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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01342
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: August 17, 1961
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01342

Full Text








PER COPY


THE:STAR


. MONEY TALKS-Let'a kee;
It where we can speak with It
once In a while-Trade with
your home town merchantal


"Port St. Joe-The Outlet. Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"
-WE4NTY-FOURTH YEAR PORT ST. JOE, FLORIBA THURSDAY AUGUST 17, 1961 NUMBER 47


Hospital


CEREMONIES SCHEDULED TO BEGIN

SUNDAY, AUGUST 20 AT 2:30 P.M.

Port St. Joe will formally dedicate its new enlarged hos-
pital Sunday afternoon at 2:30 p.m. on the front steps of the
institution.
City Commissioner Frank Hannon will act as Master of
Ceremonies. Guest speaker for the affair will be Congress-
man Bob Sikes, who was instrumental in securing the federal
funds for the expansion.


Appearing on the program will
be the Port .St. Joe High School
Band playnig the National Anthem,
Rev. John Carmichael who will give
the invocation, A. W. Fowhand of
the'Florida Development Commis-
sion, Mel Snead of Florida Blue
Cross, M iss Barbara Sharit'who will
cut .the ribbon officially opening
the houspit-al and Rev.. 0. Byron
Smith who will pronounce the
ibenediction.
SPlatfonn guests will include the
Port St. Joe City Commission, Ma-
yor J. L. Sharit and Commissioners
I. C. Nedley, I. W. Duren, Frank
Hannon and John R. Smith, R. W.
Henderson', city auditor and clerk,
Cecil G. Costin, Jr., city attorney
and Miss Minerva McLane, hospi-
tal administrator. The Hospital
medical 'staff includes J. W. Hen-
drix, M.D., Chief; H. B. Canning,
M.D., J. P. Hendrix, M.D., W. F.
Wager, M.D., T. 0. Williams, M.
D. and Robert King, D.D.S.
STARTED IN 1939
Port St. Joe's ,present hospital
has been 22 years in the making.
In August, 1939, the City Com-
mission then composed of J. L.
Sharit, B. A. Pridgeon and B. W.
. .E'ils, JSr., first started work on
securing 'a hospital for Port St.
Joe. In 1940 the Board met with a
Robert "Hauser, WPA superinten-
dent to try and secure WPA funds
and work for the hospital. Work
was finally begun in 1940, but had
an allocation of only $57,000.00
This work went along sparodic-
ally 'until a citizens committee com-
posed of C. C. Wilson, J. E. Bounds,
Harold C. Palmer, W. G. Alsip,
George M. Johnson, Mrs. B. E.
Kenney, Sr., B. A. Pridgeon, Brown-
ie Carter, B. L. Kelly, Dr. A. L.
Ward, M. P. Treadwell, L. E. Rob-
ertson, Mrs. Elizabeth Tomlinson,
Dr. L. H. Bartee, Dr. J. R.- Norton
and Dr. J. C. Coe was selected 'to


complete the building. The remain-
der of the money was 'used for fur-
nishing, equipping, legal fees, ar-
chitects fees, etc.
'On Novmeber 14, 1943, the Port
St. Joe Municipal Hospital opened
its doors to thenpublic after some
four years of planning and. build-
ing. It had its first patient two days
(Cbntinued. On Page 4)


City To Levy Taxes On
$9,880,739 Valuation

The Port St. Joe City Com-
mission sat as a tax equalization
board Tuesday night from 7:00
to 8:00 p.m. with no arguments
brought before them about in-
equities in valuation. Apparently
everyone was. satisfied.
According to City Auditor and
Clerk, R. W. Henderson, the city
will levy taxes on $9,880,739.00 in.
real and personal property this
year. This is an increase of $210,-
540.00 over last year, most of
which is due to additional tax-
able property being placed on the
rolls by improvements during the
past year.
Clerk Henderson reported a to-
tal valuation on the books (in-
cluding homestead exempt and
exempt property) of $12,249,129.
The City Commission will now
begin the task of Working up a
budget and setting millage for
the coming year.


Cypress Avenue Residents Air Problems

At City Commission Meeting Tuesday

Residents of Cyprses Avenue ap- streets and :that the City could re-
peared before the City Commis- fuse the contractor any further
sion Tuesday nigh* with a multi- building permits untill the street is
*tude of problems they wished to fixed.
discuss concerning their area of It was pointed out that the city

the city. requires no specifications for con-


Problem number one concerned
street lighting. At its last meeting
the Board voted to put street lights
in the Cypress Avenue area. Upon
inspecting the area, Florida Power
people recommended that a light
be placed in the middle of the block
as well 'at the corners of the street.
Since the block is unusually long,
the Commission voted to go along
with the Power Company sugges-
tion.
But the people of Cypress didn't
want this many lights.
All the residents of the street
signed a prepared statement to the
City Board asking that the lights
.be installed only at the corners.
The Board voted to go along with
the request.
Problem number two arose from
paving on the street. Residents in
the 'block claim their paving is be-
ing disintegrated. Since the price
of their homes and property includ-
ed a sum of money to pay for the
paving, the residents of the block


struction of city streets by private
contractors. Attorney Costin was
instructed to draw up such speci-
fications for 'an ordinance iby the
Board.
In other action, 'the board was
presented a request by Panama
City wrestling promoter Frank
Pericola to rent the Centennial
Building or the .baseball park for
wrestling 'programs in the city.
Perciola said -he was trying to
obtain a -sponsor for the local pro-
grams. The Board instructed Peri-
cola to secure his sponsor, and the
Board would work out arrange-
ments with the sponsor.

'Park Is Named After
George A. Patton Family
The City Board of Commission-
ers adopted a resolution Tuesday
naming the ,park adjacent to the
Municipal Hospital "Patton Park"
in honor of 'the George A. Pattons.
The Pattons were early residents


Dedication Is


School Opening

Set for Monday,

August 28th

The Gulf County Schools wil
open for the 1961-62 school yea:
on August 28. The 'school busel
will run :the regularly assigned
routes at the usual time.
Port St. Joe High School will
start the day at 8:35 a.m. At 8:35
all pupils will meet in the gymn'a
stum for home room assignments
A full 'day of work is scheduled and
lunch will be served in the lunch
room. Port .St. Joe High School
will end the .school day 'at 3:48 p.m.
All pupils who will be classified
as :transfers (pupils who were not
in attendance in either the Port
St. Joe High School, the Port bt.
Joe Elementary School-or the High
land View Elementary School at
the end of last school year) are
urged -to come to the office of the
principal and register some time.
during the week 'of August 21 and
August 25.
Registering for the first time in
a school has become quite a
lengthy procedure, therefore we
will not have time to register trans-
fers on August 28. It is very desir-
able that either one or both par-
ents accompnay a transfer pupil
who is registering for the first time
-as there are several forms that the
parent has to sign before the pupil
is fully registered.


H. View School

Registration Set

'School begins Monday, August 28
at 8:30 a.m. 'at the Highlani View
Elementary 'School, according to,
Harry -Herrington, Principal. All
boys and girls who have not attend-
ed this school should register be-
fore thiate.
Parents of first 'and second grad-
ers are requestedd to come in on
Wednesday, August 23 from .8:330
a.m. until 3:00 p.m. to pay the cost
of all materials not covered by
state and' county. They are request-
ed to pay lunches for one week in
advance. Lunches will cost 30c a
day and 'three cents for 'mid-morn-
ing milk, if desired. This is to give
the teachers an .opportunity 'to car-
ry on a ,regular day, in the class-
room on the following Monday.
Any child that plans to attend
the Highland View Elementary
.School 'that was not enrolled there
the previous year, must be regis-
tered before Monday morning, Au-
gust 28. Those arriving late, may
register from 1:30 p.m. until 3:30
p.m. Monday or other days there-
after. They will begin classroom
work the next .day. Your coopera-
tion in 'these -requests will greatly
facilitate your child's early adjust-
ment and progress in school.
Remember all first graders must
have a physical examination before


REV. DICKY WRIGHT


Youth Activities
Week Underway

The youth of the First Methodist
Church cordially invites you the
public to attend the Youth Activi-
ties Week to be held August 13-18.
The theme for the week is, "Be ye
doers--not hearers only", James
1:22. It promises tn be a week of
Christian fellowship, recreation,
discussion and' challenging mes-
sages.
The guest evangelist will be the
Rev. Dicky, Wright, Who is a very
dedicated young man with 'a mes..
sage for:-.all ages. Dicky has been
preaching in youth revivals and
youth activities weeks throughout
the South for the past two years.
He comes to Port St. Joe from the
Gadsden iStreet Methodist Church
in Pensacola. Dicky is a senior in
Asbury College where he is study-
ing for 'the Methodist ministry. You
will be glad that you heard the
messages that he will ,bring each
night .during the week.
The schedule for the week of ac-
tivities will be as follows: Monday


Houston Natural Gas Company Is

Permitted To Give Port St. Joe Gas

The Federal Power Commission in Washington, D. C.
this week granted permission to the Houston Texas Natural
Qas Corporation to extend natural gas service to Port St. Joe
and the Michigan Chemical Corporation.
Last year a natural feeder line


was constructed to the Michigan
Chemical Corporation plant near
Port St. Joe on a temporary per-
mit issued by the FPC. Assurance
was given at that time that every-
thing possible would be done to
secure a permanent permit for the
line.
Houston Corporation recently
contracted with a Louisiana natur-
al gas concern to furnish 93 mil-
lion cubic feet of gas a day to the
Texas company's line serving all
of Florida for expansion of its dis-
tribution system.


beginning now. Since citizens
would be reluctant to change heat-
ing methods in mid-winter, com-
pletion of the system is being plan-
ned for the .Spring, which will give
all of next summer to change over
systems.
Cositin told 'lhe Star Tuesday
that ;by next week figures should
be available on the cost of local
stock and the number of shares to
be sold.

Two-Phase Dove


According to Cecil G. Costin, Jr., S eson Is Set


spokesman 'for the St. Joe Natural
Gas Corporation, which has a fran-
chise to operate in Port St. Joe, the
Houston Corporation will begin
work in just a few weeks to bring
their transmission line to the Port
St. Joe city limits, where the St.
Joe Corporation's operating boun-
daries begin. The St. Joe Corpor-
ation can furnish natural, gas for-
bui.ines and residential use oa'-
Mayufacturing -plants ohn those iine
will'tibe serviced 'by the Houston
Corporation directly.
'Costin is now in (Jacksonville
meeting with financial agents to
prepare financial arrangements ,for
construction of the local distribu-
tion pipeline system. While in Jack-
sonville, Costin will secure direc-
tions for offering a local stock fi-
nancing arrangement in which the
St. Joe Corporation plans to sell
stock in the utility to 'those local


TALLAHASSEE Florida 'hunt-
ers will have 'a two-phase season
for migratory dove hunting during
the 1961-62 season: the first phase
with 23 consecutive half-days, and
the .second phase with 47 half-
days of hunting, according to A.
D. Al'drich, director, Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission.
Flori'dC'. two-phase dove season
'I '' io. The first phase op-
*aD OCtcber 7 through October 29,
with Hardee, DeSoto, Glades, Okee-
chobee, Indian River, St. Lucie and
that ,portion of Franklin County
known as Alligator Point closed to
dove hunting. The second phase
opens statewide November 23 to
run through January 8. Shooting
will be 'allowed from 12:00 noon
until sunset of each open day.
Daily bag limit for dove will be 12,
with a possession limit of two


through Friday, Supper 6:30-7:30; people who wish to purchase it. All days bag.
Discussion, 7:15-8:00; Worship, money possible for construction of Other rules for migratory game
8:00-9:00; Recreation, 9:'00-until. 'the .system will be raised in this during the 1961-62 season are as
-- manner, with the -difference needed follows: rail and gallinule, Sep-
Lions Club To Fete fi',anced by bonds. tember 23 through November 26,
Boys Baseball Club Gas will not be available this with a -daily bag of 15 plus 25
winter Costin said. Plans now call'sora rail; woodcock season,, Decem-
The Port 'St. Joe Lion's Club for construction to begin on =a lo- ber 16 through January 14, with
will entertain 'their Lions Club cal distribution system late this, a daily 'bag of four; snipe hunting
sponsored Little Boys Baseball year with service to begin to Port season, December 16 through Jan-
team with a barbecue chicken sup- St. Joe homeowners and business' uary 14, with a daily bag of eight.
,per tonight 'at Frank's Barbecue' next .spring. Costin said this delay Waterfowl hunting seasons-for
Ranch. A baseball program is be- is planned. .Since the approval of duck, geese and coot-will be an-
ing arranged for the boys which the FPC came so late in the sum- nounced later when finally estab-
will include a world series movie mer, it would be mid-winter before lished by the U. S. Bureau of
and a short talk on baseball. the system could be constructed Sport Fisheries and Wildlife.



Attend Student Council Meet


being accepted in school.
The annual Florida Association
Post Office Extends. of Studnt Councils Workshop was
held on the FSU campus in Talla-
.* hassee August 6-11. The 88 stu-
eliVery Service dents present divided into four
hypothetical student councils, each
Postmaster Chauncey Costin an- with a particular situation and gen-
nounced today that the Post Of- eral size 'and location. Then they
fice Department 'has approved ex- chose names, colors, mascots, yells


secure private nations from the are concerned over the state of in Port 'St. Joe and were very ac- tension of mail 'delivery service to
City's citizens. their street. The group headed by tive in civic affairs in earlier Port Juniper Avenue between 19th and
Work stopped during 1940 until Joe Parrott who acted as spokes- St. Joe. 20th Streets, 'and to Cypress Avb-
.September, 1941. Apparently it was man, asked the Commission who The park will be dedicated .Sun- nue between 19th and 20th Streets.
about this time that the WPA was was responsible for necessary re- day 'afternoon at 2:15 just prior to Patrons in the area included in
disbanded. pairs on 'the street. the dedication of the Municipal the extension who desire home de-
But even with this setback, the Acting Mayor I. C. Nedley offer- Hospital, livery of mail will be required to
citizens of the City were determin- ed the observation that as far as Mrs. George A. Patton, now of erect 'house numbers and provide
'ed to have a hospital 'and appeared he 'knew, the streets had never Jacksonville, will be on 'hand for an approved mail recepticle before
before the Commission in Septem- been deeded to the city and there- the dedciation. Commissioner John mail can be delivered, also a local
hber, 1941, asking that the project fore was the responsibility of 'the Robert Smith will act as master change of address should be filed
be continued. The Board 'then re- contractor (the contractor had the of ceremonies. with the post office indicating de-
quested $25,000 from the Federal paving done). City Attorney Cecil sire to receive mail through home
Government for the .project but G. Costin, Jr., backed up Nedley's POSTMASTER COSTIN delivery.
never received the money. Local supposition, but stated that the ATTENDS DISTRICT MEET Patrons who are in doubt as to
citizen's and local industry then city still had a certain obligation Postmaster Chauncey Costin at- their house number should call
began to pool their money for the to those living on 'the street. tended a meeting of the First Dis- the City Hall.
job to continue. The Board decided to ask Com- trict Postmasters at Highland Costin stated that this extension
CONTRACT LET IN 1942 missioners Frank Hannon and John Hammock State Park near Sebring is indicative of the steady growth
Finally in 1942, after raising Robert Smith to contact the con- on Sunday afternoon. Costin is of Port St. Joe and that other areas
some local money, the City was tractor in order to have him cor- State President of the Postmas- are near eligible and will be tak-
able to obtain a Federal grant for rect the paving work. Costin stated ters' Association and was accom- en in as soon as they meet the
$42,945 to go on with the project, that since the city is responsible panied by the State Vice-President, minimum requirements.
Albritton Williams Construction for streetss after acceptance th)e Sec.-Treas. and Editor of the Gator Mail service to the area will be-
Company was sired for $32,704 to contractor should 'still repair the Postmaster. gin on Monday, August 21.


and songs, all derived from their fe
individual situation.,
Delegates attending from Port
St. Joe were Richard Thompson,
president; Johnny Chafin, vice-
president and Sandra Baxley.
;Sandra was a member of Coun-
cil "A", which chose the name "Ar-
hogerqua". Johnny was 'a member
of Council "C", 'Colair Heights".
Richard was elected treasurer of
Council "B", "Citrus Lake".
The theme of the workshop was -'
"learning today, leading tomorrow" .
and the students learned a great
deal from the lectures by Dr. -
George Mathes from Denver, Colo., '
as well as the problem assignments
in the councils.' .
The next trip for the Student : .
Council will be in October to the i .B
Northwest Florida Association of
Student Councils Convention in COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES-Representing Port .St. Joe at a re-
Madison,. Port St. Joe will preside cent Student Council area workshop in Tallahassee are, left to
over that meeting. right, Sandra Baxley, Richard Thompson and Johnny Chafin.


Set


New


FPC Grants Permission




For Natural Gas Extension








Sidraped utith gartLnds at -o-hern
Miss Ray Lapeyrouse Becomes Bride idrad" ur h
arch. Two floor baskets of white
Of e e Kem Saturday, Auus 12 'gladiolus, two seven branched can-
Of Geore D KemD Saturday, August 12 'delabra holding burning white tap-


%F a --^ ------1.- '

Miss Ray Dapeyrouse became Jun.lus A. Lapeyrouse of Panama
the bride of George D. Kemp, Jr., City, the bride wore a novelty wo-
at the Long Avenue Baptist Church ven jacket dress of white cotton
August 12 at 10:00 a.m. with the with a small bandeaux and a short


families and a small group of
friends present. She is the daugh-
ter of Mrs. E. P. Lapeyrouse and
the late Mr. Lapeyrouse.
The groom is the son of Mrs.
George D. Kemp 'and the late Mr.
Kemp.
Mrs. Martin L. Britt, Jr., played
the traditional wedding music be-
fore and during the candlelight
ceremony. The double ring cere-
mony was performed by Rev. J. C.
Odum.
Given in .marriage by her uncle,


veil. She carried a colonial bouquet
of feathreed white carnations and
tuberoses, interspersed with tufts
of baby blue net, pearl hearts, lilies
of the valley and blue satin ribbon
streamers. Her only ornament was
a blue necklace.
The sanctuary of the church was
beautiful with a background of na-
tive foliage. A white metal lace
arch was entwined with southern
smilax and centered with a large
areca palm behind the choir rail,
which was covered with white and


ers, and four areca palms flanked
the arch. White satin bows marked
'the family pews.
' The bride's only attendant was
her sister, Miss Jo Ann Lapeyrouse,
who wore a novelty dress of pink
cotton with matching accessories.
She carried a nosegay of pink car-
nations, pink net and satin ribbon
streamers.
Marvin Cross, brother-in-law of
the groom, served as best man.
Charles Lapeyrouse of Houma, La.,
a cousin of the bride was usher.
A reception was held in the social
hall of the church following the
ceremony. The bride's table was
covered with blue linen, overlaid
with a full gathered floor length


U- e" ~ I ~ in .I a~


PI alb


for the Ivy Man


CURLEE and SEWELL

HANDSOME NEW SPORT JACKETS -
Necessary addition to any man-about-campus .
wardrobe, our all-wool natural shoulder sport '.
jackets in popular patterns; with flap pockets
and center vent.


[il


A MAN'S

BEST

FRIEND .


IS HIS SWEATER!

McGREGOR and TRUVAL

You'll wear our smart and
colorful cardigans and
pullovers everywhere!
Priced from $9.95


DICKIES

COTTON CORDUROY SLACKS
They're slim and trim, comfortable too;
just the thing for school. Adjustable
waist. Newest fall colors. See our new

COTTON CORDS $6.95

These styles will be seen on every campus
across the nation this fall See them
now at .


MEN'S & BOYS' WEAR

PORT ST. JOE'S ONLY EXCLUSIVE MEN'S STORE


oloth O1 Sheo itt Orgatdy ed. ^
ed with tiny ruffles. A beautiful S o er Honors
three tier wedding cake, embossed
with white icing roses, the tiers YVOnne Davis
were divided by white swan pillars
and was topped with the traditional
bride and groom, under a heart Miss Yvonne Davis, August bride-
shaped arch of roses, was -centered elect was honored Saturday eve-
no the table. In a double ruffle of ning when Mesdames Rudolph Pip-
blue net, arrangements of blue pin, Jean Stanley, Lutrelle McLe-
tinted carnations and net in triple more, Carolyn Watson, Audrey Grif-
branched crystal candelabra hold- fin and Miss 'Sara Johnson enter-
ing burning white candles were on trained with a miscellaneous calling
.either .side. A cluster of white wed- shower in the Pippin home at Dal-
ding bells, smilax and lilies of the keith-.
Talley formed the .background for The refreshment table, overlaid
this table. with a white lace cloth over pink


An identical table held a large
crystal punch bowl on -a tray dec-
orated with clematis and blue net
with trays of dainty sandwiches
'and crystal candelabra on either
side.
The registration table was cov-
ered with white damask and held
'the bride's book and crystal trays
of blue net rice bags.
Assisting at the reception were
Mrs. Leonard Belin, Mrs. Wayne
Hendrix, Mrs. Sue Spaulding, Mrs.
Wilbur Smith, Misses Shelley and
Christie Coldewey, Ann Belin, El-
len Scisson, Becky, Holly -and Judy
Hendrix.


THE STAA, ~ort St. J., Pla.


tHUftD~AY AtJWUeT 17, 1061


FIRST BAPTIST WMU 8. The birth occurred in the Bay
WILL MEET NEXT MONDAY Memorial Hospital of Panama City.
The First Baptist Church Wo-
man's Missionayr Union, Society Attend FSU Graduation


Number One, will meet in circles
Monday, August 21 at 3:00 -p.m. in
the following homes.
Circle 1, Mrs. Richard Saunders.
-Circle 2, Mrs. H. F. Ayers.
Circle 3, Mrs. S. D. Spears.
Circle 4, Mrs. Grady Keels.
Circle 5, Mrs. Virginia Arnold.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT


Mr. and Mrs. Richard Dawson
and Bobby Ward attended gradua-
tion exercises at FSU last Satur-
day afternoon when William L.
Dawson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Daw-
son, received his diploma in grad-
uation exercises.

Return From Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. Gannon Buzzett and


linen was centered with a crystal Mr. and Mrs. Robert He Miller family returned
a


,punch bowl encircled with lilac
asters 'and fern. Crystal plates
'holding bridal cookies and silver
compotes of nuts and mints com-
pleted the setting. Mrs. McLemore
assisted by Mrs. Watson and Miss
Johnson served.
The honoree was lovely in a
white embroidered cotton satin
sheath. She wore a corsage of lav-
ender asters presented by the
hostesses,.
Mrs. Davis, the bride-elects' mo-
ther and Mrs. Rollins the groom-
elects' mother were 'also presented
corsages.
Mrs. Dorothy Pippin kept the
bride's book.


Among the out of town guests The bride-elect was presented a
for -the occasion were Charles Es- set of ovenware dishes by the hos-
tridge, Mrs. George Estridge of tesses. Approximately 1-00 guest
Wewahitchka, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. called or sent gifts during the 'ap-
Lapeyrouse of Panama City, Mr.' pointed hours.
and Mrs. L. E. Lapeyrouse an] son Miss Davis will become the bride
Charles of Houma, La., David Lap- of James Rollins, Saturday, Au-
eyrouse of Atlanta, Ga., Mr. and gust 26, at 4:00 ip.m. .in the Honey-
Mrs. L. L. Lapeyrouse of Mobile, ville Methodist Church.
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Lapeyrouse and __
sons, Steve, Mike -and John of Mo-
bile, La.
p -ers are availeale at either the


Mr. and Mrs. Jack Young Pursi-
full of 1616 Long Avenue announce
the birth of a baby girl on August
12.

Mr. and Mrs. Waylon Graham of
803 Woodward Avenue announce
the birth of a daughter, Lynda Di.-
anne on August 9.
0*4. .* 41
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Monrow
Burket, 622 Madison St., Oak Grove
annuonce the birth of a son, Don-
'ald Willard on August 13.-
.*> *. .*..
All births occurred at the
'Port St. Joe Municipal Hospital.


Rosenwald J. C.

Opens August 28

Rosenwald Junior College will
begin fall semester activities Au-
gust 28 at 4:00 ipm. with orienta-
tion for new students, C. C. Wash-
ington, college president, announ-
ces.
"All admission papers must be
in before :the student can register"
he said.
The enrollment ,papers include
application for admission, health
certificate, affidavit of residence
and a high school or other college
transcript .of past work. These -pa-


Rosenwald High School office or
the Rosenwald Junior College of-
fice. They may ibe secured upon
request by letter or telephone or
by calling at the office in person.
A few .scholarships which are
furnished by local churches, .social
clubs and professional groups are
availaJble. Interested persons amay
apply to the president of the col-
lege.

On Vacation Trip
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sutton and
children left .Saturday for a vaca-
tion trip camping in the Smoky.
Mountains.

Off On Camping Trip
The Wayne Buttram family left
Tuesday for a week's camping trip
in North Georgia.



Kindergarten

HAPPYLAND
Mrs. Charles Brown
Mrs. Helen Kilbourn

305 6th Street
'Phone 227-4511

REGISTRATION

August 26
OPEN

August 28


VISIT

MEXICO BEACH LAUNDERETTE


Fluff Fold


Coin Machines


Behind the Shopping Center Playground for Children


-~ -,s, s


COMPLETE PHOTO SERVICE

FAST QUALITY ROLL FILM SERVICE


* PORTRAIT


* MOVIl FILM


of Port St. Joe announce 'the -birth ,vacation trip spent in Tennessee
of a son, Gregory ;Scott on August and Kentucky.

TELEPHONE: BAll 7-4191
09OPEN DAILY. 2:45 P..
SATURDAY, 12:05 P.M.


FRIDAY and SATURDAY

"PETRIFIED WORLD"


"TEENAGE ZOMBIES"


SUNDAY, MONDAY and TUESDAY







KING OF 'HIl
*?XIA I








TECHNICOLORL
KARL MALDEN
KATY JURADO


WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY and FRIDAY


AMAZING ATOMIC AGE ADVENTURE




COLORby0L


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First Area Showing


OF +


* COMMERCIAL


* BLACK and WHITE


* COLOR


LYNART STUDIO


104 Bayview Drive


Phone 7-8681


Highland View, Fla.


NEED A PLUMBER?

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Plumbing installation -- Repairs
Contract Work .t Specialty
Agents for
Brand Name Plumbing Fixtures
-CALL US FOR FREE ESTIMATE-


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TWO EXPERIENCED PLUMBERS TO SERVE YOU
1107 GARRISON AVE. PHONE BAll 7-2541


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Founded 1911 0 Home Office, Jacksonville, Florida /, .<


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APALACHIOOLA, FLORIDA


AUGUST 18 through 24


. . ...

:..BIRTHS


ll~A-4CL C -b~- -'--~d~LddL~I~dL~LLLP -U- 2- -


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P


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Girl's
FALL


Dresses

Cinderella
Nannette







Priced from


$2.98 $5.98


SPECIAL!

BALLET HOSE
Reg. $1.00 to $1.35 89
NOW ONLY I89


Boy's and Girl's SOCKS
7. .... Nylon Stretch
/ or
SRegular Cotton

S/, 39c


.... $1.00.
SPECIAL!
BUSTER BROWN SOCKS
4 pair for $1.00


ELECTRIC BLANKETS
Single Control $15.95
Double Control .--$21.95
2 Year Guarantee


Tom Sawyer
Dress
PANTS
Priced from
$3.98 to
$7.50
Buy the Best at
COSTINS!


Wash 'N Wear
Boy's Cotton
PANTS


$3.98
Sizes 6 to 16


HANES
UNDERWEAR
Boxer Shorts 85c
Undershirts 85c
Tee Shirts $1.00
Briefs $1.00
Quality At Its Best at
COSTINS!


USE 0 UR


Easy Lay-Av.Way Plan


Ship 'N Shore BLOUSES $3.98 $4.98
Artemis SLIPS ----$4.00 $6.00
Perma-Lift BRAS ---$1.50 $5.98
Genuine Leather BAGS $1.98 $5.98
Carole and Artemis PANTIES 59c $2.00
COSTUME JEWELRY --- $1.00 -$4.98
Berkshire HOSE ---$1.35 $1.65
New Fall HATS ----- $2.98 $10.98



Fabrics Gaiiore I

PATTERNS BY SIMPLICITY


Corduroy


DAN 'RIVER
Plaids


Wash 'N Wear
Cottons


NEW FALL COLORS IN
O 54" 60"
0 0 L widths


COTTON
DRESS LENGTHS 3 YD.


Bates


$2.98 yard


$1.00


Sew up their wardrobe fabrics for making dres-
and save money! You'll ses, suits, blouses, etc.
find a world of beautiful Shop right away at .
C 0 S TIN'S


Fieldcrest Spreads $8.98 $12.98
Fieldcrest Towels 79c $2.98
Boy's Dress Pants -----$2.98
Sizes 8 to 16


MEN'S SPORT SHIRTS
Short Sleeves Reg. $3.98 to $5.98
Now $2.98 and $3.98


6% Wool Blankets --- $4.98

Girl's Gym Shorts and Shirts $2.25

Boy's Pajamas ------ $1.98 $2.98
Men's Straw Hats ---------Only $2.00


Matching.
SWEATERS and
SKIRTS by


Jantzen H

and -
Koret
of
California
Fashions

To Meet the
Eye

SIZES 7-8 to 17-18

Girl's and Ladies' SHOES


$2.98 $6.98
Robinette Williams


BOY'S DUNGAREES

Lee Riders ---- $2.98
Sizes 6 to 12


NORRIS CASUAL SHIRTS
Long Sleeve Form Fitting
Two Pockets

$3.98 and $4.98

Men's Jarman Shoes
$10.95 to
$14.95
The best for your
money

BOY'S SHIRTS

Short Sleeve -- $1.29 $1.98
Long Sleeve -- $1.98 $2.98
"A Must for Back-to-School"


Children's

U. S. KEDS

Red, Blue and
Brown

3.98


Men's

Arrow
SHIRTS

WHITE

4.50


SMART PANTS
Men's Wash 'N Wear
$4.98
Men's
Corduroy Pants
$6.98
Boy's Corduroy
$5.98


Where
Prices
Are
Lower


-.

II


ings, into The Glidden Company
was approved last week `by the
directors of both companies.
Plans for the merger were an-
nounced jointly 'by Dwight P.
Joyce, Glidden chairman and 'pres-
ident, and Richard Turk, board
chairman of Pemco.
The transaction, which is subject
to approval by shareholders of both
companies, involves an indicated
consideration of around $10 mil-
lion. Shareholders will vote on the
proposal at special meetings to be
held 'at .an early date.
Under the 'terms of the proposed
agreement, Glidden will exchange
200,000 shares of a new 4 1-4 per
cent convertible preferred stock
for the 100,000 'outstanding shares
of Pemco common, with the new
Glidden issue convertible at any
time into 'a total of 225,000 shares
of Glidden common stock at an
approximate conversion price of
$45 a share.
The announcement stated that if
the merger is approved, Mr. Rich-
ard Turk will ibe elected a director
of Glidden 'and a vice president of
the company. Glidden intends to
operate Pemco as a separate unit
of the company's Chemicals Group.'
Managemen. and employees of
Pemco will be retained in their
present capacities.
Pemco, which was founded ini


bulk oils, spices, condiments and
specialty products for 'the fool in-
dustry, and its Chemicals Group,
headquartered In Baltimore, pro-
duces titanium 'dioxide 'and other
pigments, metal powders, synthe-
tic aromatics, tall oil 'and other
raw 'materials.
G. M. Halsey, vice president of
the company, he ads Glidden's
Chemicals Group.

Frank LeHardy Jr.
Flies Solo
PENSACOLA (FHTNC)-A Port
St. Joe, naval officer flew 'his first
sloo flight on July 24, his first ibig
step 'toward winning his "Wngs
of Gold."
He is Ensign Frank A. LeHardy,
Jr., son 'of Frank A. LeHardy of
Port St. Joe.
A member of Training 'Squadron
One at the Saufley Field Naval
Acxiliary Air Station, Pensacola, 'he
flew 'his -solo in the Beechcraft


1910, produces porcelain enamel
and ceramic frits and inorganic
colors. Its products are widely used
in the manufacture of appliances,
steel and aluminum architectural
paneling, autoparts, glazes for din-
nerware and .structural tile and "''
brick. Its inorganic colros are main- ...
ly used ,for coatings on glass, pot-
tery and signs.
Pemco's sales for the fiscal year
ended Decm eber 31, 1960, 'amounted
to $8,400,000 and net profit after
taxes was $501,000. For the past ENSFRANK A. LeHARDY
five years, the company's sales
have 'averaged $8,600,.000; 'profits Mentor training plane. During his
averaged $644,000. I primary flight training, he is re-
Pemco employs 260 persons at its ceiving instruction in communica-
offices, plant, research laboratory tions, navigation engineering, aer-
nad warehouse facilities in Balti- ology 'and civil 'air regulations.
more. ] When he is. finished with this
In commenting on the proposed i stage of instruction, he will move
merger, Mr. Joyce pointed out that rt: 'another field in -the Pensacola
it will be one more step in fulfill- 'ara ,for 'formation flight 'training.
ing Glidden's plans for future Before entering the Navy in Jan-
growth. uary, 1961, Ensign LeHardy was
"Pemco's ,present ,business 'and graduated from Florida State Uni-
its research activities closely par- versity.
allel Glidden's inorganic research -
objectives in refractory oxides, Attend Wedding
finely divided powders 'and cera- Mr. and Mrs. Walter Wilder of
mics. It is (believed that the re- Sneads attended the wedding of
search abilities of 'both organiza- Miss Ray Lapeyrouse and George
tions can Tbe effectively combined Kemp Saturday afternoon.
to offer Glidden new 'opportunities -.
in high temperature coatings, cera- To Visit In Birmingham
mic-metal combinations and the Mr. 'and Mrs. A. P. Jackson will
use of ceramics in electronics." spend the week end visiting Mr.
The Glidden Company is one of Jackson's parents in Birmingham,
.the country's largest manufactur- Ala.


Color Prints Reduced
Sizes 127, 120 and 620


ROLL OF 12
NOW ONLY


$3.80


Developing of film and prints

Extra Set of Prints FREE!
FOUR DAY SERVICE ON COLOR FILM
BLACK and WHITE
Film Developing and Prints
ONE DAY SERVICE
ROLL OF 12 97c
Developed and Printed

BACK TO SCHOOL
Portrait Work Our Specialty

Lynart Studios
104 Bayview Heights Phone 227-8681


tHmi btAt, Port~ S. JO., h THURSBAY AUGUST 17, 1961

Pemco Corporation of Baltimore Merger
With Glidden Company Approved
CLEVELAND Merger of ,the ers of paints, organic coatings and
Pemco Corporation, Baltimore, a resins. Its Durkee Famous Foods,
leading producer of inorganic coat- Division is a major producer of


BE SURE TO SHOP AT


-~~4--~B~L~brr~a~B~CTc~'~i~ZC~ J-~:~-IBsi~Pti~i~*~~' ~;pii


- I rll --


I P II I P III II ~ I


~P s -- I = I i


. .









PORT


























F

AMO I
peeweed

0 T i .3


new first quc
gg 'ideal 'or
Color
Lr 36-in. w


SUnbl
Our finest (
firmly wo
many house

Print
REG. 35c S
t er3rry clo
trscreen

Beautiful'



.REG.
6.99
Sompletely w
ackingI
tone
signs an multi
g round. o hit


100%

Curtali

Rego

L 42x81-in.
med, re
I1 r Washi


FAMOUS I
72x99" Twin-Fitted .i
Pillo
Carp's everyday lo
VISCOSE TI
REG
Large 27x48-in. Wa
Choose from many sol

Tots' T


REG. 2
Double fabric soft
with triple fabi
Covered e astic
White, in sizes 0 i
I..-r-r I


ST.


JOE


MEN'S UNDERWEAR
T-SHIRTS AND REG. 79c 1 S
BROADCLOTH SHORTS


FOR $
Athletic Shirts, 1,40 Knit Briefs,
Reg. 3 for 1.653 for Reg. 3 for 2.05 for
From our regular stock, Carp's own famous brand.


BOYS' LONG SLEEVE
SPORT SHIRTS
RE. 1.59 $
SAVE 59c $
Sanforized printed broadcloth in many
new fall patterns. Wash 'n wear. Sizes
6 to 18. Buy NOW for back-to-school.
Boys' Blue Jeans
REG. 1.49 $
SAVE 49c 1
Sanforized sturdy denim. 4 roomy pock-
ets, 'zipper front. Bar-tacked at points
of strain for long, tough wear. Sizes
4 to 12.


WE CASH PAYROLL CHECKS FREE!


Boys' Polo Shirts
79c VALUE
Crew neck, short F
sleeve styles. Hor
izontal stripes and
fancy patterns.
Sizes 4 to 14.

JR. BOYS' CORDUROY

SLACKS
REG. 1.49
Boxer style waistband. $P
Flannel lined for warmth.
Sizes 3 to 6.

BOYS' HOODED
PARKAS 4

SPECIAL.. 99
LOW..PRICE I3
Heavy cotton sateen, mercerized,
water-repellent. Bulky quilt lin-
ing. Easy zip-off hood. Conceal- j j'
ed wristlets. Charcoal, blue and
antelope in sizes 6 to 14.

BOYS' REG. 4.99
SHOES
DRESS,
SPORT and 12
WORK STYLES 4
Composition sales, c r e p e
soles. Black, antique
brown, burgundy and oth-
er new colors. 3v2 to 6.


Men's Shoes
DRESS, 22
SPORT and REG. 2
WORK STYLES 7.99
Fine quality shoes with Good-
year welt or vulcanized con.
struction. Many smart styles
in the newest fall colors.
Sizes 61/2 to 11.


reached Muslin
quality strong, $
ven. Ideal for YDS .
hold uses. FOR |


Women's Full Slips
SPECIAL LOW PRICE!
Fine 2-bar rayon tricot. Shadow panel,
4-gore for better fit. Nylon bodice
with nylon lace overlay. Choose from
3 styles in pure white, sizes 32 to 44.


DACRON
in Panels


panel
per panel. Hem
ready to hang.
able, moth and
Idew proof.


I 'ii

I


Women's 2-Bar Tricot Panties
Sanitized, full-cut, elastic legs. Bar- 5 '1
tacked at points of strain. White, 5 f
pink or blue in sizes 5, 6 and 7. for

Women's Blouses
REG. 66 REG. 66
1.99 2.99
S'' 1 99 2
Newest fall styles in solid colors and prints.
Sizes 32 to 38.

Sale! New Fall Skirts


REG. 66
2.99 2


See the newest styles slim
skirts, flared skirts in a variety of
solid colors, plaids and prints. Sizes
22 to 30.


DAN RIVER SHEET
,89 81'8e" d 2.
w Cases 49c
w, low price on fine quality sheets.


THROW RUGS
. 2.99
shable. Non-skid back.
lid colors.


knit cotton,
ric crotch.
wristband.
lo 6.


gv


$2


S
9


See Our Complete New Shoe Dept.
GRAND OPENING SPECIAL!
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S

NEW FALL SHOES
PRS. $ 2.66
SREG. 2.99 2 FOR PAIR
PRS. 50 3.49
REG. 399 2 FOR PAIR
Dress, sport and casual styles for women and children. Latest
fall styling and newest colors. Buy now for back-to-school and
really save! Complete size range.


4I


tri^l^i


nile~Pants


..~~ .I ill L Is IlesPL~S~ cc I __


! ,-




I



80









I


i
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IMI
Y












(,


I


REG.


NEWEST, MOST MODERN STORE!


Starts Friday-Hurry in and Save on


New FIRST QUALITY Merchandise











THE STAR
Published Every Thursday At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
By The Star Publishing Company
WESLEY R. RAmsEY Editor and Publisher
Reader and Bookkeeper
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Salesman, Photographer, Columnist, Reporter, Prorf
DIAL BALL 7-3161
Entered as spoond-class matter, December 19, 1937, at the Poetoffice, Port St. Joe,
Florida, under Act of March 8, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR, $3.00 SIX MONTHS $1.75 THREE MONTHS 127.30
TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omission in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount received for suac
advertisement
The spoken word ir given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully
weighed. The spoken word barely amerts; the printed word thoroughly convinces.
'he spoken word is lost; the printed word .emaln.
TtiIt I Al, Purt bt. Jo0, Fla. THURSDAY AUGUST 17, 1961


Hoover's Latest Report

The annual report of J. Edgar Hoover, sent to the coun-
try's editors every year, shows that crime in the United
States is continuing to increase at a disturbing rate.
In 1960, for example, a serious crime was committed
every fifteen seconds in the United States! A murder, for-
cible rape or assault to kill was committed every three min-
utes.
This has become a national disgrace and the crime rate
in the United States no longer compares favorable with that
of the leading countries of the world. We must look into our
own consciences to see what is the trouble.
The fact is that the problem is one for all Americans
and all Americans should turn their attention to it. The par-
ents of America must face the fact that the juvenile delin-
quency of recent years is the responsibility of lack of disci-
pline and training in the home. American fathers are more
to blame in this regard than mothers-for it is the father,
in the las analysis, who should exert final and firm author-
ity with the children.
In that field, American fathers are the world's worst.
They too often abdicate their authority to the already-busy
wife, who must run the house, supervise the meals and watch
over everyone's well being. As a result, we have too many
delinquents who might have been well-trained and well-be-
haved youngsters.
The latest FBI annual report shows that the trend in
this country to more and more crime is continuing and that
things are getting worse-not better. It may be convenient
to blame the churches and schools but the major responsibili-
ty is to be found in the home.
And while Port St. Joe is not too much bothered with a
situation such as this, it does not behoove us to stand on
the steps like the Pharisee and beat our chest exclaiming
in a loud voice, "Look how good we are!" Rather, it would
be to our good advantage to take a close notice of Mr. Hoo-
ver's statistics and warnings.
Port St. Joe can remain a good place to live-relatively
free from crime and juvenile delinquency-if we as parents
will assert our responsibility in the right direction.
Nothing guides a missile quite so good as a hot rear end.
Nothing will guide a child in the right direction quite as ef-
fectively as an occasional "hot end" applied at the "critical"
moment. We are not a dependent upon child psychology.



Six Things We Are For

(From the Wytheville, Va., Enterprise)
Every day of every passing week a few people (often a
very few) are awakening from their Rip Van Winkle sleep
and becoming aware of the very real threat to the freedom
enjoyed by Americans. Occasionally a person will be startled
shocked at the loss of freedoms and privileges he like the
majority of citizens have been "too busy" to pause, think,
and investigate.
If freedom is to survive there obviously must be a good
.sound, responsible government at the local level, the coun-
ty level, th estate level, and of tremendous importance at the
federal level. The Enterprise believes that those who are
sincerely interested in the preservation of Americanism in
the full meaning of the word must have a positive approach.
It is necessary that we are FOR something, rather than
against something.
The Enterprise asks you-you-you-Yes veery reader
to join with us in being FOR a positive program. Here it is:
WE ARE FOR a strong national defense without extra-
vagance.
WE ARE FOR a sound dollar that commands respect
in the money markets of the world and protects the buying
power of our citizens.
WE ARE FOR maximum freedom in our personal enter-
prise system and for minimum government interference in
the affairs of business and labor.
WE ARE FOR economic growth that is rooted in our
free economic system, our dynamic industrial and marketing
system.
WE ARE FOR social progress that comes from the en-
terprise of the individual, of many individuals working toge-
ther-not through bureaucratic compulsion.
WE ARE FOR a government that is colsest to the indi-
vidual-a government that is the servant, not the master of
the people.
BECAUSE the above is the philosophy of government
set forth by our forefathers and the framers of the Consti-
tution.


BECAUSE we support candidates for political office who
come the closest to advocating the above-
BECAUSE it is our very firm conviction this nation can
fall apart with reference to individual freedom-
BECAUSE America can fall prey to the Communist doc-
trine by financial insolvency-
The Enterprise is frequently accused of being biased
politically-criticized for supporting a candidate (it happens
regardless of who, or what party)-of being old-fashioned,


NORTHWEST FLORIDA

Florida Caverns One of Northwest

Florida's Most Dazzling Attractions

A couple of hundred million Springs in Walton County, has the


years ago, give or take a few, one
of northwest Florida's most dazz-
ling natural attractions was in the
making.
For the foundation of fbaulous
Florida Caverns (just off U.S. 90
on State Road 167 near Marianna)
was .being laid at a time when all
of Florida was covered by the sea.
Florida Caverns is another reason
Floridians are being urged by the
Governor's Tourism Steering Com-
minttee and 'the Florida Develop-
ment Commission -to see their own
state this summer.
Marine creatures, plants, and
seashells formed calcium layers,
so geologists .say, and as incalcul-
able time passed, these deposits
hardened. Other layers were ad-
ded. And a great blankete or sub-
terranean stratum now known as
Ocala Limestone still remains over
much of Florida.
Came the Ice Age with its ero-
sion which left the mountains and
valleys of the earth. Flroida broke
up from the seas, scientists be-
lieve. And again thruogh unmea-
sured time the .softer portion of
rock-and unhardened marine de-
posits-were washed or leached
"away.
Silent long after recorded his-
tory began, the Florida Caverns
remained sealed and void, hidden
until accidentally discovered near
Marianna by a mining engineer in
1937.
Now one of the Sunshine State's
26 state parks, Florida Caverns
State Park is *being visited by in-
creasing numbers of out-of-state
tourists and Floridians. Forty-five
minute tours through the lighted
colorful .passages commnece period-
ically throughout the day.
Guide service for th ecaverns is
75 cents per person, 12 years and
over; under 12 years, 25 cents;
public school groups with teacher,
25 cents each; group of 25 or more,
12 years and over by reservation,
50 cents per person.
The park totals 1,187 acres In
the valley of 'the Chipola River.
Apart from the wonders of the un-
der-ground caverns are -natural rock
gradens, protected wildlife, a nine-
hole golf course, cool woodlands for
summer hiking, picnic areas, some
camping and fishing.
Bast-west from Jacksonville to
Pensacola on U. S. 90 is the Old
Spanish Trail, with Marianna and
the caverns a good "halfway" stop.
South of Marianna on Florida 71
Is Blountstown. Farther south on
71 are the Dead Lakes and Wewa-
bitchka. Port St. Joe, Apalachicola
and the Gulf beaches are in either
direction.
Along the sweeping arc of its
coastline, the northwestern portion
of the ,Sunshine State has a most
generous trip of white sand beach.
From Destin, Panacea, Pensacola,
and Panama City leep sea fishing
boats work the outer rock shelf
daily for red .snapper and grou-
per. Smaller [boats troll for king
mackerel. Pier fishing is also pop-
ular.
Within Florida's northwestern
wedge facing Alabama, Georgia
and the Gulf -are other state parks
including Ft. Pickens and .St. An-
drews. Near Chattahoochee is the
Jim Woodruff Dam 'and reservoir
with its thousands of acres of for-
setland and fresh water.
Near Apalachicola is the John
Gorrie State Monument and at Port
St. Joe the Constitution State Mon-
ument and Museum. North of
Crestview Is Blackwater State For-
est.
DeFunlak Sprnigs, located near
the intersection of U.S. 331 and
U. S. 90 is the geographic center of
Florida's northweasern wing.
Lakewood, near DeFuniak

narrow-minded, opposing chan
judiced (unchristian) of belong
cording to some) and thus lal
we are proud to be one and nc
sary.
The Star is akin to the E
liefs.-Ed.


SALE


highest elevation (345 teet) he


state. M'apwise it commands all of
Florida west .of the Apalachicola
River. And from this point the
shortest distance in any direction
is Florida The Beautiful-centering
an area known for as varied and
delightful a package as Florida Fun-
land can .show.
CARD OF THANKS
I wish to express my heartfelt
thanks 'to -all my many friends in
Port St. Joe for .the many cards,.
prayers and flowers that were of-
fered in my behalf during my re-
cent illness and colfinemnent ito
the Weems Memorial' Hospital. I
am now at home 'and will welcome
your visits.
MRS. C. A. GRINER
Apalachicola
'K


Visiting In Texas
Chris Martin is visiting
relatives in Texas.
-K-


AUGUST 17 18-1



Shorts Pedal Pushers


Blouses Dresses


for


Toddlers Girls


Pre Teens issues



The Boogal Shop




1010 PALM BLVD.


with


L I OPICS


A Service of Your Doctor of Your Doctor Medicine,
'Your Local Medical Society and the
Florida Medical Association.
REDUCING
It is not surprising that there
are so many overweight persons
in the United States. Having the
highest level of economy in the
world, it follows that we are the
best fed people -in the world.
This situation has led, unfortun-
ately, to ingrained habits of selt.
indulgence.
Our high standard of living is
accompanied by a high death
rate from diseases and condi-
tions brought on and aggravated
by excess fat. It is estimated
that a 30 percent increase in
weight before the middle years
increases the potential death rate
as much as 75 to 80 percent.
It is not easy to lose weight
for most people and the desire
to do so must come from within
the person. Generally speaking,
other people seldom sell an over-
weight individual on the fact
that he or she should reduce. But
when a woman decides to reduce
with the objective of increasing
her own attractiveness, results
are usually obtained. The over-
weight businessman is seldom
responsive to the pleas of his
wife and family that he reduce,
but when the problem is dis-
cussed in terms of efficiency,
rates of depreciation of body
mechanism and tables of longev-
ity, he is more likely to coop-.
erate.
For reducing, many physicians
recommend a natural diet, high
in protein and low in carbohy-
drates. However, it is important
to note that each person's case
should be dealt with individual.
ly, to rule out possible compli-
cations or other causes of ex-
cess fat. This is why the over-
weight person should consult his
physician before undertaking a
reducing diet.
The accepted cause of excess
weight in most persons, accord-
ing to medical experts, is the
overeating of fat producing
foods. But, they advise, the very
best way known to avoid taking
off excess weight is not to add i
in the first ola.. ...

FOR EXPERT
Electrical Repairs

and

Contracting
IT'S

WALL ELECTRIC

COMPANY
DIAL BAll 7-4331

ge and progress, of being pre-
ging to the despised class (ac-
beled as a Conservative. But
apologies, excuses are neces-

Dnterprise in sharing these be-


You Can Buy The BEST USED CARS In Northwest Florida Right Here
In Port St. Joe at ..



Floyd Chevrolet Co.


1960 CORVAIR
Was $1210
$1595.00-...----


1958 FORD 2-Door
Was $65010
$895.00.--------


1955 FORD Wagon
as $40000
$525.00---.......-


1956 PONTIAC
Was $4000
$595.00.........


FLOYD CHEVROLET COMPANY Is Port St. Joe' Most Complete Marine
Headquarters for Everything for Water Fun!

MERCURY MOTORS CROSBY, WINNER a n d HY-

DRODYNE BOATS EE-ZY TRAILERS


NEW MODELS ARE ON THEIR WAY to Port St. Joe. FLOYD'S
Mos Mhke Room for New Model Trades Shop Us Today!



Floyd Chevrolet Co.


Chevrolet Oldsmsbile Corvair
PHONE 227-2221 401 WILLIAMS AVE.



Afiffffly-^*^Bm^R ^~.^lt~yjflJfM~rJftfO^jf~BM


CLASSIFIED ADS
Midget Investments With
Giant Returns








SG F LORR-IDA' GARDEN NOTES-


1'tHUR*8bAY AUGUSt-17, 101


FRESH PORK
SPARE lb.j C


BEEF
FRESH LEAN


Pork Ofc

Chop Q3;


TENDERIZED HAM


FRESH PORK


BACK

BO NE


FRESH GROUND DAILY



ROND


Tire Sale


By HERVEY SHARPE
Fla. Agricultural Ext. Serv.
Dodder-known as love vine-
has no amorous motives when it
becomes attached to one of your
ornamentals. It is a killer plant
with low morals.
So beware of this small yellowish
vine that some people place in
their garden plants for added beau-
ty. It is a parasitic pest.
The hosts for dodder are many
in number. These include most or-
namentals and garden vegetables.
There is a belief that if a maiden
desires to check 'the sincereity of
her swain's love, she tosses 'a
length of dodder over her .left
shoulder, then leaves and returns
in three days.
'If the love vine Is still alive--and
in most cases it is because there
is nearly always a 'host plant 'avail-
able-the .beau still loves her. (We
suspect th emales started this be-
lief.)
Regardless of the method of
* spreading, dodder is 'an undesirable
pest for the gardener. Being incap-
alble of manufacturing its own food,
the ,parasite sends root-like growths
into -the host plant 'and cheats the
ornamental out of its ,plant food.
Control measures include hand
picking .the vine-like growth from
the ornamentals and. destroying it
iby burning.
If seed pods have formed before
th-. pest is spotted, cultivate the
soil in the infested area next
spring. This will kill the germin-
ating plants before they grow out
in search of a 'host plant.
Don't try to destroy dodder with
chemicals, because chmeicals that
will kill dodder will kill the host
.plant.


Sikes remarked that "although the
activity 'at Apalachicola will vary
somewhat from previous weapons
meets, it is anticipated that the
number'of personnel' involved will
approximate the 1959 total."
The ougressmnan said: "the keen
intreest and cooperative spirit of
the 'citizens of Apalachicola and
Franklin .County is .sincerely ap-
preciated. The favorable accept-
ance of past weapons meet opera-


trieved target drones for decon- tions by 'th citizens to Franklin
tamination, this function will be and Bay 'Counties has contributed


transferred to Tyndall AFB this
year as a more economical opera-
tion. However, specific plans for
this year's operation include the
use oi the Apalachicola Mu-nicipal
Airport for a sizeable helicopter
retrieval- and rescue operation.
Mr. Sikes further announced that
the present programmed require-
iments call for positioning six H-37
helicopters at the airport. In addi-
*tion, four 85-foot and one 40-foot
retrieval watercraft 'will be sta-
tioned at the Apalachicola Airport
for the duration of the meet. Mr.

-amateur or expert--be sure to
cut the bulbsi ve tically so' that
each piece has a (portion of the
stem tissue dr basal part of the
bulb attached.
To propagate, insert these wed-
ges of bulbs in flats containing a
moist mixture of peat. moss and


sand in equal parts.
In warm weather small buliblets
will begin to form between the


BULBS scales jof Ithe bulbs -and usually
Now is a good time to divide will be large enough 'to pot off at-
many herbaceous perennials, such ter one growing season.
.as daylilies. All that is necessary These new plants should bloom
is .to spade up 'a clump of the lilies within two to three years.
then divide the mass of matted Many other "lily" bulbs are rea-
'bulbs. With the usual care and a dy for digging. Dr. T. J. Sheehan,
bit of luck the lilies will hardly ornamental horticulturist with the
know that they have been trans- Agricultural Experiment Station's,
planted. .says that 'bulbs can .be dug any
Also, you can cut the bulbs of tima after the stems begin 'to turn
your prized amaryllis to increase yellow.
the size of the planting. The hobby- Once the bulbs are dug, store
ist can safely cut a fair sized bulb them at temperatures ,between 40;
into six or eight pieces. The ex- and 50 degrees F. and do not allow
perts can divide the bulb into 60 them to dry out. If storage facili-
-pieces. ties are : ot -available, plant the
Regardless of your classification .blbs! withiti one month from the
time ,thiy are dug. iNearly dry ,peat-


moss is a ,good material for pack-
ing th e bulbs for storage.'
Most lilies deliver you a better
crop of flowers when they are dug
once a year and the young bulbs
are removed from thb parent. How-
ever, Ift this is not ,possible, then
be sure to dig the bulbs every third
year:
During hot and humid weather
keep an eye out for brown patch
!in lawns--:- especially centipede
lawns. This fungus can be cured
with an 'application of one of a
number of fungicides. Your garden
supply 'store manager has the
chemicals available and will rec-
ommend which one is best in your
locality.
Cutting off the sprinkler system
at night may keep away brown
patch. Schedule the lawn sprink-
ling so that the grass -is dry by
siundowii. The fungus likes hot hu-
mid nights and 'wet grass.


ThJis Sandwich
ts Tasty


The Best Sand Mountain Home Grown
Vine Ripe Flavor Rich LB.



T0na tfes 191

25 Lb. Bag-With Dinner
Plate FREE-- Robin Hood
FLOUR 2*

SEE THE "MACHINE" THAT
SHELLS THE "BEANS"

Fresh Shelled Daily Your Choice
Choice Peas Butter Beans
WE SHELL YOUR 'PEAS 75c bu.

1 DOZ. FLORIDA GRADE 'A' LARGE


Eggs Free
WITH $10.00 ORDER or MORE

Tender Okra

yelloww Squash lb.

Single Barianas 10


cm~. 33c


immeasurably to the success of op-
eration "William Tell". f he Star Brings News of Your NeighborsS


Spending Week End Here
Miss .Sherry Poe, [bride-elect of
Kenneth Hurlbut is spending the
week end with, Mr. and Mrs. M. K.
Hurlbut at thier home ,on Eighth
Street.


Smokey Says:


as the horse and buggy---
.. as the horse and buggy!


FREE BaHl Point Pen
With Each School Supply
Purchase Of $1.00 Or More


"VARSITY PACK"


School Special 5 Hole Punch
Loose Leaf Filler
WEAREVER M 310 Sheets
INK CARTRIDGE PEN i vol Wrap
Plus 6 Cartridge Refills COMPOSITION BOOKS
1.49 Value f 15c to 79c

STENO NOTE BOOKS
1 .- -. E )-


GOLDEN SHOW CASE
..HUDSON TISSUES .......... box 29c
2 STYLES
MAGNETIC BINDERS ...... ea. 98c
CRAYOLA
CRAYONS 15c to 1.00
Others 5c Sand loc10
PENCILS
3 for l0c
35c doz.
IIUCKLEBERRY HOUND
SCHOOL BAGS ........................ 1.69
Other Bags 98c to 1.98
SCHOOL BLUNT POINTED
SCISSORS 25c 29c
LOOSE LEAF
BINDERS 29c to 98c
BINDL ES 1. $1.19
BALL PENS l10c-98c


TYPING
PAPER .....................
WEBSTER'S NEW WORLD
DICTIONARY
Other .


Ever try eating oranges and
onions together?
"Well, if you haven't, try it,"
,ggests Chef Bill Schmidts, Cana-
n National Hotels executive
f and supervisory chef at Jas-
Park Lodge in the Canadian
*:kies. "It makes the most cool-
refreshing sandwich you can
jrve."
"Take a slice of bread, butter
t. Peel an orange, slice it, and
;!lace a layer of orange on the
'bread. Slice a large onion, and
,lace a layer of onion on top of
Lhe orange. Top the sandwich
with another slice of .buttered
bread. Cut and serve."
Chef Schmidts explains that
orange and onio", modify the
strong taste of each other, pro-
ducing a delicious cooling flavcir
for a summer-time s, "dwich. FNS


IJac TO L:JL


Oc 25c 49c

---- 50c
39c to 1.00


DRY-NON TOXIC
MARKER ---------_ 39c
Kindergarten Special


School Special Plastic Covered
12 PEDIGREE Stuffed Kinder
PENCILS ...... 72c Mat Special 1
I PENCIL "YOUR DOLLAR BUYS MORE AT AN 0. M. WEBB STORE
Ml ,- ner ... 5c
3 BALL POINT O.N EB
PENS ........ 57c r -i llt8



34 REID AVENUE PSTORT ST. OE LO
,34 REID AVENUE PORT ST. JOE, FLO


PD


RIDA


lob SiIes Announces Air Force Making

-ans foriS 1961 Operation "Wmin. Tell"


Congressman Bob Sike'st .nnoun-
ced from Washington0 thibs week
that be bad been -advised by the
Commander of TyEda l Air Force
Base that present plans for Oper-
ation **Willtam-Tell 81" include .'he
use of Apalachicol afacillltles. dur.
ing the forthcoming USAF inter-
cep'or Weaponls Meet.
Unlike last year's operation when
the Apalachicola Miuniciipal Ai.rport
was used for the evacuation 3f re-


P E SATE'S

SHELL SERVICE STATION


(FIVE MILES FROM PORT ST. JOE ON HIGHWAY 71)
(FIVE-MILES FROM PORT ST. JOE -- ON HIGHWAY 71)


7,000 DEATHS THEN .. .310 NOW

Two decades ago, 7,000 children died every year of
whooping cough. Last year, only 310 children died
fo whooping cough. What explains the difference?
It's the new wonder drugs-unknown two decades
ago. Priceless drugs? Sure! Yet the price of
the average prescription hasn't gone up any more
in 20 years than has the price of a pound of coffee.

TODAY'S PRESCRIPTION IS THE BIGGEST
BARGAIN IN HISTORY
-- The Most Complete Prescription Department -
Have Your Doctor Phone Us or Bring Your Prescription To
Air Conditioned for your Comfort
SMITH'S PHARMACY
Two Free Parking Spaces for Your Convenience
at Our Back Door
DRIVE-IN WINDOW IN REAR OF STORE


(Limit Rights Reserved)


AT WHITE CITY, FLORIDA


- THESE SPECIALS GOOD MONDAY THRU SATURDAY, AUG. 19 --


GROUND


3 bs,


HAM


Butt or Shank 3
Portion lb.
Ham
Steaks lb. u


RC COLA


69c


Nabisco Saltines Ib. 29c
AR TENNG 3Xb.69c
SHORTENNIG 31b..69c


LET US SAVE YOU MONEY BY
Filling Your Deep Freeze With Our Meats and Vegetables


_ a, ~L-IIU-~BYIII


,.. __


tt~k Oii, i-D~k 4 Jori, olih


I-`-


.Lb. 39c










TableRite Beef is chosen by conscientious selectors... bought
carefully trimmed for your satisfaction .. trimmed for value


A steak that is a treat to eat


TARBLERITE


for quality. Then it is


IABLERITE


PRICED RITE....


ROUND

STEAK


C


PORK & BEANS


"VAN CAMP'S


2No. 300
Cans


25


TOMATOES
STANDARD ,No. 303 1 "
PACK CanT 1 Oc Jf


CHARCOAL
-- Lb.99C
PEANUT BUTTERag

PEANUT BUTTER


IGA BRAND


2 Lb.
Jar


Deodorant for Men and Women
OLD SPICE STICK


Horseshoe
CORN MEAL
IGA Brand
CHUNK TUNA
No Boil
BL EACH
IGA Brand
APPLE SAUCE


59c


Plus Tax
stick $1.00


5 1b. sack
S/2can
gal.
2 no. 303 cans


35c
29c
29c
33c


Kraft Miracle
SANDWICH SPREAD 16 oz. jar 43c


Assorted Flavors
KOOL AID
IGA Sweetened or Unsweetened
GRAPEFRUIT JUICE
Brach Jelly Cone
CAND Y 1


6 pkgs.


25c


46 oz. can 29c


1 oz. pkg.


29c


IGA--20c OFF LABEL
INSTANT COFFEE 16 oz. jar $1.19


\ a4i


TABLERITE

GROUND BEEF


ORANGE JUICE


IGA FRESH
FROZEN


IGA FRESH FROZEN


4


6 Oz.
Cans


LEMONADE
IGA BEEF, TURKEY or
HAM DINNER


PILLSBURY or BALLARD
Biscuits4
TABLERITE
Sliced SWISS CHEESE
TABLERITE SLICED
AMERICAN CHEESE
TABLERITE
BUTTER (quartered)


LARGE VINE RIPE

TOMATOES


Large Vine Ripe Californ
Cantaloupes


U. S. NO. 1 WHITE

POTAI'OES


49c


11 oz. pkg. 49c

Cans 39c

6 oz. pkg. 35c

8 oz. pkg. 35c


lb. 79c


LBS.


ia Fresh Tender
29c OKRA


37c

2 Ibs. 25c


1 LBS.


CUBED LB.
STEAK
TABLERITE
SIRLOIN STEAK
TABLERITE
T-BONE STEAK
TABLERITE
Standing RUMP ROAST
TABLERITE
First Cuts PORK CHOPS
PURE PORK
PAN SAUSAGE


2


LBS.


C


lb. 89c
lb. 98c
lb. 69c
lb. 39c
31bs. $1.00


89c


CARNATION MILK


3


TALL
CANS


39c


SALAD DRESSING
IGA BRAND Jar'.a 39c


PEPSI-COLA
6 Bottle 29c
Carton 29

SHORTENING


IGA
SNOWKREEM


3 Lb.
Can


Cairo Beauty Kosher
DILL PICKLES 28
Kraft's
BARBECUE SAUCE 18
IGA
Yellow Cling PEACHES
Real Kill
BUG BOMB 14 oz
Aerowax
FLOOR WAX


Como
TOILET PAPER
Water Maid
RICE


Mahatma
RICE
Kraft
GRAPE JELLY
Sunshine Krispy
CRAC K ERS


59c


oz.jar 35c
oz. jar 39c
No. 2% Cans
3 cans 89c
.bomb 89c


quart


4 rolls 29c


3 lb. cello pkg.
2 lb. cello pkg.
18 oz. jar
lb. box


. SPECIALS FORt AUGUST 17, 18 and 19
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
We Reserve Limit Rights


4 60z.
Cans


65c


45c
35c
35c
29c


CIC- -Cr---~,


I L C~r~SChP c I I


I* I


39c







Mlnt. es O i t yti LaOltS -i ie6 i tH STA,.ti h k i Joi oil. -
S1111U6ts"dthe .dd Od nnouic t hiso is- THURSDAY AUGUST 17i 1961
tionlam made aostudy te proposed THURDAY AUGUT 17 1
County Commission tativ budget That t Is the opinion of
said o0.nigati0on thAt the budget is entirely
D too high hit this Board is requested to Aect. Proposed Requested Action of
WEWAHITCHKA, tLORIDA reduce the budget to a figure even below No. Budget Reduction Board
August 4, 1961 the total of the 1960-61 budget; that other 415 68,014. 50,000. 55,000.
members of the Tax Payers League will give 423 10,000. 8,000. 8,000.
The Board of County Commia;ioners of their views on the budget and will request 481 25,000. 5,000. 20.000.
Gul County, Florida, met this date in spe that certain reductions be made before the 451 5,000. 3,000. 4,000.
e'al session for the purpose of hearing com- budget is adopted. Those appearing and re- Mr. Tomlinson, as Sub-Chairman assigned
p.lamts on the tertative budget for the questing that the budget be reduced were: to make specific recommendations to reduce
Board of County Commiwaroners *or the T. S. Coldewey, Vice-President of the St. items in the General Fund recommended the
sc&al year beginning October 1, 1961, with Joe Paper Company; "Deke" Dunbar, Ml- following reductions:
the following members present: E. C. Ifar- chigan Chemical Corporation; Robert Fox, Acot. Proposed Requested Action of
den, Sr., Chairman, Neva S. Croxton, Leo Glidden Company, C G. Costin, Sr., St. No. Budget Reduction Board
Kennedy, A. J. Strickland and James H Joe Hardware Company; H. C. Brown, 211 13,500. 10,500. 13,500.
Greer. The Clerk, Sheriff, Attorney, Road Southeastern Terminals, Wayne Buttram, 219 3,300. None 3,300.
superintendent and Civil Defense Director George G. Tapper and M. P. Tomlinson. 280 2,602. 1,302 1,502.
ere also present Civil Defene Director Tapper, as SubChairman assigned to 270 3,895. 1,895. 3,895.
The meeting came to order at 6:10 p.m. make specific recommendations to reduce 875 1,200. None 1,200.
The Chairman opened the meeting with items in the Road and Bridge fund recom- 811 1,200 None 1,200.
prayer. mended the following reductions: 671 2,087. 1,287. 2,087.
Harry H. Saunders, Chairman of the Gulf 672 5,000. 1,000. 5,000.
681 5,300. 3,700. 5,300.
685 1,000. 500. 1,000.
811 3,400 None 3,400.
917 9,764. 2.764. 9,764.
M O N E Y Other recommendations ny the Commit-
tee: Advertise for bids on printing the Min-
FOR HOME OWNER utes, rather than paying $50.00 per month
to each paper; discontinue paying $2,000.
FIRST and SECOND MORTGAGE LOANS to School Board for Bonds; Discontinue pay-
FIRST and SECOND MORTGAGE L AN ing municipalities race track funds; Dis-
Home improvement Loans Frame & CBS Construction continue practice of County Road Depart-
ment doing work for Municipalities, Subdi-
Mortgages Refinanced Consolidate All Your Bills vision, Developers. Churches, Schools and
Reduce Your Payments One Easy to Meet Payment work on private property.
& Mr. Saunders thanked the Board for hear-
BL| IC O T AGE O ing his committee and urgently requested
SULI M O GAGE CO that a reduction of $375,000.00 be made
301 Williams Ae. Port St. Joe in Budget before its final adoption.
301 Williams Ave. Port St.F Jo R L. Tull requested the County to include
SQUICK P 2 2oe FREE funds in the Budget to pave the Jones
QUICK D one 229-27217 R Homestead Road.
SERVICE U e INSPErlION After much discussion, there was a mo-
tion by Commissioner Greer, seconded by
Commisisoner Croxton, that the following
budget for the fiscal year beginning October
1, 1961, and ending September 30, 1962,
be approved, adopted and ordered. The fol-
FREEl FR EE FREE lowing voted: AYE: Greer, Croxton, Kenn-
edy and the Chairman, NAY: Strickland.
TIKET Oommiissioner Strkkland stated that he
DA TICK S because he opposed the reduction of labor
Every Evening at 8:30 TO ALL in .the Road and Bridge Fund from $63,-
014.00 to $55,000.00.
BRING THE CHILDREN CHILDREN There being no further business to come
before the Board, the meeting did then ad-
journ.
ATTEST:
ENJOY YOURSELF HAVE FUN George Y. Core E. Harden, Sr.
-- ing .-G.s Clerk Chairman
PLAY Golf Bowling Games Oak Grove Church
GOLF Music Kiddie Rides Revival Continues
Bring your Friends, Bring Your Date
Southern Evangelist Jack Martz
of Atlanta, opened his campaign at
FREEGAME SAFE, WHOLESOME RECREATION the Aak Grove Assembly of God
19th Hole FOR ALL THE FAMILY Church with the staggering truth
of Satan triumphing in his success
"The Nicest Place On The Beach" that he has caused the entire world
OPEN Play Hrsa. to be 'turned into a camp of ene-
7 Days 1 P.M. mies. Color against color and na-
A inWeek orG a V-" L (Mto 12 M. tion against nation. Yet he declared
Rain. or t L 'i (Mon. 6-12) into this international mess comes
S S. Highway 98 exco Beach, la Jesus marching as a friend of sin-
U. S. Highway 98 Mexico Beach, Fla. ers. At the close of the sermon
many came forward to dedicate
their lives to Christ, some as sin-
ners to accept Him, others to have
their lives restored to full commit-
Oak Grove Assembly of God Church s re
Meetings are at 7:00 p.m. with
CHARLES H. HARTHERN, Pastor Missionary Ruby James speaking
to the children ,and teaching them
SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:00 A.M. songs in many languages. They
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 A.M. have already learned several in
CHRISTIAN CAD TS P Chinese and Swedish, 'and the first
CHRISTIAN CADETS 6:15P.M. service found 101) of them in at-
EVANGELISTIC SERVICES 7:45 P.M. tendance. Miss James wears her
Mid-Week Prayer Services (Wed.) .......------ 7:45 P.M. costumes from various countries,
having visited 41 in her travels in
._ ,, __ five continents. To th echild bring-
i ng the -most new visitors -over the
FTHODIST CHURCHweek, will receive a gift.
IRST Thursday night is listed 'as "Old
Monument and Constitution Fashioned Revival Night", in which
there will be only lamps with oil
REV. JOHN C. CARMICHAEL, Minister used for lighting. The congrega-
tion will wear their working cloth-
CHURCH SCHOOL 9:45 a.m. 'ing, ginghams and even overalls.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.,1l Only the oldest songs will be em-
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP -- 6:45 p.m. played singing as in a 'bee' from
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m. memory. Testimonies will be given
telling only how they found Christ,
m When and where. This is to be a
service to bring back memories of
You Ae Cordially Invited To Attend the days when modern conven-
YOU A'et Cordially Invited To Attend iences were a dream only, and pro-
duce an atmosphere of old fashion-
Long Ave. Baptist Church Friday,will be Youth Night when
Martz will speak of their useful-
REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor ness and importance in the King-
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 a.m. dom of God. People of many ide-
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m. nominations ,are attending the
TRAINING UNION 6:45 p.m. meetings. No services will 'be held
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m. Saturday night. The Martz team
Will also sing ,and play piano and
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ........ 7:30 p.m. organeach night to everyone's
.Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street pleasure.
Air Conditioned Centrally Heated
Visiting Relatives
VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME Mr.and Mrs. W. erring andt"
Santord.
Visit In North Carolina
Mrs. Frank Pate 'and sons Gary
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH and Wayne have returned home
S- after visiting in Wilmington, N. C.
Corner Third St. and Baltzell Ave. C. BYRON SMITH, Pastor with Mr. and Mrs. Doyle Rether-
ford.
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m. TV
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION ...........- 6:45 p.m. TV 'Repair
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m. .-
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) ........ 7:30 p.m.
"Come and Worship God With Us" '


PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH *A
... All Work Guaranteed


Garrison at 20th Fair Prices
Prayer Service (Thursday) 7:45 P.M. Pick-up and Delivery
Sunday School --..... 10:00 A.M. DAY NIGHT
Morning Worship 11,:00 A.M. 227-4271 229-1676
Evening Worship -- 7:45 P.M. Waring Murdock
"Souls Harbor in the Port Area" .
Rev. Hubert D. White, Pastor Radio & TV Hospital
Comfortably Air-Conditioned (In Hurlbut Furn. Store)


\ MILD AND MELLOW
EIGHT O'CLOCK
COFFEE
I-Lb. Bag I -3.Bag ,


49c 1.45


HEINZ MUSHROOM


SOUP


3


11 OZ.
CANS


ANN PAGE

Mayonnaise

QUART 49c
JAR


Powdered Bleach
LESTARE 10 oz. pkg. 49c
Cleaner
LESTOIL Pt. 37c
Eelbeck
CORN MEAL 5 lb. 51 c
Chicken of the Sea
Dietetic Tuna 61/2 oz. 33c
Laundry Bleach3
CLOROX a /2 gal. 39c
Gerber Strained
BABY FOOD 6 jars 59c
Detergent
BREEZE giant 81c
Detergent
Rinso BLUE Ige. 28c
Liquid Detergent
WISK V/2 gal. $1.42
Detergent
LUX LIQUID 22 oz. 65c
Detergent
ALL giant size 79c
,Cleaner
HANDY ANDY qt. 69c
Detergent
FLUFFY ALL giant 79c
Nabisco Graham
CRACKERS lb. 33c


Seedless or Red Malaga
G R A PES
Fresh Ripe
BARTLETT PEAF


Prices In This Ad Are Effective Through
Saturday, August 19
r510
Fifth
Street


"SUPER-RIGHT" Wsetern Boneless Swiss Steak

Chuck Stew Lb.
"SUPER RIGHT" Extra Lean Freshly

GroundBeef 3 Lbs. 1


Angel Food

OAK HILL YELLOW FREESTONE


PEACHES

A & P Vacuum Packed
CA SHE W NUTS


Bathroom Tissue
SOFT WEVE 2
Kleenex Table
NAPKINS 2 b
Rath Blackhawk Fro
Beef Chopettes
Bondware Stripe
PAPER PLATES 3
Morton's-26 oz. 'box
SALT 2 b
Shortening
SPRY 3 lb.
Detergent
SWAN LIQUID 2
All Flavors Liquid
METRECAL 6 cai
Chase and S'anborn
COFFEE Ib.
Sunnybrook Sockeye
RED SALMON
BORDEN'S
BISCUITS 2
Robin Hod 5 Ibs.
FLOUR 55c
Larry's Poor Boy
Sandwiches pkg.
Detergent
SAIL g


- ."SUPER.RIGHT" WESTERN STEER BEEF CHUCK


89c
canc 19c
. 10 lbs.
c $1.07
of 2 79c
|iant 53c


RO


ST


LB.
Boneless
CHUCK ROAST
lb. 55c


c




or

650



.29:

. 35c)







39c




t19c




15c







39e

2 qt


Ic


















rolls 27c
oxes 49c
zen
8 oz. 59c
0 for 49c
oxes 27c
can 79c
2 oz. 65c
ns $1.79
can 77c


"SUPER 'RIGHT" WESTERN HALF OR WHOLE




PICNICS
AllGood Sugar Cured Sliced
BREAKFAST BACON lb. ctn. 49c


(SL ICED PICNICS, Lb


LB. I



"Super Sight" Western Meaty Pork
SPAPE RIBS


JANE PARKER DELICIOUS 8-INCH PIE


lb.


Apple Pie


.1
I
I


JANE PARKER LIGHT TENDER CAKE LARGE RIN


I





1


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CAN


7 oz. can


WHITE HOUSE Instant Non Fat

DRY MILK


GRADE 'A' SHIPPED MEDIUM

EGGS


7
79


DOZ.


HEINZ CUCUMBER DISC


PICKLES


49c


15 OZ.
JARS


35c


SULTANA

PEANUT BUTTER


69c


FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
CALIFORNIA VINE RIPE

CANTALOUPES


3


FOR


69c

'lb. 19c

tS lb. 19c


1


-_ -~l~lpl I I-I I I


I I --ek a~ L I I s E


I_. _


2 IAIE







thi'STARt, Port k1.Joe, PeFlsrRA U4117


GUS CREECH

Is Now

ROUTE REPRESENTATIVE
for






In the Port St. Joe Area

For Pick-Up and Delivery of Dry Cleaning
and Laundry



Phone 22z7-5231


Social Security Information


FOR EXPERT



Printing



CALL




227-3161


i te amount he would go if he wait-



Yo Are Invited

TO INSPECT YOUR NEW ENLARGED




Mu niC ipal Hospital




Sunday, August 20


The age at whcih men can apply
for Social Security payments has
'been changed to 62, aeocrding *o
John V. Carey, Manager of the
Panama City Social' Security Of-
fice. Until now, men had to be at
least 65 before they could make ap-
plication for payment unless they
were disabled. For several years
women have been able to claim
their Social Security payments at
a reduced amount when they were
62. Men now have the same op-
portunity.
The problem of the older worker,
who cuoold not get a job in good
times as well as bad, was recog-
nized by the Congress, 'and the -So-
cial Security program was made
flexible enough to take account of
this problem. Men -and women, who
have made Social Security contri-
butions over the years in the ex-
pectation of receiving benefits
when they were too old to work,
now have the same degree of pro-
tection if they find themselves un-
able to work ,because of conditions
beyond their control when they are
getting along in years, even though
they have not reached the age of
65.
Under this new provision, 'a man
can weigh the amount of benefit he
can get against his physical condi-
tion, the availability of work, and
his general financial situation, and
make the choice that seems best
for him under all the circumstanc-
es.
Carey stated 'that a minor's pay-
ments 'at 62 would be reduced be-
cause he would ibe getting paid
three years earlier. By reducing
the amount at 62, he will get the
same total payments as lie would
'by waiting until 65. The benefits
for a man worker are reduced at
the same rate as now applies for
a woman worker (5-9 of one per-
cent for -each month before age 65
foi which a benefit is payab'e.. A
huiiband's benefit 'is reduced at the
same rate as now applies to a
wife's insurance .benefits (25-36 of
a percent tor each month before 65
t&r which a benefit is payable). A
man who begins getting old-age in
surance 'benefit in the montl' in
which he reaches age 62 will get
a benefit amounting to 80% cf


Don't make fire a hazard,
Smokey Says:


DEDICATION PROGRAM STARTS AT 2:30 P.M.


Special Guided Tours of the New Hospital Will Be Conducted in the
Afternoon by the Hospital Staff

Refreshments Will Be Served by Members of the Hospital Auxiliary


This Public Service Announcement Sponsored by

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK at PORT ST. JOE
Member, FDIC and Florida National Group


Smokey Says:


ed until his 65th birthday. A man
getting husband's benefits at age
62 will get 75% of what he wou'd
have gotten at age 65. The percent-
age of reduction that is applied to
men who receive benefits before
age 65 will continue to apply after
he reaches the age of 65.
The dependent widower's and
surviving father's benefits 'are
payable at age 62 without a reduc-
tion. This has been the case for
widows and dependent mothers for
several years.
A claim must be made before
any payments -can begin. The ear-
liest .payment possible under this
change in the law would be for
the month of August, which would
be paid about the third of Septem-
ber. If you would like more infor-
mation about payments for men at
62, contact your Social Security
Office at 1135 Harrison Avenue,
Panama City, telephone POplar
3-5331.

A. A/s Plan

Open House

Meeting Here
In conjunction with the campaign
being iput forth by the Advertising
Council designating 'the week of
August 26, 1961, as AA WEEK, in
commemoration of the first 'anni-
versary of the Alcoholics Anony-
mous Group here in Port St. Joe,
the White Sands Group of Port .St.
Joe has arranged an open meeting
to be held on .Saturday, August 26,
from 8 to 10 p.m. in the High
School Auditorium.
The meeting will 'be widely ad-
vertised through the mediums of
radio press and TV. Its purpose
is 'to better acquaint the citizens
of Port St. Joe 'and surrounding
areas with the operation of Alco-
holics Anonymous, and to 'attempt
to correct any misconceptions
which may exist concerning the
'function of the organization. Per-
sons 'engaged in the medical pro-
fession will be .urged to 'attend, as
well as owners, managers and
personnel directors in business
'and industry. A concentrated ef-
fort is being ,put forth to assure
100% attendance by 'the Port St.
Joe Ministerial Alliance, members
of judiciary bodies of the 'City, and
heads of all law enforcement
agencies of Port St. Joe and Gulf
County, as well 'as at least one
member of the .State Cabinet.
This will be a normal' open' AA
meeting, except that several non-
alcoholics will be 'asked to speak
at the conclusion -of the regular
meeting, telling of their experien-
ces with employees and co-workers
prior to 'and after their association
with Alcoholics Anonymous. An
attempt will be made to answer 'any
questions which may arise 'as a
result of these talks. Please be as-
sured that anonymity will 'be main-
tained except for those taking an
active part on the program.
Adequate parking facilities are
available at the High School and
please make plans to join every-
one with 'the refreshments that will
be served immediately after the
meeting.

Smokey Says: ,


aEoT"" don't you bring home a sirloin steak
I7AEM for our cookouts?"


STEERING COMMITTEE



Our 16th Year of Service Home Owned and Operated



BOYLES WEEK END SPECIALS!


STORE-WIDE BACK-TO-SCHOOL SALE CONTINUES ..


BOY'S LINED

GABARDINE


JACKETS


SIZES 2 TO 7


$2.99


SIZES 8 to 14 $4.99
Favorite solid colors. Colorful rayon
quilted lining.


WOVEN DRIP DRY FABRICS

GIRL'S GINGHAM


DRESSES




Sizes 1 to 6X and 7 to 14. Adorable back
to school styles. Colorful plaids and
solids.
, -- 7 :- J-7 "aa-- % w i-. d u


First Quality


NYLON "NOMMMU 06" m H
NYLON CLIP SAVE WORTH
H o SE Cash I on
70/O $5.00
39c Discount JLPurchase
or more
pair Good Thursday, Friday & Saturday
8V/2 to 11. Favor- August 17, 18 and 19 only
ite shades. _-_.... ---.-.- --.-----


BOYS FULL CUT, SANFORIZED

Dungaree
10 oz. bar tacked regular cut. Sizes 4
to 16


$1


.69


13 3-4 oz. Western Style
Coarse Denim


$1


.89


Every
SALES 7


TICKET / eL
from
BOYLES
A possible win-
ner. Listen dally
8 and 9 a.m. over
WJOE for lucky 222 Reid Ave.
number.


Port St. Joc


Men's and Boys'

Nylon Stretch



29c

pair
New patterns and
colors


SPECIAL FEATURE
In
BOYLES BIG SHOE DEPARTMENT
New Pointed Toe
Corduroy and Suede

XFwORDS


.99


riack, Brown and Green. Sizes 4 to 10
Dthr New Fi i $2.99 to $6.99


Made in USA
Boy's
TENNIS



h .2- 41 Black & white.
27^-426S Sizes 8/2 to 6.


kim uin the great outdoorst j


Fire-can be friend or fiend!
ONE OF ElERY THREE VISITORS
TO FLORIDA COMES ON THE
RECOMMENDATION OF FRIENDS


v~/s 3 ; ~~~ I;~~~ I


k ,


q~L --a -~-, ------~----r~tt~


g~7a~W~b~-sh~~-'-.~


.iC: ~









ating equipment, and over-all in generate 1200 kw. The site also op-
tercommunications. A life-saving erates 207 tons of air conditioning.
feature is oxygen piped to every Visitors of the club were Pat
room. Culp, Keith Jordan, John Paul,
Conducted tours of the new hos- Harold Pope, L. D. Lewis and Clay
pital will be furnished all interest- Ferguson of Panama City land Bob
ed citizens Sunday after the dedi- Freeman of Port St. Joe.


-01
:' \










An accurate case history is an
S invaluable aid to your doctor. Its
Recorded facts help him determine
a correct diagnosis. When your :
:,doctor asks you searching ques-
tions-be sure your answers are
frank and accurate.
We are iot diagnosticians, but are '
skilled in dispensing medicines
exactly as ordered by your doctor.



'Free Parking
Drive-In Window Service
Buzzett's Drug Store
817 Williams Ave.


Hospital
(Continued From Page 1)
sater.
HOSPITAL NOW IS NEARLY
TRIPLED IN SIZE
Although at times as many as
30 .beds were occupied at one time
in the old hospital, the new edifice
nan normally accommodate 52 pa-
'lents, with room for much expan-
ion of bedload.
The new hospital has nearly 30,-


cation ceremony.
Refreshments will be served by
the Hospital Auxiliary.
FIVE YEARS PLANNING
The new hospital didn't 'just hap-
pen". First work on planning of the
.expanded facility and financial ar-
rangements began in 1956. Working
with the Hill-Burton specifications,
obtaining money, and letting con-
tracts continued until January 6,
1960, when the contract was let to
.the E. F. Gunn Construction Com-
pany to Port St. Joe.
After five years, the job is now
complete.



Kiwanis Hears

Vitro Site Chief


"Freedom Our

Heritage" Is

Program Topic
Miss Beth Garraway, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Garraway,
formerly of Port 'St. Joe and now
residents of M'arianna spoke to the
Rotary Club Thursday at their reg-
ular meeting. Miss Garraway pic-
tured the opposite to the publicized
juvenile delinquent to the Club and
set their minds at ease over re-
ports of a 'decaying youth.
"Freedom, Our Heritage" was
the speaker's subject. As a pur-
pose to her talk, Miss Garraway
asked the question of her subject,
"Why would our life be worth liv-
ing if freedom failed?"


Don Rutland, site chief for Vitro The speaker offered the opinion
Corporation at Oape San Bias was of the nation's position because of
the program Tuesday 'at the Kiwan- a growing 'attitude of taking free-
is luncheon meeting. Rutland gave dom for granted. She declared that
the club a brief history of the Vit- our nation's mission is to defend,
ro organization and told them some- 'to extend and to maintain the free-
thing of the work at the Cape Sanm dom of mankind to all ends.
Blas site. "The freedoms enjoyed by our
Vitro grew out of the Second American laws have served to pro-
World War from a -manufacturer of 'mote our .system -throughout the
ceramics to an electronics complex world without foreign aid.", the
of today. Vitro has five main divi- speaker declared. "It isn't enough,
sions: Vitro Engineering, Vitro that we 'are against Communism
Laboratories, Vitro Services manu- but we must 'be .for the United
facturerm of rare earths and ura- States -and its system.".
Mium and electronics. Today our freedom is being test-
The local installation is operat- ed iby the forces 'of slavery. "Can
ed iby Vitro Services. w6 meet the test?" she asked. In


900 square feet of floor space. It Headquarters for the local' op-
aas cost-for expansion-in the rations is Eglin Air Force Base-
neighborhood of $600,000. Original an operation which began in 1951.
plans called for an expenditure by The Eglin operation, including San
the city of $225,000. and $275,000 Blas and all down range stations
by the Government in Hill-Burton -employs 1100 men and women.
.unds. Change orders and added The Eglin Gulf Test Range, op-'
facilities have run the cost up to rated by Vitro is the first of its
the $600,000 mark with the city and kind in the nation featuring inte-
the government sharing the cost grated communications between all
on the same ratio-45% by the sites.
city and 55% by the government. In investment, the San Blas Sta-
Added services in the mew hos- tion has $780,000 invested in build-
pital will include -two operating ings; $8,000,000 in electronic equip-
Srooms, two -labor rooms, two dellv- ment and a monthly payroll of
ery rooms, emergency room, two $50,000.00. 'Iu addition the station
nurseries, three waiting rooms, two stocks some 12,000 different spare
recovery rooms; three isolation parts.
rooms, central heating and air con- The site is fully self sufficient
ditioning, emergency power gener- with power generator equipment to


order to meet the challenge against
freedom, the speaker recalled the
President's inaugural address in
which he said, "Ask not what yoar
country can do for you, but what
can you do for your country".
Stating specific examples to pre-
serve freedom 'the speaker said we
"must learn of our enemies, make
scoial improvement our business,
exercise our right to vote, respect
,human dignity, inform ourselves of
our history, combat public apathy,
appreciate and love America and
return to our spiritual heritage.
Guests of the club were Billy
Buzzett and Dwight Marshall of
Apalachicola, Gilbert McLemore of
Decatur, Ga., and Emmett Brown
of Palatka.


S. and if your Dairy Foods Bear


the Brand Name





i ., Z. x:



You Have the Best

Rely on the time-tested name
of BORDEN to bring you
quality every day -Pick up
our product in your favorite
food store or call Wewahitch-
ka collect.. 9 433



NEwton 9-4383 "
For Convenient Home Delivery


We Carry A Complete Line of

Dairy Products



TRY OUR FAMOUS COUNTRY






Delivered to Your Door In Time for Breakfast





Harden's Dairy


"Gulf County's On ly Producing Dairy"

Phone 639-4383 Wewahitchka, Florida


THE STAR, iort t. Joe, PFl. THURSDAY AUGUST 1if 1961


* :CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING *


SOME FISHI-Mrs. Bobby Smith poses beside a 240 pounds-yes
240 pound-shark .she caught last Friday afternoon at 'Eagle Har-
bor,in St. Joseph Bay. The shark struck a line Mrs,. Smith hald out
fishing for ling. The 'big fish fought for an hour and a half be-
Ifore he was finally landed. The fish was eight feet, seven 'and a half
inches long. We couldn't tell you what kind of shark he is. It's
just a shark, and that's enough definition for us. (Star photo)


W -7 I ,i IM E
:-t. GI? m .
-haA


- p c,


FUND RAISING PLAN-Members of the White City Volunteer Fire
Department is operating the In.gram Service Station at White City
today with all profits going to the Department to purchase supplies
needed by the Department. The station is owned by Paul Bratpher
and is being manned by members of he White City Volunteer' Fire
Department. The ladies auxiliary of the Department is also selling
homemade cakes, pies, cookies, etc. at ithe station today. The pro-
fits-again-go to the Department: (photo by Andy Jordan)


Florida Is First State In South To Have

Dial Telephones In Every City In State

800 million 'dollars in buildings,
When Pthe Gulf Telephone 'C a- equipment and other facilities. The
pamy in Perry is converted to dial construction program for 'the com-
service on August 31, all telephones bined industry amounts to 93 mil-
in Florida will be dial operated, lion dollars for 1961.
This will give Florida the distinc-
tion of being the first state in the
South and the fourth in 'the United Bowling Assn.
States to reach this goal of 100%
,dial operation. The three preceed-
ing states are Connecticut, Rhode in
Island and Delaware.
The first dial central office in A meeting will be held to help
Florida was established in 1913 in form the Port St. Joe Bowling As-
Tampa by the Peninsular Tele- sociation. Election of officers and
phone Company, now a part of the rules of the association will be se-
General Telephone System. The lar- elected at this meeting. All persons
gest company operating in the state interested in bowling in the Port
Southern Bell, converted its last St. Joe 'area are invited to attend.
manual office to dial service on The meeting will be held in the
June 4, 1961. This exchange was St. Joe Motel Lounge at 7:30 p.m.
coated in Lake City. Monday, August 21. All persons


In this 'period of time, there have a 'u rgct u 'L" u- timo eue LU t ue
been numerous -advances in tele- amount of .business to be discussed.
phone technology that 'have con- .
stantly improved the quality of Gulf Cou nt
telephone service. The 'development u l UUnty
,of microwave transmission and the Forest Fire Record
co-axial cable vastly improved long
'distance service. Improved switch- J. H. Pope, dispatcher for the
ing equipment has enabled the in-
dustry to provide orloridaForest Service, Gulf Coun-
demands for local service. ty Unit, gives the torest fire re
Dort fo Julr -a fQ i nr..


Presently in progress is a pro-
,gram of introducing Direct Dist-
ance Dialing to Florida. Many tele-
phone subscribers in the state al-
ready have 'this service which en-
ables them to dial long distance
calls without the aid of an opera-
tor.
Florida Telephone numbers them-
selves are in a process of changing
to a system known as ANC or All
Number Calling. This system, using
seven digits instead !of the familiar
'two letters and five digits, will al-
Iwo for continued expansion of tele-
phone service as well as furnishing
a uniform numbering plan. -The
present numbering plan will run
out of available letter-number com-
binations during the 1980's.
To meet the demands for service
'over the years the Florida Tele-
Sphone Industry has invested over


Fourteen fires burned 96.1 acres
of woodlands during the month.
During July, 1960, eight fires burn-
ed 20.3 acres of woodlands.
To date this year in Gulf County,
forest fiers have burned 218-9 acres
against 23 fires burning 2,510.9 last
year through July.

Return From Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Bateman
and daughters, Kayanna and Su-
zette returned home last Wednes-
day after a 12-day camping trip
at Warm Springs, Ga., and points
of interest in Tennessee and North
Alabama.


SHOP AT HOME


Send The STAR To A Friend


FOR RENT: Furnished 'bedroom
'and ,private bath, living room and
TV privilege, convenient to school
and church. Especially comfortable
for lady. Phone 229-2636. Best time
to call before noon. 2tp


FOR RENT: Unfurnished 4-ibed-
room house, 2 'baths, living room
dining room, kitchen, ,breakfast
room, utility room, venetian blinds,
fireplace,. gas heat. Near grammar
school. $85.00 mo. Call Mrs. James
Perritt, Phone 227-8581. 4tp-8-10
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom furnished
apartmnet. 1 'block from town.
Mrs. Charles Brown. 227-4511. tfec
FOR RENT: 7-room house located
506 First St. Sale price $4500.
Call 227-8384. 2tp
FOR SALE: Three bedroom ma-
sonry home. Hardwood floors,
central heat and ducted for air
conditioning. New window unit al-
ready installed. 813 Marvin Ave.
Minerva McLane. 4tp-7-20
FOR SALE: 1961 Great Lakes trail-
er, 40' long, 10' wide. Contact
Charles Strange at Blue Gator
Trailer Park, Mexico Beach. Phone
227-3021. tfo-7-20
FOR SALE: St. Joe Beach. Five
room ,brick house, two ceramic
baths, carport, glassed in family
room, and utility room, deep well,
located on corner lot. Pay equity
and take up VA loan. Call C. E.
White at 648-4445. tfc-7-20
FOR SALE: 45'x8' Richardson
house trailer with automatic
washer. $2,995.06. Call Bill Rich
at 229-1145. tfc-5-4


FOR. SALE: 3 bedroom insulated
house. Hardwood floors, wired for
air conditioner and electric stove.
Corner lot, 302 16th St., $8.500.
$57.21 monthly payments. FHA fi-
nancing, 25-year mortgage. $300
down payment plus FHA closing
costs. Write or call collect, Ben
Dickens, 1101 Piedmont Drive, Tal-
lahassee, Florida. Phone 385-1015.
FOR SALE


1. 2-bedroom house at Mexico
Beach on waterfront 100x143 lot.
Fully furnished. Ceramic tile bath.
Priced at only $10,975.00.
2. Large frame house, over 2,000
tt. of floor space on five acres of
land at Kinard, Fla. Priced at $6,-
600.
3. 3-bedroom house, 1 bath, car-
port and 'utility room, on Marvin
Avenue. Pay owner's equity and
assume balance of $9,461.56 pay-
able at. $70.00 per month.
4. Lots at Douglas Landing for
fish camps and retirement homes.
Terms arranged to suit you.
5. Lots to rsale at St. Joe Beach.
1 block from water. Reasonable
terms.
6. 106 acres at Beacon Hill. Good
investment opportunity.
7. 32U acres of wfoodiand, six'
miles South of Wewahltchka. Ap-
proximately 300 acres planted in
4-year old pine ees.
8. New three bedroom homes un-
der construction onon Cypress Ave-
nue. $500 down, payments, approxi-
mately $80.00 per month. FRA.
9. Four lots on Marvin Ave. $660
each. Terms.
E. TOM PRIDGEON
Reg. Real Estate Broker
C. W. Long, Salesman
Phone 227-7741 301 Williams Ave.


FOR SALE: Twilight mobile home
8x36. Small equity and take up pay-
ments. Phone 648-4394. Mrs. Jerald
Garrett, Rt. 3. 4tc-8-3
FOR SALE
Two bedroom house on Palm
Boulevard. Only $6,000.
New three bedroom house on Mc-
Clellan. To sell for $10,000.
Three bedroom house on Garri-
son Avenue with chain link fence.
Buy owner's equity and assume G.
I. loan on balance with payments
of $60.00 per month.
Three bedroom house with den
on Seventh Street located In center
of two nice tree shaded lots. To sell
for $10,000. 3t-8-3
FRANK and DOT'S AGENCY
221 Reid Ave. Phone BAIll 7-3491
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom house 1308
Long Ave. Garage and utility
room. Call Grady Player, 227-3636.
EPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call
Buford Griffin, Phone 7-7011 for
trick expert service. Utf
PAINT CONTRACTING
JAMES FLOYD
214/2 7th St. Highland View


FOR RENT: Furnished apartment.
Living 'bedroom, kitchen and
bath, 401 13th St., J. A. Mira, Ph.
648-4128.
FOR RENT: House on Long Ave-
nue facing Elementary School.
Call Mrs. Nora Duren. Phone 7-5471
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom house at
St. Joe Beach. Furnished or un-
furnished. Carport, screened porch
and all rooms extra large. Phone
648-4286. tfc-7-31
FOR RENT: Two 2-bedroom, fur-
-nished or unfurnished houses. $50
per month. See Bill Carr at 227-8111
FOR RENT: Large 6-room house
with ;bath, hot and cold water,
large yard and garden. At Over-
street. See Mrs. Hardy at Post Of-
fice. tfc-8-10
FOR RENT: One bedroom furnish-
ed house in Highland View. Lots
and houses to rsale at St. Joe
Beach. J. L. Clark, Phone 227-7771.
FOR RENT: Large 7-room houfs
with, tile bath 'and fenced in yard
on ibut route at White City. T.
Hicks, Ph. 227-7995. 2tc-8-17
FOR SALE or RENT: Located in
White City. 3 bedroom, on four
lots. Inquire Mrs. James Godwiu
at White City. $4,000. or $45 per
mo. rent. Owner, O. H. Taylor, 1222
Oak Ave., Panama City. 4tp-8-17


..AWN MOWER FOR RENT: $1.00
hour. Cut your lawn and let .aue
borry with upkeep of mower. quitf
Service Station, Aubrey R. Tomin-
son, Phone 7-7501.
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F&AM every first ane
third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.


JOSEPH C. EVANS, W. M.
BILLY JOE RICH, Sec.
All Master Masons cordially invited


NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the
City Tax Assessment Roll for the
City of Port St. Joe, Florida, for
the year 1961, will be submitted to
the Tax Equalizing Board for ap.
proval on the 15th day of August
A.D., 1961 at the City Hall at 7:00
P.M. All persons desiring to have
corrections made in such roll, whe-
ther in the listing, valuation of pro-
perty or toherwise, are requested
to file with the undersigned on or
before the 15th day of August, 1961
their petition setting forth their ob-
IN THE COUNTY JUDGE'S COURT,
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
IN PROBATE.
In Re: Estate of
CLEM WALKER,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
All creditors of the estate estate of Clem Wal-
ker, deceased, are hereby notified and re-
quired to file any claims or demands which
they may have against said estate in the of-
fice of the County Judge of Gulf County,
Florida, in the courthouse at Wewahitchka,
Florida, within eight calendar months from
the date of the first publication of this no-
tice. Each claim or demand must be in writ-
ing and must state the, place or residiace
and post office, address of the claimant and
must be sworn to by the claimant, his
agent, or his attorney, or it will become
void according to law. '
I/a/ DAMON PETERS
Executor of the Estate of,
Olem Walker, deceased. 4t-8-10

-NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the
Gulf County Rod 'and Gun Club, a
non-profit corporation, has filed its
verified petition for a decree dis-
solving said corporation; any per.
son having objection to the peti-
tion or .to the granting thereof-
must file Ihis. objections thereto
on or before August 28, 1961, or be
deemed by the Court to have con-
sented thereto.
Witness my hand and the offi-l
cial seal of the Circuit Court, of
Gulf County, Florida, this August
16, 1961.
(SEAL) GEORGE Y. CORE
Clerk Circuit Cuort


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HURLBUT Gift Shop

PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


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THE ST R
Port St. Joe, Florida


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FOR SALE: Reg. $65.00 21" four-
cycle power mower. Used three
times. Special for only $45.00 cash.
First come, first served. Like new.
FIRESTONE Home and Auto Sup-
ply.
FOR SALE: 2 bedroom home in
White City. Corner lot, 82'x200o.
With chain link fence. Phone 227-
8825. J. W. Beaucha'mp. 2tc-8-17
R. A. M.-Regular convocation of
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
M., 2nd and 4th Mond ays. All vilit
ing brothers welcome.
John H. Dickey, High Priest
Joel Lovett, Secretary
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0.
0. F.-Meets second and fourth
Thursday, ;8:00. p.m. in American
Legion Hall. All members urged to
attend.
Noble Grand: Emmett Daniell
Secretary: J. C. Martin.
WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION, Meetf
ing first and -third Tuesday
nights, 8:00 p.m. American Legion
Home.


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