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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02151
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 27, 1977
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02151

Full Text


















FORTIETH YEAR, UMBER 23 i ,
-' il.,,. I.::..;. I| ...'5. 1
`r sll"~PI~8


TA
Industry Deep Water Port --FinePeople Safest Beaches in Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1977


15c Per Copy


Oak Grove W&S



Project Bid Call



Made On Tuesday


--





The Port St. Joe area experienced its first oil,
spill this week, when eight to ten barrels of number
'sixfuel oil was dumped ino St. Joseph Bay by Hess
Oil Company at their terminal here.
According to Gordon McCall with the Depart-
ment of Natural Resources, the spill was discovered
Tuesday morning and an immediate investigation
started to locate the source. McCAll told ThI Star
tarTira ffttfalSt'ltfrepDOtedU'ts'pIr B 5'
it was discovered by them, but it was late in the
afternoon Tuesday before the report filtered down
to his office.


Reported IBay


In the meantime, officials of McCall's office
and the Gulf County.Sheriff's office were investi-
gating the spill, which covered an area of about a
half mile long and 60 yards wide down the shores of
St. Joseph Bay south of the Hess terminal.
McCall said the spill appeared to do little
damage and that Hess had workmen on the job
eiegy, apernoonp c.l~ iing it UR He said popms
had been put in place to prevent the oil spill from
spreading.
McCall said the spill resulted from a burst


gasket on an oil filline at the terminal. There were
no ships or bargelied up at the terminal at the
time. McCall said ess complied with the law in
reporting the incid~ t and that no charges would be
filed in the incident.
By Wednesday; the spill had been'completely
cleaned up.
In t4ephotepde, oil can be seen collecting on
-- rckangw.iio l or f the Bay near the
Methodist Church. In the inset, a wary bird picks his
way through the gooey oil as he makes a search for
something to eat. : .


After re-activating the Oak
Grove water and sewer dis-
trict project about a year and
a half ago, the County Com-
mission took a major step
toward completion of the pro-
ject Tuesday night, when they,
issued a call for bids for the
construction .
The dreams of the project to
furnish water and sewer ser-
vices to the community which
snuggles under the southern
rim of the City of Port St. Joe
seemed to be dead after
nearly four years of planning
and figuring nearly three
years ago, but the Commis-
sion took a new avenue to
secure financing a year and a
half ago and came up with a,
Farmer's Home Administra-
tion grant for half the con-
struction costs of the project
and a loan for the other half of
the costs. This formula will
allow the community of nearly
150 homes to havethe services
at a price they can afford to
pay.
The Commission also made
other plans and made over-
'tures to the City of Port St. Joe,
to purchase treated water and
Sto handle the sewage effluent
from the area, rather than
drill wells, and construct
treatment plants for the comr-
munity. This also.spelled con-
siderable savingsfor-the dis-.
trict.
The county's engineer, R6b-
ert Nations of Florida Engin-


eering Associates, notified the
Commission Tuesday that he
had received approval of all
plans from the Department of
Environmental Regulations
and would. have all papers
completed "in a day or two" to
call for the bids.
The Commission agreed


Tuesday night to go ahead and
authorize the bids being ad-
vertised, with bids to be
received by the Board on
Tuesday, March 8 at their
regular meeting.
Requirements are that the
call for bids will be advertised
(Continued On Page 2)


Warnings Being


Placed On Sand

Representative Billy Joe Rish made a request this"
week to the Department of Natural Resources, Bureau -
of Beaches and Shores to make an inspection of a.
hazardous area of the beach on Cape San Bias, south of, -
the Coast Guard station road here in Gulf County. .
Two weeks ago, it was learned that silting from the i
Apalachicola River had deposited a layer of quicksand -
in the area, which in some instances is as much as eight
feet deep and had trapped two vehicles and offered a
danger to people walking on the beach in the area.
An inspection of the area confirmed a danger to
pedestrians and vehicles in the area which exists
between the Cape San Bias Resort to the corner of the
Spit near the Coast Guard Station.
Barriers, signs and warning devices are currently
being put together by the Department of Natural
Resources, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and
owners of the property, Eglin Air Force Base, to mark
off the danger areas. Until the barriers are erected,
people of the area. are alerted to stay away unless they
... are..anilar thhe.dangerous situation.
Rish said the barriers are eXpected to be up and in
place the latter part of this week.


The Department of En-
vironmental Regulation noti-
fied the Gulf County Commis-
sion this week the string had,
run out on allowing garbage
disposal practices by. the
County which did not meet
rules and regulations of the
state of Florida.: For the past
two years, the DER has,
warned the county they must
have a plan to meet state
specifications by next month
and have the new system in
operation by July 1 of this
year. The county can meet
neither deadline..
In a letter to the board this
week, the DER notified the
county that only one of their
landfill operations was accept-
able for continued operation..


SThe fill sites at Howard Creek,
White City and Port St. Joe
are in violation of the law due
ito high water table in the
areas. State law requires the
garbage to be buried in a dry
area and covered to a certain
depth. The only way to meet
the requirements in the areas
cited is to well point the
burying areas.;
The letter, from John Wil-
liams of DER, notified the'
county their particular situa-
tion can only be corrected by
going to an alternate method
of garbage handling. Williams
has suggested the county in-
stall a central collection spot
in the south end of the county,
compactthe iefuse and haul it
to the Bikhorn burial site in


Merchant Officers
A new slate of officer have taken over the
leadership of the operation of the Merchant's
SAssociation this month for the current year.


the north'end of the county.
Williams contends that once
the hardware is purchased
and the method put into
operation, the county can
operate it cheaper than using
its present method of trans-
porting a bulldozer throughout
the.county every day to cover
all sites.
Chairman Everett Owens
told the board that in a
meeting last fall with DER, he
and former member Silas
Player had been advised to
earmark $60,000 for the pro-
gram and apply for a 'defer-
ment of the deadline. Owens
said, "At the time, we didn't
have the $60,000."
Now, he is suggesting the
County use $60,000' of its


Shown looking over the roll book of the
Association at the last meeting of the
group last Friday noon, are, left to right,
Higdon Swatts, vice-president; Carl Bowen,
secretary-treasurer and Billy Rich, presi-
dent. -Star photo


revenue sharing money and
apply for the deferment.'
Attorney William J. Rish
informed the Board he felt the
deferment could be' obtained,
if the county would make
some move toward starting to
correct the situation.
Chairman Owens: then in-
structed Mosquito.Control Su-
pervisor Tommy Pitts to con-
tact the County's.planning
board, the City of Port St. Joe
and local industry to. begin
talks on the best method to
comply with the law and still
give convenient garbage dis-
posal.
July 1 of this'year isstill the
deadline for evey county in the
state to be in compliance with
state law, but Attorney Rish
said many counties are in the
same position as Gulf County
and the deadline will be met
by very few.
CULVERT'POLICY
George Cooper, Jr., of We-
wahitchka questioned the
Board on their policy of instal-
ling driveway culverts and
moving them once they are
installed. He said he had
observed several instances of
moving culverts on the Dead
Lakes Dam road in the Wewa-
hitchka area and he wanted a
clarification of county policy.
It took nearly 45 minutes to
ascertain what the policy Was,
and several motions died for
lack of a second in the process,
but the policy was finally
clarified in the matter.
The Board agreed to con-
(Continued on Page 2)




Amen,

Good

Buddy

I


Abe Miller Outstanding


Abe Miller, who is complet-
ing his second term as presi-
dent' of the Port St. Joe


Jaycees was selected by his
club' and apanel of judges as
their candidate for the year's-


Sheriff Ken Murphy, left, presents the
Outstanding Young Man of the Year award


Rev. Billy Heaton, Pastor of
the First Baptist Church says
many CB operators are going
to church his church on
Sunday without the intentions
of doing so.
"They are 'making their
presence felt' in our church
sound system with their CB
radios", Heaton said. "Nearly
every Sunday morning in our


Outstanding Young Man at the
annual banquet held Saturday
night for awarding the special


plaque to Abe Miller at the award presenta-
tion banquet Saturday night. -Star photo


regular worship services we
begin to get CB lingo over our
public address system. Nat-
urally this is disturbing to our
services", the local pastor
said.
Thus far nobody has let out a
lusty "10-4 good buddy", after
a prayer or reading of the
scriptures but the CB conver-
sations add a dimension to the


morning services of First
Baptist Church Rev. Heaton
says they had just as soon do -
without.
True to his calling, Rev.
Heaton said he and the church
members would be more sat-
isfied if the CB operators
attended church on Sunday
morning in person, rather
:than by voice only.


honors.
Miller was born in Highland
View, matriculated through
the Port St. Joe schools and
operates a business at Sim-
mons Bayou community.
During his latest term as
Jaycee president, the club has
nearly tripled in membership
to its present list of 52 mem-
bers. Miller has been credited
with "bringing the club back
to life".
Miller was presented his
award by Gulf County Sheriff
Ken Murphy, who was one of
the 'judges making the selec-
tion from the list of candi-
dates.
Prior to making the award
presentation to Miller, Mur-
phy gave a short address to
the Jaycees in which he noted,
"It is a new year with a lot of'
new men in office, new laws
coming and changes being
made in our life style.
Sheriff Murphy said new
attitudes toward the execution
of criminals, new juvenile
laws and changes in insanity
laws will make our court
system introduce changes in
our system of justice.
"Whether the changes are
good or whether they are bad,
we can only wait and see'!
Murphy said. He pointed to a
need for every citizen to
remain informed, to take part,
and be ready to change what:
needs changing and support
what needs supporting. -
President Miller praised the:
Jaycees for completion of 15
projects during the past year.
He offered certificates of ser-
vice to Jaycees Larry Me-:
Ardle, Chuck Reynolds, Glen
Kent, Ed Larabee, Lamon'
Daniels, Carl Bowen, Mike:
Little, Marshall Nelson, Rob-.
ert Montgomery, Rick Cassas,:
Steve Kramer, Clyde Norris,
Tommy Smith. Al Ray, Bill
Herring, Wayne Childers and:
David Roberts.
Miller offered special certif-:
icates of appreciation to Port:
St. Joe High School, the High:
School cafeteria workers,:
WJOE, the City of Port St. Joe,
and The Star.


Gulf County Is Caught


With ItsGarbage Wet


;;


t,









MGE TWO:


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 27. 1977


SFor the past 15 years or so, the
South has been attracting more and
more industrial jobs while the
traditionally industrial north was
losing ground in this area, or, at
,best, at a standstill.
Recently at a meeting of the
Southern Growth Policies Board in
Boca Raton, the southern industrial
leaders looked nervously over their
shoulders at a coalition of the
northeast and midwest states which
were in an all-out campaign to win
'6tme of the favor which industrial-
is'ts have shown toward the south.
S The question is, can the south
&continue to attract new jobs to its
.borders, whether through the ave-
,nue of attracting existing industry to
.move or new ones to come south to
organize.
It was interesting that a nor-
thern intellectual at the meeting
,observed that the south is booming
,because its people want to work and
Because its leaders aren't afraid of
Economic growth.
3. This situation may hold true for
.most'southern states, but for Florida
!with its position as the fastest



ThI wr Impre


There were several things about
the Presidential inauguration which
impressed us, here in the heart of
'Cracker Florida!':
. First, w were impressed by the
fact the new president ignored the
-Supreme Court's penchant for deny-
ing religious utterances at public
functions. The Bible was used for the
swearing in and a verse from Micah
.was quoted, thereby invoking the
word of God on the proceedings. The
versee was appropriate, "He hath
showed thee, O man, what is good."
Now, do we have sense enough to
*grasp what he shows us?
Another tning which impressed
is was an admonition that we put
Jresh faith in the old dream of our
.orefathers for a nation unique in the
ivorld for mankind.
if.


Other Editors Are Saying:



Herald Ford V


%of This Nation

SLegally, President Ford's the symbolism. Hen
Wednesday night speech to the defeated at the polls
Congress and the nation was a to step down, del
Ptate of the Union message. State of the Union
Actually, it was a valedictory The men would chalk
dress. office would contain
;On the surface, it seems to ernment of laws, n
Sa useless exercise to have Ford has every
ij outgoing President deliver leave office with
I State of the Union mes- held high in an atm
sage just a few days prior to warm feeling from
leavingg office and while the citizens.
nation'ss attention ig centered He performed I
on a new President, his pro- openly and honestly
obsals and his programs. ture and his means
."But the practice has both helped heal the ra
symbolic and practical signi- left from an era of
meance. tions and vindictive
President Ford touched on His speech was,


growing state in the south and
already suffering from the pains of
tremendous pressures put on its
public services ffrgm growth, the
opposite seems to be more true.
Florida seems to be discouraging
industrial growth, especially from
industries which may have a waste
by-product which could give dispo-
sal and pollution problems. Too, the
characteristic of wanting to work
may not hold true in.Florida either.
Florida workers seem to be leaning
toward the easier, high-paying jobs
and leaving the lower paid indus-
tries for others to attract.
With our nation at a virtual
standstill in population growth, our
only hope for more jobs comes from
attracting a new product or some
established firm which wishes to
moire. Whilewe cahn'ffor*d, here in
Florida, to be a bit choosy, we are
not yet in the position where we can
discourage new jobs, especially
here in the Panhandle. We're virtu-
ally tied hand and foot to an
economy tied to federal installations
and forest products. We could use a
little diversification.


ssions

Whether or not he follows the
axiom, President Carter acknow-
ledged that "We cannot afford to do
everything, nor can we afford to lack
boldness as we meet the future". We
have been trying to do everything
for everybody, but with little suc-
cess.
Again, we were impressed by
the new Presidents statement, "We
are a strong naton and we will
maintain strength so sufficient that
it need not be proven in combat."
We are unique in the world. We
hold the hope of freedom. If we
fritter it away or weaken ourselves
enough to allow others to destroy it,
the last hope for freedom is gone.
The only way we see to maintain our
light for our own people and those of
other nations is to refresh the dream
born 200 years ago. '


Garbage

tinue with its past policy of
installing and covering a cul-
vert purchased by a property
owner to give entrance to a
dwelling site. The Board
would not move:a culvert;unyti-
the .matter watsbrought to
their attention and a decision
made on each case.
This is the motion voted on,
but expressions by each indi-
vidual on the Board was that
the county would not move
any culverts at tax payer
expense.
FURNITURE BIDS
The Commission agreed to
advertise for bids for furnish-
ings for the new library build-
ing here in Port St. Joe.
Bids for the furnishings
would be received on Febru-
ary 22.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other business, the
Board:
-Agreed to permanently
change the time of their night
meetings to begin at 7:00 p.m.
-Agreed to request speed
limit signs be placed at Ward
Ridge by DOT.
-Agreed to request by Com-
missioner Gortman to ask the
Game Commission to investi-
gate the advisability of prohib-
iting fishing at the Dead Lakes
draw-down canal due to the
danger involved.
-Agreed to allow Tommy
Pitts call for bids for a steam
cleaner for the Mosquito Con-
trol department.
-Adopted a map which
gives a legal description of all
voter precincts and commis-
sion districts.
-Agreed to pay dues to the
Northwest Florida Planning
and Advisory Council for the
current year.


Core Explains


Court System


-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - ~~~- -
-

S-THE STAR-
SEuWIMf Evert d0y *we ur mw14i1n0i 1*AvMS. Port St. Joe. Florids
Sy The Ster Pwilnl; Compwny
Secndse Pastmae PaWtf Part St. Joe, Floride 32M
Wms t IL msey ............................ ................. Editor and Publisher
Wll m H. BRamMs ................................................ Production Supt.
e Ram ................................................ Office Manager
Srly K. Ram ................... ..................... Typesetter, Subscriptions
POSTOFFICE 0OX 3 PHONE 227.3161
":' PORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA324

;1: SECOND~ CLA$Ss POSAE PAID A PORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA SU345

SUBSCRIPTIONs INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN AtVANCE
IN COUNT-OEY- YEAR, SSI SIX MOS.. .00 THREE MOS., $.27.50
OUTr o COUNTY-OMn vYer. 1.a OUT OF U.S.-ne Year. s1.00

TO ADV TISRS-In ca o rr iaomio in I adertisements., hepublishers do not hold themselves liable
Nor dnge furtr ~M n mount received for such ayvrtisemunt.

The spoken word is glvit ant attention; the printed words thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely
Sasarts; the printed word thoroughly convince. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.



:EDITORIALS:




Our State Shouldn't


Discourage Industry


YOU cannot bring about pros-

perity by discouraging thrift.

You cannot strengthen the weak

by weakening the strong. You

cannot help the wage earner,by

pulling down the wage payer.

You cannot further the brother-

hood of man by encouraging

class hatred. You cannot help

the poor by destroying the rich.

You cannot keep out of trouble

by spending more than you

earn. You cannot build charac-

ter and courage by taking

away man's initiative and inde-

pendence. You cannot help men

permanently by doing for them

what they could and should do

for themselves.

Abraham Lincoln


(Continued From Page 1)


ETAOIN SHRDLU

By WESLEY R. RAMSEY


The cold days which followed our snow last
week, left me feeling like the man in the Nyquil
commercial head all stuffed up, throat
scratchy, coughing, sneezing, nose running,
thinking I might die if something isn't done. He
feels tough and so did I.
I didn't get the care and compassion the man
in the commercial received. Instead of a loving
pat on the head, a dose of the patent medicine
and a fond, "Can I get you anything else dear?" I
received a "Get out of bed, it's time to go to work
and make sure you don't get close to anybody
and give them what you have".
I don't get no respect.
If I hadn't had the Asian and regular flu
shots, I would have sworn I had either or both at
once. With the shots in my arm, though, I just
couldn't get the flu. It was merely a bad cold.

The big snow had the power to bring
everything to a stand-still here in Port St. Joe
Tuesday afternoon. Everybody got out in the
snow to play and the job just went lacking. Here
at The Star, we put most of the paper together on
Tuesday in preparation for printing on Wednes-
day. Needless to say, The Star didn't get put
together on Tuesday afternoon. The afternoon
was spent in playing in the snow, taking pictures
and looking in awe at something we seldom see
here in Florida.
I was interested in reading the Holmes
County Advertiser from Bonifay this past week.
He said he came to work on Wednesday morning
and the electric typewriter had to be warmed
before.it would turn on, a plastic gear in a piece
of machinery broke, setting back their deadline
and the water was frozen to the point where they


(Continued From Page 1)


Vas A Good Steward


I's Presidency


re he was,
and ready
livering a
message.
nge but the
ue. A gov-
ot men.
reason to
his head
osphere of
his fellow
his duties
y. His na-
ured style
w wounds
recrimina-,
ness.
in some


ways, a measure of his ad-
ministration.
It didn't soar in oratorical
flights. It wasn't apocryphal.
There were no bugle passages
summoning the nation to
greatness.
Much of it was old shoe,
vintage of Jerry Ford. The
substance was there. It was
solid. The wrapping was
homespun instead of tinseled.
It counted blessings, took
into account the frailty of hu-
mans and human institutions
and allowed as to how Jerry
Ford hadn't done too badly by
his countrymen.
It accentuated the positive


but not egregiously.
The chiding of Congress and
the admonitions it contained
were good-humored and sin-
cere. No offense meant, no of-
fense taken.
If the history books record
him as a caretaker President,
they must at the same time
acknowledge that he turned
over a better estate than he
inherited.
"Today," he said, "we have
a more perfect union than
when my stewardship began."
We do. And we thank him for
that stewardship. -Florida
Times Union


Bid Call Sent


for three consecutive weeks
over a 30 day period. These
are requirements by the Far-
mers' Home agency.
Commission Chairman Ev-
erett Owens told the Board he
had learned the City of Port
St. Joe has had misgivings
about the County plan to use
PVC pipe in the system and
urged the Board to call for an
alternate bid using cast iron
pipe. The City's rpisgivings
stem from the fact the County
wants the City to maintain the
system and provide the ser-
vice. All these services are to
be figured in the contract for
furnishing the water and
" treatment services.
The County Commission
tentatively set a meeting for
this afternoon with the City


Commission to finalize plans
and costs for operation of the
services.

Council

Showing

Movies
The Student Council of Port
St. Joe Jr.-Sr. High School will
show two movies tonight,
Thursday, Jan. 27, at seven
p.m. Admission will be $1.00.
Showing will be "Calling All
Curs" with the Three Stooges
and "The House That Dripped
Blood".
The movies will be shown at
the Port St. Joe Elementary
School Auditorium.


had to send next door toget water to make coffee
with. Editor Orren Smith said the water was
even frozen in the commode bowl.
Here at The. Star, we leave heat on in the
building when it's cold overnight. Offset presses
don't print newspapers too well if they are cold.
Even so, with the heat on low, it was 55 in our
building Wednesday morning and nearly noon
before it got to 70. It has to be at least 70 for the
typesetting machines to do their thing, the
chemicals to develop the pictures and sensitized
paper on which our type is set and for the ink and
chemicals to function properly in the press.
We had water to the building frozen, but an
old issue of The Star set fire and applied to the
pipe took care of that little problem. We didn't
worry about the coffee, since nobody drinks it
here except Frenchie that is until the price
went up then everybody except me had to have
a cup of coffee in the morning. Our running
water was running ice water and had to be
heated before we could get into business.
Our typesetters were warm enough to
function after a fashion and we made out. If the
water had been frozen in our commode,
however, we would have just had to lock the door
and gone back home. We can't operate without
the john.

The Apalachicola Times made it to our plant
at around 5:00 P.M., to get their paper printed.
Normally, they get here around noon. Kerry
Williams, the chief mullet wrapper technician at
The Times said their water was frozen when they
came to work Wednesday morning, to get in the
last touches to the paper before coming to get it
printed. "We had to dip water out of the
commode, and heat it, to develop our snow
pictures", Williams said.
The snow made both of us late with our
papers this past week.

You just hold your breath now. In about a
month or two, when the winter vegetable crop is
ready for market, and see if the paper mill runs
regularly, since it won't have those vegetable
and fruit boxes to make for the fruit and
vegetables which were frozen by that foreign
yankee air.

Jimmy Carter made the Secret Service men
nervous by juniping out of his car and walking,.
the 1.2 miles up Pennsylvania Avenue to the
White House following the inauguration. The TV
and newspapers were making much of Carter's
exhuberence and vitality by walking up the.
street instead of riding.
Carter was neither particularly exhuberent
or vital... he was just plain cold and he could
keep warmer walking than he could in riding
along at a snail's pace in his open car.
All of those who went up on the "Peanut
Special" seemed more than glad to get back on
the warm train and head back for Georgia and
their lighterd knot fire in the fireplace.


Clerk of the Circuit Court,
George Y. Core, explained the
state court set-up to the Ki-
wanis Club at their regular
meeting Tuesday at noon.
Core gave the court tier in
the state from the county
court to the state Supreme
Court.
As a sidelight, Core noted
that during his tenure as Clerk
of the Court only two teen
agers had been brought before
the courts in the county during
his first 20 years as clerk.
"Now, nearly half our court
cases involve juveniles", he
said. He pointed out that only
in past years has the emphasis
been put so much on juvenile
courts which didn't exist sev-
eral years ago. 'aWe takd
juveniles to court now for
reasons we didn'tt several
years ago".
Core pointed )out that the
high court in Gulf County is
the Circuit Court. "We are in
the 14th Judicial District,
comprised of six counties,
with five judges serving the
circuit". The judges are Larry
G. Smith, who serves Gulf
County, Robert McCrary,
Warren Fitzpatrick, W. L.
Bailey and Russ Bower.
The Circuit court hears all
felony, civil, juvenile, probate
and Myers act cases. "Some
of these cases go before the
judge in chambers", Core
pointed out. He pointed out
that the weekly Thursday visit
by the Circuit Judge works a
hardship on the Gulf County
court system. "It just isn't
time enough", he said.
The County Court handles
criminal misdemeanors, some
civil cases, small claims court


~~~~~~~~~~W~*,~N~~,H~ adaPPaaaeeaaaaaaaaaa


matters and traffic citations.
Core pointed out that in Gulf
and Calhoun Counties, the
county courts are limited as to
the work they can do since
neither county judge is a
practicing attorney.
"You get to court", Core
explained, "When law en-
forcement arrests you, a com-
plaint, or on direct informa-
tion from the State's Attorney
or the grand jury is filed
against you."
Guests of the club were Key
Clubbers Sandra Young, Jay
Fleming, Brenda Rushing and
Phillip Davis.

Hospital
Auxiliary
Organizing
The Municipal Hospital
Auxiliary will hold its second
organizational meeting in the
Conference Room of the hos-
pital at seven p.m. Monday,
Jan. 31. Anyone interested in
joining is urged to be present.
The organization is being
formed for the purpose of
service to the hospital and will
not be a fund-raising group.
Those interested in donating
time each week but cannot
attend the Monday meeting
may call Mrs. Jean Atchison
at 227-2021 and leave their
name and phone number.
Everyone is invited.


[ have a
nice weekend...









THE STAR, Port St. Jo9, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 27, 1977 PAGE THREE


Brownies from Troops 118


and 150 Visit Court House


' ,dgliliimem r,,,: ,,' 1@
Cuble Laird. Gulf County Extension Agent, shows this young group of
Brownies through his office. Seated are: from left. Lizzy Hopps. Theresa Jones,
Tina Weber and'Kim Harvey. Standing from left are: Mr. Laird, De Ann Young.
Lee Lee Mongold, Jill Taylor, Dorita Clemons, Sandy King, Marcy Stripling,


Recently members of the
Brownie Girl Scouts froni
Troops 118 and 150, went
visiting at the. Gulf County
Courthouse to learn about the
activities there.
4 They visited with Cubie
Laird, Gulf County Extension
Agent, who explained to them
what an Extension agent is
and what he does for the
residents of Gulf County. The
girls were especially interest-
ed in an exhibit he has-
showing the. different kinds of
grasses and a ,large map
showing all the major land
owners in the county. After
thanking Mr. Laird, they pro-
ceeded to visit the new Sheriff,
Ken Murphy, and his facili-
ties.
J Sheriff Murphy conducted
!' the tour through the lab and
explained its purpose. He
demonstrated: the breath
analysis',machine, and how
Ton.a Peak. Lori Gregg, Debbie Davis. Sharon Miller. Lisa Handley. Theresa analysis machingerprints are
Byrd. I.nn .man, Donna Young. LeAnna Rudd, Monica French and Nancy
Stoutamire. Star Photo


l Bank Has Good Year


Ted Cannon, President of Deposits decreased from
the Florida First National, $12,558,911.04 at the year end
Bank at Port St. Joe, stated of 1975 to $12,521,237.18 on
this week the bank has just March 31, 1976. On June 30,
completed the most successful 1976, deposits were $12,052,-
and profitable year in the 586.82, on September 20, 1976
bank's history. were $11,192,346.41 and as of
Several factors contributed December 31, 1976 were $10,-
to the increase in profitS. 633,123.98. Deposits were down
Among these were long term 15.33 percent under last year,
rrwith a total decrease for the
real estate- mortgage loans, of $1
;inert-.ina. installmmnl Inaq year of $1,925,787.06.


Loans decreased from year
end 1975 of $5,504,422.96 to


nlllcr ei 111n I nOlfnlI llt Ill Vi,
and also profits from secur-
ities.


$5,475,967.17 on December 31,
1976, which was down %
percent from last year, with a
total decrease for the year of
$28,445.79; This was due to
several large participation
loans paying, out this year.
Most of the merchants and
businessmen in the area show-
ed an increase in sales and
service in 1976 over 1975.

READ THE CLASSIFIED
FOR GOOD BARGAINS


taken when arrests are made. them refreshments.


They were then shown the
women's jail, which they en-
joyed until Sheriff Murphy
told them he was going to lock
them in. They stampeded out
in short order, after which the
Sheriff's Department served


The entire visit proved to be
very informative for the girls
who were trying to learn more
about how their community
operates, and what it has to
offer them as they grow into:
future adults.


PRESCRIPTIONS

FILLED WHILE YOU WAIT:


Fast and friendly prescription service is always
available. We carry a large supply of prescription
drugs along with remedies that can be purchased.
without prescriptions. We also maintain a complete
record of your prescription purchases and can furnish
you with a copy instantly for income tax purposes.

SMITH'S


Pharmacy
Drive-in Prescription Windo
Phone 227-5111


Steve PierceSemifinalist


Port St. Joe High School,
' senior Stephen Tracy Pierce,
left, received a congratulatory
Handshake from Birmingham-
Southern College president
Neal R. Berte after winning
semifinalist standing in scho-
larship competition at B-SC
recently.
Stephen joined some 250
high school students from
eight states who competed for
Birmingham-Southern Col-
lege's 'Phi Beta Kappa and


Health Careers scholarships.
Semifinalists were selected
on the basis of; scores on a
general examination designed
to determine students' pre-
parations for college work:'
Competition continued with
interviews with B-SC faculty
Members and essay writing.
Fifty scholarships valued at
$186,000 will be awarded with
winners being announced in
about two weeks. Competition
for other B-SC scholarships


are scheduled for later this
year.
Two recent studies have
,ranked Birmingham-Southernf
.College as the number one
college academically in iAla-
bama. Another study reveals
B-SC students earn doctorates
at a higher percentage than do
students from any other col-
lege or university in the South-
east--or from any Ivy League
School.


Bedroom Furniture
Southern Gentry II by Florida Furniture


Triple Dresser, Deck Mirre
5-drawer Chest, Spindle Be
'Night Table Maple Finis
Many Other Open Stock Pi


$35900


eces to Choose From




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Model FA =500
ode 23

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'/


,.,.---- --- -----..


PAGE THREF. :,'


| i


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 27" -1977


3


Dr,
!d,
3h







THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY. JAN. 27, 1977


SMiss Juanise Griffin and B. R. Williams,


Jr.





.4
'* ,
i



.1
I


^ ff


United In Marriage January 9


1.
,


;1'
i i.-, -


an overlaid jacket. Her cor-
sage was of white carnations.
Mrs. Ed Wynn provided the
organ music. Miss Janet
Murphy sang the bride's
chosen songs, accompanying
herself on the guitar.
The bridal setting was en-
hanced with candlelight, of
blue candles with blue and
yellow carnations encircled as
hearts, with an arch of green-
ery.
Miss Teresa Williams, sister
of the groom, kept the bride's
book. Steve Hattaway,
brother-in-law of the bride,
served as usher.
The bride's parents hosted
the reception following the
ceremony in their decorated
den. All tables were overlaid
with white ruffled cloths. The


wedding cake was centered on
one table, with silver candela-
bra holding tall blue candles,
on each side. The bouquets of
the bride and matron of honor
were used as table decora-
tions.
Miss Nancy Jones and Mrs.
Mike Burkett served the wed-
ding cake. At another table
Mrs. J. B. Hattaway served
the guests coffee from a silver
coffee service. Serving from
crystal punch bowls were Miss
Cindy Baxley and Miss Kuy-
ler King.
Mrs. Grace Meyers greeted
the guests at the door. Mrs.
Jean Jones and Mrs. Mary
Nobles were floor hostesses
for the occasion. The wedding
was directed by Billy Rich.
For travelling, the bride.


chose a two-piece pants suit of
aqua blue. Following the
honeymoon the couple will
reside in Port St. Joe. The
groom is employed by Basic
Magnesia, Corp. and the bride
by State of Florida Youth Ser-
vices.
Out-of-town guests for the
ceremony were: Mr. and Mrs.
Alto Williams of Marianna;
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Thomas
and children of Wewahitchka;
Mr. and Mrs. Larry Griffin
and daughter, Jimmy Green,
Miss Kuyler King, all of Talla-
hassee; and Mrs. H. T. Waller
of Chipley.
The rehearsal dinner was
held at Pier 98 Restaurant. At
this time the bride and groom
presented their gifts to the
wedding party.


Mission Group I Met

with Mrs. Ralph Swatts


Mission Group I of the First
United Methodist Church met
in the home of Mrs. Ralph
Swatts, Sr. on January 18,
with 10 members and one
guest present.
The meeting was opened
with devotions by the chair-
person Mrs. Floyd Roberts.
Mrs. Robert King, District
Supportive Community Chair-


person, suggested many pro-
jects that as concerned Chris-
tians we can do. Mrs. W. L.
Alstaetter presented the pro-
gram "Planting and Reap-
ing."
The meeting was closed
with the benediction. The Feb-
ruary meeting will be held
with Mrs. Paul Blount.


the members of'the


Church of Christ
invite you to meet with them:
Sunday Morning Bible Study ........... 10:00 A.M.
Sunday Morning Worship .............. 11:00 A.M.
S Sunday Night ........................ 6:00 P.M.
S Wednesday Night .................... 7:00 P.M.

Corner 20th St. & Marvin
For information
$ call 229-6969
&-.NW-0-Nw


Florida First National Bank Is Sponsoring A




&@4I(Y BOOK 0


weli. to our


Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Willams, Jr.


In a quiet solemnity of the
living room setting, Juanise
Griffin became the bride of B.
,R. Williams, Jr. on January 9
at 3:00 p.m. at the home of the
bride's parents. Rev. David
Fernandez officiated at the
impressive 'double-ring cere-
mony.:' '
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Buford Griffin
and the groom is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. B. R. Williams, Sr,
all of Port St. Joe.
The bride, given in mar-
riage by her father, chose a
full length gown of imported
catapeau with pearled and


beaded scalloped Chantilly
lace. The princess style gown
was styled with a high-rise
waist and and stand-up collar.
Long full sleeves with deep
cuffs were trimmed in match-
ing lace. The A-line skirt was
gathered at the back, flowing
into a chapel length train,
which was also trimmed with
matching lace. Her shoulder
length veil was held in place
with a pearled and beaded
lace crown. She carried a
bouqet of blue, white and
yellow carnations with white
baby's breath and blue
streamers.


Mrs. Wyvonne Hattaway,
sister of the bride, was matron
of honor and served as the
bride's only attendant. She
was dressed in a full length
yellow gown and carried a
bouquet of blue and yellow
carnatio4l Wi -bh Y's breatWh
and greenery. Ronnie Butler'i
served as best man and was
the groom's only attendant.
The bride's mother chose a
full length gown of sea green
with matching jacket She
wore a corsage of yellow
carnations. The bridegroom's
mother selected a street
length suit of pale orange with


Luncheon Honors


Miss Becky Childers


Joshua Burrel &
Jason Matthew Hanna

Celebrate

Joint

'Birthday
Two brothers, Jason Matt-.
hew Hanna and Joshua Bur-
rel Hanna, celebrated their
birthdays with a party.in their
home on Saturday, Jan. 15.
Jason marked his first birth-
day and Joshua was five years
old on that day.
'They are the children of Mr.
and Mrs. Buddy Hanna of
Odena Fire Tower. Grandpar-
ents are Mr. and Mrs. Ira B.
Hanna, Sr. and Mr. and Mrs.
Jagnes Goddin, both of Beacon
Hill.

CARD OF THANKS
I would like to thank all the.
wonderful people in Port St. ,
Joe for the flowers, cards and
especially your prayers dur-
ing my recent surgery at
Tallahassee Memorial Hospi-
tal. A very special thanks to
Dr. Shirley Simpson for find-
ing my problem. God loves
::you and so do I.
Dorothea (Jenny) Gentry


Becky Childers, who is
being married to George
Caleel of Chicago next month,
was entertained with a lunch-
eon recently at Bay Point
Country Club in Panama City.
Hostesses were friends of
her high school graduating
class: Mrs. Roy Smith, Mrs.
Rice Creekmore and Mrs.
Patrick Cobb of Pensacola,
Miss Carolyn Carr of Atlanta,
together with Mrs. Rex Buz-
zett and Mrs Julia Creech.
Enjoying the luncheon with
Miss Childers were Mrs.
Myrtle Childers. Mrs. Charles
Brown. Mrs. Johnie McCurdy,
Mrs. Blair Shuford of Talla-
hassee. Mrs. Jerome Johnson
of Ft. Walton, and Mrs. Calvin
Toff and Miss Cynthia Todd of
Pensacola.
Table settings and arrange-
ments accented the bride-
elect's chosen colors of red


and white. The hostesses pre-
sented the honoree with a
lovely silver bowl as a
moment of the occasion.

Methodist

A dm in istrators
At the charge conference
held on January 9 at First
United Methodist Church, the
following were elected as offi-
cers of the Administrative
Board: Billy Joe Rish, Chair-
man: Laura Geddie, Vice
Chairman: and George Core.
Secretary.
Installation service for the
officers will be held Sunday.
February 6.
' '*', : C

Read the
Classifieds


First United
Methodist Church
Constitution and Monument
Port St. Joe, Fla.
JOHNIE W. McCURDY, Minister
CHURCH.SCHOOL ..................... 9:45 A.M.
PREACHING SERVICE ...... 11 A.M. & 7:00 P.M.
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP... 5:30 P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) .... 7:30 P.M.



CONOLEY'S LUNCHES

HOME-COOKED MEALS

ALL YOU CAN EAT FOR JUST $2.50

Delivery service on all meals and
pizza. Call 227-7561.
Open 5:30 a.m. until 10 p.m. Monday- Saturday


There will be three categories made up of
grades 1 and 2, 3 and 4, 5 and 6, with prizes
of $25.00, $15.00 and $10.00, offered in each
division. To enter, come by Florida First
National Bank, register and pick up your
coloring book entitled "Welcome to Our
Bank". All books must be returned to the
bank no later than 6:30 p.m. Friday, March
4, 1977.


Winners to be
announced

March 24,

1977


Florida First National Bank


Phone 227-2551


at Port St. Joe


MEMBER: FDIC


PAGE FOUR


4-


*.~*h,~*Nr~*i)r~*C,~*~N~i);~j~ii~~llc~ %~- ~~~ Z~i~-hZ~ir`C~i(~hN~C)~i~-7~C~I~C~*~?i+~


~









M t di Y u Caaa OBITUARIES THE STAR, Port St. Joe,
Method.ist Younth Caravan
Wade B. Neel, 62, Died Last Rites
A -- "Al ho nnpnn- n ja rea tin- grad un from the First -


A out iCaravan will in
held at First United Metho-
dist Church this weekend with
South of Highland View and
First United Methodist
Churches participating. The
visiting Caravan Team is a
group of 14 youth and counse-
lors, Mr. and Mrs. Lee Matt-
hews from First United Meth-
odist Church in Panama City.
According to an announce-
ment today by Rev. Johnie
McCurdy, the schedule will be
as follows:
January 28, Friday: 7:0p
p.m., dinner in church fellow-
ship hall; 8:00-10:00, music,
puppets, multi-media, getting
acquainted.
Saturday, 9:30-11:00 a.m.,
brunch' workshop, in-depth
study of particular subjects,
Bible oriented; 1:00-3:00 p.m.,


6:30, dinner in fellowship hall;
and 7:30-10:00, music, in-
depth table discussions of
various topics, worship ser-
vice and Holy Communion:
All youth from the seventh


gra e up I* d t
United Methodist and High-
land View United Methodist,
plus the visiting team from
Panama City will be involved
in this special weekend Youth
Caravan.


Gymnastics, Dancing

Classes Being Offered


Gymnastics and dancing
classes are being offered by
the Gulf County Recreation
center'in cooperation with
Mrs. Barbara Strausbaugh,
according to John Clenney,
recreation director.
Classes will be offered in
choreography, tap and ballet.
Registration will be Monday


January 31 in the Centennial
building. Fees will be $15.00
per month, with two classes
being offered each week on
Wednesday and Fridays.
Those requiring additional'
information should call Clen-
ney or Mrs. Mary Elliott at the
Gulf County Recreation De-
partment, 229-6119.


DAR Hears Americanism


Talk by SJPC President


St. Joe Paper Co. President some government regulation,
Jacob C. Belin addressed the law of supply and demand,
Saint Joseph Bay Chapter rather than government con-
Daughters of the American trol, is essential to our way of
Revolution on "The Role Ind- life, he said. He noted the sad
dustry Plays in Our National plight of Great Britain be-
Defense". He spoke at the cause of the abandoning of this
i National Defense meeting of course.
the chapter at the Garden Mr. Belin spoke of the many
Center, on Wednesday, Jan. grants by business, including
19. St. Joe Paper Co., to educa-
Relating his subject to the tional institutions. He express-
year's theme of the National ed the hope that these univer-
DAR, "Remove not the sities and colleges would teach
ancient landmark which they the importance of the role of
fathers have set," Proverbs business, combating the anti-
22:29, the speaker stressed business image.
courage, freedom and patriot- Willingness of leaders of
ism as moral landmarks. He business and industry to serve
stated that not only should we the country at great personal
preserve physical landmarks, sacrifice was cited. Mr. Belin
but preserve and revere our suggested that there be a pool
national history and heritage, of leaders of various abilities
Speaking about business and talents, screened by the
and industry, Mr. Belin said, FBI, ready to be called in
"Educators are teaching our case of the country's need;
youth that making a profit is that business see that these
wrong-that there is some- people not lose benefits be-
thing sinful about money, cause of serving their country.
There is a stigma on busi- Mrs. Charles Brown intro-
ness." duced Mr. Belin, listing some
He pointed to the fallacy of of his many accomplishments.
this thinking, stating that the Thanking her he stated that
free enterprise system made his proudest title was that of
the country grea4 aod is nec- .American Citizen ... ...,
essary for its s4rival.. H;-C, *'.:-6.An attended'iiLt2'
stated that business'has to meeting as guest of the chap-
turn money back into itself to ter.
* expand and improve. Al- Mrs. Tom Owens and Mrs.
though admitting the need for Herb Brouillette were elected


delegates to the Diamond
Jubilee DAR State Conference
in Miami in March. Mrs. Paul
Johnsen and Mrs. Winston
Wells were elected alternates.
Mrs. Paul Fensom will attend
as Chapter Regent. Mrs. Roy
Smith, Jr. has been invited to
serve as Page by Mrs. John
Dean Milton, State Regent.
In spite of the frozen water
pipes and the 20 degree
weather, the Garden Club
members served a delicious
luncheon to the members and
guests present.


Suddenly Tuesday A.M. Held for


Wade B. Neel, age 62, a
resident of 1007 Woodward
Avenue, passed away sudden-
ly Tuesday morning.
Neel had been a resident of
Port St. Joe for the past 29
years. He was a member of
the Oak Grove Assembly of
God Church and an employee
of St. Joe Paper Company.
Company.
Survivors include his wife,
Mrs. Mary Neel of Port st.
Joe; two sons, George B. Neel
of Howards Creek and Bobby
Neel of Port St. Joe; a
daughter, Mrs. Gayle Ken-
nington of Ward Ridge; 11

CARD OF THANKS
We would like to thank Dr.
Wayne Hendrix and the nurses
at the Municipal Hospital for
the wonderful care and con-
cern for our husband and
father and also the help given
our family during our time of
grief.
We would like to thank all
our friends and relatives for
the visits, cards, flowers, food,
all other acts of kindness and
consideration, and especially
for your prayers for our
family. We shall ever be
grateful for everything you
did to make our loss a lot
easier to bear. May God bless
each of you in a very special
way is our prayer.
THE FAMILY OF
MR. ROY THARPE


Comforter Funeral I
Home
Gulf County's First
Beginning 31 Years of
Continuous Service
Pete, Hortense & Rocky Comforter
Telephone 227-3511









,- We offer a complete line : ,


Wedding Stationery
by McPhersons
See it today!

Star Publishing Co.

(i 227-3161


Jacob C. Belin


*.#...*..DD,,.....#g#D#D#EDDDDDU#EDDDEDDG~'~ eD.#.eE....#IN~ ~Ee#..#..kmewD.tIe*f


grandchildren and four great
grandchildren; three broth-
ers, Billy B. Neel of Gothen-
burg, Nebraska, Sam B. Neel
of Sonora, Calif., and Jerry
Neel of Sneads; two sisters,
Mrs. Laura Belle Griffin of
Sneads and Mrs. Lillie Seg-
grest of Grand Ridge.
Funeral services will be
held at 4:00 p.m., this after-
noon from the Oak Grive
Assembly of God Church with
the Rev. David Fernandez,
pastor, officiating, assisted by
Rev. Clayton Wilkinson and
Rev. Lloyd Riley.
Comforter Funeral Home
will be in charge of arrange-
mnents.


Mrs. Daniels

Mrs. Annie Daniels, aged 73,
a resident of 312 Third St.,
Highland View, died unex-
pectedly at 8:30 Thursday
night at her residence. Mrs.
Daniels was a long-time resi-
dent of Highland View.
Survivors include: four
daughters, Mrs. Ella Davis of
Oak Grove, Mrs. Edna
Strange and Mrs. Evelyn
Tootle, both of.White City, and
Mrs. Mildred Crowe of Castle-
berry; two sons, Earnest
Rhames of. White City and
Rufus Rhames of Eureka,
Nevada; 22 grandchildren, 14


REPORT OF CONDITION
Consolidating domestic subsidiaries of the
Consolidating domestic and foreign subsidiaries of the
FLORIDA FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Name of Bank


Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 27, 1177
I Io m IIb


great grandchildren; and two
sisters, Mrs. Ethel Kelly and
Mrs. Lillian McQuagge, both
of Clearmont.
Funeral services were held
at 2:00 p.m. Sunday at White
City Assembly of God Church
with the Rev. Jean Shoots


officiating, assisted by the
Rev. Bobby Taylor. Interment
followed in the family plot of
Pleasant' Rest Cemetery,
Overstreet.
All services were under the
direction of Comforter Pun.
eral Home of Port St. Joe.


FIRST BAPTIST

CHURCH
Corner Third Street and Baltzell Avenue
REV. BILL HEATON, Pastor
STANLEY E. YOUNG, Minister of Music & Youth.
Sunday School ..................... 9:45A.M.
Morning Worship Serice ....:......... 11:00 AM.
Church Training ..................... 6:30P.M.
Evening Worship Service .............. 7:30P.M.
Prayer Meeting (Wed.) .,............. 7:00 P.M.
"Come and Worship Ood with Us"
E-<^%!. I* .


of PORT ST JOE


City


In the state of FLORIDA .at the close of business on December 31,1976
published in response to call made by Comptroller of the Currency. under title 12. United States Code, Section 161.
Charter number 14902 National Bank Region Number Sixth


'Thousands of dollar
Statement of Resources and Liabilities THOUSANDS
Cash and due from banks ................... ................ .............. ..... 1 964
U.S. Treasury securities ......... ........................ ..................... 1, 202 ,
Obligations of other U.S. Gov't. agencies and corps ........................................ None
Obligations of States and political subdivisions ...................... ..................... 2, 8a .
Other bonds, notes, and debentures .............................................206,
Federal Reserve stock and corporate stock ................................................ .32,
Trading account securities ............. .. ...... .... .... ..................... None
Federal funds sold and securities purchased
under agreements to resell ..................... ................... ..... ... .. I 1, 100,
Loans, Total (excluding uneamed income) .................... 5 ,211,
Less: Reserve for possible loan losses ....................... 106 ,
Loans, Net .............................. ....................... ............ 5,105,
Direct lease financing ................... ............................. ........ None
Bank premises, furniture and fixtures, and other assets representing bank premises .............._ 369,
Real estate owned other than bank premises ... .................. ................ .. 26,
Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies ......................... None
Customers' liability to this bank on acceptance outstanding ............................ .. None
Other assets ........................ .. ............................................ 182,
TOTAL ASSETS I.................. ...................... 12,568,
Demand deposits of individuals, prtnshps.. and corps ............................... .. ........ 4,781,
Time and savings deposits of individuals,
prtnshps., and corps. ................... .......................... .......... 2,841, -
Deposits of United States Government ......... ................... ........... ..... ... 54.,
Deposits of States and political subdivisions ............................. 2,916 ,
Deposits of foreign govts, and official institutions, ....... : -. ..:.... ...... None
Deposits of commercial banks.... .......... ..................... .. .. .. None
Certified and officers' checks ................... ........ ........................ 41,
TOTAL DOMESTIC DEPOSITS ............................................ 10,633
Total demand deposits ................................. 5,345 I
Total time and savings deposits ........................... 5,288,
Total deposits in foreign offices ............. ............. ......................... None
TOTAL DEPOSITS IN DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN OFFICES ........... .................. I 10,633,
Federal funds purchased and securities sold
under agreements to repurchase ........ ..... .... ... ........................ 300 .
Liabilities for borrowed money ..................... ... ................... ...... O None
Mortgage indebtedness ............................... ......... .... ......... None
Acceptances executed by or for account of this bank and outstanding ...................... ... None
Other liabilities .......... ................... ................................ ....56, :
TOTAL LIABILITIES (excluding subordinated notes and debentures) ............. .......... 10,989,
Subordinated notes and debentures ................................... ............. .... None
Preferred stock No. shares outstanding None (par value) ................... None
Common stock a. No. shares authorized 1 6 ,000
b. No. shares outstanding 16,000 (par value) $25.00........... 400 ,
surplus vu650, 5
Surplus ................................................................................ -6 5 0 ,
Undivided profits ........7 .................. ...... ....... .. ......... 347
Reserve for contingencies and other capital reserves ...................................... 182,
TOTAL EQUITY CAPITAL ................. ...... ...... ....... ..... 1 579 :
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY CAPITAL ............................... .... ..... 12,568 :
Average for 15 or 30 calendar days ending with call date:
Cash and due from banks .......................................... ................... 2 330
Fed. funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell .......................... 1.606,
Total loans .......................................... ........... ........ 5 .416 ,
Time deposits of $100,000 or more in domestic offices .................................... 3,172
Total deposits ............................... ............... .......... ....... ...... 11 .401


Fed. funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase ....................
Liabilities for borrowed money ........................................ ... ...... .


3one
Nonle


of Winter Weight Yard Goods


Large selection of winter
Weight 100% polyester

DOUBLE Reg. $3.98
KNtoI$598 /2 Price
KNITSto $5.98



Assorted Fabrics 0
Includes: Dotted Swiss, Acrylics, Cottons Bols
and Blends All Sale Priced YD-

ONE GROUP ONE GROUP
Textured Polyester Poly-Cotton Blends
Ideal for blouses and dresses. Reg. $1.98 yd.
Reg. $2.29 & $2.50 $ 59 Sale Price $1 29
Sale PriceI YD. YD.




Thames Fabrics


302 Reid Ave.


Port St. Joe


Standby letters of credit (outstanding as of report date) .............. ....................... None
Time deposits of $100,000 or more (outstanding as of report date)
Time certificates of deposit in denominations of $100,000 or more .......................... 3,172,
Other time deposits in amounts of $100,000 or more ..................................... I Nong


Glen W. Williams

Vice President & Cashier
Ttt.,
of the above-named bank do hereby declare that this Re-
port of Condition is true and correct to the best of my.
knowledge and beief.



Segnature
January 25, 1977


We, the undersigned directors attest the correctness of this statement of resources and liabilities. We declare that it has
been examined by us, and to the best of our knowledge and belief is true and correct.


Directors


Phone 227-2551


Florida First


National Bank.


at Port St. Joe

Monument Ave.


DDEgDgg#AV#g#gg~ggegg~ge.g#egegggggegeggeege.egg*gggggggggggggggggg*ggjggge*ee*eggg #E#EDEDDd'DDEDED 4'., 4'*


1


c~


---L


44







4b










*H wS RICH'SIGA

Jan. 27-28-29, 1977



SSugar Creek Beef or All Meat
.T-Bonesb.39 ROUND $119 Franks P 590
ROUNDBoston Butt Pork

Sirloins Lb. $129 STEAK Lb. Roast Lb. 89
Cube Brisket
Stbak Lb. $129 Satow Lb.39
00 ", ,.b. -Sltlleak b


"EVERYDuA LuO rICES


BLACKBURN
GRAPE JELLY
BLACKBURN
POT of SYRUP
JIF
PEANUT BUTTER


18 Oz.
Jars
40 Oz.
Jars
18 Oz.
Jars


65t
$125


SUNSHINE HYDROX
COOKIES


Nabisco

Saltines
1 lb. box


AS
17 Oz.|^^
Cafi ns ^^^^^^^^^^^^


^^$ 0~


JOHNSON
GLADE SOLIDS
.LIQUID CLEANER
PINE-SOL


"EVERYDAY LOW. PRICES"
AUNT JEMIMA
GRITS1 Lb.
GRITS Pkgs.


6 Oz.
Containers


59'


28 Oz.
Btls.


MCCORMICK
BLACK PEPPER
DOG FOOD
ALPO BEEF CHUNKS


142 Oz. 37
Cans


15 Oz.
Pkgs.


85*


41't Creme Sandwich

89, Oreos


79c


15 oz.


-- --


UAQUKER TAT


CORN














*Sharks Post TwoTWins


- Port St. Joe's Sharks won
two of three games over the
past week and now boast a 9-3
record for their cage season.
Monday night of last week,
the Sharks pulled a squeaker
out of the fire against Mosley
of Panama City, winning over
the Dolphins, 62-61.
A big 20-point last quarter
gave the Sharks their winning
margin in a game which saw
the lead change hands many
times. At the end of the first
period, the two teams were
tied at 12-12. At half time,
Mosley had a slight four point
lead. By the end of the third
period, this lead had been
trimmed to one point and the
Sharks last stanza surge gave
them the one point win.
Only four Sharks scored in
the close contest, with Robert
Thomas leading the way with
18 points. Sidney Nixon added
17, Raymond Rogers 15 and
Preston Gant 12.
McRae led the Dolphins
with 21 points.
Score by quarters:
Port St. Joe 12 14 16 20-62
Mosley 12 18 13 18-61
PORT ST. JOE-Thomas,
9-0-18; Nixon, 8-1-17; Rogers,
5-5-15; Gant, 6-0-12; Roberts,
0-0-0; Fennell, 0-0-0.
MOSLEY-McRae, 9-3-12;
Kirkland, 5-5-15; Huguenard,
4-1-9; C. Huguenard, 1-2-4;
Rogers, 6-0-12.

Saturday night, the Sharks
lost their third game of the
season, when FAMU of Talla-
hassee dumped the local team



Legal Ads

NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Board of County Conmissioners of Gulf
County, Florida, adopted Resolution No.
76-17 in regular session this date. Said
Resolution did close, vacate and aban.
don all right, title and interest the
County had in and to the following
described property.:
That certain road on the West side of
Wetappo Ridge Subdivision leading
from Overstreet Highway, said
Highway being SR-386, toward We-
tappo Creek, all the way from the
Overstreet Highway (SR-386) to the
Last East-West street in the Subdivi-
sion.
Dated this 9th day of,tovember, 1976.
BOARD of COUNT:YOMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Eldridge Money, Chairman
Attest: George Y. Core, Clerk
1It 1.27
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida, adopted Resolution No.
76-18 in regular session this date. Said
Resolution did hereby close, vacate and
abandon all right, title and interest the
County had in and to the following
described property:
The South three (3') feet of Duval
SStreet, in Block 2, in Oak Grove Sub-
division, Gulf County, Florida.
'Dated this 9th day of November, 1976.
BOARD of COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Eldridge Money, Chairman
Attest: George Y. Core, Clerk
It 1-27
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida, adopted Resolution No.
77-2 in regular session this date. Said
Resolution did close, vacate and aban-
don all right, title and interest the
County had in and to the following
described property:
The Southwesterly fifty (50) feet of
the unnamed alley lying in Block
Eleven (11) of Yon's Addition to
Beacon Hill Subdivision as recorded
in Plat Book 1, page 45, Public Re-
cords of Gulf County, Florida.
Dated this 11th day of January, 1977.
BOARDof COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
SBy: Everett Owens, Chairman
ttest: George Y. Core, Clerk It 1-27
IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT
COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DIS-
TRICT OF FLORIDA
Marianna Civil No. 76-40
NOTICE OF MARSHAL'S SALE
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
Plaintiff
vs.
WILLIE FLOYD NOBLES and
DOROTHY NOBLES, his wife,
Defendants.
NOTICE is hereby given that under and
by virtue of a Final Decree of Fore-
closure rendered on the 3rd day of
DecemBer, 1976 by the United States
District Court for the Northern District
of Florida, Marianna Division, in the
case above styled in favor of the
Plaintiff, the undersigned appointed in
said Decree will on 25th February, 1977
at 12:00 o'clock noon EST in front of the
Gulf County Courthouse door in the City
of Port St. Joe, Florida, offer for sale
and sell at public outcry to the highest
bidder for cash the following mortgaged
property, situate, lying, and being in
Gulf County, Florida, and described as
follows:
The South 45 feet of Lot 4 and the
North 30 feet of Lot 6, Block 4, Pine
Ridge Addition to Wewahitchka,
Florida, a subdivision of part of Sec.
tons 23 and 26, Township 4 South,
Range 10 West, Gulf County, Flor-
ida, according to the official plat
thereof on file in plat book 2, page 8,
Public oRecords of Gulf County,
Florida.
SALE SUBJECT TO CONFIRMATION
OF THE COURT
Method of Payment: Cash, Postal
toney Order or Certified Check, pay-
able to United States Marshal.
Dated: 1-10-77
EMMETT E. SHELBY,
UNITED STATES MARSHAL 4t 1-27


REGISTRATION OF
FICTITIOUS NAMES
We the undersigned, being duly sworn,
do hereby declare under oath that the
names of all persons interested in the
business or profession carried on under
the name of PIER 98 RESTAURANT at
302 Fourth Street, Port St. Joe, Florida,
and the extent of the Interest of each, is
as follows:
Robert V. Rogers, 100 percent.
.s- Robert V. Rogers 4t 1-27


74-57.
The Sharks were behind by
only three points at half-time,
but a last half surge by FAMU
put the game out of reach.
Sidney Nixon was the big
man for the Sharks with 17
points. Robert Thomas added
12 and Jim Roberts and Ray-
mond Rogers each had 10.
Bozeman was the big man
for FAMU with 29 points.
Score by quarters:
Port St. Joe 15 15 14 13-57
FAMU 19 14 20 21-74


PORT ST. JOE-Nixon, 6-5-
17; Rogers, 4-2-10; Roberts,
3-4-10; Thomas, 6-0-12; Lane,
3-2-8; Bolden, 0-0-0; Rich,
0-0-0.
FAMU-Bozeman, 13-3-29;
Randolph, 9-2-20; Jackson, 6-1-
13; Jones, 3-0-6; McRae, 1-2-5;
Graham, 1-0-2; Wilkerson, 0-
0-0; Walker, 0-0-0.

Monday night, the Sharks
scored more than 100 points
for the second time this season
in a 107-59 rout of the Apala-


chicola Sharks.
The first period was played
on fairly even terms, but the
Sharks scorched the nets for
40 points in the second stanza
to put the game out of reach
for Apalachicola.
Sidney Nixon, for the second
game in a row, was high man
in the scoring column, with 30
points. Robert Thomas hit 24,
Jim Roberts added 21, Ray-
mond Rogers had 20 and
Chester Fennell had 10.
Lorick posted 19 points to
lead Apalachicola.


"Municipal Hospital is a
good hospital, getting better
every day", administrator
David Dunham told the Ro-
tary Club at their regular
meetjqg last Thursday _at
hoon. Dunham said improve-
ments made during the past
year and plans for the future
will make Municipal an ade-
quate medical treatment sta-
tion for the Port St. Joe area.
Dunham said that last year


the hospital served 1,052 pa-
tients, including 6,237 patient
days and experienced 94
births. The hospital perform-
ed 22,984 lab tests and 2,266
patients used the emergency
room.
The administrator said the
hospital had an average of 20
patients per day last year. He
pointed out the institution had
a capacity of 35-45 beds and
needed to maintain 80 percent


iBowling

NI


\ News- m.
! IIII


Winter Mixed League
Tuesday night the Mixed
League on lanes one and two
saw WJOE Whammos take
three games from Team
Eight. Jim Mashburn (sub)
led the Whammos with a 509
series and 211 game. Team
Eight was led by Steve Wom-
bles with 525.
On lanes three and four it
was Fiesta Food taking three
from 4-Beacons. Top bowler
for Fiesta was Nett Hender-
son with 479 while Duke Jones
led the 4-Beacons with 530.
Lanes five and six saw
Dairy Burger take three from
Team Two. Harry Lowry was
the leader for Dairyburger
with a 556 series and 212 game.
High for Team Two was
James Hicks with 555.
Sylvachem took three from
St. Joe Paper Co. on lanes
seven and eight. Bill Whit-
field's 510 was tops for Sylva-
chem, while David Howell led
SJPC with 498.
Standings W L
Dairyburger 56 12
Sylvachem 45 23
WJOE Whammos 40 28
Team 2 35 33
4-Beacons 30 38
Fiesta Food 26 42
SJPC 23 45
Team 8 17 51

Wed. Nite Ladies' League
On January 19th, the Wed-
nesday Night Ladies' League
met with the following results:
On lanes one and two,
Florida Bank deposited three
games inthe win column with
their win over Pepsi Cola.
Christine Lightfoot rolled a 442
series for the Bank. Kay Kat-
ynsky paced Pepsi Cola with a
420 series.
Highland View Superettes
won three from the Alley Kats.
Mary Brown had a fine series
of 515 with a 198 game. Marian


Deeson of the Alley Kats also
had a fine series of 513 with a
193 game.
Lou Mork rolled a 436 series
for C & G to take three games
from the Play Girls. Margue-
rite Scheffer led the Play Girls
with a 364 series.
Bertha Clayton had a big
series of 517 and a 191 game to
lead St. Joe Furniture to a
three game win over Pate's.
Peggy Heacock was high
bowler for Pate's with a 460
series.
Standings: W L
St. Joe Furniture 5012 17/V2
H. V. Superettes 48 21
Alley Kats 40 28
Florida Bank 33 35
Pate's 28 40
Pepsi Cola 2712 3912
C&G 25 43
Play Girls 20 48

Thursday Nite Ladies' League
The Thursday Nite Ladies'
League met on January 20 in
bowling competition. On lanes
one and two, Red Hot Mamas
won three games from High-
land View Motors. Toby Gray
(sub) bowled a 152 game and
383 series for Red Hot Mamas.
Joyce Gainous had a 129 game
and 374 series for Highland
View Motors.
On lanes three and four,
Renfro won four games from
Surefoots. Brenda Livings led
Renfro with a 167 game and
Bertha Clayton (sub) a 460
series. Elsie Parker and Han-
na Justice each bowled a 121
game and Hanna a 336 series
for Surefoots.
On lanes five and six, Ralph
and Henry's won four games
from Tomlinson Abstract.
Sheila Stoutamire bowled a
138 game and 376 series for
Ralph and Henry's. Laura
Jones bowled a 119 game and
Pam Barbee a 303 series for
Tomlinson.


occupancy to make ends meet.
Plans for the future include
initiation of a contract on
February 1 to provide respir-
ation inhalation therapy, up-
grading the nursing staff and
an in-service education pro-
gram.
Improvements in equipment
recently include the addition
of a ventilator in the surgical
suite, cardiac monitor, fibri-
lator, systascope and many
items of surplus military
equipment.
Dunham said hospital costs
are rising due to new technol-
ogy, more intensive services
being ordered by doctors,
labor costs and inflation.
Dunham said the biggest
problem the local hospital is
having at the present time is
the problem of unpaid bills
which are running at the rate
of 18 percent. "We can't make
it with that percentage", Dun-
ham said.
Guests of the club were Dr.
Rick Morley of Beacon Hill
and David Carl Gaskin of
Wewahitchka.


On lanes seven and eight,
Loonies won three games
from Bowen's Cow Girls.
Connie Ross led Loonies with a
158 game and 402 series. Pat
Hutchinson bowled a 149 game
and 377 series for Cow Girls.
Standings: W L
Renfro 5512 12'/
Ralph & Henry's 51 17
Loonies 42 26
Hi View Motors 411 261/2
Cow Girls 33 35
Red Hot Mamas 19 49
Surefoots 15 53
Tomlinson Abstract 15 53


Gulf Co. Men's League
Monday night on lanes one
and two, Tommy's Shirt &
Trophy won four from Camp-
bell's Drugs. David Roche led
the Trophy Center with 509
while Campbell's high bowler
was R. B. Richardson with
476.
Lanes three and four saw
Butler's Restaurant take four
from U. S. Coast Guard. Harry
Lowry was the big gun for
Butler's with 556. Fred Kleeb
led the Coast Guard with 516.
On lanes five and six it was
10-Pin Lounge taking four
from H. V. Superette. Steve
Womble led 10-Pin with a fine
595 series and 216 game. Joe
Davis was high for H. V.
Superette with 474.
Standings: W L
Butler's Restaurant 16 4
T.'s Shirt & Trophy 15 5
Campbell's Drugs 10 10
10-Pin Lounge 10 10
H. V. Superette 6 14
U. S. Coast Guard 3 17


Score by quarters:
Port St. Joe 24 40 20 23-107
Apalachicola 19 13 8 17- 59
PORT ST. JOE-Thomas,
11-2-24; Nixon, 13-4-30;- Rog-
ers, 9-2-20; Roberts, 10-1-21;
Fennell, 5-0-10; Rich, 0-0-0;


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 27, 1977


Bolden, 0-0-0; Lane, 0-2-2.
APALACHICOLA Evans,
2-0-4; Edenfield, 0-0-0; Wilson,
1-0-2; Joseph, 5-1-11; Davis,
5-0-10; Lorick, 7-5-19; Walker,


3-1-7; Johnson, 0-0-0; Selva,
3-0-6.

During the coming week,
the Sharks will meet Chatta-


PAGE SEVEN


hoochee here in the local gym


hoochee here in the local gym
Friday night at 7:00 p.m.
Monday night, the Sharks
travel to Panama City to meet
Mosley High.


Two More Students Are



Picked for Trip to D.C.


Two more students at Port
St. Joe High School have been
selected to participate in A
Presidential Classroom for
Young Americans. They and








~I

14


Elijah Smiley


other selected high school stu-
dents from throughout the
country will meet in Washing-
ton, D.C. for a nontraditional,
nonpartisan look at the
nation's political structure.
Attending will be John Ray-
mond Sewell of White City,
and Elijah Smiley of 258
Avenue F. Four other students
were named in last week's
paper who are also attending.
During a rigorous seven
days of seminars and on-site
briefings, the two young men
will study the major compo-
nents of the Federal govern-
ment-the executive, legisla-
tive and judicial branches-
plus other institutions which
have significant relationships
with government, among
them the military, the news
media, corporate manage-
ment and organized labor. The
curriculum will include both


the structure of institutions
and the decision-making pro-
cess that, combined with poli-
tical power, is responsible for.
the formation of public policy.


John Raymond Sewell


BLACKWALLS WHITEWALLS
Dec. Dec.
Size Price NOW Price NOW F.E.T.
B78-13 $35.15 $28.00 $39.05 $31.00 $1.80
C78-13 35.85 29.00 39.80 32.00 2.01
C78-14 37.10 30.00 41.25 33.00 2.01
E78-14 38.65 31.00 42.95 34.00 2.26
F78-14 41.35 33.00 45.95 37.00 2.42
G78-14 43,15 34.00 47.90 38.00 2.58
H78-14 46.40 37.00 51.55 41.00 2.80
F78-15 .. ...... 47.15 38.00 2.52
G78-15 44.25 35.00 49.10 39.00 2.65
H78-15 47.50 38.00 52.80 42.00 2.88
J78-15 ...... ..... 54.75 44.00 3.03
L78-15 .. ..... 57.25 46.00 3.12


DELUXE CHAMPION"
4-ply polyester cord.
Blackwall
Size price F.E.T.
A78-13 $22.50 $1.72
B78-13 24.50 1.82
C78-14 25.50 2.01
D78-14 26.50 2.09
E78-14 27.50 2.23
F78-14 30.50 2.37
G78-14 31.50 2.53
H78-14 33.50 2.73
G78-15 32.50 2.59
H78-15 34.50 2.79
L78-15, 36.50 3.09
All prices plus tax and old tire.
Whitewalls just $2 extra.


TRANSPORT TRUCK TIRES
For-pickups, vans and RV's.
Size
6.70-15
S 2Tube-type.
Wf Plus $2.41 F.E.T., exchange.
; Blackwall, 6-ply rating.


FREE MOUNTING
f Firestome
tire purchases


CONVENIENT
TERMS!


STEEL BELTED RADIAL 50T0
"Water Squeezer" tread.
Also Blackwall
Size fits Price F.E.T.
BR78-13 165R13 $52.00 $2.06
BR78-14 165R14 55.00 2.22
CR78-14 175R14 56.00 2.30
DR78-14 185R14 58.00 2.38
ER78-14 185R14 59.00 2.47
FR78-14 195R14 63.00 2.65
HR78-14 215R14 71.00 3.04
GR78-15 205R15 68.00 2.90
HR78-15 215R15 73.00 3.11
JR78-15 225R15 76.00 3.27
LR78-15 235R15 79.00 3.44
All prices plus tax and old tire.
Most sizes in whitewall-add $2 to $4.


BOOSTER CABLES
12 ft. of heavy duty copper wire.

Limit
one set t
at this Additional
price. $5.95.


.Firestone Revolving
Charge (just open an
account)
.American Express


.BankAmericard
.Master Charge
.Carte Blanche
.Diners Club


Municipal Hospital Good,



Getting Better Dunham


7trestone

Prices in this ad at Firestone Stores. Competitively priced wherever you see the Firestone sign.







PATE'S "66" SERVICE

Phone 229-1291 216 Mon. Ave.


All prices plus tax and old tire.


All prices plus tax and old tire.













PAGE EIGHT THURSDAY, JAN. 27, 1977 THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


Wage Reports



Due Monday


A SUCCESS STORY

:...that's the story of our
Rexall Pharmacy...and
it's all because of YOU!
Yes...our success de-
pends on your satisfac-
tion with our service and
our products. That's why
we recommend and fea-
ture Rexall quality pro-
ducts. And, that's why
you can always expect
prompt, courteous atten-
tion to your needs! Call
on us soon...and see!

Your AV PharmacY



BUZZETT'S
DRUG STORE
Ph. 227-3371 817 Wlliams
Conenkit Drive-n Window
Plenty of Free Parking


U,"d


Quarterly wage reports and
social security contributions
for household workers are due
by January 31, according to
David Robinson, Social Secur-
ity Representative for Gulf
County.
"People who pay a house-
hold worker $50 or more in
cash wages in any three-
month calendar quarter must
send a report of the wages,
along with the social security
contribution, to the Internal
Revenue Service within one
month after the end of the
quarter," Robinson said.
Quarters are January-Feb-
ruary-March, April-May-
June, July-August-September,
and October-November-De-


Social Club

Meeting Sat.

There will be a social club
meeting held on Saturday,
January 29, at 1:30 p.m. in
North Port St. Joe at Allen's
Cafe on Main St.
Any persons 17 and older are
invited to attend. New mem-
bers are needed.


cember. "Wage reports and
social security contributions
for the last quarter of 1976 are
due by January 31, 1977,"
Robinson said.
People who employ house-
hold workers can file the wage
report on a form available at
any Internal Revenue Service
office-"Employer's Quarter-
ly Tax Return for Household
Employees (for Social
Security)."
The 1976 social security
contribution for a household
employee is 5.85 percent of
covered wages. The employer
pays a matching amount.
Social security contribu-
tions help build retirement,
disability, survivors, and
Medicare protection for 11/
million household workers and
their families.
People who employ house-
hold workers can get a free
copy of the leaflet, "Social
Security and Your Household
Employee," at any social
security office.
The Panama City Social
Security office is at 1316 Harri-
son Ave. The phone number is
769-4871.


FNB, Inc. Earns



$1.36 Per Share


Florida National Banks of
Florida, Inc. this week an-
nounced net income for the
year 1976 of $13.4 million or
$1.36 per share, compared
with $9.2 million or $0.93 per
share in 1975.
This represents an increase
of $0.43 per share, or 46
percent over last year for the
$1.6 billion asset bank holding
company which owns 32 banks
statewide.
Net income for the fourth
quarter of 1976 was $3.5 mil-
lion or $0.35 per share as com-
pared to $1.1 million or
$0.10 per share for the same
period in 1975.
John H. Manry, Jr., Presi-
dent and Chief Executive Offi-
cer, stated that the increase in
earnings reflects a substantial
improvement in the loan por-
tfolio as shown by the decline
in the required provision for
possible loan losses, $3.6


million in 1976 as compared to
$10.4 million in 1975. He also
felt that substantially all pro-
blem loans have been identi-
fied and either charged off or
provided for in the reserve for
possible loan losses.

On December 31, 1976 total
assets of Florida National
Banks of Florida, Inc. were
$1,628 million, an increase of
five percent compared with
$1,548 million on December 31,
1975.

CARD OF THANKS
We would like to thank each
one of you for the many
kindnesses shown during our
time of sorrow. The food,
clothing and money were very
much appreciated. May God
bless each and everyone of
you.
THE CARMELLA
STEWART FAMILY


to look at out of the freezing weather we had
W inter's A artistry here in Port St. Joe last week and set a water
hose to running on the chain link fence which
surrounds the company property during the
The men at St. Joe Paper Company's night. The results were this fence full of
guard shack decided to get something pretty icicles. -Star photo


Clyde Farmer Responsible for Success of Plastics Firm


Apollo Supply and Plastics
Co., a small plastic specialty
business on Jackson Bluff
Road in Tallahassee has pro-
duced articles ranging from a
terrarium to a respirator, all
crafted of acrylic plastic.


The firm specializes in a
variety of plastic items, with
many designed and made to
order by Apollo's designer and
salesman Clyde Farmer.

Farmer is a native of Port


St. Joe, and is the son of Mrs.
Ferrin Rogers of Port St. Joe.

Ira Chester, owner of the
firm, said of Farmer, "He's a
genius in the quality of work
he does." Farmer's expertise


lies in the welding and shaping
of the plastic sheeting which is
the basis for each product
produced.
"If people can't get it done
elsewhere, they come here,"
said Farmer. "Sometimes the


other companies are too big or
too small to handle the job."
The firm's biggest project to
date, according to Chester,
was producing a mirrored r
plastic dance floor for a Talla-
hassee restaurant and lounge.


RE- E A -,Atm.bil
FORa~ SAiLE^ For SaI
"^^ *vj ^L


650 yard trammel net, 400
yd. gill net. Call 227-8305.
tfc 1-27

Kenmore zig zag sewing
machine, 8 decorative stitches
excellent condition. Call 229-
6369. tfc 1-27

1974 Yamaha motorcylce,
front disc brakes, sissy bar,
crash bars and luggage rack.
Recently tuned, new points &
plugs. $550 or $600 with hel-
met. Phone 229-5973. Itp 1-27


1972 15' Smoky camper,
sleeps 6. self-contained. Call
229-6278. 2tc 1-20

Used automatic 2 cycle
washing machine, Whirlpool,
all porcelain cabinet, operat-
ing. $50. 227-4636. 2tp 1-20

"The Great Tide", a beauti-
ful hardbook edition is in its
sixth printing, one of Florida's
most famous historical novels
written by Rubylea Hall, for-
mer resident of Port St. Joe, is
now on sale at Campbell's
Drug Store, Buzzett's Drug
Store, Pauline's Restaurant,
Economy Washeteria or con-
tact Mrs. Eunice H. Brinson,
229-4171. Ideal for gifts.
tfc 1-13

Lovely antique pendant
watch. Sacrifice $200.00. Call
227-3151 or 648-3197.
tfc 1-6

Mirrors for sale: 7" x 70",
$1.50; 10" x 70", $2.00. Pick up
at Smith's Pharmacy or Raf-
field's Fisheries. tfc 1-6

DRY cleaning carpets is
easier, faster, ans safer with
HOST. Rent our machine. St.
Joe Furniture, 229-1251.
tfc 10-23

CB Radios and marine elec-
tronics sales and service. 106
Monument Ave., phone 229-
8100. Open daily five p.m. to
nine p.m., Saturday, eight
a.m. to five p.m. tfc 10-7

I will demolish houses,
garages for materials. 229-
6402. tfc 1-6

FOR STANLEY HOME
PRODUCTS
Cal Betty Gilbert
648-7534
tfc 7-15

CB Radios, Johnson, Craig,
Surveyor, antennas, base sta-
tions, terms available. West-
ern Auto. tfc 3-4

Firewood for sale, short
2x4's. You load pick-up truck,
$10. We load and deliver dump
truck full, $25. 229-6380. tfc 10-7


12' galvanized canoe trailer,
229-6961. tfc 12-23

Custom-made wooden name
plaques, for mail boxes, front.
gates, door posts, etc. Econo-
my Motors & Garden Center,
301 Hwy. 98, HV, 229-6001.






Lot for Sale: St. Joe Beach,
nice yard, with facilities for
trailer. 75' by 150' depth. For
information call 227-8241 or
229-6129. tfc 1-20

Two BR home, large store
front at 110 Duval St. 229-8353.
2tc 1-20


Frame house, completely
furnished, fireplace. metal
garage, greenhouse full of
plants. 400' new chain link
fence at Dalkeith. 639-5335. No
calls collect please. 4tp 1-20

12' x 60' mobile home, par-
tially furnished, carpeted, 2
BR. 1 acre of land, cleared and
part landscaped, in White
City. Complete with new deep
well and pump, 10 x 10' utility
bldg., with concrete floor.
Phone 229-5692 after
5:00. tfc 1-13

VETERANS $300 down.
We have 2 new brick homes
for sale in Wewahitchka.
These homes have 3 BR, 2
baths, central heat, carpet,
garage, etc. FHA and conven-
tional financing available.
Call collect 205-794-6711
Dothan. An equal housing op-
portunity builder. tfc 9-23

3 BR house, bath, LR, DR,
kitchen, den, carpet, 112 lots.
$15,000. Can be seen after one
p.m. 516 9th St. tfc 11-25


OAK GROVE
3 BR house, 202 Chero-
kee St. $10,000.00.
ST. JOE BEACH
3 BR masonry house
on two lots. Landscaped,
chain link fence, very
good buy at $22,500.00.
DEAD LAKES AREA
2 BR frame house near
Bryant's Landing on one
acre of land. To sell
furnished for $12,500.00.

2 BR house on six lots in
C. F. Hanlon's Subdv. To
sell for only $7,000.00.
FRANK HANNON
Reg. Real Estate Broker
227-3491
After Hours ('all
229-5641 or 648-5364
3tc 1-13


House, 3 BR, 11/ bath, Ir, dr,
kitchen, block, one year old,
$28,000. 229-6319. 2110 Long
Ave. tfc 11-1

3 BR house, 2 baths, 3 lots on
Palm Blvd. For information
call 227-2181. tfc 11-4

New brick home at 106 Yau-
pon Ave. 3 BR, 2 bath, dining
room, living room, den and
kitchen. Call 227-2291 or 229-
5302. tfc 10-7

New brick home, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, fireplace, 1,800
sq. ft. Call 229-8119. tfc 7-22

House at White City, 3. bed-
rooms, 2 baths, 1%4 acres of
land .oll 299-1138 aftpr 5 n m
p m~~~


There will be a regular
communication of Port St. Joe
Lodge No. 111. F. & A.M.,
every first and third Thursday
at 8:00 p.m.
R. C. CHANDLER, W.M.
F. E. Brogdon, Sec.

R.A.M.-Regular c,>,, .a-
tion on St. Joseph Chapter No.
56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd Mon-
days, 8 p.m. All visiting com-
panions welcome.
J. L. SIMS, H.P.
E. William McFarland, Sec.

There will be a VFW meet-
ing the third Tuesday of each
month in the American Legion
Hall. tfc 6-19


Help Wanted

Wanted: Secretary for Gulf
County Panhandle Alcoholism
office. Should type 50 wpm,
and have previous experience.
Send resume to Doreen
Greene at 321 Reid Ave.. Port
St. Joe or phone229-3515. It

WORK AT HOME in spare
time. Earn $250.00 per 1000
stuffing envelopes. Send 25c
plus stamped, self-addressed
envelope to: R.P. SALES, P.
0. BOX 8327. MERRILL-
VILLE, INDIANA 46410.
4At 1-1


Furnished apartment for
rent for single person or
couple. 227-3261.

Furnished apartment for
rent, 510 8th St. Call 229-6895
before 5:30; 229-6827 after
5:30.


1975 Granada, silver with
red interior, fully loaded. Call
648-5272. Itp 1-27

1966 Skylark Buick, $150.
Call 648-5370. 4tp 1-13

1974 Pinto station wagon,
auto. ,air, radio and heater,
excel. cond. $2,000. Call Bob
Moss, day 227-3151 or nite 648-
3157. tfc 1-13

1973 Olds Delta 88, silver
with black interior, fully load-
ed. Call 648-5272. Itp 1-27

1976 Chevy Bonanza van,
full customized and loaded
with many extras. 227-8581.
4tp 1-6


tfc 9-23 1975 Mazda, take up pay-
ments $100.74 month. Call
227-7871. 4tp 1-6


1972 Dodge pickup, D100,
auto. side boxes. Call 648-5272.
Itp 1-27

1976 Chevy van, loaded, call
227-8241 before 5 p.m., after 5
p.m., call 229-6129. tfc 11-11






Furnished house for rent at
528 7th St. Call 648-7581 or 229-
6897.- tfc 12-30

FOR RENT: furnished
large 2 bedroom house, auto-
matic heat, carport, laundry
and storage room. Call 229-
6777 after 6 P.M.

Beach cottage for rent. Call
648-5144. tfc 9-2


WANTED
Wanted: Aluminum cans-for
the retarded adults. Monies
derived from sale of the cans
will be used to purchase
supplies to'be used for activi-
ties. Please call 229-6327 or,
bring by the Center at 113
Main St. 1-6

Wanted to Buy: 14' or 15'
boat trailer. 229-6961.
.tf 1.2-23




NO need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture,
229-1251. tfc 10-23

Public address system.
Owned by the Port St. Joe
Kiwanis Club. A new system
operable on either battery or
current. Call Ken Herring,
227-5281 for rental. tfc


FOR RENT


For Rent,: Small commer-
cial building in Oak Grove,
suitable for offices, beauty
shop, child care center. Phone
229-6875. 2tp 1-27

1 BR trailer and 2 BR trailer
at St. Joe Beach, Canal St. For
more info call 648-5650. For
Sale: 1967 extra clean Impala
Chevrolet, good cond., for
more information, call 648-
5650. tfc 1-6

Trailer lot for rent on bay at
Simmons Bayou, large enough
for several trailers. Call 653-
9928 or write Box 812, Apalach-
icola 32320. 2t 1-20

CARPET Cleaning with
HOST couldn't be easier. Just
brush and vacuum for clean,
dry carpets. Rent our HOST
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
229-1251. tfc 10-23

For carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vac, the portable steam car-
pet cleaning system. Avail-
able at Western Auto, phone
227-2271, 219 Reid Ave.

For Rent: One 2 BR house
on Duval St. at Oak Grove,
also one 3 BR furnished house
on Beacon Hill. Call 229-6961.
tfc 12-16

mobile home sites at
Rustic Sands Campground.
Mexico Beach. $30.00 month.
Laundry and rec hall. 648-3600.
tfc 12-9

Why live in the crowded
city? Move your mobile home
to peace, quiet and tran-
quility. Water, garbage collec-
tions, yards mowed, live lei-
surely. Gulf privileges. Only
VA approved mobile home
park in Gulf County. Ski
Breeze Meadows Trailer
Park, 9 miles southeast of
Port St. Joe on Hwy S-30.
Come out and enjoy the quiet.
tfc 5-6


SERVICES


FOR TV REPAIRS and
Zenith Sales see K&D TV and
Sound at 301 Reid Avenue. Call
227-2071. tfc-1-27

REPAIRS
Aluminum screens and doors,
carpentry, house repair, mill-
work, roof repair and re-roof-
ing.
SMITH & SON WORKSHOP
Phone 229-6018
Port St. Joe
tfc 7-22


i SERVICES


L and L Repair
and Rental
for Repairs to Washers, Dry-
ers Refrigerators, Air Condi-
tioners and all appliances,
plus rental of large and small
tools. Sandblasting done also.
Call 648-5272

Professional help with emo-
tional problems and-or con-
cerns. Gulf County Guidance
Clinic, Port St. Joe. 227-2691 or
227-7586. tfc 11-14


NEED CASH OR JUST
CLEANING HOUSE?
Sell me that unwanted gun,
highest cash paid, regardless
of age, make or condition.
Also buying extra barrels and
parts.
Red Carter, Gunsmith
St. Joe Beach
tfc 1-6



Tires Now Installed
FREE
In Our Own
Auto Service Center
Western Auto Assoc. Store
227-2281
3-4 tfc

Septic Tanks Pumped Out
.Carefoot Septic Tank
229-8227, 229-2351,
and 229-6694.
tfc 7-1


Carpentry Work Done
Reasonable Rates
Jimmy Johnson
Phone 227-7657
tfc 8-19

ST. JOE MACHINE CO. -
Machine Work Welding
506 First Street
Phone 229-6803
Machinist on duty all day
Every day


GLEN'S CABINET SHOP
Kitchen Cabinets -
Vanities Mill Work
Cabinet Hardware & Tops
White City, Hwy. 71
Glen Combs
Shop 229-6017 or
229-6530
tfc 1-13


Complete Wood Shop
Custom Cut Lumber
Want to Do It Yourself?
Then come see us for Stan-
ley tools, hardware, paneling,
paint, lumber.
Earley's Hardware &
Building Supply
Hwy. 98 W. tfc 8-5 229-2763


LEWIS FLOOR CLEANING All types carpet and vinyl
All Types flooring installed. 10 years
229-6482 or 229-6447 experience. For free measure-
tfc 9-20 ment and estimate, call Ron-?
ald Ross, 229-6822. tfc 12-2


Lawn mowers, tillers and
garden tractors repaired.
Economy Motors & Garden
Center, 301 Hwy. 98, HV,
229-6001. tfc 8-5

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Meets
Fri. at 8 p.m., Sun. at 4 p.m.
St. James Episcopal Church
Parish House
tfc 4-24

For Your
Painting &
Wallpaper Needs
Call
"SPOTBALL"
Phone 227-5716.
12tc 1-6



House Needing Repair?
Skilled Carpenter
Will Do Repair Work
of Any Kind
Call 229-6271
2tp 1-13


Lawn & Gardening Needs
Feed
Lawn Mower &
Small Engine Repairs
Economy Motors &
Garden Center
301 Hwy. 98 H.V.
229-6001
tfc 8-5


Your'SHERWIN-WILLIAMS
PAINT Dealer in
Port St. Joe









HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida




















tfc -5
tfe 8-5


VINYL REPAIR SERVICE
We repair cuts, tears, ciga-
rette burns. Also vinyl clean-
ing and reconditioning. For
free estimates call
648-5272
tfc 1-7


GRIFFIN'S
Refrigerator & Air
Conditioner Repairs
Call
229-6492
All work guaranteed
tfc 12-2


Wouldn't You Really
Rather Have Cable TV?





For Cable TV
Installation In Port St. Joe
i,lIh a H.r1l .,- l
Phone 229-7232
Or Visit the Telephone Company
Business Office


THURSDAY, JAN. 27, 1977


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


PAGE EIGHT


ICIIIU. 1-cill zLv-lla(


m







Family Pak

Fryer


Prices Good
Jan. 27 -


Breasts
Leg Qtrs.
Giblets


,l iowa Corn Fed USDA
SCfioice SIRLOIN TIP
STEAK

S'$159


'-.'or Whole
Sunnyland Smoked
HAMS-
Whri-e They Last'
99A. '
;.2,,,- "W ^ .!


r -Iowa Corn Fed USDA
Choice SIRLOIN
STEAKS

,..^;::IS A!K S....,
& .' ; ..* .: .


Iowa Corn Fed USDA
Choice CUBED
STEAKS
d _.d .i^~b


Lb.


Hormel
Smoked
Sausage


Iowa Corn Fed USDA Choice
T-Bone Steak


39
Lb.


L. $179
LB. J


USDA Choice
Shoulder Roast LB.


Lean Home Made
Pan Sausage
Log Camp
Sliced Bacon


99c


LB. 99"
12, 69z


10 Lbs. Frozen
Chitter-
lings


Family Pack
Fryer
Parts


"" I -I I


Rath
Roll Sausage
Old Fashioned
Hoop Cheese
Smoked
Pork Chops
Apalachicola
OYSTERS


LB. 690
LB. $169

LPt $159
Pnt $189


Fresh Pork
Neck Bones


USDA Choice
Rib Eye Steak
Fryer
Necks & Backs


Whole
Slab


Bacon


L. 49c
LB. 279

LB. 19'
LB. 69'


Strickland
Smoked
Sausage


Whole
BBQ Chicken


Fresh
Pork


Steak


Frozen
Turkey


Clark's
Beef


Steaks


$


$ 49
Each $249

LB. 79'
LB. 49'
Pkg $189


PR ..EAN. UT .
';"PURE PANUT


;A99


RE- T mo "".-. .... r" "
-. Armour .

STREET


12 Oz.


S, .F in e .............*. ?-F 'l
Fine Fare: --


Bleach


Gallon


C'


24 Oz.


71/4 Oz. Golden Grain
Mac. and
Cheese Dinners
3/89C


9 Oz. Fine Fare
WHIPPED
TOPPING
2/99C


No. 303 Del Monte
Cut
Green Beans
3/$1.00


1 Lb.
PREMIUM
SALTINES
59C


Barbara Dee
COOKIES
3/$1.00


Giant Size
Chiffon
Dish Liquid
69C


Fine Fare
TOWELS
2/99C


16 Oz. Fine Fare
COFFEE
CREAMER
99C


32 Oz. Heinz
KEG
KETCHUP

89


12 Oz. Cans
Coca-Cola
Coca-Colas Only
6/$1 os


16 Oz. Van Camp
PORK &
BEANS

3/nt1


64 Oz. Boden
BREAKFAST
DRINK


C


Orange
or Grape


59C


Van Camp New Orleans
Style Kidney
BEANS


2 Lb. Handy Pak
FRENCH
FRIES
49C


No. 303 Double Luck
GREEN
BEANS
3/69C


No. 212 Del Monte
PEACH
HALVES
59C


2 Lb. Awrey
Happy
Birthday CAKE
$3.32


Fertilizer
Variety!


10 Oz. Froz. Birdseye
PEAS
39C


10 Oz. Froz. Birdseye
Cut Corn
39'


22 Oz. Returnable
RC Cola
and Flavors
4/99C


Fresh Sweet Crispy Stalk Golden Ripe Fresh Regular
Lettuce Potatoes Celery Bananas Tomatoes Oranges


39 19c 39 19 39c Doz 39
9and Up119Lb.139Lb.1Lb.


Pound
Bag


Regular Potatoes


$2.99


Regular
$3. 75 with $20.00
or More
Food Order


10 Lb. Bag
Regular Potatoes 9 9


Limit 2
U


50


0 SAVINGS.
WARM TO UR


" II~CIP&-; *-


- f-.k


*:; ,,-


....
;1









PAGE TEN


THE STAR, Port St. loe, Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 27, 1977


Cindy Cassani Entering



State Jr. Miss Pageant


Pensacola-A Port St. Joe
teenager, Cynthia Cassani, is
one of 30 high school senior
girls from across the state
preparing for her "moment of
truth" as the countdown
begins for the week-long Flor-
ida Junior Miss Program
here.
The daughter of retired
Navy Captain and Mrs. Henry
L. Cassani, Cynthia will repre-
sent Port St. Joe in the twen-
tieth renewal of the statewide
program honoring Florida's
first ladies of youth.
This year's program will
kick off January 30 and run
through February 5.
Along with 29 of the state's
loveliest and most talented
high school senior girls, Cyn-
thia will be challenging for the
coveted title of Florida's ideal
teenager miss, as well as a
host of prizes and awards
topped by a full college tuition
scholarship.
In addition to the personal
awards and honors, Cynthia
will also be vying for the
opportunity to represent the
state in the national Junior
Miss finals later this year in
Mobile, Ala.
Cynthia (Cindy), whose


interests include all sports,
especially baseball, track and
soccer, and whose hobbies


include dancing, astronomy
and geology, hopes to earn a
masters' degree in psychology


1IlY------nukul
& &
Whfevfr You Nygd

































Business Opportunities Merchandise for Sale






O CD






v_








IgntAI Ring










Phone 227-3161



THE STAR


and them embark upon a
career in social services.
The week-long series 'of
events leading to the selection
of the 1977 Florida Junior Miss
begin with the arrival of the 30
contestants in Pensacola on
January 30.
Upon their arrival here, the
contestants will check-in for
registration, news media
interviews and photographic
sessions. The day will con-
clude with an orientation
meeting between contestants,
parents and program officials.
During the week, the talent-
ed title-seekers will spend
endless hours in rehearsals,
take part in social events,
participate in news confer-
ences, judges' interviews and
preliminary judging events. A
limited amount of time will be
available for sightseeing in
the nation's first settlement
and personal shopping.
Highlight of a crowded
social calendar will be the
Mayor's VIP Banquet at the
Pensacola Country Club on
Feb. 3. Rear Admiral Fran
McKee, Director of Naval
Educational Development,
and the first woman line
officer in the U. S. Navy to
advance to flag rank, will be
the guest speaker.
The final day of the program
completes a journey and
experience that for many of
the contestants began as early
as four months back. Selec-
tion and naming of the 1977
Florida Junior Miss and her
crowning by Panama City's
Mary Jo Rankin, reigning title
holder, will come during cere-
monies in Pensacola's Muni-
cipal Auditorium on Feb. 5.


Mrs. Cha


Named I

Chambe


The 1977 slate of officers of
the Chamber of Commerce of
Mexico Beach was installed
by the outgoing president,
Charley Evans, during the
January meeting. Installed
were: Barbara Champion,
president; Eldon Miller, vice
president; Sue Davis, treasur-
er; Traci Gaddis, secretary;
and Rella Wexler, publicity
chairman.
Chairpersons for the year
are to meet once a month
preceding the regular meet-
ing. President Champion will
meet with them on February
10 at 6:30 p.m. in the Cham-
ber building. Chairpersons
are: Olin Davis, membership;
Betty Corey, bingo; Bill
Champion, Ling Ding Fiesta;
Dana Angerer and Sylvia
Whaley, children's activities;
Gertrude Guilford, food;
Traci Gaddis, Chamber build-
ing; and .Faye Koebrugge,
entertainment.
The Chamber cookbooks are
available and may be pur-
chased from Mrs. Champion,
648-5200, or Mrs. Gaddis, 648-
5474.
A new bulletin board has
been placed on the wall adja-
cent to the Mexico Beach post
office in the general store, to
be used solely for Chamber
news.
Commencing with the Febr-
uary meeting on Monday, the
21st of February, the covered
dish supper will be from 7-7:30
p.m., with the regular meeting
starting at 7:30 p.m.
The winning tickets for a
raffle which was to have -been
drawn in December, 1976, will
be drawn during the Feb-
ruary meeting: first prize, $25
and a turkey; second prize,
$15 and a ham; third prize, $10
and a slab of bacon.
It was announced that the
Chamber Building is available
for use by members and non-
members for daytime and
evening affairs. Interested
persons are to contact Mrs.
Gaddis for available dates.
The City of Mexico Beach
has requested the use of the
booths which are currently on
the island property of the City.
These booths are to be moved
by the City for storage space
and will be on loan from the
Chamber. Two of the booths
will be moved to the Chamber
building for use as an outside
kitchen.
Dues for membership are
due now and should be for-


Alcohol,

Gasoline

Don't Mix
Tips on the use of alcohol if
driving were offered by the
Florida Highway Patrol re-
cently.
Colonel Eldrige Beach, Pa-
trol director asks this ques-
tion, "When you drink alcoho-
lic beverages, how much is too
much if you are going to
drive?"
The answer differs for each
person depending upon such
things as body weight, physi-
cal and mental condition, the
type of beverage, amount
consumed, length of time be-
tween drinks and amount of
food in the stomach. Special
studies do indicate drinking to
be a factor in a large percent
of fatal motor vehicle acci-
dents.
No one can correctly boast
that "drinking has no effect on
me." Alcohol is a depressant
drug which is absorbed almost
immediately into the blood-
stream and affects the central
nervous system. Even two or
three drinks within a short
time can affect reflexes,
judgement, coordination and
clarity of vision and speech.
Alcohol is eliminated from the
body at a fixed rate which is
not speeded up by exercise,
fresh air, black coffee or cold
showers.
Whether it is holiday obser-
vances, family celebrations, a
need to relax after a hard day,
or any other occasion on which
having "a few drinks" is
customary, observe these cau-
tions:
Don't drink doubles.
Space your drinks out over a
long period.
Have something to eat, or
nibble, while you're drinking.
Don't drink if you're taking
prescription drugs or other
medicines.


impion


each

r Prexy
warded to the Chamber of
Commerce, Box 13382, Mexico
Beach 32410, or given to Mr.
Davis, membership chair-
man.


Smokey Says:


Follow Smokey's advice-
break your matches!


of hard rock maple and oak


t-. .


Seals
Capsule
Sealing the State Bicenten-
nial time capsule with a
symbolic tap of a mallet is
Secretary of State Bruce
Smathers as Archives Divi-'
sion Director Robert Williams
looks on at the new R. A. Gray
Archives Building in Tallahas-
see during a ceremony in
which the capsule was pump-
ed full of argon gas to pre-
serve more than 60 items until
opening July 4, 2075. Cap-
sulized items include Gov.
Reubin Askew's toothbrush, a
polka dot bikini and studies on
Florida's ecology and econo-
my.


You Are Cordially Invited to Attend

LONG AVENUE

Baptist Church
Corner Long Ave. and 16th St.


SUNDAY SCHOOL ...................
MORNING WORSHIP .................
CHURCH TRAINING .................
EVENING WORSHIP ................
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ....


Rev. J. C. ODUM,
Pastor


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
5:45 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.


Jerome Cartier,
Minister of Music


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I Port St. Joe I


r School Lunch


Port St. Joe High Sch
Lunchroom Menu
Monday, Jan.31
Hamburger with bun,
chips, chili with beans,
kernel corn, lettuce, t
pickles, peanut butte
lights, milk.
Tuesday, Feb. 1
Luncheon meat sand
lasagna, string beans, 1
fries, tomato wedge, chi
pudding, milk, rolls.
Wednesday, Feb.
Barbecue chicken, n
potatoes, green butter
fruit cup, bread, milk.
Thursday, Feb. 3
Roast beef with no
hamburger with bun, 1
fries, English peas,
pie, rolls, milk.
Friday, Feb. 4
Chili dog with bun,
kernel corn, tuna
tomato slice, fruited jel
topping, crackers, milk


MENUS1


hool Port St. Joe Elementary
s & Highland View Elementary
Lunchroom Menus
potato Monday, Jan. 31
whole Chili with beans, whole ker-
omato, nel corn, tossed salad, pea-
er de-
nut butter delights, milk.
Tuesday, Feb. 1
riches, Hamburger with bun, string
French beans, lettuce, tomato, pic-
ocolate kles, French fries, chocolate
pudding, milk.
2 Wednesday, Feb. 2
lashed Barbecue chicken, mashed
beans, potatoes, green butter beans,
fruit cup, rolls, milk.
Thursday, Feb. 3
oodles, Roast beef with noodles,
French English peas, tomato and let-
cherry tuce salad, cherry pie, rolls,
milk.
Friday, Feb. 4
whole Tuna salad, whole kernel
salad, corn, French fries, fruited
lo with jello with topping, crackers,
k. milk.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe,.Fla. THURSDAY, JAN. 27, 1977 PAGE ELEVEN


John Paul Blouint In Sigma Chi Frat.
John Paul Blount In Sigma Chi Frat.


Huntingdon

Scholarship

Day Set
The Huntingdon College Of-
fice of Admissions announces
the college's Scholarship Day
for February 12. All high
school seniors are invited to
the day-long event to compete
for honor scholarships to be
awarded for the 1977-78 aca-
demic year.
Huntingdon Scholars
Awards for $1,000 will be
granted to 20 students. The
scholarships will be based on,
academic record, extra-curri-
cular activities, the scores
from the examination taken
on Scholarship Day, and inter-
views with a faculty commit-
tee. The grants are renew-
able for four years if aca-
demic excellence is maintain-
ed.
There will also be auditions
for students who are interest-
ed in performance, scholar-
ships in music, drama and art.
Up to $700 will be available in
these awards. Other scholar-
ships for $500 will be given
from the interviews with the
various academic depart-
ments.
In addition to the scholar-
ships to be awarded, Hunting-
don gives financial aid in the
form of grants, loans, and em-
ployment to those who show
financial needs.
In conjunction with the


GENERAL
REVENUE
SHARING


John Paul Blount


Scholarship Day, Parents'
Day will be held for the
parents of Huntingdon stu-
dents as well as prospective
students. The parents may
visit the various buildings and
talk to the faculty members on
campus.
Those students who are not
competing for Huntingdon
Scholars Awards, but would
like to see the campus are also
invited. For the students who
do plan to compete for scho-
larships, it is preferred that
they have applied for admis-
sion to Huntingdon, although it
is not a requirement.
The day begins at 8:30 a.m.
in the lobby of Flowers Hall.
For additional information
contact William Hamm.
Director of Admissions, Hunt-
ingdon College, 36106, or call
262-3094.


The national fraternity was
founded at Miami University
in Oxford, Ohio, in 1855. Sigma
Chi was originally named
Sigma Phi, but the name was
changed when burglars stole
the fraternity ritual.
Compared to other men's
general college fraternities,


latest available statistics
place Sigma Chi second in the
total number of initiates and
sixth in the number of active
chapters. With the chartering
ceremonies, the TSU frater-
nity will become the Eta Phi
Chapter of Sigma Chi:
Over 60 "brothers" were


ACTUAL USE REPORT


initiated Saturday morning.
Supervising the initiation
ceremony were Sigma Chi

brothers from Auburn Univer-
sity, the chapter which has
been the official "big brother"
John Paul Blount of Port St.
Joe, was among those initiated
into the chapter.


U7


GENERAL REVENUE SHARING PROVIDES FEDERAL FUNDS DIRECTLY TO LOCAL AND STATE GOVERNMENTS. YOUR GOVERNMENT MUST PUBLISH
THIS REPORT ADVISING YOU HOW THESE FUNDS HAVE BEEN USED OR OBLIGATED DURING THE YEAR FROM JULY 1, 1976, THRU DECEMBER 31,
1976. THIS IS TO INFORM YOU OF YOUR GOVERNMENT'S PRIORITIES AND TO ENCOURAGE YOUR PARTICIPATION IN DECISIONS ON HOW FUTURE
FUNDS SHOULD BE SPENT. NOTE: ANY COMPLAINTS OF DISCRIMINATION IN THE USE OF THESE FUNDS MAY BE SENT TO THE OFFICE OF
EVENUEI auHARING. WASHINGTON. D.C. 20226.


ACTUAL EXPENDITURES (Include Obligations) THE GOVERNMENT
(A) CATEGORIES (B) CAPITAL (C) OPERATING / OF PORT ST JOE TOWN
(A) CATEGORIES (B) CAPITAL MAINTENANCE
has received General Revenue Sharing
1 PUBLIC SAFETY $ S payments totaling $ 46 ,700


2 ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION $ $
3 PUBLIC
TRANSPORTATION $ $
4 HEALTH $ $
5 RECREATION $ $
6 LIBRARIES $ $
7 SOCIAL SERVICES
FOR AGED OR POOR $ $
8 FINANCIAL
ADMINISTRATION $
9 MULTIPURPOSE AND
GENERAL GOVT. $
10 EDUCATION $
11 SOCIAL
DEVELOPMENT $
12 HOUSING & COM-
MUNITY DEVELOPMENT $
13 ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT $
14 OTH0R(Specify
v inaqe Pt$an 8.711
IS TOTALS
15 TOTALS$ 8.711 $
NONDISCRIMINATION REQUIREMENTS HAVE BEEN MET
(E) CERTIFICATION: I certify that I am the Chief Executive Officer and,
with respect to the entitlement JWds reported hereon, I certify that they
have not been udsed k viotiun of either the priority expenditure
Ireurement (Section 3)Arjmach unds prohibition (Section

Signature of Chief Exelut Date
FLuank Pnfo, J ih am as it
d ame andfltie


during the period from July 1, 1976 thru December 31, 1976
VACCOUNTNO. 10 2 023 001
PORT ST JOE TOWN
MAYOR
PORT ST JOE FLORIDA


139


32456


V (D) TRUST FUND REPORT (refer to Instruction D) ,
1. Balance as of June 30, 1976 19 ,4 5
2. Revenue Sharing Funds 46 700
Received from July 1, 1976 thru December 31, 1976
3. Interest Received
or Creded (July 1,1976 thru December31, 1976) $ .980
4. Funds Released from Obligations (IF ANY) $


5. Sum of lines 1, 2, 3, 4
6. Funds Returned to ORS (IF ANY)
7. Total Funds Available
8. Total Amount Expended
(Sum of line 15, column B and column C)
9. Balance as of December 31. 1976


67,085
0


S R,7/1
S s9,374


(F) THE NEWS MEDIA HAVE BEEN ADVISED THAT A COMPLETE COPY OF THIS
REPORT HAS BEEN PUBLISHED IN A LOCAL NEWSPAPER OF GENERAL CIRCU-
LATION. I HAVE A COPY OF THIS REPORT AND RECORDS DOCUMENTING THE
CONTENTS. THEY ARE OPEN FOR PUBLIC SCRUTINY AT City Hao,
Polt St. Joe, Ftloidat


Fish and Peanuts?
Why not? Isn't this the year of the peanut? And almost any
food goes well with versatile Florida finfish. An imaginative
cook enjoys being creative with fish and can cook up
something "plain" or fancy any day of the week. With the
wide variety of species available from Florida waters, the
Florida Department of Natural Resources recommends you
add fish to your weekly shopping list. Trout, sheepshead,
grouper, redfish, Spanish or king mackerel are in-
terchangeable in this salad. Choose your favorite and try this
"Peanutty Fish Salad" for a real winner!

PEANUTTY FISH SALAD

3 cups cooked, flaked fish
/2 cup chopped celery
1/ cup dry-roasted peanuts
2 tablespoons mayonnaise or salad dressing
2 tablespoons sour cream
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon grated onion
'/ teaspoon celery seed
/2 teaspoon salt
/4 teaspoon white pepper
Salad greens
Tomato wedges and deviled eggs (garnish)

Combine all ingredients except salad greens. Mix well.
Chill. Serve on crisp salad greens and garnish with tomato
wedges and deviled eggs. Makes 6 servings.


To better reflect today's
agriculture, the official defini-
tion of a farm, as now defined
by the U. S. Dept. of Agricul-
ture and the Bureau of the
Census, is "any establishment
from which $1,000 or more of
agricultural products is sold
or would normally be sold
during a year".
Under the old definition,
S0sed since the late 1950's and
up until the 1974 census, a
farm was any place under 10
acres with annual sales of $250
or more of agricultural goods,
or any place of 10 or more
acres selling $50 or more.
The change in definition
resulted in a decrease in
number of farms. The Bureau
of the Census reports the 1974
information using both defini-
tions.
In view of the diversity of
today's farming operations,
major classes of farms are
now:
Primary Farm: One where


the operator spends at least
half his work-time on the
farm; also one operated by a
corporation or multi-esta-
blishment company which re-
ceives at least half its gross
business income from farm-
ing.
Part-time Farm: One
where the operator spends
less than half his work-time on
the farm.
Business Associated
Farm: One operated by a
corporation or multi-esta-
blishment company which
receives less than half its
gross income from farming.
A fourth class of "abnormal
farm" is used to define farms
operated by an institution
such as a hospital or school or
by an Indian reservation or as
an experimental or research
farm.
There are several value-of-
sale classes for farms with
over $100,000 of sales and also
there are several, detailed
categories for types of farms.


Dr. D. C. Blanchard
ANNOUNCES HIS ASSOCIATION WITH

Dr. G. T. Newberry AND Dr. J. E. Corry
In the Practice of Optometry

NEWBERRY OPTOMETRIC CLINIC
470 Harrison Ave., Panama City, Florida
Monday thru Friday Saturday
8:30-5:30 TELEPHONE 769-1686 8:30-12:00


(U


GENERAL REVENUE SHARING PROVIDES FEDERAL FUNDS DIRECTLY TO LOCAL AND STATE GOVERNMENTS. YOUR GOVERNMENT MUST PUBLISH
THIS REPORT ADVISING YOU HOW THESE FUNDS HAVE BEEN USED OR OBLIGATED DURING THE YEAR FROM JULY 1, 1976, THRU DECEMBER 31,
1976. THIS IS TO INFORM YOU OF YOUR GOVERNMENT'S PRIORITIES AND TO ENCOURAGE YOUR PARTICIPATION IN DECISIONS ON HOW FUTURE
FUNDS SHOULD BE SPENT. NOTE: ANY COMPLAINTS OF DISCRIMINATION IN THE USE OF THESE FUNDS MAY BE SENT TO THE OFFICE OF
REVENUE SHARING, WASHINGTON, D.C. 20226.
ACTUAL EXPENDITURES (Include Obligations) THE GOVERNMENT
CATEGORIESS (B)CAPITAL (C) OPERATING OF GULF COUNTY
(A) MAINTENANCE
has received General Revenue Sharing
# $ 130 $ 84825 payments totaling $ 67 ,987


2 ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION $ $
3 PUBLIC
TRANSPORTATION $ $
4 HEALTH $ $
5 RECREATION $ $ 500
6 LIBRARIES $ S
7 SOCIAL SERVICES
FOR AGED OR POOR $ $
8 FINANCIAL
ADMINISTRATION $
9 MULTIPURPOSE AND
GENERAL GOVT. $
10 EDUCATION $
11 SOCIAL
DEVELOPMENT $
12 HOUSING & COM-
MUNITY DEVELOPMENT $
13 ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT $
14 OTHER (Speciy)


$ 130 $ 85357


NONDISCRIMINATION REQUIREMENTS HAVE BEEN MET
(E) CERTIFICATION: I certify that I am the Chief Executive Officer and,
with respect to the entitlement funds reported hereon, I certify that they
have not been used in violation of either the priority expenditure
requirement (Section 103) or the matching funds prohibition (Section
14),f the Act. /
XV c'uJ^. i^, Jan.19,1977
Signature of Chief Executl e Date
Everett Owens Jr Chairman
Name and title


during the period from Jdly 1, 1976 thru December 31, 1976
VACCOUNTNO. 10 1 023 023
GULF COUNTY
CHRN BD OF COMM
COURTHOUSE
PORT ST JOE FLORIDR


32456


V (D) TRUST FUND REPORT (refer to instruction D)
1. Balance as of June 30, 1976 $ 31 ? ,444
2. Revenue Sharing Funds 67 987
Received from July 1, 1976 thru December 31, 1976
3. Interest Received
or Credited (July 1, 1976 thru December 31, 1976) S
4. Funds Released from Obligations (IF ANY) $
5. Sum of lines 1, 2, 3, 4 $ 385,431


6. Funds Returned to ORS (IF ANY)
7. Total Funds Available


385,431
$ 385,431


8. Total Amount Expended 85 487
(Sum of line 15, column B and column C) $ 85,487
9 Balanne anf na D mhr 1, 1076i 299 944


(F) THE NEWS MEDIA HAVE BEEN ADVISED THAT A COMPLETE COPY OF THIS
REPORT HAS BEEN PUBLISHED IN A LOCAL NEWSPAPER OF GENERAL CIRCU-
LATION. I HAVE A COPY OF THIS REPORT AND RECORDS DOCUMENTING THE
CONTENTS. THEY ARE OPEN FOR PUBLIC SCRUTINY AT Gulf County
Courthouse. Port St. Joe. Florida


STATEMENT

OF



CONDITION



SAS OF DECEMBER 31, 1976
7c31


CITIZENS



FEDERAL


Assets


Mortgage Loans and Other Liens on Real Estate ....................
A ll O their Loans .. ...... ............. .............................
Real Estate Owned and in Judgment ..................................
Loans and Contracts Made to Facilitate Sale of Real Estate ..........
Cash on Hand and in Banks ...........................................


$6,444,614.40
141,757.38

31,099.07
808,990.96


Investments and Securities .......................................... 72,025.00
Fixed Assets less Depreciation ...................................... 15,370.38
Deferred Charges and Other Assets .................................. 1,958,353.58

TOTAL ASSETS ............... ... ................... ...... $9,472,210.77


Liabilities and Net Worth
Savings Accounts ..... ........ ............ .. .. .... 5 $8,558,265.24
Advances from Federal Home Loan Bank ...................... -
Other Borrowed Money ............ ...........................
Loans in Process ............................................ ....... -
Other Liabilities ................................................... 52,915.00
Specific Reserves .................... .... .. .......... -
General Reserves ................. .................................... 461,459.80
Surplus ................. ............................................. 399,570.73


TOTAL LIABILITIES and NET WORTH ...........................


$9,472,210.77


OFFICERS

C. G. COSTIN, SR., President; CECIL G. COSTIN, JR., Executive Vice-
President and Attorney; FRANK HANNON, Vice-President; CHARLES J.
STEVENS, JR., Secretary-Treasurer; ELOYCE PRATT, Asst. Secretary-
Treasurer and Bookkeeper.


DIRECTORS
C. G. COSTIN, SR., CECIL G. COSTIN, JR., FRANK HANNON, DAVID B.
MAY, E. F. GUNN, GEORGE G. TAPPER, FOREST A. REVELL, M.
BROOKS HAYES and DWIGHT MARSHALL, JR.

OTHER PERSONNEL
MARION P. WILLIAMS ...... Office Secretary
.CAROLYN M. YOUNG ................ Teller
RUTH W. PATTERSON ................ Teller





O CITIZENS FEDERAL


000 Savings and Loan Association
O of Port St. Joe


'"


Phone 227-4646


401 Fifth Street C


GENERAL
REVENUE
SHARING


ACTUAL USE REPORT


,15 TOTALS


I


Troy State University's Sig-
ma Chi fraternity colony be-
came the newest Sigma Chi
chapter in the United States
Saturday night.
A chartering banquet was
held in the ballroom of the
Ralph Wyatt Adams Univer-
sity Center.








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Jan. 26 thru 29


Standard Grade
SRYERSJ
Packed 2 to bag

a'4d


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LOIN


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VICKS NYQUIL 10 o
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COLGATE 5


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Hormel Reg.or Hot
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12 oz. can


15 oz. can 39--
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15 oz. can 59*


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SPAGHETTI SAUCE32 oz. size


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X)61


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Rib Eye STEAK LB. $2.39
Government Inspected Frozen
BAKING HnmHNS 5. 59C
Swift's Premium Beef 69
Fresh
SPORKe STEAKS LB 89
PORK STEAK LB. 89


Fresh
PORK ROAST


FMOU [
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and
LOW PRICES
Two Good
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LB. 89C


Swift's Premium Beef LB.
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Swift's Premium Beef LB.
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Swift's Premium Beef
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war


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lb.


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RIB STEAK


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CHUCK ROAST LB.


79C


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Swift's Premium Beef LB.
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Loin End
PORK CHOPS
Swift's Premium Beef
CUBED STEAK


LB. 89C
L. $1.49


Fresh Lean


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PIES 20 oz. size 6
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SHELLS 5 ct. pkg. I
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Winter Garden Spec.,1 76
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