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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01469
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 2, 1964
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01469

Full Text






lOc

PER COPY


THE STAR

"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahooches Valley"


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA,


Auto Tags Go On



Sale January 2

Gulf County Tax Collector Har- *
land Pridgeon stated Wednesday
morning that 1964 vehicle tags riv
would go on sale at his office on New Driver Laws
January 2 at 9:00 a.m. The new '
tags will sport blue numerals on TALLAHASSEE New and ce F
an orange background 'and will be tougher driving laws face Florida
valid until March 20, 1965. motorists January 1.
Auto tags will be on sale in Major Karl Adams, deputy in-
Port St. Joe at the office of the spector of the Florida Highway
Frank and Dot Insurance Ag- Patrol,. says the regulations will
ency on Reid Avenue, be enforced gradually. At the be- .;4W
Mr. Pridgeon said that prices on ginning, drivers will be warned and
all tags were raised by the 1963 told of the changes in the laws.
Legislature but will be honored Perhaps the stiffest of the chan- "
for an additional month. ges makes it a felony-a crime pun- 4 '-
Tags for motor bikes and scoot- ishable by a heavy fine or impris- .-. ,. C
ers will cost $11.33; "D" tags onment in the state penitentiary-
$14.04; plain tags $22.17; "W" tags to leave the scene of an accident
$30.29; "WW" tags $38.42. These that caused an injury. o i
prices include the tax collector's Under the old law, it was a mis-
fee. demeanor. Members of the First Meth
Series "G" truck tags will cost A long-needed rule, and one that St. Joe, broke ground in a
$2.50 more than they did this year, many people will be caught violat- Port St. Joe, b roke ground in a
plus 1/12th to take care of the ing, requires driver to dim their Sunday morning after churcilh sending.
additional month of use. Series headlights as they approach an- $100000.00 educationaling will be built by the E. F. Guiding.
"GH" tags will jump $5 plus 1/12; other car from the rear. ing will be built by the E. F. Gu
"GK" tags up $7.50 plus 1/12, and This provision was added to the The now educational facility
"CV" tags an additional $10 plus requirement for dimming head-
1/12. lights for oncoming traffic. Includ-
Tags for house trailers will sell ed was a ban on headlights of any Regional Film libra
for $16.75 and small utility or boat color except white. If yellow fog- io a ill i i
trailers will cost $5.92. -lights are used, white headlights Sc o.l s. .
Other trailer tags will be advane- also must be on. CoUnty S hoo ls.
ed in price as follows: 'BB" ser- Drivers in the habit of turning
ies up $2.50 plus 1/12; "B" series off the pavement to get around A regional film library in
up $2.50 plus 1/12; "L", "N" and other traffic, such as cars waiting Blountstown serving Calhoun,
"O" trailer tags advanced $10 each to turn left, will find this againstFranklin, Gulf and Liberty Coun.
plus 1/12. .the law. It also will be unlawful r n th we
"E" tai tags winll st ties-is receiving this week 40
Series "E" or taxi tags will cost to remove or drive around a de- is-i recein thi e
$12.50 more than this year plus tour sign or barricade films on permanent loan from the
1/12. Wrecker and ambulance tags Another new rule likely to Florida Institute for Continuing
will cost $33 and dealer tags $14.04. catch unwary drivers makes it il- University Studies (FICUS).
Segal to use turn blinkers to signal The films are for use in public
danger, or breakdown schools throughout the four-county
endanger, or breakdown. area under the direction of How-
M rs. G. nIas. ard Johnson, general supervisor of
instruction for Calhoun County
Succumhs-SaturdayFluorescent Caps, Schools. The regional-film library
is one of 12 in Florida.
Mrs. Margaret.E.. Thiomas 48, V StS Make The films were especially cho-
died Saturday, December 28 at her sen for the library in this region
home on 16th Street, following a frat a recent meeting in Gainesville
lengthy illness. Safer l Hn tin when representatives from the 12
Funeral services were held at The safest hunters in the woods areas took turns selecting titles
2:00 p.m. Monday at the St. James from the list of 672 films which
Episcopal Church with the Rev. during the current hunting season FICUS made available to them.
Harry L. Babbit officiating. Burial will wear fluorescent-orange caps The films were from a collection
was in Holly Hill Cemetery. and vests, not the traditional red' purchased over a period of years
Vestrymen of St. James Church the Florida Optometric Association by the old General Extension Divi-
served as pallbearers. has reported. sion of Florida, forerunner of FI-
She is.survived by her husband, The optometric association dis- CUS, when part of its function was
Gordon Thomas, one son, Charles closed that an exhaustive research to supply schools with audio-visual
Thomas, both of Port St. Joe; two study reveals "blaze orange" to be materials for instruction.
brothers, Frank LeHardy of Port thr color most easily seen by per Dr. Myron Blee, director of FI-
St. Joe and Julids LeHardy, Knox- sons with normal or deficient vi- CUS, made the films available to
ville, Tenn.; one sister, Mrs. C. H, sion and the color which stands out the regional libraries as a means of
Metz of San Antonio, Texas. best under all conditions "in the accomplishing this service on a lo-
Comforter Funeral Home was in world of nature." cal level while FICUS concentrat-
charge of arrangements. FOA points out that 8-9 percent ed on its primary role of taking
of all men have defective color vi- advanced undergraduate and grad-
sion and to these persons-includ- uate level instruction from the
1 -. I '* l I I ing *n estimated one million hunt- ... ; ... ..


LOST KNes tneia or

Mrs. Askenasy
Graveside services were held at
Holly Hill Cemetery Monday: af.
ternoon at 4:30 p.m. for Mrs. Alyte
Askenasy, age 47. Services were
conducted by Father Paul Hogarty
pastor of St. Joseph's Catholic
Church.
Mrs. Askenasy died suddenly at
her home at Beacon Hill Sunday


ers-"red is as drab as the fall centers throughout Florida.
landscape" and consequently dan- Development of the local film
gerour to the wearer. libraries came about largely thru
Next to blaze orange, the best the efforts of James E. Harbin,
colors are neon red, fire orange consultant on audio-visual educa-
and are yellow, all fluorescents. tion for the State Department of
Education. He also assisted the re-
afternoon. gional film libraries in obtaining
Survivors include two son s, funds through the National De-
Frank and Shepard Gonzalez and fense Education Act for the pur-
one daughter, Theresa. chase of films in the areas of
Comforter Funeral Home was in science, mathematics and modern
charge of arrangements. foreign languages.


A hardy and ,energetic group of Port St.
Joe youngsters bWaved the cold Monday and
Tuesday of last week to go Christmas caroling.


The group made their way about the city in a
mule drawn wagon and a truck. The group was
led about town by Deputy Sheriff Jim Barfield.


ist

ists Break


odist Church of
short ceremony,
rvices on a new
The new build-
nn Construction
y will be built


on property
church auditor
Pictured a
bers and 'office
Holding the s
Jones, Jr., son
dist Sunday Si


ry Will Serve Gulf

. Located In Calhoun


Foresters To

Meet In Jax
The Society of American Forest-
ers' southeastern section will hold
its annual meeting January 9 and
10 at the Robert Meyer Hotel in
Jacksonville.
"Utilizing Timber Resources" is
the theme of the two day session.
with foresters, industrialists, and
land managers from Georgia, A'a-
bama and Florida attending.
Some of the nation's top talent
in the wood and wood products
field -will take part on the SAF
program, including:
T. A. Hewson, Assistant Vice
President, Technology, St. Regis
Paper Company, West Nyack, N.
Y., with the program topic "New
Uses for Pulp and Paper"; Irwin
A. Pearl, Chief, Lighnin Chemistry
Group, Institute of Paper Chemis-
try, Appleton, Wisconsin, with rhe
topic "New Uses for Wood By-
products, Silvichemicals":
R. V. Lawrence, Chief, Naval
Stores Laboratory, U. S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture, Olustee, Flor-
ida, with topic "New Uses for Na-
val Stores;" Alan A. Marra, Pro-
fessor of Wood Utilization, Univer-
sity of Michigan, Ann Arbor,
"Trends in Wood Utilization":
Donald L. Fassnacht, Chief, For-
est Utilization Service, Southern
Forest Experiment Station, New
Orleans, "Southern Pine Plywood
Development;" Clarence E. Miller,
Manager, Woodlands Sales, The
Buckeye Cellulose Corporation, Fo-
ley, Fla., "Utilization of Hardwoods
in North Florida;" and W. B. Say-
ers, Director of Research, Ameri-
can Forest Products Industries,
Washington, D. C., "A Look Ahead:
National Wood Requirements."
The SAF southeastern section,
an affiliate of the national Society


TWCMTY'r.EVMTM YEAR


Enjoy Party
The second annual Christmas
party of the Golden Agers was held
in the gaily decorated home of Mr.
and Mrs. Thomas Moon at White
City. The Christmas theme was
carried out throughout the rooms
as prepared by the hosts.
No program had been prepared,
but all enjoyed opening and dis-
playing the many unique and use-
ful gifts exchanged. Also much ex-
citement was created when the
identy of the Secret Pals was learn-
ed, who had been sending the
group cards and gifts during the
past year.
The hostess served home-baked
fruit cake ,toasted nuts, mints and
coffee.


Mill Schedules

Shut Down


The Gulf County Commission
Chairman, A. J, Strickland, has
announced that the Board will
meet next Tuesday morning at
9:00 a.m., CST.
The Board is regularly schedul-
ed to meet on the second Tues-
day of the month, but the meet-
ing has been advanced by one
week.
One of the probable orders of
business will be the notification
of citizens who have had their
names removed from the list of
eligible signers to a petition re-
questing an election to decide
whether or not to move the
county seat.
On Friday, December 20, Judge
Robert McCrary ordered the
Board to meet and notify these
people and set up a public hear-
ing at which they might object
to the removal of their names.


Harthern To Speak

At Special Service
Rev. Charles Harthern will hold
special services at the Pentecostal
Holiness Church on Garrison Ave-
nue Wednesday night of next week
it was announced Tuesday by the
pastor, Rev. Charles Carter.
Harthern, former pastor of the
Oak Grove Assembly of God Church
is now doing evangelistic work
throughout the Southeast.
The services will be on missions
and the program is open to the
public.
In addition to Harthern's mes-
sage, the program will include spe-
cial music by the church trio and
quartet.


Great White Hunters!


T. S. Coldewey announced yes-


of American Foresters, has a mem- terday that the St. Joe Paper com-
bership of 1,500. pany mill will go down Friday'
for not more than a two week per-
iod.
B I R T H S Coldewey said the shut-down was,
brought about by a slack in orders
Mr. and Mrs. George Miller Hun- and a need to do some mainten-
ter, Jr., 336 Park Ave., Highland ance.
View, announce the birth of a son, Coldewey said that there is a
George Miller, Il on December 21. possibility the mill will not remain
Mr. and Mrs .Melvin Douglas We- down for the two full weeks and
ber, Sr., of Apalachicola announce that further announcement will be
the birth of a son, Melvin, Jr., on made on the start-up date.
December 24.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dean Baker
of Wewahitchka announce the High School Hunter
birth of a baby girl, Cynthia Lynn
on December 22. BagS Turkey Saturday


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Thomas Bell
of Apalachicola announce the
birth of a daughter, Alesia Ann on
December 19.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Preston
Rhames announce the birth of a
baby girl, Cynthia Annette on De-
cember 23.
(All births occurred at the Port
St. Joe Municipal Hospital.)


Jimmy Lester, 15 year old son of
Mr. and Mrs. James Lester of 9th
Street bagged a 9%4 pound turkey
Saturday afternoon.
The young man was hunting
West of Wewahitchka when he
killed the bird,

Send The Sta to a frie d


Pictured above are Tommy Pridgeon and Blair Shuford along
with two deer they bagged on a hunting trip recently. The deer are
not extra big or anything of course there are two bagged in
one trip but Tommy has been doing so much bragging lately
he thought some pictorial proof would be nice.


__ ~______


MONEY TALKS-Le4. keep
It where we can speak witth It
once In a while-Trade with
your home t-ow merhenatt


lvwcmlT-a__mm __"


j


THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1964 NUMBER 16



... Small Fires Keep



Firemen On Move

i I Beginning Christmas Eve, the the home of Ernest Lowery, 519
9 SPort St. Joe Volunteer Fire Depart- Fourth Street. Fire was between
ment has had a busy holiday week the outside and inner walls next to
A, of action.
of action, the chimney when firemen arrived
Christmas Eve night at 7:00 p.m.
an apparently faulty chimney to a on the scene.
fireplace called the department to Damage was confined to the
chimney area of the dwelling.
Again on Christmas Eve at 9:00
frld Keels p.m., a duplex house on Avenue
Harold K s C burned to the ground.
I, tcIlI dB The home was occupied by the
S rilca y ln|Ure families of Martha Ward and a
l i A x 111 IPreacher Jennings. The house was
i Auto Wreck owned by Raymond Driesbach.
In Auto Wreck owob
This fire was discovered by fire-
Harold Keels, 19 year old son of man L. E. Thursday, who had gone
Mr. and Mrs. Grady Keels received to the area to pick up a baby sitter.
a serious leg injury in an automo- His attempts to sound the alarm
bile accident Saturday afternoon was unsuccessful, as something had
G ro u n d 14 miles South of Blountstown on happened to the fire warning si-
Highway 71. ren and it wouldn't blow. Thursday
immediately behind the present According to State Trooper Bur- then came back to the fire sta-
rium. deshaw of Blountstown, Keels was tion to get the fire truck, and
bove are part of the church mem- driving toward Port St. Joe at ap- sounded several long blasts on the
ers taking part in the ceremonies, proximately 1:00 p.m., when he truck siren before heading for the
shovel full of dirt is A. Morgan apparently went to sleep at the fire. Several of the local firemen
of the founder of the first Metho- wheel. Keels' car hit a concrete heard the truck siren and answered
school in Port St. Joe. culvert and bounced into a tree, the alarm.
knocking the tree over. Keels was Delay in getting the alarm sound-
p* n trapped in his car when his leg ed was also instrumental in two
Kiwanis Appoint was caught between the dast and adjoining dwellings catching fire,
floor boards. but they were extinguished before
Committee Heads Keels had to be cut out of the much damage could result
wreck. Sunday morning, at 9:20 a.m,
The Kiwanis Club, in its regular Keels was taken to the Calhoun the Department was called to ac-
meeting Tuesday, conducted a bus- County General Hospital and then tion by a blaze in the home of Mr.
iness meeting in preparation for transferred to a Tallahassee Hos- and Mrs. Silas R. Stone on 16th
the coming n year. pital. According to Burdeshaw, Street. A bed in the home was
tKeels right leg was severed below burning when the department ar-
President-elect Terry Hinote an- the knee, except for a flap of skin rived on the scene. Damage was
nounced his committee appoint- holding the leg together. It was mostly confined to smoke and wa-
ments for the year and presented fractured in three places. Keels ter damage.
them with a brochure outlining also received several cuts and Sunday was fire day in Port St.
their duties for the coming year. abrasions. Joe. The department received three
It was announced by out-going It was still undecided by doctors more calls before the end of the
president, George Anchorshat IA.at press time Tuesday afternoon day.
Governor Earl Sellers woul.-install whether or not Keels' leg could be At 3:25 p.m. a grass fire in the
the new officer slate at the regular saved. Some circulation had ban -Srea of 20th Street on Leng Ave-
meeting of the club next Tuesday restored, but the fate of the mem- nue brought out the fire fighters.
meeting,of the club next esay. ber was still in doubt. Again at 8:40 p.m., a grass fire
Guests of the club Tuesday were in Highland View sounded the
Don Mulholland and Cliff Fowler, alarm.
both of Panama City. County Board To1 At 10:30 p.m., the department
Closed out its day of activity by
d answering an alarm caused by an
Golden A ers Meet Tuesday automobile burning in Highland
Golden Agers View.


~s~n~8~









THE STAR, Port t. Joe, Pla.


THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1964


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING *


FOR RENT: Unfurnished 2 bed- FOR RENT: Furnished apartment
room apart. Phone 227-7761. tfc 1506 Long Ave. Downstairs. Cal
227-5426. John Scott tfc-11-14


FOR RENT: House with business
space attached, furnished or un-
furnished. Ph. 229-1361. tfc-9-19
FOR RENT: Two bedroom house.
corner Tenth Street and long
Avenue. Call Mrs. Nora Duren.
Phone 227-5471. tfc-6-13
FOR RENT: Trailer space in Oak
Grove. Sewer and water. $14.00
month. Puione L. C. Davis, 227-7059.


FOR RENT: Two bedroom house.
Palm Blvd. Call Cecil G. Costin,
Jr., 227-4311 tfc-11-21
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom unfurnish-
ed apartment. 619 Woodward
Avenue. $35.00 per mo. Call Gene
Halley, Tallahassee, Florida. Phone
224-9180 or 385-3139. tfc-11-21
FOR RENT OR SALE: Furnished 2
bedroom brick home and small


Terms. C. W. Long, 137' Iunter
Circle. Phone 227-4686. tfc-12-5
FOR SALE: Stucco house situated
on 90'x150' lot. Near Elementary
School. 3 bedrooms. Hardwood
floors. House insulated. Chain 1int
fence around back yard. Reasonably
priced. Call Will Ramsey 7-3161
day or 7-3646 night.
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom nice mod-
ern home with 2 porches, nice
carport, 200 foot front on Highway
71, White City. Call 229-1134. tfc
FOR SALE: 4 bedroom, 2 bath, liv-
ing room with fireplace, dining
room, kitchen with large breakfast
room, utility room, venetian blinds,
gas tank. One block from school.
506 8th Street. Call SUnset 5-8157,
Panama City.


FOR RENT: Nice furnished apart, apartment, 1301 Long Ave., $11,000uuu FOR SALE 1962 Ducati 98cc mo-
ment for couple only at 1621 Phone 648-4128. Mira. FOR SALE: 1962 Ducati 98e mo-
Monument Ave. Phone 227-7641. tf FOR RENT: At Highland View. Un- phone 227-5271. tfc-12-24
FOR RENT: Two one bedroom cot- furnished 3 bedroom and 2 bed- ,
tages, furnished on 9th Also room house, each has modern SALESMAN WANTED for Port St.
2 bedroom unfurnishe.' apt. Call plumbing. $35.00 mo. each. Phone Joe area. Age 24 to 40, Married,
227-5111 or call by Smith's Phar- 227-3983 or phone Greenhead No. high school graduate. Large nation-
macy. t 3 (2 long rings) on Highway 77. 4p al company with established terri-
S- tory. Contact Mr. Foreman at SU
FCR RENT: 2 bedroom furnished FOR RENT: Unfurnished large two 5-5721 or write to 850 N. Magnolia
apartments 522 Third Street. bedroom house with large car- Ave., Panama City. $91.00 week
$45.00. Water furnished. Call 227- port. Piped with natural gas. Lo- training salary. 2tc-12-24
8642. tfc-11-14 cated at 908 Woodward Ave. $45.00
82 per month or call 227-3081. 2tp WANTED AT ONCE: Rawleigh
FOR RENT: Spacious 2 bedroom Dealer in Gulf Co., or Port St.
furnished apartment. Phone 229- FOR SALE: 2 bedroom house, $9,- Joe. Write Rawleigh, Dept., FAK
4261 between 9-6 p.m. or 648-4600 800.00. Terms. 2 bedroom house 100-3, Memphis, Tenn. 11-21-1-9
after 6. tfc-11-14 at St. Joe Beach. Terms. 3 bedroom
house, pool, chain link fence. FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house. Lo.


cated on 2 corner lots. Ideal lo- isfactory service. If you're planning
cation for schools, Well landscaped. to move why not call your local
Located 301 16th St. Call 648-4735. Mayflower agents, SURPLU S
SALES of ST. JOE, Today. Just
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom house ov Phone 227-2011. Across from the
Marvin Ave. (high side). Well es Post Office.
ftbhlish d lawn dndi chuh l Has


well. Approx. 1350 sq. ft. Lot 751
150. Inquire 227-7006 after 3:00 pm
HELP WANTED: Middle age lady
preferred. Companion for aged
lady, to live in. Good pay and liv-
ing conditions. Contact Jake Mou-
chette at St. Joe Motel. Phone 229-
9991. tfc-1-2

MOTEL TRAINING: Learn to man-
age motel, at home, in spare
time. Men, women and couples over
25, Placement service. Low cost.
Write: National Motel Training,
Inc., P. 0. Box 71, Oak Park, Ill. 3
SEPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call
Buford Griffin, Phone 227-7011
for quick expert service. tic
WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION, meet-
ing second and fourth Tuesday
nights, 8:00 p.m. American Legion
Home.
IT'S EASY AND SAFE TO MOVE
THE MAYFLOWER WAYI
Aero Mayflower Transit Company
places a complete nation-wide long-
distance moving service at your
command! Whether you. move is
a few hundred miles or thousands,
the Mayflower System assures sat-


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Meet
every Wednesday night, 8 p.mn.
it Parish House, 309% 6th St. Port
St. Joe, Fla. Phone 229-3364 for
La iher information or write P. 0.
Eux 535.
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0.
0. F.-Meets second and fourth
Thursday, 8:00 p.m. in American
Legion Hall. All members urged to
attend.
Noble Grand aEmmett Dantel)
Secretary: J. C. Martin.
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No .111, F. & A. M., every first
and third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.


N. G. MARTIN, W. M.
H. L. BURGE, Secretary
R. A. M.-Regular convocation ui
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A
M, 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit
ing companions welcome.
Edgar L. Smith, High Priest
Roy L. Burch, Secretary
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S
COURT, GULF COUNTY,


Roses and Wives,-Both Take Lots of

Loving Care for Best Results
By HERVEY SHARPE, Editor ity and diseases.
Florida Agricultural Extension Except for the most dedicated
Service hobbyist, the modern hybrid roses
ar- the hardest to grow.


Growing roses is like keeping
your wife-mate happy-there are
many thorny problems involved.
However, both are prestige pro-
jects. If you excel you can display
both of these beauties with pride.
Solve your domestic problems
first, because you can't buy tran-
quility but you can buy roses.
You may purchase rose bushes
in three forms. These are bare
roots, in contaniers or burlap wrap-
ped. The latter is called infant
style because of the triangle burlap
and damp bottom.
For the procrastinator, container-
grown roses can be planted later,
but will cost a fancy price.
Varieties to plant can be a prob-
lem. Old-fashioned favorites have
advantages over the newcomers.
These include such roses as Louis
Phillippe, Minnie Francis, Marie
Van Houtte and Safrano. Often
they thrive where the modern hy-
brids succumb to the deep South's
tropical temperatures, high humid-


Site
Plant roses for cut flowers in a
separate cutting garden, because
they're far from handsome if prun-
.ed properly, covered most of the
time with protective fungicides and
stripped of flower buds daily.
Select a site in a sunny location.
In the event the bed is located near
large plants, protect the rose
bushes from marauding roots with
a sheet of metal roofing buried ver-
tically along the side of the bed.
Prepare the planting gsite prior
to securing the rose bushes. If the
soil is loose, light and sandy, re-
move it to p depth of 15 inches and
replace with compost of rotted
laeves, manure and rich hammock
soil. For best growth, be sure the
replaced material is quite acid.
Many sandy soils in south Florida
contain too much lime for the best
rose production ,say University of
Florida rose specialists.


FLORIDA. IN PROBATE. Choose an overcast day for plant-
IN RE: Estate of ing. First check the plant carefully
VARNIE MARTIN, and cut back the bush to four or
Deceased. five eyes. Trim off all broken
NOTICE TO CREDITORS roots.
All creditors or the estate of "
Varnie Maritn, deceased, are here- Be sure the planting holes are
by notified and required to file any large enough to accommodate the
claims or demands which they may roots without crowding. In the bot-
have against said estate in the of-
fice of the County Judge of Gulf tom of each hole drop a handful
County, Florida, in the Courthouse of garden fertilizer and cover light-
at Wewahitchka, Florida, within ly with top soil. Dip the roots of
six (6) calendar months from the each plant in a bucket of water
date of the first publication of this
notice. Each claim or demand just before planting. Insert the
must be in writing and must state new bush so that the root system
the place of residence and post of- will stand at the same level that
fice address of the claimant and it stood in the nursery row.
must be sworn to by the claimant,
his agent, or his attorney, or it With a slow stream of water
will become void according to law. from a hose, work the soil about
/s/ BEATRICE WILSON the roots, filling the hole to the
Executrix of the Estate
of Varnie Martin, deceased ground level. Pack firmly and put
CECIL G. COSTIN, JR. a saucer of earth about the plant
221 Reid Avenue to hold water.
Port St. Joe, Florida 4t-12-19 When the rose bushes begin to
Attorney for Executrix
lAttorney forout, keep an eye out for di-

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT seases such as black spot, brown
OF THE FOURTEENTH JU- canker, and powdery mildew. In-
DICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR- sect pests that may harm the bush-
IDA, IN AND FOR GULF es will include aphids, thrips,
COUNTY. IN CHANCERY.
JOAN PARRISH HALPIN, pumpkin bugs, cottony-cushion
Plaintiff, scale and red spider mites.
-vs- For a4ditibna! information ask
JAMES HALPIN, your county agricultural agent for
Defendant.
NOTICE TO JAMES HALPIN, -Extension Service Bulletin 180,
whose last known address is 2056 "Roses in Florida".
Briggs Avenue, Bronx, New York: -
On or before the 3rd day of Feb-


ruary, A. D., 1964, the Defendant,
James Halpin, is required to serve
upon Silas R. Stone, Plaintiff's At-
torney, whose address is 321 Reid
Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida, a
copy of, and file with the Clerk of
this Court the original of, an an-
swer to the Complaint for divorce
filed against him herein.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
said Court at Wewahitchka, Gulf
County, Florida, this the 31st day
of December, A. D., 1963.
GEORGE Y. CORE
Clerk Circuit Court
(SEAL) 4t-1-2


M E E T H


THE STAR

Phone 7-3161


0S I[


and a FLORIDA NATIONAL LOAN
No need to dread the New Year and its deluge pf
holiday and tax bills let a personal loan take
care of them for you! We'll


arrange convenient terms to
suit your budget.

FLORIDA NATIONAL

BANK
Member: FDIC and Fla. Nat. Group


Z
"heck with us.
ff




I or: all your
EEDS


at PORT ST. JOE


.A l


I





II I


THESE SPECIALS GOOD
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 1 thru TUESDAY, JAN. 7


We Wil OPEN All
Be Day


NEW YEARS DA For Your Shopping
Convenience


FRESH FRUIT
ORANGES APPLES TANGERINES
Mix It Up!


BAGS


100


Fresh Crop Florida
TANGELOS
DOZ. 29c


Fresh Crop Florida
TANGERINES
DOZ. 29c


U. S. NO. 1
IRISH

POTATOES
i0 LBS. 2
WITH $5.00 ORDER or MORE


Golden Ripe
SINGLE

Bananas
POUND


0


GA. GRADE 'A' WHOLE


LB.



LB.


U. S. GOOD

Chuck ROAST


5 POUND BOX SMOKED

BACON


PIECES


C


CHOICE FRYER PARTS GRADE 'A'
Breasts and Legs


ALL MEAT
BEEF STEW


398


98c


POUND
39c
POUND
69c


NO. 7- U. S. GOOD
STEA-KS


LB.


$1.49 VALUE SAVE 50c MAXWELL HOUSE INSTANT WITH $5.00 Order


0


GIANT
SIZE
12 OZ.
JAR


DON'T PAY TOO MUCH FOR GERBER'S
BABY FOOD 10 89c


SHOP and COMPARE OUR WIDE VARIETY of FROZEN FOODS!
MORTON'S FROZEN

Peach Pies 29c


FRESH FROZEN 8 OZ. BOX


DEL MONTE 14 OZ. JAR
CATSUP


HOMOGENIZED With $5.00 Order
FRESH MILK


SESSION'S PURE With $5.00


Order


BOTTLE 15


HALF 49c
GALLON


CNO. 10
NO. 10
JAR


STRAWBERRIES


Fresh Frozen Reg. 39c Val. SUHELLED PEAS or
Butter Beans BAG 19c
Big ScoQp With $5.00 Order HALF GALLON
ICE MILK 29c


Jim Dandy 5 LB. BAG
GRITS


29c


19c


YOUR TOTAL WILL BE CHEAPER AT RICH'S
PLUS ONE DOZEN GA. GRADE 'A'
LARGE EGGS

FREE!
WITH $10.00 ORDER OR MORE


I I


I ,, _I


i~s I I


-


I


-- __










THE STAR
Published Every Thursday At 306 Williams Avenue, Pert St. Joa Flet. ,
By Thi Star Publishing Company .
WESLEY R. RAMSEY Editor and Pubwer
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Salesmar, Photographer, Columnlet, Re rtwr '
Reader, Bookkeeper and Complaint Department
DIAL 227-8161 Posrom zG Box 803
Entered as second-class matter, December 19, 1987, at the Postofflee, Port St. Joe
Florida, under Act of March 2, 187l.
SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, $3.00 SIX MONTHS, $1.75 THREE MONTHS, $27J0
TO AOVERTISERS-In case of error or omissionl addertisements, the publaber
do not hold' themselves liable for damage further than amount received for
advertisement.

THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1964


Nudists Have Their Day Before
The U. S. Supreme Court
A Fantasy By Rev. John Doran
Washington, June 4, 1964-The United States Supreme
Court today handed down a decision in favor of the Terres-
trial Association of Nudists (T.A.N.) in the most recent of
the school cases to come before the Court.
The Court ruled that all children of the United States
would have to come nude to school henceforward because
the wearing of clothes was embarrassing to the children of
the T.A.N.
This case originated in the Sunnyside School District
where the school board ruled against the Nudists in their
attempt to enforce nudism on all the children. Parents of
Johnny Brown brought suit against the board, charging that
the board was infringing on their constitutional rights first
ini' insisting that- their children wear clothes to school and
secondly in not ordering that all other children come to school
nude-also on the grounds that it would be embarrassing
to the children, and discriminatory against them, to fail to
enforce a uniformity of nudity in the school district.
Justice Green of the Supreme Court in a lengthy major-
ity opinion maintained that, whereas we were a Christian
nation, we were not to use the power of the government to
enforce the ideas of the majority that clothes are a part of
a civilized Christian culture. He stated that the government
would be infringing upon the wall of separation of church
and state iffit insisted upon this basis He stated that many
eminent dermatologists hold that the rays of the sun and
the wafting of the wind are beneficial to growing bodies.
Justice Glennon in a separate opinion pointed out that
to excuse the nudist children from wearing clothes and per-
mit the other children to wear clothes would "subject them
to a cruel delimma because of an understandable re-
luctance to be stigmatized as nudists." The Justice'made
clear that the only way in which the rights of this minority
could be protected by the laws of our land was to insist that
the majority conform to the standard of nudism. The Justice
in a bit of whimsicality expressed the hope that no nudist
would ever be appointed to the Supreme Court and insist
upon the same decision being applied there.
In a strongly worded minority opinion Justice Pottery
warned that the protection of the rights of the minority did
not in American jurisprudence automatically negate the
rights of the majority, and insisted that the removal of the
clothes of the children in the majority was as much an inva-
sion of their rights' as the putting of clothes upon the mi-
nority.
Experts on the subject of Supreme Court Decisions had
long predicted that this case would be decided in favor of
T.A.N. They had pointed out that the 1963 decision in
rgeard to Bible reading and the Lord's Prayer case had been
based upon the fact that the minority not only must be pro-
tected from the wishes of the majority, but that the majority
cannot be allowed to pray or study the Bible in a school if
the minority objects. These experts said that the court in
recent years has consistently ruled against the principle that
a consensus of the American people as to the value of a
custom cannot establish this custom if there are any who
object; and hence that the rather long custom of the Ameri-
can people of dressing their children for school could not,
since it was a Christian custom, be maintained in the face of
those who objected to it on religious grounds.
-Steubenville Register


Another Kind of Freedom
Most men take pride in having their sons follow in
their footsteps. This may be good for their ego but it
may not be good for their sons'. Joshua Loth Liebman, the
psychologist, wrote: "We display true love when we cease
to demand that our loved ones become revised editions of our-
selves." How much unhappiness and heartache could be
avoided if more parents realized this!
One of the human rights with which every person is
endowed is the right to be different-even from members of
his own family. To deny this right is selfishness, not love.
We could show our love-and understanding-to greater
profit if we looked for, and encouraged, the special talents
and tastes in our children instead of consciously, or uncon-
sciously, pressuring them to be "like us." We might well
borrow from the wisdom of Goethe's mother. Early in life
she decided to concentrate her interest on the good qualities
of her friends and relatives, and skip over the qualities that
distressed her.
"I always seek the good in people," she said, "and leave
the bad to Him who made mankind and knows how to round
off the corners."
And herein, one might find the germ of an idea for a
useable, sensible New Year's Resolution.


IAliens In U. S. Must Report'
To INS In January
December 27, 1963, District Di-
rector Edward P. Ahrens of the Im-
migration and Naturalization Ser-
vice stated that the annual alien
address report program usually
causes a sharp rise in the number
of applications for naturalization.
The law requires all aliens in the
United States, with few exceptions,
to report their addresses each Jan-
uary. Throughout the United States
almost thirty percent more appli-
cations for naturalization are re-
ceived during the months of Jan-
uary, February and March than are
received during other months. Mr.
Ahens attributes this sudden rise
to the Alien Address Report Pro-
gram.


Aliens not required to make this'
report are diplomats, those accre-
dited to certain international
organizations and those who have
entered temporary as agricultural
laborers.
Forms for making the reports
will be available to aliens at all
Post Offices of the Immigration
and Naturalization Service during
the month of January. Mr. Ahrens
indicated the aliens desiring infor-
mation concerning naturalization
or similar matters should obtain
the forms at an office of the Immi-
gration and Naturalization Service
where personnel trained in these
fields will be available to answer
inquiries.


SS Searching For Lax
Employers of Domestics
With the mailing of several hun-
dred letters to housewives in the
Panhandle area, the Panama City
Social Security district office to-
day began an all-out search for de-
linquent employers of household
help.
The idea behind this effort is to
inform every housewife in the area
abuot her responsibility for report-
ing Social Security taxes on the
wages paid to maids, cleaning wo-
men, ironers, and other domestic
help.
Last year the Social Security
folks found 21,000 American home-
makers who were not .making pro-
per returnsfor their employees, ac-
cording to John- V. Carey, District
Manager. "Most of these 'delin-
quents' were exposed when their
former employees made requests
for retirement payments," Mr. Car-
ey said. He explained that in such
cases the employer is liable for
suchboth shares of the taxes that
have not been paid over past years.
The tax and penalties that are ex-
acted for not reporting at the pro-
per -time can be sizeable amounts.
Carey suggested that rather than
owe large amounts at a later time,
local housewives learn whether
Social Security taxes are due on
wages now being immediately to
make proper reports for domestic
employees.
If a housewife employee is paid
$50 or more in a calendar quarter,
Social Security taxes must be re-
ported whether the employee want-
s to be under Social Security or
not, according to Carey. He urged
any housewife in the area who
needs advice this matter or help in
making proper returns to call or
visit the Panama City Social Se-
curity District Office, 1135 Harri-
son Avenue, telephone 763-5331.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to experss our deepest,
appreciation for the sympathy and
kindness shown us during the re-
cent loss of our loved one. Your
prayers, flowers, cards and food
were appreciated so very much.
May God bless you all.
MRS. RUTH BURCH
DEWAYNE BURCH

Sharpening
"Anything that cuts"
Shears Lawn Mowers
Saws Knives Scissors
Ray L. Brant
1805 Garrison Ave.
Phone 227-7091


TELEVISION
Black & White and Color
Stereo AI Conditioning
Service Coals, $3.00
All work guaranteed
ST. JOE RADIO
& TV COMPANY
Phone 227-4081


7 ot s


G."666


- "Super-Right" Heavy Western Beef

4 "Super-Right" Heavy Western Beef


4 Steak Sale!
SIf you have a craving for steak, now is the time to satisfy it, as you'll save a sizeable
sum and enjoy the fine quality for which A&P's "Super-Right" Steaks are famous.
Come see, come save at A&P.


Specila! "Super-Right" Pure
Pork


SAUSAGE

3 1 $1.00

Grade 'A' Quick Frozen
Oven Ready

TURKEYS
4 to 10 lb. avg. 45
Pound 4"5
10 to 15 lb. avg. 3
Pound 39


18 to 22 lb. avg.
Pound


35g


'Super-Right' Corn Fed
FRESH PICNICS
lb. 33c


ROUND



SIRLOIN



CUBED


T-BONE


Bone-In Full Cut
You will enjoy this
value priced, fine
quality Steak
These are no ordin-
ary Steaks. They are
'Super-Right' quality
selected from West-
ern, grain fed beef.

BONELESS
You will enjoy these
value priced 'Super-
Steaks
Cut from 'Super-
Right" quality, West-
ern beef, close trim-
med and value pric-


TOP ROUND


SIRLOIN TIP


PORTERHOUSE


SPECIAL! ANN PAGE BROAD, FINE or EXTRA WIDE


Egg Noodles
SPECIAL! CHERRY STAR FANCY (No oil added--Packed in water)


Light TUNA.

BIG VALUE! JANE PARKER FRESHLY BAKED ENRICHED

WHITE BREAD

Special! Jane Parker Freshly Baked 1% Lb.
CHERRY PIE each 45c
Special! Jane Parker Delicious 1% Lb.


PINEAPPLE PIE


I Lb.
Pkg.


'B. 79c


LB. 88c



LB. 99c



LB. 88c


L. 88c


LB. 88c



. 95c


29c


70Z.



2 140Z. 3l
Loaves


each 39c


Special! Minute Maid Frozen 6 Oz. Cans
ORANGE DELIGHT 6 cans 99c
Special! Ann Page
MA YON N A ISE qt. 49c
Special! All Crisp Sweet
MIXED PICKLES qt. jar 39c
Special! All Crisp Whole Kosher
DILL PICKLES qt. jar 33c
Special! Lady Betty 40 Oz. Refrigerator Bottle
PRUNE JUICE bottle 49c
Special! Sunnyfield Long Grain
FANCY RICE 2 lb. pkg. 29c


Dixie Cups 6 Oz.
PAPER CUPS .... 100 for 93c
Bondware 9 Inch
PAPER PLATES .- 30 for 49c
Chicken of the Sea-3c OFF
Solid White Tuna .... 7 oz. 40c
Regular or Quick Grits
DIXIE LILY- ...... 1V2l Ibs. 19c


Detergent
DREFT
lb., 1 3-4 oz.


35c


Detergent
OXYDOL (8c off)
3 Ibs, 1/ ozs. 73c
Detergent
SALVO TABLETS
lb., 7 ozs. 41c
Cleaner
MR. CLEAN
at.. 12 fl. oz. 69c


Beg. Round White

POTATOES

Firm Red Ripe

TOMATOES

Medium Yellow Cooking

ONIONS

Crisp Red Delicious

APPLES


Nabisco Premium
NABISCO lb. 31c
Lays
POTATO CHIPS .... twins 59c
Minute
RICE .---- ......... 14 oz. pkg. 49c
Parkway Colored
MARGARINE ....--. lb, 27c


Detergent
'IVORY LIQUID
pt., 6 fl. ozs. 65c
Detergent
TIDE
lb., 4 ozs. 33c
Laundry Detergent
DASH (5c off)
lb., 8 /ozs. 34c
Liquid Detergent
THRILL (for dishes)
12 fl. ozs. 35c


/
10 LB. BAG

39c

CMN.

19c

3 Lb. Bag

29c

2 LBS.


29c


Yourdreams -coeitwe
THE ? PLAID STAMPS
THE GREAT ATLANTIC & PACIFIC TEA COMPANY. INC
s~ *


Detergent
LIQUID JOY
12 fl. ozs. 35c
Detergent
CHEER
lb., 6 ozs. 33c
Cleaner
SPIC 'N SPAN
lb. 31c
Shortening
CRISC0
3 lbs. 79c


510 Fifth Street
Prices in this advertise-
ment good through
Saturday, January 4
Detergent
Premium DUZ
2 lb., 7 oz., 81c
Cleanser
COMET (14 oz.)
2 for 33c
All Flavors 46 Oz. Cans
HI-C DRINKS
3 cans $1.00


mdle


I I


I


M.0 %- V- -- wow-





IIII"ow I


More People Than I
H Are Shopping at I


Discover, as thousands
have, that IGA mean
tion, quality products
and low prices every d
already paid a visit
,urge you to come in t
opportunity to show y
vantages you can ei
your food shopping a
a savings year .
you didl


Ever li1 1
IGA!
s of our customers
is complete selec-
s, friendly service
day. If you haven't
to our store, we
today. Give us the
you the many ad-
njoy by doing all
t IGA. Make 1964
. you'll be glad

i. ... ..': .. .-.. ........


b.
Lb.


Pork


CENTER CUT


These Prices Good January 1, 2, 3 and 4
Quantity Rights Reserved
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


This Store Will

Be Open All Day

Wednesday
NEW YEAR'S DAY



FREE HAM
Will Be Given Away Wednesday Afternoon
at 5:00 P.M.
COME IN AND REGISTER You Do Not Have To Be Present
To Win


FLA. GRADE 'B' DRESSED and DRAWN WHOLE


PORK STEAK OR CHOP CREOLE
Wipe 4 to 6 TableRite Pork Steaks or Chops with damp cloth.
To prevent curling, make, a gash or two in fat edge. Season
generously on both sides with mixture of salt, pepper, and. a
Sbit of poultry seasoning. Brown on both sides in shallow amount
of TableRite Oil. Place in garlic-rubbed and greased casserole
or baking dish. Cover with one medium onion and one green
pepper, both thinly sliced. Add one No. 2 can IGA Tomatoes,
crushed. Cover and bake in 375F oven till thoroughly cooked,
about 1- hour. Accompj.ay with fluffy rice, salad, and crusty
bread.


SMOKED
SAUSAGE


BONES


BOLOGNA


EEECK A
PEAS


DIXIE LILY LONG GRAIN
RICE
MAYFIELD CREAM NO. 303 CAN
CORN
DIAMOND
Walnuts


3 Lbs.


$1.00


3 Lbs. 53c


LB.


22 OZ.
BAG


BAG
22 OZ.


Cans


7 OZ.
CAN


PLEDGE
LARGE BOX
KOTEX


39c


GUNOUN


Tablerite Sliced Breakfast Tray Pack

BACON


3Lbs.


LB.


99


C


U. S. NO. 1 WHITE

POTATOES


37c

33c


39c

43c


69c


29c


C


10 bs.


GOLDEN


RIPE


BANANA
FANCY SWEET LI


Potatoes


1Oc


S


TANGELO LARGE
Orange!


TABLE50 -2 Pl


TABLE 50 -2 Ply
KLEENEX NAPKINS


SOFT 6 Bottle Carton
DRINKS J5' 39c


POUND 1 Oc
DOZ.
F 59c


Box 19c
HALF GAL.
29c


0,o D


PORK STEAK
OR CHOP
CREQLEF


FRESH PORK NECK


ri r ers
Tablerite Fresh


CHUNK


BEEF


JOHNSON'S WAX


IGA ICE With Order
MILK


19e










Say You Saw It In The Star -





INSURANCE


Is An Exacting Science, Too



LIKE A PRESCRIPTION, OUR

PROTECTION PLANS ARE PUT

TOGETHER WITH EXTRA CARE I

SThere are about as many differ-

ent types of insurance as there are T'1

specific needs, You can't buy them

all, so it is vitally important that you

consult with an expert. Call on us at

any time


WE PUT THE "SURE"

IN YOUR INSURANCE




MAXIMUM COVERAGE

o1 .,AT A MINIMUM COST


LIABILITY INSURANCE
Let's take an example. Do you know
that YOU can be SUEDi Someone may
have an accident on property you own TITLE INSURANCE
That someone can sue you, his claim can
WIPE YOU OUT unless you're pro-
perly insured FIRE BONDS


Tomlinson Insurance Agency
403 Monument Avenue Port St. Joe, Florida


Florida Suffering Shortage of Banking

Establishments, Says "Florida Trend"


Florida simply is not getting the
baLking service it deserves by ev-
ery facet of financial and popula-
tion growth. This fact has been
pointed out in numerous and leng-
thy articles in FLORIDA TREND
magazine. Now a University of
Florida survey emphasizes many of
the statistical shortcomings of
Florida banking which the Florida
industrial magazine has previously
harped on.
To start with, Florida has about
half as many banking offices as it
needs by national standards. Na-
tionwide there is one banking of-
fice for every 7,220 people in
Florida there is one banking of-
fice for every 14,900 people, and in
some isolated metropolitan areas
the number of persons per bank-
ing facility exceeds 25,000. All of
these statistics are according to
TREND.
The magazine goes on to contend
that apparently the conservative
number of banks in Florida also
breeds a tendency among Florida
bankers to lend conservatively.
There is a rather unique tendency
among Florida bankers to hedge
on loans and put the difference in
United States or municipal securi-
ties. The average Florida banks put
about 39 per cent of its assets on
loans while on a national level the
average is 47 per cent. On the sur-
face this might seem a rather insig-
nificant difference, but on deposit
balance alone, estimated at $5.8
billion in Florida, this means that
nearly $500 million additional
money would be available for loan
if Florida shared the national av-
erage. Probably one of the impor-
tant reasons it is not being loaned
is that there are not enough bank-
ing outlets and utilized banking
know-how in Florida to intelligent-
ly lend it.
The problem with a multiplicity
of individual small home-grown
bafks is that there simply isn't
enough money or talent to run
them efficiently or profitably. Mo-
dern banking is a multi-service bus-
iness. Every banking day brings
an avalanche of new questions and
problems. Branch bankers have a
battery of experts behind them .
small independent bankers fre-
quently have to throw up their
hands. This is the essential prob-
lem in a nutshell.
The magazine article says that
some of the greatest opposition
against branch banking comes from
banks in rural Florida counties.
These banks aren't really so close-
ly concerned in the problem as


city ad suburban banks. Actually
the impetus for branching will
probably ignite where it is most
needed in sprawling new met-
ropolitan areas, particularly in
mushrooming new suburbs. It is
not much of a secret either that
many suburban banks chartered in
recent months have been spawned
with a plan that includes merging
or selling to a larger downtown
bank when the branch law comes.
The best banking minds in Flor-,
ida as a whole agree that a branch
banking law of some form. is over-
due in Florida. They see many
new banking starts as examples of-
inferior banking service run by
staffs with a shortage of banking
know-how. There is some real con-
cern that the lack of a more lib-
eral banking policy in Florida has
become quite dangerous to the
state's financial mechanism and
that it may have some serious re-
percussions unless corrected soon.

School Lunch

Room Menu
Port St. Joe Elementary School
Monday, January 6
Spiced ham slices, buttered po-
tatoes, turnip greens, peaches, corn
bread, butter and milk.
Tuesday, January 7
Sloppy joe on buns, snap beans,
carrot sticks, apple pie and milk.
Wednesday, January 8
Hot dogs, white acre peas, cab-
bage slaw, peanut butter and gra-
ham crackers and milk.
Thursday, January 9
Barbecue chicken, English peas,
tossed salad, raspberry-apple sauce,
white bread and milk.
Friday, January 10
Macaroni and cheese ,buttered
spinach, spiced beets, banana pud-
ding, white bread and milk.
NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING
of members of Citizens Federal
Savings and Loan Association of
Port St. Joe.
The annual meeting of members
of Citizens Federal Savings and
Loan Association of Port St. Joe
will be held on Wednesday, Janu-
ary 15, 1964, at 2:00 p.m., EST, in
the office of the Association at
401 Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, Flor-
ida, for the purpose of electing di-
rectors for the ensuing term, and
to transact any other business
which may legally come before
said meeting.
Signed,


PATE'S SERVICE CENTER


I PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


C. J. STEVENS, JR. THE STAR. Port St. Joe. Fla.
Manager 2t-1-2 THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1964
Citizens Federal will close for
business at 12:00 Noon on Wednes- next regular meeting on January
day, January 15, 1964 in order to 7, 1964 at 9:00 AM, CST. This meet-
hold annual meeting of members. ing will substitute for the meeting
I- usually held on the second Tuesday
NOTICE is hereby given that the in each month.
Board of County' Commissioners of A. J. Strickland
Gulf County, Florida will hold its Chairman.

You Are Welcome To The
First United Pentecostal Church
10th St. NW. and Vtutoria Avenue Highland View, Florida
Rev. JAMES J. HILL, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 A.M.
MORNING. WORSHIP 11:15 A.M.
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 P.M.
MID-WEEK SERVICE (Wednesday) .... 7:30 P.M.
YOUTH SERVICE (Friday) 7:30 P.M.
AIR-CONDITIONED CENTRAL HEAT




GOODSON'S

RADIO and TV REPAIR

Admiral Emerson DuMont
Radio TV Stereo Air Conditioners
ANTENNA SYSTEMS, GOOD USED TV's $35.00 up
SERVICE CALLS $3.00

Phone 7-3251 or 7-3911 Day or Nite
DAY or NIGHT
317 REID AVENUE
(Next Door To Telegraph Office)
Your Satisfaction Is Our Business -


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH


SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ........ 6:45 p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) ._ 7:30 p.m.
"Come and Worship God With Us"




NEED A PLUMBER
CALL- -EAN f
Plumbing Installation Repairt
Contract Wrk Wf--A-Speclalty
Agents for
Brand Name Plumbing Fixtures
-CALL US FOR FREE ESTIMATE-

TWO EXPERIENCED PLUMBERS TO SERVE YOU

BEAMAN PLUMBING SERVICE


1107 GARRISON AVL


PHONE RAIl 7441


Opening Times
S* at. 12:45 p.m.
Sun. 2:45 p=m.
Mon.-Fri ............ -----4:45 p.m.

THURSDAY FRIDAY and SATURDAY

WANTED!













lICMER,-lAfE' R : R./"" AUIE MRPHY

SUNDAY, MONDAY ,
TUESDAY c'd WEDNESDAY













,. a MICHAEL
BARRY NELSON DIANA McBAIN
TUESDAY o d WEDNESDAYWA
o. ... Oo-AeAe-o-u


C. Byron Smith, Paster


Corner Third St. and Baltzell Ave.


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DOU BE


WHERE THERE'S BARGAINS GALORE
.IN '64


Grand Prize Stamps
Monday, Tuesday, and
Wednesday
SPECIALS FOR JAN. 2, 3 and 4
Coupons Expire Jan. 4, 1964


BEEF


S A L E FILL YOUR FREEZER NOW!
A PAY ON OUR BUDGET PLAN


DUBUQUE'S FINE WESTERN BEEF -


BEEF SHORT RIBS
BRISKET STEW BEEF
CHUCK STEAK
BONELESS STEW BEEF


COPELAND'S RANGER


SLAB


RO


ST


lb. 29c
lb. 25c
lb. 49c
lb. 69c


BACO


FOLGER'S MOUNTAIN GROWN Limit 1 With $7.50 Order
COFFEE
CAN 39c
OAK HILL No. Y2a Can
PEACHES 23c
MAYFIELD 303 Can
CORN 2 CANS 21c
LOG CABIN BU.rTEMJD 24 Oz. Size
SYRUP 59c
KEAFTS Use Just Like Velveeta
Tasty LOAF lKG 55c
JITNEY JUNGLE
M ILK 3 394.
NEW IMPROVED
TIDE
_s_ 24c


LB.


SHOULDER ROUND STEAK
SHOULDER ROUND ROAST
TENDER FOR BROILING
RIB STEAK


9C
l 6Q9c


PLAY ALL NEW
Jack Pot
at


Wie Jitney Jungle
lb. 59c


POUND
59c


C


LB.


ROBIN HOOD
FLOUR
5LB.
SBA 4O5c
JOY DISH Regular Size
DETERGENT 29c
GERBER'S Strained Fruits and Vegetables
BABY FOOD 6 59c
DELSEY'S
Toilet Tissue 2 Roil 23c
PURINA
DOG FOOD BA $2.88
BALLARD or PILLSBURY
BISCUITS oAN 8c
BAKEMUTE
SHORTENING
L3 49c


Jack Pot

$100
$O25 Added To
$2Jackpot
If No Winner
Come in and Register and pick up
a Jackpot Card. Card must be pun-
ched to win if name is drawn! Pur-
chase not necessray to win! Draw-
ing each Saturday at 7:00 P.M.-
You do not have to be present!
50 FREE
Grand Prize Stamps
With Coupon and Purchase of


I $5.00 Order
_ or More
50 FREE
Grand Prize Stamps
With Coupon and Purchase of
| 2 Pkgs. Lipton's
ONION SOUP
-- FROZEN FOOD -
Hi Acre
ORANGE JUIC
3 6 93&
Cans


m


E


Morton's Beef, Chicken and Turkey
POT PIES
ea. 19c
Morton's All Flavors
Frozen DINNERS
ea. 45c


WINESAP
Apples
CELLO BAG
Carrots


4 LB. BAG
39c

10c


FRESH FLORIDA
Grapefruit
CARTON FRESH
Tomatoes


3 FOR
19c

19c


.I .~.. .~. .-. I I


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dy Lewis, Miss Glenda Smitn and
Miss Carol Alligood, sistr of the
P groom, were bridesmaids Junior
S''bridesmaid was Miss Denise Haney
and flower girl was Miss Shrise
Haney.
The bride's sister, Mrs. Marion
Jones was soloist.
Don Sexton acted as best man
and ushers included Billy Hancock,
John Adams, Fred Henderson and
Van Linder.
Escorted by her father, the bride
appeared in a floor-length gown of
white satin with lace motifs adorn-
ing the scooped neckline, calla lily
point sleeves and detachable train.
A three tiered veil of illusion fell
from a white satin pillbox. She car-
ried a white Bible covered with a
bouquet of white roses.
The bridal attendants were dres-
sed in royal blue satin sheath
dresses with lace overskirts and
matching pillbox hats. They car-
ried bouquets of white chrysanthe-
mums.
The bride's mother chose a pink
lace dress with matching accessor-
ies. The mother of the groom was
dressed in a dark green suit, match-
ing accessories and feathered hat.
A decorated mantel, open hearth1
fire and Christmas tree decorated
the church Fellowship Hall, scene
of the December wedding recep-
tion, The punch table was decorat-
ed in the Royal blue and white col-
Judith Louise Bell Becomes the Bride or scheme.
Cutting the wedding cake was
Of J. Glenn Alligood On December 14 Henderson. Serving was Mrs. Joyce
Martin and Mrs. Patti Henderson.
Wedding vows were exchanged Mrs. Robert W. Bell of Jacksonville At the punch bowl was Miss Betty
Saturday, December 14 at 4:00 p.m. Beach. The groom is the son of Sale and Miss Mary Ann Walters.
at Beach Methodist Church, Jack- Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Alligood of Poit The Bride's Book was attended by
sonville, by Miss Judith Louise St. Joe. Lettie Sexton.
Bell and J. Glenn Alligood. Rev. Given in marriage by her father, The couple left on a trip to Sar-
Donald M. Mackay officiated. the bride chose Miss Ann fender- asota. They will make their home
Parents of the bride are Mr. and son as her maid of honor. Miss Ju- in Jacksonville Beach.


FAMOUS
QUALITY


DAN RIVER


72x108-in.
81x99-in.
Twin Fitted

81x108-in.
OR
Double Fitted


177


1,97


Matching Dan River Pillow Cases


Dan River sheets and pillow cases are famous for extraordinary beauty .for fine quality, greater strength and longer wear.
These sturdy sheets have 133 strongly woven threads to the square inch, wider tape selvages and dosely sewn hems. Hurry in
and save on either flat or fitted styles.


Abraham Foxworth is pictur-
ed above with the second prize
in Pylant's contest, a spinning
rod and reel.

CLASSIFIED ADS
Midget investment s w',,
Giant Returnu
FOR SALE
1957 CHEVROLET
Bel Air, 2-door hardtop
$850.00
Phone 229-1291


THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 1964


Local People Win Prizes Given Away
By Pylant's In Registration Contest


Mrs. Ethel Peak is shown a-
bove with the first prize in Py-
lant's recent give-away. The
first prize was a Marlin .22 cali-
bre rifle.
The contest was sponsored in
cooperation with the Nestle
Chocolate Company.


Mrs. Hubert Brinson was the
winner of Pylant's third prize,
a fine fibre-glass tackle box.


Engagement Announced
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Whittington announce the engagement of
their daughter, Doris, to Ronald Edward Young, son of Mr. and
Mrs. E. B. Young, all of Port St. Joe.
Wedding plans will be announced at a later date.
r l P arrangement of American beauty ro-
Bridal Party Fet ses and white chrysanthemums.
At LuncheonWhite doves, satin wedding bells
At Luncheon and rose placecard holders com.


Miss Ann Miller and her brides-
maids were honored last Friday
with a luncheon given by Mrs.
Henry Campbell and Mrs. Paul
Fensom at the Fensom home on
Sixteenth Street.
Miss Betty Ward, Miss Brenda
Ward, Miss Diane Lay, Mrs. Virgil
Dorminy, Mrs. James Fuller, Mrs.
Travis Jones and Mrs. Walter Wil-
der were bridesmaids honored with
Miss Miller.
The bride's luncheon table, over-
laid with linen, accented with
American beauty satin ribbon, was
centered with a silver epergne ar-


pleted the setting.
Miss Miller received a serving
piece in her chosen silver and a
corsage of red roses from the
hostesses. She presented her
bridesmaids with silver jewel
boxes. Mrs. Blair Shuford and Miss
Nan Dowlen were also honored
with gifts from Miss Miller.
Also sharing the occasion were
Mrs. J. Lamar Miller, mother of
the bride-elect, Mrs. Thomas Henry
Coleman, mother of the groom-
elect, Mrs. Paul Ward, Mrs. J.
Bouldin Frantz and Mrs. I1 H. Mc-
Intosh.
Miss Miller became the bride of
Hume Coleman, Saturday, Decem-
ber 28.


Announcing....
THE MERGER OF
PRIDGEON INSURANCE AGENCY
and
ADDISON INSURANCE AGENCY

Combined Offices of These Agencies are
now Located at
201 Monument Avenue
Telephones 227-2011 and 227-7741

We feel that this merger will be of great benefit to
the public in that we will be able to provide a bet-
ter service to our customers.
This New Insurance Service Will Be Known As

Addison Insurance Agency
201 Monument Ave. Phones 227-20111 and 227-7741
Rex Addison Tommy Pridgeon E. T. Pridgeon, Jr.


MATTRESS
PADS


Reg. 2.99
Twin Size
Reg. 3.99
Full Size
Heavy. cotton
Forced.


2.88
quilting rein-


21N 1
Pad and Cover


Reg. 3.99
Twin Fitted
Reg. 4.69
Double Fitted
Made like a


2.88

3.66
fitted sheet.


Completely washable.


Full or twin size. Full zipper; washable.


MATTRESS COVER


Reg. 3.29
Now Only 26


OUR REG. 3.99
Chenille Bedspreads 333
Luxuriously soft viscose tufting on
heavy cotton backing. White and beau-
ttful solid colors. Completely washable.


^\ HUNDREDS OF YARDS OF FRESH,
BRAND NEW FAMOUS QUALITY


SSpring Cottons


69c
VALUE


79c
VALUE


59o.


A special purchase from America's finest fabric mills! Gor.
geous new spring patterns and beautiful, wash-fast colors'
Truly an outstanding value!


Natural Gas Available

THROUGHOUT THE CITY of 'PORT ST. JOE
All homeowners and renters who desire to
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF FREE CONVERSION
and who have gas appliances burning LP gas must do so by contacting
our office to
Make Application Before January 10, 1964
since our contractor will discontinue running service lines on that date
This service is now paid for by the Company at an average
cost per house of approximately $75.00.
After January 10th, those desiring NATURAL GAS SERVICE
will have to pay for conversion cost
at the standard rate applicable to other cities in Florida
CALL OUR REPRESENTATIVE AT 229-3831
To Apply for Gas Service

St. Joe Natural Gas Co.
114 Monument Avenue


Famous Brand Bedding Needs,
Towels, and New Spring Fabrics!


Muslin Sheets


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