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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01339
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 27, 1961
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01339

Full Text










THE STAR


MONEY TALKS-Let's keel
It where we can speak with It
once In a while-Trade with
> your home town merohantel
%" .-


"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"
"WENTY-FOURTH YEAR PORT ST. JOE, PLORIBA THURSDAY, JULY 27, 1961 'NUMBER 44



Coission U....ps udget
-Commission Ups Budget


To


Tentative


16.6 Mills


Proposed Budget Hikes Millage By

25 Percent Over Last Year's Levy

In a budget session held Tuesday night at the Court
House in Wewahitchka, the Gulf County Board of Commis-
sioners tentatively set Gulf's new budget at 16.6 mills for
the coming year. This amounts to a 3.6 hike over last year's
budget which required 13 mills in taxes to finance. The new
budget as drawn Tuesday night is only tentative thus far.


Youth Pleads Guilty
To B and E Charge

A 'pre-sentence ivnsetigation was
ordered on David Coley, Jr., of
Port .St. Joe Monday by Circuit
Judge W. L. Fitzpatrick after the
youth entered a plea of guilty to
breaking and -entering with intent
to commit petty larceny.
Coley admitted 'breaking into 'he
Al Jernigan 'Service Station in
Highland View on the night of July
1'0.
Glenn Preston Anderson, 20-year,
old Miamian, who had earlier en-
tered a plea of guilty to breaking
and entering the A & P Store in
Port St. Joe on May 17 appeared
before 'the circuit judge to with-
draw his plea after he was found


Tub Full of Silver Dollars Can Attract Plenty of Attention
William H. 'Winters, Safety Director of the St. morning. While Winters and Dodson are suppos-
Joe Paper Company (left) and Walter H. Dod- ed to be inspecting the silver dollars, the expres-
son, president of the Florida National Bank of sions on their faces also tell a story-such as the
one on Winter's face that wistfully says, "wslh
Port St. Joe inspect the tub full of silver dollars- that was mine", and Dodson's face fairly shoults
that were. awarded St. Joe 'Paper Company em- "Whooey, son, what'a mess of cornbread ani gravy
ployees for gpod safety roeords last Tuesday that'd buyl"


ETAOIN SHRDLU
by W$-6.EY R. RAMSEY

Reading the Gulf County "Whirl-
wind" the other week we ran across
an article where Editor Bandjough
-pushing 40 he is--hard-said, in
part: "Looks like we're getting
ready to fight man-to-man wars
again. It's better that way, really.
Who wants to die gloriously for the
fatherland fighting atomic fallout
he can't see, feel, taste, smell? An
atomic war would -be just plain un-
romantical and all you young
cannon-fodder fellers ought not to
stand still for it. Personally, on the
next go-round, I'm heading for the
swamps .
Personally, were we In Ed's con-
dition-physical and otherwise-we
would rather take our chances on
being drafted than ;being lost in the
swamp. Considering everything,
the latter is more likely .to happen.
I firmly believe that should an-
other conflagration cnoflag in the
world, Ed and I both will still be
home punching Linotype keyboards.
But it did fill up a couple of
column inches.

Speaking of fighting fallout, I do
believe we have already had -some
-around here.
A film shown last week by Bill
Winters gave several symptoms of
radiation from fallout. These symp-
toms included such things as dis-
colored spots on the 'skin, nausea,
nervousness, falling hair there
is your symptom right there. My
,hair is falling and it just has to ibe
"fallout".

And we also read where a firm
in Jacksonville is advertising its
services to construct atomic (bomb
and fallout shelters.
Should the time come to need
such a device, for what are we go-
ing to protect ourselves?
e :..0, 4.6
These women!
They start their little women in


- Take the case of DeWetebiRowan.
age 10-note that, age 16---of Tal-.
lahassee, granddaughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Rowan.
She wrote this:
To tell the truth,, and. don't
-think I'm kiding, women DO work
harder than men! (what a laugh)
But don't get me wrong, men aren't
lazy at all! (glad to see a woman
freely admit it) They do their job
making a living for their families.
Though nowadays the jobs are get-
ting easier. (ha!) For instance:
businessmen and car salesmen have
nothing to do but talk and maybe
drive a few hundred miles a day.
If you think that's hard, listen to
what the women do while the men
are should I say resting? (no,
you shouldn't)
If I'm not mistaken the wives are
usually taking care of the children,
shopping, doing housework and
even the gardening is mostly done
by the women. (what the little girl
means, is dusting the TV, chasing
the kids out of the house so the
soap operas will have less compe-
tition and watering the geranium).
And lby the time the men come
home the wives are tired, and
grumpy. (she's right there!) Take
my Grandmother, right now she's
working in the- garden and my
Grandfather is reading the paper.
So the men had better wake up be-
cause someday before this world
ends, the women just may take
over."
The parenthesis are ours.
That ,mother ought to be asham-
ed, brain-washing that poor little
innocent girl into believing such
things, when they obviously aren't
true. Men are good workers, mak-
ing it possible for women to have
it easy all day long.
What makes women get fatter as
they grow older? Not enough exer-
cise-not enough to do to ,keep
their muscles up to 'snuff.
Eh? What makes men get fat?
That's not fat, that's muscle from
working so hard.
Little Debbie's education HAS
been neglected however, the wo-


young-indoctrinating them I mean. men have ALREADY taken over.

,C l-_-m C---I I -; J -


While most of the Commission
had expressed a desire for frugality
in setting up a new ,budget in the
county, due 'to past economic con-
ditions, several requests were rot
to the County Board during its
budget hearings for inclusion in
the county's expenditures. These
apparently were placed in the bud-
get on its first draft to come up
with the figure arrived at Tuesday
night.
What with the 1.75 million hike
,in county valuation of property for
tax purposes, the county has the
opportunity to raise their income
'by $17,500.00 even at the old value
of 'a Gulf County mill which is a
little over $13,000.00 now. But
with the .hike In valuation the val-
ue of the mill will also rise.
It is interesting to note that


to be under 21 by investigators, while the millage has been hiked
'Under the law, a defendant un- for the new ,budget by a whopping


der 21 years of age cannot plead
guilty without his parents being
advised that he is being tried on
specific charges. ,
Anderson's birthday will, come
in the first part of August at
which time he will be allowed to
enter his plea again in court.


Jaycees Install New Officers In A

Dinner Meeting Tuesday Night


Port St. Joe Jaycees installed a
new slate of officers to serve for
the coming fiscal year at a dinner
meeting Tuesday night at the Mo-
tel St. Joe. Installing officer was
Vern Williams of Tallahassee, Dis-
trict Vice-President of Florida Jay-
cees.
Officers installed were: R. H.
Ellzey serving his -second year as
,president; Harry Tison, First Vice-
President; Joe Parrott, Second
Vice-President; Do n Grossman,
Secretary and Ted. Cannon, Trea-
surer.
The new slate of directors in-
'stalled were Aaron Cooley, Ashley
Costin, Wade Barrier, Jr., John
Howard and Dr. Conral Williams.
The new officers will :serve for
one year.'The Jaycees fiscal year
began on July 1.
In addition to officer installa-
tion Tuesday night, the results of
a balloting of Jaycee members
was announced choosing the Key
Jaycee for the year, featuring
service to the club and the Jay-
cee of the Year, featuring service
for the club in civic activities.
'President EIIzey was chosen by
the Jaycees to receive the Key
'Man Certificate for his work in
organizing the chapter and for
his guidance through its first full
year of activities.
Jaycee Wade Barrier, Jr., was
chosen Jaycee of the Year for his
work in several important pro-
jects carried on throughout the
year. Barrier was instrumental In
the projects of building the Jay-
cee float for the Governor's in-
naugural parade in January, safe-
ty flare sales, street light survey
and various other projects.
In remarks to the Jaycees, Wil-
liams charged the young men to
become active within their com-


munity, for, as he said, "Young
men of action can change the
world."
Williams told the Jaycees of a


St. James Episcopai Cnurcn iiss Vacation Scneaule district caucus coming up in Aug-
St. James' Episcopal Church ser- on August 6. On other Sundays, ust in V lpariso and urged local
vices, beginning July 30, will be Layreaders licensed fby the Bishop Jaycees to attend.
under the leadership of the Vestry !of Florida will conduct .services. Guest .speaker of the evening
and Layreaders luring the absence The regular schedule will be fol- was Bill Penrose of Tallahassee
of the Priest in Charge, Harry L. lowed for Church School -and mid- who spoke and showed a short film
Bahbbit, through August 20. day services, however, the 7:30 on the Children's Home Soesaty of
The Rev. Barnum McCarty of a.m. services will be suspended un- Florida.
Sallahassee will celebrate the Holy til August 27, when the Priest,in- Guests of the Jaycees were their
Eucharist and deliver the sermon Charge will celebrate, wives.


Electric Storm

Causes Damage

Here Sunday

A severe electrical .storm in Port
St. Joe Sunday afternoon, left its
mark on the entire city with dam-
aged buildings, dead telephones,
burned out appliances and water
heaters, standing as mute evidence
of the storms wrath for the 30 to
45 minutes that it raged in the
area.
Local insurance offices report
around two dozen claims for light-
ning damage as a result of the
storm. These include everything
from -structural damage to 'electric
appliance damage.
Lighting struck the :St. Joe Auto
Parts Company building and knock-
ed several cement blocks off the
top of the North wall of the 'build-
ing and did a good deal of roof dam-
age to the building. The bolt ras
inside the building and burned up
a short wave radio set ;belonging
to 'the company owner, Dick Lam-
berson. Lightning also broke out
several windows in the same area,
hitting the Medical Clinic -and the
law offices of Silas R. Stone. Tele-
phones in the area were practically
all knocked out.
Appliance repairmen report that
over a dozen hot water heaters
were knocked out by the 'storm,
along with several' ranges, washing
machines, television sets, etc.
In Highland View a 'bolt set fire
'to a house trailer owned by Neil
Garrett and caused a fire whli:,h
i gutted the kitchen 'section of tha


Rotary District Governor Slated

For Visit With Local Club Today


Frank M. Hancock of Palatk'a,
.governor of Rotary district 694,
will speak at the Port St. Joe Ro-
tary ,Club today, in an official vis-
it here.
Hancock, elected at the Tokyo,
Japan International convention of
Rotary, also will meet with local
President B. Roy Gibson', Jr., and
Secretary Paul S. Fensom and oth-
er officers in the club assembly
program.
Before his election as governor,
Hancock was special representative
to former Governor Bob Langlie of
Jacksonville. He also served as
president, director, treasurer and
vice-president of the Palatlka Ro-
tary Club.
He has been a member of the ex-
ecutive committee of the North
Florida Council of Boy Scouts of
America for five years, this coun-
cil's representative on the Nation-
al Board, and now is council chair-
man.
He Is past president of the Palat-
ka Parent-Teachers Association, six
years chairman of the March of
Dimes, Chairman of the Finance
Committee of St. James Methodist
Church, past president of the Quar-


25 percent, dollar-wise, the new Sbud. terback Club and secretary of the
get will be practically the same a.s Putnam County Committee 3f 100.
last year. The budget total in dol- The Port St. Joe Rotary Club is
lars is $545,809.00. Last year's bud- cne of 37 in district 694 of Rotary
get total was $507,582.00 which gives International which is comprised of
a net Increase of $38,227.00 all of more than 500,000 members in 123
which will have to be raised' thru nations of the Free World.
increased taxes.
According to Clerk of the Circuit
Court, George Y. Core, the County hoping for the missiI~ fuel center
will have $17,642A0 less state men- ch will beconstructed in the
ey coming to the county this year will constructed in cal
than last yea. This- uts to near future. Thiokol Chemical
than last yea. Ti mounts to a Corp, one of -the companies biding
little over a mill. A mill this yearto manufacture the rocket propel-
with Gulf's property valuation will plant ha gned an option on land
'bring in $14,537.00. near the small Goergia town of
The amount of money requested Richmond Hill to construct the
for each department is as follows: Ri h H n
GWplant should they win the bid.
General Fund, $202,783.00. t was reported by the article in
Fine and Forfeiture Fund, $83,- the T-U that the plant would' em-
Ro219ad00. nd Bridge Fund, $17.-loy 8,000people.
Road and Bridge Fund, 173.- In Washington, four firms are
587.00. Joseh Fire Control District, seeking the government contract
St. Joseh ire control District, to produce the solid-propelant boos-
$1,600.00. ters for the Nova space rocket and
C$70,370.8pital .Outlay1.Resere nd are looking for plant .sites in Geor-
$70,370.81. gia, Texas, Florida, North Carolina,
Health enter Interest and SnkLouisiana, California and Oregon.
ing Fund, $14,250.00. A spokesman for one of the bid-
A complete 'breakdown of the ding companies confirmed the ac-
new 1961-62 budget will be publish- named the companies as
ed in next week's issue of The tn an nm t a
ed next week's Issue of The Thiokol Chemical Corp., Aerojet-
Star. General Corp., United Aircraft Co.,
anl Grand Central Rocket Co.
Missile Plant He said 'the companies need a
8 SS site of about 26,000 square feet and
lsthat it must be on deep water. He
UR mOr Flies said each of the companies has
Ibeen considering sites for some
Fuel was -added to the rumor cur- time, under option, in the event one
rently rife in Port St. Joe of pol. of them should get the contract,
sibility of a missile fuel plant be- which is not expected to be awarded
ing constructed near Overstreet by for some weeks or months.
a story in the Jacksonville Times- The Nova rocket, now 'being de-
Union Saturday. signed for the National Eeronau-
The story in ,the Times-Union tics and Space Administration and
said that a small town in Georgia, the Air Force, has as its primary
35 miles from Savannah was also (Continued On Page 4)


Frank M. Hancock


Mrs. Carter Ward

Is Taken by Death

Mrs. Cora Lee Miller Ward, age
82, passed away Sunday afternoon
at her home in White City.
Mrs. Ward has been a long-time
resident of Gulf County and has
lived at White City for a number
of years.
She is survived by her husband,
Garter; three daughters. Mr.-.~Del-
Ji ?potts o? Jacks'nvlle; Mrs. Nita
Brarndon orf Pen~icoia,' and Mr,.
Hazel ;Stafford of White City; six
grandchildren and seven great
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held Tues-
-day, July 25 from the White City
Baptist 'Church with the Rev. L.
J. Keels, assisted by Rev. C. A.
Lundy, officiating. Following the
services at White City, the body
was taken to Bruce, Florida for
funeral services at the Bruce Me-
thodist Church at 2:00 p.m. Tues-
day. Interment was in the Bruce
Cemetery.
Active pallbearers were Claude
Weston, Edison Booth, Lee Hicks,
E. L. 'Slim" Antley, Bill Harper
and Tom Owens.
Honorary Pallbearers were James
Godwii, Mr. McConnell, Earnest
Rich, R. H. Sewell, Robert Daniels,
W. C. Robertson, J. M. Sealed, Fred
Maddox, Stets Pridgeon, James
Harper, Jeff Plair, Edgar Wil-
liams, Rudolph Shirah, Clyde Gen-
try, B. A. Pridgeon, Sr., B. C.
Prince, Bill Beauchamp, Andy Jor-
dan, J. Y. Wimberly, L. D. Davis,
Harold Chafin, John Henry Smith,
Roy Harper, George Harper, Bobby
Stebel, Paul Bratcher, Gus Creech,
James Horton, Sam Husband, Otis
Pyle, Pete LeGrone, James Lauri-
mroe, C. E. Boyer, Bill Roemer
and Vestre Burke.
'Comforter Funeral Home of
Port St. Joe was in charge of ar-


rangements.


Functions of Children's Home Society of Florida Is

Explained To Kiwanis Club At Tuesday Noon Meeting


The work and needs of the Chll- early 1900's until just eight years
dren's Home Society of Florida was ago when he died.
outlined to the Port St. Joe Kiwan- The Children's Home Society has
is Club Tuesday by Bill Penrose
of Tallahassee, public relations operated through the years on, free
representative for the Society. will donations and legacies. For its


The Children's Home Society of


annual operating budget the So-
ciety has been using the free-will


establish-over a period of three
years-an additional $2 million in
trust for additional interest bear-
ing assets. The new fund is to be
called the Marcus C. (Daddy) Fagg
Memorial Fund in honor of the late
Marcus C. Fagg who devoted so
much of his time and talents to the


trailer. The Garretts were not at Florida is unique in the state in donatoins sent in along with inter- Society.
home when the bolt struck, that it is the only non-sectarian est earned off a trust fund. The The Children's Home Society
At the same time the Garrett institution operating for the place- trust fund was built up by placing places children of any age In adop-
trailer was struck, the city fire si- ment of orphaned children in per- all money left the Society through tive homes throughout the State
ren was also put out of commission manent homes. The Society was wills and legacies in a special fund of Florida. The Society even goes
,by lightning. This caused some de- established in Jacksonville in 1902 for interest bearing purposes. 'so far in its investigative process
lay in getting a fire crew to -the and has operated continuously on Here of late, free-will donations to find parents and babies that re-
Garrett trailer, free-will donations since that time. and trust fund interest has not semble each other in hair and eye
--- The Society was originally found- been providing enough money for coloring, facial characteristics, etc.
RETURNS FROM HOSPITAL ed to serve Duval County alone, annual operations and the Society Penrose also showed a short film
,Charles "Bo" Brown has return-, but has since grown to serve the has found it necessary to dip into of a kick-off dinner for the fund
ed from the Emory University Hos- entire state. its trust fund capital for operating raising committee which was held,
pital in Atlanta, Ga., where he has One of the staunchest workers, funds. This deficit operations has last February at which directors
been a patient for the past several the Children's Home has had over caused the Society to take over and operators of the Society ga-
days. Brown returned with what he the 'past years was one Marcus C. $100,000 from their interest bearing there to 'begin the fund drive.
reported to be a "clean bill of' "Daddy" Fagg who served the So- capital for the past two years., Guest of the Club was Jim Coop-
health". city as administrator from thel The .Society is now seeking to er of Gainesville.


lOc
PER COPY


!









Miss Margaret Leigh Mdrtin .Becomes

Bride of Kenneth Earl Corbin July 10

'Miss Margaret Leigh Martin be- A program of nuptial music was
came the ,bride of Kenneth Earl 'presented .by Mrs. Mildred Mont-
.Corbin. at 11.:00 o'clock July 10 in gomery. Mrs. Norma Russell sang,
the First Baptist Church with Rev. "The Lord's Prayer", "Always" and
Byron Smith, pastor cf ,he church, "Through The Years", .before the
officiating over the double ring cer- ceremony. Her accompanist was
emony. The bride is the daughter of Mrs. Mark Tomlinson. Given in
Mr. and Mrs. Courtney Eugene Mar- marriage :by her father, the 'bride
tin ,and the grocm's parents are wore a street-length gown of white
Mr. and Mrs. John Paul Corbin of silk taffeta with a princess panel
Panama City. flaring skirt appliqued with seed


MRS. KENNETH EARL CORBIN


sequins, Her short* vtil of illusion --
fell from her6 crown of. seed pearls .
and sequins matchifig those of her St. ferSburg Re
gown. She carried a shower of
white carnations Of FSPB Public Re
Miss Barbara Martin served her
sister as maid of honor and wore
a ,pink organza street-length gown Mrs. J. K. Flanagan of St. P
over net and white taffeta. The ersburg, has been named chair
3 bouffant organza- skirt was embroi- of the Public Relations commit'
dered with roses of matching color, of the Florida Society for -the P
Her head piece was of ,pink net vention of Blindness, it has be
trimmed with dark .pink flowers announced iby Mrs. Robert ,S. B.
and ,bows. Her corsage was. made of nard, president of the Society,
pink carnations. Long active in St. Petersbu
Donald Corbin served his 'brother civic and -social affairs, Mrs. Flai
as -best man. Travis Taylor, Kenny gan has ,had -an active part in
Pettis, cousins of the groom, and planning of the annual Charity B
Courtney Martin, brother of the since 1948 and was chairman
bride were his .ushers. 1953. She is a charter member
Mr. and Mrs. Martin entertained -.
the bridal party and out of town
guests at 'a buffet luncheon follow- /'
ing the ceremony. The out of town
gues's were Mr. and Mrs. S. P.
Gupton, .maternal grandparents f
the .bride and Miss Sammie Allen,
cousin of the 'bride of Durham,
North Carolina; P. C. Pettis, mater-
nal grandfather of the groom of
Panama City; Mr. and Mrs. F. C.
Corbin fo Chipley, grandparents of
the groom who were celebrating .
their 50th wedding -anniversary. .
Others from Panama City were :.
Miss Diane Gilbert, Miss Kaye Cot-
ten, Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Pettis and
children Wanda, Sandra, Anna and '
OCharles. Miss Brenda and Linda '1
Pettis, Mrs. Esto Jackson and Mrs. MRS. J. K. FLANAGAN
George Arnold.


tHUQRA~Y, JULY h10i1b.i

sident Is Chairman

alations Committee


Pet-
nan
tee
re-
een
ay-
murg
na-
the
3all
in
of


th euCrippled Chiidrenus Hos ujpital
For the wedding trip lhe ,bride Guild and has served as Guild pres-
selected a baby 'blue and white ident.
dress with -matching jacket trim- She has been a member of the
med with white, white accessories South Pinella.s .County Ohapter,
and she wore a corsage taken from American Red Cross, United Fund
her bridal ,bouquet. and the St. Petersburg .Symphony.
-Socially active, Mrns. Flanagan
VACATION IN S. FLORIDA was chairman of the Debutante
Mr. and Mrs. Frank McDonald Ball in 1955, and was named "Wo-
and Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Thursday man of the Year" in 1957 ,by the
spent last week in South Florida Beta Sigma Phi Sorority. Her name


on vacation.


'has appeared three tmies on the


Woman's Service League's "Best
Groomed" list.
In accepting the post as public
relations chairman for the Florida
,Society for the Prevention of
Blindness, Mrs. Flanagan Is carry-
ing on the work of her late husband
J. K. "Pat" Flanagan, vice presi-
dent in charge of public relations
for the Florida Power Corporation,
who served as committee chairman
for two years.

Eta Upsilon

Enjoys Dinner

Members of Eta .Upsilon Chap-
ter .of Beta Sigma Phi enjoyed a
progressive dinner Tuesday eve-
ning.
The four course meal began at
the home of Mrs. Elva Jones, 301
15th 'Street with appetizers .of to-
"mato juice, crackers and coffee.
The crowd then joined again at
the 'home of .Mrs. Gladys Brown,
815 Marvin Ave., for the second
course 'which was a delicious con-
gealed salad.
Next bhe group met at the home
of Mrs. Eulalia Slajer, 1032 Mc-
Clellan Ave., for the main course
of spaghetti.
Then the final course was in the


J.
., .- ,, ,' -. .,"' ,;' .- .








IR S. -X'xAYNE N. DAVIS
Mr. and Mrs. Victor R. Moore announced the marriage of their
daughter, Mary Ann to Wayne N. Davis, son of Mr. and Mrs.
George Davis of Port St. Joe.
Mrs. Davis is "presently employed by the Feldman and Piness
'Law Firm of Boston, Massachusetts. Mr. Davis is with the United'
States Navy stationed at .the South Weymouth, Mass., Naval
Station.

recesses 'during the summer months va Jones, Sara Peters, Pauline Mc-


home of Mrs. Lib Hammock, 304 but will begin regular meetings
12th Street, where cherry parfait again in Setember.
was enjoyed. Pledges will :begin their train-
A short 'business meeting was ing Tuesday night, August 1 with
held and plans for the coming year Vice-President, Mrs. Murlene Ward
were discussed. T h e .program instructing the training.
theme, for the coming year will be After the business session, games
entitled, "Beauty" and proves to and contests were enjoyed by all.
be very interesting. The society Thos attending included: Mrs. El-


iSEMI*ANNUAL
I 3


SALE STARTS THURSDAY, JULY 7, 28, 29, 31


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Lady Manhattan and ;

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NO APPROVALS -- NO REFUNDS -

- NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!


MEN'S


Summer Straws

'2 PRICE





BOYS and GIRLS

SHOES
White, two-tones, Sizes 8%
to 3. Beg. to $7.95.

Now $3.99


EXTRA SPECIAL!
One group, broken size men
NUNN-BUSH SHOES
Reg. to $21.95

Now $10.99


MEN'S SPECIAL SAVINGS!

MEN'S MANHATTAN

SPORT SHIRTS REDUCED!

Men's Swim Wear ------ OFF

Men's Bermuda Shorts -- V- OFF


'MEN & BOY'S WEAR
"Outfitters for Dads and Lads"


/ --
4/


Gill, Earlene McCormick, Lib Ham-
,mock, Eulalia. Slajer, Gladys Brown
Wandis Scott, Flo Maddox, June
Gay, Bernice Wager, Lillian Hall
and Jerry Ward.

Brinson Family


Has Reunion
A family reunion was 'held In
the home of Mr. and Mrs. H. T.
Brinson at their home at 517 10th
Street on Sunday, July 23.
Guests included children and
grandchildren of the Brinsons as
follows: Mr. and, Mrs. Willard
Brinson and Lucretia of Tampa;
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Brinson,
Thomasville, Ga.; Mr. and Mrs.
Curtis Brinson, West Palm Beach;
James Brinso'nd, Madell and Rand7
of 'Pensacola.; Mr. and Mrs. Hubert
SBriison, Mr. and Mrs. Dillon Smitn
,and Dillon', I, Port St. Joe ani.
iMr. and .Mrs. Robert Bedwell and
lKeith of Ashford, Ala.
VISITS HERE
Mrs. J. L. Dominey of Malone vis-
ited last week end with Mr. and,
Mrs. R. H. El-lzey. Mrs. Domlnoy is
Mrs. Ellzey's mother.
RETURN FROM VACATION
Rev. and Mrs. J. C. Odum return-
ed Tuesday after vacationing in
Hendersonville, N. C., Jacksonville
and Winter Haven.
-Ic


A Service o( Your Doctor ot Medicine.
Your Local Medical Society and the
Florida Medical Association.
TEETHING TRYING TIME
Teething time is a trying time
for many mothers. Baby's first
teeth usually appear between the
sixth and eighth month of life.
When no teeth appear by the
eighth or ninth month there
sometimes is a suspicion of
wrong feeding.
No one knows just what de-
termines the time for appear-
ance of baby's teeth. Actually,
teeth are already formed in the
jaw when the baby is born.
Most children get their first
teeth without undue trouble.
Teething has been blamed, how-
ever, for a great many condi-
tions including constipation,
diarrhea, coughs, fevers and
convulsions. It is debatable if
any of these conditions are
caused by teething.
Teething is a natural al-
though sometimes uncomforta-
ble process. The infant may
have discomfort in his gums be-
cause of pressure of the teeth.
His appetite and digestion may
become upset and he may sleep
fitfully. To relieve his sore
gums, many physicians will ad-
vise that he be given a teething
ring or a hard crust of bread to
bite on. In extreme instances,
when the teeth do not come
through, the doctor may decide
to lance the gums. If the teeth
are near the surface, the gums
often can be gently rubbed until
the teeth come through.
To have sound teeth, the in-
fant should have a proper diet.
Milk, eggs, cod liver oil, vege-
tables and fish, in proper bal-
ance will do much to make good,
strong, healthy teeth. Your phy-
sician is the person best quali-
fied to advise you concerning
your baby's diet.


Reg. $15.95
NOW ONLY
Reg. $12.95
NOW ONLY
Reg. $11.95
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Reg. $10.95
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Reg. $9.95
NOW ONLY


FREE ALTERATIONS


Large Selection
Boy's Kaynee and McGregor

SPORT SHIRTS
Short Sleeve Ideal for back to '
School

MARKED DOWN '/3


Reg. Sold to $5.95
THIS SALE ONLY
NO ALTERATIONS


$10.99

$8.99

$7.99

$7.49

$6.99


$3.99


Boy's Bermuda Shorts V3 OFF


For Outstanding



BARGAINS!


MEN'S HUBBARD PANTS


BOY'S SPECIAL SAVING
ONE GROUP

BOY'S IVY LEAGUE PANTS


i I I I I 1 I I I '1 I


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THE STAR

Published Every Thursday At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
By The Star Publishing Compan
WESLEY R. RAMSEY Editor and Putbhsher
Reader and Bookkeeper
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Salesman, Photographer, Columnist, Reporter, Proof
DIAL BALL 7-8161


Entered as second-clas matter, December 19, 7, at the Pototice, Port St. Joe,
Florida, ander Act of March 8, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
ONE YEAR. $3.00 SIX MONTHS $L75 THREE MONTHS 127 JO
TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omisesonp in advettlsements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such
advertisement.
The spoken word Ir given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully
weighed. The spoken word barely aerts; the printed word thoroughly convinces.
ThE spoken word Is lost; the printed word .eUatss.

THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, JULY 27, 1961


Frills Should Be Erased In County Budget

In conjunction with our plea of last week for a frugal
handling of county budget allowances, we would like to go
a step farther this week and urge that the County at least
hold the line on village levied. The reason, is of course, ob-
vious, what with better than two years of adverse financial
conditions in Gulf County. Present tax-payers have a lot of
catching up to do.
In looking back over the files of The Star, we find that
the County Board hiked the village slightly last year to
levy 13 mills. These 13 mills brought in a total of $165,869.00
in tax revenue. The county received $449,802.00 from other
sources such as race track funds, fines, fees, etc., to round out
a budget of $507,582.00 for last year.
It might be noted that last year $726.917 in additional,
property was placed on the rolls. $449,802 of this increase
was due to new property placed on the rolls. The remainder
of the increase was due to a hike in valuation of present pro-
perties on the roll.
This year, the tax assessor has hiked all properties on
the tax rolls by some 20 percent in order to provide more
money for the Gulf County system. The county will need
more money this year in order to participate in the program
for the schools (teacher raises, etc.,) as set forth by the
last session of the legislature. The tax payers will feel an
extra tug at their pocketbooks this year in order to meet this
need.
This year's hike in taxable property amounts to 1.3 mil-
lion dollars over last year. This is an increase to the value
of property of present tax-payers. Tax assessor Samuel A.
Patrick said that "a few" more tax payers went on the roll
as a result in the valuation increase.
Since the "same select few" will be asked to ante up the
extra cash needed by the schools, it is our opinion that it
would be only fair for the County Board to set a dollar limit
of $165,869.00 for taxes received from Gulf tax payers on
their budget fipr the year. This, in effect, will- reduce the
village levied. A mill will now be worth more in Gulf Coun-
ty as the result of the valuation hike. The freeze on the
amount of money .to be extracted from the tax payer this
year, would sit mighty pretty with these people.
The County Board has been approached for many ser-
vices and requests not now performed by the County. All the
requests were worthy. We do not argue their merits. Beu
we stand firm in the belief that the county should allot their
money on a priority basis. Provide money for the necessi-
ties, and then stretch what is left over as many luxuries as
the balance will cover.
We don't envy the Board one minute, their job of draw-
ing up a reasonable budget which will meet the county's fi-
nancial needs without being a burden upon the taxpayers.




Sovereign Will of South Is Violated

Having held their initial planning session at Jackson,
Miss., to formulate a stand on the states' rights issue, the
representatives of eight Southern states have announced an-
other meeting to be convened within the next 60 days to
strengthen their position for the preservation of Constitu-
tional government.
The next parley is to be held in the first capital of the
old Confederacy in Montgomery, where it is fitting that the
battlecry should be sounded against the violations of the 10th
Amendment which is being ripped apart by judicial fiat, ex-
ecutive decree, and a general usurpation of those preroga-
tives which belong to the sovereign will of the people alone.
It is that amendment which states that those powers
which are not specifically assigned to the Federal Govern-
ment belong to the individual states. It is that provision
which is being ruthlessly circumvented in decisions by the
Supreme Court. It is that sacrosanct covenant or social con
tract which is thrown into discard by the Attorney General
with his rampaging Justice Department agents who are
transgressing the borders of Southern States.
A great deal of the strife and intellectual ferment in
America today concern this subject with Jame sMadison
discussed so cogently in this Federalist Papers. It is well,
therefore, that all Americans- and particularly Southern-
ers-seek a clear delineation of this matter of strong central
government versus state rights. This was what the Founding
Fathers tried to do when he distinguished between Federal
Government and National Government. He described Fed-
eral Government as one which regarded the union as a con-
federacy of sovereign states. He wrote of National Govern-
ment as being one which regards the union as a consolidation
of states.
It is these considerations that will bring the Southerners
to the Alabama capital for a second meeting. Madison's dis-
tinction is one that is germane to the issue of how far we arc
going to permit Washington to invate states' rights before
we call a halt. There is no greater problem, so far as the
democratic process in America is concerned, than this one.
............-.... -Florida Times-Union


ie Linotype Did It


I


not work, you have only two choi-
ces," he added. "You can sell the
darned thing or drive an oak
stake through its heart at mid-


By ROBERT T. WRIGHT
Newspaper Publisher, Montello,
Wis., from "The Rotarian"
Some months ago, as the last
copy of my weekly newspaper
rolled off 'the press and that an-
cient pile of scrap iron clanked to
a halt, I .picked up th last copy to
give it a casual scanning. Opening
to the society page, I glanced at
a wedding story and their in let-
ters which appeared at least one
foot high, was the following state-
ment:
"The matron of honor was at-
tired In a punk dress of ceantilly-
lace accentuated," etc.
I had done it again-
The very next day the lady in
question was waiting at .the office
when I arrived and her comments
were straight and to the point.
though neither ,brief nor softly
spoken. In short, she maintained
that I had done it on purpose; that
"pink" cannot possible become
"punk" without some degree of
malice on somebody's part! All my
protestations -that it was not my
fault were wasted.
-I have been through this particu-
lar ordeal many times, of course.
Only the week before, a local al-
derman had performed some high-
decible antics in my establishment
after I had quoted him as saying
that "we need an appropriation to
rebuild some of the brides In. 'the
city." The week ,before that I had,
-been refused ,payment from an ad-
vertiser who claimed that he -had
not intended to offer for sale "a
modern ranch-type horse with run-
ning water."
As a country editor of many
years' standing, I have a skin as
tough as a mule cutlet and can
readily shed the frequent chewings
out. But it Is terribly frustrating
to be completely unable to explain
that these errors are not my doing,
not the tault of my two employees,
but are completely the result of the
Evil Spirits which inhabit The
Thing.
The Thing is a Model Five Lino-
type, a device which, when treated
properly, turns out the lines of
type from which the newspaper is
,printed. The Thing was construct-
ed, along with thousands of similar
machines, by a linotype company
in New York. I certainly haie no .
quarrel with this company, which
still produces fine, praiseworthy,
upsetting machines which are used
all over the world. I have no quar-
rel within Model Fives as a class.
Thousands of 'them -are doing yeo-
man duty trom coast to coast, turn-
ing out good reliable, news each
week without once saying as mine
did, "If the dress fits too snugly,
perhaps your hams can ,be let not."
I can only assume, then', that
The Thing somehow came under
malev1olent supernatural' influenc-
es since it was spawned some 40
years ago. I have concluded that
Th" Thing has become .L.a' ited
by a Poltergeist, a type of villa
Spirit which delights in making
life miserable for someone with-
out actually doing something tiuly
drastic-like killing him.
I purchased The Thing a few
years ago from a reputable dealer
in reconditioned -machinery. Be-
fore that it had had a long serise
of frustrated owners, many of
whom I have met, others fo whom
I have only heard.
I have lived and suffered with
The Thing long enough now to
know that the Poltergeist cannot
be exorcised by mechanical means.
I have called in expert repairmen
who clank around. the machine
with hammers, swear magnificently
and then. conclude sarcas- ically
that "the trouble with you, Wright,
is that you are a poor linotype op-
erator and a lousy proofreader-"
What nonsense! I am a good op-
erator and a first-rate proofreader.
But if I set "Polish Sausages, iper
lb 60c" very carfeully, and ;be
absolutely certain that it reads
properly on the proof, I can still 'be
quite sure that it will appear in
the ,paper as "Polish Savages, per
lb. .. O60c." I know it can, be-
cause just a month ago it did and
I received a number of nasty re-
marks from readers of Central
European ancestry.
I took the problem up with an-
other weekly editor a cuople of
years ago and tentatively worked
in my opinion about 'the Polter-
geist. This worthy, who had sur-
vived 35 years in the weekly news-
paper business and was very, very
wise, did not laugh. }Ie agreed
wholeheartedly with me and sug-
gested quite seriously that The
Thing might be rendered spiritless
if I wuold sacrifice a goat before
it a couple of tmies. "If that does


of the hatred of The Thing. One
of them is named Louise, and I
have absolutely nothing -against
her; she is a fine woman and a
credit to the community. But when
her name appeared in the paper
for the fourth tmie as "Lousie",


~ pll- --


night."
He also added that he was cer-
tain that he was one of the pre-
vious owners of the machine, but
got rid of it after his paper came
out with the statement that the
"Best man was B. W. ., who
was a -bother to the groom."
"I could have suffered through
that one," he said, "'but that same
issue contained the statement that
'the District Attorney objected to
the -manner in. which the defense
had presented his 'fleas to the
court.' "
*I am quit aware, of course, that
virtually all nwespapers contain
errors. Even the N. Y. Times has
been known to have them, and
every weekly I have ever seen
contains a few. But they are in-
nocuous, harmless, and pointless
little things, like "hte" for "the",
or "OChief" for "Chief". Not mine!
No indeed! The Thing produces
only errors which, when the .paper
hits the mail, causes the earth to
shake and the Editor to disconnect
the (phone.
The Thing works in devious
ways its evils to perform, and per-
haps one of the most effective is
to produce statements which are
grammatically and typographically
perfect, but which' are completely
saturated with double entendre.
I still shudder when I recall the
incident a few years ago when I
was confronted by an elderly lady
who used to send (past tense) an
occasional news letter of "locals"
from a near-by community. I
-gathered from her expression that
she was not happy. This was con-
firmed a moment later when she
openel up with a verbal broadside
that 'broke chunks out of the of-
flice plaster and upset two type
cases in the back of the shop.
That a 'dear, sheltered old lady
could use words like that! Well!
I weathered the typhoon for 15
minutes, quite unaware of the rea-
son fo rher wrath, though in no
doubt as to its magnitude. After
she had left I thought it might tbe
a good idea to look at her column
in the 'last issue. Sure enough. The
Thing had done It again!
"Due to the storm, the Bible
Study Society was unable to meet.
However, Ryev. D ... and Miss
Besie M .. spent an enjoyable
evening studying sin."
I checked the old- girl's news
letter. That was word for -word,
letter for letter, the way she had
writtne it. But of course, had it
not been for The Thing, I could
have caught it.
Whe nit comes to sins of omis-
sion, an entire' line can be catas-
trophic, as we have seen, but the
omission of a single letter can also
lead to all manner of consequences,
all of them dire. A missing "r",
for example, ones earned me the
enmity -of some friends about
whom I 'had written, "Mr. and
Mrs. F. R.. entertained a
group of fiends -Saturday night."
The Thing is capable of with-
holding some lettres, but has also
been known to drop in extras on
occasion with results I still dream
a-bout. A couple of loose "h's"
dropped in one time where they
were not intended, once produced
this classic: 'Sam S. shpent
two days at a convention last
week." Those two letters, thrown
in by the Poltergeist strictly on
its own, added overtones to .that
simple sentence which were never
intended.
Along with withholding and add-
ing letters, dropping lines, and
causing mental lapses in the oper-
ator, The Thing also has another
weapon: the substitution of one
letter for another. How fascinat-
ing it is for .the city council, the
chamber of commerce, and the
Rotary Club to be informed that
"our community is fortunate to
be situated on a hell overlooking
a lake." This doesn't add much to
our program of civic boosting.
And it's got so that I will do al-
most anything to avoid printing
the name of a person named Hill
or Hull. The doggone contraption'll
do it every time.
As any weekly editor who has
ever owned The Thing can tell you
there are always a few other in-
dividuals in the community whom
the Poltergeist hates violently. Vir-
tually every time you mention
these unfortunates, something
drastic happens, until finally they
are convinced you've got it in for
them and no amount of apologies
can convince them otherwise.
I've got several readers who ap-
pear to ,be the particular objects


312-317 REID AVENUE


H


(2) 'the burning of a dilapidated
old ice-house. Digging in his files
he came up with pictures of -the
lat edeceased, and the ice-houseSERV
prior to the fire. Then he seated SAVINGI_
himself ,at The Thing and produced


FIDEL STEPPED ACROSS THE LINE....

The U. S. took a stick and drew a line in the dirt--Castro
stepped across it. Castro picked up a clod and hit Uncle
Sam on the shoe when he took over U. S. industry in Cuba-
and Uncle "turned his other cheek". Now Castro has taken
Uncle's top hat and thrown it in the dirt by hijacking com-
mercial airlines planes and passengers. As a child, this would
have been the "last straw". Thirty years ago, Uncle Sam
would have already dispatched his Marines to Cuba. Is Uncle
getting old and mellow that fast? Or has he found another
cheek to turn?


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


Formerly OLEN'S




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k y & fMlbe- 0t8h k i t 1 toade"s.
My heart bleeds for a previous
4 d 0 owners fo The Thing whose paper
contained the information that
"The mother of the ,bride wore a
fool outfit il aqua anli white." For
I quit trying *to apologize and gave sheer ulnadulterated wraith, none
her a lifetime subscription. I am can match that of the mother of
only thankful that "Lousie" is not the bride.
a .strong muscular man. How does the public take all of
,One of our local general store this?
owners, a regular large-scale ad- Fantastic as it seems, the 2,300
vertiser, is also the particular Uob- subscribers to th eTribune seem to
ject of The Thing's hatred an drare enjoy it and circulation keeps go-
indeed is the week when his ad ing up, probably due to a desire
does not contain black-and-white "to se what the idiot Wright'll
evidence of this. A descriptive line come up with this week." Not long
"Whole and Shank" appeared once ago one subscribre came into the
as "Whale and Shark." The opera- office to renew his subscription
tor claimed 'that's what the hand- ,and 'brought with him his small son.
written copy looked like, though "See", he said to the boy,, "this
what a fishy line like this was do- is the man who makes all the fun-
ing in the ham department only ny mistakes". He talked much as
The Thing knows, if he were introducing a Supreme
That he has a magnificent sense Cort Justice. I truly think he was
of humor is the only thing that ,proud of me. Of course, he has not
keeps this grocer on our list of yet been personally nivolved with
advertisers, though, it very nearly The Thing's productions.
reached the breaking point a year
or so ago when descriptive lines Frankly, I consider myself for-
in the dryagoods were transposed tunate. I know for a fact that The
and, the .buying public noted with Thing is still far from reaching its
interest that he was offering: peak in .sheer malevolence. It ap-
Juicy Navel parently hates me much less than
WORK SOCKS ......-. 85c pr. the poor soul who owned it a few
All wool years ago. This man, who is now
,ORANGES, 3 dozen ... $1.00 doubtless either dead or in an
"I suppose I really should can- institution, once produced a paper
cel my advertising," he said once, in which he carried stories of (1)
'but I just can' wait from week the death of the mayor's wife and


+ RED CROSS Gray Ladies
bring relief from bore-
dom into hospital wards
GOOD THINGS HAPPEN
WHEN YOU HELP...


6, 6wd -fotiiti or the fioa tem,
BUtt, of course, when the paper
came out, the lengths to Which The
Thing can go were too horrifyingly
apparent. Over the pictuti of the
mayor's late wife was the state-
ment, "Old Eyesore Gone at Last."
One of these days something
like that is going to happen to me,
and when it does-the sharpened
oaken stake is all ready and the
airport isn't far away.


to week to see what you're gonna
do next."
I have found that The -Thing also
hates newlyweds with a terrible
intensity, and rare indeed is the
wedding s'.ory that doesn't show
it. Some of its mor' classical pro-
ductions are more or less unprint-
able (and I wish they hed been to-
tally so), but the previously quot-
ed "punk dress" item is typical of
the more refined goofs. I still
squirm when I recall having pro-
duced the deathless line, "The
bride is the laughter of Mr. and
Mrs. ." Another nuptial story
stated innocently that "The groom
is the son of Mrs. Ethel S... and a
senior at the university a sen-
tence that has implications which
were not apparent to me--unttil
they were called to my attention


I








tHIl StA, tort 6t. j.l, Pia. THURSDAY, JULY 27,'i~i

FLORIDA GARDEN INFORMATION


By HERVEY SHARPE
Agricultural Ext. Service
If the summer heat drives you to
the shade, take advantage of this
physical repsite by planning fu-
ture gardening chores.
S Most gardeners do their best
planning while rcelining in a ham-
mnock. If your conscience forces you
to think then consider the topic
of plant propagation. It'll give you
many restful hours.


job from a ,back-breaking task to
a near loafing 'hobby.
Construct the case at least eight
inches depe. Fill with five inches
fo rooting medium, leaving head-
room for leafy tips of -the cuttings
of grafts.
Rooting -media are plentiful. Sand
is the most common. Other mater-
ials Include vermiculite, peat moss,
peanut hulls, pecan hulls and saw-
dust.


To justify long-thouyht sessions, For the ,plant rooting project se-
construct .a simple ground bed un- lect softwood tips three or four
derneath the the near the ham- Inches long. Trim the cuttings,
mock. Make the (bed by laying curb- leaving the upper two or three
Ing to hold the rooting medium and leaves intact.
to support the bed cover. Next insert the cutting into the
Leafy cuttings are best suited rooting medium. After ,flooding in,
for this down-to-earth-bed. cover the case with glass, cheese-
;WIth 'a little more effort, you cloth or clear ,plastic. Keep the cut-
can construct a raised propagating tings damp with daily mist-like
case. This irill take the stoop out sprays on. the leaves.
of rooting plants and elevate the To vary the project, try leatbud


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cuttings. A ane-inct shield of the.
stem with a dormant bul and a
single leaf attached is all that's
needed. Crotons, bougainvilleas, hi-
oiscus and thundergia grandflora
can be started by leaf-bud cutting;
Only a leaf is needed to root an-
other ,plant from African violets,
achtmenes or gloxinia.
It watering become too big a
chore, then add a set of fine mist
spray nozzles above the propagat-
ing 'bed. For details on installing
the spray nozzles ask your county
agent for Circular 127A, Mist Pro-
pagation.
Should any of your propagation
plans materialie, you'll need a
quantity of compost when the new
plants are added to the garden. To
have a supply on hand when it is
needed, bgein a compost pile now.
Here are some tips on com'post-
iag provided by University of Flor-
ida Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion workers. They say that you
can compost almost any plant ma-
terial, including leaves, grass,
weeds, garden refuse and kitchen
waste.
Mak- the compost pile -a con.ven-
ient size--about 10 feet square and
three to five feet high.
In building the pile, leave the
top flat or with a slight depression
to catch the rain. Moisture aids in
decomposition.
Begin the compost with a 12-
inch layer of leaves, grass or oth-
er material. Wet this thoroughly
and pack. To save your energy, let
the small fry of the neighborhood
make a game of flattening the pile.
Next, spread a layer of manure
or green leguminous plant material.
Top this with one quart of super-
,phosphate per 100 square feet fo
compost.
Compost material will begin to
go through a heat in two or three
days.
If showers are not spaced, right,
supply the pile of future plant food
with. water and do not allow the
material to dry out.
After three or four weeks, fork
over the pile, mixing the dry top
material with the bottom moist ma-
terial. This will insure uniformly
decomposed compost. In another
three or four weeks of warm wea-
ther the compost will be ready for
use.
For 'a professional-type compost
unit, pour a 10 x 10 toot concrete
slab and construct 4-foot cinder
block walls on three sides of the
slab. Besides hiding an nslghtly
pile. of decaying, matter, the, unit
willl prevent rains from leaching
away vital plant food elements
during the composting process.

CLASSIFIED ADS
Midget Investments With
Giant Returns


SIRLOIN


OR BONELESS
CUB ED


LB.


"Super-Right" Heavy Western Steer Beef 7.
RUMP ROAST bone in lb. 61
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the regular low price on
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INSTANT COFFEE
MONEY CAN BUYIf
10-0z.
S th eua lwpieo
thSub-0z]ro h


IC


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OR BONELESS


SIRLOIN TIP


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SUPER RITE HEAVY WESTERN
)c CHUCK ROAST lb. 45c
Southern Star Boneless Cooked
7 CANNED HAM 5lb. can $3.49

JANE PARKER DELICIOUS APPLE SPECIAL!

8-inch 3 C
Sies EACH

JANE PARKER LIGHT TENDER ANGEL FOOD SPECIAL!


Cake


LARGE
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Juie CANS 87c


SULTANA


Salad Dressing


qt. 39c


OUR OWN


TEA BAGS


In Decorated Iced Tea
Glass 40 BAGS


49c


MARVEL


Ice Cream


igal. 59c


ANN PAGE


KETCHUP


2


14 OUNCE
BOTTLES


39c


Detergent
OXYDOL
Detergent
CHEER


We're always ready to pitch in

and help out the businessmen of

our community in MANY WAYS!

We like to see business prosper in our community, because
then everyone prospers! That's why our door is always open
to local businessmen. A loan to expand a growing business,
a helping start on a promising new venture, or sound finan-
cial advice whatever their needs, we are happy to serve
the men we consider very important citizens our
businessmen!


Florida National Bank at Port St. Joe
S. WHERE SUCCESSFUL MEN BANK!

MEMBER, FLORIDA NATIONAL GROUP of BANKS
MEMBER, FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION


reg. size 35c

giant size 65c


Laundry Detergent
DASH giant size 79c
Cleaner
SPIC 'N "SPAN reg. 29c
Cleanser-14 Oz. Cans
COMET 2 for 33c


Cleaner
MR. CLEAN


15 oz. 39c


M & M Almond
CHOC. CANDY 44 oz. 29c
N'abisco
RITZ Crackers 12 oz. 29c
White or Colored Kleenex
TOWELS 2 rolls 41c
Minute Maid Frozen
Orange Juice 12 oz. 49c
Blue Plate
Mayonnaise pt. 39c
White House
DRY MILK 12 qt. 89c
BirdsEye Frozen Baby
LIMA BEANS 2 for 43c
BirdsEye Frozen Fordhook
LIMA BEANS 2 for 43c


Fresh Fruits and Vegetables


CALIFORNIA VINE RIPE

Cantaloupes
ELBERTA FREESTONE

PEACHES
FANCY YELLOW SWEET

CORN
LARGE FANCY VINE RIPE

TOMATOES


3 FOR

$1
3 LBS.

25c
4 EARS

29c
LB.

23c


=US6 COMPANY. 510
IFifth
Street
Prices in this Ad Effective Thru Saturday, July 29


Liquid Detergent
TREND
Cleaner
LESTOIL
Powder Blesac
LESTAIR
Personal Size
IVORY SOAP
Medium Size
IVORY SOAP


22 oz. 49c

qt. 65c

10 oz. 4?.

4 bars 27c

2 bars 21c


Large Size
IVOR YSOAP 2 bars 31c
Regular Size
CAMAY SOAP 3 bars 29c
Bath Size
CAMAY SOAP 2 bars 29c
Regular Size
ZEST SOAP 2 bars 29c
Bath Size
ZEST SOAP 2 bars 39c
Gentle
IVORY SNOW reg. 33c
Detergent
IVORY LIQUID 12 oz. 35c
Detergent
DREFT reg. size 3'c
Liquid Suds
JOY 12 oz. 35c
Detergent
TIDE giant size 77c


I -


What A TV Set Cost 25 Years Ago
If someone complains that a television set costs
more today than it did 25 years ago, you'd lift an
eyebrow. A quarter-century back, there were no
television sets to be had-at any price. The same
logic applies to the statement that "prescriptions
cost more today than they used to cost." The drugs
you now get didn't even exist until recent years.
So the benefits these drugs bring the rapid
cures, the lives saved could not be bought at
any price. -That's why we say .
TODAY'S PRESCRIPTION IS THE BIGGEST
BARGAIN IN HISTORY
- The Most Complete Prescripffion Department -
Have Your Doctor Phone Us or Bring Your Prescription To
Air Conditioned for your Comfort
SMITH'S PHARMACY
Two Free Parking -Spaces for Your Convenience
at Our Back Door
DRIVE-IN WINDOW IN REAR OF STORE


III~Pe ~IA~Pa&B~b-~L~ II, LI I


- -- -- --- -I I


I M IN N114-11 a I I









I


The artice enti ed, eT110 alnaai
of Our Missile Program" was writ-
ten by Kenneth 0. Gilmore, a re-
porter who personally covered the
McClellan subcommittee hearings
and then travelled 7,000 miles and
talked with industrialists, teehni-
clans, labor lealers, government of-
ficials and workers in an effort to
.estimate the damage done.
His findings together with the
information ,brought out at the Mc-
Clellan hearings is downright sick-
ening and as Gilmore aptly puts it,
"One of the sorriest chapters of
self-serving in American history."
In the past five years our ballis-
tic-missile bases and test sites have
been -beset by 330 strikes and walk-
outs with the resultant loss of 163,-
000 priceless man-days. Wildcat
strikes, work stoppages, slowdowns
featherbedding and deliberate poli-
cies of low productivity on the part
of some unions and workers have
set our missile program back many
months.


Llther LIUrrespons iU ac aJi nD Lnue
face of our national emergency?
Here are some of them as gathered
by Gilmore.
Pipefitters, electricians and as-
bestos workers at one plant walk-
ed out 'because they wanted to
make their own coffee.
,Cement finishers in a Florida
base said painters must not fill
holes with the same tool -the finish-
erse use, a trowel, so the finishers
walked out.
Electricians protested elimina-
tion of overtime, while iron work-
ers contended they were too tired
to work, so they all walked out.
Nor is management 'blameless.
With the taxpayers picking up the
'bills some companies have permit-
ted featherbedding, loafing, slow-
downs, and granted demands of la-
'bor bosses no matter how unrea-
sonable, in an effort to buy labor
peace and avoid strikes and walk-
outs. All at the expense of the tax-
payer.


Behind the Shopping Center Playground for Children



i iTELEPHONE: BAll 7-4191
OOEN DAILY. 2:45 P.M.
SATURDAY. 12:05 P.M.

THURSDAY and FRIDAY

SUPERNATURALFORCP t,


S HOW ARE YOU DOING?


I overheard two men exchang-
Ing greetings as they met one
day. One asked, "What do you
know?" The other man answered
by another question, "How are
you doing?" Though the ques-
tions may seem trivial, they are
very important.
What we know is important,
for what we do depends on what
we know. We have to know the
will of God before we can do
the will of God. The question,
"How are you doing?" is vitally
important. It is not enough to
merely know good; we must do
good.
Make every minute of your
life count. You are living by
God's time, and time is running
out. A bright horizon is guar-
anteed by God when you do
His will. Live each day as if it
was your last.
Show love to others. Don't
use words that bite and tones
that are harsh but speak with
kindness. Excuse others' failures
and-faults as often and as fully
as you expect them to be leni-
ent with yours. Be patient and
understanding. Go the extra mile
and do the little thoughtful
things not expected of you.
To do good, however, -you
must have a forgiving spirit.
Forgiveness is the saving grace.
Hatred and bitterness can poison
your life. Forgiveness can find
an opening when there is no
other way out. It turns hatred


into love. Forgiveness can lift
you out of depression. It will
save you from, thoughtless acts
of vengeance that you would
later regret.
Forgiveness is part of the abun-
dant life concept, Forgiveness,
will bring you joy and peace of
mind. As Dr. Earl Loomis said,
"The experience of forgiveness
is a prime characteristic of the,
happy, full creative personality."
I heard a story once about a
scientist who was deeply hurt
during the war. He spent four
years in Germany as a slave
aborer. His mother and father
were killed by Nazis and his
brother and sister were sent to
the gas chamber. The man had
every reason to hate. Yet, he was
filled with a love of life that he
imparted to everyone he knew.
When he was asked how he
managed to keep his spirit unde-
filed, he said, "It is simple. In the
beginning, my heart was filled
with hatred. Then I realized that
in hating I had become my own
tormentor. If a person is blinded
for five years, he loses five years
of seeing. If a person hates for
five years, he loses five years of
loving. You cannot love unless
you forgive. Without love, life
has no meaning."
What do you know? Do you
know Jesus Christ as your per-
sonal Saviour? How are you
doing? Are you doing God's will
and enjoying abundant life?


.1
U



d
IT


Visit Ih Mass. ter-ln-la, i 6 south We ntouth*
Mr. and Mrs. Gei'ge tlvias and Mass. Whil eili Boston they at-
daughter, Ann, have returned home f tended the Red Sox-BaltinlOte base-
after visiting their son and daugh- ball game.



The Star Brings News of Your Neighbors


pay for a new tire?


=A .9run-a
ANDRE MORELL* BARBARA SREHifl
A *~SIUMmIamm


SATURDAY ONLY


If you want a new, factory-fresh- tire as low as $10.77 we
have it and its the best buy at this price bar none. But
.... whether its the tire for you we can only tell when we
know how much you drive, how fast you drive, over what kind
of roads, etc.
So come in and talk tires -we have 'em at all prices and
we'll make you a trade that puts the right tires under you for
the greatest safety and longest wear for your money.

SPECIAL: Gates 50th Anniversary Offer:


NEW TIRE FREE
if you damage this tire
on the road!
Under this guarantee, never before of-
ferred on a 1st line tire, you get a new tire
free if this super-strong Air-Float Deluxe fails
in any way during 1st year or 1st 50% of
tread depth. Guarantee covers blowouts,
bruises, rim-cuts, etc. If tire should fail
AFTER 1st year or 1st half of tread depth
you get a new tire with full credit for unused
mileage based on Gates published exchange
ATS AIR-FLOAT DLUX NYprice.
GATES AIR-FLOAT DELUXE NYLON


6.70-15 black tube-type
plus tax & old tire
off your car


$1988


.-- ------


FULL 15-MONTH ROAD HAZARD GUARANTEE
This Gates Guarantee covers ANY failure for full war-
ranty period. Should tire fail for
any reason you get a new
S ire, with full credit for un-
used mileage, based on Gates
\%. nationwide, standard adjust-
Y ment schedule.


.. _:" ,-,^ ^ "'' _
.-- -.. a en m


77


6.70-15 lube-type, plus lax
& retreadable trade in.


Gates Coronado,
Factory-fresh! We believe this tire is the best on the mar-
ket at the price. Body made with Tyrex the improved
rayon cord. Tread fortified with cold rubber.
Available in NYLON for $1 more. Whitewalls $3 more.


* down


with retreadable trade-in
puts any new Gates Tire
on your car.


PATE'S SHELL SERVICE CENTER


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


tIHA TAR, Pofrt St Jo, PFla. f- UAfMA J, JULV ItoM A& e4fih e of W Mlottltte amore that the basa 6stfnmAndef t
--- Il A dmitildo ctaU be, techniliaiss elves. Elevator operators have col
Sy pergotning a necessary jbb at Cape leeted as much as $363 a weelk
sell Kay's Too Late To Canaveral unhooked 1000 wires in truck drivers $324, warehouse
'" a blockhouse. The next day craft- clerks $262.
unio nelectriclans clamied it was
(n a recent column I expressed Graft, greed and extortion in their work and demanded that the These are 'but a few of the saigh
my feeling regarding the irrespon- connection with the program has same wires be reattached. Once lights revealed in the Digest arti
sible action of labor unions in de- cost the Amreican tax payer nmil this was done the craft workers cle. If you are an American con
aying America's missile p:-'am lions of dollars in addition to the promptly unhooked them again at cerned with the welfare of you
hrcugh strikes and wa'lkou s. terrible threat to our national life a working rate of $3.75 an hour. country I urge you to read the
OIlhe extent of this national scan- and freedom. sorry story in detail.
dal is reviewed in detail in the What excuse do the unions, At Vandenberg Base electricians -
August issue of Reader's Digest. workers, and management give for Ihave averaged $510 a week. $145 SHOP AT HOME
MI.A Ai4nla.. ..t.'1'.A d lThR,.Andl t 4 ..i iry,4.nn llMA nation s i* t. he-


VISIT

MEXICO BEACH LAUNDERETTE


Fluff Fold


Coin Machines


:


i NtWt if ROM

SMexico Beach
By Mrs. Betty Missler
Phone 648-3205
i"
i- The Rev. and Mrs. Samuel M.
- Brown of Bruce, Miss., were the
r guests of Mrs. Brown's 'brother,
Olen C. Hayes and Polly Hayes of
the Governor Motel at Mexico
Beach.
While the Brown's were here,
they were joined by a group of
their home town families including
the Harry Wallers, Elmer Overbys,
Doc Bryants, Jimmy Newton, Vir-
ginia Pettitt and J. Weldean Har-
ris. The entire group of Bruce,
Miss., men went fishing Friday
catching a total of 14 King Macker-
el weighing 144 pounds.
Doc Bryant landed the largest,
which weighed 18 pounds, eight
ounces and won the weekly prize in
the Mexico Beach summer long
fishing tournament. The group was
so enthused about the good fishing
they repeated the trip the next lay.
S> v A>
Mr. and Mrs. Bill Toomey of
Falls Church, Va., were visitors
here with her brother and sis, er-
in-law, Mr. and Mrs. James Chew-
ning. The Toomey's stayed at the
Rainbow Motel during their visit.

Weekly winners for the best .eid-
'ble fish catches from surf ,and boat
in the Mexico Beach fishing tourna-
ment were: Doc Bryant of Bruce,
Miss., with an 18 pound, eight oz.,
King Mackerel. Best surf catch
registered was a two pound, eight
ounce pompano caught 'by William
H. Davis, 506 Stanton St., Mobile,
Alabama.

VISITING COOPERS
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Hester and
children of Cairo, Ga., are visiting
with Mr. and Mrs. Georg eCooper.
Mrs. Hester is Mrs. Cooper's niece.





7ot S
V+.666h


CLIFFORD EVANS OLIVER REED
WONNE REMAIN aWInEA


ANAMOaNu M MU.


SUNDAY, MONDAY and TUESDAY
-"i-" 6s


Ipm m~8ansps~sl


~a~8le~ I~PW~I~


- --s 1 r~ --1II-- 1 ~- I-u --


-W&D 1w %F'%F


I


E


ct -a~ ---


for boating fans...








is now your authorized dealer for



( 'OUTBOARD MOTORS
'~' We are proud to have been
.0., selected io represent Evinrude
S -fhe first name in outboard
motor. Call on us and see
S.V today's top-performance
motor from 3 to 75 hp.
Time payments
available. Get our
S trade-in offer on
.".s ow yo your old
motor now!
EWSWRUDE
___s


r$S18%8~sars~wsa~~--~


I


I


S ; '" I


BILDWEL SUPPLY COMPANY
414-416 Reid Avenue Phone 227-4156













Cs tin's 37th Anniversary Sale


STILL IN FULL SWING


In Conjunction With Our Anniversary Sale We

Are Also Having A Big




SEmI[-ANNUAL CLEARANCE


ON ALL ROBIN HOOD SHOES

SEMI-ANNUAL


shoece


Robin .. Ho


"'OUTFIT YOUR
CHILDREN WITH SEVERAL
PAIR AT THESE LOW PRICES.






REGULARLY PRICED F-QM4.99 to 7,99

Come early for the best selection. Wanted styles in most sizes and colors.



200-306 REID AVE. PHONE 227-2771


'61 GALAXIE TOWN VICTORIA. The true
luxury car of the low-price field, with
Thunderbird-inspired elegance and comfort.
A trend-setter if there ever was onei


America's
lowest-priced*


6-passenger sedan!


'61 FALCON TUDOR. A Falcon with stand-
ard transmission averaged 32.6 mpg in
the 1961 Mobilgas Economy Run-highest
gas mileage by a 6- or 8-cylinder car in
the Run's 25-year history.


` Cash in on our
new low Galaxie
p ice. now!
manufacturers' suggested
detaill delivered prices.


I





Sweetest
-_


T.Fades


in


r e, ..
humciviger O
a buy buzzing .
your way in OUr -


rd Dealers Swappi Bee


STOP
spending money on
your car's old age.


SWAP
now for a '61 Ford.
Sales are up and
your Ford Dealer is
m a position to pay
top dollar for your
trade-in.


SAVE
with the car that's
Beautifully Built
to Take Care of
Itself. A '61 Ford
goes 30,000 miles
between lubrica-
tions, 4,000 miles
between oil
changes!


BEE AT YOUR FORD DEALER'S SWAPPING BEE TODAY!


ST. JOE MOTOR
Port St. Jo.


Sedans Convertibles .
Wagons-pick your honey and
save real money during our Ford
Dealers' SWAPPING BEE! Spe-
cial low prices king-sized
trade-in allowances easiest
terms possible. For savings that
are bee-yond bee-lief, buzz on in
to your Ford Dealer's during his
price-bustin' SWAPPING BEE.


CO.
Florida


Plan Explained

For Issuing New

Driver Licenses
TALLAHASSEF---Mechanics for
carrying out the 1961 laws calling
for ibirth-date issuance of drivers
licenses on a biennial ,basis have
been explained here by the Depart-
ment of Public Safety.
The measures were part of a
safety legislation package which
had the active support of the Pen-
insula Motor Club anl other AAA
clubs in Florida.
The new system should elimin-
ate long waiting lines at County
Judge's offices 'throughout t h e
state, since the tedious task of is-
suing will 'be carried on a year-
round 'basis.
fCant Ka-rl Adams public infor-


&eswd within 11 'ia6nta after tie
expiratfo, date .upon applioation
and payment of $1.00 delinquent
fee in lieu of taking -the required
examination.
-Members of the Armed Forces:
No changes have been made in the
new law; therefore, the same pro-
visions apply for persons whose li-
censes expire while in military ser-
vice.
Fees for drivers licenses:
Restricted operator's license, one
year or less, $1.50.
Restricted operators license, two
years, $3.00.
Operator license, one year or less
$1.50.
Operator license, two years, $3.00
Ohauffeur license, one year or
less, $2.50.'
Chauffeur license, two years,
$5.00.
The driver education of 50c a
year is included in the license fees
as listed.


motion officer of the Department Period of Driver License Re
ot Public Safety, has issued the als:
flolowing bulletin outlining proce- Birth -anniversary, Septe'
dures under the new laws: through December, 1961, two
Renewal License: All current license for odd year; one yai
Florida drivers' licenses are ex. cense for even year.
tended by law .without charge) un- January through August,
-til the last day of the licensee's one year license for odd year,
next birth month, except those ,per- year license for even year.
sons whose birth month is Septem- If your birthmonth annive:
'ber and they must renew their cur- is in October, November or D(
rent licenses prior -to September ber, 1961, and you were born h
30, 1961. No license shall be renewed even numbered year, your lie
except during the licensee's birth will be for a one-year period
month. next year you'll be issued a
Example 1: A licensee whose year license. If you were bo:
next birth month is November, an dod-numbered year, your d
1961, would keep his present dri. license will be issued for a
very's license until November and year period.
.would not be required to renew If your birthmonth anniveras
same until the month of November. January, February, March, A
At any time during November, the May, June, July or August,
licensee would make application at and you were born in an even
the county Judge's office for renewal bered year, you'll get a two
of the license. If the licensee who license. If your birth month w
applied in November was ;born dur- an odd numbered yaer, you'
ing an odd year, he would receive issued a one year license.
a two-year license since he is mak- -- _l
ing application in the odd year iPo-Jo Tirlers Dance
(1961).
If the licensee applying in No- 'in Wewa Saturday
v'meber.was born in an 'even year, The Po-J.o Twirlers Square I
he would receive a one year license Club enjoyed an evening of
which would expire on the last ,ing in Wewahitchka Saturday
date of his birth month in 1962. 'The 'group met at the comm
When this one year license expires, building and swung to the
,the licensee would receive a two- and calling of Gil Mathis.
year license upon renewal. The "Promenadors" squared
Example 2: A licensee whose' club and the "Square Eight
birth month is January, 1962, Panama City were among
would continue with his current 11- guests.
license, which was extended by law, Mr. and Mrs. Billy Shirley
;until the month of January at Mr. and Mrs. Al Whitfield
i which time he would apply for re- -
Snewal.
If the January licensee was born
''during an odd year he would re-
ceive a one year license since he is
making application in 1962, an even
year. If, however, the January li-
censee was born during an even
.year he would receive a full two
year license to expire January,
1964.
By August 31, 1962, all current
= license holders will have renewed
their drivers lcienses and all re-
newals thereafter shall be for a per- and if your Dai
iod of two years. No license shall y
be renewed except during the li-
censee's birth 'month. the Brand i
Validation: Any licensee whose
birth month is between Oct. 1, 1961,
and Aug. 31, 1962, who may -be trav-

dated for a fee of 25c by the County B 6
Judge to prevent any possibility of
delay or arrest In other states.
Original license: Every person
who makes application' for an orig- You Have t
final Florida driver's license who
has successfully passed the requir- Rely on the time-t
ed examination or .presents an ac-
cepted out-of-state valid driver's of BORDEN to
license will be issued a driver's li- quality every day .
cense in the following manner: our product in yo
(A) Any person who was born, food store or call
in an odd numbered year shall !be ka collect .
issued an original license which
shall expire at midnight on the last
day of the licensee's birth month in NEwton 9
the first odd numbered calendar
year after the year in which the For Convenient Ho
original license is issued.
(B) Any person who was born in
an even numbered year shall be We Carry A Comp
issued an original license which
shall expire at midnight on the last Dairy Proc
day of the licensee's birth month
in the first even numbered calen-
dar year after the year in which .
the original license is issued. 4
Delinquent license: Any expired
Florida driver's license may be re-

FOR EXPERT Zy
Electrical Repairs
and
Contracting



WALL ELECTRIC

COMPANY

DIAL BAll 7-4331 Phone 639-4383
I


THI OTAR, P10t St. Jo*, Fla. THURtODAV, JULY 21, 1951

trained some 50 guests afterwards 'again Friday night at the Centen-
in the Shirley's lovely home. The nial Building at 8:,00 p.m. Anyone
crowd enjoyed a delicious meal of interested in -learning the art of
baked ham, potato salad, baked ,square dancing are invited to at-
'beans, chips and dips and cake. An I tend. A class for beginners will be
enjoyable time was had by all. held soon and spectators are al-
The Po-Jo Twirlers will meet ways invited.
-I


i FREE! FREE!

GRAB BAG PRIZES
Every Evening at 8:30
BRING THE CHILDREN


I-


FREE
TICKETS
TO ALL
CHILDREN


ENJOY YOURSELF HAVE FUN

PLAY Golf Bowling Games

GOLF Music ''Kiddie Rides
Bring your Friends, Bring Your Date

FREE GAME SAFE, WHOLESOME RECREATION
19th Hole FOR ALL THE FAMILY


OPEN
7 Days
A Week
Rain or
Shinm


"The Nicest Place On The Beach"
Play Hrs.
So 1 P.M.
to 12 M.
(Mon. 6-12)


U. S. Highway 98


Mexico Beach, Fla.


and i
two-
rn in -'^* "^ "* "- -
river
two- COMPLETE PHOTO SERVICE

ary is FAST QUALITY ROLL FILM SERVICE
April, PORTRAIT COMMERCIAL
1962, MOVIE FILM BLACK and WHITE COLOR
i-year
as in LYNART STUDIO
11 be
104 Bayview Drive Phone 7-8681 Highland View, Fla.


dance MO N EY

night. FOR HOME OWNERS
vanity FIRST and SECOND MORTGAGE LOANS
mi.usi; .-home improvement Loans Frame & CBS Construction
I Mortgages Refinanced Consolidate All Your Bills
dance Reduce Your Payments One Easy to Meet Payment
n" of PUBLIC MORTGAGE CO
rthe 301 Williams Ave. Port St. Joe
y and S ICE Phone 229-2721 ispZsersoN
enter-'


iry Foods Bear


fn


he Best

,ested name
bring you
.. Pick up
our favorite
Wewahitch-


-4383
me Delivery

plete Line of
ducts


TRY OUR FAMOUS COUNTRY



Fresh Eggs
Delivered to Your Door In Time for Breakfast




rden's Dairy

"Gulf County's On ly Producing Dairy"

Wewahitchka, Florida


I -- -
















MUCHMORE BARTLETT

PEARS No. 2Y 2
Can 2 For v


20 OZ.atsup


Ga. Grade '' SMALL PENNY 3
EGGS

3 doz. $1 SYRUP


No. I
Cans


No. 5
Jar


OAK HILL HALVES

PEACHES


27c


49c


No. 2V2
Can


SNOWDRIFT

S ORTENING


2 For


3 Lb.
Can


JUMBO BANANA,
OLATE

PILO


54


COCONUT, CHOC
120z.3
Pkg lh9c


FLOUR


25 LB.
PAPER


1.99


IGA BRAND
INSTANT COFFEE
IGA INSTANT
DRY MILK
DEL MONTE STEWED
STEWED TOMATOES
SCOTT COUNTY
PORK and BEANS


PKG.
5 LB.


6 oz. jar


49c


FROSTY MORN

H


79c


or SWIFT'S PREMIUM


(HALF or WHOLE)


8 oz. pkg. 69c


303 can 25c

2 no. 2V cans 39c


IGA FRESH FROZEN
DELICIOUS IGA. FROZEN D IN N E R S
ORANGE JUICE 11-Ounce Package
CANS TURKEY BEEF 59
6 OZ. CHICKEN HAM


POUND


SMOKED SHOULDERS
BREAKFAST SLKC
FROSTY MORN
OLD SMOKIES
IGA TABLERITE
CLUB STEAKS
IGA TABLERITE
FRANKS


lb. 49c


lb. pkg.


59c


lb. 79c


12 oz. pkg. 39c


WHOLE SMOKED



POUND29c


PRODUCE


CALIFORNIA SUNKIST


Extra Large


U. S. NO. 1 WHITE



FRESH GA.

PEC HES


DOZ

39c
10 LBS.

39c

5 LBS. .

49c


WE HAVE SHELLED BUTTER BEANS
AND PEAS e ---


GA., FLA. GRADE "A" (0


FRI


NBC
RITZ CRACKERS
HALEY'S
MINERAL OIL
AEROWAX
FLOOR WAX
IGA LIQUID
DETERGENT
LIQUID
WISK
Del Monte, 303 2 cans
Spinach 35c
Kraft Dinner 2 pkgs.
Macaroni 35c


Quantity Rights Reserved)


V[


12 oz. pkg. 33c

8 oz. btl. 57c

qt. can 69c

22 oz. can 39c

large bottle 41c


KRAFT ITALIAN DINNER
SPAGHETTI
BONDWARE 9-INCH
PAPER PLATES
FACIAL TISSUE
KLEENEX 2 pk
NO BOIL
BLEACH
FOR WASHING
SILVER DUST
CAT FOOD 2


pkg. 29c

pkg. of 40 49c

;gs. of 200's 29c
quart jar 15c
large pkg. 35c
no. 1 cans 29c


Whitehouse White
VINEGAR qt. 21c
McCormick-1% oz.
PAPRIKA 25c


LB.


SUNGOLD
BRAND
1 LB.
PKGS.

i CHEESE SPREAD 2 lb. 79c


LONG HORN CHEESE


TABLERITE
QUARTERED


47c


1 LB.
PKG.


CONDENSED LIQUID
ALL ALL HANDY ANDY
24-oz. pkg. 39c quart 77c pint jar 39c
FLUFFY LIQUID
ALL BREEZE LUX
19-oz. pkg. 33c 1g. pkg. 35c reg. can 39c


We Reserve Linit Rights
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


L I F E B U 0 Y LUX .AP PiAE SOAP
2 bath bars 31c 2 reg. h:s 21c 2 reg. bh's 29c
LIFEBU0Y LUX 0,.? RAISEE SOAP
2 reg. bars 23c 2 bath ':;r3 41c 2 2 bars 41c


ROBIN
HOOD


s


ll(~g1%1~3~8~-~~1;---Y=-"-~aBL9~11~ ~ ~I ~"'


--


w


---


- 1. .. 77-1 -, --x "v


490


69c


BUTTER


















,..ON YOUR
VACATION
Your prescription
may be as Impor-
tant to you as gasoline is
to your car. To insure your
best performance and elim-
Inate unnecessary"service"
charges, refill the prescrip-
tions you need before leav-
Ingon atrip.


Free Parking
Drive-In Window Service
Buzzett's Drug Store
317 WillIam Ave.
Port St. Joe, Florida


receive an increase of approximate-
ly 10 percent. Again, this incraese
will ,be in the September 3 check
without any action required.


Bryant Names Cross-State
Barge Canal Authority
TALLAHASSEE (FNS)--Gover.
nor Farris Bryant named a five'
man, ship-canal authority to super-
vise construction of the proposed
cross-state barge canal.
Randolph Hodges of Cedar Keys
will head the group as director of
the State Conservation Department
and head of its waterways division.
Others named include Henry S.
Toland of Tampa; W. Palmer Van
Arsdale, Fort Lauderdale; William
A. McCree, Orlando; R. Malcolm
Fortson, Jacksonville; and Harry
H. Saunders of Port .St. Joe, for-
mer executive of the St. Joe Paper
Company.
The authority was named pend-
ing congressional allotment of fed-
eral funds for the project. Mem-
bers named will serve for a period
of fuor years.
The piropoael barge canal will
connect the Gulf and Atlantic and


REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00
TRAINING UNION 6:45
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) ..-...... 7:30


a.m.
a.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.


Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street
Air Conditioned Centrally Heated

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME


luffireu Shells.. For Sumimer Lunethong


THl4 tAI Pert t 4J, PI K TMURDAVY, JULY a2?, 1901


SOCIAL SECURITY INFORMATION

The benefit increases provided It is estimated that more than
by the 1961 changes will go to in- three and one-half million people,
dividuals drawing less than $40 per nationally, will have thei benefits
month and aged widows only. These increased under this provision.
increases will be received in the While the increase is not substan-
Sep'ember 3 check without any tial, it will affect the local ceonomy
cation on your part. in September as a considerable
i tired workers, disabled wvork- number of the 11,000 people draw-
ers ard sole survivors, draw:ng less ing 'benefits in this area are receiv-
than $40 ,per month will have th ir ing less than $40 per month. The
benefits raised. It benefits are be- more than 700 aged widows in this
ing paid to their family dependents, district area will, of course, receive
,here will be an increase in the the 10 percent increase.
maximum ,paid to th family group Those beneficiaries who will re-
'1:e new maximum amount to such cealve the increase on September 3
,a family group will ;be $60 ,per should not contact their lical Social
month instead of $53. There was Security office. However, individ-
no increase in benefits provided uals who have questions on their
where the retired or disablde work- Social Security matters should al-
er is already receiving $40 per ways contact* thier nearest Social
month or more. Security office.
Aged widows will nave thier bene- The office for this area is located
fits increased to $40 per month if at 1135 Harrison Avenue, Panama
they are receiving less than that. City. The telephone number is PO
If the aged widow is receiving 3-5331,
-more than $40 per month, she will --


FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Monument and bod6stitutibn
REV. JOHN C. CARMICHAEL, Minister
CHURCH SCHOOL 9:45 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a 'n
METHODIST YOUTH FELLOWSHIP .... 6:45 p.m;
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m.




PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH
Garrison at 20th
Prayer Service (Thursday) --....... 7:45 P.M.
Sunday School ......... 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship _-----------................. 11,:00 A.M.
Evening Worship ... 7:45 P.M.
"Souls Harbor in the Port Area"
Rev. Hubert D. White, Pastor
Comfortably Air-Conditioned



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Third St. and Baltzell Ave. C. BYRON SMITH, Pastor

SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION --....-............ 6:45 p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) ........ 7:30 p.m.
"Come and Worship God With Us"



Oak Grove Assembly of God Church
CHARLES H. HARTHERN, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:00 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 A.M.
CHRISTIAN CADETS 6:15 P.M.
EVANGELISTIC SERVICES 7:45 P.M.
Mid-Week Prayer Services (Wed.) ........------ 7:45 P.M.


- -I I*-I


I


Fleetside Pickup and Series 60 with high rack


NOWS THE TIME to save more truck

dollars on the moreeforayouredollar trucks!


Your truck dollars are worth a
whole lot more at your Chevrolet
dealer's right now! First off, you
get a head start on saving because
summer's the saving season. Then,
with a harder working, easier
riding Chevy truck, you're set to
save every mile you haul. And,
finally, at trade-in time, you can
expect an extra dividend because
of Chevy's traditionally higher
resale value. What could be better?


Summer's the season to get extra mile-
age from your dollars on the trucks built
to give you extra miles of hauling. With
Independent Front Suspension, Chevrolet
trucks keep going thousands of miles
longer because far less destructive jar
and shake are transmitted through the
truck. Chevy I.F.S. trucks work harder,
too, in areas where other trucks have to
be pampered. And, with Chevy's wide
choice of thrifty 6 and hardy V8 power,
you can tailor your truck exactly to your
job. So how can you miss-especially now
during the summer saving season?


CHEVROLET TRUCKS


FREE
.. .. ;,,,.,

if you damage this tire on the road!
(Gates special 50th Anniversary Offer)


Yes, we give you a brand new tire without one
penny of cost if the tire is made unserviceable by
cut, bruise, snag, blowout or ANY other failure
during the 1st year or during the 1st 50% of tread
depth!
And even after the 1st year or 1st half of
tread depth Gates continues to protect your tire
investment by replacing the tire for ANY failure
with full credit for the unused mileage based on
Gates published exchange price.


This is the first time ANY tire manufacturer
has put such an unprecedented guarantee on a
1st line tire selling at a competitive price.
You don't pay any more to get this extra pro-
tection... You don't pay any more to get the
25% extra miles of service this tire has proved -
in millions of miles of road tests-it actually
gives! Save now with safety ride on Gates Air-
Float Deluxe low profile NYLONS.


See your local authorized Chevrolet dealer


FLOYD CHEVROLET COMPANY


TIRES FOR EVERYBODY-all grades...all sizes...all prices...BUDGET TERMS

Gates CORONADO Gates AIR-FLOAT Gates AIR-FLOAT DELUXE
NYLON TUBELESS










Pate's Shell Service

Port St. Joe, Florida


.'- j ,



Here are some buttercups you won't find in the garden, but
they're a fine treat when they appear at a summer luncheon table.
These Buttercup Shells are individual corn meal pastry cups
you can fill with hot creamed chicken, other creamed fillings, or
chilled seafood or chicken salad. Self-rising corn meal is the
prime ingredient in the recipe it adds delicious corn flavor
and plenty of crunch to these golden pastry shells. You'll also
enjoy the refreshing flavor of the crushed dried mint leaves that
are -mixed with the pastry.
Pastry shells made with enriched self-rising products offer
plenty of nutritional goodness. Calcium, food iron and the three
B-vitamins -- thiamine, riboflavin and niacin are the im-
portant vitamins and minerals in enriched self-rising flour and
corn meal. Here's the Buttercup Shells recipe to bring you those
essential nutrients, plus fine eating.
3BUTTERCUTP"SHELLS
1/ ecups enriched self-rising 1 tablespoon crushed dried
corn meal mint leaves
21 cups sifted enriched self, /z cup shortening
rising flour 6 to 8 tablespoons cold water
o* Creamed Chicken
Combine corn meal, flour and -mint leaves. Cut or rub in
Shortening until mixture is crumbly. Sprinkle with water, mix-
ing lightly until dough begins to stick together. Turn out on
floured board or pastry cloth and press dough together. Roll to
circle %-inch thick. Cut with 5-inch cutter. (Or. cut around lid
of coffee can with sharp knife.) To make bottom part of shell,
fit 6 circles over outside of six inverted custard cups. Crimp to
form 4-pointed star. Prick pastry with fork. To make inside of.
shell, fit remaining circles inside six more custard cups. Prick.
Bake all shells in hot oven (425F.)' 12 to 15 minutes or until
lightly browned. To serve, place the smaller shell. inside the
larger and fill with your favorite Creamed Chicken,
Makes 6 servings.

estimated construction costs iare for planning the project and con-
around $200 million. tends that the ,canal is of prmie
Governor Bryant has asked the importance to Southern economy
federal government for $195,000 and the national defense.


The Star Brings News of Your Neighbors

You Are Cordially Invited To Attend


Long Ave. Baptist Church


~i~p


- _____ __ L __


|


404 WILLIAMS AVENUE POE722


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA








THURJbAYI JUL6Y 17, lik


,, _,,, I
James Jones, local Philco appliance dealer, is shown with Miss
A.Ei'r:a. Miss Nancy Ann Fleming. Jones was Miss America's es-
cort at a recent Philco convention, at which Miss Fleming wlas the
official hostess. Philco Corporation sponsors the Miss America,
(_O11 [eSt


Singspiration At

Presbyterian

If you have missed out on the
tfun and fellowship tha: the city-
wide sings have been providing,
you can quit kicking yourself be-
Icause you will have another chance
this coming Sunday night to attend
one.
'Join with te fifty to seventy-
five othlier young people in an hour


night the singspiration will .be held
in the Presbyterian -Church and
will begin immediately after the
evening service.
All young people, counselors, and
pastors are invited to attend.
-----'-


packed time o' sin-ging, fellowship,
and eating. I is something you Mar. and Mrs. Malcolm Dewi t
won't want to miss. This Sunhay Smith, Seventh Street, Highlaad


FREE INSTALLATION


-THt STAR, Per t6 JOG, Pik,


AtifWy Club HenrU
Otomic Survival Proopam
An interesting and informative
program was presented to the Port
St. Joe Rotary Club by Bill Win-
ters on the subject of Civil De-
fense from nuclear 'bombs.
The program consisted of two
films. One showed the effects of a
tes" ran in 1959 by the Atomic
Energy Commission in Nevada en-
titled 'Operation Cue". The other
film was instructions as to how
to prevent personal damages, from
fall-out and how to recognize fall-
out.
In the atomic test the AEC con-
structed a city in the Nevada des-
ert, much like any small town in
the U. S. containing public utilities
'and different types of buildings
and. shelters that .may be construct-
ed In the home.
In the 'blast, almost every type
house was demolished with the ex-
ception of those built of reinfroc-
ed concrete block. Several above
ground shelter areas constructed in
some of the houses-such as a re-
inforced 'bathroom, corner room or
hallway, were left standing enough
to protect their ocupants from
death from the 'atomic .blast.
Also in the test, various types of
foodstuffs were placed at varying
distances from -the blast. It was
found from the test that food in
unbroken containers -a -mile from
the blast were safe to eat.
The 'bomb set off was one the
size of the 'bonmtb that destroyed
Hiroshima. The film narrator stat-
ed that a hydrogen warhead would
-be destructive up to eight and a
half miles, while the atomic war-
head exploded, destroyed every-
thing for one mile.
A film on fall-out was shown
giving methods of protection from
this after-effect of an atomic ex-
plosion. Fallout can ,be detected as
dust which follows a known atom-
ic explosion 'and should be avoided
as much as possible.
The best protection from fall-
out, of .course, was to get into an
approved shelter and stay there for
about two weeks until the danger
can -be dissipated. A make-shift
protection is to 'stay in an inside
hallway or room in your house with

View announce the birth of twins
a baby boy, Bobble Dann and a lit-
I tie daughter, Sheila Ann on July
22.
0 a* 0

Mr. and 'Mrs. Donald Ray John-
son-, 112B Second street announce
the birth of a 'sno, Donald Ray, Jr.,
on July 20.

Mr. ,anl Mrs. George W. Simmons
announce the birth of a son, George
W., Jr., on July 18.
(All births occurred at the
Port St. Joe Municipal Hospital.)


A Service of Your 1ioctor of Medicine,
Your Local Medical Society and tie
Florida Medical Association.
WHY BREAKFAST?
Many authorities think that
breakfast is the most important
meal. Here is why.
During sleep the body is at
rest. Heart acti~s slows up.
There is usually a drop in blood
pressure. With the start of the
day's activities, however, more
energy is needed. Since break.
fast follows the longest period
of time without eating, this firso
meal becomes especially impon
tant.
Studies have been made tj
show that in workers who omi
breakfast there is increased
fatigue, irritability, reduce
work output, increased tremon
and slowing down of reaction
time. All these factors plac4
additional strain on the body
and tend to increase one'i
proneness to accidents.
Why do some persons oma
breakfast? Some, wishing t4
lose weight, erroneously believe
that skipping this important
meal will hurry along the weight
reduction. Others get up at the
last minute, hurry about their
dressing, gulp a bit of food if
they bother at all, and dash off
to their day's activities.
How much breakfast should
you have? It has been estimated
that from one-fourth to one.
third of the day's nutrients
should be taken in the first meal
rhus, with servings of fruit ot
Fruit juice, cereal with milkl
read and butter, you will havr
the required proteins, carbohy-
(rates, fats, vitamins and miner-
sla. With careful planning, thq
sasic breakfast can be varied,
Eggs, for example, should be inm
eluded or substituted at least
four times a week.
Good breakfast habits are a
Irt of good living habits. The
dividends they yield to children
ind adults alike cannot be dul
elicated for beginning the dal
with renewed zest and energy
If you want to lose weight, ski*
between-meal snacks; but don
i a balanced breakfast.


r.--. .


AlI the Features Are In the 1961 Philco


regardless of price:
Adjustable airflow grilles
Fresh air ventilation
5-year guarantee


PLUS PERMANENT
WASHABLE FILTER
with permanent built-
in germicide. Filter is
hand washable-saves
you money. Lift Out Wash Wing Reoluae
Get all the cooling
you pay for with
ry Philco Guaranteed
< ~BTU Cooling
Capacity.


ST. JOE RADIO & TV COMPANY
NOW LOCATED AT 308 FOURTH ST.


cracks filled, with rags br paper to
prevent the dust from seeping Into
the house.
Short venture sinto fallout will
not harm a person, but the "ash"
should be washed off as quickly as
possible to prevent serious burns.
Too much radiation can be recog-
nized by violent illness, but will
'pass away over a short period of
time, if the person affected will
remove himself from the exposure.
The films showed that atomic
blasts need not 'be the end of all
life in its area, but showed that
adequate shelter is necessary to
withstand the blast and fallout.
Guests of the club were Charles
Crawford of Rome, Ga., J. T. Rob-
erson and Majbry Huggins of Ever-
green, Ala., and William E. Green
of Apalachicola.

-------


THIS NEWSPAPER IS A FREE VOICE OF ALL THE

PEOPLE IN OUR TOWN!

The right given individuals to express their opinions grows from
the very foundations of democracy and exercising that right helps to
keep our way of life flourishing. This newspaper has always offered its
pages as a forum for this community a place where everyone may have
a voice. This paper has endeavored also through the years to bring you
all the news, presented as factually as possible for knowledge too helps
keep us free. This is your newspaper protect its freedom!


THE STAR


BAft 9Aft 1 I i i II


RICH'S Super A
(FIVE MILES FROM PORT ST. JOE ON HIGHWAY 71)


-- THESE SPECIALS GOOD MONDAY THRU SATURDAY, JULY 29 --

THE BEST PORK FLORIDA GRADE 'A' LARGE

CENTER

CHOPS Lb5

SUNNYLAND THE BEST
SMALL TENDERIZED 0
SHANK PORTION -3 9 F


HAM

We Guarantee Satisfaction in Heavy WITH $10.00 ORDER or MORE
Grain Fed Beef Swift Choice FRESH 4 ears 19c

Premium or U. S. Good CORN doz. 49c

ICE COLD GUARANTEED GOOD
ALL MEAT 3

STE W lb. 49 WATER 3
WITH $3.00 ORDER MELONS for

SIRLOINS ROBIN HOOD Pre-Sifted
SIRLOIN 79 FLOUR 10. bag99C

T B 0 N E lb. (Cereal Bowl SFree
SEE THE "MACHINE" THAT
ALL MEAT TENDER ROAST SHELLS THE "BEANS"
ROUND STEAK Fresh Shelled Daily Your Choice

GROUND ROUND lb. C Choice Peas Butter Beans
SIRLOIN TIP WE SHELL YOUR PEAS 75c bu.
APALACHEE BAY BREADED
BONELESS TENDER BROILING (Introductory Offer)

NEW YORK 7 SHRIMP pkg.49
STEAKS L 7 W Nabisco Premium

Saltine Crackers pkg.29
For Stew, Bar-B-Q or Soup BFd Fresh Frozen Shelled 3 $

BEEF 3 Shelled PEAS 3

SHORT RIBS Ibs. nd e JANS pkgs.

LET US SAVE YOU MONEY BY

Filling Your Deep Freeze With Our Meaes and Vegetables


(Limit Rights Reserved)


.4


air conditioner,
* Automatic Thermostat
* Stale Air Exhaust
* 2-speed Fan


. 4- -


5; ~- -- --~--- ~


~' ~~rx~w"


AT WHITE CITY, FLORIDA









-.^ "ils "if tc P -f Edison Electric Iinstttu Completes


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISiNG 8e the bedrto omes.y Cu-ers Aan eig Study of TVA Power Operations
der constructl- on Cypress Ave-
nue. $500 down, payments, approxi- -g n .
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment. FOR SALE: St. Joe Beach. Five mately s80.00 per month. F .A. The Edison Electric Institute below cost at the expense of the
all BAll 7-2165. Mrs. Paul Far- room brick house, two ceramic each. Terms. a which represents investor-owned nation's taxpayers Clapp added.
mer. ;tfc-2-16 'baths, carport, glassed in family E. TOM PRIDGEON Carp's announces that their Port electric utility companies, recently "In spite of the fact that great
FOR RENT: Nice furnished apart- room, and utility room, deep well, Reg. Real Estate Broker St. Joe store has practically com- completed a study of the TVA pow- economic benefits are claimed for
ment for couple only. Call Mrs. located on corner lo. Pay euity C W. Long, Saleman pleted the remodeling plans and er business, according to President Tennessee and the South because
Morgan Jones. 227-7641. tfe-4-6 Whteat 648-444 loan. a -7-20. E. Phone 27-7741 301 Williams Ave. that a Grand Opening Sale will W. J. Clapp of the Florida Power o fartifciially cheap TVA power,
F RENT rFurnished partmen. PLANNING TO MOVE? Let us help FOR SALE: Gaited saddle horse. take place shortly Corporation. Tennessee is on the bottom of the
Living bedroom, kitchen and you. Free estimates in town or saddle and bridle, $250.00. Spirit- Carp's of St. Louis, Missouri, be- "In the study two dajustments list of almost every economic in-
bath, 401 13th St., J. A. Mira, Ph. anywhere in the U. S. A. We rep- ed *but gentle. J. V. Gander, Apala- came the owners of 31 of the Olen were made", Clapp said, "one was dex for the South an today 70 of
6484128. resent MAYFLOWER, nationwide chciola, Fya. Phone 653-5111 or Stores on. April 1 of this year. It to charge TVA's power operations Tennessee's 95 counties are con-
FOR RENT: House on Long Ave- movers. Experienced and qualified 6534591. 'tfc-7-13 has taken up until now to remodel with taxes cmoparable to those sidered 'as depressed areas for Fed-
nue facing Elementary School. URPLUS SALES OF ST. JOE, 112 ANOTHER SHIPMENT of good the stores and -dispose of all of the paid by electric companies; and, eral aid," Clapp concluded.
Call Mrs. Nora Duren, Phone 7-5471 Monument Ave. Phone 224051. merchandise just received at ur- 'Olen merchandise. The stores pur- another was to charge for the use
plus SALES, We are offering at
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom house at FOR SALE: 45'x8" Richardson tremendous savings a vast stock of chased are located in Alabama, of funds Invested in such power VISITING IN PANAMA
St. Joe Beach. Furnished or un- house trailer with automatic Just about anything you can men- Florida, .Mississippi, Louisiana and operations comparable to those Julie and Dbera Buttram will
furnished. Carport, screened porch washer. $2,995.00. Call Bill Rich tion. Come in today and look it ov- Georgia. chrages paid by electric companies leave today to spend the week end
and all rooms extra large. Phone at 229-1145. te-5-4 er. Use our budget terms., SU- The remodeling of the local store which are financed in the free mar- in Pannma City visiting with Mr.
648-4286. rtfc-7-a1PLUS SALES of ST. JOE, 112
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom insulated Monument Ave. Phone 227-4051. We included extensive interior re-dec- 'ket." and Mrs. F. M. Douglas and Mrs.
FOR RENT: 2 or 3 bedroom fur- house. Hardwood floors, wired -for deliver. orating and the adding of a com-A
nished houses. See Robert Mont- air conditioner and electric stove. g If TVA and its munlcpaI distri- Carrie Amos.
gomery, 8th St., St. Joe Beach or at Corner lot, 302 16th St., $8.500. PLACEMENT NOW-Women to plete shoe department as well as a butors were to pay their share of -
A & P. ttc-7-27 $57.21 monthly payments. FHA fi- work 4 hours daily at excellent complete men's and boy's furnish- taxes and market costs of money, VISITING SHARITS
--- nancing, 25-year mortgage. $300 pay 'servicing Avon customers in ing department. A very decorative rates to their customers wou;d have. Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Fife of Deca-
FOR RENT: Two 2-bedroom, fur- down payment plus FHA closing your vicinity. Full or part time, no 'sign was placed on the front of the to be raised considerably,' Ciapl tur, Ga., are visiting with Mr. and
nished or unfurnished houses. $50 costs. Write or call collect, Ben experience necessary. Write P. 0. building this week. said. "If this nsiere done", ap tur, Ga., are visiting w ith Mr. and
per month. See Bill Carr at 227-8111 Dickens, 1101 Piedmont Drive, Tal- Box 3103 MSS, Tallahassee, Fla. g this week. said. "If this were done", he ad- Mrs. J. L. Sharit. Mrs. Fife is Mrs.
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom furnished lahassee, Florida. Phone 385-1015. Carp's will carry only first qual- ded, "electric rates in the TVA area Sharit's sister.
apartment. Downstairs. 522Y2 LOTS FOR SALE: Oak Grove. $25 EPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call ity merchandise, not necessarily would then be about the same as n
Third Street. Phone 227-8642. ,down, $25 per ,mo. Also camp sites Buford Griffin, Phone 7-7011 for high priced, :but first quality, re- rates paid 'by customers of tlhe, FATHER OF LOCAL
FOR SALE Three bedroom ma- acreage near Willis Landing, by w'ick expert service. tfe gardless of price. electric companies op3aating under RESIDENT PASSES AWAY
FOR SALE.: Three bedroom ma- th eacre. On paved hiway. Easy Carp's operates 34 stores in Mis- .
cenral heat .an doted for air terms. Call 227-5471. 4tc-7-6 PAINT CONTRACTING souri and Illinois in addition to the sir.ar circumstance. Rev. W. F. Peeler, father of
conditioning. New window unit al- FOR SALE JAMES FLOYD 31 in the Southeast. It 'has always "The fact that TVA 'does not pay Charles Peeler, passed away July
ready installed. 813 Marvin, Ave. 1. 2-bedroom house at Mexico 214/2 7th St. Highland Viewofarps to sup- Federal income taxes and has not 15. Funeral 'services were held at
Minerva McLane. 4tp-7-20 Beach on waterfront. 100x143 lot. R. A. M.-Regular convocation of port every worthwhile cause in ev- paid intreest on the funds advanced 11:00, a.m. July 17 In Bronson anl
FOR SALE: Roll-away Bed, double Fully furnished. Ceramic tile bath. St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A. ary town where they have a store. by the Federal Treasury, result. in burial was in Edgewood-Cemetery.
size, 48" width. Like new. Com- Priced at only $10,97500. M., 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit electric power being sold by TVA
plete $25.400. Phone 648-3126. Ito 2. Large frame house, over 2,000 ing brothers welcome. Carp's guarantee everything they
ft. of floor space on five acres of Joha H. Dickey, High Priest sell. They will also gladly cash all
FOR SALE: 16' Cartercraft boat, land at Kinard, Fla. Priced at $6,- Joel Lovett, Secretary payroll checks free.
60 'hp. Mercury electric starter, 600.
2 6-gal. tanks, Gator trailer, 2 salt 3. 3bedreom house, 1 bath, car- SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, I. 0. Ken Cox is the manager of the
water rods and reels. A-1 cnodi. port and utility room, on Marvin 0. F.-Meets second and fourth Port St. Joe Carp's Store. He in-
tion. No reasonable offer refused. Avenue. Pay owner's equity and Thursdays, 8:00 p.m. in American vites you to come in and get ac-
Ted Beard, Phone 227-2671. tfc-7-27 assume balance of $9,461.56 pay- Legion Hall. All members urged to qua'nted. He will be very happy to
able at $70.00 per month, attend.
FOR SALE: Four lots on Highway 4. Lots at Douglas Landing for Noble Grand: Emmett Daniell see you and he wants you to see '
71. Phone 229-2570. 1.tc fish camps and retirement homes. Secretary: J. C. Martin. what has 'been done to the store
Terms arranged to suit you. in the matter of layouts and mer-
FOR SALE: 1961 Great Lakes trail- 5. Lots fo rsale at St. Joe Beach. WILLIS V. ROWAN, POST 116, in the matter of layouts and mer-
er, 40' long, 10' wide. Contact 1 block from water. Reasonable THE AMERICAN LEGION, Meet- chandise.
Charles Strange at Blue Gator terms. ing first and third Tu esd a y --
Trailer Park, Mexico Beach. Phone 6. 106 acres at Beacon Hill. Good nights, 8:00 p.m. American Legion VISITING FORDS
227-3021. tfec-7-201 investment opportunity. 'Home. Mr. and. Mrs. Julus Ford and A
daughters of Long Beach, Calif., ', B H


SEE DANLEY'S COMPLETE EAT, SLEEP and

PLAY THAYER NURSERY


are visiting Mr. and Mrs. H. L.
Ford.

ATTEND ANNIVERSARY
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Buttram at-
tended the Golden Wedding Anni-
versary celebration of Mr. and Mrs.
Gary B. Hudson in Milford, Ga.,
Sunday 23. Mrs. Hudson is Mrs.
Buttramn's aunt.


*U*Ois o60 MA'tiNs
Iw.it .ut of Mr. a ,d r7.
Chris Martin were Mr. ,and Mrs.
George Zeigler and children of
Porthmouth, Va.


Missile Plant
(Continued from page 1)
purpose the landing of a man on
the moon.
Local rumor -has it that the Whit-
ney company which recently pur-
chased 50,000 acres of land near
Overstreet and also stockholders
in Aerojet-General has purchased
the land for the fuel manufacturing
center 'should they win the govern-
ment contract.
It is said the proposed plant
would ;begin with a payroll of about
800, eventually reaching a maxi-
mum of 8,000.

Fire Department
Answers Two Calls
Saturday afternoon the Port 'St.
Joe Volunteer Fire Department was
called to aid St. Joe Paper Com-
,pany fire fighters fight a fire in the
chip 'bin at the mill. A ibig rubber-
ized belt had become overheated
in the ,bin and caused more smoke
than fire in the area. The blaze was
quickly put out.
Tuesday night of this week about
midnight, the fire department was
I called out of ,bed to put out a small
,brush fire 'on the Apalachicola
highway.