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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01417
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 3, 1963
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01417

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TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR


THE STAR

"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA,


THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1963


MONEY TALKS-Let's keep
it where we can speak with it
once in a while-Trade with
your home town merchants


NUMBER 16


ETAOIN SHRDLU
by WE$L-EY R. RAMSEY


Some of the most interesting
reading in the daily newspapers is
usually found from page two on
back, usually down in the lower
half of the page. These little tid-
'-bits_ aren't usually more than a
paragrapT-or two long.with a small
head. But, usually they leave much
room for thought as to what the
human race is coming to the
goodness of man the unusual
and the downright humorous.
In one such paragraph we were
reading of some people out in Las
Vp7iq NiT7ndn who rN d h llv dr mv it


Post Office Annow



Higher Postage Rates; New Letter

Size Regulations Go Into Effect


If you are a proud parent about
to announce a new birth, a mother
about to send out your child's
birthday invitations, a friend of a
bride-to-be mailing shower invita-
tions, or a recipient of a gift about
to send a thank-you note, you will
want to know about the new size
and shape requirements for mail-
ing pieces prescribed by the Post
Office Department.


veas,,,O, --,.aa ,,rn a.n y c According to Postmaster C. L.
up New Year's Eve. They got pol- Costin, these are the new limita-
luted in the night spots to the tions effective January 1, 1963,
point where they went outside and for all envelopes, cards, and self-
started throwing their glasses and mailers: They must measure not
bottles at the expensive neon signs less than 3 inches in width or
which extoll the city's doubtful 4 inches in length, and they
entertainment on the public. must be rectangular in shape.
Something like $10,000 worth of In addition, envelopes more
damage was done to the signs due than 9 inches in width or 12 in-
to the high-jinks and the revelers ches in length or those which
spent the remainder of New Year's have a ratio of width to length
Eve in the pokey. of less than 1 to 1.414(1 to the
And that's fun? square root of 2) are not recom-
4.* .*. :1. mended.
We watched the New Year in "I mention birth announcements,
with the kids in front of the tele- birthday and shower invitations,
vision set until 11:00 at which time and thank-you notes specifically,"
we. had to take our toast of ginger the postmaster said, "because quite
ale ruined with lime sherbet and often these items are of unusually
go to bed. A hundred years from small dimensions or odd shapes.
now, we'd never know we saw 1963 Although these restrictions are mi-
in an hour early. nor ones, full cooperation of the
But, in order to redeem our fol. public will assist materially in en-
ly of Monday night, we dutifully abling post offices to mechanize
ate our hog jowl and black eye and economize."
peas on Tuesday to insure that we Envelopes, cards, and self-mail-
will have our share of luck during ers which are smaller than the
1963 (and we'll need all we can minimums indicated above, or
get). which are not rectangular in shape,
are nonmailable. Post offices will


In another of these paragraphs,
we noticed where kids of today
are two inches taller than their
mothers and dads.
And, they're several inches wi-
der in the back side for the most
part. And they say that which is
used the most, gets the biggest.
At any rate, this little tid-bid has
its compensations. The kids can-
not swipe momma's or daddy's
prize dress, shirt, pants; suit, coat,
shoes or what have you and take
them off to a tree climb or some
such teen activity.
: .*:.
My clothes are already safe. Son
number one can't get into them,
and sons number two and three
can both get into them at the
same time.

Do you remember the program,
"Inner Sanctum" which featured
the squeaky door. That program
had to go off the air because the
door was installed in The Star of-
fice.
When somebody comes into the
front door, we can hear them
enter all over the shop, which saves
installing a bell or buzzer.
The other day, we were working
at the Linotype machine when all
of a sudden someone behind us
said, "It my printing ready?"
Well it fair scared us out of our
skin, since we hadn't heard our
built-in alarm go off. We shakily
turned around and there stood
Jimmy McNeill the oyster man of
Indian Pass.
We had his printing ready.
He was able to sneak in because
he has a door just like ours which
has to be lifted to be opened silent.
He knew how to sneak up on us.
4:. .:. ..
Tt 1 f. il. r, iPnki1l-, w- ar fl ad


therefore not accept them for pro-
cessing and delivery.


The new nickel letter rate re
cently enacted into law is the same
postage rate Americans paid fo
letters when the United States is
sued its first postage stamps 115
years ago, postmaster Chauncey
Costin said this week. The new
rate goes into effect on January 6
Research shows that, in 1847
the Post Office Department issued
its first stamps, including a nickel
stamp for the basic prepaid letter
rate, Costin said.
A nickel was a lot harder to
come by in those days he added.
Since 1932, postmaster Costin
said, while living costs for the
American family have skyrocketed
by 118 per cent, the cost of mailing
a first-class letter has only increas-
ed by one cent, or 33 per cent. At
5 cents, he said, as in 1847-it will
still be one of the greatest bargains
in American history.
Of the total volume of first-
class letter mail handled locally
and in the nation, 75 per cent, he
said, is generated by business con-
cerns. The remaining 25 per cent,
he continued, generally consists of
personal letters to friends and rel-
atives, and individual business cor-
respondence.
The one-cent increase on first-
class mail, he noted, will only cost
the average family about one half
cent per day, or about $1.80 a year.
He cautioned, however, that pa-
trons after January 6 must affix
an additional penny stamp when
using 4 cent stamps to send first-
class letters.
(Continued On Page 4)


Highway Patrol Issues Appeal To

Motorists To Set Safety Record In '63

. TALLAHASSEE The Florida
Highway Patrol issued an urgent Four Teenagers
appeal today for safer driving, in
1963 to avoid repeating the record
breaking highway death score that ppre n d
Florida motorists rolled up last Stole Car
year. In Stolen Car
"It was the worst year in our
history" said Comdr. H. N. Kirk- Four escapees from a juvenile
man, Patrol Commander, "but there detention home in New Orleans
is no reason why we can not pro- apprehended on St. Joe Beach
duce a safer year than last by fol- were apprehended on St. oe Beach
lowing safe and sound driving rules New Year's Day by State Trooper
and practices when behind the Ken Murphy in a stolen automo-
wheel." bile.
By the first week in December According to Murphy, the four
there had been more Florida traf- boys, one age 14, two age 15 and
fic deaths in 1962 than for the one age 16, had stolen a 1961 au-
whole year of 1961 when the fig-'tomobile parked about three blocks
ure finally rose to 1,203. from the Milne Boys Home in New
Orleans. They attended a New
The mileage death rate at the Years Eve party in New Orleans,
and of the first six months of the selling liquor and other items
year was also a little over a com- found in the car to finance their
parable period for the year before, trip.


Final figures for this part of the
highway death story were not avail-
able immediately for 1962, but
there was fear that this total would
outdistance the year before.
Comdr. Kirkman pointed out that
there are an increasing number of
super-highways and four lane high-
ways going into service all over the
state which means easier and safer
driving.
Vehicles are safer today than at
any time in the history of the au-
tomobile, said the officer.


the holidays are over. For one rea- "So it would seem that the one
son, as you can tell by this paper, thing we need most is safer driv-
news makers take a holiday right ers. A combination of improved
along with everybody else, and it roads and improved vehicles could
is hard to fill up these columns hardly produce an increase in
when there is nothing to fill them death dealing accidents, unless we


up with.
But we had rather they all re-
main blank than have to report
that one of you, our friends, had
become a holiday statistic.
You drove carefully and you took
care not to get hurt. We appreciate
it, and it's almost certain that you
appreciate still being here.

Gulf County Schools
Re-Open On Monday
Gulf County Schools will re-open
on Monday morning of next week
after being closed for two weeks
by the Christmas holidays. The lo-
cal schools will resume their usual
operating schedule.


have an increase in driver errors,"
he concluded.

Nazarene Church Slates
Special Services Sunday
Special services at the Church
of the Nazarene will be held next
Sunday, according to the pastor,
Rev. J. A. Blackwell. Rev. L. S.
Oliver of Birmingham, Ala., will
be the guest minister in the morn-
ing worship services.
Rev. Oliver is the district super-
intendent for Alabama, which also
includes 10 counties of West Flor-
ida.
The public is invited to come
and hear Rev. Oliver.


Murphy noticed the boys, all
teen-agers, with the Louisiana li-
cense plates around 2:00 p.m. and
stopped them for routine examina-
tion. Upon close questioning he
learned that the car had been stol-
en. Murphy said the boys weren't
going anywhere in particular-
just riding. He created a destina-
tion for them in the city jail where
they are awaiting New Orleans of-
ficials to come pick them up.
Murphy said the boys were us-
ing a crucifix for a switch key to
the automobile.


ices "New Look" PROSPECT GOOD


Motor Vehicle License Tags for 1963

Now On Sale In State and County F '63 MILL

E- Florida motor vehicle license go m ---
e FormerResident tags for 1963 went on sale yester-
rr Ire SIiIl day at the office of the Frank and
D- r i/ lan Dot Insurance Agency in Port St.
5 DieS In Orlando Joe and at the office of Tax Col-
y lector Harland Pridgeon in the E .. :
.... County Courthouse in Wewahitch-
Douglas Carmichael Smith, age ka,
60, formerly of Port St. Joe, passed *
away December 16 at his residence Deadline for obtaining the tags O deWey Says Operating Time
in Orlando. is February 20, Tax Collector Prid-
"Mike", as he was known to his The tags may be obta Should Be A Good As Last Year
friends, was born in Dothan, Ala. The tags may be obtained by
friends, was born in Dothan, Ala., mail for an extra charge of 50 Tom S. Coldewey, vice president
moving to Port St. Joe in 1911, centsor an e a charge o 50 Tom S. Coldewey, vice president
where he resided before going to cenfor obtaining a tag at the local employment in charge of operations of the St.
St. Louis, Mo. While there he was branch tag office. The 50-cent fee Joe Paper Company mill here had
married to Anna Rieger, formerly does not apply to a motorist ob- L s| in State good news this week for the em-
of Heidelberg, Germany. He return- training is tag in person at the ployees of the St. Joe mill, as well
ed to Port St. Joe in 1937 and aencin the C those as the entire ity of ort St. Joe
centralwas employed by the AN Railroad, agency in the ourthouse. Florida unemployment plunged Coldewey -told The Star Wed-
St. Joe Paper Company and the Weight Determines Cost to a new two-year low of 83,200 in nesday morning that the St. Joe
Naval Mine Defense Laboratories The State Motor Vehicle Corn- October. mill will operate at least as much
in Panama City. mission, for which Pridgeon's of- The last figure lower than that time as it did during 1962 during
Funeral services were held in fice acts as agent, has a graduated was 77,500 in May 1960, two and the coming year.
the chapel of Fairchild Funeral schedule of costs for tags depend- a half years ago. While the local mill had several
the chapel of Fairchild Funeral ing on weight of the motor vehicle. s d t ps year,
Home in Orlando with burial in At the same time nonfarm em- shut-downs during the past year,
that city. Pallbearers were the All Gulf County tag agencies ployment at 1,386,800 was 58,400 it enjoyed the best year of operat-
nephews of the deceased: Harry have on file, the number and nec- above a year ago. ing in a four year period.
Gilledge, Kaspar Winslow, Harold essary information from your last "If this highly encouraging em- Coldewey said that some im-
Yoryan and Royce Armstrong. year's tag for purchase of another, ployment trend continues for the provement in operations might be
He is survived by three broth- if you purchased your tag in Gulf next six months, and the weather experienced over the past year, but
er is surm vivedming Smith Port Sth- County last year. The agencies ask and other factors hold good, Flor- that the management expected to
oe;Hrs oldeBi Smith, Ponville only that you bring your old tag ida may well have its most success- have a few shut-downs due to.
Joe; Harold B. Smith, Jacksonville number with you when you come ful season on record," predicted economic conditions just as in 19-
two sisJ. T. Graves, Mrs W St. Courtney to purchase your tag State Industrial Commission Chair- 62. The Star asked Coldewey for

Salem, Oregon and Mrs. J. S. Davis Pridgeon said motorists who got mn A. Worley Brown. this forecast after reading of the
of Orlando. their 1962 tags in a Florida county Led by seasonal industries all cut-back in labor force and pro-
-- other than Gulf should present economic segments moved upward duction to be undertaken by the
their 1962 registration and their in October except contract con- Panama City mill during 1963.
WnaL C eW;l current local address when purchas- struction which had a negligible Coldewey said that the local
W eek End Will Ing a new tag. This same procedure drop. mill's operation during 1963 de-
should be followed by those hav- "Even at that," Brown said, "At ended entirely on the economic
Feature Coo00n HuntS ing an out-of-state tag. 126,500 it was the highest October condition of the country, but that
for contract construction since Oc- he expected at least as good a
Office Hours tober 1959 when there were 136,- year as in the past year.
Desciples of the "Coon Hunt" in The Port St. Joe agency is open 700 construction workers." The local mill will resume oper-
this area will be able to take part from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Mon- Wholesale and retail trade were ation the middle or last part of
in a wild coon hunt on Friday and day through Friday and until noon in the van of the seasonal trend next week after being down since
Saturday nights of this week. on Wednesday. The office is also with a monthly gain of 11,200 in December 22 for repairs and the
Beginning Friday night at 6:00 open until 4:00 p.m. on Saturdays. October over September. The total Christmas holidays, according to
p.m. all grades dogs will hunt in The office at 'the Courthouse is employed in that category during Coldewey.
the group. On Saturday beginning open during the regular County the month was 377,800. Manufac-
at the same time, all registered Courthouse working hours. during at 217,400 was up 3,900, and Engravings Lost In
dogs will join the hunt. Eg ig s Ls
All those desiring to enter the All transfers of title must be services and miscellaneous at 225,- Th lid Sh ffl
hunt are urged to report to the handled at the Courthouse and not 200 was up 2,800 over September. The Holiday Shuffle
Highland View Men's Club build- at branch offices, Pridgeon stated. All other segments either show-
ed gains over the month or held The Star had several pictures
ing at 6:00 p.m. To obtain a tag by mail, a motor- steady, and all except transporta- scheduled for this week's paper.
A registered and grade bank ist must send to the Courthouse an tion-communication-public utilities, But when our deadline arrived
show will be held at the Men's amount sufficient to cover the cost and finances-insurance-real estate yesterday afternoon and the en-
Club building at 2:30 p.m. on Sat- of the tag, plus 50 cents, and must were considerably higher than a gravings hadn't arrived, we hit
urday. also enclose the registration slip year ago. the telephone.
Dogs from all over Northwest on his current automobile. ___ _____ The engraver said he had sent
Florida and South Georgia and them to the dispatch department
Alabama are expected to partici- D&B Says BusineSS to be sent.
pate. Veterans Officer S The carrier who usually brings
SV U s er Population Drops the engravings to Port St. Joe
l..., .I,.. rp hadn't seen them.
Mother of Local Plans Local Visit So, if you see an envelope con-
The business population of Port training engravings somewhere
Re dent Dies Veterans of Gulf County who St. Joe is down 7.1% over January, between here and the Panama
den ieneed assistance in obtaining bene- 1962, announces Joseph F. Ander- City News-Herald, please bring
fnees under the GI Bill, may receive son, district manager of the Jack- them here-they are lost.
Mrs. Charles B. Cook, mother of idancerom Jim Weant, Assist- sonville, Florida office. He states We hope to find them by the
Mrs. W. P. Dockery of this city, ant State Service Officer that figures obtained by a physi- time next week's edition is print-
died last Thursday night at the cal count of the Dun & Bradstreet ed.
Carrabelle Community Hospital. Weant will visit this area next Reference Book for January 1963
Mrs. Cook is survived by her week for the purpose of helping totaled 92 manufacturers, whole- Because of the constant flux in
husband, Charles B. Cook; six chil- veterans or their dependents in sales and retailers in the city, as the American business community,
dren, Vincent Saunders, Miami; filing claims for Compensation compared with 99 in January, 1962. there are more than 5,000 changes
Mrs. Helen Howard, Carrabelle, Benefits or solving their insurance Mr. Anderson noted that this now occurring daily in Reference
Mrs. Evelyn Pope, Panama City, problems. This free service in- month Dun & Bradstreet, Inc., is Book data. Thus the mammoth vol-
Derwert Cook, High Springs, Bert eludes assistance to employers of sending requests for financial ume must be re-issued every two
Cook, Pensacola and Mrs. Dock- veterans under the GI Bill, Voca- statements to the 2.9 million busi- months to keep up-to-date credit
ery; 11 grandchildren and seven tional Training, Subsistence or oth- nesses listed in the Reference Book. facts in the hands of manufactur-
great grandchildren. er problems. These statements are essential to ers and wholesalers. The credit re-
Funeral services were held at During his visit in this area the credit reports issued by the port which stands behind each en-
3:00 p.m. Sunday, from the First Weant may be contacted at the business information agency. The try in the Reference Book contains
Baptist Church of Carrabelle with office of the County Service Offi- requests are sent to all businesses such information as the firm's his-
the Rev. Henry Martin officiating. cer in Highland View, 104 B4yview regardless of size, from the corner tory, ownership, operation, finan-
Burial was in the Carrabelle Drive at8:30 A.M. on Friday, Jan- grocery to the million dollar manu- cial stability and current payments
Cemetery. uary 11. facturer. record.


Holiday Fires Keep Firemen


A rash of some five fires have
marred the holiday for those in-
volved and kept the Port St. Joe
Volunteer Fire Department on the
go since last Thursday afternoon.
Last Thursday, a heater in the
home of Maggie Zilliner of Avenue
D, called the department to action.
Upon arrival on the scene the
department found two rooms in
the home ablaze. They quickly put
the fire out confining the blaze to
the two rooms. The remainder of
the home was damaged by smoke
and water.
Going to this fire, the booster
brakes to the fire truck failed.


With the holidays in full swing, it
was almost impossible to replace
the part quickly and the depart-
ment was forced to go at reduced
speed to the remainder of the
fires for the week end. The part
had been replaced about a month
ago with a new booster, which ap-
parently was defective.
Friday night, a "hairy" fire
coupled with a crippled fire truck
made the department move slow
and easy.
The Phillip's 66 Service Station
caught fire about 2:00 a.m. in the
morning calling the department to
action. According to station own-


er Don Levens, he was working on
an automobile part in the station
using a can of gasoline to wash
the parts. The gasoline suddenly
exploded setting the building on
fire. After the department ascer-
tained the most dangerous portion
of the fire and determined what
was burning, it was quickly put out.
Fire was kept from spreading to
the adjacent gasoline pumps.
Saturday at 9:45 a.m. the tug
boat "Elk," owned by the Gulf
Towing Company near the St. Joe
Paper Company docks had its
clutch catch fire. The department
used its extinguishers to put out


the flame.
Early Wednesday morning at
about 4:00 a.m. a house in Highland
View, belonging to Leroy Stokes,
was gutted on the inside from a
fire of undetermined origin. The
house was a rental dwelling and
Stokes said he had just readied it
for rental the day before. No one
was living in the home at the time.
Wednesday. afternoon at 2:30 an
alarm again called the Department
to duty to put out a small woods
fire behind the home of J. C. Be-
lin on Garrison Avenue.


I _


i _









PERSONALS


JN THE LADIES READY-TO-WEAR DEPT.


DRESSES


LADIES


Sale Price
6.95
7.95
8.95
9.95
10.95
11.95
12.95
13.95
14.95
16.95
17.95


JUNI 0 RS
Reg. Price Sale
6.95
7.95
8.95
9.95
10.95
11.95
12.95
13.95
14.95
16.95
19.95


Price
4.95
5.49
5.95
6.49
6.95
7.95
8.95
9.95
10.95
11.95
15.95


1 Rack Cotton Dresses

Reg. 3.98 ------------Now Only 2.98
Reg. 4.98 ------ Now Only 3.98


Visitors From Quincy Visit Children During
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Buttram Christmas Holidays
and children of Quincy visited Mrs. Edwin Ramsey and Mary
with friends here this week. Dell spent a pre-holiday visit with
Mr. and Mrs. Donald ,Ramsey and
Return From Trip children in Greensboro, N. C. and
Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Britt and with Mr. and Mrs. Paul Edwin
daughter, Jeanine, have returned Ramsey in Atlanta, Ga. They also
from a trip visiting points of in- visited in Rome, Ga., with Mr. and
terest in Ocala, St. Augustine and Mrs. Whaley Johnson and Mr. and
Jacksonville. Mrs. Bill Carver and Cathey, for-
mer residents of Port St. Joe.


Guests from Mississippi
Mr. and Mrs. P. B. Fairley, Jr.,
and daughters of Moss Point, Miss.,
were recent guests of Mrs. Fair-
ley's parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. L.
Smith. The Smith's were also visit-
ed by their son, W. L., Jr., over
the holidays.
Visit In Malone
Mrs. R. H. Ellzey and sons, Lee
and Bobby returned home Sunday
from Malone after visiting last
week with Mrs. Ellzey's mother,
Mrs. J. L. Dominey.
Guests from Georgia
Mr. and Mrs. H. I. Wooden, Jr.,
of Warner Robins, Ga., spent
Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. W.
R. Ramsey.
Spends Leave With Parents
Archie Barbee spent a two weeks
leave from Andrews AFB, Wash-
ington, D. C., with his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Herman Barbee.
Visits Parents
Mr. and Mrs. James Stevens of
Charleston, South Carolina spent
the Christmas holidays with Mr.


Guests of Boyers
Guests of Mrs. W. E. Boyer in
the home of the Edwin Ramseys
were her children, Mr. and Mrs.
Paul Boyer and daughter, Jane of
Fayetteville, Ark., Gertrude Boyer
of Indianapolis, Ind., and Dick
Boyer of Blountstown.
LANES TAKE PLANE
TRIP TO EUROPE


Mr. and Mrs. John M. Lane and
children of Baton Rouge, La., for-
merly of Port St. Joe left Decem-
ber 13 by jet plane from Panama
City via New York where they
spent several days sight seeing.
They continued by jet plane to
Dublin, Ireland on a sight seeing
tour. They continued their trip to
Stenungsund, Sweden where they
will make their home for about
eight months.
Mr. Lane is employed as an en-
gineer by the Standard Oil Com-
pany and has been sent to Sweden.
The Standard Oil Company is build-
ing a refinery there.
Mrs. Lane is the former Marigene
Smith, daughter of Mrs. Verna
Smith who resides at 609 Monu-


Stevens' parents, Mr. and Mrs. Em- ment Ave.
ory Stevens.


i


FLORIDA 'DIMES' CHILD
R yyf ^ .. ...... ..... .. ......


BLOUSES


P A J A M AS
Reg. Price Sale Price


Sale Price Reg. 2.98 -Now 1.9
1.98 Reg. 3.98 Now 2.9
98 FLANNEL GOWNS
4.50 1/3 OFF
5.50

THE CHILDREN, DEPARTMENT


98
98


DRESSES


Sale Price
1.98
2.98
3.98
3.98
5.95
6.95


SWEATERS
1/3 OFF

Quilted and Flannel
R 0 BES
13 OFF


SPORTS WEAR
1/3 OFF

ONE LOT
Infant's Wear
1/2 OFF


IN THE MEN and BOYS DEPARTMENT


lords State March of Dimes Child for the 25th anniversary year
of 1968 is W Norconk, 7, DeLand, Florida, born with multiple
birth defotI, including hydrocephalus (water on the brain). Pictured
with hIs good friend, Mayor Louis A. Skillman of DeLand, Kenny
sysiboll the ltounands of American children who need help under
S Nati oll Foundation-March of Dimes program to fight crip-
ling birth defects, arthritis and polio through the best in scientific
imAth a nd mtical care.
77


SUITS
V3 OFF


SPORT COATS

13 OFF


JACKETS

/3 OFF


SWEATERS
V3 OFF


FALL PANTS
V3 OFF


COTTON PANTS


2.98
3.98
4.98


- 1.88
2.88
3.88


AFTER CHRISTMAS SALE

REDUCED

$20 to $50


Singer has Used Machines $14.95 up --- -,

For Free Demonstration Call By -


323 Reid Ave.


THE REMNANT SHOP
Port St. Joe, Florida


Most Everything In Men and Boys Stock Reduced To Clear


Fall Shoes



REDUCED


1 LOT TOWELS BLAN KETS

2 for $1.00 V OFF


LINENS ALSO


REDUCED


NO EXCHANGES NO REFUNDS

ALL SALES FINAL


- i C -


- Family Night Special -


CATFISH


$2.00


PER PERSON ALL YOU CAN EAT
EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT-Served with hush puppies,
Cole Slaw, Tea or Coffee

5 HAMBURGERS $1.00
5 HOT DOGS $1.00
EVERY DAY NO LIMIT
To Take Out

City Restaurant

Corner Fourth Street and Monument Ave.


Reg. Price
9.95
10.95
12.95
13.95
14.95
16.95
17.95
18.95
19.95
21.95 -----
22.95


Reg. Price
2.98
3.98
4.98
5.98
6.98


IN 1


Reg. Price
2.98
3.98
4.98
5.98
6.98
9.98


Ph. 227-2491


I I a I


I L







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1963


Wave Action Along Gulf Causes Sand
Ridge Between St. Joe and Pensacola


Tanner's paper, read to the so-
ciety in his absence, said several
other explanations of the ridge
have been advanced but all of them
appear faulty. One is that it is
formed from sand transported by
Gulf drift from the east.


The principal source of sand
Wave action through the centur- long ridge, a prominent feature of ,from the east is the deposits from
,ies has sheared off Gulf Coast head- the coastline centered at Santa Ro- the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Ri-
lands of the Panhandle of Florida sa Beach, was provided by Dr. W. ver System but Tanner said the
and deposited the material in a F. Tanner, a Florida State Univer- barrier islands, spits and shoals
formidable ridge of sand midway sity geologist, who reported on stu- off the mouth of the Apalachicola
between Pensacola and Port St. dies of the area to the American have enough sand to account for
Joe. Association for the Advancement a 5000-year accumulation. Little of
This explanation of the 100-mile of Science this week. this drifts west of Panama City,



INSURANCE


Is An Exacting Science, Too


he said.
Other conditions make it impos-
sible for the ridge of sand to have
come from anything but erosion of
the coastland itself, said Tanner,
and this erosion is indicated by
the truncated headlands between
the estuaries.
The concave coast between Pen-
sacola and Port St. Joe suggests
drift directions which should de-
posit sand at the apex and this, he
said, is the center of the 100-mile
long ridge of sand.
The ridge rises to a maximum
height of 60 to 70 feet above sea
level and "is unlike either ordin-
ary sand dune ridges," said Dr.
Tanner. It extends down 150 to 200
feet to bedrock and represents an
accumulation of almost one million
cubic feet of sand per mile of Gulf
front above present sea level.
"Ages of the various layers of
unconsolidated sand are not known,
but it is quite possible that the to-
tal thickness of sand reflects the
sea level rise of the recent thou-
sands of years," said the geologist.


SPECIALS for TUESDAY THRU SATURDAY, JAN. I- 5 -


FRESH PORK
LIVER
Pound


Fresh Ground Daily
Ground Round
Pound


Good Beef
Minute Steaks
Each


Let's take an example. Do you know
that YOU can be SUEDI Someone may
have an accident on property you own
That someone can sue you, his claim can
WIPE YOU OUT unless you're pro-
perly insured!


MAXIMUM COVERAGE

AT A MINIMUM COST

TITLE INSURANCE


-LIABILITY INSURANCE


FIRE BONDS


Tomlinson Insurance Agency


403 Monument Avenue


Port St. Joe, Florida


A c t i v e youngsters, and

adults too, maintain their
powerhouse of energy
more easily when they


drink plenty of high-protein milk nature's
most nearly perfect food!
BOOST YOUR BUDGET BUY DAIRY FOODS!

BORDEN'S FRESH-DAILY MILK PRODUCTS
Delivered Right To Your Front Door
Cottage Cheese Butter Orange Juice
Try Our Quality Fresh Country Eggs



HARDEN'S DAIRY
"IF IT'S BORDEN'S IT'S GOT TO BE GOOD"


Circuit Witness Minister J. L.
Lisle and wife Ruth.

Witnesses Plan
Bible Conference
C. L. Blum, local supervisor for
Jehovah's Witnesses, announces
plans for a Bible study convention
to be held at the Centennial Build-
ing in Port St. Joe January 11 thru
13. Speakers and delegates have
been invited from three states to
develop the theme, "Have faith to
the preserving alive of the soul,"
says Blum.
SPreparations are being made to
accommodate 600 or more persons
for the three day session. Upwards
of 400 rooming accommodations
have been secured in hotels, mo-
tels and private homes of the city
and beach areas. This is the effort
largely of the local group of Je-
hovah's Witnesses, with the help
of the Chamber of Commerce and
,civic authorities, according to Mr.
Blum.
Blum says preparations for the
program started last spring when
J. L. Lisle, Circuit supervisor for
Jehovah's Witnesses in northwest
Florida, southern Alabama and
southern Georgia announced that
Port St. Joe had been selected for
a Bible study convention. His staff
of coordinators have been working
on the project throughout the sum-
mer and fall.
Mr. Lisle has arranged for the
Watchtower Society's district sup-
ervisor, D. J. Thomas, to deliver
the key address Sunday afternoon
January 13 in the Centennial Build-
ing. He will discuss "The Bible's
Answer to Our Problem of Survi-
val." Lisle says Mr. Thomas has
just completed a series of like con
ventions in Deland, Fort Lauder-
dale, T a m p a and Jacksonville
where more than 6,000 persons
heard his scriptural message.
Mr. Blum is expecting both cir-
cuit and district ministers to ar-
rive Monday, January 7, in Port
St. Joe with a staff of assistants to
complete final arrangements and
welcome the delegates who will be-
gin arriving in the city by 4:00 p.m.
Friday, January 11.
_X


Plenty Meat-Untrimmed Our Budget
Neck Bones 3/2 lbs. $100 Sliced Bacon 3 lbs. $100

Ground Beef 3 lbs. $109 Our Own Home Made
Swift Premium Best
Chunk Balogna 3 lb. *100 Ham Hock 3 lbs. *100

OPEN "NEW YEAR" ALL DAY
GEORGIA GRADE "A" 'OUND REGISTERS 3 Lbs.


Fryers 26c Weiners $1

Grandma says: "Brown Sunbeam or Ideal Fla. Grade 'A' Large
eggs are best!"
Large Brown Grade 'A' BREAD Doz.EGGS
13 oz. loaf With $10.00 Order
2dz 97C lOc FREE


DELIGHT Sessions Rainbow
MAR GARINE 2 Ibs. 29c. Cooking Oil
MARS or HERSHEY
CANDY BARS 10 for 39c With $5.00 Order
SWIFT'S BROOKFIELD STICK 89C
BUTTER pound 69c I

SHELLED PECANS BRAZI L NUTS
79c $1u49 3 bags $1.00
79c $1.49 NABISCO
WE BUY and SELL PECANS NABISCO
SALTINES lb. 29c
CANADA DRY-28 OZ.
9C JACK'S Full Pound
Drink S Vanilla Wafers 25c
Celery, stalk BEST BUNCH IN PORT ST. JOE

Lettuce, headBas

Carrots. bag
-- HEADQUARTERS FOR -
Turnips Mustard Collards Green Cabbage
Good Bag Delicious Best Kiln Dried
Avocados A PP L E S Sweet Potatoes
ea. 10 c 3 bags $1.00 10 c lb.


LOOK! With $5.00 Order
IRISH POTATOES


10 29
POUNDS


BREMMER'S JUMBO


PIE E39c

NON-FAT INSTANT DRY
CARNATION MILK
LESS THAN 6V2c QT.


14 QT. SIZE


Phone 6 3 Cle -e h i'F


89c


BAMA
SALAD DRESSING

QUART 3uc


GOOD 25 LBS.
Scratch Feed 98c
SWANSDOWN
Cake Mixes 3 boxes $ 100

WHOLESALE PRICE--It's Got To Go
FRUIT JELLY

FULL 10
CASE $11


I I ~ - P_ _I _


.............
...... ........
....... I .........


,,, -


Phone 639-4383, Colfect


Wewahitchka, Florida






CAIRO BEAUTY HAMBURGER


Q ULOnlyTthemosts
be sure of ser
products, quality
Q UA Lyour IGA Food

FRIENDLINE


SAVI



3 Lb.
Pkg.

FERIZED


elect of foods are offered to you, our customers. You can
ring tender meats, fresh produce, tasty dairy and baked
y controlled canned and packaged goods when you buy at
Store.
S We are dedicated to bringing you fine
foods at the lowest possible cost. You'll
find you do save more on food purchases
S when you make the "Total Test," at IGA.


LB.


LB.


7c

5c


32 OZ.
JAR


19c


SUN-GLO MUSTARD GREENS or

SPN HH
'P" I N mi ";B (W


No. 303
CAN


ur every concern is for your complete shopping comfort. We are here to
serve you in every way possible. Shop IGA today and enjoy Red Carpet
Service, ourtesy, and the sincere interest that local ownership provides.


WITH $5.00 FOOD ORDER


No. 10
Jar


Vegetable Beef
Chicken Noodle


No. 1
Cans


COFFEE


60z.
Jar


1 Lb.
Box


No. 5
Jar


2 Lb.
Pkg.


GALVANIZED WITH LIDS
92 5 Size
2m2 20 Gallon


2.98


29c


6 Oz.
Pkg.


/2 Gal.


35c


59c


4 Roll 1
Package 1


IGA FROZEN
PEACH APPLE CHERRY

Frnit Pies 3 3IE
GREEN HEAD


CABBAGE
CANADIAN
Rutabagas
KILN DRIED SWEET
Potatoes
McKENZIE FROZEN
BUTTER BEANS
IGA FROZEN CRINKLE
CUT POTATOES


89c


2 -9


59c


19c


39c


39c


5


10c


TABLERITE

Pork Roast


Pork Chops


LB.


RIBS
AUSAGE


N


Gerber's Strained
BABY FOOD


IGA
CHUNK TUNA
Broadcast 4 Oz. Cans
VIENNA SAUSAGE
Broadcast
POTTED MEAT
Broadcast
BEEF STEW
Giant Size
LIQUID TREND
Large Packages
DRY TREND
1 CENT SALE
PROTEX SOAP
Toilet Soap
SWEETHEART SOAP


Calo
CAT FOOD


CENTER CUTS


69I


pound
pound
pound
pound


9 jars
6 oz. can


2 flat cans
16 oz. can


2 packages


2 tall cans


lOc


24 oz. pkg. 39c
2 lb.pkg. 47 c


PERFECTION


RICE
SOUTHERN CHOICE WIN1


COOKING OIL


CAMPBELL'S


SOIGA 00% PURE
IGA 100% PURE


INSTANT
DIXIE BELLE SALTINE


CRACKERS


BLACKBURN CORN and CANE

SYR UP


DIXIE BELLE


FIG


COMO TOILET


FIRST CUTS


ENJOY A TABLERITE
PORK STEAK
TABLERITE SMALL
FRESH SPARE
TABLERITE
PU RE PORK S
TABLERITE
SLICED BACO


TISSUE


GET YOUR GARBAGE CAN AT IGA


49c


49c
39c
53c


10 Gallon
Size


DIET RITE


99c
31c


- 6 Bottle Carton


COLA


2 cans 47c


IGA TABLERITE


27c
37c


each 49c


Swiss Cheese


ALL FLAVORS IGA
Ice Cream


39c


3 bars 29c
4 bars 45c


29c


I .


f ---4%


~s~-


GS







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THUF

Deliciously/ Crisp Waffles -
Ready n A Jiffy BOOW"LIN

: ,." .' -


RSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1963


G


V V b-U I


Whip up some waffles, why don't you, especially these 'lay.
when the mercury's low. They're "busy-day" easy and quick if
you have self-rising flour on hand for the making.
This recipe for basic waffles directs you to fold stiffly beaten
egg whites into the batter made of enriched self-rising flour,
egg yolk, melted butter or margarine and milk. This step will
give you waffles that are light and tender inside while the out-
aide is crisp and golden brown.
The traditional breakfast of hot waffles with syrup and bacon
Strips will stand you in good nutritional stead for full winter
days. The self-rising flour is enriched to supply you generous
amounts of three B-vitamins, food iron -and calcium.
Listed below are several other waffle ideas you might try in
addition to plain waffles with syrup.
WAFFLES
2 eggs, separated 1% cups milk
V, cup melted butter or 3 cups sifted enriched ;.
margarine self-rising flour
Beat egg yolks. Add butter or margarine and milk. Stir into
flour and mix until smooth. Fold in stiffly beaten egg whites, Bake
on hot waffle baker until golden brown.
Makes 4 servings.
-Hot spiced applesauce over waffles topped with little pork
sausages.
-Waffles topped with creamed turkey, chicken or ham.
-Chopped dates, nuts, apple, raw cranberry or raisins added
to waffle batter.


COMMERCIAL LEAGUE of third place ana really puti me'
bottom four teams in a tight race.
Four of our teams took to the Florida National Bank postponed
lanes last week and the results with Michigan Chemical due to the
were all in favor of tightening the holidays.
league. The team standings are as fol-
On alleys one and two, Costin'sows:
'lost their poise for one game and Team Standings W L
allowed Roche's Furniture one Costin's 39 21
point, but that one was an all im- Stevedore's 39 211
portant point. Costin's striving to ed No B 3 2n
maintain a lead on first place, fell Florida National Bank 25 31
under the pressure and with Steve-Basil's Standard 26 34
(lore's sweeping four from Basil's ce 2 3
that tied the league. Jake Koller's The same teams meet tonight35
528 and Ashley Costin's 524 led The same teams neet tonight
2ustin's team with Tommy Prid- and it should be interesting to see
Costing teamwthTomy idhow Roche's and Basil's revenge
geon's 522 a close third. Wayne how Roche's and Basil's revenge
o 2a, e ti. W the defeats handed them last week.
S 011ith hn nd vl rough night. but


still hung on for a 496 series. Lou
Little's 464 was second high for
Roche's.
The Stevedore's really lived in
a tree, pulling all stops out and
plowed under the "use to be" very
hot Basil's Standard. No one on
the alleys broke "500" and quite a
few bowlers were in the low 400's.
Many splits and taps were the
cause of the bad nights on the
lanes. Ruel Whiteliurst captured
the high honors for both teams
rolling 477. Danny Maddox, anoth-
er Stevedore, rolled a fine 466. Joe
Davis led Basil's with 461 followed
by Lamar Moore's 446. The four
game sweep dropped Basil's out


CALL 227-5996 FOR PICK-UP and DELIVERY



NOW OPEN....

In The DeLuxe Laundry and Dry Cleaner Building




Hiiote's Bacber Shop


OPEN TODAY FOR BUSINESS

Experienced barbers to give you a complete barbering service .
Come by today! All new shop and equipment with years of know-
how to operate them!


14,000 Receiving

Benefits In

7 County Area
Christmas and the New Year hol-
iday season comes but once a year
-Social Security benefits may,
come to you every month after you
become entitled. These benefits
represent retirement, survivor or
disability insurance proceeds, ac-
cording to John V. Carey, Manager
of the Panama City Social Security
Office. You or the breadwinner in
your household have paid for the
insurance protection and are en
titled to the proceeds as a matter
of earned right.
Mr. Carey states that approxi-
mately 14,000 people are currently
receiving monthly benefits in the
seven county area served by the
Panama City Office and almost 18,-
000,000 in the nation as a whole.
Yet there are many people who
could receive some benefits from
Social Security who have never
bothered to even inquire about
their rights.
He suggests that each person
who is age 62 or over and who has
never filed a claim for Social Se-
curity benefits make a New Year's
resolution now to contact the local
Social Security Office as soon as
possible. Bring with you any rec-
ord of your earnings during 1962
under Social Security you may
have, proof of your age and your
Social Security account number.
Don't lose any benefits that may
be yours. Benefits are not paid
automatically-an application must
be filed to get them started, he
said.
The Social Security Office for
this area is located at 1135 Harri-
son Avenue, Panama City, tele-
phone PO 3-5331.





..a.ti0 M&We a.
Florida Power Corporation
Home Service Department
Last call for cookies
Peppermint Stick Crisps
% cup shortening
% cup sugar
1 cup sifted all-purpose flour
% teaspoon baking powder
N teaspoon soda
Y4 teaspoon salt
Yi teaspoon nutmeg
1 egg
1 tablespoon milk
3 to tablespoons crushed
peppermint-stick candy
Thoroughly cream shortening
and sugar. Sift together dry in- I
gredients. Beat egg. Combine
egg and milk. Add sifted dry in-
gredients to shortening mixture
alternately with egg-milk mix-
ture. Drop from teaspoon on an
oiled cookie sheet. Flatten cook-
ies by pressing with a glass dip-
ped in flour. Sprinkle each with
:V teaspoon candy. Bake at
350* F. for 12 minutes. Makes
3% dozen.
Quickie Clusters
1 pkg. chocolate or butter-
scotch bits
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 large can Chow Mein
noodles
1. Melt bits over very low heat.
2. Coat nutmeats. Add crushed
noodles.
3. Spoon on waxed paper and i
chill until firm.
Makes about 24.
Variations: Substitute 2 cups
ready-to-eat cereal for noodles.

ATTEND PTA
USE THE WANT ADS


LE!


Your
Choice


LB.



59c


STEH^




T- B ONE

SIR L OIN

CUBED
ROUND


SUPER-RIGHT SLICED
Pork Loin Ib.

CAP'N JOHN'S QUICK FROZEN
Breaded Shrimp


GRADE 'A' GA. SHIPPED D. & D.
Fryer Thighs lb.

Fryer Legs AQ4

Breast with Rib


DOLE'S FANCY HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE


JUICE


46 Oz.
Cans


79c


SUNSHINE BRAND TURNIP, MUSTARD or COLLARD YOUR CHOICE


GREENS


1 Lb.
Can


lOc


3reen Giant Golden Cream Style-1 Lb. Cans ANN PAGE
CORN 2 cans 35 MAYONNAISE pt. 29c


ALL FLAVORS I


S50 Extra I
Wth f thsop an .p.uha


H I C DRINKS W &I-gaw "
S IN K With this coupon and purchase of
Antiseptic 14 Oz. Bottle
S 46 Oz. LISTERINE ------ 89c
SCalls | J-1-5 Coupon good thru January 6
25 Extiw I 0' Extra
Plaid Stamps Plaid Stamps
With this coupon and purchase of With this coupon and purchase of
Sultana 1 Lb. Can Alberto VO-5-7 oz. Bomb
BLACKEYE PEAS 2 cans 35c HAIR SPRAY------ $1.50
I J-1-5 Coupon good thru January 6 J-1-5 Coupon good thru January 6
mmmm~~~P vim m m ain mm m '


Maxwell House
Instant Coffee 6 oz. 99c
Vegetable Shortening
CRISCO 3 lbs. 83c


Detergent
BREEZE


gt. size 81c


Condensed Detergent
ALL reg. size 39c
Detergent-8c OFF
Lux Liquid 22 oz. 59c
Liquid Detergent
WISK V2 gal. $1.42
Nabisco Premium
SALTINES lb. box 27c
Hudson Bathroom-5c OFF
TISSUE 4 rolls 48c
Hudson
Facial Tissue 400's 29c
Chicken of the Sea
Chunk Tuna 9V2 oz. 53c
3erber's Strained
Baby Meats 2 for 49c
Kitty-6 oz. cans
Salmon for Cats 4 for 49c
Dixie Lily
GRITS V/2 lb. bag 19c
Detergent-7c OFF
SURF reg size 26c
Detergent-5c OFF
Rinso Blue reg. size 28c
Detergent-5c OFF
Fluffy All reg- size 28c
Detergent
Swan Liquid 12 oz. 37c
31each
HOOD 33 V/2 gal. 37c
Hludson-70's
Table Napkins 2 bxs. 29c
EIudson Family Pack
Napkins, 200's 33c
Fabby-15 Oz.
Cat Food 4 cans 59c


N H P 1E 1!l.l I


INN
lio 100 Extra ;

.- Plaid Stamps I

I o With this coupon and
Purchase of $5.00 or more
I W Redeemable at any A&P Food Store giving
I gm Plaid Stamps in Florida and Georgia
I Limit one coupon per adult customer
I Jax. 1-5-63 Coupon good thru Jan. 6
I! rn.- 5- !-5 -5
,I- I


RED RIPE FARM FRESH SALAD
TOMATOES basket 19c
FIRM RIPE ANJOU
PEARS 2lbs.29c
FRESH MADE COLE SLAW or
SALAD MIX 8oz.bag 19c

GOWA NANt& CV U eW510
Fifth
Street

Prices in this ad are effective through Saturday,
January 5


69c


--- ----- c ~ -- ce--- I


JANE PARKER
REG- 49t
Cherry Pie SPECIAL!39


_.. ...


i a


^--


I


SAVE ON FAMOUS


.L pi _Bhl








THE STAR. Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1963



1 THE STAR
Published Every Thursday At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Jo*, FIrWa
By The Star Publishing Company
WESLEY R. RAMSEY .....---- Editor and PublUhey
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Salesman, Photographer, Columnist, Reorter, Ptau
Reader, Bookkeeper and Complaint ODpartment
DIAL 227-8161 POSTOFFICE Box 808

Entered as second-class matter, December 19, 1987, at the Poetoffice, Port St. Joe,
Florida, under Act of March 8, 1879.

SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, $3.00 SIX MONTHS, $1.75 THREE MONTHS, 1127.50

TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertil ments, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable fur damage further that. *i-ns"nt rerelved for snack
advertisement.


Another year has arrived on the scene., buttons are financing today in .
About the best comprehension we have seen on the more than 40 cities across the
AU.S. Other gatherings will be ," '
state of affairs we find ourselves during these times was held in county chapter offices
drawn by Al Capp in his Li'l Abner comic strip. The old The National Foundation-
March of Dimes, in the homes
year was showing the new year how to run around and around of volunteers and elsewhere,
the world, "and when you feel your foot burn", he said, In many instances, guests at
Lhese campaign "kickoffs" will
"jump out of the world, cause those fool mortals are setting include governors or their
morl go ." wives, mayors and outstanding
off atomic bombs again!" "Where do the mortals go'' authorities in health fields. '
asked the new year, "when the atomic bombs go off?" "They Other guests will be Americans i.
of all ages who received March
have no place else to go", said the old world. of Dimes aid during and after
It's ironic that we have no place else to go and still in- polio epidemics and outbreaks. B' .
sist on playing "Russian roulette" with the world we have. mnd adolescents with birth de- Jimmy Boggl'ss, 5, of Coy, Ark., the
And, to come closer to home, Port St. Joe is the only fects or arthritis who have been Child, blows out candles on birthday
treated at these March of of aid to the crippled by the health
home we have. We cannot tear up our roots here and move Dimes centers.
to another location without major -surgery. To raise the millions required Child-who this year is Jimmy w]
vto another location ery year for patient aid and Boggess, 5, Coy, Ark.-with Cl
It would seem then that the new year would cause us research in birth defects, ar- President Kennedy at the th
to stop and wonder what we will do to improve our home. thritis and polio, each March of White House and with various sto
Dimes campaign is carefully Senators and Congressmen and of
Consider ways that we can cause ourselves to be more proud planned many months ahead, other dignitaries as well as pf
of our home and thereby have a greater civic interest in the er aremillopes oancoin h screen a ssiof the stage,
betterment of this our home town. lors to be distributed around Special events for the March pr
1he nation; hundreds of thou- of Dimes are staged in all the en
This is a time for changing our ways. It is a time for sands of posters to be erected big cities, many lesser ones and an
looking at what we wish to accomplish during the next 12 in every hamlet, town and city; in some small towns. These in- $3
two million volunteers to be clude March of Dimes bowling
months It is the time for taking inventory. It is the time organized for the Mothers' tournaments, with "roll-offs" to Th
for "drawing up a budget" of how much we will allow our- March (the climax to the cam- select a national man or woman M
pain at the end of January), champion, fashion shows, auc- re
selves to suffer because of our lack of interest or ambition, and March of Dimes films to tions, tleranias, Coffee Days, ni
It is a time of planning of making a goal to strive for exhibit to explain the work of Tag Days and street sales,
rin th nxt 12 months voluntary health organiza- neighborhood bread sales, air- in
during the next 12 months. tion. lifts and a long list of sports re.
And how can we as individuals do this? Don't we have Arrangen-nts must be corn- activities. re
pleted for hie visit in January The theme of this 25th An- a
a City Commission to plan for our city? Don't we have a ol tie national March of Dimes niversary March of Dimes, bo
County Commission to plan for our county? Yes, we do.
But, what we need most in our city and county is a Home
Commission, made up of you and I to express our wishes to the ordinary voters put even more pressure on their Con-
these other Commissions for what we desire. gressmen than the enemies of parcel post can exert.
Oh, we don't mean for you to buttonhole your Commis- We all know that only the postman knows-or cares-
sioner and say, "I think we need a swimming pool" or "I here everybody lives, and that only the postman will de-
think such and such a street should be paved" "don't liwher everybody's package lives, and that only the postman will de-
you think we could use some more parks and playgrounds ?"
. "how about some sidewalks down our street". on our Congressman, his mere inaction may hand over to
We will accomplish more this coming year, if we will the inept, the unequipped and the irresponsible a job of vital
national importance that they cannot begin to do
but approach our Commissioners and let them know that national importance that they cannot begin to do.
you are willing to do your part in order to make our com-
imunity go forward. Offer your suggestions on questions
that might come up during the year. Make the resolution
now to be a better citizen during the coming year than you
have been in the past year,
And, while we are at it, you can become the best kind of '" :'...... ...
citizen possible if you do all of your purchasing possible '
right here in our city and county. For, you are helping ''
those who are also interested in our community by doing so.
Those of like mind working together. And, when you trade .,.
out of town, you are helping no one, except the out of town
merchant you traded with
For summary, let us urge that you make that resolu-
tion now, to be the best citizen possible for YOUR home ...
town during this new year. It might sound a bit corny, but ..-
we would like to say, "This is YOUR home you have no .'" '
Other"
Nancy Davis, 20-year-old -
Pasadena City College
SOMETHING TO FIGHT FOR sophm o ,l reign as


Parcel post-a vital force in the lives and fortunes of
small town and rural America for the past half century-
is facing extinction.
It is about to die of the starvation planned for it by a
commercial carrier in pressing Congress in 1951 for passage
of that fundamentally un-American bit of idiocy known as
P. L. 199-that for the first time in our history made dis-
crimination mandatory between large and small communi-
ties,
Until then, for the preceding 20 years, packages of up
to 70 pounds in weight and 100 inches in combined length
and girth might be mailed between any post offices any-
where. Since P. L. 199, parcel post between first class post
offices-which had been handling over 90 percent of the
traffic-has been sharply, limited. Between such post offic-
es not more than 150 miles apart, size and weight were lim-
ited to 40 pounds and 72 inches. Over 150 miles, packages
could not weigh over 20 pounds. To, from or between post
offices other than first class the original 70 pounds and 100
inches remained in force.
As Congress should have foreseen, this sly legislation
forced many business mailers to use other transport-which
is readily available between large rcities-drove parcel post
volume steadily down, the cost of handling parcel post stead-
ily up.
The inevitable result, since parcel post is required by
law to pay its way, has been a series of rate hikes. And now,
mailers face a further rate increase that Postmaster General
Day, himself, has said will be prohibitive.
The only thing that can save parcel post is repeal by the
new Congress of P. L 199. With restoration of the old size
and weight regulations, and making them the same for ev-
eryone, volume may be recovered and costs brought back
into line. But this can't happen, and won't happen unless


Virginia Jasper, 19-year-old
University of Florida sopho-
more, Queen of the 1963
Orange Bowl Festival, poses in
her official car as she prepares
for the Jamboree Parade on
January 1st.


Kim Lory, of Miami, seems to
be in the dark about the ad-
vantages of her Mother's wig.


A cleaning woman at Chicago's
Opera House is so moved by
Ballerina Maria Tallchief's per-
formance during rehearsal she
tries to emulate actions.


1963 National March of Dimes -(
cake symbolizing first 25 years
organization.
which is "Give for the Life of a
child will be stressed in all
ese special events, and the'
ory told of the first 25 years
the organization. Highlights
that story are:
Patients aided, 338,000; exy.
ended for the medical care
ogram, $385,500,000; for sci-
itific research, $73,600,000;
id for professional education,
8,000,000.
Basil O'Connor, president of
he National Foundation.
arch of Dimes, referred in a
cent speech to the 25th an-
versary of the health agency
"Most certainly we take pride
* our past 25 years, and we
joice. But deep- down we
ally think of that quarter oi
century as only the spring.
lard for our future,"


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- Say You Saw It In The Star -


Cakes, Candles, Commemorations |

Light March of Dimes 25th Year'
Throughout the nation ...... .' ; ; .. 4 't'"
this month, candles will be .. "
lit on birthday cakes to .
symbolize the 25th anniver-
aary of the March of Dimes.
real ones of conventional size
to monster, multi-tiered models .
as much as 12 feet in height
and 10 feet in diameter-the
approximate dimensions of the
one to be erected in New York ni
City's famed Times Square.
Guests at anniversary events
around the country, where
cakes will be of more modest
,proportions, will be invited to .
decorate them with coins for
the March of Dimes.
Many "parties" commenmo-
rating a quarter of a century of -A
disease fighting will be helMAd at H
special treatment centers for "OF i .
birth defects, arthritis and polio DIMo S
which March of Dimes contri- ME


You Are Welcome To The

First United Pentecostal Church
10th St. NW. and Victoria Avenue Highland View, Florida
Rev. JAMES J. HILL, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:15 A.IL
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 P.M.
MID-WEEK SERVICE (Wednesday) .... 7:30 P.M.
YOUTH SERVICE (Friday) 7:30 P.M.
AIR-CONDITIONED CENTRAL HEAT


BE SAFE -- BUY ALL DRUGS FROM
A PHARMACIST AT

SMITH'S PHARMACY





--, .. .. .. ":.











.. DON'T USE
ANYONE ELSE'S PRESCRIPTION

"These pills will fix you up, Betty", Martha
beamed.
Now, Martha, we know you mean well, yet
your pills could prove harmful to Betty .
better let her doctor prescribe something.
(But, when he does, do suggest she fill her
prescription here!)



SMITH'S PHARMACY
Drive-In Window At Rear of Our Store
Two Parking Spaces Reserved for our Prescription Customers
at our Back Door.
JOHN ROBERT SMITH, Pharmaceutical Chemist


A TIME FOR RESOLUTIONS







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1963

TELEPHONE:GARDE
TELEPHONE: BAIl 7-4191 NOTES


8ln.. Frl., Holidays
Mcn. thru Thurs. -


THURSDAY FRHI


2:48 p.m. I,
4:46 p.m., By HERVEY SHARPE
Ilo rida A riIcultural


DAY


THE MIGHTIEST ADVENTURER!


RORYCALHOUN YOKoTANI.
music by LES BAXTER
,CQNEMAScOPE .. COLOR
AJ AMERICAN-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE
Saturday

FANTASTIC ADVENTURE
BENEATH THE SEA!


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UNDERWATER
WILLIAM IW s
LUNDIGAN
JULIE
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ROY ROBERTS A COUMAu muiA


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AMmied u shipl


scou BIARfURE JS Rf
ROBERT WAGNER --DfiOLOlES HART
CARfIYN JONES- HANKIE AVALO:
-ERNIE KOVACS
as the captarfi'

SUNOAY MONDAY
TUESDAY


Starts Wednesday


"WHflAT LVR
H.PPINEDTo
BABYJANE?"
RELEASED BY WARNER BROS.


Extension Service
People and plants are alike since
both are subject to freezing if
they depend only on "nature-
clothes" for warmth.
During recent topcoat weather
many plants did freeze. However,
all the freeze damage is not appar-
ent. Some damage won't show up
until spring.
When spring begins bursting out
all over, some folks will discover
that some of their prized ornamen-
tals have already burst. To the
neophyte gardener this could be
an omen of a strange new disease.
Dr. H. N. Miller, plant patholo-
gist, at the University of Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station,
says chances are the plitting bark
is not a new plant ailment, but the
aftermath of the December freeze.
Delayed death of plant branches
also causes alarm.
Azaleas and camellias often are
slow in showing freeze damage.
Jack Frost's havoc may not show
up until weeks or months after
the chilling winds have given away
to tropical breezes. In case of cit-
rus trees, the bark on badly nipped
trees splits soon after the freezing
temperature.
Split bark on citrus trees usual-
ly calluses over leaving a scar. But
on small shrubs, such as azaleas
and camellias, it's a death-dealing
blow to the branches affected. Of-
ten you are not aware of the dam-
aged bark, until you notice a dead
branch on a plant.
During the first week after a
freeze, symptoms of plant damage
are obvious. In some cases leaves
die or turn yellow and fall from
the plant. On tender plants frozen
stems blacken and shrivel. The
damage extends from the tips of
the branches downward. If the
plant has been killed, it will turn
brown, become blackened or water-
soaked.
Cold injury to evergreen orna-
mentals may show as irregular
brown blotches on the leaves. In
case of mild damage the leaves may
become tinged red or become
bronzed.
Flower buds also may be dam-
aged by cold weather. Injury to
azalea flower buds may not be ap-
parent until the plant begins flow-
ering. Few flowers appear. An ex-
amination will show that the buds
failed to develop-.They are small,
completely. brown and are easily
broken out.
Cold-damaged camellia flower
buds may remain on the plants for
some time after they normally
would have opened. They often ex-
pand, showing color as if opening.
But after lingering in this undecid-
ed condition, the buds many gar-
deners await anxiously to see un-
fold, drop from the plant. The
dropped buds will be brown at
the base of the petals. If the firm
buds are sliced open, the inside
will be a sickly brown. Many of
these sickly brown buds are mailed
to University of Florida plant path-
ologists as diseased buds. Most an-
swers are 'freeze damage."
House plants also are injured by
temperatures no lower than 40 to
50 degrees. Low temperature dam-
age is often confused with disease
symptoms. African violets, gloxen-
ias and related types of pot plant
injuries show up as water-soaked
leaves. Cold damage to such plants
as philodendrons appears as leaf
spots surrounded by water-soaked
margins. Other symptoms include
irregular tan or straw colored
blotches.
If you're not sure of an ailment
on your plants, it's always a good
idea to check the symptoms with
your county agent or send a plant
specimen to the Plant Pathology
Department, Agricultural Experi-
ment Station, University of Florida,
Gainesville.

CLASSIFIED ADS
Midget investments With
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FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Third St.8 and Bataell Ave. C. BYRON SMITH, Pastor'


a.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.


SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION .----............. 6:15
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) --......... 7:30
"Come and Worship God With Us"


Boneless Chuck


Bakerite
hortening


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lb. 25c

25c

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cans 45c

2 for 49c

cans 33B

17c

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2 lbs. 17c


2 lbs. 21c
2 LBS.

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WE FEATURE DUBUQUE'S FINE HEAVY WESTERN BEEF!!


LB. ,

69c


Ground Fresh Many Times Daily lb- 49c


3 LBS.


1.25


Beef LB.

Short Ribs 39c
Brisket LB

Stew Beef 19c


Mississippi Brand
SLICED BACON
lb. 49c


Copeland's Top Quality
F RAN KS
12oz.pkg. 39c


Shoulder

Round Roast


LB.

Chuck roast 49c
LB.

Rib Steak 59c


Stew Beef


Maxwell House


Pound Can


Kraft's 10 Oz. Jar
GRAPE JELLY
Kraft's
PARKAY OLEO
Kraft's 8 Oz. Size
French Dressing
Wishbone Deluxe 8 Oz. Size
French Dressing
Inman Freestone 2/2 Size Cans
PEACHES 2
Detergent Large Size
SUPER SUDS
Campbell's Chicken Noodle
SOUP 2
King Cole Whole 303 Can
GREEN BEANS
King Cole All Green 303 Can
BUTTER BEANS
Eatwell Grated 'Y size Cans
TUNA FISH
Tempt Spiced 12 Oz. Can
Luncheon Meat


GARDEN FRESH PRODUCE

VINE RIPENED LB.

TOMATOES 19c


Ballard's Limit 1 with $10.00 Order or More




FLOUR P19
Save floors, carpets or-use as a pad for your pet to sleep on NYLON

Door Mats 59c
Made from real carpeting Size 13 x 23 inches Assorted Colors
MO EOMN'S Specials for January 3, 4 and 5
MORTON'S









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Je t Check


Writer


Hampered


By paration, ot "Bad Check Artist"


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.
By RUSSELL KAY of thousands of dollars.
SNot all bad checks are written
Do you become irritated and in- by crooks, one law enforcement of- ways and unfortunately are smooth
dignant when a tradesman refuses ficer points out. Some are. written enough in many cases to get away
to accept your personal check? Do by otherwise responsible people without being detected. A bad
you look on the sign over tha cash who are just careless in keeping check artist will come to town,
register that reads "No Checks track of their funds, or by those stop at a local hotel or motel, pose
Cashed" as a sort of personal in- who know their account is insuffi- as a well-to-do tourist or business
sult? client at the time the check is writ- executive. He makes friends with
While your personal check or the ten but believe they will be able clerks, bartenders and store mana-
company check presented may be to deposit enough to cover it before gers. Makes a number of purchases
as good as gold, a lot of checks it reaches the bank. Other offend- for which he pays cash.
your grocer, butcher, supermarket ers are said to be alcoholics and
or filling station is asked to cash dope addicts who are desperate Then one afternoon he will in-
are as bouncing as a rubber ball. for a drink or a fix and turn to form his new friend Al, the bar-
If a clerk or market manager is the bad check as a means of secur- tender, that he forgot and left his
foolish enough to cash it, he will ing funds money in his other pants, or his
be personally responsible and the company check failed to arrive but
amount of the bum check will be The professionals operate all should be in the next mail and asks
deducted from his salary. over the state, especially in the his friend to accommodate him
The number of bad check cases winter months. They carry plenty with a little cash, say $25 in ex-
reported to Florida law enforce- of identification, most of it forged change for his personal check. He
ment officers totals many thou- or stolen. shows his Diners Club card, his
sands with losses into the hundreds They operate in many different Shrine card, hotel credit cards, dri-


THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1963
very's license.
He is clean cut and well dressed
and drives a nice car and has been
a good cash customer for several
days to say nothing of his generous
tips. So his check is cashed.
Pocketing the money, the oper-


ator goes down the line to all the
business establishments he has
previously set-up by making
friends with managers or clerks,
and pulls the same gag. He winds
up with several hundred dollars.
His suitcase is already packed and
in his car and he quietly leaves
town.
Law enforcement officers will
tell you that the best way to avoid
loss from bad checks is simply not
to cash them. You may hurt some-
one's feeling now and then but if


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liAr
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What's a gym jam? A Sai 1
hop? A sock shuffle?
Do you give up? Wan: a
translation?
All three are names of
dances that will be held b:.
teenagers across the coun-
try this January in honor

of the 25th Anniversary
March of Dimes.
The authority for this info.r-
mation is a blonde, hazel-eyed
beauty who is national chair-
man for the Teen Age Pro-
gram (TAP) of The Natio:nal
Foundation-March of Dimes.
She's Suzie Willett, 18, Wil-
mington, Del., a freshman at
Russell Sage College, Troy.
N.Y., where she is studyri
nursing. She became a March
of Dimes volunteer several
years ago because she "wanted
.o help people."
An enthusiastic worker, he
traveled the state of Delaware
and showed high school st'I-
dents how they could help car-
ry out the March of Dime_-'
programs to fight birth defects,
arthritis and polio-a trio of
cripplers of concern to young
people as well as to older age
groups.
Is Top Tap
This fall and winter, as the
top TAP, she's been corre-
sponding and talking with
teens all over the country, ad-
vising them how they can
make themselves useful in
March of Dimes activities in
their home towns.
"Just about all the teens I've
met in my travels for the
March of Dimes really want to
do something constructive,"
Suzie says. "Most of them join
TAP groups because this gives
them an opportunity to con-
tribute to the life of their com-
munity. 0
"There have been several
national surveys which show
that Dr. Jonas Salk, who de-
veloped the killed-virus polio
vaccine solely with March of
Dimes support, is a hero to
teens. It's easy to see why. Dr.
Salk is a dedicated man, ab-
sorbed in his humanitarian
work. Teens are very idealistic
and they gladly give their re-
spect to anyone who earns it.
"I'm going to be a nurse be-
cause I want a career that in-


a customer is worth having he will
understand.
If you feel you must cash such
checks, don't take the identifica-
tion for granted. Stall, while you
someone check the license number
of the car. Make a note of the
numbers on identifications cards
and report them to the sheriff.
Have someone call the address giv-
en and check with hotel or motel to
see if the person is still registered,
but the best plan is just don't cash
the check.

Federal Tax
Returns Mailed
Employer's Quarterly Federal
Tax Return, Form 941, for the
fourth quarter 1962 was mailed to
all Florida employers on Decem-
ber 31, according to Laurie W.
Tomlinson, District Director of In-
ternal Revenue, Jacksonville. Mr.
Tomlinson said that the completed
return along with any tax due must
be in his office not later than Jan-
uary 31, 1963.
"Several changes have been
made on the form to make it more
adaptable to the Service's new data
processing system," Mr. Tomlinson
said. He urged employers to use


Suzie Willett, 18, Wilmington, Del., is national chairman of the
Teen Age Program (TAP) for the 25th Anniversary March of Dimes
held, as always, during the month of January.
0
volves doing something nec- popular benefits for the 1963
essary and useful. I've worked March of Dimes:
as a hospital volunteer and I Dances head the list rang-
know that I'll be happy help- Dances head the list, rang-
ing pthat I'll be happyn't help ing from informal sock hops
in patients who can'help to Silver Anniversary Balls,
themselves." glittering events which call
Suzie, the daughter of Dr. for formal gowns and gar-
and Mrs. Albert V. Willett, Jr., denias.
spent last summer as a Candy Street sales-there seems to
Stripe volunteer in Delaware Street sales-there seems to
Hospital in Wilmington. Her be an endless supply of
father, a chemist, is an execu- items which TAPs plan to
tive with the Du Pont Com- sell. These include tiny
pany. plastic Rainbow Crutches,
balloons, lollipops, peanuts,
"I'm aware that occasionally donuts and carnations,
a tiny minority of teens get among dozens of other
into trouble and make head- products. 0
lines," Suzie says, "but I'll bet
that if they found work which Auctions thclub members
they enjoyed, even this small auction off their services to
fraction would stay out of the highest bidder for'aday
trouble. I think that most of or an afternoon, working as
all, a teenager wants to feel secretaries, baby sitters, shoe
respected and needed. I guess shiners and the like.
in that sense, we're no differ- "I'm thrilled that TAPs,,are
ent from anyone else," so willing to pitch in and .work
for theMarch of Dimes," Suzie
Popular Events Planned says. "This just proves one
From telephone and letter thing I've felt for some time-
surveys among TAPs all over most of today's teens are ideal-
the country, Suzie reports that istic, and they are searching
the following TAP activities for ways to express their
are shaping up as the most idealism."


the preaddressed form which will
be furnished them to insure proper
matching with the master file ac-
count.
Mr. Tomlinson also noted that
the return form for the fourth
quarter has attached at the bottom
a Form W-3 on which employers
will reconcile withholding from
wages for the calendar year 1962.
This form should be completed and


left attached to the employer's tax
return when filed.
------

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Teen Talk Translators Needed

For Events in March of Dimes


GOODSON 'S
RADIO and TV REPAIR

Admiral Emerson DuMont
Radio TV Stereo Air Conditioners
ANTENNA SYSTEMS, GOOD USED TV's $35.00 up|
SERVICE CALLS $3.00,

Phone 7-3251 or 7-3911 Day or Nite
DAY or NIGHT
317 REID AVENUE
(Next Door To Telegraph Office)
Your Satisfaction Is Our Business -


_


EXTRA

SPECIAL
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---


EXTRA

SPECIAL


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_ I 1 I -I I I








THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1963


L


DOMESTIC

LAUNDRY and CLEANERS

for


PICK-UP and



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EVERY MONDAY and THURSDAY

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Drop Us A Card -


417 Grace Avenue


Panama City, Florida


GOODSON'S

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Phone 7-3251 or 7-3911 Day or Nite
DAY or NIGHT

317 REID AVENUE
(Next Door To Telegraph Office)
Your Satisfaction Is Our Business -



You Are Cordially Invited To Attend

Long Ave. Baptist Church

REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL ............-----------...-....---- 9:45 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ..--.--.----... 6:15 .p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP .....-....---. 7:30 p.m.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) --- 7:30 p.m.
Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street
4ir Conditioned Centrally Heated .

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME


St. Joe Rofing


and REPAIR COMPANY


Phone 227-8946


114 Monument Avenue


COSTIN BUILDING


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PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH
Garrison at 20th
Prayer Service (Wednesday) 7:45 P.M.
Sunday School 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship -11,:00 A.M.
Evening Worship 7:45 P.M.
"Souls Harbor in the Port Area"
Rev. Joel S. McGraw, Pastor
Comfortably Air-Conditioned


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FOR RENT: Furnished one bed-
room house and two bedroom side
duplex furnished. Two 2-bedroom
houses furnished. St. Joe Beach.
Smith's Pharmacy. tfc-9-13


FOR RENT: Two bedroom unfur-
Lished apartment with garage at
1206 Palm Blvd. Call 227-7431 after
4:00 p.m. tfe-11-1
FOR-LEASE: Sinclair service sta-
tion for lease in Port St. Joe.
Call SU 5-4431, Panama City or
write Sinclair Refining Co., Box
1669. tfc-12-6
FOR RENT: Nice furnished apart-
ment. For couple only at 1621
Monument Ave. Phone 227-7641. tf
FOR RENT: 1960 10x45 trailer. See
W. E. Grimes at Ward Ridge
Trailer Park. 2tc
FOR RENT: One furnished bed-
room and private bath. 528 Corner
of Sixth Street and Woodward Ave.
FOR SALE: Furntshed 2 bedroom
brick home, 1031 Long Ave. Ph.
648-4128, J. A. Mira.
FOR SALE: Nice 2 bedroom home
in excellent condition, with den,
tile bath, wall to wall carpet in liv-
ing room. Many other extras to go
with sale. Located at 1310 Wood-
ward Ave. Priced for quick sale,
Presently FHA financed.
If interested phone 227-5261, George
H. Wimberly, Jr. tfc 10-4
FOR SALE: Modern 2 bedroom
concrete 1 lock house, insulated,
thermostat controlled heat on 185
x75 ft. lot. New chain link fence
around 'back yard. Pay equity or
low financing cost. See 'at 129 Hun-
ter Circle, Ferrell Allen, Jr. tfc
LOTS FOR SALE: In Phillip's Sub-
division on the Intra-Coastal Ca-
nal at Overstreet. .Small down pay-
ment, up 'to three years to pay.
For information contact Mrs. L. T.
Ary-olid, Max Kilbourn or R. D.
Prows, Jr., Phone 227-4991. tfec
MAN WANTED to serve consumers
in Gulf County or Port St. Joe
with Rawleigh Products. Steady
good earnings year round. No cap-
ital required. Write Rawleigh FAL-
100-11, Memphis, Tenn. 4tp-12-20
TWO VERY NICE HOMES
FOR SALE
Nice two bedroom house in good
neighborhood. Only $350.00 down
and balance on FHA loan.
Three bedrooms, two baths, liv-
ing room, den, dining room and
kitchen. This spacious home with
oak floors to sell for only $400.00
down. This $400.00 includes all
closing costs.
FRANK & DOT'S AGENCY
Registered Real Estate Broker
221 Reid Ave. Phone 227-3491
FOR SALE: 1961 Consul English
Ford. Pay small equity and take
up payments. Bert Hall. Phone 227-
5296. Itc
SERVICES OFFERED: Spencer &
Spirella corsets. Men, women and
children fitted. Registered corse-
teria. Gladys Taylor. Phone 227-
8491. Itp
WHEN YOU PLAN TO MOVE see
SURPLUS SALES of ST. JOE.
We can help you solve your moving
problems, whether small or large,
whether across town or across the
country. Let us tell you about stor-
age terms, too. We represent May-
flower, equipped with every mod-
ern technique and convenience to
handle your most priceless possess-
ions with care and speed. Our train-
ed personnel are interested first
in satisfying you. Give us a try.
SURPLUS SALES of ST. JOE, 201
Monument Ave., across from the
Post Office. ttc


IVrif IN hm-


St. Joe, Fla. Phone 229-1241 for
further information or write P. 0.
Box 535. tf

INCOME TAX
RETURNS PREPARED
Also, I will do part or full-
time bookkeeping in my home
or at your place of business. Ex-
perienced in all types of book
work. Typing work done neatly
and correct. R. W. HENDERSON,
Phone 229-1716.
WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116,
THE AMERUCAN LEGION, Meet-
ing first and third Tuesday
nights, 8:00 pnm. American Legion
Home.
EPTIC TANKS dumped out. Call
Buford Griffin, Phone 7-7011 for
tiick expert service. tte
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0.
0. F.-Meets second and fourth
Thursday, 8:00 p.m. in American
Legion Hall. AlI members urged to
aLtend.
Nolle Grand: Emmett Daniell
Secretary: J. C. Martin.
R. A. M.-Regular convocation of
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
M., 2nd and 4ta Mondays. All visit,
ing companions welcome.
Everett McFarland, High Priest
Edgar Smith, Secretary
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F. & A. M., every first
and third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.


ROBERT L. CREAMER, W. M.
ROY K. BLACKSHEAR, Sec.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
In Chancery. NO. 2234
BETTY C. NELSON,
Plaintiff,
ALLAN HERBERT NELSON,
Defendant
NOTICE TO: Allan Herbert Nelson whose
place of residence is unknown.
On or before the 21st day of January,
A.D. 1962 the defendant, Allan Herbert
Nelson is required to serve upon Silas R.
Stone, Plaintiff's Attorney, whose address
is 321 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida,
a copy of and file with the Clerk of said
Court, the original of an answer to the Bill
of Complaint filed against him herein.
WITNESS my hand and official seal of
said Court at Wewahitchka, Gulf County,
Florida, this 17th day of December, A.D.
1962.
/s/ GEORGE Y. CORE,
Clerk Circuit Court.
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
First publication 12-20-62 4t

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING
OF MEMBERS OF CITIZENS' FED-
ERAL SAVINGS and LOAN AS-
SOCIATION of PORT ST. JOE.
The annual meeting of members
of Citizens Federal Savings and
Loan Association of Port St. Joe
will be held on Wednesday, Janu-
ary 16, 1963, at 2:00 p.m., EST.,
in the office of the association at
401 Fifth Street, Port St. Joe, Flor-
ida, for the purpose of electing di-
rectors for the ensuing term, and
to transact any other business
which may legally come before
said meeting."
Signed: C. J. STEVENS, Jr.
Manager
Citizens Federal will close for
business at 12:00 p.m. on Wednes-
day, January 16, 1963 in order to
hold annual meeting of members.



CLASSIFIED ADS
Midget Investments Wth
Giant Returns


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Meet
every Wednesday night, 8:00 p.m.
at Parish House, 809 % th St Port


COMPLETE PHOTO SERVICE

FAST QUALITY ROLL FILM SERVICE
PORTRAIT COMMERCIAL
MOVIE FILM BLACK and WHITE COLOR

LYNART STUDIO
104 Bay View Drive Phone 227-8681


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Third St. and Ba-1tell Ave. C. BYRON SMITH, Paster

SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ................ 6:15 p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 p.m.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) ..-..-...----. 7:30 p.m.

"Come and Worship God With Us"



Oak Grove Assembly of God Church


FRED HUNT, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:00 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
CHRISTIAN CADETS 6:15 p.m.
EVANGELISTIC SERVICES 7:30 p.m.
Mid-Week Prayer Services (Wed.) ....--.... 7:30 p.m.
' I


Mr. adn Mrs. Wandell E. Butler
of Port St. Joe, announce the
birth of a son. Charles Calvin on
December 20.
Mr. and Mrs. Henton Hamm, 107
Second Avenue, announce the birth
of a son, Marty Dewayne on De-
cember 23.
Mr. and Mrs. Barney Ephriam
McCollough, 511 Ninth Street, an
naunce the birth of a daughter,
Verna Dean on December 29.
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dean Biggs,
Rt. 1, Wewahitchka announce the
birth of a son, Andy Dean on De-
cember 29.
Mr. and Mrs. Ashley Marion Cos-
tin, 2000 Constitution Drive, an-
nounce the birth of a baby girl,
Leslie Catherine on December 29.
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Demond
Stewart of Wewahitchka announce
the birth of a son, Bernard De-
mond, Jr., on December 31.
Colored Births
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Alexander of
190 Avenue E announce the birth
of a son, Christopher Deleon on
December 25.
(All births occurred in the Port
St. Joe Municipal Hospital.)


Elementary School
Lunch Room Menu

Port St. Joe Elementary School
Monday, January 7
Ham and potatoes, green field
peas, cabbage slaw, cherry pie,
white bread and butter and milk.
Tuesday, January 8
Spaghetti and meat sauce, snap
beans, lettuce and tomato salad,
hot biscuits and butter, apple jelly
and milk.
Wednesday, January 9
Hamburgers, buttered corn, slic-
ed tomatoes, onions and dills, but-
ter, peanut butter candy and milk.
Thursday, January 10
Barbecued chicken, mashed po-
tatoes, English peas, celery sticks,
prunes, white bread and butter
and milk.
Friday, January 11
Macaroni and cheese, buttered
spinach, carrot sticks, fruit jello,
white bread and butter and milk.

Former Servicemen
Can Now Re-Enlist

Whenever two or more former
servicemen get together, it usual-
ly takes no time at all before they
are reminiscing about the 'good
old days' when they were in uni-
form. Wistfully, they often express
the wish that they could be back
on the base again.
For those who would like to do,
more than wish about such things,
local U. S. Air Force Recruiting
Sergeant Williams has some good
news. The door to Air Force re-
enlistment is wide open for many
former service personnel. This is
true, in many cases, even though
the former service time may have
been spent in a branch other than
the U. S. Air Force.
"If the Air Force can use the
skill in which a man is proficient
or can retrain him into a skill in
which he can be used, then we can
take him," the Sergeant stated.
"The maximum age limit is nor-
mally 27," the Sergeant went on,
"but we can often make exceptions
to this depending on how much
former service time a man has ser-
ved and the skill in which he has
proficiency."
Decisions as to eligibility are
made on an individual basis, ac-
cording to Sgt. Williams, so those
interested in re-enlistment should
make application through the lo-
cal recruiting office at which time
a decision will be made. The Air
Force Recruiting Office in Panama
City is located at Room 206, Post
Office Building and is open from
7:30 to 4:30 p.m. Telephone PO
3-1301. Sgt. Williams also visits the
Port St. Joe Post Office every
fourth Thursday at 4:00 p.m.
Return To School
Students of Jones Business Col-
lege in Jacksonville returned to
their classes January 2. Port St.
Joe students enrolled at JBC are
Jan Anderson, Pat Griswold, Bobby
Bell, Barbara Bell and Mary Dell
Ramsey.


--+
Visit With Players
Mr. and Mrs. Frank LaGrange of
Jacksonville and Mr. and Mrs. Har-
ry Jones, of Jackson, Ala., visited
here during the holidays with Mr.
and Mrs. M. S. Smith and Mr. and
Mrs. Grady Player.
Advertlaing Pays Try It


The Tattler
R. GLENN BOYLES Editor :,....
Associate Editors YOU-ALL '" ,
Published by

BOYLES DEPARTMENT STORE
PHONE BALL 7-4261
R. GLENN BOYLES, Owner
'Dedicated to Better Selling mixed with La
ittle tu a"
BOYLES
STORE PERSONNEL
ERLMA M. BOYLES ManaW
TONY POWELL Men's and Boy's Department
GLADYS S. GILL ____ Ladies' and Children's Ready-to-Wear
RUTH KEELS Sportswear and Hosiery
NORMA LEE ROYAL Shoes for the Family
[RIS OLIVIA DAVIS Ladies' and Children's Lngeri*
HAROLD KEELS and DORENE SPEARS Bxtra



BOYLES WELCOMES 1963

WITH A UNIQUE SALE!

THURSDAY, FRIDAY and SATURDAY

Dear Friends:
Our first message for 1963 is short and sweet!
The fact is that Christmas business followed by our
greatest End of the Year Sale, plus inventory and
many other events, has left us slightly winded! A
question just occurred to us? We believe it will in-
terest you. Here tis!

How Much Can Be Bought At BOYLES
for 63 Cents?

A Few Startling Answers Are Given Below!

3 pairs of Men's and Boys' Crew Sox
or COTTON and NYLON MIX MEN'S SOX


1 pr. $1 Ladies Corduroy Ballets
(Inside or outside wear)



2 prs. Girls' Roll Down Bobby Sox
Sizes 8 to 11



8 Men's White Handkerchiefs
Full Size, Hemstitched



1 Group Lovable $1. Bras


1 prs. Ladies Carole 'Rayon 'Panties
Guaranteed Quality


4 Pairs Girl's Rayon Panties
Sizes 4 to 14


1 Group Ladies $1. Blouses


Yes, All This and More Can Be Bought Thursday,
Friday and Saturday of This Week at BOYLES
for Only













THINGS WE WOULD LIKE TO SEE COME ABOUT
IN '63: 2 pockets on men's dress shirts Pock-
ets on ladies dresses Pencils that won't fall out
of your pocket when you bend over. New lighting
in Boyles Store Rest rooms in automobiles .
Some wa yto get the fish to bite every day! Who'll
give a lift on these efforts? A morning prayer in the
shower: Thank you, O, Lord for this new day .
For life, health and strength to serve our fellow man
for the multitude of blessings we enjoy, including
home and loved ones, your beautiful world filled with
fresh air and sunshine We thank you for this
pure, warm, refreshing water that cleanses, and re-
freshes our body Now, O, Lord, we desire to
open our minds and hearts to the cleansing and re-
freshing power of thy spirit that cleans us inside as
the water cleanses the outside Teach us to be pa-


tient, humble, grateful, cheerful, kind and gentle. .
Help us to love ou fellow man and to refrain from
judging and criticizing others. Protect us from dan-
gers and keep us mindful that we are never alone .
That you walk by our side every minute of this day .
Thank you for washing ou' rsins away and forgiving
our failures Amen!
In the morning, in the shower is a fine time and
a good place to say a prayer! S'long. -RGB


---e~


*""BSBiKtaSMB""W>!


mnianage


~f ~ --Lsl









THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.
THURSDAY, JANUARYY 3, 1963


A tiny part is important to
a big machine. A slender needle
and bit of thread can save a
garment for many months of
wear. A little piece of paper on
which your doctor has written
your prescription may seem
a "small thing", but it can make
a big difference to your
health. Next time, let us fill
your prescription.


Buzzett's Drug Store
317 Williams Ave.
Free Parking
Drive-ln Window Service
(Contlnued From Page 1)
The new 5 cent stamp, he said,
will bear the picture of George
Washington and will be printed in
blue. In all, he added, more than
70 different George Washington
stamps have been issued and the
number of such Washington stamps
sold totals more than 405 billion.







.. 41Mfd6 Wal
Florida Power Corporation
Home Service Department
Last call for cookies
Peppermint Stick Crisps
% cup shortening
% cup sugar
1 cup sifted all-purpose flour
% teaspoon baking powder
% teaspoon soda
% teaspoon salt
teaspoon nutmeg
1 tablespoon milk
3 to tablespoons crushed
peppermint-stick candy 1
Thoroughly cream shortening
and sugar. Sift together dry in-
gredients. Beat egg. Combine
egg and milk. Add sifted dry in-
gredients to shortening mixture
alternately with egg-milk mix-
ture. Drop from teaspoon on an
oiled cookie sheet. Flatten cook-
les by pressing with a glass dip-
ped in flour. Sprinkle each with
)A teaspoon candy. Bake at
350* F. for 12 minutes. Makes
3% dozen.
S quakle Causters
1 pkg. chocolate or butter.
scotch bits
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 large can Chow Me in
noodles
L Melt bits over very low heat.
2. Coat nutmeats. Add crushed
noodles.
3. Spoon on waed paper and
chill until firm.
Makes aboutLM
Varhation Substltute 2 cup*
reSdy4owet areml for noodles.


*


Hurlbut Gift Shop
Port St. Joe, Florida

7m$s


ALL MERCHANDISE CUT TO ROCK BOTTOM FOR THIS SALE MANY ITEMS NOT


LISTED LOOK FOR RED SALE TAGS SALE STARTS 8 A.M. JANUARY 3.


"nfi-


MAPLE BUNK BED
Complete with innerspring mattress, springs, S
guard rail and ladder.


- ~


HOLLYWOOD BEDS, Complete $4995
Plastic covered headboard, innerspring mattress, W
matching box spring, Hollywood legs, twin size. -- e COc




4-Piece BEDROOM GROUP by Kroehler

Consists of large 6-drawer double dresser, plate
glass framed mirror, 5-drawer chest, spindle bed, n 5
walnut finish. Reg. $349.95.




SOLID OAK BEDROOM GROUP

Includes 6-drawer double dresser, large plate glass
mirror, roomy 5-drawer chest. Full size bed.
Reg. $239.95. 8 V


1 Solid Oak CORNER CHEST $00855
Extra drawer. Space for odd corners.
Reg. value $50.00.
1 LINEN CABINET $4 95
and Book Case. Solid Oak.
Reg. $89.00 Value.
1 BACHELOR CHEST $1% 95
3-Drawers. Solid oak. W
Reg. $50.00 Value.
1 Large 6-Drawer Mahogany Chest $ 7900
By Thomasville. Solid construction. Ideal
for extra storage space. Reg. $129.95.
1 4-Pc. BEDROOM GROUP $17 00
Solid maple. Consists of double dresser. |
Large framed plate mirror. Spacious 5-
drawer chest. Full size book case bed. Reg. $250.00.
2 BACHELOR CHESTS $2a95
Maple. Reg. $49.95.
1 MAPLE DESK CHEST $4450
Ideal for boys bedroom.
Reg. $69.95 Value.
1 8-Pc- BEDROOM GROUP $1 00100
Includes double dresser and mirror, 4-
drawer chest, book case bed with plastic
top. Also innerspring mattress and box spring. 2 pil-
lows. Reg. $189.00 Value.
3 4-Drawer CHESTS $1 95,
Reg. $29.95 Value.~ 4|
1 SEALY CLUB CHAIR $606
Reversible T-cushion. Slightly soiled. U
Reg. $100.00.
1 9-Piece DINING ROOM SUITE $Q895
Mahogany. Consists of table, extra leaf, 6
chairs and closed in china cabinet, 2 stor-
age doors and three drawers. Reg. $339.95.
1 6-Piece DINING ROOM GROUP $" ,695
Walnut. Consisting of glass door china
cabinet with silver storage tray. Oval,
plastic top table, 4 side chairs. Reg. $269.95.
1 SOFA BED and CHAIR $1 A00
With saran plastic cover. Sofa converts
to sleep two. Reg. $169.00.
1 SOFA and CHAIR $1 69 "00
Nylon cover. Reversible foam rubber
cushions. By Kroehler. Reg. $199.95.
1 SOFA and CHAIR $20 95
Upholstered in new vinyl duPont Hylene.
Glove soft plastic. Foam cushions. Ideal
for den or living room. Reg. $250.00.
1 THREE CUSHION SOFA $1 95
Sealy 100". Foam rubber reversible cush-
ions with zipper. Reg. $200.00.
1 Early WING BACK SOFA '16900
By Kroehler. Foam cushions. Durable
tweed cover. Reg. $199.95.
2 2-Piece LIVING ROOM GROUPS $ 00
Modern. Consists of sofa and matching 1
chair, foam cushions, nylon cover.
Reg. $169.95.
1 SEALY SLEEPER SOFA $19900
Plastic cover, foam cushions. With full
size famous Sealy mattress. Like adding
a new bedroom to your home. Reg. $279.00.


I SFALY SOFA $1 00
With matching chair. Modern styling. 199
Foam rubber back and seats. Reg. $250.00.
3 PLASTIC RECLINER CHAIRS $f00
Must move during this clearance.
Reg. $49.00,
1 LIVING ROOM GROUP $1 00
Modern, by Kroehler. Includes sofa and |990
matching chair. Foam latex cushions.'
Reg. $299.00.
1 Curved SECTIONAL SOFA $9995
USED. 3 pieces. Foam rubber cushions $9
and back. Very clean. Reg. $130.00.
1 4-Piece SECTIONAL SOFA $ 00
USED. Plastic. Foam cushions with zipper L2
covers. Very good condition._Reg. $160.00.
ATFORM ROCKERS $ 00
USED. Plastic. Reg. $29.95. I.


1 RECLINER CHAIR $
SUSED. Nylon cover. Plastic arm and
ea rest. Reg. $59.00.
.3 SEALY TV LOUNGES $
NEW. Reg. $60.00. ,du


5 .OCCASIONAL CHAIRS
USED. Your choice. Reg. $10.00.


00


$595


1 10-Piece LIVING ROOM GROUP $AA95
USED. 10 Pieces. Consisting of sofa bed 39
and chair, ottoman, 3 tables, 2 lamps.
Reg. $50.00.
t SOFA BED $3900
USED. With matching chair. Ideal for
rental property. Reg. $50.00.
1 BUNK BED OUTFIT $AO00
"USED. Complete with 2 mattresses, 2 Q
springs, wagon wheel type. Reg. $40.00.
2 HOLLYWOOD BEDS $3450
USED. Single Size. Complete with head-
boards, mattress and box springs, Holly-
wood legs. Like new. Reg. $49.95.
1 3-Piece BEDROOM SUITE $7900
Slightly damaged. Includes double dres-
ser, chest, bookcase bed. Reg. $99.95.
3 INNERSPRING MATTRESSES $|995
Slightly Used. Double size. Reg. $39.95.
3 BOX SPRINGS $1A95
Slightly Used. Double size. Reg. $39.00.
1 7-Piece DINETTE SUITE $3995
,USED. Table with heat and stain resist-
ant. top. Plastic covered chairs. Reg. $59.00.
1 Westinghouse LAUNDROMAT $ 95
Slightly used. Full 10-lb. capacity. Auto- I1
.matic washer. Just like new. Reg. $180.00.
3 13-cu. ft. REFRIGERATOR $1 9195.
'USED. Westinghouse. Reg. $179.00. 13
1 9-cu. ft. REFRIGERATOR $ 9
USED Frigidaire. Reg. $60.00. 49
1 ELECTRIC RANGE $49l95
USED Westinghouse. Clean, very good
condition. Reg. $60.00.


$J1 : u


T a


-'. .


I


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