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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02180
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 18, 1977
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02180

Full Text


















FORTIETH YEAR, NUMBER 52


Industry Deep Water Port Fine People Safest Beaches in Florida
PORTST. JOE, FLORIDA THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 1977


Levy Limt of 8 Mills


School Board




Sets Budget




at 4.8 Million


The Gulf County School
Board tentatively set its bud-
get reflects a moderate de-
crease from last year's finan-
cial plan. The district will
receive more state and federal
funds this year but these funds
are offset by a slight drop in
local funds and a smaller cash
balance carried over this
year.
The new budget calls for
$3,333,173.08 for support and
maintenance of schools; $618,-
432 for debt service; $322,-
334.81 for capital improve-
ment and $555,589.34 for lunch-
room services.
This brings the grand total
to be administered by the
School Board to $4,810,159.17.
Last year the Board drew up
a budget of $3,167,421.48 for
operations; $618,432 for debt
service; $690,735 for capital
improvements; and $371,661
for lunchroom services, bring-
ing last year's total to $4,848,-
249.48.

New Elementary

Students Should
Be Registered
Principal Harry Harrington
of the Port St. Joe Elementary
School reminds parents of the
fact that new students must be
registered before Monday,
August 29 for the '77-'78 school
year.
Kindergarten pupils must
have their birth certificates
and health records.
Registration "and informa-
tion can be obtained at the
school office on Long Avenue
between the hours of 8:00 a.m.
and '3:30 p.m., Monday
through Friday.


The budget for the coming
year reflects one sizeable
increase and a corresponding
considerable decrease.
The capital improvements
budget is down by some
$368,000. This is due to the fact
that the new Wewahitchka
High gym and the Port St. Joe
Vocational Education projects
have been practically com-
pleted, reducing that figure by.
a corresponding amount. The
lunchroom fund figure shows
a $170,000 increase due to the
fact that the School Board is
receiving considerably more.
state and federal funds in this
area and because the Board .is
constructing a kitchen in the
Wewahitchka Elementary
School and equipping it for
service. Meals in the Wewa
Elementary School have been
catered in the past from the
Wewa High School.
The operations budget is up
about $160,000, the biggest'
chunk of which will go to


salaries. School Board auditor
Roy Taylor said that over half
of the extra funds in salaries
will go to pay automatic raises
to teachers who will get more
pay due to longevity and
(Continued on Page 3)

Fire Damages
Fuel Truck
Fire damaged a truck on the
Industrial Road last Thursday
night about 9:30, according to
a spokesman of the Port St.
Joe Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment.
The truck, an oil tanker
owned by McKenzie Tank
Lines, apparently had a brake
dragging which caught fire
from the friction.
The fire happened just north
of the Wastewater Treatment
Plant.
Damage was confined to the
left rear wheel section of the
truck. .


Summer's Almost Gone

Here it is Thursday, August 18 and nearly the end of summer vacation.
These three young boys seem to have realized they have only a few more days


of leisure and play time left before they must get down to the nine month grind
of school days and studies. This photo was made late in the evening just before
sundown on the City Pier, as these boys stayed just as late as they could to cool
it on the pier, laying around, looking at the water and catching a fish or two. If
this photo doesn't say, "vacation time is nearly over", nothing will.
-Star photo


In Event of Nuclear Invasion



Port St. Joe Labeled 'High Risk'


Port St. Joe has been label-
ed as a "risk community" in
the event of nuclear invasion.
The ,City joins in this distinc-
tion with 18 other areas in the
state and over 400 nationally.
Philip Worth, Bob, Williams
and Bob Wilkerson, Nuclear
Civil Protection planners with


the State Division of Disaster
Preparedness, pointed out the
above fact as they offered
their assistance in planning a
crisis relocation program for
the area in a meeting at the
Gulf County Courthouse Mon-
day morning. They explained
to the local group, made up of


Window Breakers Keep


Maintenance Men Busy


Gulf County School Superintendent Wal-
ter Wilder and Sheriff Ken Murphy said this
week that a recurring problem in the area of
the Highland View Elementary School is
becoming more serious each day. The
problem is that the School Board is getting
behind with its window installation work at
the Highland View School. It seems the kids
are breaking the windows out faster than they
can be replaced.
Monday of this week, officials reported


that 57 windows at the school were broken out
to start the week. Later in the day, these
school maintenance men, Mr. Watson and
Sandy Sanborn, were trying to catch up with
the window replacing work in order to have
them all in by the start of school on August 29.
Sheriff Murphy and Superintendent Wil-
der are asking for help from parents in the
area in.order to prevent future vandalism,
which is costing' the School Board several
dollars to repair. -Star photos


&*

'i


Finedt-In.


Assuah Cnarges

Three cases are being tried this week in Circuit Court
here in the Gulf County' Courthouse.
Tuesday, Angela M. Fisher was found guilty of a
charge of aggravated, assault and fined $250.00. Judge
Robert L. McCrary presided over the trial.
Ms. Fisher was charged with discharging a load of
umber six shot from a shotgun at a group playing jump
rope.
Wednesday, Rocky Grinsley was being tried on a
charge of aggravated assault, but the verdict was not
reached by press time Wednesday aft6rnoon.
Friday, Charles Pittman will be tried on a charge of
burglary.


15" Pe r Copy


took three qualifications un-
der advisement when identifY7
ing the risk locations: 1) U.S.
counterforce military instal-
lations and missile sites, 2)
centers of industry; 3) metro-
pblitan areas of more than
50,000 people. In questiohing,
it was pointed out that Port St.
Joe fell into none of these
categories. The- briefing team
explained that the Defense
Department had considered
its reasoning for listing the
area as a, risk area "classi-
fied".
it was speculated by the
group present that it could
have been for any number of
reasons among which were:
the deep port providing easy
access to the paper mill, gov-
ernment installations on the
peninsula, or possibly even
some unknown condition.
It was also pointed out that
only one other of the 18 state
risk areas were classified
by the Defense Department
(Continued on Page 3) -


local officials who would be in
charge of coordinating such a
plan, that the crisis relocation
plan would be enacted in the
event of a friction situation
occuring that could possibly
lead to nuclear war.
The plan would involve mov-
ing some 135 million people
nation-wide, including 5,500,-
000 people in, the state of
Florida to a "host commun-
ity", a nearby area not consi-
dered to be in'a risk location.
This plan would leave
behind only the vital parts of,
the community, the members
of which would commute to
and from the host area. These
people would provide such
essential services as power,
phones and police protection.
In the event a businesss
activity, such as the paper
mill, were to be considered
essential, they also would run
under this manner.
To further illustrate the
crisis relocation project, the
group was shown a video tape


of Colorado Springs, Colorado,
planning advancements, giv-
ing some indication as to what
the local planners could ex-
pect in their plan.
The Department of Defense


FHILLIP WORTH
... Seaker


sed the thinking of the Com-
mission to Dumas when he
said, "We think there is a need
for a relaxing of the ordinance
in certain areas to allow
mobile homes. In some areas,
the homes would build up the
area and make it neater and
cleaner. Too, many people
cannot afford a conventional
home, but can manage to
purchase a mobile home."
Pate asked for a week to
consider the matter and see
what cotild be worked out. At
Tuesday's meeting, Dumas
was back again for an answer.
'The Commission agreed to
amend the zoning ordinance in
the area bounded by Avenue
A, Battle Street, Main Street
and Avenue G, to allow the
mobile homes in this area. The
several blocks are already
(Continued on Page 3)


A chink was made Tuesday
night in the City's former
armor which forbade mobile
homes from locating in the
City limits and a decision was
made to go ahead with an
increase in the water rates
during the coming year.
the Commission has suc-
cessfully fought off the intru-
sion of mobile homes to*the
City with two lone exceptions.
Temporary permits were giv-
en to the Florida Employment
Service to locate a temporary
mobile home office bn Long
Avenue and the Griffin Con-
crete Company was allowed to
locate temporary offices at
their site until they could get
something definite about the
ownership of their property
before constructing a per-
manent office building.
At last week's meeting,


James Dumas, now of Wash-
ington, D.C., and formerly of
Port St. Joe, said he is getting
ready to retire and asked for
permission to move a new
mobile home'onto property he
owned on Avenue B. Dumas
contended, and the Commis-
sion agreed with him, that the
mobile home would be an
improvement for the area and
neighborhood.
Dumas said he wished to
retire to the City but couldn't
justify going into debt for a.
home in the area of his
property and at his age. He
wished to retire in a mobile
home.
Since the City Ordinance:
prohibits mobile homes any-
where in the City, Dumas'
request was impossible to
grant.
Mayor Frank Pate expres-


Zoning Change'Would



Allo*w Mobile Homes










. PAGE TWO


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 1977


w -THESTAR-
PWW et every r"th Arsay t o wllntss AvOe, Port st. Joe, lori a
B By Te s star P* i ting Comnany

o W W R. Ramsey ........... ............... Editor and Publisher
P11 WIilam H. Ramsey .............................. Production Supt.
FrnchleL. Ramsey ............................... Office Manager
Shirley K. Ramsey........................ Typesetter, Subscription-"
POSTOFFICE BOX 306 PHONE 227-3161
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456

SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAIO AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIA324 56

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR. S.00 SIX MOS., S3.00 THREE MOS., $12750
OUT OFWCUQNTY--.000 OUT OF U.S.-One Year. $7.00

TO ADVERTISERS-In cse of error or omissions In advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable
for dWanee W rthr then amount received for such advertisement.

Te poken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely
aes is the eprteo word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.
l..(.------ l-- lll..... .4 --- ------------ P .!iiS =i- -- ------

EDITORIALS:




We Don't Have to Lock


the World Out


We have to come back to that old
theme that Gulf County is a fine
place to live every once in a while.
= We can't say that often enough.

- We had the truth in this state-
U ment emphasized to us the. other
5 night.
-: We had four young men from
: Houston, Texas staying at our
house over night last Thursday
night. They were with a group of
: young people appearing in a musical
- program at our church. When the
young men got out of my car at the
E house following the concert, we
noticed that they all locked the car
.doors behind them. We even had to
:-get the key out of the ignition to open
the back door to the station wagon so
they could retrieve their luggage.
They had locked that door when they
put their luggage in for the short trip
2 from the cliHrch to the house.
"Why did you lock the doors"?


The Big (6




President Carter has decided to
give away the Panama Canal in the
year 2000. Negotiations are going on
right now to set up a program by
which the United States will aban-
E don the ownership of the canal and
-give it, free, to the Panamanians.
Remember when this was one of
the main campaign issues which
SRonald Reagan was stressing in the
Presidential campaign? Remember
when a lot of people said it couldn't
and wouldn't happen? It is happen-
*. ing.
The United States has spent a lot
*. of time and money in constructing
: and developing the canal and the
business it enjoys. It has no doubt
elevated the living standard in


oWho
.4 Extraordinary Facts About
Some Ordinary Products.
Safety pins, pencils with
erasers, alarm clocks.. .have
: you ever wondered where they
came from, and how they be-
came a part of our everyday
life? Lawrence Peska, presi-



















0


we asked. That was the first time
those car doors had been locked
since it was last driven out of town.
They replied, "In Houston, you
just naturally lock the doors. You
don't dare leave them unlocked."
Around here, you don't have to
do that.
One boy went on to say, "I had
all four wheels stolen off my car one
night, while it was parked for the
night in my yard at home".
Living here in Gulf County can
be a relief. Nearly everyone in the
county knows our old green Ford
station wagon, for instance, and
most everyone knows if the person
driving it when they see it, should
be. The same goes for the vehicles
and property of other people.
We'll take the small town every
time, where fear is diminished and
where everyone looks out for your
property.




riveAway



Panama far above what it would be
were the canal not there. But, the
Panamanians want the whole loaf.
They're not satisfied with reaping
their profits from the business some-
one else is running.
Rest easy Americans. While
your government may be giving
away a valuable asset, they are
maintaining your right to fight and
die to defend it should someone try
to take it by force from Panama.
If someone does cast covetous eyes
on the Canal in the future, it will be a
"Castro" and the Panamanians
would hand it over without a fight.
So, there's even a good chance we
won't even have to defend the Canal
in the future.


Letters.


. to the Editor


Promoter Defends Rock Kennedy


Concert Preparations


P. 0. Box 331
Wewahitchka, Florida
August 15, 1977
Dear Mr. Ramsey,
A lot has been said about the
recent rock concert held in the
Overstreet area, most of
which is untrue. As one of the
promoters of this concert, I
feel it is my duty to clear up
some of the rumors and out-
right lies which have been
spread.
In the August 11th issue of
The Star it was printed that an
ordinance was approved by
the county commission which
set up requirements for pro-
moters of rock concerts to
comply with before being
issued a permit. These re-
quirements were: you must
have an occupational license,
provide sanitary facilities, in-
sect control, on the spot medi-
cal service, food service, flood
lighting traffic control, park-
ing space, fire protection,
provide a map of the concert
area, name performers and
vendors and a copy of their
contract, put up a sizeable
deposit to cover unforeseen
expenses by local govern-
ment, and limit the shows to
those 18 and over unless
accompanied by parent or
guardian.
It was also printed that
the ordinance was instigated
by this concert which provided
none of these requirements-
this was an outright lie. We
applied for and received an
occupational license under the
name of Silver Smith Produc-
tions, which is a registered
production company. We pro-
vided more than enough san-
itation facilities. Running
water and insect repellant was
available. There was an emer-
gency medical technician and
a doctor at the concert on call
for both days. The ambulance
service was advised in ad-
vance of the concert should an
emergency arise. We provided,
food services-our food ven-
dor had an occupational li-
cense, hotel and restaurant
license (food), beverage li-
cense, a special tax stamp and
number. There was sufficient
lighting in the stage and food
area. There were no less than
five people controlling traffic.
There was adequate parking
space. We had fire extinguish-
ers for fire protection. We had
maps of the concert area
available; we also listed the
performers three weeks in
advance on radio and posters.
A $1,000 deposit was made to
the Internal Revenue to cover
sales tax.
I do not know who investi-
gated our concert and these
requirements but whoever the
county commission appoint-
ed-if they did-did a very
poor job.
It was reported on WJOE
that 25 people were arrested at
the concert. We have yet to
find 24 out of these 25 people
who were supposedly arrest-
ed.
Overall, we feel the concert
went well, with a very orderly
crowd and very little trouble.
But the closemindedness of
the county commission and
the ridiculous lies spread by a


discoveredd These?


dent of the international idea
development firm that bears
his name, has wondered about
this too. He discovered that in
most cases, many products
that we take for granted have
fascinating but little known
histories. "In fact," says Mr.


Peska, "it appears that the
smallest inventions often have
the biggest impact on the
market."
The safety pin is an ex-
ample. The idea is credited to
Walter Hunt, a New York
Quaker, who worked only
three hours developing a
"safe" pin that would put sep-
arate articles together and not
hurt the user. "The distin-
guishing features," as stated
in his patent, "consists of a pin


made .of one piece of metal
combining a clasp or catch."
After producing a working
model of this idea, he sold his
concept outright for $400. He
never received another penny
for it.
And who is responsible for
the shrill but effective ringing
alarm clock that awakens
most of us each day? Blame
Levi Hutchins, a New Eng-
land clockmaker who was
determined to rise each morn-
ing at four a.m. After con-
structing a wooden cabinet,
Hutchins transferred the inner
mechanism of one of his large
brass clocks into which he also
inserted a bell, and a pinion or
gear. Precisely at four a.m.,
the tripped pinion set the bell
in motion making sufficient
noise to awaken him. Although
he lived to the age of 94, he
never bothered to mass pro-
duce or patent his idea. He
was just interested in not over-
sleeping. He achieved his am-
bition.
Even small ideas can be
brilliantly successful as was
the case with the eraser top
pencil. Philadelphian, H. L.
Lipman, who invented neither


few people in this county
make it highly unlikely that
another concert will be held in
the near future. I hope this
sheds some light on how the
concert really was. I feel that
the statement that we pro-
vided none of the require-
ments should be retracted and
an apology made in the paper'
to Silver Smith Productions.
Sincerely,
Kenneth M. Smith

(Ed. Note-Our story con-
cerning the new county ordi-
nance governing outdoor
musical presentations report-
ed county requirements for
promoters of the activities in
general terms only. Naturally
we did not have room to give
the specifics as outlined under
the ordinance concerning san-
itation, medical facilities, law
enforcement, etc. We did not
attend the rock concert but
after hearing the specifics of
the county ordinance read in
full at the .meeting alluded to
in the above letter, we would
not hesitate to guess that the
local promoters' could not
meet the requirements of the
new ordinance. Our story did
not intimate this however, it
reported only the activities
and feelings of the County
Commission in the adoption of
their ordinance.)


Represents

People
Dear Mr. Editor,
At the meeting of the county
commission when there was
discussion of the emergency
medical services, Mr. Ward
McDaniel spoke. In three sep-
arate parts of his speech he
emphasized that he and the
other E.M.T.s from Wewa-
hitchka welcomed Leo Ken-
nedy checking out their opera-
tion. McDaniel referred to
their being financed by tax-
payers money and it being the
duty of the commissioners to
investigate these things. He
also seemed to make a point of
the "Wewa" squad not buying
anything for their vehicle.
I can't understand why Mc-
Daniel took one attitude upon
being investigated and Lam-
berson so opposite an attitude.
Someone writing regularly to
you about this matter calls
upon both God and democratic
processes to witness that he
represents the people. I had
been under the impression
that Leo Kennedy was elected
to represent the people.
Between 10 and 15 years ago
when Leo Kennedy was a
county commissioner the
county bought Chicken-Coop
Swamp as a site for the new
court house. Leo voted against
the purchase because it was a


The news in the papers last week about the
four bodies found in a sink hole near Perry made
people around here perk up and take notice. The
later revelation that the four were identified as
two men and two women from Springfield put tyep
subject matter closer to home. Then, the
supposition that the four died as the result of
witnessing the transfer of a large shipment of
marijuana near Spring Creek made me think
about the recent drug bust here in Gulf County.
If the Springfield people were -shot for
walking up on a marijuana transfer, what would
have happened to someone who decided to go to
the dynamite off-loading spot on the canal to fish
that unloading night? What would have happen-
ed to the FDCLE officers who were lying in the
bushes witnessing the transfer had they been
spotted?
It was significant that each and every one of
those caught in the big bust was armed. The
group had a small arsenal in their possession
which they could have easily gotten to.
Here in Gulf County, we have a lot of
out-of-the-way places in which marijuana can be
.transferred to land vehicles for transfer inland.
Sheriff Ken Murphy says the Federal people and
FDCLE people think there are regular ship-
ments through this area which go un-noticed.
SWhat we're getting at is that one should be
careful when he goes exploring through out-of-
the-way places in Gulf County and not barge in
on a group of people who look as if they are busy.
You might wind up in a sink hole in Taylor
County wearing a cement block necklace.

A point of emphasis.
I wonder if Bert Lance, our national Director
of the Budget would have declared the circum-
stances which surround his loan to Hannover
Trust Company if he were to make out a Florida


Need An Education ?

See the Adult School


The Gulf County Adult Insti-
tute is offering exceptional
educational opportunities to
the adults of this area. In the
past year over 100 adults have
earned a high school diploma.
Classes for high school com-
pletion are now open for reg-
istration at the Centennial
Building in Port St. Joe. The

the eraser nor the pencil
simply devised a successful
way to join the two entities
into one. Prior to 1858 each
was used separately. He
patented his innovation which
he later sold for $100,000.
These and other interesting
facts about inventors and their
inventions are available in a
free, illustrated booklet. Just
write to Lawrence Peska
Associates, Inc., 500 Fifth
Avenue, New York, New York
10036. Request booklet 37-C.


classes are VA approved.
New reading materials and
equipment are now in use and
more are being purchased. If
you have reading problems
and wish to learn to read
better, you are invited to
enroll.
Also available for reading
are subscriptions to 50 current
magazines. They are in the
reading racks for students'
use.
There is no charge for work-
texts and there are no fees to
pay. This is an excellent op-
portunity for you to earn a
diploma at no cost to you.
Classes meet Monday
through Friday, eight a.m. to
three p.m. Evening classes
meet Monday through Thurs-
day, six to nine p.m. For
further information call 227-
5321.


swamp and also because there
were four or five other sites
available including the pre-
sent location of the bank
building. During the building
of the court house Leo and
then-commissioner Walter
Graham regularly dug around
the pilings and checked out the
things. Far more people than
that man who keeps writing
you letters reviled Kennedy. A
grand jury praised Kennedy
and Graham. The pilings were
out of line and some were not


even up to standard or being
put in properly. The court
house is still a little crooked
and the roof has leaked a"
plenty but we need to reme%
ber that if Leo Kennedy and
Walter Graham had given up
every time people ganged uf
to condemn them that the
Chicken-Coop Swamp Taj
Mahal would by now be listing
45 degrees into the mud.
Sincerely,
Louis C. Carter


Need Teen Center


August 14, 1977
Dear Mr. Ramsey,
I am forced to agree with
other concerned citizens, the
rock concert held recently in
our county was a very poor
example of entertainment for
our young people. But, have
you ever ridden by the Junior
Food Store on Saturday night
and seen the large group of
teenagers who have no place
to go and nothing to do? If a
legitimate promoter wanted to
provide entertainment in the
form of rock music for our
young people, we do not
believe our county officials
should be so presumptious as
to discourage it in the manner
described.
I will agree one or two rock
concerts a year would not help
the situation a great deal, but
something needs to be done to
provide a place year round for
our older teens to meet and
enjoy various kinds of recrea-
tion with some supervision.
The Stac House in the summer


months provides an ideal faci-
lity used by both younger and
older teens, and closing it in
the winter seems to be a
waste. Even this limited acti-
vity center kept open all year
and to a later hour on Satur-
day nights would at last
provide a decent meeting
place. If such a center could
be provided, then perhaps
there would be no need for
rock concerts.
These suggestions do no
pertain to me as I am not a
teenager, but am a working,
tax paying member of the
community. I am not yet a,
parent, but I do have a sister'
and a younger brother. I be-
lieve a year-round recreati
center on weekend nigh
would pay many dividends i
the safe future of our young
people.
Thank you for your consi-
deration in hearing my views.
Sincerely,
Danny Tankersley


Financial Disclosure document, as Florida law
calls for? Since he failed to do so in his
examination by Congress, I feel he would have
conveniently omitted the fact that there wasn't /
. what one. would call; sufficient collateral behind-
; the loan, smacking of favoritism and even an
illegal loan. If Lance would conveniently omit.
this fact to Congress, I feel he would do so before
the voters of Florida.
Another example that if an office holder is
trying'to hide something, a question on a piece of
paper is not going to make him reveal it, and our
Financial Disclosure law is, at best, ineffective.
I noticed several other papers in this area
did just as we did; they refused to print the
declarations by the several local office holders,
taking the viewpoint, with us, that what they
owned was nobody's business but theirs.

I don't see how anyone could look askance
at Governor Reubin Askew for putting $29,000
worth of new carpet down in two rooms of the
Governor's mansion. Remember, Reubin has
just a little more than a year to stay in the
mansion, so it couldn't be for his benefit.
The story broke last week that the new
carpet, which sells for $225.00 a yard, replaced
the worn carpet in two rooms of the mansion.
The new carpet was supposed to have cost so
much because it was custom made. The new
rugs were said to have been especially designed i-,
with images of palm leaves, orange blossoms;
sunbursts and dolphins woven into the fabric. A
picture of the new rugs in the papers last Friday
showed none of these special designs.
At 225 bucks a yard, I hope this new rug
doesn't wear out in 10 years, like the old one did.

POT POURRI ...
. Pete Maravich has become the most
recent sports millionaire, signing a five year
contract for $3. million. At 600 thou a year, a
person could bounce a lot of basketballs.
... Jack Eckerd is making noises like he is
getting ready to swing for the third time. He has
already had two strikes on his quest for his home
run to the Governor's mansion in Tallahassee.
Maybe the new rugs made him decide to try for
that third and fatal strike. Don't you have a
secret desire to walk on a $29,000 rug? Will
Eckerd get a hit on his third strike or will he fan
out? At age 64, he's not likely to get another at
bat.
. The TV showed that huge space craft
gliding back to earth gracefully and making a
perfect landing. How would you like to be turned
loose on the edge of space in a hunk of iron,
weighing 75 tons and be expected to "glide" to a
safe landing?
.. Communists were shooting at soldiers
and police in northern Mexico the other day.
With that leaky Mexican-American border, it
sort of makes you skittish, doesn't it? Just how
long will it be before the Communists decide to
come north a few miles where they can really
have some targets?


ETAOIN SHRDLU

By WESLEY R. RAMSEY


----------------- --------


.- P- -- - -- - - p P- -










THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAYAUGUST 18, 1971 PAGE ThREE


HusbanofFormer Resident ButldsBetter Mousetrap

t Everyone Is familiar with of her uncles are still. residents The San Diego Zoo is testing there-he could almost sup- Brown has just sold the for- to react the same way, They Perfect conditions," which little. Theyr oo~-oso
the saying, "Build a better of Podt St. Joe. the device. So are Texas A&M port his family on $236 a eign production rights for $3 lose their sense of direction.. Brown said depend on mois. off. But myeost of nelto heyhaew
mousetrap and you'll make a Brown admits that his find University and the University month Social Security check. million to International Trade They become confused. They, ture content in the soil.m garden thatostill muthehaea
million". That's literally what was a fluke-a one-in-a-mil- of California.' brown tried to supplement Specialists of Costa Mesa. And become inactive. They don't. He estimates that 12,00toied ayelin sutifll mut b
.Bob Brown of Pine Valley, lion opportunity that came his Brown, afflicted with polio his living by making electric he's dickering with others for eat or drink. units are in operation edoundiestdiatng ow nk titolthar,
California did, and he is now a way. And if it hadn't been for for most of his 50 years, was guitars, which he was familiar production rights in the United Effective range is between ft v orld.opra ntaobdle.t htnwmk tt h
multi-millionaire. his guitar, he would never down on his luck before his with, having been a touring States. one-third of an acre up to a! Brown'snw-fud Adte'sotagpri,
Local folks may remember have done It. invention. He had fallen on musician before his hard luck. "I've been offered $10 mil- square mile "under abs olute millions has changew-fudAd theme' nsigghte.i
Mr.Brwn' wfeth fome Brwnhasinentd hgh- hard times and settled down Wire coils are a Dart nf that linn-ai -.. .


Annette Lewis. She is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Hilton Lewis, formerly of Port
St. Joe, and currently resid-
ing in New Orleans, La. Many


frequency device, which he
calls Amigo, that puts an end
to mice, rats, gophers and
other rodents, plus ants, ter-
mites and other insects.


with his wife, Annetti
their two sons, Mike,
and Tom, eight, in a r
valley in southern Cali
The way of life was ci


(Continued from Page 1)


Allow Mobile Homes


zoned for multiple family In other business matters
dwellings. the Commission:
Dumas was told that the -Agreed to meet Thursda)
mechanics of the zone change morning at 7:00 to consider
would take four weeks to allow the budget for the coming
for any objections to the plan, year.
before he could move his home -Heard a complaint on the
in. The Commission stressed
that even in making the (Continued
changes, any mobile home
coming into the area would 1
have to meet the requirements S ch o o l I
for size, construction, electri-
rcal and plumbing fixtures, etc.
* WATERRATES earned degrees.
Another decision made at The School Board, like
AnTuesday's meeting wasonde every other governmental

which will increase the subdivision, has been slapped
water charges during the com- in the face by higher utility
ing year, The rates were last and insurance costs. Taylor
changed four years ago, when pointed out that utilities at
changed four years ago, when Port St. Joe High School last
the sliding scale for volume
users was abandoned, making year cost $61,000 with other
every customer pay the same schools in the county paying
rate,very on the same ratio. Taylor
ates duing the coming looked for an increase in this
Rates during the coming figure duing the coming year.
year are expected to increase figuredinthecomingyear.
by nearly 20c per thousand Major expense increases
gallons of water, which will coming up in fiscal 1977-78
increase the average water includepayment to the state of
bill by about a dollar. $9,000 for adult students. The
For years, the City's Gen- district must pay this out of
eral Fund has subsidized the revenues of charge the stu-
water operations, but re- dents a fee. They elect, at
quirements now make it present, to pay the sum out of
necessary to make the system revenues. Another expendi-
self-supporting. Other factors ture will be $47200 for a new
calling for an increase in (Continued
rates, include the need for
planning presently underway
to secure a new water supply
and to enlarge the treatment R isk A r
.plant, as well as the new
storage plant now under con- "and that was the Venice area.
tructioin. '' C The- teMih noted 'that :this
The new storage tank was area had been estimated to be
made necessary when inspec- in a one megaton bomb risk
tion and repair people said area, meaning that the De-
they would no longer service fense Department believed
one of the old tanks because it that in the event of a nuclear
was dangerous to climb, due attack this area would receive
to its age and deterioration. A a one megaton detonation
new source of water is being which would encompass, a
obtained because St. Joe Pa- radius from approximately
per Company no longer has White City to the Franklin
the water available in the County line on the east and St.
volume necessary to meet the Joe Beach on the west, with
City's needs. The treatment the City of Port St. Joe being
plant is being doubled in size in the center. This radius, ac-
because it can no longer treat
the volume of water adequate-
ly now required by the City.
WATER MATTERS !
In other'water matters, the
Commission voted Tuesday M lAdv
night to assume ownership of
the master meter which will
serve the Oak Grove system
when it goes on the line,
possibly by the end of this
year. Since the City water
system has contracted to ser-
vice the Oak Grove system at "
a nominal charge, the system
.4eels it must have charge of
the master meter to keep a
closer tab on how much water
.gges into the system. The City
water department also wishes
to install the meter so it can
calibrated periodically to
make sure it is working right. A
What Commissioner James
Roberts, who is in charge of
the water department, sug-
gested to the Board was that
the Commission ask the Coun-
ty ppy the City the amount in -
their contract to purchase the Baptist
purchase and install the me- a A
ter. Sunday Aug.'2
This request will be made of
the County.


condition of a lot on Woo
Avenue which needs cle
up.
-Turned down a re
from Ronald Neall to u
Fire Station to condi
month-long revival.


d from Page 1)


Budget


A MWTT .-'- -p y oc V Vr oIai
e, and production and they brought
seven, Brown his ultimate good for-
remote tune.
fornia. "I was out in this little shed
cheaper winding a coil," Brown re-
called. "When I hooked it up, I
noticed that it stopped all the
rodent activity in the shed.
"I found out I had made
some errors in the coil, and
got the wires confused. It pro-
duced a frequency that was
dward beyond the range of humans.
meaning But these rats just stopped in
their tracks.
request "It was a fluke. With that
se the coil I was able to back off the
uct a gophers that summer and, for
the first time, was able to have
a good garden."
Brown was able to recreate
his discovery, adapting it so
that other rodents and ter-
mites were affected. He made
a few units for neighbors and
friends, "but it took a while
i $50,- before I found it had a real
ons at value."


luon, .said Drown, wno ad-
mitted he's holding out for a
bigger figure.
The Environmental Protec-
tion Agency has given the
device its okay, Brown said.
They like it, he said, because
it's harmless to humans and
pets.
Actually, the device doesn't
kill rodents and insects, but
drives them into inactivity.
They then don't drink and die
of dehydration, and don't eat
and then starve to death.
The device sends a 50,000
cycle sound frequency radiat-
ing through the earth (the
wetter the earth, the better the
radiation).
As Brown explains it: "It
frustrates the animals, and
turns them around. It changes
the polarity of the earth. For a
moment it's negative, then
positive.
"If you put a compass over
it, the needle would just spin
around. It causes the animals


RMA


FPC Drops Nuke Plans


Sam Scott, an officer of
Florida Power said the con-
struction of the firm's nuclear
generator nearly broke the
firm. "That's the reason we
have plans now on the drawing
boards for two more fossil fuel
plants", he said.
Scott said changing federal
regulations ballooned the
costs of the plant from an
estimated $100 million to over
$400 million before the plant
was finished. "We wound up
having to sell 10 percent of the
plant and its out-put before we
could complete it and put it on
the'line", he said.
Scott said the nuclear gen-
erators can generate power
much cheaper than fossil fuels
but that construction of the
plants is made prohibitive by


continually changing govern-
menal regulations for their
construction and operation.


Scott showed the club a
short film entitled, "Atomic
Power Today".,


the members of the

Church of Christ
invite you to meet with them:
Sunday Morning Bible Study ........... 10:00 A.M.
Sunday Morning Worship ..............11: 00 A.M.,
Sunday Night ......................... 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday Night .................. 7:00 P.M.

Corner 20th St. & Marvin
For information


1,
y
r
I
ie


venue


Church

1 7:00 P.M.


Gaskin-Graddy Insurance
Phone 639-2225
Wewahitchka, Florida
Specializing In
BUSINESS PACKAGE POLICIES


FIRE LIFE BONDS




Ask About Our Convenient
Payment Plan
In Port St. Joe Every Tuesday
In Sears Cataloa Store


Close.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAYAUGUST 1 1977


PAGE THREE









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 1977


Miss Deanna Delores Ramsey Is


iBride of Marlen Eugene Taylor


Miss Deanna Dolores Ram-
sey became the bride of
.Marlen Eugene Taylor, Fri-
day, July 29, at7:30p.m. in the
-Oak 'Grove Assembly of God
Church. Rev. David Fernan-
Sdez officiating at the double-
ring ceremony. Deanna is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs..
Houston Edward Ramsey and
the bridegroom is the son' of
:Rev. and Mrs. Bobby Gene
Taylor.
: The sanctuary of the Oak
Grove Assembly of God
Church was decorated with
spiral candle trees which re-
flected light on the two large
arrangements of gladioli,
chrysanthemums, daisies and
football mums in the bride's
chosen colors of yellow, mint
green and white. ,
Organ selections were play-
ed by Billy Joe Rich, Jr. while
Myrna Fernandez sang
"More", "Walk Hand in Hand
with Thee" and "Whither
Thou Goest".
:The bride, given in marri-
age by her father, wore a
formal gown of bridal satin
featuring an empire waistline.
The bodice and the Mandarin
collar bordered with seed
pearls were lavishly overlaid
with imported peau d'ange
face. The long fitted scalloped
:Ibleeves were also of peau
-d'ange lace. The slightly A-
line skirt front and the chapel
length train were accented
with lace appliques. Her two-
tier floor length vet of French
illusion was. attached to a
camelot cap of bridal satin
overlaid with lace and pearls.
The bridal gown was fashion-
ed by Sue Wilson.
The bride carried a nosegay
of white daisies cascaded with
yellow sweetheart roses. The
nosegay was interspersed
with white satin ribbon with
love knots entwined with lily
of the valley.
Miss Rhonda Heath served
maid of honor. Bridesmaids
were Vickey Ramsey, sister of
the bride, and Regina Ellis.
The attendants wore identical
floor length gowns of yellow
crepe; sleeveless, with a scoop
neckline accented with a floral'
chiffon waist length cape.
They carried nosegays of yel-
low and, white daisies. To
complement their ensemble
they wore silk daisies in their
hair. The honor attendant

Fall Art

Classes

Scheduled
The Panama Art Associa-
tion is pleased to announce the
fall schedule of art classes.
These lessons are open to the
public. For more information
'regarding times and' fees,
contact the teachers. All the
classes, except Beginning
Watercolor, will meet at the
Art Center (15th St. at Sher-
man Avenue). Watercolor
-Painting class will meet at
tanyard Limited in the Mini
Mall.
Liz Johnson (722-4343) is
:teaching on Mondays. Her
,individualized approach al-
K lows each student to work at
her pace and in a variety of
media. Liz exhibits profes-
' sionally throughout the south-
- east. She is trained in draw-
- ing, oil painting, pastel, acry-
lic painting, and pen and ink.
On Tuesday mornings, be-
ginning September 6th, An-
Cgela Skoskie (763-2790) will
teach Acrylic Painting for
SBqginners. Angela has exhi-
bited in this area, recently
Winning the first prize in the
SMall Fine Art Show.
" Beginning Watercolor
Painting will be taught by
SNancy Wagner (769-0500). The
eight week course will be
offered during the daytime
and evening beginning Sep-
tember 21st.
' October 5th Miyoko Moody
: (722-4696) will begin an eight
L week class in Beginning
SSumi-e Painting. We are for-'
tunate to have a teacher so
:well qualified in Sumi-e, the
.ancient Japanese ink drawing.
: Miyoko is a member of the
, Sumi-e Society of America.
: Dessie Ernspiker (763-8826)
!, is new to our area. She will
; teach Oil Painting on Thurs-
Sday mornings beginning Sep-


tember 1st. Dessie, who is a n
author as well as a profes-
sional artist, exhibited her
:;realistic style in 'the West
.;:before moving to Panama City
~ist year. This versatile artist


wore a similarly fashioned
gown of mint green. Her bou-
quet of yellow and white
daisies was accented vith
mint green chrysanthemums.
Gwen Ramsey, cousin of the
bride, served as flower girl.
She wore a sleeveless floor
length gown of yellow crepe,
accented with a floral print
collar of chiffon. She carried a
basket of rose petals.
Houston Edward Ramsey,
Jr., brother of the bride,
served as ring bearer. He
. carried a pillow of white satin
bordered in lace.
Virgil Glass of Southport
served as best man. Mark
Collier and Eddie Davis
served as ushers. -
The bride's mother wore a
floor length .gown of pink
crepe with a high-rise waist-
line and sheer chiffon sleeves
with brocaded roses. She wore
white daisy corsage to com-
plete her attire.
The bridegroom's mother
was attired in a floor length
gown of blue floral print with a
V neckline and long sleeves.
She also wore a white daisy
corsage.
The bride's maternal grand-
mother, Ms. Ruby Laing of
Grand Ridge, wore a yellow
floral print double knit gown
with yellow chiffon sleeves. To
complement her outfit she
wore a corsage of yellow car-
nations. The bride's paternal
grandmother, Mrs. G. W.
Ramsey, wore a floor length
gown of mint green crepe with
a lace-overlaid bodice and
lace sleeves. She also wore a
yellow carnation corsage.
Billy Joe Rich, Jr. and the
bride were responsible for the
decorations in the church and
social hall.
RECEPTION
Following the wedding a
reception was held in the
church social hall. The bridal
table, centered with the
bride's cake, was decorated
in the yellow, green and white
color scheme. Mrs. Dale Lee,
sister of the groom, and Jan
Clenney served the bride's
cake. ". '
Two candle 'tees entwined
with lily of the valley stood at
each end of the bride's table.
An arch entwined with leather
leaf fern formed a backdrop
for the table.
The punch table was ela-


Mr. and Mrs. Marlen Eugene Taylor


borately decorated with a
silver punch bowl and silver
candelabra at each end of the
table. The candelabra fea-
tured arrangements of yellow
and white daisies. Serving
punch were Brenda and Linda
Rushing.
The groom's cake was
served by Donna Pitts and
Mrs. H. C. Thomason, Jr.,
sister of the groom.
Greeting guests at the bridal
registry table was Miss Char-
lotte Kindig of Bascom.
Floor hostesses were Mrs.
Kenneth Ellis and Mrs. Mar-
garet Harper.
The bride chose a street
length white eyelet sun dress,
trimmed with yellow ribbon,
accented with a deep ruffle at
the hemline for her traveling
outfit. The couple is now
residing in Port St. Joe after
return from their honeymoon.
OUT-OF-TOWN GUESTS
Out-of-town guests were:


Kiwanis Lt. Gov.


Visits PSJ Club


Kiwanis Lt. Governor-
designate Bob Davis of St.
Andrew, brought a delegation
of members from his club with
him in making a visit to the
Port St. Joe Kiwanis Club
Tuesday. Coming with Davis
were John Hentz, Bob Shea
and David Swedburg.
Davis spoke briefly to the
local club about the coming
year and his hopes for the
district. "We have normally
taken a back seat to the rest of
the state", he said, "but we
are going to make a supreme
effort to be at or close to the
top when the year ends".
Davis called for the coopera-
tion of the local club in
activities and support of the
local club in order to help
reach his goal.
"Several clubs in our dis-
trict can do. better than they
are". Davis said. In order to
help the clubs, Davis said he
has planned training sessions
for all new officers in October.
Davis also alerted the Ki-
wanians to coming visits by
the State President on No-
vember 1 and by the Interna-
tional President on March 3 of
next year.

does landscape, portraits, and
still life paintings.


Guests of the club were Leon
Pollock of Port St. Joe, Fred J.
Kleeb of St. Joe Beach and Bill
Fite of Mexico Beach.


Thank You

Dedicated' to the nurses of
Port St. Joe Municipal Hos-
pital.
Soft hands,
Gentle smiles,
People dressed in white.
Doctor's plan,
Sorting files,
Serving both day and night.
Tenderly caring,
Showing concern,
Funny little caps worn with
pride.
Life's sharing,
All ready to learn.
No pain from them can hide.
Always underpaid.
Hours spent,
To ease the suffering of man.
Never strayed,
Never bent,
Doing more than the average
person can.
Anyone,
Feeling free
Can learn to write a verse.
All's done,
We see
Only God can make a nurse.
By W. K. Johnson


You Are Cordially Invited to Attend

LONG AVENUE

Baptist Church
Corner Long Ave. and 16th St.

SUNDAY SCHOOL ................. 9:45A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ................ 11:00A.M.
CHURCH TRAINING ............... 5:45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .............. 7:00P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday).... 7:00 P.M.


Rev. J. C. ODUM,
Pastor


Jerome Cartier,
Minister of Music


Ms. Ruby Laing of Grand
Ridge; Mr. and Mrs. Fred
Taylor of Eastpoint; Harley
and Charlotte Kindig of Bas-
com; Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy
Medlock, Mr. and Mrs. Ken-
nith Wester, all of Marianna;
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Scott of
Abbeville, Ala.; Mr. and Mrs.
R. G. Norris of Mississippi;
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Watford of
Pensacola; Idell Talbert of
Apalachicola; Mr. and Mrs.
Bill Wester of Marianna;
Donna Griffin of Grand
Ridge; and Lisa Mudd and
Virgil Glass of Southoort.


Bowman


Alabama Choir at


Fina Plans Methodist Church


Revealed


Mr. and Mrs. Martin H.
Bowman announce the final
wedding plans for their daugh-
ter, Sharon Rose, to Gary Carl
Larson, son of Carl B. Lar-
son and Mrs. Donald Dean 0-
Conner of Orlando.
The wedding will be on Sat-
urday, August 27th, at 10
o'clock in the morning at
Mead Gardens, 1252 Denning
St., Winter Park. The Rev.
David Taylor of Winter Park
will be officiating at the
ceremony.
The reception will follow
immediately at the Lockhaven
Neighborhood Community
Center, 610 North Lake For-
mosa Drive, Orlando.
No local invitations will be
sent but all friends and rela-
tives are cordially invited to
attend the wedding and recep-
tion.

Mission

Group I

Meets
Mission Group I of the First
United Methodist Church met
August 16 in the home of Mrs.
Edwin Ramsey with fifteen
members present.
Mrs. Floyd Roberts opened
the meeting with prayer and a
thought for the day. The final
chapter in the life of Susanna
Wesley was given by Mrs.
Robert King. Many daughters
have done virtuously but Su-
sanna Wesley excelled them
all.
Following this, the benedic-
tion closed the meeting.


The Youth Choir of Grimes
United Methodist Church of
Dothan, Alabama, will pre-
sent a concert at the First
United Methodist Church of
Port St. Joe this Sunday,
August 21, at 7:30 p.m. The
choir is under the direction of
Rev. Danny Barfield, pastor
of the Grimes United Metho-
dist Church. Rev. Bar-
field has been in services in
Port St. Joe several times
previously.
The public is invited to


LISA HAGLER

Celebrates Her

First Birthday

Lisa Christine Hagler cele-
brated her first birthday on
August 6 in the home of her
aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs.
David Hagler. She is the
daughter of Hubert and Sue
Hagler of 521 Third Street.


Migratory birds in Asia cross the Himalayas, the world's
highest mountains.


attend this special service
announced Rev. Johnie Mc-
Curdy, local pastor.


Is Now Six

Miss Pamelia D. Julius will
celebrate her sixth birthday
tomorrow, August 19. She is
the daughter of Patricia A.
Julius and Frazier Miller. Her.
grandparents are Gus Miller
of Port St. Joe and Mr. and
Mrs. Eddie Julius of Apalachi-
cola.


Pamelia D. Julius


PAGE FOUR


VACATION

















Suntan lotion,

First Aid Supplies

Suntan lotions and creams, insect
repellents, first aid supplies and cold
remedies are now on sale at low prices
for summer.


SMITH'S

Pharmacy f

Drive-In Prescription Windco >

Phone 227-5111


Uffi








THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 1977


By BRUCE A. SMATHERS,
Florida Secretary of State

Better Know Your Law:
Help For Victims of Crime


All Stars Receive Tourney Trophi


These Dixie Youth League all-stars, which represented
Port St. Joe in the state play-offs, received their tournament
trophies early this week. The young baseball players are
shown with the Sub-District championship trophies and
another trophy given each boy in appreciation for their
efforts by local citizens. The presentation was made Monday
afternoon at the Dixie Youth League park by Representative
William J. Rish. Holding the trophies are, front row, left to


right: Billy Williams, David Bearden, Scott B
Davidson and Bo Burke. Second row, Rep.
Kerigan, Pat May, Ernie Bryan, Alan Sisk, I
Terry Woullard and Treace Parker. In the bac
Jim Beaman, left, and Ernie Bryan, managers..
the picture was made were Frankie William
Cooley, bat boy and Jim Cooley, coach.


Help Stop


Crime In


Your Home


Think about the shock, the
'heartbreak and the anger that
*you would experience if you
came home one evening and
found that your residence had
,been burglarized. Think about
your valuables-including
moments that you've collect-
ed and cherished over the
years-being stolen or wan-
tonly destroyed. Think about
the possibility of walking in on
a burglar while he was ran-
sacking your home at night!
Am I trying to scare you?


: Spear Fishing Is Good,

Mike Miller and Ronnie Young brought home these two
large Jew Fish recently after a fishing trip to the Jaycee reef
in the Gulf of Mexico. The largest of the two fish weighed 300
pounds and the small one weighed in at 75 pounds. The
picture is sort of indistinct since it was a color photograph
and color pictures don't reproduce too well.

Over Half of Women

Now In Work Force


Almost half of the married
women in the nation now work
.in jobs covered by social
security, according to Dave
Robinson, social security re-
presentative for Gulf County.
Over 22 million married
women 47.1 percent of them
have jobs outside their
homes compared to 43.6 per-
cent 10 years ag6, according to
the U.S. Department of Labor.
Nine out of 10 jobs are covered
" by social security.
"Working women build soc-
:'al security disability, survi-
vors, retirement, and Medi-
/ care protection for themselves
and their families," Robinson
said.
Monthly social security
benefits can be paid to a wife
on her work record even if her


husband keeps working.
To get social security disa-
bility payments, disabled
workers generally need 61/2
years of work covered by
social security with at least 5
years of it in the 10 years
before the disability began.
"But workers disabled before
31 may be eligible for pay-
mentg with as little as 11/2
years of work covered by
social security, depending on
age," Robinson said. Medi-
care starts for most people at
65, he noted. "But disabled
people under 65 can get Medi-
care if they've been entitled to
social security disability bene-
fits for at least 24 consecutive
months." he said.
A Classified Ad Is A Bargain


First United
Methodist Church
Constitution and Monument
Port St. Joe, Fla.
JOHNIE W. McCURDY, Minister
CHURCH SCHOOL ................... 9:45 A.M.
PREACHING SERVICE ...... 11A.M. & 7:00 P.M..
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP... 5:30 P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) .... 7:30 P.M.




HIGHLAND VIEW

BAPTIST CHURCH

Corner of Fourth St. & Second Ave.
SUNDAY SCHOOL ................... 9:45 A.M.
WORSHIP SERVICES ..... 11:00 A.M. &7:30 P.M.
CHURCH TRAINING (Sunday) ......... 6:30 P.M.
MID-WEEK PRAYER (Wednesday) .... 7:30 P.M.
Nursery Provided Rev. William N. Stephens
Pastor


No. I am hoping


I For years, the victims of
crime were Florida's forgot-
ten citizens. Everyone was
too busy worrying about the
lHH rehabilitation of the crimi-
nals to pay much attention to

Consider using the following
anti-burglary procedures to
help create the impression
that someone's home when
you're out during the day or
evening.
1) Don't leave messages on
the door or mailbox indicating
your absence.
es 2) Use electric timers to
turn house lights and a radio
on and off during evening
urkett, Paul hours.
Rish, Pat 3) Enlist the help of neigh-
David Pace, bors to keep mail, newspapers
ground are and ads from collecting while
Absent when you are away.
ns, Michael 4) Remember that unat-
-Star photo tended yards and unmowed
lawns over an extended period
of time are signs that the resi-
dents might be away.
5) Consider also that when
empty trash cans or when no
trash cans are set out on
collection day, it is an indica-
tion that the residents might
not be home.
6) Advise your local police,
as well as a reliable neighbor,
when your home will be unoc-
cuped for any length of time
to make you and where you can be reach
__I" . .. .1


aware tat you coma very wen
become a victim or burglary. I
would also like you to think
about-and, more important-
ly, practice-techniques that
can help you reduce the possi-
bility of becoming a burglary
victim!
Most burglars won't take a
second look at a house or
apartment that appears to be
occupied. To discourage
these criminals from selecting
your residence as a target,


ed.
In addition to these crime
resistance tips, your local
police may have other useful
anti-burglary sfiggestions,
says Clarence M. Kelley,
Director of the FBI.


SHeLOPCRS
STOP am


those killed or maimed by
criminal acts. Finally,
thanks to the wisdom of the
1977 legislature many vic-
tims can also gain some
measure of rehabilitation
through the wide-ranging
"Florida Crimes Compensa-
tion Act."
This Act provides "aid,
care, and support" for the
"many innocent persons"


Tides


The following are tide pre-
dictions for St. Joseph's Bay
for the upcoming week. The
information is furnished by
the U. S. Weather Bureau sta-
tion in Apalachicola.


Thurs:.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.


High Low
2:03A 7:34A
1:45P 6:16P
2:04A 10:48
2:36A 12:49P
3:18A 2:04P
4:11A 3:07P
5:11A 4:04P
6:14A 4:59P


who "suffer personal injury
or death as a direct result of
criminal acts or in their
efforts to prevent crime."
Through the creation of the
Florida Crimes Compensa-
tion Commission within the
Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services, the
Act authorizes those eligible
for financial awards -
victims, intervenors. surviv-
ing family members and de-
pendents to seek remuner-
ation. The Commission
reviews all such claims,
including requests for
emergency awards, which
can be as high as $500.
Payment of these awards is
accomplished through a


special Crimes Compensa-
tion Trust Fund, supplied
through appropriation by the
legislature and through fines
and forfeitures collected
from criminals. The Act also
allows the Parole and Proba-
tion Commission to require
restitution and payment
from convicts before
granting them parole.
These measures should
provide long overdue relief
to previously neglected
victims of crime.
As your Secretary of State,
I safeguard all original laws,
and thus report to you on leg-
islation affecting you.
(AFNS)


Annie's Restaurant
Phone 227-7561 Highway 98
(Across from Duren's Economy Store
Special Saturday ...
11 o'clock to 1 o'clock ,
Scallops, French Fries, Cole Slaw

and Hushpuppies $3.50

or Spaghetti and Meatballs... $2.95


Free Corn Dog

I with this coupon for children 12 years and I
younger with parent. 1 per child. 9 AM to 5 PM 1
S aturday only. August 20, 1977.
m m m m m m m


) Did You Know?
That Social Security will pay $255.p0 as a death
benefit to most survivors?
That wartime veterans have other benefits-.
available to their family?

The Comforter Funeral Home
would like to inform you of VA and Social
Security benefits.

The Comforter Family
has been serving Gulf County and surrounding
area for 31 years with ministry to bereaved:
families and with traditional quality service. .
The Comforter Family will continue to serve
our area with the same personal service
you've come to expect. Come by and visit with:,
us to learn more about financial benefits. The
director is available to counsel. ... .to help... "
and to reassure. These are the services your;
funeral director at the Comforter Funeral ..
Home has been trained to give.

Call 227-3511
at any time day or night. Stop in at 6th and
Long Avenue for your free copy of a book en-
titled "Guidelines". You will find :'
it reassuring and informative.
The Comforter Funeral Home is !!
dedicated to serve. i "


Comforter Funeral Homer
Phone 227-3511 601 Long Ave.


This Week End


Over 165 Patterns and

All Fabrics Solids to choose from
Mix and Match
Reg. $2.98 $759
Reduced to One Table of

Reg. $1.98 $ 59 Simplicity Patterns

2 for $100


Leigh Anne's Fabric

(next door to Boyles Building)


WHITE -WESTINGHOUSE

MAJOR APPLIANCES!


PAGE EIVE











THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 18. 1977


NSR Smith Board Sets Free and
Completes


Catfish Supper!

Greg Burkett caught this huge catfish
,Monday afternoon while fishing in one of the


Legc

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON SCHOOL BI
UMARY OF 1977-78 GULF COUNTY SCHOOL
1 BUDGET AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TI
Pursuant to the.provisions of Section 237.081
statutes, the Gulf County School Board, by action
t its meeting on August 15, 1977, adopted a tentati
ull County School Board Budget, a summary
budget is hereinafter set forth. The proposed ad va
village levies are 8.00 for the Operating Budget a
bt Service.
The Gulf County School Board shall meet on
1977, at 3:00o'clock P.M. EDST, at the School Boar
Room, Gulf County Court House, Port St. Joe, Flori
purpose of a public hearing concerning the afores
tively adopted budget.
SUMMARY OF TENTATIVE BUDGET
OPERATING
,'4. BUDGET for SUPPORT and MAINTENANCE
:- of SCHOOLS:
A. Balances on hand beginning of year:
1. C ash ........................... .. $
Q B. Receipts. State and Federal ........ .... 2
Local Funds . ... . .... ........
Other Sources ..........................
TOTAL RECEIPTS AND BALANCES .. $3
C. Proposed Expenditures:
1. Instructional Services ..... ...... .. $1
2. Instructional Media ................ :
3. General Administration ........... .
| 4.. School Administration ... '
'5. Fiscal Services |............ ...
o 6. Transportation .. .............
7. Operation Services ................
8. Maintenance Services .............
9. Central Services............ ..
10. Community Services ................ ,
'.- TOTAL INSTRUCTION AND
SUPPORT SERVICES ................. 3
OUTGOING TRANSFERS,............,
RESERVESE ... ................
TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS, TRANSFERS
And BALANCES ..................... $3


2. BUDGET FOR DEBT SERVICE:
A. Cash Balances Total ......... ..........
B. Receipts:
" State Sources ....................
Local Sources ........................
Incoming Transfers .. ............
TOTAL RECEIPTS.....................
TOTAL RECEIPTS, TRANFERS
and Balances ... ........ .........
C. Proposed Expenditures:
::: Debt Service . ... ....... .......
Outgoing Transfers .............
Balances ..... .... ......... ..... .
TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS, TRANSFERS,
S And Balances ................. ... .......


3. BUDGET FOR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT:
- A. Balances ......... ... ....... ....... .. $
B. 1. Anticipated Receipts, State ...........,
-2: Transfers from Operations ........
3. Reserve for Encumbrance ..;......
TOTAL RECEIPTS, TRANSFERS
And BALANCES ....................:..
C. Proposed Expenditures:
1. Total Capital Outlay ...............
2. Balance .... .. .. .. ..........
TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS, TRANSFERS
And BALANCES ...... ............. $


4

C
'C


BUDGET. FOR SPECIAL REVENUE
LUNCHROOM FEDERAL ..
A. Balance ..... ...................... $
. B. 1. Anticipated Receipts, State- Federal $
2, Local Sources ...............


-

ponds at the St. Joseph Bay Country Club. The
12 pound, four ounce catfish is an example of
what a steady diet of golfballs can do for a
fish. From what we hear, the catfish and
others in the ponds never lack for a chewy
golf ball to munch on. -Star photo


ii Ac

BUDGET
L BOARD
HERONN


advertising
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT. FOUR
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.


u CASE NO 77 122
1, Florida FLORI6A ENGINEERING ASSO.
approved CIATES. INC
r Plalntlil
ve 1977-78 vs Plan ,
of which EDDIE 41ELLEY, Inalvidually,
lorem tax SHELLBit-T CONSTRUCTION AND
DEVELOPMENT CO INC., and WIL
ind .85 for LIAMA. WALKER, II, THE TRUSTEE,
NAMES AS""
august 25, Defendanls
"uust 2 NOTICE OF ACTION
d Meeting TO. Eddie Shelley
da for the Carpenter Road
aid tenta- East Flshskill (Hopewell Junct.)
New York 12533
Shellbuill Construction ano Deve
Iopment Co. Inc ,
22 West 48th Street
New York, NY 10036
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action 10 impose and enforce a lien on
the following property in Gull County,
Florida:
81,602.78 Beginning at the SW corner of Sec-
lion 11. T9S, RIOW. Gull County.
2,337,100.30 Florida; thence N 0 degrees 16 rmin.
855,870.00 ules 3 seconds E along the West line
58 ,600. of said Sec. 11 for 1873.61 feel to a
8,0.00. point that is 3.106 39 feel from the NW
1,333,173.08 corner ol said Sec II. thence S 89
degrees 43 minutes 57 seconds E for
555.53 feet to a curve concave to the
,893,372.00 West having a radius of 1288.92 feet,
141,904 a delta angle of 2 degrees 56 minutes
143,494.00 a 58seconds and a chord bearing of S
231,206.00 13 degrees 17 minutes 5 seconds W.
263 828.00 thence rur~Wib1ng said curve for an
82':,252: eare distance of 66.35 feel, thence N
82,252.60 89 degrees 38 minutes 47 seconds E
143,147.00 for 1430 38 lee. thence N 0 degrees
' 21 minutes 13 seconds W for 76.69
298,977.00 feet, thence N 89 degrees38 minutes
98,878.00 47 seconds E for 466.69 feet thence N
17 ,975.00 0 degrees 21 minutes 13 seconds E
12,0.00 for 157.29'feet, thence N 89 degrees
12,000W00. 38 minutes:47 seconds E for 511.27
feet, thence N 29 degrees 56 minutes
S 40 seconds E for 26.55 feet, thence S
,185,129.00 60 degrees 3 minutes 20 seconds E
. *n12 n for 410.00 feet, thence S 29 degrees 56
77,124.27 minutes 40 seconds W for 19.03 feet,
70,919.81 thence'S60 degrees'3 minutes 20 sec-
ends E for 476.00 feet, to the easterly
line of Gulf County, Florida, thence
3,333,173.08 29 degrees 56 minutes 40 seconds W
along said County line for 4481.49
feet to the Northerly r-w lineof SR 30
(66' r-w) being a curve concaved to
222,410.47 the North, having a radius of 2342.62
S feet, a- delta angle of 16 degrees 18
minutes 14 seconds, a chord of 664.36
266,901.15 feet and a chord bearing of S 83 de-
89,874.00 agrees 24' minutes 37 seconds W,
31, 876.32 thence run along said curve for an
31,876.32 arc distance of 666.61 feet to a point
388,651.47 of reverse curvature having a radius
Sof 1841. feet, a delta angle of 14
degrees 0 minutes 0 seconds, a tan-
611,061.94 gent distance of 226.05 feet, and run
.. along said curve, being the Norther-
ly r-w line of SR 30 (66' r-w), for an
347,932.41 arc distance of '449.85 feet, thence S
48,800.00 76 degrees 45 minutes 30 seconds W,
214,329.53 along the Northerly r-w of SR 30 for
899.84 feet to the West line of Sec. 14
T9s, R10W, Gulf County, Florida,
S thence'N 0 degrees 16 minutes 3
611,061.94 seconds E along said section line for
2846.94feet tothep.o.b. All lying and
being in Sections 11 and 14, T9S, R10
W. Gulf County, Florida, containing
115,874.43 162.71 acres more or less In Section
101,434.38 11, and 161.15 acres more or less Ii ,
47,200.00 Section 14.'
S7, 0 has been flied against you, Eddie Shelley
57,82M.0 and Shellbuilt Construction and Develop-
ment Co; 4nc., jointly and severally, and
each of you are required to serve a
322,334.81 copy of your written defenses, if any, to
it on 5


157,366.00
164,968.81

322,334.81


20,623.82
413,621.95
119,343.57


TOTAL RECEIPTS AND BALANCES ...... 553,589.34
C. Proposed Expenditures?
TOTAL-LUNCHROOM ............... 385,046.00
TOTAL-FEDERAL................... 168,543.34
TOTAL EXPENDITURES ................ 553,589.34

TOTAL VILLAGE TO BE LEVIED ON THE 1977 ASSESS-
lENT ROLL TO PRODUCE NECESSARY REVENUE FOR
H -THOSE BUDGETS FOR THE ENSUING FISCAL YEAR
?ARE:
A. District Operating 8.00
B. Debt Service Budget 0.85
TOTAL 8.85
Complete details of each: separate part of the school.
budget summarized above are on file and are available for
public inspection at the Office of the County Superintendent
j f Schools at the County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, and will be
'..available for such public hearing together with all supporting
statements and information. All interested persons are
.,. cordially invited to participate in this public hearing and
discuss the School Program and budget for this County for
the ensuing year.
I BOARD OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
- 'aY: B. Walter Wilder, Superintendent


ROBERT M. MOORE, Esq.,
P.O. Box 248
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Plaintiff's Attorney, on or before the 26th
day of August, 1977, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's Attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a De-
fault will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on the 22nd day of July, 1977.
GEORGE Y. CORE,
Circuit Court Clerk
By: T. G. Scheffer, Deputy Clerk
4t 7-28

IN THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY
IN RE:'The Marriage of
GEORGE W. BOWMAN, husband,
and
CHRISTINE M. BOWMAN, wife.
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION#
TO: GEORGE W. BOWMAN
YOU 4 t OTIFIED that an action
for divod'lei(as'been filed against you
and you are required to serve a copy of
your wI defenses, if any, to it on
-'David skin, Post Office Box 185,
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465, plaintiffs
SAttorney, on or before September 9,1977,
and file the original with the Clerk of this
Court eie,911fore service on plaintiff's
atforne~~~-or. Immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against'you.for the relief demand In the
complait'or petition .
WITNE'St my hand and the seal of this
Court on August 3, 1977.
GEORGE Y. CORE,
CLERKIOF CIRCUIT COURT
-s- George 'Y. Core
(SEAL) 4t8-11


NOTICE
Meeting of the City Commission for
the purpose of discussion of the proposed
uses of Federal Revenue Sharing Funds
for Fiscal Year 1977-78 will be held


Training
Navy Seaman Recruit Rob-
ert L. Smith, Jr., son of Mr.
and Mrs. Robert L. Smith of
513 10th St., has completed
recruit training at the Naval
Training Center, Orlando.
During the eight-week train-
ing cycle, trainees studied
general military subjects de-'
signed to prepare them for
further academic and on-the-
job' training. in one of -the
Navy's 85 basic' occupational
fields.
Included in their studies
were seamanship, close order
drill, Naval history and first
aid.
He joined the Navy in June,
1977.


For

Ambulance

Call

227-23111


August 9. August 16, and September 6,
1977. at 8 00 P M for persons wisning to
Issue wrilen or oral comments. Meeting
will be neld In the City Commission
Room, City Hall.
*s- Michael Ji Wright,
City Auditor and Clerk 3t8-4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY
IN RE: The Marriage of
ARTHUR LEE WALKER, Husband,
Petitioner,
and
JOSEPHINE WALKER, Wife,
Respondent.
* _NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JOSEPHINE WALKER
whose address is
225 First Court
Orange Grove Project
Mobile, Alabama
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, If
any,to iton Cecil G. Costin, Jr., 221 Reid
Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456,
Petitioner's attorney, on or before Sep-
tember 6, 1977, and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Peltiloner's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for the-
relief demanded in the Petition
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on July 28, 1977.
GEORGE Y. CORE, .. .
As Clerk of the Court ;
By s Margaret 5. Core, .
AsDepuT Clei k . t

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR.
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
,STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY.
FLORIDA FIRST NATIONAL BANK, a
-national Banking association with its
principal office In Port St. Joe, Florida,
Plaintiff, /
vs.
DOLLIE C. KEYS and ERNEST. L.
KEYS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Ernest L. Keys
P.O 0. Box 2253
APO New York, New York 09194
and Dollie C. Keys
P. O. Box 2253
APO New York, New'York 09194
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property in Gulf County, Flor-
ida:
Lot Seventeen (17), Block One Thou-
sand Six (1006) according to the re-
corded plat of the City of Port St.
Joe, on file in the Office of Clerl of
the Circuit Court, Gulf County, Flor-
i da, In O.R. Book 4, Page 117 -"
has been 'filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any, to it on'Fred N. Witten,
Plaintiff's Attorney, whose address is
303 4th Street, P.O. Box 447, Port St. Joe,
Florida, on or, before September 12, 177,
and file theoriginal with the Clerk of this
Court either before service upon Plain-
tiff's Attorney or Immediately thereaf-
ter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demandedd in
tne Complaint or Petition
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on this 91h day of August, 1977


.


Reduced Lunch Criteria


The Gulf County School
Board has announced its-. po-
licy for free meals, reduced
price meals and free milk for
children unable to pay the full
price of meal and milk served
under the National School
Lunch, School Breakfast, and
Special Milk Programs.
Local school officials have
.adopted the family size in-
come criteria shown in the
table printed with this article,
for determining eligibility.
Children from' families
whose income is at or below
the levels shown are eligible
for free or reduced price
meals. An extra one half pint
of free milk is available to
those who are eligible for free
meals, except at meal time. In
addition, families not meeting
these criteria but with other
unusual expenses due to unus-
ually high medical expenses,
shelter costs 'in excess of 30
percent of income, special
education expenses due to the
mental or physical condition
of a child, and disaster or
casualty losses are urged to
apply.

Application forms are avail-
able at the principal's office in
each school. The information
provided on the application is
confidential and will be used
only for the purpose of deter-
mining eligibility. Applica-
tions may be submitted at any
time during the year. The
application forms contain a
statement above the space for
signature certifying that all
information furnished in the
application is being made in
connection with the receipt of
Federal funds, 'that school
officials may, for cause, ver-
ify the information in the
application, and that deliber-
ate misrepresentation of infor-
mation may subject the appli-
cant to prosecution under
applicable State and criminal
statutes.
In certain cases foster chil-
dren are also eligible for these
benefits. If a family has foster
childrer.living with them and
wishes to apply for such meals
and milk for them, they should
contact the school.
tUnder the provisions of the
policy the principal will re-
view applications and deter-
mine eligibility. If a parent is
dissatisfied with the ruling of
the official, he may wish to
discuss the decision with the
determining official on an
informal basis. If he wishes to
make a formal appeal, he
may make a. request either
orally or in writing tQ Temple
national origin.
Each school and the office of


VISITING WITH GORHAMS
Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Ladner
and grandchildren, Christi
and Charles Edward Hopkins,
of Picayune, Mississippi, were
Visiting Mr. and Mrs. Ernie
Gorham, 712 Woodward Ave.,
last weekend.

GEORGE Y. CORE,
Circuit Court Clerk
By Tomi Jo Scheffer, Depuly Clerk
41C 8 11


Watson, Administrative As-'
sistant, P.O. Box 969, Port St.
Joe, Fla. 32456 or telephone
229-6124 for a hearing to
appeal the decision. The poli-
cy contains an outline of the
hearing procedure.
If a family member be-
comes unemployed or if fam-
ily size changes, the family
should contact the school to
file a new application. Such
,changes may make the chil-
dren of the family eligible for
reduced price meals, or for
additional benefits such as
free meals' and milk if the
family income falls at or
below the levels shown above.
In the operation of child
feeding programs, no child
will be discriminated against
because of race, sex, color, or


B78-13'
C78-14
D78-14
E78-14
F78-14


$22.00
23.00
24.00
26.00
28.00


$1.82
2.01
2.09
2.23
2.37


the Superintendent have a which may be reviewed by
copy of the complete policy any interested party.


Free Meals and Free Milk


Mon.
$ 261
344
425
507
582
657
725
794
885
917
978
1039


Ann.
$ 3,140
4,130
5,110
6,090
6,990
7,890
8,710
9,530
10,270
11,010
11,740
12,470


60 730


Family Bi-
Size Week Wk.
1 $ 60 $120
2 79 .158
'3 98 196
4 117 234
5 134 268
6 '151 .393
7 167 335
8 183 366
9 197 395
'10 211 423
11 225' 451
12 239 479
For each
add't'l
member
add 14. 28


G78-14
H78-14
G78-15
H78-15
L78-15


$29.00
31.00
30.00
32.00
34.00


All prices plus tax and old tire.
Whitewall add $2 to $3 depending on size.


DOUBLE BELTED
WHITEWALLS

Long mileage 1977 new-car tires
Sas low as...


Sizes
Sizes Sizes H78-14,15;
B78-14,C78-14, F78-14,15; J78-14,15;
E78-14 G78-14,15 L78-15

*33 '3850 4350

Plus $1.88 to Plus $2.42 to Plus $2.80 to
$2.26 F.E.T. $2.65 F.E.T. $3.12 F.E.T.
and old tire. and old tire. aneoid tire.
Blackwalls $2 less.


PICKUP, VAN
& RV TIRES
'Firestone
TRANSPORT

S6.70-15

Blackwall, 6-ply rating:
All prices plus $2.41 to $3.44
F.E.T. and exchange tire.
TUBE-TYPE TUBELESS
Size Price Size Price
6.50-16 $30.55 7.00-141 $34.83
7.00-15 34.72 6.70-15 35.47
7.00-16 35.91 7.00-151 39.82
7.50-16 39.82


Plasi
TRASH
LINE


52$
forv
Limit one bc
at this low
Additic
$3.98 pet


Prices shown in this ad available at Firestone stores. Compel

CHARGE 'EIV

We also honor: *.BankAmerica
Ameria


Reduced Price Meals
Bi-
Week Wk. Mon. Ann.
$117 $235 $ 510 $ 6,120
154 309 670 8,050
191 383 .830 9,970
228 456 990 11,880
262 524 1135 13,630
295 591 1281 15,380
326 653 1415 16,980
357 714 1548 18,580
385 770 1669 20,030
.412 825 1789 21,470
440 880 1907 22,890
467 935 2025 24,310



27 54 118 1,420


10 to 52



than our reg. June prices per s of 4

Radial Deluxe Champion

WHITEWALLS

as low as




3 6RegJune Reg. NOW .
EACH
SizeBR78-13.
GR78-15 57Plus $2.0.00 47.F.E.T. 2





All prices plus tax and old tire. '
Regular June $40 each
POPULAR PRICES'
Whitewall
IReg. Junei Rag. NOW F.E.T.
Size ts each) each) (e$ch











SER78-14 $48.00 $41.00Limit one$2.41
FR78-14 50.00 430 2.54tth
GR78-14 55.00 0 2.69
HR78-14 60.00 50.00 288
GR78-15 57.00 47.00 2-79
HR78-15 61.00 5100 2.96cap

All prices plus tax and old tire .







SOpen 2-gallon

CAN BlanS CAN
RS
Only
3-bushel
20-gallon
trash cans.


low price.
Additional
$2.98 each.
ox of 52
price. 8-inch flexible
mnbl reversible spout


titively priced wherever you see the Firestone sign.
pl Open an -*e**
account
ird Master Charge Diners Club
can Express CaeBlanche


PATE'S SERVICE CENTER


Phone 229-1291 214 Monument Ave.


PAGE SIX


Gym Shorts


Shorts


Gym Shoes


Socks


Shark"

Gym Shorts




Phone 229-4805




323 REID AVENUE

I IM MM-st------- ---rr -j-l-rjrrjlj JJJ~J--JrJfJMJ~r


- - - - - - - -


$2.53
2.73
2.59
.2.79
3.09


I


I









THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 1977 PAGE SEVEN


Raffield's Hosts Tourney


Port St. Joe's now-famous
Raffield's industrial league
softball team will be host to
the Regional Tournament this
week end. The regional tour-
naments are the prelude to the
World Tournament which will
be played on Labor Day week
end. This year, the World


Tournament will be played in
Birmingham.
The tournament will be
played in Lynn Haven, with
the 10 top teams from Florida
and Alabama participating.
The top two teams coming
out of the tournament will go
to the World Tournament in


Birmingham.
Raffield's team will debut in
the tournament Friday after-
noon at 1:00 p.m., EST, when
they will meet Metro of Mo-
bile, Alabama. The Mobile
team is sponsored by Interna-
tional Paper Company.


Bowling Leagues Organizing


High School, as the school maintenance force, under the
direction of their new chief, Carey Floore, gets the school
plants and equipment ready for the start of school, which will
open its doors throughout the county on Monday, August 29.
-Star photo


Men's Assoc.
Men interested in the
Men's Bowling Association for
-the winter leagues are asked
to meet Monday night, August
22, at 7:30 p.m., at St; Joe
Bowling Lanes. All interested
men are urged to attend.


Gulf Co. Ladies
The first meeting.of the Gulf
County Ladies' Bowling Lea-
gue will be held Tuesday,
August 23, 7:30 p.m., at the


residence of Debbie Burns, 316
Duval St.
At least one member of each
team is requested to be pre-
sent. Any new bowlers who
wish to join are urged to be
present, or contact Debbie
Burns at 229-5451 or Bertha
Clayton at 229-5561.

Ladies' Winter
The Ladies' Winter Bowling
League will have an organiza-
tional meeting Thursday, night
at 7:30 at St, Joe Bowling
Lanes. Anyone interested in


bowling, whether a regular
bowler or a new bowler, is
invited to attend.
If you cannot attend at this
time. call the Bowling Lanes
at this time. 229-3781. for your
team placement.


In the 19th century beard-
wearing was prescribed for
men with delicate throats.


IN MEMORIAL.
In loving memory of my
husband and other father, Jim
Sealey, who departed this life
four years ago, August 4, 1973.
It only takes a little space, to'
write how much we miss you..
But it will take until eternity to
forget the day we lost you. -'
often sit and think of you when
I am all alone, for memory is
the only friend that grief can:
call its own.
Sadly missed by wife, Ver-.
ona, and sons, James and
John, and daughters, Selma,I
Sara and Dorthey.




R.A.M.-Regular convoca-
tion of St. Joseph Chapter No.:
56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd Moni
days, 8 p.m. All visiting com-
panions welcome;
J. L. SIMS, H.P.
E. William McFarland, Sec..

There will be a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe
Lodge Nol 111, F. & A.M.,
every first and third Thursday
at 8:00 p.m.
F. C. CHANDLER, W.M. "
F. E. Brogdon, Sec.


LOOKING


FOR A JOB? A


LOOKING


FOR HELP?


Sears Free Spirit 10-speed
bicycle, good cond., $50. Large
dog house, $40. Call 648-6710.
2t 8-18

19' boat and trailer, 85 h.p.
motor, works good. Excellent
for offshore fishing. If inter-
ested, call 229M506.

Piano,: lumber, antiques,
,plants. Call 229-6402. tfc 8-18

Will demolish buildings and
garages for the materials.
Woody Busby, 229-6402.
tfc 8-18


One used 12" b&w TV $49.95
cash; two all-wood end tables
with drawer, exc. cond. $39.95
ea. cash; one used wood and
Herculon sofa and chair
$199.95 terms; one used patch-
work sofa and chair $279.95
terms. Badcock Furniture
Co., 414 Reid Ave. Itc 8-18

74 model Queen Craft boat
with 20 h.p. Mercury motor,
elec. start, Mini Kota 555 foot
control elec. motor, swivel
seats, galv. trailer, used very
little. Call after 5:00 229-5296.
tfc 8-4

3 year old Damation. Needs
a new home. Great pet with
children. Contact 229-6962.
tfc-B-11

Books--Select from thou-
sands of paperbacks up to $2
value, your choice 25c. New
hardbackss up to $14 values,
.your choice $1. Will swap on a
.'2 for 1 basis. Edgewater
Shoppes, Mexico Beach.
L{- tfc 5-12

New and used lawnmowers
for sale. Lawn mowers, tillers
and garden tractors repaired.
Economy Motors' & Garden
Center, 301 Hwy. 98, HV.
229-6001. tfc 4-28.


Future II Singer sewing
machine, with desk cabinet.
229-8173. tfc 8-4

One 16" x 60" white cast iron
bath tub, left hand. $40. 229-
1331 or 648-4750. tfc 7-28.
For Your
MARYKAY
Cosmetics
Call
Wanda Brown
229-6132
tfc 4-28

DRY cleaning carpets is
easier, faster and safer with
HOST. Rent our machine. St.
Joe Furniture. 229-1251.
tfc 10-23


1973 Yamaha MX360, good
condition, $400.00. Vhon e227-
5271 days. tfc 6-30

CB Radios, Johnson, Craig,
Surveyor, antennas, base sta-
tions, terms available. West-
ern Auto. tfc 3-4

Country Club membership.,
Phone 229-6119 or 229-6310.
tfc 7-21

FOR STANLEY HOME .
PRODUCTS
Call Betty Gilbert
648-7534
tfc 7-15


Custom-made wooden name
plaques, for mail boxes, front
.gates, door posts, etc. Econo-
Smy Motors & Garden Center,
301 Hwy. 98, HV, 229-6001.

Just arrived: New shipment
plants, including variety of
cacti, ivy, begonias, prayer
plants, ferns, plants suitable
for hanging baskets and many
others. Economy Motors &
Garden Center, 301 Hwy. 98,
Highland View. Call 229-6001.
tfc 5-5

Wide-bed, tilt utility trailer
with manual wench. 229-6971.
tfc 8-11


Bob White quail,
dressed. Phone 227-328


DRAPERIES-Read
and custom made. Lai
section of swatches to
from. Roche's Furnitu
Appliance Store, 209
Ave., phone 227-5271.








3 BR house, brick
central heat and air
washer. Good location
229-6798 after 5 p.m.


3 BR house at 2005
Ave. Call 229-6573 after


Two-story house for
Oak Grove. Call 229-643
occupants at 138 2nd A


Two bedroom block
with 12' x 20' "third be
or den." Call 229-8136
5474 for appointment t


live or
16.


FOR SALE-
FOR SALE --
PORT ST. JOE
3 bedrooms, 2 baths, sun
room, central air, lots of
built-ins, custom built, fully
carpeted. Buy 'owner's
equity and assume mort-
gage.

3 bedrooms, 2 baths, large
closets, family room, 1665
sq. ft. A good buy at $32,000.

3 bedrooms, 2 baths, large
lot at 1101 Garrison Ave:
$37,000.

2 bedrooms, 1 bath, good
condition. 1310 Palm Boule-
vard. $15,000.

2 bedroom house on 2 lots
overlooking St. Joseph Bay.
Excellent buy at $15,000.
FRANK HANNON
Reg. Real Estate Broker
221 Reid Ave. 227-3491
After hours call 648-5364
3tc 8-18


Cottage and two lots, 211 2nd
Ave., Highland View. Corner
lot, 648-5332. tfc 8-4
S3 BR, 2 story, 3 baths, 3,000
sq. ft. living space on the
bayou. 1902 Monument Ave.
Call 227-7221 before six, after
six and on weekends, call 229-
6474. tfc 7-7


tfc 8-11
3 BR, 2 bath, LR, DR, break-
y made fast room, large family room,
rge sel- walk-in pantry, washer, dryer,
choose refrigerator, stove, dishwash-
ire and er, central h-a, w-w carpet,
I Reid garage, on 2 lots. Chain link
fence in back. 815 Woodward
tfc 3-10 Ave. Call 229-8145. tfc 5-5

House, appears small from
S outside, large inside, approxi-
mately 2,300 sq. ft., 3 BR, 2
baths, living room, dining
room, family room & utility
room, carpet and custom
drapes throughout, lots of
'veneer closet space, recently re-
. is- novated, new roof, kitchen
n. Callwith 17' new birch cabinets,

tfc 8-18 dish washer, garbage dis-
tcS posal, newly painted, fenced
5 Long back yard. 229-8173 or 229-6321
5 Log or see at 1031 McClellan Ave.
r 5 p.m. tfc 4-28
tfc 7-28

sale in Perfect family home-with
2orsee pool! 4 BR with 2 full baths.
Ave. Kitchen (with built-ins),
tfc 7-28 curved bar, den combination,
- formal living and dining
c house rooms. Chain link fenced back
edroom yard. Double corner lot. Cen-
or 648- tral h-a. By owner. $41,500.
to see. Port St. Joe. 229-6303. tfc 7-14
2tp 8-11 ---.. --
3 BR, 1 bath, living room,
separate dining room, den,
large kitchen with eating
area. large lot. 619 Garrison
_T.,m| Avenue, phone 227-8751.tfc 5-12


New brick home at 106 Yau-
pon Ave., 3 BR, 2 bath, dining
room, living room, den and
kitchen. Call 227-2291 or 229-
5302. tfc 10-7


Three bedroom, two bath
home in Port St. Joe. Conven-
ient to both schools. Central
air and heat, 2,500 ft. of living
area. Call 639-2781 or 639-5665.
tfc 8-11

Mini ranch farm. Approx. 5
acres. V1 mile from Gulf.
Double-wide trailer-3 BR, 2
full baths-terrific floor plans.
Stall, horse and tack. Canal on
3 sides. Partially cleared and
fenced. Well, septic tank,
water and electricity" in-
cluded. $30,000. Mexico Beach.
229-6303. tfc 7-14
3 BR house, 2 baths, 3 lots on
Palm Blvd. For information
call 227-2181. tfc 11-4






Small building for rent. Can
be used for small business,
office space or storage. Con-
tact Higdon Swatts at 229-7222
or 229-6300. tfc 8-18

One bedroom apartment
with large den and fenced in
yard. 229-3906. tfc 7-28

For Rent Year-Round-2 BR
furnished cottage on Canal St.
at St. Joe Beach. 1 block from
beach. House looks small from
outside, large inside. Can be
seen Saturday, August 13 and
Sunday till noon. tfc 8-11

3 BR house, chain link fence.
Kitchen furnished. Call 227-
7871. 3tc 8-11

No need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture,
229-1251. tfc 10-23

Mobile home sites at Rustic
Sands Campground. Mexico
Beach, $30.00 month. Laundry
and rec hall. 648-3600.
tfc 12-9

Why live in the crowded
city? Move your mobile home
to peace, quiet and tran-
quility. Water, garbage collec-
tions, yard mowed, live lei-
surely. Gulf privileges. Only
VA approved mobile home par
park in Gulf County. Ski
Breeze Meadows Trailer.
Park, 9 miles southeast of
Port St. Joe on Hwy S-30.
Come out .and enjoy the quiet.
Call 229-6105. tfc 5-6
For carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vac, the portable steam car-
pet cleaning system. Avail-
able at Western Auto, phone
227-2271, 219 Reid Ave.
tfc5-19
One or two bedroom trailers
for rent on Canal St., St. Joe
Beach. 648-5650. tfc 5-12

For Rent: Hospital beds,
electric or manual control.
Call 227-7471. tfc 6-30


Furnished exceptionally
nice 2 BR house, queen size
furniture, carpet, automatic
heat, air cond., screen porch,
closed garage, large fenced
yard. 229-6777 after 6 p.m.
tfc 8-4

Attention: Vitro TDY men
and Oak Grove construction
men. We now have two camp-
ers and one apartment for
rent. These units completely
furnished including linens, all
three air conditioned. Come
see at Ski Breeze Camp Sites.
9 miles southeast of Port St.
Joe on Hwy C-30. tfc 8-4





The Gulf County School
Board has the following pub-
lic service employment posi-
tions under its Comprehensive
Employment & Training Act
Program:
Title I
BUS DRIVERS (2)
Age 55 and over
Title VI
BUS DRIVER TEACHER
AID (1)
Age 18 and over
Applicants must have a valid
chauffeur's license, unem-
ployed or underemployed, and
a resident of Gulf County.
Apply only at the Florida
State Employment Service
Office, 401 Long Avenue, Port
St. Joe. It 8-18






1968 Javelin, $250. 229-6532.
Itc 8-18

1968 Chevy Impala station
wagon. $200. Phone 229-8415.
Itp 8-18

1966 Impala Chevrolet, 2 dr.,
at, ps. Phone 229-6563.
2tp 8-11

1969 Plymouth Fury I-4 dr.,
power brakes, power steering
and air. Good cond., 1 owner.
$650.00. 227-7586. tfc 7-28

1975 Chevrolet Impala, 4 dr.,
pb, ps, ac, 350 cu. engine,
22,000 miles. 229-6971.
tfc Btll

1973 Pinto Runabout. Auto-
matic transmission, air condi-
tioned, tape deck. Call 229-
2076. tfc 8-4

1976 Chevy "Bonanza" van,
at, ac, ps, pb, am-fm radio,
tape deck, carpet. Call 227-
8241 between 8 am and 5 pm,
after 5 pm, call 229-6129.
tifc 7-14
1973 T-Bird, full power and
loaded with options. $2,950.00.
For more information call
either 229-4877 or 648-5260.
tfc 7-28


Say You Saw It In The Star


1973 Toyota Corolla .1200, 35 Wanted: School desks, all
mpg. Phone 229-6971. sizes to buy or borrow. Faith
tfc 8-11 Christian School. 229-6707.
2tc -18


THE AMERICAN DREAM
(Open Within 3 Weeks) s
Own your own fully stocked
Jean or Ladies Fashion Shop.
Everything Provided. Your
Cost $17,900. Call Mr. Weeks
collect 904-764-7612.
ltp8-18


SERVICE


Carpentry Work Done
Reasonable Rates
Jimmy Johnsonr
Phone 22776,147
tfc,5-9


ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work Welding
506 First Streetf
Phone 229.6803
Machinist on duty all .day
every day

Taylor Paint and Body Shop,
reasonable rates. Experience
in work. Located northside of
West Arm Bridge, Wewahitch-
ka, phone 229-6118. Open Mon
day through Friday, 8-5.
2tp 8-11

FILL DIRT
Front End Loader
Backhoe Work
C. R. SMITH & SON
229-6018
tfc 3-31

Septic Tanks Pumped Out
Carefoot Septic Tank
229-8227 .
tfc 7-1


BILL'S CAR CRUSHER
will buy your old car.
Phone 227-4917
for information.

Also
Offering: 0
52tp 7-14 sanvWa


Wouldn't You Really
Rather Have Cable TV?




For Cable TV
Installation In Port St. Joe

Phone 229-7232
Or Visit the Telephone Company
Business Office


REPAIRS
Aluminum screens and doors,
carpentry, house repair, mill-
or,, roof repair and re-roof-,i
ing.a
SMITH & SON WORKSHOP
Phone 229-6018
Port St. Joe
tfe 7-29.2

Psychological Services for
anyone with problems in day-
to-day living. Gulf County
Guidance Clinic, Port St. Joe.
227-2691. (24 hr.) tfc 4-28

LEWIS FLOOR CLEANING
All Types
229-6482 or 229-6447
tfc 9-20
FOR TV REPIARS and
Zenith Sales see K&D TV and
Sound at 301 Reid Avenue. Call
227-2071: tfc 7-28


THE SAMPLER SHOP
1306 Woodward Ave.
GIFTS
Hours: Tues.-Fri. 5-8 p.m.
Saturday 11a.m. -7p.m.
tfc 7-14


For
Pest Control Service
Call
BROCK PEST CONTROL:
229-8117
tfc 6-2

KENT SERVICE CO.
GE Dealer
New & Used Appliances
For Services or Parts
Call 229-6394
tfc 4-28

Lawn & Gardening Needs
Feed Lawn Mower &
Small Engine Repairs
Economy Motors &
Garden Center
301 Hwy. 98 H.V.
229-6001


ED RISNER
PAINTING
No job too large
or too small
Local references. All work
guaranteed.
Free Estimates
Call 1-785-5106
Panama City
4tp 8-18



Complete Wood Shop
Custom Cut Lumber
Want to Do It Yourself?
Then come see us for Stan-
ley tools, hardware, paneling,
paint, lumber.
Earley's Hardware &
Building Supply
Hwy. 98 W. 229-2763
tfc 8-5



Roof Trouble?
Call O'Donnell Roofing Co.
We do shingles & built-up. 30
yrs. experience. Licensed
and bonded. Also remodel-
ing and repair.
Phone 763-5234
25tc 5-5


GLEN'S CABINET SHOP
Kitchen Cabinets-
Vanities Mill Work
Cabinet Hardware & Tops
White City, Hwy. 71
., Glen Combs
Shop 229-6017 or
229-6530
tfc 4-7


BRYAN'S
Furniture Stripping &
Refinishing
Reliable and Reasonable
Call 648-5152
Behind Mexico Beach
Shopping Center
tfc 6-2


Schools Getting Ready

Warren Whitfield and Curtis Addison are shown above
replacing formica top in the science lab at the Port St. Joe


Mc's Pawn Shop-5,000 &
15,000 BTU air conditioners,
assortment of shotguns and Mc's Pawn Shop-
rifles, home 8-track stereo and 3 lots; also new 12'
tape players, turquoise jewel- bedroom, 2 bath trailed
ry, one-third off; and many sell pawn shop and horn
more items to choose from. arately. 229-6193. 4
102 5th St., Highland View.
4tc 7-28


-rlufflu
x 68' 3
r. Will
ie sep-
Itc 7-28


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.









PAGE EIGHT THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 1977


YOUR


PHARMACIST
PROFESSIONAL
HONEST
AUTHORITATIVE
RELIABLE
MODERN
ACCURATE
COURTEOUS
INTERESTED
SINCERE
TRUSTWORTHY
Depend on him for prompt atteto
to all your drug and precrlptio*
WHENever you call
BUZZETT'S
DRUG STORE
Ph. 227-3371 317 Williams
Convenient Drive-in Window
Plenty of Free Parkini

Sponsoring

Summer


Disturbing Soil At Base Dangerous to Trees


The addition or removal of
soil around the base of a tree
may seriously disturb the
delicate relationship between
roots and soil and may consi-
derably damage or kill the
tree.
In many areas, fill is often
added to a building site and no
precautions are taken to mi-
nimize the shock of placing the
roots in a new environment.
When fill is added over
existing soils, air and water,
which are essential for normal
functioning of the roots, are
partially excluded. As a re-
sult, the roots die and the
symptoms soon become visi-
ble in the above-ground parts.
Symptoms may appear within
a month, or may not appear
for several years, The visual
symptoms are small yellowI


leaves, presence of numerous
suckers along the main trunk
and branches, many dead
twigs and in some instances,
large dead branches.
The extent of injury from
fills varies with the kind, age
and condition of the tree; the
depth and type of fill; drain-
age and several other minor
factors. Maple, oak and ever-
greens are most seriously
injured, while elm, ash, wil-
low, sycamore and locust are
least affected.
Obviously, the deeper the
fill, the -more marked is the
disturbance to the roots. Clay
soil fills cause most injury
because the fineness of the soil
shuts out air and water most
completely. The application of
only an inch or two of clay soil
.may cause severe injury.


Sandy fills may be added to a
depth of four inches. Gravelly
fills cause least damage, be-
cause both air and water
penetrate them more readily.
As a general rule, the applica-
tion of a layer of several
inches deep of gravelly soil, br
even of the same type of soil in
which the tree has been grow-
ing, will do no harm. The roots
will eventually become accus-
tomed to the new situation by
producing additional roots
near the surface.
Little can be done to save
trees that have been suffering
from grade fills over an
extended period. However,
much can be done to prevent
damage to trees by excessive
fills.
The initial cost of proper
precautionary measures is


high and replacement of the
tree may be more economical,
particularly if the tree is
young, in poor condition, an
undesirable species, or very
susceptible to insect and dis-
ease pests.
Where fills are placed
around a tree, four or six inch
agricultural tiles are laid in a
wheel-and-spoke design with
the tree as the hub. The
radical lines of the tile near
the tree trunk should be at
least one foot higher than the
ends joining the circle of tile.
A open-jointed stone or brick
well is then constructed
around the trunk up to the
level of the new fill. The
radical tiles extend into the
. well. The inner wall of the well
should be two feet from the
tree trunk. Six-inch bell tiles


WEST BUILDING MATERIALS CENTER


Guaranteed on Every Purchase!


400E. Hwy98
Parkbr, Panama City


73 7:00am-6:OOpm M-F
763-1739 :00am-4:30pm Saturday
Central Time


are placed above the junction
of the two tile systems, the bell
end reaching the planned
grade level and coarse gravel
or stone added to hold the bell
tile in place. All tile are
covered with small rocks or


cobble stones, then a layer of
gravel, to a level of 12 inches
from the final grade. A thin
layer of straw or hay should be
placed over the gravel to
prevent soil from sealing the
air space. Then good top soil


should be spread over the-
entire area except in the tree
well and the bell tile. To
prevent clogging, gravel
should be placed inside the dry
well over the opening of the
radical tile.


Litter Hazardous, Costly


Tossing litter from moving
vehicles onto highways cre-
ates hazards as well as eye-
sores the Florida Highway
Patrol said today.
"In addition to destroying
the natural beauty of our
highways, objects such as
glass drink bottles and metal
cans can cause a serious
accident," said Patrol Direc-


mUec


tor Colonel Eldrige Beach.
"Each year many accidents
and numerous injuries are
caused by objects lying in the
roadway, most of which were
thrown or fell from passing
vehicles," the director contin-
ued, "and many of these
accidents are caused by one
driver swerving or slowing
suddenly to avoid the object,


E/miAR


thereby forcing other drivers
to take drastic evasive
action."
Colonel Beach asked drivers
to stop littering, which in turn
would help reduce traffic ac-
cidents, reduce the enormous
cost of cleanup, and make
Florida's highways the most
beautiful in the nation.


Not iipose
fortypgepi
wersG.


Umlted Quantlles. All Item Adverused Amalable For SaWe at Normal tales Rate.


TProgram
The Recreation Department
of the Department of Com-
munity Affairs will be spon-
soring a summer recreation
program for the youth of Gulf
County. Applicants must be
between the ages of eight and
13 and meet the economic
guidelines set up by the U. S.
Department of Labor.
This program will consist of
a trip to the Florida Caverns
at Marianna next Friday,
August 26.
Interested persons should
contact Clotel Williams at the
Career Education Center
located at Port St. Joe Ele-
mentary School or call 227-
4493 for information and ap-
.plications.
All applications should be
returned by Thursday, Aug.
25th. There is a limited num-
ber of students who will be
able to attend, so you are
urged to get your applications
in as soon as possible.
Steve Cloud

on Dean's List
Steve Cloud, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Charles W. Cloud of Port"'
St. Joe, has been named to the
Dean's List at Mobile College
*for the spring semester. The
-Dean's List is composed of
students who have attained at
least a 3.0 average while
taking a minimum of 15
semester hours.
Mobile College is a four-
year liberal arts college affi-
liated with the Alabama Bap-
tist State Convention.


CARD OF THANKS
We would like to express our
sincere appreciation for your
prayers, concern and food
during the illness and death of
our loved one. A special
thanks to the nurses at the
hospital, to Dr. Simpson and
the ambulance squad. May
God richly bless each of you is
our prayer.
The Family of
George R. Padget


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RICHp'S IGA
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Ga. Gr. A
Heavy Beef Prem. Best

Round Fryers
Lb. Limit 1 with
Steak $7.50 Meat Order Lb.
Steak Cut Up lb. 45' Lb.
Heavy Beef TABLERITE U. S. CHOICE HEAVY End Cut
eavy eeWESTERN BEEF
Rump Tablerite U. S. Choice Pork
Roast New York Strips Lb. $2.79 CHOPS
Tablerite U. S. Choice
7 A. Rib Eye Steaks Lb$2.79 7 9
Lb. Tablerite U. S. Choice Lb.
7 Sirloin Steaks Lb.$1.69
Tablerite U. S. Choice BONELESS
,Meaty Rump Roast Lb.$1.39 O
Meaty Tablerite U. S. Choice Our Own
Loin Chuck Steak Lb. 79C Pan
Tablerite U. S. Choice
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Lb. jBudget Lb Lb. 2
b. iSliced Bacon 69 _

Heavy Beef Quartered Breast 59C
TBn 29 2Quartered Thighs 49c
T-=Bone $ Fryer Drumsticks 88C
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PAGE TEN


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 1s. 1977


iNew FTP-NEA Headquarters


Being Readied in

TALLAHASSEE Con- those few teachers to ii
;struction of a new headquar- rent membership of
= ters for FTP-NEA, Florida's and represents nearly
= largest teacher organization, public school employee
Sis underway in the heart of Florida. The FTP-NE
the city's downtown business also has grown from 2
district during that three
: FTP-NEA, the state affili- period.
ate of the 1.8-million mem- "We are extrenel
ber National Education As- ghted that FTP-NE
-sociation (NEA), will be take its place in the
making its third move in stream of Florida's C
-three years when it occupies complex andwill be h
completely renovated in the heart of Tallaha
Building at 213 South Adams downtown redevelop
: Street. Cameron noted.
ree."We believe we h
"Our new downtown head- perfect location 1
q-uarters is part of our state- block from the new C
I-wide expansion program to building and the Depar
-improve services to mem- of Education and
-ers," said FTP-NEA Exec- section of Adams Stree
i:Utive Director Don Cameron. may shortly become
The organization has' also destrian mall. The bui
o:-pened a regional office in is one of the oldest
-Orlando. downtown area and ori
FTP-NEA was created in ly served as a livery sta
: 1974 when a segment of the the turn of the centu
; Florida Education Associa- more recent years,
tioti membership refused to came a hardware store
remain with that teachers' then an office furniture
organization after it affili- let.
i ted with AFL-CIO. The new The renovation will
organization has grown from harmony with the arc


ts cur-
30,612,
50,000
ees in
A staff
to 41
e-year
y de-
A will
main-
Capitol
located
ssee's
nent,"
ave a
ialf a,
Capitol
tment
in a
et that
a pe-
uilding
in the
iginal-
able at
ry. In
it be-
re and
*e out-
be in
chitec-


allahassee

tural tradition of downtown
Tallahassee. Cameron said
the exterior will include both
stucco-and'brick. "We hope
to preserve as much of the
original brick front as the
architect deems practical'"
he said. Renovation of the
structure will cost in excess
of a quarter of a million
dollars.
Inside, the building will
contain 35 offices and two
conference rooms, one of
which will be used for meet-
ings of the FTP-NEA Board
of Directors.
The new facility also will
accommodate offices of the
Leon Classroom Teachers
Association and the Big Bend
UniServ district, teacher af-
filiates of FTP-NEA.
A second-story level will
allow for adequate storage
space and future expansion
of the organization.
With 15,000 square feet of
useable space, the new FTP-
NEA Headquarters will
more than quadruple exist-
ing rental facilities in the
Woodcrest Office complex on
John Knox Road. (AFNS)


j n Port St. Joe High School



IGCCC Offering Five


Courses Here This Fall


Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege will be offering five
courses this fall semester at
Port St. Joe High School.
SRegistration for each of the
five courses will be held
-August 29, the first night of
classes, beginning.at six p.m.
:in the high school. Books also
will be sold during registra-
tion.


Offered on Monday even-
ings, beginning August 29,
from 6:30 9:15 p.m. will be
Biology. The Biology lab will
meet Wednesday from 6:30 -
8:20 p.m.
Other courses offered in-
clude Business Law and West-
ern Civilization, both of which
are offered on Tuesday.
Freshman English I and Basic-


Gulf CTA Holds Fish Fry


,The Gulf County Classroom
Teachers Association is hav-
ing a fish fry this Saturday,
August 20th, from 5:30 8:30
P.M., EDT, at the picnic area
behind the Centennial Build-


.ing in Port St. Joe.
All Gulf County teachers
and their spouses are invited
to attend. The fish fry will
kick-off the CTA's faU mem-
bership drive.


Meteorology will each meet on
Thursday. Each of these
courses will meet from 6:30 -
9:15 p.m.
In addition, Port St. Joe
residents may be interested in
one or all of the three classes
that will be offered in Apa-
lachicola.
Basic Meteorlogy will meet
Monday, August 29, Freshman
English I will meet Tuesday,
and Introduction to Law En-
forcement will meet Wednes-
day. All classes will meet
from 6:30 9:15 p.m. in the
Apalachicola High School.
For further information re-
garding course offerings or
registration contact the Office
of Student Services, 769-1551.


m -mm- mm -----nu nn nomn IN m me m mmm m I m i


MINUTES

of the

Gulf County School Board

memmm mmmm m mm mmmmm mm mmmmmmmm "


The Gulf County School
Board met in special session
on June 24, with the following
members present: J. K. Whit-
field, Chairman; Waylon Gra-
ham; Fred Greer and Paul
Sewell.
Board member Raffield was
absent.
The Superintendent and Di-
rector of Administration were
present.
On recommendation of the
Superintendent, motion and
second, the Board voted unan-
imously to approve the follow-
ing personnel matters:
-Transfer Charles Fortner
to Wewahitchka High School;
transfer Richard Williams to
Port St. Joe High School;
appoint Al Millergren as
teacher, Wewahitchka Ele-
mentary School; appoint War-
ren Whitfield to the mainten-
ance department; appoint Ann
Sherry Herring as Technical
Assistant in the Title I Pro-
gram; transferred Ben Cau-
sey to the Wewahitchka
maintenance department.
On motion and second, the
Board voted unanimously to
grant early admission status
to J. Frank Graddy, Jr. to
enter Gulf Coast Community
College.
The Superintendent report-
ed:
1. The School Board will
administer the Title III por-
tion of the Manpower Act.
2. Discussed campus beau-
tification. A tentative amount
of $40,000.00 was approved.
3. Recommended releasing
final payment of Western
Waterproofing Company with
the exception of the 10 per cent
retainer. This was approved.
4. Discussed bus and main-
tenance projects.
5. Proceeding with lunch-
room project at Wewahitchka
Elementary School.
6. Reported on increased
funds for the 1977-78 school
year.
7. Will discuss Gulf Coast
Community College buses,at
the July meeting -
There being no further busi-
ness, the Board adjourned to
meet again July 5.
B. Walter Wilder, Supt.
J. K. Whitfield, Chmn.

The Gulf County School
Board met on July 5 in regular
session with the following
members present: J. K. Whit-
field, Chairman; Gene Raf-
field; Fred Greer; Paul Sew-
ell; Waylon Graham.
The Superintendent and Di-
rector of Administration were
present.
The meeting was opened
with the invocation by Raf-


field, and followed by the
pledge of allegiance.
On motion and second, the
Board unanimously approved
the minutes of June 7;
The Superintendent present-
ed correspondence received
during June. No action was
required.
The Superintendent review-
ed the Pupil Progression Plan
with the Board. This program
will be state wide and is based
on local goals and objectives
compatible with the state plan
for education. Copies are on
file in the Superintendent's
office.
The Superintendent present-
ed a Code of Conduct. This
plan was formulated for the
Gulf County Schools in accord-
ance with Florida Legislature
and develops' a Code of Stu-
dent Conduct and Discipline.
Copies of this plan are on file
in the Superintendent's office.
The Board discussed the
board policies that are how
being amended. Copies were
given to each member.
On recommendation of the
Superintendent, motion and
second, the Board unanimous-
ly approved the following
personnel matters:
-Place Rita Sanders and
Susie Cooper on re-assign-
ment for the 1977-78 school
year;
-Place Wayne Taylor and
Ray Smith on a 10-month, plus
two month basis for the 1977-
78 school year.
Bids were received on tools
and equipment for the bus
barn. These bids were review-
ed and tabled in order that the
equipment be thoroughly eval-
uated.
On motion and second, all
voted yes to accept the lowest
and best bid of Standard Oil
Company on gasoline, heating
fuel, motor oil and anti-freeze
for the 1977-78 school year.
Copies of all bids are on file
in the Superintendent's office.
The Board discussed the
:transportation of students, to
'Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege with respect to the legal-
ity of this service. The Super-
intendent was directed to ob-
tain a legal opinion and report
back to the Board at the next
meeting. This report will con-
tain all facts and financial
figures.
On motion and second, the
Board voted unanimously to
pay bills.
J. K. Whitfield, Chmn.
B. Walter Wilder, Supt.

The Gulf County School
Board met in special session
on July 15, with the following
members present: J. K. Whit-


field, Chairman; Paul Sewell;
Gene Raffield; Waylon Gra-
ham and Fred Greer.
The Superintendent was
present.
The Superintendent made
the following personnel re-
commendations:
-Appoint Carey Floore as
Maintenance and Custodial
Coordinator, on motion by
Graham, second by Raffield,
the motion carried with Whit-
field, Raffield, and Graham
voting aye, and Sewell and
Greer. voting nay;
On motion by Greer, second
by Sewell, all voted aye to
appoint Sondra Dickens as bus
driver in the Wewahitchka
area;
The Board instructed the
Superintendent to adjust the
baseball coaches salaries at
both high schools to reflect a
change indicated by the Board


Public Radio Is............
BBC Concert of the Week, International Concert Hall, First Hearing, In Recital, The
Listening Room, The Vocal Scene, Dutch Treat, Folk Music and Bernstein, Folk
Festival U.S.A., Voices in the Wind with Oscar Brand, NPR Recital Hall, Downtown
Jazz, Cameo Concert, BBC Newsreel, In Such Good Company, National Town
Meeting, National Press Club, Congressional Hearings, Soul With C.C., Matinee
Concert, All Things Considered, Options, Options in Education, Live Coverage of the
Bay County Commission Meetings, The Goon Show from the BBC, Jazz Alive, Jazz
Revisited, The Chicago Symphony, The Isreal Philharmonic Orchestra, The
Philadelphia Orchestra with Eugene Ormandy, Adventures in Good Music with Karl
Haas, The New York Philharmonic Orchestra, The Cleveland Orchestra, The Boston
Pops Orchestra with Arthur Fiedler, The Boston Symphony Orchestra, The TexacQ
Metropolitan Opera, NPR Opera Theatre, The Lyric Opera of Chicago, Earplay, BBC
Science Magazine, News, Sports, and Weather.......................................................
To find out when oil of these things happen
on your radio,
send for our FREE program guide.


nIUwK C-FM




USTEF 9,7
National Public Radio
A COMMUNITY SERVICE OF GULF COAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE




IF YOU LIKE NAPA PARTS,
YOU'LL LOVE THE NAPA MACHINE SHOP.
When your vehicle parts have worn out,
you've probabb, learned to head for your local
NAPA store for top quality replacements. But
what do you do when something on your vehi-
cle needs machine work?
The answer is the same. Your local NAPA
store features a machine shop that offers a
long list of machine work equal in quality to i
NAPA parts.
Your NAPA machine shop can grind your
valves, turn your brake drums, repair ignition
and distributor units, rebore and rebuild
engines, press axle bearings and much more.
Top quality repair work and top quality NAPA
parts spell more miles for your car and more
savings for you. So check with your NAPA
store for both parts and machine work.




St Joe Auto Parts
PA hone 227-2141 201 Loni Ave

we help keep America moving%


FIRST BAPTIST

CHURCH
Corner Third Street and Baltzell Avenue
REV. BILL HEATON, Pastor
STANLEY E. YOUNG, Minister of Music & Youth
Sunday School..................:...... 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Seriice .............. 11:00A.M.
Church Training .................. 6:30 P.M.
Evening Worship Service ............ 7:30 P.M.
Prayer Meeting (Wed.) ............ 7:00 P.M..

"Come and Worship God with Us"
--- -_ v v


prior to the 1975-76 school
year. As a result of this action,
the salaries of J. R. Gortemol-
ler and Gerald Lewter will be
affected.
On motion by Greer and
second by Graham, all voted
aye to approve the Pupil Pro-
gression Plan as discussed at
the meeting of July 5.
On motion by Raffield, sec-
onded by Graham, the Board
unanimously approved the
Code of Conduct Plan as dis-
cussed at the meeting of July
5.
The Superintendent present-
ed a bid on office machine
maintenance for the 1977-78
school year. On motion by
Graham, second by Greer,
all voted aye to accept this
bid. Copies are on file in the
Superintendent's office.
The Board received a grant
in the amount of $22,603.00
,under an ESEA Title IV-B
Grant. The Superintendent re-
commended that the funds be
used for developing an audio
visual instructional program.
On motion by Raffield, second
by Greer, all voted aye to this
recommendation.
The Superintendent present-
ed a plan for renovating a
portion of St. Joe Elementary
School and removing the tem-
porary classroom. This will


require an amendment to the
Project Priority List. Motion
to approve this renovation was
made by Sewell anikecondeda-
by Greer. Vote was
mous.
There being no further busi-
ness, the Board adjourned to
meet again in regular sessions
August 2.
Attest:
B. Walter Wilder, Supt.
J. K. Whitfield, Chmn.






510 Fifth


St.


- Port


We Cash Payroll Checks


S Quantity Rights Reserved
Cigarettes Excluded on Special Purchase Items


18-23


17 Oz. Fine Fare Spnall Early
FANCY PEAS


44


22 Oz. Fine Fare
Coffee Creamer


99


Cream Style or Whole Kernel Fine Fare
Corn 303 ans 3/99 CC


29 Oz. Fine Fare
CUT YAMS


41C


USDA Choice Pin Borne

Sirloin Steak


USDA Choice Eye 0
Round Roast
USDA Choice Bone-In
Rump Roast
USDA Choice Top
Round Steak
USDA Choice Bottom
Round Steak
USDA Choice
Beef Ribs


LB. $169
LB. $109
$ 149
L4$139
LB. 69"


$131


:4O


57.


LB $189
LB.$ 59
LB.$129
LS. 99
L. 79'


144


Fresh ALykes
Chicken Backs 191. Sliced Bacon 3.89
Fresh A Center Cut $
Chicken Wings 49LB- Pork Chops LB.49
Family Pack C Horme Smoked $ 39
Fryer Qtrs. LB 49 Sausage LB.
Family Pack, .,C Register's Country Smoked Dry Cured 9
Fryer Parts LB 89 HAM Shank 1/2 or Whole LB.


Pork EARS and
Neck Bones


Center Cut
LB 49 Ham Slices
$109 Delicious Red Rind
LB.- Cheese


PORK SPARE RIBS


LB. $169


I


.UI


Martha White
Plain or Self Rising

FLOUR


5 Lb.
Bag 590


32 Oz. Fine Fare
Dish Liquid


49 Oz. Fine Fare Blue All-Purpose
Detergent


Pricle of Illinois
Cream or Whole Kernel
Corn or
Sweet Peas

4/ 1 goo
No. 303
Cans


20 Qt. Fine Fare Low Fat
DRY MILK


87C


$127


Mrs. Filberts Quartered
MARGARINE
1 'Lb. Pkg. 590
Fine Fare
BISCUITS
8 Pak 99c


No. 1 White
POTATOES


Tennessee
TOMATOES
.-ft


10 Lb.
Bag


50 Lb. Bag
Potatoes
Baking
Potatoes


$3.95
Lb. 29C


Green Head
Cabbage
Cello Bags
Carrots
Firm Crisp
Lettuce


Lb. 15C
2/49t
Head 390


8 Lil Ears of Corn
Pkg. 89


Totino
Party Pizzas
Pkg. 89C


OPEN 8 AM 7 PM Monday Saturday
Featuring Iowa Corn Fed USDA Choice Quality Beef
We Accept USDA Food Stamps


iras for Aug.


St. Joe


L$159
L.b.


USDA Choice
Club Steaks
USDA Choice
Cubed Steak
USDA Choice Boneless
Stew Meat
USDA Choice Boneless
Brisket
USDA Choice Tender
Calf Liver


Lb. $1.29


$5.15


103 Oz. Fine Fare
Tom. or Veg. Soup 211


Fine Fare
Toilet

issue

4 Roll
Pkg. 19


iL


PAI















Specials for
SAug. 17 thru 20


Quality Gala

TOWELS


Jumbo
Roll


l;


All


Detergent

TIDE


Giant
Size


vith $10 or More Onr


quantity rights reserved


;alue Vacuum Pak,
Kernel or Cream Style


CORN


0


TI


al 1OI


Swift's Premium Beef $189
T-Bone Steak Lb.
Swift's, Premium Beef $ o
Cubed Steak Lb.
Swift's Prem. Standing Rib or Rib
Eye-COt, Wrapped for $ 29
Rib Steak Lb.$12


Beef
Short Ribs
Hormel Sliced
BACON


Swift's Premium Beef
Rib Steak
Sliced
Beef Uver


Lb. 49$
S119


b. 49
Lb.490


Swift's Premium Beef $269
Rib Eye Steak 2Lb.
Swift's Premium Beef $ 59
Sirloin Steak Lb. 1
Fresh $ 19
Pork Steak Lb.


Swift's Premium Beef C
Chuck Steak Lb.9


USDA Choice
Rump Roast
USDA Choice All Meat
Stew Beef


USDA Choice
Gmd. Chuck Lb
USDA Choice Lb.
Shoulder Roast


Lb. 89'
Lb. j119


990
99'


All Flavors 8112
DRINKS


6
12 OZ.
cans


ZAw


Medium

EGGS


2


Doz.


none sold to delers


'Robin Hood
Plain or Sell R1iiWg

FLOUR


all
enriched flour
w,' lMfi.


Multiply
Your Savings


16 Oz.
cans


5 lb.
bag
limit 1 wIth
$10 or more
purchase


Colonial

SUGAR


$10w orn


Good Value Early

Green Peas


for


Regua or Min
CRST$ 0
-OTPSTE7o.tub
I *Ib bo
Mte-sges


Kraft Pure h all
ORANGE JUICE g 99'
Twin Pak Kraft American '
CHEESE SLICES seZ19


Hillbilly Flakey
Merico Chocolate Chip
COOKIES
Kraft Velveeta
CHEESE


cunt10
16oz. 2
size U_90
b.$ 59
size


T.V. Sliced Frozen
STRAWBERRIES 2
10 oz. size Ole South
Frozen Deep Dish
PIE SHELLS 2-9
Piggly Wiggly Frozen
Whipped 2
TOPPING
Roman Meal Frozen
WAFFLES 81
Chef-BoyAr-Dee Frozen
DELUXE PIZZA


5991


3.5129
e

8 8


Fresh Green
CABBAGE lb 12c
TOMATOES lb. 49
Cai"fomisa Seediess
GRAPES lb. 9
Large Si Hmw
MELONS lb. 39


-6oz ize l


We Welcome |
USDA Fopd Stamp
Shoppers
Assorted Flavors
Pillsbury Funny Face

DRINK MI


8 quart
size


Kellogg's Corn

FLAKES


18 OZ.
box


Liui S12
3 o. tube


m m


II


1


:8


*II





I ,..
i+"