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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/01103
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: January 3, 1957
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:01103

Full Text





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Port St. Joe-The Outlet Port for the Apalachicola-Ghartteahchee Valley"

VOLUME XX Single Oeiy o JORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA THURSDAY, JANUARY 96f NUMBER 18
NUBE 18


ETAOIN SHRDLU
by WESLEY R. RAMSEY
Asm i a0a* a a6a6 a a a


The coffee shop uptown of
morning is the scene of all kind
of information and other intelli
gent talk.
Most anything you want to know
you can learn at the morning ses
sion of the coffee shop. Especially
the 9:40 a.m. shift at the coffee
shop.
We are not in a habit of patron
izing the coffee shop for two rea
sons. One is that we don't care foi
coffee and the other is that we ar',
usually just too busy getting the
paper out.
But, Monday while soliciting (or
trying .to solicit) an advertisement
or .two, we wandered into the cof-
fee shop with Marty Begley, the big
voice at the radio station and Du-
rel Brigman at the Modern Furni-
ture Co. Pretty soon Otto (Ford)
Anderson walked in the doorway
and stood looking around for a ta-
ble with change laying on the top.
Ours had 37c so he stopped there.
Eventually 'W. C. Roche of appli-
ance store fame wandered in and
that filled up the table.
You'd be surprised how much you
can learn from such a gathering as
this.
For instance, we were practically
the witness for one of the largest
mergers that ever just about came
into being in Port St. Joe.
IRoche and Brigman began talk-
ing ito one another about getting
"Red" Fuller and John Blount to
agree for the four of them to merge
firms and just take over the East
side of 'Reid Avenue. The whole
side of .the block they wanted.
A heated argument began then
about who would getto go fishing
on what day and just who would
mind the business. Roche came up
with a solution. He reported to the
future stockholders that John n
Blount had Doug Baldwin who stay-
ed pretty close to the store and
that would solve the problem of
who would mind the store.
Everything would have gone all-
right, and this morning the East
side of 'Reid Avenue up in the 200
block might now be the home base
of "Big Shot Enterprises, Inc". if
it had not been for one small' item.
Had this gigantic corporation came
into existence and taken up the
aforesaid quarters, they would have
put their coffee shop out in the
street without a roof over their per-
culator and that would have been
the downfall of "Big Shot Enter-
prises, Inc."
qThis discussion lasted exactly
one cup of coffee long and ended
on a note of expectancy with no
money passing as yet.


McFarland Installed As Head of Masons;

Geddie For R.A.M. On December 28


E The Masons of Port St. Joe held a
& joint installation of officers in the FPC Sets Biggest
- Lodge Hall at eight o'clock, Friday
evening, December 28. B d t of Hs
During intermission a delicious Budget Of History
meal was served by several ladies ---
of Gulf Chapter of the Order of The biggest one-year construction
the Eastern Star with Mrs. G. S. budget in the history of Florida
Croxton, Worthy Matron, in charge. Power Corporation- $33,587,000-
. The officers of Port St. "Joe has been drafted for 1957, accord-
Lodge No. 111 'F. & 'A. M. were in- ing 'to Richard Porter, manager
stalled by W. Milton Chafin assist- here for the utility.
ed by J. B. Griffith and Ralph This huge amount will go into
Swatts. power plants, substations, .trans-
The lodge officers for the year mission and distribution lines and
of 1957 are as follows: other' facilities to serve customers
Everett McFarland, Worshipful in FPC's 31-county area.
Master; George Wimberly, Jr., Sen. The 1957 budget will bring to
ior Warden: Ed Frank McFarland, $2,28 million the construction in-
Junior Warden; Joseph E. McLeod, vestment made by the company
Senior Deacon; Clifford Tharpe, since 1945, to keep ahead of the
Junior Deacon; Roy L. Burch, Sec- increased power demands in this
retary; C. G. Costin, Sr., Treasur- fast-growing area by all classes of
er; Ralph Swatts, 'Chaplain; Frank- customers-residential, industrial,
lin Chandler, -Senior Stewart; J. commercial and rural.
Henry Geddie, Junior Stewart; Rob-I "1957 promises to be Florida's
ert Trawick, Tiler. most outstanding year to date in
The officers of St. Joseph Chap- 'every phase of activity," Porter
ter No. '56, R.A.M. were installed said. "More people are moving here
by J. 'B. Griffith assisted by W. C. permanently, more tourists are
Forehand and H. R. Maige. spending winter and summer vaca-
The Chapter officers for the year tions here, we are attracting addi-
of 1957 are as follows: tional desirable industries, and in
J. Henry Geddie, High Priest; general, nearing our goal of a well-
Robert W. 'Smith, King; J. L. Wil- balanced, year-around economy. As
son, Scribe; H. R. Maige, Secie- an example of our own company
tary; J. B. Griffith, Treasurer; P. growth, this year we have added
A. Howell, Captain of 'Host; W. C. 15,000 new customers which is equi-
Forehand, Principal 'Sojourner; valent to a city of about 40,000
F. 0. Allen, Sr., Royal Arch Cap- population or one the size of Talla-
tain; Fennon Talley, Master of 'hassee."
Third Veil; Joseph E. McLeod, Mas- Largest single item in the bud-
ter of 'Second Veil; Dave Gaskin, get-$13,996,000-goes toward con-
Master of First Veil; 'R. F. Schef-'struction of ,the Paul L. Bartow
fer, Jr., Sentinel; C. A. Lupton, power plant in St. Petersburg. This'
Chaplain. big 120,000 kilowatt power plant
-- is scheduled for completion near
Return From Tampa the middle of 1958.
'Donald Ramsey, Jimmy Costin In general classifications, dhe 19-
and George Hill returned Tuesday 57- budget (including both new con-
from Tamfpa where 'they were struction and improvements to ex-
guests of friends over the week end. isting facilities) is as follows: pow-


Returns To School
Miss Pat Wilder hlas return 1 to
Florida State University after
spending the Christmas holidays
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. B.
W. Wilder of Oak Grove.

'Return To FSU
Donald IRamsey and Paul Edwin
Ramsey left Wednesday for Talla-
hassee where .they are attending the
Florida State University, after
spending the holidays here with
their parents.

Returns To School
Returning to The University of
Florida after spending the holidays
with his mother, is Harry Lee


After editorializing and running Smith.
articles for 'two weeks before
Christmas it was maybe poetic
Justice that we were the one that Dunn & Bradstreet F
became the victim of the road over G
the holidays. 'Don't know if was Business Growth f
our admonition to take care, or the
man upstairs responsible, but no
body was even shaken up except The business growth of Gulf
the car and the cow. County was underlined this week
And they are both in bad shape when the physical count of names
-especially the cow, who is dead. of businesses listed in the Novem-
ber, 1956 Reference Book of Dun


"Red" Spivey, the editor up /in & (Bradstreet was completed. The
Graceville reports that he likes to new count showed an increase of
see Christmas come around and 78.5% in the last ten years, ac-
see all 'the college students come cording to C. L. Houk, District
home. "Red" came up with a very Manager at Jacksonville, which of-
good reason for welcoming the col- fice covers this area.
lege students home for the holl- He disclosed that in 1946, there
days. "Red" avows that he likes to were 79 ratted businesses listed in
see all the pretty girls that come the ,towns comprising Gulf County,
home for Christmas. He says, "the and the count of these same towns
girls get prettier, but the boys just in then we book showed 141 names.
seem to get a little uglier, if. any- The Reference Book lists commer-
thing". cial "enterprises manufacturers,
Personally, we didn't think that wholesalers, retailers, and other
picture of "Red" on his column businesses generally those buying
made him look that old. on credit. It does not, however, in-
clude some service and profession-
We noticed in another paper that al establishments, such as real es-
we exchange with that 'they carried tate brokers, barber and beauty
a front page story about cupid tak- shops, stock broker,- etc. Thus fig-
ing a holiday over the holidays due! ures for all businesses in this Coun-
to 'the fact that there were no wed- ty would be higher than the ones
dings .over that period. He may quoted above,
have taken a holiday there but he Houk estimated that during 19'57
sure worked overtime here when they will be required to make about
three of the county's most hard 75% changes in the listings of busi-
shell bachelors finally gave in and ness enterprises in the book list-
tied the knot. ings, including new names added,
'We don't know if it was the holi- names withdrawn, changes in ow-
day spirit or the .example set by
longtime bachelor George Tapper Margaret Belin respectively.
in leading the way, but Cecil G. Tommy Owens said the other day
Costin, Silas (Mickey) IStone and\ that only Billy Tapper and Mayo
George Core of Wewahitchka have Johnson are left in the ranks of
gone and tied the knot with Mar- bachelorhood and he thought they
garet DeVore, Monica Ward and might tough it out now.


er plants, $16,345,000; transmission
lines and substations, $6,689,100;
distribution lines and substations,
$9,3',52,800; general (transportation,
Communication and office equip-
ment, land, tools, etc.) $1,200,800.

Returns To School
John Wesley 'Stephens returned
to Gainesville Wednesday after
spending two shor weeks at home.
While here he and his parents, Jr.
and Mrs. A, C. Stephens spent av-
eral of the holidays with relatives
near Marianna.

Returns To School
Leroy Gainous who has been at
home for the holidays will return
to the University of 'Florida Wed-


nesday.


report Shows A

For Gulf County Area


Fire Department Has

Rash of Fires Wed.

With the advent of cool weather
yesterday, the Port St. Joe Volun-
teer Fire Department answered a
rash of grass fire alarms, all of
them outside the city.
Yesterday morning the crew was
called to Kenney's Mill to put out
a grass fire which had started on
the North side of the main street
of that settlement. Yesterday af-
ternoon, the department was cal-
led back to the same area where
a rubbish pile had caught fire and
was setting fire to a garage at the
.home of Dud Crane. Only slight
damage was done to the side of
the building before It was put out.
Yesterday afternoon, approxi-
mately 30 minutes after the second
alarm of the day had sounded, the
department, was called to the St.
Joe Drive-In Theatre to put Dut
another brush fire.

Garden Club Sets General
Meeting For Today

There will be a general meeting
of the Garden Club January 3 at
3 p.m. at the Centennial Building.
L. K. Thompson of Bartow will
present the program on "Highway
Beautification". All members are
urged to be present and anyone in-
terested is cordially invited.

SINGSPIRATION SET AT
HIGHLAND VIEW CHURCH
,Sim,i'ar,..h will be held at the
Highland View Methodist Church,


A Glance Backward Proves




'56 Was An Exciting Year


Museum Has A

Busy Season

The Christmas holidays climaxed
the busy season at the Constitution
al State Park aad Museum whice
proved quite sat'.'fapf:ry from tle
standpoint of attendance figures
We wish to thank The Star and
radio station WIOE for their wonD
derful cooperation and publicity
that they have given to the mu
seum throughout the year. The
year's total of visitors 'to the mu-
seum through 'December 31 was 15,-
170.
'Some of the more recent visitors
that might be of interest to the
general public are as follows: U. S.
Senator Spessard IL. Holland of Bar-
tow, Mrs. Eugene Jones of Sarasota
and her friend, Mrs. H. Moore Ben-
nett of London, England. Mrs.
Jones is a member of the Florida
Park Board from District 3.
'We wish to acknowledge the
many and varied donations that
have been given to the museum by
local people as well as from others
from surrounding areas. The dona-
tions are as follows: Mrs. Erlene


Sunday, January 6, at 8:46. This is Brown from Apalachicola presented
an interdenominational singing ser- to the museum its first copy of the
vice and youth of all churches are Great Tide, Mrs. Louise M. Porter
invited to participate. Songs of the of Port St. Joe presented "Pasque
New Year and the new life will Florida" of which she is the author,
be featured. ,Refreshments will be W. B. Ferrell of Port 'St. Joe made
served, a pair of gavels from cypress wood
Swood from a railroad piling driven
Returns To College at a bridge at the Dead Lakes un-
Grant Adams, freshman at Flor- der the St. Joseph and Iola Rail-
ida Sate University visited with road, Z. Hatchette found a nickel
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry dated 1838 on Second Street at Oak
Adams on Woodward venue over I Grove and an "earthern jar" found
the holidays, by Mr. and Mrs. Sam Goy of Altha
_---- at Abe's Spring.


Returns To Stetson,
Miss Mary Agnes Culpepper left
Wednesday for Stetson University
'to resume her studies after being
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.
C. Culpepper for the Christmas
holidays.

Leaves For Emory
Miss Ruth Lynn Ramsey, left
Wednesday to resume her studies
at Emory University after spending
the Christmas holidays here with
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Ram-
sey.

Returns To College
Miss Sonjia Blount has returned
to Huntingdon College after spend-
ing the holidays here with her par-
ents and sister, Mr. and Mrs. John
Blount and Margaret Lois.

Attend Wedding Here
Mr. and Mrs. Norman King of
Fort Walton Beach attended the


Return From Virginia
Mr. and Mrs. Chris Martin return-
ed Sunday from Norfolk, Virginia
where they spent the holidays with
their daughter and family, Mr. and
Mrs. George Zeigler.

Returns To Tallahassee
Miss Martha Costin will return
to Tallahassee Wednesday after
spending the holidays here with
her family.
------.-----
-Return From Pensacola
Mrs. Bert Munn and daughter
Connie and son Michael returned
from !Pensacola Monday after
spending the week end there with
her sister and brother-in-law, Mr.
and Mrs. Alvin McKinnon.

Guest From Marianna
Miss Beth Garraway of Marian-
na has been the guest of Miss Lin-
da Roberts over the week end. Lin-


Construction Throughout Year Is

Evident For This Area

With the advent of 'another new City water rates were increased
year upon us here this the third in May by the amount of 5e per
day of January, The Star would thousand gallons.
like to take a backward glance and During the month of June, work
have a look at some of the head- began on the Glidden Chemical
lines for the year just gone by. All plant here and Gulf County put.to
in all, it was a very news-worthy work a land-fill garbage disposal
year. system throughout the county.


" The year began with petitions
and arguments and recall actions
taken in reference with an attempt
* by the City Commission to place a
utility tax on the water and sewer
systems of Port St. Joe to finance
an addition to the Municipal Hos-
pital.
'After much bickering back and
forth the action was finally defeat-
ed in a referendum held in Febru-
ary by a vote of 263 to 406.
In the month of February, the
City of Port St. Joe and the Gulf
County School Board combined for-
ces to put a city sewer line to the
high school to take that institution
off its overloaded septic tank sys-
tem.
During the month of Mareh, Port
St. Joe saw the contract let for the
construction of the overpass now
being constructed on Highway 98
near the St. Joe Paper Company
woodyard. Work was delayed until
AuguLt.h a dispute over the right-
of-way brought about by adjoining
property owners.
During March Coach Marion
Craig was named as basketball
coach of *the year, after his team
went the entire season wit' only
one loss to Wewahitchia. 'I'it2eam
was runner-up In both the Confer-
ence and Group II, Class B tourna-
ments.
During March, Port St. Joe's
walking blood bank also came Into
existence.
Along about this time the County
commission agreed to go along
with the dredging of the Apalachi-
cola River from Apalachicola to
Chattahoochee. The County was be-
ing asked to purchase several rights
of way and spoil areas, which they
were reluctant to do.
During the month of April the
Port St. Joe Retail Merchant's Di-
vision was formed by the Chamber
of Commerce; a new Scout Troop,
was organized by the Methodist
Men's Club and the Gulf County
Rod and Gun Club was formed. In
this month the city granted the
Florida Power Corporation a new
30-year franchise, under which the
city would share in the profits.
Then of course, in May began the
elections, with all the major coun-


'In August, two important per-
mits were issued. One for the es-
tablishment of a radio station here
and one for the establishment of
the Citizen's Federal Savings and
Loan Association. Construction was
began on the -railroad overpass and
construction was finished on the
Kiwanis sponsored bleachers and
rest room facilities at the football
season.
September was time for city elec-
tions in which Franklin Chandler
and I. C. Nedley were elected for
two year terms. Also during Sep-
tember, the school situation reared
its overcrowded head in Gulf Coun-
ty and the Gulf County Continuing
Education Council was formed to
try and work out a means of com-
batting this difficiency. Otis Pyle
was named to head the Council.
Flossie visited West Florida in
September flooding parts of Port
St. Joe and rumors'about as windy
as Flossie were circulating that
Port St. Joe was one of four sites
being considered as one of four
possible sites for the new Howard
Hughes' aircraft plant that Is sche.
duled to move to Florida.
In October the Gult County Tax
Council Was formed uni : ", '4ea-
dership of M. P. Tomiluson and C.
H. McKnight. The school situation
worsened as two teachers resigned
due to overcrowded conditions.
'In November Port St. Joe went
Democratic while the State of Flor-
ida returned to the Republican fold
for the second time. In Port St. Joe
work was started on clearing the
ground for a new youth center to
be built here.
In December Santa Claus came
and Port St. Joe and Gulf County
went through the holidays with no
auto accidents.
------------
Visitors From Miss.
Visiting Captain and Mrs J. L.
Bates for the Christmas hiolidays'
were Mr. and 'Mrs. J. F. Bates of
Gulfport Miss., mother and father
of Captain Bates, and Robert Bates,
his brother. Guests of the Bates
for Christmas dinner were Mr. and
Mrs. J. L. Perritt of Tampa, Mrs.
J. J. Perritt, Mrs. Coy Redd, Mr.
and Mrs. Frank Daniels and son
of Panama 'City, Mr. and Mrs. J. E.


nership, changes in credit ratings, Ward-Stone wedding, Friday morn- da returned home with her and will ty and state offices coming up dur- Perritt and Mr. and Mrs. Bill Brown.
and, in trade styles. ing. spend the remainder of the week ing the Democratic primary. Gulf and daughter.
The (Dun & 'Bradstreet Reference as her guest. voted for Cecil G. Costin to suti-
Book is said to be the World's lar- Guests From Pensacola .-- ceed himself in the House of Repre- Returns To Alabama
gest regularly published volume. It Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Costin, Sr., Holiday Guests sentatives; Bart Knight to be the Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Riley and
weighs close to 24 pounds. Six edi- had as their holiday guests their Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Swatts had State Senator and voted for Sum- son Joe of Hartford, Ala., have re-
tions of the book are published an- daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and as their guests over the holidays ter Lowry for Governor. Lowery turned to their home after spending
nually, and back of the names in Mrs. Duane 'Williamson and daugh- their son, Ralph, student at Gordon lost to Gov. Collins however. In the holidays here with Mr. Riley's
the book are reports enlarging on ter Karen of Pensacola their son Military College, Barnesville, Ga., the County, Sam Husband defeated sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and
all factors which are symbolized in and daughter-in-law, Lt. and Mrs. and their daughter and son-in-law, incumbent. Judge J. E. Pridgeon; Mrs. Alfred Joines.
the listing. Ashley Qostin of Quantico, Va., Mr. and Mrs. James Harrison of G. S. Croxton won out over Parker 'K
The credit rating consists of their daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Mel Gainesville, Fla. Mr. Harrison is G. Hart and A. J. Strickland was Returns To FSU
two symbols. The first indicates Magidson and sons, Mel, Jr., and attending engineering school at the elected to the seat vacated by T. Miss Sibble Brinson, student at
estimated financial strength; the Guerry of Pensacola and Jimmy University of Florida. D. 'Doc' Whitfield. Florida State University has re-
second symbol, ,the purely "credit" Costin of Florida State University. -- turned to resume -her studies. She
indicator, is more complex. For one -----*-----eople Suffer ccs *spent the Christmas holidays here
thing, it takes into account the Guests of Culpeppers Two Local People Suffer Accidents with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R.
promptness with which the bus.i-.' Mrs. M. C. Barsh and son Peter H. Brinson.
nessman habitually meets his obli- of Charleston, S. C., have been the Over Holidays* None In Gulf County
gations, and attempts to evaluate guests of her sister and brother- C Returns o Montgomery
some of the more subtle factors in-law, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Culpepper Miss Barbara Porter left Wed-
that affect the success of a busi- during the Christmas holidays. .Port St. Joe and Gulf County be- ily in Georgia. The Ramsey's were nesday for Montgomery where she
ness. 'One of these is experience. came the exception to the rule on their way to Warner Robins, Ga. is attending Huntingdon College.
Others might be the answers to: Called To Thomasville throughout the nation over the long to visit Mrs. Ramsey's parents last 3he has been the guest of her par-
How long. have the proprietors r Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Culpepper and holiday week and reported not one [Friday night. A group of cows were ents, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Porter.
managers been in this line of busi- daughter Mary Agnes were called accident within its confines. on the road about 10 miles north
ness? How successful were they? to Thomasville Friday by. the While the nation went on an orgyI of Bainbridge and the car struck Return From South Fla.
What are factors in their back- illness and death of Mr. Culpepper's of killing a record number of peo- one of the cows. Damage in the mis- Mr. and Mrs. Carl Stevens and
ground that point toward continued father, W. M. Culpepper. Funeral ple on the highway, Gulf County hap, was about $300.00 to the auto- son Tommy have returned from a
success or possible failure? How services were held Monday at 11 which had one of the worst traffic mobile and the cow, which was kil- Christmas holiday visit with rela-
do they stack up alongside compe- a.mn. in Thomasville. facility rates population-wise in the led. tives in South Florida.
tuition? Questions like these enter X- state,'-came through soot free over The other Port St. Joe resident if
into the picture of -the business as ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED the holidays. figuring in an accident was Earl, CARD OF THANKS
a credit risk. Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Sykes of this Gulf County residents didn't go Atchison. Atchison had gone to Bir- I wish to thank my friends for
In the next few days, a total of city announce the engagement and accident free as two accidents -c- mingham last week end to visit his the thoughtfulness and kindness
over i2,700,000 businessmen thru- approaching marriage of their curred to Port St. Joe residents out parents. He was returning Satur- shown me while I was in the hos-
out the nation will receive a re- daughter Barbara Ann to Timothy of the state. Neither accident was day night and stopped at a red light pital. Your prayers, visits, cards
quest from 'Dun & Bradstreet for J. Dolan, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. C. serious however, and no one was in Selma, Ala., where he was struck and flowers meant more than words
their financial statement, which in- Dolan of Denver, Colo. hurt. from behind by a car that couldn't can tell. May God richly bless you
formation will become part of the The wedding will be an event of One accident happened to t e stop. Damage to his automobile was' all.
new ,1957 report. January 4. editor, W. R. Ramaey and his fam- about $150.00. MRS. NADINE STEPHENS


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II"-1 .WT-S Rmi l(II--S IO L I II D l I I I AYI J U Y 7


Miss Gail Bateman Becomes Bride of Eastern Star To Mrs. Monica L. Ward and Silas R. Stone

Harold Hinote 'n Ceremony December 21 Install Officers Are Married In St. James' Church

Miss Gail Bateman, daughter of hair they wore a tiarra of white There will be an installation of 'The marriage of Mrs. Monica mums on either side of the altar.
Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Bateman, be- velvet with tiny veil and rhinestone, officers by the Gulf Chapter. 191 of Lister Ward and 'Silas R. "Mickey" I 'The bride, given in marriage by
came the bride of Harold Hinote, "Terrance Hinote, Sr., brother of the Order of 'Eastern Star Friday Stone was solemnized Friday, De- ,Senator George .G. Tapper, was at-
son of W. E. Hinote of Milton, Fri- the groom, served as best man, and night, January 4 at the Lodge Hall. cember 26 in the St. James' Episco- tractively attired in a navy blue
day evening, December 21 at 7 p.m. the ushers were Robert Nedley, The public is invited to attend pal Church in the presence f a cape coat suit, with matching shoes
in a candlelight ceremony in the Jack Justice and Terrance Hinote, tte installation which will be held few friends and relatives. and bag and white hat and gloves.
First Baptist Church. The Rev. C. Jr., nephew of the groom, at 8:00 p.m. I The simple but impressive dou. Her corsage was a white orchid.
Byron Smith, officiated. The bride, given in marriage by Officers to be installed are- ble-ring ceremony was performed Mrs. iStone had as her only at-
The wedding vows were spoken her father, chose a floor-length Worthy Matron, Jonnia Sykes. by the Rev. Gardner C. Underhill. tendant, her sister, Mrs. Norman
before a background of Southern gown of chantilly lace over satin, Worthy Patron, Bob Buchert; As- Mrs. Mark P. Tomlinson, organist, king, who wore a pink wool suit
smilax with magnolia artistically with fitted long sleeves extending sociate Matron, Mary Forehand: presented a program of soft musi- with navy accessories.
arranged to form trees on* either to a point, and secured with tiny 'Associate Patron, W. C. Forehand; cal arrangements. Standing with tne groom ,was his
side of the choir loft. Four large covered buttons of lace over satin. Secretary, Pauline Smith; Treasur- The setting for the exchange of ,brother, Jesse Stone.
pots of Iregon fern were placed at The finger-tip wedding veil of bri- er, Essie Williams; Conductress, vows was a background of a basket Immediately following the cere-
vantage points, dal tulle descended from a jeweled Betty Sue Anchors; Asosciate Con- of white gladiolis and chrysanthe- mony, Mr. and Mrs. Stone left on
The focal point of the decorations tiarra of velvet. She carried a satin dustress, Jeanette Presnell; Chap-
was a beautiful white satin ring in and lace covered white boble edged lain, Syble Scheffer; Marshall, Eu-
wsa beasutiofwhitesgiant mg with tulle and topped with a 'cas- la Dickey; Organist, Mable Swatts;
a basket of white giant mums, gla- cade bouquet of lilly of 'the valley Ada, 'Clara Pate; Ruth, Flora Long; AhDIATORS RIPAIRID nd RECOR
dioui and Oregon huckleberry, centered with a purple-throated or- Esther. Alice Hall; Martha, Erline CLEANED, FLUSHED
flanked by four seven-branched can- chid and finished with white satin 'Buchert; Electa. Lucille Williams; ji-B-k a


delabra with burning white tapers
on either side of the altar, inter-
spersed with white wrqughlt-iron
candleabra holding burning tapers.
Miss Peggy Philyaw, organist,
played a medley of pre-nuptial mu-
sic, and accompanied the soloist,
Miss Celia Tomlinson who sang.
"At Dawning", "Walk Hand in
Hand" and "Oh, Perfect Love".
Attending the bride as maid of
honor, was Miss Sandra Bracewell
wearing a dark green iridescent
ballerina length taffeta gown trim-
med in matching 1ame cummerbund
Miss Cora Sue Smith and Sonjia
Blount, bridesmaids, and Alice Hi-
note, flower girl, neice of the groom
wore ballerina length red identical
gowns of the maid of honor. All
attendants wore white velveteen
muffs adorned with red poinsettia
silver ribbon and tiny bells. In their


F --




OPEN SUNDAY, 5:45 P.M.
OPEN 6:30 p.m.-SHOW AT 7:00


FRIDAY and SATURDAY


ribbon streamers and loops of
pearls.
Mrs. JBateman chose for her
daughters wedding a light blue
faille dress with black accessories
and a corsage of white carnations.
The social hall of 'the church was
the setting for the reception, which
immediately followed the wedding.
Forming a background for the
bride's table was -an arch-covered
with southern smilax with two
white doves holding wide satin rib-
'bons to which were attached a
cluster of white wedding bells. The
'table; covered with white linen, ov-
erlaid with a full gathered floor
length organdy cloth, was centered
with a three tiered wedding cake
with traditional -bride and groom.
Orange blossom, lily of the bailey
and wedding bells added to 'the dec-
orations. On either side of the cake
were -three branched silver candel-
abra holding white tapers with red
poinsettias.
The coffee and registration table
were covered with identical cloths.
The coffee table was beautifully ar-
ranged with silver service at one
erd and glass dome with miniature
bride and arrangement of giant
mum and gladioli balanced the too,
at either end.
Miss Judy Bateman, sister of the
bride, presided a't the brides' book.
Assisting with the reception were
Mrs. .Charles Gill, Mrs. 'Roy Irwin,
Mrs. Pat Kanneberg and Miss Mar-
sha Cargill. Mrs. Chauncey Costin


Warder, Marguerite Scheffer; Sen-
tinel, ISidney Anchors.

Visiting In Georgia
Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Brinson and
daughter Sibbie left Tuesday for
Climax. Georgia to visit with Mrs.
Brinson's mother, Mrs. A. N. Hester
for the remainder of the holidays.
Sibbie will' leave Thursday to re-
turn to school at FSU.
----- + -----

cut the cake after the initial cut-
ting.
The former Miss Bateman is a
graduate of Port 'St. Joe High
School. She has been very active
in church work. She is now employ-
ed at the Florida Bank.
The groom attended Milton High
School and served in the Army
from 1954 'to May of 1,956. He is now
employed by Badger Manufacturing
Company. The couple will make
their home in Port St. Joe.
The bride chose for her traveling
costume a dark green velveteen
suit with black accessories. Her
corsage was the orchid from her
bridal bouquet.
Out of town guests attending the
wedding were Mr. and Mrs. George
Bateman, Sr., grandparents of the
bride. Mrs. Forehand Rankin and
daughter, Linda. aunt and cousin of
the bride of Bristol; Mr. and Mrs.
David Hinote and daughter Alice
of Macon, Ga.; Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Justice of Orlando.


ITAKITS anOd iENtKAIUORS
REPAIRED and IXCHANBBD


Pate's Shell Service


28 Monument Ave.


Ph.me BAN 7-9291


LA,


SATE regularly... ^J1


.. where your savings earn above-average dividends

*,. where your savings are always available when needed

... where investments received by the 10th of the
month earn dividends from the 1st


'PU l~. ft 0 I ~g mu I I


de Vore, Costin

Vows Exchanged


Mrs. Margaret Mixson de Vore
became the bride of Cecil G. Cos-
tin, Jr., in a ceremony in the home
of the bride's parents December
26 in Campbellton. Mr. and Mrs.
C. M. Mixon of Campbellton are the
parents of the bride. The bride-
groom's parents are Mr. and Mrs.
Cecil G. Costin, !Sr., of Port St.
Joe. The Rev. Stanley Britton, pas-
tor of the Baptist Church of Camp-
bellton, performed the 10 o'clock
ceremony.
The living room mantle formed a
background for an improvised altar
made of magnolia foliage, lighted
red candles and floor standard bas-
kets of white gladioli. The couple
unattended entered the living room
together. The bride wore a b6ige
suit trimmed in brown fur and her
accessories were brown.
After the ceremony, an informal
.reception was held in the dining
room with the Christmas theme us-
ed as decoration. The buffet held
lighted red candles in silver can-
delabra and an arrangement of ca-
mellias. An arrangement of silver-
ed leaves, professor Sargent 'Camel-
lias and red Christmas balls formed
the center piece of the dining table.
The table was covered with a white
linen cloth and a red table runner.
Mrs. Durelle Johnson, sister of he
bride, presided over the coffee ser-
vice. Serving was Mrs. French
Mixson, cousin of the bride.
Immediately following the recep-
tion, the couple left for a wedding
trip to Miami. Upon their return,
Mr. and Mrs. Costin will be at home
in .Port St. Joe where'she is a mem-
ber of the faculty of the Port St.
Joe High School. Mr. Costin is an
attorney-at-law and a State Repre-
sentative from Gulf County.
Out of town guests were Mrs.
Cecil G. Costin, Sr., of Port iSt. Joe,
mother of the groom; Mrs. Mel
Meagidson of Pensacola, Mrs. Ash-

a wedding trip which will take them
to Miami, and then 'a travel tour
into the Caribbean.
,Out-of-town guests attending the


ley Costin of Washington, D. C.,
Quantico, Va., and Mr. and Mrs. Du-
relle Johnso nof Port St. Joe.

Return To Sewanee
Bert Munn, .Jr., and Walter Wil-
der left Wednesday morning for
the University of the South, Se
wanee, Tenn., where they are fresh-
men. 'Bert has been the 'holiday
guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Bert Munn, Sr., and Walter was
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs, By-
ron W. Wilder of Oak Grove.


SATURDAY ONLY

DOUBLE FEATURE

-- FEATURE No. 1 -


Sne aar Brings news O T Your Neighbors wedding included: 'Mr. and Mrs.
.George T. Ward of Mobile, Ala., and
Mr. and Mrs. Norman King of Fort
Want Ads Bring Quick Results At'Small Cost! Try 'Em! Walton Beach.


II FAM -'0 "PETER LORREm
S.MICHAL PATE- REX INGRAM. TONIO SElWAI
A UNIYERSAL-INTERlA PICTURE a H H a

Play Hollywood 1 a I- I -...


PAGIQ TWO


THE STAR, Pt-RT STP. JOE, GULF COUNuTY, ftORIDA


THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1957


'LL\lill.,.,,,,,.








IMilammugallma


Florida Non-Farm Employees Tops State Gas Tax Is

Million Mark First Time In History $636,000 In 2 Days


TALLARA'SSEE--For the first in the labor market searching for 'JauckIsovi -Somewhere 11
time in history, Florida nonfarm jobs, but the specific effect 'of those Florida a service station pump on
employment climbed above the mil- entering the labor market for the Wednesday, January 2, 1957 will
lion mark and stayed there in each first .time, or re-entering after an register the fraction of a gallon of
of the first 11 months of 1956, reach- absence, is not known, gasoline that will bring to $636,000
ing 1,077,800 in November, reports November employment gains the amount Florida motorists will
Industrial 'Commission Chairman were largely in trade, 15,800; man- have paid in gasoline taxes just
James T. Vocelle. ufacturing, 9,000 (69 per cent of since midnight of New Year's Eve.
These figures come from the once ,which was in citrus canning); ser- This, it was pointed out this
a year employment estimates revi- vice 6,500, and contract construe- week by Glen P. Woodard, Execu-
sion just made by the Industrial tion, 2,600. tive Secretary of the Florida Pe-
Commission after the accumulation' Factory workers averaged 41.1 troleum Industries 'Committee, is
of more complete data. They show hours a week In November, com- as much tax money in two days, as
that off-the-farm employment aver- pared to 40.9 in October. Their av- the Florida state gas tax produced
aged 1,036,000 for the first 11 erage hourly earnings droppde from
months from last December through $1.57 in October to $1.55 in No- hourly rate average is 14 cents
this ,November. Since 1950 the in- vember, due primarily to the hiring above a year ago. 'Weekly earnings
crease in average monthly employ- of many seasonal workers whose averaged $63.70, 541 cents lower
ment has been 338,000. earnings are normally lower than than in October, but $5.18 above
"Florida's employment gains have those on a year-round basis. The year-ago levels.


been even more remarkable than
we had previously estimated, which
is another indication of the great
growth strides the state has been
making," Vocelle said. "Our figures
have been on the conservative
side."
The 'November gain was 38,800
above October. Over the same per-
iod unemployment dropped by 1,700,
down to 44,900, which was one per
cent above November, 1955. Flor-
ida's increasing population accounts
for this slight gain in the numbers


UNCLE MAINTAINS
HIS HEALTH WITH


MIL K

Guilford's Dairy
"Sealtest 'Distributor"


C SS4


ideas from other editors


From the Catskill Mountain
Star, Saugertles, New York: Here
and there are some who tell us
that this good old U. S. A. of ours
is going to the dogs.
If it is, the dogs will be more
than lucky.
The latest report is that national
income rose to a record rate in
the second quarter of this year
in spite of a slump in automobile
sales and farm earnings. This ac-
cording to an official report by
the Commerce Department.
The advance continued an ex-
pansion which began in the fall
of 1954 and pushed national in-
come 5 per cent above that of
one year earlier.
What the Department of Com-
merce calls, "compensation of
employees," moved upward for
the ninth consecutive quarter by
four billion dollars.
"Compensation of employees"
is a dry-as-dust term which means
salaries and wages.
Salaries and wages received by
American workers now amount
to an annual rate of 237 billions.
Isn't that something for the
gentlemen of the Kremlin to laugh
off, itf they can?
Isn't that something for them
to explain to the workers and
peasants of Russia?
Isn't the amount taken home by
the American workers a terrible


accusation against the imperial-
ist, capitalist, war-mongerin;.
slave-driving Government of the
United States?
The figures as to national in-
come must be hard for our own
prophets of gloom to take, too.
And harder still for them to ex-
plain.
Most of us will just take these
figures in stride, of course. We
know we live in a great country,
we know the American way of
life is the best, and we intend to
keep it so.
From the Lincoln Times, Lin-
colnton, N. C.: The wages of the
American workers are at an all-
time high-measured both by the
total national payroll and by the
average paycheck. American
workers get more of the good
things of life, in return for less
labor, than do the workers of
any other country.
These statements are simply
truisms, known to all. But there
is more to the story still-an im-
portant part of the story that
wage figures alone cannot tell,
A survey made of 1,000 companies.
covering the year 1955, shows
that fringe benefits (pensions and
insurance, vacations and holidays,
etc.) average a whopping $819 per
employee.


TEEN-AGER IS
PEPPIER WITH


MI LK

SGuilford's Dairy
"Sealtest Distributor"
~- ~


in a whole year, following its ori-
ginal enactment in 1921. And there
was no federal tax on gasoline then,
or until 1932.
Woodard noted that the present
seven-cent state gasoline tax is ex-
pected to take in a estimated $98,-
900,000 this year, while the three-
cent federal tax will bring total
motor fuel tax collections in this
state to an estimated $134,300,000.
This, he pointed out, means teat
Florida highway users are pouring
gas tax revenues into federal and
state coffers at a rate of $1 million
every three days which is $364,000


YOU'LL FIND SOME GOOD
-ELECTIONS IN THE CLASSIFIED
SECTION OF THIS NEWSPAPER
TO BUY OR SELL,
NEWSPAPER ADVERTISING
IS YOUR BEST BET.

Phone 7-3161


RED CURTAIN Hungarian foreign minister Imre Horvath
(left) talks with newsmen at UN about his government's refusal
to admit Soc. Gen. Hammarskjold.


"I think we should make a dill-
gent effort to meet state needs on
existing revenues. I am not cmnh-
vinced that new taxes are inevit-
able and I hope the Legislature Is
not," said the young legislator, who
is visiting in Miami for the Orange
Bowl festivities.
Conner said that in the event
new taxes are necessary, he would
oppose any attempt to knock out
present exemptions on the three
per cent state sales tax
"I would favor removing just
enough exemptions in the sales. tax
to meet our requirements."'
He predicted taxes will' be the
number one problem when the Leg-
islature meets in April.
-jK
Visit In Altha
Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Roberts were
the guests of Mr. Robert's parents,
I Mr. and Mrs. Ben Roberts in Altha
Sunday.


DAD FIGHTS
FATIGUE WITH


MILK

Guilford's Dairy
"Sealtest Distributor"


"sales tax" on galsolVine.



(LOOKING THEM OVER?


Citizen Federal




Savings & L an



ASSOCIATION PORT ST. JOE


Your SAVINGS with us are covered with every SAFETY provi-
sion any Financing Institution can offer, anywhere. INSURED up to
$10,000 by The FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN INSURANCE CORPORA-
TION, Washington, D. C.



Your SAVINGS placed with us by the o0th of any month begins
earning our 3 per cent, per annum dividend as of the 1st. of that month.



This dividend is CREDITED to your account in our records on June
30th. and December 31st. becoming ADDED SAVINGS compounded and
earning our 3 per ,cent per annum dividend the same as your original invest-
ment with us.


WHAT DO WE DO WITH YOUR MONEY? We loan it back in your
community on long term monthly payments, to BUILD, BUY, REPAIR, RE-
MODEL, or REFINANCE, HOMES, and COMMERCIAL STRUCTURES.
You are helping us to improve your community.


WE TAKE SPECIAL CARE of SAVINGS sent us by mail. Mail us
your check, post office money order, register cash You will promptly receive
our beautiful passbook with your savings properly entered.


CALL and SEE us: SAVE your extra money with us throughout
1957. THE CITIZEN'S FEDERAL.


I r- I'


IE E


p


1.4;-'


Regular Size Flowing Gold 5 POUNDS
BLUE CHEER 29c SYRUP No. 5 jug 55c BARKER'S MEAL 39c
Instant 4 Oz. Jar Better Brand No. 5 Jug 10 POUNDS
SANKA COFFEE 98c PURE LARD 49c BALLARD FLOUR 89c
Maxwell House 6 Oz. Jar Sessions No. 10 Jug 25 POUNDS
INSTANT COFFEE $1.39 PEANUT OIL $1.69 Robin Hood FLOUR $2.09
Penny 13 Cans Sessions No. 10 Jug 24 Oz. Package Aunt Jemima
DOG FOOD 99c COTTONSEED OIL $1.59 GRITS 2 pkgs. 25c

With Purchase of 5 Pound Package of Dixie Lily Corn Meal


1 lb Pkg GRITS FREE

U. S. No. 1 -- WITH $5.00 GROCERY ORDER


Irish POTATOES 10 LBS. 29c

WITH $5.00 GROCERY ORDER -- Limit 2 to a Customrr


BREAD 2.LOAVES 30c
Half Gal. Homogenized 5 LB. BAG
PORK CHOPS SWEET MILK 53c S U G A R 49c
Center Cut ----- lb. 59c 2 QUARTS With $5.00 Purchase or More
End Cut---l---b. 39c BUTTERMILK 37c S U GA R 5 lb. 39c
Register's Green Hill Lb. Wisconsin Lb. MEDIUM
SAUSAGE 39c HOOP CHEESE 49c E G G S 2 doz. 95c
Georgia Grade "A" Lb. 3 to 5 Lb. Avg.-FRESH Lb. Half Gal. Pasteurized
FRYERS 31c BOSTON BUTTS 39c SWEET MILK Sic





McCORMICK'S Sup r Market


Highland View, Florida


Open 7:00 A. M. TO 8:00 P. M. Highway 98


more than the one cent tax in 1921 House S weaker Sees Vacationing In Miami
produced in 365 days. ;o S k eDr. and Mrs. Joseph Hendrix and
It is true" Woodard said, "that T a Mr. and Mrs. George Tapper are
there are now 16 times as many mo- No N W T Xes vacationing in Miami 'this week end.
tor vehicles in use in lorlda than They will attend the New Year's
there were in 1931, and that many MIAMI House speaker-desig- football game.
of these vehicles are receiving nate Doyle Conner of 'Starke said
greater use, but this only partially this week he is "'not convinced that Man 'or Woman
explains the fact that gas tax reve- new taxes are inevitable" this year OWN YOUR OWN BUSINESS
nues are now running 211 times as and- called on the coming Legisla- A new Item. First time offered
high." I ture to "hold the line" with existing Start in spare time, if satis-
ified, then work full time.
The big factor, he added, is the revenues if possible. Refilling and collecting money
present combined state and federal "I may be a bit optimistic," he from bulk machines in this
ta rate of 10 cents a gallon, which said, "but I am hoping we can get increasing accordingly. If ap-
area. To qualify you must have
he said is equivalent to a 47 percent by on present tax sources." a car, reference, $360 cash to


w


'I r ~s -s~


- I I mobilI


THR STAR, PORT ST. JOE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


C FAGS IHN&ILc


THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1967


secure'territory and inventory.
- Devoting 4 hours a week to
business your end on percent-
ages of collections should net
approximately $176 monthly
with very good possibility of
taking over full time. Income
plicant can qualify financial
assistance will be given by Co.
for expansion to full time
position with above average
income. Include phone in appli-
.cation. The Star, Box EE-4.


RELIABLE PARTY

Wanted
TO SERVICE ROUTE
of
CIGARETTE MACHINES
NO Si"HJING OR SOLICITING
ROUTE ESTABLISHED for
OPERATOR
FULL or PART TIME
Substantial Income
Per -Month to Start
$995 to $1995 Cash Required
Please don't waste our time
unless you have the necessary
capital and are sincerely in-
terested in expanding We
finance expansion If fully
qualified and able to take
over at once write briefly
about yourself and include
phone number for personal
interview.
SILVER-KING DIST. CO., Inc.
4473 Olive St. St. Louis 8, Mo.

$400 Monthly Spare Time
Refilling and collecting money
from our 5c High Grade Nut ma-
chines in this area. No selling!
To qualify for work you must
have a car, references. $640 cash
secured 'by inventory. Devoting
6 hours a week ito business, your
end on percentage of collections
will net up to $400 monthly, with
very good possibilities of taking
over full time. Income increasing
accordingly. or interview include
phone number in application,
write All tate Distributing Co.,
505 fifth Ave., New York 17, N.Y.


L


.t ;


I "Oki




EVERYBODY SAVES AT PIGGLY WIGGLY


EVERYBODY SAVES AT PIGGLY. WIGGLY


U.S. Good

Heavy Beef Sale


LB


ROUND or SIRLOIN

STE


LB


~m.
-.1

U)
SM
U)
0
SM
U'





I


U)
Ii'
U)
0




-d
a-'
(5
'a-
IA'
Ii'


lb


59c


FRESH


Ground BE


T


"EF 3 LBS.
All Meat.
Sht Rib
Brisket


-BONE


GEORGIA, GRADE "A"

FRYERS


89
490
25"
19c

69c


Whole, Lb.


4 1


2 LB., APPLE
Apple Jelly


MARIGOLD
OLEO


MAYFIELD
CORN
ROBIN HOOD, Plain or Self Rising
FLOUR
BLACKBURNS
SYRUP
PIKNIK SALAD
DRESSING


2 LBS.


2 FOR

10 LBS.


No.5


Qt. Jar


BLUE RIDGE
COFFEE


29c


39c

23c

89c


49c


39c


JEWEL -- 3 LB. CAN
Shortening


U. S. NO. 1 WHITE (Limit One)
AlT SA


10 LBS.


29'


FLORIDA


EACH


HEAD


CABBAGE
GREEN
BEANS


LB.


2 LBS.


Ic

Sc


29c


BORDEN
BISCUITS
OAK HILL
Tomatoes
STOKLEY'S
Cutt BEAINS


3 FOR 29c


3 FOR


2 FOR


35c


39c


JUMBO BUNCHES
Turnipsl-Mustard Collards Green Uabbage


BRING YOUR GREEN STAMPS BACK-
- WE REDEEM THEM FOR YOU.


WIGGLY EVERYBODY


Rib Steak


ii'
An


LB.


79c


69c


I


1L ~ 814~1~EVERYBODY


I VERYBODY SAVES AT PIGGLY WIGGLYI


SAVES ATf PIGGLY WUIGG;LY


'SAVES AT PDIGGLY


Q,~talft 4E












Prices Slashed
To The one


| Where Your Dollar

Has Cents


AN NUAL JANUARY


Sale Starts
Thursday, 3rd


clearancee


SPECIAL!
OUR ENTIRE


SPECIAL!
STOCK OF


Piece Goods


1-3


Off


80 Sq. PRINTS ---- 33c yd.
Wash and Wear PLAIDS -- 65c yd.
54" FAILE, Reg. $1.79 -- $1.19 yd.
BATES FABRICS ---------93c yd.
BATES SOLIDS ----------79c yd.
o "Ladies, This is the buy of the year so hurry!"

WHAT A BARGAIN

Sweaters

} Price
LADIES' and CHILDREN
LAMPL, JANTZEN and ALL
LOVELY FIELDCREST SPREADS
Reg. $8.95 7 .00
Reg. $6.95 $5.00
ALL LADIEALL CHILDREN'S
BLOUSES BLOUSES
,% OFF
Reg. SALE
$1.95 S1.30 1 3 | |ff
$2.95 S1.97 1 |
$3.95 S2.64
$4.95 S3.30
MOTHERS TAKE NOTICE!
ALL CHILDREN'S
Robin Hood Shoes


of fl Reg.
1-3ff$3.95
$4.95
ALL SALES $5.95
ALL SALES FINAL


SALE
$2.64
$3.30
$3.97


SPECIAL
House Slippers

1DA4 Oft
All Ladies and Children's
DANIEL GREEN and Others


LADIES
Flannel Pajamas
Reg. $2.98
$2.49
Ladies Cotton Challis
Pajamas Gowns
Reg. $5.95
$4.00


$
$
$


LADIES
NYLON SLIPS
eg. SALE
8.95 --- $6.95
10.95 --- $8.95
6.95 ---- $4.95
5.95 -.- $4.00


TOWEL SETS


$4.95
$3.95
$2.95


S$3.00
$2.95
.--$1.95


HURRY!


Nationally Advertised
Brands


NO LAY-A-WAYS
NO APPROVALS


SPECIAL


SPECIAL
Large Size, Rayon and Nylon
BLANKET
DOUBLE SIZE
Reg. _$4.79
$5.95 -_I--S
CHILDREN'S
CORDUROY
SUITS


Reg. $5.95
Reg. $6.95


CORDUROY
OVERALLS


Reg. $2.95
,Reg. $1.95
Reg. $1.69
Reg. $1.49


$4.00
$5.00


$1.95
$1.25
$1.00
98c


LARGE
Bath Towels


4 for $1


.00


LADIES


HAND BAGS
Reg. $2.95
Reg. $1.95 $1.


MEN'S
Reg. 65c
2 pr. 98c
WEMBLEY
TIES
Reg.
$2.00 $1.50


Reg.
$1.50


98
30


CHILDREN'S
Flannel Pajamas
$2.98 $2.49
Reg.
$1.98 $1.25


HURRY!


98c


BOYS
Flannel Shirts
Reg. $1.95
$1.30
MEN'S ARROW
Orion Sweaters
LONG SLEEVE
Reg. $7.95
$5.00


HURRY!


1*2 Price
Must clear out to make
room for spring dresses
Arriving Every Day


COTTON
INDIAN
BLANKET
Reg. $2.95

$1.95


CHILDREN'S ROBIN HOOD
BOOTS
Combat and Con Ban
WHITE GIRLS BOOT
2 to 3

1-3 Off


A REAL BUY
81 X 99
FIELDCREST SHEETS


White
Reg. $2.95


$2.39


WHITE CASES --- 2 for $1.00


HANES SHORTS
Reg. 79c
Sale .0 A0
2 FOR $ .VU
BOY'S
TOM SAWYER
SUITS
AND
SPORT COATS

1-3 Off


5% WOOL

BLANKETS
Reg. $4.95

$3.95


MEN'S WINTER DRESS

PANTS

1-2 Price
ALTERATIONS EXTRA
Boy's Tom Sawyer
FLANNEL PAJAMAS
Reg. $3.95 ___ Sale Price $2.95
BOYS' WINTER PANTS
HALF PRICE
BOYS
TOM SAWYER SHIRTS
REG. SALE
$1.98 $1.19
$2.98 $1.98
MEN'S CORDUROY SHIRTS
Reg. $3.95 ...Sale Price $2.64


SHOP and SAVE!
MENS and BOYS
JACKETS


1-2


Price


Ij


ALL SALES FINAL
MEN'S LONG SLEEVE
Sport Shirts
Arrow and Others


REG.
$5.95
$5.00
$3.95
$2.95


SALE
$3.95
$3.35
$2.95
$1.97


ALL MEN'S
Felt HATS

Reg. $10.00 $8100

Reg. $7.95 $5.00
ALL MEN'S
SUITS and SPORT COATS

1-3 Off
MEN'S
10-Ounce DUNGAREES
Zipper Fly Reg. $2.75 '
Now $1.98


MOTHER'S, LOOK!
Little Girls Cinderella
DRESSES

2 Price
Sizes 3 to 14


Ladies Fall DRESSES


SKIRTS and COATS


$1.00 OFF ANY BRASSIERE
MAIDEN FORM PERMA-LIFT
From $2.00 up


I ___


I .1~ -


L.*l .. I --. II\ I "


oll


I Ir~lll. II ,I r .







A II I T AOIL OL IH I I J U 3,I


i


U. S. GOOD

CHUCK ROAST

Lb. 39c

Fresh Dressed Baking Size

HENS lb. 39c


BRISKET STEW

Lb. 15c

REGISTER GREEN HILL

SAUSAGE

Lb. 37c

RICH'S GRADE 'A' MED.

EGGS

2doz.85c

2 LARGE STALKS

CELERY 25c

10 LBS. With 5.00 Order

IRISH POTATOES

10 b.29c

NBC PREMIUM

SALTINES

Lb. Box 25c

OSAGE DESSERT

PEACHES

2 can 25c

3 LB. CAN ARMIX

SHORTENING

79c

WITH $5.00 GROCERY ORDER

SUGAR

5Lb. 39c
NO. 2 CAN SANTAROSA

PINEAPPLE'

Sliced 25c
NO. 5 JUG

HOG LARD

47c
McKENZY

Frozen Collards

6 Boxes $1.00
COMO-

Toilet Tissue

Roll 5c

Large LEMONS

Doz. 29c

Large CHEER

27c

PENNY

DOG FOOD

3 for 25c









Corner Williams & Third
PRICES CLERKS
RIGHT POLITE


ish, the "mark of the iron" was,
an absolute necessity. A brand
establishes the owner's claim to
his livestock and identifies the
animal not only on the home range
but on distant ranges to which
they may stray. All large market
stockyards in western America
have brand inspectors. Branding
is known as the "heraldry of the
range."
*


More than 2500 years ago people
were playing field hockey-but it
wasn't until the 19th century that
a set standard of rules was drawn
up for the game. It was universal-
ly played in France during the
Middle Ages, and it was there that
it got its name, the word hockey
being a corruption of "hoquet,"
the French term for a shepherd's
stick. Ice hockey had its origin
in Canada, where the first re-
corded game of ice hockey was
played in Montreal in 1879. It was
Introduced into the United States
n 1894-95.


send them cheery Christmas cards --
TOO LATE TO and messages. ~ at
Washington
C ACCI V The Pilot Club of Ft. Lauderdale I* on
C1. A S I F Y took ovr ethe job of remembering
By RUSSELL KAY Broward County girls at the Girls SEE SAW
Industrial School. It means a lot by WIN PENDLETON
This is the season that we are to these kid's and makes them rea- -_.
supposed to think of others and in lize that there are kindly, thought- HAPPY NEW SESSION The
reviewing lorida papers during the ful friendly people in the world who 85th Congres opens today, January
past week or so I have been im- wish ,them well and want to see 3, 1957. Here is the roll call of the
pressed with the work civic clubs, them become useful worthy mem-
women's clubs, church organiza- bers of society. It is impossible to list all the
tions and others have been doing Just about every paper I read, splendid groups and organizations.
to make life a little happier tor big city dailies and small town engaged in such work but I can tell
those less fortunate. weeklies told how local organiza- you they were active, in every com-
I was particularly impressed by tions such as the Rotary, Civitan, munity and it all goes to show that
a story from Ft. Lauderdale telling Exchange or Kiwanis clubs were America and Florida really has a
about the thoughtfulness and con- busy preparing food baskets, ga- big heart 'and a generous thought-
sideration of Juvenile Judge Dorr thering toys, arranging parties to ful nature. I just want to tip my
IS. Davis. We are Inclined to think entertain and provide a bit of hap- hat to all of them for ,the fine job
of judges as stern and austere in- piness to youngsters and others they have done and are doing.
dividuals and often lose sight of who but for their thoughtfulness It is comforting to know that in
the fact that they are men and wo- and effort might have been forgot- these trying times, there are in
men with the same emotions as you" ,ten at Christmas. the world thousands of individuals
and 1. They don't enjoy having to and groups who can think of others
send boys and girls away and they hurch throughout t and give of themselves arid their
are concerned with what happens state have been active garerg11"" abundance to make the world a bet-
to unfortunate youngsters who for food, clothing and toys for striu- ter place to live in and bring joy
one reason or another come within tion to the Children's Home- So- and happiness to those loss fortun-
the toils ofthe law. city, church orphanage groups old ate.
folks homes, and hospitals.
The story I refer to told how The IState ireman's organization These are .the folks you find do-
Judge Dorr sent a personal check sponsored a toy gathering and re- ing the leg work in the Cancer,
for $2 to each youngster he had furbishing program that made thou Heart and Tuberculosis campaigns,
committed to the Boys Industrial sands of toys available for young- out raising money and collecting
ISchool, he al-so sent them each a ster's. The Elks saw to it that chil- food and clothing for refugees and
ball-point pen and. a personal note dren at the Crippled Children's the destitute.
book. He encouraged members of Home in Umatilla had a. good They are busy people, with plen-
his staff and personal friends to Christmas. ty of -problems of their own but
they will seem to find time to put
their shoulders to the wheel to aid
others. Those who never contribute
and take no part in such efforts
may enjoy a smug satisfaction but
they never will know the inner joy
and happiness that attends such un-.
S selfish service. The Master admon-
gished us "It is better to give than
to receive" and those who believed
0 him and have followed his advi *,e
know how soul satisfying is the re-
ward. Rlorida is fortunate that she
has son many citizens with gener-
ous, unselfish hearts, God bless all
of them.


mittee. Also serves on the. Claims
Subcommittee of the Judiciary
Committee.
CONGRESiSMAN CHARLTE BEN-
NETT (2nd District)-Jacksonvill1.
Fifth term. Member of Armed Ser-
vices Committee and the Democra-
tic .Co. pressional Campaign Com-
mittee. iResponsible for making Forl
Caroline on the :St. Johns River a
National Park. Introduced the re-
solution making "In God We Trust"
our national motto.
'CONGRESSMAN BOB SIKES
(3rd District)-Crestview. Ninth
term. Has served since 1945. He, is
the "Dean" of the. lorida Delega-
tion; affectionately referred to as
the "he-coon". A member of ',he
Appropriations Committee a r d
Chairman of the Army Subcommit-
tee. Headed 'Stevenson's successful
primary race in Florida.
CONGRESSMAN A DAmNTIE FAS-
CELL (4th District)-Miami. See-
ond term. At present ,i, serving on


. sI gU11
a special Government Information
Subcommittee of the Government
Operations Committee. Purpose is
to study charges that some govern-
ment agencies withhold facts that
should be made publics. Also on
Post Office and Civil Service Com-
mittee.
CONGRESSMAN SYD HERLONG
(5th District) Leesburg. Fifth
term. Only member from Florida
ever to serve on Ways and Means
Committee. An expert on taxation.



Dale Ci

















DALE CARNEGIE
Author of
"How to Win Friends And
Influence People"

IN THIS COURSE
YOU LEARN TO
1. Speak to groups
2. take part in confer-
ences
3. think on your feet
4. be a leader
5. win friends
6. influence people
7. sell yourself
YOU DEVELOP
1. courage
2. poise and self-confi-
dence
3. your vocabulary
4. your latent powers
YOU OVERCOME
1. fear of speaking to
groups
2. fear of superiors
YOU MAY GAIN
1. more income
2. a better Job
3. a better memory
4. a victory over your
inferiority complex
5. greater prominence




Dale ,ai

Presented
FOR INFORMATION Conta
or BAll 7-2391.


Florida Delegation. Cut out this Because of his citrus business back-
list and -save it for future reference. ground and long service on the Ag-
'SENATOR SPESSAIROD H 0 L- riculture Committee, he is consa.tI
LAND ('Senior Senator)-Bartow. ed on all matters pertaining to cit-
Former Governor of Florida. Chair- rus legislation.
man of the Commerce and. Related CONGRESSMAN PAU-L ROGERS
Agencies Subcommittee of -the Ap- (6th District)--Ft. 'Lauderdale. Sec-
propriations Committee; Chairman ond term. On Public Works Corn-
of ,the Agriculture Credits and Ru- mittee. Is co-author of the Kennery-
ral Elec.trification Subcommittee of Rogers Act aimed at saving $4 bil-
the Agriculture Committee. On De- lion a year b ystream-lining bud-
mocratic Steering Committee. get and accounting procedures in
,S ATOR GEORGE SMATH- the Government-as recommended
ERS (Junior iSenator)-Miami. Sec- in the second 'Hoover Commission
ond term. Chairman of the Military report
Procurement and Small Business
Subcommittee of the Finance Com- OONGRESSMAN JIM HALEY
mittee; Chairman of the Finane Surface (7th District) -,Sarasota. Third
mittee; Chairman of the Surface term. 'Serves on two committees:
Transportation 'Subcommittee of term. Serves on two committees:
the interstate and Foreign Coin- House Administration and Interior
theandInsular Affairs. Is chairman of
merce Committee. Also, Chairman and IInsurar Affairs. Is chairman of
of the 'Democratic 'Senatorial Cam-
paign Committee.
CONGRESSMAN BILL CRAMER
(flsit Distiict)-[Sit. Petersburg. ,
Florida's T'one Republican member,
Second term. His assignments in-
clude: Rivers and Harbors, Flood '' .,
Control, and Public Roads Subcom-
mr'tees of the Public Works Comrn- .,


WELCOMES REFUGEES Pres. Eisenhower greets Hun-
garian refugee family of Gyula Krauss at White House. They're
part of thousands of refugees now being admitted to U. S.


FLIES AS FREIGHT Giant lift hoists 1041-pound Robert
Hughes, 30, of Fishook, Ill., into cargo plane for flight to New
York.



arnegie Course


Will help you to get what you want out

of life. YOU GAIN FROM THIS COURSE

skills that will help you to become more successful in
your work, more effective In civic, club and church activi-
ties and better known in your business or profession.


Score Yourself


On
Are you preparing your-
self for leadership in your
business, your profession,
your community?
( ) YES ( ) NO
Are timidity and shyness
holding you back from
the success to which you
are entitled?
( )YES ( )NO
Can you handle confer-
ences tactfully, rapidly
and efficiently?
( )YES ( )NO
Are you being cheated
out of success and happi-
ness because of an Infer-
iority complex?
( ) YES ( )NO
Are you preparing your-
self to handle the respon-
sibilities which will put
you In line for Increased
pay?
( ) YES ( )NO


These Questions
Are you popular? Have
you learned the art of
making people like you?
Can you get people to do
willingly what you want
them to do?
( )YES ( ) NO

Are you a good salesman
for your Ideas, your serv-
ices, your product your
enthusiasm?
( )YES ( )NO

Are you able to make
yourself quickly and fa-
vorably known by speak-
ing before groups?
( )YES ( ) NO

Are you in a mental rut?
Are you troubled by wor-


ry?
( ) YES


( ) NO


YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND .
THE FIRST MEETING WITHOUT OBLIGATION and
see how the course is conducted and how it may help you.

Thursday, January 10 7:00 P.M.
PARISH HOUSE
ST. JAMBS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
309 Sixth Street


rnegie Courses

By The Southern Institute
ctJudge B. B. Conklin, Phone BAll 7-7421


DAUGHTER KEEPS
TIP-TOP WITH


MILK

Guilford's Dairy
"Sealtest Distributor"



(( WIDE, WONDERFUL
,, -. WORLD


By FRANKLIN J. MEINE
Editor, The American Peoples
Encyclopedia
It is highly unlikely that your
children have watched Egyptian
cowboys on television, but the
practice of branding cattle origi-
nated in Egypt several centuries
B. C., probably by Hopalong
Pharaoh. Horses were branded in
England at least as early as the
eighth century. To the ranching
industry, established by the Span-


the Indian Affairs Subcommittee.
Was formerly head of the Ringling
Brothers Circus. Helped make it
the greatest show on earth.
OON-GRESSMAN BILLY MAlT-
TfHEWiS ('8th District)--Gaines-
ville. Third term. Serves on Agricul-
ture Committee. ,Noted as a public
speaker and master of ceremonies.
Pet Project is construction of a
NeuroPlsychiatric VeteranI' Hos-
pital on a plot of land already own-
ed by the ;Government at Gaines-
ville:

Jimmy Costin, student at Florida
State University left Wednesday to
resume his studies after being with
his family, Mr. and Mrs. C. G. 'Cos-
tin, Sr.


1 a 1M


I


mummomm


THE 6TAR, PORIT R)T. JnE, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA


THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1957


PAGE SIX


r







URA ANR I7 TIE ITAR. .I Il J L COUNTY P'LC.)Ai P.Il -


THE STAR
Puillshed khoy Thursday At 306 Wlliams Avenue, Port St.
Joe, Florida, By The Star Publlshing Company
WE' t IFr ti. HA',seY, Editor and Publisher
I tvpe Operator, Ad Man, Floor Man, Oolumnist,
'tovorter. Proof Reader and Bookkeeper
ONE YEAR, $3.00 SIX MONTHS $1.50
THReE MONTHS 1127.13
SUBSCRIWPiON iNhA IABLY PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
En'ered as second-closa matter, December 19. 1937, at the
Pil'-,(.ffie, Port St. J3e, Fla., under Act of March 8, 1879.
DIAL BAll 7-3161
TO ADVERTISERS-In case of error or omissions in adver-
tlsements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable fr
oamages further than amount received for such advertisement
The spukvi ur Lis gheu s'cat attention; the printed w'nr
is thmug)'tldlv weighed. The spoken word barely aeerft;
the printed word thorouirhlv onvinces. The spoken word
i% lat- the prmtltd word remalI.




Classified Ads Bring Quick rel ,s


B YINGI SELL IN



RE TING! SWAPPING!


READ AND USE WANT ADS FOR QUICK RESULTS!

IT'S THE TOWN'S BIGGEST MARKET PLACE-



A A3l^^^


Turn to the Want Ads in this newspaper now,
read carefully. Look there's a bargain on a
good electric guitar and a swell buy on a home
- fine lots in a new subdivision, and several nice
apartments for rent. Maybe this week you're not
interested but you may be tomorrow or the
day after or even next week. That's why it's
a good and thrifty habit to read the Wanit Ads
regularly. 'It's a good idea too, to use them when
you have a service to offer, something to sell,
or a specific need in mind. Want Ads can work
for you efficiently and economically.



THE STAR


The meeting opened with tne
singing of "The Light of the World
Is Jesus" followed with prayer.
Mrs. C. Byron Smith presented the
devotional. She gave an interest-
ing and informative talk and used
as her subject "Look Back and
Look Forward". She concluded by
reading the 23 Psalm.
During the business, reports were
given and announcements were
made. Mrs. Pridgeon announced
that the next meeting held on Mon-
day afternoon would be visitation
day and urged all members of the
union to take part. She stated that
the WMU is planning on observing
Focus Week which will be held on
the 13th through the 18th. An As-
sociational Executive meeting will
be held on Thursday at 10 o'clock
in the morning at the Long Avenue
Baptist JChurch. All members of
the board are expected to attend.
Twenty-four members were pres-
ent and two new members, Mrs.
Cliff Ellis and Mrs. Ruth Wilson
were introduced.
Mrs. Wesley Ramsey dismissed
the meeting with a prayer.

St. James YPSL Is
Feted In Panama City
St. James Young Peoples' League
was guest of the St. Andrew Young
People's League in Panama City
last Sunday night. After -attending
the pageant and enjoying a social
hour, the group visited the Christ-
mas display at the International
Paper Company.
Those attending were Alex Gall-
lard, Jimmy Fuller, Jerry Buchert,
Bill Chism, Bob Munn, Michael
Munn. Fred Griffin, Ed 'Bobbitt, Ma-
ry Jane Bobbitt, Connie Monn, Don-
na Underhill, Linda LeHardy, Judy
Fensom, Billy Mazarol. Chaperones
were Mrs. Bert Munn, Miss (Phyllis
Keith and the Rev. Gardner Under-
hill.
Return To Gainesville
Mr. and Mrs. Billy Gaillard and
daughter Ann will return to Gaines-
ville Wednesday -after spending the
holidays here with their parents,
Mi. and Mrs. Henry Campbell and
Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Gaillard. Bill-r
12 attending the University.






... FIGHTS ALL COLDS
SYMPTOMS AT ONE TIME...
IN LESS TIME ITS THE
PROVEN COLDS MEDICINE


Have your doctor phomw
(m bring yeur pfwoWiptioB


SMITWS PHARMACY
Shop The Setf4-ervle WaY
In AIr-COondltioned oWmfort
JOHN ROBERT SMITH
Pharmaceutical Chemist
I


C[IVUIUII fDbffl 9)
and
Cuotracting
DIAL BA 7-4331


SIS KEEPS
PRETTY WITH


MILK

Guilford's Dairy
"Sealtest Distributor"


The Church Attendance Crusade Highland View Methodist Church
is held by many denominations are invited to share, these great
across the United 'States. It dates services for the next three months'
from January 'to Easter. It is an an- and join together in an advance for
nual event in all the churches of a Christ and His kingdom.
neighboring county.
Members, friends and visitors of Star Want Ads Get Results


' .r Want Ads Get Result, Margaret Belin, George Highland View Church I
Y. Core Are Married To Stress Attendance
I Miss Margaret Belin of Port St. Highland View Methodists are
Joe, and George Y. Core, of We- preparing to launch their annual
Wewahitchka were married at the Church Attendance Crusade for this
Some of her mother, Mrs. W. J. Be- year on Sunday, January 6. The
[' u. 6 lin, of Port St. Joe, 'Saturday morn- Crusade services will begin Sunday
*, @ ing, December 22, at 9:00. morning at the morning worship
'". Only members of the immediate hour with Dr. A. E. Middlebrooks,
Families were present as the Rev. district superintendent of the Mar-
C. Dwight Wooten, Methodist min- lanna District of The Methodist
sister of Wewahitchka, performed Church, delivering the message. Af-
the ceremony., ter the worship hour a covered dish
j The happy couple left immediate- 'lunch will be served in the educa-
ly after the ceremony for a brief tional annex. The business session
AUNTIE FEELS wedding trip and will make their will follow. Rev. Newsome will fea-
home in Wewahitchka. ture as his sermon topic for Sun-
'BETTER WITH -- day night, "How Big Is God?"
Mrs. Pridgeon Presides
Over WMU Meeting irs
Irs. W. C. Pridgeon presided o5- WALL ELECTRIC
li hair- o,.er the regular monthly business
Guilford's Dairy meeting of the Woman Missionary COMPANY
"Sealtest Distributor" Union of the First Baptist Church
Monday afternoon held in the FOR EXPERT
church auditorium. .


HOME CONSTRUCTION


P. O. Box 668


iJith Trade-in


McClarnma Electric Co'


PHONE NEwton 9-2054


WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA


REPAIRS


PAINTING




Di

GEN
APA



ALTERATIONS


Phone OLiver 3-3802


-.nnouncement-


TO MY FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS.

Effective December 31, I sold my interest in the
firm of C. R. Witherspoon, Distributor, located in
Apalachicola to J. V. Gadder who will continue to
operate in his own name.

I want to thank each one who has contributed to
the success of this business and at the same time
solicit your continued patronage for Bubber.


C. R. WITHERSPOON


k Hilliman

IERAL CONTRACTOR
kLACHICOLA, FLORIDA


i Il~~-r~~l I,


--"Now


THIK *TAR, PORT ST. JOk GOULF COUNTY. FLORIIDA


PAGE IF p*


THURSDAY, JANUARY 7,,1957


I








ia G1 3It @n t -c % w w v


Guests From Texa- daughter, Peggy Jane McGlon tar- We are humbly grateful for these CARD OF THANKS
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Thomp- ling, was a great shock and left us many acts of Christian service and As the old year draws to a close
son of El Paso, Texas were the much bereaved. We could not have friendship, and we thank you fro.n and the holidays end, we shall ever
week end guests of Mr. and Mrs. bore the burden of oursorrow, and the bottom of our hearts. emember the many cards, letters,
Tom Thompson of Palm Blvd, could not stand. up under it now, May God bless each of you in gifts. and other expressions' of
icwere it not for your many acts of every way. friendsip 'from old friends and
CARD OF THANK8 'kindness, gentleness, thoughtful- Mr. and Mrs. Alvin McGlon new.
The recent death of oun- beloved ness, and generosity, and Family. We would like to thank each of


Living Room

2 2-Pc. Kroehler Living Room Suites $199.95
Nylon Cover, 1 green and 1 red lReg. $269.95 WITH TRADE

1 Simmons HIDE-A-BED -------. $199.95
Brown tweed cover, 1 cushion-Reg. $259.95 WITH TRADE

6 Platform and Swivel ROCKERS -_ $39.95
Blond and Mahogany-Values to $59.95

2 8-Pc. SOFA BED SUITE ------$139.95
Includes sofa, 2 chairs, 2 end tables, coffee table and 2 lamps
Sofa converts to full size bed-Reg. $169.50

2 CLUB CHAIRS .-.. ------ $39.95
1 Charcoal, 1 Turquois, with rubber cushion-Reg. $79.50

1 2-Pc. Maple Living Room Suite $179.50
Brown tweed cover, heavy frame-Reg. $219.95


3 Wrought Iron STOOLS ------
Padded Seat-Reg. $6.95


$3.95


1 Blond Oak Corner Table ---- $9.95
Reg. $19.95


Bed Room

1 3-Pc. Bed Room SUITE ------ $109.95
Nut Brown Finish Modern, Double Dresser, Bar .Bed, Chest
Reg. $149.95

1 3-Pc. Maple Bed Room Suite -- $129.95
Double Dresser and Bar Bed-Reg. $149.95

1 3-Pc. Maple Bed Room Suite__ $139.95
Vanity, Chest and Bed (Full light mirror)-Reg. $189.95


1 4-Pc. Maple Bed Room Suite ---
Vanity, Bend Chest and Postei Bed--Reg. $149.95


$119.95


1 Restonic Innerspring MATTRESS $34.95
Double Size-Reg. $49.50

2 Prince Innerspring MATTRESSES $39.95
Reg. $49.50

5 Simmons MATTRESSES -------$37.95
Hotel Standard, 3 Double, 2 Single-Reg. $49.95

2 Lane CEDAR CHESTS ----- $39.50
1 Blond Oak, 1 Seafoam. 'Mahogany, Floor Sample-Reg. $59.50

1 DRESSING TABLE --------$59.95
Solid Mahogany, With 3 Drawers, Folding Mirror Top-Reg. $99.95


2 SINGLE BEDS,---- -
Solid Mahogany-Reg. $39.50

1 NIGHT TABLE -- ----
Solid Mahogany-Reg. $39.95

1 5-Drawer DESK CHEST -
Grey Finish-Reg. $44.50

1 -5-Drawer Unfinished CHEST-
Solid Magnolia. Readyto paint-Reg. $39.50


$19.95


$14.95


$29.95


$29.95


1 5-Drawer Unfinished CHEST--- $24.95
Reg. $29,95

1 4-Drawer Unfinished CHEST ---- $19.95
Reg. $24.95


Dining Room

1 Blonde Mahogany BUFFET ---- $49.95
48" wide, Ample storage space for dining room-Reg. $98.50


2 large 5-Pc. Chrome Dinettes ----
With Comfortable Chairs--Reg. $109.95-

2 5-Pc. Daystrom DINETTES
Extension Table, Comfortable Chairs-Reg. $89.95


$79.95


$59.95


18 ODD TABLE LAMPS --------- $1.95
Values to $9.95-YOUR CHOICE

2 Cosco Folding Kitchen TABLES --_ $6.95
Size 34X34-Reg. $12.95

150 Pieces DINNER WARE --- --50% OFF
Russell Wright-Colorful, Nationally Advertised-CLOSING OUT

4 9X12 Wool Face RUGS ------- $14.95
Adds warmth to any room-Reg. $24.95

2 9X12 Axminister RUGS ------$49.95
Beautiful Patterns- Reg. $69.95

6 FLOOR LAMPS ----------- $8.95
Assorted-All the light needed for reading-Reg. $12.95

12 TABLE LAMPS ------------$4.95
Values to $14.95-YOUR CHOICE

12 Coffee and End TABLES -----.. $9.95
Mahogany or Blonde-Values to $19.95-YOUR CHOICE

2 Duo-Therm OIL HEATERS -----$119.95
With Blower Fan-Reg. $149.95

1 Duo-Therm OIL HEATER-------$99.95
Reg. $139.95

12 PICTURES ---------------$1.95
Assorted and Scenes-Values to $6.95-YOUR CHOICE,


Used Bargains

1 Blond Maple DESK CHEST------$17.95
5 Drawer

1 Walnut BOOK CASE ---------$7.95
A BARGAIN

9 Assorted TABLES----------- $2.95
Includes End Tables, Coffee Tables and Occasional Tables

4 Assorted TABLES----------- $1.50

I 3-Pc. SECTIONAL -----------$19.95

1 20-Ft. DEEP FREEZE --------$199.95
Reg. $649.00-LIKE NEW
2 SOFA BEDS ---------------$9.95
Converts to full size bed


1 2-Pc. Living Room SUITE


$14.95


1 LARGE CLUB CHAIR ------ $7.95


1 Platform ROCKER
Velour Cover


$7.95


1 4-Drawer VANITY -------- $8.95
White Enamel


1 4-Drawer CHEST -- -
White Enamel

1 4-Drawer Walnut VANITY
Round Mirror


$8.95


$7.95


1 Walnut Poster Double BED $9.95

2 Double BOX SPRINGS -------- $9.95

3 Double Innerspring MATTRESSES $8.95

2 Double Cotton MATTRESSES -- $4.95

2 Single Innerspring MATTRESSES -. $9.95

4 Double METAL SPRINGS ------- $4.95

2 Single METAL SPRINGS ----- $4.95


2 5-Pc. CHROME DINETTES --- $44.95
Reg. $54.95


7 ODD DINING CHAIRS --- -
Maple and Mahogany Finish-YOUR CHOICE


$6.95


- iasy Terms- ho Outside Finacing -


ou personally but inasmuch as this l _tail Association 1
is impossible we shall use this Ketl ASSOCIoTi 0ni
space in the STAR to express our |
deepest and most sincere apprecia- akin A Survey


tlon,
May the-New Year bring each of
you pace, health, happiness and
rrosnerlty.
Sincerely,
JOE and LULA

Visitors From Jacksonville
Mr. and Mrs. William Ferrell and
family of Jacksonville left Monday
after spending the week end here
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.
B. Ferrell.


_lK
Visitors From Calif.
M-Sgt. and Mrs. W. W. Busby of
Riverside, Calif., and March Field,
who with their children Judy, Jan
and Jim have been visiting during
the Christmas holidays with Mrs.
Busby's brother and sister-in-law,
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Joines and
' .Mrs. Busby's sister aia family. Mi.
and Mrs. Chauncey Costin. left
Wednesday for N1ow York where
they will go b yboat to Puerto Rico
to make their future home.


Art of Making

Syrup Is Fading

From The Scene

(Washington County News)
Quality home-grown and proces-
sed cane syrup is going to be scarce
again for another year. In fact, it
may never be plentiful again.
Yields- and quality of vthe 1656
crop have been better than usual,
but cane has been dropped as a
crop on many small family-type
farms. 'That is where the fine art
of syrup-making has been preserv-
ed for generations.
Standard Equipment
Gone are the days when cane
mills were standard equipment on
many West Florida farms. The
mills, operated by mule-power, were
I used to press the zestfully flavored
juice from the cane. The juice was
then cooked down to a syrup II a
vat or evaporation pan.
An abundance of "fat ligh't'erd",
a fuel otherwise known as fat pine,
simplified the cooking process.
Plenty of the lightwood was usual-
ly found nearby. Now, that, too, is
scarce. Many of the remaining pro.
cessors are using other types of
fuel. Coal and gas seem to be fa-
vored, but they're both expensive
for use in the manufacture of syrup
at any rate.
Discouragement Plentiful
The scarcity of fuel discouraged
some growers. A scarcity of labor
discouraged others. Competition
from syrup blends, composed large-
ly of a mixture of sugar and water
flavored with cane syrup, added
more discouragement.
The result is the disappearance
of cane mills from West Florida
farms and the replacement of home-
produced syrup by a blended pro-
duct on the shelves of grocery
stores.
This is cane-grinding and syrup
making season in this area, one of
the Southeast's remaining sugar
cane-growing and syrup-making
strongholds. It is perhaps one of
the few places where the art of
making old fashioned cane syrup
has been preserved on a fairly large
scale.
Going To Process
Much of the syrup produced here,
however, will never reach the na-
tion's dining tables in its present
form. It is going instead to the pro-
cessors for blending into a uniform-
ly colored and flavored product.
The syrup ,thus blended is usually
attractively bottled and sold under
the, trade name of the processor.
Mass production of sugar, most of
which is imported, enables it to be
bought much more cheaply ,than'
the old fashioned cane syrup can be
produced on the farms.
That's why the blend, which usu-
ally contains just enough cane sy-
rup for color and flavor, can be
produced more cheaply than the
pure cane syrup itself.
Less Syrup Eaten
A change in eating habits can
be partly credited with the decline
in syrup consumption. The Ameri-
can people are said to be eating
more sweets than ever, but less of
it than ever is being eaten as syrup.
iSyrup destined for the blending
process is stored in barrels at the
farm mills in this area where it is
being produced. The barrels of sy-
rup are then hauled to the proces-
sing or blending plants.
Pure cane syrup destined for the
consumer is usually packaged in
half-gallon or gallon pails. They are
usually labeled with the name of
tue farmer-producer. Most produc-
ers who have stayed in the business
1ake an Intense pride in the qu-htI
ri their product and want to be
sure it is properly labeled.
GO TO CHURCH SUNDAY
------ K -----


-


The Florida State Retailers As,
sociation is looking for the largest
and the smallest product manufac-
tured in Florida.
There is all kind of conjecture
as to what these two products ac-
tually are. Suggestions range from
dirigibles ,to doughnuts, but nei-
ther is correct.
tExtensive publicity awaits the
largest and smallest Florida-made
products and the companies which
manufacture them. The retail as-
sociation's search for ,them is in
connection with the state's second
annual estival of Florida Products,
February 14 to 23.
Nominations for the biggest and
the smallest products of Florida
industry should 'be sent to the
Florida State 'Retailers Association
headquarters, box 735, Winter Park.


CLASSIFIED ADS

FOR RENT: Furnished apartment
at Oak Grove. Mrs. Paul Farmer
Phone BA 7,3022. Utp
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment.
1506 Long Ave., John F. iScott. p
FOR SALE: Spacious four bedroom
house in good section of Oak
Grove, 80'X125' lot. House contai',t
approximately 1200 sq. ft. of living
area plus front and back porches
and car port. Only $7250.00. AbouL
$2,000.00 down and balance uii lon
tei m mortgage.
FRANK HANNON
Registered Real Estate Broker
Phone 7-3491 211 Reid Ave.
Port St. Joe, Fia.
FOR SALE: Les Paul, Jr., Gibson
guitar with fender amplifier. 115
Hunter St., Oak Grove, Denver
Skipper. 2tp
LOTS FOR SALE: Jonesville sub-
division. Only four mile& south of
Port St. Joe, Just off US 98, Lots
are 50 ft. by 150 it. $200 and up.
See Roy E. Cox or phone BA11 7-5090
Terms offered. 6tp-12-27


FOR RENT: Furnished cottages
and apartments on the Beach 9
miles from Port St. Joe. $45.00 to
$65.00 monthly, weekly rates avail-
able. See Mrs. C. E. Thompson at
Costin's Cottages, Beacon Hill. Tel.
BAJ1 7-5074. 8tp-12-27
WILL BUILD modern business
building on Reid Avenue in Port
St. Joe to suit tenant or lessee.
Building will be approximately 20
feet by 45 feet situated on Lot 18
in Block 16. Call Ben H. Dickens at
BAll 7-2281 or make appointment
107 Second Street for complete de-
tails. tfc-12-20
FOR RENT: 1 furnished and one
unfurnished apartment. Close in.
520 4th St., Phone 7-5607. Mrs. Mc-
Keithen. tfc-12-20
FOR SALE: 3-bedroom house. Re-
cently repainted on inside. Con-
venient to grammar school and to
town. See 0. M. Taylor. tfcl0-18
FOR RENT: Nice comfortably fur-
nished apartment on Monument
Avenue. Suitable for couple only.
See or phone Mrs. A. M. Jones, Sr.
FOR SALE: Parakeets. Breeding
pairs. With cage or singles for
pets. 1311 Long Ave. Ph. 7M7686 3t
FOR RENT: One and two bedroom
attractively furnished apartments
Cool in summer, warm in winter.
Window"fans, gas heat. They have
to be seen to be appreciated, Wim-
ico Lodge, White City, Phone 9-4083.
tfc-12-13


Buzzett's Drug Store
PHONE 7-1371

SPECIAL SERVICES
ELECTRIC IRONS repaired. Work
guaranteed. Quick dependable
service. Red's Shoe Shop. Reid Ave
TV ANTENNAS Installed, clean-
ed and re-wired. Phone BA 7-9921.
Bill Bowen. tfc6-14
-OR FAST, EFFICIENT plumbing
service, call BILL'S PLUMBING.
.hone 7-7846. Outboard motors re&
)aired, also.
FOR SALE: House at White City
and three lots at St. Joe Beach.
E. TOM PRIDGEON
Real Estate & Insurance
BAll 7-7741 411 Reid Ave.
KENNEDY'S ELECTRIC and RE-
FRIGERATION SERVICE. LI-
ensed electrical contractor. AU
kinds electric and refrigeration
service and installation. Phone
.-3032. tfc
F YOU ARE INTERESTED in sav-
ing money see us for anything
von need in your home. STOP and
SWAP SHOP.


Keys Mode While You Wait
35c EACH
BICYCLE PARTS
WESTERN AUTO
Rteel Parts and Repairs
"RADE US that useless article for
Something useful. STOP and
'WAP.
WILLIS V. ROWAN POST 116.
THE AMERICAN LEGION. Meet-
ng first and third Monday nights
100 p.m.. American Legion Home
1. A. M.-Regular convocation of
St. Joseph Chapter No. 56, R. A.
M, 2nd and 4th Mondays. All visit-
.llen, High Priest; H. R. Malge,
secretary.
THERE WILL BE a regular com-
munication of Port St. Joe Lodge
No. 111, F&AM every second and
fourth Friday night at 8:00 p.m.
All Master Masons cordially invited.
J. B. GRIFFITH, W. M.
F. W. CHANDLER, Sec.
LOYAL ORDER OF MOOSE
Meetings at Moose Hall, 310
Fourth St.. meeting night every other
Monday.
SAMARITAN LODGE No. 40, 1. 0.
0. F.-Meets first and third Thurs-
lays, 7:30 p. m. In Masonic Hall. All
members urged to attend; visiting
brethren Invited.
A. P. GILBERT, Secty.
G. F. LAWRENCE, N. G.


M. P. TOMLINSON

i REALTOR INSUROR

403 Munument Ave Port St Joe, Fla.





Weed r Saoe

BLOCKS UNSPLIT----Load $5.00

BLOCKS SPLIT ------Load $7.00

WALTER DUREN
CALL BAII 7-3171




You Are Cordiy Invited To Attend

L ug AV-MI DI ptist ChucII

MV. J. C. ODUM, P r
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m.1
MORNING WORSHIP -__ 11:00 a.m. -
BAPTIST TRAINING UNION __. 6." p.m.
EVENING WORSHIP 7:30 p.m.
PRAYER SERVICE (Wednesday) 7:30 p.m.
Cwmr lamg Av e mand 16th Street
VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME.
^Ai 60~10 14OW Iw2i I


~gft~qP~y~_~aapgihi~~


I ---~-- I


I


THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 1957


THK YAR PC gy inL. ULF COUNTY; FLORIDA,