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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01926
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 4, 1973
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01926

Full Text












HE STA
Industry Deep Water Port Fine People Safest Beaches in Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1973


U -


'TEN C S O


Deputeis Williams and Beiliinger Study Evidence



Thefts Investigated


'The Sheriff's office is
conducting investigations on
two weekend burglaries, both
of businesses in Wewahitch-
ka, reports Sheriff Raymond
Lawrence.
The first was a burglary of-
the Dixie Dandy Store,
located on SR-22. Thieves
entered by breaking out a
window. A quantity of Timex
watches, with an estimated
value of' about $300 were
< taken. There was also an
unsuccessful attempt at
entering the safe, but the
burglars were only able to
damage it.
Ini the second case, David
Rich's IGA Store was entered
by breaking out a window.
Approximately $600 in cash
was taken. The cash was
mostly small change, and
the Sheriff is requesting that
anyone who works at local
businesses, who has had.
persons come in to cash in
exceptional. large amounts
of change report the incident
to the Sheriff's office immed-.
i- ately.
A few possible suspects
have been interviewed,
according to Sheriff Law-
rence, and the .investigation
is continuing.


Flint Brothers
Charged With
Assault & Battery,
Two lodal men were
arrested late last week and
charged with assault and
battery, according to Sheriff
Raymond Lawrence.
Arrested were James and
"Pete" Flint, both of Beacon
Hill. Arresting officer Sgt.
Tom Berlinger. stated that he
had received a complaint
from John Roland Wood, of
Highland View, that he was
beat up in the alley, behind
Campbell's Drugs, ip' the
downtown area of -Port St.
Joe.
The complaint was filed
with the Coupty Judge, and
warrants charging the two
with assault and better were
issued.
Both were released from
the Gulf County Jail after
posting bonds of $152 each. .


Overstreet Bridge
Closed For Repairs
The' bridge over the Inter-
Coastal Canal at Overstreet
on State Road 386 will be
closed to vehicular traffic
beginning Monday, October 8,
for a period of seven working
days or 'until October 19.
A steel barge is used at'this
bridge as a floating draw-
span. During this .period the
barge will be 'drydocked for
painting.


Robison Crusade Starts Sunday Nite


All Denominations Pool Efforts In Evangelistic Program


JAMES ROBISON


Sunday night will mark the realiza-
tion of the efforts ,expended by .many
laymen in the Port St. Joe area, with the
beginning of the James Robison
Evangelistic Crusade here in the High
School Coliseum.
Robison, along 'with a team of six
other team members, all of Dallas,
Texas, will begin. a week long
evangelistic effort conducted along the
lines of the famous Billy Graham
crusades. The crusade services will be
held each evening through next
Sunday evening, October 14, at 7:30 p.m.
Several unique things are involved in
the crusade. First, the entire program is
a united effort of Christian laymen of all
denominations from all over the county.
Churches 'of every .denomination are
involved in ,the planning and the work to
be done during the coming week.
General chairman Billy Norris says
nearly 700 local people will be involved
actively in the crusade in the choir,
serving as counsellors, serving as ushers
and working with the nursery facilities.
Approximately 5,000 are expected to
attend the crusade each night. Seating
has been arranged for to cover the floor
and the balcony area of the Coliseum in
addition to the bleacher seats perma-
nantly installed by the school.,
The Crusade has been the result of
what has probably been some of the most


intense planning of any undertaking, in
Port St. Joe in many years. Plans for the
event started in May of this year with
meetings almost daily by various
committees in preparation for the
crusade. Such an undertaking usually
takes at least a year to properly plan and
finance. Nearly all expenses for the
crusade were pledged at one banquet
meeting held in July.
What has been a busy period of
preparation will only intensify the
remainder of this week with several
events being planned to encourage people
to attend the crusade services. Tonight a
plan has been devised to have members
of the City's various churches visit every
home in the South Gulf County area,
offering personal invitations for the
people to attend.
Beginning Saturday, a 24-hour prayer
period will begin for the crusade to go
through Sunday morning.
In addition to the Evangelist,
29-year-old James Robison, the team will
also be led by John McKay, who will be
directing the music and leading a
300-voice choir each night of the
Crusade. Other members of the team
play the organ and piano, sing and
operate a special sound system being
used to assure everyone of hearing
everything that is going on and said at
the crusade meetings.


JOHN McKAY ,


The City government is
insured for just about any
eventuality,- but they're not,'
insured against insurance
agents disagreeing over the
award of a policy bid.
After receiving bids ini
September, the Commission
studied the figures for a week
and met last week in special
session to award the business
for a three year period.
At the contract awarding, it
was determined Tomlinson
Agency in Port St. Joe was
the low bidder by some
$14,624.00 per year, on the
premiums. I
But Frank Hannon of the
Hannon Agency would have
none of that and appeared at
the City Commission meeting
Tuesday night to offer his
opinion that he should have
been awarded the Workman's
Compensation business, since
his bid was $542,10 less than
Tomlinson on this segment.'
In his statement to the
Commission :.Tuesday. Han-
non said, "When I'm out-bid,
I'm just out-bid. It's happen
ed before. When I'm not
out-bid, I want the business."
Hannon reminded the
Board his bid of $10,043.90 for
Workman's Compensation


was the low bid.
Mayor Frank Pate ex-
plained to Hannon the City
had called for. bids on a
package or by item price.
"This was to' select 'portions
from each bid if it was
economical for the City to do
so," Pate said. "In this
instance Tomlinson's firm
said his low price was based
on receiving all the business,
which saved the City $14,624
a year in premiums ,over
your bid. We .couldn't sacri-
fice a $14,000 savings to give
you a bid just because you
were $500 low."
Hannon continued to argue
the point saying, both firms
were requested to bid on a
lump sum and by item, which
he did. "I was low on the
Workman's Compensation
and expect the business."
Hannon went on to say he felt
it was unethical for Tomlin-
son's firm to refuse to take
insurance coverage at a
stated price unless he re-
ceived the entire amount.


FIRM WANTS RELIEF
Peabody-Petersen Com-:'
pany, prime contractor for
the Wastewater Treatment
plant asked the City Tuesday
night to reduce, their retain-
age on the job. At present,
the City holds back 10
percent of all that's owed
Peabody-Petersen which now
amounts to $471,944.28.
The firm's electrical en-
gineer, James Abrams told
the Board since the project is
near completion, the firm
felt the City could release a
portion of the retainage since
the firm's bonding company
was able to take care of any
deficiencies which might
occur.
When questioned about the
City's position in the situa-
tion, William J. Rish explain-
ed the City had received
several complaints electrical
suppliers and tradesmen had
not been paid.
Abrams said this was the
sub-contractor not paying off
and his firm had written all


.... .... .. O ,L **I wIT .At.L.. 4.Lall
creditors stating they were
Hannon's bid on the entire responsible for the unpaid
package over a three year bills.
period was an annual prem- The City still refused to
ium of $48,480.40. Tomlinson release any of the impounded
bid $33.856.40 per year. funds until the system was


running, checked out and an
understanding reached for
late penalties.

STARTS NEXT WEEK
Project engineer Bob Davis
said the plant would start
treating effluent next week.
"We took some paper mill
waste yesterday," .he said,
"and we should begin to run
in earnest next week and
shake the plant down."

Sponsoring Dance
The Port St. Joe High.
School Student Council is
sponsoring a dance Saturday
night from 8:00 to 12:00 in the
Commons Area of the high
school.
"Lehigh South" will pro-
vide the music and the
admission is $1.50 per person.


It was announced this week
that WJOE Radio, formerly
owned by Big Bend broad-
casting of Quincy, has been
sold to Mills & Crisp Enter-
prises of Panama City.
Shown above is the new
owner, Donald R. Crisp, and
the new General Manager of
the station, Mrs. Beth Law-
rence.
Mr. Crisp said, "We are
happy to announce the acqui-
sition of WJOE Radio, and
particularly pleased to say
that the station is now wholly
owned and operated by local
people. in Bay anid Gulf
Counties. It is our desire to
be of service to the commun-
ity in which we live. WJOE
Radio will continue its total
involvement in community
affairs and activities."
He stated, "Mrs. Lawrence
our General Manager, is a
nineteen year resident of Gulf
County who has been very
active in the community and
is aware of the public service
needs of Gulf County. The
station will be under her'
daily direction and we hope
that Port St. Joe and Gulf


County citizens will assist in
keeping her advised of the
public service needs of their
various community and civic
organizations."
Crisp, and his wife, Carol,
are long-time residents of
Bay County and reside at
1924 Drake Avenue in Pana-
ma City. The busy young
couple have two children.
They are both active in
Panama City and Bay County
activities. Crisp is a member


Five Hospitalized from



Accidents During Week


Rain almost every day for
a week was a contributing
factor for three automobile
accidents in and around Port
St. Joe during the past week
which put five people in the
hospital. Four of them are
still there.
Last Friday morning about
8:30, Deputy Sheriff and Mrs.
David Rogers were taking
their two sons to school,
traveling South on Monument
Avenue when an accident
hospitalized the entire fam-
ily.
It was pouring down rain at
the time of the accident.
As Rogers approached the
14th Street intersection, a
gasoline tank truck, driven
by George -Hendells of
Apalachicola came off 14th
onto Monument and stalled
just about the time it got
across the road. Rogers
locked his brakes, but they
didn't hold on the rain slick
pavement and his car
slammed into the side of the.
gasoline truck, which was
full.
Rogers, his wife and one
son are still in the hospital
being treated for severe


Four Hurt In Car-Truck Smash Up


bruises and lacerations. One
son has been released.
The car was a total loss.
Tuesday afternoon, City
police investigated an acci-
dent on Fourth Street near
Reid Avenue, when W. J.
Ferrell struck a car backing
out of a parking place, driven
by Susan Patricia Anderson,
of 304 Madison Street. Fer-
rell's brakes failed on his
car.
Total damages were $245.
Earlier on Tuesday afternoon,
H. E. Goodman was taken to
Municipal Hospital by Com-
forter Ambulance and later
transferred to Panama City
as the result of an accident at
Ward Ridge.
Trooper Al Harrison said
Goodman lost control of his
car on the rain slick road and
overturned. The car was
totally demolished.
Another accident Tuesday
saw Robert Eugene Smith of
Apalachicola charged with
careless driving.
According to investigating
officers, Ken Murphy and
Deputy Sheriff Tom Berlin-
ger, Smith lost control of his
car while traveling South on


98. He left the left side of the
road and traveled for 280
-feet before striking a utility
pole. Damages were estimat-
ed at $500.00.

Advance Tickets
For Friday's Game
Are On Sale
Advance tickets for the
football game Friday night
at Crawford Mosley are
available at the front office of
the high school. Adult tickets
are $1.75 and students, $1.00.
Only a limited number of
advance tickets are avail-
able. All tickets, both adults
and students will be $2.00 at
the gate.
The Sharks will play
Crawford Mosely in Panama
City at 8:30.

Sportsmen's Club
To Meet Saturday
The Gulf County Sports-
men's Club will meet Satur-
day night at 7:00 p.m. at the
Stac House.
All members are urged to
attend as Joe Bracewell has
a surprise in store for you.


of the Bay County Chamber
of Commerce, the Exchange
Club, Past President of the
Panama City Jaycees, and is
on the Board of Directors of
the Junior ; Museum, Bay
County Day Care Center, and
the Salvation Army. His
wife, Carol is a member of
the Panama City Jayceettes
and is Vice-President of the
Florida Jayceetes.
Mrs. Lawrence, the local
manager, is Past President
of the Board of Directors of
the Gulf County Guidance
Clinic, and is presently
serving as a director .of that
organization, as well as
several other civic and
community groups. She and
her three sons reside at 2114
Long Avenue in Port St. Joe.


200 Cars Necessary
To Construct Reef
Meeting Monday night at
the Florida Power lounge
were interested members of
the Mexico Beach Boatmen
Association, Kiwanis Club,
Port St. Joe Garden Club,
Port St. Joe city officials and
Marine Patrol officers.
Dr. Robert King brought
the group up to date on plans
formulated so far for the
artificial fishing reef that is
to be built in the Gulf of
Mexico.
Immediate need of this
project is 200 junked cars.
Residents of Port St. Joe that
may have a junked car to
give for the reef, are asked to
call 229-5861 or 229-6195. Thq
County Beautification com-
mittee, spearheaded by the
Port St. Joe Garden Club will
be spotting junked cars in the
city limits. The City of Port
St. Joe will pick up these
cars, arid transport them to
the barge area, for delivery
to the artificial reef. It is
hoped that all the junked cars
can be spotted, picked up,
and at the delivery area
during October.


THIRTY-SEVENTH YEAR, NUMBER 5


Hannon Objects to




Insurance Contract


WJOE Has New Owner


TEN CENT'S A COPY









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY. OCT. 4. 1973


I -THE STAR- I


Published Every Thurday at 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida,
By The Star Publllhing Company
S"tond-Class Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, Florida 324M


S'.
Editor and Publisher
Irn,-, t.i4,-I, S


Office Manager
Typesetter, Subscriptlonp


POSTOFF ICE BOX 308 PHONE 227-3161
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456

SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY -ONE YEAR, $4.00 SIX MOS., $2.25 THREE MOS., t127.5
OUT OF COUNTY One Year, 5.00 OUT OF U.S. One Year, 56.00

TO ADVERTISERS- In case of error or ommissions In advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable
for damage further than amount received for such advertisement.

The spoken word Is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts;
the printed work thoroughly convinces. The spoken word Is lost; the printed word remains.


System Offered to Guarantee


Identification -of Property


The Gulf County Sheriff's
Auxiliary is continuing their
"Operation Identification"
for those who have inot yet
taken advantage of this
means to protect their homes
and valuables from theft.
"Operation Identification"


is a concept designed to
make burglary a harder
crime to commit, by increas-
ing the possibility of being
apprehended.
It is'a system whereby the
citizen has his drivers'
license number, social secur-


EDITORIALS


Our River -


The people of Alabama and
Georgia-more notably members of
the Tri-Rivers Waterway Develop-
ment do not intend to let the question
of whether or not to "develop" the
Apalachicola River die.
In the news last week, K. Earl
Durden, president of the Tri-Rivers
Association chided Florida for its at-
titude toward damming and construc-
tion of locks on the lower Apalachi-
cola. Durden also chided Florida's
Attorney General Robert Shevin for
his statement of: "It's our river. It's
not yours". The chairman goes on
to say the Apalachicola gets its wa-
ter from the Flint and the Chattahoo-
chee and neither Georgia nor Ala-
bama are considering stopping the
flow of water to the Apalachicola.
That's as it should be, since the Chat-
tahoochee makes up in Tennessee and
;,. isn't theirs to stop in thefirstpl;e.
Durden "made the" statedfienl:
e wouldn't even considde"fr st-
ing that Georgia and Alabama say
Florida can't have any of our water,
but the three rivers must be a single
waterway system."
What started Durden off on his
gig at Florida was a questionnaire
his organization sent to several elect-
ed officials in the six Florida counties
bordering the Apalachicola. The


Their Water


questionnaire was designed to feel
the officials out on their opinion for
developing the river.
Rep. Wayne Mixon 'of Marianna
said the questionnaire was so loaded
that he threw it in the waste basket.
George Atkins, chapman of the
Save the River Committoi in Blounts-
town said the query wak an obvious
attempt to get a favo 'ble Florida
reaction and thus open tip the U. S.'
Army Engineers proposal to build
dams and locks in order to provide a
year-round navigational channel.
Durden rebutted by saying in
his news conference that the Tri-Ri-
vers Association would)not propose,
nor would it support, implementation
of a dependable navigational system
on the Apalachicola at: the cost of
far-reaching damage to the environ-
met f .I wate rNvay.tr "

not sd it wiil'bpposeddevelopment,
but that it will vigorously oppose de-
struction of the River.
What we can't understand is: if
the water comes from Tennessee
and doesn't belong to Alabama or
Georgia; and if the TA-Rivers does
not want locks or damson the Apa-
lachicola; just what is their beef?'
It sounds like Florida talking.


Drought Relieved


If we recall correctly, it was just
a year ago we heard the expression
on nearly every pair of lips moving:
"Wonder when it will rain and relieve
this drought?" Remember that?
Now, the same persons are look-
ing for some of that fair weather,
with a respite to the rains we have
experienced all this year.
Over a month ago, this part of
Florida had already taken in its aver-
age annual, rainfall and there is still
three months to go to get a little ex-
tra. Last year the gardens failed
because of lack of moisture. This
year they failed because of too much
rain. Many gardens didn't get plant-
ed because of the rains.
With all of the discomfort be-


Doing Pretl

What is America really like?
Hundrels of thousands of Europeans
are finding out, thanks to devalua-
tion of the dollar and higher salaries
abroad. The land of "Stars and
Stripes and apple pie" has long fas-
cinated its neighbors abroad, and
now many middle-class foreign tour-
ists can afford to learn about our
country first-hand. Government and
airline officials forsee a 20 to 25 per-
cent jump in travel to the U. S. this
year, with Japan leading the pack,
followed by B r i t a i n, Germany,
France and Italy. Last year, exclud-
ing Mexicans 'and Canadians, 2.6
million foreign visitors set foot on


cause of the extra precipitation, it is
comforting to know it is, at least re-
plenishing the underground water
supply back to normal.
It has been several years since
we've had average or adequate rain-
fall in the Panhandle of Florida. Let's
just be glad we have it 'now before
we get into real trouble.
It-'could just be that the condi-
tions which have brought us .the ex-
tra rain this year are the same con-
ditions which kept. the hurricanes
away.
With no hurricanes and no par-
ched land like they are experiencing
in the middle and far west should be
enough to make us willing to put up
with our above average rainfall tbhi
year.


Engraving Your Name On Your Valu-
ables Makes Them Less Attractive
To Thieves


ity number, or some other
positive identifying marks on
all valuables like televisions,
sterep equipment and the
like. This posts a warning for
all potential burglas, in that
if they get caught with
property that contains these
identifying marks, it will be a
positive proof of ownership,
and will make it easier to
gain convictions when cases
go to court.
This program has met with
much success in many
heavily populated areas in
which it'has been instituted
throughout the country.
Sheriff Raymond Lawrence
stated,; "We feel that this
project will hinder the
potential burglar in Gulf
County as he will know that it
will not be easy to deal in
stolen property which is so
easy to identify later."
Everyone should take this
opportunity to have their
valuables engraved free by
calling the Sheriff's office at
227-2311 and making an
appointment for any Satur-
day in the future.


Kids and Their 'Fun'


When the. football season starts in Port
St. Joe, it also starts the season for that
favorite youthful passtime-rolling the
yard.
Some get mad and others grin about it
and say, "Let the kids have their fun, if that
is all they are going to do."
The owner of this car was perturbed


(understandably so) this past week end
when the "Rolling of the yard" branched out
into the not-so-harilhiess trick of spraying
paint on her automobile. The owner of the
car said she now must get a new paint job
for her automobile 1t cover the paint put on
it by pranksters. Anid, a new paint job isn't
cheap.


* *


Another victim of the "roll" had mixed
emotions about whether he thought it a
harmless prank or not.
Dave May had his yard "rolled" Friday
night and came up with this poem to express
his bittersweet "joy" at being picked to
receive this semi-exclusive treatment by the
youth.
ROLL ON
I think I shall never see
A poem as ugly as a tree
That in the vernacular of our young and
bold
Has suffered the fate of being rolled.
Scott tissue, Northern and IGA
Can be seen dingle dangling every day
Streams of single and double ply
Grossly festooning from the sky.
Ecological bomb, environmental
disaster


Strikes any and everyone even a pastor,
A doctor, a lawyer, a political chief
Is not immune to this toilet paper grief.
Draped over' limbs, a revolting
Spanish moss,
The humor compares to burning a cross.
It's youth "getting it on", man
"it's tough".
But nothing compares to "getting it
off".
Alas, youth emits energy, and if this is
the worst ..
I suppose I'll be content to just
write a verse.
I'll "keep on truckin" and "hang in
there", as they say
I'll "suck it up" but won't like it; there
ain't no way.
by Dave May


Chamber Preforming Many


Tasks for Port St. Joe Area


SChamber of Commerce regarding tourism in the area
y F a ir JIIb President, Floye Brewton and people wanting to get in
gave a very interesting touch with realtors."
program to the Kiwanis Club Brewton said industry is
American soil. Tuesday on what the Cham- not forgotten by the Chamber
ber is doing and has done for and at least two good
This growing influx of visitors the Port St. Joe area. prospects are being dealt
could be the best thing to happen to Brewton said he had been with at the present time.
international relations in a long time. affiliated with large Cham- "Land availability isn't our
The newcomers are curious about bers in larger areas and the big problem in Port St. Joe,"
everything. They wan to see with local Chamber does a very Brewton said. "We can get
everything. They want to see with good job with all volunteer
their won eyes and experience for help. "It just isn't practical land for any industry which
themselves the real Lhited States. for a chamber in a commun- is reputable. Our big problem
Hopefully these people will see us in a ity the size of Port St. Joe to is that we can attract only
maintain a full time director those industries which are
realistic light-not as because of the lack of money desperate for water front
gry, imperialist monster, but for' sources."
what we actually are:.-an energetic Brewton ut th acreage. Our big deterrent is
people trying to make our democrat. ha e 4any t. Joe. Most industries just
cy work and doing a pretty fair job services for the Port St.. Joe don't want to pay our scale to
of it. .. area, in particular, with
tourism. "We get and answer build when they can get
-Washington County News many inquiries every day lower prices elsewhere."
:'9!( f +.! -+,-. ; .. ., .,, !


Brewton said the Chamber
was trying to accomplish
several programs in the
current year, foremost of
which is the formation of a
better business bureau. "The
public needs someone to go to
in the case of misunderstand-
ings with area service and
business establishments and
they have no one. The
Chamber is going to set up
some sort of program for this
purpose this year," Brewton
said.

Use the
Classified Ads
Midget Investments
With Giant Returns


Etaoin


Shrdlu
by WESLEY R. RAMSEY


Somebody must have been reading some-
body's mind. Last week, on the very day we
mailed the paper including the editorial concern-
ing Florida being a good neighbor and try to do
its part in furnishing scarce energy sources with-
out undue objections toward drilling for oil off
the coast, governors of energy producing states
sort of threatened to deny their energy to states
which would not allow exploration within its own
borders.
Governors Edwin Edwards, Dolph Briscoe
and David Hall of Louisiana, Texas and Okla-
homa, respectively, stated at the Southern Gover-
nor's Conference at Point Clear, Alabama, they
just might consider shutting off natural gas sup-
plies to other states if steps were not taken to
increase exploration and refining.
Governor Edwards told his colleagues that
Louisiana may use its police powers to decide
where its gas goes if other states do not utilize
their resources. Briscoe and Hall agreed they
may take the same action.
Since Florida draws its natural gas supplies
from these three states and since Florida is now
teetering on the edge of whether or not to op-
pose off-shore drilling, it stands to reason to sus-
pect that Governors Briscoe, Hall and Edwards
had Florida in mind when they made their state-
ment.
One really can't blame them. Florida is pip-
ing natural gas all the way from Texas to fuel
its industry and power generating facilities. If
it weren't for the availability of the gas here, it
only seems natural some of the industry'now here
would have located where they could get gas.
The Governor has signed an order allowing
drilling in the Apalachicola National Forest. This
is good. It's nice to have the Forest maintained
for posterity, but its a shame for all that land to
lie unused, when it could be such a help to man.
*
Representative Guy Spicola also came into
the limelight last week along these same lines
when he proposed a special tax and possibly an
excise tax against cars which use a great deal of
gas. Representative Spicola put his dividing line
at 20 miles per gallon. Other than the sub-com-
pacts on the market today, is.there a car which
eat^0 -miles ao a llon bf gasoline? .. .
M '*-Sp,-1,ol:as blaii tl6seVwho buy 'large cars
(which use a lot of gasoline) for part of the pol-
lution problem. Spicola must not be up on his
reading. It was only recently the Environmental
Protection Agency admitted car exhaust is a very
minute polluter if at all. They saw a need for
extra emission controls only in large and crowded
cities such as Los Angeles, Chicago and several
other Northern cities where they have an air pol-
lution problems.
But say the automobile is the big bear with
the bad breath some environmentalists claim.
Let's look at Spicola's idea further. Did the large
car owner buy his car because it used a lot of
gasoline? No. He gritted his teeth and bought
it in spite of the fact because he simply couldn't
abide to ride around in the glorified tin cans
which would give him 20 miles per gallon or more.
The EPA people are the cause of his new Belch-
fire 8 using so much gas; not the makers of the
automobile or the man who desires to own it.
If we would consider placing an extra tax
(a luxury tax, if you please) on a larger car be-
cause it uses more gas perhaps we should also
consider these other possibilities:
How about a tax on the person who buys
their plastic-wrapped produce or meat in small
packages rather than large? This creates more
undigestible plastic garbage.
Maybe we should sock an extra dollar or two
taxes to the person who cuts his lawn twice a
week rather than once. This uses more gas.
How about the person who has an air-con-
ditioned house? Don't forget him. In using the
electricity or gas for his air conditioner he is us-
ing more energy and polluting.
Don't forget an extra tax on those who have
swimming pools. They are using extra water and
we mustn't forget water is one of our endangered
resources.
While we're at it, let's be sure we stick the
guy who raises a back yard garden. If he makes
a crop he is bound to use insecticides and the
use of insecticides is where this whole ecology
kick sprang from.
We need clean air and we need clean water.
Already the pendulum has begun to swing toward
a more sensible approach toward conservation ra-
ther than preservation. If you add Representa-
tive Spicola's idea to the already astronomical bill
the consumer is having to take on for the sake
of ecology, one might just cause a revolt which
would result in exactly the opposite attitude as
the EPA people want to instill.


PAGE TWO


Wesley R. Ramseay
William H. Ramsey
Fronchie L. Ramsey
Shirley K. Ramsey













LET1


To The


October 1, 1973
Mr. Wesley R. Ramsey
Editor, Star
Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
"Let him who is without
sin cast the first stone".
Certainly, a mistake was
made by the Town Clerk of
Mexico Beach in paying a bill
which included an item which
was not ordered. However, a
cancellation admitting the
error was obtained from the
supplier, the money was
immediately refunded and
redeposited in the First
National Bank at Port St.
Joe. The supplier indicated
that such errors are correct-
ed in subsequent billing state-
ments.
To state that this incident
is "just an example of what
has been going on for years"
cannot be substantiated by,
the facts and is therefore
unfair, untrue and libelous
and is entirely self serving to
the so called "concerned


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 1973 PAGE THREE


city, honesty and reliability
of not only the present Town
r E R Clerk who has served only for
the past nine months, but
Mary A. Earley and Rella B.
E ito fr Wexler, the previous Town"
Clerks, as well as all present
and former Mayors, Council
Members and Town Attor-
Citizens". neys.
In the interests of responsi-
This group is actually a ble journalism, I suggest you
very, very small number of take another look at the
persons who have attempted precept on your Mast Head
and continue to attempt by which states "The printed
untrue and derogatory state- word is thoughtfully
ments to make the Town of weighed".
Mexico Beach the laughing.
stock of this area. Harry F. Cook
I challenge this miniscule Town Clerk,
number of persons to: Town of Mexico Beach
1) Publish a certified list of
members with signatures.
2) Publish a document Wes Ramsey, Editor
showing the basis or authori- The Star
zation for such an organiza- Port St. Joe, Florida
tion, its officers, dues, Dear Wes:
purposes, rules of procedure In the nearly nine months I
and anything else which have maintained an office in
substantiates its existence. the Gulf County Courthouse I
3) Prove 'that over the have been privileged to make
years numerous unexplained new friendships and renew
and questionable expendi- old ones. As I close my office
tures have been made and here and transfer to Marian-
that irregular procedures na I feel constrained to
have been followed and express my thanks to so
unauthorized actions have many, and your paper is the
been taken by the Mexico best medium I can choose for
Beach Council. that purpose.
The above allegations First, on behalf of the
impugn the reputations, vera- Circuit Court and its several


judges, I want to express
deep gratitude to the officials
and people of Gulf County for
easing an otherwise difficult
transition into our new
unified court system. The
help and cooperation of Gulf
County has been invaluable
and will be so remembered.


wife, Jerry Gates and others
on the staff for the efficient
and friendly way they carry
out an increasing burden of
duties.
I won't name others
specifically for fear of
omitting some inadvertently,
but will just say a heartfelt
thanks to all who have made


In addition, though, I must my sojourn in your county
say how pleased I am such a pleasant one. My
personally that my reception duties will bring me this way
in Gulf County was beyond frequently and I will always
cooperation and assistance, look forward to these return
to warmth and friendship. visits.
The .courthouse officials and With best personal regards
their staffs have been extre- to you, Wes, I am
mely congenial and helpful.
Particularly should Gulf Cordially,
County take pride in Clerk Bob Brown,
George Core, and his lovely Court Administrator

For Good Fresh I

BAR-B-Q
Sandwiches I
(Beef or Pork

CALL 229-6145

J & J's GRILL
106 Second Avenue
k- m- ----------------**I


Key Club Selling

'Shark' Pins, Chains


Key Clubbers this week
started selling pins and key
-chains they had custom made
in the form of a Shark.
The Club had 100 each of'
the pins and key chains made
by a foundary out of metal.
Thepins are being sold for
$2.00 each and are available


HIGH SCHOOL LUNCH
ROOM MENU
Monday, October 8
Roast Beef with Gravy,
Rice, Hamburger with Bun,
French' Fries, Pickles, Let-
tuce & Tbmato, Prunes or
Plums. ,
Tuesday,. October 9
Chili Dogs, Hamburger
with. Buns, Potato Chips,
Lettuce & Tomato, Pickles,
Chocalate ,Cake with Choca-
late Icing.
Wednesday, October 10
Barbecued Chicken, Mash-
ed Potatoes, Hamburgers
with Buns, French Fries,
String Beans, Lettuce &
Tomato, Peaches with Cook-
ies.
Thursday, October 11
Fish Square, Tartar Sauce,
Ham Sandwich, Whole Kernel
Corn, Cabbage, Carrot, &
Pepper Salad, Cake with
Strawberries.
Friday, October 12
Pizzaburger, Hamburger
with Bun, French Fries,


from any Key Club member.
In the photo above, Key
Club president, Eddie Rich,
center, puts a pin on the shirt
of Principal Edwin Williams
while Administration Coor-
dinator Kenneth Herring,
left, waits for his.


Sliced Tomato, Lettuce, Pic-
kles, Banana 'Pudding.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
LUNCH ROOM MENU
Monday, October 8
Roast Beef with Gravy,
Rice, Lettuce & Tomato,
Prunes or Plums,L Rolls or
Bread.
Tuesday, October 9
Hamburgers with Buns,
Potato Chips, Lettuce, Toma-
to, Pickle, Chocalate Cake
with Chocalate Icing.
Wednesday, October 10
Barbecued Chicken, Mash-
ed Potatoes, String Beans,
Lettuce & Tomato, Peaches
with Cookies.
Thursday, October 11
Fish Square, Tartar Sauce,
Whole Kernel Corn, Cabbage,'
Carrot & Pepper Salad, Cake
with Strawberries.
Friday, October 12
Pizzaburger, French Fries,
Sliced Tomato & Lettuce,
Pickles, Banana Pudding.


CONSTANT

ADVERTISING


One step won't take you very far,
You've got to keep on walking..

One word won't tell 'em who you are
You've got to keep on talking.
An inch won't make you very tall,
, You've got to keep on growing.
One little ad won't do it all,
You've got to keep them going.
A constant drop of water
Wears away the hardest stone;

By constant gnawin', Towser
Masticates the toughest bone.

The constant, cooing lover
Carries off the blushing maid

And the constant advertiser
Is the one who gets the trade!

HARD TO BELIEVE?
MAKE US PROVE IT!


Pants

Coats




k$1744


Junior and Missy sizes. 100 pct.
nylon dull luster quilt, polyester
fill or durable polyester-cotton
poplin all purpose coats. Asst.
colors.
Regular $20 and more


Special Harvest
Clearance Group

DRESSES

33 1/3 pct. TO /2
About 75 of these. Smart fall '73 styles and
colors, sizes for Juniors, Missy and half
sizes.

Thrifty Shoppers Will Harvest
These Savings!

GIRLS' JACKETS
$4.66 to $7.33
Original values $6.99 to $10.99, washable pile and pile
trimmed. Sizes 12 mos. to 12 yrs.


i Save a

SFat 10%


On all other girls

OATS and

JACKETS


During Our
Harvest Sale


Ladies' Rayon Tricot

PANTI ES

3 pkg $1.00
Sizes 5-9 white and assT. Guaranteed 1
Girl's
SWEATERS
and CAPES
$1.99 to $7.99
Fall is in the air. Buy now on
lay-a-way while the stock is plentiful.


Men's nylon dress or
Orlon,
CREW
SOCKS
2 pr. $1.44
Reg. $1.00 pr. One
,size fits all 10-13,
new fall shades for
men and young men.
....M. ,d-*-*en's andBdys .

Sport Coats
We overbought, you reap the savings. Your
choice of our entire stock.
ff the req.
15 pct. f low prices.
Boys sizes 8-20,
,men's sizes 36-50 in reg. and longs. All
famous names at discount prices.


Men's

BAGGIES

Reg. $9.99 & $10.99

now $8.44 pr.


All new stock by famous Wrangler, new and
exciting plaids and patterns in fall shades
you'll like, navy blue denim also.


Walk into Fall in smart new
Ladies

OXFORDS



$8.44


Reg. $9.99


Higher heels, sizes 5-10.


Extra Special
Men's permanent press

Work Suits

$8.44 set
Navy blue pants and matching shirts. 65 pct.
polyester and 35 pct. cotton with new soil release,
short or long sleeves. S-M-L-XL shirts, pants sizes
29-44. All ars permanent press.


Harvest value group. Men's & boys'

JACKETS

$8.44 & 10.44
Values to $12.99, quilted nylon with
elastic cuff to keep the cold out.
Heavy duty lining with hidden hood (
for extra warmth, Men's sizes 36-46
and boys sizes 8-20.


We've cut down the prices.
Man and boys'

Casual Shoes

$4.44 to $8.44
Reg. to $19.99. All new 1973 styles by
Rand and Thorn McAn, all are priced
to sell, most of these below cost.
Large selection.
Men's Navy Boat

SHOES


DEATMET TR


Reg. $3.99 Now

$2.97 pr.


m avy uty canvas uppers
with long lasting slip-pi vof
d Ave Phone 227-42611soles.


THE, STAR
Tnl^O^l'r. nf tltz









PAGE FOUR .THE STAR. Port St. Joe. F.la. THURSDAY, OCT. 4. 1973


State OES Officer Pays Official


Visit to Port St. Joe Chapter 191


by Marjorie Horton
On Thursday evening, Sep-
tember 27, Gulf Chapter No.
S191 O.E.S. was honored by a
i visit of Associate Grand,
Matron Val Ledbetter of the
Grand Chapter of Florida.
Prior to the meeting a deli-
cious banquet in her honor
was served by the ladies of
the Garden Club in the
Garden Center. The banquet
P I tables were beautifully decor-
ated in red, white and blue,
carrying out the theme of
S"Americanism".
-A Guests were greeted at the.
door by the Worthy Matron
Marjorie Horton, Associate
Matron Merle Weeks and
Conductress Maxine Robin-
son.
Following the banquet all
were invited to assemble in
the Masonic Hall for the
:' ]P.1meeting.
1L -Worthy Matron Marjorie
-.Horton opened the Chapter
and welcomed all those
w present.
Shown from left to right are: Helen Woodruff, Past Matron; Val Ledbetter, Associate Grand Matron; lone Associate Grand Matron
Matron, David Woodruff, Associate Grand Patron; Ralph Keene, Past Grand Matron; Donna Hainline, Past Grand
Swatts. Associate Patron; Marjorie Horton, Worthy Matron; and Inez Davis, Grand Warder.


Flower Arranging Lesson for Garden Club


The Port St. Joe Garden been attending the school of Before making an arrange- sometimes used. In general,
Club will meet at the Garden flower arrangement. There ment, decide on the place arrangements are one and
Center on Thursday October will be a plant sale for the where it will be used and one half the height of the
11 at 2 p.m. The subject of benefit of World Gardening. select a size and shape that container and one and one
the program is Horticulture, will be neither too large nor third the width. They must be
with special emphasis on Design in flower arranging too small for the space. Tall three dimensional, that is
what to plant at this season was the subject of the second slender arrangements for tall have the appearance of
and to care for plants during lesson of the School of Flower narrow wall spaces, small depth.
the winter. Arranging held at the Garden low arrangements for small Each arrangement must be
The speaker will be Glen Center Friday morning, Sept. tables, large full ones for stable or well balanced. Have
Allen, agricultural instructor 21. broad spaces. Select colors an uneven number of lines ad
at Apalachicola High School. The instructor Mrs. Glen that will harmonize with and flowers, although many
Mr. Allen has recently Porter stated that there are colors in the room. In some present day arrangements
finished a year's special several art principals one instances it may be neces- often contain only one flower.
study of horticulture. must follow in order to sary to provide a suitable Each arrangement has one
Hostesses for the occasion achieve a beautiful arrange- background. dominant feature; contrast
will be Mrs. Durell Sykes and ment. They are line, scale, In form, arrangements are with some large flowers,
Mrs. Kenneth Bateman. balance, rhythm, accent, usually triangular, circular, some medium and some
A special invitation is color, proportion and con- upright or semicircular; the small such as buds. The
extended to those who have trast. curved or S shape is :spaces between lines (voids)
m m mmm mmmmmmmmmm m m m -m mmm mmm mmm mm m mmmm mmm m











3! Fall and Winter


Ladies Dresses.

11 Marked
Down
I Toff Exquisite Form
.off B
Bras-Girdles



..2 PriceII

Ii CLOSE OUT I

"Some Jacqueline Children's Shoes
and Connie Close Out!
Fall and Winter Red Goose and
IH O/ P IC Youngqdale Fall
SHOES V2 PRICE.!

i!!s All Ladies Boots 4" $3 to $6
*: ... Special Price





SPECIAL THIS WEEK


Double Knit


Men's Suits .

Debonair, urbane, suitable for every occasion
A winner by h.i.s. And an extra pair of pants
to boot! off




SCO STIN 'S Quality and Fashion


are equally as important as
rhythm, the feeling of swing
or motion, accents or faces
the one flower or group of
flowers that is the center of
attention and appears to hold
all parts together.
Color will be dealt with
more fully in a future lesson.
In general deep toned flowers
are placed low in the design,
middle tones next and
lightest colors at the top.
The next lesson will be in
the form of a workshop with
each participant bringing
containers, necessary equip-
ment and plant material to
make an arrangement.
, For further information
contact Mrs. Stiles Brown at
229-3613.


Before the Indians caime,
a species of horse roamed
North America. They stood
about six feet high, and
had short legs ending in
three clawed toes.


Val Ledbetter, Cocoa Chapter
35, Merritt Island; Associate
Grand Patron David Wood-
ruff, Dunedin Chapter 132
and Grand Warder Inez
Davis, Blountstown, Chapter
179 of the Grand Chapter of
Florida were introduced and
given a hearty welcome.
Past Grand Matron Donna
Hainline, Florida 9, Pensa-
cola and Past Grand Matron
lone Keen, Ft. Meade 47 were
introduced, welcomed and
escorted to the East where
they were given Grand
Honors.
Grand and Past ,.Grand
Officers introduced and wel-
comed were: Mrs. Marian
Walsingham, Grand Instruc-
tor, District 5 of Miracle 306,
Panama City Beach; Mrs.
Ruby Atherton, O.E.S. En-
dowment & Investment Com-
mittee, Lynn Haven 262; Mrs.
Mae Wilhite, Masonic Home
Committee, St. Andrews 223;
Mrs. Jackie Hogan, Creden-
tials Committee, Parker 96;
Mrs. Maybel Swatts, Estarl
Committee, Gulf 191; Mrs.
Dorothy Porter, Past Grand
Warder, Gorrie 192; Mrs.
Corene Dykes, Past Grand
Esther and Mrs. Bertha
Smith, Past Grand Adah of
Panama 102.
Worthy Matrons and Pa-
trons visiting were: Mr. and
Mrs. Walter Cassel of Gorrie
192; Mrs. Clyde Stone of
Blountstown 179; and Mrs.
Inez Hale of Miracle 306 and
Ray Jolley of Gulf 191.
Associate Matrons and
Patrons of the evening were:
Mrs. Mary Bowden, Blounts-
stown 179; Mrs. Sara Hogg of
Miracle 306; Mrs. Jessie Mae
McClellan of Gorrie 192; Mrs.
Merle Weeks and Mrs. Ralph
Swatts, Sr. of Gulf 191.
Past Matrons and Patrons
introduced and welcomed
were: Mrs. Frances Meri-
wether and Mrs. Carmie
Crutchfield of Wewahitchka
229; Mrs. Mildred, Marbury,
Mrs. Irene Carter and Mrs.
Violet Gainer of St. Andrews
223; Mrs. Helen Woodruff of
Dunedin 132; Mrs. Bernice
Brock and Aubrey Dykes of
Panama 102; Mrs. Sara
Perry, Mrs. Exia Kelley and
Mrs. Juanita Wade of Gorrie
192; Mrs. Wister Miller and
Lee Miller of Parker 96; and


Mrs. Mary Jane Trawick,
Miss Clara Pate, Mrs. Ruth
Ramsey, Mrs. Eula Dickey,
Mrs. Bell DuBose, Mrs.
Wilma Cooper, Mrs. Aliene
Hightower and Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Pippin of Gulf 191.
Other members present for
the meeting were: John
Marbury of St. Andrews 223;
Mrs. Sue Skelton. Mrs. Nancy


Beers and Mrs. Josephine
Wiggins of Miracle 306; Mrs.
Edith Hutchison, Mrs. Opal
Gill, David Hutchison and
G. A. Gill of Parker 96; Mrs.
Maxine Robinson, Mrs. Onnie
Herring, Mrs. Anna Adams,
Mrs. Essie Williams, Mrs.
Catherine McDaniel, Mrs.
Nita Vern Jolley and Mrs.
Wanda Brown of Gulf 191.


f


i~


I .I ; Q .





Holly Lyons Marks

Her First Birthday


BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. Harry L.
Brewton, Jr. of Pascagoula,
Miss., announce the birth of a
son, Harry L. III on August 1,
1973 in the Singing River
Hospital of Pascagoula.
- Grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. -Harty L. Brewton of
Port St. Joe.
VISITS WITH FRIENDS
Miss Lydia Ariaudo of San
Diego, Calif., has been the
house guest of Henry Lilius
and his parents Mr. and Mrs.
H. S. Lilius.


Holly Elizabeth Lyons,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Cecil Lyons, Jr., 204 16th
Street, celebrated her first
birthday Wednesday, Sept. 26
with a clown party at her
home.
Cecil Lyons III and Robert
Williams helped carry out the
party theme byjbeing dressed
up as clowns Thoge present
to help Holly celebrate the
occasion were: Linda Cath-
erine Wood, Clay Keels, Kyle
Grossman, Mr. and Mrs.
Robert E. Williams, grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil
Lyons, Sr., grandparents, and
Mrs. Essie Williams, great
grandmother. I


HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.













THE STAR, Port St. Joe; Fla. THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 1973 PAGE FIVE




True Tragedy of Watergate


Punt, Pass, Kick Winners


Ninety-three boys between
the ages of eight and 13
participated in this year's
Punt, Pass and Kick contest,
sponsored nationally each
year by the Ford Motor
Company and locally by the
St. Joe Motor Company and
the Port St. Joe Lions Club.
Winners in each age group
will participate in regional
competition Saturday in
Marianna.


4


Winners in the different
age groups included:
Eight-Year-Olds Terry
Woullard, first; Scott Bur-
kett, second and Tres Parker,
third.
Nine-Year-Olds Kevin
Roberson, first; Ashley, Ab-
rams, second and Jake
Tankersley, third.
Ten-Year-Olds Darron
Garland, first; Greg Daniels,
second and Jay Hanlon,


third.
Eleven-Year-Olds Rick
Taylor, first; Eugene Floore,
second and Ronald Miller,
third.
Twelve-Year-Olds Danny
DeWitt, first; Freddie Woul-
lard, second and Lynn
Whitfield, third.
Thirteen-Year-Olds Billy
Kennedy, first; David Wilson,
second and Sammy Sweazy,
third.


Part of the winners are
shown in the photograph,
above, with their trophies.
They include, first row, left
to right: Ronald Miller, Jake
Tankersley, Ashley Abrams,
Kevin Roberson, Darron
Garland and Greg Daniels.
Second row, left to right:
Rick Taylor, Sammy Sweazy,
Billy Kennedy, David Wilson
and Danny DeWitt.


-H Club Has Rewarding Year


The Gulf County 4-H Horse
Club has just ended what had
been termed a very reward-
ing first year. Highlights of
this past year were:
Competing in the state 4-H
horse judging contest in July
of 1972. Four members of the
team : competed: Becky
Cleckley, Felicia Leach,
'.aI.K-anen. Knee, .and -Ricky-
. Hanlon.-ftfhe' team placed'
ninth out of 11 counties parti-
cipating.


-Staging an all 4-H Horse
Show in November of 1972..
-Holding two clinics with
extension 4-H specialists.
-Participating in the Dis-
trict 4-H Horse Show. Seven
riders entered: Allen Revell,
Becky Cleckley, Felicia
Leach, Karen Knee, Ricky
Hanlon, Tammy Rushing,
and Tami McMillian,-, with
'three. Felicia, Karen and
Tammy qualifying for the
state show.


-Sending two of the three
qualified riders, Felicia and
Tammy, on to the state show
with Tammy placing fifth in
grade mares under 14.2.
-Competing for a second
time at the State Judging
Contest. A second team was
sent consisting of Allen
Revell, Felicia Leach, Karen
Knee, and Tammy Rushing
to judging. They placed
eighth out of 13-coimnties.'"
Plans lor a bigger and
better second year are in the
making. They include:
Membership drive. Appli-
cations for membership are
now being taken and all
young people between the
ages of eight and 18 are
urged to join.
Monthly playdays, the first
to be held October 13.
Second Annual All 4-H
Horse Show.
Christmas party
Open Show, possibly in late
February.
Competing in District Show
and attending 4-H camps.
Possibly competing, at State
horse show.
Participating in Judging
Contest.
Holding year end awards
banquet.
AWARDS BANQUET
The first annual awards
banquet of the Gulf County
4-H Horse Club was held
September 15 at the Co-op
Lounge in Wewahitchka with
,a covered dish buffet being


served to the club members,
board members-and families,
and Mr. and Mrs. Cubie
Laird, Extension agent.
Mrs. Jean McMillian,
organizational leader, and
Miss Kay Knee, assistant
leader presented awards to
the following:
4-H Club officers: president
Ricky Hanlon, vice president
Allan-Revell. secretary Tam-
Ifi'y** McMifliair "and- reporter
Felicia Leach.
Judging Team 1972: Becky
Cleckley, Ricky Hanlon, Kar-
en Knee, and Felicia Leach.
Judging Team 1973: Tam-
my Rushing, Karen Knee,
Felicia Leach, and Allan
Revell.
Best Sportsmanship Award,
Pam Shores. Most Improved,
Tammy Rushing, Best
Record Book, Karen Knee;
and All Around 4-H'er, Allan
Revell.
Cubie Laird presented an
Award of Honor certificate
for "Distinguished Leader-
ship in 4-H Club Work" to the
following board members:
Kay Knee, Billy Knee, Lessie
Knee, Evelyn Murdock, Troy
McMillian, Jean McMillian,
Jeter Lister, Emma Ruth
Leach, Meadie Rogers,. and
Catherine Ramsey.
A short business meeting
was held in which Cubie
Laird, Extension agent,
appointed Miss Kay Knee as
organizational leader for
1973-74 with Mrs. Jean
McMillian as her assistant.


(The Methodist Christian
Advocate)

By Jeff Havens, Jr., Minis-
ter, Goodwater United Metho-
dist Church, Goodwater, Ala.
Condensed from sermon
delivered by Mr. Havens.
What should we do in the
light of Watergate? The one
thing about this whole
incident that disturbs me
most is not actually what
happened in Washington.
Rather it is the attitude of
most people concerning it.
I do not know how many
times I have heard Water-
gate discussed and brushed
off lightly with statements
like: "Why it is nothing to get
excited about, what the
Republicans did at Watergate
is common practice. The
Democrats have done similar
if not identical things.
The truth or falsehood of
these statements does not
concern me. What does
bother me is the attitude that
whatever is practiced, if done
often enough by enough
people, becomes the accept-
able conduct. How often do
we hear questionable conduct
excused with the words,
"Everyone does it." Does the
fact that some things have
become common practice
make them right, decent, and
acceptable? This to me is
frightening, and yet it seems
to be a general attitude.
When I was a child, many
things that are common
practice and largely accepted
now were seldom done or
even talked about. Most of
the people in my community
took seriously the command-
ment to "Remember the
Sabbath Day to keep it holy."
Of course not everyone went
to church but Sunday was
a day with a difference.
I must have been ten years
old before I ever heard the
word divorce. However, in
one recent year in these
United States there were four
divorces tor every ten
marriages.
In our nation today some 96
percent of the people profess
to believe in God and 60-66
percent profess to be Chris-
tians.... Yet we see little if
any real sense of need for
repentance on an individual
or a national level. I wish it
were possible today to
declare a national period of
mourning for our sin: a time
to call our nation to repen-
tance and faith in God.
At the time of the event
described in Nehemiah 8 and
9 the people of Israel had
been in captivity in Babylon
for 70 years. Under the
leadership of Ezra and
Nehemiah they had been lead
back to Jerusalem and had
rebuilt the walls of the city.
On the occasion of our
scripture, they are assembled
before the Water Gate (I
know the name is only
coincidental to the Washing-
ton Watergate) to hear the
reading of the Law of
Moses... And, "All the
people wept when they heard


the reading of the law, saw it
as the revealed will of God
for his people and there came
upon them a sudden sense of
guilt and of judgment before
God. They could have tried to
excuse themselves and their
conduct by saying, "But
everyone does these things."
They did not. There was
instead an immediate sorrow
for sin and repentance of it
and a turning back to God.
When the Israelites did
repent and turn again to God,
the day was pronounced as a
day of joy and feasting. When
they first heard the words
that were declared to them


the people repented with deep
grief. Then their leaders
called them to rejoice and
feast for they had heard and
understood the word of the
Lord.
What should we do in the
light of Watergate?
Let us all turn again to our
God in repentance. let us
repent of all sin in our indivi-
dual lives and be sure that
our hearts are right with
God. Then let us pray as
never before for our nation as
a whole and those involved in
Watergate in particular. Let
us pray for a national
awakening and repentance


that would cause us to know
the joy of the Lord in our
land. Then we shall truly
have a day of rejoicing.


THE


PENTECOSTAL


HOLINESS CHURCH



PROUDLY PRESENTS

The Initial Run of


THE RED, WHITE & BLUE


BUSES



Sunday October 7th











8 ,A- lagr rrF










The Pentecostal Holiness Church wishes to announce their initial bus run
beginning Sunday, October 7, 1973. The three brightly painted buses will be
picking up passengers every Sunday morning in White City, Jones Homestead,
The Beaches, Indian Pass and within the city. Everyone is invited to ride the
big red, white and blue buses and to visit the Pentecostal Holiness Church on
Garrison Avenue this Suncday.


For Information

Call
227-3246 or 229-6503


Rev. James L. Gosnell
Pastor

Pentecostal Holiness Church
Garrison Avenue


3 WHEEL



Adult Bikes


With BIG Seats


Really Comfortable
Hand Brake or Coaster Brake
Come in today and try one out.




Western Auto

219 Reid Avenue Phone 227-2271


I l II 1 -~--lr r I


~ C ----I L I L '- e I r Ibl ~ P~-e~b~ I l'd I I,










L'O


F *'*


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WHERE ECONOMY ORIGINATES
GRADE A FLA OR GA FRESH

wBe-O-Cliek
CONSISTS OF
3 LEG QUARTERS
3 BREAST QUARTERS 9 (
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3 GIBLETS
AND E C
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Cheese Slices ........PG 49c
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Cheese Loaf........K $1.33
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Cheese Loaf Sharp $1.45
Citrus Punch........ BOTTLE 1C
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Redeemable thru Sun Oct 7.
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Lb........
Cwdt SieeS antU LBL 49


A& P 1 Gal.
Laundry Bleach 45c
CARNATION-ALL VARIETIES
Slender Liquid.......0oz 5 $1.00
SOAP BARS
Irish Spring ......... Bath ize4/89
NABISCO COOKIES
Nutter Butter Cookies 13PKo53
OUR OWN LEMON & SUGARED
24 OZ
Instant Tea Mix.........* 0 894
A&P FROZEN & CONCENTRATED
12 OZ
Orange Juice........CAN 3 $1.00
S A & P 19 oz. boxes
Cake Mixes 3 $1.00
QUAKER
Instant Grits ....0.... PK3 $100
JANE PARKER PLANE OR SUGARED
King Size Donuts........... PKG67
JANE PARKER FRESH
Apple Pies ................ 49
JANE PARKER REGULAR & RIPPLE
Potato Chips .............* PK6
JANE PARKER
Sour Rye Bread .a*.........SIZE 4

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Pumpernickle Bread .......SIZE 43


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Sharks Dump Taylor Co.
_d *m __ _. -m A


13,-


PH


7 In Friday Contest


Travel to Crawford Mosely Friday


The Port St. Joe Sharks
went into the Taylor County
game with only three of their
big cylinders running at full
steam and still came home
with a 13-7 victory.
The Sharks had their stingy
defense working superbly.
The fast scatbacks were all
clicking and the pass catch-
ing of Martin : Adkison and
Russell Chason put in some
overtime. The power running
of Robert Dickens was
sidelined with an ankle injury
and put the Sharks at a slight
disadvantage when. it came
time to push for a'lew tough
yards.
The Sharks started off with
YARDSTICK
St. Joe .Perry
First Downs 11 8
Yards Rushing ... 198 1


Bowling


Nev
in the Ladies Coffee
League, Pate's won two
Games from Wewa Bank.
Ruby Lucas had the high
game for Pate's with a 188,
and high series went to
Brenda Mathes with a 436.
Elsie S. had the high game
for Wewa with a 168 and
Elsie also had the high series
of 470.
Margaret's Beauty Shop
won three out of four from
Team No. 6, with Auril M.
having high game of 167 and
high series of 431. Mary Byrd
had high game of- 151-and the
high series, 403.
Top Dollar split two games
with R & H. Betty F. had
high game of 165 and high
series of 430 for Top Dollar.
Leading R & H was Faye Cox
with a 172 high game and 488
series.
A & N Railroad won all
four games from Bowen's
Cowgirls. For A & N, Dale H.
had a high game of 171, and
Dot Hamm had the high
series of 464. Edwina Bowen
had both high game and
series for Bowens with a 159
and 362.
Team members of Bowen's
Cowgirls are Edwina Bowen,
Lou McDonell, Mae Plair,
and Betty Ambrose.


Standings:
A & N Railroad
Top Dollar
R&H
Pate's
Wewa Bank
Margaret's
Team No. 6
Bowen's Cowgirls


Lost
2
5
6
6
7


When Gutenberg invented
the printing press in 1456,.
the first thing he published
was his famed Bible. One
of the 41 -known copies of
the Gutenberg Bible, now in
the Library of Congress, is
valued at $300,000--a record
price for a complete Bible.-


iE *\


The Bible has much to
say about money, like this:
"Like the partridge that gath-
ers a brood which she did
not hatch, so is he who gets
riches but not by right; in
the midst of his 'days they
will leave him, and at his end
he will be a fool."


Yards Passinf
Return Yardage
Passes
Intercepted by
Punts
Fumbles Lost
Penalties .


222
48
'.12-21
4
.2-27
3
25


Score by Quarters:
Port St. Joe 7 0 0 6-13
Perry 0 0 7 0- 7


Last Wednesday night,
Dixie Seafood won all four
games from Bill's Dollar
Store. Mary Brown was high
bowler for Dixie Seafood with
a 163 game and 437 series.
Melba Kesner was high for
Bill's with a 174 game and 376
series.
. Florida 1st National Bank
won three and lost one to St.
Joe Kraft. Christine Lightfoot
had a 193 game and Lois
Smith had a 476 series for the
Bank. Ruby Lucas led Kraft
with a 179 game and 452
series. V,,
Shirt & 'lihy won three
and lost one to Team 8. Patsy
Cooley led Shirt & Trophy
with a 166 game and 449
series. Mary Byrd was high
for Team 8 with a 161
game and 438 series.
St. Joe Stevedores won
three out of four games
from St. Joe Furniture.
Melba Barbee led the Steve-
dores with a 187 game and
525 series. Brenda Mathes
was high for St. Joe Furni-
ture with a 178 game and 466
series.
Standings: Won Lost
Shirt & Trophy 13 3
St. Joe Kraft 9 7
St. Joe Stevedores 9 7
Fla. 1st Nat'l Bank 8 8
Dixie Seafood 8 8
St. Joe Furniture 7 9
Team 8 6 10
Bill's Dollar Store 4 12

On lanes one and two
,Campbell's Drugs took three
games from Pat's Roofing.
High man for Campbell's was
Clyde Parker with a 557
series and 200 game. Also
for Campbell's, B. R. Ric-
hardson had a 202 game and
503 series. For Pat's it *was
Tim Taylor with a 454-series.
On lanes three and four
Richard's Place took three
games from Murdock's TV,
with Randy Weston high for

Richards with a 515 series,
and Jim Flint with a high
series of 512 for Richards.
Lee Parker led Murdock's
with a 404 series.
On lanes five and six
Tommy's Gulf took all four
points from Basic Magnesia.
For Tommy's Gulf it was
Harry Lowry with a whop-
ping 593 series, Bill Beasore
with a 533 series and Jerry
Colvin with a 513 sreies.
Lowry had. a real fine 213
game also. For Basic high
man was Jerry Tuttle with a
519 series.
On lanes seven and eight
Shirt & Trophy took three
games from Marvin's TV.
High for the Trophy team
was Robert Montgomery with
a 538 series. 0. D. Strickland
with a 531 and David Roche
with a 532. David also had a
real fine 201 game. High for
Marvin's was Billy Barlow
with a 533 series, Bill versiga
had a 480.
Standings: Won Lost
Shirt & Trophy 16 4
Tommy's Gulf 15 5
Basic Magnesia 10 10
Campbell's Drugs 10 10
Marvin's TV 8 12
Murdock's TV 8 12
Richard's Place 7 13
Pat's Roofing 6 14


a bang when Jim Moore
knocked a TPerry player
loose from the ball on the
second play of the game.
Tony Harrison covered the
pigskin for the Sharks and
two plays later they had
scored. Steve Owens unload-
ed a 32 yard strike to Martin
Adkison in the end zone and
Jim Moore Kicked the extra
point for the only scoring in
the first half.
The Sharks had the ball
inside the Bulldogs' 10 yard
line three more times in the
first period but couldn't quite
make it over the stripe.
The second half started off
just like the first, but this
time, it was the Sharks
fumbling on the third play on
their own 33 yard line. On the
second play, the Dogs tried a
pass up the middle but Steve
Owens was right there and
picked it off. The Sharks
fumbled again on the first
play ahti,lost the ball to
Perry again, this time on the
29 yard line. The Sharks
defense stopped the Bulldog
drive on the 14 yard line,
avoiding the Perry score on


what seemed to the fans to be
*a golden opportunity.
After this contest of fum-
bles the Sharks started
driving and were moving well
until lightning struck. Steve
Owens. tossed a screen, pass
out to Carl Whittle, but it
never got there. Perry's Bill
Walker dashed up and took
the pass and ran 45 yards for
the only Perry score. Ronnie
Fleming's kick was good to


:Sharks Smother A
tie the gai e.
Early in the third period,
it looked as if the Sharks
would go ahead when Eddie
Rich blocked a Perry punt.
On the first play Owens
connected with Chason for 20
yards. Then Whittle picked
up 14 yards on two carries to
the Perry 14. The Sharks
could get only eight more
before losing the ball on
downs on the Perry six yard


First


ONLY ONE

Complete

SINGLE

BED

Now Only.95
Now Only


12995


Living Room -ching
IT ROMatchingKE

SUITE $279. ROCKE
i~- ^ C- 0 k lzrt


CLOSE OUTS


General Electric
Stereo Phonograph
General Electric Console Solid State
Color Television ,
Phi.co Console 23-incn
Color Television
Philco Console 25-inch

Color Television .


z SPEED
I m< SM aw.n A Dwisnon of Mc~wtr E


Perry Run Attempt
line.
With a little over four
minutes to go in the game the
Sharks were on the Perry 31
with fourth and seven to go
when Jim Moore took the
handoff and scooted around
end, broke two tackles and
went over to score the
Sharks' winning touchdown.
The kick for the extra point
was no good.
The Port St. Joe defense


was led by Kenneth Wei-
morts, Ronnie Kirkland and
Russell Chason, who had two
pass interceptions for the
night.

Friday night the Sharks,
will travel to Panama City tor
meet the new Crawford
Mbsely team in Tommy-
Oliver Stadium. Game time
will be 8:30, Port St. Joe"
time.


was 199.95
$229.95

Was 759 95
$799.95

Was499.95

Was 9
$9 549.95


Keg. e YY.95


$89.95


We Deliver


Hide-A-Bed


Was 1 Y99. Hide-A-Bed


Now $169.95 Seat
Sea


ESTABLISHED 1904




HOME FURNISHINGS CENTER
PURmITvuN aPPLIANCEse Ps. OO CovEMNO *F oM0e@glIlMvTAImwUT


.414-416 Reid Ave.


Phone 229-6195


Reg. 198.00



$168


Moore Scores Winning Point
,


FREE
Glass Serving Platter
With purchase rf $39.95 or more




[-&


S r Octagon Table
Witn tour chairs


Reg. $199.95 $169095


Won
14
11
- 10
10
9


_ N MMOM I


II _1 '" I II ,


THE WSAR, Port St. Joe, Fla., THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 1973


PAGE SEVEN


*. M^1.1^


I






















A SUCCESS STORY

7 ...that's the story of our
SRexall Pharmacy...and
- it's all because of YOU!'
Yes...our success de-
: ends on your satisfac-
tion with our service and
ourproducts. That's why
Swe recommend and fea-
ture Rexall quality pro-
ducts: And, that's why
you can always expect
prompt, courteous atten-
tion to your needs! Call
on us soon...and see!

: Your 7 Piarmacv



BUZZETT'S
S DRUG STORE
- 227-3371 .817 William
Se nvweient Drive4n Window
Plenty of Free Parking


Decorating Course
= Registration Tday
- At High School

Registration for the course
in Interior Decorating will be
held Thursday evening Octo-
Sber. 4, at 7:00 p.m. in the
Home Ec. Lab of Port St. Joe
High School. The first class
: session will follow registra-
tion.
This class is being offered
by the Gulf Coast Community
College Division' of Contin-
uing Education and is a
non-credit course aimed at
the homemaker for her
enjoyment and enrichment.
Gulf Coast endeavors to offer
courses of interest to the
ordinary citizen and taxpayer
:from time to time. Response
to these offerings will en-
r,; courage the college to bring
more courses to the local
communities.
The Interior Decorating
course will run for six 'weeks
"of two hour sessions. The fee
for the course' is $8.00

Use the
Classfied Ads
Midget Investments
With Giant Returns


NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a
two door convertible, 1968 Torino, Ford,
L.D. No. 8H 435176082 owned by
Alphonso Brooks will be sold at public
auctionn pursuant to Chapter 85, Florida
Statutues, on the Ist day of November,
1973 at 10:00 A.M., E.S.T.'at Port St.
Joe High School, Auto Mechanics
Building. The aforesaid sale shall be to
th highest bidder for cash.
DATED this 28th day of September,
A.D. 1973.
*-s- Kenneth Herring, Principal
Port St. Joe High School
2t 10.4

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY
IN RE: Estate of
CHESTER C. WILKINSON,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All creditors of the estate of Chester
C.' Wilkinson, deceased, are hereby
notified and required to file any claims
or demands which they may have
against said estate in the office of the


from light fin-
gers. Not only can
they be protected in
your home, but also
those things you
take on your trips.

YOU


from thieves and debts
and accidents. Also, protect
yourself from un-insured
motorists with our com-
plete auto insurance pro-
gram. You never know who
you might run into, or they
to you. Be safe be
insured.


FIRE BONDS


41


0


Circuit Judge of Gulf County, Florida,
in the Courthouse at Port St. Joe,
Florida, within six (6) calendar months
from the date of the first publication of
this notice. Each claim or demand
must be in writing and must state the
place of residence and post office
address of the claimant and must be
sworn to by the claimant, his agent, or
his attorney, or it will become void
according to law.
Dated this 28th day of September,
1973.
Edison B. Wilkinson
Executrix of the Estate of Chester
C. Wilkinson, Deceased 4t 10.4

NOTICE TO BID NO. WWP41
Sealed Proposals will be received by
the City of Port St. Joe, Port St. Joe,
Florida, 32456, at the Office of the City
Clerk, until 5:00 P.M., Eastern
Daylight Time, on October 16, 1973, at
which time and place all bids received
will be publicly opened and read aloud
for the furnishing of- all labor,
materials, equipment, and apparatus
for constructing a water well and
testing the .well for yield and draw
down and setting the Owner's pump in
the well after the tell 'Characteristics
have been determined and upon receipt
of the pump.
Any bids received after time and


with a policy,
written especial-
ly for your area.
Most policies are
national and co-
ver only major
points of protec-
tion. What about
hurricanes, tor-
nadoes, etc.? Be
sure you are
covered.. f


IR Possessions


YOUR CAR


Legal Adv.


Lose weight
Shape Tablets
Water Pills.
Drug.


with New
and Hydrex
Campbell's
5tp 9-13


Roche

Rambles
By W. C. Roche



One returned tourist reports the satisfactory
completion of his trip!-he beat all his checks home.

Sign in barbership: "Ten barbers-continuous
conversation.

It's not the things you don't know that get you into
trouble-it's the things you think you know for sure.

Remember when, if you told your kid to take small
bites and chew thoroughly, you were talking about
meat? Now it's water.

People who complain about the way the ball
bounces are usually the ones who dropped it.


IF ROCHE'S DOESN'T HAVE IT, YOU DON'T NEED
IT. SEE US AT 209-211 REID AVENUE.



Roche's Furniture

and Appliance
209 REID AVENUE PHONE 227-5271


date specified will not be corisidered.
One contract will be awarded for all
work.
Each bid must be accompanied by a
certified check, cashier's check, or bid
bond in amount not less than five
percent (5 percent) of the base bid, as
guarantee that the Bidder, if awarded
the Contract, will within ten (10)
consecutive calendar days after written
notice be given of such award, enter
into a written contract with the City of
Port St. Joe, Florida, in accordance
with the accepted 'Proposal.
Specifications are on file in the
Clerk's Office and may be obtained on
request.
The City of Port St. Joe reserves the
right to accept'or reject any or all bids,
waive any formalities and to choose the
bid deemed best to meet the City's
needs.
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
Port St. Joe, Florida
C. W. BROCK
City Auditor and Clerk 2t 10.4


FEEDER PIGS for sale.
Durhoc and Pole and China
mixed. $20. Phone 227-3161
during day and 229-6343 after
6:30 p.m.



a -- -- -- *H^


For Sale: 3 bedroom
Excellent condition.. I
wall carpet. For inform
call 227-8305.


Three bedroom hou
1V2 lots, $7,500. 227
229-6549.


W T


Wanted: Outgrown, used
Cub Scout uniforms. Call
229-6631. .ltc 10-4


For Rent, furnished apart-
ment at 510 8th St. Phone
648-4800. tfc 9-20


Pole lamp, head board,
mattress and box springs, 5
pc. dinette. Best offer. 229-
6195. tfc 9-27

For the best in Television
and Sound come by 301 Reid
Ave., and see our line of tele-
visions, components, stereos,
radios and tapes. We have a
repairman available daily. K
and D TV and SOUND, 301
Reid Ave., Phone 227-2071.,
tfc 9-27

Eleven month old Dober-
man Pinscher, ears and tail
clipped, $75.00. Cal 648-7644.

TRADE: 6 shot 22 Mag-
num single action revolver.
Will trade for 38 special
revolver. Call 648-5216. ltp

Sofa and matching chair,
modern, excellent cond., $100.
Sofa, early American, good
condition, $75. 229-6386. ltp

Bargains, Kirby vacuum
attachments, good condition,
$50. Nylon zip screen house,
$15. Avon, 'other collectables,
.antiques also. Call 22'-7461.
Stp 10-4

Cathey's Corner, Garage
Sale, Saturday, Oct. 6 10 til 2
EST. Clothes, furniture, and
household items of interest.
Come to the end of 20th St. on
Mexico Beach for fantastic
bargains.
ltc

RCA Color TV, good
condition. Call 229-6786.
2tp 10-4

10 speed bikes in stock.
Men's, women's. Racing
style. Touring style. Credit
terms available, western
auto, Port St. Joe.
tfc-6-15
-7




ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work-Welding
506 First St.
Phoen 229-6803.
Machinist on duty all day
Every day

BINGO
Every Thursday night.
$100.00 jackpot. Door Prize,
bonus games, little jack pot.
Refreshments.
American Legion Hall

ST. JOE ACCOUNTING
SERVICE offers you any part
of or complete bookkeeping
service. Personal and busi-
ness check books balanced,
payroll records, etc. For
information contact WANDA
H. BROWN, 225 Reid Avdnue,
(representing H&R Block).
Call 229-6132 or 2?9-6673.
Monday, Wednesday and
Friday. 9-1 and 2-5. tfc-9-6

R.A.M.-Regular convoca-
tion on St. Joseph Chapter
No. 56. R.A.M. 1st and 3rd
Monday. 8 p.m. All visiting
companions welcome.
Willie Lee Griffin, H.P.
E. William McFarland,
Sec.

There will be a regular
communication of Port St.
Joe Lodge No. 111, F. & A.M.,
evei y first and third Thurs-
day at 8:00 p.m.



E. C. Bailey, W.M.
Herbert L. Burge, Sec.


Highland View. CE
appointment 229-3571.


STANLEY HOME PR
For all your
Housecleaning Ne
Contact Betty Gill
Phone 648-7534
Free Delivery
t


CLOTEAL'S BEAUTY
SALON
White City
Opened Thursday, Friday
and Saturday
By appointment
PHONE 229-6722
4tc 9-20

Custom Upholstery
Drapery. Slipcovers
Fabrics & Naugahyde
Reasonable Rates
For limited time
20 pct.,,off
on All fabrics
Phone 229-4481 tfc 8-16

PAT'S ROOFING
Free Estimates
No job too small
Call Day or Night 227-4713
or 229-6898
tfc 8-23


AAA
REFRIGERATION CO.
Port St. Joe
Franchise Service
Repair to all
Home Appliances
Service
on GE, Hotpoint, Westing-
house, Philco, KelvinatOr
and others.
Call Day or Night
229-6953 t 9-6 ,
All Work Guaranteed


PAGE EIGHT


THE--~-~ STAR. --~- PotS.Je l.TUSAOT ,17


Precious

Cargo
The most priceless cargo
on Florida's highways is
carried in chrome-yellow
vehicles labeled- "School
bus," reminded the Florida
Highway Patrol today.
"Stopping for a school bus
may cause drivers to lose a
little time," said Colonel
Eldrige Beach, director of
the Florida Highway Patrol.
"However, life is worth more
than time. This rule is
designed. to protect the lives
of our youngsters when
traveling to and from


New decorated furnished
apt. All electric, air condi-
tioned. Mexico Beach near
water. Day phone 227-3151,
Night 229-6901. tfc 10-4

Two bedroom furnished
apartment for rent at 509 10th
St. 229-6688. tfc 10-4


For Rent: One and two
bedroom attractively fur
house. nished apartments. Cool in
Wall to summer, warm in winter.
rmation Gas heat, window fans. They
must be seen to be appre.
tfc 5-10 ciatpd. Contact Mrs. B.C.-
Prince at WIMICO LODGE
and TRAILER PARK. White
use on City. Phone 229-2413 or
7th. St. 648-3101.
4tp 9-20 tfc-10-28


HE LP WANTED


Manager for Union 76
station on Monument Avenue.
Call collect Blountstown,
674-8222. ,tfc 6-7

Help Wanted: Experienced
cooks and waitresses. Apply
in person. The Top of the
Gulf Restaurant at Mexico
Beach. tfc-9-6


Septic tanks pumped out.
Call Buford Griffin. Phone
229-6694 or. 229-2937.


Mobile Home Owners
SKI MEADOWS PARK


all for Is now open for business,
across the street from Ski
tfc 5-10 Breeze Camp Sites. Beahc
privileges, game room,
washer and dryer. Gift shop.
ODUCT Located on Hiway S30, 9
miles southeast of Port St.
Joe.


Subscribe to The Star


C&G
ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTORS
Residential and Industrial
Wiring and appliance
Repairs
Air Conditioning-Heating
Oil Burner Technician
CALL 229-5777


Color & Black and White
TV Repair. Call
HEATH RADIO & TV
REPAIR
Phone 229-2782
All Work Guaranteed
4tp 8-9


kills bugs for
up to six months,
and saves you about $100 yearly
in costly pest control services.
Use of Sp-ayer free *ibth
purchase of Rid-A-Bug
HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida -


:cua
bert


tfc 10-4


unloading, Florida law re-
quires all drivers going in the
same direction to stop.
Traffic moving in the oppo-
site direction must also stop
unless the highway is divided
with an unpaved space at
least five feet wide or a
physical carrier. School bus-
es are required to stop at
railroad crossings and mo-
torists should use caution
while following a bus ap-
proaching crossings.
"Drivers should reduce
speed when meeting or
overtaking a school bus and
be prepared to stop at any
time," concluded Beach.


Wanted: Experienced cash-
*ier, experienced stock clerk,
experienced butcher or mar-
ket manager. Apply in person
to Bill Rich at Rich & Sons
IGA, 205 Third St., Port St.
Joe. tfc 9-13

Ambitious couple or mat-
ure individual who needs.
extra income (unusual oppor-
tunity) part of full time. For
interview call between 10 and
1 p.m. 229-6801. tfc 9-20
-I
Construction workers
needed for Gorrie Bay
Bridge repairs in Apalach-
icola.
WELDERS
Paving Breaker Operators
Contact Charles Hall at
job site or call 670-4967 at
night. Goodwyn & Mur-
phree, Inc. An equal
opportunity employer.
tfc 7-5


Orderlies: needed for all
shifts at Municipal Hospital.
Applications will be received
between 7 and 3 daily,
Monday through Friday.
e 4tc 10-4


Special Meeting for
Highland View FD

There is to be a special
meeting to inform the resi-
dents of Highland View of the
fire meetings of the Fire
Department and of the
Ladies Auxiliary.
The meeting will be held
Monday night, October 8 at
7:00 p.m. at the Highland
View fire station. New
members are urged to
attend.
SAY YOU SAW IT
IN THE STAR!


One bedroom house fur-
nished St. Joe Beach. Smith's
Pharmacy. tfc 9-13

For Rent: Furnished beach
cottages at reasonable
monthly rates, Phone 227-3491
or 229-5641. tfc

Two bedroom furnished
house trailer for rent with
large screen porch at Beacon
Hill. 229-6688. tfc 10-4

For Rent: Furnished new
small one bedroom house,
automatic heat. 229-6777 after
5 p.m. tfc 10-4

Furnished house for rent, 3
bedroom, two bath on water-
front at St. Joe Beach. Call
229-6225. 3tp 10-4







Like New 1973 Mercury
Capri, radial tires, am-fm
radio, 4-speed trans., trailer
hitch. $2,600. See Al Cathey
or call 648-4066. ltc 10-4


SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR!


LEWIS FLOOR CLEANING
All Types
229-6482 or 229-6447
tfc 9-20

Professional Help with
emotional problems and-or
concerns. Gulf County Guid-
ance Clinic, Port St. Joe, Fla.
227-2691 or Rev. Sidney Ellis,
229-6599.

For Chain link fence call
Emory Stephens. Free esti-
mate. Guarantee on labor
and materials. Low down
payment. Phone 227-7972.



A New Service At
POLLACK'S CLEANERS
UNIFORM
RENTALS
For Information, Come by
or Call
107 Second Street
Phone 227-4401


for
AMBULANCE
SERVICE
In Wewahitchka and
Port St. Joe
CALL -

COMFORTER FUNERAL
HOME
227-3511


AAA
REFRIGERATION CO.
Port St. Joe
Franchise Service
Repair to all
Home Appliances
Service
on GE, Hotpoint, Westing-
house, Philco, Kelviniator
and others.
Call Day or Night
229-6953 tfc 6-14
All Work Guaranteed _


For Welding see James L.
Temple, 1302 Palm Blvd.
tfc 10-4


Consolidated Repair
& Service Co.
House Painting &
General Repair Work
No job too small
Free Reasonable Estimate
St. Joe-Mexico Beach area
Call 648-6153
Charles Brown 2tp 8-2


MEXICO BEACH
BEAUTY SHOPPE
Phone 648-5116
15th St. N. of Hwy. 98
Complete Beauty Service
GLADYS NICHOLS


Your SHERWIN-WILLIAMS
PAINT Dealer in
Port St. Joe



cov \




HURLBUT SUPPLY CO.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St Joe, Florida


school."
More than 5,000 public
school buses are transporting
over half a million school
children daily in Florida.
Many thousands more ard
transported on buses operat-
ed by private schools.
Florida's school buses have
signal lights both front and
rear to warn other drivers.
Yellow flashing lights indi-
cate slowing down and red
flashing lights with the red
arm extended from the bus is
the signal for other vehicles
to stop while the children
load or unload.
When a school bus displays
a stop signal loading or


SAY YOU SAW IT
IN THE STAR!


GIGI POODLE GROOM-
ING. Bath, clip & groom.
Does of all kinds 324 1st St


YOUR HOm


NO-FAULT INSURANCE

TITLE INSURANCE


MAXIMUM COVERAGE AT A MINIMUM

COST




Tomlinson Insurance

3 MONUMENT AVENUE PHONE 227-3201


~er


- :1


-


-I


THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 1973


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


SERVICES


--










THE STAR. Part St. Joe. Fla. THURSDAY, OCT. 4. 1973 PAGF NINF


POUND CAKE
Think of a dessert that goes
well after any meal, that club
members will enjoy at a meet-
ing this fall, that's equally as
good with morning coffee or'
a bedtime snack. The answer
is Old-Fashioned Pound Cake.
When great-great-granfid-
mother made her old-time ver-
sion, her recipe might have
called for a pound of butter,
a pound of flout, a pound of
sugar, and a pound of eggs.
The name "pound" still stands
today, but for convenience the
measurements have been ex-
acted and are given in cups..
For a flavorful beginning to
any number of dessert cbm-
binations, top your cake with
ice cream or fresh berries, add
a sauce, or serve a creamy
pudding in a chilled dish.
Customarily, pound cake is
not iced,' but many modem-
day cooks drizzle the cooled
cake with a glaze. Orange
Frosting is especially good
with the orange-flavored Old-
Fashioned Pound Cake recipe
contributed to the Holiday
Inn International Cook Book,
a collection of home-size re- In largest
cipes from around the world. cream butter


OLD-FASHIONED
POUND CAKE
From the Manchester,
Tennessee, Holiday Inn
1 pound butter or margarine
3 cups sugar
10 large eggs
1 teaspoon lemon extract
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
4 cups sifted all-purpose
flour
1A teaspoon baking powder
V1 teaspoon baking soda
% cup fresh or frozen orange
juice


ANSWERS ALL


st mixer bowl,
' at medium speed


of electric mixer. Gradually
add sugar and continue beat-
ing until mixture is light and
fluffy. Add eggs, 2 at a time,
beating -well after each addi-
tion. Add lemon and vanilla
extracts and blend well.
Sift flour, baking powder
and baking soda together. Add
to egg mixture all at once. Mix
on low speed for 1 minute.
.Scrape down bowl and beat-
ers. Beat at medium speed for
2 minutes. Add orange juice
beat at low speed for 1 min-
ute, until thoroughly blended.
Pour into well-greased and


the money spent. The type of
W l l pt lot and how well it is
W el I K e pt developed including land-
scaping-can add to or
LawIs detract from future property
La w n Is values. If properly land-
scaped, a lot and home can
P l a n n edgreatly increase in value. Too
often we see a beautiful home
on an attractive site with.-
A well landscaped home practically no landscaping.
having healthy shade trees, This' is a sad site indeed.
shrubs and flowers, and a With only a little planning
well kept lawn doesn't just a9d minimum expense (as
happen! It takes careful compared to the price of the
planning, several years and home) the package could be
perpetual maintenance. The completed. And, very often a
main goal in landscaping few hundred dollars for
should-be.Q provide a quality-...plants adds thousands-of
living environment which can dollars to the property value
be used and enjoyed by you in a few years.
and your family.
Ideally, the landscape and The time to start consider-
the home should be planned ing your landscaping is when.
together. For most families, buying a lot. Much of its
a house will be their single potential landscape develop-
largest investment. So, every ment and value as real estate
effort should be made to can be determined at that
obtain maximum value for time. Consider these factors
on the location you. are
f thinking about. -
SWht happens during the
rainy season? Does water
W stand on any part of the lot or
does it soak into the ground
quickly? Avoid sites where
poor surface water drainage
is evident, or lots where
water collects. Excess water
can hinder construction and
make growing plants diffi- ,
cult.
Check the soil on the lot
Cvy iidld r and if it is very sandy
Cyl ind er and usually dry, consider soil
H d improvement prior to land-
lead scaping.
One of the most important
Reclaim ation factors to consider on lot
selection is the existing trees,
S A few nature trees will
Service greatly enhance the immed-
iate landscape effect. Also,
Valve grinding any small flowering trees can
Valve seal, guide be used in place or trans-
and seat installation planted to fit into the design.
Disassembly Good trees increase property
Testing values and should be saved
Cleaning by marking and staking off
Head resurfacing to prevent removal or dam-
High Performance age during construction.
Services Remove the crowded, inferior
Precision Work species and save the others.
Fast Delivery Also select the kind of lot
ST which will satisfy family
J II needs. Some families need
large open spaces for child-
AUTO PARTS ren. Others may want space
201 LONG AVENUE left natural to reduce main-
Port St. Joe, Florida tenance. Fit the lot to your
Phone 227-2141 ) desires if at all possible.

You Are Cordially Invited To Attend

LONG AVENUE
BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street
SUNDAY SCHOOL ....................... 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP .................... 11:00 A.M.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION .............. 6:15 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP .................... 7:30 P.M.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) ......... 7:30 P.M.
VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME
REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor
JOHN WOODS, Minister of Music


floured 10-inch tube pan or fill
a 10-inch bundt pan three-
fourths full; pour rest of bat-
ter into a 7x5x2V2-inch loaf
pan. Bake at 350* -for I hour
or until cake tests done. Bake
loaf pan about 45 minutes.
Cool cake in pan 5 minutes
before turning out onto wire
rack.
Frosting: If desired, frost cake
when it is completely cooled.
Gradually blend 2 to 4 table-
spoons orange juice into 1 cup
confectioners' sugar until of
good pouring consistency.
Drizzle over cake and sprinkle
with 4 teaspoon grated or-
ange peel..Makes 1 cake.


Florida Forest Users Planted



76 Million Pine Trees Last Year


Florida's pulp and paper,
lumber, plywood and other
forest products' industries
planted 76,219,000 seedlings
during the 1972-73 tree-plant-
ing season, the Southern
Forest Institute, Atlanta, Ga.,
reports.
This total represents nearly
15 per cent of all the new
trees planted, or distributed to
privatelandowners for plant-
ing by the forest products
industry in the 13 Southern
states during the December,
1972-March, 1973 tree-plant-
ing season.
All told, 76,127,000 pine and
92,000 hardwood seedlings
were planted in Florida this
year. 72,374,000 of these new
trees were planted on land
owned or leased by the wood
using companies in this state.
Another 3,845,000 seedlings
were distributed to private
landowners' for planting on
their lands. Additional trees
were made available to forest
landowners from nurseries
operated by the state forestry
organization.
17,051,000 new trees planted
or distributed by industry in
Florida last season were
genetically improved seedl-
ings-often called Supertrees-
which can grow taller,
straighter and healthier, up
to 20 per cent faster than
ordinary pine seedlings.
Across the South, the forest
producers industry planted a


record 513 million trees this
year, more than eight trees
for every man, woman, and
child in the South!
Besides wood for more than
five-thousand different kinds
of useful products, the
South's forest lands supply
other benefits too, the Atlanta
based forestry institute says.
"Trees give us natural
beauty, places for outdoor

Savings Bond
Sales Lagging
for the Year

Sales of Series E and H
United States Savings Bonds
in Florida during August
were $9.7 million-down
$876,211 below August 1972.
Savings Bonds sales in the
state totaled $99.9 million
during the eight month period
-up $7.3 million over the
same period last year.
Florida attained 75.2 percent
of its annual sales goal
August 31, which is 5.2
percent above the expected
achievement for the eight
month period.
J. Ted Cannon, Gulf County
Volunteer Savings Bonds
Chairman reported sales in
the county during August
were $7,508. The county.
reached 53.8 of its 1973 sales
goal the end of August.


recreation, improved wildlife
habitat, soil erosion control,
watershed protection, and
oxygen for clean air in the
fight against pollution," said
Dr. Benton H. Box, executive
vice president.
"Best of all, trees are one
of Nature's few renewable
resources," the veteran for-
ester explained. "So long as a
man who cuts down a tree
plants new seedlings prompt-
ly in its place, there can
always be forests and trees
for the future," he said.
"There are more than 204
million acres of trees grow-
ing in the forests of the 13
Southern states today," Dr.


PEACE-

KEEPER.


Box continued.
"And through intelligent
harvesting and careful,
prompt regeneration of trees
which are cut, the govern-
ment, forest products indus-
try and private landowners-
working together-can help
insure there will always be
enough wood in our all-pur-
pose forests to meet Ameri-
ca's future needs!"


Use the
Classified Ads
Midget Investments
With Giant Returns


MARINE CORPS
RESERVE


A balance with any


Florida National Bank


will weigh


in your favor.


FLORIDA FIRST NATIONAL BANK AT PORT ST. JOE
504 Monument Avenue- Telephone: 227-2551


Our Terms Let You Enjoy It Now!


Jamison

BEDDING
Mattress and Box Springs
Twin or Queen 1
Reg. Size Size $159.00

Set 10 9 King $219.00
Size


I Come in Tomorrow! Model DA3500
S- _Model DA3500
_-DRYE"I5 9
FURNITURE INDUSTRIES INC.
PALATKA, FLORIDA


I


:'








SHOP RICH'S, Port St. Joe, SAVE TIME and MONEY!-


specials
Beef Chunks 14% Oz.
Alpo Dog Food -----can 33c
Luzianne -. 10 Oz. Jar
Instant Coffee ------ jar 99c
SGlad 80 Count Package
Sandwich Bags ---- pkg. 29c
Drain Cleaner 12 Ounce Can
Drano ---------- can 45c
Johnson Sprint 16 Ounce Can
Car Wax- ------can $1.89
Schick Platinum Plus Package of 7
Injector Blades---pkg. $1.09
Vicks 3 Ounce Bottle
Formula 44-D -- btl. $1.29
Vicks Orocin Package of 18
Throat Lozenges -- pkg. 69c
Gillette Right Guard Extra Strength 5 Ounce Can
Anti-Perspirant can $1.09

IGA Whole Kernel or Cream Style

CORN

NO. 303
CANS


Folgers (Reg. or Elec. Pere. Only)

40o z
CANS

SUGAR CURED SMOKED

PICNICS


Lb.


SP


I


Smoked
Breakfast Slices ------lb. 88c
Hickory Smoked
Sliced Bacon --- 12 oz. 93c


Tablerite Small Lean
Spare Ribs --- Ib. 89c


Tablerite Lean % Loin
Pork Chops ------ b.
Choice Tablerite
Chuck Roast ---- b.
rablerite Tender
Beef Liver --------. Ib.


99c
99c
99c


CK \at


USDA Grade "A" Tablerite (8-12 Lb. Avg.)

Turkeys .

1k GS C


iWe


IGA Bartlett

PEARS

NO.30$00
j CANS$00


Starkist 6% Ounce Cans

TUNA 2 99c
A School-Time Special!
NOTEBOOK FILLER PAPER
500 Soo EETS 8 8 c


Pillsbury Crescent

ROLLS 2 cn69c
Breakstone 8 Ounce Carton
Sour Cream--- --- ctn. 29c


Lykes Fresh Ripe
Cooked Ham 12 oz. $1.68 Red Grapes-------lb. 39c FII Your freezer
Fresh Tender We have PEAS, BUTTERBEANS, OKRA, SQUASH
Yellow Squash Ig. bag 39c CUCUMBERS ... by thebushel
H ^ RFresh Tender Fresh
0 k r a ----- --g. bag 49 Shelled PEAS 3 bags $1.00
Red Delicious
5 -Hunt's Tomato APPLES 3Lb.Bag59c Peas 4 Lbs. $1.00
m m


KETCHUP
32 OZ.
BOTTLE 4


Kraft -

Miracle Whip

quart 69c


CHECK and COMPARE
"t(Pound)
White Potatoes (ond)
S Yellow Onions (Pound)
Golden Ripe Bananas Pound
S Bartlett Pears (Eh)
Yellow Squash ( oun
I Wash. State Apples (Each)

Your
Choice


We Have A Complete Line of
Garden Seed and Fertilizer


YOUR CHOICE
Cucumbers (Each)
Juicy Lemons (Each)
Green Peppers (Each)
Juicy Oranges (Each)
Florida Limes (Each)

Your
(Ech


.................. WA.,.A AL..


Completely Home Gwned and Operated by E. J. Rihi and SeM


Specials for Oct.
1 through 6


[GA Mixed No. 303 Can
Vegetables ------can
Donald Duck 46 Ounce Can
Grapefruit Juice ----can
Armour 3 Ounce Can
Potted Meat -- can
Armour 5 Ounce Can
Vienna Sausage -- can
[GA No. '% Size Can
Tuna Flakes -------can
Bama 18 Ounce Jar
Apple Jelly -- -. jar
retley Family Package of 24
Tea Bags -------pkg.
Corn and Cane 0 Ounce Jar
Blackburn Syrup --- jar
Nabisco Coconue 15 Ounce Package
Macaroon Cookies pkg.


Mother's Best

FLOUR
5 LB. BAG 10 LB. BAG

83c $59


Aurora Bathroom

Tissue

32 ROLL
PKGS. 8c


IGA Petite Dinner
Rolls
Package of 24

37c


IGA King Size
Bread
1% Lb. Loaves

For 89


_ ~ I Il I


~~~~~~~~~~~~ """" ~~-----~~~----


~1 I II I


SAVE CASH AT RMW5


-- NsOT STAMPS:


21c
39c
17c
37c
39c
35c
89c
69c
69c














Legal Ad

REGISTRATION OF
FICTITIOUS NAMES
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interested
In the business or profession carried on
under the name of H & R BLOCK, INC.
at 225 Reid.Ave. P. 0. Box 899, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456, and the extent of the
interest of each, Is as follows: Wanda
H. Brown, Owner-Manager.
.-s-WANDA H. BROWN -4t 9.20


REGISTRATION OF
FICTITIOUS NAMES
We the undersigned, being duly
sworh, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons Interested
in the business or profession carried'on
under the name of ST. JOE ACCOUNT-
ING SERVICE at 225 Reid Ave. P. 0.
Box 899, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456,
and the extent of the interest of each, is
as follows: Wanda H. Brown, Owner.
-s-WANDA H. BROWN 4t9-20

NOTICE TO BID NO. WWP39
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida,
invites bids on the following described
equipment:
1 ea. Model CCK Onan Series SKW,
A.C. 60 HZ. 120-140 Volt complete
electric power package for flood lights,
pumps, air compressors, power tools,
etc. Engine electric start 4-cycle, two
cylinder. Full pressure lubrication,
hard chdrome-cobalt alloy rotating
exhaust valves and seat inserts, dry
type air cleaner designed for dusty
conditions, pressure air cooled. .
Alternator-Revolving armature, 4
pole self excited, enherent voltage
regulation drip-proof design. Direct
connected to engine for permanent
alignment. All climate insulation and
copper winding U.S. MFG. only or


approved equal.
Bids shall be sealed in an envelope
and plainly marked "Bid No. WWP39."
All bids must be F.O.B., Port St. Joe,
Florida, and approximate delivery date
shown. Bidders are requested to submit
bids in item sequence and totaled. The
City of Port St. Joe reserves the right
to accept or reject any or all bids,
waive any formalities and to choose the
bid deemed best to meet the City's
needs.
Bids must be submitted to the City
Clerk's Office, P.O. Box A, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456, on or before 5:00
P.M., E.D.T., October 16, 1973. Bid
opening will be held at the Regular City
Commission Meeting October 16, 1973,
at 8:00 P.M., E.D.T., in the Municipal
Building, Port St. Joe, Florida.


C. W. BROCK
City Auditor and Clerk


NOTICE TO BID NO. WWP40
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida,
invites bids on the following described
Lift Truck:
1-MACARCO Battery operated Lift
Truck or equal unit shall be capable of
raising 1000 Ibs. 78". The overall width
app. 27", length' app. 45". It shall be
equipped with a built in charger that
will plug into any 110 Volt AC Outlet
and shall automatically reduce charge
as the battery approaches full charge.
The unit shall be equipped with fork
type lifting units.
Bids shall be sealed in an envelope
and plainly.marked "Bid No. WWP40".
All bids must be F.O.B., Port St. Joe,
Florida,.and approximate delivery date
shown. Bidders are requested to submit
bids in item sequence and totaled. The
City of Port St. Joe reserves the right
to accept or reject any or all bids,
waive any formalities and to choose the
bid deemed best to meet the City's
needs.
Bids must be submitted to the City
Clerk's Office, P.O. Box A, Port St.
Joe, Florida, 32456, on or before 5:00
P.M., E.D.T., October 16, 1973. Bid
opening will be held at the Regular City


Support the Crusade for Christ
Oct. 7-14
SAttend the Church of Your Choice

ST. JAMES

EPISCOPAL CHURCH
309 6th Street, INVITES YOU
MORNING WORSHIP .................... 7:30 A.M.
SUNDAY SCHOOL ...................... 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP ......................11:00 A.M.

HEAR OUR RECTOR ON 'GOOD NEWS TIME'
WJOE, 7:50 a.m., Mon., through Friday, from Oct. I




WEIGHT WATCHERS


Trims Your Shape While It

Trims Your Budget







For class information call
648-3576

....Toll Free 1-800-432-2041 t-30
6tc 8-30




To Inform a Veteran


Be Informed!

All veterans and widows of veterans are urged to
contact your local county service officer for a summary
of benefits which you and your dependents may be
entitled.

Gulf County's Veteran Service Office is located in
the Gulf County Court House and is open (5) days per
week from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., closed from 12:00
noon through 1:00 p.m. for lunch, and is closed from
1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on the second and fourth
Wednesday of each month. The Veteran Service Office-
is also located at the old Courthouse in Wewahitchka,
from 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. C.S.T.

Your County Service Officer for Gulf County is:
Albert T. Thames.

Telephone number: 229-6125 Veterans Service Office
After 5:00 p.m. on holidays and weekends,
and fn case of emergency: Call 227-7311 or 229-6816
or Albert T. Thames


31 9-27


SCommission Meeting October 16, 1973,
at 8:00 P.M., E.D.T., in the Municipal
Building, Port St. Joe, Florida.


C. W. BROCK
City Auditor and Clerk


Kitchen


Chatter

To become a successful
food shopper, be knowledge-
able of labels as they are
your best shopping tool.
Remember not to shop in a
hurry as hasty, quick deci-
sions are not the best value
for your money spent. Use
this list as a check list for a
good informative label:
1. Name of the product.
.Example: All beef frankfur-
tur or all meat frankfurter;
Orange juice or orange drink.
2. List of ingredients.
Example: Ingredients are
listed in order of amount
used, most goes first.
3. Style of the pack.
Example: Ingredients listed
as whole or cut pieces of
beets.
4. Packing liquid. Exam-
ple: Light or heavy syrup on
fruit, or water or oil packed
tuna.
5. Quantity of contents.
Example: Double weight
listing-can 1 lb. 3 oz. or 29 oz.
6. Name and address.
Example: Manufacturer,
packer, or distributor.
For a really different
breakfast, serve your family
Apple Pancakes with Cinna-
mon Syrup.
APPLE PANCAKES
1 Egg
1 Tablespoon sugar
1 Tablespoon softened but--
ter
1 Medium apple, peeled,
cored and quartered
1 Cup evaporated milk
1 Cup packaged pancake
mix
Place egg, sugar, butter,
apple and evaporated milk in


3t 9-27


NOTICE OF FICTITIOUS NAME
This is to give notice that the under-
signed will engage in the business of
,eating and air conditioning sales and
service under the fictitious name of
Gulf County Heating & Air Conditioning
Service, whose principal place of busi-
ness will be 712 Woodward Avenue,
Port St. Joe, Florida; and who will file
an affidavit to this effect with the Clerk
of Circuit Court, Port St. Joe, Flor'da,
upon presentation of proof of publica-
tion of this notice on Friday, October 5,
1973, or thereafter.
-s-Ernest W. Gorham
NOTICE TO BID NO. WWP35
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida,
invites bids on the following described
Items:
1-Steam Cleaner.
Out-P.ut-minimum of 100 gallons per
hour pump capacity; -
Electric Requirements-115 volts, 60
Hz. single phase;
Fuel System-Tank capacity mini-
mum of 12 gallons with metering valve
to control fuel flow to burner, with fuel
filter;
Combustion System--forced air pres-
sure atomizing burner with nozzle
protected against carbbn deposits, jet
size to be 23/4 gallon per hour, heating
coil to be a three section spiral-wound
pipe with the outside winding serving
as a insulating water jacket;
Ignition System-to be automatic
with a continuous electrical spark
provided by a transformer, ignition
electrodes to be self cleaning;
Solution Tank--shall be a minimum
of 12 gallons with metering valves and
check valves to control the amount of
solution added to the vapor spray
without backflow;
Gauges & Controls-the unlit shall be
equipped with an _outlet pressure
gauge, motor switch, relief valves to
protect against excessive pressures,
fusible plug at coil outlet, adjustable
float valve to maintain water in float
tank;
Electric Motor-shall be a minimum
of one-third H.P., the unit shall be
equipped with 25' of wire-wrapped
extra strength vapor hose %" I.D. with
an angle grip swivel cleaning gun
equipped with round, 2" flat and 4" flat
nozzles & nozzle control. The unit shall
be portable mounted on 4:00 x 8 (16"
OD) Pneumatic tires.
Pump-The pump shall be of the
duplex reciprocating piston type with
replacable check valves. Disc type with
stainless cage seats. Crank bearings to
be life time lubricated. The unit shall
be equal to Jenny Type 760-OEP
Custom as mfg. by Homestead Indus-
tries, Box 348, Coraopolis, Pa. 15108 (or
approved equal)
Bids.shall be sealed in an envelope
and plainly marked "Bid No. WWP35".
All bids must be F.O.B., Port St. Joe,
Florida, and approximate delivery date
shown. Bidders are requested to submit
bids in item sequence and totaled. The
City of Port St. Joe reserves the right
to accept or reject any or all bids,
waive any formalities and to choose the
bid deemed best to meet the City's
needs.
Bids must be submitted to the City
Clerk's Office, PO Box A, Part St. Joe,
Florida, 32456, on or before 5:00 P.M.,
E.D.T., October 16, 1973. Bid opening
will be held at the Regular City
Commission Meeting, October 16, 1973,
at 8:00 P.M., E.D.T., in the Municipal
Building, Port St. Joe, Florida.
C. W. BROCK
City Auditor and Clerk 3t 9.27


If the number of licensed
drivers in Florida continues
to increase at its current
rate, the state will have
nearly five million residents
at the wheel by 1975 when the
population is expected to
reach 8 million persons.
The Florida State Chamber
of Commerce reported in its
Weekly Business Review
yesterday that' licensed dri-
vers totaled nearly 4.3 million
last year and represented a
jump of seven per cent over
1971 figures.
This gain was the highest
in any of the nation's large


the electric blender. Cover
and run on LOW speed a few
seconds until apple is chopp-
ed. Add the pancake mix.
Cover and run on HIGH
speed until blended. Pour
about 1/4 cup batter at a time
onto a preheated hot, 400 F.,
electric griddle. Bake until
bubbles appear on top and
underside is browned; turn
and bake to brown on the
other side. Serve hot with
Cinnamon Syrup. Makes
about 20 3" pancakes.
CINNAMON SYRUP
1 Cup light corn syrup
2 Cups sugar
12 Cup water
2 Teaspoons cinnamon
1 Cup evaporated milk
In a medium sized- sauce
pan mix the corn syrup,
sugar, water and cinnamon.
Bring to a full boil over
medium heat, stirring cons-
tantly. Continue stirring and
boiling an additional 2
minutes. Cool 5 minutes; then
stir in the evaporated milk.
Makes 3 cups syrup. Serve
warm over the apple pan-
cakes.


SEE

WILMER THURSDAY

For Your New or Used

PONTIACS and CADILLACS

at


LLOYD PONTIAC-CADILLAC ,Inc.


950 Burrison Ave.
7%aams 04t, Flormda


Office Phone 7683-645
Be& Phone 763-9624


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, OCT. 4, 1973


FLORIDA
WILDLIFE

COMMENTS ON THE OUTDOORS



f Director

*Ir GAME AND FRESH WATER FISH COMMISSION
s.-

TALLAHASSEE-Man, by from the Greek, "oikos",
his own evaluation, is a most which means, house; and be-
unique animal. He is, again neath the umbrella of this
according to his own estima- definition comes an under-
tion, the only creature en- standing of the mutual rela-
dowed with the power to tions between organisms and
reason. Sometimes his actions their environment. It is im-
cause you to wonder. portant that we take the true
We are now in a peculiar meaning of the word serious-
time in the history of Man. ly.
Seemingly, the species, Homo For years men have sought
sapien, has suddenly come to to .eliminate those things
realize that, along with the which they thought were of
admonition of Genesis, that little or negative worth. All
Man will have dominion over too frequently the end result
all things, he must also, of this half-thought was a
assume the responsibility to deer herd that starved to
use his gifts of reason to death because of absence of
insure the continuation of natural predation, or an
not only his own species, but, eagle's egg that would not
also, the other creatures of hatch because of residual in-
the earth, secticides. Man has made mis-
In his continuing rush to- takes and seen the error of his
ward what seems an increase. ways; but, still, too frequent-
ingly refined level of civiliza- ly he fails to take remedial
tion, man has taken little action.
time to recognize and admit The folly of Man is his
that he is but a part of a reasoning. We curse the in-
much greater total. His con- dustrial pollutor, but never
tinuing "me first" attitude give a second thought to the
has cast a dark shadow over paper cup or tin can that we
the chances of survival for throw from our speeding
certain creatures, his automobile. We denounce the
penchant for stubbornness wastefulness of our industrial
has caused him to learn cer- corporations, but leave lights
tain of his lessons too slowly, burning when they serve no
and some species have been purpose. We decry the
lost forever as a result. amount of water used by big
Now, a new awareness has manufacturers, but think
been prevading the world nothing of the water we
society, and some have be- waste as individuals. We
come doomsayers while reason that the causes of our
others maintain an attitude of problems are the making of
relative indifference. But, another, but each of us has a
man will not survive alone as hand in preserving what is
a species, and this is a lesson naturally ours.
that the creature, Homo Man is indeed a unique
sapien, must learn. animal. He does, indeed, have
The catch phrase of today the ability to reason; and he
is "ecology", a term bantered must realize that the natural
about not only by the sin- necessities of life are not
cere, but also the bandwagon unlimited. His power of
chasers. The word comes reason will decide his future.




State Sees S Million


Drivers In Two Years


29 Million People
Get Monthly Social
Security Checks

If you plan to move and
you're one of the almost 29
million people who get social
security checks each month,
you should notify the Social
Security Administration
promptly, according to Rob-
ert Latta, Social Security
Representative for Gulf
County.
"Notifying social security
before you. move will assure
delivery of your social
security check to your new
address without delay or
interruption," Latta said.
"Just, call or write any
social security office and give
them the social security
claim number that appears
on your check--as well as
your complete new address
with ZIP codes," Latta said.
"Also notify your post office
of your address change."
A change-of-address form
is printed on the back of
envelopes ; in which social
security checks are deliver-
ed.


Our depositors


deserve our loyalty.


They get.it.



Florida National Banks.


FLORIDA FIRST NATIONAL BANK AT PORT ST. JOE
504 Monument Avenue .Telephone: 227-2551


states and brought the state's
driver ratio to 601 licensed
motorists for every 1,000
residents, the Review noted.

"The number of licensed
drivers in Florida will
continue to rise so long as
there is no alternate mass
transit system to fulfill the
public's need for transporta-
tion. If we continue to
increase at the present rate,
Florida will gain about a half
a million resident licensed
drivers by 1975 bringing the
total to nearly 5 million,"
said Ronald S. Spencer, Jr.,
Executive Vice President of
the State Chamber.

According to a federal
highway study, the ratio of
drivers to total population is
generally greater in rural
states than in the more
urbanized and industrialized
states.

Florida, with no major
intra-city mass transit sys-
tem beyond commercial bus-
es and a tourist attraction
monorail, still ranks 18th in
the nation in the number of
drivers per total population
even though it is the ninth
largest state and has more
than 25 million visitors each
year, the Review pointed out.

"Florida has 81 per cent of
its population centered in
large metropolitan areas just
isn't going to stretch so our
ideas on mass transportation
must. There are not only
Florida residents on our
roads, but millions of tourists
each year as well," Spencer
added.

California's licensed dri-
vers increased by 4 per cent
for the second highest in-
crease among the nation's
large states. California, the
nation's largest state, had 619
licensed drivers per 1,000 in
total population to rank
13th--the only large state to
have a higher ratio than
Florida.


The Greco-Roman style of
wrestling, was developed in
France and has nothing in
common with the sport of
ancient Greace and Rome.


Pate's Shell Service


Jimmy's Phillip's "66"


-- I~I I


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Third Street and Baltzell Avenue
REV. DeWITT T. MATHEWS, Jr., Pastor
GEORGE PUCKETT, Minister of Music

Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Service .-....----11:00 A.M.
Church Training 6:30 P.M.
Evening Worship Service --..-........ 6:30 P.M.
Prayer Meeting (Wednesday) -. 7:30 P.M.

"Come and Worship God With Us"










BEL MONTE ROUND-UP


Bonpless Savoy Oven
Rump Roast
Rib
STEW BEEF
Brisket
STEW BEEF
All Meat
STEW BEEF
Family Pak
-Pork Chops
Whole or Half
Pork Loin
Center Cut.
Pork Chops


Lb.$ 1.49
Lb.89c
Lb. 49c
LB.$1.39
LB.89c
LB99C
LB $1.19


Meaty Lean
Loin Ribs
Our Own Pan
SAUSAGE


LB.99C
Ls. 69C


Fresh Sliced
Beef Liver LB. 79C
Cudahy Bars No. 1 All Meat
Bologna LB. 1.09V
Cudahy Bar S No. 1, 12 oz. pak
All Meat Frank 89C


Cudahy Bar S Whole Hog
SAUSAGE Roll
Whole or Half
SLAB BACON


Bar S No. 1 Vacuum Sealed
m. I 1 I lUN1


r Fla.
r Grade A
or B


$1.19
LB 89c


Rally White or Assorted 4 roll pkg. l
BATHROOM TISSUE 39
Eily Assorted 3vmbo $100
PAPER TOWELS l ,ob ;
Sgallo. plastIc *u
CLOROX BLEACH
M.".Del Monte Is The
...Brand You
1- 1 F: Ell' Know And
Trust.


Colo,
su

." / .......


SIRLOIN STEAK
ROUND STEAK
CUBE STEAK
SIRLOIN TIP STEAK

$169
.'1lb.
Class, 3 Pound or morre
Ground Chuck $1
Extra Lean, Class
Ground Round $1


T-Bone


STEAK
lb. $1.89


.29
1.49


Rib Eye
STEAK
Ib. $2.49


3 POUNDS or More
OUR BEST
Ground LB.

BEEF


.....Frozen Foods Department....


-~,--


Winter Garden
FROZEN
STRAW-
BERRIES


Sarah Lee Frozen 12 oz. 79L
POUND CAKE pkg.
Parade Frozen 10 oz. pkg.
WHIP TOPPING '38
Eggo 13 oz. pkg.- A
FROZEN WAFFLES 4


9 oz.
pkg. 594


Morton Frozen Danish
SWEET ROLLS


.........Produce Department........


Crisp Head
LETTUCE
California
RED GRAPES


294
lb .394


Sand Mountain
TOMATOES 294
U. S. No. 1
Round White

Potatoes
10 lb. bag


Close-Up Ige. t 6be
TOOTHPASTE
Pepsodent each
TOOTHBRUSH 394
Hard, Med. or Soft

7--

Kraft Pure '2 gal.
ORANGE JUICE 79


Ga. Grade 'A'
Large

Eggs
DOZEN


iI41!


Cream Stvle or Whole Kernel 303 cans,
PARADE CORN
Parade Early June 303 cans
GARDEN PEAS


4cans88C

3cans 88c


9 Parade Cut No. 303 cans
GREEN BEANS 4 88c


I Budget Makers


All Flavors Royal
GELATIN


3 oz.
pkg.


10


Hormel 3 oz. can
POTTED MEAT24
lama 18 oz. glassP
APPLE JELLY T


Kitchen Kaper twin pak Piggly Wiggly 12" X 25' rolls A $i
POTATO CHIPS ALUMINUM FOIL I
Parade Fancy 16 oz. Reg. or Quick 18 oz. box
A'SAUCE 0 y9 QUAKER OATS3O5


Cherokee f.C. Halved 29 o D G F Parade
PEACHES can DOG FOOD


15 oz.
c," i


z/)j


~LILEU
B
~:xc\~ N2&N~ --


$119


IACON


Ib.
Packed
2 to Bag


5 Ib.
bag


P i,


4*


III


Del Monte- Cream or
Whole Kernel Golden 16 oz.
cans -08

CORN 5 1


I I _I


--1/2'Gallo


Your Pleasure Is Our Policy At Piggly. Wiggly!


0


IA- S


La.. V...,