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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01144
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 24, 1957
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01144

Full Text







THE


STAR


"Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Valley"

VOLUME XXI THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1957 PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 9lb&gCb sp NUMBER 4


TO PA


7-


PTA Carnival Is


Set For Saturday


Saturday is the day for the an-
nual PTA Hallowe'en Carnival, to
be held in the City Park at the foot
of Fifth Street.
The Carnival will begin, as usual
with a big parade. The parade will
form in front of the Apalachicola
Northern Railroad depot on the
north end of Reid Avenue. It will
begin organizing for its march at
3:00 p.m. Herman Dean, bandmas-
ter, is in charge of the parade. He
requests that everyone entering
the parade be prompt so that the
line may be shaped up and the
plan of march explained. The par-
ade will leave the depot -at 3:30
p.m., go south on Reid Avenue, to
Fifth Street, turn right to the City
Park.
Upon arriving at the City Park,
all who participated in the parade
are requested to stay in line .for
a while so that costumes might be
judged. Prizes will be given for the
Most Original, Prettiest, and Best
Hallowe'en costumes. After the
award of prizes, the carnival wia
be officially opened.
There will be many items of fun
and good things to. eat for those
in attendance. There will be cake
sales, hamburger sales, hotdogs,
candy, drinks, dart' games, fortune
telling, cake walk, and many other
items of enjoyment and good things
to eat.
The PTA especially invites every-
one to attend this annual fund rais-
ing event of the PTA to carry on
their work with the schools.


Junior High Team Will
Play Blountstown Tuesday

The Junior High football team
will play host to the Blountstown
te4m Tuesday night on the baby
Sharks home field.
The Junior High team will play
the Calhoun County aggregation
here Tuesday, October 29 at 7:30
p.m.

Send The Star to a trienaa.


Plans Underway For

Fall Flower Show

Plans are underway for the first
Fall Flower Show to be held by
the Port St. Joe Garden Clue. IJ.
the past, flower arrangements have
teen displayed at the Gulf County
Fair in Septmeber, but until now
the club has never undertaken a
ftll11-fledged flower show at t ns
time of the year.
An excellent and timely theme
entitled, "We Are Thankful", has
been chosen for the show The
theme itself brings to mind much
of the plant material available dur.
ing this season of the year such as:
fruits, vegetables, fall flowers, fo
liage, berries, dried pods, driftwood
eto,
The flower show schedule will ap-
pear in The Star next week and
will include many classifications
which should appeal to the amna-
teur flower arranger as well as the
more experienced. A little imagina-
tion combined with plant materials,
fruits and vegetables now available
should produce excellent results
even for the novice.
The Garden Club invites every-
one who enjoys the simple beauties
of mother nature to participate in
this show by entering arrangements
and horticultural specimens. Watch
The Star next week for further de-
tails.

Brother of Mrs. Chason
Killed While Cleaning Gun

Mrs. A. S. Chason returned home
Friday, October 18 after attending
the funeral of her brother Robert
A. Brown of Sarasota. Brown was
accidentally killed by a tagret pis-
tol, which was discharged as he
was cleaning it.
Brown is survived by his wife,
Mrs. Blonza Revell Brown; two
daughters, Betty of Sarasota and
Mrs. Paul Wright of Jacksonville
and two sons, Frank of Fairbanks.
Alaska and Wayne,


'Trick Or Treat'

To Help Children

On UNICEF Aid

In recent years Hallowe'en has
been marked by increasing rowdy-
ism, vandalism and generalized
mischief in some parts of the na-
toin. In thousands of communities
the police forces take on extra
men in an effort to curb the com-
munity harassment. But since 1952.
when a group of Pennsylva iia Suii
day-school children gave their
"trick or treat" pennies to UNI
CEF, things have been looking up.
Last year, dressed in the tradi-
tional spooky costumes, a million
and a half youngsters in 7500 com-
munities in the 48 states, as well
as Alaska, Puerto Rico and Hawaii,
went forth on Hallowe'en eve, boi t
not on mischief but on collsatiug
pennies for the UNICEF "trick or
treat" program. The money was
used to buy milk and medicine for
sick and hungry children in other
parts of the world.
"Trick or treat" was organized
by the United States Committee
for UNIOEF with headquarters at
the United Nations in New York
City. In 1952, 484 communities in
30 states co-operated in the "trick
or treat" program and collected
$32,000 for the fund. Last year the
children turned in $750,000.
This year, children will be col-
lecting pennies for UNiCEF in
Port St. Joe on Hallowe'en night.
The local program is under the
direction of Mrs. Gus Creech.
All children are urged to take
part in this program. After their
season of collections and "spook-
ing" about the children are to turn
the money they collect in to their
respective churches that night. Up-
on arrival at the churches, light
refreshments will be provided for
the children. A collection station
will also be provided uptown with
the civic clubs of Port St. Joe fur-
nishing the refreshments and en-
tertainment in this station.
Each dollar collected will be
matched by 75c from other coun-
tries and with $3.00 by the country
receiving the aid, so that in reality
each $1.00 given means $4.75 in aid
for the world's underpriviledged
I children.


EDWARD SMili H comes in to tackle a Bay High ball carrier head-on in last Thursday's game.
Coming up behind are end Billy Denton (40) and end David Musselwhite (39). The Bay
High runner was "smeared" after this picture was taken. (Star photo)

Sharks Take Easy 21-0 Victory Over Bay High 'B' Team

Thursday Night for Clean Sweep of 10-Year Series
The St. Joe Sharks made it 10 High punt attempt on the oppo- race. The game will probably be
straight against Bay High "B" as nets 36. On the first play halfbacrated atoss-up with a slight edge
they stormed past the fighting but Frank Pletcher broke loose for a the hometown Chpley The two
out-manned team from Panama City beautiful 3'6 yard TD sprint. The .to the hometown Chipey. The two
,teams only mutual opponent was
last Thursday night. Sharks last TD came in the final Marianna. The Sharks won th
The Sharks found it a little rough quarter on a 40 yard drive that 7-0 and Chipley drew a 122 tie
going after scoring early in the ended on Bay High's two where over the Bulldogs.
first quarter. The Sharks took the Taylor again bulled over to score
opening kick-off and drove down Taylor added the point for a final .St. Joe Bay Hi
to the one yard line where full- 21-0 count. First Downs ----....-- 13 5
beck Wayne Taylor pushed over to The Sharks travel to Chipley to- Yds. Rushing --..............195 39
score. Taylor's kick was good arid morrow night for the big showdown. Yds. Passing -----......... 77 50
the Sharks led 7-0. Bay High tight- Much speculation and drugstore Total Yds. .-------......272 89
ened up their defense and the Iquarterbacking has resulted over Pass Attempt -----...- 1,6 8
Sharks were unable to score again this game. A win over Chiplay Pass Comp .....----..------.. 7 5
until the third quarter. Shark tackle would make St. Joe's stock mighty Fumbles 1 0
Larry Mansfield blocked a Bay high in the mixed up conference Yds. Penalized .-- 15 35


CITY


PROCLAMATION
WHEREAS, October 31, Hallo-
we'en, is the day when young
bright-eyed spirits in our toAvn
roam abroad seeking to Trick nr
Treat, and these spirits suffer
either from poverty, nor disease,
nor hunger, and
WHEREAS Trick or Treat for
UNICEF began as an unselfish
attempt of American children to
help their underprivileged bro-
thers abroad by sending, their
treats of small coins to UNICEF
for "all the world's children";
and
WHEREAS, UNICEF, the Uni-
ted Nations Children's Fund, is
being helped by American chil-
dren to aid 45 million children
and mothers in 95 countries and
territories by sending UNICEF
milk, vitamins, and medicines,
and is overcoming ignorance and
superstition with sound mother
and child care.
NOW THEREFORE, I, J. L.
Sharit, Mayor of the City of Port
St. Joe, Florida, do hereby pro-
claim October 31st as UNICEF
Day, and urge every citizen of
Port St. Joe to cooperate with
properly identified U N ICE F
Trick or Treaters so that these
children may be helped to help
others, in witness whereof I have
set my hand and seal of the City
of 'Port St. Joe, to be affixed this
22nd day of October, nineteen
hundred and fifty seven.
J. L. SHARIT, Mayor
City of ort St. Joe, Fla.
--------- .----- -

Rod and Gun Club
In Business Meeting

The Gulf County Rod and Gun
Club held its regular quarterly
meeting Saturday, October 12, at
the Wewahitchka High School Cafe-
teria. An excellent meal was served
under the direction of Judge S. P.
Husband after which an interesting
program was presented by various
members of the Florida Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission. Jim
Floyd, I and E officer of the Game
Commission, was in charge of the
program, who in' turn introduced
James Bickerstaff, Northwest Flor-
ida Regional Manager, E. T. "Red"
Heiner, Chief of the Fish Manage-
ment Division and Jerry Banks, Re-
gional Representative of the Fish
Management Division. The program
presented was largely on conserva-
tion and game laws with particular
reference to fresh water fishing.
Movies were shown of fishing in
Florida and also fishing on Lake
Talquin in Leon County. Mr. Bick-
erstaff reported that plans have
been made and were now in process
for making films on fishing in. the
Dead Lakes-Chattahoochee River
area to be used to advertise this
area to people outside the state.
Mr. Bickerstaff also reported that
several members of the Gulf County
Rod and Gun Club had asked about
establishing a dove management
area in Gulf County with particu-
lar reference to the Cape San Blas
area. He reported that since dove


was classified as a migratory bird,
and came under the U. S. Fish and 1
Wildlife Service that the Federal
Government would have to be con-
tacted first for their cooperation, i


New members accepted at this
meeting were L. S. Bissett, Jr.;
Mitchell Pitts, J. B. Harris and Dr.
H. B. Canning.
W. K. Settlemire reported that
progress on obtaining an easement
across the Lister property for a
road to the club property had bog-
ged down at present and that much
further work would be necessary
before this could be obtained. He


reported that if negotiations for g
the easement failed, that there was !.


a possibility that other property
would be made available that could
be swapped for the present club
property. President Hinote appoint.
ed A. L. Hargraves, Everett Mc-
Farland, Ross Stripling, S. P. Hus-
band, W. K. Settlemire and T. D.
Hutchins as a committee to con-
clude negotiations for an easement
if possible or to make a land trade
for suitable club property.
President Hinote also announced
that the Annual Ladies Night would
be held on November 9 at the Cen-
tennial Building at Port St. Joe
at 8:00 p.m.


s

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f


STREETS


City Approaches County With


Plans For Road Fund Bond Issue

In a meeting that will probably mean more to the securing of roads for the cities in Gulf
County and the County as a whole since the creation of the secondary road program, Mayor J. L.
Sharit and the Port St. Joe City Commission presented a proposal to the Gulf County Board of
Commissioners Tuesday night to pave all roads in the County in one operation.
Sharit, acting as spokesman for the local Commission, whereby the County can pave all
existing roads in Port St. Joe, Wewahitchka, Highland View, Oak Grove, White City and other
populated areas in the county; construct the tumbler dam across the Dead Lakes in the immediate
future, and save money all at the same time -- all at no cost to the county tax payer.
The local City Commission had
SIbeen working on this idea for two
Rotary Fellows ip or three months. The purpose was
'.j to determine just what the limita-
Open In Area ions of the county Commission
were in regards to their secondary
A year of study abroad as a Ro- road money allotted by the state.
tary Foundation Fellow is the ex- At the meeting, which was held
citing possibility for some student at Coy Brogdon's Cafe north of We-
Sfrom Port St Joe, Jimmy Greer, wahitchka, the Port St. Joe Com.
President of the Rotary Club of Commission with Mayor J. L. Shar-
SPort St. Joe, announced this week. it acting as spokesman for the lo-
Applications are now being acept- cal group. An Invitation had been
e / d by the Rotary Club for the Fel- extended to Wewahitchka mayor H.
lowship, which includes all trans- B. Canning, but he was out of town.
ortation, education and living ex- Sharit, in behalf of the City Com-
penses for the 1958-59 academic mission, suggested that the County
year. float a bond issue against the sec-
Qualifications for the Fellowshio cndary road fund money to get im-
Applications "or the Rotary Fel- mediate funds to:
'' lowship may be made only through 1. Get every street on the plat of
the Rotary Club in the city where the City of Port St. Joe paved ac-
$ the student has his permanent resi- c.crding to the City's wishes. Got i
dence. In Port St. Joe, application road paved to the Port St. Joe cot-
BOBBY STEBEL NOW should be made to Jimm1 Greer, orAd cemetery and build an acc eas
STATIONED IN ENGLAND Rotary Club president, road between Highway 71 and Ken-
A-C Robert L. Stebe, son of Candidates must be between 20 ney's Mill, passing alongside a pro-
Mrs. Ella Stebe te s of White City has and 29 years of age. They must posed site in which contemplated
s t White City A have a college or university degree additional Industry will be located
finished his training at Scott Air (or they must now be in their sen- in the not too distant future.
Force Base, Ill and sailed tor Eng- r year), a recoreof high scholas. 2. Pate and amplete all atreefs
land Tuesday where he will stay tic standing, and a thorough know- in the City of Wewahtitchka to their
for a tourledge of the language of th coun-. satisfaction.
force tebel address is try in which they propose to study. 3. That $175,000.00 of the bond is-

A20 Ro bert L. Stabes, 1428786 They must have the ability to sue be used for the purpose of a
199th- Robert Stebel, 14628786 make friends easily, be vital!l in- local interest share of the neces-
APOth A 1A Sqdn. terested in world affairs, and pos- sary amount for the construction of
w York, N. Ysess an instinct for leadership, a dam at the end of the Dead Lakes,
SRotary Fellowships are granted for which Wewahitchka has worked
without regard to race, creed or ci- so hard. (At present the County has
Florida Forest Service tizenship. levied a one mill tax to make up
Will Plow Fire Lines Competition within Rotary District the local funds, which this $175,000
The applicant selected by the would replace).
The Florida Forest Service is Rotary Club of Port St. Joe will 4. Pave and complete those roads
ready to begin fire line plowing for compete for the Rotary Fellowship or streets necessary at Oak Grove,
those who wish them. Rates for with applicants selected by the Highland View, White City .and
the lines will be the same as last other 35 Rotary Clubs in this Dis- other heavily populated areas in
year, according to County Ranger trict, which is comprised of North the county.
H. A. -Hardy. Florida, east and west. Deadline Sharit recommended that the
County Ranger Hardy urges all for the receipt of applications for bond issue be for $1,000,000.00 to
landowners to get their request in the 1958-59 academic year by the be repaid over a 15 year period at
so that a plowing schedule can be local Rotary Club is November 15. a nominal interest rate. He pointed
made to prevent unnecessary haul- -- out that the bonds could be handled
Ing of the equipment. Place your Visitors From Cocoa by the Florida Development Corn-
request with the Ranger in your Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Bunting of mission at a cost of one percent
area or write your request in to Cocoa will spend the week end (compared to approximately 15 per
the County Office, Florida Forest here visiting friends. They are for cent if handled by the oity or coun-
Service, P. 0. Box 674, Port St. Joe. mer residents of Port St. Joe. ty).
Sharit pointed out that this plan
T | would enable the people of Gulf
Sharks Travel To Chipley Friday To County to have the streets and
roads now to enjoy, rather than
Go Against Slightly Favored Tigers stretch their construction out over
a 10 to 20 year period as is now
being done.
The St. Joe Sharks will travel to the first team using Chipley plays. It was also pointed out at the
Chipley Friday night to play their All members of the team wera meeting that with the present In-
third Northwest Florida Conference present on the practice field for come to the County from secondary
game of the season. This is an im- the first time since the opener, road funds, financing this project
portant game for the Sharks. It Sonny Chafin and Ross Hudson are would only use up about one third
will' determine whether they remain still not at full strength, however. of the funds coming to the County
contenders for the conference Barring practice injuries, the team in this source of revenue, from the
championship or drop into the will be at full strength for this im. State. The money will not come out
"also ran" category, portant game. of local revenue. Sharit stressed the
The position the Sharks now hold The local coaching staff and fact that the County would still
is the most advantageous one ever Dave Nicholson scouted Chipley in have two thirds of their secondary
held by a Port St. Joe team re- their game with Florida High last funds each year to construct any
guarding the possibility of winning Friday night. They were impressed pieces of road that might come up
or sharing a conference crown. All with the size and speed of the Ti- in the future.
the teams in the conference have gers. They are a tough team to de- The County Board listened with
been beaten or tied with the ex- fense as they can run and pass favor to Sharit's plan and appeared
caption of Quincy. They have a 1-0 with success. eager to cooperate in such a pro-
conference record. The 'Sharks Quarterback Charles Peterson, an ject. It was brought out that th.3
could strengthen their position all conference player, is the key present method of constructing
greatly with a win over Chipley. performer in their attack. Jimmy small portions of road each year
The Sharks record in the confer- Parker, 180 pound fullback, a: d was far more costly than building
once is 1-1. swift halfbacks, Tommy McDonald a'l the roads at one time would bs
The Sharks are aware of the pos- and Donald Kent give the Tigers thereby creating more than enoash
dibilities mentioned above and are speed and power in the backfield. savings over the period of time to
preparing to give the Tigers a "don- Their line is led by co-captain more than offset Interest charges.
nybrook" type game to determine David Sellers at center, Ronnie City attorney Cecil G. Costin, Jr,
who remains in contention for the Bowers, 194 pound tackle and was instructed to set up a meeting
lag. The rougest practice sessions Charles Peel', a talented end. with the State Road Board in Tal-


of the season have been held as
extended practice sessions were or-
dered.
The blocking and tackling of the
first unit was vicious in an offen-
sive and defensive scrimmage held
Tuesday. The "Blue Shirts" caught
the spirit of the practice (in self-
defense) and moved the ball against


This will be Chipley's Homecom-. lahassee early next month for the
ing game and the spirit is high in !presentation of the plan to them
the Tiger camp. The stage is set for approval.
for a fine football game before a Mayor Sharit told The Star that
capacity crowd, if everything works as it should,
The game will start at 8:30 p.m., with no problems arising, the mat-
EST. ter of securing the money for the
No starting lineup will be named project should be completed in four
for the Sharks until game time. Ito six months.


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Woman 's Page
To Report News -- Dial BAll 7-3161


WSCS Finishes Study In closing, verses of scripture
WSCS Finishes Study taken from Octs, Collossians, First
Of Mission Book Corinthians and Romans pertaining
to a universal brotherhood.
There was a moment of silent
The final chapter of the study, prayer concluded by Mrs. Howell.
"Kingdom Beyond Caste", was pre- prayer concluded by Mrs. Howell.
IA Litany and prayer was given in
sented to the Woman's Society of unison by the members.
Christian Service Monday afternoon Mrs. G. S. Croxton, president,
October 21 in the Methodist ChI'ca nnouncedthere would be a pro-
sanctuary, gram on Week of Prayer and Self
The program was opened with Denial at the church Friday, Oc. 25.
the singing of the hymn, "My Coun- Circles will meet as follows Mon-
try Tis of Thee" and the pled.ea of day, October 28:
allegiance to the flag. Circle 1, Mrs. B. E. Rawls
Mrs. Nancy Howell gave the in- Circle. 2, Mrs. Paul Blount.
troductory, "The Most Segregated Circle 3, Mrs. Gannon Buzzett.
Major Institution". Mrs. Bradley Circle 4, Mrs. Bert Hampton.
and Mrs. Janet King .gave the finil
chapters. in Days to advertsmE-Try It!


FOOD


STORE


321 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, Fla.
AIR CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT
SUPER-RIGHT Corn Fed Fresh Small
HALF or WHOLE LB


49c


SUPER-RIGHT Sugar Cured Fancy Slab Breakfast LB.


39c


BACON

EASTERN WHITE


POTATOES


3c


A & P Our Fin'est Quality Frozen -- 10 Oz. Boxes
STRAWBERRIES 2 for 35c


SUPER-RIGHT Canned
ROAST BEEF

ANN PAGE BLENDED


SYRUP


12 oz. can 33c


24 Oz.


43c


Vickie Fowler Honored First Baptist Circle
On Sixth Birthday One Meets Monday


Circle Four of the First Baptist
Church met Monday, October 21 at
the home of Mrs. C. G. Costin on
Monument Ave. Mrs. W. 0. Nichols
chairman, called the meeting to or-
der. The devotion was given by
Mrs. W. J. Herring. Mrs. Costin
lead in prayer. Program on "Books
We Need To Know About" was pre-
sented by Mrs. W. J. Herring, Mrs.
W. 0. Nichols and Mrs. Charles
Gill.
After a short business session,
the meeting was dismissed with
prayer by Mrs. Nichols. The host-
ess served delicious refreshments
to the following members: Mrs. W.
0. Nichols, Mrs. P. W. Petty, M.s
Chatles Gill and Mrs. W. I. Her-
ring.
Arriving iFor Visit
Mrs. W. E. Boyer of Beebe, Ark.,
Mrs. H. H. Tillman of Atlanta, Ga.,
and Miss Gertrude Boyer of Indian-
apolis, Ind., will arrive this week
end for a two weeks visit with
the Ed Ramseys and the C. E.
Boyers.
GO TO CHURCH SUNDAY
pa ---o--- v'ruh-------


1 I


Little Vickie Fowler celebrated
her sixth birthday with a party at
her home on McClellan Avenue.
Those enjoying games and re-
freshments were: Charlotte Mar-
shall. Charlotte Maddox, David and
Donnie Maddox, Jan and Ruth
Fleming, Brenda Paffe, Graye Wes-
ton, Nancy Bowden, Donnie Jordan.
Phlyyis Thomasson, Jeanine Britt,
Becky Hamm, Dale Jackson, Sally
Porter, Marsha Player, Jimmy
WVoods, Kayanna and Susan Bate-
man.
Invited but unable to attend were
Joe McLeod, Donna Parker and
Richard Baxley.
--------------
Hints Given On
Fall Gardening
The season for autumn planting
necessitates preparing beds now.
Ground should be cleared, soil pul-
verized, dug to a depth of approxi-
mately a foot and fertilizer added.
Now, too, is the time for setting
in hardy bulbs such as tulips, daf-
fodils, hyacinths, crocus and snow-
drops. These Dutch bulbs are among
the easiest garden flowers to grow
and praitically certain to bloom.
The following shows the depth
to plant and expected height of
flower:
Depth Ht.
Crocus -------------1" 5"
Grape Hyacinth -- 5" 5"
Narcissus --....--- 5" 15"
Daffodils ........ --------5" 17"
Jonquils ----------5" 16"
Tulip 4' 13"

Mrs. Costin Hostess
To Circle Number 4


Circle No. 1 of the First Baptist
Church met Honday afternoon at
3 p.m. with five members and one
visitor, Mrs. W. C. Goodson, pres-
ent.
The meeting was opened by the
program chairman, Mrs. Clarence
Pridgeon, reading the devotional
,from the 84th Psalm. The new
WMU watchword, Rev. 3:8, was
read and Mrs. C. A. McClellan and
Mrs. E. C. Cason brought messages
and quotations from good books
that people should "read. It was
stressed that the Holy Bible be
used more.
Mrs. Pridgeon closed the meet-
ing by reading a verse from the
song, "Holy Bibl,e Book Divine"
and Mrs. Cason dismissed the
groups with prayer.
During the social hour the host-
ess served delicious refreshments.
---- -- ---
ST. JAMES CHURCH
EPISCOPAL
The Rev. Gardner D. Underhill
Priest In Charge
19th .Sunday after Trinity, Oct. 27.
7:30 p.m. Celebration of the Holy
Communion. 9:45 a.m., Church
School. 11:00 a.m. Morning prayer
and sermon, blessing and benedic-


Long Avenue WMS
Circles Have Meeting
CIRCLE 2
WMSQ Circle No. 2 of the Long
Avenue Baptist Church met Mon-
day afternoon in the home of Mrs.
J. A. Alligood. The meeting was
opened with prayer by Mrs. Joe Fer-
rell. The program, "An Open Door"
was introduced by Mrs. C. N. Dykes.
Others taking part on the program
were Mrs. Durel Brigman, Mrs. A.
P. Martin, Mrs. P. B. Fairley, Mrs.
Jo Alligood and Mrs. Joe Ferrell.
After a short business session, the
meeting was closed with special
prayer for the sick.
CIRCLE 1
Circle 1 of the Long Avenue Bap-
tist Church met for its October
meeting with Mrs. M. L. Britt at
her home. The meeting was opened
with prayer. The eight members
present took part on the program.
Following the program and bu.i-
ness meeting, delicious refersh-
ments were enjoyed by all.
CIRCLE 4


OPEN DAILY, 2:45 P.M.
SATURDAY, 12:45 P.M.


'Spaghetti with meat sauce, snap
beans, spiced beets, peanut butter F'lAY anSd SATURDAY
cookies, white bread and milk. ONE SHOWING OF EACH
Tuesday, October 29 PICTURE
Barbecued weiners, lima beans, FEATURE No. I -
cabbage slaw, hot biscuit, apple .. -v -.ar ..


mmmm AdsI
LCIALU


THIS WEE


0 NL


.KEND


Y


THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY .



All Fal Dresses




at COSTIN'S



MARKED DOWN


Bouquet' Funeral Wreaths Corsages
(Flowers Telegraphed Anywhere)
ED'S ORCHIDLAND FLORIST
St. Joe's Largest and Finest
226 Reid Ave. Dial BAll 7-8881 Nites &


Phone
BA 7-4646


Weddings


SUNDAY, MONDAY


Sunday, 9-1351


Port St. Joe,
Citizens Federal Florida
and LOAN ASSOCIATION


Profitable
32'% per annum, credited and,
compounded, June 30th andl
December 31st, or in cash.


u II Per Annum
uoo Insured by An Agency of The United States
Government, up to $10,000.00.
WE FINANCE HOMES ON LONG TERM EASY PAYMENTS
BRING or MAIL us your SAVINGS FUNDS, by Check,
Money Order, or Cash, by the 10th. of any month,
EARN from the 1st., EXTRA PROFIT.


Citizen.' Jederal Savings
and LOAN ASSOCIATION of Port St. Joe


TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY


I:i ClNEMAScOp
Eva Marie SAINT. Don MURRAY
Anthony FRANCIOSA-floyd NOLAN


Play Hollywood
Every Tuesday

Wednesday & Thursday


yGUN
FIGHT
AND

GLORY!
M-G-M PRESENTS
SSTEWART RHONDA
t RANGER FLEMING


CINEMASCOPE ACND
SL^ -^ METROCOLOR
DU L WILLS IE Romm g
S6 as rya.- J Coufs AUBUmO I


6" SKILLET, Reg. 85c ---4- A
8" SKILLET, Reg. $1.25 --_ $ 1M9
12" SKILLET, Reg. $1.98 -


WESTERN AUTO ASSOCIATE STORE
C. W. LONG, Owner


219 Reid Ave.


Phone 7-5251


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1957
Baptist Church met with Miss Alma jelly and milk.
Baggett for its October meeting. Wednesday, October 30
The meeting was called to order Fried chicken, ubttered rice, peas,
by the chairman, Mrs. J. C. Tra- sliced peaches white bread and
week. After a brief business session milk.
an interesting program was pre- Thursday, October 31
sented by Miss Baggett on "An Meat loaf, creamed potatoes, cel-
Open Door." Those taking part on ery sticks, strawberry jello, whole
the program were Mrs. James Tra- wheat bread and milk.
week. Mrs. Leonora Basham, Mrs. Friday, November 1
Willie Orrick, Mrs. Alice Hall, Mrs Macaroni salad, cheese wedges,
Dot Barlow and Mrs. Hutchins. turnip greens, cookies, corn bread
Three new members and one vis- and milk.
tor were welcomed to the circle. _____
The meeting was closed with a Send The Star To A Friend
prayer by Mrs. Traweek.
-Delicious refreshments were ser-
ved to the ten members present. -

Elementary School


I


~~_.... ._ .


''I


<- CD,


1111


It ipays to adveitiss try ItY


Lunch Room Menu
Monday, October 28


Pork Hams




EVeKYBODY SAVES AT PIGGLY WIGGLrY


See Our Full Line of Trick or Tr-at Specials


LOOK AT OUR FRESH FALL PRODUCE A Wide Selection!


EACH


Green Boiling


5c Peanuts29c


ARMOUR'S MARIGOLD
0 LEO


2 LBS.


35c


BORDEN'S


BISCUITS


2 CANS


25c


s


GRAPEFRUIT


8 Lb. Bag


4 LB. BAG


anfli re


SArrLE
FRESH FLORIDA
7C ORANGES


MIRACLE WHIP
Salad Dressing
WESSON OIL
3 LB. CAN
SNOWDRIFT


FRESH


QT.
QT.


49c5

55c


PARADE OF STARS *
ARMOUR'S STAR -- NO. 10


Salad OIL


ARMOUR'S STAR


MILK


79c


c

LB


FRESH SMALL RIBS
FRESH PORK HAMS


PORK
CHOPS
END
CUTS 40
CENTER
CUTS -o 1


BUTTS


Pan Sausage Ib
ALL FRESH NO


LEAN PORK


ARMOUR'S STAR -- 16 Oz.
STREET
ARMOUR'S STAR 16 OZ.


CHILI
ARMOUR'S DASH
Dog FOOD


ARMOUR'S CLOVERBLOOM


BUTTER


b ARMOUR'S STAR
CORNED BEEF HASH


C


TRIMMINGS


ARMOUR'S STAR
CORNED BEEF
ARMOUR'S STAR
ROAST BEEF
Armour's
Potted Meat


2 FOR
19c


Armour's
VIENNAS


Be Sure To Register For Our Sweepstakes Drawing
Valuable Gifts
TO BE GIVEN AwAY FREE
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of Each Week


WIGGLY VERY BODY


SAESATPI~L WGLYtAkYBDYSAE A PGGV IGL


39c
DOZEN
19c


BACKBONE


1.39


8 CANS


39c

39c

25c


2


5c


73c


16 oz. can 29c


12 oz. can


39c


12 oz. can 45c


2 FOR
39c


- I II" 1 -~- ~p~


raeae~gws~aa~ss~R~s3~


IEVERYBODBY SAVE At PiGGLY WiGGLY 1


;EWRYWOV OV&" At RMYe~96S~l WIGGLY


cnitraoDr SAVES AT PIGWv WIGGLY


EVERYBODY SAVES AT PIGGLY


'SAVES AT MGiGLY WIMYL











THE STAR
Published Every Thursday At 306 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
By The Star Publishing Company
WESLEY R. RAzSEY Editor and Publisher
Also Linotype Operator, Ad Man, Floor Man, Columnist, Reporter, Proof Reader
and Bookkeeper
ONE YEAR, $3.00 SIX MONTHS $1.50 THREE MONTHS $127.50
SUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Entered as second-class matter, December 19, 1987, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe,
Florida, under Act of March 8, 1879.
DIAL BAll 7-3161
TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such
advertisement.
weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces.
The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully


The Birthday of The United Nations
Today, October 24, is the birthday of the United Nations,
mankind's noblest attempt to establish lasting peace with jus-
tice. That date in 1945 was the historic day that the United
Nations officially came into being. It was the day on which the
charter was ratified by a majority of the then 51 participating
countries -- a Charter in which war-sickened humanity placed
its hopes and aspirations for a peaceful world.
Recognizing that no international organization can long
endure without the support of the peoples of the world, the UN
Gneeral Assembly in 1947 passed the following resolution:
". that October 24th shall henceforth be officially
called 'United Nations Day' and shall be devoted to
making known to the people of the world the aims and
achievements of the United Nations and to gaining their
support for the work of the United Nations."
In addition to maintaining international peace and secur-
ity, which is the principal purpose of the United Nations, there are
other purposes of singular importance which mean much to the
people of the world. Some of them include the consolidation
and extension of human rights throughout the world; care of the
refugee population; the child care program (UNICEF); aid to
the Non-Self-Governing peoples of the world and the making of
International Law.
It certainly can't be said that the U.N. has attained its
first and main objective, that of maintaining international peace
and security. There have been wars since its inception and even
now war clouds seem to be gathering but we do know that the
organization is tirelessly working for world peace and just for
that alone our full support is warranted, and well deserved.


An Ounce of Prevention Here Also
Better Than a Pound of Cure Later
It is better business to prevent child delinquency than it
is to correct adult delinquency. An uphill effort is being made
in Florida to do just that. But it is an uphill effort and it is too
much misunderstood.
We're speaking of the child welfare efforts of the State
Department of Public Welfare. In our opinion, it is one of the
most important jobs being done by that entire department.
That's because the effort is being directed toward making better
citizens and a brighter future for our hundreds of under-
privileged children.
Through no fault of their own, unfortunately, some of
them are illigetimate. "But even they have a right to eat," we
recently heard a social worker tell a P-TA group. She noted that
children are often turned over to that department by the courts
as a result of deaths, sickness and desertions. "We are obligated
to take care of any child that is left without shelter," she said.
That particular phase of the public welfare program, by
the way got less consideration than any other during the last
session of the Florida Legislature. Successful efforts were made
to provide more aid to the aged to the disabled and the blind,
but not for dependent children.
Do you suppose it was because children don't vote?
The Legislators might have demonstrated more long-range
wisdom by investing some of the taxpayers' money now in such
unfortunate children, rather than permit them to grow up as
social misfits or with a grudge against a society that didn't give
them a chance. The Legislators in the future will have a clear
choice. They may spend a little money on the children now, or
postpone the expenditure a little longer and spend it, plus inter-
est, on ails, penitentiaries, court proceedings and mental hospi-
tals. The cost of the preventative work may be small in compari-
son.
Such decisions, however, call for long-range vision and
statesmanship. We hope to see more evidences of that, too, as
our lawmakers beebome more acquainted with the problems with
which they grapple from time to time.-Washington County News.

We have nothing against scientists. Without them, the
world wouldn't be where it is today. But we wish that some of
them, at least, would stop trying to build bigger and better bombs
and concentrate on something like a mouse trap that can't slam
back on your finged.-Red Hook, N. Y. Advertiser.


The Star Brings News of Your Neighbors


You Must Apply For
Social Security Benefits
An application for old-age and
survivors insurance benefits must
be filed before payments can be-
gin, John V. Carey. district mana-
ger of the Panama City social se-
curity office, said this week.
One of the basic requirements
that must be met before benefits
can be paid to a retired worker is
that he must contact the nearest
social security office and file an
application for them, Carey contin-
ued. The same requirement must
be met for disability benefits and
a -survivor's claim must be filed
before benefits can be paid to a
deceased worker's family after his
death.
It is very important for the work-
er and his family to understand
this requirement so that checks
,can be started promptly and so
that no loss of payments will result,
Carey added.
The statements which follow are
important to every worker and ot
every member of his family:
1. The worker who is between 65
(62 for women) and 72 years of age
should file his application at the
nearest social security office at
the earliest opportunity after lie
retires from work, or if he doesn't
work some months or earns less
than $2,080.00 a year.
2. A worker at the age of 72 need
net retire to be eligible for pay.
ments. The worker still employed
at the age of 72 should file hi, ap-
plication at the earliest opportunity
after he attains that age.
3. After the death or a person
whose work was covered by social


WALL ELECTRK

COMPANY

FOR WPHRT

Electrical Repairs
eMd

Cuotracting
DIAL BA 7-4331
r


THE STAR, Port St. Joe, Fla. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1957

security, some member of his fam- social security payments can oe ob-
ily should inquire promptly at the tained by contacting your social
nearest social security office to security office. The office for this
learn what survivors insurance area is located at 522 Mercer Ave-
benefits may be paid. nue, Panama City.
Complete information regarding K


Advertisement

From where I'm sittin'... y Joe Marsh


Even Stephen


Sometimes things sound rea-
sonable 'til you think them over
a bit. It's what we used to call
"smooth talking' and some-
times a person can get caught.
I remember an old vaudeville
skit where one feller asked his
friend for ten dollars. "I'd like
to lend you ten but I've only got
five." "Well," said th'e first fel-
low, "you give me the five and
you can owe me the other five,
that way I owe you five and
you owe me five and we're all
even."


'.'
.55


Frdm where I'm siffin' people
can even fool themselves with
that kind of thinking That's
the way I see it when I hear
talk about passing' a law that
makes me give up the pleasure
of a glass of beer and the
other fellow give up nothing It
sounu, a little bit like "heads
I win, tails you lose!"


Copyright, 1957 United States Brewers Foundation


SEE US
FOR .

- Consolidation loans for all your bills
" Improvement Loans for your home
" Loans for replacing home equipment
"' Loans for buying a new home

" Loans for building a new home


M. P. TOMLINSON
REALTOR INSUROR
403 Monument Avenue


Phone 7-3201 1


/ -"wmI- I


'5 '
a-


New Sori 50 r m.d;urm-duij L.C.F. modd.


Chevrolet's Task-Force 58
rolls in with new broad-
shouldered styling, a revolu-
tionary new V8 engine, new
Step-Van delivery models
complete with bodies and a
wider choice of medium-duty
haulers! They're here to speed
up schedules and whittle
down operating costs with
new fast-working efficiency!
See them at your Chevrolet
dealer's right nowl


New Light-Duty Apaches
Offering high-capacity .pickups
and panels, plus Chevrolet's lat-
est, three new Step-Van Forward
Control models with 8', 10' and
12' bodies! Famous fuel-saving
6's with increased horsepower are
standard.
New Medium- Duty Pi3ir
Nine new models have been
added, all featuring a new cab-to-
rear-axle dimension for better


load distribution in specialized
uses. Compact, short-stroke V8's
are standard in all middleweight
L.C.F. models.
New Heavy-Duty Spfartans
The big news in Series 90 and'
100 is Chevrolet's rugged new
348-cu.-in. Workmaster V8. It
packs 230 h.p., and its radical
new Wedge-Head design assures
peak efficiency even with regular
grade gasoline.


/ nothing





upto


ELECTRIC


COOKING


See them at your dealer's now!


] 7 CHEVROLET S'f


Only franchised Chevrolet dealers display this famous tademark

See Your Local Authorized Chevrolet Dealer


.l -'


Women who know cook ELECTRICAL-
LY! They know that accurately measured
heat, automatic oven control, and easy
operation makes every recipe taste bet-
ter every time.

They know that an electric range is
as CLEAN as sunshine ... that it keeps
the kitchen (and the cook) COOL and
that it cooks food as FAST as food

can be cooked.

Why don't you join the thousands of
women who already know that nothing
measures up to electric cooking the
modern, economical way to Live Better
.. Electrically? You'll be glad you did.


Newest editions of the

"Big Wheel" in trucks with




NEW USTILEI


New Series 31 pikuj


- I st


S-ve 1 -


''V


. T.


NEW MUSCLE.1 NEW STYLE A Ir





*FREE PARKING


--~- tWE RE ERi VE~ LII R--IH--T PR ST---. J, IWmm- RmIJA im


\ I I\%\ \ / 11111//////
-- IGA PURE WHOLE
SStrawberry
PRESER .VEs 9c
- '20Oz. Jar 39c


HERE'S MORE PROOF -
SUPERFINE

SUG


LIMIT ONE WITH
$10 OR MORE
FOOD ORDER


YOU SAVE AT


AR


5 Lb.
Bag


N -I


Center Cut CORN FED

Pork


LB.


Chops


Corn Fed Pork
Loin ROAST
Swift's Brookfield
SAUSAGE
IGA. Table-Rite Sugar Cured Tray Pack
SLICED BACON


Ga. Grade 'A' Dressed and Drawn
.N'S


LB.


IGA DELICIOUS INSTANT
COFFEE
_______ _


Sunshine Honey
Grahams
C


49c


LB.
Cello Bag


39c


60 Oz.
Jar


Lb. Box Nabisco VANILLA
37c Wafers


- I 1 Pkg.


25c


In Our Fresh PRODUCE DEPARTMENT


Trick or Treat

PLES


3
LBS.


Fresh Florida
ORANGES


Fresh Tender


LB.


Chicken and Dumplings
DRESSED and DRAWN


59c SQUASH
Fresh Canadian
Chicken and Dressing RUTABAGAS
L.2u c RUTABAGAS


C


Swift's Select Extra Heavy Beef ROUND


Frozen Foods


Deviled
CRABS
SMcKenzie's
BUTTER BEANS
Sealtest
ICE MILK


2 for 49c
3pkgs. 55c
V2 gal. 59c


LB C

Dairy Department


3 for 25c
6 oz. 25c
2 lb. 39c


Fresh Green

PE


I -


IGA


29c


C


S


LB


Country Patties
OLEO
Armour's Sliced American
CHEESE
Sugar Creek
BUTTER


Yellow Onions


)C

IC


CUCUMBERS


3 For


I I I dd I


I ~-d'~C-l I rr


---


I I


_ I I --C I.-C -- -- II III 1113 --


PORT ST. JOEi, FLORIDA


WE RESERVE LIMIT RIGHTS


~ s* ~///!!II\\\\~~ ~


















aiJI a r I o.,ll O STO A I1 CPEE SOD
RUS L-ATCH SONC o. S U N-LTE SON CO

SALE WILL CONTINUE UNTIL ENTIRE STOCK IS COMPLETELY SOLD OUT!


CHILDREN'S and MISSES'

SHOES


BOYS 'WEATHER BIRD'

SHOES
Values To $7.95

$A97


'Weather Bird' Brand! Mis- Sizes for Boys of All Ages! Oxfords
Is and Children's Sizes. Ox- and Casual Styles. Sacrificed for
umps and Straps. Quick Disposal!


MEN'S and MISSES' WOMEN'S and MISSES'

SHOES MOC'KS
Values To $7.95 Values To $4.95

$ 77 $77


Oxfords, Flats and Casual Novelty Styles in Mocasin and Slip-
High Quality Brands At A pers for Casual or House Wear.
Price! Sensational Buys!


To $45 MEN'S SUITS
Spring, Summer and All-Year Wts.
and Patterns. Famous, High Quality
Brands. Sizes from 35 to 46. They
Must Go Fast! Buy for Next Spring
Now at A Sensational Saving!


ONE LOT CORDUROY
Boys' SLACKS
$2.98 to $3.98 Values


1.99


HUGE MARK-DOWNS ON
Boys' COATS 8.99
Prices From $3.99 Up To
HUGE MARK-DOWNS ON
Boys' JACKETS 4.89
Prices From $4.89 Up To
HUGE MARK-DOWNS ON
Boys' SUITS 15.89
Priced From $6.89 Up To


MEN'S SPORT
SHIRTS
Manhattan Brand! Values up to
$4.95. Great Range of Desirable
Patterns. Priced To Close Out
Now At
$2.99


MEN'S $8.95 WOOL
SPORT SHIRTS 4.99
Now On Sale For
29c to 39c COTTON
Men's SOCKS 19C
Priced Now At Only
UP TO 75c MEN'S
DRESS SOCKS 39c
Fancy Patterns-NOW
Famous "BVD" Brand
Men's T-SHIRTS 69c
REGULAR $1.00 VALUE


MEN'S DRESS
SHIRTS
Manhattan Brandl White and
Colors. Regular or French Cuffs.
$3.95 and $4.50 Values. Sensa-
tional at
$2.99


LOOK!
Hundreds of Items In
Wearing Apparel --
Odds and Ends -- Val-
ues From $1.00 up to
$3.00. Our Bargain Ta-
ble -- Choice -


ENTIRE STOCK $10.95
Stetson HATS
On Sale At Only


8.99


Manhattan Brand-Men's
PAJAMAS 2.99
$3.95 and $4.50 Values
$4.95 US Rainmaster-Men's
RAINCOATS 3ag0
Quitting Business Price -3 9
One Big Lot Boys and
Men's PANTS 2.99
Values Up To $6.95


LADIES' SPORTSWEAR
Pedal Pushers, SAUSTINATCHISON CO.
Etc. Entire Stock Marked POOfI
Down PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA


MEN'S ALL WOOL
TOP COATS
All $45.00 Values


28.88


ONE GROUP MEN'S
SPORT COATS off
Sacrificed Now At
VALUES TO $8.95
Men's PANTS 4.88
Marked Down To
VALUES TO $10.95
Men's PANTS 6.88
Marked Down To


I LADIES' SPORT SHIRTS I


"Lady Manhattan"
Shirts. Newest Styles.
$5.95 Values Going At


3.88


MANHATTAN -
SHORTS
Finest Broadcloth. Boxer or
Gripper Style. White, Solid Col-
ors and Fancy. Sizes 28 to 46.
$1.25 Values for
69c
I!m.


BOYS' 75c -
"HANES"
-Underwear-- Tee Shirts, Un-
dershirts, Briefs and Boxer
Shorts. All Sizes. Get a Year's
Supply At
59c


BOYS SPORT
SHIRTS
Kaynee Brand! Flannels and
Broadcloths. Many patterns To
Choose From. $1.98 to $2.50 Val-
ues! Out they go for
$1.49


TO $8.95 MEN'S
HATS
High Quality Fur Felts In All
Popular Shapes and Colors. All
Sizes. Values up to $8.95 Going
For.
$4.99


~- I-


- -~ LI~ rrrr I


I I ~--gu


aI







THE STAR, Port St. Je, Fla.


Azaleas


TH IURSDAY, dfOBER 24,1957. ,
'family over the week end, Mr. Aiffd
Mrs. Z. F. Rentz and Mrs. Sea-


NEWS FROM Farbara Brown motored to Pan-
ama City with Mrs. A. B. Pra;t
Highland View To ,k
PH ON BgAlI 7-465 Mr. and Mrs. Gene Adkins visit-
PHONE BAII 7-4652 ed in Fort White over he weeii
By MRS. EULA ROGERS end with his mother and family,
nMr. and Mrs. Bascom Williams and
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Larimore vis- family.
ietd in Dothan. Ala., over the week Rev. and Mrs. T. A. Earnest
end with their daughter and fam- spent Monday evening in Panama
ily, Mr and Mrs. Jan.ms Williams City.
and also attended the Peanut Fes. Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Stokes and
tival Saturday. baby of Mobile, Ala., visited her



Smith's Pharmacy a

Prescriptions compounded by
a GRADUATE Pharmacist A


JOHN ROBERT SMITH
Pharmaceutical Chemist


Designed exclusively for you!
Your prescription is ordered to suit your
health needs that is why we cannot
counter-prescribe, or make any changes
in amount. The doctor orders better
health. We supply it!
PHONE BAll 7-5111


wright.
Miss Betty Jo McCormick, who
Attending business school in
Jacksonville, spent the week end
with her parents and family, Mr.
and Mrs. P. T. McCormick.
The Baptist WMU had their reg-
ular weekly meeting Monday eve-
ning at the church with seven mem-
bers present. Mrs. Ruth Harbuck
was in charge of the program. The
group sang, "Lead On, 0 King
Eternal". Mrs. Lilly Richter lead
the opening prayer. Mrs. Harbuclk
read Psalms 46. Miss Mary Cox
gave a Bible talk taken from Pro-
verbs 29. The meeting closed with
prayer by Mrs. Alice Macomiber.
Rev. Adkinson, dist. superinten-
dent of the Marianna District,
preached at the Highland View Me-
thodist Church Sunday and held
quarterly conference at that time.
The Highland View Assembly of
God Church is in a revival with
evangelist Rose Peel of Panama
City. Everyone is invited to attend
thsee services nightly at 7:30 p.m.
The Rev. T. C. Earmest is pastor.
The first bible class for children
by the Misses Mary Cox and Mary
Coe were held at the home of Mrs.
Clayton Coker Tuesday, October 15
from 4 to 5 p.m. These classes will
continue throughout the school year
for all children on First, Second and
Third Streets in Highland View.
Other classes in different parts of
Highland View will be open and
announced later.
Rev. W. B. Holland has just re-


- Camdllias


- Pines Shrubbery


e- ~ .I Mxr. and Mrs. IHarold Kall left
Wqod. The girls closed the meeting Thursday for South Carolina after
with sentence prayers. f ot C after
with senten prayespending several days with Mr. and
R. A.'s MEET Mrs. Cleveland Hall.
The Junior R. A.'s met at thei Mr. and Mrs. James Bass and
Baptist Church, Monday at 7 p.m. daughter Linda, Tl
with their counsellor, Mrs. Wallace assee Sunday. visited in Tall
Guillot. There were seven members A Apalacicola
present. Their meeting opened with Alien H. Norris of Apalachicola
prayer. The program was about Ko- on business.
rea. The boys brought a good pro-) M and Mrs. Bubba Hov
gram, then gave their pledge d a Apalachicola are visiting with Mr
commission. Mr. Guillot closed theT and Mrs. Tom Levins.
meeting with prayer. Jerry Penning- Mr. and Mrs. Hansel Norris and
fn -11 1. fh~.' IMr. and Mrs. Hansel Norris anti


LUU will be their CU-counselor.

NEWS FROM
OAK GROVE
By JUANITA NORRIS

Celebrates !Fifth Birthday
Sharon Ann Hallman celebrated
her fifth birthday Thursday, Sep-
tember 26 with a party at her home.
Those attending were Regina Lev-
ins, Linda Lewis, Chris Ann Adams,
Glenda and Alfred Rudd, Fran Bllis,
Glen and Sandra Toole, Shelba,
Nelda and Kathy Gay.
The little guests wore served
cake, cookies, lolly popq and punch.
All had a wonderful time.
Honored With Party
Dot Dormany was honored with
a party on her 15th birthday Fri-
day night at her home on Madison
St. Refreshments of cake, Cokes
and turkey pilau was served to the
following guests: Jack and Joe
Levins, Peggy Jo and Donnie
Young, Tommy Walker, Johnny
Vickery, John. OBrian, Buddy


turned from the hosp e Knight, Ralph Elliott, Howard Lov-


Rides Shows Exhibits

BE ON HAND FOR SPECIAL DAYS
TUESDAY--OCT 29 ... CHILDREN'S DAY
WEDNESDAY-OCT. 30 ... SCHOOL DAY
SATURDAY-NOV. 2 .... 4-H & FFA DAY
OUTSTANDING FARM FAMILY

BRING THE ENTIRE FAMILY
-.- -- --,-.---' -


has been ill for several days. All
his friends hope he continues to
improve. His sons visited him over
the week end, R. D. Holland of
Macon, Ga., T. J. Holland of Colum-
bus, Ga. and J. D. Holland of Le-
therle, Ala.
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Watts and Mrs.
W. P. Coleman visited in Jackson-
ville over the week end with Mr.
and Mrs. W. P. P. Coleman, Jr., and
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Watts.
The Highland View Elementary
School will hold its Hallowe'en Car-
nival, Friday, October 25, from 5
until 8 p.m. at the school. There will
be plenty of fun and good eats.
Everyone is urged to attend and
make this carnival the greatest suc-
cess ever.
Mr. and Mrs. 0. M. Shavers had
as their guest over the week end,
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Head of Green.
ville, N. C.
We welcome to our community,
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pittman and
children from Panama City.
Mr. and Mrs. Steve Daniels and
children visited her mother over
the week end in Carrabelle, Mr.
and Mrs. John Brown.
,Mr. and Mrs. Donald Skipper and
son Donnie spent Tuesday with
their parents, Mr. and Mrs. George
Skipper.
G. A. MEETING
The Mary Celia Intermediate G.
A.'s met at the Highland View Bap-
tist Church, Monday at 7:00 p.m.
with five members present. Scrip-
ture was taken from 103rd Psalm
by Sarah Catherine Cumbie, fol-
lowed with prayer by Cookie Rich-
ards. The group repeated the watch
word and allegiance, Star ideals,
their aim and their goals. The group
sang the G. A. hymn. The program
was, "The Year Ahead". Those tak-
ing part on the program were the
counselor, Mrs. E. R. DuBose, Cook-
ie Richards, Sarah Catherine Cum-
bie, Carolyn Whitehurst and Elaine


ett, Mike McKenzie Patrick McFar-
land Don Gardner, Jerry Hayes,
June Ivey, Juanita Norris, Alice
Jean Gay, Sally Hudson Gall An-
derson, Tommy and Judy Anderson,
Virginia Norris, Sharon Wilson,
Ann Adkins James Knenedy, Jenny
Kay Norris, Charles Barnette, and
Raymond Burrows and the honoree
Dot Dormany. Hostess for the oc-
casion were Mrs. Buck Dormany
and Mrs. Jessie Anderson.
Mrs. Richard Levins of Vernon
spent a few days visiting with Mr.
and Mrs. Joel Lovett and Mr. and
Mrs. James Lovett, and Mr. and
Mrs. Herman 'Stripling.
Mr. and Mrs. Hansel Norris spent
Saturday in Apalachicola with Mr.
and Mrs. Allen H. Norris and chil-
dren.
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Haskin and
daughter, Peggy, motored to Gear.
gia on business Saturday.


Miss Irma Brannen and James V.
N.rris visited in Apalachicola Sun.
day with Mr. and Mrs. Allen H.
Nor: is.
Mrs. D. H. Shealey returned home
Sunday after spending several
weeks with Mr. and Mrs. Ferzell o;
P nsacola.
CARD OF THANKS
I want to thank each and every
one of you for the lovely gifts I
received at m yshower. I can cer-
tainly use them. Again I want to
thank you for the lovely gifts.
Mrs. Jason Dykes
Visits in Pensacola
Mrs. Clarence Pridgeon has re-
turned home after a visit with the
Dan Harris family in Pensacola.
-K
Visitors of Tharpes
Mrs. Bill Rich and children were
the recent guests of the Clifford
mTThrn


LATEST AP NEWS DAILY
WJOE
15/0 Cn You. Dial


the chain saw
that likes to
be compared
with others...
McCULLOCH'S MODEk


Priced just above the


sarpos. lowest. reels and cuts
4( like heavier, more expensive
makes. The ideal saw for
cutting pulp and firewood,
for tending woodlots and tree
NEWS MUSIC WEATHER farms, for clearing land.
7:55 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Seeit today.,.
Direct From Cape San Bias FREE CHAIN SAW!
Given Daily Over Station
SEE US ABOUT
W J 0 E THE FREE SAW-DRAW
1570 On Your Dial PLAYER'S STORE
Highland View, Florida



EXPERT REPAIRS...

RADIO and TELEVISION
CAR RADIOS REPAIRED WHILE YOU WAIT
Pick-Up and Delivery Service

Smith Radio & TV Repairs
Phone BAll 7-5591 Corner Reid and Third


Specially Designed for

FLORIDA'S Climate
All lights checked; battery tested; tires in-
spected; brake fluid checked; fan belt, pres-
sure cap, radiator hose, thermostat inspected;
windshield wiper blades and arms checked;
-all windows cleaned; floor board swept out.


AVOID annoying car-trouble in the months ahead, and
possible expensive repairs, by bringing your car in for
our thorough "Florida Fall Check-Up."


With your Fall Check-up, We
SOMETHING NEW! give you full GUARANTEED
ANTI-FREEZE PROTECTION for the entire winter season.
This means should you loose any of your Anti-Freeze we will
replace it FREE OF CHARGE.


Drive in Soon, and Avoid Cool-Weather Car Worries!
or Dial BAll 7-7171 for Pickup and Delivery Appointment


WOOLFORD'S

SERVICE STATION
Monument Ave. and 2nd St. Port St. Joe, Fla.


Thurs., Fri. ana Sat.
YOUR LITTLE

SUPER SAVER
Never Undersold
Quality Considered
Ga. Grade "A"
HENS

Lb. 29c
Fresh Pork Small Size
SPARE RIBS

Lb. 45c
USDA Good
CHUCK ROAST

Lb. 39c
Register's Green Hill
SAUSAGE

Lb. 39c
USDA Good-With All Excess
S Fat and Bone Removed
T-BONE STEAK

Lb. 89c
OYSTER SEASON
Premium

CRACKERS

Lb. 27c
14 OZ. Stokley's

CATSUP

Bot. 19c
With $5.00 Grocery Order

SUGAR

5 Ibs. 39 C
Heinz

BABY FOOD

6 jars 59c
Blackburn

SYRUP

No. 5 49c
HAPPY KID
Peanut Butter

12 oz. jar 29c
Maxwell House Instant
COFFEE

6 oz.jar $1.19
Large Box LIMITED
TIDE

28c
U. S. No. 1

POTATOES

10 Ibs. 39c
Fresh

TOMATOES

Carton 19c
Gravenstlne-Cook or Eat 'em
APPLES

Each lc
We Give and Redeem
Save Mor Coupons



QUALITY


MARKET


Corner Williams & Third
PRICES CLERKS
RIGHT POLITE
Quantity Rights
Reserved


ARRIVED


FALL ANNUAL'S

Pansies, Calendulas, Stock, Snap Dragons and Many Others.

Blooming SASANQUAS Greatly Reduced

Blooming Cassiaberryanna ------50c and up
ALL HIBISCUS ..... 75c
ALL HIBISCUS ----------------------75c

House Palms, Rubber Plants, African Violets

A VARIETY of HOUSE PLANTS


VISIT OUR FLOWER SHOP FOR INDOOR PLANTS



VITTUM'S NURSERY

1017 WOODWORD AVE. PHONE 7-3 46


~l~nr~CIMMM^NY.NMMhhMMVVWI~~


.P


JUST






THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1957


NOT ON YOUR LIFE!
Your prescription may look
mysterious-with its symbols,
abbreviations, Latin terms -
but there is nothing secretive
about it.
Think a minute... don't musi-
cians, engineers, lawyers, ac-
countants-in fact, doesn't
anyone in a skilled profession, "
including yourself-use technical
terminology ta communicate pre-
cise information? '
Actually, the way your pre-
scription reads facilitates and
makes certain that you gel ex-
actly "what the doctcr orders."

YOUR PH A RM ,ACIST |


Buzzett's Drug Store
PORT ST. JOE, FLA.


MAN
Age 17 to 45
ELECTRONIC FIELD
IN THE AREA OF PORT ST.
JOE and PANAMA CITY
WAGES $100 PER WEEK OR
BETTER
3 Years' Guaranteed
Placement Service
Upon Certification
WE will train personnel from nis
immediate area for jobs available
here soon. Those accepted will be
trained under the supervision and
guidance of our engineers. You w' II
train and work on practical equip-
ment in this locality. This will be
arranged so that it will not inter-
fere with your present employment.
WRITE ELECTRONICS, GIVING
NAME, HOME ADDRESS, OCCU-
PATION, P H 0 N E, WORKING
HOURS AND AGE TO THE STAR,


MAN or WOMAN
Established Toy Routes
Good Income
No Selling-No Experience
Necessary-Operate from Home
We Place and Locate All Racks
SPARE or FULL TIME
Earn up to $350 monthly refilling
and collecting from our MAGIC
TOY RACKS in your area. Must
have car-references-five hour
spare time weekly-and mini-
mum investment of $495-for lo-
cal interview-write at once giv-
ing phone number.
ADAM INDUSTRIES
170 West 7th Street
New York 23, N. Y.


CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR SALE: Penney's Beach Apart-
ments, Sit. Joe Beach, Port St.
Joe.
FOR SALE: Beach lots. Reason-
able. Apply at this agency.
E. TOM PRIDGEON
Real Estate & Insurance
BAll 7-7741 411 Reid Ave.


LOTE FOR SALE: Beacon Hill
and Mexico Beach. $350 and up.
Make your own terms. R. L. Fort-
ner, Mexico Beach. tfc-9-26
FOR SALE: For a good deal in
new and rebuilt sewing machine.
Priced to suit you. Contact K. Par-
ker,' PO 3-9669, Panama City or
write K. Parker, 2115 Bryan Ave.,
Panama City. 4tp-10-3
FOR SALE: Christmas notes. Just
right for Christmas stationery,
open house, party invitations and
thank you notes. See at THE STAR.
FOR SALE: Small baby grand pi-
ano. $100. Needs repairs and tun-
ing. Call George McLawhon. Phone
7-2921. 2tp
FOR SALE: '53 Plymouth 4-door
Cambridge custom sedan. One
owner, very clean. Runs extra good.
Best offer over .$400.00. Call 7-5356.
FOR SALE: Frigidaire automatic
washing machine. Perfect condi-
tion. Going overseas. Must sell.
66 11th St., Apalachicola. 2tp
FOR SALE: 2 beach homes. One
at $7,500.00 and one at $4,750.00.
As low as $600.00 down. Located at
St. Joe Beach. See or call Buddy
McLemore, Real Estate Broker, 21
W. Oak Ave., Phone PO 3-1397, Pan-
ama City. 2tc-10-24
NEW AND USED furniture and ap-
pliances at real savings. Every-
thing for the home. Buy the best
for less at The Old Trading Post,
200 Water St., Apalachicola.
A BIG DISCOUNT HOUSE in a
small town. The largest selection
of gas appliances in the Big Bend
area. If it burns gas we sell it. "i-
tizens Gas Co., Inc., Ave. "E" at 8th
St., Apalachicola. 4tc-10-24
NOTICE
I will not be responsible for any
bills made by wife after October
19.
2tp E. S. SIRMONS
FOR "RENT: Unfurnished duplex
apartment. On Palm Blvd. See
Silas R. Stone.
FOR RENT: Furnished cottage at
St. Joe Beach. Call 7-5561.
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment.
See Mrs. Paul Farmer, Oak Grove.
FOR RENT: Two bedroom garade
apartments. Two, three and four
bedroom cottages, furnished. Call
BAll 9-1184, or see Mrs. C. E.
Thompson at Costin's Cottages,
Beacon Hill. 8tp-10-10
FOR RENT: Large nin-room fur-
nished house. Corner j. Sixth S.t
and Long Ave. Reas.1,o.e. See
George Johnson. 4tp


Announcing

St. James' Woman's Auxiliary

BAZAAR and DINNER
At ST. JAMES PARISH HOUSE
Wednesday, November 20, 1957
4:00 til 9:00 P.M. -- Dinner Served at 6:00 P.M.


Drive n pen...


SANDWICHES OF ALL KINDS
Chicken and Shrimp In The Box
OPEN DAILY TIL 11 P.M.

IN OUR DINING ROOM

REGULAR DINNERS DAILY
MEAT, HOT BREAD
THREE FRESH VEGETABLES
TEA or COFFEE


Bus Station Cafe





Nedley's Florist

QUALITY and SERVICE
Mr. and Mrs. I. C. Nedley Cordially Invites Everyone,

TO THE FORMAL OPENING
of PORT ST. JOE'S NEWEST FLOWER SHOP
Friday and Saturday, October 25 and 26
Comer of Reid Ave. and Second St.
Register for two door prizes to be given Saturday at
4:30 p.ro. You do not have to be present to win.'
Mrs. Nedley is a well known florist. We specialize in
weddings and are equipped to service receptions and
parties and take good care of all your floral needs.

PHONE 7-7411


Washington Tigers Over
DeFuniak Springs

By JIMMIE I. FRAZIER
Victory seemed to be replacing
ties and defeats suffered by the
weak Tigers of last year as they
rolled past Roulhac of Chipley in a
7-6 duel last Thursday night fn
Washington County. The Washing-
ton eleven got off to a poor start
behind a slow defense, enabling
Roulhac to drive 81 yards in 16
plays to strike pay dirt with the
game only three minutes old. The
Tigers were not to be outdone
They fought right back with a drive
which started on their own nine
yard line. Twelve plays later found
them 76 yards down the field dig-
ging for pay dirt with the ball on
the Roulhac 15. One play later
McNabb put a 15 yard pass into
the hands of Jackson Siples who
was standing in the end zone.
With the game tied, 6-6, veteran
halfback Jewel Givens smashed
his way over for the extra point,
putting the Tigers out in front for
the first time 7-6. Late in the fourth
period with seconds left to play,
Roulhac tried to surge back but
Washington had rallied together
and allowed the Chipley boys to!
penetrate no farther than the 30
yard line.
The starting line-up was the same
for the Tigers except Earnest Giv-
ens started for Etavus Russ at
guard.
Thursday the Tigers will be look-
ing for victory number four when
they take on Rosenwald's Junior
Varsity of Panama City at Slugger's
Field in Port St. Joe.

Visit In Pensacola
Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Ramsey
were the week end guests of Mr.
and Mrs. B. L. Ramsey and son,
Clay at Pensacola.

ATTENTION ALL MASONS
Eastern Star, Gulf Chapter 191,
cordially invites all Masons and
wives to a dinner to be given to
them in the Masonic Hall, Tuesday
October 29 at 7 p.m.

Employed In North Carolina
Donald Ramsey has a position in
Charlotte, N. C.. with the Home In-
surance Company. He received his
degree in Business Administration
from Florida State University this
past summer.

LAWN MOWER FOR RENT: $.1.50
hour. Cut your lawn and let me
worry with upkeep of mower. Gulf
Service Station, Aubrey R. Tomlin-
'son, Phone 7-7501.
WANTED: Any news of interest to
your neighbor for the Panama
City News and Herald. Call Mis.
Benton Hamm at 9-1876. tfc-9-12
SPECIAL SERVICES


-OR FAST, EFFICIENT plumbing
service. call BILL'S PLUMBING.
'hone 7-7846, Outboard motors rc-
'aired, also.
SEPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call
Buford Griffin, Phone 7-7011 for
quick expert service, tfc-5-2
'"ADE US that useless article for
mething useful. STOP and
iWAP.
Keys Made While You Wait
35c EACH
BICYCLE PARTS
WESTERN AUTO
HUNTING & FISHING LICENSES
PANA-CRAFT BOATS
and E-Z TRAILERS
Rsel Parts and Repairs
F YOU ARE INTERESTED in sav-
ing money see us for anything
rou need in your home. STOP and
SWAP SHOP.
LOYAL ORDER OF MOOSE
Meetings at Moose Hall, 310
Fourth 'St.. meeting night every other
Monday.
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0.
0. F.-Meets first and third
Friday, 7:30 p.m. in Masonic
Hall. All members urged to attend;
visiting brethren Invited.
C. W. LONG, N. G.
J. C. PRICE, Secty.
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F&AM every first and
third Thursday at 8:00 p.m.


EVERETT McFARLAND, W.M.
ROY L. BUROH, Secty.
All Master Masons cordially invited
WILLIS V. ROWAX POST 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION. Meet-
ing first and third Monday*nights
800 p.m., American Legion Home
R. A. M.-Regular convocation of
SSt. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
M., 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit-
' ing brothers welcome. J. H. Geddle,
High Priest. H. R. Maige, Secretary.


N LY 7 A S LEFT DURING DANLEY'S BIG
ANNUAL FALL SALE!


EASY .IrNAS
s PM


You Can Have Room Beauty


S.^ -and a Bed Too, with


-Make


$18 9 .15 Deliver.

$18 9 TERMS TO SwIT
YOUR BUDGET


This is a real ValueI You gt all the beauty and comfort of fine ing.
room furniture, PLUS the utility of a FULL SIZE BED and the Special ONLY -
added pieces. Note the size of the "master" Club Chair, as well as the
Sofa Sleeper these pieces are designed for Comfort, Styled for Beauty 95
and Constructed for Servio C9ae in and see this group Todayl

8-PIECE MODERN BEDROOM SUITS Designed By Luther Draper.
i ~' i t


for the first

time ever!


Samsonie


7-Pc. Large Family Size Dinette

THICK PADDED SEA, ON CHAIRS 95
Case...regularly $17.5( PLASTIC TOP RESIST MARS

S I TRIPLE PLATED CHROME A' 0
FOR LCO~, ENJOYABLE WRAD $5 Delivers COFO}ELUXI
i AN* 7 SERVICEABLE
Sale STP S001 995


AI. ac STEPto u ; YOU0 NOW


THE STAR


SO ...


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