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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01470
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 9, 1964
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01470

Full Text









THE


STAR


10 c

' P'ER COPY


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA,


County Sets Date



For Public Hearing


Tuesday; the County Commis-
sion has set Monday' January 13
as the date'for a public hearing on
the petition before them to call
an election' as to whether or not
to move the county seat.:
The hearing is in keeping with
instructions given the Board by.
Judge Robert McCrary at' a Decem-
ber .20 hearing. --.
The hearing is for the purpose
of any citizen expressing. his views
concerning the petition and for ci-
tizen taxpayer-voters who have had
their names stricken from the pe-
tition and-froqn the master list of
those eligible' to sign the petition
set up by the County Board. Sever-
al names were stricken from both!
lists for- one technicality or anoth-
er. Those whose names were strick-
en either will or. have been noti-
fied by the: board.
In other action, the Board agreed
to trade one acre of land south
of Wewahitchka to William J. Rish
for an acre and a half adjoining
the county's .' act, owned by Rish.
Mrs. C., G.; Rish, supervisor of'
registration asked the Board for
$26.00 to pay deputies of hers., The
Board was dubious as to the legal-
ity of this and attorney Gaskin sta-
ted that he would secure an opin-
ion from the. Attorney General as
to whether or not the county could
pay the said deputies.
A letter was read to the Board
from Randolph Hodges, state con-
servatidon officer-peataining to'-ies-
tablishing two salt-water b o at
ramps in Gulf County between Bea-
'con Hill and Indian Pass. The boat
ramps hbad been requested by the
Port St. Joe Jaycees after the
Board was reluctant to request the
ramps in the pa l -
Hodges letter stated that the con-
servation department was ready to
build the ramps, but would need a
resolution and locations from the
County. Board: .
'As the result of Hodges letter,
the Board agreed to pick two sites
and notify Hodges of their/ selec-
tion by January 15.
In a previous: meeting the Board
had requested, the State Road De-
partmeit io correct the bad con-
dition of SR 71 from Port St. Joe


to Cypress Creek.
Tuesday, a letter was received
by the Board from SRD Board mem-
ber William Mayo that a survey
of the road-would be made and cor-
rective measures taken this year if
primary::funds.; were available.
Samuel A. Patrick, tax assessor
returned 'Surplus of funds of $11,-
193.64 tothe'-county general fund
and $4,588.27-to the school board.
Commissioner Leo Kennedy point-
ed out to the Board that the walk-
way over the canal at 18th and
Long Avenue in Port St. Joe had
not yet beei6constructed and again
noted the *eed-for such a walkway
to serve school children.
The Board decided to take steps
toward completing this project and
road superintendent Whitfield said
that the pipe for the project would
he ray 4t1i-a ---week's time.


County Commission Re-organizes;

Names James G. McDaniel Chairman

Graham Vice-Chmn.
Employees Re-hired

The Gulf County Commission or-
ganized for the coming year at
their meeting Tuesday.
Elected to serve as chairman was
James G. McDaniel. Walter Graham
was named vice-chairman by his
fellow commissioners.
The Board rehired at their pres
ent salaries, the heads of various
departments controlled by the
Commission.
These include: Lloyd Whitfield,
road superintendent; Emmett Dan-
ield, mosquito control supervisor;
David C. Gaskin, county attorney;
Dr. Willa Dean Lowery, county
health doctor; R. E. Sidwell, civil
defense; Max W. Kilbourn, engin-
eer and J. J. Hill, county service of- JAMES G. McDANIELL
fleer. ... Chairman


Voter Registration Cards In Mails
Gulf County Supervisor of Registration, Mrs. C. G. Rish,
this week mailed out cards for voters to re-register to vote in
county and state elections. This practice is followed every two
,years, by law, to keep the voter list up to date.
In order to be eligible to vote in the May elections, you
MUST RETURN YOUR CARD. If you have moved since you
last voted to another address, follow the instrucitons on the
postal card mailed you for changing your precinct. Upon mail-
ing in your old pocket registration card, with your corrected
address, you will be mailed a new card. Be sure that you name
is signed, as the card is addressed andaryouxr-pocIet registra-.
tion card is signed. The uniformity of your signature in all in.
stances is important.
If you have not received a card in the mail, chances are
that you are not registered. To check this, or to register, the
county books are now in Port St. Joe at the Addison Insurance
Agency. Register today so that you may vote in May.


City Takes Up Weigi

Stray Dogs, Bike Ri
What to do about stray and nui-
sance dogs again came up for dis-
cussion at Tuesday's city commis-
sion meeting.
Mayor Frank Hannon offered the
opinion that an ordinance prepar-
ed by Attorney Costin was not too
stringent, but served to give the
city the power to control the dog
nuisances and stray dogs.
Commissioner Coldewey said that
he agreed with the .ordinance, but
that he didn't see how the city
could enforce the ordinance with
present personnel, and that he felt
there was no need to have a pro-
vision on the books that the city
could not work.
All the Commission agreed that
some law needed to be enacted to
require rabies innoculations of
dogs and they will attempt to do
this at the next meeting.


Dun and Bradstreet Lists Port St. Joe

Business Population At Total of 89
The business population of Port try in the Reference Book contains
St. Joe is 8q announces F. B, Har- such -information as the firm's cur-
rison, district manager of the'ack- rent payments record, history,
sonville office He states that these ownership, operation, financial sta-
figures were obtained by a physi- ability.
cal count, of theDun & Bradstreet ..
Reference Bookor January, 194. Mrs. Parker Wins
Mr. Harrison noted that this
month Dun & Bradstreet, Inc., is $300 In Bonus Dollars
sending requests for financial ,
statements ,to the 2.8 million busi- / Mrs. Sammy Parker -received a
nesses listed in the Reference prize of $300.00 in a bonus dollar
Book. These statements are essen. give-away sponsored by seven 10o-
tial to tte credit reports Issued by cal merchants this past week end.-
the business information agency. Mrs. Parker was the largest prize
The requests are sent to all busi- winner to date.
nesses regardless of size, from the Other prize winners have been
corner grocery to the million dol- Mrs. W. D. Jones, Mrs. Christine
lar manufacturer.. Thursday, Mrs. June Gay and M4rs.
Because- of the constant flux in Seable Perry. Two winners have
the American' business community, failed to claim their prize by the
more than- 5,000 changes are now prescribed time and the money re-
occurring daily la the Reference mained in the jackpot.
Book data. Thus themammoth vol- This week's drawing will be held
ume must be re-issued every two in front of the Western Auto Store
months to keep up-to-date credit and after the jackpot ticket is
facts in the hands of manufactur- drawn, other tickets will be drawn
ers and wholesalers. The credit re- for prizes to be awarded if the win-
port which stands behind each en- ner is present.


hty Problems of

ding and Insurance
In reference to the long discus-
sed ordinance to require safer bi-
cycle riding-practices, the city dads
agreed to look into a new state bi-
cycle riding law before enacting a
local law: The -new state law, among
other things, requires only one ri-
der to the bicycle, that bikes be
equipped with lights and reflectors
if riden after dark and that bikes
be ridden single file on the right
side of the street.
Commissioner Nedley moved at
the Tuesday meeting that the city
purchase the lot directly behind
the City Hall. Clerk Williams said
that the St. Joe Paper Company
owned the lot. The Board voted to
begin negotiations with the Paper
Company for purchasing the lot.

Renewal of the City's liability
insurance premium came up for
discussion Tuesday. At present, the
city carries liability insurance only
on its employees at a cost of ap-
proximately $1,000.
The city had' a proposal from
Tomlinson Insurance Agency, pres-
ent carrier of the business and the
Pridgeon Agency to expand the
liability coverage to all city pro-
perties covering the public, as well
as city employees.
After a good deal of discussion,
the Board agreed to keep the busi-
ness with Tomlinson and expand
the coverage to include all city
owned buildings and property at a
cost of $1,500.00 per year.
The First Methodist Church also
had a problem to discuss with the
Board Tuesday night.
- Construction has started on a
new addition to the Methodist
Church and it has been found that
they are four feet too close to their
property line.
Since plans for the building were
drawn, restrictions for the area oc-
.cupied by the church have been
changed. New requirements are
that buildings should be 25 feet
from the property line-The new
church addition is 21 feet from the
property line.
Spokesmen for the church, con-
tractor E. F. Gunn, and church of-
ficers Harold Odom and William J.


THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1964


City Shows

Sizeable Growth In

New Construction
According to records on appli-
cations for building permits in
the City Hall, Port St. Joe had
$395,539.00 worth of new con-
struction and expansion during
the past year.
Of this amount, $186,000.00
was spent on 14 new homes con-
structed within the city limits
of Port St. Joe. It was noted by
City Clerk J. B. Williams that
these were "round figures" and
were probably shy of the actual
value of the homes.
A total of $196,500.00 was re-
corded for major construction,
which included three churches
and two store buildings.
Some $33,039.00 was spent by
local business houses in renovat-
ing and enlarging their places of
business.


High School P-TA to
Host Joint Meeting
The Port St. Joe High School
PTA will be host to all of the PTA
groups of the county next Thurs-
day night at 8:00 p.m. in the High
School Auditorium.
Featured speaker for the evening
will be Ed Henderson, executive
secretary of the Florida Education
Association. Mr. Henderson's sub-
ject will be "It is time for your
decision on quality education for
Gulf County schools".
All members of the Port St. Joe
Elementary PTA, the Highland
View PTA and Wewahitchka PTA
groups have cancelled their regu-
lar meetings to attend this joint
meeting.
Announcement of this meeting
is being made a week in advance
so that those interested in this sub-
eett mayr'make their plans to- at-
tend.

Freddie Anderson
Injured By Crackers
Freddy Anderson, 13 year old
son of Mrs. Jeanette, Anderson, had
two fingers amputated from his
left hand Newt Year's day as the
result of a firecracker accident.
According to city policeman Al
len Ray (Barney) Watson, young
Anderson was playing tennis in the
city park and was carrying kitchen
matches and' cherry bomb fire-
crackers in his pocket. The matches
ignited and Anderson slapped his
pocket with his hands' to smother
the fire. One of the cherry bombs
exploded and shattered the two
middle fingers of his left hand and
the tip of one finger on his right
hand.
He is still in the hospital as a
result of the accident, but is re-
ported to .be recovering very well.
Patrolman Watson took young
Anderson to the hospital following
the accident.

'Kiwanis Club Installs
Officers for New Year
District Governor Earl Sellers of
Chipley, was present at the Tues-
day meeting of the Kiwanis Club
to install a new slate of officers.
Sellers installed ahd charged the
following group of officers who
will serve through 1964:
President, Terry Hinote; vice-
president, Bob Freeman; secretary,
Hershel T. Dean, and treasurer,
Tom Alsobrook.
Installed as the director slate for
the club were: Dr. Joe Hendrix, Bill
Rish, Walter Dodson, Dr. Bob King,
Gannon Buzzett, Frank Hannon.
Gov. Sellers commended the past
board of directors and officers for
their activities in the club during
the past year. He made special
awards to John Robert Smith and
Hubert Richards for their efforts
in securing new members for the
club during the past year.
Guests of the club were Key
Clubbers David Roche and David
Henderson, Jesse Baumgartner of
Panama City and George Gay, Red
Davis, John McDonald and Earl
Sellers of Chipley.

Rish, stated that moving the build-
ing the required four feet would
disrupt their plans considerably.
The Board agreed to waive the
restriction for the church allowing
them to build 21 feet from the pro-
perty line. "


NUMBER 17


Board Told Need For More



County School Facilities


Specifics Given

For Improvement

Hubert Richards, Gulf County
Supervisor for the Board of Educa-
tion, appeared before the Board of
Public Instruction at its regular
meeting Tuesday, to inform that
body of a coming crisis in the Gulf
county school system.
"The day is fast approaching,
when we must make a major deci-
sion," said Richards, in referring
to the physical and instructional
facilities at all Gulf County schools.
Taking the schools, one by one,
Richards pointed out needs, immed-
iately in all of the facilities with
the exception of the Port St. Joe
Elementary. The needs there are
present, but not so dire as in other
schools of the county.
At the Port St. Joe High School,
Richards pointed out that the
science and home economic facili-
ties were entirely inadequate from
the standpoint of room and facili-
ties to do the proper job. "Future
pupil expansion will even aggra-
vate this situation," he said.
Richards also pointed to three
areas of need, that has been in the
forefront for some time-that of
needed library, lunchroom and
dressing and shower facilities.
The Board is now taking steps
to construct a new lunchroom at
the Port St. Joe High School.
The present area now occupied
by the library and lunchroom
will be utilized as library facili-
ties.
At the Washington High School,

*


Gulf County School Costs Are Less

Than National Average, Says NEA

Gulf County spends $66.48 less annually per pupil than the
national average of $433.00, statistics from the National Education
Association (NEA) disclosed this week.
The county currently spends $366.52 annually on each pupil-
just slightly above the state average which is $342.00 per pupil.
The NEA'S annual report showed that Gulf County spends
more than the average pupil expenditures of two other states:
South Carolina with $265 and Mississippi with $241. Alabama
spends an average of $280, to be below Gulf also.
The figures are current expenditures only, not including
capital outlay, interest on school bonds and other programs.
Curernt expenditures include amounts spent for general
control, instruction, operation, maintenance, fixed charges, and
such services as health, transportation, food and attendance.
Hubert Richards, Gulf County Supervisor, said the figures
were compiled on an estimated rate of absenteeism. He said av-
erage attendance was about 94 percent.
Other counties in the state comparable with Gulf in size
spend the following amounts per pupil per year for education:
Charlotte, $437; Monroe, $423; Collier, $394; Levy, $393 and
Citrus, $370.

science facilities were so limited that this month a survey of physi-
that teaching was by instructor de- cal and instructional facilities of
monstration to the pupils only., Gulf County schools will be made
There was no room or facilities for by State Department of Education
pupil experiments on an individual consultants, with anticipation of
basis. Library and band facilities this group making recommenda-
in this school are also very inade- tions for the school system to work
quate. toward.
In the Wewahitchka High School BOARD ORGANIZES
Richards pointed to the Home Ec- Tuesday, the Board of Public In-
onomics department as in need of struction re-organized for the com-
better facilities. (The Wewahitchka ing calendar year of operation.
High School has recently complet- Elected to head the Board was
ed an addition, which aided its Kenreth Whitfield of Wewahitch-
room problem). ka, who was elected chairman. Joe
S URVEY- PLANNED Ferrell of Port St. Joe was named
Richards reported, to the Board vice-chairman.


* *


Owens Will


Retire


From School Post


Funeral Services Held In
Wewa for Cordie Borders
Funeral services for Cordie Bor-
ders, age 70, were held from the
Wewahitchka Baptist Church Wed-
nesday of this week with Rev. G.
T. Hinton and Rev. W. J. Runnels
officiating. Burial was in Pleasant
Rest Cemetery in Overstreet.
Mr. Borders, a long time resident
of Wewahitchka, passed away Mon-
day following a lengthy illness.
Survivors include his wife, Mrs.
Priscilla Borders, Wewahitchka;
three daughters, Mrs. Russell War-
ren, Vero Beach, Mrs. Emory Rob-
ertson, Beacon Hill and Mrs. Ophe-
lia Ann Brooks of the Azores; three
sons, Boyd and Haywood Borders
of Wewahitchka and Bobbie Lee
Borders of Springfield, 24 grand-
children; two brothers, Durwood
Borders and Joe Borders both of
Largo; four sisters, Mrs. C. C.
iDykes, Funston, Ga., Mrs. Tom
Tucker, Moultrie, Ga., Mrs. Gor-
don Gunner of Meigs, Ga., and
Mrs. Carey Mullis of Fargo, Ga.
Comforter Funeral Home was in
charge of arrangements.

Jaycees Plan Vote for
Outstanding Young Man
The Port St. Joe Junior Chamber
of Commerce this week formed a
committee to seek nominations for
the outstanding young man of the
year in the city, according to Rob-
ert Nedley, Jaycee president.
The committee, composed of
community leaders, is actively can-
vassing churches, businesses, clubs
and organizations to determine
which young man-21 through 35-
has contributed the most to the
community during the year.
According to award chairman,
Wade Barrier, Jr., nomination
blanks will be available from any
local Jaycee.
The Distinguished Service Award
winner from Port St. Joe will be
entered in the Florida Jaycee con-
test. The state winners will then
be entered in the national com-
petition, which chooses America's
Ten Outstanding Young Men.


Superintendent of Public In-
struction, Thomas A. Owens an-
nounced this week that he will
not seek re-election to his office
in the coming election. Owens is
making his announcement now
so that the people of Gulf Coun-
ty will have an opportunity to
think over between now and elec-
tion day these statements, print-
ed below, that Owens wants to
make public:
"The needs of the schools are
great and when I say schools I
mean Port St. Joe High School,
Wewahitchka High School,
George Washington High School,
George Washington Carver
School, Port St. Joe Elementary
School, and Highland View Ele-
mentary School-All the schools
of Gulf County.
"In my opinion we have done
a remarkable job with what we
have been given to work with,
and for 24 years I have been try-
ing to get the message across
that we need more money and
constructive help from the peo-
ple of Gulf County. However, I
am afraid that it has come to
pass that the people tell me
what they want and expect me
to produce it, instead of asking
what the needs are and where
they are greater. Everybody
seems to have a pet project in-
stead of looking at the overall
picture. Like it or not all these
things have to be paid for, and
it is time that the people start-
ed worrying about the bills, and
how to pay for what they want.
"I have been in the school bus-
iness for 35 years-24 of those
years as Superintendent of Gulf
County. I like my work, and
school business has been a way.
of life for me. The job of Sup-
erintendent is the most import-
ant and responsible one in the
County. It needs a man with
something to offer, who is dedi-
cated and trained in school work,
and one who will be able to wake
the people up to a maximum ef-
fort on behalf of the Gulf Coun-
ty Schools."


THOMAS A. OWENS
... To Retire


Proclamation
WHEREAS, Arbor Day, Janu-
ary 17, 1964, has been set aside
as a day dedicated to the plant-
ing of trees in Florida and has
become an important symbol in
conservation, and
WHEREAS, an enlarged popu-
lation and expanded industriali-
zation has increased the demand
for trees, a renewable natural
resource, organizations working
for community betterment and
individual citizens are urged to
plant trees to increase the econ-
omic, recreational and aesthetic
resources of our State;
NOW, THEREFORE, I, Farirs
Bryant, by virtue of the authority
vested in me as Governor of the
State of Florida, do hereby pro-
claim January 12-18, 1964, as
TREE PLANTING WEEK
in Florida.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I
have hereunto set my hand and
caused the Great Seal of the
State of Florida to be affixed at
Tallahassee, the Capital, this 6th
day of December, A. D. 1963.
FARRIS BRYANT,
Governor.
ATTEST:
TOM ADAMS,
Secretary of State


"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"


TWENTY SEVENTH YEAR


MONEY TALKS Let's keep
it where we can speak with it
once in a while-Trade with
your home town merchants!


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Miss Hildreth Ann Miller Exchanges

Marriage Vows With Hume F. Coleman
Miss Hildreth Ann Miller, daugh- ence of a large assemblage of
ter of Mr .and Mrs. John Lamar friends and relatives of the young


Miller became the bride of Hume
Field Coleman, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas Henry Coleman of Jack-
sonville in a beautiful ceremony
solemnized at five o'clock Saturday
afternoon, December 28 at the
First Methodist Church.
The Reverend Doctor Thomas S.
Harris, officiated at the impressive
'double ring ceremony in the pres-


couple and their parents.
A tree candelabra: holding my-
riads of glowing white tapers cen-
tered the choir loft and was flank.
ed ,on either side by palm trees
and seven branched candelabra
holding white bridal tapers. Topary
trees with white mums were plac-
ed on either side of the altar, and
white satin ribbon with ivy marked


;^^.


Given in marriage by her father,
John Lamar Miller, the bride was
radiantly beautiful in a wedding
gown of white peau de soie, featur-
ing a sweetheart neckline and
three quarter length sleeves. The
waist front and back of alencon
lace over peau de soie. The skirt
bell shaped accented by laee mo-
tifs throughout the skirt. The full-
ness of the back skirt extending
into a full chapel train. Her veil
was finger tip French silk illusion


Out-of-Town Guests
Out of town guests attending the
Miller-Coleman wedding were: Mrs.
John L. Miller, Mrs. J. P. McDow-
ell, Mrs. Lester Arnold, Misses Sa-
ra and Ann Arnold, Lester Arnold,
Winter Garden. Mrs. Reginald Poe,
Miss Frances Poe, John E4war4
Poe, Mr. and MrA. Paul 1. Ward,
Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Dorminy, Mr.
and Mrs. Ed Castleberry, John Ed
Castleberry, Miss Nan DQwlen,
Mrs. Sam Dowlen, Mr. and Mrg.


U'





pylon';


ALL MEN'S FALL


SPORT
COATS





Reg. $18.95 to $75.00


off


ISO


Selection of Girls-Reg. $2.98 and $7.98


SHOES

Patents, white, oxfords, straps and ties

Selection of boys-Reg. $4.95 to $9.95


SHOES

Black, brown, oxfords, loafers. Sizes 00 to 6.


1


- SM r


A Sport Shirts

Stripes, plaids, paisley prints and solids.
Regular $3.95 to $13.95


ALL SALES CASH


ALL SALES FINAL


the reserved pews, Each window held a face forward flower of alen-
held three white candles nestled in con lace and seed pearls.
greenery. The bride carried an exquisite
Mrs. Blair Shuford was organist bouquet of white orchids, roses,
and she played a number of selec- stephanotis and valley lilies.
tions as the guests assembled, and Reception
played softly as the couple spoke Following the wedding, the
their vows. bride's parents were hosts at a re-
Miss Nan Dowlen, soloist, of Fitz- ception in their home on Constitu-
gerald, Georgia, sang "Because", tion Drive.
"Entreat Me Not to Leave Thee" The bride's table was overlaid
and at the close of the ceremony with an imported white linen and
she sang, "The Wedding Prayer". lace cutwork cloth and centered
Mr. Coleman was attended by with a.beautifully embossed tiered
Kim Miller, of Tampa, as best man. wedding cake. Silver candelabras
Ushers were John Miller, brother with burning white bridal candles
of the bride, Marshall Conrad, Mat- were entwined with smilax and
tox Hair, Tallahassee, Thomas white roses, the bride's bouquet
Clarke, Gainesville, William Cow- completed the setting. Throughout
ard, Jacksonville, James De Haven, the living room and dining room
Orlando. beautiful arrangements of white
Miss Miller was attended by Miss flowers were used. Mrs. Bolling
Betty Ward, Port St. Joe,'as maid Gay of McIntyre, Georgia and Mrs.
of honor and Mrs. Virgil Dorminy, Bouldin Frantz of Salem, Virginia,
cousin of- the bride as matron of sisters of the groom served cake.
honor, of Fitzgerald, Georgia. In the family room where coffee
Bridesmaids were Miss Diane Lay, and punch was served, the bride's
Miss Brenda.Ward of Port St. Joe, chosen color of American Beauty
Mrs. Walter Wilder of Sewanee, was used throughout the room.
Tenn., Mrs. Travis Jones of Charles- Miss Frances Poe, cousin of the
ton, S. C., and Mrs. James Fuller bride, kept the bride's book.
of Mobile, Ala. Young girls who assisted in serv-
The bridal attendants w e r e ing, were Sara and Ann Arnold, of
gowned alike in street length dres- Winter Garden, cousins of the
ses of American beauty peau-satin. bride, Sallie Gay, McIntyre, Geor-
The fitted sheath dresses had deep gia, niece of the groom, Karen
oval neckline and elbow length King, Mitzi Hendrix, Laura Guil-
sleeves, an overskirt of the same ford, Holly Barr of Port St. Joe,
material falling in soft folds, fin- Ann Gaillard, Pompano Beach.
ished at the waist with a soft bow. The bride chose a wool suit of
They wore matching shoes and cranberry with matching hat, and
matching pill box hats with short black accessories, for their wedding
veils, leaves of the same material trip, and wore an orchid lifted
entered in front with seeded from her bouquet.
pearls, the hats were originals, 4e- The couple willreside in Gaines-
signed and made by the maid of ville where Mr. Coleptan is atten4--
honor, Miss Betty Ward. They car- ing the University of Florida Schqol
tried white fiji mums and ivy. of Law,


Miss Patricia Ann Williams and
Thomas Arato exchanged wedding
vows in a double ring ceremony
performed at 10:00 a.m. Monday,
December 30, at St. Joseph's Cath-
olic Church. The Rev. Father Paul
Hogarty officiated.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. R. E. Williams of Port
St. Joe. The parents of the bride-
groom are Mr. and Mr's. H. A. Ara.
to of New Orleans, La.
The church was ornamented
with two standards of bronze vases
containing giant white gladioli in-
terlaced with petite white pompom
chrysanthemums and g r a c e ful
white standard chrysanthemums ac-
cented with lacy plumroses, fern
and jade greenery adorned the al-
tar. The festive mood of the Christ-
mas season accented the decor of
the church sanctuary. White satin
bows marked the family pews.
A program of soft nuptial music
was rendered by the organist, Mrs.
Ferrell Allen, Jr.
Attending the bride as her maid
of honor was her sister, Miss Beth
Williams. Bridesmaids were Miss
Wanda Williams, cousin of the
bride and Miss Nell Mathis of Pan-
ama City.
Andy Arato, brother of the
groom, served as his best man.
Ushers were, David Arato, brother
of the groom and Robert Williams,
brother of the bride.
The maid of honor wore a cran-
berry velvet dress with a scooped
neckline bodice, brief cap sleeves
and pleated skirt featuring the lap
skirt in front. Her red tulle veil
was attached to a large velvet rose-
bud. She carried a nosegay of gay
red carnations accented with bits
of red tulle and red satin stream-
ers.
The bridesmaids were attired in
the same manner as the maid of
honor. They wore rabbit fur muffs
which were accented with a petite
Hogarth of red featured carnations
accented with tulle design.
The lovely bride, escorted by her
father, appeared in a floor length
wedding gown. It had a basque bo-
dice with a sweetheart neckline
outlined with irridescent pearls
and sequins with long sleeves com-
ing to a calla point at the wrist.
The bouffant skirt was made of
alencon lace over illusion net in
six tiers coming to a point in front.
Her double-tiered veil of illusion
was secured to a crown of pearls.
She carried a bouquet of delicate
feathered white carnations in a
cascade arrangement to which


Hogue Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Bowers, Mrs. Lauren Parrott, Jim
Parrott, James Lee, Fitzgerald,
Georgia. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H.
Coleman, Mr. and Mrs. Charles W.
Coleman, W. D. Coward, Jackson-
ville. Mr. and Mrs. Travis Jones,
Charleston, S. C., Mr. and Mrs.
James Fuller, Mobile, Alabama. Mr.
and Mrs. Kim Miller, Tampa. Mr.
and Mrs. Jim DeHaven, Orlando.
Marshall Conrad, Mattox Hair, Dr.
and Mrs. Fred D. Conrad, Tallahas-
see. Mr. and Mrs. Bouldin Frantz,
Salem ,Virginia. Mr .and Mrs. Bol-
ling Gay, Jr., Miss Sallie Gay and
Bolling Gay, III, McIntyre, Georgia.
Mr. and Mrs. Briggs Scisson, Ellen
and Ed Scisson, Tallahassee. Ann
Gaillard, Pompano Beach. Mr. and
Mrs. Fritz Wherspaun, Pensacola.


were added bits of white dainty
tulle, white satin leaves, sprigs of
lily of the valley and delicate
white pearl shaped hearts. The
bouquet was centered with a white
eatalya orchid containing a light
yellow throat attached to which
were streamers of soft white satin.
The mother of the bride chose
for her daughter's wedding a baby
pink sheath of chantilly lace over
taffeta. The skirt was featured
with three scalloped tiers; the bo-
dice had a scolloped neckline with
short scolloped sleeves, and match-
ing accessories. She wore a light
green cymbidium orchid accented
with tulle and satin.
The mother of the bridegroom


calla cake topped with a wedding
couple in the center of the table
covered with white organdy over
red taffeta.
The bride's table was adorned
with an arrangement of five tiered
silver candlebras in which the cen-
ter tier was adorned with a gay ar-
rangement of lively red carnations
accented with lacy fern. The table
itself was draped with fresh trail-
ing smilax on all sides. At the cor-
ners of the table were simple ar-
rangements of bits of red gladioli
buds accented with fernery and
also around the base of the cake
were bits of gladioli buds accented
with greenery. The cake was serv-
ed by Mrs. Pat Bates'of South Car-
olina. The punch was served by
Mrs. Jack Williams, aunt of the
bride.
The bride's book table was grac-
ed by a petite arrangement of fes-
tive red carnations and white pom-
pom chrysanthemums, while the
two heavily laden gift tables were
enhanced by two bouquets of red
gladioli and white pompom chrys-
anthemums of symetrical arrange-
ments. The bride's book was kept
by Mrs. Don Grossmann, aunt of
the bride.
The bride is a graduate of Port
St. Joe High School and Massey
Business College of Jacksonville.
The bridegroom is a graduate of
Jesuit High School and Louisiana
State University, where he was a
member of Phi Theta Delta.
Mrs. Patricia Arato chose for
her wedding trip a black two-piece
suit with fur collar and matching
accessories. She wore the orchid
corsage lifted from her bridal bou-
quet.
The couple left on a trip to Mon-
terrey and to other points in Mex-
ico. After returning from the trip
the couple will reside in New Or-
leans, where the bridegroom is sta-
tioned at Camp Leroy Johnson.
Out of town guests attending the
wedding were: Mr. and Mrs. H. A.
Arato, father and mother of the
groom, Mr. and Mrs. Andy Arato,
Mr. and Mrs. David Arato, brothers
of the groom, Mr. and Mrs. R.
Phillpott and children, all of New
Orleans, La.; Miss Jane Martin of
Baton Rouge, La., Mrs. Mack Bates
of Norway, South Carolina, Miss
Debbie Guest of Nashville, Tenn.,
Mrs. W. I. Watts of Panama. City.

CARD OF THANKS
The family of Mrs. Margaret
'Thomas wishes to express- their


wore a blue sheath of lace over appreciation to their friends for
taffeta and matching accessories, the many kind deeds and remem-
She wore a pink cymbidium orchid branches during her illness and re-
accented with tulle and satin, cent death. Your thoughtfulness
Mrs. Ivy Williams, grandmother and help will always be warmly re-
of the bride wore a, royal blue membered by us.
crepe sheath with overskirt, with Gordon and Charles Thomas
three quarter length sleeves, and -.
matching accessories. She wore a VITRO WIVES CLUB
white carnation corsage. WILL MEET TUESDAY
Reception The Vitro Wives will meet Jan-
Immediately following the cere- uary 14, at 7:30 p.m., at the home
mony a reception was held at the of Mrs. Bob Stebel at White City.
Parrish House of the St .James Everyone please bring an old
Episcopal Church. The bride's ser- piece of jewelry for the January
vice table featured a three tiered auction.


Engagement Announced


Rev. and Mrs. Eugene Hedger,
DeFuniak Springs, announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Priscilla Ann to Lawrence Eu-
gene Cox, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Clinton Cox, of Highland View.
Miss Hedger graduated from
Walton High School, DeFuniak
Springs and is a sophomore at
Southeastern Bible College, Bir-


mingham, Alabama.
Mr. Cox attended Port St. Joe
High School and was graduated
from Toccoa Falls Academy, Toc-
coa Falls, Georgia. He is a junior
at Southeastern Bible College,
Birmingham, Alabama.
No definite plans have been
made for the wedding.


(UJ-
MEN & BOY'S WEAR
'Outfitters for Dads and LaWd"


I


I


ill 111. LJ I I -


-I*
,, ",.


Miss Patrica Ann Williams Becomes the

Bride of Thomas Arato On Dec. 30







uu-~ ~~ rfi~t-


BOYLES, F












Be Here Thursday
A.M., Jan. 9, 1964
300 FALL and WINTER

SLASHED!
DRESSES
1/2 'PRICE
Nothing held back! Stacy Ames,
Betty Barclay, Carol Rodgers,
Mynette and others. Missy Jun-
iors and half sizes. Hurry today
for best selections.


PRICED FOR A
First Time E
Lovable Bras _-_
S$1.00 Values 1 to
SRegular $2.99 PI
2NYLO0N S
Ladies sizes 32
each $2
Shadow panel la
Boy's Wellington
LEATHER -
Sizes 8/2to 3 ___
Sig Boys 31 to 6 _
Guaranteed by Acme .
BootmakersI

Special '64 Values
'LADIES' NYLOI
$1.00 Value 6


Drastically Re
Fall and Wi
GIRLS' DR
Values up to $5
$1.64 to.
Sizes 1 to 14 Fine cot
plaids.

Complete Cle
All Ladies Fall a
DRESS S
Values up to $10.99
$3.64 to
High, medium and low heels ir
others, patents and combinations.
LOOK' Fo



26Y2


orVt WSt Joe, Welvmes The New Ye


SELL-OUT!
ver!
ea. 64c
a Customer
hil-Maid
LIPS
to 42
.64
ice trimmed
(Slip-on)
ROOTS
__ pr. $4.64
Spr. $5.64
. World's largest

inm Lingerie!
N BRIEFS


4c


duced!
enter
iESSES
.99 now
$3.64
tons in solids and

arance!
ad Winter
HOES
- Reduced to
$7.64
n black and brown lea-
i AA to EEE.
r Home or Street
dies Wash and Wear
otton Dresses
ea. $2.64
12 to 20 and 14V2 to
24/2.
to 322 --$3.64


A Sellout Group
S 0 x I I ADA0* me,
For Boys and Girls
3 prs. 64c


Priced For A Sell


Men's
Star Brand Work Shoes
$4.64 pair
Proven quality, guaranteed for tough wear. Sizes
5 to 12 EE Width.
Sturdy Quality School and Play
Oxfords for Boys and Girls
$2.64 pair
Plain leathers and suedes. Sizes up to Ju-
venile 3.

Savings up to 50% on Sensational Close-Out Group
LADIES SKIRTS
Wools, dacron blends and wash and wear cottons.


Most all sizes.
Values to $8.99


$2.64 to $4.64


All Fine OrIon Sweaters
for Boys and Girls
Values up to $7.99 Reduced to
$2.64 to $4.64
Guaranteed quality by Campus and Regal
New Spring '64 Styles Arriving Daily
at BOYLES
Buy Now Use our Layaway Plan


Cu


Crepe Sole
$2
Sizes

M
Crepe Sole
$2,
ishioned insoles .


A~l sizes.


Tot's Cord
DIAP
Values up to $6.4
NOW ONLY
Sizes Medium,
27x2'
BIRDS
$1.4
Limit 1
NATIONAL 1
MEASI
January Extra PA
Made to Yo


Priced For A Sell


- COMPLETE CLEARANCE


- ALL LADIES' and


COATS and St

a 0 PAY ONLY64% OF REGU


Girl's Nylon
PETTI PANTS pr.


19c Value Ladies
Rayon Tricot BRIEFS ---


Sfor


64o
64o


Save Every Ci
BI
TI
SILVER


nI


PANTIES

3 pr.,64c
Sizes 0 to 12


ar With A Happy Sales Event!












Starts Thursday
A.M., Jan. 9, 1964
DOOR BUSTER!
Men's first quality,
guaranteed



SHIRTS



Small, Medium and Large

I-Out !
PRICED FOR A SELL-OUT!

Canvas Loafers and Van Heusen
.64 pair SPO RTSHIRTS
8V2 to 3, black. Values up to $5.99
$2.64 and, $3.64
en's Heavy
Regular and taper cuts, plain and button
Canvas Oxfords collars ... Favorite patterns and colors.
.64 pairiz
.. Real comfort and economy. Men's Heavy Duty Fully Sanforized
______ Work Pants -- pr. $2.64
Khaki or grey. Sizes 28 to 42
uroy and Velveteen --- -
E R SETS Men's Work Shirts __ ea. $1.64
002.64 Colors to match pants above. Sizes 14 to 17.
$2m64o H Long sleeves.
Large and Extra Large
-.Save About 50%/o Here!
I Ideal Quality Men's and Young Men's Fine Cotton
EYE DIAPERS IVY STYLE 'PANTS
64 dozen264 Pair
doz. to customer Pa 'i
TAILORING MADE TO
JRE AT BOYLES A good size selection. Desirable colors.
ANTS SALE ------- $7.95
ur Measure with Suit__ Men's Full Sized, Hemsfitched

WHITE HANDKERCHIEFS
-Out 10 for 64c
I CHILDREN'S Limit package on ten to customer

J IT S Reduced for A Sellout!
IAR PRIE PLAID FLANNEL ROBES
LAR PRICE each $3.64
Attractive colors ... Practical weight for the year
ash Sales Ticket From round. Sizes S, M, L and XL. w
OYLES! KnockSMe
ey' re worth Save at Boyles on Coldl
R D 0 LLA RS Undies for Children! a

I First Quality Double
Knit Cotton


yp









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, FIorica
THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1964





Opening Times
Sat. 12:45 p.mn
Sun. 2:45 p.m.
Mon.-Fri. ..--......... 4:45 p.m.


Thurs., Frl.
SATURDAY ONLY


WLAG

a MOTION PICTURE INVESTORS release
BOLD ACTIONl, R



Formerly 'Deadly Companions' -
a MOTION PICTURE INVESTORS release

SUNDAY-MONDAY
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY


FOR RENT: Unfurnished 2 bed-
room apart. Phone 227-7761. tfc
FOR RENT: Two bedroom house,
corner Tenth Street and Long
Avenue. Call Mrs. Nora Duren.
Phone 227-5471. c-V-13
FOR RENT: Trailer space in Oak
Grove. Sewer and water. $14.00
month. Phone L. C. Davis, 227-7059.


flil 1 1 "'I"i,


room, kitchen with large breakfast Aero Mayflower Transit Company
room, utility room, venetian blinds, places a complete nation-wide long-
gas tank. One block from school, distance moving service at your
506 8th Street. Call SUnset 5-8157, command! Whether your move is
Panama City. a few hundred miles or thousands,
the Mayflower System assures sat-
FOR SALE: 1962 Ducati 98cc mo- isfactory service. If you're planning
torcycle. See Michael Roche or to move why not call your local
phone 227-5271. tfc-12-24 Mayflower agents, S U R P L U S
-- SALES of ST. JOE, Today. Just
WANTED AT ONCE: Rawleigh Phone 227-2011. Across from the
Dealer in Gulf Co.. or Port St. Post Office.


Joe. Write Rawleigh, Dept., FAK
100-3, Memphis, Tenn. 11-21-1-9
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house. Lo-
cated on 2 corner lots. Ideal lo-
cation for schools, Well landscaped.
Located 301 16th St. Call 648-4735.
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom house on
Marvin Ave. (high side). Well e&
tablished lawn and shrubs. Has
well. Approx. 1350 sq. ft Lot 75z
150. Inquire 227-7006 after 3:00 pm
FOR SALE
Large two bedroom house com-
pletely furnished on 8th St. Pric-
ed for quick sale at $6,000.
Two bedroom masonry house on
Palm Blvd., with large den. Sit-
uated on two lots on corner.
Three bedroom masonry house
on Marvin Ave. Can sell for only
$9,700.
FRANK HANNON
Registered Real Estate Broker
221 Reid Ave. Phone 227-3491


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Meet
every Wednesday night, 8 p.m.
t Parish House, 309% 6th St. Port
St. Joe, Fla. Phone 229-36d for
iu Iher information or write P. 0.
Eu.- 535.
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0.
0. F.-Meets second and fourth
Thursday, 8:00 p.m. in American
Legion Hall. All members urged to
attend.
Noble Grand: Emmett Dantel)
Secretary: J. C. Martin.
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No .111, F. & A. M., every first
and third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.

N. G. MARTIN, W. M.
H. L. BURGE, Secretary


FOR RENT: Nice furnished apart-
ment for couple only at 1621
Monument Ave. Phone 227-7641. tf
FOR RENT: Two one bedroom cot-
tages, furnished on 9th St. Also
2 bedroom unfurnished apt. Call
227-5111 or call by Smith's Phar-
macy. tkc
FOR RENT: Spacious 2 bedroom
furnished apartment. Phone 229-
4261 between 9-6 p.m. or 648-4600
after 6. tfc-11-14
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment.
1506 Long Ave. Downstairs. Call
227-5426. John Scott. tfc-11-14
FOR RENT: Two bedroom house.
Palm Blvd. Call Cecil G. Costin,
Jr., 227-4311 tfc-11-21
FOR RENT OR SALE: Furnished 2
bedroom brick home and small
apartment, 1301 Long Ave., $11,000
Phone 648-4128. Mira.
FOR RENT: At Highland View. Un-
furnished 3 bedroom and 2 bed-
room house, each has modern
plumbing. $35.00 mo. each. Phone
227-3983 or phone Greenhead No.
3 (2 long rings) on Highway 77. 4p
FOR RENT: Unfurnished large two
bedroom house with large car-
port. Piped with natural gas. Lo-
cated at 908 Woodward Ave. $45.00
per month or call 227-3081. 2tp
FOR RENT: One 3 bedroom house
on Marvin Ave. Furnished or un-
furnished. One house furnished or
unfurnished on Hwy. 98 with busi-
ness space attached. Phone 229-
1361. tfc-1-9
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom well fur-
nished house at St. Joe Beach.
Has oak floors. J. D. Clark. Phone
227-7771. tfc-1-9
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom house. 217
7th St. $50.00 mo. Phone 227-
7846. ,_Itp
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom furnished
apartment. $45.00 month. 507
10th Street. Inquire at 509 10th St.
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom house, $9,-
800.00. Terms. 2 bedroom house
at St. Joe Bedch. Terms. 3 bedroom
house, pool, chain link fence.
Terms. C. W. Long, 137 Hunter
Circle. Phone 227-4686. tfc-12-5
FOR SALE: Stucco house situated
on 90'x150' lot. Near Elementary
School. 3 bedrooms. Hardwood
floors. House insulated. Chain link
fence around back yard. Reasonably
priced. Call Will Ramsey 7-3161
day or 7-3646 night.
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom nice mod.
ern home with 2 porches, nice
carport, 200 foot front on Highway
71, White City. Call 229-1134. tfc
FOR SALE: 4 bedroom, 2 bath, liv-
ing room with fireplace, dining


Grover C. Hunt Passes
Away In Ohio, 'Dec. 31
Grover Cleveland Hunt, native of
Mayo and Orlando, and resident of
Ohio for the past four years, was
fatally stricken with a heart attack
at 1:00 a.m., January 1 and passed
away at 1:30 a.m. Mr. Hunt had
moved back to Mayo, December 31.
Survivors include his father, J.
Sent Hunt and foster father, W. E.
Henderson of Mayo; one daughter,
Dorothy .Fincher, Landers, Wyo.;
one sister, Mrs. George Harper,
White City; one brother, Rev. C.
0. Henderson, Daytona Beach and
a brother Edward Henderson of
Mayo.
Visiting In Georgia
Mrs. 0. M. Taylor is visiting this
week with friends and relatives in
Moultrie, Georgia.
James Halpin, is required to serve
upon Silas R. Stone, Plaintiff's At-
torney, whose address is 321 Reid
Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida, a
copy of, and file with the Clerk of
this Court the original of, an an-
swer to the Complaint for divorce
filed against him herein.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
said Court at Wewahitchka, Gulf
County, Florida, this the' 31st day
of December, A. D., 1963.
GEORGE Y. CORE
Clerk Circuit Court


(SEAL)


4t-1-2


Eta Upsilon Chapter
Has Meeting Tuesday
The Eta Upsilon Chapter of Beta
Sigma Phi met Tuesday night in
the Florida Power Lounge with 15
members present.
Mrs. Carol Rish, chapter presi-
dent, opened the meeting with the
opening ritual. Committee reports
were given by various chairmen.
Eta Upsilons are busily making


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The Board of County Commis-
sion of Gulf County Florida will be
in special session on January 13,
1964 at 9:00 o'clock A.M. (Central
Standard Time) for the purpose of
hearing any testimony on the pe-
tition now before the board to call
an election on the question of
changing the county seat.
JAMES G. McDANIEL,
Chairman, Board of
S County Commission


plans ior the forthcoming Gulf
Area Council meeting for which
this chapter- is hostess to in Feb- BIRTHS
ruary. Chapters which shall attend Mr. and Mrs. James William
this meeting will be: Crestview, Zi Banks, Route 3, Port St. Joe an-
Psi, Alpha Tau, Zeta Delta; De- nounce the birth of a daughter,
Funiak Springs, Zi Delat Beta, Sherry, born January 1.
Gamma Sigma; Fort Walton Beach, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Thomas
Delta Omicron; Jay, Epsilon Kap- Watts, 609 Garrison Avenue an-
pa ,Eta Rho; Marianna, Zeta Gam- nounce the birth of a son, Thom-
ma; Marianna, Zeta Gamma; Mil- as, Jefferson on January 4.
ton, Zi Beta Kappa, Alpha Upsi- (All births occurred at the Port
lon; Niceville, Zi Beta Pi, Delta St. Joe ,Municipal Hospital.)
Zeta; Panama City, Zi Alpha Kap- -
pa, Beta Rho, Zeta Zeta; Pace, Ze- Visit With Parents
ta Rho; Pensacola, Zi Upsilon, Al- Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Stephens
pha Phi, Gamma Gamma; Talla- visited with Jimmy's parents, Mr.
hassee, Zi Zi, Alpha Epsilon, Ep- and Mrs. Emory Stephens, during
silon Mu. the Christmas holidays. Mrs. Ste-
A full day's schedule is being phens will remain here until Jim-
planned for these visitors. my returns from a three month's
Mrs. Elva Jones gave a very in- tour of duty at- Guantanamo Bay,
teresting program on literature Cuba.
and its history. Each member was -.
asked to give her most inspiring
book choice and all agreed the
A social time followed the meet- Jo
ing.- :

Return From Nebraska THE STAR
Mr. and Mrs. Wade Barrier, Sr.,
have returned from Omaha, Ne-
braska, this week, where they at- PORT ST. JOE, ULA.
tended the funeral of Harrison Ma-
lin. brnther-in-law nf Mrc s Barrier- -


YARD GOODS


S


LE


Reg. $1.10 Yard YARD


Corduroy


Reg. 98c Yard Dan River


Gingham


Reg. 89c A.B.C. Cotton


Prints


Reg. $1.39 Yard Bates Cotton


Prints


79c


YARD


69c


YARD


69c


YARD


89c


Feprinted by special permission of The Saturday Evening Post.
01943, The Curtis Publishing Company


*'-4.J.
1.


We are still Pilgrims


We no longer give thanks around a rough wooden
table in a forest clearing. Our problems and
rewards have taken different shapes too, but
they are basically the same.
iWe are still making a-pilgrimage, the same
peareh for a fuller and more fruitful life under
freedom of religion. And we are still thankful
for the faith that sees us through adversity
*and guides us on that pilgrimage.
Thanksgiving Day was named for its,meaning
'-the day that we come together to give thanks
for our faith and our full life ... and to
.remember that we are still pilgrims.
This Thanksgiving Day, give your thanks,
strengthen your faith, enlighten your
pilgrimage, at your place of worship.


WMrship this week


25 Years Experience In

Income Tax Service
Prompt and Efficient

J. D CLARK
101' Long .Ave.


FOR SALE: 1962 Volkswagen sta- R. A. M.-Regular convocation oX
tion wagon. Phone 227-7981. Ip St. Joseph Chapter No. S5, R. A.
M, 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit
LOTS FOR SALE: 100'x937'. In ing companions welcome.
White City. 100' frontage on Hi- Edgar L. Smith, High Priest
way 71. Deep well. Call 227-7998. Roy L. Burch, Secretary
2tp-1-9 --
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S
LOTS FOR SALE: Jonesville, near FLORIDA. IN PROBATE.
Port St. Joe. $50.00 to $500.00. IN RE: Estate of
Call 227-8712 or inquire at James VARNIE MARTIN,
Johnson, Box 333, Port St. Joe, Deceased.
Florida. 4tp-1-9 NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All creditors or the estate of
FOR SALE: One Allstate motor Varnie Maritn, deceased, are here-
scooter in excellent condition, by notified and required to file any
Call 227-3751, Pete Fox, for de- claims or demands which they may
tails. tfc-1-9 have against said estate in the of-
FOR SALE: Novel, "The Great fice of the County Judge of Gulf
Tide". A historic novel of this County, Florida, in the Courthouse
are Contact Mrs. R. H. Brinson at Wewahitchka, Florida within
area, Contact Mrs. R. H. Brinson six (6) calendar months irom the
at n6 ~o St.h or call 227-5756. date of the first publication of this
WANTED; House work, baby sitt- notice. Each claim or demand
ing or child care work. Full or must be in writing and must state
part time. Phone 229-2863. 288 Ave. the place of residence and post of-
D. Elizabeth Betton. Itp fice address of the claimant and
must be sworn to by the claimant,
HELP WANTED: Middle age lady his agent, or his attorney, or it
preferred. Companion for aged will become void according to law.
lady, to live in. Good pay and liv- /s/ BEATRICE WILSON
ing conditions. Contact Jake Mou- Executrix of the Estate
chette at St. Joe Motel. Phone 229- of Varnie Martin, deceased
9991. tfc-1-2 CECIL G. COSTIN, JR.
221 Reid Avenue
MOTEL TRAINING: Learn to man- Port St. Joe, Florida 4t-12-19
age motel, at home, in spare Attorney for Executrix
time. Men, women and couples over
25, Placement service. Low cost. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
Write: National Motel Training, OFIN THEI FOURTEENTH JU-
Inc., P. 0. Box 71, Oak Park, Ill. d DICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-
SEPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call IDA, IN AND FOR GULF
Buford Griffin, Phone 227-7011 COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
for quick expert service. tfc JOAN PARRISH HALPIN,
Plaintiff,
WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116, -vs---
THE AMERICAN LEGION, meet JAMES HALPIN,
ing second and fourth Tuesday Defendant.
nights, 8:00 p.m. American Agion NOTICE TO JAMES HALPIN,
Home. whose last known address is 2056
Briggs Avenue, Bronx, New York:
IT'S EASY AND SAFE TO MOVE On or before the 3rd day of Feb-
THE MAYFLOWER WAYI ruary, A. D., 1964, the Defendant,


--


L I


.-, b~lII-cwU vr. D re .


..............










THE STAR
-PublhMied Every Thusday At 306 Willliam Avenue, Pert St. Joe, Flerl 4
By The Star Publkhing Company
WEmzY R. RAMSE Editor and PubWAer
Also LInotye Oprator, Ad Salesman Photographer, Columnist, Reporter Vree
Reader, Bookkeeper and Complaint Department


DAL 227-8161


PosroFMicE Box W


antere as .cond.clas matter, Deember 19, 1987, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe,
]norida, under Aot of March 3, 1879.

8UBOCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, m IX MONTHS, 1.75 THREE MONTHS, $127.50

6 ADVF.RTISERS-In case of error or omislons In advertisements, the publishers
-do theme able for damage further than amount receed for su

g+HE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1964

They're Lining Up At The Post!

If you watched the Huntley-Brinkley news report the
other night, you saw the predicament of the Indian Mahara-
jah wVo raises $10,000 tigers. This chap's last litter, born
December, died. The commentator noted that tigers breed
nly in May and December and then observed that "it's a
bng, long time, from May to December ."
Even now, we may observe that it is a long, long time
intil November ... but nevertheless, they are off and run-
ing the presidential hopefuls, we mean.
i Of those announced for the office, we will have to go
ith ~.Bary Goldwater. Others may come along to make
#e change my mind, but there is no need to deal in possibili-
lies of others getting in the swim until they actually do.
It is refreshing to have a candidate speaking straight
irom the shoulder, calling a spade a spade and a liberal
i liberal.. .. without going through the usual polite, intricate
political fol-de-rol usually accompanying such an important
ace.
To find a candidate who is interested in bettering the
country and. making it once more a fiscally sound nation.
has been some few years since we have heard this proposi-
qon from someone who sounds like he means to carry out
l*is word. It might be a unique experience to be fiscally
found.
While he is unannounced, it is expected that President
0ohnison will carry the Democrat banner. But, as we said
Before, there is no use supposing until it becomes a reality.
gofe have said that Johnson is only going through the mo-o
ions of trying to secure passage of the socialized medicine
plan and the so-called "civil rights" bill of the late President
Kennedy put through Congress and passed. .
We know that we are not schooled in the intricities of
political maneuvering, but we cannot see how a person can
liv such a lie as to "go through the motions" of seeking pas-
sage of a bill that he doesn't believe in. Of course, we know,
auch actions are-to placate or delude certain factions. But,
w-vote fora man because of his convictions and actions, not
his shams.
Again, we don't understand the political maneuvers, but
it seems that if Johnson really opposed these bills, he could
have done so before becoming president. He had nothing
to lose then, We can only surmise from past and present
actions that he favors these and other bills designed to in-
fluence and buy voters and bankrupt the nation.


Evidences Show City Is Growing

A chance remark the other day that Port St. Joe was
going backward and losing population, prompted us to look
into the situation.
This person opined that the number of empty houses
in the city portended a decrease in population.
But, such is not the case. The population is steadily in-
creasing. To-back up our argument, you have but to look
at several barometers ... the increase of electrical, water,
telephone .-.. and Star ... customers, shows a growth in
population.
The myth of a growing glut of houses on the market is
soon burst when you see that last year 14 new homes were
built in the city of Port St. Joe. The value of these homes
amounted 'to $186.000. In addition to these homes, some
$109,539.00 worth of commercial -buildings also were con-
structed.
New houses aren't built; businesses don't expand, and
new churches aren't built in an area where the population is
Decreasing.
Admittedly, Port St. Joe isn't expanding by leaps and
pounds but we are growing slowly and healthily. This
type of growth is to be most desired.


"Dog Ordinance" Tests City Dads

The City Commission literally has a dog by the tail and
is seeking a way to let go.
-On hand for decision is an ordinance to regulate dog nui-
iances in the city, without penalizing dog lovers and owners.
Of course, most ordinances are copied from ordinances adopt-
ed by other municipalities and reported by the Florida League
of Municipalities, as being workable and effective. But most
of the "dog ordinances" require impounding of all dogs found
running loose without a license tag.
Enter the city dad's delimma.
Most dogs in Port St. Joe belong to someone. They are
pets. And the nature of the dogs of the city are such as those
of the children of the city.. .Port St. Joe is their home and
playground and they use it all! How is the police depart-
ment going to ake someone's pet into custody when they


know that it is a pet and who it belongs to? And such an
activity makes more work for an already small police force
. and requires a pound... and feeding... and bookkeep.
ping.
But, it is almost a necessity that laws be provided to
require rabies innoculation for pets. But how can one re-
quire an act be done, without providing penalties if the act
is not done?
If the Commission can do this that is regulate
the presence of dogs that have not been innoculated or dogs
that are a nuisance. and not arouse the ire of some dog
owners through the control methods. we will recommend
that each and everyone of the city Board of Commissioners
be appointed as life-time members to- the U. N. they are
needed there.

Charles B. Smith Elected President

Of The St. Joseph Historical Society


The regular meeting of the St.
Joseph Historical Society was held
Saturday, January 4, in the cham-
ber room of the Municipal Build-
ing. The President, Jesse V. Stone
presided at the meeting.
Mrs. Ned S. Porter gave the fi-
nal report concerning the histori-


cal float, "Framing Florida's First
Constitution." This float was a part
of both the Constitution Day par-
ade in Port St. Joe and the annual
Christmas parade in Panama City.
The float depicting the signing of
Florida's first constitution was fi-
nanced by the City of Port St. Joe


Handsome Ripe.Olive Pofafo Salad



.. ,_ ,.: *.


;
Potato salad can go to a party when it's as fancy as "Danish
Olive-Potato Salad." I
You might chill this mold overnight the day before the party-
to let the ripe lives, onion, vinegar, .dill weed and other season-
ings blend properly with. the creamy potatoes;
Versatile ripe olives sound a note of elegance in many salads,
-soups, casseroles and meat and fish sauces. -Husky. ripe -olive
wedges dress up vegetables, too, such as creamed carrots or
creamed spinach, And Whole ripe olives -as garnish for sandwich
-plates, or rolled inr olive or salad oil for party relish: trays,. are
practically an American institution,
DANIS OLIV~1 -PTATO SALAD
. 1 cup ripe olives 1 teaspoon. dill eed
1 cup chopped onion 5 cups cooked sliced or diced
13 cup butter i potatoes
/ to, 1 teaspoon salt Parsley sprigs
. teaspoon pepper
Cut olives into wedges. Cook onion in butter until soft but not
-browned. Add vinegar, salt, pepper and dill weed. Combine 'with
potatoes. Carefully mix in cream and olives. Pack mixture into
5- or 6-cup ring mold; chill. To serve, unmold on serving plate
and garnish with parsley. Makes 8 to 10 servings.


n with the St. Joseph Historical So.
city and the Gulf County Histori-
. cal Commission as co-sponsors.
The float motif was suggested by
Mrs. Porter. John T. Simpson con-
structed the float with the aid of
city personnel. Mrs. William H.
Howell, Jr., did the lettering and
artistic work on the float.
Mrs. Ned S. Porter also gave a
report of the meeting of the Flor-
ida Arts Council which she at-
tended in Gainesville, in Novem-
ber. She represented the St. Jo-
seph Historical Society and the
Gulf County Historical Commission
at this meeting.
Mrs. R. H. Brinson gave a re-
port on the displays in the mer-
chants windows during the Consti-
tution Day celebration. The follow-
ing business firms gave generously
of their window space for this occa-
sion: The Florida Power Corpora-
tion, Pylant's Men and Boy's Wear,
the St. Joe Furniture Company, the
Prince and Princess Shop and Cos-
-tins. The St. Joe Paper Company
was most generous in lending their
collection of photographs of early
Port St. Joe and in the contribution
of white cardboard for the construc-
tion of the historical float. Mrs.
Brinson also turned over to the
treasurer $6.00 derived from com-
missions on the sale of "Glimpses
of the Panhandle" during the cele-
bration. Port St. Joe's three drug
stores were responsible for the
sale of the books.
The nominating committee sub-
mitted the proposed slate of offi-
cers for the ensuing year. The fol-
lowing officers were elected by a
unanimous vote: president, Charles
B. Smith; vice-president, Mrs. Ned
S. Porter; corresponding secretary,
Mrs. R. H. Brinson; recording sec-
retary and publicity chairman, Jes-
se V. Stone; treasurer, William H.
Howell, Jr.; city coordinator, J. B.
Williams.
These officers will assume their
duties at the annual dinner meet-
ing at the Motel St. Joe on January
31. The featured speaker at the
annual dinner meeting will be N.
E. Miller, executive administrator
for the Florida Board of Parks and
Historic Memorials.
The following members were
present for Saturday's meeting,
Jesse V. Stone, president; Mrs. Ned
S. Porter, Mrs. Bernard A. Prid-
geon, Sr., Mrs. R. H. Brinson, Mrs.
Charles A. Brown, Mrs. Ralph
Swatts, Cecil G. Costin, Jr., and
Charles B. Smith.
t
CLASSIFIED ADS e
Midget Investments With
GCoa Reetufl t
-V s


The Tattler
R. GLENN BOYLES Editor
Associate Editors YOU-ALL
Published by
BOYLES DEPARTMENT STORE
PHONE WALL 7-421
R. GLENN BOYLES, Owner
"Dedicated to Better Seling mixed with a
little fun" sOYLas
*TURE PEMfBONNEL
ERLMA M. BOYLES Manager
BOB McKIERNAN Shoe Department
GLADYS S. GILL------Ladies' and Children's Ready-to-Wear
ETHEL M. GAY Lingerie
NONA WILLIAMS Men's and Boy's Wear
LARRY ALLEN, MARY REEVES and
ESTHER TAYLOR Extras


Boyles Stages A Gigantic '64 House-

Cleaning!. New Spring and Summer

Merchandise Arriving Daily!
A GREAT YEAR AHEAD!


Dear Friends:
Here's a quickie that caught my
attention: "America now has the


gram for 1964 ... a year filled
with hope and new challenges ..
a year for development and prog-


highest standard of living. Next ress ... a happy satisfying year
step should be to raise the standard of growth and achievement ... in
of thinking". Well, where do we our thinking and in our deeds! We
start? Someone has said: "Think need your help and we are willing
Big"! Alright, let's take a fling at to reciprocate Let's think
ic first with the thought that 1964 more, do more and SAVE MORE
is going to be the biggest year in '64!
ever! In connection with business Time for another "Quickie":
problems one of our first thoughts "Some girls dress to kill oth-
for the new year was to make au ers just to torment!" Here's today
effort to reduce the cost of adver- chuckle from M.P.R. "Parenthood
tising. We've already reversed this is hereditary ... if your parents
one with a full page this week in didn't have any children ... the
The Star. We're buying more ra- chances are, you won't either"!
dio time than ever. Yes, just stick- A parting word to the thrifty:
ing our neck right out to the limit. The month of January Boyles is
Why? Well, we've a story to tell offering custom tailored suits .
to the people ... Yes, a story of EXTRA PANTS only 7.95 ... Our
happier shopping for wearing ap- National Tailoring line is one of
parel and shoes for the family at the nation's oldest and most reli-
Boyles ... a small ,home owned, able. Prices start at 49.50 for a
home operated business dedicated made to your measure suit .
to serving our fellow man in this delivery two to three weeks ..
particular corner of Florida. We Glenn Boyles will take your mea-
know many of you personally and sure and guarantee a fit in suits,
we consider it a great privilege to topcoats, sport coats, extra pants
study your needs, to make person- and all kinds of uniforms. Smart,
al selection of merchandise to fill good looking, well tailored clothes
hese needs. Yes, we're small will get you off to a good start in
our resources are limited. Howev- any endeavor. Call us for appoint-
er, that doesn't keep us from ment. Evening appointments made.
THINKING BIG .. SEEING BIG Will see you at Boyles Gigantic '64
.. MAKING BIG PLANS ... in Sale ... the opening gun for '64
he effort to serve you better and with a Big Savings Booml
save you more. That's Boyles pro- S'long ... RGB.


Firestone


DeLuxe Champion NEWTREADS

RETREADS ON SOUND TIRE BODIES OR ON YOUR OWN TIRES


A.WHITEWALLS

Conventional or Slim Trim Whitewalls





49
Plus tax and 2 trade-in tires
of same size off your car.


ANY


SIZE


-- 31m
II "Charge it"... /

vanwettse Take Months to Pay!


SFREE Installation






PATE'S SERVICE CENTER










"Super-Right" Short Shank


SMOKED




PICNICS


Sliced


tb.3


PLAID
STAMPS

for Valuable Free Gifts
17"-" --fs-^r w aea


"SUPER-RIGHT" FINE QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN BEEF


Chuck Roast
,.TirfpTF.-rl lr, PNE QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN BEEF


ct 45c
uTT ^


StJ.L .xU r.viAy -n -- -v ---


Chuck Steak ure 55c
"Super-Right" Extra Lean "Super-Right" Heavy Western Bone In
Ground Beef 3 Ibs. $1.39 Shoulder Roast lb. 65c
All Good Brand Sugar Cured Sliced "Super-Right" Sliced Salami, Olive Loaf or
Breakfast Bacon 2 lbs. 89c Bologna 6 oz. pkg. 25c
Mealtimne Maid Quick Frozen Breaded-16 oz. "Super-Right" 6 oz. pkg.
Veal Steaks pkg. 69c Cooked Ham pkg. 59c

\\ ALL PURPOSE


A. P.rL Elw


LB.
BAG


IDAHO BAKING


POTATOES


FIRM RED RIPE


TOMATOES
GREEN GIANT WHITE 17 oz. size

Cream Style CORN 2 cans 29c
Nabisco Fresh Crisp
PREMIUM SALTINES lb. 29c
Ann Page
GRAPE JAM 2 lb. jar 55c
Ann Page Lb., 4 Oz. Bottles
K ETCHUP 2btls. 49c
Ann Page
M MAYONNAISE qt. 49,c
WHITE HOUSE EVAPORATED

MILK
ANN PAGE ELBOW SPAGHETTI or ELBOW

MACARONI


39c


10


LB.


LB.
BAG


CTN.


59c



19c


. .........
JANE PARKER



FSAVE REG. 49c,
SPECIAL"
C 391-

lelect
oi clim d-fresh a6ples '
I baked iiisid*e' 'a flaky light
hisfine"pie,, savecashtoo!


6


PACK



1 Lb.
PKGS.


Green Giant Green 8 oz. cans A & P Frozen 12 Oz. Cans
Sweet Peas 4 cans 49c Orange Juice
Green Giant Golden Whole Kernel 7 oz. Welch's 20 Oz.
Niblets Corn 4 cans 49c Grape Jelly
Green Giant Niblets 12 oz. Cans Bright Sail
CORN 2 cans 39c BLEACH


79c



37c


can 53c

jar 39c

gal. 39c


SWith Coupon and Purchase of
,t F 20c Off Label Bordens--9 Oz.
Instant Coffee $1.15
i Jax. 1 .11-64
Coupon good thru Sun., Jan. 12
i--


Eelbeck 5 lbs.
CORN MEAL ........--. 51c
Northern Bathroom
TISSUE .-....... 4 rolls 37c
Purina 5 lbs.
DOG CHOW ------............ 77c
1 lb. La Choy Chop Suey
VEGETABLES ..-........ 33c
5 oz. La Choy
SOY SAUCE .......--.... 19c
Lipton
TEA ..--.........---..... V2 lb. 89c
6 Oz. Minute Maid Blended
Frozen Juice .- 2 for 47c
6 oz. Min. Maid Froz. Juice
Banana-Orange 2 for 59c
6 oz. Min. Maid Froz. Orange
JUICE ------- 2 for 69c
8 oz. Min. Maid Froz. Orange
DELIGHT ...... 2 for 37c


Dizie-9 Oz.
CUPS .-....-..... 40 cups 45c
Greenwoods Tiny Whole
BEETS .--......-........ lb. 33c
Lustre Cream
Shampoo 7 oz. $1.00
Keystone Stems & Pieces
Mushrooms ... 7 oz. 37c
La Choy Chow Mein
NOODLES ...... 3 oz. 17c
Colgate Giant size
Dental Cream .......... 53c


-Yomu dreams come true with
" PLAID STAMPS
THE GREAT ATLANTIC & PACIFIC TEA COMPANY, INC.


Pure Veg. Shortening
CRISCO .......... 3 lbs. 79c
Detergent
FAB ........ lb., 4 ozs. 33c
Detergent Lb.
Super Suds .... 2 for 49c
Cleanser lb., 5 ozs.
A-JAX .--........... 2 for 49c
Ajax Liquid 15 fl. ozs.
CLEANER .............. --------39c
Pickle Patch Sliced Dill
Pickles ...... pt., 6 oz. 29c


510 Fifth St.
Prices in this
ad are good
thru Saturday,
January 11


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1964


Income Tax Filing Time Is Here Again,

Start Getting Your Records Together


January second begins another
income tax filing period and to a-
void the last minute rush now is
the time to get your records toget-
her and file your 1963 income tax
return, District Director Laurie W.
Tomlinson said today.
As in the" past, special days will
be designated as taxpayer assis-
tance days at which time suffici-
ent personnel will be available to
promptly and efficiently assist
each person with his income tax
problem. Monday of each week has
been set aside for this purpose,
and taxpayers are encouraged to
call at the District Director's of-
fice located at 634 East Highway
98, Panama City, Fla. Many of the
tax questions may be answered by
using telephone service, thus pre-
venting the taxpayer from losing
time from work and providing im-
mediate assistance. Taxpayers are
encouraged to call 763-7712 on
Monday, at which time personnel
will be available to immediately
assist them.


Largely unnoticed, Congress of the year, the tax would have
has passed a bill which in af- to be 9% of the payroll.
fect does not require certain *
states to raise the taxes to em- The difference is made up by
players to meet the high costs higher taxes assessed against
of unemployment payments to the payrolls of all employers,
reimburse the Federal govern- even those who have practical-
ment for the extra contribu- ly no turn-over rate. The Fed-
tions to these plans. eral government contributes to
each state ,in addition to the
California, money raised by the states tax-
a leader in ing the employer.
welfare pay-1 *.
ment s, wats But California was in trouble.
onstateaffect- Due tq the unions constantly
d. T iates ae pushing up and up the wages
make d an T i hat must be paid to these sea-
makes an in- S sonal workers, unemployment
resting ase payments to them also in-
study-. : creased,
As previ- C.W. Harder
ously pointed out, in the food Thus, for the Federal gov-
processing industries unem. ernment to get back the money
ployment checks are sent to it has paid out in extra funds
the students, housewives and to California, it would be in-
other seasonal employees who cumbent on the California state
only work during the summer government to raise the maxi-
season, and want no year mum rates on employers.
around steady job. Of course, *
the payroll taxes paid by the This, of course, would create
employers is of necessity add- substantial embarrassment to
ed to the cost of the products, the state government, especi-
ally if it became public knowl-
Food canning Is a big Califor- edge that the tax increases
nia industry. The seasonal were necessary to keep send-
workers receive up to 39 weeks ing checks for 39 weeks to peo-
after the canning season ends ple who do not want to work
unemployment checks even except during the season.
though they have no inten- *
tion of working the rest of the Thus, like the Seventh Cav-
year. Thus, the food canning airy used to sweep across the
industry is in affect giving the Western plains to save the sett-
seasonal employees a guaran- lers from having their scalps
teed annual wage. lifted, the Congress, armed
with the U.S. Treasury, swept
The canners in California pay across the Sierras to prevent
the maximum unemployment scalps from being lifted in
insurance rate permitted by Sacramento. It is a truly touch-
law which at present is 3.3% ing display of the principle of
of the payroll. Yet economists "all for one, and one for all,"
in the canning industry have as long as the employers, food
found if the canner's were consumers, and all other tax-
taxed on their payroll a suffi- payers foot the bill, There is
cient amount to equal the nothing that cannot be accom-
amounts handed out to the sea- polished if the public can be
sonal workers during the rest gouged deeply enough.
( National Federation of Independent Business


You Are Welcome To The
First United Pentecostal Church
10th St. NW. and V'Atoria Avenue Highland View, Florida
lvy. JAMES J. HILL, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 AM.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:15 AM.
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 P.M.
MID-WEEK SERVICE (Wednesday) -- 7:30 P.M.
YOUTH SERVICE (Friday) 7:30 PM.
AIR-CONDITIONED CENTRAL HEAT



FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Intersection Monument and Constitution
REV. THOMAS S. HARRIS, D.D, Minister

Church School 9:45 A.H.
Morning Worship 11:00 AM.
Bibye Study (Wednesday) 7:30 P.M.
Methodist Youth Fellowship -..-....-- 6:00 P.M.
Evening Worship 7:30 P.M.


You Are Cordially Invited To Attend

Long Ave. Baptist Church

Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street
SUNDAY SCHOOL ...... 9:45 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 6:45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) --. 7:30 p.m.

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME
REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor
Air Conditioned Centrally Heated


the Director's office their earning
statements, list of dividends and
interest, rents or other income re-
ceived, and records of deductions
which they may desire to claim on
their return. Also, they should


-----w---i


Charter No. 14902
REPORT OF CONDITION OF THE FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK OF
PORT ST. JOE, IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA, AT THE CLOSE OF
BUSINESS ON DECEMBER 20,-1963. PUBLISHED IN RESPONSE
TO CALL MADE BY COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, UNDER
SECTION 5211, U. S. REVISED STATUTES
ASSETS
1. Cash, balances with other banks, and cash
items in process of collection 662,967.97
2. United States Government obligations, direct and
guaranteed (Net of any reserves) 1,777,513.89
3. Obligations of States and political subdivisions
(Net of any reserves) 732,908.04
4. Corporate stocks (including $13,500.00 stock of
Federal Reserve Bank) (Net of any reserves) -------- 13,500.00
5. Loans and discounts (including $1,321.98 overdrafts) 1,686,943.07
6. Bank premises owned $72,681.49, furniture and
fixtures $17,282.63 89,964.12
7. Other assets 31,964.36
8. TOTAL ASSETS 4,995,761.45


LIABILITIES
Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships,
and corporations
Time and savings deposits of individuals,
partnerships and corporations
Deposits of United States Government
(including postal savings)
Deposits of States and political subdivisions -
Deposits of banks
Certified and officers' checks, etc.
TOTAL DEPOSITS $4,337,923.09
(a) Total demand deposits ------ $4,016,227.91
(b) Total time and savings deposits $ 321.695.18


3,428,540.29
151,695.18
173,707.22
349,578.44
224,909.24
9,492.72 -


17. Other liabilities 84,906.30
18. TOTAL LIABILITIES 4,422,829.39
CAPITAL ACCOUNTS
19. Common stock-par value per share $25.00.
No. shares authorized 8,000.
No. shares outstanding 8,000 200,000.00
20. Surplus 250,000.00
21. Undivided profits 70,242.15
22. Reserves 52,689.91
23. TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 572,932.06
24. TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 4,995,761.45
I, Walter C. Dodson, President, of the above-named bank do hereby
declare that this report of condition is true and correct to the best of
my knowledge and belief. /s/ WALTER C. DODSON
We, the undersigned directors attest the correctness of this report
of condition and declare that it has been examined by us and to the
best of our knowledge and belief is true and correct.
TOM S. COLDEWEY
J. C. BELIN Directors
J. LAMAR MILLER
REPORT OF AN AFFILIATE OF A NATIONAL BANK
Report as of December 20, 1963, of St. Joe Paper Company, Port
St. Joe, Florida, which is affiliated with Florida National Bank at Port
St. Joe, Port St. Joe, Florida, Charter number 14902, Federal Reserve
district number 6.
Kind of business of this affiliate: Manufacturer of paper pulp and
containers.
Manner in which above-named organization is affiliated with na-
tional bank, and degree of control: Alfred I. duPont Estate owns con-
trolling stock in both bank and paper company.
Financial relations with bank: Loans to pulpwood dealers secured
by assignment of monies due from paper company -------$188,780.00
I, Walter C. Dodson, President of Florida National Bank at Port
St. Joe do solemnly swear that the above statement is true, to the best
of my knowledge and belief. I declare that it has or will be published in
the manner prescribed by Section 5211, U.S.R.S., (12, U.S.C., sec. 161).
within fifteen days from the date of receipt of the call for report of
condition by the Comptroller of the Currency.
/s/ WALTER C. DODSON
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 2nd day of January, 1964.
/s/ DOROTHY J. GROSSMANN,
Notary Public State of Florida at Large.
My commission expires June 14, 1966.
(SEAL)
REPORT OF AN AFFILIATE OF A NATIONAL BANK
Report as of December 20, 1963, of Florida East Coast Railway
Company, Jacksonville, Florida, which is affiliated with Florida Na-
tional Bank at Port St. Joe, Port St. Joe, Florida, Charter number 14902,
Federal Reserve district number 6.
Kind of business of this affiliate: Railroad.
Manner in which above-named organization is affiliated with na-
tional bank, and degree of control: Majority of Florida East Coast
Railroad common stock owned by St. Joe Paper Company. The A. L
duPont Estate owns controlling stock in both St. Joe Paper Company
and the bank.
Financial relations with bank: Borrowing from affiliated bank in-
cluding acceptance executed by affiliated bank for account of affiliate
and securities sold to affiliated bank under repurchase agreement
$2,812.50
I, Walter C. Dodson, President of Florida National Bank at Port
St. Joe, do solemnly swear that the above statement is true, to the
best of my knowledge and belief. I declare that it has or will be pub-
lished in the manner prescribed by Section 5211, U.S.R.S., (12 U.S.C.,
sec. 161), within fifteen days from the date of receipt of the call for
report of condition by the Comptroller of the Currency.
/s/ WALTER C. DODSON
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 2nd day of January, 1964.
/s/ DOROTHY J. GROSSMAN,
Notary Public, State of Florida at large.
My commission expires June 14, 1966.


I


The filing of a correct and com-
plete income tax return has always
been important, but the installa-
tion of the Automatic Data Pro-
cessing System. by the Internal Re-
venue Service makes it more im-
portant than ever that each appro-
priate line of the return be proper-
ly completed, Mr. Tomlinson said.
Also, where practicable, pread-
dressed forms received by tax-
payers should be used.
Under the Automatic Data Pro-
cessing System the taxpayer's so-
cial -security number is used to
identify his account; therefore, it
is very important that the correct
social security number be used.
When preaddressed forms are used
and there has been a change of
address, a line should be drawn
through the old address and the
new address inserted immediately
above. When preaddressed forms
are not used, it is necessary that
the name and address be legible.
Those taxpayers needing assis-
tance should bring with them to


-- = I r s


F~~L 1~( (SEAL)L


bring the preaddressed from, if
available.


Electric Power

Production Up
Electric power plants in Florida
produced as much electricity dur-
ing the first six months of last year
as during the full year 1956 and
twice as much as during all of 1951
the Florida State Chamber of Com-
merce pointed out in its Weekly
Business Review released yester-
day.
"Total output of all electric
plants in the state came to 12,636,-
751,000 kilowatt-hours through
June of last year, according to of-
ficial reports recently released.
This amounted to a 10 per cent
gain over the first half of 1962
and was well over the national in-
crease of six per cent.
"Manufacturers who produce
their own power accounted for
930,966,000, kilowatt-hours of the
total and other manufacturing
plants bought 2,541,507,000 kilo-
watt-hours. The total of these was
up four per cent during the six
months, the same as the national
increase for the period.
"Use sof electricity by commer-
cial establishments in Florida
moved up 11 per cent and in the
nation, seven per cent. Residential
use in Florida was also up 11 per
cent compared with eight per cent


nationally.
"Fuel used in Florida for the
production of:. electric power
through June last year was made
up of 844,090 short tons of coal
(up 11 per cent); 9,223,341 barrels
of oil (up three per cent) and 46
billion cubic feet of gas (up 18 per
cent) compared with the like per-
iod in 1962."

David C. Gaskin, Jr.

Named Bar Prexy
Recently in Marianna, David C.
Gaskin, local attorney and execu-
tive vice president of the Wewa-
hitchka State Bank, was honored
by being elected president of the
14th Judicial Circuit Bar Associa-
tion of the Florida Bar Association.
About 1954 he served the associa-
tion as secretary-treasurer.
The 14th Judicial embraces a six-
county area: Bay, Gulf, Calhoun,
Washington, Holmes, and Jackson.

Tom Wilkins of Marianna is the
immediate past-president.
Mr. Gaskin is also president of
the Unit Bankers Association of
West Florida, an organization of
independent bankers encompassing
"Northwest Florida. He is also the
chairman of Group one of the Flor-
ida Bankers Association, an assoc-
iation of commercial bankers.
There are eight groups in this as-
sociation, Group one extending
through Northwest Florida.

CLASSIFIED ADS
Midget Investment WU
GIant RetuM .









Fresh Water Fishing
Is improving
TALLAHASSEE-Florida's fresh
water fishermen are already begin-
ning to reap some benefits from
the Fiesh Wtter Fishing Improve-
ment Act of 1983 and may expect
more and better fishing as time
passes and fishing improvement
programs extend, according to A.
D. Aldrich, director, Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission.
The Fishing Iiiprovement Act of
1963 provides for an increase of
one dollar on each resident fishing
license. This dollar is set aside to
be used for improvement of Flor-
ida's iresh water fishing.


In reporting on the progress of
the first six months of the fishing
improvement program Aldrich said
the Commission has approved 23
fish management areas in 12 coun-
ties with 53,821 acres of water now
under intensive management to
produce maximum fishing. Another
47 areas are presently being con-
sidered and under various stages
of management. Ten public boat
ramps and access sites were com-
pleted during the past six months
and over 50 miles of boat trails
have been cut through inaccessible
grass and vegetation.
Established fish management
areas are as follows: Polk County,
Lake Cooper, Lake Julianna, Lake
Mattie, Starr Lake, V-C Christina


NEED A PLUMBER?
CALL BEAMAN
Plumbing Inmtallatlon Repalr
C6ntraot Work A Speolatty
Asogte tfor
Brand Name Plumbing Fixtures
-CALL US FOR FREE ESTIMATE-

tWO EXPERIENCED PLUMBERS TO SSRVE YOU

BEAMAN PLUMBING SERVICE
117 GARRISON AVE. PHONE BAll 71-41
I ,


SEMI-PRECIOUS STONES...(CHALCEDONY) OF
RARE BEAUTY ARE FOUND IN SEVERAL RIVER VALLEYS
IN FLORIDA. THESE LOVELY GEMS BLACK ONYX, CAR-
NELIAN, SARD, SARDONYX AND AGATE- COME FROM
THE TAMPA AND HAWTHORNE GEOLOGIC FORMATIONS
DATING BACK MILLIONS OF YEARS.
IT.,-,


S -, ... Recreation Area and Saddle Creek
Lake Jessimine; Hillsborough Coun-
ty, Pleasant Grove Area; Pinellas
County, Lake Tarpon and Lake
k i Seminole; Alachua County, Orange
Sf Lake, Lake Lochloosa and Lake
1E I Newnan; Dixie County, Governors
I -Hill Lake; Walton County, Juniper
Bay Lake; Santa Rosa County, Bear
4J-tfLake; Broward County, Tigertail
.. .Pits; Sumter County, Lake Pana-
soffkee. Approved but not official
3 aat this time are Blue Cypress
.Lake in Indian River and Lake
---Lowery, Perch Lake, Blue Lake and
AMERICAN SCHOOLS Lake Magnolia in the Canip Bland-
ing area of Clay County.
Train Your Pharmacist to
Use the Medicines of all the Certain Wildlife
World for you! Hunting is Closed
The vital ingredients of your pres-
5 criptions and medicines come from TALLAHASSEE Hunting of
the far corners of all the world deer, turkey and bear closed in
but our pharmacists are trained in most sections of Florida at one-half
American skills and knowledge to hour after sunset January 5. Duck,
help you. goose and coot hunting closed
statewide at sunset January 5.
Smith l Hunting of woodcock closed state-
mtll s s rP armacy wide at sunset January 4. Snipe
hunting closed December 30. Hunt-
U 2 ReIistered Pharmacists on duty ing of quail, squirrel and rabbit
Drive-In Window At Rear will continue until one-half hour
after sunset Sunday, February 23.


-" ;l~ A


PLENTY CYF


The season for hunting deer,
bear and turkey will remain
open in the Third District until
January 12 except in Okaloosa,
Walton, Escambia and Santa
Rosa Counties where the bear
hunting season closed January 1.
No open season on deer in Wash-
jngton and Holmes Counties in
the Third District.
The third and final phase of
dove hunting closes at sunset Sun-
day, January 12.
A special turkey gobbler hunt-
ing season will be held in por-
tions of the Second and Third Dis-
tricts and in Putnam County of
the Fifth District March 28 to Ap-
ril 12, from one-half hour before
sunrise until 12:00 noon each day.
According to A. D. Aldrich, di-
rector, Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission, Florida hunters
have had a good harvest. Aldrich
urges hunters to practice cour-
tesy, safety and good sportsman-
ship during the final days of this
1963-64 hunting season.

More Floridians
Receive Social Security
More than 682,000 men, women
and children in Florida were re-
ceiving Social Security benefit pay-
ments at the end of 1963. These
payments amounted to about 46
million a month, according to John
V. Carey, District Manager for the
Social Security Administration in
Panama City. "This represents an
increase in the number of bene-
ficiaries of about six percent over
the same month last year," he
said.
The Social Security program was
28 years old last August 14. In re-
viewing the growth of the program,
Carey noted that at the close of
1940, the first year in which mon-


*or Health

Vitality

*Beauty


thly payments were made, only THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1964
200,000 people in the nation werel
receiving payMmets. In December Vet Service Officer To Visit problems. This free service in-
1963, over 19 million were on the Veterans of Gulf Conuty who cludes assistance to employers of
Social Security benefit rolls. Ben- n ... veterans under the GI Bill, Vaca-
efit payments in Florida duing need assistance in obtaining bene- tional Training, Subsistence or
1963 amounted to over a half mil- fits under t h e GI Bill, may re- other problems.
lion dollars. ceive guidance from Jim Weant, During his vi sit in this area
Many changes have been made Assistant State Service Officer. Weant may be contacted at the
in the program since its' bekining Weant will visit this area next following places at the time and
in 1937. Then, only workers in week for the purpose of helping on the date specified.
commerce and industry were covy- veterans or their dependents in Port St. Joe, County Service Of-
ered by the program. Nine out of filling claims for Compensation fice, American Legion Post 8:30,
every 10 children and their mother Benefits or solving their insurance 17 Jan. 1964.
can count on monthly benefits .. ,,
when the family breadwinner dies.
Nearly 90 percent of the people IRST BAPTIST CHURCH
reaching 65 in 1963 were eligible BI
for benefits.
The basic idea of the Social Se- Corner Third St. and Baltzel Ave. C. Byren Smith. Pauhr
curity law is a simple one, Carey SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 am.
said. During working years em-
ployers, and self-employed people MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
pay Social Security taxes which go BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ____ 6:45 p.m.
into special funds. When earnings EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m.
stop because the worker has rctir- PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) 7:30 p.m.
ed, or died, or is disabled, pay-
ments are made from the funds to "Come and Worship God With Us"
replace part of the earnings the
family has lost. Of course, employ-
ers must report the earnings of any
and all employees and self-employ-
ed people must pay the self-em-
ment tax if rights to benefits are
to exist.
"Many people have only a hazzy
idea of what to expect from Social RADIO and TV R PAIR
Security at death, disability, or re- RADIO and TV REPAIR
tirement," said Carey, "and that's AI
why we encburage folks to come Admiral Emerson DuMont
see us and get firsthand informa- d*
tion on this program that means Radio -TV- Stereo Air CoIdifioniS
so much to so many." o e6ENNA SYS-TE S, GOOD US]D TV's $5.00 p
The Social Security office for N NA SYSTE S, GOOD U T s $35.
this area is located at 1135 Harri- SERVICE CALLS $3.00
son Avenue, Panama City, (tele-
phone PO 3-5331). Phone 7-3251 or 7-3911 Day or Nite

FOR SALE DAY or NIGHT
1957 CHEVROLET 317 REID AVENUE
Bel Air, 2-door hardtop (Next Door To Telegraph Offiee)

Phone 2.291 Your Satisfaction Is Our Business -


JHiXf' ONE FOOW .50





.-,; + -





OR A WHOLE HOUSE!
(the clean way)

You'll get no more dirt from your electric heating sys-
tem than you get from your TV set. Just set the thermo-
stat and settle back to warm comfort. You won't even
need to worry about a pilot light. You can heat just one
room at a time with portables, baseboard units, wall
heaters or ceiling heat. Or you can have a year-round
houseful of comfort with a heat pump ... warms in the
winter... cools in the summer. Look into electric heat-
ing for safe, trouble-free home comfort. Remember,
one-bill living is lower in cost-higher in value.


It's good health insurance to let
us deliver all the dairy-fresh products
your family needs. And remember to
toast your own health with a delicious
glass of Borden's milk at least twice
a day!




HARDER' S

Borden Dairy Products
Call 639-4383 Collect Wewahitchka


starts at the

N-A-P-A SIGN
If you drive a car for pleas-
ure, or a truck for business,
look for the NAPA Sign...
see your service-repair shop
BEFORE trouble starts.
He's a professional who
uses NAPA Parts to keep
vehicles of all makes, models
and ages running smoothly.
Parts that bear the NAPA
Seal are of such excellence
that you'll find them where
there's a trained mechanic
competent to use them.
Assure the success of your
trip. Stop and check at tU
NAPAA &o todW I

St. Joe

Auto Parts
311 Williams AvMn


FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION


I OMAAX-PAM A-T W-Wv-oPPJ aCw CWOM


We Also Have Fresh Eggs

OUR OTHER DAIRY PRODUCTS
Mik Buttermilk
Cream Skim Milk
Chocolate Milk Butter
SV and Va Orange Juice


,


;







1 U> K IflA1P u ir


YOU


BY SHOPPING AT MY IGA DISCOUNT FOODLINER ALWAYS OVER 4,000 ITEMS HAVE BEEN DRASTICALLY REDUCED IN PRICE.
YOU CAN SAVF ROM 10 TO 20% ON ALL YOUR FOOD NEEDS EVERY DAY PLUS WEEKLY BONUS BUYS THAT SAVE YOU EVEN MORE
...SHOP TODAY! Where Your Dollars Have More Cents.


Everyday Discount Prices
IGA Whole or Cream Style 303 Cans
GOLDEN CORN----2 cans 33c
Starkist 6/2 Oz. Can
CHUNK TUNA --- can 35c
Dole Crushed No. 2 Can
PINEAPPLE----- can 33c
Dole Sliced No. 2 Can
PINEAPPLE ----can 39c
Large Size
TREND Liquid--- btl. 49c
Active Giant Size
BLUE ALL ------ pkg. 79c
Quart
ALL LIQUID ------- btl. 75c
Quart 4 f 0
HANDY ANDY ---- btl. 69c
Large -
LUX LIQUID ---- btl. 63c
Large
WISK----------pkg. 72c
Penny
DOG FOOD --- tall can 8c
Calo Tall Cans
CAT FOOD---- 2--2cans 29c


U


DISCOUNT DAIRY BUYS
rABLERITE ALL FLAVORS
ICE MILK
TABLERITE AMERICAN or PIMENTO


S


E


PURE With $5.00 Order or More
CANE SUGAR
MAXWELL HOUSE INSTANT YOU SAVE 40c


10 OZ.
JAR


COFFEE
PINK
SALMON


BAMA
MAYONNAISE
LA RUTA
CORNED BEEF


IGA CLING
PEACHES


TALL
CAN


5 LB. BAG
39c

1.19


49c
QUART JAR
39c
12 OZ. CAN
39c


NO. 2 7c
CAN 27c


Frozen Food Sale
Your Choice


IGA 10 Ounce
SPECKLED BUTTERBEANS
IGA 10 Ounce
MIXED VEGETABLES
IGA 10 Ounce
CUT GREEN BEANS
IGA 10 Ounce
BABY LIMA BEANS
IGA 10 Ounce
BUVTTERB MEANS
IGA 10 Ounce
GREEN PEAS
IGA 10 Ounce
PEAS and CARROTS


POT PIES


BEEF, CHICKEN
and TUKKEJ


DISCOUNT PRODUCE VALUES
RED DELICIOUS


HALF 39c


8 OZ. PKG.
CELLO


4 FO


29c

29c


APPLE
NO. 1 IDAHO


S


1 POUND
CELLO BAG
10 LB,
MESH BAG


POTATOES
MEDIUM YELLOW


ONION


S


3LBS.


49c

59c

19c


IGA TABLERITE


SMOKED BREAKFAST
SLICES


SMOKED


HOCKS


TABLERITE CHUCK


ROAST


LB.
48c
LB.
39c
LB.
49c


SMOKED WHOLE

PICNICS

LB. 9C


_____________________- ~ ~ ~ s.~ -.


NO. 1 SLAB SMOKED
BACON


FRESH GROUND
BEEF


38c


3m.99c


BRISKET


STEW BEEF


29c


WOOD'S

FOODLINER


DISCOU


T


The Above Prices Good All Day Wednesday, Thursday
Friday and Saturday, January 8, 9, 10, 11
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


TO


CHEE
PILLSBURY or BALLARD


BISCUITS


MEATS


- .~


^ f:





_-I m- r


-U YO(cAN..


DOUBLE


Grand


I
e


st s saving more ,
t W "ith these
.low,,O pces4


STAMPS
Monday, Tuesday
and Wednesday


F Week T DRAWING SATURDAY, JANUARY11, 3:00 P.M.
^&| RWeek A K f You Must Be Present To Win
of NAMES WILL BE DRAWN UNTIL WE HAVE A WINNER!
A L JACKPOT TOTAL, $100.00 FREE!
FRESH TENDER -
FROZEN FOODS
BEEF I ERfU *L 29ct MORTON'S BEEF, CHICKEN or TUmKEY Limit 5 With $5.00 Order
BEEF LIVERLb 29,C MEAT PIES 15c
Fresh Pork Neck Ends and Pieces Dubuque's Canned
BONES BACON HAMS YELLOWRIPE I CARROTS
POUND POUND 4 Lb. CanBANANAS Oc RADISHES
", 15e 19C $2.98 FRESH FLORIDA DOZ. BELL PEPPERS
FRESH SMALLER ORANGES 39c GREEN ONIONS
SPARE IBS Lb 39 FLORIDA 3 FO Each-
SPARE IBS 39c Grapefruit 19c C
CRISPY STALK
LAMB SALE CELERY 10c
Shoulder LB. Shoulder LB.
CANADIAN L
CHOPS 49c ROAST 39c Rutabagas 7c


FR EE With$1. RC CO LAA
-0


KELLOGG'S Limit With $5.00 Order


CORN FLAKES


CAMPBELL'S TOMATO Limit 3 Cans with $5.00 Order
SOUP
MAXWELL HOUSE Limit 1 With $5.00 Order
COFFEE
JITNEY JUNGLE Tall Cans


Stokely's Tomato 46 Oz. Can
J UICE
Kraft 16 Oz. Jar
FRUIT SALAD


3


can 31c
jar 47 C


TALL
CANS


CAN
5c
LB. BAG
49c

39c


Kraft Italian Style
Spaghetti Dinner
Maxwell House Instant 10
COFFEE


oz. Jar
jar


Package
8 Ounce


LARGE SIZE BOX
TIDE
BAKERITE


SHORTENING


,3


POUND


BALLARD'S


FLOUR


Oak Hill No. 2Y2 Can


" PEACHES
$1.47 Niblet's 12 Oz. Can
SCIOvR N
Noboil Quart Jar
BLEACH
K^^ w Delsey Bathroom 3 Roll Pkg.
.. TISSUE


POUND
BOX


2


4


3 for


- -
CI 50 FREE
GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
I With Coupon and Purchase of
18 Ounce Kraft
Strawberry Preserves I
S5c -- I
I .5 0 FR EE I
,-, I GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
9C I With Coupon and Purchase of
I 4 Pkgs. McKenzie
FROZEN FOOD I
c I 50 FREE
I GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
With Coupon and Purchase of I
23c Half Gallon, Jitney Jungle
ICE CREAM
I .c- I
49c| 25 FREE
GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
11c With Coupon and Purchase of
2 Loaves Ideal
3c Buttermilk Bread
23c-- -


Prize


MILK


~


i: h


97r-


9





- ----------


THESE SPECIALS GOOD WEDNESDAY, JANUARY, 8 THROUGH TUESDAY, JANUARY 14


FRESH FRUIT
ORANGES APPLES TANGERINES
Mix It Up!


3 BAGS




S 3


What A Buy! PIECES OF
BACON


5 LB. PKG.
99c


3 LB. PKG.
Hog Maw 69c
4 LB. PKG.


NECK BONES


DOZ.


St.00


GOOD FLAVOR VINE RIENED

TOMATOES L- 19c
U. S. 1 IRISH

POTATOES 10 LBs. 39c
*f Buy Your Salad Mateialsr Here *
LEAF LETTUCE ESCAROLE ENDIVE
ROMAINE CELERY CARROTS Bunch
RADISHES GREEN ONIONS 10
PLENTY OF GARDEN FRESH
TURNIPS COLLARDS MUSTARD RUTABAGAS


LEAN RED

GROUND BEEF


69c


Homogenized With $5.00 Order


3 LBS. 99c


S W I F T' S


HALF
GALLON 49c


OAK HILL
NO. 2V2 CAN

NO. 2V2 CAN
SUGARY SAM
SWEET

4


Peaches

Potatoe


CANS


89c


'P 'R 0 T E N


Proten U. S. Good
NEW YORK FILLETS
Proten Boneless Defatted
SIRLOIN STEAKS
Proten and U. S. Good
PRIME RIB ROAST
Boneless
ROLLED RIB.ROAST


lb. 89c
lb. 89c

lb. 79c
lb. 98c


Boneless
ROLLED CHUCK ROAST lb. 79c


All Meat
STEW BEEF


5 POUND BAG
WITH $5.00 ORDER


49c


FRESH DAILY DOZEN


DONUT


S


49c


nu Drawing4:15 p.m.
Bonus Dollar Every Friday


First Number Drawn Will Be For
BONUS DOLLAR COUPONS
The Merchants Participating Will Give Several
Several Nice Prizes
INCLUDING 5 TURKEYS
and MERCHANDISE CERTIFICATES
You must be present to win these extra 9 prizes


Apalachee Bay Breaded
Tidbit Shrimp
20 Oz. Pkg.
89c


Make Rich's Your
FEED HEADQUARTERS
Jim Dandy
DOG RATION 25 lbs. $1.99
50 POUND BAG $3.89
Purina
DOG CHOW 25 lbs. $2.59
50 POUND BAG 4.89
SCRATCH FEED 25 lbs. 99c
00 POUND BAG $3.89


LAYER
CRUMBLES


100 bs. $4.39


YOUR TOTAL WILL BE CHEAPER AT RICW'S
Plus One Dozen Ga. Grade 'A' LARGE
EGGS FREE!
With $10.00 Order or More


JUICY ORANGES
SWEET TANGELOS
JUICY TANGERINE


M aFRO
FOOD


)ZEN
SPECIALS


Collards Turnips Mustard Spinach
Cut Okra Squash Butter Beans
6 Boxes $1 00


DOMINO

SUGAR


lb. 69c


Mix 'EmUp!


FRESH FROZEN
STRAWBERRIES 10oz.pkg. 19c
Frozen APPLE, PEACH, COCONUT


Pies


3


FOR $1.00


.-~-- -...--iiil.-.~ I--i~ii~i[i~ry~o ----;iii ~ Y~ I -- --- I


--,_ I I I '' rplr rq ly rr I I I I I---rl


i o II















ONE ONLY
SOFA BED and CHAIR
Nylon cover. Sleeps two. Floor sample, slightly soil-
ed. Both pieces for one low price.
Reg.*1299 Now Only $69.95
ONE ONLY
CLUB CHAIR
Foam seat nylon covers. Beautiful beige color. Don't
miss this bargain.
Reg. %69" Now Only $39.95

ONE CLUB CHAIR
Foam cushi6n, plastic arms and back. Easy to clean.
Plastic arms and back. Beautiful brown fabric.
Reg. $499" Now Only $29.95

TWO PLATFORM ROCKERS
Reg.$19" Now Only $14.95
TWO SWIVEL
OCCASIONAL CLUB CHAIRS
Reg. $89.95 $ 9
YOUR CHOICE FOR ONLY $24.95
ONE DANISH MODERN
CLUB CH AIR
Walnut arm. Foam seat and back. Removeable cover
for easy care. Don't miss this value.
Reg. $3995 Now Only $19.95
10 SWIVEL
PLATFORM ROCKERS
Nylon and plastic covers. Choice of colors.
YOUR CHOICE $29.95


OREA TEST CHAIR and OTTOMAN SALE i~ OUR HISTORY!


GREATEST CHAIR and OTTOMAN SAIE hi OUR HIlSTORY1
EXCITING NEW DANISH MODERN --

CHAIR w OTTOMAN
# W#gfi6df. 91


ONE EARLY AMERICAN
SOFA BED GROUP


Maple frame and arms. Foam seats and back. Con-
sists of sofa and chair, 3 maple tables and 2 beauti-
ful early American lamps.
Reg. 21991 Now Only $169.00

8-PIECE FRENCH PROVINCIAL
DINING ROOM GROUP
In fruit wood. Big spaciuos breakfast china. Large
size table and 6 beautiful chairs. Floor sample.
Slightly damaged
Reg. $39995 Now Only $249.95

ONE 8-PIECE MODERN
DINING ROOM GROUP
In solid oak. Walnut finish table, 6 chairs and
breakfront china.


Reg. $24900


TWO KROEHLER
HIDE-A-BED SLEEPER
With full size foam mattress, foam cushion with
washable long-lasting naugahyde covers. Ideal for
den or extra bedroom. YOUR CHOICE.


Imagine this Deautlful Lounge Chair and Ottoman
in your own home. Exquisitely styled, decorator
designed, deep plush Polyfoam cushioning and your
choice of colors in the smart, Wipe-clean Leather
Grain Vinyl upholstery. It's unbelievable to own
this Set for this Low price but it's True. Versatile
sweeping design can be used in any room, even
on the patio. They are bound to go fast so order
yours today. (Accessories shown not included)


WIPE-CLEAN
'LEATHER GRAIN VINYL
UPHOLSTERY
~ """ : STURDILY MADE FOR BEAUTY,
COMFORT AND SERVICE!
CHOICE OF COLOR S: .'- sPr c.USU.L
Tangerine Turquoise) Mjy, _o mS c'ItI L'
_White Black *wa. .I o nhrt.M
HARDWOOD SEAT FRAMES FOR LONG WEAR


Reg. $2299


long and low.smartly tailored

4 pc. king-size grouping
o sculptured foam backs A. MA IM


,and glued flames
Nqur choice of color


~~U


BUY YOUR LUGGAGE NOW!
20% DISCOUNT
ON ALL LUGGAGE
IN OUR STOCK!
ONE KROEHLER
SOFA and CHAIR
Modern style, beautiful nylon beige co-
vers.
REGULAR $199.00 VALUE
$139.95

3 ODD MAHOGANY
DINING CHAIRS
Slightly damaged
$10.00 Each

DISCOUNT
ON A NUMBER OF ITEMS NOT
LISTED IN THIS ADVERTISEMENT
ONE FRENCH PROVENCIAL
BEDROOM GROUP
By Dixie. Double Dresser and Mirror.
5 drawer chest, double size panel bed
and nite table. A $400.00 value going
for on'.y ..
$289.95

NO OUTSIDE FINANCING
WHEN YOU SHOP AT DANLEY'S
DOUG DAVIS, Manager


,,,MANY ITEMS NOT LISTED

Jumw "lco d A v wc l9m A 0 M 5w w uvR B W B A


D3qkJ~dJL AflKA I E FA.l) JLDJLII L X J *SLN V


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Now Only $199.00


Now Only $169.00


8 BEAUTIFUL LAMPS
Consists of floor and tree lamps
YOUR CHOICE $6.95


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


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Come See


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THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida
THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1964


Buzzett's Drug Store
Drive-In Window Service
Free Parking
317 Williams Ave.


A Service of Your Doctor of Medicine,
Your Local Medical Society and the
Florida Medical Association.
FAT AND FEEDING
Some people appear able to
consume unlimited quantities of
food without becoming obese.
Other people must be careful
about their calories, to avoid
putting on exess weight.
Variations in food utilization
are said to be due to different
degrees of efficiency on the
part of the hormone and en-
zyme systems. .These systems
direct food from the general
pool toward its ultimate fate
where eventually it becomes
body protein, immediate fuel,
excreted waste, or fat.
Students of the subject be-
Xvve these differences in metab-
olic efficiency are genetically
determined. The tendency for
children to follow in the pat-
tern of their parents weight-
wise is borne out by recent
studies. A child has one chance
in ten of becoming obese if
both his parents are of normal
weight, and one chance in two
if one parent is obese. If both
parents are overweight, chances
are very good that he will be
fat.
Food intake in excess of phy-
siologic need is obviously and
logically a cause of overweight.
But the reason for excessive
appetite and the possibilities of
bringing appetite under control
are not so apparent.
Prevention against ov e r-
weight in a child begins with
the mother's cultivation of a
sound and proper attitude to-
ward feeding. In this field, the
physician can have a strong
influence in molding the attitude
of a'new mother toward food.

end The Staf to a triema.


Bowling News.....

COMMERCIAL LEAGUE turned in three identical games of
By Al Jensen 156. But, as the saying goes, there
The first night of bowling fol- has to be one in every crowd, and
lowing the Christmas holidays, the this time there were two, Fead Eth
Commercial League started its sec- ridge and Tom Thornton.
ond half of the bowling season. On Lanes 5 and 6 were used by the
alleys one and two, the Stevedores; Millwrights to drub a helpless Lab-
(the third place team) clashed with, oratory. John McKenzie at 516,
Costin's (the first place team) comn- Peanut McCroan at 478 and Jeff
ing out on the long end, with a Jeffcoat at 465 were high men for
three to one victory. Danny Mad- the Millwrights.
dox's fine series of 544 and Ruel The Laboratory crew bowled
Whitehurst's 529. Jake Koller was somewhat better than in recent
high for Costin's with a 502. War- weeks as all were over 430.
ing Murdock was second with a
488. (Don't worry John, I won't Maintenance handed Meter 'Shop
tell what your series Was). their eighth straight defeat on
Alleys three and four were cov- lanes 7 and 8. John Presnell hit
ered by a very warm team 5, as his first 500 series at a good time.
they took four points from Michi- Daryl Collier, Arch Floyd, Buddy
gan Chemical. Every man on Team Bridges and Marcus Neel were all
5 bowled over his average but Jack over their averages for Mainten-
Myres was the big gun. Michigan ance.
Chemical was suffering a streak of Horace Brown at 468 and Jay
hard luck, however Frank Dennis Bouington at 462 were the best
and Grady Dean didn't give up eas- Meter Shop had to offer. We real-
ily as they both bowled over a 450 ly shouldn't mention the worst they
series, had to offer as it was terrible.
Alleys five and six were occu-
pied by Boyles and Vitro with Vit- Standings W L
ro the victor three to one. How- Pulp Mill 41% 26%
ever high game and series for the Millwrights 36 32
night go to Boyles' Darrell Collier Paper Mill 35 33
whose second game was a 246 and Meter Shop ---------30 38
his series was 582. Fine bowling, Laboratory 25 42
Darrell. Wayne Ward came close
to a triplicate award with a 144,
147, 147 Part Honors
Wayne Ernst was also bowling Honors
close to the award with a 161 and Recent
two 169 games, amounting to a fine
series of 499. However, high hon-
ors for Vitro remain with Billy Joe Mrs. Ed Ramsey, Mrs. Silas Stone,
Richards with a third game of 215 Mrs. Harry H. Saunders, Mrs. Jos-
to make a series of 520. eph Dowd and Mrs. Herbert Brown
Team Standings W L were hostesses at a tea in the home
Costin's 38 17 of Mrs. Ramsey on Constitution
Vitro 31 25 Drive, honoring Miss Ann Miller.
Stevedores 29 27 The home was beautifully dec-
Team 5 29 27 orated for the occasion. The dining
Michigan Chemical -- 22 34 table was overlaid with a white li-
Boyles 19 37 nen and lace cloth, centered with
_an arrangement of American beau-


INDUSTRIAL LEAGUE
Tuesday evening's matches saw
Pulp Mill slap Paper Mill for three
points. The Millwrights handed the
Laboratory three defeats and Main-
tenance conquered the Meter Shop
for a sweep.
Joe Davis set the pace for Pulp
Mill with a 558 series. Joe received
ample support from his mates as
all were over their averages.
Lee Taylor was the big gun for
Paper Mill at 536. Bill Whaley held
up his end of the load with a 516
series. Even Yank Zimmerman did
a good job for Paper, when he


ty roses.
Miss Mary Dell Ramsey kept the
bride's book.
Miss Miller wore a gray wool
embroidered with white with black
accessories. The bride-elect and
her mother, Mrs. J. Lamar Miller,
wore corsages of American beau-
ty roses given them by the host-
esses.
Dainty sandwiches and cakes
with coffee were served to the
many guests who called during the
afternoon.
The hostesses presented the hon.
oree with a silver and crystal
epergne as a gift.


NATURAL GAS


NOW


AVAILABLE


Honored With

Christmas Party
Mr. and Mrs. John Robert Smith
and Edward Smith were hosts at
their home on Garrison Avenue on
Monday, December 23, at a Christ-
mas party honoring Miss Anne Mil-
ler and Hume Coleman.
Traditional green- and red ex-
pressed with Florida holly, pine,
poinsettias and numerous Christ-
mas candles carried out the Christ-
mas motif.
Miss Dianne Hannon and Miss
Kathleen Dowd assisted in serving.
Miss Miller wore a stunning
white brocade sheath that enhanc-
ed her petite beauty.
Other guests were the Misses
Brenda and Betty Ward, Elizabeth
Anne Brown, Dianne Lay, Katrina
Ferris, Messers Dick Scybert, Billy
Mills, Chesley Fensom, John Miller,
Joe Whaley, Jackie Mitchell, Mr.
and Mrs. Alex Gaillard, Mr. and
Mrs. Walter Wilder and Mr. and
Mrs. Jimmie Fuller.

City Cage Standings
Below are the standings for the
city adult basketball league.
Team W L
Wewa Bank ----- 10 0
Glidden Company ------5 5
Florida Nat. Bank -------5 5
Raffield Fisheries ------ 3 7


Visitors of Ayers
During the Christmas holidays
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ayers of Bay
View Drive had their children as
their guests, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Ay-
ers and daughter, Heather of Al-
buquerque, New Mexico and Mr.
and Mrs. Bob Baine and children,
Mike, Kay, Jo Anne, Renee and
Pam of Tallahassee.


Race Track

Funds Increase
TALLAHASSEE State Comp-
troller Ray E. Green said this week
checks for $14,000 from the race
track tax fund will be mailed this
week to each of the 67 counties.
The comptroller said the pay-
ment topped last year's for the
same period by $500. The total pay-
ment to each county thus far this
fiscal year is $60,000, an increase
of $7,000 over last year.


Sharpening I
"Anything that cuts"
Shears Lawn Mowers
Saws Knives Scissors
Ray L. Brant
1805 Garrison Ave.
Phone 227-7091


TELEVISION
- Black & White and Color

Stereo Air Conditioning

Service Coal, $3.00
All work guaranteed

ST. JOE RADIO
& TV COMPANY
Phone 227-401


STATEMENT


Holiday Apple Flan
Half Pie, Half Cake! Delicioust









S -MO .'.


It emerges puffing apple fragrance, the crowded apple slices
juicy and firm and buttery, with a hint of brandy flavor ... the
batter itself hugging the slices.
1 V4 cups milk 2/ /cup sifted flour
23 cup sugar 21/z cups canned apple slices
3 eggs a n 4 teaspoon brandy flavoring
3 tes 2 tablespoons butter or

1 teaspoon vanilla margarine
%4 teaspoon salt Mincemeat Sauce *
Combine milk, % cup sugar, eggs, vanilla, % teaspoon salt
and flour; beat until very smooth and creamy. Spread about
cup batter in a greased shallow 2 quart baking dish, or
a 9" greased deep pie plate. Place in a moderate oven, 350
degrees, about 6 or 7 minutes, or until the thin layer of batter
begins to set. Remove pan from oven and spread apple slices
over batter layer; sprinkle the apples with the remaining 1
cup sugar and % teaspoon salt. Sprinkle with brandy flavoring
and dot with butter or margarine. Pour the remaining batter
over apples and return pan to oven. Bake about 50 minutes,
or until browned and slightly puffed. Serve with Mincemeat
Sauce. If desired, garnish with citron and almonds. Makes 6
servings.
MINCEMEAT SAUCE
In a saucepan combine 1 cup prepared mincemeat, % cup
apple juice and z teaspoon grated lemon rind. Cook and stir
over moderate heat 5 minutes. Blend togethd- 2 tablespoons
water, 1 tablespoon sugar and % teaspoon cornstarch; stir
into mincemeat mixture. Simmer a minute or two, until sauce
clears and thickens slightly. Serve hot. Makes 2 cups.


of CONDITION


THROUGHOUT THE CITY of PORT ST. JOE,

All homeowners and renters who desire to

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF FREE CONVERSION
and who have gas appliances burning ILP gas must do so by contacting
our office to

Make Application 'Before January 10, 1964

since our contractor will discontinue running service lines on that date
This service is now paid for by the Company at an average
cost per house of approximately $75.00.




Only Two Days Left



For Free Conversion


After January 10th, those desiring NATURAL GAS SERVICE
will have to pay for conversion cost
at the standard rate applicable to other cities in Florida

CALL OUR REPRESENTATIVE AT 229-3831

To Apply for Natural Gas Service



St. Joe Natural Gas Co.


State, County, Municipal Bonds
of Florida --.. --..........----...........

Cash on hand and due
from banks


Loans and Discounts

Banking House

Furniture, fixtures and equipment --..........-...

Corporate Stocks

Other Assets


TOTAL ASSETS $4,
OFFICERS and DIRECTORS
WALTER C. DODSON
President
H. H. SAUNDERS
Vice-President
J. TED CANNON
Cashier
GROVER L. HOLLAND
Assistant Cashier


S. L. BARKE
J. C. BELIN
T. S. COLDEWEY
WALTER C. DODSON'
A. L. HARGRAVES
R. H. McINTOSH
J. LAMAR MILLER
H. H. SAUNDERS
Directors

MEMBER: FEDERAL DE


732,908.04


662,967.97


1,686,943.07

72,681.49

17,282.63

13,500.00

31,964.36


Liabilities


Capital $200,000.00

Surplus 250,000.00

Undivided profits 70,242.15

Reserves 52,689.91


Other Liabilities


572,932.06


84,906.30

4,337,923.09


TOTAL LIABILITIES $4,995,761.45


POSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION


MEMBER: FLORIDA NATIONAL GROUP of BANKS


of the


FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK



at Port St. Joe

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


At the Close of Business, December 20, 1963


Assets


U. S. Government Bonds ----.......... $1,777,513.89





l


114 Monument Avenue