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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02231
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 10, 1978
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02231

Full Text










p *


FORTY-FIRST YEAR, NUMBER 49


F-IA


Industry Deep Water Port Fine People Safest Beaches in Florida

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1978


Calls for Dismissal ofAdministrator,Emergency Room Doctor


Dr. Poonai Hurls Hospital Charges
iH l H' I.he


Dr. P. V. Poonai, a doctor
with offices presently located
in the Municipal Hospital call-'
ed for a need to improve the
hospital at a regular board
meeting Tuesday night and
offered suggestions as to how
this tould be done.
Dr. Poonai, who had a group
of about 75 people in attend-
ance to support his position,
made an hour-long presenta-
tion to the Board of Directors
Sih which he made a number of
charges and called for the
termination of a contract be-
tween the hospital and Dr.
Joseph Vazquez, emergency
room physician and hospital
administrator Richard Zyski.
Poonai charged that Dr.
Vazquez was involved in im-,
proper ethics and contributed
to chaos among the working
force of the hospital.
He said Zyski should i'be
terminated and someone more
capable be brought in. "We
should also stop wasting our
Money on an emergency room.
physician who sends most of
his patients to Panama City."
The meeting, which lasted
for more than two hours and at
times grew heated and emo-
tional was dominated by Dr.
Poonai's presentation and an-
swers and counter-charges
made by Board chairman
Frank Pate. Pate, who mod-
', erated the meeting and spoke
for the Directors, told Dr.
Poonai that his suggestions
would be considered by the
SBoard and said another mebt-
ing would be held in a place
large enough to hold everyone.
"We've heard just your side
here tonight", -Pate said.


Small

Fish Kill

Found
A small fish kill was
reported in (he edge of St.
Joseph's Bay Monday mor-
ning, according to Marine
SPatrol officer Bucky Rich-
ter. '
Richter said the kill ap-
S peared to tbe caused by. a
lack, of'oxygen suspension
in the water, possibly caus-
ed'by the stormy conditions
which have prevailed for
the past several days.
Richter said water sam-
ples had 'been taken and
Forwarded to the Depart-
ment of Envirunmental
i Regulation for analysis.-
SCatfish and trash fish
seemed to' be te he species
m mostly involved in the
small kill, which occurred
between the St. Joe Paper
Company mill and the
draw bridge at Highland
View.


"Now, we want to hear the
other side."
'Nathan Peters, Jr., who said
he represented the people in
north Port St. Joe, also called
for the termination of Dr.
Vazquez' contract and asked


Crowd Braves


The first step in a project
which could take up to seven
years was made here Friday
of last week as a shower of
rain built up to put a damper
on ceremonies attended by
approximately 700 to 800 peo-
ple. The rains held off, how-
ever, just long enough for the
. people to hear a little speak-
ing, witness the driving of the
ceremonial stake by Depart-
ment of Transportation Secre-
tary Tom Webb and devour
500 pounds of fried mullet.
Lieutenant Governor Jim
Williams, who has initiated
the procedure for building the
new bridge across the Gulf
County canal at Highland
View,' was held up in his
arrival here for the ceremo-
nies, by the same storm clouds
k which threatened the cere--


monies. Williams finally was
able to land in his plane and
get to the ceremony site just
as the fish dinner was being
served. He was scheduled to
drive the stake, but Webb was
pressed into duty instead, with
Williams' delay.
Webb hammered the stake
home with a heavy hammer as
brave little Trish Tapper
braved a possible missed lick
and mashed finger to hold the
post.
3-7 YEARS
. In remarks made prior to
the stake driving ceremony,
Webb told the audience that
the construction process
would take from three to five
years. "Most of this time will
be spent in securing permits",
Webb said, pointing out that
the permit process could take


from three y
years. "Actua
won't take
months for tl
tion", Webb po
Estimated t
neighborhood
the bridge pro:
key to install
new jobs in th
area. Located u
on both sides of
be a new port'
and barge wa
tion to take ad
natural harbor
Joe The Port
already having
for the feasib
catering to sev
ducts underwa
the thinking s
million port c
financed from


that Zyski be placed on sus-
pension pending an examina-
tion of his performance.
Specifically, Dr. Poonai
made charges that the con-
tents of records of his pa-
tients were "spread all over


'town". He charged also that
patient care at the hospital, in
his opinion, was below stan-
dard. For this he blamed Dr.
Vazquez and Zyski.
"I am the one being ques-
tioned", he said. "My surger-


ies are excellent", he said,
asking why they should be
questioned.
:Dr. Poonai went on to
charge that the hospital ad-
ministrator was incompetent
and the hospital facilities defi-


Threatening Rai

ears to seven George G. Tapper, chair- more efficiency to the seafood
al construction man of the port authority and production facilities now in
but about 18 prime mover of local pressure operation. According to pro-
the bridge por- to get the new high level span ducers, nearly half the sea-
ointed out. bridge approved, has'said food harvested has to be
to cost in the several shippers are interest- destroyed before it is ever put
of $3.5 million; ed in using the local facilities on the market becuase of lack'
mises to be the when they are built to the ;of facilities to preserve and
ition of several point of being willing to put handle the catch after it is
ie Port St. Joe money into its construction, made.
underneath and The $25 million figure is the. One of these centers is being
f the bridge will projected initial cost of the planned for the Port St. Joe
for deep-water port including warehouses, area and one in Texas.
ter transporta- docks, paving and storage Tentative plans call for a $30
Vantage of the facilities, million park to be built on 200
here in Port St. Another spin-off asset from acres along the canal. The
t Authority is the new bridge will be a new complex could employ up to
g studies made seafood processing, handling, 1,000 workers after it gets into
ility of a port servicing and marine center full operation..
veral area pro- being planned for the area, LT. GOV. WILLIAMS
iy and plans in possibly in the canal itself. Lt. Gov. Williams spoke
tage for a $25 The federal government is briefly to the crowd in compe-
complex to be sponsoring two such complex- tition with'a plate full of hot
port revenues. es on the Gulf Coast to give mullet, but received a warm


cient. He said the staff was not
working.
Pate told Dr. Poonai that he
had presented only one side of
the story and reminded Dr.
Poonai that the hospital had
purchased :every piece of


in

applause for his remarks
when he said the portions of
government responsible for
development of the bridge and
complex were behind the pro-
ject in Tallahassee. He said
the plans were considered
vital and necessary to the area
and would be followed closely
to completion.
The Lieutenant Governor
called on local people to
continue their support and
encouragement for the pro-
ject which he predicted would
be a considerable economic
shot in the arm for this portion
of Florida.
SNAIL DARTER
In his remarks to the crowd,
Tapper pointed out, "We all
have to support this thing. If
one person comes out in
(Continued on Page Three)


equipment he had asked for
since he has been in Port St.
Joe.
The Board. refused to: sus-
pend Zyski and retained the
services of Dr. Vazquez on a
month to month basis until a
new contract could be worked
out. Dr. Vazquez' present
contract expired this week.
Television coverage was
present at the meeting at the
invitation of an unknown cal-
ler according to the reporter
who attended.
INVESTIGATION
In an interview with TV and
the press after the meeting
was adjourned, administrator
Zyski revealed that his office
had been contacted by the
Florida State Board of Medi-
cal. Examiners, the agency
which is responsible for the
licensing of physicians.
Zyski said the agency, has
said they have Doctors. Poonai
under investigation and. have.
had for several months. Zyski
said the nature of the investi-


gation has not been revealed
by Dr. Palmer, director of the
examining board, but that a
report will be released in the
near future.
In a telephone conversation
with Dr. Palmer and chief
investigator Terry Davis Wed-
nesday morning, both verified
Zyski's statement, but would
not reveal any of the particu-
lars of the investigation.
In addition Zyski revealed
that Blue Shield of Florida has
requested the local medical
society (Gulf and Franklin
counties) to audit certain
Medicare records of Dr. P. V.
Poonai and his wife, Dr. Anila
Poonai.
Zyski said he was to report
the two matters to the Board:
at the meeting, but the opport
tunity didn't present itself to
get into any other business. !
Zyski said the Hospital
Board members were un-
aware of the two actions which
had been under way for sever-
al months. .


Sanitarian



Didn't Give



Permission


for Septic Tanks


Department of Transportation Secretary Tom Webb, drives the center
line stake for the new high level.bridge across the Gulf County Canal, while
Trish Tapper holds the stake firm and steady for the heavy hammer.:
Looking on are, left to right: Ronald Lee,, George Tapper, Senator Pat
Thomas, Roy Gibson, Jr., Col. Randall, Tyndall AFB commanding


officer, Rep. Billy Joe Rish, Webb, Barry Smith, Sen. Stone's representative
and J. C. Belin. In the bottom photo is some of the large crowd which
attended the program and stayed for a free fried mullet dinner, served after
the'ceremony.,
-Star photo


County Sanitarian, N. C.
Sweikert added another di-
mension to the Gulf Aire
septic tank question at the
County Commission Tuesday
morning.
I Schweikert took exception
to the claim by the developers
that they had permission and
approval from his agency to
install 18 septic tanks in the
area, temporarily. The devel-
opers told the Commission in
an earlier meeting they had
Received permission to place
the first houses on septic
tanks. The reason given for
this move was that such a
small number of homes would
not activate a central sewage
treatment plant. After more
than 18 homes were built, they
would put their plant into
operation. The developers also
said they were currently plan-
ning to go ahead with installa-
tion of the sewage collection


Mill Starting

Monday A.M.
St. Joe Paper Company mill
will begin operations again
Monday morning, after being
shut down since last Wednes-
day from a lack of pulpwood.
The mill ran out of the
necessary raw ingredient last
week, when heavy continued
rains in their wood purchasing
area cut off production.
Harold Quackenbush, super-
intendent of operations, said
enough wood has now been
received to crank back up.
The supply still is not up to
normal.


system before any property:
was sold.
They said only the treat-*
ment plant would be delayed.
Schweikert said, "As of
now, we have not, approved
any septic tanks at the site
since the lots as outlined on
the plat .do not meet state
. requirements." The Sanitar-
ian said the state requires at
least a half acre for a septic
tank and.at least a third acre if
the property is served by a.
public water system. "None of
these lots are that large",
Schweikert said.
Schweikert said the. only
communication his office has
had with the developers was
that a man who identified
himself as "Mr. Nations" had
called to see if his office would
approve the septic tanks. Flor-
ida Engineers, who designed
the subdivision is operated by
Robert (Steve) Nations and
his son, Robert.
Scweikert said he told the
caller 'the tanks would be
approved if they met state
requirements.
"I did not say over the phone
that I would approve these
(Continued On Page Two)


Ad Error
The advertisement for
Saveway Food Store in this
week's "Star" contains two
typographical errors. Dixie
Home Pot Pies, listed at 4 for
49 cents, should be four for:99
cents. The Tide item should
read "Limit 1 with $10.00
order", and not a $1.00 order
as the ad shows.


Grove Residents


Now Have Water


Residents of Oak Grove
can now join the newly
installed water system to
receive city water, County
building inspector E. F.
Gunn announced this week.
Gunn said the water supply
has been approved by the
State Board of Health and
the green light given to
begin using the system.
The sewer portion of the


new sanitary facilities
was opened up to custo-
mers last week and Gunn
said residents were hook-
ing up at a record rate.
Those tying into the wa-
ter system must first go by
the City Hall in Port St. Joe.
to pay their meter deposit
and have the meter put Into
place by City water crews.


t
I..




L
P.


Stake Driving Ceremony Draws Huge


_ __


I


-


%










PAGE TWO THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1978


THE STAR -

Publisihe Every Thursday at 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
By The Star Publiishing Company
Second-Class Postage Paidat Port St. Joe. Florida 32456
'A> si) .- Wesley R. Ramsey ............... Editor and Publisher
S, William H. Ramsey .................... Production Supt.
Frenchie L. Ramsey .......:.............. Office Manager
Shirley K. Ramsey .......................... Typesetter
POSTOFFICE BOX 308 PHONE 227-1278
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456

SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 324S6

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR, SS.00 SIX MONTHS, $3.00 THREE MONTHS,5127.50
OUTOFCeu NTY-S7.oo OUTOF U.S.-One Year. 59.00
TO ApVERTISERS-lin case of error or omissions In advertisements, the publishers do not hold
; fmlemeilvo liable for damage further than amount rece ed for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention;lthe printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word
barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


EDITORIALS:



Public Shows Its Support


for New Bridge


The crowd was better than
expected at the bridge stake-driving
ceremony last Friday at noon, and
that was good. It shows a keen
interest in either a free mullet
dinner or in getting a new high level
liridge over the Gulf County Canal.
Since the dignitaries responsible for
making decisions about the bridge,
were thinking "bridge", possibly
they thought everyone there was too.
- The bridge stake-driving affair
had its interesting side-effects, just
as most every other public gathering
qr happening has. In Tellico, Ten-
nessee, it prompted the discovery of
the snail darter. In New Hampshire,
it sparked a fear that cooling waters
from. a nuclear power plant might,
warm up the chilly waters of the
north Atlantic.
Here in Port St. Joe, the
stake-driving ceremony was the
vehicle by Which the greatest num-
ber of politicians could get together
Sin one place for the first time.this
political year. Thus far, the political
season has been about as exciting as
the weather we have been having.
There were politicians from all
over, shaking hands, greeting folks,


passing out literature and meeting
the public. Nearly every politician
who had an interest in the strictly
local vote was. on hand.
The affair attracted the political
breed much as a-clean white shirt
attracts a baby's candy-sticky hand.
This was good. Those in attend-
ance at the affair had the opportun-
ity to meet "that guy who's running"
and speak to him, eye-ball to
eye-ball.
It has been a long time since
we've seen such a political vehicle in
action.
The presence of the people in
such great numbers, on a day
threatened by rain, plagued by hot
weather and on a working day
wasn't the best timing in the world to
get out a public expression of
support. But the support was there,
in force, and we know those who are
trying to get thisthing off the ground
appreciated your support. .
Keep it-up--until you can one
day,. ride across the canaf on*
Highway 98 at least 60 feet in the air
on a concrete ribbon of road-way you
know isn't going to get stuck in the
open position.


It seems that the action to cut
funding to the Gulf County branches
of the Northwest Florida Regional
Library is being led by County
Commissioners Leo Kennedy and
Otis Davis, Jr. We're not making
accusations; they readily admit to
their role.
They say the people they talk to
are critical of providing library ser-
vices. We might be too, if we didn't
use its services or didn't think its
services were needed.
But while their constituents
have reportedly told them these
i things, we wonder if they have
Considered the need rather than the
- claimed sentiment in the case of the
- library and its service to the county.


If the Commissioners who are
adamant at reducing the libra
working budget were to contact the
tax-paying constituents, they wou
find most of them either regul
users or supporters of the libra
services, solely for the good it do
for the county. There is no sentime
involved.
'Our libraries fill a great void
our county or at least they have
the past: there's no telling wh
their future holds ndw.
We think that in this importa
operation, it is the bound duty of ti
Commissioners to go looking f,
testimony in these areas as well
listening to those who come to the
telling the side they are no
listening to.


so
ry
eir
ld
ar
ry
es
nt

in
in
at

nt
he
or
as
mw
1w


hv
iv


Up! Up! and Away!

A flock of brown pelicans lifts its collective landing gear and takes off
from St. Joseph Bay, hunting for a new feeding ground, after exhausting the


Wonders About "Two Pilots


In Single
Mr. Wesley Ramsey, Editor
The Star
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
As a Tulsa friend usta say,
the "Stars" August 3rd editor-
ial decrying the proposed
county budget had all the
punch of a bull that once tried
to leap a four strand bob wire
fence. -Unless we have been
mislead, that $25,000 county


Engine Bookmobile"


library budget would be sup-
plemented with "X" dollars of
state funds (extracted from
another taxpayer pocket)
which go. to the Northwest
Regional Library in Panama
City. for regional use. In other
words, Gulf County will not be
limping by on just $25,000 as'
alleged or without new books
as threatened.


(Continued from Page 1)


* nitarian


particular septic tanks",
Schweikert said.
To ward off any future such
misunderstandings, Schwei-
kert suggested that future
subdivision plats presented
the county be inspected by his
office to see if the lot sizes.
meet state requirements./
"Other requirements will
have to be tested on an indi-
vidual lot basis", the Sanitar-
ian said.
The County Commission
agreed to notify Schweikert of
any new plats presented and
make them available to his
office at the same time they
are being inspected by Tom-
my Pitts, county administra-
tive assistant, for compliance
with the county subdivision
regulations.
Asked specifically if he wias
going to issue septic tank
permits for Gulf Aire by
Commissioner Everett
Owens, Schweikert replied,
"No sir. I haven't seen any
paper work. I explained that
to Nations in his- phone con-
versation earlier. I can't give
septic tank permits until they
come in and present me with
the proper .data and proper
request."


GUNN REPORTS
E. F. Gunn, county bi
inspector reported to thi
missioner that he had
lems with people attend
to hook up to the sewer s
at Oak Grove.
Gunn said, "Everyo
trying to hook up at on(
they are getting their
dug, then going after
ial, causing the problem
The problem, as outlir
Gunn, was that some
people are removing the
from the main line before
are ready to hook up.
allows rains to wash sai
the system. We'll have
stopped up with sand
before it gets into use
he said.
Gunn said he would c
all the people he coul
advise them not to remo
plugs until they were re
hook up their service pij
want some help from
getting this word out",
said.

Some people once be
that shooting arrows ui
fruit tree would caus
fruit to fall off the
just as the arrows


Each year at budget time
we are treated to the spectacle
of NWRL people threatening a
drastic curtailment of library
services. So what! The Chi-
nese say the dragon will chew
its own tail only up to a certain
point. Hopefully our County
Commissioners in their infi-
nite wisdom have noted past
waste that should no longer be
funded.


How about the highly visible
and wasteful practice of'gag-
I gles of librarians-cum-pup-
peteers driving around the
region putting on tax suppor-
ted puppet shows gr showing
hackneyed movies9 Or fat-cat
building manning Bookmobiles with
gilding two librarians, supposedly re-
SComi- quired by law? After all,
prob- Webster's New American Dic-
mpting tionary says a library is a
system "room or building in which a
e is collection of books is kept." It
one ads don't say nuthin' about pup-
holes pets or two pilots in a single-
mater- engine Bookmobile. So, light
ater the firecrackers and let the
me y dragon bite!
ned by
of the As you implied there are
plugs other services that wouldn't
re they be missed, but please don't
"This cop out there; inform us, be
nd into specific, name them, itemize
it all their budgets, itemize their
leven services and list their results,
good", if any. If the average taxpayer
could depend on, the media to
keep him better informed he
contact might just back his politi-
d and cians, even in cutting some of
ve the those entrenched "mother-
ady to hood" agencies you alluded to.
ies. "I
you in Sincerely,
Gunn E.D. Johnson
(Ed Note: Mr. Johnson, the
believed $25,000 DOES include all funds
nder a the library would be receiving
se the in the name of the county. This
e tree includes the county contribu-
fell. tion of $17,000, the state contri-


supply in this particular place. The pelicans are plentiful in the Bay, after
disappearing from the-Florida coast for a period of time for some unknown
reason. This flock was caught by The Star photographer near St. Joseph's point
last Thursday morning, The brown pelicans are once more a fixture on the Gulf
coast, inhabiting the entire coastline from south Florida to Texas.
--Star photo


LETTERS

to the Editor

bution and a $5,000 annual (with one or two drivers) new
contribution to the Port St. Joe books, book rentals, etc. Both
branch made each year for a Holmes and Calhoun counties
five year period by Dr. Tom contribute more than Gulf to
Gibson. Since utilities, sala- library services in the same
ries and fringes for local regional system and both
library employees come to an counties pay the utilities of
estimated $30,000, we were their libraries, on top of their
disturbed. It does not include contribution to the library
any money for bookmobiles budget each year.)
/*


A Layman's View


BY: BILLY NORRIS


Bible Notes


Nehemiah 9: 1-3
KEY WORD: Revival
Verse 1: "Now in the twenty
and fourth day of this month
the children of Israel were
assembled with fasting, and
with sackclothes, and earth
upon them."
Verse 2: "And the seed of
Israel separated themselves
from all strangers, and stood
and confessed their sins, and
the iniquities of their fathers."
Verse 3: "And they stood up
in their place, and read in the
book of the law of the Lord
their God one fourth part of
the day; and another fourth
part they confessed, and wor-
shipped the Lord their God."
Do we as Christians desire
to see the fires of revival
kindled in our city, out county,
our country? I believe there
are many who truly do. The
passage above gives us a
pattern which is proven to
work. The children of Israel
(Christians) met at a specific
time to fast with humbleness,
repentance, and praise. They
separated themselves from'
strangers (non-Christians)
confessed their sins and ac-
knowledged they also recog-
nized the errors of their


fathers. They read the Word %
for six hours so they would
know what God required of
them. Then they spent another
six hours confessing their sins
and worshipping the Lord
their God. Chapter eight,
verse six, says, they "lifted
their hands, bowed their
heads, and worshipped the
Lord with their faces to the
ground." Are we willing to pay
the price?


SALTY
SALLY


ETAOIN SHRDLU

BY WESLEY R. RAMSEY


THE KIWANIS Club knows how to play,
.when they decide to take an outing and have
some fun. They have experts in the club who take
their play seriously and make an occasion of
play a fun time for everyone involved.
I received an invite from the club last
Thursday afternoon to join in one of their fun
times and I went along, having a wonderful.time.
: We all piled into one of the Raffield family of
2 fine fishing boats about 3:00, cranked up the big
diesel motor and headed across the bay to Pig
Island for a little mullet fishing, scalloping and
fish cooking.
It all turned out well until the rains came.
You here in Port St. Joe were having a whale of a
storm on Thursday afternoon, and we could
watch it across the bay as it built, struck and
poured out sheets of rain upon you. All we got


was a light soaking rain and the spectacle of
watching'the storm as it hit Port St. Joe from our
vantage point across the bay.
We had a group of kids along and had taken a
smaller boat along to put out the mullet net.
While the main body of the adventurers set out in
the mullet net boat to "strike" a school of mullet
for our supper, Billy Joe Rish took five young
boys who had been taken along, into the shallows
to look for scallops. Billy Joe was the baby-sitter
for the afternoon.
After two forays out into the flats between
showers, our doughty fishermen finally came up
with enough mullet for supper and Charlie Wall
set out to cook, after he had been thrown
overboard by Billy Joe.
Another shower forced the hardy outdoors-
men to head for the Raffield fish house, back


across the bay, in order to cook a delicious
supper.

Our "sailors" were Gene Raffield, who
drove the boat, Curtis Lane, who drove the little
boat, Jimmy Cox, Dr. Joe Hendrix, Gannon
Buzzett, George Duren, Charlie, Billy Joe,
another guest, Charlie Brock, myself and the
five young lads. As Jimmy Cox, president of the
club said, "Everyone says they will go, then
when we leave, hardly anybody shows up".
Those who didn't show up missed a good time, a
fine boat trip and a delicious meal.

I'd like to go along again one day.


WHEN REPRESENTATIVE Billy Joe Rish
announced his plans not to seek office in the State
Legislature again this year, he said one of the
reasons for not running was that he planned to
spend some time lobbying some of the other state
houses to promote a resolution calling for a
Constitutional Convention for the purpose of
writing into the U.S. Constitution that the federal
government must balance its budget each year.
Billy Joe, like a lot of us, is concerned over
the erosion of the value of the dollar throughout
the world includingg in the United States) and he
feels a major contributor to the shrinking dollar


is the government's practice of voting budgets
which need gallons of red ink to write each year.
This year's budget is certainly no exception
to the past rule and there seemed to be no end in
sight.
That is until last week.
Last week, the U.S. Senate, in one of its more
lucid moments, voted unexpectedly to require a
balanced budget by the beginning of the 1981
fiscal year, which is just three budgets hence.
The vote was a whopping 58 for and 29 against.
President Carter once said he had plans to
balance the budget in 1981, but has since
vacillated from that commitment. Now the
Senate has taken over and said "We'll do it!"
It still remains to be seen as to whether the
House will see fit to follow the wisdom of the
Senate.
With the budget for the coming year
estimated to be $53 billion in the red, the
government has a far piece to go and a lot of
cutting to do in order to meet their goal.
Since the Senate has decided to follow this
pattern of action, I can't help but believe it was
because they heard Billy Joe was coming after
them with both barrels loaded. He had that kifid
of reputation in the Florida Legislature.


I FillA Great Void


I


IMma Mond








THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1978


Ic.n.4



0


Sx


**


Kiwanians Catch

Their Supper

The Kiwanis Club took an outing last Thursday afternoon
to Pig Island across St. Joseph Bay, where they enjoyed
catching their supper, some fine, fat mullet and a bucket full
of succulent scallops.
The club memberscooked their catch and ate it after the
afternoon of fishing. Kiwanian Charles Wall acted as chef for
the cook-out.
The club took their boat ride on Raffield Fisheries,
"Three Brothers".
In the photo above, some of the club members board the
catch boat, "Geranjo" and head for the flats to let out their'
yards of net to catch supper. The fishing crew included
Charles Wall, Charles Brock, Billy Joe Rish, George Duren,
Jim Cox, Gene Raffield and Curtis Lane. Some of the
Kiwanians and guests brought their sons along on the trip.
In the photo at the side, Billy Joe Rish, Jim Cox and:
Gannon Buzzett clean part of the catch.
-Star photos


S **


Arson Charges Placed Against
St. Joe Beach Man by Sheriff


According to Sheriff Ken
Murphy, arson charges were
filed this week against Aubry
J; Ellinburg, age 68, of St. Joe
Beach.
Ellinburg was charged with
deliberately setting a fire
which destroyed his home at
the corner' of Georgia Avenue


and Gulf Street on St, Joe
Beach last Tuesday night in
which the house was totally
destroyed.
Deputy Raymond Watson,
assisted by A. D. Coson of the
State Fire Marshall's office,
with the cooperation of the
residents of St. Joe Beach


Charged with Mail Theft


Loretta Daniels, a resident
of Panama City was arrested
by Port St. Joe police investi-
gator David Rogers earlier
this week, and charged with
two counts of mail theft, two
counts of forging and two
counts of uttering a forged
instrument.
The arrest was made by


Rogers and Secret Service
Agent Jim Peacock. The in-
vestigation, which led to the
arrest, was in connection with
several cases of stolen Social
Security checks taken from
mail-boxes and cashed in the
Port St. Joe area.
Officer Oscar. Jones assisted
in the investigation.


were able to determine how
the fire was started.
Ellinburg is being held in
the Gulf County jail pending
arraig niment before the Judge
later this week. '


Sheriff Murphy expresses
his appreciation for the fine
cooperation of the area fire
departments and the resi-
dence of St. Joe Beach for,
helping in the investigation.


Two Dozier Escapees Caught

After 100-Mile-Per-Hour Chase


Tuesday, in the early
ning hours, Port St. Joe p
and Gulf County Sher
Deputies with the ail
Franklin county officers,
tured two escapees frorr
Dozier School for Boy
Marianha.
At 1:40 a.m., Monday,
cer Bob Lightfoot atterr
to stop a Datsun at


mor-
olice
riff's
d of
cap-
i the
's in
offi-
ipted
the


Doctor's

Office

Entered
Last Friday morning, in the
early hours, a burglary occur-
red at the offices of Dr. J. W.
Hendrix. No drugs were
taken, according to police, but
$43.00 in cash was taken from
the office.
During the investigation,
Sheriff's Investigator Jim Bu-
chanan located a late model
foreign convertible parked on
Garrison Avenue with a New
York license plate. Buchanan
called Port St. Joe police
investigator David Rogers in
on the case and an license
check revealed that the car
had been stolen at Lauderhill.
The investigating officers
found a white male sleeping in
the car,. who refused to give
the officers any identification.
A search of the car revealed
three "lids" of marijuana
under the seat. The suspect
was arrested and charged
with possession of a stolen
vehicle and possession of the
marijuana.
Officer Phil McLeod and.
Sheriff's Deputy Ray Watson
assisted in the investigation.

"Snow White"
At Library
The Northwest Regional Li-
brary System will present the
puppet show "Snow White and
the Dwarfs" at 7:00 p.m.
.Thursday, August 10 at the
Mexico Beach Chamber of
Commerce.


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intersection of First Street
and Highway 98 for investiga-'
tion. The car attempted to
out-run Lightfoot, who called
for assistance from officer
Phil McLeod. McLeod entered
into pursuit of the vehicle,
which was then headed for
Apalachicola.
. Gulf County Sheriff's De-
partment was then invited into
the chase and called Apala-
chicola officers to set up a
road block west of Apalachi-
cola.
The fleeing car ran the road
block and continued on into
the City of Apalachicola with
McLeod in hot pursuit, at
speeds in excess of 100 miles
per hour. Instead of turning at
the Grill Restaurant with
Highway 98, the car went
straight and attempted to turn
right at Commerce Street.
Officer McLeod bumped the
rear of the fleeing auto, caus-
ing the driver to lose control
and come to a stop on the
sidewalk.
The two juveniles, in the
car, were taken into custody.


(Continued From Page 1)

Huge

Crowd
opposition to the project local-
ly, we have problems. And
God help us if they find a snail
darter in the canal".
OTHER REMARKS
Other remarks made by
those involved in the project
included:
Senator Pat Thomas: "We
must pool our efforts in such a
project as this in order to help
our people."
Billy Joe Rish: "I'm going
to do all I can to see that this
project succeeds in order to
provide for the future of our
young people in this commun-
ity."
J. C. Belin, president, St.
Joe Paper Company: "The
land for the project will be
made available for this devel-
opment."


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PAGE THREE


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PAGE FOUR


Eight courses will be offered
by Gulf Coast Community
College this fall in the Port St.
Joe area, according to Bob
McSpadden, dean of academic
studies.
Registration for all eight
courses will be held August 24
beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the
Port St. Joe High School.
Classes begin August 28.
McSpadden explained that
the increased number of offer-
ings for Port St. Joe comes
partially as a result of the
recent study conducted in Gulf
County regarding the estab-
lishment of a GCCC Center in
St Joe.
*"Because of the interest
shown by Gulf County resi-
dents regarding the Center,
we have doubled the course
offerings this fall for Port St.
,Joe and for the first time we
are scheduling courses during-
the day hours."
.Among those courses being.
offered is Western Civilization
(EUH 1000), which will meet,
on Monday from 6:30 9:15
p.m.
Philosophy of Ethics (PHI
2600) will meet on Tuesdays
from 6:30 9:15 p.m. Emer-
gency Medical Technology
will- meet on Tuesday and
Thursday evenings from 7-10
p.m. from August 29 Novem-
ber 30.
Basic Meteorology and
Freshman English II will both
meet on Wednesday evenings
from 6:30 9:15 p.m.
Freshman English I and
Introduction to Government
(POS 2001) will both meet on
Thursday evenings from 6:30 -
9:15 p.m.

VBS Begins

Next Week

at LABC
'Vacation Bible School will
be held at the Long Avenue
Baptist Church next week.
Classes will be held Monday
through Friday for all boys
and girls from three years of
age through the sixth grade.
The school will begin each
morning at 8:30 and will
dismiss at 11:30 a.m. All boys
and girls of the community
are invited to attend.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 1% 1978


Beth McLeod and


Michael Todd Wed


"Discovery" Preparing


for Second Fall Edition


The second annual edition of
the publication "Discovery,
Florida's Last Frontier", an
information guide to Gulf and
Franklin counties for use by
the area Chambers of Com-
merce is now being planned
for a late fall publication date.
Publisher of the .book is
Lynda Keever Boggs, presi-
dent of KeevCo Advertising of
Panama City. According to
Ms. Boggs, advertising sales
have started and she is cur-
rently calling on area business
places to present her agency's
publication.
The magazine, the first of
it's kind for the two counties,
presents information and pho-
tographs of all communities
within the two counties as well
as Mexico Beach. It tells the
historical stroy of. the area, its
development and industrial
development of today. All of
this information and the pho-
tographs will be updated in the
second edition in order to give
the Chambers of Commerce
the most uptodate information
possible.
These magazines are made
available by the Chamber of
Commerce to potential inves-
tors, industry of anyone inter-
ested in coming here. It is
used to acquaint distinguished
visitors with the area.
The Discovery Magazine is
financially supported entirely
through individual business
advertising and is distributed
to the Chamber at no cost to
them.
If, your business has re-
ceived a letter about this
publication and you would like
more information, please
complete the reply card that
was enclosed and return to
KeevCo. Ms. Boggs or her
representative will call on you
to explain the publication.
KeevCo Advertising will
provide 3,000 copies of the


magazine to the Chambers of
Commerce serving the com-
munities of Port St. Joe,
Apalachicola, Wewahitchka,
Mexico Beach., Carrabelle,
*East Point and St. George
Island.
The second edition of the
magazine has already re-
ceived the endorsement from
the Apalachicola Chamber of
Commerce, Port St. Joe Busi-
nessmen's Association and the
City Commission of Port St.
Joe. Ms: Boggs will also be
calling on Chambers in Mex-
ico Beach, Port St. Joe and
.Carrabelle along with other
city and county commissions
for support.
Information contained in the
publication includes a free
listing of chamber members
in each community, listing of
churches, helpfuland interest-


ing information on boating
and fishing, historical, busi-
ness in the area, festivals and
other local attractions. A list-
ing of participating realtors
.will also be included.
Photographs will be used to
show development such as the
newly planned high-rise
bridge over the Intracoastal
Waterway, new construction
and industrial growth, as well
as points of interest that will
be useful to the newcomer.
City street maps and govern-
mental information including
schools, fire, police and medi-
cal facilities will be used,
Anyone interested in .sub-
mitting photos or has sugges-
tions for the kind of material
to be included in the second
edition should write Ms. Boggs
at P.O. Box 2433, Panama City
Fla., 32401 or phone 763-3975.


Checking Blood Pressure


Mrs. Barbara Weeks, a volunteer mem-
ber of the Gulf County Volunteer Ambulance
Squad, is shown above as she checks the blood
pressure 'reading of Mrs. Ressie Lee, a
member of the Gulf County Senior Citizens
Association.
Arrangements were made by Mrs. An-
drea Griffin, site manager, for the Senior
Citizens, to have their pressure checked at the
St. Joe Motel site Thursday, August 3.


Mrs. Griffin and members of the squad
are working on a means to have as many of
the senior citizens checked monthly.
Several squad members meet the third of
each. month in the lobby of the Florida First
National Bank and perform a free blood
pressure check to anyone desiring the
service. Any donations given during this time
will go toward purchase of a "Jaws of Life"
extrication tool.


LYNDA BOGGS


Beth Brown McLeod and
Michael Dewayne Todd
pledged their wedding vows in
the home of the bride's par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter L.
Brown, 815 Marvin Ave. on
Friday evening, August 4th at
7:30 p.m.
The Rev. William J. Wilson
conducted the double ring
ceremony.
Parents of the bridegroom
are Mr. and Mrs. Calvin
("Red") Todd, 1019 Long Ave.
The bride was given in
marriage by her father and
mother. She wore a flowing
afternoon gown of aqua silk
voile and carried a single rose
bud. She wore a silver disc
necklace, a gift of the groom's
parents.
Teresa Lynn Brown, sister
of the bride, served the bride
as maid of honor. She wore an
aqua and sky blue floral gown


complemented with a white
carnation corsage.
Calvin Todd served his son
as best man.
A reception was held follow-
ing the ceremony in the home
of the bride's parents, hosted
by her parents. Mrs. Joe
Gloria presided at the punch
bowl and Teresa Brown
served the cake.
The bride is a graduate of
Port St. Joe High School and is
presently working on a degree
in accounting through the
LaSalle University. She is
employed at the Florida First
National Bank.
The bridegroom is a gradu-
ate of Port St. Joe High School
and attended Gulf Coast
Community College. He is
presently employed with the
St. Joe Paper Company.


For the first time, two
courses will be offered during


each Monday, Wednesday and
Friday from 10:00 10:50 a.m.


the day. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. .
American Literature (AML All classes will meet in the
2022--Civil War)'will meet Port St. Joe High School. f


Local Woman Is


Examiner Columnist \


Mickey (Thompson) Fried-
man, a reported for the daily
San Francisco Examiner, was
recently named that paper's
book columnist. Mickey's col-
umn, "Book Scene," began
appearing in the Examiner on
Monday, July 3, initiating
regular Monday. coverage of
San Francisco Bay Area liter-
ary news.
Mickey has specialized in
writing reviews and feature
stories about books and au-
thors for the past year, and
has interviewed such best-sell-


ing writers as Alistair Cooke,
Gore Vidal and Ellery Queen.
She will continue her feature-
writing activities along with
her column.
Mickey is married to Alan
Friedman, Director of Astro-
nomy Education'at the Law-
rence Hall of Science, Univer-
sity of California, Berkeley,
she is a 1962 graduate of Port
St. Joe High School, a gradu-
ate of Florida State Universi-
t-y, and is the daughter of
Laura Geddie, 1018 Garrison
Avenue.


EMT's Honor Norma Wall


Last Thursday evening the Gulf County Volunteer
Ambulance Squad honored Norma Wall with a surprise going
away party at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Vazquez.
Norma had been with- the squad since 1974, when it was
formed.
In the photo above, Bobby Lightfoot, assistant squad
chief, and Jim Gregg, right, squad chief, and Norma are
shown as they admire an engraved plaque presented to her
showing the squad's appreciation for her devotion to service
for the citizens of the area.
Norma has moved to South Florida.
-Star photo


Sr. Citizens County-


wide Picnic Slated


Senior citizens of Gulf Coun-
ty will gather in Wewahitchka
Friday, Aughst 25, for a
county-wide picnic, especially
for the elderly.
The Senior Citizens Day
Picnic will be held at the State
.Park just north of Wewahitch-
ka on the banks of the Dead
Lakes. The picnic will be held
in the Community Building in
Wewahitchka if it rains.
The fun and festivities will
begin at 11:00 a.m., and
continue until 3:00 p.m., We-


The First
Pentecostal Holiness Church
2001 GARRISON AVE. PORT ST. JOE
Invites You to Worship with Them
William Wilson, Pastor
C. /ICES
SUNDAY SCHOOL ............... 9:45 AM
MORNING WORSH' .'... ............ 11:00AM
EVENING WORSHI ... ....... 7:00 PM
WEDNESDAYNIGH ................. 7:00 PM


wahitchka time.
Sponsored by the Gulf Coun-
ty Senior Citizens Association,
the affair will feature good
food, music, entertainment
and fun. All the participants
must bring is themselves.
Those needing a ride to the
picnic should meet at the St.
Joe Motel parking lot at 10:00
a.m., EST on August 25.

"Nothing is so good as it seems
beforehand." George Eliot


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Gulf Coast Offering Eight


Courses In Port St. Joe


Robert M. (Bob)


MOORE


County Court Judge


















PLATFORM POINTS
You realize the problems which come before
the County Judge are legal problems; problems
.the .individuals involved could not sove,, them-

When you have a Legal problem you seek the
advice of a qualified, trained and experienced
Attorney.
You expect your County Judge to be
qualified, trained and experienced in giving
accurate and straight forward legal advice.
Watch for Further Points


ELECT -
"Full Service" Judge
Pd. Pal. Adv. by Robert M. Moore, Camp. Treas.


the members of the

Church of Christ

invite you to meet with them:
Sunday Morning Bible Study ........... 10:00 A.M.
Sunday Morning Worship ............. 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Night ................. ...... 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday Night ..................... 7:00 P.M.

Corner 20th St. & Marvin
For information call 229-6969


----- I-~--I;--rl-- )~--~--


I







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1978


Old St. Joseph Editor



Influenced the Territory


SShown, left to right, are: Mrs. Edwin Ramsey, Mrs. Johnie honoree, and Mrs. Eugene Abrams, mother of the prospec-
"'.McCiurdy; mother of the bride-elect, Miss McArthur, the tive groom. -Star photo



Shower Fetes Bride-Elect


Miss Vicki McArthur, Sep-
'tember bride-elect, was the
;honoree at a Coffee Shower
,on Saturday, August 5, at the
home of Mrs. Edwin Ramsey
on Constitution Drive.
Guests were greeted by
Mrs. Ramsey and directed to
the bride's book, which was
placed on a table accented by
a. lighted taper and an ar-
rangement of -babys breath
and carnations.
Receiving the guests with
Miss McArthur were .her
mother, Mrs. Johnie McCurdy
and Mrs. Eugene Abrams,


the mother of the groom-elect.
Each wore a corsage of carna-
tions and babys breath.
The party rooms were beau-
tifully decorated with artistic
arrangements of summer
flowers and hanging baskets.
The refreshment table was
covered ,with a cream linen
and lace-trimmed cloth, cen-
tered with an arrangement of
cream and burgundy carna-
tions.
The guests were invited into
the rooms where the many
lovely gifts, were on display.
As a moment of the occasion,


the hostesses presented Miss
McArthur with a silver coffee
service.
In addition to Mrs. Ramsey,
,the hostesses for the occasion
were: Mrs. George Adkins,
Mrs. Glen 1oyles, Mrs.


Charles Browne, Mrs. Her-
man Dean, Mrs. Laura Ged-
die, Mrs. Alfred Joines, Mrs.
Nobie Stone, Mrs. George
Suber, Mrs. 0. M. Taylor,
Mrs. Lindsey Temple and
Mrs. Doris Whealton.


Edward Chumney Dies

Unexpectedly In Wewa


Mr. Edward Chumney, 59, a
resident of Eastpoint passed
away unexpectedly early Frir
day morning in Wewa..
He was a long time resident
of this area, and a .construc-
tion worker by trade.
Survivors include:, one son,
Tommy Chumney of East-
point; five daughters, Betty
Sue Britt of Dothan, Ala.,
Norma Jean Dunkle of Talla-
hassee, Judy Diane Knowles
of Wewahitchka, Connie Hy-
smith of Wewahitchka and
,'Jean Chumney of Port Lavo-
-'ca, Texas; one brother, Elvin
Chumney of Panama City and
two sisters, Wynell Whitfield
of Lakeland and Virginia Fra-


ser of Jacksonville.
Graveside funeral services
were held at 3:00 p.m. CDT
Sunday in the Roberts Ceme-
tery of Honeyville with David
Taunton officiating.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Fune-
ral Home.

Beaches VFD

Sets Flea Mkt.
The Gulf County Beaches
Volunteer fire Department
will hold a flea m rket- Satur-
day, August 19, starting at
.9:00 a.m.
From 2:30 to 5:00 p.m., an
auction will be held with Dr.
Richard Morley, past presi-
dent of/Gulf Coast Community
College, serving as the auc-
tioneer. Several of the items to
be auctioned off include 50
pounds of shrimp, a cast net, a
large rod and reel and many
other items.
Everyone is encouraged and
invited to attend and bid on the
auction items, shop the flea
market and have a good time.
Those who would donate
items to the flea market
should call 648-8949 for pick-up
service.
The affair will be held in the
Wright store building on High-
way 98.

THANK YOU
The '79 Senior Class of Port
St. Joe High School would like
to express their thanks to the
City of Port St. Joe for the use
of their water for our car wash
on July 29. We would also like
to thank all the citizens of St.
Joe who allowed us to wash
their cars.
During the upcoming school
year we will be involved in
many more fund-raising pro-
jects for our cruise to the
Bahamas. All support will be
greatly appreciated!
Sincerely,
'79 Seniors
Note to Seniors and Chaper-
ones: $25.00 deposit is due by
August 18.


"Fish and guests in three days
are stale." John Lyly


Rev. J. C. ODUM,
Pastor


Peter W. Gauthier, Jr. had
lived in Apalachicola and
operated a press. He changed
his paper, THE TELE-
GRAPH, to the name, ST.
JOSEPH TIMES, in Novem-
ber, 1836, because it was
stated 'that it was the most
quoted sheet in Florida, chief-
ly because of his wit and
cleverness.
The living conditions in St.
Joseph were reported to us at
the height of the boom and
R.J. Moses, the secretary of
the railroad, had written an
account of his experience and
the accommodations in the
town, in 1837 or 1838.
When men of influential
standing undertake and enter
into such bitter rivalries, as
did the Apalachicola Land
Company and the promoters
of St. Joseph, the scene of
action during the political
move usually ends up this
way.
The "Saints", as they were
generally called, tried to re-
tard the development of the
old town Apalachicola through
legislature enactments.
Through representative,
E.J. Wood, of Franklin Coun-
ty, he rushed through the
Legislature Council of 1836, a
bill removing the County seat
from Apalachicola to St. Jos-
eph, but the National Congress
annulled this law, probably
because of this annulment was
the activity of Joseph M.
White, the territorial delegate
to Congress and was interest-
ed in Apalachicola Land Com-
pany. White did everything in
his power to thwart the growth
of St. Joseph. His activity in
this direction could have
caused his early retirement in
1837, from the position or
territorial delegate, an office
that he had held for twelve
years. His successor was
Charled Downing, and he was
less hostile to the. town of St.
Joseph.
The attempt of 1836, was not
the last one to remove the seat
of County Government from
Apalachicola to St. Joseph.
The next political move was

Nursing Class

Starts at Haney
A new class in Practical
Nursing will begin in January
1979 at Haney Vocational Cen-
ter. Students desiring to enter
Practical Nursing Class
should make application at the
earliest possible date.
Preliminary requirements
for students entering this pro-
gram are: Minimum age of 17'
years, good physical and men-
tal health. A high school
diploma or its equivalent is
required for applicants.
Applicants are required to
take the NLN Pre-admission
Assessment Examination.
This examination will be given
on the following dates: August
29, at 8:30 a.m., September 26,
at 6:00 p.m. and October 10 at
8:30 a.m. The test must be
prepaid. Cost of the test is
$8.00. For additional informa-
tion, please call 769-3315.

Senior Class
Selling Pictures
The "Senior Cruise Club's"
newest project is the sale of
family portraits. The price of
the portrait is $6.95. The
photography will be done by
Majestic Studios of Cleveland,
Tennessee.
You will receive an 11 x 14
color portrait mounted on
sculptured woodgrain Deco
Plaque. To buy your certifi-
cate, see any senior by August
21. Help the Senior class go to
the Bahamas!


the annual election of a dele-
gate to the Legislative Council
of the .Territory. St. Joseph
selected Peter W. Gautier, Jr.,
while the opponents selected
Hiram Menley. Peter W. Gau-
tier was elected, being popu-
lar and well known and was
supported by the people from
the town of St. Joseph. He
showed much wisdom and
shrewdness. Two important
bills were passed by the body
which related to St. Joseph, no
doubt these two bills were
sponsored by him. The first
one provided for formation to
a new county, to be known as
Calhoun, taken from portions
of Franklin, Washington and
Jackson Counties. St. Joseph
was OhOlh as the County
Seat.
The other bill mentioned
designated St. Joseph as the
other meeting place of the
Convention that was to draw
up a Constitution for Florida.
This was quoted the greatest
political move ever won by the
"Saints". The passage of this

Khalilah Has

First Birthday
Khalilah Lashonda Hill will
celebrate her first birthday
this Sunday, August 13. She is
the daughter of Brenda Hill.
Grandparents are Napoleon
Hill and Colorado Jones.
. ., '. ... ,
., .i


Khalilah Lashonda Hill


bill, Gautier's, had appeared
more than once. The "Ga-
zette" quoted a letter from
Gautier saying that the bill
was now up for the third
reading. On the 19th, after the
law had passed, the same
paper declared, "Says Fizzy
to Peter, 'scratch my back
A*-11


and I'll tickle your elbow'."
Since the proposition suited
both parties, Peter scratched
the bank and Fizzy tickled the
town. Honors did not come
singly to Gautier, for he was
appointed by the United States
Government, Marshal of the
Western District of Florida.


AM r


- -ist. 9


EXPERIENCE AND SERVICE
Legislative Analyst, Florida House of
Representatives, 1978 Outstanding Young
Men of America.
Member of Jaycees.
DON LAMONICA SAYS:
* I believe my background acquaints me with
the needs and problems of the people of the ."
area and my experience with the Florida
Legislature equips me to work effectively
toward the solutions of these problems
* I am in favor of reducing taxes and holding
the line on government spending.
* I will work to provide more job opportunities
for this area.
* Let's put the people back in control of
government.

L Don

Lamonicas
Pd. Pol. Adv Paid For By John N Boggs. Ill. Treasurer


..C


/


Just be sure to ask him about our Energy Saver
Home Program.
Building or buying a new home that meets our
Energy Saver Standards could save you up to
35% every year in energy costs. And it could add
considerably to the resale value of your home
years from now.
Ask your builder about building an Energy
Saver Home for you or contact your local Florida
Power Office for details.







Florida

Power .J


HIGHLAND VIEW

BAPTIST CHURCH
: Corner of Fourth St. & Second Ave.
Welcome Friends
SUNDAY SCHOOL ................. 9:45 A.M.
WORSHIP SERVICES ..... 11:00 A.M. &7:30 P.M.
' "CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) :... 6i30 PM.
1ID-WMEEK PRAYER (Wednesday. 7:30 P.M
* Nursery Provided


You Are Cordially Invited to Attend

LONG AVENUE

Baptist Church
Corner Long Ave. and 16th St.

SUNDAY SCHOOL ................... 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ............... 11:00A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING................. 5:45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ................ 7:00 P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday).... 7:00 P.M.


Jerome Cartier,
Minister of Music


I I


E;Y-~.


L E-- L- E--
Ik


.PAGE FIVE


Your builder rm-T.-

could help you save
/711 5It
up to 35% a year

in energy costs.


f


'' ~io~~a~?sr~


n










PAGE SIX THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1978


Biggest Problem for Young Adults

Is Making Choice of A Life Career


What is the biggest problem
facing recent high school gra-
j-uates?
S:. Or, for that matter, the.
S biggestt problem facing literal-
:; y thousands of adults from 20
Sto 60 ypars of age?
The answer, choosirig a
"'career.
In fact, according to Cather-
ne Nix, coordinator of the
Career Opportunity Center at
.Gulf Coast Community Col-
Slege,`the number one question
asked by most college stu-
;d&nts -is "What career do I
.want to follow?"
";... "And when I say college
student I mean anyone from 17
to 60," said Nix emphatically,
"because that's who attends
college She pointed out that
at least one recent survey
indicated that over one of
every three Workers in Flor-
ida above the age of 55 was
S.interested. in changing ca-
: :.')eers!
On the national level, the.


average American will
change careers three times
during his or her lifetime.
Unfortunately, however,
given the changing nature and
diversity of today's career
market, the task of selecting a
career is becoming more dif-
ficult than less difficult.
But, there is hope and help.
."That's why we began the
'Career Opportunity Center at
Gulf Coast," said Nix. "We
offer counseling and the latest
information on over 40,000
different careers, and it's all
free and available to every-
one.,,"
"We can provide people
with information -on job re-
quirements, probability of em-
ployment, what training is
needed, what the salary and
chances of advancement are,
and where in the U.S. people
are most likely to find employ-
ment."
For example, Nix pointed
out that between 1976 and 1985


the U.S. Department of Labor
predicts that approximately
17 million new jobs will be
created and an additional 29
million more jobs will open as
a result of people leaving 'he
labor force.
"White collar" occupations,
such as scientist, engineer,
business executive, and. secre-
tary, currently represent a-
bout half ,the total work force
and they are expected to
provide more than half of all
job openings during the next
seven years.
"Blue collar" jobs will pro-
vide approximately 25 percent
of all job openings.
"Selecting a career entails
much more, however, than
simply finding an area where
there are career openings,"
said Nix.
A person must consider his
or her goals and abilities,
what kind of education the job
requires, how much money


they want to earn, where they
want to live and what are the
prospects for advancement.
."Technical fields, for the
most part, are the greatest
areas of opportunity, particu-
larly in health related fields
and scientific fields," said,
Nix.
Within technical areas
across the U.S., career open-
ings look best in such areas as,
computer programming, bank
clerks and tellers, law en-
forcement, electricians, en-
gineers, drafters, dental as-
sisting, respiratory therapy,
registered nurses, and almost
all medical areas.
Anyone wishing information
on these or any other career
fields is. asked to contact or
visit the Career Opportunity
Center, GCCC, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday. The
Center is located in the col-
lege's Learning Resource Cen-
ter.


Renfro Florida Bank, Softball Winners


Renfro's, Florida Bank, Softball Winners


Recreation Department Director John' Clenney, center,
presents winner's trophies for the Men's Softball League
after completion of the spring and summer season. First
place winner was Renfro's Auto Parts, with Willie Renfro,


left, being presented the first place trophy. Second place was
Florida Bank, with Glenn Davis, manager, being presented
the trophy for his team. -Star photo


Worms from Pets Are A Health


Danger to Both Man and Animals


Gymnasts Compete In

-Members of the gymnastics class participated in a
"Cart-Wheel-A-Thon" last Thursday, August 3. Each.girl had
gotten individuals to sponsor them for-each cartwheel they
did. Money raised will be used to purchase new gymnastics
equipment. .
Traci McClain came in first in the competition doing 260
cartwheels. She was followed by Paula Ramsey with 250,
; Julia Allen with 162, Lee Miller with 138 and Teresa Cozart
with 103. All of these girls competed in the 10 years and older
class. Leading the nine and under group was Melanie
S. Williams with 200 cartwheels. Christy Smith came in second
f.-. with 123, followed by Randi McClaim with 117, Jenny



First

Presbyterian Church
Sixteenth St.

WORSHIP SERVICE
Sunday. . .. .. 10:00 AM

Welcome to Everyone





Congratulations to


Richard E. Dick"

Thompson


For becoming a qualifying member of the 1978
Million Dollar Round Table, and for winning the
National Quality Award and the National Sales
Achievement Award.
For a professional analysis of your business or


personal insurance or retirement planning, cal
collect for an appointment (904-377-2077).

Associated with

SAM N. HOLLOWAY,
Dist. Agent & Associate
Northwestern Mutual Life Ins. Co.
1800 N. Main Street. Gainesville, Fla. 3


II


2601


S"Cart- Wheel-A- Thon"

Burroughs with 50, Melissa Watson with 43 and Amy Wright
with 27. Christy Smith won a trophy for having the most
sponsors.
Shown front row, I to r, are: Randi McClain, Amy
.Wright., Jenny Burroughs, Christy Smith and Melissa
Watson. Back row, I to r: Julie Allen, Lee Miller, Traci Mc-
Clain and Paula Ramsey.
Traci McClain also won first place for the longest hand-
stand and the most back handsprings. Gymnastics will be on
Tuesday during the school year. Anyone interested in
enrolling may call John Clenney at 229-6119. The girls' coach
is Jennifer Hendrix of Panama City.


Graddy Honored by

Hartford Ins. Group.


L. Frank Graddy, Jr., of the
Gaskin-Graddy Insurance
Agency, Wewahitchka, has
been elected to a seven mem-
ber council of top area insur-
ance agents representing the
Hartford Insurance Group.
Graddy was elected by fel-
low agents to serve on the
council of Jonathan Trumbull
Associates, a body of specially
designated independent insur-
ance 'agents for The Hartford.
The Council represents area
agents in a continuing ex-
change of opinion on insur-
ance issues and opportunities
with management of The
Hartford's Orlando regional
office.
The group, Jonathan Trum-
bull Associates, is.named for

Pvt. Daniels In

Four-Day March
Pfc. Roy L. Daniels, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Sambo J. Dan-
iels, Wewahitchka, partici-
pated in the International
Four-Day Marches, recently
at Nijmegen, Netherlands.
The marches,, sponsored by
the Royal Netherlands League
for Physical Culture, were to
develop endurance and encou-
rage friendship and goodwill
among the participating na-
tions.
Daniels, a radio operator
with the 16th infantry in
Boblingen, Germany, entered
the Army in July 1977.
Daniels is a 1977 graduate of
Wewahitchka High School.
11, -








James Buchanan, the 15th
President of the United
States, was the only bachelor
President, according to World
Book Encyclopedia.


the Norwich, Conn., historical
figure who became The Hart-
ford's first agent in 1810,. the
year The Hartford was found-
ed.
Graddy is vice president of
the Wewahitchka State Bank,
a member of the Florida
Association of Independent
Insurance' Agents and the
Wewahitchka Development
Authority.

CARD OF THANKS
We would like to extend our
sincere thanks to all of those
who sent food, cards, flowers,
and for the many prayers and
concern during the loss of our
dearly loved one.
God be with you is our
prayer.'
Wife and family of
James L. Harper


I am self-employed (Gulf Track
Service) and know the meaning
of tax dollars and what good busi-
ness management means. I'm
married to the former Rebecca
Ann Prescott and have a son,
Matthew, five.
I will appreciate,your vote and
support in the Tuesday, Sept. 12
Primary.


It's an unpleasant subject to
be avoided in dinner table
conversation. But worms are
a health danger tb both man
and animals. particularly to
young children, who inadver-
tenely swallow parasites left
in the soil by dogs and, cats
running loose.
The situation, however, can
be prevented from becoming
medically dangerous, accord-
ing to Dr. Robert Jackson,
President of the Florida Ve-
terinary Medical Assdciatioi.
"By testing pets for worms at
least twice a year, they can be
discovered and eliminated,"
says Dr. Jackson. "And peo-
ple should exercise normal
sanitary precautions",' he
says. If dogs run loose in a
neighborhood, children should
be cautioned not to put their
hands to their mouths if they
play in grass, sand, or on dirt.
People who touch the ground
when outside should simply
wash their hands when they.
come back into the house."
The most common worms
found in pets are roundworms.
They can be transmitted from
mothers to puppies before
they are born, and through the
mother's milk. That's why
veterinarians recommend a
simple examination of pups
for worms at the same time
they' are seen for. routine
vaccinations.
If roundworms are discover-
ed, there are a number of
medications that are both safe
and effective to.use on ani-
mals. "The worms may reoc-
cur," says Dr. Jackson, "and
the dog may need to be
re-wormed at some point.


They can get re-infested by.
their nosing around outside.
De-worming does not hurt a
pet, and a twice-yearly exam-
ination will keep the animal
healthy while reducing the
risk of human contamina-
tion."
The problem of human con-
tamination is greatest among
very young children living in
neighborhoods with dogs that
run loose. In addition to
stressing proper hygiene
among children, parents
should keep areas where chil-
dren play free from animals
that might be carriers.
A sandbox is a good exam-
ple. Always check a child's
sanrdtiokx'fo animal droppings,
and remove them at once. At
night, the box. should be
covered so that it cannot be
used by animals. Even after
animal droppings have de-
cayed or been removed, the
worm eggs can survive in
sand or soil.
Therp are other types of
worms called hookworms that
pass from animal to human in
a similar manner. Hookworm
larvae (not the worm) pene-
trates the skin and causes
what is known as "creeping
eruptionn" This "creeping
eruption" is painfully itchy.
The simple hygienic precau-
tion of washing hands or feet
that may have had contact
with animal droppings will
help prevent humans catching
these worms, as will keeping
feet covered while playing in a
yard frequented by dogs who
are not regularly examined
and de-wormed.
"Worms are not a' pleasant


Stationed At Ft. Hood


Pvt. Leroy Myers, son of
Mrs. Pinkie M. Myers, Wewa-
hitchka, recently was as-
signed as a tank crewman
with the 2nd Armored Division
at Fort Hood, Texas.


Myers entered the Army in
March of this Year.

The private is a 1977 gradu-
ate of Wewahitchka High
School.


- Vote For and Elect -

DOUGLAS C.


BIRMINGHAM

County Commissioner,
District Two

Experienced Aggressive
Dependable
B. S. degree in Business Administration and
History, Troy State University
Helped organize & served 3 years as Presi-
dent of Wewahitchka Little Major League.
Member Wewahitchka Volunteer Fire Dept.
Member & Past President of Wewahitchka
Rotary Club
Served 3 years as Chairman, Wewahitchka
March of Dimes (increased record of collec-
tions each year)
Served 3 years on Wewahitchka City Commis-
sion, maintaining one of the lowest ad
valorem tax structures in the State.


Pd.Pol. Adv. by Douglas Birmngham, Cmp. Treas.


subject," comments Dr. Jack- attention to the cleanliness of
son, "but with regular check- their children, health pro-
ing of animals, and parental blems can be avoided."


ALL TYPES CEMETERY WORK -



Stephens Vault & Monument Co.
412 MONUMENT AVENUE
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 324S6


TAFREE .E "MTIMATE LIrENSED


HOUSE PAINTING By

PONCHO


INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR (904) 646-5103




-FIRST BAPTIST



Corner Third Street and BaltzelI Avenue
REV. BILL HEATON, Pastor
STANLEY E.YOUNG,Ministerofic HoMusic&Youth

SYNDAY SCHOOL....... ....9:,45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE ...... 11:00 A.M.
CHURCHTRAINING ................. 6:15 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP SERVICES ..... 7:30 P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) .... 7:00 P.M.
"Come and Worship God with Us"





Summer Fun


Starts Here!

visit the Athletic House


CHARLES H. STEPHENS
BUS. PHONE 227-1612


Athletic House
323 Reid Ave.


!IHaptpHfwl^"J^Ii^w^w^

PAGE SIX


1U---


'*y .


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1978


HOME POE






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable











PAGE EIGHT THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


tdcisthe health of our community
W HAT and help make life longer and
mone comfortable. If you're unde-
cided about W]r future, consider
a career in Pharmacy. It's a field
mof importance, responsibility, and
challenge...overflowingwithgrati-
lying personal rewards.

PHARMACIST? RECALL PAACY


Apmhanidt daily mists the sic
andilmuredbydispel9 into them
the mat advanced medicine in
tie world. Thr1u1h his .product,
he -ea the pain of tragedy, pro-


BUZZETT'S
DRUG STORE
Ph. 227-3371 317 Williams
Convenient Drive-in Window
Plenty of Free Parking


The engine cover of a 22 foot pleasure
boat, owned by Joe Potter of Albany, Ga., is
shown where an explosion in the engine


Two Burned In



Boat Explosion


An explosion in the motor
compartment of a 22 foot
pleasure craft owned by Joe
Potter of Albany, Georgia
Sunday morning at about 8:00
a.m., burned two men and
ended a planned fishing trip
for five others Sunday.
According to Marine Patrol
officer, Bucky Richter, the
boat, carrying the seven peo-


compartment threw it early Sunday morning.
-Star photo


pie was headed for the Gulf in
the Mexico Beach Canal, when
a flash explosion and fire
ended the trip about 500 yards
from the Mexico Beach Mar-
ina, where the boat was
launched.
Injured were Joe Potter,
age 27, and Daniel Potter, 14,
both of Albany, Georgia, who
suffered first and second de-
gree burns about their arms
and legs. The pair were taken
to a Panama City hospital
where the elder Potter was
treated and released. Daniel
Potter was kept overnight for
observation.
Richter said passengers on
the boat said the explosion
occurred, blowing off the en-
gine cover and setting the
engine compartment on fire.
The two injured men jumped
into the water and were
thrown life preservers. The
fire on the boat was put out
with an extinguisher by James
Potter.
Richter said the fire ap-
peared to be the result of a
leaky fuel filter. He estimated
damages at approximately
$200.00.


Tides


High and low tides for the
upcoming week in St. Joseph's
Bay are listed in the table
below. The information is fur-
nished by the U. S. Weather
Bureau station in Apalaciic-


cola.


Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday


High
3:40 A
4:05 A
4:47 A
5:37A
6:29 A
7:29A
8:27A
9:26 A


Low
1:45 P
2:38 P
3:30P
4:15P
5:11P
6:00P
6:53P
7:36 P


The "Jodi Ann" is shown after a fire was extinguished aboard Thursday morning. The boat is shown aground in shallow
water where possible salvage operations can be attempted. -Star photo



Shrimp Boat Destroyed by Fire In


Early Morning Blaze Off Point
The "Jodi Ann", a shrimp was returning to port in Port members got off the burning burning boat v
boat owned by Martha J. St. Joe after a night of craft onto a lifeboat and were shallow water a
Mapes of St. Joe Beach, shrimping. The fire happened picked up by the "Three Richter said
burned Thursday morning, on the Gulf side of St. Joseph Sisters" of Port St. Joe. The totally destroy
totally destroying the $50,000 Point about three miles south-
craft, according to Buckey west of St. Joe Pass. Band Camp Starts Mond
Richter, of the Florida Marine The boat was operated by T
Patrol. The boat was operated by T


The fire started in the
engine room of the boat at
about 6:00 a.m., while the boat


J. Raffield, along with. crew-
men, David T. Watson of Port
St. Joe and Bud Pridgeon of
Wewahitchka. All of the crew


I
b
1


was pulled to
and grounded.
the boat was
d.

lay


Thne ort t. Joe Hignh Scnool p.m.
'Band of Gold" will begin If there are any questions
band camp on Monday August please contact the front office
14 from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 or Mr. Smith.


Retires

J. A. Alligood, auditor for the Apalachi-
cola Northern Railroad, retired from his
position Friday after more than 39 years of
service with the local railroad.

Alligood began his railroad career on
June 21, 1939 with the track maintenance
department, studying telegraphy and ac-


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
U. S. LIFE CREDIT CORPORATION,'
Plaintiff,
Vs.
LEIGH J. SMITH and SHARON SMITH,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LEIGH J. SMITH and SHARON
SMITH
921 West Berry Street
Hobbs, New Mexico 88240
V YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Com-
plainfhas been filed in the above styled
Court and you are commanded to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if any, on
FRED N. WITTEN, Plaintiff's Attorney,
whose address is 303 4th Street, Port St.
Joe, Florida and whose post office
address is P. 0. Box 447, Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456, on or before September 4,
1978, and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded In the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of
the Court at Port St. Joe, Gulf County,
Florida, this 1st day of August, 1978.
GEORGE Y. CORE,
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit
Gulf County, Florida
By: Margaret Core, Deputy GCirK.
4t 8-3
BID NO. WWP124
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida,
requests bids on the following: One (1)
ball bearing motor. Specifications may
be obtained from the City officee,
P. 0. Box A, Port St. Joe, .... ..2456.
Bid opening to be August 15, 1978.
-s- Michael J. Wright,
City Auditor and Clerk 2t 8-3
BID NO.WWP123
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida,
requests bids on the following: One (1)
rotary blower 1,500 CFM. Specifications
may be obtained from the City Clerk's
Office, P. 0. Box A, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. Bid opening to be August 15, 1978.
-s- Michael J. Wright,
City Auditor and Clerk 2t 8-3


counting in his off-duty hours.
He has since worked as clerk-telegra-
pher, agent-operator, accounting clerk, chief
clerk in the accounting department and was
appointed auditor on April 1, 1970.
Mr. and Mrs. Alligood will continue to
reside at 1000 Lakeview Drive, Wewahitchka.
In the photo above, ANRR vice-president,
B. Roy Gibson, Jr., right, presents a piece of
luggage to Alligood at a retirement reception
held for the retiring auditor Friday morning.
-Star photo


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATEODIVI.
SION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
AUBREY ELLIS ROWELL,.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice Is hereby given that in accord-
ance with the Order of the Circuit Court
in this Estate, dated the 20th day of July,
1978, the Personal Representative of this
Estate will offer for sale and sell at
public outcry to the highest and best
bidder for cash, at the main front door of
the Gulf County Courthouse between the
hours of 11:00 o'clock A.M. and 2:00
o'clock P.M., on the 8th day of Septem.
ber, 1978, the following described real
property of said Estate located in Gulf
County, Florida.
PARCEL NO. 1
Commence at the Southeast Corner of
Lot 1, Block 1, of Lake Heights Sub-
division, Upit 1, according to Plat
thereof on file in Plat Book 2, page 29,
Public Records of Gulf County, Flor-
ida which is the Point of Beginning;
thence run Westerly along the South
line of Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 of Block 1 of
said Subdivision a distance of 227.4
reet to the Northeast Corner of Lot 7,
Block 1, of Lake Heights Subdivision,
Unit 2, according to Plat thereof on file
in Plat Book 2, page 34, Public Records
of Gulf County, Florida; thence run
Southerly along the East line of Block
1 of said Subdivision a distance of
318.36 feet to the North right of way
line of Pope Avenue of said Subdivi-
sion; thence run Easterly along the
North right of way line of said Pope
Avenue a distance of 138.55 feet to the
West right of way line of State Road
No.71; thence run Northeasterly along
the West right of way line of said State
Road to the Point of Beginning. Said
tract of land lying in the SW'A of the
SEAV of Sectior T4S, R10W, AND
ALSO D- -. AS: That certain
tract of ; SW'4 of SE'A of
Section 11, .4S, R10W bordered on the
North by Lake Heights Subdivision,
Unit 1 as shown by plat thereof on file
in the office of Clerk of Circuit Court of
Gulf County, Florida in Plat Book 2,
page 29; on the West and South by
Lake Heights Subdivision, Unit 2 as
shown .by plat thereof on file in the


office of Clerk of Circuit Court of Gulf
County, Florida in Plat Book 2, page 34
and on the East by State Road No. 71.
PARCEL NO. 2
Lots 7,8,9, 10and 11, Block 1, and Lots
6 and 7, Block 2 of Lake Heights Sub-
division, Unit 2, according to plat
thereof on file in office of Clerk of
Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida,
in Plat Book 2, page 34.
PARCEL NO. 3
The WVzof SV2 of S'/2 of NEI' of SEiV',
Section 11, T4S, R10W.
Each of the lots described in Parcel 2
will be offered separately and then col-
lectively to determine which Is the
highest bid. All sales will be subject to
confirmation by.the Court; a deposit of
the bid will be required at the time of the
bid.
This notice given this 20th day of July,
1978.
BAY NATIONAL BANK & TRUST COM.
PANY, PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA, as
Personal Representative of the Estate of
Aubrey E. Rowell, Deceased.
By: -s- Mary E. Cooper,
Trust Officer 4t 7.27
FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that
pursuant to Section 865.09,
Florida Statutes, the under-
signed persons intend to regis-
ter with the Clef-k of the Cir-
cuit Court, Gulf County, Flor-
ida, four weeks after the first
publication of this notice, the
fictitious name or trade name
under which they will be en-
gaged in business and in which
said business is to be carried
on, to-wit:
Name of Business, Stephens
Vault and Monument Co.;
Location of Business, 412 Mon-
ument Ave.; Owner, Charles
H. Stephens; phone 227-1622 or
229-8032. 4t 7-20


Polyester cord


DELUXE CHAMPION


As $
low
as


A78-13 Blackwall. Plus $1.69 F.E.T.
and old tire. Whitewall add $3.
"A'" size 5-rib design.


47

















Whitewalls add $3.
*Tread design different
than shown.


Plus $1.42 to S1. 50
F.E.T. and old tire.

8-13, B78-14, C78-14, 078-14,
.6,0-15', 6.00-15L', 6.85S-15',
6.45-14', Blackwall


'26
Plus $1.61 to $2.01
F E.T. and old tire.

E78-14, F78-14,
G78-14, H78-14,
G78-15, Blackwall


'32
Plus $2.13 to $2.60
F.E T and old tire.

H78-15, L78-15, Blackwall

P 36
Plus $2.65 to $2.93
FE T. and old tire.


Double belted tire


SALE
Sa$ve5 $OJ2 PER SET
oSave o8 to 24 IF 4


4for*99


A78-13. Blackwall.
Plus $1.71 F.E T per
tire and four old tires
Whitewall add
$5.25 per tire.


DELUXE A $
CHAMPION Tfor I24
B78-14, C78-14, E78-14.
Sup-R-BeIlt Blackwall.
S Plus $1.92 to $2.19 F.E.T.
per tire and 4 old tires.


Belted 4 for 140
F78-14, G78-14, E78-15,
F78-15. Blackwall.
Plus $2.31 to $2.47 FE T.
per tire and 4 old tires.

4for148
H78-14. G78-15.
Blackwall.
Plus $2.55 to $2.70 FET
per tire and 4 old tires



H78-15, J78-15.
Blackwall.
Plus $2.77 to $2.96 FET.
per tire and 4 old tires



J78-14Whitewall;
Plus $2.87 to $3.05 F.E.T
per tire and 4 old tires
Whitewalls add $2 to $3 per tire.


Steel Belted


RADIAL VlTM


As
low
as
BR70-13 Whitewall
Plus $2.20 F.E.T.
and old tire.

Wide 70 series radial has
R ad a Ia seven layers of strength
under the tread two
Whitewall polyester cord radial
body plies, four rayon
stabilizer belts and
a tough steel belt.


- Public Notices -


a


PATE'S SERVICE CENTER

214 Monument Ave. Phone 227-1291


I I 1)1 _7 ;--..m ~-_--~-?--.-.~- .'. .-. iC--~---9i---l~ I~--~.- ii -il- i.n-i T





~"~'~~""


THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 1978,








SECOND

BIG WEEK

OF


DAVID RICH'!
FOODLINER ..
Port St. Joe & Wewahitchka
Store Hrs: 7:30 to 6:30


I


^ BOX
HOLDER
Prices Good Aug. 9-15


OPENINGG SA


GRAND


WINNERS OF FREE GROCERIES
J. E. Pridgeori, Lois Purswell, Katherine Faile,
Deric Ashburn, Eloise Williams, Melba Peak,
Jack Boone, Rita Pelt, M. C. Shattles, Mrs. J.
S' D'Angelo, Lois Tharpe, Mrs. James McLeod, Joe
SPurswell, Jean Stephens, Mrs. Dorothy Bolden,
Constance Clemons, Eddie Williams, Margie
Grubbs, Betty Johnson, Lillian Cannington, Judy
White Eagle, Larry Flowers, J. I. Grover, Ruth
Kendrick, Charlie Whitfield, Connie Hall, Linda
Hand, Arinett Hood, Irene Ward, Juanita
McQuaig and Myrtle Rogers.














You: Do Not Have To Be
Present To Win
All Drawings Will Be
2nd*Week -yi Whl Smo. *







THelduat4:00 P.M. a-















Sealtest Assorted Flavors
Light 'N' Lively YOGURT
Whipped 6 Stick
BLUE BONNET MARGARINE ..... ..
KRAFT ORANGE JUICE ... ......
F F














BUFFET SUPPERS Bn.qu.t..
Totina Asosrted Pizzas ..........'
IGA WHP TOPPING ............
m ippd: S tk







* 6k A


LAST WEEK


,siA
E Uk


i PKG.
Glad Trash Bags.............. OF 10
IGA French Style Green Beans . 3CAN
Q IGA Mixed Vegetables ........ .3. NS$100
Kraft 1000 Island or French Dressing BOTTLE 63
IGA Pineapple Juice . .. .AN 83




IGA ASSORTD FLAVORS-J~


48 Oz. $ 00
Ctns. $
S L Pkg. 59
Hal f l 0
Gallon $1.09-


orted
32 Oz.
SSize


$119


* 13/2 Oz .79
S. 131/2 Oz. 79C


IGA
IGA
IGA


CARMEL SWEET
PETITE ROLLS .


ROLLS ........


KING SIZE SANDWICH BREAD .


. 2 PKG. OF 6 $.00
. 2 24 CT. PKGS. $100
LOAVES


Sweet Ga. Elberta
PEACHES


Firm Head


LETTUCE


Yellow Squash or
Tender Okra


Head 9 & Up


ag 49


* I Sunkist
LEMONS o. Sweet Red Italian
LEMONS Doz 99
Florida ONIONS .
LIMES Doz. 69
Tennessee Mountain Grown
TOMATOES 3 t.y


4


Lb.
Tray


Fresh Sheiled Daily
Black or Pink-eye Pea
Tender
YELLOW CORN


$100

s LB. 69'

8 Ears 88


Fresh Crop
RUTABAGAS ......... .s. 29
Large White
SCUPPERNONG ....... LB. 79


STOCK YOUR FREEZER WITH FALL VEGETABLE:
PEAS OKRA SQUASH
BUTTER L'EANS PEACHES


_ I I Iii I~


r K.


II~


,. 390




~Rn~~"J~"~""*
L~.


Open:
. 7:30 A.M. to
H 7:00o P.M.


Week-Long Store-Wide Sale-A-Bration Start


We Really Do Appreciate Your Business...
George Annette Wiley James Evelyn Dot Sue Hazel Joyce Debra Rosa Lee Andy -
Darius Brent Bill Mark Jackie Willie
S..Cheerfully Serving You Is OurBusiness and Pleasure


$


With Your
Grocery Order 4


Round


00


ir


Top Loaves


Giant Size
TIDE

Detergent


C


8 Ounce Sweet Cubed
-SALAD DE.. IG 9.... .. ......-.O


S HAMBURGER or HOT DOG
S Sweetheart BUNS .............. 2


blibby's 29 Ounce Cans An6 C
PEACH HALVES.......... 69
SAVEBIG' I 7
, Big Variety Plants........ % off
I. _____ 'Fine Fare Whip ped, ii
Margarine 2-8oz. 59. J
Borden's 12 Oz. Mild Colby 4r 1 t
BUTTERMILK '/ Gal. CHEESE l.3 *9


Pkgs. .


*,~ I'*


Limit 1 with $1.00 or More
Food Order


See All
RICE


48 Ounce


CRISC


3 Lb
Pkg .O8


OIL


DIET PEPSI DF. PEPPER
7-UP MOUNTAIN DEW
FROSTY ROOT BEER
PEPSI

COLAS


C


Limit 1 with $10.00 or More
^ ^^Food Order


Dixie Home
POT PIES 4/49'


Kraft 28 Oz.
BARBECUE SAUCE


limit 5 with $10.00
Food Orde


Or More


6 Oz. Minute Maid
LEMONADE
Morton Fried
Chicken Dinner


99C


4/99C
14 oz. 59


4 Roll Pkg.
Charmin
TISSUE
Pkg.


Il


Delta
Paper
Towels

2/ R 9
Jumbo Rolls


1,- 7., vlY


. .


KLI


a






510 Fifth St.


Savings from the
Friendliest Store
In Town!
Cigarettes Excluded In
Special Limit Deals I


Wed., A


9t


k Tues., A


1~15-


Port St. Joe, Fla.


Tray Pak
.Whole


C


r Heavy Western Beef
Round


Choice --
Boneless Shoulder Roast Lb. $1.39
Choice
RUMP ROAST Lb. $1.29 4
Choice
SIRLOIN STEAK Lb. $1.99


5 Lbs.. or More
Ground
BEEF


Lb.


r F


iBryon's
r Sliced Bacon
Lb. 1 39
^~ Aid .


Bryan's Roll
Sausage


Bryan's Juicy Jumbo
FRANKS
Lb $129


*x.


5 Lbs. or More "
Ground Chuck.


Choice-
RIB EYE STEAK


Choice Beef
RIB STEW MEAT
Choice Beef
BRISKET STEW


Lb.$ 18


Lb $2.99


Lb. 79
Lb. 49


We Offer the Highest Quality Produce at the Lowest Possible
Prices We Haul It Fresh! ,.


Firm HBBAG
CABBAGE


AS


U. S. No.




10


1 White


is


Red or Golden L .- C
DELICIOUS APPLES ......................59
Iceberg 29Cd
FIRM HEAD LETTUCE..***. 29 u


California
Golden JUICY LEMONS .............


or,59


Fresh Florida 4 AC
Bell Pepper, Cucumbers ............. A
Fresh Firm Lb.39
RIPE TOMATOES........................-.


Lb.


Center


Cut


PORK

CHOPS


Lb.


Lb.


Lb. Bag


PeAhr at Sav aeMr a t S


Choice Quality
Chuck SteakLb. 99C
Choice Boneless
Chuck RoaSt Lb -$ 129


'., .;


8


I




-p q-: 3-i- -.~; -~ -;"""


IT'S FUN... IT'S EASY... START TODAY...
Prices ood Here's:How' ..
Au u t 9 t If WOArkS For Each Special You Buy You Will
tcs ce.... ao Hne:i ul One or More Present the Required Number of
.U ... "Supe, 0.11 3.t-nr As Advertised Save Super-Gift Stamps. Stamps on Your Saver Sheets to our
PLUS For Each'S10 Purchase You on Saver Sheets Furnished Store Manager and Get Your FREE
Will Receive One Super-Gilt Stamp oy Checker Eighty Stamps Super-Gift.
lExcluding Items Proh'ibited by Law) Complete One aver Sheet. ..s .? ,s Ta. '.re,e Apphcablel


raf ONESTAMP
APPLE JELLY ,o A
18 oz. JAR
Krawith
GRAPE JELLY OZ. JAR

Ih lANTT EA Sl2s ON E STAMP
FLOUB 5 LBSAG
Litesaver ONE STAMP
BUBBLE YUM .wit


TNT
INSECT BOMB
TNT House &
GARDEN BOMB
IODIZED SALT
Jim O*My SalfAising
CORN MEAL
Cornlet Bathoom
TISSUE


Maxwell House L'icf n( Grinds
COFFEE


I- -


Sea Pak Frozen
FISH STICKS
Sea Pak Frozen
HUSHPUPPIES
-Sea Pak Fromen
ONION RINGS
Sea Pak Frozen
FANTAIL SHRIMP


oz. 55c
, lb. 592
1 89
,o0. S209


Good Value Frozen Hashbrown
POTATOES 2 lb.
Good Value Frozen


CUT CORN


20 oz.


591
691


Sunny Delite 64 oz.
ORANGE O8c
PUNCH 0
BlJue Bar-wt Soft rff
MARGARINE 2 8z 7
Kraft Mild Natural c 1a
Kraft Medium Natuial Q A
CHEDDAR CHEESE 12 oz 1
Pillsbury Cres& ,an
DINNER ROLLS 8 59.


Fresh Southern
PEACHES
Fresh
GREEN CABBAGE
Small Fancy
CUCUMBERS
Medium
WHITE ONIONS
Large Select California
BELL PEPPER


lb. 39c

lb. 19'



lb. 291

4 for


1 Lb.
Can


Choc-Full of Nuts


COFFEE


29


Limit 1 with $10 or more additional purchase


Swif-s Pemiu Heay Weter


NewCrp Run



WITE


U- -. I..


Swift's Pre"mium
SIRLOIN STEAK

Lb. $1 m9]7


?