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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01394
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 26, 1962
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01394

Full Text








loc


HE S1i A


''1)


MONL-Y I ALNb-L&'s kecp
it where we can speak with It
once in a while-Trade with
your home town merchants


"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Voaley"


TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR


CITY ELECTION



QUALIFYING SET


Although it is hot outside, and
evidently "dog. days" (days not
fit for a dog), the time draws
near when Port St. Joe must pick
itself a Mayor and two City Com-
missioners to serve for two year
terms.
Prospective candidates f o r
these three posts may qualify for
a try at the offices from now un-
til August 27 when the qualifica-
tion books will close.
Qualification fees for all of-
fices are $35.00.
Posts coming up for election
are those held by Mayor Frank
Hannon, who is serving out the
late Mayor J. L. Sharit's term;
City Commissioner John Robert
Smith who is completing his first
term on the Board of Commis-
sioners and Commissioner Tom
S. Coldewey, completing the term
vacated by Frank Hannon when
he was elevated to the office of
Mayor.


As yet, none has qualified for
either office.
It is also time for voters to
begin thinking about checking on
their registration and for new ar-
rivals to the City to register to
vote in municipal elections.
According to City Auditor and
Clerk, J. B. Williams, the City
voter registration books will be
open for registration between the
dates of August 22 and 31. The
City Charter provides for this
abbreviated period of time in
which to register.
In order to qualify to vote in
Port St. Joe you must be a citi-
zen of the United States; a resi-
dent of the State of Florida for
one year and a resident of the
City of Port St. Joe for six
months. Of course, in order to
vote, you must be registered in
the City. County registration
does not qualify a person to vote
in Port St. Joe municipal elec-
tions.


S. B. Shuford, Sr., Succumbs To Heart

Attack At His Home Saturday Morning


S. B. (Bill) Shuford, Sr., age 65,
passed away suddenly 'at his
'home 'Saturday ,morning at 9:10
a9m. 'from a sudden heart ,attack.
Mr. Shuford was an active mem-
ber .of the First Methodist 'Church,,
a charter member of the Kiwanis
luib-and -Moose Lodge and was em-
_- rEkf. h. St. Joe Paper Gom-
pany for 22 years, trom which 'he
had retired on February 1, 1962.
iSurviving ;Shuford 'are his wife,
Lots, a S-. S. B., Jr., and two
gpaniohil .11, all of Port :St. Joe,
four brothers, Worth, -oe 'and Si-
las L. Shuford of Lincolnton, N. C.
and Victory :Shuford of Hickory,
Sfe, -t-w sisters, Mrs. Charles F.
.1..ouer ,f Li1cof.iton, N. C., and
*Mra.1C'emp Michael of Mt. Holly,

-Funeral services were held 1Sun-
day 'at 4:30 p.m. at the First Me-
thodist Church with the Rev. T. iS.
Harris officiating, 'assisted by Rev.
C. Byron Smith,'pastor .of the First
Baptist Church. Interment was in
Holly Hill Cemetery.
.Active pallbearers included: Mas-
soy Ward, George Tapper, W. D.
Jones, Alfred Joines, Otto Ander-
Bon and Arnold Danlell'.
Honorary pallbearers were: T.
S.. Coldewey, Harry H. 'Saunders,
Bob Major, Lindsey Temple, John
Blount, Terry Hinote, J. Lamar
Miller, W. C. Roche, Harvey Hall-
man, Dillon 'Smith, Otis Pyle and
the Engineering Department em-
ployees of -the St. Joe Paper Com-
pany.
Comforter Funeral Home of Port
;St. Joe was in charge of arrange-
ments.

'Lions Still Undefeated
In District Softball Play

The Port St. Joe Lions Club re-
maitned in the unbeaten ranks of
the district men's slow-pitch soft-
ball tournament held at the Oak-
land Terrace Park in Panama 'City
Monday night by downing Hiland
Park on the last play of the 'game
by a score of 5-4.
Jimmy -Costin of Port St. Joe
came up with a shoestring catch in
the last inning to salvage the lo-
cal club's decision over Hiland
Park.
*Costin grabbed Jackie Hartzog's
deep fly to left field for the third
out just as the would-be tieing run
was .crossing the plate for Hiland
Park.
The losers outhit the winners 12
to seven, but ailed to put them to-
gether for runs.
Basil McKnight and Bill Barlow
led the Lions with two for three
apiece. McKnight knocked in three
runs with a double and single..
-K
Visiting In Tennessee
Tom Martin Watts is spending
several weeks in Calhoun, Tenn.,
visiting his sister and family, Mr.
and. Mrs. Carl Norton.

ViqIt Mother
:Miss Gertrude Boyer of Indian-
fapolis, -Ind., and Dick Boyer of Al-
fpany, Ga., visited with their mo-
pher, Mrs. W. E. Boyer recently.


Local Girl Winner In


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIBA


State Plans Action

Against Two Gulf

Beverage Licensees

Two holders of beverage licenses
in Gulf County will face adminis-
trative action of the State Bever-
age Director, Thomas Lee, Jr., for
violations 'of the state beverage
laws, according to 'a Director an-
nouncement last week.
The Log Cabin Bar, located two
miles north of lWewahitchka, faces
four charges:
1. From May 1961, to February,
1962, 'all business conducted in the
bar portion of the licensed premise
was managed and controlled by a
person who was neither licensee
nor employee of the licensee, but
was lessee of the 'bar.
2. During the same dates, the li-
censee was knowingly selling alco-
holic beverages for re-s'ale;
34. On the same dates, the licen-
see did not have the right of im-
,mediate possession of the bar por-
tion of the licensed premise;
4. The licensee transferred the
bar portion of the beverage license
business to an individual and was
permittingg him to operate the bar
business under the 'owner's license
without obtaining a transfer of the
license.
According to the State Beverage
Department, these alleged viola-
tions are contrary to Florida's bevy-


'National 'Sterling" Contest e'"g lws.
Betty Jo Buitler, licensee of But-
A local girl has !been named a ler's Club, two miles northwest of
winner in the nationwide "Graduate Port St. Joe, will face four charg-
to Sterling" contest. The Sterling es that allegedly occurred in Feb-
Silversmit'hs of America, sponsors ruary and June, 1962.
of the annual contest, will send ,On or about February 16, 'an em-
each winner a lovely miniature ployee of the club 'allegedly served
sterling silver spoon pin, in the 'beer to a minor and 'permitted the
pattern of her choice. Receiving a beer to :be consumed on the 'prem-
pin locally was Miss Barbara Bell ise. That same date, an employee
of 409 Iola 'Street. is charged by the Beverage Dept.
The contest was open to 1962 with being engaged in disorderly
graduating 'high school girl. Some conduct.
60,000 girls from 'all over the coun- On June 12 'an. employee is alleg-
try entered th'e 'contest, with the .ed to have been drunk. And on the
winners selected in a nationwide same-date, an employee is alleged
drawing held in New York City. to have obstructed or 'opposed two
Local sponsor of the contest was deputy sheriffs in the lawful execu-
H. S. Lilius, Jeweler. tion of their legal duties.
---I- Licensees of the Log Cabin Bar
Carp's Change Policy and of Butler's Club 'will be given
Accepting Charge Accounts 'an opportunity to 'be heard by the
Beverage Director, if such a hear-
.Something new has been added ing is requested, Lee said.
,to the Port St. Joe Carp store. Be-
'ginning Thursday, July 26, custom- A T
ers will have the 'privilege of charg- 3T* JOe At Top

The new credit plan will be Of Baseball League
known as C. R. C. (C'anp%,s Revolv-
ing Charge). This new plan is very The Gulf 'Coast League has be-
flexible .and is designed for almost e l os e h
every budget, large or small. The
customer has the opti of spread- composed 'of five teams-two from
customer has the opti o spread- Panama ity, Apalachicola, Port
ing the payments 'out over 'a per- St. Joe ,nd Blountstown.
lod of months or of paying in full As of Wednesday morning, the
once each ,month. As of Wednesday morning, the
once each mo th. Port St. Joe Saints were -on top of
Kenneth Cox, the local Carp the league with a 6-1 record.
manager, will be glad to explain in The standings are as follows:
detail 'how easy it is to 'open a W- L
C. R. C. account. Port St. Joe 6 1
Panama City Indepents 4 3
Steve Lucas Reports Apalachicola 3 4
For Submarine Duty Blountstown 3 4
Panama 'City Stars 0 7
'CHARLESTON, S. C. (FHTNC) Game dates are a bit uncertain,
-Steve L. Lucas, torpedoman's but the home games will be 'adver-
mate seaman, USN, son of Mr. and tised by the signs on Reid Avenue.
Mrs. J. 0. Lucas of 1021 Marvin Everyone is urged to attend the
Ave., Port St. Joe, reported for home games 'and support the Saints
duty, June 25, aboard the submar- and the Gulf Coast League in this
me USS Thornback, homeported 'at try to become organized again.
Charleston, ,S. C. ---
The Thornback is preser.tly un SISTER OF MRS. SPAULDING
dergoing a two week period of up- PASSES AWAY IN TAMPA
keep prior to rejoining units of the Mrs. A. J. 'Law of Tampa passed
Atlantic fleet in anti-submarine away July 17 i.n 'a Tampa hospital.
warfare exercises. Interment was in the Brooksvill'e
Luc'as entered the service in Cemetery in 'the family plot.
June 1961 anid is a graduate of Port I Mrs. Law was a sister 'of Mrs.
St. Jce High School. Sue Spaulding of Port St. Joe.


Summer Basketball Program Ends With

Much Optomism Among Future Players

Summer basketball practice was Oakes, Danny Oakes, Lloyd Gard-
ended on an optimistic note as the ner, Mike White, Johnny Chafin,
high school recreation program Bob Craig, Freddie Chason, David
came to a close last Friday. The Babbit, Tommy Sisk, Larry Griner,
players worked hard despite the Junior Nichols, Tommy Atchison
heat in informal but spirited work- and Robert Marlow.
outs. All of the boys who worked Several *boys who are being
out showed improvement in their counted on for duty next season
ball handling and shooting. There could not practice due 'to prior
is no short cut to proficiency in commitments.
basketball and the following boys The rising sophomore players
showed their interest in ,becoming have set 'a state championship as
good players by many hours of their goal before graduating. It
work this summer: Wilbur Butts, will be interesting to observe their
Gene Tindal, Leon Hobbs, Jimmy approach to such a lofty aspira-
Goodman, Eric Hammond, Johnny tion.


THURSDAY,


JULY 26, 1962


Commission o


NUMBER 47




Work On


New County i


Pridgeon Reports

Tox Collections

County Tax Collector Harlarid
Fridgeon reported to the County
Commission Tuesday night that his
office had collected a total of' $512,-
419.89 from County tax-payers dur-
ing the past year. Although Prid-
geon was charged with the collec-
tion of $533,404.95, $19,989.59 was
claimed 'by tax-payers in the form
of discounts for paying 'their tax-
es early and $995.47 was lost by
way of errors committee anid insol-
vencies of businesses taxed.
Of the amount collected, Prid-
geon disbursed $317,597.09 to the
Gulf County School Board; $171,-
791.13 to the County Commission;
$7,218.13 to the Dead Lakes Im-
provement Commission; $14,436.23
to the Gulf County Health Depart-
ment and $1,377.31 to the St. Jo-
seph Fire Control District.
The Board accepted Pridgeon's
report as correct.
According to Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court George Y. Core, Gulf
County Commission will begin
work on the 1962-63 budget in a
special session Tuesday night.
Core said that'the budget was
due for preliminary work Tues-
day night, but a large amount of
business used up the time avail-
able, and the Commission decid-
ed to hold the special meeting.
The budget meeting will begin
at 7:30 p.m. in the Courthouse,
Port St. Joe time.
A delegation of Gulf County citi-
... .


-nr .composed of Billy Joe Rish,
Jesse Stone, Mrs. Ned Porter, Mrs.
R. H. Brinson, Dave Gaskin, Sr.,
Billy Howell, and Harland Prid-
geon appeared ,before the Board
Tuesday night to ask the county
to consider including a Gulf County
Historical Society in their new
'budget. Stone and Rish acted as
spokesmen for the group and ask-
ed -the Commission to include the
Society as a part of the county
organizations. They explained the
import 'of such a group in promot-
ing the county.
The Board agreed to take the
request under 'advisement in their
new budget.
A. P. Jackson appeared before the
Board representing the communica-
tions section- of Gulf County Civil
Defense asking that the Board take
their needs into consideration at
the setting of a new budget. Jack-
son explained the group's duties in
time of emergency 'and outlined
some of their needs. He stated
,that he had recently visited civil
defense headquarters in Birming-
ham, Alabama and Long Island,
New York to 'get ideas on how to
more effectively operate the local
system.
The County Board directed the
County Road Department to erect
stop signs in the St. Joe Beach
area on streets coming into High-
way 98.


Jaycees Plan

Teacher Reception

The Port St. Joe Jaycees will
sponsor a reception' and get-ac-
quiainted party for the Port St. Joe
'area teachers on Sunday, August
19. The reception will be held at
the Stac House from 4:00 to 6:00
p.m.
Teachers to be honored are those
that will serve the Highland View
Elementary School, the Port St. Joe
Elemnetary School and the Port St.
Joe High School.
The general public is invited to
'attend, Tmeet the teachers, talk
with them, and enjoy refreshments
served by the Jaycees.
-----X---
CARD OF THANKS
The family of S. B. Shuford, Sr.,
wishes to express to our many
friends, our heartfelt thanks and
deepest appreciation for your pray-
ers and the comfort we received
from your many kind expressions
of sympathy in our great sorrow.
Mrs. Lois H. Shuford
Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Shuford, Jr.
and family


- -,~-' '


~* -.


CITY PRESENTED PLAQUE BY PATROL FOR NO TRAFFIC DEATHS


Sgt. Dick Doyle of the Florida Highway
Patrol is shown above (left) presenting
Mayor Frank Hannon (center) and Chief
of Police H. W. Griffin (right) a plaque
for a full year with no traffic fatalities in
Port St. Joe. The plaque was for the
ninth straight year of no traffic fatalities
in the City. The sign behind the trio,


which is erected on the City Hall lawn is
in commemoration of Port St. Joe's long
safety record.
In making the presentation, Doyle, who
is in charge of Information and Educa-
tion from the Panama City Patrol Station,
commented that Port St. Joe has an en-
viable record in traffic safety.


FURNITURE DEALER RECEIVES CARLOAD OF ELECTRIC APPLIANCES

The St. Joe Furniture and Appliancme L":,'ox, and Oris Andrews. Standing in the
Company is shown above beginning to in- 'r,-ight car are Hlozelle Levens and Clay-
load a full freight car load of electric ,ap- i Asbelle, Jr.
pliances to conduct a carload sale heie- in : h Sle.. ,Soc Furniture and Appliance
Port St. Joe. Pictured above unloading Company advertisement on page 10 of this
the appliances, are, left to right, Walter issue.


_ __ ___ ______~


:extTuesday












of Social Interest

Clubs Personals Weddings Engagements Parties




Miss Sara Cumbie Becomes


Bride of James C. Love, Jr.


S Miss Sara 'Catherine Cumbie and
!i James Carl Love, Jr., were united
in marriage Tuesday, July 3, at
8:00 p.m. in an impressive double
ring ceremony at 'the Highland
View Baptist Church in Highland
View. The candlelight service was
performed by the Rev. Reuben B.
Davis.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. J. W. Cumbie of Highland
View and the bridegroom is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Love of Callo-
way.
The sanctuary -was beautifully
decorated with standards 'of white
bridal flowers of gladioli and green-
ery, flanked by white candelbara,
with window decorations of candles
and greenery. The family pews
were marked with large satin bows.
As the guests assembled a pro-
gram of nuptial music was played
'by the organist, Mrs. Helen Gilley,
who also accompanied the soloist,
?? Miss Peggy DePuy, as she sang,
"0 Perfect Love", "Oh, Promise
Me" and "The Wedding Prayer".
Serving as matron of honor was
Mrs. Elaine Barnes. She wore a
street length dress of pink chiffon
-' over matching taffeta. Her dress
Featured a scooped neckline and a
bouffant skirt. Her headpiece was
'of matching tulle and she carried
'a nosegay of tinted carnations nest-


led in tulle -with tiny streamers at-
tached.
Serving as 'bridesmaids were
Miss Libby Adams and Miss Katie
Rhames. Both were attired In blue
brocade taffeta designed similar to
that worn by the matron of honor.
Bridesmaids wore matching tulle
headpieces and .carried nosegays
of tinted carnations to compliment
.their outfits.
The flower girl, Dewannah Gull-
lott, wore blue taffeta with a scoop-
ed neckline land large bow fastened
to the 'back of the skirt. She wore
a matching tulle headpiece and car-
ried a white basket -adorned with
white satin bows from which she
scattered mum petals in the path
of the bride.
The ring bearer, Wayne Goins,
carried a lace 'covered pillow 'adorn-
ed with facsimile rings.
Mildon Dauphin, cousin 'of the
bride, served as 'best man. The ush-
ers were Billy Cumbie, brother of
the bride and Larry Love, brother
of the groom.
The bride, given In' marriage by
her father, wore a chapel train
dress of white 'silk organza over
delustered satin with 'a fitted bo-
dice and rounded neckline. Her el-
bow length veil -of illusion was at-
tached to a dainty crown of lace
seed pearls. She carried a bouquet
of white carnations Interspersed
i ith 'tiny pearl hearts and lilies of
the valley.
For her daughter's wedding, Mrs.
Cumbie chose a blue lace over taf-
feta dress with white accessories.
She wore a white carnation cor-
sage.
Mrs. Love, ithe bridegroom's mo-
ther, was attired im a dress of aqua
embroidered cotton. iShe w o r e
matching accessories 'and a corsage
of white carnations.
Immediately following the cere-
mony, a reception was held in 'the
downstairs assembly room of the
church. The bride's table, overlaid
with 'white linen, was centered 1by
a 'tiered wedding cake topped iby
the traditional miniature bride and


groom. The cake was flanked with
three tiered candelabra holding
burning white tapers. Compotes of
nuts and mints completed the set-
ting. The punch table was overlaid
in white 'featuring the punch 'bowl
surrounded by greenery.
Following the initial cutting of
the cake by the couple, Miss Bar-
bara Whitfield and Miss Norma Pe-
terson served and Mrs. Dorothy
Clark presided at the punch table.
The bride's book was kept by Miss
Sandra Adams.
The bride chose for her wedding
trip to the Southern part of Flor-
ida, a navy blue sheath with match-
ing jacket with which she wore
white accessories and the carna-
tion corsage lifted from her bridal
bouquet.
Out of town guests and relatives
attending were Mr. and Mrs. Steve
Kenyon, Valpariso; Mr. and Mrs.
Oscar Dowling, Mobile, Ala.; Ross
Baggett, Geneva, Ala.; Mrs. Daisy
Nowling, Im-mokalee.

White City FD Auxiliary
Meets With Mrs. Hightower
The White City Volunteer Fire
Department Auxiliary met July 18
at the Ihome of Mrs. Raymond High-
tower.
After the short business meeting,
,delicious refreshments were en-
joyed by everyone present.
The next meeting will be held at
the home of Mrs. T. A. Moon on
August 1 at 10:00 a.m.
Every lady in White City is in-
vited to attend.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida


Carl Zimmerman Taking
Navy "Boot Training"
GREAT LAKES, ILL. (FHTNC)
-Carl J. Zimmerman, Jr., son of
Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Zimmerman
of 817 Marvin Ave., and C. J. Gid-
diens, brother of Jerry Giddlens of
123 Second St., both of Port St. Joe
aer undergoing nine weeks of basic
recruit training at the Naval
Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill.
The indoctrination to Navy life
began on June 29. It consists of
physical fitness drills, military
drills, basic military law, customs
and etiquette of the naval service,
swimming and survival, first aid
'and basic shipboard routine.
During the training, recruits re-
ceive tests and interviews which
determine future training and as-
signments in the Navy.
-k

Eta Upsilon Has

Special Meeting
Eta Upsilon Chapter of Beta ;Sig-
ma Phi held a special meeting at
the residence of Mrs. Edwin Peters
at 1603 Marvin Avenue.
Mrs. Bill Brown, vice-president,
presided during the business ses-
sion, when "The Rushing Agenda"
was discussed.
Delicious refreshments were ser-
ved 'to Mrs. Bill Brown, Mrs. David
Jones, Mrs. Edwin McGill, Mrs.
Weylon Graham, Mrs. Jack Ham-
mock, Mrs. Robert Freeman and
Mrs. Earl McCormick by the host-
ess, Mrs. Peters.
---- K ---


See Florida This Summer

Museum Shows State's Development


THURSDAY, JULY 26, 1962


RENT
A
'Lawn Mower
By popular demand we are
now renting the famous Big
Wheel YAZOO Lawn Mower.
St. Joe Auto Parts
Phone 227-2611 and 227-2621
311 Williams Ave.
4



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PLUMBING AND
ELECTRICAL WORK
Contracting or Repairs

Licensed and Bonded
PHONE 227-3886
1312 Palm Boulevard

so ma ss aw m ama*


TELEPHONE: BAll 7-4191
Mon. thru Thurs. __ 4:46 p.m.
Sun., FrI., Holidays 2:46 p.m.
THURSDAY FRIDAY

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USE THE CLASSIFIED AD SECTION

OF THIS NEWSPAPER FOR RESULTS'


The Florida State Museum has exhibits which show the develop-
ment of the state from prehistoric times to the present day. The
Museum, located at Gainesville, is another reason Governor Farris
Bryant and the Florida Development Commission are urging Florid-
las to vacation In their own state this summer.


Most people just- naturally think of THE STAR'S want ad '

section when they think of buying or selling real estate that's -

why you'll find you can always sell that property or find that home .

faster when you use our classified! They're the proven way of get- S

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Sunday, Monday, Tuesday
SALUTING THE CIVIL WAR CENTENNIAL!
The love story

-- t l V IIed lV i
minions/ mAg

f GONE WITH



S E!iiAD-OUVlA deHAVILLAND




Starts Wednesday







WALT DISNEY...


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SERVICE CALLS $3.00


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DAY or NIGHT

317 REID AVENUE
(Next Door To Telegraph Office)


- ----'


I~ -- I LI- I I I


7. IN













Key Club International Elects


UOicago, 111.-H. Pettus Randall, .
III, a member of the Key Club of
Tuscaloosa High School, Tuscaloo-
sa, Alabama, was elected president
of Key Club International as a cli-
max to the 19th annual convention
of ,the organization held in Long .
Beach, California July 1-4. This in- I
formation -was received this week "
by Walter C. Dodson, President of '
the Kiwanis Club of Port St. Joe,
which sponsors a local Key Club. .
Randall will head, for a year, a
56,000 member organization with .
2400 'olubs in U. S., Canadian, and
Mexican high schools. Key Club,
-Which is sponsored tby Kiwanis In- H. Pettus Randall IJI
terntional, accomplishes tlio same trial Highlands, Tuscaloosa, Alaba-
service work in the hig-h school
hetrKic wans cs do the al t nma. Last year he served as a trust-
that;'Kiwanis clubs do in the adult '
community. ee of Key Club International. He
Randall is the son of Mr. and has been vice-president of his Key
Mrs 'H. Pettus Randall II, 10 Cen- Club and of his school's student





L -A IS






Tenderness Test Proves it!

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council. He has served as a page
in the U. S. Senate and is a mem-
tber of ,the forensic league at Tusca-
loosa High School.
Also elected were two vice-presi-
dents: Thomas C. Brown, Jr., of
Blacksburg, Virginia and William
C. Morris of Pensacola.
Jerry A. Fore, of Bremen, In-
diana, was elected secretary.
Twelve trustees were also elect-
ed. They ar: Lowell E. Arkins,
Huntington, West Virginia; Ken-
neth S. Cohen, Trenton, New Jer-
sey; Bond R. Faulwell, Kansas City
Mo.; S. Brian Ganderson, Norfolk,
Virginia; Alan H. Kaufman, Young-
town, Ohio; David S. Osman, Wau-
watosa, Wisconsin; J. Michael Pi-
chette, Great Falls, Montana;
Bruce W. Romick, Signal Mountain
Tennessee; Robert M. Rosenthal,
Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Paul T.
Russell, Jr., Albany, Georgia; J.
Glade Soelcberg, Payette, Idaho and
John R. Vorhies, Casper,' Wyoming.
All 'will serve for one year com-


mencing immediately.
The convention was one of the
largest in Key Club history, with
more than 1900 Key Clubbers at-


President


tending the affair. Speakers at the
convention included Barry Gold-
water, U. S. Senator from Arizona;
I. R. Whitthuhn, 'President of Ki-
wanis International, the sponsors
of Key Club; and former Olympic
Pole Vaulter Bob Richards.
Selection was made at the con-
vention of the Key Club with the
"best single service activity" dur-
ing 1961-62. The 'winner was the
Key Club 'of Narbonne High School
of Harbo rCity, California. The
award came for the Key Club's
project to aid needy families in
the Lomita-Harbor City, California
area at Christm'astime. Second
place went to the Key Club of
Shawnee East High School, Shaw-
nee, Kansas, for the design, manu-
facture, and distribution of 100 pe*,
type checker boards :to .blind per-
sons in :Sh'awnee. The third place
award went to the Key Clulb of
William Allen High School, Allen-
ton, Pennsylvania, for a project to
help finance and .assist in the op-
eration of a school for retarded
youngsters.
Best all 'round clubs in 'both
service work and 'administration


THE STAR, Po;-* St. Joe, Florida
THURSDAY, JULY 26, 1962

with more than 25 members were:
Reading High School Key Club,
Reading, Pennsylvania. first place:
and Leon High School Key Club,
Tallahassee, Florida, second place.
In clubs with 25 members' or less,
the winners were: Woodlawn High
School Key Club, Baton Rouge,
Louisiana, -first place; and Mingo
Junction High School, Mingo Junc-
tion, Ohio, second place. Honorable
mnteion awards went to Weirton
High School Key Club. Weirton,
VN est Virginia; and Northeast
High School Key Club, St. Peters-
burg, Florida.
The 1963 Key Club International
convention will be held in Pitts-
burgh, Pennsylvania in mid-July.
-----------4
Return From Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Watts have
returned after a two week vacation
spent visiting with friends land
relatives in Atlanta and Rome,
Georgia, Calhoun, Tennessee amnd
Jay, Florida. Little Freddie Ard re-
turned home with his grandparents
for a visit here.

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FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Third'St. and Battzell Ave. C. BYRON SMITH, Pastor

SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION .--.--..--......... 6:45 p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) ...... 7:30 p.m.

"Come and Worship God With Us"




PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH
Garrison at 20th

Prayer Service (Wednesday) .. 7:45 P.M.
Sunday School -__ 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11,:00 A.M.
Evening Worship 7:45 P.M.
"Souls Harbor in the Port Area"
Rev. Hubert D. White, Pastor
Comfortably Air-Conditioned



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Port St. Joe, Florida


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I HE TARA, Port SL Joe, Florida


Minutes of the County


WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA
July 10, 1962
The Board of County Commissioners o
Gulf County, Florida met this date in regu
,ai session ;with lthe following member
present : E. C. Harden, sr., Chairmnan, A
J. Strickland, Neva Croxtun, James H
pr-er and Leo heinncldy. The Deputy Clerk
Sherifi, A.t ornoy, Engiii eur, Road Supt. an(
Mosqu.to Control Supervisor were also press
ent.
Mr. James G. McDaniell and S. 0. Player
County Commissioners elec twere present.
The meeting came to order at 9:00 A.M
The chairman opened the meeting with
prayer.
The minutes of June 12, 26 and July 2
were read, corrected, approved and adopted
Waiter B. Owens of St. Joe Beach cam
before the Board and present a petition
signed by 43 residents of Beacon Hill and
St. Joe Beach, said Petition was thanking
the County for the work performed by thb
County Road Departmient on the beach a
Beacon Hill and St. Joe Beach and request
ed the County to reconsider its decision o
June 26, 1962 of not allowing County equip
ment to work on St. Joe Beach, which de
cision was made at tihe request of J. C. Ar
bogast. The petition further stated that. Mr
Arbogast was speaking for himself when hi
appeared before the Board on June 26, 1962
and was not speaking for those signing the
petition. Richard Spencer then requested
the County to clean up the Beach and to
exterminate the insects in the Beach area
After lengthy discussion, the Attorney ad
vised that the County cannot do any work
on La private beach, bu that the Mosquito
Control could do any type insect work on
the Beach, after getting approval from the
State Board of Health.
The City of Wewahitchka requested the
County Road Department to construct a
city street in the Britt Subdivision. The
Board agreed to do this work for the City.
Comm. Greer presented the following re-
solution and moved for its adoption, sec-
*onded by Comm. Croxton and unanimously
adopted, to-wit:
RESOLUTION
WHEREAS, the Supreme Court of the
United States of America has declared ille-
gal and unconstitutional ,the rights for free
American people to the christian training
and guidance in the public school system of
the Cnited States, which is so essential to
the moral training and formulation of chris-
tianity for future generations, and
WHEREAS, the Supreme Court of the
United States has, by virtue of said ruling,
violated the principles ,for which this country
was founded, and the christian beliefs which
have made it great, and
WHEREAS, the ruling of the Supreme
Court of the United States has been against
the wishes of the vast majority of the citi-
zens of this great country. and against the
moral dictates of the free world, and has
or will cause the United States to be held
, in disrepute throughout the other parts of
the free world;
NOW, THEREORE, BE IT RESOLVED by
the Board of County Commissioners of Gulf
County, Florida, in regular session, that the
ruling of the Supreme Court against prayer
in public schools is hereby condemned by
this body, and they are hereby and by these
presents requested to reconsider this ruling
and to act according to the christian dic-
tates upon which this country was founded,
and upon which the constitution of this
great nation is based;
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the
United States Congress be, and they arec
hereby required to take such steps as may
be necessary to authorize prayer to be con-
ducted in the public schools of the United


THURSDAY, JULY 26, 1962


SCommission


States.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT cop-
f ies of the foregoing resolution be sent to the
- following: Chief Justice and each of the
Justices of the United States Supreme
. Court; Honorable Bob Sikes, U. S. Congress-
man, Third District, Washington, D. C.;
, Honorable Spessard Holland, United States
d Senator, Washington, D. C.; Honorable
- George Smathers, U. S Senator, Washington,
D. C.
, Adopted by the Board of County Com-
missioners of Gulf County, Florida, this
L 10th day of July, 1962.
a BOARD of COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
2 By E. C. HARDEN, SR.
. Chairman
e ATTEST:
S GEORGE Y. CORE
d Clerk of Circuit Court
g The Board entered into a discussion with
e reference to a proposed Watershed program
t for the Wetappo Creek area in Gulf county.
- E. L. Garrett, representing the U. S Soil
i Conservation Service answered questions
* with regards to making an application for
- the Watershed Protection and lood Preven-
- tion Act. Upon motion of Comm. Strickland,
. seconded by Comm. Kennedy and unanimous-
e ly carried, the following application was
ordered and approved, to-wit:
e APPLICATION FOR PLANNING
ASSISTANCE UNDER THE WATERSHED
0 PROTECTION and FLOOD PREVENTION
ACT
(Public Law 566-83rd Congress)
STO THE HONORABLE
* SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE
The undersigned local organizations make
application for Federal assistance under the
Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention
3 Act in preparing and carrying out plans for
works of improvement for the Wetappo Wa-
tershed, Gulf County, Florida.
The following information is submitted
in support of the application:
1. Size of Watershed, 100,000 acres
2. Location of Watershed
a. State: Florida
b. County: Gulf
c. Soil Conservation District: Tupelo
3 Land Use
The land uses within the Watershed areas
are estimated as follows:
a. Woodland: 98% or 98,000 acres
b. General Farming: 1% or 1,000 acres
c. Urban and Built Up; 1% or 1,000
acres
d. Cleared Land: 20% or 20,000 acres
1. Approximately 40% of land is idle
due to annual flooding.
2. 1% is in homesites, roads, schools
and towns.
3. 38% normally used as farm pro-
duction.
4. 1% normally used for general
farming,
5. There are approximately 100 land
owners in the watershed.
4. Watershed Problems
a. The overall problem in this water-
shed is flooding of roads, highways,
woodlands, and farm land in times
of excessive rainfalls. Gulf County
suffers numerous rainfalls annually
in excess of 2 inches, which causes
problems in flooding. This land, how-
ever, if properly protected, is suit-
able for general farming, pasture,
truck farming, and/or for reproduc-
tion of forestry products, and the
recovery in wild life benefits would
also add to the value of the land
and the attractiveness of the area,
as well as health and welfare prob-


lems which would be alleviated by
pruoable flood controls in eliminat-
ing mosquitos and insect problems.
in uiiza, excessive rainfall caused
a;ii undetermined amount of dam-
-,. ... A-es os i JU,UUU Lo rual.i
and bridges alone in Gulf County in
-e i-l.appo waLerslieU area, in aio-
dition to the extensive damage done
LO farm lands and the mari anu
forestry plans.
5. The treatments believed needed are,
retention reservoirs, farm control struc-
',. t, ,rainage measures, waterways,
stream bank improvement and essen-
tial vegetation programs, including
plantings sor wildlife food" and cover.
6. ine benefits expected from the water-
shed program would include the fol-
lowing:
a. A complete soil and water conserva-
tion program on the lands within
tie entire watershed.
b. A change in agriculture to provide a
higher cash income per owner.
c. Savings of thousands of dollars in
the maintenance of roads and bridges
within the watershed.
d. A dependable, adequate water sup-
ply for all agricultural purposes.
e. Flood prevention by remove of wa-
ter in excessive rainfall periods.
f. Recreational facilities, badly needed
within the Soil Conservation Dis-
trict.
7. The cost to local groups would be
met by contributions as follows:
a. Individual land owners.
b. Board of County Commissioners.
8. Necessary easements and agreements
for maintenance will be obtained by
the sponsoring group.
It is the belief of the undersigned local
organizations that Federal assistance
insider the watershed program and flood
prevention act is needed. We hereby
apply for planning assistance to deter-
mine whether or not the project pro-
posed is physically and economically
sound.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By E. C. HARDEN, SR.,
Chairman
ATTEST:
GEORGE Y. CORE,
Clerk
Comm. Greer offered the following reso-
lution and moved for its adoption, seconded
by Comm. Croxton and duly carried, to-wit:
RESOLUTION
WHEREAS, the Federal Government col-
lects over 4.3 billion dollars annually in
gasoline and other automotive taxes for
federal-aid highway improvements; and
WHEREAS, only sixty per cent (60%)
of these funds are placed in the Highway
Trust und for Federal-aid highway improve-
ments, and the other forty per cent (40%),
which amounts to over 1.7 billion dollars
annually, is diverted to the General Fund
and used for other than road purposes; and
WHEREAS, this diversion of motor funds
is depriving the motorists of almost 60,000
miles of road improvements annually; and
WHEREAS, the House Committee of Ways
an I Me.an of Congress has before it for
consideration H. R. No. 8612, entitled "A
National Home Rule Road Program," which
provides for amendments to the federal Aid
Acts and Gasoline and Motor Vehicle Tax
Acts, to require that all Federal gasoline
and automotive taxes be placed in the High-
way Trust Fund to be used exclusively for
highway purposes; and
WHEREAS, said program will provide that
sixty per cent (60%) of the Trust Fund,
the same amount that now is used, shall be
allocated for improvements on the Federal-
aid Highway System; and the forty per cent
(40%) that now is diverted shall be al-
located to the states for the improvement of
state and local, roads; one-half of the funds
to be used for state roads, the other half
to be allocated by the states for the im-
provement of the local roads and streets in
the Counties and Cities; and
WHEREAS, enactment of the National


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]lHome Rule Road Bill, H. No. 8612, will
end the federal diversion of Motor revenues,
hliip restore national prosperity, provide em-
ployment for hundreds of thousands of men
in tie greatest state a d local road im-
plrovrment program in our nation's history,
i'iiinote the civic welfare of every com-
mnunity and state in the nation, and help
to reduce our state and local road tax bur,
den;
THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that
wo endorse the National Home Rule Road
Bill, H. R. 8612, and inform our United
States Senators and our Representatives in
Congress of our action, and request their
aid and influence in getting the bill report-
ed from the House Committee of Ways and
Means for prompt action by Congress; and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that a
copy of this Resolution be forwarded to
United States Senators Spessard L. Holland
and George A. Smathers, Senate Office
Building, Washington, D. C., and to Con,
gressman Bob Sikes, House Office Building,
Washington, D. C., and to our local news-
papers, radio and television stations, to
our Motor Clubs, Chambers of Commerce
and other civic groups for their informa-
tion and cooperation. (end)
A letter addressed to the "Officials of
Florida" from the Governor of Florida was
read to the Board, urging attendance of a
conference on Cold War Education to be
held at Miami Beach on July 18, 1962.
Upon motion by Comm. Oroxton, seconded
by Comm. Greer and duly carried, the
Board requested Max W. Kilbourn to at-
tend said meeting.
The Farm Agent, Mosquito Control Super-
visor and Road Department filed monthly
reports for June 1962.
Comm. Strickland told the Board that
he thought the Board should reconsider its
decision of June 12, 1912 to retire County
Employees upon reaching the age .t 65
years; that he wanted to see an employee
work long enough to draw at least tme
minimum retirement. After discussion Comin
Greer made a motion to retire County em-
ployees upon reaching 65 years of age, sec-
onded by Comm. Kennedy and upon vote
the following voted: AYE: Greer, Kennedy,
Croxton and the Chairman. NAY: Strickland.
J. M. Cleckley presented a plat of Cleck-
ley's Subdivision and the same was approv-
ed, accepted and ordered filed upon the fil-
ing fee of $10.00 being paid.
The following bills were presented, exam-
ined, approved and ordered paid, to-wit:
GENERAL FUND
July 10, 1962
Audrey Nunery, Co. Indigent ...... 15.00
Annie Hudgins .......... 15.00
Eva Pate ............... 10.00
Winnie Ross ........... 10.00
Mrs. John MoMullon ...... 15.00
Mrs. N. H. Conger ...... 15.00
Grace Dunlap ........... 10.00
0. 0. Davis .............. 10.00
Mrs. Minnie Paul .......... 15.00
Drusilla Keel ............ 15.00
Mrs. 0. V. Sculley .......... 16.00
Mrs. H. C. Jones ........ 12.00
Ethel English ............ 15.00
Ruthie Batson ............15.00
Charlie Sapp .......... 15.00
Lula Kemp ............ 15.00
Kate Glass .......... 1600
Mary Lee Boone ......... 10.00
Jesse Pitts .............. 15.00
Emma Darley .... 15.00
Pinkie Mae Myers .......... 16.00
Irvin Darley .......1.... 0.00
George C. Melton ...........16.00
Issac Hall, Sr. ............15.00
Hae Creamer ............ 1.00
Jewel Callahan ........... 15.00
C. D. Kelly .............. 15.00
Lucy Raffield ......... 15.00
Carry Goodwin .......... 15.00
Donnie Mae Faison ........ 16.00
Bessie Dykes .......... 12.00
Mary Clark .............. 15.00
Maudine Bell Adams ....... 10.00
Laura F. Bailey .......... 10.00
Nils Millergren, PO box rent ...... 4.40
James H. Greer, Exp. .......... 100.00
E. C. Harden, Sr., Exp. ........... 100.00
Florence McNealy, Janitor work .... 75.00
Brad Brown, Mowing lawn ...... 10.00
Neva Croxton, Exp. ............ 100.00
Boyd Bros., Inc, Sup. .......... 10.22
Fuller's Supply, Supplies .......... 1.20
Fla. Engineering, Inc., Survey ...... 11.00
W. C. Lindsey, Labor .......... 25.00
St. Joseph Tel. & Tel., Service .... 15.90
Dr W. F. Wager, Profes. Work ...... 6.50
A. J. Strickland, Exp. .......... 100.00
Leo Kennedy, Exp. ............ 100.00
St. Joseph Tel. & Tel., Service .... 81.67
West Pub. Co., Books .......... 16 00
Marianna Office Sup. Co., Sup. .... 21.36
George Y. Core, State stamps ...... 1.90
J. J. Hill, Refund .............. 14.48
St. Joe Housing & Sup, Sup. for HV
fire dept .................. 26.00
Sam P. Husband, Insanity work .... 22.50
Harold B. Canning, Profes. Work .. 10.00
John W. Hendrix, Profes. Work .... 15.00
Joseph P. Hendrix, Profes Work .. 5.00
Donnie Jean Tillman, Witness ...... 6.00
Harland Pridgeon, Com .......... 111.40
The Harrison Co., Sup. .......... 50.00
George Y. Core, Exp............ 824.40
Gen. Office & Equip. Co Sup. ...... 8.54
Orkin Ext. Co., Spraying ct. house. 171.00
Breeze Pub. Co., Printing min ... 50.00
Star Pub. Co., Printing Min ...... 60.00
W. T. Edwards TB Hospital,
Gulf Co. patients .......... 121.25
Southwest Florida TB Hosp., .. 37.60
Pitney-Bowes Inc., Sup ........... 70.20
Gulf County School Board,
to bands in county ........ 2,000.00
The Pridgeon Agency, Renewal .... 86.50
ROAD and BRIDGE FUND
July 10, 1962
St. Joseph Tel. & Tel., Serv ....... 25.40
Wewa Hdwe, Gas .............. 1.00
Bay Mach. & Weld. Co., Sup. .... 29.88
Mullins Garage & Auto, Sup. .... 16.00
St. Joe Tire & Recap., Recap .... 46.07
St. Joe Motor Co., Parts ........ 147.86
Glenn's Serv. Sta., Sup. ............ .45
Gulf Coast Elec. Coop., Serv. .... .. 47.17
Wewa Hdwe. Co., Misc. Sup. .... 632.13
St. Joe Hdwe. Co., Sup. .......... 5.80
alloway bros Sup. ............... 6.00
Breeze Pub. do., Printing ........ 13.50
Standard Oil Co., Gas .......... 24.76
Gulf Oil Corp., Gas .............. 2 88
Dorsey's Garage, Part ............ 1.20
St. Joe Auto Parts Co., Parts ...... 88.91
Burford-Toothaker Co., Parts ...... 1.91
FINE & FORFEITURE FUND
July 10, 1962
Sam P. Husband, Salary ........ 596.03
George Y. Core, Court Cost ...... 50 00
Mfarianna Office Sup., Sup. ........ 5.75
Game & Fresh Water Fish Com.,
arrest tickets . . . 54.50
GENERAL FUND PEST CONTROL
July 10, 1962
Bildwell Sup. Co., Sup. .......... 2.10
Burford-Toothaker Trac. Co., Parts 356 77
lance Prod. Co., Sup. .......... 104.80
M. G. Lewis Co., Parts .......... 84.80
Pate's Shell Center, Sup. ......... 10.00
St. Joe Sinolair Serv., Gas ........ 6.50
t. Joe Hdwe. Co., Sup. ........ 10.65
t. Joe Motor Co., Part ..............08
t. .Toe Auto Parts, Parts ......... 18.27
test Flua. Gas Co., Gas .......... 86 22
standard Oil Co., Gas & Oil .... 731.57
amuel Marion Graves, Salary .... 118.97
0 0. Dy.les, Salary ............. 109.59
-. F. Sellers, Salary ............ 113.22
'irect. Int Rev., W/tax .......... 18.40
ay E. Green, Compt., Retire ...... 16.48
nul Co. SS Acct., SS ............ .12.88
eninsular Life Ins. Co., Ins .... 22.46
GENERAL FUND
July 14, 1962
eorge Y. Core, Salary ........ 354.16
rs. 0. G. Rish, Salary .......... 89.18
;ax W. Kilbourn, Salary .......... 47.00
imer Nunery, Salary .......... 93.58
velyn Pate, Salary ............ 31.97
J. Hill, Salary .............. 69.66
abie R. Laird, Salary .......... .173 00
ireet. Int. Rev., W/tax ........ 46.10
ulf Co., SS Acct., SS ............ 9.01
ay E. Green, Compt., Retire ...... 17.53
eninsular Life Ins. Co Ins. ...... 11.23
ROAD AND BRIDGE
July 14, 1962
loyd Whitfield, Salary ........ 181.10
erry S. Holley, Salary......... 134.24
mes F. Whitfield, Salary ...... 129.30
va F. Kemp, Salary .......... .131.80
enn W. Daniels, Salary ........ 124.10
A. Hall, Salary ............ 114 10
onald J. Suber, Salary .......... .124.10
D. Hughes, Salary .......... 124.10
harles R. Cleckley, Salary ........ 96.19
illiam C. Lindsey, Salary ...... 114.10
F Knowles, Jr., Salary ...... 106.48
to Nichols, Salary ............ 91.21
ford Armstrong, Salary ...... 102.08
K. Strickland, Salary .......... 90.08
bert L. Lester, Salary .......... 100.08
y C. Tharpe, Salary .......... 95.08
nrry Price Melvin, Salary ....... 71.51
reel. nt Rev. W/tax .......1. 149.40


y E. Green, ompt., Retire ...... 96.99
If Co. SS Acct., SS ............ 75.76
insular Life Ins. Co., ns ..... 173.55
GENERAL FUND
July 16, 1962
rect. Int Rev., W/tax .......... 44.80
v E. Green, Compt., Retire .... 22.39
If -Co. SS Acct., SS .......... 17.49
insular Life Ins. Co., Ins. .... 22.46
B Coppedge, Salary .......... 80.57
T. Morris, Salary ........... 97.26
ek Harrell, Salary ............ 92.26
E. Daniel, Salary ............ 182.33
There being no further business, the
eting did then adjourn.
rEST:
ORGE Y. CORE E. 0. HARDEN, Sr.
rk Chairman


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_______________________


STHE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida THURSDAY, JULY 26, 1962
See Florida This Summer

Springs Have Underwater Circus


THE STAR |
Published Every Thursday A' 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
By The Star Publishing Company
WESLEY R. RAMSEY Editor and Publisher
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Salesman, Photographer, Columnist, Reporter, Pref
Reader, Bookkeeper and Complaint Department


DIAL 227-3161


Ever see an underwater circus? At Florida's Weeki Wachee
Springs, pretty mermaid Barbara Owens performs with sea horse pal,
"Bubbles," in a scene from the "only underwater circus in the world."
Located at the junction of U.S 19 and Florida 50, the Springs is an.
other reason Governor Farris Bryant and the Florida Development
Commission are urging Floridirus to vacation in their own state this
summer.

July 30 Is Deadline for Declaring
'Domestics Social Security Payments


Would you -deliberately ,keep a
person from qualifying for Social
Secuirty 'benefits? If you are not
reporting your cook, maid, or other
'domestic worker, you may ibe doing
just 'that, according to John V. ba-
rey, District Manager of the Pan-
ama City Sicial Security Office. So-
.cial Security tax returns to report
such employees are 'due In the of-
fice olf the District Director of In-
ibernall Revenue, Jlacksonvi'lle, by
July 30 for the three-month calen-
,dar quarter wihch ends June 30.
,If you employ domestic workers
to help you with your work in and
around your private 'home, these
workers are probably covered by
Social Security, Carey states. The
test on such work is very simple.
If the worker is paid as much 'as
$50 cash wages in a three-month
calendar quarter, the work must


IF
IT'S
IT'S


be reported. Work of this nature
in connection with a business must
be reported without regard to the
amount of wages paid. For exam-
ple, all wages paid to %. cook in a
restaurant or :boarding house are
covered.
The necessary tax forms for re-
porting domestic workers are mail-
ed out each calendar quarter by
the District Director of Internal
Revenue. If you have a domestic
worker and are not receiving the
forms, we can help you have your
name added to the mailing aist. Of
course, you can get information
on all Federal tax matters .by call-
ing your local Internal Revenue Of-
fice.
The Social Security Office for
this area is located at 1135 Harri-
son Ave., Panama City, Phone PO
3-5331.


PROVIDE
THE
ENERGY
THEY
NEED!
Mom, be sure your
youngsters are getting
plenty of those
delicious, nourishing
dairy foods they need
to stay healthy


BORDEN'S
GOT TO BE GOOD


A complete line of Borden's Dairy Pro-
ducts at your favorite super market or
delivered to your door. Just call us, col-
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route.
TRY OUR
Country Fresh Eggs


,0 0
HARDENS Aoa

DAIRYUMy
"Gulf County's Only Producing Dairy"
Phone 6394383 Wewahitchka, Florida


POSTOFFICE BOX 808


Entered as second-class matter, December 19, 1937, at the Iostotfice, Port St. Jee,
Florida, under Act of March 3, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, $3.00 SIX MONTHS, $1.75 THREE MONTHS, 127.50
TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publlshs
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount dreei d for mao
advertisement.


Court Decision Has Serious Aspects
The Federal Courts have stopped "preaching" and have
now resorted to "meddling".
Now, Florida is the brunt of their insistence that states
should re-apportion their Senatorial districts and re-arrange
the Representative populations from counties to provide for
an "equal voice" in the state legislature.
In a way, we can blame the Legislature of Florida for
this recent event of Monday. Had the Legislature met their
responsibilities to an acceptable degree and forgotten their
own individual political futures, Florida would not now be
in this deplorable situation.
And we profess that Florida-especially the smaller
counties-will now be in a deplorable situation.
Let's take a few "for instances", and examine them.
First, Gulf county and other small counties will stand
a more than equal chance of losing their Secondary Road
fund money which has built virtually every road in Gulf
County, except for main highways, during the past 15 years.
The big counties try in every session of the Legislature now
to allocate the Secondary Road Funds on a per capital basis,
using the argument that the most of these funds are paid
into the state treasury by the larger counties. The small
counties have managed to hang onto this needed source of
road building money for the past years. Reapportionment
on the court basis, will give the large counties the neces-
sary votes to get their wishes.
Next to go by the wayside will be the race track taxes
divided equally among the counties. The counties having
the race tracks in their boundaries contend that the money
is collected by them and should remain in their counties. The
larger counties will be able to make this wish an actuality.
Next to go by the wayside will be the homestead exemp-
tion. County assessors over the state have continually put
unrealistic evaluations on homes so they would be wholly
exempt. This was the politicaly smart" thing to do. But,
the growing pains of the smaller counties are magnified
much greater by the large counties. We predict that they
will band together to eliminate the homestead exemption law
to get this added source of revenue.
These are not suppositions. This is legislation that
has already been repeatedly introduced and just as repeatedly
defeated.
The Monday action of the Court could and does affect
each and every one of us. It would pay us to be informed
and ready to voice our wishes in these matters in days to
come.

Value Of A Drug
What is a prescription drug worth a drug which may
save your life, restore you to health, or prevent a prolonged
illness during which your earning power might be fully
stopped?
No one can answer such a question with mathematical
accuracy. And no layman has the knowledge that would
enable him to make statistical breakdowns that show the
cost of finding, developing, producing and distributing drugs.
But there are answers important and powerful an-
swers. For instance, a western businessman recently wrote
a letter to a senator who has been most critical of the phar-
maceutical industry.
In it he said: "On October 29, 1961, my wife was taken
seriously ill a gangrenous blocked intestine. I don't
know whether the $82 worth of drugs she received cost 82
cents or $8,200 to produce, but I couldn't care less. The pro-
fits which the drug companies made financed the necessary
research to develop drugs and equipment which saved my
wife's life.
"I am getting fed up with the attitude that profits
are criminal, sinful and should be eliminated.. I hope that
neither you nor I have our life span cut short by the lack
of a drug which was not developed."
Drug research is costly in money, time, energy, often
disappointment. The risks of failure are inevitably great.
The financially successful discoveries must carry the load of
the failures. Otherwise, progress must end and an ap-
palling human waste must follow.
-Panama City News

The President emphatically told Europe Monday, via
Telstar, that the United States would not devalue the dollar.
(Although we have done a pretty good job of that already).
A European speaking on a program concerning the Eu-
ropean Common Market Sunday night, said that European
nation's demand payment in gold because they don't trust
the U. S. dollar what with the climbing U. S. deficit spending.
And all the nation is concerned with the deficit spending
and the dwindling gold supply. A great number of the Con-
gressmen speak to their constituents and in public meetings
that the U. S.' deficit spending must stop. "It is ruining the
country" they say.
And then they all get together in Washington and vote
to extend the national debt even further.
We admit that we do not understand the high finances,
but we certainly don't understand the two opinions apparently
shared by our Nation's leaders, concerning this serious mat-
ter.


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THURSDAY, JULY 26, 1962
Washington Columnist Has Comments

On Recent Supreme Court Prayer Ruling


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- Say You Saw It In The Star -


We appreciate the views of
our Senator Spessard Holland
and our Congressman Bob Sikes
regarding the Supreme Court rul-
ing recently on prayer in school.
Last week we published Sikes
letter we received on this sub-
ject. We would like very much to
hear how some of our local peo-
ple feel about this and what they
believe will be the outcome of
this shocking action. Write a
letter to the editor and get it *o
us. Sign your name to it and we
will be glad to let the people of
this community know your feel-
ings.
This week we received a let-
ter from Win Pendleton of Wash-
ington, D. C., who further expres-
sed our feelings toward this sub-
ject. We would like for our read-
ers to hear what he has to say.
He entitles this article, "Time
To Pray".

TIME TO SAY A PRAYER
By Win Pendleton
There is in the Capitol building,
on public property, mind you, a
prayer room. Since this is for Chris-
tian worship, and since it is located
on taxpayers' property will the Su-
preme Court close it down? Don't
go, people are stirred up. We lis-
tened .to half a dozen hot argu.menrts
during the past week-with a few
participants getting pretty worked
up and excited and loud.
And this is going on all over the
country. Congressional mail on the
subject has been heavy. People are
indignant. Which is good. It is go-
ing to wake up a few folks who
had begun to take their religion
for granted. If there is anything
wrong with the Christian Church
in America today, it is Christian
lethargy-Chlristian laziness. And
this will wake them up. This will
make some of them get to work.


It already has. There were more
good old fashioned hard-hitting
sermons preached around t h e
country Sunday after the decision
than have been preached in years.
Let us pray that this continues.
(And let us add our own P. S.
And hope that the average
layman takes heedl -Ed.)
We predict that many a 'dedicat-
ed Christian teacher will work
even harder now to teach her chil-
dren the importance of prayer.
And what will happen? Will any
of them be arersted? Will any
school teacher in Tmerica serve a
jail sentence because she opened
her class with a prayer to God?
This won't happen, of course.
If you were a sheriff, would you
issue the warrant in an anti-pray-
er case? Or if it ever came to a
trial, and you were a judge, would
you pass sentence on the teacher?
In spite of word from Washinglon,
people will think twice before thev
fall in line.
As we said, you can't tell now
exactly what will come in the fu-
ture as a result of the Court's rul-
ing. As far as the Christian church
goes, it might even be a blessing
in disguise. You can already notice
some good results. People are talk-
ing about prayer. Everywhere you
laugh at these questions. They fol-
low logically what we think is 'the
warped thinking of the members of
the Court.
What can we expect? Will we
see an absolute silencing 'of prayer
in all of our schools? We think not.
In some schools, maybe. But, In


most cases we expect to see Chris-
itian teachers defy the ruling of the
Supreme Court. Defying the law
(if it is the law?) is old hat to
Christians. They defied the Em-
perors of Rome during the first
century and they have been doing
it off and on ever since. The truth


fashion & beauty GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR
Sraeport VACATIONING THIS YEAR
by Dee Morrison
Don't just rush off eagerly when the day arrives and come limping home in need of a rest-cure.
You can't do it all in one weekend, or even in two weeks with pay Give your muscles a break.
Do a few exercises now so that you'll be up to your favorite outdoor sr t w-en you get there, i
H.-re's your homework courtesy of bronztan. Pick your sport.


,v ~,-fl


V.


HOMEWORK for GOLF





"if


Ss played with the whole arm, relaxed, from the shoulder. Exercises 1 and 2 will develop thel
feeling for shoulder and arm movement.
Sistir:ight relaxed arm, from 2. With dangling, relaxed arms:
Shoulder: a. Pull up both shoulders, and...
e* 5a Left Arm in front of b. Let them drop.
.' eight times. Repeat and repeat and repeat. Be sure arms are loose.
-e with the Right Arm Exercise 3 is to develop the feeling of a relaxed hip, very
"_2ht times, important in Golf.
-:ne with both arms eight 3. Stand with feet apart, knees slightly flexed and move
:ss. the hips rhythmically from left to right, side to side.i

YORK for TENNIS HOMEWORK for WATER SKIING


Ft-AT


nis is played with arm
Sing from the shoulder, in
it to table tennis which is
I from the wrist. Forehand,
and and Serving are done
irm swinging from the shoul-
iame movement as Golf exer-
will help to develop the right
Z- for correct shoulder and
movement,
)r alertness and lightness on
: Bounce on either half-foot
I times, as if jumping rope.
R. eat Right, Left, Right, Left,
Right, Left, etc.


Toes FL-AT


1. Stand erect with heels
together, toes slightly open.
Rise slowly onto toes, heels
and knees together. Come
of foot. Bend knees out- *O
ward so that your legs
form a diamond. (keep
hands on hips, heels to-
gether and off the floor,
body erect). L
2. Note position of body
in sketch. Do this exer-
cise with knees held together and always on full flat sole of
feet. Deep knee bend. (Hold them together.) Straighten up.


You can't get a proper suntan all in one weekend either. Make some plans about that too. Pick
up a new bronztan cream-lotion. It has been sun-tested under doctors' supervision to prevent;
burn and promote a deep tan. Get a new sweater, a wacky beach-hat, some new sun-glasses. Be
eady when V-day* arrives and have twice as much funi.




Cong. Sikes Hits Foreign Aid


I am greatly disappointed in the
surrender by House and Senate
Conferees on foreign aid to Admin-
istration demands for a wide-open
'bill. Virtually all restrictions writ-
ten iakto the House bill to curb give-
aways to neutral and communist
nations have been eliminated. By
some legerdemain .the conference
report provides for a greater ex-
penditure than was authorized by
either the House or Senate bill. The
President can now give the tax-
payers' money to communist na-
ti-ons by the simple procedure of
sending a letter to Congress stat-
ing that he considers it in the na-
tiondl interest. Under the terms of
this bill the neutrals can continue
to help themselves at the U. S.
Treasury 'and give nothing in re-
turn. There is a strong possibility
that the Appropriations Committee
will 'at least cutback 'on the amount
'of money. Normally, however,
House rules prevent new legisla-
tion from being written into ap-
propriation bills. That means vir-
tually all hope of a realistic for-
eign aid policy is lost for another
year.
A modified welfare bill which is
now law contains a $4.00 increase
in the federal matching funds to
the states for each recipient of
Old Age Assistance and Aid to the
Blind and Disabled, effective Oc-
tober 1. This small increase Is
badly needed. The bill also provides
that OAA recipients may earn
funds without having them sub-
tracted from their checks. Effective

is, it seems that Christianity has
always flourished best when it has
faced Its most severe opposition
and persecution.
Because Jesus once told -his Dis-
ciples: "Blessed are they which
are persecuted for righteousness'
sake; for their's is the kingdom of
'heaven." That Is part of the Chris-
tian tradition. Christians seem to
work harder when the going is
rough-when the challenge is great.
Only history will be able to mea-
sure the enormity of the anti-prayer
'decision of the Supreme Court.
light now it is too early-and we
are too close to the event-to know
what the outcome will be. The first
amendment to our Constlution says
"Congress shall make no law re-
specting an establishment of reli-
gion, or prohibiting the free exer-
cise thereon ."
The Supreme Court seems to say
that means teachers in our public
schools cannot open their classes
with a word of prayer. Now will
the Supreme Court rule that the
daily sessions of the Senate and
House of Representatives cannot
'be opened with prayer? Will they
rule that the oath of office of the
President must be done away with?


January 1, 1963, they can exmept
all of the first $10.00 'per month
they earn and one-half of the next
$40 per month they earn. There
are other features and one appar-
ing to have merit is federal partici-
pation in state work 'and training
programs for able-bodied relief re-
cipients. This is intended to train
people for work to get them off
relief rolls.
Those who have watched Ameri-
ca's astronauts in orbit may lose
sight of the fact that more than
15,000 persons manning the critical
ground complexes are directly re-
sponsible for the success of the
man in space. It is the most precise
team operation in history.
News of the successful Nike Zeus
shot is encouraging, particularly
since it is probably equivalent to
the success claimed for the Rus-
sians by Mr. Khrushchev a day or
two -ago in this field. It does not
indicate we now have an opera-
tional anti-missile missile or that
the Russians have. We expected
this shot to be a success. There
would have been reason for con-
cern if it had not been a success.
There is still testing to be done,
and if that goes well we can soon
embark upon a program of procure-
ment. We could give consideration
to buying long lead time items now,


but I don't think we are ready for
full scale procurement on a 10 bil-
lion dollar program.
The advisory ruling by the In-
ternational Court of Justice that
UN members must contribute to
the cost of taht organization's Mid-
dle East and Congo operations to
a welcome one. Russia and many
'other countries have refused to
participate in the cost of UN activi-
ties to which they object. As a re-
sult the U. S. has been saddled
with the bills. The next step will
be to require that all nations pay
a proportionate share or lose their
voting rights in the UN. If the U.
S. insists -on this course we will
begin 'to see more realism In the
United Nations.

L. E. Thursday Enrolls
In Navy Electronic School

JACKSONVILLE ( FHTNO ) -
Lindsey E. Thursday, Jr., airman
apprentice, USN, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Lindsey E. Thursday, .Sr., of
214 Ninth Street, Port St. Joe, is
-enrolled in Aviation Electrician's
Mate School at the Naval Air Tech-
nical Training Unit, Jacksonville.
The 22-week course covers the
fundamentals of various electrical
systems, instruments and compon-
ents used in naval aviation.


I f Fadts about PHARFAAJI
ll^ -^iff I.;'** t-_ *--r^ A. I~ ~ ~ n*"= J L > ;." <


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Florida
millE "


WHY DRUGGISTS USE RX AS A

PRESCRIPTION SYMBOL TODAY

It is generally believed by authorities that
the symbol "Rx" is an abbreviation of the La-
tin word "recipe", meaning "you take." The
Rx of today, however, is a far cry from the
mystical potions of ancient times!


SMITH'S PHARMACY
JOHN ROBERT SMITH, Pharmaceutical Chemist
Two Parking Spaces Reserved for our Prescription Customers
at our Back Door.
Drive-In Window At Rear of Our Store


TDO-S F-. -r









i HE TAR.a po,-4 8t. Joe, Florida
THURSDAY, JULY 26, 1962







SUMMER'S AN

IDEAL TIME!
This summer is Ideal for a fam-
ily medical checkup by your
doctor. Especially right before
you go on vacation, or after you
return.
Your youngsters may require a
back-to-schlIol checkup after
summer fun is over. If a pre-
scription is needed, have it filled
by our Rexall Pharmacist
At our cy
Pharmacy- SIM


Final Tournaments Signal End of

High School Summer Play Program


Tennis Tournament

The tennis championship of the
Port St. Joe High summer recrea-
tion program was won by second
seeded Bob Craig. He won over
Clifford Wimberly in the finals& (1-
3) (3-0) (3-0). The scores do not
truly indicate the brand of tennis
played by the number one seeded
Wimberly. The match was one of
the hardest fought of the summer
period. Wimberly had his serve
working beautifully in the first set
which he won. Craig rallied in the
next two sets with good baseline
placements to win the match. Sev-
eral ten stroke rallies were played.


Staking Mike White (3-9) (3-0). His
next opponent was Pete Fox who
had a forfeit from Ellis Stevens in
the 'opening round. The score was
(1-3) (3-0) (3-0). Fox gained the
semi-finals with a (7-5) (3-0) win
Buzzett's Drug Store over Tommy Sisk.
317 Williams Ave. Jack Wyche and Randy Arm-
317 Williams Ave. strong played a good first round
Free Parking match with Armstrong winning
Drive-In Window Service (3-1) (1-3) (3-1). Sisk took Arm-
Sstrong (3-2) (3-2) to gain 'the right
CARD OF THANKS to play Pete Fox in the lower
The Student Councilt of the Port bracket. Fox was the third seeded
St. Joe High School would like to p o W e .
Clifford Wimberly opened first
thank Gene McCormick for his gen- round play in the upper bracket
crosity in letting the Council use by taking Robert Marlow (3-0)
the facilities at his service station (3-1) as he showed the form that
for car washes in the past several rated him the number one man in
months. We are deeply grateful and the tourney.
appreciative of what he is doing, Fourth seeded Ken. Dykes was
for the youth. eliminated by Myron Merritt in a



STUDENT COUNCIL






At

GENE'S GULF SERVICE STATION


clash between the rivals of long
standing. It was a typical match for
these hardworking players. The
score was (3-2) (2-3) (3-1). Wim-
berly beat Merritt (3-1) (3-1) to
enter the finals against Craig.
The boys who worked on tennis
this summer showed marked im-
provement in their fundamentals
and their understanding of the
strategy involved in the game.
The girls who practiced improv-
ed 'also. Carla Herring, Michele
Anchors, Brenda Faison, Charlotte
Maddox and Pat White gave evi-
dence of future tennis brilliance
after their first summer of play.
-K
Junior Badminton

Form took a terrific licking in
the junior high boys badminton
tournament held in the high school
gymnasium last week. All 'seeded
'players were 'defeated before their
predicted finishes with the excep-
tion of second seeded Danny Oakes
who advanced to the finals.' Un-
seeded Billy Antley won the tour-
nament 'with an outstanding brand
of badminton.
First round play saw first seeld-'
ed Roddy Bowdoin eliminate La-
mar Butts (11-2) (11-2). Danny
Wall' eased by Freddy Anderson
(11-7) (7-11) (11-5) in a well play-
ed match. George Small beat Knap
Smith (11-2) (11-3). Fourth seeded
Robin Downs was dropped by Bil-
ly Antley (11-6) (11-8) on the first
leg of his surge 'to the title. This
completed first round play in the
upper bracket.
'Second seeded Danny Oakes had
'a first round bye as lower bracket
play 'got underway. Bob Ellzey
dumped Tommy Atchison 'from con-
tention by 'a score of (11-0) (2-11)
(11-5). John Maddox, number three
seeded, was surprised by Clark
Downs (12-10) (5-11) (11-8). Billy
Smith took Bryan Baxley (11-2)
(11-0) to end the first round play
in this bracket.
Quarter-final games in the upper
bracket pitted Danny Wall against
Roddy Bowdoin'. Bowdoin was the
victor (11-4) (11-9). Billy Antley


applied the crusher to George
Small (11-1) (11-2) for his second
j victory.
Lower bracket quarter-finals re-
SAugust 4tsuited in Danny Oakes 'taking Bob
a u Ell'zey (11-5) (4-11) (11-7). Billy
Smith also won over Clark Downs
(11-8) (11-2).
c kup and Delivery for Your Car The semi-finals in the upper
9:00 A.M. until 'bracket was one of the best match-
es played all summer. Number one
m an, Roddy Bowdoin, fought 'hard
___ to stave off the challenge of Billy
u== = == -.- .. 4


Only



$d49


doz


CARNATIONS $s98


Were $5.00 Dozen ------------- doz


WERE $3.50 to $5.00



Hosp. Arrangements 2.98 up




Our $5.00 Funeral Sprays

CONTAIN 25 ROSES or CARNATIONS

Other Florists put only 12 to 15 roses or carnations in $5.00

sprays, but we guarantee 25 in each $5.00 Spray.

(Note-Above Prices on Cut Roses and Carnations Cash and Carry and
Local Delivery Only)


OUR PRICES ARE LOWER BECAUSE our wholesalers lowered
their prices so much that we are able to pass these lower prices on same
quality flowers to you until further notification.


ED'S

(NEXT T

Phone 227-8881


FLORIST

O0 COOPER'S BARBER SHOP)

Port St. Joe, Fla.


Antley, the unseeded upstart who St Joe Defeated
plays a wicked game of badminton. Defa
Antley finally prevailed with Bow-
doin battling down to the finish. In LBB Tourney
The score was (8-11) (11-4) (11-8).
Semi-finalists in the lower brack-
et were Danny Oakes and Billy Port St. Joe suffered defeat Mon-
.Smith. Oakes won over his stub- day night in Pensacola in the Lit-
born opponent (11-9) (8-11) (12- tle Boys League Baseball Tourna-
10) in 'another well played match. ment at the hands of West Pensa-
This set the stage for Billy Ant- cola.
ley and Danny Oaikes to vie in the West Pensacola downed Port St.
tfinlalis. Antey proved himself a Joe, 5-0, to join Myrtle Grove, a
classy champion by taking an 'easy 16-3 winner over Brent in the win-
(11-4) (11-4) match from Danny near's bracket.
Oakes. West Pensacola and Port St. Joe


ed team, lick Bryan Baxley 'and
Fred Anderson (11-9) (6-11) (11-5).
Robin Downs and Billy Smith beat
Tommy Atchison 'and John Maddox
(11-4) (11-7). Lamar Butts 'and
Danny Oakes ,eased by 'Clark
Downs 'and Bobby Ellzey (11-5)
(7T-11) (8-11). 'Robin, Downs amnd
Billy Smith defeated Oakes and
Butts (11-2) (9-11) (11-1) to gain
the finals where they were elilmin-
ated.
All players in the tournament are
to be .congratulated for their sports-
manship and honesty. No referees
were used 'and all contestants call-
ed their opponents 'shots. Badmin-
ton was one of the more popular
activities in the summer program.
-K-
Senior Badminton

Third seeded Junior Nichols won
the senior high boys badminton
crown by outplaying 'everyone that
he faced. His control of the shuttle-
cock bordered on uncanniness at
times. Upsets were prevalent thru-
out the tournament as fourth seed-
ed Mike White lost to Nichols in
the finals (11-8) (11-5).
First round games in the upper
bracket were well played. Clifford
Wimberly, the number one seeded
player, h'ad trouble with David
Young (11-9) (12-10). Mike White
took Rex Buzzett's measure (11-9)
(11-7). Number two seeded, Bob
Craig, won from Wilbur Butts (2-
11) (11-9) (11-1). Charles Thomas
'beat Albert Gentry (11-0) (11-0).
Tommyl Sisk 'dropped Rodney Her-
ring (11-6) (5-11) (11-9).
Quarter finals saw Mike White
upset (,Clifford Wimberly (13-11)
(11-4) in the biggest upset of the
day. Tom Sisk won from Charles
Thomas (11-8) (11-6). Sisk was in
turn beaten by Junior Nichols (11-
8) (11-5).
This 'brought up the semi-finals
match 'between Junior Nichols and
Bob 'Crajg. Niihols won (121-10)
(11-4) -by out-maneuvering him with
well placed baseline 'shots and
drop shots just over the net. This
was the second upset 'of 'the day.
Nichols and White had a good
match in 'the finals as both 'play-
ers showed the form that gained
them 'the finals. Nichols again
used his fine touch to send White
scampering to the baseline and
back to the net for 'the finial victory
(11-8) (11-5).
4K<


BOWLING NEWS
By AL JENSEN
Hi fans! Here are the results of
the Port St. Joe summer league
Monday night bowling.
On alleys one and two, we saw
the league-leading Stevedozes take
four big points from 'the St. Joe
Bowling Lanes. The Stevedores led
by big Ted Grab'owski .and Gary
Manz, bowling 554 and 520 re-
spectively. However the 'St. Joe
Bowling Lanes didn't give it away
as Wayne .Smith and Joe Whaley
bowled a 544 -and a 494 in, that or-
der.
Alleys three and four saw Phil-
lip's 66 and Nedley's Flower Boys
get in some close games. Gardner
,and Mun rolled a 452 and 432 for
the Gassers. Scott and Zimmerman
rolled fine series for the flower
boys with a 499 -and a 445 in that
order. Phillips 66 won the first
'game 'by 24 pins and then the flow-
er boys came back to win 'the sec-
ond game by 21 pins. The last
game was also taken by the flower
boys by one big pin and the gassers
took total pins by two 'pins so that
is some close bowling, wouldn't
you say?
Alleys five and six saw a sad
Jensen's Five lose three points to
the paper 'mill boys. It started with
Jensen's Five winning the first
game and then losing the next two
to the paper mill boys. The -high
games of Moss and Sunny Counts
of a blazing 246 and 184 in .that or-
der was more than Jensen's Five
could take. However Yank Zimmer-
man in the middle of the second
game got bit on the thumb of his
bowling hand by Wayne Smith's
pet skunk, but went on to be high
man for Jensen's Live with a fine
530 series followed by John "Hook"
McKenzie with a 481 series.


were deadlocked in a 'scoreless
game until the fifth inning when
West Pensacola picked up all five
of their runs.
The local squad lost to Brent
Tuesday evening by a score of 4-2,
but no 'details were 'available to
The Star at press time yesterday
afternoon.


St. Joe ab r h W. Pens. ia
Baxley 1 0 0 Brown
Adams 1 '0 0 Caswell'
Neel 2 0 0 Johnson
Nichols 3 0 0 Tolbert
Smith 2 0 0 Butler
Harrison 0 0 0 Messner
Humphrey 2 0 0 Brown
Cox 1 0 0 Ben'vaides
McFarland 3 0 0 Pounders
Merritt 2 0 0
Cann'gton 1 0 0
-k


Rotary Hears

Author In Program

Tom Person, instructor at the
Bay High School English Depart
ment presented a very interesting
program to the Port :St. Joe Rotary
Club Thursday of last week.
Person, an author of several no
vels and short stories, gave the
Rotarians some 'of the historic
background on one of his novels
"Trouble On The Trace".
The "Trace" was a path used by
riverboaters around 1800 to trave
from Natchez to Nashville after
floating their wares to market it
New Orleans. The river boaters us
ually -carried 'a tidy sum of money
with them back up the "Trace" and
naturally fell prey to bandits on
the way.
Two of 'the .most notorious ban
dits of this stretch 'of road were
Wiley Harpe and his brother and
a man by the name of Sam Mason
They were bloodthirsty killers and
made a habit 'of leaving no wit
nesses to their nefarious deeds.
Of course, Person's book uses
fictitious names, but the story ol
these bandits is the basis for his
novel.
Person said that the "Trace" is
now 'being touted for a Federal
Parkway and has a good chance of
succeeding in this venture.
Person said that the "Trace"
'was a monument showing "Man's
rise from dismal ignorance to
thoughtful uncertainty".
Guests 'of the club were Hub Rob-
erson of Evergreen, Ala.; Fred S.
McColl of Marianna; Charlie Mor-
gan of Wewahitchka; J. D. Booth
of Atlanta and Charlie Brock of
Honolulu.


Glidden Engineer

Talks To Kiwanis

Bill .Stauffer, an engineer for the
Glidden Company gave the program
to the Port St. Joe Kiwanis Club
Tuesday at noon.
Stauffer 'gave a short history of
the Glidden Company and describ-
de Glidden's operations in Florida,
here in Port St. Joe and in Jackson-
ville.
The company was started by Ad-
rian Joyce as a small 'group of
paint manufacturing plants. Now
their .complex has grown to encom-
pass the Durkee foods line, manu-
facture of 'edible oils, organic chem-
icals and mining on a small scale.
The Jacksonville plant 'bakes
chemicals from turpentine solu-
tions which are mainly used in per-
fumes and flavorings. This plant
manufactures mostly highly refin-
ed chemicals.
The Port 'St. Joe plant was built
specifically for a tall oil refining
process. It takes waste products
from the manufacture of paper 'and
extracts materials used in paint,
inks, plastics and -many other ar-
ticles as well as crude naval stores.


BI R T HS


Mr. and Mrs. Henry Francis Har-
rington of Mexico Beach announce
the birth of a baby girl, Nadine
Frances, on July 21.
Mr. and Mrs. James Lee Rabon
of 1106 Palm Blvd., announce the
birth of a son, James Lee, Jr., on
July 16.
Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Wilder, Jr.,
of Sneads, announce the birth of
a daughter, Toni Suzanne on July
7.
(All births occurred at the Port
St. Joe Municipal Hospital.)


FOR RENT: Downstairs furnished 0
apartment. 1505 Mon. Ave. Phone o
227-7421. ttc-6-21
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom house, 9th t1
St. 2-bedroom beach cottage. All E
furnished. Apply at Smith's Phar-
macy. ttc-7-19 s
Fn
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom furnished '
upstairs apt. 514% 7th St. Walter 5
Johnson. tfc-7-19
FOR SALE: 35' Star house 'trailer, r
completely furnished. Very nice,
$1500. Leo C. Birgenheier, 648-4461
after 5:30 p.m., Box 205. 3tp-7-19
FOR SALE: '52 Plymouth. Good
mill car, $50.00. Phone 227-8541
or see John Brown. 2tp-7-19 co
of
1962 CHRISTMAS CARDS S
Plain or personalized. All types of t
greeting cards and stationery. See H
or call (Emory Cason, 1307 Long
Ave., Phone 227-4501. 3tp-7-19 a
FOR SALE: 1962 Renault Dauphin b
$125 'equity, 23 payments $66.08. b
211 10th St. Phone 227-4871. Itp P
Is
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house. 1301 re
Woodward Ave. FHA approved. re
Low down payment. Phone 227- a
3751. tic-6-28 e
FOR SALE% 14' runabout with 46 c
horse motor 'with controls. Rea- s
sonable offer. Phone 227-4823. 2tp ,
FOR SALE:: Furnished 2 bedroom In
'brick hobie, 1061 Long Ave. Ph. I
648-4128, J. A. Mira.


FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house, 1314
Marvin Ave. Purchaser to as-
same VA mortgage. See Cecil Cos,
tin, Jr.
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom home at
White City. Lot 95x100. Good
deep well. Only 2 yrs. old. Call 227-
e 7701. Patricia Ann Redd. tfec-6-21
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house, 2
g baths, built-in kitchen, disposer,
y dishwasher, hardwood, floors, fully
insulated, central heat, air condi-
tioned. Carport and living space,
- 1240 sq. ft. Corner lot 125'x92'. 2104
e Palm Blvd. Call W. L. Winters, ph.
1 229-2521. tfc-5-24
' FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house at St.
Joe Beach. Carport and storage,
y Phone James Traweek, 648-31968.
1 l RF SALE: 2 bedroom house on
r 1S5x75 ft. lot. Back yard completely
Se closed with chain link fence.
. Plenty of shade and located in a
t ell established neighborhood. See
Ferrell Allen, Jr. at 129 Hunter
SCircle. tfc-5-31
HOUSE FOR SALE: 1303 McClel-
lan Ave. Pay equity and assume
- FHA mortgage of $5700. See Gone
E Fowler at 2000 Long Avenue.
1 FOR SALE: 50x100 corner lot with
new well and septic tank. Beacon
Hill. $750.00. See Bill Carr. tfc-7-26
- FOR SALE: Two houses for price
S.of one. Mexico Beach Gulf front.
s Highest elevation. Main house,
f three bedroom. Guest house on the
same lot. Both concrete block. Best
construction. Both for price .of one.
R. L. Fortner, Phone 648-3241. 2tp-
FOR SALE: -14 foot ibateau, 18 hp.
(Evinrude motor and Eezy trailer.
f See at Farmer's Apartment, Oak
Grove. 2tp
FOR SALE
Two year olid three bedroom ma-
sonry house with 'den. Just painted
,outside. Can sell for only $300 and
'buyer assume VA loan on balance.
This is a very good buy and
should move quickly.
Three bedroom masonry house
on 90 foot corner lot on Marvin
Avenue. Total cost only $9,700. Can
buy owners equity or refinance.
Two bedroom house in Oak Grove
on 60 foot lot. Only $4,500.
Three bedroom house on Sev-
enth Street. Has new roof and sid-
ing. $4,800.
FRANK HANNON
Registered Real Estate Broker
221 Reid Ave. Phone 227-3491
FOR SALE: Furnished 2 bedroom
house, 1304 Palm Blvd. Lot size
72' x 150', with garage. Call after
5:30 p.m. 227-8451. tfc-7-26
WANTED: 2 men, age no handicap.
50 .stops day. Each average $2.00
committion. -Write Mr. McGarity,
Box 627, Williston, Fla. 4tc-7-12
SERVICES OFFERED
I will do part or full-time book-
keeping in my home or at your
place of business. Experienced
in a'l types of book work. Typ-
ing work done neatly and correct.
R. W. HENDERSON, Phone 229-
171F.
EPTIC TANKS rumped out. Call
Buford Griffin, Phone 7-7011 for
iick expert service, tie
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0.
0. F.-Meets second and fourth
Thursday, 8:00 p.m. In American
Legion Hall. AUl members urged to
attend.
Noble Grand: Emmett Daniell
Secretary: J. C. Martin.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Meet
every Wednesday night, 8:00 p.m.
at Parish House, 3091% Oth St Port
St. Joe, Fla. Phone 229-1241 for
further information or write P. 0.
Box 535. tt


THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Pirt St. Joe Lodge
No 111, F. & A. M. every first and
third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.


ROT L. BURCH, WY. M.
ROY K. BLACKSHEAR, Sec
All Master Masons cordially invited
R. A. M.-Regular convocation of
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56. R. A.
M., 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit-
Ing companions welcome.
Everett McFarland, High Priest
Edgar Smith, Secretary

INVITATION TO BID
Sealed 'bids will be received by
the City of Port St. Joe at the of-
fice of the City Clerk In the City


The seeded teams in the doubles
played up to their reputations as
the number one seeded team of
Roddy Bowdoin and Billy Antley
won over second seeded Robin
Downs 'and Billy Smith in the fin-
als (11-4) (11-4).
First round games saw George
Small .and Mike Rutch, fourth seed-


ailable for such public hearing,.::
gether with all supporting state-'.
cents for information.
All interested persons are er- "
illy invited to participate in this
blic hearing and to..distuss the--
hool program and 'budget-for this
unty for the ensuing year.
BOARD of PUBLIC INSTRUC-
TION, GULF COUNTY, FLA.
By: COUNTY SUPERINTEN-
DENT.
/s/ THOMAS A. OWENS


* CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING *


Were $5.00 Dozen-------


II ,I -,


[all, Port St. Joe, Florida until
;00 o'clock P.M., August 7, 1962
n one (1) 1943 'lnternatoinal
'ruck, Motor No. BLD 269B-5816.
'his truck may .be seen by con-
acting the City Clerk at the City
rall at Port St. FJoe, Florida
All bids shall be usbmitted in a
ealed plain envelope and eahl 'be
marked as follows: International
'rack Bid. Not to be opened before
:00 P.M., August 7, 1962.
The City of Port St. Joe; Florida
deserves the right to reject any or
ll bids received.
J. B. WILLIAMS
City Auditor and' Clerk
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed proposals in triplicate will be ze.
eived by the Owner, the Gulf Counts. Board
f Public Instruction, in the Office 'of the
superintendent, Wewahitchka, Florida, mn-
il 10:00 A.M. O.S.T., August 7,. 1962, for
he construction of: addition to Washington
High School, Port St. Joe, Florida.
Each proposal must be accompanied by
certified check, or an acceptable bid
ond, to the Gulf County Board of Public
instruction, in the amount of 5% 'of the
ase bid, and said certificate check or bid
ond is to be returned within 15 days if
proposal is not accepted, or If contract
gieement is executed, and guarantee bond
s accepted. All certified checks will be
turned within 15 days of the date ot
receiving bids. Cashiers checks will not be
accepted. It is the option of the Board of
publicc Instruction to retain the certified
hecks or bid bonds of the four lowest
bidders for a period of 16 days. Out-ef-state
contractors will have the bid bond counter.
signed by an authorized agent within the
tate of Florida. Proposal shall be in a
ealed envelope and addressed as follows:
Chairman, Gulf County Board of Public
instruction, Wewahltchka, Florida, and
marked clearly to the project it refers.
'lans, specifications and contract docu.
ients may be inspected at the offlife of
the Owner or the Architect, and General
Contractors may procure one (1) set from
he Architect; Forrest R. Cozen AIA,. Ar-
hitect, Suite 218 Avant Building, Tallahas-
ee, Florida, upon deposit of thirty (80)
dollars, which will be refunded 't:'full to
11 General Contractors upon return of the
lans and specifications within ten (10)
ays after bids 'are opened. Contiaitors
who request plans, but who do not submit
ids, will be charged actual cost of produc-
ion.
If the General Contractors, Subcontrac-
ors or Material Dealers require additional
ets, they may be procured by pying for
he actual cost of printing and hadling.
)n thli basis, a deposit of thirty (30) 'dol-
irs will be required, and the difference
between this amount and the amount re-
uired for printing and handlhig will be"re-
unded upon return of plans and specifics-
ions complete within ten (10) dayS'after
bids are opened. Workman's, compention
public liability, fire and tdrhadd '0lkdince
will be required. One hundred 'p t' ceat
100%) performance and one hundred' per
ent (100%) payment of labor and material
bonds are required. The Owner reserves the
ight to reject any or aUll proposals and
raive technicalities. No bidder may with-
raw his bid for a period oftfhteen (1)
ays after date set tor opening thereof..
Gulf County Board of- Public
Instruction, Owner it
Forrest R. COoen AIA, Architect
4t-7-5 .. ..... ...
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO REGISTER
FICTITIOUS NAME
You will please take notice that the"i .
ersigned is engaged -in business ig.4Pzgrt
It. Joe, Florida under tihe 'firm name ,of
W'hitfield Paint and Novelty Shop anff will
register said fidtitious 1 site'with th, Ol us
Sth 'Circuit do&tliti,'(ir, 'iri
t Wewahitchka, 'Fldrida. This tlii 9th day
f July, A. D., 1962.
ULYSSES WHITFIELD '. 4t
WARREN C. WHITFIELP., T-1P
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ON SCHOOL BUDGET 19,62-63
Pursuant ito ,the 'provisions of
section 237-12, .Florida Statutes
[941, notice is hereby given that a
public hearing hail4ba'eld .by the
of Gulf County, Florida on Atgu, ps
, 1962 at the hour.of.9i'.0.0,o'.clo:
A. M. CST, in the County Bboa -
neeting room at Wewahitchka for
he purpose of discussing with the
citizens of the county the proposed
school !budget of said county .or
he fiscal year beginning' July 1,
962, and ending June,:3SQ'.19r63,
which budget is summaarized as,
allows: "
1. BUDGET FOR SUaPPORT and.
MAINTENANCE of SCHOOLS
A. Balances on hand beginning' ot"
ear 1. State Funds, $28,533.00. 2.
County Funds, $63.335.00; District
ro. 1 Funds, $667.00. Total -$92-
35.00. ...
B. Anticipated R e c'e pt:,, 1
tate and Federal Punds, $676--'
16.00; 2. County Taxes. $142.0l8.Q0
. District Taxes $142,018.00; 4. ,
St er Sources $4,860;00. ,totatr"
288,896.00.
C. Proposed Expenditures: 1. In,-
tructional Salaries, $639,254.00; 2.-"9:
transportation, $56,000.00; -' Caii.
al Outlay, $16,487.00; 4, Other Ex-a .
enses and Reserves, $351,606.00. "
otal $1,063,347.00.
II. BUDGET for DISTRICT ff-
EREST and SINKING FU1 B "':-"
A. Balances and Reserves beg n -
ing of year. $2,356.00.
B. Anticipated Receipts; Taxes,
28,403.00; Other Sources, $30,-
i5.00; Total $58,558.00.
C. Proposed Expenditures; 1.
bonds, $42,000.00; 2. Interest, $15,-
24.00. Other, $1,944.00.
D. Anticipated Reserves and Bal-
nices at end of year, $1,446.00.
III. BOND CONSTRUCTION
BUDGET.
A. Balances at the beginning of
ear: $2.00.
B. Anticipated R e c e ipts: 1;
school Construction Fund $17,-
'0.00. Transfer from Spport and
maintenance $17,200.00.
C. Proposed Expenditures: $34;-
2.00.
D. Balances and Reserves at the
.d of year, None..
IV. VILLAGE TO BE IJEVIED..:
The millage to ,be levied on ,the, .
62 assessment roll to produce ne-
ssary revenue for those budgets
r the ensuing fiscal year are:
A. County Support and Mainten-.
ce Fund, 10 mills.
B. District No. 1 current levy,
mlls. .: -
C. District Interest and Sinking
mnds each District, 2 mills.
Complete details of each separ.-.
e part of the School.budget sum, :
prized above 'are on file and are. -
ailable for public inspection at'
e Office of the County Suiperin-
ndent of Schools at Court House,
ewahitchka, and- will also be


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