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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02142
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: November 25, 1976
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02142

Full Text





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FORTIETH YEAR, NUMBER 14


Industry Deep Water Port Fine People Safest Beaches in Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1976


After Charges Made They Are Serving Illegally





Grand Jury Resumes Investigation


The sessions of the Gulf
County Grand Jury, investi-
gating charges by County
Judge David Taunton that
William J. Rish and Clerk
George Y. Core had used their
influence to enrich George G.
Tapper by $1 million at tax-
payer expense had no more


than got started in its inves-
tigations last week than it was
brought to a screeching halt,
again by allegations made by
Judge Taunton.
After the Grand Jury had
been in session for only one
day, Judge Taunton presented
charges to the Court last


Thursday that the Grand Jury
was illegally constituted and
that Judge Larry Smith should
be disqualified for allegedly
making a statement, "If
Judge Taunton messes with
me, I'll punch him in the
nose".
Taunton claimed the Grand


Jury was illegal because the
chairman, Jim J. Whitehead
was the father of a business
partner of Tapper and be-
cause he (Whitehead) was
registered to vote in both Bay
and Gulf County.
SMITH'S REPLY
Replying to the statement


he was alleged to have made,
Judge Smith told Taunton in
the Court Room Thursday,
"Judge Taunton, before this
matter goes any further, I do
wish to reply to you at this
time on the alleged statement.
Frankly, this sounds like
something that I would say in


tikMal sssawi&&* '


a jovial mood or in a spirit of
good humor, such as existed at
the time the jurors were being
drawn: This was not meant in
any way to be a threat against
you nor to be any sign of
disrespect to you in front of
anybody. In fact, I think only
the court officials were pres-
ent at the time, all of whom
know me well enough, I be-
lieve, to know when I am
speaking in jest and when I
am not. Your secretary was
present. If she alleges that she
heard, such a statement, I
don't think you would think
that I would make any threat
against you where it would
certainly be taken right back
to you".
Judge Smith went on to deny
that he had made the state-
ment to his recollection.
HONORS REQUEST
Judge Smith then agreed to
honor Taunton's request to
examine the legality of the
Grand Jury and agreed to
contact Chief Justice Ben
Overton of the Florida Su-
preme Court that day to send
an examining judge to Port St.
Joe to study Taunton's char-
ges concerning the Grand
Jury composition and selec-
tion and rule on them.


HEARING MONDAY
Monday, Judge D. J. Driver
of Pinellas County arrived in
Port St. Joe to conduct hear-
ings at 10:00 A.M., but Judge
Taunton was not present.

Driver ordered a Sheriff's
Deputy to go to Taunton's
office and get him. Upon
returning, the Deputy said
Taunton was conducting a
hearing in his office and
couldn't come to the hearing.
Driver remarked that he
would have driven 600 miles to
conduct the hearing and it
appeared as if Taunton could
walk upstairs to the court-
room for the proceedings.
Judge Driver then proceed-
ed to question Clerk George Y.
Core and Judge Smith about
the manner in selecting the
Grand Jury and also question-
ed Bay County Elections Su-
pervisor Gladys Chapman as
to whether or not Whitehead
was registered to vote in Bay
County.
Core and Smith described
the manner of selection of the
Grand Jury, stating it was
selected by the procedure
outlined by Florida law. Mrs.
Chapman testified that White-
head had registered to vote in


Rotary Charity Ball

Set for December 4


Members of the Port St. Joe High School, band, the Marching Sharks, are Parker, band captain, at left, and Tracy Pierce, drum major, proudly
shown as they returned home Sunday afternoon, following their display the trophies which they earned for their performance. -Star photo
performance in Valdosta at the Southeastern marching contest. Sammy



Band Shines In Competition


Port St. Joe's marching
band again came through
some tough competition last
week end with flying colors.
The band went to Valdosta,
Ga., to compete in the South-
eastern marching band con-
test, with bands from all over
the Southeastern United
States.
When Port St. Joe took the
field, it was pouring down rain
and the mud was about ankle
deep. Still, the band did its


thing and came away with an
"Excellent" rating from the
judges who passed out only a
pitiful few "Superior" ratings.
The band made the trip to
Valdosta by chartered bus,
leaving Port St. Joe Friday
afternoon. They arrived back
home Sunday afternoon about
2:00 to a waiting crowd of
people offering them congra-
tulations for their accom-
plishments.
The band still has another


The annual Rotary Club
Charity Ball will be held next
Saturday, night, December .4,
in the Centennial Building'.
The ball, held on the first
Saturday in December each
year, is the main project of the
Rotary Club to raise funds for
use in youth work in the
community.
The ball this year will begin
at 9:00 P.M., and continue
until 1:00 A.M., with music
furnished by the Bay High


Dance Band. The Bay High
Band has been playing at the
ball for the past several years...,
Admission to the ball is
$10.00 per couple.
Table reservations for the
annual event are now being
taken by the Club. Those
desiring to make their reser-
vations early and assure
themselves of a table should
contact Mrs. Verna Burch at
Florida First National Bank at
Port St. Joe.


competitive event this year.
They will travel to Tallahas-
see in the Spring to compete in
the concert contest to deter-
mine whether or not they are
of the chosen few who get to go
to state contest this year. The
band has already qualified for
the state contest in the march-
ing division.
The band is under the
direction of Ray Smith and the
flag corps is directed by Ann
Aldridge.


.High School Instructor,


Lynwood Vinson, Resigns


Port St. Joe High School
instructor Lynwood Vinson
tendered his resignation to the
Board Thursday of last week,
one day before he was to have
faced a public hearing con-
ducted by the Board. Vinson
had, been charged with im-
proper conduct in the class-
room.
Vinson's resignation was ef-
fective immediately. He had
been suspended earlier by the
Board pending his public hear-
ing. Vinson had been an


instructor in the local High
school for two years.
At a meeting of the Board
Friday to accept bids on an
addition to the Vocational
Building at Port St. Joe High
School, the Board received
three bids on the project which
are being studied to ascertain
who the actual low bidder is.
Hamlin Construction Com-
pany of Panama City is the
apparent low bidder on the
base bid, at $251,102. The bids
are so close, however, the


acceptance or rejection of
several alternates could
change the low bidder. Only
$3,000 separates Hamlin's low
bid from the highest base bid
received.
Other bidders include Kol-
metz Construction Company
of Panama City and Griffin
Construction Company of
Blountstown.
Superintendent David Bid-
well said the county doesn't
(Continued on Page 2)


Santa Coming to Port St.


Joe On Dec. 4 In Parade


Port St. Joe's annual Christmas
parade and visit from Santa Claus will
take place next Saturday, with a giant
parade in downtown Port St. Joe.
The annual visit from Santa Claus will
be introduced by a big pre-Christmas
opening sale being conducted by Port St.
Joe's retail merchants. The merchants are
the sponsors of the entire holiday introduc-
tion week end.
The sale will be kicked off next
Thursday, with a 16-page tabloid insert in
next week's issue of The Star, telling the
story of who is selling what for how much.
Santa Claus will enter the City in a


giant parade Saturday morning at 10:30
escorted by floats, bands, cars and
marching groups. The parade is being
produced by the Port St. Joe Jaycees, with
the Merchant's Division furnishing cash
prizes for the winning floats in the
non-commercial division.
Carl Bowen, Jaycee chairman of the
parade preparations says this year's event
will be one of the larger ones produced.
Watch next week's paper for more
information about the visit from Santa and
the big city-wide sale which begins next
Thursday.


Mayor Frank Pate is shown cutting the ribbon dedicating Canty Jones, Gerald Sullivan, Billy Joe Rish, Mayor Pate,
the new gymnasium facility at the former Washington High Damon Peters, E. F. Gunn, Wesley Ramsey and Mark Tom-
School site. From left are: Mike Wright, Benny Roberts, linson.



First Phase of Recreation Center


In North Port St. Joe Opened


Port St. Joe's City Commis-
sion officially opened and
dedicated the new recreation
facilities in North Port St. Joe
Monday afternoon.
Mayor Frank Pate officially
cut the ribbon to the refur-
bished Washington High
Gymnasium, which is the
heart of the system which has
been completed thus far.
Financed with federal Block


Grant, Mayor Pate pointed out
that what has been done thus
far is only the beginning.
"There is more to come as the
money becomes available",
he said.
The Mayor called on the
cooperation of the people of
the area who will be using the
facility to help in preserving it
in a useful condition. "With
everybody cooperating, we


can have a fine recreation
center for years to come",
Pate remarked.
Representative William J.
Rish spoke briefly at the short
ceremonies, praising Port St.
Joe and Gulf County as "The
best place in the world to
live". He congratulated the
City for providing such fine
facilities.
Rev. Otis Stallworth said the


invocation for the occasion,
which was followed by a tour
of the refurbished gym, the
picnic and barbecue areas and
restored buildings in the area
which serve as concessions
stand for the softball field and
restrooms for the facility.
Following the dedication, a
fish fry was held for the crowd
of about 300 who were present
-for the affair.


Bay County in 1951 and had
voted in every election
through 1962. He had been
purged from the list in 1964.
An assistant of Mrs. Chapman
said she had given the same
information to a female voice
calling from Port St. Joe
earlier.
JURY LEGAL
Judge Driver then ruled that
Judge Smith could continue in
his capacity and ruled that the
Grand Jury had been legally
impaneled.
But the day's action didn't
stop there.
Judge Driver then went to
Taunton's office, followed by
newsmen and county officials.
Driver saked Taunton why he
had not shown up in court.
Taunton said he wasn't pro-
perly notified of the session
and that he had a previous
case scheduled for Monday at
10 A.M., regarding a shrimp-
ing boundary dispute. State'.s
Attorney Leo C. Jones said he
had phoned the Clerk's office
to notify Taunton of the hear-
ing Friday and stated, "He
was officially notified".
Judge Driver then asked
Taunton to come to the court-
room so he could "have his
day in court".
The group then went back to
the courtroom where the same
testimony was taken over
again and Taunton was told by.
Judge Driver that both Judge
Smith and the Grand Jury as
selected were serving legally.
Later Taunton told news-
men, on questioning as to what
this ruling would do his con-
tention of wrong doing that he
had been more concerned with
ethics by local officials more
than he was concerned with
wrong doing. "I'm concerned
with the way they protect one
another", Taunton said.
The Grand Jury wasted no
time getting back into session
and got back to their work
Monday afternoon. State's At-
torney Leo Jones said the
deliberations by the Grand
Jury are expected to take
from five to six weeks. Unless
something else is brought up
in the meantime, the matter is
now expected to become a
waiting game until the investi-
gations by the Jury are com-
plete.



Rich to

Head Up

Merchants
Port st. Joe Retail Mer-
chants elected officers last
week to head the organization
for the coming year.
Elected to serve in an
official capacity for the or-
ganization were: Billy Rich,
Jr., president; Higdon Swatts,
Vice-President and Carl Bow-
en, secretary-treasurer.
The new officers will take
over their offices on the first
meeting in January.
Stepping down from lea-
dership of the Merchants are
Dicky Brown, president; Da-
vid Roche, vice-president and
Billy Rich, secretary-treasur-
er.


Meeting to Set

Public Priority
A public meeting of the
Public Service Employment
Committee will be held on
Tuesday, November 30 at 9:30
a.m. at the Gulf County Court
House.
The purpose of the meeting
will be to priortize all positions
requested for funding under
Title II of the Comprehensive
Employment and Training
Act.
The meeting is open to the
public.


15 Cents Per Copy


0 F










PAGE TWO THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fin. THURSDAY, NOV. 25, 1976


--THE STAR -
Published Every Thursday at 306 Willlaits Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
By The Star Publishling Company
Second.Class Postage PaWat Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Wesley R. Ramsey ........................ ................. Editor and Publisher
William H. Ramsey ................................................ Production Supt.
Frenchie L. Ramsey.....y ................................................ Office Manager
Shirtey K. Ramsey........................................ Typesetter, Subscriptions
POSTOFFICE BOX 308 PHONE 227-3161
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456


SECOND CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR, 5:00 SIX MOS., $3.00 THI
OUT OF COUNTY--Oe Year, $6.00 OUT OF U.S

TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold
for damage further than amount received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The sp
asserts, the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word rem


EDITORIALS:



Thinking Men Have


Made Our Nation


Tomorrow is Thanksgiving Day
and most or us will think it our due
to sit down to a sumptuous feast
'-which would have been fit for a king
Jin days gone by. Hardly a one of us
will think it out of the ordinary that
k we have so much to eat on this day of
.: traditional feasts.
Are we thankful for what we
have?
Consider our "plight" if you
will. How many of the rich knights of
the round table do you think would
have considered himself the luckiest
man in the world in his day if he had
been the proud owner of a modern
pair of insulated underwear to keep
him warm in the drafty castles of the
day? Then think of Cleopatra in all
her finery in Egypt. For all her
money and prestige, she couldn't
buy even a window air conditioner to
hang outside her palace window to
Keep her boudoir cool and comfort2
able.
It's easy to say we're thankful
for these things we enjoy, even
though we have come to the point of
; accepting them as necessities;
things everybody has and is expect-
ed to use for his own comfort.
One of the things we are most
thankful for is that this nation


pioneered the trend of letting men
think. Men thinking made man
conscious of what he might do to
better his lot if he was allowed to use
his imagination and his energies as
he wished to.
As a result, men in the United
States of America have thought out a
way of keeping our people fed when
much of the world subsists on just
barely enough to eat or dies a slow
death of starvation with not enough
to eat. Thinking men have made our
people able to enjoy comforts man
has only dreamed about. Thinking
men have given us the best medical
treatment in the world, the best
living standard.
True, thinking men also attack
our largesse and try to ridicule our
nation for reveling in such comforts.
We're thankful for thinking men
who have provided.for our people.
and who have been thoughtful-
enough to give most of the credit for
this chosen position we find our-
selves in to the God who created us
in the first place.. No thinking man
leaves God out of credits.
So, this Thanksgiving, as we are
giving thanks to God for our bounty,
let us also give thanks to thinking
man who listened and learned how to
use God's bounty to man's benefit.


REE MOS., $127 50
.-One Year. $7.00

themselves liable


spoken word barely
lains.


In recent days, subscribers to
the Tallahassee Democrat have
noticed the uproar in Tallahassee
over the Democrat's removal of a
comic strip from the paper because
of the nature of the material it
contained.
The strip contained an episode
in which two unmarried people
decided to spend a night or two
together.
Some of those who castigated
the Democrat for their action,
pointed to the Mary Worth strip as


Suggested Christmas dead-
lines for domestic parcels and
letter mail have been advan-
iced because of an exceptional-
ly high mail volume, accord-
'ing to Postmaster Chauncey
:Costin.
: The suggested Christmas
mailing deadline is now De-
'rember 3 for domestic parcels
and December 10 for letter
.nail and greeting cards in-
:tended for delivery by Christ-
inas.
"The impact of greatly in-
Creased mail volumes gene-
.ated by the 15 state United
Parcel Service strike in the
East and South, and its resi-
lual effect on other parts of
The country compels us to ask
fhe public to mail even earlier
than. normal," Costin said.
"Parcel volume has already
more than doubled in the
strike area and is up signifi-


similar in theme, but was not
removed from the paper.
There was a slight difference;
the Doonesbury cartoon showed
people approving of the extra-mari-
tal sex, while the Mary Worth strip
is showing up the pitfalls and
troubles which the activity can
spawn.
Frankly, if The Star purchased
comic strips for its pages, you can
bet your bottom dollar, one of those
strips would not be Doonesbury.


cantly nationwide, and letter
mail is also on the increase,
according to the Postmaster.
He said that while letter
mail will continue to receive
priority treatment, the in-
crease of mail from the gene-
ral public, on top of the
unprecedented business mail
volume generated by the
strike, could result in the use
of many postal facilities nor-
mally dedicated to letter mail
to prevent an unmanagable
backlog of parcels. "I strongly
urge the public to deposit
parcels by December 3 and
letters and greeting cards by
December 10 to assure that
they are delivered by Christ-
mas," Postmaster Costin
said.
Suggested mailing dates for
international mail are un-
changed, but customers are
also urged to deposit overseas


\
packages and greetings im-
mediately, and to send them
by airmail if they want to
assure delivery by Christmas.


CHRISTMAS IS NEAR
SHOP EARLY


OCCURRENCES








S... .......... . .


AMERICA'S FIRST news-
paper, 1690.


Chamber

Making

Progress

Wanda Brown, president of
the Port St. Joe Chamber of
Commerce told the Rotary
Club last Thursday that the
Chamber has several projects
moving along toward comple-
tion after a slow start this
year.
"We started out the year
with nobody to work and
nothing to work with", Mrs.
Brown told the Rotarians,
"But now we are moving with
several projects, including
preparation of a new brochure
advertising things to do here
in Gulf County.
"Our former brochure con-
tained mostly pictures which
were made outside the coun-
ty", Mrs. Brown said. "Our
new advertising piece will
contain pictures made right
here in the county, showing
just what we have to offer the
tourist, the prospective resi-
dent and any industry which
would consider locating
here".
Mrs. Brown said the Cham-
ber now has 76 paid up
members for an increase over
last year. "We have nine
active directors who are work-
ing to promote civic, economic
and social projects for the
community".
"Mostly we are a distributor
of information", the Chamber
president said, but she went on
to list several projects other
than this which the Board of
Directors has started this
year.
The projects included: spon-
sorship of a workshop on how
to go into business; sponsored
a course on shoplifting; secur-
ed a small business library at
the Gulf County Library; ac-
cumulated a library of City
Directories from North Flor-
ida, South Georgia and Ala-
bama for the use of anyone;
formed a consumer protection
agency: compiled a business
directory and currently work-
ing on a new advertising
brochure.
Guests of the club was Dr.
Rick Morley of Beacon Hill.


qsjjI II v t x Stwo I? # III[ 111 IHI v i wi61t


AN AMERICAN opinion
maker, 1898.


There are about as many versions of what is
arind what isn't the truth going around in
JudgeTaunton's accusations against William J.
Rish, George Core and George Tapper as there
are versions of what the weather will be
tomorrow
This is the unfortunate facet of the charges
made by the Judge. No matter whether he is
proven right or wrong, there will still be the
stigma which will linger with the three men
involved for some time to come. Damage will
have been done to their reputations no matter
what the Grand Jury finds in its deliberations.
Things the Judge accused the three men of
just didn't fit with what I knew about the
situations he alluded to as being against the best
wishes of the tax payer. Because of this, I
decided to find out for myself from the official
record and not rely on what the Judge said, nor
on what was said "on good authority" on the
street or even what Billy Joe, or the two Georges
said.
The Judge said Billy Joe had land made
available to him on Highway 71 near Honeyville
by Hamilton Kenner as payment for favors with
the state. He again accused George Core and
Billy Joe of having purchased land at Simmons
Bayou from a widow woman for a small amount
and later traded, to the benefit of Billy Joe and
Core to George Tapper for other, more valuable
land again in payment for favors of what Billy
Joe and Core could get done for Tapper.
It wasn't too much of a chore to go to the
legal records and get a legal opinion on the
several land deals the Judge charged against the
three men. All it took for us to get the official
record of the several transactions was to contact
an abstract company and ask for an abstract.
An abstract, you know, is a search of the
history of a piece of property and its trading and
ownership. The abstract is accepted by financial
institutions as stating valid and true ownership;
it is accepted in court as stating the history of a
piece of property and truthfully reflects the
persons involved in ownership or sale of a piece
of property.
The abstract we had made concerned the
two land deals mentioned here and reflect
nothing of what the Judge claimed before the
County Commission in October.
For instance, Rish's property on Highway 71
which Judge Taunton said was made available to
Rish by Hamilton Kenner doesn't stand up in the
abstract. The abstract shows the property was


-Continued from Page 1-


Vinson

Resigns


have quite enough state mon-
ey at present to do the project
completely, but an attempt is
being made to secure more
funding before the final deci-
sion on the alternates is made.


- - - - - - --- - - - - - -


ETAOIN SHRDLU

By WESLEY R. RAMSEY


Seeded to Wilton R. Miller and wife, Dempsey J.
Barron and wife, William J. Rish, Elizabeth W.
Thompson and Payne Midyette, Jr., on Septem-
ber 20, 1972. The Warranty Deed was issued to
the group by First American Farms, Inc., and
signed by Roger Noall, Vice-President and Mary
M. Vobg, Assistant Secretary.
Then on March 13, 1975, all of the owners
issued a Warranty Deed to Rish for that portion
of the property they had bought which was east
of Highway 71. On the same date, Rish issued a
Quit Claim Deed to the other owners involved for
that portion of the property on the west side of
the highway.
This bears out Rish's claim that he took the
property on the east side of the highway as his
share of the property when it was sold to Max
Fleming of Panama City.
As for the Simmons Bayou property, Judge
Taunton said Rish and Core purchased the
property from a "widow woman" at a "low
price".
The official records again show that Core
and Rish purchased the property August 6, 1965
from C. H. Johnson of Rome, Georgia.
C. H. Johnson is a former resident of Port St.
Joe. He was a wood procurement officer for St.
Joe Paper Company here and was working in the
same capacity for the paper mill in Rome at the
time of the sale.
The records show Core and Rish paid
$6,200.00 for the property which Judge Taunton
said was about five acres. That was a pretty good
price back in 1965.
Tapper was supposed to have traded Rish
and Core acreage in trade which was more
valuable in order to get the favors of Rish and
Core with the County Commission.
According to the abstract, Rish and Core
received about an acre and a half for each acre
they gave up.
The acreage they were supposed to have
received on the shores of the Bay which Judge
Taunton said was worth about $60,000 doesn't
even touch the Bay. According to the abstract,
the piece of property, which is roughly 210 by
930 feet has one corner which barely touches the
water, but the abstract says there is even some
doubt as to whether this corner touches the water
or not. Even so, the water in the Bay is included
in the Bay's Aquatic Preserve status and
therefore makes it useless for building on the
waterfront.
In return, Tapper received a block of
property which was sitting right in the middle of
his acreage. The trade squared up Tapper's
property and gave Rish and Core an extension on
their largest piece of property as well as the
piece which was near the Bay.
The trade seems to have been beneficial to
both parties involved.
Now, if these claims by the Judge cannot be
borne out by the public record, how many of the
other claims he has made can be borne out by
facts?


Thanksgiving


... a time forprayer


For the happiness in our families today. For the beauty
around us. For the friendships we've made. For the laughter,
and the difficult times that have helped us grow. For the food
on our tables. And for all the blessings we have received in the
past year. Let us join in the tradition of the early pilgrims and
give thanks in prayer.


Comics


iChristmas Mail Deadlines


Advanced by Post Office


I


PAGE TWO


t t '. t P t t t e : t t I ::


b


7


THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 25, 1,976


Internal Fight


Going On to


Sell SJPC Mill
St. Joe Paper Company's St. Joe and William C. Thorn-
big paper mill here in Port St. ton of Jacksonville, all wish to
Joe may be shut down at the retain the mill in the St. Joe
time, with nothing turning but Paper Company family.
the security power boilers, but
a controversy between the Dent and Mills claim the
Board of Trustees who man- Foundation would realize
age the giant industrial em- more income from interest off
pire is operating at full steam money realized from the pap-
ahead. The Board is split into er mill sale than they are now
factions, however, and is pull- receiving from the profits of
ing in opposite directions. the mill.
In meetings of the 'Board Dent and Mills, even though
during the month of Novem- they are a minority of the
ber, a power play which has Board of Trustees have threa-
been brewing for the past tened to go to court to make
several months, came to a the majority bow to their
head and a motion was made wishes to sell the mill.
to sell the paper mill here in
Port St. Joe with the proceeds. It is expected to be one of
being invested to earn interest Ball's biggest court fights in
for the Nemours Foundation his long career.
which operates a charity hos-
pital in Wilmington, Dela- .
ware.
The motion to sell the paperI L e tte rs
mill was made by Alfred Ltt
duPont Dent, who's grand-
father A.I: duPont established to the
St. Joe Paper Company in the t
first place. DuPont's will sti-
pulated that income from the E d to r
paper mill was to be used to
finance the hospital opera-
tions.Dear Mr. Ramsey:

Dent is backed in his move Keep The Star flying to this
to sell the mill by William B. part of the country. It enables
Mills, a Jacksonville attorney, me to keep tab on my many
who is also a member of the friends around Port St. Joe.
Board of Trustees. We look forward for The Star
each week. You can look for
Dent and Mills are opposed The Star to tell things as they
in their move by Edward Ball, are, both good and bad.
88-year-old head of the empire
and Trustees J.C. Belin and H.F. Ayers
Tom S. Coldewey, both of Port Scottsdale, Ariz.










Last Rites Held Monday for

Mrs. Sybil Louise Scheffer, 70


Mrs. Sybil Louise Scheffer,
70, died Sunday in Port St. Joe
Municipal Hospital.
She was a native of Holly
and had been a resident of
Port St. Joe for the past 36
years. She was a member of
the First United Methodist
Church and a member of the
Order of Eastern Star.
She is survived by one


daughter, Mrs. Eloise Modau,
Tacoma, Wash., two sisters,
Mrs. Ola Dunham of Pensa-
cola and Mrs. Leila Reinhardt
of Bagdad; a daughter-in-law,
Mrs. Marguerite Scheffer of
Beacon Hill; 10 grandchil-
dren: Richard Scheffer, Al
Scheffer, Sandra Scheffer Wil-
liams, John Foy Scheffer,
Larry Wayne Scheffer, Fritz


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. PAGE THREE


Mondau, Catherine Mondau
Moody, Christopher Mondap,
Louie Mondau and Joe Mon-
dau, also four great grandchil-
dren.
Funeral services were held
Monday at 3:00 P.M., from the
First Unitel Methodist
Church with the Rev. Johnie
McCurdy officiating.
Interment was in the Holly
Hill Cemetery, with Eastern
Star rites at graveside.
St. Clair Funeral Home was
in charge of arrangements.


THURSDAY, NOV. 25, 1976


Lower Temperatures

Are Healthier FMA Says


Floridians who respond to
energy conservation pleas and.
keep their home temperatures,
a little lower this winter are
likely to be somewhat heal-
thier than those who continue
to overheat their homes.
Temperatures in the mid
60's are healthier than tem-
peratures in the mid 70's, the
Florida Medical Association
reminds.
Heating the interior of
homes and offices during the
winter removes 'moisture
from the air. The higher the
temperature, the dryer the
air. Air with little *mniture
aggravates hrrnchial and


other respiratory problems. It
can contribute to dry throat
and nose, coughs and dry,
itchy skin.
The respiratory system
doesn't cope well with sudden
changes in temperature. Mov-,
ing from an overly warm
room into outside cold affects
the body adversely, causing
coughs and respiratory pro-
blems. The body adjusts, to
temperature changes gradu-
ally.
There are no major health
advantages inherent in keep-
ing inside temperature some-
what lower,


Brownie Scout Theresa Byrd presents a Girl Scout
calendar to the troop's sponsors, Albert Thames, center, and
Rev. Lawrence Cox. --Star photo


New Sponsors for


BORN 100 YEARS BEFORE the State of Florida time capsule is to be
opened, 1-year-old Scottie Blanchett inspects former Gov. Millard
Caldwell's pipe prior to sealing in mid-November under the auspices of
the Bicentennial Commission of Florida. The new skyscraper Florida
Capitol in the background will be the site of the opening on July 4, 2075,
when Tricentennial celebrants will discover more than 60 items of
assorted memorabilia, including the pipe, former Gov. LeRoy Collins,'
eyeglasses and Gov. Reubin Askew's toothbrush, plus tennis shoes, an
Afro hair pick, Bicentennial coins, an inches ruler, books on Florida,
photographs and a polka dot bikini. Scottie donated his Yankee Doodle
music box to give future Floridians an opportunity to hear the music he
enjoyed during America's Bicentennial. (AFNS)


Holiday Crowd Pleaser
Greet the season and your guests with a plump, juicy bird
stuffed with savory Oyster Cornbread Stuffing. It's a sure
"crowd pleaser". During the holiday season oysters are
readily available to supply a wealth of flavor on the half-shell
or in hors d'oeuvres, casseroles or stuffing. Canned in their
own liquor, fresh oysters are available as selects, the largest
size, and standards, which are best for stuffing and
casseroles. The Florida Department of Natural Resources
recommends that the holiday bird be stuffed just prior to
baking or that the stuffing be baked separately. Regardless
of how you bake it, be sure to prepare plenty of Oyster-
Cornbread Stuffing for those oysterloving guests this holiday
season.

HOLIDAY OYSTER 'N' CORNBREAD STUFFING

1 pint oysters, fresh or frozen
1 cup chopped celery
1 cup chopped onion
1/ cup butter or margarine
31/2 cups toasted cornbread cubes
/2 cup chicken broth
1 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon sage

Thaw oysters if frozen. Drain oysters. Cook celery and onion
in butter until tender. Add oysters and cook 3 to 5 minutes or
until edges begin to curl. Combine all ingredients 'and mix
thoroughly. Makes approximately 4 cups stuffing, enough for
a 4-pound ready-to-cook bird.

Stuffing for Poultry

For 5-9 pound bird...................2 times stuffing recipe
For 10-15 pound bird .................. 3 times stuffing recipe
For 16-20 pound bird.................4 times stuffing recipe
For 21-25 pound bird.................5 times stuffing recipe

For more recipes, write: Seafood, DNR, Crown Building,
Tallahassee, Florida 32304.


Graveside Rites

for Joe Dasher

Funeral services were held
at graveside in Holly Hill
.Cemetery Friday morning for
Joe Dasher, age 88.
Dasher had died Monday of
last week in a Panama City
nursing home. He had been a
resident of Port St. Joe for the
past 40 years. He was a former
employee of the old St. Joe
Lumber and export Company
here.
He was a member of the
Jehovah Witness faith.
St. Clair Funeral Home was
in charge of arrangements.

Revival Service
at White City

There will be revival ser-
vices at the White City As-
sembly of God Church begin-
ning Friday night, November
26 at 7:30 D.m.
Rev. Earl Weech will be
ministering. There will also be
special singing each night.
The church extends a cor-
dial invitation to everyone to
atend.


Girl Scou
Brownie Girl Scout Troop
118 proudly announces co-
sponsorship of their troop by
the Church of the Nazarene
and Thames Jewelry and Fab-
rics. Mrs. Beulah Rudd will
act as liasion between the girls
and their sponsors. She is
presently coordinating a spe-
cial Christmas service project
with the troop and members of
the church. Troop 118 is
looking forward to a lasting
friendship and continued co-
operation with their spon-
sors.
-While gathered around their
Brownie Pool late one after-
noon in October, Troop 118 lit a
candle and sang Happy Birth-
day to Daisy but Daisy wasn't
present! Their special birth-


The thick, white cord-like
material located on opposite
sides of the yolk is called the
chalaza and is a normal part
of the egg. It holds the yolk
in place in the white.


t Troop

day girl was Juliette Gordon
"Daisy" Low, founder of Girl
Scouting in America, who
celebrated October 31, Hallo-
ween, as her birthday.
Returning Brownies are
helping their new friends
learn the use of the "It" can,
Girt Scout Promise, how to
make and use Sit-upons, and
lots of Scouting songs. Troop
members are working on a
program for their families
which will include a play,
"Seven Silly Simons". March-
ing in the Christmas parade
will be an exciting future
event. The girls have recently
been involved in their yearly
sale of Girl Scout Calendars
and send a special thank you
to all Scouting friends that
purchased calendars.
Members of Brownie Troop
118 are Lynn Aman, Theresa
Byrd, Donna Creed, Debbie
Davis-, Kim Harvey, Sandra
King, Sheila Lucas, Sharon
Miller, Lee Lee Mongold,
Tonya Peak, LeAnna Rudd,
Allison Smith, Marcy Strip-
.ling, Jill Taylor, DeAnn
Young, Donna Young, Mrs.
Myra Byrd, asst. leader, and
Mrs. Ruth Lucas, leader.,


You Are -Cordially Invited to Attend


LONG AVENUE

Baptist Church

Corner Long Ave. and 16th St.


SUNDAY SCHOOL ................... .
MORNING WORSHIP................
CHURCH TRAINING .................
EVENING WORSHIP .................
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ....


Rev. J. C. ODUM,
Pastor


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
5:45 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
7:00 P.M.


Jerome Cartier,
Minister of Music


8 Color Portraits
(1) 11x14, (1) 8x10, (1) 5x7,
(5) Wallet

I All for this low, low price



pluss 70c film charge

I' Groups 50' Per Person Extra
^ Pay s3 Now. Balance when
j 'pictures delivered

N Jt G Bill's Dollar Store
No Limits. No Gimmicks. Just Good
Portraits
Tuesday, Nov. 30 HOURS 10-1, 2-5

See Window Display or Check With Clerk For Date |


PATE'S

CONSTRUCTION CO.

Mechanical and Residential
Contractor
Bobby Pate Owner
If you need a new home built, an old one re-
modeled, new roof, driveway, patio, or plumbing,
Call

227-3067

No Job Too Large or Too Small


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


PAGE THREE











PAGE FOUR THURSDAY, NOV. 25, 1976 THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Fla.


Core


Speaks


to DAR

The Garden Center on 8th
Street was the setting for the
DAR Thanksgiving luncheon,
held Wednesday, November
17V Interesting arrangements
of harvest fruits and vege-
tables adorned the tables and
the festive meal was served by'
rriembers of the Garden Club.
:Following the DAR ritual,
Mrs. Paul Fensom, Regent,
presented Mrs. Ashley Costin
and Mrs. Winston Wells as
new members, bringing the
membership of the young St.
Joseph Bay Chapter to 42.
' The luncheon speaker,
George Y. Core, Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Gulf County,
was presented by Mrs. Wil-
liam Simms, Chairman of
Lineage Research, who stated
that he had served in this
office for 28 years and one
day, and that he had never
faced opposition.
SUsing as his theme, "Re-
cords Landmarks from the
past for the future", Mr. Core
stated that public records are
vital to such organizations as
the Daughters of the Ameri-
cdi Revolution. He said that
Glilf County has a very good
system of keeping records but
that his office is constantly
seeking to improve it.
: Speaking of the typewritten
and handwritten records of
1925 (when Gulf County was
formed), Mr. Core said that
typewriters can't spell, and
that even very beautiful hand
writing is not always read-
able, and that ink fades. He
said that many of the early
records were incomplete, and
that mistakes can be very
costly.
The speaker said that to-
day's records are vastly su-
perior to the early records in
that today's copies are exact
copies. He said that many of
the larger counties are now
using the computer system of
recording, but Gulf and other
smaller counties are not yet
ready for this system. .He
seemed enthusiastic about
zerox and microfilm record-
ing.
Mrs. George Core, Chair-
man of DAR Good Citizens,
reported that three schools,
Wewahitchka, Apalachicola
and Port St. Joe, are partici-
pating in this project, and that
the winner from each school
will receive the Good Citizen-
ship Award and will be enter-
ed in the national contest.
Mrs. Fensom announced
that Mrs. Charles Norton,


THURSDAY, NOV. 25, 1976 THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


PAGE FOUR


Mission

Group III

Meets
Mission Group III of the
United Methodist Women met
Tuesday night, November 16,
at 7:30 p.m. at the church,
with 12 members present.
Mrs. Sidney Anchors' pre-
sided and opened the meeting
with the devotional, with
scripture from Psalm 100.
During the business session
the group voted to meet with
the general meeting at the
church December 6 for the
Christmas program to be pre-
sented by Mrs. John Miller
and Mrs. Rex Buzzett.
The regular group meeting
will be held at the church on
Tuesday night, December 14,
at 7:30 p.m.
Mrs. Anchors closed the
meeting with an inspiring
program on being thankful to
God for your blessings and
thankful for family and
friends.


Social Club to Miss Faliski Feted with Shower


MISS MARION JOYCE BRITT



Engagement Announced


Mr. and Mrs. C.R. Britt
have. announced the engage-
ment and approaching mar-
riage of their daughter Marion
Joyce, to Michael Wayne
White, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Wayne White all of Port St.

Chairman of American His-
tory, is sponsoring an essay
contest on history in the
schools.
In her report on civil de-
fense, Mrs. Nobie Stone de-
plored the decline of educa-
tional standards and the soar-
ing of public spending. She
urged a return to the basics,
reading, writing and arithme-
tic, and said that DAR favors
local control. She also spoke of
the evils of social promotion,
insisting that teachers are not
responsible, but are simply
obeying the mandates handed
down to them.
Emphasis for this year be-
ing on DAR Schools, members
brought donations of food,
clothing and other articles and
filled a large box for the Kate
Duncan Smith School at
Grant, Alabama. Receipts
from sales of DAR articles
sold at the meeting will be
added to the DAR school fund.


Joe.
The bride-elect is presently
employed at St. Joseph Tele-
phone and Telegraph Com-
pany.
Her fiance is employed by
St. Joe Paper Company.


The wedding will be an
event of March 5, 1977 at 6:00
p.m. in the First Baptist
Church. No local invitations
are being sent but all friends
and relatives of the couple are
invited to attend.


Port St. Joe


. 1 School Lunch t


\J^MENUS1


Port St. Joe High School za, potato chips, cole slaw,
Monday, November 29 spice cake and milk.
Spaghetti, hamburger with
bun, lettuce, tomato and pick- Elementary Schools
les, green beans, rolls, peanut Monday, November 29
butter chews and milk. Pizza, potato chips, cole
Tuesday, November 30 slaw, spice cake and milk.
Meat loaf, chicken with Tuesday, November 30
noodles, apple, carrot and Chicken with noodles, apple,
raisin salad, turnips, corn- carrot and raisin salad, tur-
bread, chocolate pudding and nips, cornbread, chocolate
milk. pudding and milk.
Wednesday, December 1 Wednesday, December 1
Hamburger with bun, let- Campers stew, green salad,
tuce, tomatoes and pickles, whole kernel corn, pineapple
campers stew, green salad, upside down cake, rolls and
whole kernel corn, pineapple milk.
upside down cake, rolls .and
milk. Thursday, December 2
Thursday, December 2 Hamburger with bun, let-
Battered fried fish on bun,, tuce, tomatoes and pickles,
baked beans, hamburger with mayonnaise, catsup, French
bun, lettuce, tomato and pick- fries, cherry applesauce with
les, French fries, cherry cookies and milk.
applesauce with cookies and Friday, December 3
milk. Spaghetti, green beans, to-
Friday, December 3 mato slice, peanut butter
Cheeseburger with bun, piz- chews and milk.



Do Your


CHRISTMAS


SHOPPING

Early.


See Our Selection

of Gift Items



As We See It

Alabama 23 vs. Auburn 15
Florida 28 vs. Miami 12
Georgia 27 vs. Georgia Tech 18
Louisiana State 25 vs. Utah 10
Nebraska 24 vs. Oklahoma 20
Southern Cal. 27 vs. Notre Dame 17
Pittsburgh 17 vs. Penn State 10
Texas A & M 23 vs. Texas 14
Tennessee 24 vs. Vandy 14
Army 17 vs. Navy 15



323 REID AVENUE

Pot ^St. o0 E


Help The Poor
The Future Business Lead-
ers Chapter of Phi Betha
Lambla at Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr.
High School has as one of its
annual projects, providing a
box of goodies to a needy
family in the area.
This year members pre-
pared a box which consisted of
canned goods, fruits, candies
and other assorted items. The
box was presented by a select-
ed committee of FBLA mem-
bers: Vanessa Willis, Dorothy
Boykins, Sonja Robinson, Ste-
panie Russ, Carolyn Petty and
Pat Lowery. FBLA partici-
pates in many civic projects of
this nature.

Troy Graduate
The list of candidates for
Fall Quarter graduation at
Troy State University has
been released.
Included in the list from
Port St. Joe is Janet Kay


On the morning of Nov. 20
Miss Rosemary Jean Faliski,
bride-elect of Kevin Scott
Youngberg, was honored with
a calling shower at St. James
Episcopal Parish House. Cor-
sages of the chosen colors,
pink and white, were present-
ed to Miss Faliski and her
mother Mrs. Robert Faliski,
who greeted the many guests
as they arrived. The honoree
received many lovely and
useful gifts.
Miss Freda Sutton attended
the bride's book which was
placed on a round table over-
laid with a white table cloth
enhanced by a silver bud vase
containing one pink rosebud.
The refreshment table was
resplendent with a pink and
white floral centerpiece, a
silver coffee service on one
end and a crystal punch bowl
on the other.
Hostesses for the occasion
were Mrs. Bo Bouington, Mrs.
Baynard Malone, Mrs. Ralph
Nance and Mrs. Fred Sutton,
who presented Miss Faliski


Antley who will receive a with a serving piece of her
Bachelor of Science degree. selected china.



Comforter Funeral

Home
Gulf County's First
Beginning 31 Years of
Continuous Service
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.|. Telephone 227-3511
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301 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe


..A.


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Thursday, Nov. 25

4:00 P.M.
SHOWGROUNDS- Fifth and Long
Port St. Joe
Sponsored by Gulf County
Ambulance Service


BUY ADVANCE SALE TICKETS
FROM YOUR LOCAL SPONSOR
ST. JOE AUTO PARTS $2.00 Adv
PIER 98 RESTAURANT $2.00 Adv.
THE STAR Child or Adult

$2.50 At the $3.00
Children Door Adults


FIRST BAPTIST

CHURCH
Corner Third Street and Baltzell Avenue
REV. BILL HEATON, Pastor
STANLEY E. YOUNG, Minister of Music & Youth
Sunday School ............ ........... 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship SerVice .............. 11:00 A.M.
Church Training ..................... 6:30 P.M .
Evening Worship Service .............. 7:30 P.M.
Prayer Meeting (Wed.) .............. 7:00 P.M.

"Come and Worship God with Us"
- - - - - - - -


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Miss Faliski. at


left, and her mother, Mrs. Robert Faliski
-Star photo


L.
.A


I











Water

Board


Meeting

The Governing Board of the
Northwest Florida Water
Management District will hold
its regular monthly meeting
November 30 in the Lafayette
Building of the Koger Execu-
tive Center in Tallahassee.
The meeting will begin at 1:15
p.m. in Room 268.
Two committees of the
Board will meet prior to the
regular meeting at 10:00 a.m.
The Goals, Policies, and Pro-
cedures Committee will meet
in Room 245 to discuss existing
goals, policies and procedures
and planned future activities
of the District. The Basin
Board Committee will meet in
Room 268 to evaluate the
feasibility of establishing ba-
sin boards for the Northwest
District. Both committees will
report to the entire Board at
the regular meeting.
Bob Dillard, Chief, Bu-
reau of Lake Restoration,
Department of Environmental
Regulation, will present a
proposal for a Lake Jackson
Project to the Board for its
consideration.
Staff briefings will include a
status report on Deer Point
Lake.
All meetings are open to the
public. For copies of agendas,
write to the Northwest Florida
Water Management District,
325 John Knox Road, C-135,
Tallahassee, Fl. 32303.


NARC Shows Appreciation


to Mrs. William Lyles


Mrs. William Lyles is shown
with the Certificate of Appre-
ciation she recently received
from the National Association


for Retarded Citizens.
Mrs. Lyles has served as
chairman of the Special Olym-
pics program of the Gulf


-A


Mrs. Millie Lyles


MINUTES

of the


Gulf County Commission

L


The Board of County Com-
missioners of Gulf County met
on October 12, in regular ses-
sion with the following mem-
bers present: Eldridge
Money, Chairman; Everett
Owens, Jr.; T. D. (Doc) Whit-
field; S. C. Player and Otis
Davis, Jr. Others present
were: George Y. Core, Clerk;
Jerry Gates, Finance Officer;,
William J. Rish, Attorney; C.
E. Daniell and Tommy Pitts,
Mosquito Control Director;
Lloyd Whitfield, Road Super-
intendent and Albert Thames,
C.D.-Veterans Service Offi-
cer.
The meeting came to order
at 9:00 a.m. The Attorney
opened the meeting with pray-,
er, followed by the pledge to
the flag.
The minutes of September
28, were read, approved and
adopted.
Robert Nations, Florida
Engineering Associates, Inc.,
representing Melvin D. Nach-
tscheim and Harris G. Gibson,
presented plans for a boat
basin and access channel to be
located on their property at
Overstreet. He explained that
the county must first give its
approval of this project before
the plans can be presented to
the U. S. Army Corps of Engi-
neers and the proper state
agencies for the required pub-
lic hearing. Mr. Nations ad-
'vised that he would have
another request for this same
type facility within a few days.
After discussion, there was a
motion by Comm. Owens,
seconded by Comm. Davis and
unanimously carried, that this
Board- advertise to hold a
public hearing on October 26,
1976, on this application and on
the second one that will be
filed.
Mr. Nations advised the
Board as to the progress being


made on the Oak Grove Water
and Sewer Project. He said
that is is his understanding
that the water system has
been approved and that the
sewer system is now under re-
view and that the overall
approval will be given within a
few days.
Elson Kendrick asked when
the county intended to do''the
work on the ditch at his place
that was approved by this
Board a number of months
ago. The Mosquito Control
Supervisor said that even
though the Board had given its
approval for this project, it
has not been done because
other projects had priority
and because of the lack of
equipment. He said that this
project is now on his work
plans and will be commenced
at an early date.
The Attorney advised the
Board as to a petition filed
with the Canvassing Board
and a law suit filed in the
Circuit Court, both protesting
the election results. He said
that he was requested to
represent the Canvassing
Board; that a hearing was
held on the petition in our
Circuit Court on October 7,
1976; that a Court Order was
entered dismissing the peti-
tion on the grounds that no
justifiable issue was found by
the Court and that the voting
machines be returned to the
custody of the Supervisor of
Elections. The Court further
ordered that the Plaintiff, his
attorney, and any expert of
their choosing may observe
and inspect the clearing of the
voting machines on October
12, 1976.
Mrs. J. C. Bodiford request-
ed the county to allow her to
use some of the spoil material
that the U. S. dredge boat
pumped onto the county pro-


perty at the east end of SR
22-A. There was a motion by
Comm. Davis, seconded by
Comm. Whitfield to allow her
to use some of the spoil and
upon vote the following voted:
Aye, Davis, Whitfield, Player
and Money. Nay: Owens.
Bill Simmons, Chairman of
the Library Committee, ques-
tioned the Board as: to, pro-
gress being made on the lib-
rary plans. He was informed
that the only holdup at this
time is the engineers report;
that the test piling have been
completed and the report
should be filed with the archi-
tect at an early date. -
The Board voted to pay the
architect $231.84 and Griffin
Construction Co. $13,852.40 for
the amount due on the court-
house roof job. The Chairman
gave an oral report on the
inspection of the roof.
At this point, the Chairman
turned the meeting over to the
Vice Chairman in order that
he attend the inspection of the
voting machines. Mr. Glyn
Boord, representing the Auto-
matic Voting Machine Com-
pany, was present to examine
and test the voting machines
for possible malfunctions.
After all machines were open-
ed and tested, Mr. Boord
reported that he found no mal-
functions or mechanical
trouble of any kind and that
each machine is in perfect
working order. Mr. Money re-
entered the meeting at this
point. Comm. Owens con-
tinued acting as Chairman.
Cecil G. Costin, Jr. present-
ed a right of way deed from
Gregory Lynn Dozier to the
county. He told the Board that
this easement is for only
one-half (width) a street to be
constructed on the Dozier
property at Beacon Hill and
that another easement for the
other half of the street will be
presented as soon as the sur-
veyor supplies him with a des-
cription. Whereupon there
was a motion by Comm. Whit-
field, seconded by Comm.
Owens and unanimously car-
ried, that the Board accept
this easement, subject to the
second easement being pre-
sented and with the under-
standing that the county has
no obligation to construct this
road.
The Dead Lakes Trust pre-
sented an easement for a road
located on the Rowell Fish
Camp site. Comm. Davis told
the Board that the owners of
this property have already
constructed the road. Upon
motion by Comm. Davis,
seconded by Comm. Whitfield
and unanimously carried, this
easement was accepted as
recorded in O.R. Book 68, page
120.
The following applications
for employment were re-
ceived: Bessie Lee Faison,


Association for Retarded Citi-
zens for many years. Special
Olympics is a program by
which mentally retarded citi-
zens participate in competi-
tion to exhibit differing levels
of physical fitness.
Mrs. Lyles also serves as
Chairman of the GARC Board
of Directors.
The clients at the Gulf
County Adult Activity Center
presented Mrs. Lyles with the
corsage she is wearing as a
preview of those which they
have made to sell on Decem-
ber 4th during the annual
Christmas parade.
GARC invites you to join
them in celebrating Novem-
ber as Mental Retardation
month by becoming involved
in the community's efforts to
further the cause of mentally
retarded citizens.


Karen Ann Harris, Portia
Byrd, Charles Jerome Smith,
Brenda J. Lynn, Charlene Gail
Thomas, Angela Mare Fisher,
Alfredia Hill and Lawrence
Peavy.
Marion Daniels requested to
be transferred to the Mosquito
Control Department. Because
of the type program he is
working under this request
cannot be granted.
The Board accepted the
following easements: 1. Gulf
County Farms (ditch) record-
ed in O.R. 67 page 990;
2 Louise G. Horne, et al.
(ditch) recorded in O.R. Book
67 page 991; 3. T. L. James &
Co. (road) recorded in O.R.
Book 67 page 993; 4. T. L.
James & Co. (road) recorded
in O.R. Book 67 page 994; 5.
T. L. James & Co. (road)
recorded in O.R. Book 67 page
994; 6. Ophelia A. Brooks
(road) recorded in O.R. Book
67 page 995.
The Board discussed the
straw ballot pertaining to the
Civil Defense and Veterans
Service office. The Attorney
advised that the elections
division of the Secretary of
State's office has advised him
that the election code has no
provision for a straw or opin-
ion .:ballot; however,.: if the
people of Gulf County did not
object to this question being on
the ballot, the elections divi-
sion will give its approval for
the question to be placed on
the official general election
ballot. After consideration,
there was a motion by Comm.
Money, seconded by Comm.
Whitfield and unanimously
carried, that the question be
placed on the ballot just as it is
recorded in the minutes.
Hon. Robert M. Moore, at-
torney for Melvin D. Nacht-
sheim as to his application for
a boat basin and access chan-
nel, requested the Board to re-
consider its action taken at the
beginning of this meeting in
voting to advertise for a public
hearing. He told the Board
that the U. S. Army Engineers
are required by law to hold a
public hearing therefore it is
not necessary for the county to
go to.the expense of a public
hearing. There was a motion
by Comm. Money, seconded
by Comm. Whitfield to recon-
sider its action heretofore
taken in this matter. Vote:
Aye, Money, Whitfield,.Davis
and Player. Nay, Owens.
The Clerk read a letter from
Max W. Kilbourn with refer-
ence to his request to have the
county open the "Old Wire
Road" in order that he may
have access to his property.
After a long discussion, the
Board directed the Clerk to
inform Mr. Kilbourn that


11:30 a.m.

til 9:00 p.m.


FRESH VEGETABLES Coffee o

including Homemade Pumpkin Pie!


$285 COMPLETE

MOTEL ST. JOE RESTAURANT


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 25, 1976 PAGE FIVE


Sunday School Class


Fetes Miss Parker


Miss Tracy Hodges enter-
tained her Church School
teachers, Nan Parker and Vic
Adkison, with a Paper Shower
given in the Mexico Beach
United Methodist Church. The
young hostess invited mem-
bers of the Primary Church
School class and young friends
of the honored couple.
The party room was decor-
ated with an open umbrella
spilling forth the gifts, a
refreshment table centered
with a gazebo, and dainty
finger sandwiches including
peanut butter and jelly. Punch
was served from a crystal
punch bowl by Ann Hodges
and Tracy was assisted by her
parents Mr. and Mrs. Hodges
and her brother Franklin.
Tracy's brother and father
had drawn a lifesize poster of


the county cannot become in-
volved in attempting to open a
road without the proper rights
of way from all property
owners involved.
The Board received annual
financial statements from
Harland Pridgeon, Tax Col-
lector and George Core, Clerk
of the Circuit and County
Courts, on file in the Clerk's
office.
Mrs. J. W. Oakes presented
a petition requesting the coun-
ty to close three feet of Duval
Street in Block Two of Oak
Grove. It was explained that
some of the homes were built
three feet into this right of
way, which is a 60 foot ease-
ment and at the time of the
building everyone thought the
easement was only 50 feet.
There was a motion by Comm.
Davis, seconded by Comm.
Owens to advertise for a
public hearing to vacate and
abandon the three feet in
question. Motion unanimously
passed.
The Clerk presented a peti-
tion requesting the county to
close a road on the west side of
Wetappo Ridge Subdivision


School

Minutes

The Gulf County School
Board met in special session
on October 7 with the following
members present: Herman
Ard, Chairman; Gene Raf-
field; Fred Greer and J. K.
Whitfield. Board member
Guillot was absent. The Super-
intendent and Board Architect
were present.
A bid was received from
Western Waterproofing Com-
pany for repairing the Coli-
seum roof at Port St. Joe High
School. This building will be
completely re-roofed and will
include off-white granules for
a total of $64,030.
On recommendation of the
Superintendent, motion by
Raffield, seconded by Greer,
the Board voted unanimously
to accept this bid contingent
upon approval of a Public
Education Bond Amendment
to cover the amount over the
$50,000.00 already approved.
This project will be completed
within 60 days after contract is
let.
Copies of this bid and bond
are on file in the Superinten-
dent's office.
There being no further busi-
ness, the Board adjourned to
meet again in regular session
on November 9, 1976.
Herman Ard, Chairman
ATTEST:
J. David Bidwell, Supt.


Nan and Vic in wedding attire
and the guests took turns
pinning flowers into Nan's
bouquet and a ring on Vic's
finger while blindfolded.
Another game enjoyed was
"One Potato, Two Potato,
etc." Each guest presented
the honorees with their gift
and had the pleasure of watch-
ing them unwrap it.

Tracy presented each guest
with a corsage of rice in net
tied with a white ribbon
holding two gold wedding
bands. Those attending were:
Teressa and Chris Cozart,
Leanna and Dell Rudd, Kim
and Danielle Scott, Lalla and
Chip Thomas of Pensacola,
Robin Kimmell, Shelly, Wil-
liam Parker, Timmy Kerri-
gan and Harry Hunter.


(unrecorded) in Overstreet.
There was a motion by Comm.
Owens, seconded by Comm.
Davis and unanimously car-
ried, that the Board advertise
to close this road.

Hon. David L. Taunton,
County Judge, appeared be-
fore the Board and expressed
his thanks to the members of
the Gulf County Canvassing
Board for- their efforts and
'time spent in completing the
canvass of the elections just
held. He said that Eldridge
Money lost time from his occu-
pation, which he was not com-
pensated for and that he re-
commended that some
thought be given to the possi-
bility of doing something
about seeing that the member
of the Canvassing Board that
represents the County Com-
missioners be paid for time
spent in this capacity. Judge
Taunton then asked to be
placed on the agenda for the
meeting of October 26, 1976 in
order to explain four tele-
phone calls that have been
questioned by the Board. The
Chairman said the request
would be granted.



Legal Ad
REGISTRATION OF FICTITIOUS
NAME
We the undersigned, being duly sworn,
do hereby declared under oath that the
names of all persons interested in the
business or profession carried on under
the name of ABLE SIGN COMPANY
AND ALUMINUM PRODUCTS at 407
Madison Street, Port St. Joe, Florida
and the extent of the interest of each, is
as follows:
Edwin T. Russ, 100 percent.
-s- Edwin T. Russ
4tc 11-24

INTHE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL COURT
Bank of Washington County,
Plaintiff
-vs.
Thomas A. Rogers and wife,
Yvonne Rogers
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Thomas A. Rogers and wife,
Yvonne Rogers
P.O. Box 143
Jakin, Georgia
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that and action
to foreclose a mortgage on the following
property in Gulf County, Florida:
North 1/2 of lots 2 and 3 Block H of
Forehand's A Second Addition to
Highland View according to plat
thereof on file in the office of the
Clerk of Circuit Court of Gulf
County, Florida, in Plat Book 2, page
9, Gulf County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Gerald Holley,
plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
P.O. Box 268, Chipley, Florida, on or
before December 30, 1976, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on plaintiff's
attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hanandand the seal of this
Court on Nov. 18, 1976.
Clerk of the Court
By Margaret B. Core
As Deputy Clerk


The heaviest dog on record was a Saint Bernard in Wiscon-
sin who at age 5 weighed 295 pounds.





















A f-.- __


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t' ,_V J

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Desig ned to meet or exceed LX22PM
original equipment specifica- 12-volt' "
tions. For cars with high E Exchange.
electrical demands.

...and our top-of-the-line

FIRESTONE FOREVER
AS LOW AS WARRANTED FOR
AS LONG AS YOU
$ f 95 OWN YOUR CAR!
SOur best battery for ultimate
electrical car service life.
F-22FM Resists overcharge damage.
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FOREVER BATTERY LIMITED WARRANTY
Put the FOREVER battery in your car If it ever fails to hold a charge
for you in that car. Firestone will replace it FREE with proof of purchase,
providing the battery has not been damaged due to accident or abuse
Commercial or marine use excluded,
EXTRA CAPACITY, EXTRA LIFE and MOTOR
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If these Firestone batteries fail to hold a charge in normal passenger
car service within the first ninety (90) days after purchase, any Firestone
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PATE'S "66"

Service Center


223 Mon. Ave. Phone 229-124


91.


Give Mom

a Break!


r Tea


THANKSGIVING DAY

DINNER


Your Choice of -

TURKEY, HAM or OYSTERS!
with


.M









PAGE SIX THURSDAY, NOV. 25, 1976 THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


GOOD LIF

COMES'

EASIER,:

WITH

GOOD HEALTH
...and your good health is the most
important concern of your Rexall
Pharmacist You can rely on him for
prompt, courteous attention to all
your drug and prescription needs...
whenever you call!

YOUR R .A.L/ PHARMACY


BUZZETT'S
DRUG STORE
Ph. 227-3371 317 Williams
Convenient Drive-in Window
Plenty of Free Parking




Club Giving

Away Tree
Members of the Port St. Joe
Garden Club will give away a
ceramic Christmas tree with a
music box base Saturday,
December 4.
Anyone desiring to make a
donation may do so be contact-
ing any Garden Club member.
The tree will be on display in
the window of the Florida
Power office on Reid Ave.


Tree and Shrub Planting


Now is the ideal time for
major tree and shrub plant-
ing. There is no substitute for
a *well-planned landscape
where materials are carefully
selected and then properly
planted.
Make a careful study, prior
to selecting plants, to obtain
the best possible plants for
your needs. Consider these
items in selecting plants -
surface and internal drainage,
sun and shade requirements,
ultimate size of the plants, the
relation of one plant to another
in regards to form, texture
and color and seasonal inter-
est (color of foliage, fruit,
flower and branching charac-
teristics).
For the home, do not over
plant. Remember plants pro-
perly cared for .will not be
static in the yard. They will
grow taller, spread and fill in
spaces that might seem at
first to be under planted.
Consider the size of house
and property. Large overpo-
wering plants dwarf the size of
the property and take up
usable space for outdoor living
besides becoming a problem
from the maintenance stand-
point.
Unity is an essential ele-
ment of a well-designed land-


scape which can be acheived
with a proper balance of
simplicity, contrast and scale.
A properly planned land-
scape lessens the temptation,
to add those odd pieces of
plant material which one ofter
finds on sale or receives from
will-intentioned friends. As
good as intentions are, those
unplanned plants are a com-
mon nemesis to unity in the
landscape.
Simplicity does not mean
monotony. Rather, it is vari-
ety without confusion. A large
variety of plant materials can
result in a cluttered appear-
ance.
Select areas for special
concentration rather than
spreading your efforts over
too great an area. Purchase
only those plants that are
strong and healthy. It does not
pay to sacrifice quality for
quantity.
Know the growing require-
ments of the plants you select
and what they have to offer in
way of beauty and function in
the landscape.
Some plants prefer a sunny
location and for this type
situation, you may select
among junipers, Texas sage,
hollies, bottlebrush, pyracan-
tha, daylilies, roses, fruit


trees, shade trees, primrose
jasmines, mock orange, crape
myrtle, photinia and others.
Plants well sutied to shaded
conditions include: English
ivy, ferns, fatsia, ardesia,
vinca, liriope, dwarf azalea,
aucuba and hydrangea.
Rugged plants which will
take either sun or shade and
have few major insect and
disease pests include: abelia,
althea, bamboo, podocarpus,
ligustrum, nandina, oleander,
pittosporum, viburnum, wax
myrtle, yaupon holly, loquat,
mondo grass, confederate jas-
mine and yucca.
If a plant for hedging or
screening is what you want,
take a look at ligustrum,
podocarpus, pyracantha,
cherry laurel, pittopsorum,
viburnum, sasanqua or Bur-
ford holly.
Small plants for very, imit-
ed area,:, perhaps on the patio
or near an entrance area may
include: dwarf yaupon, dwarf
azalea, aucuba, fatsia, dwarf
holly, dwarf nandina, box-
wood, holly fern, liriope,
dwarf gardenia, dward pome-
granate and others.
On nearly every property
there are small left over bits
of ground too small to effec-
tively use lawn grasses. For


added interest and ease ot
maintenance use ground co-
vers.
Areas to consider are strips
of ground between sidewalks
and drives or walks, steep
slopes associated with ditches,
areas of dense shade where
grasses will not form a good
carpet.
Plants that make good
ground covers are: English
and Algerian ivy, liriope, aju-


Magic Show


at School

Nov. 30

The Port St. Joe High School
Student Council will be spon-
soring a magic show on Tues-
day, November 30, at 7:30
p.m. in the high school. Lark,
"The Mystery Man", will be
performing. magical feats;
eating fire, passing nails
through his head, making
things appear and disappear,
and much more.
Tickets will be $1.00 per
person in advance, and $1.50
at the door. Tickets may be
purchased from any Student
Council member or at the high
school office.


ga, mondo grass, shore juni-
per and weeping lantana.
It is important to remember


Time


that landscapes are living. spend in the selection and
They do not just happen, but arrangement of plants will
must be planned. The time you reward you for years to come.


Those Delectable Indian Pass and


Indian Lagoon





OYSTERS


Are on the Market

To Reserve Your Bushel

41 Call


Indian Pass


Seafood Co.



227 8781
\-'I _1_


SERVICES '


Early American couch like
new and two matching lamps.
Can be seen at 1008 Woodward
Ave. Call 227-8006. 2tc 12-2

72 Yamaha Enduro with
helmet., Excellent condition.
$300 or $100 and resume
balance. 229-5316. ltc 11-25

: 1 Wizard Citation no-frost
refrigerator; 1 Frolic gas
range; 1 39,950 BTU Dearborn
gas heater (equipped for L.P.
:dr natural); 2 double beds
(mattress, box springs and
frame); 1 dresser with mirror
attached; 1 couch; 1 living
room chair; 2 kitchen tables
with chairs. Call 229-6573 after
:fve p.m.

S"The Great Tide", a beauti-
ftil hardbook edition is in its
sixth printing, one of Florida's
:most famous historical novels
.written by Rubylea Hall, for-
:mer resident of Port St. Joe, is
now on sale at Campbell's
Drug Store, Buzzett's Drug
Store, Pauline's Restaurant,
Economy Wasteria or contact
:Mrs. Eunice H. Brinson, 229-
4171. Ideal for gifts. 8tp 11-11

Control hunger and lose
weight with New Shape Diet
'Plan and Hydrex Water Pills.
:At Campbell's Drug. 4tp 11-25

No. 1 Drive-In Theater
Apalachicola, Fla.
Thurs., Fri., Sat.
Nov. 25, 26 and 27
Big Thanksgiving Show !
THE EXORCIST
Show starts 7 p.m. EST

I will demolish houses,
garages for materials. 229-
6402. tfc 11-18

Professional pool table, 1"
slate bed, $500.00. 229-6147.
tfc 11-18

1972 mobile home, 12' x 60'
Fernwood, 2 BR, 13 bath,
central heat and air. Call 229-
8108. 2tp 11-25
men's
golf shoes "Golden Bear"
9%D, $10; VW trailer hitch
without ball, $15. Call 229-8108.
2tp 11-25

Pheasants and quails, live
or dressed. Elmo Ford at 227-
3786. tfc 10-7

FOR STANLEY HOME
PRODUCTS
Call Betty Gilbert
648-7534
tfc 7-15


Firewood for sale, short
2x4's. You load pick-up truck,
$10. We load and deliver dump
truck full, $25. 229-6380. tfc 10-7

25' boat, twin Chevy eng-
ines, OMC equipped, CB radio,
call after 6:30, 648-5477.
tfc 10-28

23' Nomad travel trailer,
self-contained, air cond., like
new. Call 229-5271 after 5:00
p.m. tfc 10-7

30' shrimp boat with 327 250
h.p. engine. Completely rig-
ged, $2,750. Contact Kirkland's
Boat Landing. 227-8827. tfc 9-16

CB Radios, Johnson, Craig,
Surveyor, antennas, base sta-
tions, terms available. West-
ern Auto. tfc 3-4

CB Radios and marine elec-
tronics sales and service. 106
Monument Ave., phone 229-
8100. Open daily five p.m. to
nine p.m., Saturday, eight
a.m. to five p.m. tfc 10-7

DRY cleaning carpets is
easier, faster, ans safer with
HOST. Rent our machine. St.
Joe Furniture, 229-1251.
tfc 10-23

Custom-made wooden name
plaques, for mail boxes, front
gates, door posts, etc. Econo-
my Motors & Garden Center,
301 Hwy. 98, HV, 229-6001.






1974 Pinto Squire wagon.
Radio, heater, air cond., auto.
trans., 2300 cc engine. Call 229-
8372. tfc 11-18

1964 VW with 1969 engine.
Runs good, $400. 229-6147.
tfc 11-18

1973 Nova, 2 door, V-8, 3900
mileage, $2,400.00. Call 229-
4123 or229-'6010. tfc 11-18

1976 Chevy van, loaded, call
227-8241 before 5 p.m., after 5
p.m., call 229-6129. tfc 11-11

1973 Olds 98, deluxe, full
power, excellent cond., priced
to sell today, $2,300.00. Call
after 6:30, 648-5477. tfc 10-28


Read the
Classifieds


3 BR house, bath, LR, DR,
kitchen, den, carpet, 11/2 lots,
$15,000. Can be seen after one
p.m. 516 9th St. tfc 11-25

New brick home, 2112 Long
Ave., 3 BR, 2 bath, separate
living room and dining room,
kitchen, breakfast room, built-
in appliances, family room,
laundry room, 2 car finished
garage, central heat and air,
attic fan, carpet. This is a
spacious, liveable house with
many special features not
mentioned.,Must see to appre-
ciate. $51,200. Phone 229-6060.
tfc 11-18

House, 3 BR, 11/2 bath, Ir, dr,
kitchen, block, one year old,
$28,000. 229-6319. 2110 Long
Ave. tfc 11-1

3 BR house, 2 baths, 3 lots on
Palm Blvd. For information
call 227-2181. tfc 11-4

Brick veneer home, 2 yrs.
old on 1 acre, fenced, 2 BR, 2
baths, living room 18' x 28',
wall to wall carpet, blond
paneling, screened cook out
12' x 20', cement blocks 3'
high, 14 x 16 shop, pump
house, laundry and motor
house shed, 3 car garage, deep
well (iron 2 parts per million),
kitchen, dish washer, ice
maker, elec. stove; heat gas
circulated vented. Air, large
window unit in wall. Mr.
Morgan, Rt. 1, Box 150,
Howards Creek. 229-1167.
tfH 11-4
Two-story home, 1902 Monu-
ment Ave., 3 BR, 3 bath.
Phone 227-7221 or 229-6474.
tfc 8-21
House for sale on corner
with 1, 2, or 3 lots, 2nd St. and
2nd Ave., Highland View. Call
227-7551. tfc 10-28
VETERANS $300 down.
We have 2 new brick homes
for sale in Wewahitchka.
These homes have 3 BR, 2
baths, central heat, carpet,
garage, etc. FHA and conven-
tional financing available.
Call collect 205-794-6711
Dothan. An equal housing op-
portunity builder. tfc 9-23

House at White City, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, 134 acres of
land. Call 229-1138 after 5 p.m.
tfc 9-23

New brick home at 106 Yau-
pon Ave. 3 BR, 2 bath, dining
room, living room, den and
kitchen. Call 227-2291 or 229-
5302. tfc 10-7


House for sale at 228 7th St. 3
bedrooms, with duplex apart-
ment. 229-6538. tfc 9-30

New brick home, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, fireplace, 1,800
sq. ft. Call 229-8119. tfc 7-22


Nice furnished apartment
for rent. Call 229-4836.
tfc 11-25

One bedroom apartment for
rent, 1506 Long Ave. Phone
229-6688. tfc 10-14
Furnished apartment for
rent, 510 8th St. Call 229-6895
before 5:30; 229-6827 after
5:30.





Two bedroom furnished
house on Canal St., St. Joe
Beach, 1 block from Hwy. 98,
rent year round. Call 482-3354
or 482-3884 in Marianna.
tfc 10-21

Beach cottage for rent. Call
648-5144. tfc 9-2

FOR RENT: Furnished
large 2 bedroom house, auto-
matic heat, carport, laundry
and storage room. Call 229-
6777 after 6 P.M.




AT RUSTIC SANDS CAMP-
GROUND, 15th ST., MEXICO
BEACH, PATIO, BEAUTI-
FUL REC HALL PRIVI-
LEGES, 514 MILE FROM
BEACH, 648-3600. tfc 5-8

NO need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture,
229-1251. tfc 10-23

Public address system.
Owned by the Port St. Joe
Kiwanis Club. A new system
operable on either battery or
current. Call Ken Herring,
227-5281 for rental, tfc

For carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vac, the portable steam car-
pet cleaning system. Avail-
able at Western Auto, phone
227-2271, 219 Reid Ave.


Why live in the crowded
city? Move your mobile home
to peace, quiet and tran-
quility. Water, garbage collec-
tions, yards mowed, live lei-
surely. Gulf privileges. Only
VA approved mobile home
park in Gulf County. Ski
Breeze Meadows Trailer
Park, 9 miles southeast of
Port St. Joe on Hwy S-30.
Come out and enjoy the quiet.
tfc 5-6
For Rent: 2 BR trailer, air
conditioned. Canal St., St. Joe
Beach. For information, call
648-5650. tfc 6-24

CARPET Cleaning with
HOST couldn't be easier. Just
brush and vacuum for clean,
dry carpets. Rent our HOST
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
229-1251. tfc 10-23


There will be a regular
communication of Port St. Joe
Lodge No. 111, F. & A.M.,
every first and third Thursday
at 8:00 p.m..
F. E. BROGDON,
Everett McFarland, Sec.

There will be a VFW meet-
ing the third Tuesday of each
month in the American Legion
Hall. tfc 6-19
R.A.M.-Regular cu, a-
tion on St. Joseph Chapter No.
56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd Mon-
days, 8 p.m. All visiting com-
panions welcome.
JL.L. SIMS, H.P.
E. William McFarland, Sec.


Tires Now Installed
FREE
In Our Own
Auto Service Center
Western Auto Assoc. Store
227-2281
3-4 tfc


Landscaping, bush 1
plowing or discing
ready. Reasonable rat
Jimmy Goodman at
or 229-8308.

ALCOHOLICS ANONY
Meets
Fri. at 8 p.m., Sun. at
St. James Episcopal C
Parish House


L and L Repair
and Rental
for Repairs to Washe
ers, Refrigerators, Ai
tioners and all app
plus rental of large an
tools.
Call 648-5272


hogging,
garden
;es. Call
229-6265
tfc 10-14

eMOUS


Holiday Service
Baby sitting in my home. Do
your shopping child free, will
keep children odd hours and
weekend. For more informa-
tion call Helen Gilley, 229-6190.
2t 11-25

ADDITIONS,
REMODELING, REPAIRS
Work ,Guaranteed
25 Years Experience
Call 227-5986
tfc 6-17


REPAIRS
4 p.m. Aluminum screens and doors,
;hurch carpentry, house repair, mill-
work, roof repair and re-roof-
tfc4-24 ing.
f 4 SMITH & SON WORKSHOP
Phone 229-6018
Port St. Joe
_- ,ry-. tfc 7-22


rs, Dry-
r Condi-
?liances,
id small


4tp 11-4


Septic Tanks Pumped Out
Carefoot Septic Tank
229-8227, 229-2351,
and 229-6694.
tfc 7-1

All types carpet and vinyl
flooring installed. 10 years
experience. For free measure-
ment and estimate, call Ron-
ald Ross, 229-6822. tfc 9-2

LEWIS FLOOR CLEANING
All Types
229-6482 or 229-6447
tfc 9-20

Young Christian mother will
baby sit in my home, 6 a.m. to
midnight everyday but Sun-
day. Call 229-6676. tfc 9-30

ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work Weldinfj
506 First Street
Phone 229-6803
Machinist on duty all day
Every day

Carpentry Work Done
Reasonable Rates
Jimmy Johnson
Phone 227-7657
tfc 8-19

Complete Wood Shop
Custom Cut Lumber
Want to Do It Yourself?
Then come see us for Stan-
ley tools, hardware, paneling,
paint, lumber.
Earley's Hardware &
Building Supply
Hwy. 98 W. tfc 8-5 229-2763


Lawn mowers, tillers and
garden tractors repaired.
Economy Motors & Garden
Center, 301 Hwy. 98, HV,
229-6001. tfc 8-5


Your SHERWIN-WILLIAMS
PAINT Dealer in
Port St. Joe








HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St Joe, Florida


GLEN'S CABINET
SHOP
Kitchen Cabinets
Vanities --Mill Work
Glen Combs
Shop 229-6017 or 229-6530
Port St. Joe, Fla.
tfc 10-7,



















tfc 8-5


VINYL REPAIR SERVICE
We repair cuts, tears, ciga-
rette burns. Also vinyl clean-
ing and reconditioning. For
free estimates call
648-5272
4tp 11-4

Professional help with emo-
tional problems and-or con-
cerns. Gulf County Guidance
Clinic, Port St. Joe. 227-2691 or
227-7586. tfc 11-14

GRIFFIN'S
Refrigerator & Air
Conditioner Repairs
Call
229-6492
All work guaranteed
tfc 12-2

Fireplaces, stone and brick.
25 years experience. 0. H.
"Buddy" Wilson, Mexico
Beach, Fla. Phone 648-5643.
4tp 11-11


Lawn & Gardening Needs
Feed
Lawn Mower &
Small Engine Repairs
Economy Motors &
Garden Center
301 Hwy. 98 H.V.
229-6001
tfc 8-5



Wouldn't You Really
Rather Have Cable TV?




For Cable TV
Installation In Port St. Joe
-iulh ofl rM rrll
Phone 229-7232
Or Visit the Telephone Company
Business Office


kills bugs for
up to six months,
and saves you bout $100 yearly
in costly pest control services.
Use of Sprayer free with
purchase of Rid-A-Bug
HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe Floridaa


7lisceilaneous L STATE REAL ESTATE
For SWe FOR SALE FOR SALE
L













"Closed Thanksgiving Day"


EAGLE BRAND

MILK

Cans0 59

IGA 303 Cans

PEACHES

29 Oz. 398c
Cans

DEL MONTE

PUMPKIN


1GA Oz $ -
Ca1ns



BROWN & SERVE ROLLS123/88
IGA FRESH BAKED
PUMPKIN PIE 6 Inch 99

HOLIDAY COOKIES Buckets
(OVER 160 CT.)
COUNTLESS
FRUIT CAKES 0 $39

IGA WK OR CS

GOLD CORN


17 Oz.
Cans


3/898


Swift Premium Butter Ball 12 bs. up Tenderized Whole or Half
Turkeys 69" HAMS 89"


Smoked Whole Sliced 59c lb.
Picnics 55


Our Best Premium
Fryers No Limit


39


Round Steak lb. $19
All Meat Stew lb. 99'
Rump Roast 1b. 99C
Chuck Steak lb. 79C
Sirloin Steak 1b. $129
Sirloin Tip lb. $139
T-Bone Steak lb. $149
.For Soup or Stew
Beef Neckbones b. 29'Q
Brisket Stew


Blade
Chuck
Roast


59


5 Ib. or more GROUND 4 9 C
Beef While it lasts! 4 9


Fresh Large Baking
Hens


U -


uur BesT 3,s own small
Spare Ribs


59C


lb. 89C


Meaty Loin Ribs lb. 89C
End Cut
Pork Chops lb 89c


Our Best Center Cut
Pork Chops
Boston Butt
Pork Roast
Fresh Pork
Backbone


Rib Eye Steak


Bacon Ends


3 l. 139


I


Country Smoked Pure Pork
Sausage
Introductory offer $1.69 value
from ga.'s smokehouse to you Ga.


I FROZ~~EN OD


p IGA
t( [ ~ORANGE
CONCENTRATED OE
ORANGE JUICE 2 Oz
Cans
SEABROOK
PETITE LIMAS P,.
MRS. SMITH
2 9 Inch
PIE SHELLS Shells
MORTON
24 Oz.
PUMPKIN PIES Pkgs.
SOUTHERN CROSS
7 Oz.COCONUT
FROZEN COCONUT Pkgs


IGA
MACARONI


JUICE

99*
2/99'
69t
696
2/99'


& CHEESE


DINNER
71/4 Oz. 1 00
Pkgs. 4/ 1


o. KRAFT PARKAY


"" J MARGARINE
1 Lb.
_Pkgs. 2
PILLSBURY 8 Or.
BISCUITS cans
SEALTEST 8 OZ.
DIPS cups
TABLERITE
ICE CREAM Gal.
BORDEN'S
ORANGE JUICE Qts


/991
4/59'
2/99'
79'
3/o100


' PRODUCE I


lb. 79C
lb. 79C


PEPPERIDGE FARM
STUFFING
KLEENEX


DINNER NAPKINS
RAIN BARREL


Pkg.

SC. 49*

48 Oz. $199
Btls.


BRACH'S CHOCOLATE COVERED


CHERRIES


BRACH'S WINDOW BOX
CHOCOLATES


BORDEN'S
EGGNOG


12 Oz.
Boxes


Boxes


32 Oz.
Cans


99,

59'
$125


HEALTH BAUY


f' MOUTNWASH-(-0G. $1.75)
SCOPE st
TOOTHPASTE (REG. 1.


. $1o09


14)


C T (Mint 5z.
CIRLES & Reg.) Tube


HEAD & SHOULDERS (REG. $1.35)
SHAMPOO
HEAD & SHOULDERS (REG. $1.35)


SHAMPOO


2.
T


5u
ul


79'


Oz 95*

Oz. 95'


DOLE SLICED-CRUSHED-CHUNK

PINEAPPLE


(IN JUICE)
20 Oz.
Cans


2/99t


Give every Mother and Grandmother a
Give mixed fruit for Thanksgiving.


Mixed Fruit


Fresh
Cranberries
Pole Beans


2 Bags $


BAG
LB.


living house plant for T


21 in Bag
100 Oranges ,
More food for your money
29C Avacados
29ap White
Grapefruit


49C


Fancy
Bananas


thanksgiving.

690
each 29and
each 7
Lb 19c


RICH & SONS

Nov. 18-27


SUPERMARKET


Port


St. Joe, Fla.


PET
EVAPORATED
MILK Limit 3

/2 3 89'


lb. $129 FABRIC SOFTENER


BAMA
GRAPE JELLY or JAM


Jars 89


I


mmmmmmm


,|omo


............ ..... v w


$1391












PAGE EIGHT THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOV. 25, 1976 I" Odum Is Now A Consultant

BeachElects CofC Officers B ow ling I Donald E. Kauke and Daniel and marketing services. A man of the Hartford Life
OC i Os H. Odum have joined the Life chartered life underwriter, he Underwriters Association pu-
A t teInsurance Marketing and Re- has served as education chair- blication Report.
At the November meeting of search Association (LIMRA) Odum, who attended Gulf
Comthe Mexico Beach Chamber of as consultants in the Company Coast Junior College, Panama

It's n r eCommerce, new officers were W Relations Division. City, Florida, was with Penin-
t S n OU tion in 1977. Installation will Kauke, a graduate of St. sular Life from 1969 to 1974
take place during the January llation wBonaventure University, St. where he served as agent,
.. take place during the January Bonaventure,New York, was staff manager, and director of


"Stretching Your Dollars"

By GERALD A. LEWIS
Comptroller of Florida


Of the myriad of quality
items produced in this coun-
try, one item ranks highest
of all on the rating list. It
can't be successfully dupli-
cated; it's durable, moth re-
sistant, easy to carry, and
capable of purchasing prac-
tically anything. The item, of
course, is money, and the de-
mand for it is increasing.
Therefore, it is wise to tight-
en your hold on the money
you have by keeping track of
exactly where it is going.
Your money should cover
four expense areas: necessi-
ties, additives, savings, and
luxuries.
For necessities, figure the
monthly cost of all items you
deem essential, including
food, shelter, clothing and
transportation. If you are
living within your means,
these items should present
no problems.
Paying for additives
should not cause any exces-
sive hardship either. Addi-
tives include expenses for
education, insurance, social
activities and recreation.
Make certain that you keep
these costs in the proper per-
spective to avoid spending


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLOR.
IDA.
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, apolitical
subdivision of the State of Florida,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, and the
Taxpayers, Property Owners and Citi-
zens thereof and of Gulf County, Florida,
including non-residents owning property
or subject to taxation therein,
Defendants.
VALIDATION OF $136,300 GULF
COUNTY WATER AND SEWER SYS.
TEM REVENUE BONDS AND BOND
ANTICIPATION NOTES
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
TO: THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
THROUGH THE STATE ATTORNEY
FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, AND TO
THE SEVERAL PROPERTY OWN.
ERS, TAXPAYERS, CITIZENS OF
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN.
CLUDING NON-RESIDENTS OWN-
ING PROPERTY OR SUBJECT TO
TAXATION THEREIN, AND ALL
OTHERS HAVING OR CLAIMING
ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST
IN PROPERTY TO BE AFFECTED
BY THE ISSUANCE OF THE WATER
AND SEWER REVENUE BONDS
AND THE BOND ANTICIPATION
NOTES HEREINAFTER MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED OR
TO BE AFFECTED IN ANY WAY
THEREBY:
The above cause coming on to be
heard upon the Complaint this day filed
herein by the County of Gulf, Florida,
seeking to determine the authority of
County of Gulf to issue its Water and
Sewer System Revenue Bonds in the
amount of $136,300 to be dated as of the
date of delivery, in the denomination of
$1,000 or any multiple thereof but not
greater than $10,000, or the amount
maturing in each year except that in the
last year of maturity one bond shall be in
the amount of $300, maturing at such
times as provided by the Ordinance
authorizing the issuance of the Bonds,
bearing interest payable annually on the
first day of September at a rate not to
exceed the rate allowable by law, and its
Temporary Bond Anticipation Notes in
an amount not exceeding $136,300, a
more particular description of said
bonds and said Temporary Bond Antici-
pation Notes being contained in the Com-
plaint filed in these proceedings, to
determine the legality of the proceed-
ings had and taken in connection there-
with, and the legality of the provisions,
covenants ani agreements contained
therein, and seeking a judgment of this
Court to validate the proceedings for
said Water and Sewer System Revenue
Bonds and said Water and Sewer System
Revenue Bond Anticipation Notes and
said Water and Sewer System Revenue
Bonds and Temporary Water and Sewer
System ORevenue Bond Anticipation
Notes when issued pursuant thereto, and
said complaint now having been pre.
sented to this Court, for entry of an
Order to Show Cause pursuant to Chap-
ter 75, Florida Statutes, and the Court
being fully advised in the premises:
IT IS ORDERED AND ADJUDGED
that the State of Florida, through the
State Attorney of the Fourteenth Judi-
cial Circuit of Florida, and the several
property owners, taxpayers and citizens
of the State of Florida including non-
residents owning property or subject to
taxation therein, and all others having or
claiming any right, title or interest in
property to be affected in any way
thereby, be and they are each here-
by required to appear and show
cause, if any there be, before this
Court on the 2nd day of December,
1976, at 3:30 o'clock P.M. in the
Chambers of the undersigned Judge at
the Gulf County Courthouse in the City of
Port St. Joe, Florida, why the prayer of
said complaint should not be granted
and why the proceedings for said Water
and Sewer System Revenue Bonds and
said Temporary Bond Anticipation
Notes and the Water and Sewer System
Revenue Bonds and Temporary Bond
Anticipation Notes when issued pursuant
thereto should not be validated and
confirmed as therein prayed.
AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED
AND ADJUDGED that this Order to
Show Cause be published in the manner
required by Section 75.06, Florida Sla-
tutues, in The Star, a newspaper of gen.
eral circulation published in Gulf
County, Florida.
AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED
AND ADJUDGED that by such publica-
tion of this Order all property owners,


money that could go into
savings.
Many persons feel that
only those who have a lot of
money are able to save. This
is not the case. Savings, how-
ever small, add up faster
than you realize. A nickle
saved from every dollar
grows to a year's salary in 20
years. A dime does it in 10
years. Save regularly, re-
gardless of the amount.
Even the soundest of bud-
gets, with necessities, addi-
tives and savings figured in,
can be reined by excessive
luxuries. Despite the gratifi-
cation luxuries can bring,
they may also put a strain on
your finances that robs you
of security and happiness.
Put a limit on luxuries, and
indulge yourself only when
you can afford to.
By building your budget
around necessities, addi-
tives, savings and luxuries,
you should be able to put
stretch in your dollars and
make them look for you.
For more financial infor-
mation contact State Comp-
troller, Gerald A. Lewis, The
Capitol, Tallahassee.
(AFNS)


taxpayers, and citizens of Gulf County
and the State of Florida, including non-
residents owning property or subject to
taxation therein, and all others having or
claiming any right, title or interest in
property to be affected by the issuance
of said revenue bonds and bond antici-
pation notes or to be affected in any way
thereby, be and they are made parties
defendant to this proceeding, and that
this Court shall have jurisdiction of them
to the same extent as if named as defen-
dants in said complaint and personally
served with process in this cause.
DONE AND ORDERED in Chambers
at Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida,
this 9th day of November, 1976.
-s- LARRY G. SMITH,
Circuit Judge
Certified True Copy
George Y. Core,
Clerk of Circuit Court,
Gulf County, Florida
By: Susan E. Bigelow 3t 11-11

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT
COURT FOR THE NORTHERN
DISTRICT OF FLORIDA
MARIANNA DIVISION
THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,:
PLANTIFF,
VS.
CLYDE E GARLAND and
CLARA A. GARLAND, his wife,
Defendant (s).
MARIANNA CIVIL ACTION
NO. 76-39
Filed 11-3-76
ORDER FOR SERVICE OF
PROCESS BY PUBLICATION
Plaintiff, by its Attorney, CLINTON
ASHMORE, having filed its sworn
motion under Title 28, United States
Code, Section 1655, for an order for
service of process on the defendantss.
Clyde E. Garland and Clara A. Garland,
his wife, in an action to foreclose a
mortgage li.n upon real property in the
above District in Gulf County, Florida
described as follows:
Commencing at the Northeast corner of
Section 1 and running thence South
01 degrees 27' East a distance of 70.00
feet; thence South 88 degrees 33' West a
distance of 449.04 feet; thence South 01
degrees 27' East a distance of 412.50 feet
to the point of beginning; thence
continuing South 01 degrees 27' East
along the West right of way of Liberty
Street a distance of 80.00 feet; thence
South 88 degrees 33' West a distance of
150.00 feet; thence North 01 degrees 27'
West a distance of 80.00 feet; thence
North 88 degrees 33' East a distance of
150.00 feet to the point of beginning. Said
property lying in the Northeast quarter
of Northeast quarter of Section 1,
Township 8 South, Range 11 West, Gulf
County, Florida.
And it appearing to the Court that the
said defendants are not inhabitants of
and cannot be found within the State of
Florida, and have not voluntarily ap-
peared herein, and personal service
upon them is not practical because their
whereabouts, residence and address are
unknown, and the Court being advised in
the premises, it is
ORDEREDthat the defendants, CLYDE
E. GARLAND and CLARA A. GAR-
LAND, his wife, appear and file respon-
sive pleadings to the complaint for
foreclosure of a lien on the foregoing
described property with the Clerk of the
United States District Court, Federal
Building, Tallahassee, Florida, on or
before the 5th day of January, 1977, and
in default thereof, the Court will proceed
to a hearing and adjudication of this suit
the same as if said defendants CLYDE
E. GARLAND and CLARA A. GAR.
LAND, his wife have been served
personally in the State of Florida; and
such shall, as-regards the defendants
CLYDE E. GARLAND and CLARA A.
GARLAND, his wife, if they do not
appear, affect only the real property
described above. This Order is to be
published in a newspaper of general
circulation in Gulf County, Florida, once
each week for six (6) consecutive weeks,
commencing November 11, 1976.
DONE and ORDERED at Tallahassee,
in the Northern District of Florida, this
3rd day of November 1976.
S.William Stafford
United States District Judge
6t 11.11

NOTICE
OF
INTENTION TO REGISTER
FICTITIOUS NAME
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that Neil Arnold Enterprises, Incorpo.
rated intends to register the fictitious
name, K&D TELEVISION AND


meeting: president, Mrs. Bar-
bara Champion; vice presi-
dent, Eldon Miller; secretary,
Mrs. Traci Gaddis; treasurer,
Mrs. Susan Davis; and publi-
city, Mrs. Rella Wexler.

It was voted to have the
December meeting on the
13th. The annual Christmas
Party will be held on Satur-,
day, December 18, at 8:30
p.m. for members and guests.
Mrs. Faye Koebrugge will
serve as hostess of this festive
get-together.

Several new members were
welcomed. Residents of Mex-
ico Beach who are interested
in membership should contact
Mrs. Olin Davis.


Card of Thanks

As the Lord giveth, so He
also taketh away. We are
deeply grateful to each of our
friends who shared in our
sorrow and loss of our hus-
band and father. For every
flower, card, dish of food, visit
and thought in prayer, we
pray that God will bless you
for it. It is our prayer that we
will all be rejoined with him
when the master calls us home
to that great homecoming.
The family of Mr.Jack
Sheffield
Mrs. Lucille Sheffield
Mr. and Mrs. Jackie
Sheffield
Mr. and Mrs. Donnie
Sheffield


SOUND, INCORPORATED in the Office
of the Circuit Court Clerk, Gulf County,
Florida. The principal place of business
is 301 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe Florida.
The name and interest of the person
interested in the business is NEIL
ARNOLD ENTERPRISES, INCOR-
PORATED, 100 per cent.
Dated this the 4th day of November,
1976.
K&D TELEVISION AND SOUND
By: Robert M. Moore, Attorney
-s.Robert M. Moore
302 Third Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Attorney for K&D Television &
Sound
4tc 11-11

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY.
CASE NO.
IN RE: The Marriage of
BENTLEY WAYNE RILEY, Husband,
Respondent,
And
PATRICIA LOUISE RILEY, Wife, Peti.
tioner
NOTICEOF SUIT
TO:
Bentley Wayne Riley
c-o Luverne R. Holland
Dothan Steel Company
Dothan, Alabama 36301
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your Answer
of other response to the Petition on
Petitioner's Attorney:
ROBERT M. MOORE,-ESQ.
P.O. Box 428
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
and file the original thereof in the Circuit
Court Clerk's Office, Gulf County Court-
house, Port St. Joe, Florida, on or before
the 24th day of December, 1976. If you
fail to do so, a Final Judgement for the
relief sought may be granted by Default.
DATED this the 16th day of Novem-
ber, 1976.
GEORGE Y. CORE
Clerk of Circuit Court
BY: -s. Margaret B. Core
Deputy Clerk
4tc 11-18


The Thursday Nite Ladies
League met on Nov. 18. On
lanes one and two, Renfro won
four games from Red Hot
Mamas. Sydney Taylor led
Renfro with a 170 game and
Cathy Blackburn had a 447
series. Ruby Wilson bowled a
139 game and a 384 series for
Red Hot Mamas.
On lanes three and four,
H.V. Motors won four games
from Surefoots. Sandra Brock
bowled a 153 game and a 408
series for H.V. Motors. Hanna
Justice had a 137 game and a
277 series for Surefoots.
On lanes five and six, Ralph
and Henry's won four games
from Bowen's Cow Girls. Su-
san Bigelow led Ralph and
Henry's with a 150 game and a
416 series. Eleanor Williams
(sub) bowled a 165 game and a
452 series for Cow Girls.
On lanes seven and eight,
Loonies won three games
from Tomlinson Abstract. Pat
Lanier led Loonies with a 134
game and Connie Ross had a
348 series. Norma Hall bowled
a 132 game and Pam Barbee
had a 340 series for Tomlinson
Abstract.
Thursday Nite Ladies' League
Standings:
W L
Renfro 35 9
Ralph & Henry's 35 9
H. V. Motors 33 11
Loonies 26 18
Cow Girls 23 21
Surefoots 11 33
Red Hot Mamas 8 36
Tomlinson Abstract 5 39

Un lanes one and two,
Sylvachem won three games
from St. Joe Paper Co. Bill
Whitfield led Sylvachem with
a 198 game and a 464 series.
David Howell bowled a 162
game and a 428 series for St.
Joe Paper Co.
On lanes three and four,
Murphy's Dairy Burger won
four games from Team 2.
Harry Lowery bowled a 209
game and a 591 series for
Dairy Burger. James Hicks
had a 177 game and a 522
series for Team 2.
On lanes five and six,
Whammos (WJOE Radio Sta-
tion) won four games from
Team 8. Robert Montgomery
led Whammos with a 179 game
and Steve Wombles (sub) a 47
series. Cathy Blackburn had a
136 game and a 385 series for
Team 8.
On lanes seven and eight,
Fiesta Food Store and the 4
Beacons split two games each.
Nett Henderson led Fiesta
with a 191 game and a 486
series. Fred Kleeb bowled a
185 game and a 477 series for 4
Beacon's.


St. Joe Furniture moved
into first place this week by
virtue of their four game
sweep of C&G. Bertha Clayton
paced the Furniture team with
a 180 game and a 488 series.
Lou Mork rolled a 430 series
for C&G.
Pepsi Cola played the spoil-
er role in their four game
sweep of the first place Super-
ettes. Trudie Pate led the
Pepsi Cola team with her 422
series. Ann Brooks (sub) was
high bowler for the Superette
team with her 438 series.
Eleanor Williams led the
Alley Kats with her 483 series
and 196 game to a three game
win over Florida Bank. A.J.
Martin rolled a 426 series for
the Bank.
Bowen's Play Girls outbow-
led Pate's this week to take a
three game win. Nita White-
hurst led the Play Girls with a
427 series. Betty Hardin was
high bowler for Pate's with a
423 series.
Wed. Nite Ladies' League


St. Joe Furniture
Alley Kats
H. V. Superettes
Florida Bank
Pate's
Play Girls
C&G
Pepsi Cola


Standings:
W L
321/ 11V2
311/2 12/2
29 15
23 21
16 28
16 28
14 30
14 30


Gulf County Men's League
met on Monday November 15.
On lanes one and two Camp-


in broadcasting prior to enter-
ing the life insurance business
as an agent with Penn Mutual
in 1967. He joined Connecticut
Mutual Life in 1974 as a
pension consultant and in 1975
went to Phoenix Mutual Life
as manager, agent training


bell's Drugs took all four
games from 10 Pin Lounge.
Top roller for Campbell's was
Barry Richardson with a 519.
High man for 10 Pin was
Donnie- Cox with a 416.
Lanes three and four had
Butler's Restaurant taking
three games from Highland
View Superette. Butlers had
Bill Whitfield as high man
with 524. Leading the pack for
Highland View Superette was
Joe Davis with 508.
Lanes five and six saw Shirt
& Trophy take three games
from U.S. Coast Guard. Ro-
bert Montgomery's 491 was
tops for Shirt & Trophy. Chief
Berry led his Coast Guard
with a 413.
Gulf Co. Men's League
Standings: W L
Shirt & Trophy 29 11
Campbell's Drugs 28 12
10-Pin Lounge 25 15
Butler's Rest. 25 15
H. V. Superette 15 25
U.S. Coast Guard 14 26



O have a
nice weekend...


training. A member of the
S Southeastern Training Direc-
ytors Association and Combi-
zB B nation Companies Conserva-
t. ion Conference, he was awar-
ded the National Sales
Achievement Award in 1971
and 1972.
At the Association, Kauke
k and Odum will consult with
member companies, teach at
the several LIMRA manage-
'. meant schools, contribute to
,..U" i LIM RA publications, and
serve as staff representatives
DANNY ODUM on industrywide committees.


Let Us Help You In the

Selection of a Memorial













It will be a pleasure to have
you visit our display of
Monuments and Markers. If
you prefer, we will call
at your office or home.


Fogle Monument Service
Panama City
23rd St. at Harrison Ave. Phone 763-4661


Specials for


FRIDAY & SATURDAY
AA^^ ENovember 26 & 27



FITTEEO SUSDA FOOD STAMPS
510 FIFTH STREET PORT ST. JOE- --,








A .


Winter Mixed League
Standings:
W L
Murphy's Dairy Burger 34 6
Sylvachem 28 12
WJOE Radio Sta. 27 13
Team 2 19 21
Fiesta Food Store 16 2
Fiesta Food Store 16 24
St. Joe Paper Co. 15 25
4 Beacons 15 25
Team 8 6 34


FINE FARE



MAYONf


Fresh Florida



SATSUMAS


Limit I with $10 or more order




IAISE Qt. 794


1/4 bu.
box


$3.95


Legal Advertising


PRESCRIPTION SERVICE

FAST AND FRIENDLY



















We have the latest in prescrip-
tion drugs with fast service. We
also maintain a complete record
of your prescription purchases
and can furnish you with a copy
instantly for income tax pur-
poses.




Smith's Pharmacy

Drive-In Prescription Window at Rear

Phone 227-5111


EEL-


SHOP SA VE WA Y for Everyda y L o w Prices
L." a d ManMoi6 S06cials!









THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY. NOV. 25. 1976 PAGE NINE


Waterfowl Season Opens Nov. 24


1


4-40


.- -. .a







Ottis B. Smith, left, has retired from St.
Joe Paper Company, after 41 years of
employment by the firm in the maintenance
department. Smith was an oiler at the time of


ii


his retirement on November 1.
Shown presenting Smith with his reti
ment .package is his supervisor, Jo
Kramer.


Two Retire from SJPC


John S. Kramer, right, will be stepping
down from his position as maintenance
superintendent of St. Joe Paper Company on
December 1. Kramer is master mechanic at


the mill, where he has worked since June
1939. Kramer is assisted in arranging
retirement in the photo above by
successor, Robert J. Faliski, left.


The 1976-77 waterfowl sea-
son will open in Florida No-
vember 24th. Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission bio-
logist, Charles Turner, urges
hunters to obtain a copy of the
waterfowl regulation sum-
mary because of the many
changes in hunting regula-
tions and harvestable birds.
For example, legal shooting
hours on opening day are from
noon to sunset.
Turner also noted changes
in the point value of the


various species of ducks. He
pointed out that these values
change annually depending
upon the harvestable popula-
tion of the various species. An
example noted by Turner is
the fact that both canvasback
and redheads may be harvest-
ed this season'. The former has
a value of 100 points, the latter
70 points.
Turner advised that particu-
lar areas may have special
restrictions and urged sports-
men to be familiar with any


possible limitations in their
locale. "For example," he
said, "in part of Santa Rosa
County shooting is permitted
only on Thursdays, Fridays,
Saturday and Sundays (as
well as Thanksgiving and
Christmas) and shooting is
limited from one half hour
before sunrise to noon."
This area is that south of the
Gulf Power transmission lines
southward to the L&N Rail-
raod trestle across Escambia


Bay, bounded on the east by
the eastern shore of Escambia
Bay and on the west by the
east bank of the Escambia
River and western shore of
Escambia Bay.
In Leon County and on Lake
Miccousukee in 'Jefferson
County, waterfowl hunting is
permitted only on Wednes-
days, Saturdays and Sundays
and on November 25-26 and
December 23-24. Other re-
strictions in particular areas


speak to use of outboard
motors. For example, use of
motors are prohibited on Lake
lamonia and portions of Lake
Jackson in Leon County dur-
ing waterfowl season.
Copies of the current water-
fowl regulations and point
values may be obtained from
the Commission's offices in
Tallahassee, Panama City,
DeFuniak Springs, Pensacola
or from any County Tax
Collector.


Judge This Fudge -- Fantastic!

Testing Starts December 7 rV


for Crocker Scholarships / S_


The 23rd Annual General
Mills Search for Leadership in
re- Family Living, a $110,000 col-
hn lege scholarship program
sponsored by General Mills,
gets underway Tuesday, De-
cember 7. High school seniors
here and throughout the coun-
try will join in a written
knowledge and attitude exam-
ination which will determine
individual college scholarship
awards of $500 to $5,000.
Participating seniors will
compete in a 50-minute exam-
ination prepared and graded
by Science Research Associ-
ates, Chicago, who are also
responsible for all judging and
selection of winners. Each
local winner will receive a
certificate from General Mills
and will, together with other
school winners, remain in the
running for state and national
honors.
State winners -- one from
every state and the District of
Columbia -- will each be
awarded a $1,500 scholarship.
Chosen in judging that centers
on performance in the written
examination, state Family
Leaders of Tomorrow will also
earn for their schools a 20-vol-
ume reference work, "The
Annals of America," from
Encyclopedia Britannica Edu-
cational Corporation. Second-
ranking participants in each
state will receive $500 college,
grants.


On April 17-22 of next year,
the 51 State Family Leaders of
Tomorrow will gather in Co-
lonial Williamsburg, Virginia,
for. an expense-paid educa-
tional tour there and in Wash-


ington, D.C. Personal obser-
vation and interviews of the
state winners during the tour
will be added factors in the
selection of the 1977 General
Mills All-American Family
Leader of tomorrow and three
runners-up. Scholarships
awarded to the four national
winners will be for $5,000,
$4,000, $3,000 and $2,000.
The 1976 winner of the top
$5,000 scholarship is a boy, the


first in the history of' the
Search. He is Dan McVicar,
Broomfield, Colorado.
More than eleven million
students have been enrolled in
the General Mills Search since
its beginning in the 1954-55
school year. With this year's
grants, total scholarships
awarded will exceed $2.4 mil-
lion. For its first 22 years, the
program was known as the
Betty Crocker Search.


First United
Methodist Church
Constitution and Monument
Port St. Joe, Fla.
JOHNIE W. McCURDY, Minister
CHURCH SCHOOL .. ..... .......... 9:45 A.M.
PREACHING SERVICE......... 11 A.M. &7:00 P.M.
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP .... 6:30 P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) ...... 7:30 P.M.



the members of the


'Church of Christ
invite you to meet with them:
Sunday Morning Bible Study ........... 10:00 A.M.
Sunday Morning Worship .............. 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Night ........ ...6:00 P.M. i
Wednesday Night .... ... .......... 7:00P.M.

Corner 20th St. & Marvin
For information call
229-6969
.. M M. M


Everyone's grown up with fudge, so every candy lover (and
isn't that everyone?) is an expert. Judge this fudge and you'll'
say it's fantastic.
Homespun Skillet Fudge is different enough from the
ordinary to make it appealing. It calls for ingredients that are
not found in the usual fudge varieties. A bit of cinnamon
added to the chocolate chips provides a little kick, offering
emphasis without proclaiming its presence. And 3-Minute Brand
Quick Oats, the surprise ingredient, serves as a replacement for
nuts. Only a half cup of chopped nuts is needed in the recipe,
thanks to the oats. Yes, these oats have been oven baked to
make them as chewy and nut-like as the nuts themselves!
Miniature marshmallows and flaked coconut are two other
ingredients that make this fudge so mouth-watering. And, best
of all, this recipe yields three and a quarter pounds of home-
made fudge, so it can truthfully be called inexpensive to make.
Thus, everyone gets lots of fudge to judge and enjoy.
Homespun Skillet Fudge
3 cups sugar 2 cups (12 ounces)
1 can (13 ounces) chocolate chips
evaporated milk 1 cup 3-Minute Brand
'% cup butter Quick Oats
1% teaspoons cinnamon Ah cup chopped nuts
1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon vanilla
1-,cup miniature : 'cup flaked coconut
marshmallows
Combine sugar, evaporated milk, butter, cinnamon and salt
in an electric skillet. Bring to a boil over medium heat (250
degrees F.) Boil for seven minutes, stirring constantly. Turn
heat off, Blend in remaining ingredients, starring very well.
Pour into buttered 13 x 9-inch pan. Chill and cut into squares.
Makes 3-1/4 pounds.


Elementary School News


The School Volunteer Pro-
gram at Port St. Joe Elemen-
tary has begun successfully.
Approximately 25 adults,
mostly parents, are assisting
in the classrooms by tutoring
students and keeping records.
The volunteers work under the
supervision of teachers to
provide increased individuali-
zation of instruction, greater
reinforcement of basic skills,
and an added enrichment of
the curriculum.
Florida Commissioner of
Education, Ralph Turlington,
,has pledged his support to the
program and states,
"Through the school volunteer
program, concerned citizens
are able to offer students the
benefits of individual experi-
ence, skills, and enthusiasm.
In addition, school volunteers
gain for themselves a rare
kind of satisfaction with hav-
ing served usefully."
More volunteer workers are
needed. Please call the school
at 229-3221 for further infor-
mation if you are interested
in donating as little as one
hour per week to help a child.
The School Handbook was
recently circulated to stu-
dents. It contains rules for
student conduct, interprets
policies for parents, lists the
faculty teaching assignments,
and gives a calendar for
school holidays. Sixth graders
submitted drawings for the
cover of the handbook. Glenn
Ray was the winner of the
contest and his drawing ap-
pears on the cover. Parents
are asked to read the hand-
'book carefully.
Boxtops are coming in slow-
ly but surely for the Post
Cereal Fun 'N Fitness pro-
Ngram. Coaches report that
since the contest began on
October 1st, 700 boxtops have
been turned in. The contest
runs through March 31, 1977.
After that time, boxtops can
be exchanged for physical


education equipment. The the dated portion of their Post obtained.
coaches request that all per- Cereal boxtops in order that SELL TRASH FOR CASH
sons in the community save needed equipment might be WITH ACLASSIFIEDAD




Lettuce and celery stay fresher longer kept in paper bags with outer leaves intact than
they do in cellophane.




A check from the Bank every


Christmas could help you!


If you received your Christmas Club check this year,
you're in great shape! If not, we invite you to join our
Christmas Club today and enjoy your next Christmas
without financial strain. Your savings will earn you
interest compounded quarterly, letting you earn
money on the money you earn.


FLORIDA

FIRST

NATIONAL
at Port St. Joe


sEd,c depositor' inwred to S40,000


F DIILOf~rNS~ACECbttO


Phone 227-2551


OFFICE


SUPPLIES


TAPE


STAPLER


'TYPEWRfITE
RIB~o

..'*CAL 'ALIS


TIIIKE STA


Phone 227-3161


306 Williams Avenue


mimammmowamw .4m&-


We Have A Complete Line Of


I


7-` \1 7i-













None Sold
to Deelers

November 24-27 SMO
Piggly Wiggly has a complete supply of raisins fruits,
nuts and other fruit cake materials on display for your
selection.


P'ggrywIggIy ias
sizes on dd Premium "
Butlerball Turkeys
N Piggly Wiggly has a 1
good selection of baking '
hens. pork hams. smoked hams
canned nams Iully cok .edthams
Iurkey roast tef roast pork roaSt
,oysters. tea .i plu, any other Quality ,
fresh meat for your holiday tixing'*r .
BShank Portion
(ED STANDARD GRADE
HM S FRESH WHOLE


Sfl wiFRYERS
IrS wvft-i-s .....


Lb.


Delicious


SUNSET GOLI

ICE MILK


half
gal.


Ib.
BONELESS ROUND
SSTEAK Ib s148


Fresh Lean
Assorted
PORK lb.

CHOPS


Premium DBeef
CHUCK STEAK
5 to 7 lb. avg. wt.
government Inspected Frozen
BAKING HENS
R Swift's Premium Beef
T BONE STEAK


990


lb. 59
lb.$139


Fresh
PORK STEAK lb. 79'
Fresh
PORK ROAST lb. 79
Swift Premium Beef Boneless
Rump or 139
SIRLOIN TIP ROAST lb. I
Swift's Premium Beef $ 19
BONELESS STEW Ib
Swift's Premium Beef 39
CUBED STEAK lb. 1
4 Fresh Pork
SPARE RIBS lb. 991
Hormel 12 Oz. Pkg.
BEEF WEINERS 79


BEEF SHORT RIBS


Swift's Premium Beef
SHOULDER ROAST


Swift's Premium Beef
RUMP ROAST
Swift's Premium Beef
RIB EYE STEAKS


Swift's Premium Beef
SIRLOIN STEAK


Swift's Premium Beef
SIRLOIN TIP


L


lb. 69C


B. 99


lb. $199


$149
S Lb.


Loin End
PORK CHOPS 89.


P- Lindy
Early Peas


ROUND-o0


ISaeg


- s FROZEN SPECILS


Blue Bird Oran
JUICE


u Piggly Wiggly
S Turnips with Roots


4


$4
16 oz.
cans,


v Detergent

PUREX


1Y3.


Chef Boy-Ar-Dee
PIZZA


ge Chef. Boy-Ar-Dee Deluxe
6 Pak $09 PIZZA $1.29


99' PIES


Cheese, Sausage, Pepperoni


16 $109


1 Kraft Soft


PARKAY


Lbs. $100


Piggly Wiggly Single Wrap Kraft Extra Light
Cheese s,ices$1.49 Biscuits P,k 590


Round White
) POTATOES


Canadian
RUTABAGAS
Fresh
POLE BEANS


O PD el M ontei
Whole Kernel or C.S.


Nabisco Premium

SALTINES


Cudahy 3 Oz. C
POTTED
MEAT


10 Lb.
Bag


Red Delicious
Lb. 12 APPLES


88C


3 Lb.
Bag


89c


Idahoan Instant 8 Oz
Lb. 49" POTATOES 3 for 990


1 Lb. Box


Ortega 4 Oz. Pkg.
TACO 390
SHELLS
Oretega 7 Oz. Pkg.
TACO 690
KITS 69


-ans
5 Cans $10.0


Cudahy 5 Oz. Cans
VIENNA Cans$100
SAUSAGE 3 cans


2z
80 gg^1


/


! ^Quality I
SHORTENING

MOIDRIF


1.R


Domino
SUGAR
5 Lb. Bag


Wilt 1f wit$10
purchm~


(1111


Suinbea


Qt.
Size


/K


CORN


16 oz.
can


'.:


Morton Per ns


r6Nlh,