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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01365
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 4, 1962
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01365

Full Text







lOc
Pat COPY


THE STAR

"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"


PORT'ST. JOE, FLORIBA


MONEY TALKS-Let's keep \
it where we can speak with It
once In a while-Trade with
your home town merchantsl


-. .. .. rA~f IAM nADV A 1GO IN tkAW-'


SJPC


TO


Two Charged With



Breaking, Entering


Ice Company

Loses $450

St. Joe Ice Company was the vic-
tim of a burglary Sunday night be-
tween 8:30 and 9:00 p.m., accord-
ing to Sheriff's Deputy Wayne
White.
Deputy White arrested Robert
Eugene Cooper, age 18 in Apala-
chicola and Bennett Milton Griffin,
age 19 in Wewahitchka Monday
'and charged them with the burg-
lary. Both young men signed con-
fessions to the act, according te-
White.-T-he Deputy Sheriff said
that inquiries on his part located
the two boys in Port St. Joe on
Sunday night. Griffin is on parole
now for another breaking and en-
tering charge. White questioned
the two on the ice plant job and
subsequently obtained the confes-
sions.
Deputy White said that Cooper
also admitted breaking and enter-
ing the Gulf Service Station oper-
ated by Aubrey Tomlinson this
past summer. White said that the
same method of entry was used in
both cases.
According to Gene Abrams and
.Blake Thomason, owners of the
4ice, company, two cash registers
"were taken from the company of-
ice. One of the cash registers was
returnedd -by the..Sheriff's depart-
ment with the otbhec--pparentlyd"e-
molished in aff attempt, to open, it.
According to Arfams and Thoma-
'son, their losi, including the cash
register, amounted to about $450.'
Griffin is now free on bond while
Cooper is still being' held in the
county jail at Wewahitchka. Both
will be tried in the February term.
of court.,


Winners Named

'In Christmas

Decoration Contest

The Christmas decorations con-
test sponsored by the Port St. Joe
Garden Club announces the follow-
ing winners:
House top decorations: first prize
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Odom, 702
Monument Avenue.
Yard decorations, first place, Mr.
and Mrs. Gerald Strobel, 1024 Mc-
Clellan Ave. Second. place, Billy:
Hutchings, Mexico Beach.
Door decorations: first place,
Paul Blount, 128 Hunter Circle.
Second .place, Mr. and Mrs. Calvin
Floyd, Allen Memorial Way. Third
place, Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Griffin,
820 Woodward Avenue.
Port St. Joe 'was beautiful but
only the decorations registered
with the Garden Club were judged.
Next year, the club urges everyone
to register their decorations.


Simpson Gives

Program To

Kiwanis Club

Scoutmaster John T. Simpson
presented some of his Scouts in a
program before the Kiwanis Club
last Tuesday at their regular meet-
ing Simpson was presented by
Floyd Roberts, program chairman
for the day.
Simpson, who has 21 years of
.Scouting to his credit and has been
Scoutmaster in Port St. Joe for
many years, told the club of some
of the activities of Port St. Joe
Troop 47. Simpson told the club
of the Scout's lsummfer camping
plans. He said the boys use money
made at their annual circus to de-
fray camping expenses. As a result
the camping activities cost each
Scout approximately $2.50 each
year.
Simpson said .the boys prefer the
outdoors type camping they have
done the past few years to the es-
tablished camps in the area. In
their preferred camping actviities
the boys live outside, cook over
open fires and have a generally
better camping trip. In the ,estab-
lished camps, the boys live in bunk
houses and eat at mess halls.
"Simpyn told the club that' the
rbboop -has just completed an honor
.court in which five boys received
Ea.gle awards', 22 second class rat-
ings, 18 Star awards, 11 Life aw-
ards and 171 merit badges were
awarded. In addition to these
awards, Eagle Scout Ed Bobbit re-
ceived a bronze palm and five ex-
tra merit badges.
Scouts Jake Belin and Billy Wa-
ger told of some of the require-
ments they had to meet to secure
merit badges.
As 'an interesting -sidelight, Simp-
son said that 32,000,000 copies of
the Scout handbook have been sold
making it second only to the Bible
in sales.
-----------

Short Courses

Offered Adults

A short course in income tax
preparation starts Tuesday, Jan-
uary 9, conducted by the Gulf
County Adult Institute here in Port
St. Joe. In addition to the tax pre-
paration course, first year algebra
courses will begin on Monday and
be held each Monday night.
Other courses are now in pro-
gress at the Institute. Those inter-
ested in taking a course in night
school at the Institute should con-
tact H. F. Ayers, director. His of-
fice is in the Centennial Building
telephone 227-5321.


DD


Tom S. Coldewey, Vice President of St. Joe Paper
Company, announced this morning that the local mill will
return to a four-shift operation within the near future.
Employees holding recall rights are being called back to
work and new employees are being hired through the
Personnel Department.
This optimistic move on the part of the paper com-
pany is a result of reports circulating throughout the In-
dustry of an increased demand for paperboard in 1962.
This forecast, along with a full operating ratio for the
last quarter of 1961, prompted this move on the part of
Management, according to Mr. Coldewey.
The recall of old employees and hiring of new ones
will increase paper mill personnel by approximately 100
employees. This number will staff the fourth shift.
As soon as a full complement of personnel has been
hired, the fourth shift will begin operation.
This announcement is expected to stimulate local
economy. Local merchants and businessmen have wit-
nessed a mild slump since the mill reverted to three-shift
operation 14 months ago.
Under the Company's policy of meploying only or"
member of a family, new and returning personnel should
increase Port St. Joe's population by approximately 100
families, Mr. Coldewey said.


JAYCEES SEEKING NOMINATIONS

FOR 61's OUTSTANDING YOUNGMAN


Masons Install New
Slate of Officers

,On December 30, 1961, at 81OGt
p.m. officers for the year 1962 were
installed in Port St. Joe Lodge No.
111 F. & A. M. The Installation
ceremonies followed a buffet din-
ner prepared and served by the-
ladies of Gulf Chapter 91, Order of,
Eastern S'tar.
gllected 'officers u-lastalieId"were:
Worshipful Master, Roy L. Burch;
Senior Warden, Robert Creamer;
Junior Warden, Blily J. Rich; Trea-
surer, Lamar W. Jordan and Sec-
retary, Roy K. Blackshear.
Appointed officers installed were
Marhsall, Robert H. Trawick; Sen-
ior Deacon, Everet W. Owens;
Junior Deacon, Thomas J. Adkins;
Senior Steward, Pope Fendley;
Junior Steward, James C. Horton;
Tyler, Edward Johnson and Chap-
lain, Robert H. Sewell.
Trustees for the year 1962 will
be Fennon Talley, Robert Trawick
and Everett McFarland.
-Milton Chafin presided over the
installation ceremonies.
Ed Frank -McFarland served as
Marshall..
Following the Blue Lodge Instal-
lation, officers for 1962 were in-
stalled in St. Joseph Chapter No.
56, Royal Arch Masons.

Gulf's First 'Baby of the
Year Is A 'Little Girl
Port St. Joe's New Year baby
was a little girl, Sara Elizabeth
McCalvin, born to Mr. and Mrs.
Herman F. McCalvin, 411 First
Street, Highland View.
The young lady greeted the
new year shortly after other citi-
zens of Port St. Joe observed
the turning of the calendar. Sara
Elizabeth was born at 1:30 a.m.
January 1 In the Port St. Joe
Municipal Hospital.


Port iSt. Joe Jaycees begin this
week seeking nominations from the
people of Port St. Joe and surround-
ing area for the outstanding young
man of the city or area. 'Only young
,men 35 years of age or younger
are eligible for nomination. If the
nominee reaches his 36th birthday
before December 31, 1962, he be-
comes ,eligible if the a,; ii Ir. for
which he is judged wereA.erformed
when he was 35
All nom nat i.r ns- itit ; t rnm ns


FT


AT


ILL


New Mayor, Commissioner




Assumed Duties Tuesday


Ccrps of Engineers

Set Hearing for

Canal Improvement

The U. S. Army Corps of En-
gineers and Congressman Bol0
Sikes will hold a public hearing
in Port St. Joe Wednesday, 'Feb-
ruary 7 at the Stac House rel a-
tive to the deeping and widening
of the Gulf County Canal.
A move is under way to en-
large the canal to standard wa-
terway measurements of 12 feet
deep and 1?5 feet wide. The can-
al is presently nine feet deep
and 100 feet wide. The canal
runs from St. Joseph Bay to the
Intracoastal Waterway.
The hearing will begin at 9:30
a.m. and those interested in or
opposing the project are urged
to be present.

Veterans Should Look.
For Card In First
Check of the Year

Persons receiving checks from
the Veterans Administration, for


ed by the Jaycee DSA Committee veteran's nelts duffiig t-e
e b the Jae D C e month of January sthould-be-alert-
prior to Tuesday, January 23. The month of Januay should -be-aler
ed to -the fact that there Will .be.a.,
award will be made at the annual card included with the check which.
Jaycee banquet on Friday, January is very important. This card should;
26, not be ignored as just another
The winner of the distinguished piece of paper, according to. Gulf
service award will be selected f County Service Officer, J. J. Hill.
The card is the annual income
achievements, leadership and ser- e w u
vice to the community during the questionnaire which must be co-
calendar year of 1961. The award pleted and returned to the Regional
Is for direct, outstanding service Office handling the veteran's ac-
is for direct, outstanding service c e J 31 12
and has no relation to Junior Cham- 'count before January 31, 1962.
berof Commerce membership, TheShould this card not be returned
... -- 1Comme-.. memb. ,r. T. by this time the recipient's check
u~~miuce~ fL ILie ui~a


nominee nlIj eed not be a dmemb er or
a Junior Chamber of Commerce.
A nomination blank will be found
in this week's issue of The Star.
Fill it out and return to Jaycee
DSA Award, P. 0. Box 308, Port
St. Joe, Florida.


Dave May Elected

Merchant's Head

Dave May, operator of the West-
ern Auto Associate Store was se-
lected to head the Port St. Joe Re-
tail Merchant's Association last
Friday at a regular meeting of the
association.
May was selected to succeed
Wayne Buttram.
Other officers elected were Bob
Sidwell, vice-chairman and 'Marion
Parker, secretary-treasurer. Both
these officers are succeeding them-
selves.


will be discontinued until such


State Health Department Asks for

Perpetual Bacteria Check On Water

Frank Hannon was sworn into the office of Mayor-Com-
missioner of Port St. Joe Tuesday night and Tom S. Colde-
wey to the office of City Commissioner by City Auditor and
Clerk R. W. Henderson. Both will serve until October 1 of
this year, when a general election will select their successors,


SFollowing the swearing in cere-
monies, Mayor-Commissioner Han-
non was authorized to sign city
checks. :
The board then adopted Ordin,
ance Number 186X authorizing the

Pictures for This Issue
Lost In Transit To Engraver

The Sita regrets that the pic-
tures scheduled for publication
in this week's issue of The Star
were unavailable at press time
'yesterday afternoon.
When th'e pictures did not ar-
rive back to The Star at the regu-
jar time Wednesday, a telephone
'!call to the Panama Ctiy News-
ilearld (who makes our engrav-
Ings) revealed that the pictures
had never reached their engrav-
ing plant. Somewhere between
Sheire and Panama City the pic-
tures we lbst-.
-But' we .. have the pictures
in next week's issue, even If we
hiave to make more prints.

Former Agent Arrested
For Accepting Bribes


city to borrow $40,000 to complete
payments on the new Municipal
Hospital. This was the final read-
ing of an ordinance introduced two
meetings ago in December.
The Board adopted a resolution
to the late Mayor J. L. Sharit com-
mending his memory and his untir-
ing efforts in behalf of the city for
better than a quarter century.
BIDS RECEIVED
Bids were received Tuesday for
the installation of a iower genet-
ating plant now owned by the Muni-
cipal Hospital to serve as. auxila
iary' power in case of a power fail-
ure. The system will automatically
come olN when commercial :power
fails.
Low bid on there installation was
Ha'rders, Inc.. of Panama- Cty with
a bid of $3S,910. The only other bid-
der was Harrison, Inc. of Pafa'mial
COtv who bid ),746. It was pointed
ou by th- lommission that souse
of the parts of the automatic relay
switch were missing and were to
be supplied in the successful bid.
Before awarding 'thee contract, it
was decided by the Commission to
contact Harders, Inc., and notify


TALLAHASSEE-A liquor oper- them this was expected. The pro-
ation in which legal whiskey from viso was listed in the call for bids,
wet Leon and Bay counties was [but the Commission wanted to
shuttled into surrounding dry cotin- stress the point before letting the
ties for unlawful sale was broken contract.


up last Friday with the arrest of .a
former State Beverage Department
investigator and a one-time North
Florida bootlegger.


time as the card has been complet- Leon County deputy sheriffs
ed and returned, picked up Felix Bullard, who quit
In the past it has been noted by the Beverage Department in No-
this office that considerable hard- i member and H. C. Gibson, who has
ship has come to some in Gulf a long record of bootlegging con-
County because this card has been viktions. They were arrested un-
disregarded until the check was der indictments returned by a Leon
discontinued. Once the check has County grand jury.
been suspended it often takes a Both were freed on $3,000 bond,
considerable time for it to be re- returnable in Circuit Court Jan. 29.
stored., Bullard was charged with ac-
Any person who 'has received a cepting bribes and conspiracy to
card and is in doubt as to how it accept bribes to protect licensed
,should be completed is invited to liquor store operators in Leon and
visit the Veteran's Service Office Bay counties in selling whiskey for
at 323 Reid Avenue in Port St. Joe resale in dry counties. Gibson was
for information or instructions. indicted on bribery conspiracy
Also be reminded that should the charges.
card be completed improperly, it Bullard also was charged with
could cause the loss of benefits. taking a bribe to use his influ-
Recipients should be certain that ence to obtain reversal of the bev-
the proper information is on the erage department's revocation of
card. the license of Stone's Bar at Port
St. Joe. He allegedly took $3,000
BOOST PORT ST. JOEl from Jack Russ of Port St. Joe.


BOY SCOUT TROOP 47 HOLDS COURT OF HONOR


Troop 47, Boy Scouts of America
had its Court of Honor observance
last Friday night at the American
Legion Hall, conducted by Scout-
master John Simpson. Approximate-
ly 100 parents were present to wit-
ness the awards presentations.
The awards were presented by
Jake Belin., Advancement Chair-
men, Boy Scout Committee. Belin
pi esented 171 merit badges, 33 Sec-
ond Class awards; 18 Star Scout
awards; 11 Life Scout awards and
five Eagle Scout awards.
Bob Walton of Panama City, and
Scout Field Executive spoke brief-
ly to the !Scouts and praised them
for the high number of awards be-
ing presented at the Court of Hon-
or.
Walton also had some good


words to say about John Simpson'
on his work with the local Troop
and also presented him with a spe-
cial award for his work in estab-
lishing the Highland View Scout
troop.
Awards presented were as fol-
lows:
Freddy Anderson: Swimming.
Randy Armstrong: Lifesaving
and swimming.
Tommy Atchison: Public speak-
ing and swimming.
DeWayne Burch: Public speak-
ing.
Jake Belin: Animal industry, ath-
letic, book binding, forestry, life-
saving, music, personal fitness, pub-
lic health, safety, swimming.
,Roddy Bowdoin: Swimming
David Dickey: Lifesaving and


swimming.
Pete Fox: Personal fitness and
public health.
Maurice Fuller: Cooking, hiking,
public health and camping.
Terry Hall: Lifesaving and swim-
faing.
Curtis Hammond: Camping cook-
ing, home repairs, lifesaving, pub-
lic speaking, public health, swim-
ming and woodcarving.
Eric Hammond: Automobiling,
camping, cooking, lifesaving, pub-
lic health and swimming.
David Henderson: Camping, mu-
sic. home repairs, public health and
public speaking.
Rodney Herring: Camping, hik-
ing, lifesaving and swimming.
Robert Marlow: Automobiling,
camping, cooking, home repairs,
lifesaving, public health, public


speaking and swimming.
Junior Nichols: First aid, home
repairs, lifesaving, public health,
public speaking and swimming.
Ray Ramsey: Camping, cooking
and hiking.
Edmund ScissOn: Lifesaving and
sai imming.
Buddy Smith: Public health.
Knapp Smith: Lifesaving and
swimming.
Rodney Spaulding: Dog care, el-
ectricity and public health.
Nobie Stone: Citizenship in com-
munity and personal fitness.
Jack Tanner: Public speaking.
Billy Wager: Nature, safety and
sculpture.
Robert Williams: Personal fit-
ness and public health.
Jerry Wynn: Cooking, lifesaving,
home repairs and swimming.


SECOND CLASS SCOUTS
Freddy Anderson, Bryn Baxley,
Mike Clark, Jimmie Cox, Wayne
Dozer, Robert Ellzey, Roy Gaskin,
Curtis Hammond, Boyd Merritt,
Ray Ramsey, Edmond Scisson,
Knapp Smith, James Stafford, Jack
Tanner and Robert Williams.
FIRST CLASS SCOUT
Tommy Atchison, Roddy Bow-
doin, Terry Hall, David Henderson,
Robert Marlow, Robert Williams
and Jerry Wynn.
STAR SCOUTS
Eric Hammond, Robert Marlow
and Junior Nichols.
EAGLE SCOUTS
Emory Cason, Clyde Farmer,
Rodney Spaulding, Nobie Stone
and Byron Eells, III.
BRONZE PALM
Ed Bobbitt.


BACTERIA COUNT URGED
Clerk Henderson told the Board
that the State Board of Health has
contacted the City and urged them
to install bacteria counting facili-
ties at the City water plant. The
SBH said the installation was de-
sirable since the City's water
comes from an open stream. At
present, the bacteria count of city
water Is made once each month by
the Board of Health. The added fa-
cility, at a cost of about $1,500.00
would give a running bacteria
count every day.
Commissioner Coldewey asked
action be postponed until he could
ascertain if the .St. Joe Paper Com-
pany, who owns the water canal
made such checks, which would
eliminate the need for city checks.
OTHER ITEMS
Request for sewer service on
Avenue B one block north of Bat-
tle Street. Study to be made. In-
stallation will be made on lein pay-
ment basis with property owners
bearing cost of installation.
Joe Stevens asks city to recap
Cypress Avenue. Study to be made
of need and report at next meeting
of Commission.
Dick Lamberson asked that alley
be made passable in the rear of his
business, St. Joe Auto Parts Co.
Work ordered done.
George G. Tapper asked that fire
plug be moved out of traffic lane
of his new service station being
constructed at Monument an d
Fourth Street. Study will be made
as to where plug can be moved.
--------V-
Two Fires Alert Fire
Department Tuesday
Two small fires activated the
Port St. Joe Volunteer Fire De-
partment Tuesday of this week.
At 3:30 p.m. the department an-
swered an alarm to pu, out a grass
fire near the Tapper Construction
Company office at Ward Ridge.
At 5:45 p.m. the department was
called to 221 Avenue "E" where a
stove had flooded. Only smoke dam-
age resulted from the fire scare.


TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR


I vvQ41


THURSDY, JAUARY 195


"'.n m a.ra n












Museum Head Terrns Years



Attendance Very Satisfactory


'I- e Christmas holidays climaxed It is indeed gratifying that it has 1961.
' the busy season at the Constitu- been an increase in number of Flor- The Museum wishes to note that
tional State Park and Museum ida visitors over out of state visi- the Retail Merchant's Division
which proved quite satisfactory tors who have registered in the brought a group of ladies from
from the standpoint of attendance guest book at the local state mu- Lanark Village to visit the Museum
figures. We wish to thank Radio seum, according to Mrs. Maude recently.
Station WJOE and The Star for Martin, registrar. The biennial re- Operators of the Museum encour-
their wonderful cooperation and port shows a total of 4,685 vistiors ages the public to come and bring
publicity that they have given t9 to the Museum covering the period their guests to visit the Museum
the museum throughout the years, of July 1 through December 31, more regularly.


THA PTAR. F r Ott 40.4 44
THURSDAY, JANUARY V4, 6 4-, f.5, ,. J.`.i 'J1 I

Things to be seen at the Museum Feted At Shower
are relics of old St. Joseph and
many items relative to the birth of
the State of Florida. The Museum rs. Sharon Wilson and Mrs. Mary
is open on Tuesday through Sa'ur- -
vlyn Goodman with a stork shower
day from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. t th o r
-at the home of Mrs. Wilsin at 320
Sunday hours are 1:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Third Street, Tuesday, January 2
The Museum is closed all day each al S T y
at 3:00 p.m.
Monday. I Refreshments of cake, cookies,
coffee and punch were served to
the following: Mesdames Patricia
Burke, Lillian Anderson, Mary Ar-
Mr. and Mrsi O'Bryon, Nell McCormick Ann
birthof aBurke, nMary Turner, Lois Miller,
J. P. Tullis, Doris Tullis, Opall
GloriaFloyd, Edna Gargus, Drucilbo Decembera Keel,28.
A IMyrtle Raffield, Sharon Wilson,
Lila Williamson and Miss Margar-
Mr. and Mrs. Tray W. Jones of e t Ann O'Bryan.
530 Ninth Street announce the The Morning Glory Circle of the
birth of a son, Charles Robert oni



December 28. its gulorni monthly meeting in the
Mr. and Mrs. Cullen Thompsones, home Mrs. Milton Anderson, 107
announce the birth of a baby girl, Janice Lee on uCire at 9:30 a.m.
oriaDecemJean bor December 28. be a talk on
Mr. and Mrs. James C. Traweek caping by William C Zorn.
of St. Joe Beach announce the' The Morning Glory Crcle of the
birth of a daughter, Sara RuL on Port St. Joe Garden Club eill haefor
December 28. its regular monthly meeting in the
Mr. and Mrs. Preston E. Jones, home of Mrs. Milton Anderson, 107
103 Youpon Street announce the birth o a belly Circle on Thuwillsday, Jan-
birth of a baby girl, Janicuarye Lee on ury 11 at 9:0 come.m.
F December 28. lThe program will be a talk on
Mr. and Mrs. Carson A. Shores la Enjscaping by William C. Zorn.
announce the birth o f a baby boy, Mr. Zorn is County Agent for
Jerry Todd on December 26. F oanklin County.
Mr. and Mrs. Herman F. McCal-son, All members are urged to attend
vin, 411 First Street, Hiannoughland and any interested person who
View announce the birth Jof a baby wishes to join the circle will be
girl, DecembeSara Elizabeth on January 1. 20. ost welcome.
,.P:.0 4:1*
COLORED BIRTHS HOME FOR HOLIDAYS
Mr. and Mrs. Steven Gathers,. Enjoying the holidays at home
Je., 224B Kenney's Mill announce rywith his mothember and sister, Mrs.
theAll birth or a daughter, Sandra Su pending and" anis Sue, is
Faye on December 25. dHospital ersity Spaof lding from the College-
Mr. and Mrs. Alphonse Mason, Comnservatory of Music of Cincin-
158 N. Garrison Ave., announce the !nati. -aodiley is really doing well
birth of a boy, Kenneth Jerome.and brings a really splendid report
IDecember 20. on his progress at the conserva-
:. 4. story He is a member of the "Bear-
All births occurred at the Port c-ats University Band" at the Uni-
St. Joe Municipal Hospital. varsity of Cincinnati.


If Only He Ha~sdn't Pcissea l-i The ~i





AV, ~ t-'


Nearly 10,000,000 United States automobile accidents are
caused each year by "If-Only" drivers, according to the United
States Junior Chamber of Commerce. The Jaycees report that
improper passing, speed too fast for conditions, following too
closely and failure to yield tlhi right-of-way are among driver
errors accounting for more than nine out of every 10 traffic
accidents. Nearly all, they say, could be prevented if only
drivers would exercise more courtesy, caution or common
sense. They add that while chronic violators account for more
than their share of the annual traffic toll, the majority of all
motor vehicle accidents involve normally conscientious drivers.
In cooperation with Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, Jay-
:ees are conducting an educational campaign to focus public
attention on the human and economic loss caused by "If-Only'
Rivers.


buiid;ng brakn cells for mssites:


Phl.. '. '. ;, r,/ T D.I zr,'l. C."rp ali.i, i blury, LCvbl i, n.
GUIDING A MISSILE THROUGH SPACE depends upon better-
than-hospital cleanliness as shown by these missile-minded misses;
In a super-clean area of the Barden manufacturing plant, these
young women, working under triple-filtered air, perform the final
operation in the assembly of precision instrument ball bearings.
Distant cousins of the familiar ball bearing used to keep auto-
mobiles or roller skates rolling effortlessly, these high precision
bearings are essential cells in the ultra sensitive brains of missiles.
So critical are these space-age requirements that bearings are
now made with an accuracy that cannot vary more than 20 mil-
lionths of an.ihch-(1200th the diameter of a human hair). With
this kind of super-precision it's easy to see how a microscopic
particle of foreign matter in a bearlag could radically affect the
course of a missile or space craft


!S-Sgt. Sue Odom, S-Sgt. Linda Fay ise Griffin.
Gardner, S-Sgt. -Mary Ann Miller, I Many -of the Cadets have won
S-Sgt. Karen Stripling, S-Sgt. Sa- their honor badge for efficiency
rahl Norris, S-Sgt. Pat Graydon,' an scripture knowledge.
S-Sgt. Barbara Corbin, S-Sgt. Jan Charles H. Harthern
Stripling, S-Sgt. Betty Creamer, Pastor
Sgt. Dianne Gardner, Sgt. Janet


Yates, Cpl. Johnnie Odom, F-C Sue
Kennedy.
The following awards were for i
second .place trophies: S-Sgt. James
Norris, S-Sgt. Daniel Miller, S-Sgt.
Patsy Johnson, Sgt. Raymond Hol-
land, Sgt. Lola Ray, Cpl. Donnell
Holland, Cpl, Julia Johnson, Cpl.
Dorothy Roberts, Cpl. Janice Rob-
erts.
The following were awarded
first place trophies in Junior Ca-
dets: Steve Brandt, Tommy Odom,
F.-eda Yates, Cynthia Butts, Bren-
-da Brake, Regina Ellis, Yvonne
Griffin, Audrye Dennis, Desda Har-
per, Donna Worley, Renee Worley,
Sandra Jolley.
The following Junior Cadets won
second place trophies: Terry Lov-
ett, Michael Corbin, Jimmy Wood,
Jacquie Ard, Teresa Dees, Teresa
Lynch, Sue Johnson, Barbara Wor-
ley, Gloria Carroll.
:Special awards were presented
to: Gregory Wood, Debra Burns,
Terry Holt, Ralston Lynch, Juan-


SIGHT-SEEING QUIZ


Send The STAR To A Friend
------HOP AT HOME


TELEPHONE: BAllI 7-4191
Sun., Fri., Holidays --.- 2:45 p.m.
Mon. thru Thurs. .--..- 4:45 p.m.
Saturday 12:45 p.m.

Friday and Saturday


fl.II~II. ~WI itIIULUJ~), ~ L. ~l i


lKnight (with honors)lUllb, T-Sgt" Bar-
Oak Grove bara Young (with honors), S-Sgt.
*G Wilbur Butts, S-Sgt. David Young,
Christian Cadets S.Sgt. Jimmy Ferrel Burns, S-Sgt.
Receive A Iwards Roy Norris, Sgt. David Lee,S-Sgt.
ReCeiV6 AWardS Danny Glass, Sgt. Lamar Butts,
,Sgt. Rickey Lovett, S-Sgt. Anita
Eighty two trophies and awards Yates, S-Sgt. Gloria Burkett, S-Sgt.
were presented to the Christian Floria Burkett, S-Sgt. Sarah Yates,
Cadets for efficiency and attend-
ance for 1961. Four special mission-- -
ary trophies were awarded. --. -
Michael Laevell attained the '. '
highest award for missionary giv-
ing in the boys and girls mission-
ary crusade. Jacque Ard attained
the highest award among the girls.
Regina Ellis and .Steve Brandt won -tO'
the second place trophies. CAaTU
Over $626.00 was given by the
Cadets during 1961.
S-Sgt. David Young won the 100
yards swimming championship tro-'
phy. S-Sgt. James Norris won the
second place.
S-Sgt. Mary Ann Miller won the
100 yard running championship.
Cpl. Janice Roberts won second -'.
place. i"'
.S-Sgt. Sarah Norris won the 100 n o
yards swimming championship. S-
Sgt. Barbara Young won second AMERACANS R -"'TN _/ .

S-Sgt. Jimmy Frerel Burns won Mi;HT BR
the 100 yards running champion- o !rOTAT5-
ship. S.Sgt. James Norris won sec- A -N .ARO- c
end place. S;"h i^
M-Sgt. Doyle Glass won the effi- -
ciency and achievement trophy in .,,' / .... j
the boys section. M-Sgt. Wanda i' -"_ )
Jean Odom and S-Sgt. Paula Lov- ,.-' ". ..j -
ett won the outstanding achieve- -"; i'.-' ". ,
ment trophies among the girls. '-- / Y '-'
The following were awarded .
first place trophies for attendance:
M-Sgt. Roy Knight, M-Sgt. Marilyn


ac. l~krSNOW SCULPTUVES AKE
FEATUREs oF THIS EyENT AA NA & "PsHiR
COLLEGE 114 THE FOOTHILLS OF THlE WRITE
MOUNTAINS.



Good'*ey~ses sw 5000good oiries.
Cvre for goor eye'Es 0of v//, iet.-


5 CAUSE

RINK


O Mh'=Z
A45WA W11


NEVER
BEFORE
",SEEN 0

SCREEN
AUSIO ARTISTS R.I.eo
STANRWi
ORSON WELLES
ELEONORA ROSSI DRAGO IVO PAYER

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday

YOUNG














TROY DONAHUE
CONNIE STEVENS
DOROTHY McGUIRE LLOYD NOLAN

Starts Wednesday


f f%
I, -- .






.\ -*: r


- 2 -


ar~sa~iap~a


I








c :FNo. Thot Mred mae AUfawnt
types of cancer, arising In different
Cancer Facts M ade Avaiabl fent rates and differing in their
response to treatment. Cancers are
S: 'alike In that they grow and spread
and, if -not treated, cause death.
4. How does cancer spread In
.... the body?


During the next few weeks this the facts about cancer.
-column will be dedicated to *the This column is sponsored by the
answering of one hundred.and one Gulf County Cancer Society. The
questions about cancer. Since this information and statistics are fur-
disease will strike forty million wished by the American Cancer So-
lmen, women and-children who are ciety.,
now living, it is very important, Categories to be covered are the
to you and your family to know i following:


THE STAR

Published Every Thursday At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
By The Star Publishing Company
WESLEY R. RAMSEY Editor and Publisher
Reader and Bookkeeper
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Salesman, Photographer, Columnist, Reporter, Proof
DIAL BALL 7-3161
Entered as second-class matter, December 19, 1987, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe,
Florida, under Act of March 8, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, $3.00 SIX MONTHS $1.75 THREE MONTHS $127.50
TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishene
do not hpjd themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such
advertisement.
The spoken word ir given scant attention; the printed word Is thoughtfully
weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces.
ti spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


1. What Cancer Is
I: 2. What Causes Cancer
1 3. How Cancer Is Detected
4. How Cancer Is Treated
5. Cancer in Men
6. Cancer in Women
7. Cancer in Children "\
8. Cancer's Vital Statistics
9. Cancer and You
4. .:
WHAT CANCER IS
1. What is cancer?
Cancer is a group of diseases in
which there is uncontrolled and
disordered growth of abnormal
cells which, it unchecked, will
cause- death.
2. How do cancer cells behave
differently from normal cells?
Normal cells grow in an orderly
way to form the body or to repair
worn or damaged tissue. Cancer
cells 'grow in a disordered way and
produce useless tissue. They de-
prive normal cells of nourishment,
.displace. and destroy them and, if
unchecked, spread to other parts
of the body.
3. Are all cancers alike?


Cancer cells grow into surround-
ing tissue or are carried by lymph
and blood vessels to colonize -In
other parts of the body. This spread
is called metastasis.
5. How fast does cancer grow?
There Is no set rate of growth.
Some types grow more in a few
weeks than others -do in several
years.
6. Is Hodgkin's Disease a form
of cancer?
Yes. It is a disease in which there
is uncontrolled growth of abnormal
cells arising from the lymphatic
system.
7. Is leukemia a form of cancer?
Yes. It is a disease in which
there is abnormal growth and de-
yelopment of white blood cells.
8. What is a tumor?
A tumor is a swelling or lump.


It may consist of an excess of nor-
,mal tissue, or fluid as in a cyst or
an abnormal new growth.
9. Are all new growths, cancer-
ous?
No. New growths are of two
kinds: 1) benign (seldom endan-
gering life or health) and 2) ma-



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TH 6OTAft& Port W. 46-4 .i
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1962

lignant or cancerous.
10. What is the difference in be-
havior between a benign and a
malignant growth?
A benign growth does not spread
to other parts of the body as does
a malignant growth. A malignant
growth (cancer), if unchecked, will
spread and cause death.
11. Can one have cancer without
noticeable symptoms?
Yes. In their early stages some
forms of cancer may give no warn-
ing to the patient, but may be de-
tected by a pyhsician in a routine
health checkup.
12. Do lower animals develop
cancer?
Yes. Cancer is found in all forms
of life.
13. Can the ersults of cancer stu-
dies on animals be of any help to
human beings?
Yes. Since cancer exists in all
forms of life, scientists believe that
better understanding of the disease
in human beings will be furthered
by animal studies. Important medi-
cal discoveries have been made or
confirmed through animal experi-
ments. Such research has saved
countless human lives.

--- ---


A Service of Your Doctor of Medicine.
Your Local Medical Socie-y and ',he
Florida Medical Association.
PRESCRIPTIONS OLD
AS PILLS
The small bit of paper the
doctor gives a patient and calls
a prescription contains *ihe di-
rections from the physician to
the druggist for preparing and
dispensing medicine. Aside from
the name of the patient, the pre-
scription consists of four parts.
The first part is indicated by
the symbol Rx. Rx stands for
the Latin verb derivative "re-
cipe"-meaning to take. Many
persons have a misconception
that this mark on a prescription
is a relic of ancient hocus-pocus
when the priest used mystic
words or symbols to impress the
patient as he muttered some
abracadabra while administering
medicine.
The second part of a prescrip-
tion gives the name and amount
of each drug or preparation to
be used. The third part contains
brief directions to the pharma-
tist to mix and make pr divide.
P finally, the fourth padi has to
do with directions to tthe patient
for taking or using medicine. It
is usually preceded by the Latin
abbreviation "sig." m e a ni n g
"write" or "label" and followed
by the signature of the doctor
who wrote the prescription.
It is customary to write the
ingredients of the prescription
in Latin, not to mystify the
patient, but because Latin names
are official and as such are
recognized everywhere by phar-
macists and physicians. Federal
legislation has placed restric-
tions on the sale of drugs and
official and nonofficial drugs
are now classified as restricted
and nonrestricted. The label on
a restricted drug must carry the
words "Federal law prohibits
dispensing without a prescrip-
tion."
Stone tablets containing pre-
scriptions have been found
which dated back to the time of
Cheops, the Egyptian king,
about 3700 B.C. Prescriptions,
therefore, are practically as old
as pills.
---- ----


Florida Power

Appoints New

Board Counsel

Florida Power Corporation's
Kendrick E. Fenderson, senior vice
president, gener-
al counsel and
,ut4niber of the
board of directors
ret ires December
31, concluding 35
service, FPC
Prudent W. J.
Clapp has an-
K. E. Fendersonnounced.
Named t succeed Fenderson as
counsel is Edgar H. Dunn, Jr., vice
president and formerly assistant
general counsel. [
Fnederson, 63, will continue as!
a member of the board of direct-;
ors. He has headed all legal activi-
tivities of the company, including
those concerning franchises, rates,
taxes and real estate. Employed as
staff counsel, he was promoted to
general counsel in 1944. He was
named a vice president in 1947 and
senior vice president in 1959.
A native of New Hampshire, Fen-,
derson was graduated from Dart-,
mouth College in 1920. He attend-
ed Harvard and received his law
degree in 1923 from New York
University Law School. He is a
member of the American, Florida
and St. Petersburg bar associations
and the Federal Power Bar Assoc-


See FREE GIFT OFFER BELOW



The Tattler


H. GLENN BOYLES .._ Editor
Associate Editors YOU-ALL

Published by
BOYLES DEPARTMENT STORE
PHONE BALL 7-4261
R. GLENN BOYLES, Owner
"Dedicated to Better Selling mixed with a
-li ttle fun"


STORE PERSONNEL
ERLMA M. BOYLES Manager
GUY N. MIDDLETON Men and Boys Wear
ESTHER TAYLOR. Men's and Ladies Ready-to-Wear
GLADYS GILL -- .......... Ladies and Children's Ready-to-Wear
TREVA SURRENCY Lingerie and Hosiery.
RUTH KEEL OLIVIA DAVIS -


WE PLEDGE FOR THE NEW YEAR



To Serve You Better


To Save You More!

SIGNED

The Management and Personnel at ..



OYLE

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CASH VALUES !!


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TUNE IN TO WJOE DAILY AT 8 AM and 9 AM FOR
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He has served for several years
on the ABA standing committee
which reports on the development
of public utility law.
I Dunn. who was
named a vice pre-
siden-rt last March
left his St. Pet-
ersburg law prac-
tice to join FPC
in 1.",5. He is a

Florida College of
E. H. Dunn, Jr. Law.
The utility's new general coun-


i'ation. He is also admitted to prac- ,alel, effective Janua(ry 1, moved
tice in Maine and New Hampshire. ,to this state from Kentucky in


1919. During World War II, he
served as a -pilot in the Army Air
Corps in the American and Pacific
theatres of operations. He was re-
called as a lieutenant colonel dur.
ing the Korean conflict to direct
the office of special investigations,
Northeast Air Command.
Dunn has been admitted to prac-
tice before all courts in Florida,
Federal Tax Courts, the Unitpi
States Treasury Department and
the United States Tax Court. He
is a member of the St. Petersburg
and Florida Bar Association&
-k


SHOP AT HOMR


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Noton's Maihnen6Are Poent Force

InMarch of Dimes Disease Baffle
A small, yellow envelope
serving as a harbinger of
an expanding war on crip-
pling disease arrives in the
maflBoxes of 40 million
American families thislweek.
It brings the "mailer" of the
1962 March of Dimes, now ded-
icated to seeking the answers
to birth- defects and arthritis
while conti using its work in
polio. Printed on each envelope
is the confident prophecy,
"Your Dimes Will Do It Agin!"
Addressed by tens of thou-
sands of volunteers in the
county chapters of The Na-
tional Foundation March of
Dimes across the nation, this
symbol of scientific research
and total medical care for the
victims of these diseases prom-
ises immediate help and future
hope through the generosity of
the Anerican people.
i e prediction on the mailer,
1Your Dimes Will DoIt Againl"
is a reference, of course, to
development of the Salk anti-
polio vaccine and to the later
abin oral vaccine. Both were
made possible, as-, were the
medical care and rehabilitation
of many of those paralyzed by
polio, .by public contributions
to the March of Dimes. Man
millions of the dollars so wei
used to bring about these ac-
complishments came to local National Poster Child of 1962 March of Dimes, Debbie Sue Brown,
chapters through similar mail- 5, Clarkston, Wash., exhibits jumbo-sized mailer for contributions.
ers in years past. Born with the serious birth defect of an open spine;,rDebbie Sue
Recipients of these mailers, inserts bill in an envelope almost as tall as she is.
including those in distant Ha-
waii and Alaska, were urged the problem. Each year in this But our scientists never aban-
by March of Dimes leaders this country, at least 250,000 infants doned hope and, because of
week to return the mailers to are born with significant, birth March of Dimes contributions
local chapters as promptly as defects and 21,000 die. This we from those who believed as we
possible. must prevent, did, the answer was found.
As one chapter chairman "As to rheumatoid arthritis, Tens of thousands of lives have
said: "Aside from finaiclal out- fully 30,000' children and ado- been saved since then, and tens
lays needed urgently for re- lescents are crippled. Alto- of thousands saved from crip-
search and for total medical gether, more than 11 million pling.
6are of victims, The National Americans suffer from the ar- "None of us, scientists in-
Foundation -March. cf Din-s tbrit.ic diseases. This must not cluded, knows when the an-
.mnust expand its already erx~t- happen in the future. swers will be found to birth
ing national network of chap- "When we say to the public defects and arthritis. We just
tar-supported clinics helpir-.g that 'Your Dimes Will Do It know, as we knew with con-
those stricken by birth defects Again!' it's not an empty boast. fidence before the Salk vaccine,
or by'arthritis. We mean preri.vly thqt. Sopme that those answers will be
'The figuresgive you an idea folks behaved thai the insw'cr found provided sufficient pub-
of the appalling magnitude of to polio would ne. cc be found, lic support is forthcoming."


S-ATURDAY ONLY


5 HAMBURGERS $1. 9 3| 3', hhh
With Everything On It... ToGo* I V
MILK SHAKE : Oc ___ __


Florida Garden Information

By HERVEY SHARPE C e f N To
Agricultura' Extension Serv. erain P of Is Necesiary To Receive
Foundation plantings to the gar-
dener are like some garments- Social Security Payments, Says Carey
they smooth out features and add .
a "dressy" look. .
So, to insure -that you will spruce Certain proofs are necessary in ever, the filing of a claim should
up around the home, add founda- I the payment of any Social Security never be delayed because you don't
tion plants to your 1962 gardening claim, according to John V. Carey, have a certain proof. A claim must'
resolutions. IDistrict Manager of the' Panama' be filed before any payment can
When properly made, a founda- City Social Security Office. How- be made, an, it can only go back'
tion planting serves definite pur-i for a period of. 12 months before
poses. It connects the house within Don't depend too much on an- the month the claims actually
the grounds and adjacent orna- nuals as a basis -of the planting. filed.
mental so that the house and They require continuous replace- Individuals expecting to file re-
grounds appear they have grown ment and during some seasons will tirement claims should bring an old
together into an eye-appealing not do justice to your mortgage. record of their age, evidence of
homestead. Don't use too large or too con- their earnings for the previous year
Shrubs and vines also tend to spicuous materials. Trees can be and the Social Security card. If the
soften and blend architectural used only against the largest-build- individual's -wife is filing a claim
lines. Such plants give the home a ings, and some of the variegated also, a record of her age should
finished look. foliage plants dono fiti.n wellbe brought in and her Social Se-
Generally, foundation 'plantings with all types of architecture. curity card if she has one. If any
reflect personal preferences. The Don'ti use too many conifers- children are going to be claimantso
SThere is almost no restriction on that is, a child under the age of
owner of a Spanish Villa-type home broadleaved evergreens. ,M an y 18 or a .disabled adult child, birth
will use gaily colored acalyphas, such plants are ideally adapted o certificates should be bought for
crotons and other tropical plants, foundation' plantings.- each child and the child's Social
while the proud owner of a city Don't be Lifraid o-f your own Security card if any.
rance home may feature cactus and ideas as to plants. Your enthusiasm
cottonwoods. Should not be dampened by the Disability claims generally in-
Rules for making foundation Idon'ts". volve the same proof requirements,
plantings are vague. Early settlers Don't fail to plant some-sort of and, of course, in addition the dis-
cut out the underbrush so that they foundation planting if there is a abled individual must furnish med-
could keep an eye out for Indian bare spot at the base of your ical evidence of his condition. It is
attacks. building. Remember these plants up to the disabled individual to ob-
Conditions haven't changed very will increase th value 'of the pro- tain all medical records from 'his
much. Homeowners plant low grow- perty, yet will look so natural' that doctors. The necessary medical re-
ing plants which allow for good vis- te tax assMsor. i + f ,a add the port forms will be furnished to the


ibility so they can keep an eye out* improvement to his tax roll.
for peddlers, bill collectors and un- There are scores of plants suit-
wanted visitors. However, beauty able for setting around th home.
is the reason most gardeners give. The native cherry laurel is one. The
University of Florida ornamen- wax privet is another excellent
tal experts offre a few don'tt" in glossy green plant.
making foundation plantings. Other larger growing foundation
Dno't overplant. This is a comrn- suggestions include abelia, .severi-
mon fault, and crowding of too nea jasmines, wax myrtle and a
much miscellaneous materialnumberof the arborvitaes and con-
around the home is a common blun- ifers.
der of a rank amateur. Still .another group of plants-
ferns-have a place against shad-
ed walls, and underneath larger
plants.
1 The Sword, Boston, leather and
other cultivated varieties aake ex-
cellent foundation arrangements.
9 '- Native ferns from the woods can
also be planted.
"nh y a w w eugb "o I In bays and other small indenta-
S : b '1 'tions ,to tone down the higher
J 1 I frl 'e I L plants and add color, plant ih-rba- .
flu mDO *ceo, s p.r-nni.iIs such a 'tfour.o.
clocks., Stokes' aster, penstembn,
PORT ST. JOE, FLA. physotsegia, wandering jew and
violets.


disabled individual at the time he
makes his claim.
Survivor claims require the same
general proofs as retirement claims,
and, in addition, proof of death
must be furnished. Also, it is gen-,
er.ial, necessary to submit a mar-


tH4 iTA L NPet.. Ji .i.-*. +
TrHUSftBAY, JANUARY 4, 1062
riage certificate In a survivor
claim.
Many individuals will be filing
Social Security claims early In
1962. If good proofs are presented
promptly, the Social Security check
will arrive sooner.
The local Social Security Office,
at 1135 Harrison Avenue, Panama
City, will be closed on. Monday, De-
cember 25 and on Monday, January
1, in observance. of the holidays.
SHOP AT HOME
Advertising Pays- Try It

AMERICAN FAMILY
LIFE INSURANCE CO.
Cancer Accident
Hospitalization Life
Charles R. Garraway, Jr.
District Manager
Phone HU 2-4054. Marianna
Mrs. E. M. Gay
Licensed Representative
Phone 227-3078 Port St. Joe

FOR EXPERT

Electrical Repairs
and
Contracting
IT'S
WALL ELECTRIC
COMPANY
DIAL BAll 7-4331


$2.20 PER EXTRA YEAR OF LIFE
The average family today spends about $222 a year
more for prescriptions than it did in 1929. Largely
because of the wonder drugs in those prescriptions,
you can expect 10 more years of life than you could
in 1929. This means that the typical; family pays
about $220 for each extra year of life expectancy
That's why we say ...
Two Parking Spaces Reserved for our Prescription
Customers at our .Back Door

S.S M IlTH S P HARMAC Y
Phone 227-5111


i


IC Super MARKET
(FIVE MILES FROM PORT ST JOE ON HIGHWAY 71)


(Limit Rights Reserved)


AT WHITE CITY, FLORIDA


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29c


JR


10 LB BAG

79c


$5.00 ORDER I


LB.

29c


~I


rrggggarggg-g


-Now@


ill I I -s


W-L", LUX uYskYu,-,sor win iaii to aaci m


i


I








Perfect Partners


for


'62-


IGA BRAND-NO. 2V2 CAN
Spiced Peaches
IGA Sweetened or Unsweetened
Grapefruit Juice
IGA-10 OZ. GLASS
APPLE JELLY


29c
46 Oz. Can
25c


19c 2


Bush's Great Northern NAVY BEANS or-No. 300
Blickeye Peas 3 cans 29c


edl CCrpet Service means that you
receive complete shopping assistance at your 1GA Food Store.
Filenidly, courteous attention, together with fast checkout and
carryout service, is yours every day in the week. This, as well
.s the m--.y helpful serving suggestions and added personal
-riures, will help make your shopping experience more enjoy-
e .z.I CGA. Come in today...,you'll be giad you did.
PERFECTION


VAN CAMP'S
Pork & Beans
BLACKBURN
Corn & Cane Syrup
IGA
Tomato Catsup
IGA VACUUM PACK REGULAR OR DRIP


2


No. 300
CAN
No. 5
JAR
14 Oz.
Bottle
1 LB.
CAN


~ABLERITE BOSTON BUTT

t81


'


EGA CREAM

CORg


o03
CANS


I


COPELAND'S LEAN MEAT 12 OZ. PKG.


TABLERITE LEAN COUNTRY STYLE


Pork Ribs


1Oc

39c

19c
590


No. 303
CANS


TABLERITE PURE PORK
SAPUSAn3E

Pound


MUCHMORE and BOB WHITE SLICED
BACON

Pound 39


COLLARDS
cm ~c


LARGE
BUNCHES


2)FOR


FANCY CARTON
FRESH TOMATOES
FLORIDA LARGE SIZE
GRAPEFRUIT


39t


ctn. 19c

10for 49c


IGA FRESH FROZEN
FISH STICKS


- 8 OZ. PKG.


COLLARDS, MUSTARD, TURNIP 10 OZ. PKGS
McKENZIE'S GREENS
READY TO SERVE IGA 10 OZ. PKGS
STRAWBERRIES


(FIRST CUTS)

MV j TOPS IN
C, CHOPS ...
TABLERITE
LB.


pkg.
4 pkgs.


GERBER'S STRAINED
BABY FOOD
ARMOUR'S
STREET
IGA
CHUNK TUNA
DOLE SLICED
PINEAPPLE
SUNSWEET
PRUNE JUICE
CAIRO BEAUTY SWEET
MIXED PICKLES
SAVE 10c IGA
INSTANT COFFEE
ALL FLAVORS WRIGLEY'S
CHEWING GUM


6 jars 59c


12 oz. can


49c


/2 can 29c


No. I can, 2 for
qt. bottle
16 oz. jar
6 oz. jar


37c
49c
29c
79c


6 pkgs. 23c


SAV 5c ARMOUR'S 15V OZ. CAN
CORNED BEEF HASH


TABLERITE
MARGARINE


39c
59c


4 pkgs. 89c


1 lb. pkg., 2 for


TABLERITE
CHEESE SPREAD
PILLSBURY
CINNAMON ROLLS


2 lb. loaf


34c
49c
79c


can 29c


special


GIRLS CAPRI (Cotton or Corduroy) Sizes 3 to 16
ANTS 98c&
LADIES CAPRI Sizes 10 to 18

LADIES ORLON
2-PIECE SET TODDLERS
2-PIECE SET TODDLERS


1.98




1.98


LADIES NYLON (Shadow Panel) Sizes 22 to 34
L 3 1.98 t 2.98


GARCREST .(Popular Sizes)

VWE HAVE A COMPLETE LINE OF HANES
EiWElr & A


1.00

;ox


V. ___________________________________,~ I


DIXIE QUEEN COOKING
t^ ___No. o 10
Jar


RICE


3 LB.
Cello Bag


29c


COFFEE
IGA BRAND EXCELLENT TO SERVE WITH PORK
Apple Sauce


VARIETY STORE SPECIAL AT IGA
WHILE THEY LAST-FIRST QUALITY NYLON


HOSE PAIR
ITv Q^


IGA BEEF, CHICKEN or TURKEY MEAT-8 Oz. Pies
PIES 5for $1


I c~Bamok no=r


3-'T


39e


Ib39


atore


CardPuroy Toddlers








.."ll; f A k~lfc #1ri t.THURSDAY, JANUA R 4, 19g
*Af rt ,J P. H DAY JAN 4 "' Florida Seeks To

The Star Brings News of Your Neighbors Reduce Insurance
>: ,Cancellations
S FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH TALLAHASSEE-More than 135
-I ...... i major automobile insurance com-
Corner Third St. and Baltzell Ave. C. BYRON SMITH, Pastor panics will join next March 1 to
!lessen one of the most aggravating
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 a.m. irritants of motorists, the sudden
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m. and unexplained cancellation of au-
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ..--------. 6:15 p.m. !to liability insurance without no-
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 p.m. twice to the policyholder.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) -.----..... 7:30 p.m. State Treasurer and Insurance
Commissioner J. Edwin Larson said
"Come and Worship God With Us" more than 100 companies represent-
Sed by the National Bureau of Cas-


PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH
Garrison at 20th
Prayer Service (Thursday) __- 7:45 P.M.
Sunday School 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship .11:00 A.M.
Evening Worship -- 7:45 P.M.
"Souls Harbor in the Port Area"
Rev. Hubert D. White, Pastor
Comfortably Air-Conditioned


You Are Cordially Invited To Attend

Long Ave. Baptist Church


REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00
TRAINING UNION 6:15
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ....-.... 7:30


a.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.


Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street
Air Conditioned Centrally Heated

.-VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME



Oak Grove Assembly of Godi hurch


CHARLES H. HARTHERN, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:00 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 A.M.
CHRISTIAN CADETS 6:15 P.M.
EVANGELISTIC SERVICES 7:30 P.M.
-Mid-Week Prayer Services .(Wed.) ----7:30 P.M.


I HOME>~.


S.*P -LJ MURYGAGE CO.
Call or Write
301 Williams Ave. J Phone 229-2721
Port St. Joe, Fla.



NEED A PLUMBER?
CALL BEAMAN
'Plumbing installation Repailrb
Contract Work A Specialty
Agents for
Brand Name Plumbing Fixtures
-CALL US FOR FREE ESTIMATE-

TWO EXPERIENCED PLUMBERS TO SERVE YOU
BEAMAN PLUMBING SERVICE


nalty Underwriters, and the 37
firms banded together in the Mu-
tual Insurance Rating Bureau, have
filed plans which will limit their
rights to cancel automobile liabil-
ty insurance policies except for
specific and limited cause.
Commissioner Larson and Fire
and Casualty Actuary Charles M.
Graham, who examined the two
bureau filings, said, "We feel these
plans represented a decided step
forward In assuring the driving
public of Florida that they will be
able to rely upon the continuation
of their automobile Liability Insur-
ance so long as they obey the law."
Under -the limiting terms of the
changed cancellation rules, NBCU
members and MIRB members will
be required to guarantee renewals
up to five years after a 60-day "pro-
bationary" period during which the
policyholder can be checked as to
record and desirability.
Companies operating under the
limitation agreement will be requir-
ed to guarantee renewal of auto
insurance to policyholders who do
not violate the following stipula-
tions:
1. Conviction or ball forfeiture
while driving while intoxicated or
under influence of narcotics; 2.
failure to stop and report when in-
volved in an accident; 3. homicide
arising out of the operation of a
motor vehicle; 4. driving a motor
vehicle during a period of revoca-
tion .or suspension of -driver's lic-
ense; 5. motor vehicle theft; 6.
making of false statements in ap-
plication for a driver's license.
Additionally, the guarantee does
not apply If the named insured fails
to comply with policy conditions
requiring cooperation and assist-
ance after an accident, makes false
representations in policy declara-
tions, or fails to pay premiums on
schedule.
Also excepted are "owned auto-
mobiles" which are either not pri-
vate passenger automobiles, or are
not registered with State of Flor-
ida.
Autoists who are subject to epi-
lepsy or heart attacks, or have
been convicted of three or more
violations within a period of 18
months; and motorists who have
violated ordinances as to speed
limits, or other motor vehicle laws
of any State also are not eligible
for the renewal guarantee, as set
out by the National Bureau of
Casualty Underwriters or the Mu-
tual insurance Rating Bureau, Lar-
son said.
I-


8 Inch
EACH


IPANA Tooth Paste


BRYAN BROTHERS VIENNA



a Sasg e


4 Oz.
Cans


Cans
8 Oz.


J 3c


Jane Parker Iced
SPANISH

BAR


19 Oz.
LOAF


29e


Pork Loin- Sale!
"Super-Right" Hard Corn Fed Pork
HALF or WHOLE
LOINS lib.49c
'Super-Right" Center Cut Pork
CH 0 PS Ib. 59c
'Super-Right" Pork Rib End
ROAST lb.33c


E


"SUPER-RIGHT" HEAVY WESTERN
Steak Sale!
CLOSE TRIMMED

SIRLOIN

Boneless Top LB.
or Bottom Round 890

CHUCK STEAKS lb. 49c


14 Oz.
Bottles


39c


10c OFF!


73c


1107 GARRISON AVE.


PHONE BAIl 7-2541


PIrics i thiad eeceh S:atuday, J.


A w m w ll a ~ l
IWVMIM AS Mrims SNIV.Lt4I1OW VIMf1
VIMW ?.lNQ1V4 NitOM I M3HfNYS
Good eqes mesangoodmemores.
Car. fo1yr eyq OO# -/ /lim~eY.
Smokey Says:
WMBRIGDEBRIS-0 SE CARE
M VIS MAN Is DOING!
~7I'MBT,1


Debris burning-
No. 1 cause of forest ires


Gerber Strained
BABY FOOD


6 jars 59c


Calo-152 Oz. Can
CAT FOOD 3 cans 43c
Hudson's -Bathroom
TISSUE 4 rolls 53c
Hudson's Facial
TISSUE, 400's 27c
Hudson's Table 80's
NAPKINS 2 pkgs. 25c
Morton's-26 Oz. Box
SALT 2 boxes 27c
Streitman's Zesta
SALTINES (8 pak) 29c
Hearts Delight-12 Oz. Cans
Apricot Nectar 2 cans 31c
Wax Paper
CUT-RITE 75 ft. roll 19c
Birdseye Frozen-10 Oz. Pkg.
PEAS 2 pkgs. 39c
Birdseye Frozen-9 oz. pkg.
GREEN BEANS pkg. 23c
Detergent
SAIL giant size 53c


Nabisco Graham
CRACKERS lb. box 27c
Detergent
FAB giant size 77c
Detergent
CHEER reg. size 33c
Cleanser-14 Oz. Can
AJAX 2 cans 33c
Air Purifier 10c OFF
FLORIENT 69c
Reg. Bars Cashmere
BOUQUET 3 for 29c
Bath Bars Cashmere
BOUQUET 2 for 29c
Reg. Bars Palmolive
SOAP 3 for 29c
Bath Bars Palmolive
SOAP 2 for 29c
Marcal Bathroom
TISSUE 2 rolls 23c
Birdseye Frozen
MIXED FRUIT 12 oz. 39c
Birdseye Frozen
PEACHES 12 oz. 29c
Dixie Lily
GRITS 1/2 lb. 19c


GOLDEN RIPE READY TO EAT
BANANAS 3 Ibs. 29c
LARGE FRESH CRISP
LETTUCE 2 heads 29c
EASTERN WHITE
POTATOES 10Ib.bag 25c

510
Street


- Aligood Brand Sugar Cured Sliced Breakfast


Jane Parker Freshly Baked
CHERRY

PIES


ANI PAGE TOMATO




NEW FAMILY SIZE WITH HEXA-FLUORIDE


MAGNOLIA BRAND SWEETMILK or BUTTERMILK


35:c
^kf1
JDC


4Qc
mT~


Dry Cleaning

PICK-UP and DELIVERY SERVICE

PHONE 227-5996

24 HOUR SERVICE

Port St. Joe's Only Locally Operating Dry Cleaning
Business


Deluxe Laundry

and DRY CLEANERS
107 SECOND STREET


~s~s~a~l~nslss~Rlla~saR~barq~i


~i~s~g~is I---~~sc~i~asgl 811


tB~~~


Prices in this


ad effective through Saturday, Jan. 6i


I Ib. pkg.









Bowling News


By BOB KERRIGAN dustrial league bowls on Tuesda
Well, year 1961 has just closed at 6:30 p.m. Then on Thursda
on a very satisfactory year for the night at 7:00 p.m. the commercial
bowlers of Port St. Joe. league rolls.
I We have a nice new bowling al- Each of the leagues have eigh
ley in the city for the first time, teams of five or more men, som
there is good parking space and a of the men have rolled on tw
food bar for the hungry. teams in different leagues.
We have formed an Association We have some very fine bowler
for the City of Port St. Joe and the and some very low average bow]
Association has helped to form ers but the most important thin
three good leagues. The merchants is that we have men who get to
league pushes over their pins on gether one or more nights a weel
Monday night at 7:30 p.m. The in- and have a lot of fun. Some of ou:

If Only He Hadn't Cut Out of Line


Many accidents caused by changing lanes could be avoided,
according to the United States Junior Chamber of Commerce,
if only drivers refused to cut suddenly out of line and instead
first made sure that the way was clear in front of and behind
them. Safety authorities say that investigations of thousands
of accidents in every state in the Union show conclusively
that nearly all could have been avoided if only one or another
of the involved drivers had driven with greater care. In co-
operation with Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, Jaycees
are conducting an educational campaign against "If-Only"
drivers who annually contribute to accidents on United States
highways causing 1,400,000 injuries, 38,200 deaths and costing
$6,500,000,000.

DRY SAWMILL

WOOD FOR SALE

0$7.50 per load
CALL 227-3171

WALTER DUREN



FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Monument and Constitution
REV. JOHN C. CARMICHAEL, Minister
CHURCH SCHOOL 9:45 a.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a ma
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP .... 6:45 p.m.

mrwm.


PROVIDE

THE

ENERGY

THEY
NEED!
Mom, be sure your
youngsters are getting
plenty of those
delicious, nourishing
dairy foods they need
to stay healthy I



IsBORDEN'S

IT'S GOT TO BE GOOD
A complete line of Borden's Dairy Pro-
ducts at your favorite super market or
delivered to your door. Just call us, col-
lect, to have your name placed on our
route.

TRY OUR

Country Fresh Eggs



HARDENS

0 o 0
D AIRY 0 "-0*

"Gulf County's Only Producing Dairy"
Phone 639-4383 Wewahitchka, Florida
1"~~ ~ eg *E ^ *^ '^. ^ ^e.v -' -


ELM4


There is on record a three .game
series with 37 fouls in the three
games. The man had 15 fouls in
the first game, 12 in the second
and 10) in the third. Do you know
what he said after the series was
over? "Yue see I am improving
with each game". So don't give up
fellows, that is the easy way out.
Just keep on knocking them down.
Advertlaing Paye- Try It


tHURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1962

bowler efijer had & ball In their
hand prior to last September and
y now are U inteiefted In bwoling
y as the men we ihate who have
1 knocked over ten pins for 20 or
more years.
it
e There are plans in the near fu-
o ture tor the formation of a fourth
league on Friday nights at 7:00
s p.m. This will be an inter-city
I- league, we hope, with teams from
g Wewahitchka, Apalachicola, Port
- St. Joe Beach, Blountstown, Mexico
k Beach and Port St. Joe and maybe
r a team from Tyndall AFB as well.
Also in the year just past we had
a 3, 6, 9 tournament. That is the'
third, sixth and ninth frames have
an automatic strike. The tourna-
ment ran for the month of Decem-
ber and the following men were
the winners.
First place, D. Etheridge .... 826
Second place, D. Huffman .... 714
Third place, R. Medlin __ 691
Fourth place, J. Presnell .... 669
Fifth place, B. Melton .....--... 665
Sixth place, W. Smith- ..--- --658
Seventh place, C. Sargent -..- 657
Eighth place, B. Kerrigan .... 649
Ninth place, B. J. Richards and
C. Lane 634
The highest game was rolled by
Doyle Etheridge of Panama City
with a 299.
This year also saw the .big Wool-
ford Service team take a beating
from the Costin's team of the com-
mercial league in a match game
on December 9. That is enough
about that match.
In the new year, 1962, we -plan
to form a mixed doubles league
which will meet on Sunday after-
noon about 3:00 p.m. This league
will consist of husbands and wives
as teammates bowling against each
other for position in the league.
We also plan to form a Senior
High .School league of boys and
girls which will meet on Saturday
afternoon for league bowling. The
high school league will elect .their
own officers -and adapt their own
playing rules, handle their own
money and paper work, make their
own banking and write their own
bowling column for the Purple
Wave. This league will be assisted
by the adults only as supervision
and instruction requires.
We .will need sponsors for this
league asa to shirts 'and lettering
only, the 'young people will pay
their own bowling and shoe rental.
This is a good way of backing the
young people with a good healthy
pastime and at a low cost to the
sponsor. The total cost to a sponsor
for a three girl or boy team will
be only about $12.00.
Here are some of the records
from the archives of the American
Bowling Congress:
Last year the average of all men
bowlers was only 154. Now, how
does that meet with your average?
The average for all women bowlers
was 131.
The men rolled a total of 628 per-
fect .games of "300" while the wo-
men rolled only seven such games.
During the 1960 bowling season
there were 1,523 men carrying an
average of "200" or better. The la-
dies had two with that high aver-
age.
The highest man's average was
beld by Walt Mecurio in the 1934-35
season with a whopping 238 for 90
games. Another fellow named Walt
Ward has bowled five consecutive
games of "700" or better in a sea-
son.
The highest triplicate ever rolled
was by Thurm Gibson with three
"268" -games. The lowest three
games rolled was a triplicate of
50 per .game. The man's name was
not listed in the records.
The highest three games ever
rolled were by Ollie Brandt with
297, 289, and 300 in one series. Now
the laides highest series was by
Miss Mica of St. Louis with a total
of 787. Her individual games were
not recorded but they must have
been some honeys.
Two persons share the honors
with the most strikes in a row,
Frank Carcana and Max Stein with
29 each.
The most "600" series in a row
was by Joe Wilman who had 45
such series in consecutive nights
and on the 46th night, what do you
think he rolled? That's right, a 599.
Now that fellow just had 600 on his
mind whenever he took his ball out
of the bag.
Now, here is a record for you
fellows taht are always going 'to
give up the game after a bad night.


Foam rubber reversible cushions. Beautiful brown color
Modern Sofa and Matching Chair $299.95
$329.95 Value


Traditional-Foam cushions with zipper covers.
Sofa with Matching Chair
$269.95 Value


$229.95


roam cushions, nylon cover.
Kroehler Sofa and Matching Chair $169.95
$199.95 Value


Foam cushions with zipper covers. Off the floor
Modern 2-piece Sectional Sofa
$399.95 Value


styling
$299.95


Beautiful toast color. Converts to sleep 2 comfortably
Danish Modern Sofa Bed $109.00
$120.00 Value

Foam rubber reversible cushions.
Early American Wing Back Chair $50.00
$70.00 Value

Foam cushions. Large, comfortable
2 Swivel Platform Rockers $50.00
$70.00 Value

Foam cushions, seat and back.
3 Danish Modern Occasional Chairs $39.95
$50.00 Value

Plastic head and arm rest. Nylon seat and back.
2 Large Recliner Chairs $6995
$80.00 Value

Upholstered with reinforced plastic
2 Larg ePillow Back Reclienr Chairs $99.95
$110.00 Value


Covered with nylon fabric
Kroehler Recliner Chair
$140.00 Value


$99.95


Upholstered in heavy nylon fabric with full size innerspring
mattress Sleeps two.
Hide-Away Bed $199.95-
$259.95 Value


includess large oval table, 3 mates chairs; buffet
7-Piece Maple Dining Room Group
$189.95 Value


and hutch.
$159.95


6-Piece Modern-Large oval table with plastic top (slightly
damaged) 4 comfortable chairs, spacious glass door china cabinet
Walnut Dining Room Group $299.95
$345.00 Value


H-utch Top and
Solid Oak Base Cabinet
$99.95 Value


$59.95


Plastic top table resistant to stains, heat and scratches
6 side chairs, plastic covered seat and backs.
2 7-Piece Dinette Suites $89.95
$109.00 Value

Modern-Includes large 6-drawer double dresser with framed
plate glass mirror, spacious chest of drawers, double size
spindle bed.
4-Pc. Walnut Bedroom Group $299.95
$369.95 Value


6-drawer double dresser, large framed plate
5 drawer chest, double size bed.
4-Pc. Oak Bedroom Suite
$250.00 Value


glass mirror,

$229.95


Includes double dresser, plate glass mirror, 5-drawer chest,
double size bookcase bed, (slightly damaged).
Kroehler 4-Pc. Bedroom Group $289.95
$330.00 Value

In beautiful golden bisque finish. Includes double dresser and
Lilting mirror, 4-drawer chest, bookcase bed.
2 4-Pc. Modern Bedroom Suites $89.95
$109.95 Value


Innerspring bunkies, ladder and guard rail.
Maple Bunk Bed, Complete
$109.95 Value
Good condition
Used Sofa with Matching Chair
$30.00 Value

Used Sofa with Slip Covers
$24.50 Value

With full size innerspring mattress. Converts to
Ideal for reupholstering.
2 Used Sleepers
$29.95 Value
With foam padded seat.
2 Used Sofa Beds
$9.95 Value

Used Sofa, Plastic Cover
$9.95 Value


$89.95



$20.00


$14.00


sleep 2

$19.00



$5.00


$5.00


Good condition.
Used Sofa Bed and Matching Chair $10.00
$19.95 Value


2 Used Platform Rockers
$19.95 Value


$9.95


Used 5-Pc. Chrome Dinette Suite $19.95
$29.95 Value


Used Wooden Table and 5 Chairs
$19.95 Value

Used Walnut Vanity and Mirror
$14.95 Value

Used Walnut Chest of Drawers
$19.00 Value
With Mattresses.
2 Used Single Size Rollaway Beds
$24.50 Value
Innerspring Clean.
2 Used Single Size Mattresses
$24.50 Value

2ox Spring and
Used Single Size Mattresses
$12.95 Value

Used Double Size Box Spring
$14.95 Value


4 Used Double Size Mattresses
$9.95 Value

Used Westinghouse Like NewI
Washer and Dryer both fo
$250.00 Value

Westinghuose Excellent condition.
Used Electric Range
$70.00 Value

Westinghouse
Used Electric Range
$60.00 Value

Modern Maid Full size.
Slightly Used Gas Range
$149.00 Value


Used 30" Gas Range
$60.00 Value


C~vdet M~=~2!AKEYOUR HOUSE
RWANWK R


$9.95


$9.95


$14.95



$19.95


$19.95



$9.00


$9.00



$5.00



or $199.95



$59.00



$49.00



$99.00



$49.00


Open An Account Today!

3 WAYS TO BUY:

Open Account

Easy Payments

Cash


~4ri~s~ig;~-s;b~ 9t~i~a-;~~-lraaQS~*~: jNow"es


IC1 m I---- --- Qe~~seaeu~l~a~


IT'S INVENTORY TIME AT DANLEY'S And at Inventory Time we try to work our stock down in prep-
aration for a new year Danley's is offering these and many more items at reduced prices for this
event. Come in and shop around See the many furniture bargains and make your choice.










*- CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING *

FOR RENT. Two-bedroom housb. FOR RENT: Unfurnished newly
$35.00 month. Also, two -bedreom decorated two bedroom house.
hoube, $45.00 monthly. Both unfur- Carport, laundry and storage. Ph.
I sled. .See. Bill Carr or.phone 227- 227-8536. tfc-10-26
811L fc


FOR RENTTi-nfurnished two bed-
room apartment. 617 Woodward
Ave. $45.00 per month. Call or write
Gene Halleyi,2108 Croydon Dr.; Tal-
lahassee, Offite phone 222-0550, ext.
849,, home .phone, 385-3139. tfc


FOR RENT: Spacious 2-bedroom
(urnished first floor apartment.
12th and Palm Blvd. Phone 227-4481
or 227-4261. ttc-11-30
.FOR RENT.:...Unfurnighed two bed-
room house at 1305 Woodward
Ave., circulating oil heater. $60.00
per month. Call B. C. Gaillard, ph.
227-7396. tfc-11-23


FOR RENT: Downstairs furnished
apartment. Available after first
of year. Phone 227-5771. ttc-12-21
FOR RENT: 2% room, furnished
'garage apartment. Couple prefer--
red. Call 227-5916 at 510 Sixth St. 2


FOR RENT or SALE: 3 bedroom
house. Central heating, hardwood
floors. 813 Marvin Ave. Phone 227-
8321. 5tp-1-4
FOR RENT: Three bedroom house
at St. Joe Beach. Contact Larry
Porter, phone 648-4286. tfc-1-4-
FOR SALE: Used piano, Wurlitzer-


studio upright. Has damp chaser. 600.
Good condition. $295.00. Call 227- 3. 3,aedroom house, 1 bath, car-
3151 or 227-3551. port and 'utility room, on Marvin
Avenue. Pay owner's equity and
FOR SALE: Lots. 3 miles from assume balance of $W,461.56 pay-
Stown. 75' x 110', $500 each. 50' x able at $70.00 per month.
150' $350 each. Special, 79%' x 239' 4. Lots at Douglas Landing foi
only ;-$500. See James Johnson, fish camps and retirement homes.
Joneasville Subdivision. 6tp-11-30 Terms arranged to suit you.
FOR SALE: Acre of land, at Over- 5. Lots to sale at St. Joe Beach
street. Call Union Finance Co. termslok from water. Reasonable
terms.
FOR SALE: One bedroom and two 6. 106 acres at Beacon Hill. Good
bedroom houses in Oak Grove. investment opportunity.
Contact Sam Neel, Ingram Service 7. 320 acres of wfoodland, sib
Station, Carrabelle, Phone 697- miles South of Wewahitchka. Ap
3990. tfc-10-19 proximately 300 acres planted in
4-year old pine ees.
8. New 'three bedroom homes un-
FOR SALE ler construction on Cypress Ave-
aue. $500 down, payments, approxi-
1. 2-bedroom house at Mexico mately $80.00 per montkl. FFA.
Beach on waterfront. 100x143 lot 9. Four lots on Marvin Ave. $660
Fully furnished. Ceramic file bath. each. Terms.
Priced at only $10.975.00. E. TOM PRIDGEON
2. Large frame house, over 2,000 Reg. Real Estate Broker
rt. of floor space on five acres of C. W. Long, Salesman
iand at Kinard, Fla. Priced at $6,- Phone 227-7741 801 Williams Ave,


annual


*


Starts Thursday, Jan. 4


ALL WINTER STOCK REDUCED FROM 25 TO 50 PERCENT


AM Girls All ladies Ladies


DRESSES DRESSES BLOEDUCEDUSES

REDUCED SUITS 9S% REDUCED


40% COATS 133%


ALL LADIES
REDUCED


SWEATERS & SKIRTS 33%


PIECE GOODS 5% Wool
Bates Material, Reg. $1.39 __now 98c yd.
Pampered Cottons, Reg. 89c._ now 69c yd.
Velveeen, Reg. $2.98 -- now $2.00 yd. I

Box BDrapery Cloth Men's Knit Long Sleeve
BLANKETS BLANKETS pes i SIR T S
R c44 ehes Wide
Reg. $12.95 Reg. $8.95 Reg. $1.69 Yd. Reg. $4.00 to $5.95

now $8.00 now $5.95 now 98c yd. now $1.98


All Ladies ALL MEN'S Men's


Winter Shoes W intern SuitS SWEATERS

and

REDUCED TO Sport Coats 33%


/2 PRICE Redced 33% OFF

MenC' dN. 4
l~ e /01


ALL

DRAPERIES
and

CURTAINS

Reduced 25%


SPECIALS *
Boy's Winter Suits 33V %
and Sport Coats ------------OFF

1 Lot Boy's Shirts -------- $1.00
Men's Wash and Wear
COTTON CORD PANTS ------$3.69
1 Lot Men's Jackets -------- $8.95
Ladies' Ballet Hose --------89c Pr.
Ladies' HATS ---------- 3 OFF
BATH TOWELS --------_ 2 for $1.00
1 Lot Men's Short Sleeve
SPORT SHIRTS ---------$1.98
WASH CLOTHS 4 for $1.00
Fieldcrest 81 by 108
Striped SHEETS -------- $2.69
Boy's SWEATERS --------- OFF
Men's WOOL SHIRTS -------$5.00


Men's

Dress Pants

33V3% off
Small Alteration Charge


Men's Corduroy

PANTS
Sizes 28 to 34


33/3% off


All Men's

JACKETS

REDUCED

33Y3%


I II


FOR SALE: 2 bedroom house 1808
*Long Ave.- Garage and utility
room. Call Grady Player, 2?7-3636.
WANTED: Woman' to do ironing
and housework, '.preferably -with
own car.- Inquire at white' house
across 'from Jolly Golf range. Mex-
ico Beach. 2tp-12-28


LPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call
Buford Griffin, Phone 7-7011 for
trlck expert service, tfc
PLANNING TO MOVE? Let us help
you. Free estimates in town or
anywhere in the USA.. W erepre-
sent MAYFLOWER, nationwide
movers. Experienced and qualified
SURPLUS SALES of ST. JOE, 112
Monument Ave. Phone 227-4051.
WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION. Meet-
Inc first, and third T'u es day
nIghts, 8:00 p.m. American Legion
Home. '
.AWN MOWER FOR RENT: $1.00
hour. Cut your lawn and let me
worry with upkeep of mower. Gulf
f.t -- A P-_ *T .- m 1in


FOR SALE
Three bedroom house witt
breezeway, garage and oak'floors
On 90x165 ft. lot on Garrison Ave
To sell for only $350. down -plus
closing cost. Balance on FHA loan
Two bedroom masonry house or
Marvin Ave. Total cost only $6,800
Terms.
Have an old house on Seventt
Street located on two very nice
lots. Can sell for only $5,000. The
lots alone are worth half the price
New three bedroom house on Mc
Clellan Ave. Only $10,000. Terms.
Two bedroom house with 150 ft
well in White City. Can sell for
small down payment and 'balance
like rent. -
FRANK HANNON
Registered Real Estate Broker
221 Reid Ave. Ph. 227-3491

FOR 'RENT OR SALE: Furnished
2 bedroom brick home, 1031 Long
Ave. Also two' story, two bedroom
stucco home, 1508 Long Ave. Phone
648-4128, J. A. Mira.
PERSONALIZED rubber stamps.
One day service. J. A. Blackwell,
phone 227-8476. 4td-12-28
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom house, 1
acres land at Overstreet. Phone
648-3333 or 227-7201. 2tc-1-4
LOTS FOR SALE: In Oak Grove.
$25.00 down, $25.00 per mo. Phone
227-3201 or contact Tomlinson Ab-
stract Co. 8tc-1-4
FOR SALE: Acreage on Willis
Landing road. Three-quarters
mile South of Hiway 71. Sed Ted
Cumbie, Phone 639-2396, Wewahit-
chka. 3tp-1- 4
,FOR SALE:'3 bedroom perma-
stone house; $8,500. -Insulated,
less than-5 yrs. old. tile floors, cyp-
ress paneled kitchen, living room,
dining' roim. and hall, venetian
blinds,, 1-ton air conditioner and
Prigid'aire stove. Built in kitchen
cabinets; carport and utility room,
tree shaded lot,. chain -link fence,
lot 90x135. See at 621 Maddox St.,
Oak Grove, Phone 227-7053, Frank
J. Zelichowski. 4tc-1-4
INCOME TAX SERVICE: Call 64S-
4436 after 5:00 p.m. Mr. and Mrs.
Chuck Gibson. 13tp-1-4
HELP WANTED: Lady with gen-
eral sales background, neat in
appearance, interested in perman-
ent position, willing to work. Reply
in own handwriting giving full par-
ticulars on self and considered
starting salary. Answer P. 0. Box
308 Pdort St. Joe. tfc-1-4
MRS.. HOUSEWIFE. If youi have
*sp,r-r time. If, you need extra
money, you can earn ri.ur in your
fneiChbOrhoo-d .showing fine -Avon
Products. Write AVON Box 3103,
MS S, Tallahassee,'.-Fla.. 2ct-1-4
THERE WILL, BE a regular com-
munication of Pirt St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F. & A. M. every first and
third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.


ROY L. BURCH, 'W. M.
'ROY K. BLACKSHEAR, Sec
All Master Masons cordially invited


Employment Is
Climbing In Florida

TALLAHAS SEE-Season-al Flor-
ida employment continued its up-
ward push in November and unem-
ployment dropped for the fourth
straight'.month.
State Industrial Coninis4sionr
Chairman A. Worley Brown said
employment rose 28,800 over Octo-
ber to total 1,337,900 in November.
Fhat was 22,1.00 above November
1960.
Brown said unemployment drop-
ped 4,600 from October to 107,900
in November. But it was 15,300
above a year ago.
*Contributing to the brightening
seasonal employment p i c t u re,
Brown said, were extensive hirings
in citrus processing plants, expan-
sion in retail outlets in response

all others having or claiming any right,
title or interest in property to, be affected
by the issuance by the City of Port St. Joe,
FiRrida, of Hospital Revenue Bonds of 1961,
hereinafter more particularly described, or
to be affected ;rn -. ,i ,-. t.,. ,: here-
by.required t. .. 1, :t..: h,,- circuit
Court of'Gulf .'.-- ,!, ri'-ij. .. Four-
teenth Judicial Ci.r.ur ..-f ijt i6. -re the
City Hall in :'."r, er ... i.:.,.i ':.r, the
29th day of Janual. '_. :, ar 1, ,,,
o'clock A .T ,'ri d : ., .:- "\yI te
prayers Iof tih p,._ rc.a { ,,l ,I n a i, i b..- .
proceeding P,.. i- ..[.I r I. '"M-i. l r.,rj rh,
$40,000.00 Hospital' I-..1 ,,- ,:.! 1 -..1
therein described and the proceedings here-
tofore had authorizing the issuance thereof
validated and confirmed, such :bonds -being
dated December 1, 1961, maturing serially
on December of each of the years 1976 to
1978, both inclusive, bearing interest, pay-
able semi-annually (June 1 and December
1) at such rate' or rates not exceeding the
legal rate, a more particular description of
said bonds being contained in the Petition
filed in this proceeding.
DONE AND ORDERED at Wewahitchka,
Gulf County, Florida this the ard day of
January, 1962.
/s/ W. L. FITZPATRICK
Judge of the Circuit Court of the
Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of
Florida in and for Gulf County.
4t-1-4


NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING
of Members of Citizens Federal Savings and
Loar Association of Port St. Joe.
The annual meeting of members of Citi-
zens Federal Savings and Loan. Association
of Port St. Joe will be held Wednesday,
January 17, 1962, at 2:00 P.M., EST, in
the office of the Association at 401 Fifth
Street, Port St. Joe, Florida, for the pur-
pose of electing Directors for the ensuing
term, and to transact any other business
which may legally come before said meeting.
Signed: 0. J. STEVENS, Jr.
Manager
Citizens Federal will close for business
at 12:00 P.M. on Wednesday, January 17,
1962 in order to hold annual meeting of
members.


to the holiday season, and the hiir-
ing of more workers in service es-
tablishments preparing for' the
winter tourist season.
On a long term basis, Brown
said, Florida will gain "'," jobs
ina 1962 -over 1961.
He estimated the -state's average
monthly employment for 1961 'at
1,320,000. He predicted an average
o. 1,400,000 for 1962 basel on Flor-
ida's ten year employment growth
aud -anticipated business, improve-
ments in 1962.
Although Brown pointed out thai.
November was the fourth, straight
month that unemployment dropped,
he warned that the seasonal influx
-of out-of-state job seekers during
the remainder of the winter and
early spring could block any great
decline in unemployment.
All major business and industrial
icategor.|es shoved emnployinent
gains in November over October.
Trade gained 12,700 to 3671400:
manufacturing, 7,300 to 21,I001);
service and miscellaneous, 4.9b1) 1to
213,500; government, 1,900 to' 232.-
000; construction, 1,06O to 11 ,l90i;
and transportation-communicationsr
public utilities, 900 tp 99,300.

Vet Officer to Visit -

Veterans of Gulf County who
need assistance in obtaining pe-
fits under the GI Bill, may receive
guidance from Jim Weant, Aq4t-
ant .State Service Officer.
Weant will visit this area 'next
week for the purpose of, helping
veterans or their 'dependents in
filing claims for Compensation
Benefits or solving their insurance
problems. This free service includes
assistance to employers of veterans
under the GI Bill, Vocational Train-
ing, Subsistence or other problems.
During his visit in this area,
Weant may be contacted, at the
Port St. Joe City Hall from 8:00 to
9:00 a.m., Friday, January 12.,..


WCFD Auxiliary Meets

Members of the White City Vol-
umiteer Fire Department Auxiliary


erv.ice oLaLi, u y n. min- held their Christmas party at the
son, Phone 7-7501. IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT, held their Ch mas party at the
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN home of Mrs. Robert Heacock on
.R. A. M.-Regular convocation ot PROBATE. December 20.
.-St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A. IN RE: Estate of
. 2nd d4h nda. Al v MANNING BRYANT SMITH, During the short business meet-
ing brothers welcome. THE STATE OF FLORIDA ing 'the present officers were una-
John H. Dickey, High Priest TO. DONALD W. SMITH, whose address is nimously elected to serve for 1962.
674 Riverside Terrace, Orangeburg, South
Joel Lovett, S.ecretary Carolina. After the gift exchange, games
You are hereby notified that a petition
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, I. 0. has been filed in said Court praying for the were played with prizes being pre.
0. F.-Meets second and fourth appointment of Tom Fleming Smithas Ad-the winners.
T ministrator of the above estate and you scented to the winners.
Thursday, 8:00 p.m. in American are hereby required to file your written de- Deliciously festive refreshments
Legion Hall. All members urged to senses thereto within forty (40) days after
attend. ,.,irst publication and posting hereof. were served by the hostesses: Mrs.
Noble Grand: Emmett Daniell Shouldyou fail therein, decree will be en- Heacock and Mrs. Raymond High-
tered in due course upon said petition.
Secretary: J. C. Martin. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said tower.
I Court at Wewahitchka, Gulf County, Flor- I
FOR SALE: 3 bedrooni'huse with ida, this 19th day of December, A. D. 191. A most enjoyable time was -had
den, separate dining room, cen- County Judge 4t-12-2
tral heating, carpet and new blinds I. --- --- .--- --
included. Large tree shaded cor-
ner lot. 1301 Woodward. Phone I -
227-3751. tfc-8-24 i -* ^ a N -" I"- 7 "


IN THE' CIRCUIT COURT, FOUR-
TEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN CHANCERY
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, a )
municipality in the County of
Gulf, State of Florida, )
Petitioner, )
STATE OF FLORIDA, and the Tax- )
payers, Property Owners and )
Citizens of the Cit- of Port St. Joe, )
including non-residents owning )
property or subject to taxation )
therein, )
S Resn AIents. )
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
TO THE STATE OF FLORIDA AND THE
SEVERAL I'ROPERTY OWNERS, TAX-
PAYERS AND CITIZENS OF THE STATE
OF FLORIDA AND OF THE CITY OF PORT
Sr. JOE, FLORIDA, INCLUDING NON-
RESIDENTS OWNING PROPERTY OR SUB-
JECT TO TAXATION THEREIN, AND ALL
OTHERS HAVING OR CLAIMING ANY
RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN PROPER-
TY TO BE AFFECTED BY THE -ISSUANCE
BY THE CITY OF PORT ST JOE, FLOR-
IDA OF THE HOSPITAL REVENUE BONDS
(U' Y'.6l,, ;EIcElN.\FTER MORE PARTIC-
ULARLY DESCRIBED, OR TO BE AFFECT-
ED IN ANY WAY THEREBY:
You and each of. you, the State of Flor-
ida, through the State Attorney of the
Fourteenth Judicial -Circuit in and for Gulf
County, Florida and the several property
owners, taxpayers, citizens of the State of
Florida and of the City of Port St. Joe,
Florida, including non-residents owning
property or subject to taxation therein, and


O UllflltllUIn aLnlllll



Jaycee Distinguished Service Award

Name Date of birth...........

Address

City .....-... .... State

Sponsor .--...-

Mail Nominations To

JAYCEE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD

Postoffice Box 308
Port St. Joe, Florida


le


Al Boys

JACKETS

REDUCED

33Y3%


OCC-UR TO NOC41AALLY
S 'GOOD" RlvFERs.
AVOYD) CAREESSNESS...
-. ~ gm ,,'Cl?:'r BE AN
0'LIBS-RT',MU7hAL IS;11--,,--


~ a~- I


~ie~nsrp ~rmc~sl~C~


Men's Type No. 4
Army Twill

Work Pants

$2.98
SHIRTS -- $2.69