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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01442
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: June 27, 1963
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01442

Full Text










THE STAR

"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"


TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 1963 NUMBER 41


Baseball All-Stars


Will Meet July 4


Commission Hires Engineer


Games Set At 4:00 P.M.
and 7:00 P.M. July 4
Dixie Youth Baseball has their
annual all-star games lined up for
Thursday, July 4 again this year
with games to be played in both
the American and National
Leagues. The two games will be
played, one in the afternoon and
another at night.
At 4:00 p.m. Thursday afternoon,
National League champion Rotary
will meet an all-star team compos-
ed of team members from other
teams in the league. This team
will be consisted of: Pat Gentry,
Flip Gentry, Larry McFarland,
Steve Belin, Mike Wimberly, Clay
Thomason, David Maddox, Mike
Gainey, Tommy Simmons, Gregg
Burch, Larry Cox, Goober Lovett,
Freddie Harrison, Billy Herring,
Willie Ramsey and Barron Abrams.
At 7:30 p.m. the Hard Stars,
American League winners, will
play an all-star team composed of
the following: Bobby Kennedy,
Charles Blackburn, Mike Martin,
Gary Griswold, Kirby Gautreaux,
Thomas O'Brian, Sidney Dykes,
Steve Macomber, John Christian,
Dennis Atchison, Tim Griffin, Rob-
ert Faliski, Perry Adkinson, John
Ford and Billy Carr.
In addition to some good base-
ball, several valuable door prizes
will be given away at both games.
A transistor radio will be given
away at each game in addition to
a host of other prizes.
Prizes to be given away include:
pictures, theatre passes, candelabra
set, swim suits, TV trays, ski belts,
four stereo records, $5.00 food cer-
tificate, $2.00 gas certificate, oil
change, 5-cell flashlight, twp regu-
lar dinners, baseball glove, cvredan
oil tonic, waste basket, ventilated
cushion, Robin Hood hair tonic,
alarm clock, blanket, steak knives,
1,000 Grand Prize stamps, handbag,
ice chest, flashlight, barbecue grill,
spinning rod, super-right ham, 2-
piece trash can set, and a $5.00
gift certificate.
Donating the prizes are: Dan-
- ley Furniture Co., Port Theatre,
H. S. Lillius, Jeweler, Prince and
Princess Shop, Christo's, Bildwel
Supply Co., Kennedy Electric,
Woods Discount Foodliner, Phillips
66 Service, St. Joe Motor Co., St.
Joe Pure Service, City Restaurant,
Campbell Drug Store, Palace Bar-
ber Shop, Smith's Pharmacy, Pate's
Shell Service, Cooper's Barber
Shop, Goodson's TV, Carp's, Hurl-
but Gift Shop, Jitney Jungle Su-
per Market, Pixie Shop, Western
Auto Store, Buzzett's Rexall Drug,
Roche's Furniture and Appliances,
St. Joe Hardware Co., A & P Food
Store, St. Joe Farniture and Ap-
pliances and Pylant's Men and
Boy's Wear.


This Is A Tool.


Pictured above is a tool sus-
pected to be used by the builders
of the St. Joseph and lola Rail-
road.
The tool was presented to the
St. Joseph Historical Society by
R. L. Fortner of Mexico Beach.
Mr. Fortner received the tool
from W. G. Hardy of Overstreet
who used the tool 50 years ago
himself. Mr. Hardy reported that
it was an ancient tool when he
acquired it.
The device is used to haul or
drag crossties or logs out of the
woods.
Oxen were usually used to


Star To Publish

Early Next Week
The Star will go to press
a day early next week in
order that our staff may
observe the Fourth of July
holiday, and so that our
subscribers may receive
their papers on Wednes-
day of next week and not
be a day late in getting
their papers.
There will be no mail de-
livery on Thursday.
All material to be includ-
ed in next week's issue
must be in our office no
later than Tuesday noon of
next week.


Two Autos Are,.

Stolen; Both Are

Recovered
This was the week for car steal-
ing in Port St. Joe.
Two local autos were stolen and
one stolen car turned up in the
city after being stolen in Louisiana.
Last Thursday a 1954 Ford was
stolen from the St. Joe Motor
Company used car lot. Th,.q,'uto
was found Friday parked near. the
Holly Hill Cemetery. **,, '
Friday of last week, 'a: eep',.e-
longing to Dr. Wayne Hendrix was
stolen from the Pure Service Sta-
tion and left abandoned on Tenth
Street near the Florida Power sub-
station.. ,
Officers still have not found out
who stole the two vehicles.
The Louisiana car, a 1962 Buick
was discovered Saturday_n,ight
parked on the Jitney Jun :e Super
Market parking lot by _fS*. Al
len Ray Watson. The person "who
allegedly stole this auto and drove
it to Port St. Joe was picked up
in Pensacola. Highway Patrolman
Ken Murphy said that the Louis-
iana theft had been witnessed and
arresting officers had a name and
description to go on in this arrest.


Gulf Has One

Auto Death In May
The Florida Highway Patrol an-
nounced this week that 130 persons
were killed in traffic crashes dur-
ing May in 36 of the state's 67
counties.
Of these 130 deaths, one occur-
red in Gulf County.


.. The Man Said


.


drag the crossties out and the
drag chain would be run through
the hole in the pointed nose of
the gadget (right), looped around
one end of the crosstie, which in
turn would be lifted onto the pan
and dragged out to a collection
Point. The gadget, being pointed
and rounded, prevented the
square end of the crosstie from
hanging on small trees, roots,
cypress knees, etc.
Even though our forebears
didn't have the mechanized tools
of today, they got along very well
with their ingenuity.


Move Made To By-Pass Bill To

Prohibit "Retaining" Engineer


Max W. Kilbourn, of Florida En-
gineering Service appeared before
the County Board Tuesday night at
their regular meeting to ask what
his status with the county was, now
that a bill had passed the Legisla-
ture to prohibit the county retain
ing the services of an engineering
concern.
Kilbourn said, that according to
the bill, his services were no long-
er legally available to the county
on a retainer basis since June 18.
He wished a clarification of his
status with the Board.
Some hour and a half of discus-
sion went into this matter with the
Board agreeing, to a man, that the
county needed the type service
rendered by Florida Engineering's
retainer status.
Attorney David Carl Gaskin told
the Board that the bill had pro-
hibited the county from "retain-
ing" the services of an engineering
firm. He pointed out that defini-
tion of words would allow the
county to legally "employ" Kil-
bourn in the capacity that Florida
Engineering had been "retained".
Commissioner Walter Graham
moved that the Board employ Kil-
bourn as county engineer and de-
fine his duties as follows:
Examine all plats for compliance
with county rules; establish right
of way monuments; inspect street
and road construction work in
progress; advise the Board on road
and drainage problems; attend all
Board meetings and perform any
other duties requested by the
Board.
All of the Board members ex-
cept James McDaniell voted for
Graham's motion to hire Kilbourn.


Vitro Services

Awarded Contract
EGLIN AFB-The Air Force
announced this week the award
of an Air Force Systems Com-
mand contract for $7,100,000 to
the Vitro Services Corporation
of New York City for fiscal year
1964.
Under this contract, the Vitro
Corporation Services will em-
ploy approximately 950 for oper-
ation and maintenance of the Eg-
lin Gulf Test Range and the ex-
tensive land test network locat-
ed on the Eglin reservation, a
part of the Air Proving Ground
Center.
The Fiscal Year 1964 award is
a follow-on contract to Vitro
which won the original award on
a technical and price competi-
tion.
Vitro personnel will continue
to be engaged in the operation
of the test instrumentation to
acquire significant data on mis-
sile tests conducted over the Eg-
lin Gulf Test Range from track-
ing sites located at Eglin AFB,
Port St. Joe, Tarpon Springs and
Naples.


School Board

Gets Resignations
Superintendent of Public Instruc-
tion Thomas A. Owens said this
week that the Gulf County School
Board had received four letters of
resignation that the board had re-
quested on June 11.
Owens said the Board received
letters of resignation from all per-
sonnel from whom such a request
had been made.
The resignations had been re-
quested by the Board in an attempt
to straighten out difficulties in the
Port St. Joe High School.
Owens said that no replacements
for the resigned instructors had
been obtained or were in sight as
of Wednesday morning.

Visitor of Dockerys
Miss Mina Riley of Melton, Fla.,
is the guest this week of Miss
Evelyn Dockery.


*


* -f


Bar Owners Seek

Longer Open Hours
Daryl Butler of Port St. Joe
presented a petition to the Coun-
ty Board Tuesday night, signed
by six bar room operators in the
county.
The petition' requested that the
bars be allowed to remain open
after the 12:00 midnight closing
time now set by the county.
All of the Commissioners
except James McDaniell voiced
their opposition to such a request
and before McDaniell could have
his say, Butler withdrew his pe-
tition seeing that it would not
meet with the favor of the Board.



Driver Ed. Class

Starts Monday
Classes will begin Monday morn-
ing, July 1, for all students that
have signed up to take the second
three weeks of driver education.
The second session will be Zrom
July 1 to July 19.
If any student that has signed
up for the course and sees that he
will not be able to take the course,
please notify the instructor, as
there is a long alternate list. Alter-
nates will bie notified by the in-
'strictor. Classes 'will begin at 8:00
p.m., Room 15, Monday, July 1.


FHP Says 15

Will Die July 4
TALLAHASSEE The Flor-
ida Highway Patrol predicts that
15 persons will die in traffic
crashes on the state's streets and
highways during the July 4th
holiday week end.
The Patrol's prediction is for
the period beginning 6 p.m. July
3 and lasting through midnight
July 7. This year's prediction co-
vers a 102 hour period, 72 hours
longer than the 1962 holiday
when two people died as a re-
suit of traffic crashes.
The 1963 prediction is some-
what lower, however, than the
resulting figures of 1961 when,
in a 102 hour period, 21 highway
deaths were recorded.


Population Growth

Highest In Youths,
Florida's population growth since
1960 has been accompanied by new
age-group patterns, the Florida
State Chamber of Commdrce re-
ported this week in its Weekly
Business Review.
"The state gained 10 per cent
during the 27 months from the
census count on April 1, 1960 to
July 1, 1962. On the latter date,
Florida's population stood at 5,-
459,000 according to latest official
estimates.
"A breakdown of the 1962 fig-
ie by age groups shows 590,000


SFloridians under 5 years of age.
Brother of Localup 9 per cent during the 27
Brother of Local esient months. The 5 to 17 year old gcoup
'Passes Away In Lake City :numbered 1,277,000, up 12 per
LAKE CITY-C. Jimmy Wilder, cent; 18 to 44 year olds totaled 1,
35, died Sunday. Surviving are the 883,000, up 11 per cent.
widow, Ella; 3 daughters, Shirley, "The middle-aged group, 45 to
Barbara and Lynn; father, Henry; 64 years, came to 1,081,000 and
3 sisters, Mrs. Jim McCollum, Mrs. gained 6 per cent and those aged
Leoise Bodiford, Mrs. Inez Adams; 65 and over numbered 628,000, up
4 brothers, Edward, Henry, Jr., all 14 per cent.
of Lake City, J. C., Valdosta, Ga., "The varying rates of growth of
and B. W. Wilder of Port St. Joe. the age groups have brought about
Funeral services were held at changes in the importance, or
3:00 p.m. Tuesday in Sherrill- weight, of each group in relation
Guerry Funeral Home of Lake City to the total population. The two
with burial in Memorial Cemetery. groups growing less than the state
-it average were the under 5-year-olds
and the 45 to 64 year group. Thus
--I rill Ar these groups are diminishing in
New Land Fill Area i rtn
importance.
The other three age groups are
Will Open Monday profiting by this diminishing. This
is especially true of the 5 to 17
The County Commission an- year olds and the oldsters of 65
nounced this week that the new and over. Both of these groups are
garbage fill area on Industrial now accounting for a larger pro-
Road will be open for use on portion of the state total than for-
Monday, July 1. merly."


HEALTH DOCTOR REPORTS
TO COUNTY BOARD
Dr. Willa Dean Lowery, County
Health Doctor, appeared before the
County Board Tuesday night to re-
port that the program outlined by
the Board had put into effect in
the Health Department.
Dr. Lowery said that a meeting
by the Health Department employ-
ees had familiarized the program
with all employees and all pledged
to work toward providing a good
health program for Gulf County.


The County Board began discus-
Si sion of its new budget Tuesday
Connection With night, with preliminary requests
el e To to for funds from different depart-
; released ToDoctor hients being heard and discussed
for a short while.
Deputy Sheriff Jimmy Barfield One budget was tentatively ap-
this week arrested a suspect in proved, however.
the rash of phone calls to local Due to the necessity of turn-
women that has plagued the city ing the mosquito control bud-
for the past few months, get into the State Health Depart-
Barfield made the arrest Mon- ment in July, this budget was
day afternoon of a 21 year old man approved.
about 3:00 p.m. He reported to The Mosquito Control budget
The Star that the suspect had con- was approved at $36,500 on the
fessed to making calls to specific county level. This includes $5,-
homes Tuesday afternoon., 000 from the City of Port St. Joe
Barfield said that the suspect and $1,500 from the City of We-
said he made his first call on May wahitchka. This makes the bud-
5. All of the calls had been made get $1,000 more from local sour-
in Port St. Joe. ces than it was last year.
The arrested suspect wasn't State matching percentages
the only person making obscene have been reduced causing the
phone calls, apparently, as po- county to receive $2,640 less
lice reported that another call from this source than last year.
was received by a Port St. Joe Other items in the budget will
girl Monday night, after Barfield come in for slight raises.
has placed his suspect in the In the Fine and Forfeiture area,
Gulf County jail. which takes in the Sheriff's De-
Barfield pointed out that the cal- apartment and the County Judge's
ler was not a native of Port St. Joe office, income from fines and for-
but was only here temporarily. features are some $15,000 short
He said that the suspect had been this year, which will need to be
turned over to a doctor's care. corrected in next year's budget.
S___In the Road and Bridge depart-
Car Injures Pedestrian meant, Road Superintendent Lloyd
Whitfield entered a request for
Walter Jones of Highland View $278,000.00 for the next fiscal year.
received a fractured hip last Sat- The Board was quick to cut this
urday morning about 11:45 when request down to $180,186 and may
he was struck by an automobile cut it more before final passage of
on the IGA Super Market parking the budget. This division was bud-
lot, according to local police. geted $167,118 last year not includ-
According to police, Jones was ing money paid to Port St. Joe by
walking behind an auto driven by law which requires half of all road
Herbert Brown, just as Brown taxes collected in a municipality
was backing out of a parking space. by taxes to go to the city.
Brown stopped his car just as Jones The General Fund will probably
walked into the rear bumper, but be increased a small amount with
was still knocked down, receiving most other funds to remain the
the broken hip. He is being treat- same as last year.
ed in a Panama City hospital. The Board will do its first work
No charges were filed in the on the budget at their next regular
accident, meeting of July 9.


Historical Society Seeking Information


Anyone having any knowledge
whatsoever of any ancient artifacts
or relics having been found at any
place within the bounds of this
area, i.e. from Palm Point on High-
way 98 to Beacon Hill Beach, or
Yellow Bluff (as it was formerly
known), please contact any mem-
ber of The Gulf County Historical
Commission.
The engineers and workmen who
excavated to build the Gulf Scenic
Highway in the early 20's, mid
30's and in more recent years of


work on this particular roadbed
would more than likely be able to
furnish us with valuable and need-
ed information.
-it
Georgia Visitors
Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Alligood and
children Ann, Nina, Denise and
Janice of Atlanta, Ga., have return-
ed home after spending a week
with Mr. Alligood's brother and
family, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Alli-
good.


1Oc

P 'ER COP Y


MONEY TALKS-Let's keep
it where we can speak with It
once in a while-Trade with
your home town merchants


New Cargo Liner Stops At Paper Company On Maiden Trip


Suspect Arrested in

Obscene Phone Calls


A new $10.million cargo liner go of paper from the St. Joe tronic controls and was "the
of the Lykes Bros. Steamship Paper Company bound for Bre- latest word in ocen-going ves-
Company stopped in Port St. Joe men, Germany and Rotterdam, sels, outside of atomic power.
last week on its maiden voyage. Holland. The local cargo was handled
The new ship picked up a car- The new liner featured elec- by Tapper and Company.




County Starts Budget Work


The old dump area North of
Highland View will be closed to
use on this same date.
Persons hauling trash to the
dump after Monday, will be ad-
vised to use the new area.
The area will be marked with
signs to aid citizens in using the
new area.
---------it
Leave On Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. John Core and chil-
dren, Kitty and Lowell, left Mon-
day for a vacation trip in the
mountains.










THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 1963
^ -*


Ensign Boyer R ry Hears

Completes Course Oyster Man


Ensign Charles Boyer, USN, son "Northerners don't care to eat
of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Boyer of fresh oysters containing their na-
514 Fourth Street, Port St. Joe, tural mud and salts", according to
was graduated from a one week Don Turner of Apalachicola, man-
shipboard fire fighting course giv- ager of the Allan Kirkpatrick Co.,
en at the Fleet Training Group, U. there. The company packs fresh
S. Naval Base, Charleston, S. C. oysters for shipment to northern
The course included the chem- and mid-western markets.
istry of fire, fire fighting equip- Turner was speaking to the Ro-
ment, classes of fire, and one day tary Club last Thursday.
devoted to fighting fires -common Turner said that his company


MISS JUDITH BLAND FENSOM

Fensom Sanders


Mr. and Mrs. Paul Sherwood
Fensom of Port St. Joe announce
the engagement of their daugh-
ter, Judith Bland, to Brian Cabot
Sanders, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Wilson Sanders of Winter Park.-
Miss Fensom was graduated
from Port St. Joe High School,
Stephens College and received
her Bachelor of Science degree
in Education from Florida State
University. She is a member of
Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority.
Mrn Sanders was graduated
from Edgewater High School,
Orlando, attended Washington
and Lee University and received
his B.A. and L.L.B. degrees, cum


USE THE WANT ADS


HOW COOL

WILLYOU BE

WHEN You

GET HOME ?


One ,thing about it it's a
lovely day for air condition-
ing. Now wouldn't it be nice
to go home to cool, cool,
electric comfort? Why wait?
It doesn't cost much. Look
into electric air conditioning
today and spend the rest of
the.summer living in cool
comfort.


Instant
Comfort
Electrically!
* ss- ag& h ^


FLORIDA
POWER
CORPORATION


laude, from the University of
Florida. He is a member of Phi
Delta Phi legal fraternity, Phi
Kappa Phi, was a member of
Scabbard and Blade and is a
First Lieutenant in the United
States Army Reserves. Mr. San-
ders served as a Special Assist-
ant Attorney General during the
1963 Legislature and is now en-
gaged in the practice of law with
the firm of Sanders, McEwan,
Schwarz and Mims, Orlando.
A date will be set for a fall
wedding at St. James Episcopal
Church to which all friends of
the family in Port St. Joe are
invited.


Mira Powell

Plans Told

A wedding on the fourth of
July is planned by Miss Toni
Mira and Tony Powell.
The prospective bride's par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Mira of
Mexico Beach, have made this an-
nouncement. Mr. Powell is the
nephew of Mr. and Mrs. Clay-
borne Sapp of Marianna.
The bride-to-be is a graduate
of Mount de Sales Convent
School at Macon, Georgia.
Her fiance, an alumnus of Per-
kinson Junior College in Mis-
sissippi, now serves with the
United States Army, Force
Training Regiment at Fort Gor-
don, Georgia.
The families would be most
happy to have their friends join
them for this nuptial ceremony
next Thursday morning, nine
o'clock, at Saint Joseph's Church,
Port St. Joe.


Local Students

On Dean's List

TALLAHASSEE-Florida State
University this week announced
the Deans' List for the second tri-
mester, containing the names of
undergraduate students with the
best academic record during the
trimester.
To make the Deans' List stu-
dents must have carried 12 or
more trimester hours of work and
in most divisions must have made
a grade average of 3. (B) or high-
er. Students in the College of Arts
and Sciences had to make an av-
erage of 3.25 and those in the
School of Nursing 3:5.
Students making the Dean's List
from Port St. Joe were Coral L.
Armstrong, James Edward Bobbitt,
Wayne N. Davis, Judith Bland
Fensom and Michaele A. Thomp.
son.

FAMILY REUNION
Brothers and their families of
Mrs. Wesley Ramsey who were here
last week for a family reunion of
the Mize family were Mr. and Mrs.
W. R. Wren, Clinton, Okla., Mr.
and Mrs. Gilbert Mize and daugh-
ters, Gil and Dannie Gene and
granddaughters, Kelly and Judy of
Perryton, Texas and Mr. and Mrs.
Woodrow Mize and children, Bill,
Johnny and Mary of Odessa, Texas.


to destroyers and aircraft carriers.
Ensign Boyer is assigned to the
USS Robert K. Huntington (DD
781) where he is the First Division
Officer and First Lieutenant.


buys fresh oysters all the way to
Texas and that his company packs
over 10,000 gallons of oysters a
week for shipment.
The oysters are washed thorough-


-- + ly before shipment and according
to Turner, have a completely for-
1956 Graduates eign taste to what we have become
Sued to here.
H av The company operates in a 70x
Have ROeunion 140 foot building in Apalachicola.
i Of this space, 30 x 75 feet is cold
Mexico Beach park was the storage. They manufacture five
scene for a hamburger cookout for tons of ice a day to handle their
a few of the classmates from the product. Turner said that during
1956 graduating class and their the oyster off-season, it is a prob-
husbands and wives. lem to get rid of the extra ice.
Those attending were: Mr. and Guests of the club Thursday were
Mrs. Gene Raffield, Mr. and Mrs. Carl C. Hall of Ellicott City, Md.,
Harold Hinote, Mr. and Mrs. Ed and Merritt Pope of Panama City.
Creamer, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Wil- __
der, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Taylor,
Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Marlow, Mr. CARD OF THANKS
and Mrs., Bobby Stebel, Mr. and May we in our humble way ex-
Mrs. Jimmy Howell, Mr. and Mrs. press our heartfelt thanks and ap-
Billy Johnson, Mrs. M. G. Kanne- preciation for the many acts of
berg, Miss Louise Daughtry, Rob- kindness, the many prayers, and
ert Nedley and Grover Holland. cards offered during the recent
illnell s and reat loss of our dear


CARD OF THANKS
I wish to thank my many friends,
neighbors and Rebekah Lodge for
the many wonderful flowers, cards
and visits during my 31 days in the
hospital. I also wish to thank Dr.
Wayne Hendrix, the nurses and
Revs. Maxwell, Odum and Smith
for their care, concern and prayers.
MRS. LUCILLE WILLIAMS


beloved husband and father. Your
many acts of assistance to us, the
bereaved family, and your floral
offerings were especially appreciat-
ed.
May God bless you all.
ELIZA KEENEY LAWSON
GLADYS LAWSON BOYER
MARGUERITE LAWSON
PRIDGEON


.rA Sr 1. r I- 11
E sApi, Por4 k Joe, Fla.


Local Teacher

Attends Institute

James J. McInnis of Port St. Jo?
High School is in Birmingham,
'Alabama, this summer attending
the National Science Foundation
Institute for secondary school
teachers.
Birmingham Southern College
which provides its facilities for the
institute receives a grant from the
NSF for the project. In addition to
classes which bring the teachers
up to date on the latest develop-
ments in their scientific fields, the
program includes field trips to vai-
ious Birmingham industrial plants
and several lectures from visiting
professors including a speaker
from Cambridge University, Eng-
land.
Dr. Hoyt M. Kaylor will direct
the institute which will bring 66
of the teachers to the Birmingham,
Southern campus through August
16.


Vitro Gets Another

Project for Range

Port St. Joe's Vitro installation
on St. Joseph's Point is due for
a long life, according to a Mr.
Heathcock, of Vitro Services and
Fort Walton Beach. Heathcock
broke this news to the Kiwanis
Club Tuesday in their regular
meeting.
Heathcock said that Vitro at Eg-
lin Air Force Base had just signed
a contract with the Air Force for
development of a new project
which will include the D-3 site
(Port St. Joe) as very instrumental
in the new program.
The Port St. Joe installation
will be upgraded for the new pro-
gram, and possibly additional em-
ployees will be added when the
new program gets into full swing.


3 BIG DAYS!


Begins Today!



Thurs., Fri. and Sat.


Extra On Your Home :7sLes!!


DOUG DAVIS
Come in and get acquainted
with
Your new Danley manager


Early American. Beautiful nylon
tweed cover, foam seats, high back.
Reg. $199.00 SALE
Wing Back SOFA $149.00
Modern style group. Includes: Sofa
Bed, Matching Club Chair, 2 Step Ta-
bles, Cocktail Table and 2 Lamps. A
complete living room group.
SALE PRICE
SOFA- BED GROUP $129.95
Sofa Bed with matching Club Chair.
Modern styling, durable plastic cover,
slightly damaged.
Reg. $139.95 SALE
Sofa Bed, Club Chair $89.95
90" Sofa and matching club chair.
Foam seats, pillowed back, pleated
skirts, slightly soiled.
Reg. $349.95 SALE
90" Sofa, Club Chair $149.00
High backed rocker. Foam seats, pad-
ded back.
Reg. $59.95 SALE
PLATFORM ROCKER $44.50


Yor CHOICE of a beautiful Westing-
house Range, Refrigerator or Laundro-
mat to be given away ABSOLUTELY
FREE at each Donley Store on Saturday,
June 29th at 4 P.M. Just come in and
register.

Furthermore, you wi be given 1 chance
for each dollar paid on a purchase or on
your account. You do not have to be
present to win-no obligation--ust our
way of thanking you for your valued.
business.
_^-7 --, -M -:.,; ., ,,li ..h-Bir 1"


Kroehler club or recliner chair. Foam
padded seats, durable nylon cover.
Reg. $99.00 SAI
Recliner CHAIR $49.00


Modern styled platform
rocker, slightly soiled.
Reg. $39.00
Platform ROCKER


or swivel
SALE
$19.95


3-way lighting system, your choice.
FLOOR LAMPS $10.00

Swivel platform rocker. Beautiful
black linen fabric, reversible foam
cushions.
Reg. $69.95 SALE
PLATFORM ROCKER $39.00

Modern style. With matching ottoman
by Kroehler, beautiful brown nylon
fabric.
Reg. $129.95 SALE
High Back Club Chair $89.00


Early American. Designed by Fox. In-
cludes: Sette, matching wing chair, 2
step tables and cocktail table. Remov-
able covers, foam seats and back.
Reg. $229.95 SALE
5-Pc. SOFA GROUP $189.00
Early American. Includes: sofa bed,
matching wing chair, 2 maple step ta-
bles and matching cocktail table.
Reg. $239.95 SALE
SOFA BED GROUP $189.00
Early American Wing Back Sofa and
pleated skirts, beautiful tweed fabric.
Reg. $249.95 SALE
Sofa, Matching Chair $199.00
Kroehler. Foam seats,, tufted back,
durable nylon covers.
Reg. $199.00 SALE
Lawson Style SOFA $149.00

96" Sealy, 3 cushioned, Lawson styled,
": foam cushions, beautiful nylon cover,
slightly soiled.
Reg. $299.95 SALE
> Sofa, Matching Chair $189.00

Three sets. Plastic tops on the tables,
4 plastic covered chairs. Your choice.
SALE
5-Pc. DINETTE $39.95
Three sets. Formica tops, matching
chairs.
Reg. $79.95 SALE
7-Pc. DINETTES $59.00

Three sets. Table and 8 matching
chairs.
Reg. $119.95 SALE
9-Pc. DINETTES $89.00

Modern style, by Johnson-Carper. In-
cludes: double dresser, full length
mirror, 5 drawer chest, double panel
bed, and nite table.
Reg. $289.00 SALE
5-Pc. Bedroom Group $209.00

Double dresser and framed mirror,
5 drawer chest, and bookcase bed in
solid maple.
Reg. $259.95 SALE
BEDROOM SUITE $169.00


Sealy. Wide arms, modern style, foam
cushions, durable plastic cover. Makes
full size bed.
Reg. $279.00 SALE
Hide-A-Bed SLEEPER $199.00
Modern style, durable naugahyde co-
ver, ideal for lounge or den.
Reg. $169.95 SALE
SEALY SOFA $129.00
Modern. Foam cushions, beautiful ny-
lon cover in rose beige.
Reg. $199.95 SALE
4-Pc Curved Sectional $159.00
Modern Kroehler. Foam cushions,
durable nylon cover, bumper end.
Reg. $259.95 SALE
4-Pc. SECTIONAL $199.00
Modern, 3 cushioned. Foam cushion-
ed and backed. By Sealy.
Reg. $249.95 SALE
Sofa, Matching Chair $149.00
Lawson style club chair. High backed,
foam seats.
Reg. $79.95 SALE
CLUB CHAIR $59.95

Danish modern walnut group. Includes
double dresser and full length mir-
ror, 4 drawer chest and panel bed.
Reg. $289.95 SALE
4-Pc. Bedroom Group $229.00

Modern style with sliding glass
fronts. Your choice. SALE


BOOK CASE


$18.00


High backs, plastic arms. Your Choice
SALE


Platform ROCKERS


$15.00


Corner Chest and matching book case
Desk in solid oak.
Reg. $89.95 SALE


Chest and Desk


$49.00


Modern style. Choice of colors.
TREE LAMPS $8.00


-II I I -


I I I -


MISS PATRICIA ANNE GRISWOLD


Griswold Bates
Mr. and Mrs. John Griswold of 117 Bellamy Circle announce
the engagement of their daughter, Patricia Anne to Cecil McQueen
Bates, son of Mr. and Mrs. Webster Bates of Norway, South Carolina.
The bride-elect graduated from Port St. Joe High School and.
Jones College of Jacksonville.
Mr. Bates graduated from Norway High School in 1960. He is
stationed at Cecil Field Naval Air Station in Jacksonville.


Returns To South Carolina Visiting In Dakotas
Mrs. M. J. Kanneberg and sons, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Marshall and
Keith and Mark have returned to daughters, Janeen and Charlene
Rock Hill, South Carolina after are visiting Mrs. Marshall's par-
spending three weeks visiting with ents in Rapid City, South Dakota.
Mrs. Kanneberg's parents, Mr. and
Mrs.-AEmmett Daniell.


77










On


Your


Total


Food


Bill


When you shop at WOODS IGA DISCOUNT FOODLINER You will find


savings you never thought possible
No Price Juggling to confuse you.


Our items are Priced Low Everyday ..


Compare Our Prices with anyone.


See for


PORT ST. JOE
PRICES GOOD NOW


yourself, which store offers you the most in savings.


FOR IT!


DON'T TAKE OUR WORD


Come in and prove it to yourself.


Shop IGA Discount Foodliner Today
No Sales To Dealers Quantity Rights Reserved


DIXIE'S BEST


0


DRnESS.


6 Oz.
Jar


Tall
Can


9
9


2


FOLGER'S
Instant COFFEE
OCEAN BOY k r
Pink SALMON


REDDIE MAID CHERRY
Sauce


CAN
lOc


GOLDEN RIPE
BANANAS


POUND


Jazz Dog
Food


Sungold, 1 Lb., Quarters
OLEO


Pillsbury New Flaky Buttermilk
BISCUITS


Whole or Shank Half
TABLERITE SMOKED


Pint
Jar


69c

49c


I
CANS


LBS.


2


81c


290


29c


CHUCK ROAST


Tablerite Canned 4 LB. HAM EACH
HAMS 319
GROUND CHUCK lb. 59c
Tablerite Sliced Lb.
BOLOGNA 49c


Shoulder


CHICKEN SALAD TIME Small
HENS


NO. 1 California Jumbo Size
LETTUCE


California Red
p L S S


'I


IGA Package of 6
WAFFLES
IGA Breaded 10 Oz. Pkg.
SHRIMP


HEAD
23c
5cI
59c


SWIETNING OR JEWEL
Shortening


BLACKBURN'S CORN and
Cane
IGA


10c
69c


Syrup


Pork & Beans
STANDARD
Tomatoes


U
m -


3 Lb.
Can

No. 5
Jar
300
Can


303
Con


FOODLIIER
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
Prices Good Now!!


lb. 49c


Round Steak 69c


Lb.


25c


49c

39c

lOc

11c


I I I I I r, ---I ~~-----, II I I -


I,


-










Dependents of Deceased Veterans To

Receive Increase In Compensation


All children and dependent par-
ents of deceased veterans will re-
ceive an increase of about 10 per-
cent in their monthly dependency
and indemnity compensation pay
ments as the result of a law enact-
ed by the 88th Congress and sign-
ed by the President, the Vete.:ins
Administration announced t h i s


The increased payments will be
automatic, and will be included in
the July checks mailed to reach
beneficiaries about August 1, 1903,
J J. Hill, Gulf Councy Service ')f
. cer explained. There is no need
to write the VA.
A child, now receiving $70 per


ramlith, will receive $71 per month;
under the new law, Mr. Hill point
ed out.
Iwo children, currently receiv-
ing dependency an.I indemnity
compensation checks amounting to
$1WO per month, will receive $110
equally divided between them bn-
der the new law.
Three children, r ceiving $130
per month, will receive $143 per
ncntb equally divi led between
thm.-


If there are
chi.(t en, each


more than three
additi mnal chii,l,


how receiving $25 a month, will re-
ce %,' $28 a month unde:- the lnew Make Sure Your
law.
In the case of dependent parents Earnings Reported
liv'rjg together witn an annual in-
come of less than $1,000, their Individuals working for some-
present payment of $50 each will Individuals working for some-
present payment of $50 each willone else should see that their
be increased to $55 each under the earnings are reported for Social
new law. Security purposes, John V. Carey,
i District Manager of the Panama
Visiting McLawhons City Social Security Office, said
Miss Pat Schultz, of Panama this week. It is the employer's re-
sponsibility to make these reports
City is spending this week with if he has one or more workers.
Miss Edith McLawhon. However, workers should see that


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURS

ODDLY EmouGH


m a~ -~ ~


priceO Vd |sNYL
For a NN

Sellout TIRE BA .G11

Hurry In For every make and model'car...
P Pick your size and price...deal today!

6.70-15 6.70-15, 7.50-14
Tube-type, Blackwall Fits most..s Tubeless, Blackwall
Chevrolets
Fords
"10 Plymouths
Ramblers
Studebakers

WHITEWALLS ONLY *2.00 MORE
7.10-15 Fits most... 8.00-14
Tube-type, Blackwall Buicks Tubeless, Blackwall
Dodges
Pontiacs
Mercury
Olds Fords
Hudsons

WHITEWALLS ONLY *3.00 MORE
7.60-15 Fits most.,. 7.60-15, 8.50-14
Tube-type, Blackwall Buicks Tubeless, Blackwall

7 DeSotos
Mercurys
Oldse- Dodges

WHITEWALLS ONLY *4.00 MORE
*All Prices plus tax and trade-in tire off your car


NO Tttretone DOUBLE GUARANTEE FREE
CASH Is honored by more than 60000 Firestone dealersRE
and stores from coast to coast wherever you travel TIRE
NEEDED LIFETIME GUARANTEE 2 ROAD HAZARD GUARANTEE MO
aga t defects in workmadoip against normal road hazard (except repairable
wi ur orgal tread. car use for numnbore of months specified. uanerU I
old trade-in lamet prorate o tread war d baed on it pricec current at time of adjotmrnt. Fast efficn-
tirPs Tour Firestone GUARANTEE C et
ires provide protection against Service
I tire failure from dozens of l -- <' 6 (v 6
lCee. road hazards like these Bottles Cans Curbs Chuckholes Metals Stones, O WAITING .
Don't Miss Out! Prices Good Only Whle Stocks Last!
Don't Miss Out! Prices Good Only While Stocks Last!


Recaps $8.00 a nd upE L NGE



PATE'S SERVICE CENTER


Port St. Jme, Florida


the reports are made for their own
protection.
Rights ,to Social Security bene.
fits must be built up during the
working years, Carey continued. A
certain number of work credits are
needed for retirement, disability or
survivor protection under Social
Security. If an individual works
Through the'years and the employ-
eis do not make reports of the
earnings, he or she may wind up
without any Social Security rights.
Any individual, including the
self employed person, can obtain a
statement of' his: individual Social
Security account by completing a
simple post card form, Carey add-
ed. In.the case of an employee, if
the statement does not show credit
for work that has been done, an in-
vestigation should be started im-
mediately. Mistakes in your Social
Security record, or failure of your
employer to make reports of your
'earnings, are difficult to correct if
more than three years have gone
by.
All Social Security offices have
the postcard4r-rm, which is avail-
able wifklutifirge, for you to
complete your request for a state-
ment of your account. Protect your
rights to your future Social Secur-
ity benefits by making certain
that you have credit for all of your
earnings.
The Social Security Office for
this area is located at 1135 Harri-
son Ave., Panama City, telephone
PO 3-5331.


Mathews Chosen
'Most Valuable'

In Legislature
TALLAHASSEE (F N S) State
Senator John E. Mathews, Jr., of
Jacksonville was selected by his
colleagues as the most valuable
member of the 1963 legislature.
Runnersup in the poll, conducted
by political columnist Allen Mor-
ris, were House Speaker Mallory
Horne, Tallahassee, and Rep. Fred-
eric B. Karl of Daytona Beach.
Secretary of State Tom Adams
was voted by the legislatures as
the most effective administrator of
a state agency, with conservation
director Randolph Hodges and At-
torney General Richard Ervin as
runners-up.
Others winners in the poll in-
cluded Sen. Verle Pope, St. Augus-
tine and Rep. Julian Bennett, Pan-
ama City, as most effective deba-
tors. Sen. Ed Price, Jr., Bradenton
and Rep. James Sweeney, Jr., De-
land, were named most effective in
committee.
The legislators cite Mathews for
his diligent study of legislation,
solid judgement, unquestioned in-
tegrity, high degree of intellect,
leadership, ability to get along
with people and ambition to ren-
der public service to all of Flor-
ida.


___________________________________________________________________________ N U


DAY, JUNE 27, 1963


AIR COOL

CUSHIOl
SFeaft bold u$3
Fabric in 4 most
poptar colo"ilt


BILDWEL

SUP PLY C 0 MANY
414-416 Reid Ave. Phone 227-4156

We Have A Broke nStoek of
Glidden and Gold Bond


PAINT

SALE V3 to /2 OFF
Good Colors


FOR STRAIGHT SALE -- NO TRADE-IN
16 Foot New
Sport Craft Boat ------ $400.00
14 Foot New
Fibre Glass Boat --- $275.00
12' Peeroe Fibre Glass New
Fishing Boat ------ $129.00
14' Peeroe Fibre Glass New
Fishing Boat --------$149.00


COMPLETE NEW OUTFIT
Ready to go fishing. 16 Foot Sport Craft Boat
with top and light. 40 horse select-shift Evin-
rude motor. Heavy duty trailer.
$140000


----------


I --- : --- -- --- -


~ wczac~c~







S THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 1963


Bob Sikes Reports


r

















I








I
































































I


U




























































H
'I
'I
Ii
I
I
I


SQUARE
CUT


45c


55c




$1.00oo


Fresh
Fruits
and
Vegs.


Fresh Red Cardinal
GRAPES


lb. 29c


Fresh Tender Golden


CORN


10 ears49C


STOCK UP BEFORE THE NEW TAX (30c
per carton) GOES INTO EFFECT JULY 1

CIGARETTES

S2.45 $2.49

White House-13 Fl. Oz. Cans


Sg u Evap. MILK 6 cans 77c
4 _y PsI ,PLAID ,
r TAMPS Mel-O-Bit American, Pimento or Swiss
SWith Coupon and purchase of Sli CHEESE 12 oz. 39C
Ann Page Italian Sliced CHEESE 12oz. 39c
Dressing 8 oz. 25c
J-6-29 Delsey Bathroom
Coupon good through June 30
TISSUE 8 rolls 89c


JANE PARKER DELICIOUS

Apple, Pies
ALL FLAVORS MARVEL

Ice Cream 2
SULTANA

Pork & Beans 2


Morton's Frozen
TV DINNERS 59c
Morton Frozen (8 Oz.)
MEAT PIES 20c
Morton Frozen
Dessert Pies 3 for $1.00
Swanson's Frozen (1 Lb.)
MEAT PIES 65c
Betty Crocker Layer
CAKE MIXES 39c
Chicken of Sea Light Meat
Chunk Tuna 6V2 oz. 35c
Reynold's Wrap, 240 Inches
Broiling Foil 49c
Pfeiffer's Slaw
DRESSING 12 oz. 43c


Nabisco Premium
CRACKERS lb. 31c
Dole's Sliced
Pineapple lb. 4V2 oz. 39c
Kraft Cracker Barrel
CHEESE 8 oz. 49c
Instant Sanka
COFFEE 5 oz. 99c
Detergent Tablets-Sc OFF
VIM lb., 8 oz. 36c
Planters Dry Roasted
PEANUTS 94 oz. 69c
Dromedary Whole
PIMENTOS 7 oz. 31c
Bright Sail
BLEACH gal 39c


For


SPECIAL!

$1
SPECIAL!


Y2 GaL
- 99c
SPECIAL!
3 Lb., )
cam 55C


All Flavors-46 Oz.
Hi-C Drinks 3 for $1.00
Instant Yuban
COFFEE 5 oz. 89c
Detergent
Super Suds 2 boxes 49c
Quarter Lb. Box
LIPTON TEA 45c
Lipton (12 family ctn.)
TEA BAGS 49c
Sunsweet
Prune JUICE qt. 49c
Dromedary Sliced, 2 oz.
PIMENTOS 2 for 27c
Detergent
SAIL 1b., 3 oz. 25c


510 FIFTH STREET
Prices in this ad are good through
Saturday, June 29


"SUPER-RIGHT" HEAVY WESTERN BEEF (Bone In) LB.


The new ZIP Code plan, Post-
master Hardy said, for the first
time will permit the Post Office
Department to short-cut repeated
address reading.
, "The address on mail must often


be read as many as eight ur ten
times by postal employees, to get
it to the proper destination," Mir.
Hardy said. "Each handling slows
the process of mail dispatch and
adds to the opportunity for human
error.
"With ZIP Code, a clerk needs
only to glance at the cade to Know
immediately to what national area,
state and post office the letter is
destined, and to speed it on its
way, cutting up to 24 hours of the
time between deposit and delivery.
Postmaster Hardy said that when
ZIP Code is in full swing, the Unit-
ed States will have "the most mo
dern system of mail distribution
and delivery in existence."


It's Mercury Savings Timel


$2183.00 I


ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY


THE SUPREME COURT
MUST BE CURBED
The U. S. Supreme Court has
struck a body blow at our Consti-
tution. It has placed an interpreta-
tion of the wording of the Consti-
tution that was never intended by
the Founding Fathers. They were
deeply religious men. All they
sought to do was to prevent the
establishment of a state church.
They could not have dreamed that
their wording would be used as an
argument against religion itself.
The Court has kept its sorry re-
cord intact. A Court which has al-
lowed itself to be used as the er-
rand boy for racial and civil rights
extremists and which has ruled
more than once in favor of Com-
munists could hardly be expected
to stand up for the Holy Bible or
for prayer in the public schools.
This is another blow at the bright
symbolism which made this coun-
try the hope of the world for so
many years. The decision has
cheapened America and weakened
its moral strength. I sincerely
hope the Congress will rebel
against the things that are hap-
pening to our country and its peo-
ple and reassert the principles
which made us a great nation. As
a first step, the Supreme Court
must be curbed.
JOINT DOG FLY CONTROL
INITIATED AT PANAMA CITY
I am advised by the U. S. De-
partment of Agriculture that coor-
dination of research has now been
arranged on the dog fly control
program by state and federal agen-
cies as recently suggested by your
Congressman. Upon the advice of
the Florida State Board of Health,
which already has entomological
work in progress at Panama City,
it has been agreed that coopera-
tive work would be located there.
Bay County health authorities al-
so will participate in the program.
The Director of the Agricultural
Research Service of USDA states:
"We are hopeful that the federal
and state team research efforts
will produce practical and effective
methods of minimizing the serious
dog fly problem in the Southeast."
It is my belief that this is one of
the most important steps taken in
years to advance the Gulf Coast as
a recreation area. A full month
can be added to the vacation sea-
I son each year if dog flies are con-
trolled.
U. S. RUSSIAN SPACE
COOPERATION?
Shortly after the epochal space
flight by Gordon Cooper I urged
President Kennedy to make a
stronger case for a joint U.S.-
Russian space exploration effort. I
am afraid that no action was tak-
en on this suggestion. Now the
Russians have again trumped our
ace, and I presume we shall find
both countries continuing a fren-
zied effort to best each other in
space. Space exploration is very
largely non-milixtary. There is lit-
tle to b3 gained from individual ef-
forts by competitive nations. In
fact, the joint efforts of the two
countries would be much more pro-
ductive and much less costly. A
saving of billions would be in pros-
pect. Possibly the Russians would
not agree, but we don't know until
we try.
Overstreet Gets ZIP Code
Our five-digit ZIP Code is 32453
Pastmaster Edna L. Hardy announ-
ced this week.
"Everyone in Overstreet, Florida,
will use this ZIP Code on all their
correspondence to speed mail de-
liveries and reduce the chance of
mis-sent mail," Postmaster Edna
L. Hardy said.
ZIP Code, the Post Office Depart-
ment's revolutionary new system
of improved mail dispatch and de-
livery, goes into effect nationally
on July 1.
Postmaster Edna L. Hardy stres-
sed the importance of all citizens
of Overstreet learning this city's
ZIP Code and using it in their re
turn address on all correspondence.
In answering mail, she said, ZIP
Codes taken from return addres-
ses on incoming mail should be
used.
'The ZIP Code is literally the
last word in mail addressing,"
Postmaster Hardy said. "It should
follow the city and state in ad-
dresses.
She cited this example of the
proper use of ZIP Code:
Edna L. Hardy
Overstreet, Florida, 32453


SAVE ON ALL

FIRST QUALITY
X ,IC .1! ,1


AND SAVE!


Handsome Don River woien
plaids, neal checks, fancy pat-
ierns and solid colors with
embroidered trims. Regular
and ivy styling. Wash n wear
cottons nod Dacron and cot-
ions. Full cut with long toils.
Sizes S, M, L, XL.


/Josh 'n wear cottons in woven
ginc ham plaids, fancies and solids
Regular or ivy styling. Sizes 6 to 18.


Handsome solid colors
and woven plaids in
ivy or continental styl-
ing. Sizes 29 to 40.


r.'J, ITSa "kw CU S


S99 099
AND 2

BOYS' 99
S, M, L J


H' Hancn knit and lastex in the new long leg
s vies. Buckle front, built-in supporter. Solid colors
and fancy patterns.


Canvs Cams For7
CH LDREN'S 99 MEN'S AND
SIZES WOMEN'S SIZES /
Sturdy canvas uppers, reinforced cushioned arcl. Cor
pletely washable. White and colors. Complete size range.


I S P.L. SETS
'*^^ S^IM^ PI W ^^L


Jamaica shorts with co-
ordinating tops. Solid col-
ors and printer. Sizes 3 to
S ,:, 14.


Girls' JamVrr
>"- Toris and $
Crop Tops
Sizes 3 to 6X and 7 to 14.

To S; rFrS^ $
,doraobie prints and solid colors
Wo hoLale, tub fast cottons. Boys'
and garls' styles.


99
AND
2.99


199


Ig


/


5'


p. povs $ <
2 TO 6


322 Monument Ave.


Phone 227-8737


CHUCK ROAST
"SUPER-RIGHT" HEAVY WESTERN BEEF FULL CUT


CHUCK STEAK
SUPER RIGHT LEAN


GROUND BEEF 3D


MEN'S COOL SUMMER

SPORT SHIRTS


BOYS' SPORT SHIRTS


MEN'S WASH 'N WEAR

Walking Shorts


0oys' WalkingY S
Wash 'n wear cottons F ',
in woven plaids or solid ;: "'
colors. Sizes 8 to 18.


ME'S


I- --


dIIC __I 1 111 1 I pll_


S A
AV


R ~ ~ ~ p~~r--r~4' ., -s,M-Mmmmmmlii


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Ptla.


91~


199






- 3 '11


THESE SPECIALS GOOD TWO WEEKS WED.,
JUNE 26 through TUES., JULY 9th
OPEN J L- LY 4 For Your Convenience


II" ..


PLEASE SAVE THIS SALE PAPER This Is.A Two-Week Sale. .
These Prices Good June 26 through July 9.
WE WILL BE OPEN ALL DAY THURSDAY, JULY 4


S SWIFT PREMIUM CANNED
3 POUND HAM

fl19


SWIFfTi PREMIUM
ALL MEAT WEINERS
3 PACKAGES


Field Ripe Fresh Tender
PEACHES 0 K R A
Pound

S -'


Best Taste Home Grown
TOMATOES


Fresh Blackeye
Pound
'PEAS


C


Basket


QUART BASKET


Fully Cooked -Ready To Eat
SWIFT PREMIUM

Canned Ham 4 2.99
Select Tender Meaty
Beef Liver 3 lb. 99c Ham Hock 3 lb. 99c
Smoked Link Fresh Tender Pork
Sausage 3lb. 99c Pork Liver 4 lb. 99c
OUR BEST FIRST OUT

Slab BACON 29c
SLICED ENDS and PIECES

BACON 5 99c

Swift Premium Proten


BEEF SALE

NONE BETTER CAN BE BOUGHT ANYWHERE


PROTEIN MINUTE STEAKS
9 C EACH

PROTEIN CHUCK ROAST
49c L.M
Proten Ground Chuck
59cLB


Proten Boneless
New York Fillet lb.79c


Proten
Delmonicos


lb. $1.19


PROTEIN CUBE STEAKS
9c EACH

PROTEIN No. 7 STEAK
59c LB.
Proten Shoulder Roast
69c LB.


All Meat
Stew Beef


BRISKET STEW --
Short Rib STEW


lb. 69c


5 lbs, 99
3 l.99


JHe.


Freezer Bag
Wholesale Less
EACH

1C


Green Boiling Sunkist
S PEANUTS LEMONS
Pound Dozen

19c 29c
JH-ELBUY THE CRATE!


EY TO CANMIT TO PRESERVE
Nabisco, Reg. 49 Shopping Cart
OR E0S Loaded with
Lb.TnBox Watermelons

43c $1.00
430 PER LOAD


EACH


C


ICE COLD ,A
Watermelons I P EU CH
GUARANTEED RIPE \ ID :*. L
With $5.00 Order, 'EACH


Del Monte, 14 Oz.
Catsup
2 FOR
29c


YOUR TOTAL WILL BE CHEAPER AT RICH'S
PLUS ONE DOZEN GA. GRADE 'A'
LARGE EGGS

FREE!
WITH $10.00 ORDER OR MORE
Ga. Grade 'A' Large Best Fresh Yard
BROWN EGGS
2 DOZ. 8


Showboat, No. 300 Kraft, Quart
Pork & Beans Mayonnaise
CAN Reg. 59c
10c 49c


Fla. Grade A Sm.
EG GS
42 EGGS FOR

$1
Swift's Gem
OLEO
2 LBS.

25c


Colored Butter
BEANS
Pound


Cleanser
AJAX
CAN

10


Fresh Frozen Shelled
PEAS and
Butter Beans
4 BAGS


1.00

CHARCOAL
SPECIAL!
5lbs. -- 29c
10 lbs. 49c

0. 79c


For Your Convenience Fresh Shelled
Butter Beans Available Every Day! By the


Wednesday Afternoon


&


Thursday July 4 Specials Only


June 26, July 3
and July 4!


Grade 'B'
FR YEARS


Our Budget
BACON


Ib. 23c


3 bs. 99c


Fresh Ground
BEEF 4 lbs. 99c
Borden's or Velda
MIL K full gal. 89c


Soft Drinks
PEPSI
Bottle
5c


Fla. Grade A Sm.
EGGS
5 DOZ.
$1.00


Buy All These
SPECIALS
July 4th
and Save Money!


Field
PEAS
Pound
5c
Limit 5 Lbs.


Tender
OKRA
Pound
5c
Limit 5 Lbs.


Green Boiling
Peanuts
Pound
10c
Limit 5 Lbs.


Peas and
Bushel!


m


W--%FE a MAILED W am w N


L -~~.~~~... Ilr.I


2


ROD0 UCE









THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 1963


THE STAR
Published Every Thursday At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florlda
By The Star Publishing Company
WESLEY R. RAMSEY Editor and Publisher
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Salesman, Photographer, Columnist, Reporter, Proof
Reader, Bookkeeper and Complaint Department
DIAL 227-3161 POSTOrxiCE Box 308

Entered as second-class matter, December 19, 1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe,
Florida, under Act of March 8, 1879.

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, $3.00 SIX MONTHS, $1.75 THREE MONTHS, 127l50J

TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omIssions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount received for Buoi
advertisement.


Weekly Editor Disturbed by Shenanigans

In Washington; As All of Us Should Be

"News dispatches originating in Washington during re-
cent weeks," writes Editor and Publisher J. B. Chism, Jr.,
of the Pelham (Ga.) Journal, "have started my blood boil-
ing, and the more I read about the proposals coming out of
the White House, the more coal is added to the fire that is
sending my temperature soaring.
"It has been my policy for the 518 columns ('Down
the CHISM TRAIL') that have appeared under the
above heading to stick strictly to local matters, leaving
national affairs to the 'big wheels'. But lately, the
Executive Department of our Government is aiming the
gun-sights close to home, and unless some block is plac-
ed in front of some of these proposals we are going to
wake up and find ourselves in a mess of a predicament.
"I have stood by with tongue in cheek long enough,
as too many weekly editors throughout the nation have
done, until things have gone too far to be curtailed."
Editor Chism observes that there may not be a single
reader who will agree with him, "but thank God, not agree-
ing is one privilege Americans have long enjoyed". He warns
however, that the right to an opinion will be lost, too, if
things keep on the way they are going, and hastens to sound
off while he can:
"The news articles of late have clearly and distinct-
ly stated that it is the President's desire to put every
business purchasing articles manufactured out of state
under interstate commerce, thus giving him the power
to dictate the policies of said business.
"In other words, a restaurant serving a bowl of
soup canned out of state would be considered doing busi-
ness in interstate commerce, and the owner, not obeying
certain policies set up for him, could have his doors
closed and he and his family could just starve to death.
"The ballot-box is still the strongest weapon we have
to combat this sort of thing," says Editor Chism, and he
urges his readers to register, to vote and to "vote your con-
victions, not vote just because your grandfather voted that
way", just as we urge our readers to do.
This editor is right, of course-and has pointed out one
pitfall that may lie ahead. But there are others--Federalized
education, Medicare, a shifting policy on foreign aid that
threatens to cut the support we are giving our friends to
give moro to pro-Communist and Neutralist nations--that
are more imminent. He is right that every editor, daily
and weekly, city and small town, should keep his readers
posted. But these are issues that will be decided in Con-
gress, not at the ballot-box. Voters must first impress
upon their Congressman and Senators what they want-then
reward these men or retire them-at the polls.
"The more I think of it," concludes Editor Chism,
the more I am coming to share that feeling of Patrick
Henry, who stood to his feet and shouted: 'Give me li-
berty or give me death.' "
But we might warn Editor Chism that during these
times it would be dangerous to make such a statement un-
less one had his will and testament made out.

We hear a lot about our dwindling gold supplies due to
our "big give-away" to foreign countries to foreign aid. And
we believe that a certain amount of this is necessary-to our
allies, if not to us. But what would be wrong with taking
these lately publicized counterpart funds and use them for
foreign aid?


Court 'Has, in Effect, Vowed To Protect

The Religion of Atheism In Schools

We respect whole-heartedly the Supreme Court's con-
tention that they wish to keep church and state separated.
And we concur with their wish to keep denominational teach-
ing out of schools.
But we cannot agree with their method of going about
these desires.
Also, we cannot see the Supreme Court's rulings being
automatically the "law of the land" as they have been in
so many instances lately. As we see their duties, they are
"interpreters" of the meaning of the law not the apply-
ing body. And, what with their general lack of judicial
experience as individuals, we even shudder at the thought of
having them as "interpreters" or "the last word" of U. S.
law.
But, getting back to the subject at hand. We concur
that our government and the teachings of the church are like
gasoline and water. They should not mix. But water is
placed in gasoline pipelines to separate gasoline from other
substances that might contaminate it, and to keep one gaso-
line separated from another. This is the part religion plays
in our government, while remaining entirely separate
keeping hte government pure, untainted and pointed toward
the high ideals on which this country was founded.
The schools of our nation are the pipeline feeding the


finished product of human beings into our society to mold may like to sprinkle the lawn be- -"
it and protect into a God-fearing christian society. If the fore applying top soil. LETTERS TO
Fertilizing the lawn at this time LETR
separating water of the Gospel is removed from the pipeline is a good idea with or without top THE EDITOR
of knowledge, we believe that the end product will be so soiling. However, don't place too
contaminated with impure products as to be useless, heavy a hand in the fertilizer bag
And, while being so zealous, the Supreme Court has or you will help your subdivision Wesley Ramsey, Editor
done exactly what they thought not to do-they have en- get the reputation of being the 40 The Star
dorsed a religion to be practiced in our schools--the reli- most fertile acres in the commun- Port St. Joe, Florida
ity. This title is usually reserved Dear Mr. Ramsey:
gion of atheism for, in truth, they ruled in favor of ath- for homes where the stork makes
eism. The word "religion" is not necessarily Christian. It annual visits, so, don't give the ti- ample for one application.
applies to anything to which we give our full allegiance. tle double meaning. Even a hundred pounds of plant


Florida Gardening

By HERVEY SHARPE ly as other legs of the same age.
A lawn is like an 'ole fashion So if you desire to hide ugliness,
corn-shuck mattress-both tend to the answer is simple-cover up.
get lumpy and bumpy. Cloth is suggested for legs and loa-
Since kneading and rustling the my soil for roots.


painful bumps out of the bed is a
lost art, this narrows the subject
down to smoothing out a lawn.
There are scores of reasons why
a lawn becomes as unsightly as the
scatter rug on the rumpus room
floor after a small fry television
party. Some dents in the outdoor
carpet may have been caused by
the lumbering cement mixer deliv
ering material for the patio, the
utility truck hauling away a dead
tree, or the ruts made by last win-
ter's mobile home visitors. Rain
and wind also erode wrinkles into
a lawn.
Leg-size roots coming to the
surface is a good sign that the ele-
ments are taking their toll of lawn
top soil. Usually, leg-size roots are
middle-aged, gnarled and unsight-


Tne average wuorkig perau
during 1963 will work 2 hours
and 21 minutes out of each 8
hour day to pay Fed-ral, state
and local taxes.
The same average worker
will only work 1 hour and 24
minutes out of each 8 hour day
to supply K, M
housing and .' '
housing op-
eration.

Thus, a .y, .
roof over the
head costs
less than h3l
the cost of ,
taxes.
C. W. Harder
Of course, the great gulf in
these comparisons is that the
average worker is supporting
more than one roof. Sen. Rob-
ert Byrd of W. Va., on the com-
mittee that administers civil
affairs in Washington, D.C.
picked 236 district welfare cas-
es at random and found about
60% of these cases did not de-
serve welfare payments in the
first place.
And the bitter fact remains
that every taxpayer is not only
burdened with the welfare load,
but also with the salaries and
expenses of almost 10,000,000
people employed by federal,
state and local government.
While the major attention is
focused on the costs of federal
government, it is a fact that
state and local governmental
costs are contributing mightily
to the cost of existence.
0
As the situation -~ov stands,
in ten years federal spending
on non-defense items has
@ National Federation of Independent Business


whnen ordering a ioaa 01 osol, be
sure to include an ample supply to
fill the ruts caused by the heavy
delivery truck. Scatter the top soil
into the depression in the lawn
and rake the newly added real
estate as smoothly as possible.
Usually lawn grasses will peep
through all but the thickest ap-
plication of top soil. So unless you
have made a complete change of
geography of your yard, it will be
unnecessary to sprig in grass fol-
lowing a liberal hole-filling opera-
tion.
If you scatter top soil over '.he
entire lawn area, it is a good idea
to make a light application of fer-
tilizer prior to sifting on the terra
firma. To insure that the fertilizer
won't burn covered blades, you


jumped from approximately
$23% billion to $63Y billion,
and at the same time state and
local spending has jumped
from $22 billion to $49 billion.
*
The nation's independent
businessmen, voting through
the National Federation of In-
dependent Business, feel
strongly that a reduction in in-
come tax rates is essential to
preserve a free economy, and
to provide more employment.
*
Yet, the nation's independent
business proprietors have also
voted strongly in favor of cut-
ting government expenses to
offset, at least in part, a tax
cut.
*
As shown by the above fig-
ures, there is plenty of water
to be wrung out of governmen-
tal spending to provide size-
able tax cuts.
*
On the other hand, reflection
on these figures cause wonder
if the water must be wrung out
of the federal budget alone,
or whether at the same time
local governments all through
the land should be forced to cut
back on their expenditures.
Today, the public debt of the
federal government is over
$100 billion more than the com-
bined public debt of all the
free nations of the world com-
bined, yet these nations re-
ceive billions of U.S. dollars in
foreign give away funds.
*
Thus, perhaps Castro is not
the greatest concern of every
American.
Perhaps of far greater con-
cern is the actual solvency of
the nation.


Farmers often grow lush grass
in their pastures on a few hundred
pounds of fertilizer per acre. Re-
member, if you don't intend to
graze the lawn with cows, cutting
lush over-fertilized grass is a
sweaty job.
Teasing grass with tiny applica-
tions of plant food won't aggra-
vate the grass into excessive growth
nor aggravate you if you have to
mow twice a week.
Try applying 15 pounds of a 6-6-6
or similar analysis fertilizer per
1,000 square feet of lawn area. If
your lot is 100 x 150 feet, you are
paying taxes on about one-third of
an acre. Subtracting the areas of
the house, the driveway, the tool
shed and the flower beds, most
likely 150 pounds of fertilizer is


A Service of Your Doctor of Medicine,
Your Local Medical Society and the
Florida Medical Association.
FORCED FEEDING
Forced feeding of a child
against his will usually is a mis-
take. Mothers often worry for
fear something will happen to
a child if he misses one or two
meals. Something is more likely
to happen to the child forced to
eat when he doesn't want food.
Appetite is variable, especially
the appetite of a child, and there
are many reasons for a child's
apparent loss of appetite. There
may be an oncoming sickness.
The food ^offered may have
been causing a disagreeable re-
action. The child may be too
excited or too tired to eat.
Not uncommonly the child
wishes to attract attention by
refusing to eat. He may be ex-
perimenting with his power to
impose his will, rather than just
to obey his mother. Practically
all children try this trick at
times.
The manner of handling such
a try for independence can be
direct and simple. The moment
the child refuses food, take it
away and say nothing further
about it. There is no danger
that he will starve or do him-
self harm by missing a meal or
two. If the mother is deter-
mined not to be overwhelmed
by a small show of rebellion, he
will tire of his performance. A
normal child will eat when he
gets hungry.
N a child refuses to eat or
shows a small appetite beyond
a period of a day or two, he
should be taken to a physician
to determine the reason.


ooduu may be adequate to Keep your
outdoor carpet green and thrifty.
Since lawn grasses can take diet-
ing better than you perhaps, you
can reduce your fertilizer bills by
experimenting to discover how
much fertilizer it takes to keep
your lawn green but not lush
growing.


THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Fla.


Lay Away Specials


EVERGLADE


BLANKETS


72" x 90" 94-1 Rayon, 6% Acrylic




Assorted Colors
$1.00 Will Hold


Infant Boys and Girls
2-Piece SUITS
Sizth 9 to 12 months
$1.98
Girls
PLAY SUITS
With elastic waist
assorted colors
$1.00 ea.

NAPKIN SALE
250 to pkg. Colors or white
37c pkg.


ODDS and ENDS
SALE


ONE COUNTER

1/2 PRICE


Belts, Hats, 'Bathing Caps,
Swim Trunks, Dishes,
Toys, Undershirts, Shorts.
These are name brand: Fruit
of Loom, Hanes, best of qual-
ity.


SUPER FOAM

0,111- Decorator Cushions


Attractive colors.
This Week
Only


Reg. $1.29

880


--- OPEN ALL DAY WEDNESDAYS -



CHRISTO'S


5c and 10c STORE
328 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, Fla.


I -.


O~t GsoQ


ON EASY MONTHLY TERMS:

ON EASY MONTHLY TERMS:


* For Homes For Appliances


SFor Cars
* For Vacations


For Personal 'Needs
* For Medical Bills


Need a loan for any of these things? Or for any
other reasonable purpose? Then give us a call or
come in and talk to one of our friendly, helpful loan
officers. They'll arrange a loan at lowest rates, on
easiest terms!


Florida National Bank


at Port St. Joe
Member FDIC and Florida National Group


Homogenized,

Pasteurized and

Buttermilk

Fresh Yard Eggs

Butter Oleo

Orange Juice

Orange, Grape and

Lemonade


Home Deliveredl



garden's Dairy

BORDEN DAIRY PRODUCTS


Call 639-4383 collect


5


/
/
'a0


7
I


Take time out at least
twice a day to refresh with a
delicious glass of ice cold milk.
It's so good and full of vitamins
needed for energy!


Wewahitchka


Relative to your comments of
June 20, 1963, this writer is whole
heartedly in agreement with you
that any nation without God, does
not exist.
The writer would like to ask
(with all humility) the readers of
your paper how many have read
"The Rise and Fall of The Roman
Empire", even once?
The writer has read the above
mentioned three times.
Most sincerely Mr. Editor, keep
up the good work.
Very trul yyours,
Mrs. W. P. Shannon


CLASSIFIED ADS
Midget Investment WWs
Giat Retumu


__


I


It


P~








PRICES
GOOD


V. .,...


JUNE ... .. .. ..*



Check these buys for PROOF of savings at


Port St. Jue, Florida


FR EE


If Winner Is Present at 6 PM Drawing Friday
$25 FREE If Winner Is Not Present


Cut Up_29c lb.


C


Whole
LB.


Georgia Grade "A" Small
EG GS


FROSTY MORN OLD SMOKEY Copelands Bologna, Pickle Pimento, Liver Cheese, Olive Loaf
30z- $1 SAUSAGEq 59c Lunch Meat 4' $1


JITNEY JUNGLE


- Limit 2


1 AL.
2


Aunt Jemima-l'" Ib box


C


MAXWELL HOUSE limit 1 with $5.00 orderENDERSONS limit 1 with $5.00 order
COFFEE Cm 49c SUGAR 5 59c


BAKERITE

SHORTENING


Jitney Jungle Potato
CHIPS


Twin 49
Pack 49C


GOLD NOTE

OLEO


I lb


25c


BALLADS or PILLSBURY CANNED
Biscuits


SCANS


39c


LB.
CAN


MARCEL
Napkins


GOLDEN RIPE
BANANAS-


49c


BOX


110


SEARCH LIGHT
SALMON

CAN 49c

ROMAN
STARCH
HALF
GALLON 25c


*Double Savings *. Valuable Premi***ms*
Double Savings Valuable Premiums


-i-i IZ ant


2 bs. 19c


CELLO BAG
CARROTS 2 pkgs. 19c
GREEN HEAD
CABBAGE 31bs. 19c


GREEN BOILING
PEANUTS


200 FREE
GRAND PRIZE
STAMPS


With coupon
$12


& purchase
Order


Coupon expires June 29
50 FREE
GRAND PRIZE
STAMPS
With coupon & purchase of
Half Gallon
Aero Wax
Coupon expires June 29


lb. 19c


50 FREE
GRAND PRIZE
STAMPS
With coupon & purchase of
I Bottle Sure Pine ....
Pine Oil
Coupon expires June 29
50 FREE
GRAND PRIZE
STAMPS
With coupon & purchase of
Lb. Pkg.
L&M TEA
Coupon expires June 29


CALIFORNIA LONG WHITE
POTATOES 10bs.


59c


DOUBLE GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
will be given every
Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday


PRICES GOOD JUNE 27, 28, 29


25 FREE
GRAND PRIZE
STAMPS
With coupon & purchase of
Any Size Black Flag
Insect Spry
Coupon expires June 29
50 FREE
GRAND PRIZE
STAMPS
With coupon & purchase of
Qt. Jar Kraft
Mayonnaise
Coupon expires June 29


25 FREE
GRAND PRIZE
STAMPS
With coupon & purchase of
/2 gaL Dad's
Root Beer
Coupon expires June 29
50 FREE
GRAND PRIZE
STAMPS
With coupon & purchase of


10 lb bag
CHA
Coupone


RCOAL
expires June 29


~1


g- I 1


I s


YOUR COMVLETi


[ SAVE7


rGRANDI


~U^uU


---


~mwwwwwvwwwwvuMhcA~urzMmrr~Hlwwvr~vw~Mmv


~


Astk


..~..,,.,,,,,~,,~,_..~,~


I


~-------~








TH= StARk, Port St. Joe, P1l.


How COOL

WiLLYOU BE

WHEN You
GET jOMi H ?
_vamwi


THURSDAY, JUNE 2, 1963


NEED A PLUMBER?
CALL BEAMAN
Plumbing InstaolMlen Repalrb
Contract Work A *lpsmlaty
Agmt fofr
Brand Name Plumbing Fixtures
-CALL US FOR FREE ESTIMATE-

TWO EXPERIENCED PLUMBERS TO SERVE YOU

BEAMAN PLUMBING SERVICE


1107 GARRISON AVL


PHONE BAll 7-441


5 HAMBURGERS $1.00
5 HOT DOGS $1.00
EVERY DAY NO LIMIT
To Take Out

City Restaurant

Corner Fourth Street and Monument Ave.


Ask any delivery man, he
goes everywhere. Air condi-
tioned homes have the
.happiest people. And it
.doesn't cost much to turn
your home into a cool haven
from the muggy world out-
si~te. Find out about electric
air conditioning today.
-Spend the rest of the sum-
,mer in cool, cool comfort.


I instant
Comfort
Electrically!


FLIORlDA
-~CORP RATION
O~4 C?.........


FURS and


WOOLENS


PROFESSIONALLY

CLEf4HED
AND VAULT

STORED


Complete protection
from Moths, Fire and
Theft.
. More closet space
for you.


Box Storage $2.49
Plus Cleaning Charges Insured for $200.00
It costs so little and it's so convenient to get this finest
storage service. Send your winter garments now .
Be safe and smart.
Our Routeman In This Area Monday and Thursday

DOMESTIC Laundry and Cleaners
417 Grace Ave. Panama City, Florida


C lluormicSk's Super Market


and SELF-SERVICE LAUNDRY

MAYTAG WASHERS WITH COMPLETE 25 MIN. WASH CYCLE
DRYERS, 20 MIN. DRYING CYCLE WITH FULL HEAT CONTROL
LAUNDRY OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7:00 AM. UNTIL 10:00 P.M.

Sunnyland, 12 Oz. Hickory Smoked Half or Whole Slab


Franks 3Fs.P$1 BACON LB 35c


Our Value Evaporated
Canned
MILK
3 CANS
39c

Rainbow Cottonseed


OIL
NO. 10 JUG


990

Danish Pork Luncheon
MEAT
12 OZ. CAN
35c


Golden Pod
Bananas
Pound

10c


Ga. Grade 'A' 1% to 2 lb. avg.


FRYERS

2 FOR $1

Limit 4 to A Customer
Ga. Grade "A" Small


EGGS


3


DOZ. 95


Pert Big Pack, 200 Count
PAPER NAPKINS


F >


PACK 2S


16 Oz. Giant Cola and Dr. Pepper
SOFT DRINKS

EACH SC


Center Cut Pork


CHOPS


59c|
Pound

Large Size
Super Suds
2 BOXES.
45c


Peacock
FL 0 UR
5 POUNDS
49c

Delmonte 20 Oz.
Family Size

CATSUP
BOTTLE

25c


Price Increase of Motor Vehicle Tags
Will Go Into Effect On Monday, July I


The new, increased schedule of
fees for auto, truck and trailer
tags will go into effect July 1,
according to County Tax Collector
Harland Pridgeon.
Pridgeon said he had received
notification of the effective date
-as set by the Legislature when
it increased the fees-from State
Motor Vhicle Commissioner Arch
Livingston in Tallahassee.
The first increases felt by tag
buyers will be on half-year tags
effective July 1, Pridgeon said.
Boat Trailer Tags
Pridgeon said the new half-year
rate for boat trailers 500 pounds
and under will be $5.50, up from
the present $3 annual fee. He said
citizens with trailers not yet tag-
ged can save by buying before
July 1.
Under the new schedule, a half-
year "D" tag for cars 2,500 pounds
and under will be $6.75, up from'
$5.50, Pridgeon said. For a tag
with no letter prefix, 2,501 to 3,-
500-pound vehicles, it will be $10.50
up from $8. For a "W" tag, $3,501
to 4,500 pounds, it will be $14.25,
up from $10.50. For a "WW" tag,
more than 4,500 pounds, it will be
$18, up from $13.
Pridgeon said 1964 tags will be
sold as usual between Jan. 1 and
Feb. 20 renewal period but will
be good for 13 months-until
March of 1965.
Rate Schedule
He said the 1964 increased rates
will be: For a trailer 500 pounds
and under, $5.92, up from $3; for
a "D" tag, $14.04, up from $10.50;
for a no-letter prefix tag, $22.17,
up from $15.50; for a "W" tag,
$30.29, up from $20.50, and a
"WW" tag, $38.42, up from $25.50.
Pridgeon said a "Q" tag-for
cars more than 20 years old-will
sell for a half year after July 1 at
the same $5.50 rate, which is also
the present annual rate. For 1963,
he said, it will be $8.63.
He also reminded that the Legis-
lature increased the sales tax on
autos from 1 to 2 percent, effective
July 1.
Tags are sold locally from the
Frank and Dot's Insurance Agency
on Reid Avenue during their reg-
ular business hours.

Fishing Licenses
'Due On June 30
TALLAHASSEE- Deadline for
the 1963-64 fishing license is mid-
night June 30. Fishermen are ad-
vised that Wildlife Officers will
conduct a strict fresh water fish-
ing license check effective July 1.
Persons violating the provisions
of the fishing license law may be
fined not less than ten dollars, nor
more than three hundred dollars,
or imprisoned not to exceed ninety
days.
Fishermen may obtain their
1963-64 fishing license at the offic-
es of all County Judges and their
authorized sub-agents throughout

Expert Carpentering
Cabinet Making
Roofing and Painting
Complete Homes or general
repairs-no job too large
or too small
Phone -
GRADY MATHIS
229-1406 for free estimates


TELEVISION
Black & White and Color
Stereo Air Conditioning
Service Calls, $3.00
All work guaranteed
ST. JOE RADIO
& TV COMPANY
Phone 227-4081



W!5


the state.
License fees are:
Resident, annual, $3.00; Non-resi-
dent, annual, $8.00; Non-resident,
14-day continuous fishing, $3.25;
Non-resident, five-day continuous
fishing, $2.25.

ATTEND GRADUATION
Mr. and Mrs. Charlie D. Spears
recently attended graduating exer-
cises for their daughter, Mary Fran-
ces Spears. Miss Spears received
her degree from the Gorgia Bap-
tist Hospital School of Nursing in
Atlanta, Georgia. She will be em-
ployed by the Georgia Baptist Hos-
pital beginning in September.
Frances plans a vacation with her
parents in Port St. Joe during the
month of July.
Send The Staf to a friend.
,*.~^^r


TELEPHONE: BAll 7-4191
Sun., Fr., Holidays __ 2:45 p
Mon. thru Thurs. 4:48 p.m.


BURNING

ILLS
SWARNERCOLOR
A WAAt R BOS. PI-U0
'"_L


ANDY GRIFFITH
MYRON McCORMICK JEAN WILLS

SUNDAY MONDAY
TUESDAY


'.. / .-- .

FRiDMACMURRAY
meOLSON KEEANWYNN
Released by BUENA VISTA Distr buton Co.. e.


a


; APF h&M-AkidO


Phone 227-4261 Port St. Joe, Florida
222 REID AVENUE -- "In the busy block where
everybody shops!"
Your Friendly, Neighborly Store Home-
Owned, Home-Run to serve youbetter and save
you money!


JULY CLEARANCE

In JUNE CONTINUES


20% REDUCTION

on LADIES' SUMMER SHOES
Dress and Casual Styles

First Quality
SEAMLESS NYLON HOSE



3 Pairs 9 7c


Colorful, Floral 59c Value
TERRY BATH TOWELS


3 for $1.00

For More Details, Turn Your Radio Dial to 1080
Thursday and Friday A.M.


The Tattler
R. GLENN BOYLES Editor
Associate Editors YOU-ALL
Published by '"
BOYLES DEPARTMENT STORE
PHONK BALL 7-421 '
R. GLENN BOYLES, Owner
"Dedicated to Better Selling mixed with a
little fun"
BOYLE$
BTORn PRRBONNEL
ERLMA M. BOYLES Manager
GLADYS S. GILL -------Ladies' and Children's Ready-to-Wear
RUTH KEELS Sportswear and Hosiery
ETHEL M. GAY and PAULA LOVETT Lingerie
MARTIN BRACKIN Shoes for the Family
HAROLD KEELS Men's and Boys Wear

JULY CLEARANCE IN JUNE ..

BOYLES LEADS AGAIN!
RIGHT THIS WAY, FOLKS. To See A Bargain Blasting
Tune in St. Joe 1080-For Daily Round-up of
BOYLES Happy Shopping News!


Dear friends:
Quotation from a church bul-
letin: "Even if you are on the
right track, you'll get run over
if you just sit there" From
a sales bulletin: "Real Measure
of success is not whether you
have a problem to deal with but
whether it's -the same problem
you had last year."
In the mail: A request from
an out of towner for member-
ship in St. Joe Beach Booster's
Club. Thank you, sir, for think-
ing more of our fine beach than
we do! (No local requests yet
received!). This seems to be an
indicator that we have nany
great opportunities right around
us that we are unable to see. St.
Joe needs more industry and
more payroll. The business men
of this community could get it if
we wanted it enough to work
hard enough, long enough! Does
anyone agree? Or, are we just
plain stuck in the mud, sand, or
what have you? Did you know
that Gulf County has lost popu-
lation since 1960? Whassa mat-
ter? We're way out of step with
our own state! Just look at the
record! How much longer are we
going to sleep just too com-
fortable to be bothered? ? Some
of the honey stuff we hear is
plain sickening! How can we
point with pride to our great,
great achievements and lose our
shirts at the same time? We saw
a fine, wide awake aggresisve ef-
fort in an adjoining county just
today that gives this writer a
red face. Now, whose move is it?
We're heard it said that the busi-
ness men either make or break
a community! Just appears to me


it's no one's fault but our own.
This is one buck we'll be unable
to pass! We've formulated many
excellent alibies that only serve
to obstruct progress! Will some-
thing run over us if we continue
to sit in the same place? END.
Ordinarily this humble little
column stays in the area of mer-
chandising and light sort of chat-
ter. Can't explain how we got
started as we did this time, but
we are tempted at times to
launch out into deeper waters
with just neck sticking out! We
have been tagged as one of those
"reckless neck sticker outers"
at times and might as well have
a try now and then, anyway! We
happen to be one of those old
timers who rejects most of the
modern formulas for making
this world a free, happy, peace-
ful and plenteous land?
We do not believe these great
blessings are bought with dol-
lars or brought about by govern-
ment, laws and legislation, pow-
er politics and supreme court
decisions. No, no one else can
put freedom, happiness and
peace in our hearts but our own
selves. Seems that a utopian
dream is spreading its soothing
syrup over this land of ours! God
forbid that we should be doped
into this unreal and impractical
sort of thinking. Our own free-
dom from want will only come
about as it came to our forefa-
thers by hard work, long
hours, sweat and tears and
we use the words of the ancient
prophet again in closing: "What
is required of thee, 0 man, but
to do justice, love mercy and
walk humbly with thy God".
S'long. -RGB


GROCERY PRICES GOOD JUNE 27 THROUGH JUNE 29


a


-



















FOR RENT: Two bedroom house,
corner Tenth Street and Long
Avenue. Call Mrs. Nora Duren,
Phone 227-5471. tfc-6-13
FOR RENT: Two bedroom house
in Oak Grove. $50.00 mo. furnish-
ed; $40.00 mo., unfurnished. Phone
227-8111. tfc 6-13
FOR RENT: Upstairs furnished
apartment. 1505 Monument Ave.
Phone 227-7421. tfc-4-28


FOR RENT: Trailer space in Oak FOR RENT: Two one bedroom cot-
Grove. Sewer and water. $14.00 tages, furnished on 9th St. Also
month. Phone L. C. Davis, 227-7059. 2 bedroom unfurnished apt. Call
227-5111 or call by Smith's Phar-
FOR RENT: Nice furnished apart- macy. tfc
ment for couple only at 1621 --
Monument Ave. Phone 227.7641. tf FOR RENT: Nice 2 bedroom house.
Separate dining room, attic fan
and automatic heat. Fenced back
FOR RENT: Unfurnished 2 bed- yard. Phone 227-8536. tfc-6-27
room house. $55.00 per month at -
1305 Woodward Ave. Phone B. C. FOR RENT: 3 bedroom furnished
Gaillard at 227-8396. and unfurnished houses in High-
1-I U- P.*-. .....M. rT *nV1.Ar1


GENTLE
Slower action,
shorter cycle gives
special, gentle
care to your del-
icates.


F
h~. -


NORMAL
'Brisk action,
longer cycle gives
your everyday
things the wash-
ing action they
require.


I I


FOR SALE: Nice 3 bedroom block
house with built-in range, 2 tile
baths, large closets, extra large
living room, garage, utility room
and patio on completely landscap-
ed lot in one of the nicest and
newest areas of Port St. Joe. Pay
very small equity and assume VA
loan. Call 227-5086 after 12 noon
for appointment. Itp
FOR RENT: One bedroom and pri-
vate bath, living room and TV
room privilege. 528 corner of Sixth
Street and Woodward Ave. 2tp
FOR SALE: 4 bedroom home, 2,000
feet floor space. 2 full baths,
large fenced back yard, garage and
utility. Close to school. Well estab-
lished landscaping. 1027 Long Ave.
Contact Ed Ramsey.
FOR SALE: A double tank aqua
lung. Riviera Banana Slalom and
double handle ski rope at 808%
16th St. or phone 227-5616 if inter-
ested. 2tp-6-20


Model LJA-4J


AUTOMATIC WASHER
Sure, it's not the only washer with two speeds, two
cycles but it's the only one with the exclusive
"million" current water action of the Surgilator
agitator. It's the washing action that gently flexes
clothes over and ever to get them really clean. And
exclusive Magic-Mix* dispenser filter blends in de-
tergent, filters out lint. automatically! *Tmk.
Use of trademarks @ and RCA by Whirlpool Corporation, manufacturer
of RCA WHIRLPOOL appliances, authorized by Radio Corporation of America.


Model EKT-14DM


St. Joe Hardware Co.

Port St. JAe, Florida


p


olI


THERE WILL BE a regular corn
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F. & A. M., every firsi
and third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.


ROBERT L. CREAMER, W. M.
ROY K .BLACKSHEAR, Sec.

ATTENTION OWNERS, AGENTS,
CUSTODIANS, LESSEES AND
OCCUPANTS OF REAL PROP-
ERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIM-
ITS OF THE CITY OF PORT ST.
JOE:
You are hereby notified that you
are required by law to cut and keep
cut to a height of not exceeding
twelve (12) inches all weeds, grass
or underbrush on any property
owned, controlled or occupied by
you in the City of Port St. Joe and
also to remove any trash, debris,
refuse, filth or other noxious mat-
ter located upon such property, and
that upon your failure to do so the
City of Port St. Joe will cause said
weeds, grass or underbrush to be
cut and such weeds, grass or under-
brush or any trash, debris, refuse,
filth or other noxious matters to
be removed from said premises and
the costs thereof assessed against
the property upon which said
weeds, grass or underbrush or such
trash, debris, refuse filth or other
noxious matter may be growing or
located.
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
FRANK HANNON, Mayor
ATTEST:
J. E. Williams,
City Auditor and Clerk 2tc-6-20
NOTICE TO BID
BID NO. 9
The City of Port St. Joe, Florida,
will receive sealed bids in the of-
fice of the City Clerk, City Hall,
Port St. Joe, Florida, until 5:00
P.M. July 2, 1963, for the follow-
ing:
1. Glaze and paint all windows
located in the Centennial Building.
Prices to be on a Per Pane basis
for glazing and a per window ba-
sis for painting.
2. Contractor shall furnish proof
of Standard Workman's Compensa-
tior, Insurance is in effect prior to
awarding of contract.
3. Windows shall be scraped by
the City prior to glazing and paint-
ing and shall be removed from the
frames and replaced in the frames
by the City.


lanu view. Reasonable. J. u. Clark,,
phone 227-7771. tfc-5-30



Real Estate For Sale
2 bedroom house, Mexico
Beach. Large lot, 100x150. Com-
pletely furnished.
Frame, 2 bedroom house on
highway, St. Joe Beach. Excel-
lent financing by owner.
Frame 3 bedroom house on
Hunter Circle. Presently FHA
financed.
Beach lots, St. Joe Beach and
Mexico Beach.
WANTED-Listings on rental
property, St. Joe and the Beach-
es.

The Pridgeon Agency
INSURANCE REAL ESTATE
E. Tom Pridgeon, Reg. Broker
Mrs. Jean Arnold, Reg. Sales.
301 Williams Ave. Port St. Joe
Phones 227-7741 and 229-3201

FOR RENT: 3 bedroom house fur-
nished on bluff at Beacon Hill.
$50.00 week. For reservations call
648-4238 or 229-3201. Mrs. L. T.
Arnold. tfe-6-6
FOR SALE: 1950 2-door Ford with
1953 reworked engine. Good con-
dition. $100.00 or best offer. Phone
229. 2446. Itp
FOR SALE: 1960 Fleetwood house
trailer. Two bedrooms, 46 ft.
long, 10 ft. wide with auto washer.
$500.00 equity and assume pay-
ments. For further information
you can come by and see the trail-
er at 444 Parker Ave., Highland
View. Itp
FOR SALE: 14 ft. PanaCraft run
about and trailer. Equipped with
windshield and steering wheel. See
at 1707 Garrison Ave. or phone
227-5886. tfc-6-27
FOR SALE: German Shepard blue
book puppies. AKC. $50.00. Ph.
648-4194. 2tp-6-27
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom block house.
Small equity and assume VA
mortgage. Call 229-2186. 2tp-6-20
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house. 801
Marvin Ave. See Cecil G. Costin,
Jr. tfc-5-2


4. All paint and glazing com
pound to be furnished by the City
5. For any additional informa
tion desired please contact the City
Clerk, City Hall.
The City of Port St. Joe reserves
the right to reject any or all bids
received.
J. B. WILLIAMS 2t
City Auditor and Clerk 6-20


WARD
ELECTRIC SERVICE
517 First Street
SMALL APPLIANCES
Repaired
ELECTRIC MOTORS
Rewound and Repaired


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, PFa.


FOR SALE: 1962 Harley Davidson
"SCAT" (175 c.c.) Is in excellent
condition. Has windshield and rear
view mirror. For further informa-
tion contact Mike White at 229-
3331_or_227-8881. !tp
FOR SALE: 1962 model sewing
machine and economy type vac-
uum cleaner. Balance owed $48.00.
Make last four payments of $12.00
each. Write credit manager, 280
North Palafox Street, Pensacola.
Both of the above in very good
condition. 4tc-6-27
FOR SALE: 2 story unfurnished 2
bedroom home, 1508 Long Ave.,
$5,500. Also, furnished 2 bedroom
brick home and small apartment,
1031 Long Ave., $11,000. Phone
648-4128. Mira.

FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house on St.
Joe Beach. Carport and storage
room, cypress paneled thruout. Will
finance. Call J. C. Traweek at 227-
5927 after 5 p.m. or week ends.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Meet
every Wednesday night, 8 p.m.
at Parish House, 309% 6th St. Port
St. Joe, Fla. Phone 229-3331 for
further information or write P. 0.
Box 535.
WANTED: A good reliable person
to supply customers with Raw-
leigh products. Write Rawleigh's,
Dept. FAF 100-127, Memphis, Tenn.
4tp-6-6
SEPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call
Buford Griffin, Phone 227-7011
for quick expert service. tfc
WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION, meet-
ing second and fourth Tuesday
nights, 8:00 p.m. American Legion
Home.
HAVE YOU SEEN the handsome
California Redwood 0 u t d oor
Furniture at SURPLUS SALES OF
ST. JOE? It is strong! All stress
points are securely bolted. Dur-
able! Will withstand years of wea-
ther and use. Beautiful! The natur-
al color and texture of California
Redwood adds beauty and charm
to any home. Low Priced! Quality
considered, you cannot beat these
low prices:
Large Table and four benches, 'all
for $29.95.
Restful Chair with attractive wa-
ter-resistant cushions, $21.95.
Comfortable settee-for-two with-
matching cushions, $28.50.
Round roomy coffee table, so con-
venient (no barked shins) $8.50.
We also have treated Southern
Pine 2-chair and settee sets, at the
low, low price of $14.49. Limited
supply. These values and many
more can be had at SURPLUS
SALES OF ST. JOE. Phone 227-
2011. Across fro mthe Post Office.
Convenient terms. ltc
IT'S EASY AND SAFE TO MOVE
THE MAYFLOWER WAY!
Aero Mayflower Transit Company
places a complete nation-wide long-
distance moving service at your
command! Whether your move is
a few hundred miles or thousands,
the Mayflower System assures sat-
isfactory service. If you're planning
to move why not call your local
Mayflower agents, SURPLUS
SALES of ST. JOE, Today. Just
Phone 227-2011. Across from the
Post Office.
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0.
0. F.-Meets second and fourth
Thursday, 8:00 p.m. in American
Legion Hall. All members urged to
attend.
Noble Grand: Emmett DanieDl)
Secretary: J. C. Martin.
R. A. M.-Regular convocation of
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
M., 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit
ing companions welcome.
Edgar L. Smith, High Priest
Roy L. Burch, Secretary


THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 1963


American Flag

Usually Goes

Neglected by 'Public
Flags everywhere on public
buildings in private homes -
pictures in stores or fluttering in
the soft summer breeze FLAGS
- AMERICAN flags.
Passers-by, on the busy street of
the city, hurry on their way, minds
intent on their own small affairs.
They look idly at the flags, but,
DO THEY REALLY SEE THEM?
That oblong piece of cloth with
its bright dyes, is the visible sym-
bol of America today an Amer-
ica more precious, more wonderful
than ever before, because the gifts
it has given us are threatened, as
never before with loss and de-
struction! It is the thrilling heart
of America the sign of our in-
heritance the presence of all
that we hold dear! The courage
and strength of the days when we
were beginning to be a nation.
These are the red of its stripes.
The high and stainless purity
of mind and motive the white-
ness of the souls of great men -
Washington, Lincoln, Jefferson,
and many others, who strove self-
lessly to hold high their beliefs
in the greatness of this nation,
and who dedicated their lives to
its service These are the white
stripes!
The truth that will not stoop to
lie the integrity of the princi-
pals that underlie our common-
wealth, the unshakable faith and
trust in God, that has come down
to us from those long gone before
who have held high the light,
that we might walk safely -
these are the stars on the blue
field.
And every one of these stars
shines with a new splendor of
meaning the symbol of a free
people, living their lives in a
blessing of freedom freedom
to worship Almighty God as they
choose freedom to work, to
laugh, to love and live God's
precious gift to man to be
guarded sacredly forever!
What is our Flag? It is the soul
of America and God help us
that it shall ever wave over our
land as such. -


,Jll About




Older Dogs
Need Weight Watching
If your pet is getting on in
years he's probably putting on
unhealthy and unattractive
pounds.
Older dogs gain weight for the
same reasons people do: cur-
tailed activity
Without a re-
duction of food
intake. Extra
calories are not
burned up but
are turned into
fat.
"Older dogs usually grow
short-winded and lazy as fat
thickens around their hearts and
constricts the blood vessels," ac-
cording to Clarence C. Fawcett,
of the Purina Pet Care Center,
St. Louis, Mo. "This-usually re-
sults in a general slowdown of
body functions. Sluggishness can
lead to a number of diseases."
Fawcett says, however, that
the overweight dog should not
be put on a strict reducing diet.
The most effective way to put
your dog on a diet, pet nutrition-
ists note, is to cut down the total
amount of food but increase the
number of meals. Instead of a big
bowl of Dog Chow at one time,
dish out three-quarters or half
the amount in three or four serv-
ings. Snacks and scraps must be
eliminated no matter how per-
sistently Rover hangs around the
dinner table.
Living with a dog year after
year may make it difficult for a
master to know just when his pet
goes over the safe-weight limit.
If'there is any doubt see a veter-
inarian. He can tell for sure and,'
if necessary, prescribe appetite-
curbing medicines.,

CLASSIFIED ADS
Midget Investments With
Giant Returns


UNTIL YOU CATCH A COMET AT

YOUR MERCURY DA S


PRICED FROM $1997.00 AT

ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY
501 Monument Ave. Phone 227-3737


You Are Cordially Invited To Attend


Long Ave. Baptist Church

REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL ........... 9:45 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
. BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ..-.......------...-.... 6:45 P.M.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 P.M.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday)- ..... 7:30 p.m.

Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street
Air Conditioned Centrally Heated

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME


FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Intersection Monument and Constitution
REV. THOMAS 8. HARRIS, D.D., Minister


9:45
11:00
7:30
6:00
7:30


Church School
Morning Worship
Bibye Study (Wednesday)
Methodist Youth Fellowship ..............
Evening Worship


A.H.
A.M.
P.M.
P.M.
P.M.


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH


C. Byron Smith, Pastor


Corner Third St. and Baltzell Ave.


a.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.


SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ------...-........... 6:45
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) ........ 7:30

"Come and Worship God With Us"


You Are Welcome To The

First United Pentecostal Church
10th St. NW. and Victoria Avenue Highland View, Florida
Rev. JAMES J. HILL, Pastor


SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45
MORNING WORSHIP 11:15
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30
MID-WEEK SERVICE (Wednesday) .... 7:30
YOUTH SERVICE (Friday) 7:30


AM.
AM.
P.M.
P.M.
P.M.


AIR-CONDITIONED CENTRAL HEAT


NOTICE OF TAX SALE
Notice is hereby given that on the 24th day of June, 1963, at the
t front door of the City Hall, City of Port St. Joe, State of Florida, tax
sale certificates will be sold on the following described land to pay
the amount due for taxes herein set opposite the same, together with
all costs of such sale and all advertising.
J. B. WILLIAMS,
City Treasurer and Collector
City of Port St. Joe, Florida
ASSESSED OWNER: Lot Block Adv. Total
Granger, Andrew W % 8, 10 1016 .50 3.32
Pallon, Ed 25 1003 .50 3.32
Peters, Damon 31 1018 .50 1.91
Williams, Roy Lee 32 1010 .50 3.32
PERSONAL PROPERTY
Alma Lee Bryant's Beauty Shop .50 3.32
Floyd Chevrolet Company .50 35.78
Tomlinson, A. R., Service Station .50 14.61


ONE
WEEK $298.00
ONLY!


NOW OPEN!

FUN

MINIATU. FOR
GL0F ALL


FREE GAME
19th Hole Safe, Clea


r


-
-


U. S. Hiway 98
Mexico Beach

GOLF BOWLING
GAMES MUSIC
* KIDDIE RIDES
n Recreation for All the Family