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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02211
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: March 23, 1978
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02211

Full Text


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industry Deep Water Port Fine People Safest Beaches in Florida
PORTST. JOE, FLORIDA THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 1978


NUMBER 29
1


We k End oftWor-ship WillObserve Resurrection


Port St. Joe's Ministerial Association
has planned a full week end of holy week
activities for worship in the community,
beginning with Friday services with the
Seven Last Words of Jesus from the
cross.
The Good Friday services will be
held in the-Long Avenue Baptist Church
auditorium beginning at 11:30 a.m., and
continuing through 3:00 p.m. A different
minister will be speaking each half hour
on the several words.
The speakers, in order of appear-
ance, will be:


1130a.m:, Rev. J. C. Odum, the first-
word, '"Father forgive thn;, for they
know inot what they do." Luke 23:34.
S 1200 noon, Rev. Bill Heaton, second
word, "Today thou shalt be with Me:in
paradise." Luke 23:43.
12:30 p.m., Rev. Sidney Ellis, the
third word, "Woman behold thy Son."-
John 19:26.
1:00 p.m., Father Fausto Stampiglia,
the fourth word, "My God, My God, why
hast Thou forsaken me." Matthew 27:46.
1:30 p.m., Rev. William Touchton,
the fifth word, "I thirst." John 19:28.


2:00 p.m., Rev. Charles P. Price, the
sixth word, "It is finished." John 19:30.
2:30 p.m., Rev. Lawrence Cox, the







SERVICES
seventh word, "Father, unto Thy hahds i
commend My spirit." Luke 23:46.


SEveryone is invited to attend all or
any portion of the three-hour service.
S EASTER SUNRISE
:'The Christian community of Port St.
Joe will greet Easter Sunday morning
with sunrise worship in the high school
football stadium at 6:30 a.m. The special
worship will also be sponsored by the
Ministerial Association.
As the sun comes up on the morning
of the Resurrection, the high school band
will play the prelude, followed by a call to
praise duet by Billy Rich and Mrs. David


Fernandez.
Father Fausto Stampiglia, pastor of
St: Joseph's Catholic Church will give the
invocation- and lead in repeating the
Lord's Prayer. Rev. David Fernandez,
pastor of Oak Grove Assembly of God
will read the scripture. Rev. Larry Wells,
pastor of the First United Pentecostal
Holiness Church will give the morning:
prayer. Stanley Young, minister of music
and youth of the First Baptist Church will
Ssing a solo before the message.
The Easter message will be deliver-
'ed this year by Rev. Johnie McCurdy,


pastor of the First United Methodist
Church.
The benediction will be pronounced
by Rev. William Touchton, pastor of
the Highland View Church of God.
The sunrise service will be of an
interdenominational nature and all faiths
are urged and invited to attend.
Music for the program will be under
the direction of Ray Smith, bandmaster
of Port St. Joe High School.
In case of inclement weather, the
services will be held in the High School
Coliseum.


Survey Will Establish


Building Elevations


Engineer Gerald Ward, City Clerk Mike Wright and
Federal Insurance Adininistration agent Rick Mason look


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Idle Machine

.. :. ... .I


over charts and maps depleting the elevi
throughout Gulf County.


St. Joe Paper Company scarce due to heavy rains supply is still n
resumedd peraion o ts in the wood harvest area as need. "Wi

Wednesday motlhilg after wods. agalh in the
being down'for three weeks Acedrding. to Harold said.
The company had shut Quackenbush, operations Over a hundi
down one of its two ma- manager of the local firm, were idled by t
chines when wood became wood still is scarce and the shut down.


Members of the Florida Legislative Appropriations Recreation Park to discuss a request
SCommittee gathered in the sun on the boardwalk at Sunland million dollars in construction.


The Federal Flood Insur-
ance Administration sent a
trio of representatives to Gulf
County Monday, along with
three representatives of Gee
S' and Jensen, Engineers, to
advise local government offi-
... cials that they intend to begin
;. a survey of the county in order
to set elevation requirements
'and rates for;:flood insurance
., premiums.
Meeting with representat-
ations found tives of the cities of Port St.
-Star photo Joe and Wewahitchka and
Gulf County government were
Bob Cassell, Rick Mason and
lot as great John Gamble of the Federal
e mai have Insurance Administration and
cc~idi~ai n 'OeralO.Wmth-WartrwoMdjfWiWV j*,
future", lie o" the engineering firm.
Mason told the local officials
red workers that a study made three years
.he machine ago in this same area is now
void. That study set an eleva-
tion of seven feet in Port St.


for an 'additional
--Star photo


lsh Aft er $1 Million for



Sunland Recreation Park


SCalling on a game plan which worked
well last spring, Representative William
J. Rish enticed members of the approp-
riations committee for the Florida
Legislature to come to the Sunland
Recreation Park on St. Joseph Peninsula
yesterday at noon for a seafood dinner at
whichhe made a pitch for more funds for
tde facility. '
Present for the dinner were Represen-
tatives Earl Dixon, Gus Craig, Tom
Lewis, Jerry Melvin, Elaine Gordon,
Beverly Bernstead and Sam Beall and
Bob Mathews, with the Division of
Retardation, of Tallahassee, who oper-
ates the area facility.
Rish is asking for. $1 million to
construct more cottages at the site and
continue toward the goal of providing
facilities to accommodate all Sunland
center clients in the state of Florida with
a beachside and picnic vacation area.
At last year's soire, Rish was success-
ful in securing $600,000 in state funds and


contracts on this construction phase are
expected to be let next month.
The project calls for construction of a
central dining and recreation facility
along with four more cottages. The site.
now has seven cottages on location and is
capable of handling all Sunland clients in
North Florida.
SAlso on the site, recently constructed
are a swimming pool built to accommo-
date disabled persons, dressing rooms,
boardwalks and an underpass under the
road leading to the state park, which will
allow clients to use both the bay-side and
Gulf-side facilities without the hazard of
walking across the road. The swimming
pool is a constant four feet deep and the
water depth can be regulated. The pool is
equipped so wheel chair patients can
enter and leave the pool in their chairs.
. Mathews told those present that the
site attracted over 2,500 visitors during
the past hummer. After construction is
completed on the phase.to be bid next


month, the site will be capable of caring
for all clients in north Florida. Presently
is can care for those in the Marianna and
some from other facilities in the area.
The park is located on a tract-of 98.5
acres on St. Joseph Peninsula and has
both Gulf and bay frontage. The Gulf side
has 4,500 feet of beachfront and has been
developed into a beach type recreation
program. The bay side has 940 feet of
water frontage and has been developed
more along the camping, picnicing
theme.
There is a year-round custodial staff at
the center, but visiting groups furnish
their own staff to tend the clients needs.
The visiting dignitaries enjoyed the
meal of mullet, shrimp and raw oysters
and they were duly impressed with what
has been done already on the site. They
didn't say if the dinner was good enough
or the tour impressive enough to approve
the additional $1 million Rish is request-
ing.


Joe. This was the minimum
elevation to which a building
could be built in order to
obtain the federal-sponsored
insurance.
The Gee and Jenspn firm
has been hired by the federal
government to make a study
along the coast and water-
ways from Bay to Pasco
counties. The study is likely to
take at least one and a half to
two years, according to the
representatives here Monday.
The meeting Monday was to
establish identification. of
growth areas, existing devel-
opment and to establish con-
tact with' representatives in
the. three local governments
involved. '
Representative William J.
Rish, who was present at the
meeting, asked the question,
"Do we have the option of
turning down your recomi-
'mendation?"
Mason replied, "Yes, but
there are penalties involved.
These include a refusal of
financing by any government
insured lending agency and
refusal of flood insurance on
existing structures." Mason'
went on to say that the cities
and county involved will have
the opportunity to appeal their
decisions and that the deci-
sions would. not be made hard
and fast 'until they are first
presented to local representa-
tives for discussion.
Mason said that after the
lines are set, flood insurance
premiums will be drastically
reduced on existing buildings
which comply with the requir-
ed elevations. The present
rate of flood insurance is
$25.00 per $1,000 of insurance.
Ward, who represented the
engineering firm said the
study will probably begin this
year. The study will include
storm and natural disaster
experience in the area since
1900. He.indicated that an
average of high water will be
ascertainedfrom the recorded
storms and the building eleva-
tion be ascertained from this
average.
Receiving particular atten-
tion in the survey will be what
the delegation termed the
"high hazard area", that area
along the waterfront. Mason
said this line would probably
follow the already-established


set-back line, which was set
two years ago.
Ward said that in addition to'


V.


the Gulf and Bay fronts, the also be considered in the
floodways of the Chipola and study. "This flood area is not:
Apalachicola Rivers would very large.,' he observed.


Supreme Court



Scolds Taunton


"For Conduct

... .Mr oft

Of the three options available to them,
the Florida Supreme Court chose the
middle ground and publicly reprimanded
Gulf County Judge David Taunton on
charges that he "engaged in conduct
unbecoming a member of the judiciary".
The Supreme Court had the option they
took or they could have removed Judge
Taunton from office or given him a private
reprimand.
: In making their reprimand, the jus-
tices noted that there was no evidence of
corruption'or a corrupt motive. .
In their reprimand, the high court
warned Judge Taunton that "a continu-
ance of improper conduct, which Taunton
indicated will be his future practice, will
subject him to possible removal, notwith-
standing his good intentions and compas-
sionate motives".
Monday afternoon, Judge Taunton told
The Star that he wasn't interested particu-
larly in flaunting the court's ruling, but
that he felt "everyone needs an equal
opportunity before 'the law and they are
not now getting it". Taunton was particu-
larly concerned over the fact that in
certaifi instances, especially in small
claims court cases, the defendant is not
eligible for services of the Public Defender
as he is in felony cases. "If a defendant in
that court cannot afford an attorney, I feel
he should be advised of his rights",
Taunton said, and it is this practice which
partially' has him in hot water with the
State Judiciary and the Supreme Court.
They say it is Taunton's duty to judge, not
give out free legal advice.
In hearings last July, the state's
Judicial Qulifications Commission found
Taunton guilty of five instances of judicial
misconduct.
The charges were:
-That he mailed forms to a woman in
.another county so she could change the
location of a trial and avoid a 140-mile
journey to be heard in court.
-That he conducted an investigation
of political figures during office hours and
later publicly revealed his findings.
-That he appeared before a hearing
examiner on behalf of a man he had found
guilty of drunken driving.
-That he gave a woman money so her
washing machine would not be reposses-
sed and refused to make her pay court
costs to the company that wanted to
repossess the machine.
-That he gave advice to a defendant
who owed money to a creditor and refused.
to enter a judgment against the defendant
because he did not think the defendant
could pay.
The Supreme Court agreed with the
qualifications commission that the char-
ges constituted "misconduct", but the
justices said the case was "particularly
difficult because it appears that Judge
Taunton was motivated by his own sense of
right and wrong and his concern for the
poor and underprivileged."
Justice Joseph Boyd wrote a separate
concurring opinion, saying that Taunton
was clearly in the wrong. Boyd paid close


t Unbecoming A

he Judiciary"

attention to the investigation Taunton
conducted and charges he subsequently
made public of alleged corruption in a land
deal involving former state Sen. George
Tapper and Representative William J.
Rish, both of Port St. Joe.
A Grand Jury investigation later found
there was no basis to the charges.
Boyd said, "It is an elementary
principle that criminal court judges should
not use the influence of their office to make


JUDGE DAVID TAUNTON
.public speeches charging persons with
crimes or other misconduct".
STaunton said Monday that he would
continue to exercise his rights to reveal: ,
wrong doing where he sees it.
"If he were willing to learn and
observe the canons of conduct our problem :
would be. over", Boyd said. "It seems
obvious that he will likely be again before
the Judicial Qualifications Commission."
"I will continue to carry on the
business of this office in an effort to give
the same privileges to everyone, poor and
rich alike and if my actions go against the:'
Supreme Court's rulings, I very well may:
be before them again. However, I intend to
render equal justice to all", Taunton said
Monday.
Taunton said he planned to obey the
standards of conduct set for judges if he
could, but that he wouldn't give any sector
an unfair advantage over the other.
Taunton said Monday, "I just don't
believe that there is any justice in ruling
against a defendant on procedural grounds
just because he cannot afford to hire an
attorney. In the case of criminal procedure
the state provides a public defender. In
civil litigation there is no such provision. If
they would just let-me appoint a public
defender, I wouldn't have to advise them."
When asked if he planned to seek
reelection, Taunton replied, "I have been
encouraged to run for a public office and I
have been giving serious consideration,"
He didn't say what the office was.


15' Per Copy


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THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 1978


W*, w-- THE STAR -
Published Every Thursday at 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
By The Star Publishing Company
SSecond-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
A. Wesley R. Ramsey ................. Editor and Publisher
S William H. Ramsey ...................... Production Supt.
Frenchie L. Ramsey ................... Office Manager
Shirley K. Ramsey ........................... Typesetter
PCSTOFFICE BOX 308 PHONE 227-1278
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456

SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN-ADVANCE
IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR, SS.00 SIX MONTHS, S3.00 THREE MONTHS, S127.50
OUT OF COUNTY--7.00 OUT OF U.S.-One Year, St.00
TO ADVERTISERS-in case of error or omissions In advertisements, the publishers do not hold
themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such advertisement.
The spoken word Is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word
barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


EDITORIALS:


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Greatest

S Sunday is Easter Sunday to
'.Christians throughout the world.
' The Spring holiday comes in the
midst of the season of the miracle of
S birth and re-birth following a long
Period of dormancy and regression.
Recently, we heard a preacher
a-Isk the question of his congregation,
S"What do you think was the greatest
- miracle of Jesus Christ?" To some,
one of the greatest miracles was
healing a blind man with a handful
of mud mixed with spit. There have
not been many men to do this either
before or after Christ, so this could
be termed a great mircale. Then
there was the time He healed a lame
man by merely telling him to get up
and walk. Again, the men through-
out history who have accomplished
This feat are missing.
There are a host of people who
Swill give you a stiff argument about
Sthe feat of Christ, when he walked up
Sto Lazarus' tomb and said, "Laza-
S rus, come forth!" When Lazarus,
who had been dead long enough to be
Stinking, came forth from the tomb,
E that had to be the show stopper of
That season in the land of the Jews.
N Nobody can lay claim to having
Pulled off a miracle such as this.


Reading a recent issue of News-
Sweek, we find that the dollar, in its
fluctuations up and down, is follow-
.ing the path of gold on the world
market in its gyrations. When the
-dollar goes down, the price of gold
goes down and vice versa.
Most Americans have been con-
cerned with the pulsating value of
the dollar. Especially do we abhor
the instances when it takes a
dramatic plunge as opposed to the
value of other currencies in the
world. The phrase "sound as a
dollar" makes good listening to most
Americans.
Although we are concerned over
the state of the dollar's health, we
can't get too excited about its
fluctuations when we look at the
state of the pattern nations. In Italy,
for instance, a former premiere and
valued member of the government is
kidnapped, along with other impor-


A Layman's View


t Miracle


Raising men from the dead has
to be in the running for the title of
"miracle of the age".
In our opinion, Jesus' ability to
raise men from the dead was only a
sort of side effect to the real miracle.
The first four books of the New
Testament tell us about what we
believe is the greatest miracle-the
miracle of providing salvation and
eternal life for sinful man.
As we say, some other man in
history may have made a blind man
see; he may have made a cripple
walk; but we haven't heard or read
about it. Someday, a man may be
brought back from the dead, even
after he has started to stink.
The Bible tells us, though, and
we believe it, when it says, "No man
cometh unto the father but by me".
There will be no other man by which
this may b accomplished.
One way ard one way only for a
man to be in the family of God. One
way makes it a miracle. Since man's
only hope for the hereafter is to be in
the family of God, then Jesus'
sacrifice, noted on Easter morning,
is the most important miracle for
man- ever performed.


tant men. In Germany, government
and business officials don't dare step
outside withotit a bodyguard or
brace of guards. In France, the
leadership of the government was
narrowly prevented from falling into
the hands of the Communists and a
French policeman was killed by a
terrorist bomb on the streets of
Paris. In England, a virtual civil
war has been going on for years with
the Irish.
In all of these countries, it isn't
safe for anyone to walk down the
streets with or without his body-
guards. In America, we are con-
cerned only with the reputation our
dollar has concerning its. stability
among these nations who seem to
have forgotten the meaning of the
word "stable".
It seems we still have the most
of the best of what the world offers a
man for a satisfied life regardless of
the state of our dollar,


By Billy Norris


Bible Notes


Titus 2:11-15 ASV good deeds. These things
Key Word: A Purified People speak and exhort and reprove
with all authority. Let no one
"For the grace of God has disregard you."
appeared, bringing salvation
to all men, instructing us to All God's people must start
deny ungodliness and worldly from salvation. It is only from
desires and to live sensibly, this point that God begins to
righteously and godly in the instruct us and starts His puri-
present age, looking for the fying work in our lives. There
blessed hope and the appear- are three basic. things God
ing of the glory of our great would have the Christian do.
SGod and Savior, Christ Jesus; These are deny sin, live sensi-
Swho gave Himself for us, that bly, and look for the return of
SHe might redeem us from Jesus. You see Jesus has al-
e:- every lawless deed and purify ready performed every thing
for Himself a people for His needed to redeem us from all
own possession, zealous for sin and to purify us for Him-


self. We are to desire to do
good deeds because of Him.
The Christian is to speak,
act and come against ungodly
things with all authority. The
Christian has God-given aut-
hority-to use. God expects us
to do this and to refuse is sin
which ultimately must be
dealt with. Then we have the
specific instruction, "Let no
one disregard you." Jesus
said He would rather have us
cold or hot and not lukewarm.
You may ignore something
lukewarm, but not something
cold or hot. God wants zealous
people, talking people, acting
people.
In these five verses is a
great message. Read them
over again and again and
listen to God in them.


Substantial Interest In GCCC



Center for Gulf, But No Money


There is substantial interest
among residents of Gulf and
Franklin Counties for opening
a Gulf Coast Community Col-


lege Center in Port St. Joe, but
at this time, no money with
which to do it, the GCCC
District Board of Trustees


were told this past week.
"Our research indicates a
center would be an asset to
Gulf Coast and particularly to


Letters to the Editor


CETA Program Explained


Dear Mr. Ramsey: ratedd 8. Handicapped 9.
Thursday, March 15, 197 Limited English speaking 10.
Thursday Mar 15 Offenders-EX-Offenders 11.
edition of The Star, carried a Of 11.
edition of The Star, carried a Youth (16-21) out of school 12.
letter under Letters to te Older workers (45 plus years)
Editor", entitled "Parents 13. Minority 14. Head of
Earn TooMuch13. Minority 14. Head of
Earn Too Much" household with other depen-
I agree with you from the dents 15. Family income
sound of the letter, it could lauding parents) Nm-
well have been a CETA posi- be in the fam
tion this person applied for. The CETA programs are
From time to time we have to administered by the U. S.
tell some young person you Department of Labor through
aren't- eligible because ., the' State Department of
, parents earn too much-OnW ,'Fomniunit.j'fairs Wwe 1 not
We of the CETAstaff w6uild make regulations, only try to
like to thank the person who follow them.
wrote the letter for being You do not have to be poor
concerned enough to question and-or black to participate but
the program. This gives us an- you do have to be poor.
opportunity to clear up some
misconceptions about CETA
programs.
First and foremost CETA IS
NOT AN EMPLOYMENT'
AGENCY, but a -training
agency.
CETA is the acronym for .H
Comprehensive Employment
Training Act. Participants in
all programs are engaged in ,
training of some type. This
program was initiated to
assist those who were consi-i
dered to be hard to employ by


not having specific skills nor


ability to get necessary train-
ing for specific employability A
and vocational skills.
The following criteria are;i
used in order to determine the
eligibility of an applicant:
1. Unemployed or underem-
ployed 2. Unemployed 30 days.
or more 3. Economically
disadvantaged 4. Welfare
recipient 5. Vietnamese
assistance recipient 6. 11th
grade education or below for
Title I 7. Veteran: Unemploy-
ed, disabled, recently sep-

Uphold

Leash

Law
Dear Wesley,
What will it take in our city,
for citizens to uphold the leash
law?
Animals are being allowed.
to run loose and are not being
properly restrained.
Fright and injuries are be-
ing afflicted upon law abiding
citizens, when the leash law is
broken.
Our mother was injured on
Sunday, March 12, when a dog
that was not properly restrain-
ed, ran after her causing her
to fall, and she received
injuries, physical and emo-
tional fright, which caused her
to be hospitalized.
We are animal lovers and
animal owners. We protect
our animals by upholding the
leash law.
Our family is concerned!
Are you, the citizens concern-
ed?
Concerned daughters,
Andrea M. Griffin and
Barbara M. Smith


If we should ever have an accident here at
The Star or at home, we should be well covered
for quick, trained reaction to our hurts.
Last week, Frenchie, Shirley and Carol took
the first aid course offered by the Gulf County
Ambulance Service and are now well versed in
how to apply pressure to a bleeding wound, burp
a piece of stuck food out of our wind-pipe or wrap
up a broken appendage in "anything which is
handy at the time". I put this in quotes because
that's what instructor Randy McClain told them
to do if someone breaks an appendage.
Even though these three ladies have
received their week of training, taking three
hours each night for five nights in a row, I still
have my misgivings. I was in the office Friday
afternoon while they were cramming for the
final exam which was to be given that night and
if that discussion is any criteria, the first thing
we can expect if and when we have a need for
their newly acquired first aid expertise is, "Is
that a compound or simple fracture"? .
"Should the pressure point be in the armpit,
alongside the muscle or at the neck?"... "Is this
cut an abrasion, a laceration, a puncture or a
scratch?"
If someone strains himself these three girls
will debate the issue of whether it is a strain
which calls for a hot compress or is it a sprain
which calls for cold applications? In all
likelihood, they will not be able to make up their
mind and we will get both a hot and cold
compress for whatever has exceeded its limits.
We will be in better shape than the place with
only a trained first aid technician (ip our case,
three of them). Frenchie is going all the way and
taking the EMT course which includes CPR and
advanced training in what she was exposed to in
the first aid course.
We'll be all set. In fact, we may hold office
hours and see patients on a part-time basis if the
printing business begins to fall off or get slack
during the summer. We'll have the personnel.
I want to warn you ahead of time, though,
that if you think you want our services in this
matter, you may be taking a chance. Frenchie


Presently we have fifty-eight
(58) participants of which
twenty-nine (29) are white and
twenty-nine (29) are black. We
do have quotas set by the U. S.
Department of Labor.
Hopefully this clears some
of the misconceptions some
may have about CETA in Gulf
County.
We invite any and all to visit,
the office any time and
especially if you have ques-
.tioiis'labout-the program. 1
n~'iia.y ayte.you and aoftu
staff'would like to do a feature
story on the local program.

Frank W. Barnes, Director
CETA Programs- Gulf County


the community of Port St. Joe
and to some extent, the com-
munities of Wewahitchka and
Apalachicola," Bob McSpad-
dent told the Board.
McSpadden is chairman of
the committee which is re-
searching the possiblility of
opening a center in Port St.
Joe.
"I think the center could be
a success," McSpadden
added, "but at this time I don't
know how such a project could
be financed."
He explained to the Board
that at this time the college
did not have sufficient funds to
build a center or rent an
existing building and staff it
with full-time faculty..
He pointed out, however,
that his committee was con-
tinuing to explore other possi-
bilities of how to improve the
educational services to the
residents of Gulf and Franklin
counties. ,a -
"Building a new cehfer at
this time is definitely out,"
said McSpadden. He explain-
ed that to get state funds to
build a center would require


proof that the center would
generate 500 FTE, a legisla-
tive funding formula that
equals to approximately 2000
part-time students. All of Gulf
Coast currently generates
only approximately 2400 FTE.
"In light of this," said Dr.
Larry Tyree, GCCC president,
"I think our basic question at
this point is do we want to
change our current method-
ology for serving Gulf and
Franklin Counties?"
His answer was. "yes" and
he pointed out to the Board
that the college was already
exploring the possibility of
hiring an individaul on a
part-time basis who would
serve as a center director for
Port St. Joe. That person
would be charged with investi-
gating the specific educational
needs of the community. and
teaching some courses.
..- "We also are'exploring the
''pi'ssibi'lit' of using some
'already'existing facilities and
using more adjunct instruc-
tors who already reside in the
St. Joe area," said
McSpadden.


doesn't take too kindly to the sight of blood. In
the past, when our kids were little, she didn't
exactly follow the instruction book when one of
them would get hurt. Her method of treatment
when one of the kids would get a cut, a bruise, or
a konk on the head was to grab the hurt one up
and start running and yelling for someone to "do
something". By the time somebody finally
chased her down, the kid was usually all right.
I know she loves me, because she said she
was taking the EMT course so if I had a heart
attack she would know how to give me CPR until
I could get to a hospital or a doctor. She has been
on this EMT course now for about a month and
has a month and a half to go. As she progresses
into the training, I think she is just sitting around
watching me, to see if I won't oblige her and have
a heart attack so she can put her new-found
knowledge to work.
I'm going to try and disappoint her in this
matter.
Part of my misgivings about how much good
this training will do us was demonstrated last
Friday night, right after the first aid course test
was taken.
Shirley was headed home, after the test and
had an automobile accident at the corner of
Woodward Avenue and Eighth Street. Wires
came down on Shirley's car, so she disregarded
her teaching and got out immediately, risking a
sudden shock. The wires happened to be
telephone wires andShirley said she knew it.
Maybe she learned the difference in her first aid
course.
The man in the other car was hurt and
unconscious. Shirley, who was only bruised ran
up to the other car, anxious to apply her first aid
smarts, took one look at the man, who happened
to be T. C. Smith, saw the blood about his head,
saw that he was incoherent and groggy and
immediately recalled her training and scream-
ed, "Someone call an ambulance!"
I'll rest easy now, since I am surrounded by
these three trained young ladies who now know
how to look at someone who is hurt and scream,
"Someone call an ambulance!"


Christians to Mark
/


Sound As A Dollar


ETAOIN SHRDLU

By WESLEY R. RAMSEY


PAGE TWO


.i Retiring from


-. Basic Position

Bo Boyette, left, manager of Basic Magnesia plant here
S In Port St. Joe presents Jim Mapes with one of several gifts
presented to him last Friday afternoon as Mapes retired
from his position at the plant. Mapes joined Michigan
Chemical in 1946, and came with the plant here to Port St. Joe
S when it was built. He left employment with Michigan in 1966,
;ii ;and returned with Basic in 1969 and has served .as plant
engineer for the past several years.
., -i Mapes. who also owns a shrimp boat he uses for a hobby,
said he would be doing some serious shrimping and fishing
from now on. To aid him in his pursuit the plant and
employees presented him with a saltwater rod, reel, line and
* r, the works to go fishing with.
Mapes resides at St. Joe Beach. -Star photo


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THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, MARCH 23. 1978


PAGE THREE


Government Says Population




-Is Dwindling ... Cuts Goodies


The Federal Government
has presented the City of Port'
St. Joe with estimated popula-
tion figures showing the City
has lost 153 residents since the
last' census was taken. This
claim came on the heels of a
report issued by the Univer-
sity of Florida late last year
which said the City had lost
120 residents during the dec-


ade.
The Government's claim is
based on indicators rather
than a head count and will
result in a loss of federal
revenue sharing funds. Ac-
cording to City Clerk Mike
Wright, the revised census
count will cost the City $4,633
this year in federal revenue
funds.


The City Commission ob-
jected to the figures Tuesday
night, but can only refute the
claim with an actual count.
Estimated costs are that it
would cost the City $3,355 to
take an approved census.
Since the regular government
census will be taken in 1980,
the Commission decided to
just take in its financial belt a


notch and wait for the gov-
ernment to prove that their
figures are wrong.
NUISANCE CLAIM
The Commission received a
written claim of a dog nuis-
sance at the corner of Palm
Boulevard and 14th Street.
The written notice contained
six signatures claiming that a
dog owned by David Treace is
a nuisance and claimed the
dog caused Mrs. A. P. Martin
to be injured and hospitalized.
Treace was present at the
meeting to defend his dog and
stated the animal never
touched Mrs. Martin.
Treace said, "The dog is
trained, he is kept up at all
times and was on a chain at
the time of the incident".
Treace said the dog was
trained to watch after his
children and at the time of the
incident was in the yard,
chained, playing with his chil-
dren. He said the Martin's
parked their car in the edge of
his yard to walk across the
street to visit. The dog barked
when the Martin's got out of
the car. They started across
the street and the dog barked
again and broke his chain. The.
dog ran to the edge of the road,
still barking, and Mrs, Martin
ran across the road, tripping
and falling at the edge of the
road.
Attorney William J. Rish
advised the Board that at'leas,t
three persons, from different


households within 500 feet of a
nuisance must sign a written
complaint before the Commis-
sion can legally take action.
Treace had signed state-
ments from 27 people in his
neighborhood testifying to the
fact that he always kept his
dog under control.
Treace said the incident was
an isolated happening and that
he took pains to keep his pet
under control at all times.
Mayor Frank Pate instruct-
ed assistant Police Chief Roy
Robinson to contact the people
signing the complaint and
inform them of the language
of the nuisance ordinance.
CONTRACT STUDY
The Commission engaged
the services of Addicks. and
Associates of Atlanta, Georgia
'Tuesday night to conduct a
risk management survey and
insurance audit for the City.
The firm is to make a recom-
mendation to the City on
insurance coverage and sug-'
gest methods of self insuring.
The study is being conduct-
ed.in an attempt to save the
City money.. Presently, the
City's insurance premium is
running over $100,000 per
year.
For about a year now, the
City Commission has been
investigating the possibility of
being self insured, but didn't
know how to go about it. This
surveylis designed to point the.
way.-


S Chauncey L. Costin will
retire -from his position as
Port St. .Joe's Postmaster
tomorrow after 27 years in
S postal and federal service.
,\ Costin was appointed acting
postmaster of Port St. Joe on
August 31, 1951, following a
long tenure as postmaster by
Henry A. Drake who took an
early retirement. He resigned
as acting postmaster effective
September 30, 1952, when it
was determined that a
Permanent appointment,
would not be made due to'
change. in the National Ad-.
,ministration. On August 2,
1954, he received his commis-
sion as Postmaster of Port St.
Joe, having been appointed by
the President and confirmed
by the Senate of the United
States.
When asked about some of
Sthe most memorable happen-
ings during his tenure of
S office, he stated that probably
the inauguration Of city de-
livery in 1951, had the greatest
impact on the patrons of the
office, and moving into the
new post office building with
adequate room and air con-
ditioning for the employees.'
In preparing for'the dedica-
tion of the new building he said
he thought it would be in-
teresting to know who the
postmasters were who pre-
ceded him and he, wrote to
sWashiington for. th informa-.,
Sc,-(tin. hpfirsfpot pofficejethe
area-was named Indian Pass,
Calhoun County, Florida, and
was established on May 18,
1906, with Henry D. Collins as
postmaster. The name was
changed, to Port St. Joe on
August 3, 1907, and Terrell H.'
Stone was the postmaster.
After Stone' came James E.
Maddox, March 16, 1917;
Henry A. Drake, January 18,
1918, Obed L. Maddox, Febru-
ary 28, 1935; Henry A. Drake,
again, February 25, 1936;
Chauncey L. Costin, acting
July 1, 1951; John Simpson,
acting October 1, 1952; Pearl
J. Brown, acting, June 1, 1953,
and Chauncey L. Costin, Octo-
ber 1, 1954.
Costin has been active in the
National Association of Post-
masters of the United' States
since becoming postmaster
and served as its state presi-
dent in 1962. He has also been
active in civic affairs in Port
St. Joe having been a member
of the Port St. Joe Rotary Club
S for over 25 years and is a past
treasurer and president of the
club., He is a past president
and vice president of St. Joe
Charity Ball, Inc., which is
sponsored by the Rotary Club.
He has been active in the
scouting program in the city
and chaired the' annual
finance campaign for two
years, also was institutional
representative for several
years. He is a member and
director of the St. Joseph Bay
Country Club and belongs to
the exclusive "Hole-in-One"


"Savingy
money. 1at's
Reason No. 1 why
we should do
your taxes."






Henry W. Block
We are income tax specialists.
We ask the right questions.
We dig for every honest de-
duction and credit. We want
to leave no stone unturned to
make sure you pay the small-
est legitimate tax.

HsR BLOCK
THE INCOME TAX_ PEOPLE
116 MONUMENI.A__VE.
PHONE 229-8536
OPEN AFTER 6:30 P.M.
By Appointment


club. He is a long-time
member of the First United
Methodist Church and has
served on a number of com-
missions and several years as
church treasurer. He is Mason
and served two years as
Worshipful Master.
Prior to his appointment as
postmaster, he was elected for
two terms as Superintendent
of Public Instruqtion, Gulf
County, and one term as
school board member.
He is married to the former
Marie Joines of Wewahitchka,
and they reside: at 1206 Monu-
ment Avenue.
After retirement, Chauncey
said, "If you can't find me at
home, I will 'be hunting,
fishing, golfing or traveling".


'WANTS VARIANCE
After being turned down last
month, Mrs. Mary Linda Butts
appeared before the Board
Tuesday night asking for a
variance for her residence at
2116 Long Avenue.
Mrs. Butts wants to put a.
beauty parlor in her home, but
the Zoning Ordinance prohi-
bits business enterprises in
her area.
Mayor Pate informed Mrs.
Butts that her last application
for a variance at her homesite
had been turned down because
of objections which had been
received by the Commission
from people who lived in her
area. In addition this particu-
lar area carries the most
restrictive zoning application
of any residential area in the
city.
Mrs. Butts asked the City to
advertise for a second hearing
on the matter, which the.
Commission agreed to do.
Mrs. Butts is charged with all
expenses concerning the hear-
ing.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business items, the
SCommission:
S-Took two bids on the
purchase of a new validating
machine. Burroughs Corp.. bid
$3,525.00. National Cash Reg-
ister Corp., bid $5,027.00 which
included programming of the
machine. The bids were taken
utder advisement to see
which machine would best
serve the City's needs.
-Awarded a bid to Tampa
Machinery for purchase, of a
,'bucket truck in the amount of
$25,000. ,,
-Started work on a paving
priority schedule to' present to
Gulf County.


Arhelger Says Evangelists


Live Life of A Nomad


Jerry Arhelger of Wewa-
hitchka, a travelling evange-
list, spoke to the Rotary Club
last Thursday, telling the club
members of some of his
experiences on the road.
Arhelger said his organiza-
tion is now in the process of
incorporating under the name
of "Net,Casting" and is plan-
ning to build a headquarters
building just south of Wewa-
hitchka'.
In the crusade type evange-
listic work, he said at least
three to four months of prep-
aration and planning is needed
before going into a specific
area. He said crusades are
planned as far as three years
in advance.
In addition to the crusades,
Arhelger is also getting into
the gospel recording business
and has already cut 'several


records.
The county-based evangelist
said his services are beini
used in crusades from coast to
coast, taking him away frofi
home for sometimes months
at a time.
He appeared to think it wis
worth the effort, since he
seemed to thrive on the coi-
tact he has been able to make
with people who have prob-
lems. .
Arhelger told the group ie
thought the greatest threat 'to
young people of today was
satan worship and cultism.
"There's more of it than you
think", he said, "Even rigkit.
here in our own area." .
Guests of the club were Tom
Gibson of Huntsville, Ala., and
Dr. Richard Morley of Beacon:
Hill.


1 ;r
.x~ -
:
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Costin Stepping Down



from Postmaster Post


FIRST BAPTIST

CHURCH
Corner Third Street and Baltizell Avenue
SREV. BILL HEATON, Pastor
STANLEY E. YOUNG, Minister of Music & Youth

SUNDAYSCHOOL .................. 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE ...... 11:00 A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING ................. 6:15 P.M.,
EVENING WORSHIP SERVICES ..... 7:30 P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) .... 7:00 P.M.
"Come and Worship God with Us"


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THE STAB, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, MARCH 23.1978


Carol Sterrett and James


Stephen
In a candlelight ceremony,
S- Carol Sterrett and James
; ... Stephen Atchison were united
Sin holy matrimony on Feb-
::ruary 25 at 7:30 p.m. in
.. Central Presbyterian Church,
Houston, Texas. Officiating at
..the double ring ceremony
were the Rev. John D. Craig
; and the Rev. Father David T.
O'Shea.
S The bride is the daughter of
SMr. and Mrs. Sam L. Sterrett,
Jr., of Houston. The groom is
S....the son of Mrs. Jean A.
S... Atchison of Port St. Joe, and
the grandson of the late Mr.
S .and Mrs. Thomas Eugene
Austin of Apalachicola.
Prior to the ceremony music
S was rendered by the hand-bell
choir. The bride was escorted
,. to the altar by her father as
the organist played the pro-
S essional, "Trumpet
Voluntary", featuring the
S :trumpet and bell-choir. The
,'bride was radiant in a floor
7 lengthgown of candlelight silk
marquisette over taffeta, ap-
S. :pliques with Alencon lace
which was reembroidered
-:-with seed pearls. Her cathed-
S. ral length veil of Alencon lace
featured tiny clusters of seed
.: pearls. Inher shoe she wore a
Ssixpence which had previously
been worn by her sister pand
her mother. An antique gold
and pearl pin worn at the
1 neckline was gift from her
great-grandmother. She car-
ried a bouquet of white roses
Sand tiny orchids.
i Mrs. Michael Martin at-
U tended her sisteras matron of
--honor; Miss Anne Flannagan


Mission G


m Met On M
e Mrs.; C. L. Costin was
Hostess to.Mission Group II of
the First United Methodist
Church on Monday with
S: twelve members present.
S Miss Mazie Stone and Mrs.
L. L. Copenhaver, Sr. were
S welcomed as visitors. .
Mrs. Costin, Chairman,
N opened the meeting 'with the
reading of a prayer written by
S"Joey Whitehead of Port St.


Joe.


Atchison Married


was maid of honor. They were
attired in brown floor length
empire style gowns and
carried bouquets similar to
the bride's. The bridesmaids,
wearing identical gowns, were
Susan Asterdor, Robin Stone,
Amy Parker, Houston, Texas;
Pam Hartman, Cincinnati,
Ohio; Cathy Linden, Ft.
Smith, Ark; Mufiel Ware,
cousin of the bride, Corpus
Christi, Texas.
Tommy Atchison of
Houston, Texas, served his
brother as best man. Grooms-
men were Dennis Atchison,
brother of the groom, Pensa-
cola; Lawrence Bowen, Port
St. Joe; Robert Dunbar, Birm-
ingham, Ala; Vance Hutchi-
son, Fred Flanagan, Houston,
Texas; Lee Smith, Lubbock,
Texas; William Hansen.
Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
Mrs. Sterrett chose for her
daughter's wedding a floor
length gown of blue crepe.
Mrs. Atchison, mother of the
groom, was attired in floor
length dress of green chiffon.
Mrs. Selma Warrick, grand-
_mother of the bride, wore a
beigefloor length dress. Their
corsages were of tiny orchids.
SAfir the wedding party had
assembled at the altar, Gina
Savage, soloist, sang
"Wedding Song" and "One
Hand, One Heart". Following
the exchange of vows, "The
Lord's Prayer" was rendered
as a solo, featuring Muriel
Ware. After the lighting of the
single candle by the united
couple, signifying oneness in
marriage, "0 Perfect Love"


roup H


monday
A letter was read from Mrs.
Vera Collier of Oklahoma
stating the Indian Mission
would be happy.to use the quilt
squares which will be donated
by the women of the church.
Mrs. Alfred Joines gave the
prqrgranu, reading, from
Matthew of the Resurreetion,
on "The Living Christ."'
Mrs. Charles Browne in-
vited the group to meet with
her, for the April meeting.


was sung by Miss Ware. The
recessional, "Rigadoon", was
played by the organ and
hand-bell choir as the bridal
party left. the sanctuary.
Immediately following the
ceremony, the bride's parents
hosted a wedding celebration
in the Fellowship Hall of the
church. Music was furnished
by a piano and string quartet.
Guests were served wedding
cake, sandwiches and punch
from appointed tables. Fol-
lowing the rehearsal Friday,
evening, Mrs. Atchison had
entertained with a dinner at
Bavarian Gardens.
The bride attended Cen-
tenary College, Shreveport,
La. where she was a member
of Chi Omega sorority, and the
University of Houston. She is
employed by Southwest On-
cology at M. D. Anderson
Hospital and Tumor Institute.
The groom attended Port St.
Joe High School and received
his B.. S degree from the
University of the South,
Sewanee, Tenn. He is employ-
ed by the Adloph Cours Co. of
Houston, Texas, where the
couple will make their home.
Out of town guests attending
the wedding included Mrs.
Jacque Price, Mrs. V. .R
Anderson, Mrs. Ge6rge
Anchors, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Moorej; Mr. and Mrs. Law-
rence Bowen, Brad Bowen,
Port St. Joe, and Mr. and Mrs.
Dennis,Atchison, Pensacola;
Miss Marjorie Austin, St.
Petersburg; Mr. and Mrs.
Tom Duke, Panama City;
Billy Buzzett, Andover, Mass.


Clay Costin Magidson

Clay Magidson

Celebrates First
Clay Costin Magidson cele-
brated his first birthday on
Sunday, March 19. He is the
son of Mr. and Mrs. Mel
Magidson, Jr. of Port St. Joe.
Grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. Mel Magidson of Atlan-
ta, Ga. and Mr. and Mrs.
William L. Clay of Huntsville,
Ala.
Great grandparents are Mr.
and Mrs. C. G. Costin, Sr. of
Port St.' Joe.


From left, Mrs. George Core, Mrs. Allie Strange, mother
of Glenda Cooper, Glenda Cooper, Sarah Arrant, Deborah


Stutzman, and her mother, Mrs. Ollie Stutzman.
-Star photo


DAR Good Citizens Are



Honored at Luncheon


The St. Joseph Bay Chapter'
of the Daughters of the Ameri-
can Revolution at its meeting
on March 15 honored the
winners the 1978 Good Citizens
Awards for seniors from three
area High Schools. The
awards winners were chosen
by their classmates and
faculty of each school for
outstanding qualities of de-
pendability, leadership, ser-
vice, and patriotism.
The 1978 DAR good citizens
are Stella Sanders, Apalachi-
cola High School, Apalachi-
cola; Glenda Cooper, Wewa-
hitchka High School, Wewa-
hitchka and Deborah Sue
Stutzman, St. Joe High School,
Port St. Joe. The Sponsor of
each winner was Lee Howell,
Apalachicola High School;
Sara Arrant, St. Joe High
School, and Fletcher C. Pat-
terson, Wewahitchka High
School. Mrs. Howell and Mr.
Patterson were unable to
attend.
The winner of this award


from each school is entered in
the State DAR Good Citizens
Contest, submitting a resume
of their school and community
activities, academic standing,
future plans and understand-
ing of good citizenship quali-
ties and American govern-.
ment. Each state winner re-
ceived a $100 Series E bond or
a scholarship of $75, according
to the recipient's preference.
Each State winner is entered
in the National DAR contest
competing for the singular
national honor and the $1,000
scholarship to the college of
the winner's choice. The
National winner is also pre-
sented to the DAR continental
Congress at which time a
sterling silver Paul Revere
bowl engraved "National
DAR Good Citizen- 1978" is
awarded to this student.
Mrs. George Y. Core, Chair-
man of the DAR Good Citizens
Committee, was in charge of
the program. After intro-
ducing the three winners she


called on each of them to
speak on "Why I am Glad I am
an American". The traditional
DAR Good Citizens pin and
certificate were presented to
each winner. Mrs. Core called
on the mother of each of the
winner's to pin the lapel
button representing the Good
Citizens award on her child.
A brief review of the pre-
vious winners of the Good
Citizens awards was given.
The winner for 1975 was
Janice Schweikert. She at-
tended Tom P. Haney Voca-
tional School and is employed
by St. Joe Paper Company.
The winners for 1976 are all
attending colleges of their
choice.
Following the program,
Mrs. Paul S. Fensom, regent,
conducted a business meeting.
Mrs. Charles Browne read tle-,
minutes of the previous meet-.
ing; Mrs. Herman Deani,gave
the treasurer's report. Mrs.
Nobie H. Stone, National De-


fense Chairman, talked on
Crimes as. suggested by T. V.
and movies. Other matters of'
interest were discussed. The
luncheon was served by the
Port St. Joe Garden Club and
the theme of the decoration of
the tables was Spring time.


No Charge Car
On Sale

^ hro,'Y T'Merchandise






Dresses Reduced3 and More

Vicky Vaughan Jr's and Toni Todd.
Regular sizes.


Ladies' Blouses /2 off

TWO RACKS by Lady Arrow and
-. Sunny South


Meeting 1
Mrs. Harry Hallinan has
been named Crusade ,Chair-
man of the South Gulf County
Unit of the American Cancer
Society's 1978 educational and.
fund raising Crusade which
Begins April 1. Mrs. Gillie
-McNair has been named Vice
Crusade Chairman.
These ladies will lead local
volunteers in a community-
wide effort to help "wipe out
cancer in your lifetime" by
research and education. "Our
volunteers will urge their
friends and neighbors to help
win this goal by supporting the
Society's life-saving programs
with "a checkup and a check",
they said.
The television personality,
Marlin Perkins, host of "Wild
Kingdon," and his wife, Carol,
an author and commentator
will lead the Crusade as
National Co-Chairmen.
"Our programs which moti-
vate people to have regular
checkups, are carried into all
communities of the country by
many volunteers".
"We know that people really
want to do something about
cancer and for this reason as
we speak to our friends,
neighbors, and others during
the Crusade, we will bring
them information about
cancer's Warning Signals. We
will provide information about
how to help protect them-
selves against cancer."
"We want to wipe out cancer
in your lifetime so join us in
this Crusade".
Mrs. Hallinan and Mrs.
McNair are encouraging
volunteers for this unit to
attend a Crusade workers
meeting tonight at 7:30 p.m. at
the First United Methodist
Church. At this meeting
workers will be educational
materials and receive training
to aid in the house to house
Crusade to be conducted
during the first week in April.
The 1978 crusade goal for
the South Gulf County Unit has
: been set at $3400.00.


tonight
If you can give a few
minutes of your time to help in
some way, you may call one of
the above ladies or attend the
training meeting to be held
tonight. Please be one of the
many volunteers who will be
serving during the 1978
Crusade who will say, "I don't
have the time, but, I'll take the
time".


I'--All7MV~ I.



Only four kinds of poisonous snakes live in the United
States rattlesnake, water moccasin or cottonmouth,
copperhead and coral.



Convenient x Service


















Fast and friendly prescription service is always
available. We carry a large supply of prescription
drugs along with remedies that can be purchased
without prescriptions. We also maint jih a corrplete
record of your prescription purchases and can
furnish you with a copy instantly for income tax
purposes.

SMITH'S

Pharmacy
Drive-tn I'rescription Window

Phone 227-1723


.: ,.PAGE FOUR


ds


Every Shoe In the Store


10% off Reg. Price
For men, women and children. Casual shoes,
dress shoes, canvas shoes. A great time to
stock up for summer.


Men's Suits


% price


ONE RACK H.I.S., Merit and Haggar.
3 Pieces. All colors and sizes.


Billy the Kid Reduced40%
Shirts, Pants, Vests, Jackets. Sizes 2-18.


Men's Shirts
Long sleeve. Sizes 14V2 to 18.


% off


COSTIN'S


ONE RACK

Dresses

Reduced 50%


Name brands. Jr., Reg.
and half sizes.


and More


200 Reid Ave.


Crusade Workers


You Are Cordially Invited to Attend

LONG AVENUE

Baptist Church

Corner Long Ave. and 16th St.

SUNDAY SCHOOL ..... .......... 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................ 11:00 A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING ................. 5:45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP ................ 7:00 P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ... 700P.M.

e..!6 M -." Jerbme-Carfibr;
Pastor Minister of Music


I -,


-


Fran Harrison

Methodist

Speaker
Fran Harrison will be
speaking at the Mexico Beach
Methodist Church on Tuesday, "
March 28 at 6:00 p.m., CST.
The public is cordially
invited to attend this monthly
Outreach Service.

"An acquaintance is a person
we know well enough to
borrow from but not well
enough to lend to."
Ambroise Bierce



Ming's

Greenhouse
St. Joe Beach

648-5213

FERNS Over 20
Varieties
POTTED PLANTS
HANGING BASKETS
CACTI
SUCCULENTS
BROMELIADS
TOMATO, PEPPER,
EGG PLANTS
BEDDING PLANTS


Will Deliver
PORT ST. JOE'S
LARGEST SELECTION
Corner Georgia
and Magellan


c
-
r
r.
~
'.F
6'








.




r


, -,
rr
--
--
i
..





z



r

I
c


r








THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 1978


PAGE FIVE


USDA Pushing Education



In Nutrition As Program


'4.



i.


The big news this week is
the theft of a lobster that was
on display in th tri
between the A-pd' exit and
j Brpod entrance. No descrip-
Stion of the stolen lobster is
available, but I imagine that it
is just one of your plain old
everyday lobsters with big
claws and all whatever else a
lobster has.
As of Tuesday, no ransom
notes had been received from
the kidnappers, but the owner
of the lobster (name un-
known) says that they would
really appreciate it if the
lobster would be returned.
Nobody is quite sure when the
lobster was abducted.
The National Honor Society
hald their annual election of


The St. Joe Singers will
soon be cutting a record of
the songs they have done
and will have the records
for sale to the general
public.
Ann Aldridge, director of
the group of high school
music students said the
record has already been
contracted for 'and will
soon be available for $5.00
each. The record will be a


new officers during their'
regular weekly meeting
Monda,. e nes-1 nge
tict was successful in jf bid'
for, Presidential and 'ice-'
Presidential positions. Jan
Leavins was elected Secre-
tary, and Teresa Nichols was
picked for Treasurer. Rodney
Herring and Dewana. Jacobs
were elected to the positions of
Parliamentarians.
Don't forget to come to the
big Powder Puff Football
Game this Thursday night at
8:00 on the football field. The
Junior girls will be playing
against the Senior girls. Both
teams have been practicing
for several weeks, so this
promises to be a really good
game.


long play album containing
about 12 numbers.
The Singers have per-
formed at various func-
tions in the area and have
been well received.
Miss Aldridge said that
anyone wishing to pur-
chase one of the records
may place their order by
calling the school office,
any of the Singers or Miss
Aldridge.


Seafoo


Buffet

A large crowd en
delicious seafood Satu
night at the Quarter
Club's Seafood Festiva
the photo at left, "CI
. Ken Herring. Cecil P
SFerrell Allen. Curtis "
zly Bear" Lane,
Owens, Charlie Wall
Cliff Sanborn prove the
many. cooks don't n
sarily spoil the broth.
-Star p1


The U. S. Department of
Agriculture (USDA) is
making nutrition education an
integral part of its commodity
feeding program for low-
income women and children,
Assistant Secretary of Agri-
culture Carol Tucker Fore-
man has announced.
USDA has published interim
rules for the Commodity Sup-
plemental Food Program
(CSFP). In addition to adding
the nutrition education com-
ponent, the interim rules ex-
plain how USDA, for the first
time, will be helping state and
local CSFP agencies pay their
administrative expenses and
tI operating costs. Congress
gave the go-ahead for these
administrative payments in
legislation approved last fall.
Other provisions tighten
controls on CSFP financial
management systems. The
enjoys. interim rules give the federal
irday government access to state
back and local program records,
al. In and require independent
hefs" audits of state and local
ettis,. finances at least once every
Griz-. two years.
Skull The Commodity Supple-
and, mental Food Program'distri-
at too butes food packages of se-
eces- elected USDA-purchased com-
modities to pregnant, post
hotos partum.and breast-feeding
women, infants and children
up to six years old. Infants get
either baby formula or eva-
porated milk and corn syrup,
farina and canned juice. In
addition to evaporated milk


and canned juice, older child-
ren and women get these foods
plus egg mix, nonfat dry milk,
instant potatoes, peanut
butter, canned fruit or vege-
tables, and canned meat or
poultry.
Assistant Secretary Fore-
man said USDA wants nutri-
tion education to be thorough-
ly integrated into this pro-
gram. The interim rules re-
quire nutrition education for
all adult CSFP participants
and for parents or guardians
of infants and children. States
are urged to make their
nutrition education programs
relevant to specific household
situations and nutritional
needs, especially ethnic or
cultural influences.
"We want to bring, about
positive changes in food.
habits," Ms. Foreman said.
All USDA.food programs, she
pointed out, are putting new
emphasis on the relationship
between proper nutrition and
good health.
Funding provisions:;of the
interim rules explain how
state and local CSFP pro-
grams will share the newly-
authorized administrative
money. Public Law 95-113,
approved Sept. 29, 1977, ties
USDA administrative pay-
ments to the total value of
commodities distributed by'
each state. States get 15
percent of the total com-
modity value, to cover both
state and local administrative
.costs.


AnnieBelle Lowery Taken by Death


Mrs. Annie Belle Lowery,
66, a long-time resident of Port
St. Joe, died early Thursday
morning at her home. She was
a member of the Philadelphia
Primitive Baptist Church of
Port St. Joe:


Survivors include:.two sons,
Robert Lowery III of Detroit,
Michigan and Kloskia Lowery
of Port St. Joe; a daughter,
Mrs. Nether Franklin of Port
St. Joe; an adopted brother,
Jackson Siples of Jackson,


'^ ,'.-
.* r'" f


--


A Day Off
These three young boys used their day off
from school last Friday to get in a little
fishing, and were,amply rewarded for their


Chief Aubrey L. Hardy Participates

i In Exercise Witnessed by President


Navy Chief Master-at-Arms
Aubrey L. Hardy, son of
Margurite B. Hardy of Wewa-
hitchka, recently participated
in a tactical training exercise,
with President Jimmy Carter
as guest observer.
He is serving as a crew-
member aboard the destroyer
USS Peterson, homeported in
Norfolk, Va.
Conducted off the coast of
Georgia, this exercise in-
cluded a host of battle group
activities, primarily involving
three Atlantic Fleet surface
ships and the nuclear-powered
aircraft carrier USS Dwight
D. Eisenhower with the Presi-
dent embarked.
During Carter's five-hour
visit, the battle group con-
ducted tactical training exer-
cises in a simulated combat
environment. This included


integrated maneuvers for
establishing control of sea
lanes, providing defense
against hostile submarines,
surface combatants and air-'
craft and projecting naval
striking power deep into


hostile territory ashore.
More than 50 assorted,
carrier-based aircraft parti-
cipated in the exercise. Their
demonstrations included both
individual and coordinated
strikes at simulated targets.


First United

Methodist Church

I Constitution and Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe, Fla.
JOHNIE W.McCURDY, Minister

CHURCHSCHOOL ...................... 9:45 A.M.
PREACHING SERVICE .......... 11A.M. &7:O P.M.
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP ....... 5:30 P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) ......... 7:30 P.M.

.0m.-- -m--=I- G-


Mich.; two adopted sisters,
Mrs. Bennie Jean McNeal of
Port St. Joe and Mrs. Charles
Nichols of Ocala; and five
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday, March 21, at two


efforts. From left, Carlton Wilkerson, Andy
Wilkerson and Billy Merchant proudly dis-
play a string of 38 mullet. They caught the fish
off the oil docks on snatch hooks.
-Star photo


The First
Pentecostal Holiness Church
2001 GARRISON AVE.- PORT ST. JOE

Invites You to Worship with Them
William Wilson, Pastor

SERVICES
SUNDAYSCHOOL ......................... 9:45AM
MORNING WORSHIP ..................... 11:00AM
EVENING WORSHIP .................... 7:00PM
WEDNESDAYNIGHT... .................. 7:00 PM





STRUCTURAL WELDER

NEEDED

Contact Bill Vaughan at jobsite

between the bridges on U.S. 98
Causeway in Apalachicola or- at
653-9032 week nights.

Murphree Bridge Corporation

An Equal Opportunity Employer


p.m. in the Philadelphia Prim-
itive Baptist Church of Port
St. Joe with the Rev. G. Wilson
officiating. Interment follow-
ed in the family plot of Forest
Hill Cemetery.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Fun-'
eral Home, Port St. Joe.
* .'
"To every man his own life
is a mystery." Latin proverb


Under the interim rules, the
state agencies would keep a
percentage of the total pay-
ment and give the remaining
money to local projects ac-
cording to their needs.
Latest USDA estimates
show over 107,000 people parti-
cipating in the Commodity
Supplemental Food Program,
through 43 projects in 12 states
and the District of Columbia.
Public Law 95-113 extends the
program through Sept. 30,
- 1981.
Interested parties are in-
vited to comment on the
interim rules. Ms. Foreman


said. All comments, she
added, will be carefully con-
sidered before final regula-
tions are issued. Comments
will be carefully considered
before final regulations are
issued. Comments will be
accepted until May 3, 1978 and
should be delivered to Jen-
nifer R. Nelson, acting
director, Supplemental Food
Programs Division, Food and
Nutrition Service, U. S. De-
partment of Agriculture,
Washington, D. C. 20250.
The interim rules appeared
in the Federal Register of
March 3, 1978.


Smathers Will Speak Here


Honorable Bruce Smathers,
Florida Secretary of State,
will be the guest. speaker at
the monthly meeting of the
Port St. Joe Historical Society
on Saturday, April 1st. The
group will meet in the club
room of the Corrine Gibson


Library.
The Apalachicola and Bay
County Historical Societies
are invited guests for this
occasion. The future of
Florida's old state capitol will
be the subject for discussion.


Happy Birthday

to the "Over the hill" Gang

Helen & Ben Aminstiong

Especially Helen at 30

J.B. and B.B.

U U


_ __ ~ C I~_ _


I '-, I


News...

From the High School

By WOODY JONES


the members of the

Church of Christ

invite you to meet with them:

Sunday Morning Bible Study ........... 10:00A.M.
Sunday Morning Worship .............. 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Night ......................... 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday Night ..................... 7:00P.M.

: Corner.20th St. & Marvin
For information call 229-6969


Singers Making


Record Album


~' `-"~*~"
FF'


'(
t


V'





THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 1978 THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


REA ETAT6 FR AL


S2 BR home with good size
porch and utility room, on 75'
150' lot. Stove and refrig-
erator included. $19,000. 648-
S $315. 'tfc 3-23

A home at Bryant's Landing
with 35' mobile home, has 8'
room on both sides built over
,trailer, on two lots 80' x 100'.
May be seen by calling Mrs. C.
E. Boyer at 639-2874, or owner.
SArchie Williams at 653-8737.
; tc 3-16

S4 lots in Highland View on
8th St. For info call: Magda-
)'ne Stewart, Wewa 639-5614.
4tp 3-9

New brick home at 106
iaupon Ave.. 3 BR. 2 bath,
Shining room, living room. den
and kitchen. Call 227-1302 or
227-1151. tfcl10-7

3 bedroom house with nice
family room, chain link fence
'around back yard, garden
:! pace 51)8.9th Street. 229-6082
r r643-5138. tfc 1l-24

: :Cottage, 2 BR, 2nd Ave.,
S Highland View, corner lot,
.5,000 firm. 648-5332.
tfc 12-15

SNew brick home, 3 bed-
.rooms, 2 baths, fireplace,
Large garage. Call 229-6979.
:after six p.m., tfe 9-22


: :1BR house. 2baths. 3 lots on
P;llm Blvd For information
call 227-1112. tfc 11-4

75' x 115' zoned lot at Mexico
SBeach. Phone 229-2763. tfc 8-25


GOOD RENTAL POTEN-
TIAL, PLUS A HOME
Well kept older 2 BR frame
home, with an apartment in
it, also a duplex masonry
building. To sell completely
furnished. Near downtown
shopping.
WEEKEND RETREAT
One bedroom frame cottage
on 6 lots near Cypress Lodge
on Dead Lakes. A good buy
at.$7,000.
BEACII LOT
Only one lot, back from set-
back line. Beautiful view of
Gulf at Indian Pass Beach.
$6,500.
FRANK IIANNON
Reg. Real Estate Broker
221 Reid Ave. 227-1133
4tc 3-23


Three bedroom masonry
house at 1i05 Bellamy Circle.
Cal :227-1607 after 5:00 p.m.
tfc 10-13







1972, Ford Galaxie, 4 door
hardtop, all power, new vinyl
top, air, runs good, looks good.
$795. 227-1420.' 2tp 3-23

1973 Datsun 610, 4-dr., stnd.
transmission, am radio, 227-
1721. tp3-23






Reward offered for return of


keys. Keys missing from car
Rish's Subdivision, 3 BR, 12 Sunday night approx. 1 week
'bath home, with central heat ago at First Baptist Church.
and air, large fencedl yatdl:.:,Call 227-1278 or bring by The
. 229-6151. 6tc 3-23 Star.


SPORT ST. JOE

Delu e m at duced
pr: c lenti at
to I ost of on-
str Ti ho h all
th 1 wo d uild


3 bdrm. I bath. living-dining
area on 2 beautiful lots total-
i. ing 190' x 126' ft. Storage
i shed. 'workshop. utility
:' room:. Excellent buy for
starter home. 212 12th St.

4 bdrm. 1It baths, plenty of
room for large family.
aluminum siding, grape ar-
bor. chain link fence back
yard. 1.600 sq. ft. Priced
right. 518 8th St.

3 bdrm home on 2 park-like
lots. custom drapes & al-
most new. carpet. Lots of
extras. 815 Woodward.

S 3 bdrm. 2 bath, large living
: room. Carpeted thruout.
Fenced yard. patio area off
; living room. Price reduced.
106 Behamy Circle.

S2 year old 3 bdrm, .2 bath
in fine condition. Large
comfortable kitchen-dining
area. With FHA or VA. 2110
Long Ave.

S Nw Listing Nice family
home on lot and a half. 3
bdrms 2 tile baths. Living,
rm dining room. Playroom
or den. Fireplace in living
room, cen. heat and air,
carpeted throughout 1730
sq. ft. Near hospital..

.Newly-weds or senior citi-
.. zens come see this 3 bdrm
Sone bath home in convenient
Location, nice lot and a price
: you can afford. 1315 Long.


Eldon B. Mille


Live crabs for sale. whole-
sale or retail. Caught daily.
219 Main St., Port St. Joe. 229-
8826. 4tp 3-23

Hand crochetted baby crib
afghans. $14 each: large size.
$25. Call 648-8985.
2tp 3-23

ROGERS NURSERY
Wewahitchka. Fla.
11 kinds of tomato plants.
pepper plants, egg plants.
3tp 3-16

Marine hydraulic trans-
mission. a Borge Warner with
221 reduction. $350. Call. 648-
50(5 after 10 a.m. and before 8
p.m. Overstrcet. tfc 1-26

No need for wet carpets. Dry
clean them with HOST. Use
rooms right away. .Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture,
227-1251. tfc 10-23

Custom-made wooden name
plaques. for mail boxes, front
galts. door posts, etc. Econo-
my Motors & Garden Center,
:311 Ilwy. 9., !iV..229-6001.
New and used lawnmowers
.for sale. Lawn mowers, tills
and garden tractors repaired.
Economy 'Motors & Garden
('enter. 301 IIlwy. !8, HV.
22i>9-(i01. tfc 4-28

DRAPERIES-Ready made
and custom made. Large sel-
election of swatches to choose
from. Roche's Furniture and
Appliance Store, 209 Reid
Ave.. phone 227-1730.




^^^m^^


SB. MILLER REALTY

Brick home. 3 bdrms, large H
rooms, nice corner lot, gcod
location. Lots of extra fea- 2B
lures. 1912 Juniper. bal
-- Wil
150
BEACHES
202
Lot with chain link fence
around back yard. Trailer
with added room, $11,500.

Furnished trailer and 'lot, l
$9,500.
___ Re
Delightful, well-built 2 story or
home with rental apart-
ment below. Indian Pass
Beach.
3
2 bdrm, 1 bath home, com- wi'
pletely furnished. Beauty 2 b
parlor attached to home, all hat
equipment included. Price $27
reduced. 15th St., Mexico
Beach,
6A
Unimproved lots and com- Me
mercial property. Call for mo
information. als
tog
Well-built. roomy 3 bdrm
beach house, corner of Pine
& Americus. St. Joe Beach. F

3bc
Duplex -1 bdrm & bath one fot
side. 2 bdrm & bath other t%,
side on nice lot. Columbus
St., St. Joe Beach.
___ Ho
Retirement or permanent for
home. Well built 3 bdrm 112 A
baths. 2 blocks from beach co"n
'on large wooded lot. 1st St., elect
Mexico Beach. bug
$17
Mobile home with 2 added
rooms on nice landscaped
lot making a total of 3
bdrms, den, bath, large
living room, completely fur- 2 sl
nished. Tennessee Ave., on
Mexico Beach. De(
-pot
Several nice beach lots to
choose from.


MICOO ET HL A D]


Daniels' Greenhouse
Highway 71 White City:
Ferns, begonias. cacti. many ,
others, some tropical. Free
ginger lily. 229-6239.
5tp 3-2

Froggy Pen Holder, a gift
just right for special friends.
(Paper-Mate pen and froggy
holder. $2.98). See at The Star.
306 Williams Ave.

FOR STANLEY HOME
PRODUCTS
('all Betty Gilbert
648-5 7-15
tfc 7-15


For Your
MARY KAY
Cosmetics
Call
Wanda Brown


22!-6132;
tfc 4-28

CB Radios, Johnson, Craig.
Surveyor, antennas, base sta-
tions, terms available. West-
ern Auto. tfc 3-4






Furnished 3 BR, 2 BR and 1
BR houses for rent. Phone 229-
6777 after 7 p.m. tfc 3-23,

For.carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vac, the portable steam car-
pet cleaning system. Avail-
able at Western Auto, phone
227-1105, 219 Reid Ave.
tfc.3-16


.For-Rent: 3 bedroom. 1 bath
furnished house at Beacon
Hill. Call 229-6961. tfc 11-10
Why live in the crowded
city? Move your mobile home
to peace:-quiet and tran-
quility. Water. garbage collec-
tions. yard mowed, live lei-
surely. Gulf privileges. Only
VA' approved mobile home
park in Gulf County. Ski
Breeze Meadows Trailer Park
9 miles southeast of Port St.
Joe on Hwy. S-30. Come out
and enjoy the quiet. Call 229-
6105. tfc 9-29


,lY cleaning carpets is
I:lsiel, faster and safer with
' lST'. Rent our machine. St.
.lte Furniture. 227-1251.
tfc 10-23


Will demolish buildings or
'garages for the' material.
Phone 229-6402, Woodie Busby.
life 2.2

SR.A.M.-Regular convoca-
tion of St. Joseph Chapter No.
56. R.A.M: 1st and 3rd Mon-
days, 8 p.m. All visiting com-
panions welcome.
J. L. SIMS, H.P.,
E. William McFarland, Sec.


There will be a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe
Lodge No. 111, F. & A.M.,
every first and third Thursday
at 8:00 p.m.
J. J. PIPPIN, W.M.
F. E. Brogdon, Sec.


Help Wanted: Middle-aged
lady for part or full-time work.
Apply at Dairy Burger..
tc 3-23


The following CETA-Public
Service Employment position
is available to. Gulf County.
residents:
LABORER with the' Gulf
County Road Department. Eli-
gible residents who have been
unemployed at least 15 of the
last 20 weeks and whose
family income meets the.
guidelines required under
Title VI should apply at the
Florida State Employment
Service Office at 401 Long
Avenue, Port St. Joe. First
preference will be given to
Veterans.


Public

Notices

S FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned corporation intends to reg-
ister with the Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf
County, Florida, four weeks after the
first publication of this notice, the ficti.
tious name or trade name under which it
will be engaged in business and in which
said business is to be carried on, to-wit:
(Name of Business( Wewa Drugs
(Address of Business), P. O. Box 986,
Wewahltchka, Florida 32465
(Owner) Jackson-Hurst Drugs, Inc.
4t 3-2

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
IN RE: The Marriage of
IRENE S. LETNER GAY, Wife,'
Respondent.


SEVIE


WANTED: Large house to
rent in 10 mile radius of Port
St. Joe. Call 229-8486. tfc.3-23


Personalized New Car
Quote Service
On any American-made new
car or pick-up truck; Get
factory retail cost on your
next new car before buying.
Could save you. money.
CALL
BEACH AUTO SALES
648-8236
8 tp 3-23



Carpentry Work Done
Reasonable Rates
Jimmy Johnson
Phone 229-8757
tfc 2-2

If you are interested in
taking piano lessons, contact
Mary Ann Pennington. 227-
1540. 3tp3-9

ALLEN'S CABINETS
328 7th Street
Highland View
Cabinets, furniture, vanities,
etc.
Call 229-6207
ffc 12-1

LEWIS FLOOR CLEANING
All Types
229-6482 or 229-6447
tfc 9-20

FILL DIRT
Front End Loader
Backhoe Work
C. R. SMITH & SON
229-6018
tfc 3-31


KENT SERVICE CO.
GE Dealer
New & Used Appliances
For Services or Parts
Call 229-6394
tfc 4-28


HIGHLAND VIEW

ayfront lots with 2 bdrms
th house with drapes.
ndow a-c., screen porch.
ft. frontage, 110 ft. deep:
Bayview Drive.



COMMERCIAL
or Sale or Lease-Excel
it store location. 222
id Ave. $30.000. Rent
lease negotiable.


ACREAGE

A. in Ovqrstreet. Dbl-
le mobile home. 4 bdrms,
aths. large den, built-in
Excellent condition.
.500.


CRES-fenced on 386A in
xico Beach. Double wide
bile home on property
o for sale separately or
ether.



FISHING AREAS

Irm., 1 bath trailer. Ideal
fisherman's retreat, on
I leased lots. $4,000.


about a getaway place
weekends? Brand new
frame brick and wood
struction. 3 bdrm 1 bath
:tric heat. "Cute as a
g" on lovely wooded lot.
.500.


OAK GROVE

story house, 1,900 sq. ft.,
lot 50x150'. Needs repair.
ep well & pump. Exc.
ential. 136 2nd Ave.


Piano lessons offered in my
Some. Call 229-6649. 2t 3-23

Any Type Lawn Work
I'll do it right
.' whether large or small!
S Call Now!
Tommy Simmons 229-8404
Free Estimates
SU4tp 3-23

Complete Wood Shop
Custom Cut Lumber
Want to Do It Yourself?
Then come see us for Stan-
ley tools, hardware, paneling,
paint, lumber.
Earley's Hardware &
Building Supply
liwy 98 W. 227-1763
tfc 8-5

S REPAIRS
Aluminum screens and doors,
carpentry, house repair, mill-
work, roof repair and re-roof-
ing.
SMITH & SON WORKSHOP
Phone 229-6018
Port St. Joe tfc7-22

ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work Welding
506 First Street
Phone 229-6803
Machinist on duty all day
every day


BILL'S CAR CRUSHER
will buy your old car.
Phone 227-1654
for information.
24 uar
Also
Offering:
S TOWN
52tp 7-14, SRVICS


DON & SONS
TV SERVICE
Corner Canal & Americus St.
St. Joe Beach
648-5976
26 Yrs. Electronic Experience
4tp 3-16

Painting & Remodeling
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
Phone 648-5204

WHITFIELD'S
POWER CLEANING
& PAINTING
Carpentry & Plumbing
Repairs
Houses or Any Buildings
229-8715 tfc 2-2

Psychological Services for
anyone with problems in da,
to-day living. Gulf County
Guidance Clinic, Port St. Joe.
227-2691. (24 hr.)

CAREFOOT SEPTIC TANK
Septic tanks cleaned out.
Phone 229-8227
tfc 12-22

GLEN'S CABINET SHOP
Kitchen Cabinets-
Vanities Mill Work
Cabinet Hardware & Tops
White.City, Hwy. 71
Glen Combs
Shop 229-6017 or
229-6530
tfc 9-1



THE SAMPLER SHOP
1306 Woodward Ave.
GIFTS
Hours: Tues.-Fri. 5-8 p.m.
Saturday 11 a.m. -7p.m.
tfc 7-14


S ........ills bugs for
Going Fishing?
Stop here first up to six months,
for a complete *n -Mn and saves you about $100yearly

Use of Sprayer free with

Fishing Tackle lnstalt In PortSt. oe purchase of Rid-A-Bug

Hurlbut Supply Phone 229-7232" HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
Or Visit the Telephone Company 306 Reid Avenue
306 Reid Ave. Business office Port St. Joe Florid


And
BENJAMIN L. GAY, Husband,
Petitioner.
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: Irene S. Letner Gay
Route 1, Box 103
Pansey, Alabama 36370
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your Answer
or other response to the Petition on Peti.
tioner's Attorney:
ROBERT M. MOORE, ESQ.
P.O. Box 248
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
and file the original thereof in the Circuit
Court Clerk's Office, Gulf County Court.
house, Port St. Joe; Florida, on or before
th e13th day of April, 1978. If you fail to
do so, a Final Judgment for the relief
sought may be granted by Default.
DATED this the 13th day of March,
1978.
GEORGE Y. CORE,
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: -s- Susan E. Bigelow, Deputy Clerk
A43.16
'IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR.
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUITOF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
IN RE: The Marriage of,
ELEANOR SMITH, Wife,
Respondent,
And
JIMMY A. SMITH, Husband,
Petitioner.
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO: Eleanor Smith
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your Answer
or other response to the Petition on Peti-
tioner's Attorney:
ROBERT M. MOORE, ESQ.,
P. Oa Box 248
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
and file the original thereof in the Circuit
Court Clerk's Office, Gulf Count Court.
house, Port St. Joe, Florida, on or before
the 13th day of April, 1978. If you fail to
do so, a Final Judgment for the relief
sought may be granted by Default.
Petitioner is requesting title to all real
and personal property accumulated
during the marriage. Other relief sought
by the Petitioner is further and more
specifically described and outlined in the
Petition.
DATED this the 9th day of March,
1978.
GEORGE Y. CORE,
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: .s- Margaret B. Core,
Deputy Clerk 41 316
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice of intention of the Northwest
Florida Creek Indian Council to seek
amendments to chapters 75-370 and 76.
360, Florida statutues: to expand the
jurisdiction and membership of the
Council; providing, method of selecting
nominees for governor's. appointment;
terms of office and date.
Notice is hereby given that the
Northwest Florida Creek Indian Counc-
il, a political subdivision of the State of
Florida, intends to seek introduction of
legislation arid passage of a special act
at the 1978 session of the Florida Legis-
lature amending chapters 75.370 and
76-360 pertaining to .the Northwest
Florida Creek Indian Council, providing
method of selecting nominees for Gov-
ernor's appointment; prescribing mem-
bership on the Council be Increased from
eleven (11) members to twenty-five (25)
members; and expanding representa-
lion to include Creek Indians residing
within Walton, Holmes, Jackson, Bay
Washington, Calhoun and Gulf counties;
apportioning membership; terms.of
office and date.
March 7, 1978
Northwest Florida Creek Indian Council
Buford L. Rolin,
Chairman 4tc 3-9
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Pursuant to the provisions of State
Certificate of Need, Public Law 92-603,
Section 1122, a public hearing will be
held on April 11, 1978; at 6:00 P.M.,
(EST) at the Gulf County Courthouse,
County Commissioner's Room, Port St.
Joe, Florida.
The purpose of the public hearing will
be to solicit comments, recommenda-
tions and questions from the community
on the following proposal:
An application submitted by Health
Care Services of Pensacola, Florida, for
the construction' of a 120 bed Nursing
Home to be located in Port St. Joe,
Florida. (Project Number 78-161).
Pursuant to the provisions of A.9S,
Public Law 93-641, Section 1513 (e), a
public hearing will be held on April 10,
1978, at 5:00 P.M., (CST) at the Pan-
handle Sub-District Council Office, 812
W. Ilth Street, Panama City, Florida.
The purpose of the public hearing will
be to solicit comments, recommenda-
tions and questions from the community
on the following proposal:
An application submitted by the
Northwest Florida Mental Health Cen-
ter, Inc., for a Continuation Growth
(Staffing) Grant, Iqcated In Panama
City (Bay County), Florida. (Project
Number 78-176).
Pursuant to the provisions of A-95,
Public Law 93-641, Section 1513 (e), a
public hearing will be held on April 7,
1978. at 11:00 A.M., (CST) at the Wel-
come Station, Highway 331, Paxton



on the following proposal:
An application submitted by the
Paxton Medical Center, Inc., for a Rural
Health Initiative Grant, located in
Paxton (Walton County), Florida. (Pro-
ject Number 78-163).
Pursuant to the provisions of State
Certificate of Need, Public Law 93.603,
Section 1122, a public hearing will be
held on April 11, 1978, at 5:00 P.M.,
(CST) at the Northwest Florida Sub-
District Council. Office, 2260 LaVlsta
Avenue, Pensacola (Escambia County),
Florida.
The purpose of the public hearing will
be to solicit comments, recommend.
tions and questions from the common.
ity on the following proposal:
An application submitted by the
Health Care Foundation of Baptist Hos-
pital, Inc., for a "Life-Care" Elderly
Residence, located in Pensacola (Es-
cambia County), Florida. (Project No.
78-157).
Pursuant to the provisions of State
Certificate of Need, Public Law 92.603,
Section 1122, a public hearing will be
held on April 12, 1978, at 5:00 P.M.,
(CST) at the City Hall, County Com-
missioner's Room, Crestview, Florida.
The purpose of the public hearing will
to be solicit comments, recommends.
lions and questions from the community


on the following proposal:
An application submitted by the
Health Care Services of Pensacola, Inc.,
for the addition of 60 beds to the existing
nursing facility, located in Crestview
(Okaloosa County), Florida. (Project
No. 78-160).
Pursuant to the provisions of A-95,
Public Law 93-641, Section 1513 (e), a
public hearing will be held on April 11,
1978, at 5:30 P.M. (CST), at the
Northwest Florida Sub-District Council
Office, 2260 LaVista Avenue, Pensacola,
Florida.
The purpose of the public hearing'will
be to solicit comments, recommend.
tions and questions from the commun-
ity on the following proposal:
An application submitted by the Re-
habilitation Institute of West Florida for
a Training Services Grant, located in
Pensacola (Escambia County), Florida.
(Project No. 78-182).
Copies of the above applications are
available for public review and copying
at the'following three locations:
Panhandle Sub-District Council
812 W. 11th Street
Panama City, Florida 32301
Capital Sub-District Council
325 John Knox Road
Suite 238, Bldg. F.
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
Northwest Florida Sub-District Council
2260 LaVista Avenue
Pensacola, Florida 32504
THE FLORIDA PANHANDLE
HEALTH SYSTEMS AGENCY, INC.
Nancy E. Hudson, Health Planner I,
Project Review
Gregory R. Shanika, Executive Director
It 3-23

IN .THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR.
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
Case No. 78-8
IN RE: The Estate of
LILLIAN EVELYN KRAFT,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the administration of the estate of
LILLIAN EVELYN KRAFT, deceased,
File Number 78-8, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida.
Probate Division, the addressof which is
Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe,
Florida, 32456. The personal representa-
tive of the estate is ROBERT MOSS, P.
O. Box 565, Port St. Joe, Florida. The
name and address of the personal re-
presentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims against the
estate are required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of the
above court a written statement of arty
claim or demand they may have. Each
claim must be in writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the creditoror his
agent or attorney, and the amount
claimed. It the claim is not yet due, the
date when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the uncer-
tainty shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to enable
the clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the estate to
whom a'copy of this Notice of Admini-
stration has been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges the
validity of the decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal representative,
or the venue or jurisdiction of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS, AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WITH
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: March 23,
1978.
-s. Robert Moss,
As Personal Representative of the'
Estate of Lillian Evelyn Kraft, Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
s. ROBERT M. MOORE,
P. O. BOx 248
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(904) 229-8181

FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice Is hereby given that pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida Statutes, the
undersigned persons intend to register
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Gulf
County, Florida, four weeks after the
first publication of this notice, the
fictitious name or trade name under
which they will be engaged in business
and in which said business Is to be
carried on, to-wit:
Panhandle Realty & Development,
located at Rt. 3, Box 106, Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456, ownedby Jean F. Arnold,
phone 648.5000.
4t 3-23

NOTICE TO ARCHITECTS
VOCATIONAL AUTO MECHANICS
FACILITY AT WEWAHITCHKA HIGH
The Gulf County School anticipates the
construction of a Vocational Auto Mech-
anics facility In the near future.
If your firm deslr6s to be considered
for architectural services for this pro-
ject, please submit Standard Form 251.
The School Board will be considering
these applications on April 11, 1978, at
5:30 P.M., E.S.T.
If you have further questions, please
call the School Board office.
-s- B. Walter Wilder, Superintendent
2t 3-23

NOTICE TO RECEIVE BIDS
The Gulf County School Board will
receive bids until 5:30 P.M., EST, April
11, 1978, in the office of the Siuperinten-
dent of Schools on two new utility build-
ings, 12' x 20'. Buildings may be seen at
Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School, Monday
Friday, 8:00 A.M. 2:30 P.M. All bids
under (1,300.00 for each buildnig will be
rejected. Bids may be for one or both
buildings. Bids will be opened Tuesday
April 11, 1978, at 5:30 P.M. Successful
bidders will be contacted and it is not
necessary to be present for bid opening. *
For further information contact Mr.
James Wood, teacher or Mr. Kenneth
Herring, Principal at 229.8251. The
Board reserves the right to reject any
and all bids. Please mark your bid
envelope "Sealed Bid Utility Build-
Ing".
B. Walter Wilder, Superintendent
? 21t3-23


PAGE SIX


LOOKING


FOR A JOB?


LOOKING


FOR HELP?


q We're Here For YdouT
=I .1 E ch office ki indrpendrntl) oned and opefiled.


r, Realtor Patty Miller, Associate


648-5011


I


* ..' .


ILL I


I










THE STAR, Port St. Joe,Fla. THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 1978 PAGE SEVEN


i Sharks Have A



Winning Week


After a slow start in which
theSharks lost their first three
games, they have bounced
back and posted two impres-
sive wins.
On March 11, the Mosl3y
Dolphins came to Shark sta-
dium.- With the score tied 3-3
going into the bottom of the
seventh, Harlon Haddock
walked, Robert James Tho-
mas ran for Haddock. Thomas
stole second and scored on a
Greg Chason single for the
winning run. The Sharks were
led at the plate by Bascome
Roberts and Craig Weimorts,
each with two hits.

Playing

Game for

Crusade
Peters Laundry basketball
team will play the Chocolate
City Cougars on April 1, at the
Washington Recreation Cen-
ter. This game should prove to
be a thriller, as the last two
tournaments between the two
teams have been close ones.
All proceeds from this game
will be donated to the Ameri-
can Cancer Society, an-
nounced Nathan Peters, Jr.
Admission will be 25 cents
,for students and 50 cents for
adults. Game time is 8:00 p.m.

PFC Danny

Hallinan Now

In Hawaii
Marine Private First Class
Danny C. Hallinan, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Harry W. Hallinan of
Pbrt St. Joe, has reported for
duty at the: First Marine
Brigade, Kaneohe Bay,
Hawaii.
A 1976 graduate of Port St.
Joe High School, he joined the
Marine Corps in February
,& 8.. ,,; ?r.a ,. i ..; > i,. ..,,
r.a.. t r '" ri: h".' + -l i. r ,"^


Duane McFarland picked up
his first win df the season on
the mound. Mac gave up three
.hits while fanning 11 and beat
a good Mosley team.
. Last Friday the Sharks tra-
veled to "Tiger Country" to
take on Blountstown. The
Sharks jumped on the Tigers
for nine runs in the first three
innings and then coasted the
rest of the way for a 9-3
conference win.
SDuane McFarland and Har-
lon Haddock both hit three run.
homers to provide much of the
offensive punch. Craig Wei-
morts contributed a double
and a single.
Tuesday night, the Sharks
took a 3-0 win over a tough
Wakulla team at Shark Sta-
dium.
Craig Weimorts tripled,


drove in a run, and pitched a
five-hit shutout as the Sharks
evened their record.
Weimorts provided himself
all the insurance he needed in
the second inning when he
tripled and scored on a-field-
er's choice.
Wade Stoutamire, who pac-
ed the Shark attack with two
singles, scored the other .two
Shark runs in the fourth and
sixth innings on a fielder's
choice and sacrifice fly.
Glenn Harper allowed only
four hits in a losing effort.
During the coming week,
the Sharks will play in Apala-
chicola this afternoon at 4:00
p.m., and will host Chipley
Friday at 7:00 p.m., in a night
game. ^


The Sharks
record of 3-3.


In a continuation of last
Tuesday's meeting the Gulf
County Commission turned

Mission Group

Meets In

Roberts Home
Mission Group I of the First
United Methodist Church met
March 21 at 9:30 in the home of
Mrs. Floyd Roberts with four-
teen members and one visitor.
Mrs. Robert King opened
the meeting with prayer and
Mrs. Edwin Ramsey, chair-
person, read thoughts from
"Spirit Lifter".
The church will launch a
Pension Fund campaign.
Rev. Erwin Doiley, Confer-
ence Secretary of Missions,
will be present April 22 for
Mission Day and the covered
dish dinner.
Mrs. Jerry D'Angelo read
about Bishop Goodson meet-
ing with President Jimmy
Carter in Washington, D. C.
Sand read an interesting article
from Virginia Advocate.
Mrs. Rex Buzzett gave a
very inspiring program from
the book, "In Search of a
Crown", by Helen B.
Emmons...

Presbyterians to

Hear Koehler
Rev. Malcolm B. Koehler,
of Panama City Beach, will
speak at the Sunday morning
service of the First Pres-
byterian Church of Port St.
Joe at 10 o'clock.
Everyone is invited to
attend.


OFFICE

SUPPLIES

Available at


The Star

306 Williams Ave


down a suggestion that they
retain an engineering firm to
do their road planning of the
future, Monday evening.
With the County soon to be
responsible for all road work
within the county, the Com-,
mission had toyed with the
idea of retaining the services
of Florida Engineering Asso-
ciates as their engineer con-
sultant and use the services of
the firm in projects which
come up from day to day,
where they need expert ad-
vice.
The engineering firm didn't
make the County an offer
Monday night, and the Com-
mission didn't make a propo-
sal.
Florida Engineering presi-
dent, Steve Nations, did offer
to work with the county as
needed in the future with no


retainer needed to secure his
services.
The County decided to ele-
vate Tommy Pitts, Mosquito
Control Department head to
the position of administrative
assistant to the Board in
addition to his present duties
and use his engineering know-
ledge in various projects.
Pitts has an engineering
degree from the University of
Florida but has never worked
in that capacity. The Board
will hire an engineering firm
when major projects require
these special services, with
Pitts to work in advisory
capacity for the County and
also take care of day to day
problems which arise.
Pitts had been doing this
work on a limited sacle al-
ready, especially in his own
department.


Church Softball


Starts April 3


The Church Softball League
will play a split season to
begin on April 3, with the first
half running from April
through May 29. They will be
playing each Monday evening
beginning at seven p.m.
Rosters are due in the
Recreation Office by the last
week in March. Entrance fee
for each half will be $50.00 for
each team entering. The
second half will be from June
12 through August 28.
Long Avenue Baptist
Church, first Baptist Church,
Oak Grove Assembly of God
and the Beach Baptist Chapel


have all indicated they wilt
play the first half of the
season. If other churches de-
sire to enter they may call
229-6119, or come by the
Recreation office upstairs in.
the City Hall.







Cy Young of the Boston
Americans pitched the first
perfect major league baseball
game on May 5, 1904.


NNW.- -
.ms..ms


now have a


.; a... ,p


V

*2 ."' r- -"~- -Iia
'Ir)


In the photo at top, Wade
Stoutamire slides home for
one of his two runs for the
night against Wakulla.
At left, St. Joe pitcher, Craig
Weimorts unloads a pitch
against a Wakulla Indian bat-
ter in the night-time. game
against Wakulla Tuesday.
-Star photos






Story Hour At

Public Library
On Saturday, March 25, at
10:30 a.m., there will be a
story hour at the St. Joe Piblic
SLibrary.' ": '
Featured flannel bbard
stories will be, "The Child
Who Found Easter' .and
V3Blink,ur,tthef l P patchwork
S.fUnhy". .,'-'.;'i: ..


II


Steel Belted Radial



Our finest steel
belted radial tire!
Long mileage. Road-gripping traction.
Gas economy.; Easy radial handling.
Size White F.E.T. Size White F.E.T.
BR78-13 $55.00 81.99 GR78-14 $70.00 $2.76
CR70-13 64.00 2.25 HR78-14 75.00 2.96
S19_5/70R-13.__66.00. 2.18 GR78-15 72.00 2.83
CR78-14 59.00 2.26 HR78-15 77.00 3.03
DR78-14 61.00 2.32 JR78-15 80.00 3.19
ER78-14 62.00 2.40 LR78-15 83.00 3.34
FR78-14 67.00 2.58 All prices
Above sizes slightly different plus tax
tread design than shown. and old tire.



BUDGET TIRE BUYS!


ta -.


--E- $*--95
18A713
SBlackwall
(5-rib
design)
Plus $1.69 F.E.T. r .
S and old tire.


pFrestone DELUXE CHAMPION
Polyester cord
Economy priced, quality built Whitewalls add $2 to $3.
Size Black F.E.T. Size Black F.E.T.
*6.00-12 $21.95 $1.42 F78-14 $28.95 $2.26
*5.60-3 21.95 1.46 G78-14 29.95 2.42
P155/80D-13 21.95 1.43 H78-14 31.95 2.60
"6.00-13 22.95 .50 '5.60-15 23.95 1.61
B78-13 22.95 1.77 6.00-15L 25.95. 1.70
6.45-14 25.95 1.71 6.85S-15 26.95 1.86
C78-14 23.95 1.93 G78-15 30.95 2.45
D78-14' 24.95 2.01 H78-15 32.95 2.65
E78-14 26.95 2.13 L78-15 34.95 2.93
*r-- A s--- L +. a p... pu a an i ire.


Sreao design snown at All prices plus tax and old tire.
right above.
DOUBLE BELTED TIRES$



O 00
g9 A78-13
+i, agglW Blackwall

,Plus $1.71 F.E.T. and old tire.

S restore DELUXE CHAMPION
SUP-R-BELT Two fiberglass stabilizer belts plus
1 U- M- two polyester cord body plies.


Size Black F.E.T. Size Black F.E.T.
B78-14 $31.00 $1.92 E78-15 $36.00 $2.31
C78-14 32.00 1.97 F78-15 37.00 2.44
E78-14 33.00 2.19 G78-15 39.00 2.55
F78-14 36.00 2.34 H78-15 42.00 2.77
G78-14 38.00 2.47 J78-15 43.00 2.96
H78-14 41.00 2.70 .L78-15 45.00 3.05


Whitewalls add $ 2 to $3. All prices plus tax and old tire.


poesI RADIALS



3 BR78-13
10W Whitewall

Plus $1.95 F.E.T. and old tire.

VFrestone RADIAL
DELUXE CHAMPION '
Size White F.E.T. Size White F.E.T.
ER78-14 $41.00 $2.36 GR78-15 $47.00 $2.75
FR78-14 44.00 2.51 HR78-15 53.00 2.94
GR78-14 46.00 2.65 JR78-15 55.00 3.08
HR78-14 50.00 2.82 .R78-15 57.00 3.22
All prices plus tax and old tire.
Prices in this ad available at Firestone Stores.
Competitively priced wherever you see the Firestone sign.


Tommy Pitts Elevated to


Administative Assistant


4


PATES

SEL'.CE CENTER
214 Monument Ave.
Phone 227-1291


LCVX~I~Pi6S~jjiCI.


0


t.











~PAE FGH TH STRPos St Je, la.1'URSAYMACH 3, 97


Apbm edetddaly liSt the sick
agibjurdbydispleimigfo them.
iiu meint advanced m'nldcI in
the" w Through his product
e ms the pain of tragdy, pro-
*^., /' ," '


SSays

Plan
"i Ellzey tol
Club Tuesday
organization, C



Tid- .

High and low
Soseph's Bay fo
ikng week are
t Ublebelow. The
is furnished b
SWeather Burea
Apalachicola.

I ursday 11
riday 10
tpturday 1
4nday 11
Mondayy 12
tuesday 12:
Wednesday 2::
Wednesday 2::


tcts the alth ofourcomn
and helps make Ife long
more comfortable. It you're
added about y future, cot
Career in Pharmacy. Its
of Importance, responsibilif
challenge...overflowlaowit
fyng penal rewards.
Yo RREXALL rmn

BUZZETT'S
DRUG STORE
Ph. 227-3371 317 Will
Convenient Drive-in Wi
Plenty of Free Parki


unity
ir ind
unde-
iider
v, and
grati-

MACY


E.
iams
ndow
ng

.'


Coastal Zone

Is A Menace
d the Kiwanis Management could take all
that a new choice out of the hands of local
Coastal Zone land owners as to what. they
would do with their property if
allowed to pass in the Florida
legislature this year.

Sis'being prepared by a com-
mittee for presentation to. the
legislature would allow only
tides- for St. about 10 percent of the land
ir theu pcom- area' in Gulf County to be
shown in the developed without permits
e information from state or federal, agency.
y the UT S. ;He pointed out that the plan t
su station in called for fully one half of the t
countyy land area to remain
ightb Low untouched with no develop-
:20A 5:54 A meit. whatever.
:21P 3:12P He pointed out that the plan
:5.IA '5:30A ostensibly claims to preserve (
5:20P the resources, water, air and
:15A. 4:21A shoreline with its stringent r
:56A 7:03P rules and regulations for land a
:24A" 8:32P use. r
i3P: 9:.55. .Guests of the club were
:48P '11:14P Key Club members Brenda fi
39P 12:26 A Rushing, Sandra Young; Woo- n
9 Pi 12:26 A ly Jones and Rodney Herring. h


Public Notices

NOTICE OFtLEEIiSLATION DATED this the 21st day of March,
TO WHOM It MAY CONCERN0' ''8' '
Nolice is hereby given of Intention to GEOGE Y. CORE,
aplly ta me I l Msession of the Florida clerk Q Circuit Court
Legislature for passage of an act .erk bircut Core
creating and organizing a flre district in MargaretIt 3-.
aull County. Florida, in the following Deputy k
area:
segin at Ihe northeast corner of pD NQ.24,
etia'n 3L Township 5 South. Rtang 11 "
Wt and-run due East to the northeMst The City of Port St. "Joe,
corner of Section 5, Township 5 South, Florida, invites bids on two (2)
Range 11 West, thence due South to the
Southpaw cornerof, Stionde Township self-propelled high wheet
South, Ran 11 West. hence due East power mowers (rotary) ti.be
to the north t corner Section opened April 4, 1978, specifica.i
Township 6 South. Rage 11 West., thence
south to the souteast corner of section tions may be obtained from
S. Township 6 South, Range i West, the City Clerk's Office, PO
tnce due West tothe southwestcorner Box A, ort St. Joe, Florida
of Section 19. Township 6 South, Range Bo'ort "
II West, thence ruh due North back to 32456.
Point Of Beginning;.naming, said fire BID NO. WWP1I8
district the Overstreet Fire District;,'
providing for the evy not to exceed ia The City of Port St. Joe,
mill o the assessed vale of real and Florida, invites bids on one (1)
personal properly within said district; 10H.P. electric motor to be
provldlng ior the appointment of fireor 10 He
I nmmissoners and setting forth the opened April 4, 1978, specifica-
kutles and rights of said commission. tons may be obtained from
It3.23
S- the City Clerk's Office, PO
jf THE CIRCUIT COURT; FOUR- Box A, Port St. Joe, Florida.
iEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE 32456.
jtATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
3SULF COUNTY..
: case No.77199 -s- Michael J. Wright,
*, o1N VIEW MOTORS City Atiditor and Clerk 2t 3-23
Plaintiff. '
.MMA EARLINE SMITH, NOTICE
:: p tendat. Notice is hereby given thai
SNOTNIC s OS .HREB GIVEN pur. 'the City Commission of th(
: sant toa Final Judgment dqted March City of Port St. Joe sitting as
1m. in Case No. 77-1W o he Circuit he Board of Adjustment wil
ourt of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit the Board of Adjus
iand for ft Courenty, Florida, in which hold a public hearing at the
ih)iand View Motor:s Inqporated of City Hall; Port St. Joe, Flor
Irt St. Joe. Florida, Is the P aintiff and
,ihma Eartine Smith of Part St. Joe, ida, at 8:00 P.M., E.S.T.
4rorida, is the Defendaf, I shall Tuesday, April 4, 1978, t(
il to the highest and best bidder terin whether the it
W cash in the lobby at the fro dor of oor determine whether the Ci
the Gulf county courtous in Port St. will authorize a deviation t(
Joa, ulf count, Foriod, at1100 A.M. Zoning Ordinance No. 5 for t
until :00. P.M. (Eastern, time) on
Monday. April Io, 1m, the fotlowtng variance in R-1A Zoning, Lo
eicbedpro t set r forth Inthe Order 8, Block 111, 2116 Long Ave
rLot JTwnty.towseven ( lock nue, for the purpose of operate
Thousand Four (1004), City of Port ing a beauty shop.
St. Joe, Florida, as per official map -s- Michael J. Wright,
n fle in the Office of the Clerk of
rcut court of Gulf county. Flori. City Auditor and Clerk 2t3-2


p
s
s
e
r
, t


Bry an Baxley


Picked As The


Teacher of Year


Edward Bryan Baxley,
physical education instructor
at Wewahitchka Elementary
School, has been selected as
Gulf County's Teacher of the
Year, according to School
Superintendent Walter
Wilder. Mr. Baxley, a
graduate of both Port St. Joe
High School and Florida State
University, has taught in
Wewahitchka for the past
',. "


Bryan' Baxley
three years. He is married to
he: former Deborah Lister
vho is also a teacher at the
Wewahitchka school.
Dutrng his short tenure as a
member of the WES faculty,
Coach Baxley has developed
ind implemefited a well-
rounded program'of physical
activites for his charges. As a
esjlt of his efforts, marked
improvement has been noted
n his students' physical fit-
ness and in their social be-
havior while competing. His
other contributions include the
provision of an intramural
sports program after regular
school hours, the acquisition
if additional\ playground
equipment through fund-
aising' activities, and volun-
eer work with Little League


sports programs. J
One of four nominees from V,
Gulf County schools, Coach
Baxleyr was selected as
district-wide screening com-
mittee composed of personnel
representing each partici-
pating school. Other nominees
included: Mrs. Betty Bidwell,'
English teacher, Wewa-
hitchka High School; Mrs.
Virginia Harrison, language, .
arts teacher, Port St. Joe
Elementary School; and '
Gerald Lewter, physical edu-
cation teacher, Port St. Joe -
High School. Superintendent ..
Wilder stressed that all the
nominees are outstanding
teachers and worthy- of the
recognition bestowed.on them'
by their individual faculties.
The Teacher of the Year. T. C. Smith is hospitalized
program does not attempt to after his car', shown above,
single out any individual as was struck by a second' ve-
the "best teacher" but to hicle, and crashed into this
honor one who is representai-: utility pole.
tive of all good teachers. From' The vehicle which struck
the county nominations re- Smith's auto is shown in. the
ceived by Commissioner of photo at right, and was driven
Education Ralph Turlington, ,by Mrs. Shirley Ramsey.
one individual will be' choser.:
Florida Teacher of the Year -Star photos
1979' and will become the
state's candidate for National
Teacher of the Year honors.



.'* ... m .' d ... .
One Injured, Three Cars


Smashed In Two Wrecks


.Three cars were heavily' The first of the two mis-haps
damaged and one man is still -occurred Friday evening
in the hospital from injuries ,about 8:30 p.m., at,the corner
suffered in one of two automo- of Woodward Avenue' and
bile accidents in the City Eighth Street. According to
during the past week. the accident report, Mrs. Shir-


EarlWaddell was charged with careless the curve and knocked over a utility pole at
driving when his vehicle, shown above, shot the entrance toSt. Joe Paper Company.


ley Ramsey was travelling
south on Woodward, when T.
C., Smith came through the
intersection, travelling west
on Eighth into the path of the
Ramsey vehicle.
Mrs., Ramsey was taken to
the hospital for examination
and released. Smith was kept
for treatment and later trahs-
ferred to Panama City with
chest and head injuries. He is
still hospitalized.
No charges have been filed
by the investigating officer,
Bob Lightfoot.
The second accident was at
4:3 n p.m., Saturday afternoon
on the road which exits traffic
from St. Joe Paper Company
mill.
According to Patrolman
Bob Lightfoot, Earl Waddell of
102 Main Street was driving
out of the mill and apparently
took,the corner at too great a
speed, losing control and run-
ning up on the overpass em-
bankment and knocking over
a utility pole.


Top of the Gulf
Restaurant
MEXICO BEACH
IS FEATURING THE FOLLOWING SPECIALS
EASTER DINNER SPECIAL
Sunday, March 26 11 AM- 4 PM (CST)
BAKED HAMor
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In The Commodore Room
Each Wednesday- 4 PM- 8 PM
SLadies' Night Each Tuesday- 4 PM till


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229-6195 PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
414-416 Reid Ave. Kelly Goodman, owner


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THE STAIL Port St. JetFla. THtRLSD~AY MARCH 23, 19788


/r




































IGA STEWED TOMATOES 2 C 7a ,
~B RACWH'S MELLOWCREME PETS 2 Size "99
SWe Have A Supply of Garden Fertilizers

Delaon ESLARGE SWE ET PpINK2 F LA.
L I GRAPEFRUIT Bag9
O R -F O G L m n C Bag W '
.aMAa .ND .TEN ER OKRA LB. 39 STRAWBERRIES
NEW POTATOES ag 69 2/$1.00
GAELarge N SEEDSIn B
"t"ifi-:":I:~,'c~. Variety of IFRESHaGARDEN SEEDS Packa e ,
Del Monte .e'sor ves Van Camp16 Oz. Can
16 Oz. Can tABLERITE PORK &
Fordhook. Limas or Birds CEe "TE
PEACHES 79Broccoli Spears 299 BUTTER BEANS 3/8
PEACHES. .79 Birds Eye.3/89
Del Monte LIL' EARS of CORN P 99 29
Mrs. Edward's Lemon, Chocolate, Coconut SUNSHINE
16,0z. Can CONDENSED PIES $199
TOM ATO "z. ca CONDENSED PIES 899 BLUE BONNET QUARTERS Lb
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SAUCE TOTINOPIZZASS8BUTTER ME NOT 912 OZ. WAFERS
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McKenzie's 16 Oz. IGA MILD OR MEDIUM, STICKS 19-
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S I I I I I I I I I I I


.Ir/










PAGE TEN


The Board of County Com-
missioners of Gulf County,
Florida, met February 17 in
continuation of the regular
meeting of February 14; which
was recessed. The. following
members were 'present:
Chairman Jimmy 0. Gort-
man, William R. Branch, Leo
Kennedy, and Everett Owens,
Jr. Also present was Deputy
.Clerk Jerry Gates and' At-
torney William J. Rish.
S-' The meeting came to order
at 5:00 p.m. Attorney Rish:
opened the meeting with
prayer and led thepledge of,
allegiance to the flag.
Vice-Chairman Branch
chaired the meeting at the
request of Chairman
Gortman.
: .Chairman Branch then noti-
fied those present that this
.jneeting was a continuation of
the regular meeting of Feb-
"ruary 14. He said additional
imb had been needed so that a
detailed study could be made
.of problems arising due to a
.proposed development at St.
SJoe Beach. A petition was then
presented by B. M. Janowski
containing g 42 signatures in
S Javor of the development.
-BEeve Nations, Florida Engi-
neering Associates.--Inc.,. re-
S r-esenting Developers Rowe
Sudduth and C. C.;Harrison,
'Jr., presented a plat of the
: subdivison and stated that all
:streets would be paved and a
.iater and sewer.. system
-would be installed. He stated
that the subdivision plat did
uot.meet Gulf County's sub-
:frvision regulations fn that lot
.sizes were less than '' acre
:and the streets wereess than
O. feet wide. He requested the
:County grant the developers a
:variance since the Vi acre lot
-size would not be required by
;the Department of Health due
Ftb the installation ofa centra-
sized water and sewer system.
:ni addition, he said all streets
.would be 60 feet Vide and
i _ved with proper drainage
:provided. Commissioner
:, wens then presented the
.._bckground of the adoption of
-the subdivision regulation. He
:tated that I' acre lot sizes
: 'ad been specified to protect
S Public since tixawas the
hlldst lot size upon which a
ptickank coihlbe dItlthbrlt-
,d by the State Department of
: Health. He added that other
regulations had been adopted
.at the insistence of the State
:gnd in accordance with State
'Law.
: A long discussion then fol-
'lowed among the Commission,
:the Developers, and members
:of the audience attending the
meeting. Major areas of dis-
cussion included lot sizes, no.
of acres in the subdivision.
size of sewer and water plant,
'type homes, and restricitons
in the subdivision. Major
points made by the Develop-:
ers were as follows:
1. All water and sewer
.facilities would be constructed
S in accordance with state law
2. Water and sewer facilities
'would be maintained by a
homeowners association and
Snot by Gulf County.
S3. An easement would be
Provided for emergency pur-
poses across the rear of the
property.: -'dra
: 4. Fire hydrants would be
provided.
5. All roads would be paved
and would have a 22 feet road
bed.
6. A site would be.provided
for a fire station if determined
that this would be the best
location and if built in accord-
ance with .the developers
Sspecificatiois.
SAfter a long discussion,
:Commissioner Kennedy
moved that the Board tenta-
tively approve the plat,
subject to 'the Board adver-
t rising for a public hearing on
:March 14 at 9:00 a,.m. to
consider adding a section to
the subdivision regulations al-
?lowing 60' x 120' Iodttsizes for
Single family residential sub-
idivisions with a centralized
Sweater and sewer system pro-
'isded by the developer, allow-
ig multi-family dwelling lot
:'sites to be considered on an
:ifplividual basis inii other de-
Ivelopments containing a cen-
'tnfralized water and sewer
system provided by the de-
lnoper, and providing that
xo.ads in such subdivisions
Sfi'all be paved with a mini-
,jjiim 60 feet right of way.
c-Commissioner Owens second-
S ed the motion and it passed
unanimouslyy
^";In other business, Commis-
sisner Kennedy requested all
Commissioners attend a meet-
elig in Lake City on Tuesday,
rRibruary 21, in the Lake City
'.Co.urtroom, for the purpose of"
organizing County support
;against the hospital indigent
;- "Commissioner Gortman
,.said the City of Wewahitchka
,'isrrequesting use of the heat-
ing and air conditioning unit
; being removed from the


:Gourthouse. After.discussion,
'Commissloner Gortman
moved the City be allowed use
of the unit provided an agree-


THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 1978 THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


ment is furnished stating that
the unit would be returned to
the County in operating condi-
tion within thirty days after
notification by the County that
the unit is to be returned.
Commissioner Kennedy
seconded the motion and it
passed unanimously. In addi-
tion, Commissioner Gortman
requested the Board write the
City of Wewahitchka request-
ing a workshop to be set up to
: discuss mutual problems of
the two governing bodies.
Commissioner Branch told
the Board he would like to
'emphasize to the. Road De-
partment Superintendent that
under no circumstances is
County equipment to be allow-
ed on private property and
that no commissioner has the
authority to order such. He'
said that this has not been, nor
will it be, a practice of the
Board. The Road Superin-
tendent said he knew of no
instance where this had occur-
red 'The Attorney asked
Commissioner Branch if he
had had any complaints or
reports of the County equip-
ment working on private pro-
perty. Commissioner Branch
stated no, but, State. At-
torney's Investigator Wayne
White had received calls con-
cerning the County equipment
working on the Sauls Creek
Road which was a county road
and not a private road as
reported to Mr. White.
Jackie Lee, Collins, along
with other county employees,
told the Board that the rules
adopted by the Board at the
last meeting concerning tardi-
ness and absences among
employees were too steep. He
said that Commissioner Ken-
nedy had read them to the.
Road Department Employees.
Commissioner Branch asked
Commissioner Kennedy if he
thought the rules had been
adopted. Commissioner
Kennedy stated yes, whereup-
on, the Clerk was instructed to
-read the minutes pertaining to
'this matter, showing only that
the rules had been presented
and a poll taken as to whether
Board members felt present
policy was effective in curbing
tardinesso aia& .absences.
Commissioner Kennedy


pass, he would offer his
apology for the mistake.
Commissioner Gortman
stated that some kind of rules
needed to be adopted so
everyone would be treated the
same and these rules had been
presented for study. After
further discussion,. Commis-
sioner' Branch asked Opera-
tions Superintendent Bob
Lester if he could handle the
problems of tardiness and
absences in the Road Depart-
ment. Mr. Lester stated he
could handle the problem if he
had the full backing of the
Board. The Board agreed to
back Mr. Lester in this
matter.
Commissioner Owens told
the Board that a decision
needed to be made concerning
the addition of water and
sewer lines to the Rochelle
Estates Subdivision of the Oak
Grove Water and Sewer Con-
tract. After discussion; Com-
missioner Owens moved the
engineer be authorized to
draw up a change order for the
addition as originally drawn
by Mr. Nations with the main
line running down Roche
Drive; such work to be con-
tracted at the unit price less
deducts as stipulated in the
contract. Commissioner
Branch seconded the motion
and it passed unanimously.
Bank balances as of Feb-
ruary 1, 1978 and payment of
bills are on file in the Official
Record Book at the Gulf
County. Clerk's office.
There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting was
adjourned.


The Board of County Com-
missioners of Gulf County,
Florida, met February 28 in
regular session with the fol-
lowing members present:
Jimmy 0. Gortman, Chair-
man, Leo Kennedy, Everett
Owens, Jr., William R.
Branch, and Otis Davis, Jr.
Others present were: George
Y. Core, Clerk, Jerry Gates,
Finance Officer, William J.
Rish, Attorney, Tommy Pitts,
Mosquito Control Director,
Lloyd Whitfield, Road Super-
intendent, C. E. Daniell,
Deputy Sheriff, and Albert
Thames, Civil Defense-
Veteran's Administration
Officer.
The meeting came to order
at 7:00 p.m. The Clerk offered
the opening prayer, followed
by the pledge to our flag.
The minutes of February 14
Sand 17, 1978, were read, ap-
proved, and adopted.
Pursuant to Notice to
Receive Bids to sell the
County one new crawler
tractor with front-end loader
bucket, bids were received.
There was a motion by Com-
missioner Branch, seconded
by Commissioner Owens, and
unanimously carried, that all


* MINUTES^**

S-- 'the I- ,


Gulf County Commision
u s-.V


HIGHLAND VIEW


BAPTIST CHURCH

Corner of Fourth St. & Second Ave.

SUNDAY SCHOOL ..................... 9:45 A.M.
WORSH IP SERVICES'..... 11:00 A.M. & 7:30 P.M.
CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) ......... 6:30 P.M.
MID-WEEK PRAYER (Wednesday) .... 7:30 P.M.


Rev. William N. Stephens,
Pastor


Nursery Provided


SERVICE STATIONS & GARAGES
Radiators Cleaned & Repaired
For $16.50
We repair auto air
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All Work Guaranteed
90Days.


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Service
525 N. Cove Blvd.
(Acroos From Bay Memorial Hosp)
785-4524


Forestry Service Offering


Summer Camp Program


bids e held until the meeting
of arch 14. to allow time to
study the bids and specifica-
tion' Representatives from
eaci bidder, being present.
agreed to this motion All bids
are o file in the Clerk's office
Fred Hartsfield, represent.
ing the owners of St. Joseph
Bay Estates, appeared before
the Board` and requested a
letter stating that the County
has -agreed to accept the
maintenance of all roads con-
structed on the unplatted
portion of the said St. Joseph
Bay Esfates. After discussion,
there was a motion by Com-
missiondr Owens, seconded by
Commissioner Kennedy, for
the Board to write the letter as
requested, pursuant to an.
agreement reached at the
meetingg of October 25, 1977,'
whidc was followed by a letter
froni the Board's Attorney on
November 28, 1977.
H. iT. West filed an Appli-
catidii to Carry Firearms.
TheSt- wasa motion by Com-
missioner Davis, seconded by
Commissioner Owens, and
unanimously carried,.that this,
application be turned over to
the Sheriff for his investi-
gation. '
The following applications
for employment were re-
ceived: Rhonda Lorene
Heathi"Charles W. Bentley,
Linda Davila Johnson. Brenda
Faye Robershaw, and Sandra
Jean Young.
E. F. Gunn, County In-
spector, filed the following:
daily reports:
Oak Grove Water and Sewer
Project 'No 159 to 168
Health Clinics- Old Court-
house- No. 22 to 27
N. C. Schweikert of the Gulf
County Health Department
advised-"the Board that the
owners of Peninsula Estate
Subdivision on St. Joe Penin-
sulahad heretofore requested,
a variance on .their subdivi-
sion which has been denied by
the State Department of
Health. The requested, vari-
ance was to allow individual
sewage disposal.
The Department of Trans-
porttion notified the Board
that a public hearing will be
held on & l 10 at 11:00 a.m.
in the Couniy Commissioners
--Meeting-Rioomr -- .....-.
Joseph D. Garland, County
Supervisor, FHA, notified the
Board that a "dry-run" in-
spection on the Oak Grove
Project should be made on or'
before March 10th. The At-
torngy said he will contact Mr.
Garland as to a dale for this
meeting.
The Board discussed a letter
front the Department of
Natural Resources with refer-
ence to a proposed fresh-
saltwater dividing line in the
Gulf. County Canal. The
Department suggested the
line be set at the Highland
View Bridge in accordance
with the Administrative Pro-
cedires:Act: Commissioner
Branch stated that all local

citizens 'have' always recog-
nized the bridge as the divid-
ing line. It was also pointed
out that the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission re-
cognizes the bridge as the
dividing line and requires a
fishing license for fishing
north of the bridge. After
lengthy discussion, Commis-
sioner Branch suggested that
local commercial fisherman
should appear before the
Board for their advice and
recommendation. The Chair-
man said an invitation will be
issued to the local Com-
mercial fishermen to meet
with the Board on March 14th.
The Board entered in to a
lengthy .discussion with refer-
encelto secondary raods and
the 5th and 6th cent gasoline
tax. The DOT advised that an
engineers salary can be paid
fromT 5th and 6th funds, but
only as to work charged to this
fund? DOT has set its five year
road program meeting with
this: oard for March 14, which
is the same date as the
advised this Board it was not
necessary to be' in attendance
because DOT has nothing to do
with secondary roads after
January 1, at which time the
County began its own engi-
neering and contracting.
Upon motion by Commis-
sioner Kennedy, seconded by
Commissioner Owens, and


306-308 Williams Ave.


unanimously carried, Resolu- The Chairman reported that
tion No. 78-1 was adopted. This the City of Wewahitchka will
Resolution supports Senator supply the necessary pipe for
Glisson's proposed bill con- a Red Bull Island Project,
cerning a municipality or providing the County will in-
county's authority to refusetp stall the pipe. The Board
administer any governmental' agreed to work with the City
state programs unless the' on-this project.
State provides a means to Commissioner Kennedy re-
finance such activity, service ported that he attended a
or facility. meeting in Lake City of
.Upon motion by Commis- County Commissioners from
sioner Branch, seconded by North and Northwest Florida,
Commissioner Kennedy, and which was called for the
unanimously carried, Resolu- purpose of opposing the new
tion No. 78-2 was adopted, law that requires counties to
giving support to the decision pay hospital bills for patients
of the Northwest Regional that the hospital decides are
Library System in the nomina- indigent. He said that in the
tion of Dr. Tom Gibson as short time this law has been in
recipient of the Outstanding effect Baker County was billed
Citizen Award for 1977-78. $6.028.00 for six patients,
Upon motion by Commis- Columbia $38,172.00 for 10
sioner Branch, seconded by patients, Dixie billed $8,848.00
Commissioner Owens, and for four patients. Jefferson
unanimously carried, an ease- billed $10,889.00 for three
ment for road right-of-way patients. Suwannee billed
from Wood's Fisheries was $11.896.00 for five patients and
accepted as recorded in O.R. Walton- billed $47,973.00 for
Book 73. Page 434. only. three patients. He said
The Board having hereto-' Gulf County has been billed
fore received applications to $8,465 00 for six patients. He
close and vacate one subdivi- then said this law is only five
sion and parts of another' months old which means that
subdivision, the A'torne;, ad- at the present rate, this one
vised that certain information law could ruin a county's
required from the landowners finances He urged each
has not been furnished; there ..member of the Board to attend
fore, he has closed the filed on the State Association of
this matter, assuming that the Counts Commissioners Meet-
owners have changed their .ing in Fort Walton on March
mind as to their application Ist. thru 4th. and help small
The Attorney informed the counties prepare legislation to
Board that his negotiations, do'away with this law.
with the State have been' The Wewahitchka Volunteer
successful in obtaining a; Ambulance Squad requested
second ambulance for the that a portion of the Old
Wewahitchka Area; that Courthouse be assigned to
Whiting Andrews, Emergency them for meetings, storage,
Medical Service, HRS will be training and to store two
in the Clerk's'office on Wed- : ambulances. There was a
nesday toassist in the filing of e motion by Commissioner
the application. After discus- Branch. seconded by Commis-
sion, there was a motion by sioner Kennedy, and unani-
Commissioner Branch, mously carried that the
seconded by Commissioner County Architect be authoriz-
Davis, and unanimously ed to commence planning for
carried, to submit the grant this facility.
application for one new A letter from Jerry Neal
ambulance. Garrett informed the Board of
The Board discussed a pro- damages to his automobile,
posed lease to the Department caused by lime .used at the
of Health in the old court- Oak Grove Water and Sewer
house. The Chairman said that Project. The Attorney advised
after determining the costs of that the Contractor is required
utility, insurance, janitorial to carry insurance for this
service, and maintenance; a type damage; therefore, this
proposal will be made by the letter should be mailed to the
Board Contractor.
Commissioner Davis asked ACommissioner Gortman told
if progress has been made in the Board he would be notify-
replacing the Stonemill Creek inig them of a date and place
Bridge. The Road Superinten- 'for a meeting with the City of
dent said his plans call for Wewahitchka.
replacing :the bridge with There being no further busi-
triple 36 inch culverts; that he ness, the meeting adjourned.
now has about half the pipe
required and it will take The Board of County Com-
another three weeks to make missioners met March 9 in
the balanceneeded. Mr. Davis workshop session with the.
then asked about the new- Wewahitchka City Commision'
Howard's Creek Drainage in the City Hall at Wewa-
Ditch. The Road Superinten- hitchka. The following mem--
dent said the easements have bers were present: Chairman
btahbGeniabtained at time. injiy)c. 'GArtman, Everett
The Board then diic sed a wens, Jr William
.fe"egitqut ffoi?'Sparkeiffl field R. Igranch, and Eeo Kennedy.
for the Road Department to City Commissioners present
loan him its equipment on the were Mayor. Ed Bandjough,
weekends in order that he Bob Davis, Doug Birming-
could do some drainage work ham, Claude Lister, and
on his private property. He Harold Armstrong. Also pre-
said he would pay the County sent were Cqunty Finance
operators .for operating the Officer Jerry Gates and City
machines. After discussion, Projects Officer Bud Poucher.
the Board decided that this City Commissioner Bob
request cannot be granted. Davis opened the meeting
Commissioner Kennedy told with prayer and led the pledge
the Board that the owner of of allegiance to the flag.
the Jr. Store in Port St. Joe Mayor Bandjough stated
has requested the County to this meeting was called to
patch several holes in his discuss mutual.problems of
parking lot and that he would the two governing bodies. He
pay whatever the County stated a prime concern of the
charged. Commissioner City was fear that the County
Kennedy said the general was going to build an am-
public, has been complaining bulance building in Wewa-
about these holes and has hitchka apart from the multi-
asked that they be patched. He purpose medical facility
further stated that the general which the City of Wewahitch-
public uses this lot to park ka was trying to build if grants
while shopping and it is also finds become available. Bud
used by the public for parking Poucher then explained pro-
after the store is closed. The cedures presently being fol-
Board agreed that the holes lowed that looked promising
need patching. There was a for the City in obtaining
motion by Commissioner ;' $200,000 for such a facility. He
Kennedy that the Road De- stated funds were available
apartment do this work and for renovation only and would
charge the owner its costs. require the City to build shell
The motion received no costing approximately $65,000.
second. Chairman Jimmy Gortman
Commissioner Owens re- stated the County was con-
ported that the reason the
white lines on the Simmons
Bayou Road have not been /" ,.Don't Let
painted is because the striping This Happen
machine is inoperable at this i TO YOUI
time. .
Commissioner Owens re- .
quested the Civil Defense ee U First. .
Director to obtain all im- Radiators Are Our
portant information on the Onl"Businessl
Youngstown disaster, espe, n Business!!
cially as to the handling of the ..
poison gas clean up. He said etE
that because the very same COOLING
kind of poison gas is shipped COOLIN
into Port St. Joe:on a regular SYSTEMS
schedule we should be prepar- : wpp v
ed for the same type emer- C ,r.
agency. The Civil Defense Di- I. ComplteRadiator
rector told the Board that he m e Radat
had two Gulf County Citizens ., .obs
that offered to help in the $O 9B
Youngstown disaster and that :'on the car 'O
we have several other men ';,
that are well trained in this 05 : A 9
type disaster. off the car


A summer environmental
program will be held at Black-
water River State Forest
beginning June 18. Students
who have completed the 6th
grade and have not entered
the 12th grade may attend.
They will spend their time in
the woods and water rather
than in classrooms.
Leaders will be well-trained
people from the Division of
Forestry assisted by specially
trained college students and

cerned that no place would be
available to store the new
ambulance being purchased
by the County for the Wewa-
hitchka' Ambulance Service;
In addition, he stated
members of the Wewa Am-
bulance Squad had been wait-
ing for a building for a long
time and were now ready for
the County to proceed as the
City had been frustrated time
after time in trying to obtain
grant funds for a medical
facility. He said the County
would be willing to give this
grant effort a chance since
results would be known in
approximately three months
according to Mr. Poucher.
The two governments then
discussed plans, finances,
ownership,i date' of comple-
tion, and other matters re-
lated to the medical facility.
The County then agreed to
consider taking action at its
next regular meeting towards
an intergovernmental agree-
ment to furnish $30,000 to-
wards such a facility, provid-
ed grant funds were received.
The County also agreed to a
.four month time limit for
processing the grant appli-
cation, setting July 15 as the
date the County would proceed
with its plans if the City had
-not been successful in obtain-
ing a grant.
The two bodies then dis-
cussed the roads on Red Bull
Island with the following con-
clusions: All streets in Red
Bull Island Subdivision were
owned by the City of Wewa-
hitchka. The County would
perform normal maintenance
on major streets in the sub-
division. The County would
'help install a pipe across
Cochran Slough, provided the
City purchased the pipe.
The County Commission
then told the City Commission
that County Equipment bor-
rowed by the City of Wewa
n u pri te
circen-
County policy.
After further discussion of
mutual problems, the meeting
was adjourned.


Airman Dykes will rdow
receive specialized training in
the administrative field.
The airman is a 1976 grad-
uate of Wewahitchka High
School. Her father, Jason
;Dykes,, resides at 206 Duval.
St., Port St. Joe.

For

Ambulance
Call-

227-1115


Agent may be
contacted at

St. Joe

ACCOUNTING
302 Third St. Port St. Joe

Tues. & Thurs.


Phone 227-1278


Airman Norma M. Dykes,
daughter of Mrs. Betty J.
Fowler of Wewahitchka, has
been assigned to Keesler AFB,
Miss., after completing Air
Force basic training.
During the six weeks at
Lackland AFB, Tex., the
airman studied the Air Force
mission, organization and
customs and received special
instruction in human rela-
tions. Completion of this train-
ing earned the individual
credits towards an associate
in applied science degree
through the Community Col-

lege of the Air Force.


Airman Norma Dykes

Assigned to Keesler AFB


Announcing


FARM BUREAU

INSURANCE


Save



your shoes...


Let our classified pages


do the walking for you.


Take off your shoes and relax while you look through the
classified pages of our newspaper. If you want a job, or
someone to fill that job, or want to buy, rent or sell
anything from aardvarks to zeppelins, chances are that
you'll find whatever you're looking for in our classified
pages. Our classified pages do the walking,for you-and
get results for those who are looking as well as those
who advertise.


The Star


teachers. Students will in-
vestigate trees and plants,
soil, water, and wildlife; and
how they are linked in nature.
Field investigations will be
carried out by co-ed groups of
eight to 10 with at least one
field leader.
They will have supervised
swimming, canoeing, fishing,
volleyball, basketball, even-
ing programs, and campfire
gatherings. At least one staff


I NOENO


I


I I -I -


member will be on duty 24.
hours a day.
The Environmental Cente
is located 45 miles northeast of
Pensacola. The camp fee. is:
$60.00 per week, and a student
may attend either one or two.
weeks.
Students interested in this,
camp can get more informa-
tion and'sign up at the Port St.'
Joe.High School.


AUTO
LIFE
FIRE
BUSINESS
RETIREMENT
FARMING


A: 2"




'L.


Sav Moe atSAVI -Sav MreatSAVEA Y- av Mred-tSAVEA -Sae MreatSAVEA


510 Fifth Street
Port St. Joe




3) ___ SAVE


$1.63!


17 Oz. Del Monte
FRUIT COCKTAIL
17 Oz. Del Monte Seasoned
GREEN BEANS


2/89

3/99'


8 Oz. Kraft 1000 Island
SALAD DRESSING 2/91
Hi Protein $6
DOG FOOD 25 Lbs $6.
25 Lb. Bag $7.
PUPPY CHOW$7.8


Martha White

FLOUR
5 Lb. Bag




LIMIT 1 WITH $7.50 OR
MORE FOOD ORDER


32 Oz. Fine Fare
MAYONNAISE
32 Oz. Blackburn
WAFFLE SYRUP
15 Oz. Chef Boy-Ar-Dee
BEEF RAVIOU


4 Count-5 Oz. Pkg.
FINE FARE
Waffles
Handy Pak-5 Lbs.
m a -


99C

990

2/99C


141 Oz. Family Size
TIDE
48 Oz. Size
IVORY
LIQUID


Ctn.


$


ave 49!


Buy 6 or More at $5.89
DOG Traiblazer


RATION


Fine Fare

BLEACH,
One Gallon Jug

'--- ^f^ \. ^

^B^H^H^H"'"'"''^^ ..*^w^-.


4/ $0 &uPRODUC0
4/s o Murcott Honey Sweet

SI. A Tangerines or


French Fries 1.19 Temple Oranges


Our~~ Prmu eCutySoe


Our Premium Be.
FRESH
HENS


I 59C
L.b.


Sliced Free-Whole or Half


SLAB
BACON


Lb. 88


Fully Cooked, 2-6 Lbs.
BONELESS
HAMS Lb.


50 Lbs.


Country Smoked ..
SLICED FREE C
PICNICS Lb.o


Meaty Lean
LOIN
RIBS


Lb.88


USDA Choice Western
ALL MEAT


Lb.
$i 1 9.'.L -.*'H B ->if -


Register Dry Cured Is the Best
Whole

SHams
06____^


5 Lbs. or More


GROUND
CHUCK
USDA Choice
ROUND
STEAK


USDA Choice
SHOULDER
Lb. 99 ROAST


Western
Lb.$1,29


Western USDA Choice Western
TOP and BOTTOM
b.$1.39 ROUND Lb$1.48


USDA Choice Western
BONELESS CHUCK 14
ROAST Lb.$1.19


Fresh
OX TAILS
Fresh
PORK LIVER


USDA Choice Western
BONELESS RUMP b
ROAST Lb.$1.29


For Seasoning Lb.
Lb. 69' Smoked BONES 39C
USDA Choice Western Lb.
Lb. 39C Sirloin Tip Roast $148


Mrs. Filbert's
Margarine 2/99O
M a 'g, a r i i Lb


Fine Fare
BISCUITS


6 Pak


Agree Reg., Oily, Ex. Body-Reg. *$16
CREME RINSE $1.m
Head and Shoulders-7 Oz.
LOTION Reg. $1.89 $1.4


99'


Seedless Pink
GRAPEFRUIT


39
49


C


Cello Bags Golden
S.CARROTS .-B 10


Large Stalk Pascal
CELERY
3 Lb. Bag Delicious
APPLES
4 Lb. Bag Georgia
YAMS


Bog 290

Bag 99

Bag 990
Bag


FPA 4R IA M-9 -I aA4'


STEW ;.


: e^ Jumbo

CARROT
for the Easter Bunny to
the First 100 Customers


Everyoe
A Happy
Easter

A ccept
USDA
Food
Stam'


-I


K


;L1


Frozen Foods


m


mommosommomm


i


I Healh & Bauty


I


qW-rR W


t.39



$ 649


Sa A




SI.


./ 1 .


. -THE


Specials for:
March 22 through 25


A


ST,


lac Swit's Preium Bee


IACON ROUNDSTEA


Swift's Prem. I
T-Bone
Swift's, prem.
Cube Ste
Hrbel ef.
Rib Stea


.1 Snow Hill Baking Beef Short

Hens Lb. 69 Ribs Lb. 790
Beef b 1 Q Swift's Prem. Beef Fresh
Steak Lb. 89 Beef Liver Lb.49' Pork Steak Lb. $19
Beef Swift's Prem. Beef USDA Choice
eak Lb. 79 Rib Eye Steak Lb269 Rump Roast Lb $09
$. Swift's Prem:. Befp Swift Ers..ei. e
S Lb $ 9 Sirloin Steak L. 9 Chuck Steak Lb. 99


*


Pilbury Funny Face



FRUIT DRINK



Q99


Hunt's
Sliced or Halv


Peaci



2$9
29 oz.
can


quantity rights re


I.I
In J ice De M nt
-lcdorCuhe 0o.


F,,


T. V. Frozen
Southern Vegetables Collards,
Mustard, Turnips with Roots or
TURNIP GREENS 6z57


Oh Boy Frozen
With Cheese, Chives or Bacon 12oz. A
POTATOES size59
Edwards Frozen
APPLE PIE s, 20
Steak House Beef Tenderloin,
Rib Eyeor Sirloin Strip 10oz.4 Q
FROZEN DINNER pkg.
Stk House Frozen Chop 0.s 5
SIRLOIN DINNER pg. 1


Bi

F


2


SUNBEAM
brown & Serve

tOLLS


Pkgs. 99
mli


Piggly Wiggly Single Wrap Sliced 8 59
CHEESE SPREAD g
Blue Bonnet Whip I b.,
STICK OLEO l 5i


Pillsbury
SUGAR COOKIES
Borden Half Moon
LONGHORN CHEESE
Sunnyland
OLEO TUMBLER
Borden French
ONION DIP


s8oz; QQe



size 119
41c

size73c


White Gold

SUGAR


Shortening


limit 1 wi


l. ,


I

I


I.


Del Montea


3loz.


Sel-Rising orPlain
Pilllbury



FLOUR
yr '. '


it 1 with $10or more additional purchase


l .


ba 99
Vie*ip


Vine Ripe
SALAD TOMATOES
Select
CANTALOUPES,
Red Ripe
WATERMELONS
Fancy
D'ANJOU PEARS
Fancy Select
CELLO CARROTS
Mild
YELLOW ONIONS


3


Be


I
21
be
3
b


Ib. 39
ach 69C
Ib.
lbs.loo00

6:.39C
1 59c


.5
Luk eaf6oz$19




': e a
Onon, lanHt r icor S k


S ~ COGAE ub


HadSoft r M diu
Cogae Adult
TOOT 3for99


000 -3 -. CHANT .c ''niv r' 0s x't97


50000 72 1 n 87.343 1 In 12.477 1 in 6.239.
100.00 508 in 12.379 1 in 1768 1in 884
'1000 1049 1 i 5.995 1 in 856 in 428
500 2.265 1 m 2776 1 in 397 1 in 198
S 100 40.309 n 156 1 in 22 in 11.1
S44.203 1 n 142 1 n 20.3 1in 10.1
.0 i -, ae.. 1 e. .- le-erArs U
;* *: "r *l, J rin r or sar,;Wir* W.iC


it


I


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WIN up $20,00


RULES-
1 Gr: a I',S Big Deal Sweepsgame ticket every
:.me v,5*. ,,si a oarticialing store Tickets may also
oh roldIioed by mailing a stamped settaddressed
invloo Bir BIG DEAL SWEEPS. RO Box 398.
iGneiva AlaDama 36340 No purchase necessary
Lilml anpi Ckel per family per visit Adulis only eligi.
ble' 8 yrs or older
2 HOW TO PLAY Using the edge ofa coin. gently rub
Ithn box dsignatedas DEALERSIHAND toreveal a
3-ld-a-kind caad value Now rub the 6 boxes desig-
nalpeda YOURHAND II YOURHAND onone
ticket reveals a higher 3-ol-a-kind t rd value than
DEALERS HAND Ionthesame ticket. youhavea
winning ticket. and you win the prize amount in the
PRIZE BOX Simply rub the PRIZE BOX to reveal
the prize amount YOUR HAND mus reveal a..
higher value 3-of-a-kind than Ihe DEALER S HAND
3-ol-a-kind in order to win
Card values Highest to Lowest
3 Aces 3 Kings. 3 Oueens. 3 Jarks. 3 Tens. 3 Nines.
3 Eights
Only 3-of-a-kind on one ticket can win
Example II YOUR HAND reveals 3 separate Kngs
and the DEALERS HAND reveals 3 Oueens, you
win the pnze amount in the PRIZE BOX
3 WHAT TO DO IF YOU WIN Subomt all claimed
winning tickets to store office for verification All
winning submissions must be signed in area provided
in presence of authored personnel Signature and
address must be supplied before receipt of any prize
Alter verification. $1. $5 and S10 winners will be paid
at store All $100 and 500 claimed winning submis-
sions must be verified by Ihe general office ia receipt
wll be issued before payment bydheck Applicable
taxes are responsibility of winners
A FINALISTS SUBMISSIONS If the word FINAL-
IST appears n PRIZE BOX on a winning ticket, you
are eligible for entry into a Grand Prize Orawing All
claimed FINALIST submissions must be signed in
area provided in presence of authorized personnel
After verification, you will be entered in aGrand Prize
Drawing after compelling Entry Form All Finalists.
verified by February 4 !1Q78 will bd eligible for draw-
ing Februaty 10 1978 All Finalttsverified by Apoil
29 1978 ,ii i iDehig-blp to, lina! biawng May 5 1978


Drawing dale of May 5. 1978 is contingent upon all
game tickets being distributed by April 25. 1978
5 Tickets void if not obtained from and verified by
authorized personnel. illegible. mutilated altered.
counterfeit. miscut: aisregistered. reconstituted.
defectlveprinted or produced in error, incomplete
or contains extraneous symbols, any portion of VOIC
IF REMOVED spot is exposed. other than exactly
one 3-of-a-lnd appares in DEALER S HAND box
in black ink; other than exactly five (5) separate play-
ing card values appear in YOUR HAND m black ink.
other than one prze amount (Dpears in PRIZE BOX
in black ink. any such symbols inconsistent with their
caption or with valdation number; i8099 does not
appear on back of ticket: security pattern ones not
appea under all 5 playing cards in YOUR HAND
and er prze amount in PRIZE BOX and under
DEALER'S HAND' inred miL or id cket ftals any
of BIG OEALS other validation tests. ability for vdid
ticket, if any.imited to replment of ticket Al sub-
milsed wAriaig tickets become the property of gme
sponsor and cannot be resumed Not responsible for
los or stolen tickets E ployees of Piggly TWggI.
Genson p owlesale Cof Diie Dandy. Dixie On-
count. Mea World PRillis Grocery. Mllace Games.
Inc. and their immediae family living at home are
ineligible to play Game void where taxed or prohlb-
iled by law
6 Game ends upon dilnbthont a all Game Tickets.
which might be on. before. or after the scheduled
termination date The offer to exchange 10 TICKET
Winners for 10 free tickets expires immediately upon
dasnbution of all game tickets men and if verified
claims for prizes in any categoryae equal to the numr
ber of pres advertised for 1hat category, then game.
as it relates to that specific razecaegory. hall nmme-
diately terminate without notice and any unverified
ticket aubbmied at or after thal tene shall be auto-
mahically relecled
7 Only BIG DEAL SWEEPS tickets with Series
*BD99 valid for this game Valid wnnmng tickets must.
be presented mwthin two 2i weeks after end ol game
or prizes are forteited Game program may be re-
peated y popular demand The total number and
worth o pries to be awarded will depend upon the
number a veiled tickets actually redeemed


I ,- -. -


T. V.Foe


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1111