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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01563
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 21, 1965
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01563

Full Text









THE STAR

"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"


PoRT CT .IJO FLORIDA 32456. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1965


TWENTY-NINTH YEAR


First Objections Raised


To City Expansion Plans


, .Extension of the Port St. Joe
City Limits met its first opposition
Tuesday night, as the City began
to prepare a resolution calling for
the annexation election.
Objections came in the persons
of Bob Vervaeke, representing
Michigan Chemical Corporation
and.J. P. Fleishel, representing St.
Joe Lumber Company.
Both of these men expressed the
belief that being in the City would
give them any benefits and would
mean that their firms would be
-forced to pay city taxes in the
enlargement.
Vervaeke told the Board that his
firm already had its own water
system, its own sewage system and
its own fire fighting facilities. He
stated that taking in his firm would
be a liability since his firm would
expect to be put on the city's wa-
ter and sewer system if annexed,
and serving his company would be
a financial burden to the city due
to the extremely long lines that
would have to be provided to serve
the company.
Fleishel stated that his company
(Continued On Page 12)


Department Store

Is Burglary Victim

Local Police and the Gulf Coun-
ty's Sheriff's Department have been
working this week to solve a crime
of breaking and entering of a lo-
cal business. This is the third case
of breaking into a local business in
the past four weeks.
Entered last Saturday night was
Boyles Department Store on Reid
Avenue.
SAccording to Police Chief H. W.
Griffin, the thieves entered the
business, through the rear door,
forcing the door open, and took
several hundred dollars in cash as
well as several pieces of men's
clothing.
Earlier this month, thieves en-
tered the Piggly Wiggly Super
Market and the McCormick Gulf
Service Station. Nothing was taken
from the Piggly Wiggly, but the
service station lost several dollars
from the cigarette machine.


Jaycees Examine 80

Bicycles In Rodeo

More than 80 local youngsters
participated in the Junior Cham-
ber of Commerce Bicycle Rodeo
held Saturday at the Port St. Joe
Elementary School, according tc
John Howard, Jaycee President.
Jaycees and Police officials, who
conducted the bicycle safety pro
gram, inspected 100 bicycles for
mechanical defects, conducted ri
ders through a test driving course
and put night-time reflector tape
on approximately 100 bicycles.
The first, second and third place
winners in age group 10 through
14 were Bobby Faliski, Calvin
Johnson and Benny Sherrill. In
age group six through nine the
winners were Steve Davis, David
Player and Delie Hardy.
The Jaycees wish to express their
appreciation to Pate's Service, Wi-
ley Supply, St. Joe Hardware
Western Auto and Port Theatre
for donating prizes for the winners.

I. C. NEDLEY IMPROVING
AFTER OPERATION
City Commissioner I. C. Nedley
is reported to be recovering well
after a recent operation in the Tal-
lahassee Memorial Hospital.
Mr. Nedley is in Room 371 of the
Hospital and appreciates letters
and cards.


Inspection Is Made of High School




Monday to Determine Accreditation


Dr. Vincent McGuire, chairman
Sof the Florida Division, Southern
Association of Secondary Schools
e and Colleges, made his promised
Visit to Port St. Joe High School
Monday of this week to make a fi-
nal inspection of the high school
Before voting by his committee on
Whether or not to drop the school
from the accredited list.
S The high school is currently on
probation while seeking to remedy
Three areas of deficiency in order
to remain on the accredited status.
The three points of deficiency
Marked against the school are in-
Sadequate library facilities, inade-
quate lunch room facilities and
inadequate shower and dressing
room facilities.
Dr. McGuire looked over the
plant and viewed current construc-
tion of a new cafeteria for the
school which was started last week.
-Dr. McGuire gave no encourage-
ment that his committee may let
Port St. Joe remain on the accre-
dited list since construction of this
facility had been started: He said
he had no idea how the committee
would vote in view of his findings.
McGuire stressed that he-had only
one of eight votes on the commit-
tee so he would not be able to
offer an opinion as to how the vote
would go.
Cites Library
Dr. McGuire said that since the
lunchroom is currently under con-
struction, the school library is now
the biggest liability of the school
plant. Superintendent R. Marion
Craig and Supervisor Hubert Rich-
ards advised McGuire of the fact
that once the new lunchroom was
:built, the library would be enlarg-
.:ed .into. the. present lunchroom
area, but nothing could be done
in this area until the lunch area
has been changed. Craig showed
McGuire plans drawn for this move.
In looking at the inadequate
shower and locker room facilities,
Craig and Richards advised Mc-
Guire of thinking by the Board to
move the elementary school to
the present High School facilities
and with such a move, enlargement
of these facilities would be unneces-
sary. McGuire agreed with the
school officials that enlargement
of these facilities would be foolish
with such a move in mind.
Dr. McGuire told the school of-
ficials that loss of accreditation for
a year or so was nothing to fear as
compared with the financial loss
of enlarging the shower and lock-
er facilities merely to remain on


INSPECT CONSTRUCTION-Shown above Superintendent R. Marion Craig and chairman of
looking over the lay-out of the new Port St. Joe the Florida Committee of the Southern Associa-
High School cafeteria, now under construction, tion of Accreditation, Dr. Vincent McGuire. Dr.
are, left to right, Gulf County Supervisor, Hubert McGuire was in Port St. Joe Monday to inspect
Richards; Principal Wayne Saunders; Gulf County Port St. Joe High School facilities. -Star photo


the accredited list, with changes in
mind.
It was pointed out that should
the school be dropped, they could
be re-instated in one year with
compliance to the recommenda-
tions of the Southern Association
but that if it was necessary to re-
main off the accredited list for
more than a year, a complete ex-
amination of the local facilities
would be necessary to get back on
the accredited list.
Need Proper Tools
In questioning Dr. McGuire as
to why the school was facing loss
of accreditation in view of the fact
that academic standards were ap-
parently up to qualifications he
said that it was the opinion of the
Southern Association that the tools
of teaching were equally impor-
tant to the student's education as
the program of education present-
ed. He said, for instance, that the
school could hardly teach health
and hygiene to its students and
not provide facilities for practicing
health and hygiene while on cam-
pus.
The Florida chairman emphasiz-
ed that they did not relish drop-
ping any school from the accredit-
ed list, but that they must go by
their standards in order to make


Meeting Next Thursday Will Air

Idea of Relocating Elementary School


The High School PTA meet-
ing will feature a subject of
importance for the parents of
Port St. Joe next Thursday
night, according to program
chairman, M. P. Tomlinson.
T The meeting will be hela'
next Thursday night, 'October
28 in the Port St. Joe High
School Auditorium at 8:00
p.m.
The program will deal with
the planned construction pro-
gram for Gulf County Schools
and will deal specifically with
the feasibility of moving the
Port St. Joe Elementary
School into the present High
School plant and building a


new High School for Port St.
Joe.
Present for the program and
leading the discussion will be
the Gulf County School Board,
Superintendent Marion :daicf,
-and "the School Board a ac hi-
tect, Norman P. Gross.
Both High School and Ele-'
menetaory PTA members are
invited to attend as well as
other interested citizens.
While this discussion is
primarily concerned with whe-
,ther or not to move the base
of elementary operations, oth-
er phases of the proposed con-
struction program will be air-
ed publicly as they develop.


their standards mean something in and would then render their deci-
the scholastic circles. sion on whether or not to allow
Decision In November the high school to remain accre-
Dr. McGuire said that his group dited. He said the school would be
would meet on November 1 and go notified of their decision as soon
over his report on the local school as it has been made.


Miss Ronnie Prince is crowned Homecoming To the left of Queen Ronnie is her escort, Eugene
Queen above, by Student Council President, Den- Harper. In front are Debbie Fowler, flower girl
nis Dawson, at halftime ceremonies in last Friday's and Jay Fleming, crown bearer. -Star photo
Homecoming football game here in Port St. Joe.

Shark Offense Begins To Roll, But Not.

Enough to Defeat Monticello Last Friday ng Ave. twists
Plan Revival


The Port St. Joe Sharks used
their Homecoming game last Fri-
day night, to put on their best of-
fensive show of the season, scor-
ing for the first time this season
and doing it up right with three
touchdowns. The only thing lack-
ing was the victory. The Monticello
Tigers rapped the Sharks 53-20.
The Sharks first score of the sea-
son came in the second stanza as
fullback Larry Branch made it the
hard way from three yards out up
over the middle. Branch could lit-
erally smell the Sharks first six
pointer from this distance and ran
through the entire Monticello line
for the TD. Quarterback Tommy
Atchison ran the extra point over.
Halfback Billy Smith was the
hero of the.night however, with a
75 yard run for a touchdown with
bnly one minute gone in the last
period. Shortly after, the Sharks
recovered a Monticello fumble on
their own 46 yard line and again
-Smith ran for paydirt going 52
yards for the TD. Branch carried
over one more extra point to give
the Sharks their first points of the
season.
Monticello's quarterback Tommy
Richter sparked his team as he


passed for five touchdowns and
ran for one. The Tigers scored in
every period.
Tomorrow night, the Sharks en-
ter a conference contest in Chip-
ley. The affair will be Chipley's
homecoming. Game time is sche-
duled for 8:30.Port St. Joe time.
THE YARDSTICK
Mont. Sharks
First downs-- 13 8
Rushing ydg. -_ 389 231
Passing ydg. _______ 72 56
Passes intercepted 3 1
Fumbles lost ___--- 2 2
Yards penalized ___ 55 20


Highland View PTA

Carnival Is Saturday

The annual Highland View
Elementary School Hallowe'en
Carnival will be held Saturday,
October 23 from 4:00 to 8:00
p.m.
There will be a parade begin-
ning at 3:30 p.m. behind the
Week's Store building on Third
Street in Highland View and will
terminate at the school.


The Long Avenue Baptist Church
announces that revival services
will be held in their church next
week beginning on Monday eve-
ning, October 25. The Reverend
Joe Courson of New Orleans will
be the visiting evangelist. Revival
music will be directed by Edward
Ramsey of Port St. Joe. Reverend
Courson was formerly pastor of the
Terry Parker Baptist Church in
Jacksonville for several years. He
is now an assistant to the President
of New Orleans Baptist Theological
Seminary.
The evening services will begin
at 7:30 p.m. on Monday through
Saturday. Morning services will be
held at 7:00 a.m., Tuesday through
Friday. The morning service will
be informal and brief dismissing
by 7:30 a.m. Coffee, milk and do-
nuts will be served at the church
each morning following the revival
service. The church nursery will
be open for each of the evening
services.
The Reverend Courson will con-
clude the series of revival services
on Sunday evening, October 31.
Worship services on Sunday are
held at 11:00 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.


New Kiln Arrives As Part of Michigan Chemical Corporation Expansion Program


The three employees with the
longest service record at the
Port St. Joe plant of Michigan
Chemical were on hand last week
with their wives and children to
watch the unloading of the larg-
est single section shipped of an
11ii x 275 foot long rotary lime
kiln. The section was 89 feet
long, weighed 80 tons ,and was


shipped on two special railroad from Choctawhatchee Bay and is
cars from the Allis-Chalmers expected to be in operation in
Company plant in Milwaukee March, 1966, with the completion
of the entire modernization pro-
Wisconsin. gram expected in the last half of
The kiln is the first phase in 1966, when capacity of the plant
a 2z1 million dollar moderniza- is expected to reach 200 tons per
tion and improvement program day.
at the Port St. Joe plant of The Murphy Division of the
Michigan Chemical Corporation. Dorr-Oliver Company, Bartow,
The kiln will burn oyster shell Florida, has the contract for the


project.
The three employees having
the longest service record and
their wives and children:
J. B. Smith and wife, Odell,
and grandson, Tommy.
James Tankersley, wife, Deb
bie and children, Danny and
Paula.
A. D. Jernigan and wife,
Eliose.


I C PER

[bC COPY

i _r_


MONEY TALKS-Let's keep
it where we can speak with it
once in a while-Trade with
your home town merchants


------- L-


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-

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I EWEN mlkO Iff 0 w %to








THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21 ,1965


THE STAR
Published Every Thursday At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe. Florida,
By The Star Publishing Company
WESLEY R. RAMSEY Editor and Publisher
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Salesman, Photographer, Columnist, Reporter, Proof
Reader, Bookkeeper and Complaint Department
POSTOFFICE Box 308 PHONE 227-3161
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32456

Entered as second-class matter, December 19, 1987, at the Postofflce, Port St. Joe,
Florida, under Act of March 8, 1879.

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, $3.00 SIX MONTHS, $1.75 THREE MONTHS, $127.5(

TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable *or damage further than amount received for such
advertisement.

The'spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtful"-
weighed. The Lpoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly o
rioces. The spoken word is lost; th3 printed word remains.



Letters To The Editor


October 19, 1965.
Dear Mr. Ramsey:
I hear that there is a rumor go-
ing around 'town that teachers in
this county are well paid. In fact
I heard that one man had figured
that a first grade teacher made
around $6.00 an hour. I am not a
first grade teacher but they are
paid on the. same scale and work
the same hours that I do. There-
fore, I know that this is not true.
As a teacher with sixteen years
experience and a Masters Degree,
I make $3.37 an- hour. This is
based on an eight hour day which
I will assure you that I put in. I
work at school from 8:00 until
3:30 and more than thirty minutes
a day at home grading papers and
making preparations.
Rumors like this are partly the
cause of the Gulf County schools
being in the condition that they


are now in. For example, every
time it rains the roof in my build-
ing leaks so that we have to put
buckets, pans, jars, papers, etc.
around to catch the water. I am
still trying to conceive of this hap-
pening in the United States of
America in the year 1965. AND
THE TAXPAYERS LEAGUE DOES
NOT THINK THE SCHOOL BOARD
NEEDS THE $230,000.
I am from Alabama, the part
that is in Appalachia, but I had
never seen such inadequate build-
ings as these in Gulf County until
I came to the prosperous state of
Florida.
Sincerely yours,
Mary Grace Smith,
Fifth Grade Teacher, Port
St. Joe Elementary.

READ THE CLASSIFIED


PI IIIIII lM IMIM ill i|iii ,li; ii :111; i::i:. i ..1.. ll I h *Vllli Ill: ;=li li,; |13 l IIJ : 1. .( 1 1h 1 ,


i .. .. .. .. ../ i
PRESENT CHECK-DCT President, Larry right are, Jerry Parrish, Jack Terry, Gary Davis,
Branch, seated above left, is shown presenting a Ray Clark, Ronnie Atchison, Karen Stripling, Keith
check to Gene Raffield, President of the Shark Wilson, Susan Gentry, Robert Boone, Cora Sue
Boosters' for $238.00. DCT program director, La- Johnson, Jake Nichols, Sonia Cooper, Judy Sims,
mar Faison is seated at the right end of the table. Linda Carter, Ray Ramsey and Principal, Wayne
DCT students watching the presentation, left to Saunders. -Star photo


DCT STUDENTS PRESENT CHECK TO SHARK BOOSTERS


The DCT students of Port St. Joe
High School presented Shark Boos-
ter President, Gene Raffield with a
check for $239.75 Friday afternoon.
The DCT students had earned
the money selling tickets for the
recent Shark Booster barbecue, on
which they had received a commis-
sion. Since the purpose of the bar-
becue was to raise money to pur-
chase blazers for the athletic teams,
the DCT students decided to do
their part and return their ticket
commission to help the cause.
The presentation was made in
a brief ceremony Friday in the


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DCT classroom at Port St. Joe High dents for their assistance in the
School. barbecue dinner and for their gen-
Shark Booster President Raffield erosity in returning the commis-
offered his thanks to the DCT stu- sion money to the Boosters.


Dr. Thompson

Outlines Program
Dr. William Thompson ,of the
State Board of Health Dental De-
partment, spoke to the Port St. Joe
Rotary Club last Thursday giving
the Rotarians a first hand report
of the Dental Clinic now in prog-
ress in Gulf County, sponsored by
the Rotary Club.
Dr. Thompson told the club mem-
bers that the Clinic service was
being provided for all children
grades one through three, with
treatment given free to children
whose parents might undergo a
hardship providing the treatment


from a private practitioner.
Dr. Thompson said that the
Clinic has examined 64 children to
date and have singled out 27 chil-
dren who are eligible for treat-
ment. He said that treatment has
been started on 23 children with
treatment completed on 15. The
Doctor emphasized that parental
consent must be obtained before
treatment can be initiated.
Only the second and third grades
have been examined with examin-
ation of first grade students under
way this week.
The Clinic unit has been here
fo rone month and it is expected


to be here for i
month.


Hunters Are Urged to Watch Closely

For Pheasants While Hunting Quail
Tallahassee Hunters in the the Iranian pheasant with the Chin-


Northeast and Northwest Regions
are again reminded to hold their
fire when an expected covey of
quail turns out to be pheasant. The
pheasant hunting season in the two
north Florida districts was closed
at the recent meeting of the Game
and Fresh Water Fish Commission,
September 30.
According to W. B. Copeland,
Commission Chairman, the closing
of the pheasant season is to pro-
vide an added measure' of protec-
tion for the imported Iranian
pheasants released at selected sites
in the two regions. The release of
the pheasant is an effort on the
part of the Commission to provide
a new and exciting game bird for
Florida sportsmen.
Copeland said, "The closing of
the pheasant season does not ap.
ply to the licensed shooting pre-
serves, and preserve owners may
continue to conduct pheasant shoots
with the Chinese rinkneck pheas-
ant. Ordinarily, Florida does not
have pheasant hunting other than
on shooting preserves, however,
there is an open season which co-
incides withthe quail season in
which hunters may bring to bag
any pheasant that might escape or
be released by shooting preserves."
The many attempts at stocking
the Chinese ringneck pheasant in
the South has proven unsuccessful,
however, the experimental stock-
ing of the Iranian pheasant appears
to be off to a good start. At the
present, the program is in the ex-
perimental stage and the released
birds are being closely watched for
signs of survival and reproduction.
If the birds are successful in re-
production the stocking program
will be accelerated, according to
Copeland.
"The program is under close su-
pervision of the Commission Wild-
life biologist and breeding birds
are not available to sportsmen,"
Copeland said. He added, "Until
this program has proven successful
we do not want the sportsmen to
become too involved with this im-
port for several reasons. First.


at least another there is the biological danger that
someone might accidentally cross


est pheasant and while both birds
are almost identical in appearance,
such a cross may endanger the en-
tire population of Iranian pheas-
ant. Second, we do not want the
sportsman to invest his money in
a program that is still experimen-
tal and not proven. This sort of
thing has happened before, such
as the boom for stocking the cotur-
nix quail, which did not prove to
be a success."
Pheasants are farm-country birds
that are seldom found far from
corn or grain fields, similar to the
type.habitat selected for the stock-
ing program in North Florida. The
experimental stocking program
thus far has amounted to a total
of 703 pheasants being released in
the following counties: Calhoun,
Jackson, Washington, Holmes, Wal-
ton, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Gadsden
and Suwannee. Releases prior to
this summer were made in Holmes
and Jackson Counties and the re-
sults from these earlier stockings
has indicated both survival and
wlid reproduction.
While the pheasant hunting sea-
son is closed in the North Florida
districts and hunters may not shoot
pheasants found in the wilds, the
Commission is still interested in
any and all reports of wild pheas-
ant being sighted by sportsmen.
Copeland said, "Even if the re-
leased birds do survive and repro-
duce in the wild there is no posi-
tive assurance that the species will
continue to multiply, or that it
will be a satisfactory game bird
with adequate sporting quality. Un-
til all questions are answered the
Iranian pheasant will remain an
experiment."



^S(*^ Stand Tall
In Florida's
.. LFuture!


SWHY NOT RESTORE



NEW TESTAMENT CHRISTIANITY


DEPARTURE WAS FORETOLD
Through the centuries since the time of Christ and
His apostles, there have been many departures
from the teaching and practice of the Lord's church
in the first century. This, however, was foretold
in Paul's letter to Timothy, where he said: "Now
the Spirit speaketh expressly, that in the latter
times some shall depart from the faith, giving heed
to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils." -
(1 Tim. 4:1).
This can be clearly seen in comparing the teaching
and practice of many present day religions with
the New Testament.

COUNCILS OF UNINSPIRED MEN HAVE
MADE
Additions to God's Word!
Subtractions From God's Word
Substitutes for God's Word!
Such changes were condemned by the Lord in these
words: "But in vain do they worship me, teaching
for doctrine the commandments of men."-(Matt.
15:9).

CONCLUSION: We individually are committed to the te
as made known by the Lord, and set forth in the Bible.


RESULTS OF MAN'S REJECTING
GOD'S WORD
These perversions have resulted in many departures
from the practice and teachings of the first century.
Man-made commandments have:
1. Led many away from the purity and simplicity
of Divine teaching.
2. Brought division and confusion in religion.
3. Dishonored the wishes and arrangements of
Christ.
4. Obscured the Bible as the rule of faith and
practice.

THE WORLD'S GREATEST NEED TODAY:
To restore respect for obedience to the Word of
God, the Bible!
To restore the church of the Lord as He estab-
lished it!
To restore the same conditions of membership
in God's Kingdom!
To restore the unity and oneness of God's
people!
To restore the spirit of fellowship and love found
in New Testament times!

ask of restoring and obeying New Testament teaching


THE CHURCHES OF CHRIST make this plea even at the risk of incurring the disfavor of other religionists.
We are of the conviction that the matter of pleasing God is infinitely more important than pleasing man. This
conviction is based upon the following scriptures:


"For do I now persuade men or God? Or do I seek
to please men, for if I yet pleased men, I should not
be the servant of Christ." (Gal. 1:10).


"But as we are allowed of God to be put in trust
with the gospel, even so we speak; not as pleasing
men, but God which trieth our hearts." (4
Thess. 2:4).


Are You Not Interested In A Plea Of This Kind?
VISIT, WRITE OR CALL


CHURCH
20th Street and Marvin Avenue


of CHRIST
Phone 229-3761


r





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SANDWICH pkg. 35c
Strietmann Fudge, 14 oz. cello
STRIPE 2 cellos 89c

WE
GIVE ST
vs ~ ~ SA v Pwss S'?


PRICES EFFECTIVE
OCT. 20, 1, 22 and 23
Quantity Rights Reserved
WE GIVE S&H STAMPS


SSUNNYLAND BOBWIITE SLICED

BACON


What Is USDA CHOICE BEEF?
"USDA CHOICE" GRADE BEEF is beef that has been graded choice by the United States De-
partment of Agriculture. The Department impartially grades beef for quality in the meat pack-
ing houses. There are several Government grades of beef: Prime Grade, the highest grade
(available in only small quantities); Choice Grade, the highest grade available in sufficient
quantities for food stores which specialize in gourmet quality .. Then there is Good Grade,
Standard Grade, Commercial Grade, Utility Grade and Cutter and Canner Grade. Piggly Wgigly
proudly features USDA Choice Grade!


SUSDA CHOICE
HEAVY MATURE BEEF
,-CT ROUND or RIB
Am STEAKS

POUND
OCTOBER IS BEEF MONTH


ENJOY
QUALITY
TENDER
MEAT!


HEAVY MATURE BEEF

STEAK
T-BONE I


OCTOBER IS BEEF MONTH VS V


1 Lb.
Pkg.


USDA Choice
1st Cut Chuck
Roast
POUND

49c


USDA Choice
Shoulder
Roast
POUND
69c


Fresh
Beef
Liver
POUND

33c


SPIGGLY WIGGLY GROUND BEEF IS GROUND FRESH IN OUR MARKET SEVERAL TIMES DAILYI


PLYMOUTH BRAND

MAYONNAISE
QUART JAR
YOU SAVE 16c!
LIMIT .'One Jar with $7.00 or More Order


Borden's
BISCUITS
8 Oz.
Can
Armour Potted
MEAT
33c. 399
Armour
STREET
Cans
Armour Vienna
SAUSAGE
5 Oz.
35z 794
Cans 79
Home Grown Sweet
POTATOES
Lb. T10
Texas
CARROTS
Cello m
Bag log


Hunt's Tomato 46 Oz. can
JUICE 3 cans
Hunt's Fruit--No. 300 can
COCKTAIL 4 cans
Hunt's Solid Pak-No. 300
TOMATOES 6 cans
Hunt's Tomato-14 0.
CATSUP 5 btls.


HORMEL WITH BEANS
14 Oz.
CHILI 3 C
CHICKEN OF SEA LT. CHUNK
TUNAA 3
Cans


FIRESIDE SANDWICH
CREMES 3


V2 Lb.
Crtns.


ENJOY THE
VERI BEST ,

PRODUCE
FIRM, TROPICALLY
GROWN, GOLDEN RIPE

Bananas
POUND
PLEASURE SHOP PIGGLY
WIGGLY for DEW-LICIOUS
PRODUCE!


MORTON,
frozen


Dinners
11 OZ. SIZE. EA.

REG. 2 FOR 89c
ENJOY QUICK, EACY and
DELICIOUS DINNERS!


- SAV E


Yellow Rose
Peanut Butter
3 Lb. Jar


i


* Johnson's Glo-Coat
WAX
27 Oz. Size
$1.00 Size Woodbury
SHAMPOO
only 69c


Eastern Grown Red
APPLES
4 Ib. baa


1 1 c -


Ga. Grade "A" Small


EGGS 3 doz.
In Cartons

The Best to You Each Morning
KE 0 G SG
K LL


CORN

FLAKES
8 OUNCE BOX

YOU SAVE 6c-



SPECIAL NON-FOOD SPECIALS --
9 INCH PIE-Pkgs. of 12 Lanolin Plus Hair (SAVE 42c)
PLATES 2pkgs. 66c SPRAY 14 oz. 57c
Round Casserole with Woodbury With Dispenser
COVER only 66c LOTION btl. 69c
COLGATE TOOTH-


PASTE
GIANT SIZE TUBE


(Save 1Qc) Supreme Big Scoop
MILK
Gal. Ctn.
LIMIT ... One crtn. with $7.00
or more order.


People Deserve the Best -at Piggly Wiggly You Get It! Your Pleasure Is Our Policy


- -


''









THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21 ,1965


NEED A PLUMBER?
CALL BEAMAN
Plumbing Installation Repairs
Contract Work A Specialty

Agents for
Brand Name Plumbing Fixtures
CALL US FOR FREE ESTIMATES -

,TWO EXPERIENCED PLUMBERS TO SERVE YOU

BEAMAN PLUMBING SERVICE


1107 GARRISON AVE.


PHONE 227-2541


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


Pin Points
Amison's Seafood held first in
the league this week by winning
three of four games from the sec-
ond place team, Jitney Jungle.
Verna Burch led Amison's with
high game, 154, afd high series,
438. Evelyn Smith was out front
for Jitney Jungle with a good se-
ries of 490. Evelyn had two high
games of 185 and 190.
Dixie Seafood won 4-0 over Tap-
per's Seifators. Mary Brown led
Dixie Seafood with high game, 202,
and high series, 548. Vivian Hardy
led the Senators with her 398 se-
ries. Mary Alice Lyon followed with
a 170 game and 395 series.
The Whitfield Strikers downed
Beaman's Plumbing 3-1. Jerry Free-
man bounced back (wearing red
and black knee socks) this week to
give the Strikers high game, 170,
and high series, 424. Eleanor Wil-
liams' 411 series was high for Bea-
man's. Loyce Beaman had high
game of 163 for Beaman's.
Pate's Shell Service and 13-Mile
Oyster Co. each took two games.
Debbie Tankersley led Pate's with
her 153 game and 387 series. Sonja
Taylor ,a new'bowler, had a good
game of 141. Sonja's 341 series was
second high for Pate's. Martha
Ward rolled high totals for 13-Mile
with a 155 game and 405 series. Ola
Jean Silva picked up her average
this week with a 149 game and 378
series. ..
As. we look over the Pin Points,
it can hardly go unnoticed that
some of the new bowlers are really
doing well. We continue to wish
them luck.
Standings: W. L.
Amison Seafood -------- 21 3
Jitney Jungle -------- 17 7
Dixie Seafood ___- __- 15 9
Beaman's Plumbing ____- 11 1i3
Whitfield Strikers ______ 10 14
13-Mile Oyster Co. ______ 9 15
Pate's Shell Service ----- 7 17
Tapper's Senators 6 18


Friday afternoon


a parade


A beautiful tribute..

Personalized

Service
At time of sadness every
comfort is extremely im-
portant to the immediate
family. We spare no effort
in aiding you with
that lasting and thought-
ful tribute.

Comforter
Funeral Home
601 Long Avenue
Phone 227-3511
Serving Gulf County
-. Since 1946

* U


Legal Adv.
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S
COURT, GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE.
In Re: Estate of
ERVIN BOSWELL,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All creditors of the estate of Er-
vin Boswell, deceased, are hereby
notified and required to file .any
claims or demands which they may
have against said estate in the of-
fice of the County Judge of Gulf
County, Florida, in the Courthouse
at Wewahitchka, Florida, within
six (6) calendar months from the
date of the first publication of
thL. h.vtice. Each claim or demand
must be in writing and must state
the place or residence and post-
office address of the claimant and
must be sworn to by the claimant,
his agent, or his attorney, or it will
become void according to law.
SILAS R. STONE,
Executor of the Estate of
Ervin Boswell, deceased.
First Publication: September 23,
1965. 4t


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT,
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
GULF COUNTY. IN CHANC-
ERY.
IN RE: Petition for Adoption of
CECIL REMEL WARREN
by JACK BOONE and wife,
ARMANDA BOONE
NOTICE TO APPEAR
TO: DOUGLAS WARREN, whose
place of residence and post of-
fice address is unknown.
YOU are hereby notified that the
above named Petitioners have fil-
ed a petition in th e abovestyled
Court for the adoption of the minor
child named therein, and you are
required to show cause why the
same should not be granted on or
before the 22nd day of November,
1965, by serving a copy of your
written defenses, if any, upon Hon.
Cecil G. Costin, Jr., Attorney for
the Petitioners, whose address is
221 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, Flor-
ida, and by filing the original there-
of with the Clerk of said Court,
otherwise a decree may be entered
against you granting said adoption.
WITNESS my hand and official
seal of said Court at Wewahitchka,
Gulf County, Florida ,this 6th day
of October, A. D. 1965.
/s/ GEORGE Y. CORE,
Clerk, Circuit Court.
4t--Oct. 14, 21, 28; Nov. 4


and Michele Anchors and David
Macomber.
After the game the Centennial
Building was the setting for the
traditional Homecoming dance
sponsored by the Key Club. The
Fabulous Fiascos of Panama City
furnished the music. A large crowd
was in attendance.
As an abrupt change of pace the
seniors are this week taking sen-
ior tests. These tests are a neces-
sary part of senior evaluation. Ac-
ceptance into many colleges de-
pends on these test scores.
During the next three weeks the
St. Joe Sharks will be traveling
each Friday night. Though each of
these games is a considerable dis-
tance, let's try to attend if possible
and thus encourage our much im-
proved team.
---- -( ____
GARDEN CLUB HOLDS
MONTHLY MEETING
The Port St. Joe Garden Club
held its regular monthly meeting
at the home of Mrs. Terry Hinote
on Thursday, October 14.
An interesting talk on the Art
Principle of Line in Flower Ar-
rangement was given by Mrs. Dave
Jones. She illustrated her lecture
with drawings, pictures and ar-
rangements of seasonal flowers,
which had been made by club mem-
bers.
Mrs. Tom Byrd spoke on the
Planting and Care of Bulbs. She
stated that now is the proper time
to plant narcissus and daffodils,
also amarillis bulbs may be potted
for house culture. Now is the prop-
er time to move amaryllis growing
outside if they have become crowd-
ed. Beds for bulbs should be en-
riched with peat moss or leaf mold
and a well-balanced commercial
fertilizer with some meal added.
Do not put bone meal near azaleas.
Twelve members and one visitor
were present. Refreshments were
served by the hostess.


Part Time Nursing Care Program For

Veterans Is Now In Effect, Says V. A.
St. Petersburg-M. T. Dixon, of attention from the doctors and
the Florida Department of Veter- nurses, and which can be taken-
ans Affairs, announced today that care of at home. While under the
the Veterans Administration has Home Nursing Care Program,. the
signed contracts with many com- veteran is ,at all times, under the
munity nursing agencies in all care of a fee-basis physician, Re-
parts of the state to put the part- gional Office physician, or in the
time nursing care program into ef- f ,
feet. case of'a patient on leave from a
VA hospital, by the physician on
The program enables the Veter- the hospital staff.
ans Administration to give higher For this care, Dixon said, prior
r do n te t e n For this care, Dixon said, prior
quality medical care to veterans
for service connected injuries or approval from the VA Regional Of-
for service connected injuries or lice must be obtained.
illnesses, and all Spanish American
War veterans who can be treated For information on this, Dixon
in their own homes under the suggested seeing the Veteran Coun-
Home-Town Medical Care Program. ty Service Officer, or write him at
The program is expected to free P. O. Box 1437, St. Petersburg.
beds in VA hospitals now occupied ----
by patients not requiring constant READ THE CLASSIFIEDS




NOTICE -


City of Port St. Joe business

Occupational Licenses are

now due.


Avoid penalty of 15% ef-

fective November 1.



J. B. Williams
Cty Treasurer


Two new Super Sport beauties
for '66-a hardtop and convertible
-propelled by nothing less than the
new Turbo-Jet 396 V8.
This remarkably efficient power plant,
with aircraft-type valves, deep-breath-
ing ports and other design advances,
develops 325 hp in the standard
version. And you're welcome to order
more-in a 360-hp version-if you're
so inclined.


ST. JOE NATURAL GAS CO., INC.


INVITES YOU TO SWITCH TO NATURAL GAS ALONG

WITH THE MAJORITY OF GAS FUEL USERS IN THE

CITY OF PORT ST. JOE AND OAK GROVE




1. NATURAL GAS IS MORE ECONOMICAL.

2. NATURAL GAS HAS A HIGHER BTU VALUE THAN LP GAS
(100,000 BTU PER THERM); THUS, HAS MORE HEAT
VALUE.

3. NATURAL GAS IS MORE DEPENDABLE.

4. LP GAS IS A BY-PRODUCT OF NATURAL GAS.

5. NATURAL GAS IS NON-POISONOUS.

6. THAT THE PRICE OF LP GAS WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN
REDUCED HAD IT NOT BEEN FOR THE AVAITARITTTY OF
NATURAL GAS (EVEN WITH REDUCTION OF LP GAS
PRICES, NATURAL GAS IS CHEAPER).

7. NATURAL GAS ALONE SUPPLIES APPROXIMATELY 28%
OF FUEL ENERGY PRODUCED IN THE UNITED STATES.

8. WHERE NATURAL GAS IS AVAILABLE, A GREATER MA-
JORITY OF PEOPLE UTILIZE IT OVER LP GAS FOR FUEL
PURPOSES.


'No LP gas dealer can sincerely deny that natural gas is cleaner, more
economical and has a higher heating value.


Just ask your neighbor who uses natural gas, and then call 229-3831 for your
free piping and conversion. Be sure to call before the winter rush.


We have experienced and dependable service personnel who are

always available to service your appliance and equipment.




Free Offer Until November 15th
A free service line and convresion of your appliances will be provided for
all persons in the City of Port St. Joe and Oak Grove Community presently
using LP gas, provided you contact the company and have your name listed
prior to November 15, 1965. This offer expires on that date.




ST. JOE NATURAL GAS CO., INC.


Both Chevelle SS 396 models ride on
a special flat-cornering chassis. A fully
synchronized 3-speed transmission with
floor-mounted stick shift is standard. Or
you can order a 4-speed or Powerglide
-also Strato-bucket front seats, center
console and full SS instrumentation.
Your Chevrolet dealer's is the place to
see how all this feels from behind the
wheel. He's a great believer
in letting the customers
handle the merchandise.


PHONE 227-2471


Shark Notes
By
MICHELE ANCHORS
After burning the midnight oil
so often during Homecoming Week
the students at Port St. Joe High
are probably ready for a rest. The
efforts of the clubs and organiza-
tions were outstanding during the
preceding week.
A bonfire pep rally started
spirit soaring on Thursday night.
The Key Club was in charge of this
pep rally and the band and cheer-
leaders performed.


through downtown began the fes-
tivities. This parade was made up
of floats, the band, cheerleaders,
and the Homecoming court. The
junior class took first prize in the
float competition. The senior class
was second and the Teen Club
third.
Miss Ronnie Prince was crowned
Homecoming Queen in the pre-
game activities. Student Body Pres-
ident, Dennis Dawson, crowned our
queen for 1965. Little Miss Debbie
Fowler was flower girl and Jay
Fleming was crown bearer. Miss
Prince was escorted by Eugene
Harper. Other members of the
court and their escorts were: Edith
McLawhon and Jerry Branch,
Diane Huckeba and Ronnie Atchi-
son, Rena Petty and Johnny Mad-
dox, Christie Coldewey and David
Lee, Ann Belin and George Small,


Now! New Chevelle


by Chevrolet


401 WILLIAMS AVE.


See the new '66 Chevrolet, Chevelle,
Chevy II, Corvair and Corvette at your dealer's
09-6942


JIM COOPER MOTOR CO., Inc.






















1Os" ANNIVERSARY

JUBILEE
THRIFT WAY s


THRIFTY WAY
TO GET GIFTS!


PLAID


STAMPS


"Super-Right" 4 Pork Loin Sliced Western


PORK



CHOPS

2 to 3 Lb.
Avg. Pkg.
Lb._ _---__ 6 9 c


ALLGOOD BRAND NO. 1 SUGAR CURED 1-Lb. Pkg.

SLICED BACON


69c


SULTANT QUICK FROZEN TURKEY, CHICKEN or BEEF 8 Oz. Pkgs.

MEAT PIES 5 pkgs. 79c
Allgood Brand Sugar Cured Cap'n John Quick Frozen Breaded
Sliced Bacon, 2 Ib. pkgs. $1.35 Shrimp -----2-lb. box $1.79
"Super-Right" All Meat Skinless "Super-Right" Pure Pork
Franks -1-lb. pkgs., only 59c Sausage -- 1-lb. bag 59c
ALL FLAVORS MARVEL BRAND Y Gal. Ctns.

ICE MILK 3 ctns. $1.00
SULTANA QUICK FROZEN CRINKLE CUT FRENCH FRIED

POTATOES 2 Ib.bag 29c
A&P Frozen Mixed Vegs., Fordhook Limas or A&P Really Fresh
Baby Limas 5 10-oz. pkg. 89c Instant Coffee, 10-oz. jar $1.09
A&P Frozen Concentrated Florida A&P Colored Mild
Orange Juice 6-S z. cans 89c Cheddar Cheese, 1-lb wedge 63c
Paper Towels "Super-Right" Corned
Scot Towels __-jumbo roll 33c Beef Hash, 3-15/2-oz. cans $1


ill!
F .... ..- Y





FRESH YOUNG


Ps2


/1.


TENDER CARROTS
2Lb.25o


Gerber Strained
Baby Food --....6 for 65c
Pepsodent Reg.-Giant Size
Tooth Paste ..----..-....53c
Pepsodent 9dult
Toothbrush .......----...-59c
Pepsodent Stripe
Tooth Paste, Ig. tube 31c
Green Giant
Sweet Peas, lb., 1 oz. 25c
Green Giant Golden
Niblets Corn, 12 oz. 23c
Green Giant
Mexicorn _-.....-12 oz. 23c
Green Giant-1-lb., 1-oz.
Peas with Onion ..........29c
Dry Detergent 124 Oz.
Trend ----.......2 pkgs. 39c
Detergent
Dove Liquid, pt, 6 oz. 65c


ROME APPLES ---_ 4 Ib. Bog
YELLOW ONIONS _-5 Ib. Bag
U. S. No. 1 Potatoes-5 Ib. Bag
Fla. Grapefruit -----5 b. Bag
MIX or
mmc aEm 3 for $1
MATCH 'EM O 1.

Anjou
PE AR S ------ b. 19c
Red Delicious
AP P L ES- ----b. 19c


Dutch 14 Oz.
Cleanser ---.....2 for 33c
Pillsbury
Biscuits .....----.. 8 oz. 10c
Morton's Frozen 8 Oz.
Pot Pie ---.........5 for 99c
Morton's Frozen Meat
Dinners --.......... 11-oz. 49c
Aunt Nellie's Small Whole
Pickled Beets, lb. jar 29c
Nine Lives Liver--6V Oz.
Cat Food .........2 for 35c
McCormick Vanilla
Extract_--2-oz. bottle 49c
Chicken of the Sea-62 Oz.
Chunk Tuna, 3 for $1.00
Hormel
Spam -......12-oz. can 57c
Chef-Boy-Ar-Dee Pepperoni
Pizza ......--1-lb., 1-oz. 69c


. Your dreams come true with
PLAID STAMPS
TH R AT TLANTIC & PAOCI R TEA COMPANY, INC.
510
S..- ..---Prices in thi
Satur


ir' )-


Jane Parker Delicious
LEMON

PIES


8-Oz. 39


1-Lb.,
Each


Jane Parker Glazed-Box of 12
Donuts .--- 39c
For Cooking Salads--8c Off
Crisco Oil, 1-qt., 6-oz. 69c
Regular Bars
Camay Soap ..2 for 25c
Liquid Detergent
Joy -.. 12-oz. bottle 35c
Fabric Softner
Downy-.. 1-pt., 1-oz. 47c
Liquid Cleaner
Mr. Clean ..-.....15 oz. 39c
Detergent
Oxydol-... 3-lb., 1-oz. 85c
Dole Pineapple
Juice, 1-qt, 14-oz. can 37c
Dole Crushed
Pineapple, lb., 4V2-oz. 35c
Dole Pineapple-Grapefruit
Drink .-- 1-qt., 14-oz. 39c
La Choy
Soy Sauce, 5-oz. bot, 21c
La Choy Chow Mein
Noodles -. 3-oz. can 19c
La Choy Chow SUEY
Vegetables, 1-lb. can 33c
FIFTH STREET'
is ad are good through
rday, October 23.


- I -U


Gardening In Florida...


TI-IE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21 ,1965


soils, or have special plants, you
may consider humoring the plants


By Hervey Sharpe, Editor, Florida, The main idea is to apply plant with a soil test and special mix
Agricultural Extension Service food that contains the major fer- wt ,. ,il an.
tij of fertilizer


Expecting plants to hibernate all
winter without food is like sending
a hungry child to bed minus his
supper-you are asking for trouble.
Plants perhaps won't whimper,
but they can make you worry al-
most as much as a wayward child.
So to keep from having night-
mares, be sure to feed your orna-
mentals adequately so they can
build up strength to survive the
cool weather ahead.
Many gardeners have a miscon-
ception about fall and winter fer-
tilization of ornamentals. They
think that fertilizing during these
seasons makes plants more likely
to get killed.
However, the opposite is true,
according to Agricultural Experi.
ment Station horticulturists.
Ornamentals need plant food at
least once every three months. And,
it doesn't matter which month you
start the cycle as long as you keep
adding plant food at regular inter-
vals.
Year around fertilizing program
makes sense when you consider
that in Florida some plant growth
occurs throughout the year. Re-
member, when the plant top is dor-
mant, usually the root system is
bearing for a spring flush of
growth for the above ground parts.
This takes plant food.
But don't over-fertilize. Scatter-
ing extra amounts of plant food-
just for good measure-may burn
plant roots. Applying excessive fer-
tilizer is a waste. It is just like
tossing a handful of dimes down
the drain.
Of course the correct amount to
use depends on the formula the
higher the formula the less you'd
use. Since an 8-8-8 fertilizer for-
mula is common, here are some
recommended rates using that for-
mula.,
Every three months apply about
2 pounds of 8-8-8 fertilizer per 100
square feet, or per 100 feet of row
if you are applying plant food to a
shrub border. This is a very small
amount when you consider that a
1 pound coffee can holds 2 pounds
of most commercial fertilizer ma-
terial.
For lawns apply about one pound
of actual nitrogen per 1,000 square
feet. If you are dipping your fer-
tilizer out of a bag of 8-8-8, you
would use 13 pounds of fertilizer
per 1,000 square feet of lawn area.
any gardeners get confused by
the vast array of fertilizers, brands,
and formulas available. However,
since plants can't read don't worry
too much if you apply an .99-99
"lawn special" to your rose bushes.


ENROLLING FOR MEDICARE
UNDER SOCIAL SECURITY
Now that medicare has been pass.
ed by Congress and made a part of
the Social Security Act, the Social
Security Administration has the
vast job of getting all persons who
are 65 years of age or within three
months of being 65 enrolled in this
program, according to John V.
Carey, the Social Security District
Manager in Panama City. This task
is going to be carried out in two or
three different ways.
Medicare consists of two provis-
ions-hospital insurance and medi-
cal insurance. Hospital insurance
is that part which pays for the hos-
pital bill. It is free. Medical insur-
ance will pay most of your doctor
bill and will cost $3 per month.
Anyone over age 65 already receiv-
ing Social Security benefits or rail-
road retirement benefits wlil auto-
matically be enrolled for hospital
insurance. These people will re-
ceive a card in the mail asking
them if they would like to enroll
for medical insurance. They do not
need to contact their local Social
Security office.
People receiving welfare pay-
ments will be contacted at a later
date and will be given an oppor-
tunity to enroll in the medicare
program.
"There is another group of peo-
ple we would like to contact at the
earliest possible moment," Carey
said. "This group is those people
over age 65 and not receiving So-
cial Security, welfare, railroad re-
tirement, or civil service annuity
payments." These people should
contact the Social Security office
or a Social Security representative
to sign up for medicare. If they are
presently age 65, they have only
until April 1, 1966, to apply for
this program.
For more information about the
new medicare program and about
other changes in the Social Secur-
ity provisions made by the 1965
amendments, you should contact
your local Social Security office.
The office for this area is located
at 1135 Harrison Avenue, Panama
City, Florida (telephone 763-5331).


tilizer elements nitrogen, phos-
phorus ad potassium-in a 1 to 1
ratio, such as a 6-6-6 or a 8-8-8
fertilizer. On most Florida soils
these mixtures of plant food will


Some subborn gardeners refuse
to buy special azalea fertilizer.
They claim that the some plant
food for lawns will make azaleas


produce good growth in most of grow. Of course the acid loving
your plants, including house plants. azaleas may turn a bit yellow after
Of course if you have special getting a sprinkling of "common"


fertilizer, but usually within a few
weeks all is forgiven and the shrub
returns to a happy green color.
Water is almost as important as
plant food. So if nature does not
cooperate by wetting the ground
after each application of plant food,
soak the ground from the city's
water supply.
For additional answers to your
fertilizer questions, contact your
county agricultural agent.


Two out of three traffic accidents -and nearly three out of four traffic deaths -occur on two-lane
roads. Last Memorial Day weekend, 474 Americans died in traffic accidents. All but 12 of these deaths
were on two-lane roads. Modern, four-lane highways drastically reduce accident, injury and death rates
and result in lower insurance rates. Yet, 43 percent of Florida's primary highway system is classified as
"poor" or "critical" by engineers. The $300 million Highway Improvement Amendment provides the means
for constructing 1241 miles of new, four-lane major route improvements. Projects were selected on the
basis of traffic volume, safety hazards, condition of present facility, area economic consideration and
other sufficiency ratings prescribed by the Florida Highway.Code. Provision is included for the state to
assist counties in buying rights-of-way on a 50-50 basis. One-third of the rights-of-way has already been
purchased. Florida's tremendous traffic growth has outrun the pay-as-you-build policy. The 1965 Florida
Legislature voted overwhelmingly in favor of this emergency program. You can assure Florida of an
adequate primary highway system now by voting for Amendment #4 on November 2nd.

FLORIDA FORWARD
VOTE FOR AMENDMENT NO. 4 NOV. 2


PUT A





GIANT


OF





POWER


IN YOUR HOME!






Guulf gas LP- GAS

The quiet, dependable,

economical fuel with the

power of a giant.

GET IT FROM




West Florida Gas

YOUR DEPENDABLE GAS DEALER

SERVING YOU BEST FOR 25 YEARS

Call 227-4291 Now


I I -I I U _


Nfflfaj~fm


T14E STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21 ,1965











Floats


---I


+ Pretty Girls


; Marching Band Equals Homecoming


Smith Tells of

European Travels
Kiwanian John Robert Smith ad-
dressed the Port St. Joe Kiwanis
Club at their regular meeting on
Tuesday of this week. Smith told
the Club of his recent trip to Eu-
rope where he attended the wed-
ding of his son, J. R., Jr., and tour-
ed several of the countries of Eu-
rope.
Smith said that the only time he
saw the sun shine in England was
above the clouds just before his
plane landed. He said the country
is a good one with wonderful peo-
ple and fine crops. Smith said that
he should have gone to Rome first,
however, since everywhere he went,
"the Romans had already been
there."
Smith emphasized that Europe is
fine but everything in the U. S. is
better. He said he was glad to get
back home to "get a drink of water
and a decent breakfast."


First Baptist Church WMU Met In

Circles During The Past Week


... --


L6L-~-*1


Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Forehand are pictured above at a birthday


Some of the friendliest and hap- parry given by nte Masonic Lodge and Order of Eastern Star last
piest people on his trip were found Saturday night honoring Mr. Forehand on his 100th birthday.
in Germany, Smith said. The Ger-
man people are hard working peo- Masons, 0.E.S. Honor W. C. Forehand
pie and some of the healthiest and
happiest he saw on the entire trip. With Birthday Party Saturday Night
Germany also had the best roads
of any country he visited. Members and guests of Masonic'after the passage of 100 years.
Two of the things that struck Lodge 111 and Gulf Chapter 191, Also displayed for the delight
Smith most was the habit of the Order of Eastern Star, met Satur- of everyone were pictures spanning
people of Europe to drink mostly day evening, October 16th, in the f f
beer and wine and never a drunk Masonic Hall to honor Mr. W. C. e e Mr hand.
to be seen and the visit he made Forehand in commemorating his The occasion, which was origin-
to St. Peter's in Rome to see this 100th birthday which occurred on ally planned for September 28th
big church over 600 feet long in- September 26th. but necessarily postponed because
side and "not a chair to sit on." of tropical storm "Betsy," was a de-
ests of the cl wre K on behalf of the Masonic Lodge, lightful affair, and the fellowship
Clubbers John Maddox andwere Ken Mr. Bill J. Rich, Worshipful Mas- and refreshments were enjoyed by
Clubbers John Maddox and Ken- ter, presented Mr. Forehand with everyone.
neth Geautreaux and Panama City an engraved gold pocket watch.
club members, Sam Morgan, John The honoree also received a lounge
Paul, Keith Johnson and Johnalso received a lo
Bradshaw. robe from the members of the


WOMEN OF PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH HOLD OCTOBER MEET
Mrs. Henry Campbell was hostess
-to the Women of the Presbyterian
'Church for the October circle meet-
ing at her home on Hunter Circle.
As the guests assembled they were
served delicious refreshments and
enjoyed a period of fellowship.
Mrs Leslie Spillers, incoming
president, opened the meeting with
-prayer. She served as moderator to
introduce the Book of Acts for
study for the 1965-66 church year.
The group studied the purpose of
the book, its relation to Luke, and
the general plan of the book. Mem-
bers were stimulated to study in-
dividually during the ensuing year.
Mrs. James Ghent invited the
circle to meet with her in Novem-
ber. Those present were Mrs. Les-
lie Spillers, Mrs. Warren Settle-
mire, Mrs. James Ghent, Mrs. Law-
rence Bissett, Mrs. John Robert
'Smith and Mrs. Henry Campbell.

Visiting Friends and Relatives
Mrs. Steve Lucas and daughter
Kim. are visiting in Port St. Joe
with friends and relatives. Steve
is currently on patrol aboard the
nuclear submarine USS John Ad-
amns.


Eastern Star.
On display were the many con-
gratulatory messages received by
Mr. Forehand, including one from
the President of the United States
and one from far-away South Af-
rica. Another message of particu-
lar interest came from a nephew,
Mr. John Forehand, Seattle, Wash-
ington, stating that his mother still
has the old family bible in her
possession and that the pages
showing the birtrs are still intact


NEWCOMERS
Recent newcomers to Port St.
Joe include:
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Mils, Ward
Ridge Trailer Park.
Mr. and Mrs. T. L Sharp, Ward
Ridge Trailer Park.
Mr. and Mrs. BillRobinson, Ward
Ridge Trailer Park.
Mr. and Mrs. Steve Johnson, 301
Highway 98, Highland View.
Mr. and Mrs. Angus Peterson,
White City.
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Mills, White
City.
Mr. and Mrs. Randall Godwin,
520% 8th Street.
Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Bennett, 510
8th Street.


MADE'S TAVERN
DINE Nf MzJANCEI
Apalachicola Across the Bdlge
Seafood and Steaks Our Specialty
Open Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Sunday 9 A. M. to 12
Friday and Saturday 9:00 A. M. to 1:00 A. M.
For Party Appointments Phone 670-9121


Circle No. 1 of First Baptist
Circle No. 1 of the First-Baptist
Church met Monday, Oct. 18th, in
the home of Mrs. Albert Blackburn
with seven members and one visit-
or present.
The meeting was called to order
by Mrs. T. E. Parker, Sr., Circle
Chairman. Mrs. L. W. Cox brought
the devotion. The scripture was
taken from Romans 13:11-14. Mrs.
Blackbburn read the call to prayer
and Mrs. Byron Smith led in
prayer.
It was the first meeting of the
new church year and there were
no reports, but plans were made
for the new year's work. The meet-
ing was dismissed with prayer by
Mrs. Parker.
Delicious refreshments were
served by the hostess.

Circle No. 2 of First Baptist
Circle No. 2 met Oct. 18th with
six members present. The meeting
was opened with prayer by Mrs. C.
G. Costin, circle chairman. Mrs.
Marshall was in charge of the meet-
ing. After a brief business session,
Mrs. E. C. Cason, program chair--
man, presented the program, "My
Church Seeing and Doing." Scrip-
ture reading was Ecclesiastes
3:1-11, Psalms 15, by Mrs. Lauri-
more. Taking part in program were
Mrs. Goodson and Mrs. C. G. Cos-
tin. The meeting was closed with
prayer by Mrs. Laurimore.
The hostess served refreshments
to the six members.

First Baptist Circle Three
Oct. 18, 1965 Circle Three First


Baptist Church met in the home of
Mrs. W. I. Cardin. Four members
present, one new member.
The meeting was opened with
prayer by Mrs. W. J. Daughty, Cir-
cle Chairman. After a business ses-
sion the meeting was turned over
to the program chairman, Mrs. W.
I. Cardin. Topic for program was
"Proclaiming Through Woman's
Missionary Society," given by Mrs.
W. I. Cardin and Mrs. Vlaudine
Vandevender. Closing prayer by
Mrs. W. J. Daughtry.
Refreshments were served by the
hostess.

CARD OF THANKS
While our hearts are still heavy
with grief we are not unmindful
of the many acts of kindness shown
to us by our many relatives, friends
and neighbors during the recent
tragedy that claimed the life of
our beloved husband and father,
D. A. (Buster) Rogers. We deeply
appreciate the words of comfort,
many prayers and beautiful floral
arrangements. We would especially
like to thank the people of the
Wausau Community for their many
acts of kindness and for the prep-
aration of meals during our days of
greatest need. Also to all the chur-
ches of the Wausau Community
and to the following ministers, Rev.
Dolton Owens, Rev. Terrell Green,
Rev. Curtis Peacock.
May God's richest blessings be
the reward to one and all.
Mrs. Mattie Rogers,
Children and
Grandchildren


Fields- Glass

Engagement
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Fields of
Perry, Florida, announce the en-
gagement and approaching mar-
riage of their daughter, Sherry,
to Doyle Glass, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Hoke Glass of Port St. Joe.
The' wedding will be an event -
of November 6 at the First As-
sembly of God Church, Perry.



Births
Mr. and Mrs. Harmon Ben Hen-
derson, Oak Grove, announce the
birth of a daughter, Stacey Lynn,
Oct 10, 1965.
*
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Allen Wald-
ing, 1305 Woodward Avenue, an-
nounce the birth of a son, Michael
Wade, Oct. 13, 1965.


Graham-Lanier
Engagement Is Told
Mrs. T. Frank Graham of Colum-
bia, Miss., announces the engage-
ment and approaching marriage of
her daughter, Ann, to Gary Clifton
Lanier, son of Mrs. Bruneese Lanier
of Tallahassee, formerly of Port St.
Joe. Miss Graham is presently em-
ployed with the Commercial Credit
Corp. of Tallahassee. Mr. Lanier is
employed with the Tallahassee
Bank and Trust Co.
The wedding will be an event of
November 13 in Tallahassee.





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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21 ,1965


Gulf Chapter 191, O.E.S., Honors


Associate Grand Matron of Florida
Gulf Chapter 191, O.E.S., honor- bow".
ed Mrs. Onie Mae Stephens of Mar- Another highlight of the meeting
iana, Associate Grand Matron of was the presenting of a small love
the Grand Chapter of Florida, Or- gift from the officers of the Chap-
der of the Eastern Star, with a ban- ter to Mrs. Ferne Forehand, Or-
quet in the social hall of the First ganist, who with her husband will
Methodist Church Tuesday evening, be moving from Port St. Joe in the
October 12. very near future to return to Cali-
The delicious meal, which was fornia to reside.
prepared by the members of the Among the distinguished guests
Women's Society of Christian Ser- introduced were: Mrs. Dorothy
vice, was made even more delight- Porter, Grand Warder of Apalachi-
ful by the rendition of a beautiful cola; Mrs. Mary A. Bass, Past
hymn, "It Is No Secret What God Grand Martha of Quincy; Mrs. Co-
Can Do", by Mrs. Virginia Arnold, rene Dykes, Past Grand Esther of
who was accompanied by Mrs. Eli- Panama City; Mrs. Gertrude Pur-
zabeth Tomlinson at the piano, cell, Past Grand Ruth of Grand
Following .the banquet, everyone Ridge; Mrs. Juanita Wade, Grand
was invited to reassemble in the Representative to Ohio, of St. An-
Lodge Hall for the regular meeting drew; Mrs. Eula Dickey, Grand
of the Chapter. Representative to Wyoming of
The Chapter Room was beauti- Port St. Joe; Mrs. Minnie Lee Al-
fully decorated, with the-predom- lan, Grand Instructor, District 3 of
inant color being blue. On the wall Parker and Mrs. Carmi Crutchfield
in the West two bluebirds held a District Chairman, Eastern Star
ribbon on which were the words Magazine of Wewahitchka.
"Bluebirds of Happiness", which Members of the following chap-
was the theme used throughout the ters were among the guests: Pan-
evening. ama 102, Wewahitchka 229, Gorrie
A lovely courtesy presented to 192 (Apalachicola), Parker 96, St.
Mrs. Stephens in verse form recit- Andrew 223, Marianna 129, Adrian
ed by officers on the floor was 25 (Grand Ridge), Union Hill 246
climaxed with the members sing- (Bonifay) and Washington 43 (Quin.
ing "Somewhere Over the Rain- cy).


Sparkman Circle

Met Monday
The Louise Sparkman Circle of
the Long Ave. Eaptist Church W.
M. U. met at the church Monday
night, Oct. 11.
The meeting was opened by the
call to prayer by Mrs. Keith Ward,
followed by the reading of the
Watchword and singing of the W.
M. U. song.
After a brief business meeting,
a very interesting program, "My
Church Seeing and Doing," was
presented by the program chair-
man, Mrs. John Hanson. Those tak-
ing part were Mrs. David Jenkins,
Mrs. Joe Fortner, Mrs. Danny Mad-
dox, MrsI Joe Parrott. Others pres-
ent were Mrs. Keith Ward, Mrs.
Theo Johnson, Mrs. Cecil Harrison,
Mrs. Neil Arnold, Mrs. John Young,
Mrs. Edward Ramsey. We welcome
one new member, Mrs. Joel Strait.
The meeting was closed with
prayer by Mrs. Neil Arnold. Re-
freshments were served by the hos-
tesses, Mrs. Joe Parrott and Mrs.
Edward Ramsey.


Class Installs New

Officers Sunday

Sunday at the Sunday School
hour Mrs. Elsie Grififn installed
the officers of the Marie Jones
Bible Class for 1965-66. The new
officers are as follows:
Mrs. Alma Jones, president; Mrs.
O. M. Taylor, vice-president; Mrs.
Elsie Parker, secretary and trea-
sursr. The theme for installation
was, "Christianity, The Light of the
Word".
On an altar table in the center
of the room was a huge white can-
dle. Surrounding it was a candle
for each officer. A red candle to
the right of-the large candle a,
large box of candles, one for each
member of the class and its visi-
tors.
As Mrs. Griffin read the beauti-
ful installation service, the officers
formed a circle, then Mrs. Griffin
lighted the red candle symbol of
Jesus shed blood.
The service was closed with a
prayer of dedication.



School


Menu
Port St. Joe Elementary School
Monday, Oct. 25-Baked beans,
spiced ham, buttered spinach, cel-
ery sticks, cherry pie, white bread
and butter, milk.
Tuesday, Oct. 26-Cheeseburgers,
snap beans and potatoes, sliced to-
matoes, lemon pudding, butter,
milk.
Wednesday, Oct. 27--Pork and
rice, mustard greens ,spiced beets,
peanut butter candy, white bread
and butter, milk.
Thursday, Oct. 28--Fresh stew
beef and brown gravy, mashed po-
tatoes ,cabbage slaw, sliced peaches,
white bread and butter, milk.
Friday, Oct. 29-Tuna fish salad,
English peas, potato sticks, orange
juice, chocolate cake, white bread
and butter, milk.


Eta Upsilon Meets
With Mrs. Pridgeon
The Eta Upsilon Chapter of Beta
Sigma Phi held its regular bi-
monthly meeting October 19 at the
home of Ann Pridgeon. The presi-
dent, Shirley Daniels, presided
over the meeting and Ann Prid-
geon was hostess.
The ways and means chairman
notified the members that the
tickets are now available for the
fish fry to be held November 12.
Tickets can be obtained from any
Eta Upsilon member.
Cookbooks are on sale also at
$1.00 each. Included in the book
are personal recipes of well-known
personalities here in Port St. Joe,
The cultural program was pre-
sented by Shirley Daniels on "Jew-
elry", and a social hour followed.
11

CARD OF THANKS
I would like to express my
thanks and appreciation to my
many friends who sent flowers,
cards, food and other gifts, also
phone calls and visits, to me while
in hospital and during my conva-
lesence at home,
To the entire hospital staff arid
Dr. Wayne Hendrix who minister-
ed to my needs while, in hospital.
May God's richest blessing abide
with each of you. Again, thank you.
Mrs. W. S. Smith.

SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAR


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


You Are Cordially Invited To Attend

Long Ave. Baptist Church

Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 A.M
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 P.M.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ................ 6:45 P.M.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) ...... 7:30 P.M.

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME
REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor
Air Conditioned Centrally Heated




FIRST METHOIlIS CHURCH
Intersection Monument and Constitution
REV. THOMAS S. HARRIS, D.D, Minister

Church School 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 AM.
Methodist Youth Fellowship 6:00 P.M.
Evening Worship 7:30 P.M.
Bible Study (Wednesday) 7:30 P.M.
"Where Old Fashioned Friendliness Still Surives"


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Third St. and Baltzell Ave. C. Byron Smith, Pastor

SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 AM.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP 5:00 P.M.
TRAINING UNION 6:15 P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ........ 7:30 P.M.

"Come and Worship God With Us"
I


I


Agriculture Department
Issues Annual Yearbook
Gainesville-The 1965 Yearbook
of Agriculture, "Consumers All,"
s off the press.
U. S. agricultural yearbooks have
been published since 1844, but this
s the first completely devoted to
consumer interests.
A giant how-to-do-it, it has some-
hing of interest to every member
of the family-the gardener, the
handyman, the homemaker, even
the youngsters. Its 496 pages are
packed with valuable facts-infor-
nation on buying and using food,
clothing, household furnishings
and equipment, improving com-
nunities and using leisure time.
Food is given major attention,
including diets for weight watch-
ers, savings in buying food, and
suggestions for preparing meat,
vegetables, dairy products, bread,
beverages, and other areas.
Two nutritionists with the Flor-
ida Agricultural Extension Service,
Mrs. Susan C. Camp and Miss Izola
Williams, prepared a section on
new ways with fruit, giving infor-
mation on choosing and using fruit.
The Yearbook may be purchased
for $2.75 from the Superintendent
of Documents, Washington, D. C.
20402. In addition, each member
of Congress has a set number of
copies for free distribution.


Royal Arch Masons Will
Attend White City Church
All Royal Arch Masons and their
families are requested to attend
the 11:00 a.m. services at the First
Baptist Church in White City,
Sunday, October 23.
THOMAS J. ADKINS,
High Priest

Beta Sigma Phi To
Sponsor Fish Fry
The Beta Sigma Phi will spon-
sor a fish fry at the Centennial
Building on November 12. The sup-
per will be served from 5:00 to
7:00 p.m.
Proceeds from the sale will be
used for club projects.
Tickets may be purchased from
all club members. .- ---w.
----- --9 -.-- --
GULF COUNTY ACTIVITIES
INCORPORATED HERE
Tallahassee-Secretary of State
Tom Adams today announced the
chartering of the following corpor-
ation:
Gulf County Civic Activities, Inc.,
NP 9733, Post Office Box 967, Port
Saint Joe, Florida. Filed October 8,
1965, by Hal A, Davis, Esquire, Citi-
zens Bank Building, Quincy Flor-
ida. Purpose; to promote Ameri-
canism. Subscrgibers: John T.
Simpson, Ralph F. Maxwell, Jr., A.
E. Daniell, all of Port Saint Joe,
Florida.

Visiting Son and Family
Mrs. P. O. Cooper of Ochlochnee,
Ga., is visiting this week with her
son, Ivey Cooper and family.







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21 ,1965


Florida Greeting Service,
Inc.
A cordial welcome awaits you from
the local :merchants and civic
organizations of Port St. Joe.

Brought to you by our local hostess
If you are a newcomer, please call
MRS. ANNE JOINES
1002 Garrison Avenue Phone 229-1686





JOREE- rWOOS OIRIS..


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End those rainy-day blues! See-your appliance dealer now.
(You'll love your Fiesta-perk!)


A GOOD BREAKFAST IS AN
ESSENTIAL SAY NUTRITIONISTS
Tallahassee Children are more
apt to do well in studies and rec-
Sreation if they go to school with a
good breakfast, say nutritionists
with the Florida Agricultural Ex-
tension Service.
Back your children up with a
good breakfast every day. You'll
not only be starting them off right
in the morning, you'll be helping
them develop a habit valuable to
them all their lives.
If breakfast is a problem at your
house, careful planning may be the
answer.


If the family eats at different
times, or if a child must be left to


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Hunters Responsible for Accidents In

Woods Says Game Department Head
. Tallahassee With the opening been prevented through proper
of hunting season, W. B. Copeland, hunter safety training and common
chairman of the Florida'Game and sense.
Fresh Water Fish Commission, re- According to Copeland, the Game
minded hunters that they are re- and Fresh Water Fish Commission
sponsible for hunting accidents and serves as the hunter safety train-
pointed out that accidents involv- ing coordinator for the sportsmen
.ng firearms can be decreased if of Florida and the National Rifle
sportsmen will remember to follow Association. The Commission is the
:he simple rules of hunting safety, clearing house for hunter safety
Last season there was a total instructors. This activity provides
of sixty-one hunting accidents in- instructors with training materials,
evolving firearms, fifteen of which examinations and maintains a cur-
were fatal, all of which could have rent listing of qualified safety in-
structors.
At the present time there are
405 qualified hunter safety instruc-
tors located throughout Florida.
These instructors are citizens who
have an interest in forearms and
hunter safety and who contribute
Their time to help make Florida a
safer place for the sportsman.
Young sportsmen who desire
Basic training in hunter safety
should contact the Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission for the
name and address of their nearest
'1 i hunter safety instructor. Senior
sportsmen who would assist by
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safety.


Copeland said, "To encourage
gun safety and to reduce hunting
accidents the following ten com-
mandments of firearm safety
should be memorized and observed
by every hunter:"


1. Treat every gun with the re-
spect due a loaded gun.
2. Watch the muzzle! Carry your
gun safely; keep safety on until
ready to shoot.
3. Unload guns when not in use,
take down or have actions open;
guns should be carried in cases to
shooting area.
4. Be sure the barrel is'clear of
obstructions, and that you have
ammunition only of the proper size
for the gun you carry.
5. Be sure of target before you
pull trigger; know identifying fea-
tures of the game you hunt.
6. Never point a gun at anything
you do not want to shoot; avoid all
horseplay.
7. Never climb a tree or fence or
jump a ditch with a loaded gun;
never pull a gun toward you by
the muzzle.
8. Never shoot at a flat, hard
surface or water. Be sure of your

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backstop when target practicing.
9. Store guns and ammunition
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children.
10. Avoid alcoholic beverages be-
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take little preparation. Stock
plenty of fruit, juices, and ready-
to-eat cereals. Hard cook eggs and
fix bacon early to leave for lat-
comers.
If Mother works ,every morning
minute counts. Mix frozen juice or
squeeze fresh juices the night be-
fore. Chill canned juice overnighiT
Serve cheese as an alternate for
eggs.
Serving food your family likes
makes breakfast brighter for every-
one. Just try to see that fruit, ce-
real or bread (or both), and milk-
with sometimes a hearty food like
meat, eggs, cheese-are included
in one form or another.
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eat breakfast alone, keep ready-to-
eat foods on hand or foods that SAY YOU SAW IT IN THE STAF










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ON 0 I0


Installed
NO MONEY DOWN


-0


Phone 227-5111


5 .1


Your shocks are probably busted
if your car's front or rear sags, if
the wheels bounce off the road
or if the car sways in turns.
Let us instaH a new set of shocks today!


V/


SFamous Make 10%4
B TTERIS 6-vexol
D rRg 'exchange


Pate's Service Center


TYNE'S STANDARD SERVICE


~i~H~89~


I
r

I
i
t


d


~BBIS~iB







The Only Home Owned and Operated Super Market In Port St. Joe


PILLSBURY

BISCUITS


FILL YOUR CART WITH SAVINGS \
Every department throughout our store has waiting for you,
many added values during this outstanding "IGA Red Letter
i Day" week. Be prepared to stock up on quality foods the
entire family will enjoy. Tender TableRite meats, fresh fruit
and vegetables, tasty dairy and bakery products, flavorful
frozen foods, and a wide selection of canned and packaged
foods are at your fingertips when shopping at your friendly
IGA. Visit us today you'll be glad you did.
MARTHA WHITE 10 LB. BAG WITH $5.00 ORDER
FLOUR 10 Ibs. 99c
KRAFT MACARONI
DINNER 2 pkgs. 39c
IGA SPECIAL BLEND FOR HALF LB. PKG.
ICED TEA pkg. 59c


:Try and Compare, Guaranteed None Better
Anywhere "Take My Word"
OUR TABLERITE BEEF IS EXCLUSIVE HEAVY
WESTERN AGED U. S. CHOICE STEERS
Through long and careful searching of grade and
quality we now feel assured of our customer's
'satisfactionrDon't be short changed;-call for. .

TABLERITE BEEF


FRESH PORK LEAN

Spare Ri
Fresh Sliced
PORK LIVER
lb. 35c
Our Own-Pork
SAUSAGE
Ib. 49c
Boneless Rolled 'N tied
Pork Shoulder
R RO AST
Ib. 69c
Tender, Flavorful
PORK STEAK
lb. 59c
TWO THUMB
Oyster Gloves
3 pair $1.00


THESE SPECIALS GOOD
Our Budget Sliced Grad(
BACON ___-- Ib. 49c HEN
Sunnyland Sm6ked
PICNICS ------ Ib. 29c Legs
First Cut Pork QUP
SALT BACON Ib. 39c
Tablerite and Proten Cut
NO. 7 STEAK Ib. 49c Whc
All Meat For
STEW BEEF __ Ib. 49c SPU'
Cube
STEAK ___------ Ib. 69c


WE HAVE A LARGE VARIETY OF HALLOWE'EN
Supplies Candy Pumpkins
PILLSBURY PANCAKE
FLOUR 2 Ib. pkg. 39c


IGA APPLE NO. 303 CANS
SAUCE
IGA LIQUID 22 OZ. BTL.
DETERGEN
PENNY TALL CANS
DOG FOOD


4
MIRACLE 6-S'
OLEO
KRAFT VELV
CHEESE
KRAFT BLUE
DRESSING


ANS 29

TICK
Slb. pkg. 29c
EETA
2 lb. pkg. 79c
CHEESE t 29c
8 oz.btl. 2


2 cans 33c


btl. 39c


13 cans $1.00


MORTON APPLE, PEACH, CHERRY

FRUIT PIES
20 25.
Pie 25c


IGA FROZEN
WAFFLES -------- 6 oz. pkg.


IGA 12 OZ. CAN
ORANGE JUICE ---- 3 cans $1.00
APALACHEE BREADED
TIDBIT SHRIMP -- 20 oz. box 99c


Ga. Grade "A" Large
ONE DOZEN

F R E E

EG GS
With $10 Order or More


C


bs


BONELESS BUTTERFLY
PORK CHOPS Ib.
SLICED QUARTER
PORK LOIN
EXTRA LEAN-PICNIC STYLE
PORK ROAST
FRESH SHOULDER.
SLICED PICNICS-
FROSTY MORN
SLICED BACON
FROSTY MORN HONEY GOLD
SAUSAGE lb. pi
EXTRA LEAN 'N TENDER-PORK
CUBE STEAK
FRESH PORK
NECK BONES
FRESH
PORK HOCKS
FRESH 'N LEAN PORK
PORK BRAINS


We Cash
PAYROLL
CHECKS


$1.09

lb. 59c

Ib. 35c

Ib. 43c

Ib. 73c

kg. 59c

Ib. 79c

lb. 29c

Ib. 39c

Ib. 35c


IGA

EVAP.

MILK
3 T

39c


WE BUY AND SELL
GOOD PECANS
IDAHO BAKING 5 LB. BAG
POTATOES bag 49c


LARGE SLICING
CUCUM B ERS
EXTRA LEAN TRIMM

PORK CF


Center
l'


Center Cut
RIB 75c
Pound


LARGEST SELECTION OF
FRUIT CAKE MIX
IN TOWN AT THE BEST PRICE!
RED, FULL POUND ONLY
CHERRIES
NATURAL
PINEAPPLE 7
ORDER OR MORE

3 Ib. can 59c


1 Ib. can 59c


3 pkgs. 79c


RED TOKAY
GRAPES
NEW CROP SHELLED
PECANS


CELLO BAG
4for 19C CARROTS
WHITE or COLORED
ED BUTTER BEANS
NO STRINGS
i.OpS TENDER BEANS --
LARGE BUNCHES GEORGIA
ct COLLARDS TURNIPS
IN ri NO. 1
SN SWEET POTATOES


Pound


WEDNESDAY MORNING ONLY, OCT. 20, 8:00 TO 12:30 SHOP RICH'S WEDNESDAY AND SAVE!


e A, 3 to 4 Ib.
IS
and Breast
ARTERS --.-....
up for Frying
)le FRYERS __
Barbecuing
T FRYERS._-- -
POUND-_____


FRESH PEAS
Yellow
SQUASH lb.
EGG PLANT
RUTABAGAS
Butter
BEANS __
Pole
BEANS __ Ib.
Tender Green
BEANS .----


5c


lOc


Red Delicious
APPLES __


Ib. 5c


ORANGES, APPLES
LEMONS, G'FRUIT
3 bags $1.00
Mix or Match
2 doz. EGGS FREE
With $10.00 Order


IGA-With $5.00 order
ICE MILK -_ /2 gal. 29c
Bottle
Pepsi Colas ----_ 5c
Jergen's Bath Size
SOAP __--__ bar 10c


Maxwell House
With $5.00 Order
COFFEE ---- Ib.


Ib. 15c


jar 69c

bag 1Oc


Ib. 15c
- MUSTARD
Ib. 1Oc


ALL SIZES ALL PRICES
PUMPKINS FOR HALLOWE'EN
WHITE ACRE PEAS -BLACKEYE PEAS
WHITE or COLORED BUTTER BEANS
3 bags $1.00


THESE PRICES GOOD
OCTOBER 20
THROUGH 23


'he Only Home Owned and Operated Super Market In Port St. J<


10c


BAKING SHORTENING-SWIFT'S .WITH $5.00

JEWEL
MAXWELL HOUSE -- WITH $5.00 ORDER

COFFEE
WHITE, YELLOW, DEVILS FOOD IGA

CAKE MIXES


I


o r II -Ib~ 1 sP ~


~a~-d 'I 'r


I 'III 'Ep II ~P'


- II i


- -


foeI


II 'I' I


--1 ITJ


SAVE CASH AT RICH'S .. NOT STAMPS


SAVE CASH AT RICH'S ... NOT STAMPS!


!
!





SPECIALS for WEDNESDAY MORNING, THURSDAY, FRIDAY and


E


SATURDAY, October 20, 21, 22, 23, 1965


401 REID AVENUE


PURS

PLEA!
DOMINO ,


RITTER BREMNER'S
TOMATO MARSHMALLOW
JUICE 3
qt. 29 Pies37
FOLGER'S Limit 1 with $7.00 Order


PORT ST. JOE, WLORIDA


WE GIVE DOUBLE GRAND PRI8E STAMPS
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
Pink Lotion LUX Regular Size --- -
Pink Lotion SWAN Regular Size -__-
Diamond-35 Ft. Roll Jack & Bean Stalk 303 Can
AluminumFoil SWEET PEAS _--- can 19c
SStokely No. 2 Can
Roll 19c Grapefruit Juice _2 for 33c
BAMA


PEANUT BUTTER


12 Oz. Jar


27c


DETERGENT GIANT SIZE


Limit 1 With $7.00 Order
AUNT JEMIMA 5 LB. BAG


GRITS
JITNEY JUNGLE ALL
CAKE
MIX


Lb.
Can


FLAVORS

pkg. 25c SARDINES


c


can 10c


SIDE OF BEEF


lb. 49c


Cut and Wrapped


Due to Your Tremendous
Response... HERE IT IS AGAIN!


I 3 1 ~ji
W, -~l


CLIP ENTIRE LIST BRING TO
GET FREE STAMPS


Fore Quarter Hind Quarter
lb. 43c lb. 63c
i..-


All Cuts From Heavy Western Beef Use Our Budget Plan


.---100 with $7.00 ORDER or MORE
___50 with Any Size HI-C DRINK
--_.-. 50 with 6 Oz. SWEET 10
.---- 50 with Qart BRUCE'S WAX
-_-- _25 with One Can BON-AMI
.- _-50 with 2 Pkgs. HALLOWE'EN CANDY
FRESH PRODUCE
10-OZ. CUP


DATES
FRESH GREEN


33c


ROUND STEAK
Ib. 79c
Top Round
STEAK lb. 089
Sirloin Tip Roast

Ground Beef


Rib Steak lb. 69c
Shop & Save at Jitney Jungle

Ib. 99c

3 Ibs. 99c


EXTRA WEDNESDAY MORNING SPECIALS


Prestone
Antifreeze
$Gal. 1.69


Jitney Jungle
ICE CREAM
1/2 gal. 39c
Limit 1


Kraft's
PARKWAY
lb. 19c
Limit 2


Fresh Ground
BEE F


Red


GRAPES


3 Ibs. 89c lb. 10c


BEEF
Chuck
Roast Ib,
SHOULDER
Round
Roast lb.

Rump Roast


C


C


Ib. 69c


POLE BEANS
Ib. 19c
FRESH YELLOW
SQUASH
2 Ibs. 25c
DELICIOUS
APPLES
lb. 19c
FIRM HEAD
LETTUCE
large head 15c


'/r)


5 Ib.
bag


bag 37c


~B~db~~lb~hr~'iCPsB~it~ ~ ~ ~ L ~~P~I~ a~


STORE





IMIMMI 1111


j
i









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


Guys and Dolls
Due to the work schedule of
some of our bowlers, four teams
played earlier in the week and two
'Mayed on Friday night. Here's how
the games came out.
On Lanes 1 and 2, St. Joe Steve-
dore took all four games from
Carp's. Bowling high for the Steve-
dores was Jim Glover with a game
of 217 and a 551 series. Dixie
Glover, a substitute, had a 496 se-
ries and Ruby Lucas 516. And Rob-
ert Montgomery, a substitute, add-
ed a 538. Mary Roberts bowled high
for Carp's with a 491 series. Har-
ley Roberts added a 460 series. Ed-
ward Youngblood was bowled blind
with a 465 series. Evelyn Smith, a
substitute, had a 578.
On Lanes 3 and 4, St. Joe Furni-
ture took all four games from Unit-
ed Real Estate with Colin Tharpe
bowling three fine games for St.
Joe Furniture, of 194, 214 and 218,
and a 632 series. Elise Rogers
bowled a 190 game with a 541-se-
ries and Barbara Tharpe added a
-Si0, and Vance Rogers had a 465
series. Francis Kirkland bowled
high for the losing team with a
game of 193 and a 513 series. Con-
riie Kirkland had a game of 203
tand a 469 series. Loyce Beaman
added a 447 series and Jim Bea-
man a 443.
On Lanes 5 and 6, Florida Bank
took three games and, 13-Mile one.
Joe Davis bowled three fine games
:for the winning team of 234, 206
and 181 and a 621 series. Lamar
Moore had a 189 game and a 505
series. Sue Moore had a 506 series
and Joy Nel Davis added her 485.
:Buddy Ward bowled high for 13-
'Mile with a 512 series. Donna
Ward had a 199 game and a 509
series.. Martha Ward had a 194
game and a 503 series. Wayne
Ward had a 189 game and 502
.series.
Stanadings: W. L.
Florida Bank 18 6
13-Mile Oyster Co. ______ 15 8
St. Joe Furniture ________ 14 10
United Real Estate ----_ 12 12
.St Joe Stevedore -------11 13
Carp's 2 22

Merchants' Bowling League
By Robert Montgomery
The standings took a shuffling
tlonday night asaall eight lanes-got
busy. Finally, St. Joe Lanes and 13-


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21 ,1965


Our

Growing

Forest :
by
Carl F. Muller
Bay, Gulf
Farm Forester -


Mile broke the spells hanging over
them.
On Lanes 1 and 2, St. Joe Lanes
took four from St. Joseph Tel. and
Tel. Co. Wayne Smith swung back
into action with a 506 for St. Joe
Lanes. Virgil Daniels is keeping
up honors for St. Joseph Telephone
as he rolled 524.
Lanes 3 and 4 saw Cooper's Chev-
rolet take four from Vitro II. Ralph
Ward started the season with a
whale of a series, 614. Russell Wil-
liamson was high again for Vitro
II with 398.
On Lanes 5 and 6, 13-Mile Oyster
Co. finally broke loose, taking
three close ones from top-ranked
Glidden. Al Jenson rolled 503 for
13-Mile, while Ed'Plagyi kept up
for Glidden with 515.
Lanes 7 and 8 saw Costin's take
over first place as they took three
from Vitro I.' Jimmy Costin got
into the spotlight with 511. Larry
Townsend was tops for Vitro I
with 467.
We congratulate Ralph Ward on
his big 614 series and high games
of 234 and 216. Joe Richards had a
208.
Standings: W. L.
Coston's 16 8
Glidden 14 10
Cooper's 14 6
Vitro I 10 10
St. Joe Lanes 9 11
St. Jos. Tel. & Tel. _---- 8 12
13-Mile Oyster Co. ----- 7 13
Vitro II 5 15

VETERANS FHA HOUSING
LAW NOW CLARIFIED
St. Petersburg-M. T. Dixon of
the Fla. Dept. of Veterans Affairs,
clarified today Public Law 89177,
(Housing and Urban Development
Act of 1965) approved and signed
by the President with an effective
date of August 10, 1965. This law
gives veterans who served during
any war period, and peacetime vet-
erans, more liberal treatment un-
der the Federal Housing Adminis-
tration Home Loan Insurance Pro-
gram, but does not apply to veter-
ans who have received home loan
benefits under the Veterans Ad-
ministration Loan Program.
Veterans interested should con-
tact their local Veteran County
Service Officer, for a form so the
VA can certify to the person's en-
titlment in "order to further ne-
gotiate for a home with FHA.


city and county organizations, Apa-
lachicola's second annual Seafood
Festival has been set for Saturday,
October 23, with plans underway
to be hosts to over 5,000 visitors
from Georgia, Alabama, and Flor-
ida points.
With a registration last year of
3,800 visitors, plans are underway
this year for many interesting
events which will keep the family
entertained from the big parade
which kicks off at 10:30 a. m.,EST,
through downtown Apalachicola,
followed by a short speaking pro-
gram which will feature Florida
Secretary of State Tom Adams as
the principal speaker; into the big
free seafood dinner at noon. In the
afternoon at 2:30 Tallahassee's Lit-
tle Big Top Circus, consisting of
school children from six to sixteen,
will be held at Memorial Ball Park.
Apalachicola Municipal Airport,
with its 3-mile long concrete run-
ways, will be the place to see the
latest model aircraft displayed by
eleven major aircraft manufactur-
ers. Aerial clubs from throughout
the southeast are expected to fly-


Since a large percentage of the
i male population would rather hunt
than eat, here are some interest-
ing notes concerning the compat-
ability of wildlife to the manage-
ment of timberland. Here in Bay
and Gulf counties many of us make
our bread directly or indirectly
from wood products. Thus, we can
say the production of wood is pri-
mary and the wildlife is second-
ary. Although wood production is
our primary goal ,we can produce
game simultaneously without any
ill effects on our timber yields. In
other words, wildlife management
and forest management are com-
patable if both give and take a
little.
Because the production of wild-
life is usually a secondary consid-
eration in the forest, the task of
S dSeafood Festival meeting the needs of wildlife must
SSeaf Festial be met while the forester is grow-
Sing a crop of wood. The chief re-
Free Seafood Dinner sponsibility of the forest manager
is to keep the lands occupied with
in also. trees of all ages and arranged so
A square dance exhibition will that a portion of the forest is ready
follow at. 4 p. m. at downtown for harvest each year. When this
Market Street, and a Teen-age task is accomplished ,a condition
street dance at 8:00 p. m. of sustained yield is possible. To
Among the many other outstand- get land into production on a sus-
ing events, the Philaco Women's tained yield basis, the land must
Club will sponsor an art exhibit at go through a series of changes from
the park by the LeMoyne Art Foun- open land to mature trees. The
nation of Tallahassee; plus a guid- wildlife management will still have
ed tour through historic Alapachi- to follow along behind the various
cola. timber production operations even
Before the big Festival Ball at after the cycle is set up. Due to
9:00 p. m. at the Armory, a gigantic these changing conditions, the va-
fireworks display will be featured riety and density of the game must
at 7:00 p. m. at Battery'Park. Af- vary with the stage of the timber
ter the crowning of the Seafood production cycle. This is a result
Festival Queen, will be drawings of wildlife having a different use
for oil paintings and a vacation lot for trees of different ages.
on beautiful St. George Island. There are several factors that
This year's Seafood Festival is must be consireder by the land-
coordinated by the Apalachicola owner before he sets up a joint
Chamber of Commerce and direct- wildlife and timber management
ed by Chairman Fred B. Mayson. program on his lands. First, the



Bowling News


Gulf County Ladies League
Rich's won three games from
Econo Wash with Mary Whitfield
leading Rich's with a 415 series.
Econo Wash won one with Ben-
nie Hunter leading her team with
a 390 series. They have a new bowl-
er. Her name is Margaret Player.
Welcome to the league, Margaret.
Cooper's Chevrolet won three
games from Raffield's Fisheries
with Joyce leading her team with
a 420' series. Irene Beamon picked
up the 5-7 split. Raffield's took one
with Jo Brown leading with a 424
series. She had a real good game,
a 183.
Comforter's won three games
from No. 7 with Mary Roberts lead-
ing with a 395 series. No. 7 won
one with Norma Hobbs leading
with a 402 series.
Will Whits Four took a turn for


U


the worse as they lost all four
games to Glidden, putting Glidden
in first place. Evelyn Smith led
Glidden with a 466 series. Mary
Brown led Whits Four with a 511
series. She had a fine game of 194.
Shirley Whitfield picked up the
5-10 split.
Standings: W. L.
Glidden 15 5
Rich's I. G. A. ___---- __ 14 6
Cooper's Chevrolet ------ 12 8
Comforter's 9 11
Whits Four 8 12
Raffield's 6 14
No. 7 4 8
Econo Wash 4 8
--- --<

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Apalachicola-Sponsored by nine


Bowling News


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Parkas

A 99
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12-o. quilt lining. Straight
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Heavy knit collar. 100% wash.
able Olive, blue or gray.
Sizes 6 to 16.

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Water repellent muted plaid
poplin with warm zip-out pile
liner. Ideal for all season wear
Sizes 8 to 18.


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Flannelette

Sleepwear


2"
Oher Styles et 3."
WaM pjama tI a mrly or
mea tailored srte,. La* and
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or s eid .elo. .. a


TODDLER AND
JUNIOR BOYS


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5" AND 6
Corduroys. p6phins i ak
wools pile lined nd
quilt lined. Zip off and at.
tachod hoeds. Completely
wahable, toddler sizes 2
to 4; ir. boy' fto 7.


U


YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND


0 0


Revival Services


AT




Long Avenue




Baptist Church

CORNER OF LONG AVENUE AND 16TH STREET





October 25 through 31


Nightly at 7:30 P.M.

Morning Services at 7:00 A.M.
(TUESDAY THRU SATURDAY)




Rev. Joe Courson

EVANGELIST
NEW ORLEANS, LA.


Edward Ramsey

SONG LEADER



NURSERY OPEN EACH EVENING


size of the holding will influence
the species of bame he can accom-
modate. Second, the forest types
on his lands will determine the
species of game his land will sup-
port. There are habitat require-
ments peculiar to each game spe-
cies that must be considered in de-
veloping a joint program.
Bobwhite quail do not require
large land areas for their range, so
they may be managed on areas as
small as 40 acres. But, prescribe
burning is a must for maintaining
shooting conditions and production
of quail food. Therefore, forest
types that are not suitable for re-
peated burns are not suitable for
quail management. In general, the
timber types here in Bay and Gulf
counties could be very easily man-
aged for quail.
Turkeys are wide ranging birds
requiring thousands of acres of
land with 25 per cent of it in oaks.
Also, grassy areas and openings
are needed for nesting and food.
The area requirements can be
taken care of by joining landown-
ers working together with their
management. A 5,000 acre area
should support around 100-150 tur-
keys year round with a harvest of
about a quarter of the total popu-
lation each year.
Deer are very adaptable to for-
est conditions and other wildlife
requirements. Once established,
the principal problem is to keep
the herd within the capacity of the
forest. The timber must be main-
tained at a slightly lower density
than normal to keep the deer well
supplied with browse. This lower
density allows more light to reach
the ground and thus, more shrub
growth. Also, control burning
helps to develop new succulent
browse. Of the major game species,
deer are the most adaptable to
short rotation timber crops because
they can easily move from one
area to another.
In summary, woodlands have a


I _, I -


I r. I, I r


KIRKMAN GIVES SOME MORE
HIGHWAY TRAFFIC STATISTICS
Tallahassee-Colonel H. N. Kirk-
man, Director of the Department of
Public Safety, announced today
that 35,216 hazardous moving vio-
lation arrests were made by troop-
ers during the past 11 weeks of the
patrol's selective enforcement pro-
gram.
"During this all out effort by the
patrol to reduce the tragic and un-
necessary wrecks occurring on our
Florida highways which have killed
1,274 persons thus far in '65, Flor-
ida Highway Patrol commanders
throughout the state have pre-se-
lected those roads in their areas
where the greater number of
wrecks have occurred in the past
and assigned additional personnel
over and above those normally as-
signed with specific instructions to
rigidly enforce the law," stated
Col. Kirkman..
Over thirty-five thousand viola-
tors have felt the patrol's sting
when they were caught following
too closely, violating stop signs or
signals, failing to yield the right of
way, -driving over the center line,
improperly changing lanes, driv-
ing at a rate of speed which was
unlawful or unsafe for the condi-
tions and other accident causing
traffic violations.
Col. Kirkman concluded with
'this word of advice to all motorists,
"almost everyone involved in a
traffic crash can figure out how it
could have been prevented after it
happens. Try to figure this out be-
fore it happens by driving defens-
ively."

good potential for yielding revenue
from timber crops and produce
abundant game at the same time.
Management of the forest can eas-
ily be modified at very little cost
to produce adequate food and cover
for all types of wildlife.


Fill"ll










MHE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21 ,1965


Two Auto Accidents Occur In City

During Past Week According to Police

Two automobile accidents in the section in Port St. Joe was the
city limits of Port St. Joe have scene of a collision as an auto


been reported within the past week
by the Port St. Joe Police Depart-
ment.
On Saturday noon of last week-
end, the third collision of the year
occurred at the intersection of Gar-
rison Avenue and Highway 71.
According to Patrolman Allen
Ray Watson, M. B. Phillips of 121
Westcott Circle was traveling south
on Garrison and crossed the inter-
section colliding with a pickup
truck driven by W. K. Settlemire,
who was traveling west on High-
way 71.
No injuries were reported in the
accident.
Monday at noon, another inter-


driven by R. H. Sewell collided
with a pickup truck driven b y
Charles Edward Ward at the cor-
ner of Williams Avenue and Third
Street.
According to Patrolman Watson,
Sewell was traveling west on Third
Street and collided with the Ward
pickup at the intersection. Ward
was driving south on Williams
Avenue.
No injuries were reported in this
accident.


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KOy uonala Jonnson

Graveside services were held at
Holly Hill Cemetery yesterday at
4:30 p.m. for Roy Donald Johnson,
age 37, of Cocoa. He was a former
resident of Port St. Joe and was
employed by Vitro while here.
Funeral services were conducted
by the Rev. Robert Carey. Pall-
bearers were John Hanson, Randy
McClain, Gene Snodgrass, James
Summer, Bob Steeble and Rev. Har-
ry Powell.
Survivors include one daughter,
Patricia Ann Johnson of Port St.
Joe, his father Olaf Johnson of
Oakland, Calif.; two brothers, Bert
and Robert of Oakland; three sis-
ters, Mrs. Florence Hannon, Mrs.
Jean Klein both of Oakland and
Mrs. Lillian Burgard of Freemont,
Calif.
Comforter Funeral Home was in
charge of local arrangements.


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o Full 24-inch oven with Bar-B-Kewer* oven control
Infinite-heat removable plug-in surface units *Tmk.
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Lots of room in the automatic defrosting fresh-food
action, too 9 Bushel-size twin crispers Glide-out
shelf Glide-out meat pan 'Super-Storage door
,with egg rack and butter keeper.



St. Joe Hardware Co.


203 Reid Avenue


Phone 227-8111


Itafa ~v pro should appreciate the natural talent
if Sunk~enGardens model Drenda rooks who shows groat
r Is the unanlmou hoic by sports writers a
r e nry to receive n honors. She is
ost, shifty and In t physical condition.
S re T apely St Persburg, orda sa
to, .leal secretary when sl iMdeUlng r
ayno Wall,



Merhants Begin Making Plans for

Annual Parade, Visit From Santa Claus


The Port St. Joe Merchants Di-
vision this week began planning
activities for the annual Christmas
parade to be held in Port St. Joe
on Saturday, December 4.
Planned tentatively for the pa-
rade will be a visit from Santa


First Objection
(Continued From Page 1)
was in the same position as Michi-
gan Chemical.


Claus, along with several floats, Tentative plans of the City Board
bands and decorated bicycles. Cash were to extend the City Limits to
prizes will be awarded to the three the Gulf County Canal which would
best floats and the three best deco- include the land occupied by these
rated bicycles in the big parade. two firms.
The big parade with Santa Claus Mayor Hannon explained that the
-as the central attraction has been Board had not anticipated any ob-

an annual event of the Retail Mer- sections to their plans since two
chants and each year something,local industries are already in the
new is added to make the parade City Limits and there would be no
bigger and better than ever and discriminating against any indus-
to make Christmas shopping in try.
Port St. Joe better than ever with Vervaeke stated that the two
more savings offered than ever be- industries now inside the City
fore. boundaries were built after the
limits were established and they
Plans now are to have the parade were fully aware of what they
and the visit from Santa Claus at were doing.
10:'00 a. m., Saturday, December 4. Resolution Read


As plans progress ,you will read
about them in The Star.
----

Accident On Reid

Avenue Yesterday

An automobile accident on Reid
Avenue yesterday morning caused
an estimated $250 damages to two
automobiles, according to Port St.
Joe Police Department.
According to the police report,


City attorney Cecil G. Costin, Jr.,
presented-a pattern resolution for
adoption by the City to call the an-
nexation election. The resolution
did not contain any boundaries or
dates for the election ,since these
have yet to be established by the
Board. The Board is currently con-
sidering extension by one section
line in three directions and the
election will be held 30 days after
notice is given publicly.
Annexation elections must be
held in any area to be incorporated


Eara Whitfield of Port St. Joe was where there are ten or more resi-
parked in front of Western Auto dents. -----. ...
when Jackie Dale Reagan, 209 2nd At the November 2 meeting the
Ave., Highland View ,backed out Board plans to discuss and possibly
of a parking space into the street set boundaries to be included in


but failed to cut sharp enough to
miss hitting the rear of the Whit-
field vehicle.
g -

Wewa Approves

Bond Program

Wewahitchka, Oct. 12 (Special)
-The Wewahitchka City Commis-
sion met in special session Tuesday,
October 12, and adopted a resolu-
tion endorsing the proposed $300,-
000,000 Road Bond Program being
promoted by the Citizens for Road
Progress of Florida. The Commis-
sion action was unanimous after
Max Kilbourn explained the need
for the prograni. Mr. Kilbourn em-
phasized the fact that even though
none of the proposed four lane'
projects were within Gulf County
enactment of the road bond issue
would release extra primary road
funds for use on primary roads in
those areas not served by the four-
lane program.
Mayor Canning stated that our
goal is to do that which will result
in the greatest good for the great-
est number of all of Florida's ctii-
zens. We urge all our citizens to
vote for Amendment Number Four
on November 2nd.
READ THE CLASSIFIED
READ THE CLASSIFIEDS--
READ THE CLASSIFIED


the annexation plans.


St. Joe Tel. & Tel. Gets

$800,000 REA Loan

A telegram from Florida's Con-
gressional delegation this week
stated that an REA loan had been
approved to the St. Joseph Tele-
phone and Telegraph Company in
the amount of $800,000.
The loan was made to the local-
phone company to expand present
communications service to S.A.G.E.
military installation, operated by
the company.
-- r -


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YiR IROu W 16 EY Y'a4W 7Ml~,V t W11
Ir A, AAF P4R-Ir 4A v4 FE Pmav
*xr


FOR SALE
Three bedroom masonry house
with den and double garage. Car-
pet and two room air conditoners
included. To sell for only $12,700.
Two, new, three bedroom, brick
homes on Tenth Street. $450 covers
down payment and closing cost.
FHA financed.
FRANK HANNON
Registered Real Estate Broker
221 Reid Ave. 3t-10-14 227-3491
FOR SALE: For $2850. Good in-
vestment, 5 acres and small
house as is) Jones Subdivision. For
information call Port St. Joe 227-
8712 or write Box 344, Clewiston,
Fla., 33440 or call YU 2-6411. 3tp


FOR SALE: 1303 Marvin Ave. 2
bedroom house, kitchen, living
room, dining room and den, utility
room (total 1250 sq. ft) Carpet liv-
ing and dining rooms, drapes, hea-
ter, cook stove elec., TV antenna
on 35 pole with rotor, elec. pump.
See Bob Ellzey, Phone 227-4611.

FOR SALE: House on Long Ave-
nue. Near Elementary School.
Also furnished cottage at Indian
Pass Beach. Phone 227-7151, 8 to 5
Monday thru Friday. M. H. Ed-
wards.
FOR SALE: Large 2 bedroom
house at White City. Double car-
port, large utility house and 20'x
21' garage or shop building. On
two choice lots. Phone 229-4964. tc
FOR SALE
MEXICO BEACH FURNISHED
3 br. Duplex, carport, porch, bch
side of hwy. ccb lot 75x100
terms $9,000.00
2 br ccb dublex A/C ___- 13,500.00
2 br waterfront brick
terms 12,500.00
2 br ccb house ,good cond. 9,500.00
2 br frame ,asbes. sid. --_ 8,500.00
2 br ccb large, well located 10,500.00
2 br frame, frt lot 50x150
good terms 7,500.00
3 br ccb waterfront, good
terms 11,000.00
5 lots, 75x90 each, beachside of hwy
good motel location. Sacrifice
for cash 7,150.00
Waterfront lots ____-- 4,500.00 up
Others 1,000.00 up
3 large lots, new subdiv
99 x 280 3,000.00
UNFURNISHED
Lovely 3 br, 11/z bath brick, family
room, A/C and central heat, fen-
ced yard, many extras. Down pay
$1,750. Take up pmts. 15,500.00
ST. JOE BEACH
2 br fur. o.s 9n frt corner lot
ccb. $1.000 dal, _= 7,507 C
2 br.fr with uinfin. 1 br house in
back, part. furn. lge lot 9,500.00
ELIZABETH W. THOMPSON, Asso.
Mexico Beach Branch Office Mgr.
Hwy. 98. 19th St.. Phone 648-4545
E. TOM PRIDGEON, Broker
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom house in
Oak Grove. Call Cecil G. Costin,
Jr., phone 227-4311. tfc
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment
for man. Phone 227-5151. tfc
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom furnished
house at Beacon Hill. Call Cecil
G. Costin, Jr., phone 227-4311. tfc
FOR RENT: Redecorated furnished
apartment, $55.00 per mo., unfur-
nished, $45.00. Near school. Call
Jean Arnold, 648-4800. tfc
FOR RENT: Two 1-bedroom fur-
nished houses. Also two 2-bed-
room furnished houses at Beach.
Phone Smith's Pharmacy, 227-5111.
FOR RENT: Furnished two bed-
room concrete block beach front
ottage. $50.00 per week or attrac-
tive monthly rate. Call 227-3491.
FOR RENT: Clean 2 bedroom apt.,
at 619 Woodward Ave. $45.00
per month. Call Gene Halley, Tal-
lahassee, Fla., Office 224-9180, Ext.
598, Home 385-3139. tfc-10-7
FOR RENT: One bedroom and pri-
vate bath. Living room and TV
privileges. Reasonable rent. 528
corner of Sixth Street and Wood-
ward Ave. 2tp-9-30
FOR RENT: Furnished 3 bedroom,
2 bath, living room, den, kitchen,
dining room and screen porch.
Beach front location. Call 227-3921.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom house, 507
7th Street. See J. T. Simpson
or call 227-4861 after 5:00 p.m.


FOR RENT: One, two and three
bedroom houses, furnished, on
beach. Also 2 bedroom unfurnish-
ed house at Oak Grove. Call Chris
Martin at 227-4051. tfc-9-2
FOR RENT: Two to four bedroom
cottages, furnished. Early occu-
pants privileged to ren.ain through
next Summer season at no increase
in rent. COSTIN'S COTTAGES at
Beacon Hill. Tel. 648-4030 or 227-
7816. tfc-8-25
FOR RENT: Furnished cottage on
St. Joe Beach. Livin groom, din-
ing combination, 2 bedrooms, kit-
chen and bath. Phone 229-1351. tfc
FOR RENT: Reasonable. Unfurnish-
ed houses in Highland View and
I hobe of t S~ T Je Beach Phnne


FOR SALE: 24 cu. ft. Amana up-
right freezer and 12 cu. ft. In-
ternational Harvester refrigerator.
Both in first class condition. Also
selection of used washing ma-
chines. See Dewey Gay or call 229-
1876.
FOR SALE: 6 year old buckskin
mare, "Annie Oakley". Trophy
winner in -speed events. See or
call David Rich.

HELP WANTED, FEMALE: Ac-
counting clerk. Must be high
school graduate. Prefer at least
one year business school and some
experience in payroll work. Must
type minimum of 40 cwm. Apply
in person. Michigan Chemical Corp.


227-7771. SAW SHARPENING: Any kind,
hand, band, circle and chain
FOR RENT: 1 to 4 bedroom fur- saws, lawn mower blades, planer
nished cottages and apartments. blades and chisles. Complete shar-
Many on year around basis. Mexico opening service. All work guaran-
Beach, Beacon Hill and St. Joe teed. U. F. Whitfield. Call 648-
Beach. $50.00 per month and up. 3332 or 229-2061. tfc-9-16
Elizabeth W. Thompson, Assoc.,
Mexico Beach Branch Office Mgr., PART-TIME SALESMEN
Hwy. 98, 19th St., Ph. 648-4545, E. Unusual Opportunity
Tom Pridgeon, Broker. ABC FENCE INDUSTRIES is op-
ening new offices. We offer an op-
SEPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call portunity for men to earn more
Buford Griffin. phone 229-3097 part-time than on their full-time
job.
FOR SALE: Black walnut lumber. This offer is just in time to give
Whelpley, Mexico Beach, 42nd you the most prosperous Christmas
St., Phone 648-3126. 2tp-10-22 you have ever given your family.
NO Experience Necessary
FOR SALE: Ethan Allen early We Train You
American hutch and round ta- NO Investment Required
ble. Walnut marble top wash stand We Furnish All Supplies
Whelpley, Mexico Beach, 42nd St., MEN NEEDED IN
Phone 648-3126. 2tp-10-22 PORT ST. JOE AREA
Phone 648-3126. Be the man in your town to rep-
GUITAR LESSONS taught. Adults resent us
only. See George Padgett or call WRITE (all replies confidential)
227-5901 at night. lp ABC FENCE INDUSTRIES
Attention: Jack W. Thomas
OFFICE SUPPLIES: Typing paper, P. O. Box 4236
rag content bond, all sizes. On- Mobile, Alabama
o rlrn manursri,,n-t nvor carhnn Phone 479-1485


aper, clips, fasteners, file folders.
Everything for the office. The Star,
227-3161.


RCAVICTOR


The Most Trusted Name
In Color Televisloq
irast In compatible color TV

ST. JOE RADIO
and TV CO.
Phone 227-4081 228 Reid
SOUTHERN FLOOR CLEANING
and WAXING. Phone 648-3141. 2
FOR SALE: 1 used Philco washer-
dryer combination. Like new
condition. Cost new $550.00. Selling
now for $150.00. St. Joe Radio and
TV Company, 228 Reid Ave.
FOR SALE: 1964 Fairlane Ford. 4-
door, 6 cylinder, straight shift.
Good shape. $1425.00. Phone 229-
3911. 3tp-10-14
FOR SALE: 1959 Plymouth V-8 au-
tomatic, air conditioner, fordor
sedan. $425.00 cash, or best offer.
Will consider a trade-in. Call 648-
4300 after 4 p.m. 2tc
FOR SALE OR TRADE: 1963 9-pas-
senger Chevrolet station wagon
or 1964 Ford station wagon. Call
227-7887. tfc-9-16
FOR SALE: Army field jackets,
$3.95 to $6.95. Assortment of
sizes. GI can openers, 25c. SUR-
PLUS SALES of ST. JOE.
FOR SALE: 1962 Corvair Monza.
Radio, heater, factory air condi-
tioning, 2 tone, white sidewalls, au-
tomatic transmission. Recent tune-
up. Real clean, $1095. Call 227-
8541 after 5 p.m. tfc-9-9
FOR SALE: 1962 International
Scout, 4-wheel drive. Excellent
condition. Call 648-4480 days or
648-4170 nights. tfc-10-7
FOR SALE: GE 14 cu. ft. Frost-
guard refrigerator-freezer. Was
$349.95. This week $299.95. SUR-
PLUS of ST. JOE.


HELP WANTED: Male or female,
Are you looking for a good part
time or full time income in Gulf
County or Port St. Joe? Many Raw-
leigh dealers earn $2.50 and up
per hour. Write Rawleigh, FAI-
100-26, Memphis, Tenn. ptll-4
LOSE WEIGHT safely with Dex-A-
Diet Tablets. Only 98c at CAMP-
BELL DRUGS. pdtl2-2
GUN REPAIRS: Stocks made and
altered. Hot salts deluxe bluing.
Nickel plating. Guns for sale or
trade. Ammo. Phone 648-4045 or
see Red Carter, St. Joe Beach.
KITCHEN CABINETS: Step into
Spring with a new set of factory
built cabinets with one piece for-
mica top. Free estimate. Also fi-
nancing available. 227-3311. tfc
DON'T BE DOWN IN THE DUMPS
for garbage service outside the
city, call Hughey Williams Garbage
Service. Phone 227-7866. tfc-8-25
MOVING? Your MAYFLOWER
man is as near as your telephone.
Call 227-2011, ADDISON INSUR-
ANCE AGENCY, across from 'he
Post Office. Local and Long Dis-
tance Moving. Free Estimates.
CARPET CLEANING on location
or free pick-up and delivery.
Guaranteed service. J. Gavin, 909
Kraft Ave., Panama City or call
PO 3-7824. tfc-4-2?
GUNS REPAIRED, blued and :lean
ed, stocks made and refinished.
rifles sportized. Reasonable rates.
Work guaranteed. Jack Myers,
Ward Ridge, Phone 229-2272. tfc
WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION, meet-
ing second and fourth Tuesday
nights, 8:00 p.m. American Legion
Home.
RA.M.-Regular convocation on St.
Joseph Chapter No. 56, R.A.M.
1st and 3rd Mondays. All visiting
companions welcome.
THOMAS J. ADKINS, High Priest
EDGAR L. SMITH, Secretary
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F. & A. M., every first"
and third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.



BILL J. RICH, W. M.
H. L. BURGE, Secretary