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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01924
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: September 20, 1973
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01924

Full Text











KE' STA
Industry Deep Water Port Fine People Safest Beaches in Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA THURSDAY, SEPTEMBBER 20, 1973


* a


TEN CENTS A COPY


City Commission



Accepts Design for



New Fire Station


The" City Commission took
the second step Tuesday
night- in providing an ade-
quate fire station. The need
for the fire station was gene-
rated several years ago with
the ..purchase of the last
fire .pumper. The new
purpper .is. too large for the
present station and it is only
natural toexpect. that future
pumpers will be even larger.
"'The CLiimission has en-
gaged architect Charles Gas-
kin of Wewahitchka to
prepare plans for the building
and Tuesday night Gatkin
presented his architect's
drawing for the Board's
approval of exterior design.
The architect's rendering is
shown in the drawing repro-
duced on this page.
The new station will be
located behind the City Hall,
facing Williams Avenue. The
present fire-station will be
,remodeled and included in
the Police Department office
space. This department is
also crowded in its present
location 'to the rear of the
City Hall.
The proposed fire station
will be'78' x'58' and will be
built with approximately the
same outside material as the
City Hall. The new station
will have room for four
pieces of fire fighting equip-
ment, a meeting room,
library, kitchen, chief's of-
fice, gear room, storage

Arrested

"On- Drug.-.

Charge

Gulf County Sheriff Ray-
mond Lawrence announced
the arrest of another narco-
tics violator in Gulf County
late last week. Arrested was
Johnny Lee, age 20, of Port
St. Joe.
Arresting officer, Sgt. Tom
SBerlinger stated that he
received information from a
reliable source that Lee was
in a house on Marvin
Avenue, and that he report-
edly, "had a pocketful- of
marijuana." Upon arrival,
Berlinger searched Lee and
arrested him after finding a
"lid" of marijuana, a felony.
A "lid" is about one ounce
and sells for $20 to $25.
Lee was. arraigned .last
Friday by, Circuit Judge
Larry G. Smith, and bond
was set at $1,502. He is
presently being held in the
Gulf County Jail.


facilities and a bath room.
The new fire station is being
planned with the thought in
mind of providing for a full
time fire department in the
future.
After the drawing was
presented along with an
estimated cost of around
$88,000, the Board instructed
Gaskin to give the Board an
estimate of architect and
engineering fees to complete
working plans and present
these costs to the Board.
The Board is planning to
pay the greater part of the
construction costs with reve-
nue sharing funds. Already
$50,000 has been set aside for
this purpose.
Bids should be let on the
construction project in the
very near future.
The Board also:
-Delayed a decision on
letting a contract for the
City's insurance needs until a
study can be made of the two
bids received. The Tomlinson
and Hannon agencies of Port


St. Joe submitted the only
bids received.
-No bids were received for
furnishing the City's tire
needs for the new fiscal year.
Mayor Frank Pate said this
was no great crisis as the
City is eligible to purchase
tires under state prices which
are the lowest prices avail-
able.
-Pollock's Cleaners of
Port St. Joe was awarded the
contract of furnishing uni-
forms for City employees for
the new year.
-A pre-construction con-
ference was set for Septem-
ber 28 for the City and the
Department of Transporta-
tion of the State of Florida to
discuss the pending drainage
work to be done on the South
end of Long Avenue.
-W. W. Barrier appeared
before the Board complaining
of the condition of 16th Street
between Woodward and Mar-
vin Avenues and the condi-
tion of Garrison Avenue
South of 16th Street.


New Program Would


Help Kids Choose Job


Wuthrich, Barnes, plan program.


PO. Offers A New Service


'According to Postmaster
Chauncey Costin, the local
post office will join with
thousands lofL other post
offices in the United States in
implementing a .new service.
The kick-off day was Sep-
tember 17, and the title of the
new service: is "Stamps By
Mail."
It works this way, accord-
ing to the postmaster. All city
delivery patrons will be
provided with an order blank
on which is listed f variety of
stamps and envelopes which
can be ordered by',mail, also
anh envelope requiring no

Scout Program
Being Revived
A membership drive is
underway for all boys inter-
ested in the 'Scouting pro-
gramh in Port St. Joe.
Parents of these boys are
urged to accompany them
and attend a meeting tonight
in the Commons Area of the
Port St. Joe High School at 7
o'clock p.m.
There will be a. $1.00
registration fee and $2.50 for
a boy's life subscription.


postage which may'. be
addressed to the local post-
master for mailing the order,
check or rioney order to
cover the cost. A charge of 40
cents in addition to the value
of stamps ordered will be
added to cover cost of
handling the service.
In a pilot operation the
Postmaster said the service
has been well received
particularly by shut-ins and
patrons who have an occasion
to visit the post office
infrequently..
"Stamps By Mail" orders
will be picked up by city
carriers and the stamps will
be delivered to the patron
usually on the second day,
the Postmaster said.

.Free Puppet Show
At Library Friday
Traveling through the
Northwest Regional Library
system this week, and to Port
St. Joe, Friday, September 21
at 3:30 p.m., will be the
puppet show, "Peter's
Chair." All children are
invited, no admission is
-charged.


Parent Night Set
At High School
Parent Night will be held in
Port St. Joe High School
Commons Area Monday,
September 24. From 7:30-8:30
all junior high parents and
teachers will meet for
conferences. Following a 15
minute break, all senior high
parents and teachers will
meet from 8:45-9:45.
All parents are urged to
attend and observe the listed
times.

Quarterback Club
Membership Drive

The Quarterback Club is
beginning a membership
drive this week for the new
school year.
Membership chairman is
Gene Raffield and president
of the club is Bob Phillips.
The Quarterback Club will
be selling fried fish dinners
Friday night before the
football game. The dinners
will go on sale at 7:00.


A new program has been
introduced into the Gulf
County school system this
year, which is designed to
guide students in attaining
the training they will need,
from an academic stand-
pofrit, -to prepare -fo'4thehr
chosen vocation. The pro-
gram is provided for all
students, Kindergarten
through 12th grade.
Zack Wuthrich, Frank
Barnes and Woody Busby are
administering the Career
Education project in its first
year here.
Not only does the program
guide a student into studies
needed to complement his
chosen vocation, it also intro-
duces the student to the
vocation "We will try to give
a student a knowledge of the
kinds of work people do in
earning a living, what is
required of a certain vocation
or trade and give the
students opportunities to try
out different kinds of work",
Wuthrich said.
The program is completely,
financed by the state at the
present time. The Gulf
County Schools have received
an allocation from the
.Department of Education for
development of career educa-
tion model; implementation
and evaluation of a program
of Career Education in the
five schools in the county.
At present, the staff is
engaged in curriculum re-
search efor K-12, teacher
training, classroom imple-
mentation, career counsell-
ing, job placement and org-
anizing a structure of com-
munity resource persons to
give advice to students, in
their chosen fields.


Last Rites

for Infant
Katherine Roberson, 3
days, died, Saturday in the
Municipal Hospital.
She is survived by her
parents, Nathaniel and Con-
nie Roberson of Port St. Joe;
both maternal and paternal
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
William Fillmore and Mr.
and Mrs. C. L. Sylvester; and
a number of cousins.
Graveside services were
held Sunday, September 16 at
4 p.m. at Forest Hill
Cemetery with the pastor R.
U. Baker officiating.
All arrangements were
under the direction of Com-
forter Funeral Home.


Architect's Drawing of New Fire Station


Beach Concern Aired


Beacon Hill and construc-
tion of buildings on the Gulf
side of U. S. 98 were again in
the limelight at the County
Commission meeting Tues-
day night.
A group of residents of
Beacon Hill,-wtithFranlt'Lull-
'as their spokesman told the
Board they were concerned
about a new house just being
started in the area which
appeared to them to be built
on a dedicated alley.
Lull claimed the new
house, being built by L. L.
Lanier of Wewahitchka was
being built on what was
sh6wn on his plat as an
alleyway. Lull' said his plat
showed the road which ran
beside' his house as being


extended across the highway
into the Gulf. Lull said the
property he owns had been
purchased from a Mr. Cleck-
ley in 1932 and he had been
given a plat at the time of the
purchase which he showed to
the Board.'- '. '
The Board went to the
official, plat in the matter,
which didn't, show the street.
One member of the Beacon
Hill group asked attorney
William J. Rish if Lull's plat
wouldn't hold precedent over
the one on file in the
Courthouse if Lull's plat was
older. Rish replied it would if
the piece of property involved
was the same in both
instances. He pointed out that
there were several discrepan-


cies in lines and property in the vicinity of Second
boundaries in the Beacon Hill Street at Beacon Hill and to
area. ask Lanier to stop building
What the delegation was until the survey could be.
asking the County to do was made.
to have the streets in the The matter didn't stop
area surveyed and compared there, however, since Com-
with the record- to see if-m sioner Eldridge Money
Lanier' Was building on a said he had several recom-
public alley or street. mendations to make- in
Commissioner Walter Gra- regards to Beach property.
ham said he had been talking He suggested the Board
with Lanier Monday about establish setback lines of 30,
the matter and Lanier was of feet and require buildings to
the impression he was be at least 75 feet from the
building on land owned by high water line.
him and he didn't want to put Emmett Daniell, a proper-
his house in the wrong place. ty owner in the vicinity
As a result of about an hour jumped up to object. "You'll
and a half of conversation, squeeze us out of existence
the Board agreed to have the with rules like that. That'll
roads and alleys surveyed (Continued on Page 8)


Marker Placed on Captain Kupfer's


*Grave; Brought Fever to St. Joseph

The City of St. Joseph was Tidal Wave destroyed every 1843, there was nothing left The new grave
bustling when the schooner standing building. After the except debris, old brick and, acquired by the
Herald of Boston, on her way tidal wave in September of the old cemetery. Historical Society
from Havana, Cuba dropped ,* A
anchor in St. Joseph Bay.
The Captain, George L. ,
Kupfer was dying, and the
crew asked for medical aid.
Captain Kupfer died the
day after the- ship reached St.
Joseph, and then several of .
his crew came down with the
same ailment, the dread
yellow fever. Captain K1upfer
was buried in the Old St.
Joseph Cemetery. His grave .
marker is now housed in the -
local Constitution Convention
State Museum.,
The strange part of this
-story is, the epidemic did not -
spread until nine months
later. Once it started, how-
ever, people died like flies. In
the beginning, families tried
to bury their dead in caskets,
then open trenches tpok the
place of graves, and finally,
many dead were left where
they fad fallen.
Those who were able tried
to escape from the City, but
many of those died along the
roadside. In one year after
the epidemic struck, the
population of. St. Joseph
dropped from 4,000 to 400
people.
Business came to a com-
plete halt and St. Joseph
became as a ghost town.
Then in the fall of 1841, there
was a forest fire, and two .
years later, in September
1843, a tidal wave struck the V v
town which was caused by a
hurricane, and washed the -
foundations of the remaining
houses from under them. The MrFS. Brinson, Mrs. Brown Admire Marker


marker was
St. Joseph
,


V


.. -ru v.an ununwn a


THITT-F-V-N N MAK Muor.%


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PAGE TWO THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla, THURSDAY, SEPT. 20, 1973


-THE STAR-

PvMwed Every Thursday at IN Willams.Avweu, Port St. Je, Florida,
By The Star PuMisling Co-pany
StmCasw Postage Paid at Port St. Joe, Florida 32456


Wesley R. Ramsey
WilUam H. Ramsey
Frenchie L. Ramsey
Shirley K. Ramsey


POSTOFF ICE BOX308
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32


Little things cause us to wonder
some crazy things sometimes.
For instance, why do some cats
like some places and not others?
What do the neighbors' dogs find so
fascinating about your yard? or, is
it nearer for all the kids in the area
to cut through your garden on their
way to wherever kids go?
The thing that made me wonder
this particular time was the rain
which came at the football game last
Friday night. From up in the press
booth, looking at the rain against the
lights it was a pretty sight to see.
For those who were sitting down in
the grandstand with no protection,
it was possibly a different sight en-
tirely.


Now to the wondering.
Why is it that baseball fields
are usually covered and football sta-
diums are not? Baseball is played in
the summer' time when the weather
is usually good. Tr'ue, the cover is
wlecome for the shade it offers from
the hot sun.
But, why should most baseball
stadiums be covered when football
stadiums are almost invariably not
covered? Who decides such things?
Why is it? Football is played at that
time of the year when rain, sleet and
snow is a distinct challenge to the
determination of those who wish to
go see the games. Why is there no
protection?
Who makes the rules?


Sig oRf R eii f
1 .s -. .rf.., V It i a,


A very audible sigh of relief was
heard in Port St. Joe last week when
the unions and the St. Joe Paper
Company came to terms and signed
an agreement to work together for
three years.
Whether or not the threat of
strike was ever very real or not isn't
known for sure. It is known the fear
of strike was very real.
It's funny how 35 years of
building a reputation of working to-
gether can be wiped out just like that


in one action. 'The first thing which
came to mind at the beginning of the
negotiations just passed was, "will
they strike?" Forgotten were the
many years in the past when agree-
ment was ironed out with no thought
of strike.
This newspaper joins the rest of
the community in congratulating the
unions and the company for being
able to reach an accord without the
strikes which seem to be just another
part of writing a contract anymore,
invading our community again.


(FPR).."C.J.," the world's only water
skiing chimpanzee, demonstrates his crowd-
pleasing talent with Donna Dolphine, an act
typical of the innovative show planned for
Sea World of Florida when it opens in


Orlando. This ability, which took five
months of concentrated training is
considered unique since chimpanzees have a
natural aversion to water.


View Of Treatment Plant


Bob Simon, the City's head will travel in a 42 inch high
man at the new wastewater pressure pipeline to the
treatment plant, gave the treatment plant where it will
Rotary Club a view of the be dumped in a huge 225 foot
type operation at the new clarifier for settling. Sludge
multi-million dollar plant drawn off will be sent to a
scheduled to begin operation digester for grinding and
--this month .. .- ... : dryingThe'.remaining -water
S: Simonn'saidithe,plant would. will go to areating digesters.
i'be1uni*lue* from two aspects- where it will' be mixed with
its size and the fact it will be oxygen in 70.2 acres of
treating domestic and, indus- digesters.
trial sewage. Simon said at this point in
Six sewage lift stations treatment, the waste water is
throughout the City will a pollutant only because it
pump the waste to a has a very low oxygen count.
gathering point near the The aereators will put oxygen
Highway 98 overpass: There in the liquid before it is put
it will be treated to kill into the Bay.
bacteria in a chlorinat6r. Grit Solids removed will go to
will also be removed from an incinerator where it will
the waste, be burned and the resulting
From this point, the ash trucked to a land fill
sewage and industrial wastes area.


Bill, Ebersole was taken
into the club as .a new
member. Ebersole was a
member of the club several
years ago..
CARD OF THANKS
The family of the late
Willie King would like to
express their sincere thanks
to the many friends who have
shown concern during their
time of sorrow.
We do appreciate every
gesture that was made
during the long illness and
subsequent death of our
beloved husband and father.
May God bless all of you.
With sincere humility,
Mrs. C. M. King
Mrs. B.F. Thomas
Mrs. M. K. Gant


You Won't Like If


With the new 1974 automobiles
starting to come out this week, it
looks like there is a new way of life
about to begin for the American mo-'
torist and we probably won't like it.
The automobile, the nation's prime
mover of people, is-by law-to be- -
come even more expensive to drive
and far less convenient as a form of
transportation. As federal clean-
air standards and new safety regula-
tions combine with fuel shortages,
our patience, our pocketbooks and
our devotion to environmental pro-
tection will be sorely tried.
Most of the measures proposed
have aimed at reducing air pollution.
Some areas of cities may be declared
"off limits" to all cars, while parking
rates may jump by $4 to $5 a day





LETTER


To The Edito


Dear Mr. Ramsey:
Sometimes we take -things
for granted. Maybe we have
done that with The Star. You
have been most kind in
serving the Girl Scouts of
your coverage area with


publicity and w
our home off
complimentary
to your fine ne'
not only clip the
public relations
you to know th


in other sections in order to discour-
age congestion. To conserve fuel and
further reduce pollutiornspeed limits
are likely to be lowered. We may
also see a new tax based on weight,
horsepower and fuel consumption to
discourage purchasing of large auto-
mobiles. With this will come a trend
toward smaller cars and increased
prices as more safety and antipollu-
tion devices ar? added.

The changes that are coming will
be restrictive, high in price and irri-
tating. As usual, the consumer, this
time the drive public, will have to
pay the bill. And the bill will have
to be paid not only in dollars, but
in the more precious coin of personal
mobility, freedom and convenience.

Directors, who read your
paper regularly, tell us how
- much help it is for them to
better know your community
so that they may better serve
the needs of your local
people.
We appreciate this service
r and hope that your paper will
continue to keep us on your
mailing list. Thank you for
ith supplying supporting the Girl Scout
ice with a movement.
subscription Sincerely,
wspaper. We Jack Shoemaker
items for our President, Girl Scout
use but want Council of the Apalachee
at our Field Bend


Foresters Take First Aid


A first aid course was
recently held for the Division
of Forestry employees of the
Panama District at the
Headquarters Site, -715 West
15th Street, Panama City,
Florida.


Once every three years
each Division Employee is
required to take a 10 hour
course on the different
techniques used in First Aid.
Included in the session was
also a subject on safety.
Forest Ranger Supervisor


Billy Roberson is shown
instructing the artificial res-
piration technique.
Included in the Panama
District are employees from
Bay, Gulf, Calhoun, Liberty
and Franklin Counties.


Eftaoin


Shrdlu
by WESLEY Rt. RAMSEY


Editor and Publisher
Production Supt.
Office Manager
Typesetter, Subscription.
PHONE 227-3161
456


SECOND-CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY ONE YEAR, s4.1" SIX MOS., S2.25 THREE MOS., $127.50
OUT OF COUNTY On Year, .S OUT OF U.S. One Year, 6.00

TO ADVERTISERS- In case of error or ommisslons In advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable
for damage further than amount received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed wordt is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts;
the printed work thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. ,:-,


In 1858, a box-like tub containing revolving paddles
operated by a hand crank was invented as the first .washing
machine.


EDITORIALS ...


r--\.


Who Makes The Rules


Watch Them Corners, Ace!


What on earth has happened to the "He-
Coon"?

Week before last, Congressman Bob Sikes
came out against oil drilling off the coast of Flor-
ida, while the average "Joe" in these parts were
looking for the drilling to provide some much-
needed jobs and give Northwest Florida the boost
it needed to become an area of providing its peo-
ple with good pay as well as the best place in the
world to live. Congressman Sikes points to the
ecological damage a possible oil spill will have on
our blossoming resort area. He notes the area
is just beginning to develop and oil exploration
will retard this growth.

If we're on the way to becoming another
Miami Beach, then, we say, "bring on the oil"!
Then this past week, Congressman Sikes
used the word "appease". I had never known
him to use the word "appease" except in a de-
rivisive tone. The good Congressman wants to
"appease" the Arabs so we can continue to get
their oil (and supposedly have no need to hunt
for more off the coast of Florida).
We can understand the Congressman object-
ing to the oil drilling. Other people do too. If
he feels that way, he's entitled to express him-
self even though he is a public figure.
To see Congressman Sikes-who in the past
has been wont to stretch himself to his full height,
jut his chin forward, make every hair on his
moustache bristle straight out, purse his mouth,
beetle his brows and come out with the most in-
dignant prose known to man when one suggests
the United States "appease" anybody-come up
with the no-no word himself was something I
thought I'd never see.
*

It's been two weeks now since I started wear-
ing glasses to read with. Before I started wear-
ing TI could read anything at about half arms
length. Now, I can't read a darn thing without
my glasses! Do the Optometrists put something
in the lenses to cause this phenomena?
*

pi,'o.r tliepast two weeks I have been getting
copies of the comic strip "Half Hitch" in the mail.
The particular panel I'm getting, naturally, is the.
one where Half Hitch and his buddies are putting
out a newspaper on board ship. In one of the
panels they mentioned the name of this column
-ETAOIN SHRDLU. The comic strip explained
these words are Latin for "Back to High School".
I'm surprised it was mentioned at all, since
ETAOIN SHRDLU is rapidly fading away into
the sunset with the advent of the new cold type
process taking over the newspaper business in
this nation. Those new-fangled computer and
electronic typesetters don't have an ETAOIN
SHRDLU on them. It only stands to reason that
as they become more popular, ETAOIN SHRDLU
will be remembered only by those proud souls
who were printers back in the good old days when
you had to be a mixture of a super-craftsman and
a magician to turn out quality printing. Now, if
you have the money to buy the expensive ma-
chines and the mountain of supplies to keep them
running, anybody can print-or so say the print-
ers who use to do it "the other way".
t

Speaking of words fading, have you noticed
how the word "that" is so fashionable these days.
Even people, who should know better throw
that's around like they were going out of
style. Next time, you read a piece, notice the
proliferation of that's sprinkled here and there.
Then go backkover the piece and see how many
that's could have been eliminated. It's getting
worse than a person unaccustomed to public
speaking and his "and a".

The following definitions of the various
"isms" have been making the rounds:
SOCIALISM: You have two cows. The gov-
ernment takes one and gives it to your neighbor.
COMMUNISM: You have two cows. The
government takes both and gives you the milk.
FASCISM: You have two cows. .?hIe gov-
ernment takes both and sells you the milk.
NAZISM: You have two cows. The gov-
ernment takes both cows and shoots you.
NEW DEALISM: You have two cows. The
government buys both, shoots one, milks the oth-
er and throws the milk away.
CAPITALISM: You have two cows. You
sell one cow and buy a bull














,MINUTES

Board of


County Commissioners


The Board of County Com-
missioners met on September
11 in regular session with the
following members present.
Chairman A. L. Davis,
Walter Graham, T. D. (Doc)
Whitfield, and S. C. Player.
Commissioner Eldridge
Money was unable to attend.
The: Clerk, Attorney, and
Bailiff were also present.
The Clerk opened the
meeting with prayer.
The minutes for August 28,
1973 were read, approved and
adopted.,
Pursuant to invitation to
receive sealed bids for one
paint striping machine for
the Road Department, the
low bidder of Pilot EauiD-
menf Co. of $8,987.71. Copies
of bids are on file in the
Clerk's office.
After .discussion, Comm.
Player moved the low bid of
Pilot Equipment be accepted,
payment to be made in the
1973-74 fiscal year. Comm.
Whitfield seconded the
motion.
Commissioner Graham


amended the motion to
include the addition of the
spray gun assembly adding
$145.00 to the bid cost and
deducting the ASME tanks
reducing the bid price by
$300.00 for a total cost of
$8,832.71. Comm. Whitfield
seconded the amendment.
The amendment and motion
passed unanimously.
Upon motion by Comm.
Graham, second by Comm.
Whitfield, and unanimous
vote, the Board accepted a
deed from Coy Brogdon,
Annie Brogdon, Carlos W.
Adkinson, Mary Ann Adkin-
son, H.T. King, Jr., Kathryn
,King, Robert King, Louella
King, Jim Merritt, Dave
Herring, Irene Herring, Ter-
ria E. Bond, Elizabeth Bond,
in Sec. 3:.T4S R10W recorded
in OR Book 5.4 page.
Ralph J. Edenfield, Divi-
sion of Forestry, presented
his department's yearly
report to the .Board. The
Board thanked Mr. Edenfield
for his appearance and
Comm. Graham compliment-


ed the Division on behalf of
Gulf County residents for the
speed in acting on requests
for small burnings.
Upon request by the Road
Superintendent, Comm. Play-
er moved and Comm. Whit-
field seconded a motion that
the Board advertise for bids
to be received October 9, 1973
on one 1974 truck, as per
specs on file in the Clerk's
office. The motion passed
unanimously.
The Mosquito Control
Superintendent reminded the
Board of the need for county
acquisition of property for
new land-fills. The Board
agreed and Comm. Graham
offered to contact St. Joe
Paper Company about avail-
able sites. He addedthat the
Board should adopt a policy
of recognition for all donating
landowners at County land-
fills. After discussion, Comm.
Graham moved that the
Mosquito Control Supervisor
prepare signs to be erected at
the entrances of all County
land-fills, properly recogniz-


ing the donating landowner.
Comm. Whitfield seconded
the motion and it passed
unanimously.
Al Whitfield, acting mana-
ger of Gulf Coa.t Electric
Cooperative,, presented a
letter from the Cooperative
requesting the Board pursue
attainment of a right of way
easement for building a road
into the area of the Brother's
River around Howards
Creek. The road is needed to
-establish electrical service to
the area. Comm. Whitfield
felt the right of way could be
obtained for this road and the
Board agreed to visit the site,
study the situation, and notify
the Cooperative of their
decision.
After discussion, Comm.
Whitfield moved that the
Board compensate George
Bryant in the amount of
$1,352 for the 1973-74 fiscal
year. Comm. Graham secon-
ded the motion and it passed
unanimously.
The Mosquito Control Sup-
ervisor informed the Board
he had, failed to receive a
1973 pick-up truck ordered in
February from Cook-White-
head Ford, Panama City. The
Attorney was instructed to
inquire as to the reasons for
this delay.
Commissioner Player told
the Board he had a request
for grading the airstrip at
Jones Homestead. The Board
felt this airstrip should be
graded since the airstrip is


Sthe974 Fords








lu r

























Friday, Sept. 21


IN OUR SHOWROOM
I I
















FreeI Favoror Everone

Bring the family and stay awhile o











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I ----mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm------------------mmmmmmmmmmmmm
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Mustang H is 19 inches shorter than lost year's
Mustang ... even a bit shorter than the original
one. It's more than a new MUstong. It's a whole
new class of small car: First Class. In every way.
From its jewel-like exterior to its handsomely
appointed interior, the new Mustang 1I gives


THURSDAY, SEPT. 20. 1973


you a luxurious level of standard equipment
you probably never expected to find a a small
car. Yet Mustang IIstill carries an economical
small-car price. Mustang comes in two
different body styles, four different models.
See them soon.



1974 Ford Torino.The solid mid-size.
Torino's got a new young look this
Year. Excitingly restyled outside...
'"l~Jt ~exciting new features inside. And
I lots of solid car to go with them.
--, A new young look, a smooth and
.- steady ride. That's Torino '74.


Gron Torino Brougham 2-Door Hardtop
shown with optional deluxe bumper group.


1974 Ford LTD. The quiet full-size.


Quiet, luxurious, beautifully built:
that's LTD for '74. A high level of
craftsmanship wherever you look,
from the fit of the doors, hood and
trunk to the impressive list of LTD
features. Steel belted radial tires.
Automatic transmission. Power
steering. Power brakes, and more.
All standard on LTD for '74.


Ford, LTD Brougham 2-door Hardtop shown with W
optional deluxe wheel covers, white sidewall
tires and deluxe bumper group. FO R D


See all the 74's from Ford on September 21.
The closer you look, the better we look.


FORD DIVISION w


,99 "'" i P t nJo, oi


PAGE THREE


open to public use.
The Clerk read a letter
written to the Consultant
concerning his employment;
status:with the Board.
The Road Department Sup-
erintendent presented his
monthly secondary road ex-
penses of $5,032.50.
After discussion, and upon
motion by Comm. Whitfield
second by Comm. Player,
and upon unanimous vote, the
Board accepted a road right
of way easement in Meeks
Subdivision recorded in OR
Book 54 page 849.
The Board received notice
that speeds on SR 30 (US 98)
will be raised from 35 MPH
to 45 MPH from June to
Labor Day, and from 45 MPH
to 65 MPH from Labor Day to
June.
The Board received copies
of safety recommendation
and notices to comply from
the Department of Com-
merce, which were relayed to
the Courthouse Commission-
er.
The Board received notice
from the Department of
Transportation that plans are
underway to perform repair
work on the Highland View
Bridge.
The Board received inspec-
tion reports and recommen-
dations on F.A.S. Bridges no.
1 through no. 8. The Road
Department Superintendent
was instructed to study the
reports and make the neces-,
sary repairs.
The Board received the
yearly budgetary report from
the County Health Unit Fund.
'The Board received a
request from the Division of
Youth Services for $2,428.67
to fund juvenile detention
facilities from July 1, 1973 to
December 31, 1973. The
Board took no action as they
have a prior agreement to
pay for these facilities on a
per diem basis.
The Board received notifi-
cation from Randolph
Hodges, Executive Director,
Department of Natural Re-
sources, that lands along the
Apalachicola and Brothers
:Rivers would be given full
consideration for acquisition
under the Environmentally
Endangered Lands Program.
The Board received a
request from the Comptroller
that past due balances of
$18,222.25 be immediately
paid to the Division of
Family Services for Nursing
Home and In-Patient .Care.
, ,T-he .Comptroller, -added that
failure ,to ; respond, would
force the Department of


Banking and Finance to
withhold this amount from
State receipts due Gulf'
County. After discussion,
Comm. Graham moved the ..
Board refuse to pay this bill. :
Comm. Whitfield seconded
the motion and it passed
unanimously. .
The Board received em-
'ployment applications from
Kathryn P. Orrell, Deborah -
Jean Herndon, and Lucretia
Dianne Poole.
Upon request from the
Board, the Tax Assessor
reported that the Department ,
of Revenue is withholding
approval of- .the tax roll. '.
Comm. Whitfield moved that
a meeting of the Tax Adjust-
ment Board be set as soon as
the Department of Revenue
approves the roll. Comm. .*
Player seconded the motion
and it passed unanimously.
Comm. Graham moved N
that the Mosquito Control
Supervisor and Road Depart-
ment Superintendent be
authorized to attend the "v.
County Commissioners meet-
ing in Miami, Florida on
September 23 thru Sept. 26,
1973. G.
The Civil Defense Director Hollan
reported that the Sheriff had materi
told him the old radio tower Guida
was going to be turned back
over to the Gounty Commis- .ing f
sioners. The Board requested reserve
the Sheriff notify the Board fishing
of this action by letter. added,
Comm. Davis said that the d
Mrs. George aox is request- every
ing the Board allow the that th
Wewahitchka school use of a for p
voting machine for instruc- anima
tion in proper, voting proce- Board
dure. The Board agreed to concern
this request, with proper County
supervision provided by a animal
Board Election Official. official
author
Comm. Davis said that instru
David Rich's IGA in Wewa- ordint
hitchka would like to pur- with C
chase some asphalt from the The
Board to repair their parking ed p
lot. The Board agreed to Board
furnish the names of sup- his v
pliers to Mr. Rich, as the increa
Board cannot resell asphalt. Board
Comm. Graham informed the provide
Board of the splendid cooper- not att
ation received; from Glidden-
Durkee Corporation at the Comn
Port St. Joe dump, and Board
moved that the Board write a public
letter of appreciation to the posed
company. Comm. Player San I
seconded the motion and it partici
passed unanimously. ,, the s
Comm. Graham suggestij*, 'AtEn
that all members of 'the'" Tbpr`
Board enforce rules concern- inspec


state agencies before he is
allowed to build on this
property.
There being no further
business, the meeting was
adjourned.

ATTEST:
George Y. Core, Clerk


Florida Banks
Get Larger

Florida National Banks of
Florida, Inc., one of Florida's
largest registered bank hold-
ing companies, has just
acquired three additional
banks, The Bank of Com-
merce of Florida at Fort
Lauderdale; Citizens Bank of
Bunnell and Northside Bank
of Miami.
Additionally, Florida
National Banks of Florida,
Inc. and the Ellis Banking
Corporation have proposed to
merge. The resultant compa-
ny would number fifty-six
banks, would have consoli-
dated,,resources of approxi-
-mately $2 billion and capital
fundss of approximately $172
million


guidance Counselor Miss Rita Sanders shows Mark
d and Robert Dickens what is available in educational
ials in the Guidance Office as Mrs. Brenda Wood,
since Clerical Aide, reviews today's agenda.


Ford introduces the 74's.

The news is big,medium and small.

At your Ford Dealer's.


Ford Mustang I. A new class of small car: First Class.


ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY


fishingg in the ditch
ed for the children's
g rodeo. Otherwise, he
, the Board should open
itches to fishing for
mne. He also suggested
he Board furnish a basis
protection for biting
ls. After discussion, the
felt that ordinances
rning trespassing on
y property and biting
ls would offer police
ls legal enforcement
ity. The Attorney was
cted to prepare these
ances in conjunction
omm. Graham.
Tax Collector request-
ermission from the
to install shelving in
ault to handle his
sed work load. The
granted the permission
ed this shelving was
;ached to the walls.

m. Graham told the
he had had numerous
inquiries about pro-
condominiums at Cape
Blas and people are
ularly worried about
sewage ,problem. The
ey said that Ihe dever
willl hhve 'to pass
tions of, all concerned


~P" -'-


Port St. Joe, Florida


__


322 Monume~nt Ave.











THURSDAY, SEPT. 20, 1973


First Methodist church Se'


Of Brock-Godfrey Weddin
r The sanctuary of the First Elmore Myrick Godfrey IV in altar which was decorated
United Methodist Church of marriage. Rev. Millard with greenery and baskets of
Port St. Joe was the setting Spikes, pastor, officiated at summer flowers.
Saturday, July 14, for the the double ring ceremony. The bride is the daughter
traditional ceremony uniting The vows were exchanged at of Colonel (USAF Ret.) and
Frances Charlene Brock and 5:00 p.m before a candle lit Mrs. Charles W. Brock and


MR. AND MRS. -ELMORE

MR. AND MRS. ELMORE


MYRICK GODFREY IV


'L9'1





I,'


Feted With Shower


Miss Gail Neel was honored
with a bridal shower hosted
by Miss Regina Ellis, Desda
Harper, Tammy Rushing,
Jaque Ard, Benna Butts,
Vicki Bass and Becky Gables


in the social hall of the Oak
Grove Assembly of God
Church.
Shown here at the bridal
event are left to right: Mrs.
Wade Neel, mother of the


honoree; the honoree Miss
Neel; Mrs. G. L. Kennington,
mother of the prospective
bridegroom; and Mrs. F. M.
Rowan Sr., grandmother of
the bridegroom?:'


Garden Club Begins New Year


The Port St. Joe
Club met at the
Center on Thursday,
ber 13.
A business sessi


Garden
Garden
Septem-
on and


program followed the lunch-
eon. Mrs. Wesley Ramsey,
president, presided. Year
books were distributed,
reports by committees given


and future plans discussed.
Mrs. Kenneth Bateman
who, with the president,
attended the state convention
gave a brief report of the
plans of the State president
for the coming year. She
stated that the St. Joe Club
won two certificates of award
for projects they participated
in last year. The projects
were "World Gardening" and
participation,-, in Cancer
Drive.
Mrs. Bobby Jackson pre-
sented the program on
horticulture with an interest-
ing revue of the book "Plants
Are Like People."
One former member, Mrs.
Lucille Suber resumed active
status and Mrs. A. E. Joines,
Mrs. Helen Baldwin, Mrs.
Donna Burch, and Mrs. Edith
Stone were accepted as new
members.


ffing


ig Bans

the bridegroom is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Elmore M.
Godfrey III, all of Port St.
Joe.
Nuptial music was provid-
ed by Mrs. Mark Tomlinson,
who played chosen selections
of the couple including
"Somewhere My Love",
"The Hawaiian Wedding
Song", and "Theme from a
Summer Place." She also
accompanied Mrs. James
Tankersley who sang "Be-
cause."
Given in marriage by her
father, the bride wore a gown
of imported silk organza: The
empire bodice featured a
high neckline enhanced with
lace trimmed camelot sleev-
es. The A-line skirt ended in
a chapel length train. The
bride's headpiece of venise
lace petals trimmed with a
pearl accent was attached to,
an elbow length veil. Her
bridal bouquet was a cascade
of summer flowers' and
cymbidium orchids comple-
mented by satin streamers.
Mrs. John Quindimil, sister
of the bride from Pleasonton,
Calif., served as matron of
honor. She was attired in a
pastel plaid floor length
organdy gown featuring an
empire waist. Accenting the
round neck and puffed
sleeves was a garland of
white daisies. She carried a
basket of summer flowers.
Bridesmaids were Miss
Carolyn Carr, cousin of the
bride from Atlanta, Ga., and
Miss Valerie Quindimil, niece
of the bride from Pleasanton,
Calif. They weeredressed
identical to the matron of
honor.
The groom chose his father
to serve as best man.
Groomsmen were Jim God-
frey, brother of the groom
and Robert Marlowe. Rex
Buzzett and Charles Thomas
served as ushers.
Flower girls Miss Jill Strait
and Miss Allison Costin,
cousins of the bride, were
attired in miniature copies of
the dresses worn by the,
bridesmaids. Garrett Quindi-
mil, nephew of the bride,
served as the ring' bearer.
For her daughter's wedding
Mrs. Brock chose a cham-
pagne chiffon floor length
gown accented by a jeweled
cummerbund. Mrs.Godfrey
the groom's mother, wore a
pastel pink floor length crepe
gown trimmed with a lace
cummerbund.
Following the ceremony a
wedding buffet was held in
the church social hall. ,The
reception tables were cover-
ed with white cloths and
decorated with mixtures of
summer flowers.
Mrs. Paul Pierce presided
at the bridal registry table
which was accented by. a
memory candle.
The bride's cake was
served by Mrs. Chauncey
Costin and Mrs. Ashley
Costin. The groom's cake was
served by the Misses Karen
Williamson,- Kim Williamson
'and Sara Claire Herring.
Mrs. Wendell Whitaker and
Miss Octavia Copenhaver
served at the punch table.
Coffee was served by Mrs.
James Costin and Mrs.
Duane Williamson.
For a wedding trip to
points of interest in South
Florida and Tennessee the
bride chose a blue and white
three piece pant suit comple-
mented with white accessor-
ies and an orchid corsage.
The couple will reside at
Mexico Beach.
OUT OF TOWN GUESTS
Out of town guests were:
Col. and Mrs. Kenneth
Rogers and Miss Tammy
Rogers of Miami; Mr. and
Mrs. Basil Moore, Mrs.
Horace Soule, and Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Hilton-Greene,
all of Panama City; Mr. and
Mrs. Mel Magidson, Sr., Mel
Magidson, Jr., and Guerry
Magidson, all of Atlanta, Ga.
Mr. and Mrs. Duane
Williamson, Karen, Kimberly
and Tommy of Birmingham,
Ala.; Mr. and Mrs. John
Quindimil, Valerie, Sharon,


Dianna and Garret, of Plea-
santon, Calif.; Mr. and Mrs.
James Yadon and Leonard
Costin, all of Tallahassee;
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Costin
of Albany, Ga.
Miss Frances Brock, Miss
Florence Brock, and Miss
Patsy Williams, all of Shreve-
port, La.; Mr. and Mrs. E.
M. Godfrey, Jr., Mr. and
Mrs. Gene Demont, and Mr.
and Mrs. Glenn Medlock, all
of Knoxville, Tenn.; and Mrs.
Ira Bowden of Smackover,
Arkansas.


a PAGE FOUR


Wedding vows were ex-
changed between Charmaine
Marie Kramer and James
Alfred Lemieux Saturday,
September 8 at 7:30 p.m. at
St. Joseph's Catholic Church
in Port St. Joe. The impres-
sive nuptial Mass was cele-
brated by Reverend David T.
O'Shea.
Graceful fan shaped bou-
quets of clustered asters,
chrysanthemums. and spires
of gladioli, in shades from
palest orchid to deepaster
purple, introduced Ihe ride's
colors and enhanced the
"candle lit altar.
Selections of sacred music
including, amond a number
of others, "Santus", Agnus
Dei, Aviaso, Ave Maria and
Panis Angelicus, were pre-
sented by Mrs. Robert B.
Shaw of Butler, Ala., a
lifelong friend of the bride.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. John S.
Kramer, 147 Hunter Circle.
The groom's parents are Mr.
and Mrs. Marvin Lemieux,
18th Street and Monument
Avenue.
The bride -was given in
marriage by her father, and
she wore a gown featuring a
Chantilace bodice with soft
ruffles framing a deep
V-neckline. The cutaway
skirt of angelskin nylon fell
away to reveal tiers of ruffles
on the underskirt and swept
back to form a Chapel train.
her two-tiered veil of nylon
illusion was attached to a
Juliette cap of puffed Alencon
lace and featured a separate
blusher veil which was raised
at the beginning of the
ceremony.
The bride's jewelry consist-
ed of a dainty gold cross and
chain, a wedding gift from
the groom, and a pair of
carved Ivory earrings bor-
rowed from her mother.
These, along with a penny in
her shoe and a blue garter
helped carry out the time
honored wedding tradition.
Sweetheart roses centered
with a nuns orchid made up
her dainty bouquet. After the
Mass the bride and groom
paused to pray and lay a rose
from the bouquet before the
altar of the Blessed Virgin
Mary.
Mrs. Michael Lowry of
Clarksville, Tenn., served as
matron of honor with Mrs.
Page Hemil, of Panama City,
and Miss Lee Anna Hardy of
Port St. Joe, acting as
bridesmaids. They wore
matching gowns of a soft
warm orchid double knit with
matching picture frame hats
and carried dainty nosegay
bouquets of miniature carna-
tions centered by deep purple
asters.
Spec-5 Michael Lowry of
Clarksville, Tenn., served the
groom as best man. Grooms-
men and ushers were Benny
Sherrill, Orlando, and Ken-.
neth Lemieux, brother of the
groom of Port St. Joe. Steve
Kramer, brother of the bride
and Talmon Sisk, her cousin,
both of Port St. Joe, acted as


Altar Boys. During the Mass
the scriptural readings were
given by Col. Frank J.
Klassen, uncle of the bride.
The offertory gifts were
presented by Mrs. Frank
Klassen, the bride's aunt, and
Miss Barbara Eells.
The bride's mother chose a
floor length gown of soft
blue nylon silk with a silk
screened floral motif extend-
ing from the hem up the front
panel. The flowing sleeves of
blue chiffon added a graceful
note to the ensemble.
For her son's wedding,
Mrs. Lemieux chose a floor
length gown of soft beige


double knits. Its simple lines
were enhanced by gold
beading which trimmed the
rounded neckline.
Following the ceremony a
reception hosted by the
bride's parents, was held in
the parish hall. The bridal
colors were featured, as
friends assisted in serving
the wedding party and
guests.
Joy Parker, served cake at
the bride's table with Patria
Fitzpatrick of Panama City
presiding at the groom's
table. The guest book was
kept by Marsha Player.
Shelia Lemieux, sister of the-


groom, and Kim Fitzpatrick
passed out orchid rice from
dainty white baskets.
The bride chose a tailored
two piece suit of maroon with
white windowpane plaid for
her traveling outfit. After
their wedding trip the young
couple will be at home at
Clarksville, Tennessee.
Sponsoring Dance
The St. Joseph Bay Country
Club will sponsor a dance
Saturday night, Sept. 22 from
9 til 1. Music will be provided
by the Mini Brutes from
Panama City. The admission
is $5.00 per couple.


0 with a policy
written especial-
-4 ly for your area.
Most policies are
national and co-
ver only major
points of protec-
.tion. What about
hurricanes, tor-
Tnadoes, etc.? Be
. | sure you are
covered.


YOUR HOmE


from light fin-
gers. Not only can
they be protected in
your home, but also
those things you
take on your trips.


YOUR


from thieves and dents
and accidents. Also, protect
yourself from un-insured
motorists with our com-
plete auto insurance pro-
gram. You never know who
you might run into, or they
to you. Be safe be
insured.

FIRE BONDS


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For class information call
648-3576
.Toll Free 1-800-432-2041
Atc 8-?5


403MOUMNTAVENUE


Course

Started

The first session of the
"School of Flower Arrange-
ment" was held at the
Garden Center Friday morn-
ing, Sept. 14. Mrs. Glen
Porter, of Panama City, is
the instructor, and is an
experienced gardner and
accredited judge.
She holds a life certificate
for judging and has had wide
.. experience in judging flower.
shows. Fourteen attended
this class.
!Discussed were the mech-
.,anics of flower arrangement,
the necessary equipment;
which includes a good needle-
--'r point holder, sharp knife aud
shears for cutting plant
material, plastic clay for
and sometimes plastic foam.
Suitable containers should
be of two types, low or bowl
shaped, and tall or vase
shaped. These should not be
/elaborate but be of a neutral
color and have good lines and
be of a texture that will
.. .harmonize with plant mater-
ial and flowers to be used.
.. Containers may also be used
as a contrast.
Also discussed were the
selection and preparation of
plant material. The next
lesson will be a lecture.
IThere are still a few spaces
available. If interested in
taking this, course contact
Mrs. Prentis Brown at 1505
MRS. JAMES ALFRED LEMIEUX Monument Avenue.



Charmaine .Kramer Becomes Mrs.


Alfred Lemieux In Sept. 8 Vows












Mission Group
Meets With
Mrs. Perritt
Scripture and prayer by
Mrs. Emmie Joines opened
the meeting of Mission Group
Two of the First United
Methodist Church, Monday,
September 17, at 3:00 p.m.
Hostess was Mrs. Calla
Perritt, with 12 members
present. Mrs. Chauncey Cos-
tin presided over the meet-
ing.
Mrs. Emmie Joines pre-
sented the program, "Public
Education." Mrs. Ivek Wil-
liams, Mrs. Eula Pridgeon,
Mrs. Elsie Griffin and Mrs.
Estelle Mosely took part in
the program.
The meeting was closed
with benediction. The next
meeting will be held with
Mrs. Lyda Adkins.


Ceremony Unites Patricia


Clayton and Johnnie


A double ring, candlelight
ceremony united Miss Pat-
ricia Clayton and Johnnie
Hanna in marriage August 23
in the home of the bride's
cousin, Mrs. Charles R.
Smith, Jr. The Rev. William
E. Smith, Jr. officiated at the
6:30 p.m. ceremony.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L.
Clayton, and the bridegroom
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ira
B. Hanna, all of Port St. Joe.
The bride, given in mar-
riage by her brother, Michael
Clayton, wore a formal gown
of white lace over taffeta
featuring a wedding ring
collar. Her elbow length veil
of illusion was attached to a
headpiece of lace and pearls;
She carried a bouquet of pink
and white carnations, nestled


..- ...
. . . .


-A


*' / "


/


' I lt'.-.A 2,;, -,,, IA


h~h;'~--i~ "'t lt'. -;v-11 ;, t iF?


MRS. JOHN A. KELLY, JR.


Rita Pinter,


John


Kelly, Jr., Married


The marriage of Miss Rita
Karen Pinter to John Albert
Kelly, Jr., was solemnized
September 1 in the chapel at
Homestead Air Force Base.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. I. E. Pinter,
Sr., Homestead, and the
grand daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. W. B. Dykes, Port St.
Joe. The groom is the son of
Mrs. Norman Bates of Irving,
Tex., and the late John A.
Kelly, Sr.
Chaplain John D. Single-
tary performed the ceremony
at one o'clock. Mrs. Herbert
Redhead was organist, and
vocalists were Miss Stella
Norris and Mrs. Judith
Gollett.
Given in marriage by her
father, the bride wore a full
length gown of white taffeta
overlaid with sheer nylon.
The bodice of cluny lace was,
accented with satin ribbon.
Matching lace and satin
ribbon edged the cuffs of the
sheer sleeves and the attach-
ed train. A head-hugging clip
covered with cluny lace
motifs held her elbow length
veil which also was edged in
the same lace. A separate
blusher was attached to the
top of the headpiece.
The bride wore her moth-
er's pearls and carried her
father's Bible which was
covered with lace and a
cascade of white baby
orchids topped with a white
Cattelaya orchid.
Mrs. Colman Allen, Talla-
hassee, was matron of honor.
Miss Donna Smith was maid
of honor. They wore full
length, old fashioned gowns
of pink crepe with white
picture hats trimmed in pink
crepe.
Mrs. David Gollett, Biloxi,
Miss., was bridesmatron.
Bridesmaids were Miss Stella
Norris, Biloxi,' and Miss
Malina Allen, Tallahassee.
Miss Cindy Allen was junior
bridesmaid.
Their old fashioned gowns
were made of light blue
flocked pink print material
and they wore white picture
hats with pink crepe trim.


Each attendant- carried
cascades of pink satin roses
with feathered white mums
and rainbow colored ribbon
streamers.
Robin Pinter, sister of the
bride, was flower girl. Her
gown was of pink crepe with
a light blue flocked print
pinafore. She carried a white
basket of pink and white
roses.
John Cottrial was best
man. Ushers were Edell
Pinter, Billy Norris, David
Gollett and Clifford Dykes.
John Chandler was ringbear-
er.
The reception was held in
the chapel annex.
Mrs. Kelly is a graduate of
South Dade High School 'and
prior to her marriage was a
secretary for Calavo in
Princeton. Her husband grad-
uatel from Lexington High
School and served four years
in the Air Force. He was
employed as a shipping clerk
for Calavo.
After a wedding trip to
Tallahassee and Jackson,
Miss., the couple now live in
.Dallas, Tex.

Band Parents
Hunting Members

There will be a business
meeting for all band parents
and concerned persons Tues-
day September 25 at 8 o'clock
in the band room.
The purpose of this meeting
is to discuss a means to raise
funds to help support the
band music program at the
high school.
Extra funds are especially
needed during the football
season to help in the
purchase of new music, to
repair and replace uniforms
and instruments and to pay
the 'bus drivers for out of
town trips.
Membership to the Band
.Parents Association is open
to all persons interested in
the band. Former band
parents and band members
are encouraged to join the
Association.


in tulle, with ribbons and love
knots.
Immediately following the
ceremony, a reception was
hosted by Mr. and Mrs.
Charles R. Smith, Jr. The
focal point of the reception
was a three tiered wedding
cake, decorated in: the bride's
chosen colors and topped
with the traditional replica of
the bridal couple. Mrs. John
C. Dickey presided at the
cake table while Mrs. Charles
R. Smith, Jr. served punch.
Miss Mary Whittington kept
the brides book. ,,
Following the reception the
the bridal couple left on their
honeymoon trip to points
along the Gulf Coast. For,
traveling the bride wore a
yellow and white knit suit
and white accessories. They
*:' .;


THURSDAY, SEPT. 20, 1973 PAGE FIVE


Hanna
will make their home in Port
St. Joe where the groom is
employed with Basic Mag-
nesia, Inc.



School
Lunchroom
Menus

HIGH SCHOOL LUNCH
ROOM MENTI
Mon. Sept. 24
Ravioli, Hamburgers with
Buns, French Fries, May.;
Must., & Cat., Pickles,
Lettuce & Tomato, Green
Beans, Brownies, Rolls-
Bread.
Tues. Sept. 25
Chili Dogs with Buns,
Whole Kernel Corn, Pork
Chops, Rice with Gravy,
Lettuce, Tomato, Celery &
Carrot Salad, Strawberry
Cake.


Wed. Sept. 26
Fried Chicken, Hamburger I
with Buns, Potato Salad,
May., Must., & Cat., Lettuce
& Tomato, Cole Slaw, Fruited
Jello with Whipped Topping,
Bread-Rolls.
Thurs.Sept. 27
Spaghetti, Hamburger with
Buns, Cabbage & Tomato
Salad, Lettuce & Tomato
Slices, May., Must., & Cat.,
Fruit Cup with Cookies,
Bread-Rolls.
Fri. Sept. 28 MRS. WILLIAM
Tuna Fish Salad, Sloppy
Joe on Bun, French Fries,
Cinnamon Rolls, Crackers-
Bread. Carolyn
Port St. Joe Elem. and
Highland View Elem. Menus
Mon. Sept 24 Miss Carolyn Elaine
Ravioli, Lettuce & Tomato, Brooks, Ocala, and William
Green Beans, Brownies, Rolls Harry Smith, Tallahassee,
Bread. exchanged wedding vows
Tues. Sept. 25 Saturday afternoon at 3
Pork Chops, Rice with o'clock in the First United
Gravy, Lettuce, Tomato, Methodist Church of Ocala.
Celery & Carrot Salad, The bride is the daughter of
Strawberry Cake. Mr. and Mrs. Ralph W.
Wed. Sept. 26 Brooks, Ocala. The bride-
Fried Chicken, Potato Sal- groom is the son of Mrs.
ad, English Peas, Fruited Milburn Smith, Port St. Joe,
Jell -with Whipped Topping, 'and the late Mr. Smith.
Bread-Rolls. Performing the ceremony
Thurs. Sept 27 was the pastor, the Reverend
Spaghetti, Cabbage & To- Robert Bledsoe.
mato Salad, Fruit Cup with Miss Peggy .Brooks attend-
Sr, Cooppies, Bread-Rol '' ed ldHr sister'. as maid of
S". Fr.. .ept.iT 2 1, '. honor.' The bridesmaids
Tuna Fish Salad, French included the Misses JoAnne
Fries, Spring Salad, Cinna- Dillard, Debbie Phillips, Val-
mon Rolls, Crackers-Bread. orie Bengtson and Brenda


MOM


Brooks, W. H. Smith Wed


Rogers.
Willis Shaw served as best
man and the ushers were
Tommy Wright, Mayson
Brooks, Larry Smith, Joe
Garcia and Ralph Roberson.
The bride, given in mar-
riage by her father, wore a
formal gown of white chiffon
with a bodice overlaid with
embroidered organza flower-
ettes, and long full sleeves
cuffed with the same flower-
ettes. Her chapel length veil
of illusion was overlaid with
an imported lace mantilla
from Venice, Italy, a gift of
her great-aunt, 1Mrs Philip
Fry,. '*, ,. .- ,-, ,
She carried a cascade
bouquet ,centered with or-
chids surrounded with baby's


breath and baby carnations.
The attendants were gown-
ed in full length dresses of
summer green and white
gingham checks with eyelet
trim and sashes. The bodices
featured short puffed sleeves
and empire waistlines. They
wore picture hats of green
and carried bouquets of
daisies.
The parents of the bride
entertained immediately
after the wedding with a
reception at the Golden Hills
Country Club.
'When Mr. and Mrs. Smith-
rthFn from a fi'bnemoo*"
"trip to Sea Island, 'Ga., and
Atlanta, they will live in
Tallahasgee.


Eastern Star
Exec to Visit

Mrs. Val Ledbetter, Asso-
ciate Grand Matron of The
Grand Chapter of Florida,
Order of the Eastern Star,
will make her official inspec-
tion of Gulf Chapter Q1 on
Sept. 27. All members are
urged to attend.
A banquet will be held at
6:00 p.m. E.S.T. at the
Garden Club Center on,
Eighth See.eaby resecyation.
The meeting will begin at
7:30 p.m. in the Masonic Hall
on Reid Avenue.


SRoche

Rambles
By W. C. Roche




Youth is when you decide what you want; maturity
is when you learn you can't always have it.

Out of the mouths of babes comes a lot of what they
should have swallowed.

Some courageous young men become test pilots and
astronauts; others give driving lessons.

If all the people who sleep in church were placed
end to end, at least they'd be more comfortable.

Teenager we know took a job aptitude test. He was
found to be suited for retirement.


WE'RE SUITED TO FILL YOUR REQUIREMENTS
FOR DESKS FOR THE BACK-TO-SCHOOL CROWD.



Roche's Furniture

and Appliance

209 REID AVENUE PHONE 227-5271


P R fPO


THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Fla.


vi










iJ


WHERE ECONOMY ORIGINATES


"SUPER-RIGHT"
HARD CORN FED WESTERN
1/4 PORK LOIN SLICED


Includes Centers & Ends


9toll
Chops
Per pkg.

CPu


LB.1.19


Cut


$1.69


IMPORTANT
FOR YOU


GRADE
FLORIDA


A & P POLICY: Always do what is honest and fair for
every custmerver sold out ask
RAINCHECK if an advertised special is ever sold out ask
the Manager for a Raincheck. it entitles you to the same item at


"A" FRESH
OR GEORGIA


Fiq



Leq o% Bmm~t


LB.


SUPER RIGHT
HARD CORN FED PORK


F h


3-5 LB.
AVERAGE


LB. 99


"SUPER-RIGHT"
SMOKED FULLY COOKED


SHANK
OR BUTT
PORTION

CENTER SL


LB. 9v
ICES ROUND LB.$1.49
BONE


:IV


I r W I


S\ i


U.S. #1 ROUND

Wkih

Poff


10-LB.
BAG


'A&P DISPOSABLE OVERNIGHT
12ct




I Iru BOX
%.MM --MIN^



I KOSHER OR POLISH

I I
II-
32 oz.
Sjar 49
mm ___mm mm mm mm mmm m -- -- m m
MOUTHWASH

Ito
S 32oz. |
bottle-0 *,9I


^~ PROCTOR & GAMBLE'S
II cila _niBATHROOM
Cfio/ f ~TISSUE I
* 4 ROLL
PAK 44PKG.
ASSORTED COLORS






ROL/L
3 OZ 00
m ..m mm mm m mm mm
I 8oz. QUAKER'


8,z.pkgs. | O


Iolaedoa


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LAKl
# SI
ahii6j
5 SIZE


*EACH 69


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BULK
SL6. 19
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AHOY PINK
LiquL !/2 GAL.
* BTL. I


iomm Oft e m me 1m m
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S,!, America's Favorite
r I




I DETERGENT I
0 1 b., 11 oz.
FAMILY SIZE BOX I4 30
.mmammimmm mm iimm m mm-'
IONA

'Tomatoes
S 4 16oz.cans 99t


the sme price the following week. Or if you wish we'll give you
a comparable item at the same special price.
GUARANTEE: A&P offers an unconditional money-back
guarantee. No matter what it is, no matter who makes it, if A&P
sells it A&P guarantees it.


CHECK & COMPARE
100%BRIZILIAN INSTANT COFFEE
Eight O'Clock ...........joz $1.29
EIGHT O'CLOCK 97%CAFFEIN FREE
Instant Coffee .......... r
PREMIUM INSTANT
Bokar Coffee ....... ... -$1.49
DEL MONTE JA
Cut Green Beans ..........'a. 29
HEINZ
Keg-o- Ketchup ............. 67
A&P GRADE JAM OR
Grape Jelly ..... .... a89%
A&P NON FAT
Instant Dry Milk ...... $1.59
ANN PAGE
Instant Puddings I'r 2/333
OUR OWN LEMON & SUGAR
Instant Tea Mix ........ ?4;, 894
A&P UNSWEETENED
Grapefruit Juice....... c 394
DOLE
Pineapple Juice .........c 394
A&P NON DAIRY
Coffee Creamer...........'66
A&P WINDOW SPRAY15 OZ CAN
Window Cleaner ...Amthnia 3
SPRAY CLEANER
Formula 409 ............. ott 79
A&P FLYING INSECT OR
ANT & ROACH KILLER
Bug Spray.... .......cn:: 694
YUKON CLUBALL FLAVORS (12-oz. cans)
Beverages. EG.......10/89
FROM OUR FROZEN
i FOOD & DAIRY DEPTH
A&P FROZEN CONCENTRATED
Orange Juice.......... 3 'c:$1.00
A&P FROZEN NON DAIRY
Coffee Creamer ............ .19
A&P FROZEN SLICED
Strawberries............... ,: 554
A&P FROZEN
Macaroni & Cheese .... 4 p 954
SUNNYFIELD FROZEN
Waffles ......................pg124
RICH'S FROZEN NON DAIRY CREAMER
Coffee Rich ............. ',6. 29
BREAKSTONE PLAIN & FLAVORED
YogurtSTAY N' SHAPE oz.
INDIVIDUALLY WRAPPED AND SLICED
Ched-o-Bit Cheese ..........' 75
IkA&P CHILLED IN GLASS J
1 qt. __
I

mlBabqPiIIti
A&P


Si ze!
v59t
e---- m- m- m mm -- -m m
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DeL Memt

I BEEFBURGANDY 25%oz.PKG.
1 CASSEROLE CON CARNE 21 Y2 oz. PKG.
POLYNESIAN SWEET'N' SOUR 331/2 oz. PKG.
CASSEROLE DI NAPOLI....14/ oyz. PKG.

I 2P PKGS. 99

Jane Parker Reg. Sliced Bread 20oz. 29
Jane Parker Cracked Wheat Bread LoafI3
JaneParker Whole WheatBread 16oz. 33
I Jane Parker Danish Carousel 18oz. $1.00
22oz.
1Jane Parker Peach Pie ...........Size 63 g


MARKET
STYLE


&Ae


I


Adi =k dOL











Now Possible to Earn Degree



At GCCC In Evening Classes


Gulf Coast Community
College this week announces
the addition of a new
community service program
designed specifically for
those wishing to earn a
college degree while holding
full-time employment.
Dubbed the "Cross-Calen-


IF YOU'RE 8 TO
YOU HAVE A


dar Term," this program
calls for the scheduling of
classes on weekdays from,
4:30-6:15 p.m. and on Satur-
days from 8:00-11:30 a.m.
Saturday classes will meet
12 times beginning Sept. 22.
Weekday classes will be
divided into two sessions
meeting either Monday-Wed-
nesday beginning Sept. 25, or
Tuesday-Thursday beginning
Sept. 25.
Registration will be held
Thursday, Sept. 20, from
4:30-5:00 p.m. Fees will $10
per credit hour for both new
students and those already
enrolled at Gulf Coast on a
full-time bases who are using


the cross-calendar term to College Business Math
accelerate their college 105 Beginning Shorthar
program. 100 General Biology-P
The schedule of courses to Joe, MS 103 Modern
be offered is as follows: matics, PE 101 Beg
Monday-Wednesday: BAN Tennis 4:30-5:45, PE
110 Principles of Accounting Weight Training 4:3
I; BEN 101 Beginning Type- PLS 201 Intro. to G
writing, BY 101 General ment, PSL 173 Basic (
Zoology, EH 110 Advanced' stry, SCH 101 Fundam
Reading Techniqties, EH 206 of Speech.
American Literature, MUY aturday BAN 21
201 Music Appreciation, PE ay.
102 Beginning Golf 4:30-5:45,. Accounting, EH 110 A
PSY 110 Psychotogy Human ed Reading Technique
SRelations, SY'-0 Marriage 6 r can e
Family Living..s Y 101 Beginning Tennis,
Tuesday-Thursday: AIB 210' Beginning Badminton,
Money Banking Thursdays 201 General Psycholog3
only (6:30-9:15), BAN 125 For further inform


Common Garden Mum


Member of Large Family


ENTER THE 1973


PASS


& KICK
COMPETITION
You could win. one of 18 Uo.al
trophies, and .krrpi.le att r'e'
NFL games 1ncudlrnq the Supe ..
Bowl in hui n. .
It's free Just bring your par-,
ents (or guardian) to register,
get your .free PP&K Tips Book
and start practicing.
Remember, your chances are
good. You compete only against
other youngsters your own age.
REGISTRATION ENDS
SEPTEMBER 28

St. Joe

Motor Co.


The common garden chry-
santhemums, popularly call-
ed "mums" belong to a large
group of annual and perenn-
ial herbs in the plant family
called Composite. The cold-
hardy, cultivated varieties
are used extensively as
garden and patio flowers for
fall color.
The wide color range and
type and size of flowers tend
to increase the popularity of
this fine garden subject
especially noted for its
excellent show of color in
September and October.
Flowering of mums can be
controlled by manipulating
day length, but most home
gardeners allow their plants
to flower in the normal fall
season. Controlled flower
production at other seasons is
best left to commercial cut
flower producers.
Chrysanthemums will grow
in any well-drained soil that
contains an abundance of
organic matter. If the soil is
very sandy, a three to four
inch layer of peat or other
organic material should be
worked into the flower bed to
a six inch depth.
'Mdfri- -are grown fdh
cuttings or division 'of old
parent clumps. Rooted cut-
tings are usually available
from local .garden stores.
Space the plants a foot apart
for a mass effect or two feet
apart to emphasize individual
plants.
After the plants are esta-
blished and at least six
inches tall break off the top
one or two inclies'6f the stem.
This will encourage lateral
branching and produce lower,
bushier plants.
Two to three applications of


a 6-6-6 fertilizer at the rate of
one pound per oae-hundred.
square feet during the
growing season is sufficient
to grow a good crop of
flowers. When applying ferti-
lizers, keep the material off
the leaves. Water thoroughly
to distribute the fertilizer
throughout the root area.
Chrysanthemums may;
need to be supported unless
the plants are. the.:low, strong
growing types. Tall,. weak
stemmed plants definitely


need some form of stall
a wooden stake is used
it into the ground at p
+i-- rt. r Q _.L f+-- +1,.-


call 769-1551.
Registration for classes
held in Port St. Joe will be
this afternoon, September 20
from 4:30-5:00&-t Port 91. Joe
j" -igh School.

Enroll Now for
Square Dancing
, BEN Take this simple test and if
nd, BY your answer is yes, then you
'ort St. qualify.
Mathe- 1) Do you find yourself
ginning patting your foot to the
E 112 rhythm of music?
30-5:45, 2) Do you enjoy being with
rovern- people?
Chemi- 3) Do you like to have good
rentals clean fun?
If your answer is yes to all
three questions you are
3 Tax eligible for membership in
dvanc- the next square dance class.
s, EH The Sun Shiners Square
re, PE Dance Club will begin a class
PE 114 Thursday, September 20 at-
SPSY '7:00 p.m. in the Methodist
Y. Fellowship Hall. There are 15
nation sessions and the fee is $8.00
S per month. There is no age
limit as this is a pastime
which teenagers to Golden
Ageres enjoy.
gThe caller and instructor is
Daryl McMillian and Chester
Gay from Panama City.
Don't confuse this with the
old time "Barn Dance,"
"Turkey in the Straw," type
king. If square dancing. This is a
1, drive modern version and the
planting music is the popular songs of


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 20, 1973


.PAGE SEVEN


Guitar ourse Offered


According to the chairman
of Gulf, Coast Community
College's Fine Arts Division,
Norman Hair, "Every stud-
ent who enrolls in our new
guitar course will learn to
play the guitar and will learn
to play it well."
The course, which begins
Sept. 27, is based on a sophis-
ticated method developed by
Chet Atkins and the "Fame"
music company, Hair said.
Each student will wear a
headset that will enable him

the day. Square dancing has
been taken out of the barns
and into community build-
ings, church social halls and
other respectable places.
People of every walk of life
enjoy the',:district and state
wide atheings. And you will
find square dancers who are
doctors, lawyers, clergymen,
politicians, contractors and
all phases of life with one
thing in common and that is
they enjoy people, fellowship
and fun._,
This is the last chance to
get in on this class, so come'
on out Thursday evening.


to listen to the taped lessons could be only the beginning
as well as his own playing. A for a lot of people to do
filmstrip demonstrating tech- something in music they have
niques accompanies the always wanted to do-sing
sound track. and play a musical instru-
Included in the $35 registra- ment," Hair stated.
tion fee will be use of the Registration for this
equipment and a brand new course, MUS 140, will be held
"Fame" guitar, as well as an Sept. 20 in the GCCC Fine
instruction manual, an hour's Arts Auditorium from 4:30-
college credit and a lot of 5:30 p.m. Enrollment is
encouragement, Hair added. limited to 24 students who
"Statistics show that 85 to must be high school seniors
90 percent of all people or adults.
receive no musical instruc-,. Lessons will begin' Sept. 27
tion whatsoever. This course at 4:30 p.m.


Want To Invest
In Your Future?
The Navy has unlimited opportunities for ambitious
high school graduates in the nuclear field program, or
advanced electronics field. Up to two years of class
room training with a chance for $15,000.00 reenlistment
bonus after three years. Interested?

See Jack Lott
.Any Tuesday at 11:00 at the
Port St. Joe Post Office
Or Call 785-5582 in Panama City.
.a m m mmmmmmm m m-.- -.. m..-


itme: OStaking after the plants
are established can cause
injuries to the roots.
By careful choice of varie-
ties, flowers of many types
and colors can be produced
,from September until Christ-
mas,. although an early frost
will injure some young buds
and thus reduce flowering.
So color it with Florida
mums!


13 YEARS OLD,
CHANCE'TO


We also handle



all kinds of trusts.4


FLORIDA FIRST NATIONAL BANK AT PORT ST. JOE
504 Monument Avenue -Telephone: 227-2551


CONSTANT

ADVERTISING


One step won't take you very far,
You've got to keep on walking..

One word won't tell 'em who you are
You've got to keep on talking.

An inch won't make you very tall,
You've got to keep dd growing.

One little ad won't do it all,
You've got to keep them going.
, A constant drop of water
Wears away the hardest stone;

By constant gnawin', Towser
Masticates the toughest bone.

The constant, cooing lover
Carries off the blushing maid.

And the constant advertiser
Is the one who gets the trade!

HARD TO BELIEVE?
MAKE US PROVE IT!




THE STAR

Telephone 227-3161











THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT.'20. 1973 fly, 5th free. 5th breast. Bo
Parrott-6th breast.


YOUR

S Swim Team

PHARMACIST

PROFESSIONAL Ends Season


HONEST
AUTHORITATIVE
RELIABLE
MODERN
ACCURATE,
COURTEOUS
-INTERESTED
SINCERE
TRUSTWORTHY
- Depend on him for prompt attention
to all your drug and. prescription
needs WHENever you call!


BUZZETTY'
DRUG STORE
P227-371 317 Willianm
Convien Drive-In Window
.Plenty of Free Parking


The St. Joseph's Bay
Country Club swim team
'ended its first season of
competition Sunday, Sept. 2
in a dual meet with Panama
City.
St. Joe competed with less
than half of its members as
only 14 of more than 30
members showed for the
meet. However the team did
remarkably well as it picked
up more points than in any
other meet for the yar.
The club racked up a total
of 57 points in the meet. The
big problem was that they
had to give away many
points in uncontested compe-
tition because of the lack of
swimmers.
St. Joe's only relay team,
its 8 & under girls, managed
first place finishes. Kathy


Legal Ad Bowling


NOTICEOF FICTITIOUS NAME
This is to give notice that the under-
signed will engage in the business of
Sh6eating and air conditioning sales and
service under the fictitious name of
Gulf County Heating & Air. Conditioning
Service, whose principal place of bust-
uess will be 712 Woodward Avenue,
Port St. Joe, Florida; and who will file
an affidavit to. this effect with the Clerk
,of Circuit Court, Port St. Joe, Florida,
Upon presentation of proof of publica-
lion of this notice on Friday, October 5,
T973, or thereafter.
's.Ernest W. Gorham

REGISTRATION-OF
FICTITIOUS NAMES
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interested
Jnr the business or profession carried on
under the name Of H & R BLOCK, INC.
at 225 Reid Ave. P. 0. Boxi899, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456, and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows: Wanda
H;. Brown, Owner-Manager.
's -s-WANDA H. BROWN 4t 9-20

REGISTRATION:OF
FICTITIOUS NAMES
.. We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interested'
in the business or profession carried on
under the name of ST. JOE ACCOUNT-
ING SERVICE at 225 Reid Ave. P. 0.
box 8W Port St. Joe, Florida 32456,
and the extent of the interest of each, is
as follows-: Wanda H. Brown, Owner.
-- s-WANDA H.- BROWN "-9-20

.NOTICE TO BID NO. WWP38
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida,
invites bids on the following described
Chlorine:
1 years supply of liquid chlorine in
one ton cylinders delivered in 5 ton lots.
Minimum of 12 tons per year.
Bids shall be sealed in an envelope
and plainly marked "Bid No. .WWP38".
All bids must be F.O.B., Port St. Joe,
Florida, and approximate delivery date
shown. Bidders are requested to submit
bids in item sequence and: totaled. The
City of Port St. Joe reserves the right
to accept or reject any 'or all bids,
waive any formalities and to choose the
bid deemed best to meet the City's
needs.
Bids must be submitted to the City
Clerk's Office, P.O. Box A, 'Port St.
Joe, Florida, 32456, on or before 5:00
P.M., E.D.T., October 2, 1973. Bid
opening will be held at the Regular City
Commission Meeting October 2, 1973, at
8:00 P.M., E.D.T., in the Municipal
Building, Port St. Joe, Florida.
C. W. BROCK
City Auditor and Clerk 2t 9-20


IN TH( CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
JULIA McCASKILL GARRAWAY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RALPH A. SWATTS, JR. and his wife,
MADELINE G. SWATTS, and SAMMIE
C:PARKER, SR. and his wife, MARY
A1N PARKER,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure
entered in the Circuit Court of Gulf
County, Florida, on the 13th day of
September, 1973, in a case therein
pending wherein Julia McCaskill
Garraway is plaintiff, and Ralph A.
Swftts, Jr. and his wife, Madeline G.
Swatts, and Samgnie C. Parker, Sr. and
his wife, Mary Ann Parker. are
defendants, the case docket being 9
73-67, I will offer for sale and sell at
public outcry to the highest cash bidder
at 11:00 o'clock A.M., the 3rd day of
October, 1973, at the front,door of the
Courthouse in Port St. Joe,.Florida, the
following described property, to-wit:
Lots One (1), Three (3), Five (5),
Seven (7), Nine (9) and Eleven (11), in
Block Twenty-Five (25) in the City Of
Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the
Official Map on file in the office of the
Cjgrk of the Circuit Court of Gulf
County, Florida, lying and being a part
of theNW V4 of SW 1/4 and SW i/. of NW
'A of Section 1, Township 8 South,
Range 11 West, and lying South of the
right of way of the Apalachicola
Northern Railroad.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
of this Court, this 13th day of
September, 1973.
GEORGE Y; CORE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Susan E. Bigelow 2t 9-20
(SEAL)


NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
The Board of County Commissioners
of Gulf County will receive sealed bids
from any person, company, or
corporation interested in selling the
County the following personal proper.
ty:
One 1974 model V2 ton pick-up truck
with custom cab and fleet: side body.
V-8 engine not less than' 283 cu. in.,
Heavy duty cooling system, Oil bath
type air cleaner. Left hand rear view'


News
Tuesday morning Ladies
Coffee League has started
another year of bowling.
Top Dollar and A & N Rail-
road split their games two
each. Marion Deeson had a
high game of 168 and high
series of 438 for Top Dollar.
Dale Harper led A&N Rail-
road with a high game of 161
and 402 high series.
Margaret's, Beauty Salon
lost. three games and won
one. Margaret had high game
of 139 and high series of 360.
Wewa Bank won three games
from Margaret's, with Elsie
S. having a high game of 152
and Louise S. had a high
series of 434.
R & H won all four. games
from Team 6, with Faye Cox
taking high game with 178
and high series of 466
Mary B. was high bowler
for Team 6 with a high game
of 190 and 446 series.
Pate's took all four games
from the Cowgirls. Brenda
Mathes was top bowler for
Pate's with a high game of
200- and high-series of-474.
Edwina Bowen was .high
bowler for.the Cowgirls with
a high game of 109 and high
series of 305.


Top uollar team r
are Betty Fain,
Davidson, Lou Mo:
Marion Deeson.
Standings: W
Top Dollar
A&N Railroad
Margaret's Salon
Wewa Bank
R&H
Team 6
Pate's
Cowgirls

Last Wednesday n
Joe Stevedores won
games from Bill's
Store. Loyce Beam
high bowler for the
dores with a 189 ga
446 series. Carol Be
Bill's with a 155 game
series.
St. Joe Kraft won th
lost one to Team 8
Barton led Kraft wit
game and 418 series,
Byrd was high for
with a 195 game
series.
Shirt & Trophy won
games from Dixie
Patsv Cooley led
mirror, 2-Speed electric
wipers with washer, Dual s
armrests, Extra heavy duty
automatic transmission, Po
lion rear end. Rear bump
lights & reflectors, 5-900
tires; Color-red and white,
conditioning, Power brakes
steering.
Delivery date must be
Liquidated damages for
deliver unit on specified date
at S5.00 per day. Bids will I
until October 9. 1973 at
E.O.T. at the office of th
Circuit Court, P.O. Box. 96
Joe, Florida 32456.
The Board reserves the
reject any and all bids.
Board of County Commissio
Gulf County, Florida 32456
BY: A. L. Davis, Chairman

TAX ADJUSTMENT BOARI
NOTICE is hereby giver
Board of Tax Adjustmen
County, Florida, will meet
E.O.T. on the 4th day of Oc
for the purpose of hearing
or needed adjustments for
either granted or denied p
Florida Statute 196.194.
1) A copy of the said exen
were either granted or denied
in the Office of the C
Assessor and the Clerk of
Court of Gulf County, Florid
2) The Board at said m
also hear such other comply
properly filed with the Cl
Circuit Court.
Eldridge Money, Chairman
Tax Adjustment Board
ATTEST:
'George Y. Core
Sior r', r' uit Court


Parrott and Patrick May
both took first place ribbons
in the butterfly.' All 14
swimmers were able to pick
up points and ribbons in the
meet. A list of swimmers and
how they finished follows:
Eight and under girls-
Kathy Parrott, 1st fly, 1st
medley relay, 1st free relay,
2nd back, 3rd freestyle, 5th
breast. Vicki Barlow-ist
medley relay, 1st free relay,
3rd fly, 4th freestyle, 4th
back, 6th breast.
Lori Gregg-lst free relay,
1st medley relay, 3rd breast,
4th fly, 5th free. Mari Jem
Harrison-1st medley.- relay,
2nd breast, 2nd fly. Kristi
Gregg-lst free relay, 5th fly,
6th back.
Eight and under. boys-.
Michael Malone-3rd fly, 4th
breast, 5th back, 6th free.
Nine and ten boys-Kip
Altstaetter-2nd back, 3rd
fly, 4th breast, 5th free.
Michael Hinson-4th fly, 6th
free, 6th back. Patrick
May-1st fly, 4th back, 4th
free. ,
Eleven and i2 girls-
Phoebe Barlow-3rd back,
4th fly, 5th breast, 5th free.
Beverly Beard-3rd fly, 4th
breast.
Eleven and 12 boys-Dusty
May-2nd fly, 2nd free, 4th
breast. David Lawrence-3rd

(Continued From Page 1)


Beach

leave only about 10 feet to
build on and all of the
property to keep on paying
taxes on." Daniell went on to
say he didn't plan to build on
his property as he 'owned a
house across the street and
he owned beach lots to
maintain access to the water.
"But with your restrictions it
wouldn't be worth anything,"
he said.
Daniell suggested the
Board condemn and buy all
vacant property in the area
pointing out the County
couldn't set restrictions 'for
Beacon Hill waterfront they
weren't willing to set for all
waterfront property in the
/county.


members TAX HEARING
Sherry- .-Attorney William; J. Rish
rk, and said he had received word
the County's assessed proper-
Yon Lost ty rolls were on their way
2 2 back from Tallahassee and
2 2 had been approved by the
1 3 State Revenue Department.
3 1 Rish suggested the Board
4 0 go ahead and set the time
0 4 and date for the Tax Adjust-
4- 0 ment Board hearing as
0 4 required by law. Rish said at
least six or seven affidavits
ight, St. had been filed which would
all four presumably want to object to
Dollar the property assessments:
an was The Board agreed to set the
e Steve- hearing for Thursday, Octo-
ime and ber 4 at 7:30 p.m. At this
sore led hearing objections may be
e and 414 presented to property valua-
tions and questions raised
three and about the status of exemp-
8. Hazel tions given or rejected.
th a 164
s'. Mary Trophy with a 153 game and
Team "8 436 series. Bertha Clayton
had a 168 game and Shirley
all four Hicks had a 418 series for
all four Dixie Seafood.
Seafood. St Joe Furniture won all
Shirt & four games from Florida 1st
windshield National Bank. Brenda
sunvisors & Mathes had a 195 game and
V 4 forward
sitive track Jo Sealey had a 519 series for
per, Signal St. Joe Furniture. Lois Smith
x 15-4 ply had a 180 game and Christine
Factnd powry air Lightfoot had a 430 series for
the Bank.
specified.
failure to
e 'will be set
be received You're Never Too
9:00e receivA.M.

l er Old To Hear Better
8, Port St.
e right to Chicago. Ill-A free offer of
special interest to those who
ners hear but do not understand
words has been announced by
2t9-20 Beltone. A non-operating
model-of the smallest Beltone
D NOTICE aid ever made will be given
absolutely free to anyone
n that the
it of Gulf requesting it. Thousands
at 7:30 P.M. have already been mailed. so
tober, 1973, write for yours today.
complaints
exemptions TrV this non-operating
pursuant to model in the privacy of- your
own home to see how tirv
options that
ed is on file hearing help can be. It s
county Tax yours to keep. free. It weighs
the Circuit less than anl ounce, and it's
da.
meeting will all at ear" level, in one unit.
saints as are No wire lead from body to
erk of the head.
These models iare free. so
write ror yOirs now. Write
Dentl. 9875. Beltone El.clron-
i's, 12)1 W Viclria. ('hica-
t .0 9 ? ; i li. 2 1i 20


For Rent, furnished apart-
ment at 510 8th St. Phone
648-4800. tfc 9-20

For Rent: 1973 2 bedroom
mobile home, unfurnished, at
St. Joe Beach. 229-6734. tf9-6
For Rent: One and two
bedroom attractively fur
nished apartments. Cool in
summer, warm in winter.
Gas heat, window fans. They
must be seen to be appre
cited. Contact Mrs. B.C.
Prince at WIMICO LODGE
and TRAILER PARK. White
City. Phone 229-2413 or
648-3101.
tfc-10-28







One bedroom house fur-
nished St. Joe Beach. Smith's
Pharmacy. tfc 9-13


Wall to For Rent: Furnished beach
rmation cottages at reasonable
monthly rates. Phone 227-3491
tfc 5-10 or 229-5641.. tfc


ATTENTION
Mobile Home Owners
SKI MEADOWS PARK


Is now open for business,
tfc 5-10 across the street from Ski
Breeze Camp Sites. Beahc
privileges, game room,
ANING washer and dryer. Gift shop.
Located on Hiway S30, 9
47 miles southeast of Port St.
tfc 9-20 Joe. tc 8-9


Kirby vacuum, attach-
ments, good cond. Complete
screen house, zip nylon.
Avon, other collectables and
few antiques. 2tc 9-13

Kenmore automatic zig zag
sewing machine and cabinet.
Second hand, good as new.
has disc for 16 decorative
stitch variations, makes but-
tonholes and sews on buttons.
$125. Call 229-5901. ltp

Lot for rent or sale.
Suitable for trailer, ready to
move on. Also trailer & lot.
B. Anerson. Cherokee &
Madison, Oak Grove. 229-
6604. Itp

Appaloosa and quarter
horse gelding. Gentle,. $150.
2274436. 2tp 9-20

Lose weight with New
Shape Tablets and Hydrex
Water Pills. Campbell's
Drug. 5tp 9-13


Use the

Classified Ads
Midget Investments
With Giant Returns







ST. JOE MACHINE CO.
Machine Work-Welding
506 First St.
Phoen 229-6803
Machinist on duty all day
Every day

BINGO
Every Thursday night.
$100.00 jackpot. Door Prize,
bonus games, little jack pot:
Refreshments.
American Legion Hall

ST. JOE ACCOUNTING
SERVICE offers you any part
of or complete bookkeeping
service. Personal and busi-
ness check books balanced,
payroll records. etc. For
information contact WANDA
H. BROWN. 225 Reid Avenue,
(representing H&R Block).
Call 229-6132 or 2?9-6673.
Monday. Wednesday and
Friday. 9-1 and 2-5. tfc-9-6

NOTICE
As of this date. September
6. 1973. I will not be
responsible for any debts
made by anyone other than
myself.
4tp-9-6 J. L .HARRISON

R.A.M.- Regular convoca
tion on St. Joseph Chapter
No. 56. R.A.M.. 1st and 3rd
Monday, 8 p.m. All visiting
companions welcome.
WiTlie Lee Griffin. H.P.
E. William McFarland,
Sec.

There will, be a regular
communication of Port St.
Joe Lodge No. 111, F. & A.M..
every first and third Thurs
day at 8:00 p.m.




E.C. Bailey, W.M.
herbcrt L. Burge, Sec.


HURLEUT SUPPLY CO.
'306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joen, Florica


Construction workers
needed for Gorrie Bay
Bridge repairs in Apalach-
icola.
WELDERS
Paving Breaker Operators
Contact Charles Hall at
job site or call 670-4967 at
night. Goodwyn & Mur-
phree, Inc. An equal
opportunity employer.
tfc 7-5

Help Wanted: Experienced
cooks and waitresses. Apply
in person. The Top of the
Gulf Restaurant at Mexico
Beach. tfc-9-6

Wanted: Experienced cash-
ier, experienced stock clerk,
experienced butcher or mar-
ket manager. Apply in person
to Bill Ridh at Rich & Sons
IGA, 205 Third St., Port St.
Joe. tfc 9-13

Ambitious couple or mat-
ure individual who needs
extra income (unusual oppor-
tunity) part of full time. For
interview call between 10 and
1 p.m. 229-6801. tfc 9-20


For Welding Needs see
-James L.Temple, 1302 Palm
Blvd. tfc-9-7:
Professional Help with
emotional problems and-or
concerns. Gulf County Guid
ance Clinic, Port St. Joe,
Florida 227-2691. or Rev.
Sidney Ellis, 229-6599.

Color & Black and White
TV Repair. Call
HEATH RADIO & TV
REPAIR
Phone 229-2782
All Work Guaranteed:
S4tp 8-9

Custom Upholstery
Drapery, Slipcovers
Fabrics & Naugahyde
Reasonable Rates
For limited time
20 pet. off'
on All fabrics
Phone 229-4481 tfc 8-16

A New Service At
POLLACK'S CLEANERS

UNIFORM

RENTALS
For Information, Come by
or Call
107 Second Street
Phone 227-4401

Your SHERWIN-WILLIAMS
PAINT Dealer in
Port St. Joe


HUPLBUT SUPPLY CU.
306 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida


Manager for Union 76
station on Monument Avenue.
Call collect Blountstown,
674-8222. tfc,6-7


Jeep 1968 CJ5, V6, top, 2
sets of tires, roll bar, Warren
hubs, tow bar, trailer hitch.
See Jim Fensom or
call 227-5661. 2tp 9-13

Pontiac GTO 1970. Full
power & air. vinyl top, bucket
seats, trailer hitch. $2300. See'
Jim Fensom or call 227-5661.
2tp 9-13

1972 Yamaha mini-endaro
motorcycle for sale. Only 2000
miles, like new, new tag and
inspection sticker, $235. 227-
5961. Itp

1964 Malibu for sale, or
trade for motorcycle. Cal
229-6798 after 5:30 p.m.
2tp 9-20


For Chain Link Fence call
Emory Stephens. Free-
estimate. Guarantee on labor
and materials. Low down
payment. Phone 227-7972.

Septic Tanks pumped out.
Call Buford Griffin. Phone
229-6694 or 229-2937.

CLOTEAL'S BEAUTY
SALON
White City
Opened Thursday, Friday
and Saturday
By appointment
PHONE 229-6722
4tc 9-20


AAA
REFRIGERATION CO.
Port St. Joe
Franchise Service
Repair to alh
Home Appliances
Service
on GE, Hotpoint, Westing-
house, Philco, Kelvinator
and others.
Call Day or Night
229-6953 tfc 9-6
All Work Guaranteed


Going Fishing?
Stop here first
for a complete
line of

Fishing Tackle

Hurlbut Supply
306 Reid Ave.


STANLEY HOME PRODUCT
For all your
Housecleaning Needs
Contact Betty Gilbert
Phone 648-7534
Free Delivery
2tc 9-13


C&G
ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTORS
Residential and Industrial
SWiring and appliance
Repairs
Air Conditioning-Heating
Oil Burner Technician
CALL 229-5777


10 speed bikes in stock.
Men's, women's. Racing
style. Touring style. Credit
terms available, western
auto, Port St. Joe.
tfe-6-15


Act Now-Sell Toys & Gifts
Party Plan. Work now 'til
Christmas. Highest Commis-
sions. Call or write Santa's
parties, Avon. Cn. Con. 06001.
Phone 1 (203) 673-3455. Also
Booking Parties. 3tc 9-13









Three bedroom house on
1/ lots, $7,500. 227 7th St.
229-6549. 4tp 9-20


For Sale: 3 bedroom
Excellent condition.
wall carpet. For inform
call 227-8305.


GIGI POODLE GROOM-
ING. Bath, clip & groom.
Dogs of all kinds. 324 1st St.
Highland View. Call for


appointment 229-3571.



LEWIS FLOOR CLEi
All Types
229-6482 or 229-64


PAT'S ROOFING
Free Estimates
No job too small
Call Day or Night 227-4713
or 229-6898
tfc 8-23


for
AMBULANCE
SERVICE
In Wewahitchka and
Port St. Joe
-- CALL -

COMFORTER FUNERAL
HOME

227-3511



Consolidated Repair-
& Service Co.
House Painting &
General Repair Work
No job too small
Free Reasonable Estimate
St. Joe-Mexico Beach area
Call 648-6153
(I 'arles r '.. ~t p 2


MEXICO BEACH
BEAUTY SHOPPE

Hwy 98 Phone 648-5116
Complete Beauty Service
GLADYS NICHOLS


House.


PAGE EIGHT


Mis e M i


St. Joseph'sBayCountry
Club swim team had its first
annual picnic to close out a
very successful season.
Certificates and awards were -
given-and trophy winners
were: Patrick May, Most
Valuable: Vicki Land, Best
All Around Senior; David
Lawrence, Best All Around
11-12: Kip Altstaetter. Best
All Around 9-10; and Kathy
Parrott, Best All Around 8.
and under.
The picnic was held at
Mexico Beach Wayside Park. .
with all 30 members and
thier parents present. Food
and games were enjoyed by
all.

Pictured are first row left
to right: Vicki Land, Kathy
Parrott, Kip Altstaetter, Pat-
rick May and David Law-
rence. Second Row: Vicki
Barlow, Kristi Gregg, Lori
Gregg, Williard Paul Gilbert.
Third Row: Phoebe Barlow,
Beverly Beard, Leanne Par-
rott, Nancy Knox and Dianna
Sealey.


,' Il I


SERVICES








THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 20, 1973 PAGE NINE


Team comes on the field for opening game.


Russell Chason set to receive pass.
(Note ball coming toward him)


Band gets in formation to march out and play National Anthem.






Sharks Drub Gators




Win 21-0 In Season Opener


advanced to the five yard team lost only three in
line at one point, but were the downpour.
set back to the 19 yard line It was during the heavy
when quarterback Jerry rain that the Sharks made
Moore was sacked back on their last and most spectac-
the 19 yard line by Ronnie ular score of the game on a
Kirkland while trying to get 62 yard pass play, ,Steve
off a pass. As a matter of Owens unloaded a 20 yard
fact, the Gators made two aerial straight up the middle
scoring threats in just a few to Eddie Rich who caught it
minutes of the third period. on the tip of his fingers, and
The Gators recovered their raced 52 yards for the final
second of three fumbles on touchdown of the game. Jim
the Shark 36 and. quarterback Moore's extra point kick was
Moore got to the seven before good, giving' the Sharks a 21-0
the Gators fumbled and the victory.
Sharks took over on their own The whole story of the
nine. The Sharks got to the 23 game-other than the now
before they lost the ball for famous "improper equip-
the third and last time and ment" penalties-were the
the,Gatois managed to get to inability of a heralded
tlhe five before they stalled7-'-- wahimthkarffensesthrnte
the ball against the Sharks
Heavy rain in the third solid line and the question-
quarter made that period and able Shark offense generating
the last a fumbling contest a considerable amount of
for both teams, but each steam.


THE YARDSTICK
St. Joe Wewa
First Downs 10 3
Yards Rushing 197 107
Yards Passing 84 8
Passes 3-7 1-5
Punts 2-32 4-25
Fumbles Lost 3 3
Yards Penalized 125 47
Score by Quarters
Port St. Joe .... 6 8 0 7-21


Wewa


0 0 0 0- 0


Tomorrow night, the
Sharks will host the Walton
County Braves of De Funiak
Springs.
In the Jamboree held in
Crestview two weeks ago, tlib
Braves were the only teaftto'
be scored upon. Crestview
put six points on the board
against the Braves while all
other teams in the contest
were not scored upon.


Head football coach Wayne
Taylor said last week, "If we
have any outstanding points
this year, it will be our line
and our defense". Taylor
went on to say he was afraid
to make any predictions even
there, because of the failure
to score in the Jamboree the
week before. "But I really
believe our strong point this
year will be our line".
Taylor's predictions came
true last Friday night in the
21-0 shocker win over Wewa-


hitchka. The shocker was for
partisan Port St. Joe fans as
well as Wewahitchka fans.
The Gators had been a high
scoring team the previous
week in the Jamboree and
the Sharks hadn't. The
Gators were expected to deal
the Sharks some trouble. But
the big line stepped in and
held the Gators to only three
first downs for the entire
game. The Gators ran only
four plays in the first
period. The Sharks pounced-


on a fumble after the Gators
first possession of the ball in
the game. On their second
possession, they were allowed
to keep it for only three
downs before being forced to
punt. The Shark line refused
to allow Wewahitchka's Bill
Traylor and Mike Garrettout
of their own back yard.
The Sharks scored the first
time they got their hands on
the ball. Starting from their
own 40 yard line, a drive,
featuring a 10 and 20 yard
run by Robert Dickens and a
14 yard pass play to Russell
Chason and Dickens raced
over from the 20 yard line for
the Sharks' first score of the
season.
Dickens scooted through
gaping holes made by the line
and skirted the contained
ends for 51 of his 108 yard
production for the night in
the first period.
The Sharks kicked to the
Gators who ran one play and
were forced into a fumble
which was recovered by
Eddie Rich. The Gators only
other possession in the first
period came after a Shark
fumble late in the period. The
Gators fumbled on third
down and Ed Floore pounced
on it.
In the second stanza
fullback Carl Whittle and
halfback Kenneth Weimorts
got into the running game
and ripped off gains of 10 and
20 yards to set up the Sharks'
second score.
Starting from their own 40
yard line, Whittle popped
through the line for 20 yards.
Dickens then spun off a 10
yard gainer. Weimorts got
into the act for 10 more yards
and Dickens went on to the 10
yard line before a penalty set
the Sharks back. In two more


carries, however, Dickens
had scored for the second
time. The attempted pass for
the extra point was no good
but a pass interference
penalty gave the Sharks an
extra chance at the extra
point and Dickens ran it over
from the three to give the
Sharks a 14-0 lead.
In the second half, the
penalties, which were al-
ready to the ridiculous stage
took a turn for the worse. At
one point in the third period,
the Sharks were penalized on
four straight plays. In the
entire game the Sharks were
rapped for 125 yards and the
Gators for 47...
The Gators made their only
serious scoring threat in the
third period when they


Hike the ball and let's go!


Robert Dickens gains yardage through heavy traffic.


Eddi Rih dies or -ass








t'E TEN THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT 20, 1973




10 biologists Are eating



amples from Lakes


*'*EWAHITCHKA-A four-
ikan team of Game and
resh Water Fish Commis-
jon fisheries personnel,
*ider direction of Regional
Biologist Norman B. Young,
< rrently are collecting fish
population samples in Dead
lakes, and are expected to
4jntinue their work through
Friday of this week; weather
&lrmjtting .
Young said that data
bllected at this time con-
&erning species presently in
lie lake, together with their
numbers, size and condition
4 the fishes, are further
studies begun a year ago to
mpile a "facts bank" prior
a planned drawdown of the
lake level in 1974,
i He said that the evidence,
oith concerning fish and
aluatic vegetation now in the
lake prior to the drawdown,
fill be collected again after
t.e drawdown, and the two
Sorough studies used com-
Varatively to establish the


benefits of the drawdown,
used with definite success as
a fish management tool in
many lakes.
Young expects the draw-
down. and fluctuation of the
lake level to accomplish
improvement in fishing suc-
cess and be effective as a
,weed control measure in
Dead Lakes also.
He explained that two
,devices are being used to
make fish collections.
One is the block-net techni-
que in which all fish inside
the net are suffocated and
removed by using a fish
toxicant. He said further that
the strength of the. fish
toxicant is so regulated as to
prevent significant kills out-
side the net.
The other device now being
used is a trammel net which
tends to collect mostly larger
sized fishes, including non-
game species, also being
studied.


S SEE-

WILMER THURSDAY
For Your New or Used

PONTIACS and CADILLACS
at

4LOYD PONTIAC-CADILLAC ,inc.
I0 Haison Ave. Offle Phone 763-6575
1 m Cty, Florids 'Be. Phone 76S-962K


You Are Cordially invited To Attend

LONG AVENUE
BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street
SUNDAY SCHOOL ...... 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP-........ ...... 4..."11:00 A M.W
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION I *......... 6:15 P.M.
SEVENING WORSHIP ...................... 7:30 P.M.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) ......... 7:30 P.M.
VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME
REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor
JOHN WOODS, Minister of Music
> ^ _. 9_ ^ _. ^


ery little in life has been more reliable or a
igger bargain down through the years than
electricity.
And we'd like to keep it that way.
But the fact is, reliable electric service
Wust isn't going to be possible without an
increasee in electric rates.
. Right now, new customers are moving
Into our service area at the rate of 250 each
working day. 64,000 a year.
Over the next 5 years we'll need to


Earnings

Check Is

Important
If you're a student 18-22
getting monthly social secur-
ity checks, it's important to
report any changes in your
earnings, school enrollment,
or marital status, according
to Robert Latta;',Social
Security Representative for
Gulf County. f .
About 650,000 students 18
and over get monthly social
security payments because a
parent gets disability or
retirement benefits or has
died. They can continue to
get payments to age 22 -
slightly beyond for under
graduates-as, long as they
remain full-time students and
unmarried.
Students getting social
security payments, should
notify social security immed-
idately if they marry, leave
school, or start attending on
a part-time basisccording
to Latta. "Students must tell
us of such changes 'so we can
stop their monthly benefits as
required by law," he said.
Social security payments to
students can also be affected
by total yearly earnings from
part-time or temporary jobs,
according to Latta.
S"If you're a student getting
social security payments and
know your earnings for 1973
will be more than $2,100, you
should report that to social
security," he said. "Other-
wise, you might get benefits
you'll have to pay back
later."
Students getting social
security checks should also
report a transfer .from one
school to another, he said.
People with questions about
social security student pay-
ments can get answers by
riling, visiting,-or- calling
any social security office.

Si'THE,
FOURTH PIMNWio !


invest a billion dollars for new construction
to meet the growing demand for power. And
this money must come from investors.
That's why it's so important that
Florida Power maintain adequate earnings.
If we can't show a fair return to
investors, it will become exceedingly
difficult to get the money needed to continue
construction of vital facilities.
If we can't get the money, even crossing
our fingers won't help.


Florida
Power


Tim Grandberry At

Sheppard AFB


SAN ANTONIO-Airman
Timothy Grandberry, son of
Mrs. Rosa L. Anthony, 233
Avenue C, Port St. Joe, has
been assigned to Sheppard
AFB, Tex., after completing
Air Force basic training.
During his six weeks at the
Air Training Command's
Lackland AFB, Tex., he
studied the Air Force mis-
sion, organization and cus-
toms and received special
instruction in human rela-
tions.
The airman has been
assigned to the Technical
Training Center at Sheppard
for specialized training in the
aircraft equipment mainte-
nance field.
Airman Grandberry is a
1973 graduate of Port St. Joe
High School. His father,
Robert C. Larry Sr., resides
at 207 Avenue F, Port St. Joe.

Smokey Says:


Florida's first Indians,
10,000 years ago, were part of
the great migration from
northeastern Asia. The land
was inhabited by large
animals, now extinct, which
the Indians killed, for food,
clothing, tools, and orna-
ments.
Around 5000 B.C., the first
suggestion of villages began
to appear and the Indians
became more dependent on
fish, nuts, and edible roots-
for food. Pottery-making
began here at about 2000W
B.C., some 800 years earlier
than in any other part of the
continent.
During the transitional
period (1000 B.C.) profound
changes took place in the
Indians' daily life. New ideas
and tools brought in by new
people changed Florida from
a hunting and fishing econo-,
my to one which produced'
some of its food by horticul-
ture.
About the beginning of the
Christian Era; the Mexican
practice of building burial
mounds was introduced. A
shallow circular hole was dug
and in it was placed a base
consisting of a mixture of
sand and charcQal. A few
burials were then placed on
this base, covered with sand;
then later more burials were
placed on top of the previous
ones with only a thin layer of
sand between. This procedure
continued until the mound
became too large; then
burials were placed under-
neath the top layer, disturb-
ing the burials below. The
mounds also contain suffi-
cient evidence, in the form of
artifacts, that the Indians
believed in a life hereafter.
The first mounds with
temples atop them appeared,
late in the Weeden Island
period, around 1300 A.D. The
Fort Walton Temple Mound
(Named for its Indian build-
ers) is an excellent example
of the temple mound of the
period. Built around 1400, it is
an impressive structure of
500,000 basketloads of dirt
gathered by the Indians for a
place of worship. Early
excavations, in 1861, uncover-
ed skeletons were removed,
.:wired, together by Confede-
rate soldiers and displayed in
the fort. The collection was
,later destroyed during a
Federal attack.
The latest excavation, in
1960, uncovered a surprising
number of fragmented skele-
tons and artifacts. Many of
the artifacts date from the
Deptford Period of 300 B.C. to
300 A.D.
Designed by the Depart-
ment of the Interior as a
National Historic Landmard,
the Temple mound has been
restored to its original
configurations. A museum on
the site contains exhibits

CARD OF THANKS
We want to take this means
to acknowledge and extend
our appreciation to the people
of the community for the
many thoughtful and kind
deeds extended us during the
loss of our loved one.
We shall always remember
with grateful appreciation
your kind expressions of
sympathy.
The Phillip A. Lewis familV


depicting the technological,
spiritual, and artistic a-
cheivements of 10,000 years
of life in the area.


The museum is owned and
operated by the City of Fort
Walton Beach ,and is open to
the public.


II


.t








Cylinder

Head

Reclamation

Service
* Valve grinding
* Valve seal, guide
and seat installation
* Disassembly
* Testing
* Cleaning
* Head resurfacing
SHigh Performance
Services
Precision Work
Fast Delivery

ST. JOE
AUTO PARTS
:201 LONG AVENUE
Port St. Joe, Florida


SO INAL E IMpeopleNT



1974 ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT!


Pate's Service Center



Jimmy's Phillips "66"
Port St. oe-F6ri-ia,


111 1 -


-


Florida's First Indians A



Part of Great Migration




















See the SHARKS In Action


Friday Night


against


Walton High


Kickoff at 8:00 P.M.


This Page Sponsored by
The Following Merchants


Hedy's Florist
and Gift Shop
Driesbach's Cleaners
Pick-up and Delivery
Jake's Restaurant
Buffet Steaks Seafood
SEARS
Catalog Sales
The Sewing Center
Third and Reid
Western Auto
David B. May
Roche Furniture
Frigidaire Appliances
COSTING'S
Quality at Savings
BOYLES
Pay Cash and Pay Less
St. Joe Hardware
Whirlpool Appliances
Dairyburger
Come by for a Snack
Danley Furniture Co.
Make Your House A Home
St. Joe Auto Parts
Your NAPA Dealer
St. Joe Furniture
and APPLIANCE CO.
St. Joe Motor Co.
Ford Mercury
St. Joe Natural Gas
Gas Is Naturally Better
St. Joe Stevedore Co.
RICH'S IGA
Fresher Produce
West Fla. Gas
Our Rolling Pipelines Never End
Piggly Wiggly
For Greater Savings
Citizen's Federal
Savings & Loan Assn.
Debbie's Flowers
Next Time Send Our Flowers
Dixie Seafood Market
Fresh Gulf Seafood
Earley Hdwe. & Supply
Hwy. 98 Highland View
Florida 1st National Bank
at Port St. Joe
Hannon Insurance
and Real Estate
St. Clair Funeral Home
Phone 227-2671
Player Supermarket
Highway 98 Highland View
Pollock Cleaners
and LAUNDRY
Raffield Fisheries
Phone 227-3326
Gulf Service Station
Coldest Drinks In Town


Left to right. Bottom Row: Mike Rich, Vic Adkison, Bill Norton, Bonnie
Garland, Carl Bailey, Steve Cloud, Carl Whittle. Second Row: Tony Harrison,
Robbie Sanborn, Mike Ethridge, Greg Abrams, John Shackleford, Randy Herring,
b* Bruce May, Sandy Sanborn, David Ambrose. Third Row: Danny Tankersley, Bruce


Varsity Schedule
Sept. 14-Port St. Joe, 21; Wewa, 0


Sept. 21-Walton Sr. High, H .
Sept. 28-Perry, T ...........
Oct. 5-Crawford Mosley, T ..
Oct. 12-Crestview, T ........
Oct. 19-Chipley, T ..........
Oct. 26-Blountstown, H .....
(Homecoming)
Nov. ,2-Marianna, H ........
Nov. 9-Chattahoochee, T ....
Nov. 16-Wakulla, H ........


8:00
8:00
8:30
8:30
8:30
8:00

8:00
8:00
8:00


Sept. 13-Open
Sept. 20-Wakulla, H .........
Sept. 27-Open
Oct. 4-Marianna, T .........
Oct. 11-Blountstown, T .....
Oct. 18-Open
Oct. 25-Marianna, H ........
Nov. 1-Wakulla, T ..........
Nov. 8-Blountstown, H ......


Nixon, Wayne McKiernan, Andy May, John Owens, Robert Dickens, Jim Moore,
Steve Owens, Ronnie Kirkland, Steve Lawrence. Fourth Row: Harold Cassidy,
Russell Chason, Kenneth Weimorts, Mark Wimberly, Martin Adkison, Eddy Rich,
Steve Davis, Mike Todd, Tad Mathews, Ed Floore.


7th & 8th Grade Schedule
Sept. 13-Open
Sept. 20-Wakulla, H ........ 5:00
Sept. 27-Open
Oct. 4-Marianna, T ......... 6:00
Oct. 11-Blountstown, H ..... 5:00
Oct. 18-Blountstown, T ...... 7:00
Oct. 25-Marianna, H ........ 5:30
Nov. 1-Wakulla, T ........ 5:00
Nov. 8-Open


7:00

7:30
7:30

7:00
7:00
7:00


Junior Varsity Schedule






Specials for Se.
17 through 22


SHOP RICH'S, Port St. Joe, SAVE TIME and MONEY!


[GA 20 Count Package
Trash Can Liners --20 ct. 99c
20c off Label
Scope Mouthwash 18 oz. 99c
Toothpaste
Ultra Brite-- --5 oz. tube 53c
Victors (Stick-Reg.-Cherry)
Cough Drops -- 2 sticks 25c
[GA
Instant Coffee -- 6 oz. 99c


Swansdown
Cake Flour _-_ 2lb. pkg. 49c
Pillsbury Extra Light
Pancake Flour 2 lb. pk. 49c


[GA Early June No. 303 Cans
Peas ----3 cans


69c


MAXWELL HOUSE
With $10.00 Order or More

Coffee


$1.68


SCOTT VIVA BIG ROLLS
Paper


TC

3


FO9c


2>


Duncan Hines Family
Brownie Mix -.23 oz.


69c


S' int~e 3 .jer Nstea1.19
;a Instant Tea_ 3 oz. jar $1.19


French or Spaghetti Sauce
Chili-O Mix -- 4 pkgs. $1.00
Sunshine 14 Oz. Pkg.
Hydrox Cookies pkg. 53c
Johnson
Pledge-----14 oz. $1.49


Make Your Own Popsicles

-FUN POPS'
fJif
Peanut Butter.---- 18


-M


SUNNYLAND MILD CURED (Water Added)

49c HAMS
oz. jar 69c (SHANK PORTION)
* jur 69c


STARKIST CHUNK

TUNA


2 60z.
Cans


C


* ~


HUNT'S WHOLE


tomatoes
28 Ounce Cans

3.. 00


I FOENFOODS


Lb.


Sunnyland Mild (Water Added) (Butt Portion)
Cured Hams --Z -- lb. 88,--
Funnyland Mild Cured (Water Added) (Center Roast)
Ham Slices-----lb. $1.28
rablerite Choice Blade Cut
Chuck Roast----lb. $1.09
rablerite Choice
Chuck. Steak ---- lb. $1.19
rablerite Lean
Ground Chuck---lb. $1.38
rablerite Center Cut
Pork Chops-----lb. $1.39
Sunnyland J
Weiners------ 12oz. 88c
Sunnyland All Meat Sliced
Bologna -- 12 oz. 88c Fre


I INSECT BOMB 13 Ounce Can

99c Hot Shot $1.19


pkgs. $1.00


IGA 16 Oz. Can
Orange Juice
[GA Pkgs. of 2
PIE SHELLS----3----


[GA Pkgs. of 6
IGA.WAFFLES ----4 pkgs. 49c
DAI Y BUY


Kraft Whipped Parkay
MARGARINE --- Ib.
IGA Tablerite 8 Oz. Cans
Crescent Rolls ---2 cans


59c
59c


IRISH SPRING Deodorant Reg. Bars
IRISH SPRING

3 49c


_-1 lb. ctn. 49c


ICE CHESTS
SMALL LARGE
$2.98 $3.98


Kt
PL


TABLERITE LEAN 1/ LOIN


Pork Chops

Lb. $1.18


Fresh, Crisp

Cucumbers

squash 39c
LARGE BAG .3 9c


99c


IGA BOTTLED

DRINKSS

28 Oz.$100
Btls


Fill Your Freezer
with RICH'S PRODUCE
We have PEAS, BUTTERBEANS, OKRA, SQUASH
CUCUMBERS ... by the bushel
Fresh, Ripe, Mountain Grown

Watermelons


Red
sh Ripe Radishesbag c
'DGRAPES Radishesbag 1
UMS ----lb. .4 Y C Sfesh
Shelled PEAS------- bag 49


Fresh Tender
0 k r a-------g.bag 49c
We Have A Complete Line of
Garden Seed and Fertilizer


Washington State Fancy
APPLES
Red Delicious
APPLES


Fresh


Peas 3


Lbs$1.00


Golden, Crisp
CARROTS ------ 2 bags 29c


Lb. 29c


With $3.00 Food Order


3 Lb. Bag 59


FRESH CRISP
Cucumbers


4


FOR


29c


Potatoes
10 LB. BAG 50 LB. BAG

89c 429


Completely Home Owned and Operated by E. J. Rich and Sons


I


iT
I

-5


Breakstone
Cottage Cheese


IGA Sandwich
Bread
King Size-VA Lb.

33c


--


I;-- I~r qr 1 I -r '


I ,


--1 e~ 'II L~d


I ,


tf fa R WA a f.


r


I A*AL-%


,- I


\


SAVE CASH AT RICH'S -- NOT STAMPS










School Food



Services Trying



to Meet Needs


J.T. Graves Honored

On 87th Birthday


J. T. Graves celebrated his
87th birthday with a dinner at.
his home at 201 Iola Street.
Those sharing this special
occasion were his two daugh-
ters, Mrs. Martha Cutchen
and Mrs. W. D. "Tiny"
Jones, W. D. Jones, Mrs.
Anna Smith, Mrs.. Verna
Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Tom F.
Smith, all of Port St. Joe.
Mrs. Jerry Golden, Mr. and
Mrs. Irvin Carter of Abbe-
ville,Ala., Mr. and Mrs. Billy
Jimmerson, Keith and Doug
of Echo, Ala., Mr. and Mrs.


Bowling


Neu
St. Clair Funeral Ifome
took three out of four games
from Jimmy's Restaurant on
lanes one and two. Dianne
Terry was high bowler for St.
Clair with a 436 series and
Connie Ross bowled a, 387
series for Jimmy's Restau-
rant.
The Supermarket won all
four games from Troy's
Standard Station, with Kathy
Williams bowling a 446 series
for The Supermarket and Dot
O'Shall with a 447 series
being high bowler for Troy's.
Peak's Pawn Shop took
four games from Basic. Ann
Peak rolled a 378 series for
Peak's and Ellen Sidwell


E. K. Cutchen and son Kyle
of Lutz, Mr. and Mrs. Moody
Lingo, Teressa, Vince and
Oran of Anchorage, Alaska.
Mr. and Mrs. Travis Jones,
Katherine and Greg of
Orlando and Mr. and Mrs.
Hayne Herndon, Tiffany and
Stephanie of Hampton, S.C.
In the above guests, Mr.
Graves had one brother, Mr.
Tom :,F. Smith, five grand
children, ten great grand-
children and two great great
grandchildren.


ended up with a 315 series for
Basic.
The Box Plant and the Ten
Pin Lounge met on lanes
seven and eight with the Box
Plant taking all four games.
A 396 series was high for the
Ten Pin League by Mary
Lyons and Evelyn Smith was
top bowler for the Box Plant
with a 455 series.





U.S. Supreme Court Jus-
tices do not have to be
lawyers.


= mo

FIRST DrATISFtHwRCH
Corner Third Street and Baltzell Avenue
REV. DeWITT T. MATHEWS,-Jr., Pastor
GEORGE PUCKETT, Minister of Music
Sunday School 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship Service ---...---11:00 A.M.
Church Training 6:30 P.M.
Evening Worship Service -------6:30 P.M.
Prayer- Meeting (Wednesday) .... 7:30 P.M.
"Come and Worship God With Us"




To Inform a Veteran

Be Informed!
All veterans and widows( of veterans are urged to
contact your local county service officer for a summary
of benefits which you and your dependents may be
entitled.
Gulf County's Veteran Service Office is located in
the Gulf County Court House and is open (5) days per
week from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., closed from.12:00
noon through 1:00 p.m. for lunch, and is closed from
1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on the second and fourth
Wednesday of each month. The Veteran Service Office
is also located at the old Courthouse in Wewahitchka,
from 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. C.S.T.
Your County Service Officer for Gulf County is:
Albert T. Thames.
Telephone number: 229-6125 Veterans Service Office
After 5:00 p.m. on holidays and weekends,
and fn case of emergency: Call 227-7311 or 229-6816
Sor Albert T. Thames


The School Food Services
are trying to meet the needs
of every individual that eats
in the lunchroq.,-~
For the breakfast, program
in Wewahitchka, a little more
variety has been added to the
menu. Food prices are a big
problem this year, but the.
biggest problem ianot getting
enough food from one vendor.
The School Food Service is
having to order the same
item from several companies
just to get enough food to
meet the need. .--
There will be an attempt to
get menus in the paper each
week for the parents. It may
be necessary to change the
menu from day to day if
certain foods aren't received.
Menus are made up six
weeks in advance because of
the work involved.,
Chocolate milk is being
offered for the break only in
the elementary schools and
with the lunches to high
school students. The State
Department feels that the
School Food Service needs to
set good food habits for
elementary students and by
the time they reach the high
school they should be able to
decide for themselves. Ele-
mentary students like to
drink their chocolate milk
before they eat .and conse-
quently they will not eat their
food. This is the -'easoning
behind the State' Depart-
ment's regulations.;
The Food Service hopes to
be able to offer milk shakes
to high school students during
the lunch hour, to be sold


only to a student who buys a
lunch from the lunchroom.
Of course, the milk shake will
be sold separately from the
regular lunch.
A choice program is being
offered' to the students in
Port St. Joe High School to
meet the needs of a student.
This program will still have
to be a Type A lunch in order
to get reimbursement back
from the State Department.
The Food Service needs all
the help it can get in this
program. A Type A lunch
consists of a meat or meat
by-product, fruit and vegeta-
ble, bread, butter and milk.
e No funds are being receiv-
ed this year from the State
Department for milk. This is
why if a student receives an
extra milk at lunch or drinks
milk at break time, he will
have to pay ten cents. This
will have to include all
students, whether they are
on a free meal or not. They
will receive one milk with
their lunch, and any milk
other than that will have to
be ten cents.
The parents cooperation is
needed in letting your child
eat in the lunchrooms.
National Lunch Week will be
coming up October 14-20. The
School Food Service will be
asking parents to come and
participate.


Use the
Classified Ads
Midget Investments
With Giant Returns


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, SEPT. 20, 1973 PAGE THIRTEEN


Safe Boating
S7 Is


No Accident


5
RANDOLPH HODGES
Executive Director


Florida Department

of
Natural Resources


4th in a series


(AFNS) Previously, we
pointed out that a boat's class
has a direct bearing on
equipment requirements, so for
emphasis we want to restate the
correct classifying system. The
class is determined by the
boat's overall length, from the
extended portion of the bow to
the stern, excluding any motor.
A. boat less than 16 feet is a
Class A boat; a boat between 16
feet but less than 26 feet is in
Class 1; a boat between 26 feet
but less than 40 feet is in Class
2; and a boat between 40 feet
and 65 feet is a Class 3 boat. In
measuring sail boats, bowsprits
and stern attachments are not
included.
Everyone is interested in
cost, and we will deal with the
cost involved in registering
your boat. Pleasure craft
powered by a motor in excess of
10 horse power, and all com-
mercially classified boats are
required by law to be registered
in the State of Florida, or any
boat may be titled if the owner
so desires. Application for
pleasure boat registration
certificates and titles are to be
filed by the boat owner with his
county Tax Collector. When
registering and titling a new
pleasure boat the owner must
establish proof of ownership,
acceptable to the Florida
Department of Natural
Resources. Your registration
certificate must be aboard at all
:times the vessel is in operation.


The registration number
issued to a boat is permanent
and remains with the boat as
long as it is in the State of
Florida, even though ownership
changes, The registration
number is to be attached to both
sides of't'bow's forward half,
and must be in block letters and
numerals at least three inches
high. The numbers must read,
from left to right and must be a
contrast in color of the boat. A
decal signifying the year during
which the registration cer-
tificate is valid will be furnished
with each certificate issued,
and must be displayed on the
port (left) side of your boat
although it may be placed
before or after the registration
number.
Registration fees are
governed by the length of your
boat and all fees must include
an additional fifty cents
provided by law to be received
by the issuing agency. Less than
12 feet in length, $2.00 12 feet
or more "and less than 16 feet,
$6.00 16 feet or more and less
than 26 feet, $11.00 26 feet or
more. and less than 40 feet,
$31.00 40 feet or more and less
than 65 feet, $51.00 65 feet or
more and less than 110 feet,
$61.00 110 feet or more in
length, $76.00 Dealer
Classification, $10.00, and title
fees, $2.00, plus $1.00 if there is
to be a lien recorded on the title.

Continued Next Week -


SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR! |


Breakfast More Important Than You Think
Nutritionists tell us that breakfast should provide about ,s,
of our calories for the day. We need the energy first thing in
the morning to keep us going until noon. In fact, that's what
breakfast means to break the fast after a night's sleep.
Breakfast doesn't have to follow any set pattern. Within the
past couple of years, peanut butter has come into its own as
a worthwhile breakfast food. Two tablespoons peanut butter
all by itself provides the body with protein, iron and niacin, a
B vitamin. Spread the peanut butter on toast or make it into
a sandwich and the protein, B vitamins and iron are increased.
Turn the peanut butter sandwich into French toast and you
add still more nutrients vitamin A, iron and protein from the
egg; protein, minerals and vitamins from the milk. To round
out the breakfast, nutritionally, serve milk as a beverage and a
citrus fruit such as an orange or grapefruit for vitamin C.
Peanut Butter French Toast: Beat 1 egg and beat in 1/2 cup
milk. Spread each of 4 slices enriched white bread with 2 table
spoons Skippy creamy or chunk style peanut butter. Top each
with a second bread slice. Dip sandwiches into egg mixture.
Cook on well-greased griddle or in margarine in skillet, turning
once, until browned on both sides. Makes 4 servings.


Erskin D. Johnson,

Former Resident, Dies


Erskine D. Johnson, 66, of
Pensacola, died Wednesday
morning, September 12.
Mr. Johnson was a member
of the West Pensacola
Chapter 252 of the Order of
the Eastern Star, a retired
supervisor for Gulf Power
Co., and he was a member of
the Master Workman's Sun-
day school class at Browns-
ville Baptist Church.
Funeral services were held
Friday, September 14, at 2
p.m. in Fisher-Pou. chapel of
Pensacola with the Rev.
Clayton Baker and the Rev.
Henry Lewis officiating.
Survivors include his wid-
ow, Mrs. Grace Johnson; a
daughter, Karen (Sue) John-
son; a son, Jerry Johnson;
three sisters, Mrs. W. N;
Routh of Charlotte, N.C.:
Mrs. Florence J. Fudge of
East Palatka and Mrs.
Lenora Lewis of Bristol; two
brothers, Paul F. Johnson of


Pensacola and Mayo Johnson
of Port St. Joe and one
grandson.
Burial was in Bayview
Memorial Park with Masonic
services at the grave. Fisher-
Pou Funeral Service was in
charge of arrangements.

Books Needed
The Division of Family
Services is working toward
providing children's books to
preschool youngsters. in
needy families. Exposure to
such learning tools at an
early age prepares the child
to use the tools properly
when he enters school.
Anyone having children's
books to donate to this
project may leave them at
the Division of Family
Services office in the Health
Department or call 229-6229
to request the items be
picked up.


Sears


X, Is The

BIGGEST

SHOPPING

CENTER
IN THE
WORLD
and- in,- Port St. Joe. This
merchandise giant is as close as
your telephone. Buy any item
advertised by Sears anywhere in .
the United States, simply by dialing


m227-2291
Catalog Sales
H. Lee Treace,
owner


Cougar XR-7 In size, this new breed of Cougar is like Grand Prix and Monte Carlo. In every other way, it's like
nobody else's.car. Totally new for '74. New wide buckets, new dash with tachometer and hooded gauges mounted in
deeply padded vinyl. Distinctive new Landau roof. Elegant opera window. Steel-belted radials. All standard.


FRIDAY IS THE DAYOF THE CAT
SEE ALLTHE NEW 74'AT YOUR MERCURY DEALER


Marquis Brougham -W
Today a great ride is just not enough. So we
designed the '74 Marquis to be more economical
to maintain. Gave it steel-belted radials, standard.
And Marquis does not require premium gas.


How about checking



with us, too.


FLORIDA FIRST NATIONAL BANK AT PORT ST. JOE
50"- Monument Avenue -Telephone 227-2551


Comet with Custom Option
Who says gas economy comes only in plain little cars?
Even though Comet's stingy on gas, it's generous on
luxury. Because this Comet's got a little Cougar in it.
Now you don't have to give up luxury to get gas economy.


Montego MX Brougham
This personal-size Mercury is designed to ride like
a big car. On an extra-wide stance and the same
type suspension system as Lincoln-Mercury's most
expensive luxury car. But with the economy of a
mid-size car.


Not shown: Mercury Monterey, the medium-priced car
'ith the famous Mercury ride. TLir .-'-
See the whole new family of wagons, j!::5 .
oo. The kind only Mercury could build. u ,i ''
It all happens "The Day of the Cat." -:.




Optional equipment shown: Marquis Brougham-WSW tires, wheel
covers; Montego MX Brougham-vinyl roof. WSW tires, wheel
covers; Cougar-WSW tires, radio, stereo tape, air conditioner.


ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY
tn..im nt Awm Port St. Joe, Florida


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First Cut Whole
Slab Bacon


1.19


Cut or Whole
Bacon


LB.89


20 oz. btle. $118
LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC 1
Dry Powder, Reg. or Unscented 6oz.coany7
DIAL ANTI-PERSPIRANT i
Macleans Fresh Mint orSpearmint 3 oz. $I
TOOTHPASTE tubes

Buqqed bq
liqh Prices?
Swat Tm Down
at PIGGLY .
WICGCG. Y!


Sliced
Beef Liver


Streak-O-Lean
Salt Pork
Family Pak
Pork Chops
Loin End
Pork Roast


Meaty Pork
lb. 79c Loin Ribs


Fresh
lb. 79c Turkey Necks Legs
Pig Feet Neck Bone


lb. 99c
lb. 99c
lb. 1.09


LB. 69t


Tender
Cubed Steak


1.79


Shank Portion Tenderized

Hams
Center
Ham Roast


Tenderized
Butt HaIf


Rally White Bathroom 4 roll
TISSUE pk., 39
Campbell's 101/2 oz. an Showboat 31 oz. can
TOMATO SOUP I PORK&BEANS 34


Grape or Orange 46 oz.
HI-C DRINKS can


* Sea Pak Frozen Fish
WEDGES 14i oz. 8
Minute Maid Orange
JUICE 12 oz. can 55











Colonial or White Gold


31t


Efferdent 40 ct.pkg.$118
DENTURE CLEANSER I
-Schick Plus Platinum 7 ct. pkg.$109
INJECTOR BLADES


One A Day Brand
VITAMINS
cOne A Day
VITAMINS
One A Day
VITAMINS
One A Day
VITAMINS


100 ct. $~79
btle. $


100 cd
with


tle. $19
60 ct. $198


60id. b:le.1


R


1 with $7 or more


Mrs. Filberts 1 lb.pkgs.3 $1
MARGARINE for I
Parade Single Wrap 47
CHEESE 8 oz. 4

-ae
UBUTTERMIL.


Kellogg's 12 oz. box SMA Liquid Baby
CORN FLAKES 04 FORMULA


'1ize 3 3 4


Bama 18 oz. glass 13 oz.size Similac Liquid Baby or
APPLE JELLY FORMULA WiT.ron


Lysol Reg. or Scented ,12 oz.can
DISINFECTANT 7


Piggly WigglyAluminum
FOIL


12" X 25'$
rolls |


Youra easue sOr oiyAt S S 0Wigly


Round White



POT


10 Ib. bag



TOES


C


Fresh Salad pint pkg.
TOMATOES 294


5 Ib.
bag


Fresh lb.
CUCUMBERS


Fresh Crisp
CELERY


194


stalk23<


for E, Quality an. dConenianceS YWte !


Chug-A-Lug Canned







12 oz.with $10.00 order

10 with $10.00 order


ao.: o, aS


Ga. Grade "A"
E LARGE

Eggs


Doz.


First
Slab


79c
Ib. 1.19


Ib. 89c


ro