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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/02074
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 17, 1972
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:02074

Full Text








TWELVE PAGES


THE STAR


"The Safes# Beaches In the World Are In Gulf County"


10c PER COPY


THIRTY-FIFTH YEAR


PORT ST..JOE, FLORIDA 32456 THURSDAY, AUGUST 17, 1972


Progress


At Plant Is


Improving

Joe Tiest, representative of
David B. Smith Engineers over-
seeing the construction of the
City's Wastewater Treatment
Plant reported to the City Com-
mission Tuesday night that the
project is beginning to gain
some of the loss in schedule and
that now the job is only about
,six to eight weeks behind sche-
dule.
I "The construction firm has
made some changes", Tiest said,
"with a new foreman on the
job, the work is being done
in a better manner than before."
Tiest said he expected some
more "'catching up" on the con-
struction timetable, but it would
be unlikely that the deadline, of
Jafxary 24 for one portion and
February 15 for another would
be met.'
In connection with this report
Cleri~ Charles Brock announced
that' tle State Department of
Pollution Control had authorized
a loan of $7,475,000 at 6% inter-
est from the state's bonding
fund to finance the program.
The City had requested $9 mil-
,lion and will make an applica-
'tion for the remainder of the
funds from the State's next.
bonding program.
Dock Repairs
The City' has finally received
a permit to repair the boat dock'
at the West 'end of Fifth Street
and the City Pier, damaged dur-
(Continued On Page T2)


Mrs. John Ford

Dies Suddenly

Mrs. Pauline Rose Ford, age
71, a resident of White City,
.passed away unexpectedly Wed-
nesday morning of last week.
Mrs. Ford is survived by her
'husband, John H. Ford of White
City; two sons, Angus N. Grif-
fin of Panama City and Dwight
H. Griffin of Tallahassee; seven
grandchildren; one brother, Rich
ard Clenney of Bradenton; three
sisters, Mrs. Maude McCauley of
Ft. Meade, Mrs. Alma Hendricks
of Anniston, Ala., and Mrs.
Ruby Greenhut of Pensacola.
Funeral services were held at
2:30 p.m. Friday, August 11 at
the First Baptist Church in We-
wahitchka conducted by Rev.
Douglas Burns. Interment fol-
lowed in the family plot of Je-
hu Cemetery.
Services were under the direc-
tion of Comforter Funeral Home:

Roy Goddin Hurt
When Hit by Car
Roy Alan Goddin, young son
of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Goddin,
205 Ninth Street, is still in Mu-
nicipal Hospital under observa-
tion after being struck by an au-
tomobile while riding his bicy-
cle on Highway 98 Tuesday..
According to Police Officer
James Graves, young Goddin was
riding his. bike on Highway 98
near the R. Ci McIntosh home,
without lfolding the handlebars.
Suddenly the bike swerve1 into
the ,path of a 'car driven. by
Paul Frye, Jr., of New Braun-
fels, Texas.
Goddin was taken to the hos-
pital by a Kilpatrick Funeral
Home ambulance with head in-
juries.

Overnight Visitors
St. Joseph State Park reflected
a slight drop of visitors for the.
past fiscal year as compared to
fiscal 1971. State Park records
report 53,399 persons visited the
park during fiscal 1972 as com-
pared to 55,020 in 1971.
Overnight visitors at the park
took an increase, however, with
33,873 overnight visitors report-
ed in fiscal 1972 and 32,759 in
1971.


Boy and Cub Scouts of Troop 47, collected a full
truck load of garbage and debris from the beaches
in the St. Joe Beach-Beacon Hill area Saturday morning.
Fifteen Scouts and Cubs took part in the "Operation
Clean Sweep" in an attempt to clean up the beaches
which had become so dirty due to people throwing out
trash on their visits to the Gulf.
Taking part in the operation were Scouts, Steve
Lawrence, David Lawrence, Ray Lawrence, Daryl Par-


County, City Get


Port St. Joe Jaytees Ray Kilpatrick, left, View bridge and present their case to members
Robert Montgomery, bak I to camera and Rep- of the e department of *Transportation.
resentative William J. Rish, inspect e Highland -Star photo


roblem Bridge Fund
O I ,


Due largely to efforts by the


Port St. Joe `Jaycees hAd Rep.
reseniative William J. Rish, the
SHiglad View' dr'awbrdge: is
slated for repairs in t*ie near
future.
Representuttel od tbe bidge
engineering department of tfhe
Department of Transportation
headed by C. H. Owen, were in
Port St. Joe Thursday of last
week inspecting the bridge. Ow-
en said his department was un-
aware the bridge was causing
undue hardships on the travel-
ing public until it was called to
their attention by the Jaycees
and Rish. "As far as we were
concerned, the bridge was oper-
ating normally with the few de-
lays always experienced by me-
chanical devices".
Owen and DOT representa-
tives, Ted Spangeburg, Fred
Branch inspected the bridge
thoroughly, examined the opera-
tor's log and talked to the op-
erator. The biggest problem
seemed to be in the electrical
system, causing power failure
(Continued On Page 12)


Mrs. Murphy Is

Taken by Death

Funeral services for Mrs.
Edith Jane Murphy, 48, of 1602
Garrison Avenue, were held at
2:00 p.m. Saturday, August 12
from the First Baptist Church
with Rev. DeWitt Mathews offi-
ciating. Burial followed, in Holly
Hill Cemetery.
Mrs. Murphy died last Thurs-
day .in Municipal .Hospital fol
lowin -a long illness.
Mrs.-Murphy was a native of
Cincinnati, Ohio but came to
Port St. Joe from Dayton, Ohio
13 years ago. She was a mem-
.ber of the First Baptist Church.
She was active in forming the
Beta Sigma Phi sorority here in
Port St. Joe.
She is survived by her hus-
band Harry Murphy; one daugh-
ter, Debra Murphy; one son, Mi-
chael Murphy all of Port St.
Joe; one sister, Mrs. Ruth Lock-
hart of Indiana, Pa., and two
brothers, Ray Schuler and Har-
old Schuler both of Cincinnati,
Ohio.
Pallbearers included Joe Fort
ner, James Sealey, Jr., Frank
Pate, Marvin Shimfessel, Harold
Cassidy and Bob Ellzey.
Kilpatrick Funeral Home was
in charge of all arrangements.


Rish Aids In Getting State Contribution of
Funds for c t on o Dead- Lak ByPass

SRepresentaltve William J. The purpose of the structure
*iski annomie- .-yesterday that is to.provide a means of periodi-.
*he and a delegation of Wewa- call lowering the ,water level
hitchka Jayees attended the in order to. let nature destroy*
S .a -- aquatic growth in the lakes.
State .Cabinet 'meeting Tuesday
.of this week ath ich the Cabi- The Dead Lakes Water Man.
S ti weekat, chtheCabi-Iagement District plan to fund
net approved a transfer of $125,- their part of the project through
000 to be used .on the proposed a loan from the Farmers' Home.
bypass lock to.be constructed on Administration. The District will
Dead Lakes :Mn the vicinity of pledge revenues from their Fish-
the dam. i. -. -- .... ,-.


The total price for the project
'will be $375,000, with the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commis-
sion furnishing $125,000 and the
Dead Lakes Water Management
District furnishing $125,000.


ing Permits to repay the loan.
The District has a bid from
the Ernest Construction Com-
pany of Mobile, Ala., to construct
the by-pass. Ernest has guaran-
teed his bid to be firm until the
end of this month.


Democrats

Scheduling

Four Rallies

The Gulf County Democratic
Executive Committee has sche-
duled four political rallies prior
to the September 12 primaries.
The rallies, to be held in White
City, Highland View, Wewa-
hitchka and Port St. Joe are de-
signed to let the people become
acquainted with the candidates
and let the candidates present
their platforms to the people.
The first of the four rallies
will be held Saturday afternoon
at 5:00 p.m. at White City in
front of Stafford's Store. The
public is invited to attend.
The schedule for the remain-
ing three rallies are: Highland
View Fire Station, August 26,
5:00 p.m.; Wewahitchka in front
of the bank, September 2, 4:00
p,m.,. CST.; and Port St. Joe at
Fifth a"d Reid, September 9, at
5:00 p.'."


Pate Cleared i

For Ballot,

The Star had barely, been de-
livered last Thursday, when the
Supreme C6urt of. Florida hand-
ed down the decisiori that Port
St. Joe Mayor Frank Pate had
_complied with the "Resign to
.Run" law and was eligible to
.have his name placed on the bal-
lot in his quest to be elected
Judge of the Gulf County Court.
Five of the six Justices con-
sidering the case of Pate and six
others over the state, ruled that
Pate had complied by present-
ing his resignation from his post
as Mayor on June 27. The Judges
ruled "without dispute" that
Pate was eligible to seek anoth-
er office. "We find no deficien-
cy on his part", the Judges wrote
in their decision. The sixth Jus-
tice, J. McCain took no part in
the decision.


e' Payment



City Penalized by


Its Taxing Ability

Cities and counties of Florida sharing in the 1972
state financial assistance program were mailed their first
monthly checks last Week.

Here in Gulf County, the county is scheduled to re-
ceive $68,034.53 as a guaranteed amount.

Port St. Joe will receive a guaranteed $64,183.21 and
.$23,102.95 in "growth money" for a total of $87,286.16.
Wewahitchka reaps the real bonanza in the state sharing
program in Gulf County. Wewahitchka will receive $23,-
114.04 in guaranteed income and $97,032.39 in "growth
'money" for a total of $120,146.43.

The formula for distribution penalizes Port St. Joe's
receipts, due to its ability to generate its own tax dollars.
The distribution of funds is made on the criteria of pop-
ulation, contributions to the State's sales tax revenues
and local ability to raise revenue based on a one mill per
capital levy: on real and personal property assessments.
Port St. Joe has two industries based within the city limits
as well as several, satellite companies of St.; Joe P.aper
company Iwhich" generate 80% of; the tax dqllars-:fieedefoi
, for adequate operation of the City's -services." I hs is
the point which penalizes, the Cttyf-n its receipt of state


T<' I*V


Ino order to receive the state funds, both city and
county must levy at' east three mills in taxes and have
all its law enforcement personnel certified to state stan-
dards and receiving salaries of at least $6,000 per year.

All of the city and county law enforcement officials
meet the qualifications. The City is levying 7.5 mills and
the Coimunty, 9.5.mills.

The payments will be made in twelve equal install-
ments from the office of state Reve nue Director, Ed
Straughn.

In making the first payments, Straughn said, "Des-
pite a rather complicated procedure, we are happy to get
these first payments out on time. We have had splendid
cooperation from every agency involved-the Department
of Administration, League of Cities, Police Standards
Council, the State Comptroller, Legislative Committees,
and city and county officials


ker, Randy Parker, Bob Lange, Alan Lowery, Steve Os-
borne, Dewayne Woullard, Tom Bouington and Barry
Nobles and Cub Scouts Ronald Miller, Randy Atchison
and Michael Hinson. Adult Scouters working with the
boys were Assistant Scoutmaster Donald Parker and
Charles Osborne.
The Scouts collected about 50 plastic garbage bags
full of debris, which was hauled to the dump by a
Gulf County truck.


After the morning of labor, the boys were treated
to a lunch of hot dogs, potato chips and cold drinks by
the Rotary Club, Troop sponsors. In the photo above,
left, the boys dig into the dogs, dished out by Tom
Ford, center, Bill Altstaetter, center right and Ted
Cannon, minding the boiling pot. In the photo at right,
the boys did what all boys do, found a spot of shade
in which to enjoy their refreshments.
--Star photos


NUMBER 50


Scouts Make Clean Sweep of Beaches Area


-runyv;\






PAGE TWO


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY; AUGUST 17, 1972


EDITORIALS...


GCCC Offering

English Course

In Port St. Joe


Three Acres A Minute


Commercial forest lands are disappearing at the rate
of three acres per minute due to growth of communities,
land withdrawals for recreation and wildlife and other
causes. Currently, some 248 million acres of forest land
are set aside in wilderness areas, national parks and other
restrictive classifications that exclude wood product man-
agement. ,
These figures illustrate the need for more intensive
management of remaining commercial forst lands as well
as the necessity of halting the alarming trend toward re-
moving even more commercial forest lands from produc-
tion and locking them up for recreation use only. Ironic-
ally, the nation's commercial forests upon which everyone
depends for wood products are disappearing, not because
timber companies are exploiting them, but because of an
almost fanatical drive to "preserve" forests for nonproduc-


tive uses. The belief that this has to be done to protect
these forests from timber companies is, to put it mildly,
arclhaic.
As an official of a forestproducts company has ob-
served: 'Forest management recognizes trees as a renew-
able crop, supporting multi-million dollar mills which have
been built on the basis of renewable forests, with planned
harvesting under theguidance of professional foresters.
As a result, these millions are economically dependent upon
good forest practices which will maintain a constant sup-
ply of raw material to them. This is what guarantees the
citizens of this nation perpetual forests .' No one has
a greater stake in maintaining productive forest lands
than the timber industry which needs them for its exist-
ance no one, that is, except the public which must have
wood products in a thousand different forms.


Ridiculous Study


1 The Department of Health, Education and Welfare
according to the Associated Press, is conducting a $23,-
000 study to find out why tots fall off tricycles.
Over the years one has read of hundreds, perhaps
thousands, of boondoggles carried on by various depart-
ments and bureaus of the federal government, some fully
as silly as this. In total they mount up to tens, of millions
of dollars a year. In hundreds of cases the money wasted


on such absurd and frivolous studies and surveys is spent
abroad, thus aggravating our balance of payments plight.
Do some of our bureaucrats lie awake at night, think-
ing of ways to waste the taxpayers' money? And what-
is one to think of the moral standards of the leeches who
initiate such futile projects, and the other parasites, even
if Ph.D's, who take the money for conducting such boon-
doggles? --Houston (Tex). Tribune


No Free Lunch

One bill which making politicians mouth water these willingness of the taxpayer. They just borrow the money
days is the Federal govetrnikpsI'share the wealth" plans.. they spend which they don't have. Thusly, they can bor-
of sending some of your tax money b~tFo the state law- r w money and send it to the states in the guise of "sharing
makers after it has made a trip to Washington. Congress the wealth".
is just trying to make up its mind tw whether pr not; r Meanwhile, the average man in the street, looks with
how it can send the money on a 'no striiigs attached"
bashow it can send the money on a "no strings aach bated anticipationfow the national largess to his state, de-
basis. ', I signed to '"lower his taxes" on a state level. But, Mr.
What started it all in the first place is-the fact that Afer4ge Citizen will pay a larger-chunk to Uncle Sarffto
the states cannot spend more than they take in, so they send back to his state. There is no such, tin'g as a free
were limited to the amount of money they could pry out, ,lunch. Either the tax payer will pay his state or the fed-
of the taxpayer each year. Congress, of course, is bound eral government taxes for those things he thinks he
by no such "artificial" restraints as money available or wants.


Perspective

On


Education
by DR. BOB M. THORNTON
Professor of Education
University of West Florida


We have seen the public
school "administrator attempting
to implement his administration
to perpetuate the goals of public
education in the face of warring
community and political con-
flicts. If the policy of the public
school administrator is deemed
by him so very critical to the
needs of education he may him-
self turn "politician". This be-
comes especially true as politi-
cians seek to become "public
school administrators" it is a


question of survival and a ques-
tion of duty. Although the educa-
tion profession has its-cowards,
the history of public school ad-
ministration has certified its
list of candidates for great Amer-
icans in each decade.
Whether it be the politicians
thinking themselves a public
school administrator or the pub-
lic school' administrator thinking
himself a politician, both may
necessarily come to employ a
political rhetoric. On the one end


-- THE STAR-
Published Every Thursday at 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida,
By The Star Publishing Company
WESLEY R. RAMSEY Editor and Publisher
Alsi Linotype Operator, Ad Salesman, Photographer, Columnist, Reporter%,ro'
Reader, Bookkeeper and Complaint Department
SPosmomci Box 308 PHONE 227-3161
.PoRT ST. JOE, FLO IDA 32456

Second-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, Florida 32456

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
4IN COUNTY ONE YEAR, $4.00 SIX IOS., $2.25 THREE MOS., $127.50
OUT OF COUNTY One Year, $5.00 OUT OF U. S. One Year, $.00o
TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or ommisaions In advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount received for snoe
advertisement.
The spoken word Is given scant attention; the printed word Is thonghfly
weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly con-
wince. rThe spoken word is loet; the printed word remalme.


is the "radical", upon the other-
is the "reactionary", and in be-
tween we have the "progressive"
and "conservative" and the fine
lines are drawn by the use of
"ultra" and "psuedo". These
terms are used in name-calling
sprees with more emotion than
reason; however, most emotional
disagreements in public life do
have a casual relationship with
a rational basis.
Essentially the political spec-
trum in education is divided into
those who wish rapid change and
those who wish evolutionary
change. Each see the other as an
adversary with a powerful fol-
lowing. Ultimately it is not a
difference in philosophy but a
difference in personality. The
radical sees change as a vehicle
by which he can challenge au-
thority. It is the tool by which
he surmount shis father figure
restructured as the establish-
ment by chipping away at the
foundation. The progressive is
not unlike the radical but sees
to his distinct advantage not so
toppling the structure that he
himself becomes part of the
crashing rubble. The conserva-
tive feels a confidence in the au-
thority that flows from what is
presently in existence. Like the
progressive he shuns all rapid
change and for the same reasons,
The reactionary feels even more
threatened than the conserva-
tive. He feels that change has
already undermined the author-
ity to which he gives blind obe-
dience.
Most of us in Gulf County find
ourselves moving from progres-
sive to conservative on particu-
lar issue while fearing the holo-
caust of the destructive and


bloody war the radical and the
reactionary would have us wage.
But you and I are not personally
and that is egotistically, involv-
ed in the change. Ou rsole test
is "how will it affect me and the
community?" The politician and
the educator follow the all too
often test of "how will I look
and appear aMd therefore. where
will my job be Essentially it
is a difference of having the peo
ple first in our minds rather
than ourselves. The public school
administrator whose first consid-
eration and thought is the people
will implement his administra-
to perpetuate reasonably neces-
sary change while keeping intact
the "cornerstone of our public
school system".


Gulf Coast Community College
will offer English 206, a course
on American Literature, from
1860 to the present time, on
Wednesday evenings during the
fall semester in the Port St. Joe
High School, it was announced
Tuesday.
Registration for the course
will be 6:30 p.m., EST, Wednes-
day, August 23 at the Port St.
Joe High. School. The first class
meets the following Wednesday
evening.
The Gulf Coast program in
Port St. Joe is expected to reach
a higher enrollment this fall as
the 'results of a new state rul-
ing that allows high school Sen-
iors with 12 units to enroll for
college courses.


Social Security

Recipients May

Get Food Stamps

Social Security recipients, not
on public welfare,-may be eligi-
ble to buy food stamps. A notice
being sent nationwide with Au-
gust Social Security checks states
"Whether a person is eligible or
not depends on how much his
monthly income is and how
much he has in savings or other
assets."
The Division of Family Serv-
ices is strongly advising those
people who feel they are eligi-
ble to get in touch with their
local Division of Family Services
office. Contact should be made
during the second or third week
of the month. Eligibility wil
be determined by local workers.
The Division further suggests
that actual purchases be made
either by mail or after the fourth
of the month to avoid standing
in line.
The maximum amount of in-
come an individual or family can
have and still get food stamps
depends on the number of peo-
ple in the household. Monthly
maximum limits are $178.00 for
one person, $233.00 for two per-
' sons and $307.00 for three per-
sons. People with income above
these limits may also be eligible
for stamps if they -have unusual
expenses such as big medical or
hospital bills or high rent pay-
ments. Appropriate receipts or
bills should be shown at the time
of application.
Additional eligibility require-
ments are that a person living
alone can't get food stamps if he
has assets of $1,500 or more.
Such assets might be stocks,
bonds, cash, checking or savings
accounts. This limit also applies
to families, regardless of size,
unless one or more of the family
is 60 or older. In that case, the
family may have assets of up to
$3,000.
A home, life insurance poli-
cies, and personal property do
not count as assets.
The re-examination of the food
stamp eligibility is a result of
the President's Special Message
on Aging, presented on March
23, 1972.


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Third Street and Baltzell Avenue
DeWITT T. MATHEWS, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP SERVICE -........ 11:00 A.M.
TRAINING UNION 6:30 P..L
EVENING WORSHIP SERVICE 7:30 P.M
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) 7:30 P.M
"Come and Worship God With Us"



You Are Cordially Invited To Attend

LONG AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH

Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street


SUNDAY SCHOOL
MORNING WORSHIP
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ....-........
EVENING WORSHIP
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) .....


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
6:15 P.M.
7:30 P.M.
7:30 P.M.


VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME
REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor


Etaoin


Shrdlu
by WESLEY R. RAMSEY


Has Channel 7 TV ever messed up!
Changing from NBC to ABC was one of the worst
possible moves they could have made. They are prob-
ably losing viewers wholesale now, with the rot ABC
puts on the air. Wednesday night's television was just
a short step less than idiotic. I know, I know. I didn't;
have to watch it. I have Cable TV and could watch Chan-
nel 6, which I plan to do more than ever. But I had to
stay tuned to Channel 7 this week just to see if there by
chance was a good program on. The only thing I saw
all week, which I enjoyed, was the movie of Kung Wu on
Tuesday 'night.
They took away my Monday night baseball, IrQnside,
Flip Wilson, Nichols, Saturday afternoon baseball (al-
though I haven't seen that one this year). It will mean
an absence of winter football (except on Channel 6) the
World Series and many other programs I thoroughly en-
joy. The only thing I won't miss is David Brinkley.
I can't really figure Channel 7's reasoning for such
a move. The only thing I can figure is that NBC dropped
them or ABC pays much higher royalties. At any rate,
I hope Channel 7 sees the error of their ways and gets
back into the NBC fold.
Either that, or I hope St. Joseph Tel. and Tel. makes
some improvement at their Cablevisibn installation and
brings in an NBC station. Knowing how much Vice-Pres-
ident Roy Gibson enjoys baseball and football, that just
might be in the planning stages already.
*

Sergeant Shriver says it's alright that George Mc-
Govern didn't consider him as the first choice for Vice
President. "He wasn't my first choice for the Democra-
tic Presidential candidate, either", the good' Sarge said
. in public. That doesn't sound much like a politician.
It sure doesn't sound much like a running mate. It was
well known that McGovern wasn't Eagleton's first choice
either, but he never said so in public.
Summing up the summer of politics, it looks to us as
if it will succeed in re-electing Richard Nixon as President
of the United States for another four years; Spiro (Who)
Agnew as Vice-President and Tom Eagleton as the "hero
of the year" award.
One of McGovern's youthful supporters remarked on
TV, a week ortwo ago that she was appalled to find out
that McGovern was just a "practical politician" after all,
referring to his expedient dumping of Eagleton.
What do they say about feet of clay?


Big shots from the Department of Transportation
were in town last Thursday inspecting the Highland View
drawbridge at the urging of the Port St. Joe Jaycees.
The big shot who came-Chuck Owens, Bridge Engineer
with the DOT--said most of the problems with the bridge
are in the electrical system and will be repaired. Owens
also set up a six month intensified system of keeping a
log on the bridge to find out just how regular the problems
are so his department will know where to start in looking
for an upgrading of service.



Say You Saw It In The Star -


NOtIlEXHAUST SYSTEM

SUPPLYCENTER

g is upMt myd h i


aOoundm o-o







MUFFLERS PIPES MO UH

ST. JOE AUTO PARTS CO.
201 Long Avenue Phone 2274111
Iw hlb


I






THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, AUGUST 17, 1972 rAGE THR[]


Baker Act Provides "Bill of Rights" for People


With Mental Problems; -Local Treatment


TALLAHASSEE-Florida resi-
dents needing help with mental
or emotional problems now have
local facilities where help is
available-free if they can't af-
ford it.
Secretary of Health and Reha-
bilitative Services, Emmett R6b-
erts, released this week a direc-
tory of "receiving facilities"
which lists 73 locations which
will serve all 67 counties.


Only Hardee County lacked a
formally established center, but
will temporarily use Polk County
facilities, the Secretary said.
The new centers-some of
which were existing already but
now are designated officially as
receiving facilities, and others
that were improvised for the
purpose-are equipped and staff-
ed to take care of emergency,
diagnostic and initial treatment


SEE


"TOMMY"


HUTCHINS

Tommy Thomas Chevrolet
Panama City

New and Used Cars and Trucks

Call Panama City 785-5222
Nights, call Port St. Joe 227-3477.


"Voluntary patients likewise


retain all civil rights but may
apply for discharge considera-
tion at any time after admission.
If improved sufficiently the hos-
pital superintendent may dis-
charge them at his discretion,"
Furlough explained.
Furlough said that the new
law's intent was to make mental
health a community responsibil-
ity like other health care pro-
grams-avoiding, if possible,


sending patients to distant hos-
pitals for prolonged treatment.
FEDERAL FUNDS pay 75 per
cent of the cost of such treat-
ment for persons who qualify,
and the balance is furnished 50-
50 by state and local funds.
However, he explained that the
state and federal funds are only
available for patients who are
determined medically indigent
or otherwise unable to pay.


General Mangaer of
Sales and Marketing


HI NEIGHBOR!
GEORGE BRYAN
Representing BUILDER'S
HOMES, Inc.
is in the
PORT ST. JOE area
to help you own your
own home.


NEW FARMERS HOME ADMINISTRATION
HOME BUILDING PROGRAM
PAYS MOST OF THE INTEREST
Very Low Down Payments and Monthly Payments
to Fit Your Budget. We Build Anywhere
On Your Lot Or Ours
"Equal Housing Opportunity"


WRITE

GEORGE BRYAN
AF-
SBUILDERS

= HOMES, Inc.
z-

--; 1707 Montgomery Hwy.
Dothan, Ala. 36301.


of residents who need such help.
LOCALLY, RESIDENTS may,
go to the Gulf County Guidance
Clinic or call 229-3621 for help.
Doctors in the community, law
enforcement officers, or other
persons having contact with men-
tally or emotionally disturbed in-
dividuals may refer them to the
center for help, or may bring
them in.
Secretary Roberts explained
that such facilities were requir-
ed by a new Florida law called
the "Baker Act", so named for
Representative Maxine Baker
who drafted and crusaded for
the legislation .He said the new
law constitutes A "Bill of Rights"
for residents who need mental
health services.
Mental Health officials and
workers around the state intro-
duced a crash program to have
the centers ready for business
on July 1 when the law became
effective, Roberts said.
Some of the smaller counties,
having no usable facilities, had
to join with adjacent counties
to share facilities, he said,
EACH CENTER IS REQUIRED
under the new law with primary
responsibility for receiving indi-
viduals with mental health prob-
lems, screening them to deter-
mine their needs, providing diag-
nosis and treatment where pos-
sible and to serve as referral
agents where clients need to be
admitted to a private or state
mental hospital for intensive or
long term care.
Roberts said that the new law
stresses the importance of treat-
ing mentally ill persons with the
same concern and respect tradi-
tionally accorded physically sick
persons.
"It was not uncommon in the
past," Roberts said, "for persons
with mental and emotional prob-
lems to be held in jails await-
ing sometimes lengthy judiciary
commitment to a mental hospi-
tal. They will not be guaranteed
humane, courteous and immed-
iate help with physical restraint
being employed only as a last
resort."
According to Robert R. Fur-
lough, administrator of the pro-
gram for the Division of Mental
Health, it is too early to esti-
mate how much the new local
screening and treatment pro-
gram will reduce state hospital
admissions.
"Since July 1, there has been
a slight decrease in daily admis-
sions," he said, "But this is not
long enough to give us a good es-
timate since the first two weeks
of July were devoted to the lo-
cal screening activities and pa-
tients were not coming to the
hospitals directly through the
courts as in the past."
Furlough said that the percen-
tage of patients that would even-
tually be admitted to state hos-
pitals would be reduced but that
the increasing state population
would -probably offset this and
the agency expects only a "lev-
e cling off" of admission rates
which have been increasing rap-
idly each year with the influx
of new residents.
Admissions to the four state
hospitals last year totaled 7,581,
separations totaled 8,284 leav-
ing the patient load at 8.170 on
July 1.,
Furlough said the most signi-
ficant feature of the new law
was the provision for patients to
get treatment on a voluntary ba-
sis whereas in the past "judi-
ciary committmet" was the usual
way, requiring that each person
admitted be declared "legally
incompetent."
PATIENTS ADMITTED now
are urged to do so on a volun-
tary basis. Persons who are in
need of help who refuse the vol-
untary status are -entitled to le-
gal counsel before an involun-
tary admission for treatment.
They still retain all civil rights
and must be considered for dis-
charge after six months in a
state hospital. A hearing exam-
iner will conduct inquiry pro-
ceedings on request of the pa-
tient or his legally appointed
guardian after the six month per-
iod of treatment. The patient
will be furnished legal counsel
if he cannot afford such legal
representation. If sufficiently
improved the patient will be dis-
charged or referred to a local
community mental health facil-
ity for further treatment.


and Muskie as possible nominees
and other strong candidates as
Humphrey, Senator Jackson and
Eugene McCarthy as strong run-
ners but never even mentioned
Senator McGovern.
While she saw great danger
to President Nixon on his trip
to China, she predicted he would
be nominated and win the elec-
tion.
She saw Governor Wallace
only as an also-ran and nothing
concerning the attempt on his
life. Nor did she mention Tom
Eagleton or Sargent Shriver.
Getting back to her predic-
tions of last week, she sees the
blacks and the young deciding
the election. How can they if


SAVE 10%!
SCute and Colorful

SHRINK TOPS and

PANTS SWEATERS

36 to 46. Our entire stock of sweaters.


Gulf County School System Shows

Increase In 'Receipt of State Funds


Gulf County's School system re-
ceived an increase in state funds
paid to the county system this
month over the same month of


OUR APPRECIATION
We appreciated the deep expres-
sions of sympathy from our friends
in the form of prayers, food, flow-
ers, cards and many other acts of
kindness in our time of sorrow.
We gratefully acknowledge and
deeply appreciate your many ex-
pressions of consideration.
THE FAMILY OF
JANIE MURPHY


Nixon is to win? She warns po-
litical leaders, national and lo-
cal, to tighten their security
against assassinations.
Probably writing under the
influence of McGovern's pledge
of one thousand per cent back-
ing of Eagleton she states,
"George McGovern has opened
the magic door for Eagleton and
the young man from Missouri is
on his way." He opened the door
alright and kicked him through
it.
She sees no hope of the re-
turn of prisoners by North Viet-
nam unless we really bomb the
dikes in earnest. The begging
approach advocated by Senator
McGovern, she states, will never
work.
Internal troubles will continue
in Egypt and President Sadat
will be in great physical danger
and should be on his guard. She
sees no cessation of the Arab-


last year, according to a release
this week by the office of Fred 0.
Dickinson, State Comptroller.
Gulf's schools received $123,460
in state funds for the month of
August. Last August, the system
received $112,224 from the state.
Dickinson's report showed that
Florida schools received $55.5 mil-
lion this month. Dickinson said the
funds are part of the 1972-73 legis-
lative appropriation to cover the
cost of teacher's salaries, student
transportation and other expenses.
Under Florida statutes, each
county school system, grades K-12,
receives monthly appropriations
based on enrollment figures.


Israel quarrel in the near future.
According to Jeanne, big
things are ahead for Shirley
MacLaine. She is seen working
very closely with McGovern and
Eagleton during the presidential
campaign. Evidently this predic-
tion was made before McGovern
slammed the door. This creates
quite a credibility gap for the
seeress to overcome.
George Meany is seen in a
peck of trouble with bitter dis-
putes among labor leaders as to
future political activities and
policy. Mayor Daley and Presi-
dent Nixon will become buddies.
George Wallace will walk again
but not without help. Prime Min-
isters Indira Ghandi and Golda
Meir will remain in power while
Leonid Breznev of the U.S.S.R.
and Willy Brandt of West Ger-
many will dim a bit. Mayor John
Lindsey is all washed up politi-
cally. So predicts Jeanne Dixon.


Boy's KNIT or

SPORT SHIRTS
Regular to $3.49

2 for $5.00
Siezs 8-18 by Campus. All perma-
press and machine washable.


ALL SEASONAL/ "
CLOTHING AND SHOES /2 PRICE
Ladies and Girl's, Men's and Boy's SPORTSWEAR, SWIM-
WEAR & SHOES Ladies' & Girl'% DRESSES & PURSES


GIRLS

COTTON PANTIES

3 pair 88c
Sizes 2-12 SAVE 12c HERE!


JR. BOYS' BRIEFS

3 pair $1.29
Sizes 1-6 SAVE 16c!


SAVE 10%
Famous Brand School
OXFORDS and
LOAFERS
Ladies' and Children's


Ladies


BOOTS


$6.88

White and black with zip-
pers. Sizes 5S to 10. Guar-
anteed first quality!


- t I


BOY'S

CANVAS OXFORDS
Regular $2.99 $2.U
NOW ONLY ........... Z W
Sizes 12V2 to 6. Black or white. $4.00 value.
By Bata.

Jr. Boys, Boys, Young Men and Men's

FLARE JEANS
now 10% OFF
By Lee, Levis, Wright and Wrangler. Sizes
1-6X, 8-78 and 26 to 44 waist. Blue denim,
corduroys and twills.


MEN'S
Windbreaker

$5.00 and

$8.00
$10.99 Values
By Wrangler and Campus.
Water repellant. Perma-
press. London Fog styling.
S-M-L-XL. Navy and Gold.


GYM SHORTS---------$1.39
22 to 38. Navy blue. All elastic waist band, sanforized. Guaranteed
by Fruit of the Loom.

ATHLETIC SUPPORTER --- $1.25
22 Boys' to 44 Men.


Too Late To Classify
By Russell Kay


Jeanne Dixon, the Washington
seeress has just released her
mid-year predictions. I don't find
them very exciting or startling.
Before she began to commercial-
ize on her so-caleld talent she
did pretty well but her predic-
tions during the last couple of
years, as far as I can determine,
haven't been too good.
Looking back through my files
I find most of her predictions
were not much more than an ed-
ucated guess. The average well
read and well informed citizen
could probably do as well and
hit as many nails on the head
in the long run.
Visioning the Democratic con-
vention, she mentioned Kennedy


ELECT


Clinton E.


FOSTER

CIRCUIT JUDGE
14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, Group 5
Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson
and Washington Counties


Clinton E. Foster, 37, was born in Escambia County, Florida
and reared in Bristol, Florida. He is a graduate of Liberty County
High School, attended Chipola Junior College and graduated from
Florida State University in 1960 with a B.S. Degree in Public Ad-
ministration. In 1962 he graduated from the University of Florida
College of Law with.an LL.B. replaced in 1967-with a Juris Doc-
tor. He served in the United States Air Force from 1953-57.
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Foster of Bristol, Florida,
and is married to the former Betty June Green of Blountstown,
Florida, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Silas Green, and they have
one son, Rusty. He and his family reside in Panama City and
attend the St. Andrews Baptist Church.
Clinton Foster has engaged in the fulltime general practice
of law in Panama City, Florida since he was admitted to the bar
in 1963. He is the incumbent Bay County Prosecuting Attorney,
having been appointed in 1964, elected in 1966 and re-elected in
1970. He has served as Attorney for the Town of Cedar Grove
since 1964, County Attorney for Liberty County since 1965, and
Municipal Judge of Panama City Beach since 1969. He is a former
Municipal Judge of the City of Springfield. He is a member of the
American Bar Association, Florida Bar Association, 14th Judicial
Circuit Bar Association, Bay County Bar Association, and is past
president of the Bay County Bar Association. Clinton Foster is
an experienced criminal and civil trial lawyer. In his capacity as
Bay County Prosecuting Attorney, he led the legal battle against
the sale and distribution of hard core obscene literature in Bay
County. Clinton Foster is an advocate of law and order and be-
lieves in a strong judiciary. He believes that judges should fairly
and impartially interpret and apply laws and not make them.
He believes that all persons appearing before the courts should
be treated fairly and impartially.
(Paid Political Advertisement)


Ii -I


BOYLES BELL RINGING BACK-TO-SCHOOL SALE CONTINUES WITH ADDED

TOUCH DOWN FEATURES
IVU H g#4 W Igap1g


$4.99 to
$9.99
By Wrangler, Lee and others.
Sizes 3 to 15, ladies 6 to 46 waist.

L.a.,j


_I


I


_i____ I_ I____




PAGE FOUB' THESTARi PortSt. Joew Florida THURSDAY, AUGUST 17, 1972
Spto,, A9 ug. RICH and SONS' IGA PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
14 through 19..... --


GRADE "A" FLA., GA, ALA.


WHOLE


Lb.


LEG or BREAST
FRYER QUARTERS Ib, 38c
Ga., Fla., Ala., Grade "A"
FRYER BREAST .--- lb. 58c
THIGHS or
FRYER LEGS ---- l. 68c
USDA Grade "A"
BAKINGIHMENS.-------- Ib 49%
"-ablerite Center Cut
PORK- I.. 98k
-'irst Cut
PORK CHOPS ----:-b. 68k
IGA EVAPORATED TALL CANS



SCans
^.^^7 9C^f ^^ ^^~


SUPREME ROUND HALF,

Ice Cream


89c


TABLERITE Fresh
GROUND BEEF -- --lb. 68c
Morrell Pride Skinned and Deveined
BEF LIVER -------1 6k
TABLERITi Freshlt
GROUP N CHUCK---- I: 98
TABLE 0 BlSmIaae' Cu
CM SIEAVI@-----lbii 18c
LOdt

I MISS GEORGIA No. 2% Cans
PEACHES-----3 cans 89c
SHOWBOAT No. 2% Cans
PORK and BEANS -----4 cans $1.00
IGA (Chicken-Rice or Cream of Chicken
CHICKEN SOUP -----no. I can 16c
Sunshine Krispy
CRACKERS------- I lb. pkg. 39c
KRAFT 7% Oz. Pkgs.
MACARONI DINNER ----.4 pkgs. 88c
LIBBY
TOMATO JUICE -- 46 oz. can 39c
IGA No. % Can
TUNA FLAKES---------can 35c
CLEANSER
C 0 MET --------- reg. can 17c


TRELLIS 303 Cans
English PEAS
STANDARD 303 Cans
TOMATOES,
LINDY 303 Cans
CO1RN-_ cans


Regular 98c Value
FILLER PAPER --- 500 shts. 66c
Regular $1.47 Value
COMPOSITION BOOKS --- 3 for 88c
Regular 59c Value
BRIEF FOLDERS -----pkg. of 5 44c
Regular $1.29 Value
MENNEN "E" DEODORANT 4 oz. 88c
IGA SLICED or CRUSHED
Pineapple

C Nos$1.00
MARTHA WHITE Limit 1 Bag with $10 Order


FLOUR


SLICED .J. DOWNY i.
FABRIC SOFTENER---: /2 gal. 99c BAG W
BACON 4t7' Ga. Grade "A" MEDIUM 8
___ "G Doz. IGA--TWIN BAGS
CRINKLE CUT 2 LB. PKG. Gal Grade 'A' With $15.00 Order P T
French Fries 29 1" doz. EGGS.. FREE CHIPS..


MORTON (Chocolate-Lemon-Coconut) 14 Oz.
CREAM PIES ------- 3 for 89c
IGA 10 Oz.' Pkgs.
BROCCOLI SPEARS--- 3 pkgs. 89c
IGA *
OCEAN PERCH------ 1 lb. pkg. 69c"
McKenzie 10 Oz. Pkgs.
WHOLE OKRA -------3 pkgs. 89c


Blue Bonnet
MARGARINE ----- 1 lb. pkg. I3c
Breakstone
SOUR CREAM ---- 16 oz. pkg. 49c
Butter-Me-Not 9% Oz. Cans
B I C Ul TS 2 cans 39c
WALDORF -4 ROLL PKGS.




3 $1.00-7
IGA Limnit 1 Jar with $10.00 Order or More

MAYONNAISE

QUART JAR

At White City Chain Link Fence On Large Lot
FOR SALE 3 BEDROOM HOUSE


Completely Home Owned and Operated by E. J. Rich and Sons


00


CELERY RADISHES CARROTS
GREEN ONIONS
SMatchr 2 for 29c;
SWEET WESTERN
CANTALOUPE


49c


Tender
SOK RA---------lb. 23c
Fresh
FIELD PEAS---- lb. 2&

US 3 for $1.00


U. S. NO. 1

IRISH POTATOES

10 68c

FILL YOUR FREEZER NOW AT WHOLESALE PRICES!


,'oMf U cuEEi rn 'fAi,,


Fresh Tender Home Grown
OKRA or SQUASH


BAG


49c


Fresh
Yellow SQUASH -----lb.


Cs p ed'We Take Great Pride In Our
Crisp Red Produce Department
Delicious APPLES 3 lb. bag 49c The Quality and Variety Always Garden
SAVE CASH AT RICH'S NOT STAMPS


19cI

Fresh


IGA BOTTLED ran jnsLLCu UAInL
(All Flavors) _4
DRIMIC -PEAS and
UDRI!N BUTTERBEANS
28 Oz. Bottles BUTTERBEANS
FOR 0- GoodSingle
88c BANANAS lb. lOc


I


- --


DAIR BUY


m











~A.V


Teachers, Age 62, May Be Eligible


For Social Security In Summer


'Teachers may be losing valu-
able social security checks," David
Robinson, Social Security Field
Representative for Gulf County,
said this week.
V Many teachers, age 62, fail to
4eltaiFe th'a they can receive a so-
cial security check for summer
months in which they do not teach
or do some other kind of work.
The Social Security law consid-
ers a person retired in any month
in which he earns $140 or less as
an employee, or if self-employed,
in which he does not render sub-


stantial services to his business.
This is true regardless of the fact
that his total annual earnings are
so much that they prevent payment
of benefits in all other months of
a year.
Teachers who are age 62 or old-
er should contact their social se-
curity office to determine if it is
to their financial advantage to re-
ceive summer social security
checks. In many cases it is and
these benefits can help replace
earnings during those lean sum-
mer months.


Florida Power Cancels Plans for

Construction of Nuclear Power Plant


Florida Power Corporation has
cancelled construction of a sec-
ond nuclear power plant at Crys-o
tal River, A. P. Perez, chairman
of the board and chief executive
officer, announced recently.
Plans for the second nuclear
power plant were announced in
August, 1971.
The action followed recent
studies by the company's engi-
meers which indicate that Crys-
tal River Unit No. 3, the com-
pany's first nuclear plant, will
not. be ready for operation until
October 1974. Original start-up
for this plant was scheduled for
April 1972. Later the schedule
was adjusted to September 1973,
because of delays outside Florida
Power Corporation's control.
"In view of the delays already
experienced and the need to
have new generating facilities
available in 1978, when the sec-
ond nuclear unit was supposed to
be ready, we cannot jeojardize
our customers' electric supply by
proceeding on our previously an-
nounced course," said Perez.
"The whole history of nuclear
plant construction for the past
few years has been one of intol-.
erable delays and cost increases.
This has forced us to plan for
fossil fulbbd plants to supply a
greater portion of thea electric
needs of ouir customers than we
had previously planned.
"We will continue to closely
Follow developments in the nuc-
lear power field. In fact, we are
involved in substantial research


in this area. However, until or-
der and stability return to this
segment of the industry, we can-
not afford to gamble on commit-
ting ourselves to another nuc-
lear plant at this time," Perez
said..

White Bible Service
Held for Brides-Elect
The Baptist Young Women held
a White Bible .service for, Regina
Levins and Judy Moore on Wednes-
day night, August 16 at 7:30 p.m.
at the First Baptist Church.
Friends and relatives of the
honorees were invited to attend
the special service for the two
prospective brides.

Gulf IRifle Club
Sponsoring Trap Shoot
The Gulf Rifle Club will conduct
a trap shoot on Thursday, August
12, at the Club Range on Highway
71. i>lS.
Shooting will start at 5:00 p.m.
All interested shotgunners are
invited to come out and get some
practice for the upcoming dove
season.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to thank our many
friends and neighbors for their
many acts of kindness during the
recent death and illness of our
loved one. The kind words, food
and flowers were very much ap-
preciated during our time of sor-
row.
JOHN F. FORD FAMILY


FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Intersection Monument and Constitution
REV. R. MILLARD SPIKES, Minister,
Church School ..... 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship .......... 11:00 A.M.
Methodist Youth Fellowship .-..............---- -----5:45 P.M.
Evening Worship 7:00 P.M.
"Where Old Fashioned Friendlinesi Still Survives"


VOTE FOR


LARRY G. SMITH
CANDIDATE FOR

CIRCUIT JUDGE GROUP FOUR
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
Bay Calhoun Gulf Holmes Jackson Washington


RULE OF


Whilb it is true that the check' of the reduction at age 65.
is reduced at age 62, 20% below Toll free phone service to the
thit received at age 65, in most scoial security office is available
cases the reduction is so little that to residents of this area by dialing
the checks usually received for the "0" and asking for WXX-4444.
summer months between age 62 The area offic-eis located at 131
and age 65 far exceed the amount Harrison Ave., Panama City.



KINDER GARDEN

FOB 4 nd 5 YEAR OLDS (must be ,4 by Jan.)

Mrs. Blie DuBose and Mrs. Maxie Smith
305 Sixth Street

Regis ration -- August 28 from 9 to 12
2t Open -- Tuesday, Septemiber5


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, AUGUST 17, 1972 PAGE fIl
I.1


_ltIf Iit_
---- ^


LAW
RIGHT, NOT MIGHT


QUAL IFIED turtleneck tops" $ $14
In knowledge of the law, experience, integrity, girl's SM $ RE .$
temperament and background c tton panties -4 $ 1
temperament ad background pan DelghtfulDamasks Solid. colors In no-Iron Machine washable...
In solids or two- Oolyester. 58" to 60" ulti colored,
Admitted to Florida Bar 1949. Admitted to practice women's I Biseiction. tone plaidsor wdet Texture patterns. 27' x 45 size.
in trial and appellate courts of Florida, Federal Dis- tote bags Nwaityle tone plaidsture patterns. 45" size.
trict Courts and Supreme Court of the United States.
Member Bay County, Fourteenth Circuit, Florida and QUALITY COMES FIRST THEN OUR LOW PRICES Charge It
American Bar Associations.
&tp-8-17 (Paid Political Advertising)


Political Rallies


Sponsored by the



GULF COUNTY DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE


WHITE CITY (Stafford's Store) -- Aug. 19 5:00 P.M., EST

HIGHLAND VIEW (Fire Station) --- Aug. 26 5:00 P.M., EST

WEWAHITCHKA (Wewa Bank) -- Sept. 2 4:00 P.M., CST

PORT ST. JOE (5th and Reid) --- Sept. 9 5:00 P.M., EST

4t C. G. COSTIN, Jr., Chairman


V n-






E.SIX- THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, AUGUST 17, 1972



Miss Christie Coldewey and Jerone


Johnson Are United In Marriage


In the gardens of her home,
Miss Margaret Christie Coldewey
of 1405 Constitution Drive, be-
came the bride of Dr. Jerone
Powell Johnson of Hattiesburg,
Mississippi. on Saturday morn-
ing, August 5 at 11:00 a.m.
Miss Coldewey is the daugh-
ter of Mr.-and Mrs. Thomas Shel-
ley Coldewey of Port St. Joe, and
the groom is the son of Mrs.
Clyde Wolverton of Jackson,
Mississippi and' the late Thomas
Johnson of Vicksburg, Miss.
The 'Reverend Sidney Ellis,
rector of St. James -Episcopal -
Church of Port St: Joe, officiat-
ed.
Mrs. T. G. Alsobrook, organ-
ist, presented a program of pre-
nuptial music as the wedding
guests gathered in the gardens.
Selections included were "Pur-
cells Trumpet Volentary" which
was used as the processional
and Mendellsohn's ."Wedding .
March", played as the bridal
couple left the altar.
Vows were exchanged before
an altar which was placed before
a tall and verdant background of -
azaleas and cherry laurel trees
and featured a handmade linen
,and lace altar cloth and a tall
brass cross. The base of the altar
was garlanded with southern
smilax. Flanking the altar were -
standards of massed arrange-
ments of white and yellow chrys- -
anthemums. fuji mums, snapdra- -
gons and daisies. Outlining the
altar area were twin trees of
fern. Throughout the gardens
were hanging baskets of yellow
and white 'mums, snapdragons, "
daisies and fern, as well as bas- MRS. JERONE P
kets and white wrought iron
standards of similar yellow and the garden were massive bas-
white summer flowers placed at kets of fuji mums, snapdragons
vantage. points. Guests entered and daisies, with white satin
the gardens through a white arch ribbons and daisies marking the
entwined with ivy and flowers family area.
WNtflg was'flanked by baskets of .The bride was escorted to the
yellow a' & pwte snapdragons, altar on the arm of, her father
fuji mums, "daailes and.,;ferns. who gave her in marriage. En-
The canopy of pines 6vei a lush,,, hancing her natural beauty, hqr
background of azaleas and yel- wedding ensemble: was- a white
low jasmine formed the setting floor-length original gown of tex-
for the ceremony. tured imported cotton of slim,
Marking the seating area in A-liie' design with a scoop neck-


MISS GLORIA JANE SPIKES


Spikes-, Sullens


The Rev. and Mrs. Roy Millard
Spikes of Port St. Joe announce
the engagement of their daugh-
ter, Gloria Jane, to Terry Hugh
Sullens, son of Mrs. Frances
Beaty of Hamilton, Ala., and 0.
W. Sullens of Harvest, Ala.
The b r i d e-elect graduated
from Sidney Lanier High School
-of Montgomery,. Ala. She is a
:graduate of Huntingdon College
.and was elected to Sigma Sigma
Sigma and Kappa Mu Epsilon.
She received her M.S. degree in
math imatics from Auburn Uni-
versity and will teach at Macon
Academy, Tuskegee, Ala.
The groom-elect is a graduate
of Phillips High School in Bir-


mingham, Ala., and -Jefferson
State Junior College in Birming-
:ham where he won the fresh-
man and sophomore awards for
excellence in chemistry. He is a
Marine Corps veteran and holds
the purple heart with stars, the
Croix-de-Guerre and other 'cita-
tions. He is .a student of Auburn
University. :'
The wedding will be an event
of September 16, at 2 o'clock in
the First United Methodist
Church, Port St. Joe. No invita-
tions are being sent locally but
all friends and relatives are in-
vited to attend. A reception will
be held in the social hall of the
church following the ceremony.


WELL JOHNSON
line and long bell-shaped sleeves,
accented with bands of imported
lace daisies at the wrists. A
slight rounded train fell from
the empire waistline. She wore a
mantilla of white silk organza
edged with matching lace daisies
which fell softly to her shoul-
ders: She carried a colonial bou-
quet..of marguerite daisies, fuji
mums,'Iily of the valley and ba-
bys breath with cascading white
satin ribbons tied in love knots.
The bride's only attendant -
_ was Mrs. John Robey' of Stark-
ville? Mississippi who wore a
floor-length yellow and white flo-
.r'ral print sleeveless gown made
on slim lines with tiny covered
buttons down the side. She wore
daisies in her hair and carried
a nosegay of daisies interspersed
with tulle and ribbon streamers.
Serving as best man was Dr.
John Robey of Starkville, Mis-
sissippi. Ushers were the groom's
brother, Norbert Johnson of.
Hattiesburg, Mississippi and Gil
Shealay of Wewahitchka.
Mrs. Coldewey chose for her
daughter's wedding a floor-length
gown of green and white. The
bodice was of tiny green and
white checks and the slim skirt
was of white pique on which
were scattered circles of green
and white checks, chalk beads
and brilliant and was edged at
the hemline with a deep border
of matching checks, chalk beads
and brilliant ending with cotton
teardrop lace. She wore phale-
nopsis orchids as her corsage.
Mrs. Wolverton, the groom's
mother, was gowned in a floor
length dress of pink and white
flowered voile, featuring a deep
ruffle at the neck, long full
sleeves, and hemline, and was
belted with a deep pink ribbon.
Her corsage was also phalenop-
sis orchids. The groom's grand-
mother, Mrs. Felecia Ganzerla
of Vicksburg, Mississippi, wore-
a street length dress of turquoise
silk accented by her corsage of
white roses.
Immediately following the cer-
emony, Mr. and Mrs. Coldewey
hosted a champagne brunch in
their home, gardens and pool
area. The formal bride's table
was overlaid with a white Ital-
ian lace and cut-work cloth, and
was centered with the five-
tiered -wedding cake decorated
in white with touches of dainty
yellow and pale green flowers
and topped with a nosegay of
fresh marguerite daisies, tulle
and streamers. Daisies were also
scattered over the cake and en-
circled it- at the base. Flanking
the cake were tall branched sil-
ver. candelabra holding burning
white tapers. The candelabra
held bouquets of marguerite dai-
sies,' white roses, snapdragons
and lacy fern.
On the buffet was a massed
fan-shaped arrangement of white
mums, yellow and white snap-


dragons and daisies flanked by
branched silver candelabra hold-
ing mint green tapers. The
bride's book was kept by Miss
Mary Ann Patton of Atlanta,
cousin of the bride, on a table
featuring green and yellow
munis.
Guests were served a lavish
buffet and champagne on the
patio and in the pool area which
had arrangements of the yellow
and white summer flowers plac-
ed throughout. In the living
room, den and other party areas
arrangements of fuji mums,
snapdragons and daisies were
placed at vantage points.
Serving punch and the choco-
late groom's cake in the gardens
were Mrs. Ronald Mucha of San
Diego, Calif., Mrs. Kent Seely of
Greensboro, N. C.; Mrs. Gerald
Parish of Laurel, Miss.; Mrs. Gil
Shealey of Wewahitchka; Mrs.
Chris Cottrell of Panama City;
Miss Ann Belin of Montgomery.
. The wedding cake was served
to the guests by Miss Mary Lee
Moore of Marietta, Ga., Miss Ca-
rol Wager of Port St. Joe, Mrs.
Norbert Johnson of Hattiesburg,
Miss., and Mrs. Steve Manieri of
Tallahassee. Greeting guests at
the door were Mrs. J. Lamar
Miller and Mrs. Paul Fensom.
'Hostesses assisting in the serv-
ing and caring for the guests
were Mrs. Leo Shealey, Mrs. J.
P. Hendrix, Mrs. Winthrop Saw-
yer of Indianlantic, Mrs. W. E.
Whaley, Mrs. Richard McIntosh,
Mrs. Tommy Hutchins, Mrs.
George Tapper, Mrs. George An-
chors, Mrs. Ronald Childers and
the aunts of the bride, Mrs.
Howard Maddox of Sebring,
Mrs. Parker T. Vause of Talla.
hassee and Mrs. Leon Patton of
Atlanta. All the hostesses wore
corsages of white feathered
mums.
Dainty daisy-topped rice cud-
dles were passed to the guests
from beribboned baskets by lit-
tle Master Haywood Shealey and
little Miss Trish, Tapper. Mas-
ter Shealey's boutennaire was a
white rose and Miss Tapper's
corsage was a white feathered
mum.
After mingling with their
guests, Dr. and Mrs. Johnson
left on an extended wedding
trip which will include stops in
the mountains of North Caro-
lina; West Virginia and Tennes-


see. For traveling, the bride
chose a silk dress in shades of
blue with tiny buttons down the
front, with pleated skirt and ac-
cented by white at the neckline
arid puffed sleeves. She wore
matching accessories and her
corsage was lily-of-the-valley.
The bride attended Brenau
College in Gainesville, Georgia
and is a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Southern Misisippi at
Hattiesburg where she received
both her B.S. and M.S. degrees.
She taught in the field of special
education at Natchez, Mississippi
last year. She is a member of
Alpha Gamma Delta social soror-
ity and Kappa Delta Pi, National
Educational Honorary society.
The bridegroom is also a grad-
uate of the University of South-
ern Mississippi where he receiv-
ed his B.S., M.S. and PhD. de-
grees. He has held teaching posi-
tions at Natchez, Meridian, Jef-
ferson Davis Jr. College and was
a teaching assistant at the Uni-
versity of Southern Mississippi.
He is also a member of Kappa
Delta Pi, National Educational
honorary society. He will teach
at East Tennessee State Univer-
sity at Johnson City, Tennessee
in the fall, where they will be at
home after the wedding trip.
Out of town guests attending
the wedding were Mr. and Mrs.
Leon 1. Patton and Miss Mary
Ann Patton of Atlanta, Ga.; Mr.
and Mrs. Howard A. Maddox,
Sebring; Mr. and Mrs. Parker T.
Vause, Tallahassee; Robert J.
Moran, Miami Springs; Mr. and
Mrs. Norbert Johnson, Hatties-
burg, Miss.; Mr. and Mrs. Gil
Shealey and Haywood, Wewa-
hitchka; ,Miss Mary Lee Moore,
Marietta, Ga.; Mr. and Mrs.
Steve Manieri, Tallahassee; Capt.
and Mrs. Ronald Mucha, San Di-
ego, Calif.; Mr. and Mrs. Kent
Seely, Greensboro, N. C.; Mr.
and Mrs. Gerald Parish, Laurel,
Miss.; Mrs. Chris Cottrell, Pan-
ama City; Miss Ann Belin, Mont-
gomery, Ala.; Mrs. Jack Con-
nell, Wewahitchka; Mr. and Mrs.
Fount May, Quincy; Mrs. Jack
Kerigan, Dothan, Ala.; Jake Be-,
lin, Jacksonville; Mrs. Paul
Ward, Fitzgerald, Ga.; Miss Bren-
da Ward, Denver, Colo.; Mr. and
Mrs. Tom Bowser, Jacksonville;
Mr. and Mrs. Briggs Scisson,
Tallahassee; Mrs. Felecia Gan-
zerla, Vicksburg, Miss.; Mrs.
Clyde Wolverton, Jackson, Miss.;
Dr. and Mrs. John Robey, Stark-
ville, Miss.; Miss Enid Mathison,
Jacksonville; Mr. and Mrs. Win-
throp _Sawyer and Miss Mindy
Sawyer, .Indialantic; Miss Jan
Lehman, Huntsville, Ala.; Mr.
and Mrs. Billy Gaillard, Planta-
tion and Tommy Wright, Talla-


YOUR STATE SENATOR


The children of Mr. and Mrs.
J, W. Sealey, Sr., will honor
their parents on their 50th wed-
ding anniversary on Saturday,
August 26.
All friends and relatives are


Pentecostal Women's
Auxiliary Meets

The Woman's Auxiliary of the
Pentecostal Church met in the"
home of Mrs. Avery Howell Mon-
day, August 14 at 7:30 p.m. with
eight members present.
Mrs. Claudine Vandevender pre-
sided at the meeting due to the
absence of the president.
Mrs. .Vandevender called the


- DISTRICT 3


invited to call between the
hours of 2:00 and 5:00 p.m. The
event will be held at their home
at 508 Ninth Street, Port St
Joe.


Rehearsal 'Dinner
Fetes Bridal Party

The rehearsal dinner for the
Christie Coldewey-Jerone Johnson
wedding was held at the home of
the Lawrence Copenhavers at 8:00
p.m. Friday, August 4.
Clusters of wedding bells, lilies
of the valley and white ribbons
were used on the front door and


meeting to order by asking the la- on the individual candle-lit tables
dies to form a circle for prayers throughout the home. The bride's


for all requests given by the
group. Mrs. Howell gave the devo-
tional from John 10:22-30.
Minutes of the last meeting were
read and approved. A business
meeting followed and reports from
committees were given. The meet-
ing was closed with prayer.
The hostess served the ladies
cake, ice cream and punch.


hassee.
Pre-nuptial parties for the
bride included a shower given by
friends at Disney World in Or-
lando where she was employed
for the summer, a luncheon giv-
en by Mrs. Roy Gibson, Jr., Mrs.
Robert King and Mrs. J. P, ,Hen-
drix at the Hendrix beach cot-
tage; a luncheon at the Hilton
Hotel in Tallahassee given by
Miss Becky Childers of Atlanta
and Mrs. Wayhe Childers of Tal-
lahassee; a luncheon at the Han-
non beach home given by Mrs.
Frank Hannon and Mrs. W. E.
Whaley; a coffee at the Miller
home given by Mrs. J. Lamar
Miller, Mrs. Paul Fensom and


table was centered with a bridal
bouquet with yellow and green
streamers and featuring a minia-
ture bride and groom.
, Approximately 40 guests includ-
ing the wedding party and out of
town guests attended.
Co-hosting the evening affair
were the Leonard Belins and the
Leo Shealeys.


Mrs. Henry Campbell; a buffet
dinner at the Stone beach home
given by Mr. and Mrs. S. R.
Stone and Mr. and Mrs. George
Tapper and a rice-bag party giv-
en by Mrs. Tommy Hutchins.
A buffet luncheon for the wed-
ding party; family and out of
town guests was given by Mrs.
George Anchors, Mrs. Chris
Cottrell, Mrs. Jean Atchison and
Mrs. Lamar Hardy. The rehearsal
dinner for tie wedding party and
out of town guests at the Copen-
haver home- was hosted by Mr.
and Mrs. L.. L. Copenhaver, Mr. 1
and Mrs. Leo Shealey and Mr.
and Mrs. Leonard Belin.


RECOGNITION COMES QUICKLY TO DEVOTED WASHINGTON NEWCOMER ...


CHIPLEY-Margaret Zebedee Brock is a citizen who gets in-
volved-in civic projects, community affairs,. government or any-
thing else she considers constructive. .
And she has a lot of energy, knowledge, talent, ability and ex-
perience to draw upon in the interest of the people and institu-
tions of this area. If anybody's 'listening. And if the local public
feels that progress here is not already too fast.
Washington C6unty has been Mrs. Brock's second home for
more than two decades, but she moved here two or three years
ago to make her permanent home.
She is otherwise known as Mrs. Conway C. Brock, wife of a
retired Atlanta, Ga., veterinarian. He is native of Washington
County. Dr. and Mrs. Brock for years have owned a ranch of
nearly 1,000 acres in the western part of this county. That's where
,they have their home.
But they hadn't been there long before Mrs. Brock was before
the county commissioners, putting in a bid for some improved
roads.
She had more success in organizing a volunteer Red Cross
group for service at the local hospital.
She attends county board meetings from time to time, and
she's in the court room now and then to see how justice is being
administered. And- she asks questions; penetrating questions-
and she sometimes makes suggestions and otherwise take part
in the public opinion-making process.
Mrs. Brock has an accent sufficiently pronounced to suggest
that she is a native of Virginia. Born Margaret Mae Zebedee in
Petersburg, Va., she attended school there and graduated from
Radford College.
She had made a distinguished record for herself long before
coming "home" to the ranch. She taught school for awhile after
her graduation from Radford, and in 1942-43 she headed the
personalized service department for the Roane-Anderson Co., at
Oak Ridge, Tenn.
With the Red Cross in the European Theatre from 1944
through 1947, she became supervisor of voluntary services and
had charge of leave area clubs in the Bavarian region of Germany.
"I enjoyed that work more than anything," she recalls. "It
was fascinating and the scenery was superb."
But, then, she enjoys much of the work she has undertaken.
She once took time off from her work to earn a law degree, except
for three more months of study. She still feels that the course
was just interrupted, not halted completely.
And she has been a successful businesswoman-as a real
estate broker, no less, one with a six-agent staff.
In the meantime, she has been recognized with listings in
Marquis' "World Who's Who in Finance and Industry" and "Who's
Who of American Women with World Notables," both published
in the United States. She is also listed in "The Dictionary of In-


ternational Biography," a who's who-type book- issued periodically
in London.
Few women hereabouts have won such recognition. Few men,
either for that matter.
Upon returning from Europe in 1948, she bought and began
operating an apartment motel in Daytona Beach. That's where she
met Dr. Brock. They married in 1950 and moved to East Point, a
suburb of Atlanta, where she founded and operated Zebedee Real-
ty, Inc., and he owned and operated East Point Animal Hospital.
It was here that Mrs. Brock was named' "Mrs. East Point," a
title for woman of the year. She was a member of both the
Woman's Club and the Business and Professional Women's Club.
She was a director of a regional clothing bank, a volunteer direc-
tor of Girl Scouts and was chairman of the Code and Ordinance
Committee of the City of East Point.
Mrs. Brock's first real estate venture was in Florida, where (in
addition to the apartment motel) she built and leased post offices
at Daytona Beach, Holly Hill and other nearby communities and
bought the old Jay Gould mansion in nearby Ormond Beach.
She acknowledges having come a long way since finding her-
self an orphan at age 10, the eldest of three children. Her brother
was killed in World War II, and her sister died at age 29. The
court appointed an attorney, whose wife was a supervisor of
elementary education, as her legal guardian.
"Having the guidance of this fine couple was a stroke of great
good luck," she recalls.
She's tempted from time to time to return to law school to
complete requirements for that degree.
Although no women's liberation militant, she believes
strongly that women should take a more active part in politics.
"I think we'd have better government if women, played a
more active role in politics," she said. But she denied having any
personal political aspirations here... "I have nothing in mind at
the moment," she laughed. "But, III keep my options open ."
When not busy with her real estate interests in Atlanta or
Daytona Beach, Mrs. Brock sometimes knits. But she prefers
something a little more challenging.
She's often at the side of her husband, who is chairman of the
Washington County Development Authority. They have spent
many hours in the performance of the duties of that post. Both Dr.
and Mrs. Brock say they see a great potential for future develop-
ment here, and she's determined to play some role in shaping its
course.
Her's won't be a negative role-not unless it is completely
out of character. She is a positive person, one that's rarin' to get
on with making the world hereabouts a better place .

Reprinted with permission from THE PENSACOLA NEWS-
JOURNAL Sunday, April 23, 1972.


(Paid Political Advertisement)


Will Celebrate Golden Anniversary


VOTE FOR and ELECT

MARGARET Z. BROCK










Barrier to Speak at Long Avenue


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, F1ridm THURSDAY, AUGUST 1T, T,2T PAGE SEV L



Port St. Joe Jaycees Form New


SThe Reverend Dr. John Bar-
rier, Pfofessor of Evangelism at
Moody Bible Institute in Chi,
eago will speak at the Long
Avenue Baptist Church on Sun-
day, August 20.at the 11:00 A.M.
woihip service. Dr. Barrier is
visiting his parents, Mr, and Mrs.
fW. W. Barrier, Sr., at 504 17th
Street, while in Port St. Joe on
vacation. He is a graduate of
Port St. Joe High School and
Florida State University. His


graduate studies in Theology
were done at Wheaton College
in Glyn Ellen, Illinois where he
earned his Masters degree and
was awarded the Doctor of Di-
vinity degree.
The Reverend Barrier has
been engaged in numerous evan-
gelical ministries. Some of these
have been on a nation-wide ba-
sis. For the past several years he
has been Director of Practical
Christian Work at Moody Bible


DR. JOHN BARRIER


U


Institute.
One of the first public sermons
delivered by Rev. Barrier was
in the Long Avenue Baptist
Church about 16 years ago, at a
Student Night at Christmas pro-
gram, while he was a student at
FSU.
During the many years since
this local man left Port St. Joe
he has maintained a friendly and
warm relationship with the Rev.
J. C. Odum, pastor of the Long
Avenue Church. Odum is next
door neighbor to the Barriers
in Port St. Joe.
The public is cordially invited
to attend the worship service
and hear Dr. John Barrier.


Bridal Party Honor

Given In Silas R. Stc
On Thursday evening, August 3,
Miss Christie Coldewey and her
fiance, Dr. Jerone Johnson, were
honored at a dinner at the Stone
beach house hosted by Mr. and
Mrs. Silas R. Stone and Mr. and
Mrs. George G. Tapper.
The cottage and patio were dec-
orated with the bride's choen col-
ors of yellow, green and white.
The buffet table featured an ar-
rangement of marguerite daisies,
and was overlaid with a yellow
cloth. The bride's table also had a
yellow cloth and was centered
with a cluster of green and yellow
seashell candles nestled in daisies
and fern. Individual tables scat-
tered throughout the home and on
the patio \were overlaid in yellow
and were centered with a seashell
candle backed by daisies and


Your Harvest At Harvestime


SEND


HARVEY J.




BELS.ER-


to CONGRESS





TO THE CITIZENS OF GULF COUNTY:

Your receipts at harvest time from federal
funds for the fiscal year 1971 to Gulf County gov-
ernment amounted to '$6,024.55 according to the
official report of the Comptroller of -the State of
Florida.
The federal government collected 4% billion
dollars from Florida taxpayers last year and Flor-
ida government received back 500 million dollars
according to the State Comptroller in aids, grants,
etc.
Your present congressman voted against the
revenue sharing bill for states, cities and counties
but this legislation passed the congress irrespective
of his and other opposition. In dollars and cents
Gulf County will-receive $73,698.00 and the cities
in the County will'receive $71,697.00 or a grand
total of $145,395.00 for the County. You will not
be able to thank your congressman for any help in
obtaining these funds. The overburdened taxpayer
in Gulf County should be able to receive a long
overdue tax break.
Your congressman also at this session of Con-
gress voted against the 19 billion dollar aid to edu-
cation legislation sam th anti ng' --^-}--
thereto.
Your congressman approved of the young peo-
ple fighting in Vietnam but he disapproved (by his
vote in the Congress) of their right to vote.


Construction funds for Tyndall Air Force Base
for fiscal year 1972-73 amount to $1,408,000. Con-
struction funds for Coastal Systems Mine Labora-
tory amount to $85,000.00. BUT construction funds
appropriated for neighboring Fort Rucker and
Gunter-Maxwell in neighboring Alabama amount to
$12,000,000.00 according to Republican Congress-
man Bil Dickson of Alabama.
In 1971, the congressional district of Repub-
lican Congressman Bob Wilson of San Diego, Cali-
fornia, home base of 74,000 military personnel, 21
Navy and Marine Corps command headquarters,
three Naval air stations, a massive encampment
and such aerospace firms as General Dynamics
Corp., and Teledyne-Ryan pulled in $72,000,000.00
in construction funds. More recently a 288 mil-
lion contract has been let in this district to con-
struct a merchant marine ship.
Are you satisfied with the crumbs from the 245
billion dollar federal budget each year, or do you
want a piece of the cake?
Vote BELSER, the lawyer-sheriff for Congress
for action. not talk. in the first district.
'In eanidate wft zA years of experience in
local and state government and with proven dedi-
cated service in all three (3) branches of Florida
Government.


After 32 Years You Deserve A Change



Send Belser to Congress


Club Last Week


n Wewahitchka


PRECINCT NO. 2
White Building Wewahitchka
Cerk: Dorothy E. Strength
Inspectors: Mrs. Walter Hendrix,
Cosetta Walsingham, Bessie M.
Nunnery and 1Ola Harden,
PRECINCT NO. 3
Crutchfield Building
Honeyville
Clerk: Carmi B. Crutchfield
Inspectors: Thelma Vanhorn,
Maxine Coker and Dorothy Fore-'
hand.


I


PRECINCT NO. 4 '
Overstreet Community Building
Clerk: Mrs. Annie Cook
Inspectors: Jimmie M. Hardy,
Minnie E. Herring and Mrs. James'
Guilford.
PRECINCT NO. 5
Highland View
Clerk: Mrs. Mae Creamer
Inspectors: Mrs. T. 0. Richards;
Mrs. Carlos Miles and Mrs. Pearl
Whitfield.
PRECINCT NO. 6
Fire Station White City
Clerk: Mrs. Raymond Hightower
Inspectors: Eloise Harper, Mrs.
Bill Harper and Eunice Daniels.
PRECINCT NO. 7
The Beaches
Clerk: Nadine B. Robertson
Inspectors: Joyce Young, Bar-
bara Creel and Mrs. Parker G.
Hart.
PRECINCT NO. 8
City Hall Port St. Joe
Clerk: Mrs. Zola Maddox
Inspectors: Mrs. W. J. Daugh-.
try, Addie Goodson, Nadine Low-
ery, 'Lucille Sheffield and Mrs. J.
A. Garrett.
PRECINCT NO. 9
STAC House Port St. Joe
Clerk: Elsie Griffin
Inspectors: Virginia Smith, Beu-
lah Hatfield, Mrs. Roy C. Tharpe
Mae N. Pierson and Mrs. Elise
Dawson.
PRECINCT NO. 10
Scout House Port St. Joe
Clerk: Mrs. 0. M. Taylor
Inspectors: Mrs. Albert Black-
burn, Mrs. E. C. Cason, Mrs. R. M.
Spillers, Alice Macomber and Ger-
trude Boyer.
PRECINCT NO. 11
Centennial Building Port St. Joe
Clerk: Mrs. E. M. Walker
Inspectors: Beulah V. Knight,
Qi a' Howard, Brenda Mathes and
Mrs. John McKenzie.


a


to,

04


LOOK AT THE RECORD!
6 years ago Commissioner Leo Kennedy, working -with.
others helped in getting the 98iacre site of the new .Sunland
Recreation Park for the retarded and handicapped, to be lo
cated on St, Joseph Peninsula near the>IT. H. Stone Memorial
Park, transferred from the The/ Florida State Board of Parks
'"to the Departmeiit 'Of retardationn.
In March of this year, Leo Kennedy, along with other
members of the Board of Directors of the State Association of
County Commissioners, met in Tallahassee with the House
Revenue and Taxation Committee and Committee on State
Parksn a assisted our local legislation delegation in lobby-
ing an appropriation for the first phase of constructionlfor an
.amount in excess of $100,000. This first stage, when completed,
will employ some 15 people or more and when fully completed
will employ more than 100 people. This will not only help the
--retarded and handicapped but will also boost the economy of
Gulf County.
Leo Kennedy is working with other members of the Gulf
Count"B oard of Commissioners in obtaining at least two Way-
side Parks, with at least one. of these to be located on our
beaches.
VOTE FOR IA MAN OF ACTION!


RE ELECT

Leo Kennedy
County CommisiOiter District 5
I Will Appreciate YourAVote and Support
(Paid Pol.


Adv.)


I1-


Classified Ads


Call 227-3161


F-


The Port St. Joe Jaycees, the group of young, men from Wewa- secretary, Benny Lister; treasurer,
BREAKS BOTH ARMS Panama City Jaycees and Ken Pat-' hitchka on -August 1 and urged Houston Whitfield and directors)
Barry McKnight, 10- year old terson of Apalachicola met with a these interested young men to Gil Sheaty, Don Gilmore and Ted
grandson of Mrs. Lucille McKnight form a Jaycee club in their com- Whitfield.
of this city, received fractures of munity. On Monday night, August
both arms while playing football I I A J 7, the Port St. Joe club' made their
at his home in Melbourne this dream a reality as they again met
week. Barry is the son of Mr. and L* with the Wewahitchka group to
Mrs. Bob McKnight. organize a new club. I -_
.. -o u INVITATION TO BID The Port St. Joe Jaycees have -
OVERNIGHT VISITORS. BID NO. 130 been interested in forming a club
Mrs. Mattie Traweek and Mrs. The City Commission of the City in Wewahitchka for some time and "
Terry Lucky of Texas, spent Tues- of Port St. Joe, Florida, will re- recently found some interested
day night with Mrs. Lucille Mc- ceive sealed bids until 5:00 P.M., young me from Wewahitchka and
Knight. They are sistersin-law of September 5, 1972, to be. opened began to pt their ideas into ac-nd--
Mrs. McKnight. at 8:00 P.M., at the City Commis- tion and on last Monday night end-
sion meeting September 5, 1972, ed their ideas with the reality of
S At Dinn r for the sale of the following des- a Wewahitchka Jaycee .organiza-
le At Din r cribed property located on Wood- tion. Aiding the Port St. Joe 'Jay-
ward Avenue in the City of Port cees in their efforts to get the We-
)ne Beach Home St. Joe, Florida: wahitchka club started were a
LOTS 6 and 7, BLOCK 38 group of Panama City Jaycees,
fern. Torches and patio candles' The City of Port St. Joe reserves Ken Patterson, district 21 vice-:
lit the al fresco dining area on the i the right to reject any or all bids president pro-ter from Apalachi-
patio. received. 'cola; John Hutt, Jr., district 21
The hostesses presented the bri- C. W. BROCK 8-17 vice president and Bob Saunders,
dal couple with a gift of a molded City Auditor and Clerk 3t regional national director both of MISS DIANNE VARNES
ceramic casserole which was filled r ePanama City.
on this occasion with daisies.
Special guests besides the hon- INSPECTION ELECTION BOARDS The Port St. Joe club feels the Varnes Ward
ored couple were her parents, Mr. September 12 and October 3, 1972 new Jaycee organization will be.of e
and Mrs. T. S. Coldewey, the Notice is hereby given, that pur- great benefit to the Wewahitchka Engagement Told
groom's mother, Mrs. Clyde Wol- suant to Chapter 102.012, F. S. community and to the young men
verton of Jackson, Mississippi, 1971, the Board of County Commis- themselves. The We wa hitchka and Mrs Neil Varnes of
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Maddox of sioners of Gulf County, Florida ap- group has already made plans for Mr. and are proud to an-
Sebring, Mr. and Mrs. Leon Pat- points the following Election some action to be takenmin their Highland View are proud to an-
ton of Atlanta, Robert Moran of Boards to conduct the primary city that will be both beneficial nounce the engagement and ap-
Miami Springs, aunts and uncles elections to be held on September and meaningful to the community. daughter, Patricia Dianne to
of thQ bride. Also present were Dr. 12, 1972 and October 3, 1972 to- Officers for the newly formed Olan Ward, Jr., the son of Mr.
and Mrs. John Robey of Starkville, wit: Olean Wr, ,an Wr Sr nof
Miss., who will attend the bride Wewahitchka Jaycees were elected and Mrs. Olan Ward, Sr., of
and groom, at their wedding on PRECINCT NO. 1 last Monday night as follows: Pres- Apalachicola. .
August 5. Covers were laid for ap- City Hall Wewahitchka ident, Andy Thomas; first vice- Se tber eddinl F nal plan
proximately 50 friends of the bride Clerk: Eunice Arhelger
and groom. Inspectors: Leona O'Neal, Dolly president, Doug Birmingham;, Sec will be announced at a later
Weeks and Alice Chason. ond vice-president, Cornel Stokes; date.


I





~5'Xi i~LT 'In II RI, Pert St. Jew Flo i ThURS RA'. M)USW 17, 1972


round the world as well as in
Florida, is impressed with the new
FIorida' s after Use Act Put everyone, including the water user,
and help bring about badly needed
control of the use of the state's wa-
In Book Form; Free For Asking ter rese." s
Florida Water Resources Act of
One of the best and most comn- ida Water Resources Act of 1M72, Inc., a consulting firm of ground, gain a useful eronept of the intent 1972" are available free from the
0ehe&ilve water management, ats' ccoidlig to an analysis recently water specialists. of the. bill and of the meaning of firm's southeastern office: Geragh-
in force in the nation is The For- I prepared by' Geraghty & Miller, The Act stipulates that w its important provisions.' ty & Miller, Inc., Suite 520, Gulf
S- spu es within Geraghty & Miller, Inc., exper- Life Tower, Jacksonville, Florida
.two years after implementation ienced in ground water matters 132207.
SExhaust Systems M istbe Op ratMing date, present users must apply ..- I .
Exhaust Systems Most e pertin for a permit to continue to divert SAY____ Y OU SAW IT IN THE STAR -
water. In doing so, they must jus- ___ _
TALLAIASSEE.-'Exhaust sys. patches made .of. an arc or acety- tify the use as reasonable-benefi- -- ---
terns must be in good repair be- lene wa. cial; show that they are not divert-
inning August 15, 1972, in order. 4. Mfflersortail'pipes are not ing water Ieyond replenishment;
to pass vehicle inspection announ-! connected with clamps to prevent that they're no t unduly in-
ped the Florida Highway Patrol leakage. teinerilg wi t other users and are
ibis week.. 5. Tail pipe opening is mashed t causing s-wa r intrusion.
Colonel Eldrige Beach, director or pinched. In' a six-page booklet; Geraghty & H -- rs s
of the Patrol said, "The Florida S. Holding brackets are lose Miller describes in lay terms theseTRE C
State Legislature amended the ve- or. broken. and other pertinent parts of the
hiele safety equipment inspection 7. Any part of exhaust system Act.
law to include inspection of ex- passes through occupants compart- Recommending the Geraghty & &S
Iaust systems and the following ment. Miller analysis as a good piece of
Implements this requirement." 8. Tail pipe fails to discharge interpretive writing, D a 1 e H.
Vehicles will not pass inspection exhaust from the rear or sides of Twachtmann, Executive Director ,
if: 'file passenger and luggage corn-, of the Southwest Florida Water
;1. Manifold, exhaust line or apartment on passenger vehicles. Management' District, says: "It -
aluffler connections have any leak- "Vehicle owners should make should enable all persons concern-
age or holes other than "built-in". periodic checks, of their exhaust ed with water 'resources develop-
drains, system fo possible leaks and when meant, says: "It should enable all'
2. There is excessive vibration driving keep a window or the ven-personsconcerne wa
of exhaust lines. Itilation system partially open to persons concerned with water re-
3. A muffler has been repaired' allow fresh air to enter as they sources development, 'use, conser-
wilth a jacket or patch except, travel," said Colonel Beach. vation, control and management to


VOTE FR EXPERIENCE


VID BIDWELL


SUPERINTEEDENT Of SCHOOLS


.ik


GULF COUNTY
. -. .. /


41



4<


EXPERIENCE IN


CLASSROOM TEACHING
SCHOOL FINANCE
STUDENT SERVICES
. em-"


SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL LAWS and POLICIES
CURRICULUM PLANNING


As far astb5.iys and' girls of Gulf County are concerned, this may well be
the most important l tueal: decisiomryou. make this year.
4tp84-17 (Paid Political Advertising)


omdmn Bad


ANNUAL
mal" .mlmft.. l ;- -Mmwfirmh


USED

SPEED QUEEN


Automatic





Only


$98oo00


ThI lo"ok-odUy took a look abroad... at the ro.
antic trend toward.things Spanishl Scrolling-and.
Serving motifs accent each piece of this dramatic
maw bedroom roupl Sleek handholds complete the
pta nceoCheMset i the wai ich tone "Spanish
wohatw" and Pccessorize N with any colors fromn
p bo -ld Mediterranean schemes.,-


4 PIECES


BED PLATE GLASS MIRROR
TRIPLE DRESSER and CHEST


Heavy Vinyl Cover
Channel Back

SOFA
AND
Matching Chair


$169.00


Bounty Gold Medal
PAPER TOWELS 3 rolls 99c F L 0 U R ---- 5 lbs. 49c
Georgia Grade "A" Jewel
Medium EGGS --- 2 doz. 89c SHORTENING 3 lb. can 69c
U. S. No. 1 2 Pound Bag
POTATOES --- TO Ibs. 69c Yellow 'Onions --- bag 29c
Large 2 Ounce Bottle$

PEPSI or 7-UP 3 for 89c
Fresh CGWOUN

Hamburger 3 lbs. $1.69
Tender Tender, Delicious
CLUB STEAK -----b. $1.29 7-Bone Steak --I----b. 79c
New York Full Cut
STRIP STEAK---- b. $1.79 Round STEAK -----lb. $1.09
Shoulder U. S. Choice Beef
Round ROAST -----b. 89c RIB EYE STEAK --- lb. $1.89


WHOLE

Whole PICNI(
All Meat
STEW BEEF
CHUCK ROAST. 1b. 97c


CS lb. 49c
Shank Half or Whole
Cured HAMS -----_ I-b. 59c
Georgia Grade "A"
FRYERS__------- b. 31c


Speed Queen Model No.
DA3100

Automatic Washer
0 2 Complete Cycles 0 3 Water Temp. Settings

$199.00
MATCHING SPEED QUEEN $i 17.UA
ELECTRIC CLOTHES DRYER ... $159.00


SEALY FIRM

Perfect Rest


Mattress and

Box Springs
Comfortable Quilt Top

BOTH75
FOR $7500


7-


F r I ~ ~


Wonder Bar
ST. JOE BEACH
featuring
THE VERSATILE FIVE
tfc Starting at 8:30 P.M, 8-17


II














i










I
























I


'c': '


" c -


MLIV


Fa-


ii I~ I ,, _


-: ~: ---------











Florida


Garden


Notes
by SHANNON SMITH
Home Grounds Specialist


University


August is a' month for gar-
deiing in Flo 'It's too late to
plinti many sua flowers and
toaq early for r varieties. And
furthermore, iti'ijt too darn hot
to spend all d~yr:slaving in qthp
yard. But don't despair, there are
plenty of easy jobs .lef' to do..
Here's a potpourri of easy-to-do
garden chorest
i: If you're growing mums or point.
settias for winter color, this is -tlie
last month you should pinch these
ljnts to increase blooms. Pinch-
ing back the bud tips will promote
Heavier flowering because of in-
creased branching. I.Ap-, if you
wait too late, pinchingwill remove
flower buds and thus reduce flow.
ers this fall.
It's also about time to 'begin dis-
budding camellias to increase flow-
er size. As soon as you can dis-
tinguish the rounded flower buds
from the pointed vegetative bud,
twist off all but one of the flower


Airman Dannie Bolden
Assigned to Chanute

Airman Dannie E. Bolden, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Bolden
of 309 Avenue E, has been assign-
ed to Chanute AFB, Ill., after com-
pleting Air Force basic training. ]


ty of Florida


buds at each' tip? Be careful not
to injure the remaining bud which
should develop into a larger flow-
-er. Sasanquas and japonicas which
are prized for multi blooms, need
.not be pinched.
Common ornamentalss like olea-
nder hydrangeas and azaleas can
be ,propagated .by cuttings this
time of year. For azaleas, take tip
cuttings three to five inches long
with several ,leaves left attached.
Many rooting mediums can be used
such as sand or a mixture of peat
and perlite. Place the cuttings in
the media and keep moist by cov-
ering with a plastic bag or use a
mist system. A rooting hormone
may hasten root growth. If you
have any cold sensitive ornamen-
tals, try rooting cuttings before
winter and keep the young plants
in a protected spot this winter.
Then, if the ornamental freezes,
you'll have' replacements for the
spring.
If you want to plant things this
time of year, try bulbs of Louis-
iana iris, gingers, crinums, day-
lilies, amaryllis and zephyr lilies.
Of course, you can still plant woo-
dy ornamentals, but hurry up so
they'll be well established before
the winter arrives.
If you intend to plant winter
annuals like Baby's Breath, calen-
idulas or, pansies, start ordering


During his six weeks at the Air your seed and preparing the flow-
Training Command's L a c kland er beds.
AFB, Texas, he studied, the Air Keen watching for insects of
Force Wission;, organization and 1
e sion,, organ ization and s lawns and ornamentals. Chinch
struction t in human relations. i bugs and mole crickets pre very
etive on lawns and wbhi flies,
The airman has been assigned :... L ,
th :. .. : \ scales, aphids antcerpilars are
to the Technical Training Center lars are
Chantite for specialized train- damaging ornamentals.
fg as a fire protection specialist. There's lots of other activities
Airman Bolden is a 1972 grad- you can think of, but thesee will
uate of Port St. Joe High School. keep you busy for a While. .



Hughey

Willim s

A Would Make You A Good
PSheriff
Honestly!
(Paid Pol. Adv.),
Il


isi----


and tomatoes for 15 to 20 minutes
or until slightly thickened. Cook
noodles in boiling salted water.
Drain.
Add meat to tomato mixture.
Fill 3-qt. casserole by alternating
la y e r s of noodles, mozzarella,
teheese, meat sauce and parmesan
cheese. Bake'in 375 degree oven
for 20 to 25 minutes. May be gar-
nished with sieved, hard cooked,
egg yolks. Cover well and freeze
in container up to 2 months. Serves
6.
TUTTI-FRUTTI TORTONI
Stir 1 pint vanilla ice cream to
soften. Add %: cup chopped candied
fruits and peels, cup chopped
(seedless raisins, and' rum flavor-
ing to taste. Spoon into 4 or 5 pa-
per bake cups set in muffin pan.
Freeze till nearly firm, poke in
whole toasted almonds, point down
and freeze firm.

CLASSIFIED ADSI
Midget Investments That Yield
Giant Returni
I S


-ELECT-


the Lawyer-Sheriff



to CONGRESS


Ec~7fY J BEL~iEa


ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH THE CoLJMBS "kOM THE 245 BILLION DOL-
LAR FEDERAL BUDGET, OR DO YOU WANT A PIECE OF THE CAKE?

REMEMBER, BELSER, IS THE CANDIDATE WHO IS NOW AND HAS BEEN
FOR PRESIDENT NIXON AND WILL WORK HARD IN THE CONGRESS TO
HELP THE PRESIDENT GET HIS PROGRAMS ENACTED INTO LAW.

AFTER 32 YEARS YOU DESERVE A CHANGE!



Send Belser To Congress
(Paid Political Advertisement)


THE STAR, Port t. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, AUGUST 17, 1972 PAGtE NIN J



Pen Raised Black Bear Given


New Home In Wilds at Box R


Sheffield, Crosby
On Carrier Kennedy

Navy Seaman. Apprentive Don._
nie R. Sheffiel,. son.,of Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Sheia id, 01 jy.oodward
Avenue and Nvy Seam&p Jo~n S.
Crosby, nep4.4., of lWs. 'Martha.
Locke, 169 gbis v., 1. icina-
ted in a sep Ftleqt oper-
ation in -0.fMe tanean aboard,
the a4W ft carrier USS John F.
Kennedy. .












CHATW

by Florida Power Corp.
A freezer is a very good invest-
ment for most families today. It
mainly helps homemakers to pur-
chase bargains 'in quantity and
serve /them .as treats when the
same foods are quite costly in the
supermarkets. The following is a
sample of recipes you may want to
experiment with this summer.
LASAGNE
8 oz. pkg. lasagne noodles
1 lb. ground beef
% t. garlic' powder
2 T. salad oil (optional)
Y4 c. minced onion
1% t. salt
% -t. pepper
1% t. oregano or Italian season
1 8-oz. can tomato sauce
1 no. 2 can tomatoes
% lb. sliced mozzarella or
American cheese
% c. grated Parmesan cheese .
Brown ground beef and garlic
powder. Cook onion, salt, pepper, I
Italian seasoning, tomato sauce


- Say You Saw It In The Star -


Adpen-reared Florida black bear, program to restore bear popula-
eight. yearg told and weighing ap- tions will be greater in the wild.
pro~,pMtely,.500 pounds, has been He said the bear is now being
removed fropn his zoo-like viewing fitted with a fancy collar enclosing
cage oanState Road 20 by the a long-life radio transmitter which
Gamnenppd ,Fresh Water Fish Comn- game division personnel will mon-
mission n4 hauled deep into the itor to keep track of bruin's com-1
wQods where he can. roam at his ings and goings. Purpose is to'
will. and. dig up his own meals. trace his range and travel habits,
The bear has beon released at the once his callar is fitted and he is
Box-R Ranch, owned by St. Joe Pa. released on the game reserve.
per Company, located between Turner also said that people fre-
Port St. Joe. and Apalachicola. quently capture wild creatures
r and seek to make pets of them.
Ghales Turner, regional game "In so doing," he said, "the ani-
biolpgist, responded to pleas from mals lose their fear of man and,
the caretaker of a roadside service unless released in protected areas,
constructing a new cage. to meet such as the Box-R Ranch Preserve,
constructing a new cage to eet they become unwary of hunters
new legal height and width space and others who would destroy
for the, huge animal. Assisted by them."
Tom miy Jackson and Don Dowling,
gameinanagers, Turner moved the He added it would be much wiser'
bruin in a mobile :.age to his new not to capture any wild creature
home on Box-R Ranch. and seek to tame it or make a pet
of it, since all wild animals in cap-
Although Turner's bear has been tivity may also become dangerous
a major sight-seeing attraction for at some time. "It is much wiser
both young and old for many years, and safer to leave them in the
the bear's usefulness in a serious woods," he said.


1s '


PATE'S SERVICE CENTER

JIMMY'S PHILLIPS "66" STATION


Ii


LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES BILL HEADS
CIRCULARS. FORMS BUSINESS CARDS
BROCHURES SOCIETY PRINTING
ENGRAVING


-THE STAR-




PAGE TEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, AUGUST 17, 1972


Your HAPPY PIGGLY WIGGLY is as frsehly modern and con-
venient as tomorrow but as old fashioned friendly and courteous
as can be. Pleasure Shop your HAPPY PIGGLY WIGGLY for m
all the good foods your family's taste can imagine at the lowest
possible PIGGLY WIGGLY prices plus prompt, friendly and
courteous HAPPY PIGGLY WIGGLY service!


August 16 thru 19


SPECIAL LS
Quantity Rights- Reserved


COLONIAL or WHITE GOLD
EXTRA FINE GRANULATED


5 LB.
BAG


LIMIT ... 1 Bag with $10.00 or More Order


ALL POPULAR FLAVORS
CHUG-A-LUG BRAND CAN


$
12 OZ.
CANS





$
Jumbo
Rolls


15 cans at this low price, please


SELECTED SPECIAL
VIVA BRAND PAPER


Strong, Absorbent, Dependable
HAPPINESS IS ENJOYING THE VERY BEST FOODS AT LOW PGGLY WIGGLY
PLEASURE SHOP PIGGLY WIGGLYt
Hunls Whole 15 Oz. Can Van Cam 20 Ounce Can"


TOMATOES--- 5 cans $1.00
Hunt's 6 Oz. Cans
TOMATO PASTE 6 cans $1.00
Hunt's 8 Oz. Cans
TOMATO SAUCE 8 cnan' $1.00
Viva 140 Count Pkgs.
NAPKINS -----34kgs. $1.00
Comet Large Cans -
CLEAANSER:"- 3cns 49c
Downy King Size P Botte
FABRIC S ENER--- $1.19

I FINAl OPPORTUNITY
WHILE THEY LAST!


Your Choice
WEXFORD
Footed Goblet, Sherbet
or Footed Juice
With Every $3.00 Purchase
at Piggly Wiggly.
Your Choice of Wexford
COMPLETE
PIECES
Save More Than 30%
Scented or Unscented


6 Ounce Can Anti-Perspirant 8
Close Up Regular or Mint
TOOTH PASTE-------Ig. tube 66c
Blue Horse Side Punch
FILLER PAPER ----500 ct. 77c
Blue Horse Side Punch
FILLER PAPER ---- 350 ct. 58c
Multi Pak $1.47 Value
THEME BOOKS--------3 pak 88c


C


PORK & BEANS 4 cans


PRICES.
.

S$1.00


FREE 100 EXTRA
S&H GREEN STAMPS
With $15.00 or More Order
Good Through August 19, 1972


Produce Specials
Juicy, Ripe
FRESH PEACHES ----b. 23c
Flavorful
YELOW ONIONS 3 lb. bag 45c
Idahoan Au-Gratin, Scalloped and Hashbrown
POTATOES---6 oz. pkg. 39c

Frozen Special
Minute Maid Frozen ORANGE

JUICE 120z.Can55c

Dairy Specials

WHIP OLEO --- 16 oz. 39c
Kraft American
SINGLE CHEESE----- 8 oz. 50c
Kraft American
SINGLE CHEESE ----6 oz. 39c
Blue Bonnet
REGULAR OLEO ----- 1 Ib. 39c


BLUE RIBBON BEEF BONE-IN
FULL CUT ROUND


Fresh Lean
GROUND

BEEFF
Pound ---
Fresh Lean
Pork Steak lb. 79c
Fresh Lean
Spare Ribs l-- b. 89c
Boston Butt
Pork Roast Ilb. 69c


Sunnyland Good Timer
WIENERS --12
USDA Inspected Fresh
Fryer Breast
QUARTERS -
Grade "B" Goodness


oz. 69c


lb. 43c


HAPPINESS IS SELECTING FRESHEST FRESH
AIR CONDITIONED


$

bWt


19


Bob White Sliced
BACON

-. 69c


First Cut --While they last
Pork Chops Ib. 49c
Blue Ribbon Beef
Swiss Steak lb. 98c
Blue Ribbon Beef
Chuck Steak Ib. 99c
Fresh Lean
Ground Chuck lb. 99c
USDA Inspected Fresh
Fryer Leg
QUARTERS lb. 39c
Grade "B" Goodness


PRODUCE IN PIGGLY
GARDEN!


FIRM, COLE SLAW PERFECT FRESH AND GREEN SELECTED


CABBAGE


WIGGLY'S


Ib. 8


Large EGGS 2doz. 99c

MORTON'S FAMOUS BRAND FROZEN CHOCOLATE, LEMON, COCONUT

Cream PIES14 OUNCE PACKAGE25

SWEET MILK OR BUTTERMILK PILLSBURY BRAND OVEN READY


BISCUITS


REGULAR 8 OUNCE CANS
4 PAK CARTON


39c


Your Shopping Pleasure Is
Our Policy at Piggly Wiggly


C


- II


I k~l,


"...-. '.L -- -- ------- rcll~LBL"II~I~AC*rC~~































"5UPER-RIGHT" IjEAVY WEST6KI'Il WIeUR
BONE
-D... IN

FULLY COOKED HAM0---6;
a rUPER-RIGHT" SKIN LES
COPELAND SKINLESS
_A : rtis gi ; '1


I
I


STHfi STAR, Port St. Joe, forf T~iHUiSDAY, AUGUST 17, 1972 P


GRADE "A" FRESH FLA. OR GA. GRADE "A" FRESH FLA. OR GA. "PRqCO D




SSB SMALL
CONSISTS OF: cWOL99_^ MH
3 IEDU AROUND
3BONES L.-
FRYER QUARTERS INCLUDES BACKS & GIBLETS

ANQUEt QiUCK FROZEN BLICIOUS "SUPER-RIGHT" DELICIOUS "COUNTRY TREAT"

SMOKED SLICED "MARKET STYLE" CAP'N JOHN'S QUICK FROZEN FRENCH FRIED
p. k 77o ot a r.........,.......* .....* .... .. Fi .SH ............ ......... 75
S"r-ight" -n'n John's Quick Frwene
.-L. 9 FRESH BEEF TRIPE L-- -. 59c Delicious SHRIMP CREOLE I
.. KG69-e


A&P DELICIOUS '
ti ^ (M ^.w...,..,..W,^.


12-OZ.
.. PKG.


PKO 79
PKG. "


QUICK FROZEN. -.- -- -- 1


10c OFF LABEL LAUNDRY DETERGENT
b& "a


.69t


Jima

S A V E
AT WE
LB.

,,U*S*4 PObhVA


Un


10- 69t


~~~V~1 lei'b S O


SYellow Onions,'


FOR YOUR LAUNDRY OUR OWN EVNRY IOW PRIE
Drive Detergent.. Sx 99c Tea Bags...... 14
AHOf PINK EVERYDAY LOW PRICES TEA BAGS EVERYDAY LOW P 'C :
Liquid Detergent,... .o 29c Lipton..............I 58c
Y LAUNDRY BLEACH AP PURE EVERYDAY LOW PRICll
Clorox...........5 38c Cal'ne Sugar....... L.54 r c
SAP LAUNDRY EVERYDAY LOW PRICEl PURE CANE SUG OW PMaY a
SBleach. ,.39c ix R'lC********-6Lk J D7 C t .,,, a
PLANTATION OR PACKERS LABEL NON-DAIRY CO FIE CREAMER
Charcoal............20o,88c Coffee-Mate.........'o. 77c
KRAFT EVERYDAY LOW PRICES 100% BRAZILIAN INSTANT COFFEE
Bar B.Q. Sauce...... ,0 35c Eight O'Clock.... .'690J C.99c
PURE VEGETABLE EVERYDAY LOW PRICE KELLOGGS EVERYDAY LOW PRICE!
Dexola Oil..........o. 83c Corn Flakes........'.9 o 36c
PILLSBURY FLOUR OR SUNNYFIELD EVERYDAY LOW PRICE!
Gold Medal.......... 5-59c Corn Flakes........ .'. 35c
DEL MONTE EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! LUNCHEON MEAT
Catsup............a...i0_ 44c ,lrnnel Spainm .. ..... 59c
ANN PAGE REGULAR OR CHEF STYLE OUR OWN WITH LEMON AND SUGAR
French Dressing...... o,,, 39c Instant Tea.... .... go 79c
DEL MONTE CREAM STYLE OR WHOLE KERNEL SMOOTH OR CRUNCHY
16-ox 4r18-ox.
Golden Corn.........Ca 25c JIf P-Nut Butter.... 69c r
A&P ASSORTED FLAVORED ANN PAGE SMOOTH
46-ox. D28-ox.
Fruit Drinks..........C 27c Peanut Butter.......J .r 89c
ASSORTED FLAVORED A&P FROZEN
< Hawaiian Punch...... '29c Handi Whip......... C 39cA
b" .,'. -ENCORE SOLID
BABY FOOD------ 4 oz. jar 10 Margarine..........., o 17c
DISPOSABLE DIAPERS GOLDEN RISE BUTTERMILK OR SWEET MILK ,
Pampers...12'. 79c.30'.$1.49 Biscuits.......... o6, Is.57c
REGULAR OR SUPER ALL DIET
Tainpax....* r, 39 cBs,$1,38 Daily Dog Food.......' 10Oc c
REGULAR OR SUPER A&P NOTEBOOK /
Kotex..............*o 79c Filler Paper...... .. t 9c


Spe**ak 80A COak
SIZE* 39t
JANE PARKER BAKERY FRESH
Whit BIAa


4 6
URW.ADSEV


ROUND TO 22
LOAF 22 0


.1NUTE MAID FROZEN
6-ox. I
o J .......... C 27
MORTON FROZEN EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
-14- x:O0
CMa iPiA........ S.... s00
MORTON FROZEN
ApptbPiss............o 3e


GREEN GIANT FROZEN. (WITH CHEESE OR CHIVES)
Ba -A-Tote 4 Pso$00
PLASTIC
Han Wp '=^ SS
"OFF" EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
I e Rep 9a t 97-ox.


,w q


.t +*








THE STAR, Port St. Jo, Florida THURSDAY, AUGUST 17, 1972


i Lions, St. Joe Motor, Sponsoring

Punt, Pass and Kick Competition


Local boys, ages eight through
13, dI[ be blbFwi the dust off
their footballs and loosening up
their throwing arms soon for the
1972 mmt, Pass andl Kick Com-
.petition. .
- This year the local level of
PP&K -will be co-sponsored by
the Poi Sf.-Joe-I4ons ..Club in


Doctor and Drugglst, two India.
Spensable men In your community
who collaborate on your health
problems. In time of sickness they
are the most important men in your
f life. Their skill assures you that
you are In safe hands. Place your
Srust In Doctor and Druggist. When
you are Ill both team up to make
fou well. Bring your Doctor's pre-
scription to our Rexal drug store.
YOUR



Plenty of Free Parking
Convenient Drive-In Window

BUZZ ETT'S
DRUG STORE
Ph, 227-3371 317 Williams





Drive


Safely


All The


TIME!


CLASSIFIED ADSI
Miet Investments That Yield
ien* Retwlum


conji nctisn wilth St. Joe Motor
Company.
Nationally IPP&K, now in its
12th year, is e-sponsored by the
National Football League and
the Ford Dealers of America.
Since it was started in 1961, the-
program has attracted "over 8
million boys, ages eightt through


13, and participation this year
is expected to top the 1,100,000
mark.
Participants in the Punt, Pass
and Kick program compete only
against boys their own age. Any
boy eight through 13 years of
age may register ,to compete at
a participating Ford Dealer.
There is no entrance fee and no


Herring Says "We, Not


"1" Will Solve Problems


Progressing
(Continued From Page 1)
ing hurricane Agnes recently.
The City had. already started
repairs some time ago, but were
stopped by the Corps of Engin-'
eers who told the, City a permit
was necessary to make repairs
to the structures which had been
in existence for years.
The City made a study of whe-
ther to repair the old pier or
tear it down. City Police recom-.
mended that the pier be left
standing and 'be repaired since.
it is used considerably by chil-
dren. The Board decided to make
repairs to the pier also.
In other matters the City Com-
mission decided to: a
Increase insurance on its
volunteer firemen from $5,000
;o $10,000.
Install a water main on Li-
berty, Street in Millview Addi-
tion, the cost to be refunded by
liens against the property join-
ing the street. -
Agreed to replace a two-,
inch- water -main serving Hun-
..ter Circle with a larger main to
provide adequate water pressure
to homes, on the Circle and also
to provide bettei':fire. protection.


New Port St. Joe High School comes a senior "especially in the
Principal Ken- Herring spoke to areas of science and history".
the Rotary Club Thursday ex- Herring said one of the biggest
plaining his concept of what is challenges facing the school to-
needed to have a good learning day is' teaching the, student to
situation and how he hoped to deal with and accept change. "The
institute these ideas into the cur- things which hurt our efforts
riculum of Port St. Joe High. : most", Herring said, "are lack of
Herring stated, "We are going communications and rumors, loss
to raise our standards and qual- of confidence and failure of the
ity". He said more materials 'are public to be informed about their
available for teaching today than school system".
ever before. "This is necessary", Herring summed his address up
he said, "because knowledge is by saying "I can't solve our prob-
changing so fast today, past me- lems. There's no need to say I can.
thods of teaching are not as ef- But, working together, WE can".
fective as we thought ,they were". Guests of the club were Bernard
He pointed out that things a stu- Wilson of Madison and Harold
dent learns as a freshman today Quackenbush of Apalachicola.
are obsolete by the time he be- --


Bridge Trouble

(Continued From Page 1)
through blown fuses, caused by
an overload somewhere indthe
system.
It was"found the overload re--
sultsin a bind in 'the operating
geats o the West side of the
bridge causing a slight align-
menr t problem. -
Immediate repairs call for a
rearrangement of the fuses iin
. he bridge so they can be chan-
ged in a matter of
fa-o permangiw epairs, e. =DOT
S Dpresentatives said engineers
from Tallahassee an' Philadel-
phia will be broughtnto the pic-
ture in the Prly near future to
determine the best steps to 'e
taken in order to eliminate the
problem,
DOT offihals assured the
Jayee, that' the bridge would
be" properly repaired. The bridge
was already scheduled for some
extensive maintenance during
the present fiscal year, but it
was only a routine scheduling,
for repairs until the emergency
nature of' the situation was
brought, before the DOT.


0, 0 0


Gulf Said


Free From


Brucellosis

Recommendations to revise Flori
ida's brucellosis regulations will be
sent to Commissioner_ of Agricul;
ture Vfoyie Conner this week, Dr
C. 1/Campbell, state veterinarian,
said this week.
The revisions were adopted Fri-
day ,at, meeting of the Animal
Industry Technical Council in Kis-
simmee following their approval
by the. directors of the Floridq Cat-
flemen's Aisociation.
The changes in the brucellosis
eradication regulations will bring
Florida's rules. .into conformity
with the national uniform methods
and rules for eradicating brucel-
losis, a disease of cattle and swine.
In humans, brucellosis is known as
undulant fever.
The preicpal change concerns
length of the quarantine period,
which will be made a minimum of
120 days, instead of the present
30 days after a negative herd test,
and requirement, of 'two negative
herd tests, .for release of quaran-
tine of infected herds.
The objection of. cattlemen to
the changes was to the extension
of the quarantine period, which
they said will interfere with calf
sales. The regulations were adopt-
ed, however, under threat of re-
moval of modified-certified status
of Florida unless they were adopt-
ed by September 1.
'Under the changed regulations,
infected herds will be tested at
30-day--intervals until negative,.
with an additional test 90 days af-
ter the first negative test.
Dr. Campbell reported 16 Florida
counties are qualified for brucello-


body contact during competition.
No special equipment is needed
and participation does not im-
pair a boy's amateur standing.
Scoring is based on accuracy
and range with one point added
for every foot of punting, pass-
ing and kicking distance and a
point subtracted for every foot
off a center line.
Twelve national finalists will
compete. for the National cham-
pionships in their age group dur-
ing the half time of the Pro Bowl
Game in Dallas, Texas, January
21, 1973. Winners will have their
names permanently enshrined in
the Pro Football Hall of Fame in
Canton, Ohio. Their trophies will
be presented 'by Football Com-
missioner Pete Rozelle.
Boys, accompanied by a par-
ent or guardian; imay register
for PP&K at~St. Joe Motor Co.


SDEBBY FOUSE, Teacher
Classes In '
Ballet -- Tap Acrobatic
and Jazz
S1 to 4 P.M."

Registration Aug. 19
OOURTH STREET
,i[ or.
Panama City 763-8552
-iit "


Office Supplies


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Is headquarters fior all your office supply needs. We stock.
only famous brand names in quaflty office supplies No
need to wait for those everyday office needs. Call us today!


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7 FILE. FOLDERS
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,^ SCRATCH PADS, all sizes
TYPE WRITER PAPER
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'^ CARBON PAPER


^ INDEX CARDS, all sizes
CARD FILES, wood & metal
POST BINDERS
.- ^ LEDGER SHEETS
STAPLES.

^ GEM CLIPS, FASTENERS
LEGAL and LETTER PAnc
MACHINE RIBBONS
*^. PENCILS, ERASERS
'^' DUPLICATOR FLUID


- And A Host of Other Office Needs


--THE


STAR -


PHONE 227-8161


806 WILLIAMS AVE.


--- Re-Elect --

F. R. (Rudy) PIPPIN, Jr.

County Commissioner District 1
Your Continued Vote and Support will be
Greatly Appreciated
Subject to the Democratic Primaries




Re-ELECT

WAYLON


GRAHAM r

SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
DISTRICT NUMBER 4

Qualified and Experienced in School Administration

&a


+ Classified

FOR SALE: Used mimeograph ma- FOR RENT: 2 bedroom unfurnish-
chine. In good condition. See at ed house. Adults. 229-4571. tfc-83.
Costin's Department Store. FOR RENT: One bedroom and pri-
vate bath. 528 corner of 6th St.
FOR SALE: 1967 Chrysler New- and Woodward Ave. ltp
port Custom. Power steering,
brakes, air conditioned. $800. 1966 FOR RENT: Furnished house at St.
Lincoln, all power, new tires, $1200 Joe Beach. Smith's Pharmacy.
Paul Blount. 229-4401. tfc-8-17 tfc-8-17


NEED MORE ROOM? Large home
for sale by owner. 5 bedrooms, 3
full baths, carpeted, air condition-
ed, built-in dishwasher, range,
oven. All this and many more ex-
tras. For m6re information call
229-6586. tfc-817
FOR SALE: 1965 Pontiac Catalina
4-door, eight cylinder sedan
Power brakes and steering. Excel
lent running condition. Call Gan-
non Buzzett, 227-3371. tfc-8-17
e FOR SALE: Large lot on Marvin
- AV~e'234' across, 175' deep, Call
S-fter 6:30 p.m., 229-6851. tfc-8-10
FOR SALE: 1969 Skamper hard
top camper. 8 sleeper. Call af-
ter 5:00 p.m. 227-5236. tfc-9-8
10 ACRES,, Colbrado $1,995! Beau-
S tiful .high country mountainous
area. $25 down. $25--monthly. Deal
.direct with owner. Steed, 911 W.
10th,, Amarillo, Tex. 806-373-0115.
7tp-7-13
HOUSE FOR SALE: 3 bedroom, 1
bath house, chain link fence. On
large lot. See David Rich. at Rich's
IGA. 229-4562 or 229-6816. tfc-8-10
FOR SALE: Houme on 100'x150' lot
with 14'x26' work shop. At White
City. Joe Evans. Phone 229-2414. 8-3
FOR SALE: Beach buggy. See at
1003 Woodward Ave., or phone
229-3041. tfc-7-27
FOR SALE: 25 hp SeaKing motor.
boat trailer and fiberglass boat.
Used very little. Can be seen at
Jeff Plair's Shop. 6tp-7-27
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom home with
den, fully carpeted, central air
and heat, all electric, chain link
fence, small utility house. Call 229-
6597 after 5:00 p.m. tfc-7-27
FOR SALE: Nice two bedroom
house, fully carpeted and air
conditioned. Large fenced in yard.
For appointment call 229-4761. 3tp
FOR SALE: Lovely home on large
waterfront lot, 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, den and kitchen. combina-
tion with all electric built-in kit-
chen appliances, plenty of storage
room. Screened in back porch,
central heat and air conditioning
Carpeting throughout home. May
be seen by appointment by calling
227-4491 or for further informa-
tion. tfc-7-20


sis-free status. They are Bay, Bre- FOR' SALE: Surf board and racks.
vard, Dade, Escambia, Gulf, Jack- Like new condition. Call Alford
son, Holmes, Leon, Liberty, Mon- Ramsey, 227-3161 or 229-2776.
roe, Okaloosa, Pasco, Santa Rosa, FOR SALE: 18% foot Seabreeez fi-
Sumter, Walton and Washington. berglass boat with trailer, elec-
__ trick winch and 75 horse Chrysler
I motor. Also 15% foot Lone Star fi-
berglass boat with trailer and 40
horse Johnson motor. Call 227-
7816 after 5 p.m.


FOR RENT: 1 and 2 bedroom fur-
nished apartments. Port St. Joe
and Beach area. For more infor-
mation phone 648-4800. tfc-5-4
FOR RENT: Fu-nished beach cot.
tages. Reasonable monthly rates.
Phone 227-3491 or 227-8496. tfc
FOR SALE: 3 used lavatories. H.
E. Goodman, phone 229-4801.
2tc-8-10


KLPATRICK
Funeral Home
and
Ambulance Service
Prompt-Efficient-Courteous
Telephone 227-2491


Ads+

MEXICO BEACH
BEAUTY SHOPPE
Hwy. 98 Phone 648-5116
Complete Beauty Service
GLADYS NICHOLS


FOR RENT: One and two bedroom WANTED: Man with service sta-
attractively furnished apart- tion and mechanic experience.
ments. Cool in summer, warm in Apply at Ralph and Henry's Stan-
winter. Gas heat, window fans. dard Service. tfc-8-3
They must be seen to be appreciat- I
ed. Contact Mr. or Mrs. B. C. Prince FOR CHAIN LINK FENCE call
at WIMICO LODGE and TRAILER I Emory Stephens. Free estimate
PARK.WhiteCit Phone 2292413 guarantee on labor andmaterials.
PARK. White City. Phone 229-2413 ia down payment. Phone 227-
or 648-3101. tfc-10-28 7972.


FORUK WELDING .NEEDS see James
I. Temple,-1302 Palm Blvd.
tfc-8-10
MISSING: 8 "ft fiberglass boat.
green outside, grey inside. For
information call Bill Carr 229M
6474. tfc-6-29
10 SPEED BIKES IN STOCK, from
$69.95. Men's, women,s racing style,
touring .style. -Credit terms avail-
able. WESTERN AUTO, Port St
Joe. M tfc-6-15
WANTED: 2 used 26-inch bicycles.
Call 229-6798.


WANTED TO BUY: Scallop shells.
The Shell Shack, Mexico Beach,,
648-4572. 4t-8-3
WILL TRADE: 1961 Ford station
wagon for plywood bateau boat
of equal value. 229-6387 mornings.
PROFESSIONAL HELP with emo
tional problems and/or concerns
Gulf County Guidance Clinic, Pori
St. Joe, Florida 229-3621 or Rev
Sidney Ellis, 229-6599.
SPECIAL TUTORING: 18 years ex-.
perience in public and private
schools. Emotionally disturbed,
retarded and slow learners. Phone
229-6863, Mrs. Gorham, 712 Wood-
ward Ave. 4tc-8-10
COMPLETE PAINTING SERVICE
Interior and exterior. General,
carpenter repair. Free estimate.
Bill Emily, 648-3324. 3tp-8-17
MC's PAWN and SWAP SHOP i
1 new Johnson Messenger 123 CB
unit $,235. 8trac automatic tape
players, $29.95 to $49.00, new. New
Craig model 3212 home type deck
$119.00. Many other items for sale.
See at 105 5th St., Highland View.
Phone 229-6193. tf
REDUCE safe and fast with Go-
Bese Tablets and E-Vap "water
pills." CAMPBELL'S Drug. 12p-7-13 !
Your SHERWIN-WILLIAMS
PAINT Dealer in Port St. Joe


COVER;
EARTH



HURLBUT FURNITURE
and APPLIANCES
306 Reid Ave.


RAY'S TRIM SHOP |
Complete Upholstery Service
"We aim to please you
Every Time"
602 Garrison Ave.
Phone 229-6326


C. P. Etheredge
518 Third Street
Port St. Joe, Fla.
Plumbing and
Electrical Contractor
Call 229-4986 for Free Estimte


I ,The Best Costs Less
TRY
V A RT U NG
-The Paint Made with
TUNG O4L
Oil base, Vinyl aihd Latex
Orel and Bristlfd Brushes
See or Call
,AL SMITH
Phone 227.7751


NO. 1 DRIVE-IN
Apalachicola, Florida

Now Playing
"WOMEN IN CAGES"
also -
"OIL TOWN"
with Charlton Heston
Next Week End-Aug. 25-26
"DOVERMAN GANG"
-also -
"UNTAMED WEST"



POODLE GROOMING
Specializing in Puppy Trim
Other Small Dogs Washed
and trimmed

For Appointment call
229-6571 tfc-5-18


FOR
AMBULANCE SERVICE
In Wewahitchka and
Port St. Joe
-- CALL ,-
Comforter Funeral Home
227-3511


SEPTIC TANKS pumped out Call
Buford Griffin. Phone 229-6694
or 229-2937.
R.A.M.-Regular convocation on St.
Joseph Chapter No. 56, RA.M.,
1st and 3rd Mondays, 8 p.m. All
visiting companions welcome.
WALTER GRAHAM, H. P.
H. T. WEST, Secretary
WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION, meet-
ing first and third Monday nights,
8:00 p.m. American Legion Home.
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe Lodgeir
No. Ut, F. & A. M., every firt
andd Thursday at 8:00 p.m.


FOY E. ADAMS, W.M
HERBERT L BURGER, Secty.


~AEw -'u'sWTi7U


_I


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FOUSE STUDIO of DANCE


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"Publishers of Your Home-Town Newspaper"


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