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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01432
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: April 18, 1963
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01432

Full Text





1|MONEY TALKS-Lef's keep
1 I c it where we can speak with it
10 C once in a while-Trade with

PER COP Y your home town merchants

TWE"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"

TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 1963 NUMBER 31


ETAOINSHRDLU I'
By WESLEY R. RAMSEY

Rep. Ben C. Williams is introduc-
ing two pieces of legislation this J
week that will probably bear a lit
tle local controversy. L "" "'
Williams told us about his intent
on these two particular bills just
before he left for the. Legislature
and asked how we felt about them.
Of course, we couldn't give an an-
swer right then because we wanted c g, R : t i
to think about it a little and find A
out a little information.
Ben asked us to air our opinions
on his actions and we will dothat
only in the view of expressing our
opinion, not in attacking Mr. Wil-
liams actions nor from animosity.
First, we think Mr. Williams Port .
Authority bill goes a little too far.
We, as well as Mr. Williams,
realize much hasn't come from the AWARD WINNERS-Pictured above are the win- hber, manager Sockys, winner of American League
present Port Authority. Whether ners of the Little Boys Baseball trophies for last pennant, Roy Garrot holding sportsmanship award
or not his proposals will remedy year's play, presented at the League barbecue of Raymond Jings of the National League; Lamar
this situation or in our opin- last Friday night. Above, front row, left to right Moore, manager of Rotary, winner of the Nation-
his souation, t..creyo situl t nis are Jerry Nichols, Most Valuable Player, Nation- al League championship, and James Harrison hold-
ion cause a worse situation, is al League and Randall Walker of the American ing sportsmanship award won by Larry Byrd in
Williams Port Authority bill will League. Back row, left to right, Ralph Macom- the American League. (Star photo)
give the new authority the power
to levy up to three mills. This par- M o D P AM D
ticular portion of the bill we can other o o aLEAGUEBEGINS ND
not approve. We don't believe that Dies Pay will begin in the Dixie noon will be the Boxers and the
an appointed memberof any body snessm n League Baseball organization on Hard Stars in the American
should be allowed to levy village. Monday afternoon of next year, League and Rotary and Ford
In our opinion, they should be able Mrs. Jane Eliza Roche, age 92, according to Harry Tison, presi- Western in the National League.
to request tax money from the passed away in Bonifay Nursing dent of the league. Mayor Frank Hannon will toss
County-if needed-but not be able Home at 12:20 Monday, April 15. Al teams in the league have out the first ball of the season.
to levy village themselves. She had been a resident of Port been holding try-outs and prac- On Tuesday of next week, the
The bill calls for a nine member St. Joe for many years and was a twice sessions for the past two Dozers will meet the Sockys in
committee. A.f t e r considerable member of the First Baptist Church weeks, and are ready to play the e m ern l agth e ac adRock -
thought, we.believe this is an un- of Port St. Joe.onday. ets will play the Krafties in the
wieldly committee. The bill also Mrs. Roche is survived by one All games will begin at 5:00 National League ,
calls for members to be appointed daughter, Lenora Pray, Beaumont, p.m. with night games starting On Thursday of next week, it
from all sections of the county. Texas, four sons, Welton C. of Port p.m. with night games starting On Thursday of next week, it
from all sec tions of the county. T exas, four sons, Welton C. of Port after school is out on June 3, will be Hard Stars vs Dozers and
The only waterfront sections in the St. Joe, Spurgeon N., Mobile, Ala., Taking the field Monday after- Ford Western vs Rockets.
county, practicabeto haile water William H. of Shreveport, La., Dr.theern s
transportation through port facill- B. F., Waco, Texas, seven grand DINNER TO DISCUSS 'PARK APPROPRIATION METHOD
ties, is Port St'. Job t :oitrse, the children and 12 great-grandchil- N
creation of such facilities in Port dren. There will be a dinner meeting way and Speaker of the House, Mal.
St. Joe would greatly affect the Funeral services were held from tomorrow night at the Motel St. Joe lory Horne, William Kidd, assist-
entire county.. the First Baptist Church of Ver- called by the Chamber of Com- ant to the Governor, Walter Cold-
We also believe they should not non at 4:00 p.m. Wednesday, April merce to discuss means of securing well, Director of the Florida Park
be allo. edty hire a or manager, 17, with. Blackbur Funeral Home appropriations for construction- of Service and Representative Ben C.
but should rTecommend the h ing of Chipley in charge. a State Park on St. Joseph's Spit. Williams will meet 'with civic and
of a'port manager and recommend Interment waste in the Vernon Senator Luther Tucker, Presi government leaders of Gulf Ca.i)aty
port,%harges and purchase of pro- Cemetery. dent of the Senate, Wilson Carra- at the meeting.
ppity for port facilities.
In other words, -we believe. the t l
bill givesathe.Depp ed por author- tocl Postal Employees Notified That They May Join In
ity too much authority.
Now, for the oyster bill. ..We ith 'Labor Organizations Formed To Air Their Grievances
for the oyster bill gWe
talked with Gulf County's biggest The Port St. Joe, Florida post of- 1, 1962, in which 451,000 postal em- meetings and working out written
oyster bed leasing producer, James fice has taken official action to Im- ployees participated. Official re-agreements on matters affecting
T. McNeill, about this bill. Accord- element the Post Office Depart- sults were issued to each post of- all employees in the craft unit reap
ing to Jimmy, the only reason he ment's new program for negotia- fice by the Post Office Department agreement s reiterate ut rp-
Norks his beds i closed season s tion and consultation on grievances, in Washington. resented regardless of employees'
bae f som of. his whoes t on and consulrataon on grievances, in Washington.
because some of his wholesale working conditions, personnel prac Here are the results of the local membership status. National agree-
competitors furnish oysters for tices and other related matters, post office: ments give local employee organi-
their customers and he feels he Postmaster Chauncey Costin report. United Federation of Postal nations the right to deal with the
ust do the same for his. some ... ed this week. Clerks, exclusive recognition. Na- postmaster on local working condi-
it ives his oyster crs omral inwork The move, developed by the tional Association of Letter Car- tions, personnel practices and in
during thesemonths of normal in- Postal Service under President riers, exclusive recognition resolving interpretations under the
activity. Kennedy's historic Executive Order "Exclusive" recognition was ac- local agreements.
PtEople in Port St. Joe can sym- 10988 of January 17, 1962, officially quired by employee organizations At the same time, the l4ational
pathize with his last reason. As for recognizes federal employee organ- having a clear majority of the votes agreements reiterate Executive Or-
the first, if this bill applies to all izations for the first time. Recogni- in a particular craft unit under der 10988's ban against strikes,
the state, the first reason would be: tion is based on results of the larg- prescribed voting procedures. The discrimination. They set forth
beside the point est nation-wide labor management postmaster will negotiate with management's prerogatives which
But th thought we have is this: election, held June 15 through July these organizations, holding regular are not subject to negotiation-s
if a person goes to the trouble to such as the budget, asisgnments of
hase a bead, pay for it cultivate it N personnel, work-technology or, of
and coax it to produce regularly F course, any matter determined by
the aaru hig o -Congress, such as pay rates. Postal
pend on his beds for the future as N -: management, under the Executive
well as the present. For this rea- ** Order, also retains the right to di-
sn, Le will protect his raw product -, S rect employees, to hire, promote,
in season and out. If harvesting transfer, suspend or separate em-
oysters is depleting his b, ployees in accordance with Civil
quit harvesting-in season or out. Service regulations.
The bill seems superfluous to Gk A report of the President's task


St. Joe Boat Club

Summer Cruise

Schedule Listed
Earl Creel, cruise master of the
St. Joe Boat Club has set up the
following cruises for the club dur-
ing the summer months.
April 21, Bay City Lodge, leave
1:00 p.m., Jim Fortner, cruise
leader.
May 5, St. Joe Point, leave at
2:00 p.m., R. F. Maxwell, cruise
leader.
May 19, Ft. Gadsden fish
fry, catch your own fish.
June 2, St. Andrews State Park
leave 9:00 a.m., L. E. Thursday,
cruise leader.
June 22 and 23, Ft. Walton and
return, leave 1:00 p.m., Silas R.
Stone, cruise leader.
July 21, Apalachicola Grill,
leave 1:00 p.m., Earl Creel, cruise
leader.
Adgust: 1, Chipola Cut-off,
leave 9:00 a.m., L. E. Thursday,
cruise leader.


POSTMASTER C. L. COSTIN (right) is shown presenting to President
John Williams of the Letter Carriers organization and President
W. L. Smith of the Postal Clerk's organization, the special Post
Office notice of the results of national organization elections held
June 15 through July 1, 1962. (Star photo)


force on Employee-Management re-
lations in the Federal Service-sub-
mitted to the President on Novem-
ber 30, 1961, before the issuance
of Executive Order 10988, said:
"representatives of the employee
organizations made it clear
that they are aware of these limi-
tations and are quite content to ne-
gotiate within them."
Postmaster General J. Edward
Day was a member of this task
force.
The employees of the Port St.
Joe post office now receiving of-
ficial recognition at the local level
for their employee organization,
join with employees in more than
30,000 post offices throughout the
Nation in acquiring official recog-
nition under the president's labor-
management order for federal em-
ployees.
Ten employee organizations rep-
resenting seven postal craft units
-letter carriers, clerks, rural car-
riers, maintenance-custodial, motor
vehicle, mail handlers, special de-
livery messengers-have been rec-
ognized.
The number of organizations rep-
resented at each post office varies,
according to the election results.


Progress Report Presented




Commission By Clerk


City Auditor and Clerk J. B.
Williams presented the City Com-
mission with a report of the past
year's accomplishments for the pe-
rusal of the Board.
Along with the report, Williams
presented a first quarter financial
statement which showed the City
to be in good financial condition.
Commisisoner Coldewey called
to the attention of the Board that
the financial condition was brought
about by a closer enforcement of
city ordinances rather than addi-
tional taxes. Coldewey praised the
Clerk and the Board for close en-
forcement of these ordinances.
Williams pointed out that during
the past year, the city has paid off
approximately $20,000.00 to special
assessment holders for unremitted
funds; paid off a $15,000 bank
loan and purchased over $32,000
in new equipment. The major items
are: tractor and mower, police car,
dump truck, pickup truck, garbage
lcad packer, fire hose, transit level,
accounting machines, validating
machine, calculator, power saw,
small welding-cutting outfit, trash
receptacles and a used truck for
the fire department water tank.
During this period the city has:
Installed sewer system in North-
ern part of city; built a city gar-
age; installed tin roof on the city
pier; installed lights on the tennis
court in the city park; completed
a new softball field with lighting;
completed fencing of Little League
ball park; authorized installation
of new mercury vapor lights on
both sides of Reid Avenue and
supplied materials for paint of
Stac House by the Jaycees.
Major ordinances passed by the
Board include a new city occupa-
tional business license ordinance
and a new city garbage ordinance.
Currently under way by the Board
is a new comprehensive zoning or-
dinance, which is now in its final
stages of development.
Projects currently under way in-
clude waterproofing and painting
the outside of the City Hall; paint-
ing and repairing the Centennial
Building; beautifying the grounds
at City Hall; beautifying the cen-
ter strip of Fifth Street; clearing
of the Forest Park area from Fifth
Street to 20th Street and beautify-
ing the cemeteries.

h MillerSr.
John Mler. Sr.


Dies In South Fla.
John L. Miller, age 79, of Mexico
Beach passed away April 15 in Win-
ter Garden.
Mr. Miller was a prominent lum-
berman for 30 years. He retired
in 1955 in Hosford.
He is survived by his widow,
one daughter, Mrs. Lucile Mc-
Dowell, Winter Garden; one son,
J. Lamar Miller, Port St. Joe; two
sisters, Mrs. Lila Harlow, Tallahas-
see and Mrs. Vera Sheehan, Do-
than, Ala.; one brother, T. W. Mil-
ler, Iron City, Ga., and three grand-
children, Mrs. Lester Arnold, Win-
ter Garden, John and Ann Miller
of Port St. Joe and three great
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held at
the Methodist Church, Iron City,
Georgia at 3:00 p.m. yesterday.
Evans Funeral Home of Donal-
sonville, Ga., was in charge of ar-
rangements.


Mrs. Mary Branch

Dies In Hospital
Mrs. Mary Susan Branch. age 79,
died in the local hospital Friday,
April 12. She was a resident of
Simmons Bayou.
Sne is survived by her husband,
Henry W. Branch; three sisters,
Mrs. Hattie Richards of Panama
City, Mrs. Lola Nolan, Gainesville
and Mrs. Omi Lynn of Panama
City; one brother, Mac Miller of
Simmons Bayou.
Graveside services were held at
3:00 p.m. Saturday afternoon with
Rev. L. D. Sellers of the Church of
God, Apalachicola officiating, al
Holly Hill Cemetery, Port St. Joe.
Comforter Funeral Home was in
charge of arrangements.


-A-


* *


Proposal Made For


Sewer Rate Change


Kiwanis Minstrel

Friday Night
The Port St. Joe Kiwanis Club
will present its annual Minstrel
Show tomorrow night at 8:00 p.m.
in the Elementary School Audi-
torium.
As has been the custom with
the annual event, the show will
feature entertainment from com-
edy, special acts and song.
Featured as end men in the
minstrel show this year will be:
Walter Dodson, Robert E. King,
Billy Joe Rish, George Wimberly,
Marion Parker and Jim Cox.
"Mr. Interlocutor" will be Bob
Freeman.
Other Kiwanians, Key Club
members and other friends of the
club will -make up the chorus and
specialty acts.
Funds derived from the show
is used by the Kiwanis Club to
carry on youth and scholarship
work each year.
Tickets are 99c each and are
on sale by any Kiwanis member.
Tickets will also be available at
the door to the show tomorrow
night.
The show this year has a com-
pletely new skit and is being
directed by Mrs. Winton Ferrell.


Team Sponsors

To Supply Umps
Umpire assignments for Dixie
League Season opening Monday,
April 22, have received a boost
with several sponsoring firms each
offering to provide an umpire for
18 games of the season. Individual
assignment of dates is now being
made.
Vitro, Ford-Western, Hard-Stars,
Container Division and Mill Divi-
sion of St. Joe Paper Company each
have signed to provide two umpires
for games each week. The umpires
will not officiate at games played
by the sponsor's team.
The Chief Umpire, Harry Babbit,
complimented these sponsors for
their whole-hearted support in de-
veloping the schedule. He stated
that arrangements are underway.
for the other sponsors to join in
the plan. The plan provides that
umpires scheduled by a team spon-
sor come first from fathers of
boys on the team, and secondly
from other men interested in the
youth baseball program whose boys
are not in the program.
It was pointed out that nine um-
pires from each team will result
in each man covering only two
games in the season. A volunteer
for umpire service should call the
sponsor if his boy is playing, or
Harry Babbit, chief umpire at 227-
5381.
Participation of parents is urg-


The City Board took the first
steps Tuesday night to put the big
water tank back into first class
condition.
Last year the City repaired the
old, smaller tank.
In repairing the large tank, steps
will be taken to make it usable for
its full capacity 'of 200,000 gallons.
Presently, due to a short stand-pipe
inside the tank, which allows it to
be filled only to a little over half
capacity.
Work will not start on the tank
until after school is out to hold
danger down to a minimum from
the work going on.
Change In Sewer Charges
Is Requested
Wesley R. Ramsey appeared be.
fore the Board Tuesday night ask-
ing that some changes be made in
the method of charging for sewer
services. Presently, a base charge
of $1.00 is made with a percentage
of the water bill over and above
the minimum charge also charged
for sewer services.
Ramsey pointed out that with the
grass watering season coming on,
the cost of watering lawns becomes
prohibitive due to the percentage
charge for sewer services.
The proposal was for a flat 12-
month charge of $1.50 per r..nth
for sewer, lowering the cost for
sewer in the summer months, but
in some instances, raising the cost
during winter months.
It was pointed out that from past
records, the city would lose no
revenue under the plan.
Most of the Commissioners ap-
peared in favor of the proposal
but elected to think of the matter
for a while.


Former Resident
Dies In Quincy

Rev. C. J. Buttram, passed away
Tuesday at 9:00 a.m. in the Quincy
Hospital. Rev. Buttram was the old-
est member of the South Alabama-
North Florida Methodist Confer-
ence and had spent 45 years as pas-
tor in this conference. Mr. Buttram
had been a frequent visitor to
Port St. Joe visiting his son and
family, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Butt-
ram, former residents.
Survivors are his widow, Mrs. C.
J. Buttram; three sons, Wayne of
Quincy, Glen, Auburn, Ala., Worth,
Dallas, Texas; two daughters,
Blanche of Marianna and Mrs. John
Lawrence of Auburn, Ala.; one
sister, Mrs. Julia Powers of Colum-
bus, Ga.
Funeral services will be held to-
day at 11:30 a.m. CST, at the Cot-
tondale Methodist Church with
burial in the Hopewell Methodist
Cemetery, 10 miles South of Flor-
ala, Ala.


a r F und1 D iv *


ed and expected to make this base- Utticially Tartea
ball program effective for the
youth and community at large. Members of the Gulf County
SChapter of the American Cancer
W o I Ct ll Society met Tuesday morning at
Woo s Fire Calls 9:30 a.m. for their kick-off meet-
ing in the St. James Episcopal Par-
Out Fire Dept. ish House.
Some 50 workers heard the main
A woods fire burned over two address by George Y. Core, Clerk
acres of pinelands in White City of the Circuit Court of Gulf Court
Monday afternoon, according to -himself a recent cancer victim.
County Ranger H. A. Hardy, appar- Core declared that cancer is one
ently caused by children playing of our enemies and the Cancer Sc-.
with matches. ciety is mobilizing an army to fight
The White City Volunteer Fire cancer from two "fronts"; the front
Department first contacted the of providing money for research
blaze and used their water supply and promoting the need for early
holding the fire from spreading medical investigation of suspected
until forestry units of the St. Joe cancer.
Paper Company could arrive and Core gave some of the statistics
plow the fire out. on cancer victims stating that one
The Port St. Joe volunteer fire person every two minutes will die
department was called upon for a in the United States from cancer
supply of water to help put out the this year. Core stated that records
blaze. (Continued on Page 4)









are encouraged to bring your chil- THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.
dren and young people. A nursery THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 1963
will be provided at the church for
infants and small children. Daytona Beach visited with Mr. and
Mr. and Mrs. Mitchner are active Mrs. C. H. McKnight over the week
lay-members of the First Baptist end. Mrs. McKnight is spending the
Church of Oxford, North Carolina. remainder of the week with the
Mr. Mitchner is a retail merchant McKnights. Mr. and Mrs. Walter
and spends his vacations and spare Wilder of Sneads spent the week
time in promoting Christian mis- end also with their parents, the
sions. McKnights and Mr. and Mrs. B. W.
Wilder.
Visit Parents --
Mr. and Mrs. Bob McKnight of SBad The Staz to a rriena.


.TELEPHONE: BAlI 7-4191
Sun., Frl., Holidays .- 2:41 p.m.
f on. thru Thurs. __ 4:41 p.m.

SATURDAY ONLY


Oak Grove C. A.'s Mrs. Petty Hostess

Have Banquet To Circle Two


The, C. A. class of Oak Grove
Assembly of:God Church held their
pre-Easter banquet in the Centen-
nial Building Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
It was planned by their leaders,
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Ellis. The
theme for the occasion was "In the
Garden", and was appropriate in
keeping with the Easter season.
The tables were the center of a
garden arrangement surrounded
by white picket fence decorated
with greenery and colorful flow
ers.
The program was opened by the
president, Kenneth Ellis.
Miss Dean Glass sang, 'The Beau-
tiful Garden of Prayer".
Misses Wanda Odum, Sue Odum,
Paula Lovett and Karen Stripling
sang, "In the Garden".
The pastor, Fred Hunt, was the
speaker for the evening and con-
cluded the program with prayer.

Houseguests
The Chris Martin's and Mrs. Bil-
ly F. Parrish had as their house-
guests over the Easter holidays,
Mrs. Martin's four sisters: Mrs.
Dick Jones and Mrs. Tom Owens
of Austin, Texas and Mrs. Hollis
McKnight and Mrs. Leo Page of
Ft. Worth, Texas.


Circle Two of the First Baptist
Church met in the home of Mrs.
P. W. Petty, Monday, April 15 with
eleven members and two visitors,
Mrs. Huffman and Mrs. Kerr, sis-
ters of Mrs. Petty, present. The
chairman, Mrs. W. L. Durant pre-
sided.
Mrs. W. C. Pridgeon, brought
the devotional from Ephesians 4:13
and presided over a panel discus-
sion entitled, "Enlistment for Mis-
sions".
The regular routine of business
was conducted with good reports.
Everyone was encouraged to pray
and visit during our revival.
Next meeting to be with Mrs.
Tom Parker, Sr., in May. Mrs. Joe
Bracewell dismissed the meeting
with prayer.
.9
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to acknowledge with
grateful appreciation your kind
expressions of sympathy during the
recent bereavement of our loved
one. Our special thanks and affec-
tion to those who sent so many
lovely flowers and cards, and a
most heartfelt thanks to Dr. Joe
Hendrix for his care and attention.
The family of
George W. Parrish


A wondsarjl
gift suggestion
give a
Brooaview
with an unusual
Box Card

SFor
Automatic
Wash and Wear
use an
EASY
COMBOMATIC


Gladiolus Circle

Has Meeting
The Gladiolus Circle of the Port
St. Joe Garden Club met last
Thursday afternoon in the home
of Mrs. David Jones.
Mrs. Cecil Hewett gave a pro-
gram on roses. She had gathered
information on the selection of
bushes, the preparation of the soil
and on planting.
A short business meeting was
held and Mrs. Jones served refresh-
ments to the six members present.


Eta Upsilon Meets

With Mrs. Freeman
Eta Upsilon Chapter of Beta Sig-
ma Phi met in the home of Mrs.
Greta Freeman for their regular
meeting with Mrs. Freeman as host-
ess. The meeting was called to or-
der by Mrs. Pauline McGill in the
absence of the president, Mrs..
Gladys Brown. The minutes of the
previous meeting was read by Mrs.
Dolores Cox and approved by the
group.
During the business session, a
report was presented concerning
the selling of drinks and hot dogs
during the band festival by the
ways and means chairman, Mrs.
Murlene Ward. Following the busi-
ness meeting, the program was pre-
sented by Mrs. Carol Rish based
on sculpture.
The meeting was closed with ev-
eryone saying the closing ritual in
unison. A social hour followed.


Jayceettes Plan

Bake Sale
The Port St. Joe Jayceettes met
Monday night for their regular
monthly dinner meeting at the St.
Joe Motel with nine members
present.
Mrs. Hulon Mitchell presented
the program on poise and charm.
she demonstrated ways to improve
ones appearance and gave many


helpful hints on how to obtain self
confidence.
Reports were given by the var-
ious committee chairmen and plans
were made to have a bake sale
Saturday, April 20 in front of
Campbell's Drug Store.


Ronnie Batson I


Feted At Party
Pictured above is little Ronny
Batson, who celebrated his sixth
birthday Tuesday, April 9 with
a party at the Jack and Jill Kin-
dergarten.
Helping Ronny enjoy this hap-
py occasion were Juanise Griffin,
Gary' McCroan, Cindy Wilson,
Gregg Norris, Craig Pippin, Jeff-
ery Powell, Mike Hammock,
Jacque Ard, Wade Stinson, Vicky
Richards, Steve Kramer, Ricky
Sweitzer, Suzanne McFarland and
Terri Lise Hinote.
_Games were enjoyed and tra-
ditional birthday cake was served
to the guests.
-'-
Ruth Lawrence Circle Meets
With Mrs. Joe Hendrix
! The Ruth Lawrence Circle of the
Woman's Society of Christian Ser-
vice of the First Methodist Church
met Monday morning at the home
of Mrs. Joe Hendrix with the
chairman, Mrs. W. D. Jones, pre-
siding. The inspirational program
was presented by Mrs. W. H. How-
ell, Jr., with the members taking
part.
The chairman of the supper
committee, Mrs. Joe Hendrix, then
completed plans for the every
member canvas supper which will
be held Thursday, April 25. The
meeting was then closed with the
WSCS benediction.

Revival Scheduled At
Highland View Assembly
Rev. 0. L. Thomas, will be the
evangelistic speaker at Revival
Services beginning at the High-
land View Assembly of God Church
on Sunday, April 21. The series of
special meetings will continue
throughout the week. Services will
be held each night at 7:45 p.m.
Special music, evangelistic ser-
vices and special events will be
featured each night, according to
W. G. Mizelle, Pastor of the church.
Everyone is invited to attend.
Thomas is the District Superin-
tendent of the Florida Association
of Assemblies of God.

SUPPORT THE SHARKS


Mission Program

At Long Ave Church
Mr. and Mrs. William Mitchner
will present a program of World
Missions at the Long Avenue Bap-
tist Church tonight, April 18 at
8:00 p.m. Mr. Mitchner is a mem-
ber of the Home Mission Board
and Mrs. Mitchner is a member of
the Foreign Mission Board, of the
Southern Baptist Convention. They
have toured the mission fields both
in America and abroad and are
currently on another tour of Home
Mission points which begun this
week in Miami and will carry
them to New Orleans and many
points west including California.
From California they will spend
some time in Hawaii before re-
turning home by way of Oregon
and Washington state.
The program in the Long Ave-
nue Church will consist of an "n-
teresting presentation of missions
by various means of visual aids
and brief talks by both Mr. and
Mrs. Mitchner. Everyone is invited
to attend and hear of the impact
of Christian Missions upon our
world. The program will be of in-
terest to the entire family. You


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THE StA, Port St. Joe, Pla. THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 1963




THE STAR '

Published Every Thursday At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
By The Star Publishiln Company

WESLEY R. RAMSEY Editor and Publisher
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Salesman, Photographer, Columnist, Reporter, Proof
Reader, Bookkeeper and Complaint Department
DIAL 227-3161 POSTOFFICE Box 308

Entered as second-class matter, December 19, 1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe,
Florida, under Act of March 3, 1879.

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, $3.00 SIX MONTHS, $1.75 THREE MONTHS, $127.50

TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such
advertisement.



Regardless of Who Collects Taxes;

The Total Is What Concerns Taxpayers

From the taxpayer's point of view, which agency collects
his taxes, or what way it does it, is of comparatively small
importance. The total tax bite is the big thing, for that de-
termines what he has left in his pay envelope to spend or save
or invest.
This pinpoints an aspect of proposed federal income tax
reductions that deserve a great deal more attention than they
have so far received.
This year, for instance, the social security tax was in-
creased again. The tax has collected more than $100 billion
in the 26 years since the program began, according to Oregon
Tax Research. And in the next six years alone it will take
in its second $100 billion.
Practically every state is looking for more revenue, to
be gained from sales taxes, excise taxes, income taxes, pro-
perty taxes, business taxes, hunting and fishing taxes, and
so on ad infinitum. You name a tax-and someone, some-
where is advocating it. The same thing is true of the other
governmental entities-municipalities, counties, school dis-
tricts, etc.
The moral, certainly, is plain. A cut in federal income
taxes will do little or nothing to stimulate investment and
consumption if it is largely offset by increases in taxes else-
where.
Compounding taxation is the path to bondage.
-Panama City News


While this is The News' opinion on the tax mess, it dif.
fers only slightly with our views.
We hate to have the stigma of the word "Republican'
in any way connected with our name but we have to
close our eyes, grit our teeth, rub our golden donkey and
admit that we agree with their point of view on- the tax prob
lem. If we retain all the services we have, and have come
to expect. and dream up even more things for government
to pay for, just as much money must be collected to pay the
bills, regardless as to who pays it.
We do not believe the country will be greatly benefitted


if the tax is taken off one item and put on another. lifted the intervening years his mind had
from one person and placed on another eliminate one generated the idea that a non-
deduction and create another. This is like shifting your bill- existant, but most historically ima
fold from your left to your right pocket and declaring the ly marked for the annals of Flor-
need for money different. ida's history. To do this he intro-
One proposal we have read has advocated that the fed- duced such a bill to the 1917 Flor-
e: al government return a percentage of taxes collected in a ida Legislature. Being a man of in-
state and a percentage to the municipalities for local dis- fluence as well as affluence lhe
bursement. This may work, but we think it would be to was able o intda'es government.ech In
the advantage of the taxpayer and the dollar would lose the year 1919, the honorable H. L.
less cents in the transfer, if the federal government would Oliver was again returned to the
reduce their take and their services: let the local govern- Senate, and this time, the bill hav-
ments, on state, county and city level collect and distribute ing been passed, appropriations
the tax monies. were made whereby the site of the
old City of St. Joseph, where Flor-
Like the Republicans, we feel that the only true tax idea's first Constitution was formed,
reduction that will be effective as purchasing power for the would be appropriately marked by
industry, business and individual populace of the United the Constitution Monument, and
States, will come as the result of less expenditures and less the site of Old Saint Joseph would
need of federal monies. henceforth be known and honored
as Florida's First Constitution
City. This proud memorial became
a reality in 1923, with appropriate,
S. fabulous celebration and festivities
Toying With Prayer and Bible Reading to mark the historic landsite and
n Wi l It h y and e l Re ng resurrect it from the dust of obli-
In Public Schools Is Dangerous Thing vion that had threatened to bury
it for all time. It is important to
note that the ancient tombstone
First patriotism became passe and now it begins to look and crypts were the only actual,
as if the agnostics are going to send things religious along standing memorials then to be
the same pathway. It is indeed sad that thinking people found of the old city's unparelelled
hi story, in Florida. Desecrated as
such as are presumably in our higher positions, would give they had been, yet they still re-
even a second thought to banning the reading of God's word mained to tell their moving story.
in schools or uttering the Lord's Prayer. Let us pause a moment to reflect
Some have questioned the definition of the word "reli- the lines from the immortal "Rubi-
gion". True, it does not mean fidelity to God alone. The yet" of Omar Khayyam: "The mov
word "religion" can be applied to anything we strictly ad- ing finger writes: and, having writ,
moves on: Nor all your piety nor
here to. We can be religious about brushing our teeth at wit shall lure it back to cancel half
6:00 a.m. each and every morning. a line, Nor all your teams wash out
There has been objection to reading of the Bible and a work of it."
the repeating of the Lord's Prayer in school because the Many years ago the enclosed
contention is "that it teaches the Christian religion" as op- property was donated outright to
posed to certain other sects and groups. the City by one of Northwest Flor-
The way we see it, removing the reading of the Bible ida's most beloved citizens of for-
from the everyday order of public schools for these reasons mer days James T. McNeill,
is, in fact, denying that the Bible is the word of God. And Sr., and with the passing of the
years some organizations of Port
the same Bible tells of harsh punishment for those who do St. Joe, sought to preserve these
not believe this fact. Refusal to permit the repeating of ancient reminders out of the dim
the Lord's Prayer, which is found word for word in the and distant past. At one time an
Bible, is also repudiating the diety of the Bible as the Word iron-link chain fence was erected
of God. Since this nation was founded on the freedom of by the city in its effort to preserve
part of this area, but with the pas-
worship and the admonition of the Lord, we can have nothing sage of the "l0d Gypsy's Caravan"
but fear for the future of any nation which would ban the this too, fell into decay.
reading of His word, at school, at home, or anywhere. In the year 1957 the St. Joseph
Historical Society was formed. A
CHILDHOOD SUSPICIONS CONFIRMED the urgence of Mrs. Hubert Brin
son, then the curator of Constitu
We were reading the other day where some scientist has tion Museum, (because of interest
proclaimed that the moon is not covered with rock and dust, aroused by visitors to the museum)
the recovering of the old cemeterS
but is in fact covered with a fuzz such as is found on a peach. had one of the first places on the
While Some may look askance at such a pronouncement St. Joseph Historical Society's
- we cannot help but cast a sideway word of approval of such agenda. The late J. L. Sharit, their
e an observance and proclaim that this is what all children Mayor of Port St. Joe, and a mem
t have told us for centuries. And everyone knows a child's ber of the Society, had the city
e knowledge in such things is infallible. erect a sturdy wire fence and en
listed the aid of the city workmen
This fuzz could be nothing more than the mold on the who, under the able direction o
I green cheese! P. W. Petty, grubbed and cleaned


the area and restored the broken-
into-vaults that are now preserved.
At our request the City appropriate
ed $100.00 to be used to purchase
shrubs and trees and have them
set out. Walter Coldwell, director
of the Florida Park Service, per-
sonally drew up for us a wonderful
sketch of how this area could be
beautified and made a sanctuary,
but, lacking sufficient funds, to
produce same, and also water sup-
ply to insure its beautification, a
handful of our members did their
best with the materials at hand.
Mrs. Fred Maddox secured from
the St. Joe Paper Company our
first marker to designate the place.
With the information of the Gulf
County Historical Commission, we
ultimately found a way to have an
appropriate marker erected by the
beneficient aid of our Gulf County
Commission and the Florida Biard
of Parks and Historical Memorials.


LEGAL ADVERTISING

IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. IN
PROBATE.
In Re: Estate of
SAMUEL BLAIR SHUFORD,
deceased.
NOTICE OF FILING PETITION
FOR FINAL DISCHARGE OF
ADMINISTRATRIX
TO ALL WHOM IT MAY
CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that I
have filed my final returns as ad-
ministratrix of the estate of Samuel
Blair Shuford, deceased; that I
have filed my petition for final dis-
charge, and that I will apply to the
Honorable S. P. Husband, County
Judge of Gulf County, Florida, on
April 29, 1963 for approval of the
same and for final discharge as ad.
ministratrix of the estate of Sam-
uel Blair Shuford, deceased.
/s/ LOIS HILL SHUFORD,
Administratrix of the Estate
of Samuel Blair Shuford, de.
ceased.
April 4, 1963. 4t-srs


I IN THE CIRCUIT COURTd GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA. In Chancery
SA W. MURPHY,
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
CANNIE B. MURPHY,
Defendant.
DIVORCE
NOTICE TO CANNIE B. MUR
t PHY who place of residence i
unknown.
On or before the 29th day of Ap
- ril, A.D. 1963 the defendant, Can
t nie B. Murphy is required to serve
u, upon Hon. Cecil G. Costin Jr.
SPlaintiff's Attorney, whose address:
Y is 221 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe
e Florida, a copy of and file with thi
s Clerk of said Court, the original o:
n an answer to the Bill of Complain
filed against her herein.
S Witness my hand and official
Y sea! of said Court at Wewahitchka
i- Gulf County, Florida, this 27th da:
, of March, A.D. 1963.
of GEORGE Y. CORE,
d ( Clerk Circuit Court.
d (Circuit Court Seal) 4t-3-28


LEGAL ADVERTISING
Tallahassee, Florida
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that the Trustees
"of the Internal Improvement Fund of the
State of Florida will offer for sale and ie-
ceive competitive sealed bids for a State
Drilling Lease for oil, gas, sulphur, salt
and/or brines, covering the interest of the
said Trustees of the Internal Improvement
Fund in the following described sovereignty
lands in the Counties of Escambia. Santa
Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf and
Franklin in the State of Florida, to-wit:
All sovereignty submerged and tidal lanis
including sandbars, shallow banks, and
islands seaward of the mean low water
line of upland, to the territorial boun-
dary of the State of Forida, being in
the Gulf of Mexico, bounded Westerly
by the Alabama-Florida boundary and
prolongation of the same due South
and bounded Easterly by a line projected
South 30 West from the Westernmost
point of St. George Island, and Sou-
therly by said territorial boundary three
leagues from the low water mark of
upland, the same including all soverign-
ty lands in and under inland waters of
Perdido Bay (Florida portion), Big
Lagoon, Pensacola Bay, Escambia Bay,
Blackwater Bay, East Bay, Santa Rsa
Sound, Choctawhatchee Bay, West Bay,
North Bay, St. Andrews Bay, Grand
Lagoon, St. Andrews Sound, St. An-
drews Inlet, Lake Powell (Phillips In-
let), St. Joseph Bay and St. Vincent
Sound, and the bayous thereof but not
including creeks, rivers and streams,
the sovereignty lands under inland wa-
ters aggregating 353,300 acres, more
or less and offshore waters and aggregating I,-
142,937 acres, more or less, the over-
all total being 1,496,237 acres, mje
or less.
Said Trustees have determined that the
lease shall require royalty payments of
one-eighth in kind or in value for oil and gas
produced from said lands and fifty cents
per long ton for sulphur, salt and/or other
brines produced from said lands, and an
annual rental of two cents per acre for
the lands in bays, bayous and sounds and
an annual rental of one cent per acre for
the area designated as offshore lands, the
annual rentals to increase five percent of
such original annual rentals after the first
two years. Primary term of the lease will
be ten years.
The bidding shall be on the basis of a
cash consideration for the lease, the amount
of which cash consideration shall include
offer of rental for the first year at the rates
stated above. Copy of the lease form is
available for inspection in the State Land
Office of the Trustees of the Internal Im-
provement Fund, Elliot Building, Tallahas-
see, Florida. The successful bidder will be
required to pay all costs of advertisement of
this Notice. All bids must be accompanied
by Certified or Cashier's Check for the full
amount of the cash consideration offered as
bid.
Sealed bids may be filed in the State Land
Office, Trustees of the Internal Improvement
Fund, Elliot Building, Tallahassee, Florida
in advance of the sale date hereinafter
Stated, or may be presented to the Trustees
Sat their meeting on sand date in advan.a of
" the opening of the bids. The sealed bids
will be opened and read at the meeting of
- the said Trustees May 14, 1963 at 10:00
A.M. (EST) in the Board Room of the Go"-
ernor's Office in the State Capitol Building,
Tallahassee, Florida. Said Trustees reserve
the right to reject any and all bids
S BY ORDER of the Trustees of the Inter-
nal Improvement Fund of the State of
Florida.
Farris Bryant, Governor
Attest: Van H. Ferguson
Director-Secretary 5t-4-11
IN COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT, GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE: Estate of JOSEPH F. CHRISTIAN,
deceased.
S NOTICE TO CREDITORS
You and each of you are hereby notified
P and required to present any claims or de-
f- mands which you or either of you may
e have against the estate of Joseph F. Chris-
tian, deceased, late of Gulf County, Florida,
I. to the County Judge of Gulf County, Florida,
S at his office in the Courthouse in Gulf
, County, Florida, within six calendar months
from the date of the. first publication of
this notice. Each claim or demand must be
f in writing and must state the place of resi-
t dence and post office address of the Iai-
mant, and must be sworn to by the Clai-
mant, his agent or attorney, or the same
1 will become void according to law.
, Dated this 10th day of April, A. D. 1968.
y sMARY C. CHRISTIAN,
Administratrix 4t-4-11
Dave. port, Johnston, Harris
and Urquhart
201 East 4th Street
Panama City, Florida


Given At Marker Dedication


- -.I.1.-__. U-,,i ; .- ----~-------"- -- ---- ;;--.- ---l--


Text of 'History of Old St.



Joseph Cemetery' Report


By Mrs. Ned S. Porter
(Reprinted below is the record
of history concerning the old
St. Joseph Cemetery, read by
Mrs. Porter at the dedication of
a marker at the cemetery site
two weeks ago today.)

The little that is known of this
particular memorial cemetery has
come to us mainly through the
writings of Dr. James Owen Knauss
the first qualified historian, in the
State of Florida, to give us unequi-
vocal data concerning this particu
lar last resting place.
Dr. Knauss, in his article, "The
Rise and Decline of the Old City
of St. Joseph," published 2sveral
times, beginning with 1927, in
"The Florida Historical Quarterly',
and at other times locally and by
the Florida Park Service, in pamph-
let form, informs us as to the why
and the wherefore of this specific
site. In his article there is men-
tion of three such cemeteries. The
other two, as of now, we have been
unable to locate and identify.
It is not my purpose, here and
now, to go into the history of the
old City of St. Joseph. I feel certain
most of you are aware, principally
because of our Constitution Mu.
seum, (and other information you
most likely are familiar with), that
for five years the old City of St.
Joseph had a meteoric and catas-
trophic history, of utmost import-
ance to our state, that ended in al-
most unbelievable tragedies and
disasters that swept the old city
from the face of the earth-and al-
most from the pages of history.
The first of these devastating catas-
trophies that struck the then young
and fabulous city, bringing about
its, partial demise, was the yellow
fever epidemic that ravaged the in-
habitants in the late summer and
fall of 1841.


Few of the tombstones and
crypts remaining here, excepting
that of Captain George L. L. Kup-
fer, of Boston (which is now kept
in our museum), are not thought to
be of the yellow fever victims, be-
cause, when that dire tragedy
struck, in all of its ferocity, there
would have been no time or con-
ditions for erecting proper head-
stones and building such time-resis-
tant brick and mortar crypts as you
find remaining today. The great
majority of the yellow fever vic-
tims, it is logically believed, had
to be buried in trenches. The Cap-
tain Kupfer, already mentioned, is
thought to have been the first vic-
tim of the epidemic, the disease
having been brought to this ill-
fated port by his schooner "Herald"
from the Greater Antilles.
From excellent authority, an el-
derly Apalachicola citizen of integ-
rity, John Glass, now deceased, I
learned that after the War Between
the States, during "Reconstruction
Days", numerous ancient brick
crypts and graves were torn into
and unbelievably desecrated and
molested by vandals and marau-
ders, searching undoubtedly for
jewelry, and the like, they hoped
to find on those here interred. It
was known that here were buried
some of the wealthiest men of Ter-
ritorial Florida, some of her most
illustrious statesmen and renown-
ed journalists, together with their
families. The cemetery area, now
enclosed by a fence, is thought to
be but a parcel of the area involv-
ed.
In an article appearing in "The
Apalachicola Times", October 11,
1902, supposedly written by a Rev-
erend Harrison, who with his wife,
made the trip with "Young Charlie
Mahon", driving the horse and bug-
gy vehicle from Apalachicola to
Yellow Bluff, (now Beacon Hill


Beach), in order to attend the wed-
ding of the memorable Gustave G.
Hensler to a Mrs. Helen Bryan of
Wewahitchka, at the home of the
bride's mother, Mrs. E. K. Hunter
at Beacon Hill. In the course of
the trip, over over-grown trails, the
party came upon the remains of
the old cemetery and paused long
enough to write down the names
and dates on the headstones and
number the brick vaults they found
then in existence. In 1902 there
were only three or four additional
vaults and headstones other than
are to be found here today. The
writer of this article also verifies
the story of the vandalism and de-
struction that had taken place in
the intervening 60 or more years.
Under dateline, April 12, 1912,
"The Apalachicola Times" carries
the story of an automobile caval-
cade organizing and originating at
Apalachicola, traversing the beach
area and traveling on to the Town
of Saint Joe. This cavalcade was
organized and trip made in order
to create interest in building good
roads between the two towns by
way of the beach route. The driver
of one of the cars, a prominent
young "Beau Brummel" of Apala-
chicola, in crossing what was thot
to be just an overgrown field thick
with palmettos, wiregrass, scrub
oak and other native growth, ran
headlong into a marble shaft that
marked the resting place of an
evidently prominent man of an-
other land and bygone era. Being
of intelligent and inquiring mind
he called the cavalcade to a halt
and all disembarked. What they
found in surrounding areas evident-
ly impressed Homer Lee Oliver. I
arrive at this conclusion from th-
simple fact that in 1917, five years
In'-1 W.-- T --e ee vr w-. s eec-.


later, Homer Lee Oliuver was elect-
ed to the Senate from this then
Fifth District of Florida. During


- I II_II


facts about paper


federal taxes





paid annually by paper and allied products producers-

amount to close to $600,000,000.


million


This message by ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY, Port St. Joe, Florida,

in behalf of the Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Industry.









S-5 Robert Gibson
Assigned To Ft. Benning

FORT BENNING, GA. (AIITNC)
-Army Specialist Five Robert' C.
Gibson, 28, son of Charles L. Gib-
son, Port St. Joe, recently was as-
signed to the 11th Air Assault Di
vision rt Fort Benning, Ga.


.




100 Extraj
vlaid stamps2
With this coupon and
[ Purchase of $5 or More
Redeemable only at A&P stores
giving Plaid Stamps in Florida,
lARL. 63-41
Coupon good thru April 21



00so Ex-tr








r id S. njp
With this Coupon & purchase of
JohAntiseptic 14 Oz. Bottlean
isterant -Wax $1.89c
Coupon good through April 21



SO Extra


Coupon good t h l












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-J Ea. of the Following Items
-A

EXCEDRIN -- ---btl. of 60 93c
Scott
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Box of 100
OUR OWN TEA BAGS ----- 95c
Welch's Quart Cans
Apple-Grape Drink -.. 3 cans $1.00
14 Oz. Bomb
HOT SHOT BUG KILLER -----89c
Comstock Pie "
SLICED APPLES .20oz.can 27c
Wizard-With the Purchase off Label
Bathroom Deodorizer Followingtem59c
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Crosse & Blackwell--7 O. Cans
Choc Nut Roll ....-------2 cans 49c
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Gillette Super
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With the Purchase of
BEa. of the Following Items
Choc "No Coupons Necessary"

Del Monte
Breakfast Prunes --- 2 lb. box 63c
Pkg. of 50
Ideal Spring Clothespins --- 45c
Ann Page--3 Oz. Pkg.
Sparkle Gelatin .... 4 pkgs. 29c
Ann Page
Garden Relish ---- 10 oz. jar 25c
A&P Instant-133- Oz. Box
Choc. Flavored Drink F- box 33c
Hormel Dinty Moore
BEEF STEW Pr.. 24 oz. can 49c
Knorr Soup Mixes --- pkg. 37c
Ravo Gold Kist
PEANUT OIL- ---- qt. bot. 63c
Dessert' Topping
GLUCKY WHIP s:h 9_ 1/2 oz. 53c
JanemP In- 3 O. Ber
Glamour qeti:-- lb. loaf .25c


The division, the only unit of its He is a 1952 graduate of Port St.
kind in the Army, was formed last Joe High School. His mother, Mrs.
Ffbrumry in order to develop and Belle Blakeslee, lives on Route 2,
implement Army air-ground corn- Blakely, Ga.
bat tactics. The air assault unit is -,
designed to achieve surprise and
gain tactical advantage in combat GI Insurance Must
through the use of aircraft. Be Pa idPromptly
Specialist Gibson, a helicopter P mptly
incchapic in the 507th Transporta-
tion Detachment, entered the Army The habit of "riding the 31-day
i. 31956. grace period" has caused the lapse


"Super-Right" Fine Quality Heavy Western


Beef Steaks


Boneless Top Round
Boneless Full Cut Round
Boneless Minute Cubed
YOUR CHOICE, LB.


88c


Allgood Brand Sugar Cured Sliced


CO


Lb. Pkg.


74C


1 Lb.
Pkg.


Extra Fancy Win
APPLES

Fresh Ripe
STRAWBERI


Jane Parker Gold or Marble


SPECIAL!


of GI insurance policies for many THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.
hundreds of veterans in recent THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 1963
years, the Veterans Administration
said this week. that monthly payment that they
Too many veterans on "grace may be running behind, bven if
they have been making their pay.
period" time forget their final ments each time during the grace
deadlines, and eventually allow period.
Jhcir policies to lapse, often a a
time when their dependents need
protection the most, J. J. Hill, Ralph Swatts, Jr.
County Service Officer, said.
Hill advised veterans to make up Completes Sales Course


Ralph A. Swatts, Jr., a salesman
on the staff of St. Joe Motor Com-
pany, Port St. Joe, has been certi-
fied as a graduate of the retail
salesmanship course conducted in
Tallahassee recently by a staff in-
structor of Ford Motor Company's
Atlanta Marketing Institute.
Course completion was announc-
ed by L. C. Brock, director of the
Ford Institute.
The week-long course, taught by
R. E. Busch, Institute instructor,
included fundamentals of salesman-
ship, specific individual assign-
ments, and group participation in

simulated retailing situations.
The Atlanta Marketing Institute
annually enrolls more than 2,500
sales specialists of Ford Motor
Company products from a ten-state
area.

Lunchroom Menu
Highland View Elementary
Monday, April 22
Pig in basket, English peas, cab,
bage, apple and raisin salad, pine-
apple pudding, corn bread and
milk.
Tuesday, April 23
Cubed steak, buttered corn, let.
tuce and tomato, apple sauce,
brownies, buttered bread and milk.
Wednesday, April 24
Barbecued beef on bun, butter
beans, toss salad, orange slice cup
and milk.
Thursday, April 25
Sheppard pie, apple crisp, hot
rolls and milk.
Friday, April 26
Fried fish, toss salad, English
peas, fruit jello with whipped
cream, corn bread and milk.









GaLL


AHE
















S:4'-







4 4


aesap
3 lb. bag 49c


RIES pt. 29c

White Beauty


Shortening


CB.
CAN


49c


Special Sale! A'P Coffees!
EVERY POUND CUSTOM GROUND TO F 'l YOUR OWN COFFEEMAKERI
MILD & MELLOW ICH I A mU400I 1Os M os % W
EIGHT O'CLOCK RED CIRCLE BOKAR COFFEE


L.B49c 55c W59c

3-th.Bag $145 3-th.Iag $15 3 Abte $69


XIELK


. -*


With $5.00 or More Order!

PI.AIDe S'TAMPS 5510 Fifth Street
PAlIC TA OY ,Prices in this ad are good
through Sunday,
April 21


50 Million Workers Could
Qualify For Disability

Over 50 million workers have
enough work credits to qualify for
disability benefits under the Social
Security program if they become
disabled, according to John V. Ca.
rey, District Manager of the Pan.
ama City, Social Security Office.
The number of workers insured for
disability payments continues to
increase by about 2 million a year,
Carey said.
Cash disability benefits were first
paid in July 1957. Now, less than
six years later, more than 700,000
disabled workers get total payments
goes to 500,000 dependents of these
workers. In all, well over one mil-
lion people get about $76 million
a month in benefits under the So-
cial Security disability program.
Carey said that many people had
lost badly needed money because
they delayed in making their bene-
fit claims. Many workers delayed
their claims because they had not
heard about cash disability bene-
fits under Social Security.
Too requirements must be met
to qualify for disability payments,
Carey added. First, the worker


needs at least five years of work
credits. These five years of work
credits must have been earned in
the 10-year period just before he
claims his disability payments.
Second, he must be too disabled to
do any substantial work.
In judging the worker's ability
to work, the Social Security Ad-
ministration considers not only the
worker's physical condition. His
education and experience are also
taken into account. If, considering
all these factors, the worker is
found disabled to do any work, he
gets disability payments. Partial
or temporary disabilities are not
covered by the law, Carey empha-
sized. He also pointed out that dis.
ability benefits are not paid until
the seventh month of disability.
Since it takes time to collect all
the medical evidence and other in-
formation, disabled workers should
not wait to claim these payments.
"If your doctor says your disability
will be permanent, come to the So-
cial Security office right away",
Carey concluded.
The Social Security office for
this area is located at 1135 Harir-
son Ave., Panama Coty, phone PO
3-5331.


$2183.00 -


ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY
322 Monument Ave. Phone 227-3737


ONS





ADE4~-

I- 7pr"f


-imm


...WITH


QUICK RECOVERY WATER HEATERS
There i onl-, one r'eas-'n for a water heater
in ,our houL e to heat v.ater fast.
Whet-her it s a standard model or able top,
no matter ...here jou inrsall it (you can
Sp.It an electric: .-.,ater hearer in Ihe garage,
utility roon or e.en under kichen and
Sb ,ithroon-m co.r,nters-there s no flue), elec-
Siric: g,.e' a super-fasl, continuous sup-
of 150 degree hot ..*.aier.
/And ,iz afe No flame means no
Sjrres no pilot light.


Uima


PLASTIC

LAUNDRY



J asket


,P6


imm


--~-` --


Ni





-..... ~.. .. ..'-.I lisirrr;~gi--w~awm


SENTENCED FOR 99 YEARS and 364L DAYS


SJudge i. M. Meany (Better known as the hanging judge) sentenced WOOD'S
PRICES. Many tears were shed by the people of Port St. Joe and Gulf County
plan and let MR. STAMPS, MR. COUPONS AND MR. GIMMICKS take over as


DISCOUNT FOODLINER TO 99 years and 364V2 days for the murder of Mr. HIGH FOOD
because they were afraid that Wood's would have to drop their everyday low price
they have in other supermarkets.


Judge 1.. Meany then offered to suspend the sentence if WOOD'S would continue their Everyday Low Prices. Ed Woods, the spokesman for the convicted group,
jumped to his feet and promised that Wood's would continue to have the lowest grocery prices from Jacksonville to New Orleans. The Gulf County people jumped
with joy and thanked the hanging judge, I. M. Meany, for his services to the community.


Sentenced To Continue Everyday Low Prices!


NO STAMPS


IGA BONUS SPECIAL

,,.. aA. .


- s~


- NO COUPONS


- NO GIMMICKS JUST EVERYDAY LOW PRICES!!!


YOU DO NOT HAVE TO S OP ANY SPECIAL TIME OF THE DAY OR WEEK TO


YOU DO NOT HAVE TO SHOP ANY SPECIAL TIME OF THE DAY OR WEEK TO
GET THE

liomis pc 5 at wood's Iiscou.nt Foodliler
Vi WANT O'R CUSTOMER'S TO SHOP AT THEIR CONVENIENCE AND ENJOY
THE OUTSTANDING SAVINGS


BONUS SPECIAL


TIDE
Giant AC
Box 59M


PERFECTION FANCY (BONUS BUY) SERVE WITH HOT BISCUITS (BONUS BUY)

Long rain Rice BS. 3c Blackburn Syrup No. J39
COMET Large Size BALLARD Plain or Self Rising (BONUS BUY) CASTLEBERRY Barbecue
CLEANS2 s 25c FLOUR 5 S. 39c SAUCE .1oz. 29c


iFLGER'S 6 iiZ. JAR
N a t,&-mIN


COFFEE


PLANTER'S COCKTAIL PEANUTS 12 oz. can 35 C
[GA CREAM 303 CAN
GOLDEN CORN 15c
GREEN GIANT PEAS No. 303 Can 19c
DEL MONTE 8 OZ. CAN
TOMATO SAUCE 9c
B & B CROWN or SLICED MUSHROOMS 3 oz. can 33c
16 OZ. CAN
V-8 JUICE 33c
SUNSHINE No. 2Y2 Can
SPICED PEACHES 31c
QUART CAN

CG HALF SIZE CAN
_-''u AtA 4,A 25C
Sa .', CA 5 cON

IGA 18 OZ. JAR
Peanut BUTTER 39c


[(A 20 OZ. JAIR
GRAPE JELLY


31c


PACKAGE OF 13
Jumbo PIES
[GA QUART JAR
MAYONNAISE


AUNT WICK'S Each Package Makes Two Quarts
FLA-VOR-AID 6 IKGS. 19c
SLICED POUND
Muchmore BACON 39c
POUND
Cubed & Sirloin Steaks 89c
POUND
Round STEAK 89c
POUND
Shoulder ROAST 59c
Ground BEEF POUNDS 1.29
12 Ounce Packages Chuck
FRANKS 3 pkgs.$1.00 ROAST Ib. 49c


FRESH PRODUCE


Large Ctn. Fancy
Tomatoes
Large Stalk Pascal
CELERY


39c

49c


Port St. Joe, Florida
April 17,18,19,20


CTN.


15e


10l


- II I ~ I,


~F:~


79c








From The Florida Agricultural Extension Service


Gardening In Florida...


By HERVEY SHARPE
Trees have habits; like some peo-
ple-they dripk a lot. One good
trait of tree---they don't drive
while drinking, but they do thrive
while drinking.
If your trees are not thrifty, per-
haps they are showing signs of hun-
ger and thirst. Water plus adequate
quantities of nitrogen, phosphorus
and potassium are necessary to
keep trees from looking as if they
were "three sheets in the wind."
Most Florida soils are dificient
in NPK plant foods. As a result of


these deficiencies, trees make poor zer for each inch diameter of the
bud development, show unhealthy tree.
color, drying branches, and in gen- Flowers
oral make poor growth. Don't delay planting annual seed
Trees will usually perk up their another day. Prepare a small area
lav es if you apply a 12-12-12, or in one corner of the garden in a
similar analysis fertilizer, into the well-protected spot. This is a good
ground near their feeder roots. Ap- idea, because seedlings have a bet-
ply the fertilizer through a series ter chance to survive attacks by
of crowbar holes made about one birds, scratching sessions by dogs
foot apart beginning at the tree and cats, and trampling by roving
trunk and extending as far out .is bands of young cops-'n-robbers.
the tree branches. The total amount Prior to planting, work the soil
of plant food to pour into the holes until it is loose and friable, add
should equal one pound of fertili- a sprinkling of garden fertilizer to


Marvin's Standard Service Station
Corner Monument and Second St.
Rich and Sons Super Market
205 Third St.
DeLuxe Laundry and Dry Cleaners
107 Second St.
The Star Publishing Co.
306 Williams Ave.
Costin's Department Store-
209 Reid Ave.
Harden's Dairy
Wewahitchka, Florida
Roche Furniture & Appliance Store
209 Reid Ave.


Mabel's Beauty Shop
1109 Monument Ave.
St. Joe Motor Company
322 Monument Ave.
Florida National Bank
502 Fifth St.
Vida's Cafe
307 Reid Ave.
Murdock's Radio and TV
411 Reid Ave.
Pridgeon Insurance Agency
301 Williams Ave.
Campbell's Drug Store
210 Reid Ave.


the surface, and then mix the
plant food into the top four inch-
es of the soil. Water the area well,
rake it smooth, and then sow the
seed in the shallow trenches that
are about twice the diameter of
the seed in depth.
There are a smore or more an-
nuals that can be seeded now. One
is the ageratum. Varieties of this
low growing border plant produce
blue, lavender-pink, golden yellow
and creamy white blossoms.
Celosia, either the cockscomb or
feather type, will give a brilliant
show of color during the hot
months ahead. Color-wise yo.i can
choose fiery red or golden yellow
For tall, lanky background flow-
ers, try the four-foot cosmos. They
maP e good cut flowers and produce
jdiuk, white, crimson and roqe col.
ored blossoms.
If vnou like to a.aden in thp


and high potash fertilizer for THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.
plants set in muck or peat soils.
Here is a tip on how to make a __
raised flower bed around the base
tof a tree without posisbie damage
to the tree.
Construct an inner and =n outer -
masonry wall to contain the bed.
Build the inner wall close to the
circumference of the tree-allow- -
ing ample space for tree growth.
The distance between walls and -
the height of the walls depend on -__
the size of the bed you desire.


Highway Patrol

Urges Check-up
-'For Your Auto- ,'
oFr Your Auto


U- ". TALLAHASSEE--"Don't gamble
shade during th ehot days, plant with your life. Check your car for
sultanas, also known as impatiens. safety sake," urged Florida High-
Ctber annuals to plant now in- way Patrol Comdr. H. N. Kirkman
chme marigolds, dwarf salvia or this week.
scarlet sage, wishbone flowers, rose
moss zinnias, four-o-clock, petunia, He described it as one of the
mnonflower and periwinkle, best life insurance policies against
When transplanting annuals, be what might happen to you while
sure to feed them a liquid diet. Uni- driving this upcoming summer.
varsity of Florida specialists say t. "Many a person who wouldn't be
,r*ettle the roots of the newly set caught dead in a gambling casino,
plants with a pint of fertilizer-rich has literally been caught dead by
water. Add two tablespoons of a the gamble of riding in an unsafe
commercial fertilizer pe: gallon of car," the veteran officer declared.
water for plants set in sandy soil He went on to emphasize that in
and a like amount of low nitrogen many accidents on our highways


`OLOR TV BARGAIN BU/


RCA VICTOR MARK 8 COLOR TV
Glare-proof High Fidelity Color Tube
Power-boosted New Vista Colot
Chassis
Only Two Controls Make Tuning Easier
Precision-crafted Space Age Circuitry
75000 O59500 With workable
Trade-In

ST. JOE RADIO and TV SERVICE


308 Fourth Street


Phone 227-4081


THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 1963


WE CONGRATULATE

Governor Farris Bryant on his


"Florida Greeter" Program

We Are Proud To Cooperate With The Governor in This Project And

WE INVITE ALL OUR CUSTOMERS IN THE

PORT ST. JOE AREA
To Also Cooperate By
Extending Friendly Greetings To Our Visitors and Newcomers

We Are Sponsors Of


Florida Greeting Service, Inc.
Which has been Greeting Newcomers to Florida Cities since 1950

All Of The Undersigned Sponsors Have Been Designated
OFFICIAL "FLORIDA GREETER" INFORMATION CENTERS
We Invite All 'Newcomers And Others To Visit Us!
-Look for the "FLORIDA GREETER" Sign-


last year, a vehicle in "need of me-
chanical repair" was right in there
doing its part to lower the popula-
tion.
"People who are killed in acci-
dents because of the unsafe condi-
tion of their vehicle, are bigger
gamblers-with greater odds stack-
ed against them-than the fellow
who plays against a stacked deck
and more likely to lose a far more
precious stake-his life."
Here is a check list, follow thru,
for your own safety sake:
Brakes, headlights and back


lights ,stop lights, tires, wheel
alignment, exhaust systems, wind-
shield wipers, glass, horn and rear-
view mirror.

CARD OF THANKS
Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Alexander
wish to thank their scores of
friends for the many lovely atten-
tions in visits, notes, flowers and
other gifts while Mrs. Alexander
was hospitalized twice recently at
the Municipal Hospital. All these
gracious indications of friendship
were greatly appreciated.


Only Batter Whipped Sunbeam

tastes so good!


Telephone your Chevrolet dealer for any kind of truck.


-Floyd Chevrolet Co.
401 WILLIAMS AVENUE


This Tenderness Test Proves It!
See how evenly Sunbeam Bread tears!
It's this smooth, tender texture that
locks out staling air and guards
Sunbeam's oven fresh flavor and good-
ness. It's Batter Whipped, mixed in small
batches at high speeds- that's why!
Try the Tenderness Test today! Get j
Batter Whipped Sunbeam Bread at
your favorite grocer's!

Su
^ r'-.^^ ^ ^ ^ _l

4k%,'s ^
^%&i~~~~~~ !* "Sf^Bpniiri.


PHONE 227-2221


PLENTY REASONS TO BE HAPPY-It's little wonder
this Flowers Sunbeam bread salesman is so happy. Who
wouldn't be in the company of "Miss Batterwhip"-
luscious Linda Lehew of Florida State University. She's
extending best wishes to Owen Elkins, Port St. Joe area
salesman, as he goes after a week's paid vacation and
prizes totaling $3,000 in the company's spring sales cam-
paign just launched. Left to right, they are: Gerald
Kirkland, District Manager, Miss Lehew, and Owen
Elkins.


- r I I I


.~..~.


- -- ---- ----


,, -- II







SPRING BRINGS A FRESH LOOK TO PRODUCE, JITNEY OFFERS IT iT


DOUBLE
GRAND


P R IZE


SPECIALS GOOD THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY
MONDAY and TUESDAY APRIL 18, 19, 20, 22, 23


STAMPS
WEDNESDAY'S


~'~; ~*~'


CHUCK


ROAST


FREE 1,000 Grand Prize
Stamps with purchase of .
a side of Dubuque Fine
S A 4 Western Beef
Side of Beef
Cut and Wrapped
Hinlb. 49c
Hind Quarter


Cut and Wrapped
lb. 5,9c
Boneless
Stew Beef


Grade 'A' Whole


FRYERS


LB.


Ib. 59c LB.
Beef
Short ibs
lb. 39c
Beef Shoulder
ROAST
E~ ~~~b 59C .*^ Ky^


A ,f


FREE 500 Grand Prize
Stamps with each quarter
of Dubuque Fine Western
Beef
Chuck Steak
lb. 49 c
Front Quarter
Cut and Wrapped
Ib. *43c
Dubuque's Pure Pork
Sausage
lb. roll 25 c
Brisket 0
Stew Beef
Ib. 25c
Dubuque's Fresh Pork
Small and Tender
Spare Ribs
lb. 39c


Fresh Ground

BEEF


LBS. 99C


'ii\


JITNEY JUNGLE SPECIAL
S T 100 Free G P Stamps
I Twin Pack 49 C with coupon and purchase of
20 Gallon
STOKELY CATSUP _GrgeC
14oz.bot. 17c


Royal Crown
Canned Beverages
5 Cans 49c


ARMOUR'S STREET
12 oz. can 43 c


TETLEY TEA 1c SALE
64 count 69 C
BUY 48 TEA BAGS AT REGULAR PRICE
AND GET 16 MORE FOR Ic


50 Free G P Stamps
with coupon and purchase of
1 Qt. Jitney Jungle
Mayonnaise


Fresh Lean and Meaty

Pork Chops


50 Free G P Stamps
with coupon and purchase of
$5.00 or More


50 Free G P Stamps
with coupon and purchase of
1 Qt. or V2 Gallon
AEROWAX


25 Free G P Stamps
with coupon and purchase of
Any 4 Pkgs. McKenzie
Frozen Foods
$


50 Free G P Stamps
with coupon and purchase of
I Qt. Black Flag
Insect Spray


HOOD E-Z
LIQUID STARCH
qt. bottle 18c
WEAREVER
ALUMINUM FOIL
roll 27c
JITNEY JUNGLE
SWEET POTATOES
No. 212 can 23c
WALDORF
TOILET TISSUE
10 rolls 83 c
ALL PURPOSE DETERGENT
SUPER SUDS
2 1g. pkgs. 47c


Double Grand Prize

Stamps on Wednesday


These Bargains Plus

Grand Prize Stamps


Produce


Green Head
CABBAGE
2 lbs. 7c


Cantaloupes
3 FOR
O1.00
Firm Head
LETTUCE
head 17c
Fresh
Strawberries
pt. 39c


I Lb.
Can


49c


Limit One With $5.00
Order or More


Frozen Specials
Morton's
Meat Pies
Beef, Chicken, Turkey
4 for 89c
Pet Ritz 8" size
Creme Pies
Choc., Cocoanut, Lemon
and Banana
ea. 47c o
Meal Time Maid
Veal Cutlets
Sib. pk. 79c
Meal Time Maid
Cube Steaks
lb. pk. 79c


SUGAR


5. 39c
Limit One With $5.00
Order or More


- 4-


'a


''


1.0


'I


a


nA


90,


COFFEE








Smon, 1905 Juniper Ave., announce
the birth of a baby girl, Virginia
Kay on April 13.
aMr. and Mrs. Herschel Thomas
Dean, Jr., 904 10th Street announce
the birth of a daughter on April
13.
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Elmo McClam-
Mr. and Mrs. Troy Gay, 131 Hun- ma, 212 Garrison Avenue, announce
ter Circle announce the birth of a the birth of a baby boy, Larr Gene
baby girl on April 14. on April 8.
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Lyle Sick- Mr. and Mrs. James Edward Mar-







AMESICA FAVORITE
RR.- ,




-. .


No other wall paint has
ever won such a big "OK"!
NEW ECONOMY- goes farther per gallon.
NEW DURABILITY- looks better longer.
NEW WASHABILITY--finger prints and smudges
wash away without a trace. I
NEW EASY PAINTING all the skill you need is
in the paint.
NEW COLORS--bring more beauty to your rooms.
NEW MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE-purchase price
of paint refunded if you're not completely satisfied,

WILEY'S SUPPLY CO.
232 Reid Ave. Phone 227-7281









and SELF SERVICE LAUNI
with NEW MAYTAG WASHER
LAUNDRY OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7:00 A.A


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.
THURSDAY, APRIL IS, 1963
low, 803 Marvin Ave., aR'lounce
the birth of a daughter, Laurel
Candace on April 8.
Colored Births
lvir. and Mrs. Howard Garland,
170 Ave. F announce the birth of
a boy, Darryl Aro n onApil 11.
(All births occurred at thie Port
St. Joe Municipal Hospital.)

BOWLING NEWS
MORNING COFFEE LEAGUE
By Maxine Jensen
Jitney Jungle and the IGA bowl-
ed their games on lanes 1 and 2
w:th Jitney Jungle taking three of
the four possible points. Linda
Stewart led her team with a 384
series. Evelyn Smith was next with
376. Lois Smith, Verna Burch and
Ann Whittle finished with series
!cf 375, 360 and 336 respectively.
1 Maxine Smith was high for the
IGA with her 364 series. Jean Ste-
bol followed with a 359. Sally
White and Elaine Ernst supported
with their series of 328 and 268
On lanes 3 and 4, Ed's Florist
and the St. Joe Laundry met with
Ed's Florist making off with all
four points. Maxine Jensen had
bigh game an series for the lanes
with a 177 game and a 436 series.
Elise Rodgers was next with a
3f'9 series. Wynell Burke, Mary
Brown and Jean Dennis had series
of 359, 363 and 356 to help Ed's
take their points. Dot Creamer was
high for the IGA with a 341. Dot
Koller had a 310 series. Betty
Whitehurst, Lou Taylor and Mary
Roberts had series of 295, 293 and
266.
Team Standings W L
Jitney Jungle ------- 85 S5
Ed's Florist 75 45
St. Joe Laundry ------- 48 72
IGA 34 86


BOYLES Continues Profit Slashing

Campaign With Sweeping After-Easter

Clearance! (Must Sell. Profit or no!)
The 'Proof 'Lies In Prices Some Are Quoted Below!


A Truly Fabulous Group of
Carefully selected, Proudly
labeled, Spring and Summer
D R 'E SSE S
3331% OFF
This is startling right at the be-
ginning of the season, but Mrs.
B. says, "It's time to move 'em
out hit 'em hard". Sizes for
Junior, Misses and Women.
Men's Sewell
SUMMER SUITS
Dacron and wool, dacron, nylon
and mohair and other favorite
fabric blends.
20% OFF
Our regular cash price
Shorts, regulars and slims. Col-
legiate and conservative models.
34 to 46.
Beautiful, Perfect Quality
NYLON HOSE
In Summer's lovely shades
39c Pair
Made to sell for 59c pair. You
may have the profit! Sizes 8%
to 11.
Cool, Comfortable and
Attractive
Jamacia Short Sets
4I 00


Ladies Dressy
Spectator Pumps
Regular Price $8.99
Clearance Price
$6.99
Narrow and medium widths.
Black and white and brown and
white. Pretty as can be!
Entire Stock Ladies and
Children's Spring and
SUMMER HATS
33'Y3% OFF
Our Regular Low Cash Pricel
They're the newest styles of the
season. They're pretty!
Men's Triple Stitched
10 Oz. Heavy Duty
DUNGAREES
$2.00 Pair
Compare quality with a $2.99
garment anywhere. Sizes 28 to
t2. Assorted lengths.
A Clearance Group of
Children's
LEATHER SANDALS
Made to sell for $2.99
now only $1.99
White, tan and brown (not all
sizes in a style) but sizes for
toddlers up to large 3.


COMMERCIAL LEAGUE n ..
Alleys 1 and 2 saw Roche's take Ladies sizes 10 to 18. Sanforized Extra Values in Cool
it on the chin for the first game. and clean cut. CANVAS FOOTWEAR
but then they dished it out the
hard way and ended up with 3 vic- Children's
stories over Florida National Bank. SHORT SETS
Wayne Smith rolled 576 followed SHORT SETS Ladies oxfords and slip-ons in
by Williams with 480. Jerry Stro- black, red and combinations.
bel had 483 to help Roches. Billy 77C Children's oxfords in white, red,
Joe Richards rolled 524 and Louie Sizes to 6X. Easy to launder, denim blue and peppermint
Holland rolled 519 for the Bank- sanforized summer fabrics, stripes.
ers, but got little help. .
Basil's almost got arrested for
murder because they beat Costin's Ward rolled 513 and Tom Freeman' l l* .
so bad the first game. They whip- 499. Ruel Whitehurst hit 510 fol- il
ped Costin's by 170 pins for one lowed by Ted Grabowski's 479. W illiams Int produces
game and then held on for total iBasil's get their chance ton eight Port Authority ,
pins. The split movedBasil'swith- when they meet the Stevedoresyst
in 4 games of the leaders, Stev while Costin's match Roche's. Cich-
dores. Ralph Moss rolled 552Tto lgan Chemical and Florida National
lead Basil's with Joe Davis' 518BankttogetherlonalIoad
second high. Tommy Pridgeon hit .ank te together on alleys 1 and
544, Jake had 543 and Waring had Team Standins W L Rep. Ben C. Williams of Gulf
505. Ashley rolled 182 the last Stevedores--------- 71 49 County this week introduced in
game, giving Costin's the game by Basil's Standard ------67 53 the House a bill creating a port au-
5 ins. Ct made a Costin's 6 6 60 thority in Gulf County with power
Michigan almost made a sweep Michigan Chemical _54 65% to tax property up to three mills.
of the Stevedore's but cooled off Fla. National Bank 54% 65% T t orty w cossefn
enabling the league leaders one Roche Furniture --- 53 7 The authority will consist of nine
game. Grady Dean took high hon- members appointed by the gover-
ors away from the glory boys Med- nor. One member reach would be
nor. One membe reach would be
lin and Ward by rolling 521. Ralph Visitor From Alabama 'from the Wewahitcbka area, Dal-
Mrs. W. L. Head, Ozark, Ala., is keith and Honeyville, 'Indian Pass
visiting with her daughter and fam- and southern Port St. Joe, Highland
ily, Mr. and Mrs. James Traweek. "View, St. Joe Beach, White City
and Overstreet. One commissioner
from the county at-large would be
JOt B appointed to serve as chairman.
SIn addition to its taxing powers,
the authority could fix rates for
use of waterfront facilities, grant
DRPVY franchises and leases, and, subject
IDRY to a referendum, issue bonds. It
IS would have authority to employ a
port manager and to purchase pro-
M. UNTIL 10:00 P.M. perty and construct port facilities.
T A n Another bill introduced by Wil-


W lll


The Tattler
R.. GLENN BOYLE8 Edltr
Associate Editore YOUALL
Published by
BOYLES DEPARTMENT STORE
PHONE MALL 7-4*61
R. GLENN BOYLES, Owner
'Dedicated to Better Selling mixed with a
litle sun"
*OYLEI
STORE PERSONNEL
ERLMA M. BOYLES Manager
MARTIN BRACKIN Men's and Boy's Department
GLADYS S. GILL __ Ladies' and Children' Ready-to-Wear
RUTH KEELS Sportuwear and Hosiery
[R:S OLIVIA DAVIS -Lades' and Children's Linaerie
HAROLD KEELS and DORENE SPEARS Extra


Dear Friends:
It's good to have time for a
little extra Tattle following the
busy, joyful Easter season. The
meaning and spirit of this mo-
mentous celebration should occu-
py a permanent place in our
hearts and guide our lives each
and every day. It is good to use
a part of our time to study, to
meditate, and give thanks to One
who mastered life and conquer-
ed death. Isn't it wonderful that
this hope was passed on to man-
kind? A Light for this life and
eternity? What more could one
wish for? Is it incredible that
we worship this Lord of all? Wil-
fred A. Peterson has this to say
in his essay on the Art of Wor-
ship: "Outer symbols create the
atmosphere and mood of wor-
ship. The altar, the cross, the
candles, the stained glass win-
dows, the silent sanctuary before
the service begins. But, whether
in cathedral or cottage the art of
worship is an inner adventure; it
is the personal practice of the


Bills Concerning

ers and Employees
liams provides for suspension and
dismissal of employes of the Coun-
ty Commission and school board.
It gives the employee the opportun-
ity for a hearing and makes all pa-
pers in the case public records.
Williams has also introduced a
bill to prohibit oyster gathering
from private beds during the state
closed season.

Museum Addition

Sought by Society


presence of God. It is resting our
weary hearts and minds on the
Everlasting Arms." We have this
privilege daily at home, at
work or play. Question: How
much are we using it?
In last week's mail: A letter
from my mother and she com-
ments: "I just looked out the
window and saw dad riding a
white horse." My dad (93) is
strictly an outdoor man. He loves
the soil and still works it with
animals that he also loves. I
sorta hope he has a horse to ride
when he goes to heaven. My mo-
ther (at 86) would be happy there
with her Bible and some good
books. However, she still might
be a little uneasy about dad fall-
ing off the horse! Well, since
they are still enjoying life and
good health time to think
about that later!
Now, it's time to give some at-
tention to this little matter of
buying and selling that takes a
great part of our time. Be sure
to double check our spectacular
offerings. S'long. RGB


Museum has been too small to pro-
perly display material on hand to
depict the early historic value of
the old city of St. Joseph. Since
its instructionn, new items have
been added and provided, making
the Museum totally inadequate to
handle all historical data.
The letters went to lawmakers
of ar, as from which original sign.
ers of the Florida Constitution
came from.
Visit Musselwh'tes
Mr. and Mrs. David Musselwhite
and Mr. and Mrs. Don Laird spent
the Easter holidays here visiting
with their parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Calvin Musselwhite, Mr. and Mrs.
Jack Tillman and other friends and
relatives.


The St. Joseph Historical Society Mississippi Visitors
this week sent communications to Mr. and Mrs. P. B. Fary, Jr.,
54 State Senators and State Repre- an d daughters, Joyce and Teresa
sentatives concerning the Constitu- of Moss Point, Miss.,spent Easter
tion State Park Museum here.
The letters urged the influence visiting here with Mrs. Fairley's
of these lawmakers in securing an parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Smith.
addition for the Museum.
Since its construction, the lo-al SUPPORT THE SHARKS


Life



IT'S SA



GREAT



LIFE!


Plan a secure life
for your kids and wife.
Ask your Gulf Life
representative how
Adapt-A-Plan adds to
your family security.



Gulf


Life
INSURANCE
COMPANY


Fresh Boston Butt Register's Green Hill
Pork Roast lb. 29c SAUSAGE lb. 39c
2 to 3 Pound End Cut
Ga. Grade 'A' Small Georgia Grade "





3 DOZEN



99 23 S1v

LIMIT 3 PLEASE! SUGAR
5 POUND BAG
Register's Prim Rose -5
Roll Hickory Smoked 53 C
Sausage PICNICS lb. 29c Pillsbury
3 POUNDS U S A
s oo USDA Good
$1.00 RIB STEAK lb. 69c BiSCuitS
SUPREME
White Acre P EE3 CANS
PE A S COTTON SEED OIL
No. 303 Can NO. 10 jug 99 C 25

21c 16 Oz. Giant Cans
COLAS -- DR. PEPPER
MASON'S ROOT BEER Maxwell House Instant

Reg. 27c LoafAD CANNED SOFT DRINKS COFFEE
AD 6, fr 2 12 Oz. Jar

25c 6 for 29c $1.29


GROCERY PRICES GOOD APRIL 17 through APRIL 21


..--- --- -------- ---- ------------- --------- -- -- ----









THE- STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.
THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 1963 Y__ L.llF A





FOR RENT: On St. Joe Beach. 3-
bedroom, two bath unfurnished.
Two 2-bedroom furnished. In city,
two 1-bedroom houses furnished.
I w Smith's Pharmacy. tfc-1-10
FOR RENT: Upstairs furnished
< apartment. 1505 Monument Ave.
Phone 227-7421. tfc-2-28
FOR RENT: Unfurnished large 2-
bedroom house, Phone 227-8536
after 5:00 p.m. tfc-3-28
FOR RENT: Nice 2 bedroom house
on Monument Ave. Call Mrs. No-
ra Duren, 227-5471. tfc-4-4
...Magic words in the'automo- FOR RENT: Trailer space in Oak
tive industry-an absolute rule Grove. Sewer and water. $14.00
in the compounding of prescrip- month. Phone L. C. Davis, 227-7059.
FOR RENT: Downstairs apartment,
The medicines your doctor pre- unfurnished. Available May 1.
scribes for you are for you alone, Call Bob Buchert, 227-7761. tfc 4-11
designed specifically for your --
needs and well being or your LOTS FOR SALE: In Phillip's Sub,
needs and well-being division on the Intra-Coastal Ca-
You can depend on us to give nal at Overstreet. Siaall down pay-
each prescription you send us, meant, up to three years to pay.
undivided, individual attention For information contact Mrs. L. T.
Ar-old, Max Kilbourn or D.
YOUR Prows. Jr.. Phone 227-419' *,tf
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom furnished
Ir apartment, on Sixth St. Couples
only. Call Mrs. Brinson, Phone 227-
5756. Utp
FOR SALE: 4 bedroom home, 2,000
Buzzett's Drug Store feet floor space. 2 full baths
zzett's Drug Store large fenced back yard, garage and
317 Williams Ave. utility. Close to school. Well estab-
lished landscaping. 1027 Long Ave.
Free Parking Contact Ed Ramsey.
Drive-In Window Service FOR SALE: 2 story unfurnished Z
Port St. Joe, Florida bedroom home, 1508 Long Ave.,
$5,500. Also, furnished 2 bedroom



SPRING DISCOUNTS


Reg. 98c Assortment. Direct
from Winter Garden
POT PLANTS
68c Each

Assorted colors, Economy
FLAT WALL PAINT
gallon $1.89


All of Our
ADVANCE PATTERNS
Half Price
9 X 12 Reg. $7.95
LINOLEUM RUGS
only $4.49
Aluminum
'LAWN CHAIRS
1 331 each


Children's Boxer Type *.
Reg. 79c pair Reg. $1.19
PLAY SHORTS .. TABLE LAMPS
___ pair 39c 99c each


CHRISTOS S

5c and lOc STORE
328 Reid Ave. Phone 227-8851


brick home and small apartment,
1031 Long Ave., $11,000. Phone
648-4128. Mira.
FOR SALE: Nice 2 bedroom home
in excellent condition, with den,
tile bath, wall to wall carpet in liv-
ing room. Many other extras to go
with sale. Located at 1310 Wood-
ward Ave. Priced for quick sale.
Presently FHA financed. If inter-
ested phone 227-5261, George H.
Wimberly, Jr. tfc-10-4
FOR SALE: Nice 3 bedroom frame
house, panel walls, tile floor. At
White City. Large 85x160 lot. See
or call David Rich for more infor-
mation. Day phone 227-2522. Nite
phone 229-2575. tfc-2-28
FOR SALE: Camp house, furnish-
ed on 1 acre of land on Big Bro-
thers River near Howard Creek.
Call Bob Buchert, 227-7761. tfc-28
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom masonry
home. Built-in oven, range and
refrigerator, chain link fence and
extras. Contact M. P. Ferris, 1907
Long Ave., phone 229-2201 or 227-
7616. tfc-3-28
MOVING IS OUR BUSINESS. If
you are planning to move, please
call SURPLUS SALES of ST. JOE.
We represent Mayflower, one of the
nation's oldest and foremost mov-
ers. Experienced, capable, cour-
teous. Free estimates for both lo-
cal and long distance moving. SUR-
PLUS SALES of ST. JOE, 201 Mon-
ument Ave., Phone 227-2011.
TAKE UP PAYMENTS: Apartment
size gas range and Admiral re-
frigerator. Like new. $13.90 a mo.
Inquire at Union Finance Co. tf
FOR SALE
TENTH ST.-Three bedroom, 2
bathroom, living room, den, kitchen
and separate dining room, oak
floors.
WOODWARD AVE:-Large two
bedroom house with oak floors.
HUNTER CIRCLE-Two bed-
room masonry house. Very good
condition.
GARRISON AVE.-Three bedrm.
masonry house with oak floors.
All of the above houses can be
purchased with small down pay-
ments under FHA financing.
FRANK HANNON
Registered Real Estate Broker
221 Reid Ave. Phone 227-3491
FOR SALE: Refrigerator and four-
burner gas range. Good condi-


Expert Carpentering
Cabinet Making
Roofing and Painting
Complete Homes or general
repairs-no job too large
or too small
Phone
GRADY MATHIS
229-1406 for free estimates


i-00 YOUNG 1"0 RETIRE


WE ARE



Restocking our Store


WITH POPULAR BRAND MERCHANDISE
SELLING FOR CASH ONLY and buying for cash from the mills when possible
. thereby saving both discounts! *

WE HAVE NO OVERHEAD since we own the building therefore we can
compete with any competitor selling the same quality merchandise.


ALLOW US TO THANK YOU ...
. for your friendship and patronage for the past twenty-two years and we most
cordially invite you to come in for a hand-shake and see for yourself that you can
save by trading at home.

WE-HAVE THE OLD POST OFFICE SIDE STOCKED WITH 0 0 ea.
MORE THAN 500 MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS PRICED AT $-- 1.

We have a SPECIAL in Women's and Turner Tog Brand
Children's OXFORDS and Women's Jeans $2.95
Sandals pr. $1,00 N & W and Polly Brand
Men's Overalls $2.95

YARD GOODS N & W and Polly Brand
Men's Khaki's $2.95
Batiste, Organdy, Dotted Swiss,
Broadcloth, Ginghams and f Town Topic and Hallmark
Fruit of the Loom Prints Mn
YARD, ONLY Men's Dress Shirts $1.95

$1.49 a Yard Value Hunting and
Upholstery Material yd. 90c SHOP CAPS 25c



W. H. WEEKS

DRY GOODS and NOTIONS


301 HIGHWAY 98


HIGHLAND VIEW


0 Ilf 1# I fff


Classified Ads
Midgel investments With
Giant Returns


tion. Selling to avoid storing. Avail-
able April 29. Call Mrs. Ralph Rich,
phone 227-5291. Itp
FOR SALE: 14 ft. outboard boat,
12 hp. Elto motor, boat trailer,
oars, cushions, anchor, etc. All in
good condition, $145.00. S. L. Barke
521 Tenth St., Phone 227-4441. tf
FOR SALE: Chest of drawers. Good
condition, $10.00. 301 16th St. lp
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house on St.
Joe Beach. Carport and storage
room, cypress paneled thruout. Will
finance. Call J. C. Traweek at 227-
5927 after 5 p.m. or week ends.
FOR SALE: Chihuahua puppies, 4
months old. Already wormed. Ph.
229-1148. Itp
FOR RENT: Nice furnished apart-
ment for couple only at 1621
Monument Ave. Phone 227-7641. tf
FOR SALE: New concrete block
3 bedroom home at St. Joe
Beach. Easy terms. See Cecil G.
Costin, Jr. tfc-4-11
FOR SALE: Highland View church
house and lot. Phone 227-5974
for information. 2tc 4-11
PIANO LESSONS: Inquire at 507
Madison St. 2tp
SEPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call
Buford Griffin, Phone 227-7011
for quick expert service. tfc
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Meet
every Wednesday night, 8 p.m.
at Parish House, 309V2 6th St. Port
St. Joe, Fla. Phone 229-3331 for
further information or write P. 0.
Box 535.
WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION, meet-
ing first and third Tuesday nights,
8:00 p.m. American Legion Home.
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0.
0. F.-Meets second and fourth
Thursday, 8:00 p.m. in American
Legion Hall. All members urged to
attend.
Noble Grand: Emmett Daniell
Secretary: J. C. Martin.
R. A. M.-Regular convocation of
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
M., 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit
ing companions welcome.

Edgar L. Smith, High Priest
Roy L. Burch, Secretary
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F. & A. M., every first
and third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.
ROBERT L. CREAMER, W. M.
ROY K .BLACKSHEAR, Sec.
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT
IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
In Re Estate of: )
GEORGE GLASS Deceased)
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All creditors' of the estate of
George Glass, deceased, are hereby
notified and required to file any
claims or demands which they may
have against said estate in the of-
fice of the County Judge of Gulf
County, Florida, in the courthouse
at Wewahitchka, Florida, within
six calendar months from the date
of the first publication of this no-
tice. Each claim or demand must
be in writing and- must state the
place of residence and post office
address of the claimant and must
be sworn to by the claimant, his
agent, or his attorney, or it will
become void according to law'.
Dated April 17, 1963.
/s/ BELLE WILLIAMS
Administratrix of the Es-
tate of George Glass,
deceased.
/s/ WILLIAM J. RISH
303 Fourth Street
Port St. Joe, Florida
Attorney for Administratrix 4t
First publication on April 18, 1963
NOTICE-BID NO. 5
The City of Port St. Joe will re-
ceive sealed bids until 5:00 o'clock
P. M., EST, May 21, 1963 for gen-
eral repair to the City of Port St.
Joe, 200,000 gallon capacity water
storage tank, subject to full com-
pliance with specifications, which
may be obtained from the City
Hall.
Bidding instruction forms may
be obtained at the office of the
City Clerk, City Hall, Port St. Joe,
Florida for the total sum of $2.00
per set, said sum of $2.00 not to be
refundable to any bidder.
The City of Port St. Joe reserves
the right to reject any and all bids
received or part of any bids re-
ceived.
J. B. WILLIAMS, 2t
City Auditor and Clerk
---- ---


SUPPORT THE 8IARKS


Cancer Fund Drive
(Continued From Page 1)
show that 88,000 more will be sav-
ed this year, if they will seek early
treatment.
Core stated:
This month, two years ago, I
returned to my home after spend-
ing 38 days in a hospital in an
ordeal with cancer. The treat-
ment I received was made pos-
sible by research that was partly
paid for by funds from the Amer-
ican Cancer Society, some of
these funds were collected by
you. You and those whom you
collected from helped me yester-
day by paying' for some of the
tremendous cancer research pro-
grams that are going on all over
the world."
In addition to Core's talk J. C.
Belin introduced Mrs. Edna Row-
ell, area director of the American
Cancer Society, who in turn intro-
duced Bill Spoon, from the Tampa
office, who spoke briefly.
Gulf County's goal for 1963 is
$3,000.00.

More Workers In

Cancer Fund Drive
More workers selected to help in
the Cancer Fund Drive, secured
since last week's publication of the
initial group are as follows:
Mesdames Gary Gordon, Robert
Stebel, Rudolph Shirah, Tom Byrd,
R. E. Downs, Walter Owens, Al
Smith, Herman Stripling, Leon
Kennedy, Talmadge Kennedy, Har-
vey Kennedy, Shirley Webb, James
Tankersley, J. V. Dowd, James
Wise,. B. E. Rawls, Charles Smith,
Bill Brown, W. J. Branch, Ted Rich-
ards, Hozie Barfield, Steve Daniels,
Henry Miller, Archie Floyd, Flet-
cher Capps, Thomas Rogers and
John Dady.

Bowling News
INDUSTRIAL LEAGUE
Tuesday night's action saw a
powerful first place Vitro win
their 12th straight point. This time,
it was a good Box Plant team that
went down at the hands of Vitro.
An on-rushing Glidden team
handed a fading Electric Meter
three losses.
Back Maintenance held off Pulp
Mill and maintained their slim hold
on second place. Pulp Mill took
games 1 and 3 while Maintenance
took game two and total pin count.
Laboratory knocked a helpless
Paper Mill team further into the
league cellar by dealing them four
more losses.
High team series, Vitro, 2494.
High team game, Vitro, 854.
High individual series, Smith, of
Glidden, 546.
High individual game, Smith,
Glidden, 201.
Team Standings W L
Vitro Services -------- 80% 35
Back Maintenance -.-- 65% 54
Pulp Mill 65 55
Laboratory 64 56
Box Plant 58 62
Electric Meter ------- 54 66
Glidden Co. ---------49 67
Paper Mill ---------40 80
------ ----


TELEVISION
Black & White and Color
Stereo Air Conditioning

Service Calls, $3.00
All work guaranteed

ST. JOE RADIO
& TV COMPANY
Phone 227-4081


-709 S



ci?~1i6


lignAdjust Brake
ant Endd Repack Front
Wheel Bearings








Tretstone


NEW TREADS
APPLIED ON SOUND TIRE BODIES OR ON YOUR OWN TIRES

WHITEWALLS-ANY SIZE
NARROW OR WIDE DESIGN TUBELESS OR TUBE-TYPE



PATE'S SHELL SERVICE CENTER
223-25 Monument Avenue Phone 229-1291


only $2686.00



ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY


ONLY the RICH

can afford

POOR CONSTRUCTION!

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP AND MATERIAL
IS ASSURED WHEN YOU USE THIS NAME .
BETTER BUILT BY


Barrier Builders

Commercial Residential
Repairs Additions Remodeling
Telephone 227-4636


ILLi~ri


IF SO ... WE'LL 00 ALL THIS


-~ II I ---~-----


I ,. -


I I


r


501 Moonument Ave.


Phone 2271;-37371


LOOK!


Time to water lawns

Why Pay High Water Bills When You Can
Have Your Own Well?

DURING APRIL ONLY!

A Complete Well System for Only


$89.45

HERE'S WHAT YOU GET (Please compare prices)
1-1/3 hp. Heavy Duty, High Volume Pump .--- $85.00
3-5 ft. Sections 1V4" Pipe with Sleeves at $2.50 7.50
1-30" Heavy Duty Well Point 7.95
1-1/4" 'Check Valve 3.50
Necessary Elbows, Nipples and Union Needed to
Connect Pump to Well 3.50
NORMAL TOTAL PRICE $109.45

YOU SAVE $20.00


Si. Joe Auto Parts
311 Williams Ave. Phone 227-2611 Port St. Joe, Fla.