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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02134
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 30, 1976
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02134

Full Text















FODTIETH VYAD R.INUBR1D &


EIU 3 K LU
Industry Deep Water Port Fine People Safest Beaches in Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1976


15 Cents Per Copy


Hold the Phone -I It's ot Over et!


Hold the Phone-- It's Not Over Yet!


The sweating continues for all the
candidates in Tuesday's election except for
two candidates. With still 382 absentee ballots
to be counted, only Waylon Graham was
assured of victory when the regular ballots
were tallied Tuesday night, upsetting Her-
man Ard for his post on the School Board, Ard
had defeated Graham for the position just
four years ago.
Precincts One and Four were the last ro
Precincts One and Four were the last to
report to the Supervisor of Elections Tuesday
night and dramatically changed things in
Several of the races when they came in. With
the large number of absentees to count, things
could change again in the see-saw races
which typified every race on the local ballot.
Another sidelight of the fall primaries in
the county was that Mrs. Dessie Lee Parker,
Supervisor of Elections was the only one
re-elected as an incumbent. Sheriff Raymond
Lawrence was the only incumbent who had an
outside chance of staying in office Wednesday
morning when counting of the absentees
began.
BIG VOTE
Throughout the Big Bend of Florida, newspa-
pers were predicting a light vote for the
second primary. This wasn't the case here in
Gulf County where exteme interest was
generated, especially in the races for Sheriff
and Superintendent of Schools.
Here in Gulf County, a whopping 71
percent of the registered voters'cast their
vote. An unofficial count has 4,576 voters
casting their ballots. Gulf has 6,444 registered
voters.
When you consider that a portion of the
6,444 registered are Republican and Indepen-
dents, the percentage of those eligible casting
ballots was even higher.
LOCAL RACES
Locally, it appears as if the county will
begin the 'year with three new County
Commissioners and two new School Board
members.
As counting of the absentees ~started
yesterday, the District One races stilliup for
grabs with Jinimy Gortman of(Wewahitchka
holding a narrow 53 vote lead.over Rudy
Pippin. Pippin had a comfortable lead until


Precinct One came in. Gortman wound up
with 1,942 votes to 1,889 for Pippin, who was
defeated four years ago by T. D. Whitfield,
who did not seek re-election.
In District Five, incumbent Eldridge
Money has only the slimmest of chances of
holding onto his seat after the absentees are
counted. Leo Kennedy, who was defeated by
Money four years ago, polled 2,098 votes for a
277 vote lead over Money who polled 1,821
votes.
In the District Three School Board race,
Paul Sewell is the apparent victor in his initial
bid for public office. S.ewell had a 226 vote
lead over James Hanlon when the polls
closed. Sewell's lead was considerable until
the Precinct One box came in, boosting
Hanlon, but not nearly enough to give him an
outside chance with the absentees. Sewell
polled 1,984 and Hanlon.1,758.
In School Board District Four, Waylon
Graham will go back into office, replacing
Herman Ard who defeated Graham four
years ago. Graham has the only vote total
which cannot be upset by the counting of the
absentees. Graham earned his clear-cut
victory by polling 2,392 votes while Ard came
up with 1,360.
TWO CLOSER ONES
The two races which generated the heat
for voters to go to the polls, the Sheriff and
Superintendent of Schools, are still undecid-
ed, though the trend seems to be that Ken
Murphy will be Gulf County's new Sheriff and
Walter Wilder will be the Superintendent of
Schools unless a miracle occurs.
Lawrence and Murphy, who fought it out
toe to toe through both the primaries are still
only 202 votes apart, with Murphy having the
edge. In this race, too, it was neck and neck
until the spoiler, Precinct One, came on the
scene. Murphy picked up 101 of his majority
in this box, alone, and seems destined to upset
Lawrence who polled 1,996. Murphy had 2,198.
The surprise of the election was the
;;vote-getting ability of Ronald Wayne Chil-
/ders. who tossed his hat,.in:,the ing for
Superintendent of Schools, to the surprise of
everybody except himself.
When the smoke cleared Tuesday night,


Childers had 1,870 votes.
Walter Wilder, making his second try at
the post seems to be the victor, heading
Childers by a 270 vote margin, with his total of
2,140.
DISTRICT, STATE RACES
In the District Three Senate race, Gulf
County helped re-elect Dempsey Barron,


Precinct 1
CANDIDATE


giving him 2,591 votes to only 1,347 for his
opponent, Travis Marchant.
In the only state contest on the ballot, that
of Supreme Court Justice, Group I, Gulf
County again voted for a winner, giving
Frederick B. Karl a 100 vote majority over
Charles R. Holley. Holley polled 974 and Karl
1,074.


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11- Total


STATE SENATOR, 3rd District
Barron ....... 360 249 148 41 216 118
Marchant .... 166 135 60 21 69 63

SHERIFF
Lawrence .... 218 201 113 26 131 90
Murphy ...... 331 229 101 37 168 91

SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT
Childers...... 195 195 80 30 138 97
Wilder ....... 308 186 110 31 150 84


181 247 254 347 430 2591
92 328 69 160 184 1347


130 262 172 320 333 1996
147 445 154 195 300 2198


382 absentee ballots will tell the
final tale. Counting started yesterday
afternoon but were still not completed
at press time.




Only one race was definitely
decided with Tuesday's vote.





Jaycees kept everyone informed
of latest count on tote board. Latest
figures are put on board in photo
below.


City Buys Insurance


After receiving bids which
were a little confusing, the
City Commission met in spe-
cial session Tuesday morning
and awarded its insurance
business to the twd local
agents, Tomlinson Insurance
Agency and Hannon Insur-
ance.
Both firms said the compan-
ies they represent were reluc-
tant to bid on the business
because of the proximity to
the coast and because insur-
ance firms have been taking a
licking, financially, from mu-
nicipal coverage.
What the agent said must
have been true, since the City
sent invitations to bid from six
firms and only the three in
Gulf County offered bids. One
bid, for the City's workman's
Compensation insurance was
Received from Midyette Moor
of Tallahassee. The Tallahas-


see firm didn't bid on the other
several items on the bid sheet.
As it would up, the liability
insurance, which included
workman's'compensation, ve-
hicle coverage, general liabil-
ity, all risk liability, bonds and
police officers accident insur-
ance went to Hannon.
Property coverage such as
employee bonds, robbery, boi-
ler insurance, property cover-
age went to Tomlinson.
The highest premium in the
package, which was about half
the entire cost of coverage
was $25,307.00 for workman's
compensation.
Cost of property coverage is
still uncertain, since no firm
bid was offered at the bidding.
The City has changed its
statement of values and it had
not been filed long enough
with the insurance industry


for a firm rate to be given. The
Commission will negotiate
with Tomlinson for this rate
after the statement of values
has been declared to the
carrier.


Permit

Issued

The Army Corps of Engi-
neers district headquarters at
Mobile, Alabama, has an-
nounced that a total of 78
permits for work in navigable
waters were issued in August.
Permit actions in this area
was the issuance of a permit to
the Board of County Commis-
sioners of Gulf County for the
construction of a concrete
boat ramp off the Apalachi-
cola River at Wewahitchka.


Oak Grove Plans Complete


From appearances, it would
seem the County Commission
will issue a call for bids for
construction of the Oak Grove
Water and Sewer system with-
in about a month.
The Commission has been
waiting for several weeks for
the circuit court to approve
their financing method and for
the engineer to finish up-dat-
ing the construction plans for
the project.
At a special meeting of the
Commission last Thursday,
called to replace the regular
meeting scheduled for this
past Tuesday night, the Com-
mission learned that the en-
gineer had completed the
plans and turned them over to


Quarterbackers


'Two Cars Damaged In Wreck Meeting Mon.
The Quarterback Club


Two cars smashed together
last Wednesday afternoon at
the intersection of Third
Street and Williams Avenue.
According to investigating
officer Bobby Lightfoot of the
Port St. Joe Police Depart-


ment, Laura Catherine Garri-
son of Lanark Village was
travelling west on Third Street
and ran through the intersec-
tion, failing to yield right of
way, and smashed into an-
other vehicle.


The second vehicle was
driven by Lena Mae Morning
of 234 Avenue G, which was
travelling south on Williams
Avenue.
No charges have been
made.


will


have a meeting Monday night,
October 4, at 7:30 in the
Commons Area of Port St. Joe
High School.
All members and prospec-
tive members are urged to at-
tend.


the county earlier that week.
Now, all that remains to get
started on the project is for the
courts to complete their ap-
proval of the financing meth-
od. Attorney William J. Rish
says this should "be just any
day now."
The people -of Oak grove
have been trying to get water
and sewer and the County has
been assisting them for at
least the past eight to ten
years. The present Board got
interested in the project about
a year and a half ago when
they persuaded the Farmers'
Home Administration to make
a 50 percent grant to the
project and guarantee a 50
percent loan. FHA had earlier
rejected financing the work
because, in their thinking,
there were not enough resi-
dents in Oak Grove to pay off
bonds needed for construction
of the facilities.
The project got another shot
in the arm two weeks ago
when the City of Port St. Joe
signed a contract to construct
a new water storage tank in
the Oak Grove area. The new
tank will supply enough pres-


sure to serve the area as well
as provide better pressure for
south Port St. Joe.
Included in the water tank
bid was an item for running a
water main to Oak Grove for
their system to tie to.
COUNTY SHAFTED
The County Commission felt
it was shafted by the State
DOT last Thursday evening,
when a letter from the DOT
notified the Board they were
backing out on a deal with the
county.
Financial Officer Jerry
Gates told the Commissioners
that a letter had been received


last week from the DOT
saying they yould not honor
an agreement to hard surface
the Kemp and Roberts Ceme-
tery roads in the north end of
the county, after the county
had prepared them for paving.
The County Commission had
secured a agreement with
DOT to do the paving under a
special federal program, with
the county being responsible
for bringing the roads to grade
and priming them. This was
accomplished several months
ago and repeated notices to
DOT has failed to yield the
paving work.


The letter from DOT this
past week says the county
must now pay 30 percent of the
paving cost if they get the
work. Rather than see the
work and money already ex-
pended go to waste, the Com-
mission agreed to pay their
share, which will amount to
around $9,000. In the mean-
time, they will be utilizing the
services of their attorney to
try and get the original agree-
ment restored.
OTHER BUSINESS
In other items of business
(Continued on Page sw


Hearing Oct. 5 On Rates


The Florida Public Service Commission
will conduct public hearings in two locations
on the petition of St. Joseph Telephone and
Telegraph Company to increase its rates for
telephone service.
Public hearings will be conducted Octo-
ber 5, Tuesday, at 9:30 a.m., at the County
Commission Room, Gulf County Courthouse,
1000 5th St. Wednesday, October 6 is reserved
at the same location if necessary.
A public hearing will also be conducted


Thursday, October 7, 9:30 a.m., at the Council
Chambers, City Hall, 22 Jefferson Street,
Chattahoochee.

Members of the public who wish to pre-
sent testimony regarding the adequacy and
quality of service by the company should
arrive at the hearings 30 minutes prior to the
start of the hearing so that they may confer
with members of the Public Service Commis-
sion Legal Staff.


Precinct Voting Less Absentees


I










,PAGE TWO


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 30, 1976


----
-THE
Published Every Thursday at 306
By The Star Pu
Second-Class Postage Pald
Wesey R. Ramsey ................ ......
William H. Ramsey .....................
Frenchie L Ramsey ....................
Shirley K. Ramsey.......................
POSTOFFICE BOX 308
PORT ST. JOE,

SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIAB
IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR, 55.00 SI:
OUT OF COUNTY-One Year, $6.00

TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions In adv
for damage further than amount received for such adve

S The spoken word Is given scant attention; the printed
asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spo




EDITORIALS:



We're Ex


SGreatI


5 We have ,waited with bated
Breath for the elections to be over
: and now they are. So far as local
. politics are concerned, the last vote
? has been cast for two years and we
Swill live with what we have.
S It will now surely be. like
Christmas.
We can hardly wait for our taxes
,to go down on every level. Neither
Ecan we keep calm while awaiting for
iall the fine things we know will be
happening in just a short time. Our
Roads will be paved, our outlying
areas will have sanitary services,
there will be no more begging to get
=something done, no problems to face
Mus every day. Everything will be
jrpses free roses that is.
Tomorrow, we expect our
'grandchildren now going to school to
start reading fluently, figuring like
an accountant an:d, writing' the e
=Spencerian hand. All of this is going
to cost us less and benefit us more.
- Beginning tomorrow, there will
lbe less waste, less useless expendi-
itures made, more to show for our
Money and a utopia of services, the
like of which we have never seen.
SThere will no longer be pot holes



Didn t Get I
-.-

A few weeks ago we expounded
in this space about Port St. Joe being
.-the best of places to live because it
_'Eas peaceful here. Of course, we
'heard from some who had exper-
;enced robbery, etc. We didn't claim
_4o be free from strife, but we did and
still do, claim this community is
virtually crime free.
A week later, one of the head
iBI men in the state spoke before
the Rotary Club and said there was
:an average of over 5,000 serious
-,rimes per 100,000 people committed
--r this nation every year.
;H The FBI agent backed up our
Klaim with facts and figures. We had
nade our statement from opinion
;based on what we see about us each
|.nd every day.
If the FBI statistics were literal-
y applied to every 100,000 people in
le nation, then Gulf County would
itaYve had over 500 murders, armed
ia-bberies and rapes last year. We
.didn't get our share and we're
thankful for that.


STAR- I
Williaris Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
blushing Company
rat Port St. Joe, Florida 32S46
...................... Editor and Publisher
........................... Production Supt.
........................... Office Manager
.................. Typesetter, Subscriptions s
PHONE 227-3161
FLORIDA 32456

AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456

ILY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
X MOS., $3.00 THREE MOS., 1127.50
OUT OF U.S.-One Year, S7.00

'ertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable
rtisement.

d word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely
ken word is lost; the printed word remains.
s~s~~s&-<^^^^^ y '^^'^'tws~y~^ 4


pecting


Things


in the roads, minions of people on the
payroll needlessly and more and
more work out of the public em-
ployees who will remain on the
payroll. There will be a dollar spent
only after it has been proven beyond
the shadow of a doubt that it should
be spent. There will be no padding of
budgets by any one department to
make sure its supervisor gets what
he needs to work with. There will be
no more needless, expensive trips
"which weren't necessary in the
first place". There will be no more
teachers who aren't teaching1 ad-
ministrators with nothing to do and
everything mechanical will begin to
work miraculously well and without
problems. Our transportation prob-
lems will all be solved.
Who knows, gasoline, electricity
and insurance may even go down.to
the point where they will no longer
threaten the liquidity of the various
budgets in our county.
We fully expect these things to
come to pass. You should expect it
too, because didn't every man
running for office tell us that this
would be. the situation if he was
elected?



Our Share


We seriously doubt that all the
arrests made in the county by all law
enforcement agencies would total up
to 500 per year. This includes
drunks, petty thefts, shoplifting, bad
checks, etc.
This of course leaves our law
enforcement with not too much to
do. We then accuse them of sitting on
their duffs. We're not saying they
don't do a modicum of that, too: all
of us are prone to get slack when
things get slow.
If our law enforcement are
responsible for preventing crime
from happening, they are perform-
ing a valuable service. We think our
lack of crime is! due not so much
from the deterrent factor of the law
as it is from the intention of the
people to be good neighbors, behave
themselves and still consider crimi-
nal acts as something to be shunned
rather than something to be gotten
away with.
We stand by our former state-
ment.


----


SLetters
to the


[Editorl
L .
Mr. Editor,
I am writing this letter in
reference to a news item you
ran on page one of The Star on
9-23-76.
I am sure that since you are
a city commissioner that you
know that I have some know-
ledge of the so called Negotia-
tion Sessions that has been
going on between this City and
Labors International L.U.
1306, so I would like to make a
few comments about this
story.
1st I would like some ex-
planation as a taxpayer why
we have payed the law firm of
Fisher & Phillips the astro-
nomical sum of $17,683.02 for
legal fees and travel expenses
when we have on the city
payroll a city attorney. In-
cidentally this money was for
nine calender months and this
is more than two years salary
that is payed to a welder.
working an eight hour day five
days a week. And what is so
bad this $17,683.02 was spent to
try and keep this welder and
these garbage collectors and
street workers and Water
Dept. employees from having
the same privilege that I and-
the Paper Co. employees in
this community as well as
other industrial workers have.
Like a-decent wage, seniority
rights and others, that inci-
dentally part of our City Com-
missioners enjoy. But yet they
don't think our city employees
ought to have these rights.
After seven months of so
called Negotiations the City
has finally agreed that the
employees can have Bulletin
Board rights and that is all.
No Seniority rights, No Ste-
warts, No Job Classifications.
When the Union proposed
these benefits the City Lawyer
Mr. H. V. Hansen (from At-
lanta, Ga.) said No.
When asked what the City
would agree to he said "We
want to sign a contract and not
see the Union Representative
for another year and to be able
to go:&n operating the City as
they had for fifty years."
There was mention of.black-
mail by the employees. This is
a joke in view of what was
attempted. According to an
employee at the Wastewater
Treatment Plant the City
Clerk called him to his-office
and asked "What would it take
for you to just forget the
Union." This is Black Mail
and dirty tactics. I thought the
taxpayers ought to know.
Charles E. Carroll
Pres. LU 14963 USWA

-Mr. Carroll, you asked a
question and I'll try to answer.
Mr. Hanson, a labor rela-
tions specialist, was hired to
give the City some expertise in
dealing with the introduction
of the public workers union to
counteract the expertise of the
labor specialist lawyers the
unions sent to work out a
contract with the City. None of
the Commission or their at-
torney had any experience in
these things and the interest of
the taxpayer had to be pro-
tected as best the Commission
could.
Question number two The
use of the word "blackmail"
came off the letter the union
filed charging the City with
unfair labor practices. The
word was not ours. -Ed.


ETAOIN SHRDLU

By WESLEY R. RAMSEY


A couple of weeks ago, I came home about
7:30 on a Monday evening and had my sights set
on an evening of watching the Miami Dolphins
play football with the New England Patriots. I
ate supper, hunted up my paper to read during
the commercials, turned or- the TV and
scrunched down in my easy chair.
Nothing happened. The TV just snowed back
at me with a blank stare on its face. I turned the
channel selector and the same thing happened. I
changed again and still the same snow. Then I
ran the channel selector all the way around and
all I got was snow.
I muttered under my breath about those
little meddling hands which belong to my grand-
sons, who delight in coming to the house and jig-
gling the fine tuning knobs on the TV. After sev-
eral minutes of "tuning", the same thing was
happening. Then, I pushed the reset button,
checked the cable TV attachment both on the set
and the wall. Both ends of the connection were
tight. Then, I kicked the set: when that didn't
work either, I knew I had a serious problem on
my hands and told Frenchie to call the
repairman the next morning.
Tuesday night was a free night. Ordinarily I
either have a meeting or have to work to make
up the time lost at a day meeting on Tuesday and


Elementary PTA Sets

First Meeting of Year


The Port St. Joe Elemen-
tary School PTA will kick off
the first meeting of the new
school year on Monday even-
ing, October 4th, at eight p.m.
President Jim Cooley will


conduct a business meeting
first, then the classrooms will
be open in order that the
parents may meet and talk
with teachers of their chil-
dren.


Seventh Graders Complete Annual

Orientation Study of High School

Thursday marked the final High School. All seventh to facilitate procedures for in-
date for seventh grade orient- graders have been exposed to coming students. The sessions
ation at Port St. Joe Jr.-Sr. orientation activities designed were designed to explain vari-
,. Sous features of the school pro-
G 3 "P gram such as the physical
plant, student services, people
to know, rules and regulations
and extra-curricular activi-
ties.
1%- SAll seventh graders re-
ceived parent verification
forms for orientation sessions
L Thursday: All parents are
urged to sign and return the
form by your child.
The orientation sessions
were coordinated through the

School Guidance office and-
under the direction of Mrs.
Sarah A. Riley, seventh grade
counselor.
In the photo students are
exploring the guidance office.
Looking on is Mrs. Jacque
Price, seventh grade instruc-
tor.


I rarely, if ever, get to watch my favorite
program, "Mash". This particular Tuesday
evening was free and I headed for home just
before time for "Mash" to come on, confident in
the belief I would get to watch Hawkeye and
company.
I turned on the TV and there was that same
snow. "Didn't you call the repair man?" I asked
Frenchie. "I forgot", she said. That didn't help
matters any.
I had reached the conclusion the night before
that there might be trouble with the cable TV,
but this theory could hardly stand up for two
nights in a row.
Another thought crossed my mind and I
asked Frenchie, "Did you pay the cable TV bill
this month?" "It's not that", she said, "I always
pay it six or seven months at a time. We're in
good shape there. I'll call the repairman in the
morning."
Next night, the TV was working. Guess what
was the matter. That "Paying the cable TV six
or seven months at a time" hadn't occurred for
the past nine or ten months and the cable TV
man had cut it off.
Now Frenchie checks the cable TV bill every
month to see how much credit she has left... or
she says she does.

I saw a headline the other day which read,
"Hugging makes comeback as expression of
affection". I didn't know hugging had gone out of
style did you? Have been laboring under the
thought that it has always been proper to hug if
you wanted to express affection. Nobody had
ever told me the bear hug was no longer done ...
that an occasional squeeze was out of style.
Have I missed something?
I guess that if you analyze the situation, the
only ones who have missed anything are those
who may have thought it wasn't kosher to hug or
give an occasional squeeze.

Jimmy Carter has caught a lot of flack the
past week or two about his interview with
Playboy magazine and his views on Christ's
standards for men and Carter's confession to
lusting after women.
This was one time when I could agree with
Carter's statements. I don't agree with his giving
Playboy an interview, but I agree with what the
papers reported him as saying. I think that if
Carter used the words he was reported as using
that he should try and enlarge his vocabulary to
enable himself to express himself in a more
genteel manner, but his subject matter was
straight.
Carter said, in effect, that Jesus Christ had
set impossible standards for men to live by.
Read the New Testament if you question this,
and tell me who you know that can even forgive
his offending brother 70 times seven times, much
less all the other things Christ says a man must
do if he is to be in favor with the standards God
has set.
Carter also confessed that he has looked on
many women with lust. If there is a man who can
truthfully say he has not, then I will believe in
mediums bringing people back from the graves.
Such a man has to be dead.


A


~"3~-~c~:~


--k -


i .

ir


Indians

Still

Visiting

Bay

Many eons ago, the Indians
came to the shores of St.
Joseph Bay to relax and eat
oysters, scallops and fish
while enjoying the fresh and
cooling breezes.
Even after the white man
came to this region to do the
same thing and harvest the
wealth of wood products from
this area, the Indians still
came until the area was
permanently settled prior to
the Civil War.
Now, it seems the Indians
are back. Last week end three
couples of Creek Indians from
S Tallahassee pitched their te-
pees on the banks of St. Joseph
*j Bay to enjoy the sea breezes
S and try their hand at gather-
ing a few scallops.
Needless to say, the tepees,
drew considerable attention.








THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 30, 1976


Bowling



News
.. .. ... a
mL niinmm rlj


Gulf Co. Men's League
On lanes one and two Mon-
day night, Campbell's Drugs
took three games from But-
ler's Restaurant and Lounge.
Glen Williams was top man
for Campbell's with a 552
series, while Bill Besore led
Butler's with a 558.
Lanes three and four had
Highland View Superette tak-
ing three from U. S. coast
Guard. Warren Yeager led H.
V. Superette with 481. The
Coast Guard was led by
Prange with 464.
Ten Pin Lounge took all four
from Chocolate City on lanes
five and six. Donnie Cox was
high for 10-Pin with 523. Ray-
mond Peters led Chocolate
City with 391.
On lanes seven and eight it
was Shirt and Trophy taking
four from Team Six. David
Roche's 531 was high for Shirt
and Trophy. Ray Baker led
Team Six with 374.
Standings: W L
Shirt & Trophy 7 1
H.V. Superette 10 2
10-Pin Lounge 9 3
Campbell's Drugs 7 5
Butler's Rest. & Lounge 6 6
Chocolate City 4 8
U.S. Coast Guard 1 7
Team Six 0 12
Winter Mixed League
Team Six won four games
from Team 8 on lanes one and
two. Harry Lowry bowled a
202 game and 515 series for
Team 6. Glenn Davis had a 187
game and 441 series for Team
8.
On lanes three and four,
Sylvachem won three games
from Fiesta Food Store. Bob-
by Hicks led Sylvachem with a
179 game and 500 series. Bill
Henderson bowled a 192 game
and Nett Henderson had a 455
series for Fiesta.
Lanes five and six had Team
4 winning three games from
Team 2. Fred Kleeb led Team
4 with a, 176 game and 491
series. James Hicks had a 183
game and 503 series for Team,
2.


On lanes seven and eight,
Team 3 and Whammos split,
each taking two games. Rick
Bond bowled a 169 game and
David Howell a 458 series for
Team 3. Bertha Clayton bowl-
ed a 200 game and 460 series
for Whammos.
Standings: W L
Sylvachem 7 1
Team 6 7 1
Whammos 5 3
Team 4 5 3
Team 3 4 4
Fiesta Food Store 2 6
Team 2 2 6
Team 8 0 8
Thursday Nite Ladies League
On lanes one and two, Ren-
fro won four games from
Surefoots. Cathy Blackburn
led Renfro with a 151 game
and Trudy Pate had a 413
series. Wanda Pate (sub)
bowled a 133 game and 369
series for Sure
H. V. Mou l three
games from mas
on lanes three an our. Joyce
Gainous 'bowled a 135 game
and 369 series for H. V.
Motors. Ruby Wilson was tops
for the Mamas with a 132
game and 378 series.
On lanes five and six,
Bowen's Cow Girls won three
games from Loonies. Arlene
McCullough bowled a 162
game and 362 series for the
Cow Girls. Sue Parrish was
high for Loonies with a 135
game and 362 series.
On lanes seven and eight,
Ralph and Henry's won four
games from Tics. Eleanor
Williams (sub) bowled a 180
game and 448 series for Ralph
and Henry's. Nancy Vinson
had a 100 game and 266 series
for Tics.
Standings: W L
Renfro 12 0
Ralph & Henry's 12 0
H. V. Motors 8 4
Loonies 7 5
Bowen's Cow Girls 6 6
Surefooters 1 11
- Red Hot Mamas 1 11
Tics 0 12


Seven Cub Scouts from Pack
47 entered the Lake Sands
District Mini-Olympics last
Saturday at the Navy Lab in
Panama City. The local Scouts
won three medals for their
efforts. Events entered were
the 50-yard dash, standing
broad jump, push-ups, sit-ups
and softball throw.
Seth Howell won a silver
medal for second place in the
nine year old group; Joey Wil-
liams won a silver medal in
the eight year group, and Tim
McFarland won a gold medal
for the highest point getter in


the eight year group.
Other boys attending from
Pack 47 were Tony Kemp,
Scott Howell, Rick Cramer
and Stone Swatts.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. David Lee of
Port St. Joe, announce the
birth of their son, Jason
Dwight, September 18, at Bay
Memorial Medical Center.
Grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. Bobby Taylor and Mr.
and Mrs. Roy Lee, all of Port
St. Joe.


THISIS

AN OLD FASHION"

Harvest the Values This Week at BOYLES! WELCOME FALL


Save Big! Fall Fashions

Ladies Pant

Suits, Dresses

and Ensembles

Now 10% to


33/3% off
Nothing held back-Butte Knits, Queen
Casuals, Devon, Jonathan Logan and
other well-known labels of quality. Jr.,
missy and half sizes.


I


Free Dress Shirt!

Your choice with purchase
of any men's business


SUITS


$79.99
and up
For 100 percent polyester double knit
suits. Solids, stripes and checks. Two
and three piece suits.


New Fall Save! Save!


PURSES

10% off
A great selection of styles, colors.
Leather-like vinyls, fabrics, etc.


Fall '76
Children's
JACKETS and

COATS

$8.47 to

$27.47
Original prices $10 to $30. Nylon
quilts, fun furs, etc. All washable.
All pretty enough to please both
mother and daughter.
Just in Time for the Cool Days

SAVE 10%

On Girls' Pant

Suits and Jeans
A Fantastic selection of
jeans for fashion cons-
cious growing girls.

Seasons End Bargain!

STRAW

THONGS


$1.47 pr.

Reg. price $2.99. Great for
all year wear. Comfort-
able, durable.


Girls' Fall

DRESSES


$4.47 to

$14.47
Original values $6 to $17. Toddlers, i 'ji
and 3-14 girls. Cunning new styles, /
fabrics and colors.


Men's Socks 2/I147
Hi-bulk turbo orlon acrylic crew or ban-Ions. Reg. $1.00 pair.
Save 53 cents. One size fits all.


Men's
JACKETS
Bue denim western styling, 14 oz.
plus denim. Sizes 36-50. Reg. denim
or pre-washed, including Wrangler,
No Fault and Levis.
-- Reg. to $15 4
$17.99 '.$15 -


Buy Now and Save! B, R
Ladies' Super 13 7 10.00 NOW $9.47iz-20
Soft Loafers $ A- r ..'. l ....


Regularly sells for $18 & $19
Black, red, brown and navy

Junior Boys Fall
. Leisure Shirts


$3.47
Regular $4.99 value. Beautiful asst. of
patterns and colors. Sizes 4-5-6.

Probably Never at This
Price Again!
Girl's Nylon Satin
BIKINIS

47 pr.
Sizes 4-14, white and asst. colors.


Spair. New fall styles and colors.
Y.


Men's Pocket

Tee

Shirts

now, 2 for


$3.47

SAVE 36C
By Fruit of the Loom. White and
asst. colors. 100 percent cotton, S,
M, L, XL.


Super Buy!

Ladies' Quality BIKINIS


Zpr. $1.47
Cotton or nylon, sizes 4-7.


I I


Calendars
Mrs. Charles Noble, Chair-
man of the band calendar
drive for the Port St. Joe High
School band is urging the
public to support the program
again this year. When you are
called on to help the band,
please be generous.
CARD OF THANKS
The Boyles family is taking
this method to sincerely thank
their many friends for the
concern, thoughtfulness and
kindness shown during the ill-
ness and hospitalization of
Glenn. The flowers, get well
cards, telephone calls and
prayers are deeply appre-
ciated as well as most helpful.
Thank you and may God bless
you.
Glenn, Erima and Barbara
Boyles


MtNSi WUKORK SETS
MATCHING PANTS AND SHIRTS. Famous
Dickies brand. Sizes 29-50 waist in perma-press
twill, 65 percent polyester and 50 percent cotton.
Pants $7.47 Shirts $5.47

Men's Thermal
UNDERWEAR
Shirts and pants, reg. $3.19 each. 50 percent
Dacron, 50 percent cotton blended thermals -
ecru long sleeve shirts, ankle length drawers.
Our best quality by Fruit of the Loom. S, M, L,
XL.
$2.47 EACH
Men's
WORK BOOTS
By Georgia Giant. 8" boot with neopreme oil
resistant sole, moc. toe, cushioned insole with
arch support. Sizes 6'/2-13 in regular'and extra
width. Reg. $19.99.

$18.47 pr.


DEPARTMENT TA


Phone 227-4261 222 Reid Avenue


Band Earning Money off Cream


The Port St. Joe High School
Band will be earning money in
October and early November
through a Marching Bands of
America promotion, sponsor-
ed by Meadow Gold Supreme
Ice Cream.
The Band will be paid 10
cents for each carton top from
a half-gallon of Meadow Gold
for Meadow Gold" said Mana-
Ice Cream turned in by band
members and their supporters
between October 1 and Nov-
ember 10.
Merrill Green, manager of
Meadow Gold's branch in
Panama City, said today, "We
are happy to be working with
all the high school bands in our


area in raising money for uni-
forms, music, instruments,
travel, and other important
needs. We hope that each
community will support its
local band by collecting and
turning in American Hostess
half-gallon carton tops."
Rules of the fund-raising
program include: Meadow
Gold Supreme Ice Cream
Company will pay 10 cents
each for all round tops from
American Hostess half-gallon
cartons. Bands are to collect
all turned-in tops for which
they seek credit; band direc-
tors will be advised as to
where the collection is to be
delivered for counting and


payment.
"This is a good promotion
for Meadow Gold, said Mana-
ger Green, "and it offers high
school bands an exceptional
'opportunity to raise needed
money. We are hoping to have
to pay out very large checks to
all high school bands."
Band members of Port St.
Joe High School will be col-
lecting the ice cream tops.
Anyone wishing to collect the
tops may turn them in to any
band member, or at the band
room at the high school. Band
director Ray Smith said the
band will use proceeds from
the box tops to help defray


expenses to attend the South-
ern National Band Contest in
Valdosta, Georgia. Bands


from all over America have
been invited to participate in
the contest in Valdosta.


Cubs Enter District

Mini-Olympics Event


A Chance to Buy LIBERTY
In One of Florida's Last
Frontiers!


REAL ESTATE


AUCTION

At Estifanulga (Stiff and Ugly)
S9 Miles South of Bristol, Fla.
Take State Road 12 South.
Look for Signs
Being Offered in Acre Lots & Small Acre-
age Tracts. This Frontiersman Country
Located on the High East Bank of the Apa-
lachicola River. Several Lots Front on
Outside Lake.

RIVER ROAD
A Sportsman's Dream

Saturday, Oct. 9
10:00 AM
SIDNEY P. HOUGH'S Auction & Real Estate Sales. Reg.
Fla. Real Estate Broker, 468 Capital Circle N.W., Talla-
hassee, Florida.
TERMS: Cash or 15 percent down-payable day of sale by
cash or check with acceptable identification. Balance
payable 5 years (60 monthly payments) 9 percent simple
interest.


Thanks

I would like to express my thanks and appreciation to
the citizens of Gulf County for the vote and support I
received in the September 7, primary.
It has been an honor and privilege to have served you
for 10 years as your County Commissioner District 3.


S. C. PLAYER


PAGE THREE


Ile % rlr t









PAGE FOUR THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 30, 1976


Michelle Lindley and CraigDavis Exchanged


Nuptial Vows September 14 in Florence, Ala.


reception was held at Lake-
view Inn in Florence. The
bride's book was kept by Gay
Lindley.
After a short trip to Ken-
tucky, the couple will reside in
Auburn, Alabama, where they
both attend Auburn Univer-
sity. Craig is a senior in
Chemical Engineering, and
Michelle is a sophomore in the


same field.
The recent bride was honor-
ed with a bridal shower at the
First Baptist Church of Port
St. Joe this past Thursday,
September 23.
Hostesses for the occasion
were Betty Fleming, Mrs. B.
W. Wilder, Betty Rich, Allie
Padgett and Jerry Moore.


Local Rebekahs


Honor Dignitary


Mrs. Craig Davis


'Michelle Lindley became
the bride of Craig Davis at
North Wood United Methodist
iburc in Florence, Alabama,
Saturday, September 4, with :
'*v. O. S. Gamble officiating
tte double-ring ceremony.
:The bride is the daughter of
M5. and Mrs. Travis A. Lind-
oli of Florence, Alabama, and
t'he bridegroom is the son of
Ir. and Mrs. L. C. Davis of
IQrt St. Joe.
.The church was decorated
.With candelabra entwined by a
iifeath of hearts, white car-
rations, gardenias and pom-
ppns. Lighting the candles
,gre David Lindley and Miss
I i"m Rainey, friends of the
bide.
;The bride was escorted and
given in marriage by her
father. Her gown was an
empire silhouette of silk or-
ganza and re-embroidered Al-
eicon lace. The hand-clipped
lace, touched with pearls and
crystal beading, outlined the
sheer yoke, formed the man-
darin neckline and accented
tli long fitted sleeves that
cine to lily points. The A-line
skirt wasadorned with match-
ing beaded lace and finished in
a:*border of scalloped lace at
the- hemline. Complementing


her gown was a chapel length
mantilla of imported English
net encircled with Alencon
lace. She carried a cascade of
white roses, phalaenopsis or-
chids, tuberoses and bridal
ivy.
Special musical selections
were rendered at the organ by
Walter Erben.
Attendants of the bride were
Miss Marijyn Kaye Brown,
matron of honor; and brides-
maids, Misses Kathy Hulon,
Sandy Hfuln, Brenda Duckett
and Sherry Lindley. Th&hoibor
attendant was attired in a
gown of toast colored knit
crepe. The bridesmaids wore
gowns of dusty rose knit
crepe, featuring bodices
covered with ivory lace which
accented the portrait neck-
lines and long sleeves.
The bridegroom chose his
father as best man. Ushers
were Steve Davis, brother of
the groom, Kevin Lindley,
brother of the bride, Phil
Abroms and Jim Shaw, class-
maters of the groom. They
were attired in cream tux-
edos trimmed in toast.
Ringbearer was Mack Lind-
ley, cousin of the bride, and
the flower girl was Lori Pifer.
For her daughter's wedding,
Mrs. Lindley chose a floor-


Church of the Nazarene


Announces
The Church of the Nazarene,
located at the corner of Long
Avenue and Niles Road, has
announced a time change in
services, and the start of sev-
eral new church activities.
As of October 3, the Sunday
School hour will begin at 9:45,
rather than 10:00. This is de-
signed to allow more time for
Opening Exercises, such as
thd. tie-cutting contest pre-
sently going on.
A; Ladies' Luncheon is be-
ginning at the church, which
will be held the first Wednes-


Change
day of each month from noon
to 1:00 to accommodate those
working.
Men of the church are
having a Men's Breakfast at
7:30 a.m. the first Saturday of
each month. Young People's
Services, for everyone, begins
at 6:00 Sunday evenings. The
teens are studying the beliefs
of the church while the adults
are presently studying I John.
The church extends a per-
sonal invitation to all, to come
worship and have fellowship
with them.


length light blue silk dress
belted at the waistline. Sh
wore a corsage of phalaenol
sis orchids and white roses.
Mrs, Davis, the bride
groom's mother, chose a floor
length light green polyester
gown with a cape-like effect
and wore a corsage of whit
orchids and Jack Shaw pon
poms.
Mrs. Arther Lindley, gran
mother of the bride, chose
floor-length purple knit dress
RECEPTION
Following the wedding

Flower

Show

School
A Flower Show School-
Course II, has been schedule
by the Panama City Garde
Club at the Garden Center o
October 6, 7 and 8. Registrar
tion will begin promptly a
8:30 a.m. on Oct. 6. Mrs. Glen
Porter, Flower Show School
Chairman, and Mrs. E. G
Hobbs, Co-chairman, ar
planning and coordinating th
program.
This school is open to any
one who wishes to learn the ai
of horticultural judging. Men
There will be a charge (
$20.00 for non-members of th
Panama City Garden Clul
which will include lunch fo
two days. Activities will con
mence at 8:30 a.m. each dal
A distinguished panel
nationally accredited Flowe
Show instructors will preser
the agenda on horticulture
conservation, flower shoN
practice, artistic division an
examinations.
"We consider ourselves
most fortunate in securing th
services of outstanding in
structor personnel," Mrs
Porter announced, "and w
extend a warm welcome to a
members of area Garde
Clubs to participate in thi
course."


8 COLOR PORTRAITS


L NO LIMITS. NO GIMMICKS, JUST GOOD
PORTRAITS
10-1, 2-5


(1) 11x14, (1) 8x10, (1) 5x7,
(5) Wallet

\l for this low, low price

$795
plus 70c film charge
Groups 50' Extra. Pay 1300 now.
Balance when pictures delivered


Bill's Dollar Store

Thursday, September 30


ss
ie
3-

e-
r-
er
te
m
d-
a
s.

a








id
,n
)n
a-
at
in
Is
r.
re
ie

y-
rt
1-
of
ie
b,
)r
1-
y.
of
ar
nt


Melody Rebekah L
honored Mrs. Elsie Co
ident of the Rebekah
bly of Florida with a
at the Masonic Hall.
A decorative then
red, white and blue cai
the Bicentennial ti
Mrs. Cole was honore
gift from the Noble
Shirley Webb, a jar of
mullet.
Mrs. Addie Goodso
duced the disting
guests: Mrs. Grace
District Deputy Pres
District 2; Mrs. Els
President of Rebekah
bly of Florida; Past
Master of Florida and
sentative to the
George Cole, Past Pre
Margaret Land and
Long. Flora is a met
the local lodge.
Marianne Peterson
lain of Rebekah Asse
Florida; all Vice Gran
Vice Grands, Noble
Past Noble Grands we
honored guests and we
A gift of a Becky tr
presented to the Pr


Kimberly Diane Th

Kimberly

First Part
Kimberly Diane
celebrated her first b
September 15 with a
her home. Friends a
tives were on hand t
the occasion a happy
Kimberly. She is the &
of Mr. and Mrs. R
Thomas of Port St. J
Grandparents are
Mrs. A. W. Thomas of
Joe and Mr. and Mrs.
Miller of Tallahassee


lodge 22
le, Pres-
Assem-
banquet

ne with
rried out
tradition.
d with a
Grand,
Scanned

)n intro-
guished
Tucker,
ident of


Sister Liz Jones, Vice Grand,
presented her also with 10
silver dollars.
Guests from Wewahitchka
61, Friendship 25, Panama
City 15, Lynn Haven 35 attend-
ed and helped Melody 22 wel-
come their guest.

P.C. Club

Will Have

Bulb


ie Colse Workshop
SGrand
SRpre- A workshop on bulbs will be
. Repre- presented by the Panama City
residents, Garden Club on Tuesday, Oct.
Floraents, 5 beginning promptly at 1:00
mber of p.m. CDT at the Garden
Center. Mrs. M. S. Culver-
, Chap- house, Garden Club president,
mbly of will present the first portion of
ds, Pt the program on the care and
ds, Past culture of bulbs, and will illus-
Grands, trate her discussion with
ere also colorful slides. Mrs. E. G.
lcomed.
Hobbs will then conduct a
ee was lesson in Basic Flower Ar-
esident.
ranging.
Culminating the workshop
will be a demonstration on
corsage making by Mrs. R. C.
Lunsford, whose technique
fascinated those who attended
the initial workshop. Tables
will be provided and partici-
pants will have the opportun-
ity to make their own corsages
under the expert supervision
of Mrs. Lunsford. Some mat-
erials will be available at the
Garden Center for purchase.
A donation of $1.50 will be
accepted at the door from all
participants and proceeds will
4J be used for building improve-
ments. All Garden Club mem-
bers in Port St. Joe and sur-
rounding areas, as well as
interested members of the
public, are cordially invited to
attend.
omas "I am very gratified with
the response which we re-
Has ceived on our workshop in
September," stated Mrs. Cul-


y
Thomas
birthday
party at
nd rela-
to make
one for
laughter
,oger A.
oe.
Mr. and
Port St.
Kenneth


Miss LaFrance Is Honoree


The Hubert Richards' resi-
dence at 1302 Monument Ave-
nue was the scene of a miscel-
laneous calling bridal shower
honoring October bride-elect
Elizabeth LaFrance.
Miss LaFrance will become
the bride of Tommy Brown on
the 23rd of October.
The party rooms were
decorated in the bride's

verhouse. "We plan to conduct
a workshop on the first Tues-
day of each month and we
have scheduled a number of
educational and interesting
topics."
"We hope to see a number of
Port St. Joe ladies (and men)
at all of our workshops. They
will be most welcome," Mrs.
Culverhouse concluded.


WANT

TO LOSE

WEIGHT?
Join the Diet Workshop!'
Thurs., Sept. 30-7:30 PM
First Methodist Church
Constitution & Monument
Port St. Joe
1st per
$6 meeting 2.50 week
FREE MAINTENANCE
(10 Week Savings Plan $25)
648-5250
NEW MEMBERS WELCOME
EACH WEEK

THE DIET

WORKSHOP,


SComforter Funeral

| Home
Gulf County's First
Beginning 30 Years of
Continuous Service
Pete, Hortense & Rocky Cornfor

Telephone 227-3511
;1...-- ----- --- --- ..**** r** ***** ** ****'. :*l*******


fer


.....***.... *.*.*.*.-*.~.**.*..*..**.*.*.**


e, ---mmmmmmm------ mmmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmm
w
d Stir Up A Happy ., ,
es 0 O O f -- I
s Halloween Party -::-
n-Si ------ "..
e I

s


I Napkins, Plates, Cups And
S~? All Your Decorating Needs
^C ALSO
Special Halloween Cards : I
S& Fresh Flower '
9 / Arrangements, Potted '
I... Plants, Dish Gardens a I


SThe Sugar Plum Tree
I e.
Gift and Florist Shoppe ,

= Phone 229-6010 ,
mI 319 Reid Ave.
II



I mmemmmmmmmmmmmm
L m m -- -- --------- ---


chosen colors of pink and blue.
Hostesses for the occasion
were Misses Carol Barton and
Vicky Richards.
The honoree was the recep-


ient of many lovely and useful
gifts from those attending.
The hostesses presented Miss
LaFrance with a serving piece
of her chosen china pattern.


PRESCRIPTION SERVICE

FAST AND FRIENDLY















We have the latest in prescrip-
tion drugs with fast service. We
also maintain a complete record
of your prescription purchases
and can furnish you with a copy
instantly for income tax pur-
poses.



Smith's Pharmacy

Drive-in Prescription Window at Rear
Phone 227-5111

11 WAN


TRYANY

NEW BU LlUNE

SYIVANIA

GT-MAIC.


j^^^r
SI C
MoelFACX6163W


Model CX6163W
17" diagonal, 100% solid-state

OU



YAIGEf

YOUR

MONEY BACK.
MANY MODELS AND SCREEN SIZES TO CHOOSE FROM.
LIMITED WARRANTY "SATISFACTION GUARANTEED" OFFER
Purchase a new, fall line Sylvania GT-Matic" TV on
or between Sept. 11, 19.76 and Oct. 10, 1976 from
a participating dealer. Fill out a simple registration.
If you're not completely satisfied with the set, call
your dealer within 30 days after purchase. The set
will be picked up and your cash price refunded,
excluding charges such a* finance charges, if any.
This offer is an addition to GTE Sylvania's
obligations during the first 30 days of the "Limited
Warranty" you receive with the set.
TM-Trademark GTE Sylvania Incorporated.
THIS IS THE SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OFFER OF
5I N IAv Batavia, N.Y. 14020
Sylvania has never made an offer like it-
because they've never made a set like it.


ROCHE

209 Reid Ave.


Furniture and
Appliance Store

Phone 227-5271


w::s~~:~~:::~:~:~:~::~~:
~`s.-.~..~.~~..~..~..ssssz.r
ra.r....... --


r- -4 -a-qw~L ~ -w- -w- -









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 30, 1976


New 1977 Fords Being Shown Friday


Miss Dwana Lewis


In Basic Training


Miss Dwana Lewis, daugh-
ter of S-Sgt. and Mrs. James
Lewis of Port St. Joe is cur-
,rently in basic training for the
National Guard at Ft. Jackson
South Carolina. She will parti-
cipate in basic training for six


months, after which s
continue her education
Coast Community Col
Miss Lewis is a 1976
ate of Port St. Joe Jr.-t
School.


Gingham is said to come from the Malay word gi
meaning striped.





cA Thousand Wore

















88"
Get acquainted with our new colle
of color and scenic background
Sept. 30 Oct. 2
10 AM to 8 PM
819 W. llth St. PANAMA CITY



All nag l: Babi ,chis c ldren and adult. One sitting per ubjlcct. Additional sulbjcts-
or individual in nsam f .iailyv-$1.00 per %ubhict. Noi prof.--choi-se from finish
fe(sional portraits li 'n.-our selection. Y iima r i.elect additional portraits of
reannablr prices. Gunar.ntlletd .col tplrle ,ialirf.crion or nmoncy cheerfully refund
handling chlrgie.


- FREE BABY PORTRAIT COUPON -

Is your baby one year or younger?
If so, this coupon entitles you to one free 8 x 10 color
S portrait of your baby. Be sure to bring this coupon to
our store and take advantage of this special offer.
Cw
SName Z
m
m Address
SCty State Zip
I Sept. 30 Oct. 2 (108) I
T E CLIP HERE I I E I T nE
ESTABLISHED 1904

OVER 150 STORES SERVING THE SOUTHEAST


Two new automobiles, the
Thunderbird and the LTD II,
head the lineup of Ford Divi-
sion's 1977 cars, which are on
display at St. Joe Motor
Company, 322 Monument Ave.
From subcompact to full-
size, Ford dealers in 1977 will
be offering customers the
widest choice of car sizes
available.
Heading the list are two
all-new mid-size cars, the
luxurious Thunderbird, a two-
door hardtop, and the LTD II,
offering sporty-looking two-
door models as well as elegant
four-door models and station
wagons.
The new Thunderbird is a
luxurious mid-size car, and
the LTD II is a stylish inter-
mediate-size family car.
The 1977 Thunderbird, for
example, is a specialty car on
a 114-inch wheelbase. Overall
length is 215.5 inches. The
two-door hardtop Thunderbird
he will offers high levels of standard
at Gulf equipment, a quiet, comforta-
S ble ride and excellent hand-
lege. ling -all at an affordable
gradu- price.
Sr. High Ford Division's other new
mid-size entry, the LTD II,
comes in three series. The
base LTD II "S" and mid-ser-
ies LTD II each feature a
distinctive two-door hardtop,
a four-door pillared hardtop
and a station wagon. The
ngamp top-of-the-line LTD II Broug-
ham offers a two and a
four-door model, and the ele-
gantly appointed LTD II
Squire is Ford's high-series
mid-size station wagon.
All LTD II models have a
S lean, sculptured look, yet offer
six-passenger comfort.
"Both of these cars will
greatly strengthen our posi-
tion in the largest segment of
the automobile market," Bray
said. "The Thunderbird and
the LTD II two-door models
give Ford Division a powerful
one-two punch in the specialty
or upper end of the segment,
and the four-door LTD II
models and station wagons
are ideal for buyers seeking
six-passenger comfort and ot-
her full-size car attributes at a
smaller .price'."
krpT For 1977, all Pinto models
have a new, sportier-looking
front end. A new all-glass
third door (a no-extra-cost
option) gives three-door Pinto
ctiofl models a fresh, modern look
and, two and three-door Run-
dS. about models are in a lower
inertia weight class (2,750
pounds) -- the same as the 1976
Pinto Pony models.
Addition of a Pinto Cruising
Wagon in 1977 will greatly
expand the subcompact's ap-
peal in the youth segment of
the automobile market. Other
-groups
ed pro- new Pinto options include a
flured at
ed. No flip-up open air roof, a Sports
Sj Rally Package with tachome-


ter and gauges and a four-way
manual driver's seat.
In 1977, Granada becomes
the first domestic car to offer
a four-speed manual over-
drive transmission as stan-
dard equipment.
Ford LTD remains full-size
for 1977. The top-of-the-line



HELP
STOP CRLME@
Governor's Crime Prevention Committee
Tallahassee. Florida


lEAWAY. SLEEPERS
so-A *d.
(A) TRANSITIONAL SlEEPER (14HS)0 95
Reversible seat cushions. "Hideaway" design. Front 239.
boll casters. 4" thick foam mattress. Available in Compare at $259.95
block nylon plaid and brown nylon stripe.
(B) CONTEMPORARY STYLE SLEEPER(04HS)95
Attached button channel back. Front boll casters. 6 27995
thick T-cushions. 4" thick foam mattress. Available in Compare at $299.95
expanded brown vinyl. "Hideaway' design.
(C) SUPER QUEEN SIZE SLEEPER (12RS) 9900 95
Heavily padded, rolled arms. 1000o Herculon brown $
stripe cover. Arm caps. Loose back foam cushions. Compar at $319.95
"Hideaway" design.


I'M DAubl
JARANTEE


Kelly Goodman
H OWNER, MANAGER
P 416 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe Phone 229-6195
"BAasMoc & 1"d 11"ee R4U-sh"


LTD Landau has been reposi-
tioned into the price class of
the LTD Brougham -- which
has been deleted from the
lineup -- but continues such
standard luxury features as
hidden headlamps, wide, co-
lor-keyed bodyside moldings
and a high level flight bench
seat with a fold-down center
armrest.
Mustang II for 1977 offers a
host of improvements, includ-
ing added standard equipment
on 2+2 models at no added
cost, the flip-up open air roof
and four-way manual driver's


Coa



,
C4













I I
xti






































New Look. Lean, cl
year's Thunderbird.
New Size. Shorter b
with its new suspen
you easy handling,
i New Price. Unbelie
Thunderbird luxury
andFelegant appoin
Another Thunderbiu
roominess smooth
don't cost extra. Th
trademarks we wou
drive the all-new Thi
8 ~ -

; y







;;;



S:NwLo. en l
::: ea' h nd rid
:NwSz. hre




i::Aote hudri
::i omnes*sot


': trdmrsw o
;:: div h llnwT

as


seat, a Ghia Sports Group and
other exciting new options and
money-saving packages that
group popular optional items.
Maverick also offers new
options and convenience fea-
tures, including four-way
manual seats, wire wheel
covers and wide bodyside
moldings.
New exterior paint, vinyl
roof and interior trim colors
add sparkle to the appearance
of 1977 Ford Division cars.
To meet the U.S. govern-
ment's more stringent 1977
model year emission control


standards, most Ford cars
have revised emission control
systems that include a larger
volume catalyst and Ford's
new Duraspark high-energy
solid-state ignition system
which provides increased vol-
tage at both starting and
running speeds, allowing
cleaner air-fuel mixture and


even longer spark plug life.
Other 1977 entries include
the full-size LTD, with its
renown for quiet, comfort and
ride; the Granade, Ford's
.hot-selling "swing" car; Pinto
America's most popular sub-
compact; Mustang II, a small
specialty car sales leader;
Maverick, the proven durable


me See Them Friday, O

In Our Showrooms

ome In and Register for Free Doc


Look at a
S118 in
S302 CI
Ignitio
* Select
* Power
* Family
* Choose
three


ean lines. Trimmer than last
But unmistakably Thunderbird.
by 10 inches than before. And
sion system, Thunderbird gives
great ride and comfort.
vably low price for traditional
, standard features
tments .
rd Classic. 6-passenger
h, quiet ride lots of extras that
ese are famous Thunderbird
Didn't dare change. Come see and
hunderbird soon.


S


Mot

F


322 Mon. Ave


compact and the highly popu-
lar Econoline Club Wagon.
"For 1977, Ford cars are
uniquely in step with the
market," said James Bray,
manager. "Our cars give cus-
tomers the opportunity to
select the right size car to
meet his or her driving
needs."


FORD|

When America needs
a better idea,
Ford puts it on wheels.







october 1



)r Prizes



R.








ill you get with LTD II:
ich wheelbase (4-Door & Wagon/114" in 2-Door)
ID 2V V 8* (351 CID in Wagon) both with DuraSpark
on
Shift automatic transmission
steering and front disc brakes
.-size 15 cu. ft. luggage compartment
e from 2- and 4-Door Hardtops in three series PLUS
Wagons.






!

X:.


















it. Joe


or Company

Ford-Mercury
Phone 227-37371
.. * ** -****--..--..r"-.::":*"*" f.


......... .. .....


.-... ~.~~z~r;...2~~: ...~::~:::::~::~:~~:::::! ,...,, ~ ~ .~.~~,:~;:~::~:.::~~~5:~::~::lee.


''~i'~'~'~"''''''''''''~'`'~'~' '~'-'-' ":':'"''''' ''''''''''~'~'~~`~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~`~~``~` ~`~`~~~~~~~~~~~~~`~ ~~~~~``~


MOMM&O


I FOR


PAGE FIVE








PAGE SIX


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 30, 1976


MINUTES
of the

Gulf County Commission
L 'lamp ms- -dr ab. mmo ronw-ao


The Board of County Com-
missioners of Gulf County,
met on August 24, with the
following members present:
Eldridge Money, Chairman;
Everett Owens, Jr. and S. C.
Player. Others present were
George Y. Core, Clerk; Wil-
liam J. Rish, Attorney; Bob
Lester, Asst. Road Superin-
tendent; C. E. Daniell, Acting
Mosquito Control Supervisor;
Albert Thames, Civil Defense
Veterans Officer and Ray-
mond Watson, Deputy Sheriff.
The'meeting came to order
at 7:30 p.m. The attorney
opened the meeting with
prayer, followed by the pledge
to the flag.
The minutes of the meeting
of August 10, and August 12,
were read, approved and
adopted.
The Board entered into a
lengthy discussion on the pro-
posed new library building.
The Chairman presented a
new preliminary floor plan
containing about 3,000 sq. feet
less space than the original
preliminary floor plan. He ex-
'plained that the architects
hew plan was according to the
'directions of this Board in its
decision to hold the construc-
tion costs to $200,000. Comm.
Owens asked what the opera-
'fing costs would be for the
smaller building. No answer
to this question.
By letter dated August 23,
1976, the Big Bend Epilepsy
Foundation, Inc. requested fi-
nancial support in the amount
of $2,500.00.
.The Standard Oil Agent
notified the Board that gaso-
line prices increased, one cent
: on August 12, 1976.
The Medicaid bill for July
was'$470.10. The Board order-
ed to hold this bill.
Comm. Owens asked what
Progress is being made on the
Oak Grove Water and Sewer
'project. The Attorney report-
ed that the bond issue pro-
ceedings is on schedule.
.The following applications
for employment were received
and ordered filed: Linda
Davila Johnson, Earl W. Hunt-


er, Nathaniel Brown, George
W. Hieber, Stanley Ambrose
Carter, Douglas Wayne Kelly,
Steve Allen Blackmon, Oscar
Felder.
B. M. Janowski informed
the Board that the Highland
View bridge continues to have
a problem of remaining open
too long after a boat goes
through the canal. He said
that traffic has been held up 20
minutes or more for no appa-
rent reason. He said this does
not happen each time the
bridge opens; however, it
happens too often. He said an
unnecessary delay at this
bridge could be the difference
between life and death for an
ambulance patient. The At-
torney was directed to look
into this matter.
Bennie Roberts, City Com-
missioner, City of Port St. Joe,
informed the Board that the
City of Port St. Joe is now in
need of a new fire truck and
requested the County to consi-
der buying the City this equip-
ment and allow the city to
repay the County in the same
method that the District fire
departments are doing.
Mr. Roberts then asked if
8th and 10th Streets in Port St.
Joe have been moved up on
the paving program. He then
discussed the necessary drain-
age structures required to
properly drain 10th Street.
The Chairman said attention
will be given to these pro-
blems.
The Board then requested
Mr. Roberts to have the City of
Port St. Joe contribute-
$2,500.00 for the operation of
the new library.
Comm. Player discussed the
problem of garbage being
thrown on the road rights of
way and on private property.
One land owner present told
that garbage is thrown on his
property almost every day,
but that he has a plan ,to
correct this matter.
The Chairman discussed a
drainage problem at the Lu-
ther Flowers home in Wewa-
hitchka that was caused by the
paving of the streets. He said


it will take a culvert to correct
this matter. It was decided
that this matter be referred to
the .City of Wewahitchka.
The Chairman told the
Board that John Smiley was
upset because the county
equipment ran over the drain-
field pipe in his yard. The
Road Superintendent was
directed to investigate this
complaint. He then discussed
a drainage problem at the
Hargraves property in St. Joe
Beach.
The Board discussed the
drink machine at the Court-
house. It appears that it has
reached the point to where it
may not be worth the time and
expense to continue to operate
the machines. Because so
many bottles are being mis-
placed, it was suggested that
cans or .non-return bottles be
used.
The Board entered into a
discussion with reference to
the county working up and
paving dedicated streets in
subdivisions filed prior to the
new plat ordinance. The
Board now has requests to
construct streets in certain
subdivisions where the streets
have been dedicated but
where no street has ever exist-
ed. The Chairman said that in
the past the county has con-
structed many streets
throughout the county in sub-
divisions but that the time has
come that the county cannot
tax its citizens to develop a
private subdivision. It was
decided that each request for
constructing a street in an old
subdivision will be considered
separately, but that all new
subdivisions will be subject to
county ordinance number six
governing subdivisions.
Comm. Player informed the
Board that he has secured the
Wright building on U. S. 98 in
St. Joe Beach as the polling
place for the beaches.
SThe 6oaird directed the Fi-
nance Officer to add $500.00 to
budget account 2440:102 to be
transferred from account
9990:701.
The Chairman reminded the


members of a special called
meeting for August 26.
There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting did then
adjourn.
Eldridge Money, Chairman
Attest:
George Y. Core, Clerk
The Board of County Com-
missioners met on August 26,
in special session, duly adver-
tised as required by Florida
Statutes 200.065 2 (A), with the
following members present:
Chairman Eldridge Money,
Otis Davis, Jr., Everett
Owens, Jr., S. C. Player and
Finance Officer Jerry Gates.
Also present were 11 citizens
from the community.
The Chairman announced
that this meeting was a public
hearing to consider a millage
increase of 1.3 mills. He stated
the Board had met on August
12, 1976, to consider a 2.3 mill
increase but had voted to levy
only 1.3 mills and use Federal
Revenue Sharing Funds to
finance the Fine and Forfei-
ture Fund.
A general discussion was
then held with the audience
concerning ways the Board
could cut the budget. Topics
covered during this discussion
included workmen's compen-
sation, utilities, insurance,
ambulance service, retire-
ment, social security, medi-
caid, and the various budgets
in the county. The Board also
discussed the budgets of each
elected official with the audi-
ence present. Comm. Player
stated that the people had
elected these officials to run
their offices and when they
made requests from the Board
they were considered as hon-
orable requests needed to run
an office. He added that each
original budget had been cut.
Chairman Money told the
audience that as a result of the
last public hearing each de-
partment head and elected of-
ficial had been asked to scru-
tinize their office to see if it
was possible to cut the number
of employees under their
supervision. Comm. Davis
stated that if the Board had
not made each department cut
their budget last year by 10
percent the board would be
faced with a larger tax in-
crease than the present one.
Comm. Owens stated that
earlier in the year when the
Board had voted to combine
the Veterans Affairs.- Office
and the Civil Defense Office in
an effort to save money the
Board was faced with an
overflowing crowd of people
and a petition requesting the


Students to Take Aptitude Testing,


Mrs. Sarah A. Riley, gui-
dance counselor at Port St.
Joe Jr.-Sr. High School an-
nounced that sophomores,
juniors, a'.d some seniors will
be able to join over one million
other students around the
world in taking the Prelimi-
nary Scholastic Aptitude Test


(PSAT NMSQT) this fall. The
test, co-sponsored by the Col-
lege Board and National Merit
Scholarship Corporation, is an
important step in making col-
lege plans.
Scheduled for October 19,
the PSAT NMSQT measures
verbal and mathematical apti-


tude-two abilities important
in doing college work.
The test can also lead to
othet opportunities for high
school students:
-They can enter the com-
petition for scholarships ad-
ministered by the National


Cubs Going to Big Rodeo


"Wild West Rodeo" will be
the theme for the September
pack meeting of the Cub
Scouts. Pack 47 will hold its
monthly meeting Thursday
night at 7:30 at the Scout
House on Tenth Street. The
regular meeting date was
changed due to the election
being held Tuesday, as the


Scout Hut is a public polling
place, "
The September theme,
"Wild West Rodeo" will be
developed during the meeting.
Highlight of the meeting will
be graduation of the Webelos
to regular Boy Scouts and
graduation of Cubs to Webe-
los: Seven Webelos (11 years


Church Plans Festival


The United Pentecostal
Church of Wewahitchka is
having a big fall festival
Saturday, October 9, from five
to eight p.m. CST. There will
be pony rides, all kinds of
booths, fishing pond, haunted
house and a gigantic Country
Kitchen.
Plan now to attend. The

Board not to take this action.
He added that tonight, faced
with a tax increase, only 11
people had showed up to pro-
test this action and it made
one wonder what the people
really wanted.
-After further discussion,
Comm. Owens moved the
Board levy a 1.3 mill increase
as advertised. Comm. Player
seconded the motion. Com-
missioners Player, Owens and
Money voted aye. Comm.
Davis voted nay.
There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting was ad-
journed.
Eldridge Money, Chairman
Attest: George Y. Core,
Clerk


People once believed that
panthers were friendly to all
animals except dragons.


festival will be held on the
church grounds on Highway 71
in the heart of Wewahitchka.


old) will move up to the Boy-
Scout Troop, and 14 Cub
Scouts (10 years old) will
move up to Webelos. District
officials from Panama City
will be in charge of these
ceremonies.
Cubmaster Perry McFar-
land welcomes all 22 new
members and five adult lead-
ers which were recruited at
the recent "School Night for
Scouting" program. He also
extends a welcome and en-
courages all Cub Scouts who
have been attending regularly
to get back into Scouting.


Merit Scholarship Corpora-.
tion;
-They can participate t
the College Board's Student4
Search Service and have their
name sent to colleges interest-
ed in students like them;
-They can get a good idea
of what the Scholastic Apti-
tude (SAT) is like.
With their score reports,
students will receive a copy of
Your PSAT-NMSQT Scores, a
booklet that contains valuable
information about estimating
SAT scores, finding out where
to get and how to use more
detailed information about
colleges and financial aid, and
planning for financing a col-
lege education.
Also, by using the College
Board's College Handbook,
students can compare them-
selves with enrolled students
at the 2,864 colleges and uni-
versities listed.
Interested students must
sign up in the guidance office
no later than Monday, October
11.


Shrine of Memory


Select
Blue Granite L LLAG HE R
Ond
Georgia MarbleONAL ELAINE M. i
M emorials FAT A 0J R JUNE 45 ER


"All Kinds of Cemetery Work"


~; JOSEPH H
'hANDREA
1926 197L


Call
DeFuniak Springs
892-3213


Bob K. Ingram, Owner, Mgr.


Ingram Memorial Co.
P. 0. Box 602, Hiway 90 West DeFuniak Springs
Across from the Airport


Trailblazer


DOG


FOOD


Georgia's Best Premium Grade


25 lb.
bag


S29


lb.


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' 1'^ yLimit 2 Please


Red Tokay


GRAPES


lb. 39"


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POLE BEANS lb. 39



Cucumbers

Bell Peppers


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$


90


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Yellow

ONIONS


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Potatoes


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Order


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Bag


Select


Potatoes


50 Lb.
Bag


79


Fresh Shelled


Peas and

Butter Beans


Sweet

Potatoes


8 Ib.
bag


$100


White
Grapes
White
Scupper-
nongs


IGA King Size or Round Top


BREAD


I


Rich and


Sons
PRICES GOOD SEP. 30 OCT.


IE
ra


4 Page Beef Sale
Circulars In Store on Shopping Carts


I


PEAS A

OKRA 4


SQUASH


m I ImIm_


PEAS


OKRA


SQUASH


00


.P~4llur~-'lrrue~atas~~~4-~a~p~~,- ~ ~17~19al;


I


I I I


I


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-'"fa~,~


- -^










THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 30, 1976 PAGE SEVEN


Bulldogs Handle Sharks In Defea

Port St. Joe's Sharks were Bulldogs tore a page out of the any sort of record in offense gain their win. distance of the goal line in the
handed their first defeat of the Sharks' book and defeated the Friday night, but the Bulldogs As has been their pattern in first period and failed to push
season last Friday night in Port St. Joe team 12-0. held the Sharks to minus 54 the past several games, the the football across the mark.
Perry as the Taylor County Neither team established yards in the second half to Sharks drove to within spitting The Sharks had the ball on


Dejected Sharks leave field after loss to Taylor County


Seat Belts


Save Lives!


Traffic accident figures for
1975 indicate that persons
wearing seat belts fare much
better than nonusers when
involved in a crash said the
Florida Highway Patrol to-
day.
Patrol Director Colonel El-
drige Beach is a firm believer
in seat restraints and insists
that all troopers wear them.
SMany troopers who have been
involved in crashes while.,
working credit seat belts with
saving their lives or reducing
the severity of their injuries.
Records for 1975 statewide
crashes of all drivers show
that one person was killed for
every 1,254 vehicles involved
in accidents in which the
occupants were wearing seat


Say You Saw It

In The Star


belts. Of those not wearing
seat belts, one in every 320
was killed. In other words, the
chances of being killed when
not wearing a seat belt is four
times greater than it is when
using a seat belt.
Of 1,332 occupants killed in
auto crashes in 1975, 1,238 or 93
percent were not wearing seat
belts. Studies have shown that
approximately 25 percent of
people killed in auto crashes
would not become fatalities if
they would wear seat belts,
approximately 300 could have
been saved.
Beach concluded by saying,
'If drivers and passengers
would wear seat belts, not just
on long trips but every time
they got into their vehicle,
there would be a tremendous
reduction in traffic fatalities
which in 1975 amounted to
2,040 people being killed. Dur-
ing the same period, 154,728
people received injuries in
traffic crashes.


Legal Advertising


COMMISSION HEARING
DOCKET NO. 760347-TP
FLORIDA PUBLIC
SERVICE COMMISSION
to
ST. JOSEPH TELEPHONE AND
TELEGRPAPH COMPANY
and
ALL OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES
NOTICE is hereby given that a public
hearing in the above docket previously
scheduled for 9:30 A.M., Thursday,
SOctober 7, 1976, County Commission


Room, Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 5th
Street, Port St. Joe, Florida, is hereby
RESCHEDULED to the following time
and location:
9:30 A.M., Thursday, October 7, 1976
Council Chambers, City Hall
22 Jefferson
Chattahoochee, Florida
The purpose of the hearing scheduled
on October 7 will be to permit Petitioner
to present a brief summary of its case at
the outset of the hearing, to permit
members of the public to present testi-


The Kick-off


The Gators have had two good games in a row--now
they go against one of the early surprises Louisiana State.
Surprising only, in that they held Nebraska to a tie in the
first game. If Florida can get by LSU-the only teams that
should prove trouble are Georgia and Auburn. Course
Sthats trouble enough.

This week's highlight is in Athens with Georgia going
against Alabama. The TV people are giving us a good one
in Ohio State vs. UCLA, but if I had my choice I'd take the
SEC game. This could be the game that breaks "the
Bear's" hold on the SEC title. Having lost to Ole Miss in
the first game, another loss could be it. If Georgia wins it
could mean the Florida Georgia game would be for the
"blue chips".


As We See It

Alabama 24 vs. Georgia 17
Auburn 24 vs. Ole Miss 20
Louisiana State 17 vs. Florida 14
Florida State 20 vs. Kansas State 19
Georgia Tech 27 vs. Virginia 7
Penn State 21 vs. Kentucky 12
Tennessee 20 vs. Clemson 10
Vandy 21 vs. Tulane 6
Nebraska 42 vs. Miami 7
Ohio State 24 vs. UCLA (TV Sat.) 17



33 REID t AVENouE
323 REID AVENUE
/Pwtt St. goe


James Ward stops Taylor runner


Grain Used for Purposes

Other than Eating


mony regarding the Petition for a rate
increase as well as the adequacy and
quality of service rendered by Peti-
tioner. All witnesses shall be subject to
cross.examinatoin at the conclusion of
their testimony.
ADDITIONAL NOTICE
To assure that the public is aware of
the public hearing scheduled in this
matter, St. Joseph Telephone and Tele-
graph Company is hereby directed to
public in a newspaper of general circir-
culation in the Chattahoochee service
area on two separate dates prior to the
scheduled hearing date, quarter page
advertisements setting forth fully the
time and place of the public hearing
scheduled herein and the nature and
scope of said hearing. Proof of publica-
tion that such notices have been pub-
lished should be filed with the Commis-
sion prior to the commencement of the
public hearing.
All other provisions in the prior Notice
shall remain in effect.
By Direction of Chairman WILLIAM
T. MAYO, Commissioner WILLIAM H.
BEVIS and Commissioner PAULA F.
HAWKINS, as and constituting the
Florida Public Service Commission, this
13th day of September, 1976.
-s. William B. DeMilly,
Commission Clerk (SEAL)
it9.30
NOTICE
All City of Port St. Joe Occupational
Licenses will expire September 30, 1976,
and must be renewed on or before
October 31, 1976. All licenses not
renewed before November 1, 1976, shall
be delinquent and subject to a fifteen
percent penalty in addition to the
standard license fee.
-s- Michael J. Wright,
City Auditor and Clerk 4t9-30

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP,
MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION
The Star, a newspaper, is published
weekly at 304-306 Williams Avenue, Port
St. Joe, Florida 32456 with the head-
quarters and general business offices at
the same address. Wesley R. Ramsey is
the publisher, editor and manager editor
of The Star. The Star is owned by Wesley
R. Ramsey, with Florida First National
Bank holding one percent or more of the
total amount of bonds, mortgages or
other securities.
Extent and nature of circulation: total
no. copies printed net press run, 2325;
paid circulation, sales through dealers
and carriers, street vendors and counter
sales, 869, mail subscriptions, 1400; for a
total paid circulation of 2269; free
distribution by mail, carrier or other
means, samples complimentary and
other free copies, 25; for a total distri-
bution of 2294; office use, left-over, un-
accounted, spoiled after printing, 31; for
a total of 2,325.
-s- Wesley R. Ramsey, Owner


The Port St. Joe Kiwanis
Club was informed Tuesday
that its program chairman,
George Wimberly had secured
a film to be showed at the
weekly civic club dinner meet-
ing. The only odd thing about
the film was that Wimberly or
nobody else knew what it was
about. The only thing they
knew was that it was entitled,
"In the American Grain"
which sounds innocent
enough.
When the film started rol-
ling, the club members found
out it was about grain alright
- how to make whiskey from


it. The film didn't instruct the
Kiwanians in how to make
their own spirits, it was a
promotional film put out by a
distiller showing how they did
it; in generalities only.
Though the Kiwanians
wouldn't have purposely se-
lected the film, it was interest-
ing.
Guests of the club were Ira
Campbell of Panama City and
Key Clubbers Steve 'Pierce,
Keef Pettis, Dianne Freeman
and Donna Jo Davis.

Support Local Merchants
Shop at Home


It

the Taylor goal line in two
other drives in the game, but
mistakes in a night which saw
the Sharks lose five fumbles,
cost them scores.
Taylor County didn't just
walk the ball over the line: the
Sharks made them earn every
point and every inch during
the night, even though the
Sharks were out-manned and
out-weighed.
The Bulldogs didn't get on
the board until eight minutes
had gone in the third period.
They took over the ball on the
Perry 37 after a Shark fumble.
In six plays they were on the
Shark 28 with third and six
inches. The Dogs tried a
quarterback sneak for the
first down and Chester Fen-
nell met him six inches before
he reached the line of scrim-
mage and the Dogs then had a
fourth and one situation. They
gambled on fourth down and
Kenny Crews broke loose
around end to score.
On the first play of the last
period, quarterback Rick Tay-
lor threw an interception 23
yards from the Shark goal
line. On the first play, Crews
again scooted up the middle-
for the TD and the Bulldogs
had their points. Both conver-
sion attempts failed.
In the waning minutes of the
final period, the Sharks put
out their last effort at scoring
with a 40 yard pass from
Duane McFarland to Preston
Gant on the Bulldog two yard
line. Even though the pass was
completed, it was called back
by a Shark mistake.
The Sharks had made a
similar threat in the first
period when Chester Fennell
and James Ward had forced a
Bulldog fumble.
On the first play from
scrimmage the Sharks were
pushed back 15 yards. On the
third down, Ward scooted
around end for 25 yards to the
Perry 17 where the drive
stalled.
The Bulldogs had another
score nullified in the fourth
period. Alan Wilson snagged a
Keith Neel pass mid-way in
the last stanza, and ran 25
yards to cross the goal line.
The TD was called back by a
call of roughing the passer
against Perry.
THE YARDSTICK
First Downs 8 9
Yards Rushing 20 155
Yards Passing 7 28
Return Yardage 31 35
Passes 1-5-0 2-12-0
Punts 4-39.2 4-32.2
Fumbles Lost 7-5 3-3
Yards Penalized 51 75

Score by quarters:
Port St. Joe 0 0 0 0- 0
Taylor County 0 0 6 6-12

SCHEDULE CHANGE
The Sharks next game
against Lincoln of Tallahas-
see, scheduled for Friday
night has been re-scheduled
for tonight instead. A conflict
with the playing field has
forced the change to be made
according to head coach
Wayne Taylor.
The game will be .played
tonight, (Thursday) at Bragg
Stadium on the FAMU cam-
pus at 8:00 p.m.
Change of the varsity game
also makes it necessary to
change the junior varsity
game scheduled for tonight.
Tonight's junior varsity game
will be played Saturday night
at 7:00 p.m., here with
Blountstown as the opponent.


Coon, Possum


Hunters Must


Change Methods


Panhandle raccoon and
opossum hunters must adjust
their hunting tehcniques ac-
cording to a statement from
the Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission, The
Commission has amended the
regulation to prohibit the hunt-
ing of raccoon or opossum by
the display or use of a light
from any moving vehicle, boat
or animal.
Captain M. H. Foxworthy,
regional law enforcement
supervisor, said the amend-
ment was necessary because a
number of individuals were
taking advantage of the rac-
coon hunting areas to illegally
hunt deer. He pointed out that
it was difficult to ascertain if a
man were legitimately hunt-
ing raccoon or was attempting
to take deer without an actual
kill available as evidence.
He pointed out that under
this modified regulation the
legitimate opossum or rac-
coon hunter would be able to
continue their recreation with
a minimum of difficulty.
"Most of these folks," he said,
"take their dogs to the woods
and when they find a track,
they put the dogs on it." But.
under the letter of the old law,
we had a number of people
who would just run the roads,
shining a light and looking for
a deer. This regulation puts
them out of business and will
have a minimal effect on the


regular sportsman.
In Northwest Florida, it is
legal to hunt raccoon or opos-
sum at night with the aid of a
light provided the sportsman
uses specified firearms and is
using a minimum of two dogs.
Guns used may be either a .22
caliber pistol or single shot
rifle using .22 short ammuni-
tion or a single shot .410 gauge
shotgun using shot no larger
than number six. Both species
are listed as unprotected fur-
bearers and may be hunted
year around.


Would

You Like to

Volunteer
Would you like to give as
little as an hour a week to en-
rich ant extend the learning
experience of a child?
Port St. Joe Elementary
School is seeking persons who
want to become involved in
school programs as volunteer
workers. If you have any extra
time on your hands and would
like to participate in a pro-
gram where you will gain far
more than you give, please
call 229-3221 for further infor-
mation.
Read the Classifieds


-m'i YX 'IL a iZ(J


M ORE I


TOI

for ALL AND WI



with

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'last Thursday, the Commis-
sion:
-Awarded a bid to Dyna-
Med, Inc., of Carlsbad, Calif.,
for $817.62 to furnish the
Wewahitchka ambulance ser-
vice with a Resusci-Anne
training mannekin.


O


A pharmacist daily assists the sick
and injured by dispensing to them
the most advanced medicine in
the world. Through his product,
he eases the pain of tragedy, pro-


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


-Again heard a request
from Port St. Joe City Com-
missioner Benny Roberts to
purchase the city a new fire
truck and allow repayment
from the City's share of the St.
Joseph Fire Control district
revenues. The county had


tectsthe health of our community
and helps make life longer and
more comfortable. If you're unde-
cided about your future, consider
a career in Pharmacy. It's a field
of importance, responsibility, and
challenge... overflowing with grati-
fying personal rewards.

YOUR RECALL PHARMACY


BUZZETT'S
DRUG STORE
Ph. 227-3371 317 Williams
Comnvm ,t Drive-In Window
Plenty of Free Parking


THURSDAY, SEPT. 30, 1976


Oak Grove Plans


Interview "Ford", "Carter"


In Unique Program


Rotary Club program chair-
man Roy Gibson had his
program fail to show up at last
Thursday's meeting, so he


came up with a home-made
version of a press conference
on the spur of the moment to
entertain the club members.


(Continued from Page 1)

made similar deals with We-
wahitchka, White City and
Highland View.
-Issued a call for bids to
furnish the Port St. Joe am-
bulance service with six pag-
ers for registered EMT's serv-
ing with the squad.
n ADOPT BUDGET
The County Commission for-
mally adopted its fiscal 1976-
'77 budget last Thursday.
Final hearing and adoption of
the budget was the reason for
the Thursday meeting in the
first place. The Tuesday meet-
ing was cancelled for the
convenience of those Commis-
sioners involved in the politi-
cal races.
The final budget figure puts
the county on record as plan-
ning to spend $2,556,599.14 in
its various operations.
The budget and a 1.3 mill
increase met a bit of express-
ed concern from tax payers
during the hearing sessions
which proceeded the adoption.


Fires called the Port St. Joe
volunteers out three times
during the past week.
Last Wednesday morning, a
smouldering blaze was found
in one of the new homes under
construction on Cypress Ave-
nue. The blaze had apparently
been triggered from a spark
from a welder's torch the day
before and was found the next
morning when the workmen
reported for their jobs.
Saturday afternoon, fire-
men were alerted by a brush


fire on State Road 30-A near
Simmons Bayou. A small
patch of woodlands beside the
road was burning, but was
quickly put out after a small
area had burned.
Monday afternoon, fire was
discovered in the ceiling of the
Piggly Wiggly Super Market
and the department called
upon again.
The blaze proved to be an
electrical short around a
fluorescent light and was ex-
tinguished with minimal dam-
age.


Gibson selected George
Tapper to play the roll of
"Jimmy Carter", Democratic
presidential candidate and
Dave May to play the role of
Gerald Ford. Rotarians were
members of the press corps to
question the two candidates in
a news interview.
Tapper proved so adept at
replying, "You can trust me.
Have I ever lied to you?" that
he drew the bulk of the
questions.
One thing the program
taught the Rotarians and that
was to inform them of the
tactics George Tapper used in
getting himself elected to the
Florida Senate a few years
ago. It was easy to see how he
did it.
Guests of the club were
Norman Smith, visiting Rotar-
ian of Pompano Beach and
Wheelettes Phyllis Willis and
Jean Whitfield.


Want Ads Get Results!



e w .5 :. .. ..:: .o.o^ ^ o o o o o


LaBlanc wood clarinet, like
'new, used one year. Phone
'229-6077. Itp

YARD DALE
- Friday and Saturday, from
nine til. 706 Woodward Ave.
Clothes and miscellaneous
.items. It

BIG YARD SALE
4 families. Clothing, all sizes
infants up to 24/. Household
items. Thursday and Friday,
Sept. 30 and Oct. 1. Bay St. at
St. Joe Beach, last trailer on
left. 9 a.m. til 3:30.

Used commercial barbecue
machine, all stainless steel,
can be used in restaurants,
stores, etc-. Has rotissiere.
Call 229-3331. 4tp 930

1972 Mobile home, Monteo
Carlo 12' x 70', 2 large bed-
rooms, 2 full baths, central-h &
a, fully carpet, partially fur-
nished. Spanish. 670-8180 or
653-8472. tfc 9-30

2 Family Carport Sale
613-615 Marvin Avenue. Chil-
dren's clothes, books, some
new hand-made items, many
other things. Saturday, Octo-
ber 2, 9 til.

One new king size foam
mattress and foundation, $100.
One used full size bed box
springs and mattress,. $50.
:229-6326. tfc 9-23

: 30' shrimp boat with 327- 250
h.p. engine. Completely rig-
ged, $3,500. Contact Kirl~ia d's
,Boat Landing. 227-8827.
-: 4tc 9-16

SAssorted storage buildings,
trailers, buses, some shelved,
insulated, heavy duty. Special
priced while remodeling.
Edgewater Campgrounds.
'648-3035. tfc 9-16

SClean, used mobile home, 12
k 65', 1 year old, 2 BR and 2 full
:.baths, many added features.
"No equity, take up payments.
229-8353 or 229-6152.
tfc 9-2

SCB Radios, Johnson, Craig,
Surveyor, antennas, base sta-
tions, terms available. West-
ern Auto. tfc 3-4

SGET SLENDER NOW
Lose excess pounds and inches
with the milkshake vitamin
program.

GET ENERGY NOW
For extra energy or weight
gain, try the milkshake vita-
min program.
Call Jean McMillan at 229-
6351 after p.m. tfc8-26

CB Radios and marine elec-
tronics sales and service. 106
Monument Ave., phone 229-
8100. Open daily five p.m. to
nine p.m., Saturday, eight
a.m. to five p.m. tfc 8-5

Wizard garden tillers, hand
plows, lawn mowers, all gar-
den needs. Western Auto.
tfc 3-4


17.1 frost free refrigerator'
like new with ice maker.
Electric Dryer, heavy duty. 1
set of sliding glass doors.
Tempered triple strength. 1968
Oldsmobile excellent work
car. Call 229-8173 tfc 8-5

DRY cleaning carpets is
easier, faster, ans safer with
HOST. Rent our machine. St.
Joe Furniture, 229-1251.
tfc 10-23

Just arrived over 100 potted
plants, beautiful assortment.
Pots, potting soil, plant food,
perlite and other flower and
garden needs. Economy
Motors & Garden Center, 301
Hwy. 98 HV, 229-6001. tfc 8-5


ALUMINI
PLATE
24%" x 3
Ideal for chicken
pump houses,
and what have
Call 227-3161 or
The Sta

FOR STANLEY
PRODUCE
Call Betty Gi
648-7534


UM
IS
6"


House at White City, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, 1/4 acres of
land. Call 229-1138 after 5 p.m.
tfc 9-23

Seven room home for sale at
403 Madison St. Will sacrifice.
Owner leaving town, $3,500.00.

Two bedroom frame
dwelling at 221 Ninth St.,
only $9,500.00.

Three bedroom frame
dwelling at 410 Madison
St., Oak Grove, $7,500.00.

Large duplex apartment,
5071/2 Long Avenue, $15,-
000.00.

FRANK HANNON
Reg. Real Estate Broker
Phone 227-3491


Ib 2t 9-23
an houses,9-23
outhouses, For Sale in Wewa: Clean,
you. extra nice and sturdy 12 x 65',
drop by 2 BR mobile home on 100' x 60'
r lot 500 yards from Dead
HOM Lakes. This includes air cond.,
OTS 2 utility sheds, 400 ft. flowing
lbert well, front awning, rock drive-
way, $8,500.00. Call Jim at 229-
tfc 7-15 6305 day or 639-5498 night.
5 tfc 9-2


Custom-made wooden name
plaques, for mail boxes, front
gates, door posts, etc. Econo-
my Motors & Garden Center,
301 Hwy. 98, HV, 229-6001.
tfc 8-5


REL ST T


New house on the Gulf
beach, $18,500. Hotle, 229-6171
Indian Pass Beach, Port St.
Joe. 4tp 9-30


Masonry house for sale at
1907 Cypress Ave. 3 BR, LR,
den, carport. Contact Tom
Culpepper at 229-8177 after
6:30, before at 227-4261.
2t9-30
VETERANS $300 down.
We have 2 new brick homes
for sale in Wewahitchka.
These homes have 3 BR, 2

baths, central heat, carpet,
garage, etc. FHA and conven-
tional financing available.
Call collect 205-794-6711
Dothan. An equal housing op-
portunity builder. tfc 9-23

Masonary home, 3 large
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large
living room with fireplace.
Dining room, den, lots of
shade trees. Fenced with 48"
chain link. Large azaleas
around yard. Will sell or trade
for equal value. Write or call
265-2967, 507 E. 10th St., Lynn
Haven, Fla. 32444. 2tp 9-23

House for sale at 228 7th St. 3
bedrooms, with duplex apart-
ment. 229-6538. tfc 9-30

12' x 60' 2 BR mobile home in
excell. condition. Including 10
x 10 utility building. Located
on six landscaped lots in White
City. See to appreciate! Phone
229-5692 after six p.m. tfc 7-15


3 bedroom, 2 bath brick
home at White City, $19,000.
229-6786. tfc 8-12

Two-story home, 1902 Monu-
ment Ave., 3 BR, 3 bath.
Phone 227-7221 or 229-6474.
tfc 8-21

New brick home, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, fireplace, 1,800
sq. ft. Call 229-8119. tfc 7-22


New brick home at 106 Yau-
pon Ave. Construction comple-
tion approximately August 10.
3 BR, 2 bath, dining room,
living room, den and kitchen,
2-car garage and utility room.
Features bar, birch cabinets,
dish washer, garbage dis-
posal,. range and compactor,
rock fire place, refreshment
bars, central heat and air,
central vacuum system, car-
pet and outdoor brick barbe-
cue. Call 227-2291 or 229-5302.
tfc 7-22


Mexico Beach, 2 bedroom
furnished apartment. Central
heat and air, adults only. 648-
4208.

Two bedroom furnished Du-
plex Apt. Corner of 14th and
Palm Blvd. Call 227-4311.
tfc 8-12

Adults only. Furnished
apartment, living room, bed-
room, breakfast nook, bath
and kitchen. 229-1352.
tfc 9-23

Furnished apartments for
rent at Mexico Beach. Inquire
at the Driftwood Motel, Hwy.
98. 648-5126. tfc 9-23


Three BR furnished house at
528 7th St. Call 648-7581 after
4:30. tfc 9-23

Beach cottage for rent. Call
648-5144. tfc 9-2

Furnished small 1 bedroom
house. Call 229-6777 after 6
p.m. tfc 8-5


L ----en


For Rent to Adults: 5 room
house, 1111 Garrison Avenue,
large lot. Call 229-4571.
tfc 9-30

Unfurnished large 2 BR
house with screen porch, laun-
dry and storage room. Auto.
heat. Call 229-6777 after six
p.m. tfc 8-26
For Rent: 2 BR trailer, air
conditioned. Canal St., St. Joe
Beach. For information, call
648-5650. tfc 6-24

Why live in the crowded
city? Move your mobile home
to peace, quiet and tran-
quility. Water, garbage collec-
tions, yards mowed, live lei-
surely. Gulf privileges. Only
VA approved mobile home
park in Gulf County. Ski
Breeze Meadows Trailer
Park, 9 miles southeast of
Port St. Joe on Hwy S-30.
Come out and enjoy the quiet.
tfc 5-6
CARPET Cleaning with
HOST couldn't be easier. Just
brush and vacuum for clean,
dry carpets. Rent our HOST
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
229-1251. tfc 10-23

AT RUSTIC SANDS CAMP-
GROUND, 15th ST., MEXICO
BEACH, PATIO, BEAUTI-
FUL REC HALL PRIVI-
LEGES, /4 MILE FROM
BEACH, 648-3600. tfc 5-8

NO need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture,
229-1251. tfc 10-23

Public address system.
Owned by the Port St. Joe
Kiwanis Club. A new system
operable on either battery or
current. Call Ken Herring,
227-5281 for rental, tfc

For carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vac, the portable steam car-
pet cleaning system. Avail-
able at Western Auto, phone
227-2271, 219 Reid Ave.
Office or warehouse space
for rent. 518 First St. Call
229-6308 or see Bob Holland. tfc





Responsible persons 18 or
over, to sell unique exquisitely
styled jewelry. For begin, kit
send $2 to Omega Sales, Box
528,'Port St. Joe. 3t 9-23


1966 Oldsmobile, one owner
car, 35,000 miles. $400.00 cash.
229-6663. tfc 9-30

1973 Olds Delta 88, 4 dr.
hardtop, ps, pb, ac, vinyl top,
$2,400. 648-5272.

1976 Ford Econoline Ford
van, $3,995.00. Contact Julia
Creech after 6:30 or week-
ends. 229-6331. tfc 9-16

Must sacrifice 1974 Pinto
Coupe, 4 speed, $1,500.00. Call
after 5:00 p.m. at 229-4961.
3tc9-16

1975 Ford pickup, small
equity and take up payments,
24,000 miles. 904-265-3304.
4tc 9-16

1976 Ford F100 Explorer.
$3,850.00 or $300.00 and take
over payments. Call 229-3322.
tfc 9-9

1973 Toyota Celica, 4 speed,
AC, R&H, Call 229-6129 or can
be seen at 1319 McClellan
Avenue. $2600.00. tfc 8-12



F rank'sUed. Car
339I. 15h St


WANTED

Wanted: Good used oyster
boat. Call 904-265-3304.
4tc 9-16

Wanted: 1970-1973 Plymouth
Cuda. Call 229-6013, after 6:30
p.m. call 648-6596. tfc 9-16

WANTED: Old dolls for col-
lecting. Call 229-6631. 4tc 9-9


There will be a regular
communication of Port St. Joe
Lodge No. 111, F. & A.M.,
every first and third Thursday
at 8:00 p.m.
F. E. BROGDON,
Everett McFarland, Sec.

There will be a VFW meet-
ing the third Tuesday of each
month in the American Legion
Hall. tfc 6-19

R.A.M.-Regular convoca-
tion on St. Joseph Chapter No.
56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd Mon-
days, 8 p.m. All visiting com-
panions welcome.
J. L. SIMS, H.P.
E. William McFarland, Sec.


SERVICES


SHARPENING
Saws, chisels, lawn mower
blades, etc.
W. C. Miles
112 First St., H. V.
Phone 229-6552
4tp 9-30

ADDITIONS,
REMODELING, REPAIRS-
Work Guaranteed
25 Years Experience
Call 227-5986
tfc 6-17

Complete Wood Shop
Custom Cut Lumber
Want to Do It Yourself?
Then come see us for Stan-
ley tools, hardware, paneling,
paint, lumber.
Earley's Hardware &
Building Supply
Hwy. 98 W. tfc 8-5 229-2763

Carpentry Work Done
Reasonable Rates
Jimmy Johnson
Phone 227-7657
tfc 8-19


Now Open
St. Joe Outboard
Repair Shop
309 Monument Ave.
Phone 229-6151
tfc 6-17

GENERAL CONTRACTING
Licensed and Bonded
Free Estimates
No Job Too Small
CALL 229-6321
tfc 7-8

POODLE GROOMING
For Appointment Call
229-6674
tfc 8-5


All types carpet and vinyl
flooring installed. 10 years
experience. For free measure-
ment and estimate, call Ron-
ald Ross, 229-6822. tfc 9-2


LEWIS FLOOR CLEANING
All Types
229-6482 or 229-6447
tfc 9-20


-I


REPAIRS Young Christian mother will
Aluminum screens and doors, baby sit in my home, 6 a.m. to
carpentry, house repair, mill- midnight everyday but Sun-
work, roof repair and re-roof- day. Call 229-6676. tfc 9-30
ing.
SMITH & SON WORKSHOP Septic Tanks Pumped Out
Phone 229-6018 Carefoot Septic Tank
Port St. Joe 229-8227, 229-2351,
tfc 7-22 and 229-6694.
tfc 7-1
GRIFFIN'S
Refrigerator & Air ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Conditioner Repairs Machine Work Weldint
Call 506 First Street
229-6492 Phone 229-6803
All work guaranteed Machinist on duty all day
tfc 5-6 Every day

Lawn mowers, tillers and
Tires Now Installed garden tractors repaired.
FREE Economy Motors & Garden
In Our Own Center, 301 Hwy. 98, HV,
Auto Service Center 229-6001. tfc 8-5
Western Auto Assoc. Store
227-2281
3-4 tfc Visit or call the Alcohol
Counseling Information
Center of the Panhandle Al-,
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS coholism Council, Inc. 321
Meets Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe.
Fri. at 8 p.m., Sun. at 4 p.m. Phone 229-3515. tfc 1-30
St. James Episcopal Church
Parish House Port St. Joe-Gulf Co. CofC
tfc 4-24 WELCOME SERVICE
Call 227-2501 or go by the
Professional help with emo- Chamber office, Municipal
tional problems and-or con- Building, 5th St., Monday thru
cerns. Gulf County Guidance Friday, 9-12 EST. tfc 5-1
Clinic, Port St. Joe. 227-2691 or
227-7586. tfc 11-14
Lawn & Gardening Needs
Feed
Your SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Lawn Mower &
PAINT Dealer in Small Engine Repairs
Port St. Joe Economy Motors &
Garden Center
301 Hwy. 98 H.V.
229-6001
coV\ tfc 8-5
'.%A ell


HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port' St. Joe, Florida


GLEN'S CABINET
SHOP
Kitchen Cabinets
Vanities Mill Work
Glen Combs
Phone 229-6530
Port St. Joe, Fla.
tfc 5-20



















tfc 8-5


Wouldn't You Really
Rather Have Cable TV?




For Cable TV
Installation In Port St. Joe

Phone 229-7232'
Or Visit the Telephone Company
Business Office


PAGE EIGHT


Fire Department


Answers Three Alarms


Yes, Virginia


There really is a






40th



Birthday


We know because

we've been there




L. M. & .


"Ithink it was something I oate."

Rkid-cBug,

kills bugs for
up to six months,
and saves you bout $100 yearly
in costly pest control services.
Use of Sprayer free with
purchase of Rid-A-Bug
HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe. Florida


I r I


I













510 FIFTH ST.
PORT ST. JOE,
Store Hours:
8 AM -8 PM
Monday Saturday.


PRICESS GOOD
SEPT. 23-25


'C


IOWA CORN FED USDA
CHOICE CENTER CUT (7 BONE)

CHUCK
... ROAST
^^P-t" *^^^ ^^
Exr La II~o


USDA Choice SHOULDER
ROAST
99C Lb


Extra Lean
Cube Steak
$149 Lb.


Tender Lean


'ORK


Lb.


- 9


Copeland Reg. or Beef
FRANKS
79 L.
9 Lb.


Legs, Thigs, Breast
Fryer Parts

69'


Slab Bacon
79 Lb
10' Extra Sliced


Stew Meat


$119


Lb.


USDA Choice T Tender Lean 1 27
Boneless Chuck Roast L. 99 Center Cut PORK CHOPS Lb. $



Cigarettes Not Included in Grocery Order for Sale Merchandise
I I V ______


III


Jumbo Marcal
TOWELS


Regular Cocoa Butter
Tone Soap


F- 17 Oz. 1
Delmonte W K
CORN
3/$100


14'/2 Oz. Hunt's Whole
Tomatoes


cFARM FRE 2
FARM FRESH PRODUCE


POTATOESS


10 lb.
bag
with $10 or
More Food Order


Mountain Grown
Tomatoes
CRISP RADISHES
GOLDEN CARROTS
YELLOW ONIONS
Fancy
WHITE GRAPES


Fresh
CRISP CELERY


37C
bags 27"
bags 35C


3 lb. bag


59C


lb. 490


Stalk


29C


Shop Our Fresher Produce Every Day


-I a -


28 Oz. French's
Big Tate Instant
Mashed
Potatoes
99' J


4 Roll Marcal


Toilet Tissue
Regular 89c Value


29 Oz. Fine Fare
Fruit Cocktail


69'


10 Ct. I
Butter Me-Not
Biscuits
4/100
12 Oz. Delmonte
Cream Style
CORN
3/1


Gallon Size PUREX
BLEACH


Small Eggs


2/99'


32 Oz. Returnable
RC Cola
& Flavors


4/99'


N.


III


9i'


~____L__


Family Pac


FRYE


~~"~











PAGE TEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 30, 1976


Legal


Now Is The Time When


Advertising Those "CreeDie Crawlies"


NOTICE
THE BANK OF PORT ST. JOE,
located at Port St. Joe, a proposed new
bank, has made application to the
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
for the establishment of a new bank to be
located at 505 Fifth Street, City of Port
St. Joe. The proposed facility will
engage in the business of a full service
banking facility. FDIC accepted the
application for filing on July 6, 1976.
Officers of the bank engaged in submit-
ting the application are: Cecil G. Costin,
Jr., Bernard G. Buzzett, J. W. Grant,
Wayne Hendrix, Frank Hannon, Grover
Holland, James B. Roberts, Silas R.
Stone and Edwin G. Williams.
"Any person wishing to comment on
this application may file his comments
in writing with the Regional Director of
the Federal Deposit Insurance Corpora-
tion at its -Regional Office located at 2
Peachtree Street, N. W., Suite 3030,
Atlanta, Georgia 30303. If any person
desires to protest the granting of this
application he has a right to do so if he
files a written notice of his intent with
the Regional Director within 15 days of
the date of this publication. The noncon-
fidential portions of the application are
on file in the Regional Office as part of
the public file maintained by the Cor-
poration. This file is available for public
inspection during regular business
hours."
Cecil G. Costin, Jr.
Bernard G. Buzzett
J. W. Grant
Wayne Hendrix
Frank Hannon
Grover Holland
James B. Roberts
Silas R. Stone
Edwin G. Williams 2t 9-23
REGISTRATION OF
FICTITIOUS NAME
We the undersigned, being duly sworn,
do hereby declare under oath that the
names of all persons interested in the
business or profession carried on under
the name of ST. VINCENTS SHRIMP
COMPANY at Indian Pass Beach, Gulf
County, Florida and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
James T. McNeill, 50 percent.
Donald Britt Pickett, 50 percent.
-s- James T. McNeill
-s- Donald Britt Pickett 4t9-23
REGISTRATION OF
FICTITIOUS NAME
We the undersigned, being duly sworn,
do hereby declare under oath that the
names of all persons interested in the
business or profession carried on under
the name of PIER 98 RESTAURANT at
302 4th Street, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
and the extent of the interest of each, is
as follows:
Robert V. Rogers
Rita Jean Brown
-s- Robert V. Rogers
.s- Rita Jean Brown 4t 9.23

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids in.duplicate will be re-
ceived until October 7, 1976 at 11:00
A.M., EDT by the Board of Public
Instruction of Gulf County at which time
and place all bids will be publicly opened
and read aloud for the Re-Roofing of:
GYMNASIUM
PORT ST. JOE HIGH SCHOOL
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
The Contractor shall furnish all labor,
i materials, and equipment, and shall be
responsible for the entire completion of
this project.
Plans, specifications, and contract
documents may be inspected at the
office of the Architect; State Road 22,
Wewahitchka, Florida, and may be pro.
rurred by General Contractors upon a
deposit.of $10.00 for each complete set of
plans and specifications, of which the
full amount will be returned to eacn
General Contractor who submits a bid,
and all other deposits for other than one
complete set of plans and specifications
will be returned less deduction to cover
cost of reproduction. All documents
must be returned in good condition
within ten (10) days after date of opening
of bids.
Cashier's check, certified check, or
bid bond, for not less than five percent of
the amount of the bid, must accompany
each proposal.
Performance, Labor and Material
Bonds, and Workman's Compensation
Insurance will be required of the suc-
cessfull bidder.
Right is reserved to reject any or all
proposals and waive technicalities.
No bidder may withdraw his bid for a
period of (30) days after date set for
opening.
David Bidwell, Superintendent
The Board of Public Instruction
Gulf County
Port St. Joe, Florida
-s- Charles A. Gaskin, AIA
ARCHITECT
P. O. Box 7
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465 3t 9-16
REGISTRATION OF
FICTITIOUS NAMES
We the undersigned, being duly sworn,
do hereby declare under oath that the
names of all persons interested in the
business or profession carried on under
the name of OMEGA SALES at Port St.
Joe, Florida and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
Mrs. Ometa Osborne, Entire Company
*s- Ometa Osborne 4t9-16
IN THE CI.:CUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY.
CASE NO. 76-171
IN RE: The Marriag eof
MICHAEL W. PARRISH, Husband
Petitioner,
and HELEN JEAN PARRISH, Wife
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: HELEN JEAN PARRISH whose
address is 473 Emma Road, Asheville,
N.C.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Cecil G. Costin, Jr., 221 Reid
Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456,
Petitioner's attorney, on or before
October 18, 1976, and file the original
with the clerk of this court either before
service on petitioner's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on September 15, 1976.
GEORGE Y. CORE,
As Clerk of the Court
By: -s- Margaret B. Core,
As Deputy Clerk
(SEAL) 4t 9-16
REGISTRATION OF
FICTITIOUS NAMES
We the undersigned, being duly sworn,
do hereby declare under oath that the


names of all persons interested in the
business or profession carried on under
the name of ST. VINCENTS SHRIMP
COMPANY at Indian Pass Beach, Gulf
County, Florida and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
James T. McNeill, 50 percent.
Donald Britt Pickett, 50 percent.
-s- James T. McNeill
-s- Donald Britt Pickett 4t 9-23


Invade Your Gardens


Now is the time for the
"crawly ones" to invade vege-
table gardens planted in early
fall says Florida Nurserymen
and Growers Association
(FNGA). They can completely
wipe out all of the prized
plants set in the garden. Bet-
ter prepare to battle. Your
shield of protection will be
some form of insecticide.


Insects abound in all shapes,
sizes and colors. Some are
crawly worms, others are tiny
beetles, and some live below
ground. Each one is intent on
battling you for what ever you
have planted. Since there are
so many types, it would be
well to know just how they eat
and the best way to declare
total war.


i Port St. Joe


I J \ School Lunch l


MENUS
1 US .
F-ME.N


Port St. Joe High School
Lunchroom Menu


Port St. Joe Element
Highland View Elemel


Monday, Oct. 4 Lunchroom Menu
Hamburger with bun, tunaMonday, Oct. 4
salad, French fries, tomato, Luncheon meat and (
lettuce, pickles, whole kernel dwich, English
corn, peanut butter and jelly, French,. fries, green
milk. fries, green
mik. fruit cup with cookies,
Tuesday, Oct. 5
Hamburger with bun, pizza- Tuesday, Oct. 5
burger on bun, string beans, Pizzaburger on bun,
lettuce, tomato, pickles, pota- beans, cole slaw, apple
to chips, apple crisp, milk. milk.
Wednesday, Oct. 6
Chili dog with bun, hambur- Wednesday, Oct.(
ger with bun, baked beans, Porklthbps, rice &
cole slaw, lettuce, tomato, turnips, lettuce and tc
pickles, peaches with cookies, cornbread, peach with (
milk. milk.
Thursday, Oct. 7 Thursday, Oct. 7
Cheeseburger with bun, Chicken pot pie, gree
Chicken pot pie, gree
chicken pot pie, green butter ter beans, tossed salad,
beans, French fries, cinnamon rolls, cinnamon rolls, r
rolls, bread, milk.
Friday, Oct. 8 Friday, Oct. 8
Sloppy Joe on bun, meat Sloppy Joe on bun,
loaf, mashed potatoes, tomato kernel corn, cabbage,
slice, bread, rolls, peanut but- and raisin slaw, peanut
ter chews, milk. chews, milk.


Recycling Unit Has


Two Stops In October


After collecting 9,354 pounds
of aluminum last month from
the Apalachicola area, Rey-
nolds Aluminum's mobile re-
cycling unit has two stops
scheduled during October.
The public will receive 15
cents a pound for their all-
aluminum cans and other
clean household aluminum
every other Tuesday, Oct. 5
and 19 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00
p.m. at County Dock Boat
Base, Avenue "E" and Waters
Street.
"Once it is produced, alum-
inum becomes an energy
hank because aluminum dns


;ary
ntary
s

cheese,
peas,
salad,
milk.


string
Crisp,


6
gravy,
tomato,
cookie,



in but-
bread,
nilk.


whole
carrot
butter


Vardell, Reynolds District
Manager for aluminum recy-
cling.
This 95 percent energy sav-
ing makes every aluminum
can an energy bank-energy
that is saved over and over
again, each time the metal is
recycled.
"And, because of alumi-
num's high scrap value, the
aluminun' can is less likely
than other containers to be lit-
tered or thrown away, and
more likely to be picked up or
saved for recycling," Vardell
added.'


Insects have three types of
mouth parts. Each type of
mouth part will require a dif-
ferent type of insecticide for
control.
Chewing insects are those
that take a bite out of the plant
leaf or flower. Most of these
can be killed rather easily
when they are young. Let
them grow up and about all
that is effective for control is a
hammer. So the lesson is to be
prepared when you see the
first bit of leaf disappear.
Some of the insects that have
chewing mouth parts are:
grasshoppers, katydids, all
types of worms (actually lar-
vae of butterflies and moths),
many types of beetles, and
cutting wasps and bees. The
insecticide must be on the
plant part for the chewing in-
sect to eat and ingest. The
larger the insect the more it
will have to eat to be killed.
Sucking insects are almost
as abundant as the chewers.
Unfortunately many of these,
have armor. You need to be a
little sneaky to get control
says FNGA.
Aphids and scale insects as
well as white flies are the pre-
dominate ones that do the
sucking of juices from plants.
Now it is well known that
aphids can literally turn foli-
age into distorted abnormal
forms. As they suck out the
juice of the plant, the leaf
curls and twists. Aphids feed
only on the tender young
growth.
Scale insects are considered
as stationary. However, they
do move when they first hatch
out of the egg. Once they find a
place suitable they settle down
for the rest of their life which
you hope is short when insect-
icides are applied.
Another pest that is kind of
in a group by itself is the
spider mite. This tiny insect
has a sicking mouth part, but
it has eight legs instead of the
usual six. It causes a dis-
coloring of leaves and also
severe leaf drop. Look closely
to see it.
Last but not least there are
the raspers. These are the
thrips that so often discolor
flowers by their feeding. The
mouth part of this insect
works just like a wood rasp.
Slowly but surely they remove
the layers of plant cells killing
the leaf eventually or dis-
figuring the flower.
Know the type of insect and
its control to win battles
against the "crawly ones."
Use pesticides wisely, accord-
ing to the directions, and your
plants will be healthy and you
will stay alive.


not deteriorate, and recycling M. 1 -.
it for re-use requires less than th members of the
five per cent of the energy o Ce
used to make the aluminum Church of Christ
originally," according to Dave iChurch of C hrist


S invite you to meet with them:

e oll Sunday Morning Bible Study ........... 10:00 A.M.
W e d Sunday Morning Worship .............. 11:00 A.M.
yhave SundayNight ........................ 6:00P.M.
SWednesday Night ..................... 7:00 P.M.


forest Corner 20th St. & Marvin
toburn For information call
t ob rn, 1 229-6969


Those Delectable Indian Pass and

Indian Lagoon





OYSTERS


are on the


To reserve

your bushel


Call


$. Indian Pass


Seafood Co.


227-8781


F*fji iLd4


1630at 90S0 0 000 A M ,a d ls o c 4 9PM


NEXTTO ESTBLG.e

7E9456


u


r I


- -I= m- -















MINUTES

of the


Gulf County School Board

.- w- w w ww. w~w A


The Gulf County School
Board met in regular session
on August 3 with the following
members present: Herman
Ard, Chairman; Gene Raf-
field, J. K. Whitfield, Fred
Greer and Wallace Guillot.
The Superintendent was pre-
sent.
The meeting was opened
with the invocation and
followed by the pledge of al-
legiance.
On motion by Whitfield,
seconded by Raffield, the
Board unanimously approved
the minutes of July 6 and 13.
Wade Barrier, representing
the Band Boosters, met with
the Board requesting any fi-
nancial assistance which the
Board could offer. The Board
will request a projected bud-
get of three to five years from
each Band Director and dis-
tcuss this item at a special
'meeting August 12.


The Superintendent present-
ed correspondence received
during July. A letter from the
State Department of Educa-
tion was presented regarding
the Wewahitchka Elementary
School lunchroom program
and a survey which is to be
made during the year.
Package insurance cover-
age bids were received from
Tomlinson Abstract, Hannon
Insurance Company and Gas-
kin-Graddy Insurance Com-
pany. On motion by Greer,
seconded by Whitfield, all
voted to consider these bids at
a special meeting August 12.
On motion by Raffield,
seconded by Greer, all voted
Yes to accept the highest bid
on a time deposit from the
Wewahitchka State Bank in
the amount of $114,125.00.
Bids were received on jani-
torial supplies for the schools
in the system for the 1976-77


school year. On motion by
Guillot, seconded by Greer, all
voted Yes to reject all bids
until a survey could be made
regarding need, storage, e.c.
Oscar Redd, President,
Wewahitchka Elementary
P.T.A., presented a letter re-
questing assistance from the
Board on various projects at
this center. On motion by Guil-
lot, seconded by Raffield, the
Board unanimously agreed to
advertise for bids on air con-
ditioning of all elementary
lunchrooms in the system.
On motion by Greer, second-
ed by Whitfield, all voted Yes
to accept the lowest bid of
Sunshine Dairyman's Coop.
for the lunchroom supplies.
On motion by Guillot,
seconded by Greer, the Board
unanimously accepted the low
bid of Flowers Baking Com-
pany for lunchroom bread
supplies.


The Board unanimously ac-
cepted the low and best bids
for foodstuff on motion by
Whitfield, seconded by Raf-
field, from Swift & Company,
Phillips Meat Company, Daf-
fin Mercantile, Tallahassee
Grocery, William E. Greene
and P. R. Harrell & Sons.
On motion by Greer, second-
ed by Whitfield, all voted Yes
to accept the highest bid of
Larry Wells on a used hot
water heater in the amount of
$25.00.
Copies of all bids are on file
in the Superintendent's office.
Motion was made by Greer,
seconded by Guillot, to ap-
point Hazel Nunnery as bus
driver in the Wewahitchka
area. All voted Yes.
All other recommendations
were unanimously tabled until
a special meeting August 12,
on motion by Guillot, seconded
by Greer.
Charles Gaskin, Board
Architect, met with the Board
to discuss the vocational build-
ing at Port St. Joe High
School. Motion was made by
Guillot, seconded by Raffield,
that the Board advertise for
bids on this construction at the
regular meeting September
14.
Motion was made by Greer,
seconded by Raffield, that the


Fiscal 1976-77 Budget City of Port St. Joe


ORDINANCE NO. 84
AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO THE APPROPRIA-
TION OF FUNDS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976-77 FOR THE
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FOR THE PURPOSE
OF PROVIDING FOR THE ORDINARY AND REGULAR
REQUIREMENTS OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE FOR
FISCAL YEAR 1976-77, DECLARING THE PASSAGE OF
SAID ORDINANCE TO BE AN EMERGENCY, AND
PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
WHEREAS, the City Commission is of the opinion that it
is necessary for the immediate protection and preservation
of the peace, safety, health and property of the City and its
inhabitants, and to provide for the usual daily operation of
the City and its departments that this Ordinance be enacted
and take effect immediately, therefore
BE IT ENACTED BY THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY OF
PORT ST. JOE:
Section I. There is hereby appropriated the sum of
$869,797.00 for the General Fund, the sum of $1,725,460.00 for
the Water & Sewer Fund and the sum of $2,478,411.00 for the
Wastewater Treatment Plant for Fiscal Year 1976-77 to be
used in the operation of said departments for the City of Port
St. Joe, Florida, as set forth in the Budget and Financial Plan
of said City on file with the City Auditor and Clerk.
Section II. The City Clerk is hereby authorized and
directed to publish a notice of this Ordinance as provided by
law, '
Section III. This Ordinance shall take effect immediately
upon adoption.
INTRODUCED at the Regular Meeting of the City Com-
mission on the 21st day of September, A.D. 1976, and
ADOPTED by the City Commission on the 21st day of
September, A.D. 1976, as an emergency Ordinance.
FRANK PATE,
Mayor-Commissioner
ATTEST:
Michael Wright,
City Auditor and Clerk

ORDINANCE NO. 85
AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO THE LEVY OF
TAXES IN THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, FOR
THE TAX YEAR 1976, LEVYING AN AD VALOREM TAX
OF 5.13 MILLS ON ALL REAL AND PERSONAL
PROPERTY WITHIN SAID CITY, WHICH IS NOT
EXEMPT UNDER LAW, FOR THE PURPOSE OF
PROVIDING FUNDS FOR THE ORDINARY AND REGU-
LAR REQUIREMENTS OF THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
FOR FISCAL YEAR 1976-77; PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE
DATE AND DECLARING THE ADOPTION OF SAID
ORDINANCE TO BE AN EMERGENCY.
WHEREAS, the City Commission is of the opinion that it
is necessary for the immediate protection and preservation
of the peace, safety, health and property of the City and its
inhabitants, and to provide for the usual daily operation of
the City and its departments, that this Ordinance be enacted
ind take effect immediately, therefore
BE IT ENACTED BY THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY OF
PORT ST. JOE:
Section I. That there be, and there is hereby, levied and
assessed upon all property, both Real and Personal, within
(the Corporate Limits of the City of Port St. Joe, not exempt
from taxation by the Constitution and Laws of the State of
Florida, the following Ad Valorem Taxes for the Year 1976.
A. A tax of 5.13 mills upon the dollar of assessed valua-
tion for the purpose of providing funds for the ordi-
nary and regular purposes of the City of Port St. Joe
Florida, for the Fiscal Year 1976-77; said valuation to
be based upon the Assessment Roll of said City as
previously approved and adopted.
Section II. This Ordinance shall take effect immediately
upon adoption.
INTRODUCED at the regular meeting of the City Com-
mission on the 21st day of September, A.D. 1976, and
ADOPTED by the City Commission on the 21st day of
September, A.D. 1976, as an emergency Ordinance.
FRANK PATE,
Mayor-Commissioner
ATTEST:
Michael Wright,
City Auditor and Clerk


NOTICE TO TAXPAYERS OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
Pursuant to Section 129.01, Florida Statutes, 1971,
NOTICE is hereby given that the Board of City Commis-
sioners, of Port St. Joe, Florida, has adopted a tentative
budget for the several City funds for the fiscal year beginning
October 1, 1976, and ending September 30, 1977; that said
Board will be in session on October 5, 1976, at 8:00 P.M., for
the purpose of hearing complaints from any person or
persons, firms or corporations that are dissatisfied with said
Budget, to-wit:
BOARD OF CITY COMMISSIONERS
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 1976,
and ENDING SEPTEMBER 30,1977
CONSOLIDATED BUDGET
GENERAL FUND, WATER & SEWER FUND AND
WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT FUND
ESTIMATED REVENUE
301 Real & Personal Property Taxes ....... $ 267,699.00


307
309
310
313
314
315
316
316A
318
319
320
322
323
324
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
344
344B

345
800
801
801A
802
803
804
805
806
807
815
820
821
823
825
1201
1202
1203
1204
1205A
1205B
1205C
1205D
1220


License Penalties .....................
Utility Tax ............. ...............
Occupational Tax ......................
Franchise Tax ................... .....
Cigarette Tax .........................
Fines & Forfeitures ...................
Parking Meter Receipts ..............
Parking Tickets .......................
Permits & Fees .......................
Road Tax ...........................
Garbage Fees .....................
Miscellaneous .............. ..........
Holly Hill Cemetery Lots ...............
Forest Hill Cemetery Lots .............
St. Jos. Fire Control District .........
St. Jos. Cemetery Sprinkler System ....
Dog License ...........................
Qualification Fees .....................
Gas Tax ................... .......
Federal Revenue Sharing ..............
Rain Storm Disaster Funds ..........
Hurricane Eloise Disaster Funds .......
Community Development Block Grant..
Interest Earned (Revenue) ..........
Interest Earned (Federal Revenue
Sharing) ...........................
Purchase Discounts .......... ....
Water Service ........................
Water Tapping Fees .................
Sewer Tapping Fees .................
Service Charge .................. .....
Delinquent Fees ....................
Sewer Service ......................
Sewer Connection Fees ..............
Sewer Laterals .......................
Hydrant Rent (40 percent) ...........
Miscellaneous ........................
Purchase Discounts .................
Federal Revenue Sharing .............
Interest Earned ......................
Transfer from Genera) Fund ..........
W-W Treatment Service .............
Debt Service Collection, Interest .......
Debt Service Collection, Prinicipal .....
Miscellaneous .........................
Interest Earned, Revenue .............
Interest Earned, Construction ........
INTEREST Earned, Escrow .........
Interest Earned, State Bond Loan ......
Purchase Discounts .................


100.00
40,000.00
15,000.00
24,000.00
95,000.00
2,000.00
5,000.00
2,000.00
1,500.00
20.00
45,000.00
6,000.00
3,500.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
-0-
100.00
140.00
34,000.00
92,372.00
-4-
-0-
-0-
11,000.00

2,500.00
1,600.00
150,000.00
1,500.00
500.00
500.00
1,500.00
60,000.00
10.00
70.00
24,000.00
2,000.00
250.00
---0
3,000.00
65,803.00
1,609,279.00
571,932.00
160,000.00
3,000.00
5,000.00
-0-
8,000.00
200.00
1,200.00


Sub-total ............................. $3,318,075.00
Cash Carried Forward (Revenue) ...... 355,593.00
Sub-total ................. ........... $3,673,668.00
FHA Loan ........................... 1,400,000.00
TOTAL ............................ $5,073,668.00

CONSOLIDATED BUDGET
GENERAL FUND, WATER & SEWER FUND AND
WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANTFUND
ESTIMATED EXPENSE


City Commission ..................... $
City Clerk's Office ...................
Municipal Court ..... ................
City Attorney ................. .......
Elections ..............................
Municipal Building ...................
Police Department ...................
Fire Department ......................
Streets & Highways ....................
Garbage & Trash Removal.............
Parks & Cemeteries ..............
Non-Departmental ..................
Contributions ..........................
Miscellaneous ............... ........
Warehouse & Garage .................
Contingencies .........................
General Depreciation ................
Tax Discount ..........................
Transfer to Water & Sewer Fund .......
Capital Outlay General Fund.........
Amortize Bond Discount .............
Water & Sewer Department ..........
Sewer Department ...................
Water Department ....................
Water Treatment Plant ..............
Depreciation .........................
M miscellaneous .........................
Long Term Debt ......................
Capital Outlay Water & Sewer Fund ... 1
Contingencies .........................
W-W Treatment Plant ................. 1
Contingencies .........................
Interest on Notes .....................
Principal on Notes ...................
State Bond Loan Admin. Expense ......
Capital Outlay Wastewater Treat-
m entPlant ..........................


Sub-total .......... .. ..........
Surplus ..............................
TOTAL ....................... .........


$5

$5


8,312.00
19,855.00
368.00
2,025.00
370.00
18,697.00
151,740.00
22,074.00
112,736.00
72,628.00
50,227.00
17,288.00
21,875.00
14,600.00
38,712.00
60,000.00
1,331.00
10,000.00
65,803.00
180,800.00
356.00
33,245.00
70,921.00
25,024.00
90,509.00
4,750.00
8,678.00
75,833.00
,406,500.00
10,000.00
,470,479.00
80,000.00
571,932.00
160,000.00
6,000.00

190,000.00
5,073,668.00
,073,668.00
5,073,668.00


Board offer property adjoin-
ing the baseball field to the
City of Port St. Joe for
$7,650.00 for the construction
of a water tower. All voted
Yes.
On motion by Raffield, sec-
onded by Greer, the Board
voted unanimously to approve
a request for funds under the
Comprehensive School Con-
struction and Debt Service
Fund in the amount of
$75,025.00. These funds are
being used to construct the
gymnasium at Wewahitchka
High School.
Temple Watson, Adminis-
trative Assistant, gave a re-
port on the coliseum roof at
Port St. Joe High School.
Motion was made by Greer,
seconded by Raffield, to ad-
vertise for bids for repairs to
this roof, and to notify the
Board Attorney to handle the
legal aspects of this roof
repair.
VII PROGRAM CONSI-
DERATIONS

The Superintendent pre-
sented a letter from the State
Department of Education re-
garding textbook monies. On
motion by Raffield, seconded
by Whitfield, all voted YES
that the board approve that
each school spend 25 percent
'of the state monies for text-
book related materials with
assurance that needs are met
at all schools.
On motion by Raffield, se-
conded by Whitfield, the board
unanimously approved Ricky
Woullard, a student at Port St.
Joe High School, attending a
United States Department of
Agriculture Forest Service
Conservation Corp Program
for high school credit.
The E.S.E.A. Title IV Pro-
gram which supplies equip-
ment and materials for teach-
ing of the handicapped was
unanimously approved on mo-
tion by Greer and seconded by
Whitfield.
Laura Geddie, Director of
Instruction, presented the'
Master Plan for Inservice
Training for 1976-77. On mo-
tion by Guillot, seconded by
Raffield, this plan was unani-
mously approved.
VIII PAYMENT OF BILLS
Payment of bills was placed
in the official minute book.

The Gulf County School
Board met in special session
on August 12, with the follow-
ing members present: Her-
man Ard, Chairman; Wallace
Guillot; Gene Raffield; J. K.
Whitfield; and Fred Greer.
The Superintendent was pre-
sent.
The Board received bids on
county-wide insurance cover-
age from: Tomlinson Abstract
Company, Gaskin-Graddy In-
surance Company and Hannon
Insurance Agency. On motion
by Greer, seconded by Guillot,
the Board unanimously
awarded the insurance as fol-
lows:
Tomlinson Abstract Com-
pany, Workman's Compensa-
tion, $11,983.00; Hannon In-
surance Agency, boiler and
machinery coverage, $2,-
132.00; Gaskin-Graddy Agen-
cy, blanket bond, crime and
burglary, buildings and con-
tents, vehicles and musical
instruments, $30,164.00.
Copies of all bids are on file
in the Superintendent's office.
Bill Yates, a representative
of Sun Life Insurance Com-
pany, presented a proposed
insurance packet to the Board
for their consideration. The
plan will be. presented to the
instructional staff for their re-
view.
Ray Smith, Band Director,
appeared before the Board to
discuss financial needs for the
music program at Port St. Joe
High School. The Board as-
sured Mr. Smith that funds
will be provided this year for
up-dating the entire program.
The bus routes for the
county were discussed. On
motion by Raffield, seconded
by Whitfield, all voted Yes to
approve these routes. Copies
of the routes are on file in the
Superintendent's office.
On motion by Raffield, sec-
onded by Greer, the Board un-
animously approved budget
amendments 1 to Part I, 1 to
Part II, 3 to Part III and 7 to
Part IV. These amendments
reflect a transfer in funds.


A proposed salary schedule
for 1976-77 was presented to
the Board. This matter was
tabled until a special meeting
August 19.
On recommendation of the
Superintendent, motion by
Greer, seconded by Guillot,
the Board unanimously ap-
proved the following person-
nel:
Highland View Elementary,
appoint Linda Lewis and Sara
Owens to annual contract;
Port St. Joe Elementary
School, appoint Phillis Bixler


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 30, 1976


and Martha Sanborn to annual
contract, appoint Betty Sue
Anchors to continuing con-
tract, accept Pauline McLen-
don's resignation;
Wewahitchka Elementary
School, appoint Flossie Prid-
geon and Sara Joe Wooten to
continuing contract and Linda
Joyce Husband to annual con-
tract;
Port St. Joe High School,
appoint Myrtle Howell on an-
nual contract and Betty Hines
on annual contract, appoint
James Wood to continuing
contract, accept resignation of
Karen Price;
Wewahitchka High School,
transfer Sharon Gaskin from
Port St. Joe Elementary to
Wewahitchka High School as
physical education teacher.
On motion by Whitfield,
seconded by Guillot, the Board
unanimously approved the
creation of an EMR teaching
position for Wewahitchka
High School. Recommenda-
tion for this position to be
forthcoming.
Non-instructional person
nel:
Wewahitchka Elementary,
appoint Patsy McDaniel,
Myrle Jones, Mary Frowiss,
Alane Redd, Gordon Alford,
John Bidwell, Mae Murphy,
Sandra Pridgeon, Veronica
Williams, Nancy Wilson, Ber-
tha Thomas, Viola Kemp, Yo-
lande Cook, Nervine Colvin,
Eva Flowers, Geraldine Wil-
liams, Wava Johnson, Wynell
Tate;
Wewahitchka High School,
appoint Patricia Stripling, Sue
Mathes, LaRue Huddleston,
Lester Gortman, Willie Glaze,
Ada Dozier, Janice Forehand,
George Cooper, Edna Alford,
Causie Griffin, Hazel Lister,
Katheryn King, Viella Rouse,
Bessie Smith, Betty Cleckley;
Highland View Elementary
School, Frances Shores, Marie
Anchors, Lou Eaker, Essie
Hall, Agnes Cumbie, Curtis
Watson, Sandra Brock, Dar-
lene Linton.
Port St. Joe Elementary
School, Helen Armstrong, Wil-
lie Ellis, Minnie Lovett, Rita
Todd, Easter Nichols, Georgia
Peak, Yvonne Atchison, Eve-
lyn Harcus, Teresa Johnson,
Helen Kilbourn, Juanita Pow-
ell, Ben Causey, Sarah Sweet,
Eloise Henderson, Doris Tul-
lis, Josephine Frazier, Frank-
lin Filmore, Tercie Causey;
Port St. Joe High School,
Connie Kirkland, Betty Bou-
ington, Brenda Wood, Virginia
Smith, Faye Lewis, Ina Mer-
ritt, Elizabeth Prows, Opal
Owens, Maggie Bell, Willie
Moore, Kate Kilbourn, Ollie
Neel, Faye Ford, Joyce Is-
aacks, Lucille Fleming, Bes-
sie Willie, Gladys McArdle,
Queen Pittman, Alma Bryant,
Stella Norris, Kerry Wilson,
Lyndon Thompson, Q. P.
Wise.
The Board voted to appoint
an additional administrative.
aide at Port St. Joe High
School. The vote was ap-
proved with Greer, Guillot,
Whitfield and Raffield voting
Yea and Ard Nay. This posi-
tion will be filled by Jean
Stebel.
Adult School, Mary McIn-
nis, Donna Waler, Gordon Mc-
Innis, Quan Nguyen, Eula
Dickery, Mary Elliott, Shirley
Williams, Barbara Wood;
County Office, appoint Caro-
lyn Nichols as Needs Assess-
ment Secretary. This will be a
temporary position.
On motion by Guillot, sec-
onded by Greer, all voted Yes
to request of the State Depart-
ment of Education a change in
the Project Priority List to
allow for the repair of the coli-
seum roof at Port St. Joe High


School.

The Gulf County School
Board met in special session
on August 19, with the fol-
lowipg members present:
Herman Ard, Chairman; Wal-
lace Guillot; Gene Raffield; J.
K. Whitfield and Fred Greer.
The Superintendent and At-
torney were present.
The invocation was given by
Guillot, and followed by the
pledge of allegiance.
On motion by Whitfield,
seconded by Guillot, the Board
voted unanimously to use the
same salary schedule as the
1975-76 school year for the pr-
esent, and to set up a special
meeting for August 27 at 9:30
a.m.
The annual report was re-
viewed by the Board. On
motion by Whitfield, seconded
by Greer, all voted Yes to
approve this report for trans-
mittal to the State Depart-
ment of Education for their
approval. Copies of this report
are on file in the Superintend-
ent's office.
There being no further busi-
ness, the Board adjourned to
meet again in special sessoin
on August 27, at 9:30 am.
EDT.

The Gulf County School
Board met in special session
on August 27 with the follow-
ing members present: Her-
man Ard, Chairman; J. K.
Whitfield; Wallace Guillot;
Gene Raffield and Fred
Greer. The Superintendent
was present.
The invocation was given by
Guillot, and followed by the
pledge of allegiance.
Motion was made by Raf-
field, seconded by Guillot, that
the Board accept the proposed
salary schedule at a five per-
cent increase with at least a
base pay of $2.30. This motion
and second failed and the


PAGE ELEVEN


Save Box

Tops for

School

Port St. Joe Elementary
School has started a collection
drive aimed at acquiring new
and much needed equipment.
The equipment will be pro-
vided by Post Cereal brands of
the General Foods Corpora-
tion in exchange for Post
Cereal box tops.
Jim Ryun, former world re-
cord holder for the mile, is the
Special Projects Director for
this program. Ryun is a long-
time supporter of good school
athletic programs.
Only the portion of the box
top that nicludes the Post
"Freshness Date" will -be
accepted as a valid proof of
purchase. The collection pro-
gram began October 1, and
will continue through March
31, 1977.
Please turn box tops in to
Coach Floore or Coach Taun-
ton at the Elementary School.

motion withdrawn.
On motion by Guillot, sec-
onded by Whitfield, all voted
Yes to a five percent salary
increase for non-instructional
personnel, except administra-
tive personnel, after a base of
at least $2.30 per hour.
Motion was made by Whit-
field, seconded by Guillot, that
a salary increase of three
percent be given administra-
tive personnel. All voted Yes.
There being no further busi-
ness, the Board adjourned to
meet again in regular session
September 14, at 9:00 A.M.
EDT.
Herman Ard, Chairman
Attest: J. David Bidwell,
Superintendent


First United

Methodist Church
Constitution and Monument
Port St. Joe, Fla.
JOHNIE W. McCURDY, Minister

CHURCH SCHOOL ......................... 9:45 A.M.
PREACHING SERVICE ......... 11 A.M. &.7:00 P.M.
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP .... 6:30 P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) ...... 7:30 P.M.

--------hv-- ------ --- -----

FIRST BAPTIST

CHURCH
Corner Third Street and Baltzell Avenue
Rev. Bill Heaton, Pastor


Sunday School .................. .. ..
Morning Worship Serice ..............
Church Training .....................
Evening Worship Service ............
Prayer Meeting (Wed.) ................


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
6:30 P.M.
7:30 P.M.
7:00 P.M.


"Come and Worship God with Us"



You Are Cordially Invited to Attend


LONG AVENUE

Baptist Church

Corner Long Ave. and 16th St.


SUNDAY SCHOOL ...................
MORNING WORSHIP ................
CHURCH TRAINING. ................
EVENING WORSHIP .................
PRAY E R MEETING (Wednesday) ....


Rev. J. C. Odum,
Pastor


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
6:15 P.M.
7:30 P.M.
7:15 P.M.


Jerome Cartier,
Minister of Music


SAVE


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JOIN THE HUNDREDS OF WINNERS IN YOUR HOMETOWN


V


Sale Prices Effective
Sept. 30 Oct. 2
.


Mrs. Hildbold presents $100 to Ruth Hendrix.


,' \ \ 111 ,
'i "" v \ e "

M g '- a: .d

Margie Carr accepts $100 check from Mrs. Hildbold.


STANDARD GRADE Limit 2 bags
w/$10 order
FRESH WHOLE
FR ERSpacked
to bag
FRYERS lb.


Swift's Premium Beef
bone-in, full cut

ROUND STEAK


$


lb.


29


SLAB BACON Lb. (I
sII i


Swift's Premium Beef
CUBE 39
STEAK Lb.
5 Lbs. or More Fresh Lean
GROUND
BEEF Lb. 69
Swift's Premium Blade
CHUCK
ROAST Lb.69
Swift's Premium Beef
CHUCK
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Swift's Premium Beef $239
RIB EYE STEAKS LB..


Swift's Premium
PORK Lb.
CHOPS Center Cut
Swift's Premium Beef 8c
SHOULDER ROAST lb.0


Swift's Premium Beei
RUMP ROAS
Fresh Lean Boston Bu
PORK
ROAST


B. $129


Ib.
lb. "C


Sliced
BEEF Ib.
LIVER
Hormel i2 Oz. Pkg.
BEEF WETNERS


79c


Selected
RED lb.


Meadow Gold $109
ICE CREAM only
HALF GALLON CARTON


$ 29


Bounty jumbo o00
PAPER TOWELS rolls I


Half Gallon plastic
Piggly Wiggly1
BLEACH
48 Oz. Bottle
WESSON OIL


Hunt's
TOMATO
Hunt's
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u 15 oz.7s2c
SAUCE cans O1


PASTE


12 oz.,7c
can J5


1000 Island 8 oz.A c
KRAFT DRESSING btle.
French 16 oz. O
KRAFT DRESSING btle. 07


Gillette 9 ct. $I9
TRAC II CARTRIDGES I
With Baby Powder
Soft & Dri only 84c
ANTI-PERSPIRANT
Super, Scented Or Unscented
Soft & Dri only 84c
ANTI-PERSPIRANT


Johnson's
BABY LOTION


9 oz. $119
size I


Carnation
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--


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P