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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02133
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 23, 1976
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02133

Full Text







& *


Industry Deep Water Port Fine People Safest Beaches in Florida

FORTIETH YEAR, NUMBER 4 PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1976


S w


15 Cents Per Copy


S..,g I |Tab Comes to $431,021.50


City Contracts forNew





SWater Storage Tank


PRESENTING TROPHIES-At the Boy Scout charter Kitchens, Perry McFarland, Ray Eberlee, Eric Hammond
award Thursday were, left to right: Ted Cannon, Bill and David Horton. -Star photo



Boy Scouts Receive 35th Charter


Port St. Joe's Boy and Cub
Scout Troops, number 47 re-
ceived their 35th annual re-
newal of their charters last
Thursday, as area profes-
sional scoUters from the Lake
Sands District presented the
charters to the Rotary Club,
the sponsoring organization.
Ray Eberlee, unit advisor of


the Lake Sands District, re-
marked that the Port St. Joe
troop is the largest continuous
troop in the entire district. He
also had good things to say
over the re-organization of the
troop after a period of time
being in.limbo.

Bill Kitchens, chapter advi-


sor for the district made the
presentation of the charters to
Rotary Club president, Ted
Cannon. Cannon immediately
turned the charters over to
Boy Scout leaders Eric Ham-
mond and David Horton and to
Cubmaster Perry McFarland.
Cannon stated, "I am proud
of David, Perry and Eric are


giving their time and efforts to
the scouting program. It's
such a needed activity for
young boys to participate in".

Cannon and Rotary youth
chairman, Jerry Sullivan
started making plans to guide
the club in renovating the
Scout Hut on 10th Street.


Lively Interest In Voting


Gulf County voters will go to
the polls Tuesday, facing an
abbreviated ballot but with a
magnified interest.
In the first primary, three
weeks ago, the voters had a
relatively large ballot to make
their selections from. Now
that the field has been nar-
rowed down to only eight
contests, the interest has
grown considerably.
While every race on the
ballot has engendered a great


School

Night for

Scouting

The Boy Scouts of America
will hold their big "School
Night for Scouting" program
Thursday night at 7:30 p.m. at
Port St. Joe Elementary
School. All boys interested in
joining the Boy Scout program
should attend and bring your
mother and father, or at least
one parent.
Boys can join either Cub
Scouting (age 8-9), the Webe-
los Scouts (age 10) or the Boy
Scouts (age 11 and older)
according to your age. Bring
$2.50 to join.
The Boy Scouts of America
is a lot of fun. You'll enjoy
doing things like swimming,
carping out, canoeing, arche-
ry and rifle shooting, cooking
out over a fire, making mon-
ey, entering contests, taking
part in Indian dances and
ceremonies and big scout
shows, plus a million other
things.
Come to the school Thurs-
day night at 7:30 p.m. to join
the biggest gang in the
world...The Boy Scouts of
America.


We Made A

Boo-Boo
The gremlins got in our type
- setter last week and transpos-
ed the vote count in the County
Commission, District One
race.
The Star reported Jimmy
Gortman had 1,603 votes and
Rudy Pippin, 1,662.
The correct count was 1,063
for Gortman and 1,662 for
Pippin.


amount of interest for-those
involved, the two which have
had the most widespread in-
terest among voters are the
races for Sheriff and Super-
intendent of Schools. While
these two races generated a
bit of feeling in the first
primary, they have wound up
to a peak of interest produc-
tion.
Gulf sent just over 60 per-
cent of its 6,444 registered
voters to the polls during the
first primary. Chances are the
percentage will be even higher
during the second round, pro-
vided the weather is clear.
The winners of this round
will be elected here in Gulf
County, since there are no
Republican candidates trying
for any of the county posts in
the November general elec-
tion. After this one is over,
political pundits may focus all
their attention on the Presi-
dential contest.
CANDIDATES
Those on the ballot next
Tuesday, in the eight contests
to be decided include:
State Senator-Dempsey J.
Barron and Travis P.. Mar-
chant.
Sheriff-Raymond Law-
rence and K. E. "Ken" Mur-
phy.
Superintendent of Schools-
Ronald Wayne Childers and


Walter Wilder.
County Commission, Dis-
trict One-Jimmy Gortman
and F. R. "Rudy" Pippin, Jr.
County Commission, Dis-
trict 5-Leo Kennedy and
Eldridge Money.
School Board, District 3-
James Hanlon and Paul
"Sousehead" Sewell.
School Board, District 4-
Herman Ard and Waylon Gra-
ham.


Justice of the Supreme
Court, Group 1-Charles R.
Holley and Frederick B. Karl.
VOTING PLACES
Polls will be open Tuesday
from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.,
local time. Polls in the Central
time zone in the county will
open an hour later and be open
an hour later than those in the
Eastern zone.
Polling places will be the
same as they were in the first
primaries.


Minister of Music, Youth

Coming to First Baptist

The First Baptist Church
announced this week that a
new minister of music and
youth has joined the staff of
the church.
Stanley E. Young, a 28 year
old native of Lyons, Ga., will
join the church staff the.first
Sunday in October to fill the
vacancy left by the resigna-
tion of George Puckett.
Young is a graduate of
Brewton Parker Junior Col-
lege at Mt. Vernon, Ga., where
he majored in voice. He also
graduated from Baptist Bible
Institute with a degree in
music, education and theolo-
gy.
He and his wife Drenda will
STANLEY E. YOUNG be living at 524 Seventh Street.


The City Commission ten-
tatively agreed to sign con-
tracts for a total of $431,021.50
Tuesday afternoon to con-
struct a new 500,000 gallon
water storage tank, to replace
an old, badly worn 100,000
gallon tank now in service.
In addition, the job will call
for extending the main water
line to the tank and extending
water mains to Oak Grove and
a six inch line to the Port St.
Joe High School property.
The tank will be located
near the baseball stadium on
Long Avenue, in the vicinity of
the schools and should give
considerably better water
pressure in the southern sec-
tion of the City. In addition, it
will provide enough pressure
to serve Oak Grove, the
schools and give the City more
insurance of maintaining wa-
ter service in times of trouble
through an increased storage
capacity.
The main contract of $364,-
100 will be signed with Pitts-
burgh-Des Moines Steel Com-
pany of Atlanta, Ga., for
construction of the new tank
pending approval of Farmer's
Home Agency, the lending
agency for the project. Also
included in the bid is the
razing of the old tank to be
taken out of service.
A second bid of $67,921.50
will be awarded to Rusty
Plumbing Company of Sara-
sota pending the same appro-
val from FHA. This contract
will pay for the piping work
and extension of the water
lines to Oak Grove and the
high school area.
Construction time for the
tank construction is estimated
at 240 days and the piping.
work is expected to take 150
days.
Smith and Gillespie En-
gineers of Jacksonville is the
designing engineer on the
project.
INSURANCE BIDS
The City Commission took
bids Tuesday night on the
insurance needs of the City for
the coming year and appear-
ances are that the City's
insurance bill for the coming
year will be in the neighbor-
hood of $65,000 for complete


coverage.
The final amount of the
insurance bill cannot be de-
termined until the bids have
been tabulated and interpret-
ed and the business given to
the various bidders.
Of five firms making bids on
the City's insurance needs, no
one firm bid on' all items
requested. About the only item
all firms seemed to be inter-
ested in was the Workman's
Compensation insurance,
which three firms bid at
around $25,300 each. There
was only $38.00 difference in
the three bids for Workman's
Compensation.
Only one bid was received
on coverage for buildings and
property owned by the City.
This bid was for $10,385.00.


APPROVE BUDGET
The Commission approved
the City's budget for the
coming fiscal year Tuesday
night, giving their nod to a
budget of $5,073,668.00. Of this


amount, $1.4 million is includ-
ed as a special fund to pay for
the new water tank construc-
tion approved Tuesday night
and enlarging and improving
(Continued on Page 2)


County Awarded $5,500


for Boating Facilities

The Governor and Cabinet Tuesday awarded Gulf
County more than $5,500 in funds from the Florida Boating
Improvement Program for construction of a boat ramp and
parking facility.
According to Harmon Shields, executive director of the
Department of Natural Resources, the ramp will be located
at the end of State Road 22 at the Apalachicola River. Plans
also call for parking facilities near the 24-foot wide ramp;
Shields said.
Funding for the project, which totals $5,524, will be
administered by DNR's Division of Recreation and Parks.


Charges of Unfair Labor


Practices Made of City
A charge of engaging in St. Joe this week by the sons for taking the action. The
unfair labor practices was Laborers' Local No. 1306, charge notice was signed by
filed against the City of Port AFL-CIO, citing several rea- R. O. Scherer, representative
of the union.


Hospital Program Recognized


Municipal Hospital has been
formally recognized by the
American Hospital Associa-
tion as an active participant in
a program to more effectively
monitor cost management.
The program involves the
sharing of cost data submitted
by nearly 3,000 health care
institutions as a means for


these facilities to compare
their own cost control effec-
tiveness with others of similar
size.
Municipal Hospital has been
taking part in the AHA-spon-
sored program since 1970;
"We have found the data
information supplied by the


program to be an excellent
management tool in evaluat-
ing our cost containment ef-
forts," said David Dunham,
administrator. "By keeping
abreast of what other health
care institutions are doing in
cost areas, we are better able
to adjust our own procedures
accordingly."


.-- -

manhole sticking up above the roadbed on Westcott Circle where the road is under
R ash of W recks W rack R region construction. In the photo at right is the car which Charles Costin smashed into a pine tree last
J Friday night. Young Costin failed to stop at the end of Long Avenue and ran across Highway 98,
Two of the three automobile wrecks in the area this past week happened in these two striking a pine tree. Costin apparently came upon the stop sign before he realized it and
cars. In the photo above at left is the auto Mrs. Roy Burch was driving when she ran over a couldn't stop in time. He has a broken nose to remind him the sign is there.


Specifically, the action lists
the following charges against
the City:
"We had an election on
February 4, 1976, and on
March 8, 1976, we asked the
City of Port St. Joe, to start
negotiations with Local No.
1306. As of this date we have
had six negotiation meetings,
and have agreed on one point
only. This is bulletin board
privileges.
"We have filed a number of
unfair labor practices against
the City for its employees, as
they have no grievance proce-
dure.
"Something has come up
between the City and the
employees and the City is now
accusing the union of black-
mail.
"The City has now fired
nine (9) of their employees
because of their union activi-
ty."
The City has in fact released
nine of its employees at the
Wastewater Treatment plant,
in a force reduction move,
according to City Clerk Mike
Wright, acting as spokesman
for the City. The employees
were released this week on a
seniority basis. The official
City answer pointed out the
extra employees were hired to
work out bugs in the new plant
and get it operating properly.
In its design, engineers stipu-
lated the plant could be oper-
ated with a force of 24.
The plant now will have a
work force of 29 men after the
force reduction has been ac-
complished.


I










PAGE TWO THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 23, 1976
--- -- -------


K. Small


-THE STAR -
PubloW d Every Thurday at 3WUtll*t Avnue, Port St. JoI. Florida
By The Star Publshlea Co.epny
second-.c a PostageF Pat at Port St. Joe, Florida 3 as
W sltey R Ramsey .......................... ............... Editor and Publisher
Willlam H. Ramsy ......................................... .Production Supt.
Frenc e L Ram ey ................................................: Office Manager
SNhil y K. Ram ey......................................... TypesettersSubscriptios
POSTOFFICE BOX 30 PHONE 227-3161
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA32456

SECONDCLASS POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA 3246

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ArVANCE r
IN COUNTY-ONE YEAR, U5.0 SIX MOS., S3.00 THREE MOS.. $127.50
OUT OF COUNTY--O* Yer. s4. OUT OF U..-One Year, $7.00

TO AOVERTISIE --l Case o error Of omissions In advrtlisemnts, th publishers do not hold themelve liable
for dan ea Iurher un a ount received sor such dverlismaent.

ThR Spoh n word Is given Kat attntlon; h printed word is thoughtfully weighed. he spoken word barely
*sertsj the printed word thoroughly convinces. The s0ken word is lost; the printed word remains.
Sf----------- i~~ --9---->---- .t-----'ry'9 '-'--A;K *S WK~



EDITORIALS:





| County Governments


Need Good Managers

Election day coming up next body at all times. Government is s
i'Tuesday and an article in the papers big and complex these days that thi
iast week sort of complimented each just isn't so. It takes constant
other for us, and emphasized our vigilence or onecan spend hi
editorial before the last primary, government into the poor house. I
;saying we need to be selective about doesn't take too many of these
iwho we choose to run our govern- "things" we think we would like t
mentall bodies, have, which cost just a few dollar
SThe article in the papers said the each year, until we are in a position
i3ty of Monroe, Louisiana was broke of not being able to pay. It's mud
:Ond couldn't pay their employees or like buying things on the installmen
Their bills. with your own personal budget
How can a city go broke, one except on a larger scale.
.iiay ask. With taxing power and This matter, coupled with ou:
inillions of dollars going into public habits of voting for friends or those
funds each and every year from our we like as opposed to the one who
iieavy tax levies, how can a city or can do the best job is a constant
other governmental subdivision go worry to us. It'smore of a worry due
broke? to the fact we vote in this manner on
- It's easy, if there isn't someone every level of government.
iiianaging all this money who is' We're not saying a person should
capable of managing-:,it? '. have a lot of money"to be a public
;: It's :true govfithemnts these servant. What we are saying is tha
days handle a lot of money. Our he should have the reputation o
:governments here in Gulf County being able to manage his own affair
iach handle over $3 million each properly, keeping his financial af
year. That's a lot of money and fairs in order and managing his
;should be enough to keep anybody household or business on a sourn
fiom going broke. basis. If he is capable of doing this
SThe sad truth is that it's easier he is capable of managing youi
to go broke with this much money public affairs.
than it is with just a little bit. With so Use a little restraint when yoi
much money, one may tend to think go to the polls Tuesday, or we too
they have plenty to favor every little could be like Monroe, Louisiana -
request which comes before their broke!




Dog Problem


It seems we are hearing more
complaints than ever about dogs
roaming the streets of Port St. Joe.
This is not only a problem in the
City, but throughout the county.
Roaming, big and vicious dogs are
becoming more and more of a
problem.
It has been ignored or tolerated
for too long.
We think the City needs to step
up its present preparations being
made to take care of this problem
and the county, too, should become
concerned before we have an unfor-
tunate incident happen here due to
dogs which aren't cared for proper-
ly.
While this is a problem which
government should face, we think
the dog owners have a duty and
responsibility to see that their dogs


LETTERS. .

to the Editor


Sept. 15,1976
Dear Editor:
:I would like to leave this
thought with the voters.
: You have been told by one of
the Senate candidates that
your auto insurance rates
would go down on October 1,
1976. I just received my insur-
ance statement, which is due
October 1, 1976, and it has
increased $90.00.
SLet your conscience be your
guide when you start to vote.
Sincerely,
Clyde M. Melvin


are kept from being a nuisance or
threat to their neighbors. If a person
has a dog which"they know to be
mean or destructive, they should.
take steps to see that it doesn't
bother other people. No doubt those
people with this kind of dog have
received complaints.
If the dog owners were being
bothered by the dogs of others, they
would properly expect the owner to
take care of the situation.
Dogs are fine pets, but when
they become a nuisance to others,
this should be a concern of the
owner.
It's unfortunate that govern-
ment should have to be called in to
take care of this problem. Those
causing it should be more than
willing to see that their pet isn't a
bother to others.


(Continued from Page 1)


Water Tank

the water treatment plant.
The operating budget is still
$3.6 million as reported three
weeks ago.
A breakdown of the budget
shows, $869,797.00 for the Gen-
eral Fund, $1,725,460.00 for the
Water and Sewer Department
(which contains the $1.4 mil-
lion construction fund), and
$2,478,411.00 for operation of
the Wastewater Treatment
plant.
Millage levied to finance the
budget was set at 5.13, which
will bring in the same num-
ber of tax dollars as last
year's levy of 5.14 mills.


September 3, 1976
Dear Mr. Ramsey:
I would like to take this
opportunity to thank you for
the excellent coverage given
in The Star leading up to and
during the open house of the
Gulf County Guidance Clinic.
We appreciate your efforts in
making it a successful event.
Sincerely,
William F. Lyles
President, Board of Directors
Gulf County Guidance Clinic
Read the Classifieds


Mulberry

Manager
Kenneth S. Small, the son of
Mr. and Mrs. George Small of
Port St. Joe, has been retained
by the City of Mulberry as
their City Manager, effective
this week. Small was chosen
from a field of 78 applicants
for the position in the central
Florida city.
Small, who is 23 years of
age, now has the distinction of
being the youngest City Man-
ager in the State of Florida.
Prior to taking the position
in Mulberry, Small had work-
ed here in Port St. Joe, with
the City, as administrative
assistant. His main responsi-
bility was in administration of
federal programs and grants:
in which the City of Port St.
Joe was involved.
Small has a degree from
Florida State University, with
study emphasis in govern-
mental economics, business
management and accounting.
Small was formally hired by
the Mulberry City Commis-
sion at their regular meeting
on Tuesday night of last week.


Supporters


Adopt
o
s Theme
it
S Ford has a better idea.
t President Gerald Ford, that
e is.
He and his Florida staff
0 want to make it simple for you
S Democrats and Republicans
n and Independents alike to
h find out whatever it is you
t need to know.
Or maybe just to get a Ford
, bumper sticker.
So the Florida President
r Ford Committee wants you to
e call and have made it as
o simple as possible.
The Ford state headquar-
ters telephone number in Tal-
e lahassee is (904) 222-"FORD".
n Easy to remember. Easy to
dial.
The "better idea" was the
brainchild of James Sebesta,
S executive director for the
t Florida President Ford Com-
f mittee.

S He's got nothing against
Chevrolet or Cadillac or
Volkswagen.
s Not even Cougar or Mus-
d tang.
But they simply won't fit Ma
r Bell's numbering system.
FORD does...and isn't that
simpler than 222-3672?
U And that ain't peanuts....uh,
, hay.


How to


Warm


A Dock!

Have you ever been to a "Dock
Warming? Do you know what they do at a
"Dock Warming?" No? Then we can tell
you.
At a dock warming you warm a dock,
just like you warm a house at a house
warming. One thing different though: at a
dock warming you eat raw oysters on the
half shell and boiled shrimp.
The authority on dock warming in
this area seems to be Jimmy McNeill of
Indian Pass Seafood Company. He had one
for his new shrimp dock at Indian Pass last
Thursday and eat shrimp and oysters is
what they did. Nobody even took a glance
at the new dock.
In this photo, George Core and Bubba
Gander, whose best half face is in the
extreme foreground, show how you eat
oysters at a dock warming. -Star photo


* ^ :K;


ETAOIN SHRDLU

By WESLEY R. RAMSEY


We have some fine facilities for various
activities here in Port St. Joe; facilities we can
justly be proud of. We have some fine school
buildings, which are the envy of many another
community, we have fine churches, stately and
serviceable government buildings such as the
City Hall and the Courthouse, not to mention the
Stac House, Centennial Building, etc. We have
nice parks for our children, reasonably well
equipped and some of the best baseball and
softball facilities in the Big Bend. As a matter of
fact, other communities in the Bend and
Panhandle are just now starting to catch up to
what we have had for years. I know we all
appreciate what we have and enjoy their 'useto
the fullest. ,
We have most of everything, except toilets
which will flush and run off into the sewer at the
football stadium,
The toilets at the football have been a shame
and disgrace ever since the stadium was built
several years ago. Recent renovations at the
stadium didn't remedy this situation one little
bit. Now, rather than one or two toilets to run
over into the rest room floors, flooding them, like
we had with the old facilities, we now have


FBI Agent Tells Rotary


Release

Art Newhass, an FBI agent
from Jacksonville said most of
his organization favored ex-
tended jail sentences for
habitual criminals in a speech
before the Port St. Joe Rotary
Club last Thursday.
Newhass said most law
officers can predict what two
thirds of the jailed criminals
will do when they get out of
jail on some type of release
program. "Two thirds of those
arrested for criminal acts are
repeaters", the agent said.
One disturbing statistic the


Kiwaniar


the GCC(

Dr. Larry Tyree, president
of Gulf Coast Junior College,
told the Gulf Coast story to the
Kiwanis Club Tuesday, using
a slide presentation to aug-
ment his rendition of what the
college had to offer for citizens
of this area.
Dr. Tyree said the school
offers a well-rounded curricu-
lum, with something for all
ages. He emphasized this
claim by pointing out that the
college is now serving over
10,000 people in full time and
night classes, in addition to
the many community services
programs the institution of-
fers.
He pointed out that the
school has the latest equip-
ment to use in dispersing their
subject matter.
while the college offers a
two year program, he pointed
out that some students grad-
uate with degrees in much less
time by taking special ex-
aminations: others go on and


Programs Failing

enforcement officer gave the gave an incidence in Jackson-
Rotary club was that there are ville where a concentrated
5,283 serious crimes committ- operation was conducted
ed each year for every 100,000 against a criminal activity in
people living in the United that city. A few months later
States. "Every 31 seconds the same operation was per-
someone is either robbed, formed and nearly half those
murdered, raped or assault- apprehended the second time
ed", the agent said. were still out on parole or
The agent went out on a limb awaiting trial for the first
and said, "Release programs round-up.
are not working. In many Newhass suggested that all
cases-nearly half-the ser- criminal acts should be tried
ious crimes committed are and all sources of appeal given
committed by a person out on a time limit of not over nine
a release program". He months from the date of the
performance of the criminal
act. "Swift and sure justice is
TT needed to properly punish the
iS n ear criminal and protect the in-
nocent", he said.
-n S The agent stated, "The ha-
Storybitual criminal, who commits
S y two-thirds of our crimes, con-
siders the manner of punish-
on for years, taking courses ment so minimal as to be no
and earning various degrees, deterrent to his illegal activi-
Dr. Tyree also said, "We offer ties."
schooling to a large number of Newhass offered his own
veterans", solution to the rising crime
The college president point- rate as being a strengthening of
ed out that Gulf Coast offered the family ties. "Keeping the
some of the least expensive family together and loving is
exposure to higher learning the key to keeping potential
available in Florida. "For criminals from becoming
instance", he said, "A student criminals", he said. The agent
can take a full time load at said one could almost spot the
Gulf Coast for around $250.00 a future criminal element from
semester, plus eating and an early age. "This 'find
living expenses. If he lives in yourself and do your own
Port St. Joe, he can ride back thing' liberal thought of today
and forth to classes everyday s doingnothing but fostering
on our bus free of charge." criminal activity", Newhass
declared.
The speaker pointed out that Guests of the club were
the institution is working hand Keyettes Angela Harvey and
in hand with the University of Valerie Wynn; Dr. Richard
West Florida to make a four Morley of Beacon Hill, Mr.
year degree available in Pan- Harris of Houston, Texas,
ama City in many subjects. Russ Barber, Dayton, Ohio
Guests of the club were lan and Scout executives Bill Kit-
Barker of GCCC and Key chens, Ray Eberlee, Eric
Clubbers, Jerri Lewis, Sissy Hammond, Perry McFarland
Lowery and Ronald St. John. and David Hortion.


several toilets to run over and flood the rest room
floors.
To be real candid about the situation, I have
never been in the rest rooms at the football
stadium. But, where I haven't, hundreds of
others have at every football game. It seems
that after every game, I hear somebody
grumbling about the restroom facilities at our
stadium.
I don't know what is wrong with them. I do
think they should be fixed, permanently, before
the next home football game. It's embarras-
sing to have visitors come to Port St. Joe's
stadium and be forced to remember us as that
place.where you haye to hike up your britches
legs and wade intthe-resrooms. .

Writing about this river which comes up in
the rest rooms at the football stadium at every
game reminds me of something I read in the
papers the other day. Did you know the northern
lumbering firms are quitting their practice of
rafting logs down the river to the mill? It seems
skidders and log trucks have been introduced to
the north woods to take over that chore. Too, the
north woods lumberjack is fading from the
scene; a victim of changes in the way of doing
things. The north has also discovered the
tree-cutting machine which trims the limbs from
the tree, snips it off at the bottom and lays it in
the truck.
I wonder where the north woodsmen have
been all these years? We have had the tree
cutting machine, skidders and log trucks for
years.
Stretching the subject a bit, one could
wonder when the ecology boys will get to the
point of outlawing skidders, wood trucks and tree
cutters. They are making the wood cutter a
dying species and they are in the business of
seeing that species don't die even if their dying
is an improvement.

I see where Pat Moynihan has defeated Bella
Abzug as the Democratic nominee for the Senate
in New York.
That's a pity: I'm going to miss Bella's
floppy hats and fog horn voice on TV ... almost
as much as I miss a tooth ache.

There are times when Frenchie tries to get
my attention around my newspaper at night, like
saying "Yoo Hoo, I'm home, I'm here too!" Of
course I knew it all the time, I was just reading.
I know you men and ladies have that trouble
too. The men like to relax for a few minutes and
read the paper, a book or a magazine and the
women want to rattle about this and that.
Even though things get touchy and the ladies
think they are being ignored, they're really not;
at least not as much as one man from
Montgomery I read about the other night during
one of those times Frenchie was saying, "Yoo
hoo". This fellow started on a trip with his wife
and stopped for gas. His wife said she was going
to the rest room while they were stopped.
After he paid for the gas the man got back in
the car and drove off. He drove and drove for five
hours before he noticed his wife wasn't in the car
with him.
Now, I may be guilty of shutting Frenchie
out for a while at night while reading the paper,
but I find it hard to believe I could be off on a trip,
leave her at a service station and not realize it
until five hours later.
The lady who was left found that hard to
believe, too. She hinted the man was going to eat
what he cooked for himself for a while after that
little episode.













.I Bowling



.N News

L-m -- mm


Thursday Nite Ladies' League
On Lanes one and two, HV
Motors won four games from
Tic's. Joyce Gainous bowled a
134 game and a 357 series for
HV Motors. Joan Peterson led
Tic's with a 109 game and a 309
series.
On lanes three and four,
Renfro won four games from
Bowen's Cow Girls. Vicki
McNeil and Cathy Blackburn
each bowled a 153 game and
Cathy had a 422 series for
Renfro. Arlene McCullough
bowled a 151 game and a 369
series for Bowen's Cow Girls.
Trudy Pate and Sandy Wood
each picked up 5-7 split.
On lanes five and six, Ralph
and Henry's won four games
from Surefoots. Susan Bige-
low had a 146 game and a 401
series for Ralph and Henry's.
Wanda Pate bowled a 131
game and a 388 series for
Surefoots.
On lanes seven and eight,
Loonies won four games from
Red Hot Mamas. Sue Parrish
had a 16a game and a 391
series for Loonies. Ruby Wil-
son bowled a '59 game and a
377 series for Red Hot Mamas.
Standings: W L
Renfro 8 0
Ralph & Henrys 8 0
Loonies 6 2
HV Motors 5 3
Bowen's Cowgirls 3 5
Surefoots 1 7
Red Hot Mamas 0 8
Tics 0 8


Winter Mixed League
The Winter Mixed League
started the 1976-77 bowling
season Tues. Sept. 14.
Whammos woi. three games
from Team 2 on lanes one and
two. Bertha Clayton bowled a
201 game and a 521 series for
Whammos. James Hicks led
Team 2, with a 178 game atdr a
507 series.
On lanes three and four,
Team 3 and Team 4 split two
games each. Cathy Howell
bowled a 159 game and a 458
series for Team 3. Duke Jones
had a 169 game and a 442
series for Team 4.
On lanes five and six, Team
6 won three games from
Fiesta Food Store of Mexico
Beach. Larry Brooks bowled a
212 game and a 496 series for
Team 6. Bill Henderson had a
182 game and a 483 series for
Fiesta.
On lanes seven and. eight,
Sylvachem won four games
from Team 8. Shirley Hicks
led Sylvachem with a 179
game and a 495 series. Daryl
Parker had a 149 game and a
395 series for Team 8.
Standings: W L
Sylvachem 4 0
Whammos 3 1
Team 6 3 1
Team 3 2 2
Team 4 2 2
Fiesta Food Store 1 3
Team 2 1 3
Wed. Night Ladies' League
Highland View Superettes


PRESCRIPTION SERVICE

FAST AND FRIENDLY














We have the latest in prescrip-
tion drugs with fast service. We
also maintain a complete record
of your prescription purchases
and can furnish you with a copy
instantly for income tax pur-
poses.



Smith's Pharmacy

Drive-In Prescription Window at Rear
Phone 227-5111
BI- manti a- copee eod


maintained their hold on first
place by winning four games
from Pate's. Mary Brown
rolled a 183 game and a 509
series to pace the Superettes.
Pate's had Peggy Heacock
high bowler with a 162 game
and a 436 series.
Jo O'Barr was high for the
St. Joe Furniture team with a
468 series thus enabling them
to take four games from Pepsi
Cola. Pepsi Cola had Toby
Gray bowling a 394 series.
The Alley Kats won four
games from the Playgirls.
Marian Deeson had a 175
game and a 478 series to pace
the Kats. Sydney Taylor bowl-
ed a 162 game and a 443 series
for the Playgirls.
C & G won three games from
Fla. Bank. Pat Hanna rolled a
549 series for C & G.Verna
Burch paced the Bank with a
441 series.


Standings:
H. V. Superettes
St. Joe Furniture
Alley Kats
Play Girls
Florida Bank
C&G
Pate's
Pepsi Cola


W L
8 0
6/2 1/
5'/ 21/2
3 5
3 5
3 5
2 6
1 7


Gulf County Men's League
The men's league got under-
way Monday night and the
bowling went as follows:
Shirt & Trophy drew a bye
due to the absence of an eighth
team.
On lanes three and four it
was Campbell's Drug Store
taking three from Ten Pin
Lounge. Glen Williams led
Campbell's with his 550 series.
Steve Wombles was high for
Ten Pin with a 406 series,
Lanes five and six had
Butler's Restaurant taking
four from Carr's Auto and
Gas. Harry Lowry had a 587
series and 253 game for But-
ler's. Bill Parker added a 582,
Duke Jones and Bill Besore
added a 529. Bub Magruder
had a 408 series for Carr's.
On lanes seven and eight
Highland View Superette took
three from Chocolate City.
Warren Yeager had a 558 for
H.V. Superette. Raymond Pe-
ters had a 458 for Chocolate
City.
On lanes one and twon
Monday night the Highland
View Superette team, tok a
four game forfeit from Carr's
Auto and Gas.
On lanes three and four
Chocolate City took three
games from Butler's Restau-
rant. Raymond Peters led
Chocolate City with a 534
series and a 220 game. Harry
Lowry led Butler's with a 543
series.
Lanes five and six had Shirt
and Trophy taking three
points from Campbell's
Drugs. Robert Montgomery
led Shirt and Trophy with a 521
series while Campbell's was
led by Johnny Linton with a
516 series and a 220 game.
On lanes seven and eight the
Ten Pin Lounge took four from
Coast Guard. Randy Weston
led Ten Pin with a 485 series.
C. Brown led Coast Guard
with a 415 series.
Standings: W L
Highland View Superette 7 1
Shirt &Trophy 3 1
10-Pin Lounge 5 3
Butler's Restaurant 5 3
Campbell's Drugs 4 4


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 23, 1976


D TS_


ANNUAL


J


Prices Reduced So Low You Won't Believe Them...

Shop, Plunder and SAVE BIG!


Mens and Boys DRESS SHOES ...... 76cto $3.76
Mens and Boys Knit SHIRTS.......... 76c to $3.76
Mens and Boys UNDERWEAR ........ 26c-to 76c
Mens and Boys'
Sport SHIRTS ............................ $2.76 to $4.76
Mens and Boys'
Walk Shorts and Cut-Offs ............ 76c to $3.76
Boys CANVAS SHOES .............. 76c to $1.76
Men's WORK SHIRTS. .......... ...... $1.76
Men's TANK TOPS ............... 76c to $1.76
Men's HATS and CAPS ............. 76c to $1.76
Men's DRESS SLACKS ........... $3.76to $9.76
Men's LEISURE SUITS ....... $17.76to $24.76


Never before have the prices been less on the
streets of Port St. Joe. All sales final no .
refunds no exchanges. A Give Away to
make room for new fall goods arriving daily.


Bandmaster Ray Smith Is

Picked for Leadership Award


The Board of Advisors for
the Outstanding Leaders in
Elementary and Secondary
Education Awards Program
announced today that Ray:
mond Smith, band director of
Port St. Joe High School has
been selected for inclusion in
the 1976 edition of "Outstand-
ing Leaders in Elementary


Chocolate City
Coast Guard
Carr's Auto & Gas


and Secondary Education.
Each of these educators has
been nominated by school
principals and superinten-
dents who know the excep-
tiozial contributions each one
has made toward the advance-
ment of education.
Smith, along with approxi-
mately 6,000 fellow Outstand-
ing Leaders in Elementary
and Secondary Education
from across the United States,
will be presented in the pres-
tigious annual awards vol-


Original prices up to $12.00.
Ladies' Jeans and Slacks ............
Ladies Values to $15.00.
Shirts, Blouses, Knit Shirts ..........
Original prices up to $35.00.
Ladies DRESSES & PANT SUITS....


76c to $2.76

76c to $5.76

76c to $7.76


Values to $8.00.
Ladies' SHORTS .................76c to $4.76
Values to $15.00.
Ladies' SWIM SU ITS, SUN TOPS .... 76c to $1.76
Values to $10.00.
Ladies, ROBES, SHORTY PJ'S
GOWNS, BRAS, GIRDLES, SLIPS $1.76 to $4.76
reg. $4.00 values.
GYM SHORTS (Navy Only) ....... $1.76 & $2.76
Values to $22.00.
Closeouts in Ladies SHOES,
SANDALS, BOOTS, etc. ............. 76c to $6.76
Values in this group to $8.00.
Infants & Children's KNIT SHIRTS,
SWEATERS&CAPES............. $1.76to $3.76
Girl's and Boys' Values to $10.00.
SHORTS, SLACKS, PANTS SETS .... 76c to $3.76
Close Outs in Children's Values to $5.00.
PAJAMAS & GOWNS .............. $1.76 to $2.76


Clip



Valabl-e

coUP"oS ,


ume. In addition, they are now
being considered for one of the
ten $500 unrestricted grants to
be awarded in September to
the five elementary and se-
condary teachers chosen as
the most outstanding in their
divisions.
Smith accepted the position
of Director of Bands in Port
St. Joe last year. Last year the
band participated in all FBA
contests and were judged
Superior in the Marching
Competition and Excellent in.
the Concert Competition. This
year the band plans to attend
all FBA contests and the
"Southern Open Band Compe-
tition" in Valdosta, Ga.'


4 ~ (~( I~I~I~i


or More
Your choice new Fall clothing or shoes. This
Sale only.


the members of 'the


'Church of Christ
I!
invite you to meet with them:
Sunday Morning Bible Study ........... 10:00A.M.
Sunday Morning Worship .............. 11:00 A.M.
Sunday Night ............ ........ 6:00 P.M.
Wednesday Night ..................... 7:00P.M.

Corner 20th St. & Marvin
For information call
229-6969
4 --- --- -


Shop Danley for Better Home Appliances


s34900


0Pp0~u1 Si~ ~
0 g~tomalic lter rol
EMt6e01 Safety Signal Light

0~r
- - - - - - - - -


Westinghouse

"Frost Free 14"
Refrigerator-Freezer
14.0 cu. ft. capacity--only 30"
wide Big 131 Ib. capacity
freezer Completely Frost-
free Glide-Out Adjustable
Rollers Separate controls to
Rollers Separate controls
for refrigerator and freezer -
New High Performance Filter
Cool System Full-width,
full-depth shelves Adjust-
able two-position shelf Deep
door shelves Full-width
Vegetable Crisper Butter
Server Egg storage in door
No coils on back Ground-
ed for your safety 26/%"
deep, 64 9-16" high.

$399


;';:~'..i i L ..;i'!' -':~:...........'.... i ". .:.; ... :
: :.::: : : : : : ::; ::::: : : : :::::::::::::::::::::::;::~::~: : : ::::::::::::: .......:, ........


- --- ---IH


S IkA1 $1. a91 sFW! d


Worth $5.00
Purchase of $50.00


On


Chest Type

FREEZERS


I


-II, I


..... . .. .... ........... u z;.;.
5..........
........... .........;; ~,.~:t;t~:::~~~~::::::::~:::~~:Ix~ix;;t;~~ ::::~::::i~~~~:~~::::~


.i :::;::::5.1:~:~:~_. . .. ..... . .. . . .. . . .:~:~:~:


PAGE THREE











-~PAGE FOUR THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Fla. THUgSDAY, SEPT. 23, 1976


Hairdressers Attend Style Mission Group Meets With Mrs. Rish


Show In Birmingham


The staff of hairdressers
from Aline's Beauty Salon
attended a hair style show in
Birmingham, Alabama. The
show was sponsored by the
Besco Beauty Supply and
featured some of the finest
hairstylists of today.
Among the new styles for


Paris' Latin Quarter got its
name from the days in. the
middle ages when students
and tutors from the Univer-
sity of Paris would go there,
and converse in Latin.


SLeft to Right, Wayne Parrish, Buddy Renfro and Mike Todd.


Men's Softball Winners


Renfro's-Railroad Men's
Softball team won the Port St.
Joe men's League Champion-
ship for the second consecu-
tive year with a 23-1 record.
They also won the Men's


Gulf County Championship.
During the year they won
several awards such as second
place in Wewahitchka, third
place in Wewahitchka and
first place in Carrabelle.


Calvin's of Panama City
won the Second place award in
the St. Joe Men's League.
Mike Todd of Renfro's-Rail-
road won the league's most
valuable player award.


SJPC Honors DAR In


National Magazine Ad


St. Joe Paper Company has
honored the City of Port St.
Joe and Saint Joseph Bay
Chapter Daughters of, the
American Revolution in an
advertisement in the Bicen-
t4nnial Issue of the Daughters
of the American Revolution
Magazine dated July 1976.
i:The local DAR chapter is
recognized for its organization.
during our country's Bicen-
tennial Celebration and Port
St. Joe as the site of the
signing of Florida's first con-
stitution.
. The special issue magazine
has many patriotic and histo-
- -- . - - -


ric articles including ones on
the first Continental Congress,
the Declaration of Indepen-
dence and its Signers, the
various sections of the country
in 1776, Washington's Contin-
ental Army, Mars in 1976 and
a Forward and address by
President Gerald Ford.
Saint Joseph Bay Chapter is
'proud to be included in this
historic issue intended as an
heirloom and wishes to public-
ly thank St. Joe Paper Com-
pany for this honor.
The purposes of the National
$ oqiety Daughters' of Ameri-
can Revolution are to inspire


| Comforter Funeral

Home
Gulf County's First

Beginning 30 Years of
Continuous Service
Pete, Hortense & Rocky Comforter

3 Telephone 227-3511




FIRST BAPTIST

CHURCH
Corner Third Street and Baltzell Avenue
Rev. Bill Heaton, Pastor
Sunday School ......................... 9:45 A.M.
S Morning Worship Ser1jice ............. 11:00 A.M.
Church Training ...................... 6:30 P.M.
Evening Worship Service .............. 7:30 P.M.
Prayer Meeting (Wed.) ................ 7:00 P.M.

"Come and Worship God with Us"
^ WWWWW^*.-^ -^^W^<^<-*VWWIIN


patriotism, preserve history
and to educate for good citi-
zenship. ;
Copies of the Bicentennial
Issue of the DAR magazine
may be ordered from Treasu-
rer Geeral NSDAR, 1776 "D"
St., Washington, D.C. 20006
and ard$2.50 each.


fall and winter were the new
Nova and Wedge cuts. These
styles are designed by the
National Hairdressers Asso-
ciation and are created to
accentuate the clothing styles
of the season. The cuts are
simple, carefree and easy for
the busy woman of today to
manage.
Mens new styles were also
shown and are topped off with
the new Uniperms for men.
For the lady who still likes
long hair, we will see a
"foxy", curly look.


Cub Scout

% nCalendar


Thursday, Sept. 23-School night for Scouting-"Fron-
tier 76 Round-Up", Port St. Joe Elementary School lunch-
room, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 25-Den Three meeting aftScout House
on 10th St., 3:30 p.m.; Den Four meeting, Jewerline
Farmer's House, 303 Avenue A.
Tuesday, Sept. 28-Pack meeting, Scout House on 10th
St., 7:30 p.m.


Mission I of the United
Methodist Women met on
Tuesday morning, September
21 in the home of Mrs. Billy
Joe Rish. The hostess served
refreshments to nine mem-
bers and one visitor.
Mrs. Johnie McCurdy, the
chairperson, called the meet-
ing to order and presided over
the business session. The
members were reminded of
the annual conference meet-
ing at Blue Lake on October 2
and the District meeting on
October 16 at DeFuniak
Springs.

Wash and Bake

The student council at Port
St. Joe High School is having a
car wash and bake sale to
raise money Saturday Sept. 26
downtown. Please help sup-
port us.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Hitch-
cock, announce the birth of a
son Jacob Wayne, born Sept. 1
at Municipal Hospital.
Grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. Barney Amerson of Port
St. Joe and Mrs. Clifford
Hitchcock of White City.


The program for the meet-
ing was presented by Mrs.
Betty McNeill. She briefly
reviewed Catherine Mar-
shal's book, "Something


More", bringing out a few
interesting highlights from the
book.
The meeting closed with the
benediction.


Taxpayers!

Can you the taxpayer afford a 47 percent increase
in the valuation of your property?
Can you the taxpayer afford a 1.3 millage increase
in your taxes?
My opponent supports these two increases. He says
it is necessary because of inflation.
A 5 percent increase in wages because of inflation
seems to be the accepted scale. Wouldn't this same
increase of 5 percent in property valuation apply to a
property valuation increase, without the 1.3 millage
increase? This big increase in property valuation and
millage increase can be corrected by voting for and
electing LEO KENNEDY your County Commissioner,
District 5.
VOTE FOR A MAN WITH A PROVEN RECORD,
VOTE FOR A MAN OF AND FOR THE PEOPLE


Leo Kennedy

County Commissioner

-...........


... ._._._... _._. .. D .. t . . . . .
.~ I .... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~Il.s2t;z ;;; .~....~:r.. .....


Variety of Fall

Activities

The Gulf County Recreation
Department has announced a
variety of fall activities, which
should prove of interest to the
community. Those interested
in the classes should call
Walter Wilder at 229-6119.
Courses being offered are
Ceramics, crafts and macra-
me at Port St. Joe High
School, White City and High-
land View; gymnastics for
elementary age children;
slimnastics for adults and
young adults and guitar for
adults and young adults.


I -


Port St. Joe High Sc
Lunchroom Men
Monday, Sept. 2
Cheeseburger wit
spaghetti, whole kern
cole slaw, brownie, m
Tuesday, Sept. 2
Hamburger with bu
.tered fried fish wit
baked beans, lettuce,
pickles, French fries,
with cookie, milk.
Wednesday, Sept.
Fried- chicken, ric
gravy, string beans,
salad, bread, rolls, app
with graham crackers
Thursday, Sept.3
Ham and cheese sai
dry limas with ham, b
rice, tomato and onion
fruit salad with cookie
bread, milk.
Friday, Oct. 1
Hot dog with bun, 1l
English peas, potato
roll, jello with topping


rlmm m m-mmnm m l- l mlmnm- mm n- n

I Stir Up A Happy -..

I:. Halloween Party ---


/- -g


I- I

Napkins, Plates, Cups And
S 1 O All Your Decorating Needs
g p :; ALSO
/g of Special Halloween Cards ., I



S* ..(.At Dried Fall
,I Arrangements '


/ The Sugar Plum Tree
I I
s: Gift and Florist Shoppe

S\ Phone 229-6010
1 319 Reid Ave.




Ill- ;.;"r/Znnn i ii n lli1 n


Port St. Joe


School Lunch



MENUS


:hool Elementary Schools
us Lunchroom Menus
7 Monday, Sept. 27
h bun, Spaghetti, whole kernel
el corn, corn, cole slaw, brownie with
ilk. peanut granules, rolls and
8 milk.
In, bat- .
~n, bat-Tues. Sept.28
h bun, Battered fried fish with bun,
tomato, baked beans, cabbage, raisin
peach and carrot salad, coconut
cake, roasted peanuts and
29 milk.
e with Wed. Sept 29
green Fried chicken, rice with
lesauce gravy, string beans, green
Smilk. salad, bread, rolls, fruit cup
30 and milk.
ndwich, Thurs.Sept.30
uttered
, dDry limas with ham, col-
Sslices, lards, tossed salad, apple-
, corn sauce with cookies, cornbread
and milk.
asagnaFri. Oct. 1
chips' Hot dog with bun, English
,.'peas, cabbage and tomato
Smilk. slaw, jello with topping and
milk.


Vote For and R(




HERMAN


Your School Board Met


Words cannot adequately express my
appreciation for your vote of confidence on
September 7. I appreciate the many
courtesies shown me by the citizens of Gulf
County, and if I can ever be of any help to
any citizen, please call me. I also want to
take this opportunity to ask for your con-
tinued vote and support in the second
primary.
I would like to ask the supporters of Mr.
Canty Jones and Mr. Nathan Peters, Jr. to
support me in the election September 28. It
is pertinent that ALL tie people of GuIlf
County 4l~,represented. A vote for Herman
Ard will be a vote for ALL the children in
Gulf County.
There seems to be two main issues in
this campaign: (1) Basic Education, and
(2) Discipline.

BASIC EDUCATION

is covered by a new law that was enacted by
the 1976 Legislature-"The Functional
Literacy Law" which states, "Specific
emphasis must be placed on each pupil's
mastery of the basic skills-especially
reading-before he is promoted from the
third, fifth, eighth or eleventh grade. Begin-
ning with the 1978-79 school year, each
School Board must establish standards for
graduation from high school. Based on


these st
award
author
differed
the vai
tences
En
skills i
during
with p
grades
that we
the stu
require



As
the re
cancer
worked
schools
I'v
as your
missed
repres
I know
every i
my ho
the la\
It
the pa
I SOLI


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e-Elect




ARD


mber Dist. 4


standards, each district is required to
certificates of attendance, and is
ized to provide for the awarding of
ntiated diplomas to correspond with
trying achievement levels or compe-
of its secondary students."
iphasis has been placed on basic
in the Gulf County School System
the 1976-77 school year, grades K-3,
plans to expand through the upper
. Action has been taken to make sure
e abide by this new law and prepare
dents in our, cou tj.to meet these..
mients. X .

DISCIPLINE
far as discipline is concerned, check
cord as to how I've always voted
ning this issue. I have personally ::
d to improve the discipline in our
S.
e been dedicated while serving you
r School Board member. I have never
I a meeting therefore, I was there to
ent you and meet each issue head-on.
That I couldn't please everyone on
issue, but I've always faced and voted
nest convictions within the limits of
w.
has been a pleasure serving you for
st four years.
CIT YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT


For and Re-Elect



LRD

Member

............ .... ..-..-..-.--;..,,-,,--Z~ .- .


.-- s'~~'.*5'
.~:::::;::;~ z~z:::: :::: .:::;;;;ss...:


Kelly Goodman, Owner & Mgr. Port St. JO--
Phone 229-6195 414-416 Reid Ave.


Kelly Goodman, Owner & Mgr. POrt St. Joe
I 'b


Go to the Polls Sept. 28, Vote



HERMANA

Your School Board
District 4


-PAGE FOUR


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THUgSDAY, SEPT. 23, 1976


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THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 23, 1976 PAGE FIVE



Mixson to Speak Before RC&D


Representative Wayne Mix-
son will speak to the West
Florida RC&D (Resource Con-
servation and Development)
committee members, spon-
sors and guests at the annual
13 county meeting scheduled
for September 30, according to
Raymond Hurst, Steering
Committee Chairman. The
meeting will begin at 2 p.m.
C.T. at the American Legion

Greene Grad
of U. of W.F.
Bennie Greene was a recent
graduate of the University of
West Florida with a B.A.
degree in Criminal Justice.
He graduated with a 3.0 grade
point average.
Mr. Greene is an officer
with the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission.

Tennis Team
Starts Practice
The tennis team of Port St.
Joe High School will begin
practice Monday, September
27 for a period of two weeks.
They will practice each week,
Monday through Thursday.
Practice for boys will be from
3:00 to 4:30, followed by girls
practice from 4:30 to 6:00.



HECLPI
STOP RIM
Governor's Crime Prevention Committee
Tallahaisee. Florida


manfrom Washington County.
SCS Biologist John Vance will
report on a fish and wildlife
study request and Raymond
Hurst plans to distribute the
Land Resource Committee's
new publication on land use
policy for the 13 county area.
Gulf County RC&D Commit-
tee members are T.D. Whit-


field, Eldridge Money, Silas
Player, Otis Davis, Jr., Eve-
rett Owens, George Y. Core,
Hugh H. Semmes, Lewis W.
Jamerson, O'Neil McDaniel,
Charles Borders, C.R. Laird,
Frank Pate, C.W. Brock, B.A.
Pridgeon, Emmett Daniel,
William J. Rish, Robert Moore
and Ed Bandjough.


Legal Advertising


Building in Marianna. County
RC&D officials, USDA agency
representatives and others in-
terested in conservation, de-
velopment and wise use of
natural resources are invited
to attend. A dutch-treat meal
will be served after adjourn-
ment at 5 p.m.
In addition to the business
meeting, other program fea-
tures include a discussion on
comprehensive planning by
Barry Boswell, Executive Di-
rector, Northwest Florida
Planning and Advisory Coun-
cil; Water Management Dis-
trict objectives will be discus-
sed by Bill McCartney, Direc-
tor, Northwest Florida Water.
Management District, and
Pete McPhee will outline fea-
tures of a new recreation
parks program offered
through the Department of
Natural Resources, Division
of Recreation of Parks.
RC&D forestry goals, in-
cluding a new craft guild
proposal, will be discussed by
Rex Yates, Committee Chair-

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry M.
Whitehurst of Port St. Joe,
proudly announce the arrival
of their second child James
Michael Whitehurst. .:
He weighed seven pounds
and 14 ounces and was born on
Sept. 11 at the Municipal
Hospital.
Maternal grandparents are
Mr. and Mrs. Christy Gilbert
of Stanton, Ky. and paternal
grandparent is Mrs. Merle
Whitehurst of Port St. Joe.


fidential portions of the application are
on file in the Regional Office as part of
the public file maintained by the Cor-
poration. This file is available for public
inspection during regular business
hours."
Cecil G. Costin, Jr.
Bernard G. Buzzett
J. W. Grant
Wayne Hendrix
Frank Hannon
Grover Holland
James B. Roberts
Silas R. Stone
Edwin G. Williams 2t 9.23
REGISTRATION OF
FICTITIOUS NAME
We the undersigned, being duly sworn,
do hereby declare under oath that the
names of all persons interested in the
business or profession carried on under
the name of ST. VINCENTS SHRIMP
COMPANY at Indian Pass Beach, Gulf
County, Florida and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
James T. McNeill, 50 percent.
Donald Britt Pickett, 50 percent.
..s James T. McNeill
-s- Donald Britt Pickett 41 9-23
REGISTRATION OF
FICTITIOUS NAME
We the undersigned, being duty sworn,
do hereby declare under oath that the
names of all persons interested in the
business or profession carried on under
the name of PIER 98 RESTAURANT at
3024th Street, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
and the extent of the interest of each;-is;
as follows: :
Robert V. Rogers
Rita Jean Brown
-s- Robert V. Rogers
-s- Rita Jean Brown 4t9-22
tfc 9-23


~s~6~,~,r;~~sccc~,,-s~ci2


Accreditat



The accreditation of our schools is an
important issue in the election of your
School Superintendent. Many tax dollars
have been spent to put all of Gulf County's
schools on the accredited list and it is
important that the money and work
involved in this process not be wasted.


Here Are the Facts
on Accreditation

Schools are not accredited by the State
of Florida, consequently the quoting of a
state statute in supporting an argument on
accreditation is misleading.
Our schools are accredited by The
Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools. This is a regional accrediting
agency. Regional accreditation is voluntary
and extra-legal.
The education requirements for the
Superintendent are outlined in the "Princi-


-1' r'r


Is Important

S ples and Standards of Membership".
Principle E; Standard 1.
"The administrative head of the system
.... (Superintendent) and of the member school
(principal) shall have earned a graduate
degree from an institution approved by the
Association or other regional accrediting
agencies. Further, he shall have earned at
least 15 semester hours of graduate credit
with emphasis on school administration and
supervision either as part of the master's
program or in addition thereto."



If your Superintendent fails to meet the
above requirement your schools will be
removed from the accredited list.


Walter Wilder meets
this requirement.
Walter Wilder has had his graduate
transcript reviewed by the Executive Sec-
retary of the Florida Commission of the
Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools. In a letter written to Walter Wilder
by the Executive Secretary the final
sentence reads, "You meet the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools stan-
dard on the qualifications for Superinten-
dent or principal."


These are the FACTS on
accreditation.

Don't be misled.

Vote for Proven Leadership

Vote for a Qualified Educator

He has three children involved in the
Gulf County School System. He Is
Concerned.


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Vote for




Walter Wilder


Superintendent of Schools


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I .


SEALI NG OF VOTING
MACHINE NOTICE:
The voting machines to be used
Tuesday, September 28, 1976, in the
Second Democratic Primary Election
will be sealed Monday, September 27,
1976at 9:00 A.M. EDT at the courthouse
in Port St. Joe.
At this time qualified parties or their
representatives may be present to see
that the voting machines are in proper
working order.
At the completion of the inspection, the
machines shall be sealed, at which time
the voting machine number, the protect.
tive counter number, and the seal num-
bers will be recorded.
M. O. McDaniel, Custodian It 9.23
NOTICE
THE BANK OF PORT ST. JOE,
located at Port St. Joe, a proposed new
bank, has made application to the
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
for the establishmentof a new bank to be
located at 505 Fifth Street, City of Port
St. Joe. The proposed facility will
engage in the business of a full service
banking facility. FDIC accepted the
application for filing on July 6, 1976.
Officers of the bank engaged in submit-
ting the application are: Cecil G. Costin,
Jr., Bernard G. Buzzett, J. W. Grant,
Wayne Hendrix, Frank Hannon. Grover
Holland, James B. Roberts, Silas R.
Stone and Edwin G. Williams.
"Any person wishing to comment on
this application may file his comments
in writing with the Regional Director of
the Federal Deposit Insurance Corpora-
tion at its Regional Office located at 2
Peachtree Street, N. W., Suite 3030,
Atlanta, Georgia 30303. If any person
desires to protest the granting of this
application he has a right to do so if he
files a written notice of his intent with
the Regional Director within 15 days of
the date of this publication. The noncon-


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THURSDAY, SEPT. 23, 1976 THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


Say You Saw It In The Star


A pharmacist daily assists the sick
and injured by dispensingto them
the most advanced medicine in
the world. Through his product,
he eases the pain of tragedy, pro-


tects the health of our community
and helps make lile longer and
more comfortable. If you're unde-
cided about your future, consider
a career in Pharmacy. It's a field
of importance, responsibility, and
challenge... overflowingwith grati-
fying personal rewards.

YOUR RECALL PHARMACY


BUZZETT'S
DRUG STORE
Ph. 227-3371 317 Williams
Convenient Drive-In Window
Plenty of Fre Parking


No Butts, It's A Goat Show


They're cheaper, faster and
have a higher output than
their closest competitor.
Sounds like a good foreign
car, right? Wrong! It's a goat!
To promote the dairy goat
industry, the North Florida
Dairy Goat Club is sponsoring
Florida's first dairy goat
show.
Goats have been exhibited
at various 4-H shows and
county fairs, according to Ray
George, the Club's Vice Presi-
dent, but there has never been
a show in the state solely for
dairy goats.


The show, which will be held
at the Wakulla Livestock Pa-
vilion in Crawfordsville on
September 25, is open to all
five breeds; Nubian, Alpine,
Toggenburg, LaMancha and
Saanen, purebreds and
grades. Though the show is not
sanctioned by the American
Dairy Goat Association,
George said that ADGA rules
will be followed as closely as
possible.
"There are a lot of miscon-
ceptions about goats...they eat
tin cans, smell bad and that
type of thing...that we hope


the show will help clear up. We
are trying to promote the idea
that goats are very practical
animals that take far less land
to graze on than a dairy cow.
One good dairy goat will
produce enough milk for a
family," George said.
Judging of the 20 event show
will be done by Lewis and
Martha Ingram of Birming-
ham, Alabama, well known
dairy goat breeders.
The club's vice-president
also said that it is still not too
late to enter the show. The use
of a pen for the animals is


included in the entry fee and
spectators to the show will be
admitted free.
For further information, in-
terested participants should
call 385-0393 (Leon County),
997-3857 (Jefferson), 926-7424
(Wakulla, or 627-6245 (Gad-
sden).





UE


PAGE SIX


Garage Sale, Satu
Sept. 25. 1705 Garrisor
Nine a.m. til.

S.Cocker Spaniels, AK
istered, excellent blood
beautiful puppies. Call
Gregg at 229-8362 or see
.Long Ave. Ready to go

One new king size
mattress and foundation
One used full size be
.springs and mattress
229-6326. t


irday, ALUMINUM
n Ave. PLATES
24/" x 36"
Ideal for chicken houses,
C reg- pump houses, outhouses,
lines, and what have you.
Linda Call 227-3161 or drop by
at 711 The Star


foam
i, $100.
d box
, $50.
:fc 9-23


-:.Dinette set, $65.00, 1 year
*old. Phone 229-6858 anytime.
Itp

30' shrimp boat with 327 250
.h.p. engine. Completely rig-
ged, $3,500. Contact Kirkland's
Boat Landing. 227-8827.
S2tc 9-16

Assorted storage buildings,
trailers, buses, some shelved,
insulated, heavy duty. Special
priced while remodeling.
Edgew.ater- Campgrounds.
648-3035. tfc 9-16

Clean, used mobile home, 12
x-65', 1 year old, 2 BR and 2 full
,baths, many added features.
No equity, take up payments.
229-8353 or 229-6152.
tfc 9-2

.Nice modern living room
set, 72" couch, matching easy
chair, coffee table, 2 end
fables, very reasonable. Call
648-4387. .9 3toQ,2

CB Radios, Johnson, Craig,
Surveyor, antennas, base sta-
tions, terms available. West-
ern Auto. tfc 3-4

GET SLENDER NOW
iose excess pounds and inches
with the milkshake vitamin
program.

GET ENERGY NOW
For extra energy or weight
gain, try the milkshake vita-
min program.
Call Jean McMillan at 229-
6351 after 6 p.m. tfc 8-26

:17.1 frost free refrigerator'
like new with ice maker.
Electric Dryer, heavy duty. 1
set of sliding glass doors.
Tempered triple strength. 1968
Oldsmobile excellent work
car. Call 229-8173 tfc 8-5

fB Radios and marine elec-
troffics sales and service. 106
Monument Ave., phone 229-
8100. Open daily five p.m. to
nine p.m., Saturday, eight
a.m. to five p.m. tfc 8-5

Lose weight with New
Shape Tablets and Hydrex
Water Pills at Campbell's
Drug. 12tp 7-8

DRY cleaning carpets is
easier, faster, ans safer with
HOST. Rent our machine. St.
Joe Furniture, 229-1251.
tfc 10-23

Just arrived over 100 potted
plants, beautiful assortment.
Pots, potting soil, plant food,
perlite and other flower and
garden needs. Economy
Motors & Garden Center, 301
Hwy. 98 HV, 229-6001. tfc 8-5

Wizard garden tillers, hand
plows, lawn mowers, all gar-
den needs. Western Auto.
tfc 3-4


Singer Zig Za
machine, take up
$8.50 monthly. Ma
holes, monogram
sews on buttons,
229-6782.

FOR STANLEY
PRODUCE
Call Betty Gi
648-7534


Custom-made wo
plaques, for mail b
gates, door posts,


ag sewing


WANTED


For Sale in Wewa; Clean,
extra'ni&e and sturdy 12 x 65',
2 BR mobile home on 100' x 60'
lot 500 yards from Dead
Lakes. This includes air cond.,
2 utility sheds, 400 ft. flowing
well, front awning, rock drive-
way, $8,500.00. Call Jim at 229-
6305 day or 639-5498 night.
tfc 9-2


12 pmts.
ke button- 3 BR frame house on corner
kes button- lot in White City, nice home.
ms, hems' $10,000.00. If interested write:
guarantee.
tfc 1-30 O. Q. Cushing, Rt. 2, Box 14,
Donalsonville, Ga. 31745.
SHOME 4tp 9-2
TS
ilbert 3 bedroom, 2 bath brick
home at White City, $19,000.
tfc 7-15 229-6786. tfc 8-12
Two-story home, 1902 Monu-
)odenname ment Ave., 3 BR, 3 bath.
toxes, front Phone 227-7221 or 229-6474.
etc. Econo- tfc 8-21


my Motors & Garden Center,
301 Hwy. 98, HV, 229-6001.
tfc 8-5

Sewing machines repaired
regardless of make or age.
Over 25 years experience.
Parts, supplies for all makes.
Free estimate, guaranteed
satisfaction. 229-6782. tfc 1-30







VETERANS $300 down.
We have 2 new brick homes
for sale in Wewahitchka.
These homes have 3 BR, 2
baths, central heat, carpet,
garage, etc. FHA and conven-
tional financing available.
Call collect 205-794-6711
Dothan. An equal housing op-
portunity builder, tfc 9-23

Masonary home, 3 large
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large
living room with fireplace.
Dining room, den, lots of
shade trees. Fenced with 48"
chain link. Large azaleas
around yard. Will sell or trade
for equal value. Write or call
265-2967, 507 E. 10th St., Lynn
Haven, Fla. 32444. 2tp 9-23

House for sale at 228 7th St. 3
bedrooms, double garage. 229-
6538. tfc 9-23

House at White City, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, 134 acres of
land. Call 229-1138 after 5 p.m.
tfc 9-23

Seven room home for sale at
403 Madison St. Will sacrifice.
Owner leaving town, $3,500.00.

Two bedroom frame
dwelling at 221 Ninth St.,
only $9,500.00.

Three bedroom frame
dwelling at 410 Madison
St., Oak Grove, $7,500.00.

Large duplex apartment,
507V2 Long Avenue, $15,-
000.00.

FRANK HANNON
Reg. Real Estate Broker
Phone 227-3491
2t9-23

12' x60' 2 BR mobile home in
excell. condition. Including 10
x 10 utility building. Located
on six landscaped lots in White
City. See to appreciate! Phone
229-5692 after six p.m. tfc 7-15


New brick home, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, fireplace, 1,800
sq. ft. Call 229-8119. tfc 7-22.

New brick home at 106 Yau-
pon Ave. Construction comple-
tion approximately August 10.
3 BR, 2 bath, dining room,
living room, den and kitchen,
2-car garage and utility room.
Features bar, birch cabinets,
dish washer, garbage dis-
posal, range and compactor,
rock fire place, refreshment
bars, central heat and air,
central vacuum system, car-
pet and outdoor brick barbe-
cue. Call 227-2291 or 229-5302.
tfc 7-22


Adults only. Fur
apartment, living roox
room, breakfast nook
and kitchen. 229-1352.



Furnished apartme
rent at Mexico Beach.
at the Driftwood Mote
98. 648-5126.

Mexico Beach, 2 b
furnished apartment.
heat and air, adults on
4208.


nished
mn hbd-


1 bedroom house in town
ready for rent October 1. 648-
5144. tfc 9-16

Unfurnished large 2 BR
house with screen porch, laun-
dry and storage room. Auto.
heat. Call 229-6777 after six
p.m. tfc 8-26

For Rent: 2 BR trailer, air
conditioned. Canal St., St. Joe
Beach. For information, call
648-5650. tfc 6-24

Why live in the crowded
city? Move your mobile home
to' peace, quiet and tran-
quility. Water, garbage collec-
tions, yards mowed, live lei-
surely. Gulf privileges. Only
VA approved mobile home
park in Gulf County. Ski
Breeze Meadows Trailer
Park, 9 miles southeast of
Port St. Joe on Hwy S-30.
Come out and enjoy the quiet.
tfc 5-6

CARPET Cleaning With
HOST couldn't be easier. Just
brush and vacuum for clean,
dry carpets. Rent our HOST
machine. St. Joe Furniture.
229-1251. tfc 10-23

AT RUSTIC SANDS CAMP-
GROUND, 15th ST., MEXICO
BEACH, PATIO, BEAUTI-
FUL REC HALL PRIVI-
LEGES, A4 MILE FROM
BEACH, 648-3600. tfc 5-8

NO need for wet carpets.
Dry clean them with HOST.
Use rooms right away. Rent
machine. St. Joe Furniture,
229-1251. tfc 10-23

Public address system.
Owned by the Port St. Joe
Kiwanis Club. A new system
operable on either battery or
current. Call Ken Herring,
227-5281 for rental. tfc


k, bath For carpets cleaned the way
professionals do it-at a frac-
tfc 9-23 tion of the cost, rent Rinse N
Vac, the portable steam car-
nts for pet cleaning system. Avail-
Inquire able at Western Auto, phone
1 ,H, 227-2271, 219 Reid Ave.


N, r".y.
tfc 9-23

edroom
Central
tly. 648-
tp 9-23


Two bedroom furnished
apartment for rent. Call 229-
6895 before 5:30, 229-6827 after
5:30. tfc 9-9

Two bedroom furnished Du-
.plex Apt. Corner of 14th and
Palm Blvd. Call 227-4311.
tfc S-12







Three BR furnished house at
528 7th St. Call 648-7581 after
4:30. tfc 9-23

Beach cottage for rent. Call
648-5144. tfc 9-2

Two bedroom furnished
house at St. Joe Beach for
rent. 648-3466. tfc 8-19

Furnished small 1 bedroom
house. Call 229-6777 after 6
p.m. tfe 8-5


Office or warehouse space
for rent. 518 First St. Call
229-6308 or see Bob Holland. tfc






Responsible persons 18 or
over, to sell unique exquisitely
styled jewelry. For begin, kit
send $2 to Omega Sales, Box
528, Port St. Joe. 3t 9-23

HELP WANTED: Need im-
mediately-experienced sales
and office lady, must be
mature. See Kelly Goodman
at Badcock Home Furnishing
Center.

$100 weekly possible stuffing
- mailing circulars for firms I
represent. Send stamped self-
addressed envelope: Omega
Sales, Box 528, Port St. Joe.
4tp 9-2

FOUND

FOUND: Keys found near
Ski Breeze Campsite. One for
a HOnda, one for Samsonite
luggage, 2 others. May be
picked up at The Star and
paying for this ad.


WANTED: 24 new
Scouts. Sign up tonight
23 at 7:30 at Port St. J
mentary lunchroom.

Wanted: Good used
boat. Call 904-265-3304.


Wanted: 1970-1973 P1
Cuda. Call 229-6013, aft
p.m. call 648-6596.

WANTED: Old dolls
lecting. Call 229-6631.






1970 Dodge Coronet,
will sell or trade for
648-4813.

Must sacrifice 1974
Coupe, 4 speed, $1,500.
after 5:00 p.m. at 229-


1975 Ford pickup,
equity and take up pa:
24,000 miles. 904-265-33


1968 Ford pickup V-8
good condition. Call 2


1976 Econoline For
Contact Julia Creed
6:30 or weekends. 229


1976 Ford F100 E:
$3,850.00 or $300.00 a:
over payments. Call 2


I


w Cub
it, Sept. There will be a regular
Joe Ele- communication of Port St. Joe
Lodge No. 111, F. & A.M.,
every first and third Thursday
oyster at 8:00 p.m.
F. E. BROGDON,
4tc 9-16 Everett McFarland, Sec.

ymouth There will be a VFW meet-
ter 6:30 ing the third Tuesday of each
tfc 9-16 month in the American Legion
S Hall. tfc 6-19


for col-
4tc 9-9


--I


BINGO R.A.M.-Regular convoca-
Every Thursday & Saturday tion on St. Joseph Chapter.No.
7:30p.m. 56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd Mon-
American Legion Hall days, 8 p.m. All visiting com-
Sponsored by American panions welcome.
Legion Post 116 J. L. SIMS, H.P.
tfc 10-9 E. William McFarland, Sec.



Want Ads Get Results!


.... I:s*.*.*.-^?: w^ :


SERVICES


ADDITIONS,
REMODELING, REPAIRS
V8, p.s., Work,Guaranteed
r truck. 25 Years Experience
It 9-23 Call 227-5986
tfc 6-17
4 Pinto
SPintoC Complete Wood Shop
00. Call Custom Cut Lumber
4961.
Want to Do It Yourself?
3t9-16 Then come see us for Stan-

small ley tools, hardware, paneling,
yments, paint, lumber.
304. Early's Hardware &
4tc 9-16 Building Supply
Hwy. 98W. tfc 8-5 229-2763
engine, Carpentry Work Done
229-6671. Reasonable Rates
2tp 9-16 Jimmy Johnson
Phone 227-7657
:d van.
h tfc 8-19


h after
-6331.
tfc 9-16

explorer.
nd take
229-3322.
tfc 9-9


1973 Mercury Marquis
Brougham, 1 owner, air cond.,
am-fm radio, power through-
out, seat, steering, brakes,
windows, cruise control.
Phone 648-5364. tfc 9-2

1972 Monte Carlo, green,
vinyl top, am radio, 8-track
tape deck, full power, excel-
lent cond., $1,800.00. After
tfc 9-2

1974 Jeep CJ5 Renegade,
white with black stripe, 304 cu.
inches, twin exhaust, radio
and heater. Call 229-6565.
tfc 8-19


Willis Jeep-1953 model
with Warren hubs in good
shape. Needs only minor re-
pairs, $550 firm. Call 648-6596
after 6:00 p.m. tfc 7-22

1973 Toyota Celica, 4 speed,
AC, R&H, Call 229-6129 or can
be seen at 1319. McClellan
Avenue. $2600.00. tfc 8-12












Paaa iyFa


PAINTING
Interior Exterior
Housewashing & Roofcleaning
Will remove grime & mildew
with pressure cleaner. Good
work at low cost to you.
Call 229-6321
tfc 4-1

Now Open
St. Joe Outboard
Repair Shop
309 Monument Ave.
Phone 229-6151
tfc 6-17

GENERAL CONTRACTING
Licensed and Bonded
Free Estimates
No Job Too Small
CALL 229-6321
tfc 7-8

POODLE GROOMING
For Appointment Call
229-6674
tfc 8-5

All types carpet and vinyl
flooring installed. 10 years
experience. For free measure-
ment and estimate, call Ron-
ald Ross, 229-6822. tfc 9-2

LEWIS FLOOR CLEANING
All Types
229-6482 or 229-6447
tfc 9-20


REPAIRS
Aluminum screens and doors,
carpentry, house repair, mill-
work, roof repair and re-roof-
ing.
SMITH & SON WORKSHOP
Phone 229-6018
Port St. Joe
tfc 7-22

Septic Tanks Pumped Out
Carefoot Septic Tank
229-8227, 229-2351,
and 229-6694.
tfc 7-1

ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work Welding
506 First Street
Phone 229-6803
Machinist on duty all day
Every day

Visit or call the Alcohol
Counseling Information
Center of the Panhandle Al-
coholism Council, Inc. 321
Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe.
Phone 229-3515. tfc 1-30

Port St. Joe-Gulf Co. CofC
WELCOME SERVICE
Call 227-2501 or go by the
Chamber office, Municipal
Building, 5th St., Monday thru
Friday, 9-12 EST. tfc 5-1

Your SHERWIN-WILLIAMS
PAINT Dealer in
Port St. Joe



COVER
'THE




HURLBUT SUPPLY CO..
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida


GLEN'S CABINET
SHOP
Kitchen Cabinets
Vanities Mill Work
Glen Combs
Phone 229-6530
Port St. Joe, Fla.
tfc 5-20





















tfc 8-5


GRIFFIN'S
Refrigerator & Air
Conditioner Repairs
Call
229-6492
All work guaranteed
tfc 5-6

Lawn mowers, tillers and
garden tractors repaired.
Economy Motors & Garden
Center,' 301 Hwy. 98, HV,
229-6001. tfc 8-5

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
Meets
Fri. at 8 p.m., Sun. at 4 p.m.
St. James Episcopal Church
Parish House
tfc 4-24

Professional help with emo-
tional problems and-or con-
cerns. Gulf County Guidance
Clinic, Port St. Joe. 227-2691 or
227-7586. tfc 11-14

Tires Now Installed
FREE
In Our Own
Auto Service Center
Western Auto Assoc. Store
227-2281
3-4 tfc

Lawn & Gardening Needs
Feed
Lawn Mower &
Small Engine Repairs
Economy Motors &
Garden Center
301 Hwy. 98 H.V.
229-6001
tfc 8-5



Wouldn't You Really
Rather Have Cable TV?





For Cable TV
Installation In Port St. Joe
.al .lrt S.l ,rIIl
Phone 229-7232
Or Visit the Telephone Company
Business Office


Flag Football

League Forming
Any men interested in form-
ing an adult flag football team
should contact the Gulf County
Recreation Department at
229-6119. Several teams have
already been formed, but
there is room for additional
teams to participate.

CARD OF THANKS
We would like to take this
opportunity to thank all of
those who were so kind to us in
the death of our loved one,
Mrs. Rachel Baker wife, mo-
ther and sister.
Thank you for the food,
cards, flowers and all of the
other acts of kindness that
were shown.
The Baker family
The Barnwell family


IJ


INOTI(ESI












Raymond Lawrence Has Given You



Fair, Honest, Concerned Law Enforcement







Lawrence has fought drugs.... ..... r


Raymond Lawrence is opposed by
some because of arrests made as a
result of his efforts to stamp out the use
of drugs in Gulf County. His experience
as a Little League baseball coach, Boy
Scout Master, Sunday School leader
and Quarterback Club leader has
caused him to have an interest in youth
so that he will continue to try to
eliminate drug use from becoming a


problem in this county by any means at
his command.
A report of Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement dis-
closes that the Gulf County Sheriff's
Department made more drug sale
arrests during the year 1974 than
any other County Sheriff's Depart-
ment under 25,000 population in
Florida.


Lawrence is better qualified


There are those who support Ray-
mond Lawrence's opponent who say
that his 19 years as a highway patrol-
man better qualifies him to be Sheriff.
This is absolutely false as the law en-
-forcement experience which the high-
way patrol is involved with is primar-
ily traffic citations and accident re-
ports whereas the office of a sheriff is
involved with all types of law enforce-
ment including traffic citations and
auto accident reports. The Sheriff's
office investigates and assists in pro-
secution of murder, robbery, larceny,
assault and battery, trespass, viola-
tions of narcotic laws and many
various and sundry other breaches of


Opponents fa


the peace. Not only must a Sheriff be a
peace officer but he must also be an
administrator, crime fighter, public
protector, court official, jail keeper,
and public servant and he must also be
prepared to go through many sleepless
nights when it is necessary to locate
lost persons and recover bodies from
the swamps and waters of the county.
Although the Florida Highway
Patrol has various ranks for its
patrolmen from trooper to Colonel,
it is interesting to know that the op-
ponent of Raymond Lawrence re-
mains a trooper after 19 years of
highway patrol employment.


to discredit


Lawrence after mighty efforts


Opposition to Raymond Lawrence
comes from some persons in law en-
forcement who wanted to be Sheriff
and were either employed by the
former Sheriff and waiting for him to
retire or who were sitting on the side-
lines waiting for what they thought was
the right signal to run. After Lawrence
was elected over a Sheriff who had
served Gulf County well for 36 years,
these persons immediately became
opponents and the State's Attorney's
office and certain police officers and
others of these opponents instigated an
intense investigation of Sheriff Law-
rence's office through the State Audi-
tor General, the States Attorney's
office and the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice and finally the only success these
persons had was to persuade the
United States Attorney to charge
Lawrence with having killed an alli-
gator which was designated as an en-
dangered specie. After trial of this
cause it was obvious to the United


States Federal Judge that this was
politically motivated and the case was
thrown out with no one offering any
evidence that Lawrence had been
guilty of any wrong doing whatsoever.
Probably the worst abuse was
from those who attempted to distort a
public confession by Sheriff Lawrence
in his church more than a year ago
where he stated he had done certain
things in office which he considered
were wrong and asked for forgiveness
and divine guidance in the future. His
opponents say that he should not be
returned to office for this reason and
many false rumors were circulated
against Lawrence concerning his state-
ments in his church. Again Raymond
Lawrence admits that he has made
mistakes in judgment, but he has
learned from these mistakes and feels
that his ability to perform the duties of
the office of Sheriff has been strength-
ened by these mistakes.


You said four years ago you wanted fair and effective law


enforcement


- Raymond Lawrence has given it to you


. RAYMOND LAWRENCE


I

The Former Sheriff Served

36 Years

Why not let Raymond Lawrence have a second term to show you
that he is sincerely and honestly interested in making you a
better Sheriff


Sheriff


I '










THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 23, 1976


They Even Smell Like Fishermen


10


'. ., -- f


S These two old men stumbled off down to the stump hole
last Saturday and came back with these two fine red fish,
Which they lucked upon. At left is Harry Ford, who drove the
Bronco to the fishing hole and at right is R. G. Boyles, who
had the fish he is holding drag him into the surf. -Star photo


Herman Jones, left, and Mike Herring, righ
fishing in St. Joseph Bay Saturday and came ho
fine 55 pound ling for their efforts. The fishermen
were several other ling in the area, but this one ii
they could get a spear into. From the size of him,
enough for a few days.


MINUTES I

of the

Gulf County Commission
L I u- -CMIIm-
The Board of County Com- Johnnie May Johnson, Laura inspectors: Mary F. Hanlon,
missioners of Gulf County, Wynn Hinton and Ola Harden. Minnie E. Herring and Jim-
met on July 29 in regular Precinct 3-Whitfield; mie M. Hardy.
.session as a continuation of Crutchfield building, Honey- Precinct 5-Player; Highland
the meeting held on July 27, ville; clerk, Carmie B. Crutch View; clerk, Mae P. Creamer,
being duly recessed according field, inspectors, Stella Till- inspectors, Pearl Whitfield,
to law The following mem- man, Bessie. Smith, JoAnri Oreie Richards and Mrs.
bears were present: Eldridge Forehand. Helen Miles.
*Money, Chairman; Everett Precinct 4-Player; Over- Precinct 6-Player; Fire sta-
SOwens, Jr.; Otis Davis, Jr.; street, Community Bldg.; tion, White City; clerk, Mrs.
and S. C. Player. Others pre- clerk, Mrs. Annie M. Cook, Aliene S. Hightower, inspec-
sent were Jerry Gates, Deputy
Clerk, and a number of em-
ployees of the Road Depart-
ment and Mosquito Control.
The meeting came to order
at 7:00 p.m.
The Chairman announced to
the employees that the Board
had unanimously voted to give Does the candid
the employees a $416.00 a year
pay raise, which amounted to secondary sc
20 cents per hour. He said this
was all the Board could do in
light of the anticipated tax
hike facing the Board. The
employees stated this was not
enough as all of the costs had
increased just like the Board's Does the candid
and they needed more moneycan i
just to keep up with the cost of in Florida pul
living. After a long discussion,
the Board again unanimously
voted to give the employees a
$416.00 per year pay increase.
The Board then began dis-
cussing budgets and made the
following unanimous decisions
to increase the tentative pro- Does the candid
posal for Panhandle Alcoholic
Council from $1,000.00 to $1,- certificate?
500.00 and to cut the Sheriff's
budget request to the follow-
ing final figures and to notify
the Sheriff of this matter in
accordance with Florida
Statute 30.49 (4):
Salary of Sheriff, increased Accord to the
by $17.00 to $20,667.00;Aco g te
Salary, deputies and assist- Southern Ass
ants, decreased by $18,802.00
to $123,126.00; will our scho,
MIatching FICA and retire- .
ment, decreased by $3,276.00 if the candid
:to $25,040.00;
SExpenses other than
salaries, decreased by $8,850.
to $44,900.00;
Investigations, left the same
at $1,200.00; Has the cand;da
Equipment, decreased by
$8,600.00 to $11,000.00; School Syster
Contingencies, left the same
at $9,000.00;
These represented a total of
$274,534.00 requested. A bud-
get of $234,933.00 was ap-
proved, which reflected an in-
:crease of $17.00, and a de- R Ovi
crease of $39,618.00. v
The Board did then appoint
,the following election board: w ith
Precinct 1-Whitfield, City Go w ith expi
:Hall, Wewahitchka; clerk, Eu-
-hice Arhelger, inspectors,
Fredna Price, Ruby W. Gay,
IJanice Forehand and Alice
Chason.
Precint 2-Davis; White
Building, Wewahitchka;
clerk, Dorothy Strength, in-
spectors, Bessie.. Nunnery,


tors, Eloise I
Peterson and Eu
Precinct 7-I
Beaches; clerk
Robertson, insp
bara Creel, Joyc
Lou Mork.
Precinct 8-C
Hall, Port St. Jo
M. Maddox; ins]
Garrett, Mary
Addie Goodson,
field, Nadine
Geraldine Wilson
Precinct 9-0
House, Port St
Elsie Griffin, in
ginia Smith, Lois
Pierson, Beulah
and Betty J. Clo
Precinct 10-M
House, Port St
Mrs. Ralph M


PAGE EIGHT


spectors, Mrs. O. M. Taylor,
Mrs. E. C. Cason, Margaret
Nichols, Hazel Blackburn and
Gertrude Boyer.
Precinct 11-Money; Centen-
nial Bldg., Port St. Joe;- clerk,
Catherine Kennedy, inspec-
tors, Mrs. Willie Key, Mrs. N.
G. Martin, Dorothy M. Hamm,
Opal Howard and Brenda
Mathes.
There being no further busi-
ness, the meeting did then
adjourn.

The Board of County Com-
missioners of Gulf County,
S met on August 10 in regular
session with the following
members present: Eldridge
SMoney, Chairman; Everett
t'" Owens, Jr.; Otis Davis, Jr.;
S.C. Player and T. D. (Doc)
S Whitfield. Others present
were Clerk George Y. Core,
S Financial Officer Jerry Gates,
SSheriff Raymond Lawrence,
Acting Mosquito Control
Director C.E. Daniell, Road
:,**.<- Superintendent Lloyd Whit-
field and Attorney William J.
Rish.
The meeting came to order
at 9:00 a.m. Comm. Davis
1 opened the meeting with pray-
er and the pledge to the flag.
The minutes of the meeting
of July 27, were read, ap-
proved and adopted.
Pursuant to notice to re-
ceive bids to repair the roof on
the old courthouse and other
repairs, the following bid was
received:
Griffin Construction Com-
t, went spear pany, base bid, $21,941.00;
*me with this alternate one, $16,128.00; al-
en said there ternate two, $2,196.00; alter-
s the only one nate three, $4,800.00; alternate
he should be four, $2,448.00 and alternate
-Star photo five, $20,079.00.
After consideration, there
harper, Lois was a motion by Comm.
mice Daniels. Owens, seconded by Comm.
Player; the Player and unanimously car-
Nadine B ried, that the Board accept the
sectors, Bar- base bid, plus alternates two
ce Young and and three in the total sum of
$28,937.00.
The Board then discussed
wenss; City painting and necessary re-
e; clerk, Zola pairs to the rest rooms. After
pectors, J. A. being advised, the Board re-
F. Bryant, quested Griffin to give the
Lucille Shef- Board a price on painting the
Lowery and lower floor area and the re-
n. pairs to all rest rooms.
wenss; Stac The Board did then discuss
Joe; clerk, the plans for the proposed new
spectors, Vir- library building. Charles A.
sTharpe, May Gaskin, Architect, presented
iK. Hatfield the plans. In the discussion
oud. that followed, the Board dis-
loney; Scout cussed the construction and
Joe; clerk, equipment costs and the pos-
acomber, in- sibility of the operating costs


1i


:-
>...-
'

k '


increasing to a level that
would cause a hardship on' the
taxpayers. After lengthy dis-
cussion, it was decided that
the Architect hold up on these
plans, to allow the Board to
meet with the Library Com-
mittee and the Northwest
Florida Library in an effort to
reach a full understanding as
to the operation of the newx
library, a method of financing
the required budget for opera-
tions and future maintenance.
The Board did authorize the
necessary test borings. The
Chairman said he would re-
quest Bill Simmons, Chair-
man of the Library Planning
Committee to call a meeting
for August 12, at 5:00 p.m. in
order that a full understand-
ing be reached on several
matters as to a maximum


construction cost, equipment
costs and a possible change n
the plans to eliminate space
that may not be required.
William C. Sullivan, Asst.
Director, Florida Panhandle
Health System, appeared be-
fore the Board and after
reporting on the activities of
his organization, he requested
the County to pay the $1,400.00
due under the 1974-75 contract
and to renew the contract and
include the same amount in
the 1976-77 budget. After being
advised by the Attorney as to
the contract, there was a
motion by Comm. Owens,
seconded by Comm. Whitfield
and unanimously carried, that
the $1,400.00 be paid as per
contract and that it be paid
from any funds available in
the General Fund or to trans-


fer that amount from the re-
serves for contingencies.
Marion Daniels appeared
before the Board on behalf of
his application for employ%
ment. He requested the Com-
mission to employ him as a
member of the maintenance
staff at the courthouse. The
Board said that the Supervisor
will first make his recommen-
dation as to filling a position
by choosing from the applica-
tions on file and that his
application will be considered.
Mrs. Jean Arnold presented
her plat of Wetappo Creek Es-
tates for final approval. After
examining the plat, it was
returned to her for correc-
tions. After corrections by her
engineer the Board approved
the plat for recording.
(Continued on Page 9)


Eldridge Money


Thanks You

To all the people of Gulf County: I want to thank
each of you for your vote and support, which you
honored me with in the first primary. I also want to
take this opportunity to ask you for your continued vote
and support in the second primary.
I also would like to ask Mr. Charlie Davis'
supporters to help me in the second primary, and it will
be greatly appreciated. If I'm elected, I will continue to
give the people in Gulf County fair and impartial
service with integrity; the Lord being my helper.
THANK YOU

Eldridge Money


A Concerned Parent

































Candi.. date











1. My family and I reside at Beacon Hill Beach.
2. I am a product of the Gulf County schools, and I graduated from
high school in 1958.
3. I attended Chipola Junior College.
4. I have attended the University of West Florida extension in
Panama City; I majored in Business Administration.
5. I am mature enough to exercise sound judgment and young
enough to be interested in the future.
6. I am interested in the development of children.
James Hanlon













School Board Member
"'r '














































District 3



Tune in WJOE-1080 on your radio dial--on Friday, Sept. 24, 1976, at
5:05 p.m. I anted in to James Hanlon, his family and friends discuss


Votehis candidacy.
James Hanlon


School Board Member


District 3



Tune in WJOE-1080 on your radio dial--on Friday, Sept. 24, 1976, at
5:05 p.m. and listen to James Hanlon, his family and friends discuss
his candidacy.


^>lt-^


~(0x0x0~~r0x0x0~0~~0rOKOuoKm~Oub~uD~cOu0


".










THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 23, 1976 PAGE NINE

Panama City Music Association Is Sponsoring

Membership Drive Beginning Next Week


P, P and K Winners

First place winners of the Ford Motor Company Punt,
Pass and Kick competition will be going to Marianna
Saturday to compete in the zone competition. Winners in
Marianna will continue in district competition in Tampa.
Local first place winners in the several age categories were
Douglas E. Roberson, Josh E. Jenkins, Dexter Stallworth,
Scott Burkett, Kevin Roberson and George Jones. Second


The Panama City Music
Association is having a mem-
bership drive beginning Sept.
27 and ending on Oct. 2.
Some of the Associations
programs will include:


place winners were Stacy Strickland, Demitre M. Thomas,
Troy McMillian, Terry Woullard, Mark Mork and Randy
Raffield. Third place, Dexter Baxter, Michael Pittman, Brad
Bowen, Thomas E. Parker, Tim Stutzman and Tommy Joe
King.
Part of the winners are shown above in the picture. Front
row, left to right are: Dexter Baxter, Demitre Thomas, Stacy
Strickland, Michael Pittman and Scott Burkett. Back row,
left to right: Tommy King, Tres Parker, Mark Mork, Josh
Jenkins and Douglas Roberson. The others were not present


when the picture was made.


-Star photo


Continued from Page 8 -


Gulf County Commission Minutes


Pursuant to notice published
according to law for the
Board's consideration, to
issue a dredge and fill permit
to the State of Florida, the
Chairman called for com-
plaints from the public. There
being no complaints offered,
there was a motion by Comm.
Player, seconded by Comm.
Whitfield and unanimously
carried that Resolution 76-13
be adopted. The Resolution
granted a dredge-fill permit to
the State Department of
Transportation for dredging
and fillingin Simmons Bayou
area. Copy of said resolution is
on file in the Clerk's office.
Pursuant to notice published
according to law that this
Commission will consider
adopting an ordinance for a
fee for electrical hookups for
inspections for mobile homes,
the Chairman called for objec-
tions and there being none,
there was a motion by Comm.
Player, seconded by Comm.
Whitfield and unanimously
carried, that Ordinance 76-3
be adopted. The Ordinance
stated that a fee of $6.00 will be
charged for inspections for
electrical hook-ups to mobile
homes. Copy of said ordinance
is on file in the Clerk's office.
The Board directed that a
refund be made to each appli-
cant that has paid the $12.00
fee for the electrical inspec-
tion.
The Board discussed the
question of a special millage
being assessed for the opera-
tion of the Port St. Joe Munici-
pal Hospital and the joint, or
separate civil defense and
veterans offices. These ques-
tions will be placed on a
special ballot in the general
election.
Tommy Pitts, by letter
dated August 9, 1976, advised
the Board that he would ac-
cept the position of Mosquito
Control Supervisor at a salary
of $12,500.00. After much dis-
Scussion the Board agreed to
pay this salary, but that addi-
tinal duties will be assigned to
that office, including all engi-
neering requirements, survey-
ing, approve all subdivision
plats, approve applications for
utility permits on county
roads, and dredging permits
before they reach the Board
for its final approval, and
other planning work as direct-
ed by this Commission. The
Board directed the Clerk to
notify Mr. Pitts to meet with
them at the earliest date pos-
sible to discuss his employ-
ment.
The Supervisor of Elections
asked the Commission to con-
sider the purchase of two
additional voting machines to
be kept as standby machines
in case one of the present
machines fails to operate dur-
ing an election. She said the
law provides that standby
machines be on hand during
elections. She suggested that
if the Board decides to obtain
standby machines, that AVM
Corporation has used
machines selling at $1,500.00.
The Board asked the Finance
Officer to look at the Super-
visor's budget and see if she
has funds available to pur-
chase two used machines.
After looking at the budget, it
was decided that funds were
not available for this equip-
ment at this time.
The Board discussed a re-
quest from the Civil Defense
Director to establish a warn-


ing system between that office
and the school system, which
would require the purchase of
one base station tone recorder
at $186.50 each. After discus-
sion, the Board said that be-
cause of budget difficulties
that no action will be taken on
this request.
The Chairman discussed the
possibility of passing a county
ordinance prohibiting com-
mercial fishing and scalloping
in certain areas of St. Joseph
Bay. He said that the Board
receives many complaints on
this matter each year. After
discussion, it was decided to
invite Captain Gordon McCall
to attend one of the meetings
to discuss this matter.
The Road Superintendent
informed the Board that the
Cemetery Roads are now rea-
dy for the State to pave under
the off-systems highway a-
greement. He said this paving
should be done as sodo as;pos.
sible because a .long delay
would result in a deterioration
of the surface because of the
traffic. The Chairman re-
quested the Attorney to assist
in having the DOT commence
with this project without fur-
ther delay.
Sheriff Raymond Lawrence
discussed his budget being cut
at a meeting he did not attend,
after it had been tentatively
approved at the meeting of
July 27, 1976. He said he was
disappointed and surprised
at the Board reducing his bud-
get in his absence. He re-
quested the Board to reconsi-
der his budget and restore it
just as it was at the time it was
tentatively approved. He ex-
plained each item in the bud-
get. After considerable discus-
sion Comm. Whitfield made a
motion to reconsider the Sher-
iff's budget. This motion died
for the lack of a second.
Comm. Player said that
several counties along the
northwest Florida Gulf Coast
have recently received dredg-
ing permits and told of the
projects just completed at
Two Mile in Apalachicola and
the Panama City Beach re-
storation project. He said that
is permits can be obtained for
these projects, certainly one
can be obtained for the Sim-
mons Bayou channel. The


Board directed the Mosquito
Control Department to file an
application to clean out this
channel.
The Board authorized the
Public Service Commission to
use its meeting room for a
public hearing on October 13,
14 and 15, 1976.
Comm. Davis told of the
need of a caution light for the
intersection of SR 386 and SR
71. The Clerk was directed to
write a letter to DOT request-
ing a traffic device be erected
at this location.
The Chairman asked what
progress has been made on
drainage ditch at the Buddy
Gay property. The Road
Superintendent said that the
landowners have refused to
give the necessary easements.
Comm. Davis said he would
assist the Superintendent in
securing these easements.
The Board then discussed the
Butler Bay drainage anid
learned that the absence of
necessary easements continue
to hold up this project.
The County Commissioners
and the School Board appoint-
ed the following Tax Adjust-
ment Board: Eldridge Money,
Everett Owens, Jr., Otis
Davis, Jr., Joseph K. Whit-
field and Gene Raffield.
The Board discussed Chap-
ter 17-7 Part II, Florida Ad-
ministrative Code and Chap-
ter 403 F.S. as to State Re-
sources Recovery and Man-
agement program. The Board
directed the Mosquito Control
Department to continue all
present programs and to stay
abreast of all rules pertaining
to this program.
A letter from the Game and


Fresh Water Fish Commission
informed the Board of the
regulations which require this
Board's concurrence as to
traffic regulations in the G. U.
Parker, Edward Ball and
Gaskin Wildlife Management
Areas. The Board decided
against making a recommen-
dation in this matter.
The Road Superintendent
reported that maintenance of
secondary roads cost $4,826.46
for the month of June and
$8,120.24 for July.
After a discussion of the
property appraisers budget,
the Hon. Sammy Patrick, Gulf
County Property Appraiser,
agreed to a cut of seven
percent in his budget from last
year's budget. He told the
Board he had always operated
his office at the lowest possi-
ble cost to the county and
would agree to this cut-back in
order to help the Board keep
taxes. as low as possible. *
The Board instructed Mr.
Thames, Civil Defense Direc-
tor to place a hold on surplus
equipment needed by the
Board.
Bank balances as of August
1, 1976 and warrants for bills,
presented, examined and
ordered paid are on file in the
Clerk's office. All payrolls for
the month of July were ap-
proved as paid.
The Clerk reported the
amount of fines and bonds
collected for the month.
There being no further busi-
ness the meeting did then ad-
journ.
-s- Eldridge Money, Chairman
Attest:
George Y. Core, Clerk


With A Humble Heart

I would like to thank everyone who voted for me
September 7. Also a special thanks to my two
opponents for the clean campaign they conducted. If
you voted for Mr. Guillot in the first primary, I
earnestly solicit your vote this second time around. To
get something accomplished we have to unite and work
together. So, I urge each one of you to go out and vote
for Paul "Sousehead" Sewell on September 28.


Paul Sewell
2tp 9-16


"Shenandoah", Fred War-
ing's Pennsylvanians, The
Birmingham Symphony Or-
chestra, The New York Harp
Ensemble and the Houston
Ballet and Houston Ballet


Symphony.
If you are interested in
joining membership fees for
students are $6.25, regular
membership $12.50 and pa-
trons (reserved parking and


seats) $25.00, mail your check
with your address to Panama
City Music Association, Box
133, Panama City, or contact
someone at the auditorium
during this week.


Special Purchase...




Bean Bag


M Red, white, blue combination

t I and assorted $1
h .,,. colors


0 -
I\


Bean Bag Refills $4.95


School Colors -


vs
,i


on

D95


- Auburn, Georgia,


Fla. State, Florida, $95
Denim and
Denim patterns

Assorted colors of red/white,
blue/white,


blue/orange,
gold/white


$3495


St. Joe Furniture Company

205-207 Reid Ave. Phone 229-1251
wmm


To the Citizens of Gulf Co.


The time has come for you to make a final decision for the
Commissioner in District One to represent you for the next four years.

Rudy Pippin, for many weeks has made the effort to see each person :
as an individual and has made personal contacts with many people in
Gulf County discussing the problems facing our county today. :

Rudy Pippin, a man who has served as a Commissioner can and will
be a strong effective voice in your county government.:

Rudy Pippin will work with the Board members as a team serving
ALL the people in Gulf County with a progressive government and
representing each one fair and impartial.

Go to the polls Sept. 28 and vote for
.X

F. R. (Rudy) Pippin, Jr.


County Commissioner Dist. One
::

..........


II








! Rich & Sons IGA
Port St. Joe, Florida
Thurs., Fri., Sat. Sept. 23-25


Sirloin
TIP
STEAK


DEL ONT

CATSUPjo









Jar


Choice
Quality
SIRLOINS
$149
Lb.


$149
Lb.


Ii


LIMIT 1
W-Food Order


DETERGENT


FAB


l000 Or More


RUMP
ROAST

$119
Lb.


RIB
STEW


69 b


RIB EYE
STEAK

$239
$ Lb.


New York
STRIPS

$239
$ Lb.


Choice Quality Blade
Chuck Roast
5 Pounds or More
Ground Beef
Choice Quality
Round Steak
Choice Quality
Shoulder Roast
Lykes Hickory Ranch
Sliced Bacon
Ga. Grade A Premium
Fresh Hens
Lykes
All Star Franks


FRYER PARTS
Quartered Breast
Quartered Thighs
Drumsticks
Chicken Wings
Chicken Backs
Chicken Necks

Poprite 16 oz. bag
Popcorn
I 1 oz.
Hot Shot
Roach & Ant Bomb


Lb. 59C
Lb 59C
Lb $119
Lb 89C
2 oz. 99C
Lb. 49'
Pak 59C


SPECIAL
49C
45C
79C
49c
39C
3/490


Loin
MEATY
RIBS


Lykes
BOLOGNA


89Lb


Lykes
COOKED
HAM


Lykes
COOKED
PICNIC


Choice Quality
ALL MEAT
STEW


Choice Quality
CHUCK
STEAK

79C


KRAFT 14 O
29 DELUXE DINNERs 75gs


89


5 Lb.
Bag


Limit 1 with 510 Food
Order or More


MACARONI & SPAGHETTI g^ 79
BRONCO 2Lb. I7
I THIN SPAGHETTI P 9gs
HEINZ
57 SAUCE 10 Osz $105 MCCORMICK ,4.
57 SAUCE BIs. BLACK PEPPER cans 8
NESTLE 16 025 NABISCO 12 Oz.
STRAWBERRY QUIK Cans 1RITZ CRACKERS Boxes /


Limit 2 Pkgs.

So'


0 W O IL


I ..I I


49 O.
Boxes


Robin-.
Hood(1 ROBIN HOOD
enriched flour
FLOUR


I


I









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 23, 1976 PAGE ELEVEN



Gulf Residents Purchase $3,533

Worth of U.S. Bonds In July


Florida sales of Series E and
H United States Savings
Bonds during July were $14.4
million -- up $1 million over
July 1975. Florida attained
60.4 percent of its annual sales
goal July 31 with sales totaling
$1,08.8 million during the seven
month period.
Mr. J. Ted Cannon, Gulf
County Volunteer Savings
Bonds Chairman reported Ju-
ly sales in the county were
$3,533. The county attained
51.8 percent of its annual sales


IIw t


~~A

-~ ~ rpi


The Huron Indians had men
who preached to fish and per-
suaded them to come and
be caught.


goal July 31.
The County Chairman stat-
ed that the Bicentennial de-
sign E Bond on sale during
1976 has been a popular gift
among county residents be-


cause of its historical and
practical value. He noted that
Americans are estimated to
purchase approximately $7.5
billion U.S. Savings Bonds
during this Bicentennial year.


You Are Cordially Invited to Attend

LONG AVENUE

Baptist Church

Corner Long Ave. and 16th St.


SUNDAY SCHOOL ...................
MORNING WORSHIP .................
CHURCH TRAINING ................
EVENING WORSHIP ................
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ....


Rev. J. C. Odum,
Pastor


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
6:15 P.M.
7:30 P.M.
7:15 P.M.


Jerome Cartier,
Minister of Music


Sharks of 1924-25

Several weeks ago we printed a picture of the 1932 high


school basketball team. This one goes back even further, to
1924-25. The picture was made available by Jake Belin, one of
the '32 team. Shown, left to right are: John Griffin, Jimmy
Dean, Joseph Aratti, Buster Owens and John Dendy.


Sikes Notes Academies' Deadline


Congressman Bob Sikes re-
minded eligible young resi-
dents of Florida's First Con-
gressional District that De-
cember 1st is his deadline for
the return of applications for
nomination to a military aca-
.demy.
Applicants between the ages
of 17 and 21 who are interested
Sin attending one of the aca-
demies beginning with the
classes entering in 1977:should&
write the Congressman im-
mediately for an application.
- The address is 2269 Rayburn
Building, Washington, D.C.
20515.
Congressman Sikes said he
expects to nominate qualified
residents for appointment to
the Military Academt at West
Point, N.Y.; the Naval Aca-
demy at Annapolis, Md.; the
Air Force Academy at Colo-
rado Springs; and the Mer-
chant Marines Academy at
Kings Point, N.Y. Although
Coast Guard Academy candi-
dates are chosen on a nation-
wide competitive basis and
not by Congressional nomina-
tion, Mr. Sikes said he can


Atchison

Enrolls At

Sewanee -
S James Stephen Atchison,
son of Mrs. Jean A. Atchison
1309 Woodward Avenue of this
city, is registered in the
College of Arts and Sciences of
the University of the South for
the 1976-77 school year. A
thousand college students
from 40 states have arrived at
the mountaintop campus of
the Episcopal-owned univer-
sity, located between Nash-
ville and Chattanooga.
The university, popularly
known as "Sewanee," is 119
years old and also includes the
graduate level School of Theo-
logy with 81 students and the
preparatory level Sewanee
Academy with 172 students.
Sewanee has held to its
liberal arts origins while keep-
ing up to date with computer
science, teacher certification,
and the newest theories in old
subjects like astronomy and
historical research.
The college has been coedu-
cational since 1969, and at
present about one-third of the
students are women. There
are ten social fraternities,
several academic and honor
fraternities, and 51 other ex-
tracurricular organizations to
engage the attention of stu-
dents in their free time.


supply those interested with
catalogs and applications.
Nominations by Congress-
man Sikes are based on appli-


Harry C
Harry F. Cook of Mexico
Beach was declared 2nd place
winner on .September.10th in
the Western Auto "Paint
America Beautiful Sweep-
stakes." Mr. Cook entered the
contest at the Western Auto
Associate Store in Port St.
Joe.
David B. May, owner of the
store, has presented Mr. Cook
with everything needed to
paint his house, including 10
gallons of paint, a 16 foot
extension ladder, brushes, and
a roller tray set; a value of
$145.53.
Strange as it may seem, Mr.
Cook, and, of course, Mrs.
Cook were actually in the
process of house painting
when notice of the award was
received. In fact, they had just
completed the cleaning and
caulking job and were,actual-
ly on their way to purchase
paint and a ladder when the
award notice arrived. Natu-
rally, Mr. May and his West-
ern Auto Associate Store got
the business.
Another, but more remote
coincidence came to light
when Mr. Cook advised that he
was a former employee of the


cants' scores on the Scholastic
Aptitude Test (SAT) and on
leadership activities in school
and the community. Appli-


cants must take the SAT no
later than November 6th this
year. High school guidance
counselors can assist those


students interested in regis-
tering for the test and this
should be done as soon -as
possible.


Western Auto Supply Compa-
ny. Some fifty years ago,
while a high school student, in
St. Paul, Minnesota, Mr. Cook
worked as a part time stock


(


boy in the Mail Order De-
partment of the St. Paul store.
.-He recalls that his pay was not
more than the going rate of
twenty five cents per hour.


Mr. Cook feels that in win-
ning this, his first major prize
.ina contest, justice, at long
last, has prevailed.


Those Delectable Indian Pass and

Indian Lagoon



OYSTERS

are on the market again!


To reserve
your bushel


Call


Indian Pass

Seafood Co.


227-8781


-VOTE FOR-


Waylon Graham

School Board Member
District Four
I Solicit Your Vote
and Support


Vote For

SJimmy 0.

S GORTMAN

ii g County Commissioner
District
A man with truth behind his word
A man with truth behind his word


I SUPPORT


Raymond Lawrence

for Sheriff

I, George H. Harper, have lived in this county since 1938, and as
S an old resident of this county I have known Sheriff Lawrence's
people and particularly his father. I always say that "By their fruits
ye shall know them." Sheriff Lawrence is much like his father was
during his lifetime.

"' ':-^ I have seen both sides of life
and heard the pros and cons of the
good and bad of life. I am close to
my 75th birthday and have made
Smy choice. I endorse 100 percent
: P. i Sheriff Raymond Lawrence under
S,, no advice, pressure or reward


other than seeing
elected.



George


a good man


Harper


Sylvania has never made an offer like it-
because they've never made a set like it.
SYLVANIA GFMATIC." FIRST true self-adjusting color set.
Many models and screen sizes to choose from.


ROCHE Furniture and
RE Appliance Store


^ 't *, .''' -*"'-'5 -_ -- (Pd. Pol. Adv. by George Harper) ::i


209 Reid Avenue


Phone 227-5271


4.

"
?


ook Wins WA Sweepstakes


--I


I L I


rJ.ll
SVVAI

ST.m A 1


1. sW
Ap


rl
I~
ii~ "i1








"PAGE TWELVE


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 23, 1976


Travel to Taylor County Friday



Sharks Shut Out Florida High



Demons, 12-0 In Friday Action


Terry Larry takes off on 30-yard scamper.


Port St. Joe's Sharks gained
their second shut-out of the
season here Friday night,
defeating the Florida High
Demons 12-0, in a defensive
battle.
The Sharks scored in the
first and third periods. One
score came on a six yard
plunge by Tim Beard and the
other from an intercepted
pass by Carl Beard.
The Sharks allowed the
Demons two chances at the
ball in the first period before
they took over on their own
nine yard line with 2:36 left in
the opening stanza. A Demon
penalty and three plays later
and Tim Beard scooted into
the end zone. The leap-frog


j k
i-, .
... ... .;..: .
James Ward (24), Chester Fennell (53), ground) hem in Demon runner Ben Willis.
.Preston Gant (89) and unidentified Shark (on -Star photos


Port St. Joe's premiere high school band did its share of bringing the fans
to their feet in applause during their half-time performance. The band is
Ishown above in the finale of its performance. -Star photo



SAVE


$60.00

'10x10-Ft. Lawn

4i Building

REGULAR $
$179.00

SRugged and roomy, the big capacity Re-
gency! Exclusive 5-step finish means years
-. of dependable usage.


.m 's60 OFF12x12-Ft.

.A:"" i -Big Red Barn
.:Z .', REGULAR
i :: .; ^- $359.00
S940 Cubic Ft! 9 9
. W T 5400 E. Hwy 98 Parker, Panama City
Phone 763-1739
:::ibJILDING MATERIALS CENTER 7-5:30M-F, 8-3:30Sat., 10-2
7-5:30 M-F, 8-3:30 Sat., 10-2 Sun. CST 1


drive was sparked by a 30
yard scamper by Terry Larry
and Beard's six yard scoring
run. Preston Gant's kick for
the extra point was delayed
slightly by a low snap and was
blocked. The Sharks took ex-
actly one minute off the clock
in their scoring drive.
Early in the second period,
it looked as if the Sharks were
mounting another scoring
drive when Gant intercepted a
Jeff West pass on the Shark 48,
giving the Sharks good field
position. But the Sharks elect-
ed to punt on a fourth and one
situation, giving up the ball.
AS THE SECOND HALF
opened, Ronnie Garland
brought the stands to their feet
as he took the Demon kick on
his own 24 and scooted down
the sidelines for a touchdown.
The referee called the play
back, however, ruling that
Garland's knee touched the
ground when he caught the
ball.
On their next possession the
Demons penetrated to the
Shark 32 before they came up
with a fourth down and nine to
go. The Demons tried to fool
the Sharks by gambling, but
Jody Taylor caught Ben Willis
trying to come around end and
the Sharks took over on their
own 37.
THE SECOND SCORE for
the Sharks came with 1:34 left
in the third period. The situa-
tion had the Demons back on
their own 38, with a first down
after a 15 yard Shark penalty.
West faded back to pass and
Ray Lawrence bored in and
slapped the pass high into the
air. When it came down, Carl
Beard caught the ball, slipped
out of the arms of two tacklers
and ran for the touchdown and
the Sharks' final score.
The Sharks tried to pass for
two extra points, but Keith
Neel's pass to Preston Gant
fell incomplete.
THE DEMONS made their
deepest penetration and only
threat to score late in the
fourth period, when they


worked the ball to the Shark 19
before Preston Gant inter-
cepted a West pass to end the
threat. The Demons had the
ball on the Shark seven yard
line, but a penalty put it back
on the 15 before the intercep-
tion play.
THE SHARKS DEFENSE
which held the Wewahitchka
Gators to only 98 yards the
week before did their thing
again against the Demons
Friday night.
Leading the defense was
Curtis Williams, with 12 tack-
les and five assists. Williams
earned the distinction of being
named the Tallahassee Dem-
ocrat's "Lineman of the
Week" for his Friday night
performance.
Other defensive standouts
were Chester Fennell with
nine tackles and four assists,
Preston Gant with seven and
three and one pass intercep-
tion, Jody Taylor with five and
seven, Donnell Ghrland with
four and five, Keef Pettis with
three and five and Wade
Stoutamire with five and two.

THE YARDSTICK
Statistics Courtesy of
Eddie Rich
PSJ Demons
First Downs 6 5
Rushing Yards 131 73
Passing Yards 0 16
Return Yards 30 25
Passes 0-3-0 3-9-3
Punts Avg. 5-35 4-34
Fumbles Lost 1 0
Penalties Yards 85 55


Score by Quarters:
Port St. Joe 6
Florida High 0


S0 6 0-12
0 0 0- 0


Florida's

News Source

Adequate
There's 'o shortage of com-
munications in Florida,
thanks to the state's 258
weekly newspapers and 63
daily newspapers covering the
67 counties.
The news media tend to
keep up with the population
-growth in the state, according
to Dahne's Florida News Me-
dia Directory, published at
Leesburg. As individual urban
centers expand, new publica-
tions are developed to service
community needs.
The state now also has 43
television stations and 307
radio stations, the Directory
reports.
There are also 139 monthly
and weekly magazines, and
133 special publications, such
as guide books and director-
ies. Internal house organs and
employee bulletins were not
included in the statewide in-
ventory.
The 228 page Florida News
Media Directory lists the ad-
ministrative, editorial and
news reporting staffs of the
print and broadcast media in
the state on an annual basis.


v: ;,i: ;f1 .nst:;F1 Read the Classifieds




K. E. "Ken" Murphy

Stands for:

',f^ / Strict enforcement of all laws that endanger
the lives and property of the people of Gulf
County.

I Prompt attention to ALL complaints
S/ Courteous and friendly service.
/ An experienced Sheriff that will be avail-
able at all times.
S'Cooperation with all law enforcement
agencies.
Si A Sheriff's office that is obligated to no one
S except the people of the county.
: / Most of all a sheriff YOU can talk to.

VOTE FOR 19 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Vote

K. E. "Ken" Murphy

Your Next Sheriff of Gulf County


FRIDAY NIGHT
Friday night, the Sharks
take to the road for the first
time this season and travel to
Perry to meet the Taylor


County Bulldogs. The Sharks
have treated the Bulldogs
shabbily for the past several
years and will probably meet
a tough battle tomorrow night.


The Kick-off


"Bowden may bring the Seminoles back-but don't
expect miracles right away." My goodness, after last
week the task seems more improbable than ever. If it
happens this week at least it will be against a highly rated
team. Course that poses the question-Is Miami that good,
or FSU 'that bad? Coach Bowden seems to think the
Seminoles were that bad. At any rate we'll certainly get a
better idea after this weekend-with Miami going to
Colorado and FSU taking on Oklahoma. Both the Big 8
schools would give anybody all they could handle.

The Gators have played one good, one bad. They
should take Mississippi State, but the Bulldogs have
always given them problems. So this could be an upset.

Alabama 45 vs. Vandy 7
Tennessee 17 vs. Auburn 13
Florida 28 vs. Mississippi State 12
Oklahoma 48 vs. Florida State 7
Georgia 28 vs. South Carolina 10
Louisiana State 21 vs. Rice 12
Kentucky 15 vs. West Virginia 6


Colorado
Southern Cal
Georgia Tech


-- -,_^ ____
Miami, Fla.
Purdue
Clemson


323 REID AVENUE
JoLk St. Jo










TIREDEALS



BIAS PLY Firestone

DELUXE CHAMPION0
4-ply polyester cord
As
A78-13 Blackwall.
low Plus $1.74 F.E.T. and
old tire.
as
$ 45 $C45 $0745
8278-13 E78-14 & F78-14
Plus $1.84 FE.T. Plus $2.25 F.E.T. Plus $2.39 F.E.T.
$O 4 $ 45 $|45
G78-14 H78-14 H78-16
Plus $2.55 F.E.T. Plus $2.75 F.E.T. Plus $2.80 F.E.T.
All prices are blackwalls plus tax and old tire. Whitewalls add $2.

DOUBLE BELT r eston

DELUXE CHAMPION"
SUP-R-BELT
Long mileage
1977 new-car tires!
it As low as


T'30wos d31 :o :34:.
0CM14 1 E78-14 W 8014
Plus 52 05 F.E.T. Plus 2.27 F.E T. Plus $2.43 F.E.T.
Low, wide
78 series design.
Two rugged belts 3 G78-14$ G7815IIS 7814
hold tread firm for 191
long wear and Plus $2.60F.E.T. Plus s2 65 F.E.T Pluss 2.83 F.E.T
easy handling. 0 3 Pr os are
Rugged 0 for blackwalls
construction gives H78-1 L78-15
excellent road $4
hazard resistance. Plus2.87 F E T. Plus s3 14 F.ET.
All prices plus tax and old tire.

PICKUP. VAN &
VRV TIRE trestone
al t, TRAMCDnPRT


$2862
Plus $2.42 Fed. Ex. tax, exchange.
Black, tube-type 6-ply rating.
Strong, Shock-Fortified nylon cord body.
long mileage all-wheel position truck tire.
Prices~~~~~~~--- shw-n-h--daalbl-tF-etneSoe


Prices shown in this ad available at Firestone Stores,.
Competitively priced wherever you see the Firestone sign.
We also honor:
CHARGE T...... .BankAmerncard Master Charge
'EM I M Diners Club .American Express
Es S.Carte Blanche



Pate's Shell


223-225 Mon. Ave.


station

Phone 229-1291


Service Si


~j


MEMENEW














510 FIFTH ST.
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Store Hours:
8 AM 8 PM
Monday Saturday


PRICES GOOD
SEPT. 23-25


Iowa Corn Fed
USDA CHOICE Bone Ir
ROUND


Tender Lean 1/4


- PORK

LOIN


SST E A K


Iowa Corn
Fed USDA Choice
Rib Eye Steak

267 Lb.


Iowa Corn Fed
USDA Choice
Sirloin Tip STEAK
$149 Lb.


Lb.


Lb.
j'


Light Western
T-Bone Steak


I


Lb.


Swifts Sweet Rdsher Packaged
SLICED BACO


Slab Bacon


Lb. 79


10'
Extra
Sliced


HAM


PORK LIVER
PIG EARS

39'


PORK
NECK BONES
Lb. 39 Lb.


Shank Portion
Butt Portion


Lb. 79'
Lb. 89'


B- U U


4 Roll Marcel
Toilet Tissue


GIANT PALMOLIVE
Dish Liquid

10A
OFF
LABEL


__ I I U I I


32 oz. RAGU Limit 1
SPAGHETTI 9C
SAUCE 9,


16 oz. Birdseye
CUT GREEN 4 cQ
BEANS N 9
15 oz. Penny
^^ DOG 1
OOL. 7 Far/
5 Lb. 7 Farms dk .. -..A


FRENCH
FRIES


32 oz. Bottle
Lemon-Lime 2E )gc
Orange / 9
IATORADE/ E8
2 Lb. Ronco
THIN TI 7
.$PAGHETTI 79


WE ACCEPT
USDA FOOD STAMPS


I 1


'I


5 LB. BAG


SUGAF


Limit 1
with $10
Food Order
or More


1 Lb. Quarter Parkay
Margarine


FRESH PRODUCE
10 Lb. Bag
I Potatoes

77
S Vine Ripe
TOMATOES Lb 37
Fancy Ripe
BANANAS Lb. 19C
YELLOW ONIONS 3 Lb. Bag 59
Fancy White Grapes Lb. 49
Fresh CELERY Stalk 29
32 oz..Returnable


32 oz. Returnable
RC & Flavors

4/88


6 oz. Bottle
VICKS NYQUIL
$188
4 oz. Bottle
VITALIS LIQUID
$113


LOW- LOW LowLO W...


Jumbo MARCAL
TOWELS


- a


24 oz. Swift
CORNED
BEEF


99c


16 oz. Birdseye
BLACKEYE 49
o PEAS


14 oz. Can
Showboat
Spaghetti


5/


$1


*


30 oz. Bonus Bottle
LOG CABIN $119
SYRUP
12 oz. Fine Fare _
ORANGEE/ 2 g
JUICE
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT
TO LIMIT QUANTITIES


.Fa ilyP-,ck
FRYER.


i


g -I -L Ls


I I -- ~__. ,. -,, - --~~-


I - -- -, ,_,


II


w


I


46,


I *


$


$139









PAGE THIRTEEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 23, 1976


It's Only Your



MONEY

Trust in the Future
By GERALD A. LEWIS
Comptroller of Florida


the headache of financial
upkeep-a service favored by
many retirees. For a small
fee, which is tax deductible,
a retired individual may
arrange a trust to manage
his or her money, leaving
more time for relaxation.
Another advantage lies in
the fact that should the
grantor become disabled,
the trustee may take
responsibiltiy for bill paying
and income tax, in addition
to providing protection for
the grantor and his family
against unsound investment
advice.
Also, unless stipulated for.
tax advantages, the trust
agreement may be amended
or revoked until the time of
the grantor's death. This
allows him to watch the trust
operate, making certain it
meets with his approval.
Upon the death of the
grantor, the terms of the
trust and trust assets are.
strictly private. During the
time the estate is being.
settled, there is very little
disruption of cash flow,
providing freedom from
worry at a time of emotional
stress. The families' funds
can be handled with capable,
understanding efficiency.
For more information
regarding trust agreements,
contact State Comptroller
Gerald A. Lewis, The
Capitol, Tallahassee 32304.


A sensible form of estate
planning, a trust agreement,
is becoming widely accepted
among persons with sub-
stantial assets.
A trust is an agreement
which allows a person to
place his "property in
safekeeping for the benefit of
himself or others. Any trust
consists of four elements:
:(1) The Grantor, Settlor,
or Donor, by whom the trust
is established;
(2) Trustee-s, a Cor-
poration or individual who
protects and manages
donated property;
:(3) Trustee Assets,
Property, Principal or
Corpus, combined with
earnings on the property;
(4) Beneficiary (ies) and
Remaindermen, the
recipients of the trust's in-
come and principal.
The trust agreement
establishes terms under
which trust assets are
managed and distributed,
and earnings accumulated
ori paid out. Since those
terms must be in keeping
With the desires of all of the
parties to the trust, an at-
tarney experienced in trust
agreements, as well as your
bank's trust officer, should
draft and review the
agreement.
:Establishing a trust
agreement carries many
advantages. It can eliminate


Say You Saw It In The Star


AVery Special Sandwich


For lunch or quick 'n easy suppers, these sandwiches pro-
vide deep down eating goodness. The favorite combination of
ham and cheese sandwiches is dipped in a French toast batter
andlsautded till golden brown. Pour on lots of syrup and enjoy!
FRENCH TOAST CLUB SANDWICHES
12 slices bread 14 cup butter or margarine
6 thin slices boiled ham 2 eggs, slightly beaten
6 slices process American /4 cup milk
cheese 4 teaspoon salt
Mustard (optional) Pancake and waffle syrup
Trim crusts from bread and top 6 slices with a slice of ham
and a slice of cheese. Spread lightly with mustard; top with
remaining bread. Melt butter in large skillet. Blend eggs with
milk and salt. Dip sandwiches quickly into egg mixture. Saute
in butter, turning to brown both sides. Serve hot with syrup.
Makes 6 sandwiches.



NOTICE

The Wewahitchka State Bank wishes to announce
:the filing on August 23, 1976, of an application with the
'Federal Deposit Insurance Corporationfor a branch
facility in Port St. Joe, Florida. If this application is
approved, the address of the proposed facility will be
'403 Williams Street.
The applicant shall, within 15 days after the
,Regional Director has notified the applicant in writing
:that an application has been accepted for filing,
publish one time in a newspaper of general circulation
in the community in which the applicant's head office
: located and in a newspaper of general circulation
:in the community in which the applicant proposes to
engage in business a notice containing the name of the
'applicant or applicants, the subject matter of the
application, the location at which the applicant
.proposes to engage in business, and the date upon
jyhich the application was accepted for filing by FDIC.
immediately after publication, the applicant shall
'Turnish the Regional Director with a certification from
the publisher and a tear sheet or clipping evidencing
such publication.

WEWAHITCHKA

STATE BANK


Dyer, Lister, On Committee


Jack Dyer and Roy Lister,
of Wewahitchka, have been
named to the North Florida
Agricultural Committee for
Lawton Chiles.
Dyer and Lister join 34 other
North Florida agri-business-
men on the committee which
is playing an important rol3 in
the re-election campaign of
Senator Chiles.
"I am very happy Mr. Dyer
and Mr. Lister have accepted
my invitation to be on this
committee and I look forward
to working with them in this
most important area," Chiles
said.
Chiles is a member of the
Senate Appropriations Com-
mittee's Subcommittee on Ag-
riculture.
The senator has imposed a
ten dollar per person limit on
contributions to his re-election
campaign to enable each per-
son to have an equal share in
the United States Senate office


and the North Florida Agricul-
tural Committee is helping
with that fund raising.
"Since his election to the
United States Senate Lawton
Chiles has proven himself a
friend of agriculture. He has
always been interested in our
problems and worked hard to
resolve them. It is important
for Florida agriculture that
we have a man in Washington
with the experience and abili-
ty to get things done," the


committee stated in a recent
letter.
"In his first six years Law-
ton Chiles has built a solid
record on agriculture in the
United States Senate. Whether
it's OSHA (Occupational Safe-
ty and Health Administration)
reform or limiting beef im-
ports; maintaining the tobac-
co program on reforming the
estate tax; funding the fire ant
program or enlarging the
Florida staff of the Farmers


Home Administration, Sena-
tor Chiles has been out in the
front working for the Florida
farmer," the committee said.


ORGANIZED


CRIME

IS A SOCIAL DISEASE.


Gaskin-Graddy Insurance
Phone 639-2225
Wewahitchka, Florida
Specializing In
CA BUSINESS PACKAGE POLICIES mo.


FIRE LIFE BONDS


Paym Pan bugiouodhand&.

Ask About Our Convenient
Payment Plan
In Port St. Joe Every Tuesday
In Sears Catalog Store


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ON DISPLAY WITH VALID AT POGGLY WIGGLY THROUGH SEPT. 28, 1976.
FEATURE PIECES OF WEEK


First United
Methodist Church
Constitution and Monument
Port St. Joe, Fla.
JOHNIE W. McCURDY, Minister
CHURCH SCHOOL ........................ 9:45 A.M.
PREACHING SERVICE ......... 11A.M. & 7:00 P.M.
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP .... 6:30 P.M.
CHOIR REHEARSAL (Wednesday) ...... 7:30 P.M.
mm mm


MOTOR NOIE


OATS

1inCI
news~


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*a '
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PS8~8t~Sr
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-~x-~P86.-~-~4rs18~ 8%1 IB:r









IN


Sale Prices Effective
Sept. 23, 24, 25
i~nlmlml l


V Pure Vegetable "
SHORTENING

CRISCO


3 lb.
can


HE


Mrs. Hildbold presents $100 check to Ruth Hendrix.


REDS OF


STANDARD GRADE Limit 2 bags
w/$10 order
FRESH WHOLE
packed 2
to bag
FRYERS lb.


i Shank Portion
Hickory Smoked
It
HAgS "
"water a
BUTT PORTION LB.89c /4 SLICED HAM I
CENTER SLICED LB. $1.49 CENTER ROAST I


Margie Carr acce
Margie Carr acce]


rINNERSIN YOUR HOMETOWN







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pts $100 check from Mrs. Hildbold. Hildbold presents $100 to Gene Brackin
pts$10 ch ck fro Mr.Hlbod idbl rset 10 oGn Bakn


Pure
BAMA


b


MAYONNAISE


32 oz.
jar


added"


LB. $1.09
LB. $1.39


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Additional purchase ,


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Beef Swift's Premium
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Fresh Lean Boston Butt
PORK b.
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18 oz. 49C
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Seabrook Petite 10 oz.1
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CAKES Size
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$129


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Assorted Flavors
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size I


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JUST WHOSE

SPECIAL INTEREST


DOES 'THE BARRON'

REPRESENT.



Branch Banking Bill Passes


urrspl~UUPUO" RECEIVED
S7W
I- LIY S1~D I


j~ ~..ar .
J F CddJ
Pblift Bok= P-R
AA a Cu---RM-


Fksuk Bawor' poom Add
ba dfl& E ClPW.M
A r I .
P" pbm -


The Facts:
*The Branch Banking Bill created banking monopolies with
the legal power to raise interest rates above the usury level.
*Dempsey Barron became an officer in one of Florida's larg-
est bank holding companies shortly after the passing of the
Branch Banking Bill.

Barron Sponsors No-Fault Insurance


RECEIVED
gInmu I biF? se.54~
Ib 7 2 w FH


L-&- -so- Asor-
f BImd A (o .
A,-W Lo,
indqd. k L as ma
C..km d Flows
mr. W.D. Hrlss..- -


A-MW B AP-.
hi~n.Mmm --
Bllr'S.
mmarm .C


The Facts:
*in addition to the above-listed contributions, the Martin, Dale
and Hubbell National Directory of Law Firms list the following
clients of the Barron law firm:
Allstate insurance Company Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company
American Mutual Insurance Company Reserve Insurance Company
American Fire & Casualty Co. Royal Globe Insurance Company
Continental National American Group Shelby Mutual Insurance Company
Dodson Insurance Group Statesman Group
Employers-Commercial Union Ins. Group' Stonewall Insurance Group
Florida Farm Bureau Insurance Company State Farm Mutual Insurance Company
Fireman's Fund American Insurance Co. Transport Indemnity Insurance Company
Government Employee's Insurance Co. United Services Automobile Association
Insurance Company of North America United States Fidelity & Guaranty Co.
International Service Insurance Company Unigard Insurance Group
Kemper Insurance Company Utica Mutual Insurance Company
Lloyds of London
*During the past two years, under the "No-Fault" plan, insur-
ance rates have increased 72o%.in Florida while only increas-
ing 15% in our neighboring state of Georgia.


0I1c,--- _


War Chest Full


Barron


IS


. 1..1o nLI il IIOnirt


SWO r, Caflai1dIt L mI it iy Iruckor Johr, EsPY.
a ('livr lr builder Kell


B BILL KACZO B u ,.- --- Auburn., -.Pd.".
6 MIuStj NI Service grou 11 ,trbii rtlup 1 t jl AOUel-.n c.n. llltL. --
ST.U'. -H- 'SSE: en. duri I, -.p.rllr.ln, HaVat.,inp, C ,rpa T r:' d. p ,' dT.n Prelt e Ld.e. L
alI..P ldr lde nl p BR r pPrlud .ilKl u p Ip i ulr. ." l c V 1 p .nraleA
..q )-PdMaM City. vwdll u PtW er -e P
A Barron's campaign report reads like a "Who's Who" or
"What's What" of special interest groups and businesses.
Eight contributors, including financier Edward Ball, donated
$1,000 each to the Barron campaign in the last reporting
period. The Florida Medical Political Action Committee (PAC)
gave $1,040.
Others in the $1,000 club are Hill-Kelly Dodge, Pensacola;
Gulf Breeze accountant R. Pierre Brown; Florida Rock Indus-
tries, Inc., Jacksonville; the Florida, Orlando, Florida Wholesale
Spirits Continuing Existence Committee; and the Florida Beer
Distributors Committee for Good Governments. 99

ISN'T IT ABOUT TIME SOMEONE
REPRESENTED THE PEOPLE!

ITS YOUR SENATE WITH TRAVS


SiARCHAN T
Paid Political Advertisements; Paid for by Campaign Treasurer


TRAVIS MERCHANT

WILL


REPRESENT

ALL OF N.W.

FLORIDA


A NATIVE SON
Travis Marchant has close family ties throughout the
Panhandle-from the west to the east.
Travis Marchant is one of eight children born to
Mrs. Tinnie Marchant and the late D.A. Marchant of
Chipley, Florida.
He spent his first 24 years growing up in Chipley
and working in the family grocery in Washington
County. A football standout, he graduated from Chipley
High School and went to work on a surveying crew
for the Department of Transportation's Regional Head-
quarters in Chipley.
Travis later travelled to Tallahassee where he grad-
uated from Tallahassee Community College and
Florida State University, studying in Government and
Planning, subjects he has since put to great practical
use.
Travis is married to the former-.Kathy Sdhneider, a
native of Panama City, whose family still reside in
Bay County. The Marchants have two little girls:
Michelle, 5 and Brady, 21/2.


A DEDICATED, HARD-WORKER
An "unknown" to local politics, Travis Marchant ran for
the Leon County Commission in 1972 against a long-
time incumbent and amassed the second-largest vote
any elected official had ever received in that county.
Characterized as being honest & outspoken in the
public's behalf, he was elected by his fellow Commis-
sioners as Chairman in 1975. During his Chairmanship
he was able to fulfill his promise of decreasing the tax
rate while improving services to the public through in-
creasing efficiency and eliminating waste.

A MAN WHO
BELIEVES IN THE PEOPLE
His motto when he ran successfully for the County
Commission remains his motto today: "When you
talk, I will listen with understanding and act in your
behalf."
He has made a firm pledge to visit each of the
counties in the district on a regular basis, with prior
notification, to discuss the needs and problems of the
citizens in the district. What this district needs is a
Senator for four years-not a Senator once every four
years.

If ITS YOUR SENATE WITH TRAVIS


lMARCHANT
Paid Political Advertisements; Paid for by Campaign Treasurer


**"* W .. *


ahsrpmlokmo~,PlulSundoy. Seplembe, 12 1976














Legal Advertising


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
INt AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
IN PROBATE
in Re: The Estate of
THOMAS E. GRINSLADE,
deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS
OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
the administration of the estate of
THOMAS E. GRINSLADE, deceased, Is
pending in the Circuit Court for Gulf
County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Gulf County Court-
house, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456. The
personal representative of the estate is
LILLIAN S: GRINSLADE, whose ad-
dress is Wewahltchka, Florida 32465.
The name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or demands
against theestate are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the Clerk of
the above court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may have.
Each claim must be in writing and must
indicate the basis for the claim, the
name and address of the creditor or his
agent or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim Is not yet due, the
date when It will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contingent or un-
liquidated, the nature of the uncertainty
shall be stated. If the claim is secured,
the security shall be described. The
claimant.shall deliver sufficient copies
of the claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons interested In the estate to
whom a copy of this Notice of Admini-
stration has been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges the
validity of the decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal representative,
or the venue or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration, September 16,
1976.
-s- Lillian S. Grinslade,
As Personal Representative of the
Estate of Thomas E. Grinslade,
deceased.
RISH & WITTEN, P.A.
303 4th Street
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Attorneys for Personal Representative
-s- By: William J. Rish 2t9-16

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids in duplicate will be re-
ceived until October 7, 1976 at 11:00
A.M., EDT by the Board of Public
Instruction of Gulf County at which time
and place all bids will be publicly opened
and read aloud for the Re-Roofing of:
GYMNASIUM
PORT ST. JOE HIGH SCHOOL
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
The Contractor shall furnish all labor,
materials, and equipment, and shall be
responsible for the entire completion of
this project.
Plans, specifications, and contract
documents may be inspected at the
office of the Architect; State Road 22,
Wewahitchka, Florida, and may be pro-
curred by General Contractors upon. a
deposit of,10.00 for each complete sefof
plans and specifications, of which the
full amount will be returned to each
General Contractor who submits a bid,
and all other deposits for other than one
complete set of plans and specifications
will be returned less deduction to cover
cost of reproduction. All documents
must be returned in good condition
within ten (10) days after date of opening
of bids.
Cashier's check, certified check, or
bid bond, for not less than five percent of
the amount of the bid, must accompany
each proposal.
Performance, Labor and Material
Bonds, and Workman's Compensation
Insurance will be required of the suc.
cessfull bidder.
Right is reserved to reject any or all
proposals and waive technicalities.
No bidder may withdraw his bid for a
period of (30) days after date set for
opening.
David Bidwell, Superintendent
The Board of Public Instruction
Gulf County
Port St. Joe, Florida
-s- Charles A. Gaskin, AIA
ARCHITECT
P. O. Box 7
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465 3t9-16
REGISTRATION OF
FICTITIOUS NAMES
We the undersigned, being duly sworn,
do hereby declare under oath that the
names of all persons interested in the
business or profession carried on under
the name of OMEGA SALES at Port St.
Joe, Florida and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
,Mrs. Ometa Osborne, Entire Company
-s-Ometa Osborne 4t 9-16

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
IN PROBATE
IN RE: The Estate of
STRAFFORD L. BARKE,
deceased.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that under and
by virtue of an Order authorizing sale of
real property issued by the Circuit
Court, in and for Gulf County, Florida,
dated September 13, 1976, the following
described real property will be sold at
public auction, for cash, to the highest
bidder:
The East V/ of Lot 19 and all of Lots
21 and 23, City of Port St. Joe, Flor-
ida, according to the Official Plat
thereof on file in the Office of Cir-
cuit Court Clerk of Gulf County,
Florida.
Said sale will take place on the steps of
the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St.
Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., EDT, on
Monday, September 27, 1976.
Said real property consists of a resi-
dence and an outbuilding located at 521
10th Street, Port St. Joe, Florida. The
property may be seen by appointment at
229-8211. Sale subject to approval by
Circuit Court.
DATED September 14, 1976.
HAZEL G. BARKE,
Personal Representative of
The Estate of S. L. Barke
By: Fred N. Witten,
Attorney for Personal Representative
2t9-16

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-


TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR.
BAY COUNTY.
IN PROBATE
SIN RE: ESTATE OF
HOWELL F. HAYS, Deceased.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Per-
sonal Representative of the Estate of
Howell F. Hays, Deceased, will offer for
sale to the highest and best bidder, for
cash, at public outcry at the Courthouse
in Port St. Joe, Florida, at the hour of
11:00 o'clock A.M., EDT, on the 18th day
of October, 1976, the following described
Real Property of the Estate owned by
the Decedent, situate, lying and being in
Gulf County, Florida, to-wit:


Begin at the Northeast corner of the
Southeast Quarter of Southwest
Quarter of Section 5, Township 7
South, Range S West, and run South
135 feet for point of beginning;
thence run West 130 feet; thence run
South 60 feet; thence run East 130
feet; thence run North 60 feet to
point of beginning, being Lot 3 of
Block 5 of the Second Addition of
Whiffleld Acres of Howard Creek,
Gulf County, Florida, same being in
in the Southeast Quarter of South-
west Quarter of Section 5, Township
7 South, Range 8 West.
All sales are subject to confirmation
by the Circuit Judge of Bay County,
Florida. This sale is made pursuant to
Order of the Circuit Judge dated the 13th
day of September, 1976.
JIMMIE LOU RHODES,.
Personal Representative
By: J. C. Bodiford,
Attorney for Personal Representative
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRE-
SENTATIVE
.J. C: Bodiford
P. O. Box 1022
Panama City, Florida
Telephone 785-3439 21 9-16

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY.
CASE NO. 76-171
IN RE: The Marriag eof
MICHAEL W. PARRISH, Husband
Petitioner,
and HELEN JEAN PARRISH, Wife
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: HELEN JEAN PARRISH whose
address is 473 Emma Road, Asheville,
N.C.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to iton Cecil G. Costin, Jr., 221 Reid
Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456,
Petitioner's attorney, on or before
October 18, 1976, and file the original
with the clerk of this court either before
service on petitioner's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this
Court on September 15, 1976.
GEORGE Y. CORE,
As Clerk of the Court
By: -s- Margaret B. Core,
As Deputy Clerk
(SEAL) At 9-16

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY
L. CHARLES HILTON, JR., et al.,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
LAWRENCE E. COOPER, et al.,
Defendants.
Case No. 76-135
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LAWRENCE E. COOPER,
a Natural Person
146 Mount Paran Road, N.W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30305
FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF
CHICAGO, a National Banking As-
sociation
One First National Plaza
Chicago, Illinois 60670 (its principal
place of business)
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF
ATLANTA, a National Banking As-
sociation
First National Bank Tower
Atlanta, Geoigla (its principal place
of business)
YOU AND EACH OF YOU ARE
hereby notified that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the following
property in Gulf County, Florida, to-wit:
Lands in Township 9 South, Range 10
West, and in Township 9 South,
Range 11 West, Gulf County, Flor-
ida, more particularly described on
Exhibit "A" attached hereto and
made a part hereof,
EXHIBIT "A"
PARCEL I: Section 8, Township 9
South, Range 10 West.
PARCEL II: The North one-fourth
of Section 17, Township 9 South,
Range 10 West.
PARCEL III: Section 7, Township 9
South, Range 10 West.
PARCEL IV: Section 18, Township 9
South, Range 10 West.
PARCEL V: All of fractional Section
19, Township 9 South, Range 10
West, EXCEPT that certain tract
conveyed to Money Bayou Company
by instrument recorded in Deed
Book 12, Page 223, Public Records
of Gulf County, Florida, and des-
cribed as: Beginning at a point on
the North boundary line of the right-
of-way, of State Road No. 10; said
point being marked by a concrete
monument, aforesaid point of begin-
ning being 1300 feet Easterly, mea-
sured along State Road No. 10 from
the East end of the bridge across
Money Bayou, and being also 1560.4
feet South and 2577.8 feet West of the
NE Corner of said Fractional Sec-
tion 19, and being also 62.81 feet
South and 272.07 feet East of a
Unites States Primary Triangula-
tion Monument marked "Peninsula
1934", from said point of beginning
run thence North 7 degrees, 10 min-
utes East 200 feet to a point marked
by a concrete monument, thence
North 82 degrees, 50 minutes West
1500 feet to a point marked by a
stake, thence South 7 degrees, 10
minutes West 280.4 feet to a point
in the center line of State Road No.
10, thence continuing South 7 de-
grees, 10 minutes West 753.8 feet to
the average high water mark of the
Gulf of Mexico, thence in a North-
easterly direction along the average
high water markof the Gulf of Mexi-
co which now bears South 88 de-
grees. 15 minutes, East 1506.73 feet
to a point, thence North 7 degrees,
10 minutes East 692 feet to the point
of beginning, and containing 30.88
acres, more or less.
ALSO EXCEPT:
All that part of said Section 19 lying
South of the right-of-way of State
Road S-30 and West of the said
Money Bayou tract, said part here-
tofore deeded to W. S. Wightman,
Trustee. Subject to the right-of-way
for State Road S-30.
PARCEL VI: The South one-half of
Section 1, Township 9 South, Range
11 West. SUBJECT to the right-of.
way for State Road S-30.
PARCEL VII: Section 12, Township
9 South, Range 11 West. SUBJECT
to the right-of-way for State Road S-
30. (Less exception noted below).
PARCEL VIII: Section 13, Township
9 South, Range 11 West. SUBJECT
to the right-of-way for State Road S.-
30, If any: (Less exception noted be-
low).
PARCEL IX: That part of Fraction-
al Section 24, Township 9 South,


Range 11 West, lying North of the
right-of-way of State Road S-30.
PARCEL X: All of the South one-
half of Fractional Section 2and all of
Fractional'Sections 11 and 14, all of
said sections being in Township 9
South, Range 11 West. TOGETHER
WITH a certain tract of submerged
bottom lands conveyed by the Trus-
tees of the Internal Improvement
Fund of the State of Florida by in-
strument dated November 24, 1964
and recorded in Official Records
Book 23, page 328, Public Records of
Gulf County, Florida and described
as: Beginning at the intersection of
the. South boundary of Section 14,
Township 9 South, Range 11 West,
at its intersection with the mean


Doe Deer Are



Illegal Game



On Reserves


Doe deer are not legal game
for archers on Florida's Wild-
life Management Areas.
Game and Fish Commission
Regional Manager, T.L. Gar-
rison, today cautioned pan-
handle sportsmen that despite
confusion in printed informa-
tion, doe deer were legal only
to archery hunters on open
lands.
Garrison pointed out that
there was some confusion due
to the wording in literature
available to the public by the
Commission. This year the
key phrase which stipulated
that only buck deer could be
harvested on management
areas was omitted. "Howe-
ver," he said, "the basis in
law is on the certified regula-
tions which were approved by
our board of Commissioners
and which are recorded with
the Secretary of State's office.
The regulation governing
the subject states: 'Legal
game' as specified by regula-
tions for any wildlife manage-
ment area shall be deer
(having one or more antlers at
least five inches in length-."
The only exception to this
ruling are archery hunts con-
ducted on Eglin Air Force
Base and on St. Vincents
Island National Refuge where
the Commission's certified re-


high water line of St. Joseph Bay,
being 1747 feet Westerly from the
Southeast corner of said Section 14;
thence running Westerly along pro-
jection of said South boundary of
Section 14 a distance.of 1025 feet;
thence North to a point on projection
Westerly of the North boundary of
Si2 of Section 2, Township 9 South,
Range 11 West, at a point 2442 feet
Westerly from intersection of said
North boundary of S'/2 of Section 2
with the mean high water line of St.
Joseph Bay; thence Easterly along
said Westerly projection of the
North boundary of said S12 of sec-
tion 2 to said mean high water line;
thence Southerly, following the
mean high water line of St. Joseph
Bay to the point of beginning; said
submerged land being in Sections 2,
11 and 14, Township 9 South, Range
11 West, containing 420.75 acres,
more or less, and lying and being in
the County of Gulf, in said State of
Flor:da includc;ng any accretions to
the said South one nalt of said Frac
tional Section 2 and to the said Frac-
tional Sections 11 and 14. (Less ex-
ception noted below)
THERE IS SPECIFICALLY EX-
CEPTED From Parcels VII, VIII
and X described above the following
described property, to-wit:
Begin at the point of intersection of
the South line of the North half of
Section 14, Township 9 South, Range
11 West, and the Eastern right of
way of State Road 30 and extend a
line East along said South lineof the
North half of said Section 14 and the
South line of the North half of Sec-
tion 13, Township 9 South, Range 11
West for 1700 feet; then turn left
along a line that is parallel to State
Road 30 for 1375 feet; thence turn
right along a line that is parallel to
the South line of the North half of
said Section 13, Township 9 South,
Range 11 West for 1000 feet; thence
turn left along a line that is parallel
to State Road 30 between the point of
beginning and the North line of Sec-
tion 13, Township 9 South, Range 11
West for 2000 feet; thence turn left
along a line that is parallel to the
North line of Section 12, Township 9
South, Range 11 West for 1060 feet;
thence turn left along a line that is
parallel to the second call above for
875 feet; thence turn right along a
line that is parallel to the South line
of Section 12, Township 9 South,
Range 11 West for 375 feet; thence
turn right along a line that is parallel
to State Road 30 for 3875 feet; thence
turn right along a line that is paral-
lel to the South line of said Section
12, Township 9 South, Range 11
West for 1000 feet; thence
turn left 90 degrees along a
line for 750 feet; thence turn left 45
degrees along a line for 1125 feet;
then right 45 degrees for 375' to a
point on the North line of Section .12,
Township 9 South, Range 11 West;
thence turn left for 1140 feet to a
poinT on the Eastern right-of-way
line of State Road 30, then turn left
along the Eastern right-of-way line
of said State Road 30 for 7923 feet to
the point of beginning.
LESS, ALSO, that part of Section 19,
Township 9 South, Range 10 West,
conveyed to State of Florida for the
use and benefit of State of Florida
Department of Transportation in
Official Record Book 54, Page 931,of
the Public Records of Gulf County,
Florida.
LESS: The northern most 200 feet of
the South V2 of Fractional Section 2,
lying between State Road S-30 and
the Mean High Water Line of St.
Joseph Bay.
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DAVENPORT,
JOHNSON, HARRIS, GERDE & HAR-
RISON, Cross-claimant's attorneys,
whose address is 406 Magnolia Avenue,
Panama City, Florida, on or before the 4
day of October, 1976, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court, either before
service on Cross-claimant's attorneys,
or immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Cross-claim.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on this 25 day of August, 1976.
GEORGE Y. CORE,
Clerk of Circuit Court
Gulf County, Florida
By: -s- Margaret B. Core,
Deputy Clerk
(SEAL) 4t9-2

REGISTRATION OF
FICTITIOUS NAMES
We the undersigned, being duly sworn,
do hereby declare under oath that the
names of all persons interested in the
business or profession carried on under
the name of ST. VINCENTS SHRIMP


COMPANY at Indian Pass Beach, Gulf
County, Florida and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
James T. McNeill, 50 percent.
Donald Britt Pickett, 50 percent.
-s- James T. McNeill
-s- Donald:Britt Pickett 4t 9-23


gulations specify deer of ei-
ther sex except spotted fawn.
In explaining the philosophy-
for the difference in legal
game on and off management
areas, Garrison pointed out
these key facts. "Initially
there are not that many people
participating in archery
hunts. The number of sports-
men is very low in relation to
the available game. Secondly,
the success ratio of archers is
considerably lower than with
regular hunting. Because of
this, we do not feel that the
small number of doe deer
which may be harvested will
have any effect on the deer
population.
On management areas,
however, you have a different
situation. Because of a scar-
city of open lands and Flor-
ida's strict trespass statutes,
there is a much higher deer
harvest. Under this circum-
stance, we are reluctant to
permit the harvesting of doe
deer because the numbers
taken could be damaging to
the herd on.specific areas.
Florida's 1976 archery season
opened statewide on Septem-
ber 4th and runs through
September 26th. A valid hunt-
ing license as well as an
archery permit is required to
hunt on wildlife management
areas during this period.



Airman Branch

On Carrier
Navy Airman Curtis L.
Branch, 24, son of Mrs. Myr-
tice L. Branch of Wewahitch-
ka, has reported for duty
aboard the aircraft carrier
USS Lexington, homeported at
the Naval Air Station, Pensa-
cola, 'Fla.
A 1971 graduate of Wewa-
hitchka High School, he joined
the Navy in March of 1972.

Support Local Merchants
Shop at Home


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 23, 1976 PAGE SEVENTEEN


Semmes Reports Meeting


sunshine state as having to
accept a two-fold responsibi-
lity. He said this involved,
"First, to maintain and in-
crease agriculture production
here and second, to remain
vigilant about the conditions
of Florida's resources.
During the actual meeting
itself the district supervisors
passed several resolutions
- which could have far-reaching
results.
They asked the Florida le-
gislature to exempt elected
soil and water conservation
district supervisors from fi-
nancial disclosure require-
ments since the positions were
not salaried.
Another resolution called
for the re-instatement of full
funding for the acceleration of
soil surveys in Florida. The
state legislature has not in-


Saying that he could think of
no other national issue, more
critical than food production,
R.M. Davis, Administrator of
the Soil Conservation Service,
Washington, D.C., addressed
the Florida Association of
Conservation Districts August
18-20 in Winter Park, states
Hugh Semmes, Chairman of
the Tupelo Soil and Water
Conservation District.
Davis told the group of Soil
and Water Conservation Dis-
trict supervisors that "Flori-
da's attention to agriculture in
-its comprehensive plan indi-
cates some real foresight, and
I hope that you act as strongly
to help implement it as you
have to draft it."
Because loss of farmlands in
Florida have not been as
extensive as in other parts of
the country, Davis sees the


1


NO LIMITS, NO GIMMICKS, JUST GOOD
PORTRAITS

10-1, 2-5
' AA AA -^^ ^^ -^. ^^^ ^t^ ^^ ^^> .^


creased the budgetary allot-
ment for the combined fede-
ral-state accelerated soil sur-
vey program as originally
planned.
The supervisors also urged
the state legislature to adopt a
concept of multi-use manage-
ment for state-owned land.
They expressed concern that
much usable land in Florida is
sitting idle or being utilized by
private individuals without
compensation.
The final business of the
meeting saw John Hunt of
Bartow, Florida elected to
another one-year term as
president of the Florida Asso-
ciation of Conservation Dis-
tricts.

The Supervisors who pre-
sently serve on the Tupelo Soil
and Water Conservation Dis-
trict Board are Hugh Semmes,


O'Neil McDaniel, Otis Davis,
Jr., Lewis Jamerson and
Charles Borders.




CARD OF THANKS

We would like to take this
opportunity to thank all of
those who were so kind to us in
the passing away of our loved
one Mrs. tBetty Ephriam,
mother ind grandmother of
Evergreen, Alabama.
Thank you for the food and
cards flowers and all of the
other acts of kindness that
were shown. We say from the
bottom of our hearts we.are
deeply grateful.
The Coker family
The. Nelson family
The Baker family


-W Q p -W -lop- L -q --q E


(1) 11x14, (1) 8x10, (1) 5x7,

(5) Wallet



All for this low, low price


$795



plus 70c film charge


Groups 50' Extra. Pay $300 now.

Balance when pictures delivered




Bill's Dollar Store



Thursday, September 30


-w~~~~~~~~ ~ ~~ -w- Iw~w- w-ww~ '~ w-~-~


DEMPSEY BARRON




BECAUSE...





He has no"Miami




Connection"


Dempsey Barron's opponent has received 80% of
his campaign donations from South Florida. Why ---4
are folks in Miami and Miami Beach contributing
money in a North Florida Senate race? Why
are they pumping thousands of dollars into
Tal lahassee?


If elected, who would Mr. Marchant vote to .
represent. You, or Miami? Think about it.

You know where Dempsey Barron stands. And
you can count on his support for North Florida.


Can Dempsey count on yours?






a G































District 3/Democrat

PAID POLITICAL ADV. PAID FOR BY CAMPAIGN TREASURER.
PAID POLITICAL ADV. PAID FOR BY CAMPAIGN TREASURER.


8 COLOR PORTRAITS


IW
















Proposed Constitutional Amendments


PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENTS TO BE VOTED ON
NOVEMBER 2,1976
NOTICE OF ELECTIONS
WHEREAS, The people, pursuant to
Article XI,' Section 3, of the Constitution
of the State of Florida, have petitioned to
have an amendment to the Constitution
of the State of Florida submitted to the
electors at the General Election to be
held on November 2, 1976; and
WHEREAS, the Legislatures of 1975
and 1976 passed Joint Resolutions pro-
posing amendments to the Constitution
of the State of Florida, and they did
determine and direct that the said Joint
Resolutions be submitted to the electors
of the State of Florida at the General
Election to be held on November 2, 976;
NOW, THEREFORE, I, BRUCE A.
SMATHERS, Secretary of State of the
Stale of Florida, do hereby give notice
that a General Election will be held in
each County in Florida, on the First
Tuesday after the First Monday in
November, which date is November 2,
!976, for the ratification or rejection of
the Initiative and Joint Resolutions pro-
posing amendments to the Constitution
of the State of Florida; viz:
Article II, Section 8 is created to read:
Ethics in Goverment-A public office is
a public trust. The people shall have the
right to secure and sustain that trust
against abuse. To assure this right:
(a) All elected constitutional officers
and candidates for such offices and, as
may be determined by law, other public
officers, candidates, and employees
shall file full and public disclosure of
their financial interests.
(b) All elected public officers and candi-
dates for such offices shall file full and
public disclosure of their campaign
finances.
ic) Any public officer or employee who
breaches the public trust for private
gain and any person or entity inducing
such breach shall be liable to the state
for all financial benefits obtained by
such actions. The manner of recovery
and additional damages may be pro-
vided by law.
'd) Any public officer or employee who
is convicted of a felony involving a
breach of public trust shall be subject to
forfeiture of rights and privileges under
a public retirement system or pension
plan in such manner as may be provided
by law.
(e) No member of the legislature or
statewide elected officer shall personal-
ly represent another person or entity for
compensation before the government
m;ody or agency of which the individual
S.s an officer or member for a period of
*,wo 'ears following vacation of office.
;:.n member of the legislature shall
:personally represent another person or
ifity for compensation during term of
.:ifice before any state agency other
* an judicial tribunals. Similar restric-
i;;ns on other public officers and
employees may be established by law.
,t) There shall be an independent com-
mission to conduct investigations and
inake public reports on all complaints
concerning breach of public trust by
public officers or employees not within
the jurisdiction of the judicial qualifica-
lions commission.
(g) This section shall not be construed
to limit disclosures and prohibitions
which may be established by law to pre-
serve the public trust and avoid conflicts
between public duties and private in-
terests.
(h) Schedule-On the effective date of
this amendment and until changed by
law:
(1) Full and public disclosure of finan-
cial Interests shall mean filing with the
secretary of state by July 1 of each year
a sworn statement showing net worth
and identifying each asset and liability
in excess of $1,000 and its value together
with one of the following:
a. A copy of the person's most recent
federal income tax return; or
b. A sworn statement which identifies
ecih separate source and amount of
income which-exceeds $1,000. The forms
for such source disclosure and the rules
under which they are to be filed shall be
prescribed by the independent commis-
sion established in subsection if), and
such rules shall include disclosure of
secondary sources of income.
.2) Persons holding statewide elective
offices shall also file disclosure of their,
financial interests pursuant to subsec-
lian (h) (1).
;3) The independent commission pro-
vided for in subsection (f) shall mean the
Florida Commission on Ethics.


Committee Substitute for
Senate Joint Resolutions Nos. 49 and 81
A JOINT RESOLUTION proposing an
amendment to Sections 3, 10 and 11,
Article V of the State Constitution, to
provide for the selection and reten-
tion and terms of justices of the sup-
reme court and judges of district
courts of appeal and for the filling of
vacancies in such offices.
De it Resolved by the Legislature of the
State of Florida:
That the following amendments to
Sections 3, 10 and 11 of Article V of the
State Constitution are hereby agreed to
lnd shall be submitted to the electors of
this state for approval or rejection at the
general election to be held in November
i976:
ARTICLE V
JUDICIARY
SECTION 3. Supreme court.-
(a) ORGANIZATION.-The supreme
c(:urt shall consist of seven justices. OF
THE SEVEN JUSTICES, EACH AP-
PELLATE DISTRICT SHALL HAVE AT
LEAST ONE JUSTICE ELECTED OR
'.APPOINTED FROM THE DISTRICT
tO THE SUPREME COURT WHO IS A
RESIDENT OF THE DISTRICT AT
THE TIME OF HIS ORIGINAL AP-
POINTMENT OR ELECTION. Five jus-
;:ces shall constitute a quorum. The con-
currence of four justices shall be
necessary to a decision. When recusals
for cause would prohibit the court from
convening because of the requirements
of this section, judges assigned to tem-
porary duty may be substituted for
justices.
(b) JURISDICTION.-The supreme
court:
(1) Shall hear appeals from final
judgments of trial courts imposing the
death penalty and from orders of trial
courts and decisions of district courts of
appeal initially and directly passing on
the validity of a state statute or a federal
statute or treaty, or construing a pro-
vision of the state or federal constitution.
(2) When provided by general law,
shall hear appeals from final judgments
and orders of trial courts imposing life
imprisonment or final judgments enter-
ed in proceedings for the validation of
bonds or certificates of indebtedness.
(3) May review by certiorari any
decision of a district court of appeal that
affects a class of constitutional or state
officers, that passes upon a question
certified by a district court of appeal to
be o0 great public interest, or that is in


direct conflict with a decision of any dis-
irict court of appeal or of the supreme
court on the same question of law, and
m-iy interlocutory order passing upon a
matter which upon final judgment would
be directly appealable to the supreme
court; and may issue writs of certiorari
to commissions established by general
law having statewide jurisdiction.
(4) May issue writs of prohibition to
courts and commissions in causes within
the jurisdiction of the supreme court to
review, and all writs necessary to the
complete exercise of its jurisdiction.
(5) May issue writs of mandamus and
quo warrant to state officers and state
agencies.


(6) May, or any justice may, issue
writs of habeas corpus returnable before
the supreme court or any justice, a
district court of appeal or any judge
thereof, or any circuit judge.
(7) Shall have the power of direct re-
viewof administrative action prescribed
by general law.
(c) CLERK AND MARSHAL-The
supreme court shall appoint a clerk and
a marshall who shall hold office during
the pleasure of the court and perform
such duties as the court directs. Their
compensation shall be fixed by general
law. The marshal shall have the power
to execute the process of the court
throughout the state, and in any county
'may deputize the sheriff or a deputy
sheriff for such purpose.
SECTION 10. RETENTION; Election
and terms.-
(A) ANY JUSTICE OF THE SUP-
REME COURT OR ANY JUDGE OF A
DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL MAY
QUALIFY FOR RETENTION BY A
VOTE OF THE ELECTORS IN THE
GENERAL ELECTION NEXT PRE-
CEDING THE EXPIRATION OF HIS
TERM IN THE MANNER PRES-
CRIBED BY LAW. IF A JUSTICE OR
JUDGE IS INELIGIBLE OR FAILS TO
QUALIFY FOR RETENTION, A
VACANCY SHALL EXIST IN THAT
OFFICE UPON THE EXPIRATION OF
THE TERM BEING SERVED BY THE
JUSTICE OR JUDGE. WHEN A JUS-
TICE OF THE SUPREME COURT OR A
JUDGE OF A DISTRICT COURT OF
APPEAL SO QUALIFIES, THE BAL-
LOT SHALL READ SUBSTANTIALLY
AS FOLLOWS: "SHALL JUSTICE (OR
JUDGE) (NAME OF JUSTICE OR
JUDGE) OF THE (NAME OF THE
COURT) BE RETAINED IN OFFICE?"'
IF A MAJORITY OF THE QUALIFIED
ELECTORS VOTING WITHIN THE
TERRITORIAL JURISDICTION OF
THE COURT VOTE TO RETAIN, THE
JUSTICE OR JUDGE SHALL BE RE-
TAINED FOR A TERM OF SIX YEARS
COMMENCING ON THE FIRST TUES-
DAY AFTER THE FIRST MONDAY IN
JANUARY FOLLOWING THE GEN-
ERAL ELECTION. IF A MAJORITY
OF THE QUALIFIED ELECTORS
VOTING WITHIN THE TERRITORIAL
JURISDICTION OF THE COURT VOTE
TO NOT RETAIN, A VACANCY SHALL
EXIST IN THAT OFFICE UPON THE
EXPIRATION OF THE TERM BEING
SERVED BY THE JUSTICE OR
JUDGE.
(B) CIRCUIT JUDGES AND
JUDGES OF COUNTY COURTS SHALL
BE ELECTED BY VOTE OF THE
QUALIFIED ELECTORS WITHIN THE
TERRITORIAL JURISDICTION OF
THEIR RESPECTIVE COURTS. THE
TERMS OF CIRCUIT JUDGES SHALL
BE FOR SIX YEARS. THE TERMS OF
JUDGES OF COUNTY COURTS SHALL
BE FOR FOUR YEARS.
(a) ELECTION: All justices and
judges shall be elected by vote of the
qualified electors within the territorial
jurisdiction of their respective courts.
(b) TERMS. The terms of all justices
of the supreme court, judges of district
courts of appeal and circuit judges shall
be for six years. The terms of judges of
county courts shall be for four years.
SECTION 11. Vacancies.-
(A) THE GOVERNOR SHALL FILL
EACH VACANCY ON THE SUPREME
COURT OR ON A DISTRICT COURT OF
APPEAL BY APPOINTING FOR A
TERM ENDING ON THE FIRST TUES-
DAY AFTER THE FIRST MONDAY IN
JANUARY OF THE YEAR FOLLOW-
ING THE NEXT GENERAL ELEC-
TION OCCURRING AT LEAST ONE
YEAR AFTER THE DATE OF AP-
POINTMENT, ONE OF THREE PER-
SONS NOMINATED BY THE APPRO-.
PRIATE JUDICIAL NOMINATING
COMMISSION.
(B) (a) The governor shall fill each
vacancy ON A CIRCUIT COURT OR ON
A COUNTY COURT in judicial office by
appointing for a term ending on the first
Tuesday after the first Monday in
January of the year following the next
primary and general election, one of not
fewer than three persons nominated by
the appropriate judicial nominating
commission. An election shall be held to
fill that judicial office for the term of the
office beginning at the end of the ap-
pointed term.
(C) The nominations shall be made
within thirty days from the occurrence
of a vacancy unless the period is extend-
ed by the governor for a time not to
exceed thirty days. The governor
SHALL must make the appointment
within sixty days after the nominations
have been certified to him.
(D) Jb) There shall be a separate
judicial nominating commission as pro-
vided by general law for the supreme
court, each district court of appeal, and
each judicial circuit for all trial courts
within the circuit.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that
the following statement be placed on the
ballot:
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE V, SECTIONS 3, 10,11
Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to provide that each appel-
late district shall have at least one
supreme court justice selected from the
district to the supreme court and that
justices of the supreme court and judges
of district courts of appeal submit
themselves for retention or rejection by
the electors in a general election every
six years, and that failure to submit to a
vote for retention or rejection, or a vote
of rejection by the electors, will result in
a vacancy in the office upon the expira-
tion of the current term; and to provide
that the governor fill vacancies on the
supreme court or on a district court of
appeal by appointing a person nomi-
nated by the appropriate judicial nomi-
nating commission for a term ending on
the first Tuesday after the first Monday.
in January of the year following the next
general election occurring at least one
year after the date of appointment.
Filed in Office Secretary of State June
3, 1976.

House Joint Resolution No. 1709
A JOINT RESOLUTION proposing an
amendment to Section 12 of Article V
of the State Constitution relating to
discipline, removal and retirement of
justices and judges.
BE IT RESOLVED BY THE LEGISLA-
TURE OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
That the amendment to Section 12 of
Article V of the State Constitution set
forth below is agreed to and shall be
submitted to the electors of Florida for
approval or rejection at the general
election to be held in November 1976, or,
if authorized by three-fourths of the
membership of each house of the
legislature, at a special election to be
held March 9, 1976:
ARTICLE V
SECTION 12. Discipline; removal and
retirement.--
(a) There shall be a judicial qualifi-
cations commission vested with juris-
diction to investigate and recommend to
the Supreme Court of Florida the
removal from office of any justice or
judge whose conduct, during term of
office or otherwise occurring on or after
November 1, 1966, (without regard to the


effective date of this section) demon-
'strates a present unfitness to hold office,
and to investigate and recommend the
reprimand of a justice or judge whose
conduct, during term of office or other-
wise occurring on or after November 1,
1966 (without regard to the effective date
of this section), warrants such a repri-
mand. The commission shall be com-
posed of:
(1) Two judges of district courts of
appeal selected by the judges of those
courts, two circuit judges selected by the
judges of the circuit courts and two
judges of county courts selected by the
judges of those courts;
(2) Two electors who reside in the


state, who are members of the bar of
Florida, and who shall be chosen by the
governing body of the bar of Florida;
and
(3) Five electors who reside in the
state, who have never held judicial office
or been members of the bar of Florida,
and who shall be appointed by the
governor.
(b) The members of the judicial
qualifications commission shall serve
staggered terms, not to exceed six
years, as prescribed by general law. No
member of the commission except a jus-
tice or judge shall be eligible for state
judicial office so long as he is a member
of the commission and for a period of two
years thereafter. No member of the
commission shall hold office in a
political party or participate in any
campaign for judicial office or hold
public office; provided that a judge may
participate in his own campaign for
judicial office and hold that office. The
commission shall elect one of its
members as its chairman.
(c) Members of the judicial qualifica-
tions commission not subject to im-
peachment shall be subject to removal
from the commission pursuant to the
provisions of Article IV, Section 7,
Florida Constitution.
(d) The Commission shall adopt rules
regulating its proceedings, the filling of
vacancies by the appointing authorities,
the disqualification of members, and the
temporary replacement of disqualified
or incapacitated members. The com-
mission's rules, or any part thereof, may
be repealed by general law enacted by a
majority vote of the membership of each
house of the legislature, or by the
supreme court, five justices concurring.
After a recommendation of removal or
public reprimand of.any justice or judge,
the record of the proceedings before the
commission shall be made public.
UNTIL FORMAL CHARGES AGAINST
A JUSTICE OR JUDGE ARE FILED
BY THE COMMISSION WITH THE
CLERK OF THE SUPREME COURT
OF FLORIDA ALL PROCEEDINGS BY
OR BEFORE THE COMMISSION
SHALL BE CONFIDENTIAL; PRO-
VIDED, HOWEVER, UPON A FIND-
ING OF PROBABLE CAUSE AND THE
FILING BY THE COMMISSION WITH
SAID CLERK OF SUCH FORMAL
CHARGES AGAINST A JUSTICE OR
JUDGE SUCH CHARGES AND ALL
FURTHER PROCEEDINGS BEFORE
THE COMMISSION SHALL BE PUB-
LIC. The commission may with seven
members concurring recommend to the
supreme court' the temporary, suspen-
sion of any justice or judge against.
whom formal charges ere pending. and
in the event the supreme court suspends
such justice or judge all proceedings
before the commission and all hearings
shall be public. Otherwise, all proceed-
ings before the commission shall be
confidential until a recommendation is
filed with the clerk of the supreme court
recommending removal or public repri-
mand at which time such proceedings
shall become public record.
(e) The Commission shall have access
to all information from all executive,
legislative and judicial agencies, IN-
CLUDING GRAND JURIES, subject to
the rules of the commission. AT ANY
TIME, on request of the speaker of the
house of representatives or the gover-
nor, the commission shall make avail-
able ALL information IN THE POSSES-
SION OF THE COMMISSION for use in
consideration of impeachment or sus-
pension, respectively.
(f) Upon recommendation of two-
thirds of the members of the judicial
qualifications commission, the supreme
court may order that the justice or judge
be disciplined by appropriate repri-
mand, or be removed from office with
termination of compensation for willful
or persistent failure to perform his
duties or for other conduct unbecoming a
member of the judiciary DEMONSTRA-
TING A PRESENT UNFITNESS TO
HOLD OFFICE, or be involuntarily re-
tired for any permanent disability that
seriously interferes with the perform-
ance of his duties. MALAFIDES,
SCIENTER OR MORAL TURPITUDE
ON THE PART OF A JUSTICE OR
JUDGE SHALL NOT BE REQUIRED
FOR REMOVAL FROM OFFICE OF A
JUSTICE OR JUDGE WHOSE CON-
DUCT DEMONSTRATES A PRESENT
UNFITNESS TO HOLD OFFICE. After
the filing of a formal proceeding and
upon request of the commission, the
supreme court may suspend the justice
or judge from office, with or without
compensation, pending final determina-
tion of the inquiry.
(g) The power of removal conferred
by this section shall be both alternative
and cumulative to the power of impeach-
ment and to the power of suspension by
the governor and removal by the senate.
(H) NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OF
THE FOREGOING PROVISIONS OF
THIS SECTION, IF THE PERSON WHO
IS THE SUBJECT OF PROCEEDINGS
BY THE JUDICIAL QUALIFICATIONS
COMMISSION IS A JUSTICE OF THE
SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA ALL
JUSTICES OF SUCH COURT AUTO-
MATICALLY SHALL BE DISQUALI-
FIED TO SIT AS JUSTICES OF SUCH
COURT WITH RESPECT TO ALL PRO-
CEEDINGS THEREIN CONCERNING
SUCH PERSON AND THE SUPREME
COURT FOR SUCH PURPOSES SHALL
BE COMPOSED OF A PANEL CON-
SISTING OF THE SEVEN CHIEF
JUDGES OF THE JUDICIAL CIR-
CUITS OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA
MOST SENIOR IN TENURE OF JUDI-
CIAL OFFICE AS CIRCUIT JUDGE.
FOR PURPOSES OF DETERMINING
SENIORITY OF SUCH CIRCUIT
JUDGES IN THE EVENT THERE BE
JUDGES OF EQUAL TENURE IN
JUDICIAL OFFICE AS CIRCUIT
JUDGE THE JUDGE OR JUDGES
FROM THE LOWER NUMBERED
CIRCUIT OR CIRCUITS SHALL BE
DEEMED SENIOR. IN THE EVENT
ANY SUCH CHIEF CIRCUIT JUDGE IS
UNDER INVESTIGATION BY THE
JUDICIAL QUALIFICATIONS COM-
MISSION OR IS OTHERWISE DIS-
QUALIFIED OR UNABLE TO SERVE
ON THE PANEL, THE NEXT MOST
SENIOR CHIEF CIRCUIT JUDGE OR
JUDGES SHALL SERVE IN PLACE OF
SUCH DISQUALIFIED OR DISABLED
CHIEF CIRCUIT JUDGE.
(I) SCHEDULE TO SECTION 12.-
(1) The terms of office of the present
members of the judicial qualifications
commission shall expire on January 1,
1975 and new members shall be appoint-
ed to serve the following staggered
terms:
(A) (a) Group I.-The terms of five
members, composed of two electors as
set forth in s. 12(a) (3) of Article V, one
member of the bar of Florida as set forth
in s. 12(a) (2) of Article V, one judge
from the district courts of appeal and
one circuit judge as set forth in s. 12(a)
(1) of Article V, shall expire on Decem-
ber 31, 1976.
(B) (b) Group II.-The terms of tour
members, composed of one elector as set
forth in s. 12(a) (3) of Article V, one
member of the bar of Florida as set forth
in S. 12(a) (2) of Article V, one circuit
judge and one county judge as set forth
in s. 12(a) (1) of Article V shall, expire on


December 31, 1978.
(C) (c) Group III.-The terms of four
members, composed of two electors as
set forth in s. 12(a) (3) of Article V, one
judge from the district courts of appeal
and one county judge as set forth in s.
12(a) (1) of Article V, shall expire on
December 31, 1980.
(2) The 1976 amendment to section 12
of Article V, IF SUBMITTED AT A
SPECIAL ELECTION, SHALL TAKE
EFFECT UPON APPROVAL BY THE
ELECTORS OF FLORIDA. provided
herein and the provisions of this sche-
dule shall take effect January 1, 1975.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that in


accordance with the requirements of
section 101.161, Florida Statutes, the
substance of the amendment proposed
herein shall appear on the ballot as
follows:
Proposing an amendment to Section 12
of Article V of the State Constitution to
provide that proceedings before the
judicial qualifications commission shall
be confidential until the filing of formal
charges against a justice or judge with
the Clerk of the Supreme Court, to re-
quire the judicial qualifications com-
mission to make available all informa-
tion in its possession upon the request of
the Speaker of the House of Representa-
tives or the Governor, to provide that im-
proper motive shall not be required for
removal of a justice or judge whose
conduct demonstrates unfitness to hold
office, and to provide for service on the
Supreme Court by certain chief judges of
the judicial circuits, rather than justices
of the Supreme Court, when the judicial
qualifications commission has under-
taken proceedings against a justice of
the Supreme Court.
Filed in Office Secretary of State May
30, 1975.

Committee Substitute for
House Joint Resolution No. 3982
A JOINT RESOLUTION proposing
amendments to Sections 3 and 4 and
the creation of Section 16 of Article VI I
of the State Constitution relating to the
valuation and taxation of property
lying within certain community re-
development areas and to the financ-
ing of, and issuance of bonds for, cer-
tain community redevelopment pro-
jects.
WHEREAS, it is found and declared
that there exist in counties and munici-
palities of the state slum and blighted
areas .which constitute a serious and
growing menace, injurious to the public
health, safety, morals, and welfare of
the residents of the state, and
WHEREAS, the prevention and elimi-
nation of slums and blight through
community redevelopment plans, adopt-
ed for community redevelopment pur-
poses, are found and declared to be
matters of state policy and concern, and
WHEREAS, it is found and declared
that such community redevelopment
purposes include:
(1) The clearance, replanning, recon-
struction, conservation,or rehabilitation
of residential or nonresidential slum or
blighted areas contributing to the spread
of disease and crime, constituting an
economicor social liability, contributing
to a decrease in the tax base, or Impair-
ing sound growth, and
(2) The resale of such property to any
private person or entity or the resale or
gift of such property to any public or
governmental entity, NOW, THERE-
FORE,
Be It Resolved by the Legislature of the
State of Florida:
That the amendments to Sections 3
and 4 and the creation of Section 16 of
Article VII of the State Constitution set
forth below are agreed to and shall be
submitted to the electors of Florida for
approval or rejection at the general
election to be held in November 1976:
ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION
SECTION 3. Taxes; exemptions.-
(a) All property owned by a munici-
pality and used exclusively by it for
municipal or public purposes shall be
exempt from taxation. A municipality,
owning property outside the municipal-
ity, may be required by general law to
make payment to the taxing unit in
which the property is located. Such
portions of property as are used pre-
dominately for educational, literary,
scientific, religious or charitable pur-
poses may be exempted by general law
from taxation.
(b) There shall be exempt from taxa-
tion, cumulatively, to every head of a
family residing in this state, household
goods and personal effects to the value
fixed by general-law, not less than one
thousand dollars, and to every widow or
person who is blind or totally and per-
manently disabled, property to the value
fixed by general law not less than five
hundred dollars.
(C) WHEN AUTHORIZED AND AS
DEFINED BY GENERAL LAW PASS-
ED BY A TWO-THIRDS VOTE OF THE
MEMBERSHIP OF EACH HOUSE,
ANY COMMUNITY REDEVELOP-
MENT PLAN AS APPROVED BY THE
ELECTED GOVERNING BODY MAY
PROVIDE FOR SUCH TOTAL OR
PARTIAL EXEMPTION FROM TAXA-
TION TO BE GIVEN TO THE IM-
PROVEMENTS ON LANDS WITHIN A
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT
AREA, BY SUCH METHOD OR
METHODS, FOR SUCH PERIOD OR
PERIODS OF TIME, NOT EXCEED-
ING TWENTY-FIVE YEARS IN ANY
INSTANCE.
SECTION 4. Taxation; assessments.
-By general law regulations shall be
prescribed which shall secure a just
valuation of all property for ad valorem
taxation, provided:
(a) Agricultural land or land used
exclusively for non-commercial recrea-
tional purposes may be classified by
general law and assessed solely on the
basis of character or use.
(b) Pursuant to general law tangible
personal property held for sale as stock
in trade and livestock may be valued for
taxation at a specified percentage of its
value.
(C) PURSUANT TO GENERAL LAW
PASSED BY TWO-THIRDS OF THE
MEMBERSHIP OF EACH HOUSE,
REAL PROPERTY WITHIN A COM-
MUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AREA
MAY BE VALUED FOR TAXATION AT
THE VALUE OF THE LAND, EXCLU-
SIVE OF IMPROVEMENTS, FOR THE
YEAR IMMEDIATELY PRIOR TO RE-
DEVELOPMENT FOR SUCH PERIOD
OR PERIODS OF TIME, NOT TO EX-
CEED TWENTY-FIVE YEARS, AND
UPON SUCH TERMS, CONDITIONS,
AND RESTRICTIONS AS MAY BE
PRESCRIBED BY GENERAL LAW.
SECTION 16. FINANCING OF COM-
MUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PRO-
JECTS.--
(A) WHEN PROVIDED BY GEN-
ERAL LAW PASSED BY A TWO-
THIRDS VOTE OF THE MEMBER-
SHIP OF EACH HOUSE, ADVALOREM
TAX COLLECTIONS BY THE TAXING
AUTHORITY OF THE TAXING UNIT
WITHIN WHICH THE COMMUNITY
REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT IS
LOCATED EXCEEDING AD
VALOREM TAX COLLECTIONS PRO-
DUCED AT THE RATE OF TAX LEVY
EACH YEAR BY SUCH TAXING
AUTHORITY UPON THE ASSESSED
VALUATION OF TAXABLE PROPER-
TY WITHIN EACH COMMUNITY RE-
DEVELOPMENT AREA AS REFLECT-
ED IN THE JUST VALUE TAX ROLL
EXISTING PRIOR TO THE ADOPTION
BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE
TAXING AUTHORITY OF THE COM-
MUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN
MAY BE ALLOCATED TO AND USED
BY A COMMUNITY REDEVELOP-
MENT AGENCY TO FINANCE OR RE-
FINANCE EACH COMMUNITY RE-
DEVELOPMENT PROJECT.


(B) COMMUNITY REDEVELOP-
MENT PROJECTS AS MAY BE
AUTHORIZED BY GENERAL LAW
MAY:
(1) REDEVELOP PROPERTY FOR
RESIDENTIAL, RECREATIONAL,
COMMERCIAL, OR INDUSTRIAL'
USES;
(2) ACQUIRE PROPERTY BY EMI-
NENT DOMAIN BY ANY CITY, COUN-
TY, OR AUTHORITY CREATED BY
GENERAL OR SPECIAL LAW; AND
. (3) RESELL OR TRANSFER SUCH
PROPERTY TO ANY PRIVATE PER-
SON PURSUANT TO CRITERIA AS
MAY BE ESTABLISHED BY GEN-
ERAL LAW.


(C) COMMUNITY REDEVELOP-
MENT PLANS AS MAY BE AUTHO-
RIZED BY GENERAL LAW SHALL:
(1) CONTAIN THE FINDINGS AND
DETERMINATIONS OF THE ELECT-
ED GOVERNING BODY THAT THE
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT
AREA IS A SLUM OR BLIGHTED
AREA; AND
(2) CONTAIN THE FINDINGS AND
DETERMINATIONS OF THE ELECT-
ED GOVERNING BODY THAT TIJE
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT
AGENCY HAS A FEASIBLE METHOD
OR PLAN, TO INCLUDE REPLACE-
MENT HOUSING, FOR THE RELOCA-
TION OF PERSONS TEMPORARILY
OR PERMANENTLY DISPLACED
FROM HOUSING FACILITIES WITH-
IN THE COMMUNITY REDEVELOP-
MENT AREA.
(D) WHEN AUTHORIZED BY GEN-
ERAL LAW PASSED BY A TWO-
THIRDS VOTE OF THE MEMBER-
SHIP OF EACH HOUSE, ANY MUNI-
CIPALITY, COUNTY, DISTRICT, OR
AUTHORITY CREATED BY GEN-
ERAL OR SPECIAL LAW MAY ISSUE
REVENUE BONDS SECURED SOLE-
LY BY A PLEDGE OF AND PAYABLE
FROM TAX REVENUES DERIVED
PURSUANT TO SUBSECTION (a) TO
FINANCE OR REFINANCE COM-
MUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PRO-
JECTS WITHIN THE COMMUNITY
REDEVELOPMENT AREA FROM

WHICH SUCH TAXES WERE DE-
RIVED.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that in
accordance with the requirements of
section 101.161, Florida Statutues, the
substance of the amendments proposed
herein shall appear on the ballot as
follows:
Proposing amendments to Sections 3
and 4 and the creation of Section 16 of
Article VII of the State Constitution
authorizing tax exemptions and assess-
ments at less than lust valuations for
purposes of community redevelopment
or renewal of slum or blighted areas and
authorizing the use of portions of the ad
valorem tax revenues derived from a
community redevelopment project, and
the issuance of bonds pledged to such
revenues, for the purpose of financing or
refinancing such community redevelop-
ment activity.
Filed in Office Secretary of State June
10, 1976.

House Joint Resolution No. 1779
A JOINT RESOLUTION proposing an
amendment to Article VII of the State
Constitution to provide a new Section
16 relating to bonds for housing and
related facilities.
Be It Resolved by the Legislature of the
State of Florida:
That the following addition of Section
16 to Article V I of the Constitution of the
State of Florida, as an amendment to
such article, is hereby agreed to and
shall be submitted to the electors of
Florida for approval or rejection at the
general election to be held in November,
1976; said Section 16 to be effective
immediately upon ratification by the
electors:
SECTION 16. Bonds for housing and
related community development facili-
ties.-
(a) When authorized by law, revenue
bonds may be issued without an election
to finance or refinance housing and
related facilities in Florida (herein
referred to as "facilities").
(b) The bonds shall be secured by a
pledgeof and shall be payable primarily
from all or any part of revenues to be
derived from the financing, operation or
sale of such facilities, mortgage or loan
payments, and any other revenues or
assets that may be legally available for'
such purposes derived from sources
other than ad valorem taxation, includ-
ing revenues from other facilities, or any
combination thereof (herein collectively
referred to as "pledged revenues".).
(c) No bonds shall be Issued unless a
state fiscal agency, created by law, has
made a determination that In no state
fiscal year will the debt service require-
ments of the bondssproposed to be issued
and all other bonds secured by the same
pledged revenues exceed the pledged
revenues available for payment of such
debt service requirements, as defined by
law.
(d) The total bonds outstanding shall
not exceed $100,000,000 in any one fiscal
year.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that In
accordance with the requirements of
section 101.161, Florida Statutes, the
substance of the amendment proposed
herein shall appear on the ballot as
follows:
Proposes an amendment to Article VII
of the State Constitution to provide a new
Section 16 which authorizes the issuance
of revenue bonds to finance or refinance
housing and related facilities in Florida,
secured primarily by pledged revenues
at least equal to the annual bond pay-
ments. Limiting the bonds which may be
outstanding in one fiscal year, to $100,-
000,000.
Filed in Office Secretary of State June
14, 1976.

Senate Joint Resolution No. 266
A JOINT RESOLUTION proposing an
amendment to Article II of the State
Constitution, adding section 8, pro-
hibiting by July 1, 1978 and thereafter,
the number of full-time salaried state
employees from exceeding one per-
cent of the state population estimate;
prohibiting the number of part-time
state employees from exceeding ten
percent of the full-time employees.
Be It Resolved by the Legislature of the
State of Florida:
That the following amendment to
Article II of the State Constitution is
hereby agreed to and shall be submitted
to the electors of this state for approval
or rejection at the general election to be
held in November 1976:
ARTICLE II
GENERAL PROVISIONS
SECTION 8. State employees.-By
July 1, 1978 and thereafter, the number
of full-time salaried state employees,
excluding officers elected by popular
vote and persons appointed to fill such
offices, shall not exceed one percent of
the official estimate of the state popula-
tion for the preceding year; and the
number of part-time state employees
shall not exceed ten percent of the
full-time employees; but the governor,
with the approval of three members of
the cabinet, may be authorized by law to
approve additional positions to meet
emergencies for the duration of the
emergency.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that
the following statement be placed on the
ballot:
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE II
Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to prohibit by July 1, 1978
and thereafter, the number of full-time
salaried state employees, excluding
officers elected by popular vote and
persons appointed to fill such offices,
from exceeding one percent of the
official estimate of the state population
for the preceding year; and prohibit the


number of part-time state employees
from exceeding ten percent of the
full-time employees; but the governor,
with the approval of three members of
the cabinet, may be authorized by law to
approve additional positions to meet
emergencies for the duration of the
emergency.
Filed in Office Secretary of State June
4, 1976.

Committee Substitute for Senate
Joint Resolutions Nos. 619 and 1398
A JOINT RESOLUTION'proposing an
amendment to Section 18, Article I of
the State Constitution, to authorize the
Legislature to nullify any rule or regu-


lation promulgated by the executive
branch and providing for deferral with
respect to such nullification and to pro-
vide for suspension of such rule as
provided by law.
Be It Resolved by the Legislature of the
State of Florida:
That the following amendment to
Section 18 of Article I of the State
Constitution is hereby agreed to and
shall be submitted to the electors of this
state for approval or rejection at the
general election to be held in November
1976:
ARTICLE I
DECLARATION OF RIGHTS
SECTION 18. Administrative penal-
ties.-No administrative agency shall
Impose a sentence of imprisonment, nor
shall it impose any other penalty except
as provided by law. ANY ADMINISTRA-
TIVE RULE OF ANY AGENCY OF
THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH MAY BE
NULLIFIED BY CONCURRENT RE-
SOLUTION OF THE LEGISLATURE
ON THE GROUND THAT THE RULE IS
WITHOUT OR IN EXCESS OF DELE-
GATED LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY
AND MAY BE SUSPENDED AS PRO-
VIDED BY LAW ON THE SAME
GROUND; HOWEVER, BY A MAJOR-
ITY VOTE OF THE GOVERNOR AND
CABINET THE SUSPENSION MAY BE
DEFERRED UNTIL ACTED UPON BY
THE LEGISLATURE. FAILURE OF
THE LEGISLATURE TO DISAP-
PROVE THE SUSPENSION AT THE
NEXT REGULAR SESSION SHALL
AUTOMATICALLY REINSTATE THE
RULE.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED That
the following statement be placed on the
ballot:
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, SECTION 18
Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to authorize the Legislature
to nullify or suspend any rule or regula-
tion promulgated by the executive
branch of state government and pro-
viding a procedure for the deferral of
any such nullification which rule or reg-
ulation is without or in excess of dele-
gated legislative authority.
Filed in Office Secretary of State June
10, 1976.

House Joint Resolution No. 291
A JOINT RESOLUTION proposing the
creation of Section 14 of Article X of
the State Constitution relating to state
retirement systems.
Be It Resolved by the Legislature of the
State of Florida:
That the creation of Section 14 of
Article X of the State Constitution set
forth below is agreed to and shall be
submitted to the electors of Florida
for approval or rejection at the general
election to be held in November 1976:
ARTICLE X
MISCELLANEOUS
SECTION 14. State retirement sys-
tems benefit changes.-A governmental
unit responsible for any retirement or
pension system supported in whole or
in part by public funds shall not after
January 1, 1977, provide any increase in
the benefits to the members or benefi-
ciaries of such system unless such unit
has made or concurrently makes provi-
sion for the funding of the increase in
benefits on a sound actuarial basis.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that in
accordance with the requirements of
section 101.161, Florida Statutues, the
substance of the amendment proposed
herein shall appear on the ballot as
follows:
Proposing to add Section 14 to Article
X of the State Constitution to provide
that increases in the benefits payable
under any governmental supported re-
tirement system after January 1, 1977,
be fully funded by the governmental
unit.
Filed In Office Secretary of State June
2, 1975.

Senate Joint Resolution No. 999
A JOINT RESOLUTION proposing an
amendment to Article IV of the State
Constitution, adding section 10,
authorizing the creation of a capitol
and mansion commission.
BE IT RESOLVED BY THE LEGISLA-
TURE OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA:
That the following amendment to
Article IV of the State Constitution is
hereby agreed to and shall be submitted
to the electors of this state for approval
or rejection at the general election to be
held in November 1976:
ARTICLE IV
EXECUTIVE
SECTION 10. CAPITOL AND MAN-
SION COMMISSION.-THERE MAY
BE CREATED BY LAW A CAPITOL
AND MANSION COMMISSION WITH
AUTHORITY TO ESTABLISH AND
MAINTAIN A BASIC PLAN OR
SCHEME FOR THE FURNISHING,
DECORATING, AND ALTERATION
OF THE GOVERNOR'S MANSION AND
THE CAPITOL BUILDING COMPLEX,
CONSISTENT WITH THE ARCHITEC-
TURE AND THE HISTORIC AND
SYMBOLIC NATURE OF THE BUILD-
INGS. THE TERMS OF THE MEM-
BERS SHALL NOT EXCEED 9 YEARS.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that
the following statement be placed on the
ballot:
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE IV
Proposing an amendment to the State
Constitution to authorize a capitol and
mansion commission with authority to
establish and maintain a plan for the
furnishing, decorating, and alteration of
the capitol building complex and the
governor's mansion.
Filed in Office Secretary of State June
4, 1975.

CODING: Words in Bold type are dele-
tions from existing law; words in
BOLD CAPS are additions.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have
hereunto set my hand and affixed the
Great Seal of the State of Florida at
Tallahassee, The Capital, this the 19 day
of August, A.D., 1976.
-s- BRUCE A. SMATHERS,
SECRETARY OF STATE (SEAL)
2t 8-26


"Division of Forestry dispatchers Lee Goodwin and
Ralph Williams make daily fire weather observations."
-Forestry Photo




Land Owners



Must Get Burn



Authorization


The determining factor in
whether or not a Burning
Authorization will be issued to
Florida landowners is the
current and predicted daily
fire weather. Information
such as wind direction and
velocity, relative humidity,
temperature, amount of time
since last rainfall and stagna-
tion (pollution) index must be
favorable before a permit is
issued. Fire weather informa-
tion is gathered daily both
locally and through the Natio-
nal Weather Service.
Open burning between the
hours of 9:00 a.m. (standard
time) and one hour before
sunset is allowed for forest,
grass, woods, wild lands or
marshes, or vegetative land
clearing debris provided a
burning authorization is ob-
tained first. The Division of
Forestry may allow open
burning at other times when
there is reasonable assurance
that atmospheric and meteor-
ological conditions in the vici-
nity of the burning will allow
proper diffusion and disperse-
ment of air pollutants.
In all cases, the landowner
must notify adjacent landow-
ners of his burning intentions


and have or make adequate
provisions that the burn will
be contained within his own
boundaries. Failure to obtain
proper burning authorization
could result in a fine up to
$500.00 and up to sixty (60)
days in jail.
For additional information,
contact your nearest Division
of Forestry Field Office or
local forest fire control unit.





Double up,


America.


AEDICAL 0


MESSAGE

from the FloridaDoctors


Football Conditioning Suggestions


Is your son one of the several
hundred thousand young
Americans who will soon be
"going out" for football this fall?
If so, health authorities have
some suggestions that will help
to insure that your son is
properly conditioned for this
vigorous sport. Begin with a
pre-season medical examination
by your family doctor to insure
that your son is physically fit to
participate in a contact sport.
Football requires a standard of
physical fitness that assures
sufficient strength and
endurance, a good level of skill,
and an ability to adjust to hot
and humid weather. There is no
substitute for good health and
physical fitness!
Before exposing him to the
rigors and risks of tackle
football, be sure that your son
is physically ready. Some of
the recommendations by the
Florida Medical Association
are aimed at coaches but many
of them are for individual
players and their parents.
Your son should faithfully follow
a personal conditioning
program during the summer
based on information gained
through the school's health and
physical education classes plus
some specific training for
football.


FIRST WEEK NON-CONTACT
DRILLS
At least the first week of practice
should be limited to non-contact
drill with emphasis ,ca
conditioning and fundamentals.
Shorts, T-shirts and football
shoes are the recommended
training gear in this period
because of the heat. Mouth
protectors should be worn in
order for the players to become
accustomed to them.


SECOND WEEK LIMITED
CONTACT
The second week should include
only controlled body contact
drills and wide-open play should
be avoided. Practice games or
game-condition scrimmage
should be avoided until after at
least two weeks of practice. A
minimum of three weeks of
carefully planned practice
should precede the first regular
game.

FURTHER THOUGHTS FROM
DOCTORS
Here are some additional
thoughts from the doctors of
Florida.
Participation in interscholastic
football is not a right but a
privilege for those who can
demonstrate the high level of
physical and emotional fitness
necessary to play aggressively,
skillfully and with
sportsmanship.
However, participation in school
football should not detract from
keeping up with a broad based
physical education program and
from sampling other sports
during the off-season.
Doctors in Florida are
concerned about the health and
safety of our state's young
athletes. A special committee
dealing with the Medical
Aspects of Sports has been
established and is functioning.
Studies on sports injuries and
the ways to prevent these
injuries are one of this
committee's main concerns.
The group of doctors serving
on this committee are studying
data concerning the heat, fluid
and electrolyte balance in the
body. This imbalance is
thought to be an important
due in the study of sports
injuries and deaths In youth
athletes. Continued research on
the causes and ways to prevent
injuries in athletes is the main
goal of this committee. It is part
of the continuing effort by
doctors in Florida to provide the
best medical care to all the
people in this state.
This Is a medical message
from the Florida Medical
Association in behalf ofthe
doctors of Florida and a public
service of this newspaper.


I