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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01476
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: February 20, 1964
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01476

Full Text





MONEY TALKS-Let's keep
10 C It where we can speak with it
once in a while-Trade with
PER COP Y your home town merchants

"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"
TWENTY.SEVINTH YEAR PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1964 NUMBER 23


.f. ..


Boys School Escapee Re-captured

After Running In Gulf County Canal


A 16-year-old escapee from the
Florida Industrial School at Mar-
ianna, was recaptured Monday
morning at 7:15 by Bay County
Deputy Sheriff James Bailey with
the cooperation of Port St. Joe City
Police, after a high speed chase
from near Tyndall Air Force Base.
The chase ended at the St. Joe
Boat Club boat basin on the Gulf
.County Canal.
The youth fled the school early
Monday and stole a 1957 Chevro-
let in Jackson County.
City Patrolman Allen Ray Wat-
son, set up a road block just across
the draw bridge at Highland View,
forcing the speeding escapee to
turn his auto down the dirt road
that leads to Raffield's Fisheries,
Gulf Towing Company's, berth .
and the boat club basin.
When the fleeing youth saw that,
his road to freedom ended in the
water, he jumped from the mov-
ing automobile and ran up into the
Highland View area with Deputy
Bailey hot after him on foot. Af-
ter chasing the boy for about a half
mile he was caught and returned
-to jofl. -
The car ran off into the boat ba-
sin but was kept from sinking out
of sight by fenders placed along-
side the basin.


T. W. Hinote

Sheriff Candidate
T. W. (Terry) Hinote this week
announced that he will seek the
office of Sheriff of Gulf County
during the May Primary election.
Hinote, a local businessman, is
making his initial bid for public
office.
The Sheriff candidate has been
a resident of Port St. Joe since
1938 and is owner of Hinote's Bar-
ber Shop and DeLuxe Laundry
and Dry Cleaners. He is president
of the Port St. Joe Kiwanis Club
and is a member of the First Bap-
tist Church. He is married and has
two children.
In making his announcement, Hi-
note said, "If elected, I will do my
best to make Gulf County the best
Sheriff that has ever served the
people."


Shrubbery Wanted
For New City Park
Anyone having any kind of
shrubbery that they would like to
donate to the new city park please
call 227-3661 or 227-8581.
The city will dig up the shrub-
bery and carry it to the park,
Spotting these shrubbery dona-
tions is a project of the Golden
Ager's Club of Port St. Joe.


Crowd Attends

Burns Barbecue
Last Saturday night, Mayor Hay-
don Burns of Jacksonville spoke to
a crowd estimated at 800 people
in Port St. Joe's Centennial Build-
ing. The crowd was large, despite
a late afternoon thunder shower.
After his introduction by Tom
Ford, Burns pointed with pride to
his 15 year record of service as
Mayor of Jacksonville, and to such
honors as having been selected by
Preisdent Kennedy as one of three
U. S. Mayors to serve on the Na-
tional Civil Defense Advisory
Council. Burns emphasized that he
spoke of these honors and accom-
plishments humbly, and only to
point out his experience and quali-
fications for the office of Gover-
nor. Burns reflected his adminis-
trative experience by such obser-
vations as his desire to hold the
line on, taxes, but to increase the
efficiency of-the state's operations
so that the citizen's would receive
a greater return for the tax d61-
lars spent.
Before th& Mayor spoke, musical
entertainment was furnished by
the Joe Whitfield band. After the
short address, barbecued chicken
was served.


A. J. Strickland
Up for Re-election
A. J. Strickland, County Commis-
sioner, District 1, announces that
he will seek re-election to that of-
fice. He is completing his second
term. In his statement, Mr. Strick-
land said, "I want-to take this op-
portunity to thank the people
for their help and for their confi-
dence in me during my last two
campaigns and during my service
in office.
"I hope I can count on your con-


Last Day Today To
Get Your Car Tag
Pack your lunch, board out
the pets, get a baby sitter and
prepare to spend the day at
the tag office if you have not
yet purchased your 1964 au-
tomobile tag as yet.
You will need these prep-
arations beforehand because
today is the last day of the
tag sales, and everybody else
in your fix will also be trying
to buy a tag at the last min-
ute.
One last word of advice.
Take more money than you
did last year because they are
higher this year by about
25 percent.


Fred 0. Dickinson

Campaigns Here

On Opening Day
Fred 0. (Bud) Dickinson opened
his campaign in Gulf County Tues-
day afternoon only a few hours af-
ter qualifying, for Governor of the
State of Florida.
Dickinson arrived in Port St. Joe
at 4:15 p.m. aboard his campaign
bus, which bore the theme, "One
United Sunshine State".
Th e Gubernatorial candidate
spent most of his time in Port St.
Joe walking up and down Reid
Avenue with his lovely wife and
part of his retinue, meeting and
visiting with local citizens and not
forgetting to put in a plug for his
candidacy.
In a short, extemporaneous ad-
dress beside the City Hall, Dickin-
son thanked the people of Gulf
County for the large vote given
him in 1960 and urged continued
support for his candidacy. He left
nothing to insinuations when he
promised more industry, roads and
progress for Gulf County as well
as all of Northwest Florida if he
is elected.
"I want to be a good Governor
for all of Florida and that in-
cludes Northwest Florida, which
has largely been forgotten in the
past", Dickinson said.

SELL THAT 'WHITE ELEPHANT'
WITH A STAR CLASSIFIED!

tinued support in the coming
election.
"As a county commissioner, I
have sought to serve Gulf County's
many and varied interests serious-
ly, thoroughly, fairly and honestly."
"It has been a high honor and
privilege and a constant pleasure
to serve in this vital office. I hope
that the people of Gulf County
will see fit to allow me to contin-
ue serving them in this capacity."


George G. Tapper Files Papers To

Run For 5th District Senate Seat
George G. Tapper, 47 year old
general contractor of Port St. Joe, | a Ld
qualified Tuesday in Tallahassee Judge Sam Husband
as a candidate for Florida Senate, Up for Re-e eCion{
5th District, subject to the Demo- orIOl


cratic primary in May. Fifth Dis-
trict includes Gulf, Franklin, Li-
berty and Wakulla counties.
Tapper is not a newcomer to the
political field, having served in
both the House of Representatives
and the Senate previously. He ser-
ved six years as Representative of
Gulf County and four years as Sen-
ator from the 25th District; during
this term he served as President
pro tem in 1955.
He has also served as member
of the Democratic Executive com-
mittee, chairman of the Board of
County Commissioners of Gulf
County, president of Young Demo-
cratic Club of Gulf County and
served three times as alternate


County Judge Sam P. Husband,
this week announced that he will
be a candidate for re-election in
the May Primary election.
In making his announcement,
Husband stated, "When I took of-
fice, I felt that the office belonged
to the people and that I was there
to serve the people. I have stuck
to that philosophy.
"I have never assessed more
than minimum fines against those
who have had to come before me.
I have always given a sympathetic
ear and have tried my utmost to
understand the problems of those
who have appeared before me.
Whenever posisble, I have arran-


delegate to the National Democra- ged for payment of fines so as to
tic Convention. minimize financial hardships on
While in the State Legislature, families. When jail terms were
Tapper had particular interest in mandatory, I have tried to arrange
advancement of elementary and them so the person would lose not
higher education, having served on work time or as little as possible.
both the Education and Approp- "I am mindful", he stated, "that
rations committee. He has also my court is the people's court, just
long been interested in roads and as I am mindful that most of those
highways and served as chairman who come before me accused, are,
of the Legislative committee that by far, not criminals. As such, I
rewrote the Highway Code of have always realized that while the
Florida. Having fished with his law must be upheld, it must also
late father, Capt. Robert Tapper, be tempered with mercy, kindli-
(Continued On Page 4) ness, concern and understanding."


State Gets Title To Property




On -eninsula for St te Park



$83,873 Paid Work Started On New Park Development

For 671 Acres

On the Gulf

The State of Florida finally was
transferred a parcel of land on St. .
Joseph's Point Tuesday, the cul- -
mination of nearly two years of '
work by local citizens to have the *
area containing 671 acres of beach' ,
property turned into a state park. b'
The site on St. Joseph Peninsu- .. ..
la, was the first to be acquired by ,
the state under the new Outdoor .
Recreation Act approved by the .. .
1963 session of the Legislature.
The land was purchased from the .
federal government for $83,873.
Title to the land was turned over
to the state in a brief ceremony in -
the capitol at the weekly meeting
of the cabinet trustees of the in-
ternal improvement. T
"It is my hope," said Gov. Far- i
ris Bryant, "That this is but a
small beginning of a program i
which will result in a system of ER R 1
outdoor facilities which is com-
mensurate with Florida's position
as playground of the nation." Pictured above is the beginning of a flow water all the time. The water
Cabinet members rejected a re- new park in Port St. Joe started last week. overflow to a little rill. Surrounding
quest to immediately free the re- The above photo shows a pool which has fountain will be various shrubs and f1
mainder of a $100,000 appropria- been built across from the Stac House ers and a nature walk with a arched bri
tion to develop the property as a which will be centered with a fountain to over the rill., (- ph
state park.
A group from Port St. Joe, and
the St. Joseph Park Committee and 'Post Office Will Be

State Attorney General Jimmy '
Kynes who assured them the trans- Postmaster Chauncey Costin
fer of funds, in his opinion, is le- announced today that the local Fr 'S a' lt
gal. He said he exp.cts,the..monies post office would be closed all l 0. La.td y
will be made available in the im- day Saturday,- February 22, in
mediate future. Also in the study observance of George Washing- Port St. Joe Merchants are chandise at the lowest poi
of legality is $100,000 set up for ton's birthday. He stated that in- conducting their second annual price.
the park from the Outdoor Rec- coming mail would be distribut- "George Washington's Birthday" One of the main feature
reaction Committee bond issue. This ed to post office boxes as usual Sale this Saturday. the event will be the sal
money was also earmarked for the and that all mail deposited thru- For one day only, Saturday, cherry pies, traditional wit
park and the legality of spending out the day would be dispatched, February 22, prices will be cut birthday observance, at the
the money for development as well however, there would be no win- to the bone on certain items in price of 22c by each mer
as land purchase must be made. dow service or carrier delivery local stores to clear out stock participating in the sale.
Groups attending the deed cere- except for special delivery mail. and celebrate the birthday of the On page 10 of this issue c
monies were, St. Joseph Park Corn- Costin urged that patrons buy "Father of our Country". Star you will find reproc
mittee: Jesse V. Stone, chairman; money orders and stamps on Fri- Advertising the sale will be the front page of the circular
Mrs. Ned S. Porter, Mrs. Charles day, February 21, in order not a tabloid circular which you ll w will receive tomorrow. It
Browne, Cecil G. Costin, Jr., and to be inconvenienced while the receive tomorrow. tains just a sampling of the
Harry Saunders. office is closed. This sale is another in a ser- gains you will receive in Po
St. Joseph Historical Society: .ies of sales events planned by Joe Saturday.
Charles Smith, president; Mrs. R D.the Port St. Joe Merchant's Di- Read the ad, watch for th
H. Brinson, Ralph Swatts, Fred T. D. Whitfield Will vision to promote shopping in Port cular and prepare to sav
Maddox, Dave Gaskin and George Be Commission Candidate St. Joe by offering quality mer- shopping in Port St. Joe.
Y. Core.
Chamber of Commerce: Walter T. D. "Dock" Whitfield announc-
Dodson, George Tapper, Cecil Cur- ed this week that he will be a can- James C. Horton
ry and Robert Fox. didate for the Gulf County Com-
Bud Wesson, Apalachicola Cham- mission from District 1 in the May After Commission Seat
ber of Commerce; George Anchors, primaries.
John Howard and Joe Parrott, civic Whitfield served as Commission- James C. Horton, of White City
organizations. er during the years 1950-54 and announced this week that he will
James G. McDaniel and Leo Ken- he states, "if elected, I promise seek election to the Board of Coun-
nedy, Gulf County Commission; to represent the people as my re- ty Commissioners from District
Frank Hannon, Port St. Joe Mayor; cords show I did in the past. I will Number three.
Senator Luther Tucker and Rep. strive to promote unity and pro- Horton has been a resident of
Ben Williams. gress for the entire county." Gulf County since 1939, except for. .
Women's civic groups were rep- Whitfield is a lifelong resident three years in active service in U. '
resented by Mrs. Tom Byrd and of this county, is married, and has S. Navy. He has been a resident of
Mrs. Dave Jones. a family of six children. White City nine years. He has been -


Reward Money Given To Boys' Ranch


Pictured above is Sheriff B.
E. Parker and Deputy Wayne
White, displaying a reward check
given Deputy White for solving
a recent burglary In Port St.


White said he is presenting the
check to the Florida Sheriff's
Boys Ranch.
Photo Courtesy Gulf Co. Breeze


an employee of the St. Joe Paper
Company for the past 18 years. He
is married and has one son, David.
He is a member of the First Bap-
tist Church of White City.
He says that if he is elected his
desire is to serve the people of
Gulf County to the best interest
of the County.

Legion Auxiliary Plans
Bake Sale Saturday
The American Legion Auxiliary
is holding a bake sale in front of
Thames Jewelry Saturday, Febru-
ary 22 beginning at 9:00 a.m.
The auxiliary will use the pro-
ceeds from this sale to pay the ex-
pense of sending a delegate to Girl
State this year.
The Legion Auxiliary asks your
support in this effort to raise funds
for a worthy undertaking.

MERCHANTS TO MEET
TOMORROW AT NOON
John Blount, chairman of the
Merchant's Division has announced
today that there will be a special
meeting of the group at the Motel
St. Joe tomorrow at noon.
Blount urges all merchants to
attend.


will
the
low-
idge
oto)


=sible

is of
ie of
h the
i low
chant

f the
duced
r you
con-
e bar-
rt St.

e cir-
e by


Jack E. Hammock


Jack E. Hammock

Dist. 5 Candidate
Jack E. Hammock, Port St. Joe
businessman, announces he will be
a candidate for Gulf County Com-
mission, District Five, subject to
the Democratic Primary in May.
He has been in the barber busi-
ness for the past 15 years. He is a
veteran of World War 1 and the
Korean War. He is married and
has three children.
Hammock said, "I have long
wanted to be of public service to
my country and its citizens, and if
elected, I am free to represent all
the people of Gulf County."












































































Reg. $2.98
NOW ONLY
Reg. $3.98
NOW ONLY


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


Opening Times
Sat. 12:45 p.m.
Sun. 2:45 pmn.
Mon.-Fr --..-..-... 4:45 p.m.


THURSDAY FRIDAY


COLUMBIA PICTURES presentI
LAURENCE LEE ALAN
HARVEY- REMICK BATES
THE
RUHNNING"O
MAN
NAVNISION'. BREATHTAKING COLOR


SATURDAY
I CIARLTON YVETTE
HESTON MIMIEUX
GEORGE FRANCE
CHAKIRIS NUYEN
JAMES DARREN


HEAD
PANAVISI0N Eastman COLOR
A COLUMBIA PICTURES RELEASr


SUNDAY, MONDAY 4
TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY


JACK LEMMON.


*UNDER, E




T. .3
CAROL DEAN EDlE '
LY'LEY JONES" ADAMS
IMOGENE PAUL ROBERT
COCA LYNDE-LANSING
Eastman COLOR


With Valentine Ban
The Young Woman's Auxiliary
of the First Baptist Church was
entertained last Thursday night by
the ladies of Society Two of the
woman's Missionary Union. The
event, a Valentine Banquet, was
the climax of YWA Focus Week.
The purpose of this week, Febru-
ary 9-15, is to focus anew the at-
tention of YWA members on the
true meaning of Young Woman's
Auxiliary membership.
Young Woman's Auxiliary is the
Southern Baptist Missionary or-
ganization for single young wom-
en 16 through 24 years of age. Its
purpose is to unite Baptist young
women in advancing world mis-
sions by leading them to study
about misisons, to pray intelligent-
ly for missions, and to engage in
community missions activities for
the spiritually and physically
needy.
Mrs. Myra Lancaster, president


I


IHNGiDI


YS


SALE

Specials for February 20,21, and 22


$2.28

$2.99


Come and Shop at PYLANT'S


BARGAN TABLE

VALUES NEVER SEEN BEFORE!


Everything $1.00 or Less!


McGREGOR, PURITAN and TRU VAL BRANDS

MEN'S SWEATERS BOY'S SWEATERS
Reg. $7.95 Reg. $4.95
NOW ONLY ----NOWONLY..........99
Reg. $10.00 f $7 Reg. $10.95 $ Q
NOW ONLY .. ....--. ow 5NOW ONLY .......... ....


LOOK LADIES!
SPECIAL BUYS on Lady Manhattan and
White Stag

BUY ONE AT REGULAR PRICE


GET ONE FREE!


4 MEN & BOY'S WEAR


quet Thursday
of Society 2, and Mrs. L.
president of the WMU
the program and enterta:


W. Cox,
brought
ined the


members later with a witty version
of "The Match Game". A short film
was also shown which was enjoyed
by all.
The young ladies, their hostesses
and sponsor are shown here, seat-
ed left to right are Linda Kay
Webb, Elaine Sherrill, Polly Sue
Pyle and Carolyn, Carr. Those
standing are Willie Mae Giles, Bar-
bara Bell, Geraldine Campbell,
Linda Cox, Mrs. Myra Lancaster,
Sandra Baxley, Mrs. L. W. Cox
and Mrs. Grover L. Holland,


Whittington-Young
Wedding Plans Told
Miss Doris Whittington and Ron-
ald Edward Young are announc-
ing their final wedding plans. The
wedding will be an event of Sat-
urday, February 22, at 3:00 in the
First Methodist Church of Port St.
Joe.
The reception will follow immed-
iately in the fellowship hall of the
church. All friends and relatives of
the couple are invited to attend.


Elementary P.T.A. Will Honor

Founders Tonight With Program


__


Pictured above is the Brownie
Scout Troop No. 7. Mrs. Joe
Hendrix and Mrs. Lamar Hardy
are the leaders.
I Front row, left to. right are,
Martha Griffin, Ruthiie Flemming
and Sarah Claire Herring.


Circle Meets With

Mrs. Tom Freeman
The Mary McMillan Circle of the
Women's Society of Christian Ser-
vide of the First Methodist Church
met Tuesday morning at the home
of Mrs. Thomas Freeman.
There were eight members pres-
ent with one guest, Mrs. Phil Eng-
dahl. Also present was Mrs. J. L.


who have made of their common
understanding a common purpose
and will.

Mrs. Daniell Is Hostess
To Circle No. Four
Circle No. 4 of the WMS No. 1
First Baptist Church met Monday,
February 17 with Mrs. J. F. Dan-
iell, in her home on 9th St.
Mrs. Pridgeon, program chair-
man, was in charge of the topic,
"I Must Be Informed", dealing
with Christian citizenship. She was
assisted by Mrs. Stevens, Mrs. Lar-
imore and Mrs. Chafin.
Mrs. E. C. Cason, WMS No. 1
president, conducted the business
of the circle in the absence of the
chairman, Mrs. Keels.
The hostess served coffee, cook-
ies and potato chips to the seven
members and one visitor present.


THUrRSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1964


Temple, president of the WSCS.
The devotions were taken from
the First Corinthians, 15th chapter.
Mrs. W. D. Jones, president of
the Mary McMillan Circle, presid-
ed 'over -the business meeting.
Plans were made for the circles'
activities for the month of March.
The program was given by Mrs.
Paul Blount. The topic was, "The
Methodist Family". This program
was to acquaint members with Me-
thodism in this country.


CHRISTO'S 5c and 10c STORE
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


4


KING and QUEEN of the Long Avenue Baptist Church
Valentine Banquet are pictured above. They are, Emory
Burleson, king and Gayle Odum, queen. ( photo)

Long Avenue Baptists Entertain

Youth At Valentine Banquet, Party
The annual Valentine Banquet of ing the tables and the soft back-
the Long Avenue Baptist Church ground music. Miniature TV's were
was held on February 2 at the placed on the tables to further
church. There were 46 young peo- carry out the theme.
ple and intermediates present, with The guest speaker for the eve-
nine guests. ning was Rev. W. E. Green of Ap-
The theme of the banquet was, alachicola. Mrs. Winton Ferrell
"Showcase of Hearts". The banquet was guest soloist.
room was decorated with red and Both messages were greatly en-
white streamers and hearts. The joyed by all present.
banquet room was decorated with The highlight of the evening was
red and white streamers and the coronation of the "King and
hearts. The focal point being a Queen". Emory Burleson and
large heart placed at the front, Gayle Odum were elected as "King
with a "TV camera" focused on it, and Queen" of the Valentine Ban-
carrying out the theme. The tables quet. They were each presented a
were decorated with red and certificate.
white down the center, with a After the meal, the presenta-
large floral arrangement on the tions, TV games were played and
speaker's table. The evening was enjoyed by everyone present. The
enhanced by the candlelight from evening was closed with group
the red and white candles decorat- singing.


-F


328 Reid Avenue


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Port St. Joe, Florida


THURS., MARCH 5 thru SAT., MARCH 7
10:00 A.M. till 6:00 P.M.
NO AGE LIMIT ADULTS TOO!
LIMIT-One Per Subject Two Per Family
Each Additional Subject $3.95


The Port St. Joe Elementary
School Parents and Teachers Asso-
ciation honors its national and lo-
cal founders at its Founder's Day
program, this Thursday, February
20 at 8:00 p.m. in the Elementary
School Auditorium. PTA members
across the nation gather in Febru-
ary to remember, appreciate and
honor the outstanding people
whose ideas and efforts have made
and kept the PTA strong. The first
National Congress of Parents and
Teachers was organized 67 years
ago by Alice McLellan Birney and
Phoebe Apperson Hearst. The lo-
cal chapter's original charter with
the State and National organization
was issued November 20, 1935 af-
ter operating and working for 15
years as purely a local organiza-
tion. Many of the charter members
are still living in Port St. Joe. It
is interesting to note that these
chatrer members organized and
operated the first "soup kitchen"
in Port St. Joe during the great
depression without government fi-
nancial support.
It is pointed out that the Foun-
der's Day program is not merely a
parade of the past. The organizes
honors the past by using it to nour-
ish the present and the future. At
this year's program, parents and
teachers will hear an address by
Miss Catherine Nix, Dean of Wo-
men, Gulf Coast Junior College and
by Jack Mahon, local educator, on
the PTA of the future.
All parents, elected school board
officials and members of the com-
munity who are interested in pro-
moting the welfare of children in
home, school and community are
invited to actively participate in
the local PTA and answer the call
for a new type of citizen; one who
walks to the polls just as firmly
as did his frontier forefather, but
who sees that he walks, mentally
and emotionally, with a powerful
company of those who have stu-
died together to understand and


BOY'S FALL LONG SLEEVE
Plaid, Pin Stripe, Solids and Prints

SP 0 RT SHIRTS
S1eg. $1.98
', "=' "-... NOW ONLY $1.49


S BIG 1IxI14PORTRAIT


only 00 reg. 00
Plus Handling &-Wrapping Charp
Photographer Will Be At ,

CHRISTO'S 5c and 10c STORE


Second row, Lee Anna Hardy,
Susan Trammell, Linda McNeil,
and Mary Margaret Yadon.
Third row, Lynda McCullough.
Mitzie Hendrix, Pat Jones, Jen-
nifer Smith and Catherine Ly-
ons.


--=


-


____


I_ __


Golden Agers

Meet At Stac House
The Golden Agers met on Feb-
ruary 17 at the Stac House with
14 members present.
In the absence of the president,
Mrs. Vanlandingham, the meeting
was opened by Roy Gibson, first
vice president. The minutes were
read and approved. During the old
business it was decided that two
members each were to plant the
same kind of flowers for the park.
The new business was opened by
Mr. Gibson appointing Mrs. Iva
Williams to visit patients in the
hospital twice this week. She is to
enquire as to their needs. Next
week a different person is to be
appointed to visit.
Hostesses for the meeting were
Mrs. Dessie Lee Parker and Mrs.
J. A. Fillingem who served cook-
ies and coffee.
Next meeting will be February
24 at the Stac House.
The meeting was adjourned with
prayer by Mr. Gibson.


Brownie Scout Troop 7










LEGAL ADVERTISING

IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S
COURT, GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE.
In Re: Estate of
ELIZA K. LAWSON,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All creditors of the estate of
Eliza K. Lawson, deceased, are
hereby notified and required to file
any claims or demands they may
have against said estate in the of-
fice of the County Judge of Gulf
County, Florida, in the Courthouse
at Wewahitchka, Florida, within
six (6) calendar months from the
date of the first publication of this
notice. Each claim or demand must
be in writing and must state the
place or residence and post office
address of the claimant and must
be sworn to by the claimant, his
agent, or his attorney, or it will
become void according to law.
/s/ Gladys Lawson Boyer
/s/ Marguerite Lawson Pridgeon
Executrix of the Estate of
Eliza K. Lawson, deceased
SILAS R. STONE
321 Reid Avenue 4t-2-20
Port St. Joe, Florida
Attorney for Executrix
-K
NOTICE OF NAMES OF PERSONS
APPEARING TO BE OWNERS OF
ABANDONED PROPERTY
Pursuant to Section 13 of Chap-
ter 717, Florida Statutes, entitled
"Florida Disposition of Unclaimed
Property Act", notice is hereby
given that the persons listed below
appear to be the owners of un-
claimed or intangible property pre-
sumed abandoned.
3-0461-0001, Acacia Mutual Life
Insurance Co.; 3-0461-0002, Gay, C.
M. Gay, Comptroller, Tallahassee,
Fla.; 3-0490-0001, Nelson, Hubert;
3-0490-0002, Withers, Charles.
Information c o n c er ning the
amount or description of the pro-
perty and the name and address of
the holder may be obtained by any
persons possessing an interest in
the property by addressing an in-
quiry to Ray E. Green, State Comp-
troller as Administrator, Aban-
doned Property Division, Capitol,
Tallahassee, Florida. Be sure to
mention account number, name
and address, as published in this
notice. Unless proof of ownership


Lunch Room Menu
Port St. Joe High School
Monday, February 24
Vegetable stew with beef, cab-
bage slaw, sliced peaches, pineap-
ple upside down cake, milk, bread
and butter.
Tuesday, February 25
Candied sweet potatoes, sausage,
buttered corn, turnip greens, corn-
bread, milk, bread and butter.
Wednesday, February 26
Meat loaf, buttered potatoes,
snap beans, tossed green salad,
chocolate pudding, milk, bread and
butter.
Thursday, February 27
Pizza burgers with cheese, fro-
zen butter beans, tossed salad with
1,000 island dressing, Jello, milk,
bread and butter.
Friday, February 28
Salmon croquetts, Spanish rice,
cabbage salad, hot rolls, butter,
jelly, milk and bread.
Port St. Joe Elementary School
Monday, February 24
Beef and noodles, buttered spin-
ach, shredded cheese, celery sticks,
apple jelly, hot biscuit and butter
and milk.
Tuesday, February 25.
Roast pork with gravy, rice,
green beans, tomato cup, peanut
butter bars, white bread and milk.
Wednesday, February 26
Hamburgers, potato sticks, sli-
ced tomatoes, onions and dills,
chocolate pudding and milk.
Thursday, February 27
Chicken and rice, green butter
beans; carrot and cabbage salad,
sweet potato puffs, white bread
and milk.


is presented to the holder by Ap-
ril 22, 1964, the property will be
delivered to the Administrator.
Thereafter, all further claims
must be directed to the Administra-
tor.
RAY E. GREEN 2t
As Administrator 2-20


St. James Church

In Lenten Services
St. James Episcopal Church is
conducting a series of Lenten ser-
vices which began with Ash Wed-
nesday last week.
The Rev. Harry L. Babbit, Rec-
tor of the Parish, announced that
the speakers are priests from oth-
er sections of the southeast. The
presentation will be on "Christian
Living" in several aspects includ-
ing the question "Why be a Chris-
tian? what does it cost? what is the
nature and purpose of the church?
th value in personal devotion? and
how can one live as a Christian in
the everyday world today?
Following brief services in the
church at 7:30 p.m., each of the
Wednesday before Easter, the
presentations will be made at in-
formal discussion sessions in the
Parish House over coffee. All in-
terested persons of the community
are cordially invited to attend the
Lenten series.
The first speaker is the Rev. Neil
Gray, Director of Christian Educa-
tion of the Diocese of Florida from
Jacksonville. The second speaker
will be the Reverend Bernard J.
Hellmann, Associate Rector, Church
of the Advent, Birmingham.
---- *
CARD OF THANKS
We want to thank our friends
for their many kind words and
deeds in our loss of brother, sister- 1
in-law and sister. God bless you.
Bessie and Eugene Wimberley i


Friday, February 28 t
Cheese toast, buttered potatoes,
snap beans, tomato wedge, cookies c
--A -:1c


Here's A Twist! Eta Upsilon Group

One Not Running Will Host Area


To all my friends and especially
to the large number that has en-
couraged me to enter the race for
Representative of Gulf County, I
would like to express my very deep
and sincere appreciation for your
expressions of confidence and for
the support preferred me. I have
considered this race long and ear-
nestly and have given serious thot
to this appealing opportunity for
public service. I have always tried
to promote Gulf County and have
devoted much time in such ser-
vice. I shall continue to help this
area prosper in every way I can.
I am greatly honored and grati.
fied to have received such strong
consideration from so many, how.
ever, I believe that at this time,
I can best serve Gulf County as a
private individual. Therefore, in
fairness to everyone, I announce
publicly that I will not be a candi-
date for public office this year.
Again, my grateful thanks for
your kind consideration and confi-
dence.
Sincerely,
JESSE V. STONE

March 5 Is Club

Fashion Show Date
The Fourth Annual Fashion Show
sponsored by the Garden Club will
be held this year on March 5 at
8:00 p.m. at the Centennial Build-
ing.
The show will feature the wide
selection of 1964 fashions one has
to select from when shopping in
Port St. Joe. I
Many of the city's leading mer-
chants will participate in this '


Beta Sigma Phi
Eta Upsilon Chapter of Beta
Sigma Phi made final plans Tues-
day evening for their Area Council
meeting. This chapter will be host-
ess to 25 chapters in this North-
west Florida area.
The meeting is February 23,
Sunday, and a full day of events
have been planned. The schedule
includes: registration, 9:45 a.m. to
10:45 a.m. During this hour coffee
and sweet rolls will be served and
those who wish may tour the mu-
seum. The theme will be along
the lines to emphasize the Consti-
tution City.
Worship services will be held at
the First Methodist Church, where
the members will join together
and sit in a marked section. Flow-
ers will be placed on the altar by
Beta Sigma Phi.
Luncheon will be served at the
Centennial Building. Mayor Frank
Hannon will give the welcoming
address.
The business meeting will follow
the luncheon.
Beta Sigma Phi would like to
thank the many merchants and
business firms for all their coop-
eration and their donations of door
prizes and favors which will be
given away.


Mrs. Marshall Hosts
Baptist Circle 3
Members of Circle 3 of the First
Baptist Church met for their regu-
lar meeting Monday afternoon with
Mrs. Karl Marshall, Sr., as hostess.
There were six members present.


,u m .show and use local talent for mo- The meeting was called to order
dels. by the president, Mrs. Marshall,
There will be refreshments and who then turned it over to the
door prizes, program chairman, Mrs. Dewey Da-
Admission is $1.00 and tickets vis. Mrs. Davis gave the devotional
may be purchased from Garden and led in prayer.
Club members. Those participating on the pro-


W JHG


- Panama City


CHANNEL 7


ALSO:
Pensacola, FEAR, Channel 3 ..-..-............ -------10:20 PM
Tallahassee, WCTV, Channel 6 .....1.... 1:15..PM
(Paid Political Advertisement)


FOR TOTAL IANCE




WAS BO i!i RE


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and your day is off to a flying start. Your clothes can be in the dryer while you're still
at breakfast. Food comes easily from your electric refrigerator and cooks cleaner and
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It is more economical to go all electric than to have a combTnation of services .... when
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THE SOUTH'S TOTAL PERFORMANCE CHAMP

WAS BORN AND BRED IN RACES, RALLIES,

ECONOMY RUNS! MANY HELD RIGHT HERE

IN THE SOUTHLAND! READ HOW RACING

HELPS GIVE BIRTH TO BETTER FORDS.


Most automotive engineers will tell you that the
track is one of their most valued laboratories.
For example, track competition has led directly
to the following Ford engine changes: better block,
improved pistons, improved valve train, stronger
connecting rods and bolts.
Such improvements contribute not only to Ford's
winning track record, but also to the total per-
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Come see how it feels to test-drive a total per-
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TEST-DRIVE A TOTAL PERFORMANCE WINNER... AT YOUR FORD DEALER'S



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I Il-~r 911


e I st I


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Pforida THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1064

gram were Mrs. Dewey, Davis, Mrs. refreshments were served to those
Wesley Ramsey, Sr., Mrs. F. E. present.
Tranmmell;,and. Mrs. Karl Marshall, Next Monday is Mission Study
Sr. Other-members present were at the church.
Mrs. W. J. Belin and Mrs. W. J. The next meeting will be held in
Daughtry. The session was con- the home of Mrs. W. J. Belin.
eluded with sentence prayers. 4
A social hour was enjoyed and SUPPORT THE SHARKS



SEE and HEAR



SENATOR


SCOTT KELLY

Candidate for Governor

discuss a subject

of vital interest

to all Floridians


10:00 P.M.



Thursday, February 20
TELEVISION STATION


And -millr










THE STARt Port St. Joe, FPorid THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1964

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING *


-FOR RENT: By week or by night,
one. bedroom and private bath.
Living room and TV room privi-
Slege. 528 corner Sixth St. and
:: Woodward Ave. 2tp-2-13
FOR RENT: Upstairs furnished ap-
artment. 1506 Long Ave. Phone
227-5426. tfc-2-13
FOR RENT: Modern 2 bedroom
furnished apartment. Plenty of
living area. Call 227-4261 between
8:30 and 6:00 p.m. or 648-4600 af-
ter 6:00 p.m. tfc-2-13
FOR RENT: Unfurnished 2 bed-
room apart. Phone 227-7701. tic

FOR RENT: Nice furnished apart-
ment for couple only at 1621
Monument Ave. Phone 227-7641. tf

FOR RENT: Two bedroom house.
Palm Blvd. Call Cecil G. Costin,
Jr., 227-4311 tfc-11-21
FOR RENT: Furnished 2 bedroom
brick home and small apartment,
1301 Long Ave. Phone 648-4128.
Mira.
FOR RENT (with option to buy at
a very low price) 3 bedroom com-
pletely furnished house on First
St., St. Joe Beach. J. D. Clark, ph.
227-7771. tfc-2-20
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom house. 205
12th Street. Phone 227-5151. tfc
FOR RENT: Newly decorated bed-
room furnished downstairs ap-
artment, equipped with electrical
appliances. Call Mrs. Hubert Brin-
son, phone 227-5756, Sixth Street.
Couples are preferred.
FOR RENT: 10th St., 5 room house,
unfurnished, $35 mo. 10th St., 2
bedroom house furnished, $35 mo.
Long Ave., 5 room unfurnished
house, $40 mo. See Mrs. Nora Du-
ren, Phone 227-5471 or phone 229-
2941. 2c-1-16
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom house at
1007 Monument Ae. For informa-
tion call 227-5471, or 229-2941. tfc
FOR RENT: One 2-bedroom furnish.
ed apartment, One 2-bedroom
unfurnished apt. Two 1-bedroom
houses, furnished. Smith's Phar-
macy, Phone 227-5111.
FOR SALE: Grassed lots, well
drained, with pines. Ready for
building. 100'x175' Back of lot
close to canal property. Phone 229-
2428. tfc-2-20
FOR SALE: 5 room house on 7th
Street. Small down payment. Cath
arrange low cost financing. Call
Otis Pyle, 227-3737. ite
FOR SALE or R3NT: 2 bedroom
block house at White City. Phone
229-1140 or 229-2102. 4tc-2-6
FOR SALE: Residential lot. Phone
227-4696. Hulon Mitchell. tfc
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house. Lo-
cated on 2 corner lots. Ideal lo-
cation for schools, Well landscaped.
Located 301 16th St. Call 648-4735.
FOR SALE: One Allstate motor
scooter in excellent condition.
Call 227-3751, Pete Fox, for de-
tails. tfc-1-9
FOR SALE
Large two bedroom house com-
pletely furnished on 8th St. Pric-
ed for quick sale at $6,000.
Two bedroom masonry house on
Palm Blvd., with large den. Sit-
uated on two lots on corner. ,
Three bedroom masonry house'
on Marvin Ave. Can sell for only
$9,700.
FRANK HANNON
Registered Real Estate Broker
221 Reid Ave. Phone 227-3491
FOR SALE: Gold leather bound
family Bible. Large print. Guid-
ing Light edition. $25.00. See at
305 13th Street. 2tp-2-13
FOR SALE: 5-ton GE air condition-
er, commercial type. In good
condition. For details call 229-
3526. Itp
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom nice mod-
ern home with 2 porches, nice
carport, 200 foot front on Highway
71, White City. Call 229-1134. tic
WANTED TO BUY: Roller piano.
Must be in good condition. Call
227-5271. Roche Furniture and Ap-
pliance Store.


PART TIME work selling Avon
Products. Hours at your conven-
ience. Write Mrs. Dorothy Martin,
Avon manager P. 0. Box 3345 MSS
Tallahassee, Fla.
INCOME TAX SERVICE on a full
time basis, your office or mine,
business or personal, 20 years ex-
perience, subscriber to Commerce
Clearing House Tax Guide, located
on highway S-381, next to "Infin-
ger's Sportsman One Stop" (Wil!is
Swamp Road). Rates reasonable.
Telephone Wewa 639-2415. R. L.
CAPPS.l 2tp-1-23

HELP WANTED: Young man, 20-
30 years of age for a general
office and inventory clerk. Must be
high school graduate, type 40 wpm,
and have aptitude for mathematics.
Interview by appointment only.
Call H. T. Dean, The Glidden Co.,
Phone 227-2081. tfc-2-13
WOOD WORKS Screen doors,
picture frames, cabinets, kitchen
sinks made to order. P. G. Hart,
Phone 648-4223. tfc-2-13
WANTED: Waitress, over 21. Full
or part time. Apply in person at
Gulf Sands Restaurant, St. Joe
Beach. tfc-2-13
MOVING? Your MAYFLOWER
man is as near as your telephone.
Call 227-2011, SURPLUS SALES
OF ST. JOE, across from the Post
Office. Local and Long Distance
Moving. Free Estimates.
TO MY MANY FRIENDS
Please note that I am now asso-
ciated with Addison Insurance Ag-
ency, 201 Monument Ave., Port St.
Joe, Florida directly across the
street from the Post Office.
R. W. HENDERSON
Tel. 227-2011 Tel. 227-7741
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Meet
every Wednesday night, 8 p-n.
it Parish House, 309% 6th St. Port
St. Joe, Fla. Phone 229-33 64 fo
la iher information or write P. 0.
bL., 535.
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Purt St. Joe Lodge
No .111, F. & A. M., eVer. first
and third Thumsday at 8:00 p.m.


N. G. MARTIN, W. M.
H. L. BURGE, Secretary

SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, I. 0.
0. F.-Meets second and fourth
Thurssays, 8:00 p.m. in Americab
Legioi hall. All members urged to
attend.,
Noble Grand: Emmett Daniel)
Secretary: J. C. Martin.
WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION, meet-
ing second and fourth Tuesday
nights, 8:00 p.m. American Legion
Home.
R.A.M.-Regular convocation on St.
Joseph Chapter No. 56, R.A.M.
1st and 3rd Mondays. All visiting
companions welcome.
JOE EVANS, High Priest
JOHN C. DICKEY, Secretary
SEPTIC TANKS Pumped out. Call
Buford Griffin, Phone 227-2977
for quick expert service. tfc




income Tax Service

Prompt and Efficient


J. D. CLARK
1017 Long Ave.



LEROY STOKES
Landscaping Clearing
Fill Dirt Top Soil
Oyster Shells
Phones
229-3311 and 227-4853


NOTICE



I have Sold my Phillips 66

Distributorship



Hennessy Oil Co.

To



Phillips Petroleum Co.

Bartlesville, Oklahoma



George G. Tapper

THANKS to the people of this area for their patronage
during the past two and a half years.


(Continued From Page 1)

Tapper ,
who was a commercial fisherman,
he has a keen interest in the com-
mercial fishing industry in Flor-
ida. He served as an original mem-
ber of the legislative council and
was an original member of the
Florida Highway Patrol.
In 1917, while he was still less
than one year old, his family mov-
ed to Florida and in 1919 he and
his family moved to Port St. Joe
and has lived in this city since.
He was educated in the public
schools of Gulf County.
The Senate candidate is a mem-
ber of the Rotary Club and a past
president of this organization. He
is' a member of the Elks Club,
American Legion and is an Execu-


Sharks Lose Out After Making It

To Finals of Conference Tournament


Port St. Joe's Sharks waltzed by
DeFuniak Springs last Thursday
night, 83-58 behind the good shoot-
ing of every man on the team to
gain a first round victory in the
Northwest Florida Conference bas-
ketball tournament in Marianna.
Leading the Sharks scoring were
Bill Versiga with 16; Bob Craig, 14;
Fred Chason, 13 and Randy Wes-
ton and Leslie Nichols, both with
12 points.
Friday night, things were a lit-
tle tougher, with the Sharks getting
by Marianna with a point to spare.


The Sharks defeated the


Bull-


tive Board Member of the Gulf dogs for the second out of three
Coast Council Boy Scouts of decisions this season, 43-42.
America. He has served as presi- Bob Craig led the Sharks in their
dent of the Jaycees, president of second round victory with 13 mar-
the Chamber of Commerce pr kers. Fred Chason added to the vic-
dent of the Gulf Coast Electric Co- kers. Fred Chason added to the vic-
operative. A member of the Catho- ory wi points.
lic church, he is also a member of But Saturday night was a dif-
the Knights of St. Gregory and the ferent story.
Knights of Columbus. In a game that was nip and tuck
In addition to, being a general all the way, the Sharks lost out in
contractor, he is also in the real the final period. ,
estate business, is president of the Milton's Panthers led the Sharks
M & B Railroad running between at the end of the first quarter,
Marianna and Blountstown and is 21 to 16, but the Sharks roared
a director of the Citizens Federal' back in the second period to nar-
Savings and Loan Association of row their deficit to one noint. Mil-


Port St. Joe.
Tapper is a veteran of 3% years
military service during World War
II, having served as a bomber pi-
lot in the Army Air Corps, where
he attained the rank of Captain.
During his service he was decor-
ated 11 times for gallantry inac-
tion, received the Presidential
Unit Citation, 5 campaign stars
and 3 theatre ribbons. He served
in the North African, the European
and Balkans theatre of war. After
his active service he served 10
years in the reserve.
He is married to the former Miss
Amy Gibson.

LUTHER TUCKER
ANNOUNCEMENT
To the citizens of Gulf County,
I wish to announce that I have
qualified as a candidate for Sen-
ator of the 5th District subject to
the Democratic Primary on May
5, 1964.
I am seeking re-election as the
5th District Senator and to serve
the first full term of the newly
apportioned District which now in-
cludes Gulf, Franklin, Liberty and
Wakulla counties.
I will run on my record in the
Legislature.
I point to a few of the accom-
plishments that took place during
the 1963 sesison that affected Gulf
County. The local legislative dele-
gation with the help of many citi-
zens of Gulf County were able to
acquire the land necessary for a
state park on St. Joseph's Peninsu-
la. We were fortunate in getting
an appropriation of $100,000 for
this project. We got a claim bill
through for $10,000 for a family in
Gulf County.
Many other projects for the bet-
terment of the citizens of Gulf
County have been started but are
yet unfinished.
I ask that you inspect my record
as Senator, look at the legislation
that I supported and that legisla-
tion that I opposed and determine
for yourself my position as your
Senator.
I served the following commit-
tees: Chairman Salt Water Conser-
vation; Vice Chairman Public
Roads and Highways; County Or-
ganization; Finance and Taxation;
Governmental Reorganization; Live-
stock; Motor Vehicles; Pensions
and Retirement; Public Health "B";
Welfare. During the 1961 sesison
I served on the following commit-
tees: Chairman Game and Fisher-
ies; Forestry and Parks; Industrial
and Atomic Energy; Legislative
Management and Population; Mis-
cellaneous Legislation; Motor Ve-
hicles; Public Health; Welfare. At
this time I am serving on the fol-
lowing Legislative Council Interim
Committees: Roads and Highways,
Vice Chairman; Commercial Codes;
Fisheries and Natural Resources.
I humbly solicit your vote and
support for a man of action, not
promises.
lit (Paid Pol. adv.) 2-20


Phone 227-3161


ton led 35-34 at the half. The Pan-
thers picked up five points in the
third quarter and held the lead
at the game's end. In the final
period, a determined surge by the
Sharks threatened to upset the
Milton applecart. At one time the
Panthers had an 11 point lead, but
the Sharks narrowed the margin
back down to one point, but were
unable to overcome a freeze tactic
by the Panthers, which meant the
victory was lost.
Randy Weston was high man for
the Sharks with 14 points. Jake
Belin and Fred Chason both netted
12 points.


Mrs. Bell Hostess

To Circle Two
Circle Two of the WMS No. 1 of
the First Baptist Church met in
the home of Mrs. Lonnie Bell,
Monday afternoon at 3:00 p.m. with
six members including one new
member, Mrs. Martha Clemens.
The devotional was brought by
Mrs. Ayers from Matthew 26:36-56
and prayer by Mrs. C. G. Costin,
Sr., for the missionaries on the
prayer calendar.
The program was brought from
the Royal Service magazine by
Mrs. Ayers, Mrs. Costin, Mrs. Rich-
ard Saunders and Mrs. Lonnie Bell
on the subject of "I Must Be Pre-
pared". Mrs. Saunders dismissed
the group with prayer.
All six members enjoyed the so-
cial hour.


Sharks Defeat

County Rivals

Tuesday Night
Port St. Joe's Sharks up-ended
the Wewa Gators Tuesday night on
the local court, 80-63 for their
19th win of the season.
Fred Chason put forth one of
his high-scoring nights to pluck 22
points out of the game to lead the
Shark scoring. Billy Versiga was
next in line with 19 points and 22
big rebounds. Jake Belin and Bob
Craig each netted 12 points and
Randy Weston coped 11.
The Sharks led all the way and


were never in trouble.
Score by quarters:
Port St. Joe -- 13 18 15 32-80
Wewa Gators 11 15 16 21-63
Sharks fg ft tp Gators fg ft tp
Belin 6 0 12 | M'gren 6 1 13
Chason 9 4 22 Suber 6 3 15
Versiga 8 3 19 Smith 0 3 3
Weston 5 1 11 Lister 7 1 15
Craig 6 0 12 Thomas 7 1 15
Nichols 0 2 2 Taunton 1 0 2
A'strong 1 0 21
The Sharks will close out their
season schedule tomorrow night at
home when they go against Bristol.
Game time for the B game is 7:00.


Mr. and Mrs. Gary E. Manz of
Ward Ridge Trailer Park announce
the birth of a son, Ronald Eugene
on February 4.
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Olynn
Wester, 813 Marvin Ave., announce
the birth of a son, Mark David on
February 5.
Mr. and Mrs. William Richard
Merchant, Sr., 112 Wescott Circle,
announce the birth of a baby boy,
William Richard, Jr., on February
13.
Mr. and Mrs. Clark Eugene Kol-
ler, 112 Bellamy Circle, announce
the birth of a son, Craig Edward
on February 16.
(All births occurred at the Port
St. Joe Municipal Hospital.)

LONG AVENUE WMU PLANS
FOR MISSION STUDY
Mrs. Durel Brigman, mission stu-
dy chairman of the WMU of the
Long Avenue Baptist Church re-
minds all members and visitors of
the study and covered dish supper
which will be held at the Long
Avenue Baptist Church Tuesday,
February 25 at 6:30 p.m.
The nursery will be open.


Serve Up-To-The-Minute Chicken Stew
V" mmmmmmm" -.. enme e ss m m ermnr


Set your table with sparkling freshness. Then serve the latest
chicken stew seasoned with Knorr soup mix, slim bread sticks and
a sleek salad. For a heartier salad try the famous Any Bean Salad.
Modern Chicken Stew
1 broiler-fryer chicken, cut up
Flour
2 tablespoons Mazola corn oil
1 cup water
I envelope Swiss recipe onion soup mix
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1/2 cup sliced carrots
% cup sliced celery
1 cup coarsely chopped green pepper
Dredge chicken with flour. Heat corn oil in skillet; add chicken;
cook over medium heat, turning as needed, until golden brown on
all sides. Add water; bring to boil. Stir in soup mix and tomato
paste. Cover and simmer 15 minutes. Add carrots; simmer 15 min-
utes. Add celery and green pepper; simmer until chicken is tender,
about 10 minutes. Makes 3 to 4 servings.
Any Bean Salad
1 (1-pound 13-ounce) can beans
1 tablespoon chopped scallions
1 tablespoon chopped green pepper
1 tablespoon chopped pimiento
1/2 cup Mazola corn oil
A% cup Vinegar
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon salt
%1 teaspoon pepper
2 radishes, sliced
Drain beans; reserve liquid for marinade, adding water, i" neces-
sary, to make % cup liquid. Combine beans, scallions, green pep-
per, and pimiento in medium-size bowl. Mix corn oil, vinegar.
sugar, salt, pepper and bean liquid together; pour over vegetables
and marinate in refrigerator at least three hours. Add radishes
just before serving. Serve plain or on lettuce leaves. Makes 4 salad
servings or 8 appetizer servings.
Note: Green Beans, kidney beans or chick peas may be used.


Over Million

Lose SS Money
More than one million people
over 65 lose Social Security money
each month, according to John V.
Carey, District Manager of the
Panama City Social Security Of-
fice.
"Many workers over 64 feel thefe
is no use to ask about payments be-
cause they believe they can't get
Social Security if they earn over
$1200," Carey added. In some cases
an employed or self-employed per-
son with minor childern may earn
as much as $4400 and still receive


some Social Security payments.
One worker earned $2400 and lost
$600 because he didn't apply for
retirement benefits. Still another
case involved a 68 year old worker,
his wife and two minor children.
In that case payments to the fam-
ily could have started threeyears
ago. As a result over $2000 was
lost.
"All workers, regardless of age,
should find out what Social Securi-
ty means to them," Carey con-
cluded. Knowing the full story a-
bout Social Security will help you
in planning the financial protec-
tion you want for yourself and
your family. Any worker over age
62 may find it to his advantage to
claim reduced retirement benefits.
The Social Security office for
this area is located at 1135 Harri-
son Avenue, Panama City, Florida,
(telephone 763-5331).


Sgt. Anderson Is
Wounded In Viet Nam
Sgt. H. L. Anderson, whose wife
Nadine lives at 111 Second Avenue
in Oak Grove, was reported wound-
ed in South Viet Nam last week.
Sgt. Anderson is stationed in
Siagon, Viet Nam.
Sgt. Anderson was one of many
wounded on February 16 when a
terrorist planted bomb exploded in
a movie theatre killing three and
wounding about 50. Sgt. Anderson
suffered wounds from metal frag-
ments and bruises and abrasions
of the right leg.
Mrs. Anderson has received word
that her husband is recovering
from his wounds nicely.














4SOODS


(l
1y
s
R
1i
b
p
s


V CHECKING ACCOUNT
SERVICE "





SHOPPING'S A



SNAP WHEN



YOU PURCHASE



BY CHECK!


Found a bargain but don't happen to have
^ the cash on hand? You can still take ad-
vantage of those savings by writing out a
check! Shopping with your checkbook is
so convenient makes keeping track
of expenditures easier!


MODERN
FACILITIES


Open A Personalized

Checking Account

With Us Today


Florida National Bank

at PORT ST. JOE
Member: Florida National Group and FDIC


I AM A CANDIDATE
for the office of

State Senator
for the

5th Senatorial District
My qualification and exper-
ience, including 10 years in
the Florida Legislature, 6
years as Representative, and
4 years as Senator, will enable
me to best serve the individ-
ual interest of all of the peo-
ple of the Fifth District.


George G. Tapper
Your vote and support will
be appreciated
(Paid Political Adv.)


ETAOIN SHRDLU
By WESLEY R. RAMSEY

Another argument against the
continuation of foreign aid was
nade evident last week in the U.
S.
Opponents of foreign aid have
long argued that such activity by
the.. federal government does not
buy us friends in facts it ap-
pears to breed contempt.
An example in fact was pre-
sented last week when Britain
sent us "The Beatles".
But then they may have been
retaliating at us for exporting El-
vis to them.
We must admit that true to the
English image of reserve, the Bea-
tles were more subdued than their
American rock and roll counter-
part.
But, dig those crazy haircuts,
Jack!
Or, lack of haircuts.
Recalling several years of
"progressive musical apprecia-
tion" we wonder if it would be
"cool" to suggest that the Bea-
tles use the one time "hit",
"Rag Mop" for their theme song?


e








TPRECMORK0Iti


Fresh Pork Sale
Fresh Pork 70 to 90 Pound Average

WHOLE PIGS


Pound
Cut and Wrapped


2Sc


FRSH PORK LB.

SHOULDER ROAST 29c
SMALL SIZE PORK LB.

SPARE RIBS 39c
OUR OWN' PURBE PORK LB.
PORK LIVER 25c

FRESH PORK LB.
HAMS HALF or WHOLE 4c
Get These Low, Low Prices, Plus
Double Grand Prize Stamps
MISSISSIPPI BRAND SLICED LB.
BACON 39c
FRESH PORK LB.
NECK BONES 19c
FRESH LB.
PORK STEAKS 39gc
BONELESS ROLLED BOSTON BUTT LB.
PORK ROAST 49c


DUBUQUE'S BONELESS


Cooked Ham


3 LB. CAN


$2.39


UL~~L-f


Port St. Joe,
Florida
Specials for
February
20,21 and 22


Snowdrift

Shortening
3 Pound Can

49c
Limit 1 With $5.00 Order or More
Folger's

Coffee
Pound Can

48c
Limit 1 With $5.00 Order or More
Oak Hill

T matoes
No. 303 Cans


3


For


Double Grand Prize Stamps at
Jitney Jungle Every Day!


Frozen


Pet Ritz 2 to the package


PIE SHELLS


Bama 18 Ounce Jar
STRAWBERRY PRESERVES


jar


I 1 I


TUNA


Y2 Size


Foods


3 pkgs. $1.00


MORTON'S FRUIT

PIES 29C
Hi Acres ORANGE
JUICE 3 95c
Cans ^


GOLDEN RIPE
Bananas


GREEN CABBAGE -- 2 Ibs.
Sweet POTATOES--- lb.
RUTABAGAS---- Ib.
Cello Bag CARROTS .-- pkg.
FRESH CORN -- each ear
GREEN ONIONS -- bunch
BELL PEPPERS --- each


Cello RADISHES bag


100 Pound Bags


Fertilizer

Fertilizer


Formula $1.99
8.8. $1.99


Formula
4-10-7


$2.49


m


39c


29c


LB.c
10c


Dubuque's Limit 3
POTTED MEAT 3oz.can lOc
Friskie
CAT or DOG FOOD 7 cans 97 C
Island Pride No. 2 Can
SLICED PINEAPPLE can 25C
Idahoan
INSTANT POTATOES 2 pkgs. 49c
DETERGENT
FAB
LA2GE 25
BOX
CARNATION EVAPORATED
MILK 3 43c
AUNT JEMIMA
GRITS 12c
JIM DANDY 25 LB. BAG
Dog Food $1.89
WALDORF
TISSUE 4 33c
STARKIST


-~i~i~t~


A











School Investigating Group


Studies Carver High Facilities


Buzzett's Drug Store
Drive-In Window Service
Free Parking
317 Williama Ave.


County Gets $32,000
From Track Funds
TALLAHASSEE State Comp-
troller Ray E. Green said this
week checks for $32,000 from the
race track tax fund are being
mailed to each of the 67 counties.
The comptroller said the pay-
ment last year for the same month
was $29,000. Total payments made
to counties thus far this year is
$92,000, or $10,000 more than re-
ceived by the counties for the
same period last year.

CLASSIFIED ADS
Midget Investments With
Giant Returm


TELEVISION
Black & White and Color
Stereo Air Conditioning

Service Calls, $3.00
All work guaranteed

ST. JOE RADIO
& TV COMPANY
Phone 227-4081


On February 13, the School
Committee met at eight o'clock,
EST., at Carver School in Wewa-
hitchka with the chairman, Dr. R.
E. King, presiding. Present were
19 committee members and visitors
and approximately 30 teachers and
parents of Carver students. The
meeting was opened by prayer by
Mrs. Jackie Quarles.
Bob Jackson presented the com-
mittee with three choices of names
for the committee. The name cho-
sen was County Educational Study
Committee.
Dr. King introduced the princi-
pal of Carver School, Edwin Wil-
liams, who outlined the situation
of his school. His report contained
the state requirements of a "Le-
vel 1" school which is the mini-
mum level and not adequate for
accreditation and some of the re-
quirements of a "Level 2" school
which does meet accreditation
standards. He then stated the pres-
ent situation of the school which
is far, far below the minimum
standards. He said that he could
never meet the high school require-
ments because of the small num-
ber of pupils, but that with one
additional classroom, two teachers
and many necessary repairs, books
and equipment, two teachers and
many necessary repairs, books and
equipment, he could meet the
needs of grades 1-6. He suggested
that the 7-12 grade students be
transported to Port St. Joe to Wash-
ington High School for a more ade-
quate education. The number of
students involved would be 33 in
grades 7-9 and 15 in grades 10-12.
Max Kilbourn was asked to give
his appraisal of the transportation
situation. The students of Carver
School are scattered and the bus
makes a two hour run each morn-
ing and each afternoon. There is
only one bus serving students
south and north of the school and
this one bus is in poor condition.
A suggestion was made from the
school that perhaps smaller vehi-
cles would be the answer in trans-
porting students from these scat-
tered areas and& the bus be used in
bringing students from closer more
populous areas. It was also brot
out that the eight furthermost stu-
dents were from Calhoun County.
There was discussion from the
floor -p.n the-,pros and cons of the
Carver students commuting to the
Washington High School. Mr. Wil-
liams concluded his report with
the introduction of his two seniors
(the entire class) who stated that
they would like to finish out their
year at Washington High. He also
said that the opinion of all his
students in grades 7-12 was-if an
education cannot be had at Car-
ver, they want to go to Port St.
Joe to Washington High School.
Mr. Twine, principal of Wash-
ington High, was then asked if he
could assimulate the 48 pupils from
Carver and, after hearing an en-


rollment rundown, stated that he
could take care of them.
Dr. King announced that the
next meeting would be held at the
Highland View School at eight
o'clock EST, February 27.
The committee adjourned for a
tour of the Carver School plant.
Jacquelyn K. Quarles
Recording Secretary










THE STAR
Phone 227-3161


Cub Scouts Feted
At Annual Banquet
The Cub Scouts of Troop 47, Port
St. Joe, will have their annual
"Blue and Gold" Banquet Monday,
February 24, at seven o'clock. Pres-


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Plorida THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1964


ent will be the boys and their fa-
milies and the following guests:
Mr. and Mrs. John Simpson, local
Scoutmaster, Mr. and Mrs. Dave
May, committee chairman and Har-
ry Babbit, institutional represen-
tative.
Troop 47 is under the leadership
of Bill Quarles, Jr., Cubmaster and
Lawrence Bowen, assistant Cub-
master. Den Mothers are Mrs. Jake
Belin, Den 1; Mrs. Ann Hammock,
Den 2; Mrs. Rub Lee Kennedy,
Den 4; and Mrs. Nell Vandevender,
Den 5. Ladies in charge of the
banquet arrangements were Mrs.
Doris Jordan, Mrs. Tillie McKier-
nan and Mrs. Ralph Macomber.


because of a lack of Den mothers.
The present Dens are at full ca-
pacity and several new ones are
needed. Den 3, representing the
area between 16th Street and Al-
In Memorial Way needs to be re-
organized under the leadership of
interested parents. If you are in-
terested in becoming a Den Mo-
ther, please contact Bill Quarles,
Jr.


NEED A PLUMBER? 7

CALL BEAMAN
Plumbing Installation Repairi
Contract Work A Speclalty
AgMUta for
Brand Name Plumbing Fixtures
-CALL US FOR FREE ESTIMATE--

TWO EXPERIENCED PLUMBERS TO SERVE YOU

BEAMAN PLUMBING SERVICE
1107 GARRISON AVL PHONE SAll 741


L


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH


C. Byron Smith, Pastor


Corner Third St. and Baltzell Ave.


A.M.
A.M.
P.M.
P.M.
P.M.


"Come and Worship God With Us"


SUNDAY SCHOOL
MORNING WORSHIP
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION .....-........
EVENING WORSHIP
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ....


FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Intersection Monument and Constitution
REV. THOMAS S. HARRIS, D.D., Minister


Church School
MORNING WORSHIP
Bible Study (Wednesday)
Methodist Youth Fellowship
Evening Worship


9:45 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
7:30 P.M.
6:00 P.M.
7:30 P.M.


9:30
11:00
6:15
7:30
7:30


I See Special Birthday Sale Circular Friday


ST. JOE LAUNDRY & CLEANERS

Now Under New Management All Work Done In Our Plant

Get Acquainted Offer

BRING YOUR CLEANING AND 'REGISTER FOR
$5.00 WORTH of CLEANING
Free Cleaning To Be Awarded Wednesday, February 12


You Are Cordially Invited To Attend

Long Ave. Baptist Church

Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION --....--....... 6:15 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 P.M.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) .... 7:30 P.M.

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME
REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor
Air Conditioned Centrally Heated


The Cub Scouts want to extend
man thanks to the above mention-
ed workers who make it possible
for them to join in this program
and they especially want to thank
the Rotary Club for their sponsor-
ship and willingness to help when-
ever they are called on.
There are boys though, who
would like to join in this organi-
zation who have been turned away




























Half f W or 4
D5 lb.4 Loin Half C
4c-LB.^^ 4LB. ,


'-SUPER-RIGHT" HEAVY WESTERN BEEF CHUCK

ROASTS Bne 45c
LB.


Boneless 69
LI. O6 c


YOUNG 6 to 14 lb. Avg. 16to 22 lb.


L- 39c -L 35c


12 OZ. AE


jr ^^PKG.

I With coupon and purchase of
r No Bugs 'M' Lady 9 Special! Ann Page Reg. or Thin Lb. Pkg.

13"x25' or 18"x18' roll I gS.
Jax. 2-22-64
upon good thru Sun. Feb. 23 p Special! Ann Page
-u MAYONNAISE at. 49 c


25 Extra
w Plaid Stamps
With coupon and purchase of
1 Pfeiffer's Thousand Island
Dressing 8 oz. 39c
Jax. 2-22-64
1 Coupon good thru Sun. Feb. 23

Save at A&P! Jane Parker Golden,
| mCinnamon or Sugared


DONUTS


BOX
O1ox 19c
OF 12


I Special! White House

SINS TA ?


MIL




8 Qt Pkg.


Special! Jane Parker 11/2 Lb.
PEAC lPIE
Special! .JaneParker-1'/ Lb.
CHERRY PIE


Nonfat Dry

IT


K


59c


L LETTERS
To The Editor


YOUR CH,O-I CE

3 LBS. FRANKS ------ -

S 3 Lbs. RED,HOT FRANKS C

3 Lbs. SmokedSAUSAGE -_

3 Lbs. HAM HOCKS_ ----

3 Lbs. FRESH PICNICS


...... ...



"SUPER-RIGHT" WESTERN PORK


LOINS Aw


Dear Mr. Ramsey,
I read your editorial of a couple
of weeks ago, and it set me think-
ing. The column concerned the
problem of the cities' dogs. As a
"dog lover" I would like to pre-
sent my ideas on the subject.
The problem is mainly this:
1. The dogs must be rabies vac-
cinated for health reasons.
2. "Nuisance" dogs must be con-
trolled.
I have been a resident of Port
St. Joe for about three months
now, so I am unfamiliar with
Florida rules on such matters, but
I will tell you how California op-
erates.
Each dog must have a license,
which will not be issued unless
proof is presented of recent rabies
vaccination. The cost of the license
varies according to city, but aver-
ages three dollars, which is reason-
able. The State Department of
Health provides "Rabies Clinics"
once or twice a year, so vaccina-
tions are provided for the nomin-
al fee of $1.00.
Now, the problem is what hap-
pens if the dogs don't have licens-
es? A pound would not be terribly
expensive to build. I don't know
what the dog license proceeds are
used for, but a small pound and
office would suffice. If a dog was
picked up for lack of a license, he
could be held until "bailed out"
by his owner for the price of a
rabies shot and license, plus per-
haps $1.00 for feeding while being
held. If a city ordinance is passed,
people must obey it or be penalized
for disobedience just as if they
didn't buy their 1964 car tags.
I wouldn't mind being dogcatch-
er. The job would involve care of
impounded dogs, capture of nui-
sances and strays and seeking
homes for unclaimed dogs. Per-
haps the S.P.C.A. would have
some suggestions.
Many cities in California keep
records of dog bites and require
that all dog bites be reported. One
offense receives a warning (to the
owners); two, and the dog must be
confined or tied; three, and the
dog must be removed from the
city or destroyed. Our pound de-
stroyed unclaimed strays and dogs
labeled vicious. This I wouldn't
like if I were dog catcher. Any fe-
male dogs "adopted" from the
pound were spayed, to prevent
over-population. A fee was charg-
ed for adopting a dog.
Sometimes dogs were picked up
in unfamiliar neighborhoods for
raiding garbage cans or the like.
These dogs were taken to the
pound and kept there until the
owners came for them. If they
were licensed, the owner was con-
tacted.
Recently a stray female dog had
a litter of pups under a neighbor's-
house. She was quite mangy and
many neighbors feared that their
dogs would catch it from her. A
pound and dogcatcher would have
provided a place for her to raise
her pups while protecting the
city's dogs from whatever diseases
she had. The pups could have been
put up for adoption at the age of
8 weeks or so.
The ideas outlined in this letter
are those used in a city of 600,000
people. As a result ,there are many
more dogs and the proceeds from
license taxes are much .greater.


.1


ea. 39c


ea. 45c


JANE PARKER FRUIT (100 Stamps 3 lb. Ringe$2.89) (50 Stamps 1V2 lb loaf $1.49
CA K E200 EXTRA
PICA K EDGPLAID $3 99
STAMPS


Nabisco Premium
SALTINES .-....... lb. 29c
Liquid Det. 12 oz., 22 oz.
TREND -----... 29c 49c
Detergent, Large Size
TREND 2 for 39c
Detergent, lb., 4 ozs.
SURF (7c off) ....-... 26c
Detergent
BREEZE ...-... 15 oz. 35c
Detergent, 3 lbs., 7 ozs.
Imso Blue (10c off) 69c
)ndensed Detergent
4LL ..-.... 3 lb., 1 oz 79c


Your dreams come true with
PLAID STAMPS
HE GREAT ATLANTIC & PACIFIC TEA COMPANY, INC

A.7


Detergent
Fluffy ALL .... 3 lb. 79c
Detergent, 12 fl. ozs.
Lux Liquid (8c 6ff) 27ec
Detergent, pt., 6 fl. ozs.
Swan Liquid --.--...........- 65c
Liquid Detergent
WISK qt. 75c
Gold Medal (5 lbs.)
FLOUR 59c
Dole Crushed (20 oz.)
PINEAPPLE .........------ 37c
Betty Crocker or Puffin
BISCUITS ...... 8 oz. 10c


Mazola (1 lb. ctn.)
MARGARINE .........-- 39c
Del Monte Lt. Meat, 6/2 oz.
Chunk Tuna --- 3 for $1.
Larsen s Mixed Vegetables
VEG-ALL ....-----.... b. 21c
Pfeiffer's Roquefort (8 oz.)
DRESSING -- 8 oz. 35c
Knorr
Soup Mix -- 3V/ oz. 39c
Wishbone French
Dressing (10c off) -- 57c


AMERICAN SCHOOLS
Train Your Pharmacist to
Use the Medicines of all tht
World for you!
The vital ingredients of your pres-
criptions and medicines come from
the far corners of all the world .
but our pharmacists are trained in
American skills and knowledge to
help you.


SMITH'S PHARMACY
2 Registered Pharmacists on duty


Phone 227.5111


Drive-In Window At Rear


* I


ffing, after examining what Gulf County is using for a jail
facility. The question that must be faced is whether the peo-
le want the facility near to the hand of the bulk of the popu-
ation (over 60 per cent of Gulf's population lives within a
three mile circle of Port St. Joe) or whether it will be placed
ff the side, unnoticed and largely forgotten by the bulk of


the people.
We think the "not needed" information being spread
now is only to try and convince you to let things remain as
they are for the time being.


I'\ : '- 'I ~ '


I


-RADE 'A' QUICK FROZEN TENDER


TURKEYS


Y-DY D i-


510 FIFTH STREET


.Prices in this Advertisement are good
through Saturday, February 22


Cancer Kills More

Than Cars 'In

Gulf County
The cancer death toll, over a
twelve-month period, in Gulf Coun-
ty was greater than deaths result-
ing from motor vehicle accidents.
The information is given in the
Annual Report of Florida Vital
Statistics for 1962, recently releas-
ed by the Florida State Board of
Health.
Other information tabulated
showed that total number of deaths
from all causes in Gulf County, for
the same year, totalled 65. Of this
total, nine died from cancer and
one from motor vehicle accidents.
According to statistics released
by the Florida Division office of
the American Cancer Society total
cancer deaths throughout the state
have continued to increase, from
7,719 deaths in 1960, to 8,233 in
1961 and 8,814 in 1962.
The ACS County Unit Spokes-
man in commenting on the statisti-
cal report, had this to say. "We do
not wish to frighten or unduly a-
larm people with cancer death fig-
ures. We only want everyone to
face up to facts and be aware and
informed about the disease. We
hope that more and more people
will get to know "Cancer's Seven
Danger Signals" and have regular,
complete medical check-ups. A
great many more might be saved
if the disease is diagnosed early
and proper treatment is given
promptly. Evidence of this is the
1,200,000 Americans, living and
pronounced cured, five years after
prompt and proper treatment was
given.

Hunting Season Will
Close Sunday Evening
TALLAHASSEE Hunting in
Florida of all game birds and all
animals except rabbits, will close
one-half hour after sunset Sunday,
February 23, according to A. D. Al-
drich, director, Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission.
Only rabbits and unprotected
animals and birds may be taken af-
ter the closing day, February 23,
until opening of the special spring
turkey gobbler hunting season in
certain counties in Northeast, Nor-
thwest and Central Florida, March
28 to April 12.
Unprotected animals and birds
which may be taken at any time in
Florida include bobcat, red and
grey fox, raccoon, opossum, nutria,
skunk, flying squirrel, English
sparrow, armadillo, crow, rats,
mice, bats, moles, shrews and buz-
zards.
All hawks and owls, and all ot-
her birds and animals, including
alligators and crocodiles, not listed
above as "unprotected," are fully
protected by Federal and state
laws.

However, a small pound might be
needed by this city, to protect not
only the city's dogs, but its peo-
ple as well.
The ideas are sketchy; my
knowledge of the facts isn't thor-
ough enough to outline details.
Your cooperation in keeping the
public informed of what action the
City Commissioners take is all that
is asked.
Thank you for hearing
me out,
M. J. IVEY


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Plorida THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1964



THE STAR
Published Every Thursdy At 306 Williams Avenue, Pert St. Joe, Fled
By The Star Publishing Company
WESLEY R. RAMSEY Editor and PubPsher
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Salesman, Photographer, Columnist, RI erter 're
Reader, Bookkeeper and Complaint Department
DIAL 227-3161 PosTOFarzc Box 30P

Entered as second-class matter, December 19, 1987, at the Postofflee, Port 8t. Joe,
Florida, under Act of March 8, 1879.

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, $3.00 SIX MONTHS, $1.75 THREE MONTHS, *127JO

TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amout raet"ed for siel
advertisement.


Moving County Seat Will 'Not

Take Funds From Other Services

We think it is time for a little clarification on the mat-
ter of seeking to change the location of the county seat.
Some mis-conceptions concerning such a move have been
brought to light, that do not hold true to the case, and serve
no purpose but to cloud the issue.
One specific to which we have reference is an article in
the Gulf County Breeze two weeks ago in which Editor Ed
Bandjough lamented the thinking toward "wasting" money
building a new courthouse when the needs of our schools
are so great.
On the surface, this supposition makes sense. But let's
take a deeper, more penetrating look.
First, a committee now in operation is studying the needs
of the schools. And at the beginning this committee has
found that the revenue available to Gulf County schools is
growing at a rate nearly 50 times that of the pupil popula-
tion in the schools. Note that we are not discouraging any
up-grading of the schools on the grounds that they are now
receiving enough money. We certainly are encouraging bet-
ter education facilities and better education, period. We are
also a member of this committee, and we will refrain from
any suggestions until the committee has made a thorough
study of the needs, available resources and kind of education
offered by our schools.
But the hard truth is, the schools in Gulf County
are receiving all the money from taxes in Gulf County
that can be legally provided through county tax sour-
ces. The only way Gulf's schools can receive more money
is for more taxable property to go on the rolls. The only
way more taxable property can go on the rolls is for the
County Tax Assessor to place a higher valuation on
real and personal property, :
So, the building of a new Court House cannot in any
way take needed money from the school system. Because of
the reason above stated and because of the fact that the
tax money is handled through two entirely different chan-
nels. The schools handle school tax levy and spending and
the county handles county tax levy and spending.
In another vein. it is evident from past performance
that enough money will be spent for Court House and jail
improvements in the future, regardless of how the Court
House moving question is disposed of, to build a new Court
House for Gulf County entirely adequate to meet Gulf's
needs.
We saw a beautiful Court House in Marianna Friday
afternoon that would be entirely too big for Gulf County.
[t's cost? $800,000. A new Court House is under con-
struction in Holmes County that would be completely ade-
quate for Gulf County at a cost of less than $400,000.
While we agree no definite action in these lines have
been taken by the Gulf County Commission, the county will
in all probability spend in the neighborhood of $300,000 on
our Court House facilities, EVEN IF THE COUNTY SEAT
MOVEING FAILS! It has been discussed. Figures have
been quoted and suggested, and for projects that will only
begin the work desired.
Before the County Seat movement started, there was
publicity to the fact that the State Prison Board had DI-
RECTED Gulf County to provide jail facilities for approxi-
nately 50 people. Intelligent estimates of this project were
n the neighborhood of $250,000. This did not include money
:o renovate the present jail facilities into usable space in the
)resent Court House. So it is reasonable to assume that the
totall bill would go over $300,000.
There was even a directive from Circuit Judge Warren
L. Fitzpatrick to get on with the jail job.
But, suddenly, after the petition to move the county
seat began to take shape, Gulf's jail needs mysteriously
vanished. We now have word that we no longer need such
elaborate facilities Even after the county went so far
,s to get preliminary drawings and to hire an architect to
nake concrete plans.
Mr. citizen, we contend that the wool is being pulled
>ver your eyes now trying to make you think money needed
or schools will be spent on a new Court House just as the
vool was pulled over your eyes over the statement for new
ail facilities sorely needed. or. no new jail facilities
ieing needed.
It would seem to us that the state's directive must still
ie carried out in the "convenient future" or that
he directive was never as strong and precise as it was pre-
ented last summer.
But, frankly, we think the expenditures are still in the









NAME DELETED FROM. tally deleted from the honor roll
SCHOOL HONOR ROLL LIST list published in The Star recently.
What made it so bad was that
Principal Wayne Saunders noti- Jeanine had made the all 'A' hon-
fied The Star this week that the or roll, and deserves the recogni-
name of Jeanine Britt was acciden- tion for such an achievement.

PANAMA CITY

BUSINESS DIRECTORY *


HAIRLEY-DAVIDSON MOTORCYCLES -
SiX SENSATIONAL ""
MODELS FOR n
YOUR RIDING *8''aJri0 l
PLEASURE ,IE,"I
See us for new and
used motorcycles or motor scooters.
We offer low down payments and
easy terms to fit your pocketbook.
"FOR INFORMATION CALL"
GULF COAST Harley-Davidson
1418 Harrison Ave. SU 5-6363


'RUG CLEANING
9 by 12 Rugs, $5.00
CASH AND CARRY
Dyeing Spot Removal
FLOORMASTER 'RUGATERIA
3425 E. Hwy. 98 PO 3-1545


CATHERINE'S SJ
First Quality Fab
Patterns Notio
See Our Spring ]
2817 E. 5th St.


ELLIS MUSIC CO.
HAMMOND ORGANS
Story & Clark Pianos
Guitars, Musical Instruments
SHEET MUSIC, INSTRUCTIONS


763-2611


VOLKSWAGEN
SALES and SERVICE
704 West 15th Street
Phone 763-5495


BONDY'S RAMBLER
SALES AND SERVICE ON
Rambler Renault M.G.
Austin Healy
Repairs on all imports
1026 Harrison Ave. Ph. 763-4678


BOB'S TOP SHOP
Auto Interiors a Specialty
Complete furniture upholstery
Truck, Tractor Seats Repaired


2135 Hwy. 98 East
SU 5-6091


PO 3-1683


M & S
TERMITE & PEST CONTROL, Inc.
HOME OWNED SINCE 1943
"Don't let your pests rest-
put M&S to the test"
HOME COMMERCIAL
RESIDENTIAL
for free inspection call SU 5-8733


Ornamentals Should Be Fertilized

For Spring Rush of New Growth
Most deciduous plants are as
modest as humans. The first thing I in a spray.
they do when they awake in the Azaleas and camellias need a
spring is to cover their limbs with good shot of fertilizer as soon as
leaves. Dogwood, redbub, peaches blooming is over. Play it safe and
and plums and a few others are get one of the many special azal-
exceptions. They prefer to put on ea-camellia fertilizers on the mar-
a show of color before dressing. ket. After feeding these acid-lov-
Regardless of how plants begin ing plants, add another layer of
spring growth, you will find them leaf mulch around these plants.
hungry after a long winter's sleep. Roses will need an application
Excessive rains in January have of nutrients during their first
washed away vital plant food, flush of bloom. The size of bush
Therefore, plan to give all orna- and soil is a factor. But when in
mental an application of fertili- doubt, apply two ounces of a 10-
zer to carry them through their 0-10 top dresser to each rose
first spring growth, bush.
Lawns will need at least 20 to 30 If daylilies don't get their ear-
pounds of a balanced plant food ly spring meal and a ground cov-
per 1,000 square yards to form a er of mulch, they not only will be
carpet of green. University of Flor- slow to flower but will make only
ida turf experts say it's a good idea lazy efforts to set color.
to apply some organic nitrogen so After feeding all the plants,
that the grass will not gulp down then consider making cuttings of
this greening agent in a few weeks poinsettia, ixora, ligustrum, aza-
and become hungry before your lea, croton and viburnum. Place
next payday, cutting beds in a shady spot, or
If rye grass is on its way out, furnish shade for .the project.
then mow and rake it out of the Cutting of many types of orna-
permanet grass. Remember, drying mental from heavy root system
March winds will cause grass to most quickly in mixtures that
burn, so sparing the water hose contain acid peat. Experience is
will spoil the grass. the best teacher to determine the
If your ulcers get fidgety be- best rooting medium to use for
cause part of the lawn is not as different plants. When choosing ]
green as you think it should be, cutting, remember, everything 8
quit worrying most likely the being equal, rooting ease increase t
soil temperature is out of kilter the nearer the cutting is taken to i
at that spot and there is tempor- the root system of the plant,
ary shortage of iron. To save you Summer flowering blubs ready
from worrying overtime about for planting include crinums, can- f
the pale grass, you can bring nas, dahlias and agapanthus. f
green color back quickly by ap- Annual flowers which may be
plying two tablespoons of iron planted now include astre, bal- o
ulphate to each gallon of water sam, begonia, blue lace-flower b


PI

ZI
m




4.
Y

'1



TI


celosia, chrysanthemum, marigold THE STAR, Port St. Jo., Ptortde
morning glory, rose-moss, nas-
turtium, strawflower, sunflower The Mother's Role In A
tithonia, verbena and the wish-
bone flower. Teen-Age Bo y


2
f


c
jl
1
t
t





sl


Most of the annuals can be seed-
ed directly into the garden. Sow
the seed thinly in shallow trenches.
A baking powder can with holes
punched in the bottom and a three-
foot stick attached for a handle
serves well as a seed shaker. This
home-made seeding gadget takes
the back-aching stoop out of seed-
ing.
Next, cover the seeds lightly
with firmed soil. Cover the plant-
ing, if possible with wet burlap or
other materials to hold in the mois-
ture and to prevent seeds from
washing. Be sure to remove the
covering before the plants emerge.
If you want to keep annuals blo-
oming for another month, keep the
flowers picked. If plants go to seed,
the blossoming period will be cut
short.


BOWLING

NEWS

LADIES COFFEE LEAGUE
Amison Seafood and Beaman
Plumbing bowled on lanes 7 and
8 Thursday morning. Amison won
;hree games and Beaman one. Dor-
is Amison bowled a 452 series.
Lois Smith had a 415 and Verna
Burch a 412 series. Christine Light-
:cot had a 355 series. High bowler
for Beaman was Mary Harrison,
with a 410 series. She had games
of 155, 143 and 120. Fern Guilford
had a 365 series.
Jitney Jungle and the Whitfield
Strikers tangled on lanes 1 and 2.
The Whitfield Strikers won all four
points. This tied them for second
place with Jitney Jungle. Norma
Zeigler bowled a 405 series for
Whitfield Strikers. Jerry Freeman
had a 390 series and Ruby Lucas
a 364 series. High bowler for Jit.
ney Jungle was Evelyn Smith
with a 381 series.
Faye's Seafood Grill and St. Joe
Natural Gas was on lanes 3 and
L. St. Joe Natural Gas won 3 and
Faye's Seafood won one. Wynell
Burke was high for Natural Gas
with a 427 series. Ann Whittle
bowled a 374 series for Faye's.
Alice Machen was next with a 369
series.
West Florida Gas and Rich's
Super Market split two and two.
This left them tied for third place.
Verna Burch and Evelyn Smith
picked up 5-7 splits.


Team Standings W L
Amison Seafood ------54% 21%
Jitney Jungle -------- 45 31
Whitfield Strikers ....45 31
West Fla. Gas Co. 35 41
Rich's Super Mkt. 35 41
Beaman Plumbing -- 31 45
St. Joe Nat. Gas ------29% 46%
Faye's Seafood Grill -- 29 47

Send The Stao to a rlena.


Ever since Cleopatra bathed
in -milk and precious oils to
preserve her complexion, skin
care has been milady's exclu-
sive province.
But have you, ever stopped
to think that men and boys
have skin care problems too?
And, until recently, 'men and
boys especially adolescents
- have had nowhere to turn
for advice about skin care (un-
less their problem was serious
enough to require medical treat-
ment). This creates a real prob-
lem for mothers seeking to help
their .high
school aged (
sons who are
plagued with
unsightly-faci- ('
'al blemishes- A
acne pimples
and black-
heads.
lem is further
aggravated by
a high school ,
boy's increas-
ng assertion -
of independence and his with-
dcrawal from parental influence.
When a child grows from
childhood into adolescence, phy-
sical as well as psychological,
changes take place. Physically
glandular functions are intensi-
fied, hormones are secreted, and
these produce oils, more abun-
dantly on the face and scalp.
These oils were not present
during childhood.
These new body functions,
and t h e ir resulting physical
changes, are often accompanied
by skin care problems for grow-.
ing boys.
Psychologically; an adoles-
cent undergoes a distinct emo-
tional change. He wants to de-
velop his own personality and
sense of identity, and tends to
resent parental influence while
he seeks emotional indepen-
dence.
If the process of maturing
during adolescence is not ac-
complished evenly and smooth-
ly, it is entirely possible that
ph y sical and psychological
"scars" may result that will
have a lasting influence in later
years.
When it. comes to the prob-
lem of skin blemishes, which
make a child ashamed of his
appearance and causes him to
"withdraw" from his friends
and social groups, mothers are.
left wondering what to do about
this.
No teen-age boy likes to be


GARY HALL .MAKES
DEAN'S LIST FOR SEMESTER
Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Hall, SL-t
Beach, have received word thi
their son Gary, who is a student i
Louisianna Polyteclhni, Rustol
La., is on the Dean's List with
3.5 average.
-+,
SELL THAT 'WHITE ELEPHAN'
WITH A STAR CLASSIFIED


TAK E-A








B E |,


ALL 3
WHEEL WHEEL BRAKE SERVICES
ALIGNMENT BALANCE ADJUSTMENT 9

manufacturer's and weights for all four wheels, add
specifications. Parts both front wheels. fluid and repack
extra, if needed. Extends tire life. front wheel bearings. Any Amerca
1 9 Car


PATE'S SERVICE CENTER


P E 2 1-I I


Drink at least three glasses of
cold, refreshing milk every day.
Each glass will provide you with
extra energy. You need milk


Homogenized Milk, Rich
Buttermilk, Non-fat Milk,
Low-fat Milk, Chocolate Milk
Butter, Eggs, Oleo, Fruit
Juices.

Pick up these fine Borden's Dairy
Products at your favorite Super
Market or call us, collect, for home
delivery.


Harden's


BORDEN DAIRY PRODUCTS

Dial 639-2356 Wewahitchka, Fla.


314 Harrison Ave.


EXER--



CAR
SERVICE


DAIRY



FRESH


$ :0



]SAFETY CHA'MPIOIN N: -QNs

WITH Nd. LIMIT" ROAD HAZARD. GUARAN*TEE.
!:p 1 I


1 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1


r's Skin CareJ

left out when something is go-
ing on. He 'dreads unpopularity,
and he knows that this is a real
threat to his social success u
less he has good looks. -
To be sure, a mother. can
teach her son the importance
of good health and hygiene at
an early age; -she can impress
upon 'him the necessity for
keeping clean and removing ex-
cess facial oils, but it's often
hard to follow through on this
"program" with an active,
growing boy.
T h e r e are, however, ways
that the importance of a good
appearance through r e g u I a'r,
careful care, can be brought
forcefully before teen-age boys
'as their circle of experience and
friends becomes larger. Organ-
izations such as the Boy Scouts
stress personal hygience;
school systems emphasize the
importance of body care in gym
classes and sports programs.
As a boy grows up, he tends
to adopt "idol's. Many of these
/ 7"idols" are
sports figures,
some of them
Solympic medal
S winners, all
of whom are
well groomed
and have
clean, clear
faces. A boy's
natural inter-
est in sports
lN CAEMfJ can be capital-
ized upon to
.make him conscious of the
value of a good appearance.
When t'he seriousness of the
teen-age -boy's. skin problem
was f u'l ly realized (and his
natural reluctance to use "girl"
skin-cleansing .preparations was
appreciated medical techni-
cians set out to develop an acne
preparation that would help re-
duce the incidence of unsightly!
facial eruptions. After years of
research, they came up with
Tackle a clear medicated gell
which helps boys keep their
complexion clear with regular
care. The Colgate- Palmolive
Company, makers of Tackle, re-
tained leading dermatologists
to conduct clinical tests involv-
ing this product.
These tests showed that
Tackle proved effective in k.
large number of cases, and was
particularly successful witt h
teen-age youths. Boys tested
said they liked it because it was
made just for them it didn'C
have a "sissy" girl stigma.


i


i~


223-225 MONUMENT AVRL


PHONE 229-1~291










ED Says!
"We pay highest prices for food we buy.
We get lowest prices for food we sell. How
can we stay in business? We're lucky!
CHICKEN SHRIMP FISH OYSTER BOXES
(In Season)


Includes French
$1.


fries, rolls, slaw
.25


HAMBURGERS ---5 for $1.00
HOT DOGS ----- 6 for $1.00
VEAL, FISH, STEAK and BARBECUE SANDWICHES
CORN DOGS and FRENCH FRIES
MILK SHAKES SUNDAES CONES
(Now made with "Velda" mix)


DAISYIQUEEN
and SANDWICH SHOP


401 Monument Ave.


Pine Seems Common; But Fills An
Uncomimoni Role In Florida Economy


The pine-tall green backbone
of a half-billion dollar industry in
Florida-is an amazing tree.
And planted by the millions, as
Florida farmers and landowners
have planted them this season, the
result also is remarkable. At ma-
turity, those planted pines open
up new jobs in town, new homes
go up, and retail sales increase.
A stand of mature pines is a
kind of working capital. As those
planted pines grow, so do oppor-
tunities in business and industry.
Of course there are few indi-
vidual landowners who could plant


ants rats mice siv rs
call j i roaches

for the sake of your home -


Phone 227-7181


SELL THAT 'WHITE ELEPHANT' WITH A STAR CLASSIFIED!


enough pines to change the econ-
omic face of a community. Yet
something of that effect is reach-
ed in any area when a number of
landowners put a portion of their
unused land to growing timber.
The single pine tree itself is
noteworthy. For the chemical pro-
cesses and engineering feats of
the tree are wonders to behold.
Each tree's basic unit of life is
the cell. Inside each cell is a nuc-
leus which carries the chromo-
somes which guide the develop-
ment of the tree. These cells serve
as factories for manufacturing and
utilizing needed substances.
The root of the tree, too, is a
marvelous organ. Th emain root
structure serves to hold the tree
upright. But each tree also has
tiny roots similar to hairs in size
stretching out from the older and
larger roots which serve as vital
avenues.
The tiny hair-like roots finger
around and through the soil ab-
sorbing moisture and nutrients-
all part of the "factory".
The pine, if not taken for grant-
ed, is an impressive thing to see


and ponder. Unseen are the com-
plicated processes which go on
quietly beneath the bark, in the
dark green needles, and under the
soil.
Indeed, the whole process which
turns an unused acre into wood-
land profit-with a minimum of in-
vestment and care-is remarkable.
Ask your Farm Forester or Coun-
ty Ranger for details on planting
pines. There is still time before
the season ends this month to get
your stand of pines planted and
off to a good start.

GCC Offers Plans
To Light Dam, Bridge
The Gulf Coast Electric Cooper-
ative presented a plan to the Gulf
county Commission Tuesday to
place lights at the Dead Lakes dam
and bridge.
The utility proposed to place
seven mercury vapor lamps at the
bridge at a monthly rental of
$24.50 for the entire lighting fa-
cility.
The Board voted to accept the
proposal.

Say you saw it in The
Star!


Specials
AWWed. thru Tues.
Feb. 19-25
TE .. ......p_


SUNBEAM or IDEAL 13 Ounce Loaf


BREAD


13c


Regular Size FAB 4 boxes $1.00
Del Monte No. 303 Can
CREAM STYLE CORN 2 cans 29c

McKENZIE'S FROZEN VEGETABLES


6 Boxes $1.00

SLENDER SUE With $5.00 Order HALF GAL.


ICE MILK 29c

Modess or Kotex
SANITARY NAPKINS box 29c
FROSTY MORN No. 10 Gallon


PURE LARD 79c
GA. GRADE 'A' LARGE BROWN


EGGS


2


DOZ.
FA "*NT41


SESSIONS PURE NO. 10 GALLON


Peanut Oil


ROBIN HOOD FLOUR


Ga. GRADE 'A and B



FRYERS
POUND NOT CUT



250


"What A Buy"
Sunnyland Best All Meat

WEINERS

Pkg. 29c


97c


* Rich's FAMOUS Produce *


THE STAR, Port St. Jo%, Pil. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1964


Byrd takes a stand for cutting
government spending, the more
polite among the ultra-liberals
call him an old fuddy duddy
while cruder persons assail
him with what to their little
minds is the most horrendous
of all epithets-a conservative.
O \ei loohecd |
is fi' r t i h e A
Sen.a,..r i .1 i | a | i
rea hi.dr all, $
age aid ta- "
tio i ld i r --
whe 1 re he' li e ,1 '
c o ti I (I f % '" r%
we l ,uilhdu,
a s er o '
public <""-L -, '
science and c. W. Harder
follow line taken by Louis XIV,
the Magnificent Sun King of
France. When informed that
the vast expenditures of his
government on such items as
Versailles, and ill conceived
foreign adventures were ruin-
ing the French economy, he
shrugged his shoulders saying
"After us the deluge." In the
inevitable deluge, the next
Louis but one, and his hausfrau
sustained loss of heads.
Thus the situation now a-
building will never personally
affect Senator Byrd. What is
the situation? It is briefly that
when a nation does not have
gold, it cannot pay its debts.
The hard facts are that there
is not enough gold in the world
to go around due to global in-
flation triggered by U.S. spend-
ing policies. Whenever there is
inflation, supplies increase. The
world's currencies have now in-
creased much faster than the
available gold supply.
*
For example, using round fig-
ures, since 1955 the U.S. cur-
rency in circulation has jumped
(c) Naliinia! Federation of Independent Business


from $30 billion to $37 billion,
or a jump of $7 billion. Other
currencies have also increased,
as inflation has proceeded. ,
Yet from 1955 to 1961 the
known production of free world
gold production was only $7F%
billion. On the basis of current
gold production from 1961 to
the end of 1963 less than $2Y
billion in new gold was pro-
duced, while in the same two
years U.S. currency in circu-
lation jumped $5 billion.
*
To further complicate mat-
ters, there is an apparent dis-
appearance of gold. While from
1955 through 1961 the free world
mined over $71/ billion in new
gold, the gold stocks of the
free world governments and
central banks only increased by
$3/ billion. Making due allow-
ances for the small amount
used in jewelry, gold plating,
et al, it is apparent that gold
is disappearing from free world
in huge quantities
And of course, what the Com-
munist nations are doing with
the gold they acquire, Is a
great enigma.
There is reason to suspect
around the world there are sub-
stantial operators who discount
the Scriptural maxim "The
meek shall inherit the earth"
and believe instead that those
who have gold shall inherit the
earth. All free world peoples,
except U.S. citizens, are per-
mitted to possess gold. It would
appear some are storing gold
waiting for the deluge.
So when Senator Byrd calls
for economy, it is important to
bear in mind the long range
picture. Some may shrug their
shoulders and say "who needs
gold?" But in over 3,000 years
of history, mankind has found
no substitute for gold.


PINT


Strawberries


39c


Fresh Florida


TURNIPS


- MUSTARD


- COLLARDS


FRESH FLORIDA


FRUIT 3 bags $1.00


CELLO LETTUCE 1
CELL 0 CARROTS ea.lOC 1
CELLO RADISHES

U. S. NO. 1 IRISH 25 Lb. Bag


POTATOES


79c


50 POUND BAG --------- $1.49
With $5.00 Order

Reg. 99c
SUAVE HAIR SPRAY --------89c
Reg. 59c "
Large Size ALKA-SELTZER -.....---49c

NABISCO SALTINES -----b. box 29c


BONE


Tray


39c


is 59c


Fresh Good
Ground BEEF


3 Lbs.
99c


BOWLING
NEWS
GULF COUNTY LADIES LEAGUE
By Maxine Jensen
Raffield's Fisheries. and St. Joe
Furniture split tuo points each on
lanes 5 and 6. St. Joe Furniture
maintained, -their one point .in sec-
ond place. Christine Lightfoot led
St. Joe Furniture with a 414 ser-
ies. Norma Zeigler-was-rnext with
a 375 series.
Jo Ferrell for Raffield's had high
series for the night with a 462.
She had a 190 second game. Joan
Myres and Evelyn Murdock both
had a 397 series.
Comforter's stretched their lead
two more points giving them a 15
point lead. Sue Moore took third
high game in the league. She had
a 192 game, and her series was a
fine 454. Maxine Jensen was next
with a 445. Elise Rogers had a 414.
Florida National Bank, losing all
four points to Comforter's had
Ruby Lucas bowling a 371 series
and Mary Harrison next with a
349.
Team Standings W L
Comforter's 61 27
St. Joe Furniture ------- 46 42
Raffield's Fisheries ---- 45 43
Fla. Nat. Bank ---------24 64
Sports Regulation Hearings
Planned for April
TALLAHASSEE-Florida's -1964-
65 hunting and fishing regulations
will be established during the
month of April and become effec-
tive July 1, 1964, according to an
announcement by A. D. Aldrich, di-
rector, Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission.
The annual regulations meeting
has been advanced to April in or-
der to provide additional time for
prtiting of regulations. Prior to the
April meeting, both hunting and
fishing regulations were establish-
ed during the month of July and
as a result fishermen often found


themselves
knowledge
tions.


fishing without full
of the current regula-


CAREFREE DRIVING
starts at the

N-A-P:A SIGN
If you drive a ear for pleas-
ure, or a truck for business,
look for the NAPA Sign.
see your service-repair shop
BEFORE trouble starts.
He's a professional who
uses NAPA Parts to keep
vehicles of all makes, models
and ages running smoothly.
Parts that bear the NAPA
Seal are of such excellence
that you'll find them where
there's a trained mechanic
competent to use them.
Assure the success of your


St. Joe
Auto Parts
311 William Avm


GOODSON'S

RADIO and TV REPAIR
Admiral Emerson DuMont
Radio TV Stereo Air Conditioners
ANTENNA SYSTEMS, GOOD USED TV's $85.00 up
SERVICE CALLS $3.00

Phone 7-3251 or 7-3911 Day or Nite
DAY or NIGHT
317 REID AVENUE
(Next Door To Telegraph Office)
Your Satisfaction Is Our Business -


FRESH FLORIDA


$1.19


25 lbs. $1.98


FREETOMATOES Wi SOUP
CENTER CUT


Pork Chop

Fresh Pork 3 Lbs.
BACKBONE $1.19
Tender Select 3 Lbs.
BEEF LIVER 99 c

MINUTE and CUBE STEAKS

Each iOC


Fresh Meaty 5 Lbs.
NECK BONES 99C
Large Selection
of Canned Meat & Vegetables


10c can 95C
or 10 CANS FOR ............


7vtt


- ----


- -







SALE STARTS WEDNESDAY MORNING, THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY


DISCOUNT FOODLINIER
Port St. Joe, Florida
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA t' PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA C Prices Good February 79, 20, 2I and 22
Prices Good February 19, 20, 21 and 22g Prices Good Februry 19, 20, 21 and 22

GEORGE WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY, SAT., FEB. 22
WITH DISCOUNT PRICES, FUN and ENTERTAINMENT BY THE LOVETT BROTHERS QUARTET of South Georgia At the IGA SATURDAY
MORNING from 11:00 to 12:00 noon and 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY ONLY Also the GOSS BROTHERS of Atlanta, Ga.
BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY AND TELL YOUR FRIENDS -- BE ENTERTAINED WITH GOOD MUSIC WHILE YOU SHOP!


FRESH BAKED SATURDAY ONLY





AURORA-Keeps the Bathroom Deodorized
Tissue 2 ROLS29c


Fresh Produce
YELLOW
Onions


LB.
5c


FRESH GREEN LB.
Cabbage Sc
GOLDEN RIPE
BANANAS

10c
U. S. NO. 1 WHITE ROUND
POTATOES

10 39c


Saturday Only, With
$10.00 Order. Limit 2


DISCOUNT SPECIAL LARGE BOX

PIES c FAB 19c
S2 BAMA APPLE 2 LB. JAR
lellv 25c


U


t W- -
IGA CREAM NO. 303
Corn 2CANS 29c
CARNATION Evaporated
Milk 3 44c
CAMPBELL VEGETABLE
Soup 3 CANS 39C
DEL MONTE or STOKELY'S CREAM No. 303
Corn 5 ANS 88c
ARMIX or ARMOUR 3 LBS.
SHORTENING 49c
Try This In Your Coffee 4 OZ. JAR
Premn 410c
JIM DANDY DOG 25 LBS.
Food $1.79


GA. GRADE A LARGE
Eggs


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88c


SAM FORD INVITES EVERYONE TO VISIT HIM AT THE IGA DISCOUNT FOODLINER FOR EXTRA GOOD TABLERITE MEATS


TABLERITE BLADE CUT
Chuck Roast


LB.
39c


FRESH TENDER LEAN CENTER CUT LB.
Pork Chops 69c
TABLERITE LOIN WHOLE or HALF LB.
Pork Roast 49c
FRESH PORK LB.
Steaks 39c
MIXED SMOKED
Sausage 3 LBS. 890


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GROUND FRESH MANY TIMES DAILY
Beef 3-LB.$1.OO
SMOKED SLAB LB.
Bacon 29c
TABLERITE BONELESS LB.
Beef Stew 69c
TABLERITE 12 OZ. PKG.
Franks 39c


SMOKED
HAM HOCKS


5 LBS89c


THE LOVETT BROTHERS
Will be at IGA along with other singing groups Saturday
morning, February 22, February 22, 11:00 to 12:00 Noon and Saturday
afternoon, 3:30 to 5:00 p.m.


AT PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
GOSPEL SING CONCERT
SATURDAY NIGHT, FEBRUARY 22, 8:00 P.M.
At The Port St. Joe High School Auditorium
Sponsored by the IGA DISCOUNT FOODLINER, Port St. Joe, Fla.
PROCEEDS WILL GO TO THE PORT ST. JOE HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY
---- Featuring
THE LOVETT BROTHERS QUARTET with MOM and DAD
From South Georgia
THE GOSS BROTHERS of Atlanta, Georgia
THE LOCAL BOYS QUARTET of Port St. Joe
THE GULF TRIO of Port St. Joe
THE CARTER FAMILY of Port St. Joe
THE HAMM BROTHERS of Port St. Joe
For Advance Tickets
See Any One of the High School Students or the IGA Foodliner
ADULTS, 75c STUDENTS, 50c 'PRE-SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN, FREE


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