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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01445
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 18, 1963
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01445

Full Text









THE STAR

"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"


MONEY TALKS-Lefs keep
it where we can speak with It
once in a while-Trade with
your hom* town merchantsI


TWENTY.SIXTH YEAR


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA,


THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1963


Paper Company Pine Planting Methods Pictured In Bank


This series of photographs, current- County in 1952.
ly on display at the Florida National Bank The work has progressed steadily
shows how the large scale land clearing since that time and today the company has
program of the Woodlands Division of the cleared and planted over 60,000 acres .
St. Joe Paper Company is handled. mainly in Calhoun, Liberty, Gadsden,
One of the pioneers in the business Leon and Wakulla counties.
of converting the scrub oak ridges of The young ladies are Miss Patsy Lew-
Northwest Florida into pine producing is and Miss Treva Campbell.
areas, St. Joe began operations in Liberty


Union Committee Seeks Ways To

Stop Climbing Hospital Insurance Cost


Members of the insurance com-
mittees of the Machinists Local,
Electrical Workers Union and Pa-
permakers Unions met with the
doctors and representatives of Mu-
nicipal Hospital Tuesday to try to
seek a solution to climbing hospi-
tal insurance.
The employees of St. Joe Paper
Company face an insurance hike
in their group hospitalization po-
licy. The insurance premium has
been increased from $10.00 to
$26.00 in the last ten years.
Union representatives told the
hospital authorities and doctors
that they realized the insurance
policy had been abused by their
members in the past, causing the
premium to go higher. The repre
sentatives asked the doctors and
hospital authorities to help then
in trying to keep abuses to a min-
imum, so that the insurance might
not be priced out of the reach of
the participating members.
The doctors and hospital people.
recommended that a deductible
policy be put in force by the un-
ion members. Miss Minerva Mc
Lane, hospital administrator told
the members that no emergency
had been turned away from the
hospital for lack of' a deposit. "In
no case would anyone be turned
away from the hospital in an emer-
gency", said Miss McLane. She told
the group that in cases where ad-
mittance could obviously be post-
poned, payment of an outstanding
bill would be required before ad-
mittance, or arrangements made
for payment of a deposit.
All of this information was giv-
en in case the unions decide to go
to the deductible policy. The poli-
cy now in force pays all of the
hospital bill.


Presbyterian

Minister To Be

Installed Sunday
The Rev. Robert David Neese
will be installed as pastor of The
Presbyterian Church of Port St.
Joe this Sunday evening, July 21.
The Presbytery of Florida at its
summer meeting July 9, appointed
the following Commission of min-
isters and ruling elders to accom-
plish the installation: Rev. M. A.
Durant, First Presbyterian Church,
Marianna, to preside; Rev. Wil-
liam Stewart, Westminister Presby-
terian Church, Tallahassee, to
preach the sermon; Rev. Julius
Cox, Lafayette Presbyterian
Church, Tallahassee; to charge the
congregation; Elder Fred McGehee,
First Presbyterian Church, Marian-
na, to charge the minister.
The two additional members of
the Commission are: Elder J. T.
Kelly, Westminster Presbyterian
Church, Tallahassee and Elder Hen-
ry Campbell, The Presbyterian
Church, Port St. Joe.
The installation service will be
held at the Presbyterian Church,
Sixth Street, and will begin at
7:30 p.m.
The public is cordially invited
to attend.

VISITING PARENTS
Mr. and Mrs. George E. Zeigler
and children, Chris Ann and Steph-
en, have returned to Portsmouth,
Virginia, after spending the past
week with Mrs. Zeigler's parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Chris Martin and sis-
ter, Mrs. Billy F. Parrish.


Methodists To

Have Youth Revival

The First Methodist Church of
Port St. Joe announces its Youth
led Revival beginning Sunday, July
21 and continuing through Friday.
July 26. The youth activities begin
at 5:45 each evening and include
a light supper, recreation and dis-
cussion groups. At 7:30 each eve-
ning worship will be held fo. both
youth and adults.
Leading the worship will be
George Sadler of Thomasville,
Alabama. George has just complet-
ed his Sophomore year at Living-
ston State College, Livingston, Ala-
bama, where he is a ministerial
student.
Leading the music will be Joe
Bullington who is at present min-
ister of youth at First Methodist
Church.
On Wednesday, July 24, there
will be a family night. The youth
should bring thier families to the
youth activities. There will be a
covered dish supper, after which
the families will take part in all
the activities for the evening.
The church cordially invites all
the youth of the community to' join
in each evening next week for fun,
fellowship, and spiritual growth.



Rotarians Hear

From President


Commission

Hears No Tax

Complains Tuesday

The City Commission sat for
one hour Tuesday night as a tax
equalization board in the city
but had no objections to valua-
tions being placed on the rolls
on personal and real property
for the coming tax year.
Valuation-wise, Port St. Joe
had only a small, increase this
past year over the previous year
of 1962. Last year's real and per-
son property valuation of exempt
and non-exempt property in the
city was $12,440,595.00. This year
the valuation is $12,579,073.00 or
an increase of $138,478.00.
According to City Auditor and
Clerk, J. B. Williams, most of
this increase came about by the
removal of formerly homestead
exempt property from the ex-
empt rolls and placing them on
the taxable rolls.
Included in the total property
valuation is $10,066,243.00 in tax-
able property and $2,512,830.00
in exempt property. Taxable
property increased by $138,478.00
over last year.


Lions Lay Plans

For 'Horse Show
Lions Club members laid more
complete plans for their August 10
horse show at their regular meet-
ing Monday noon. The Lions are
sponsoring the show at the local
baseball field to raise funds to
support their sight conservation
program.
Program chairman Harry Tison
showed the club a film entitled,
"Lady and the Stock Market", de-
picting the workings and operation
of the New York Stock Exchange.
Guest of the club Monday was
Phil Tomberlin, manager of Chris-
to's 5c and 10c Store.


Mayor Orders Crackdown




On Parking oi nations


Dr. Lowery Urges



Pre School Checkup


Parents were urged this week by
Dr. W. D. Lowery of the Gulf
County Health Department to see
that their children have a medical
checkup before starting the school
year. "Illness and poor performance
;n school can be prevented in many
youngsters by a preschool check-
up," said Dr. Lowery, "and this &p.
plies from kindergarten through


Over 30 Girls Sign
'Up for Softball Teams
Over 30 girls signed up to play
softball in the Jaycee softball rec-
reation program. Friday, July 19,
at 5:30 p.m. the Jaycees will again
sign up girls who want to play.
Monday, July 22 at 5:30 p.m. all
girls will meet at the Dixie Youth
Baseball Park for practice. Prac-
tice will be held every afternoon
from July 22 through 26. Friday,
July 26, teams will be picked and
league play will begin July 30.
Teams will play two games a
week on Tuesday and Thursday af-
ternoons at 5:30 and 7:30 p.m.
All girls will play who sign up.
The program is for fun and not
statistics. Five inning games will
be played, with two hour limits.
The uniforms will be whatever the
parents want the young girls to
Wear. No set uniform will be man-
datory.


Kiwanis Club Hears Report on Recent

Legislature From Volusia Law Maker


A report on the recent session
of the Legislature was presented to
the Kiwanis Club Tuesday by Rep-
resentative Fred Karl of Volusia
County.
Karl, chairman of the education
committee of the House of Rep-
resentatives is currently speaking
throughout Northwest Florida.
He offered the opinion that the
recent session was a "good session'
with solid legislation and a solid
finance program being worked out.
He pointed out that a new aware
ness was manifesting itself among
the members of the needs in educa-
tion throughout the state. He point-
ed with satisfaction to a new pro-
gram by the state to furnish 75%
of the minimum foundation finan-
cial requirements of counties; new
teacher rules to attract the better
teachers to the state; opening of
Junior Colleges for year-round op-
eration and broadening of the fi-


The Port St. Joe Rotary Club "in orbit" long before man. And
heard a recorded address from Na- it is up to individual members to
tional President, Carl P. Miller at retain Rotary in this position 'of
their meeting Thursday. service to mankind".
The address by the National The president closed his address
President charged Rotarians to by stating, "We are not seeking a
add new impetus to their new year victory of nation over nation, but
which began on July 1. The presi- man over his weaknesses".
dent declared, "America has now Guests of the club were Steve
put a man in orbit, but Rotary, was Lyons and Dick Pinder.


Port St. Joe Port Shows In

MOBILE-Three West Florida 043,852 tons in 1962, foriegn im- the port in 1962 compared with
ports show increases while two had ports amounted to 74,642 tons 21,307 the previous year. The main
decreases in 1962 compared with while foreign exports totaled 187, commodity handled at Carrabelle
1961, U. S. Army District Engin- 473 tons. Petroleum products led was wheat flour, 33,362 tons.
eers announced. in tonnage with 819,395 tons. Pensacola: This port lost ton-
Port St. Joe, Panama City and Port St. Joe tonnage increased nage with 651,910 recorded last
Carrabelle had substantial gains by 45,051 tons in 1962. Waterborn year compared with 696,040 in
while Apalachicola and Pensacola commerce totaled 1,743,690 tons 1961. Petroleum products totaling
had decreases. ? last year compared with 1,698,639 419,159 tons headed the list of
Commerce moving on the Apala- tons the previous year. Imports ac- port commodities. Foreign comm-
chicola, Chattahoochee and Flint counted for 2,225 tons and exports erce totaled 88,016 tons and ex-
rivers also increased, engineers 9,894 tons. Petroleum products ports 50,049.
said. made up the bulk of port comm- Apalachicola: Port tonnage total-
Reports by cities included: erce. ed 20,064 in 1962, a drop of 2,865
Panama City: commerce increa- Carrabelle: Tonnage increased from 1961's figure of 22,929. Shell-
sed by 79,620 tons in 1962, when 27,120 at the eastern terminus of fish products totaled 11,787 last
a total of 1,123,472 tons was hand- the Gulf Intercoastal Waterway, year.
led at the port compared with 1, with 48,427 tons passing through Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and


nancial foundation of the school
system.
Rep. Karl said that the question
of state borrowing came up for
some profound thought and much
planning by the Legislators. He
spoke in favor of the Governor's
planned outdoor recreation financ-
ing plan. This would allow the state
to borrow up to $50 million to be
repaid with a 5% tax on sporting
goods, to purchase lands through-
out the state for recreation and
tourist attraction. A proposed park
for St. Joseph Point will come un-
der this financing plan.
Karl added his support for an
annual session of the legislature
since budget plans were mere con-
jectures at best when planning so
far ahead as is now the case.
Karl said that he approved of
all new taxes with the exception of
the added cost to automobile li-
cense tags. He said that most of
the taxes were on luxury items,
which records show will be paid
to a large extent by tourists.
Guests of the club were: L. D.
Lewis, Sam Morgan, Frank Febro,
John Paul, Norman Griffin, Art
Rushing and Wilbur Jackson of
Panama City; George Tapper, Rev.
Dave Neese and David Macomber
of Port St. Joe and Dick Brewer
of Tallahassee.

Local Man In Wreck


Moulton A. Freeman, of Port St.
re a s e Joe, received minor injuries in an
r e a s e auto accident in Panama City Sun-
day night, according to the Panama
1City Police Department.
Flint rivers: barge shipments on According to police reports, wit-
the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee nesses said Freeman ran a stop
and Flint rivers in 1962 totaled sign and ran into the side of a
388,584 tons, an increase of 5,5 pulp wood truck driven by F. D.
388,584 tons, an increase of 5,567Willis of Arcadia.
tons over 1961's 383,017 tons. In- Reports said the impact knocked
bound shipments accounted for the truck body completely loose
220,347 tons; outbound shipments from the frame.
5,984 tons and local movements Both the truck and Freeman's
162,253 tons. Petroleum products car were demolished by the acci-
made up the bulk of shipments, re- dent.


gistering 177,179 tons.
The engineers said the figures
were preliminary and subject to
revision.


USE THE WANT ADS


VISITING RELATIVES
Rev. and Mrs. Everette Lamber-
son, missionaries to Haiti are vis-
iting with relatives in Port St. Joe
Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Lamberson and
Mrs. Selma Lamberson, this week.


high school."
The answer to "Why can't
Johnny read?" may be that he
can't see the words so well, or
perhaps he doesn't hear the tea-
cher as well as he should. Ua-
suspected small defects can
make a big difference in his pro-
gress at school and later in life.
Protective immunization against
p lio, diphtheria, tetanus and
whooping cough, and vaccination
against smallpox are the best de
fense against these crippling and
killing diseases. Follow-up booster
shots should be obtained at proper
intervals, and these can be taken
care of at the regular checkups.
In many states this protection is
required before any student is
permitted to enter school.
Authorities emphasize the need
for greater national physical fit-
ness, especially in our youths.
A regular checkup c e an im-
portant step toward maintaining
fitness and health.
In most cases the child will re-
ceive a clean bill of health, which
.is always good news. In others an
unsuspected condition may be dis-
covered and taken care of before
it becomes serious, thereby avoid-
ing posisble suffering, lost time,
and expense. Dr. Lowery urges par-
ents not to wait until the last min-
ute when doctors and clinics are
swamped. Now is the time to ar-
range for that important pre-school


- checkup.


Gas Franchise

Is Discussed
The City Commission expressed
concern Tuesday night for the de-
cline in parking meter receipts and
laxity of enforcing parking laws
in alleys of the city.
Mayor Frank Hannon expressed
the wishes of the Commission to
Chief of Police H. W. Griffin and
asked that his department pay clo-
ser attention to the parking me-
ters and try to ascertain why reve-
nue continues to decline.
The Mayor also expressed con-
cern to the Chief of Police of cars
parking in alleyways downtown,
blocking the alleys.
The Chief was instructed to give
tickets to such vehicles other than
those loading and unloading mer-
chandise.
The Mayor also told the Chief
that a little trouble had been ex-
perienced in getting the police de-
partment on the phone lately. Chief
Griffin said that the phone in the
police car had been out of order
for a period of time but that it was
working again now.
Mayor Hannon also requested
the Chief to file a monthly report
of all arrests and disposition of
cases handled by his department.
NATURAL GAS
Commissioner I. C. Nedley made
the observation that a time period
for activating the franchise of the
St. Joe Natural Gas Company had
expired and wanted to know if the
franchise was now void.
Attorney Costin stated that the
franchise stated that it could be
terminated if it was the desire of
the Commission at the expiration
of the allotted time given to serve
the City. If the Commisison did


You may obtain the proper not take any action to terminate
school health form from your pri- the franchise it would remain in
vate physician or the Health De- effect.
apartment. This form should be pro- Costin also stated that the Fed.
perly filled out at the time of pre- eral Power Commission had given
school checkup, and submitted to the St. Joe Natural Gas Company
the school as a part of your child's a natural gas allotment which ex-
permanent record. pires on September 17 if construe-
Preschool medical examina- tion on a distribution system is
tions may be done by your pri- not started by that time. Costin
vate physician, or you may bring told the Commission that if the cur-
your child to the Gulf County rent franchise is revoked, it will
Health Department any Thursday take another gas company at least
afternoon between 1:30 and 4:30 a year and a half to get a gas allot-
beginning Thursday, August 1, ment.
iSS ~ ~ ~ S^^.S'.S ^' ,. E'F IN*i~ll MI --


-g


-14


Baby Boy Makes Five Generations


Pictured above is five genera-
tions. A son born recently to Mr.
and Mrs. David Rich made the
fifth living generation in the
family of Mrs. W. 0. Upshaw of
White City.
And to make matters even
more confusing, this is the third
straight time it has happened
in the same family. Mrs. S. C.
Pridgeon, the great grandmother
in the current five generations,
was a fifth generation living
daughter; Mrs. Harold D. Kirk-
land, the present-day grandmo-
ther, was also a fifth generation;
Mrs. David Rich, the moth' r,


was also a fifth generation baby.
If you can make out all this
relations business.
Pictured above, left to right are
-little David Rich, Jr., in the
arms of his mother, Mrs. David
Rich, Mrs. Harold Kirkland, the
grandmother, Mrs. S. C. Pridgeon
the great grandmother and Mrs.
W. 0. Upshaw, the great great
grandmother.
The little lad has five grand-
mothers to "aid in his upbring-
ing", as there are four living
generations on the father's si:'e
in the persons of Mrs. E. J. Rich
and Mrs. H. E. Rich.


Wewa FFA To Sponsor Horse Show
The Wewahitchka FFA chapter the Wewahitchka ball park.
will sponsor a horse show this Sat- Chairman of the event is Hugh
urday evening at 7:00 p.m. (CST) II. Scmmes with Chap Millergren,
with proceeds to go to the Gulf co-chairman.
County Little League baseball Admissions have been set at 50c
teams. for school children and $1.00 for
The show will be presented in adults.


lOc

PER COPY


F,


NUMBER 44











Miss Arttoinette Florence Mira Is

Married To Samuel Addison Powell, Jr.


Miss Antoinette Florence M'ra caronets of
artd Samuel Addison Powell, Jr., They wore
: qexehnged wedding vows in a pers and wl
--dounle-ring ceremony performed They carri
at 9 o'clock Thursday morning, white and t
July the fourth, in Saint Joseph's nations, edg
Citholic Church. The Reverend le and shoN
Father Paul Hogarty ;officiated. ribbons. T
The bride is the daughter of Mr bouquet be
and Mrs. Joseph Anthony Mira. The shade of ye
foster parents of the bridegroom 'The gioo
are his aunt and uncle; Mr. and their were
Mrs. Claiborne Sapp of Marianna. charcoal gre
Ihe church was ornamented with white carn
elegant arrangements of white pin-striped
inums, white pom-poms and white Escorted
gladboli, jade: foliage .and graceful bride appe
pluffiosi fern I 'pedestailled brass gown of w'
flower.lholders at either end of the over peau
Chancel' ailing where the solemn ed bodice
vows were spoken. Tall lighted ta- scooped ne
pe in f-gold 'andlesticks burned at Her bouffa
either 'side of th1 tabernacle ani French llui
a' oft imbed'glow from the'stainid ing star4it
'"-glaswihdows fell upon the nuptial of aurora c
seet:e. White satin bows; marked She wore s
'thei family-pews. gloves and
SA: prd&tam of soft nuptial music -quet ofwh
" wa' rendered by the organist, Mr.; 'edged with
-'Fdrrel"Allen, Jr. centered-
'AtterIding the' bride as her ma-- throated wl
troxi of"honor-wag her sister, Mrs. was showe
J. E. iH'taway-" Bridesmaids were satin -'ibbc
`' Miss 'Patricia Williams and Miss 'with' valle
"Beth-Williams. pearl heart
Mr. Claiborne- Sapp served his The'iW'ot
--nephew as best man and the ushers for her'dha
,'were J;. B.Hattaway, brother-in-law shaded linE
. of th'e-*bride and Harold Keel. ed at the i
The matron of honor and brides- and re-emb
irmaidsi were identically costumed in ri-beige ha
pale yellowwbrocaded-cotton sheaths and her p
h complimented with abbreviated transleucen
-'tieredwveils of starched yellow tull shoulder. c
Attached toe the' hair with half- cymbidium


so ^*^ ~ l T B


I blown yellow roses.
matching yellow slip-
hite wrist-length gloves.
[ed hand-bouquets of
tinted-yellow tufted car-
ged in fluted yellow tul-
wered with yellow satin
'he ;:honor attendant's
.ing of slightly deeper
allow.
tmsafen and bride's fa-
attired in full-cutaway
ey morning jackets, with
action at the lapel, and
grey trousers.
by her father the lovely
eared in a floor-length
white silk organza posed
de sois, hatring a mould-
of' Alencon lace with
ckline and cap sleeves.
nt, elbow-length veil of
sion.fell from a glitter-
, butterfly-shaped tiara
crystals and seed pearls.
heer white, wrist-lei)gth
carried ai'ascading bou-
iteo feathered carnations,
-flutted- white tulle and
With a -single yellow-
htite orchid. The bouquet
red with slender white
ons tied in love knots
.y-lilies and miniature
ts.
her of the bride chose
iughter's'Wedding a sand
en sheath dress accent-
neckline with coral trim
briodery. Her small, Cap-
at -featured a semi-veil
pumps were Capri-beige
it patent. She wore a
orsage of creamy-yellow
orchids.


U. S, Government

State, County, Mui
of'Florida

Cash on hand-and
from- banks


Loans and Discoun

Banking House

Furniture, fixtures

Corporate Stocks

Other Assets

TOTAL ASSE

-WFICERS and Dl
WALTER C. DOD


at:Port St. Joe

'PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


Atthe Close ofBusiness, June 29, 2963




-Ass e ts


Bonds .------...... $1,826;759.20

nicipal Bonds
497,854.50

'due
:408,710.00


its 1,444,714.24

74,862.55

and equipment 11,306.29

,13,500.00

40,892.92

7TS $4,618,599.70

DIRECTORS
SON Liabilities


:"-President
H: H.-SAUNDERS Capital
'Vice-President
J. TED CANNON T Surplus
Cashier
GROVER L. HOLLAND Undivided profits
-Assistant Cashier


S. L. BARKE
J. C: BELIN
T. S. COLDEWEY
WALTER C. DODSON
A. L. HARGRAVES

R. H. McINTOSH
J. LAMAR MILLER
H. H. SAUNDERS
Directors I


S-


$200,000.00

250,000.00

52,225.97


Reserves 37,482.35


Other Liabilities

Deposits


539,708.32


62,544.04

4,016,347.34


14


-


The aunt of the groom was cos-
tumed in a dress of azure blue silk
shantung. Her small hat and slip-
pers were in a matching shade of
blue. Her corsage was of lavender
cymbidium orchids.
Immediately following the cere-
mony the bridal reception was held
at the home of the bride's parents


at Mexico Beach. Yellow daisies
and white snapdragons and polish-
ed magnolia leaves predominated
in the decor.
The guests were greeted by the
host and hostess and presented to
the bridal party.
The bridal table, overlaid with
a white Maderia cut-work cloth,.


TELEPHONE: BAll 7-4191
Sun., Fri., Holidays 2:46 p.m.
Non. thru Thurs. -- 4:45 p.m
THURSDAY FRIDAY


YOU'LL HAVE

TO SEE IT TO

BELl VE IT!


N


0 Sm


he fabulon1s dolpbhn


SATURDAY ONLY

NEW

: .,


,. L COLOR by IL.UX
HOPE LANGE
TUESDAY WELD
MILLIE PERKINS

The LIFE, The LOVE, The LEGEND


CinemaScope Color by De Lux

ROBERT WAGNER JEFFREY HUNTER
HOPE LANGE AGNES MOOREHEAD


JOHN WAYNE


TME


WHITMAN BALI -PERSOFF MARV]N.-2


SUNDAY. MONDAY
TUESDAY
HISTORY-MAKING
SCREEN ENTERTAINMENTS


TOTAL LIABILITIES $4,618,599.70


MEMBER: FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION

MEMBER: FLORIDA NATIONAL GROUP of BANKS


,,.. NATALIE WOOD
RICHARD BEYMER- RUSS TAMBLYN
RITA MORENO GEORGE CHAKIRIS


was centered with the three-tiered
embossed wedding cake topped
with a miniature bride and, groom
and encircled with flowers and
greenery. After the initial cutting
of the cake by the bride and groom,
the cake was presided over by Mrs.
W. B. Simmons and Mrs. Pete Ivey.
Attending the bride's book was
Miss Mary Dell Ramsey. Passing
decorative yellow net holders of
rice were Mrs. Joel Strait and Miss
Barbara Weeks. Catering was done
by Mr. H. G. MacNeil of Pensacola.
Mrs. Powell, Jr., chose for her
wedding trip, a sheath dress of
teal-blue silk having white fringe
trim. Her white, coronet-shaped hat
was of starched cotton net orna-
mented with white velvet and illu-,
sion veiling. Her accessories were
gleaming white patent. Her jew-
elry was baroque pearls and she
wore the orchid corsage lifted from


her bridal bouquet.
The bride is a graduate of Mount
de Sales Convent of Macon, Geor-
gia and Mr. Powell, Jr., an alum-
nus of Perkinson Junior College in
Mississippi. He now serves with the
United States Army Forces Train-
ing Regiment at Fort Gordon, Geor-
gia. .
Out of town guests attending the
occasion were: Maternal aunt of
tlfe bride, Mrs. Rafael Ciceraro,
Mrs. Lulema Moyer, Mrs. Maria C.
Bethart, Mr. William Bethart Tomp-
ton of:liami, Florida; Miss Ger-
trude Sapp, Miss Shelia Powell of
Trenton, Florida; Mr. and Mrs. Guy
Eisher4of Pensacola, Florida; Mr.
anid As. Donald Ramsey, Greens-
boro, North Carolina; Mrs. Mel
Magidson of Tampa, Florida and
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Fleming of Pan-
ama City, Florida.

Golden Agers 'Hold
Regular Meeting Monday
The Golden Agers held their reg-
ular meeting Monday night, July
8, in the Stac House. Mrs. Ellen
Kirkland presided in the absence
of Mr. Fillingim, the president.
Mrs. Calla Perritt, secretary called
the roll.
Those of the Club who accepted
the invitation of the Panama City
Senior Citizens reported that they
were royally entertained and had
a most enjoyable evening.
The members voted unanimously
to have a picnic at the next meet-
ing, which will be July 22 at 6:00
p.m. The picnic will be at the
beach, and each member will pre-
pare and take whatever the com-
mittee instructs.
The program c e' had
games and ce '..... :
members busy tainetS
Those present w, -,'&a '-. ,'"rs and
the winners wenr Wa-
liams and Mrs. El id .


Refreshments w -
Miss Carrie and Mr. -
hostesses.


NOW OF


MINIATUM



GOLF

FREE GAME
19th Hole


:q.


Long Avenue

Circle Meetings
Circles Number One and Two of
the Long Avenue Baptist Church
met in the home of Mrs. T. D.
Hutchins, Tuesday, at 9:30 a.m.,
with seven members attending.
Mrs. Joe Ferrell, Mrs. Frank
Barnes, Mrs. John. Core, Mrs. J. O.
Lucas, Mrs. John Dickey, Mrs. T.
D. Hutchins and Mrs. T. J. Braxton.
A very interesting panel discussion
was given on the changing patterns
in city missions. The hostess ser-
ved delicious refreshments of
Cokes, coffee and donuts.

Circle No. Five met in the home
of Mrs. Wesley R. Ramsey, Tues-
day at 7:30 p.m. with five members
present and one visitor, Mrs.
James Traweek. Members present
were Miss Alma Baggett, Mrs. Gene
Fowler, Mrs. Wesley R. Ramsey,
Mrs. J. D. Clark and Mrs. Mary
Barham. Mrs. Ramsey brought the
program on "The Changing Pat-
terns In City Missions", followed
by Miss Baggett giving an enlight-
ening talk on the "Good Will Cen-
ter" visited by her in Panama City.
Refreshments were served and en-
joyed by all attending.

Circle Number Six met at the
church Monday at 7:30 p.m. with
seven members present: Mrs. Gary
Manz, Mrs. C. E. Marshall, Mrs. Ce-
cil Harrison, Mrs. Joe Fortner, Mrs.
Billy Norris, Mrs. Clyde White and
Mrs. Edwin Peters. All members
took part in a panel discussion on
"The Changing Patterns in City
Missions". The hostess, Mrs. Gary
Manz, served refreshments to
4 ... attending.

.e To School
M every Baldwin has re-
j New Orleans to school
it- siting her parents, Mr. and
L_,: oug Baldwin.


- -^ fCQ BSS

FOR V. S. Hiway 98
ALL Meo Beach
GOLF BOWLING
GAMES MUSIO
KIDDIE RIDES
Safe, Clean Recreation for All the Family


iT of CONDITION


Sof the


FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK


I FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH


C. Byron Smith, Pastor


Corner Third St. and Baltzell Ave.


SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION .----..-..-......... 6:45 p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) ....... ------7:30 p.m.
"Come and Worship God With Us"


m


...........


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1963




,













t.





















Campbell Bergeron

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Campbell of this city announce
the engagement of their daughter, Treva Marie to
Donald James Bergeron, son of Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Ber-
geron of Abbeville, La. The wedding date will be an-
nounced later.


APT


'







These Specials Good


Wednesday thru Tues.


JULY 17,18,19,20,22 and 23


PROTEIN CHUCK ROAST
49c

Proten Ground Chuck
59c".


PROTEIN No. 7 STEAK
59c

Proten Shoulder Roast
69c LB.


PREMIUM QUALITY

GROUND BEEF 3,bs. $1.19


SMOKED LINK SAUSAGE 3 Ibs.
Meaty BRISKET STEW 5 lbs.
BEEF RIB STEW 3 lbs.


STREAK-O-LEAN
Salt Pork


POUND


Hickory Smoked Spuare Cut
Pork Side
POUND
&AMAC


C


FROSTY MORN BEST FLAVOR
'i -,- ^TyFull


For Your Convenience We Have A Choice Selection
of Swift Premium Veal


Robin Hood
FLOUR
10 Lb. Bag


MOPS
SAVE 20c
49c


No
Ig


LARD
.10 8 9c


No. 5
Jar


49c


Carnation Dry Milk


8 QUARTS


14 QUARTS


Nabisco
SALTINES
POUND
27c


GUARANTEED TENDER


FRYING OKRA or
YELLOW SQUASH
fc

BAG


Jumbo Cello Bag
LETTUCE Carrots, Celery
Head ..I.A D.D :;IeL


19c


UIna RIUIlub

lOc


FANCY HANDS


Bananas

10c lb.


SWIFT CANNED MEAT SALE!
Swift's 12 Oz. Swift's Corned Swift's Beef
PREM BEEF STEW
12 Oz. Can 12 Oz. Can 24 Oz. Can
39c 49c 39c
Swift's Spaghetti and Swift's Vienna Swift's Corned
Meat Balls Sausage Beef Hash
24 oz. can 3 FOR 4 oz. can 2 FOR 15 oz. can 3 FOR
$1.00 39c $1.00
Zephyr Stuffed Alabama Fla. Grade A Small
OLIVES MEAL EG GS
8 Oz. Jar 5 Lb. Bag 3 DOZEN
39 c 29 c $1.00


YOUR TOTAL WILL BE CHEAPER AT RICH'S
PLUS ONE DOZEN GA. GRADE 'A'
LARGE EGGS

FREE!
WITH $10.00 ORDER OR MORE
Ga. Grade 'A' Large Best Fresh Yard
BROWN EGGS


2;+ .89c
%,-


YOUR FREEZER NOW!


FILL Y
Fresh Tender
OKRA
Bushel
1.90


Colored Butter
BEANS
Bushel
3.25


Fresh Field
PEAS
Bushel
1.90


Frying Field Colored Butter
0 K RA PEAS BEANS
Pound Pound Pound
10c 100c 12c
FRESH SHELLED WHITE ACRE

PEAS BA39c
With SNAPS
BLACK EYE PEAS
BAG NO. 5 JUG NO.10 JUG
39c 79c 1.39


ICH'S


SWIFT'S CHOICE


Premium Proten Beef


Minute
Steaks
EACH

9c


1 -I II 1 I- IB- N I ~-- -u L -I


I -c----g ~-- '--111~---


pp-


I ,-,


I -1 L I i III~ ~ILI I --_-I


Pr'coTe-n










THURSDAY, JULYJS1, 1963
EMrs Marshall


New Edition of Social Security Handbook

Now Available At Your S. S. Office

A new edition of the "Social Se- Percentage increases in both
curity Handbook", a 314-page di- loans and deposits for June 30,
g,,st of the Social Secu ity law ad 1963, as compared with June 30,
regulations, is available now, John 1962, are as follows: Loans up 15.5
V. Carey, District Manager of the percent; time deposits up 9.7 per-
Panama City Social Security Of- cent; demand deposits up 8.8 per-
fce said this week. It covers all cent with total deposits up 9.1 per-
tl at anyone needs to know about cent.
%ie old-age, survivors and disabil- __
ity insurance program and how it
operates. U&E THE WANT ADS
The Handbook, whici was first
published in 1960, has proven use-
ful to lawyers, ac:.untants, per-
sonnel directors, servi.:e officers of
veterans organizati.n:i, labor un-
inn officials, members of Congress,
ai d others who as,ist or advise
the public on Social Security mat-
ters.
Among the Handbo~o's 21 chap-
trrs are .wo about the disability
p-.uvisions of the Social Security
law, including the medical factor\
considered in deciding disability
claims. Other chapters tell about
he requirements f'i retirement,
dependents and survive r. benefits,
d, scribing in detail the types of
evidence the claimant may be ask.
ed to supply. The rights of a clai-
mant to appeal wnat he considers .-
on unfavorable decisi ,i are fully i
explained. The final chapter pre- ,
sents a summary of other Govern- fi
inent benefit programs, giving
their eligibility requirements and
rates of payment.
The "Social Security Handbook"
may be purchased from the Super
intendent of Documents, U. S. Gov-
ernment Printing Office, Washing-
ton 25, D. C., for $1.25.
For a full explanation of the So-
cial Security Law in your individ-
ual case always contact your near-
est Social Security Office. The So-
cial Security Office for this area is
located at 1135 Harrison Avenue,
Panama City, Telephone PO 3-5331.


Banks Show

Healthy Increase

In Business


sionary birthday calendar. hostess for the August meeting.
During the business session, A social hour followed a closing
good reports were given by the prayer by Mrs. Durant. Everyone
committees. enjoyed ice cream custard and
Mrs. W. J. Belin will be the cake.



FIRST METHODIST CHURCH I
Intersection Monument and Constitution
REV. THOMAS 8. HARRIS, D.D., Minister


Hostess to Baptist

Circle No. 2
Ten ladies of Circle Two of the
First Baptilst WMU met in the
home of Mrs. Marshall for their
regular monthly business meeting.
Mrs. W. L. Durant presided.
Prayer was led by Mrs. C. G.
Costin, Sr. Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon
brought the devotional from Ephe-
sians 4:13. The theme "Leadership
Training" was given in open dis-
cussion with all taking part, fol-
lowed in with prayer by Mrs. Joe
Bracewell, remembering the mis-


9:45
11:00
7:30
6:00
7:30


A.H.
A.M.
P.M.
P.M.
P.M.


UED


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Pla.


ORLANDO-Totals released this
week by Floyd Call, Executive Vice
President, Florida Bankers Associa-
tion, indicate continued healthy in-
creases in loans and deposits of
the state's 362 commercial banks.
Overall growth of 13-1 per cent in
loans and 8.5 per cent in deposits
compared with totals one year ago,
shows dramatically the influence
and significance of this industry in
the expanding Florida economy.
Current deposits amount to $5%
billion with loans totaling in excess
of $2/2 billion.



HEALTH

TOPICS -

A Service of Your Doctor of Medicine,
Your Local Medical Society and the
Florida Medical Association.
MODERN HAIR
STYLES
Young ladies nowadays-and
sometimes their mothers, too-
are showing up at the office,
at school or at a party with a
variety of elaborate new hair
styles that men often find some-
what baffling.
Most of the new puffed up
hairdos depend on roughing,
back-combing, or "teasing" the
hair to give added body to the
newest style. Some other names
for these techniques are "rat-
ting" and "lacing".
Today's Health, the magazine
of the American Medical As-
sociation, reports that roughing
or back-combing does not dam-
age the hair if it is done pro-
perly and if the hair is in good
condition; that is, if it is na-
turally lustrous and the fibers
are strong and springy.
However, these operations
should be carried out gently
and not too frequently. This
will avoid roughening of the
hair fiber's surface and undue
tangling, especially on dry,
brittle or easy-to-break hair.
These operations tend to
tangle the hair quite badly.
Tangled hair is difficult to
comb and somewhat greater
than normal fiber breakage may
occur unless care is exercised.
And when milady tires of the
puffed up hair-do and decides
to return to normal, begin
combing at the ends and then
gradually progress toward the
scalp to remove the tangles by
gentle combing. Actually, brush-
ing is more effective than
combing for removing the
tangles and is easier on the
hair. *
If your teen-age daughter
turns up one day with what
the parents believe is an absurd
hair-do, or a dye-job in un-
natural colors, don't worry
about it. The new hair that
grows out from the roots will
still be daughter's own normal
hair and the new style will go
Away with time.__


!


Many More Va


E-','-;.,TOqAY,


You Are Cordially Invited To Attend

Long Ave. Baptist Church

REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ........ 6:45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ........ 7:30 p.m.
Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street
Air Conditioned Centrally Heated

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME


Church School
Morning Worship
Bibye Study (Wednesday)
Methodist Youth Fellowship ..............
Evening Worship


I II* IT | iI% I *1 l.









,r w, ,, ,, --,, ,, .. .r 0zen S W series "Go Forimal"
M-Allgood Brand Super Right Heavy

Breakfast Shoulder

A BAC ON Swiss Steak

2 LB. P G- ...-POUND




"Suer-Right" Heavy Western Beef CHUCK





FOR GENERATIONS this French original, Coeur a la Crime,
has been a world-famous dessert. The recipe given here is a sim-
plified version as creamy and delicious as the original. Frozen
strawberries, just thawed, make a peofect sauce for the delicately
textured "heart of cream". Despite its elegance, Coeur a la Creme
|Is easy to makeand requires very litge last-minute preparations,
a virtue greatly to be desired in a company dessert.
Boneless COEUR A LA CRMB
Bone i 2 teaspoons gelatin I enp whipping cream
| |h S]f 1 poun I2 3cs8 sg tablespoons cold water Itablespoon confectioners
IUh* ^ W ^ j poundd (2 cups) ; agar
,lb cottage cheese -' packages (10 ounces each>
Uck Roast packages (3 ounces Ach) t esn strawberry halves,
cream cheese, thawed
Soften gelatin in cold water. 'eat over hot water until dis.
m mm mmm mm mmmmm solved. Put cottage cheese through a fine sieve. Soften cream
cheese add cream gradually, blending well, Add augar and the
cottage cheese, Stir in dissolved gelatin. Spoon into 1-4luart mold
Eastern (heart-shaped, if desired) or 8 to 10 individual molds. Chill until
XRound White Irm. Unmold. Serve topped with the strawberry halves. Makes
RoundWhiteup enough for 10 sevn
Coupon and purchase of Mi o thsome of the future roads with as
Potatoes O.SISoz. Bomb c utycm isio nphalt but no decisions were made
Hair Spray $2. 35 tunty Commiiern at this time.
10 L. The Board did then discuss the
0 g J-7.20 WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA 1963-64 budget until 5 p.m., ten-
S Coupon good through July 21 July 9, 1963 tatively approving the Health De-
partment Budget calling for $14,-
29 c The Board of County Commis- 452.00 from county funds but mak-
Ssoners of Gulf County, Florida, ing no other decisions as to said
met this date in regular session budget.
Su V with the following members pres- The Board authorized the Clerk
Western Jumbo Vine Ripe Each ent: A. J. Strickland, Chairman, to attend the National Clerks and
A ALeo Kennedy, S. C, Player, Walter Recorders meeting in Denver, Col-
C~ln ta o~ 3j |Graham and James G. McDamniel. orado, beginning July 26.
-. The Clerk, Sheriff, Attorney, Aoad All bills were presented, exam-
Superintendent, Civil Defense Di- ined, approved and ordered paid.
With Coupon and purchase of rector and Max W. Kilbourn were All payrolls for June were ap-
SAnn Page, Pint Jar also present proved and ordered paid.
A nP agPr in Ja The meeting came to order at All payrolls for June were ap-
SOdwICh' Spread 39c 9:00 a.m. The Rev. J. J. Hill open- proved and ratified as paid.
Sa c d ed the meeting with prayer. There being no further business
Large Firm Ripe Elberta 2 LBS. 21 The minutes of June 11, 17 and the meeting adjourned,
Large Firm Ripe Elberta 2 LBS. Coupon good through July 21 25 were read. approved and adopt- ATTEST;
Smed. George Y. Core A. J. Strickland
Ph2-J. L Bateman and J. C. Arbogast Clerk Chairman
members of State Welfare Board +
appeared before the Board and dis-
PRhW" explained that even though the
Lrge FanyPNT With Coupon and purche of Board bad signed one of the Midget InIwotnnts With
Ann Page, 1 Pint, oz. CourtRooms as a Welfare Office,
Lrge Fancy PnP, thatroom is continued to be used G

e ended Syrup availableaeon a temp orary basis in
.l 7,20 the Health Center, but that the
l Coupon good through J -21 Welfare Department requires a / ,
l.i permanent office. The possibility
J > of constructing a building in We-
.... ^wahitchka and Port St. Joe was
M Ma I11 il1J Ie IMI Afl uI Im me m m i, 1 Mdiscussed. Mr. Arbogast told the O
SOperial ole7 MILD AND MELLOW EIGHT O'CLOCK Board that Welfare payments in
Gulf county amount to $24,000.00
per month that Gulf county is wo
now due iBe workers and will How COOL
St a be due four workers by October
Unit Office being placed in GulfI YoU BE
county. He said the U. S. Govern-
T PI ment will pay 55% on construe- lOU-N Y
M,.. tion for the needed facilities and W HEN
m n* ^~m l 1mwith a representative from the G a
L ..Stat Office to discuss this matter., GET HOM i
The Chairman announced that the
TEMPTING TRIO of Timely ys EW Jane Parker Delicious Cinnamon Board will meet with the Welfared fZ =- -
ANEW JaARrR IDlGE RASN1 Cnm wDepartment Representatives at any
A sE RAISINt LOAF 12 qoz. 29cOR. H. Ellsey, Seal Sale Chairman
ANGEL FOOD for the Gulf county TB Association
ANGEL FOOD appeared before the Board and
A & P Sweet or Unsweetened 46 Oz. Cans discussed possibility of the county
GrE a eri 2 ..eSAVE I J** givin finanl aid to T3 patients
Ju ie dischaBrged from the Hospital and
JANE PARKIE U I Clle ine a rehabilitation pro-
AJAP RellArehEumr b am, After discussing this request,
BLACKBERRYe A & P Really Fresh Jumb7 e oa4d said that consideration
.. i99 would be given at the proper time.
.. SAVE Istalt Coffee 10 ozThe Farm Agent and Road De-
S' apartment filed reports for June
and the same were ordered filed.
JAN10 OFF LABEL White House Nnfat The BoardNoexecuted Gan agree-


P -rAin e t SF AhteH h sLo rmed on withe progress being madss, Ar-
E A S t t Ml 1o e stcabish to e a sCountvey Civil Dexist

N P 1 95 Instant Mik G1S2 a;. Iesse Headquarters at the Mosqui-n.
PKG ing Control building at Kenney's a
A MilL Drop everything you're do.1
A & P OUR FINEST QUALITY! APPLE SPECIAL! The Board added Dhe Rwing ing and investigate electric

aw0a G n Gported on th crngeorene bing oade
Wreto Conto b chd h attended to cool, cool, air conditioned
A & P FROZEN QN UENTRATL D ORANGP E SPECIAL! recently. With the report each nog r and yie ostg elec rcan

JCUIJ 49 o a C9 arore d on th e orda Coenter spend the rest of the SUm-
CANS for Cold War Education; a copy mer relaxing in cool, air con-
of the program and a 340 page ditioned pleasure
book "Education and Freedom in .
Gerber Strained Chase & Sanborn Shortening a World of Conflict." A i
B1aby Food 10 Jars 99e OOFFE- lb, 71e FLUFFO 3 lbs. 794 ates filed a revised plan for the
King Tabby, 14s Ozs. Dixie Lily streets to be paved in the Lester
Kotton Mops 12's 95c CAT FOOD 4 cans 59c GRITS 12 lbs. 200 ed because the drainage method
Hawaiian Green Giant, lb., 1 oz. Lays, Twins had to b changed. The plans were
PUNCH qt., 14 oz. 37c Sweet Peas 2 cans 49c Potato Chips 59e approved and turned over to the
Staleys Green Giant, lb., 1 oz. Heinz Tomato Road Department.
CORN OIL qt. 69c Niblets Corn can 21c KETCHUP 14 O.S 370 The ward entered Into a d cus- Instant


Detergent, 121 Ozs. Green GiantE einz I4der drainage problems in the Williams- Comfort
TREND 2 boxes 39c MEXIGORN 12 oz. ~1 VINEGAR qt. 39c burg area. The Board decided +o omfortriC y!
Detergent, 12 oz. Green Qiant, with Onions Campbell Condensed, 10% oz. take a look at these problems be- f e- ,' r ;:
Liquid Trem ..o..PEAS lb, 1 oz. 2c fore a decision be made.
Liquid Trend 9SP PEAS lb,, I 9 V]EG. SOUP can 1K Max W. Kilbourn presented the
Nestea, 1 ozs.-10 OFF Morton's Frozen Veg. Shortening Board samples of a section of a
INSTANT TEA 79c, POT PIES 5 for 99c Snowdrift 3 lb. can 63o road that has been in use over
four and a half years and told the r FLORIDA
answ a"Mfa a510 FIFTH STREET Board of the type of material used-1L POWER
the same being asphalt. He stated CORPORAT;
Prices in this ad are good througl atthis materials the same type .
Prices In thi ad axe goodthrough the Board recently discussed with
an engineer from the Standard Oil
Saturday, July 20 Company of California. The Board
discussed the possibility of paving


S*JL THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Pla.
i Met o iss Have THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1963

Annual Picnic Summer Rec
The annual picnic for the Mar- nMo ram Holds'
ianna District Methodist ministers Program Holds
and their families was held June
27 at Blue Pond near Chipley. Tournament
After a period of informal fellow- A badminton tournament was
ship the three different groups of held for senior high boys at the
the organizations were called to or- high school recreation program
der by the Rev. Sam Shirah for the last week. Lloyd Gardner and Da-
minister's group; by Mrs. Ed Har- vid Young were seeded first and
din of Marianna for the Susannah second respectively.
Wesley Service and by Neal Brown First round games found Mike
of Marianna for preacher's kids. Rutch winning from David Lee
New officers for the groups were (11-2), (11-4). Lloyd Gardner beat
elected as follows: Ministers Group: Johnny Scott (11-6), (11-4). David
The Rev. Clifford Abbott of Mar- Young eliminated Robin Brown
ianna, President; The Rev. Tom (11-2), (11-5). Robin Downs bested
Sowell of Bonifay, vice-president; his brother, Clark Downs in a hard
th, Rev. J. C. Brown of Marianna, fought match (11-9), (11-7).
secretary and treasurer. Semi-final games were close,
Susannah Wesley Service: Mrs. well-played matches as the better
Charles Foster of Panama City, players sought berths in the fin
president; Mrs. Lloyd Tubbs of als. Lloyd Gardner dropped Mike
Chipley, vice-president; Mrs. Ray- Rutch from contention in a match
mond Schneider of Panama City, that went three games (11-5), (5-11),
secretary and treasurer. (5-11). David Young moved into
the finals with a victory over Rob-
Preacher's Kids: A nominating in Downs (11-4), (9-11), (11-4).
committee was appointed by the Lloyd Gardner and David Young
preisdent, Neal Brown,'as follows: squared off for the final match and
Kay Hardin, chairman; Barbara immediately showed the class that
and Bobby Abbott. Officers for this enabled them to be finalists. Young
group will take office at the Christ- gained an early lead in the first
mas party. game and held it to win (11-7). The
Ten new ministers and their second and deciding game was won
Ten new ministers and their by Young after a fast and furious
families were introduced and wel- display of badminton (12-10). The
corned, game was as close as the score in-
The Rev. H. P. Childs, retired dicated. Gardner used every shot
minister of Chipley gave the invo- at his command to try to salvage
cation before the picnic lunch was, the match but David Young proved
served. One hundred and five per- a worthy champion as he fought
sons attended, off his rallies.
Charter No. 14902 Reserve District No. 6
REPORT OF CONDITION OF THE FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK AT
PORT ST. JOE IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA, AT THE CLOSE OF
BUSINESS ON JUNE 29, 1963 PUBLISHED IN RESPONSE TO CALL
MADE BY COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, UNDER SECTION
5211, U. S. REVISED STATUTES
ASSETS
1. Cash, balances with other banks, and cash
items in process of collection 408,710.00
2. United States Government obligations, direct
and guaranteed (Net of any reserves) 1,826,759.20
3. Obligations of States and political subdivisions
(Net of any reserves) 797,854.50
4. Corporate stocks (including $13,500.00 stock of
Federal Reserve bank) (Net of any reserves) ----- 13,500.00
5. Loans and discounts (including $1,190.80 overdrafts)
(Net of any reserves) 1,444,714.24
6. Bank premises owned $74,862.55, furniture
and fixtures $11,306.29 86,168.84
7. Other assets 40,892.92
8. TOTAL ASSETS 4,618,599.70
LIABILITIES
9. Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 3,51,820.76
and corporations ,51,a
10. Time and savings deposits of individuals, partnerships,
and corporations 205,729.72
11. Deposits of United States Government
(including postal savings) 360,427.04
12. Deposits of States and political subdivisions -------- 237,975.52
13. Deposits of banks 155 7.57
14. Certified and officers' checks, etc. 4,806.73
15. TOTAL DEPOSITS $4,016,347.34
(a) Total demand deposits .-- ----3,660,617.62
(b) Total time and savings deposits $ 355,729.72
16. Other liabilities 62,544.04
17. TOTAL LIABILITIES 4,078,891.38
CAPITAL ACCOUNTS
18. Capital Stock:
(a) Common stock, total par $200,000.00 .__ 200,000.00
19. Surplus 250,000.00
20. Undivided profits 52,225.97
21. Reserves (and retirement account lor preferred stock) 37,482.35
22. TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 539,708.32
23. TOTAL LIABILITIES and CAPITAL ACCOUNTS __ 4,618,599.70
MEMORANDUM
24. Assets pledged or assigned to secure liabilities
and for other purposes 795,720.26
I, Walter C. Dodson, President, of the above-named bank do hereby
declare that this report of condition is true and correct to the best of
my knowledge and belief. /s/ WALTER C. DODSON
/s/ WALTER C. DODSON
We, the undersigned directors attest the correctness of this report
of condition and declare that it has been examined by us and to the
best of our knowledge and belief is true and correct.
/s/ J. LAMAR MILER
/s/ J. C. BELIN -Directors
/s/ R. H. McINTOSH
REPORT OF AN AFFILIATE OF A NATIONAL BANK
Report as of June 29, 1963, of FLORIDA EAST COAST RAILWAY
COMPANY, Jacksonville, Florida, which is affiliated with Florida
National Bank at Port St. Joe, Port St. Joe, Florida, Charter number
14902, Federal Reserve district number 6.
Kind of business of this affiliate: Railroad.
Manner in which above-named organization is affiliated with na-
tional bank, and degree of control: Majority of Florida East Railroad
common stock owned by St. Joe Paper Company. The A. I. duPont
Estate owns controlling stock in both St. Joe Paper Company and the
bank.
Borrowing from affiliated bank, including acceptance executed
by affiliated bank for account of affiliate and securities sold to affiliated
bank under repurchase agreement $3,750.00
I, Walter C. Dodson, President of Florida National Bank at Port
St. Joe do solemnly swear that the above statement is true, to the
best of my knowledge and belief. I declare that it has or will be
published in the manner prescribed by Section 5211, U.S.R.S., (12,
U.S.C., sec. 161), within fifteen days from the date of receipt of the
call for report of condition by the Comptroller of the Currency.
/s/ WALTER C. DODSON
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 11th day of July, 1963.
DOROTHY J. GROSSMANN, Notary Public
State of Florida at large My Commission expires June 14, 1968
(NOTARY SEAL)
REPORT OF AN AFFILIATE OF A NATIONAL BANK
Report as of June 29, 1963, of ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY, Port
St. Joe, Florida, which is affiliated with Florida National Bank at Port
St. Joe, Port St. Joe, Florida, charter number 14902, Federal Reserve
district number 6.
Kind of business of this affiliate: Manufacturer of paper pulp
and containers.


Manner in which above-named organization is affiliated with na-
tional bank, and degree of control: Alfred I. duPont Estate owns
controlling stock in both bank and paper company.
Loans to pulpwood dealers secured by assignment of monies due
from paper company -- $272,661.51
I, Walter C. Dodson, president of Florida National Bank at Port
St. Joe, do solemnly swear that the above statement is true, to the
best of my knowledge and belief. I declare that it has or will be pub-
lished in the manner prescribed by Section 5211, U.S.R.S., (12, U.S.C.,
sec. 161), within fifteen days from the date of receipt of the call for
report of condition by the Comptroller of the Currency.
/s/ WALTER C. DODSONi
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 11th day of July, 1963.
DOROTHY J. GROSSMANN, Notary Public, J
State of Florida at Large My commission expires June 14, 1966
(NOTARY SEAL)






'I .5 *5 '5 *I '5 *5 *5 '5
I. I. 5. I.
4;, 'I, 4, :. *;, *5 II 45 5, 5* 5* 5


FREE


If Winner Is Present At 6:00 P.M.
Drawing Friday, July 19
$35U


$25.00 FREE IF WINNER IS NOT PRESENT
- Register every time you come Into Jitney Jungle


YOU GET DOUBLE GRAND PRIZE STAMPS WHEN YOU /
SHOP ON MONDAY, TUESDAY or WEDNESDAY
PRICES GOOD JULY 18, 19 and 20 Port St. Joe, Florida


I n.~.i1~I IYTWrI-I17 rWff~Cm I-Inn rTLrr~


STOKELY'S FINEST
PEACHES


303
CANS


ROAST


$1.00


STOKELY'S FINEST
FRUIT COCKTAIL


303
CANS


$1.00


SSTOKCELY's
P INB


46 Ounce
CANS -


tUIT COMCK:


$1.00


STOKELY'S FINEST
Tomato Juice


46 Ounce
CANS


VAN CAMPS
HOMINY


$1.00


Stokley Cut-303 Can
BEETS 9 cans $1.00


Stokley
PEAS


$1.00


VAN CAMPS
Pork & Beans


$1.00


$1.00


STOKLEY'S FINEST TOMATO

Catsup

6 14 OUNCE
.BOTTLES
$ A


Honey Pod-303 Cans
5 cans $1.00


Circus Orange-46 Oz. Cans
DRINK 3 cans 97c
With 25 Extra Grand Prize Stamps


1 gal. 41c
roll 27c
nt
4 for $1.00
8 pkgs. $1.00


Softweve 2 Roll Pkg.
TOILET TISSUE 4 for $1.00
Waldorf Toilet 4 Roll Pkg.
TISSU E 3 for $1.00


Scott Large Roll
TOWELS


3 for $1.00


LARGE SIZE


TIDE
BOX





-- FROZEN FOODS -


39c


3


LBS.


99c


BEEF
Shoulder Roast B. 59c
BONELESS CHUCK
STEW BEEF lb. 59c S TE A K Ib. 49c
SIRLOIN RIB
STEAK lb.89c S TE AK lb. 59c
PULL CUT ROUND BEEF
STEAK lb. 79c SHORT RIBS lb. 33c
SHOULDER ROUND STEW BEEF
STEAK lb. 69c. BRISKET lb. 25c
_-- FREEZER BUYS Cut Up and Wrapped
Fore Quarter lb. 39c Hind Qtr. lb. 59c Side of Beef lb. 49c
MAXWELL HOUSE -- Limit 1 With $10.00 or More Order

COFFEE 39c
BAKERITE -- Limit 1 With $5.00 or More Order


3


PILLSBURY


5 LB. BAG


U


GOLDEN RIPE
BANANAS


lb.


FIRM HEAD
GREEN CABBAGE


FRESH PICKED
POLE BEANS
CELLO PACKAGE
CARROTS


Ib.


2lbs.

2 pkgs.


* 52"'"


IIit


10c

5c

37c

25c


POUND
CAN 49c
r


100 FREE
s Grand Prize Stamps
With Coupon and
Purchase of
$7.50 Order
or More
50 FREE
Grand Prize Stamps,
With Coupon and
Purchase of
2 Packages
SMODESS
25 FREE
,Grand Prize Stamps'
With Coupon and
Purchase of
2 Lbs. Blue Bonnet
S OLEO


Meal Time Lb. Pkg.
Beef Cubed Steaks
Morton's
MEAT PIES


69c


4 for 89c


ss s s ,. s. s is :. s. is s s s I.


BEEF


10


No. 300
CANS


No. 300
CANS


Sta-Flo Liquid
STARCH
Wearever Aluminum
F OIL
Scotties 400 Coul
TISSUE
Scott Family
NAPKINS


VAN CAMPS
Vienna Sausage


4 Ounce
CANS


st,


R T E-..-N -


~p~ r I


COME5 INW


UR


-crrr7TV---^









June as follows: in distress. ..
Six accidents were investigated -
resulting in two injuries and $1, Wirking In New Jersey
485.00 in damages. Miss Kay Creech, daughter
The Patrol made 25 arrests and Mr. and Mrs. Gus Creech, is wo
issued- four written warnings. 37 ing this summer at Convent
faulty equipment cards were issued. Hall at the Boardwalk, Asbury,
The Patrol aided six motorists J.


lcCormick's SHper Market


and SELF- SERVICE LAUNDRY

MAYTAG WASHERS WITH COMPLETE 25 MIN. WASH CYCLE

DRYERS, 20 MIN. DRYING CYCLE WITH FULL HEAT CONTROL

LAUNDRY OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7:00 A.~. UNTIL 10:00 P.M.

FRESH MEATY 4 lbs. REGISTERS GREEN HILL lb.

HAM HOCKS $1 SAUSAGE 43c

STREAK of LEAN Ga. Grade "A" 1% to 2 lb. Average Ga. Grade 'A' Small
WHITE

MEAT FRYERS EGGS


29c 3 DOZ.
Margaret Holmes
WHITE ACRE For

PEAS
2 cans Limit 4 to a customer

49c JUMBO
U. S. No. 1 IRISH S H R I M

P O TAT 0 ES POUND


Sugar 10 lbs. 35c 85
PILLSBURY Butter-
5 lb. BAG McKenzies Frozen French Fried Milk or Sweet Milk

69c POTATOES BISCUITS

692 Ibs. 37c 27c

Limit 1 Please
IDEAL or SUNBEAM 16 oz. Giant Cola KRAFT
27c Loaf

B REoAD SOFT DRINKS Mayonnaise
LOAF QUART

25c each 45c


GROCERY PRICES GOOD JULY 18 through 20


New Walihide Latex


one-coat flat with GHP*


PAINTS


. 4 PaIMM2'ook..Ion


ST. JOE HARDWARE COMPANY
Port St. Joe, Florida


of
irk-
ion
N.


Bob Sikes Reports


FHP Activities

In Gulf Reported

The Florida Highway Patrol re-
ported the activities of the Patrol
in Gulf county for the month of


There have been recent promo-
tions, principally among postal
workers, which indicate that the
Administration's Equal Employ-
nment Opportunity Program is re-
sutting in discrimination against
white employees. There are even
graver charges that the Adminis-
tration has ordered that Civil Ser-
vice procedures be ignored and
promotions made strictly on the
basis of race. A situation of this
kind, if true, would be a very un-
fortunate one for the Kennedy Ad-
ministration. Even the strongest
civil rights proponents must ad-
mit that discrimination against
whites is as bad as discrimination
against Negroes. If such a policy
were allowed to exist, it would, in
my opinion, surely defeat the pres-
ent Administration in the next
election.
"OFF LIMITS"
I have waged a vigorous protect
with the President and with Ad-
ministration officials against any
attempts to force integration on
off-base establishments through
threats of "off-limit designations".
"Off-limit designations" were in-
tended to apply only in those cases
where health or moral conditions
are considered sub-standard. Any
departure from this precept would,
in my opinion, be unlawful. I am
drafting legislation to insure that
"off-limit designations" cannot be
used as a means to force observ-
ance of socialistic precepts. In the
meantime, vigorous protests should
be filed directly with the Admin-
istration from businessmen and
civic leaders who would be affect-
ed.
RUSSIAN-CHINESE SPLIT?
I have consistently warned
against taking too much comfort
from the disagreement on ideology
which has developed between Rus-
sian and Chinese dictatorships.
Both are bad. Each is determined
that Communism shall rule the
world. However, the Russian brand
of Communism has in recent years
accepted a somewhat more realis-
tic view of the damage of war, and
they have been a little less intol-
erant toward other systems of gov-
ernment. The Chinese Reds are
less informed on world affairs and
less vulnerable to the damage of
war; therefore, less tolerant of the
thinking of other people. The split
has progressed to the point that
there is no longer unanimity of
thought and action. This provides
an opportunity for the Free World
to operate with more boldness, and
this should be done on all fronts.
At the same time, it must be re-
membered that both the Russian
and Chinese ideology are Comn-
munistic and that friendship for
the West will not develop in either
case. They will fight the West be-
fore they fight each other.
HENRY FORD CENTENNIAL
1963 is the Henry Ford Centen-
nial. He was born 100 years ago.
Certainly, it must be said that Mr.
Ford widened our horizons more
than any other person in modern
history. He created an industrial
revolution, and he made the au-
tomobile a way of life. It was the
Ford car which set the stage for
an unprecedented freedom of
movement by the people of the
world.
NEW FIRST DISTRICT
PROJECTS
My office and those of our two
U. S. Senators have announced a
number of projects during the past
week which are of value to First
District communities. Briefly to re-
capitulate, these are:
Department of Health, Educa-
tion and Welfare grant to Walton
County Hospital at DeFuniak
Springs for 19-bed addition, in the
amount of $195,000.
-- Rural Electrification Admin-
istration loan to modernize power
facilities at the Gulf Coast Electric
Cooperative at Wewahitchka, in
the amount of $464,000. Included
is a substation at Southport.
HEW grant of $33,120 to the
City of Valparaiso for construction
of a secondary sewage treatment
plant.
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Ser-
vice grant of $22,200 to Washing-
ton County for Holmes Creek Ac-
cess Road construction project.
COLD WAR MEDALS
I strongly supported H.R. 2998,
a bill which passed the House last
week to give Cold War heroes the
recognition they deserve. As it
stands at present, courageous
Americans who fight and die
abroad in "police actions", or who
serve with friendly foreign forces
at war with Communism, cannot
receive the medals and recogni-
tions accorded "Hot War" soldiers.


However, favorable Senatorial and
Presidential action on H.R. 2998


DISCRIMINATION AGAINST
WHITES?


you know there's a porcupine or
skunk family in the area or if
snakes are a problem better
keep your pet penned up when
you're not around to watch him.


THE STAR
Published Every Thursday At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
By The Star Publishing Company
WESLEY R. RAMSEY Editor and Publisher
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Salesman, Photographer, Columnist, Reporter, Proof
Reader, Bookkeeper and Complaint Department


DIAL 227-3161


POSTOFFICE Box 308


will authorize the awarding of ti
Distinguished Service Cross, tl
Silver Star, the Navy Cross, ti
Air Force Cross, and other hono
to those members of the armn
services who distinguish themselves
conspicuously "by gallantry and i
trepidity at the risk of life above
and beyond the call of duty
Through such legislation, our go
ernment can show an addition,
measure of the gratitude we fee
for the actions of courageous me
who daily engage our enemies s
that freedom may not be lost.


FHP Names Five

Major Violations

TALLAHASSEE The Florid
Highway Patrol this week calls t
the attention of motorists five c
the major violations of regulator
traffic laws that account for 90 pe
cent of all traffic accidents in th
state.
SPEED is the leader and follow
ing too closely comes right on th
heels of speed as a second reason
for ihghway death, injury and pro
perty damage.
IMPROPER TURNING causes
goodly share of the highway car
nage, failing to grant right-of-wa
is one of the leaders and imprope
passing completes the top five.
"There can be no better reaso:
for our urging you to take it eas
and observe all traffic laws an
regulations when you are on
vacation this year, or on any tri]
short or long," said Col. H. N. Kirk
man, Commander of the Patrol.
"While there are many other
causes of accidents, the five men
tioned above are the leaders an
most frequently violated-and such
violations account for death and
misery such as we experience al
most every day in the year," Kirk
man declared.
The Patrol points out that vaca
tion time is a good time to empha
size the need for obedience to
traffic laws and warns all drivers
to be on the alert for the unexpect
ed.
"Whether you are driving in
your own neighborhood, where
there will be visitors or in unfa
miliar areas on your vacation, i
is a good idea to have the situa
tion well in hand at all times by
being alert to highway and traffic
conditions and at all times obey
traffic laws," advised the Patrol.

Return from Visit
Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Saunders have
returned home after visiting with
relatives and points of interest in
Florida last week.







City Dogs In The Country
City dogs sometimes act like
bumpkins in the country. Their
first meetings with snakes, por-
cupines, bees or other forms of
rural wildlife may teach metro-
politan pooches some uncomfort-
able lessons.
V Most of these
lessons won't
do lasting
harm, accord-
ing to Clarence
C. Fawcett, a
P K leadingauthor-
ity on dogs at
the Purina Dog Care Center in
St. Louis, Missouri. But to pro-
tect your vacationing pet-or to
sooth him in hours of distress, the
Purina expert has made this list
of hints for owners of country-
jound dogs.
1. If Romping Rover romps
into a battle with a porcupine,
Be'll need a veterinarian. Don't
iry to remove quills yourself-it's
ai operation calling for expert
,:are... as quickly as possible.
2. If Rover roves into a bee or
hornet nest and runs out yowl-
ing, you can soothe his stung hide
with an alkaline solution such as
a heavy paste of bicarbonate of
soda, or of plain starch, or un-
diluted hydrogen peroxide.
3. Here's something you can
do about a canine skunk victim.
Bathe him-if you can get near
him-with plain tomato juice, lib-
erally applied. Then rinse with
water-most of the odor will dis-
appear.
4. In case of a .bite from a
poisonous snake, you'll have to
work fast. Make several cuts
around the swelling and try to
press out the poison-then apply
a mild antiseptic such as perox-
ide. If a leg has been bitten, wrap
a tourniquet around it during
treatment. Then rush the dog to
a veterinarian.
Most important rule of all,
however, is, take precautions
whenever possible to see that
your dog stays out of trouble. If
your vacation area is known--if


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roller in soapy water
Comes in a rainbow of
-NE CQAT FLAT smart colors

SFOR THE A WITH THE GCost le bOLD TOP" PITTSBU t



"LOOK FOR THE CAN WITH THE GOLD TOP" P I T T S B U R G H


Entered as second-class matter, December 19, 1987, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe,
Florida, under Act of March 8, 1879.

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, $3.00 SIX MONTHS, $1.75 THREE MONTHS, $127.50

TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold .themselves liable for damage further than amount received for nobh
advertisement.

FHE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florid,, THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1963



EDITOSIALS


ATHEISM ON THE MARCH
(Editor's Note-The following editorial appeared re-
cently in the South Fulton Recorder, Fairburn, Ga. We
commend it to the sober thinking of our readers.)

The American Association for the Advancement of
Atheism in its annual report says:
"The United States, not being a Christian nation, and
its Godless Constitution requiring a secular government, the
American Association for the Advancement of Atheism DE-
MANDS (emphasis ours):
1. Taxation of church properties.
2. Elimination of Chaplains and sectarian institutions
from the public payroll
3. Repeal of laws restricting rights of atheists, and
those enforcing Christian morals.
4. Abolition of oaths in court and inaugurations.
5. Non-issuance of religious proclamations by chief ex-
ecutives.


h 6. Erasure of the superstitious inscription IN GOD
d
- WE TRUST, from our coins, and removal of the church flag
. from above our National flag on battleships.
7. Exclusion of the Bible as a sacred book from the
public schools.
8. Suppression of the bootlegging of religion through
- dismissing pupils for religious instruction during class time.
9. Secularization of marriage, with divorce granted upon
e request.
" 10. Repeal of anti-evolution, anti-birth control and cen-
t
- sorship laws.
Y This is the program and aim of the Atheists, and Item
c 7 has already been obtained that is the exclusion of the
y Bible from the public schools through action by the Supreme
Court of the United States. This is the basic step required
to put the other nine aims into effect. The Supreme Court
e has already outlawed Bible reading and prayer in public
1 schools. Aims No. 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 of the Atheists as given
above will follow as logically as waters run down hill if the
Supreme Court follows its own decisions in the Bible and
prayer cases. Otherwise they will be so inconsistent that
one decision will destroy the other.
The elimination of the Bible and prayer in public schools
in terms of the vernacular is "Getting a foot in the door."
Now the door can be pushed wide open and all forms of
religious activity and principle eliminated everywhere that
public funds are involved, including the elimination of Chap-
lains from our armed services, exemption from taxes of
church properties, abolition of oaths in courts and inaugura-
ations, and on down the list.
Many people err, in my humble opinion, in not taking
the Supreme Court decisions on Bible reading and prayer
seriously, and fail to look ahead and visualize where these
decisions can lead us. It is a very serious and dangerous
situation.
The basic question involved is are we to pursue the
principles of atheism or Christianity? The Supreme Court
of the United States apparently is leading the march towards
atheism.

(We might point out that only in a land with freedom of
religion, can such things happen. We would keep our land
free for the individual's free exercise of his religion. To keep
it thus, where man is truly free to pursue the dictates of his
coi scious and convictions, we must put forth some effort.
Lethargy breeds loss of freedom and slavery.-Ed.)


County's Tendancies Toward Economy Welcome

We would pause for a few minutes to urge on the County
Commission toward their probing, conservative ways in set-
ting forth a county budget for the coming year.
We have sat in on nearly every formation of a county
budget for the past 10 years, and we have never seen such
forthright questioning of the various funds and budgets to
ascertain if they are actually needed.
The County Board is working on the premise and
we concur with this thinking that if the money is not
actually needed to do the job that needs to be done during
the next 12 months, there is no need to levy taxes to provide
these funds.
It is refreshing to see such an attitude of concern over
the poor taxpayer in times like these.
While it is to be expected that the Board will provide
the funds necessary to operate the various departments of
the county during the next year, we expect to see a lean
budget come out of their deliberations this year.


~ _~





-~% -- .


I


I I A That everyone has the desire to save money on their food needs We, at IGA DISCOUNT FOODLINERS, know this to be true and
IT 1S A DEFINITE FACT have gone into action to do something about it .
IGA DISCOUNT FOODLINERS pledge to give every food shopper the greatest savings possible on all your food needs We have slashed prices on thousands of food
itmhis. COMPARE OUR PRICES .. TAKE YOUR SAVINGS IN CASH .
SAVE MORE TODAY! SAVE MORE TODAY!
BOTTLE i LMO T OAY IM' B A A $ 7DEL MONTE 14 Ounce Bottle
SWEET -10 tl. 69c o0 oppo un CATSUP btl. 17c
CALCIUM or SODIUM 4 Oz. Bottle Once-In-a-zfetime Ppon PERFECTION
SUCARYL btl.59c to buy a famous RICE 31b. cello 33c
METRECAL Chocolate or Spice S aI ANKAoCOFFeE
AF ER S pkg. 83c 7 'amsoe i SANKA 'COFFEE 89c
ALL FLAVORS 8 Ounce FO D N T B E .-'^DIXIE BELLE Ibo
METRECAL 6 pak $1.39 FOLDING TABLE SALTINES lb.box 19c
ALL FLAVORS 10 Ounce Can ...ii. Regular ,6.95 Value 4 McCORMICK 2 Ounce Bottle
SEG can 23c Nationally, VANILLA btl. 45c
GERBER'S STRAINED WITH $25 WORTH Advertised! McCORMICK 4 Ounce Can
BABY FOOD 6 for 55c REGISTER BLACK PEPPER 33c
BABY FOOD jar 14c DOG FOOD .
......... ..GERBER'S STRAINED G E RATION 2 Tall Can
GERBER'S STiRAINED ^^^ All-Purpose Table /Ideal Gift SUPPORTS \ RAIO Tal Can
BABY MEES jar 22c DOG FOOD can 14c
BABY MEATS l~r 22 C M Genuine Samsonite Table has stain, 500 LBS. OF SUGAR D FOOD ca 14c
j*iar 2 2 resistant, abrasion-resistant vinyl film 1 1 .
LIQUID plastic top. Steel protective binding over Jut: ihe ih;ng for ewing FACIAL TISSUE 400 Count
C, table edges. Easy,-compact folding. Ex-. Marvelous for luncheons
ARNALAC can 23c elusive asy-actionleg locks. Electriclly- Practical for homework SCOTTIES pkg. 21lc
Swelded tubular steel legs. Chip-resistant and do-it-yourself
ATbaked enamel finish on all metal parts. Convenient for TV snack TOILET TISSUE
CARNATION -- 8 Quart Size This table is available in two popu- dinners
DRY MILK pkg. 59c lar colors: Tan with bronze frame and Wonderful for card playing S C TT roll 11C
IGA -'18 Ounce Jar jSCOTT
PEANUT BUTTER jar 39 LIMITED QUANTITY TOWELS big roll 29
PAU BUTTER. jar 3 c Don't miss this exclusive offer!
CAL'T TUPELO 16 Ounce Jar 4"_ _AUN__riT S52JEMIMA7
H ON,1E Y jar 45C lGRITS 51b.box27c
FANCY CARTON
BONUS BUYS FRESH TOMATOES ctn. 19c und Steak
SUPER COOLA o tea
CALIFORNIA R d S k
N CARROTS lb. cello 10c
C A N D R IN K S SOUTH CAROLINA Tonight, Serve that wonderful family fav-7 9 Iu
E A Iorite, swiss steak. It can't be beat for
P E A C S 3 s. 39 c old-fashioned goodness and true econ-
1 5 omy if it's TableRite U. S. Choice
C S IGA FROZEN 10 Ounce Packages
STRAWBERRIES 2 pkgs. 39c
3 LB. CAN SHORTENING IGA CRINKLE CUT TOP ROUND or
S wIf n 49 POTATOES 2lb.pkg.39c SIRLOIN STEAK pound 89c
ifn ing 49 McKENZIE'S 24 Ounce Package
MIXED VEGETABLES pkg. 39c T-BONE STEAK pound 98c
GALLON JUG GA. GRADE 'A' SMALL
Color Vox 55. A .. WsM GROUND ROUND pound 79c
ROBIN HOOD 10 BAG G FROSTY MORN FRANKS Ib. 49c
Fl0ur 8c 3 Doz. 89c SLICEDBACON 2lb.pkg. 99c


DISCO


Port S


t


Ilnrida


I%%


ER


HIGHWAY 98 NEXT TO THE POST OFFICE
HIGHWAY 98 NEXT TO THE POST OFFICE


Specials for July 17 through 20
NO SALE TO DEALERS
Limit Rights Reserved


I n P-








the program was "Leadership
Training". Assisting with the pro-
gram were Mrs. McClellan, Mrs.
Spears and Mrs. Smith. Mrs. Bag-
gett led the group in prayer for
the missionaries on the calendar
of prayer for the day.
After a short-business period the
meeting was closed with prayer by
Mrs. Wilson.
The hostess served cake and
, Cokes to the six members present.


Rotary Dixie Youth Team Successfully

Defends National League Champ Title


Our pharmacist is an expert on the many
pharmacy items, vitamins and other health
helps that do not require a, prescription.
Consult him for all health products.

SMITH'S PHARMACY
John Robert Smith, Pharmaceutical Chemist
Drive-In Window & Free Parking At Rear
236 Reid Avenue


You Are Welcome To The


First United Pentecostal Church
10th St. NW. and Victoria Avenue HIghland View. Florida
Rev. JAMES J. HILL, Pastor


SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45
MORNING WORSHIP 11:15
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30
MID-WEEK SERVICE (Wednesday) .... 7:30
YOUTH SERVICE (Friday) 7:30
AIR-CONDITIONED CENTRAL HEAT


AM.
P.M.
P.M.L
P.M.


NEED A PLUMBER?
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1107 GARRISON AVE. PHONE BAlI 7441


By SARA SMITH
The Rotary Dixie Youth baseball
team successfully defended their
National League championship.
They finished three games ahead
of the second place team and then
defeated the league all-stars on
July 4.
The parents and players are
grateful for the work of the man-
ager Foy Adams and Lamar Moore.
Ihe team had several outstand-
ing players this year. One of them,
James Cannington was co-winner of
the "Most Valuable Player" award.
James pitched in ten games and
won nine of them. In a game June
11, James pitched a no-hitter and
struck out 17 of 18 batters. In the
all-star game, James gave up just
four hits while he was striking out
11 all-star batters.
Much appreciation goes to the
ball team. Each boy played hard
and gave his complete support.
Steve Freeman served as bat
boy and did a very good job.
The team bids farewell to five
12-year-olds. They are: James Can-
nington, Terry Parrish, Billy Sim-
mons, Harry Young and Larry
Young.
Below is listed some of the play-
ers and their batting averages.
Player Avg. RBI
Charles Smith -------- 556 23
James White --------500 8
Kenny Merritt -------484 3
James Cannington -- 451 14
Terry Parrish -------- 412 9
Harry Young -------- 371 12
Jim Simmons --------352 2
Billy Simmons -------343 4
Steve Adams --------314 6
Petey Peters ---------264 1
The team celebrated winning the
championship by having several
parties. They had two milk shake
parties, a hot dog supper and a
beach party. The beach party was
given by the parents and was held
at the Fensom's beach cottage.


MidGoec
a4&d G*0


Homogenized,

Pasteurized and

Buttermilk

Fresh Yard Eggs

Butter Oleo

Orange Juice

Orange, Grape and

Lemonade -


Home Deliveredl



Harden's Dairy

BORDEN DAIRY PRODUCTS
Call 639-4383 collect WewaMitchka


Take time out at least
twice a day to refresh with a
delicious glass of ice cold milk.
It's so good and full of vitamins
needed for energy!


-,V fie n-.-


Medical Self-Help

Training Available
The State Board of Health this
week said medical self help train-
ing courses would be incorporated
in all future curriculums in all
Catholic high schools in Florida.
Claudius Walker, State Health
Mozilization Coordinator for the


First Baptist Circle No. 3
Meets With Mrs. Padgett
Circle Number Three of WMS
Number One of the First Baptist
Church met Monday, July 15 with
Mrs. G. W. Padgett in her home at
Oak Grove.
Chairman, Mrs. Wilson, was in
charge of the meeting and also had
charge of the program. Topic of


rHE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florlde
THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1963

It is thrilling to know that the
team will be presented a beautiful
trophy and gratifying to have such
a successful season.


Letter To The

City Commission
Honorable Frank Hannon
Mayor-Commissioner
City of Port St. Joe
Dear Mr. Hannon:
The St. Joseph Historical Society
would like to take this opportunity
to thank the City of Port St. Joe
City Commission for having the
Centennial Building painted. The
Historical Society would like you,
as the Commission, to know how
very much we appreciate this be-
ing done and congratulate you on
a job beautifully done.
We are proud of the part that
our Society had in getting this
work accomplished.
We would like to request at this
time that either a brass or bronze
plaque be affixed to the Centennial
Building giving the why and where-
fore for this building's erection and
the date of erection.
Thank you again for painting the
Centennial Building and please ac-
cept our sincere appreciation.
Very truly yours,
MRS. R. H. BRINSON,
Secretary


Youths Get In

Basketball Practice
Summer basketball practices are
being held in conjunction with the
Port St. Joe High School recrea-
tion program. It is felt that these
sessions allow the boys who wish
to become outstanding players the
court time needed for developing
the skills and reactions required
in present-day basketball. Their
willingness to work during the hot
weather indicates that they are in
terested in becoming better play-
ers. The many hours spent this
summer will result in improved in-
dividual and team performance
next basketball season.
The following boys are working
regularly on basketball: Andy
Trammell, Randy Armstrong, Da-
vid Macomber, Leon Hobbs, Lloyd
Gardner, Billy Lee, Tommy Atchi-
son, Danny Oaks, Bob Craig, John-
ny Oaks, Junior Nichols and Jake
Belin. Other boys who are being
counted on next season have not
been able to practice regularly due
to summer jobs and vacations.
The work-outs are held at 3:00
p.m. daily. Any boy of high school
age is invited to join and improve
his basketball ability as well as his
physical condition.


WARD
ELECTRIC SERVICE
517 First Street
ELECTRIC MOTORS
Rewound and Repaired
SMALL APPLIANCES
Repaired


5 HAMBURGERS $1.00
5 HOT DOGS $1.00
EVERY DAY NO U M'
To Take Out


rCity Restaurant

Corner Fourth Street and Monument Ave.


board which administers the pro-a
gram for schools, inudstry and
other groups, said county school
systems in eleven counties also
have adopted the courses and that
Pan American personnel at Cape
Canaveral are taking the training
too. The county systems are Liber-
ty, St. Johns, Flagler, Brevard,
Sumter, Polk, Highlands, Hardee,
De Soto, Charlotte and Sarasota.
Father Mortimer Danaher of the
St. Augustine Diocese of Catholic
schools said he believed the pro-
gram would aid students not only
to become more effective citizens
but would also help train them for
assisting in disasters.
The programs are built around
basic information a person should
know to preserve life and health
in time of natural or man-made
disaster. The course contains 11
lessons on such subjects as radio-
active fallout ,and shelter, emer-
gency supplies and sanitation,
burns, shock, bleeding and ban-
daging, birth of babies in shelters
and transportation of the injured.
Dr. Lowery, County Health Of-
ficer, adds that Gulf County was
one of the first counties to institute
the disaster preparedness training
course. Approximately 30 persons
completed the course last summer.
Any persons or groups interested in
taking this training should contact
Dr. Lowery.

HOME FROM FORMOSA
Rev. and Mrs. Frank P. Smith,
.missionaries to Formosa for the
past five years are visiting with
Mrs. Smith's mother, Mrs. Selma
Lamberson and her brother and
family, Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Lamber-
son.

Expert Carpentering
Cabinet Making
Roofingand Painting
Complete Homes or general
repairs-no job too large
or too small
Phone -
GRADY MATEIS
229-1406 for free estimates


TELEVISION
Black & White and Color
Stereo Air Conditioning

Service Cals, $3.00
All work guaranteed

ST. JOE RADIO
& TV COMPANY
Phone 227-4081


THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY

MOM


Phone 227-5111


- I-


OFF REGULAR PRICE!

373 Pairs Summer



SHOES


DRESS FLATS CASUALS

Values up to $10.99




273 SUMMER



DRESSES

For Misses, Juniors and Women $8.99 and up. Yes!
It's A Price Blasting Space Making 331/3 OFF SALE!



The Tattler
R. GLENN BOYLES Editor
Associate Editors YOU-ALL
Published by
BOYLES DEPARTMENT STORE
PHONW BALL 7-4261
R. GLENN BOYLES, Owner
"Dedicated to Better Seling mixed with a
little fun"
'OYLE8
STORK PKRUONNEL
ERLMA M. BOYLES Manager
GLADYS S. GILL -------Ladies' and Children's Ready-to-Wear
RUTH KEELS Sportswear and Hosiery
ETHEL M. GAY and PAULA LOVETT Lingerie
MARTIN BRACKIN Shoes for the Family
HAROLD KEELS Men's and Boys Wear

Space-Making, Price-Shattering, Profit-
Blasting Thirty Three and One Third Off Sale
Is the Big News at BOYLES This Week End.

Dear Friends:
Some "Sales Sparks" from recent mail: EVERY
DAY is a good day if you make it that way GIVE
IT A TRIAL: Keep your heart free from hate, your
mind free from worry. Live simply. Expect little,
give much. Fill your life with love. Scatter sunshine.
Forget self, think of others. Do as you would be done
by. Try this for one week. You'll never regret it .
Said one salesman to another: "Recessions don't bother
me. I was a failure during the boom". Man shopping
for some nautical clothes to salesman: "I'm going cruis-
ing this week end. What would you suggest I go in?"
Salesman: "I've heard boats are very popular around
here!" S'long -RGB
P. S.-A Passing Thought: This will be a better
world to live in when people stop trying to run other
peoples' lives and start running their own in better
fashion and, this includes cousins, aunts, uncles,
grandmas, grandpas, husbands and wives!!!


7as 147. -


ATTENTI 0 N
to Everyone Looking for A
GOOD PLACE TO
DINE and DANCE
GOOD EATS and
COLD BEVERAGES
Come Out to
COX'S PLACE
SR 381 Dalkeith, Fla.
7-11 Talmadge Cox 5tp











National League All-Stars Take Two

Game Sweep From American Stars


Familiar words in times of
illness. How relieved you are to
know the friendly doctor is here
at last. In most cases he will
give you a Prescription and you
will hurry tQ your pharmacist.
We know how important that
piece of paper is to you. So,
it gets top priority in this
Rexall Drug Store. We-want the
sick to get well, too. We have
loved ones and know just how
.you feel.

YOUR DRUG STORE


Buzzett's Drug Store
317 Williams Ave.
Free Parking
Drive-In Window Service
%. *4 ,- *e * *0
Leave On Vacation Trip
The Joe McLeod family left
Tuesday morning for a vacation
trip camping at points of interest
in the mountains.

Visiting In Tampa
Mrs. W. B. Weeks and daughters,
Kathy, Barbara and Brenda return-
ed Saturday after visiting Mrs.
Weeks' mother, Mrs. Helen Klien
at Tampa.


In the second game, Tuesday
night, little Tim Griffin of the
American League was pitching his
team to a two to one lead when he
tired in the sixth inning and load-
ed the bases. Ford came on in the
sixth and was tapped for a hit to
score two runs and win the game
for the Nationals in the last half
of the last inning.
Both Griffin and Mike Canning-
ton pitched almost perfect ball un-
til Griffin tired. Caninngton gave
up one hit, while going the route
for the Nationals and winning his
game; Grifin and Ford gave up five
hits to the Nationals, but they man-


M cup Lea & Perrin Worcestershire
sauce
Sprinkle hamburger with pepper
*and mix lightly. Shape into 8 cakes
or patties. Quickly brown hamburger
patties on both sides on hot skillet.
In small saucepan, combine remain-
Ing Ingredients and bring to a quick
boil. Put hot sauce over browned
hamburgers. Simmer over low to
moderate heat about-15-20 minutes.
antil done as desired. Cook longer
for very well done patties. (Makes 4
servings, or 8 patties with eauceJ
If desired, these hamburgers may be
prepared ahead of time and reheated
for serving at picnic or barbecue.
Serve on soft hamburger buns for
asy eating.
For free recip booklet fol
Teenagerst "Simple Fare With a
Party Flair" wite to Lea & Per-
rins, Ine., oar Laws, N. J.


Port St. Joe Teams I

Pitch Softball Play li

In the second night of first-round
slow pitch softball tournament in
Panama City Tuesday night, three
Port St. Joe teams dominated the
action. Wewahitchka State Bank
walloped St. Dominics of Panama1
City, 19-1; Wiley Supply defeated
Panama City Movers, 12-10 and
Florida National Bank smashed Car-
tigan of Panama City, 24-2.
Wewa State Bank jumped off to
a 5-1 lead and then exploded for
14 runs in the sixth inning to clob-
ber St. Dominics. The winners
banked out 26 hits to back Carl
Zimmerman's four-hit pitching.
Deomes Aplin rapped out three
doubles and two singles to pace

Saturday of next week, here in
Port St. Joe.
The first game will begin at 8:00
p.m. next Thursday night on the
local Dixie Youth League field.
The second ame will be played


0 Bank tackles the Independents and
Domiatte lOW Wiley Supply meets West Florida
Gas.

nPanama City Gas.
SPanama City Visiting M. H. Elders
Wewa's attack. Tommy Pridgeon Mr. and Mrs. Benny Elder and
added three singles and a double son of Silver Springs, Maryland,
by Bernard Stewart and Daryl arrived here Monday afternoon to
Strickland each chipped in with visit with Mr.' Elder's parents, Mr.
two doubles and a single for the and Mrs. M. H. Elder and other rel-
victors. atives.
Wiley Supply banged out 18 hits "
and scored five runs in the fifth
inning while piling up a 12-3 mar- ;, :
gin before the PC Movers broke
loose for seven runs on eight hits
in the last inning but fell short.
The Movers left the tying runs on
base.
Johnny Ray, Bobby Wiley and
Bill Fleming each collected three
hits for the St. Joe team. THE STAR
Florida National Bank cracked THE
out 25 hits, including three home
runs, in the lopsided win over Car--
tigan.

Lou Little stroked a homer and

homer and two doubles and Joe Da-
vis ripped a homer and single for
St. Joe. Royce Butts added a triple


The National League All-Stars of aged to group them for runs.
the Dixie League Baseball took two The Nationals committed three
straight games from the American errors while the Americans com-
League Monday and Tuesday night mitted four errors, one of them re-
of this week to take the Sub-Dis- suiting in a run for the Nationals.
trict Tournament in this district. DISTRICT TOURNAMENT
The Nationals won Monday night The National League All-Stars
by a score of seven to two and will now represent Port St. Joe in
again Tuesday night when they the District Tournament against
pulled a close game out of the fire Pensacola on Thursday, Friday and
in the last inning by a three to -
two score.
In the first game, played on
Monday night, Larry Cox went the K.i cenJ :F
route on the mound for the Na-
tionals, giving up two hits. Billy A.A ,wse
Carr started for the Americans but by LYDIA PERRINS
broke his glasses in the third and
gave way to Kennedy who finished Favorite of Teenagers
the game. Carr had held the Na- For ground beef that makes
tionals run-less during his three light, tender and juicy hamburg-
innings. The Nationals picked up ers, have your beef ground to
a total of four hits from the offer- order by the butcher and ask
ings of Carr and Kennedy. him to put it through-he grinder
just once.
Clay Thomason helped the cause HAMBURGER B.ABECUESTYIB
of the Nationals by poling a three- 2 lbs. beef chuck, ground-
run homer in the third inning. Vy tsp. coarse ground black pepper
The Nationals committed only 1 can condensed tomato soup
two errors while the Americans had 2 Utp. svua
five miscues. % top. salt


VQWLMDA
SAVE! If YourTrade-in Is Worth More Than Required Down
SAYVE!Payment, We'll Give You The Difference In Cashl


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Pla.
THURSDAY, JULY 18, 1963

Visiting With Cousin
Miss Betty Joyce Harville of
Pensacola is spending this week
visiting her cousin, Miss Lila Dock-
ery.


FOR RENT: Two bedroom house, FOR SALE
corner Tenth Street and Long Three bedroom house, two baths,
Avenue. Call Mrs. Nora Duren. Florida room, double carport, oak
Phone 227-5471. tfc-6-13 floors. Situated on large lot in ex-
cellent residential area of city.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom house Buy owner's equity and assume low
in Oak Grove. $50.00 mo. furnish- interest veterans loan for balance.
ed; $40.00 mo., unfurnished. Phone Three bedroom masonry house
227-8111. tfc 6-13 on Marvin Avenue on corner lot.
FOR RENT: Upstairs furnished To sell for only $9,500. Can arrange
apartment. 1505 Monument Ave. FHA financing.
Phone 227-7421. tfe-2-28 New three bedroom house on
Phone 227- Long Avenue. One and one-half
FOR RENT: Trailer space in Oak baths. FHA financing.
Grove. Sewer and water. $14.00 2t FRANK HANNON 7-18
month. Phone L. C. Davis, 227-7059. 221 Reid Ave. Phone 227-3491
FOR RENT: Nice furnished apart- FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house on St.
ment for couple only at 1621 Joe Beach. Carport and storage
Monument Ave. Phone 227-7641. tf room, cypress paneled trout. Will
-_ finance. Call J. C. Traweek at 2g27.
FOR RENT: Unfurnished 2 bed- 5927 after 5 p.m. or week ends.
room house. $55.00 per month at
1305 Woodward Ave. Phone B. C. FOR SALE: Two bedroom mason-
Gaillard at 227-8396. ry home located 606 Garrison
Sat Ave. Hardwood floors, separate
FOR RENT: Two one bedroom cot- dining room, paneled kitchen, tile
tages, furnished on 9th St. Also bath, floor furnace heat, attic fan.
2 bedroom unfurnished apt. Call $500 total cash. Balance $76 month.
227-5111 or call by Smith's Phar- For further information call Bill
macy. tf9 Thompson, Jacksonville collect, day
PO 4-1711, night 353-9931. tf-7-11
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom unfurnish-
ed house located at 522 Third SALESMAN WANTED: Man or wo-
St. $55.00 per month. Water fur- man. Families need service in
nished. Inquire at 1904 Garrison Gulf County or Port St. Joe. Full
Ave., or phone 227-8642. tfc-7-18 or part time. Some earn $3.50 hour-
ly and up. See or write Rawleigh,
FOR RENT: Furnished 2 bedroom Dept. FA G 100 538, Memphis,
apartment, 114 Monument Ave. Tenn. 3tp-7-11
Call 227-7816. tfc-7-18
FOR RENT: Two bedroom unfur-]
nished apartment with garage. F 0 A E
1206 Palm Blvd. Apply at 1208 FOR JA LE
Palm, or call 7-7431. 4tp-7-18 1. _, J-.-TI ,rM I


FOR SALE: 14 ft. PanaCraft run
about and trailer. Equipped with
windshield and steering wheel. See
at 1707 Garrison Ave. or phone
227-5886. tfc-6-27
FOR SALE: 4 bedroom home, 2,000
feet floor space. 2 full baths.
large fenced back yard, garage and
utility. Close to school. Well estab-
lished landscaping. 1027 Long Ave.
Contact Ed Ramsey.
FOR SALE: 1962 model sewing
machine and economy type vac-
uum cleaner. Balance owed $48.00.
Make last four payments of $12.00
each. Write credit manager, 280
North Palafox Street, Pensacola.
Both of the above in very good
condition. 4tc-6-27
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom house at
Oak Grove. Pay equity and take
up payments. 408 Madison St.,
Cliff Ellis. It
FOR SALE: Good used Kenmore
sewing machine. Yours for only
$5.50 per mo. The Remnant Shop.
323 Reid Ave. Phone 227-2491.
HOUSE FOR SALE: Florida, util-
ity, breakfast, dining, living, 3
bedrooms, patio, double carport, 2
lots, fenced. Pay owners equity on,
GI loan and take up payments.
Call after 5:00 p.m., 227-2311. 301
16th St. Itp
FOR SALE: Three bedroom, 1%
bath home with living room and
den. Move in with very small down
payment. Call Dr. R. E. King, Ph.
227-3611. tfc-7-4
FOR SALE: 2 story unfurnished 2
bedroom home, 1508 Long Ave.,
$5,500. Also, furnished 2 bedroom
brick home and small apartment,
1031 Long Ave., $11,000. Phone
648-4128. Mira.


HOUSE
Located at the corner of
Monument and Sixth Sts.
$750.00 cash. Building must
be removed from the prem-
ises within ninety days by
the purchaser.

FRAME STORE
BUILDING
30' x 90', with 12 bed-
rooms upstairs, located cor-
ner Reid and Third St. $1,-
000.00 cash. Building must
be removed from the prem-
ises within ninety days by
the purchaser.

See
SILAS R. STONE
or call 227-7161

WE WILL OIL and adjust your
sewing machine for only $1.00.
Good only during July. Phone 227-
2491. itc
UNCLAIM REPAIRS: We have 3
Singer sewing machines that
were unclaimed. Pay repair bill of
$14.63. These machines are in ex-
cellent shape. Write service mana-
ger, 280 North Palafox Street, Pen-
sacola. 4tc-7-18
JOE'S STARTER and
GENERATOR SHOP
Rebuilt like new and auto repari.
All work guaranteed. 612 Maddox
St., Oak Grove. 2tp-7-11


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Meet
every Wednesday night, 8 p.m.
at Parish House, 309% 6th St. Port
St. Joe, Fla. Phone 229-3331 for
further information or write P. 0.
Box 535.
SEPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call
Buford Griffin, Phone 227-7011
for quick expert s-rvice. tfc
WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION, meet-
ing second and fourth Tuesday
nights, 8:00 p.m. American Legion
Home.
IT'S EASY AND SAFE TO MOVE
THE MAYFLOWER WAYI
Aero Mayflower Transit Company
places a complete nation-wide long-
distance moving service at your
command! Whether your move is
a few hundred miles or thousands,
the Mayflower System assures sat-
isfactory service. If you're planning
to move why not call your local
Mayflower agents, SURPLU S
SALES of ST. JOE, Today. Just
Phone 227-2011. Across from the
Post Office.
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0.
0. F.-Meets second and fourth
Thursday, 8:00 p.m. in American
Legion Hall. All members urged to
attend.
Noble Grand: Emmett Daniel)
Secretary: J. C. Martin.
R. A. M.-Regular convocation of
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
M., 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit
ing companions welcome.
Edgar L. Smith, High Priest
Roy L. Burch, Secretary
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F. & A. M., every first
and third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.


ROBERT L. CREAMER, W. M.
ROY K .BLACKSHEAR, Sec.

LEGAL ADVERTISING
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S
COURT, GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN PROBATE.
In Re: Estate of
A. D. LAWSON,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All creditors of the estate of A.
D. Lawson, deceased, are hereby
notified and required to file any
claims or demands which they may
have against said estate in the of-
fice of the County Judge of Gulf
County, Florida, in the Courthouse
at Wewahitchka, Florida, within
six (6) calendar months from the
date of the first publication of this
notice. Each claim or demand must
be in writing and must state the
place or residence and post office
of the claimant and must be sworn
to by the claimant, his agent, or
his attorney, or it will become void
according to law.
/s/ ELIZA K. LAWSON
Executrix of the Estate of
A. D. Lawson, deceased.
SILAS R. STONE
321 Reid Avenue 4t-7-18
Port St. Joe, Florida
Attorney for Executrix


CLASSIFIED ADS
Midget Investments With
Gn Returns


ICE CREAM IS AMERICA'S ALL-TIME FAVORITE summer
dessert. It will be doubly popular combined with a Caramel Pea-
put Butter Sauce in a luscious sundae topped with crushed
peanut candies.
Select an assortment of peanut candies. Peanut logs, peanut
plank bars, old fashioned peanut butter filled sticks, chocolate
candies with a peanut caramel center, peanut brittle, or any of
the popular peanut candies available in supermarkets, grocery
and variety stores. Chop or crush the candies and arrange in a
lish. Put out a bowl of vanilla ice cream and a pitcher of the
Daramel Peanut Sauce. Then let everyone mix and match sundae
ingredients to suit individual tastes.
PEANUT CARAMEL SAUCE
1 cup light brown sugar, 1 cup water
firmly packed 1/2 cup smooth or crunchy
I tablespoon flour peanut butter
/8S teaspoon salt I teaspoon vanilla
Mix sugar, flour and salt. Stir in water. Cook and stir over low
;mat until mixture comes to a full rolling boil, Add peanut buttEr
ird r br; ag:iin to a bcil, stirring constantly to make a smci;;a
a''iure. Re'o.Aove from heat, Add vanilla. Serve hot or gold L-.-'
f,, efad. lakesks 12% cups,


c *L









t.
f. ,


3
<


Wheth.-r it is a noiurshiiig .re-l f-,-t to sL:rt the day, a special
lunch for the children, or supper for the family, fruit fritters
with corn syrup may be the happy solution. Home Economists
in the Karo Kitchens, developed this recipe using plentiful fruits,
Fruit Fritters and Corn Syrup
1 cup sifted flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
Y teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
2 egg yolks
S, cup milk
1 tablespoon corn oil
1 cups blueberries or chopped fruit
2 egg whites, stiffly beaten
Corn oil, for frying
Light, dark or mapley corn syrup
Sift together flour, baking powder, salt and sugar.- Combine
egg yolks, milk and corn oil. Add to dry ingredients, mix until
well blended. Add fruit. Fold in stiffly beaten egg whites. For
shallow frying, pour corn oil into skillet to a 1-inch depth.
For deep frying, fill kettle 1/3 full. Heat oil to 375'F. Drop
fritters by tablespoonfuls into hot oil and fry 3 to 4 minutes
turning-to brown evenly. Fry only a few fritters at a time.
Drain si absorbent paper. Makes 4 to 6 servings. If desired,
fritters may be pan fried. Heat about 1/2 cup corn oil in a
skillet. Fry fritters to a golden brown on one side. Turn to
brown on other side.
Serve warm with corn syrup flavor of your choice,


SWING INTO ACTION NOW-YOUR PRESENT
models
es se Give best deals of
capture as many tased I I L
cars aspossiblel

SWING INTO ACTION NOW-YOUR PRESENT
CAR'S VALUE DROPS MORE EVERY DAY YOU WAIT


ST. JOE MOTOR CO.
Phone 227-3737 322 Monument Ave.


3 Days
ONLY













I

F

E.


aOnly at


3 Days
ONLY


BIG 16x20 PORTRAIT



oiily reg. $2500

OR

11 x 14 Semi-Life Portrait

$8.00 Value Only $1.00

Plus 75 Handling -Wrapping Charge
Photographer Will Be At






July 22, 23,24- 9 to 6 p.m.
No Age Limit Adults, Too!
Limit, One Per Subject Two Per Family
ADDITIONAL SUBJECT, $4.95


SMT. This Product
Distributed by


4 St. Joe

Auto Parts
-OD 311 Williams Avenue


----


o


Friday afternoon at 4:00 p.m. If a and two singles for the visitors,
third game is necessary, it will be who tallied 10 runs in the third
played Saturday morning at 10:00 and six more in the fourth.
a.m. Wednesday night Florida Nation-
Lamar Moore will manage the al Bank was scheduled to play Kol-
all-stars in the tournament. metz Construction; Wewa State


Quick Peanut Candy Sundaes


V, "ill'