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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01182
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: July 24, 1958
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01182

Full Text






PI A COPYj


I-. lOcI


THE


STAR


MONEY TALKS-Let's keep
It where we can speak with it
once In awhile-Trade with
your home town merchants!


"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"


TWENTY-FIRST YEAR


,ORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1958


St. Joe Asked To Provide Harbor Facilities


County Agrees To



Lower Mills To 13


The group of taxpayers from Port St. Joe who objected to
the original draft of the County budget for the year 1959, won
out in their pleas for "holding the line" on taxes Tuesday of this
week. After much discussion, the County Board agreed to hold
the County millage at the 13.8 mark that it was last year.
Since last Tuesday, when the request for a lower budget
was asked for, the County Board has had several meetings and
worked hard over the budget, which they felt was all necessary,
to bring the tax burden in line with what the taxpayers in the
County felt they were able to pay.
The taxpayers were led in their
quest for a reduced millage by H. elude all special millage taken up
H. Saunders, representing the St. by the St. Joe Fire Control Dis-
Joe Paper Company; H. C. Brown, trict, the Health Clinic expendi-
representing the Southeast Ter tresad ell iceDed
minals and CecilG. Costin, Sr, ures and mllae fr the Dead
representing the Gulf County Tax- Lakes tumbler dam fund.
Tpayers League. The motion to cut back the mil-
payhe group etioned the Co- lage was made by Commissioner
The group questioned the Co-E. C. Harden and seconded by Com-
missioners closely on several por- missioner George Cooper. Ad voted
tons of the budget, especially in missioer Georg Cooper. All voted
the Road and Bridge Fund, the Fin aye with the exception of Strick-
the Road and Bridge Fund, the Fine land, who was against the reduc-
and Forfeiture Fund and the Gen- .
eral Fund.
Although the proposed budget
had been set at slightly over 50% C. F. Scott Dies
above last year's budget, the Com-
mission had good explanations and Of Heart Attack
good cause for every item that was
included in the original draft. Cryl Franklin Scott, 48, of Oak
The County Board had already Grove died Saturday, July 19 from
pared the original version of the a heart attack.
budget down from its 20 mills. The Funeral services were held Mon-
delegation seeking the decrease day, July 21 at the Oak Grove As-
again appealed before the Board sembly of God Church with Rev.
to further reduce the budget and E. F. Gilliland, conducting. Inter-
"go slow" on all the improvements meant was in Jehu Cemetery -in We-


and new equipieunt included in o P
original 20 mill budget.
After lengthy discussion, the
Board finally decided to hold the
line on last year's amount of $373,-
815.00. The group of taxpayers had
originally asked for a reduction to
$350,000.00
(Biggest reductions were taken by
VVRoad and Bridge Fund which
had been hiked to a 75% increase
over last year. The next biggest
cut will be taken by the General
Fund with the Fine and Forfeiture
or the Sheriff's department receiv-
ing the least cut in millage.a
The village will be set again this
year at an even 13 which will in-


wahitchka- .
Palibear'r iv"i'.- Jack Lloyd, Leo
Teat, Gene Fussell, Ralph Green,
Ben Scott, Jr., and. Ted Beard.
Survivors include, his mother,
Mrs. Lilla Lindsey of Oak Grove;
one daughter Mrs.. Bonnie Webb of
Pensacola; three brothers, Ben
and Gordon of Pensacola and
Charles of Thomasville, Ga. Four
sisters, Mrs. Louise DeVane, (Clew-
iston; Mrs. Ethel Teat, Apalaeibi
cola; Mrs. Edna Mae Chapman and
Mrs. Lena Fussell, both of Pensa-
cola.
'Comforter Funeral Home of Port
St. Joe was in charge of arrange-
ments.


Chamber Welcomes


Two New Industries

The Port St. Joe Chamber of Commerce gave its official
"Howdy Neighbor" to'the Michigan Chemical Corporation Tues-
day nighatat the Centennial Building. The Chamber entertained
the vice-president of the concern along with their chief engineer,
the manager for the local plant and the engineer who was to de-
sign the new plant. At the same time the Chamber members
learned of another small industry that has already moved into
Port St. Joe.


Announcement of the intention of
the Michigan Chemical Corpora-
tion to construct a sea-water mag-
nesium oxide plant here in Port St.
Joe, was made by The Star two
weeks ago.
Tuesday night, it was announced
that the Crawford-Hutchings Manu-
facturing Company, formerly of
High point, N. C., had moved into
Port St. Joe and was now in
the process of getting under way.
The new plant will manufacture
furniture parts from hardwood and
will utilize some of the old St. Joe
Lumber and Export Company ma-
chinery, building area and man-
rower.
Bill Hutchings, who is now in
Port St. Joe and a partner in the
firm said ,that the company is now
Int the process of securing a supply
of hardwood lumber and will begin
operations in just a -few short
weeks or even days. He said that
the concern will begin operations
with about a dozen men and in-
Stnds to grow in volume and man-
power. Hutchings said that the lo-
cal plant will manufacture rough-
cut furniture parts and plans are
now to enlarge into finished parts


Michigan Chemical Welcomed
Chamber President George G.
Tapper gave a short welcome ad-
dress, in behalf of the Chamber in
wlpoin~ th MiniinOpi


AN EDITORIAL

Opportunity Knocks At Our Door

For the umpteenth time in almost as many years, Port
St. Joe has been told by outsiders what lucky stiffs they are
to have our fine natural deep Water harbor and what a po-
tefitial the area has due this port being so nice as to be lo-
cated right in our back yard.
But, always in the past, we have merely smiled and
said, "yes, we are lucky, we could probably make a pile of
money for our town with that port -- we'll have to develop
it someday."
We have even gone to far as to create a Port Authority
and then have let the matter die again.
Now, Port St. Joe has been approached by the Bain-
bridge, Ga., Chamber of Commerce to please, (pretty please
if you must) develop your port facilities so we can give you
some lucrative business. In effect, the Bainbridge men said,
"We have the business all lined up for you all you have to
do is provide the facilities."
We'll guarantee you, if the St. Joe Paper Company or
any other firm should walk in our door and say, "Wesley,
get your shop ready, we are going to give you our business,"
We can tell you we would make the utmost haste to make
ready for what we would consider a windfall.
Here Port St. Joe is offered just such an opportunity
by the City of Bainbridge and by new industry locating here
that they can use our fine natural harbor. What are we going
to do about it? Are we going to wait on some other port to
develop and take this business?
You can bet we have the best location to offer, or the-
business wouldn't come looking for us they would be hard
to get. We believe in seizing the opportunity and doing all
possible to build Port St. Joe up as a water shipping city.
Water shipping built New Orleans, Mobile and many
other great port cities. It can do the same for us, too, if we
will but prepare ourselves and give it half a chance.


Port Would Be Outlet For



Three Rivers' Water System


Otis Pyle Is In

School Board Race

'Otis Pyle, .of Port St. Joe quali-
fied Tuesday just before noon with
the Circuit Court, George Y. Core,
to seek election as School Board
member from District number Five.
Pyle will oppose Fennon Talley,
who is now Board Member from'
this District and seeking re-elec-
tion.
Pyle has long been associated
with school activities in Port St.
Joe and Gulf County being an ac-
tive member of the PTA fo-: sev.
eral years and a past president of
that organization. Three years ago,
when the Gulf Countinuing Educa-
tion Association was former wita
the purpose in mind of bettering
the teacher pay situation iu Gulf
County, Pyle served as president
of that organization.
'He is a member of the Ftrs-t
Baptist Church in Port St. Joe, and
is employed as sales manager of
the Floyd Chevrolet Company.
Pyle stated that one of his aims
Is for the School Board to hold
periodical meetings with leaders in
each school in Gulf County to get
their problems and needs first hand
for close study by the Board.


Loan Aproved For Dead


Lakes Dam Construction


TALLAHASSEE-A onmeback by West Florida's Dead Lakes as
one of the state's top sports fishing resorts appeared assured lues-
day when the Internal Improvement Fund trustees agrea' to advance
$100,000 to help build a tumbler dam across the Lakes.
-Only a few years back the Dead Lakes which spread across Gulf
and Calhoun counties were tamous for the size and quantity of the
bass, bream and shellcrackers taAt.n by sports fishermen.


Then drought and construction
ot dams in the Apalachicola '-iver
dropped the level of the Dead
Lakes nearly to the point of extinc-
tion.
The fish population dropped right
along with the water level.
The Dead Lakes aren't true lakes,
bat overflow water from 'he Chi-
p;'la River.
The 1957 Legislature appropria-
ated $100,000 for construction of
a dam at the mouth of the chain
of lakes, but made the appropria-
tion contingent upon $100,000 be-
ing raised at the local level. The
dam will hold the present water
and rain runoff water to restore the
lakes to their former level.
A special fishing permit fee and
levy of one mill on Gulf and Cal-
houn property were authorized to
supply the matching money needed
by the counties. The two counties
have banked about $23,000 from the
$1.25 special fishing permit and
the property levy.
But to speed the project, the


weicmingthe ichian Cemicl trustees agreed to lend the coui-
Corporation to Port St. Joe. He ties up to $100,000, to be repaid


gave praises to Harry H. Saunders
as the man "most responsible" for
bringing the concern to Port St.
Joe. Tapper then called on Saun-
ders to introduce the visiting MCC
officials.
Saunders first introduced Fred
DeMaestre, who is vice-president
of Michigan Chemical. DeMaestre
in turn introduced the other mem-
bers of the Michigan firm's team
that has come to Port St. Joe to
work out the engineering of the
new firm's plant. He introduced
Wendell Dunbar, chief engineer of
MCC, Mark Fremodig, who will be
manager of the local concern and
who DeMaestre had only the high-
est of glowing praises for and Jim
Deason, representative of Cunning-
ham and Webb, engineers of De-
troit, Mich., Who will do the de-
signs for the new plant.
In Big Demand
DeMaestre explained somewhat


and finished knocked-down furni- the operations of the coming new
ture for shipment. (Continued on Page 4)


over a 10-year period.
In addition to, the dam, the
trustees instructed Director Van
Ferguson to work out plans for
dovetailing into the dam con-
struction, the building of a high-
way to the .dam and a bridge
across it. This will come out of
Gulf County's share of the secon-
dary road funds. The Road De-
partment expects to let the bridge
contract next month and the dam
contract sometime in August or
September.
Representative Cecil G. Costin,
Jr., headed a delegation consisting
of G. U. Parker of Blountstown,
William Linton, Chairman of the
Dead Lakes Commission and Har-
land 0. Pridgeon, both of Wewa-
hitchka.
-----
Rev. and Mrs. J. C. Odum and
family are visiting in Winter Ha-
ven this week with Mr. and Mrs.
John Sitton and Mr. and Mrs. Rus-
sell Odum.


Clyde Brogdon After

Another Term On Board

Clyde Brogdon, member of the
Board of Public Instruction from
District One, announced this week
that he will seek re-election to his
post.
Brogdon is a long-time resident
of Gulf County having come here
at the age of 13 from Jackson Coun-
ty. He is a tour foreman in the
pulp mill at the St. Joe Paper Com-
pany and makes his home in We'
wahitchka where he raises cattle
on a small farm.
Brogdon said that after his three
years of active service on the school
board he is still actively interested
in the system. He vowed that if the
voters were considerate enough to
return him to this important pub-
lic office, he would continue to give
the school system his attentive,
close and serious attention. He
pledged that he would continue to
assist the Board membership in
spending the taxpayers' money as
wisely and as carefully as was with-
in his power.


Boat Club Plans

Sunday Cruise

The St. Joe Boat Club will take
a cruise Sunday up the Intra-
coastal Canal to Apalachlcola and
back.
The group will leave the Fifth
Street pier at 10:00 a.m. and will
cruise to Apalachlcola where they
will eat dinner. The group will
cruise back to Port St. Joe Sun-
day afternoon.

Attend Funeral
J. E. Cason and Mr. and Mrs. E.
H. VanLandingham attended the
funeral of Mrs. P. E. Robinson of
Houston, Texas. Interment was in
the Quincy Cemetery at 11' a.m.
Saturday.


Walter Graham Jumps

In Commission Race

Walter Graham of this city this
week announced his candidacy
for County Commissioner from
District Four. This group is now
a three way race between Gra-
ham, Coleman Tharpe and Harry
Dowden.
Graham is 31 years old married
and has three children. He has
lived in Gulf County for 10 years.
He has lived within the Fourth
District for eight years.
He is a veteran of World War
II and a Mason. He is employed
at the St. Joe Paper Company.


Firemen Coached

On Aircraft Fires

The Port St. Joe Volunteer Fire
Department received instruction at
Tyndall Air Force Base, Thursday,
July 17. On this date, Tyndall was
host to fire departments of sur-
rounding cities in Northwest Flor-
ida whose cities are in the light
pattern of Tyndall aircraft. Fire-
men from Tallahassee, Chattahoo-
chee, Quincy, Wewahitchka, Pana-
ma City, Pleasant Hill and P'ort St.
Joe were in attendance. The course
of instruction dealt with plane iden-
tification and the proper method of
shutting off all power on jet planes.
Most instruction was on the pro-
per manner to release the pilot
from the plane. All jets have auto-
matic ejectors for the pilots to be
ejected from his disabled aircraft,
and if a plane crashes and the pilot
is still in the craft this presents a
problem of getting the pilot out
without further harm to the pilot
and also without harming the
would-be rescuers.
Chief Biggs, Tyndall's fire chief
advised all attending to assume
that a craft that crashed in our
area is armed with some sort of
missile or rockets or possible both.
He warned the firemen to proceed
rescue work with caution. He also
advised that these weapons must
be fired in order to do the job they
are intended to do, but with heat
from a fire an explosion of great
(Continued on Page 4)


Bainbridge Man Says Sea Port

"Must" For Developing River Ports


At a special meeting of the di-
rectors of the Chamber of Com-
merce and members of the Harbor
Development Committee and Indus-
trial Development Committee, E. J.
Willis, President of the Bainbridge
Chamber of Commerce and Deasy
Rahn, Bainbridge Port Authority
Director explained how Bainbridge
developed their water facilities,
and how they established the first
terminal on the Three Rivers Sys-
tem. They told of the plans for fu-
ture development of this system.
Plans are being made to build dams
to insure a proper water level on
the Three Rivers' System. Their
reason for being in Port St. Joe,
was the need for a deep water sea-
port. George Tapper, President of


Stamp Goes To 4c

On August I

Postmaster Chauncey Costin- thi
s week announced new postal rates
which go into effect on August 1. T
he new rates reflect the recent
hike authorized by Congress to pr
ovide additional services for "the
Post Office Department. The nod
w postal rates are as follows:
First Class Letters, 4c an ounce.
Post and Postal Cards, 3c each.
Air Mail (not exceeding 8 oun-
ces), 7c an ounce.
Air Post and Postal Cards 5c ea.
Third Class Mail, 3c first two oun-
ces 1%c each additional ounce.
Weight limit for third class mail
is increased up to but not includ-
ing 16 ounces.
Postmaster Costin stated that due
to the Department's policy of first
day sales, issues of the new stamps
will not be available to the public
until August 1, however, ;commer-
cial users who need to prepare their
mailing prior to August 1, may be
permitted to purchase the follow-
ing: 3c postal cards; 4c Lincoln
coil stamps; 4c embossed stamped
envelopes; 5c airmail post cards;
7c embossed stamped envelopes.
Most of these Items are now avail-
able at the local post office. \
The new domestic postage rates
will become effective at 1'2:01 a.m.
August 1, 1958. Mail deposited ih
the post office prior to that time
will be postmarked as of July 31,
and will carry the old rate. All mail
deposited after the time stated will
-ci,rry the new rate and it deficient
in postage, will be returned to tile
sender or rated for the amount
short- paid and be collected from
the addressee.

Frank Chandler Resigns
From City Commission

In a letter to The Sta- t.'is week,
City Commissioner Franklin W
Chandler made public the fact that
he was resigning his position. as
City Commissioner for the City of
Port St. Joe.
Chandler's letter said, in pawt:
"It is with deep regret that I
am tendering my resignation as
City Commissioner of Port St.
Joe. Because I have accepted a
position with Marathon Southern
Corporation I am no longer able
to continue in my position as
City Commissioner.
"I have enjoyed living in Port
St. Joe for the past 20 years and
serving on the commission for six
of the past eight years. I am still
deeply interested in the welfare
of the people there and if I may
ever be of service to you in the
future please let me know."

Home Form Hospital
John Clements is now home from
the hospital following major sur-


the Port St. Joe Chamber of Com-
merce, said at this point that Port
St. Joe, with its deep water har-
bor, is a natural to fit into this
system.
The need for the deep water sea-
port is to attract traffic through
the Bainbridge Port from South
America, West Florida.and the Gulf
coast states, and the West.
IBoth Mr. Willis and Mr, Rahn
agreed that Port St. Joe looked like
the deep water port that was need-
ed.
Mr. Willis noted that a deep wa-
ter sea port would greatly increase
the barge traffic and tonnage thru
Bainbridge. In making their origin-
al report on the feasibility of a
spoxit at Banlibridge, they stated
that they expected 37,000 tons to
be shipped through the port. Mr.
Willis reported that in the year
ending June 1958, 75,428 tons were
shipped through the port or more
than double that which they anti-
cipated. It might be pointed out
that the port hasn't been in opera-
tion but for a short while. It was
noted that this total could have
been increased, had there been suf-
ficient storage warehouses avail-
able. These warehouses are sche-
duled to be built shortly. Mr. Rahn
said that he expected 173,000 tons
to be shipped through the port this
year.
In developing the Three Rivers
System, additional dams are re-
quired to maintain water level
throughout the system. Upon com-
pletion of same, would open ports
of Columbus and Augusta. It is an-
ticipated that these two will be in
operation within ten years. Further
necessitating the deep water out-
let here in Port St. Joe.
The Port Development Commit-
tee of the Chamber of Commerce
is going to work closely with the
Port Authority of Bainbridge to
further develop the Three Rivers
System with Port St. Joe as the
sea water port for the system.
Mr. Willis suggested that a city,
county planning board be formed.
That the city set up a zoning plan.
He noted that cooperation of the
City Council, the County Commis-
sioners and the Chamber of Com-
merce is essential. "Cooperation is
the key to action", he said.


William (Bill) Roemer

Opposes Clyde Brogdon

_ William (Bill) Roemer, Sr., qual-
ified Monday of this week to seek
election as School Board member
from District One, opposing mem-
ber Clyde Brogdon, who is seeking
re-election.
Roemer makes his home in Hon-
eyville where he is very active in
the Methodist Church. He came to
Gulf County in 1946 and is employ-
ed in the machine shop of the St.
Joe Paper Company.
Roemer was born in Germany
and came to America to make his
home in 1925, when he was 21 years
of age.
This is Roemer's first try for pub-
lic office. The candidate said that
frankly he wasn't too familiar at
this time with all the many details
handled by the School Board. He
said that he will do his best, thru
hard work to better the school pro-
gram, teacher standards and econo-
my in school operation. "I am not
criticizing the way the schools are
run now," said Roemer, "But I be-
lieve that the schools, as well 'as
anything else, can't get so good
that they can't stand improve-
ment, and this is what I will work
i for."

gery. He is improving slowly but
steadily. He would like for his
friends to visit him.


NUMBER 43


I






c


- ---- -









TAR, Prt t. Joe, F THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1958Mrs Creech Is


Hostess To Circle


A Real Tennessee,3folunteer


The Volunteer State of Tennessee never produced a more attrac-
tive volunteer than Mrs. Dorothy Severance of Nashville-the "Mrs.
United States Savings Bonds of 1958." She won the title over a bevy
of capable (and attractive) homemakers representing every state
in the union at the "Mrs. America" finals in Fort Lauderdale,
Florida. As an unpaid volunteer of the Treasury's Savings Bond
Program, she will visit various cities during the year in the promo-
tion of Savings Bonds and Stamps. Mrs. Severance needed no indoc-
trination following her coronation. She and her family have been
regular buyers of Savings Bonds and Stamps over the years, and
she's already one of the Treasury's best "salesmen." A graduate of
Wake Forest College, she is author of two .books. She is married to
W. Murray Severance, a film producer for the Baptist Sunday School
Board, and they have two small children. .. j
SP-236-C _. -


Circle No. 2 of the WSCS of
the First Methodist Church met at
the home o fMrs. Gus Creech at
9:30 a.m. July 21.
Mrs. J. L Temple opened the
meeting with a short business ses-
sion
Next meeting will be held at the
home of Mrs. Robert King on Au-
gust 18,,
The devotional period was open-
ed with prayer by Mrs. Temple.
Mrs. Nancy Howell gave a.very
4iteresting lesson on "Women's
Work in the Methodist. Churcn".
Parts were taken from Acts, -which
.told of women's work through the
church in Korea, and their grate-
fulness for being a member of the
Federation of Women in the Metho-
dist Church.
Mrs. Robert King gave an editor-
ial on "Organized Women In the
Church.
Refreshments were served to six
members.
The meeting closed with the
WSCS benediction.
--- -4(- ---
ST JAMES' CHURCH
EPISCOPAL


Rev. G. D. Underhill, Rector Moving up this week Jerry Butler
The eighth Sunday after Trinity, preciouss Love", "Little
7For Your Preciousm Love", "Little


July 27. 7:30 a.m., Celebration of
the Holy Communion. 10:00 a.m.,
Morning prayer and sermon and
the Church School
The public is cordially invited to
worship with us and is assured of
a warm welcome.

4,dvertlslng doesn't ost-It PAYS
GO TO CHURCH SUNDAY
GO TO CHURCH SUNDAY


Serenade" by the Ames Brothers
(still like Teddy Randazzo's ver-
sion). Sleeper' of the week Billy
William's "I'll Get By". "Patricia"
took over the. top spot this week
and we're not surprised, are we
Wes? ".Down Memory Lane" again
number two. "Yakity Yak", in the
third spot, "Purple People Eater".
The number one tune a year ago
today, "Searchin" by the Coasters.


Alligood, Mrs. P. B. Fairley and
Mrs Joe Ferrell.
--------I-
PAULA BASS ENTERS
MASSEY BUSINESS COLLEGE
C. A. Barringer, President of
Massey Business College, Inc., an-
nounces that Paula Bass, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Bass of Port St.
Joe, entered Massey Business Col-
lege, Inc., July 8, where she is tak-
ing the Secretarial Science Course.
Miss Bass was recently graduat-
ed from Port St. Joe High School.

Visitors From Tennessee


___ i_~iil_______Y____1WNY__rm


Mostly Music....!


Another week just passed and (Pass the 'H' Wee. Five years go,
the new crop of tunes arriving at Les Paul and Mary Ford had the
WJOE of the pretty music variety. big tune, "Vaya Con Dios". A de-
Nick Noble has a new entry for cade ago, "Little White Lies" and
the top "20" "Fountains Cry" very "Love Somebody", sharing top
pretty and am sure you will like 'honors.
it. The Jimmy Dorsey orchestra THE BOY NEXT DOOR
also has a new one. The band has -- -
been taken over by Lee Castle and L
they've just turned out two fine Long Ave. Circle
rides for the fraternity label "Un-
cer A Texas .Moon" and "Love On Met MOnday
The Rocks" featuring the fina voi-
.es of Tommy Mercer and D.anre
W;sdc.m. Another Italian import Circle No. 2 of the Long Ave-
headed for the best seller list, "Nel nue Baptist Church met Monday
Biu Dipinto Di- Blu" pass the dic- afternoon, July 14, in the home of
tionary, Wes) .It wouldn't d. any P. Martin with six mem-
good-Wes) The tune is sung by bers present. The meeting was op-
the composer Domenico Moduguo ended by the repeating of the watch-
and it means, "In the Blue, Painted word and prayer led by Mrs. Joe
of Blue", headed straight for Hits- Alligood, circle chairman.
ville. Bob Crewe does a very inspir- about missionary intework in the Near
national job on his new disc, Ofy work in the Near
,heSeaandheSanEast was presented with each mem-
Sun, The Sea and the Sand". Jim-
mie Rodgers' "'Are You Really
Mine" getting hotter than a fire- Following a short business meet-
cracker. The Diamonds "Kathy-O" ing Mrs. Martin served refresh-
looks like the big side. The boys ments of cokes, cookies, salted
proving they can sing ballads as nuts and candy to Mrs. James Al
well as R 'N R tunes. l ,Mrs. Tnrfl Rrigman. Mras. Joc


cof-4s9 GENE BARRY
KEELY Q.MITH



SATURDAY ONLY
DOUBLE FEATURE

The Death-Battle That
Shook the Indian Nationsl


Large Crowd Enjoys

STAC House Play

Everyone had fun at the STAC
House last Saturday night. There
were 67 people including many out
of town visitors. We danced, play-
ed pool and ping pong.
Anyone havin gthe articles need-
ed for the STAC House please con-
tact Mrs. Biggs.
We will have a covered dish sup-
per this week at the STAC House.
Everyone is invited to come and
bring a covered dish.
The supper will be put on a ta-
ble at which the supper will be.
served buffet style.
Everyone from out of town stay-
ing with friends and relatives are
welcome to come.
--------------
Visiting Mrs. Grice
Visiting Mrs. S. R. Grice are her
granddaughters, Misses Mary, Jean
Anne and Patti Harrison, also Mis-
ses Lucile and Jackie Taylor, all of
Selma, Ala.

HIGHLAND VIEW WMU
HAS ROYAL SERVICE MEET


To make the Dean's List he scor-
ed a semester academic average
of 3.0 (B) or better.

On Vacation
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Shartt are
vacationing in North Georgia.

10 TO CHURCH SUNDAY








TELEPHONE: BAll 7-4191
OPEN DAILY, 2:45 P.k.
SATURDAY, 12:45 P.M.


Thurs., Fri.


L
OBLEMS
OUR,


s


The WMU of the Highland View
- Baptist Church met for their month-


ly Royal Service program meeting.
The meeting was opened with the
WMU song. Scripture reading was
taken from Ephesians 1:15-23. Mrs.
Richter lead the opening prayer.
The theme for the program w:'.s
"In Ancient Doors". Those taking
part on the program were Mrs.
Belle DuBose, Alice -Macomber,
Maxine Mills, Nora Lee Roney, Til-
lie Richter, Ruth Harbuck. The
meeting was dismissed by Mrs.
Belle DuBose.
(






You Are Most Cordially Invited To Help Us Celebrate Our


SALE STARTS THURSDAY, JULY 24 8:45 a.m.


Prices Have Been Cut To The Bone To Make This A Party For You!


Summer

Dresses



2 Price
Every one marked for quick
clearance. Stock up on these
lovely dresses. Nationally ad-
vertised brands.


LADIES' and CHILDREN'
SHORTS & BERMUDAS


Ladies
SHORTY
Pajamas
and Gowns
Reg. $198"
$1.29


All Ladies Summer
Skirts


Price


Chenille
BED SPREADS LADIES' PANTIES
Double Size Assorted Colors and White
Double Size
$2.99 3 Pair $1.00
SnCANNONN SHEETS I Ladies' Nylon '
81x99 and 42x36 HO SE
WHITE .9 2 PAIR .
CASES ---- 2 for $1.00 $1.00 .


TOWEL SPECIALS
Heavy 22x40 BATH TOWEL ------ 79c
Jantzen BEACH TOWEL -----$2.95
Heavy HAND TOWELS ----- 39c
Heavy WASH CLOTHS -------19c
Large BATH TOWELS --- -- 3 for $1.00


CHILDREN'S SUMMER

Dresses -'
REDUCED TO


2 Priee
Cinderella 3 to 12. Nanett 6 months
to 8 Years. Just right for back t6
school. D WI

ALL CHILDREN'S SWIM SUITS


Regularly priced from
$3.95 to $6.95


1-3 off


Men'sSportShirts
Reg. $2.95 $1 98
SALE PRICE ---- ........
Reg. $3.95 and $4.50
SALE PRICE -. -- avU


A Ladies 3 R LEAD PENCILS FOR Blue Chambray WORK SHIRTS
SWIM SUITS OFF CANDY SUCKERS CHILDREN LONG andO 1
By Jantzen A vrr *. BALLOONS CHILD N SHORT SLEEVE
LADIES' Boy's 10 Oz. Boys' Tom Sawyer MEN'S and BOYS'
BLOUSES DUNGAREES SPORT SHIRTS SWIM TRUNKS
A LUO^"f ^ Reg. SALE i 1 oUf
Size 6 to 16 $1.69 -now '$1.19
1/ PRICE r 1 1
V2 PRI $1.19 $1.698 noww $1. 29 I
Ship and Shore and others Back To School $- 2.98 -nHOw $1.98

PIECE GOODS SPECIALS LADIES' SUMMER SHOES r rlMMER DANTS
New Fall CORDUROY OC* ., ? LDREG. SALE SSUMMEimR PANTS f
22 CoL~oRS YARD O*J Boy's Summer SUITS I af.
COs NOW REDUCED TO n- UII $2.95 ------ now $1.95 REDUCED
Bates Summer Patterns 1 An $3.95------ -- now $2.95
YARD W. .w Ladies Summer BAGS $1 5 0nff $5 d $6.25 now $3.49 small
)BROADCLOTH YARD 1 L NOW REDUCED TO :|-j g $7.95. and $o.5 now $4.95 i Alteration
ripandryLadies Cotton SLIPS $7.95 $.5 -- Charge4
PRINT CLOTH a1 00 Cto SLIPS $2.98 Boy's and Girl's Shoes $3.95 hare
3 YARDS .uu R $ WASH and WEAR
1 Lot Summer Cloth Boy's PAJAMAS G195 GIRL'S SHOES DACRON and RAYON
Reg. priced 69c to $1.29 Yd. YARD + f "" 1 White $2.95
ff ;^ ,** Boy's SPORT COATS o M Eft Schles ..... $395 DACRON and WOOL
5% WOOL B' WHITE LINEN S $7.50 School Shoes ---- $3.95 ACRILON and COTTON
LANKETS Men's DENIM PANTS FORSHEIMSHS--$13.99 Priced Reg. from $6.95 to $9.95
BLAKET Lgh.Blue", Elas. band, Regj $2 .951 FLORSHEIM SHOES ...$13.99
Double MnsTE AChildrens -- Rge. $2.95
3 Men's TEE SHIRTS 100 CANVAS SHOEidrens Rge. $2.95 1 LOT PANTS
Doub e 1 \Shorts and Undershirts 2 FOR g AVAS SHOES R$1.95
Size Men's WORK PANTS Ladies TO 399
i,/ KHAKI ..S/ Canvass Summerweights $2.95


BUY NOW
AT


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
Gulf County's Oldest and Most Reliable


Department Store


Ladies'


1-2


OFF
Reg. $2.95
to $7.95


;a~r~mlFYr


--b- I LI 81


PIPI


~ ~c-"C~ -- -I IuIII


cC ~1 IPIC ~IIP IP~s~L II II 9 I IC I I-p~- -1


4 -.'"-"*


SBLE


36




Y,5k bOtY SAV9! A tIY W0i"YGL4


LeVRYWbDY SAMs At P1GL WIGGLY


-/ 4'


Grade'A' Ga. Dressed and Drawn 2 to 2 Lb. Avg.


FRYERS


C
EACH


Additional Fryers -39c Ib


3 LBS.
1.39


FRESH GROUND
BEEF
ALL LEAN
STEW


-.
*:: I J~


69c


BLACK HAWK

BACON
U. S. GOOD SHOULDER

ROAST


69c
LB.


3 LB. CAN
CRISCO


9 5 LB. BALLARD
FLOUR


6 OZ. INSTANT MAXWELL HOUSE


85c


49c


COFFEE
303 CAN VALLEY
TOMATOES


1.09
2 FOR
25c


:


FANCY

SQUASH
FRESH


LB.


LB.


TOMATOES 10c
PURPLE HULL LB.
PEAS 5c
BUSHEL PEAS------$1.25
CHOICE LB.

OKRA l0c
BUTTER LB.
ButterBeans1Oc
BUSHEL BUTTER BEANS $2.95
U. S. NO. 1 -- With $5.00 Order -- 10 Lb. Bag
Pota 00oes 19c


6 OZ. VAN CAMP'S
TUNA
IDEAL or SUNBEAM 13 OZ. LOAF
BREAD


23c
2 FOR
29c'


JAZZ


FEEDS


25 POUNDS
SCRATCH
25 POUNDS -- PELLETS or CRUMBLES
LAYER
50 LB. BAG
DOG FOOD


STORE HOURS
MONDAY, TUESDAY, THURSDAY 8:00 to 6:30
WEDNESDAY 8:00 to 12:30
FRIDAY and SATURDAY 8:00 to 7:00


1.12


1.19


4.19


MARIGOLD
OLEO
BORDEN'S
umI,, IO fL


2 LBS.
35c
5 FOR
A 0


ARMOUR'S STAR


CORNED BEEF
HASH

STREET


VIENNAS


12 OZ. CAN
Corned Beef


LARA LYNN -- PKG. OF 12
PIES
ARMOUR'S TALL
MILK


49c
3 FOR
39c


REAL KILL BUG KILLER
QUART BOTTLE
PUSH BUTTON
PER-FEK
Dog Food


97c
98c
38 FOR
19c


Frozen Foods


39c

49c
23c


49c


MIX 'EM UP
Vegetables
CHICKEN, BEEF and TURKEY
POT PIES
T.NV.
DINNERS


BREADED
SHRIMP


5 FOR
$1
3 FOR
79c


EACH


63c
PKG.
69c


VVEST P WGGVERYBODY SAVES AT PIGGLY WIGGLY


5.00 Order
Limit 2 With


s~i~m~Plli~a~lB~E~


*LlJ "91 sY-~


WIGGLY EV~~-plPC~ISPI xYBODY


ivot~ribbv JAM, Af P-lor-d Wirv'4


~~1


*-1,
)n


I-


EVERYBODY' SAVES; AT PlGGJ


SAVES AT PjGGLLY WIGGLY


I Biscui~t 4tpe


I








NEWS FROM

Highland View
By MRS. EULA ROGERS

Mr. and Mrs. Peavy Mims and
daughter Tommy Ray visited ove,
the week end in Atlanta, Ga., with
Mr. Mims mother and family, Mr.
and Mrs. A. L. Knight.
Henry Rogers and son Lewis
spent last week in DeFuniak
Springs with Mr. Rogers sister,
Mrs. Beulah Dockins.
Buddy McMullon has just return-
ed from a month's visit in Port
Arthur, Texas with his sister and
family, Mrs. Christine Miller.,
Mrs. Thelma Rhames and daugh-
ter spent last week in Clarksville
visiting her father and family, B.
J. Pitts,
Mrs. Sally Taylor of Panama City
spent the week end with her son
,and family, Mr. and Mrs. J. E.



-LOST-

PAIR WATER SKIS
AT CITY PIER
Around First of July Small re-
ward for their return.
CLYDE WHITE
PHONE 7-3261
1301 LONG AVENUE


Hudson. -- --
Elmer Kent ,son of Mrs W. B
Coppedge of Frankfort, Germany,
visited his mother and other rela-
tives for a three week's leave, and
now has returned for duty at the
Walter Reed Hospital, Baltimore,
Md.
Mrs. Naomi Lee visited her mo-
ther Mrs. Chambers in East Point
over the week end.
Mr. and Mrs. George Skipper
spent Friday and Saturday in Pan-
ama City visiting their son and
family, Mr.-and Mrs. Willard Skip-
per.
* Mrs. Steve Daniels and children
and Mrs. Ray Nobles and children
spent last Thursday in Samsoa,
Ala., visiting Mrs. Nobles mother,
Mrs. W. B. Bowdin
.Mr. and Mrs Wayne Levins and
daughter spent Tuesday with Mr
Levins grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
Jim Chestnut.
J. D. Rogers of Bay Minnette,
Ala., has been visiting his aunt for
two weeks, Mr. and Mrs. Bob Raf-
field.
Mrs. Doris Hale of Thoma ston,
Ga., visited her mother here,,Mrs.
W. P. Coppedge and her sister, Mrs
Harry Owell at White City last
week.
Fay and Katy Rhames spent last
week in Clarkesville with their un-
cle, Mr. and Mrs. Jimmie Pitts.
Donald Skipper of Panama City
visited his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
George Skipper Monday.


FOR RENT


2 BEDROOM HOUSE

3 BEDROOM HOUSE
Both Unfurnished -- At St. Joe Beach

$50 PER MONTH

PHONE BAll 7-3171


I W. W. DUREN


Gail and Landers Weekly of
Orange, Texas is spending the sum-
mer with their grandparents, Mr.
and Mrs. Bob Raffield.
Mr. and Mrs. James Posey and
children Linda and Joe of Junction
City Ga., were the week end
guests of Mrs. Posey's mother, Mr.
and Mrs. W. P. Coppedge
Jmmy and Gene Cox visited in
Sopchoppy Sunday and were accom-
panied back by their cousin, By-
ron Cox for a visit.
, 'George Kelley is spending the
summer. with his cousin in Atlan-
ta, Ga., Ralph Knight.
Miss Mary Cox and Gene Cox
spent last week in a Children's Bi-
ble Mission Camp as counsellor at
West Florida Assembly Grounds in
Panama City.
Pvt. Grover Lee Holland, son of
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Holland, is
home for a 14 day furlough. He has
completed his basic training at Fort
Jackson, S C. Pvt. Holland will re-
turn and resume, his military du-
ties at Fort Belvoir, Va., where he
will be a clerk-typist in the field
of communications.
WMU Meeting
The regular meeting of the WMU
of the Highland View Baptist
Church was held on Monday after-
noon at 3:00 p.m. at the church.
The program was opened with the
singing of the WMU hymn. Mrs.
Malcolm Mills opened with prayer.
A short Bible study by Rev. Mills
was brought before the group. The
meeting closed by prayer by Mrs.
Ruth Harbuck.
--
NEWS FROM

OAK GROVE

Miss Minnie Ola Ray visited in
Georgia over the, week end with
friends.
Edgar Dees motored to Panama
City Friday night on business.
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Campbell and
children visited in Cross City over
.:he week end with relatives.
Joyce Faye and Arlene Lipford
of Marianna are visiting with their
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Cleve-
land Hall.
David Pertzyl of Pensacola is
visiting with his grandparents, Mr.
and Mrs. D. H. Shealey.


Miss Minnie Ola Ray and Miss children of Marianna visited with iting with friends and relatives, spending two weeks in Miami vis-
Juanita Norris motored to Panama the latter's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Rev. and Mrs. Allen H. Norris iting with S-Sgt. and Mrs. Ivis Pin-


-City on business Sunday of last
week.
Mr. and Mrs. Everitt McFarland
and son Patrick returned home
Wednesday of last week after
spending several days visiting in
Arizona with Mr. and Mrs. Bobby
Gibson and children.
Mr. and Mrs. Willys Lipford and


Pistol Hose Nozzle
Reg. Q
1.29 8
Hundreds of spray
settings. Can be
locked. Rustproof.


Cleveland Hall Sunday.
A-2C Robert D. Lowery, Miss
Juanita Norris and Mrs. Stella Nor-
ris visited in Marianna Sunday with
Mr. and Mrs. James Broome and
daughter, Wanda Jean.
Miss Juanita Norris rteurned
home last Saturday after spending
several days in South Florida vis-


Barbecue Cw
Reg. 4d4,
5,95 4
Large 18" size. Adjustable
chrome-plated grid, 241/"
height, "coppertone" legs.


and children of Apalachicola visit-
ed with Mr. and Mrs. Hansel Nor-
ris last Saturday.
Mr. and. Mrs. J. C Newsome and
daughter Iva Lilly returned home
Sunday of last week after spend-
ing several days in Frink visiting
with friends and relatives
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Dykes are


ft. deep. Durable heavy-
gauge vinylite construction.36


Reg. 44
5.9!;
Nearly 5-ft. diameter, over
1/2 ft. deep. Durable heavy-
gauge vinylite construction.


ter and children

Visiting In Perry
Mrs. Gus Creech and three
daughters are visiting Mrs. Harley
Huxford, Mrs. Creech's sister, in
Perry this week.

GO TO CHURCH SUNDAY


Everain Sprinkler
Reg. A 44
6.95
Rectangular spray area.
up to 1500 sq. ft. Fully
guaranteed. Rustproof.


O-C-113


Cola Cooler
Reg. 88
11.89 01-
Keeps food and beverages
cold for hours! Bright red.
Rust-resistant construction.


Canister Set
Reg. 299
4.95 2
Heavy-gauge aluminum.
One, two, three, four-qt.


Yacht Chair
Reg. 5S
6.95
Lightweight aluminum
frame with deluxe
nylonite seat and back.
Buy a pair!


Therma-Glass Set

Sale 595
Double-wall air chamber
construction keeps drinks
hot or cold. Eight 10-oz.
glasses, assorted colors.


26inch Bicycles
Reg. ".1lCI
49.95 4.0 down
Rugged construction,
American-made.
Save Now!


BoontonwGere
Reg. 77
38.00 I 75c a week
Written guarantee against
breakage. Won't chip or
crack. Beautiful design.


Power Mower
Reg. al3Q99
54.50 1.75 a week
Aluminum deck, recoil
starter, 2 h.p. motor.
Adjustable cutting height.


Bissell
Shampoo Master

Now 1495
The liquid rug
cleaner appli-
cator that
removes deep
S" down dirt with
speed and ease.
Reg. 1.98 can of
D.141 -- liquid cleaner
FREE
with purchase


10-W-7


Timex Watches
Men's or 1195
Ladies' Plus Fed. Tax
Chrome case. Waterproof
and shockproof.


3-B.J99i

Venetian Sunshade
Reg.
6.49
Allows full vision, yet
gives maximum sun
protection. Fits all cars.
Installs in minutes.


2-pc. Luggage Set
25.00 77
Value I Cm men'.
plus Fed, tax
Large folding bag for
suits, etc. Smaller bag
for accessories.


Bucket

Sale 595,
Insulated to keep ice for
the "life of the party." Un-
breakable plastic in choice
of colors with brass trim.


Transistor 2 i
Portable



Philco "Veep".
at 1995
only batteries
extra
Vest pocket size with
excellent tone. High
impact case.


Big 12"
Size

14-E-18


Oscillating Fan
Reg. 4 t99
19.95 U __ 75c
a week
Buy now...save money and
have cool comfort ready
for hot suinmer days.


4-A-171

Portable Phono
Slashed 95
to only... 4 we1,k
.3 a week
Twin speakers, 4 speeds,
plays all sizes. Lovely
wrap-around zipper case.


Auto Top Carrier
Reg. 99
11.75 9 Term?
Unique pressure pads and
Quik-Lok eliminate suction
pads and gutter-straps.
Supports weight on strong
curved edge of roof.
700-lb. capacity.


Firestone Home & Auto Supply

Port St. Joe, Florida


All


I I- -- I I- -----~II ~I I







THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1958


PORT ST. JOE


VAULT Co.

Plant Phone 7-3326 Home Phone 7-3821
104 FOURTH STREET
Manufacturers of
Anything Made of Cement

SEPTIC TANKS SIDEWALKS

STEPS COPINGS

GRAVE MEMORIALS
INSTALLATION and REPAIRS


select a new *
"Built in" GAS RANE


Modern, luxuriously beautiful yet designed
throughout for easier, faster, cleaner cooking! Every,
automatic feature you could ever want! In fact, no
range is more automatic, more glamorous than a
new GAS Rangel See them soon!


Southern Liquid

GAS COMPANY
"YOUR GAS COMPANY SINCE 1932"

NO TANKS TO BUY -- NO RENT TO PAY
Port St. Joe Representative ANDY ANDREWS
Panama bity telephone POplar 3-1931


County



Agents Notes


01


(U. S. Department of Agriculture, University of Florida Agricultural Extension
Service, and Gulf County Board of Commissioners Cooperating. Office open 9 a.m.
to noon, (CST) Mon.-Fri. in the Courthoese, Wewahitchka, Florida.)
4-H Honor deer roaming in the woods and a
David Roche of Wewahitchka trip t othe Gulfarium at Fort Wal-
won a ribbon at 4-H Club Camp ton. Instrution at camp for the
last week for being a member of boys and girls included "Highway
the Honor Squad for the week. I iis Safety" by FHP Education Offi-
honor was given for good behavior cer, and "Shrubs and Other Orna-
and enthusiastim participation in mental" by H. C. Gray, Assistant
all phases of the camping program. County Agent, Bay County. Gulf
Our Gulf County boys attending County boys attending camp this
camp enjoyed a week of fun and year were: James Wade, Arthur
vacation at this camp, including Bozeman, Benny Brogdon, Tom
swimming, athletics, folk dancing, Semmes, Kenneth Gilbert, Terry
crafts, singing, trip into Eglin AFB Linton, Pete Smith, Fraukle Suber,
Reservation to see some 25 to 50 Jerry Turner, Jessie Eubanks and


FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Port St. Joe, Florida
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship Hour 11:00 a.m.
Methodist Youth Fellowship .- 6:15 p.m.
Worship Hour 7:30 p.m.


RADIATORS*: REPAIRED and RECORD
A IA CLEANED, FLUSHED

STARTERS and GENERATORS
REPAIRED and EXCHANGED

PATE S SHELL SERVICE
Phone BAII 7-9291 223 Monument Ave.




BEAMAN PLUMBING SERVICE
110 HUNTER CIRCLE
Licensed Plumber
Can Handle Any Type Plumbing, Small or Large
15 Years Experience

PHONE BAll 7-2541 At Anytime
ALL WORK GUARANTEED FREE ESTIMATES
. - - - - --. . .


I,,.
.1
'V
.. '.. ,J' I
~ C
*~ .~:,,


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla.


By CUBIE R. LAIRD


David Roche.
Planting Improved Permanent
Pastures
Good, improved permanent pas
tures are a must in a modern cat-
tle operation. Cattle must have
roughage and improved pasture
grasses are one of our best and
cheapest sources of roughage.
So It will pay you to evaluate
your pasture-cattle situation thor-
oughly now. If you need more per-
manent pastures, the warm, moist
summer months are good periods
to start a new pasture. But be sure
to plan your procedure carefully
before planting.
You need to give special consid-
eration to pastures you establish
by sprigging-such as Pangola,
Bermuda and other Southern grass
pastures.
Attention to six points will help
you do a better job of pasture es-
tablishment:
First, be sure you have a source
of strong, live planting material.
The best way to do this is to plant
your own small increase nursery.
Of course, you would have to do
this about a year before you plan
to use the sprigs.
In planting such a nursery, se-
lect the most favorable site, but
avoid old crop land where weeds
are a problem. One acre can plant
100 acres of pasture if you plant
at two or three different dates.
Fertilize your nursery liberally,
but don't use too much nitrogen.
Second, lime and fertilize the
new pasture properly at planting.
Follow proven recommendations
for applications of these materials.
Third, make your planting by
sprigging in moist soil, during the
period when it rains frequently.
Plant the sprigs as deeply as pos-
sible, but be sure that the tips are
exposed. You can plant with a disc
harrow or special planters.
For the fourth point, delay graz-
Ing the newly planted pasture for
awhile, until the new sprigs begin
to grow. The young plants need
time to become established and
develop an extensive root system.
Fifth, if weeds grow up before
the grass, use a mowing machine
or chemicals to eliminate thia cost-
ly competition.
Finally, be sure to add nitrogen
as the new pasture becomes estab-
lished to keep it growing rapidly.
After about two months, apply
about 100 pounds of ammonium ni-
trate or 200 pounds of sodium ni-
trate.
Remember, rapid establishment
of'your new pastures means quick-
er dollar returns from grazing
them.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to thank the hospital,
doctors, nurses and our many
friends who were so faithful to
assist and encourage us during the
illness and death of our beloved
father, son and brother.
The Clyde Thomae Family
TU em -a WifteW to a iQ so gqult


AIR CONDITIONED


SMITH'S BARBER SHOP
Wewahitchka, Florida 4t



/.I6.p


OKALOOSA
COUNTY
County Seat,
Crestview


350,000 ACRES
Eglin Air Force
Base


Gulf Qf Mexico


Home of the giant Eglin Air Force Training Fielid,
with 350,000 acres or over half of the county's acreage,
Okaloosa County was created in 1915. Once Indian ter-
ritory, many Indian burial mounds and other traces of
early Indian occupation have been found here. The
very name Okaloosa comes from the Choctaw language
meaning "black water." Except for timber cutting, the
scenic beauty remains untouched in the county's interior,
with the tourist trade found only on the coastal beaches.
In progressive Okaloosa County, and throughout
Florida, the United States Brewers Foundation works
constantly to assure the sale of beer and ale under pleas-
ant, orderly conditions. Believing that strict law enforce-
ment serves the best interest of the people of Florida,
the Foundation stresses close cooperation with the Armed
Forces, law enforcement and governing officials in its
continuing "self-regulation" program.


BEU."3IDf
LIGHT, BRIGHTi,`H2
BEVERAGEwz-


Extra insurance you can
afford right nowl


CO.c-


Prices start lowest...capacity goes highest in Chevy pickups!


You have your choice of the fast-stepping
Stepsides, featuring America's lowest priced
popular pickup, or the fleet new Fleetsides,
offering more load space than any comparable
popular models.
Look over Chevrolet's lineup of 12 different
models-and pick the pickup that suits your
job best. For cutting costs, there are the fast-
D


working Stepsides, which include America's
lowest priced popular pickup. For hauling big-
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offering more cargo space than any compar-
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Your dealer's got all the facts on why no
other pickup brings you such rock-ribbed de-
pendability at Chevy's rock-bottom price.


First in buyer preference since 1937


THE "BIG WHEEL" IN TRUCKS


Gulf Life's



ADAPT-A


PLAN

... fits your changing

family protection needs

The new, low-cost Family Security
Adapt-A-Plan provides:
Immediate cash if Father dies.
Plus a monthly income for Mother-
doubled during the children's
growing up years. Then her
income checks continue until
Father would have been 65,
when she will receive the face
amount of the policy.
Or, if Father lives to 65, he
gets the full face amount of
the policy, or a retirement
income for life.
To learn all about this Family Security Plan.
call your Gulf Life representative TODAY!


See your local authorized Chevrolet dealer


Floyd Chevrolet Company
Port St. Joe, Fla.


Gulf Life


Gulffo Es Btablished 1911 Home Office, Jacksonville, Florida
\ TA tove------- --------------------------------------.--.
LtheSt, Now Over ONE BILLION DOLLARS of Lile Insurance in Force

C. B. GREIF, Jr. 221 Reid Ave.
m Ie"ll I IIIiI I m aII IIIII I II


You Are Cordially Invited To Attend

Long Ave. Baptist Church
REV. J. C. ODUM, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9.45 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION __ 6:45 p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 8:00 p.m.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) 8:00 p.m.
Corner Long Avenue and 16th Street

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME





ATTENTION

AS OF JULY 10th, WE WILL HAVE TWO BAR-
BERS ON DUTY SIX DAYS A WEEK and THREE
ON WEEK ENDS.


- --- -r I~


Unte taesBewr


NO WAITING


Ammee/t






Specials For


JULY 24, 25 and 26
Plenty of Free Parking
AIR CONDITIONED
We Reserve Limit Rights
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


SUNSHINE
HIMNeiahbor!


Georgia Grade "A" Dressed and Drawn

< ,


291C


LB.


HI-HO
Crackers


Lb. Box


37c


Health plays a very important part in today's fast
moving business life. Therefore, Dad needs that
hearty breakfast to maintain his healthy condition
and yes the youngsters, too, need that hearty
breakfast to maintain that pep and vitality to keep
at the top of their classes. Yes IGA is the place
to buy those important vitamins and best of all you
save cash money at IGA. For proof make the famous
I GA "TOTAL TEST" and see for yourself...


USDA Good Extra
STEAK


Heavy Beef ROUND


Ib


79c


USDA Good Extra Heavy Beef CHUCK


ROAST Ib


49c


BE SURE TO REGISTER FOR THE FIVE
FREE Tenderized PICNICS


USDA Good Extra Heavy Beef SHORT


USDA Good Extra Heavy Beef RUMP


RIBS


Ib


39c


ROAST Ib


69c


With Food Order


FRESH PORK
PIG FEET
ALL MEAT, BONELESS, WASTELESS


C


2
BOXES


29c


Stew


U. S. NO. 1


California Sunkist
LEMONS


Beef.


LB.


10LB


10 LB.
BAG

doz


Doz.


CELLO BAG
RADISHES
FRESH GREEN
Green ONIONS


2 Bches,


69c


29c


Starkist Chunk Style IGA Garden
Tuna Fish Sweet Peas
Flat 2 303 Can 29c
Can J 2 FOR


Sunbeam or Ideal 13 Oz. Loaf Limit 2 Loaves With Food Order


29c

lOc
25c


BELL PEPPERS or
CUCUMBER `': EACH Sc
Cooking APPLES 21bs 25c


Georgia Grade 'A" Small


- In Cartons


3 DOZ.


$


LOAF

I


read


Fancy Long Grain
Perfection Rice


3
LBS.


39c


SWIFT'S SHORTENING
Shortening
Crestmore Cut
Green Beans


IGA Brand
Instant Coffee
60oz 89c
Jar 0

Can 69c
Cairo Sweet
Mixed Pickles


Borden's Canned
Biscuits


CAN Golden Brown Frozen
l0c SHRIMP


SEALTEST -- ALL FLAVORS
SHERBET


2pts


10 Oz.
59c


39c


303 Can
4 FOR
Jim Dandy


59c


GRITS


IGA
IODIZED SALT


2 LBS.


16 Oz.
2 FOR


49c


24 Oz.
Pkg.


BOX


lOc


,~_~aapsg~Clpl~$W~pl~I ~~= 1


~ep--~--~sp~-ras, ~I -rr Ttl I II -~g I I I


_+__


Potatoes


1










THE STAR
PubIlhld Every Thur At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
By T Star Publishing Conwny
W=susr R. RAMSEY Editor and Publisher
AiM L~eop Operator, Ad Man, ioer Man, OolnnUist, Reporter. Proof Reader
and Bookkeeper
ONE YEAR, 300 SIX MONTHS 1.50 THREE MONTHS $127.50
SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY TAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Intea as seoad-ela matter, December 19, 1937, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe,
lorida, nde Aot of Mrch 3, 1879.
MIAL BARl 7-3161
TO ADVERTISIERS-a case of error or omisionsa in advertisements, the publishers
do ot holth Uemsee Uiable for damage further that amount received for such
advertiemen.
2% spoken word Is given saeut attention; the printed word is thoughtfully
weighd. The spoken word barely asserta; the printed word thoroughly convince.
The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.



Classified Ads Bring Quick Results


Port St. Joe
Florida


TOO LATE TO
CLASSIFY
By RUSSELL KAY
Florida might, wel lsay, "Thanks
for the recession," for nothing
could have been more effective in
centering the attention of teh na-
tion on this state or have created
a more favorable impression for
us ,in the minds of top-flight econ-
omists, business and industry.
Florida took not only the na-
tional recession but a disastrous
Winter, trhown in for good mea-
sure, and bunced back to become
the brightest spot in the nation.
Florida has demonstrated that she
can roll with the punches, take it
on the chin and come back' strong-
er than ever.
Potential investors and moneyed
interests have been watching Flor-


PHONE
BAII 7-4646


Citizens Federal Savings

and Association of Port St. Joe


Statement of Condition, June 30, 1958


Assets
First Mortgage Loans $749,637.04
Savings Share Loans 1,000.00
Stock In Federal Home
Loan Bank 10,000.00
Cash on hand and in Banks -- 75,187.61
Fur., Fix., and Equip. 2,574.84
Office Supplies and prepaid
Insurance 972.70
$839,372.19


Liabilitie s
Savings Accounts $749,374.67
Advances from Home
Loan Bank 80,000.00
Other Liabilities 154.48
Required Federal
Reserve 8,053.85
Undivided Profits 1,789.19
$839,372.19


Dividends paid Savings Account owners, in cash or credited to Savings balances,
June 30, 1958 $ 11,807.09


total t


Net Savings receipts, July 1st thru 12th, $126,200.27 bringing our Savings Capital
IWR -UA -TJ


1, L. G. Buck, Executive Vice President, Citizens' Federal Savings & Loan Association
-of Port St. Joe, do hereby certify that the above statement is true and correct to the best of
my knowledge.
Signed, L. G. BUCK
Executive Vice President


Easy on you..



and your wallet


Drive it and see!


You'll not only discover new power, handling ease and
comfort in our new INTERNATIONAL Trucks-but greater
economy as well.
But don't go on our word alone, take an INTERNATIONAL
out on your own. See how you like its get-up-and-go spirit
... its roomy cab and huge, sweep-around windshield. Try
it in traffic or on the road. Check its performance carefully.
Find out by yourself some of the reasons why owners
have found that INTERNATIONAL Trucks cost least to own!
Come in today.


INTERNATIONAL
TRUCKS


. e, ^,,^ .," .o ., :,,.,, *, "
> A.



The world's most complete truck lne. .1/2 ton to 96000 lbs ...
The world's most complete truck line-12-ton to 96,000 Ibs. GVW.


INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS cost least to own!



I. W. DUREN
Port St. Joe, Florida


Idea's progress with some skepti- which indicates that Florida i.firm. THE STAR, Pet t. Joe, Fla.
cism. The said, "Yes, it is going ly entrenched in the minds o'f homw
great guns but what will happen if seekers and investors. Star Cmiified Ads Bring
she has a bad Winter that cripples What about business and Indus-
her tourist business and destroys try? Secretary of State Gray points _fi_
her citrus crop? How will she re- with pride to the fact that Florida
act to a national depression?" stands in third place In the num- FIRST AP
Fair questions, but now we have ber of new corporations, second
the answer. Florida has taken just only to New York and California. Corner Third St. and Baltzell
about the worst that Mother Na- In the number of business fallurea
ture and the national economy we stand eighth, topped by N1w SUNDAY SCHOOL
could throw at her and today she York, California, iPennsylvania, WO
is entertaining more tourists than New Jersey, Ohio, Illinois and MI- MORNING WORSHI
ever before. Her citrus industry is chigan. If you are interested In the TRAINING UNION
..-..-. ...... -.. f N I 1L7% V T T T .,T 0 g1X 1r 1 DQT VTT1D


swinging back into high gear, she
is leading most of the country in
building construction, real' estate
sales, department store sales, more
attendance at her attractions and
more just about everything else
bu unemployment which is improv-
ing day by day.
While some citrus and vegetable
growers suffered severe losses the
over-all picture is better than any-
one expected. Those who still had
fruit or produce to sell realized bet-
ter prices and it leveled off to give
the state an excellent; batting aver-
age.
Many growers feel that the cold
Winter was a blessing as it served
to separate the men from the boys
as far as citrus acreage was con-
cerned and tended to keep us on
an even keel.
Developers of legitimate proper-
ties are not a bit unhappy over the
situation. They are finding that in-
terest in Florida is keener than
ever. Investments are not dominat-
ed by speculators. People are In-
vesting in permanent homes, new
businesses and are not out for the
"quick buck", which means a sta-
ble economy and steady, sound
growth.
National sales organizations of-
fering Florida properties report
steady sales to folks who plan to
make this state their permanent
home. Developments such as Apol-
lo Beach, Port Charlotte, Punta
Godra, Carol City and others all
show a sound, healthy ,growth



GOT A -'C

SUMMER COLD
TAKE
I s symptomatic

666 REUEF

NOTICE OF REGISTRATION
OF FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby given that the
undersigned, desiring to engage In
business under the fictitious name
of COASTAL REALTY COMPANY,
at 116 Monument Avenue, in the
City of Port St. Joe, Florida, in-
tends to register the said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Gulf County, Florida.
4t-7-17 WILLIAM J. RISH


liabilities of failures, Florida is at
the bottom of the list with 3.4 per
cent against a national average of
14.8. So it looks like we were hold-
ing our own, thank you,
,Manufacturing industries, ever
increasing in Florida, offer more
and more jobs in both large and
small industries. While agriculture
and tourism sluffed off as far as
employment was concerned due to
a bad Wintter, business and indus-
try took up the slack by providing
more and more jobs so we main-
tained a comfortable balance.
Florida is still the brightest spot
in the nation.
I


e
'B'

o 4%4

IPOODtJh ~


Check Your Tires Nowl


THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1958


Quick Results At Small Cost!


TIST CHURCH
Ave. C. BYRON SMITH, Pastor

9:45 A.M.
P 11:00 A.M.
6:45 p.m.
? 8:00 p.m.
(Wednesday) ...---. 8:00 p.m.


I "Come and Worship God With Us"

i Wai AdA Bring Quick Results At Small Cost! Try 'EmI


Smith's Pharmacy

PreowiptlMs eimpundoM by
a ORADUATE Pharmaelst
IJON ROERT MITH
Pawmiautleal Chemist


Designed exclusively for you!

Your prescription is ordered to suit your
health needs that is why we cannot
countwe-prescrlbe, or make any changes
Ia amount The doctor orders better
health. We supply It!


FOR VACATION and

Summer


Driving


If you need new tires
Replace them with


New Goodyear Tires

600 x 16 --- -----$10.95 peea'lst*
670 x 15-------$12.95 Recapping
710 15 -----$14.45 and all tire work
/ I 1X -------- ... l. Trueing and Balancing
All prices plus tax and recappable tireTru andBala ig


Smith Tire & Recapping Co


Take the ETHER ou oWEATHER...
Take the Wlllitout of W000H..


U sp~ 38 -


EVENINGt WUORSHIPJ-
PRAYER MEETING


Whether it's
SUMMER, WINTER,
SSPRING or FALL

enjoy the temperature
you like best with





AIR CONDITIONING

Heat waves or cold spells needn't worry you not
with an electric heat pump. For the amazing heat pump
both cools and heots and it's all automatic. Simply set
the dial and enjoy refreshing coolness during the hot sum-
mer months, plenty of warmth in wintertime.
For additional information on electric heat pumps
see your air conditioning dealer today. Take the "whether"
out of weather, and enjoy year 'round comfort in your
home ILICTRICALLY I


FLORIDA POWEF CORPORATION
V | '' %, tl Vt~tll
E BETTR,%


I


I I Ir


~por irlur TBt


st


to











Hello..!
By R. GLENN BOYLES
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, Md.
DEAR SUNSHINERS:
In the effort to find a subject or
today's column, somehow, my thot
turns to traveling. Maybe it's con-
nected with my traveling home re-
cently and back here again. No
doubt the deep desire to travel


home again tomorrow, for
keeps is also in the limelight. It
is our plan and hope to do this
about December this year. It's a
wonderfully refreshing thought.
Will you think along with me on
:his subject of traveling?
You'll agree 'traveling' is a tre-
mendous and most important activi-
ty and industry in this country and
the world. It's far
SLoo big to Cover in
1 a small column
i and we'll only try
to hit a few high
"' and low spots.
Wre might think
First of the ways,
,- means and rea-
s A sons for travel.
,B M oa the ground
in the air -. on
BOYLES'" the deep, distant
waters, even underneath the ground
for business pleasure and
sundry reasons. An endless stream
of humanity surges in and out .
and on airports, railroad sta-
tions, bus stations and highways.
A good birds eye view would prob-
ably look like millions of bees
working in a hive, or industrious
ants hauling in their food supply.
It is, indeed, a whopping business
as well as an interesting and edu-
cational adventure for all mankind.
Even the lonely foot traveler con-
tinues his weary trudge, trusting
and looking for a lucky lift towards
his destination if he has one.
All the risks and dangers in travel-
ing are submerged by the desires
and necessities to get some place
as fast as possible. In the process
it's a startling and sobering fact
to see the death toll continue to
rise and it behooves each traveler
to exercise the utmost safety pre-
cautions on all occasions. Our own
traveling has been limited to rela-
tively short distances and mostly>
in the eastern part of the U. S.
While it has always been unduly
tiresome to this writer It has also
been filled with interest and ad-
venture most of the time. We have
many pleasant memories of vaca-
tion trips and visits to our native
states (,North Carolina and Virgin-
ia), along with some thoughts of
'the difficulties involved. The best
trips were when the family quartet
was present. A foursome, at least,
is desirable in many of life's exper-
iences including pleasure and busi-
ness sometimes two's a com-
pany! Traveling alone is not always
conducive to one's pleasure even
when necessary. In a car it's a fine
advantage to have the second dri-
ver when the distance is several
hundred miles. This occurred re-
cently when the wife and I left
home on July 8 and arrived in
Maryland the evening of the 9th
with an overnite stop at Columbia,
S. C. It's peach and watermelon
time in Ga. and S. C. and my wife
was tempted at every roadside
stand and truck bargain prices
. we're still feasting on these de-
licious fruits of the sun, tree and
vine,. even peach preserves. The
cooler weather farther north added
lo the pleasure and comfort of the
journey. Now, we know that one
can get worn out, annoyed, stuck;
busted and disgusted traveling. In
fact we got stuck on the first eve-
ning meal and my (Scotch) wife
suggested w. ecould get a better-
deal by negotiating the main meal
at noon with a burger or frank
in the evening. Now, those of you
-who insist on the main evening
meal well, you'll pay the price
and take a greater risk (is our
opinion) Anyway you take it tra-
vieing has its goods and bads. May-
be one of the worst parts is just
being absent from home, friends
and seeing only strange faces from
all walks of life.
You'll note on a plane, train or
bus the tired, anxious, maybe sad
faces, while others are eager,
happy and glad. For some, travel-
ing is commonplace for others
it's a novel adventure filled with
interest and pleasure. Some are
traveling of a sad necessity and
others make their livelihood tra-
veling. Truly, it's a big business.
Some travelers may be just gett-
ing away from where they were,
looking for the proverbial pot of
gold at the end of the rainbow.
Maybe later they return to the
doorstep that was left and find
far greater satisfactions, riches and
rewards just where they had not
been seen before. maybe unaware


at the beginning of the journey I
that the best things of life are Apply for SS Cash
not to be found in the air, on the y .
highways or seas, in other places |f You're Eligible
and distant lands, but in a '
HOME where LOVE reigns su- Individuals under the Florida
preme. Don't you think it's time to State and County Employee's Re-
end this column journey? tirement System who elected so-
RGB cial security coverage last fall may
P. S. Sunshine Values and Homey need to contact their nearest so-
like service is available every day cial security office, John V. Carey,
at BOYLES your COOL, conven-.distrit manager, Panama City so'
lent, happy shopping store! cial security district office, said
--- this week. Individuals who have
reached retirement age may now
be eligible for monthly social se
curity insurance benefits and In-
BT dividuals who were already receiv-
I ng monthly benefits may b3 en-
t t'td to an increase.
^ T We know that a consl.lerable
Snam-ber of-individuals in this area
el who are employed under this re
R t'lcment system elected to coma
under Plan B, the plan whilh in-
4 \cludes both retirement system and
social security, Carey added. We
DID, $ also know that many of those who
S00,. are of retirement age and who
S. elected social security coverage
Shave not contacted the Panama


POINTERS FOR PICNICKERS


Nutritionists and' outdoor
chefs have some specific ad-
vice for picnic-goers:
Prepare sandwiches to suit
occasions and conditions under
which they will be kept and
served; to keep open-face or
unwrapped sandwiches moist,
do not cover with a damp cloth
-cover with a moisture-vapor
proof material and refrigerate;
carefully made sandwiches
may be stored for 12 to 24
'hours at temperatures under
50 degrees Fahrenheit.
Melted" butter or margarine
are absorbed by bread and are
not recommended for spread-
ing; before preparing sand-
wiches, make fillings and gar-
inishes, refrigerating them if
'necessary; wrap sandwiches
individually to prevent flavors
or fillings from mingling.
It may sound unbelievable,
;but there are recipes for ghost
burgers, sweetheart sandwich-
ies, and clown, sailboat and top
'hat sandwiches. To make your


FOOD


4th of July complete, there is
the firecracker roll sandwich.
The ingredients of this list-
as you might imagine-are far
too numerous to list.
Americans large, medium
and small-will eat one billion,
five hundred million meals
outdoors in 1958.
In their picnic pursuits, they
will consume 10% billion buns
during the current year-and
just about that many hamburg-
ers and hot dogs.
And all this is in addition to
the 40 million loaves of bread
sold each day, and to the mil-
lions of pounds of pies, cakes,
cookies, cereals and crackers.
These figures come from
E. E. Kelley, Jr., president of
the American Bakers Associa-
tion, who has a firm belief
that outdoor eating, whether
it be strictly a family affair or
one including company, helps
build family and community
relations.


STORE


AIR CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT
321 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, Fla.
PRICES GOOD JULY 24, 25 and 26

FRESH LUSCIOUS RIPE ELBERTA 83 LBS.

PEACHES 3Ibs. 25c

SUPER-RIGHT LUNCHEON 12 OZ. CAN



MEAT 37c

IONA CUT GREEN 15% Oz. Can 2 FOR


BEANS 21c

Our Own Pekoe and Orange Pekoe Black % Lb. Box


TEA 49c


SUPER-RIGHT HEAVY WESTERN LB.
BEEF CHUCK ROAST b. 45 c

PLUMROSE BRAND GENUINE DANISH (Denmark)
COOKED BONELESS CANNED 3 LB. CAN


2.99


Park Setvice Piaces Constitutionii istorio lMemorial at Hi STAR, Port St. JQ; 0a. T HURSDAY, JULY 24, 1958
Folders In Museum Port St. Joe, according to Mrs. R.
H. Brinson, Constitution Park Mu- Five of the convention partici- ida Park .Service at Tallahassee,"
The Florida Park Service has seum director. pants are portrayed in the paamph- said State Park Director Emmett
published a pamphlet on the State The lead raticle is from the pen let. They are William P. DuVal, rep- L. Hill.
of Librarian Dorothy Dodd of the resenting Calhoun County, Robert __
Florida State Library. It covers Raymond Reid of St. Augustine,
City district office. the first 'State Constitution Conven- Judge William Marvin of Key West, GO TO CHURCH SUNDAY
The social security coverage for tion, Judge Benjamin Drake Wright of _
most of these people was effective Another article in it, "St. Joe Pensacola and Col. John L. McKin- "
January 1, 1956, Carey concluded. Rises Again", is a condensation of non ofWalton County. Also picur- | HAVE MOVED
Individuals of retirement age ob- Professor James Owen Krauss' ar- ed is Peter W. Gautier, Jr., St. Jo- IHAYE MOVED
trained an insured status based on ticle on St. Joseph published many seph newspaperman who was one to the
this retroactive coverage and may years ago in the Florida Hostorical of the leading figures in getting St. COSTIN BUILDING
be due monthly benefits at thiwQuarterly. Joseph selected as the meeting 116 MONUMENT AVE.
time upon the filing of an applica- The publication carries illustra- place of the convention. Upstairs across the hal; from
tions showing the museum building "The pamphlet was edited by C. Dr. R. E. King
The social security district office at the convention site as well as H. Schaeffer of the Park Service.
for this area is at 522 Mercer Ave- views of the exhibits designed, Cepies of it may be obtained free Dr. Wesley Grace
nue, Panama City. The telephone constructed and installed by the at the State Parks and Historic OPTOMETRIST
number is POplar 3-5331. I Florida State Musuem. Memorials or by writing the Fl'or-


ALWAYS A HAPPY BELL-RINGING, BARGAIN EVENT AT BOYLES! !

88c DAYS 88c DAYS 88c DAYS 88c DAYS 88c DAYS


EIGHTY .8CD


YOU'LL EAT UP ATEY-ATE CENT OFFERINGS
THURSDAY thru MONDAY!
ALL SUMMER
DRESSES

$2.88 TO

$8.88
Never Before Such Values!
A tremendous saving on all sum-
mer dresses, including such famous
j pames as Georgianna, Peg Palmer,
Doris Dodson and others.

BOOM GOES PROFIT -- 88c DAYS!
LOVEABLE BRASSIERES 88c ea.
It costs so little to look lovable. Don't fail to see these.

BOYLES 88c DAYS BUSTS THE BARGAIN
BARREL WIDE OPEN!
ALL LADIES and CHILDREN


Swimwear


1.88 to 4.88


COME RUNNING

THURSDAY
9 A. M. SHARP!

4 BIG DAYS

Eighty 8c Days for Value
Lovers!

LADIES' SUMMER

DRESS SHOES

$4.88
Values to $10.95
Whites and combinations-dar-
ing high heels and darling little
heels. Dozens of pairs at terri-
fic 88c Days savings.

88c DAYS FEED HUNGRY
SHOPPERS!

FIRST QUALITY

NYLON HOSE

2pr. 88c

Best summer shades. They are
clear and beautiful.

NO INDIGESTION Atey
Ate 0 Days!
LADIES

SHORTS

$1.88 pr.
Values to $2.95
Stock up now for rest of sea-
son and next year. Check Boyles
big selection today

Raid BOYLES on Eighty
8c Days

CANNON 22" x 44"
Double Thread

TOWELS

2 for 88c

A big he-man towel that is tough
and thirsty. Stock up now and
save during Boyles happy 88c
Days.

Another July Explosion
Popping 88c Days at
Boyles

BOYS NEW

SPORT SHIRTS

2 for $2.88
Reg. $1.95 and $2.95
Knits, ginghams, woven stripe
chambrys. Ivy style button down
collars.


HAPPY BARGAINS -- 88c DAYS
Men's Hemstitched

White 'KERCHIEFS 10 for 88c
Full size First quality

Men's KNIT SHIRTS $1.88 ea.
With collars, with pockets, crew necks. Some just in. S. M. L.
II II IIIII I


Famous names. Styled to suit everyone. Come early, these
won't last long

NO FRILLS! NO ILLS! NO BILLS! FROM
BOYLES EIGHTY 8c DAYS!
FOR THIS SALE ONLY!
LADIES
SANDALS and

WEDGES

iFT $2.88
Values to $5.95
Hundreds of pairs of snappy
styles for comfort and lasting
good looks.

88c DAYS OK'd FOR THRILLS!
LADIES
NYLON PANTIES 88c pr.
Elastic leg and flare leg briefs. Attractively trimmed. Sizes 5 to
10 for Miss and Mrs.


LYS
EXTRA! EXTRA!
Mrs. B. has just return-
ed from the Baltimore
market Made some
real scoops, too sav-
ings are passed on to you
our friends and custom-
ers.

Here's A Baltimore
Bargain Buster
Ladies and Childrens

SPORTSWEAR
SHORTS
JAMAICAS
BLOUSES

88c Each
Stock up now for the rest of the
season and for next year.

BOYLES Marches on in
Front 88c DAYS!
Lace Trim
COTTON

SLIPS and

HALF SLIPS

88c Each
Sanforized cool shadow
panel. Beat the heat at Boyles.

88c DAYS Have 12 Cents
Less Than $ Days!
FOXCROFT 81x99

SHEETS

$1.88 ea.
Guaranteed for 100 washings.
Type 130 count. No disappoint-
ments here.

Eighty 8c Days Are
Welcome as Pay Days
Men's Heavy Twill
WORK PANTS

$2.88 pr.
Khaki or grey. Sizes 29 to 40.
Full cut and sanforized. Heavy
duty waistbands and pockets.

SHIRTS TO MATCH

$1.88
Sizes 14 to 17!4
TheI t YorslftoI8


Theat Yourself to 88c
Days Dessert
MEN'S
VAN HEUSEN

SPORT SHIRTS

2 for $4.88
The widest selection of styles,
colors, and fabrics ever shown
in Gulf County. Stock up now
at this never before price..
I I I I I I I I


BOYLES BIGGER AND BRIGHTER DAYS
THE 88c WAY!


ONE GROUP
MEN'S
SUMMER PANTS

$4.88 Pr.
A shopper stopping selection of
wash and wears, washable cords,
washable rayons and many blends.
ivy leagues, regulars. Sizes 27 to
44.


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/I E CONSTANTLY strive to'
make our Rexall Phar-
macy a better health center for
this community. While we feel
our services are of the highest
quality, we continue to search
r ways to improve them.
Besides the hundreds of drugs
and medicines we carry, you'll
,find a complete line of sickroom
supplies. Look for gauze band-
ages, hot-water bottles, fever
thermometers, adhesive tape and
dozens of other items to make
convalescence more comfortable.




Buzzets Drug Store
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


Political Announcements
(Paid Political Advertising)


I wish to announce my candi-
dacy for re-election as County
Commissioner from District No.


if re-elected, I promise to 66n-
tinue to serve all of Gulf County
honestly and to the very best of
my ability.
I will appreciate your vote and
support.
E. C. HARDEN, SR,


FRIENDS OF GULF COUNTY:
I am announcing my candidacy.
. for County Commissioner for
District No. 4. I have lived in
Port St. Joe and Gulf County for
20 years. I pledge to work for
the best interest of all the peo-
ple in Gulf County, and will sin-
cerely appreciate your vote and
support.
COLEMAN W. THARPE


VOTE TO KEEP
BENJAMIN H. DICKENS
County Prosecuting Attorneky
Subject to Democratic Primary
September 9
CAPABLE IMPARTIAL
EXPERIENCED COURTEOUS
Should the people honor me by
returning me to this office, I
pledge that I will be a servant
Of the public. I will always up'oul
the high public trust reposed in,
the office of County Prosecuting
Attorney.


For Small Claims Judge
I am seeking re-election to


LIMIT 2 OF EACH TO A CUSTOMER

GIANT 20 QT. WASTE BASKET


my first full term as Judge of
the Small Claims Court of
Gulf County.
During my past two years
in this capacity we have ren-
dered the people of Gulf Co.,
every service possible. We
offer our candidacy on our
past record.
B. B. CONKLIN


For School Board Member
I am seeking re-election to
my current position of School
Board member from District
One.
I have become familiar with
the workings of our school
system and pledge myself to
the best school system it is
possible for Gulf County to
have.
CLYDE BROGDON


For School Board Member
I offer myself for election
for the first time-- to the po-
sition of School Board mem-
-ber in District One.
If elected I pledge myself
to the betterment of the stan-
dards and efficiency of the
Gulf County school system.
WILLIAM ROEMER




CLASSIFIED ADS

LAWNS MOWED. Call Jimmy Wil-
der. Phone 94903.


FOR RENT: 2 bedroom house, cor-
ner 10th and Long. Call Mrs. No-
ra Duren. Phone 7-5471. 2tc
LAWNS MOWED ODD JOBS
Contact Leo Punt at Phone, 7-3541.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom, two
story house with garage on Long
Ave., corner 16th St. $60.00 per
month. J. A. Mira, Phone 9-1301.
FOR RENT: 'Unfurnished 2 bed-
room apartment. 617 Woodward
Ave. Call Gene Holley, Phone Tal-
-lahassee 3-2625. 2tp
FOR RENT: One and two bedroom
attractively furnished apartments
Cool in summer, warm in winter.
Gas heat, window fans. They have
to be seen to be appreciated. ALSO
NICE TRAILER PARKING SPACE
Phone 7-8820 or 9-9133, Wimico
Lodge Apartments and Trailer
Park, White City. tfc-7-17
FOR ,RENT: Unfurnished apart-
ment. 706 Woodward Ave. Phone
BAll 7-3941 for information. 2tc
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment.
-Newly redecoratde. Also house
trailer. Mrs. Paul Farmer. Oak
,Grove. Phone 7-2565. tfc-7-23
FOR RENT: See Mrs. Shirey for
apartments and houses, furnished
and unfurnished. Phone 7-8058. tfc
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom unfurnish-
ed apartment. Newly redecorated.
$35 per month. Close in. Inqaii-e at
1904 Garrison or call 7-8642. tfc-5-29
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom furnished
apartment. Close in. Inquirs at
1904 Garrison or call 7-8642. tfc-5-29
FOR RENT: 4 room house on 4th-
street. Phone 7-5421, Mrs. B.. H.
Dickens, Sr. tfa-4-3
FOR RENT: Furnished cottages
and apartments. See Otto Ander-
son. tfc-3-27
BEAUTIFY YOUR HOME with
beautiful ceramic tile. Repair
work our specialty. Can be finanz-
ed. J. B. HICKS, Tile .and Marble
Co., iPhone 7-7995. tfc-6-5
FOR RENT: House, corner of Long
and First St. Frank and Dot's
Agency. 6tp-7-10
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom.house, un-
furnished. See at 217 9th St. Also
furnished apartment. See at 216
9th Street. Call 7-7246. 2tc


FOR RENT: 3 Bedroom House at
White City. Electric hot water
heater and electric range furnished.
See E. J. Rich at White City. tfc
FOR SALE: Choice lots in Jones-
ville Subdivision. Just'three miles
south of town off U. S. 98. Lots 50'
X 150' going for only 300 each. Very
reasonable terms offered. See Roy
E. Cox at Smith Tire and Recap.
Co., Port St. Joe. 6tp-7-10
FOR SALE: 1951 Dodge panel
truck. See Gus Creech. tfc-6-19
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom house also
apartment building on back of
lot with 2 bedroom unfurnished ap-
artment upstairs and 2 bedorom
furnished apartment downstairs.
$150.00 monthly income. Contact
Rev. A. G. McKeithen, 1207 Lisenby
Ave., Panama City. Phone POplar
3-2440. tfc-6-19
BEACH LOTS FOR SALE: $25.00
down. $10.00 per month. R. L.
Fortner, Mexico 1Beach. tfc-7-1 7
BUILD-REPAIR-REMODEL
36 Months To Pay
See BARRIER BUILDERS
LAWN MOWER FOR RENT: $1.00
hour. Cut your lawn and let me
worry with upkeep of mower. Gulf
Service Station, Aubrey R. Tomlin-
son, Phone 7-7501.
F YOU ARE INTERESTED in sav-
ing money see us for anything
vou need In your home. STOP and
SWAP SHOP.
UPHOLSTERY WORK: Does your
furniture lo-k old? Bring it to


Butler's Trim Shop, corner secondd
and Reid for expert rebuilding.
NEW CAR OWNERS: Protect that
bright new upholstery with tailor
made seat covers. Many fabrics to
choose from. Butler's Trim Shop,
Corner Second and Reid.
FOR FAST, EFFICIENT PLUMB-
ING SERVICE. Call Bill's Plumb-
ing. Phone 7-7846 or 7-8161. tfc
SEPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call
Buford Griffin, Phone 7-7011 for
quick expert service. tic-6-2
etADE US that useless article for
Something useful. STOP and
'WAP.
Keys Made While You Wait
359 EACH
BICYCLE PARTS
WESTERN AUTO
HUNTING & FISHING LICENSES
BOATS and TRAILERS
Reel Parts and Repairs
WILLIS V. ROWAN POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION. Meet-
ing first and third Monday nights
00O p.m., American Legion Home
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0.
0. F.-Meets first and third
Friday, 7:30 p.m. in Masonic
Hail. All members urged to attend;
visiting brethren Invited..
C. W. LONG, N. G.1
J. C. PRICE, Secty.
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F&AM every first and
third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.


ROBERT W. SMITH, W.M.
ROY L. BUROH, Secty.
Ail Master Masons cordially invited
LOYAL ORDER OF MOOSE
Meetings at Moose Hall, 310
Fourth St.. meeting night every other
Monday.
R. A. M.-Regular convocation or
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
M., 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit-
ing brothers welcome. R. W. Smith,
High Priest. H. R. Maige, Secretary.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA.
In Chancery.
Hazel Whitten, Plaintiff,
Vs.
Richard Whitten, Defendant
DIVORCE
NOTICE TO: Richard Whitten
whose place of residence is Route
2, Longview, Texas.
On or before the 28th day of July,
A.D., 1958 the defendant, Richard
Whitten is required to serve upon
Hon. Cecil G. Costin, Jr., Plaintiff's
Attorney, whose address is 221 Reid
Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida, a
copy of and file with the Clerk of
said Court, the original of an an-
swer to the Bill of Complaint filed
against him herein.
Witness my hand and official
seal of said Court at Wewahitchka,
Gulf County, Florida, this 23rd day
of June, A. D., 1958,
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
GEORGE Y. CORE 4t
Clerk Circuit Court 6-26

FOR SALE
1 House and 1 vacant lot at
Mexico Beach.
House on McClellan ,Ave.,
2 bedroom.
FOR SALE: House at 522 9th
St. Priced to sell.
SEVERAL NICE HOMES for
sale in different parts of Port
St. Joe. We help you arrange
financing. If you are inte:es&t-
ed in owning your o'wn home,
please contact us.

E. TOM PRIDGEON
Reg. Real Estate Broker
Phone 7-7741




C. P. ETHEREDGE
Licensed
PLUMBING and
ELECTRICAL WORK
Phone 7-2564
605 Maddox Street

LISTEN TO

The Baptist Hour
EACH SUNDAY 4:00 P.M.
Over Radio Station

W JOE
1570 On Your Dial


Chamber Welcomes
(Continued From Page 1)

plant. He said that the magnesium
oxide that the plant produces from
sea water is a good seller. He re-
ported that his firm had always
been able to sell all they could pro-
duce in their other plant in St.
Louis, Michigan, with a guarantee
that they could sell more if it was
available. He told the Chamber
that MCC had examined the coast
from Port St. Joe to Texas and
found Port St. Joe to be best suit-
ed to their needs.
DeMaestre had nothing but
high praises for the friendly at-
mosphere that he and his people
had encountered in Port St. Joe.
"This definitely had a deciding
power in our decision to build in
Port St. Joe. We like to do busi-
ness where we are wanted. And
we feel that we are wanted here."
DeMaestre said that the new
plant will employ about 60 people
when it first goes into operation
and about 90 to 100 when it is ex-
panded in another two years.
"Most of the labor will be local
people trained by .the company with
about a half dozen key trainee men
brought in from other area-, said
DeMaestre.
The Chamber wined and dined
representatives of the two manu-
facturing concerns on mullet, cole
slaw, pickles, bread and coffee.


Ed Smith Reports On

Key Club Meet

Ed Smith, Key Club President at
the Port St. Joe High School gave
tha Kiwanis Club a report on the
Key Club National Convention held
in Chicago recently. The local club
had sent Smith to the week long
convention.
Smith gave the club an insight
on the enormity of the convention
by saying that it would be impos-
sible for anyone to attend all the
meetings. Smith said that the Con-
vention was well attended by all
sections of the U. S. and was very
informative in the work of Key
Club activities.
The convention started at 10:00
a.m., Monday, July 7 and lasted un-
til Friday. He gave descriptive ac-
counts of the trip to Chicago and
back and also told of some of the
sights the boys" had seen in the
"Windy City".
Smith staid that on the Key Club-
bers last night at the convention,
members of the convention staged
a talent show. He said that actress
Kim Novak was on hand to kiss
the winners and "broke up the
show".
'Visitors at the club meeting
Tuesday: Bill Cowden of Port St.
Joe; Fritz Varm of Chatom, Ala.;
Bill Depford, Leland Frye, Albert
Logan, Sam Pittick and Otis Pad-
gett, all of Marianna.
-- -

Classified Ads
Midget Investments With
Giant Returns

THE STAR
PHONE 7-3161





WALL ELECTRIC

COMPANY,

FOR EXPERT

Electrical Repairs
and

Contracting
( DIAL BA 7-4331


C SEE THEM AT


BUZZETT'S-


SDRUG STORE.


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fid.


Rotary Told of

Need For Port


The Port St. Joe Rotary Club
heard from a well-informed out-
sider what has been talked about
here for the past 25 years-that
the greater part of Port St. Joe's
future lies in the development of
her fine natural harbor for ship-
ping facilities.
E. J. Willis, of Bainbridge, Ga.,
pleaded with the Rotary Club and
Port St. Joe to develop its harbor
for the handling of foreign shipping
and for a transfer point for river
traffic in freight. "We have the fa-
cilities to handle the river traffic
and the customers wanting to ship"
Willis said. "All we need is a deep
water sea port to take in foreign
and long distance freight for the
transferring to river vehicles." This
is what Willis wants Port St. Joe
to do-develop its port for wate.-
freight and act as a terminal for
river and sea traffic to and from
Bainbridge, Ga., and other inland
ports due to be constructed on the
Three River's System.
Willis said that our port and
deep water were our "ace in the
hole" to''future greatness. "Peopile
beginning to realize that there is
a definite need for cheap vater
transportation, and the swing to
this method of drayage is greater
every day". Willis said that water
traffic carries big loads cheaply
and therefore is in.demand. He stat-
ed that competition is keen for wa-
ter transport and getting keener
and the best route will get the
trade. Willis said that the Bain-
bridge, even though not in full op-
eration, had already more than
doubled the tonnage it was expect-
ed the port would handle.
Guests of the club were B. R.
Hawks, Brewton, Ala.; Hub Robin-
son, Evergreen, Al'a.; B. S. Gordon,
Panama City; Marty Begley, Rich-
ard Porter and Harry Saunders of
Port St. Joe.
---- -- -


JOB PRINTING

THE STAR
PHONE 7-3161


WEDDINGS
Our Hallmark Cards to
congratulatee the bride and
groom say "you care /
enough to send the very/
best." We also have
special cards for
engaged couples.


THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1658


Firemen Coached
(Continued From Page 1)

consequence could occur. The chief
advised local fire fighters to park
their equipment in front of burn-
ing crashed aircraft to prevent any
rocket or missile being fired into
a residential area. "The equipment
will catch the missile and explode
it", said the chief.
Attending the course from Port
St. Joe were assistant chief R. H.
Ellzey and firemen Jenks St. Clair,
Goulden Scott and David Shirah.
----- ---

Pete's Pork Roast Is

Barbecued By Accident

The Port St. Joe Volunteer Fire
Department was called out of bed
Sunday by the threat of a fire at
the Pete Comforter home on the
corner of-Sixth and Long.
A roast had caught fire in the
Comforter oven and was blazing up
briskly. The fire had died down
when the firemen arrived, and the.
only damage was from smoke.


Want Ads Get Resukls



ELECT

Silas R. Stone

County
Prosecuting Attorney

Democratic Primary, Sept. 9


Do You Want Your Car

FIXED RIGHT
by a man with the know how?
Seven years on the assembly
line in Detroit, Mich. All
makes from Model T to 1958.
See J. B. Akens

Forehand's Garage
Highland View, Fla.


FOR SALE


3 3-BEDROOM HOUSES
Located on Garrison Avenue -- Masonry construction
Spacious landscaped lots, FHA financing available


ONE BUILDING LOT
On Garrison Avenue


ONE BUILDING LOT
On Tenth Street



ONE BUILDING LOT
At St. Joe Beach


ONE BUILDING LOT
On Fourth Street


WYNOKO

DEVELOPMENT COMPANY


JOE CHRISTIAN


Phone 7-4616


YOU'RE INVITED TO SEE

OUR NEW COLLECTION OF

FOR EVERY OCCASION .


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