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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01422
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: February 7, 1963
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01422

Full Text






ST MONEY TALKS-Lt's keep
1 C I it where we can speak with It
PER COP Y A once in a while-Trade with
PER COPY your home town merchants
"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"

rWENTY-SIXTH YEAR THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1963 NUMBER 21


Paper Company



Sets Safety Record


Officials of the Liberty Mutual a
Insurance Company were guests of Sarks Get In
the St. Joe Paper Company at its
annual Safety Awards dinner Mon- Win Column
day night at Van Horn's Beach Res-
taurant. A w
Ferrell Allen, Mill Safety Direc- Against W ew
tor, introduced John Vance, Li-
berty Mutual's Senior Safety En- The Sharks scared the pants off
gineer, who made presentation of the Rutherford High Rams in Pan-
a plaque to the Paper Company for ama City last Friday night when
having operated for a record-1,- they dropped a 46-43 decision that
300,000 man hours without a lost saw the lead change hands many
time injury. Mr. Vance stated that times, especially in the last two
this accomplishment could only quarters.
have been made through the com-1 Larry Griner kept putting the
bined efforts of every employee of Sharks in front in the last quarter
the St. Joe Paper Company and with jump shots, but the Sharks
that for a single individual to have were unable to hold the lead. Fred-
accumulated this much injury free dy Chason gave the Sharks their
time, he would have had to start last lead in the close of the fourth
working 150 years before Colum- quarter, after which the Sharks
bus discovered America. fell behind by the game deciding
Ferrell Allen then presented three points.
43 Certificates of Appreciation Griner and Chason led the Shark
for Outstanding Supervision to scoring with 19 and 14 points re-


individual supervisors for the
number of months that they had
led their departments without a
lost time injury. Among the re-
cipients of these certificates
were the following supervisors
who have better than five years
without a lost time injury oc-
curring under their supervision:
C. E. Boyer, 97 months; R. P.
Nance, 89 months; C. 0. Hewett,
77 months; A. J. Owens, 70
months; J. L. McQuaig, 67
months; J. Lamar Hardy, 64
months; A. D. Roberts, 64 months
Merrill Sherrill, 63 months; and
John E. Beasley, 62 months.
Tom Coldewey expressed the
Company's 'appreciation to all the
employees of the St. Joe Paper
Company who made the 1,300,000
man hour record possible. He com-
mended 'he supervisors for thpir
outstanding supervision in having
led their departments to this rec-.
ord performance. Mr. Coldewey
stated that C. E. Boyer's 97 months
without a lost time injury had only
been achieved two times in the his-
tory of the mill.
Other guests at the Awards Din-,
ner were Bill Winters, former lo-
cal Mill Safety .Director, now of
the Company's Jacksonville office,
and Robert Taylor, Division Service
Manager of Liberty Mutual Insur-
ance Company in Atlanta.

Highland View Baptist
Brotherhood Sets Program
Thursday night, February 7, at
7:45 p.m., the Brotherhood of the,
Highland View Baptist Church will
have a covered dish supper fol-
lowed with -a program of tape re-
cordings of the Florida Evangelis-
tic Conference.
Ladies will receive a special in-
vitation to attend this program. All
the family is invited to attend.


spectively.
Sharks fg ft tp Rams
Chason 7 0 14 Batyski
Weston 2 1 5 Schultz
3riner 9 1 19 Moulder
Ken'ton 1 1 3 Stitcher
Dodson 0 0 0 Brock
Tohnson 1 0 2 Peel
[lobbs 0 0 0 Loftin
Versiga 0 0 01
Score by quarters:
Port St. Joe .- 11 10 1


Rutherford Hi


15 8


fg ft tp
5 2 12
11012
5 0 10
24 8
2 0"4
00 0
00 0


2 10-43
8 15-46


The Shark Jayvees defeated the
Rams for the second time this year,
handing them their only upsets to
date this season. The young Sharks
came home with a 41-33 victory.
Jake Belin and Junior Nichols shar-
ed scoring honors with 10 points
each.

ALTHA 52, PORT ST. JOE 48
The Sharks suffered their sec-
ond loss of the season to Altha last
Saturday night on the local court.
Lamar Shelton proved to be the
Wildcat that clawed the Sharks by
scoring 20 points for the night.
Larry Griner topped the Sharks
losing efforts with nine points.
Randy Weston and Bob Craig both
netted eight points for the Sharks.
The Shark B team picked up an-
other win by defeating the Wild-
cats 48-32 in the preliminary.
Score by quarters:
Port St. Joe -_ 19 12 10 7-48
Altha -.-- -- 12 14 13 13-52

SHARKS 77, WEWAHITCHKA 55
The Sharks picked up their fifth
win of the season Tuesday night
on their home grounds by defeating
their arch rivals, the Wewahitchka
Gators, 77-55.
Four Sharks scored in the double
figure column. Larry Griner led
the parade with 19 points. He was
followed by Bog Craig with 14,
Fred Chason with 12 and Randy
Weston with 10 points. Bill Strick-


Students Paint School Lunchroom
Pictured .above are members of the Student Council who vol-
unteered their Saturday and their services to repaint the Port St.
Joe High School Lunchroom. The Student Council undertook the
job as a project of school betterment. While these four industrious
boys pictured above are not all of the group who worked at the
painting job, they are, left to right, Ken Dykes, Robin Downs,
Albert Gentry, and Jimmy Goodman. (Star photo)


C. J. Parrott Is

Taken By Death
Charles J. Parrott, a resident of
Beacon Hill for 18 years and an
employee of the St. Joe Paper Com-
pany passed away in his sleep last
Thursday night.
He is survived by his wife, Ma-
bel; two sons, Luther of Bradenton,
and Frankie of Port St. Joe; two
brothers, Edmond of Milton and
Henry of Covington, Ky., and two
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held Sat-
urday afternoon, February 2 at
3:00 p.m. from the Long Avenue


Mayor Calls For Of City Books;




Accept Bids For improvements


* ^


Garbage Truck To

Begin Work Mon.


Baptist Church with the Rev. J. Mayor Frank Hannon notified
C. Odum officiating. the City Board Tuesday night that
Interment was in Holly Hill it is now time to conduct the an-
Cemetery. nual audit of the city's books. The
Comforter Funeral Home was in Board has received information
charge of arrangements. from several audit firms in the
-. past few months in reference to
the audit and moved Tuesday night
T A Ato employ the firm of Haskins and
TI W AUtos Are Sells of Jacksonville to make the
I audit.
Involved in Wreck J. T. Woods was granted a per-
mit to move a garage building to
Two cars were involved in a col- the rear of his lot on Tenth Street
lision at the corner of First Street for use as a garage and playhouse.
and Monument Avenue Tuesday af-1 Neighbors of Woods had offered
ternoon at 5:50 p.m. resulting in no objection to the move, so the
bruises on the left leg of Mrs. permit was granted.
James Montgomery. The City granted Clerk Williams
According to investigating offi- permission to attend a short course
cers, an automobile driven by for City Clerks offered by the
James Montgomery was struck in University of Florida on March 17
the side while traveling down through 20. The City will take care
Monument by an auto driven by of William's expenses to the short
Henry P. Duncan of Birmingham, course.
Alabama, coming out of First St. The Board granted a request for
Approximately $350.00 in dam- street lights to be placed at the
ages was inflicted to both autos. corners of Avenues E, F and G on
No charges were preferred. Hodrick Street.
Officers Allen Ray Watson, M. A good deal of discussion was
A. Kelley and Chief H. W. Grifin held in reference to the repainting
investigated the accident assisted of the Centennial Building. The
by Trooper Ken Murphy. Beard is currently compiling speci-
bK Mfications for the repairing of
cracks on the outside of the build-
V l ing and waterproofing and paint-
T V Classes To ing the outside of the building.
S* It was announced by the City
Teach Recadin Clerk that the City's new packer-
loader garbage truck would be in
Are you one of the many adults service on Monday morning of
who cannot read or write? Do you next week. He also announced that
know one or more of such people? a telegram received stated that the
If so, then read this. City's new police car would go into


Starting Monday, February 11, production on February 12.
at 7:30 p.m. over Channel 11 tele- The garbage truck was purchased
vision, will be a series of 100 les- from the St. Joe Motor Company
sons designed especially to teach and the police cruiser from Floyd
any adult to read and write. This Chevrolet Company.
is a program sponsored by the Two bids were opened and award-
Adult Education Department. Any- ed by the City Board Tuesday night.
one who knows someone in this The first bid went to the West-
group is urged to contact the lo- e Auto Associate Store for two
cal Director of Adult Education, H.


F. Ayers, at once.
This is a good chance for these
unfortunate individuals to learn to
read and write. They may sit in
their own home and go to school.
The Adult Institute needs your
help in locating these people.


Craig Shows Film
To Kiwanis Club
Coach Marion Craig showed an
interesting film to the Kiwanis
Club Tuesday. The film was of
the type used in training of foot-
ball teams by the "Ivy League"
teams. The film was secured by
Craig at the annual conference of
coaches in Los Angeles, Calif., this
January.
Craig said that Port St. Joe High
School hopes to adopt some of the
practices for training used by the
"Ivy League" in the coming sea-
son.
Guests of the club were Rex Buz-
zett and Al Cathey of the Key Club.
W. C. Roche, local furniture dea-
ler, was inducted into the club as


Little Boys Baseball
Officers Will Meet
Officers, directors, managers and
prospective sponsors for the Dixie
Youth Baseball organization are
notified of an organizational meet-
ing that has been set up for next
Thursday, February 14.
The Dixie Youth Baseball organ-
ization is the former Little Boys
Baseball organization. Nothing has
been changed but the name.
The organizational meeting will
be held in the AN Railroad build-
ing conference room.
All officers, managers and inter-
ested persons are urged to be pres-
ent.

Babe 'Ruth League
Sets Organization Meet
All managers and other interest-
ed parties in the Babe Ruth League
baseball program are encouraged
to meet Tuesday, February 19 at
7:00 p.m. at the Florida Power
Lounge.
This meeting has been called to
get things organized for the com-
ing baseball season.


a new member. --

land led the Gators with 32 points. Three Receive Hurts


The Shark Jayvees also claimed
another victory by defeating the
little Gators, 48-32 in the prelimi-


nary.
Sharks
Chason
Dodson
Ken'ton
Griner
Johnson
Versiga
Weston
Craig
Score
Port St.


fg ft tp [ Gators fg ft tp
5 2 12 Mil'gren 2 2 6
3 1 7 Smith 1 4 6
2 1 5 Suber 1 2 4
8 3 19 S'land 111032
1 5 7 Lister 12 4
1 1 3 Hatcher 03 3
4 2 10
7 0 14
by quarters:
Joe _-- 21 18 16 22-77


Wewahitchka


12 20 10


13-55


Tomorrow night, the Sharks will
travel to Marianna to do battle
with the Bulldogs. Next Monday,
they will be host to Bay High of
Panama City.


In Beach Wreck
Marion Albert Abrams of Gaines-
ville was charged with failure to
have his vehicle under control as
the result of an accident involving
his automobile Monday night at
11:15 p.m., according to trooper
Ken Murphy.
According to the trooper, Ab-
rams was traveling South toward
Port St. Joe about six miles south
of Wewahitchka when his car left
the road on the right side. The ve-
hicle traveled 345 feet, knocking
down a road sign, crossed the road
and left the hard top on the left
side, traveling 160 more feet be-
fore knocking down a utility pole.
Total damages were estimated at
600.00.


STUDENT CITY OFFICIALS-Pictured above are
the students from Port St. Joe High School
elected to serve for a day as officials for the
City of Port St. Joe. Pictured left to right, front
row are: Diane LeHardy, Chief of Police; Sandra
Baxley, City Commissioner; Wally Dodson, Mayor;


21,000 btu air conditioners for the
Council Chambers. The total bid
for the two machines, installed.
was $578.20.
The second bid went to H. F.
Barbee in the amount of $1,280.00
for waterproofing of the Munici-
pal Building. Barbee's contract
called for him to repair cracks in
the building, paint moulding and
concrete decoration and waterproof
brick walls of the building.
The City Board then officially
adopted the resolution presented
by the Student City Council govern-
ment requesting that the student
program be continued each year.
Mayor Hannon congratulated the
student's for their interest in civic
government and for the efficient
and businesslike manner in which
they had carried on their activities
for the day.


James Moore, faculty advisor to the Student
Council, student sponsor of the program. Back .,
row, left to right: Joel Barbee, Bill Fite and Dew-
ter Atkinson, City Councilmen and Born u
zet, City Clerk. (Star it4) .,.


$Ch0ol Students Take Over
a
r oFy tiCf on oitarepO A Day Tuesday


ley Councilmen; Diane LeHardy,
Chief of Police and Bernie Buz-
zett, city clerk.
The project was sponsored by *
the Port St. Joe Rotary Club.
Sponsor of the election con-
test in the High School was the
Student Council, under the direc-
tion of James Moore.
Kenneth Dykes was the stud-
ent supervisor of the election
procedure.
The members of the Student
City Council served the City for
the entire day Tuesday, work-
ing alongside their counterpart
for the full day in order to learn
more about how City government
operates.


DECISION FORTHCOMING 0" RELEASE OF LAND


A decision has been promised in I portion if the Air Force released
two weeks by Air Force officials in the land on the point. He said that
Washington on whether a 2,000- they expected no trouble in obtain-
acre tract of land on St. Joseph' 90-acre tract on the Gulf coast be-
Peninsula will be declared surplus ing right-of-way privileges from the
and made available for use as a Coast Guard across land from the
state park, Jesse Stone, chairman lighthouse to the 90-acre plot,
of the park committee said Fri- which would expedite construction
day. of an access road to the main part
Stone, who has returned from a of the proposed park on the point.
trip to Washington, D. C. to confer The 32-acre plot borders on a paved
with officials on the acquisition of road, that leads to the lighthouse,


the land, said the Air Force report-
ed all preliminary reports on de-
claring the land surplus were fav-
orable.
Stone, along with Florida Park
Service officials, met with repre-
sentatives of the Air Force, Coast
Guard, the Bureau of Land Manage-
ment, and the General Services
Administration to work out details


he explained.
Stone said the Air Force indicat-


ed the property could be released
in two months if it is declared sur-
plus. Finances for the purchase of
the property could be worked out
by the state, he added.
"I am more optimistic than ever
over the establishment of a park
on the point," said Stone. "The
main value of the meeting was that
efforts of all agencies seeking to
transfer the land to the state were
coordinated and each now knows
what others are doing.


e as ; a I
O'97 Ire AldfWS LOUS9 Util9

0 ye Uring the POSt Week
F fi f i tu alled This is about four fires to this


................. tUiL lt Ui li i n Lo a Ul r .e u J.i J L O ms is auutuo ree m n a ru
for the transfer. for the services of the Volunteer same vicinity during the past few
Rep. Bob Sikes conducted the Fire Department during the past months.
meeting, week.
Stone said he learned that the Sunday afternoon the department County Sheriff's Department
state would have to purchase the was called to the home of Joe Bad- Deputy Jimmy Barfield has been
land from the Air Force, but that ger on Avenue A when a heater investigating the origin of the false
it would be sold to the Park Ser- flooded. The fire danger was over alarms and reported this week that
vice for half the appraised value. when the fire department arrived, he had some definite leads on the
He said the Department of Inter- Sunday night at 7:40, a brush problem.
ior offered the Park Service two fire was threatening telephone At the regular meeting of the
additional tracts of land adjacent poles carrying trunk lines to the Fire Department Monday night,
to the proposed 2,000-acre park on Beaches and Tyndall Field in the Fire Chief R. H. Ellzey informed
the point of St. Joseph Spit. Highland View area. The brush fire those firemen having alarm signal
He said the two parcels, one a was put out after about an hour of apparatus in their homes not to
tween the light house and Eagle fire fighting, sound them for the Highland View
Harbor, and the other, a 32-acre Monday afternoon at 5:00 p.m. area in the future, unless the per-
plot between the missile tracking the department received another in son calling gives his name.
station and U. S. Highway 98, are a series of false alarm calls in the On Tuesday afternoon at 3:30
available to the Park Board at a Highland View area. This call even p.m. the department was called to
cost of $2.50 per acre. identified the home on fire, but Highland View again by the Florida
Stone explained that the two ad-, investigation by answering the fire Forest Service to assist in a brush
ditional parcels will be used in alarm call revealed that the home fire that was threatening some
conjunction with the 2,000-acre had never been on fire. buildings in the area.


Members of the High School
student body, elected to serve as
city administrators for a day
took over the reigns of city gov-
ernment for a short period prior
to Tuesday night's meeting.
During the student official's
brief reign, they introduced a
resolution to the City to declar
such a "student Government
day" each year in Port St. Joe.
The Resolution was introduced by
City Councilman Joel Barbee
and was read in full by Council-
woman Sandra Baxley.
Serving on the honorary board
for a day were, Wally Dodson,
Mayor; Joel Barbee, Bill Fite,
Dexter Atkinson and Sandra Bax-


I..


.ai~a~














Her French illusion veil fell from
a headpiece of tulle leaves and
pearls. She carried a prayer book
on which white roses and holly
were mounted.


member 15 in the Firs reuye |r- Miss Brenda Schultz of Middle-
ian Church, Goshen, New York. A vs r S o Middle-
ian Church, Goshen, New York.lonial Inn, town, N. Y., was maid of honor for
reception -at Old ColonialInn, Miss Wendell. Bridesmaids were
Dwaarkill, followed. Mrs. Albert Sykora and Miss Lana
Escorted by her father, the bride North, cousins of the bride of Go-
wore a floor length gown of chan- shen, and Miss Helen Spengler of
tilly lace, with scooped neckline, Newburgh, N. Y. Miss Gail Van-
fitted bodice, bouffant skirt, ac- derMark of Goshen was flower
cented with sequins and pearls. girl and Harold Fraude, Marlboro,


/


.. 2.. TODD























THE GREATEST OF EASE...
I'1r ".' young individualist
.B 1 luson sheath that never
," 1 1.- the clock or calendar.
\ ...l.- marvel of wiltless wiles,
i,,- l..ni Todd Uncrushable
S takes to travel, scorns wrinkles,
washes and drips dry in jet speed.
Exciting stained glass print ini
Rosewood's Arnel triacetate
Jersey. Gray/bronze;
S aqua/blue, or blue/green. 8 to 18.
only the LOOK
expensive











COSTIN'S


Miss Arlene Wendell and Eddie

Montgomery Married In New York


BIRTHS

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Hudson, Jr.,
of Fort Walton Beach announce
the birth of twin sons, Victor Rich-
ard and Ross Russell on February
1.
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Alexander
White, 1601 Marvin Ave., announce
the birth of a daughter, Vivian
Lynn on January 30.
(All births occurred at the Port
St. Joe Municipal Hospital.)


ruary 5 at 3:00 p.m. from the Unit-
ed Pentecostal Church of Wewa-
hitchka with Rev. Gordon Adams
and Rev. J. J. Hill officiating.
Interment was in the Cypress
Creek Cemetery.

Lunch Room Menu
Port St. Joe Elementary School
Monday, February 11
Meat balls with gravy, rice, snap
beans, carrot sticks, apple brown
betty (recipe from Susan Johnson,


BAUGH WHO PASSED AWAY
EIGHT YEARS AGO TODAY,
FEB. 5, 1955
Beyond the great horizon
Where skies are always blue
You are resting now in perfect
peace
With loved ones you once knew.
Earth's toilings now are ended
All heartaches passed away
How sweetly you had waited
For the dawning of the day.
Sadly missed,
ANN HOBAUGH, Wife.


Local Delegation Gets Sneak Preview

Of Speaker Scheduled To Appear Here


N. Y., was ring bearer.
Miss Schultz wore a gown of em-
erald green satin, scooped neckline
and bell shaped skirt. She carried
white mums and pom poms with
holly. The bridesmaids gowns were
of the same style but in gold. They
carried gold mums and holly. The
flower girl's frock was of white
organdy, taffeta and lace with a
gold sash. She carried a colonial
bouquet of gold and white pomr
poms.
Bronnie Fisher of Kentucky was
best man for Mr. Montgomery. Ush-
ers were Wayne Wright of Goshen
and Carl Wright of Sloatsburgh,
both cousins of the bride, and Rob-
ert Peltier, Goshen.
The bride is a graduate of Gosh-
en Central Schools. Mr. Montgom-
ery is a graduate of Port St. Joe
High School and is now serving in
the U. S. Navy aboard the USS
Shangri-La stationed in the Brook-
lyn Navy Yard.
After a Washington and New
York City honeymoon the couple
will stay at Goshen until March,
and then make Port St. Joe their
home.
MEN'S BOWLING ASSN.
TO MEET IN POWER LOUNGE
There will be a meeting of all
Association and League officers of
the Port St. Joe Men's Bowling As-
,sociation in the Florida Power
Lounge at 7:30 p.m., We4nesday,
February 13.


We Are Pleased To Announce


SAMMY PARKER


IS NOW A MEMBER OF OUR SERVICE DEPARTMENT



SEE US FOR THE BEST MECHANICAL SERVICE

IN TOWN

Regardless of Make




RHUTCHINS' MOTORS

RAMBLER Sales Parts Service


- Pure Oil Products


Authorized Dealer for


tRambler END "Car of the Year"


A delegation of Port St. Joe citi-
zens returned Saturday from a
Tallahassee meeting with Mrs.
Gert Behanna, author of the best-
seller "The Late Liz".
Co-chairmen Tom Owens, Gulf
County Superintendent of Public
Instruction and Tom Coldewey,
Vice-President, St. Joe Paper Com-
pany, advised that arrangements
have been completed for the forth-
coming visit of Gert Behanna to
Port St. Joe on Monday, February
18 at 8:00 p.m. in the Elementary
School Auditorium. The authoress
addressed the 120th Council of the
Episcopal Diocese of Florida in
Tallahassee before proceeding to
an engagement in Jacksonville.
Telling the story of "The Late
Liz" as she moves about the coun-
try from brief rests at her home in
Twentynine Pal m s, California,
Gert will meet next week with a
statewide gathering of high school
students in Gainesville. When
speaking to young people, follow-
ing her visit to Yale University,
Chaplain William Sloan Coffin,
Jr., says that "Mrs. Behanna is a
more powerful and moving person-
ality than ordinarily seen in the
pulpit. One must be careful about
tampering with the liturgy, but
being dignified doesn't mean
avoiding that which is personal, for
Christianity is more concerned with
truth than taste."
Speaking with the bright capti-
vating air which marks her as she
celebrated her 69th 'birthday last
Thursday, Gert says there are two
groups toughest to reach. "One is
the well-insulated. They have ev-
erything and they are all frighten-
ed. The other and far tougher
group are those who were born
and raised into a hidebound, cur-
tailed religious group. They know
the answer as she's writ," grinned
Mrs. Behanna.
"The Late Liz" written under the
psuedonym of Elizabeth Burns is
available locally in paper binding.
It tells her story of life as the
daughter of wealthy New Yorkers,
brought up, in a world, "Where
God was a swear word", her Euro-
pean education, three marriages
and divorces, alcoholism, and in
1947, in a hospital recovering from
attempted suicide, her discovery
of God. Now she travels most of
the year speaking at colleges, high
schools, seminaries, prisons, chur-
ches.
The local committee on arrange-
ments are elated for their part
in bringing Mrs. Behanna to our
city for her evening visit. The com-
mittee expresses the hope that a


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ST. JOE RADIO
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Phone 227-4081


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Monday date and the advance no- THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1963
tices of this visit will enable all
who want to hear her to make ap- 'Bryan Jones, Wewa Mrs. Faison's Fourth Grade), white
propriate arrangements to do so. Resident, Dies Sunday bread and butter and milk.
Mr. Coldewey informed this paper Tuesday, February 12
that Mrs. Behanna has asked that Bryant Jones, a resident of We- Pork goulash, English peas, cole
written unsigned questions be giv- wahitchka for the past 20 years, slaw, Alice's peanut butter cook-
en her for answer at the close of slaw, Alice's peanut butter cook-
her formal talk. passed away Sunday night at his ies (recipe from Steve Macomber,
I home. Mrs. Nelson's fourth grade), white
Co-chairman Tom Owens announ- is survived by his wife, Lua bread, butter and milk.
He is survived by his wife, Lula
ced that Sunday Mrs. Behanna willof Wewahitchka; two daughters, Wednesday, February 13
appear on TV channel 7 at 5 p.m. Mary Lou Rhames of Port St. Joe, Hot dogs, sauerkraut, potato
EST, the day before her visit to Zorabelle Holley of Wewahitchka, sticks, buttered corn, spice cake,
Port St. Joe. Following her over- five sisters, Mrs. Effie Tittin, Co- butter and milk.
night visit in Port St. Joe, Mrs. lumbus, Ga., Mrs. Naomi Maddox
Behanna will speak in Panama City of Tallahassee, Mrs. Lura Bailey Thursday, February 14
on Tuesday and Wednesday from and Mrs. Mary Lee Boone of Wewa- Chicken and dumplings, buttered
the auditorium of the First Baptist hitchka; four brothers, Gene and spinach, sliced tomatoes, hot biscuit
Church. It is reported that the Van Jones of Wewahitchka, Lloyd and jelly, butter and milk.
Saturday Evening Post is consider- Jones of Graceville and J. P. Jones Friday, February 15
ing coverage of the Liz visit to of Crawfordville; seven grandchil- Salmon loaf, green butter beans,
Florida. Mr. Owens emphasized dren and a stepmother, Mrs. Rosie stuffed celery, fruit Jello, white
that "one who misses the Late Liz Smith of Crawfordville. bread, butter and milk.
loses a most unusual opportunity." ._-
Services were held Tuesday, Feb- IN MEMORY OF EARL L. HO-


Miss Arlene Wendell, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Wendell,
Sr., and Eddie Montgomery, son of
Mr. and Mrs. George Montgomery
of Port St. Joe, were married De-
--- -4-1- f- ...,4.c,,~ -


Goodyear Tires


- I m


I I -~


II


. .









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1963



THE STAR
Published Every Thursday A 4. 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, FIrlda
By The Star Publishing Company
W 'ESLEY R. RAMSEY Editor and Publihru
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Salesman, Photographer, Columnist, Reportsr, trwe
Reader, Bookkeeper and Complaint Dspartment
DIAL 227-3161 PoSrommF Box 308

Entered as second-class matter, December 19, 19S7, at the Po ie., Port St. JO,
Florida, under Act of March 8, 1870.

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, $3.00 SIX MONTHS, $1.75 THREE MONTHS, $127.50

TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omislons in advertisement, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further thay. amomt received forac
advertisement.


We Predict A SNAFU!
The first act of the reapportionment hassle is over.
The Legislature has met for the umpteenth time argued
. met connived traded and came up with a
plan which placed Gulf County in a Senatorial District with
Franklin, Wakulla and Liberty Counties. This is to be lab-
eled the new Fifth District, we believe.
This leaves us here in Gulf County in a peculiar delim-
ma. It has been obvious that for the past year, at least,
we have had no Senatorial representation in Tallahassee.
Senator Barron apparently has forgotten Gulf, Washington
and Calhoun Counties in his efforts to carve a Senatorial
seat out of the Legislative doings for Bay County.
The Senator was, in effect, protecting his own seat,
by catering to those who will cast votes in his district for
Senator next year.
But. back to Gulf's delimma. Who is our Senator?
In the hustle and bustle the trading and swapping .
the scratching of backs and soliciting of promises, Gulf has
wound up without a Senator.
We suppose, that by the rules of the newly reappor-
tioned Senate, Luther Tucker of Wakulla County is now
our Senator. But, we didn't elect him, so how can he rep-
resent us? And, by retrospect, we elected Barron to repre-
sent us in the Senate, and he has not done it.
So where do we stand?
It is to be supposed that even though he didn't ask
for us. and we didn't ask for him that Senator Luther
Tucker will do better by us that did Mr. Barron.
But, on the other hand, we don't know yet if the
State has been reapportioned. Suits and counter suits have
been filed in the courts to nullify the plan drawn up by the
Legislature last week. The Legislature goes into session in
April, and several districts must hold elections to fill vacan-
cies created by the special session,
This probably will be one of the most interesting ses-
sions in history. We'll wager that before the session is over,
some Legislator will present a bill to be acted upon to become
state law, and ,someone will start an investigation to see if
the Legislatorreven hai-the right$to be in the Legislature at
all, or to introduce a bill before that body to-vbe acted upon.
The Government started all this mess to "straighten
out" Florida's law making body into a "workable and repre-
sentative" voice of the people. But, as usual with things
Government, we predict a giant SNAFU.

WYNNE, ARKANSAS, PROGRESS
"I see by the papers that the national deficit is now
running at the rate of six billion dollars a year. You know,
it takes a lot of patriotism to buy government bonds, invest-
ing in an organization that is losing money at the rate of
$500 million a month, $16,666,666 a day or $604,444 an
hour. What I'd like for Christmas is for the Kennedy boys
to quit believing in Santa Claus."

LISLE, ILL., ADVERTISER
". Dr. Paul Dudley White, a past president of the
American Heart Association, believes human beings need
a mixture of both physical and mental stress to live a nor-
mal, healthy life. He has this to say 'Forty hours of
work per week is probably too little for healthy humans.
We spend so much time trying to entertain ourselves in our
leisure time that we are probably less culturally adapted
than were our grandparents, who, fortunately for them, did
not have automobiles and television-they walked, and read."

POOR-RICH KINFOLKS
Jim Griffith, Jr., editor of The Lusk (Wyoming) Her-
ald, has done, we think, a very decent thing. He has written
an open letter to his great, great grandchildren in which
he but we'll let him tell it his way:
"To my Great, Great Grandchildren,
"Inasmuch as we shall never meet, I want to leave
you this note of appreciation.
"You see, it was during my lifetime that the lea-
ders of the United States decided to spend some of the
tax money that your great grandparents, grandparents,
parents and you, and most likely your descendants,
would have to pay.
"Thank you for your generosity.
"Our practice of deficit financing was started
during a financial depression and was necessary. It
was necessary to continue the practice through a great
war, called World War II. Following World War II
the United States had a period of long prosperity, but
we had grown accustomed to spending more tax money
than we liked to pay. Rather than paying off what we
had borrowed, we decided to let you do it.
"I hope you won't hate the memory of my genera-
tion. Mostly, they were darn fine people. They would
have liked to leave you the same rich, debt-free heritage
that they received, but in the name of progress we had
to get money from someone. We took it from you.
Thanks.
"With appreciation,
Great, Great Grandpa Jim."


Rep. Sikes Reports Progress


On


St. Joseph Spit Park


This was a signal diplomatic vic-
tory for the United States. It had
far-reaching effects in world coun-
cils and did much to boost the mor-
ale of the American public and of
American armed forces. Our arms
buildup at that time was a power-
ful, smoothly executed operation.
However, it is now obvious that
although missiles and bombers
were withdrawn along with about
4,000 Russian supporting forces
there remains in Cuba very sub-
stantial Russian forces and wea-
pons. Reports reaching me indicate
the presence of about 17,000 Rus-
sian troops, many organized in
combat units, and of vast amounts
of arms and material. These are
defensive in nature, but that does
not lighten the ominous overtone
of this clandestine arms buildup.
We must remain aware of the
dangers which threaten the West-
ern hemisphere. Additional action
should be taken to pressure the
Castro regime into economic in-
solvency and to remove the Rus-
sian presence entirely. The danger
from -Cuba remains.
X-


Talks


FLORIDA WILDLIFE SCRAPBOOK


ST. JOSEPH'S SPIT PARK
Progress was made in attempts
to convert St. Joseph's Peninsula
into a state park in a meeting held
in my office on January 31 with
representatives present from the
Florida Board of Parks, Gulf Coun-
ty Historical Commission, Depart-
ment of the Air Force, Department
of the Interior, General Services
Administration, Coast Guard and
other interested parties.
The prime result of this confer-
ence was the promise given by
Air Force officials to begin immed-
iately a study of their need for the
northern half of St. Joseph's Penin-
sula, with an eye to selling this
property to Florida. Air Force rep-
resentatives were optimistic that
their report, to be given in about
two weeks, will be a favorable one.
Should this be the case, Florida
will be able to purchase at bar-
gain prices over 2400 acres of some
of the most beautiful land in the
state for development as a state
park.
Other results of the meeting
were the promise given by the De-
partment of the Interior to sell
land which it owns on the Peninsu-
la for $2.50 per acre for park pur-
poses. Also, the Coast Guard an-
nounced its willingness to start
immediately a study of the feasibil-
ity of permitting an access road
to be built to the park across its
Peninsula holdings. The Coast
Guard operates Loran stations on
St. oJseph's Peninsula and nearby
auto traffic interferes with these
delicately adjusted navigational
aids. A Coast Guard decision can
be expected shortly.
I feel the January 31 meeting
has provided the catalyst which
will shortly result in the fulfill-
ment of years of effort to establish
a park on St. Joseph's Peninsula.
Its prime result was coordination
of local, state and national inter-
ests in the Peninsula. I will con-
tinue working on this with all de-
liberation and I express admiration
for the perseverance of local and
state officials in our joint efforts
to establisli a state park.
TYNDALL
Tyndall Air Force Base is sche-
duled to receive some needed im
provements in facilities during the
current year. An Auto Maintenance
Shop, an Area Searce Radar Build-
ing, a Crash Fire Station and a
Heavy Equipment Shop will ac-
count for some $700,000 in new
construction, which will be recom-
mended to the Congress by the
Department of Defense. I predict
that Congress will approve these
recommendations. The facilities
will strengthen Tyndall's place in
the Air Force program. I am anx-
ious to see permanent improve-
ments located at Tyndall whenever
it is possible, for these improve-
ments strengthen Tyndall's likeli-
hood of survival when cutbacks are
made in the number of Air Force
bases. There is keen competition
throughout the Air Force system
for these improvements.
STATE REAPPORTIONMENT
I have introduced measures in-
tended to restrict United States
courts from interference in state
legislative apportionment. This is
patently a state matter and not one
in which the federal courts by any
stretch of the imagination could be
considered to have jurisdiction.
Yet, the United States Supreme
Court in a notoriously bad ruling
has stated that reapportionment
can be ordered, and in fact car-
ried out by the federal courts. I
have introduced two measures-
one which would provide the neces-
sary restrictions against interfer-
ence by the federal courts in reap-
portionment matters by a simple
act of Congress; the other would
provide for a constitutional amend
ment to accomplish the same pur
pose. Florida's unfortunate prob,
lems in reapportionment stem di
rectly from interference by the
federal courts.
CUBA
I have been watching with grow
ing dissatisfaction the buildup oi
Soviet arms and troops in Cuba
Their presence, just 90 miles fron
our shores, strategically situate'
for the subversion of Latin Amer
ica, poses a threat to our security:
which cannot be ignored or under
estimated.
Last October 22 when Presiden
Kennedy got tough and demand<
the withdrawal of offensive wes
pons from Cuba, the Russns o ens bace
ed down and acquiesced to Amern
can demands. Khrushchev further
agreed to end the shipment of oJ
fensive weapons to Cuba.


with Mr. and Mrs. Julian Agerton
and Mrs. Lovie Coburn in Greens-
boro. Enroute home Sunday after-
noon, they visited in Blountstown
with Mr. and Mrs. Alton Dendy,
Mrs. E. B. Dendy and Mrs. Verna
Miller. In Wewahitchka, they visit-
ed Mrs. Harriet Rowell and Mrs.
Berta Williams.


KINGSBERRY HOM ES thoughtful design for Southern Living
lilli Ii


"THE DANFORTH" NOW OPEN FOR INSPECTION


$13,500.00

PRICE INCLUDES:


* BEAUTIFUL BEACH LOT
* CITY WATER
* PAVED STREETS
* TERRAZO FLOORS
* BRICK VENEER
* MARK 27 GE RANGE
* BUILT IN KITCHEN EQUIPMENT


* PAVED DRIVES
* 2 FULL BATHS
* HURRICANE CLIPS
* PANELING
* CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONING
* CENTRAL HEAT
* LARGE SCREEN PORCH -
* CARPORT .


NEW KINGSBERRY HOMES IN MEXICO BEACH


Mexico Beach offers year-round living with all the
advantages of Florida resort living. Many lots have
canal and beach frontage and a community water sys-
tem serves the residents. Mexico Beach is convenient
to shopping centers, churches, schools. There's fishing
and hunting at your doorstep, yet you're living in the
heart of one of Florida's fastest growing areas.
Mexico Beach lies between two good towns. Panama
City is on the West, and Port St. Joe on the East.
In Mexico Beach you can set your own budget-you
may splurge or you may live quietly and econom-
ically. However you choose, you'll be in one of the
really fun spots of the South!

MEXICO BEACH'CORPORATION, INC.
in MEXICO BEACH


HOMES PRICED FROM

$7,950 TO $25,000
ATTRACTIVE FINANCING
As little as no down payment
to move into one of our homes ;t-
ON YOUR LOT ,

LOOK AT ALL THESE WONDERFUL FEATURES
Terrazo and Oak Floors Waterproofed Exterior
Fully Insulated Woodwork
Built-in Kitchen Equipment Solid Concrete Foundation
Paved Driveways Anchor Bolts and
Brick Veneer Hurricane Clips
Architecture Paneled Interiors
DIRECTIONS: Sales office on U. S. 98, Mexico Beach, -Fla.

MEXICO BEACH CORPORATION, INC.
Mexico Beach Station Phone: Port St. Joe 648-3111
MEXICO BEACH, FLORIDA


'II I P L-C- -


Historical Society I c
#S 8 tClOso avr sews1 lmse
Has Meeting IOe i/i /. f

The regular meeting of the St.
Joseph Historical Society was held stated that definite progress was Commission in conjunction with
February 2 at 3:00 p.m. in the made concerning the release of the the Florida Board of Parks and
February 2 at 3:00 p.mBuilding. in the land on St. Joseph Peninsula for Historic Memorials.
Municipal Building. State Park development. --
President Jesse V. Stone pre-
sided over the meeting. Charles B. Smith reported on the Visit in Greensboro
The highlight of the meeting proposed historical marker to be and Blountstown
was a report by Mr. Stone on his erected at the old St. Joseph Ceme- Last week end Mrs. Verna Smith
trip to Washington, D. C. Mr. Stone tery by the Gulf County Historical and Mrs. Myrtice Smith visited










-- SPECIALS GOOD WED., FEB. 6 THROUGH TUES., FEB. 12 --


These Specials Good
WEDNESDAY through TUESDAY
February 6, 7, 8, 9, 11 and 12


I!


SWIFT PROTEIN and SELECT
SIRLOINS


LB.
79c


SWIFT PROTEIN and SELECT LB.
Boneless New Yorks 89c
SWIFT PROTEIN and SELECT LB.
CLUB STEAK 69c
SWIFT PROTEIN and SELECT LB.
No. 7 STEAK 59c
ALL MEAT LB.
STEW BEEF 69c
SHORT RIB LB.
STEW BEEF 39c
LEAN MEATY BRISKET
Stew Beef 4 LB.$1m.00
SWIFT SELECT TENDER
Beef Liver 3LBS.-$1.00
FRESH GROUND DAILY
Ground Beef 3 LBS $1.00
FLAVOR RICH BROILING EACH
Minute Steaks 10c
5 'S p


"CHOICE FRYER PARTS SPECI
QUARTERED (Money Saver)
FRYER LEGS pound
QUARTERED (Money Saver)
FRYER BREAST, with wing lb.
FRYER BACKS 5lbs. 5
CHOICE CUT (Money Saver)
BREAST and LEGS pound
'ABLE READY FRESH WHOLE CUT UP

Fryers 2


AL!"
29c
33c
.1.00
43c


9c


CARNATION GOLD CROSS BRAND
EVAPORATED 4 Tons On Display!
Tall C

With $5.00 Order
FREE "JUMBO" MOVIE TICKET WITH QUAKER Box
Quaker Oats 23c
Sessions Rainbow or Southern Choice No. 10 Jug

Cooking Oil 97c
BAMA
SALAD DRESSING quart 39 c
GERBER'S STRAINED
BABY FOOD 10 jars 97c
(A MONEY SAVER)

Pepsi EC

COLAS Bottle
Fancy Long Grain Perfection 3 LB. BAG
RICE 39c
OAK HILL
PEACHES 4 C
YELLOW LABEL
Sweet POTATOES Cans
NO. 1 TALL CAN

TOMATOES 10c


Hershev's COCOA


V1 b.29c


FROM THE SOUTH I
OVER 10 TONS (20,000 Pounds) OF FRESH PRODUCE
SOLD HERE EACH WEEK -- ONE BIG TRUCK LOAD
HAS TO GO TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY -- ONE BIG
TRUCK LOAD HAS TO GO THURSDAY and FRIDAY!


-- Green Salad Specials --
Hard Head CABBAGE lb. I
Cello Bag RADISHES bag


5c


Cello Bag CARROTS bag 7c
Lg. Stalk CELERY stalk
Why Pay More? VINE RIPE LB.

TOMATOES 15c
"A Money Saver"
Firm Head LETTUCE head 19c
AVACADO PEARS each 1Oc
Large Bunches Fresh -
TURNIPS MUSTARD COLLARDS

50 LB. BAG II 0


Potatoes
With


10 LB.
$5.00 Order


19c


FRESH CROP
Yellow SQUASH pound 10c
BELL PEPPERS 4
CUCUMBERS For 19C
GREEN ONIONS 2 bunches 25c
BEST GRADE LB.
Pole Beans 19c

Sweet ,L. c
POTATOES
GA. GRADE 'A' LARGE BROWN

Eggs 2 97c
KRAFT-New Tasty Cheese Loaf Packed In Two-Pound Box
Cottaae-American CHEESE 2 Ib. 49c


Compare Our Prices We Save You Cash -- Not Stamps
TIIDRZD- qT A IVK Jlin~r .N


39c


BOSTON BUTT FRESH LB.
Pork Roast 36c
PORK STEAKS pound 45 c
Frosty Morn Sliced BACON lb. 49c


For Your Convenience With Our Many Varieties
- SWIFT PREMIUM 'LAMB -


KRAFT 16 Oz. Pint Jar (A Money Saver)

MAYONNAISE
PILLSBURY CANNED
B I S CUI TS 4 cans 25c
DELIGHT
OLE0 2lbs.29c
SWIFT'S BROOKFIELD
Stick BUTTER lb. 69c


SUPREME
ICE MILK


/2 gal. 39c


29c


FREE EGGS


ONE DOZEN


TO EVERY CUSTOMER WITH $10.00
ORDER OR MORE!


-- SPECIALS GOOD WED., FEB. 6 THROUGH TUES., FEB. 12 --


r I --I iI


HAM.iJJJLu.JLlJ UJLLk 'rl'IUJ.
HAM


-~ --


=EMU"







E STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1963




1 .I--


WELCOME TRAVELER... I( '
greeted with compliments on ":.
your every port of call.
The Toni Todd Uncrushable
arrives and departs on a 24-hour
7-' itinerary, any season, always
wrinlde-free, morning fresh.
Brush-stroke printed acetate
jersey wearing contrast binding
round, scoop neck and sleeves.
Machine washes, drips dry,
needs no iron. Black, brown or
green on white.
10 to 20; 12Y to 22Y.

$ 59 95


CCOSTIN'S


is most important for the pro-
spective mother to exercise
extra precautions against ex-
posure to infectious ailments.
Blood typing of both fattier
and mother will inform the doc-
tor as to whether there is a
possibility of a clash of blood
types between the two parents
that may cause problems for
the infant. Warned in advance,
the doctor can be prepared to
meet this condition. Drugs
sometimes can have an effect
on the embryo, particularly dur-
ing the early months of preg-
nancy. The expectant mother
should be very cautious about
taking any drugs without con-
sulting her doctor.
Good prenatal care won't
solve all of the problems asso-
ciated with childbirth, but it
will enable the doctor to deal
successfully with many of them.


-I
II I I I


et savings tooat


5Ev dah Power Corp. Will Have Open
House At New Suwannee River Plant
"All residents of the community Porter said that the plant's Open
and surroundings areas are cor- House tours are in honor of Na-
dially invited to attend Open tional Electrical Week-February
House at our Suwannee Plant on 10 through 16-which is being cel-
Friday, February 15, and Sunday. ebrated by electric companies thru-:
February 17," announced R. G. out the United States.
Porter, Port St. Joe District Man- "Under the direction of Plant
ager for Florida Power Corpora- Superintendent W. L. Dinkins,"
tion. said Porter, "plant personnel will
The hours for Open House on guide walk-through tours of Su-
these two days are: Friday, from wannee Plant." i
2:00 to 5:00 p.m.; and Sunday, He pointed out: "If local civic
2:00 to 5:00 p.m.; and Sunday clubs or high school classes would
from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. like to tour our facilities as a
group, but cannot attend on Fri-
day or Sunday, we would appreci-
ate their contacting our local of-
fice as soon as posisble; we will
make every effort to schedule a
tour at their convenience."
During National Electrical Week,
the following facilities of Florida
Power Corporation will have Open
A Service of Your Doctor of Medicine, House: Paul L. Bartow Plant; Hig-
Your Local Medical Society and the
Florida Medical Association. gins Plant; Inglis Plant, Turner
PRENATAL CARE Plant; Suwannee River Plant; Av-
IMPORTANT on Park lant; and the System Dis-
Childbirth is a completely patching Center in St. Petersburg.
natural and normal happening Porter said: "We are looking
and in a large majority of
births there are no special prob- forward to seeing our friends and
lems for either child or mother. neighbors and their children dur-
The early weeks of pregnancy ing Open House, and we're sure
are the most important in the
infant's development. It is dur- they will find our Suwannee Plant
ing this period that the grow- to be a fascinating operation."
ing baby is most susceptible to Residents of the community and
all sorts of problems that will
cause trouble later. Widespread surrounding areas are invited to
studies have shown that many attend Open House at the Suwan-
birth problems could have been nee Plant of Florida Power Cor-
mother-to-beor haducedsultedth portion on Friday, February 15,
physician at the outset of preg- from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m., and on
nancy, or even before becoming Sunday, February 17, from 1:30 to
pregn stance, a well-balanced 4:30 p.m. This plant, one of eight
diet containing all the essentials electric generating plants in the
to proper nutrition and growth 31-county system of Florida Power
is necessary for both mother Corporation, was built in 1954 and,
and infant. The doctor has long
been aware of the importance today, generates 148,000 kilowatts
of diet in pregnancy and thus of electricity. These Open House
gives counsel to the mother-to- tours are in honor of National Elec-
be. Certain infectious diseases,.
such as German measles, can trial Week (February 10-16) which
have an adverse effect on the is being celebrated by electric com-
infant if the mother becomes panies throughout the United
ill, particularly during the first States
-thrpp months reof( ..nn. TIt IStates.


ROAST


LB.


39c


GROUND FRESH DAILY-GROUND


BEEF


LBS.


MISSISSIPPI BRAND SLICED


BACON

FRESH APALACHICOLA


OYSTERS


register's
WEINERS
shoulder Round
ROAST


3 Ibs. $1.00

lb. 59c


Brisket ."
STEW Ilb. 19c
Fresh Meaty Pork
Neck Bones l0 lbs. 95c


USE THE WANT ADS


ants rats mice rfish
cai coaches

for the sake of your ho.me


NOWNYLON TRUCK TIRES BUY
7srsfneNYLON TRUCK TIRES/,


670x15 RECAPS
As Low As-With Xchange

$7.98


mox
600
x16


*Long pay-load mileage
* Shock-Fortified Cord


* Traction-proven tread
* Built for farm and highway


Pate's Service Center


Port St. Joe, Florida


ENDS and
BAC


Morton's Beef, Chicken and
Turkey
POT PIES
ea. 19c

Morton's TV
DIN NERS
All Flavors
ea. 49 c

Fresh
Strawberries
pt. 39c

Sweet
POTATOES
lb. 10c

Red A
POTATOES
3 1bs. 19c

Fancy
CARR 0 TS
2 pkgs. 15c


Bama Fresh Full Quart
Mayonnaise 19c
Limit One Quart to Family At This Low Price
Bakerite
Shortening 3 lbs. 59c


Bar C
Sausage
Boneless


1.25


LB.


39c


PINT


79c


3lbs. $1.00


Stewing Beef lb. 59c
3eef Short
RIBS lb. 29c
3ure Pork
Sausage lb. roll 29c


PIECES
ON


4 lb. box 89c


utant% qo usitWt .. J




QUART BOTTLE
ORANGE JUICE 37c
PILLSBURY HUNGRY JACK
Pancake Flour lb. box 23c
CHASE and SANBORN
C 0 FFEE lb. can 59c
KELLOGG'S
Rice Krispies 5'2 oz. pkg. 17c
PURINA
DOG CHOW 21b.pkg. 43c
SWEETIE PIE
MIVarshmallow Pies doz. 39c
IITNEY BRAND BIG NO. 2V/2 CANS
Sweet Potatoes 2 cans 49c
KRAFT'S NEW MILD AMERICAN STYLE
Spaghetti Dinner 2 for 49c
KRAFT'S ..*
Peanut Brittle 14 oz. pkg. 39c
KRAFT'S Fresh ruit Good-In New Re-Usable Tumbler
APPLE JELLY 18 oz. 29c
AtYLES I ,.
TABLE SALT box 10c


Daisy Fresh
OLEO
5,000 USP


Detergent
FAB


2lbs. 31c
Units Vitamin 'A' Added


pkg. 25c


275 FREE EXTRA GRAND PRIZE STAMPS
WITH COUPON FROM THURSDAY'S PANAMA CITY NEWS-HERALD


I -


I


i-


I


- I I, I


I


Q


- I


SPECIALS FOR FEBRUARY 7, 8 and 9
BEST MEATS IN TOWN--LOOK! DUBUQUE'S HEAVY WESTERN BEEF!


CHUCK


mo ,











100 Extra Plaid Stamps
With This Coupon and
PURCHASE of $5.00 or MORE
Redeemable only at A&P Stores giving Plaid
Stamps in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina
Limit one coupon per adult customer
:oupon good thru Feb. 10 Jax. 2-8-63


2nd BIG WEEK! "SUPER-RIGHT" FREEZER


BEEF
"Super-Right" Western (85 to 100 lb. avg.)
Whole Beef Round lb. 69c
(Consists of Roasts, Steaks and
Ground Meat)
"Super-Right" Western (45 to 65 lb. avg.)
Whole Full Loin lb. 79c
(Consists of Sirloin, Porterhouse and
T-Bone Steaks)
"Super-Right" Western (25 to 30 lb. avg.)
Whole Short Loin lb. 95c
(Consists of Porterhouse and
T-Bone Steaks)
"SUPER-RIGHT" HEAVY WESTERN

Beef Rib


25 to 30 Lb.
Average
(Consists of Steaks
and Roasts)
LB.


SALE!
'Super-Right" Western (275 to 325 lb. avg.)
Side of Beef lb. 53c
(Consists of Steaks, Roasts, Stew
and Ground Meat)
'Super-Right" Western (150 to 175 lb. avg.)
Beef Forequarter lb. 49c
(Consists of Roasts, Steaks, Stew
and Ground Meat)
'Super-Right" Western (80 to 100 lb. avg.)
Whole Arm Chuck Ilb. 53c
(Consists of Roasts, Stews and
Ground Meat)
'SUPER-RIGHT" HEAVY WESTERN BEEF

Hind: Qtr,
Average -
140 to 165 Lb.
(Consists of Steaks,
Roasts and Stew)
LB.


"SUPER-RIGHT" WESTERN BEEF T-Bone, Sirloin or Boneless Top Round


STEAKS


Dial


SOAP
9c OFF


4


Reg.
Size


49c


Bright Sail


BLEACH


-. 'Gal.
Z Glass


Your
Choice

LB.


Ann Page


KETCHUP


14 Oz.
Bottles


33c


Ann Page


Mayonnaise


39c


A & P Instant


COFFEE


10 Oz.
Jar


99c


FRESH CRISP PASCAL

CELERY


Quart


53c


White House Evaporated


MILK
13 Fl. Oz.
C .ans ,C
6 .' 79c''i-:


2


FIRM RIPE ANJOU

PEARS


FOR


LBS.


19c



29c


JANE PARKER FRESHLY BAKED SPECIAL!
Reg.

BlackberryPie 49 39c


Swel
Frosting
Gentle
Ivory Snow 1
Detergent
Dreft lb.,
Detergent
Ivory Liquid
Liquid Detergent
JOY pt.
Detergent
Oxydol lb.
Detergent
TIDE lb.
Fabric Softener
Downy pt., I
Nabisco Premiur
SALTINES
Purina
Dog Chow 2
Le Sueur W. K.
White Corn


Dixie Lily
% lb. 37c GRITS lb. box 17c
Detergent
2% oz. 35c Cheer 3 lbs., 5/2 oz. 79e
Premium Detergent
1% oz. 35c DUZ lb., 7 oz. 79c
Detergent
12 oz. 35c DASH lb., 8V2 oz. 39c
t Cleaner-3 lbs., 6 oz.
6 oz. 67c Spic 'N Span 93c
Comet-14 oz.
,4 oz. 35c Comet 2 cans 33c
Cleaner
, 4 oz. 33c Mr. Clean pt., 12 oz. 69c
Liquid Detergent
Ifl. oz. 46c Thrill pt., 6 ozs. 67c
m Chicken of the Sea
lb. 27c Chunk Tuna 9V4 oz. 53c
Green Giant-12 oz.
;5 lb. $2.79 Niblets Corn 2 cans 39c
12 Oz. 3reen Giant
2 for 43c Mexicorn 12 ozs. 21c


mreMST bwM


Personal Bars
Ivory Soap
Medium Bars
Ivory Soap
Large Bars
Ivory Soap


4 for 27c

2 for 21c

2 for 33c


Regular Bars
Camay Soap bar lie
3ath Bars
Camay Soap 2 for 31c
Regular Bars
Zest Soap 2 for 29c
3ath Bars-3c OFF
Zest Soap 2 for 35c
Detergent Tablets
Salvo lb., 7 ozs. 41c
sanitary Napkins-12's
Kotex 2 boxes 89c
3reen Giant C. S.
Golden Corn can 21c


510 FIFTH STREET
Prices in this ad effective through
Saturday, February 9, 1963


Gulf


.,"





A state-wide hog c
cation program was in
the State of Florida.
Florida is one of th
to start an organized
program. It is expect
states throughout the
begin similar program
future.
Florida's program w
istered by the Animal
vision of the Florida
ment of Agriculture i
with the USDA An
Eradication Division.
The Florida State
Eradication Committ
membership includes
ducers, livestock marl
packers, veterinarian
officials and universe
agreed that two steps
to accomplish a succe
tion program: one (1)
number of swine vac
two (2) control the


COUNTY AGENT'S NOTES

By CUBIE R. LAIRD


cholera eradi- easier to control and eradicate.
inaugurated in Additional information regard-
February 1. ing hogcholera and the eradication
e first states program will be sent to you. If
d eradication there are .questions regarding the
ed that other program, please feel free to call
e nation will on us.
is in the near
End Visit Here; Return
ill be admin- To Las Vegas, Nevada
I Industry Di- Mrs. Charles H. Sundin and baby
State Depart- son, Michael Porter Sundin, left
n cooperation Friday, February 1 for Las Vegas,
imal Disease Nevada, after a six week visit here
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ned
Hog Cholera Porter, who accompanied them as
tee, whose far as New Orleans. Mrs. Sundin
swine pro- and son flew from New Orleans to
ket operators, Las Vegas Saturday afternoon.
s; regulatory Mr. and Mrs. Porter returned to
ty personnel, Port St. Joe Sunday night. Captain
are necessary Sundin, having spent a month here
ssful eradica- with his family, had left two weeks
) increase the earlier for his post as Nellis Air
ccinated, and Force Base, Las Vegas, Nev.
movement of _


unvaccinated swine.
The swine producer will have un-
til August 31, 1963 to vaccinate his
animals against hog cholera. Dur-
ing this interval, animals may
move from farm to farm without
restrictions. After August 31, 1963,
all swine movement from the farm
must be swine vaccinated at least
21 days prior to movement, except
those going to permitted slaughter
establishments. This means that
swine cannot be moved to another
farm, auction market, or gathering
,place unless they have been vac-
cinated against hog cholera at
least 21 days.
SThe state will furnish, through
qualified administrators without
cost to the owner. vaccines to be
used in the treatment of swine
against hog cholera. All other costs
will be borne by the owner, as in
the past.
Owners of swine which die from
hog cholera 21 days or more after
vaccination, or owners of swine
condemned under the hog cholera
eradication program, will be idem-
nified for the appraised market val-
ue of such swine.
Be sure to call a veterinarian or
livestock inspector at the first
signs of illness in your herd.
Vaccination is the only safe
means of protecting swine against;
hog cholera. Florida's eradication
i program will be based on wide-
spread innoculation. Authorities
say that if 65% or more of our
swine population is vaccinated
each year against hog cholera that
the chances of an epidemic of hog
cholera will be nil, and that occa-
sional infected herds will be much


CLASSIFIED ADS
Midget invesments With
Giant Returns


PLUMBING AND
ELECTRICAL WORK
Contracting or Repair

PHONE 227-3886

CECIL PARRISH
Licensed and Bonded


FROM


A Service of Your Doctor of Medicine.
Your Local Medical Society and the
Florida Medical Association.
SOME BULES FOR COLDS
Old King Cold is arriving
again for his annual, if not
more frequent, visit to thou-
sands of Floridians of all ages.
We all know the familiar
symptoms, so first off let's say
once again that you can't cure
a cold. You can ward off a cold
much of the time by following
a few simple rules-
Keep your body in condi-
tion to fight disease by eating a
well-balanced diet. Get enough
sleep every night.
Don't sit or lie in a draft.
Beware of chilling or of over-
heating, either of which can
weaken resistance.
Dress appropriately for the
weather. Avoid extremes.
Avoid close contact with
others who have colds.
Vaccination is not a certain
method for prevention. Ask
your doctor whether you should
have a vaccine.
And then comes the day
when you still catch a cold. To
help your body fight the infec-
tion-
Take a hot bath, drink a
glass of hot lemonade or warm
milk, and go to bed. Colds re-
quire bed rest to allow your
body's defenses full chance to
fight back against the virus.
Follow a common sense
diet. Don't overeat but don'l
starve yourself. Drink a lot oi
liquids if you wish. It won't
help the cold but it won't hurl
you.
Don't take laxatives unless
your doctor so orders.
Use caution in taking msed-
icine. Follow your doctor'd
directions carefully. Paten
medicine "cold cures" availabk
without prescription can oady
relieve discomfort. Vita
won't help, either.
Blow your nose geam
Strong blasts can cause ear st
sinus problems.
Consider others. Cover fi
cough or sneeze. Use your ow
glass, towel, dishes and utensils.
Stay out of crowds and don'
kiss anyone.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1963


S4e Star Brings News of Your Neighbors


- Family Night Special -


Big 32 Ounce

SIRLOIN FOR TWO


$2.75


Served With FRENCH FRIES, LETTUCE and TOMATO
TEA or COFFEE and ROLLS

5 HAMBURGERS $1.00
5 HOT DOGS $1.00
EVERY DAY NO LIMIT
To Take Out


City Restaurant

Corner Fourth Street and Monument Ave.


PLANS TO


COMPLETION..,


COMFORT

_0^:9 CONVENIENCE

VALUE


@YOUR MEDALLION HOME, the complete
way to carefree, total electric living. Whether
you are planning to build or remodel, look for! .vard
to an electric cooking center, electric water
heater, electric washer and dryer and
clean, flameless electric heating and cooling.
Plan your home to make use of all the
jii Gout work-saving electric appliances, and make sure
1pO )IR m S to ask your contractor about Light for Living,
\ u IN ithe low cost, sight-saving way to make use

I\ ERicN, of interior design.
Plan a complete home ... a Medallion home.
When your building or remodeling is finished,
i O t illt a .,
.\ ,rCment f 0 '3 comfort and convenience will come
I nP HOUJS- from a flip of the switch.


FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
YOUR TAX-PAY/NG, INVESfOR-OWNED ELECTRIC COMPANY


',I


GOODSON'S
RADIO and TV REPAIR

Admiral Emerson DuMont
Radio TV Stereo Air Conditioners
ANTENNA SYSTEMS, GOOD USED TV's $8W.00 up
SERVICE CALLS $3.00

Phone 7-3251 or 7-3911 Day or Nite
DAY or NIGHT

317 REID AVENUE
(Next Door To Telegraph Office)
Your Satisfaction Is Our Business -


1312 Palm Boulevard


~wsl


mmmm";


__ ,, I


L wri~hr~a~a*LIIW*arwc-~i~lrr*ew LPiarrl- ---I-








THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1963


NEED A PLUMBER?
CALL BEAMAN
Plumbing installation Repair a
Contract Work A Specialty
Ag.nta for 5
Brand Name Plumbing Fixtures
-CALL US FOR FREE ESTIMATE-

TWO EXPERIENCED PLUMBERS TO SERVE YOU

BEAMAN PLUMBING SERVICE
1107 GARRISON AVE. PHONE UAll 7-2M41





DME TIC

LAUNDRY and CLEANERS
for


PICK-UP and


DELIVERY SERVICE
PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA
MEXICO BEACH OVERSTREET WHITE CITY

EVERY MONDAY and THURSDAY
FAMILY LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANING and
UNIFORM RENTAL SERVICE
Drop Us A Card -


417 Grace Avenue


Panama City, Florida


Your own safety, as well
as the other fellow's, de-
mands the dimming of
your lights so you won't
i blind an oncoming driver.
If he can't see, he might
hit you.
2-11


CLASSIFIED ADS
Midget investment With
Giant Retur


TELEVISION
Black & White and Color
Stereo Air Conditioning
Service Calls, $3.00
All work guaranteed
ST. JOE RADIO
& TV COMPANY
Phone 227-4081


Four different ways to make going

more fun than getting there
You can see why one of America's will :m-ke you.think that ice and snow
favorite outdoor sports is driving are stuff; and for pure adventure,
Chevrolets, with four entirely different Ann *'s only sports car, Corvette-
kinds of cars to choose from. There's tov in wo all-new versions with looks
the Jet-smooth Chevrolet, about as luxu- thai f:;n stop traffic like a rush-hour
rious as you can go without going over- bliz zt rd. Picked your favorite already?
board in price; the low-cost The next thing is to take
Chevy II, a good-looking car the wheel at your Chevrolet
that would send any family dealer's. If that doesn't have
packing; another family you thinking of places to
favorite, the sporty Corvair, go, maybe you'd rather just
whose rear-engine traction Keeps Going Great have a ball around town!


~ -~
(


CHEVY II NOVA 400 SPORT COUPE


I -


CORVAIR MONZA CLUB COUPE


AHVETTE STING RAY SPORT COUPE


, Now-Bonanza Buys on four entirely different kinds of cars at your Chevrolet dealer's


FLOYD CHEVROLET COMPANY


PHONE 227-2221


Frozen Plants

Are Possible
Tax Deduction
Taxpayers who suffered losses of
trees, shrubs or other non-business
property during the December
freeze may have a deductible in-
come tax loss according to Laurie
W. Tomlinson, District Director of
Internal Revenue.
Mr. Tomlinson said that inquiries
directed to his office indicate a
misunderstanding on the part of
many persons as to how to com-
pute the loss, particularly where
ornamental trees or shrubs are in-
volved. As a means of clearing up
any misunderstanding Mr. Tomlin-
son said that the following provi-
sions apply: (1) If a storm (or
freeze) damages trees or shrubs
any loss must be the result of an
actual decrease in value of the
property as a whole. In arriving at
the value of the property as a
whole, trees, shrubbery and build-
ings are considered an integral
part of the realty. (2) The amount
of the loss is determined by the'
difference in the fair market val-
ue of the property as a whole im-
mediately before and immediately
after the casualty. Of course, the
actual cost of repairing the dam-
age to the property may in any
(particular case serve as evidence
of the amount of the overall loss
to the property. Thus, the total of
the actual expenditures for remov-
ing destroyed or damaged trees,
pruning to preserve damaged trees
and shrubs, and the replanting ne-
cessary to restore the property to
its approximate value before the
casualty, may serve as evidence of
the amount of the overall loss to
the property. Thus, the total of
the actual expenditures for re-
moving destroyed or damaged
trees, pruning to preserve damag-
ed trees and shrubs, and the re-
planting necessary to restore the
property to its approximate value
before the casualty, may serve as
evidence of the amount of loss to
the property brought about by
damage to trees or shrubs. (3) The
loss determined in (2) above must
be reduced by any amounts receiv-
ed from insurance and may not ex-
ceed the adjusted basis of the en-
tire property. (4) No loss may be
taken for sentimental value or mi-
nor damage which merely retards
the growth of shrubbery or trees.
(5) The loss must be claimed in the
tax year during which the casualty
occurred, regardless of when the


I .


repairs or replacements are made.
Mr. Tomlinson also said that tax-
payers having questions on the
computation of casualty losses or
information needed to support the
loss can obtain a booklet, publi-
cation number 5174, covering los-
ses from casualties from his office
without charge. Assistance can al-
so be obtained by calling or visit-
ing the nearest Internal Revenue
office on Monday of each week.


protein milk
perfect food.


During this season of
illness, active young-
sters and adults too,
maintain their power-
house of energy .
and their health .
more easily when they
drink plenty of high-
nature's most nearly


THE IDEAL FOODS

Dairy Products keep you "Up-to-par"
during those days of denial.


ORLETE MAL


Phone 639-4383, Collect


Wewahitchka, Fla,


II


401 Williams Avenue


_______________ U


Oak Grove Assembly of God Church
FRED HUNT, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 10100 am.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 aJ.m
CHRISTIAN CADETS 6:15 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC SERVICES 7:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Services (Wed.) ........ 7:30 p.m.


EGGS
BUTTER
OLEO
MILK


COTTAGE CHEESE -- SKIM MILK -- BUTTERMILK "W-A-A
CREAM -- CHOCOLATE MILK -- ORANGE JUICE

IF IT'S BORDEN'S, IT'S GOT TO BE GOOD -


HARDEN'S DAIRY
"GULF COUNTY'S ONLY PRODUCING DAIRY"


BORDEN PRODUCTS AGENT


facts about paper



three out of five


people believe that trees are being cut faster than used .

whereas there is 9% more growing wood now than in 1935.
























This message by ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY, Port St. Joe, Florida,

in behalf of the Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Industry.

I Ira -- .1111[


1 'IC~PP"~g~-rl~Wn~zbC~I~Y~i~Lep~Bl~bl~e~













ANNIVERSARY


SEE "BILLY ROSE'S
JUMBO"...
MGM's adaptation of Broadway's gay, colorful,
.song-happy circus musical starring Doris Day,
Stephen Boyd, and Jimmy Durante.
----------------- m------ m------mm-----W~tw--- ------
Come in today and join in the fun and excitement of our 37th
Anniversary Circus Sale. Star "performers" will be featured
throughout this Jumbo two week engagement. The Ringmaster
(your friendly IGA Grocer) will personally attend to the intro-
duction of these famous names. We know they will mean satis-
faction and enjoyment to everyone in your family.


PERFECTION

IGA-GRATED
TUNA
GERBER'S STRAINED
BABY FOOD
DIXIE BELLE
FIG BARS
60 TABLET BOTTLE
BU OFFER N


3 b. pkg. 45c

6 oz. can 23c


9 jars

2 lb. pkg.


only


99c

39c

89c


FE I0,000 Top Value Stamps
Register Each Time You Visit Your IGA Super Market
alEiEb 20 WINNERS 500 TOP VALUE STAMPS EACH


TASTY IGA


Pork & Beans
MAYFIELD CREAM
Golden Corn 2
\ PREFRESHIlNG IGA
SPineapple Juice


LE-KO CUT NO. 303 CAN


Green Beans


300
CAN


S303
CANS
46 OZ
CAN


1 Oc

25c

29c


c


Can


Trellis Early Garden No. 303 Can


GRADE 'A' STEWING-3'/2 TO 4 LB. AVG.



COPELAND'S MIXED SMOKED


PEAS


2CANS


33c


Allen Baby Green No. 300 Can

LIMAS 2CANS


29c


ALLEN'S
Sweet Potatoes 2 CS 27c

Jergen's Bath Soap 1 Oc


LARGE PACKAGES
FAB


COOKED


ALL PURPOSE DETERGENT


IFOR


IGA LIQUID PINK LOTION
DETERGENT


49c


22 OZ.
SIZE 39c


Butt Portion


Per Pound


TENDERIZED WHOLE
Smoked HAMS
SMOKED SLAB-SLICED
BACON


SWIFT'S PREMIUM
FRANKFURTERS


VEGETOLE PURE VEGETABLE
SHORTENING


Shank Portion


Per Pound


LB.

S LBS.


47c

$1
39c


12 OZ.
PKG.


3 Lb.
Can


SWIFT'S JEWEL COOKING

0OIL

V2 Gal. 69c
HIRES 6 BOTTLE CARTON
Root Beer
29c

Betty Crocker
DEVIL'S FOOD
WHITE YELLOW


Pkgs.


Mixes

89c


COOKING or EATING 4 LBS.
APPLES 49c

RADISHES BAG 5c
GA. RED SWEET LB.
POTATOES lOc
VALUE ASSORTMENT
VALENTINES
29c 39c 49c


GIANT PACKAGE
AD DETERGENT
BAR SOAP FOR LAUNDRY
OCTAGON SOAP


Prices Go<
February
7, 8 and 9


Ii U


3
Lbs.

FULLY


ea. 79c
2 bars 23c


all"Idds


)


Cake





Wayne Ernst was high man for
the Pacer's with a 500 series. Jo
right, front row: Scheffer, Treasurer; Roy Blackshear, Sentinel; Ann Holland came in high for the
Matron; Mrs. Ver- Mrs. Marie Creamer, Worthy Matron; Robert H. girls with a 325 series.
s Clara Pate, Sec- Trawick, Worthy Patron; Mrs. Madeline Black- On alleys 7 and 8 the Splits lost
iate Patron; Mrs. shear, Martha; Miss Charlotte Lovelace, Ruth; three of the four games to the
ava Croxton, Mar- Mrs. Patsy Haddan, Organist; Mrs. Mary Jane Tra- Spares. The Spares high man was
irs. Evelyn Smith, wick, Associate Conductress. (Star photo) Frank Dennis with a 429 series,
arder; Mrs. Sybil Wynell Burke came in high for
the girls with a 364 series. and
HOLDS OPEN INSTALLATION TUES. Wynell also picked up a fine 6-7
1 HOLDS OPEN INSTALLATION TUES. split.
Things are happening to the
Splits as Wayne Smith had a 457
iprin Thi i M o fnr tlia I


invocation was led by the Chap-
lain, Mrs. Madeline Blackshear.
Mrs. Dickey welcomed all mem-
bers and visitors, after which she
called her officers to the East
where she graciously thanked them
-p-, F.'*_: +. "1'-1 n.I .. .. .. A c... .. .4


iUlly decUrated, with the predomii- for their faithfulness and present-
nant colors being red and white, ed each with a lovely gift. Mrs.
the chosen colors of the new Wor- Dickey received from her officers
thy Matron. A large golden cup, as moments of the past year a
the emblem of the new Worthy Ma- charm bracelet and a white Eastern
tron was placed in front of the Star Bible, which had been auto-
dias, and her motto "Faith and graphed by each of the outgoing
Loyalty" was blazoned on the wall officers.
above the station of the Associate At this time Mrs. Dickey intro-
Matron in red letters on a white duced the installing officers: In-
background. Misses Sara Norris stalling Worthy Matron, Mrs. Ruth
and Pat Johnson, neices of the in- Ramsey, PM; Installing Marshal,
coming Worthy Matron, acted as Mrs. Flora Long, PM; Installing
pages. Chaplain, Mrs. Jonnie Sykes, PM;
The opening ceremonies were Installing Secretary, Mrs. Jeanette
presided over by Mrs. Eula Dickey, Presnell, PM; Installing Organist,
the retiring Worthy Matron. The Mrs. Myrtice Smith, PM.


TELEPHONE: BAll 7-4191
Sun., Fri., Holldays- 2:46 p.m.
L Mon. thru Thurs. 4:45 p

FRIDAY and SATURDAY
-&MOMAWN 'W lr. i


SUNDAY -


MONDAY TUESDAY


TH ,A r. r l ii ,l i : i i: I H H r :I L jr,! [l HF ; ,

ANTHONY
FRANCIOSA .
JANE FONDA -
JIM HUTTON '
LOIS .
NETTLETON
i TENNESSEE
WILLIAMS'


.


.~,:- ~


SUSAN PETER
HAYWARD. -FINCH


D r4NE C ,'PiL
I :E. PI|Q .MLIPE
Li, iiLfl.I


OES OFFICERS-Above, left to
Mrs. Eula Dickey, Past Worthy h
na Burch, Associate Matron; Mis
retary; Robert Creamer, Associ
David Moon, Chaplain; Mrs. Ne
shal. Back row, left to right: M
Ester; Mrs. Oleta Atkinson, W


GULF CHAPTER 19


By Mrs. Jeanette Presnell
Gulf Chapter 191, Order of Eas-
tern Star, held open installation
for its 1963-64 officers in the Ma-
sonic Hall at 7:30 p.m. January 29.
The Chapter Room was beauti-
F1711 17 A- Arn- -- I-3 --2 -ihfl.T-- ---I -F


series. s.iil was ng 1 tIle
Splits. Other news was Alice Sam-
uelson bowling over 100 for the
first time since she started bowl-
ing. But things will be better after
this for there is talk around that
she has a new bowling ball.


Team Standings
The Big Four
The Splits


W L
8 4
8 4


The Sn s7 !5


Winton Ferrell took high series
for the Ten Pins with a 484, Jo Fer
rell took high series for the girls
with a 341.
On alleys 3 and 4 the Telstars
took four games from the Little
Four with Vance Rogers taking
first place with a 434 series. Mary
Brown came out on top for the
girls with a 396 series.
The Little Four had Jesse Stew,
art leading the team with a 432
series, and for the second week in
a row Ann Whittle took high ser-
ies for the girls with a 389.
The smoke was rising on alleys
5 and 6 as the Big Four took four
games from the Pacer's Four, and
also went into first place in league
standing. The Big. Four had the
highest team series Friday night
that has been bowled up to this
point in the mixed league. They
had a 1972. Ray Medlin and Billy
Joe Richards had a big part in this
high series as Ray bowled a 573
series, and Billy Joe had a 546
series. Evelyn Smith was on the
head pin again as she bowled a
123, 191, and a 132 for a series of
446.


The Untouchables ------ 6 6 Jitney Jungle made off with
The Telstars 6 6 three of the four points. Lois Smith
The Ten Pins 5 7 rolled the highest series for lanes
Pacer's Four 5 7 1 and 2 with her 442 including
The Little Four -- -- 3 9 games of 154, 135 and 153: Linda
Stewart followed Lois with a ser-
COMMERCIAL LEAGUE ies of 377. Next in order were Eve-
Last week our league really got lyn Smith with the high game for
a shake-up. Basil's Standard Sta- their lanes of 162 and a series of
tion team pulled the biggest upset 374. Ann Whittle had a series of
our league has seen. Basil's took 363, and Verna Burch supported
on Costin's and became the first with her series of 336.
team to hand the once proud For St. Joe Laundry, Jean Stou-
"sweepers" a sweep. The four fer led with a 377 series. Frances
game loss is the only time Costin's Graham was next with a 355 series.
has bowed all games to anyone Lending their support was Lou Tay-
Joe Davis did the most damage lor with a 321, Dot Koller with a
with his 493 followed by Sam Sam- 298 and Betty Whitehurst with a
uelson's 469. The biggest help Ba. 297.
sil's got all night was given how- Ed's Florist made off with three
ever by.none other than Costin5s points with Maxine Jensen leading
ex-anchor man Jake Koller. Jake with high series for the lanes of
rolled a record busting 419 series 465 including games of 135, 175
to become the "goat". Tommy andand 155. Mary Brown was next
Pridgeon was high for Costin's with her series of 366. Elise Rod
with 496. gers bowled well with a 351 ser-
Florida National Bank collected ies followed by Wynell Burke with
four points the easy way by having a 349 series and Alice Machen had


* As the roll of incoming officers
Jwas called by the Installing Mar-
* shall, they took their respective
places inside the labyrinth where
they assumed their vows. They
were then invested with the badge
of their office and seated by the
Marshall. Installed for the year, in
a very impressive ceremony, were:
Worthy Matron, Mrs. Marie Cream-
er; Worthy Patron, Robert H. Tra-
wick; Associate Matron, Mrs. Verna
Burch; Associate Patron, Robert
Creamer; Secretary, Miss Clara
Pate; Treasurer, Mrs. Sybil Schef-
fer; Conductress, Mrs. Bell Du-
Bose; Associate Conductress, Mrs.
Mary Jane Trawick; Chaplain, Mrs.
David Moon; Marshal, Mrs. Neva
Croxton; Organist, Mrs. Patsy Had-
dan; Ruth, Miss Charlotte Lovelace;
Esther, Mrs. Evelyn Smith; Martha,
Mrs. Madeline Blackshear; Electa,
Mrs. Eula Dickey; Warder, Mrs.
Oleta Atkinson and Sentinel, Roy
Blackshear.
The Marshal-elect, Mrs. Maybel
Swatts, was unable to be present
and will be installed at a later
date.
The new Worthy Matron thanked
the Chapter for the confidence
shown by placing her in this sta-
tion and expressed her hope that,
with the help of each member,
this will truly be an outstanding
year in the things for which the
Order stands.
The Worthy Patron addressed
the members and visitors and ex-
pressed his pleasure in being cho-
sen to serve the Chapter.
A vocal solo, "I Believe", was
rendered by Miss Marian Lauder,
accompanied by Mrs. Myrtice
Smith at the piano.
The Conductress escorted Mrs.
Eula Dickey and Robert Creamer to
the East, where they were present-
ed the Junior Past Matron's Jewel
and the Junior Past Patron's Jewel.
The Worthy Matron introduced
the members of her family pres-
ent; her mother, Mrs. Sara Shef-
field; her husband, Robert Crea-
mer; her son, Robert, Jr., and four
nieces, Mrs. Loren White and
Misses Sara Norris, Pat Johnson
and Ann Johnson.
Before closing the meeting, Mrs.
Creamer presented gifts to the In-
stalling Officers, to the pages, to
Miss Lauder, and to others who
assisted in making the evening a
success.
Among the out-of-town guests
were Estella Parramore, Grand
'Instructor, Hazel Millergren, Nils
Millergren, Josephine White, Er-
nestine Jones, Robert Jones, Geral-
dine Freeman and Carmi Crutch-
field of Wewahitchka, and Corene
Dykes, Kate Simmons and Effie
White of Panama City.
The evening ended with a recep-
tion graciously presided over by
the Worthy Matron.


BOWLING

NEWS

MIXED LEAGUE
By L. D. Holland
Friday night on alleys 1 and 2,
the Untouchables were shining as
they took four games from the Ten
Pins. Randy McClain was high man
with a 453 series, also coming into
the spotlight was Linda Akins as
she took second place for the Un-
touchables with a 422 series. Her
J games were a 134, 152 and a 136.


a 291 series.
For the IGA, winning their one
point, was Maxine Smith, leading
with a good series of 393. Sally
White followed with a series of
363. Ruth Ramsey was next with
her series of 334. Jean Stebel had
a series of 319. Judy McClain was
suffering from a bad case of "split-
itis" and only managed a series
of 293.

INDUSTRIAL LEAGUE
Tuesday night's action saw Elec-
tric Meter bump Vitro three to
one. Sonny Counts at 481 and Jay
W. Bouington at 427 set the pace.
Vitro was led by Randy McClain
and Ruel Whitehurst with identical
492's.
The Laboratory held Pulp Mill to
a split of four points on lanes 3
and 4. The Chemists presented a
well balanced attack and had a re-
spectable 2260 series. Tom Thorn-
ton had a 505 for the night.
Box Plant ran over the Glidden
boys for all four points. The Box-
ers turned in a very good 2279
series. Wayne Smith and Lou Lit-
tle were way "off" for the Glidden
crew.
The hottest man and the hottest
team at the alley was Bill Whaley
and the Paper Mill. They "took"
four points from Back Maintenance.
As if Bill's 598, a personal high,
and high for the league so far,
wasn't enough, Archie Floyd threw
a 469. Paul Blount also turned in
a new high for himself when he
hit a 435. Back Maintenance got
good bowling from John McKenzie


COMPLETE PHOTO SERVICE

FAST QUALITY ROLL FILM SERVICE
PORTRAIT COMMERCIAL
MOVIE FILM BLACK and WHITE COLOR


LYNART STUDIO
104 Bay View Drive Phone 227-8681


s Monday night. Dave May, rolling THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 19S0
- a 394 series followed John.
s After usffering two games of at 494. Box Plant 40, 40
defeat by Pridgeon's on 5 and 6 Team Standings W L Electric Meter -------36 44
Pate's Shell Service was 98 pins Vitro 52 27% Glidden Co. ---------33 47
in the hole for total pin fall. In Pulp Mill 48 32 Paper Mill 28 50
the third game Pate's came back Laboratory ---------- 42 38
rather strong as they beat Prid- Back Maintenance _-- 40% 39 /
geon's agency 120 scratch in the
third to sweep that game plus total
pin fall, to drop Pridgeon from
first place tie to second place, two
games out. BE SAFE -- BUY ALL DRUGS FROM A
Billy Joe Richards, rolling 223
in his third game led Pate's for PHARMACIST AT SMITH'S PHARMACY
his series of 513 and the alleys for
his 223 game. Pate's rolled a 853 A
game in their third to take third
high for the alleys Monday night.
The Pridgeon Agency was led
by Tommy Pridgeon's 518 series
followed by Waring Murdock's 487.
Jimmy Costin, not feeling quite up
to par fell down in his third game
to come up with a 439 series. Prid-
geon's series of 2348 was second
highest on the alleys Monday night.
On 7 and 8 the Sand Bar met
Phillips 66 as Phillips took three
of the four games from them. Al
Jensen's 501 series led as Lee Tay- *
lor's 494 followed. Phillips 66 is ,-
within five games of second place
as they gained one game Monday
night.
Wayne Smith's 577 series for the
Sand Bar was tops for them and DRUGS
number two for the alleys. McMil- KEEP DRUGS
lan followed Wayne with a 378. OUT OF CHILDREN'S REACH
Team Standings W L
Pat's Wonder Bar 55 25 "Doctor, come quickly!", shrieked Martha over
Pridgeon's Agency 53 27 the phone. "My little Johnny swallowed a whole
mPhillip's 66 48 32 bottle full of my heart capsules"
Custom Shop ______ 43 37
Pate's Shell Service .... 39 41 We hope the doctor gets there in time, Martha.
Floyd Chevrolet __-- 34 46 We hope the doctor gets there in time, Martha.
The Sand Bar 28 52 Please, please be sure to move all medicines away
Pylant's 22 58 from the hands of curious children.

MORNING COFFEE LEAGUE
By Maxine Jensen SMITHS PHARMACY
Tuesday morning found Jitney
Jungle rolling against the St. Joe Drive-In Window At Rear of Our Store
Laundry on alleys 1 and 2 and Ed's Two Parking Spaces Reserved for our Prescription Customers
Florist against the IGA on 3 and at our Back Door.
4 JOHN ROBERT SMITH, Pharmaceutical Chemist


rs -----psm~upss~ L -


PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH
Garrison at 20th

Prayer Service (Wednesday) -- 7:45 P.M.
Sunday School -- 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11;00 A.M.
Evening Worship 7:45 P.M.
"Souls Harbor in the Port Area"
Rev. Joel S. McGraw, Pastor
Comfortably Air-Conditioned


You Are Cordially Invited To Attend


Long Ave. Baptist Church

REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION .-.....--......----. 6:15 p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 p.m.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ........ 7:30 p.m.

Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street
Air Conditioned Centrally Heated

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME




FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Intersection Monument and Constitution
REV. THOMAS 8. HARRIS, D.D., Minister


Church School
Morning Worship
Bibye Study (Wednesday)
Methodist Youth Fellowship ..............
Evening Worship


9:45 A..
11:00 AM.
7:30 P.M.
6:00 PM.
7:30 P.M.


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Third St. and Baitaell Ave. C. BYRON SMITH, Paier

SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ......--------....---- 6:15 p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 p.m.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) .......---.. 7:30 p.m.

"Come and Worship God Wfth UfW


You Are Welcome To The

First United Pentecostal Church
10th St. NW. and Victoria Avenue Highland View, Florida
Rev. JAMES J. HILL, Pastor


SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45
MORNING WORSHIP 11:15
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30
MID-WEEK SERVICE (Wednesday) .... 7:30
YOUTH SERVICE (Friday) 7:30
AIR-CONDITIONED CENTRAL HEAT


A.M.

P.M.
P.M.
P.M.


Roche Furniture forfeit to them.
The Stevedores and Michigan
Chemical postponed.
Team Standings W L
Stevedores ___---------- 47 29
Costin's 45 35
Fla. National Bank _- 39 36/
Basil's Standard ___.._ 41 39
Roche Furniture ----. 35 45
Michigan Chem. _____ 26 45

MERCHANT'S LEAGUE
By D. L. Sickmon
The Custom Shop and Pylant's
met on alleys 1 and 2 as the Cus-
tom Shop swept four games from
Pylant's to insure their grip on
fourth place in the league. Skip-
per rolling a 456 series, led the
Custom Shop followed by Robert
Freeman's 455.
Pylant's Grady Dean, rolling a
4A8 series led them with Stafford's
353 following. Hard luck has been
Pylant's biggest handicap since the
first of the season, with only three
bowlers last Monday night they
had some big odds against them.
Floyd's Chevrolet was snowed
under on 3 and 4 as the Big O's
from Pat's Wonder Bar dealt a
swift 4-game defeat. The Big O's
had the number one and two high
games on the alleys Monday in
their march to regain first place
in the league. Ray Medlin, Pat's
new anchor man rolled a 587 with
two games over 200. Jake Koller
sat in the back seat with a fine
series of 552.
Floyd's John Hanson rolling a
440 led them again this week only
to face Pat's with four bowlers


L.


~ --e I--~a----~--~g~- 9-~l~rl


I


MORMEMOMP mm1~11


P--- RI -~-~3-C~~L-~L


I


1


s^








THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1963 F(
In
w
HE'S USED TO THE
S"PANIC BUTTON" H
z ,f Iihness crises are frequent in the life of
-'k/ vc' ,/ ,,ur Rexall Pharmacist. He meets them with
speed and confidence as part of his complex th
professional duties. You can rely on him to x7
fill your prescriptions exactly as your doctor ar
ordered. lo
YOUR Qexa PHARMACY
od e.ar
an
m
Buzzett's Drug Store ,i
817 Williams Ave. Pr
Free Parking F(
Drive-In Window Service 1
FO
yoUL FInD IT #,I[ rF

Pai

Hu
$3
loa
FOR RENT: Two bedroom unfur- FOR RENT: 2 bedroom garage ap-
Lished apartment with garage at artment. Phone 227-8305. B. L. fir
1206 Palm Blvd. Call 227-7431 after Presnell.
4:00 p.m. tf-111 FOR RENT: Unfurnished apart- $3
FOR LEASE: Sinclair service sta- ment. Ideal for couple. 706 Wood-
tion for lease in Port St. Joe. ward. Call 227-3941. W. J. Her- ho
Call SU 5-4431, Panama City or ring. 2tp
write Sinclair Refining Co., Box) -
1669. tfc-12-6 FOR RENT: 2 bedroom furnished Ph
I house on beach. Phone 227-4301, --
FOR RENT: Nice furnished apart- Mrs. Clarence Pridgeon. Itp F
ment. For couple only at 1621 -
Monument Ave. Phone 227-7641. tf FOR RENT: Garage apartment, St
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom house onI furnished. 2 bedroom, storage
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom house on room beneath, $55.00 mo. 1015 W
the beach at Beacon Hill. Hot Monument Ave. Phone 227-7396. B.
water and gas free. Completely' C. Gaillard, 1009 Monument Ave. 1t
furnished. Call 648-3631, H. B.I
Dawson. tfc-1-10 FOR SALE: Second hand refriger-
I ator with top freezer and second W
FOR RENT: On St. Joe Beach. 3- hand full size electric range both N
bedroom, two bath unfurnished, in good working order. $25.00 for P1
Two 2-bedroom furnished. In city, refrigerator and $50.00 for range.
two 1-bedroom houses furnished. Call Jim Brickson, 227-4001 be-
Smith's Pharmacy, tfc-1e4-10 tween 9 and 4. 2tp
FOR RENT: Trailer space in Oak LOTS FOR SALE: In Jones Home- t
Grove. Sewer and water. $14.00 stead subdivision. $50.00 to $500. c
month. Phone L. C. Davis, 227- cash or terms. Phone 227-8712 or p
7059. tfc-1-10 write P. 0. Box 333, Port St. Joe. 8 v
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment. 8tp-1-24
703 16th St., Phone 227-7636 af- FOR SALE: Repossessed sewing
-ter 4:00 p.m. tfc-1-17| machine. Take up payments of I
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom furnished $5.50 month. Used Singer sewing
house at St. Joe Beach. J. D. Home sewing machine, $5.00. New Sur-St
Clark. Phone 227-7771. plus Sales Sewing Center, across M
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom house. Cor- from Post Office, Phone 227-2011.
ner 4th and Woodward. See Em n
mett Daniell. tfc-1-24 FOR SALE or LEASE: 20x26 block th
building on 100x100 lot. Ideal for as
FOR RENT: 619 Woodward Ave., barber, TV, radio shop. Call 648- ca
- nice two bedroom apartment, un- 4160 after 5 p.m. 5tp-1-31 T
furnished, $35.00 per mo. Call Gene o
Valley Tallahassee, Fla. Office ph. FOR SALE: Furnisned 2 bedroom th
22 -0560 ext. 349 or home phone brick home, 1031 Long Ave. Ph. es
385-3139. tfc-1-31 648-4128, J. A. Mira. of


OR SALE: Nice 2 bedroom home' Gainesville Man In
in excellent condition, with den,
e bath, wall to wall carpet in liv- Accident Monday Night
g room. Many other extras to go
ith sale. Located at 1310 Wood- Two women and a four month
ard Ave. Priced for quick sale, old baby were treated for cuts and
Presently FHA financed, abrasions Monday afternoon at the
interested phone 227-5261, George
. Wimberly, Jr. tfc 10-4 Municipal Hospital as the result of
an automobile accident at Mexico
OR SALE: Modern 2 bedroom Beach, according to Ken Murphy,
concrete lock house, Insulated,
ermostat controlled heat on 185 Florida Highway Patrol trooper.
5 ft. lot. New chain link fence The accident occurred about 2:45
found back yard. Pay equity or p.m. Monday when an automobile
w financing cost. See at 129 Hun- driven by Robyn Lyn King of Mex-
r Circle, Ferrell Allen, Jr. tfc b
S ico Beach was struck by another
OTS FOR SALE: In Phillip's Sub- vehicle driven by Eugene Taylor
division on the Intra-Coastal Ca- .of Apalachicola.
al at Overstreet. Small down pay-
ent, up to three years to pay. According to Murphy the King
or information contact Mrs. L. T. vehicle was traveling West on U.
rr.iold, Max Kilbourn or I. D S. 98 and made a left turn into a
rows, Jr., Phone 227-4S91. side road into the path of the
OR SALE: 3 registered male Ger- Taylor automobile, which was tra-
man Shepard puppies, $45.00 ea. veling east.
female, $40.00. Phone 7-7999. 2t Total damages to both estimates
OR SALE: 2 window fans, one were estimated at $600.00.. King
air conditioner. Call 227-4832. was charged with making an im-'
OR SALE: River front lot. Con- proper turn.
tact T. W. Barrington, PO 3-1655
nama City. 2tp
EPTIC TANKS rumpled out. Call
HOMES FOR SALE Buford Griffin. Phone 7-7011 for
Two bedroom masonry house on wiick expert service. tte
hunter Circle. Purchase for only
00 down and balance on FHA ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Meol
an. every Wednesday night, 8:00 p.m.
Two bedrooms with den, oak at Parish House, 809% 6th St. Port
doors, only $350 down. FHA loan. St. Joe, Fla. Phone 229-3331 for
Three bedrooms, oak floors, further information or write P. 0.
50 down. FHA loan. Box 535. tf
Get the details on these nice
times before you purchase.
FRANK HANNON
Registered Real Estate Broker Income Tax Service
h. 227-3491 221 Reid Ave. File Returns ar
LYING CLUB: Anyone interested
in flying or learning to fly with
. Joe Flying Club call 227-4081. J. D. CLARK
Prompt and efficient.
'ANTED: A lady to share a 2 bed- INCOME TAX SERVICE
room apartment with a retired
hristian lady. Please call at 509 1017 Long Avenue
ith St.
fORK WANTED: Work as maid WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116,
weekly or by day. 245 Ave. D., THE AMERICAN LEGION, Meet.
hwone 229-2961yay. ve..,ing first and third Tuesday
nights, 8:00 p.m. Amerioan Legionz
INCOMEE TAX Home.
RETURNS PREPARED SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0.
Also, I will do part or full- O. F.-Meets second and fourth
ime bookkeeping in my home Thursdays, 8:00 p.m. In American
or at your place of business. Ex- Legion Hall. All members urged to
erienced in all types of book attend.
work. Typing work done neatly Nolle Grand: Emmett Daniell
and correct. R. W. HENDERSON, Secretary: J. C. Martin.
Phone 229-1716.
R. A. M.-Regular convocation of
4COME TAX RETURNS filled out St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
Call 648-4318, Mrs. Jean Martin, M., 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit-
t. Joe Beach. 14tc-1-10 ing companions welcome.
Edgar L. Smith, High Priest
AOVING?-Let Mayflower help Roy L. Burch, Secretary
you. Mayflower movers are pio-
eers in transfer and storage and THERE WILL BE a regular com-
heir years of experience are your munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
assurance of satisfaction. Why not No. 111, F. & A. M., every first
ill SURPLUS SALES of ST. JOE. and third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.
hey will be glad to advise you
n all of your moving plans, whe-
her local or long distance. Free
estimates. Phone SURPLUS SALES ROBERT L. CREAMER, W. M.
ST. JOE, Phone 227-2011. ROY K. BLACKSHEAR, Sec.


Rotary Magazine ed people were first covered by Visit Parents
ary Magazine Social Security in 1951, there were Mr. and Mrs. David Musselwhite
Pr m Subect thousands of individuals-who ire of Starksville, Miss., visited last
Fnr ram SuC already over age 65 who would ev- week end with their parents,-: Mr.
Rotarian Ed Woods, Magazine er have become insured under~-So and Mrs. Calvin Musselwhite and
Chairman of the club presented a cial Security if they could not- gre, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Tillman.
few pertinent facts about the club's credit after age 65. Also, many par: 1K
magazine at their regular meeting tially retired individuals increase
Thursday at noon. the amount of their Social Security-
checks each year based on earnings
The Rotarian is the oldest civic after age 65. Any, individual who
organization publication in exist- earns more than $1200 a year may "' hN A .
ance today, having been founded ask that his Social Security check "
in 1911. In 1933 the magazine be- be refigured. If the earnings :are- -
gan printing a Spanish language higher than average yearly eirfn-i--
edition. Each month, 387,000 of the ings, his Social Security check will
magazines are sent to Rotarians, be increased. *
schools and libraries all over the The only time that age is :con-
Unlike most "house organs" the sidered in connection with Social
Rotarians deals with articles other Security taxes is when a child
than those concerning Rotary. As works for his parents, Carey -en--
a matter of fact, its main content eluded. A child working for his
is concerned with issues of the mother or father does not get So- 0
day, with a monthly feature, invar- cial Security credits while he is- IJ
iably concerning some foreign under age 21. .
country or a personage of the news. For more details contact your
Three-fourths of the magazine is nearest Social Security or Inter-
dedicated to editorial comment and nal Revenue Service Office.
has its editorials reprinted fre- The Social Security Office for
quently in other publications. Al- this area is located at 1135,Harr4-.
most every month a Rotarian ar- son Avenue, Panama City, phone,l
ticle is reprinted in the Readers' PO 3-5331.
Digest.
ATTEND PTA


Social Security Taxes *
Are Due From All
Social Security taxes are due
from all individuals regardless of
age, according to John V. Carey,
District Manager of the Panama
City Social Security Office. People
over age 65 who are employed or
self-employed must continue to
have their earnings reported.
This question comes up frequent-
ly at this time of the. year, Carey
continued. All accountants, law-
yers and others who help prepare
tax returns should understand that
retired or semi-retired individuals
must make reports for Social Se-
curity purposes if they have earn-
ings from work or self-employment.
There are several reasons for the
payment of Social Security taxes
without regard to age, Carey ad-
ded. Perhaps the most important
reason is that many people could
not build up enough Social Secur-
ity credits if age 65 were a cutoff
point. In fact, the original Social
Security law, passed in 1935 to
take effect on January 1, 1937, ex-
cluded all individuals age 65 and
over from coverage. However, this
provision in the law was changed
in August 1939. When self-employ- *


LAUNDRY .ad CLEANERS



PICKUP and


BELIVERY SERVICE
PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA
MEXICO BEACI; BOV WnET WHITE CY

EVERY MONKA and THURSDAY
FAMILY LAU i YDRY CLEANING and
UNIFORM RENTAt- SERVICE
DropUs-~A Card -
417 Grace Avenue Panama City, Florida


USED CAR


We are overstocked-We must sell


TERMS TO FIT MOST EVERYONE'S BUDGET


1958 CHEVROLET
Bel Air. Fordor, V-8 with automatic


transmission.
was $950.00
NOW ONLY


.............. $795


1957 MERCURY
Tudor, V-8. Automatic transmission.
Was $795.00 $595
NOW ONLY................-----------595


1956 CHEVROLET
Bel Air, fordor, 6 cylinder. Standard
transmission.
REDUCED TO $295
TO SELL FOR ----------------


1959 PLYMOUTH
Sedan. 6 cylinder. Automatic trans-


mission.
Was $995.00
NOW ONLY


............- $895


1959 FORD
Station Wagon. V-8. Automatic trans-
mission.
Was $1095.00 $945
NOW ONLY .................. $9


1958 CHEVROLET
Bel Air. Fordor V-8. Automatic trans-
mission.
REDUCED TO$295
O10 SELL FOR ........ ....


All cars, regardless of price, carry written warranty for 12
months.or.. 12,000-miles. ...


Change In Our Service Dept.


In order that we may give you faster service, and for lower cost, we have set up a new


QUICK SERVICE STALL
^^^F ~~~- ,.^ ,-, ^^ -..'


in our repair department


NO MORE WAITING !


For a Motor Tune-up, Muffler and Tail Pipe Installatin Wheel Balanc-

ing, Etc.

We will pick up, repair and deliver your car, or you canwait ii our ,onfortable, service
customer's lounge, that we have set up in our show room. "=
WE SPECIALIZE IN FORD PRODUCTS, but repair all makes and models.


WE


GUARANTEE


Clean, prompt, courteous and efficient work We have rolled out the

red carpet for you, our service customers TRY US!


WE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THAT.. .


Mr. JAMES PARKER

IS NOW MANAGER OF OUR PAINT and BODY SHOP
We cordially invite you to come in and let James make you a free estimate on any work you may need.
No job is too little or too big. All work is guaranteed, and our prices are competitive. FiMancing is
available.


322 MONUMENT AVE.


ST.


JOE


MOTOR


COMPANY


FORD MERCURY FALCON METEOR


TELEPHONE 227-4


m


I Is~a I


_ I C I


L I II- I I I -L- IC_ 7.


~_ __ __ __


L


mmm


~


_


373


37