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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01116
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: April 4, 1957
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01116

Full Text












Port St. Joe The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Ghattaaheocke Vlley"


VOLUME XX Single Copy So JORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1957 NUMBER 23




Gulf School Board rants $400 Teacher Pay ise


The Florida Forest Service has decided to advertise Gulf County's excellent wild tire record. 1o
advertise this record, the FFS has secured the services of Clyde A. Fite, local artist to draw
a series of cartoons setting Gulf up as a good example. Fite has prepared a series of cartoons
on this subject, the first of which appears above.


Shark Football Squad Begins Their

Spring Practice Session With 26 Boys

The Port St. Joe Shark football Coach Craig says that the Sh
.squad for next year took to the have a rough schedule next
field for spring practice yesterday with seven class 'A' schools on
afternoon at the high 'school with ,ten game schedule. Fourth of
15 boys returning from last year's ,ten games will be played at h
squad. Coach Marion Craig says Sept. 20, Apalachicola, Ther
that the practice session will con- Sept. 27, DeFuniak Springs,
tinue "until next season's team is Oct. 4, Marianna, There
formulated and performing in a Oct. 11, Graceville, Here
satisfactory manner." Oct. 17, Bay High Jr. Var
The following lettermen are re- Oct. 25, Chipley, There
turning this next year: Frank Flet- Nov. 1, Blountstown, Thece
cher, Wayne Taylor, Billy Denton, Nov. 8, Bonifay, There
Sonny Chafin, Larry Mansfield, Nov. 15, Quincy, Here
Jackie Mitchell, Ross Hudson, Fred Nov. 22, Choctawhatchee, T
Griffin, Alex Gaillard, Charles Boy-
er, David Musselwhite, Ken Hurl- Joint Meeting of Garder


but, Willie Daniell, Richard Zipper-
er and Ward Richards.
New'boys reporting for the squad
are William Lucas, Terry Porter,
Johnny Price, Drew Hall, Ronnie
Raffield, Bailey Chumney, Bill Ma-
zarol, Leonard Costin, Don John-
son, Preston Ramsey and Thomas
Adams.
The rising ninth grade will be in-
vited' to participate in spring prac-
tice this week. They are not includ-
ed in the roster shown here.

'Superior' Rating Entitles Banc



Band Wil

By C. H. McKNIGHT
Port St. Joe High School's splen--
did band is making a determined
effort to go to the State Festival-
to be held this year in Gainesville
on May 9-11.
This being its first year to rate
superior in every performance at
the District Festival last month,
the band has achieved the right to
go to Gainesville, and the students
are leaving no stone unturned. Af-
ter many years of hard work, pa-
tience and co-operation, between
students, band director and bond
boosters, a long cherished drea.n
is being realized. The band i.; an
outstanding community-supporting
organization.


Cancer Crusade Rally

Planned For Tonight

An American Cancer Crusade
barks Rally will be held at the Port St.
year Joe High School gymnasium Thurs-
n the day, April 4 at 8:00 p.m.
Sthe There will be a concert by the
High School Band. A movie filn en-
-re titled "Horizon's of Hope" will be
r shown at this rally.
The members of the panel will
be Mrs. Marjorie C. Bates, North-
west Florida Field Representative
of the Florida Division of A. C. A.,
Dr. W. T. Weathington, medical di-
rector of the Gulf County Health
Department of Port St. Joe and We-
ee wahitchka, Dr. Joe Hendricks of
the Ward Clinic, Dr. William Wa-
n ger of this city and Mrs. Polly Sow-


~ -- ---- -----~-4-ra~---- ~-L q~~4j*_~18~18--~IYWBl~;i*~a~lD~BTB1*


nges On Accuracy


tive Valuation


Between 15 and 20 Port St. Joe parents attended the regular
monthly meeting of the Gulf County School Board in Wewahitch-
ka Tuesday morning determined to see that Gulf County school
teachers received a raise in pay.


Kiwanis Minstrel Raise Hi1

Tomorrow Night Of Tenta

The Kiwanis Club is presenting O f T en ta
its fifth annual minstrel tomorrow
night at the Port Theatre auditor-

The minstrel this year is chock .. .. ., -*, '
full of songs, laughs and enter ain-
'ne.t. Featured on the program w.
be ti e laughs brought to you by th .
i:;d men, Hubert Richards, George '. .
Wimberly, Jr., J. T. Simpson John :
Robert. Smith, Dick Lamniberson and
It. IE. King. .,
The songs and entertainment will .. "
be provided by specialty acts by
Jimmy Cox. Celia Tomlinson, Caro- .........
lyn Traweek. The Dickey Birds, '
the barbershop quartet consisting :".
of Bill Cowden, Hubert Richards. '
Dick Lamberson and Wesley R. --
Ramsey and the High School'band. -
The High School band will enter-
tain the early arrivals from 7:30 -
to 8:00 p.m. with a concert. T he
itins:rel will begin promptly at 1,-
S:00 pr.mlC.
-Friday afternoon at 4:30 the cast
of the\ Minstrel will parade through
town with selling tickets as their
purpose. The parade will be led by Johnny Chafin, 11 year old son
the Iigh School Band and will con- of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Crafin of
isj of Mlinstrel characters made up White City, was declared spelling
for (lie part and a wad of tickets champion of the Port St. Joe Ele-
in their hot little fists at, the going mentary School last week over con-
pri'ice of 1.00. testants from the fourth, fifth and
Tickets are now available at sixth grades.
Buzzett's Drug Store, Smith's Drug He will represent this school -n
Store and from all Kiwanis Club the district spelling meet to be held
members. All tickets are $1.00 each. at Bay County High School in Pan-
Proceeds from the Minstrel goes ama City, April 6.
toward the children's charities Johnny is a sixth grade pupil
work carried on by the Kiwanis and captain of the School Patrol
Club. Boys.


PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, the Month of April, 1957 has been desig-
nated as cancer month in Port St. Joe, Florida, and
WHIEREAS, the Gulf County Unit of the American
Cancer Society proposes to solicit contributions from citizens
of the City of Port St. Joe during the month of April, 1957
as assistance in the continuance of the necessary work of
this organization.
NOW THEREFORE, I, J. L. Sharit, Mayor of the City
of Port St. oe by virtue of the power vested in me, do hereby
proclaim the month of April as cancer month in the City of
Port St. Joe, and recommend to our citizens of this commun-
ity to cooperate and assist the workers of the Gulf County
Unit of the American Cancer Society during their drive in
the cancer fund crusade.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my
hand and caused the official seal of the City of Port St. Joe,
Florida to be affixed hereto, this 25th day of March A. D.,
1957.
J. L. SHARIT, Mayor
ATTEST:
R. W. HENDERSON
City Auditor and Clerk


City Prepares To

Enforce Ordinance
p
The City Commission decided, at
their meeting Tuesday night to be- h
gin immediately making a survey d
of lots in the city. M
The survey, to begin this week
,will determine what vacant lots in
the city should be cleaned off to t
make them pleasing to the sight F
and for insect control purposes.
Notices will be sent to lot owners
advising them to clean the lot
within 30 days or make arrange- C
ments with the city to do so. The
City will' make a charge for the lot S
cleaning service.. I
This survey will carry out an or-
dinance to this effect passed re-
cently by the commission.
TO REPAIR ROOF
Also at the Tuesday meeting 'he d
'tiC rCommision agreed to make t


he first pay cheek teachers receive
or the next school term, with the
revision stated above. School Su-
erintendent, Thomas A. Owens ex-
ressed the opinion that the tax .
oils as unofficially described by
'atrick in his letter will be essen-
lally correct with very little var-
ation.
This will raise Gulf County s
tarting teacher salary to $3,350
ad the maximum pay to $4,100.
GOVERNOR'S REQUEST
Tuesday in his address before
he Florida Legislature, Governor
Collins recommended before the
Legislature that the State raise the.
pay pf teacher unit by $300.00 per
rear. Gulf County has 106 teacher
nits and 108 teachers.
County Superintendent Owens
old The Star that the teacher unit
otal for Gulf County next year
will be about the same. as it is
his year. He said that if the funds.
rere available locally, the' County.,
would give each teacher a $300.00
aise (in addition to the County's
400.00) instead of restricting the
Itate raise to teacher units. If the
State raise pending was divided
among Gulf County's present teach-*
r load it would amount to an an-
.ual raise of $294.53 per teacher
er year.
_.--.--c-- -- *

M Evelyn Horton

s Taken By Death

Mrs. Evelyn Mae Horton 33, of
)alkelth, died in Bay Memorial Hcs
ital Tuesday morning at 12:30 a.m.
Mrs. Horton is survived by her'
husband, McKinley Horton; two
daughters, Julia Ann 5, and Shirley'
Iae 4; her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
'homas Maloney, all of Dalgeith.
Funeral services were held yts-
erday afternoon at 2 p.m. at tne
'lrst Presbyterian church in Port
St. Joe with Rev. Harry M. Punt
officiating.
Interment was at Greenwood
Cemetery in Panama City.
Comforter Funeral Home of Port
St. Joe was in charge of arrange-
aents.

Return To Sewanee
Bert Munn, Jr., and Walter Wil-
ier left Monday for Sewanee, Tenn.,
o resume their studies at the Uni-


Club Circles Is Planned ers, Clerk and Deputy Registrar of u I T temporary, repairs to the roof of versity of the South. They were
the Gulf County Health Departnlent. CancerG rOUp Holds Meeting To the Centennial building and agreed visiting with their parents during
There will be a joint meeting of IPrizes will be awarded to win- to put an item in next year's bud- spring holidays.
the Azalea and Gladioli circle at ners in the Cancer Poster Contest. P n Collection Campaign get t apply a new roo to the build- ---- -
the Centennial Building on April 11 Winners will be chosen from each linpg GO TO CHURCH SUNDAY
at 3:00 p.m. of the three schools, Port St. Joe ---
Howard Grey, assistant county High School, Port St. Joe Elemen- On Thursday night, March 28, at tative of the Florida Division of
agent of Bay County will present tary School and the Highland View 7:15 p.m. the Gulf County Unit of the A. C. S., Mrs. H. C. Brown, Four Automobile Accidents Occur n
a program on insecticides and Elementary School. The panel mem- the American Cancer Society held Unit Chairman and W. W. Cowden. "
sprays. Mrs. Lawrence Bissett, Mrs. bers will be the judges of the Pos- a meeting at the City Hall in Port n If CCSin I Ct We
Wayne Ashley, Mrs. Chris Martin ter Contest. St. Joe. It was announced by Mr. Belin Uf C Unty Since Lst Wednesday
and Mrs. Paul Blount will be host- Posters to be judged may be seen J. C. Belin, Lay Delegate Direc- that members of the nominating
esses, now in downtown business store tor and head of the Gulf County committee were Dr. William Wager,Patrolman Trai Apln to him Saturday morning. When he
c- crusade was in charge of the meet- J. C. Belin and Wayne Ashley. Highway Patrolman Tras Apn to him Saturday morning. When he
d o Compete In State Event ing. Mrs. C. Bown, Unit Chair- April 6 was designated as Tag of Port St. Joe reports that there investigated he found Hall in his
mad T Compete In State Event n reviewed the activities of the Day in Port St. Joe which will be have been four traffic accidents in car with the water up "o the oor
Gulf County Unit and outlined some handled by Mrs. Madeleine E. Whit- Gulf County since last Wednesday boards, drunk and still drinking.
GufConT o S ta te tysinc lat Weds Aplia told Hall to come on out of
which is t start Apri 1.. Health Coordinator wll' have a night. There have still been no the car. Hall replied "no sir, I'm
Two hiew board members unani- Tag Day in the colored qua-ters on deaths in Gulf County during 1957 having a good time so I'll just have*

mously elected to the American April 6 also. and in all four of these accidents to stay right here". Aplin forced
Cancer Society. They were Marty Volunteer workers in attendance only one person was injured slight- Hall out of the car.
The fund-raising campaign was will be needed to pay the bill for pegley, manager of Radio Station were assigned duties by Crusade ly. The third accident occurred on
started on the closing night of the the 91 students and necessary clia- WJOE and Mrs. John Sowers, Clerk Chairman, J. C. Belin. Wayne Ash- The first traffic accident occur- the Overstreet Road Saturday night
Laymen's Crusade at the high perones for the four-day period, ard Deputy Registrar of the Gulf ley was appointed publicity chair- red last Wednesday night at 9:20 about 10:30 p.m. Robert Cary Pea-
school, with contributions totalling including meals, room and transpor- County Health Department. man for the drive. p.m. Betty Jean Zorn was traveling cock, another boy and two girls, all
$24.62. Last Saturday, students station to and from Gainesville. Announcement was made tuat Those in attendance were Max W. toward Port St. Joe from Highland of Quincy overturned in Peacock's
raised $101.00 through bake sales "Mr. Dean, the director, and I have there would be a radio panel' for Kilbourn of Wewahitchka, J. C. View. She turned left to enter the car. Peacock left the road, lost
and auto washing down town. They carefully gone over this together", the American Cancer Society *n Price, T. W. Hinote, I. W. Duren, St. Joe Drive-In Theatre and was control of his car and turned the
expect to continue these activities said Chason. "It will be necessary station WJOE at 11:00 a.m. Thurs- Leonard Belln, W. L. Tharpe, Mrs. struck in the left side by George car over. One of the girfs received
each week. Two public concerts are to charter one bus, besides the use day, April 4. The panel members Roy Gibson, Jr., Mrs. Lamar Hardy, Walton Simmons who was attempt- a cut on the head, but no one else
being planned. Harry Saunders ini- of a school bus and a van will be will be Mrs. Marjorie C. Bates, Mrs. Dave Maddox, Bill Cowden, ing to pass the Zorn car. was injured.
tiated a contribution by the St. Joe needed to transport the equipment., Northwest Florida Field Represen- Will Ramsey, Mrs. Blake Thomason, No one was injured. Monday afternoon at 5:15, Joseph
Paper Company of $250.00. All this, I know that this sounds like a lot Mrs. Marvin Land, Mrs. Jimmy The second accident occurred at W. Mills of Blountstown overturned
coupled with a small bank balance of money, but we have figured ev- Cox S. E. Player of Highland View, the Cypress Creek Bridge between his car on the Apalachicola Ii-11n-
of the Band Boosters Association, erything very conservatively. If windows. F. E. Trammell, Madeleine E. Whit- Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka some way where the new short cut takes
brings the total raised to date to our citizens all get behind this ef Nursery facilities will be avail- taker, W. T. Weathington, M. D., of time Friday night. Thomas Earl off from the present Highway 98.
a little over $400.00. fort, we-will put it over. Students' able at the High School for small Apalachicola, David W. Mims, Al- Hall of Sneads ran off into the wa- Mills was not injured and was
Henry Chason, President of the parents are contributing heavily, children. fred Joines, Bill Winters, Wayne ter beside the bridge and sat in charged by Trooper Aplin of driving
Band Boosters Association, esti- also, and will carry the bulk of the Refreshments will be served at Ashley, Mrs. H. C. Brown, Mrs. ihis car all night long. Trooper Ap- while intoxicated, driving without
mates that a minimum of $2,300, expenses," Chason concluded, the close of the Rally. (Continued onl Page 4) lin said the accident was reported a license, and reckless driving.


The Port St. Joe parents were
representatives from two organiza-
tions, the Gulf County Continuing
Education Council and the PTA.
Spokesmen for' the two delega-
tions were John Robert Smith for
the GCC.EA and Mrs. Paul Fensom
for the PTA. Smith came before the
board with a letter from Tax As-
sessor Samuel A. Patrick suibstan-
tuating the fact that money would
be available in next year's school
budget to grant the raise in pay.
'Patrick's letter (which we point
out is not official) stated that the
tax rolls for next year would hold
a taxable valuation of 12 million
dollars as against 9 million dollars
for the year now in progress. It
was estimated that the increased
valuation would increase the am-
ount of money that the School
Board would receive by about $58,-
000.00.
There was much discussion be-
tween the board members about
committing themselves on a budget
for money that hadn't even been
officially certified as yet. Certifi-
cation of the proposed taxable pro-
perty valuation will come around
the first of May. After much de-
bate and quoting rules and regula-
tions, the Board did agree to grant
the school teachers in Gulf County
a raise of $400 per year provided
the tax rolls turn out as Patrick's
letter had tr' -ively described
them.
This raise will go Into effect with


STAlt


w 1'=Ho-, 4 1 FiJA







*A~R 'tWO r~1 ar-i, t-r -r-.- Joe GULI' COUNTY FLftI- THI$DY APRI 4, 195


- ~ -~- '-.,,---~- LW


Ann Costin Honored
With Kitchen Shower
Miss Ann Costin. bride-elect of
April 6 was honored wi'h a cose
party and kitchen shower Saturda3
morning at 10 a.m.
Hostesses were Mrs. Jimmy Har-
risen and her mot iri'. Mrs. Ralph
Swats. 'Phe party N.s. held in the
I. me of the former cni Sixth Street.
A tractive arrangements of p;uk
(carnations and greenery were us-


ed oil the table and in the' ivig;v
room.
Among the 15 invited guets- were,
Mrs. Chauncey Costin, mother of
the bride-elect.
--------
Visiting Mother
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Grice of Selma,
Ala., are visiting his mother, Mrs.
S: R. Grice. They will return home
the later part of this week.

Star Want Ads Get Resuit


PRE EASTER


Suit Sale


Si.
AU"',,V,





O
















$ ,
l-







$14 .95


Phone 7-9171 410 Reid Ave.


Miss Joy Williamson Becomes Bride

Of Lt. Wallace 0. Borden Saturday

Miss Joy Williamson, daughter of sang "The Lord's Prayer" to close
Mr. and Mrs. Bud Williamson of the ceremony. The traditional wed-
Highland View, became the bride ding march and recessional were
of Lieutenant Wallace Odell Bor- used.
due, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Bor- The bride, who was given in mar-
den of Burnsville, Missibsippi, Sat- riage 'by her-father, was radiantly
uiday afternoon, March 23, at 3:00 lovely in an exquisite formal gown
p.m. in the First Baptist Church of of imported Chantilly lace and ny-
Port St. Joe. Ion with a small Chapel train. The
The beautiful and impressive skirt was completely hand embroi-
double-ring ceremony was performn- dered to match the lace on the
ed by the Rev. C. Byron Smith. skirt. The long, close-fitting sleeves
Southern magnolias formed the came to points over the hands. Shaw
background for a central arrange- wore a coronet styled fingertip veil
ment of white gladioli and chrysao- fashioned with pearls.
themums with large floor baskets IS-he carried a white prayer book
of gladioli on either side. The bri- topped with an orchid-centered cas-
dal scene was lighted by burning cade bouquet of feathered carna-
tapers in four wrought-iron seven- tions.
branch candelabra. The maid of honor, Miss Kathryn
Miss Marietta Chafin, organist, Williamson, only sister of the bride,
rendered a program of nuptial\ mu- was lovely in a gown of sunshine
sic which included "Idylls of yellow organdy, over taffeta. Her
Spring", "Olh. Promise Me", and headdress was a halo of orchid col-
"Walk Hand in Hand". Preceding ored satin leaves. She carried a
the ceremony, Miss Celia Tomlia- satin open heart in a lovely shade
son, soloist, sang "At Dawning", of orchid. A yellow throated purple
and "Tile Sweetest ;Story Ever orchid with a cascade of orchid sa-
Told". The ceremony was perfonn- tin leaves and streamers was at-
ed to the background music of tached to one side.
"Sweet Peace", and Miss Tomlinson" The bridesmaids, Miss Cora Sue


FOOD


321 Reid Avenue


STORE


'Port St. Joe, Fla.


PRICES GOOD APRIL 4, 5 and 6

SUPER-RIGHT HEAVY WESTERN BEEF


Brake Special


Thursday, Friday and Saturday

Replace your worn-out brake linings with
new bonded brake shoes No rivets to
scar brake shoes Available for all cars
1949 to 1957. Reg. $30.00 Value.

ALL FOUR WHEELS



$22.40

All cylinders and hydraulic lines checked free
(3 Factory-Trained Mechanics On Duty)





THURSDAY

CHEVROLET COMPANY
Phone 7-2221 401 Williams Ave.


lRold STEAK

SUPER RIGHT U. S. CHOICE BONELESS



Beef Stew

SUPER-RIGHT LEAN PARK



Spare Ribs

GRADE 'A' CORNISH 16 to 18 OZ. AVG.



Game Hens

FRESH GREEN STRINGLESSS


BEANS

TALCO LAYING MASH

PELLETS


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i69c

LB.



59c

LB.



39c

- EACH



69c


15c


25 LB. BAG $1.23
100 LB. BAG $4.89


7 U- -- _


social hall of the church. Against
a background of magnolias inter-
spersed with lighted candles, the
bride's table was covered with pas-
tel yellow linen overlaid with a
floor length cloth of white organdy
featuring a full gathered skirt with
tiny double ruffles outlining the
table edge. A beautiful three4iered
wedding cake, topped by a minia-
ture bride and 'groom, centered the
table, on either side of which was
a three branch candelabrum holding
hand decorated bride's candles. An
arrangement of pompoms and dai-
sies and silver compotes of pastel
colored mints completed the lovely
picture. Mrs. Chauncey Costin ser-
ved the cake.
The central arrangement for the'
punch table, which was covered to
match the bride's table, was a
spreading bouquet of gladioli under
a white satin arch. from which hung
a cluster of lace wedding 'bells.
Presiding at the punch table were
Mrs. Marlyn Kannaberg, Miss Son-
jia Ann Blount, and Miss Kathryn
Marshall.
The bride's book was attended by
Miss Eda Ruth Kilbourn. A hand
decorated candle surrounded with
net ruffles in which was nestled a
white dove holding two hearts en-
'twined with lillies of the valley
complemented the organdy covered
table.
Following the reception, the
young couple left for a wedding
trip through the East. Mrs. Bor-
den chose a lavender ensemble with
black and white accessories for her
traveling costume. She wore the
white orchid from her wedding bou-
quet.
Mrs. Borden is a graduate of
Port .St. Joe High School in the
class of 1956.
Lieutenant Borden is currently
stationed at Suffolk County Air
Force Base, Westhampton Beach,
New York.
Out-of-town guests included Mrs.
Gertrude Kover, Mr. and Mrs. M.
J. Aultman, Mrs. Mary Barlow and
son Ronald Godwin, Mrs. James
Avant and Mrs. Riley Hill all of
Panama City; Mr. and Mrs. Perry
L. McClellan, Mr. and Mrs. C. T.
Johnson and Mr. and Mrs. Billie
Mosser of BlountstOwn.


Dinner Honors

Engaged Couple

Miss Ann Costin and Joel Strait,
whose marriage will be solemnize'l
April' 6 in the First Methodist
Church, were honor guests at a
seated spaghetti dinner Friday
night.
Hostesses were Mrs. Chris Mar-
tin, Mrs. Hubert Brinson, Mrs. Tom
Pridgeon, Mrs. George Suber, Mrs.
Chales Brown, Mrs. 0. M. Taylor
and Mrs. J. P. Fleishel. The host-
esses chose the Mexico Beach home
om Mrs. Fleishel.
This party was one of the many
scheduled for the couple.
Miniature Mexican straw hats
marked the places of the guests
and 'carried out the Mexican
theme. Low arrangements of day
lilies and yellow candles centered'
the tables which were covered with
green and yellow linen cloths. Red
amaryllis lilies were used in the
kitchen.
Attending were Mr. and Mrs.
Tommy Pridgeon, Mr. and Mrs.
Marion Parker, Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Hinote, Mr. and' Mrs. Ken Kenna-
berg, Mr. and Mrs. Ferrell Aller
Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Harrison, MT.
and Mrs. Chauncey Costin, Mr. and
Mrs. Fred Davis, Miss Sibbie Brin.
son, Miss Frances Clark, Miss Ce-
lia Tomlinton, Gerald Garrett Jack
Bush and Kennon Williams.

Alabama Visitors
Visiting Mrs. 'S. R. Grice from
Selma, Ala., the past week end
were her daughter, Mrs. H. F. Har-
rison and her daughters, Anne,
Jean and Patti. They returned
home Sunday.

advertising doesn't eaot. It PAYSI

Smith and Miss Martha Costin,
wore dresses of champagne organ-
dy, similarly fashioned to that of
the maid of honor. Their bouquets
were also identical to that of the
maid of honor.
The flower girl, Miss Debbie Wil-
liamson, niece of the bride, wore
a gown of sunshine yellow, identical
to those of the other attendants.
She carried a white lace basket
adorned with orchid satin rosettes
and streamers. Kenny Avant, cou-
sin of the bride, was ring bearer.
Carl Williamson, brother of the
bride, served the groom as best
man. The ushers were George Hill,
cousin of the bride, and Walter Wil-
der.
Mrs. Williamson chose for her
daughter's wedding a dress of grey
lace over pink taffeta with grey
and 'pink accessories. Her corsage
was t lavender orchid.
,Immediately following the cere-
mony, a reception was held in the


Rev Carden Accepts

Alabama Pastorate

The Rev. William Luther Carden,
28, has accepted a call' to the pas-
torate of Hartselle, Alabama, First
Baptist Church, and will move there
with his family soon. It is expect
ed that Easter Sunday, April 21,
will be the date of his occupying
the Hartselle pulpit for the first
time as pastor.
Rev. Carden, a native of Port St.
Joe, has been pastor of the First
Baptist Church at Livingston, Tenn.
since July, 1954, which was his
first and only pastorate since his
completion of work on his B.D. de-
gree at Southern Baptist Seminary
at Louisville, Ky., in 1954.
His family includes his wife, the.
former Faye Morris, of Port St.
Joe, whom he wed in June, 1951,
and their one child, lByron Luther,
who was born August 23, 1954. Mrs.
Morris holds a Bachelor of Science
degree in nursing from Emory Uni-
versity.

STAC House Plans
Covered Dish Supper
'The student STAC house commit-
tee has planned something new for
the students of St. Joe High. Next
Saturday night, April 6, they are
having a covered dish supper and
dungaree dance. Admission to the
dance is a covered dish. The cos-
tume for the evening is strictly in-
formal and dungarees and slim jims
are encouraged.
A night of fun has been planned
by the STAC House committee and
you surely won't want to miss it.
Send The Star to a friend.
F = -


---_' starring
JEFF CHANDLER
JOANNE DRU ULIE LONDON
RELEASED THRU UNITED ARTISTS


FR iAY and SATURDAY DANNY KAYr.
- FEATURE No. 1 -



swillr


Elvis Presley Records
'Prior To Show Time
Come Early Have Fun

TUESDAY


=-

wjk liCANti u imu simisi s ZALEm
Diriburad by RKO RADIO P.TURES ia.

Play Hollywood

Every Tuesday

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY




E^ MOMENT

C.ig JON SAON Mn.mwmonA A iMme
A UNIVERSALINTERNATIONAL PICTURE


BATTLiE

HYMNIV

ROCK HUDSON
MARTHA HYER
DAN DURYEA
A UNIVERSAL INTERNATIONAL
PICTURnE


Wednesday & Thursday
FRIDAY


AUNIVERSA: ,. rel ra.t" :r.-i t :- : < ;
JEFF CHANDLER"
JEANNE CRAIN
JACK CARSON


Scouts Seeking Help
On Summer Trip Fund
iHelp the Boy Scouts who will go
to the Jamboree in Valley Forge,
Pa., by buying tickets to a shrimp
creole supper. The time and place
of the supper will be announce
next week.
Help Scouts of Troop 313 with
their fund raising drive to go to
summer camp.
WAYN E CHILDERS, Scribe

It pays to advertise try it!








THURSDAY FRIDAY


^^~~^^M""""^""^^^""^"`^""""~


I Il


- ,-~-


rnr ion I


'tht StAR, PORT ST. JOIK, GULF COUNTY FLORIOA


THU-R$DAY, APRIL 4, 1951


F --


AaUa -tWo







THURSDAY, APRIL.4,. 197 THE STAR, PFO7 $T. JTOs, oUtFF COUNTY, FLORIDA

LEGISLATURE 19 eoin1I from uand whey, oit g'o s atois i.nc ,. many boards -.. .:. Usk atd the limit o timUa
ig and commissions, sherit'f, justice prevents many bills from being giv-
HIGHLIGHTS 'Eager and anxious to help them of the peace, judge, county commis- en the serious and careful consider-
in reaching a decision is an ardent sons and many others, ation they should receive. This is The
(Florida News Service) crowd of lobbyists representing jus'. The theme song is money money, no reflection on legislators, but ra-
Florida's legislature now in ses- about every conceivable private it.- money and more money for increas- their the fault of the system. Pas
sion finds itself confronted with terest. ed salaries, for school buildings and Among many bills that may be Celeb
countless problems, most of them lobbying is not confined to pri- teachers for larger staffs, for ev- looked for this session will be those ion. 9
concerned with where the money vate interests; it includes orani- erything and everything. dealing with such problems as revi- a.m.,


You Are Cordicdly Invited To Attend

af Avenue Baptist Chcih
REV. J. C. OUM, Pastor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m.S
MORNING WORSHIP -- 11 00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION _. 6:"L p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 p.m.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) 7:30 p.m.
Corner Lng Avenue and 16th Street?

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME'
1 % Aft OONtOTIONEDO


Many of these demands are jus


tified. Florida is a fast-growing
state. Living costs are high, con-
struction costs .are high. Many
boards- and bureaus are understaf-
fed and unable to properly perform
the jobs they are supposed to do.
tHouse Speaker Doyle E. Conner
and Senate President W. A. Shands
must depend on their appointed
committees to carefully consider
each problem and make recommen-
dations.
Legislative wheels have jilst
started dto turn. They move slowly
at firs', but pick up speed as the
session progresses,
During a 60-day session of the
Legislature in the neighborhood of
3,000 bills are introduced. All must
be given consideration. It is a gi-


FORD


is lowest priced of the

low-price three!


'The new lung. I:,w -and-
lovely Custom Tudor


Everything that makes a fine car fine -
can now be yours at the low Ford price! You get a fine-car V-8
engine-the end result of Ford's 25 years' experience building
more V-8's than anyone else. You get the-longest, biggest,
loveliest of the low-priced cars. You get a new "Inner Ford"
with a full-cradle frame and the last word in suspension systems
for a smoother ride and longer life. But, don't take our word for it!
Visit your Ford Dealer and see what a fine car Ford dollars deliver.


It makes LUXURY a low-priced word
ANEW
KIND OF R
*Based on comparison of
manufacturers' suggested retail
delivered price,
F.D.A.F.


COMPANY
Florida


sion of the state sales tax. A trong
effort will be made to broaden it
*with the Florida State Retailers As-
sociation strongly backing such
move.
Milk price controls will again be
a major issue. This controversial
0 subject has been simmering since
last session and dairy interests are
not a bit satisfied with the situa-
tion which they claim is putting
them out of business.
Reapportionment will of course
bob up, but considering the legisla-
ture's experience with this problem
last session it is doubtful if any
action will be taken. Small county
blocks still dominate and any at-
tempt to give metropolitan areas
greater representation will result
in a fight that would probably end
in another stalemate.
Merchants Associations are out
to give the axe to trading stamps,
1This has been done in several
states and several legislators have
promised to introduce legislation
at this session that will outlaw all
fra-ding stamps.
Unions will again make an effort
to 'get rid of Florida's "Right to
Work" amendment, but at this writ-
ing it appears that they have. lit
tie chance of suc.cess. Legislators
familiar with the situation know
that the amendment is sound and
in the interest of the public and the
laboring man. Its opponents are the
labor bosses and labor bosses aren't
faring too well right now; some of
them are more concerned with the
"Fifth Amendment" than anything
else.
An attempt will probably be made
to abolish the fee system but oppo-
sition on the part of fee officers is
strong. They have won out in the
past when similar efforts to do
away with the fee system have
been considered.
Small loan people can look for a
fight to lower interest rates; but


LOSE UGLY FAT
IN TEN DAYS OR MONEY BACIP
If you are overweight, here is the
first really thrilling news to come
along in years. A new and conven-
ient way to get rid of extra pounds
easier than ever, so you can be as
slim and trim as you want. This
new product called DIATRON curbs
both hunger and appetite. No drugs,
no diet, no exercise. Absolutely
harmless. When you take DIATRON
you still enjoy your meals, still eat
the foods you like but you simply
don't have the urge for extra por-
tions and automatically your weight
must come down, because, as your
own doctor will tell you. when you
eat less; yon weigh less. Excess
weight endangers your heart, kid-
neys. So no matter what you have
tried before, get DIATIRON and
prove to yourself what it can do.
DIATRON is sold on this GUARAN-
TEE: You must lose weight with
the first package you use or the
package costs you nothing. Just re-
turn the bottle to your druggist and
get your money back. DIATRON
costs $3.00 and is sold with this
strict money back guarantee by:
SMITH'S PHARMACY
Port St. Joe, Fla.
Mail Orders Filled


NO MATCHES...NOMESS...


C't& WATER HEATERS ARE..*

Modern

p JAutomatic

Sime-savinq

I, IT- ,, C lean

HF ealt;.iul

Labor-saving

S, --" Economical

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-- Sure


FLORIDA POWER
CORPORATION


rumic
Celeb
Bring


ST. JAMES CHURCH
EPISCOPAL
Rev. Gardner D. Underhill
Priest In Charge
sion Sunday, April 7. 7:30 a.m.
ration of -the Holy Commuo-
:45 a.m., Church School. 11:0ff
Celebration of the Holy Corn-
on and sermon. (NOTE: Th:s
ration is a family service.
the family.) (NOTE: This


few groups are as well organized
or as experienced in dealing with
law-makers, and if the small loan
people are hurt it will be a genu-
ine surprise to most political ob-
servers. They may make some con-
cessions but not enough to amount
to much as far as small loan costs
to the borrower are concerned.


PORT ST. JOE,
FLORIDA


and LOAN


Your Saving


,6i',li Mra l. L t i'ie rlili Will dd ilea'
the third In a series of sermo'i on
the Apostles' Creed. The subject
will be "I Believe In Jesus C:'ist")
7:00 p.m., Episcopal Young Church-
men. 7:00 p.m., Celebration of the
Holy Communion and sermon at
St. John's Church, Wewahitchka.
Tuesday, April 9. 8:00 p.m. Choir
rehearsal.
Wednesday, April 10. The mid-
week even Lenten service will not
be conducted as the Prest in charge
must be away for the evening.
Friday, April 12. 7:,30 a.m., Cele-
bration of the Holy Communion.
The public is cordially invited to
worship with us and is assured of a
warm welcome.

Star Want Ads Get Result'


Owned by the Savings PHONE
Investors BA 7-4646


Caitizenm

Federal %



ASSOCIATION of Port St. Joe


Is Placed With Us. .


YOUR SAVINGS placed with us
by the 10th earn from the Ist, PRO-
FITABLY, SAFELY, PLEASINGLY.

SAVE THE EASY WAY BY
MAIL You will be please, and so
will we.


Sun., Mon., Tues.

April 7,8 and 9


SOME MEN LOSE THEMSELVES
IN WAR...SOME MEN
FIND THEMSELVES IN IT!
,. '*'E1 i


A UNJVElSAAL1INTE l4AXIONAM
FicnJM TECHNICOLOR

ROCK HUDSON MARTHA HYER DAN DURYEA
_ _. DON DfIRE ANNA KASHFI JOCK MAHONEY


Thurs., Fri. and Sat.
April 4, 5 and 6



4 to 6 Lb. PICNIC

HAMS Lb. 29c




SMOKED SLAB

BACON

3 1b. 99c



Ballard or Pillsbury

BISCUITS

2 for 19c



GA. GRADE "A"


HENS Lb. 29c


5 LB. BAG

SUGAR 39c
With $5.00 Grocery Order



U. S. GOOD

Chuck Roast

Lb. 33c



REMEMBER

Save-Mor coupons


ARMOUR'S -

Canned MILK

2 tall cans 25 c


FRESH PASCAL

CELERY

2 stalks 19c



Robin Hood, Plain or Self Rising

FLOUR

25 Lb. $1.98



ARMOUR'S

Peanut Oil

No. 10 jug $1.59



GA. GRADE "A"
NEVER UNDERSOLD

FRYERS





QUALITY


MARKET
PRICES CLERKS
RIGHT POLITE
Corner Williams & Third


BY STANDARD OIL EXPERTS
As an extra "Standard" service we will
give you with your lubrication job a 1957
calendar to hang on your sunvisor. This calen-


dar has a space for keeping up


mileage for lubrication purposes.



Come In Today!



Woolford's Standard Serv.


113 Manument Ave.


Port St. Joe


ST. JOE MO TOR (


'a ~rro~ibiJlsL~ rr~Pi~e~a~u~~ p~.lr~ ~a~Sa~-?~F~.~3-~:i.~p~liaPS~unm


I ----0 s -- --a. .- 1_1.


-


--I-- I I I ,


II I Ib LI -- 1 I I


' --- --- ~ -' ---


""iMm"


with your


SPhone 7-7171


'kF~F~-J~f~''~"B~~ ~B~Wc-*~%b~a~*2~3~~






. .....AR. POITIITrJOt iGULPlCOUNTY FLORIDA APR_- ,,___ii_ iii ..il I I i 4, 19 .7I


S* I Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
CoStin P ": TI ~ ive Highland View mission made up-wards of $30,000
And Wh" of R c-on fishing licenses. Low water has
And Whi" C '. 7-rt of Race Track Fund dropped it to $10,000. Yet the
G IWFC figures it would realize
$40,000 on licenses with a dam to
By Edwar' !., Pandjough a'e, Costin said. He plans to intro- stabilize fishing conditions.
Last Wednesday evening at the duce legislation to that effect. Sportsmen, he continued, pay a
court house, RPp. Cecil Costin, JTr., Costin indicated that regardless tax on cigarettes, liuqor, and gas-
held his Wewahitchka area, pre-ses- of objections he planned to push line, all of which goes back to
sion public mectiing. And as usual, ahead with the bill giving the two the state. Th estate profits immen-
it was sparse y attended, the peo- above-mentioned areas the $3,000. sely because tourism is the state's
pie of this area being, seemingly, Asked for his opinion by David biggest business. Therefore, he rea-
satisfied with matters as they are C. Gaskin, Sen. Bart Knight said soned; the state should shoulder the
and apparently having no legisla- that if the issue became controver- burden of constructing the dam.
tion they would like to see passed. sial, he would put it up for referen- Costin agreed in principle, Be-


All of the county commissioners
were in attendance, as were Sen,
Bart Knight, Dave Gaskin, David
C. Gaskin, Lloyd Whitfield and
Byrd E. Parker.
Amon gthe items Costin is pre-
paring for passage through the leg-
islature is the proposal that White
City and Highland View receive
$3,000 each from the race track
funds annually, as is now the case
with Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka.
The reaction to this proposal by
the county commissioners was mild
although Comm. E. C. Harden took
exception on the grounds that
White City perhaps ought not to
qualify for the money because the
area was not incorporated and had
no present intention of becoming
so. Highland View is to incorpor-


dum.
Comm. Harden asked Rep. Cos-
tin what his legislative plans were
regarding the dam for the Dead
Lakes.
Costin replied that several ave-
nues were open for consideration,
one being the General Appropria-
tion. He said he believed he ought
to get additional information from
the administration, and from other
legislators whose areas were being
affected as was the Dead Lakes, be-
fore he settled upon the best ap-
proach to the financial obstacle.
David C. Gaskin reiterated his
opinion that the state should fi-
nance the construction, since much
of the money brought into this sec-
tion by sportsmen went directly to
the state capital. In good fishing
seasons, he told the group, the


SLoans for buying a new home
SEE US
FOR .-
Loans for buying a new home
Loans for building a new home
"4 Improvement Loans for your home
"4 Loans for replacing home equipment
Consolidation loans for all your bills

M. P. TOMLINSON
REALTOR INSUROR
Monument Avenue Phone 7-3201


REPAIRED and RECOREB
CLEANED, PLUSH*O


STARTERS and GENERATORS
WMPAIW nd ICBCHANOW
Pate's Sh Sevice


Ph...A AU7-9M M36 Monumnt Ao..


fore turning to another topic, he
told the commissioners of his plan
to caucus with other legislators


-I
'I


At


Beauty
Created for
Versatility
The most versatile of shoes .
here done in fine style for sum-
mer, of smooth white leather.
It's the sweater pump, slim and
high of heel, slender of shape,
with the added fillip of snug.
elasticized binding.

Only $4.95


who need dams, and urged the com-
missio ners, and other interested
persons, to come to Tallahassee
when there was need for local
)groups to be heard, the better to
) give the legislators a true picture
of the continuing need for the dam.
!Sen. Knight promised the dam
matter would get top priority on his
legislative calendar.
Informally, the Junior College
proposal got kicked around again.
Costin suggested that the Board
get an enabling act passed thru
the legislature which would author-
ize the Board to participate one
time for $5,000, then stop. When
next the Board was requested to
participate, they could say, we


COSTINS


have gone as far as we can. In
short, limit the bill' to one approp-
riation with succeeding participa-
tions to be financed from the
School Board budget.
'The Board, however, did not re-
quest 'Costin to proceed with such
a bill.


!hi. on yotour printing Is to asi of aualit.


BEAMAN PLUMBING SERVICE
110 HUNTER CIRCLE
Licensed Plumber
Can Handle Any Type Plumbing, Small or Large
15 Years Experience
ALL WORK GUARANTEED FREE ESTIMATES
PHONE BAllI 7-2541 At Anytime


Classified Ads Bring Quick Results


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or
LAY-AWAY PLAN


Stylis


Made by the Makers of Buster Brown

h Shoes For


Men


FLORSHEIM 16.95 to 18.95
FORTUNE ----------7.95 to 10.95

Lovely Easter Dresses
f e'vc picked a Spring bouquet of


I


All



These



Lovely



Fashions-


At


Costin's


for



Easter


NELLY DON ------ $10.95 to $16.95
TENNA PAIGE ---------$9.95 to $12.95
LAMPL ------------ $10.95 to $17.95


ASHOE


SHOE


Fiion Iraft Shoes For Ladies
Stylish Dress Shoes Priced From

$6.95 to $8.95


Robinnett Ladies Shoes
Flats and Wedges Priced From

$4.50 to $6.95


Robin Hood Shoes For Children
BITl:, Patent and Whites. Sizes 3 to 5% 6 to 8%, 8% to 12, 12'/ to 3

$3.95 to $5.95


Step smartly Into summer .
in this jutt-rlght-for-everything
pump of rich white leather. It's
calculated to pay pretty compli-
ments to you wherever you go,
whatever you wear. The little
low heel Insures comfort.
Only $2.95


JOIN THE EARLY SHOPPERS FOR YOUR



EASTE[ FASHIONS


ENROLL NOW
at the

LIVELY TECHNICAL SCHOOL

CORNER DUVAL AND PARK AVENUE
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
and

EARN WHILE YOU LEARN
to be a


Practical Nurse

Class Begins April 8, 1957


12 MONTHS COURSE CONSISTS OF:
4 Month Pre-clinical Training at Lively Technical School
8 Months Clinical Training at Tallahassee Memorial Hos.
(Students receive $50.00 a month while in training)


RADIATORS:


$10.95 to $24.95


LADIES
EASTER HATS.
$2.98 to $6.98


LADIES' GLOVES

$1.00 to $1.98 pr


LINGERIE
by Artemis
LOVELY SLIPS
Nylon and Rayor'

$2.98 to $10.98


j .
-. .:... dresses

' ... ..,- for you ...
S .. ...the young
in heart!

Come see, come pick your
S*' Spring wardrobe from our smart,
,.gay and colorful Minx Modes
r- dresses fresh from the
; pages of your favorite fashion
S -magazines. Every important
\ style is here see them today!
r -- 1 *


II


- ,


Gay
Ballerina
of a Shoe
Beloved of all ages the flat-
flat little pump in smooth white
leather that's as young in heart
as every summer day you'll wear
it. Guaranteed to do nice things
to clothes, morning, noon and
night.

Only $2.95


Summer Calls
for

Pretty Comfort
We answer the summer call for
pretty comfort with the nicest
sandal you'll ever own a
smooth white medium wedgie,
its throat dot-punctuated, its
vamp wearing a straight-across
buckle. The foam cushioned lin-
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Only $3.95

MOM: -
Why not dress that replica
of you in a
Cinderella
DRESS
FOR EASTER
Prices From

$2.98 to $8.98

She must have a stand-out
PETTICOAT
to go with that Easter dress
WE HAVE THEM

$1.98 to $5.98


Right In Step
with
Summer


'Tma strAR, PORT 3Tr. JOIE. GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


THURSDAYv, AO-RIL 4, 1957


-neOf !Z.IvtcICU






IT'S


BIG


SPRING


VALUE


TI


DURING


OUR


DEL


ONT


No. 2 CAN SLICED


pineapple


29c


NO. 2'/ CAN


PEACHES


NO. 303 CAN FRUIT


COCKTAIL


29c


25c


NO. 303 CAN


t RD ..i. Il ILLSBURY
" ':""' T S


SPL MOUTH


4 1a


I y \l. -) 'S NO. d10


.4 *.


I'


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3
FOR.


FOR





SFOR


Al .,..


NO. 303 CAN DEL MONTEt
CORN'hMN
NO. 2 CAN DhL MONTE
PEAS


1.2
FOR


2
FOR


a'33W0


37c


DEL MONTE
LI MAS


BALLARD
l'.' .


6 OZ. 1 TANT CHASE and
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3,,LB. SWIFT


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PALM VALLEY

FRANKS


Loose, LB.


EVYD IEA
EIR LfAN


Pork


25c


ChopsFIRST CUT 39c
PS CENTER 69c


PURE FRESH
AROUND BEEFLs


C
t444
44
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0
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VELDA ICE CREAM


FROZEN FOODS
WHOLE SUN


7 FOR


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LIBBYS
CREAM STYLE CORN
STRAWBERRIES


4 FOR


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DUCHESS

2 pt 25c
NEW STORE HOURS:
MON., TUES., THURS. 8:00 to 6:30
WEDNESDAY 8:00 to 12:30
FRIDAY and SATURDAY ..----....---. 8:00 to 7:00


E


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as .o -


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,PEARS


OnANGE JUICE








STOT STA14 PORT aT. JOW, qU C~l93JPT, FLUORIDBA


-.* ""I' Y P'


rlTHE STAR

P1uclueh Every Thursday At 306 Williams Avnus, Port St. Jo*, Florida
By the Star Publishing Company
WESEr& BR. RAMSEY Editor and Publisher
AimslfUetyp Operator, Ad Man, Floor Man, Columnist, Reporter, Proof Beader
and Bookkeeper
O ME YEAR, ,a00 SIX MONTHS 1.50 THREE MONTHS $127.50
IUBSCRIPTIONS INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
entered as ecod-olass matter, December 19, 1987, at the Postoffice, Port St. Joe,
Florida, under Act of March 8, 1879.
DIAL BAll 7-3161
*O ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than amount received for such
xa4ertisement.
the spoken word is given, scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully
weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces.
the spoken word Is lost; the printed word remains.


Research Attacks Cancer
For the last dozen years the American Cancer Society has
;been mounting a massive research assault against the cruelest
k;er of all time.
'Several thousand scientists have been recruited and trained
for' the battle against cancer. Fantastic equipment designed to
measure minute chemical and physical changes in cells and
tissues has bee designed, built and distributed to hundreds of
laboratories. New laboratories have been constructed to house
the men and the machines.
And now the attack is on. It is by far the most extensive
and expensive war ever conducted against a single disease.
It is also one of the most varied and imaginative approaches
'ever attempted to control any tragedy of mankind. It embraces I
dobens of disciplines in Science cytologists to seek the subtle
stesutural differences between normal and cancer cells, biochem-
ists to learn where normal cell and body chemistry goes awry d
in cancer, immunologists to try to learn what constitutes natural 8
resistance to disease and to try to turn that resistance against F
cancer,-and many other highly specialized types of scientists.
Al1 this has been made possible by public contributions t6o
die American Cancer Society. These have risen from a total of a
S0 00,000 in 1943 to more than $27,000,000. last year. It represents $
;a decided change in both public and scientific opinion on the
question of whether cancer can be beaten. A dozen years ago we n
i ted in an atmosphere of despair where cancer was concerned e
a--many of the best informed sources in the field felt that cancer in
-never would be controlled. Today many scientists feel that the
Conquest of cancer is only a matter of time, although few will U
venture to speculate as to how much time. 1
Of one thing we are sure the war against cancer should
Sand must be supported. We recommend that you send your con-
tribution now to the American Cancer Society.


'How Big Is The Race Track Fund?
We would like to take a little space. to ramble for a few
moments about a couple of pieces of legislation that Representa-
tive Cecil G. Costin says he is going to introduce to the Legisla-
-ufre. for approval at the present session.
'' Last Wednesday evening in Wewahitchka, Representative
Costin stated that he would enter a bill to the Legislature to pro-
,ide White City and Highland View with $3,000.00 annually from
Cif Count '.s share of the race track funds.
Maybe we are all wet, but we will have to disagree with
litr. Costin. ,
I believe it \ias County Commissioner E. C. Hardeni that
suggested to Costin that neither Highland View or White City
we're incorporated towns and he didn't think they were entitled
tr, the funds for this reason. We agree with Mr. Harden.
It is true that Highland View is seeking incorporation in
the present session of the Legislature. But we cannot see where
they should 'receive the funds UNTIL they become an incorpor-
ated town or city. As for White City, they are not incorporated
and as far as we know they have no plans to incorporate.
lf this bill is passed, what is to keep Overstreet, Indian
'Pass, Dalkeith, Buckhorn, Ward Ridge and and other places
'fTaom demanding a like sum? And if the bill is passed, what is
.i) k-eep them from getting the money? We fail to see where
the two communities are qualified to receive the funds yet and
'hope that Mr. Costln will come to this conclusion. We believe he
is an able legislator and certainly the voters think,he is or he
'rwold not be elected. Maybe he sees farther in this matter than
we do, but sincerely hope that he abandons this idea or explains
a goodI reason.
The race track already get a good beating when they come
fiito the county with $3,000.00 a year going to both Wewahitchka
and Port St. Joe; $1,00.00 to both bands in Wewahitchka and
hat St. Joe; $1,000.00 a year to the colored band in Port St. Joe
and $10,000.00 a year to the proposed health clinics for Port St.
e "ad Wewahitcbka. The remainder is divided evenly between
e county), and the school board.
With no malice 'intended, the Star wishes it had budget
iattwe could take any amount we wanted for anything we wanted
and still expect the budget to do its expected job.
The second piece of legislation is purely rumor and we
hate to repeat it. But we feel that the rumor is sufficient to
iawe some enlightenment on before it passes provided the
-*rtmor is'fact.
We heard Monday that Representative Costin is going to
require 'that all. licenses be purchased from the offices in Wewa-
kitchka that originally dispense them. We know this is how it
is supposed to be, but we would-,hate to have to go to Wewahitch-
To just to get our drivers' licenses, hunting licenses, fishing li-
weenses, auto tags and the like. We know we are supposed to, but
the. offices here are handy for the people and we hope they re-
mali as they are. We hope that it was just a rumor and'if they
.are, we apologize for bringing the matter up.


Letter To The Editor.


* *


lb.'
51,,~


I


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. Go to your Mercury dealer
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W VILL THERE BE A TEACHER FOR YOUR CHILD NEXT YEAR?
SFlorida needs more than 5,000 new 'teachers every year to keep
sp, with increasing school enrollments and resignations. Yet, less'than
" ., new teachers from Florida's colleges and universities are enter-
i.n education each year. Florida schools face a teacher shortage'
,xahich threatens to cripple the state school system.
Why do we have this itea.cher shortage? Let us examine some of
,.L-'iact.s prevalent to the cause. Enrollment is up and'the need for


new teachers is really a matter of arithmetic. Every time 30 new stu-
dents enter Florida schools, another new teacher must be employed.
Enrollment is increasing at the rate of 60,000 new pupils each year.
That's 2,000 new teachers each year to meet increased sarollment
alone.
Increased enrollment is only part of the problem. There is a nor-
mal drop-out due to such natural causes as marriage, birth, death and
retirement. Then, there's the apecial.cause--and this is the important
one-change of occupation as teachers seek positions which provide
higher salary and greater comforts for self and family. More teachers
dropped out of the profession in Florida last year than at anytime
in history.. ,
Teacher supply is down. While the demand -gets greater due to
growing enrollments and the need becomes more acute due to drop-
outs in the profession, -the future supply gets smaller and smaller.
This year there are 1,860 ,students training in education who are
scheduled to graduate this year (statistics show that less than half
of this number will even become teachers).
It's getting harder and harder to lure teachers to Florida from
other states, many of which are now topping Florida salaries. Add it,
subtract it, or divide it and it comes out the same. The number of
classes is increasing at a far greater rate than the number of teachers.
If we do not have well-qualified teachers, there can be no real educa-
tion.
Can Florida Afford A Teacher Shortage? Good teachers make good
schools. Education is the mainstay of Democracy and teachers are the
mainstay of education. Buildings, textbooks, buses, and visual aids are
all important and necessary, but at the heart of every school stands
the teacher. Without him there is no real education.
Education is a part of the growth of Florida. Although school
needs have grown with the growth of the state, the state cannot long
grow and prosper unil these needs are met. Schools and Progress are
partners, standing together. New residents, new investment capital,
and new industries will not come to Florida unless we can offer ade-
luate educational opportunities for all.
The answer to the question, "Can Florida Afford A Teacher Short-
age?" is an emphatic NO! Florida cannot afford the luxury of under-'
paid teachers, poor schools, and inadequately educated children.
How are we going to meet and beat the teacher shortage problem?
Florida colleges and universities this year are graduating 1,860 teach-
ers, (:We need more,than 5,000), but only half of them plan to enter
'he profession. By actual count, of the 1,800 graduates last June.
840 trained, qualified and certified teachers did not enter teaching in
Florida.
Why did these teachers not teach? The answer is obvious-low
tarting salaries. Starting teacher salaries in Florida (4-year degree)
average $3,200, or just -a little more than $60 a week. This is only
29.00 a year more than the average salary paid semi-skilled factory
workers in Florida last year. Many teachers start at less.
Teachers and future teachers learn early irk life that they will
ever build up a substantial supply of this world's goods. They don't
expect to get rich, but they do want to be able to support a family
n a fair and modest fashion.
Now te.ke a look at the starting salaries offered 4-year degree
University of Florida and Florida State University graduates in June
1956.
occupation Av. Starting Salary Offered
Management Trainees ....------...---. $5,400


Teacher Salary Grade Level


$4,000
$5,600'
$5,000
$3,500
$4,000
$3,800
$4,200
$3,700
$4,150
$3,050
$3,806


Elementary
.Administrator
High School
Social Studies
High School
Mathematic
Industrial Arts
' Elementary
Science
Elementary
High School


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Oak Ridge Technicians $5,280
Engineers $5,220
'RIgistered Pharmacists $5,200
Insurance Saleeman $5,000
Building Construction $4,800
Civil' Service $4,932
Business Administration $4,200
Journalism $4,140
Agriculture $3,900
Teaching $3,200
As you can see, teaching fields were offered a beginning salary
lower than any other field of work.
FloAida must begin to bring teacher salaries in line with reality
to stop the exodus of well-trained personnel from the profession,
More teachers left the profession for better paying jobs elsewhere
last year than ever before. There were 3,300 teacher"resignations last
year alone. In many counties, teacher turn over is so great that a well-
planned and adequate school program is impossible. In one county, over
half the teachers are new to the system this year. In. another, 46 per
cent are new. The overall' average for Florida is a -teacher turn over
of over 20 per cent.
Teachers' pay in Florida averages $4,117 a year. This includes
teachers who have teaching certificates based on six years of college
work and the maximum in years of experience. This amount is con-
siderably less than most other professions which require college
training. More than half of Florida' teachers make even less. Some
teachers make as little as $2,790 a year. Fifty-one per cent of Florida's
teachers will earn less than $3,499 this year, ,
Now take a look at what teachers earn when they leave for bet-
ter paying jobs in private industry.


New Occupation New Salary
'Salesman, School Supplies 10,000
Grave Management 10,000
Educational Consultant 10,000
'Real Estate Salesman 8,500
Mathematics Consultant 8,000
Mathematician Air Base 8,000
Technician IBM Corp. 8,000
Building and Real Estate 7,500
,Oak Ridge Atomic Plant 7,000
Insurance Salesman,-. 6,500
Army Officer 6,000


For several years school people have been knowing by the process
research that this public school problem was developing. The Governor
of th State and the State Legislators have always been made aware
of public school problems.
The Continuing Educational Council, which was created by the
governor, and composed of lay people from the many civic organiza-
tions over the state was given this assignmenI by the Governor. "Find
the answer to the big question of what we can do in Florida to recruit
and retain the highest, possible caliber of teachers for our children-
considering the question primarily from the point of view of the citizen
"ho. for his own children, for his neighbor's children, and for tb-e
progress of his state, wants a school system of the highest possible
standards. and effectiveness.
This committee took several months to do the research and to
make their report.\.At the same time the Florida Educational'Associa-
(Continued On Page 10)


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bring your prescriptions to or
have your Physician phone .

Smith's Pharmacy
Prescriptions compounded by
a GRADUATE Pharmacist
JOHN ROBERT SMITH
Pharmaceutical Chemist


I


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THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1957


NOTICE OF INTENTION TO REGISTER
FICTITIOUS NAME
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCoEN:
You will please take notice that the
*',uersigned arl e-'cut.t In isine ssin lult
3L .Toe, Florida under the firm name
"Wimberly Pontiac Company", and will, e
22 April, 1957, register said fictitious name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Guy4
County, Florida, at Wewahsitchka, Flor-da-.
This the 20th day of March, A. D, 195T.
GEORGE H. WIMBiiTLY, SR.
GEORGE H. WIMBERbY,' JR.
March 28, April 4, 11, 18, 26.







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First Baptist WMS
Has Business Meeeig-

The business meeting of the Wd-
nan's Missionary Society of the
S1,First Baptist Church met Monday
S afternoonn at the church, with Mrs.
W. C. Pr'idgeon. president, presid-
Sling.
S PRESCRIP'ftO DEPT. The meeting opened with the
Saying of Psalm 85 in unison, Mrs.
C. Byron Smith led the opening
LOOK FO2 THIS SIGiN prayer. The roll call was answered
by 19 members. Reports were given
EVERY T ME Y 0 U by Mrs. Milton Chafin, young per)
pole's leader. A leader's YWA con-
DOCTOR PRESCRiE-'S. ference at the First Church in Pan-
ama City on May 7 and a Girl's
I T IS T H E SIG O F Auxiliary Coronation following af
8 p.m. at St. Andrew's Baptist
PR E C I Church were announced. All R. A.
members are urged to attend the
PRESCRIPTION SERVICE R. A. conclave at West Florida Pap-
tist Assembly grounds, Sunday, Ap-
ril 7. The community mission re-


Buzzett's Dug Store

Port St. Joe, Florida


NEWS FROM

OAK GROVE
By HELEN NORRIS

Honored With Party
Mrs. D. H. Shealey honored her
daughter Evelyn on 'her 16th birth-
day Tuesday night at 7:30 at her
home on Duval Street. Rferesh-
ments of cokes, cakes, cup cakes
and ice cream were served to the
,following guests: Treva Campbell,'
Juanita Norris, Alice Jean Gay, Ka-
thryn Elliott, Joel Norris, Ted Can-
non, Joyce Hayes, Frances Spears,
Virginia and Elbert Norris. Hostess
for the occasion were Mrs. H. D
Levins and Mrs. Shealey.
Mrs. J. T. Campbell and daugh-
ters, Sherry and Geraldine and Mrs.
Essie Knight visited in Cross City
Sunday.


Mrs. Knight of Cross City re.uri-.
ed home Sunday after spending a
few weeks with her son, Mr. and
Mrs. Glenn Knight and children and
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Campbell and
children.
Mrs. Jewel Callahan and children
visited in Westville Sunday with
her parents.


IT'S

WALL ELECTRK

COMPANY

FOR EXPERT

Electrical Repairs
and

Contracting
DIAL BA 7-4331
r


THO bTAR. POR-rST, JlnL'L 'iy, PVTl0JA-.AYAPIL 4, 195'


Ml*lrS Wh riyv PreSlde^ ,01 L t tlailI h ise iUfiitLed t1hir hinvitol4 herh boy ;eii0 i for the week
U ecomfimeniatiols to be presented nd which is full of special activi-
At St. James' Meeting to the Vestry. The roup voed o ties such as a hay ride, picnic, ban-
buy a funeral pall. quet and a tea in the flower gar-
Mrs. Ernest Wimborly, president. TThe meeting adjourned with a den of Dr. and Mrs. Riddle. Thru-'
presided over the regular monthly prayer, out the week end Sophomores will,


business meeting of St. James' Wo-
man's Auxiliary Monday afternoon
in the parish house. Nine members
were present.
The meeting opened with the
Woman's Auxiliary prayer follow-
ed with a devotion given by Mrs.
Tom Coldewey.
Mrs. Otto Anderson was appoint-
ed chairman of the dinner to be
given for Rotary ladies night.
It was voted to have the regular
monthly covered dish luncheon on
the second Sunday in place of the
third Sunday. The committee ap-
pointed to investigate use and rates

port revealed that $68.98 had been
given for the month in food, cash
and clothing.
All members were asked to at-
tend a meeting of the Cancer So-
ciety at the Port St. Joe High
School gymnasium, Thursday, Ap-
ril 4, at 8 p.m. The meeting colaed
with prayer by Mrs. Chafin.


MARIETTA CHAIN RETURNS
TO SCHOOL AFTER HOLIDAY
Miss Marietta Chafin, a sopho-
more at Judson College, returned
to school Wednesday of last week
after spending a week of spring
holidays with her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Milton Chafin.
Sunday through Thursday of this
week she is on a tour of Alabama
with the Judson choir.
Friday through Sunday she will
observe "Sophomore Week end".
This is the biggest event of the year
for a Sophomore at Judson. She


enjoy enor privilegess..
. Lane Wells, a student at George-
town College, Georgetown, Ky., will
be the guest of Miss Chafin for this
week end.

Guests of Baggetts
Mrs. James B. Jones, Mrs. Frank
Kieler and Mrs. Robert Bell of Pen-
sacola and Mrs. J. R. Parrish of
Auburn, Alabama, sisters of Mrs.
J. '0. Baggett, have been the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Baggett.
They returned to tleir home Fri-
day.


Letter To The Editor.


* *


tion was making its own research and report. The findings and recom-
meqdations of both reports were very similar in detail. Both reports
contained recommendations that if Florida was to retain its present
system of education, teachers salaries would have to be raised to a
beginning figure of $4200 for beginning teachers and with other teach-


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III


eNi' &alarvleg r'aiad l iii'u ui lfo11 to the "*heiniiig 'alary, The .aotg
in this article were taken from the report of the Continuing Education-
al Council of Florida and can be authenticated from it.
The Governor of the State of Florida repudiated the report of his
own committee, -by saying a starting salary of $4200 was un-realistic
and un-sound. Since then some legislators have made similar state-
ments.
Over a period of years teachers have been underpaid. As prices
and wages went up, teachers salaries did not go up in proportion.
Thereby a salary lag was created. Now and from necessity they are
asking for a decent starting wage and the cry goes up that for a teach-
er to want ra decent wage is un-realistic.
People are forgetting the fact that teachers are human just as
other people. They are forgetting that teachers, just like other people,
like credit ratings that will enable them to finance homes, a new
car every second year, television sets, and the other modern conven-
iences that finance companies are able to afford people.
Teachers are told daily, "I just wouldn't work for what you are
working for." Consequently many teachers take this suggestion ser-
.ourly and quit working "for what they are working for" and join the
higher salaried brackets.
Teachers are finding it much easier to find better paying jobs than
it is for them to argue with the people about better pay for teaching.
The .whole thing breaks down to a matter of dollars and cents.
Are ycu willing to pay a few dollars extra so that your child can have
a better education? If you are, the Igeislature is now meeting in Ta'-
lahassee and it can do something a-bout stabilizing the school situation.
Call your legislators or, send them a wire.
The question is still with us. ,"Will your child have a teacher next
year?"
Sincerely,
LEROY BtOIWDOIN, Principal
Port St. Joe High School







THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1957 THE STAI~, P~iR1 UT. .3t~ ~UL~ OOuNTV~ FLORIDA


Palm Boulevard, announce the en-
gagement and approaching mar-
riage of their daughter, Betty Rose.
to Clifton C. McCoy, son of Mr. and
Mrs. G. A. McCoy of Auburndale,
1611 Fla.


Intramural Game
Results Are Listed
By PAT SPEARS
The intramural Board of Port St.
Joe High sponsored their annual
Basketball Tournamntcii Thuri-dav,
March 2S. during activity period in
the High School Gym.
The Senior boys met the 10 B
boys for a tremendous struggle for
top scores. The 10B class took :he
lead in the first quarter, then tie
Seniors came to the conclusion that
they had a fight on their hand;.
At the end of the game the score
read, Seniors 143 Sophomores '.IS.
High point men for the Senii:
class team was Wilford Elliott wih11
19 points and Wayne Davis will
15 points. Other players include'i
Ronnie Holsonback. Travis Jones
and Louis Ray. High point men tai
the 10B13 team was Edward Smnllh
with 13 points and James Knixht
with 12 points. Other boys partici-
pating were Jackie Mitchell, Jonn
Presnell, Ronnie Young. Richard
Zipperer, Fred Griffin and .Bill
Chism.
While the boys were tearing it
up on one end of the court, the
girls were having themselves a real
Miss Martin is a graduate of Mul-
berry High School. Mulberry, Fla.,
with the class of 1954. She is em-
ployed in the Accounting Depart-
ment of the St. Joe Paper Co.
Mr. McCoy received his educa-
tion in Auburndale. He served three
years with the United States Army
and is presently employed by tilhe
Coca Cola Bottling Company in
Lakeland.
The wedding will be an event of
May 12.


battle on the other end. The ninth Rotarians See
grade girls being under classmen
Were a slight favorite of the crowd. !Movie On Cancer
The Junior girls had quote a cheer- I
ing squad also. Cancer was the topic of the pro-
The two aiams took to the floor ...
The two tas took to the floor gram brought to the Port St. Joe
and the battle was on. In the first Rot Club at theirt-
quarter the Freshmen jumped regular meet
ahead by five points, but after a ing last Thursday at noon.
hard fight the Junior girls tied up The program was brought to the
the score. The Freshmen girls Rotarians by Mrs. Marjorie C.
came within two point of catching Bates, Field Representative of the
up. but at the close of the game the American Cancer Society of Pensa-
score read 11th, 19, 9D, 17. High 'cola. Mrs. Bates showed a film on
scorer for the Junior team was "Horizons of Hope". The film told
Dauhrice Keels with 10 points. of research that is being done to
High scorers for the Freshman combat cancer-especially malig-
team was Carrie Jo Walker with nant cancer. No field of search is


eight points and Frances Spears
with seven points.
'The Intramural Banners will be
awarded to the Senior boys and
Junior girls Wednesday in Assem-.
bly by the Intramural President,
Terry Hinote.
Events sponsored this week by
the Board will be the annual Sen-
ior-Varsity game scheduled Wei-
nesday during activity period in
the High School gym.
r'hi on your print i in R sign of quality,


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Boyles Easter Parade Starts April 4


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TIES --------------59c
TEE SHIRTS ----- 2 for $1.00
* DRESS SHIRTS -------$1.95
SHORTS-------2 for $1.00
! Dress your young man with savings from
SBOYLES.


HAPPY CUSTOMERS
Men's Short Sleeve
SPORT SHIRTS

$1.00 ea.
Tan, green, white, blue. Wash-
able sanforized sport shirts with
a yoke. Strong and tough to
stand the tub. Well made for
comfortable good looks.


IF YOU DON'T SEE IT ASK FOR IT
MEN'S


TEE SHIRTS


2 For $1.00
White tee shirts, a must for summer wear.
Full cut, well made. You've worn hundreds of
dozens of these.


I Savings For Entire Family

LADIES' HOSE

77c Pr.
I Beautiful spring and summer
shades to compliment any out-
fit. Slight irregulars. All sizes.


- SMART BUNNYS SHOP BOYLES HOP IN AND SAVE FOR EASTER

I GIRLS BRIEFS Mens and Boys
STRETCH SOX
I 3 Pair $1.00 2 Pair 99c
Rayon tricot and cotton plisse. CorreCtly
proportioned for wear. Styled for good That real stretchy Helenaca knit nylon.
Looks. Made of long wearing easy waqh- The sox that wears and wears and wears.
ing fabrics for savings. White only. Washes easily too.


EASTER BARGAINS
Ladies
PETTICOATS

99c ea.
100% 40 denier nylon. That no-
iron miracle fabric. Full 7" lace
edging. Small, medium and
large.


I Payroll

Checks

SCashed

Free Gift

I Wrapping


Happy Buys For Holidays

Ladies' Panties

2pr. $1.00
Correctly proportioned of run-
proof rayon tricot fabric. Beau-
tifully styled and tailored and I
bar tacked at points of strain.


Open Every

Friday

Night I

til 8:30


MO A


Martin-McCoy
Engagement Told

Mr. and Mrs. N. G. Martin,


We're


Ready


DOWN $ 445
PAYMENT ------ -"
With the following equipment:
* Powerglide Heaters-Defrosters Oil Bath
* Oil Filter 2-Tone Finish White Wall Tires


. '- ---, OF--- 4,.,F1L~; r


AmI e


U11113111


I I ,


I-AMERICAN.


10"


THR SDTA14 PORT MT. JOE1s, OULP 100UNTY, ft~io'A:: A


THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 1WS


being ignored in the battle of can-
cer and mankind according to the
film. Research is going on through
antibodies chemical; radiation and
even to-the attempt to make a poi-
son for cancer cells. The battle has
been figured out in theory, accord-
ing to the film, but much experi-
mentation must be carried on to
put the theory into practice.
The program was introduced by
J. C. Belin, crusade chairman for
Gulf County during the current can-
cer drive. Accompanying Bdlin on
the program were Mrs. H. C. Bravwn
and Mrs.'John Sowers, both mem-
bers of the Gulf County Chapter of
the American Cancer Society.


FAara ~MW~L.:


Guests of the club were B. S. Gor-
don of Panama City and Lane Enzor
-of Troy, Alabama.
(t pays to ,1'. ClbtI--Lry It!

LEGAL AD/ERTIS-ING
IN TIIHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
HE tl''OURTEENTH JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA,
N\ HI IANCERY.
JASON DYKES )
PLAINTIFF, )
VS )
MILDRED DOLORES DYKES)
D1iEENDANT )
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
TO: Mildred Dolores Dykes,
I 1335 West "D" Street
I Hastings Nebrask a.
You are hereby notified that suit
,has been brought against you in
the Circuit Court in and for Gulf
County, Florida, in Chancery, as
above entitled, by a complaint for
divorce and other relief and you ara
required to serve a copy of your
answer or other defenses to said
complaint on plaintiff's attorney
hereinafter shown, and file the ori-
ginal of such answer, or other de-
fenses in the office of the Clerk of
the Circuit Court, Gulf County,
Florida, at Wewahitchka, -Florida,
on or before 22 April. A. D. 1957.
That upon failure to do so, said com-
plaint will be taken as confessed
by you as to the relief therein
sought, as by law in such cases
made and provided.
This the 4th day of April, A. D.,
1957.
GEORGE Y. CORE
Clerk of Circuit Court
Gulf County, Fla. (seal)
ERNEST C. WIMBERLY
Attorney for Plaintiff
303 Fourth Street
Port St. Joe, Florida.
April 4, 11, 18, and 25.


I








-*t-:.~ -. ~ THE9 ITAR, P'ftivr ST. Jfi'GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


I IBIG REt telephone PTA Groups Offer Resolution
LITTLE CLASSIFIED ADS GET RESULTS BAII 7-3161 "_I I.. 1 .u m
*~ 6- M- %t. A Rn t. .. ''w' -SL 4 ^A LJ ^ 1 1 ^ ^


Cancer Society

Meets Thursd y

(Continued from pags I)


FOR RENT: Brand now 2-bedroom
house at St. Joe Ilea';;' Wish to
lease. See J.. Clark. fc-4-4
FEMALE HELP WANTED: Wom-
en 18-55, to address and mail oir0
circulars at home on commission.
Write GIFT 1 AIR, Dept. 8. Spring-
field, Pa. 3tc-4-4
MAY WE SUGGEST that you se-
lect your Easter wardrobe now
,while we are sill in stock on sizes
and colors. We know that we can
give you the latest fashions, he
highest quality, the largest selec-
tion, and the best values at popular
prices. We invite you to shop and
compare. Then you will make your
selections at Stones' Shop for Men,
the store of quality and style at
popular prices.
WANTED TO RENT: 2 or 3 bed-
room house in Port St. Joe. C. B.
Greif, Jr. Box C, Port St. Joe. 2t
FOR SALE: Good used electric
range. Full size. Phone 7-39S6 or
see Mrs. H. F. Ayers. tfc
FOR SALE: Two adjoining lots on
Marvin Avenue. High and dry
with nice trees. Phone 7-3986 or
see Mrs. H. F. Ayers. tfc
FOR RENT: One and two bedroom
attractively furnished apartments
Cool in summer, warm in winter.
Window fans, gas heat. They have
to be seen to be appreciated, Wim-
ico Lodge, White City, Phone 9-4083.
tfc-2-21
FOR SALE: 195i I/a ton Chevrolet
truck. Good shape. $495.00. Can
be financed. See Bill Carr, St. Joe
Hardware. 3-7-tfc
SEPTIC TANKS pumped out. Call
.Buford Griffin, Phone 7-7011 for
quick expert service. 3-7-4tp
FOR RENT: Small unfurnished
house. 1305 Long Ave. Phone
7-4876. 3-14.tfc
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom lafurnish-
ed house on St. Joe Beach. Be-
tween Terry Hinote and James
Bass. $50 per mo. See Walter Du-
ren. 3-14.tfc
-WANTED: Salesgirls for part time
and full time positions. Experi-
ence preferred but not essential.
Appil in person to Mrs. Tukey, 01-
en Department Store. No phone
calls.
HELP WANTED FEMALE EARN
WHILE YOU LEARN: Tupper-
ware dealerships NOW available.
Turn you rspare hours into spare
money. Earn $35 or more per week
part-time. It is pleasant, interesting
and profitable. For interview write
or call E-Konomy Sales, -P. P. S.
Box 3501, Tallahassee, phone 2-8210
3-14-3tc
GOR SALE: Nice three bedroom
house. Also has separate dining
room and den with fireplace. Sit-
uated in excellent neighborhood.
Ha outdoor fireplace and other
features to make this a very nice
home. Only $3,600.00 down.
FRANK HANNON
Registered Real Estate Broker
Phone 7-3491 211 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe, Fla.
FOR SALE: Three bedroom home
on McClellan Ave.
E. TOM PRIDGEON
Real Estate & Insurance
BAII 7-7741 411 Reid Ave.

SPECIAL SERVICES

:OR FAST, EFFICIENT plumbing
service, call BILL'S PLUMBING.
hone 7-7846. Outboard motors re
)aired; also.
ELECTRIC IRONS repaired. Work
guaranteed. Quick dependable
service. Red's Shoe Shop. Reid Ave
KENNEDY'S ELECTRIC and RE-
FRIGERATION SERVICE. Li-
ensed electrical contractor. All
kinds' electric and refrigeration
service and installation. Phone
.-3032. tfec
F YOU ARE INTERESTED in sav-
ing money see us for anything
ton need In your home. STOP and
SWAP SHOP.

Keys Made While You Wait
35c EACH
BICYCLE PARTS
WESTERN AUTO
HUNTING & FISHING LICENSES
PANA-CRAFT BOATS
and E-Z TRAILERS
Reel Parts and Repairs
"'ADE US that useless article for
somethingg useful. STOP and
'WAP.
LOYAL ORDER OF MOOSE
Meetings at Moose Hall, 310
Fourth St.. eeting'night every other
Monday.
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. O.
O. F.-Meets first and third
Thursday, 7:30 p.m. In Masonic
Hail. All members urged to attend;
visiting brethren invited.
C. W. LONG, N. G.
J. C. PRICE, Secty.
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F&AM every second and
fourth Friday night at 8:00 p.m.
EVERETT McFARLAND, W.M.
ROY L. BURCH, Seety.
All Master Masons cordially invited.


WILLIS V. ROWAN POST '116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION. Meet-
ing first and third Monday nights
800 p.m., American Legion Home
R. A, .M.-Regular convocation of
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
M., 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit-
ing brothers welcome. J. H. Geddle,
High Priest. H. R. Maige, Secretary.


$30,076.89 Left In County Secondary


Road Fund For Remainder of Year

When you add up all the commit- far as to suggest the site near the
ments made by the county com- wayside park at West Arm Bridge
missioners for street paving and as one possibility. He said that such
then throw in the Bay City road projects are justified under the SRD
because boat owners pay gasoline
project for which a contract has tax the same
tax the sameas auto owners..
already been let, you come un with __
a remainder of $30,076.89. That is *
exactly what the commission has Constitution Park
left to spend on county streets
until next year. Museum Lists
And that's what they had verified | USOUili I.1E
for them at the meeting with the s Y
State Road Board, presided over by Visitors For Ye d
Dick Simpson, district board mem- -
her at/Chipley, last Thursday. The total attendance of the Con-
Here's how it breaks down: stitution Park Museum since i!s
The Bay City road (or to be opening day now stands at 17,000.
specific, 2.7 miles of it) is to be The total number of visitors 'nce
built by the Tapper Construction the first of the year now stands
Company for $109,760. at 1,149.
Cost of road, if not much else The following are the states and
is involved except paving, is deter- number of visitors to the museum:
mined by the SRED, for budgeting .Florida, 725: Michigan, 43; Geor.
purposes, to be $20,000 per m'le. gia, 46; Ohio, 16; Colorado, 2; Mis-
The cost of the Bay City road shot sissippi, 18; Alabama, 75; Pensyl-
so sky high because of the need vania, 9; Virginia, 10; Illinois, 24;
for drainage, culverts, and the like. Utah, 1; Washington, 1; California,
In point of fact, the commission 1,1; Louisianna, 4; Massachusetts,
was not too enthusiastic about see- 2; Nebraska. 2; Tennessee, 1; Dela-
ing the Bay City road paved at this ware, 1; South Carolina, 8; Texas,
time, considering the staggering 15; Canada, 134; New Jersey, 2;
cost for just a paltry 2.7 miles. New York, 30; North Carolina, 2;
What happened was that when the Vermont, 2; Minnesota, 17; Iowa,
commission submitted a resolution 7; Iowa, 7; Maine, 2; Kansas, 17;
last year they set up a list of roads Wisconsin, 10; Kentucky, 1; Miss-
to be paved and gave them all a ouri, 18; Indiana, 5; West Virginia,
priority one rating. Came time 'o 6; Connecticutt, 1; New Mexico 1;
let contracts and the SRD, noting Norway, 2.
that the Bay rights-of-way were in Some of the out of town visitors
order, let contracts for that stretch, who visited the museum last week
feeling that the Gulf County Board were Emmett L. Hill of the Florida
regarded all roads listed of equal Park Service of Tallahassee; Mr.
- importance. Actually, the Board and Mrs. Grubber Steen, Norway.
agreed to make all road projects (Mr. and Mrs. Steen are now mak-
priority one so that no section of ing their home here in Port St.
the county would feel that it was Jre), Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Haac.
being slighted. Atlanta, Georgia. Mr. Haac is the
Lists in the future will contain a 'professor of Romance Languages
more realistic priority listing, at Emory University.
Commitments for projects not Since the highway signs have
yet begun are: Streets in Highland b,-Fi- put up it has attracted ,he
View $20,000; Americus Ave., in attention of the tourists on their
Yon's Addition, $13,000; streets in way back North. The attendance
Port St. Joe, $45,000; Shippy Road record for the last three mon.hs
in Wewahitchka, $15,000 (it is un- has been increasing steadily.
derstood this project is out, for The Museumil will receive publi-
want of 100% right-of-way); ano- city in the near future from Mr.
other street project (road running and Mrs. C. Barfield, Tallahassee in
north and south past county repair the "Florida Cracker". Bill Penrose
shop) in Wewahitchka, $11,000. Panama City, in the "Newsrdierald"
The county delegation, headed and Hank Rrane, Jacksonville, in
by J. C. Price, chairman of the the "Florida Times-Union".
Board, asked about the possibility __
of having another wayside park,
this one at Beacon Hill. Several Little Bbys Baseball
years ago Sammy Patrilck gave the
county a strip of land at Beacon Try Outs Monday
Hill for development as a public
park. The commissioners want the Monday, April 8 at 4:30 p.m. the
state to put in a wayside park try outs for Little Boys Baseball,
there, if possible. If the county will start at recreation park. All
does. nothing park-wise to the pro- boys between the ages of eight and
perty, Patrick wants it back. Simp- 12 years old should turn out for
son said that the S'RD policy is practice.
that the parks must be at least 25 Tickets will be on safe for the
miles apart. He said the board also barbecue of April 20 after April 8.
likes to construct smaller parks It is hoped that the new base-
instead of larger ones and that the ball field will be completed in time
board constructs them primarily
board constructs a them primarily for the try-outs. Work is still in
for tourists and not for local resi-progress at the present time and
progress at the present time and
dents, although local residents are should be ready for the tryout date.
welcome to use them-and do. Price The next directors an managers
had suggested the Beacon Hill site meeting will be held at the Elemen-
as a park for local use.
ai a park for local use, tary School at 7:30 p.m. on April 8.
SSimpson was also asked about
the possibility of constructing a Ton of
Ton of rteel
boat launcing ramp. He said that A single ton of high-carbon, cold-
the department would like to have rolled strip steel will produce a mM-
a number of these ramps, going so Uon safety razor blades


Phone 7-


BUTLER'S TRIM SHOP.
-2051 112 Reid Ave.


March 30 in the Municipal Hospital.

Advertising doesn't cost-It pays'


High School PTA

Two recommendations were pre-
sented to the Parent-Teacher Assoc-
iation by the executive board,
Thursday night in their monthly
meeting in the high school auditor-
ium. The recommendations were as
follows:
1. The board recommended that
the PTA adopt a resolution to read
as follows:
WHEREAS, the Florida Educa-
tion Association legislative program
is designed to alleviate the press-
ing needs of.the schools, which in-
clude adequate salaries for teachers,
with beginning salary at $4,200.00
additional funds for construction;
current operating expenses, trans-
portation and textbooks. as well as
reduction in class load.
WE HEREBY RESOLVE:
1. That we endorse the FEA leg-
islative program.
2. That we ask our local legisla-
tive delegation to support legisla-
tion to provide funds for the FEA
program from state level.
2. The board recommended that
'he PTA authorize its secretary to
write to the City Commission of
Port St. Joe, drawing to their at-
tention the need for a sidewalk to
the high school and street lights
at the high school, and ask the
Commission to communicate with
the PTA, advising what plans the
Commission has in connection with
these needs.
The group voted to adopt both
measures. Mrs. Paul Fensom, presi-
dent presided.
Leroy Bowdoin. principal, spoke
on the pressing needs of adequate
salaries for teachers. He told of
how many teachers were leaving
the teaching profession for other
fields in order to make a living for
their families.
The program was presented in
a skit entitled, "Choosing the Right
Subjects", by students of Mrs. Jac-
que Price and Mrs. Margaret Ivey.
Assigned on the program was Bar-
bara Mitchell, Mrs. Ivey, Miss Neta
Niblaick. Mrs. Margaret Biggs gave
a report on the STAC house assist-

ed by Jerry Buchert and Barbara
Mitchell. Joseph Dowd, treasurer,
of the STAC house committee gave
a full report on finances.
Refreshments were served in the
lunchroom by members of the Tri-
Hi-Y to some 87 members attend-
ing.


Elementary PTA

The Port .St. Joe Elementary PTA
at its regular meeting on March 21,
adopted a resolution endorsing lihe
Florida Educaiton Association's
1957 legislative program. It also vot-
ed to write the Gulf County School
Board urging that if funds, assured
to the teachers of Gulf County thru
the efforts of the Continuing Edu-
cational Council, were made avail-
able that the school principals be
notified immediately and have the
privilege of stating the amount of
the raise so that they might be in
better position to fill vacancies and
retain teachers for the-next school
term.
The resolution adopted was as
follows:
WHEREAS, the Florida Educa-
tion Association legislative program
is designed to alleviate the press-
ing needs of the schools which in
elude adequate salaries for teach
ers, with beginning salary at $4200;
additional funds for construction,
current operating expense, trans-
portation and textbooks, as well as
reduction in class load.
WE HEREBY RESOLVE:
1. That we endorse the Florida
Education Association legislative
program.
2. That we ask our local legisla-
tive delegation to support legisla-
tion to provide funds for the FEA
program from state level.
MINNIE B. HOWELL
Vice-President
Port St. Joe Elementary PTA
58 MEMBERS PRESENT
MARGARET M. SMITH
Recording Secretary
Port St. Joe Elementary PTA
Dated, March 21, 1957.









Mr. and Mrs. Cecil E. Harrison of
513 .Ninth Street announce the
birth of a *son, Tony Vincent on


TOO LATE TO

CLASSIFY
By RUSSELL KAY


On the banks of the lazy Su-
wannee, Florida is developing a
major attraction that promises to
take its place as a National Shrine.
In beautiful natural surroundings
with ample room for expansion, we
are creating an outstanding tribute
to Stephen Foster. No composer is
better known or more loved than
the gentle soul who gave the world
music and lyrics it could under-
stand regardless of race, color or
creed.
While the marble bust of Stephen
Foster rests in the Library of Con
gress in Washington, his soul I am
sure haunts the beautiful grounds
of Stephen Foster Memorial Park
at White Springs where mother na-
ture weaves her magic to create the
natural beauty and charm that in-
spired Foster and brought to ful-
fillment such melodies as "Way
Down Upon de Swannee Ribber,"
"Oh! Susanna," "Camptown Races'!
"My Old Kentucky Home," "Jeanie
With the Light Brown Hair," and
others.
Sponsored by the State of Flor-
ida, the Stephen Foster Memorial
is the most .visited non-commercial
attraction in the Southeast, and
many feel it is destined to become
the "music mecca of America."
This year marks an important
step in the development of the Me-
inorial for the new 200-foot carillon
tower will be opened to the public
around July 1, according go Earl
W. Brown, chairman of the Stephen
Foster Memorial Commission.
Formal dedication of the impres-
sive colonial brick, marble and cast
stone tower will await the installa-
t'on of the world's largest set of
tubular bells which are'now being
cast and will be ready for use the
latter part of this year. In the mean-
time, a high fidelity set of elec-
tronic bells and chimes will be used
to play Foster melodies from the
tower.
Although handicapped through
lack of funds, the Commission has
achieved much through the con-
struction of the ante helium $250,-
000 Foster Museum, gatehouses at
the north and south entrances of
the park, and now the imposing
half-million dollar bell tower.
Popular also are the Conestoga
Wagon tours that take visitors
through the grounds and the 30-pas-


FIT ANNUALe


FIFTH ANNUAL



KIWANIS







MINSTREL


Friday, April 4, 8:00 pm


BAND CONCERT STARTS AT 7:30 P.M.



Port Theatre


Jokes Music Specialities


A NIGHT OF FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY






Admission $1.00


Funds derived from this minstrel is

used in youth work by the Port St.

Joe Kiwanis Club.
I Ili I I IIIIaI


MANUFACTURER'S AGENT


West Palm Beach, Florida


P. O. Box 1383


____ ~______________________UY__m__(m_____W__


I II --sl- -


2c Per Word, Minimum 60c


Marjorie C. Bates, Field Represan-
senger replica of a paddlewheel riv- tative; R. W. Henderson, Mrs. Polly
er boat which offers rides on the Sowers and J. C. Belin, Crusade
Chairman.
Suwannee in season. Splendid pic- Mrs. Polly S,owrs of the Gulf
nic facilities provide pleasure for County Health Department ga'e
scores of family groups each week. me interesting figus compiled
The Memorial stages a series offrom her office. In 195.6 the Gulf
special events during the year such omy records how that 130 visits
as ISunday concerts by musical were made by patients to the tu-
groups from colleges and universi- mor clinics which are located n
ties. Outstanding, of course, is the Panama City. Pensacola, and Talla-
annual Florida Folk Festival which assee. These 10 visits were ma e
will be held this year, May 3, 4 and b 37 patients 118 home visits to
5. The colorful event is directed by county patients were made by the
Miss Thelma Boltin. County Health Department. 31 new
Last year over 1,800 participated patients were admitted to the can-
in the Festival featuring the finest cer program and attended the
talent available, singers, dancers, clinics. Of the 31 patients 21 were
musical groups, tale tellers and diagnosed as having cancer and
other craftsmen. Indications are 19 were nzon-malignant. There wt.e
that the 1957 event will attract lar- nine deaths due to cancer in 1956
ger participation and a greatly in- Gulf County
creased attendance. In 1956 $735.45 was expended ior
The Memorial is collecting folk hospitalization for cancer patients
literature ,costumes, musical in- in Gulf County.
struments and other historical ____
items with the purpose of establish-
ing a folk lore museum on the Advertising doesn't cost-it pays!
grounds. This promises to be the
most complete and comprehensive
record of old Southern ways and Foster Memorial well worthwhile.
colorful costumes ever assembled. It is distinctive among Florida at-
You will -find a visit to Stephen tractions.



TIME IS SHORT...


INCOME TAX SERVICE
112 REID AVENUE





PART TIME


COFFEE MACHINE ROUTE

BE YOUR OWN BOSS

Manufacturer's agent will train and establish route
for local party to service and collect from 10c coin-
operated coffee vendors. Part time to start. Last na-
tional average report showed $27.60 net profit weekly
per machine. To qualify you must have auto, references
and $395.00 to $2,000.00 down payment. Balance paid
from profits monthly. Write giving name, address
and phone number to


i o tJuln ounty ;ncnooi noarct