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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01193
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 9, 1958
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01193

Full Text






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10c


T HEI


STAR


MONEY TALKS--et's keep
it where we can speak with It
once in awhile-Trade with
your home town merchants


"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"


SORT ST. JOE. FLORIDA


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1958


First Brick Building Built


Here Is Being Torn Down


ETAOIN SHRDLU
by Wh$r.-EY R. RAMSEY

Well, we went after the little
gray birds Saturday, along with
about 20 others. There was more
hunters on our field than there
were doves.
We went with Earl Tom Prid-
geon and son Tommy, the sharp-
shooters of the bunch. And then
there were hunters like Gannon
Buzzett, Dick Lamberson, Dick
Spillers, Joel Strait, Woodrow Hen-
derson, Byron Eells, and people like
that. We removed these last "hunt
ters" from the same sentence with
hunters like the Pridgeons. And
then there was the so-so sharp
shooters like Blake Thomason and
Prank Pate. If you ever go bird
hunting with this batch, you should
park yourself across the field from
those in the second sentence. Then
as the doves fly over these boys
will. shoot (and miss) driving the
birds back over your way.
If Tom Pridgeon had stayed
home, we would have been high
man for the bunch with five birds.
Tom got eight.
It was drizzling rain and the
birds either weren't there or were
afraid to venture across our field,
but it was fun for the first day of
the season anyway.

'Bill Carr had a good one pulled
on him the other day. He went in
the "Seafarer" Restaurant (new
name for Honey's) and ordered
hot cakes for breakfast the other
morning. Bill was reading his pa-
per when he was served his hot
cakes.
Bill continued to read about his
idol, L'il Abner (improving his
mind) and generously poured the
"syrup" over his cakes. He took
a big bite, then began spraying the
wall. Someone had slipped Bill -the
vinegar in place of the syrup.
'Nobody knows if it was inten-
tional or not.

'Did you ever try to listen to the
World Series and set up a column
"at the same time? It is quite a
chore.
One consolation though, Milwau-
kee is winning.

You folks here in Port St. Joe
are falling behind Wewahitchka in
one respect.
It's hard to have to say, but it is
so.


Building Was Built By R. A. Costin

In 1914 For Store Building

The first brick building constructed in Port St. Joe since
the days of the old town of St. Joseph, which was destroyed over
a hundred years ago, is now being demolished. The work is being
done by George G. Tapper, present owner of the property, to
make room for the completion of a new and modern shopping
center, which was begun a little over a year ago.


- 4


The building now being demol-
ished was built by R. A. Costin, a
PFCR S Bp0 So lg pioneer settler in this city. Mr.
Costin came to Port St. Joe in 1909
Pie Bake Contest and opened the first store in the
town. Five years later, in 1914, the
brick building was completed and
All girls and boys who have Costin moved his general merchan-
passed their 14th birthday by Jan- dise business into the new building
uary 1, 1959, but who will not have which he operated until 1923, at
passed their 21st birthday on Jan- which time the business was trans-
uary 1, 1959, are eligible to enter ferred to his son, Cecil Costin,
the first lap of the National Cherry with C. A. McClellan a part owner.
Pie Baking Contest, sponsored !o- The ownership of the building
caliy bi t"ie io.i" a o.? r- C"as changed- hand. five times dur-
.r-[in. Mrs. Amy Thlomipsu-i. di- itg the allI_,.t. half century of its
rector of the company's home'ser- existence. It was first sold during
vice department announced this the good days of 1928 to H. V. Cov-
week. ington of Jacksonville,. as a real
Contestants must be unmarried, estate investment, but the crash of
No person who has previously -ep- 1929 considerable decreased its
resented his state is eligible for value and in 1931 it was purchased
the National Cherry Pie Contest. by Cecil Costin who retained title
The local winners will receive until 1932, at which time it was
a No. 209 Pyrex pie plate. The di- sold to J. S. Shirey who converted
vision winner will receive a study the building into a motel which he
lamp, and will go on to the State- operated until about 1954.
wide competition which will be Paul 0. David of Columbus, Ga.,
held in Clearwater, Saturday, De- saw great possibilities in the mo-
cember 6, 1958. An expense-paid' tel business in Port St. Joe and in
trip to. Chicago for final competi- 1954 purchased the property from
tion with winners from other Shirey. Due to ill health and the
states, Canada and Hawaii will be work and responsibility of operat-
given to the winner and the cha- ing a motel, Mr. David, in 1956, de-
peron from Florida. cided to auction the old building
and adjacent properties which
Those desiring to enter the con- wr e by fle pr G. Ta n.


You just don't support your edi- test may contact .the home service
tor in the style that Wewa supports adviser Mrs. S. Patrenos, Port St.
-theirs. Joe Florida Power Corporation of-
And your editor is younger and fice. Registration is open now and
more vigorous than the Wewa, too. will continue through October 21.
But will he stay that way with The Contest will be held in the
this kind of treatment? High School Homemaking Depart-
The Wewa 'editor already has meant at 1:30 p.m. Copies of recipe
three of the "B's" of old age, so must accompany pie.
he is sinking fast. He has a B-ald ______m
Head, B-ifocals and B-unions. All Fine Tribule Paid To Local
.he needs now is a B-ig belly.
SBut back to the subject. M v A W
The editor up at Wewa has been 0st Love A Winne
supported to such financial gain L
that he was able to buy the first Loves Their Sharks
new Oldsmobile to come to town.
At least he bought it in Gulf
County and kept his money at (From the Panama City
home. News-Herald)
After all the new cars come out, Everyone loves a winner.
we will take our pick and then try But everyone in Port St. Joe
to make negotiations to finance a loves the Shark football team. Win,
hubcap toward purchasing a new lose or draw.
car. Buying it a piece at a time. St. Joe fans proved this last Fri-
ra ti ,day night as they cheered coach
Marion Craig's boys to defeat for
Delegation Seeks *the first time this season against
P Di the Bulldogs of Marianna.
Paid DirCector St. Joe has support at its finest.
When the Sharks make a trip, half
A delegation from the High of St. Joe goes with them. Kids,
School PTA appeared before the mothers, fathers, brothers, grand-
City Commission Tuesday asking folks and everybody else.
the commission to provide funds St. Joe has a team of cheerlead-
for the salary of a director for ers that have probably the least
the youth center in Port St. Joe. trouble of any yelling group in the
The delegation was composed of state.
Mrs. Bert Hampton, Mrs. Tom All the encouragement it takes
Mosely and Mrs. Joe Stevens. They for a Shark fan to yell is to have
requested that the city bear all or him in the same park with his foot-
part'of the cost for a director for ball team.
the Stac House organization. St. Joe won their opening game
Mayor Sharit told the group that at home, and had an overflowing
the City was in no financial posi- crowd that sent a steady stream
tion to finance the project and of encouragement to the field and
that he felt that the acquisition to the nearby bench.
and payment of a director was up The Sharks were on the road the
to the parents and not a respon- following Friday night, and so was
sibility of the City. ja better part of St.. Joe. And as far


per, present owner and demolisher.
The sturdy construction of the
old brick building, with walls 16
inches thick and narrow windows,
has withstood the ravishes of hurri-
canes and .storms for almost a half
century. It has seen the many ef-
forts of our town to break its bonds
and grow into a fine city.


TWENTY-SECOND YEAR


As an example of what can hap-
'pen he gave China as a grim warn-
ing. "China hasn't always been a
rice eating nation", he said. "They
must eat rice by necessity". Carey
said that at one time China ate as
good as any other nation in the
world. Poor conservation practices
had reduced the fertility of China's
soil to the point where rice was
about the only crop that would
grow abundantly enough to feed
the nation.
Carey cited the St. Joe Paper
Company on their efforts to con-
serve water. "That big ditch was-
n" dug because they wanted to",


said Carey, "but from force of no-
Fans cessity by a falling water table".
Carey awarded Rotarian Jimmy
r; But St. Joe MONeill a plaque for his conserva-
W I wtion practices on his vast tract of
or i woodlands. "Such men as MeNeill",
said Carey, "will insure the 1U. S.
of a good crop for years to come."
as crowds went, you couldn't tell Ed J. Woods, owner of the IGA
the home team side, (which was Foodliner was taken into the club
Walton High) from the visiting St. as a new member.
Joe side. Guests of the club were Alfred
There, again, 'the lauded eleven Shuler, Frank Stanf.ord, Buck
were backed up all the way by a Chauncey of Apalachicola; W. C.
standing crowd from St. Joe, win Garrett of Liberty County and F.
or lose. (They won.) R. Weed, Farm Forester of Blounts-
Last Friday night, St. Joe came town.
from behind to take a one-touch-
down lead that they held until the TOO LATE TO
last quarter, when Marianna went Cf A SSIE Y
ahead by two points. .CLA SSI
This was quite a blow for the By RUSSELL KAY
team, but it did no more to St. Joe -
fans than bring out a little more Well, here we go again. After my
encouragement. They screamed, trip to Mexico and Guatamala last
yelled and cheered right down to Spring I figured I'd had it and did
the closing minutes of the- game, not expect to be going anywhere
while Marianna was turning the again for a long time but when the
Shark tide and pushing them down National Editorial Association came
into the loss column, 15-13. up with a European Study Mission
'Shark fans don't just get on their and invited me to join the party, I
coat and go to the game to yell found it too tempting to resist.
their lungs out. They know every Mrs. Kay and I have embarked
players name, and they use it. on a three weeks trip that will take
They give credit where credit for us to Holland, Belgium, France and
even a good try is due. England before we return. We left
This, is support at its finest. New York with the editorial group
This, is support at ts finest, iSeptember 19 and we will return
This, is the kind of support every to Florida about the middle of Oc-
school needs. (Continued On Page 8)


Commission Reduces City



Taxes By 3 Mills for '59


PTA Study Course

Set For Monday

Next Monday night, October 13
promptly at 6:00 p.m. at the Stac
House, study will begin on the PTA
manual. Everyone is requested to
bring a covered dish for supper to
be served at 7:00 p.m. This is to
help as many. as possible to attend
at the early hour set for the meet-
ing.
Special emphasis Will be placed
on basic policies and guiding prin-
ciples of PTA and on parliamentary
procedure.
This will be an opportunity to dis-
cuss any questions you have and
to make suggestions for improve-
ment in PTA programs and service
the PTA can make to the home and
the school.
Plans are to make the study as
enjoyable and profitable for all and
all officers, and committee chair-
men are urged to attend.
The meeting will adjourn prompt-
ly at 10:00 p.m. Credit will be giv-
en for all who attend the full four
hours.
The Elementary and Highland
View PTA members are invited to
attend and participate.


Conservation Is A

Must -Carey

Burt Carey, of the Soil Conserva-
toin Service addressed the Rotary
Club last Thursday on the need for
soil conservation in Florida now,
to preserve our water and soil re-
sources.
Carey said that until recent years
Florida had given no thought to
conserving water, but that the re-
source was rapidly diminishing and
conservation methods are a must.
He reported that acres fit for cul-
tivation are disappearing at the
rate of a half million acres per
year, while the population and
need for more food production con-
tinues to rise.
"Don't be misled by our current
food surpluses" he said. The cur-
-rent food surplus is about five per
cent of the total production, while
the population increase is rapidly
catching up with this surplus. He
predicted that in five years, the
rise in population would use up all
of the available surpluses now on
'hand.


Expenditures Set At $267,674.43

More Property On Tax Rolls

The Port St. Joe City Commission Tuesday night approved
a tentative budget for the year 1959 which will lower the millage
rate of city taxes by three mills. The budget will call for expen-
ditures of $167,674.43 for 1959. The budget for the past year
called for expenditures of $157,097.82.


The budget was tentatively ap-
proved at the Tuesday meeting.
Final approval will not come until
the meeting of October 21 after
publication of the ordinance setting
the budget which will be found in
this week's issue of The Star.
The tax bite to the individual
tax-payers, in addition to having a
reduced operating budget, will fur-
ther be softened by the fact that
additional taxable property has
been added to the city tax rolls.
Reductions in expenditures occur
in the Administrative Expense
Fund, Street Maintenance Fund,
Operation Municipal Hospital Fund,
and Contracts Paybale Fund. The
only increase in the budget comes
in the Police Department Fund
which is up 2,000.00 over last year.
Debt Service Funds have been in-
creased from $32,797..82 for last
year to $59,648.43 for this year.
This increase is brought about by
bonds floated during 1958 for addi-
tions to the Municipal Hoslpital.
The Hospital bonds are retired by
receipts from the cigarette tax.
Ad valorem tax rate for last year
was 13.5 mills. This year's taxes
have been set at 10.5 mills.
Tu'rn to page 'ev-'n for a com-
plete breakdown of anticipated
revenues and expenditures for the
coming year,

Visitors From Fort Walton
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Toole and
daughter Donna of Fort Walton
Beach, were the week end guests
of Mr. and Mrs. Dorris E. White
and family and Mr. and Mrs. Doug-
las Baldwin and family.

SO TO CHURCH SUNDAY


Last Thursday night, under diffi-
cult playing conditions, Port St.
Joe Junior High defeated the Jun-
ior High team of DeFuniak 'Springs
by a score of 33 to 6.
The game was played during a
downpour of rain that never let up
during the contest. The ability of
the Junior Sharks holding on to the
wet ball made the difference. The
excellent ball handling of Freddy
Bowdoin and the fine running of
Nelson Hall, Freddy Joines, Ches-
ley Fensom and Blaine Tharpe
provided the scoring.-
The defensive play of Richard
Arnold, Joe Whaley, Richard
Thompson, Michael McKenzie, Da-
vid Nance, Robert Costin, Courtney
Martin, George Boyer, and John
Graham led the Sharks to a 19-0
halftime lead.
The second halt saw Nelson Hall
taking a hand-off from Freddy
Bowdoin to score early in the third
quarter. The last touchdown was
made on a handoff from Curtiss
Hammond to Freddy Joines. Cur-
tisa Hammond passed to Richard
Arnold for the extra, point which
ended the scoring for the Junior
Sharks.
The Junior Braves scored in the
last few minutes of the fourth quar-
ter. The game ended with Nelson
Hall returning the kick past the
mid-field. stripe.
'Other Junior Sharas that saw ac-
tion in this first game of the sea-


son and did a fine job were linemen
Larry Davis, Tommy Grimsley,
Carl Zimmerman, Tommy Stevens,
Clifford Wimberly, Bernie Buzzett,
James Gibson, Gene Tindell, Rob-
ert Settlemire, Johnny Chafin,
Harod Keels and Roy Harper.
The next home game for the Jun-
ior Sharks will be Tuesday, October
14. They will play the Florida
School for Boys of Marianna. Game
time will be eight o'clock. Admis-
sion will be 25c for students and
5.0c for adults.

S S Offers More

Dollars for Depedents

An important notice was enclos-
ed with the social secu.itt checks
delivered Saturday to the .200,000
disabled workers who are receiv-
inug monthly disability insurance
benefits, John V. Carey, district
manager, Panama City social se-
curity office, said this week. This
notice tells about a provision in
the 1958 Amendments to the Social
Security Law under which supple-
mentary dependent's benefits may
be paid.
Disability insurance benefits have
been payable to severely disabled
workers 50 to 65 years of age since
July, 1957, Carey continued. These
(Continued On Page 8)


Sharks Leave Undefeated


Ranks In Loss To Marianna


'Hams' Planning

Disaster Network

Amateur .radio operators of Port
St. Joe met in the Florida Power
Lounge Tuesday night to lay plans'
for the formation of an emergency
short-wave radio communication
system for Port St. Joe and vicinity.
The group will work with a nation-
wide set-up of amateur radio op-


Quarterback Jackie Mitchell Suffers

Broken Leg In Friday's Game

Too many fumbles and not enough Mitchell. -- That's
about the way things stacked up in the Sharks 15 to 13 defeat at
the hands of Marianna last Friday night. Time and again the
Sharks fumbled away potential scoring drives and to cap things
off, quarterback Jackie Mitchell, the Sharks main defensive spark-
plug, suffered a cracked ankle bone and had to leave the game in
the third quarter. Mitchell is expected to be out of action for


eratorthe meeting Tuesday, this operation at least five weeks. His absence in the Shark lines will be sorely
At the meeting Tuesday, the ama- ct1
teurs laid plans for obtaining emer- felt.
agency power sources for their sets Both Marianna TD's came as a quarterback Ed Smith, using some
in case of a storm, or other emer. result of a Shark fumble. The Bull- good football logic elected to down
agency. dogs scored first in the third quar- the ball in the end zone and give
Saturday of this week, the radio ter after a Shark fumble. Marianna Marianna two points rather than
operators will set up their stations connected with a long pass that put risk a fumble in those close quar-
and operate on emergency power the ball on the Shark one yard line. ters.
as a test of their planned emer- Quarterback Williams pushed over Marianna scored their clinching
agency communications system. The for the Marianna score. touchdown after the Sharks had
test is being conducted nation-wide The Sharks struck back instant- stopped their thrust but drew a 15
with the local "hams" participating ly as fullback Ed Smith took the yard penalty that gave the Bulldogs
with the nation-wide set-up. ball on the second play of the kick- first and ten on the 15. They mov-
The local "hams" will utilize sev- off and rambled 48 yards to score. ed down to the one where the quar-
eral portable power generating Robbins added the extra point and terback pushed over for the score.
kits available in Port St. Joe to the score was all tied up. Bobby The Sharks tried frantically to
provide electricity for their sets. Burkett intercepted a Bulldog pass score with but three minutes co
In case of emergency, their pta. on the Sharks 12 and from there play but had two opportunities
tion will be located at the Florida Richard Zipperer scampered 85 thwarted by pass interceptions.
Power office with another station- yards behind some beautiful block- The Sharks will enjoy an opoe
ary set being located at the St. Joe ing to put the Sharks ahead 13-7 date this Friday and the following
Paper Company where 'emergency at halftime. )week end they will travel to Pan-
power will be available in case of Both teams fought back and ama City for a game with the Bay
domestic power failure. The ama- forth in the third quarter as the High B' team.
teurs will set up several mobile ball changed hands several times THE YARDSTICK
stations to tour trouble areas and on fumbles and intercepted passes St. Joe Marianna
will also have two or three other stalling the Sharks offensive thrust. First Downs 6 11
stationary sets around the city and In the fourth quarter, the Bull- Yds. Rushing ..........216 166
in the beach area. dogs took a fumble on the Sharks Yds. Passing _---. 0 38
Local "ham's" participating in 25. Marianna moved down to the Fumbles 4 1
the emergency set-up are A. P. five where the Sharks closed the Pass Attempt. ..--- 7 7
Jackson, Tom Alsobrook, Durel door. However, the Sharks were Pass. Comp. ....... 1 2
(Continued On Page 8) unable to move out of the hole, so Had Intercept. --- 3 1


PTA To Select A
New Vice-President

At the next meeting of the High
School PTA, a new first vicespresi-
dent will be elected to replace J.
W. Allen. Allen, who was elected
last year to the post is now making
his home in Jacksonville and has
resigned his office.
All members will be asked to
vote for a new vice-president at
the next general meeting.


NU.k5.I{ i,


Junior High Sharks Soundly Defeat

Junior Braves In Downpour of Rain


NUlMBEK2









First Baptist WMU Has First Royal

Service Program of New Church Year

The WMU of the First Baptist meetings as follows:


Church met Monday afternoon for
the first Royal Service and busi-
ness meeting of the new year.
Mrs. Milton Chafin, program
chairman for Circle One was in
charge of the Royal Service pro-
gram.
A very inspiring choral presen-
tation of the WMU watchword,
Psalms 95:2 and the new WMU
hymn, "0 for A Thousand Tongues
To Sing" was given, with Mrs.
Cliff Ellis as soloist.
Mrs. Chafin's circle then took
the group on an imaginary clipper
flight to the Philifpines, with
maps and a miniature clipper ov-
erhead the group visited all of the
main cities of the island where
missionary work is in progress.
The ladies assisting Mrs. Chafin
and giving highlights of the differ-
ent cities visited in the Philippines
were: Mrs. Ellis, Mrs. C. G. Costin,
Mrs. W. 0. Nichols, Mrs. C. E Mar-
tin, Mrs T E Parker, Sr, Mrs Per-
ry Elliot, Mrs Clifford Tharpe, and
.Mrs C. A. McClellan.
Mrs. J. 0. Baggett led in prayer
for the missionaries.
Mrs. C. E. Martin, the new presi-
dent for the year, presided at the
business meeting. Prayer chairman
Mrs. Nichols offered prayer for the


First Monday: Royal Service and
business meeting.
Second Monday: Circle meeting.
Third Monday: Mission Study. l
Fourth Monday: Cmomittee meet-
ing.
The meetings will be held at 3
p.m.
Fifth Sunday at 5 p.m. an execu-
tive meeting with the Business Wo-
mne's Circles.
Next Monday will be circle meet-
ing in the homes. The Circles will
,meet as follows: Circle 1 with Mrs.
C. G. Costin, Sr.; Circle 2, Mrs.
Roy F. Irwin; Circle 3, Mrs. Clar-
ence Pridgeon and Circle 4, Mrs.
Z. B. Adams.

STAC HOUSE
NEWS

The Stac House was well attend-
ed Saturday night with 71 members
present.
Everyone enjoyed dancing, pool
and etc.
We send out our thanks to Mrs.
Chism, who was a swell chaperone;
and our director, Mr. Floore.
'Let's all come to the Stac
House this Saturday night and


meeting. Interesting reports were have a gay time. Hot dogs will be
given by the chairman and com- sold.
mittee members. New workers for -----
the auxiliaries were presented and Visit In Georgia
voted on. Mr. and Mrs. T. G. Frary spent
It was also voted to change the last week end visiting in Georgia.


'59 Chevrolet...


Thursday, Oct. 16



decidedly different design
new Slimline design ... fresh, fine, fashionable!


fabulous new finish
Magic-Mirror acrylic lacquer needs no waxing or
polishing for up to three years!


C ;. .
S* ... '

." ,,b '


'Si
/

I
I


The Shape of
Things to Come
from Chevrolet


Garden Club Plans Mission Being

First Meeting Organized Sunday


The first general meeting of the
Port St. Joe Garden Club was held
October 3 at the home of the presi-
dent, Mrs. Lawrence Bissett. The
president, presided. Fifteen mem-
bers and one visitor were present.
Chairmen of all standing com-
mittees gave reports-and outlined
plans for projects to be carried on
during the year. Special emphasis
will be placed on horticulture, land-
scape 'design, conservation and
garden therapy.
The club chose as its civic pro-
ject the landscaping and planting
of the open court at the Port St.
Joe High School. Christmas gifts
will be sent to the Boy's Industrial
School at Marianna.
Other projects were discussed
and tentative plans made. Dele-
gates were appointed to represent
the club at the conservation confer-
ence to be held in Panama City on
October 7 and to the district con-
ference at Chattahoochee in No-
vember.
A social' hour followed during
which the hostess served refresh-
ments.

Senior Class Selling
Cakes, Tags, Friday

The Senior Class will have a
bake sale and "Shark" car tag sale
Friday morning. So let's all' help
support the Senior Class by buying
a cake and a tag.
The Seniors would like to thank
the Piggly Wiggly for furnishing
the ice for the football concessions
Friday night, and also Mr. McDon-
ald of the West Florida Gas Co.,
for the hot plate.


There will be a meeting of a
Nazarene Sunday School Mission
this Sunday, October 12. This is
an organization meeting and every-
one interested in becoming a part
of this Mission is urged to attend.
The meeting will be held in High-
land View on Eighth Street, three
blocks east of the Highland View
Elementary School.
The time of the meeting is ,rorn
10:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.
--- K* ---


'Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Casey an
nounce the birth of a daughter, Rita
Kay on October 1.
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Goodson are
announcing the birth of a daughter
Rebecca Jennine on October 3.
'Mr. and Mrs. Otis Kirkland an
nounce the birth of a baby girl,
Rhoda Gail on October 5.
,Mr. and Mrs. James Jones an-
nounce the birth of a son, Craig
Vinson on October 4.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Merritt an-
nounce the birth of a son, Johnnie
Brooke on October 4.
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Gay announce
the birth of a baby boy, Steven Al-
len on October 6.
(All births occurred at the
Port St. Joe Municipal Hospital.)
Visit In Atlanta
Dr. and Mrs. Joe Hendrix spent
last week in Atlanta, Ga., attend-
ing a post-graduate course at Enm-
,ory University.


Smith's Pharmacy

Prescriptions compounded by
a GRADUATE Pharmacist
JOHN ROBERT SMITH
Pharmaceutical Chemist


Designed exclusively for you!

Your prescription is ordered to suit your
health needs that is why we cannot
counter-prescribe, or make any ohanges
in amount. The doctor orders better
health. We supply it!


QUALITY


LAUNDERETTE and DRY CLEANERS
On Monument Ave., next to IGA
OPEN 6 DAYS A WEEK 7:00 A.M. to 7:00 P.M.

Completely modern washers and dryers to handle all your
laundry problems. Why go on washing the old fashioned
way with no investment, except our moderate charge,
you can have afully-equipped, modern laundry right at your
very finger tips. Come in today, and enjoy the comfort of
a completely automatic laundry without the large investment
needed to purchase one.
Managed by

DREW B.. HALL


NEWS FROM

OAK GROVE

Mrs. James Broome and daughter
Wanda Jean of Marianna were the
guests of her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Hansel Norris for a week.
Mrs. Jason Dykes and daughter
spent a week in Wewahitchka vis-
iting with friends and relatives.
Mr. .and Mrs. Robert Lowery
spent the week end in Milmar, Al;:.,
visiting with relatives. Mrs. Lowery.
is the former Miss Juanita Norris.
Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Levins and
daughter Regina spent several day-a
in Bonifay visiting with the latter's
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Crutchfield.
Miss Minnie Ola Ray, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Ray spent
several ,days in North Carolina on
business.
Mrs. June Norris motored to Pan-
ama City Friday on bu-siness.
Hansel Norris and Mrs. James
Broome visited in Apalachicola Fri-
day.
Cliff Stripling and Lee Barton
spent the week end in Geneva, Ala.,
visiting with friends and relatives.
Billy Allen, Judith Ann and Jen-
ny Kay Norris of Apalachicola
,spent several days visiting with
their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
Hansel Norris and Mr. and Mrs.
W. B. Dykes.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Norton of Cal-
houn, Tenn., announce the birth of
a son. The young man lias been
named Scott. Mrs. Norton will be
remembered as Betty Sue Watts,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. M.
'Watts -.of-tI-sciy


Watts of this city.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to express our apprecia-
tion for the kindesses, sympathies,
gi'ts and especially the prayers
which were offered in Steven's be-
half during his critical accident.
We wish to thank Dr. Wayne Hen-
drix and the nurses at the hospital
for thie extremely fine ,care. We
thank you for the friendship ex-
pressed by each one. It was a com-
fort in our time of need.
Rev. and Mrs. Albert Pletcher
and family
----------

Leo Punt Is

Wheaton Student

Leonard Cornelius Punt, son of
Rev. and Mrs. Harry M. Punt, 1008
Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe, has
enrolled as a freshman student at
Wheaton College (Illinois). He at-
tended Port St. Joe high school
where he participated in football
and was awarded a student coun-
cil key.
Located in suburban Wheaton, 25
r.'les west of Chicago, Wheaton
college attracts students from all
over the United States, as well as
an average of 36 foreign countries
vho lend a cosmopolitan atmos-
phere to the attractive campus.
Wheaton enjoys a limited enroll-
meLt of 1600 students and 100 gra-
duate students in the Graduate
school and seminary.
LONG AVENUE
SUNBEAMS MEET
The Sunbeams of the Long Ave-
nue Baptist Church met Monday af-
ternoon at the church with 17
members and two visitors present.
Everyone enjoyed stories, color-
ing and singing.
The next meeting will be Octo-
ber 20 at the church.
GO TO CHURCH SUNDAY
STAR Want Ads Get Resilts


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1958


Historical Society Urged To Include

St. Joe Data In Quadracentennial

The Historical Society of Port way that it could be used in some
St. Joe met Tuesday, September of the displays in the exposition.
30 at 10:00 a.m. at the Constitu- Mr. Appleyard suggested that the
tion Park Museum, with four mem- local Historical Society consult
bers present. Those present were Justine Weddell of Pensacola about
Mrs. Hubert Brinson, Mrs. Ned the possibility of having a celebra-
Porter, president, J. L. Sharit and tion of this kind.
Mrs. Chauncey Costin. -


John Appleyard of Pensacola, di-
rector of Florida's Quadricenten-
nial Celebration told of plans that
are being made by Pensacola for
.the celebration. Appleyard told
those present that any community
having any historic background,
such as Port St. Joe, should gather
all data and promote it in such a


Visit In Chattahoochee
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Buttram vis-
ited in Chattahoochee Wednesday.
---- --- -
GO TO CHURCH SUNDAY

Want Ads Get Resuitb
It pays to advertise try it


- -- a


MEN'S & BOYS'WEAR

"Outfitters for Dads and Lads"
410 Reid Ave. Phone BAll 7-8171


STORE


AIR CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT
321 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, Fla.
PRICES GOOD OCTOBER 9, 10 and 11
ANN PAGE CONDENSED -- 10% Oz. Cans

TOMATO SOUP 10 cans 99


ANN PAGE PINEAPPLE OR PEACH


new riding comfort
new softness, new road-steadiness from new
suspension system advances


new bigger brakes
27% more lining area for surer stops,
longer brake life!


ALL NEW


ALL OVER AGAIN


place your order now at


-your local authorized COh -olet dealer's


FLOYD CHEVROLET COMPANY
PHONE BAII 7-2221 401 WILLIAMS AVE.


I Rl 72 110 Hunter Cirle


PRESERVES 27c

IONA YELLOW CLING HALVES or SLICED, 29 Oz. Can


27c


PEACHES

SUNNYFIELD -- LB. BOX

PANCAKE MIX


GRADE "A" Dresse dand Drawn GA.


HEN$


SUPER-RIGHT FULLY COOKED


LB. JAR


NOW
II--



2 Experienced


PLUMBERS

On Our Staff To Serve You
.Quickly and Efficiently
Son of E. W. Beaman, founder of Bea-
man's Plumbing Service, is back from ser-
ving his duty in the Armed Forces. He
is a licensed plumber nnd is now assoc-
iated with his father, locally, in his plumb-
ing business. N

FAST, EFFICIENT

SERVICE


BEA AN PLUMBING SERVICE


2 boxes 23c


29c

LB.



39c


I ~b ---I I L-' I dllJ


FOOD


110 Hunter's Circle


Phone BAII 7-2541







NEWS FROM relatives. September 9 marked the begin-
g I Sgt. and Mrs. Thomas Workmen beautiful and useful gifts.
Highland View and children of Fort Benning, Ga., ning of the Children's Bible Class
By MR.S. EULA ROGERS were the week end guests of Mrs. conducted every Tuesday afternoon
Workman's parents, Mr. and Mrs. at 4:00 p.m. in the home of Mrs.
Mr. and Mrs. W. V. Burke and Buck Lageure. Clinton Cox on Second Street. The
daughter, Glenda, attended the an- PYt. and Mrs. Buddy Posey and parents are cordially invited to
nual rodeo in Bonifay Saturday children of Virginia Beach, Va., are visit and bring the children and
ni rodeo in Bonify Sturdy visiting Mrs. Posey's parents, Mr. avail themselves of this opportun-
night. and Mrs. John McMullen and Mr. ity for which we are very fortun-
Mr.the week end in Panm Hatfied spentty with Posey's sister and family, Mrs. ate to have as teacher of the class,
Mr. Htfield's brother and family Doss Kelley. Mrs. Mary McAllister, who is a
Mr. and Mrs. Forest Hatfield. Clinton Cox was a recent visitor missionary teacher on furlough
I Mrs. Ted Whitfield and children in Birmingham. from Brazil.
spent Saturday in Panama City Miss Mary Cox left Monday for Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Garrett
shopping. Southeastern Bible College in Bir- spent the week end in Florala, Ala.,
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Raffield of mingham where she will do depu- with Mr. and Mrs. C. Thompson.
Pensacola are visiting friends and station work in the Children's Bible Mrs. Nancy Elizabeth Patterson,
relatives here this week. Memory Association for the coming of Route 4, Graceville, died at 1:15
Mr. and Mrs. John Henry Smith year. Her many friends so sweetly p.m. Sunday. Funeral services were
of White City were visiting friends expressed their love for her in hav- held at 2:00 pan. Monday, Septem-
in Highland View Sunday evening. ing a "go-away" shower at the home ber 29 at Bethel Baptist Church
Mr. and Mrs. Pelham Revell of Mrs. Edna Floyd where she was near Graceville with Rev. Williams,
spent Saturday in Bonifay visiting the appreciative recipient of many C0 C. Balkcom and Roy Carter of-
ficiated. Burial was in the church


---i-........-
YOUR



HA OND


ORGAN DEALER

for PORT ST. JOE and GULF CO.
IS
W. F. TIRE & SUPPLY CO., of Panama City
120 W. 6th St. Phone SU 5-7468
Box 1161 Panama City, Fla.
FOR INFORMATION LOCALLY CONTACT


Mary Fuller

at FULLER'S SUPPLY CO.


CHORD, SPINNET and

CHURCH MODELS.


/


*cemetery with the Mitchell Fun-
eral Home directing -the services.
Survivors includes five daughters,
Mrs. Ida Mae Rollins, Route 2,
Bonifay; Mrs. Ethel Armstrong,
Highland View; Mrs. Lizzie Bax-
1 Mrs. Mellie Bell of Route 4,
Graceville. Three sons, T. E. Pat-
terson and H. L. Patterson of
Graceville and E. F. Patterson of
Panama City and two sisters and
one brother.
Junior G. A.'s


The Junior G. A.'s of the High-
land View Baptist Church met
Monday at 4:30. The meeting *as
called to order by the president,
Linda Graham. A social was plan-
ned for Friday afternoon. The pro-
gram chairman gave out new books
for October. The program chair-
man gave out the parts for next
week. We selected new officers
for the next six months.
Jennifer Kennedy


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH i
Corner Third St. and Baltzell Ave. 0. BYRON SMITH, Paitor b

SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 A.M.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 A.M.
TRAINING UNION 6:45 p.m. >
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m.
PRAYER MEETING (Wednesday) _- 8:00 p.m.

"Come and Worship God With Us"


You Are Cordially Invited To Attend

Long Ave. Baptist Church
REV. J. C.' ODUM, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION _. 6:15 p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 p.m.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) 7:80 p.m.
Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME
I a


Chevrolet'




Task.Force 59



arrives!




-HHA ,; ,
;z :./ e' .


New might! New models! New money-saving power!

Never before have trucks brought such ironclad assurance of reli-
ability and economy to your hauling job. Chevrolet's '59 line rolls
in with new ways to ride high costs right out of your operation!


You'll find ways to save in every
weight class. There's a big variety
of Stepside and Fleetside pickups;
Plus spacious Step-Vans, 4-wheel
drive models, medium-duty jobs
specially designed for trailer ap-
plication, and a whole lineup of
heavy-duty haulers, including
tougher-than-ever tandems!
A new high-performance
Thriftmaster 6 featured in all
Series 30 and 40 models-delivers
up to 10% greater gas economy.
There are bigger brakes in all


Series 31 and 32 light-duty mod-
els. New Positraction rear axle in
the same Series as an extra-trac-
tion, extra-cost option! Greater
durability has been built into all
Chevrolet cabs.
With new advances, new Task-
Force advantages beneath that
bold '59 design, Chevy trucks are
surer than ever of staying and
saving on your job. Look 'emra
over first chance you get. Your
Chevrolet dealer has a model
that's bound to fill your bill!


THiE TAR, Peot t. Joe, Phe. THUIl SDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1958


tBaptist WMU
rThe Highland View Baptist WMVU
Circle met in the home of Mrs.
Nora Lee Roney with seven mem-
bers present. Circle chairman, Mrs.
Roney, rb&d the scripture reading
taken ftroli Mat. 29:35 and Psalms
119:97 followed by prayer .by Ruth
Harbuic. The last two chapters of
"Sdul Winning In Our Community"
waA given by Alice Macomber. The
meeting w&s dismissed with prayer
by Mrs. Macomber.
Youth Fellbwship Party
The. members of the Highland
View Biptist Youth Fellowship en-
joyed a& *6inir roast and skating
party at Wayside Park Saturday
night froni 1:,30 til 10:30. All those
attending the party enjoyed hot
dogs, cold drinks, cookies, cake,
etc. Those attending were: Loyce
Asbelle, Clayton Asbell,e Sonjia
Branch, Leroy Davis, Archie Floyd,
Debra Floyd, Audrey Ann Brock,
George Gainnie, Rosa Lee Keel,
Dauhrice Keel, Buddy Kennington,
Patsy Patterson, Helen Richards,
Louise Richter, Mary Lou Skipper,
Melba Watts, Jerry Wood and Roy
Wood. The chaperones for the par-
ty were Mr. and NM rs. Archie Floyd,
and Mrs. A. D. Roberts.

GARDEN NOTES
FALL SOWING OF SWEET PEAS
iSWeet peas should be planted
*hete they will receive full sun-
light or only partial shade, and
where air circulation is good. They
grow best in cool, moist, yet well
drained soil. It is, therefore, impor-
talt to give special attention to
preparing It.
Dig the soil deeply, and if poad-
ble work in generous amounts of
compost, peat moss, or well rotted
manure to add humus and improve
drainage. Sand or cinders may also
be necessary to lighten extremely
heavy ground. Lime at the rate of
one half pound to a fifteen foot
row cadi be Incorporated to correct
somewhat acid or sour soil. Rake to
pulverize the surface, an andat the
same time work in one pound of
,bonemeal, superphosphate, or a
complete fertilizer to fifteen feet
of row.
Make a furrow 1 to 2 inches
deep, drop the seeds two to three
inches apart, and cover with fine
oll; Mound the ground over the
rows slightly to prevent water from
remaining there. Rows should be
At leatt three feet apart. Where
winter Are severe, after the ground
has frozen hard, mulch the plant-
ing with a loose covering of straw,
salt hay, or evergreen branches.
Remove this mulch In the spring.
For the finest flowers, we rec-
ommend the trench method of
planting. Remove the top soil to a
depth of a spade or shovel blade,
or as deeply as the good top soil
extends. Place this at the side of
the trench and dig up and cultivate
the subsoil or neit layer without
removing it from the trench. Add a
liberal quantity of manure or fer-
tilizer. When the subsoil is well
loosened, replace the topsoil pre-
viously piled at the side of the
trench. Rake in bonemeal- or super-
phosphate at the rate of one pound
to fifteen feet of row, and sow
seeds as previously described.
Deep digging and preparation of
the soil permits the vines to root

LISTEN TO

The Baptist Hour
EACH SUNDAY 4:00 P.M.
Over Radio Station 1

I WJOE
S1570 On Your Dial





SUMMER COL


OPEN DAILY, 2:45 P.M.
SATURDAY, 12:45 P.M.
S TELEPHONE: BAll 7-4191


THURSDAY NIGHT ONLY OCT. 9
SHOWS START AT 7:00 and 9:00 P.M.
SO SCARY -- We dare you to sit through it
all -- if you do -- You win FREE, two tickets
for the price of one. Also, you
S11 get free, Chanel, My Sin or other
1.A *'*Vg1 perfumes to all the girls.


THURSDAY and FRIDAY

GORDON

FIGHTFORUIFE SCOTT
METROCOLOR M.M PICTURE EVERENT


SATURDAY ONLY



RAWH IDE
TRAIL NANCY GATES


. NDLE WITH CARE'
[ .,ming DEAN JONES JOAN O'BRIEN
THOMAS MITCHELL JOHN SMITH j
S k&. A m A MnBO.lOWYM1AYPC URCTUEel men Jos

SUNDAY and MONDAY

CERTAIN To Be The Most Talked About Picture Of The Year!


See the best yet of the best sellers...


Chevrolet Task-Force 59 Trucks!


WALL.MREWIC





PJwt 3A 7 43


TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY


.AO.h' ''*': ~-~'53'~*."~`


See your local authorized Chevrolet dealer


FLOYD CHEVROLET Co.
Pert St. Joe, Florida


deeply and thus increases the
growth of the plants and prolongs.
their life during hot weather. The
plants then develop the largest and
finest flowers.

James G. Adams In
Sigma Nu Fraternity
ATLANTA, GA.-The thirteen na-


tional fraternities at Emory Uni-
versity received 288 new pledges
recently during the Sunday after-
noon "walk around the row." Under
this traditional plan, each rushed
walks through the semi-circle of
chapter houses, and turns in at
the fraternity of his choice.
James George Adams, 532 Wood-
ward Avenue, Port St. Joe, was
picked by the Sigma Nu fraternity.


I--~-11 g-- 'I ~' I -- --~


. . .





EVERYBODY SAVES AT PrGGLY WIGGLY',--1 TVYRYBODY SAVES AT P;G.GL WIGGLY


Our aim is to save you more on your everyday shopping.
Week in and week out you save at PIGGLY wIGeeGL

WE DON'T KNOW WHERE TO FIND DOVES BUT FOR BETTER VALUES -
FOR YOUR FOOD DOLLAR BE SURE TO SEE THE EASY HUNTIN' AT THE
PIGGLY WIGGLY!


.nI *

I
/ i GA. GRADE 'A' SMAl
EGGS
3 doz 1.09 'I


ROBIN HOOD -- 10 LB. BAG


FLOUR


98c


NATIONAL BISCUIT


RITZ
BEECHNUT STRAINED
BABY FOOD
MAXWELL HOUSE 6 OZ.
INSTANT COFFEE
LIPTON -- % LB. BOX
TEA
16 COUNT -- TEA
BAGS


CHICKEN OF THE SEA -- Family. Size
TUNA
SANTA ROSA
PINEAPPLE
BORDEN'S
BISCUITS
-' : i."


29c
6 for 59c


SCREEN|
STAM PS

We will Redeem S & H Green
Stamps During December
IDEAL or SUNBEAM -- 13 Oz. Loaf


BREAD
2 for 25c


CARTON
TOMATOES

CUCUMBERS


$1.15

79cFresh PEAS
CHOICE
2zc SQUASH

37c POLE BEANS


EACH
lOc
EACH
5c
LB

5c
LB
1Oc
LB
19c


27c LB
5 FOR
49c NEW POTATOES 5c


FREE!
at Your PIGGLY WIGGLY
1952 CHEVROLET
SEE IT TODAY -- COME ON IN AND REGISTER
Only pe'osons ver 18 years of age will be eligible to win.
Em ployees of Piggly Wiggly and their immediate families
will be ineligible to win.
DRAWING, NOVEMBER 22
A VALUABLE PRIZE WILL BE ANNOUNCED EACH
'' MONDAY prior to Grand prize Drawing.


SWIFT'S -- NO. 10 With $5.00 Order
ng Oil


MILADY LITTLE CHEF
T lilCATSUP
4 FOR 2 FOR
2 c29c
STERLING


STERLING SALTERS -- 2 for 29c


FRESH FROZEN FOODS
CUT CORN ---
COLLARD GREENS
MUSTARD GREENS
CUT OKRA
BUTTER BEANS -


6 PACKAGES FOR


RANGER SMOKED (Stab, Unsliced)
BAC0N


FRESH SHOULDER

ALL LEAN
STEW


FRESH PORK
CHOPS


CENTER, LB.
69c


U. S. GOOD BONELESS
Club Steak
GA. GRADE 'A' 3 to 4 LB. AVG.


LB.
49c
LB.
29c
LB.
69c
END, LB.
49c
LB.
98c


LB.


29


LIVER and LIGHTS
Georgia SPECIALS


SET
$1.29


iV&RacluJ') SAVES At PIGGIV WIGGLY


'eVERYBODY SAVES AT PIGGLY WIGGLY


zziuu~ Inum~


8818~ --- -p r ---1 1~111


I ~-~alP-~l --1- 1131


i~-~~Tll~Feb, "FVESloOaDV AIM'S AT PIGGIY WIGGIV




THE TOTAL IS LESS AT IGA


THE TOTAL IS LESS AT IGA "' THE TOTAL IS LESS AT IGAJ I


To CeIebrate Our Big




ANNIVERSARY


IGA FOODLINER PORT ST. JOE, FLA.
OCTOBER 9, 10 and 11


Your Door For 4 Page Sale Paper


WE ARE LISTE~G BELOW SOME OF THE MANY OUTSTANDING VALUES AT I.G.A.'s ANNIVERSARY SALE


- DON'T MISS !!


TELEPHONE REPAIR UNIT, 32 Piece Set----NOVEMBEREN AWAY
0 RLWWESTO ENLD DTO BE GIVEN AWAY
GOLDEN WEST COW GIRL DOLL --------------NOVEMBER 22


To Be way Sat. Oct. 11
You Do Not Have To Be Present To Win
THE TOTAL IS LESS AT IGA THE TOTAL IS LESS AT IGAA


TO BE GIVEN AWAY
BRIDE DOLL WITH EXTRA DRESS ------------DECEMBER 20


w
w s w S ate w<.-pL ii


%Ir"lPaskaec~a~B~rsa~r~ps~rs~


WE TOTAL IS LESS AT IGAI










THE STAR
Published Every Thursday At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Jo*, Florida
By The Star Publlshing Company
WasILt R. RAMEY Editor and Publisher
Also LUotype Operator, Ad Man, Flor Man, Oolumnist, Reporter, Proof Reader
and Bookkeeper
ONE YEAR .00 SIX MONTHS .50 THREE MONTHS $127.50
SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Iatered as second-class matter, December 19, 1927, at the Postofflce, Port St. Joe,
Florida, under Act of March 3, 1879.
DIAL BAll 7-8161
TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such
advertisements
The spoken word Is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully
weighed. The spoken word barely a serts; the printed word thoroughly convinces.
The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.




EDITORIALS


Self-Defeating Alliances With Vice


Every so often the alcoholic beverage industry launches a
public relations campaign which might make the naive believe
that schools, hospitals, and public improvements are heavily de-
-pendent upon the taxes liquor pays. This is an argument commer-
cialized and institutionalized vice employs frequently. And fre-
quently legislators and public officials must be counted among
the naive.
For instance, New York City, which often epitomizes on a
huge scale problems nationally familiar, is finding that "bingo"
which it expects its voters to legalize for religious and charitable
sponsors, may cost at least as much as it brings in. The pay of
the auditors, inspectors, and investigators necessary to insure
that the sponsors ar elegalized sponsors and the proceeds do go
to legalized beneficiaries promises to exceed the city's income
from license fees.
The easy alternative, of course, would be to throw the
games wide open. This, besides endangering the interests of
presumably philanthropic causes, would put the city in partner-
ship with the professional gambling fraternity.
The perils of extending alliances in this direction farther
than the already exist apparently have given the city fathers
pause., In an effort to stretch the city's income to cover estab-
lished services it has been proposed to ask the legislature to legal-
ize and tax off-track betting on races. Mayor Wagner says, how-
ever, he will appoint first a committee of "outstanding citizens"
to study both the moral and fiscal aspects of such a device.
The question that must continually be raised is: How
much more in untainted taxes is collectible where money spent
for gambling, liquor, and other forms of vice is spent instead on
productive enterprises and their constructive products?
The Christian Science Moniotr

What You Get From 'Peter' Pay Back To 'Peter'
In these days of decreased spending in Gulf County, we
have urged that the citizens do every possible bit of their buying
right here in Port St. Joe and Gulf County.
We can think of enough good reasons for so doing to fill
this entire page but suffice it to say that it is the neighborly
thing to do, and cheaper for you.
To carry this thing farther, we would like to urge the
same thing of the County Commission and the Gulf County Board
of Public Instruction. In looking over their minutes, we see
thousands of dollars spent each month out of the county on goods
and services that could be furnished by Gulf County businesses.
Wouldn't it be easier for these two bodies and a financial boost
to the County's business for their spending to be done in Gulf
County. Practically everything they use can be purchased right
here. We, therefore, go on record as urging that these two boards
confine their bids to Gulf County merchants.
Keep that money at home so the local merchants may pay
their taxes next year to replenish that which is spent.
We feel that the two county boards will benefit by bet-
ter service, better guarantees, better prices, and certainly they
will feel better for having bolstered the economy of their home
county. 4
Star Classified Ads Bring Quick Results At Small Cost!


SEE US
FOR. ..


Consolidation loans for all your bills'" -A
Improvement Loans for your home :,
Loans for replacing home equipment
Loans for buying a new home -
Loans for building a new home 1 'i,. .

M. P. TOMLINSON
REALTOR INGUROR
403 Monument Avenue l Phane 7-3201


Fla. Pulpwood Valued
At $39,960,000 In '57
Atlanta, Ga., (Special)-The val-
ue of pulpwood produced in Florida
totaled $39,960,000 in 1957, accord-
ing to the Southern Pulpwood Con-
servation Association, Atlanta.
This value was based on a 12-
state pulpwood production survey
by the U. S. Forest Service Experi-
ment Stations in Asheville, N. C.,
and New Orleans, La., in coopera-
tion with SPCA, Atlanta.
A total of 65 of Florida's 67 coun-
ties shared in this income, with
Baker, Marion, Santa Rosa, and St.
Johns Counties leading in this har-
vest of the timber crop.
For the South as a whole, the
pulpwood production totaled $396,-


Phone BAll 7-9291


000,000, with more than 90 per cent
of the counties in the 12-state re-
gion from Virginia to the forested
area of Texas participating.
The survey revealed that more
than 15 per cent of the total pulp-
wood production was hardwood. It
also showed a continued trend to-
ward a more efficient utilization
of trees harvested. An all-time high
of 6 per cent of the total produc-
tion came from the use of saw-
mill slabs and veneer cores for
which the pulp and ,paper industry
provided a market.
H. J. Malsberger, General Man-
ager of the SPCA, said, "With signs
of better business conditions ahead,
it is expected that the decline of
2.8 per cent of pulpwood produc-
tion of 1957 compared with 1956
will soon be reversed."


mm AN :


RADIATORS:


REPAIRED and RECORD
CLEANED, FLUSHED


223 Monument Ave.


Sewanee Begins First
Year of Second 100
SEWANEE, TENN.-The Episco-
pal-owned University of the South
began the first academic year of
its second century this week with
an nerollment matching the record
peak of its centennial year.
In the College of Arts and
Sciences 570 young men are en-
rolled, among them nearly 1601
freshmen who were selected from
over 500 applications. Geographi-
cal concentration is from the
South, but in all there are 38
states, the District of Columbia,
and eight foreign countries repre-
sented.
States with 50 or more students
are Tennessee, Florida, and Ala-
bama. Both South Carolina and
Texas have more than 40. In city
representation, there are ten or
more students from Memphis, B-ir-
nlingham, Columbia and Charles-
ton, S. C., Jacksonville and Atlanta.
Attending the University from
Port St. Joe is Byron Walter Wil-
der, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. B. W.
Wilder, 402 Madison Street in Oak
Grove.


Advertising Doesn't Cost It PAYS.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1958




STUDENTS!

In Grades 7 through 12
EACH WEEK BE SURE TO PLAY

PLANT'S SHARK SCOREBOARD
Last Week's Winner of $5.00 Gift Certificate

JOE WHALEY

NOTHING TO BUY -- FUN FOR ALL
Pick up your FREE ENTRY BLANK Today at



SMWearn &

SBoysWear


"Outfitters for
410 Reid Ave.


Dads and Lads"
Phone BAll 7-8171


m 0a


the only car with wide-track wheels?


I


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i./" EXCLUSIVELY YOURS- WIDE-TRACK WHEELS L.-
Wheels moved out 5 inches for the widest, steadiest stance in America-better cooling for engine and
brakes-lower center of gravity for better grip on the road, safer cornering, smoother ride, easier han-
dling. You get the most beautiful roadability you've ever known-in America's Number (i) Road Car!




P ONTIAC America's Number T Road Car!


Those exclusive Wide-Track Wheels sparked a chain reaction of wonderful new
ideas: You can see the trim, tailored new look it's inches lower without
sacrificing roominess or road clearance. The first time you drive it, you'll discover
this beauty handles city corners and clings to country curves in a way the conven-
tional narrow-gauge cars can't hope to imitate. And the ride the miraculous
freedom from sway, dive and bounce this is an experience in buoyant travel-
that you won't believe-until you try it.
But there's still more to the new Pontiac
to stamp it as the big change for '59:
Vista-lounge interiors with full 360-degree visibility seats actually wider
than a sofa Air-Cooled True-Contour Brakes for smooth, effortless control,
stop after stop after stop.
The industry's most advanced V-8, Pontiac's Tempest 420, gives you spectacular
new responsiveness. And there's a new companion power plant, the Tempest
420E, that delivers phenomenal extra mileage-and does it on regular octane gas!
Come see why no other car can possibly be so new as the new Pontiac-three
series: magnificent Bonneville, dramatic Star Chief and brilliant new Catalina.
See Ginger Rogers on the Pontiac Star Parade, Wednesday,


'*:;. ~

:~-~- *.~


2 Great New Engines
If you love action-you get the liveliest on
wheels with the new Tempest 420 V-8, ac-
claimed by automotive experts as America's
most advanced power plant.
If you want the accent on economy, choose
Pontiac's new Tempest 420E. This new V-8
actually delivers better mileage tha many
smaller cars with so-called "economy engines"
.. and it uses regular octane fuel.
Oct. 15th, CBS-TV,


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


STARTERS and GENERATORS
REPAIRED and EXCHANGED

PATE S SHELL SERVICE


Who in the world built this beauty


SEE YOUR LOCAL AUTHORIZED PONTIAC DEALER

WIMBERLY PONTIAC COMPANY Now On Display
CORNER 2nd and MONUMENT STREETS


-!, Ql


arsarr----------- -- -------


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AL


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PANAMA CITY HERALD, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 1st.


NOW .. Burton-Dixie's original =o




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THE
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DOUBLE DRESSER, MIRROR, CHEST
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This bedroom gives you a lot of modern for
your money expensive, curved-front.
drawers, it's obviously upper-bracket. There
are features you can't see, too, carefully
finished interiors, of all drawers. Come in
and see this spectacular new bedroom for
yourself. Check it for quality and price
and you'll agree it's a whopping value.
Choice of two finishes, Tropic Dawn or
Bleached Walnut.


RUS


NEW WESTINGHOUSE SPEED CLEANER

PICKS UP MORE DIRT FASTER

THAN OTHER CANISTER CLEANERS
V. Amazing "rug race" proves it] Westinghouse
is the fastest, work-savingest cleaner you can
'r ? own. Light bulb on nozzle shows every srok,
S'cleans-no need to repeat strokes as with
other cleaners. Swivel wheels glide swiftly
anywhere, Reel-Away Cord Storage. Chardoul
and white.
Five-yeasr uarantee. OL. S4 $49.95
"I a ,fWestinghouse


Now An automatic blanket so well

insulated it's WASHABLE... even in a machine


1 .. .


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Perfect for families that want EXTRA-
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1958 WESTINGHOUSE SPEED ELECTRIC RANGE


Bakes -*tter-Spread-Even
Heaters radiate heat evenly.
Miracle Seal locks heat in oven


Cleans Easter-Both oven
and surface units plug out
for easiest cles'ing.


AND JUST LOOK
Wider ec .-e of health setlings-5 .marked settings, 1001
heats !': sen.'.. Big economy oven-uses current only
7to 10 :3 each baking hour.

JUST ARRIVED! 6 PIECE

THAYER NURSERY GROUP
Includes: Drop side Thayer crib, Thayer Mattress,
Thayer Hi-Chair, Thayer Play Yard and Pad, Thayer
Crib Bum-per Pad.

Reg. $995 NOW $79.95


FALL


Polh.:.? Department .......... 21,175.00
.i,: i.:nger Department ........ .12,600.00
S..,, E -i:utive Department ........ 2,120.00
F.r.- Department ........... 3,550.00
.Sirr-,: Lights .............. 2,100.00
-..ir, nistrative Expense %"..... 10,440.00
L, gal Expense ............. 1,700.00
-itr.-. Maintenance ......... 23,921.00
i'rk Maintenance ............ 3,300.00
I'.1t Control & Land Fill Prog. 5,000.00
M..:.-llaneous Expense ...... 2,000.00
Or-rrtion Municipal Building .. 1,570.00
ti-..r"tmacts Payable ........... 500.00
A.hi-1 t ................ ... 650.00
Muin. ipal Hospital .......... 10,000.00
C'.ratrngencies .............. 4,000.00
s,.: t Security Insurance .... 2,600.00
I1..11;, Hill Cemetery ........ 400.00
I...,et Hill Cemetery ......... 400.00
*TOTAL ...................108,026.00
H.:ip.iral Revenue Bond Fund .. 29,000.00
Ir.t-re.st and Sinking Fund
(0.9 Mills) .......... 7,041.79
'p.e Sinking Fund for Refunding
Bonds of 1950 (1.1 Mills) 8,606.64
r- Ci.._truction Fund (60%) Utility
Tax .................. 15,000.00
l:.t'd Debt Service Funds .... 59,648.43
S iOrAL ALL FUNDS ... 167,674.43
ORDINANCE NO. 172X
"AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO THE
..s-FCSSMENT AND LEVY OF TAXES IN
[ HE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
r. ,R THE TAX YEAR A. D., 1958 LEVYING
A.N ADVALOREM TAX OF 0.9 MILLS UPON
THF DOLLAR OF ASSESSED VALUATION
I',.R THE PURPOSE OF PROVIDING
FUNDS FOR THE PAYMENT OF INTEREST
Ain.I PRINCIPAL ON THE $175,000.00
l"E[,GING BONDS ISSUE OF THE CITY
UF PORT ST. JOE DATED JANUARY 1,
.i? AND ANY INDEBTEDNESS THEREON
ourISPANDING, A TAX OF 1.1 MILLS FOR
S Tril PURPOSE OF PROVIDING FUNDS
FOR THE PAYMENT OF INTEREST AND
iRiNCIPAL ON THE $90,000.00 CITY OF
PORT ST. JOE REFUNDING BONDS ISSUE
OF JANUARY 1, 1950, AND ANY INDEBT-
EDNESS THEREON OUTSTANDING, AND
A TAX OF 8.5 MILLS FOR THE PURPOSE
OF PROVIDING FUNDS FOR THE OR-
DINARY AND REGULAR PURPOSES OF
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE FOR THE
YEAR 1959."
Introduced to the City Commission of the
City of Port St. Joe, Florida at a Regular
Meeting of the City Commission on the 7th
day of October A.D., 1958. Said Ordinance
No. 172X will be acted on finally at the
regular meeting of the City Commission at
the Municipal Building at 8:00 p.m., October
20, 1958. Estimates upon which said ap-
propriation Ordinance is based are on file
a for inspection by the public at the office of
the City Clerk.
lei' Witness my hand and the official seal
of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida this
7th day of October, A.D., 1958.
it. W. HENDERSON
fl V City Auditor and Clerk


... (SEAL)
STATEMENT REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF
AUGUST 24, 1912, AS AMENDED BY
THE ACTS OF MARCH 3, 1933, AND
JULY 2, 1946 (Title 39, United States
Code, Section 233) SHOWING THE OW-
NERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, AND CIRCU-
LATION OF
The Star, published weekly at Port St. Joe,
Florida for September 30, 1958.
1. The names and addresses of the pub-
lisher, editor, managing editor, and business
managers are: Wesley R. Ramsey, Port St.
Joe, Florida.
2. The owner is: Wesley R. Ramsey, Port
St. Joe, Florida.
3. The known bondholders, mortgagees,
and other security holders owning or hold-
ing 1 percent or more of total amount of
bonds, mortgages, or other securities are:
W. S. Smith, Wewahitchka, Florida.
4. Paragraphs 2 and 3 include, in cases
where the stockholder or security holder ap-
pears upon the books of the company as
trustee or in any other fiduciary relation,
the name of the person or corporation for
whom such trustee is acting; also the state-
ments in the two paragraphs show the af-
fiant's full knowledge and belief as to the
circumstances and conditions under which
stockholders and security holders who do
not appear upon the books of the company
as trustees, hold' stock and securities In a
capacity other than that of a bona fide
owner.
5. The average number of copies of each
issue of this publication sold or distributed
through the mails or otherwise, to paid
subscribers during the 12 months preceding
the date shown above was: 1,278.
WESLEY R. RAMSEY
Sworn to and subscribed before me this
8th day of October, 1958.
(SEAL) RUTH M. HAMMOND
Notary Public
(My commission expires April 17, 1962)

MINUTES OF THE


COUNTY COMMISSION

WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA
SEPTEMBER 25, 1958
The Board of County Commissioners of
Gulf County, Florida met this date in
special session with the following members
present: G. S. Crotxon, Chairman, George
Cooper, A. J. Strickland and J. C. Price.
The Clerk, Attorney, Engineer and Super-
visor of Mosquito Control District were also
present.
The meeting came to order at 6:20 p.m.
The Engineer told the Board that be-
cause of the proposed development of St.
Joe Point, there is a need for a survey to
locate the proposed road that will run
from State Road 30 to St. Joe Point, via
Cape San Bias; that the Board has hereto-
fore requested the State Road Department
to make this survey, but th, r, ,.- was
made by letter and not by r-: l.r; :the
State Road Department informs us that a
resolution calling for the survey will be
required before the survey can be made.
After discussion, there was a motion by
Comm. Price, seconded by Comm. Strick-
land and duly carried, that the attorney pre-
pare the necessary resolution.
The Board discussed the possibilities of
making a survey from the Willie Rowell

Fish Camp road where it intersects State
Road 71 and running East to the Dead
Lakes, thence North to intersect with the
Magnolia Landing road. The Board agreed
that this survey is needed but made no
decision at this time.
Comm. Strickland discussed the need for
a certain alley in the Highland View area
and suggested that the Road Department
discontinue the project it is now working
on long enough to construct the alley.-After
discussion, there was*a motion by Comm.
Strickland, seconded by Comm. Price and
duly carried, that this alley be constructed
(Continued On Page 8)


I


NL LY


.v.
i


.. *-SBgm-


Regular $169.95
_ $10 Delivers


$13950


SEEING IS BELIEVING!


Irr~a ~ WWWWO4,P~ 1~~ 1 W#WAau I


~a~ll~Pa~sJ~ilsrsl3&


"as-, 4-


S


THE ATAR, Port St. Jo*, Fla.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1958

LEGAL ADVERTISING

CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
PROPOSED BUDGET 1959
ESTIMATED REVENUE
ESTIMATE YEAR 1959
Property Tax (8.5 Mills) .... $ 66,506.00
Occupational License Tax .... 12,170.00
Race Track Funds .......... 2,000.00
Admission Tax ............ 1,300.00
Florida Power Franchise Tax
(2%) ................ 4,200.00
Gasoline Tax (Repeased by Reg. Elect.
Sept. 10, 1957) ....... -0-
Fines and Forfeits .......... 5,700.00
Permits, Fees, Etc......... 400.00
Garbage Collection Revenues ., 5,900.00
Miscellaneous Revenue ...... 2,500.00
Holly Hill Cemetery Lot Sales 1,100.00
St. Joseph Fire Control Dist. 850.00
Forest Hill Cemetery Lot Sales 300.00
TOTAL GENERAL FUND .... 102,926.00
Parking Meter Revenue Fund
(C.l-,e tions from Parking.
Meters) .............. 5,100.00
Ti Tr.\L GENERAL & PARKING
METER REVENUE
FUNDS ................ 108,026.00
Bona Retirement & Interest Sinking Funds
Hospital Revenue Bond Fund
1-, r.ited Cigarette Tax receipts
or year 1959 .......... 29,000.00
fi.trAt & .Sinking Fund ...... 7,041.79
..:. A Sinking Fund for Refund for Refunding
Bonds of 1960 ........ 8,606.64
....i-:ruction Fund (60%) of
Utility Tax ........... 15,000.00
'I .tiA Debt Service Funds .... 69,648.43
.jt All Funds ............ 167,674.43
-., Assessed Taxable
Valuation .............7,824,216.00
P'i. p.Psed village for General
Operation ... (66,506.00) 8.5 Mills
S..*. ted Millage for Interest & Sinking
Fund ....... (7,041.79) 0.9 Mills
I r-..p-.-ed Millage Special Sinking
Fund for Refunding Bonds of
1950 ........ (8,606.64) 1.1 Mills
'i"'0AL MILLAGE FOR
PAX YEAR ........... 10.5 Mills
CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
PROPOSED BUDGET 1959
EXPENDITURES
PROPOSED BUDGET-1959
0.neral Fund & Parking Meter Revenue
Fund


1XVI M


---~-







THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, #TOBER 9, 1958


9Ee


0ANT IA I'


Couple only. 1621 Monument Ave. mr---- 1111 COUNTY COMMISSION
CLASSIFIED ADS Phone 7-7641. Mrs. A. M. Jones, Sr. FOR SALE
1 House and 1 vacant lot at as soon as the right of way is obtained.
FOR RENT: Room furnished. Pri- Mexico Beach. wilcontinueai the discussion o that e Morris-
_I vate entrance and bath. Call BAll House on McClellan AVe., Mosquito Control matter.
9-1046, evening 7-8041. ltp 2 bedroom. The Supervisor of the Mosquito Control
FOR RENT 3 BEDROOM HOUSE on Mon- District came before the Board and said
that when he was employed by this Board
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment umentAvenue. as supervisor, that the oBard gave hinm the
-1 for couple. 216 9th St. J. F. Dan- SEVERAL NICE HOMES for power to hire and fire, along with other
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom, unfurnish- jell. tfc-10-2 sale in different parts of Port duties, and charged him with operating the
program to the satisfaction of the State
ed apartment. Close in. Inquire FOR RENT: 3 room unfurnished St. Joe. We help you arrange and this Board; that to carry out his du-
1904 Garrison or phone 7-8642. tfc apartment. $35 per month. Com- financing. If you are inte:est- ties, it became necessary to terminate S.
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment. pletely private with venetian blinds. ed in owning your own home,. f is and that he isdeci n ast ign another
1505 Monument Ave. or Phone Gold and hot water furnished. 123 please contact us. payroll that has the name of S. T. Morris
7-5771. tfc-9-252nd Ave., Phone 7-3023. Mrs. Shell- appearing on it.
nd A ., Phone The Chairman said it now appears that
FOR RENT: New 3 bedroom house horse. tfc-10-9 E. TOM PRIDGEON if the Board directs the Supervisor to re-
R ok foor U urnshe A oR. R eg. Real Estate Broker instate Morris, that the Supervisor, accord-
with oak floors. Unfurnished. At RENT: 3 bedroom house. Un- Phone 7-7741 ing to his statement will not do it, there-
St. Joe Beach. Also small furnished furnished. 21.2 9th Street. Call Supfore, the Board which l havens the entirrminate he
house in Highland View. See J. D. 7-4551.c-9 which means the entire program
houseC lark. Phone 7-7771. tfc-9-2See J D. 74551. tfc-109 will be discontinued until such time the
Clark. Phone 7-7771. t-9-25 State could approve another Supervisor and
--- FOR RENT: House facing Elemen- FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house. 2 that in his opinion, the people of Gulf Coun-
FOR RENT: Furnished cottages tary School on Long Avenue. baths, living, dining and kitchen, ty will not stand by and see hte program
and garage apartments, two to Partly furnished. Mrs. Nora Duren. Wall to wall carpeting in part ofhut down The Chairman ctothen suggested the
four bedroom. For permanent or Phone BAll 7-5471. Ite house. Good location. Close to Bureau of Entomology on this matter before
temporary occupancy. Reasonable town. Corner lot fenced in. See at a decision is made in this matter.
rates by month or week. See Mrs. 'FOR RENT: Furnished cottage at 528 6th St., or phone 7-7616. tfc Omtnm. Stricklad said that we did not
C. E. Thompson, Beacon 'Hill, or1 Beacon Hill. Reasonable. See Si- sor, or employing a new Supervisor, but to
Call BAll 9-1184. Costin's Cottages, las R. Stone or phone 7-7161. 10-9 FOR SALE: Model A Ford and decide whether or not Mr. Morris was justi-
Beacon Hill. tfc-9-4 power lawn mower. Good runn- fiably fired and to either reinstate him, or
ing condition. Phone 7-5461. '3tp to stand behind the action of our Supervisor.
FOR RENT: One and two bedroom _Incod Comm. Cooper said hlie wanted to see
FOR RENT: One and two bedroom FOR SALE SALE: 2 bedroom home in Morris go back to work but he didn't want
attractively furnished apartments O FOR SALE. 2 bedroom home in his returning to work to cause all of the
Cool in summer, warm in winter. Oak Grove, 503 Madison St. Con- Mosquito Control men to be out of work.
Gas heat, window fans. They have tact J. L. Godwin at 603 Kenney's Coinin. Price said that he expressed lis
G as heat, window fans. They have FOR SALE: A spacious three bed- Mcl odwn at Kenneyts feelings at the meeting of September 23
to be seen to be appreciated. ALSO room sonryhouse with living Mill.and tat he has not changed his mind; that
NICE TRAILER PARKING SPACE room masonry house wi ing if we put Morris back to work and the Su-
Phone 7-8820 or 9-9133, Wimico room, den and separate dining BARGAINS: Moving out of town. pervisor quits because of this action, then
Lodge Apartments and Trailer room. Located on 90 ft. x 150 ft. lot wish to dispose of several items it will be the Supervisorrthat shuts the
Lodge Apartments down and not Morrs. Conun. Price
Park, White City. tfc-7-17 in very desirable residential see- quickly. Upright piano, cheap. Gas movyd to reinstate Mr. Morris, seconded by
tion. Only $400 down. range, special. Wringer type wash- Commi. Strickland and upon vote, the fol-
FOR RENT: See Mrs.. Shirey for A NICE two bedroom house on Mc- er. 24" window fan. Five gas hea- lowing voted AYE: Price and Stricekand.
apartments and houses, furnished Clellan Avenue. Only $8,500. Can ters. Push type lawn mower. 10 hNA t Comm. Cooper said thalot lie would
and unfurnished. Phone 7-8058. tfe be financed through FHA with venetian blinds. Many other items. Supervisor would consent to work Morris.
small down payment. May be seen 'at 1311 McClellan Ave. The Ciairman said he would vote against
FOR RENT: Furnished cottages THREE BEDROOM HOUSE with or call BAll 7-7826. athedmeotion because the ... i,.
and.apartments. See Otto Ander- a large den and large kitchen. Morris, which would shut down the entire
son. tfc-3-27 Has fireplace, porch and other de- TALK TO THE PEOPLE at Coas- program.
.T .'sirable features. Total price only tal Realty Co., before you build, A lengthy discussion followed, after which
FOR RENT: 2 houses, 2 bedrooms. $10,500. buy, rent, or sell any property in Comm. Price moved to put Morris to work
$10,500. buy re or any property cleaning ditches or some other type Mos-
Unfurnished. In Oak Grove. Nice THREE BEDROOM, two baths, den, this area. They will be happy to quito Control work and pay him his regular
2 bedroom at Beacon Hill, unfur- 'dining room, living room and -help you get located. There is no salary frm the Mosquito Control Funds, un-
ished. Call 7-3696. 4tp-9-11 kitchen, hardwood floors. This extra charge for helping you ar- seconded by Comm. Srickmand. The followiMng
FOR -RENT: 2 bedroom furnished house is less than three years old. range your financing. vote: AYE: Price and Strickland. Motion
.apartment. Downstairs. $50.00 Total price $13,500. We can assist failed.
per month. Close in. Inquire at you in financing any of these fine HAVE TOOLS, WILL WORK: Plas- istrussioned Mrco. Morrids ft r wport t
1904 Garrison. Ave. or phone BAll homes. tearing, stucco, concrete or small the County Road Supt. for work at 7 a.m.
7-8642. tfc-10-2 FRANK HANNON .odd jobs. Several years experience. Sept. 26, 1958 and work with the Road
7Registered Real Estate Broker Work guaranteed. J. J. Wood, ph. until further notifiness to come
FOR .RENT: Furnished apartment. Ph. BAlI 7-3491 221 Reid Ave. BAll 7-8436. 906 10th St. 4tp-10-2 before the Board, the mnieting did then ad-
journ:
^ =:-= .=- BEACH LOTS FOR SALE: $25.00 AES'T'
eorg Y v, Core G S. Croxton
down. $10.00 per month. R. L. Clerk Chairman
Fortner, Mexico Beach. tfc-7-17 -.
Si : ,NEW CAR OWNERS: Protect that
.- I ~... "bright new uphclstery with tailor II
"made seat covers. Many fabrics to
choose from. Butler's Trim Shop, a f e
S. '' Corner Second and Reid. JameS Gem S .
.'x *' i,: : '-' ', i *-: '*.
-SEPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call by JAMES STAFFORD
Buford Griffin, Phone 7-7011 for
quick expert service. tc-6-
rb 9% TTAM T Cz -A /


U O Ve L a

the

student

body


f $3.95





f shirt blouses
styled by PETER PAN
It hugs your hips, indicates a wisp of a waist
with your every move It's prettiest in paisley with
a cocoon bow back, roll-up sleeves!l
Dripadry cotton in red or beige. Sizes 28 thru 4A0

.. As advertised in Seventeen!

With Each Purchase, Register for the Free Blouse
To Be Given Away Thursday, October 16.


ONE RACK of DRESSES ---- V OFF-


Childrens, Pre-teens and Juniors


POPULAR PRICES FOR THE POPULAR SETS

Open Thursdays 'til 8:00 p.m. Closed Wed. & Sat. Afternoons


The Bungalow Shop

1010 PALM BLVD. PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
:: G' .* 2% -- !:__ .


e*ADE US that useless article for
Something useful. STOP and
%WAP.
Keys Made While You Wait
35c EACH
BICYCLE PARTS
WESTERN AUTO
HUNTING & FISHING LICENSES
BOATS and TRAILERS
Reel Parts and Repairs
WILLIS V. ROWAX POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION. Meet.
ing first and third Monday nights
%00 p.m., American Legion Home
UPHOLSTERY WORK: Does your
furniture In k old? Bring it to
Butler's Trim Shop, corner Second
and Reid for expert rebuilding.
FOR FAST, EFFICrENT PLUMB.
ING SERVICE. Call Bill's Plumb-
ing. Phone 7-7846 or 7-8161. tfe
F YOU ARE INTERESTED in sav-
ing money see us for anything
you need in your home. STOP and
SWAP SHOP.
LAWN MOWER FOR RENT: $1.00
hour. Cut your lawn and let me
worry with upkeep of mower. Gulf
Service Station, Aubrey R. Tomlln-
son, Phone 7-7501.
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, I. O.
0. F.-Meets first and third
Friday, 7:30 p.m. in Masonic
Hall. All members urged to attend;
visiting brethren Invited.
B. B. CONKLIN, N. G.
J. C. MARTIN, Secty.
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F&AM every first and
third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.


ROBERT W. SMITH, W.M.
h' ROY L. BUROH, Sooty.
Ail Master Masons cordially invited
LOYAL ORDER OF MOOSE
Meetings at Moose Hall, 310
Fourth St.. meeting night every other
Monday.
R. A. M.-eRegular convocation or
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
14., 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit-
ing brothers welcome. R. W. Smith,
High Priest. H. R. Maige, Secretary.


C. P. ETHEREDGE
Licensed
PLUMBING and
ELECTRICAL WORK
Phone 7-2564
605 Maddox Street


Th('A MW SWWMOIN4 1 y I1


City Restaurant

At the Bus Station
Fresh Water CATFISH
Cole Slaw and Hush Puppies
All You Can Eat
$1.00
Barbecue Beef Sandwich
20c
HOT DOGS
6 for $1.00


PLAY RADIO



BINGO


1:15 to 1:30 p.m.
On


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(Continued From Page 1)
Brigman, Sam Parker, Eugene
Zeak, Joe Alligood, Pope Fendley
and Harry Brewton.

Too Late

(Continued From Page 1)
tober.
The NEA Commission will study
economic conditions in western
Europe, visiting some of the larger
industries, we will be given a bref-
ing on the activities of SHAPE and
NATO and spend several days at
the World's Fair in Brussels.
The entire trip will be by air
with the exception of 'bus tours in
the countries we visit. The Belgian
government is going out of its way
to make sure we see all that can
be seen in the short time we are
there.
American ambassadors in Hol-
land, Belgium, France and England
have assigned representatives to
our tour party to assist in arrang-
ing our itinerary and contacts.
It will be an interesting and busy
three weeks and we are keenly
looking forward to it. While busi-
ness and study will occupy a good
part of each day there will be
numerous receptions and time for
sightseeing and, of course, shop-
ping.
Tour arrangements were made
by International House of New Or-
leans through facilities of the
Amreican Express Company. We
will fly from New York direct to
Amsterdam via KLM-Royal Dutch
Airlines and return from London
via Pan American Airlines so we
will have an opportunity to com-
pare these two inter-continental
services as well as western Europe
feeder lines in the several coun-
tries.
We are informed that H. R. H.
Prince Bernard of the Netherlands
will hold a reception for our group
on arrival and later that day we
will be received at the City Hall by
the Burgomaster and the aldermen.
During our short stay in Holland
we will visit the Hague Peace Pal-
ace, Hall of Knights, Royal Palace,
Maruitshuis Art Gallery as well as
the cities of Rotterdam and Utrecht
traveling by motor coach. Some of
the larger industrial plants will be
checked enroute.
At Brussels we will, of course,
spend most of our time at the
World's PFair and a press confer-
ence with the- United States Com-
misisoner General is planned at the
American Pavilion. The following
day we will be guests of His Ex-
cellency Baron Moens de Fernig at
the Belevedere Palace Gardens and
later a reception given by the Bur-
gomaster of Brussels.
One of the most interesting
events will be a visit to the Cham-
ber of Deputies in Paris where we
will have an opportunity to inter-
view a number of French officials
as well as industrial leaders.
An entire day will be spent at
NATO headquarters where we will
be brought up to date on the back-
ground, structure and operations of
this organization and will hear an
address by the Secretary General.
We will then visit SHAPE head-
quarters where a similar briefiimg
will occur. In London we will visit
British and American official offi-
ces and meet a number of officials.
Press correspondents in London
will' entertain us during our stay.
I won't lack for column material
from now on.

Social Security

(Continued From Page 1)
disability payments are equal in
amount to the monthly old-age in-
surance benefits the worker would
receive if he were already 65 years
of age, but the dependents of these
workers have not until now been
eligible for payments.
Under the new amendments, the
disabled person's dependents will
be paid the same benefits they
would receive if he were 65 and
drawing benefits as a retired work-
er, Carey added :Benefits can be
paid to any of his children who
are under age 18 (or who have been
totally disabled since before their
18th birthdays), and to his wife re-
gardless of her age, if she has in
htier care children who are eligible
for these dependent's benefits. If
there is no child in the family eli-
gible for benefits, the wife of a
disabled person can qualify for
benefits when she reaches 62.


1







d


It is estimated that about 180,000
Lependents of disabled workers ,


Blood: The River of Life
No other part of our body works so hard or does so many vital
jobs as does our blood. The average person has 12 to 13 pints of
blood. It is moved constantly through a network of about 60,000
miles of arteries, veins and capillaries in its job of feeding tissue,
regulating temperature, removing waste and fighting disease. There
is nothing else in the world quite 4
like blood, and there is no sub-
stitute for it.
Just what is blood? It is com-
posed of a number of things, the
largest portion by volume being
plasma. This is the fluid part of
the blood and is about 92 per cent
water.
Probably the hardest little
worker in the blood is the red cell,
which is made primarily in the i
bone marrow. Red cells are sau- c _
cer shaped and are spongy. They -
hold hemoglobin, the chemical
which picks up oxygen from the 1 j; '
lungs and carries it through the
body. 0
Iron is necessary to keep the
production of hemoglobin at a
normal rate. Best sources of iron are several forms. Anemia re-
are meat (especially liver), eggs, sults when there is an inadequate
green leafy vegetables, whole amount of red cells, or when
grain bread and cereals. there is a shortage of hemo-
White cells, larger than red ulo':n in n .hese cells. Fortunately
cells and irregularly shaped, are vour .hisician has available
the "doctors" of the body. In the various ways to treat anemia.
normal body, there is only one There is much general confu-
white cell for every 600 red cells. sion about the Rh factor in blood.
When the body is attacked by an Rh stands for an inherited fac-
invading disease, the white cells tor in the red cells. The Rh fac-
rapidly converge on the organ- tor exists in 85 to 90 per cent of
ism and throw up a defense. That all Americans. These are "Rh
is why the white cell "count" positive." The remainder don't
increases when you have an in- have the Rh factor, and they are
fection in your body. "Rh negative."
Another factor in the blood The only real danger in a mar-
are platelets, which assist blood riage is when the mother is Rh
in coagulation by helping form negative, the father is Rh posi-
blood clots, tive, and the baby inherits the
Of all the diseases of the blood, father's positive blood type. This
leukemia is the most serious. It causes the mother's blood to start
is almost invariably fatal. This producing antibodies agair3t the
condition is brought on when, for baby's Rh positive blood.
some unknown reason, the body For this reason, and for rea-
produces white cells at an ab- sons of possible blood transfu-
normal rate. sion, it is important that each
Another serious and more person should know his blood
widely-spread disorder of the type and his Pf factor.
blood is anemia, of which there (@ 1953 Sche; .*i Corporation)


could start collecting benefits, Ca- nearest social security office.
rey concluded. Before payment can The social Isecurity office for
be made, however, an application this area is located at 522 Mercer
must be filed by or on behalf of Avenue, Panama City. The tele-
the eligible dependent with the phone number is POplar 3-5331.


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"I don't want to die and go
to hell," said a husky young
sailor who lingered at a church
after the worship service.
He told the pastor how he
ran away to sea as an over-
grown fifteen-year-old, and had,
during World War II, sailed on
freighters through mine-infested
waters. said: "Preacher,
I've never .,een in jail, though
I've done things I should not
have done. I never worried
much about it until recently.
In the last few months I've
dreamed several times that our
ship was shipwrecked and that
I was drowned in the ocean;
and preacher, I know that if I
die like I am, I'll go to hell. I
don't want to die and go to
hell."
In those unforgettable words,
"I don't want to die and go to
hell," the sailor voiced his con-
viction that there is a life be-
yond the grave and that choices
in life determine fate in death.
He believed that unrepenting
sinners would spend eternity in
hell, and that godly believers
would know the joys of an
eternal abode in heaven. The
Bible says: "The wages of sin
is death; but the gift of God is
eternal life through Jesus Christ
our Lord"- (Romans 6:23).
Two things lie beyond the grave
- eternaI death and life ever.
lasting.


The death beyond the grave
of which the Bible speaks is a
living death where "the fire is
not quenched" (Mark 9:44).
It is the inevitable end of the
rebellious soul, an "everlasting
punishment" (Matthew 25:46)
that the unbelieving bring upon
themselves.
The life beyond the grave is
"everlasting life" (John 3:16).
It is the place of perfect knowl-
edge, "For now we see through
a glass, darkly; but then face to
face" (1 Corinthians 13:12).
It is a place of perfect peace,
for "God shall wipe away all
tears from their eyes, and there
shall be no more death, neither
sorrow, nor crying, neither shall
there be any more pain" (Reve-
lation 21:4).
What lies beyond the grave
for you? It depends on what
you do with Christ. He said,
"He that heareth my word, and
believeth on him that sent me,
hath everlasting life, and shall
not come into condemnation;
but is passed from death unto
life" (John 5:24).
Baptists preach Christ and
him crucified, as the one and
only way the complete and
adequate way to heaven. Right
now, you can turn from all
known sin and trust Christ as
your personal Saviour. If you
will do this God will give you
his free gift of eternal life. You
can't have it any other way,


THE STAR
Phone 7-3161


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