots were firgd at approximately 5:00 ,
a.m., as the triwk was travelling south on U.S. 98
near First Street in Highland View.
One load of the shot blew out the left front tire at
close range. The other load was directed at the cab
of the vehicle, narrowly missing the driver, Delbert
Lee Riley, age 37, of Panama City. Riley was
uninjured even, though the pellets struck the cab all
around him.'
One of the pellets missed hitting the window by
the driver's head by about an inch.
The vehicle was unloaded, coming to the
Sylvachem plant to pick up a load of rosin.
Sheriff Murphy said the Gulf County Sheriff's
Department. and Florida Department of Criminal
Law Enforcement agency are investigating the
latest in a series of shootings believed to be
connected with a strike at the plant.
In addition to ,the investigation, the truck
owners have increased a reward being offered by
Sylvachem for information leading to the arrest and
conviction of the snipers by another $10,000. This
brings the reward for the snipers to $20,000.
(Continued On Page 2)


-Star photo J


---


r











.Editorials and Opinions


THE STAR


PAGE TWO


THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 198P'


. Since Nobody Else Will, We're Calling A Meeting


Sylvachem and its operating unions have
been at odds with one another now for over two
months. This disagreement has resulted in a
crippling strike crippling to the company,
the striking employees and the community in
which it is located.
The worst part, of the whole situation is
that neither side seems to be making any
overtures to settle the disagreement and get
things rolling once again. Both sides know the
matter will be settled. one wayv or another, so


what's the big delay in getting
of hammering out an agreem
S Is it pride on the part of bot
keeps either side from initiation
then both sides.should be ashai
. more people involved, innocer
S are being hurt as much or
company or the strikers.
?t, Probably the most desire
tive trait in the world'is pride
have it. It's a necessary' ingred
into bettering our education, o
our environment, etc. It can
cripple our present.and our fu
the trait of stubbornness along
If we had to come to a concl
: there are no talks going on wil
and the union, we would label it



From Page



I Gulf Census


I and creation of the estuarine and seu
sanctuary hinges on whether Beaches
or not the five-year dredging pay the
program is approved. they ha
E Gulf County is holding up County
thile program by refusing to Tallahas
Sgve their permission for the the surv
f ve-year plan, unless the '-Ado
SCorps of Engineers re-opens identify
Corley Slough and Virginia lines ha
3 Cut .Slough, closed up- by Commis
S.previous river dredging by the ersley a
I4 .prps. sistant
Calhoun County wants an -Wer
oitlet to the river deepened Port St.
and improved to serve a boat policy fo
building firm as the price of
their signing. 'Sh
Gulf County is now offering
an alternative, suggesting the
Corps be allowed a one-year (Conti
pact, during which time they Two
will have opportunity to meet during t
Sthe stipulations put on them with the
for the slough openings. If of the sl
they do not open the sloughs in Friday
that period, the remaining neth Wa
four years of the dredging charged
pact will be denied. ly miss
This idea will be put before must a
the Corps and the State of answer
Florida in a meeting today in ber 1
Tallahassee, which County The co
officials will attend. against
OTHER BUSINESS the plan
in other items of business, said he
the County: pick-up
-Agreed to cancel a con- plant fe
tract with Florida Engineers 'mire wa
Associates to conduct a pre- and tool
liminary survey for a water The cor




For First Ti

WE HAVE US A new preacher out
-t our church, the Long Avenue Baptist
SChurch.
Last week, the church called Rev.
X Ted Corley, now of Bosier City,
L.uisianna and Rev. Corley accepted
the call to the church and will be on the
z job the first Sunday in September.
I told the news to somebody last
week and he credulously asked, "Did
you all let Bro. Odum go?"
*'No", I said, "we just put him out
to pasture. Odum is retiring after 27
years of service to the church, being
one of the three pastors in the state who
have served one church for more than
25 years.
A Rev. Clyde Lipscomb, pastor of
5 the Hendricks Avenue Baptist Church
in Jacksonville retired his pastorate
last year after 27 years of service there,
5 Last month Rev. Joe Bamberg retired
as pastor of the First Baptist Church of
S, Milton, after 33 years there.
S These three pastors had the longest
Service with one church of all the
SBaptist pastors in Florida.
-. THE GOOD REV. ODUM has built
himself a house here in Port St. Joe on
SLong Avenue and is retiring to his own



--TIWI
q -tN-4U Published Every Thursd
Second-Class P05
o Tc r ^Wesley R. Ramsey .
S .William H. Ramsey .
Shirley K. Ramsey ..


at the business
ent?
h parties which
g talks? If it is,
med. There are
it victims, who
more than the

d and destruc-
. We all should
dient to spur us
ur appearance,
also severely
iture if we link
with that pride.
fusion as to why
h the company
t as a good case


of the stubborns.
We know both sides hope to come out of
the disagreement with a semblance of a
contract they think they can exist with. But
neither will realize his goals as long as both
parties sit, day after day, on opposite sides of
the fence which surrounds the Sylvachem
complex. There has to be talk to reach an
agreement. Neither will realize any part of his
goal unless they discuss the problem with one
another.


Comedian Rodney Dangerfield's trade-
mark is the oft-quoted line, "I don't get no
respect from anybody."
Watching the President's news conference
on Monday night of last week, we have come to
the conclusion this phrase could also be the
trademark of the present President of the
United States.
We thought the press representatives in
attendance at the press conference treated the
nation's first officer very shabbily. As a
matter of fact, some of them were downright
rude.


At the risk of having people think we're
butting into something which doesn't concern
us, we are going to call a meeting of the union
and Sylvachem management for one day each
week. Maybe they will just say, "How are you
this fine day?" or "Drop dead" or "Let's go
fishing". But at least they will be talking.
We're calling for company representa-
tives and union leaders to meet in the Fire
Station meeting room behind City Hall every
Tuesday morning at 10:00 a.m., to look each


From reading the polls in recent days, we
realize the President doesn't have the
confidence of a great percentage of the people
of the nation. The fact remains, that as long as
he is President, he deserves the respect of the
press and others who come into his presence.
The office deserves respect.
When one particular newsman butted in
on the president, shouting, "Wait a minute,
I'm not through yet!" he should have been
ejected from the conference in our opinion.
Every question that was asked; every
answer which was given had all been reported


other in the face, eyeball to eyeball, and say
something to one another. We'd rather have
this happen every Tuesday and Thursday,
same time and same place, but one day a week
will be better than now.
We have this meeting set up for you. If the
day doesn't suit you, call us, and we'll arrange
another day and time.
The thing is, you need to get to talking.
The thing is, this matter is our business
and the business of everyone in Port St. Joe.


in the news in previous sessions. There was no
new ground plowed at the conference and none
was called, for. All the questions have been
gone over again. So there was no need for any
indignation on the part of the press, and, even
so, there was no cause for disrespect for the
chief official of the land.
In the South, we know better than to be so
rude in public.
Even though the President is low in the
polls, he showed by his performance, he had
much better manners than those who were
performing the inquisition.


Report


wer service for the
and White City and
firm $2,500 for work
d already done. The
has since hired a
ssee firm to provide
'ey.'
pted guidelines to
indigents. The guide-
ve been prepared by
sioner James Tank-
nd administrative as-
Tommy Pitts.
e asked by the City of
Joe, to identify their
>r handling customers

ots Fired

inued from Page 1)
arrests were made.
he week in connection
Strike, charging two
strikers with felonies.
y of last week, Ken-
ade Stoutamire was
with throwing a dead-
le at a dwelling and
ppear in court to
the charge on Novem-
omplaint was signed
Stoutamire by
Beyars, a guard at
it. Beyars' complaint
t observed a blue
truck pulled up to the
nce. He said Stouta-
ilked up to the truck
k something from it.
mplaint said, he was


of the Oak Grove water and
sewer district who have had
their service cut off for lack of
payment. A county ordinance
requires residents of the dis-
trict to 'use the system.
-Tabled a matter which
would close all streets in St.
Joe Shores Subdivision after
Bobby Bellows of Pensacola, a
property, owner in the area,
objected.
-Agreed to contract with
St. Joseph Telephone and
Telegraph Company to ser-
vice its mobile radio systems.


then observed shooting a
slingshot in the direction of a
guard shack inside the plant.
Stoutamire was arrested by
City Police.
George E. Jones of Wewa-
hitchka faces charges of ag-
gravated assault with a fire-
arm as a result of an incident
at the plant Saturday.
George Baublit, a security
guard at the plant signed a
complaint alleging that the
guard was taking pictures of
strikers near their trailer
headquarters outside the main
gate, when Jones allegedly
ran inside the trailer and
appeared at a window with a
revolver in his hand.
Jones must also appear in
court to answer the charges.


me In Its History, Our Church Will Have Preacher with Hair


hacienda, the first one he has ever
owned.
I really believe he retired for that
reason alone. All these years he has
lived in rented houses or' pastoriums


time. They turned in a 180 degree circle
when they called a new pastor. The new
man is young, where Rev. Odum thinks
he is getting to be an old man. As a
matter of fact, he was older when he


ETAOIN SHRDLU


and now he is in his own place his and
the finance company's.
It's going to be strange for the
townsfolk to get used to another face at
the helm of the local church, but it will
be even harder for the members. When
a church has had only one pastor in its
entire church life, it is bound to be hard
to change.
THE CHURCH really changed this


cover might have been at one time or
another.
OUR PASTOR has become a
fixture in this area and he has taken a


y: Wesley R. Ramsey


came here than the new pastor is. The
new pastor is 32 years of age.
Again, the new pastor has hair.
Rev. Odum was never blessed with too
much hair. He tried to make light of his
handicap by observing that the Lord
just couldn't trust some people out from
under cover. He, of course, was out
from under cover way out from
under cover. As a matter of fact, it's
how hard to see even a trace of where


lot of kidding, both from others and
from his members. He can give it back,
too. He's smart enough to know that a
person who isn't loved doesn't get
teased by his friends. As a matter of
fact, if a person isn't kidded on occasion
he should investigate as to whether he
really has any friends or not.
+++I TOLD OUR preacher I hated to
I TOLD OUR preacher I hated to


see him hang it up. Now, breaking in a
new pastor, I will have to get used to his
cadence on Sunday morning. A new
rhythm of sound and speech will have
to be plugged into my listening. It's
going to be hard to doze during the
sermon time until I get used to the new
preacher.
I told Rev. Odum the other day
about this problem, pointing out that
one night not long ago, I was having
trouble getting to sleep and I toyed with
the idea of calling him up at about 1:00
in the a.m., and asking him to preach to
me so I could get to sleep.
He came right back at me and said
that if I had called that time of the
morning, he guaranteed he would have
had me asleep just as quick as he could
get out of bed, get to my house and hit
me over the head with his hard-back
Bible.
APPLICATION OF THE word in a
persuasive manner I believe he called
it.

ONE LIKENESS we found in both
our old (figuratively speaking) prea-
cher and our new one: they both like to


-'


[E STAR -
y at 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe. Florida
e Star Publishing Company
tage Paid at Port St. Joe. Florida 32456


POSTOFFICE BOX 308
PHONE 227-1278
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456


Editor and Publisher
................... Production Supt. AT PORTST. JOE, FLORIDA 3456
................... Office Manager
.... ...... ............ Typesetter


SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR, 56.00 SIX MONTHS, $4.00
OUT OF COUNTY-ONE YEAR, 510.00 OUT OF U.S.-ONE YEAR, 512.00


TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold
themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such advertisement


The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word
barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


St. Joseph

Bay Tides
High and low tides and their
respective heights for St.
Joseph's Bay for the upcom-
ing week are shown in the tide
table below. The information
is furnished by the U. S.


We had a hand-cranked ice cream
supper on a recent Saturday for the
new prospective preacher when he
came to give us a sample of what he
would be preaching in the years to
come. Both preachers ate considerable
ice cream. Kindness prevents me from
saying just how much.
While our out to pasture preacher
once had a tummy proceeding him
down the sidewalk, he has since lost
much of it due to a stomach condition.
He said the condition was caused from
having to deal with his recalcitrant
members for all these years. I say it
was caused from over-wprking it.
Our new preacher is also pleasingly
plump like all us jolly people.
I was one of the five members on
the pastor search committee, and his
slightly rotund appearance, much like
mine, was one of the first things which
drew me to him in the first place.
THE ENTIRE community has
profited from its association with
Brother Odum for the past 27 years. We
hope for many more to come as he lives
here in our town as a private citizen.


Weather Bureau station in
Apalachicola.


Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.

Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.


Timer1
1243
1319
306
1424
318
350
436
518


Ht. Time Ht.
1.2 2104 .7
1.1 1951 .8
1.1 1033 .7
.9 1725 .7
1.2 1340 .73
1.4 1433 ,
1.5 1518 .4
1.6 1604 .3


President's Office Deserves Our Respect









THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 14. 1980


PAGE THIkEE


A Orientation Slated Next



Thursday at High School


Orientation activities for
seventh graders and all new
students will be held Thurs-
day, August 21, at Port St. Joe
Jr.-Sr. High School.
The orientation program
.begins promptly at 9:00 am
in the Commons Area and.
ends at 11:20 am. All parents
of seventh graders are urged
to attend. Plans are being
made for seventh grade par-
ents to meet with the teachers.
School buses will run. Listed
below are the bus stops for the
orientation day. All times are
approximate, so students
should be a few minutes
earlier than suggested times.
All times are Eastern, Day-
light time:
Overstreet, O(ne block west
of bridge on 386 at 8:00 am.
Mexico Beach Highway 98
at shopping, center. at 8:15
am; Old Surf Drive-n site at
8:20 am.
Beacon Hill site of old
Presbyterian Church on 4th
Street at 8:30 am. .
. St. Joes Beach stops will
begin at 8:35 am, Alabama
Street at DeSoto, Alabama
Street at Magellan, Alabama


Every. h
-students
place to s
desk for
selection-
style-siz
finish.

Days



FINANCE
- ^- jAVilL

1rlPH'


20" x 48" Writing Surface, fi
... Drawers, Plus Locking File
Drawer

MANY OTHER
DESK ON
DISPLAY AND
ON SALE


Street at Selma and Alabama
Street at Pine.
Highland View, Highland
View Elementary and High-
land View Baptist Church at
8:45 am.
Port St. Joe stops will begin
at 8:30 am, Avenue A and


Apollo, Avenue A and North
Park, Avenue C and Battle
Street and Avenue D and Main
Street.
White City all stops on
Highway 71 at Gulf and
Standard Stations at 8:20 am.
If there are students who


live in the Howards Creek,
Indian pass, Simmons Bayou,
and Jones Homestead areas
that will need transportation
to the orientation, please
notify Mr. Temple Watson,
Gulf County School Board,
phone number 229-8256.


By John W. Macy
The greatest th
large number of de
United States I be]
not an earthqua
swarm of tornado
even a nuclearpla
but a hurricane..
We have the pote
hurricane claim
death because f
think that hurric
that kind of thf
attitude of apathy


$s1


DAYS ONL


DAYS
ONLY


'., Director multiplies the dangers of a
ireat of a hurricane.
eaths.in the The main killer will be the
lieve to be, storm surges that accompany
ke, not- a hurricanes. Storm surges are
es, or not giant wind-driven waves that
nt accident push ahead of a hurricane.
The waves, which may be 20
ential for a feet or higher, plow inland
ing 10,000 until tamed by the contour of
ew people the land.
anes pose More than 6,000 people died
Peat. That when storm tides swept over
ly greatly Galveston Island in 1900.
Storm surges caused 350
deaths near New Orleans in
1909; 240 deaths in Florida in
1928; 600 in Long Island and
New England in 1938. Hund-
reds of people died when the
storm surge in 1957 from
Hurricane Audrey caused
flooding in flat Louisiana
desk coastal land as far as 25 miles
inland. And the record goes on
nient and on.
Instead of respecting the
S the sea, people by the millions
--have moved like lemmings in
iat/ recent years on to the spits of
sand we call barrier islands. It
is beautiful to live that near
the ocean, but it is dangerous
to consider -your family and
your dwelling safe from the
wind and waves of a hurri-
cane. Man has opted in favor
of beauty and against prudent
building and zoning codes that
would recognize the danger of
living directly on the ocean.
The populations of some
beach areas have increased so
fast in the last few years that
it is now mathematically im-
... possible to evacuate everyone
within a day or so on the few
roads that lead inland. If
people have only 12 hours to
evacuate in the face of a
hurricane in some large popu-
lation centers, it is impossible
for everyone to leave by car.
Some of these people may be
caught by a hurricane on low,
coastal highways, sitting bum-
per-to-bumper in traffic block-
ed by downed trees and
flooded roads.
It has been suggested that
99 some large coastal cities
should plan to evacuate people
vertically into high-rise build-
ings. But there has been little
LY local planning and prepara-
tion for such hurricane evac-
uations.
Sooner or later, the United
States will experience a horri-
ble disaster from a hurricane.
Thousands of people will die in
their beach cottages, in high-
rise comdominiums with pil-
ings buried in sand, and in
their cars on coastal roads.
The denseness of the coastal
t populations, coupled with
people's lack of respect for
hurricanes, add up to tragedy.
We have ignored the teachings


of history.
Historically, coastal-smash-
ing hurricanes occur every
one and one half years in
Florida; every four years in
New England, North Carolina
and Louisiana; every five
years in Georgia and South
Carolina; every six years in
Alabama and Mississippi;
every 11 years in New York;
and every 16 years in Virginia,
Maryland, Delaware and New
Jersey. The odds are against
man.
Coastal regions are not the
only ones threatened. Don't
overlook Mother Nature's
wrath when it comes to hurri-
canes causing death and de-
struction far inland. Some of
the nation's greatest disasters
were caused by hurricanes
that weakened into, tropical
storms over land.
The storms pick up tons of
water while they move over
the warm ocean. When they
hit the colder land, they dump
their loads of water in the
form of rain that is sometimes
measured in tens of inches.
Hurricanes produce record
floods, far from the salt air.
For example, Hurricane
Agnes caused over 100 deaths
and billions of dollars of flood
damage in 5,000 square miles
of the interior of mid-Atlantic
states in 1972.
Whether coastal or inland,
communities that have flood
hazards and agree to attempt
to manage of mitigate their
hazards, are eligible to join
the National Food Insurance
Program. Under the Federal
program, residents and busi-
nesses may purchase flood
insurance protection at afford-
able rates.
If you live in a flood-prone
area, consult with your in-
surance agent or broker about
purchasing flood insurance.
You'll find that your home-
owners insurance policy does
not provide flood protection,
but that you can purchase a
separate policy for flood
coverage on a building and its
contents. Call your insurance
agent or broker to find out the.
coverage .you need, if you
don't have a flood insurance
policy.
You should hope that you'll
never need to collect on your
flood insurance policy, but if
you need it, it may save you
from total financial disaster.
The program is administered
by the Federal Insurance
Administration within the
Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Agency (FEMA).
Just as a family should
check on their flood insurance
protection at the start of the
hurricane season each year on


On Monday of Each Week


Drivers' License Office Closing


The Department of Public
Safety and Motor Vehicles
announced this week the Port
St. Joe office will begin closing
each Monday beginning next
week. .
According to Mrs. Rhudine
Skipper, operator of the local
office in the Courthouse, the


move is being made to comply
with the department's four*
day, 10-hours a day work week
being adopted all over the
state. "There's no use in our
being open on Monday, be-
cause the computers we must
use by remote control in
Tallahassee are all closed
down on Monday and we can't
do a thing", Mrs. Skipper said.
The offices will open at 7:30
in the morning and remain
open until 5:00 p.m., Tuesday'
through Friday. The office
will be closed from 12:00 Noon
to 1:00 p.m., for lunch.

OBITUARY:

Harry Brewton,
Dies In La.
Harry Brewton, Jr., 35. of
Springhill, La., and formerly
of Port St. Joe, died Tuesday
in Springhill..
He is survived by his wife,
Mrs. Sara Brewton of Spring-
hill; one daughter, Julie Ann
Brewton of Springhill; one
son, Harry L. Brewton, III of
Beverly, Mass.; one step-.
daughter, Amy Thompson of
Beverly, Mass; his mother,
Mrs. Leila Brewton of Pana-
ma City and one sister, Julie
Griner of Panama City.
Funeral services will be
held today at 4:00 p.m., from
the Smith Funeral Home
Chapel with the Rev. Eugene
Snider officiating. Interment
will follow in Evergreen Me-
morial Gardens in Panama
City.

Softball Tourney
Is Slated.
"Big Rock" is sponsoring a
softball tournament August 29
and 30 in the Port St. Joe
softball complex behind the
High School.
The tournamentVwill feature
class -B and C teams. Those
who would like to enter teams
in the tournament areasked to
call 227-1771.


EXPERIENCED PROVEN LEADERSHIP QUALIFIED

RE-ELECT

B. Walter Wilder
Superintendent
of Schools
"VOTE FOR CONTINUED IMPROVEMENT
IN YOUR SCHOOLS".
. Pd. Pol. Adv. for B. Walter Wilder, Pd. for by Louise Parker, Camp. Treas.


QUALIFIED
VIETNAM VETERAN
B.A. UNIV. WEST FLA.
GULF CO. DEMO. COMM.
State Committeeman
Vice Chairman
LICENSED 'REAL ESTATE
BROKER
CERTIFIED FLA. EVALUATOR
10 Yrs. ACTUAL APPRAISAL
EXPERIENCE
Vpcant Land
Residential
Agricultural
Commercial
Industrial
OWNERSHIP MAPPING
Has trained a number of
deputy appraisers In mapping


Vote For and Elect

RODNEY LOUIS

HERRING

PROPERTY

APPRAISER

CONCERNED
MEMBER, 1st METHODIST
CHURCH
Chairman of Administrative
Board
Lay Leader
ROTARY CLUB
LITTLE LEAGUE
Charter member -
Vice President,
SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION
President
CANCER SOCIETY
Vice President
WEWA GATOR BACKERS
Vice President -
President,
JAYCEES
Treasurer
Vice President
Secretary


June 1, the family should also
consider other protective
steps. You need to re-think
each year what steps you
would take if an evacuation of
your area is ordered because
of an approaching hurricane.
If your home is in a relatively
safe area, a hurricane may
require some precautionary
steps: check your household
supply of non-perishable food,
first aid kit, fire extinguisher,
battery-powered radio, flash-
lights, and extra batteries.
Tips on safety precautions,
details on the availability of
purchasing flood insurance,
and other suggested hurricane
preparations are listed in
FEMA materials being distri-
buted this summer as part of a
'hurricane awareness cam-
paigns with the help of civil
defense offices, fire and police
departments, insurance
agents, civic groups, and
governmental agencies. To-
gether, we are attempting to
inform and educate the public
on the dangers of hurricanes.
While leaflets may help
educate people to the threat of
hurricanes, I pray that it will
not take a disastrous hurri-
cane to break people away
from their apathetic attitudes.
According to the Audubon
society, the optimum depth
of birdbath water is 2 1/2
inches. Less makes
it difficult for birds to
bathe, more frightens them.


S "A Working Appraiser to Serve
the People of Gulf County"

Rodney Louis Herring

PROPERTY APPRAISER
Pd. Pol. Adv., Pd. for by Rodney Louis Herring


22" x 48" writing surface,
Locking- File Drawer, Plus 5
Drawers. Pine .or Maple
Finish.


Days Only

$279


BIG 3 INCH POST
BUNK BED WITH BEDDING
PINE OR MAPLE FINISH DAYS
ONLY

s229


* The Right Man for A Big Job* *


THE JOB
THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT IS:
A CIRCUIT COURT OFFICIAL, COUNTY COURT OFFICIAL,
THE COUNTY TREASURER, COUNTY AUDITOR, COUNTY
RECORDER of all deeds and mortgages and CLERK
ACCOUNTANT for the BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION
and has the greatest variety of general administrative duties in
the county which involves a score of -legal and financial
responsibilities.
THE CLERK is an IMPORTANT COURT OFFICIAL. He
must keep the minutes and an accurate record of each term of
court, and keep a docket of the progress, default, judgement and
execution, trial motion, subpoena, lis penden, and conviction In
each case and has custody of all records of the circuit and
county court and records sent to the county from higher courts.
He must notify all jurors selected for jury duty, make payment
to jurors and witnesses, and report the same to the state
comptroller.
O@


*


n, lr A.8. r. 4. -..


JERRY GAl


Clerk of the Circuit C


*

THE MAN
JERRY GATES ISA MAN OF:

EDUCATION AND HONORS
HONOR GRADUATE:
Blountstown High School, University of Florida: Bachelor
of Science degree in Business Administration, with a major In
accounting and a minor In management.
BECAUSE OF EXCELLENCE in athletics and scholarship
he was awarded a joint athletic-academic scholarship to the
University of Florida.
HE WAS WINNER of the Panama City News Herald's
"Thom McAn" Trophy in 1962 as the outstanding scholar-athlete
in Northwest Florida.
HE WAS SELECTED as the top scholar-&.thlete in the State
of Florida In 1962 by the Florida Sportswriters Association.





*ES *


ourt (Tobe Continued)


r::,~CWIFSI~ m'r~;


Hurricanes Pose Potential



Death Trap for Hundreds


ome needs a
need a convey
study -Danley ha
all purposes- grei


e and .


Only



.ING
BLE, ;


,i,












His work as legislative aide to Congressman Earl
Hutto taught Steve how to fight for the interests of the
people. He has experience in securing new Industry for
This area. Steve will continue this fight in Tallahassee
by working for a program of tax Incentives.
H _Steve knows the importance of coming back to the
people of Gulf County. He has visited your home during
the campaign and will be back talking with you again
S as your representative.

Pd. Pol. Adv. for Steve Strickland
Pd. for by Joe Grammer Ill Camp. Treas.

WE NEED A BETTER WAY
im Ill


Pd. Pol. Adv., Pd. for by Jerry Oatesi


3~.


Ec'













Browns Attend National


'Republican Convention

Mr. and Mrs. Stiles Brown While in the North, Stiles Brown was a guest of the Re-
have just returned from an Brown, who is the Chairman publican National Committee
idended vacation tiip "to In-. of the Republican Party of and was privileged to meet
Iiana and Michigan. waue Gulf County, attended the with Ronald and Nancy Rea-
there they visited with Mrs. Republican National Conven- gan and also with George and
Brown's sister, Professor tion in Detroit, Michigan. Mr. Barbara Bush.
Elizabeth Orlosky at her home Mr. Brown says "It was the
in Angola, Indiana. They also feeling at the convention that
-pent time in Grand Rapids, this November's election is a
Michigan visiting Mr. Brown's watershed election at which
her and sister. time the people will vote to get'
In Grand Rapids, a Brown our country back on a path of
.family reunion was held at the fiscal sanity, and also to again
Some of Joel and Clara show the world that America
.Whitfield Brown, at which the is strong and reliable and is
entire family celebrated the still, deservedly, the true
75th birthday of Stiles Brown's leader of the free world. This
.sister, Mrs. Dorothea Konkle.- is the people's year, and the
M.Also celebrated were Mr. and people, desperate for a return
,Mrs. Stiles Brown's birth- to America's greatness will
sdlays. 'vote Republican.for a chan-
ge."


PAT ALONZO

We're


:he carpet industry is one of
the fastest rising industries in
tle world. Carpet used to be a
lpxury, but now has become
sttcommon that it is the un-
cirpeted home that is rare.
'The reasons for the rise in the
development of carpet are
Sthreefold:
-'-Carpet design is the most
liniovative aspect in the decor
of a home or an office, or any
i sucture for that matter;
:-The quality of carpet
i manufacture has been just as
Innovative, developing fibers,
and methods of dyeing, spin-
ning, sewing, and so forth that
are more practical and more
pleasing to the eye; and
, --The third and most inno-
vative reason for the rise in
the production of carpet is
increase in volume, delivery,
and styles of carpet, coupled
with a decrease in price.
-Innovation plus, the byword
of carpet manufacture. We
are proud to be the sales
representatives of such a
dynamic Industry. See us
today and enjoy the fruits of
the most innovative labor in
the world.


ofPort St. Joe
204 MONUMENT AVE.
PHONE 227-1199


MARY ELLEN DAVIS


Recent Bride

Mr. and Mrs. R.D. Davis
announce the marriage of
their daughter Mary, Ellen, to
William Preston Allyn,son of
Mr: and Mrs. William B. Allyn
ofPalatka. -
The bride is a 1975 graduate
of Port St. Joe High School and
attended Gulf Coast Commun-
ity College. She is employed
by St. Joseph Telephone and
Telegraph Company.
The bridegroom is a 1972
graduate of ealatka South
High School and graduated
from United Electronics Insti-
tute of Tampa and is also
employed with 'St. Joseph
Telephone and Telegraph
Company.
They were married August
2nd at Donaldsonville, Ga.,
and :are now residing at
Beacon Hill Beach.


I'


Miss Holly Hendrix, second from right,
was honored at a bridal coffee Saturday
morning. Shown with the honoree are, left to



Coffee Honor
*' *. ..* '


Faith Christian

"School House" Sale


, A




right: her sister, Judy Hendrix, her future
mother-in-law, Mrs. Jack Jimison and her
mother, Mrs. J. Wayne Hendrix. -Star photo


s Miss Holly I


Hendrix, Bride-Elect

S elect of Jack Jimison, Jr. Was canapes. b : brass planter'
.RW- -p .: honored by a beautiful coffee Coffee was served by Mrs. Miss Hendrix
W-nC'q"*-' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ cofe Cofe w *'-l^ i,,>

JOLYNNE PARKER
Cute One

Jolynne Parker celebrated'
her first birthday just recent-
ly. She is the daughter of
Randy and Lynn Parker.
Jolynne's friends who help-
ed her to celebrate this joyful
occasion were: J.J. Hattaway,
Lee and Michelle Cannon,
Amanda Phillips, Ray Butler,
Jr., and Jackie and Jason
Terry.
She is the granddaughter of
Dorothy O'Shall of Port St. Joe
and Mr. and Mrs. Donald
Parker of Simmons Bayou..
Her great grandmother is
Dessie Lee Parker of Port St.
Joe.


Ming Tells of Her


Life In S.E. Asia


Ming Pierce, operator of a
nursery at St. Joe Beach, told
her interesting history to the
Rotary Club last Thursday at
noon. /
Mrs. Pierce, a Chinese
whose family home is in
Shanghai, was born in Saigon,
Vietnam. She said she had
rarely been to China since her
father was in the diplomatic
corps for the Taiwanese and
during her life, she had spent
her youth in Vietnam, Cambo-
dia, Siam and all the former
French colonies of the Orient
where the French language
was used.
Ming, whose family name is
Hiu,came to the United States
in 1956 to attend school. She
was sponsored by the Metho-
dist Church Women and Ro-
tary International.She attend-
ed college in Cuthbert, Ga.,
where she met her husband,
Tracy Pierce.


The speaker said her father
had been in the diplomatic
source all her life which gave
her advantages others didn't
have. She had attended school
and learned French and some
English as well as her native
Cantonese and Mandarin lan-
guage. Ming said Mandarin is
the national language of China
and Cantonese is one of many
dialects. The dialects coin-
pare to the Mandarin much as
* a Southern drawl is to English.
Ming said students in the
foreign schools she attended
go to school from 8:30 in the
morning until 1:00, then start
again at 1:30 and go t6 6:00 in
the evening. The schools are in
operation for eight months out
of the year.
Guests of the club were Pat
Macri of Tampa and Frank
Whitehouse of Apalachicola.

Miss Quinn

Honored by

Shower
Miss Denise Quinn, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Billy
Quinn, Sr., was honored with a
bridal shower Saturday,
August 9, at the Senior Citi-
zens Building.
Hostesses for the occasion
were Mrs. Gloria Langston,
Mrs. Cora Quinn, Mrs. Cynth-
ia Quinn, Miss Vivian Quinn,
Miss Valencia Hall, Miss
Maggie Hall and Miss Phyllis
Willis.
The honoree was married to
Leslie C. Hall, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Leslie Hall of Port St, Joe
on August 11, in Tallahassee,
where they now reside.

New Arrival
Chrislev Darid
Conger
Dr. and Mrs. T. Wayne
Conger announce the birth of
their second son, Chrisley
David. Chris was born on
Saturday, August 2 at the
Memorial Hospital of Jack-
sonville, weighing in at ten
pounds and two ounces.
The proud grandparents are
Mr. and Mrs. Grady Player of
Port St. Joe and Mr. and Mrs.
James E. Conger of Miami.


Mrs. J. Lamar Miller on
Saturday, August 9.
The flowers which adorned
the nuptial atmosphere were
of an apricot tone. The dining-
room table was, lovely with an
arrangement of white, and
apricot chrysanthemums, and
they were surrounded by


* a


Serry txson aUn
Mitchell Mays. Punt
served in the family r
Mrs. Charmaine Lemii
Mrs. Wayne. Steven
bride's book was kept 1
Judy Hendrix, sister
bride.
Over 125 guests call
ing the appointed hi


. '

"; 4[


KRISTI ANN LAWRENCE

Kristi Lawrence Has

Birthday, New Sister


Miss Kristi Ann Lawrence,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Steve Lawrence of 1034 Wood-
ward Avenue announced her
second birthday celebration
on Sunday, August 3rd was
also a joyful welcome home
party for her new sister,
Stephanie Leigh Lawrence.
Little Leigh Lawrence ar-
rived, to a warm welcome by
parent and friends, at Gulf
Coast Community Hospital in
Panama City on July 29th. She
weighed in at six pounds and
13V4 ounces and in perfect
physical condition. She ac-
companied her mother, the
former Pam Parker, and her
father home to Port St. Joe by
the weekend where she was
greeted by grandparents Tom
and Louise Parker, Aunt Joy
and Uncle Tres Parker, great-
grandparents Mr. and Mrs.
B.W. Wilder and Mrs. Dessie
Lee Parker, all of Port St. Joe.


Other grandparents of Kris-
ti Ann and Stephanie Leigh
joining the celebration on
Sunday were Supreme Court
Justice James C. Adkins and
Mrs. Beth Lawrence Adkins of
Tallahassee and Panama
City, and Mrs. Mary E. Carter
of Vernon. -
Sending greetings to the two
young Lawrence .ladies were
aunts and -uncles Ray and
Pam Lawrence of Gaines-
ville; David "and Lisa Law-
rence of Arcadia; Donald and
Donna Capps, Bryan and Rad
of Wright Patterson AFB,
Ohio; grandparents Raymond
and Edwina lawrence also of
Arcadia and great-grand-
mother .Francis Lawrence of
Chattanooga, Tenn.
Kristi Ann also said she will
plan future festive occasions
to introduce her new sister to
friends and neighbors in Port
St. Joe.


iree. A beautiful
was presented to
by the hostes-


a mtrs.
hi. ,, .


icn- was
oom by The guests were welcomed
omad by Miss Hendrix, Mrs. J.
eux and Wayne Hendrix, mother of the
s. The bride, and Mrs. Jack Jimison,'
bof Mis Sr., mother of the groo.
Hostesses were Mrs. J.
ed dur- Lamar Miller, Mrs. Gannon&-
ours to Buzzett, Mrs. Silas Stone4-
Mrs. Edwin Ramsey, Mrs; -
W.O. Cathey, Mrs. Tom Park-
er, Mrs, Jean Atchison, Mrs.
David Groom, Mrs. George
Anchors and Mrs. L.L. Copen-
haver.




Tack a pair of spools close
together on a wall to make
a broom ,or tennis-racket
holder. .


The parents of students of
Faith Christian School invite
the public to a "School House"
celebration sale, Saturday,
August 23 from 9 am unit 5
pm. The bargain and bake
sale will be held in the new
building at the corner of 20th
Street and Marvin Avenue.
Proceeds will be used to
further finish the building.
Donations of children's
clothing, household goods,
furniture, and white-elephant
items are needed. For pick-up
please call:
Overstreet, Mrs. Parker,
648-5628; beaches, Mrs. Thar-


pe, 648-5838; White City, Mrs.
Seymour, 227-1570, Oak Grove,
Mrs. Smith, 299-6340; Sim-
mons Bayou and Indian Pass,
Mrs. Presnell, 229-6497; and
Port St. Joe, Mrs. Bergeron
229-6067 or Mrs. Thursby
229-8719.
Faith Christian School is
also collecting Campbell's
soup labels and aluminum. All
donations will be much appre-
ciated said school officials.

In 1873, St. Louis estab-
lished the first public kinder-
garten in the United States.


The First
Pentecostal Holiness Church
2001 GARRISON AVE. PORT ST. JOE
Invites You to Worship with Them
Ernest A. Barr, Pastor
i.; SERVICES
SUND Y SCHOOL ..................... 9:45,AM
MORNING WORSHIP ..............11: 60oAM
SEVENING WORSHIP................ 7:00PM
WEDNESDAY NIGHT............... 7:00PM




S- Vote For & Elect-


FAYE STRIPLING COX
Supervisor of Elections


Wewa City Commission
Mayor Pro Tern
Secretarial Experience"
Pres., Amer. Cancer Society
Bd. Directors Medical Cen.
Bd. Directors, Gulf County
Recreational Dept.

S Your Vote and
Support Will be
/ Appreciated
Pd. Pol. Adv., Paid for by Faye Stripling Cox


1U 'V


I would like to take this opportunity to thank the
citizens of Gulf County or for allowing me to go unopposed
in my bid for re-election as School Board Member from
District Four on the Democratic ticket.

I am indeed grateful and very humble at the trust
and confidence you have placed in me. I pledge, to you
the citizens, that I will continue in every way to justify the
faith you have in me.

I am always available to serve your needs.

THANKSAGAIN.

Waylon Graham
Pd. Pol. Adv., Pd. for by Waylon Graham


V A

O N















Eda Ruth Taylor

TAX COLLECTOR
Gulf County
QUALIFIED CAPABLE EXPERIENCED


AN EMPLOYEE IN THE TAX
COLLECTOR'S OFFICE FOR THE PAST
6V/ YEARS

Pd. Pal. Adv. for Eda Ruth Taylor, Pd. for by Mary Agnes Kilbourn.
Camp. Treas.
Camp. Treas.


I


PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, Pwrt St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1980


5ses.


)~aC









THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1980


ACub Scouts Are

Ready For Year Quartet
Themes for CUb Scout ae- ember is "'Cmmunications." The Frazer-- Boys Quartet
tivities.and programs for the Activities f'or the ontli will will have a Reunioi Concert
coming year have been an- include visits to radio andTVthis Sunday Night. August 17
nounced by the Gulf Coast Stations, demonstrations and t 7:30 .m. at the First
Council, Boy Scouts of Ameri- others. United Mthodist Church here
ca. Beginning in October, in Port St. Joe.
"The monthly themes offer monthly program themes will The Frazer Boys originated
packs and dens throughout the be as follows: October, "Cub in 1974 at Frazer Memorial
council the opportunity to Scout Citizen (Election of a United Methodist Church in
develop program ideas that President)."; November, Montgomery, Alabama. They
are fun and will achieve the "Thanksgiving, Living and .trely ffoua. sei
purposes of Cub Scounting," Sharing"; December;, .Happy ro fsionall in irit-
according to W. Robert Cree, Holidays"; January,, "Indian p "ensicl concs a
Scout Executive. The Cub-. Lore"; February, "Great the S h st The
Scout program offers boys Events of Scouting"; ch ver the South-east. They
ages 7 to 10 a year-round, Geius Night; April, "h Six Flags over Georgia, Unit-
home-centered program World Around Us"; May, Methodist Youth Fall Ral
emphasizing involvement with "Under the Big Top"; June, a Methods Y'ou Alabama
their parents, adult leaders, "Flags of America; July, West BFloridake Camp, Alabamnference
andM friends. "Famnily Picnic"; andrAugust West Florida Confer ence
SThecentral program activi- ,,Physical Fitness." Y' th a,"-,, ver'. ,
.y r-lating to the monthly people, and several city and
theme will be decided at each
pack's annual planning con-, 1 1
ference. Individual dens with -j_
Teacher B0-rd'
their specific part- of the C .:, .. B
overall program, which will The Gulf Couny Classroom One of the major topics to be
be presented at the monthly Teacher's Association and the discussed: will be, a written
pack meeting. Each program Gulf County School Board will -salary proposal from the
will inicude opportunities for have a negotiating session School Board
advancement. Thursday, August 14, at 5:00
pm E.D.T. The meeting will
rThe new monthly themes be held at Port St: Joe- -.
wibegin in September and Elementary School.
continue through August 1981.
The program theme for Selt- '-
Thae n kis fors m Tourneye
We would like to tak4 this
opportunity to thank all those
people who helped in any way
Sto make our recent Dixie
SYouth Baseball League Dis-
trict Tournament 'a success.
We especially would like to
thank Mrs. Dennis Scully and
the ladies from Xrafties Tearn
who helped so much in the
-:" *concession stand. Without' -'
their help, we would not have
ment.
*X Thanks-td all thosee who did
sucha great job on the field. It
really looked good throughout
David Lee Byrne the tournament, even with all
S;the rain. To the announcer,.
David L ee Byrn scorekeeper, etc., our sincere
SDavid .Lee Byrn e thanks. To all those who -
S. donated their time; efforts
Has Birthday and money, we say thanks.I :
Should not bepossible to rui
David Lee Bryne celebrated the league successfully with- :1 R
f: his first birthday on August 7 out such people as you. Ci
with a party at the home of his Scel
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. ... Sincerely,
Hubert Miller of Port St. Joe. Carland Jo
HeisthesonofMr.andMrs. : o a ..
' *KevinD.ByrneHeOIs also;thei .- : .y :
grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Jim P l
Bryne of Lucerne Valley, Cali- t
fornia. ..
-Notie
Limit NOTICE
d mNflPi Per NOTICE IS HEREBY
i~ : t nV Customer GIVEN that the Board of
U "County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Floria, at their regu-
t lar meeting on Tuesday, Aug-
ust 26, 1980, at 7:00 P.M.,
E.S.T., will consider a vari- I
m ance with regard to contour
li es and length of blocks on
proposed plats known as San
Bias Estates and Cape San
Blas Gulfside and Bayside 'B R I EF '


Reg. *2.85
Quality Can Spout
Nickel-plated quality
steel throughout with
neoprene gasket to pre-
vent leakage. Fits 1 qt.
to 1 gal. cans for quick,
complete can drainage.
720-1054






$ UReg. '9.79
Multi-Load
Grease Gun
All-steel, -spring. fed
hand gun develops up
to 10,000 lbs. pressure.
Will accommodate any
type cartridge and can
be hand or dispenser
loaded. 715-1241
'St. Joe.

Auto Parts
201 Long Avenue
Prices effective thru Aug. or while
slipplies last. -.


Al interested citizens are
invited to attend said meeting'
and: be heard.
BOARD of COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Douglas C. Birmingham,
Chairman
Attest: George Y. Core, Clerk
1t8-14
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND: FOR
GULF COUNTY.
: -'Case No. 80-150, Division Civil
IN RE:
The Marriage of
LARRY W. JOHNSON, husband,
and
PORTIA B. JOHNSON, wife.
;: NOTICE OF SUIT FOR
DISSOLUTIONOF MARRIAGE
TO:"PORTIA B. JOHNSON-
504 North 12th Avenue East
iuth, Minnesota `
S-ouare hereby noitifed that the above
SnamedPetitioner has filed suit against
you fO dissolution of. marriage In the
above entitled Court,and you are hereby
notified, to .file your answer or other
written defense with .the Clerk of this
Court and toserve a copy thereof upon
THEODORE R. BOWERS, Attorney for
Petitioner, Post Office Box 811, Panama
City, Florida- 32401 not later than
September;11, 1980. Herein fall not or a
default will'be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Petition.
-WITNESS my.hand and the seat of
said tourt at Panama City, Bay County.
Florida" this'42th day of August,. 1980
GEORGE Y. CORE,
Clerk of Circuit Court,
Gulf County, Florida
By: Susan E. Bigelow, Deputy Clerk
(SEAL) 4tc8-14


To Sing For Methodist


ance.
. Everyone is
tend.


invited to at-


soloist. He is currently youth
director of the First United,
Methodist Church.
Now, almost-two years
later,. this group of young men, .


Meet
All interested persons are
welcome to attend this very
importantsess.ion. FRAZER BOYS QUARTET-Left to,right: Brent
Markwelli, Ronald Gardner, Roy Harris and D. G. Markwell.


Vote for and Elect


' Minnie Ola McDaniel,

Supervisor of Elections
Pd POI. Adv Pa lor bv M.nne 018Oa McDameI


- 'I'


Pete's Air Conditioning

and Refrigeration

25 Years of Experience

Service On Commercial and

Residential Equipment


Expert Service

Phone 229-6446


..... ..... ..... . . -


-"i'awi -


i'-


PAGE FIVE


state-wide talent shows and. which blend gospel music with
contests. Barbershop harmony, are re-
n N b of 18, Ry ..uniting for a one time appear-
In November of 1978, Roy
Harris (Baritone) entered the
Armed Forces to serve his
country. Brent Markwell
(Tenoi) began traveling as a
merchandiser for'a major, .
-department store. Don Mar- '
well (Base) went to Auburn
University and played in their .
marching band. Ronald Gard-
ner (Lead) went to Hunting-
don College in Montgomery a
and began traveling as a A .


.~ .*ttl-


.I: : '~ i


-]


I


I




"I' "

PAGE SIX


t,


,-. .










'*i 2'. ,*
..'* *


'- : .'


ELDON B. MILLER,
REALTOR


648-5011 sA
: SA
: .It


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1980


We're Here ForYou..
Each office i' independently owned and operated.



E. B. MILLER REALTY


RENTAL,
Brand new, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage and porch
in Gulf Aire. 6 months lease minimum.
Available soon.


BEACH LOTS
A Ig. Selection of excel.
bldg. lots in Mexico Beach,
St. Joe Beach, Beacon Hill,
plus Gulf Aire lots. No. 900.
Commercial lots 90o 90',
i,20'x90', in Mexico Beach
Business Center. Lg. conm-
mercial lot-275' frontage
.on Hwy. 96, 320' on canal-
strategic corner on sWa-
going canal. No. 901
S168' Gulf front, 164' on U.S.
98i over 250' deep. Ideal for
investment or unique loca-
tion:for a beach home. No.
902.
COMMERCIAL
30'x90' commercial lot on
corner of Reid Ave. & 5th St.
Across alley from City Hall.
Priced right and owner will
finance.,$12,000. No. 703

3% acres,: close to town,
with store bldg., fully equip-
ped, including Ig. commer-
cial cooler, counters and is-
land shelving. Plenty of
room for expansion. Owner
may finance. Make offer.
No. 701.

PORT ST. JOE
New Listing: 523 Third St.
Available immediately. 3
bdrm., 1 ba. Carpeted liv.
rm;. Newly painted inside
and out. Conveniently' loc-
ated and very reasonably
priced at $14,000. Owner wil
consider financing at 10
percent. No. 111.
Price reduced! 4 bdrms.
and 2 ba. with nice 18%' x
23' family room. Stucco on
block exterior on 2 lots.
Plenty of room for the whole
:family! 1618 Marvin Ave.
$44,900 with terms available
New Listing: 4 bdrms, 2 kit-
chens, could be used as 2
apartments or a boarding
house. Room galore for the
large family, good garden,
space and utility house.
Quiet dead end street. No.
103
Low down payment, own-
er wants to sell. Assume
existing loan, owner will
accept 2nd mortgage at low
:: interest rate. 3 Ig. bdrms, 2.
ba., living rm, big den,
screen porch, cen. h&a, Ig.
lot with shade trees. Redec-
Sorated and, in excel. cond.
$44,500. 1101 Garrison Ave.
No. 102

Nice shady city lot, 516 7th
Street.
Income producing property.
Located on Reid Ave. 3 indi-
vidual income units. Buy
equity and assume 1st mort-
gage at 94. percent. $37,000.
No. 112
SExcel. opportunity for a
young couple to own their
;own home and have income
:from the property paying
the mortgage. 3 furnished
Rental units in addition to
Smain house. Owner financ-
ing available. Come find out
the details! $46,000. No. 100.
:Terrific starter home: 2
Sbdrm., 1 ba. furn. home on
62x150' corner lot. $23,500.
NO. 101

:Corner lot with nice 3
bdrm., 2 ba. house. Lg. liv.
rm & comfortable den.
Chain link fence, stor. shed,
shallow well and pump. 619
SMarvin Ave. $37,500. No. 104

Take-root in a 2 bdrm, 1 ba.
home on fenced lot. Liv. rm.
with fireplace, din. rm, re-
modeled kjchen, utility
house in back, new cen. h&a
Call for more. info. 527 10th
St. $25,000. No. 106

Beautiful executive home
Son THREE landscaped lots.
3 Ig. bdrms, 28' liv. rm.,
garage and double carport.
Lots of extras, including 1g.
screened Fla. rm. and 2
: workshops. 602 17th St. No.
: 107. $59,500.
: Clean and sharp, 1 bdrm.
with child's rm, fully furn.
: mobile home on corner lot in
Oak Grove. Well insulated,
Sagas central heat. Owner will
Finance, $7,500. No. 108.
SPractically new! 3 bdrm, 2
ba. brick home: Has all
amenities including wet
bar, b-b-q, trash compactor,
central vacuum system,
plus super location. 104 Yau-
pon. $59,900. No. 109 .


OVERSTREET
Two beautiful % acre lots at
Wetappo Estates, not far
from the Canal. No mobile
homes. Financing avail-
able.

ST. JOE BEACH
Absolutely immaculate,
charming beach cottage,
professionally decorated &
fully furnished with superb
taste. 2 bdrm., 1 ba. and kit-
chen is a homemaker's
dream. On. stilts among. the
pines. 75'x150' lot. This one
will go fast. $38,950. No. 206
Brick veneer energy saving
extra well-built 2 bdrm.
home on 2 lots. A home you
will be proud of. Call for
appt. Santa Anna St. $55,000.
No. 203
BEACH LOTS--3 lots, 1 blk.
from beach in St. Joe
Beach. Each lot 50'x125'
$16,750. No. 200
Excel. buy! 3 bdrm, 1 ba.
mobile home on 75'x10O' lot.
Block and a half from the
beach, $12,500. Santa Anna.
No. 201

3 bdrm., 2 ba. beauty on 2
lots, extra insulation thru-
out, carport, storage bldg.,
chain link fence. Less than 2
yrs. old. Will sell below re-
placement cost. (Ponce de
Leon). $47,500. No. 204
This most attractive beach
home is located 1 blk from
beach and is priced to sell. 2
bdrms, 1 ba., liv. rm., din.
rm, kitchen, cen. h&a, well
insulated, utility house and
fenced in back area. Canal
St. $22,500. No. 205.
Use your own skills and
imagination to complete a
partially finished house. 3
bdrms., 1 ba., liv. rm, din.
rm, garage with utility rm.,
only I block from beach. Ad-
jacent corner lot also avail-
able. $19,000. No. 207

Super nice beach cottage, 2
bdrm. den, or 3 bdrm., 2
ba. on U. S. 98, across from
beach. Unique design. Car-
pet & vinyl floors. Lg. utili-
ty rm, board privacy fence.
Sharpest cottage on beach.
$42,500. No. 208

Need more room? Beautiful
beige brick home on east
side of Hwy. 98. Lovely nat-
ural wood interior. 3 Ig.
bdrms;, 2 baths, den with
magnificent view of Gulf.
Huge bay windows, sun
deck. Fenced dog run. 25'
kitchen-dining rm., until. im,
very Ig. living rm with fire-
place. Adjoining acre. Will
sell separately. No. 209.

block from beach in good
location. Duplex with 2
bdrm. bath on each side.
Good rental or live one side,
rent the other. $26,000.00.
No. 202

BEACON HILL
3 bdrm. mobile home on
TWO wooded lots. Includes
very Ig. screened porch and
outdoor shower--only 1 blk.
from the beach! Partly fur-
nished, owner financed.
$21,250.

2 story house with sun deck
on U.S. 98, gives you a
beautiful view of the Gulf.
Completely furns, deluxe 4
bdrm., 2 ba. home. Ready
for occupancy. $65,000. No.
300'

CAPE SAN BLAS
Two gorgeous dry acres of
tall pines and shrubbery
with 205' fronting on the
highway and bay. Just
beyond' the old salt works
marker. Owner will sell all
or 100' either side. Finan-
cing available.

Gulf front 71' on the Penin-
pula. Beautiful homesite,
very reasonable. This one
will go fast. No. 11.


PATTY MILLER, Realtor Assoc.

AFTER HOURS
LERRIE ZYSKI 229-8494 JIM CLEMENT 648-5482
loker-Salesman Associate
NDRA CLENNEY 229-6310 DONNIE LANGE 229-8004
Maltor Associate Associate


Route 3, Box 167A Port St. Joe, Fla. 32456
1829 Hwy. 98 MEXICO BEACH


One of Ocean's Strange Inhabitants


With eyes at the end of each
arm, a stomach that can turn
inside out, and the ability to
regenerate new arms, the
starfish or sea star surely
ranks as one of the ocean's
strangest inhabitants.
Starfish, which are found in
tidepools of every ocean in the
world, are not really fish at
all, says the current issue of
Ranger Rick's Nature Maga-
zine. They belong to a group of
sea animals called echino-
derms, and come in a variety
of shapes, colors, and sizes.
The largest can measure two
or three feet across.
Sea stars get around by way
of hundreds of tiny tubelike


LOOK AT


INDIAN PASS
Observe the beauty of the
Gulf! This newly construct-
ed stilt beach home has ob-
servation deck for viewing
and sunning. 2 bdrms, insul-
ated thruout. Call for more
info. $39,500. No. 601

1.99 acres 150' on SR30 to
Indian Lagoon. Approx. 650'
depth. An ideal building site
cleared and filled. $41,250.
No. 603
'Be protected by Century
21's Home Protection Plan
when you purchase this
lovely 3 bdrm, 2 ba., cen.
h&a, fully modern home
only 1 blk. from .beach.
$40,000. No. 602.

MEXICO BEACH
Remodeled, cozy, 2 bdrm.
home on paved 386A (15th
St.) One block from beach.
Refrig., stove, dishwasher
stay. $29,500.00. No. 404
Valuable property on beach
side--3rd lot from beach!
Completely furnished dup-
lex on 28th St. 1 bdrm., I ba.
on each side. Call for more
info. $47,000. No. 401

Live within Walking dis-
tance of beach in a furn. 2
bdrm., 1% ba. mobil home
on 75'x112' corner lot. Utili-
ty shed in back with wash-
ing machine. 2 blks. from
beach at a nice affordable'
low price-$17,500. No. 402.

1 blk. from beach in a nice
location! Furn. 2 bdrm, 1
ba. home with screen porch.
Extra bdrm. and shower
connected. 2 a-c's. Call for
more information. $25,000.
No. 403
2-3 bdrm. mobile home' on
attractive fenced lot 2 blks.
from beach. Completely fur-
nished including washer &
TV. EXTRA 56' screened
rch! EXTRA 40' boat
house. Available immedi-
ately. No. 406.

ACREAGE
200' on Intracoastal Canal,
3.7 acres. % mile from
paved Hwy. 386. A beautiful
property for anyone who
wants to tie up his boat in
his own backyard. $30,000.
No. 800.
Almost 2 acres fronting on
Wetappo Creek. High and
dry with horseshoe bank
overlooking creek. Owner
may subdivide. $27,000. No.
804.
Shady lot at Howard Creek.
Just a few minutes walk
from the boat landing.
$3,000. No. 805
Perfect acre in Overstreet
for your new home. High, no
marsh. Not far from the
Intracoastal Canal. $3,500.
No. 806
Beautiful brand new 3 bdrm
2 ba. home on 6 private
acres. Modern "country"
living at its best. Priced in
the mid 50's. No. 807.
8.5 acres on 386, near Over-
street, all cleared. $50,000.
No. 802.

BUSINESS
FOR SALE.
Someone is missing a
really profitable oppor-
tunity here. If you have
even thought idly about
this, take the time to call.
and see if purchase can be
worked out to your satis-
faction.
Profitable, efficiently op-
erated business in Port
St. Joe. Known to all of-us
for quality sandwiches.
Buy this and if you
operate as well as pre-
sent owner, will pay for it-
self in a few short years-
known as the "Sub Shop".
No. 110.


"feet" located on the under-
side of each arm, explains the
National Wildlife Federation's
monthly publication for chil
dren. Suckers attached to the
end of the tubes enables the
animal to grip onto rocks, as
well as its next meal.
Once a sea star homes in on
dinner, a scallop perhaps, it
locks onto its shell, and its
tube feet begin to suck the
shell open. The scallop, with
only two muscles to hold its
shell tightly shut, quickly tires
of the tug-of-war.
It's a battle the scallop
always loses. After the shell is
opened, the sea starpushes its
stomach through its mouth,*


located at the center of its
body, surrounds, the scallop
with its stomach, and digests
it outside its body.
A close look at the ends of a
sea star's arms will reveal its
eyespots, which enable the
animal to see only light and
dark, not objects, say
Ranger Rick.
The sea star's arms are
expendable, eyespots, and all,
for new ones can be easily
regenerated. Shore birds or
sea otters may take a dive at a
tasty sea star and end up with
only a tidbit. Scientists have
discovered that even a small
part of a sea star's arm can
regenerate four new ones.


Colorful as they are, live sea
star shouldn't become part
of your summer sea shell
collection, advises Ranger
Rick, for they are a vital link
in the fragile marine life food
chain.

H.V. Fire Dept.

Frying Fish
The Highland View Volunte-
er Fire Department will be
sponsoring a fish fry Satur-
day, August 16, during the
political rally.
Serving will begin at 5:00
p.m, at the Highland View
Elementary School.


Cakes of salt have been used
as money in remote Tibet
and Africa.


1500 REWARD
For capture and conviction
of persons) breaking into
Red Cabin, Money Bayou.
Contact Willie Adams,
2708 Cambridge Rd., Al-
bany, GA 31707.
3tp 8-14


One 150 gal. propane tank,
some pipe. 648-5393. 3tp 8-14

20' travel trailer, -self con-7
trained, excel. cond. Phone
648-5665. 2tp 8-14

Sears 36" electric range,
push button with griddle, auto.
oven, timer-clock. $75 cash.
Call 229-6553 after 6. 2tp 8-14
1976 Cab-over camper for
mini trucks, sleeps 4 with
jacks and tie downs. $950.
Phone 229-6133. 2tp 8-14

TV's at the Hollanday Motel.
Color and black and white.
Start at $25. 2tc 8-7
Rabbits, bucks, does and
young. Price negotiable. 648-
8952 after 6:00. tfc 8-7

18' fiberglass cabin cruiser
with heavy duty trailer. Lots
of extras, excel, cond. 227-
1356. 2tp,8-7
1976 15% Marquis Mod. tri-
hull boat. Walk thru wind-
shield with a Dry Dock trail-
er. 85 h.p. Javelin with power
trim. 227-1271. tfc 7-31
1977 Kawasaki KZ-750
motorcycle. Like new, 5,500
miles on it. Phone 648-5997 or
229-6699. tfc 7-24

Garage Sale, two families at
2102 Cypress Ave., Sat., Aug:
16,9-5. ltp 8-14

Yard Sale: August 15, Fri.
(if not raining). 313 Fortner
Mexico Beach, from 8 to 6.
Glassware, household items,
jewelry & misc. items. ltp

Bargain and bake sale. Sat.,
Aug. 23, beginning at 9 a.m.
Faith Christian School. 20th &
Marvin.



A 5

Wanted to Buy: Camper
shell for 1980 Ford F100 swb.
In good cond. and reasonably
priced. 229-6154 or 229-7264.
ltp 8-14


Need Real Estate

Salesperson

To handle sales of Gulf-front properties
in Cape San Bias Indian Pass Beach
area. It is essential that person
selected be interested in a substantial
income. All replies confidential Phone
785-0566; nights 234-5877.
Wm. L. Glenn Associates, Inc.
P. O. Box 2294, Panama City, Florida


FO ENT


For Rent: Trailer at Mexico
Beach. 3 bdrm., 1 ba. 227-
1393. ltp 8-14

House for rent: 206 Sixth St.,
Highland View. Call 229-8570.
2tp8-7
2,000 sq. ft. hpme, 3 bdrms, 2
ba., den, living rm. Good loca-
tion. 227-1151. tfc 7-3
Furnished 2 bdrm. house,
auto. heat, no pets; furnished
large one bdrm. apt., auto.
heat, no pets. 229-6777 after 7
p.m. tfc 11-8

Thames Hotel, day, weekly,
monthly rates. 302 Reid Ave.,
229-8723.

No need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent.
machine. St. Joe Furniture,
227-1251. tfc 10-23


2 bedroom furnished house
on Canal St., St. Joe Beach. 1st
block from beach. Can be seen
Sunday, Aug. 17 or call Carol
Clark at 904-482-3844.

For carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vac, the portable steam car-
pet cleaning system. Avail-
able at Western Auto, phone
227-1105, 219 Reid Ave.
tfc 3-16






Qualified nutritionist to
direct WIC (Women, Infant,
Children) project for Port St.
Joe area. Call Gulf Co. Health
Dept. Phone 227-1276, P. 0.
Box 188, Port St. Joe, 32456.
4tc 7-31


R.A.M.-Regular convoca-
tion of St. Joseph Chapter No.
56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd Mor
days, 8 p.m. All visiting corr!
panions welcome.
E. E. WEEKS,H.P.
E. William McFarland, Sec.

There will be a regular com-
munication of 'Port St. Joe
Lodge No. 111, F. & A.M..
every first and third Thursday
at 8:00 p.m.
JOE ST. CLAIR,W.M.
J. P. Cooley, Sec.

The V.F.W. will meet every'
second Tues. and fourth Thur-
sday of each month at Paul-
ine's Rest. at 7 p.m. tfc 5-31


1972 Chevrolet Impala, 4 dr.,
air, new paint, runs good.
$1,300 cash. 2tp 8-14


I ~~~SERIE


Acre of land at Howard
Creek. 12x60' mobile home
with screen porch on one side.
Deep well, all fenced and
cross fenced. 2 pumps for gar-
den. Good outside buildings.
16' covered chicken pen. Call
Emory Stephens, 229-6803 or
229-8840. tfc 7-31

Modern 2-story, 3 bdrm.
home at Dead Lakes, Priced
to sell at $29,500. Call Blounts-
town, 674-8772 after 5 p.m.
5tc 8-7

3 bedroom house for sale or
rent. Fully carpeted, new
heat central and air. Newly
remodeled, fenced back yard.
If interested, call 1-318-357-
8378. 8tc9-1

Mobile home with 10x30'
addition on nice lot, furnished.
Douglas Landing. 229-6030.
4tp7-31

For Sale by Owner: 3 bdrm.
block house with 2 baths.
Located on Long Ave. near
schools. For more informa-
tion, call 227-1313 after 5 p.m.
tfc 11-14
3 beautiful wooded lots, 2
blocks from the beach. $4,500
ea. Call 229-6573 after 5 p.m.
.'- tfcl1-22

2 lots on Hickory Street,
approx. 100 yds. from river on
beautiful Red Bull Island,
Wewahitchka. Perfect area
for fishing and hunting. Each
lot 125' wide x 100' deep. For
quick sale, $2,195 ea. Call 904-
648-5351 after 5:00 p.m. tfc 7-17






Have a highly profitable and
beautiful Jean Shop of your
own. Featuring the latest in
Jeans, Denims and Sports-
wear. $14,500.00 includes be-
ginning inventory, fixtures
and training. You may have
your store open in as little as
15 days. Call any time for Mr.
Wilkerson, 1-214-631-4022.
"Never injure a friend, even
in jest." Cicero


Owner must relocate 82'xl 40' lot in new Oak Grove
subd. with new 1980 mobile home completely furnished,
ready to move in. For only $13,200.

Three bedroom masonry house with ceramic tile bath,
screened breezeway, carport, storage house. Neat
as a pin & priced to sell for only $26,900.

Large 2 bdrm., 2 bath Cottage with large screened

porch on two lots fronting Hwy. 98 at St. Joe Beach



HANNON INSURANCE & REALTY
Frank Hannon, Broker


221 Reid Avenue Roy Smith, Associate


227-1133


Complete Wood Shop Alcoholics Anonymous
Custom Cut Lumber Port St. Joe Serenity Group
Want to Do It Yourself? Sunday 4:00 P.M. EST
Thbn coinesee us for Stan-. St. James Episcqopl Church
ley tools, hardware, paneling,
paint, lumber. Air conditioning, refrigera-
Earley's Hardware & tion and major appliance re-
Building Supply pair. All work guaranteed.
Hwy. 98 W. 227-1763 John Hill. 229-6035. tfc 7-17
tfc 8-5 ,___-_. ...,, _,. r ._
Wa~iU k h~ll~l


For Your
STANLEY Home Needs
Phone Gail Zimmerman
229-6593
4tp7-31

"A philosopher is one who
doubts." Montaigne

.RED CARTER'S GUN SHOP
Port St. Joe Beach
Gunsmithing Blueing
New & Used Guns Scopes
tfc 4-3


Wouldn't You Really
Rather Have Cable TV?




For Cable TV
installation In Port St. Joe

Phone 229-7232 ,
Or Visit the Telephone Company
Business Office tfc 5-]


arpuentry TorI uuIone
Reasonable Rates
Jimmy Johnson
Phone 229-8757
tfc 2-2







648-8376
Foreign, Domestic
& Marine
Painting & Mechanics

Car Care

Center

(Located behind Mexico
Beach Shopping Center).


kills bugs for
Going Fishing? up tosix months,
Stop here first up to six months,
for a complete and saves you obout S100 yearl
oline of in costly pest control services.
Use of Sprayer free with

Fishing Tackle purchase of Rid-A-Bug
HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.'
Hurlbut Supply 306 Reid Avenue
3o6 Reid Ave. I Port St. Joe, Florida


FOR TRACTOR WORK
Call 220-8939 or 648-5306
tfc 8-14

For electrical work or re-'
pair, Ist class electrician. Call
227-1848. Rodney Bramton.
ltp 8-14

NOW SERVING YOUR
AREA-Finest quality inter-
ior and exterior painting, at
the very best prices. Prompt
and reliable service. Call 763-
4477: 4tp 8-14

Psychological services for
anyone with problems in day-
to-day living. Gulf County
Guidance Clinic, Port St. Joe.
227-1145. (24 hrs.)

CAREFOOT SEPTIC TANK
Septic Tank Cleaning '
Phone 229-8007
tfc 11-30

ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work Welding
506 First Street
Phone 2294803
Machinist on duty all day
every day
Smitty's Air Cond. &
Electric Contractor
Franchised Dealer for Fedder
Window units & central air
conditioning complete with
duct system. Residential &
commercial, wiring.
For Free Estimates, Call
648-5024 or 648-5650

IDLE HOUR
BEAUTY SALON
402 Third St.
Specializing In
Permanent Coloring
Shaping All Your Hair Needs
Owner, Betty Heath
Phone 229-6201 for Appt.
tfc 11-15


k


AnT Anns


I : .






:~:r


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1980


"Put Honesty Back In Your Government"
--- ELECT-


Billy M. Johnson

County Commissioner
District s5
Pd. Pol. Adv., Pd. for by Campaign Fund of Billy M.








energy miser Pumps. Energy Savers
Sales Service Installations
AIR CONDITIONING- REFRIGERATION
ICE MACHINES- HEATING EQUIPMENT

BILL WHITE'S

St. Joe Service Co.
229-6914
24 Hour Service '22 Years Experience
sEmia J .


ELECT -

Mildred W.Jones
.. .. YOUR
Supervisor of Election

Qualified Dependable Dedicated
Thank you so much for your vote
and support

21 Yrs. Secretarial Experience
Past Matron of Order of Eastern Star
SPast President, Fireman's Auxiliary
Farm Bureau Director
Pd. Pol. Adv., Pd. for by Mildred W. Jones, Camp. Treas.




For

Fair

and.

Honest



Enforcement




ELECT


ED BROWN

Sheriff of Gulf County
"An Honest Man Who Cares"
Paid Political Adv., Pd. for by
Campaign Fund of Ed Brown, by Phyllis A. Brown, Treasurer


l ERA PARKER REALTY
Hwy.9 at31stSt.-Mexico Beach, Fla.
Al you need to know Electronik Really Assoiates
Rel EAft-.eat' Eh .d,, qwjnd ,,,
HOUSES PORT ST. JOE
Prestigious 3 bdrm. brick home on -3. landscaped lots. Financing
available. 17th St.
Comfortable 3 bdrm. frame home in excel. cond. on 2 lots in nice neigh-
borhood. McClellan Ave.
Family 2 or 3 bdrm. block home with many possibilities on 2 lots near
practice golf course. Owner financing. Woodward Ave.
Lovely bdrm., 1% b. home n nice, onve nice, convenient neighborhood. Excel.
cond. with many extras. Equity and .assume low Interest loan.
* Cypress Ave.
Well-cared for 3 bdrm., 1% bath home. Landscaped, fenced yd. Must see
to appreciate and at a very affordable price. Cypress Ave.
3 bdrm. frame home In Oak Grove area near schools. Priced to sell.
"Real Estate Specialist for Over 30 Years". Calls us for information on
these as well as a large Inventory of houses and lots offered for sale in
Mexico Beach and surrounding areas. Rentals weekly or monthly.


MARGUERITE WAINRIGHT, Realtor


21,500 MEXICO BEACH. Newly
painted 2 bdrm, I ba. home with
single carport & Ig. screened-in
sun porch. Owner will finance.
$18,500 MEXICO BEACH. Take
advantage of this opportunity to
own this 3 bdrm, 2 be. mobile
home. Furnished and priced af-
fordably. Call and sea this home
today.
$45,U0S MEXICO BEACH. Beauti-
ful brick home with 3 bdrms, 2 be.
on Ig. lot. Short distance from
Gulf. Many extras. Call for an
appt. today.

ALISA DUREN
Realtor-Associate


PAGE SEVEN


Changes Made In Benefits


Prepare


for Curing


Large Trees


Are Found


Thruout State


Many a community in Flo-
rida has a tree so large and
impressive that it has geen
given a name and is protected
by admirers.
Most of these locally famous
trees are live oaks, among the
most majestic of all trees. But
there are other kinds that
have made reputations for
themselves.
Where is the largest live oak
in Florida? The largest mag-
nolia? Slash pine? Royal
palm? Where are the chain
pions of all the estimated 600
kinds of native and introduced
trees found in Florida?
The State Division of Fores-
try has announced a new,
statewide program to identify
and crown all the champions.
Public nominations are invit-
ed.
Anyone or any group can
nominate a tree. to the county
forester. If the tree appears to
have a chance to win the state
championship, the county
forester will officially identify
and measure it. Records will
be kept by the division of
Forestry 'in Tallahassee and
"Champion Tree" Certificates
will be awarded to the owners.
The field is wide open. State
champion trees have not been
recorded in Florida before.
There are more than 100 trees
growing here that have been
recognized as national cham-
pions. But until now there has
been no contest for state
champions.
The largest tree in Florida
may well be a bald cypress
growing near Sanford in a
Seminole County public park.
Named "The Senator", it is 36
feet, two inches in circum-
ference 4.5 feet above the
ground, and 138 feet high. It is
not a national champion. Bald
cypresses nearly 40 feet in
circumference have been
found in both Tennessee and
North Carolina.
Is the Senator truly the
largest tree of any kind in
Florida? Noboby can be sure.
Is there a still larger cypress
left by loggers to stand in
some remote swamp? If so,
perhaps a search for state


900BE. Hwy. 98
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Multiple Listing Service
648-8220


$60,000 MEXICO BEACH. Near
the water's edge, you'll find this
attractive 3 bdrm., 2 be. brick
home with family rm. & Ig. sun
porch. Located on Circle Dr. Call
and let us show you this today.
25,500 ST. JOE BEACH. Attrac.
tive 3 bdrm, 2 be. mobile home on
21g. lots. Partially furnished. Low
equity assumption and payments
like rent.
$27,900ST. JOE BEACH. Recently
remodeled 2 bdrm, 1 be. home on
corner of Ward St. and Alabama
Ave. Carpeted and ready for occu-
pancy. Call us today.

648-8220


S35,000 ST. JOE BEACH. Enjoy
the view of the Gulf from this at-
tractive 3 bdrm, 1v/ be. home
located on Santa Anna St. Owner
will finance.
New Listing. ST. JOE BEACH.
Executive home 3 bdrm, 2 be., IIV.
rm, modern kitchen, family rm.
with Ig. sun porch overlooking
privatepool. Call usfor an appt. to
see this lovely home today.
PORT ST. JOE. Very nice 3 bdrm,
1% be. brick home on 1 acre. Lg.
family rm, modern kitchen, din.
area, Ig. screened-In sun porch,
double car garage. Close to school
and shopping. Call for an appt.
today.
ISAAC DUREN
Broker-Salesman


Herman Jones (in bathing suit) watches
while employees of St. Joe Paper Company
prepare the set of railroad wheels Jones
recovered last week for curing. The curing
process, which is a period of washing, is
designed to keep the wheels from corroding
after they are exposed to the air. The wheels
had been in St. Joseph Bay for about 140
years. Jones found the wheels in St. Joseph
Bay while skin diving. --Star photo


champions by many people
will find it.
Two of the world's most
poisonous trees growing Flori-
da. Where are the champions
of this pair of little horrors?
They are the poison sumac
of north and west Florida,
which isn't a sumac at all but
a member of the infamous
poison ivy family, and the
deadly little manchineel of the
Keys and extreme south Flori-
da, reputed to be the most
toxic tree in North America.
Fortunately, both little trees
are rare and grown in out-of-
the-way places and.shouldn't
be-sought out for extermina-
tion. But everything about
both can be injurious, from the
sap to the rainwater runoff
from the leaves to the smoke
from burning any part of
either.
As soon as enough state
champions have been identi-
fied and certified, a listing will
be printed by the Division of
Forestry for the general pub-
lic. The crowns are expected
to change often in the first
year or two as larger and
Larger trees are discovered.


Important changes have.
been made in the way benefits
are figured for workers who.
first become entitled for social
security disability benefits
after June, David Robinson,
Social Security Field Repre-
sentative for GulfCounty, said
recently.
People who were receiving
benefits before that date are
not affected.
The new law limits the total
benefits payable to a disabled
worker and his or her family,
Robinson said. Under the old
law, there were times when a
disabled worker and his or her
family received more in bene-
fits than the worker received
in take-home pay before be-
coming disabled. As a result,
there was less incentive for
the worker to return to work.
The new law limits family
benefits to the smaller of 1/
times the worker's benefits or
85 percent of his or her
average monthly earnings be-
fore becoming disabled. The
limit has no effect on 'the
worker's own benefit.
More information about the
changes in the disability law
can be obtained at. the Pana-
ma City Social Security


*
*
*<
*
*
*f
*

*^
*<
*<
3*
*(
*
*-
*^


Office. The office is located at and the telephone number is
30 West Government Street, 769-4871.


Dixie Belle Motel Has Opened A

TACKLE SHOP

We Have A Good Inventory of
FISHING POLES, REELS, TACKLE, MISC.
AT HARD TO BEAT PRICES
BAIT, SHRIMP, SQUID& CIGAR MINNOWS





Athletic House
323 REID AVENUE

For All Your Athletic Needs

Shark Jerseys
7 "Pep Club" Shirts
S.J.H.S.
kt P.E. Shorts and Shirts
Football Shoes
's "Bulldog" Back Packs
"Shark" Tote Bags
( / "Bulldog" Gym Shorts

Faith Chrisitan Back Packs & Tee Shirts
Converse Gym Shoes, Seminole Jerseys
ORDER YOUR SCHOOL JACKETS NOW
Faith Christian "Lions"
St. Joe Elementary "Bulldogs"
St. Joe High "Sharks"


B. J. (Bill)



Rich, Sr.



Tax Collector

I will run this office efficiently and
economically

Your Vote Will Be Appreciated

Pd. Pol. Adv., Pd. for B. J. (Bill) Rich, Sr.
* ******* *****


*-





*^i.
*
*'
.*
*<
*





**4


Vote For -


ELDRIDGE MONEY
A Man of Integrity for
County Commissioner, Dist. 5

I will work for all Gulf County for a better place to
live, with integrity and without partiality, "God being
my helper".
Pd. Pol. Adv., Pd. for by Eldridge Money


BECAUSE OF THE

Make Your Move Now' REDUCED ROLLING
RESISTANCE OF
-- L MICHELIN RADIALS
OVER BIAS-PLY TIRES

E U YOUR CAR COULD USE
SA- F E L BETWEEN 5% & 8%/ LESS
GASOLINE! DEPENDING
ON HOW YOU DRIVE.
MICHELIN MICHELIN COME IN

Xzx X TODAY!

AMERICA'S CHOICE FOR AMERICA'S CHOICE FOR
IMPOKi u CARS! AMERICAN CARS! 9
SIZE 'NOW FE.T. SE NOW, FEUP .
155-13 $48.58. 1.48 BR78-13 $69.61 2.13
165-13 $53.28 1.61 CR78-14 $71.02 2.36
175-13 $57.66 1.86 ER78-14 $76.14 2.60
175-14 $59.33 1.86 E R78-14 $78.59 2.70
185-14 $63.51 2.28 GR78-14 $83.94 2.88
145-15 $47.42 1.43 GR78-15 $85.43 2.95
15515 $53. 23 1.66 HR7815 $88.34 3.16
165-15 -$57.88 1.81 JR78-15 1$92.36 3.13
235-15 $107.33 3.38







MICHELIN ... the fastest growing tire company in America!






PATE'S SERVICE CENTER

Phone 227-1291 Port St. Joe 219 Monument Ave.


-r ,,* .


~I ** + + + + + + -* + +:+: ~ + ~ + + + ++~









PAGE EIGHT


THE STAR. Port St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1980


Blankenship Heads State Visit In Va.


Brucellosis Program


Smart Investors always seek the
greatest dividends for their invest-
ment. .. so here's a tip for you. A
.small investment of your time in
, regular check-Ops by your family
doctor can result in the most preci-
ous dividend of all. good health.
Don't gamble with your health.. :
invest in your future. Make an ap)-
pointment for a physical examina-,
tion now.
-. OUl p PHARMACY


S.. BUZZETT'S,
DRUGSTORE

:'"Self-control is at the root
;all virtues." Samuel Smil


'I


of
es


The Florida Department of
Agriculture & Consumer Ser-
vices and the U.S. Department
of Agriculture & Consumer
Services and the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture have
named Bob Blankenship as
the Brucellosis Information
Coordinator to assist in the
cooperative state-federal
brucellosis eradication pro-
gram.
The purpose of the statewide
information plan is to make
information readily available
to herd owners. State Veteri-
narian Dr. C.L. Campbell,
Director of the division of
Animal Industry, says that
this is an important step in
helping Florida reach the
nationwide goal of eliminating


WILLIAM EARL BURROWS

New Baby
Mr. and Mrs. Willie Bur-
rows are proud to announce
the birth of a baby boy, named
William Earl. The baby was
3orn on July 13th, at Bay
Memorial Hospital in Panama
City.
Paternal grandmother is
Oma Burrows and maternal
grandparents are Freeman
Rogers, Lily Demont and
Elizabeth Turner.


brucellosis completely.
The program will involve
input from the state extension
service, veterinarians, beef
and dairy organizations;
special interest groups, farm
credit associations, as well as
herd owners and any other
groups concerned with brucel-
losis eradication.
According to Dr. W.W. Bird,
USDA's Animal and Plant
Health Inspection Service
veterinarian in charge, "a
public understanding of the
program is essential in order
for it to be effective."
Here in Florida there is a
relatively high rate of infec-
tion with known brucellosis
infected herd.


Mrs. Junior Glass and Mrs.
Thomas Webb of Oak Grove
accompanied by Miss Robin
Glass of Amherst, Virginia
(who had been visiting a
month with her grandparents,
Mr. and Mrs. Junior Glass)


spent two weeks in Amherst,
Virginia at the home of Mrs
Glass son R.H. Glassa1
Family. 0
While they were there, they
saw many interesting places.
Also, Mrs. Webb, Mrs. Linda
Glass, and Miss Robin Glass
spent two days in Washington,
D.C. sightseeing and a tour of
the White House.


-HOME HEALTH
S- Im


The above picture, one of Leo Kennedy's accomplish-
ments during the present term as your County Com-
missioner from Dist. 5, through the Florida Panhan-
die Health System Agency as a member of the General
Council, with the assistance of Mrs. Mary Adell
Jackson and Bob Davis of the Advisory Council.
A Man of Action, Not Promises
I'll Never Let You Down, My Time Is Your Time


ge-


Leo Kennedy


County Commissioner, Dist. 5
Pd. Pol. Adv., Pd. for Leo Kennedy


'Ea
-ELECT -


Ted Whitfield, Jr.
Your
School Board Member-Dist. 2
Gulf County
YOUR VOTE AND SUPPORT WILL BE APPRECIATED
, Pal. Adv, for Ted Whitfield, Jr., Pd. for by Doris K. Whitfi ld, Camp. Treas.


-VOTE FOR AND ELECT-

Cora Sue


ROBINSON





E -.

V C



O 0
R N
Qualified Dependable Cooperative
Pd. Pol. Adv. for Cora Sue Robinson, Paid for by Camp Treat Margaret Smith


CAPABLE


ACCESSIBLE


CONCERNED

-ELECT-

Leon F.

Pollock, Jr.

COUNTY
COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 5

AGGRESSIVE


The Most Qualified

Candidate


WORK HISTORY
Labor- Management
Self Employed
USAF, Hon. Discharge
SJPC 1960 & 1970
Philco Corp. Field
Engineer
IBM Administrative
Operations Manager
Lederle Laboratories
Medical Representative
Owner Pollock's Clean-
ers
Owner Sears Catalog
Merchant Store current-


EDUCATION
Associate of Arts, Ga.
Southern College
Bachelor of Arts, Poli-
tical Science, Univ. of
Georgia
Master of Arts, Political
Science, Major Field -
Public Administration,
University of Georgia
MEMBER OF
Rotary Club
Past President
Merchants Association
Treasurer Currently
American Cancer Soc.


,1 Past Chairman
Pd. Pol. Adv., Pd. for by Leon F. Pollock, Jr.


Annual Kill
Steve Wood, who seems to manage to find a large rattler
every year about this time near the Chevron plant on First
Street, came up with this four footer last Friday. Woods said
the snake was chased out of tall grass being cut by city crews
in the vicinity. -Star photo
*********** **************
* *
* IN WASHINGTON *

WITH

-EARL


HUTTO
* ***********************


THE GLOBAL 2000 REPORT
(First of a Two-part series)


I think that most human
beings feel an obligation
toward children and the loved
ones who follow them after
they pass away. As one who
has 'lived through a depres-
sion and two major wars, I
would like to think that my
children' will enjoy a better
standard of living than I have
known. For most of my
generation, that has been the
case; but the likelihood for
continued propserity seems in
jeopardy according to a
recently released report, the
Global 2000 Report. This
comprehensive study was
conducted by the Council on
Environmental Quality and
the Department 'of State,
working with other federal
agencies, to determine the
probable changes in the
world's population, natural
resources, and environment
through the .end of the cen-
tury. Although there have
been other studies by various
groups in the past, no other
study can match the Global
2000 Report in the richness of
detail for the various in-
dividual sectors such as food
and agriculture, water,
energy, population and so
on. What emerges are not
predictions but projections of
the future world population,
resources, and environment if
present policies continue.
Unfortunately, the results are
less than encouraging.
According to the report,
"If present trends continue,
the world in 2000 will be
more crowded, more
polluted, less stable
ecologically, and more
vulnerable to disruption than
the world we live in now."
Here are some of the findings
in the report:
- In 1975, there were 4


billion people in the world.
By 2000, there will be 6.35
billion.
- The population of the
United States will increase
from 214 million to 248
million; Latin America from
325 million to 637 million;
Western .Europe from 344
million to 378 million; Russia
and Eastern Europe from 384
million to 460 million; Asia
and Oceania' from 2,274
million to 3,630 million;
Africa from 399 million to
814 million; and other in-
dustrialized countries in-
cluding Japan and Canada
from 151 million to 183
million.
- World food production is
projected to increase 90% by
2000 which is a per capital in-
crease of less than 15%. Real
prices for food are expected
to double.
- Arable land will increase
only 4% by 2000 so that most
of the increased output will
have to come from higher
yields, which depends heavily
upon fertilizers, pesticides,
power facilities to irrigate,
and fuel availability.
- Coal, oil, gas, oil shale,
tar sands, and uranium -
the world's finite fuel re-
sources are unevenly
distributed and they pose
economic and environmental
problems. In addition to this,
they vary greatly in the
amenability to exploitation
and use.
- Atmospheric concentra-
tion of carbon dioxide and
ozone depleting chemicals are
expected to increase at rates
that could alter the world
climate and upper at-
mosphere significantly by
2050.
- Regional water shortages


Rap Rattler

Robert Farmer and Amos Pittman put this big 5'6"
rattlesnake to rest with a big stick Monday afternoon. They
found the large snake in front of the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Willie B. McLeod on Liberty Street. -Star photo


will become more severe.
Development of, new water
supplies will become more,
costly virtually everywhere.
- World energy demand is
projected to increase 58%,
reaching 384 quads
(quadrillion British Thermal
Units) by 1990. Nuclear and.
hydro sources will increase
most rapidly (226% by 1990),
followed by. oil (58%),
natural gas (43%), and coal
(13%). Prices will continue to
rise for petroleum products
as they will reach their peak
production before the end of
the century. This, in turn,
will encourage the adoption
of alternative fuels and


technologies such as coal,
solar, and certain conserva-
tion measures.
In short, the Global 2000
Report depicts conditions
that are likely to develop if
there are no changes in public
policies, institutions, or rates
of technological advance,
and if there are no wars or
other major disruptions. I
believe that we as Americans,
with the most preeminent
economy in the world, can
overcome these obstacles and
provide for future genera-
tions. It will not, however, be
easy.
Next week 1 will discuss
how this can be done.


Now Open for Business

rto Paint and
Burton s Body Shop

Highway,98 & 1st St. Highland View
Phone 229-6449
Save s 0 -This Week's Special Average Car
Car Undercoating Prce $39.95
We Specialize In Paint and Body Work
FREE ESTIMATES for your insurance claims, body
work, undercoating and painting. We carry all Gulf Oil
products.
Light MechanicMan On Duty



You Are Cordially Invited to Attend

LONG AVENUE

Baptist Church

Corner Long Ave. and 16th St.

SUNDAY SCHOOL ................ 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ............. 11:'00A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING .............. 5:45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ............. 7:00 P.M.:
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday).... 7:00 P.M.


Rev. J. C. ODUM,
Pastor


JEROME CARTIER,
Minister of Music


-Elect-


Myers D. Boring

School Board Dist. 2

Associate degree in Education
Proven Businessman (Big B
Drive In)
U. S. Navy Retired
Member United Pentecostal Church

Pd. Pol. Adv., Pd. for by Myers D. Boring



A yMuessage .from


KEN


MURPHY

to the People

of

GulfCounty


I sincerely appreciate your support in the last four
years. The comments about your department, both
good and bad, have been most welcome. They have
helped me in making your Sheriff's office more
efficient.
You asked me, and I promised, to be available to
handle your problems. I have been available on a 24-
hour basis, and I have never been too busy to sit down
and talk.
I realize I have not visited with you in your homes
and businesses as much as I would have liked to, but
you elected me to do a job for you, and I believe when
you call on your Sheriff he should be available at all
times, because problems have to be solved and
decisions have to be made, as soon as possible, without
delay. The easy part of being your Sheriff is visiting
with you, the people. The hard part is working
constantly to keep Gulf County a better place to live, as
it is now. So, you can rest assured I have been working
and doing the job you elected me to do.
I will continue to work with all my 23 years
experience as long as you, the people, want me. There
is no magic formula to solving crime, only hard and
continuous work.
Your continued support will be appreciated on
September 9th.
Re-Elect


Ken Murphy


Your Sheriff
Pd. Pol. Adv. for Ken Murphy, Paid for by
Jim Cooley, Campaign Treasurer


NEW BETHEL
African Methodist Episcopal Church
146 Avenue C Phone 227-1213
Rev. James W. Williams, Pastor

SUNDAY SCHOOL .................. 9:30 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .............. 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ............... 6:00P.M.
"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer,
Man Our Brother"


1




,'- ..:. ,


~w ~


J.


Cofdec at Sa Shp wthConidece t-


We Reserve the Right
to Limit Quantity


Cigarettes Excluded In
Limit Deals


[-m


HCt../


Prices Good
Aug. 13 thru 19


510 Fifth Street
Port St. Joe


16 OZ. N-RICh
COFFEE CREAMER
30 Oz. Realemon Mix
LEMONADE


10 Oz. Barnma
FRUIT DRINK
10 Count Glad
TRASH BAGS


$1 09 10 Oz. Castleberry-Limit 1 Deal
A HOT DOG /s O0O
$288 CHILI 5 100
limit 5 Cans with $30 Order
4/$1oo 4/$100 with 3/$1O.th
5/ $20 OrderV 10 $10 Order


$1.39


SReal Kill
'ROACH TRAPS


32 Oz. Returnaqble Bottles BARGAINS
COCA COLA, 3 Q C EXTRA forr
TAB, SPRITE I v HEAVY SHOPPERS


"Is


$1.39 W
Your Choice FINE FARE
BLACKEYE PEAS
CROWDER PEAS


16 Oz.
Cans


3/99C


Light Crust Limit 1 with $10 Order

FLOUR 5Lb. Bag


49~


TURKEY PARTS
DRUMSTICKS,
WINGS & NECKS


39c


2nd Big Week- Sasser's
COUNTRY
SAUSAGE


$179
Lb.


End Cut
Pork Chops
Tender Beef
Cube Steak
Favorite
Sliced Bacon


Tender Select
Beef Liver


Lb. $1.19

Lb. $2.59


Lb. 990

Lb. 990


12 Oz. Disinfectant
LYSOL SPRAY
25 Lbs. Jim Dandy
DOG RATION
48 Oz.
WESSON OIL


12 Ounce
PERK


M 1 Lb. Jim Dandy
om Yellow RICE


Meadow Gold-',/ Gal. Limit 1
With $10 Order $128
Ice Cream 28


,$448 with
$20 Order
G&W 10 Ounce
PIZZAS


$168 With
$10 Order


$107


S/2Gallon Barber
Choc. MilkS1


Mrs. Filbert's Gold. 1A 's
MARGARINE
12 Oz. Kraft Amer. Singles
SLI. CHEESE


29


59C
$148


I ,hi


72-'0


Quartered Chicken
Breast

Lb.
59C
Quartered
Chic. Legs

59C


iU U,


V lIS


-?"


w


$188

$499
$249
$129

79


Dairy Items


I YCK


.r,.


101


7


. 1 1r V







'PAGE TEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.



Florida Powe
V Flurida Power Corpora- suiting from the fermentation
tion's search for alternative of cattle wastes.
sources of energy took another At 10 o'clock this morning,
S.step forward today when, for the Honorable Andy Ireland,
j e first time in Florida on a member of Congress from
continuing basis, electricity Florida's 8th District, pushed
S was made from methane gas a bright red "start" button
itn a pilot-scale program re- that put a 440-kilowatt genera-


IFirst

Presbyterian Church
Sixteenth Street and Forrest Park Avenue
Phone 227-1756
SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE ...... 10:00 A.M.
ADULT SUNDAY SCHOOL CLASS .... 11:00 A.M.
Study in the Gospels, Wetnesday -7:00-7:45

71 Welcome to Everyone
; .JOHN M. STUART. Pastor
Phonp 229-6857



-Elect


KENNETH D.

HERRING

Superintendent of
Gulf County Schools
Pd. P ol0. Adv., Pd. for Kenneth
D. Herring


liIu CATION'.
Abbevllle High School
H61meii Jr. College
tA AtMn Peay State Univ.
Abburn University
Florida State Univ..
Univ. of Florida
stetson.Uriv.
' Amhirst College
Agnes Scott College
-Florida State Univ.
Univ. of Mtssissippi


CERTIFICATION
H. S. Diploma '4
B. S. Degree '54
M. Ed. Degree '5 '
*Cert. in Adm. K.12 '63
Admiri.& Super.
-.- ;.Courses'56&'68'
Courses in Admmn &
Supervision *66
Updating Trends in Ed.
ucation, '66,
Updating Trends in Ed-
ucation, '74
Voc. Ed., Minorities '74
Updating Trends in Ed-.
ucafion, '75


EXPERIENCE
Classroom, 8 years
Eng., Hist., Dr. Ed, PE
Coaching 8 years, Foot.
ball, Basketball &
Baseball
Athletic Director, 3 yrs:.
Asst. Principal, 2 years
Principal, 16 years
PSJHS Princ., '72-'7.
H.V. Elem. Prin. 78-'80
Many .workshops, inser-
vices & Accreditation
Committees


QUALITY EDUCATION THROUGH
INTEGRITY AND EXPERIENCE

KENNETH D. HERRING
Supt. of Gulf County Schools




NOTICE

Sale of Used Vehicles

The St. Joseph Telephone

'& Telegraph Company

will sell the below listed vehicles:
Vehicle No. 109 S-N PH45K2D139426
'72 Plymouth Wagon $ 495.00
Vehicle No. 415 S-N CCCQ145A145201
'75 Chevrolet VT P-Us cyl.$1350.00
Vehicle No. 416 S-N CCQ145AI45281
'75 Chevrolet T P-U' cyi.$1375.00
Vehicle No. 420 S-N CCQ145A145242
'75 Chevrolet T P-U6 cy,.$1375.00
. Vehicle No. 424 S-N CCQ145A145463
'75 Chevrolet 2T P-U6 cyl. $1375.00

The price is listed above and payment will
be cash or certified

These vehicles can be seen at the Supply
Coinplex in Port St. Joe, Fla.

The above units are publicly advertised and
will be sold on first come, first served basis

CONTACT: Bernard 0. Wester,

Supply Manager
St. Joseph Telephone & Telephone Co.
229-6737 or 229-7263


THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1980



r Looks for New Energy
tor into operation at the apartment. When not needed by the Federal Department of the company's utilization of a
Kaplan Industries'cattlefeed- Kaplan, the power could be Energy. mixture of oil and finely
lot just south of the city of used to illuminate lights or run To relieve the company's ground coal as a boiler fuel.


Bartow. Power from the na-
tural gas engine or generator
,now can be used to provide
refrigeration and other ser-
vices to the feedlot and meat
packing facility through the
city of Bartow electrical de-


machinery in Bartow.
The $300,000 generation pro-
ject is a joint endeavor of
Florida Power, Kaplan Indus-
tries, with the Hamilton Stan-
dard, Division of United Tech-
nologies and under contract to


(and the nation's) reliance on
oil as an electric fuel, Florida
Power has become involved in
or pioneered several notable
experiments with alternative
sources of Fuel. Th; most
successful of these, to date, is


Nancy Noble Entering the


Stetson School of Law


NANCY NOBLE


Ms. Nancy Noble, of Port St.
Joe will be attending Stetson
college of Law this fall.
Ms. Noble attended Port St.
Joe High School where she
participated in band as a
majorette and musician, was
a member of National Honor
Society, diversified Coopera-
tive Training and graduated
with high honors.
Upon graduation from high
scho61l, Nancy Noble attended
Wesleyan College in Macon,
Georgia, where she received a
BA in Elementary and Early
Childhood Education with a
concentration in English Com-
munications. While at
Wesleyan Nancy Noble re-
ceived the Freshman Honor
Scholarship. Ms. Noble was
also on the homecoming court,
May court, participated as a
cheerleader, elected to Phi


Heat Relief


Furnished to


Elderly Needy


An end to the summer heat
wave may. be slow in coming,
but families unable to pay for
a new fan or a higher cooling
bill are now eligible for some
financial relief.
Congress passed a law the
last week of July allowing the
federal government to extend
financial assistance for home
cooling as well as for home
heating. This corrects an
inequity; in the home energy
assistance-bill passed in 1979
as part of the windfall profits
tax bill.
"It took a disastrous sum-
mer heat wave that has killed
more than 2,000 people to
.convince Congress that too
much heat can be as serious as
too much cold," said Sen. Dick
Stone. "That's a tragedy, but-
maybe this, new aid can
prevent some deaths among
others."
During debate on the bill in
the Senate, Sen. Lawton Chiles
pointed out that his Senate
Committee on Aging had held
hearings on the problem of
low-income persons affected
by the heat wave. He said,
"Witnesses confirmed that the
majority of the 2,000 deaths
caused by the heat were
elderly and that most of the
thousands hospitalized were


older persons. Often these
persons were low-income,
lived in old, uninsulated hous-
ing and had no cooling de-
vices. Moreover, rpany who
were stricken were found to
have fans or window air
conditioning but were afraid
to use them because of the
impact on their utility bills.
One witness testified that an
increase as little as $13 a
month was enough to keep
some persons from using their
fans in heat as high as 110
degress."
When the Senate adopted
the home energy assistance
act last year, Sen. Stone and
others pushed for full consid-
eration of the problems of
excessive heat. The senate
adopted an amendment intro-
duced' by Stone, Chiles and
others that gave priority for
this aid to elderly and handi-
capped persons. They also
invinced the Senate to reject
an attempt to block any
federal funds from being used
for cooling. However, an
amendment passed the Senate
at that time which skewed the
aid formula in favor of states
with colder climates. This
meant more federal money
was available for heating
assistance than for cooling.


Wewa CS Chapter


Sponsors Dance


The Wewahitchka chapter
of the Cystic Fibrosis Founda-
tion is sponsoring a Communi-
ty Dance on August 22 at the
Community Center from 7:00
to 12:00 p.m., CDT.
All ages are invited to come
and participate. There will be
a dance contest for those who
wish to enter. Prizes will be
awarded to the best couple in
each group consisting of ages


Hannon Insurance

Agency

The Insurance Store Since 1943


Auto Home Business Life Flood

Bonds Mutual Funds


8:30 til 6:00, Monday through Friday


221. Reid Avenue


Phone 227-1133


We are HERE to Service What We Sell


10 through 13 and ages 14 on
up.
Live music will be provided
by two bands: "The Jessie
Bailey Band," consisting of
Kenny Smith, Joel Smith,
Glen Roy, Ron Brailey, Allen
Lytle, and Cokie DuBruel; and
"At Random. From Wewa",
formerly "Future Gold", is
composed of Dell Jackson,
Robert Daniels, Juan Stevens,
and Dale Stevens.
Concessions will be avail-
able. The dance will be well
chaperoned and parents are
welcome.

Art Show

On Display

In Panama

The opening ceremonies of
the 19th Bay Annual Art Show
were held at 2:00 pm Sunday,
August 10 at the Municipal
Auditorium in Panama City.
The Bay Annual Art Show
will be open to the public from
August 11 through September
12. All works will be on display
at the Municipal Auditorium
between the hours of 9:00 am
to 12:00 pm., and the 1:00 pm.
to 4:00 pm, Monday through
Friday.


Kappa Phi honorary academ-
ic organization, Kappa Delta
Epsilon honorary educational
organization, and Who's Who
in American Colleges and Uni-
versities, awarded for selec-
tion in the Rebecca caudill
Children's Book Award, the
recognized founder of the
Wesleyan Student Alumnae
Organization and graduated
Magna Cum Laude.
Upon graduation from
Wesleyan, Ms. Noble joined
the Warner Robins Police
Department, Warner Robins,
Georgia, as a Public Rela-
tions Police Officer where she
developed an educational plan
entitled "Youth and the Law".
She continued studies at Tift
College, Forsyth, Georgia, in
Criminal Justice.
Completing her project at
Warner Robins, Ms. Noble
returned to Port St. Joe where
she was employed as an
instructor at Port St. Joe High
School for the Work Experi-
ence Program and Law Stud-
ies course.

St. Vincent,

Projects.

At An End
The YCC ended its summer
projects on St. Vincent Na-
tional Wildlife Refuge Tues-
day, August 12. Among the
many beneficial projects com-
pleted by YCC were a scenic
two and half mile nature trail
on St. Vincent Island and
evening Loggerhead turtle
patrols (an endangered
species protected by law).
The closing of camp cere-
mony took place Friday,
August 8th, on St. Vincent
Island. Parents of the enrol-
lees and local school board
representatives were invited
to attend and given the
opportunity to walk the newly
completed trail.

Area Grads

Get Degrees

From FSU
Florida State University
awarded degrees to approxi-
mately 3,862 students in the
spring quarter of 1980.
Graduates from the Port St.
Joe area are as follows:
Gibson, Kimberly Fern
Overstreet, BS in Business.
Henderson, Arleatha, 242
Avenue B, BS in Home Econo-
mics, and
Melton, Lisa Laroy, 1807
Garrison Avenue, BS in Social
Science.


The company also is involv-
ed with the production of
electricity from solar cells (in
a project with DOE and Sea
World); supporting the deve-
lopment of the utilization of
sea water temperature dif-
ferentials to produce electri-
city and or hydrogen for use as
a fuel in a conventional power
plant boiler 'with DOE,
Tamp Electric Company and
Florida Power and Light
Company); is investigating
the feasibility of the gasifica-
tion of coal to make it useable
in a modified oil-burning
plant; and is studying the
possibility of using wood as a
boiler fuel to generate elec-
tricity.
"A large part of our re-
search and development pro-
gram is built around alter-
native energy sources," said
company President Andrew
H. Hines, Jr. "We have cut our
use of oil by nearly half in only
five years and will reduce it
further in the future, until it
becomes a less significant
source of electric energy."
It takes the waste from
10,000 cattle to produce
enough methane gas to run the
packing house boiler and to
operate the electric generator.
The methane produced at
the Kaplan site is equivalent
to the energy provided by
about 30 barrels of oil a day -
enough energy to' provide
electrical service to approxi-
mately 240 "average" Florida
homes.
As a result of a project
requirement to approximate a
"real life" situation, Kaplan
charges Florida Power for the
methane gas, Florida Power
sells the electricity to the
Bartow municipal electrical
system which, in turn, sells it
to Kaplan. "While the com-
pany is not making money on
the project, our customers are
not subsidizing it at all,"
Hines emphasized. "And, in
the long run, the more we
learn about renewable energy
resources the better off we
will all be."


-VOTE FOR AND ELECT-

Robert L.

MONTGOMERY

Supervisor of Election
Experienced In Keeping Records
Experienced In Public Relations
Pd. Pol. Adv., Pd. for by Robert L. Montgomery, Camp. Treas.



FIRST

BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Third Streed and BaltzelI Avenue
REV. BILL HEATON, Pastor
AL YANCEY, Minister of Music
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE ........ 11:00 A.M.!
CHURCH TRAINING 6:30 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP SERVICES ...... 7:30 P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ..... 7:00 P.M.
"Come and Worship God with Us"




-VOTE FOR AND ELECT-



attawa





O.n S.eptfember 9t 1

F or our lerk o ourt
SI have served the people of Gulf County for the past 7
years. I have workedin your Sheriff's Department and
your County Judge's Office. I have assisted you in
many ways and will continue to be always available. I
am now qualified and seeking your vote for Clerk and C
guarantee that I will be a clerk that you can trust,
S respect and be proud of. -I have been a resident of Gulf
% County for the past 26 years. I am married to Steve
S Hattway, and we have a son, John. I have attended
Gulf Coast Community College taking courses in
4 Business Administration and Accounting. I graduated
from Port St. Joe High School with honors. My parents
Share Buford and Ruth Griffin.
Pd. Pol. Adv. for Wyvonne Hattaway, Pd. for by Ruth Griffin, Camp. Treas.
Gulf CoastComm unityCollegetaking **Moursein


................ a


Democratic Party




POLITICAL



RALLIES


White City, Aug. 9 In Front of
Kirkland's Store

Highland View, Aug. 16 Fire Station

St. Joe Beach, Aug. 23 Fire Station


S
S.
S.
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S.
S.
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p.
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S.
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p.
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S.
p.
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WSSS MS flflSflSflflflflflflflflfl


Keep Leonard Hall

Working As Your


State Representative
of District 9

He is a man who listens .'.
He believes that spending your money is serious
business
He places high priority on the availability of jobs..
He has many working experiences ..
He is a family man, active in his community and
church...



RE-ELECT LEONARD J. HALL--.THE
PEOPLE'S CANDIDATE
STATE REPRESENTATIVE-DIST. 9
-DEMOCRAT
STILL INTERESTED IN YOU...

Pd. Pol. Adv. by Sharron Brown, Camp. Treas.
S.. .. .. .. AI AA A A A AA AA AA AAAA


AAAAAAtA




II.
***


A*


Wewahitchka, August 30............... Place to be Announced

Port St. Joe, September 6 .............. Place to be Announced

RaOlies Will Begin At 5:00 P.M., E.D.T.
Sponsored by Gulf County Democratic Executive Committee




SUPPORT YOUR CANDIDATES


.* A ~ll k~ik.Lkkk kk1hW~ AA~ A.L AAA A.L kAA AAA J.A~ k


414.d


J A


~~~f~*~~l~~~n~










MINUTES

S, of the


Board of Public Instruction.


The Gulf County School
Board met in regular session
on July 8, with the following
members present: Paul Se-
well Chairman; J.K. Whit-
Sfield; Fred Greer; and the
Superintendent and Director
of Administrative Affairs. The
-Board members Raffield and
Graham were absent.
..The meeting was called to
'order with the invocation by
Greer and followed by the
Pledge of Allegiance. I
On the motion by Whitfield,
second by Greer, the minutes
of June 3, were approved.
The board presented a
plaque of appreciation to
Hugh Semmes and Letha
Rester in recognition of their
many years of devoted ser-
vices to the Gulf County
School System.
On motion by Whitfield,
second by Greer, the board
approved the submittal of an
updated Master Plan for In-
service Education, 1980-81.
On motion by Whitfield,
second by Greer, the board
proved a $300.00' supple-
- hI~ent for School Health Edu-
'cdation Coordinators for the
1980-81 school year.
On motion by Whitifield,
second by Greer the board
unanimously approved the


Florida Diagnostic and Learn-
ing Resource System applica-
tion. This program identifies
exceptional children, and
planning educational piro-
grams for such children.
The board reviewed cost
'center budgets. No action was
necessary.
The board reviewed the bills
in the amount of ordered paid
which is listed in the official
board book.
On motion by Whitfield,
second by Greer, the board
unanimously approved the
following matters:
-To direct the principals to
use classroom aides as sub-
stitute teachers when feasi-
ble;
-Reviewed custodial and
maintenance report from Port
St. Joe High School and
approved the superintendent's
recommendation that the'
permanent custodial and
maintenance staff serving
Port St. Joe High School be
granted a meritorious day off
from work;
-The superintendent pre-
sented an agreement between
the Gulf Coast Community
College and the Gulf County
School Board whereby the
school board would furnish
two buses to transport stu-


dents to Gulf Coast, with Gulf
Coast reimbursing the school
board for one-half the costs for
operating the buses. Copies
are on file in the Superin-
tendent's office;
-Approved Performance
Contract for Evaluation and
Consultant Services with- the
Gulf Coast County Guidance
Clinic. Copies are on file in the
Superintendent's office;
-Approved classes for the
emotionally handicapped con-
ducted by the Gulf County
Guidance Clinic. Copies are on
filein Superintendent's office;
-The Board received bids on
tools for transportation de-
partment. All voted yes to
accept the lowest and best bid.
Copies are on file in the Super-
intendent's office.
-The board received bids
on gasoline, petroleum pro-
ducts and heating fuel for the
1980-81 school year. The board
approved the bid of Chevron
for all gasoline, petroleum
products and heating fuel;
-The board agreed to con-
tinue as a member of Florida
Association of District School
Superintendents for the
1980-81 school year;
-Approved architectural
fee for Wewahitchka Elemen-
tary planning in the amount of


Sylvachem Corp. Offers A



$10,000 Reward


For info ma Lion leading to the arrest and

conviction of the person or persons who fired

the high-powered rifle shots into its Dowtherm

Flash Tank and other major equipment of its

Port St. Joe Plant on July 21, 24 and and 28.


This reward will include any accomplice or accessory
to this crime who is arrested and convicted. There shall
be only one reward given and any person claiming

such reward shall apply to the General Manager at the
Port St. Joe Plant, Mr. Charles W. Morris.

Information 'should be directed to the Gulf County
Sheriff or other law enforcement agencies of the
State and County.






Sylvachem Corporation and


McKenzie Tank Lines

EACH HEREBY OFFER


Rewards of $10,000




(For A Total




of $20,000)

For infoi madLion leading to the arrest and

conviction of the person or persons who fired

a shotgun at a McKenzie Tank Lines truck

in the vicinity of Highland View, Florida, at

5:00 A.M. August 8, 1980.



These rewards will include any accomplice or accessory

to the crime who is arrested and convicted. There shall

be only one reward given and any person claiming

such reward shall apply to the General Manager at the
Port St. Joe Plant, Mr. Charles W. Morris.


Information should be directed to the Gulf County

Sheriff or other law enforcement agencies of the

state and county.


$28,000,00;
-Approved transportation
for the 1980-81 school year;
-Approved Educational
Specification changes for new
Wewahitchka Elementary
School;
-Approved a request that
John Cassani attend a Chem-
istry course being offered at
Port St. Joe High School by
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege; and
-Approved the transfer of
Timothy Williams from Port
St. Joe High School to adult
school; granted permission
for Stony and Ricky Merideth
to attend Port St. Joe Elemen-
tary School; approved a re-
quest from Mrs. Frank Linton,
Sr. and Elizabeth Brake that
their children be transferred
from Highland View Elemen-
tary to Port St. Joe Elemen-
tary.
On motion by Whitfield,
seconded by Greer, the board
unanimously approved the
following personnel matters:
-Approved a teaching posi-
tion for Mary Ester Taunton,
Richard Williams and Tommy
Nix for the 1980-81 school
year;
-Approved Jerry Lewter to
begin his administrative du-
ties June 23;
-Approved a professional
leave of absence for Daniel
Crews June 10, 11, 12, 13, 16,
17, 18, 19, 20, and 23 for the
purpose of attending summer
school;
-Approved maternity leave
for Sandra Husband for the
period of June 10, through
August 15; Approved Betty
Gainous as substitute secre-
tary at Wewahitchka Elemen-
tary School for the period of
June 10 through August 15;
-Accepted the resignation
of Darlene Linton from High-
land View Elementary for 3%
hours per day and approved
Mrs. Linton to continue work-
ing at Port St. Joe High School
for S3i hours per day, effective
June 16;
Accepted the resignation of
Lester Gortman from the
maintenance department of
Wewahitchka High School,
effective June 24;
-Accepted letter of resig-
nation from Kenneth Whit-
field, School Board member,
addressed to Supervisor of
Elections;
-Approved the following
personnel for summer em-
ployment at Port St. Joe High
School: Edwin Williams, Prin-
cipal, 12 months; Barbara
Shirley, Assistant principal,
through June 30; Sarah Riley,
Guidance, 8 weeks; Chris
Earley, Adm. assistant, 1 day;
Frances Shores, Secretary, 12
months : Betty Bouington,
Bookkeeper, 12 months; Daisy
Pittman, Adm. and Guidance,
10 weeks; Reva Lane Adm.
Aide 4 days Jean Thompson,
Aide, 4 days; Ernest Williams,
Security and Summer School,
8 weeks; Beverly Rich, Gui-
dance, 1 day; and
-Approved the following
teachers for employment for
six weeks of teaching begin-
ning June 16th and ending July
24th at Port St. Joe High
School: William Lane, Eng-
lish; Joseph Walker, Compen-
satory English and Math;
Chris Earley, Mathematics;
Ometa Osborne, History and
Science; Herman Dean,
Band; Wayne Taylor, P.E.;
Kesley Colbert, P.E.
There being no further
business, the board adjourned
to meet again on August 5th at
9:00 am.



Pick Your

Litter Up

Says Patrol
This is the time of year when
Florida's litter problem peaks
out said the Florida Highway
Patrol today.
"This is the season for
picnics, vacations, fishing,
hiking, camping, nature
watching and many other
activities," said Colonel Eld-
rige Beach, Patrol director,
"and during such events,
littering becomes more pre-
valent."
To prevent these eyesores,
Beach recommends that
everyone carry a litter bag in
their car and take it back
home if there are no trash
facilities available. He also
suggested that people pick up
trash that may have been left
by someone else and dispose
of it properly.
"State troopers as well as
other police officers have the
responsibility for enforcing
the anti-litter law but it would


be much better if everyone
would pitch in and help keep
Florida the scenic place it is
supposed to be," concluded
Beach.

Program Sat.

for Shut-Ins
The Concern Christian Soc-
iety is sponsoring a program
for the sick and shut-ins,
entitled "Give Me My Flowers
While I Yet Live". The
program will be held Saturday
night at 7:30 at the Zion Fair
Baptist Church, announced
Abraham Evans, chairman of
the event.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1980


The St. Marks National
Wildlife Refuge announced
recently that there will be two
primitive weapons hunts and
one conventional gun hunt this
fall on a portion of the Refuge.
The hunts will be three days
each for whitetailed deer and
feral hogs. Legal weapons will
be according to state regu-
lations for archery equipment,
muzzle loading firearms and
conventional weapons, except
that no buckshot or hand guns
will be permitted.
Date fdr the hunts will be as
follows; Archery, September
28-30; Primitive Gun, Novem-
ber 21-23; and Conventional
Weapon, December 12-14.
Requests for permit appli-
cations are now being receiv-
ed by letter or by personal
appearance only. Any person
who received a permit to hunt
at St. Marks Refuge last year
does not need to apply for this
year's hunts. They will auto-
matically receive a permit in
the mail. Write for the hunt
brochure and permits at: St.
Marks National Wildlife Re-
fuge, P.O. Box 68, St. Marks,
32355.
The deadline date to receive
requests for the hunt brochure
and permits is August 29.
There will be a drawing for
the conventional weapons
hunt only. Hunters interested
in this hunt must apply early


4t 7-31


Dessie Lee Parker,
Supervisor of Election


NOTICE TO RECEIVE BIDS
The Gulf County School Board will
receive. sealed bids until 10:00 A.M.,
E.D.T., August 18, 1980, in the office of
the Superintendent of Schools, Gulf
County Courthouse, on the following
stoves which have been declared surplus
by the Gulf County School Board.
Hardwick Gas Stove, Model ZKA-
96320-149A, Serial No. 218458B;
Hardwick Gas Stove, Model ZKA-
96320-149A, Serial No. 218459B
These stoves may be inspected at Port
St. Joe High School, Monday through


PAGE ELEVEN


Primitive Hunts Slated


for the hunt brochure in order
to send in the application form
by August 29. There will be 400
names drawn for this hunt.


Women's 5,000

Meter Race Set
The Susan B. Anthony 5000
Meter Run and 1 Mile Walk for
women only will be held
Saturday, August 23, at 8:00
am, in McKenzie Park in
downtown Panama City to
celebrate the 60th anniversary
of the 19th Amendment giving
Women the Right to Vote.
The entry fee for each event
is $3.00 and T-shirts will be
awarded the first 200 finish-
ers.
These events are sponsored
by the Bay County League of
Women Voters and more
information may be obtained
from JoAnn Cain at (904)
769-4588 or Tom King at (904)
763-0305.


Ladies' Bowling
League Planned
All ladies interested in join-
ing a Wednesday or Thursday
night bowling league are
encouraged to call 227-1572.


NOTICE OF A SPECIAL ELECTION
TO BE HELD ON SEPTEMBER 9,
1980, REGARDING THE PROPOSED
LEVY OF A TAX IN THE
OVERSTREET FIRE CONTROL
DISTRICT
Notice is hereby given that an elec-
tion will be held on September 9, 1980,
regarding the imposition of a tax of up to
1/2 mill on the assessed value of the
property within the district.
The Overstreet Fire Control District is
comprised of the area located in the
following described part of Gulf County,
Florida:
Begin at.the northwest corner of Sec-
tion 31, Township 5 South, Range 11
West, and run East along the section
lines to the northeast corner of Sec-
tion 35, Township 5 South, Range 11
West, thence South along the section
lines to the northwest corner of Sec-
tion 1, Township 6 South, Range 11
West, thence east to the northeast-
corner of Section 1, Township 6
South, Range 11 West, thence south
along the section lines to the south-
east corner of section 24, Township
6 South, Range 11 West, thence West
along the section lines to the south-
west corner of Section 19, Township
6 South, Range 11 West, thence
North along the county boundary
section lines to the Point of Begin-
ning.
All qualified freeholders residing in
said district who are also registered to
vote in said district, shall be eligible to
cast their ballot at the election.
The tax which may be levied shall be
paid into a special fund to be known as
the Overstreet Fire Control District. The
governing board Of the Ov'rstreet Fire
Control District shall be composed of
three members of the Board of County
Commissioners as provided in said law.
The ballot to be provided for said
election shall be in the following general
form, "a referendum to determine
whether the commissioners of the Over-
street Fire Control District shall be
entitled to levy up to V/ mill on the
assessed value to be used for fire control
purposes."
,For the tax
Against the tax


Thursday, 8:00 A.M. until 3:00 P.M. by
contacting the school office.
Please specify the stove you are
bidding on by serial number.
The successful bidder will pay for and
remove the stove from the school
property immediately.
The Board reserves the right to reflect
any and all bids.
Please mark your bid envelope
"SEALED BID STOVES".
2t8-7

NOTICE OF A SPECIAL ELECTION
TO BE HELDON SEPTEMBER 9,
1980, REGARDING THE PROPOSED
LEVY OF A TAX IN THE HOWARD
CREEK FIRE CONTROL DISTRICT.
Notice Is hereby given that an election
will be held on September 9, 1980,
regardinghthe imposition of a tax of up to
1/2 mill on the assessed value df .the
property within the district.
The Howard Creek Fire Control
District is comprised of the area located
in the following described part of Gulf,
County, Florida:
Commencing at the Southwest cot.
ner of Section 36, Township 7 South,
Range 10 West, for Point of Begin- r
ning; thence run in an Easterly dil-
rection along the South line of said -
Township 7 South to the Southeast
corner of Section 32, Township 7
South; Range 8 West; thence North
to the Northeast'corner of Section 5,
Township 6 South, Range 8 West;
thence run West to the Northwest
corner of Section 1, Township 6 -
South, Range 10 West; thence run -"
South back to the Southwest corner
of Section 36, Township 7' South, c
Range 10 West, to the Point of Begin-
ning.
All qualified freeholders residing in-
said district who are also registered to-
vote in said district, shall be eligible to-
cast their ballot at said election.
The tax which may be levied shall be
paid into a special fund to be known as
the Howard Creek Fire Control District.
The governing board of the Overstreet
Fire Control District shall be composed,
of three members of the Board of County
Commissioners as provided in said law.
The ballot to be provided for said
election shall be in the following general.
form, "a referendum to determ'lrg
whether the commissioners of tha
Howard Creek Fire Control DistriCt
shall be entitled to levy up to V/ mill loi.
the assessed value to be used for fir'b
control purposes." -
For the tax -
Against the tax
Dessie Lee Parker, -
Supervisor of Election.


.mg.





5 .,. .




















ST. JOE CUSTOM BUILDERS WINS ENERGY SAVER AWARD!
W A. Jones, left, receives an Energy Saver Award sign from Florida Power commercial
specialist H. H. Falk, Jr., for his award-winning home at 229 Saunders Court, Ward Ridge,
Port St. Joe.
The attractive home is well insulated throughout and includes such other energy-saving
features as an electric heat pump for efficient cooling and heating, double glass windows and
a superinsulated water heater.





Reduce energy costs


with our


Energy Saver


New Home Program


If you're buying or building a new home, be sure to ask about
our Energy Saver New Home Program.
For our Energy Saver Program is designed to help you
determine which energy-saving options will provide the greatest
energy efficiency for the amount of money in your new home
budget. And by building to Energy Saver standards, you can
actually save money from the day you
move in.
So ask about our Energy Saver 9 .
Program. Find out how your home
can qualify as an award-winner and
save energy!

Florida

Power
*re putting our enemW to wourk for yo


Public Notices


HIGHLAND VIEW

BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of Fourth St. & Second Ave.
Welcome Friends
SUNDAY SCHOOL ................ 9:45 A.M.
WORSHIPSERVICES..... 11:00 A.M. & 7:30 P.M.
CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) ......... 6:30 P.M.
MID-WEEK PRAYER (Wednesday) .... 7:30 P.M.

Nursery Provided BRO. JERRY REGISTER







We Welcome
USDA Food Stamp
Shoppers



Io


SPH Effectie f
August 13 thru 19, 1980


4
1.


Find the Groceries You Need Priced to Please at


09 *.(.C.~'


S16 Oz. Returnable Bottles
COCA COLA
- ca. a


Plus Deposit


32 Oz. Returnable BtIs.
RC COLA


4/$1s Dep
Plus Deposit


Sunset Gold
ICE MILK


Kingsford
CHARCOAL


b10 lb
bag $199


Tropicana
ORANGE JUICE


39


Van Camp's


PORK &BEANS


Sm--Mi-


Nifty Notebook Filler

PAPER

175 77
sheets
077


-..---


$1


+ a


Ni-- .-~


Hickory Smoked
SLICED

PICNICS


Lb.


C


Power Pak
CHICKEN
FRANKS


120z.
Pkg.


"Family Pak"
CENTER CUT
PORK
CHOPS

Lb. $169


Coronet Bath

TISSUE 8p k







T.V. Single Wrap American Sli. 9T. Frozen Fresh
CHEESE SPREAD 12Oz. ORANGE JUICE l2. 75 PLUMS 2 I
Kraft T. V. Frozen Crinkle Cut 5
SQUEEZE PARA 1 89* POTATOES 51 BAE 4Fresh
T. V. Half Moon Cheddar or Colby MEXICAN DINNER1i4o Yellow
LONG HORN CHEESE oo0149 EIChicoFrozen Reg. orCheese.t4 09Q ONIONS 3 ,bbe1
ENCHILADA DINNER2oz'"E NewCrop E
r.M minute Maid FrozenS Ne r o pTFrs i
Ballard Butternilk $ 59 ORANGE JUICE 26z. SWEET POTATOES 1
BISCUITS 6pk. I WAffrLES oz 69 SHOPPIOOL'GI OL VI!


Fresh
BANANAS


'I


With This Coupon and $10 Purchase or More
(Coupon item not included in $10 purchase)
Redeem 1 Coupon with $10.00 Purchase 2
Coupns with $20.00 Purchase 3 Coupons
with $30.00 Purchase and 4 Coupons with
$40.00 Purchase or More


88 oz. Sessions
PEANUT 01


With This Coupon and $10 Purchase
or More (Coupon item not included
in $10 purchase)
Redeem 1 Coupon with $10.00 Purchase 2
Coupns with $20.00 Purchase 3 Coupons
with $30.00 Purchase and 4 Coupons with
$40.00 Purchase or More.


Detergent
TIDE


With This Coupon and $10 Purchase or More
(Coupon item not included in $10 purchase)
Redeem 1 Coupon with $10.00 Purchase 2
Coupons with $20.00 Purchase 3 Coupons
with $3..00 Purchase and 4 Coupons with
$40.'q Purchase or More.

Good Value
PATTIE OLEO


With This Coupon and $10 Purchase or More
(Coupon item not included'in $10 purchase)
Redeem 1 Coupon with $10.00 Purchase 2
Coupons with $20.00 Purchase 3 Coupons
with $30.00 Purchase and 4 Coupons with
$40.00 Purchase or More.


1 lb.
can


Maxwell House
COFFEE

2 99I
2^Q -


Uquid Detergent

DAWN


li~Y~jiaB~ '.:i~T~~i


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