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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01464
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: November 28, 1963
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01464

Full Text








STHE STALKS-LTAR keep
0 C- -here we can speak with
Sonc In a while-Trade with
PER COPY your hmemn town merdhml

"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1963 NUMBER 11


ETAOIN SHRDLU
By WESLEY R. RAMSEY

The events of the last few days
have.most surely put a damper on
the holiday season coming up for
most of the nation.
For some it may seem a bleak
Thanksgiving ... seemingly not
much to be thankful for.
But, we still have much to be
thankful for on this Thanksgiving
eve.
We are a young nation, compar-
ed to others over the world, and,
have evolved in civilization to the
point where it takes an almost de-
mented' radical to shoot a head of
State. In other nations not so far
away, so-called civilized people
shoot each other and' kill entire
governments just because of a dis-
agreement of minor points.
We should be thankful that such
a tragic thing as the assassination
of a president does not spell the
doom of the democratic system
under which we live. We are shak
en by the events, but the nation
goes on in its mission of spreading
freedom to the world. This isn't
so in other nations.. Killing of a
head of state, usually means a re-
versal of field for the government.
Even though at times we didn't
agree with President Kennedy, we
should be thankful that we have
strong and purposeful young men
ready and eager to serve their
country for the sake of service and
not for the sake of personal gain.
We admire the late President for
his courage, of which he was abun-
dantly blessed. And we think it
evident that his office was truly a
service of love of country, since
te had all the "gain" we as indi-
viduals label as "gain" in this day.
And, we are thankful that such
an event as the assassination can
not' plunge our nation into a
state of seige. and martial law as,
it would have, in many other na-:
tions of the world.
It is notable, that in our history as
a nation only -four presidents have
inet with untimely ends. Several
other attempts have been made.
but by and large, in this land of
the free and home of the brave, a
President is safer than he would be
in any other country in the world
-and for this we are thankful.

PTA Meeting Is
Postponed For Week


The High School PTA meeting,
which was scheduled for Decem-
ber 5 has been changed to Decem-
ber 15, due to a conflict with the
Junior play program.
All members are invited to be
present on December 12 for a pro-
gram on "Education".


HALFBACK BILL VERVAEKE bulls his way by an Apalachicola tack-
ler in the third period last Friday night to pick up a first down
for the Sharks. (k photo)


LINEBAKER DAVID DICKEY puts the stop on Apalachicola's run-
ning threat, Jook Patrenos, in the first period of Friday night's
game here in Port St. Joe. (- photo)


Sharks Lose Hard-Fought Game

With Chapman In Season Finale


IGA Foodliner Awarded Certificate of

Merit for Continued Good Merchandising


Congratulations are in order fo. rthe Port St. Joe IGA Foodliner
and its employees for receiving the IGA award of achievement for
the year 1963. The local IGA Foodliner has received this award
consecutively since the year 1959.
Qualifications to be met in order to receive this award are:
cleanliness, friendliness, competitive prices and merchandising con-
veniently for its customers.
The above receiving the award, are left to right: Houston Ram-
sey, grocery department manager; Edward J. Woods, owner; Don
Norby, District IGA Supervisor, making the award; Clyde Burns,
produce -department manager and Houston Marks, meat department
manager.


The Port St. Joe Sharks ended
their football Iseason last Friday
evening the same way they started
it 10 weeks ago, namely by losing
to Apalachicola.
The Sharks, who have been se-
verely hampered by injuries the
last few games played well enough
to win, but were unable to capi-
talize on what few breaks they re-
ceived.
Both teams played to a dead-
lock in the first quarter which saw
Apalachicola drive to the Shark
two when the quarter ended. On
the first play of the second quar-
ter, Apalachicola scored, but the
extra point attempt was blocked,
giving them a 6 to 0 lead. With 17
seconds to go in the second quar-
ter, Chapman scored again on an
eight-yard pass play.
Neither team drew blood in the
third period, but the Sharks fin-
ally caught fire in the final quar-
ter and on a long drive that fea-
tured some nice running by Al
Cathey and Tommy Sisk, they
drove to the Chapman two where
David Young plunged over for the
score with Al Cathey scoring the
extra point.
On the kick-off after the TD,
Jimmy Gainnie covered the Sharks
on-side kick and it looked like the
Sharks were on their way to vic-
tory but a costly fumble ended
their drive and ended the Sharks
hopes of ending the season on a
winning note.


Glidden Plant Is

Crippled By Fire
Fire raged through a rosin treat
ing unit at the Glidden Compan3
plant here in Port St. Joe Sunday
afternoon doing an estimated $40,
000 in damages, according to com-
pany personnel.
The fire started about 1:15 from
a ruptured rosin line on the treat-
ing station, catching the rosin on
fire and burning for over an hour
before the fire was completely put
out.
Rosin in this particular area is
treated under heat and is brought
to the flash point, but kept in lines
so it won't burst into flames. When
air hit the rosin from the ruptured
line, it burst into flames.
Quick action by the plant opera-
tors on duty at this time, L. C. Da-
vis and Richard Saunders, kept the
fire confined to the small area, and
had it under control when Port St.
Joe Volunteers arrived on the
scene.
The fire's destruction will halt
the plant's rosin operations for a
few weeks while repairs are being
made, but the other activities of
the plant will continue, according
to Robert Fox, plant manager.


I Wasn't Lost; But
Woodrow Was!
Like Mark Twain, reports of
my being lost are greatly exager-
ated.
I was not lost Saturday evening
in the woods. I stuck my wetted
finger to the breeze, read the
moss on the tree, and took 15
steps and sure enough, there was
the river, right where I had left
it.
But came 7:00 p.m. and my
hunting partner Woodrow Hen-
derson had not yet came out of
the woods. Either the wind had
quit blowing on his wetted fin-
ger or the deer had eaten the
moss off the tree.
When 7:30 came and Woodrow
still was not back to the boat,
and my hollering and whistling
had gone unanswered, I drew the
conclusion that he was lost.
And at 10:30 p.m. when Ed
Johnson and the Gulf County
Sheriff's Department boat oper-
ated by Deputies Wayne White
and Jim Barfield brought him
out of the woods, he confirmed
my suspicions.
Woodrow admitted that, in-
deed, he had been lost,
I felt good in two ways. I had
been hunting with him for ten
years and never have seen him
turned around in the woods, re-
gardless of weather conditions.
Number two reason: I would
have hated to have the calling of
the Sheriff's Department on my
conscious if he had not been lost.

Mrs. Docia Hatfield, 73
Dies In 'Local Hospital
Mrs. Docia Hatfield, age 73, of
Apalachicola passed away in the
Port St. Joe Municipal Hospital
Sunday at 5:20 p.m.
Graveside services for Mrs. Hat,
field were held at 1:00 p.m. Tues-
day in Holly Hill Cemetery with
Rev. W. G. Mizell, pastor of the
Highland View Church of God of-
ficiating.
Survivors include her husband,
John H. Hatfield of Apalachicola;
and four sisters, Mrs. Vassie Mix-
on, Columbus, Ga., Mrs. Ludie Mix-
on, Columbus, Mrs. Maggie Hatfield
of Black, Ala., and Mrs. Ada Braze-
well of Black, Ala.
Comforter Funeral Home was in
charge of arrangements.

Eleven senior Sharks ended their
high school grid careers Friday
night. They were Emory Burleson,
Bill Vervaeke, Eric Hammond,
Tommy Sisk, Jimmie Gainnie, Al-
bert Gentry, James Todd, Rodney
Herring, Paul Robbins, Johnnie


Oakes and Freddie Chason.
THE YARDSTICK St. Joe
First Downs -------15
Yards rushing ------ 199
Yards passing ----. 39
Passes Complete 3-5
Fumbles Lost .... 2
Yards Penalized .... 37


Apal.
12
181
55
5-6
1
37


CONSTITUTION


LET US








OF ITS BLESSINGS
FOR LIFE AND ALL


As we gather around the holiday table with our families

and friends, let us pause to acknowledge the source of all pros-

perity, our Almighty Creator. May He continue to bless our

homes and country.


Thanksgiving Service Set


Congressman Sikes Publicizes St. Joe's

Constitution Day In Weekly Newsletter


Two Area Homes

Damaged by Fire
Two Port St. Joe area homes
were seriously damaged by fires
during the past week, according to
fire chief R. H. Eellzey.
Last Thursday afternoon; the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Webb in Oak Grove was badly dam-
aged in the kitchen and living
room by a fire of undetermined ori-
gin. The home was closed complete-
ly which kept the blaze from
spreading until the fire department
could arrive on the scene.
Saturday afternoon -at, '7:15 a
small frame house on Avenue F
belonging to I. W. Duren called
the Fire Department to action. The
quick response by the Department
confined the flames to the rear of
the small dwelling and quickly
brought the fire under control.
Origin of the fire was not de-
termined by the Fire Department.


County Commission
Discusses Petition
The County Commission met
Tuesday night in regular session.
Expected to be on the agenda
for the evening was a lengthy dis-
cussion concerning the petition
to call for an election to decide
on whether or not to move the
Gulf County seat.
According to what transpired
at the last meeting and guide-
lines set up for checking the
petition, it is expected that the
matter of officially calling for
the election will be near at the
meeting.
The results of this meeting
cannot be reported in this week's
issue of The Star, due to an early
publication date because of the
holidays.
The Star will carry a full re-
port of the meeting in next
week's edition.

"Port St. Joe Story" Will
Be Televised Friday
Friday night at 9:30 p.m., "The
Port St. Joe Story" will be shown
on television. The show will be
aired on Channel 7, Panama City,
and will deal mostly with the
City's growth and its past history
in promoting the December 7
Constitution Day celebration.
The program will be 30 min-
utes long, beginning at 9:30 p.m.
Port St. Joe time.
Returns From Visit
Mrs. Ben Ferrell returned home
Sunday after spending a pleasant
visit with relatives in Greensboro
and Quincy.






DAY


Congressman Bob Sikes has in-
cluded the following article in his
"Newsletter" this week which is
sent all over Northwest Florida to
news media and political figures:
CONSTITUTION DAY AT
PORT ST. JOE
I am very pleased to call atten-
tion to the fact that the City Com-
mission of the City of Port St. Joe
extends an invitation to the people
of the State of Florida and our
neighbor states to attend "Constitu-
tion Day" in Port St. Joe on Satur-
day, December 7. This is the anni-
versary of the Birth of Constitu-
tional Government for the State of


Community Thanksgiving ser-
vices will be held this morning
at 9:00 a.m. from the First Pres-
byterian Church.
Rev. David Neese, pastor of
the church, will deliver the
annual Thanksgiving message.
The services are sponsored
each year by the Ministerial Al-
liance.
The services this morning will be
open to those of all faiths. The
special devotional period will last
for approximately 45 minutes.
Others appearing on the program
among the Ministerial Alliance
membership are: Dr. T. S. Harris,
pastor of the First Methodist
Church, who will give the call to
worship; Rev. H. D. Ferrell of the
Oak Grove Assembly of God Church
who will pronounce the Thanksgiv-
ing prayer; Rev. Jack Carter of
the Pentecostal Holiness Church.


Florida. Florida's First Constitu- who will lead the responsive read-
tion was signed in Old St. Joseph, ing and Rev. LivingstonBlauvelt'of
one hundred and twenty-five years the Faith Bible Church will pro-
ago. Governor Bryant will be the nounce the benediction. ..
principal speaker. Your -Congress- Everyone is cordially invited
man and many high dignitaries to attend these special Thanks-
from all parts of the State are plan- giving services to worship as the
ning to attend. Highlights of the Pilgrims did on that first Thanks-
day will be a big parade, speeches, giving.
free fish fry, horse show, band con-
cert and a charity ball at the close ment persisted, the town was not
of the day. actually rebuilt until this century.
It is also the observance of the It received its present impetus in
Golden Anniversary of the Charter the 1930's with the construction of
of modern Port St. Joe, which was a paper mill by the St. Joe Paper
granted in 1913. Company.
Port St. Joe is one of the most The program which has been de-
historic sites in the South. It was veloped is one of the most impres-
a booming port city and one of sive yet announced for Northwest
Florida's largest cities in the Florida. In addition to elected of-
1830's. Florida's first railroad was ficials, it is expected to draw a
constructed from St. Joe to the Ap- strong contingent from gubernator-
alachicola River to transship cot- ial hopefuls and other State politi-
ton and other cargo coming down cal aspirants.
river from the Georgia-Alabama Congressman Sikes letter also
plantation communities to waiting stated that money had been placed
ships at Port St. Joe which would in the Rivers and Harbors Bill to
carry the cargo to the ports of the provide funds for the necessary an-
world. Within a few years the pop- nual maintenance of the harbor at
ulation was virtually decimated by Port St. Joe as well as mainten
yellow fever and a hurricane fol- ort St. Joe as wel as mainten-
lowing soon afterwards completed ance funds for the Gulf Intra-
the job. Although a small settle- Coastal Waterway.


Missionaries To Speak
At Faith Bible Church
Missionaries from West Pakistan
are slated to speak at Faith Bible
Church Sunday, Rev. and Mrs.
Charles Burton have recently re-
turned from a five year tour of
duty under The Evangelical Alli-
ance Mission Board in West Pakis-
tan, the world's largest moslem
state. "Chuck" and Betty, as they
are better known, will wear the tri-
bal costumes of that land and speak
of the people, customs, and reli-
gion of that Mohammedan world.
This young couple were married
on the field and their son, Dwight,
was born there, also. You are in-
vited to come and hear of this fas-
cinating country of 80,000,000 souls
and the problems of reaching those
steeped in the teachings of Islam
for Christ.
They may be seen and heard at
the Port St. Joe High School Audi-
torium Sunday at 11:00 a.m. and
7:30 p.m.


DEC.


Last Rites Held for
Alonzo T. Stewart
Funeral services were held last
Friday at 3:30 p.m. from the Oak
Grove Assembly of God Church for
Alonzo Thomas Stewart of Oak
Grove. Mr. Stewart passed away
last Wednesday in the Municipal
Hospital at the age of 59.
Rev. Harvey B. Ferrell, pastor of
the church, conducted the services.
Interment was in Holly Hill
Cemetery.
Mr. Stewart is survived by his
widow, Mrs. Minnie Stewart of
Oak Grove; four sons, John Henry
and Jerry Thomas of Bradenton,
Alonzo Francis and Timothy Judon
of Oak Grove; three brothers, Ase
Stewart and A. Randall Stewart of
Houston, Texas and Stanford Stew-
art of Tallahassee; two sisters,
Misses Winnie and Ida Mae Stew-
art of Bradenton.
Comforter Funeral Home was in
charge of arrangements.


7


1


I










Long Avenue Lists


New Circle Officers


[_.L 1J. "Jj_1" [ ^^ .3f'l F Listed below is a new slate of
officers for the Women's Mission-
ary Union of the Long Avenue
A FBaptist Church.
All M enC s Fall General WMU Officers
President, Mrs. Cecil Harrison;
vice-president, Mrs. Charles Mar-
shall; secretary-treasurer, Mrs. M.
TS & L. Britt; G. A. director, Mrs. H. F.
SU ITS & Barbee; Sunbeam Band director,
Mrs. Wesley R, Ramsey.
Stewardship and prayer chair.
S man, Mrs. T. D. Hutchins; mission
S study, Mrs. Durel Brigman; com-
l C o a ts munity missions, Mrs. Joe Alligood;
J s social chairman, Mrs. J. 0. Lucas;
,/-'H-, flower chairman, Mrs. W. D, Sykes;
program chairman, Mrs. Keith
S Ward; children's home chairman,
Mrs. J, C. Odum; publicity chair-
: .. man, Mrs. H. F. Ford,
G. A. Counsellors-Junior; Mrs.
j lCliff Robbins and Mrs. David Jen-
kins. Intermediate, 13-15; Mrs.
OFF George Ipollar 4A 4 lTMrs. Barney
Early, assistant. Sunbeam band:
/ Nursery, Mrs. Charles Marshall. Be-
ginners, 4-5 yrs. Mrs. B. A. Collier
2. 1. 'and Mrs, Qary Manz, assistant. Pri-
mary, 6-7 yrs. Mrs. Russel Goolsby
and Mrs. 0. E. Griffin, assistant.
gEN'Sr World Friends, Mrs. Cecil
VIEN'S SUITS AND SPORT COATS Harrison a?4 1Ir.g, Grady Player, as-
Latest fall fashions, tailored by CURLEE and i counselor and diretor.ge Lea
hon, counselor and director. Lea-
SEWELL, hand picked for that best dressed man ders: Mrs. Theo Johnson, Mrs. Joe
of Port St. Joe. Ferrell. Circle chairmen: No. 1,
COME IN AND SEE THE BEAUTIFUL SELEC- Mrs. John Core; No. 2, Mrs. N. G.
TION NOW SELLING AT 25% to aid Christmas Martin; No. 3, Mrs. A. P. Jackson;
TION NOW SELLING AT 25% OFF to aid Christ- No. 4 and 5, Mrs. James Traweek;
No. 6, Mrs, Charles Marshall and
mas shoppers. Also ask about our charge and lay- No. 7, Mrs. George Holland.
Away plans. Shop at PYLANT'S and you only buy CIRCLE OFFICERS
quality merchandise. Circle No. One
Mrs. Frank Barnes, community
missions chairman; Mrs. D. Brig-
SPORT SHIRTS man, mission study chairman; Mrs.
John Core, circle chairman; Mrs.
SrJoe Ferrell, prayer chairman; Mrs,
15% OFF J. Wayne Hendrix, secretary and
publicity chairman; Mrs. B. L. Huk-
S, Come in and see the many eba, social chairman; Mrs. T. D.
a I i beautiful nationally advertis- Hutchins, program chairman; Mrs.
Ied men's sport shirts. Dave Maddox, stewardship chair-
man; Mrs. Lota Palmer, vice chair-
WNOW ON SALE man and enlistment chairman.
Circle No. Two
q _--._ __ Mrs. N. G. Martin, chairman;
elret Ak u Mrs. John Dickey, program and
SFeel Free to Ask About Our prayer chairman; Mrs. H. L. Ford,
publicity and publication chairman;
Charge & Lay-Away Plans Mrs. J. 0. Lucas, social chairman;
.I *Mrs. J. C. Odum, children's home
chairman; Mrs. M. L. Britt, secre-
Stary and treasurer; Mrs. T. J.
t e r Braxton, mission study and stew-
ardship chairman and Mrs. Durel
Sykes, community missions.
Circle No. Three
Mrs. A. P. Jackson, chairman;
Mrs. H. F. Barbee, secretary and
treasurer; Mrs. George McLawhon,
'program chairman; Mrs. John Mc-
SMEN & BOY'S WEAR Kenzie, prayer chairman; Mrs. H.
Y. Zipperer, social chairman.
"Outfitters for Dads and Lads" Circle Nos. Four and Five
_Mrs. James Traweek, chairman;


Mrs. Gene Fowler, program chair-
man; Mrs. Kenneth Bateman, com-
munity missions; Mrs. Wesley R.
Ramsey, treasurer and publicity;
Mrs. T. M. Watts, children's home;
Miss Alma Baggett, mission study;
Mrs. W. P. Dockery, prayer and
stewardship; Mrs. Selma Lamber-
son, telephone chairman.
Circle No. Six
Mrs. Charles Marshall, chairman;
Mrs. David Jenkins, program chair-
man; Mrs. Billy Norris, mission stu-
dy; Mrs. Tony Peterman, prayer
chairman; Mrs. Clyde White, com-
munity missions; Mrs. Russell
Goolsby, stewardship chairman;
Mrs. Danny Maddox, children's
home; Mrs. B. A. Collier, publicity;
Mrs. John Hanson, social chairman;
Mrs. Keith Ward, enlistment chair-
man and Mrs. B. A. Collier, secre-
tary and treasurer.
Circle No. Seyeq
Mrs. George Holland, chairman;
Mrs. James Jones, secretary and
treasurer; Mrs. Raymond Hardy,
community missions; Mrs. Barney
Earley, mission study and prayer
chairman; Mrs. Cliff Robbins, pro-
gram chairman; Mrs. H. F. Hall,
children's home and enlistment
chairman.

Eta Upsilon

Meets In Lounge
The Eta Upsilon Chapter of Beta
Sigma Phi met Tuesday night at
the Florida Power Lounge. Mrs.
Flo Maddox and Pauline McGill
were hostesses to the group.
Mrs. Dot Grossman and Dot Kol-
ler received their Pledge Ritual,
the first degree of membership
into Beta Sigma Phi. The two girls
were welcomed into the sorority
by all members. Mrs. Carol Rish
led the ritual. Mrs. Greta Freeman
pinned the sorority pins on each
and its meaning was explained.
Social chairman announced later
that the annual Christmas party
plans included a dinner party with
husbands. "Beta Buddy" gifts will
be exchanged at this time.
Each member brought a gift to
the meeting which will be sent to
the TB hospital patients.
Mrs. Delores Cox announced
plans for the Christmas float. All
members are urged to be on hand
to help decorate. Coffee and cook-
ies will be "on the house" on the
night designated as "work night".
The group was happy to have
Mrs. Carol Saunders meet with
them.
-9,
Jayceettes Have

Regular Meeting


THE STAR, Pert St. Joe, Fla.


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1963


GREATEST CHAIR snd OTTOMAN SALE in OUR HISTORY!
EXCITING NEW DANISH MODERN


CHAIR S OTTOMAN


We Have A Truckload of


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7 Different Models to Choose From
More Women Cook On

MAGIC CHEF RANGES
Than Any Other Range In America Today!

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PHONE 229-3831


The Port St. Joe Jayceettes held
their regular monthly meeting at
the St. Joe Motoel Monday night.
Mrs. Sylvia Costin and Ann Tison
were hostesses to the group.
Officers for the coming year
were elected as follows: President,
Mrs. Virginia Cannon; vice-presi-
dent, Caroline Norton; secretary,
Sylvia Costin; treasurer, Dot Kol-
ler. Directors are Ann Tison and
Ann Mitchell.
Final plans for the annual Christ-
mas party were announced. A
child's toy will be brought by each
member and later presented to
Jaycee's Toys for Tots.
Jayceettes are preparing a hearty
and delicious Thanksgiving dinner
for a very deserving family and
extends their wishes for a happy
Thanksgiving.
Members are reminded to bring
an original Christmas tree decora-
tion at the December meeting to
be placed on a tree at the hospital.
ALBERT E. McNAIR
TRAINS AS AIR POLICE
LACKLAND AFB, TEX.-Air-
man Albert E. McNair, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Damon McNair Sr., of 149
Ave. "D", Port St. Joe, has been
selected for technical training as
an air policeman at this Air Force
Base.
Airman McNair, who enlisted in
the Air Force a short time ago,
has just completed his basic mili-.
tary training here.
The airman, a 1958 graduate of
George Washington High School,
attended Florida A & M University.
Will Visit Sister
Mrs. Gus Creech and daughter,
Beth, will spend Thanksgiving with
Mrs. Creech's sister and family,
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Lumpkin in Crys-
tal Lake.
Se4t The Sto to a- ric.


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YB RED HOT SPECIALS
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Grapefruit
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Be Sure To Register For The
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STOCK UP WITH US FOR
THANKSGIVING DINNER
Sunnyland 12 to 14 lb. avg. Whole HAM----- Ilb. 49c
Shank Portion



S.. Butt Half lb. 49c


Meaty
HAM HOCKS 3


HOG
HOG MAW


- 99c


3 L


69c


w"


OUR BEST SIRLOINS


lb.


Proten Best Our Best for Broiling
CHUCK I49c No.7 K69c
ROAST STEAK b


Swift Premium Best Sliced


BACO
"What A Buy"


C


Pound


It Costs You Money to Save Stamps!
SHOP RICH'S SAVE CASH NOT STAMPS WE ARE ENLARGING TO SERVE YOU BETTER WITH LOW PRICES EVERY DAY!


WITH $5.00 ORDER

BAKERITE

SHORTENING


25 Pound Bag
SCRATCH FEED
New Georgia Cane
SYRUP
Delmonte
C A TSUP
Apalachee Bay Breaded
Tidbit SHRIMP


'98C


quart 39c
14 oz. 19c
20 oz07. 89c


3 LB. CAN


Ocean Spray
Cranberry Sauce 2 for 49c
Mueller's
Egg Noodles 2 bags 39c
Mars or Hershey
CANDY 10 bars 39c
Carey
SALT box 10c


YOUR TOTAL WILL BE CHEAPER AT RICWS
PLUS ONE DOZEN GA. GRADE 'A'
LARGE EGGS

FREE!
WITH $10.00 ORDER OR MORE


ROBIN HOOD


FLOUR


Session's Pure

Peanut Oil
NO. 10 JAR


No. 303 Standard

Tomatoes


2CANS


Sw $
inmit 1 with $5.00 Order


10 LBS.


99c


SPECIALS FOR WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON ONLY-
Large Clover Valley Ground Sunnyland Best Homogenized
H E N S BEEF Shank Portion MILK
Pound 4 Pounds HAMSGallon
Pound
29c 99c 39c 93c


WEDNESDAY
Ga. Grade 'A'
Lge. EGGS
Dozen
39c
With $5.00 Order


Y, NOVEMBER 27- SPECIALS GOOD FROM 1:00 TO 6:30 P.M.
Fresh Regular 10c Fresh Sweet Red
Cranberry CANDY GARLIC Potatoes GRAPES
Box Bar Box Pound Pound
19c 5c 5c 5c 10c


_ I--r


I ,- -


W WAN 0 4ftW IOW '%F


I





I


PBAPPY HANKSGIVING
3B ^^ a oY F'0bPOOD "FTES T c
WE WILL BE CLOSED THANKSGIVING DAY
DOUBLE GRAND PRIZE STAMPS MONDAY, TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY
Prices In This Advertisement Good November 29 and 30 PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


Copeland's Ranger Brand Hickory Smoked


AC0 N
Small Tender

Spare Ribs


LB.

WILSON'S FRESH BEEF
IVE R


39c


LB.


N


I..


C


*~TvT
.'4

: C C im C.ZC2:CC


MISS IOWA SLICED
25c BACON


LB.


39c


Wilson's Top Quality Streak-0-Lean


SAL TPOR*I


C


LB.


PLAY ALL NEW

Jack Pot
at
Jitney Jungle

$50


Jack Pot
If No Winner
$25 Added To
Jackpot


MAXWELL HOUSE -Limit 1 With $6.50 Order

COFFEE


JITNEY JUNGLE White, Yellow and
Cake Mix
LIMIT 1 With $5.00 Order
Giant TIDE


DELSEY
T I


BATHROOM
SS


Devil's Food


f7Kr


Lb.
Can


STA-FLO
23c STARCH
BAKERITE
59c Shortening


BOOTH'S
Fish Sticks
38 OZ.
1 PKG. 1


39c


3


Quart

LB.
CAN


23c

49c


WILSON'S


UE


ROLL
PKG.


25c MOR


3


Cans


$1.00


.--- Last Week's Winner -
JEWEL PITTMAN, $75.0Q
COME IN and REGISTER and PICK
UP A JACKPOT CARD. Card must
be punched to win if name is drawn!
Purchase not necessary to win!
Drawing each Saturday at 7:00 P.M.
You Do Not Have To Be Present
ro Win!
100 FREE
RANDD PRIZE STAMPS
I With Coupon and Purchase of
$10.00 ORDER
Ior More

50 FREE
GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
With Coupon and Purchase of
$2.50 PRODUCE
Order or More

50 FREE
GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
With Coupon and Purchasp of
5 Pkgs. MeKenzie's


I' 9' a g gi S
S


GOLDEN RIPE


10c


FRESH TURNIP


Bunch


15c


IDAHO BAKING
POTATOES


10


Lbs.


59c


HALF GALLON With 25 Extra Grand Prize Stamps


APPLE CIDER


Jar


53c


L


FROZEN FOOD

50 FREE
GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
With Coupon and Purchase of
2 46-Oz. Cans Adams
ORANGE JUICE


ama"s


wdmmw m-


BANANAS


G'"REENS










Grade 'A' Quick Frozen Young Tender.


TURI
10 to 16 Lb. Avg. 17 to 23 Lb. Avg.


Pound


EYS


Pound


39c 35C


Grade 'A' Quick Frozen--4 to 6
DUCKLINGS


Lb. Avg.
lb. 49c


Grade 'A' Quick Frozen 4 to 6 Lb. Avg.
BAKING HENS lb. 45c

Grade 'A' Quick Frozen 6 to 9 Lb. Avg.
LARGE CAPONS lb. 75c

'Super Right' Heavy Western First Cut
Beef RIB ROAST lb. 79c


"SUPER-RIGHT" SHORT SHANK FULLY COOKED Whole or Butt Half


HAMS
ALLGOOD BRAND SUGAR CURED SLICED

BACON


LB.



2


LB.
PKG.


49c


79c


FOR


FRESH LB. CELLO BAG


CranSberries
EASTERN ROUND WHITE 10 LB. BA(G


POTATOES


190


25c



39c


P's Own Whole or Jellied
. A&P's Own Whole or Jelled


f C.PAIDB

With Coupon and Purchase of
2 Oz. Bottle Ann Page
Vanilla Extract 39c
Jax. 11-30-63
Coupon good thrq Sat., Npy. 3





With Coupon and Purchase of
German Choc. 79C
Jax. 11-30463
Coupon good thru Sat., Nov. 30
^iW .imii3I


With Coupon and Purchase of
SJane Parker Brown 'N Serve-12
Twin Rolls doz. 25c
Coupon good thru Sat., Nov. 30
Jax. 11-30-63


LIB SUEUR WHOLE KERNEL WHITE

CORN


11

2


JANE PARKER DELICIOUS APPLE 1V2 LB. EACH


PIES

100 'EXTRA PLAID STAMPS
With Purchase of 5 lb. Jane Parker
FRUIT CAKE


LB.
RING


3.99


39c

Wrap-25 Ft. Roll
roll 29c


qt. 49c


lb. ctn. 29c


25c


JANE PARKER
STUFFING BREAD


LB.
LOAF


12 OZ.
CANS


25c



29c



39c


510 FIFTH STREET
Prices In This Advertisement Good
Through Saturday, November 30


A: Yes, they were included.
Q: Did you list those with wi-
dows' exemptions?
A: Anly listed those with taxes
paid.
Q: You did not include those.
A: No.
Q: Were any names listed ac-
count of conveyances during year?
A: No sir.
By the County Attorney:
Q: Your Tax Roll was made up
by the Tax Assessor?
A: Yes.
The County Attorney then an-
nounced that the Tax Collector us-


THE STAR, Port St. Joe. Flal.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1963

Minutes of the
County Commission
WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA
November 12, 1963
The Board of County Commis
sioners of Gulf County, Florida
met this date in regular session
with the following members pres-
ent: A. J. Strickland, Chairman
James G. McDaniel, S. C. Player
and Walter Graham. The Clerk
Sheriff, Attorney, Road Superin-
tendent and Civil Defense Director
Mosquito Control Supervisor were
also present.
The meeting came to order at
9:00 A.M., Commisisoner Graham
opened the meeting with prayer.
Minutes for the meetings of Oc-
tober 8 and October 22 were read
approved and adopted.
The Chairman announced that
the first business would be to dis-
cuss the County Insurance program.
The following insurance represen-
tatives were present: Rex Addison,
Frank Hannon, M. P. Tomlinson
and Frank Graddy. After lengthy
discussion the Chairman requested
all insurance agencies in Gulf Coun-
ty to get together and decide on a
plan and that said plan be present-
ed at the next meeting.
Hon. Frank Hannon, Mayor of
the City of Port St. Joe, appeared
before the Board and told of the
plans for Constitution Day to be
held on December 7, 1963, in Port
St. Joe, and then requested the
County to give financial aid to the
event. After discussion, the Board
informed the Mayor that the Coun-
ty would pay up to $100.00 on the
expenses incurred by the City of
Port St. Joe.
T. J. McConnell appeared before
the Board and told of plans now be-
ing formulated to construct a plant
to make laminations from paper
board; that the plant will be locat-
ed on his property on the Over-
street Highway. He then told of
the bad repair of the Wetappo
County Road and of an accident he
and his wife had on said road dur-
ing a rain storm. He requested the
County to keep this road in good
condition because it is the shortest
route from Panama City to the
plant site and further requested
the county to pay for his damages
suffered in the accident. The chair-
man announced that the Wetappo
County Road has now been re-
paired.
Jesse V. Stone gave an oral re-
port on the progress of the St. Jo-
seph's Spit State Park. He advised
the Board that the property has
now been declared surplus and the
State of Florida has filed its appli-
cation with the General Services
Administration to purchase said
property; that the only apparent
hold up from this point would be
the access roads to the Park site.
He stated that he did not agree
with the report of Commissioner
Graham as to route of the access
road; that he has recently made an
inspection of all possible routes
and finds that a route not inspect-
ed by Commissioner Graham would
be much cheaper; that he would
like to take all the Commissioners
on an inspection tour of his propos-
ed route before the Board meets
with State Officials to ask for fi-
nancial aid.
The Chairman called on the Tax
Collector for his list of all names
appearing on the 1962 Tax Roll as
paying taxes. Whereupon, the Hon.
Harland 0. Pridgeon, Tax Collec-
tor, filed a list of names, said list
being 129 pages. Mr. Pridgeon was
sworn and then questioned by the
County Attorney as follows:
Q: Mr. Pridgeon, are you Harland
0. Pridgeon, the duly elected, qual-
ified and acting Tax Collector for
Gulf County, Florida?
A: Yes sir.
Q: Is this list of 129 pages that
you handed me a list of all Tax
Payers listed on the 1962 Tax Roll?
A: Yes sir,
Q: How did you make this list?
A: I took the Tax Roll and began
on page 1 and went all the way
through the roll listing each name
that paid taxes.
Q: How.did you list the names?
A: Just as they appeared on the
roll.
Q: Taking this name here "Res-
ter ,et als", did you try to deter-
mine who the et als were?
A: No sir.
The following questions were
propounded to the Tax Collector
by Hon. Mayo C. Johnston, Coun-
sel f6r the Little Tax Payers.
Q: In making your list, did you
use the 1962 or 1963 Tax Roll?
A: 1962.
Q: Did you make an effort to
determine if any conveyances had
been made from 62 to 63?
A: No sir.
Q: Do you know if the Tax Roll
reflects the names of owners in
1962?
A: No sir.
Q: Did you check to see who ac-
tually paid the taxes.
A: No sir.
Q: What did you do about the
Homestead exempt lands?
A: They would not show in the
list. The Home Owners that paid
fire tax are listed.
Q: You included those?
A: Yes sir .
Q: Did you attempt to include
man and wife's name where only
one name is shown?
A: No sir.
Q: Did you include other exempt
property?
A: No sir.
Q: Were any names added to roll
over the last roll?


ed all caution in preparing the list. Subdivision.
3 He then informed the Board that The accepted right-of-way ease-
according to the Attorney General ments from Joseph T. Land, et ux,
of the State of Florida, the Clerk and H. L. Bozeman, et ux, lor the
of Circuit Court should take the Transfer Landing Road, Riverside
list and check each name listed to Park Subdivision, Bozeman's Cir-
determine if the property that the cle and a drainage ditch.
taxes are paid on is actually owned The Mosquito Control Supervisor
by more than the one person as presented his budget amendments
listed on the certified list and to for the fiscal year ending Septem-
determine the owners that are list- ber 30 ,1963, and requested the
ed as "et us", "et als" "et vir" and Board to approve said amendments
the owners of fictitious names and as required by law. After consider-
estates. ation, the amendments were ap-
T. S. Coldewey, Chairman for the proved and ordered.
Petitioners told the Board that his The Health Department, Road
Committee was without counsel at Department and Farm Agent pre-
- this time; that he did not agree bern
, with the County Attorney in that
Sthe checking of the list would be The Sheriff filed his annual re-
a monumental task; that in his port for the year ending Septem-
opinion the checking of the list The Board directed the following1963.
should take less than a day; that hospital bil ectedthefo be paid: owing
this matter has now gone more Chopalhoun Gene alHospital for
than sixty days and that it now
appears to many that the Board is
merely taking delaying action.
The Board then considered its
- next move and after much discus-
sion, Commissioner McDaniel said
that it looks as if this matter will
end up in Court either way it goes,
therefore, the Board should call an
7 election on the question and then
let it go to Court. After further
discussion, there was a motion by
Commissioner Player, seconded by
Commissioner McDaniel and duly,
carried, that the Clerk be directed
to check the list as outlined by the
County Attorney.
Commissioner Graham informed /
the Board that the "Insurance Com-
mittee" met with all county em- /
ployees in an effort to select an
insurance company to write the
county group policy; that the Mos-
quito Department selected the pol-
icy offered by Union Bankers In-
surance Company of Dallas, Texas,
and the Road Department selected
the Gulf Life Insurance Company
of Jacksonville, Florida, which is
the policy now carried by the em-
ployees. After much discussion,
Commissioner McDaniel stated that
because a majority of the employ-
ees wanted the Gulf Life policy, he
moves that the county and employ-
ees purchase the policy offered by
Gulf Life Insurance Company. Com-
missioner Player stated that be-
cause the majority of the employ-
ees wanted the Gulf Life policy, he
would second the motion. The mo-
tion was unanimously carried.
Whereupon, there was a motion
by Commissioner Graham, second-
ed by Commissioner Player and
unanimously carried, that the coun- WORLD T
ty purchase the policy offered by
the Gulf Life Insurance Company;
that the County participate in the
premiums as provided by law; that
the county pay a flat rate of $5.00
on each employee's policy, provid-
ing the $5.00 is less than 60% of
the total premium, or pay 60% of
the employee's premium in those
cases where $5.00 would represent
more than 60% of the employees
premium; that the county's partici-
pation in the premium be retroac-
tive to October 1, 1963.
After discusisng the County In-
digent Roll, the Board set up a
policy that each name added or re-
moved from the roll be recorded FIDCT DADTI1
in the minutes. FIRlSJ D/API 1
The Board directed the follow-
ing names added to the indigent
roll: Lois C. Stone, $15.00; Ernest
Hoover, $15.00; Belle Williams, December 1
$15.00.
The Board accepted a borrow pit TWO SERVICES DAILY -
easement from Robert Stebel for
a 100' x 100' pit in Block 6, Wimico


TRAVELER AUTHOR

SPEAKER
SPARKLING
MUSIC
GREAT
SINGING


ST CHURCH


through 8
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*For Health

Vitality

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It's good health insurance to let
us deliver all the dairy-fresh products
your family needs. And remember to
toast your own health with a delicious
glass of Borden's milk at least twice
a day!




HARSDEN'S

Borden Dairy Products


Wewahitchha


CELERY


CRANBERRY SAUCE


1 LB.
CANS


A&P's Own Aluminum
WONDERFOIL


Bell's 1 Oz. Can
POULTR SEASONING can 15c


Ann Page
MAYONNAISE
Ann Page Corn Oil
MARGARINE


Jane Parker Herb Seasoned-8 Oz. Pkg.
STUFFING MIX pkg.


We Also Have Fresh Eggs

OUR OTHER DAIRY PRODUCTS
NMi Buttermilk
Cream Skdm Milk
Chocolate Milk Butter
V2 and Ys Orange Juice


Call 639-4383 Collect


Elizabeth Hysmith, $75.00.
Port St. Joe Municipal Hospital
for Lula Kemp, $75.00.
The Board voted to pay the Com-
forter Funeral Home $75.00 for
services for D. W. Smith.
All payrolls for October were
approved and ratified as paid.
The bills for October were pre-
sented, examined, approved and or-
dered paid.
There being no further business,
the meeting did then adjourn.
ATTEST:
George Y. Core A. J. Strickland
Clerk Chairman
To Visit Sister
Miss Celia Creech left Tuesday
to spend Thanksgiving with her sis-
ter Kay at Asbury College, Wil-
more, Ky. They are the daughters
of Mr. and Mrs. Gus Creech.


I Lp~


__


r


flN,










COUNTY AGENT'S NOTES
By CUBIE LAIRD, Gulf County Agent


THE STAR


Phone 7-3161
n~oT P l f hii EI Bi rA


IIIOB


AGRICULTURAL
THOUGHT PROVOKER


SANTA'S F/""
Santa believes in being thrifty as well as practical... that's why he
chooses Carp's as his favorite store. Take a tip from Santa and make
Carp's your Christmas Headquarters, too! &


production can be accelerated to
meet the demands. We will indeed
need to produce a world-wide
"Food explosion" to meet the
needs.
Such has already taken place
here in North America, and can
readily continue at an accelerated
tempo if our progressive farmers
are allowed to apply scientific re-
search to their farms and other-
wise make progress unimpeded.
The international unrest and ten-
sions of our present times is a re-
flection of the strain between avail-
ability and need for food. We must
consider the Russian proverb "A
hungry stomach knows no law."
C. America and Its Food Surplus
Our population is increasing at
a rate calculated to remove our
politically embarrassing food sur-
plus in but a few years.
In our land of apparently un-end-
ing surpluses, we are not only
shortsighted but complacently apa-
thetic about our food supply. The
relatively small cost of our surplus
is today a major political issue.
Yet, it is really a minor expense
for the insurance it bestows upon
the income of the farmer and the
cost of food to the consumer. A 5
percent food surplus costs the na-


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1963

- Say You Saw It In The Star -



NEED A PLUMBER? I


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Third St. and Baltzell Ave. C. Byron Smith, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a-m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION .- 6:45 p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) 7:30 p.m.
"Come and Worship God With Us"


POT T J&: UKU


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WARM, SOFT FLANNELETTE
Ski types, tailored and 199 99
novelty styles. Assorted I AND
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WOMEN'S PAJAMAS
Warm, washable flannel- 00
ette in man tailored, ski
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Others
4.99 TO 8.99


R'ch looking nylons, fleeces
and acetates elegantly trim-
mec. with nylon lace.
Warmly quilted. Solid col-
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Sizes 10 to 20.


CAREFREE DRIVING
starts at the

N AP-A SIGN
If you drive a car for pleas-
ure, or a truck for business,
look for the NAPA Sign...
see your service-repair shop
BEFORE trouble starts.
He's a professional who
uses NAPA Parts to keep
vehicles of all makes, models
and ages running smoothly.
Parts that bear the NAPA
Seal are of such excellence
that you'll find them where
there's a trained mechanic
competent to use them.
Assure the success of your
trip. Stop and check at the
NAPA Sisn today!

St. Joe

Auto Parts


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19" tube (overall diag.) 172 sq. In. picture Super-
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311 Williams Avenue


A. Man's Most Significant Problem
By far the most significant prob-
lem facing man today, is the pro.
duction of food and fiber to meet
the necessities of life. For even
with the so-called food surpluses
which currently plague the U. S.
and the Western World, if all the
food of the world were divided
equally among the people of the
world, we would all be in a state
of starvation.
B. Situation Is Becoming
Increasingly Acute
The population of the world has
now passed three billion and is in-
creasing at an incredible 55 million
per year (almost 7000 per hour).
This population explosion is not
confined to the countries of Asia
and Africa, but in our country the
population is reasonably-predicated
to pass 400 million by the year
2000.
Available land for food produc-
tion will soon fall below 2 acres
per person in North America and
one half acre per person for the
world as a whole.
It is obvious that this could
spell catastrophe for our type of
civilization, unless food and fiber


tion only a fraction of what a simi-
lar deficit would cost the house-
wife in increased food cost.
Today our food surplus would
hardly carry us for seven lean
months and if used to feed the
hungry people around the world,
it would be exhausted in less than
two months. Thus, even with our
most proficient agriculture and
our surplus abundance we are, but
for the grace of God, not more
than a year or two at the most from
starvation right here in this coun-
try.
Agricultural Paradox
"Fewer and fewer farmers are
producing more and more food and
fiber, on les sand less land, for
more and more people, for less
and less profit.
D. Agricultural Efficiency
1. Appreciating our Agriculture.
We fail to appreciate what agricul-
ture has and presently is meaning
to the progress and development of
our country.
2. Let's look at some of the facts
of our Agricultural Efficiency. In
U. S., 10 out of 100 are farm work-
ers. In Russia, 40 out of 100 are
farm workers. In Communist China
70 to 80 out of 100 are farm work-
ers. We completely out-distance
the world with our agriculture,
and to the hungry world, food is
number one importance.
By requiring fewer and fewer to
produce more and more food, our
labor force becomes larger to pro-
duce commodities that afford us a
higher and higher standard of liv-
ing in an expanding economy.
Today's average farm worker in
the U. S. produces more than three
times as much as he did 20 years
ago.
Our population has climbed 80
million since 1930. Yet, the total
man hours of farm labor have
dropped from 24 billion hours to
10.3 billion. Using less than half
the man power and 12 million few-
er acres than 1920, today's farmers
are producing twice as much.
All the world, including the Rus-
sians, are more impressed with
our agricultural accomplishments
than any other activity. This is
America's greatest success story.
It seems real strange that so
many good American people use
our greatest success story as their
favorite "whipping boy". Maybe
poor public relations is the penal-
ty of success.
In most countries of the world
people spend half or more of their
take-home pay for food. In U. S.,
21%; India, 60%; Italy, 45%; Ja-
pan, 42%.
E. A Few Facts About
Florida Farming
Farming in Florida isn't hayseed.
The agri-business of our state is a
3 billion dollar a year industry,
and has a total investment of 10
billion dollars.
1. Agriculture in Florida and the
Nation is a giant industry and the
very bread and butter of our econ-
omy. We can be truly grateful.
2. Every year the City and the
Farm are coming closer and closer
together.
3. The City problems are becom-
ing the farming problems and the
farming problems directly relate to
city problems.
4. By working together, by lis-
tening with sincerity to each oth-
er, we should be able to go a long
way toward finding solutions that
will benefit everyone.


FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Intersection Monument and Constitution
REV. THOMAS S. HARRIS, D.D., MInlter


Church School 9:45 A.H.
Morning Worship 11:00 AM.
Bibye Study (Wednesday) 7:30 P.M.
Methodist Youth Fellowship ........---. 6:00 P.M.
Evening Worship 7:30 P.M.


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SERVICE CALLS $3.00

Phone 7-3251 or 7-3911 Day or Nite
DAY or NIGHT
317 REIP AVENUE
(Next Doer To Telegraph Office)
Your Satisfaction Is Our Business -




Ashley Costin Says...





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THE STAR
Publlihed Every Thurday At 306 William Avenue, Port St. Joe, Flrla i
By The Star Publishing Company
WES-Y R. RAMSEY Editor and Pubsbher
Also Unotype pmrator, Ad Salesman, Photographer, Columnist, Reporter Mreft
Reader, Bookkeeper and Complaint Department


DIAL 227-3161


PosroFrrcE Box SW


ngterd as aecond-clas matter, December 19, 1987, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe,
Florida, under Act of March 3, 1873.

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, $S.0 SIX MONTHS, $1.75 THREE MONTHS, $227.30

TO ADVERTISERS-I-n case of error or omissions In adverti.ementa, the publisher
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount received for uch
advertisement.







It is interesting to note the could park their cars. Obvious-
constant see-saw on Capitol ly, this was not money spent to
Hill on proposals to spend fed- help some poor, but brilliant
eral money on various "aid-to- students attain t!ie education
education" programs. needed for the space age.
The big city writers, with a In many communities, funds
dash of inspiration and a clat- and facilities takcn frcl the
ter of type- taxpayers to provide junior col-
writer keys, lege education are used to set
usually inject up cooperative tax-free busi-
into report- [ ness enterprises.
age of theI l .. **
cot ovethe At one time,-on most cam-
othat a ver ise puses a book store of sort's was
over these -- operated in order to serve as
programs a .4 a clearing house for used text-
progra ous a books, so that financially lim-
agrel ig ,. e: .' ited students could buy use'
anglofe.r The lig texts at a reduced rate, and
use of relin- c. rer also have a market to which to
ion to explain C. W. Harer sl
away anything is quite handy, sell texts no longer needed.
although not a new device. Today, in many instances,
So, the notion spread around from these humble beginnings,
by these erudite people is that and aided by untold tax funds,
those who believe in parochial they have become full line re-
schools will not vote any money tail establishments competing
unless parochial schools are cut with private enterprise.
in on the expenditures. The .
others want money for public n tha in many parts of the
schools, but will not vote one Lduntry the independent busi-
cent for parochialschool nessen have sn the waste
that has gone into school op-
t* eration when control has been
But real heart of the contro- wrested from local school
versy seems to have escaped boards and given to county ad-
attention. That revolves around ministration, And where the
money. And that in turn re- control has been seized by a
volves around how much such state "education" board, situa-
education costs. Nobody has yet tion is even worse. After all,
answered that question. it was a state department that
put $W., million dollars into stu-
From the smaller communi- dent parking at San Francisco
ties' of the nation there comes State.
a great deal of objections to- *
ward more federal taxes being So the word goes around.
used to go into the sphere of *
local education. Thistis largely And that word is somewhat
engendered by the waste of along these lines, "We ain't
funds that is witnessed, seen nothing yet if ti-ae federal
boys get their hliand's i'No the
For example, in the building school districts." The-e is the
of the Inew multi-million Sani feeling that fede-al school
Francisco State College, the "aid" could even ec ir tlhe
'sum of $2% million was spent hundred billion Collar idccral
on a garage so that students foreign "aid."
( Ntilnnnl Federation rf Tnflepndeit Itusitness


TELEVISION
Black & White and Color
Stereo Air Conditioning

Service Calls, $3.00
All work guaranteed

ST. JOE RADIO
& TV COMPANY
Phone 227.4081


Sharpening
"Anything that cuts"
Shears Lawn Mowers
Saws Knives Scissors
Ray L. Brant
1805 Garrison Ave.
Phone 227-7091


James C. Bray

Takes Sales Course
James C. Bray of St. Jbe Motor
Company, Port St. Joe, has been
certified as a graduate of the retail
salesmanship course conducted in
Pensacola recently by a staff in-
structor of Ford Motor Company's
Atlanta Marketing Institute.
Certification of course comple-
tion was announced by L. C. Brock,
director of the Ford Institute.
The three day course was taught
by W. H. Sharp, institute instruc-
tor. Subjects range from managers
and merchandising courses for dea-
lers and their department mana-
gers to salesmanship and special-
ized workshops for staff members.
The Atlanta Marketing Institute
annually enrolls more than 2,500
sales specialists of Ford Motor
Company products from a ten-state
area.


You Are Cordially Invited To Attend

Long Ave. Baptist Church

Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ---. 6:45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 PM.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ..-...... 7:30 p.m.

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME
Air Conditlened Centrally Heated
REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor


IYou Are Welcome To The

First United Pentecostal Church
10th St. NW. and Victoria Avenue Highland View, Florida
Rev. JAMES J. HILL, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:15 AM.
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 P.M.
MID-WEEK SERVICE (Wednesday) .... 7:30 P.M.
YOUTH SERVICE (Friday) 7:30 P.M.
AIR-CONDITIONED CENTRAL HEAT


Hospital Auxiliary Names Workers


The new workers for the Hospital
Auxiliary Thrift Shop were an-
nounced this week for the months
of December, January and Febru-
ary by Mrs. George Tapper, presi-
dent.
The pick-up and marking commit-
tee who will serve for these three
months are: Mrs. Tommy Pridgeon,
227-8696; Mrs. Jimmy Costin, 229-
3566 and Mrs. Joe Parrott, 229-
2621.
Anyone who has used clothing or
other merchandise to donate for
sale -at the Auxiliary's Thrift Shop
will please contact one of these
ladies.
Thrift Shop workers are listed
below, and are once again remind-
ed that each worker is responsible
for providing a substitute if she is
unable to serve on the designated
day:
December 7, Mrs. Bob Freeman,
Mrs. Bob Fox.
Dec. 14, Mrs. George Anchors
and Mrs. Leonard Belin.
Dec. 21: Mrs. Walter Duren and
Mrs. Milton Anderson.
Dec. 28: Shop closed Christmas
week.
Jan. 4: Mrs. Paul Fensom and
Mrs. Cecil Curry.
Jan. 11: Mrs. Lamar Hardy and
Mrs. Benny Roberts.
Jan. 18: Mrs. Ashley Costin and
Mrs. Wayne Hendrix.
Jan. 15: Mrs. Pete Ivey and Mrs.
John R. Smith.
Feb. 1: Mrs. Frank Hannon and
Mrs. Cecil Costin, Jr.
Feb. 8: Mrs. George Wimberly,
Jr., and Mrs. Dillon Smith.
Feb. 15: Mrs. Calvin Floyd and
Mrs. Sid Brown.
Feb. 22: Mrs. J. L. Miller and
Mrs. Lawrence Bissett.
Feb. 29: Mrs. Charles Stevens
and Mrs. Walter Dodson.
-K

Theta Rho Girls

Travel To Tampa
The Theta Rho Girl's Club of
Port St. Joe traveled to Tampa this
week end. The purpose of the trip
was to institute a new club in Tam
pa. There were three assembly of-
ficers who went. They were: third
herald, Linda Davis; guardian, Lin-
da K. Webb and chaplain, Judy
Williams. The other girls and ad-
visors were Charlotte Williams,
Charlotte Marshall, Vicki McGill,
Diane Goodman, Rita Rasmussen,
Suzanne Antley, Mrs. Addie Good-
son, Mrs. Jessie Owens and Mrs.
C. W. Long. The girls and advisors
really enjoyed this trip and will
look forward to their Assembly
which will be the second weekend
in June. The hosts were very nice
to the local girls and Saturday eve-
ning they enjoyed a very delicious
banquet. The Jacksonville Club ini-
tiated the new girls after which the
Assembly officers instituted the
club and Saturday night the Ft.
Pierce club installed the girls in
their office. All work was very im-
pressive.


First Baptist WMU

Has Prayer Retreat
The WMU of the First Baptist
Church met Monday for prayer re-
treat, the purpose of which was to
give praise and thanks to God for
all His blesisngs, a time for self
examination, repentance and a re-
newal of faith. Mrs. H. F. Ayers led
the program. Scriptures were read
on prayer and the discussions on
the needs of prayer in the whole
world, especially at this time of
confusion and stress.
Prayer can give us answers to
problems in our homes, churches
and our nation.
Sixteen women were present and
it is believed all went away in-
spired to spend more time in pray-
er, and to work more to show their
love for God and His work.


Internal Revenue

To Publish Book
Laurie W. Tomlinson, District
Director of Internal Revenue, today
announced that the Internal Reve-
nue Service will publish sales tas
tables for use by Florida taxpayers
in claiming deductions for Florida
sales tax on their 1963 income tax
returns.
Tomlinson said that the table
will show average sales tax deduc-
tions by income brackets which will
be accepted by the Service without
further verification. The deduc


tion may be claimed by taxpayers
who elect to itemize their bebuc
tions on Form 1040.
Sales tax tables will be avail
able in local Internal Revenue of
fices about December 1, 1963.


Home Employees

Should Check S. S.
Are you getting the proper Social
Security credits for your work?
According to John V. Carey, Dis-
trict Manager for Social Security in
Panama City, Florida, you may not
if you are a maid, baby sitter, or
other household employee. Carey
went on to explain that some
housewives do not know they must
report wages paid to domestic em-
ployees.
"This report," he said, "is made
to the District Director of Internal
Revenue for any household employ-
ee who makes $50 or more cash
wages in a three month period. If
your employer pays you as little
a s $4 a week o n a regular basis,
your work is covered by Social Se-
curity, and your employer must
make a report for you; and if more
than one person pays more than
$50 a quarter, each of them must
report your wages."
Carey said that household work-
ers should get in touch with his of-
fice if their work is not being re-
ported. They can get a copy of the
booklet, "Social Security and Your
Household Employee," which tells
employers h o w to get the forms
they need to make the report.
The Social Security office in Pan-
ama City is at 1135 Harrison Ave-
nue. The telephone number is PO
3-5331.

Pvt. Jasper King

At Fort Bliss
FORT BLISS, TEX. (AHTNC)-
Army Pvt. Jasper King, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Elton L. King, 504 Third
st., P or t St. Joe, is scheduled to
complete a Nike universal electron-
ic maintenance course at The Air
Defense Center, Fort Bliss, Tex.,
May 1, 1964.
The 20-year-old soldier entered
the Army in August 1963 and com-
pleted basic training at Fort Gor-
don, Ga.
King is a 1963 graduate of Port
St. Joe High School.
Before entering the Army, he
was employed by the St. Joe Ice Co.


AUBREY L. HARDY IS
ASSIGNED TO SECURITY
PATUXENT RIVER, MD. (FHT-
NC)-Aubrey L. Hardy, chief sig-
nalman, USN, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Horace A. Hardy of Port St. Joe,
is stationed at the Naval Air Sta-
tion, Patuxent River, Md.
He has been assigned to the se-
curity division.
Hardy entered the service in
June 1957.
-K
To Spend Holidays Here
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Emble-
ton and children, Alan and Leslie,
from East Brunswick, New Jersey
will arrive in Apalachicola on No-
vember 23, to spend the holidays
with relatives and friends. They
will visit Mr. and Mrs. George Size-

Fashion's Fufure


SMART town and country
sophisticates will "live" in
this clever new ensemble. The
softly bloused jacket is teamed
with a classic detailed shift.
dress. For a smooth line and
perfect fit, a Talon Zephyr-the
nylon coil zipper-is used for the
front closure. A "must" for the
seamstress: Press as you sew
using a press cloth to protect
fabrics and to cover the zipper,
whether it be nylon coil or
metal. f -


more in Apalachicola, with Mr. and
Mrs. James Bray in Port St. Joe
and Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Skipper
in Panama City.
_V
Visits Friends Here
Mrs. S. W. Witt and Sarah from
Jacksonville, visited Mrs. 0. M.
Taylor and other friends recently.
AA
Visiting In Tampa
Mrs. Selma Lamberson left Tues-
day for Tampa to visit with friends
and relatives.
if
CARD OF THANKS
We at the Glidden Company


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1963

would like to offer our thanks and
appreciation to the Port St. Joe
Volunteer Fire Departmennt for
their quick effective action Sunday
afternoon in helping to put out the
fire in our plant.
The response to the call was
quick and their work was effective
and efficient. We appreciate their
efforts and capabilities.
R. B. FOX, Manager
The Glidden Company

-If


TIME TO COUNT


OUR BLESSINGS


AND GIVE THANKS

How fortunate we are in comparison to
those in other parts of the world! Too often,
we forget to give thanks for the bountiful land
in which we live. Let us be grateful as we ga-
ther about the table on Thanksgiving Day.


Florida NationalkBank

at PORT ST. JOE
MEMBER: FDIC and Florida National Group


~br-- L711


Inexhaustible
Nuclear energy promises to per cent of the planet. As the
give mankind a new tool for McGraw-Hill Yearbook of'
producing pure, fresh water Science and Technology points
from the sea. out: "Two-thirds of the United
Experts from the Inter- States population lives in the
national Atomic Energy Agen- 24 tidewater states. For them
cy (IAEA) agree that by dis- the sea offers an inexhaustible
tillation, atomic reactors could supply of water."
pump out an endless stream of IAEA, a United Nations af-
sweet water for domestic, in- filiate, is rushing its studies on
dustrial and agricultural uses. atomic distillation. Experts
They also note that reactors note that the world's fast-grow-
could produce fresh water as ing population,, coupled with
a by-product while generating increasing pollution, is putting
electricity. a severe strain on natural fresh-
The source may be inland water supplies. Time for solv-
stands of brackish water or ing the problem is growing
the seas, which cover over 70 short.











LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES BILL HEADS
CIRCULARS FORMS BUSINESS CARDS
BROCHURES SOCIETY PRINTING
ENGRAVING


THE STAR PUBLISHING CO.
Letterpress Printing Offset Printing Office Supplies
DIAL 227-3161


OPEN 7 A.IVI. TO 9 P.M.
,/ */ .:

O 00 SAFETY


SERVICE

OFFER
Here's What We Do.
(D Align Front End ) Adjust Brakes
( Balance All Repack Front
4 Wheels Wheel Bearings


$: --


95

Any
American
Car


Re moment Parts if needed and torsion bar adjustment not Included





Pate's Service Center

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


/ ,'-,v p


- ~5 M...-













IT'S THANKSGIVING *

Thanksgiving is a special time

of gratitude, concern, hope and belief
Gratitude for the peace and plenty in our land.

Concern for those not so fully blessed.
Hope for a friendship between all people
Belief in our way of life.



In a "spirit of Thanksgiving", all of us at Buzzett's
Drug Store send you a very special "thank you"
for the trust you have placed in us. We will try
always to merit that confidence. With our best
wishes for a happy and abundant Thanksgiving.
-GANNON BUZZETT



Buzzett's Drug Store
317 Williams Avenue
Drive-In Window Service -- Free Parking


FOR- RENT: Unfurnished 2 bed-I FOR SALE: Trailer and addition.
room apart. Phone 227-7761. tfc I 3 bedrooms, 150'x75' corner lot.
Trees, flowers, good lawn. St. Joe
FOR RENT: House with business Beach. Off highway. Nice quiet
space attached, furnished or un- neighborhood. Utility house, lawn
furnished. Ph. 229-1361. tfc-9-19 furniture, 125 gal. underground
FOR RENT: Two bedroom house. gas tank $2800. Phone 227-7846. tf
corner Tenth Street and Long FOR SALE: Furnished 2 bedroom
Avenue. Call Mrs. Nora Duren. brick home and small apart-
Phone 227-5471. mfc-6-13 ment, 1301 Long Ave., $11,000.
FOR RENT: Trailer space in Oak Phone 648-4128. Mira.
Grove. Sewer and water. $14.00
month. Phone L. C. Davis, 227-7059. FOR SALE: 3 bedroom nice mod-
h ti uuih sWmee


FOR RENT: Nice furnished apart-
ment for couple only at 1621
Monument Ave. Phone 227-7641. tf
FOR RENT: Two one bedroom cot-
tages, furnished on 9th St. Also
2 bedroom unfurnished' apt. Call
-227-5111 or call by Smith's Phar-
macy. thc


ren hlome wibii porch e I
carport, 200 foot front on Highway
71, White City. Call 229-1134. tfe
FOR SALE: 1964 blue MG. Contact
Jerry Wynn. Phone 227-8591. 2t
FOR SALE: 4 bedroom, 2 bath, liv-
ing room with fireplace, dining
room, kitchen with large breakfast
room. utility room. venetian blinds,


FOR RENT: 2 bedroom house fur- gas tank. One block from school.
nished or unfurnished at Oak 506 8th Street. Call SUnset 5-8157,
Grove. Call Bill Carr at 227-8111. Panama City.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom furnished FOR SALE: 1957 4-door hardtop
apartment. 522Y Third Street. Buick Century. Brown and white.
$45.00. Water furnished. Call 227- Power steering, automatic transmis-
8642. tfc-11-14 sion. $350. Call 227-8627. 2tp
FOR RENT: Spacious 2 bedroom FOR SALE: U. S. Divers skin div-
furnished apartment. Phone 229- ing equipment. 72.5 cu. ft. tank
4261 between 9-6 p.m. or 648-4600 and Miistral regulator. See John
after c-- Ragan, Ward Ridge Trailer Park.
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment. 2tp
1506 Long Ave. Downstairs. Call
227-5426. John Scott. tfc-11-14 WANTED AT ONCE: Rawleigh
FOR RENT: Two bedroom house Dealer in Gulf Co., or Port St.
Palm Blvd. Call Cecil G. Costing. Joe. Write Rawleigh, Dept., FAK
Jr., 227-4311. tfc-1l 2 100-3, Memphis, Tenn. 11-21-1-9
F RENT dro unfu FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house. Lo-
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom unfurnish-r cated on 2 corner lots. Ideal lo-
ed apartment. 619 Woodward l cation for schools, Well landscaped.
Halley, Tallahassee, Florida. Phone cated30116thStCa648 5.
224-9180 or 385-3139. tfc-11-21 FOR SALE: 2 bedroom house on
FOR SALE: Three bedroom con- Marvin Ave. (high side). Well es-
FOR SALE: Three .. b ath e ac'tablished lawn and shrubs. Has
create block house. Two baths, well. Approx. 1350 sq. ft. Lot 75x
panel walls, hardwood floors, dou- 150I Inquire 227-7006 after 3:00 pm..
ble carport, utility room, separate
dining room, breezeway and stor- FOR SALE: 50x170 lot, 8th Street
age. Call 229-1421 or 227-8676. and Long Avenue. $1,000. I. C. Lup-
FOR SALE: Stucco house situated ton. 4tp-11-7
on 90'x150' lot. Near Elementary FOR SALE: Large 2 bedroom
School. 3 bedrooms. Hardwood house. 2% lots, chain link fence.
floors. House insulated. Chain link floor furnace, air conditioner. L.
fence around back yard. Reasonably E. Meyer, 521 8th Street, Phone
priced. Call Will Ramsey 7-3161 227-4986. 4tp-11-7
day or 7-3646 night.



I St. Joe Laundry



and Cleaners


3 FOR 2 SALE


ANY THREE ITEMS

Expertly cleaned and pressed

FOR THE PRICE OF TWO

IN SOME CASES THIS AMOUNTS TO 33V3/% DISC.


EXAMPLE


$3.30
$2.20
$1.10


Mix 'em up Any Yay You Like!

Cash and Carry Only -

THIS SALE GOOD THROUGH DEC. 7

Let Us Clean Your Formals for the Annual Ball


Ladies Dresses Reg. Price
Reg. Price of Two
YOU SAVE


I Returns From World Trip


July 1, Miss Lottie Hall, local Jehovah's
Witness missionary and mother, Mrs. Grace
Hall of Deland, left America for a mission-
ary tour around th world. They traveled
with 600 other witness misisonaries on an
itinerary designed by the Watchtower So-
ciety to fulfill Matthew 24:24 and Revela-
tion 14:6 about bearing the "Everlasting
Good News" of God's heavenly kingdom and
peace on earth to all nations.
Miss Hall found the sightseeingtours in-
spiring. They saw the Hebrew form of Je-
hovah's name above church doors, on castle
towers, in old manuscripts and engraved on
stone tablets. They found thousands of
Christian Bibles in non-Christian homes.
Among the unusual sights were the Da-
chau concentration camp torture chambers,
beautiful Milan Cathedral, Cedars of Leban-
on, the gold Buddha and Buddhist hell, the
floating market on Thailand's Chao Phy Ri-
ver where they got stranded in midstream
and had to be rescued, snake and octapus
steaks in Rangoon, snake charmers in Sin-
gapore and many other sights.
Miss Hall says due to the dry summer, the
Jordan River was narrow and blue, the Dead
Sea was calm and lifeless and the 2,000 year
old olive trees in the Garden of Gethsamane
were truly awe inspiring.
In the picture, Miss Hall poses in Athens,
Greece with Miss Maro Dratsoumi on the
steps of the Areopagus (Mars Hill) where the
Greeks arrested the Apostle Paul.


FOR SALE
Two bedroom house, Ig. den can
be used as 3rd bedroom. Many ex-
tras, fireplace, separate dining
room. One bedroom cottage attach-
ed to Ig. garage. Corner lot size
112%x165.
Why pay rent? Pay owner small
equity and assume mortgage. Mo.
payments of $72.00 on 3 bedroom
house.
2.84 acres on Wetapo Creek, $1,-
500.00 Terms.
For more information on these
and other real estate listings con-
tact Mrs. Jean Arnold.
MRS. JEAN ARNOLD
THE PRIDGEON AGENCY
Insurance Abstracts
301 Williams Av. Phone 7.7741
FOR SALE: Nice 2 bedroom house.
New paint, 75x100 lot. Terms.
308 15th St. J. C. Laney, Phone 227-
5871. 4tc-ll-7
LOST: Fishing tackle box. Lost be-
tween Mexico Beach pier and'
Port St. Joe. Finder return to T.
S. Singletary, phone 227-7341. lp
PECANS FOR SALE: 25c lb. Mixed
varieties. 523 9th St., W. J. Her-
ring. Phone 227-3941. 2tp-11-28
BE ASSURED of money for Christ-
mas shopping-part time work-
no experience necessary. Write
Avon Mgr., Mrs. Dorothy Martin,
P. 0. Box 3345, MSS, Tallahassee,
Fla. 3tc-11-28
SEPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call
Buford Griffin, Phone 227-7011
for quick expert service, tfc
WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION, meet-
ing second and fourth Tuesday
nights, 8:00 p.m. American Legion
Home.
IT'S EASY AND SAFE TO MOVE
THE MAYFLOWER WAYI
Aero Mayflower Transit Company
places a complete nation-wide long.
distance moving service at your
command! Whether your move is
a few hundred miles or thousands,
the Mayflower System assures sat-
isfactory service. If you're planning
to move why not call your local
Mayflower agents, S UR P LU S
SALES of ST. JOE, Today. Just
Phone 227-2011. Across from the
Post Office.
LET US SHOW YOU our beautiful
line of Christmas cards. Stop by
The Star or call 227-3161.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Meet
every Wednesday night, 8 p.m.
at Parish House, 309% 6th St. Port
St. Joe, Fla. Phone 229-336d fcr
Iur-her information or write P. 0.
Eux 535.


SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0,
0. F.-Meets second and fourth
Thursday, 8:00 p.m. in American
Legion Hall. All members urged to
attend.
Noble Grand: Emmett Daniel)
Secretary: J. C. Martin.
THERE WILL BE a regular corn
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F. & A. M., every first
and third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.


ROBERT L. CREAMER, W. M,
H. L. BURGE, Sec.
R. A. M.-Regular convocation ox
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A
M, 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit
ing companions welcome.
Edgar L. Smith, High Priest
Roy L. Burch, Secretary
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTIN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
NATIONAL LIFE INSURANCE
COMPANY,
a Vermont corporation,
Plaintiff,
-vs--
ESTON CLEMENTS et ux,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT
THE STATE OF FLORIDA
To: Eston Clements, whose resi-
dence is Cairo, Georgia. His mail-
ing address is Post Office Box 417,
Cairo, Georgia.


Flowers Thrive

On Love and Care
A beautiful garden is like the
vow-for better or for worse-because
flowers also thrive on love and
care.
So to keep from being divorced
from a living beauty, start off your
romance of flowers quite warmly.
That is, bake the soil prior to fill-
ing the seed flats. Sterilizing the
soil insures healthy seedlings for
transplanting. Baking soil at 160
degrees for two hours will kill ne-
matodes, weed seed and damping-
off organisms. Formalin will alsq
cleanse soil.
Damping-off of seed and seed-
lings is the risk you run if you fail
to treat t h e seed or sterilize t h e
soil.
There are two types of damping-
off fungus that are responsible for
poor stand or weakened plants, ac-
cording to Dr. H. N. Miller, plant
pathologist with the University of
Florida Agriculture Experiment
Station.
Pre-emergence damping-off rots
the seedlings before the young
sprouts break through the soil. This
phase of the disease is most severe
in cool, wet soils when germination
is slow.
Post-emergence disease attacts
the seedlings. Succulent stems be-
come blackened and watersoaked
at the ground line. Plants wilt and
fall. The roots decay and plants die.
Treating flower seeds with pro-
tectant dusts such as Arasan, Cer-
esan, Cuprocide, Semesan or Sper-
gon prevents losses. It takes prac-
tically no time at all.
For small packets of seeds, place
a pinch of the protectant dust in
the packet with the seed and shake
it vigorously until all the seed are
coated. This coating of fungicide
will kill or inhibit the organism on
the seed, or in the soil, and provide
temporary protection during ger
mination.
Dr. Miller advises sowing seed in
flats rather than in the open. By
using flats it is easier to control
growing conditions-especially dur
ing the cool days ahead.
Almost any shallow box can be
converted into a flat. Be sure the
bottom of the box has plenty of
holes or cracks to allow good drain
age. Soil for the flat should be fer
tile, containing a f a i r amount of
organic matter.

Hilda B. Clements, whose resi
dence is Cairo, Georgia. Her mail
ing address is Post Office Box 417
Cairo, Georgia.
You are hereby notified that a
suit has been filed against you in
the above entitled cause, and thai
you are required to file your an
swer with the Clerk of this Court
and to serve a copy thereof upon
the plaintiff or plaintiff's attor-
neys, whose name and address is
Jennings, Watts, Clarke and Hamil-
ton, 1200 Barnett National Bank
Building, Jacksonville 2, Florida,
not later than December 31, 1963.
If you fail to do so a decree pro
confess will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint. This suit is to foreclose
a mortgage. The real property pro-
ceeded against is:
Lot 26 in Block 69, according to
the plat of the re-subdivision of
all Blocks 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73,
74 and 75, according to Official
Map No. 12 of Port St. Joe, Flor-
ida, filed the 29th day of June,
1925, as same appears on file in
the office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court in Gulf County,
Florida.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court at WeWahitchka,
Florida, this 23rd day of Novem-
ber, 1963.
/s/ GEORGE Y. CORE
Clerk of the Circuit Court
(COURT SEAL) 4t-11-28


Before transplanting the annuals
from the flats into the garden, free
the garden soil of nematodes, fungi
and weed seeds. There are several
chemicals you can use. The most
ettective is methyl bromide. How-
ever, you may choose other mater-
ials such as vapam and Mylone.
A few annuals that can be seeded
now are baby's breath, blanket flo-
wer, blue-eyed African daisy, but-
terfly flower, California poppy,
calliopsis, carnation, candytuft,
C h i n e s e forget-me-not, Flora's
paintbrush, larkspur, petunia, pop-
py, snapdragon and verbena.
Window Boxes
A good soil mixture, planting ma
trial adapted to the exposure and
plant care are necessary for a suec
cessful window-sill project. A sug
gested s o i 1 mixture for the house
plants is equal parts of sand, peal
moss and good garden soil. To each
bushel mix in a half pound of com
plete fertilizer, such as 6-6-6 or
8-8-8.
It's a good idea to grow not over
t w o o r three kinds of plants per
window box. You'may like to con
sider color combinations, too. Thi:
could include blue, pink and white
red, white and blue; red and yel
low; o r red with white. Trailing
vines and green foliage plants go
well with all of these.
Suggested plants for growing ii
window boxes are begonias, coleus
ferns, wandering jew, vinca, gerar
iums, pansies, petunias, portulaca
marigolds, nasturtiums and ver
benas.
Don't be too anxious to prune ou
"dead" wood from your shrubs fol
lowing a cold snap. Cold will often
defoliate branches without killing
the wood. If you cut out wood soo:
after a c o 1 d wave you might di:
cover that you have cut live wood
So let the shears stay in the she'
until you're sure of the exact e3
tent of cold damage.


Cancer Meeting

Set In Marianna

How men and women who ar
y interested in the fight against cal
cer can contribute their service:
" learn more about problems of can
cer and become volunteers in th
e American Cancer Society will b
told at the six-county, District 2
f Cancer Education Conference t
- be held Wednesday, December ,
- at the Hotel Chipola in Marianna.
f There is no admission charge t
the session which starts at 1:0
p.m., and an open invitation is ex
- tended to all interested citizens c
Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gulf, Jack
son and Liberty counties.
The meeting will be hosted b
the Society's Jackson County Uni
It will be called to order at 1:3
p.m., with Will W. Taylor, Marian
na, District 2 Lay Delegate Direc
tor, presiding. Rev. D. W. Pooh
Sneads, will pronounce the invoca
tion and the Hon. Fred Harris, Ma
yor, City of Marianna will give th


er will be L. H. Peterson, Tampa,THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.
Executive Vice President, Florida THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1963
Division of the American Cancer
Society. His subject will be, "The
American Cancer Society's Fue. bowled a 404 series for Jitney Jun-


I


welcome message. "
Subjects which will be present- B i- *w
ed and discussed during the pro- OWing News


gram, by authoritative speakers,
will include the following: "A Mo-
ment of Discovery", a film show-
ing dealing with Cancer Research.
This will be followed by a discus-
sion led by E. B. White, M.D.,
Blountstown, Medical Advisor of
the Society's Calhoun Unit. At 3:45
p.m., Richard Schultz, M.D., Mar-
ianna and Joseph Morris, M.D.,
Panama City will present, "Can
Cancer Be Cured?", followed by a
question and answer period. The
conference dinner will be held at
5:30 p.m., Tom Haney, Panama City
presiding. The after dinner speak-


LADIES COFFEE LEAGUE
St. Joe Natural Gas Company
really went after Amison Seafood
Thursday morning and set them
back three to one. Bowling high
for St. Joe Natural Gas was Wanda
Oglesby with a 399 series. Janet
Heath was next with a 397 series.
High bowler for Amison Seafood
was Verna Burch, bowling a 433
series. Doris Amison bowled a 414
series.

Jitney Jungle moved up by tak-
ing all four points from West Flor-
ida Gas Company. Ruth Ramsey


tions In Cancer Control."
Cancer Education literature will
be available, without cost, to those
who are attending the conference
which will adjourn at 8:30 p.m.


Miss Ann Miller

Honored At Coffee
Miss Ann Miller, bride-elect of
December 28 was honored with an
informal coffee on Wednesday
morning, November 20 at the home
of Mrs. Fennon Talley at 1610 Mon-
ument Avenue. Other hostesses for
the occasion were Mrs. Walter Du-
ren and Mrs. Chauncey Costin.
Greeting the guests with Miss
Miller were her mother, Mrs. La-
mar Miller and Mrs. Fennon Talley.
The home was beautifully decor-
ated with Thanksgiving arrange-
ments and fall flowers.
The table was overlaid with a
white linen cutwork tablecloth
with a cranberry cloth underneath.
Assisting with the serving were
Miss Elizabeth Crowne, Mrs. Tom-
my Pridgeon, Mrs. Blair Shuford
and Mrs. Jimmy Costin.
Miss Miller was presented a sil-
ver trivet by the hostesses.
About 60 friends called during
the appointed hours.



Kiwanis Hear Talk

On Americanism
Byron McKissack of Carrabelle
spoke to the Kiwanis Club Tues
" day at noon on the subject "Whal
Do You Stand For?" in the line of
Americanism,
McKissack, who is one of the
I planners of Florida's teaching pro
- gram of "Communism vs. Ameri
- canism", told the club that al
citizens were either right winger
t or left wingers, some father ii
one direction than others bu
. nobody straddles the fence.
r The speaker offered the opinion
that far right wingers were gooi
r for the nation, causing us to thin]
r of the destiny and purpose of ou
. nation. He pointed out that since
s the creation of the-phrases "left
; and "right" wingers not a single
I, "right winger" has been brought
g to trial as a traitor. Only left wing
o ers have had this "distinction".
The speaker stated that we mus
n be actively for or against one sid
or the other. America provides s
.- much for its people, that it require
a, much in return namely goo
r- citizenship in every realm.
McKissack blamed Oswald's en
t bracing communism on his lack c
I- teaching at home and the failure
n of the school system to teach th
g true story of what Communism rea
n ly is. He also stated that the boy
s- and girls of today are not eve
1. taught simple Americanism, an
d this, he said, is in his opinion whi
x- caused Lee Oswald to be able I
shoot President Kennedy lac
of information and lack of pu
pose.
He declared that the youth (
today may face another Korea son
day and they must know who the
are facing and why they must pu
the trigger.
re McKissack stated that America
n- only danger was from an erodir
s, character. He said this factor
n- painfully evident today. Years ag
.e man's word was sufficient for
e binding contract, bank loan or ar
2, other bargain. Now one must hav
o a contract written down in an ai
4, tight contract to trust his fello
man.
o The speaker said there are re
0 sons for such actions but no e:
x- cuses.
if The reasons are that parents a:
k- not starting from the cradle 1
teach their children honesty, ho;
y or and integrity. These three thin
t. are necessary in the makeup of
0 dependable man and they must I
:- taught, not at school or church bti
e- at home!
e, "Americans must assume the
a- individual responsibilities just
a- our forebears did, or our nation
e is doomed".


No. 1


Drive-In Theatre
Apalachicola, Florida

Thurs., Fri., Nov. 28, 29
Special Thanksgiving Show
Elvis Presley in
Kid Galahad
In Color -

Saturday, November 30
DOUBLE FEATURE -
Randolph Scott in
Buchanan Rides
Alone
also -
James Stewart in
Mountain Road


Sun., Mon., Tues., Dec. 1, 2, 3
Elvis Presley in
Love Me Tender

FREE CARLOAD NIGHT
Wednesday, Dec. 4

Beast of Paradise
Isle


I


gle. Mary Brown bowled a 367 ser-
ies for West Florida Gas. Aline Ab-
rams was next with a 322 series.
Team No. 8 sneaked up and took
three games allowing Faye's Sea-
food only one. Bowling high for
Team No. 8 was Fern Guilford,
bowling a 325 series. Ann Whittle
bowled a 409 series for Faye's Sea-
food. Alice Machen bowled a 406
series. Faye Gardner bowled a 344.
Faye's Seafood Grill was really
bowling, but it was just not their
day.
The Whitfield Strikers also won
three games allowing Rich's Super
Market one. Jerry Freeman was
high for the Whitfield Strikers
with a 344 series. Rich's Super
Market's Gloria Morgan was high
with a 379 series. Norma Zeigler
picked up a real difficult split 2-
7-10. (Good going Norma).







Opening Times
Sat. 12:45 p.m.
Sun. 2:45 p.m.
Mon.-Fri. ............ 4:45 p.m.

THURSDAY FRIDAY
....' ....M-G-MPresents........



LOUIS JOURDAN
ELSA MARTINELLI
MARGARET RUTHERFORD
MAGGIE SMITH
ROD TAYLOR
*AND
t ORSON WELLES


-PANAVISION" and METROCOLOR
.-
1 SATURDAY ONLY
s
t

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k
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e





e .
0 AMERICAN INTERr NATIONAL

d


f JOCK MAHONEY -
e
e SUNDAY MONDAY


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