<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The star
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01104
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 10, 1957
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01104

Full Text




PORT W.J"
$ A P egVedvs

- dyN Ipq


THE


STAR


Port St. Joe- The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Ghattahoochee Valley"

VOLUME XX Single Copy So ,ORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 1957 NUMBER 19

m -- --m -m -m -E m S m mm


cou


Hallmark To Head March of


Dimes Drive In Gulf County


Gordon S. Hallmark has been ap-
pointed as the chairman of the
March of Dimes. Fund Raising Cam-
paign for Gulf County it was an-
nounced this week by March of
Dimes headquarters.
*Hallmark has named a commit-
tee composed of Joe Mira Leonard
Belin, H. L. Prim, Wesley R. Ram-
sey, Don Sports, Otis Pyle and Mrs.
Sue Spaulding to aid in carrying


the goal for Gulf County was set
at $2,500.00 and was met, under the
leadership of Otis Pyle.
Hallmark stressed the motto of
the National Foundation, "Let's
Finish The Fight" in urging the
people of Gulf County to contribute
to this worthy cuase. He pointed
out that while the Salk vaccine
had reduced polio cases the need
for treatment for those already the
victims of polio was still taking


out the drive a great amount of mon3y. He point-
Harold Prim has. the job of nam- ed out that until the last patient
ing chairmen for different localities Was able to go home, there would
throughout the county to carry on be a job for the March of Dimes
the fund campaign. All chairmen *o do, and money would be needed
have not yet been picked and will to accomplish the job.
probably be named in next week's Several activities have been
paper. planned for the month of January.
Hallmark said that he hoped the Foremost of these activities will
drive would realize as much this be a basketball game. But this will
year as it did last year. Last year be an unusual basketball game. It


will be between the business men
of the town, such men as C. W.
Long, John Blount, John Robert
Smith and a host of others just
like them and the male office force
at the Paper Mill, such as Tom Col-
dewey, Tom Moseley, Lawrence Bis-
set and other sportsmen. The game
will be strictly for laughs and--
the March of Dimes. The date has-
n't been set as yet, but it will be
toward the last of the month.
Other activities will be a fish
fry, headed by Ernest Wimberly,
peanut sales and the annual Mo-
ther's March, conducted by the Wo-
man's Club of Port St. Joe. The
Mother's March will be held Thurs-
day, January 31.
Coin collectors are now scattered
about the town for your conven-
ience and the motto of the moment
is, "Please Give".


.-


City Cutting Boat Landing At Foot of Fifth Street In Bay


The City of Port St. Joe, with
the aid of its new drag line is in
the process of digging a boat basin
and launching site at the foot of
Fifth Street to make a boat en-
trance to St. Joseph's Bay.
The channel is being dug deep
and long enough to provide ade-
quate facilities to load and unload
boats into the bay at low and high
tide.
Only the channel is being dug
now. Further development of the
boat basin will depend on how
much it is used.
S tar Photo)n


Four New County Officials Assume

Duties Of Office, Tuesday, Jan. 8

Four new officials assumed their Tax Collector Harland Pridgeon,
duties in Gulf County Tuesday as winner over Walter Stafford in a
nine incumbents continue their jobs hard-fought battle, enters on his
for another four years. first full term.
ISam Husband will take over the
duties of county judge. He defeated tMrs. C. G. Risk returns unoppos-
the formerly powerful incumbent d to her duties as supervisor of
the formerly powerful incumbent registration. Harbor Master H. M.
J. E. Pridgeon, who held the office registration. Harbor Master H. M.
foJ. E. Pridgeonsecutiv, who held the officers. Hammock was also unopposed in
for 16 consecutive years. his bid for reelection as was Incum-
('. S. Voroton who defeated Par- bet Sehool Bord rdyni ibir Parta


SL JOBI


Commission Asks

Road To Be Named

For Geo. Tapper

A Resolution was presented to
the board of County Commissioners
at their meeting Tuesday urging
that body to designate the new
highway from Port St. .Joe to Apa-
lachicola as the "George G. Tapper
Highway".
The Resolution cited Tapper as
a great public servant and lauded
his accomplishments throughout
the 25th District during his 10 years
in public office.
The Resolution also asks that a
sign be erected at each end of the
.highway, designating it as "George
0 Tapper Highway".
The Resolution was presented to
the board by Dave Gaskin, presi-
dent of the Wewahitchka State
Bank.
The highway was granted by he
State Road Department largely
through the efforts of Tapper and
will shorten the distance between
here and Apalachicola by approxi-
mately 14 miles.
Copies of the Resolution were
provided to be sent to Wilbur Jones
Chairman, State Road Department;
Dick Simpson, Road Board Mem-
ber; Franklin County Commission-
ers; Mrs. Bryant Patton, Franklin
County Rjepresentative and Bart
Knight, Senator of the 25th Discric.
The Resolution was adopted by
the Commission and will now go be-
tore the State Legislature for ap-
p:oval or disapproval before the
'oad will be designated.


Mrs. C. C. Argo

Taken By Death

Mrs. Catherine Coldewey Argo
of Miami Springs, died Saturday
night in the Municipal Hospital
here. She was visiting here with
her brother, Tom S. Coldewey.
Born in Louisville, Ky., Mrs.
Argo moved to Fort Lauderdale
in 1925, and had been active in
social welfare work in the state
since then.
She served as a director on the
board of social welfare at Tallahas-
see, Quincy and Miami. During
World War II she was chairman
of home service for the American
Red Cross in Miami. She was a
member of the Council of Social
Welfare and for several years was
director of the Southeastern branch
of the Children's Home Society in
Miami.
Other than her brother, she is
survived by a sister, Mrs. Helen
Moran of Cincinnati, Ohio.
Funeral services were held at 4
p.m. Monday at St. James Episco-
pal Church in Port St. Joe, with the


Rev. Gardner D. Underhill officiat-
ing. Interment was in Holly Hill
Cemetery with Comforter Funeral


'.- A*- J r 6 n. LoLo, wt 4 eaLeur a n c -oar mem arer
h- ker Hart in the first primary, andI Ward. Home in charge of arrangements.
Last Rites Held For A. J. Strickland, "dark horse" who- Pallbearers were George Tapper,
ST ieS upset veteran W. C. Roche in the r n lu J. Lamar Miller, W. P. Shannon J.
Richard M. Yeager runoff, are the new faces around Garden Club How To A. Mira, Mark Tomlinson and Har-
the County Commission table. Bautify Hig*lhw ss ry Saunders.
SC. E. Boyer, winner of a seat on
Funeral srevices were held Tues- school Board over incumbent
day at 11 a.m. in ,St. John's Episco- J. B. Harris, took office Tuesday, A general meeting of the Port Martin Tr hy Will B
pal Cathedral Jacksonville, for although beenon theboardSt. Joe Garden -Club was held Jan- Trophy
Richard Mitchell Yeager, 27, of 1406 several weeks already. Boyer was uary 3 in the club room of the Cen- Awarded At Hi School
Harbor Oaks Rd. Mr. Yeager was appointed by Gov. LeRoy Collins tennial Building with Mrs. Carl
a student at St. Luke's Seminary, allowing the second primary when tng and Mrs. Fred Davis, co- The Martin Trophy will be award-
Unversiy of The South, and wasy ^ hostesses. Guest speaker was L. K. ed to the most popular football
fatally injured in an automobile ac- Har Thompson of Bartow who spoke on player on the 1956 Shark squad as
cident near Winchester, Tenn., Sun- healt,e "Highway Beautification". Mr. determined by a poll' of students
IncbGeorge Cooper will return funty Commissioner Thompson appeared through the of St. Joe High School on Thurs-
Critically injured n the same othertermHe defeatedill return for aT. 0. courtesy of the State Highway De- day at 7:00 p.m. from the stage.
CPol-partment and was introduced by, All players will be guest of the
accident was Ralph W. Johnson of tevint of Port ,St. Joe. This will be Mrs. S. Croxton ouce All players will be guest o the
Windsor, S. C., Mr. Yeager's room- Cooper's second term. Croxton theatre after 6:00 p.m.
mate. The two were on their way Veteran Sheriff Brd E Prker The speaker's stand was center-1 This Sunday afternoon the Port
mate. The two were on their way Veteran Sheriff Byrd c Parker ed with an arrangement of pink Theatre will hold a little auction
'to Normal, Ala., to conduct Episc"- began his fifth consecutive term perfection camellias and palmi'with all proceeds to go to the
pal services at the Alabama Agri- Tuesday. He won easily over T. D. perleaves. mellias and palm with all proceeds to go to the
cultural and Industrial School cha- Whitfield, outgoing county commis- leave March of Dimes. The auction will
e1 sioner. M.rs. Thomas Mitchell, president, be held to auction off a life-size
pel. sooner. Mrs. Thomas Mitchell, presidentstand-up poster of Elvis Presley
Mr. Yeager is survived by his par. CCircuit Court Clerk George Y. presided over a brief business ses- after the first showing of "Love Me
ents, Mr. and Mr. Mitchell Yeager, Core, unopposed in the election, sion. It was announced that plans Tender". The posterwill be old
one brother and two sisters. Mr. will begin his third term. for the spring flower show were un- to the highest bidder with the pro-
Yeager is well known here at St. Thomas A. Owens was unopposed derway and would be announced at ceeds going to the March of Dimes.
James' Episcopal Church having in his bid for a fourth term as a later date., eds gtong t he Mdisplay in the lob-f Dimes.
held service during the summerschool superintendent, fter n members attended The poster is on display in the lob-
while attending Camp Weed. He iSam Patrick, also unopposed in meeting members attended the by of te Port Theatre
was a senior in the seminary and the election, will begin his third| __
was to have graduated in June. Term as tax assessor It pays to advertrse--try It! Star Want Ads Get Results


DISPUTE


Commission To Ask Supreme


Court To Rule On Question


Go Ahead Given

For Gas Pipeline

WASHINGTON, Officials of
two pipe line companies have stat-
ed they will go ahead with the $150
million gas pipeline in Florida de-
spite conditions imposed by the
Federal Power Commission.
[In a threeto'two decision the
iPFIC has authorized the Houston
Texaa Gas and Oil Corp. and the
Coastal Transmission Corp. to con-
istruct and operate a natural gas
pipeline from the Gulf Coast to
Florida. But the commission said
that within 3,0 days the companies
must "eliminate a number of ob-
jectionable features relating to traf-
fic and methods oft financing the
project." Officials of the two com-
panies said the conditions imposed
can and will be met.
Under the plan submitted to the
FIPC, the two companies will lay
about 2600 milee of main line and
lateral pipelines from Texas and
Louisiana gas fields to points in
Florida.


Dickens Charges County Can't Legally

Hire Costin For Prosecutor


In what began as a normal meet-
ing of the county commission Tues-
day morning there arose a hassle
that continued for two hours and
remained unsettled when the mat-
ter was tabled.
To begin the first meeting of the
new commission, J. C. Price was
appointed chairman of the group to
serve for the coming year. E. C.
Harden, who served as chairman
last year, was named vice-obairmat.
by the group.
The next order of business was
the selection of the county at'oz-
naey and the county prosecuting at
tourney and this is where the hassle
began.
David C. Gaskin of Wewahi.chka
tiled the only application as coun-
ty attorney and was chosen for that
post. The office of county prosecut-
ing attorney *was applied for by
ilas R. Stone, who held the posi-
tion last year, Cecil G. Costia and
EP.n H. Dickens all of Port St. Joe.


Miss Minerva McLane Assumes Duties

As Administrator of Local Hospital


Miss


Minerva McLane of De-


Funiak Springs has assumed her
duties in Port St. Joe as adminis-
trator and head of nurses at the
Municipal Hospital, succeeding Mrs.
Dottle Thomas who resigned the
first of the year.
Miss McLane comes to Port St.
Joe from Tallahassee where she
was chief anesthetist at the W. T.
Edwards Tuberculosis Hospital.
She has been in the nursing pro-
fession for 16 years and has worked
in her home town of DeFuniak
Springs at the Walton County Hos-
pital and in Venice, Florida. Since
1950 she has been qualified as boh
an anesthetist and nurse superina-
tendent two of her main duties at
the local hospital. Miss McLane
served as part-time anesthetist at
the Municipal Hospital prior to the
coming of Mrs. Thomas.
Miss McLane has an impressive
record of training and service to
her credit. She is a graduate of the
Hubbard Hospital School of Nurs-
ing in Montgomery, Ala., and Char-
ity Hospital School of Anesthesia,
New Orleans, La. She is a member
of the International Association of
Anesthesiologists, Inc., the Ameri-
can Association of Nurse Anesthe-
tists, the Florida State Association
of Nurse Anesthetists, of which
she was recently elected secretary-


treasurer; and the Florida State


Nurses Association.
Locally Miss MoLane is a mem-
ber of the First Baptist Church
and plans to become active in civic
work in the city. She is making
her home here at 1024 McClellan
Avenue with her sister, Mrs. T. J.
Ward.


.9'
CONTEST T OF ELECTION
DISMISSED BY COURTS
A contest of election filed by W.
C. Roche in connection with his
race for the County Commission
against A. J. Strickland of Wewa-
hitchka was dismissed by Judge E.
Clay Lewis, Jr., on January 2.
The suit was filed by Roche ac-
cusing that irregularities were per-
formed in the election and ballot
counting causing Strickland to de-
feat him by about a dozen votes.
.9'
Return From Colorado
Mr. and Mrs. Karl Marshall have
returned from Denver, Colo., where
they have been visiting their daugh.
ter, Catherine and Mr. and Mrs. Bob
Best, Mrs. Marshall's sister. Also
Mrs. Albert Rowell of Panama City
was with the Marshalls. Mrs. Mar-
shall spent the month of December
in Colorado. The Rowell's and Mr.
Marshall spent the Christmas holi-
days there and they all returned
home together.


Commissioner George Cooper be-
gan the nominating by naming Cos-
tin for the job. Commissioner A. J.
Strickland nominated Ben H. Dick-
ens and the fight was on.
Before the voting occurred for the
position, Ben H. Dickens took the
floor and declared that Costin was
ineligible to hold the job due to the
fact that he had been elected Rep-
resentative of Gulf County during
the November primary. Dickens
backed up his argument with three
sections of the Constitution of the
State of Florida. He quoted from
Section 7, Article 3, Section 15, Ar-
ticle 16 and Section 13 of Article
4. These articles, according to Dick-
ens arguments, provide that no
elected official in the State of Flor-
ida can hold another job that gives
pay in any part of government In
-the state. Section 7, Article 3, ac-
cording to Dickens provided that
anybody serving i'd the Legislature
who accepts such a job is no longer
a member of the Legislature. He
cited the fact that several coun-
ties In Florida had this very situa-
tion in force, but declared by the
Constitution it was illegal and urg-
ed the Commission to abide by the
Constitution.
[Dickens cited a case sent to the
Supreme Court y Gov.-Sidney J.
Gatts in 1.918 whereby a -State
Senator had accepted a position as
a county prosecuting attorney and
asked the Supreme Court what he
should do in this case. The Supreme
Court ruled that the man was no
longer a State Senator, by the pro-
vision of the Constitution. Dickens
declared that in this light it was
his opinion that the naming of Cos-
tin, to the position would jeopardize
his position as Representative.
Costing then took the floor and
urged the Commission to put off
naming the county prosecutor un-
til an opinion on the matter could
,be received from the Attorney Gen-
eral, Richard Ervin. He expressed
the opinion that he was eligible
to serve. He said that if the Com-
mission didn't want to wait for a
decision from the Attorney Gen-
eral, he would take the chance of
being ousted as Representative if
they would name him to the job.
Costin stated that he made 'iis
statement, with the confidence that
he would be found eligible,
.Much arguing went back and
forth on the subject but the above
is essentially what was said all
through the arguments.
Commissioner Harden expressed
a desire to wait upon an opinion
from the Attorney General. He
then asked the County Attorney,
David C. Gaskin for his opinion on
the legality of the matter. Gaskin
quoted the same passages as Dick-
ens and agreed with Dickens in-
terpretation of the matter.
Costin then pointed out other
instances where such a situation
was in existence naming Calhoun
and Franklin Counties where the
eame situation was in effect, with
State Representatives serving as
county attorneys.
After all was over, the Commis-
sion decided to ask the Governor
to get a decision from the Supreme
Court on the matter and in the
meantime, Gaskin will serve as the
county prosecuting attorney in ad-
dition to his duties as county at-
torney.

MRS. STEBEL AWARDED
PAYMENT FOR DIRT
The County Board Tuesday au-
thorized the payment to Mrs. J. A.
Stebel of White City of $200.00 per
acre for dirt that was used in e
construction of streets in Whi e
City recently.
The county used dirt from %lout
two acres.


*N~w b'BMOS. Am
GkODNMSd TI b U A








Jy!IT, ..R,


PICTURED ABOVE are the new officers of Melody Rebekah Lodge No
right: Mrs. Onnie Greer, Mrs. Mary Weeks, Mrs. Voncille Miller, Mr
Mrs. Addie Goodson, Mrs. Zola Maddox, Mrs. Alice Hall, Mrs. Dori
Front row, left to right: Marguerite Farris, Marion Williams, Mrs.
Hightower, Mrs. Viola Walters, Mrs. Ruth McCortnick, Mrs. Virgini


Mrs. Hightower Installed As Noble

Grand At Rebekah Lodge Ceremonies

Masonic Hall was the scene of Mrs. Connell thanked the Lodge
the public installation service of for their loyalty and support and
Melody Rebekah Lodge No. 22 and presented a gift fro mthe Lodge to
SOainTitan o T.no- TnT A No 40 which rwas eacnnh orf -lin stallino. ro s .ffi,'rad


conducted in a most impressive
manner in the presence of the mem-
bers and guests from Port St. Joe,
Panama City and Lynn Haven.
Mrs. Florazelle Connell, retiring
Noble Grand, presided and in a very
gracious manner received Mrs.
Gladys Boyer, district Deputy Pres-
ident of District Two and her corps
of deputies: Marshall, Mrs. Flora
Long; Warden, Mrs. Eliza Lawson;
Secretary, Mrs. Effie White; Treas-
urer, Mrs. Viola Walters; Chaplain,
Mrs: Mary 'Forehand; Musician,
Mrs. Margaret Land; Guardian,
Mrs. Viva Reese.


also a gift to the officers who ser-
ved with her. Mrs. James Greer
presented her with the Past Noble
Grand's jewel and commended hlr
work in the Lodge since its institu-
tion, she being a charter member
of Melody. Mrs. Mary Weeks pre-
sented Mrs. Connell a gift from the
officers and members of the Lodge
and lauded her for her loving ser-
vice and kindness to all.
The retiring officers surrendered
their stations to the incoming of-
ficers as follows: Noble Grand. Al-
iene Hightower; Vice Grand, On-
nie Greer; Recording Mary E. Weeks; Financial Secre-
tary. Doris Ford; Treasurer, Lessie
V. Byrd; Right Support to Noble
Grand, Adidie Goodson; Left Sup-


. 22. They are back row, left to
rs. Flora Long, Mrs. Vera Davis,
s Ford and Mrs. Lessie V. Byrd.
Juanita Poitevint, Mrs. Aliene
a Smith and Mrs, Pauline Smith.


port to Noble Grand, Virginia
Smith; Warden, Jessie Owens; Con-
ductor, Ruth McCormick; Outside
Guardian, Juanita Poitevint; Inside
Guardian. Alice Hall; C i. .' Flo-
ra Long: Musician, Marguerite Far-
ris; Right Support to Vice Grand,
Pauline Smith; Left Support to
Vice Grand, Voncille Miller; Color
Bearer, Marion Williams; Attar
Bearers: Right Support to Cii '.-,u.
Vera Davis, left Support to Chap-
lain. Zola Maddox, Right Support
to Past Noble Grand, Viola Wal-
ters; Left Support to Past Noble
Grand, Lucille Williams.
Mrs. Aliene ilightowor in her
charming nianner told in her ac-
ceptance speech how she happened
to lie a Rebekah aud the great sat-
isfaction that its fellowship and
service had given her.
Thirty out-of-town guests-signed
the visitor's register and linge',e
to enjoy the delicious dinner and
enjoyable social hour which follow-
ed and see the installation of the
officers who were chosen by Sa-
maritan Lodge No. 40 to serve for
the ensuing year.


'0HURWAY, JANUARY 10, 1087


OPEN SUNDAY, 5:45 P.M.
OPEN 6:80 p.m.-SHOW AT 7:00

FIIAY d SATURDAY


Order which hangs in the East, the
beautiful ceremony, conducted by
the installing Worthy Matron, Ruth
Ramsye, took on new meaning.
Otler installing officers assisting
in the ceremony were Marshall,
Leslie Spillers; Chaplain, Flossie
Wilson; Treasurer Callie Howell;
Conductress, Wilma Cooper; See-
retary, Cora Solomon and Assistant
Conductress, Wanita Wade, both of
Gorrie Chapter, Apalachicola; and
Organist, Frances Merriweather of
Wewahitchka Chapter.
Officers installed for the year

Visiting Porters
Captain and Mrs. Charles A. Sun-
din, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ned,
S. Porter, of Sacramento, Californ-
ia have been visiting here with the
Porters over the holidays. Mrs. Por-
ter met the Sundin's in New Or-,
leans where they spent three days.
They have visited here and in Apa-
lachicola and at Tyndall Air Force
Base. They plan to leave on Jannu-
ary 9 to return to Sacramento. The
Porters will accompany them to
New Orleans.


- J .- InC


Wednesday & Thursday
SPECTACLE AND THRILLS
OUT OF DARKEST AFRICA!
m-rwHn ami me ema "


PICTURED ABOVE are the new officers for Samaritan Lodge, No. 40, l.O.O.F. They are back row, left
to right: W. H. Weeks, B. B. Conklin, Jimmie Greer, Warren Pareseau, C. W. Long, Raymond High-
tower, A. P. Gilbert, H. W. Griffin and J. C. Price. Front row, left to right, W. C. Forehand, Dewey Da-
vis, Charles Pippin, Henry Geddie and Josh Miller. (Star Photo)


WHEN you're serving toasted,
buttered buns for the
"bread" in a meal, give them a
dash of Parmesan cheese just be-
fore they come to the table for
that extra flavor.
Open-faced hamburgers are
easily made. Simply spread bun
halves with mustard, then spread
on seasoned hamburger all the
way to the edge. Broil until done.
If you're making ham loaf out
of leftovers, give it a dress-up
treatment by studding with red
cherries, brown sugar and whole
cloves. It's wonderful for flavor,
too.
Diced cooked potatoes are really
delicious if you place them in a
heavy skillet with butter and

THIS WEEK'S RECIPE
Dried Beef Filling
(For 4 sandwiches)
12%-once jar dried beef
1 2%-ounce jar dried beef
1 3-ounce package cream
cheese
1 teaspoon horseradish
1 tablespoon minced onion
Cut dried beef into thin strips
with scissors. Combine with
remaining Ingedients. Use as
filling for sandwiches, or as a
spread for crackers.


cream and cook slowly, turning
frequently, while they brown. Like
chives? Sprinkle them over the
potatoes when cooked.
Hot cereal can be glorified if
you top with brown sugar, butter
and cinnamon. No one will turn
it down.
If you like broiled chicken to
taste extra good, brush it with a
well seasoned oil and vinegar
dressing and let stand for an hour
or so before cooking. M
Loaf or round angel food cake
can be treated to a frosting made
of whipped cream into which has
been folded crushed peppermint
candy. Tint the cream pink if
necessary. It's a real treat.

One of the natural characteristls
of cranberry jelly and other tart
truit jelly is to "weep" after the
mold is cut. To prevent this, placo
cranberry jelly in smaller molds
so that all of it will be used up at
one meal. Then none will be left
to stand and "weep."


, 6'.


Gulf Chapter 191, OES, Installs Mrs.

Jonnia Sykes At Worthy Matron Fri.

'ihe- Mj.sn' Luodi e aCs tuie color- wV r e- Worthy Matron. Jonaai
tall set-Lnii-- Friday evening of last Sykes; Worthy Patron, Bob Bu-
.:-.Li ... he iLupressi ie elemicny chert; Associate Ma.t.ron, Betty
,, hi-.:lt IIhe u.iv ,ittIieLrs of Gulf Forehand. .As&ociate Patron, W. C.
C(a'l IJer 1i11. OE'S were installed Forehand; Conductress, Betty Sue
i' I t .il tIe iace, dignity, and Anchors; ,Associate Conductress,
i..i v, i.,eti~tian l this io.j ely ulder. Jeianette Presnell: Secretary, Pau-
In ar n atii:splihere created by soft iiue Smith. Treasurer. Essie Wil-
ti' ft.run tao .ev.:-n-brtj clied can- Hams; Chaplain. Sybil Sc heffer;
'.-I.labra i'hldiing ill white tapers Marshall]., Eula Dickey:; Organist.
irt'le.tiug on a huge arrangement Maybel Swans.; Ada, Clara Pate;
OI -.rne gtaIdoii and on carnations Ruth, Flora Long; Esther, Alice
tiriied a de&iate blue, and by the Hall; Martha, ETllne Buchert;
IL;,,.-peed-l i. tiie neWv regime and Electa. Lucille Williams; Warder.
II ,- : :-. : atid Ii, i eauitfult invo- Ma rguerite Scheffer; Sentinel. SiJ-
l.ati.,,in i -en Iv,' the R.-v. J. C. Od- ney Anchors. Preceding the instal-
linl ot tli- L n.r- Ave-ue Baptist lation, the meeting was called ,to
.'ltii ii. ~ih'... 't- ) itual upilit to the order by the out-going W orthy Ma-
gathering. tron, Neva Croxton, who gave a
F,'r.i1.n ing the .eatiiig of the new L-ordia-l welcome to members and
tiL.tcs -., rh he, V \ 01iti t, M.tion Viistor;s and expressed her apprec-
toolk the avel and she together iation to the out-going officers and
Airl, tlie \V\'rtrib Patron expressed a;istant office-rs and presented
tipi. apt iCijt.uito ful ithL Lonur of each bSitn a lovely gift. She wished
.r ig the Cha.pter. Gifts were pre- solo, "I Believe" by Prances Merri-
l...:re,:i tu the .zlinng officers and wether. accompanied by Maybel
the meeting came to a close with Swatts.
the gracious rendition of the vocal During the soolal hour which fol.
rainbow hues from the blue, the lowed the meeting, the refreshment
gold, the white ,the green and the committee served a variety of de-
red of the Star pedestals and from vicious sandwiches, cookies and coft.
the Eastern Star, emblem of the fee.


THURSDAY FRIDAY


SATURDAY ONLY

DOUBLE FEATURE
- FEATURE No. I -


- FEATURE No. 2 -

GARY COOPER RIH ROMAN










SUNDAY
Monday & Tuesday



ELVIS PRESLEY
You'll love him
tender in the
story he was
born to play! \


C. W. Long Installed As Nobls Grand

S Of Samaritan Lodge, No. 40, 100F


IS MORE HE-LARiOUS
TfAN EVER IN WARNER BROS'
ALL-NEW ALL-OUT
A *) RIOT OF FUN!


Play Hollywood

Every Tuesday


..



COLUMBIA PICTURES presents A WARWICK Produ tion
VICTOR JANET
MATURE LEIGH











CINEMASCOPE
ColorbyTECH NICOLOR
me JOHN JUSTIN ROLAND CULVER
UAM REDMOND *EARL CAMERON ORLANOO MARTINS
reonplay by ANTHONY VEILLER Directed by TERENCE YOUNS
Produ ed by IRVING ALLEN and ALBERT R. 81OCCOU


'Immediately following the social
hour Thursday night at joint instal-
lation services of the Melody Re-
bekah Lodge No. 22 and Samari-
tan Lodge No. 40, a visiting installa-
tion team from Panama City and
Lynn Haven installed C. W. Long
as, Noble Grand of the Lodge in
the usual impressive I.O.O.F. instal-
lation ceremony. Long replaced
G. F. Lawrence who has finished
his year of service in that office.
A full slate of officers installed
by the lodge were: C. W. Long,
Noble Grand; Warren Pareseau,
Vice-Grand; J. C. Price, Recording
Secretary; Theo Bishop, Financial
Secretary; A. P. Gilbert, Conduc-
tor; Dewey Davis, Warden; B. B.
Conklin, Chaplain; W. H. Weeks,
Right Support to Noble Brand; H.
W. Griffin, Left Support to Noble
Grand; Raymond Hightower, Out-
side Guardian; Charles Pippin, Left
Support to the Vice Grand; Jimmy
Greer, Inside Guardian; W. C. Fore-
hand, Lodge Founder; Josh Miller,
Left Scene Support; and Henry


Geddie, Right Scene Support.
-I(-
ST. JAMES' CHURCH
EPICSOPAL
The Rev. Gardner D. Underhill
Priest in Charge
1st Sunday after Epiphany, Jan.
13.
7:30 a.m., Celebration of the Holy
Eucharist followed by the Laymen's
Meeting and Breakfast.
9:45 a.m., Church School.
11:00 a.m., Church School
11:00 a.m., Morning Prayer and
sermon.
The public is, cordially invited to
worship with us and is assured of
a warm welcome.

Oil Rewerves 1Up
According to most recent authori
tative information, during 1950 the
total proved U.S. reserves of oil
climbed from 28.588 billion barrels
Io 29.952 billion barrels, an in-
crease during the year of 1.366 bil-
lion barrels. During the same period
1.17 billion barrels were produced ,


STHE BAFFLES


MY WIFE'S BROTHER HAS MOVED
IN AGAIN.WHAT A GORILLA!
WHAT A LAZY BUM. 1 EVEN
HAVE TO PICK UP HIS
CLEANING!


By Mahoney


THAT'S THE SUIT 1 WANT-
OVER THERE, MISS.


RICEARD [GANDEBNMPAGE

flVIS PRICEY



MDMSAY& -44A


WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY


"THE

WRONG MAN"
HENRY FONDA
VERA MILES
Alfred Hitchcock's Latest
Suspense Thriller


THE STAR

Phone 7-3161


JOHNNY
S AGAINST










vdthKarn Boothl Richard Stplej
and iannba Ofhn ThI~n~d C -,pl
Sivy r.d Su-,,,Play by SAMUEL NEWMA
Blad up tht fna- J915,)I-, Lg Ftrla Sndr .ananyp,,i tn,
pWnd LSWAM AI .tA A 4 LZ EM


SUNDAY and MONDAY


q~9~r~*~4l~e~Fa~l~'e~~-~'rJCi~~lTF;CW,-


~


I


I


BAN 0O uSTHR r"O
MEET TONIGHT
The Band B,w.ter-i Auso-ciatiun
will mee[ at trie Ban R.)m tonight
at S:uu p.m.
All those intere-teid in the pro-
gress af tLhe i High Sli:. band are
Invited to aLlt nid.








?1U-A. 4AUr.fO 195 TH -a TAFI,- PO-t ST. .JO,~ ~ GUL CONY FLUNIDA- PAOK NIN


NEWS Ff OM

Highland View
By HELEN RICHARDS
Phone BAII 7-2627

Mary Burke and son returned by


MR. ROCJ


plane to their hole in Rome, Ga;,
after spending 'several weeks With
'Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Kelly and other
relatives.
Mr: and-Mrs:"John' Hewett visit-
ed Mrs. Hewett's mother, Mrs. Woo-
,ten -n DeFuniak -Srings for the


Never before has so much bigness and luxury cost so little.
* And Mercury introduces features you can't buy at any price in
other cars.'Mercury's new Dream-Car Design is Mercury's alone.
It's sleek, daring, clean-cut-makes other cars look plump and
old-fashioned. Mercury's exclusive Floating Ride is the finest


days last week in Ta'llahassee with
iMrs: Redd's brother, Wade Hare.
Leslie Coker and* Billy Joe Rich-
ards are visiting in Starke tor a
few days.
Mrs. Cordie Bulger and daughter
Eloise, visited Mrs. Clinton Peter-


week end. Ison and other friends on Monday.
Mrs. Sally Redd and children, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Baine visit-
Patty and Jimmy spent several ed relatives in North Alabama, over
the. week end.
1AlIC Bill Baine of Pisgah, Ala-
bama, who is stationed at Mem-
Sun., Mon, Tues phis, Tennessee, with the Navy, is
I*f I V visiting this week with Mr. and
In- 12 1A 1C ,Mrs. Robert Baine.


SN'- RO L L


R Rbert Niddloton YihawCm p ROD NvjIJk an~ :t


Angus eierson and ramny iof
Avon. Park visited Mr. and Mrs.
,Clinton Peterson and family over
the week end.
Billy Joe Richards, who is sta-
tioned aboar dthe USS Yorktown,
at Alermieda, California is home on
leave, visiting his family and
friends.
.SP3 Leslie Coker, who is station-
ed in Kentucky is visiting his fam-
ily and friends for several days.
'The WMU. of the Highland View
iBaptist church met Monday for
Mission Study with six members
present, Mrs. Edna loyd gave the
opening prayer. The group sang
the song, "Wonderful Words of
Life". Mrs. Ruth Harbuck and Mrs.
Ruth Graham finished teaching the
inission book, "Japan Advances".
*Mrs. Lillie Richter dismissed the
meeting with prayer.
The Highland View Men's Club
will have a special meeting Mon-
day,' January 14. All members are
urged to attend this meeting as
there will be very important mat-
ters to discuss.
Mrs. Lee .Watts honored her
daughter Melba Jean with a birth-
day party, Saturday on her eleventh
birthday. Games were played after
which refreshments of cake and
punch were served to the follow-
ing little guests: Stevie Macomber,
Dewanna Guillot, Roy Boyette, Son-
ja and Barbara Branch, James and
John Story, Helen Richards an'l
Katie and Marie Rhames. Sending
0 gifts were Marilon Brown and Pat-


Fsy r


THIS IS THE BIG M: FOR


'atterson.


Congressman Bob Sikes Is Sworn In

To Begin Ninth Term From 3rd Dist.


WASHINGTON, D. C.-Congress-
man Bob Sikes of Crestvlew was
sworn in by Speaker Sam Rayburn
for a Ninth Term in Congress at
the opening session of the 85!h
Congress on Wednesday. Since then
he has been busily engaged in the
many responsibilities connected
with the opening of Congress and
the organization of his office to
handle its duties.
Sikes, who worked from his
Crestview offiQe during the Recess
with speaking engagements in prac-
tically every oity and town in the
District in addition to many state-
wide assignments, predicted that
this session of Congress will be a
particularly interesting one. He an-
ticipates a harmonious session, but
one made difficult by the heavy


PAINTING


responsibilities ot'world problems.
"Difficulties which have become
seriously aggravated in the Middle
East pose the greatest problem of
'the moment," he said. "A firm
American policy is imperative. Very
probably some adaptation of the
President's program must now be
adopted to prevent further 'Soviet
gains in that area. At the same
time the President's policy is one
which, if mishandled, could involve
us in war at any moment. His pro-
posals must be considered very
carefully and safeguards for the
good of America must also be in-
cluded."
LSikes expects a generally coop-
erative attitude between the Con-
gress and the Chief Executive. Par-
ticularly will this be true in mat-


ALTERATIONS

Phone OLiver 3-3802


combination of bump-smothering features ever put between
you and the road.
- Check the low price tags in our showroom. You'll find you
can get a new Big M for little more down-or per month-than
for the lowest price cars. And what a lot more you get!


ALL-WEATHER COMFORT IS NO LONGER A. LUXURY! MERCURY'S NEW CLIMATE-MASIER COMBINES AIR CONDITIONING AND HEATING IN ONE LOW-COST SYSTEM! ,


STRAIGHT OUT OF TOMORROW M ERCGU V Y for 57 with DREAM-CAR DESIGN k



ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY


O,.M iFmw& S9kqt mu NIghiiul 96


HOME CONSTRUCTION

P. 0. Box 668


1957


Styling ffI, dream-cars
z-


BOLD, IMAGINATIVE LINES-Here is the first dream car you can own-
the first car you can buy with Dream-Car Design. Here's distinctive,
distinguished styling shared by no other car.


size from expensive cars

FAR BIGGER IN EVERY IMPORTANT DIMENSION-This year Mercury ,"
has grown bigger in every important dimension. For example, '. -,: -
there is more headroom, leg room, shoulder room, hip room. .- ------ --;


WIDEST RANGE AND CHOICE OF POWER IN MERCURY HISTORY-A 290-hp TURNPIKE CRUISER V-8 engine is optional on all
models. In the Montclair series the standard engine is a 255-hp Safety-Surge V-8 with a Power-Booster Fan that
saves horsepower other cars waste. A 255-hp Safety-Surge V-8 is standard in the Monterey series. A special M-335
engine (335-hp) is available at extra cost in Monterey models equipped with standard transmissions.


terms of defense, tax reductions, and
steps to combat disease. and allev-
iate human suffering. However, he
anticipates differences between the
Congress and the Administration
on the amount of foreign aid, on
farm programs, on federal aid to
education and on increased interest
rates.


Guest Here
*Mrs. ,M. C. Lott of Cincinatti,
Ohio is the guest of her daughter
and son-in-law, Mr. and rMs. T. D.
Hutchins.

II pays to advertise try it!
advertising doesn't cost. it PAYS!


REPAIRS


Major Joseph L. Solomon is in .Korea with the Air Force. He has full
assurance that the two of his three children stricken with polio who
need continuing care are being assisted by the March of Dimes. His
family is waiting for him in Lincoln, Neb.


You Are Cordidy Invited To Attend

L Avee ptistd Chucrd

MV. J. C. OOUM, Pastbor
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m.
MORNING WORSHIP ____ 11:00 a.m.
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION -_ 6:- p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 p.m.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) 7:30 p.m.
Conw r lIng Avenue and 16th Street

VISITMOS ALWAYS WELCOME
.IW% AM- OwfiNOHMD




NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING

The annual meeting of members of Citizen's Federal Savings
and Loan Association of Port St. Joe will be held Wednes-
day, January 23, at 2 p.m. (eastern standard time) at the
office of the association, Port St. Joe Florida. For the pur-
pose of electing Directors to serve for the ensuing term.
And to transact any other business which may legally come
before said meeting.

L. G. BUCK
EXEc. VICE-PRESIDENT-DmEcron

------------------------


BEAMAN PLUMBING SERVICE

Licensed Plumber

"Can Handle Any Type Plumbing, Small or Large
15 Years Experience


PHONE BAll 7-2520 At Anytime







Gulf Sands Restaurant


WELCOMES YOU TO THE BEACH
SPECIALIZING IN


CHOICE STEAKS
FRIED CHICKEN


FRESH SEAFOOD
BROILED LOBSTER


Sunday Dinner Served As Usual


MARGARET & STANLEY
FULLER, Managers


SARAH LOGAN
KENNEY, Owner


i I I


'A'1


Dick Hiillmn


GENERAL CONTRACTOR


APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA


action from


sports cars


price just above small cars


-11-- ~ ---" ---


B6 ,," 7A


-- `


i3111


- ,PAa~-:ai#s


.__~Tn:~iAR-~d~IT~. JOk, GULF Cd3NTY, F-LUMIOA


'f,14UFttbAY; JANUARY-WH, 19,57-.


It


40


,=~rr,


qw. 141 Pw* 0. Jim. Ploomw








PAGEI I IT I I '1t .T. I G F O T I U- J


THE STAR

Published Every Thursday At 306 Wlliams Avenue, Port St.
Joe, Florida, By The Star Publishing Company
WESLY R. RAMS, Editor and Publisher
Also Linotype Operator. Ad Man, Floor Man, Columnitt
Reporter, Proof Reader and Bookkeeper
ONE YEAR, MONTH SIX MONTHS $31.
SUBSCRIPTION INVARIABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
Entered as second-ela matter, December 19, 1987. at the
Postoffice, Port St. Joe, P., under Act of March 8. 1879.
DIAL BAll 7-8161

TO ADVERTISERS-In ease of error or om0tslous I ade,
tisements, the publishers do not hold themelwea lable for
damages further than amount received for suoh advertisement
The spoken word Is given scant attention; the printed ward
Is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts
the printed word thoroughly novinces. The spoken word
Is lost- the printed worA rema.



"YOUTHS AND DRIVING"
We would like to take this space and opportunity to
toss a few bouquets to the police department of our city for their
concentrated efforts to curb speeding and unsafe driving in our
city. EvenThough their drive has been in force only a few short
weeks, already visible results are evident that the pace of traffic
and the flagrant violations of the rules of the road in our city
have been curtailed considerably.
Although the police have been effective in curbing some
of the traffic, the fact that only patrol car is available to the
city, their effectiveness is limited in traffic control work.
Nobody knows this any better than some teen-agers in
'our city especially at night. We know* of this first hand
since about half the night last Friday night was spent racing and
squalling tires around our neighborhood over on Marvin and
Garrison Avenues. The police knew about it and they were
there, but the patrol was on duty elsewhere. If the patrol car
had been available, it would be a hopeless task to stop a half
dozen cars scratching off in a dozen different directions. But
license numbers were taken and parents will be notified.
We have no idea that all the boys were observed by the
authorities. We believe that it is the duty of the parents of this
city to see that their children drive like they should or forbid
them the use of the family car. The ranks of speeding youthful
drivers is growing in Port St. Joe with leaps and bounds. We
know that parents don't want their cars torn up or worse still,
we know that they don't want their children to kill themselves
or others. It is bound to happen sooner or later if the practice
isn't stopped.
We have a hunch that the parents of children speeding
and driving dangerously know or suspect that their children are
involved. The wear and tear from such driving of an automobile
will show up. We urge the parents of these youths to take mea-
sures to see that they straighten up and drive right.
Chief of Police Buck Griffin has stated to the editor
that after the parents have been notified, reckless driving youths
are going to be picked up and placed under arrest, possibly to
spend some time in the local callaboose on top of having to pay
a stiff fine. There just might possibly be something in it for the
parents too.
We had just as well make up our minds that this dan-
gerous practice must stop immediately and do our best to co-
operate with the authorities to see that it~is stopped before dras-
tic action has to be taken.
Or even worse, before someone is killed or maimed for
* life.



"LET'S FINISH THE JOB"

This is the theme announced by March of Dimes head-
quarters here for the campaign that will be carried on through
January.
The "job" it two-fold: To raise funds for repair of the
damage that polio has done to thousands of Americans in the past
and to prevent the disease from crippling more thousands in the
future.
March of Dimes spokesmen explain that an estimated
80,000 persons have been left handicapped by polio, throughout
the length and breadth of the United States; and they point out
that the job of conquering the disease cannot be considered fin-
ished until these patients have been helped to regain normal and
productive lives.
The second objective of the campaign is to promote the
widest possible use of the Salk vaccine, which was developed
under March of Dimes sponsorship, and which has been proven
safe and effective many millions of times over.
Commenting on the 16,000 cases of polio reported in
1956, Basil O'Connor, president of the March of Dimes organi-
zation, said:
"We of the March of Dimes are determined that 1957
shall not see a repetition of the polio record of 1956. Even so, we
know there will be attacks of the disease, and we must provide
for the care of all who need it."
"We must also remember," Mr. O'Connor added, "those
persons for whom the vaccine came too late. When we give to
the March of Dimes, we are helping those who need help and
protecting those who don't."




Wood For Sale

BLOCKS UNSPLIT -- Load $5.00

BLOCKS SPLIT ----Load $7.00


Classified Ads Bring Quick Results


District Army Engineers Chief Denies

Woodruff Operation Lowering Lakes

VEWB AHItTOHKA Spokesmen to the decrease of the water level
for the 'Corps of Engineers has de- in the Dead Lakes.
nied that the Jim Woodruff Dam 'So therefore, the closure plan
above the Chattahoochee and Apa- that has been adornnted nronvis 1tha


lachicola has drained the Dead
Lakes of water and brought econ-
omic hardships to fishing camp .and
resort owners.
But the denial failed to stem the
criticism of the operation of the
da mand Gulf and Calhoun County
efforts to have a dam built in the
Dead Lakes to restore the water
level to its former depth continued
unabated,
Harland Pridgeon, Gulf tax col
lector and leader of the movement
to have a dam constructed in the
Dead Lakes, levelled charges three
weeks ago that caused Dead Lakes
water level to fall to such an extent
that most former fishing grounds
were now dry.
Col. Harold Bisbort, district en-
gineer, denied these charges In a
letter to Pridgeon.
"The charges do not take inIo
acoun fact that for the periods
1954, P155 and 1956 streamflows on
the Citl;ola River and the ApDaachi-
co.a River have been substant: .v
below -Lormal," Bisbort stated.
'This situation is not due to the
construction or operation of tho
dam but to deficient rainfall. The
carrnen: dry cycle is the most ex-
treme since streamflow records
were initiated in 1,28."
Bisbort said, by way of illustra-
tion, that the Chipola River a* Al-
tha has an average flow of 1 500
cubic feet per second, based on 20
years of records. In 1954, the aver-
age flow was 1,264 C.F:S. and in
1955 only 613.
On the Apalachicola River, Bis-
bort said, the flow for January of
1956 was over 70 per cent below the
normal January flow for the past
26 years.
"Insufficient inflow into the Dead
Lakes by the Chipola River has
been the controlling factor in the
decrease at Dead Lakes", the
Engineer declared. "The Chipola
River, -which is the main source of
inflow into the Dead Lakes, is in no
way affected by the: operation of
Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam,. De-
crease in flow in the Chipola would
cause Dead Lakes to drop in-
dependently of any operation of the
dam."
Bisbort said that the Engineers
recognize that a complete closing
of the dam gates would contribute


during filling the outflow from the
Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam will
be sufficient to maintain a
s',age of 6.1 feet at Blountstown .
(which) exceeds that stage that
the Game and resh Water Fish
Commission requested ." he ex-
plained.
He said that if the inflow into


the dam dropped below a certain
point no water would be stored in
the dam reservoir, and water lev-
els below the dam would not be af-
fected.
Btsbort also denied that dredging
of a deep, wide channel in the Apa-
lachicola from the dam to the city
of Apalachicola has affected water
levels.
"Discharge measurements taken
before and after dredging at the
puncture of the Chipola Cutoff and


age if used properly; that is, it they
dry us up in droughts."
He said that the Apalachicola
River is a big controlling factor In
the level of the Dead Lakes and is
the sole source of water there.
"The Apalachicola acts as a
cushion to hold back the flow from
the Chipola," he declared. "When
the Apalach. falls, water is sucked
from the Chipola and the Dead
Lakes."
Pridgeon pointed out that follow-


the Apalachicola iver show no ing recent rains, in Georgia in mid-
change in the river level due to the December, the Apalachicola River
river dredging," he stated, backed up into the Dead Lakes to
Pridgeon said his group feels the such an extent that the water level
"dams could work to good advant- Jumped from 1.5 feet on Dec. 115 to
don't flood us in heavy rains and 8.7 on Jan. 1.


"The -crest was reached in mid-
week," Pridgeon pointed out, "and
now the Lakes are dropping fast."
He said the draining process has
been accentuated and accelerated
by the closing of the dam gates,
which the engineers did to begin
filling the reservoir behind the dam.
Pridgeon said he is awaiting ac-
tion by Congressman Bob Sikes in
this new session of the CongreSs o
insure that federal aid for construc-
tion of the Dead Lakes Dam will
be forthcoming.

Return From Tampa
Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Hutcbins have
returned to their home after spend-
ing several days in Tampa.


THE FLORIDA NATIONAL GROUP OF BANKS


FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at Ocala

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at Fernandina Beach

FLORIDA BANK
at Fort Pierce

FLORIDA BANK
at DeLand

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at Perry

FLORIDA BANK
at Starke

FLORIDA BANK
at Port St. Joe

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at Belle Glade

FLORIDA BANK
at Madison


FLORIDA BANK
at Chipley

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at Arlington

FLORIDA BANK
at Bushnell

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at Brent


COMBINED STATEMENT OF CONDITION


COMBINED STATEMENT OF CONDITION
DECEM'BER 31, 1956

RESOURCES


Loans and Discounts $161,704,854.61
Banking House, Furniture and Fixtures
Including Office Buildings 5,481,854,10
Other Real Estate Owned 132,978.61
Prepaid Expenses 51,869.93
Other Resources 25,009.61
Customers Liability A/C
Letters of Credit 107,535.00
Accrued Interest and Income
Receivable $ 1,587,368.46
U. S. Government Securities 203,749,614.17
Florida County and Municipal Bonds ....... 23,078,286.20
Federal Reserve Bank Stock 967,050.00
Other Securities 625,668.35
Cash on Hand and Due From Banks ...----- 155,253,876.93 385,261,864.11
'$552,765,465.97


LIABILITIES


Capital Stock $ 16,350,000.00
Surplus 18,670,000.00
Undivided Profits 2,477,139.26
Reserve For Contingencies
Reserve For Taxes, Interest, Etc.
Interest and Income Collected Not Earned
Letters of Credit
Other Liabilities
Deposits


37,497,189.26
7,900,551.10
3,017,876.70
2,105,987.07
123,576.50
14,709.95
502,105,625.39


FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
of Jacksonville

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
& TRUST COMPANY
at [Miami


FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at St. Petersburg

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at Orlando

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at Pensacola

FLORIDA :BANK &
TRUST COMPANY
at Daytona Beach

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at Coral Gables

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
& TRUST COMPANY
at West Palm 4Beach


FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at Lakeland

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at Key West

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at Bartow

FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
at Galnesville


SWALTER DUREN
CALL BAll 7.3171


Skm6douFEDERAL NATI 0 NA /
DEPOSIT INSURANCE -N G B 1
CORPORATN GROUP OF A^
-- A- FLORIDA
=- .,. -- -B A N K'Jl- SOUTHEAST


j


_ .71 `r


THE GITAR, POR~T 8T. J09p GQULF COUNTY# FLORIDA


THURSDAY,, JANUNOARY 10, 1967


PAGE sIX








RD JNY--- 10, 1957' T STAR. POHT ST. JMt., GULF COUNTY, PLORIDA PAGE SEVER


ARE YOU A 'WACKY WALKER'


.-3032. tfc
F YOU ARE INTERESTED In av- .
Ing money see us for anything
you need in your home. STOP and |
SWAP SHOP.


'-5-



-* CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING *


FOR SALE: Spacious four bedroom WILL BUILD modern business
house in good section of Oak building on Reid Avenue in Port
Grove, 80'X125' lot. House contains St. Joe to suit tenant or lessee.
approximately 1200 sq. ft. of living Building will be approximately 20
area plus front and back porches feet by 45 feet situated on Lot 18
and, car port. Only $7250.00. About in Block 16. Call Ben H. Dickens at
1i2.000u.0 down and balance 0., lo'in BAll 7-2281 or make appointment
tei it mortgage. 107 Second Street for complete de-
FRANK HANNON tails. tfc-12-20
Registered Real Estate Broker FOR SALE: 3-bedroom house. Re-
Phone 7-3491 211 Reid Ave. cently repainted on inside. Con-
Port St. Joe, Fla. venlent to grammar school and to
town. See 0. M. Taylor. tfc10-18
LOTS FOR SALE: Jonesville sub-
division. Only four miles south of FOR S tALE: Parakeets. Breeding
-Po._ St. Joe, Just off US 98, Lots pairs. With cage or singles for
are 50 ft. by 150 it. $200 and up. pets. 1311 Long Ave. Ph. 7-7696 3t
lee Roy E. Cox or phone BAll 7-5090 FOR RENT: One and two bedroom
Terms offered. 6tp-12-27 attractively furnished apartments
FOR RENT: Furnished cottages Cool in summer, warm in winter.
and apartments on the Bea*cb 9 Window fans, gas heat. They have
ailes from Port St. Joe. $45.00 to to be seen to be appreciated, Wim-
$65.00 monthly, weekly rates avail- ico Lodge, White City, Phone -4083.
able. See Mrs. C. E. Thompson at tf0-12-13
Costin's Cottages, Beacon Hill. To].
BAll 7-5074. 8tp-12-27 Star Want Ads Get Results


This sweet, smooth and sassy new
Chte v has its own built-in "dollar-
saver"-America's favorite six!
Hard to believe it, but this big
beauty is a bottom-priced Chevrolet
"One-Fifty." It's got Body by
Fisher quality written all over it.
And it has a peppery, sweet-running
"Blue-Flame" six under the hood to


S Keys Made While You Wait
/ 0 5c EACH
BICYCLE PARTS
WESTERN AUTO
/Reel Parts and Repairs
l ADE US that useless article for
somethingg useful. STOP and
WAP.
S WILLIS V. ROWAN POST. 116,
THE AMERICAN LEGION. Meet-
Ing first and third Monday nights
0 p.m., American Legion Home
'I A. M.-Regular convocation of
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
M., 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit-
.lien, High Priest; H. R. Malge,
secretary.
HERE WILL BE a regular com-
S/ municatlon of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F&AM every second and
fourth Friday night at 8:00 p.m.
All Master Masons cordially invited.
SJ. B. GRIFFITH, W. M.
l t F. W. OHANDLI.R, See.
LOYAL ORDER OF MOOSE
Meetings at Moose Hall, 310
Fourth St.. meeting night every other
Monday.
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0.
S" O.F.-Meets first and third Thur*
days, 7:30 p. m. In Masonic Hall. Alh
members urged to attend; visiting
brethren Invited.
A. P. GILBERT, Secty.
G. F. LAWRENCE, N. G.
"^ ~NOTICE OF INTENTION
2". TO DISSOLVE CORPORATIONS
aNotice is hereby given under the
provisions of Section 608.36, Florida
.--- _' | ~Statutes, 1953, to each of the cor-
porations listed below, the same be-
-ing incorporated under the laws of
FOR SALE: House at 110 Hunter ,Florida, and according to the re_-
,Circle. Priced for quick sale. ords of the Secretary of State, each
E. TOM PRIDGEON and every such corporation appears
Real Estate & Insurance delinquent for three (3) years or
BAII 7-7741 411 Reid Ave. more in the filing of reports and
,payment of taxes under the provi-
WANTED TO BUY: Piano in good 'sions of Section 608.33, Florida Sta-
condition. Phone 7-5831. Itp tutes, 1953, and that under the pro-
--- -- visions of said Section 608.36, Flo*-
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apartment. ida Statutes, 1'953, said corporations
For couple only. 515 Third St. have been classed as subject to dis-
- _- _- ---- --solution, and that three (3) months
FOR RENT: House in Highland after date of this publication eac0i
View. Couple or couple with and every such corporation listed
small baby. J. J. Laurimore. p below that has not in the meantime
FOR ALE: Lot, X 165 i e filed its reports due and paid the
FOR SALE: Lot, 50 X 1 in Wh ti taxes due under the provisions of
City. New deep well and septic Section .608.33, Florida Statutes,
tank. Inquire at Piggly Wiggly. 193, will be certified to the Gov-
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment ernor of the State of Florida, who
at Oak Grove. Mrs. Paul Farmer will issue a Proclamation at that
1 time dissolving said corporation.
SPECIAL SERVICES GULF COUiNTY
w-. w- a .-*,_ ^ ^ -Name Principle Place of Business
GULF INVESTMENT OOM'PANY,"
TV ANTENNAS installed, clean- Port St. Joe.
edd and re-wired. Phone BA 7-9921. MEXICO BEAH FUNITURE
Bill Bowen. tfc6-14 .COMPANY, Port St. Joe.
'OR FAST, EFFICIENT plumbing It is further directed that a copy
service, call BILL'S PLUMBING. of this notice be published one
-hone 7-7846. Outboard motors rf- itime in the Port St. Joe Star, a
maired, also. newspaper published in Port .St. Joe
i Florida, in which county the home
KENNEDY'S ELECTRIC and RE-I office of the above listed corpora-
FRIGERATIOIN SERVICE. Li- tions are shown to be located.
,ensed electrical contractor. All' IN WIT NEISS WHEREOF, I have
kinds electric and refrigeration i hereunto set my ban, dand caus-
service and installation. Phone ed the reat Seal of the State


make your gas stops few and -fa
between.
Like all new Chevies, it brings you
a very special sureness of controL
This is a quality that just can't be
measured in dollars and cents. Lots
of cars that cost lots more just don't
have it. Come in and see how much
pleasure we're passing out these days
at Chevrolet prices!


Patsy Williams Is
Honored With Party

Mrs. Robert Williams honored
her daughter Patsy on her 12th
birthday with a surprise birthday
party at her home on Garrison Ave-
nue.
The guests enjoyed dancing, and
a number of games. They then ga-
thered around the dining table,
which was centered with a beauti-
ful birthday cake. The guests sang
"Happy Birthday" to Patsy.
After refreshments of cookies,
cake and Cokes were served, tha
guests took part in a dancing con-
test. Alice Land and Joe Whaley
were selected as winners. Those at-
tending the party were: Peggy
Lewis, Reva Oakes, Wanda Wil-
lams, Bob Bracewell, Alice Land,
Toni Mira, Mary Dell Ramsey, Bar-
bara Bell, Mickey Thomson, Gay e
Griffin, Jimmy Johnson, George
Boyer, Brenda Tomlinson, Blaine
Tharpe, Carolyn Whitehurst, Glen-
da Burkett, Beth Williams, Robert
Ti lliams, Jr., Joe Whaley and Mau-
rice Fuller. Those sending gifts
but not attending were Haro;d
keels and Jenifer Kennedy.
Assisting Mrs. Williams in enter-
taining and serving was Miss Doto
thy Williams and Mrs. Ivy Wil-
liams.
GLAD CIRCLE WILL MEET
WITH MRS. HUTCHINS
A general meeting of the Gladioli
Circle of the Port St. Joe Garden
Club will be held on Thursday af-
ternoon, January 10 at 3 p.m., in
the home of Mrs. T. D. Hutchins
on Monument Avenue with Mrs; I
Paul Fensom in charge of the pro-
gram.

of Florida, to be affixed at Tal-
lahassee, the Capital, this the
l2nd day of January A. D., 1957.
(ISBIAL) R. A. GRAY
Secretary of State

Symptoms of Distress Arising from
STOMACH ULCERS
DUE TO EXCESS ACID
QUICK RELIEF OR NO COST

---- Over five million packages of the
WILLARD TREATMENT have been sold
for relief of symptoms of distress arising from
Stomach and Duodenal Ulcers due to Ex-
cess Acid-Poor Digestion, Sour or Upset
Stomach, Gassiness, Heartburn, Sleep-
lessness, etc., due to Excess Acid. Ask for
"Willard's Message" which fully explains
this home treatment-free-at

Buzzetfs Drug Store
Port St. Joe, Florida







... FIGHTS ALL COLDS
SYMPTOMS AT ONE TIME...
IN LESS TIME! ITS THE
PROVEN COLDS MEDICINE


JR. CHAMP .Janice Hulllin-
ger, 18, of Manly, Iowa, exhibits
"Dale", her 1050 pound Angus
steer which was chosen grand
junior champion at Chicago's
57th annual International Live-
stock Exposition.


BY LYN CONNELLY
"I'E'fLE tunes from motion pic-
tures continue to provide the
recording companies with hit
discs and the motion picture pro-
ducers with a box-office boost-
a happy wedding The most
notable ones in recent months
have been "The Man With the
Golden Arm," "Picnic," and "The
Proud Ones," the latter break-
ing currently with a Nelson Rid-
dle slicing Most recent climb
on the bandwagon are "Some-
body Up There Likes Me," re-
corded by Perry Como, "Bus
Stop," by the Four Lads and'
"Friendly Persuasion" by Pat
Boone.
Incidentally, some credit should
be given young Pat Boone .
He has succumbed to movie offers
but intends to finish his college
training at Columbia University
. Only 22, he is happily mar-
ried with three daughters .
Pat is handsome, clean cut and
versatile Not only does he
belt out a whale of a rock 'n roll
number, but he does equally well
with a dreamy ballad Elvis
Presley's first acting in "Love Me
Tender" emerges as pretty fair
but the picture is definitely corn-
ball.
PLATTER CHATTER
CAPITOL:-Another debut on
this label, this time by Ken Err-
air, formerly ot the Four Fresh-
men Ken does well by "I
Ain't Goon' Nowhere" (only in
the song, cause he's personally
going somewhere-up) with "I
Want to Love While I'm Young"
on the reverse Jimmy Heap
and Perk Williams team up in a
pair: "This Song tk Just for You"
and "Mingling."
Still on Capitol label, Joe 'T"n-
gers" Carr continues his sensa-
tional piano playing with "La La
Collette" Flipside has 'Tm
a Little Echo," one of his rare
vocals Joe may not have curls
and candelabra, but he certain-
ly can thump those ivori-'


'i4.


The "One-Rfty" 2-Door Sedan with Body by Fisher-one of 20 beautiful new Chevrolets for '571


Only franchised Chevrolet dealers jii display this famous trademark


I'
/


M. P. TOMLINSON


REALTOR
403 Monument Ave


- INSUROR
'urt St. Joe, Fla.


PRICES


CLERKS


emwr 4lk amil W RHmiIT


-W %w -W w .~ %% tt4


71ig beauty with small-budget ways!

It's powered by Chevy's famous six


/ utchins-Thursbay Chevrolet Ca.


S7CHEVROL;ET


Lb. 39c


SLAB BACON

Lb. 29c
SLICED FREE
Guaranteed Fresh Ga. Grade 'A
LARGE EGGS

2 doz. 87 c
GREEN
CABBAGE

Lb. lOc
LARGE HEAD

LETTUCE

2 for 29c
,LARGE and FRESH
BANANAS

Lb. 10c

NEW SYRUP

/2 Gal. 69c
NBC PREMIUM
SALTINES

Lb. Box 25 c
OSAGE DESSERT

PEACHES

2V can 25c
3 LB. CAN ARMIX
SHORTENING

79c

WITH $5.00 GROCERY ORDER
SUGAR

5 Lb. 39c
NO. 2 CAN SANTAROSA
PINEAPPLE

Sliced 25c
NO. 5 JUG

HOG LARD

47c
COMO

Toilet Tissue

Roll 5c
PENNY

DOG FOOD

3 for 25c

Large LEMONS

Doz. 29c
w- s -o-

Large CHEER

27c
ARMOUR'S

MILK

2 tall cans 25c




Quality



Market

Corner Williams & Third


1111- 1,, Il LI -I __


THS STAR, PORfT 5T. JOk GULFT COUNTY, FLORIDA


PAGE SEVEN


. TH URDAY, 'JAN UARY -10, 1957


RIGHT PLT


::~lhris*? mumsr


j_





S--YS A LAI W EVERYBODY SAVES AT PIGGLY WIGGLY


/ .. ... :.^:..- .-. : : ^... .:.:.?....... ..... :::. .


0
0
-I
0
0
a:
I.-


0
LU
LU






-a
0
I
-I
0
a:
LU
I)
0
0
LU






0
0
-1
0
0
a:
I'!

0
'0
)h.
LU
~a.
IL





I
-.1
S.
I-.
LU
(~)
~b.
0
'0
LU


I


ROBIN HOOD -- 10 LB. BAG

FLOUR

NO. 10 ARMOUR

Cooking Oil
1 LB. PKG. NABISCO
CRACKERS


89c


$1.49


SMOKED TENDERIZED
Half or Whole

HAMS



W4~


25c


FRESH PORK
SIDE 25c

FRESH PORK WHOLE

SHOULDER 29C


i-egster's Pure Pork

SAUSi


CB
L-B


SLAB (Whole)
BACON

SLAB (Sliced)
BACON


29c


Spare Ribs


LB


EXCLUSIVE
ALL NEW AT
PIGGLY WIGGLY
COMPLETE
PASTRY DEPT.
All The Delicious Goodies
You've Looked For. Place
Special Orders for Birthday
Cakes or Other Special Oc-
casions.


WHOLE SUN FROZEN


Orange JUICE
AUNT JEMIMA
GRITS


HILL'S


7
FOR

2
FOR

2
FOR


9916


25c

25c


Stokeley's Fruit
COCKTAIL
No. 303 25c
Hunts
PEACHES
No. 300 19c


Half Gallon
CLOROX
31c


TOMATOES .,,,ans 29c


RUTABAGAS
POLE
BEANS


LB.


LB.


SUNKIST
LEM 0 N SDOZ.
GOLDEN RIPE


BANANAS


LB

10


SNOWCLEAN
CAULIFLOUREACH


BIG SUPER MARKET COLORING CONTEST AT PIG-
GLY WIGGLY! KIDS ENTER TODAY!

-35 Big Prizes-
7 prizes in each store, Plus an Opportunity to Participate in the National
Coloring Contest -i


5-Boys Wrist Watches
5-Girls Wrist Watches
5-Boys Pen and Pencil Sets
5-Girls Pen and Pencil Sets


5-Ansco Cameras
5-Pair Roller Skates
5-John Gnagy Sketch Outfits
Total Prizes Worth Over $425


-gv GREN SA-tbi


70A1~IM A7~001 lif S3AVS A0RAIBAI


- ^iil -+ .^-- ^ ^-- n ++'-+.'-.s_ *% -' -
-- ] i ; --- ._ -__ -+ +
I\~


I


hi


5

9%;
-0


1


29w


U. S. Good Heavy Shoulder


ROAST


49c Ib


Wl"LY p~ ~-


_ L L_l i


IIII~ILILdL9


II II I


~C~--- RB--L~IIIR~r"C~C--I


kvWB6DY'~j S'AV'f'S AT PIOGLY


j'v,'R'Yi3,o~ SAV'FS AT PIGGY WIGGL'j


FLA. GRADE 'A' MEDIUM .


I


AISSIM A-it-Did IV S3AVS AGOBAd
I IAUI


A19SOLM AMON31 IV 3AVIS AOlff8lf3A3 I


Dog FOOD





PAGS Fiva


THURSDAY,------- JAUR 10, 197TH TR5PRTS.JOGLFCUNY LR


WEST FLORIDA GAS CO.'
"Serving ALL Northwest FLORIDA" ,



BUY O-F THE YEAR'I
aY ---


iull Size All Porcelain Automatic Gas Range-As Pictured.


Automa-


tic Micro-Lite Ignition for Top Burners, Automatic Oven Ignition. Alum-
inum Burner Caps Are Rust Proof, Drip Trays for Easy Cleaning, Hi-Lo
Click Valves, Oven Has Window and Light, Electric Clock and Four
Hour Timer, Eze-Kleen Fully Removable Broiler and True Smokless
Broiling that Only Gas Can Give. New 1957 Model ,#. -N*W


REGULAR PRICE FOR RANGE

REGULAR PRICE 21-Piece Cookware



Both for Regular

Both for 179 SAVE


r -" ;30 Gallon
Glass Lined "

WATER HEATER


$790.


Model
SG-326D
WHY PAY MORE


OPEN 8:30 A.M.
TO 5:30 P.M.
DAILY


18995

5995

24990


70.90


OPEN 8:30 A.M.
TO 5:30 P.M.
DAILY


Elvis Presley
Coming To Port
EAvis Presley, the singing sensa-
Stion of the teenage set, was a truck
driver two years ago but he's "big
business" now. Before he started
work *in his first motion picture,
"Love Me Tender", the Twentieth
Century-Fox CinemaScope hit com-
ing this week end to the Port Thea-
tre, co-starring Richard Egan and
Debra Paget, he set up an office in
the ante-room of his dressing room
to handle the calls and correspond-
ence of Elvis Presley Enterprises.
in addition to booking Presley's
personal appearance tours and 'iV
and radio appearances, his organi-
zation handles his dealings with
RCA Victor, which has his record-
ing contracts; with another com-
Ipany which deals in Presley-spon-
sored merchandise; and with a sub-
sidiary which handles his music
publications.
On Presley's staff are his mana-
ger, Colonel Tom Parker, veteran
showman; his cousin, Gene Smith,
of Memphis, who acts as Elvis'
companion and all-around assistant;
and his secretary, Trude Forsher.

NEWS FROM
OAK GROVE


"Get married? ... But, then where would I spend my evenings?"


By HELEN NORRIS
in Marianna visiting with Mr. and Mr. and Mrs. Allen Norris motor-
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Lightfoot Mrs. Wallace Hall and Mr. and ed to Wewahitchka Saturday on
and children spent several days in Mrs. Willys Liptford. business.
Dothan, Ala., visiting with friends Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Campbell and Mr. and Mrs. Allen H. Norris and
and relatives. daughters spent several days in children and iss Helen and Juanita
iRev. and Mrs. red Hadley and Perry visiting with relatives. Norris motored to Vernon Friday
children spent several days in Mo- Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Deese and visiting with friends and relatives.
bile, Alabama visiting with friends children of Panama City spent New Honored With Party
and relatives. Year's Day visiting with Mr. and Mrs. Joe Burns honored her
'SSgt. and Mrs. Ivis Pinter and Mrs. Carl Deese. daughter Carolyn with a birthday
children returned home Saturday Mr.s. Eddie Tubberville and party onday night at 6:30 at her
after spending some time visiting daughter Marlyn and Miss Betty home on Duval St., Refreshments
Deese motored to Panama City Sat- of Cokes and cake were served to
with Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Dykes and urday on business. the following guests: Dot Dormany,
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Norris. 'Louis Ray, Miss Leona and Min- Joe and Jack Levins, Marlene Hud-
Miss Patricia Lewis daughter of 'nie 01a Ray motored to Jackson- son, Sharon Wilson, Bobby Cooper,
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Lewis of Ver- ville on business. Betty Deese, Gail Anderson, Harry
non spent several days visiting. Carl Deese and son, L. C. motor- Brewton, Patricia Hanlon and the;
with Mr. and Mrs. James Lovett, ed to Georgia Monday on business, honoree, Carolyn Burns.
Mr. and Mrs. Hermnan Stripling Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Deese and ------
and Mr. and Mrs. Joel Lovett. children of Panama City spent Sat-
Mr. and rs. H. D. Levins and urday visiting with Mr. and Mrs. tar Want Ads Get Results
daughter Regennia attended the Cart Deese. T U H E T A R
funeral of his father in Bonifay Mr. and Mrs. Quincy Keith of I H ST R
last week. Cottondale spent the week end vis- L- A7 1
Mrs. Eunice Vickers and Mrs. iing with Mr. and Mrs. Carl PrORne -3101
Cleveland Hall spent several days Deese.
In" I


Citizen- 9Jederal



Savings & Loan

ASSOCIATION of PORT ST. JOE


OWIHE


By


Savings


Investors


Our 3 per cent per annum current rate dividend
credited to your SAVINGS account June 30th. and De
cember 31st. is compounded and forms added savings
itself earning dividend.
THE DIFFERENCE:- We finance homes and commercial structures on long
term monthly payments.
OUR ASSOCIATION:- A safe place for people to invest their funds SAFELY,
and HELPFULLY to the community in which they live.
OPERATED BY experienced, successful, businessmen of our area.
SAVINGS ACCOUNTS ARE EASILY OPENED BY MAIL. Mail us your
check, Post Office money order, register cash. You will promptly
receive our beautiful pass book with your savings properly entered.


OUR OFFICERS


C. G. COSTIN, Sr., Port St. Joe
PRESIDENT-DmECTOR
J. C. BELIN, Port St. Joe
1ST. VICE-PRESIDENT-DIRECTOR
L. G. BUCK, Apalachicola
ExEc. VICE-PRESIDENT-DMIECTOR
G. U. PARKER, Blountstown
VICE-PRESIDENT-DImECrTO
DWIGHT I. MARSHALL, Apalachicola
VICE-PFESIDENT-DmEcroR


OTHER DIRECTORS
M. BROOKS HAYES, Blountstown
FRANK HANNON, Port St. Joe
E. F. GUNN, Port St. Joe
W. 0. ANDERSON, Port St. Joe
GEORGE G. TAPPER, Port St. Joe
CECIL G. COSTIN, Jr.,
DImECTOR AND ASSN. COUNSEL
MRS: HORACE SOULE
OFFICE ASSISTANT


-


rLORIDA


THE $T+AR, PORT ST, JOE, GULF covuNT, F


T HURSDAY, JANUARY 10,-1957


..


:i~i~~-- 91


1








I I I II 1"1; 1 I1' I( I I' I T I IEIIOUNTYIIR IDA A J


TOO LATE TO

CLASSIFY
By RUSSELL KAY

When Miami sets out to kick up
her heels she does it in a big way
and each year her magnificent
Orange Bowl celebration becomes
more colorful and elaborate.
Tt was my privilege to attend the
affair this year and with so much
going on it la difficult for one lit-


-.....---..t. .., i ... trainer business and supplies fieia -the restaurant parking lot. This
jam before going to Miami I might
have been unhappy but I expected i
it, and took it in stride and liked, it,
bumper to bumper for miles. It's
funny how folks react to such in-
convenience. If you expect it and
make up your mind to accept it be- '


ITS

WALL ELECTRIC

COMPANY

FOR EXPERT

Electrical Repairs
and

I Contracting
DIAL BA 7-4331


From The Ravenswood News,
Ravenswood, W. Va.: If all the
speeders on the highways today
would take a long look at the cost
of speed they just might change
their ways. Or does a wild-eyed
speeder ever change until he is
parked on a slab in a mortuary or
on a bed in a hospital?
Speed is the Number One Kill-
er. It costs in death and property
loss. It also costs so far as the
operation of' a motor vehicle is
concerned.
Now this is not fantasy. Here
are some facts.
At 65 miles an hour out on the
open highway, a speed which is
illegal in West Virginia, most
automobiles use 30 per cent more
gasoline than they do at 40 miles
per hour. Tire wear is two and
one half times as great and oil
consumption is actually doubled.
These facts were given to us by
the West Virginia State Police and
they know whereof they speak.
Out in Kansas City a few years
ago, some tests were made by the'
American Automobile Association.
It was actually learned that you
don't gain a bit of time by driv-
ing fast in cities, in congested traf-
fic.
Cars traveled eight miles in con-
gested traffic. Those going 25 miles
an hour had only one stop (for
traffic light) to every five stops


made by cars going 35 miles per
hour. The gas consumption on the
slower cars was 23 per cent less.
We could go on with 'real sta-
tistics and prove speed is expen-
sive in the operation of your car
but that's not the only high cost.
Death, injury and destroyed prop-
erty is expensive, too..

From the Herington Advertiser-
Times, Herrington, Kansas: We
frequently hear people in public
'life advocate tax reduction on the
One hand-and huge new govern-
ment spending programs on the
other hand.
Actually, both proposals could be
undertaken-by such expedients as
an extreme "soft money" policy
and by turning loose the presses
that print the currency.
. If that should happen, what
.would the results be? Secretary
of the Treasury Humphrey an-
swered with these words:: "This
. is the policy of deliberate in-
flation and must result in a return
to a budget unbalanced by sever-
al billion dollars, with all of the
inflationary pressures that it would
create." Then we'd have more dol-
lars in circulation, but each of
them would become progressive-
ly less valuable-and if the pro-
gram were carried to its logical
end, would become worthless.


RE-PATRIOTS A-ley Pate,
26, of Carbond-le, Ill., (left)
and Aaron W-lson, 24, of Urania,
La., Korea PfWs wih, chcsp to
stay w;ih Reds, ietu n to U. S.


tie country boy to take in every-- fore you start but, itfisn't so bad,. aand packing crates to growers and amazing service is for free to Shar-
thing but what I did see was cer- but if yo uare hte nervous, always packer. -spending about six months rards customers and it sure saves
tainly Impressive. in a hurry, type youi'll be' driven out of the year in South Florida. I a lot of wear and tear for those who
Highlight, of course, was the bril- stark staring nuts. I felt positively indecent sitting take advantage of it.
liant Orange Bowl parade and the Native Miamians know alleys, back in his Cadillac while he drove I've seen a lot of exciting foot-
big game on the following day. short cuts, round about and cut- us hither and yon, but it was glor -
Both events were beyond the pow- offs that help to avoid jams and ious. Ordinarily I have to wrestle
er of mere words to adequately get them there quicker but visitors with lights, brakes, steering whel
4escribd. dependent on maps anid main thor- and directional signals and it was :..- ,,
The great nightparade with it oughfares have' a pretty tough wonderful to sit back like a Rajah .. .
beautil illuminated floats and gor time. or tycoon and have somebody else
beautiful illuminated floats and go- Fortunately, we were guests of do the work.
geous girls took my breath away .
Countless thousands packed the my good friends, Veirnon and Carol But Vernon was smart. He knew "
streets on the line of march and I Ramsey, who know Miami and Dade his way around so instead of trying .
understand all available seats for county almost as well as they do to drive to the stadium for the big .
the parade were sold well in ad- their native Virginia. They have a game, he drove out to Jerry Sher-
vance. Scalpers had a hey-day and cozy apartment just across the riv- rards Dixie Belle restaurant at
were offering seats from $12 to $15 er from downtown Miami and we Kendall where we had a delightful
each. could see the parade make up from lunch and then took a bus direct to
Tah' Th.... h their window. Vernon is in the con- the Orange Bowl leaving our car in
If T had not anticinpated a traffic ... ; .


IF .. .. 0


0 w save on the tire designed for


ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT

on 8,000,000 of America's finest cars


0


The 9-passenger Country Sedan


ALL SIZES -ALL TYPES SALE


i:


"'


The Del Rio Ranch Wagon


The Ranch Wagon


FIVE NEW FORD glamour wagons

long, low and loaded with Go!


Black Si


Super Champion
idewall White Sid


Size Sale Price Each'


Tubed Type
6.70-15
7.10-15
7.60-15
6.00-16
6.50-16

Tubeless
6.70-15
7.10-15
7.60-15


14.35
16.05
17.60
12.55
17.25


16.15
17.95
19.70


Leave it to the station wagon leader to make
the big news for '571 And what news! Wagons
so big, so full of fine-car prestige that you'll
wonder how it can be done at low Ford prices.
If your choice is the Country Squire, you'll
be proud to pull up at the finest places in this
new glamour wagon with its wood-like trim.
If your needs call for a 6-passenger wagon
with four doors, you'll love the new Country
Sedan. It has almost nine feet of loadspace-
nearly a foot more than ever-before.
There's still another 4-door Country
Sedan. It has the extra third seat for 9-passen-
ger room. And, as in all Ford wagons for '57,
you have the new single:control handle


which opens both the wrap-around liftgate
and tailgate with one motion. And they
can't be opened from inside!
There's good news, too, about Ford's
popular Ranch Wagon. This 6-passenger,
2-door model features Ford's new subdued
tones, and smart interiors which'defy muddy
little shoes and drippy chocolate cones.
In the wonderful way that Ford can take
a fine thing and make it even finer, the Del
Rio Ranch Wagon goes beyond the Ranch
Wagon in style, fabrics and trim.
Better take a Ford wagon for a spin. You'll
agree that for styling it's a sweetheart .
for work and power, it's an obedient slave


New '57 Fords have toughest
shakedown cruise Is history!
-The '57 Ford broke 458 national and
international records from 1 kilometer
to 50,000 miles 'onneville, Utah.
For 50,000 miles '57 Fords aver-
aged over 107 anc ph respectively.
This time included ail pit stops... the
greatest endurance feat of all time!


Ask for Yo,-

FORD

STATION WAGON
Action Test Today


"Plus tax ana your recappable tire
....... :" ;. .s .+; ':


-ar.-ous non-skid
-.af.ty tread
c ,sign


Safety-Tensione
Gum-Dipped
Cord Body


ST. JOE MOTOR COMPANY
I 4WPaIt .,PAIiu


nIRMTONE MIE & AUTO SUI LY STmE

L W. BUCk, awne


RADIATORS: EPA ED cmi RECORD


STARTERS md ,GENERATORS
MPAIRED and KXCHANGADr


Pate's Shel Service


Pb. sBAN 74"1


23 Monument Ave.


The 6-passenger Country Sedai :


PRICED


Size


6.70-15
7.10-15
7.60-15
6.00-16
6.50-16

Tubeless
6.70-15
7.10-15
7.60-15
8.00-15


17.55
19.70
21.55
15.35
21.15


19.85
22.05
24.15
26.85


S FIRESTONE
NATIONWIDE
*' S LIFETIME
GUARANTEE


d, Guarantee
honored wherever
you go


tH.UAS15AY,~v JANUARYI.Op 1967


II __


I


ball games in my time but this
year's Orange Bowl game topped
them all'. Colorado took over in the
first half and ran up a score of 20
before Clemson even began to start.
Then Clemson came back in the
second half and made Colorado'
look like a total loss running up a
score of 21. The jam packed sta-
dium went wild. It was anybody's
game and with a lot of luck, Colo-
rado won by one touchdown.
The half time program was the
most brilliant and colorful I have
ever witnessed. Both Colorado and
Clemson staged magnificent shows
with their bands and drill teams
while the Orange Bowl presenta-
tion of the 1957 queen and her
maids was spectacular. I was proud
of Tampa's Adelaide Gonzales, as
beautiful and charming a queen as
had ever ruled over the Orange
Bowl.
Tampa with its Florida State Fair
and Gasparilla 'Carnival and St.
Petersburg with its Festival of
States will have their hands full
competing with Miami and her
Orange Bowl. I predict they will
all be bigger and better in 1957.


___. ._ SCI~L~Fl~q----y.


THE STAR, P(-T ST". JOIE, GULF COUNTY, PLORIIDA


INAUGURAL BELLS .. Poto-
mac Park carillon, gift to U.S.
from Netherlands, will herald
Inauguration of Pres. Eisenhow-
er on Jan. 21st.

Star Want Ads Get Results


11 pavp to adil'Te-s--try it!
( -


"t


~c' ,"a': f


PAQK TIN


1, P 7OW 04W


Pew St. Joe, Plepw







BOYLES SALUTES THE NEW YEAR WITH A HAPPY SAVING SONG!

OT* JBIEiMAU H /i/L9l i E7


P.S.A


TERRIFIC CLEARANCE, STREAMLINED for GREAT SAVINGS!


GLADDEST NEWS THIS YEAR!

FIRST "STRIKE IT RICH" DAY


Thursday, Jan. 1

YOU WIN WITH EVERY PURCHASE!

STRIKE IT RICH AT BOYLES IN 1957!
LESS THAN HALF PRICE!
ALL WINTER COATS, SUITS, TOPPERS
and DRESSES


Off Reg. Price


SIncludes Missy, Junior an dHalf Sizes! Also includes all 1956 spring and
Summer goods
A NEW AND SPECIAL PURCHASE -- $8.95 Value
Missy Size (10 to 18) SUITS ------- $5.57


STRIKE THREE! OUT GOES THIS
SUPER '57 VALUE
All Children's and Girls
Including sweaters, jackets and
corduroy sportswear

50% Off
Children's and Girl's outing
Pajamas and Gowns


Reg. $1.98
STRIKE PRICE
Reg. $1.59
STRIKE PRICE


$1.57
$119


BOYLES STRIKES HARD FOR
PLAIN CASH! NO PROFIT!
All Missy and Ladies

Winter Skirts


37%


Off


HANDBAGS
(You can use mostly anytime)
Reg. $2.98
Veg l 0e $1 97
Values -.----.---..-------.---- I.
Ref. $1.98
Values $1.57


BOYLES MAKES A RICH STRIKE FOR YOU!
Hi Men! Start '57 With Record Savings On

Work Clothes
Reg. $4.95 LEE Chetopa Twill
WORK PANTS ------ $3.57
and SHIRTS (Save more than V/)
Boys Reg. $2.69 Heavy duty Sizes 4 to 16
LEE RIDERS--------- $1.97
Khaki Drab Quilt lined $6.95 Value
WORK JACKETS ----Now $4.57


A '57 STRIKE IT RICH SALE
MULTIPLIED BY 19
1 Group Boys Quality

JACKETS

77% Off
LESS THAN HALF PRICE
TOGETHER WE'LL MAKE '57 A
STRIKE IT RICH YEAR
Boys Gay Plaid Flannel

Sport Shirts

$1.29
All Sizes


NEVER BEFORE A STRIKE THE
LIKE OF THIS '57 BLOW!
Big Hit IVY LEAGUE


PANTS
Sizes for Men and Boys

$2.97
Black and tan army twill

Worth $4.00 pair


SF MI ~ s :


U1114 I---


FIRST IN VALUES FOR 1957


FREE I DUAL,
CONTROLS

Electric Blanket
WORTH $27.50 STRIKE
ASK FOR DETAILS! 1957


Let's Start A Happy and Prosperous '57
Strike It Rich At Boyles Jubilee Sale!


WARM Blankets


ee $95 -
Were $9.95 STRIKEl,


Were $4.98
DOUBLE, PLAID, Prs.
Were $3.98
SINGLE BLANKETS


GOOD


$3.57
S2.97


A Home Run Blanket Hit!
WHITE SHEET BLANKETS
$2.39 Value $1.57


WE'RE LATE BUT STILL WISHING
HAPPY NEW YEAR
TO OUR GOOD FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS
THROUGHOUT 1957


BOYLES STRIKES PROFIT
A DEADLY BLOW FOR
YOU!
Men's Happ high quality
PANTS
Values to $12.75

$7.57
Values to $7.95

$4.57


A RICH STRIKE FOR YOU BOYLES
TAKES THE LICKING SMILING!
Calling All Men (16 to 100) Be Smart!
288 Short Sleeve, Choice Patterns and Colors

Sport Shirts


$3.00
VALUE
$2.00
VALUE


Buy 'em now and save enough to take a vacation
Full cut, quality merchandise
MUNI


YOU MUST BE HERE TO WIN!
No. 1 DOUBLE BARREL
STRIKE IT LADIES OUTING PAJAMAS
STR IKE ITWere $2.98


$1.97
Ladies' PLISSE GOWNS ------$1.97
Were up to $3.95


STRIKE IT RICH NOW AT BOYLES!

3 STRIKES. We're OUT. YOU'RE IN!

CORDUROY DUSTERS (Robes) $4.57

CHENILLE DUSTERS (Robes) --- $2.57
Happy spring weight and colors 10 to 18


NYLON


HOSE --- ---- Pair
Values to $1.25 in group


STRIKE OUT TO BOYLES EARLY
THURSDAY, JAN. 11, 1957
Here and There '57 Thrillers!
1 Lot $6.95
Mojud Gown

$4.57
for Miss and Mrs.
1 Lot Children's
ANKLETS

190
Values up to 49c
1 Group Ladies
COTTON DRESSES
Values up to $2.98
97c


57c


BOYLES NEEDS CASH WITH NO
PROFIT-YOU'LL STRIKE IT RICH
39 Inch Heavy Duty
Unbleached Sheeting
10 yds. $2.57
79c Value DAN RIVER
PLAID GINGHAM
yd.57c
Some Terrible Colors
TAFFETA
Moire (sick green) was 98c
yd. 57c
Plain, was 59c
yd. 37c


BOYLES HITS THE BALL HARD FOR CASH!
YOU'LL STRIKE IT RICH ON THIS CATCH!
Wake Up! All Men's and Boys
Values up to $39.50 -- During Strike out Sale
SUITS & SPORT COATS

Knocked Down 331 -3%
P.S. 1 Rack Young Men's
SPORT COATS ------- $9.97
Hit harder -- $15.75 Value
Boy's SPORT COATS -- $5.57 and $9.57
Harder Hitl
A


STRIKE IT RICH AT BOYLES and
HAVE A HAPPY, PROSPEROUS
'57 START HERE
READ! LISTEN!
This is one of those determined
"NOT TO GO OUT OF BUSI-
NESS SALES" We're slashing
prices recklessly just to make it
possible to SERVE YOU even bet-
ter in 1957 Watch Boyles .
See Boyles Save and smile
with Boyles the whole year thru.
Are you one of those few who
wear two piece
LONGHANDLES
$1.79 Values
EACH 9


BOYLES STAGES ATOM SALE
STRIKES IT RICH FOR YOU
Be sure to see our New Year's
SCRAMBLE TABLE
You can double and triple your
money on many items you
might find anything from a pre-
cious baby dress to a sweet lady's
skirt! Turn it upside down and
let's have a scrambling good time.
Bargainly yours,
THE MANAGEMENT
CLIP THIS COUPON!
It's Worth $1.57 CASH
on any Suit, Coat or Dress LAY-A-
WAY you may have here made
prior to Dec. 15, 1956 with a bal-
ance due of 5.00 or more if same
is taken out during sale.


RICH

VALUE!


57


STRIKE IT RICH IN '57
Men's high spirited
Van Heusen, outing flannel

PAJAMAS
$3.98 Value


$ A skWM


$1.97

$1.37


FRIENDS. You'll See Hundreds of "STRIKE IT RICH" Values Not Even


Mentioned Here. DON'T MISS THIS! YOU'LL WIN!


alsB


mLB


PL


Ilrr~a~81Pra~sa~PPaa~an


a --~-c --- cg CIl b I BPIB~b~B~Bre~lc~PI~-------w ~I-- I Ilrr qr ll~B~E ~ II i 1 111 I p~ II


I ,,


"""


I-- -, -


,~E~,~i~lllll


I II


9 re


LII


l)III -'- IC~ --II I


M


19C~I~I'






I*6 ~OBTSTR 4r .JDtUI7CUT. LRD


Ball and St. Joe Paj

Main Figures In C


TALLAHASSEE: Legal skirmish-
ing in the 30 million dollar court
battle between two of Florida's ti-
nancial giants gets under way in
nancial giants got under way in
Tallahassee Wednesday.
The pretrial conferences between
opposing attorneys and Federal
Judge Dozier Devane will help nar-
row the issues for the trial begin-
ning Jan. 14.
The case pits R. E. Crummer of
the Crummer Co., an investment
house, against Ed Ball and the
Florida duPont interests, the state's
leading banking and industrial or-
ganization.
Crummer seeks the 30 million
dollar award on the ground the
duPont interests conspired to de-
stroy his multimillion dollar bond
business in Florida in 1940 by a
series of state and federal investi-
gations.
The du.Pont interests deny the
charges and have made some coun-
ter claims of their own against
Crummer. A counter suit for six
million dollars brought against
Crummer by the duPont interests
was dismissed some time back.
The case was filed in December
1949 and has been in and out of the
courts since that time. The record
in the case now runs into several
hundred thousand words and hun-
dreds of exhibits overflow two huge
filing cabinets in the office of the
U. S. district court clerk.
Crummer, who formerly lived in
Orlando and now resides part time


pany handled 50 million dollars
worth of county road and bridge
district refunding bonds.
These refunding bonds were nec-
essary, he said, to eliminate "chaos"
in the state after collapse of the
1925 land boom.
iCrummer and some of his assoc-
iates were indicted on charges of
mail fraud and violation of the se-
curities act in 1944 but these indict-
ments were dismissed in 1946.
Defendants in the case are Ball,
who is rated one of Florida's weal-
thiest and most powerful men; his
sister, Mrs. Jessie Ball duPont, the
Florida National' Bank of Jackson-
ville and Albert Dent as trustees of
the estate of the late Alfred I. du-


in Reno, Ne., once said his corn- ED BALL


WHAT'S NEW!


WHAT'


What Vail


HALLMARK


Always Something New


per Co.


- Something Different!


Miss Marjorie Rogers and John Cumbie
*mMrir nMnln DAAm 9
e5 rA U Mae On Monday17 J December zS


SITCt Miss Marjorie Rogers, daughter served the groom as his best man.
of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rogers of Glenn Garrett and Gene Adkins,
Pont; Roger L. Main. of Jackson- Highland View exchange vows cousin of the bride, served as ush-
ville; Howard S. Wheleer, Paul L. with John Hubert Cumbie on of ors for the occasion.
Pierce and Clyde L. Pierce, Orlan- Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Rooks of Chip Mrs. Rogers chose for her daugh-
do brokers; Walter L. Fuller of St. ley, in an impressive candlelight ter' wedding a light blue dress
Petersburg; S. Wallace Shafer of ceremony at the Highland View Me- with pink accessories and wore a
Lakeland, the St. Joe Paper Co., ithodist Church on Decembe: 24 at corsage of pink roses.
Leedy, Wheeler and Aleman, Inc., 8:00 p.m. The (Fellowship Hall of the
and Claude C. Pierce Corp. The double ring ceremony was Church was the setting for the re-
-performed by Rev. Douglas New- ception which immediately fol-
Week Set At some. The Church was artistically lowed the wedding. The bride's ta-
FOCUS Week Set At decorated in interspersed greenery, ble was covered with an imported
First Baptist Church and with a centering of white glad- white linen cloth which was hand-
F ioli and chrysanthemums with an somely hand embroidered and was
archway of lighted candles, centered with a three-tiered wedd-
Focus Week will be observed in Mrs. Harry Forehand, pianist, ing cake, with the traditional bride
the First Baptist Church January played a medley of pro-nuptial mu- and groom.
13-18. The week will start wita em- sic and accompanied by soloist, Orange blossoms, lily of the val,
phasis on prayer Monday with Mrs. Mrs. Mary Lou Taylor, who san ley and wedding bells added to the
W. J. Daughtry, prayer chairman ,0 Holy Night" and Beca.se of decorations of magnolia leaves and
in charge. You". Christmas berries which were
Wednesday the emphasis will b o The bride was given in marriage backed with lighted candles.
on Mission Study. Mrs. Gene Mar- by her brother, Pelham Revells. The Miss Joyce Hayes, neice of the
tin and Mr. C. A. McClellan are )bride was lovely in a bouffant bride, presided at the brides' book.
chairmen. length gown of chantilly lace over 'She was dressed in a lovely blue
'T'hursday will be Community a full skirt of nylon taffeta and gown of taffeta covered with rolls
Missions Day with Mrs. C G. Cos- tulle, with a fitted midriff and fash- of net and lace. She wore a cor-
iin as chairman, ioned with long sleeves ending sage of white carnations.
The Focus Week will be con- calla point over the hands. Her veil After the initial cutting of the
cluded Friday, January 25 with a was held with a crown of seed cake, Mrs. Douglas Newsome ser-
baxluvet for the men at tne church pearls. She carried a Bible topped ved the guests. Mrs. Mary Burke,
with Dr. Harold Sanders, p-as-or of~with white carnations. sister of the bride served at the
the First Baptist Church oL Talla- Miss Martha Raye. cousin of the punch bowl.
i.hisee as gue-.t speaker. bride, attended her as maid of hon- Mrs. Cumbie chose for her travel-
or, she wore a waltz-length light ing costume a navy blue suit with
HUSBAND NAMES blue dress made of taffeta with a white accessories and the carna-
JUVENILE COURT COUNSEL covering of net, she carried a nose- tions lifted from her bridal bou-
gay of rose-pink carnations. quet. After a short trip the couple
Newly elected Countyhis week named David Miss Barbara Gay of Wewahitch- will preside at their home in High-
P. Husband this weeklor in the Gulf ka and Miss Mary Ruth Willams land View. The bride is a senior at
County Juvenile Court. of Fort White, cousins of the bride Port St. Joe High School. Mr. Cum-
County Juvenile Court. were bridesmaids. They were al- bie is employed with the St. Joe
Both Husband and Gaskin began
th n a Gsatered in light pink dresses made Paper Company.
their new duties Tuesday. waltz-length and carried a nose- Out of town guests were Mr.
Sgay of light pink carnations, and Mrs. David Hinote and daugh-
Flower girls were triplet cousins ter Alice of Macon, Ga., Mrs. Cliff
of the bride, Laura, Linda and Le- Steely of Lititz, Pa., Mis. W. R.
nora Williams, daughters of Mr. and Searingen of Panama City; Joe
Mrs. H. B. Williams of Fort White. Swearingen of Panama City; Mrs.
They were dressed in blue taffeta. H. B. Williams and daughters of
dresses with mat-ching shoes an: lFort White; Mr. and Mrs. Bennie
S DIFFERENT! carried small baskets of pink and lBurke and son of Rome, Ga.; Mrs.
white carnations outer lace with Merle Jordan of New Orleans, La.;
pink net. Miss Sylvia Jordan of New Or-
leans, La.; John Klein of Tampa;
"Gib" Burke, son of Mr. and Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Rooks of Chip-
Mrs. Bennie Burke ofRome, Ga.. ley.
and nephew of the bride was ring
Sbearer. He carried a white satin Farm Product Demand
js pillow centered with an artificial A very strong demand for most
e white rose used for carrying bride's farm products is fif prospect for
ring. 1951, according to U. S. department


S


Week End Specials

THURSDAY, FRIDAY and SATURDAY
January 10, 11, 12


I Big Crief 36 Oz.
RICE pkg. 33c


Penny's
DOG FOOD


Stocton Brand Calif. Tomato Better Brand
CATSUP bot. 15c PURE LARD


No. 2/2 Can Oak Hill
PEACHES


29c


U. S. GOOD
CHUCK ROAST


13 Cans
99c


No. 5 Jug
49c


Sessions No. 10 Jug
PEANUT OIL $1.69


--I


Since the March of Dimes start-
ed in 193,8, $402,000,000 has been
provided for its programs. Some
322,000 patients were directly aid-
ed, at a .cost of more than $254,000,-
000. In addition, development and
testing of the Salk polio vaccine
used $25,500,000 in March of Dimes
Funds.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FOUIRTEFNTH JUDI-
IOI'AL OICUIT OF GUiuF
COUNTY, FLORIDA
ICHANCU~RY CASE NO. 1498
,ST. JOE LOAN COMPANY, Inc.,
PLAI'NTliFF
VS
EDUARDO JOHNSON,
DEFENDANT


BLACKBURN'S
SYRUP


PHONE 7-3161


No. 5 Jug 53c


U. 'S. NO. 1 With $1.00 Grocery Order or More
IRISH POTATOES 29c
PET, CARNATION or SILVER COW
CANNED MILK 3 cans 42c
Maxwell House and Bailey 'Supreme With $1.00 Order or More
COFFEE Lb. Can $1.02
Turnips, Collards, Mustard, Pork & Beans, Spaghetti and
Black Eye Peas
NO. 303 CAN 2 for 19c


S Sessions No, 10 Jug Loaf
Lb. 39c Cotton Seed Oil $1.59 BREAD


3 TO 5 LB. AVG. FRESH
BOSTON BUTTS Lb. 39 c
FRESH
SPARE RIBS Lb. 49c
CENTER CUT
PORK CHOPS Lb. 59c
END CUT
PORK CHOPS Lb. 39c


GEORGIA GRADE "A"
FRYERS


Lb. 31c


Barker's
MEAL


5 lb, 29c


Robin Hood
FLOUR 25 lb. $1.99
Robin Hood
FLOUR 10 lb. 89c
Aunt Jemima 24 Oz. Pkg.
GRITS 2 pkgs. 25c
5 Lb. Pkg.
SUGAR 49c
Turnips, Collards and Mustard
FRESH GREENS


16c


Fla. Grade 'A' Med.
EGGS 2 doz. 89c
CDM Pure
COFFEE lb. 85c
Apalachlcola
OYSTERS pt 70C
Wisconsin
HOOP CHEESE lb. 49c
Register's Loose
WEINERS Ib. 29c
Register's Green Hill
SAUSAGE lb. 39c


M COMICK'S Super Market


Open 7:00 A.M. TO 8:00 P. M. Highway 98


Port St. Joe's Finest Department Store Has It!


WATCH FOR THE


BTI EVENT


THIS WEEK END AT HALLMARK'S


AT THE


Lowest Prices








HALLMARK'S


FAIR and SQUARE"


Blue Crutc 'Sm l NOTICi OP F ALI
Blue Crutch 'Symbol Notice is hereby given that pur'-
SH e' M y suant to final decree of foreclosure
Of Hope For Many etred in the caae of St. Joe L, an
__ FCompany, Inc., Plaintiff vs Eduardn
Johnson, Defendant, now pendiilg
'The familiar Blue Crutch, sym- ia the Circuit Court of Gulf County,
bol of hope for thousands of para- Florida, as Chancery Case No, 1P3,
lytic polio victims, is making an I, George Y. Core, Clerk of said
appearance throughout the state of 'Court, will,on 18 January, 1957, at
Florida during January as a part 10 o'clock A. M., (C'ST) at the front
Florida during January as a part door of the Gulf County Court
of the March of Dimes Drive. House, Wewahitchka, Florida, sell
Civic organizations and youth or- at public sale property described .s
ganizations are handling the Blue follows:
Crutch campaign in communities One (1) 195.1 Chevrolet Truck,
Crutch ca ai Serial No. JCA 423877, Model No.
throughout Florida. UK 8U1KC1947.
The Blue Crutcn campaign ties (1S]A L) GEORGE Y. CORE, Clerk
in with the March of Dimes slogan, Circuit Court, Gulf County,
"Let's Finish The Job". Florida.


II I I ~


I-- II


I ILII ~ I


THGRPibAYO j4NAOBIY 1" 1061i


TMR9 ISTAR. F~dAT Tr. JDA, GULP coubffry. FLORMA~a


FPAG FOUB


Peay Mnis ofHihlad iew


of agricuituq stmaes


'Highland View, Fla.