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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01451
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 29, 1963
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01451

Full Text









THE STAR

"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"


TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA,


THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 1963


Group Presents Petition


To Commission


Good Crowd Attends Jaycee Teacher Reception Sunday


More than 200 people were in attendance
Sunday afternoon at a reception honoring Port
St. Joe area teachers for the school year beginning
tomorrow.
The annual event, sponsored by the Port St.
Joe Jaycees and Jayceettes, was held at the Stac
House.
I Refreshments of punch and cookies were
served to the teachers and guests in attendance.


ETAOIN SHRDLU
By V' ESLEY R. RAMSEY


We used to think that Al Capp
was; sort of "touched" when he
would sing the praises of catfish
eye-ball stew in his comical strip
"Lil Abner".
But come to find out, Mr. Capp
has some disciples along this line
among the local gentry.
And some of them are educated
enough to know better.
We have also learned that we
have some "fellow gourmets" with
us who will turn stomach aside at
the, mention of catfish eye-ball
stew.
Hubert Richards, local educator
with the Gulf County school sys-
tem and resident of several years
in Port St. Joe is the chief ex-
ponent of this dish.
Hubert is so fond of the eye-balls
in 'his catfish stew that he also
leaves that area surrounding the
eye-ball all the way back to the
fish's neck in his stew. And he
voliches for the superb flavor of
this dish.
'Vhile we have never tasted the
disb, the listing of ingredients-
mainly the main ingredient .
that part of the catfish from snout
to .heck-causes us to describe it
with adjectives other than "su-
perb". The word "flavor" we can
understand.
Weldon Roche goes along with
Hubert.
But come to think of it, both of
these self-styled "specialists" on
the finest of catfish stew come
from Vernon and thereabouts.
Suppose this could have some-
thing to do with their peculiar
tastes?
They also eat chitlin's.
*. *: *
It looks like the realization of
a State Park on St. Joseph's
Point will become a reality by
next summer.
The Government has finally
gone through its red tape and
all but finally released the land
to be turned into a park.
Chairman Jesse Stone, his co-
workers and the legion of citi-
zens who offered their supoprt
in this project are to be com-
mended on a project well-pre-
sented and followed through to
completion.
This project has required a
considerable amount of timp, leg
work and down-right hard labor
to bring to fruition. But at no
time did we see any signs of
discouragement or let-up by
those working on the project.
They gave it all they had and
as such the case should be, when
(Continued On Page 4)


Pictured above, left to right are, Hubert Rich-
ards, County Supervisor; Bob Freeman, Jaycee
teacher welcome project chairman; Allen Scott,
assistant principal, Port St. Joe High School;
Harry Herrington, Port St. Joe Elementary
School Principal; Wayne Saunders, Port St. Joe
High School Principal; Howard Blick, Highland
View Elementary School principal and Bob Ned-
ley, Jaycee president. (* photo)


Release of Proposed Park Site Land

On Point By Governient Seems Eminent


The realization of work accom-
plished came a step nearer this
week for establishment of a State
Park on St. Joseph Point.
Some 18 months of concentrated
effort and work has gone into the
project to get the area declared
suitable for a State Park and to
secure property on the Point from
the U. S. Government.
Presently the project is await-
ing release of land from the Gov-
ernment.
Release from, the Government
of some 12 miles of land on the
Point reached the next to the
last step this week, according to
a telegram received by Jesse
Stone, local park project chair-
man from Congressman Bob
Sikes. The telegram stated- that
the Secretary of Defense has ap-
proved declaration of the pro-
perty as surplus. The matter
is now before the House and
Senate for ratification, but ap-
proval from this source is ex-
pected shortly.
The telegram stated that nego-
tions can begin between, General
Services Administration and the
State of Florida, for purchase of
the land by the State Park Service
pending the approval of the House
and Senate,
Florida's outdoor recreational
expansion program got off to a
fast start Tuesday with the plan-
ning group's calling for $330,000
for specific projects In many
sections of the state,
Subject to final approval of
the State Cabinet, the planning
committee headed by Gov. Far.
ris Bryant proposed to spend
$100,000 in acquiring and devel-
oping 3,000-acre St. Joseph Pe-
ninsula near Port St. Joe as a
state park. This tract with a 20-
mile beach front is slated for ex-
tensive development throughout
the next few years.

Billy Graham Series
Will Be On TV
A series of televised Billy Gra-
ham crusade messages will begin
next Monday night, September 9
over WJHG-TV, Channel 7.
The telecasts will be of the Los
Angeles, California crusade and
will run Monday through Friday
nights.
The programs will be telecast
each night at the following Port
St. Joe times: Monday, 10:0') to
11:00 p.m.; Tuesday, 9:30 to 10:30
p.m,;- Wednesday, 10:00 to 11:00
p.m.; Thursday, 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
and Friday, 8:30 to 9:30 p.m.


Natural Gas Crews

Moving Into City
Crews began moving into Port
St. Joe yesterday, along with their
equipment and machinery to begin
construction of the gas pipeline
system in Port St. Joe for St. Joe
Natural Gas Co., Inc.
Edward B. Schafer, project en-
gineer for the Barnard and Burk
Engineering Company of Baton
Rouge, La., and Darwin Oglesby,
superintendent of construction for
Harbert Construction Company
have arrived in Port St. Joe and
are scheduled to begin work .on
the system some time this week.
Equipment was scheduled to be-
gin unloading yesterday and will
continue through today. Workmen
will begin today laying pipe on
the job sites throughout the city.
According to Oglesby, construc-
tion will begin probably early next
week on the actual burying of pipe
and laying of mains. He said that
approximately three months will
be needed to complete the system
but that customers would begin re-
ceiving natural gas in 60 days or
less.
Construction headquarters for
the project are in the Costin Build-
ing on Monument Avenue.
-p

Adult School

'Registers Wed.
Registration will be held all
day Wednesday, September 4 in
the Centennial Building for all
adults who plan to take part in
the educational opportunities of-
fered to adults of this community.
Tf you would like to learn, to
read and write, finish high school,
or take a refresher course in any
of the high school subjects you are
urged to come by and register and
get in on the first class.
If you are in doubt of your abil-
ity to do high school work, or in
case you might wonder what grade
you might be placed in please
come by and talk the matter over
with H. F. Ayers, the director.
A program of work can and will
be worked out to fit your needs
and desires.
A registration fee of $3.00 is all
it will cost to get started. Your
books and material will cost very
little.


American Legion

Urges Flag Display

The American Legion, Post
116, in Port St. Joe, urges all
business houses, individuals and
private homes who have the
American flag to display it on
Monday, September 3, which is
Labor Day.
The Legion Post is endeavor-
ing to make the local citizen as
well as visitors to Port St. Joe
conscious of our great heritage
and at the same time promote a
move to preserve this precious
inheritance. By the display of
the American flags on sidewalks,
front lawns, from the upper win-
dow or corner of the home,
those who pass and see the flag
should be reminded of his or
her duty to keep it ever waving.
The Legion strongly urges ev-
eryone who has an American
flag to display it on Monday,
thereby giving forth with their
part in America 'the beautiful.

City Voter 'Registration
Books Close Friday
The City's voter registration
books will close at 5:00 p.m. to-
morrow afternoon, according to
City Auditor and Clerk, J. B. Wil-
liams. -.
Those desiring to vote in Sep-
tember 10 primary election, but
not registered in the city, must do
so by tomorrow afternoon.
Those wishing to cast absen-
tee ba:lots must secure their bal-
lots and have them back in the
office of the City Clerk by Wed-
nesday, September 4 at 5:00
p.m. Absentee ballots are now
available in the office of the
City Clerk for those who will not
be in town on election day.


School Millage Is

Levied by County

The County Board officially
adopted millage for the School
Board Millage Tuesday night at a
rate of 22 mills, The budget calls
for 10 mills for county support
and maintenance fund; 10 mills
for District No. 1 current levy and
two mills for District Interest and
Sinking Fund each district.
The school board budget for the
year beginning July 1 will amount
to $1,105,891.00. Of this amount,
$314,567.00 will come from local
tax sources. The remainder of the
money will come from: State and
Federal Funds $729,341.00; Other
sources, $5,560.00 and balances on
hand at the end of the year, $80,-
020.00.
In expenditures, the School
Board will pay out $43,000.00 on
bonded indebtedness; $11,986.00 in
interest; $1,907.00 in commissions
and Other debt services, $150.00.
Instructional salaries, $700,453.00;
transportation, $46,000.00; Capital
Outlay, $12,500.0; Debt Service,
$14,390.00 and Operational Expen-
ses and Reserves, $332,548.00.

Police Issue Warning
About Noisy Mufflers
It has been brought to the at-
tention of City Police that the
practice of driving automobiles
without mufflers in the city has
begun to grow especially
among the younger set.
Several complaints have been
filed with the city as a result of
this noisy driving.
Chief of Police H. W. Griffin
and his crew has set out to "stop
noisy muflfers", as is the law in
Port St. Joe. An ordinance on the
books prohibits the driving of
autos with excessively noisy muf-
flers.
Chief Griffin urges that muf-
flers be put in use on all autos
before cases have to be made
against their owners.
-p
Visiting Musselwhites
Miss Hariett Musselwhite of
Bainbridge, Georgia is visiting at
St. Joe Beach with her brother
and family, Mr. and Mrs. Calvin
Musselwhite.


To Relocate County Seat

The Committee for Relocation of the Gulf County Seat, represented by Bob Fox,
vice-chairman, presented their petition to the Gulf County Commission Tuesday night
asking for an election to be held. The election, which the county must hold according
to Florida law will give the citizens of Gulf county the opportunity to decide whether
or not they desire to change the county seat.


County Chairman

Suggests Minor

Repairs to Jail

County Commission Chairman A.
J. Strickland. made the suggestion
Tuesday night that the county un-
dertake a project of making "min-
or repairs" to the Gulf County jail.
Strickland said that he had poll-
ed several people throughout the
county and found that their sen-
timents ran, along this line due to
a need for further taxes to con-
struct a new jail at this time.
The Commission has been order-
ed by the State Board of Correc-
tions and by Circuit Judge Warren
L. Fitzpatrick to make arrange-
ments for improved jail facilities.
They have ruled that the present
jail is in such bad repair as to be
almost unfit for housing prisoners.
The jail has been plagued by bad
plumbing problems for a number
of years and a great deal of rust-
ing and rotting of facilities is in
evidence.
Commissioner Leo Kennedy ad-
ded to the discussion that he felt
the security of the jail was ade-
quate but that some of the "com-
fort" repairs were badly needed.
Commissioner Walter Graham
offered the opinion that he thought
the jail needed more than "minor"
repairs. Graham stated, "I think
our best avenue of action would
be to repair the old jail, but the
needed repairs would be more than
"minor" in my opinion".
Commissioner James McDaniel
moved that the entire matter of
jail construction or repairs be
tabled until after the outcome of
the petition for relocation of the
county seat could be decided.

County Buys Fire Hose
The Gulf County Commission
voted Tuesday night to purchase
fire hose and equipment for the
Highland View Fire Department.
The Commission voted to pur-
chase 200 feet of 2% inch hose,
300 feet of 1 inch hose and 250
feet of one inch hose at a total
cost of $999.50.
The bid went to the Fire-End
Products Company, apparently the
only bidder meeting the county's
specifications.


The petition contained some 517
names of approximately 976 eligi-
ble to sign. The law requires a
third of those eligible to sign to
subscribe to the petition in order
to require an election to be held.
Only tax-paying registered voters
were eligible to sign the petition
but all registered voters in the
county will be eligible to help de-
cide whether or not the move is to
be made.
The petition was presented by
attorney J. Donaldson Jones of
Jones and Jones of Panama City
who represented the group of
petitioners.
Jones cited the petition as be-
ing drawn up under Section 138.01
of the Florida Statutes which re-
quires one third of qualified tax
paying electors to sign such a pe-
tition to call an election. The at-
torney told the Board that all the
signatures had been verified from
the records of the Supervisor of
Registration as correct.
The attorney pointed out that
many more than the one third re-
quired signatures were attached to
the petition.
Chairman Strickland accepted
the petition and passed it to at-
torney David Carl Gaskin for an
opinion of what move to make
next.
Gaskin stated that he 'wasn't ex-
pecting the petition to be present-
ed at Tuesday's meeting and need-
ed to do some research before he
advised the County Board on their
next move to make. He said he
would probably have an opinion
for the Board within the next two
days.
The petition, which requested
the County Board to hold a refer-
endum election on whether or not
the citizens of Gulf County desire
to move the county seat, was in
card form. Each card had the pe-
tition request printed at the top
and had the name of one tax-pay-
ing elector signed at the bottom.
Each petition card which had been
signed was also signed by a wit-
ness to the signature attached.
It is *now up to the county to
determine if the petition meets
the letter of the law and is pro-
perly executed and then it will be
their duty to set up election dates
and procedures if the petition is
found to be in order.
USE THE WANT ADS
USE THE WANT ADS


Architect Presents

Suggestion for New

County Jail House

Architect Norman P. Gross of
Panama City presented prelimin-
ary plans for a new jail and pro-
posed renovation of quarters now
occupied by the old jail in the
county courthouse at Tuesday
night's meeting of the County
Commission.
Gross had estimated figures for
cost of the new jail building out-
lined in his preliminary plans and
stated that it would c6st between
$135,000 and $145,000. In addition
he had estimates of $1,000 per an-
ticipated prisoner for equipping
the new jail. The State Board of
Corrections has recommended a
jail capable of caring for 50 pri-
soners for Gulf County.
In answering questions as to the
feasibility of repairing the old
jail, Gross said it could be done
but that the project would be cost-
ly. He stated that the nature of
the steel used in jails took special
equipment for working and that
repairs were almost impossible.
Gross offered the opinion that if
the old jail facilities were to be
reworked adequately, the best road
for the county to take would be to
discard all present equipment and
replace with new.
Gross said, "jail people don't
like to ,repair any equipment al-
ready installed due to the special
heat-treated steel employed in
jails."
The County had previously em-
ployed Gross' firmat at a retainer
fee of $1,000.00 to provide work-
ing sketches for new county jail
facilities.
p

Shark Boosters to

Meet Next Tuesday
The Port St. Joe Shark Boosters
will hold their first meeting for
the 1963-64 football season next
Thursday night, September 12 at
7:30 p.m.
The meeting will be held in the
High School Auditorium.
Those interested in promoting
the athletic program of St. Joe
High School are urged to attend.


Dixie Youth National League Champions Receive Trophies


RECEIVE TROPHIES-Pictured above is a portion
of the Port St. Joe Rotary Club, Dixie Youth Na-
tional League champions with trophies present-
ed them by the Rotary Club last Thursday. Pic-
tured left to right, front row are: Steve llatta-
way, Lamar Cannington, Pete Peters, Larry Young
and Steve Adams. Second row: Pete White,


James Cannington, Harry Young, Terry Parish
and Kenny Merritt. Back row: Coaches Foy Ad-
ams and Lamar Moore; Rotary President, Cecil
Curry and Club representative, J. Lamar Miller.
Not present at the awarding of trophies were
Charles Smith, Lamar Newsome, Billy Simmons
and Jim Simmons. (- photo)


1Oc

PER COPY


MONEY TALKS-Let's keep
it where we can speak with It
once In a while-Trade with
your home town merchants


NUMBER 50

















































Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Wil-
liams announce the engagement
and approaching marriage of
their daughter, Patricia Ann to
First Lieutenant Thomas A. Ara-
ta, USA, of Camp LeRoy Johnson,
son of Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Arata
of New Orleans, La.
The bride-elect is a graduate
of Port St. Joe High School, and
Massey Business College, Jack-
sonville.


The bridegroom-elect is a
graduate of Jesuit High School,
and L.S.U., where he was a mem-
ber of Phi Delta Theta fraterni-
ty.
The wedding will be an event
of Monday, December 30, at 10:00
A.M., EST in the St. Joseph's
Catholic Church. No invitations
are being sent, but all relatives
and friends of the couple are
invited to attend.


.. ~----- ---
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Smith Munn

Engagement Is

Announced

Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Smith of
Pine Bluff, Ark., announce the en-
gagement of her sister, Miss Eve-
lyn Jo Wood, also of Pine Bluff to
Boyd Herbert Munn, IM, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Boyd Herbert Munn of
Port St. Joe.
The bride-to-be was graduated
from Pine Bluff High School and
is a member of Beta Sigma Phi
Sorority. The groom-to-be wasI
graduated from Port St. Joe High
School, attended the University of
the South, Sewanee, Tenn., where
he was a member of Sigma Alpha
Epsilon social fraternity; Mexico
City College, Mexico City and Gulf
Coast Junior College, Panama City.
The announcement of Miss
Wood's engagement and appropch-
ing marriage to Mr. Munn is one
of wide interest, both young peo-
ple having a wide circle of ac-
quaintances throughout Arkansas
and Florida.
Vows will be exchanged by the
couple on Saturday, October twen-
ty-six at six in Trinity Episcopal
Church, Pine Bluff.

RELATIVES VISIT WITH
MRS. W. S. SMITH
Mrs. Catherine Coody, George
Coody and three sons, Billy, Eddie
and Michael, Mr. and Mrs. L. M.
Coody, Jr., and daughter, Debbie
and son Robin, arrived early Tues-
day, August 20 from North Adams,
Mass., to visit with Mrs. W. S.
Smith for a few days. They left
Saturday, accompanied by Mrs.
Smith to attend the annual Coody
reunion held at Jay Bird Springs
near Eastman, Ga. on August 25.
The Massachusetts visitors have en-
joyed swimming at Mexico Beach
while in our city.


of Sigma Theta Epsilon and Alpha
Phi Alpha.
His wife, Janice, is the daugh-
er of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Smith
1225 E. 113th St. Cleveland, Ohio.

Guests of W. L. Smiths
Mr. and Mrs. P. B. Fairley and
daughters, Joyce and Teresa of
Moss Point, Miss., were the recent
guests of Mrs. Fairley's parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Smith.


Family of

Mrs. Montgomery.

Have Reunion
All the children, grandchildren
and great grandchildren of Mrs.
Elizabeth Montgomery met at her
home in Oak Grove for dinner on
the ground Sunday, August 25.
Those attending were her daugh-
ter, Mrs. Duffy Lewis, with her
husband and daughter Patsy, all of
Port St. Joe; a son, S-Sgt. William
Montgomery with his wife and
daughter, Cindy of Cherry Point,
N. C., another son, A-1C James
Montgomery and wife from Brook-
ley Air Force Base, Mobile, Ala.;
a granddaughter, Mrs. John Alford
with her son, Richard from Orlan-
do. Also celebrating this family re-
union with Mrs. Montgomery was
the family of Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Richardson, also of Port St. Joe.
James Montgomery and his wife
left for their home in Mobile after
the reunion. Bill Montgomery and
family and Mrs. Alford and son re-
mained in Port St. Joe for a few
days.


Geo. T. Williams

Undergoes Training
GREAT LAKES, ILL (FHTNC)-
George T. Williams, 18, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Edgar M. Williams of
Port St. Joe, is undergoing nine
weeks basic training at the Naval
Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill.
The intensive recruit training pro-
gram includes naval orientation,
history and organization, ordnance
and gunnery, seamanship, sentry
duty and military drill, damage
control, shipboard routine, physi-
cal fitness, swimming, first aid
end survival.
During their training period re-
cruits receive tests and interviews
which determine their future as-
signunents in the Navy.
Upon completing the training
program they are assigned to ser-
vice schools for technical instruc-
tion or to ships or shore stations
for on-the-job training in a Navy
rating specialty.


Ronald W. Parrish

Aboard Destroyer
USS BIGELOW (PHTNC)- Ron
ald W. Parrish, seaman, USN, soB
of Mr. and Mrs. Troy C. Parrish oJ
1015 Woodward ave. Port St. Joe,
Fla., is serving aboard the destory-
er USS BIGELOW, part of Destroy.
er Squadron 16 and currently de-
ployed on five months duty with
the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterran-
ean.
She is a Forrest Sherman class
general-purpose destoryer. Her pri.
mary mission is antisubmarine
operations, for which BIGELOW
displays the Squadron "E" Award
for battle efficiency.
BIGELOW recently returned
from six weeks refresher training
in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and also
took part in other recent Carib-
bean operations.
Ports of call during her Medit-
erranean cruise will include coast-
al cities in France, Greece and
Spain.
BIGELOW normally operations
out of Mayport Fla. as an Atlantic
Fleet unit.

CAPT. C. L. McNAIR
COMPLETES COURSE
GUNTER AFB, Ala.-Doctor
(Captain) Clarence L. McNair of
1280 Milton, Akron, Ohio, who re-
cently came on active duty in the
United States Air Force has com-
pleted the orientation course for
officers of the Medical Service
here.
The doctor, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Damon McNair of 149 Ave. "D",
Port St. Joe, Fla. was given fam-
iliarization instruction covering
administrative procedures, military
medicine and medical service sup-
port. of USAF objectives.
Captain McNair is being reassig-
ned to the U.S. Air Force hospital
at Dover AFB, Del. He will join the
staff there for practice as a den-
tist.
Doctor McNair attended Kent
(Ohio) State University, and Ohio
State University. He has B.A. and
D.D. S. degrees, and is a member


One thing about it it's a
lovely day for air condition-
ing. Now wouldn't it be nice
to go home to cool, cool,
electric comfort? Why wait?
It doesn't cost much. Look
into electric air conditioning
today and spend the rest of
the summer living in cool
comfort. ,'


OFFER GOOD .t ,
JUNE I Instant
AUG. 31 O
A Comfort
Elect.



FLORIDA
POVJER
CORPORATION





WORLD WIDE PICTURES
presents
THE DRAMATIC
BILLY GRAHAM
EVANGELISTIC FILM


High School Auditorium
Friday, Sept. 6-8 P.M.


St. James Church Kiwanis Hears

Plans Meetings History Teacher

History of the Christian Church, The Port St. Joe Kiwanis Club
her faith and practices will be the received two new members into
subject of meetings for the next their club Tuesday at their regu-


White City VFD Auxiliary
Will Meet Wednesday
The White City Volunteer Fire
Department ladies auxiliary will
meet Wednesday, September 4 at
10:00 at the White City Commun-
ity Building.
Mrs. Claude Weston and Mrs.
John Tanner will be hostesses.
All members are urged to at-
tend.
----..-._....----
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to take this opportunity
to offer our heart-felt thanks to
our many friends of this area for
their kiAdnesses, prayers and well-
wishes during the illness of our
wife and mother, Mrs. Bill Roe-
mer.
Your concern and acts of kind-
ness have been more than appre-
ciated.
The family of
MRS. BILL ROEMER









How COOL

WILL-YU BE

WHEN You

GET HOME ?
.... R, ii:


several weeks at St. James Epis-
copal Church, according to the
Rector, the Rev. Harry L. Babbit.
The congregation invites all per-
sons interested in discussion of
these topics to meet next Tuesday,
Sept. 3, at 8:30 p.m. at which as-
sembly the time of future weekly
gatherings will be determined.
The Rev. Mr. Babbit advises that
this is a program presented period-
ically for inquirers and that this
series will be concluded on Nov. 3
with a visitation by the Bishop of
Florida. All persons interested in
reviewing the history, faith and
pracitce of the Christian Church
will be welcome. Laymen of St.
James will assist in presenting
portions of the series.

Garden Club Changes 'Plans
The Port St. Joe Garden Club
-has announced that a change in
the date for give away of a televi-
sion set has been made. Due to
summer vacations and so many
people being out of town. the date
for giving the television set away
has been changed to Saturday, Oc-
tober 5.


VONZIEL'S SCHOOL of DANCING
Will hold registration, Tuesday, September 3. At the
Stac House 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
CLASSES WILL BE TAUGHT IN:
Tap Ballet Toe Modern Jazz
Acrobatic Ballroom
Pre-School Beginner Intermediate Advance


TELEPHONE: BAll 7-4191
Sun., Frl., Holidays 2:4 p.m.
Mon. thru Thurs. 4:46 pm..

THURSDAY

BLAZING A NEW TRAIL OF COURAGE
JAMES ALAA JOOY t ,
MITCHUMH LAOD McCREA




Leis e






KENT TAYLOR-MARIE WINDSOR
SWILLIAM MIMS- O*t .'

FRIDAY and SATURDAY

JERRY LEWIS












IE TRAP" MAPTHA H'ER
"THE T "^ -s ? DAPFEJ MGAVIN
TECHNICOLOR' A .i
Lth Carl Benton Reid* Chuck Wassil


SUNDAY through THURSDAY



THEY FOLLOWED THE APACHE TRAIL


BRIAN TOMMY MARTA KEVIN DEWEY JEFF RAFAEL Stif
KEITH.-KIRK- KRISTEN. CORCORAN MARTIN YORK. CAMPOS *PICKENS
Released tc BUENA VISIA
| IIIIIm o
I III1-,


Engagement Announced


II


lar meeting.
Installed as members were Rev.
Dave Neese, new pastor of the
Presbyterian Church and Wayne
Saunders, new principal of the
Port St. Joe High School.
Guest speaker for Tuesday's
meeting was O. P. Holt, democracy
and history teacher at the High
School. Holt, a retired Army man,
spoke of some of his experiences
throughout the world with the Ar-
my. Some of these experiences
took him behind the Iron Curtain.
Guests of the club were Ed Clar-
no of Fort Walton Beach, John
Hansen of Port St. Joe and Law-
rence Dozier and son of Chatta-
nooga, Tenn.

Guests of J. 0. Lucas'
Guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. 0. Lu-
cas last week were Mr. and Mrs.
R. N. Parker and son, Cha.:les P'k-
ert from Springhill, La.
Visitors r-o'n Texas
Mrs. Roy Hellen and daughter,
Karole and Mrs. J. B. Traweek of
Wichita Falls, Texas are visiting
with friends and relatives.












THE STAR
Published Every Thursday At 306 Wlllhamn Avenue, Port 8t. Joe. FPWI t
By The Star Publishing Company
WESLEY R. RAMSEY Editor and Pu4hfw
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Salesman, Photographer. Cotumnit, Reporter '
Reader, Bookkeeper and Complaint Department
DIAL 227-3161 POSTOFFICE Box 308
I ~--
Entered as second-class matter. December 19, 1987, at the Postoffice. Port St. Joe
Florida, under Act of March 8, 187I.

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, 3.06 IiX MONTHS, $1.75 THREE MONTHS., 1273

TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissilona In advertisements, the publlabhra
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount ecetd tm 0
advertisement.


The Petition Is Presented


The first step has been taken now for the people of
Gulf County to decide if they want to move the county seat
to another location or to leave it where it is.
A petition bearing the signatures of more than half of
the tax-paying electors in Gulf County was presented to
the Board last night, requesting the Board to call a special
,election to this effect.
This question should be decided at this time.
It is adamant that the County spend a good deal of mon-
ey during the next few years on the old court house. It
needs renovating and the State Correctional Division is
demanding that Gulf build a new jail.
Estimates on the complete job run as high as a half
million dollars.
Proponents of the deciding election as to the location of
the county seat, point out that an adequate and beautiful
courthouse for Gulf county may also be built new for
'this sum of money.
Estimates drawn out of the blue on the new jail are in
the neighborhood of $200,000.00. This would include quar-
ters for the Sheriff's Department.
One entire wing of the court house is now taken up by
the Sheriff's Department and the jail.
It is only proper to expect that this area of the court-
house would be re-worked to make additional office space.
Renovation of this wing would be expensive to say the least.
Many pounds of iron bars would have to be cut out along with
extensive renovations. Such renovations would be foolish
unless they should bring the wing up to modern, efficient
standards. This would take a lot of money.
And with a newly remodeled and modernized wing, it
would be almost imperative that the remainder of the court-
house be brought up to the standards set by the remodeled
area. This too would cost a lot of money.
The courthouse is old. It has the old-fashioned high
ceilings. It has oiled-board floors. Both extremes mean
costly renovations to bring them up to date. Air condi-
tioning and proper heating facilities would also be "proper"
after an extensive remodeling job. Face-lifting of the out-
side would be expected.
So, with the vote coming uip, it isn't a question of whe-
ther or not we wish to see the money spent on court house
facilities. The money will be spent. The question to be
decided is whether or not to move the court house and spend
the money in the South end of the county where two-thirds
of the people in the county live, or to spend the money on
renovating the present facilities.
In either event, it will mean taxes to be spent on the
project. And ironically enough, it is those who must pay the
great bulk of the taxes that want the move made and the
money spent.
(

Cooperation Needed for Faculty i

Another session of the Gulf county school system gets t
under way this morning. d
Much new leadership and many new faculty members l
are on hand to greet the students. f
These changes came about by the happening of unfor-
tunate events last school term.
It appears that the School Board has replaced able ad- i
ministrators with other able administrators to carry on the t
work. e
And, if the crowd of people in attendance at the Jaycee I
teacher reception Sunday afternoon is any indication, the t
new faculty beginning the school year, will get the coopera- e
tion of the parents in making for a successful school year. '
We think this is a good sign. With able people in charge and
cooperation from parents of the community, our school sys- ,
tem can come up to its full potential and continue to offer c
a quality education to the students of Port St. Joe and sur- I
rounding area.
We fervently hope that animosities will be laid aside and p
replaced with cooperation and interest of the welfare of the a
students and that this will be a harmonious and instructive c
school year for our students.


School Bells Again! -
t
c
Everyone's view of summer is different depending on I
his responsibilities, opportunities, and role in life. Many r
mothers very probably feel it has been long, noisy, busy and
hot. But a good many million children and dogs probably h
find it hard to believe that three months could have sped so
quickly and that the school doors are about to open once e
again. f
The sounds and smells and experiences of summer vaca-
tion are still an important part of growing up. But there
have been changes. The automobile and airplane have vastly
extended the scope of things that can be seen on a vacation c
trip. School has changed too, as the frontiers of man's know- <
ledge have been pushed back so rapidly in recent years.
The amount of knowledge that must be packed into the t
heads of children in grade school and high school has vastly


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 19

increased.
As school bells ring again, let's salute our young pec
ple and those who guide them through ever more complicate
fields of learning. In the great affairs of nations, in science
and in the complicated business of leading a good and worth
while life, our need has never been greater for concerned
intelligent, educated men and women.



James A. Farley, Realist

As a prophet, James A. Farley who has been but sel
dom in the public eye in recent years, is not without honoz
in his own country.
More than 300 of the nation's most seasoned political
reported and most influential columnists support the stirr
ing appeal for "decisive action" presented in his "Creed for
a Time of Danger" in the July Reader's Digest. And if there
are any calling him "an alarmist or even a warmonger", as
he said he expected, they are keeping their voices very low.
The views of the nation's top reporters were pretty well
summed up by Jack Meddoff of the Buffalo (N.Y.) Evening
News when he wrote: "James Farley has better common
sense judgment fast asleep than those calling him names
possess wide awake." And the 300 who were polled go along
with Sanford E. Stanton of the N. Y. Journal American in
describing Mr. Farley as a "realist, not an alarmist".
There is some division, however, in the matter of our
"image" abroad. Two-thirds share the author's fear that
Red leaders are contemptuous of the "fighting spirit" of the
average American, while the others believe our will to resist
Communist aggression is well understood and respected.
Emphasizing the latter position, Clyde Walthall of the Cof-
feyville, Kan., Daily Journal declares that lacking such re-
spect, "the Russians would have triggered World War III
long before Khrushchev came to power."
But practically all are in agreement with Mr. Farley
when he says: "The map proves that we are not moving
toward war with the Communists; they are moving war
toward us."
"Anyone who does not believe this," says Jack K. Over-
myer, editor and publisher of the Rochester, Ind., Sentinel,
"simply has had his head in a sack for 15 years."
As for what to do about it, the following steps were
urged:
Direct action in Cuba in defense of the hemisphere.
Firmness at Geneva and in other international con-
ferences.
A bipartisan Congress where foreign policy is involved.
Stop foreign aid to Communist and "Neutral" coun-
tries.
Mr. Farley, in his Digest article says: "How, when and
where the will of the American people must exert itself is
the decision solely of the President." Every citizen, he
thinks, should let the President know that he stands behind
him "in the awful risk, confident that. he will exert that
will-only because he can do naught else-and again prayer-
ful htat it is also the will of God, in whom we trust".
There should be no need of pollsters to establish our
endorsement of these words.



Attorney General of the Air Force?

Senator Barry Goldwater, a major general in the Air
Force Reserve, sees in the Defense department's civil rights
program "the threat of a military take over should things
change in the country and we find the military commanders
have become used to running politics and the social life of
he community."
The Arizona Republican expressed this concern in at-
tacking, on the floor of the Senate, the Pentagon order that
directs commanders of military establishments to place off
limits nearby areas where "relentless discrimination" is
found.
Senator Goldwater charged that the directive "started
n the Attorney General's office" and demanded an investiga-
ion of the recent tour of military bases by the newly-appoint-
ed Deputy Assistant Secretary for Civil Defense, Alfred B.
'itt, who, he said, was "completely armed with dossiers on
he businessmen of the community, dossiers complete with
very figure the committee (Presidential Committee on Equal
opportunity ) can get out of income tax returns."
Democratic Senators John Stennis of Mississippi and
Strom Thurmond of South Carolina backed the Goldwater
harge that the Pentagon order put the military in politics.
n the view of Senator Stennis, chairman of the Senate Pre-
?aredness Sub-committee, it "places the members of our
rmed forces in the mainstream of swirling political currents
.nd, unless rescinded, will keep them there for years to
ome".
The Pentagon admitted that a group of Defense offi-
ials recently visited Air Force bases at Biloxi, Greenville
nd Columbus, Miss.; Mobile, Ala.; and Shreveport, La., and
hat Mr. Fitt was on part of the tour-'where off-base dis-
rimination problems had been known to exist". But the
Department denied that Mr. Fitt or any others had infor-
nation from income tax records or Government files.
It would seem to us that the Defense Department might
lave its hands pretty fully running the Army, the Navy, the
&ir Force, the Marine Corps and in maintaining and strength-


ening our defenses against the most cunning, ruthless and
far-flung enemies the nation has ever faced-without un-
iertaking to police civil rights.
However, the Goldwater charge of the use of "police
state" tactics, would seem to revolve around the question
of whether or not Mr. Fitt and his group have used, as the
Senator said, "the full force of the Internal Revenue docu-
ments". When the facts have been established by investiga-
tion it will then be time to determine the proper scope of
niitary duty.


63 reaction of Calvin MC Gurt feat- apparent in the traditional arrang-
Country-"ospel ures the excellent voice of Trudy events that will trill the Mexico
Mcnabb. This Quartet, in addition Beach audiences as they have
o MUSIC p 0gram to a full schedule of personal ap- audiences throughout the nation.
o ITIUSId pearances, has also appeared in
e, such TV serials as Laramie, Wagon
- Set At Beach Train and Outlaw Recently the or Job Printing It's
G" --- Dsingers worked with that outstand-
S Two Country and Gospel Music ing NBC singer Betty Johnson. THE STAR
Their sincerity and talent is
variety soows are planned for Mex-
ico Beach during the Labor Day
week end. Under the sponsorship t-
of the Tri Beach Association. The
shows will begin at 8:30 PM EST
on Saturday August 31 and Sunday EVERYONE SA VES A T
September first. According to Bill
Lyles, president of the sponsoring \ \
r group, each show will be entirely
different.
l The Country music fans will be
delighted with such outstanding
Talent as Jim Nesbitt and his band.
r Jim is till riding a crest of popular-
e ity following the release of his
"PLEASE MR. KENNEDY". Also
appearing in this show will be the
l pton with the Showmen. Stemp-
ton's group is just recently back yd "
in the South following a week long
Carson City engagement where .
they shared billing with the Sun. ...
hine Boys Old Red and his Tro- \ H
upe are well known, locally, as a 1 H
result of being chosen as the Coun-
try music group for a recent FSU ,
home coming.
Rounding out the Country music "
segment of the shows will be Two ALWAYS
Nationally known Singers. From
Nashville, Tennessee is 22 year t \ FIRST
old Ott Stevens. Ott, a Georgia Boy
who lists Ringgold as his home QUALITY
town is signed to Frank Sinatra's
"Reprise" Label with a long term
contract. This past May reprise
released "somebody left the gates
of Heaven Open", and it is now
climbing on the national charts. .
Stevens, a former country music
DJ will also be remembered for his
"Oh Broken Hearted Me", Robert
E. Lee and "Big Boys Don't Cry". n- .
Another Georgia boy who now ,
calls Millen his home is Frank
Taylor. Frank brings to Mexico
Beach a solid background of coun-
try music entertainment along MISSES' AND WOMEN'S
with a couple of the records. His
first successful disc was "A Part
o f You" cut in 1961. The next,
careful consideration was "SnowT nOo
White Cloud", that hit the charts
Sh tateR EG 1.99
in just five weeks after release. RE 1.9
Taylor, now 29 years old has recen-3 DAYS N LY
tly returned from Nashville where 3 DAYS ONLY
a recording session produced what Long w e ar n g heavy duck
may well be another big hit. uppers, non-skid rubber soles.
"The Georgian's"', a group that's -Machine washable. Cushioned
been called "Georgia's Favorite arch and insole. Sizes 5 to 8,
Gospel singers" will provide the 8 to 3, 4 to 0.
gospel music fans with a well
rounded program of gospel and SPECIAL! BOYS'
spiritual music. I L BOYS
"The Georgian's" under the Dir- Blazer Socks


Sharpening 5Ila er St ONL
Saws Knives Scissors 25c SELLER--3 DAYS ONLY C
Shears Lawn Mowers Fine 100% spun cotton with W
"Anything that cut' reinforced hee I and toe.
Ayt tha Assorted, colorful bI az er
Ray L. Brant stripes. Sizes 6 to 11.
1805 Garrison Ave.
Phone 227-7091'


- h


o .Prove /t








WOMEN'S

CORDUROY


CAPRI PANTS


1.99 V1'1!E 44
3 DAYS NMY
AT THIS PMRCE!

SFine Qualify Pin-Wale and Mid-Wale
Corduroy
e New Fall Solid Colors and Fancy Prints
e Narrow Waist Band, Side Zipper
e Completely Washable e Sizes 10 to 18


ALWAYS FIRST QUALITY


,- -







- 94 _


3 Pc. Italian Coitemporary Bedroom


Choice of Bookcase or Panel Bed


IN THIS 7-Pc. DIN
Beautiful two-tone Inlaid top in
decorator colors, with matching
Duredge. You'll love these deep
seated foam cushioned chairs
niIhed In mathing two-tone
Vinyls. Table and hair legs
ore made of large heavy tubing
In bronze or ehrowm, for Wfe-
time wear. ----


5995


BEDDING BUY

OF THE YEAR

DON'T MISS THIS GREAT SALE!
Perfect Posture
312 Coil MATTRESS and Matching
BOX SPRINGS
$75.00
Button Top
MATTRESS and Matching BOX SPRING
Made by Jamison -5%00
Double or Single Size SET 5p9.0w
Poly Foam
MATTRESS and Matching BOX SPRING
Flat Top Alergy FreelT $5995
Single Size SE1

STUDENT DESK with CHAIR
Walnut or Maple Finish S49.00

SOFA BED and Matching CLUB CHAIR


Ideal for Den or Living Room


Choice of Colors


$69.95


HIGH BACK PLATFORM ROCKERS
Beautiful Tweed Fabric $4450

Solid Maple BEDROOM GROUP


Includes Double Dresser, Mirror, Chest
and Bookcase Bed


... Outstanding Bedroom Buy of the Year.



Modern 4 Pc. Bedroo00m Suite


deliberately designed for young


* ITALIAN WALNUT


moderns with more good taste than money...


Double Dresser Tilting Mirror
Chest and Bookcase Bed


95


$129.95


- DEAL ONLY WITH DANLEY'S -
NO OUTSIDE FINANCING EASY TERMS
UP TO 18 MONTHS TO PAY
FREE DELIVERY
OPEN AN ACCOUNT TODAY


/ [ ~ ,
,. '
,t' [' "'*
;' i '
,' ,: i,.-
.. ?- .-*


Beauhfulj to lool. at pra.:i:Col to I,.e ..ifl
and .ill f,11 ever, bLud-ge JutI lool a'
these beo.uful f,r..he. I lion Violnul,
Sea and Sand or Cherr/ Cord,'.ani Pick
the one thao look the best in your ro.:.n,-
they're all at one low price. Thi is but
one of fifty bedroom values


."-3 *


-d ms.


C'


THESE SPECIALS GOOD

August 29 thru September 7
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


I `


- I ,, II


~Pl~ltaeF


SGOA wu f& wsd.~ mot-


~ho~eb~ aoplrt






Sunnyland All Meat

FRANKS


Heavy Beef RIB

STEAKIi


I

I


For A Hamburger Delight Use Jitney Jungle Fresh

Ground Beef


3
Lb.
Pkg.


LB.


Heavy Beef

Chuck Roast


lb.


59c


Sunnyland or Copeland Smoked

HAM


Ya or Whole


POUND


(Limit 1 Packafe With $2.00 Order)


--- NO CENTER SLICES REMOVED


U




I
p




I


i
U
F]


For QUAI. SELECTION and ECONOMY


Snn here and'

SnOr BT


ola
O &!


IEINZ Limit 2


CATSUP


2


HEINZ
TOMATO SOUP


14 Oz.
Bottles


2 cans


19c


19c


FRENC H' S MUSTARD 6 ozjar 10c
ALABAMA GIRL WHOLE
DILL PICKLES 16 oz jar 25c


MARCAL
NAPKINS


2nkas


23c


2 PlusDepsit


ROBIN HOOD


FLOUR


SINGLETON'S FRESH
FR 0 ZEN SHRIMP
NABISCO CHIPETS


10 Lb.
Bag


89c


2-10ozpkgs 89c


pkg.


43c


McCORMICK'S
BLACK K PEPPER 4 oz can 35c


NINE LVES
CAT F


SOD


2 cans


27c


am % x as amhe r M~q~ l -%- 0 -%F -%-F- -
Bakerite
3iLb.

SHORTENING


MAXWELL HOUSE Limit 1 With $5.00 Order


Pound
Can


C


3 POUNDS
RED 'A' POTATOES
POUND
POLE BEANS


DOUBLE
Grand Prize
STAMPS

MONDAY, TUESDAY
and WEDNESDAY
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
Prices Good Aug. 29, 30 and 31


100 FREE
GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
With Coupon and Purchase of
$8.50 ORDER

50 FREE
GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
With Cr*1 nn a -d PDrhs h. s of


VtIll ,ouponJ an II urc na e
V2 Gal. Jitney Jungle
ICE CREAM

50 FREE
GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
With Coupon and Purchase of
4 Pkgs. McKenzie
'FROZEN FOODS

25 FREE
GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
With Coupon and Purchase of
One Twin Pack Gordon's
POTATO CHIPS


25 FREE
GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
With Coupon and Purchase of
1 Pkg. Jitney Jungle
CAKE MIX


at 29c pkg.


I
I
I


POUND
NECTARINES
2 POUNDS
BANANAS


120OI
Pkg.


2


I


IAIP ~ I' C r I I -


WH


~ +


yl~C~HNWIMMMMMMMNH


I I -


I


39c


I


~






Discount
Foodliner
Specials for August 28, 29, 30 and 31
'Port St. Joe. Florida
Quantity Rights Reserved (No Sale To Dealers)


at IGA


This Store Will Be Closed Mnc
Employees May EnjoyI


-a-Jfl~lllV3 d


KRAFT QUART JAR
MIRACLE WHIP
KRAFT 18 OZ. BOTTLE
BARBECUE SAUCE
9 OZ. JAR
FRENCH'S MUSTAI
DIAMOND PKG. of 10 PLATES
PAPER PLATES
DIXIE PKG. of 25 CUPS
COLD CUPS
LAY'S WITH RCA RECORDING DEAL TWIN PACK
POTATO CHIPS
BRIQUETS 24 LB. BAG

ALA. GIRL WHOLE PINT JAR
SWEET PICKLES
HOLSUM 7/2 OZ. JAR
STUFFED OLIVES
ROBERTS 1/4 LB. BAG
VANILLA WAFERS


39c

35c


tRD


14c

15c

25c

59c

99C

31c

49c

29c


L


BARBECUE SPECIAL

Pork Chops.


CENTER
CUT
POUND


C


SELECT BEEF
Liver


DAY


BARBECUE SPECIAL PORK

Spare Ribs

POUND


LB.
2Sc


PURE PORK

Sausq


CHARCOAL SPECIAL!
T- BONE
STEAK


POUND


Samsonite
FOLDING TABLE


-BACK TO SCHOOL-
BLUE HORSE COMBINATION
$1.19 Value BINDER
25c NOTE BOOK FILLER
10c Value INDEX
39c Value DICTIONARY
$1.98 Regular Value
ALL FOR -..- 59


73 Sheet Loose Leaf
NOTE BOOK FILLER
500 Sheet Loose Leaf
NOTE 'BOOK FILLER


10 Pack Pencil Set


19c
98c
29c


Discount

Foodliner


TABLERITE FRESH

PRODUCE


LOOK! WHAT A LABOR DAY SPECIAL SUNKIST

Ii

THOMPSON WHITE
GRAPES
IARGE FRESH EARS

CORN10Oa


2-


DOZIN





39c


rs


iI


A.


I I


I


r


I


I i


^






Food-

-liner


Specials for August 28, 29, 30, 31


ly, September 2 So That Our
.e Labor Day Holiday !


!AJ SPECIALS
GOOD TIME TO BARBECUE GA. or FLA.
GRADE 'A' D and D WHOLE
SHBOLOG w E
BQOC FRYERS

O AMPLE SUPPLY
CUT TO ORDER
3 LBS. HICKORY SMOKED SLAB NO LIMIT

$1 Bacon 37c
S LICED and WRAPPED Ib. S9c


Prices Good AUGUST 28, 29, 30 and 31
NO SALE TO DEALERS! A B -


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


U. S. POSTAGE Permit No.38
PP A I D BOX HOLDER
Sec. 34.66 P.LAl PATRON
Port St. Joe, Phl ROUTP


THE IGA DISCOUNT FOODLINERS HAVE MORE OF 'EM ..
BIGGEST VARIETY ... FOR THE LADY WHO PUSHS THE CART .


spelled backwards is "BARGAINS".


gains than all other stores combined in this area.


SAND IN THE
. "SNIAGRAB"


Your IGA Discount Foodliner has more bar-


We can really prove the above


statements. All that we ask you to do is shop and compare our prices .
Once you have exposed yourself to our everyday prices you will return again and


again to shop in our Discount Foodliner .


FOOD
TERRY'S OVEN FRIED CHICKEN
Roll TableRit Frying Cshicken places In melted TableRite
Butter seasoned with salt, pepper and Accent. Roll buttered
Chicken in Cornf lake Crumbs. Arrange buttered and crumbed
Chicken in Baking Dish. Drizzle remaining butter over top
and bake in 3500 oven till tender, 40-45 mi.
Try versatile tender TableRite Chicken for your patio party#
,prillea, broiled or baked In fo~l.


. Why don't you shop with us TODAY!


NATIONAL BISCUIT SPECIALS!
Date and Nut
Pecan Shortbread
Chocolate Chip


Cookies


LROOAL SPECIAL WESTERN BEEF


C


less Round LB.
ruIIT D- t)-


fI M/~


iIR'EE One Can
SJellied CHE
SAUCE


55C


RRY


h Purchase Any Cut of Tenderized


Whole or
Half LB.


LBLER E
FRANKS


FULL CUT ROUND

STEAK


LB.


79c


SWIFS PREM

Lunchf Mealt


SIZE


SWIFS PREMIUM VIENNA

Sausage


ALL BRANDS 1 6 BTL TN.
SOFTgDRINKS 39c
IGA HALF LB. BOX

ICED TEA 59c

Perfection RICE 33I
FROZEN FOODS DAIRY FOODS -
IGA FROZEN
LEMONADE TABLERITE PUE
6 OZ. 49c BUTTER
CANS
IGA MEAT POUND69C
PIES 59c 6
SUNGOLD LB.
Sara Lee Chocolate PKG.
Brownies 79c OLEO 16c

Port St. Joe, Florida
Next To The Post Office


POUND


14 OZ.
BAG 49c


1 I


I I


I


GH BA







These Specials Good


Wednesday thru Tues.


AUGUST 28 thru SEPT. 3


FLORIDA GRADE 'A' or GA.


FRYERS


c


Pound


Minute


Minute
and Cube

STEAKS
EACH -----


Fresh Pork


Fresh Pork
Center Cut

CHOPS
Pound ---


Place Your Order for


Place Your Order for
Pure Country Smoke House
MEATS


F!


LIVER and LITE SET 99c
MEATY HAM HOCK 3 Ibs. 99c
HOG MAW 3 Ibs. 69c
Sliced
SUNNYLAND ALL MEAT BOLOGNA 3 Ibs. 99c
SELECT BEEF LIVER 3 Ibs. 99c
LABOR DAY TABLE READY MEAT
-- SPECIALS -
Swift Prem. 5 lb. CANNED HAM $3.85
Swift Prem. 3 lb. CANNED HAM $2.39
Swift Prem. 3 lb. CANNED PICNIC $1.89
FREE SAMPLES FRIDAY and SATURDAY
FROSTY MORN WEINERS
3 Pkgs. 99c
(Get Your Supply for
Labor Day)


We Will Be

C OSED
ALL DA Y

LABOR

DAY
September 2
Nabisco Saltine--Lb.
CRACKERS 1Oc
with the purchase of
Apalachicola Fresh '

OYSTERS

Pin 79c


LARGE SIZE BOX
CHEER


NO. 2Y2 CANS
Oak Hill Peaches
SUGARY SAM YELLOW ABLE
Sweet Potatoes


ALL BRANDS
SALT
BOX


FRESH PEAS
TENDER OKRA
POUND


LARUTA CORNED
BEEF
CAN


PAL PEANUT
Butter
2 LB. JAR


( N


g; .


Cello CARROTS B
Cello CELERY A
Cello RADISHES G I


Proten Sirloin


lb. 95c


Proten
Delmonicos lb. $1.29
Proten
Rib Eye lb. $1.89
Proten PORTERHOUSE and
T-BONES lb. $1.09


Proten
New Yorks


* ..


.i ........ ..... .'-.
FANCY HAND

Bananas


lb. $1.09


Proten BROILING NO. 7 STEAK


MANHATTAN BROIL


PENTHOUSE BROIL


Ib. 69c
lb. $1.29


lb. $1.29


SESSIONS NO. 10 JUG
PURE PEANUT

OIL
(WITH $5.00 ORDER)


$1.19


NO. 303 CAN

Tomatoes


2 POUND BASKET




25C


LETTUCE


and UP
YOUR TOTAL WILL BE CHEAPER AT RICH'S
PLUS ONE DOZEN GA. GRADE 'A'
LARGE EGGS
or 5 Ibs. SUGAR

FREE!
WITH $10.00 ORDER OR MORE


All Stores Will Be Closed Labor Day

Stock up Saturday at our store for your Holiday Specials


r


I I


- I


- ---


T

























"SUPER-RIGHT" SHORT SHANK FUL



HAM
Shank
Portion

n~~~ I v


ANN PG.E : itY IN
... S .AI


-m


CABOT BRAND BRIQUETS OF

CHARCOAL

ALL FLAVORS MARVEL

ICE MILK


DAD'S
ROOT BEER


Vine Ripened Fancy
TOMATOES lb. 19c
Crisp Large Heads
LETTUCE 2 for 29c
Sultana Light Meat-6% oz. cans
Tuna Flakes 5 cans 99c
Ched-O-Bit American or Pimento
Cheese Spread 21b.. 79 C
Libby's-1 qt., 14 oz. can


Tomato Juice
Our Own Easy Brew
Tea Bags


Burry's Happy Family
Assortment 12 oz. 39c
Realemon
Lemon Juice qt. 73c
Dole Sliced-8 oz.
PINEAPPLE 2 for 41c
All Flavors (46 oz,)
HI-C Drink 3 for $1.00
Starkist Light Meat-3c OFF
Chunk Tuna 6V2 oz. 29c
Nestea % oz. 5c OFF LABEL
Instant Tea 34 oz. 44c
Yuban
Instant Coffee 5 oz. 89c
Aunt Jemima, 24 Oz. Box
GRITS 2 for 33c
Maxwell House
COFFEE lb. can 71c
Fleischmann's Corn Oil
MARGARINE lb. 39c
Colgate (Family Size)
TOOTH PASTE 83c
B&M
Baked Beans 27 oz. 43c


Make A&P
your
School
Supply
Center


'LY COOKED (10 to 14 Lb. Average)

9 Whole or 48




"Super-Right" Hard Corn Fed
Spare Ribs lb. 39c

Allgood Brand Sugar Cured Sliced
Breakfast Bacon 2 lb. 99c

'Super-Right" Heavy Western Grain Fed
Round Steak lb. 79c


20


Lb.
Bag



tns.


SPECIAL!

89c

SPECIAL!

87c


PUID *I
th Coupon and Purchase of
6-oz. Cans Frozen 5 Cans
Hawaiian Punch 98c
Jax. 8-31-63
Coupon good thru Sun., Sept. 1 I


H-S1 85 Extra i

With Coupon and Purchase of
Our Own
Sugared Donuts 25c
Jax. 8-31-63
Coupons good thru' Sun., Sept. I





p With Coupon arid Purchase of ,
S School Supplies
Totaling $2.50 or more at A&P
Jax. 8-31-63
Coupon good thru Sun., Sept. 1


a*iE -ttm


Star Like 300 Sheets
TYPING PAPER

Star Like 150 Sheets
FILLER PAPER


pkg. 39c


pkg. 69c


Star Like 80 Sheets
Composition Books ea. 39c


Waterbury
Ball Point PENS


Mallard
PENCILS


ea. 29c


pakof 10 29c


Driver Education Becomes



Part of School Curriculum


'.


WARD
ELECTRIC SERVICE
517 First Street
ELECTRIC MOTORS
Rewound and Repaired
COMPLETE PUMP
REPAIR


Today, almost every high school
student becomes an automobile
driver, and in the next decade
there will be more than three-mil-
lion youngsters reaching driving
age every year.
The state of Florida has wisely
decided not to wait until this mass
of young people embark out upon
the highways with little more than
a few instructions from dad and
a worried wave from mom to be-
come posisble statistics in the ever
increasing ledger of death on the
highways.
Beginning with the coming
school term, every high school in
the state must offer driver educa-
tion in its curriculum, and unless
the course is successfully complet-
ed by a student, he is not eligible
to apply for a driver's license un-
til he is eighteen years old instead
of sixteen.
:..* :.
Driver Education is offered in
Port St. Joe High School, both
the first semester and second
semester, also in the summer.
You are reminded as to the
new law that went into effect
the First of July. Forms for phy-
sicals will be available at each
doctor's office and at the Gulf
County Health Department.
If your son or daughter has
not signed up to take driver ed-
ucation, you are invited to come
by and discuss your child's pro-
gram with the instructor or gui-
dance director.
At the alarming rate of young
driver accidents today, the price
we would pay in the years ahead
for not training these beginners
would be an intolerable waste of
lives and resources.
Actually, driver training is as
important to the high school cur-
riculum as any academic study,
for learning to live sensibly and
successfully with the automobile
-yes, to stay alive-has become
vital in our increasingly mechan-
ized and mobile age.
As an integral part of the for-
mal education of our youth, it pro-
vides an unexcelled opportunity to
make sure youngsters learn good
citizenship habits behind t h e
wheel before they have a chance
to develop bad ones through the
"hit and miss" methods prevailing
today.
The benefits of driver education
to the community could not be
more tangible or significant-it
reduces the wrecking of lives, fu-
tures, families and property.
As a result of fewer accidents,
savings in dollars and cents as well
as in human resources accrue to
all of us as parents, breadwinners
and taxpayers, not just to the
young drivers involved.
These include :(a) reduced pro-
perty repair costs; (b) reduced hos-
pital and medical costs; (c) reduced
cost of governmental services, such
as police, courts, motor vehicle de-
partment, etc., and (d) reduced in-
surance costs.
There can be no doubt that the
logical place to begin is with new
drivers. Since they must be taught
the proper attitudes as well as
skills of sound driving, the high
school's unique educational facili-
ties and classroom atmosphere will
produce far more superior, com-
prehensive and lasting results
than the informal efforts of rela-
tives or friends.
Obviously this program will cost
money and require a great many
additional teachers. Florida, here,
has also had the foresight to plan
ahead to the day when sheer num-
bers of students would prevent ade-
quate driver training and defeat
the entire purpose of the program.
Man school systems are acquir-
ing driving simulators which are
designed to bridge the gap between
the classroom and behind-the-
wheel training.
One of two simulators approved
for state use is the Allstate Good
Driver Trainer built by the "Link
Trainer" builders of World War
II fame, General Precision, Inc.
with films produced by the train-
ing division of the Allstate Insur-
ance Companies in cooperation
with leading driver education
teachers and audio-visual special-


,THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 1963






0 666


NEED A PLUMBER?
CAU. BEAMAN
Plumbing Installation Repairt
Contract Work A Spelalty
Agenats for
Brand Name Plumbing Fixtures
-CALL US FOR FREE ESTIMATE-

TWO EXPERIENCED PLUMBERS TO SERVE YOU

BEAMAN PLUMBING SERVICE
1107 GAlRISON AVLE PHONE AII 7-141


ists.
The trainer incorporates learn-
ing situations that are practically
the same as those in an actual au-
tomobile except without the dan-
ger involved. It-utilizes progressive
teaching 'principles, reduces the
overall cost of training per stu-
dent, enables the instructor to
reach more students at one time
than ever before, and offers real-
istic driving features.
With the sharp rise in auto fa-
talities across the nation in 1962
to the unprecedented figure of
41,000, Florida is taking a positive
step forward a reversal of this
trend.


Child Safety

Responsibility

Rests With Driver
The major responsibility for
child safety in traffic rests with
the motorist, the Peninsula Motor
Club (AAA) reminded today as lo-
cal schools got ready to open their
doors for the new term.
The motor club also issued a 10-
point check list designed to pre-
vent traffic accidents involving
school-age children. It is part of
the annual "School's Open" cam-
paign. conducted by the AAA in
cooperation with local law enfor-
cement agencies and schools.
_-Assisting in the distribution of
posters, bumper strips and other
"School's -Open -materials -sup-
plied by the AAA are: Sheriff
Byrd E. Parker of Gulf County and
Police Chief H. W. Griffen of Port
St. Joe.
Throughout the nation, some
four million children out of a total
of 46.8 million will be going to
school for the first time. Emphas-
izing that last year 7.4 school child-
ern were killed in traffic accidents
for every 100,000 persons, the mot-
or club issued the following "Scho-
ol's Open" safety tips:
1. Local authorities should make
certain that cross walks, particu-
larly those around school areas,
are clearly markde well before the
opening of schooL
2. Parents of youngsters attend-
ing school for the first time should
familiarize themselves with the
"safest route to school" and accom-
pany their children to and from
school for the first week or so.

USE THE WANT ADS


Long Ave. Baptist Church
REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ...-......- 6:45 PM.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) .-....... 7:30 p.m.
Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street
Air Conditioned Centrally Heated

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME


FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Intersection Monument and Constitution
REV. THOMAS 8. HARRIS, D.D., Minleter


Church School
Morning Worship
Bibye Study (Wednesday)
Methodist Youth Fellowship .--....
Evening Worship


9:45 A.H.
11:00 A.M.
7:30 P.M.
6:00 P.M.
7:30 P.M.


idn Goodj

hoa4G


Homogenized,
Pasteurized and

Buttermilk

Fresh Yard Eggs
Butter Oleo

Orange Juice

Orange, Grape and
Lemonade

Home Deliveredl


Harden's Dairy
BORDEN DAIRY PRODUCTS


Call 689-4383 collect


Take time out at least
twice a day to refresh with a
delicious glass of ice cold milk.
It's so good and full of vitamins
needed for energy!


Wewahitchka


/2 gal 39c


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH


C. Byron Smith, Pastor


Corner Third St. and Baltzell Ave.


SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION .......--..... 6:45 p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) .. 7:30 p.m.
"Come and Worship God With Us"


can 31c


64 for 49 c


II1~Yrslll


i


~P3~1et~ll


I


I


You Are Cordially Invited To Attend








if there is no storm alert. Such leaves at the first hint of a storm.


Hurricane Season Is Here. Warning

Issued To Trim Dead Branches FromTrees


The hurricane season is here.
This brings to mind that trees and
men have one thing in common-
they often are exposed to the fury
of a lady.
The human-type tiff may be caus-
ed by arguments over a permanent
wave. But without a doubt tree
trouble starts with an easterly
wave.
Men have the choice of joining
the Foreign Legion when a storm
begins brewing around their home,
because they may find it easier to.
face bullets than fight a domestic
battle.
But trees have no choice. They
must face the full fury of a lady
without being able to strike back.
Usually the storm's first provo-
cation is to soak the rotting, moss-


filled tree branches. Next, the
windy lady slaps the soggy mass
to the ground with a dull thud
which puts the home owner's ner-
ves on edge.
So inspect your trees for dead
branches that seem to be ready to
fall. Also look for dead branches
that are firm but brittle. A gust of
hurricane-force wind can snap an
arm-size branch from a tree and
send it at missile speed through
a picture window.
A low-hanging branch over a
roof can wreck havoc. Powerful
winds can turn the limb into a tool
of destruction. This tool can re-
move slate shingles as easily as
a fish scaler can remove scales.
Removing dead and out- of-
place limbs is a good idea even


will


S.. AMER C4A ARMED FORCES ARE 7 BeST E/tqPPOED AV
7HE ORtRD. ANO HEYO LPKEEP AMEPJCA STRONG AA \
wELL-QUI/PP5D wIH ytx/R yo JAS45E OF
.S.SAVIMSS BONDS /




Make Your Choice. The People's Voice

-- ELECT -





W. W. carrier, Jr.



Group 4




City Commissioner

Own and Operate Local Business
Pay City Property Taxes
Time to Serve
Interested to Serve

Paid Political Advertisement 3t-8-22




To the People of Port St. Joe:

I wish to announce my candidacy for re-elec-
tion as your City Commissioner for Group 3 for
the City of Port St. Joe. I have long experience
for City Government and I feel my record will
speak for itself. I have always worked for the im-
provements of your city. I am proud to have had
a hand in improvements of our City that has been
done by your City Commissioners this past year.
I know I will not be able to contact all the
voters. If you do not know me. ask your neigh-
bor. I am a businessman and tax payer. I will
endeavor in the future to serve the interests of
all the people.
I would like to encourage everyone eligible to
be sure and register, then vote for me. I will ap-
preciate your vote and support.


I. C. NEDLEY


GROUP 3
Paid Political Advertisement


3t-8-22


pruning is nessary for eye appeal.
Fan-like fungus growing on the
side of a tree trunk indicates rot-
ten spots that need attention. A
hole made by a woodpecker, dam-
age by earliet storms, or the gouge
of an auto bumper can start rot-
ten spots.
The auto-made wound can easily
be filled with a water-tight mater-
ial, as it is not more than kneel-
ing height. But other rotting are-
as will require experience at climb-
ing to dizzy heights on a trembling
ladder. Having the know-how of
a dentist is also helpful. Often it
is cheaper in the long run to call
a professional to handle the tree-
top jobs.
Some older trees with Y-shaped
crotches often arp,proned to cleave
apart. Check the trees in this cat-
egory. If necessary, place tem-
porary, props in the appropriate
places,, or make the tree one unit
again with steel rods and turn-
buckles.
Remove decayed trees that are,
too weak to hold up under the
strain of a storm. This action will
you grief later.
Palm fronds with saw tooth
stems are wicked to deal with if
propelled by an 80 mile per hour
wind. So, clean away all loose palm


Trees are not apt to crush a
house if t h ey succumb to a big
blow. Usually, as the soil becomes
soggy and wind stronger, the trees
fall gently against the dwelling.
If the trees lean against the house
during the first half of the storm,
this is an asset. The trees then
serve as a prop to the house snug-
gly and safely during the second
half of the blow.
Actually,. a hundred mile per
hour wind is not as dangerous as
it sounds, if necessary measures
are taken before the wind reaches
gale force, plus retreating indoors
while the unwelcome lady is danc-
ng around outside.
If your home is located in an
Area that might be flooded, you'll
be given ample notice to evacuate
hours before the storm reaches
your area. Otherwise, there is no
safer place than in a well-built
home:


Soon as the storm is past it is
a 'good idea to inspect the trees
and other plants around the house.
Usually all the plants will show
signs of wind damage. But with a
little trimming, propping and re-
setting of root systems, nearly all
plants that were shaken loose from
the ground can be salvaged.
Following a hurricane there are


nearly aways a few bright sunny
days. Use these days to dry out and
tidy up around the house. In no
time at all you will erase the signs
of the big blow.


Classified Ads
Midget Investments With
Giant Returnrm


THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla.


Phone 227-5111


THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 1963


You wouldn't trust your loved one's health
to a "quack doctor" nor would you give
your prescriptions to "just anyone" to fill.
Our pharmacist's skill merits your trust!
SMITH'S PHARMACY
John Robert Smith, Pharmaceutical Chemist
Drive-In Window & Free Parking At Rear
236 Reid Avenue


I ^w *.* '- .. ^m
$a [lei EM



NYLONAIRE $
A low-priced, economy tire with no sacrifice in quality
* Built with Safety-Fortified nylon cord body for extra mileage
* Its 7-rib tread grips the road for full traction


15-Month Road
Hazard Guarantee


trestone

Champion NYLONS
* Advanced precision-bladed tread
design offers starting-stopping power
Features exclusive Firestone
:Safety-Fortified nylon cord body
18-Month Road
Hazard Guarantee


Sire0stone


* ]
$

*
a


Safety Champion N $

NYLONS
Features advanced precision-bladed
tread design.
Built with Safety-Fortified nylon cord
body for extra mileage.
Features speedway weld for extra protection 6.7C
against heat and impact breaks. 1.5
21-Month Road


6.70-15. Tubed-.vpe. BIackwall
Whitewalls 12 More


0.15. Tubed-type. Blackwall
.00-13. Tubeless. Blackv,31i
s, Ia. ~ nj..] 10- .. I. -,.
Whitewalls S3 More


Hazard Guarantee


STFresf0on DOUBLE GUARANTEE
is honored by more than 60,000 Firestone dealers
and stores from coast to coast wherever you travel
againstt defects in workmanship 2 against normal road hazards (except repairable
"d and materials for the life of the punctures) encountered in everyday\ passenger
s original tread, car use for number of months specified.
HE TON Il IAE .Replacements prorated on tread wear and based on list prices current a tlimne of adjustment.
Your Firestone GUARANTEE provides
protection against tire failure from
Sv-TLIC ? oCR FORy. dozens of road hazards like these Bottles Cans Curbs Chuckhol.'s Mei Stonos

Priced as shown at Firestone Stores; c mp; live y priced at Firestone Dealers and at all service stations displaying the Fitestone siun.



PATE'S SERVICE CENTER

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


I am a Candidate
for election to the

City Commission
City of Port St. Joe

Group No. 3
TUESDAY, SEPT. 9


A. V. BATEMAN
I cannot contact everyone per-
sonally before election day,
but I want you to know that
I will appreciate your vote and
support for this office even
though I may not get to con-
tact you personally. 3t


Iygll~- -


i --l-pm~~p--r~-~-~u~~a_ I I C I~h~ --_ -I









THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 1963


Congressman Sikes Commlents On

March To Washington and 'Pork Barrel'


MARCH ON WASHINGTON
There is speculation about the
effect of the march on Washington
by Negroes on August 28. Some Ne-
gro groups which constantly try to
stir up trouble between the races,
are recruiting as many marchers



TELEVISION
Black & White and Color
Stereo Ait Conditioning

Service Cols, $3.00
All work guaranteed,

ST. JOE RADIO
& TV COMPANY
Phone 227-4081


as possible from the ranks of the
unemployed and from others who
want a free trip to Washington.
Others are demanding the day off
with pay and with expenses to
Washington for their members.
Nevertheless, there is apprehen-
sion among the responsible mem-
bers of the colored race about the
effect of the growing animosity tO-
ward their race due to demonstra-
tions and riots. What will happen
here is unpredictable, and some
Congressmen's offices will be clos-
ed for the day. Your Congressman's
office will be open for work as
usual.
PORK BARREL
Life Magazine recently drama-
tized its complaint on "pork bar-
rel" projects. This is a commend-
able complaint. However, it con-
tains. inaccuracies. For instance,


NEWSOME

WELDING and MACHINE WORKS

TRACTOR ROLLER REBUILDING
AUTOMATIC WELDING
Saves TIME and MONEY
Depot Street Blountstown, Florida
Phone 674-8539
OPENING DATE AUGUST 31, 1963



REGISTRATION

HAPPYLAND KINDERGARTEN
MRS. CHARLES BROWN

'Registration Day: Thursday, August 29

School Begins Friday, August 30



Registration Day for the

JACK and JILL KINDERGARTEN

W--Wlbe FRIDAY, AUGUST 23 from 9:00 A.M.
Until 12:00 Noon
Kindergarten Starts Thursday, August 29

MRS. DuBOSE 2t
MRS. FOX 8-15


You Are Welcome To The

First United Pentecostal Church
10th St. NW. and Victoria Avenue Highland View, Florida
Rev. JAMES J. HILL, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 AM.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:15 AM
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 P.M.
MID-WEEK SERVICE (Wednesday) .... 7:30 P.M.
YOUTH SERVICE (Friday) 7:30 P.M.
AIR-CONDITIONED CENTRAL HEAT


ARNOLD'S TV and RADIO
Phone 229-3611 131 Bellamy Circle

TELEVISION and RADIO REPAIRS

SERVICE CHARGE ------$3.00


FURS and


WOOLENS


PROFESSIONALLY

CLEANED
AND VAULT

STORED


Complete protection
from Moths, Fire and
rheft. A,

. More closet pace
:or you.


Box Storage $2.49
Plus Cleaning Charges Insured for $200.00

It costs so little and it's so convenient to get this finest
storage service. Send your winter garments now .
Be safe and smart.

Our Routeman In This Area Monday and Thursday

DOMESTIC Laundry and Cleaners
417 Grace Ave. Panama City, Florida


Part of the Shark football
linemen are shown above getting
ready to do some early morning
practice last week. The linemen
began practicing for the last two
weeks at 6:30 a.m. in the morn-
ing.
Those present at the time the
picture above was made were,


left to right, front row, coach,
Bobby Brown, Wayne O'Brian,
Freddy Chason, Jerome Barnes,
Rodney Herring, Norton Kil-
bourn, Albert Gentry, Mike
White and Johnny Oaks.
In the bac krow are: Herbert
Smith, Leon Hobbs, Andy Tram.
mell, Jerry Parrish, Tommy


statements made against the Flor. goes off the Florida coasts alone


ida Cross State Canal are not sup-
ported by the facts. This is a pro-
ject that would pay its way and
which has been recommended by
the U. S. Enginebrsa-both for com-
mercial and defense reasons. The
loss to the nation in ships and car-


reigns i

where 1 A 5
whe jre} "

pours

Stops
radiator rust.

This Preduest
Distributed by


St. Joe

Auto Parts
311 Williams Avenue


OauL ul. farsus was quite a
well known, efficient tax collec-
tor until one day he was struck
by a blinding light and became
Paul the Apostle.
Today over the land many
employers are also seeing a
light, and T 71
while not
able to dis-
continue the
role forced .
on them of ".
being unpaid "
tax collec-6 I
tors, are be-
coming apos- 14.
tles of sanity. '
Recently J. C. W. Harder
S. ximel, Sr., president of the
Republic Electric Company, a
Davenport, a 50 year old Iowa
firm paid his employees their
full check with no tax deduc-
tions, accompanied by a letter
which said in part:-
"I am letting you know this
week how much you are really
earning by paying you the full
amount due you, not deducting
the withholding tax or the so-
cial security tax. The extra
amount given you this week
will be deducted and spread
over the next three week's
checks."
A. G. Heinsohn, Jr., presi-
dent of the Cherokee Mills in
Sieversville, Tennessee, also
recently brought home to his
employees who pays for gov-
ernment extravagance.
He gave them their usual
checks minus the deductions,
but then handed them bags of
silver dollars equalling the
amount of the deductions, ex-
plaining this would be deduct-
ed from next three paychecks.
For about eighteen months,
l National Federation of Independent Buslness


in World War H would have paid
for the canal several times over-
to say nothing of the loss of human
lives. I have called to the atten-
tion of Life publishers one omis-
sion from their list of "pork bar-
rel" projects. Nothing is said about
the $15,000,000 of the taxpayers'
money enjoyed by Life each year
on shipping subsidies or the $23,-
000,000 enjoyed by Luce publica-
tions each year, or the quarter-bil-
lion dollars a year which the gov-
ernment pays for shipping subsi-
dies for privately-owned publica-
tions in all categories. Apparently
this is one spending loop-hole Life
doesn't want plugged.
SERVICE ACADEMY
EXAMINATION SCHEDULED
On Saturday, November 9, 1963,
the U. S. Civil Service Commission
will conduct a preliminary exam-
ination for young men who are in-
terested in appointment tothe U.
S. Military Academy ,the U. S. Air
Force Academy, the U. S. Naval
Academy nad the U. S. Merchant
Marine Academy. This examination
is given for the purpose of select-
ing qualified young men for ap-
pointment to the various service
academies.
To be eligible for consideration,
a young man must be at least 17
years of age and must not have
reached his 22nd birthday by July
1, 1964; must never have been
married and must be in good phy-
sical condition. To be eligible for


Lte rremier .nuhu oeurvice in
Parkersburg, West Virginia,
headed by A. K. Summers, has
been regularly paying employ-
ees their full checks three
weeks out of the month, and
then taking all deductions out
of the fourth paycheck.
A $125 per week employee,
under this system, finds the
pay for the fourth week is
$?2.68. A-$70.00 per week em-
ployee finds that on the fourth
week not only is no pay forth-
coming, but that actually $4.75
ii owed in additional taxes.
"Most of our employees,"
Mr Summers states, "now re-
alize wild federal spending is
coming out of their pockets."
Shortly after starting this
,plan, in one of those "Man-
aged news" episodes, newspa-
per people informed Mr. Sum-
mers that the tax people had
told them they would take ac-
tion against him if this con-
tinued. But despite headlines,
no move has ever been made.
*
The Baker Tool Company of
Los Angeles, Coors Brewing of
Denver, and many others are
using variations of these meth-
ods to impress on employees
who pays for waste.
So far, under the existing
laws, this appears legal, as
long as the employer pays gov-
ernment tax amounts due.
*
There may be a move to
make a ruling that this "cru-
sade of truth" is illegal.
*
If so, Congressman Edward
J. Gurney of Florida has said
he is ready to introduce a bill
which will confirm employer
right to continue educating em-
ployees on who supports gov-
ernmental extravagances.


Wright, David Dickey, Ellis Sre.
vens, Peter Fox, Charles Zim-
merman and Junior Nichols.
The Sharks were undergoing
a session of "skull practice" as
this picture was made. All po-
tential linemen were not pres-
ent when the picture was made.


THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla.


my appointment, an applicant i
must be the son of legal residents
and registered voters in my Con
gressional District, and must plan
to make the service his career.
I shall be pleased to have young
men residing in my Congressional
District, who meet the eligibility 4
requirements and are interested
take the examination. Those who
already have contacted me will
receive instructions for reporting ......
for examination. Others who are Ty Cobb's record of 96 stolen
interested should write to me at bases in one season stood for
1112 House Office Building, Wash- 47 years until Maury Wills of
ington, prior to October 1, 1958, the Los Angeles Dodgers made
furnishing his full name, home ad- off with 104 bags in 1962.
dress, age, date of birth, legal res-
idence of parents and indicating .'@p 3
the academy to which he seeks an .
appointment.
CNO TO VISIT PENSACOLA .
I am pleased to announce that
Admiral David L. McDonald, Chief
of Naval Operations, will be the- ....-.
principal speaker at the 1963 an
nual meeting of the Joint Super- .....
visors Association of Northwest Compton's Pictured Encyclopedia lists th
Florida. This is always a gala oc- most no-hit, no-run games in a single sec
casion with supervisory personnel set in 1938 by John Vander Meer of the
and their wives from the three by the New York Yankee's Allie Reynol,
naval installations of Northwest Trucks of the Detroit Tigers.


New Wallhide Latex


one-coat flat with GHP*


St. Joe Hardware Co.

Port St. Joe, Florida


Florida-Naval Air Station, Pen- Return From Vacation
sacola; Whiting Field, Milton and Mr. and Mrs. James Jones and
the Navy Mine Defense Laboratory, daughters, Nancy and Peggy have
Panama City. Invited uestsinreturned to their home at St. Joe
Panama City Invited guests in- Beach after spending last week vis-
clude civic leaders and top naval citing in Daytona Beach, Silver
and air force personnel in the Springs and Alabama.
area. The date has been set as De- _+
cember 14. It is anticipated that GEORGIA VISITORS
the Pensacola Navy League will Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Griffin and
give a reception for the Admiral Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Griffi and
during the afternoon prior to the family of Perry, Georgia, are vis-
supervisors' banquet. In the past iting here this week as the guests
two years at my invitation, Navy of Mr. and Mrs. Wesley R. Ramsey.
Secretaries Connally and Korth Mrs. Griffin is Mrs. Ramsey's sis-
have addressed these groups. Ad- er.
miral McDonald's visit is consid- ___
ered highly important to good re-
lations between the Navy and
Nprthwest Florida communities.





POWDER POST
BEETLES .




THE STAR for the sake of your home


BASEBALL WHODUNITS
FACTS FROM COMPTONS
At The record for the most base hits
in a single season is 257, set in
1920 by George Sisler of St. Louis
Browns.
r #, ,~, pN.
-- ^ -^ B-L l~flt^ ^y ^ *^ yy <.> .,.*.f'tw ^ M -iS;


Sharks Prepare For Season


il "Ill.,'..,.... -- ......... ....... ...


....... .....










Employers With One or More Employees Drive-In Theater

Must File Earnings Reports Promptly A Open 7 Nights A Week


... ..%...


%. ^

..





...Magic words in the automo-
tive industry-an absolute rule
in the compounding of prescrip-
tions.
The medicines your doctor pre-
scribes for you are fo( you alone,
designed specifically for your
needs and well-being.
You can depend on us to give
each prescription you send us,
undivided, individual attention.

YOUR_




Buzzett's Drug Store
317 Williams Ave.
Free Parking
Drive-In Window Service


Classified Ads
FOR RENT: Two bedroom house,
corner Tenth Street and Long
Avenue. Call Mrs. Nora Duren.
Phone 227-5471. tfc-6-13
FOR RENT: Trailer space in Oak
Grove. Sewer and water., $14.00
month. Phone L. C. Davis, 227-7059.
FOR RENT: Nice furnished apart-
ment for couple only at 1621
Monument Ave. Phone 227-7641. tf
FOR RENT: Two one bedroom cot-
tages, furnished on 9th St. Also
2 bedroom unfurnished apt.- Call
227-5111 or call by Smith's Phar-
macy. tfc-
FOR RENT: Furnished 2 bedroom
apartment, 114 Monument Ave.
Call 227-7816. tfc-7-18
FOR RENT: Two bedroom unfur-
nished apartment with garage.
1206 Palm Blvd. Apply at 1208
Palm, or call 7-7431, 4tp-7-18
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom furnished
apartment at 522% Third St., $45
month. Inquire at 1904 Garrison
Ave., or Phone 227-8642. tfc-8-1
FOR RENT: Upstairs furnished gar-
age apartment at 514% 7th St.
Walter Johnson, Phone 227-7766.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom houses.
Furnished or unfurnished. Phone
229-1361. Fennon Talley. tfc-8-15
FOR RENT: at St. Joe Beach. Com-
pletely furnished house. Has 2
bedrooms and large screened
porch. Phone 227-7771. tfc-8-29
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom furnished
apartment. Will be for rent Sep-
tember 1. Location 10th St. Call
Blountstown, 674-5630. 2tp
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment
1506 Long Ave. Phone 227-5426.
John Scott. 2tc-8-29


LOTS FOR SALE: 100'x937', 100'
frontage on Hiway 71, 937' deep.
Deep well on front lot. Call 227-
7998. White City. 2tp-8-29
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom house at
Oak Grove. Pay equity and take
up payments. 408 Madison St.
Cliff Ellis. ltp
FOR SALE: Mobile home, 1958
44x10 Great Lakes with washer.
Can be bought with or without air
conditioner and 25' aluminum awn-
ing. See Wayne Taylor, St. Joe
Beach. Phone 648-3346. Itp
FOR SALE: 4 bedroom bome, 2,000
feet floor space. 2 full baths,
large fenced back yard, garage and
utility. Close to school. Well estab-
lished landscaping. 1027 Long Ave.
Contact Ed Ramsey.
FOR SALE: 2 story unfurnished A
bedroom home, 1508 Long Ave.,
$5,500. Also, furnished 2 bedroom
brick home and small apartment,
1031 Long Ave., $11,000. Phone
648-4128. Mira.
FOR SALE: 1959 LeSabre 4-door
Buick. Walter Dodson, Fla. Na-
tional Bank., tfc-8-15
FOR SALE: 16-ft. Borum runabout
boat and 85 hp Mercury Motor.
Walter Dodson, Fla. National Bank.
TRADE-IN SALE: 3 Singers in port-
able case only $10 ea. also 2 Ken-
mores $12 ea. 2 Atlas $10 a mo.
Write credit manager, 280 N. Pala-
fox St., Pensacola. 4tc-8-22
SEPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call
Buford Griffin, Phone 227-7011
for quick expert service, tfe
OPENINGS for women. If you want
work but cannot give full time
there is a splendid income oppor-
tunity for you with Avon. Write
Mrs. Dorothy Martin, Avon Mana-
ger, P. 0. Box 3345, MSS, Tallahas-
see, Fla. tfc-7-24


MELP WANTED: Man to succeed
Rawleigh Dealer in Gulf County
or Port St. Joe and nearby. Over
25 preferred and car necessary. Can
earn $125 and up per week from
start. Write Rawleigh, Dept. FAB
100-1145, Memphis, Tenn. 8tp-8-1
WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION, meet-
ing second and fourth Tuesday
nights, 8:00 pam. American Legion
Home.

IT'S EASY AND SAFE TO MOVE
THE MAYFLOWER WAYI
Aero Mayflower Transit Company
places a complete nation-wide long-
distance moving service at your
command! Whether your move is
a few hundred miles or thousands,
the Mayflower System assures sat-
isfactory service. If you're planning
to move why not call your local
Mayflower agents, SURPLUS
SALES of ST. JOE, Today. Just
Phone 227-2011. Across from the
Post Office.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Meet
every Wednesday night, 8 p.m.
at Parish House, 309% 6th St. Port
St. Joe, Fla. Phone 229-3363 fo-
farther information or write P. 0.
E.x 535.

SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, I. 0.
0. F.-Meets second and fourth
Thursday, 8:00 p.m. in American
Legion Hall. All members urged to
attend.
Noble Grand: Emmett Daniel)
Secretary: J. C. Martin.
R. A. M.-Regular convocation of
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
M, 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit
ing companions welcome.
Edgar L. Smith, High Priest
Roy L. Burch, Secretary
THERE WILL BE a regular corn
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F. & A. M., every first
and third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.


ROBERT L. CREAMER, W.M.
ROY K .BLACKSHEAR, Sec.
JOE'S STARTER and
GENERATOR and AUTO REPAIR
All Work Guaranteed
612 Madison Street
Oak Grove



FOR SALE I
12 ROOM BOARDING
HOUSE
Located at the corner of
Monument and Sixth Sta.
$750.00 cash. Building must
be removed from the prem-
ises within ninety days by
the purchaser.

FRAME STORE
BUILDING
30' x 90', with 12 bed.
rooms upstairs, located cor-
ner Reid and Third St. $1,-
000.00 cash. Building must
be removed from the prem-
ises within ninety days by
the purchaser.

See
SILAS R. STONE
or call 227-7161


IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S
COURT, GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE.
In Re: Estate of
W. G. HARDY, SR.,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All creditors of the estate of W.
G. H.irdy, Sr., deceased, are hereby
n..'fied and required to file any
claimss or demands which they may
l. -ve against said estate in the of-
fice of the County Judge of Gulf
County, Florida, in the Courthouse
at Wewahitchka, Florida, within six
(6) calendar months from the date
of the first publication of this no-
tice. Each claim or demand must
be in writing and must state the
p .ce or residence and post office
address of the claimant and must
be sworn to by the claimant, his
agent, or his attorney, or it will
becoije void according to law.
HORACE ALTON HARDY
QUINCY LEE HARDY
Executors of the Estate of
W. G. Hardy, deceased.
SILAS R. STONE
321 Reid Avenue 4t
Port St. Joe, Florida 8-8
ATTORNEY FOR EXECUTORS
NOTICE OF REGULAR
MUNICIPAL ELECTION
Notice is hereby given that the
First Primary for two City Com-
missioners, one in Group Three (3)
and one in Group Four (4) will be
held at the City Hall Fire Station
in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida
on Tuesday, September 10, 1963.
The polls will open at 7:00
o'clock A.M. and will close at 7:00
o'clock P.M., Eastern Standard
Time.
When there are more than two
candidates for any one office and
neither shall receive a majority of
the total votes cast for such of-
fice, then another election shall be
held two weeks from the date of
the first election, or September 24,
1963, at which time the two candi-
dates receiving the largest number


Rotary Club

Honors 'Ball Team

The Port St. Joe Rotary Club
honored members of their Dixie
Youth Baseball team at dinner last
Thursday noon at the St. Joe Mo-
tel.
Each of the team members pres-
ent were presented with miniature
trophies by J. Lamar Miller, Club
representative, for winning the Na-
tional League championship this
year in the Dixie Youth Baseball
season play. Also presented tro-
phies were Managers Lamar Moore
and Foy Adams.
Team members present for the
dinner and presentation were: Lar-
ry Young, Harry Young, Lamar
Cannington, Jimmy Cannington,
Steve Hattaway, Pete White, Pete
Peters, Kenny Merritt, Terry Par-
rish and Steve Adams. Receiving
trophies, but not present for the
meeting were Charles Smith, Lar-
ry Newsome, Billy Simmons and
Jim Simmons.
Presenting the program for the
meeting was Gulf County Civil De-
fense director R. H. Sidwell, Sid-
well told the Club about the change
being made in the Civil Defense
plan over the nation. The program
is changing to a plan of furnish-
ing fall-out protection. Formerly
warning and care of survivors was
the emphasis of CD. Now, the plan
is for the armed services and area
organizations to take care of these
tasks.
The director pointed out that
smaller rural areas was more in
need of this attention than larger
cities. The larger cities have many
buildings that have protective low
er floors that can be used for fall-
out protection, not found in the
smaller towns' with smaller build-
ings.
The State is presently urging
the allocation of Federal money to
be provided to build in fall-out pro-
tection in all public buildings.
The club took into its member-
ship, Henry Campbell, owner of
Campbell's Drug Store in Port St.
Joe.
Guests of the club were Luke
Houston, Doug Davis, Wayne Saun-
ders of Port St. Joe and Deck Hull
of Panama City.



Etaoin Shrdlu
(Continued From Page 1)
the best is given, success result-
ed as the only natural thing.
This park will mean a great
deal to the area, and not in par-
ticular to Jesse or his commit-
tee.
There are too few of us these
days who will put forth such ef-
fort without direct gain.
Who says kids aren't getting
smarter every day?
Some of the local teen age drag
racers are making it easier for
those who will handle the remains
of this dangerous "sport".
The kids are dragging in the
cemetery.
All that will be necessary will be
the digging of a hole.
But even though this has made
things handier to handle the vic-
tims of this madness, it is caus-
ing the city some consternation.
The dragging of automobiles has
made a shambles of the grass lawn
in the cemetery.
The city is considering locking
up the drive-in gates to the ceme-
tery. This will move the location
of the draggers but it will not
move them further from death.


All employers who have one or


more employees working on jobs
covered by Social Security are re-
quired to report their earings ac-
curately and promptly, according
to John V. Carey, District Manager
of the Panama City Social Security
Office.
He said many employers think
it is not important to report earn-
ings when a worker only earns "a
little bit." But this "little bit" may
be the factor which determines
whether the worker's family gets
Social Security benefits when he
retires, dies, or becomes disabled.
Carey said there are three em-
ployer classifications. (1) Emplo-
yers who operate a trade or busi-
ness (2) Housewives who have do-
mestic workers in and around their
homes! and (3) Farm operators
who hire farm hands.
"All these employers should ask
that the worker show his Social
Security card when he is hired,"
Carey said. "You, as the employer,
should put in your permanent re-
cords the name and Social Secur-
ity number exactly as they are
shown on the card. You will need
these two items when you report
the worker's earings to Internal
Revenue Service."
Employers who operate a non-
farm farm trade or business must
report on any wages paid to anr em-
ployee. Payments in kind in lieu of
money count as wages.
Household employers report
only the actual cash wages in a
calendar quarter must be reported.
Farm employers report only the
cash wages paid and make their re-
port to the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice in January of each year. This
report covers the preceding calen-
dar year. (Non-farm business em-
ployers and household employers
report to the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice at the end of each calendar
quarter.) A farm worker who is
paid $150 cash wages or who works
on some part of 20 different days
in the calendar year must be re-
ported by the farm employer.
Your local Social Security office
or your local Internal Revenue
Service office will be happy to an-
swer your questions on reporting
earnings for Social Security pur-
poses.
The Social Security office for
this area is located at 1135 Harri-
son Avenue, Panama City, Florida,
(Telephone PO 3-5331).


of votes in the former election shall
be voted on again.
J. B. WILLIAMS 4t
City Auditor & Clerk 8-15
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S
COURT, GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE.
IN RE: Estate of
ALLIED C. PORTER,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF FILING PETITION
FOR FINAL DISCHARGE OF
ADMINISTRATOR
To All Whom It May Concern:
Notice is hereby given that I
have filed my final returns as ad-
ministrator of the estate of Allie
C. Porter, deceased; that I have
filed my petition for final dis-
charge and that I will apply to the
Honorable Sam P. Husband, Coun-
ty Judge of Gulf County, Florida,
on September 23, 1963, for appro-
val of the same and for final dis-
charge as administrator of the es-
tate of Allie C. Porter, deceased.
Dated August 21, 1963.
/s/ J. B. PORTER
Administrator of the Estate
of Allie C. Porter, deceased.
4tc-8-22 CGC


C


Highway Patrol

Predicts Deaths
TALLAHASSEE-The Florida
Highway Patrol predicted this
week that 16 persons may be
killed in traffic crashes during
the 78 hour long Labor Day
week end and appealed to ev-
ery person to drive and walk
with caution and care.
"The Labor Day week end sig.
nifies the last fling at summer
holidays for most people and the
opening of schools in most sec-
tions of the state the day after
Labor Day," said Patrol Cmdr.
H. N. Kirkman. "We will have
to drive for all we are worth to
come through this long week end
without a traffic accident of one
sort or another."
The Patrol said that while
there will be a lot of people on
the highways going one place or
another for the week end, there
will also be those who will be
stretching their vacations to the
last minute and then they will
start the homeward trip "all
keyed up and in a big hurry."
This year's Labor Day predic-
tion is one less tha>n In.f+ vT~nrl.-


Thurs., Fri.-Aug. 28, 29
old Wind In August
Adult Art Show


Sat., Aug. 31
Big 4 Hour Show
Tennessee's Partner
Treasure Pancho
Villa


CLEOPATRAS


D A U GHTER

Sun-Mon-Tue-Wed

Sept. 1,2, 3, 4

NO. 1 DRIVE-IN THEATER

Apalachicola, Fla.


17 highway deaths, but two more
than the actual count for 1960 'DIan- Hannon
and 1961 when 14 persons werene Hannon08
killed each of those week ends -
by traffic __ Attending Stephens

SColumbia, Mo.,- One student
from Port St. Joe, will be attending
Stephens College in Columbia, Mo.,
this fall when the independent
residential college for women star-
ts classes on September 16.
Before the fall term begins, how-
S oSever, students who hold campus
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Ollen offices will arrive early for a two-
Wilkes, 316 Second Street, High- day Student Leaders' Workshop
land View, announce the birth of on September 6-7. All students wil
a daughter, Sherry Virginia on arrive on campus by September 9.
August 26. Registration will take place Sep-
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Leonard tember 10-14.
Varnum of 1227 Main St., Chatta- Student leaders who have been
hoochee announce the birth of a invited to return early for the two-
son, Michael Barry on August 23. day Leaders' Workshop include:
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Allen Lee, Miss Connie Dianne Hannon,
Sr., 120 15th St., Apalachicola, an- daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank
nounce the birth of a son, Timothy Hannon, 1302 Contitution Drive,
Dell on August 21.' Port St. Joe, who will be the Social
(All births occurred at the Port Chairmans for Lela Raney Wood
St. Joe Municipal Hospital.) Hall and Coordinator of Hall Soci-


Ni


al --Chairmans h i


al Chairmans for the Social and
Recreational Commission.


Dance Studio

Sets Registration
The Vonzeil Dance Studio, un-
der the direction of Mrs. Vonzeil
Taylor, will have registration day
September 3 at the Stac House
from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Mrs. Taylor has made plans for
classes to begin September 10 pro-
viding attendance is good.
Parents unable to register their
child on September 3 can contact
Mrs. Taylor at -416 West Shotwell
Street, Bainbridge, Ga.



<-g


SHOP AT HOME AND YOU NEEDN'T FEAR .
YOUR NEIGHBORS ARE YOUR MERCHANTS HERE!
You have chosen this community to live in because you preferred
the calmer, more tranquil life of an area in which you know and are
known by those about you where your grocers and merchants are
your neighbors and friends. When you spend your shopping dollar here
at home, you are casting a vote for our community way of life!

SPONSORED BY YOUR FRIENDLY HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER .


II -- ,


~3 1 I


Sun., Mon., Tues., Wed. PRINTING
Sept. 1, 2, 3, and 4 JOB PRINTING
CLEOPATRAS Phone 7-3161
DAUGHTER .Pone 7-JI1I
Adult Art Show Port St. J e, Florida