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The star
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028419/00924
 Material Information
Title: The star
Uniform Title: Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: W.S. Smith
Place of Publication: Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date: October 26, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates: 29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1937.
General Note: Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note: Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID: UF00028419:00924

Table of Contents
    Section A: Main
        page A 1
        page A 2
        page A 3
        page A 4
        page A 5
        page A 6
        page A 7
        page A 8
        page A 9
        page A 10
        page A 11
        page A 12
        page A 13
        page A 14
    Section B: Second Section
        page B 1
        page B 2
        page B 3
        page B 4
        page B 5
        page B 6
        page B 7
        page B 8
        page B 9
        page B 10
        page B 11
        page B 12
    Section C: Business
        page C 1
        page C 2
        page C 3
        page C 4
        page C 5
        page C 6
        page C 7
        page C 8
        page C 9
        page C 10
        page C 11
        page C 12
Full Text










5 50
USPS 518-880


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR OVER 69 YEARS
69th Year, Number 1 Port St. Joe, FL 3 Sections 38 Pages
October 26, 2006


Lights on Afterschool 1 B


A Tin

By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

Alison and Dewayne Butler were high
school sweethearts with big plans for their
future together.
They married soon after high school and
relocated to Port St. Joe, settling into a small
three-bedroom house on McClelland Avenue
they. believed would nicely accommodate a
family of four.
Though she wanted two children, Alison
was diagnosed with Polycystic Ovarian
Syndrome and remained childless for nine
painful years.
After a doctor removed a wedge from each
of Alison's ovaries, she became pregnant and
gave birth to son, Justin, now six.
Following Justin's birth, the Butlers had
three more children in quick succession.
Brianna, four, Tristan, three, and Maelynn,
21 months.
As their family grew, the Butlers were
overwhelmed by their many blessings.
After a nine-year struggle to conceive
a child, they did not know that a greater
trial would follow, one that would profoundly
disrupt their family's lives.
Last year, within nine months, Alison had
two heart,attacks and two bypass surgeries.
Justin was the Butlers' miracle. Brianna,
Tristan and Maelynn, their "bonuses."
Alison's medical nightmare, their most
difficult challenge.
A year later, as Alison's recovery continues,
so does her struggle to balance motherhood
with healing.
As she makes her health a priority, she
worries about the consequences for Her
beloved family.
A Persistent Headache
Alison's troubles began after the birth of
her youngest daughter, Maelynn.
Following an epidural, fluid surrounding
Alison's spinal cord leaked through the
puncture site, changing.the pressure around
.her brain and spinal cord.
The result was a painful spinal headache
that increased in intensity when Alison sat up


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer

Early in 2007 Gull Coast Medical Center
will begin a bigger commitment to Gull County
'by adding a diagnostic center to Beacon Hill,
according to Rod Whiting. Marketing Director
for Gulf Coast Medical.
The new service will complement the
hospital's primary care clinic in Port St. Joe
that opened last year, he said.
Dr. Kimberly Cooper-Dunn. an alumna of
Port St. Joe High School. will arrive No\ ember
S 1 to join the Gulf Coast Medical Center Primary
'Care Clinic staff in Port St. Joe. She will oiler
,continuing primary care to Gulf County and
'Mexico Beach residents, according to Whiting.
Whiting said at tunes the Port St. Joe primary
care clinic sees more than 20 patients per day
J i, Dr. Carol Sutton. who has been in charge
of the Port St. Joe clinic since it opened last
year, will eventually move.to the Beacon Hill
facility to expand and supervise diagnostic
services. She will continue her private practice
from there.
Whiting said the first phase of the. move
will be opening the Beacon Hill diagnostic
'center, which will.piovide x-ray. CT and lab
services.
'"As the area's needs grow. we have the
options fo expand, in offering additional
diagnostic and medical services." said Whiting.
S"This also applies for primary care services."
The diagnostic center at Beacon Hill will
also provide care to residents in the Geri-Care
and Beacon Villa Retirement commntiinuies.
which are already operating at Beacon Hill,


I


ie for Hi

in bed. .
To relieve
the headache,
Alison's doctor
inserted a needle
into the same area i
the epidural had
been and sealed
the puncture hole
with blood from
Alison's arm.
When Alison
left the hospital
with Maelynn,
her doctor
cautioned that,
in rare instances,
spinal headaches
could recur. If
her symptoms
continue, Alison
would require
another blood
patch. ,
A I i s o n ::. .
returned home ';
feeling fine. Her i .
parents came from. :.
Alabama to visit
her for a week and
admire their new
granddaughter. WE i I
It was during h cin'
her parents' stay -
in February 2005'. I e
that Alison began "
experiencing a
tightness in her
chest.
One night,
while she and her
mother cleaned
the kitchen,,Alison Alison Butler rocks her
grabbed her heart. two heart attacks in the
"I guess I have recovering.
heartburn, but if it
is, it's the worst heartburn I've ever had in my
life." Alison told her mother.
The "heartburn pas- ed and Ahsoi felt


dealing

; : -
.~ .


Despina Willians/The Star


r 21-month old daughter Maelynn. Alison suffered
two weeks following Maelynn's birth and is still

like herself again.
Confident that their daughter was in good
(See HEALING on Page 8A)


Early Voting Up


and Running

By Tim Croft
Star News Editor

Those hoping to be first in line at the polls
should consider themselves. late.
The general election remains nearly
two weeks away, Nov. 7, but early voting got
underway at the beginning of this week.
From now until Saturday, Nov. 4, county
voters can cast their ballots and make
Election Day a tad easier for poll workers and
voters alike at two locations.
Supervisor of Elections Linda Griffin and
her team are on alert at her new offices
on Williams Avenue in Port St. Joe and the


Ir -


Wewahitchka Public Library for any of the
county's 9,000-plus registered voters wanting
an early start.
Hours are 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. ET in Port
St. Joe and 8 a.m. -until 4 p.m. in Wewahitchka.
Those hours appl\ Mlonday through Saturday.
Precinct po11llini places will operate, on.
Election Day from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. ET, or 6
a.m. until 6 p.m. CT-for voters in the Central
Time Zonie.
\Voi.-rs must !iave- a piettire and signature
identification for either early voting or at the
polls.
The picture ID can be,. in any
combination: '
Florida driver's license:


and will be available to patients and primary Refirement communities, Bay Medical will Florida ID card issued by the Department
care physicians in and around Mexico Beach, "have a continued presence in Gulf County." of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles;
Wewahitchka and Apalachicola, said Whiting. BaylMedical has operated limited diagnostic United States passport;
.According to Gulf Courty commissioner service at Beacon Hill for the past several.
Bill Williams. whose company, Integras, owns years. (See EARLY VOTING on Page 6A)
and operates the .Geri-Care and Beacon Villa a


Police Seek Help in Stabbing Incident


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer

Port St. Joe police are asking the
community to help identify at least one of two
suspects wanted in connection with two related
stabbings on Friday. October 13.
Shortly before 3 p.m. E.T. on October 13,
two men who were fishing near the public boat
ramp under the George Tapper Bridge on the
Highland View side of the canal were stabbed
with a knife.,
A man, aged 57, arhd a 13-year old boy
were' fishing in the 'canal and were confronted
by two white men. After exchanging words the
men began fighting and the 57-year old man
and young boy were stabbed.
Both victims were taken by Gulf. County
Emergency Medical Services to Bay Medical
Hospital in Panama City in serious condition.
According to Port St. Joe Police Chief James
Hersey on October 23, both victims are
Snmproving.
The suspects were described as white
males in their early 60s, with gray hair, driving


a champagne-colored, mid to small, two-door
pickup truck with a silver toolbox attached to
the bed behind the cab.
Hersey said the truck was described, from
the rear. as resembling a Ford Ranger or
Toyota
"We have leads," said Hersey, "but it takes
time to run tests and analyze evidence."
A composite sketch of one of the suspects
has been circulated in Port St. Joe, and has
been distributed to Crime Stoppers.
Police are asking .if anyone has any
information regarding this' crime, to please
contact the Port St. Joe Police Department at
(850) 229-8265. If anyone has information about
the crime and wants to remain anonymous,
they should call Crime' Stoppers at (850) 785-
TIPS (8477).
A cash reward of up to $1,000 is being
offered in this case.

Have You Seen This Man?
Between 50-60 years of age, clean shaven,
about six feet tall, driving a champagne-colored,
mid to small, two-door pickup truck. .


Ni 2" School Board ................................. 3A Jail for Bail .................................. 6A I N D E X

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County Commission ........................ 7A Junior Miss .................................. 11B LellersiolheEiilof .....5A TilngsToDo & See ..7B


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2A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, October 26, 2006



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Changes May be in Store for Gulf County Enrollment Policy


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer

At Monday's workshop,
the Gulf County School Board
found itself at. a crossroads
over cross-county student
transfers.
After months of
investigation, Superintendent
Tim Wilder informed the
board that four Apalachicola
students had subverted School
Board policy to enroll in Port
St. Joe's Middle and High
Schools.
The students failed to
demonstrate proof of residency
during a 30-day grace period,
wherein they were told that
failure to do so would mean
expulsion.
Wilder reported that the
30-day period expired two
weeks ago, and asked the
board for advice on how to
proceed.
The board members were
left with two options allow
the students to remain in Port
St. Joe or send them back to
Apalachicola.
'"At what point do we say,
you don't have it (residency),
now go back?" Wilder asked.
School Board members
encouraged the superintendent
to make good on his expulsion
promise.
"You're going to have to
do what you said you were
going to do. What's the point
of having rules if you don't
efiforce them?" said board
member Charlotte Pierce.
o Linda Wood concurred,
saying, "If we don't do this, it
will lead to a can of worms in
the future."
* After hearing the board's
opinion, Wilder said he would
send certified letters to the
students' parents, notifying
them that their children would
be disenrolled from Port St.
Joe schools on Friday.
* Assistant Superintendent
Bill Carr. who led the
investigation, was called
awa\ during the cross-county
transfer discussion.
After the board meeting.
he confirmed that only one
of the students in question, a
Port St. Joe High School tenth
grader,. faced expulsion for not
pronidina proof of residency
- The other three students
ace Apalachicola residents
who have attended Port St. Joe
Schools for two or three years
w\h the board's approval.
Those students' names


were flagged when they did
not submit a school choice
form prior to this school year
acknowledging their intentions
to remain enrolled in Port St.
Joe schools.
Carr said he would
notify the students' parents
immediately and ask them
to complete the necessary
paperwork.
The issue of cross-county
transfers became a hot topic
in mid-August, when both
Gulf and Franklin County
School Boards launched
investigations amid rumors
that a number of Apalachicola
students had enrolled in Port
St. Joe; schools under, false
Gulf County addresses.
Carr investigated eight
students at the beginning
of the school year whose
enrollment applications listed
home telephone numbers with
a "653" Apalachicola prefix.
Franklin County
superintendent Jo Ann Gander
submitted 12 names to the
educational consulting firm,
Jerry Copeland Associates,
for investigation, and later
gave Wilder three names for
review.
At the workshop, Wilder
downplayed the controversy,
saying the cross-county
transfers. have not "been a
big issue" for either Gulf or"
Franklin counties.
He did; however,
recommend to the board
that they revisit the board's
enrollment policy.,
Specifically, he suggested
that the board amend its
parent consent form, which
allows Franklin County parents
to appoint a Gulf County,
representative in matters of
their children's education.
Nine Apalachicola parents
signed the consent form to
enroll their children in Port
St. Joe schools this year,
prompting criticism from
both Gander and former Gulf
County superintendent. Jerry
Kelley.
Linder his administration.
Kelley required court-ordered
guardianship changes for
Apalachicola parents seeking
to enroll their children in Gulf
County Schools.
The School Board adopted
a new policy under \VWilder's
administration. allowing
parents to bypass the courts
through a notarized consent
form.
Wilder said the policy


change was intended to make
it easier and less expensive
for parents who had suffered
hardships to designate a Gulf
County relative to oversee their
children's edZucation.
At the workshop, Wilder
said the consent forms have
been used for purposes other
than those originally intended,
noting that the policy change
have made it "too easy" to
transfer.
"I think a lot of them have
taken advantage of us using
that," said Wilder. "Maybe they
shouldn't have been allowed to
get in that easy."
Wilder noted that he'd
"like to see the board go in
a different direction," on its
consent form policy. He hopes
to address the matter further
at a future workshop.
According to Wilder, the
36 Apalachicola students
legitimately enrolled in Port
St. Joe schools will be allowed
to stay, including those whose
parents signed the consent.
form.
ThQugh the consent form
requires that Apalachicola
students live with Gulf County
family members, and not
commute from their home
city, Carr noted that the
school board, has not closely
monitored the students'
residency status.
"That's where it gets real
sticky," said' Carr, .noting that'
border patrolling is not one
of his duties as assistant
superintendent.
"I cannot and will not,
devote' eight hours a day to
tracking down these kids. I
don't go to the border and
see if they're -coming over," he
said.-
In other business:
*Board members spent a
significant portion of Monday's
workshop reviewing plans for
the new Gulf Academy.
The new academy, being
constructed b% Royal Concrete
Concepts. Inc. IRCCI mn West
Palmn Beach. \\ill measure 24
by 80 feet and can comfortably
accommodate 16 students.
SL students currently
attend Gulf Academy.
Aided by a large sketch pad
mounted on an easel, School
Board members debated the
placements of windows. air
conditioning units, bathrooms
and offices for final submission
to RCC.
The new building \\ill
feature two handicapped-


accessible classroom units
divided by a central support
column.
A gabled roof will top the
building, which will have solid
cement walls and sheetrock
interiors.
The old Gulf Academy will
likely be demolished, with the
new site located to the left of
the Adult School in the empty
lot behind the bus barn.
The School Board has
budgeted $280,000 for the
project, with the RCC bid
coming in at $214,180.54.
The school system's
maintenance department will
handle some of the interior
jobs, such as the walls for
the two faculty offices, at a
substantial savings to the
district.
, RCC will construct the
modular building at its facility
and \transport the structure
to the site for placement on
poured footings.
Construction will take 12
weeks, following final floor
plan discussions between the
school district and RCC.
*Wilder updated the board
on his efforts to. standardize
teacher and staff sign in/sign
out policy throughout Gulf
County schools.
His efforts were prompted
by a problem with Port St.
Joe Middle School teachers
leaving' campus during school
hours. -
"I found out teachers were
coming and going like crazy,".
said Wilder, who examined the
middle school's, sign in/out
records first-hand..
"It was pages and pages of
people. leaving for home and'
bank and store, and the hours
were adding up," he said .
Board policy allows
teachers to leave school.
property during their assignried
lunch/planning periods, with.
principal's approval.


Wilder has asked teachers
to obtain principal approval
for any school-related off-
campus trips, such as those
to the grocery store to obtain
needed supplies.
Principals will check a
field on the office sign in sheet
to indicate that the teachers
should not be charged for
those off-campus minutes.
Teachers will be charged
for attending to personal
matters that are not school


related.
*The board revisited its van
use policy and recommended
measures to increase the
cleanliness of school vehicles.
Pierce asked Wilder to
amend board policy to require
board approval for any school
vehicle crossing state lines.
Wilder said he would look
into whether or not the board
had such a policy, already in
place.


No Rate Increase from


Blue Cross for Schools

By Tim Croft
Star News Editor

Gulf County Schools Superintendent Tim Wilder
announced this week that the district has negotiated a rate-
hold with their health insurance carrier. Blue Cross and
Blue Shield of Florida (BCBSF). The program, which offers
employees a choice of three different benefit options, renews
effective January 1. 2007.
Superintendent Wilder was pleased with the end result,
indicating that a rate-hold -in today's health insurance
environment is unusual.
Representatives from BCBSF indicate that no other
district in this area of the state enjoyed the same outcome.
The key to the good news. according to Wilder, is the
favorable claims experience within the group. The district
is at a size %whereby the employee's own claims account for a
substantial portion of the renewal premium calculation.
Sue Gannon. the district's Coordinator for Human
Resource Services, said that encouraging healthy lifestyles
and helping employees and their family members understand
their personal health status and risks is all part of the
program.
."We see the direct correlation between an employee's
health and our insurance premiums. Helping our employees
and their families stay healthy is a win:win for all concerned.,"
Gaunnon said.
According to Gannon, the district will continue to review
and pursue ways to help employees and families become
aware of health conditions, in a confidential fashion, that
place them at risk and offer ways to get healthy.


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4A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, October 26, 2006


Passing the Buck


As President Harry Truman famously
said, the buck stopped with him.
Apparently, in the hands of local
officials, a buck represents a hot potato
best left pitched into others' hands.
Last week, when they voted to ask the
public whether to amend the city's alcohol
ordinance to allow Sunday sales after 1
p.m., Port St. Joe commissioners followed
a troubling trend in local government.
By avoiding, or rather postponing,
simply taking up the question and making
the tough choices, some commissioners
reversed a previously-held position and all
backed away from their sworn duties.
Let's get one thing out of the way early,
unless there is some way, sorting through
the legalese, to word the ordinance
commissioners will presumably pass
at Tuesday's meeting, ensuring that the
question put to voters is absolutelybinding,
the concept of a binding referendum is
semantic goobledy-gook.
Non-binding, binding, ultimately the
question returns to commissioners.
Commissioners could choose to ignore
the issue and never take it up again, twist
it in anyway they wish. For a short time,
in Florida law, they could be bound by the
vote of the voters'should they act, but once
that time frame elapses it is back to where
we are now.
'All commissioners purchased last
week was more time.
The decision to put it to a referendum
is troubling-in other ways.
Unless commissioners wait until
the May municipal election cycle comes
around, this referendum will almost
certainly come after the first of the year and
cost taxpayers the money for Supervisor
of Elections Linda Griffin to hold a special
election.
Safely put the price. tag at $5,000-
$10,000 on that one.
More distressing, though, is that this
is governing for survival. This is the kind
of politics that is so abhorred by so many
in Tallahassee and Washington. governing
.based on opinion poll.
Once again, as we have seen son much
from the county and city alike, votes are
.reversed, and by all appearances done so
because sufficient numbers showed up at


a meeting to protest or applaud.
Put enough people in front of a local
governmental body and it will vote Santa
Claus a scofflaw too easy with gifts for
good little boys and girls.
So it becomes easy, almost addicting,
to avoid the tough decision, particularly in
the face of so many who might oppose that
decision..
We have. seen it with county-wide
voting, a referendum which is instructive
in this little voting exercise government
seems to enjoy putting the
public. through from time
to time after all, this isn't
the first time for Sunday Non-bin
alcohol sales.
With county-wide binding,
voting, the issue was largely ultimate
ignored for a year before,
commissioners flipped- the que
flopped over it for a few
weeks and then dropped it returns
altogether. commis
November marks two'
years nothing has been
done.
And 'in that case the people provided
all the political cover commissioners could
ask. Given the percentages, county-wide
voting was supported by a hundred or so
votes short of 50 percent of all registered
voters.
So the argument to push county-wide,
even when an audience 'full of opponents
sat a few feet from you and said no, was
little more than basic public service.
In the end, however, what has scuttled
county-wide voting binding referendum
or non-binding referendum, it matters
little is this survival instinct which seems
to consume elected officials upon reaching
office.
Public service -takes a back seat the
rumble seat for that'matter to whether or
not a re-election is in the offing two years,
four years hence.
To understand that only consider all,
the items which have not been put before
the voters.
" Voters' say has had scant impact on
the bloated government budgets, spending
sprees and hefty tax bills that come with
them, tax bills the public must pay.


I'


Elected officials don't consult voters
about new vans or whether new parks and
boat..ramps should be higher priorities
than a courthouse, where county business
is conducted, that has a roof akin to a
piece of aged Swiss cheese.
None of that is practical, of course.
We have made our view on the Sunday
sale of alcohol known, that for this page it
is a question of less government above all
else, about removing only one thin layer
of government regulation from businesses
that have enough.
And this isn't about
whether that view becomes
Sing, the majority from the
commission.
This is -about
iy commissioners actually
stepping up to the plate
stion on what is, in the grand,
scheme of things, a
to the change-up, at most, given
sioners. everything in front of
elected officials.
That they are willing to
pass the decision, hard and
anguished as it might be, onto the voters
ignores two other concepts integrity and
responsibility.'
When they put their name on the
ballot, when they took the office of office,
they swore to uphold the laws of Florida
and to "serve."
Public office isn't about two weeknights
a month, not about scratching backs to see
how many scratches are received in return,
not about what can be done to cement re-
election in a few years, not decisions based
on the number of folks who show up at a
particular meeting.
That's why county-wide voting has
gotten nowhere, why Sunday alcohol sales
is now an issue to be dragged out for at least
couple of months survival, maintaining
office, holding onto power rather than the
responsibility bestowed by the public in
the only true vote that is binding.
There is an adage older than Harry
Truman that ,,speaks to something
about fiddling ,while all about burns. All
commissioners accomplished last week
was applying resin to bow.


TRY



I STAR
YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR OVER 68 YEARS
Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Commentary by
TIBOR R. MACHAN
^Freedom News Service






Sam Harris and Altruism
In his recent book, "The End of Faith:
Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason"
(Norton, 2004), Sam Harris advances some of
his thoughtful reasons for doubting the merits
of a religious outlook on the world, especially
with regard to politics. Harris has spawned ,a
'bit of a revolution with this work, putting many
who. insist that religion is essential for a civi-
lized and peaceful life on the defensive.
In a column he penned for The Boston
Globe, Harris goes further and argues, contrary
to widespread opinion, that religion is not only
not a necessary foundation for morality but
actually incompatible. with genuine morality.
That widespread opinion is, of course,' rein-
forced in such classic (but dubiously attribut-
ed) quotations from Fyodor Dostoevsky's "The
Brothers Karamazov," as "If there is no God,
that means everything is permitted/allowed/per-,
missible."
Harris argues, instead, that "The truth
is that the only rational basis for morality is
a concern for the happiness and suffering of
other conscious beings. This emphasis on the
happiness and suffering of others explains why
we don't have moral obligations toward rocks..
It also explains why (generally speaking) people
deserve greater moral, concern than animals,
and why certain animals concern us more
than others. If we show more sensitivity to the
experience of chimpanzees than to the experi- .
ence of crickets, we do so because there is a
relationship between the size and' complexity
of a creature's brain and its experience of the
world."
My concern here isn't with the battle Sam
Harris is carrying on with religion, but with
whether or not, he, is right about morality. Is
"a concern for the happiness and suffering of
other conscious beings" a rational basis for it?
Arguably, Harris is wrong here.
.Perhaps the most explicitly rational ethics
comes to us from the work of Aristotle, in 350
BC, in his book "The Nicomachean Ethics.' In
this work one of the greatest philosophers in
human history argues that the only rational
basis for morality is human nature. Our nature,
which is that of.a rational animal, supports
the idea that our moral, or ethical excellence
amounts to living life by our reason., And the
first purpose or goal of such a rationally lived
life is not "concern for the. happiness and suf-
fering of other conscious beings" but our own
human happiness.
All of the ethical or moral virtues Aristotle
identifies have as their aim, when we practice ,
them conscientiously, to achieve hImnan happi-
ness in the agent's life. It is true, of course, thug
this rational ethics or morality includes 'as a
very important virtue being generous or liberal
toward others. But it also includes being pru-'
dent, courageous, moderate, temperate, hon-
est, and, in politics. Just. The most important
imperative in this most rational of ethics is to
live by right reason or prudence.
If one thinks for a moment, it would turn
out to be very odd indeed to urge human beings
to concern themselves primarily with others. ,
Why on earth would others be more deserving
of concern than one's self? Not only does'.one
know one's owlA situation better than the situa-
tion of others so that one can act most respon-
sibly about one's self. Not only does a ,concern
for others as a primary responsibility tend to
encourage meddlesomeness and.intrusiveness
other than in emergencies. But most impor-
tantly,,one Is, after all, a human being whose life
is every bit as worthwhile as the life of another.
So why then focus mainly on the lives of others,.
unless one has made a promise to take up that
task as parents do?
In the modern age many moral philoso-
phers have promoted altruism, but that is
because they believed thatcaring for one's self
came naturally, automatically. So it would be
redundant to have a moral: system that also.
directs us to do this. Once the instinct or drive
for self-preservation was accepted as innate,-
then it made sense to focus ethics or morality
on interpersonal matters. Such was the think-
ing since the time of Thomas Hobbes, for exam-
ple in the ethics of Immanuel Kant, Auguste
Comte and Karl Marx, among others.,
If; however, we aren't hardwired to care for
Ourselves; if there is no selfish instinct in us
and judging by the colossal mess throughout
the world and history, it is a dubious idea that
we all naturally take good care of ourselves
then we must be prudent first, take good
care' of ourselves. Nor can we be any good to
others if we do not do so.
Harris is mistaken to think that our first
ethical responsibility is others and this quip
From W.H. Auden makes pretty clear why the
idea is not at all rational: "We are here on earth
to do good for others. What the others are here
for, I doffn't know." .

Tibor Machan is the R.C.. Hoiles Professor
of Business Ethics & Free Enterprise at
Chapman University's Argyros School of
B&E and is a research fellow at the Pacific.
Research Institute (San Francisco) and the
Hoover Institution (Stanford University). He
advises Freedom Communications, parent
company of this newspaper. His most recent
book is "Libertarianismr Defended," (Ashgate.
2006) E-mail him at TMachan@link.freedom.
corn


Mr. Red's Accident Was an Accident!


It was cold'. Unusual] cold for October. We
were hunkered down in the back .of Mr. John
Charles Sasser's old pick up. Joe acted like'he
had permission to be "out with the truck" and
no one questioned him on it. We had a "don't
ask, don't tell" policy way back as far as I could
remember. ..
If we weren't sure our parents would "go
along" with some hair-brain scheme Yogi or Ricky*
Lynn were always coming up with-we just acted
like everything was normal..until we heard the
siren or somebody's daddy had their belt off and
was closing in on us.
I believe Joe minuht have been sixteen. But
,as I look back with a- more honest eye he could'
have been fifteen. And if that was the Halloween
Millicent Blackburn came up from Memphis to
spend with her grandmother-Joe was fourteen!
S dp know for sure he Was easing through
downtown with all of us "hidmi" Ui the bed of that
old Ford. We must a'had fifty pumpkins in there'
with us. We got most of them from Archie Moore's
field. 'Course, come to think or it, I'd,borrowed
a few from Daddy. And Mr. John Charles had a
whole bottom lot full of them things!
They Weren't much good for nothing.
Pumpkin pie was way too bland and mushy for
me. Mother would cut the top off of a big one
each year, de-gut that thing, cut some; eye holes
and a mouth, stick a candle in the soggy bot-
tom and proudly display it on the porch as'the
trick or treafers would come'by. I can still see
'that orange mucus with the little seeds floating
around draining down our sink. It was enough to
make a body puke! .
We had become way too big to be trick or
treat'en. And the "haunted house" up at the vol-
unteer fire hall wasn't quite as haunted as it used
to be. We had put in ten good years at. the high
school Halloween Carnival. We had out grown
fishing booths, bobbing. for ghouls and cake
w alks. :
Yogi balanced a "big one" up on the top of the
tail gate. We planned to drop it in the middle of
the intersection under -the only red light in town.
The idea was to smash that thing, dead center
of the road and ease over to the other side of
the square and see how many,- THE PUMPKIN
DIDN'T' BURSTI It bounced up about a foot in.


:THE"'STAR
USPHS 518-880
Published Every Thursday ai 135 West Highway 98
Port St Joe, Florida 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
General Manager: Krichelle McGhee
News Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: Kevin Burke
Creative Design Manager: Kathleen Smith


Florida Press
Association


HUNKER DOWU


SWITH KES-

Kesley Colbert
Contributing Writer


the air and started rolling down E. Cedar Avenue
toward Highway 79.
You've got to be kidding me! Joe stopped
dead still and we watched min silent awe as that
pumpkin gathered speed. We had all raised up to
.get a better look when Mr. Red Melton pulled his
big Buick out of the American Legion parking lot
right in front.of the on coming missile.
Ruth Ann or LaRenda gasped. I thought "if
Mr. Red wrecks that car, ,Daddy will kill me".
Millicent jumped out of the truck'and lit a shuck
for her grandmother's'. Buddy yelled, "We don't
need to be here."
Joe hit, the gas and we leaped past Dr.,
Holmes office. We heard the screech of brakes
'and the .pumpkin smash..but, as Yogi decried
later, when we "were letting the dust settle" in the
darkness behind the Gulf Station, "I'd give a ten
dollar bill to have seen Mr. Red's face."
We listened for sirens or any extra ordinary
,commotion. As the stillness engulfed us we pon-
dered our situation. It was Halloween night. We
were all together. Except for Millicent. It was still
early. And we had forty-niine pumpkins in the
back of this truck.
"Forrest. Hill." Ricky Lynri had a mind like
you wouldn't believe : ',
Joe wheeled us to the top and turned the
lights off. Buddy ran half way down the hill so
he could,,see back up Main Street toward town.
When a car turned the corner arid headed down
Main, Buddy signaled and we let a couple of
pumpkins loosely Forrest Hill wasn't all that high
but those pumpkins built up a fair head of steam
as they bowled down the hill. The first two cars


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we were way behind. The pumpkins smashed
harmlessly into the curb. We needed to adjust
our tactics. We let a wave of the orange,projectiles
go in three second intervals at the next vehicle. It
was like shooting ducks in a barrel. We couldn't
miss! It looked like the whole hillside was moving
as a stampede of pumpkins rolled and bounced
toward Maiii Street
"People," we were already moving toward the
back of the truck as Pam Collins spoke up, "we
might have over done this one!"
Joe had, us all the way out by the Chadwick
'Oil Company when the bombs hit. We could only
laugh and talk about what might have happened
back on North Main. We had pulled in behind
Chadwick's to listen for the siren. "Isn't this so
much better than putting onr those masks and
walking all over town just to get a few pieces of
candy?" Buddy reminded Mary E. that he thought
she looked better with the mask on...-,
We were laughing at that when Ricky Lynn
said, "How about the overpass?"
I wasffn't sure about the overpass. We hit a
car from way up there, we might could really
do some damage. But, as Jane Hill pointed out,
"We've got lots of pumpkins left."
The plan, of course, was to.drop the ptump-
kin well in front of the car. Just sorta "ghost'em"
a little. We hit the second vehicle right square in
the hood! It was, as Suzie Cozart said later, "'The
worst case of pumpkin throwing she had ever'
seen!" '
Mrs. Callie Heishaw's '56 Chevrolet took the
hit. I can still see the orange mucus with the zil-
lion little seeds settling over the hood, windshield
and top of that car. I didn't have time to pukel
The siren wailed at about the same time the red
light came on.
Joe put that old Ford into overdrive. We were
throwing out pumpkins on every side to lighten
,the load and get rid of the evidence. I think
we tossed Ruth Ann out in front of the Shiloh
church. When we sped under the lights at the
railroad crossing I got a good look at everyone's
fate...didn't any of us need a mask..
Respectfully,'
Kes


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$23.00 YEAR $15.00 SIX MONTHS
OUT OF COUNTY
$33.00 YEAR -- $20.00 SIX MONTHS
TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions'in advertisements the
publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage
further than amount received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed
word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely
asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces.
The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.
i-&


.
__.'/


National Newspaper
Association


~C






CSTUE ei 17/ i1O7 i 7rvInu C;-If roi-nv and- suru n a fo 8


~*~?9,


Stop Parole of Killer

Dear Editor:
Our community has
an opportunity to be heard
in a very important matter
involving a vicious killer.
Jimmy Lee Smith
committed one of the most
brutal double homicides in
the history of our circuit. He
murdered a young mother
and her daughter, viciously
mutilating the little body of
the girl. Two very young
siblings were left in Smith's
vehicle while these horrible
acts were committed. He then
dropped the children at their
home knowing that there was
no one to care for them.
The surviving family
members have been
continually traumatized since
the conviction of Smith. His
death sentence, ordered after
a trial during which Smith
personally addressed, the
jury and asked for death, was
overturned and the retrial--
15 years after the conviction-
-was conducted in Tampa.
Family members were forced
to travel that long distance to'
attend the trial and attempt
to see justice done.
In 1992, Smith
escaped while awaiting
trial. Fortunately, he was
recaptured and charged.
His violent history speaks
volumes.
This inmate was
sentenced to life. Under
today's laws, Smith would
be ineligible for release.
.By any standard, Smith's
release should not be a valid
consideration. I strongly
believe that Smith would
pose a real and serious threat
if released.
Smith is set for hearing
.before the Florida Parole
Commission on November 1,
2006. Iurge all of our citizens
to join With me to contact
7 the conunission and let our
voices be heard. Comments


Letters



to the Editor


may be addressed to:
The Honorable Monica
David
Commission Chair,
Florida Parole Commission
2601 Blair Stone Road,
Building C
Tallahassee, FL 32399-
2450

Sincerely,
Steve Meadows
State Attorney

Support Gator Grapplers

Dear Editor,
I am writing this letter
to ask for your support for
the Wewahitchka High School
Wrestling team. I am not a
parent or a coach, but over
the past year I have seen
such positive impacts from
the wrestling program started
last year at Wewahitchka High
School that I am now a firm
supporter of the sport. I have
been teaching sixth grade
in Wewahitchka for seven
years and last year, through
wrestling, I saw my students
changed. The sportsmanship
in wrestling is like nothing
I've witnessed in any other
sport. It took a student I
remember for his capacity
to bully anyone' smaller than
himself and taught him to
stand up for those who cannot
defend themselves. It took a
student I remember for his
ability to find someone else
to blame when things went
wrong and taught him to take
responsibility for his actions.
Most of all, this program
helped a student I don't
remember much. It took a
young man who liked being
average, who did everything
he could to avoid notice, and
' gave him the confidence to be
a leader. .
This year, however, the
program's influence is-'being
threatened. The mat that
the, school has been using
is more than 20 years old


and in poor condition. Deep
groves that trap bacteria and
a two-foot rip have turned it
into a safety hazard for the
wrestlers. A new mat will cost
$8,500.00 and since most
schools are already under-
funded, there is no chance of
help from the school district.
The team is expected to
double in size from last year
so there is already a lack of
funds for extra uniforms and
equipment. With the season
scheduled to begin in four
weeks, we are running out
of time.
We are asking for your
help through any donation
you are able to make, but we
would like you to consider
joining the wrestling booster
club. The club is new and
designed to support Gator
Wrestling at the high school
and club level. Contributions
that you make will be used
to purchase 'equipment and
uniforms and to help students
with any extra costs involved
with wrestling. If you are
willing to join, we can offer
you a club member t-shirt
and membership card that
will grant you free admission
to all home wrestling meets,
recognition in ,a home meet
program, and reserved
parking for home meets.
We are asking members to
contribute $100.00. If you
have any questions about this
or if you are interested in,
joining, please contact me by
phone (850) 639-5356 or e-
mail ctotman(@)gulf.k12.fl.us.
Please consider the worth
of this sport and its impact
on our youth. If you find
yourself unable to contribute,
please at least come to a home
meet this. year and witness
the program in action. To
see young men compete so
fiercely then have the grace
to help each other up and
walk away' as friends is
truly amazing. Whatever you
decide, thank you so much


r .


for taking the time to read
this. and for all that you do
for the youth of our county.

Sincerely,
Cameron Totman
Wewahitchka Middle
School Teacher
Wrestling Booster

Amendment 8:
A Necessary Safeguard

When Florida property
owners head to the polls on
November 7, they will not
only have the opportunity
to cast votes on our State's
elected leadership but also
to vote on Amendment 8 a
measure designed to protect
private property rights.
Earlier this year, the Florida
Legislature wisely took action
following the U.S. Supreme
Court's controversial. 5-
4 split decision in the Kelo
v. New London eminent
domain case. In Kelo, the
Court ruled the City of New
London, Connecticut could
lawfully use its power of
eminent domain to seize the
homes of Susette Kelo and
several neighbors not. for a
specific public "use" such as
a road or school as provided
in our Constitution's Fifth
Amendment, but for the
public "purpose" of economic
development. In response to
the Kelo decision, lawmakers
forged a two-track legislative
solution designed to reverse
Kelo in Florida and effectively
end this form of eminent
domain abuse in our state.
First, the Legislature enacted
strong and meaningful
changes in the state statutes
governing the use of eminent
domain to provide immediate
protections for Florida
property owners., These
statutory reforms were signed
into law by Governor Jeb
Bush in May and prohibit,
the taking of property under
the guise of blight or slum
eradication and prevent
government from selling or
transferring properties taken
through eminent domain for
a period of ten years. These
protections are now the law,
of the land in Florida and Are
considered the strongest post-
Kelo reforms in the nation..
However. legislative leadersI
also saw' a need to create


School Board contact info


Charlotte Pierce,
District 5
can be reached at
227-1475


District 5


Linda Wood,
District 3
can be reached at
229-,8414


VA Urges Veterans to Wear




Medals as Show of Patriotic Pride


General George
Washington had it right
when he turned over -the
victorious Continental,
Army and said: "This new
nation owes these men who
procured our freedom a debt
of gratitude."
Ourjobatthe Department
of Veterans Affairs (VA) is to
fulfill that debt of gratitude
.,and we do, it well. But,'
there is even more we can'
do as Americans, and that,
is to honor and thank our


veterans and encourage
them to be openly proud of
their service, sacrifice and
accomplishment.
In that spirit of
gratefulness, VA has
launched its Veterans Pride
initiative where we are
asking American veterans to
proudly wear their military
-medals and decorations on
Veterans Day, November 11,
2006:
We hope they will. also
wear them on Memorial Day


and the Fourth of July, and
that it will become a tradition
in America.
Our goal is to inspire
the American people to
recognize and : honor the
military serviceof their fellow
citizens, .and to engender a
greater sense of pride and
satisfaction on the 'part of
the veterans-for what they
did for outr country.
We are urging all
veterans to pin on their
military medals and ribbons.


Question

S. Given recent articles about staph and bacterial infec-
-i OnUline tions, are you taking more precautions?
Opinion
"Pole Regults -
Yes, hand-washing is a requirement.
APIFn75%/

No, mybody Is tinmuine.
... "' 25%
Visit The Star's website to 25%
weigh in on next week's Don't care, I'm a carrier
question: www.starfl.com 0%


STo Voic

Write To:
P.O. Box 308
Port St Joe, FL 32457
Fax To:
(850) 227-7212
Email To:
tcroft@start.col


e An Opinion


Comments from our readers in the form of letters
to the editor or a guest column are solicited and
encouraged. A newspaper's editorial page should
be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are
exchanged. All letters and guest columns must
be signed and should include the address and
phone number of the author.' The street address
and phone number are for verification and will
riot be published. Letters must be in good taste
and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for
correctness and style.


on Veterans Day, especially
when participating in
festivities and parades, but
also in just going about their
regular activities of that
day.
'The Veterans Pride
initiative. hines a bright
light on millions of our fellow
citizens who. answered the
needs of our nation both
in peace and in war. Each
veteran's, medals tell a story.
about their service, Thib
initiative will also help
stimulate interest in our
veterans' service and sacrifice
on the part of their families,
neighbors, colleagues and
fellow community citizens.
We ,,hope to bring our
veterans' stories home to
all Americans this Veterans
Day.
The Department of
Veterans Affairs "Veterans
Pride" campaign Web
site, http://www.va.gov/
veteranspride/, describes
the program and offers
important information
and guidance about how
veterans* can be informed
of the medals they received
and how they can obtain
medals earned during their
military service.
To America's veterans I
say, wear your medals over
your heart with pride this
Veterans Day and let your
fellow citizens know that you
served.


linaB Wood
District 3


Billy Quinn, Jr.,
District 4


Billy Quinn Jr
district 4 .
can be, reached at .
227-9801











S..; George Cox,
District
cahbe reached at
S 6392496


George Cox
District 2
, .


Danny Little
District .1


Danny Little,,
District I
can be reached at
639-5619



School Board- members
can also be contacted
via mail at. 150 Middle
Sc.h'ot Road, Port St,.
Joe, FL 32456.


a second long-term layer of
protection. They understood
without any safeguard in
our State Constitution, at
any time a future Legislature'
might meet, Florida land
owners could lose the hard-
won property rights recently
restored. The Legislature
proposed Amendment 8 -
which will require a three-
fifths supermajority vote of
both houses of the Florida
Legislature to make changes
to the legislation governing
the transfer of properties
taken through eminent
domain. Any Floridian
who believes in the sanctity of
private property ownership
and that government's power
of eminent domain should
be limited to true public
uses should strongly support
Amendment 8. Amendment
8 will provide a necessary and
long-term safeguard against
eminent domain abuse in
our State and prevent future
legislatures from easily
amending or revoking the
powerful limitations placed
on government's eminent
domain power earlier this
year.
Cordially submitted by:

Carol Saviak
Executive Director


Coalition -for Property
Rights
2878 S. Orlando Avenue
Orlando, FL 32806
407-481-2289 Office
telephone
321-231-6085 cell phone
savlak(@proprights.com

The Coaliti6nforProperty
Rights is a property rights
education and advocacy
organization based in
Orlando, Florida. CPR's
mission is to educate the
public and elected officials
regarding the importance
of property rights and to
defend these rights from
further erosion.

Additional note: CPR
was a leading proponent
of the eminent domain
reforms this past session
and specifically advocated
for a Constitutional
amendment. In Fall 2005,
CPR commissioned a
statewide survey by, the
nationally-respected Mason
Dixon polling and research
firm which showed 63% of
Floridians would support a
Constitutional Amendment
which provide increased
protections against eminent
domain abuse.


2Vet CzLt


I'


" '


TheSta, ortSt Jo, L -ThrsdyOctbe 26 206 S


Establishedl 1937 Servina Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


I


~wM-w~Ntmt











Project Graduation Accepting Donations, Early Fines


Now in its 21st year in Port
St. Joe, Project Graduation
is asking for donations and
volunteers for the Port St. Joe
High School Class of 2007,
and preparing for a favorite
town event.
One ofProject Graduation's
more popular fundraisers, Jail
for Bail, will be held this year
on Tuesday, October 31, from
3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. E.T.
For those who are
"arrested," a $100 minimum
fine must be paid before a
"release" can be made. Those
receiving arrest warrants may
pay the "fine" prior to 5 p.m.
Thursday, October 30, or
make phone calls October 31
from the designated jail to
arrange for release.


One of Project Graduation's
more popular fundraisers, Jail
for Bail, will be held this year on
Tuesday, October 31, from
3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. E.T.


To avoid jail time, make
checks payable to Project
Graduation and mail to:
Project Graduation
2007, C/O Decorative Flooring,
305 Third Street, Port St. Joe,
FL 32456; or
Project Graduation
2007, C/O Cape San Blas
Realty, Inc., 4320 Cape San
Blas Road, Port St. Joe, FL


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32456.
To arrange pickup of a
check (instead ofmailingit), call
(850) 229-7720. All donations
to Project Graduation are tax
deductible.
Project Graduation is an
all-night, lock-in celebration
for graduates promoting a
safe, drug and alcohol-free
environment.
Supervised by parents, all
graduating seniors enjoy food,
music and games, with each
senior receiving at least one
door prize.
Through the support of
the local business community
and other individuals, door
prizes include educational
scholarships for specific
institutions, phone cards,
microwave ovens and
computers.
In addition to cash
donations, people and
businesses may also contribute
door prizes, food, or their time
as volunteers by contacting
Ronald Pickett, co-chairman,
Project Graduation, (850)
227-2160.


Early Voting

* Employee badge or with th
identification; require
* Buyer's club Vo
identification; to cast
* Debit or credit card, ballot.
' Military identification; A
* Student identification; imninme
* Retirement center legal
identification; an ab'
Neighborhood assocr nation Super\
identification; request
' Public assistance by nmai
identification. A
If photo identification does ballot I
not have a voter's signature. must t
additional identification p.m. E


- From Page 1A


the voter's signature is
ed.
ters have a third way
t their vote, by absentee

voter, member of their
liate family or their
guardian may request
sentee ballot from the
visor or Elections. The
t can be made in person.
l or by telephone.
request for an absentee
to be mailed to the voter
be made no later than 5
T on Nov. 1


A designee may pick up an
absentee ballot for a voter up
to four days prior to Election ,
Day. Designees must have
written authorization from the
voter, present a picture ID and
sign an affidavit.
Absentee ballots must be ,
returned to the office of the
Supervisor of Elections by 7
p.m. ET on Election Day. They
can not be turned in at a
precinct or polling place.
For more information '
contact Griffin's office at 229-
6117. "-


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6A he ta, PrtSt.Jo, F -Thursday, October 26, 2006







EstaDIisned i/ I '.erviy uui? uui uiiu J>^iin ..r ... l.u. .-. --I / --.5-


County Commissioners Refuse


Countywide Voting Issue Again


By Marie logan
Star Staff iVriter

The issue of county-
wide voting rea-ed its head
at the county commission
meeting Tuesday night,
when a citizen asked the
board to place the topic on
a referendum,
Using the recent assign-
ment. of Suiday alcohol
sales to a cty-wide refer-
endum by tie city of Port
St. Joe, the nan asked the
county commissioners to
hold a bindtig referendum
on county-vide voting at
the same tine.
"Will yau listen to the
will of the otherss and make
and pass a referendum
for countywide voting," he
asked the oard.
His request came after
66.93. percent of voters
favored return to county-
wide voting in a November,
2004 referendum.
County commissioner
Nathan Peters responded
that it would be impos-
sible tc do so, and asked
Gulf Cunty attorney Tim
McFarlnd to explain why.
Mcrarland said that
even i there were a refer-
endun, the issue of moving
from single ,member dis-
trict oting to county wide
was required to go before a
fedeni district judge, who
mad, the ultimate decision,
evenif 100 percent of vot-
ers approved the move.
.'he three-minute time
lim; for people address-
ing the board sounded
an( commission chairman
Camen McLemore imme-
ditely told the man his
tine was up. Upon the
mnn's request, however,
tle board agreed to allow
hbn to ask a question of
I~cFarland.
/ The man then asked


McFarland if the board could
suspend Robert's Rules of
Order, by which the com-
mission conducts its meet-
ings, and allow commis-
sioners Bill Williams and
Jerry Barnes to address
the issue of county-wide
voting.
Both Williams and
Barnes admitted being
unable to readdress the
topic at commission meet-
ings because previously
they both voted "yes" on a
motion to hold a referen-
dum on county-wide voting
and were defeated by a vote.
of 3-2.
Williams then offered a
motion to suspend Robert's
Rules of Order so he could
readdress the topic of coun-
ty-wide voting, although he
said he recognized that in
doing so he was "opening
a Pandora's box for the
future."
Barnes seconded
Williams's motion.
Commissioner Billy
Traylor agreed that
Williams was "opening a
Pandora's box" and it would
be a "drastic mistake," and
Williams and Barnes were
defeated 3-2, Taylor, Peters
and McLemore voting "no."
However, in the
October 31, 2005 commis-
sion meeting, the commis-
sioners voted 4-1 (Peters
dissenting) to suspend
Robert's Rules of Order to
allow Williams to reintro-
duce a motion in favor of
county-wide voting..
The board had previ-
ously voted 3-2 to retain
single-member districts.
In the 2005 meeting,
McLemore made a motion
to proceed with county-
wide voting, which passed
4-1, with Peters again dis-
senting.
Following that vote,


Traylor and McLemore both
stated they would resign
from office if the board
reversed course again and
voted not to go forward
with county-wide voting.
This summer, during
budget hearing for the 2006-
07 fiscal year, the board
removed the money previ-
ously set aside for legal fees
needed to overturn single
member districts in federal
district court.
In other business:
There will be a meet-
ingbetween county commis-
sioners and the Gulf County
Tourist Development
Center (TDC) on "a critical
issue," as Butler stated it,
on Monday October 30 at 4
p.m. E.T.
During the commission
meeting the topic of people
camping on county beach-
es was raised by a citizen
who had called police on
two recent weekends when
people pitched tents on the
beach and dug latrines.
McLemore said the
board needed to workshop
the issue and asked that it
be added to the TDC meet-
ing agenda for October 30.
Gulf County adminis-
,trator Don Butler request-
ed that the board invite
state Senator Lawson and
whomever the new state
representative will be after
the November 7 election
to meet in Gulf County
with representatives from
all county groups involved
in economic development
of the area to talk about
"several issues." The board
agreed.
The board also agreed
unanimously to accept
the only bid received for
catastrophic inmate care
for pregnant inmates and
inmates.with AIDS/HIV
The county is mandat-


ed by a state legislative stat-
ute to provide such medical
care to its county inmate
population.
The single bid received
has an $18,505 yearly
premium with a $10,000
deductible.
A ceremony celebrat-
ing the official re-opening
of Dead Lakes Park north
of Wewahitchka will be held
at 10 a.m. Central Time
Saturday, October 28, at
the Dead Lakes Park.


The board heard
requests from three groups
for funding and granted
amounts of $500 to the
Wewahitchka Volunteer
Fire Department, $1,000 to
the Port St. Joe Boy Scout
troop, and $1,000 to the
Wewahitchka High School
wrestling team.
Peters asked
McFarland if the county
needed to post warning
signs along the ditch on the
west side of the courthouse


because there is at least
one alligator in the ditch.
McFarland agreed
that posting signs would
be wise, and suggested
Butler's office also call the
appropriate state agency
that handles nuisance alli-
gator calls.

Star staff writer
Despina Williams also con-
tributed to this story.


rg .


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Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Local: 850.227.2160
Toll-free: 866.242.7291
Fax:^850.229.8783
:Visit
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St. Joe Beach Gulf View 7660 Hwy. 98
Unobstructed GulfView, lot size 50 x. 140.
MLS #201604. $695,000. Call Ronald Pickett at 850-227-2160.


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Realty, Inc


Overstreet -Wetappo Creek -9959 Hwy. 386
Lot size approx. 2.6 acres w/120 ff on water.
MLS #200843. $450,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949.
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144 Betty Dr.- irregular lot size MLS # 109390
-$119,000
125 14th Street 112 x 120 MLS #200356 -
$239,000
1310 Monument Ave.- 120 x 105 MLS # 20035!
$259,000
171 Village Dr. Marina Cove Commercial, 40 x 98
MLS # 105310 $389,000
C-30
Shallow Reed Subdivision we have released 6
Village lots for $279,000 each
5454 Sandbar Dr.-Treasure Bay SD, .59 acre MLS
# 106513 $307,000
5312 Sandbar Dr. Treasure Bay SD 103 x 200
MLS #105578 $389,000
Cape San Bias
-- 122 Rosemary Ct. Jubilation SD, .20 acre MLS


Port St. Joe 608 17th Street
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2,424sf, lot size 95 x 126
MLS #106985. $365,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949


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2 bedroom, 2 bath, loft, 2,876sf, 1.9 acres.
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md LAND


#109793 -$319,000
120 Seagrass Cr.- Seagrass SD, 128 x 107 MLS #
108472 $649,000
St. Joe Beach
303 Nautilus Dr. Sea Shores SD, 80 x 140 MLS #
110234 $270,000
801 I Americus Ave. Edgewater SD, 92 x 124
MLS #201308 $432,000
7660 Hwy.98- GulfView,50 x 140 MLS # 201604
$695,000

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948 South Long St.- Pine Breeze SD, 108 x 300
MLS # 111065 $75,000
9959 Hwy. 386 -Wetappo Creek, 2.6 acres, 120ft
water MLS # 200843 $450,000
121 Little River Cr. Seven Springs SD, .50 acre
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UK I Tk Vlnr P 01 St IcI LF[ ursdyO o 6 6b dS n f t uso y


Healing -

health, Alison's parents
returned to Alabama.
Surprise Attack
Maelynn had just turned
two weeks old the night
Alison began feeling a strange
sensation.
Reclining in her bedroom
after putting her children to
bed, Alison felt heaviness in
her chest, accompanied by
pains that shot half way down
both arms.
Back pain, anxiety and
tightness in her neck and jaw
followed.
Seeing his wife's distress,
Dewayne asked Alison if he
should call for help.
Alison believed her spinal
headache was recurring and
asked him to hold off.
Whenherbreathshortened
and pain spread from her
arms into her fingertips,
Alison told Dewayne to call


the ambulance.
Though her follow-up
with the doctor was a week
later, Alison knew she needed
immediate attention.
When the ambulance
arrived, Alison asked to be
taken to Gulf Coast Medical
Center, where she'd delivered
all her babies.
Once at Gulf Coast, Alison
sat in the emergency room for
hours.
A physician's assistant
told Alison her blood pressure
was up, but not to worry.
"The PA almost sent me
home with ibuprofen for chest
pains. He was pretty convinced
I didn't have a heart attack,"
said Alison.
Thankfully, a young
doctor intervened and sent
Alison downstairs for further
tests.
When the tests were


' From Page IA

concluded, the doctor visited
Alison, his eyes wide with
wonderment.
"He said, 'I just came
to tell you that you had not
one but two heart attacks,'"
recalled Alison.
The tests found that her
first heart attack had
occurred sometime in
the recent past.
Alison suspected
the heart attack
happened in the
kitchen the previous
week, when she
misdiagnosed her chest
pains as heartburn.
The second heart
attack happened that
night.
The doctor told
Alison that women are
less likely to feel heart
attack symptoms |
than men, and her
experience was
common. '
The fact that she
survived was another
story.
A Medical Miracle
Following her Al
diagnosis, Alison was photog
transferred to Bay bypas:
Medical Center, where Tristar
she endured multiple row: d
heart catheterizations; had a
D o actor s later,
discovered that her
heart attacks were the result
of a spontaneous dissection
of the left coronary artery, a
rare and often fatal condition
that occurs predominately in
young to middle aged women
who are otherwise healthy.
A fourth of the reported
cases occur in women during
childbirth or approximately
six weeks thereafter.
The survival rate is 30
percent, with 70 percent of
diagnoses made postmortem.
"It usually occurs in
women, but most women do
not survive this. They find
out on an autopsy table what
happened to them," said


Alison.
"They said it was a miracle
that I'd survived it."
During a final heart
catheterization on the seventh
day, doctors found a 60
percent blockage.
Though they'd initially
contemplated a transfer to
Birmingham, the doctors
knew they must act quickly.
At age 32, Alison


lison Butler (right) poses for a
;raph following her first double
s surgery. Back row (I to r): dc
i, husband Dewayne and son Justin
daughters Briannq and Maelynn.
second, single bypass surgery nine
n November 2005.

underwent double coronary
artery bypass surgery.
Biannual Bypass.
Aided by her loving
family, Alison spent the next
two months recovering at her
Port St. Joe home.
Not able to hold her
children in her lap, Alison sent
them to stay with her sister
and mother in Eastpoint.
She was heartbroken
i by the separation, which
was made endurable by, the
support of her husband,
Dewayne, who took a leave of
absence from Progress Energy


to be by her side.
Recovery was slow.
The surgery had weakened
Alison, making routine tasks
difficult.
To relieveAlison's lingering
chest pains, her doctor
prescribed nitroglycerin pills,
which gave her an "odd"
feeling.
Alison began taking the
pills frequently when the
task of walking Justin
J to his class in the
morning became more
and more difficult.
V When she
underwent a stress
test and heart
a catheterization in
November 2005, the
doctor discovered one
of her bypasses had
failed.
In her first-ever
Hk plane ride, Alison
was transported to
S the University of
Alabama Hospital in
Birmingham.
Seated near
, a window, Alison
called the plane ride
"awesome."
She used other
words to describe her
family second heart surgery.
heart "Good Days and Bad
daughter Days"
i. Front Doctors told
Alison Alison it generally
months takes a year to recover
from heart surgery.
Enduring a single
bypass only nine months after
her first heart surgery, Alison
began the healing process
anew.
"I was starting to heal
from the first one, then I had
to be pulled apart again and
had to start over with the
healing process," she said.
Eleven months have
passed since her last surgery
and Alison still feels tired and
unmotivated.
"Yesterday it was. all jI
could do to put one foot in'
front of another," Alison said
last Friday. "I'm so zapped.


Residents of Gulf County,
Did you know for minor illness or injury...


You can see a doctor

without an appointment!


Walk-in patients

are welcome!

Evening and weekend hours are now available at
St. Joseph Care of Florida located at the
Gulf County Health Department
2475 Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe

New hours are:
Monday-Friday, 7:30 .am. 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Pediatrician also available for appointments.

Discount rates available based on income.
We look forward to serving you and your family.
For more information, call (850) 227-1276, ext. 100

This adi ertilement brought to ou as a public service of
St. Joseph Care of FL, Inc/Gulf County Health Department


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-" '


I can't e'Ten make myself get
up early.'
In tUe past, Alison spent
time fussing with her hair
and malkup. Now makeup
free, she calls herself a "plain
Jane."
. She nourns the loss of
her former active self "I'm
nothing likt I used to be," and
worries about her house not
being clean,
Alison't doctor has
stressed tie importance of
home exercise, but a treadmill
and stationay bike remain
largely unused.
The denands of caring
for four smdl children and
attending to ier duties as a
wife leave little time for such
pursuits.
With hei two oldest
children exitng school at
different times Brianna
attends Pre-K until 11 a.m.
while Justin, a lindergartener,
stays until 2:3Cp.m. Alison
performs a daily: juggling act.
She gets allfour children
ready before 8 a.n., drops two
off, returns hone', goes back
with two in toiA to retrieve
Brianna, waits z few hours.
and returns to school, three.
in tow, to retrieve Justin.
After Alison's first heart
bypass, Progres Energy
automated its meer reading
system, thus eliminating
Dewayne's position He now
works as a lineman a)prentice,
a job that pays less..
With. the family's single
income reduced anc medical
bills still to pay, thA Butlers
cannot afford the exra $40-
45 dollars a week t extend
Brianna's Pre-K hour4to 2:30,
p.m.
Alison would like o place
her two youngest daugter in
the Head Start program until
2:30 p.m. each day, andhopes
to get some help in extending
Brianna's Pre-K hours.
Though she know? she
must make her heah a
priority. Alison feels guilty.
about leaving her children in
others' hands.
"I have some guilt for.
trying to do this because ifoel
like I should be the one )ho
takes care of them. I'm t[ir
mother." she saLid. 1
But. Alison finds -he
alternative even mc-e
frightening. .
"If I don't exercise, I'm-nt
going to be around for then'
she said.
Hardship has diminished
Alison's pride, and she; i,
grateful to her family anc
friends for their help in seeing
her through difficult times'.
Alison's faith in God
strengthened her through, her
two surgeries, and strengthens
her now as she continues the
recovery process.
"It's been a rough, rough
year. I still have my good days
arid I have my bad days,".said
Alison.
"I have to keep my faith
and He'll get me through it
one day at a time."


-f -Oyu. .W- I


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Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrouncfng areas for 68 years


BA1 The Star otS.JeF hrdy Otbr2,20







L-whtIfVh 0 -V 1 7 SOIsvi G forr--If c-I arr -o - a i I--S,


New Class Inducted into PSJ Athletic Hall of Fame


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor

One of the school's greatest basketball stars, the coach of the first 11-man state
football championship squad and the legend for whom "The Dome" was named were
inducted last Friday night into the Port St. Joe High School Athletic Hall of Fame.
The three constitute the second class into the Hall of Fame, following the induction
last year of Vernon Eppinette, who coached the Sharks to state titles in boys basketball
and cross country and track.

-'? -. R. Marion Craig
R Marion Craij was a Clemson nrdduate
who played football for Fr::iik Howard and
came to Port St. Joe in 1947.
He coached until 1962. was elected
~ .'' s Superintendent of Schools in 1964,
S' '''. erivuie until 1972 when he retuirnd to the
y classroom and taught until his retirenient
in 1986.
S, During his earl\ 'ears at Port St. Joe.
he coa lied lootbaU. basketball and baseball
without an assistant and was the head coach
of the team which inaugurated Shark Field
-in 1955.
He also coached girls' basketball for a
S '" tinie.
kWllle superintendent, new hlgh schools
were built in Wewahitchka and Port St.
Joe and Craig. w\ho passed away in 1992.
always stated that his goal was to leave the
school system in better shape than when he
arrived.'
S'" His name is inemorialized in the R.
S. Marion Craig Coliseum at Port St. Joe High
*' ''School. better known to area basketball fans,
S- '. as "The Dome."
"I,,,- o-. day. las--c, -a. t.- Dec. --9 -.,'












NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
BID NO. 0607-03
The Gulf County Tourist Development Council will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing
the development of the following:
Gulf County 40-Page Visitor Guide (16 pages of ads) to include:
Project Coordination
Creative Services -. :
Production Services/Direction
Cover Design and/or photography
SSpecifications:
Size: Folded 11" x 7" approx. with envelope to fit
Colors: 4 Color Process + one PMS + spot varnish, envelope 2/c, prints front side and flap
Stock: 100# text, number one dull coated sheet, envelope is parchment
Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is 16 SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Proposals
must contain a detailed production timeline and cost estimates for each category specified and must be turned in to the Gulf
County Clerk's Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 5:00 p.m., E.T., on Friday,
November 10, 2006. Bids will be opened at this location on Monday, November 13, 2006 at 10:00 a.m., E.T.
Publish: October 26 and November 2, 2006 Ad #2006-118



rOf Blojtsstolon

WES H AVE BEEN ,IN.BUSI NE.SSINCE199



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850-674-3307 (800) 419-1801
CONTACT US ONLINE! HopkinsBTown@hotmail.com
20331 CENTRAL AVE. WEST (Hwy. 20, BLOUNTSTOWN, FL


Wayne Taylor
Taylor grew up in Port St. Joe and played football under
Coach Marion Craig.
Taylor graduated high school in 1958 and played football
S,.:f for the Univer-iyN of Georgia Bulldogs, playing in the 1959
Orange Bowl against Missouri.
Taylor's first coaching job was as an assistant at Tampa
Hillshorc High School. but in 1966 he came home to be head
"3 football coach and athleuc director at Port St. Joe. High School
and became known to just about everybody around town, even
to this day,. as Coach Taylor.
STavlor guided the Sharks to the 1971 state title, the first
for the school in 11-man football. and also helped develop the
present da\ Florida high school playoff system.
S\ was surprised and elated." Taylor said of his selection to
the Hall of Fame "1 am very appreciative. It was a great time.
We had a great booster club and great community support. It was a lot of fun.
I always told mi players that football was a microcosm of life. It was a capsule of how to
live and how not to live. Were the\ going to get up when they got knocked down in life?"
Pride. Dedication. Coronimitment they comprised Ta'ylor's motto and continue to be the
foundation for what locals call "Shark Pride.'


David B. Langston
Dr. Langston was born and reared in Port St. Joe. Florida.
graduated from Port St. Joe High School in 1969. and remains
proud of the upbringing from parents who died too young.
Gertrude Jackson and Mallic Langston. and a grandmother.
Irene McPherson, who uispired David and younger brother.
Norris.
Langston \\as a Sunkist High School All-American, led
the Sharks to their first state title in basketball. was the high
school's studentathlete of the year, and selected to the high
school All-Southern team.
This at a time when integration had only just begun in the
Deep South and in Port St. Joe.
Langston also noted Raymond Peters. Samuel Stallworth.
Gloria Jean Fennell and Adrian Gant as people who crossed his
path and helped shape the vision of what he could become.
Langston played at Gulf Coast Community College and
was elected to the Florida Community College Basketball Hall
of Fame.
He also played at Drake University. where he was All-Missouri Valley Conference and was
later drafted by Memphis Rams of the American Basketball Association and the Philadelphia
76ers of the National Basketball Association.
"It was a task." Langston said of his years on the hardwood. "From the beginning to where
it has led me to are some of the best periods of my life."
Langston's proudest moment, he said. though. was founding Norris D. Langston Youth
Foundation, Inc.. named for his younger brother who passed away 15 years ago.
The foundation sponsors tutoring and mentoring programs at schools in a six-county
area. fulfilling his vision of developing youth.
"I would encourage all young people to realize the opportunities they have and to continue
to work toward their goals." Langston said. "I'm proof that it can be done.
"The have-nots can become the haves. But y'ou can't do it sitting on your butt."
-


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Established 19317 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


L


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101 Thne. ami, ruP tSii. F r .O o 2 6t se 9 S n G f u a sr dg so 8 a


PIC KS


83% (66-14)
6. Mississippi St.
7. Florida
8. Virginia
9. Troy
10. Washington St.


S Ralph

Roberson


g ROBERSON & FRIEDMAN, P.A.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

(850) 227-3838
214 7th Street, Port St Joe, FL


, .;..N.^"
1. Clemson
2. Oklahoma
3. Tennessee
4. Georgia Tech
5. Florida State


L NO DIVING i
AiliWF. 1
1. Clemson
2. Oklahoma
3. Tennessee
4. Georgia Tech
5. Maryland


1. Clemson
2. Oklahoma
3. Tennessee
4. Georgia Tech
5. Florida State



Gulf Coast Realty


Tim
DePuy
80% (64-16)
6. Mississippi St.
7. Florida
8. NC State
9. North Texas
10. Washington St.


Jay
Rish
'8% (62-18)
6. Mississippi State
7. Florida
8. Virginia
9. Troy
10. U.C.L.A.

(850) 227-9600
252 Marina Drive
Port St Joe, FL


1. Clemson
2. Oklahoma
3. Tennessee
4. Georgia Tech
5. Florida State

First Floridian
A Travelers Company


Andy
Smith
'9% (63-17)
6. Kentucky
7. Florida
8. Virginia
9. Troy
10. U.C.L.A.

Hannon
Insurance
850-227-1133


221 Reid Avenue. Port St. Joe


Clay
Keels


78% (62-18)


1. Clemson 6. Kentucky
2. Oklahoma 7. Florida
3. South Carolina 8. Virginia .
4. Georgia Tech 9. Troy
5. Florida State 10. U.C.L.A.
ietalshby the Bay .Lei o 4t4
Hard's Fl rist andGifts
Your Floral & Tuxedo Specialist
(850) 227-1564
208 Reid Ave, Port St Joe, FL


1. Clemson
2. Oklahoma
3. South Carolina
4. Miami (FL)
5. Florida State


Jim
Norton
79% (63-17)
6. Kentucky
7. Florida
8. NC State
9. Troy
10. U.C.L.A.


C@ASTALCOMMUNTY BANK
206 Monument Ave. Port. St. foe, Florida 32456 850-227-7722
www.coastalcommunltybank.com


Steve
Kerigan
76% (61-19)
1. Clemson 6. Kentucky
2. Missouri 7. Florida
3. Tennessee 8. Virginia
4. Georgia Tech 9. Troy
5. Florida State 10. U.C.L.A.
COAST 2 COAST
PRINTING & PROMOTIONS, INC.
One Source for ALL of your
Printing and Promotional needs!
(850) 229-2222


Dina

Parker
76% (61-19)
1. Clemson 6. Kentucky
2. Oklahoma 7. Florida
3. Tennessee 8. Virginia
4. Miami (FL) 9. Troy
5. Florida State 10. Washington St.
PROSPERITY BANK

Port St. Joe
528 Cecil G. Cc-ir. Sr BIl.
850-227-3370



Kerigan
I ;75% (60-20)
1. Clemson 6. Kentucky
2. Oklahoma 7. Florida
3. Tennessee 8. NC State
4. Georgia Tech 9. Troy
5. Florida State 10. Washinqton St.

i Nautical
2M -0 R T G A G E
229-LOAN
2'* 1 I *. .


1. Clemson
2. Missouri
3. Tennessee
4. Georgia Tech
5. Florida State

FRANK D. MAY,


Dusty &
Daniel May
75% (60-20)
6. Mississippi St.
7. Florida
8. NC State
9. North Texas
10. U.C.L.A.

DMD, PA
Doai ,are tA .i' o gefinkc" r, adian'd


(850) 227-1123
319 Williams Avenue Port St. Joe www.doctormay.com
Keith "Duke"


1. Clemson
2. Oklahoma
3. Tennessee
4. Georgia Tech
5. Florida State



Gulf Coast Realty


Jones


S. 75% (60-20)
1. Clemson 6. Mississippi St.
2. Oklahoma 7. Florida
3. Tennessee 8. NC State
4. Georgia Tech 9. North Texas
5. Florida State 10. U.C.L.A.
AUDIT, ACCOUNTING, TAX & CONSULTING SERVICES

America Counts on CPAs
411 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850-229-1040 PH 850-229-9398 FX


1. Clemson
2. Oklahoma
3. Tennessee
4. Georgia Tech
5. Florida State


Blake
Rish

5% (60-20)
6. Mississippi St.
7. Florida
8. Virginia
9. Troy
10. U.C.L.A.

(850) 227-9600
252 Marina Drive
Port St Joe, FL


Mark
Costin

75% (60-20)
6. Kentucky
7. Florida
8. Virginia
9. Troy
10. Washington St..


Port St. Joe
St. Joe Ace Hardware -
#00844
Ati 201 Williams Avenue
The helpful place. (850) 227-1717 or 229-8028


w-
1. Clemson
2. Missouri
3. Tennessee
4. Georgia Tech
5. Florida State


(850) 229-7665
408 Garrison Ave., Port St Joe, FL


PORT INN
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
(850) 229-7678 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe


David
Warriner
80% (64-16)
6. Mississippi St.
7. Florida
8. NC State
9. Troy
10. U.C.L.A.


~~


i~E


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years.


10A The~ Star. Port St.JeFL-TusaOtbr2,06





CSMIUahus 1 7 *- rvin (,if g- rntv rindsiru di es 8 ret ,sao- ctober 26, 2006 -w


1. Clemson
2. Oklahoma
3. Tennessee
4. Georgia Tech
5. Florida State
coastal l


Patti

Blaylock
S72% (58-22)


1. Clemson
2. Missouri
3. Tennessee
4. Georgia Tech
5. Maryland


Coastal Grill
port 'st. joe, florlda


6. Mississippi St.
7. Florida
8. Virginia
9. Troy
10. U.C.L.A.

(850) 227-7900
602 Monument Ave
Hwy 98
Port St Joe, FL


Michael
Hammond
71a% (57-23)
6. Mississippi St.
7. Florida
8. NC State
9. Troy
10. U.C.L.A.


Go Noles!


1. Virginia Tech
2. Oklahoma
3. Tennessee
4. Georgia Tech
5. Florida State


Megan
Burkett
75% (60-20)
6. Kentucky
7. Florida
8. NC State
9. Troy
10. U.C.L.A.

(850) 227-7775
106 Reid Avenue
Port St Joe, FL


SMel
SMagidson
.T : ~73% (59-21)
1. Clemson 6. Mississippi St.
2. Missouri 7. Florida
3. Tennessee 8. NC State
4. Georgia Tech 9. Troy
5. Florida State 10. Washington St.
Mel Magidson, Jr.,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
528 6th St. Port St. Joe, FL
850-227-7800


Bo Knows Pest Control
(850) 227-9555
402 3rd Street, Port St Joe, FL

Darius

S Chambers

71% (57-23)
1. Clemson 6. Mississippi St.
2. Oklahoma 7. Florida
3. Tennessee 8. NC State
4. Georgia Tech 9. Troy
5. Florida State 10. U.C.L.A.

.piggly wiggly

(850) 229-8398
125W Hwy 98, Port St Joe, FL


Aaron
Farnsley
71 % (57-23)
6. Kentucky
7. Florida
8. NC State
9. Troy
10. U.C.L.A.
ley Financial Consultants


Providing Personalized Financial Guidance
S(850) 227-3336
202 Marina Drive, Port St Joe, FL

i Joan
Cleckley
66% (53-27)
1. Clemson 6. Kentucky
2. Oklahoma 7. Florida
3. Tennessee 8. NC State
4. Georgia Tech 9. Troy
5. Florida State 10. U.C.L.A.

(850) 229-8226
529 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd
Vision k Port St Joe, FL


Matt

Trahan
59% (47-33)
1. Clemson 6. Mississippi St.
2. Oklahoma 7. Florida
:3. Tennessee 8. Virginia
4. Georgia Tech 9. Troy
S5 Florida State 10. U.C.L.A.
Wl Dockside Cafe
(850) 229-9703 (850) 229-5200
908 Cape San Bias Rd 342 West 1st Street
Port St Joe, FL Port St Joe, FL


Boyd
Pickett

S70% (56-24)'
1. Clemson 6. Kentucky
2. Oklahoma 7. Georgia
3. Tennessee 8. N.C. State
4. Georgia Tech 9. Troy
5. Florida State 10. U.C.L.A.


FINE WINE & SPIRITS
(850) 229-2977
202 W. Hwy 98 Port St. Joe


Williams
65% (52-28)
1. Clemson 6. Kentucky
2. Oklahoma 7. Florida
3. South Carolina 8. N.C. State
4. Georgia Tech 9. Troy
5. Florida State 10. U.C.L.A.
INTEGRAL THERAPY WELLr`ELSC
(850) 647-9170
190 Lightkeepers Drive, St Joe Beach, FL
______ ^ ^ '4'.


1. Clemson
2. Oklahoma
3. Tennessee
4. Georgia Tech i
5. Florida State I



PREBLE-RISH INC
CONSULTING ENGINEERS & SURVEYORS


:. 64
1. Clemson,
2. Oklahoma
3. Tennessee
4. Miami (FL)
5. Florida State



Gulf Coast Realty


Ralph
Rish

% (56-24)
6. Kentucky
7. Florida
8. NC State
9. Troy -
10.-U.C.L.A.


(850) 227-7200
324 Marina Driv,e
Port St Joe, FL


Brett
Lowry
4% (51-29)
6. Mississippi St.
7. Florida
8. NC State
9. Troy
10. U.C.L.A.

(850) 227-9600
252 Marina Drive
Port St Joe, FL


S- ----------------- ---------
For Playing Week of October 26, 2006 .
Ii ;4 rf '"I71PREDICTIONS
Cirde the teauname you arereedcting to win for each melisted:
w, | //// !1. Clemson at Virginia Tech
I, Its A 1 2. Oklahoma at Missouri I
It's fun and easy! Pick the winners in the games listed I
by the team you think will win. (One entry per person 3. Tennessee at. South Carolina
If more than one entry is entered,you will be 4. Miami (FL) at Georgia Tech
disqualified. Must be 18 or older to play. 4. Miami (FL) at Georgia Tech
Employees of Star Publications and 5. Florida State at Maryland
their family members are not eligible 6.
to participate int the Pigskin Picks. \ 6. Kentucky at Mississippi State I
Bring, fax or mail your 7. Georgia at Florida
I entryto* I
SThe Star 8. NC'State at Virginia
135 Hwy98 9. North Texas at Troy
I Port St Joe, FL 32456 Tie Breaker:/ 10. Washington State at U.C.L.A.
I /
Fax:227-7212 Pick Score Name n
Entries must be brought in, Georgia Address
mailed or faxed no later than Aori rSS
noon F b'.y prior to games. r Daytime Phone
I Last WeeKs Winner: Skippy Pittman of Port Joe Fl (Random draw ing willdetrmine winner in ase of a ti e) ,
--- -- --- ~- -"" --- -- -- -- -.- ----,,.*


1. Clemson
2. Missouri
3. Tennessee
4. Georgia Tech
5. Florida State
SlFarnsi


1. Clemson
2. Oklahoma
3., South Carolina
4. Georgia Tech
5. Florida State


Bo
Patterson
72% (58-22)
6. Mississippi St.
7. Florida
8. NC State
9. Troy
10. U.C.L.A.





*I~Li Il ii II = r= r II ~IILIL~C-1I~


The tar Pot S. Je, L -Thusda, Otobr 2, 206 II


E-hhihe 97- evn Gl ont n uroniq ra or6 er






17A Ift;! Frd a 0t e 7n f y s n a os


Gators Lose another Heartbreaker


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
There could be an argu-
ment to be made that the
Wewahitchka Gators should
be 5-2 team in the playoff fight
in District 1-1A.
But in another game in


which the bounces simply did
not go the Gators' direction,
they fell at Freeport 3-0 and
dropped out of the playoff
race.
It was the third-straight
game played by Wewahitchka
which had been decided by
three or fewer points, two of
which were Gator losses.


The loss dropped
Wewahitchka, which opened
3-0, to 4-4 overall and 2-3 in
the district. With the Gators'
third loss in district play, their
slim chances of reaching the
state playoffs disappeared.
And the Gators' wounds
were too often self-inflicted.
A Dee Baker punt return in


-, ,RF : I -





Wewahitchka managed just 40 total yards on the ground.
Photo courtesy of Micah Peak


the second quarter was called
back due to a Wewahitchka
penalty. The Gators turned the
ball over three times, includ-
ing a fumble by quarterback
Sean Bierman at the Freeport
20.
The Gators gained 180
yards total offense, just 40
rushing the ball, but the
ground game was eroded by
30 yards in sacks taken by
Bierman. Bierman was 12 of
23 passing for 140 yards.
"Offensively we kept
shooting ourselves in the foot,"
said Wewahitchka coach Todd
Lanter.
The offense was hurt
again fullback Ryan Ranie
has nursed a bad ankle nearly
all year, Bierman was knocked
woozy last week when center
Tyler Bush sustained a shoul-
der injury on Wewahitchka's
second offensive play of the
game.
Kyle Luckie and Blaine
Pitts filled in for the junior
anchor' of the offensive line
from that point.
"I was proud of them for
stepping in and doing a good
job," Lanter said.
Maybe the high point for
the offense was the right leg
of wide receiver Dee Baker.
While Freeport largely held
Baker in check on offense,
the senior was a monster as a


The Gators held Freeport to 150 yards.
Photo courtesy of Micah Peak -


punter, including uncorking a
73-yarder.
Defensively, the Gators
were paced by the efforts of
Roy Suber, J.J. Roberts and
Ranie. Wewahitchka held
Freeport to 150 yards.
"We played great defen-
sively," Lanter said. "I've been


real proud of the' defense all-"
year.
"J.J. played middle line-
backer, outside linebacker and
he was all over the field. Roy
Suber played another great
game."
Roberts finished with 20
total tackles, Ranie with 13.


Gene Raffield Teams 10-2


The Gene Raffield Youth
Football League teams continue
to play well in the competitive
Big Bend League. The seven-
and eight-year-old Dolphins
Iost an S-0 heartbreaker to


Blountstown on October 3,
but followed up with a big win
over Chattahoochee the next
week. The Dolphins have a
3-1 record heading into their
'next ganc ait Liberty CountlIty.


Defensive Coaches Stacey
Hanlon and Bobby Nobles'
have their bbys holding down
the opposition to only two
scores in lour games.
Thr: nminu- and ten-year-


old Jaguars have been the
surprise team of the league
this year, going 4-0.' Coaches
Eric Saunders, Mark Cothran
and Reverend James Wiley
took over a team with 13


Dolphins defensive player Elijah Caldwell makes the tackle on Blountstown back. Cole Cryderman, Ethan Sapders and Lamartesse
Wyatt were ready to help. n


SPO


WEW


Game
1.
2.
3.
4.


2006 V4
Date
9/01
9/08
9/15
9/22


5: 9/29
6. 10/06.
7. 10/13
8. 10/20
9. 10/27
10. 11/3
/ '







PORT ST. JOI
530 Cecil G. Costin, Sr
Port St. Joe, FL 324
emeraldcoastfcu.co
EMERALDCOAST@GTC
850-227-115


J. J. Roberts
Roberts, a senior linebacker, had
20 total tackles as Wewahitchka
held Freeport to 150 yards and a
field goal in a 3-0 loss.


Ryan Ranie
Ranie, a- senior fullback/line-
backer, had less than 40. yards
rushing but totaled 13 tackles in
helping pace the Gator defense.


$UPERO
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Pn~rt S.Jo, 4 18 C~c~li C.. jtr. Jr Eid J 810-2 -,714 16
10 MebrFI ww .sue ioibn~o


newcomers and molded them Franklin County look to .be
into a cohesive unit. Their tough but these Bucs don't
wins over Blountstown and stop here! .
Chattahoochee didn't come This week's game against'
easy, but the boys are unde- Franklin County will be player-1
feated and looking at a playoff at 10 AM Saturday. October'-
position. Their key remain- 28, at Shark Field. Over 75 '
ing game will be against rival players are involved and are .
Franklin County here at home cheered on by over 40 cheer-
on October 28. leaders in the three divisions.
The eleven- and twelve- The competition is vigorou's..
year-old Buccaneers were as is the hitting on the field.;-
3-0 until running into a 1)ut at game's end. the seveni-*.
buzz saw last week against and eight-year-olds. live up to."
Chattahoochee. At 3-1, how- shake hands with their oppo-
ever, the Buis are capable nents. The sportsmanship
of making the playoffs and and fun experienced by both',.
are looking forward to a players and fans is what the.
rematch \ith Chattahoochee Gene Raffield League tries to
on November 11 in the Super promote. We hope to see you "
Bowl. Their remaining games at the game'
against Liberty County and '-

Long Avenue Baptist Church"


Upward Basketball
Parents may drop off their form and registration fee at tle.f
Long Avenue Baptist Church .office anytime between 9:00 a.nl..:
and 5:00 p.m Monday through Friday. '
For drop-offs, the church is located at 1601 LongAvenue in.,
Port St. Joe. FL 32457.
The early registration cost per child for basketball is 850..
The early registration cost per child for cheerleading is $55. .
After November 3, add $10. Deadline for registration fs.
November 13.




'RTS SCHEDULE


AHITCHKA GATORS

varsity Football Schedule
Team. Place
South Walton (H)
'Cottondale (H)
Jay (H) ,
Port St. Joe (A)
Northview (H)
West Gasden (H)
Sneads (H)
Freeport (A)
Liberty County (A)
Blountstown (A)




zEmeraKif Coast

k Federal Credit Union '
E WEWAHITCHKA
Blvd.,
456 101 East River Road
)m Wewahitchka, FL 32465
OM.NET
OM.NET 850-639-5024
16


pi


STAR PLAYER OF THE WEEK

Wewahitchka High School



f


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years"


12A Th4 Star, Port St oF hrdy cotr2,20






F-'zfrIi'hpd 79 -7 --~- Sirvn Gul conyadsroniaaesfr6 er h tr otS.Je L TusaOtbr2,20


Port St. Joe Downs Jay 33-13


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
With his thunderous
tackle on the opening kickoff
Friday night at Shark Field,
Port St. Joe's Patrick Bailey
established a theme.
This was a game the
Sharks had to have.
Port St. Joe ran around
and through visiting Jay for
,366 yards and shut down
the Royals' most dangerous
weapon quarterback Brandt
Hendricks to dominate a key
District 1-1A contest 33-13.
The Shark victory, which
moved Port St. Joe to 6-2
overall and 4-1 in the district,


sets up a regular-season finale
next week at West Gadsden,
one of three district teams
with a single league loss enter-
ing Friday night, with the win-
ner assured of a playoff spot.
"We had to have this,"
said Port St. Joe coach John
Palmer. "What we've been try-
ing to sell the kids on this
week is after we lost last week
(at Liberty County, the other
one-loss district team) every
game is a playoff game."
Though they committed
too many penalties Port St.
Joe was penalized 80 yards
and for the fourth game this
season had a touchdown


erased by a yellow flag and
fumbled the ball away near
the Jay goal line, the Sharks
balanced the scales up front
on both sides of the line of
scrimmage.
Offensively, they relied
heavily on the sweep, creating
seams outside in both direc-
tions which allowed Jordan
McNair to gain 147 yards on
just nine carries and Chaz
Byrd to add 114 yards on
eight carries.
For the second time in
three games, the Sharks aver-
aged 10 yards per carry. They
finished with 420 total yards.
"We thought our speed


'im .ro Mrne Star
Jordan McNair (1) is gone down the right sideline for an 85-yard touchdown run..


was better than theirs and
our blocking on the corners I
thought was very good," Palmer
said. "I thought we played with
pretty good intensity."
Meanwhile, the Sharks
defense was all but immovable
save a 69-yard touchdown
pass from Hendricks to Dale
Barlow, wide open in blown
coverage, midway through the
second quarter.
Hendricks, a dual threat
around whom the Royals'
offense thrives, managed just
three other completions in 10
attempts and minus-4 yards
rushing as the Royals (3-5,
2-4) mustered just 76 yards
on the ground and 180 total
yards.
"We were trying to contain
(Hendricks)," said Port St. Joe
defensive coordinator Chuck
Gannon. "We thought he could
throw the ball. Our thinking
was to put pressure on him
and we stunted more than we
usually do.
"We contained him and
really got after them ... At this
point we can't take anything
for granted."
After Bailey's spectacular
collision on the opening kick-
off, the Sharks held Jay on
downs, got a short punt that
gave them the ball at the Royal
44 and quickly took the lead.
Quarterback Mike Quinn
(64 yards rushing, 54 pass-
- ing) dashed 26 around end,
McNair got eight and Ashley
Davis and Byrd traded carries


off tackle until Davis scored
from the 1.
Austin Peltier, perfect on
PATs on the night, made it
7-0.
After halting Jay at mid-
field on the ensuing posses-
sion, Port St. Joe mounted
a 72-yard, 13-play drive that
consumed 6:30, mixing the
run and the pass. Quinn
capped the march with a 21-
yard toss to the right pylon to
McNair who evaded a tackler
to score.
Momentum momen-
tarily shifted, though, when,
Hendricks,- taking the snap
at his 31, found Barlow open
30 yards downfield and the
sophomore out-raced a closing
Quinn to the end zone.
Jay was within a touch-
down after the extra point.
After an exchange of punts
gave the Sharks the ball at
their 15 with less than two
minutes in the half, McNair
took a handoff on a sweep
right, picked up blocks at the
seam from Terry Thompson
and Patrick Bailey and was
gone down the sideline for a
touchdown.
With Port St. Joe up 21-7,
McNair took the second half
kickoff 90 yards for a touch-
down but the play was nulli-
fied by a block in the back.
Byrd in, turn nullified the yel-
low flag with a 70-yard jaunt
on the next play and Davis
barreled, over from the 6 two
plays later for a 28-7 lead.


Peltier added a soaring
48-yard field goal for a 31-7
lead before the end of the third
quarter.
Jay followed with its one
sustained drive, covering 73
yards in nine plays, aided by
a Port St. Joe face mask pen-
alty, Hendricks hitting Josh
Marshall from 8 yards for the
touchdown. The pass for two
points ended in a sack.
A Byrd fumble at the Jay 5
snuffed out the ensuing drive,
but Port St. Joe got two points
out of the drive when Shane
Duty tackled running back
Steven James in the end zone
to close the scoring, sending
the Sharks to a showdown in
West Gadsden.
Jay 0 7 0 6 13
PSJ- 7 14 10 2 33
First quarter
PSJ Davis 1 run (Peltier
kick)
Second quarter
PSJ McNair 21 pass from
Quinn (Peltier kick)
Jay Barlow 69 pass from
Hendricks (DeGraaf kick)
PSJ McNair 85 run
(Peltier kick)
Third quarter
PSJ Davis 10 run (Peltier
kick)
PSJ FG Peltier 48
Fourth quarter
Jay Marshall 8 pass from
Hendricks (pass failed)
PSJ Safety, James tackled
in end zone


P SJ Se n r


N ig ht


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AST. JOE HARDWARE CO.
C 201 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe 229-8028
Hardware Monday-FNday 8-00-5 -I0 EST CGlo;ed Sundays


STAR PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Port St. Joe High School


McNair, a junior wide receiver, car-
ried nine times for 147 yards, includ-
'ing an 85-yard. touchdown run, and
Caught a 21-yard touchdown pass as
[theSharks downed Jay 33-13.


Patrick Bailey'
Bailey, a senior lineman, had 15
tackles including two sacks and one
thunderous tackle on the opening
kickoff, setting a tone for the remain-
der of the game.


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Game

2.


SPORTS SCHEDULE

PORT ST. JOE SHARKS
2006 J.V. Football Schedule 4. 9/8 Chipley
Date Team Place Time 5. 9/15 *Freeport
8/18 Vernon (A) 8:00 6. 9/22 *Wewahitchk
8/24 "Blountstown (H) 7:00. 7. 9/29 *Sneads


3. 9/7 Wewahitchka (A)
4. 9/14 N.F.C. (A)
5. 9/21 Florida High (H)
6. 10/5 Wewa (H)


7:00
7:00
7:00
7:00


8. 10/6
10/13
9. 10/20


2006 Varsity Football Schedule
Game Date Team Place Time
1. 8/18 Vernon (A) 8:00
2. 8/25 Blountstown (H) 7:30


9/1


Marianna (H)


10/27
11/3


7:30


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and

Support Your Team!


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Refinishing
234 Reid Ave. 229-6374
AJI Wood Furmirure, Giflt..
Wicker, Kitchen Cabinets


The Star
Come Visil Us At Our New Li:otwon
135 W. H\vy. 98. Port
City Shopping Center
227-1278


(H)
(A)
ka (H)
(H)


(Homecoming)
*Liberty County (A)
OPEN
*Jay (H).
(Senior Night)
*West Gadsden (A)
Apalachicola (A)


8:00
8:00
8:00
8:00

7:30

8:00

8:00
7:30


* District 1 Games/Class A All times are Eastern.



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516 First Street
229-8232
Your Building
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TheSta, ortSt.Jo, F -Thusda, ctoer 6,200 13A


Established 7937 SeSFrvinq Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years






Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


THE FORECS


RECORD
High: 86' (1939)
Low: 37 (2005)


TODAY





Variable clouds with a
few P.M. showers
High: 74; Low: 67


TOMORROW

^,2 2


Morning storms, then
clearing
High: 730; Low: 530


SATURDAY
28




Mostly sunny and
pleasant
High: 740; Low: 540


SUNDAY


Continued mostly
sunny
High: 750; Low: 560


MONDAY
S 30




Mostly sunny and mild

High: 770; Low: 610


TUESDAY
K^ 31




Partly cloudy and
pleasant
High: 780; Low: 640


WEDNESDAY
1




Chance of showers
and thunderstorms
High: 760; Low: 610


Today's high and tonight's low temperatures


E i Dothan:
/ 72/57 7


-- Bainbridge
S2 6f --- _
Defunzak Springs
. __ *.. -:l I ..: ,--r-- nl- -
"M art '. .

Niceville i 1 .--
75 -sc Crystal Lake Brislol

oft-Walton,_ .* 7r ?- Tallahassee
Beach '3
: ,. -- ._. Wewah'itchka' Wilma
--lma Neporl
S Panama City ,74 -j- '
75/65 "
Pensacola
80/58
Port SI. Joe '
.. Apalachicola
,':.


LAST 7 DAYS
Monday 10/23 67/42/0.00
Sunday 10/22 86/67/0.05
Saturday 10/21 ....................... 80/63/0.00
Friday 10/20 83/69/0.29
Thursday 10/19...................... 86/70/0.00
Wednesday 10/18 ................... 83/75/0.63
Tuesday 10/17 83/77/0.00

SUN & MOON
Sunrise Sunset
Thursday 10/26...7:50 a.m...7:00 p.m.
Friday 10/27 .. ...7:51 a.m.. .6:59 p.m.
Saturday 10/28 .. .7:52 a.m.. .6:58 p.m.
Sunday 10/29 ... .6:53 a.m.. .5:57 p.m.
Monday 10/30... .6:53 a.m.. .5:56 p.m.
Tuesday 10/31... .6:54 a.m.. .5:55 p.m.
Wednesday 11/1 ..6:55 a.m.. .5:54 p.m.

Moonrise Moonset


APALACHICOLA RIVER
Site Flood Stg. Stage Chg.
Woodruff Tailwater 66.0 39.61 -0.41
Chattahoochee 39.60 -0.41
Blountstown 15.0 1.30 -0.30
Wewahitchka 12.44 -0.14,
OCHLOCKONEE RIVER
Thomasville 15.0 1.73 -0.11
Concord 24.56 0.33
Havana 25.0 11.57 -0.06
Bloxham 22.0 3.29 0.0


6 7rn- 1.12. i i-l.0v [ I.:-!. j: 1 1"..
6 l' j,, li I : lTlil',
In-j i'iln, l I'i T ,,i ,, r l .,i .grl'

High ''" '. "'
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Low '. ,l:.d -r1 lh-) '.i Hih Extreme


Thursday 10/26. ..12;06 p.m. 10:02 p.m.
Friday 10/27 1:03 p.m.. .11:02 p.m.
Saturday 10/28 .. .1:54 p.m...-
Sunday 10/29 ... .1:39 p.m.. .12:07 a.m. First Full Last
Monday 10/30 ... .2:18 p.m.. .12:13 a.m. "
Tuesday 10/31... :2:54 p.m.. .1:20a.m. '.
Wednesday 11/1 ..3:27 p.m'.. .2:27 a.m. Oct. 29 ,Nov. 5 Nov. 12


Friday
Hi Lo
Albany 70 48
Apalachicola 73 53
Bainbridge 71 49
Bristol 72 50
Columbus 67 49
Crystal Lake 70 48
DefuniakSp. 69 47
Dothan 66 46
Enterprise 66 45
Ft. Walton Bch.72 55
Gainesville 77 53
Jacksonville 77 53
Marianna 70 48
Mobile 70 46
Montgomery 64 45
Newport 76 54
Niceville 70 50
Panama City 70 55
Pascagoula 71 50
Pensacola 68 51
Port St. Joe 73 53
Tallahassee 73 50
Valdosta 73 50
Wewahitchka 73 52
Wilma 73 55


Saturday
Hi Lo Otik
73 47 s
74 54 s
73 48 s
74 52 s
69 50 s
73 50 s
72 50 s
72 50 s
72 50 s
75 56 s
74 49 s
72 50 s
73 50 s
74 53 s
69 46 pc
75 55 s
75 54 s
74 56 s
77 48 s
74 55 s
74 54 s
73 48 s
73 49 s
75 52 s
75 52 s


ST. JOSEPH BAY
Thursday A.M. t. P.M. 11t.
High- ------ --
Low 10:19 0.0--
Friday A.M. ft. P.M. ft.
High 12:24 2.1-- -
Low ,11:47 0.0 -
Saturday A.M. ft. P.M. ft.
High 1:21 2.1----
Low 1:05 -0.1.---
Sunday A.M. ft. P.M. ft..
High 2:22 2.1
Low 2:03 -0.2
Monday A.M. ft. P.M. ft.
High 2:23 2.1
Low 1:47 -0.2
Tuesday A.M. ft. P.M. ft.
High 3:27 2.0-----
Low 2:20 -0.1-- -
Wed. A.M. ft. P.M. ft.
High 4:41 1.7-----
Low 2:42. 0.1 ---


All forecasts, maps and graphics
@2006 Weather Central, Inc.
For a personalized forecast,
go to:
www.prerdiumweather.com


Low pressure will intensify as it moves through the central U.S. on Thursday. Showers and thunderstorms will spread from the
lower Great Lakes south through the Mississippi River Valley to the Gulf Coast. High pressure will keep much of the western U.S.
dry, as skies will be sunny to partly cloudy. The exception will be an onshore flow in the Northwest where clouds and showers will
be likely.


EXTREMES MONDAY:
Hottest: 97 R',,erside C1li1
Coolest: 11 Heninaer IJ.D


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston,
Buffalo
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit



City
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Baghdad
Bangkok
Beijing
Berlin
Brussels
B' Aires
Cairo
Dublin.


Today
Hi Lo
59 34
36 25
54 50
56 36
53 37
60 50
59 36
55 38
49 35
50 29
48 41
50 43
49 39
49, 40
51 31
45 35
49 38


Today
Hi. Lo
87 76
68 53
77 62
84 67
88 78
68 51
74 55
70 53
77 57
78 59
51 36
61 46


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otik
63 37 s
30 18 pc
60 47 pc
59 42 r
57 38 pC
60 44 w
61 38 s
50 44 pc
48 38 r
56 28 pc
46 37 sh
52 37 sh
48 35 sh
50 35 sh
64 31 s
50 33 pc-
46 37 sh


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otik
86 75 t
60 44 pc,
76 63 s
87 69 s
86 76 t
70 54 pc
59 40 pc
66 47 pc
76 58 tf
. 6 57 pc
47 33 sh
60 45 sh


City
El Paso
Fairbanks
Honolulu
.Indianapolis
Kansas'City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Omaha
Orlando



City
Geneva
Helsinki
Hong Kong,
Jerusalem
Kabul
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
New Delhi


68 44
19 9
86 74
48 41
50 40
71 49
72 49
79 57
65 52
84 74
46 38
45 34
59 48
79 62
55 43
45 35
82 66


Today
Hi LO
77 55
48 35
85. 73
72 54
68 .46
71 61
66 50
75 57
78 58
44 34
. 57, 41
88 64


Tomorrow
k Hi Lo Otik
71 45 s
17 7 pc
86 74 pc
50 38 sh
56 35 pc
76 51 s
68 44 pc
77 57 s
62 49 w
87 71 .pc
45 35 rs
44 '33 rs
62 44 pc
72 56 s
55 45 r
51 32 pc
84 64 pc


Tomorrow
H, Lo CIlk
72 54 pc
42 28 rs
86 75 pc
75 55 pc
71 53 s
72 62 pc
62 48 pc
78 61 pc
73 54 t
47 35 pc
62: 47 pc
85 65 s


City
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lk City
San Diego
San Fran.
Seattle
Spokane
Tucson
Wash., D.C.
Wichita,



Cny
Oslo
Paris
Rio
Rome
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Toronto
Vancouver
Viaena
Warsaw


Today
Hi Lo
55 39
82 58
48 38
.50 30
' 62 43
67 34
56 40
82 51
53 43
51 30
74 57
77 53
56 47
52 35
78 50
57 41
54 37


Today
Hi Lf
52 39
73 54
79 66
78 61
55 41
88 78,.
69 48
67 54,
46 35
52 48
77 56
68 52


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
56 41' r
86 58 s
49 37 sh
51 37 pc
62 43 pc
67 33 s
63 43 sh
82 51 s
52 44 w
59 36 s
75 58 s
72 54 s
57 44 pc
54 36 pc
79 49 s
60 43 sh
63 39 pc


Tomorrow
H, Lo IP'
43 32 rs
66 47 pc
81 70 pc
79 62 s
60 45 pc
87 77 t
71 54 pc
71 56 pc
49 38 s
59 48 sn
68 47 pc
-59 40 pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; fg=tog; i=ice; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; sf=snow flurries; t=thunderstorms; w=windy

- -


I U
~ ~ ~' __ ~
1~UIW~. -.


14AIThe Star,Prt St. Joe, FL tiuIsUay, IUUt I Z,


IAA C- D 4 C4 ri TL.....J... 9A)A nn6


WEATHER
Temps for October 26


NORMAL
High: 77
Low: 57'


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"Building a Better Community"


eh
"197
PRE IIMR
WEATH






Pet of the Week 4B


Obituaries 4B


Law Enforcement 8B


m m


.s.-.i~i.i:.l,.-r 79107 *c-..;.',. ,rvni Gulf county and srronrdina areas for t68 years


LtfU5.JfllOn l iinCLJ IT '-'-"v'''u


The Star. Port St. Joe. FL Thursday, October 26, 2006 SECTION B;


A Good Education is its Own Reward


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
On Thursday, Oct. 12, students in the Norris
D. Langston Youth Scholarship Foundation 21st
Century Learning Center seemed especially
engaged in their educations.
The Port St. Joe Elementary students lis-
tened with rapt attention to Raffield Fisheries
vice president Eugene Raffield, who delivered
a speech as part of the national Lights, on
Afterschool initiative.
Raffield's speech was one of 7,500 events
occurring that day in celebration of afterschool
programs.
But the students' focus made this particu-
lar event something far more unique.
Visitors to the elementary school lunch-
room may have attributed the students' atten-
tiveness to Raffield's engaging delivery or his
positive, pro-education message.
Those sitting closer to the action may have
concluded it was the $100 bill beckoning from
Raffield's hand.
Ben Franklin was part of Raffield's motiva-
tional strategy.
I "What are the two most important things to
do in school?" Raffield asked his audience.


Fifth-grader Glenda Wright holds Eugene
- Raffield's business card. She plans to participate
in Raffield's 5100 e-mail challenge.


"Listen," said one student.
"Pay attention," said another.
Underscoring the importance of the stu-
dents' answers, Raffield offered an incentive for
those who paid close attention to his speech.
After giving each child a business card,
Raffield asked the students to summarize the
high points of his talk in an e-mail.
The child who penned the most thoughtful
essay would receive the $100 bill.
After delivering his challenge, Raffield
encouraged the students to always be alert in
the classroom.
"It's like an extension cord in a vacuum
cleaner if you don't plug it in, it will not work,"
he said.
Though he now runs a world-wide opera-
tion, shipping products all the way to Tokyo,
Japan, Raffield said he was not a model stu-
dent.
His teachers often reprimanded him for
talking too much.
"It wasn't that I wasn't interested in what
the teacher had to say, I just had my mind on
other things," Raffield said.
Having discovered a love of reading later in
life,. Raffield encouraged the students to read
frequently.
"Start small, with something that interests
you," implored Raffield, who as a fifth-grader


Malayah McNair and Aiden Gainer apply
their skills to a light bulb art project commemo-
rating the Lights on Afterschool program.
(I


was fascinated by books about the inventor
George Washington Carver.
"He impressed me because of his back-
ground," Raffield told the children, noting
that Carver grew up poor and lacked a college
education.
Reiterating his speech's central message,
Raffield asked the children to take a lesson
from Carver's life.
"He paid attention, he listened and he
learned. He educated himself because he want-
ed to," he said.
Raffield left the students with a final mes-
sage "You cannot be successful in this world
without a good education. You have to have it."
Raffield reminded the students of his e-
mail challenge and fended off requests for more
cash.
"Can I have $200?" one bold young man
asked, to Raffield's delight. *
"That's what I like. He wants to double his
money, and there's nothing wrong with that.
You can have $2 million. You know how? Get
an education," said Raffield.
Jo Clements, who helms the after school
program with fellow teacher Rebecca Pittman
and adult tutors Linda Tsuchdi and Charlotte
Faircloth, called Raffield a "mentor and con-
stant guide for children."
"I picked Eugene because he is a motivator
of kids. He can speak in a language they under-
stand," said Clements.
Each day, Clements and her team instruct
approximately 55-60 students from 2:30-5:30
p.m.
They coordinate with the students' teach-
ers and focus on individual needs.
"It's an extension of the classroom really,"
noted Clements. "It's reinforcement for what's
done during the day."
Clements organized the Lights On
Afterschool program to raise awareness of
after-hours instruction.,
According to the Afterschool Alliance,
which founded the Lights on Afterschool pro-
gram in 1999, more than 14 million school-age
children are on their own after school.
Clements is alarmed by the statistic, and
strives to make a difference in the lives of Port
St. Joe's own latch-key kids.
"If we can help just a portionof them. we
feel like we're doing something." she said. ,


Raffield Fisheries vice president Eugene
Raffield addresses students during the Lights on,
Afterschool program at Port St. Joe Elementary
School.




Afterschool Fact Sheet

More than 14 million school-age children 125%'-)
are on their own after school Among them are more
than 40,000 kindergarteners.
The parents of more than 28 million school-age
children work outside me home
Only 6 5 million K-12 children ll"') participate
in afterschool programs An additional 15 million
would participate if a quality program were available
in their community
The hours between 3 p m. and 6 pm are the
peak hours for juvenile crime and experimentation
with drugs alcohol, cigarettes and sex.
Teens who do not participate in afterschool pro-
grams are nearly three times more liKely to skip class-
es than teens who do participate. They are also three
times more likely to use marijuana or other drugs, and
they are more likely to drink alcohol, smoke cigarettes
and engage in sexual activity.
Information compiled by the Aflerschool Alliance,
a nonprofit public awareness and advocacy organiza-
tion working to ensure that all children and youth have
access to quality afterschool programs by 2010.
For more information visit www afterschoolal-
liance org


Waterfront Partnership Eyes Theatre


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
While relatively small in numbers the
Waterfront Partnership Committee is eyeing a
sizable prize.
During its recent general membership
meeting. the Waterfront Partnershipdiscussed
the possibility of acquiring and contracting to
operate the old Port Theatre.
The concept is clear as a drive down Reid
Avenue through the City of Port St. Joe's down-
town district.
The theater, which was placed on the
National Registry of Historic Places a couple of
years ago. is the dominating facade along the
five blocks between First and Fifth streets.
."(The theater) is the icon of downtown.",
said David Warriner. who was succeeded as
chairman of the Waterfront Partnership by Jim,
,Garth during the membership meeting.
The Port Theatre is certainly an icon in
the history of the town. with the likes of Roy-
Rogers and Trigger. rMinnie Pearl and Roy Acuff
among the constellation of stars which graces
the theater's stage at one time or another.
The idea. Garth explained. would be to
refurbish the theater. which could seat in excess
of 1.000 people and operate it as a theater for
first-run movies, art and music performances


and classes and a place where seniors and chil-
dren groups could hold a variety of functions.
The current owners of the building have
had it up for sale for more than a year.
"I think we should make it a goal that
we are going to .save the Port Theatre." Garth
said..
Garth said the Gylf Alliance for the Local
Arts (GALA) had expressed an interest in
assisting in operating the theater and putting
on a host of art exhibits, classes and other
functions. .
The flip side of;the coin, Garth noted, was
that the estunated cost of purchasing the build-
ing and refurbishing it while there is much
original 'equipment, including the projector
room, movies, reels, etc., the building is in
disrepair in many respects at more than $3
nllion. ,
While there might .be grants available for,'
such a project the restoration of the Cape
San Bias Lighthouse has benefited from, state
historical grants, for example there would
need to be, Garth said. "significant community
participation."
John Hendry, a member of the partner-
ship. suggested that a viable first step be secur-
ing grants to draft a business plan. ,
With a plan in place. long-termi financial
sustainability and preservation of
the building in perpetuity would
become more possibility than
potentiality.
"A business plan would also
be an easier way to get to grants."
Hendry said.
Refurbishing and operating
the theater, the group agreed.
would have a "ripple" effect m the
downtown, bringing more people.
potential customers for down-
town businesses. into the Reid
Avenue area on weekends.
Even when the only activi-
ties going on at the theater were
the weekend auctions by Wade
and Paula Clark, who own the
building. downtown traffic was
increased and adjacent business-
es had more potential custom-
ers.
As Sandra Chafin. executive
director of the county Chamber
of Commerce noted, she had
received a number of calls from
people who wondered. "Why is
that theater just sitting there?"
The other initiative the
Waterfront Partnership members
discussed was a wide board-
walk between the marina and
Centennial Park.
Hendry noted that his com-
pany, The St. Joe Company. had
bandied about the idea of extend-
ing the boardwalk to C-30.


Garth noted that while engineering and
architectural comnipanies were "lined up and
available" to contract with the Waterfronts
group on the project. grants had yet to be
secured to fund the boardwalk ajnd time was of
the essence to secure such grants in this year's
cycle. ,
The St. Joe Company has already pledged
half a million dollars toward extending a board-
walk along the waterfront toward Sunset Grill,
but how far those monies would carry the proj-
ect remains in doubt.


Also in question is land along U.S. 98 as
it nears Oak Grove and its viability for the
boardwalk. Hendry said he would carry quesl
ions back to his company and try to provided
answers in the coming weeks.
Beyond that, the Waterfronts Partnershi~
adopted by-laws, appointed.somlie members t'
committees and elected new officers.
Garth also reported that the partnership
had decided to use a $50,000 grant to assist
the city in removing silt from Patten Baou.


Christmas for the




Children and Elderly


It's hard to beheve that the Christmas season is right arounrid the corner but we better believe it. The
next couple of months will bring the expected whirlwind of shopping. planning. and preparation for the
season
Gulf County Senior Citizen's Association, sponsor of the Christmas for the Children and Elderly pro-
grani m Gul County., is already in full swing The Christmas Comrnuttee is collecting donatlon- of food.
toys. clothing, and gifts for needy lamilies and the elderly as well as cash donations to purchase ifts and
to make food baskets
The Christmas Conimittee teams up with the Salvation Army Christmas Cheer program to. bring assis-
tance to those who would otherwise have little or no reason, to celebrate the holidays
If you have children 16 or under and need help with Christmas giLts. the Salvation Army representa-
tives, and local volunteers. will be taking applications for Gull County residents and families needing food
and toy assistance at the following locations:

For Port St. Joe families:
Wednesday. November I at the STAC House in Port St-Joe 10 a m. to 4 p m. EST
For Wewauitchka families
Wednesday. November 1 at the Community Center in Wewahitchka 10 a.m to 4 p.m. CST

Please note. this will be the ONLY DATE for registration! There will be no applications taken after this
date.
All apphlcants must provide the following:
Photo ID
Social Security Cards for applicant and all children
Recent rent receipt llf someone else owns the home or pays the rent. that person should accom-
panyl
Utility bills, cable bill. and phone bill
Proof of address (Only necessary if you do not pay rent, ulities, or cable
Recent paycheck stub, or other proof of income for all household residents
In order to insure adequate supplies for each family. we ask that you not apply if you have applied or
are planning to apply with another agency.
If you are over the age of 60 and need assistance, a separate application form is available from Gulf
County Senior Citizen's Association at the Port St Joe or Wewa Senior Centers Registration for seniors
who are not clients will be held at the same time and date
If you are not already a client. you will need to provide proof of identity or income. and will not have
to attend the sign-up on November I. Other seniors will need to sign up on this date and will need to
provide the information shown above.
For additional information on how you (an become involved as a volunteer or donor. call Sandy
Lieberman at 229-8466


I


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Eighth Annual Mexico Beach Art 8&
Wine Festival Another Success
With pereci. weather sandwiched between days of rain
and heavy clouds, the Eighth Annual Mexico Beach Art and
Wine Festival wrapped up Saturday night at the Driftwood
Inn on U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach.
Artists from across the southeast once again competed
In a juried exhibition aud each donated a work for the
traditional live auction.
Live entertainment. food from local restaurants
and plenty to drink kept the crowds happy while they
browsed through the artwork and enjoyed the beach.
People also purchased the annual collector's wine
glass, t-shirt and poster, designed this year by noted
local artist Chuck Creasy.
All net proceeds from the annual event go to Special .
Events of Mexico Beach, Inc.. to help fund other events
in the area.


4.-..._- ,


A. "I,


On your next visit to the Thirsty
Goat leave your business card with
the bartender for a gift certificate
drawing at the end of the month.



22 P R*7


* Facials
* Massages
* Microdermabrasion
* Complete Hair Salon
* Hair Removal
*Ear Piercing


License # CE99652-9


First Day Spa in Gulf County
Located at:
304 Wiliams Avenue
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850-227-9727


This year we invite you to participate in our "Baby's First Christmas" page which wiil be in our
December 21st edition. The cost of the ad is only $15.00 and will include your baby's photo,
name, city and birth date (sorry, no room for other information). We will accept ads until
December 15th at 5pm, so hurry, space is limited.


1. .* FIn The. December 21st edition v,., Name
of the Star for only dedre,
7Citn SLiIC _- Zip
Phone Number
Pa mcnt Encln d '
Paymnt lit ri qiirtd kull order
Bab\' Name
Baby's Name NIMal o: The Star. P.O. Box 3(\i Cir.
City Port St Joe. FL 32457 Birth Date
Birth Date Or drop off at our office ai
1/ l35 \V. Hv\ 9S next to the Pigl\\ WigDl.adi i sDcme15ii 206lt.500 1mE
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 yeari


2B he ta, PrtSt.Jo, F -Thursday, October 26, 2006


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Oh1 S i f n d n r f ae P S oT d c 2 0


Happy 7th
Birthday
De'Amber Marcella
Rolack!
Love Always,
Parents Denine
Pittman and Nickolas
Rolack
Grandparents-Amos
Pittman Sr., Vernell Bailey;
Gene Hill and Linda Hill
Great Grandparents-
Queen Pittman
Godparents- Marty
Brown, Willie Quinn Sr.


Isabella Turns One!
Bella Starr celebrated
her first birthday at the park.
Many friends and family came
to help celebrate this special
occasion. Bella is the daugh-
ter of Sabrina Canington and
special friend Toni Gayton.
The proud grandparents are
Lavon and Tammy Canington
and Tim and Macheri Slaton.
Great grandparents are Henry
and Judy Darna and Howard
Canington.


Welcome Home Jolie Moore
Randall Moore and Jolene Colson would like to announce
the birth of their daughter Jolie Grace Moore, born Sept. 7, 2006
at Gulf Coast Medical Center. Jolie weighed 8 lb. 8.9 oz. and was
20Y2 inches long. Grandparents are Larry Joe and Georgette
Colson, Mary Moore and Sheila O'Neal. Great grandparents-
Lamar Moore, Sue Walker and Mary Jane Lyndsey.


Happy 16th
Birthday
October 28, 2006
Mackenzie Bryant
Love Always,
Parents--Denin e
Pittman and Waymon,
Bryant
: Grandparents-Amos
Pittman Sr., Vernell Bailey;
John Bryant, Majorie
Platers
Great Grandparents-
Queen Pittman
- Godmother-Connie
Richards


Jay Whitfield
Truns One
Jay Raymond Floyd Winrfield
turned one on October 10,2005. He
celebrated at his house on October
8,2005 with lunch being served
and a Wmnrie the Pooh first.birth-
day party. His parents John and
Sherry Whitfitel d. h i ~ is -te r.Danielle
Sranley. broithirs. Little John
WhItheld and Brett Satterfield
Grarndparnrits Fran Pippn.Ted
-and Kay Whitlceld,Raymond Joe
and BerT Horne and numerous
relaeuvet and friends helped him
celebrate


It's not about your life, it's about theirs.
Life insurance isn't about your life, it's about the people who rely on it.
As a local independent agent, we can design an insurance program
that's just right for you and your family. Give the people you love
Safe.Sound.Secure. protection from Auto-Owners Insurance Company.
,Auto-Owners Insurance

Coastal insurance Agency
312 REID AVE* PORT ST JOE, FL
850-227-1900


Happy 40th Birthday, Cheryl!
.. .. Love,
Your Family


Keersten Has Arrived
TJ and Krystal, Easter
would like to announce
the birth of their daugh-
ter, Keersten Dawn Easter.
Keersten 'was born at Bay
Medical Center on September
20, 2006 at 5:09 PM. She is
blessed with 4 Grandparents,
S Great Grandparents. and
1 very special Great Great
Grandparent- Mrs. Kathryn
King Mamawl-whicLh would
make: Keersten the 5th. gen-
eration on her Mother's side.
She has already brought great
joy to everyone she comes in
contact with and is loved by
many.


Trades &


fl,


Six Chances to Win,-
One each week!!!


Get an entry slip from the cashier as you check out.


Services Speci;
Hook & Trigger
Account Executive


Kim Tharpe

227-1278

IJTAR THETJE
A2L M,,nl,
=d-aKww..ll


HALLOWEEN





CHECK

Make sure all of your Halloween treats are
. sweet to eat by doing a quick candy and
treat inspection with Mom or Dad!
* Look for torn packaging pinrfoies or quesiiurijble
appearance *hen inspecting HIaliween candy.
* Wash Iruils and slice triem into s-m.ill pieces Delore
eating
* If any piece of candy looks like ii -may have been
hampered with, discard it i rn ediaely
We wish all of our area ghosts and goblins a
happy and sate Halloween!


I*THE STAR TitffwEs ^j


Enter everytime you make a purchase!

Drawings held on Fridays

October 13 at 7p.m.

October 20 at 7p.m.

October 27 at 7p.m.

November 3 at 7p.m.

November 10 at 7p.m.

November 17 at 7p.m.
Drawing box is dumped after every drawing,
so be sure to enter weekly

Shop your local Duren 's




Down Home,

Down the Street
B--Efik^^S~s-


SAdvertising no

I Be Sure to


IfflPT -- F-~E~


TheStrPot S. oe F -ThusdyOcobe 2, 00 -3B


Established 79317 Servinq Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


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4D I ne STCr, ronr OT. JOut, Ir iIuiauu y, vUCO vi v, vvo-


of the Week


Pzt


Company Coming? K

Let us be your
Guest Room!


'. ttk .Street

-N' 9"9 z5 7.795


10th Street Bed & Breakfast
605 10th Street
Port St. Joe, FL
(850)227-7955
wwwl0thstreetbb.com


Sil's Home Center
1023 N. Tyndall Parkway
Panama City, FL 32404
1-800-239-4671

"P4tf qawdies i4-a 4lo#aet di

Baxley Thanks
You can shed tears that he is gone, or you can smile because,
he has lived.'
You can' close your eyes and pray he'll come back or you canr
open your eyes and see all he has left.
Your heart can be empty because' you can't see him or you
can be full of the love you shared.
You can turn your back on tomorrow and live yesterday or
you can be happy for tomorrow because of yesterday.
You can remember him and only that he's gone, or you can


4,

~

cherish his memory and let it live on.
You can cry and close your mind, be empty and turn your
back, or you can do what he'd want smile, open your eyes, love,
and go on. Author Unknown
The family of Richard Baxley extends our heartfelt apprecia-
tion for the kindness and concern you have shown during our
time of sorrow. We will not forget.

Jones Family Thank You
The family of Marvin L. Jones wish to thank all of the
friends and family that expressed their concern and caring
with food, cards, and flowers. A special thanks to Pastor Brent.
Vickery and First Baptist Church.
Myrna Jones, Joseph Jones, Janice Douglas, Judy Herring,
George Brunner, Michael Brunner, Mary Morris, Marie Davis,
and Vernice Martines


77h


Janie Natalie

Redfearn Whitfield
Janie Natalie Redfearn
Whitfield. 82, formerly of
Wewahitchka passed away
October 21, at her home
in Tallahassee. Janie was
born August 18, 1924 in
Sanford, FL. She gradu-
ated with a BS degree from
Florida State College for
Women in i946 and earned
an MSW degree from Florida
State University in 1972.
She,was a social worker for
the State of Florida, work-
ing throughout Northwest,
Florida, from Pensacola
to Tallahassee, until her
retirement in 1989. She
was an active member of
First United Methodist
Church of Wewahitchka
and, since 1995, Saint Paul
United Methodist Church
of Tallahassee. She was


preceded in death by her
husband Ernest Kendrick
Whitfield; sister, Patty
Redfearn, Brown; sister-
in-law. Shirley' Whitfield
Cosgrove; and father and
,mother, George Robert and
Florine Butler Redfearn.
She is survived by her
children, John Michael
'Whitfield (Jane) of
Milledgeville, .GA, George
Alfred "Whitfield of Denver,
CO, Tony Lee Whitfield of
St. Joe Beach, Christopher
Allen Whitfield (Sharon) of
Charlotte, NC, and Janie
Marlo Peck (Aaron) of
Tallahassee; her grandchil-
diren Clay Allen Whitfield
(Ktm), Lara Kathleen Moore
(Chad), Leah Michelle
Hawkins (Trey), Joseph
Lee Whitfield (Connie),
Natalie Renee Whitfield,
Ryan Kendrick Whitfield,'
Nicholas Allen Whitfield,
Mark Christopher
Whitfield, and Katherine


Leigh Whitfield; four great-
grandchildren; brother,
George Redfearn (Wifinie)
of Fremont, CA; brother-in-
law, Alfred Wh.itlield IAngie)
of We\wahitchka: sister-in-
law Marlene McNair (Alan).
of Wewahitchka; and special
friend Margaret Hargrove,
of Tallahassee.
A memorial service
will be held on Moiday,
October 23 at 11:00 a.m.
EST at Saint Paul's United
Methodist Church, in
Tallahassee, conducted by
Reverend Clarke Campbell-
Evans. A graveside service
will be held that after-
noon at 5:00 p.m. EST
(4:00 CST) at the family
plot at Jehu Cemetery in
Wewahitchka, conducted by
Reverend Harry Johnson.
of First United Methodist


O


Church of Wewahitchka.
Donations may be made in.
Janie's memory to the First
United Methodist Church of
Wewahitchka, Saint Paul's
United Methodist Church
of Tallahassee, or the
Department of Social Work
at Florida State University.
Funeral arrangements
are under the direction of
Comforter Funeral Home,
Wewahitchka Branch
Chapel.


Gregory Malone
Pickron

Mr. Gregory Malone
Pickron; age 45, of Kinard,
Florida passed away Friday
night, October.20, at his
home. Greg was born on


Stals by the Bay
) ., ,q .. ". ,'. Specialist


'1:". '.~ / i


PSJ Boatwork


'U


Celebrating over 15 years in
business, our florists have over 100
years ofcombined knowledge and
experience working for you.
I Hard's Florist
and Gifts


208 Reid Ave.
Port St.Joe, FL 32456
S 227-1564 or 229-2737
'Aj A-


October 24, 1960 in Gulf
County, Florida and had
lived in Calhourn County
for most of his life. He was
shop foreman with the Gulf
County Road Dept. for 13
years. He was a member of
the Holiness faith.
Survivors include:
Wife- Loretta Pickron
of Kinard, FL
2 Sons- Stephen
Pickron, his wife Mandy,
and their two children,
Stephanie and Whitney of
Blountstown, FL; Bradley
Pickron of Kinard, FL
1 Daughter- Makayla
Pickron of Scotts Ferry, FL
2 Sisters- Pinky McCall
and her husband James of
White City, FL; Jean Helms
and her husband Ken of
Wewahitchka, FL
Very special friends-


Stacy, Minnesota, Gail,
Susie, and Kimr
S.2 Grandchildren
and several Nieces and
Nephews

Funeral services were,
held Wednesday, October
25, 2006 at 1.1:00 am
(CDT) from the. graveside
at Cypress Creek Cemetery
in Kinard, Florida. Greg's
friends officiated the service.
Interment will follow in the
Cypress Creek Cemetery.
The family received friends
Tuesday, October 24, 2006
from 6:00 pm (CDT) until
8:00 pm (CDT) at the Peavy
Funeral Home. All arrange-
ments are under the direc-
tion of Marlon Peavy at
Peavy Funeral Home in
Blountstown, FL.


Heritage Funeral


247 Tyndall Parkway, Callaway


785-1316
Joe D. Gainer, Justin M. Kent, Local Owners

"Serving Bay and Gulf Counties"


. ., .. . .


50 ton Travel Lift
Yachts: 30 65 feet
LargerVessels: 1,000 ton
Marine Rail
www.PSJBoatworks.com
www.GCShip.com
Tohatsu outboard dealer


At the junction of Gulf County Canal and
ICW near White City
Call first and ask for Red
'._;-\ ,. _jy' xr r'. *.".;**-A. 41 V, j. x el, ,a^_:,.


Available now for adoption from the
t. Joseph Bay Humane Society -
Squirt (pictured); Lance, a beautiful
1ale with blue eyes, Zane, a nice male
white english; Charley, Ike, and Mike,
month old B/T hounds. (1 st shots);
lolly a nice white english bulldog
male; Boots, a 16 week old male kitty.
Ways kittens! Come see.
Please visit Faith's Thrift Hut, 1007
enth Street. Volunteers appreciated.






General Medicine
Dermatology
gS Sa" n* Flea & Parasite Control
u-soPTirAL- Dental
112 4TNr n nUMAKL Oot F'L. 32O

Located at 112 Fourth Street in Apalachicola
Open Monday-Friday 8:00AM to 5:00PM
- Call us at (850)653-4888 Leslie Biagini, DMD


1 Whether buying or selling, for the L
-'. service you deserve, call
Linda L. Somero ABR, GRI,
Broker Associate
=B. Phone:
._. .... E ..... (850)866-1269


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 yearrs


AR L, Q4 -, (Z 1. r Tliirzrrtv ()tn pr 6 00


4


i


3


.


//


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- .'_ .- -


Power Wheelchairs Available

Miracle on Wheels makes available Electric Power
Wheelchairs to non-ambulatory Senior Citizens (65 year
old & up) and the permanently disabled of any age, if they
qualify.
Usually, there is no charge or out-of-pocket expense
for the power wheelchair, including shipping and delivery
to the home by a technician, who makes the final adjust-
ments to fit the individual and shows them how to use
and maintain it. No deposit is required and there is no
obligation for determining if they qualify.
Electric wheelchairs are provided to those who can-
not walk and also cannot operate a manual wheelchair..
sufficiently or safely enough to care for themselves in'
their residence. They do have to be able to safely operate
a joystick controller on the armrest and understand the .
basic instructions.
There are additional qualifications including that'
their doctor approves and recommends their need for a
power wheelchair.
Please call 1.800.749.8778 or visit our web site at
www.jaspanmedical.com for more information on the,
details of this program.







Military speakers available
Looking for a speaker for your next community func-
tion? Tyndall has a base speaker's bureau to provide
speakers in the community free of charge. Subjects can
range from general military to a specific topic. For more
information or to arrange a speaker, contact 325th Fighter
Wing public affairs office at 283-4500.

Tricare briefing
The 325th Medical Group Tricare operations office
and Tricare service center staff will join with the Naval
Support Activity Clinic, Panama. City Beach to present
a Tricare health benefits briefing 6-8 p.m. Nov. 9 at the
NSA Long Glass Club. The presentation addresses all"
aspects of the Tricare health benefit to include Tricare for
Life and a segment will cover skilled nursing versus long
term care. For more information, contact the 325th MDG
Tricare Operations office at 283-7331 or 283-7332. -

Retiree' Appreciation Day
Tyndall hosts Retiree Appreciation Day on Nov. 4.
Events include base mission tours, free health screenings,_
and Base Exchange and Commissary specials for retirees.'
To sign up for the base tour, call 283-4204.

SBonita Bay flea market
The Bonita Bay fall flea market will be 7 a.m. 'to 1
p.m. Saturday in the Bonita Bay parking lot and pavilion
area. Those interested in selling items in the flea market
must register for space and tables by Oct. 15. Used rental
equipment from Outdoor Recreation -will also be' available
for purchase. To participate in the event or for more infor-
mation, call 283-3199.






r


Fall Festival at Beach Baptist
Anointed Blue


'Children, Come one-, Come all to our Fall
Festival. Free admission. Saturday Oct. 28
10:OOAM-2:OOPM ET. We will have lots of free
family fun, refreshments, Games, and Prizes.
Join us at Beach Baptist Chapel, 311
Columbus Square St. Joe Beach
647-3950

Who's on


Your Throne?

If you're saved, tell about it, let it be
known.

If you're saved, tell everyone who's on
the throne.

If Jesus isn't on the throne, leading you
each day.

You'd better read your Bible, and get on.
your knees and pray.

He's always ready and waiting, to hear
what we have to say.

He's also going to answer, in His own
time and way.

Paul is a good example, of having Jesus
on the throne.

Because of his thorn in the flesh, he
knew he was never alone.

There'll be mountains ano valleys,
though this life, sureIl you don't want to
face it alone.

To ask Jesus into your heart is the
answer, then put Him on the throne.

If you follow the footsteps of Jesus, and
never, ever stop.

-You can be sure that you're a winner,
because Jesus never sponsors a flop.

-Billy Johnson


Grass Gospel Music
The Cobb Family
Date: October 28, 2006
Time: 6:00 P.M.
Where: Calvary Chapel
119 Bay Avenue
Wewahitchka, FL
2 Blocks West of Glad Tidings A/G
Harvest Festival at New
Bethel A.M.E. Church
Come one! Come all! There will be a
Harvest Festival at New Bethel A.M.E. Church
Saturday, November 4. It will begin at 10:00
A.M. until 3:00 P.M. Everyone is invited. The
church is located at 146 Ave. C. There will be
lots of games and fun.

Honeyville United Methodist
Honeyville United Methodist Church will
celebrate homecoming November 5, 2006, the
first Sunday in November. Services will begin
at 10:00 A.M. CST and Rev. Anthony Cuchens,
our pastor, will be preaching a Bible message.
A covered dish lunch will be spread in the
fellowship hall at approximately 12:00 Noon.
Please join us for worship and fellowship. Call
Rev. Anthony Cuchens at (850) 639-3411 or
Henrietta Branch at (850) 827-8863 if more.
information is needed. The church is located
four miles south of Wewahitchka, Fl. on Hwy.
71.


. The Potter's House
WHERE BROKEN VESSELS ARE MADE NEW
Rodney G. Leaman, Pastor
850-639-5993 850-639-4588
636 Second Street Post Office Box 631 Wewahitchka, FL 32465
SERVICE SCHEDULE
Sunday School 9:45 a.m..
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Worship 7:00 p.m.
YOU ARE WELCOME AT THE POTTER'S HOUSE

OAK GROVE
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Pastor: James ivili'v
A place to celebrate,' serve, evangelize, and equip
disciples for the increase of God's kingdom.
Sunday Worship Service: 10:45
Sunday School: 9:45 ,am
613 Madison Street Port St..Joe, FL
-850-227-1837


Come into

The Star

today to let everyone in the
community know what's
happening in your church!


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and Monument Port St. Joe
(850) 227-1724


Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m.
.i- I'. F. '., 11:00 a.m.
Methodist Yuthl Fellowship: 6:00p.m.
All Time. reEST.m.
All Times are EST


Rev. Mac Fdulcher
PASTOR
eff Wiitty
Minister oflusicdYouthl
Deborah Loyless
Director ofChildren Ministries


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
'igl)lanb vietw aptist C utl
J 382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
I (850)227-1306
SSunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:00 p.m..
Discipleship Training 6:00 p.m.
Mike Westbrook Wednesday Prayer 7:00 p.m.
Pastor


rheCathoic Church of Guf Cot

St. Joseph Parish
20th & Monument, Port St Joe, FL, 227-1417
All Mass times EDT:
Saturday: 4:00 pm, Sunday: 9:30
Monday, Thursday, Friday: 9:30 am
Wednesday: 5:30 pm
En Espanol: 8:00 am, last Sunday of Month
St. Lawrence Mission
788 N Hwy 7"1 Wewahitchka, FL
Sunday: 11:00 am (CDT) .


"Our Church can bc iOlu r fiomc"
First Church of tlihe :Vi.azr
2420 Long Avenue Port St. r lofia c"45
(850) 229-9596


Sunday School ......... .. 10 a.m.
'j.u,,j. Morning Worship ... .. 11 a.m.
. '' ,,\ -i Wiiii ,,ii,[l .l .... ... 6 p.m .
W uljri,- dd E ,J,-,nr, .,,r,,,ia 7 p m '


lu Ui bted A1ieti~t
ffiwh f 4 ead
111 North 22nd Street Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Sdayd Worship Sernic: 9:00 a.m. CST
Sunday S(liol: 10:15 a.m. CST
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexio Beach United Methodist (hurh
NURSERY PROVIDED
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820


Family Life (hu
"Touching Lives with the Love of Jesus"
Join us in worship ,., .. ....
10:30 Sunday Morning 9,,. 8"
7!00 Wednesday Evening < >
Pastors Andrew
Cathy Rutherford Reid Ave.
Rhema Bible Training Center graduates Family lfe Churh
Visit pur website at:
familylifechurch.net yWewahitchka
323 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe 229-LIFE (5433)


"The Churches of Christ Salute You"
Romans 16:16

The Wewahitchka Church of Christ
Meets At 2241 Hwy. 71 South, Wewahitchka
(1/4 Mile North of the Overstreet Road)
(850) 639-5401
Sunday Bible Study 9:00 a.m. CT
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. & 5:00 p.m. CT
Wednesday Bible Study 6:00 p.m. CT


church ofChrist
at the Beaches
Established 33 AD in Jerusalem


We meet at 314 Firehouse Road
Overstreet 850.647.1622
Sunday Bible Study 10:00am EST
Sunday Worship 11:00am EST
Wednesday Bible Study 7:30pm EST
"we are about our Fathers business"




CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS


Singing:
Worship:


9 a.m. Sunday
9:30 a.m. Sunday
Call 229-8310


WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. 0. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32457
Corner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue



BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: .General Assembly 9:45 a.m. Bible Study all ages 10 a.m.
Morning Worship 11 a.m. Evening Worship 6 p.nt.
WEDNESDAY: Choir Practice 6 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"0 taste and see that the Lord is good: blessed-is the man that trusteth in Him.
Please accept this invitation to join us in worship. God bless you!
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-5026 Home 769-8725


SFirst Baptist Church
102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE
'Brent Vickery, Pastor
Buddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education
Michael Rogers, Minister to Students
Sunday School .. . ... .. 9:45 am
Worship Service ... ... 8:30 & T1:00 am
Disciple Training. ... . ... 6:00 pm
Evening Worship ........... ....... .. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeling .. .. .. 6;30 pm
Mon-Fri Det'oiion on 105.5 FM .. A .7 -19 am E


.." '

First Baptist Church
MEXICO BEACH
Located at 823 N. '15th St., Mexico Beach
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Worship Sundays at 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Bible Study Sundays at 9:00 a.m. (all ages)'
wednesday '- Prayer and Bible Study at 6:30 p.m.
Please note, all times central!
Reverend Eddie LaFountain


"iFS "A Reformed Voice
U i in the Community"

Dr. Bill Taylor, Pastor

'Sunday School ..................;.:............: 9:30, a.m.
Sunday Fellowship.................... 10.30 a m.
Sunday Morning Service ......... 11.00 a.n.
Sunday Evening Service .. .......6:00 p.m.
.Thursday Firehouse Fellowship .. 6:00 p.m.
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-6707
H,-ne ,, Faith Chu ia. S, h,,.,l

TO AjOV CHRIST.tVD TO MLikE Fl .I IIVOLY N

+ +ST. JAMES'

EPISCOPAL CHURCH
800 22nd STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (ESTy Suniday School 9:45
Child Care Provided for at 11:00
www.stjan iesepiscopalchurch.org 850-227-1845


Worship with us at

Long Avenue Baptist Church '


Where Faith, Family &


Friendship are found
Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pm
Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm


1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL For More Information Call 229-8691


18571


Sk WORSHIP





AT THE CHURCH


. OF YOUR CHOICE


Now


c \ ~L~C~


-


TheStI o, or St Je, L Tursay Ocobr 6, 00 -5B


Establishedl 1937 Servina Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


fT& em ,&uoinedajA i~ute am & to- tf the cduw"c& of ou c'owice tfhi. week

SOUTHERLAND FAMILY COMFORTER COSTIN & COSTIN Rish, Gibson, Scholz
FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL HOME LAW OFFICES & Groom, P.A.
W. P. "Rocky" Comforter Charles A. Costin William J. ishThomasSGibson
50710th Street Port St Joe L.F.D. Personal Injury Real Estate Will Rsh, Tholz, Paul s S Gibsonom11
(850)229-811... (850) 227- workers' Compensation RusseShol, Paul Groom II
(850) 229-8111 (850) 227-1818 (850) 227-1159 (850) 229-8211







VU Ih t JIUt I UII *. J I i nnu y %J V U Z-U


IU l tll i n


Meeting Schedule for Local
Government
Gulf County School Board
The School Board meets once a month,
typically the second Tuesday of the month,
though during the summer that schedule is
subject to change. Meetings are typically con-
ducted at district offices located on Middle
School Drive in Port St. Joe, though dur-
ing the school year the board conducts one
monthly meeting at high schools at each end
of the county.
Postings of all School Board regular
and special meetings and workshops can be
found at the district offices.
City of Port St. Joe
The Port St. Joe City Commission


conducts regular meetings twice a month, on
the first and third Tuesdays of the month at
6 p.m. ET in the Commission meeting room
on the second floor of City Hall on Cecil G.
Costin Blvd. near Reid Avenue.
Postings of all City Commission regular
and special meetings and workshops can be
found at City Hall.
City of Wewahitchka
The Wewahitchka City Commission
conducts regular meetings twice a month,
on the second and fourth Mondays of each
month at 6 p.m. CT in the first floor meeting
room at City Hall.
Postings of all City Commission regular
and special meetings and workshops can be
found at City Hall 'on Second Street.


Cdl newr


Board of County Commissioners
The Board of County Commissioners
conducts regular meetings twice a month,
at 6 p.m. ET on the second and fourth
Tuesday of each month in the Commission
meeting room located in the Robert Moore
Administrative Building next to the County
Courthouse on Cecil G. Costin Blvd.
Postings of all regular and special meet-
ings and workshops can be found at the
Robert Moore Administrative Building.
City of Mexico Beach
The Mexico Beach City Council con-
ducts its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m.
CT on the second Tuesday of each month in
the Civic Center located behind the business
district on 30th and 31st Streets.


Postings of all regular and special meet-
ings and workshops can be found at City
Hall, located on 1411 Street, or the Civic
Center.
County Economic Development Council
The EDC conducts a monthly meeting,
typically during the lunch hour of the first
Tuesday of the month at Sunset Coastal
Grill. For more information contact the EDC
at 229-1901.

A note to civic organizations and
other groups in the area: submit meet-
ing times and locations to the news-
paper and we will publish them each
week on this page.


Grand Re-Opening of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge's Visitor Centers


Come visit the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge newly
renovated visitor center and meet the staff and volunteers that
work at the Refuge. The visitor center will be open on Saturday,
November 4, 2006 from 11 am 4 pm. Normal visitor hours


Gulf Coast Workforce Board Annual Dinner
The Gulf Coast Workforce Board will hold their annual
dinner on Thursday, October 26, 2006, to recognize staff and
participants of the board's various service provider partners
who run workforce programs Gulf Coast Community College,
Royal American M jia,:iemen t. Bay District Schools, Gulf County
School District, Franklin County School District and Friends of
the Franklin County Public Library. These programs are funded
by federal and state funds which are used to assist participants
in Bay, Gulf and Franklin Counties.
Further information may be obtained by calling 913-3285
or by mailing Donna Williams of the Gulf Coast Workforce
Board at dwilliams(@gcwb.org ,


are Monday Friday 8 am 4 pm.
St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge recently updated the
visitor center exhibits with a grant received from the Bass Pro
Shop and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. Exhibits
at the office discuss the importance of the Apalachicola River,
Apalachicola Bay, the lake system on.St. Vincent Island, the red
wolf program, and the history of St. Vincent Island. In addition
to the updates, Mr. George Wefing's family recently donated
personal property of Mr. George Hatch that is on display. The
Refuge staff is very appreciative to have received historical
property from the first private landowner for St. Vincent
Island.
In addition to the updated exhibits, it is with great
excitement that we announce the formation of the Supporters
of St. Vincent NWR, a friends group for St. Vincent National
Wildlife Refuge. The purpose of the Supporters of St. Vindent
NWR is to support the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge as
a natural resource and work to protect it. This group will be
dedicated to promoting and perpetuating the Refuge. The 'list
of the initial Board of Directors and information on joining this
dynamic Friends group will be available in the near future. All
members of the public are invited to join the Supporters of St.
Vincent NWR.
--St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge visitor center is located
at 479,Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida. Look for directional
signs located on Highway 98. As a reminder, the Refuge is open
to the public year-round during daylight hours except during
hunt periods. Special permits or prior notice are not required
to visit except during the hunts. Transportation to the Refuge is
the responsibility of the visitor when not in' conjunction with a
specific refuge activity. ,If you have additional questions please
contact Refuge Manager, Monica Harris at 850-653-8808.
"Our mission is working with, others to conserve, protect,
and enhance fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats for the
continuing benefit of the American people:"


EventS


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


AR ka fn Pnf r~fI. Fl- Turdov Otobr 6, 00


t





The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, October 26, 2006 7B


OCTOBER
Music by the Bay, Each Thursday in Frank Pate Park,
Port St. Joe

NOVEMBER
43rd Annual Florida Seafood Festival, Nov. 3-5,
'Battery Park, Apalachicola
4th Annual Jazz Festival, Nov. 10-11, Dixie Theatre,


Mighty Mullet Maritime

Festival To Feature

Cook Off, Family Fun


The First Annual Mighty
Mullet Maritime Festival,
'Nov. 18 in Panacea, will fea-
ture fun for the entire fam-
ily, including an international
mullet cook off, maritime
demonstrations and exhibits,
karaoke finals, "living leg-
ends" storytelling, craft and
food vendors, student art dis-
plays, music, the crowning of
a king and queen, and (for
.,children) toy boat building,
-white boot races, and mullet
-jumping.
The all-day event will
begin at 9 a.m. at Panacea's
-downtown Woolley Park
-on Dickerson Bay just off
Coastal Highway 98.
The international mullet
cook off is open to the pub-
lic, with more than $3,000
in prize money to backyard
cooks and restaurant chefs
alike. The competition will
comprise three categories for


appetizers, first courses, and
main courses.
Named as judges are:
Joshua Butler, executive
chef, Governor's Mansion;
* Harold Hilliard, executive
chef, American Cullinary
Federation; Angelo Petrandis,
chef and owner, Angelo and
Son's Seafood Restaurant,
Ochlockonee Bay; Tamara
Suarez, chef. and owner of
Tamara's Cafe Floridita and
Cafe Con Leche Ihternet
Cafe, both in Apalachicola;
and Justin Timineri, execu-
tive chef, Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer
Services. In addition to hav-
ing a mullet to judge, there
will likely be mullet to eat,
thanks to a variety of food
vendors expected along with
arts and crafts vendors.
Bill Lowrie, festival direc-
tor, said


Apalachicola
Annual Christmas Celebration, Nov. 24, Downtown
Historic Apalachicola


DECEMBER
Christmas on the Coast, December 1-21, Downtown
Port St. Joe


Send Your Community Events to:
Write To: Fax To:
The StarlCommunity Events (850) 227-7212
P.O. Box 308 Email To:
Port St Joe, FL 32457 starnews@starfl.com


Island Lights, Dec. 1, St. George Island
Holiday Fresh Market, Dec. 2, Apalachicola
3rd Annummal Christmas Tree Lighting and Annual
Boat Parade of Lights, Dec. 9, Timber Island Yacht
Club, Carrabelle
Celebration of Lights, Sunset Park, Mexico Beach
Dec. 2
Celebrate Safe, Celebrate Twice, December 31, St.


Be sure to put Community News as the
subject when mailing.
Announcements are limited to 50 words,
and will run for a maximum of 4 weeks.


Panhandle Piecemakers' Port St. Joe Garden Club Coming Events
Quilt Show
The Port St Joe Garden ho e you will like it so lease Club ladi o


When: Saturday, October
28, 2006, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m. EST
Where: St James
Episcopal Church, PSJ
Admission is FREE
View beautiful, antique
and contemporary quilts
Free quilting demonstra-
tions offered by club mem-
bers

Bay County
Audubon Society
Field Trip
Saturday Monday
October 28
Public welcome to par-
ticipate
http://www.bavcounty-
audubon.org
Contact Richard
Ingram
871-1736


Club will have its pro-
gram CHRISTMAS IN THE
GARDENS on November 18,
2006 from 1:00-4:00 PM at
the Club building on 8th Street.
The Garden Club has been
renovated and you will be able
to see what we have done. We


come and enjoy CHRISTMAS
IN THE GARDENS with Garden
Club members. The program
will include designers and you
will be able to pick up some
ideas for your own Christmas
decorating. Door prizes will be
awarded as well as the Garden


COME TO PHIll Y'S TFINBEST
[anESHu i=aml E lS =' [ QEm *
AND GOa tlB UP SOMB FREE
SAMPLES OF OUR

z2)98'T WP Fir T T oRz THE '7<1S .


THE BEST
CHEESESTEAKS WE DELIVER!
PIZZA LIMITED TO JONES HOMESTEAD
HOAGIES & HIGHLAND VIEW AREAS
HOT WINGS $10.00 MINIMUM ORDERS


their special Christmas good-
ies after the program. Tickets
are $10-but $12 at the door.
See any Garden Club member
and come and enjoy an after-
noon of Christmas splendor.
See you on Nov. 18.


Pizza & Cheesesteaks
112 REID AVENUE
PORT ST. JOE, FL
850-229-9825
HOURS:
MON-THURS 11AM 9PM
FRI-SAT 11AM- 10PM
SUNDAY CLOSED


Time: 7:00 p.m. (EST)
Location: Thirsty Goat (Port Inn)
Port St. Joe


October 26
Larry Parker
Sponsored b-:
Hannon Insurance Agency

November 2
John Mazzanovich
Sponsored by:
Roberson & Friedman, P.A.


November 9
Jamie Hunter
Sponsored by:
Coastal Communicr Bank

November 30
John Mazzanovich
Sponsored by:
Farnsley Financial Consultants, LLC


4 Fantastic Fall Evenings of

Free Family Entertainment


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,Established 193 7 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


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OD Ine ar, ron rlt JSoe, L "I- IIuisu y, luc i iI z. vu


Gulf County Sheriff's Office
Arrest Log
On 10/04 Raymond Todd
Hall, 38, of Wewahitchka,
turned himself in at the Gulf
County Sheriff's Office for fail-
ure to pay child support. Mr.
Hall was released after paying
his purge. ,
On 10/05 Regina Lynn
Heckenlively was arrested
for violation of probation for
DWLSR. Heckenlively violated
probation by being arrested in
Bay County for DWLSR and
DUI.
On 10/06 investigators
received information that a
David Anth.on Wynn, 29, was
living in the Wewahitchka
area and had warrants from
Escambia County. Investigators
arrested Wynn on the war-


rants and also charged him
with Failure to Register as a
Convicted Felon.
On 10/06 deputies
responded to a disturbance
call on Bonita St. in Highland
View. Neighbors had called and
reported two people fighting
in the yard. When deputies
arrived they found Christopher
D. Maxwell, 28, and Shayla
Gay, 25, involved in the dis-
turbance. Christopher Maxwell
was arrested for domestic bat-
tery and possession 6f mari-
juana. Charges are pending on
Ms. Gay.
On 10/07 deputies attempt-
ed to stop a vehicle on Highway
71 in Wewahitchka. The driver
failed to stop and after a short
pursuit the vehicle was forced
to stop near Henry Street.
The driver, Charles Devin


Goodwin, 23, Wewahitchka,
was placed under arrest and
handcuffed. While deputies
searched Goodwin's car, he
broke and ran from them.
He was found a short time
later by K-9 Zeus hiding in
a wooded area near Chipola
St. Goodwin was charged with
Fleeing and Eluding, DWLSR,
DUI, Possession of Controlled
Substance x 2, and escape.
On 10/07 deputies
attempted to stop a vehicle
operated by Von Terell Holmes,
40, was stopped for a traffic
violation. While speaking with
Mr. Holmes, the deputy learned
that Holmes' license was sus-
perided and that he had a war-
rant for failure to pay child
support. When Holmes got out
of 1his vehicle, the deputy saw
a baggie of marijuana in the
front seat area. Holmes was


arrested for DWLSR, failure to
pay child support, and posses-
sion of marijuana.
On 10/08/ Major Barton
Rice, Jr. was operating a vehicle
that was stopped for a traffic
infraction. It was learned that
he had a warrant for failure to
pay fines. He was arrested and
taken to the Gulf County Jail.
On 10/08 Donald Wade
Harcus Jr. was operating a
vehicle that was stopped for
having a taillight out. While
one of the deputies was writ-
ing Harcus a warning, K9 Zeus
walked around the vehicle and
gave an alert for the presence
of illegal narcotics. Harcus
was found in possession of a
pipe commonly used to smoke
crack cocaine. He was arrested
for possession of drug para-
phernalia and taken to the Gulf
County Jail.
On 10/08 deputies and
park rangers from St. Joseph
State Park responded to a dis-
turbance call at one of the
campsites. They learned that
the victim had been struck in


the head with a beer can. Her
husband, Ray Allen Longshore,
46, Georgia, was arrested for
domestic battery and taken to
Gulf County Jail.
On 10/09 a vehicle was
stopped for a traffic violation
on Hwy. 98 in Port St. Joe.
During a search of the vehi-
cle, a passenger in the trunk,
Shawna Marie Hatcher, was
found in possession of a set of
digital scales. She was arrested
for possession of drug para-
phernalia.
Sean S. Chehardy, 18,
Wewahitchka, was arrested on
a warrant for failure to pay
fines on charges of operating a
vehicle with no registration.
Donald J. Bauer III,
Wewahitchka, was arrested on
10/09 on charges of domes-
tic battery. It is alleged that
he head butted his estranged
wife.
While patrolling Hwy 98,
deputies observed a vehicle
was stopped and the driver was
found to be intoxicated. Gila A
Conditt, 28, New Mexico, was


arrested for DUI and taken to
the Gulf County Jail.
A deputy observed a per,
son he thought to be Catherine
Lois Jones, 43, Port St. Joe,
standing on Martin Luther King
Blvd. The deputy knew Ms.
Jones had several warrants. He..
stopped and asked her name.
During a short conversation
she gave three different names. -
Ms. Jones was arrested on two
warrants for failure to pay fines,
and Obstruction by Disguise
for giving the false names. -
On 10/13 narcotics inves-
tigators served two warrants,'
arrested was George Bryant IV,
33, and Arthur T Addison, 49,
both of Port St. Joe. Bryant was
charged with Sale of Cocaine-
and Addison was charged with'
Robbery by Sudden Snatching. -
Addison's charges come'
from stealing money from an '
undercover informant as they'
attempted to purchase crack.
cocaine. Roderick Chambers',
35, Port St. Joe, was arrested
for DUI and taken to the Gulf-
County Jail.


i-VOTE




immYv


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DAY


Early Voting 8:30 4:30 Mon. Sat., Oct 23rd -Nov. 4th


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can do more to...

* Lower Hoimeownier's insurance -
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Help Our Schools ; Z,-
Visit Jimmy at www VoteJimmy corn ,


2006 Crime In Florida Semi-annual Report'


The Florida Department of "Typically the first half of last year. Murder, manslaugh- greater declines in crime vol-
Law Enforcement released the the year is a good indicator ter, and aggravated stalking ume than what is experienced
2006 semi-annual report of the as to what is ahead in the showed an increase. nationally, both for violent and,-
state's crime statistics today, remaining months," said FDLE The semi-annual report non-violent crime.
providing h preliminary indica- Commissioner Gerald Bailey .reflects an increase in violent The complete 2006 Semi-da,
tion of this year's crime figures. "We're pleased to see a continu- crime volume .(3,2%) and a Uniform Crime Report includ-
The report includes data sub- ation of the downward trend in decrease in non-violent crime ing county-by-county break-"
mitted by 404 law enforcement crime in Florida." volume (-0.9%). Total arrests downs, can be found on FDLE'.
agencies for crimes reported The number of reported decreased by 0.7% from last Web site: www.fdle.state.fl.us '
from January through June domestic violence offenses year's figure. Juvenile arrests For Further Information
of this year. The overall crime decreased by 1.5% from last increased 7.1%, while adult Contact:
volume reported in Florida year. Forcible rape, forcible arrests decreased 1.8%. Heather Smith or Kristen
decreased by more than 1,100 sodomy, forcible fondling, The FBI released the 2005 Perezluha
crimes and showed a decrease aggravated assault, simple national offense data on Sept. FDLE Office of Public,.
of 0.3% compared to the same assault, and threat/intimida- 18 which compares crime Information
time period in 2005. tion all showed a decrease over volumes from state to state. (850) 410-7001
Se Florida continuess' to have

Twenty-three Senior Managers Graduate from Senior Leadership Program !,


The Florida Criminal
Justice Executive Institute
announces the graduation of 23
senior managers from the Senior
Leadership Program on Oct. 20
at the Florida Department of
Law Enforcement headquarters
in Tallahassee.
The goal of the Senior
Leadership Program is to pre-
pare Florida's Criminal Justice
leadership for the challenging
and changing demands of the
future. Class participants study,
the trends and events that will


976 0 Hwy98WestPrtStoeF (850)229


challenge criminal justice pro-
fessionals and our state as we
enter the new millennium and-
examine the leadership skills
necessary to create and lead the
changes that lie ahead -
TheFloridaCriminalJustice
Executive Institute, established
\withlh the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement and affili-
ated with the State University
System, was established in
1990 by dihe Florida Legislature
who recognized the need for
an innovative and multifaceted
approach to the education and.
training of criminal justice pro-


fessionals. Since the program
began 16 years ago, 268 exec-
utives representing agencies
throughout the criminal justice,
community have completed this
specialized training.
Attached is a list of grad-
uates for the 11th Senior
Leadership Program.
For'Further Information
Contact:
Heather Smith or Kristen-
Perezluha
FDLE Office of .Public
Information
(850) 410-7001
SENIOR LEADERSHIP,


We, are evaluating cases of Lung cancer,
COPD, Berger disease, mouth and throat
cancer, PAD and emphysema for possible
claims against the tobacco companies
for symptoms or diagnosis that occurred
between 1990 and 1997.

We have been helping families facingtragedy
since 1973. We have offices throughout NW-
Florida.

On the web at Kerrigan.com
d -L' "'



Kerrgan, Estess, Rankin,


McLeod &Thompson
ATTORNEYS AT LAW




7' .T



The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based
solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written
inf-Irrr,.muoA jh.'.ul our qualifications and experience.


PROGRAM CLASS 11 ,
Lieutenant Joseph-
Anderson
University of South Florida',
Police Department
Captain Randy Belasic
. Zephyrhills Police Department
Lieutenant Kenneth"
Christmas
Okaloosa County Sheriff's -
Office
Captain Jack Daugherty.
FL Fish & Wildlife Conservation '
Comm. ,
Captain Clyde Eisenberg
Hillsborough County Shei off's, '
Office
Captain Robin Ford
Ocala Police Departent' .
Lieutenant William Hagans
Pmnellas cournn- Sheriff's Office
Lieutenant Todd Hand
FDEP, :. Diviion of Law.
Enforcement .
Lieutenant Richard Hohl '
Polk County Sheriff's Office '
Captain Randall LaBelle
Highlands County Sheriff's
Office / '
Commander Robert Lewis
Collier County Sheriff's Office '
Captain Kathryn McCurdy '
Panama City Police Department
Captain Richard Moore,
FL Fish & Wildlife Conservation
Comm.
Lieutenant Kerry Orpinuk
Daytona Beach Police
Department
Captain Marcus Rivenbark
Hernando County Sheriff's
Office
Major James Russell
Florida State Unnersity Police'
Department ,
Lieutenant Douglass Seely ,
Winter Springs Police;
Department
Lieutenant Daniel Smutz ;
Altamonte Springs Police
Department
Captain David Tripp
Florida Highway Patrol
Lieutenant Steven Vitt.'
Citrus County, Sheriff's Office
Lieutenant Tony Wasden '
Okaloosa County Sheriff's
Office
Captain Darrell Wilson
Plant City Police Department
Bureau Commander- Royce,
Wilson
Hillsborough County Sheriff's-
Office


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E_._fablish 193 evn ufcut n urudn aesfr6 er h tr otS. oF hrdy coe 6 06


FWC DNITON OF LAW NFCORCCMINT FICLD OPERATIONS


This report represents
some significant events the
FWC handled over the past
week: however, it does not
include all actions taken
by the Division of Law
Enforcement.
BAY COUNTY
Officer David Brady
responded to a boating acci-
dent in Grand Lagoon where
a boat collided with a naviga-
tional marker. No one was
injured; however, damages
were estimated at $2,000. A
citation was issued to the
operator of the vessel.
Lt. Jay Chesser and Officer
Dennis Palmer worked a tres-
pass complaint on a 1,500-
acre tract of private proper-
ty.- A stand and bait were
located; however, no hunters
were present. A truck was
stopped on the property and
a consensual search revealed
a bag of less than 20 grams
of-cannabis and a brass pipe.
The appropriate citations were


issued.
Officer Mike Nobles
responded to a complaint of
shots fired and found a grand-
father and grandson cleaning
several squirrels in the elderly
man's back yard. Apparently,
the duo had been shooting
the squirrels to protect their
pecan trees. Officer Nobles
issued warnings for hunting
out of season.
Two favorable disposi-
tions were received recently
from federal charges that
stemmed from cases made by
Officers Nick Price and Neal
Goss. One of the cases was
issued a Notice of Violation
Assessment in the amount of
$8,000 and a 20-day Notice
of Permit Sanction. A Notice
of Proposed Forfeiture was
also issued in the amount of
$1,280.93 for the proceeds of
the catch. In the other case,
the owner/operator settled in
the amount of $1,980 with an
eight-day permit sanction and


forfeiture of $552 for the pro-
ceeds of the catch.
FRANKLIN COUNTY
On October 9, Officer
Travis Huckeba charged two
subjects with attempting to
take dove over bait. These
arrests were the result of FWC
officers working in conjunc-
tion with the Investigations
section.
On October 9, at approxi-
mately 2 a.m. Officers Travis
Huckeba and Don Walker were
in their patrol vessel near the
FSU Marine Lab at Turkey
Point. The officers had ,sus-
pected that some illegal netting
activity was occurring in this
area. Utilizing advanced night
vision equipment, the officers
saw a vessel heading in their
direction. The officers maneu-
vered their vessel and 'con-
ducted a stop and inspection
of the suspect vessel. Upon
inspection, they found that the
three suspects on board were
in felony possession of mono-


WEELVY REPORT

filament trammel net and
approximately 300 pounds of
illegal fish. The net and fish
were seized and the three sus-
pects were incarcerated.
On October 13, at approxi-
mately 3 a.m. Officers Huckeba
and Walker were concentrat-
ing their enforcement efforts
on illegal net fishing in the
Apalachicola Bay. Utilizing
advanced night vision equip-
ment, the officers identified a
suspect vessel running with-
out navigation lights. The offi-
cers maneuvered their vessel
to intercept the suspects and
conducted a stop and inspec-
tion of the suspects' gear and
catch. Upon inspection, the
officers discovered that the
suspects were in possession
of, and had been fishing with,
an illegal net. The officers
seized the illegal net and near-
ly 200 pounds of fish. The
two subjects onboard the net
boat were issued appropriate
citations.


Second Annual Touch a Truck


There is little the young
'uns love more than playing
fire engine or dump truck.
On Sunday, October 29,
the youngsters will have their
chance to touch and jump on
the real thing.
The second
annual Touch
a Truck will
be held from
4-6 p.m. at
Long Avenue
Baptist
Church, which
will host the Touch
a Truck event along with a fall
festival.
Admission to the event is
free but children are asked
to bring a bag of canned food
items or a new toy for the char-
ity, Christmas for Children
and the Elderly, which again
this year will benefit from the
proceeds of Touch a Truck as
well as the fall festival.


There will be bouncy cas-
tles, cake walks and other fall
games along with a host of
trucks and emergency vehi-
cles for kids of all ages. of
course to climb on and, if the
impulse pulls them,
sound a siren or

two. So, those
who live near
the church,
located at 1601
Long Avenue in
Port St. Joe, hear
the sounds of sirens
on the late afternoon of Oct.
29, remember, it is just kids
having fun.
The folks at Long Avenue
and Touch a Truck encourage
everyone to come out for a fun
time and to support one of the
finest of local charities.
Questions? Call Suzanne
Doran at 227-3570 or LABC
at 229-8691


Students go to Tennessee for Student Council Convention


By: Olivia Lamberson
Southern Association of
Student Councils, otherwise
known as SASC, is a conven-
tion held every year in vari-
ous places all over the South
of the U.S. This year it was
held at West High School, in
Knoxville TN. West High was
last year's President of all
Southern Student Councils,
which is why their school host-
ed this convention. I (Olivia
Lamberson), Kayla Minger,
Leah Miniat, Shayla Nickson,.
and Treva North,' from Port
St. Joe High School's Student
Council attended this conven-
tion, where the theme was
"Lights, Camera, Leaders in...
ACTION".
When we arrived at West
High on Saturday, October 7th
we were all really excited, and
could not wait to find out what
all we would be doing over the
next few days. The conven-
tion started with registration
and once that was completed
there was a "fair" and a "meet-
n-greet" on the football field at
the high school, complete with
free food and drinks and other
games we could all play to get
to know each other. After a
few hours at the football field,
we were split into two groups,
the "actors" and the "agents".
The five of us were all in the
"actor" category, and while the
"agents" went to dinner, the
"actors" went to the gymna-
sium to watch a group of danc-
ers from a local Tennessee
dance school. The dancers
were amazing and ranged in
ages from 8 to 17. Afterward,
the groups switched places
and the. "actors" went to din-
ner, where we were encouraged
to sit with other schools and
mingle. After dinner everyone
split up into their state and
we all had state meetings in
our "State Room" where we
talked about the first general
session and that we would all
sit together. Afterward all the
delegates attended our First
General Session, and. were
introduced to the officers. We
also had motivational speak-
ers during the First Session.
After the Session' we broke
up into three groups with 3
or 4 states per group and
had activity rotations. When
this' was over at about 11:00
we met our host families and
went home..
Sunday started early in
the morning with an optional
church service, however, the
actual convention started at
9:00 with another General
Session with a few more
speakers, one of which being
Miss America. After the
General Session we all had a
workshop and lunch rotation,
the way it worked was we all
received sixpieces of colored
,paper. and we went by color
to, the workshop listed on the
paper. Workshops ranged
from Ballroom Dancing to a
class, on Financial Planning to
a Singer Bread House Building
Contest, however, there were
tvmo things that they all had in
common. One was they were
all unique .and fun in their
own way. The second is that
S all of these were ideas that we
each could bring back to our
high school student councils
and teach them or do things
with them to help benefit the
community. After this we had
a snack and then went tq our
Third General Session where
we watched skits and voted
onf who we ,wanted to be the
next Southern Association of
'Student Councils officers. We
--soon afterwards found out
who won. While there were
many offices, the one most
unmportant ,was the office of.


President, two schools ran for
this office, Allen High out .of
Texas, and one of our neigh-
boring schools Bay High out
of Panama City. When it came
time for the office of President
to be announced, the room
fell silent. "And the winner
is...Bay High School!!!" The
whole place went crazy (after
all there were 210 delegates
just from Florida there.) Once
the pandemonium was calmed
we were dismissed for din-
ner and a leadership learning
class. When dinner, was over,
and we were all full, we loaded
up in buses and traveled to
the Tennessee Theater where


we were able to watch "The
Wizard Of Oz" in one of the
first places it ever appeared.
It was truly an amazing expe-
rience!! When the show came
to a close we all loaded back
up and met our host families
and went "home" yet again for
another evening.
On Monday, also our last
day at the convention, we were
up and at the school at 8:00
in the morning for another
fun filled day. Today we all
had to wear our Conference
Shirts that we were given
because we would all be going
to Dollywood Theme Park as
our activity for the day! After


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New.Fall Clothing.......... ....................50% Off
Scented Fall Candles & Potpourri ........20% Off



Interiors 'Etcetera.
10:00 a. m. 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday Saturday

Bridal Registry Gifts Clothing
China & Crystal Accessories


B D ESJqyLS please come see us!
We have freegift when you register for china, crystal
and accessories.

505 Reid Ave Port St. Joe Phone 229-6054




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a whole day of eating, rid-
ing rides, and spending time
with the friends we had made,
we headed back to West High
School to go to our last and
final General Session. When
the session was over we all
headed up to the high school
football field for the annual
Candlelight Ceremony. We all
held a candle and one by one
lit the candle near us until all


you saw was 800 candles all
lit and shining bright. The
ceremony ended with everyone
saying goodbye until next year
and taking many pictures. We
then met up with our host
families one last time to head
"home" for the night.
Sure, we were all tired
and some of us even sick when
we pulled into the parking lot
at Port St. Joe High School on


Tuesday evening about 7:00,
but ask any of the five girls
that went and you'll get the
same answer. "Yeah, we would
do it again, in a heartbeat!"
All five of the girls would like
to thank Mrs. Joni White and
Mr. Rodney Herring for taking
us to Tennessee for an experi-
ence that none of us will soon
forget!


Fall Classes
Beginning November 7th
Christmas Table Runners Placemats
Purses Various Quilts and more...
Stop by the store for dates
Offering classes for Beginners to Advanced


j By order of and which Sincere Appreciation:
The Parents of the Graduating Class of 2007 Port St. Joe High
SFind You...


L, WARRANTS ARE BEING ISSUED FOR YOUR ARREST!
It's that time of year AGAIN... The Annual Graduating Class of
Port St. Joe High School's


JAIL for BAI

Project Graduation Fundraiser
You have been identified to participate in the Class of 2007 "Jail for Bail" in j
support of Project Graduation. Your assistance in this fun,.yet beneficial fund raiser
will help in promoting a SAFE and FUN graduation night our 2007 Graduates.

Tuesday, October 31, 2006
To avoid your sentence of Jail-time, make your tax-deductible donation
to Project Graduation!
Call your friends and neighbors to begin collecting your bail money and,
have a great time supporting PSJHS.
To avoid jail time, make your checks payable to Project Graduation and


Project Graduation 2007
C/o. Decorative Flooring
305 Third Street
Port Saint Joe, FL 32456


mail to:
Project Graduation 2007
or C/o Cape San Bias Realty, Inc
4320 Cape San Bias Road
Port Saint Joe, FL 32456




4


7 S P


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, October 26, 2006 9B


Established 7 93 7-SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


.2.:: -*.- ..: ,r*' *






nO .... ....I P... S.... o. FL .. ..u O 26


Important Dates to
Remember :
October 25th- Report
Cards are sent home with stu-
dents.
October 26th-27th- Port
St, Joe Middle School will be
hosting a book fair!
November 1st- Sign-up
(Port St. Joe residents) for the
Christmas Assistance Program
sponsored by the Salvation
Army will be hosted at the
Stack House in Port St. Joe
from 10:00a.m.-4:00p.m. All
applicants must provide the


following information: photo
I.D.; Social Security Cards
for applicant and children;
recent rent receipt(If someone
else owns the home or pays
the rent, that person should
accompany applicant); util-
ity bill, cable bill,& cell phone
bill; and household Income
receipts.
Parents,
You are able to monitor
your child's grades online. Go
towww.gulf.kl2.fl.us and click
on:
a. for the parents


Federal Lifeline Notice

Alltel customers may be eligible to
receive monthly reduced rate
telecommunications service under the
Federal Lifeline and Link-Up programs if
they satisfy federal eligibility criteria.

If you think you qualify,
please visit your local retail store or
alltel.com/lifeline for further information.








wireless


b. view grades online
c. click here to begin
You will need to enter the
student ID and PIN Code and
then select Port
St. Joe Middle School.
If .you do not have a PIN
Code, please call 227-3211 to
make an appointment. You
will need to sign a release and
show proof of identity.
All students have new
Pinnacle passwords this year,
,not just those students new
to the school. Sorry for any
inconvenience this will cause.
Parents and students: it
is never too early to start pre-
paring for the FCAT exam, To
help make practicing a little
more fun log onto www.fcatex-
plorer.com and play math and
reading games that will help
you learn FCAT material while
having fun! Parents, you can
pick up your students FCAT
Explorer ID. and password in
the Middle School Guidance
Office or call Andria Butts at
227-3211.
Port Saint Joe Middle
School's Positive Behavior
Support Program reward
to students with no disci-
pline referrals for the month
of. October will be attending


the Halloween Dance held or
October 31st at around l:00p
m. Students keep up the good
work and avoid behavior tha
will get you a referral! You
won't want to miss this dance
Parents and Students
it is, never too early to star
planning for College. Florida
Bright Futures Scholarships
are awarded to any and al
Florida Public and Private
School Graduates who meet the
qualifications. Scholarships
are given based on grade point
average, Standardized Tes
Scores, Graduation, and
clean criminal record. You
can start planning for your
future now by staying ou
of trouble and keeping your
grades up! For those students
or parents interested in learn
ing more about The Florida
Bright Futures Scholarship
Program you can visit www
MyFloridaEduca'tion. com
brfuture or come by thi
PSJMS guidance office for
brochure.
Andria J. Butts
Guidance Counselor
Port St. Joe Middli
School'
abutts(a)gulf.kl2.fl.us
(850) 227-3211


"Popular Pops and Classical

Classics" COncert at GCCC


The Orchestra of St.
Andrew Bay, a GCCC music
program partner, will be
presenting- "Popular Pops
and Classical Classics" con-
cert on Saturday, October 28
at 7:30 p.m. in the Amelia
Center Theatre at Gulf Coast
Community College. Admission
is ten dollars for adults and
.five dollars for students-underl
eighteen.
The St. Andrew'.Bay
orchestra .will perform various
symphonic tunes by several'
famous composers. Selections


will include musical compose
tions by, Georges Bizet, Hector
Berlioz, Antonin- Dvorak
Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov
Jean Sibelius, Johani
Strauss, Jolui Barry, Leonarc
Bernstein, Ronan Hardiman
Andrew Lloyd Webber, anc
John Williams.
The Orchestra of St
Andrew Bay will be conducted
by Eddie Rackley. Tickets are
available at the box office bni
hour prior to the concert.
For additional informa
tion, call 872-3886.


"Motivating Your Teenager"--

Parent Workshop

Workshop for Parents and Grandparents of Students in
Middle and High School
Skills to help motivate students!
Port St. Joe High School Media Center
1 Presented by Panhandle Area Educational Consortium
Monday, Oct. 30, 2006
d 6:00 7:00 p.m. ET
For more information contact Martha Weimorts,
1 Gulf County Schools ESE Staffing Specialist/Parent Liaison.
: Phone 229-1492
t Sponsored by Gulf County Schools and Panhandle Area
a Educational Consortium
S "
e National Bullying Prevention
s Awareness Week Empowers Schools,.
t ,
t Parents to End Childhood Harassment:
a '
u National Bullying resources for parents, ai
r Prevention Awareness Week interactive activities to tea 1t
t is Oct. 22 28, 2006. It is second through sixth graders
r sponsored by PACER Center's about bullying and how to pre*
s National Center for Bullying vent it.
- Prevention and cosponsored A grant from Robins,
a by the National Coalition Kaplan, Miller and Ciresi LLR
for Parent Involvement in Foundation for Educati6Za
. Education, National Education Public Health and Social
I Association and National PTA. Justice, a supporting orga-
e Teachers, parents, and nization of the Minneapolts
a children nationwide are Foundation, is instrum n- -
encouraged, to use bullying tal in funding, the Web. site.
prevention activities and mate- Additional support comes front
rials at Target Corporation: Minnesota
e http://www;pacerkids- Twins; Kansas City Chiefs stali
againstbullying.org to help end Tony Gonzalez; Hollywoqto
bullying. producer Chris Moore (Gdod
"Childhood bullying is a Will Hunting); and others.
significant problem nation- PACER Center serves
wide," said Paula E Goldberg, 'families of children and youth
executive director of PACER, a with disabilities and special -
national parent center located health needs, in addition to -
in Minnesota. "It can cause the bullying prevention project
school absenteeism, men- for all children. It provides
tal and physical stress, poor resources such, as public -
school performance, poor self- tions, workshops, and individ-. -
- 'esteem, and, in some cases,. ualized assistance and heipg -
r school violence.' Statistics families make decisions abeflt. -
, show that 160,000 children in education, vocational trainifgt -
the United States miss school employment, and other set"
n.. each day as a result of being vices for their child.
d bullied. That's not acceptable.- PACER is. located at'
Teachers and parents can 8161 .Normahdale Blv -
i play a critical role in creating Minneapolis, MN 55437-1044,
a climate where bullying is Telephone numbers are 952.
t. not tolerated. When adults and 838-9000 (%oice);. 952-83 -
d children stand together, bully- .0190 (TTY) or 888-248-082-2,
e ing ends," Goldberg said. (toll-free). PACER's princj-..
e The http:"'\v\v.pacerkid- pal Web site is wnAv.pac'er.
sagainstbullyina.ore Web org. and its e-mail address Fs
- site features lesson plans pacer,5,pacer.ore.
and materials for teachers.


A Big "Thank You" to all those





who made the 10th Annual Scallop


Festival, a great success!


We couldn't have done it without you!

The Gulf County Chamber of Commerce extends a heartfelt thanks to all of our

Sponsors and Volunteers whose hard work and commitment made this year's festival the: bst ever!

Your efforts to assist usprompote ..ri'ed:scallop andQurdowntown area is very much appreciated. With support
S' from theoeontin torow festival and feature Gulf Co '



-' .INUM,;.'" ESIA"ONSORSHIPS FRIENDS OF T" .-C E -

PT-UM.I... ., .,S-iVER.. FRIENDS OF THEESITI.
SCity of Port'St. fde ile Seafood Parti Blyok
SGulf Ci-ny Tbotrist.Development Counitii Duren's Piggly Wiggly .PllyannaH.ie
Lions Chib of Port St. Joe ,Kenn Strange Electric ., Gail.Hac ,c
Progress Energy of Florida etcalf Electric & AC -- J Nort .
I -, '. .: Mexico Beach Community Develdptme' C6niocilE 86.bb S ed.'
"G.LD Raffield Fisheries tr Tharpe .
iChemicai.. Sunset Coastal Grill _, -..ue& Lee Vmce-,t.
Spe^rSigtfis& Logo Design G 'ulf Coast Propertm Services G.-Yfoun-y Comrnissin1er "BillWjI-'.
'tirv 21/Gulf Coast Realrx Waste Recyclers, n Borden -
'anache Ten.s& Events ,a : ** .-^ ^, ,' .' ,i
0 ..' .- '" ,, _., .. ; ,
.- [ ". -,- ~i m ,..- ..... ,.. .._ -. __- '


Established 1937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


IOBTheStr, ortSt Jo, F -Thursday, October 26, 2006






t Istamisnea 10/75/ ,norsvitoy CIfio Luiltf ulfV in 5 u a orebr


The Gulf County Junior


Miss Program this Saturday


The Gulf County Junior Miss Program
will take place this Saturday beginning at
5 p.m. ET at the Port St. Joe Elementary
School Auditorium.
Seven girls representing Port St. Joe
and Wewahitchka High School will com-
pete: Arielle Bragg, Amelia Brockman,
Courtney Craft, Ellen Manor, Leah Miniat,
Megan Peak and Kate Shoaf.
The program is locally sponsored by
the Junior Service League of Port St. Joe


No More Towing
Park It Here
Under The Bridge


and exists to recognize and reward young
women who have distinguished them-
selves at school and in their community
with educational scholarships.
The admission is $5 per person and a
concession stand will be available.
The Gene Raffield Cheerleaders and
Pam Nobles Studio will be performing
during intermission.
Everyone is welcomed to attend.


1624 Grouper Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida
eugene@raffieldfisheries.corn


Boat & RV Owners can enjoy Security and Convenience for an affordable price with Raffield Fisheries New 24 Hour Access
Secured Fence Indoor & Outdoor Storage Facilities.


Outdoor Storage Rates
(RV's & Boats)
$3.00 per ft. a month


Over 28,000 sq. ft w/Sprinklers
Indoor Storage
(Boats on Trailer Only)
$7.00 per ft. a month Boat
Length Only
Utility lrailer. A Boail


T'rallers onli
$50 per month Outside


Please Call Mike (850) 227-3357 Ask About One Month Free Storage
Located under the bridge in Highland View next to Port St. Joe & only minutes from St. Joseph Bay boat ramp


11.. hFor all your

Advertising needs...

,. Be Sure to

Contactyour

West Gulf County
Account Executive

Rachel Browning

227-7856


JATHE STAR


135 W. Hwy 98
Port St Joe, Florida


~t.v


Fr UU$ I


- -.; 5 ~.
Lw


Vr I


Vision Bank


SAYS
HA VE A PICTURE PERFECT


www.tiffininteriors.com
60 Island Dr
Eastpoint, FL 32329

850-670-8800


12 month no payments no interest to qualified buyers
with minimum $2000 purchase


Does your child or grandchild -


Mle niber
FDIC


, ,.


ZZ.,


have the cutest costume?
On Tuesday, October 31st,
from 9:00 to 5:00 EST
drop by the Vision Bank
office located
at 529 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd and
have your picture taken with your
favorite Vision banker.
Pictures will be $5.00 and all
proceeds will be donated to
the PSJ High School
2006 Project Graduation.
The best costume wins a prize!
So come on by, enjoy a
Halloween treat
and have fun with Vision Bank-

Your Community Bank


LENDER


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Cape San Bias Lighthouse Keepers' Quarters Wins State Preservation Award


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The St. Joseph Historical Society was awarded this plaque for
its successful restoration of the lighthouse keepers' quarters on
Cape San Bias.







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The Cape San Bias
Lighthouse Keepers' Quarters
is not only beautiful on the
outside, it was such an excel-
lent restoration job that it
received an historic pres-
ervation award earlier this
year.
The restored old house
was nominated for the
prize in the Restoration/
Rehabilitation category,
Florida Trust for Historic
Preservation, by Charlotte
Pierce, one of the board
members for the restoration
project.
The lighthouse keepers'
quarters are located at the
site of the Cape San Blas
lighthouse on U.S. Air Force
property near the Sttimp
Hole on Cape San Bias. Two
old houses used by former
lighthouse keepers are sit-
ting side by side and adjacent
to the lighthouse tower. One
house has been restored; the
other is waiting for funding
for its restoration.
According to the infor-
mation on the Trust's web-
site, the two lighthouse' keep-
ers' dwellings were originally


constructed in the early 20th
century and are the only
two of their unique type in


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salesia mexicobeachproperties.com

850-648-5767 1-800-239-4959
I f T .7 :f-, , 1' '-- 'J


Joan Rick
Lovelace Krause
roher A .oclr- A'ocalolec


IL L ,
zIbt~x


Catol
Bonanno
A;:ociaip


Regina
Capps
A.'Qocioae


Margie
Raffield
A.'ociaoe


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Lisa
Glennon
A:ociaorte


Florida.
"In 1999, the U.S. Air
Force relocated the two hous-
es away from the water's
edge, and converted one of
the dwellings into an officer's
retreat.
"The other structure was
left in poor condition on tem-
porary shoring. Recognizing
the restoration potential hid-
den in the dilapidated keep-
ers' quarters, the St. Joseph
Historical Society coordi-
nated the restoration of the
dwelling back to its original
appearance."
The Restoration/


Rehabilitation Award:
acknowledges the proper
restoration of a structure
to an earlier or original
appearance, or the rehabilt-
tation and/or adaptive new
use. Projects must rigidly
adhere to the Secretary, "of
the Interior's standards. :
Eda Ruth Taylor and Afn
Yon, two members of the.St.
Joseph Historical Socilty,
attended the Preservation
Awards Ceremony in :SC
Augustine in May to accept"
the award on behalf of. the~
society. -


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1309 Hwy 98 Mexico Beacn
BEAUTIFUL GULF FRONI CORNER LOT zoned Tourist Commercial In me heart at Me/ico Beacnl Waterfioni loot
age ,s 66 6' on me Gull oy 80 deep. Muli-family use .s allowed $1.300.000
837 Inalian Pass Ro.. Inaion Pass
PRISTINE GULF FROMI 50 lot at secluded Inaian Pass. Beautilul wide wnile sana each ols of0 natural vegela-
rion palm flees sea oats & aunes Aalacent 50 lot available also Enjoy spectacular sunsets and Gull Breezes
fhom this beaulilul lo01 $1 150 000


1032 15n Streel Mexico Beacn
THREE ACRES ZONED GENERAL COMMERCIAL with 24 x 40 snop/warenouse Clealea and fillea wint oeauhtully landscaped nignlea pavers
brick entrance and wiougnl iron lence along lion Seoenteen residential water meters. ana one commercial water melei eighteen sewer
tapi PRIME COMMERCIAL DEvELOPMENT SITE!! PRICE REDUCED $2.350 000
1100 15th Street. Mexico Beach
PRIME COMMERCIAL LOf in the nean ol Mevico Beachi Seller I6 very motivated ana ,s olfenng this impiesswe 100 x 100' property for only
5$49 000


Cornel lor lhat is only 3 lots back liom the dedicalea beacn Can buila home either tac.ng Auger or 386 ana have a Gull View S598 000
8109 Americus, St. Joe Beach
Great building lot witn community pool in back and snort walk 10 beacn Lot Is cleaed and reaay to oulld Covenants & Restricllons ana plal
map on file Buila your beach name or a greal mental. 6469 900
127 Columbus Street, St Joe Beach
Beaulitul Guil View lol in Isi Block al St. Joe Beacn. Only sleps to Dedicated Beacn and in nice neighborhood 50 x 150' 275 000


290 Ola Bay City Ra Wewahllchka C .,-c- ii, i- 1i: :i:..e I.:. iI. 1: : E:i;.:: r:r, T, .3:r.-$215000


ir- Ii -,' I r, u :l[ .: 1.1 .-:.-., ,T,,jr,lr .629.900
' 324 Douglas Landing Rd. Wewahilcnuka.i :. : :..:.r. 3.:r. : I
*.3j.-i .i .-,-'. -,.- Iar.:..:r,:,:, J..49.900
121 Palm Breeze Way PortSt. Joe-L,3- 1: I 10:1 r.-j :,:ur.
tr, .-Hi., .;i.;.- t.: i j.-: -. S73.500
122 Gulfl Coast lC Port SI Joe-l J .*.. :uir, .-.3i- uL., i i: -.
O :c r.lIot .rl,:., : b,- :iTilir .:.r..S124 900
3577GarisonAve Por SIt Joe-r ~ c.or- .ucjl.i i :,, .i:, i.:r
..iiri .3r. rii .: j,.31 .. -l :I.-$124 900
128 GulftCoast Cir Por St Joe- 1i:: c.o -i -i .3r, .:om.- 3-',',' ,r,:
i.C.. .$124 900
3609 Garrison Ave Port Sr Joe-:-.-oir l:. :... i.. r,... :.jc 31 i i. i
S -.-i ll:e : ,r3 r.,: cr .ri -:..$124 900
124 Gulf Coas Cii Port St Joe IeT ,.uci li::.-, r.-o.i ':.iI 3.
,-:* t a,. ,-Id: e-: .. :,- 1-:1 -$124,900
130 Gull Coast Cir Port St Joe 1..:- J. I .. : i.3i ri.:.r. .. r.r,
3,:hil. 1,jr.i .: :, .:r -$124,900
3555 Garrison Ave Port St Joe.:.,ll, C-or- uL. ii1:.r, 10t: :' i.:I
I-, ,'.,,ai I.. :.:.: 124 900
10O Texas Dr M exico Beach-r J.:.- ii:' lui lot i r:.i. aj r.- 1. ,,,I.1i
,-, .3r.c.:..r -.:.,:. S160 000
411 Arizona Dr Mexico Beach .-..C.: 3 a : i. I i, 1 i;l.i .rli.i
c,.-,,ar.c.:r,: 5165 000
410 La Siesta Dr., Mexico Beach-Cic.i-, ,e:'.:l.3-rti. i c jllir,. j i.:.I i,
A 110 inr :u.j .ii i:i:r.-S166000
110 Paraalse Cove Mexico Beach L .I.- :i.r...i Jr:.'.: I: I ir.
F .3..31- '.: .. '. .31 ... .- 51 79 000
116 Four J s Ra Sl Joe Beach-Nice I' -I i:.1 ir, a.,_ir : .: .u, ,Ir,
,Irr, c: : i i : 1. : 199.000
106 Wnite Blossom rolail S Joe Beacn-B. eOuir,rjl 'i.3 : I i: 'ri r1 .
-,:i _li.T'! B.J io i.i,:i:r '- 200 000O
124 Whnile Blossom Tiail Sr. Joe Beacnh'.-i-c... ": .-' i.:.r..u:c .


124 Hiaaen Plage Rd SI Joe Beach-.i.- I31, .ii.u. j M .:i:,-i,-.r
i:.: rte i i ir.: 31. r, .j1 .- 'ijt. 31.1:1:,-r. 5219.000
225 Old Bay C.ry Rd. Wewonircnkad-: r.i :r J.: :r.:.:-
c.:.,. ::i icir, I:...uit -.1,.i.i .- S224.900
140 Four J Ra.. St. Joe Beach-E u.,riru l.Ii "'i' i : h' I i -.",:r -: ,
ir, :.. ,,, r .:1.:.:- .' .ur,,j, r,-225.000
243 Coronado St Joe Beacn..-.: .:..:r, i .:. i: :. .:
C- i a.: 3i. 3 i-:r. MaKe offer.$225 000
107 Wnie Biossom Trail St Joe Beacn. -., ,.-:i,..I- ':. IJ-1:1 I .
r.1 .:i:.:i lu.n :,u.s i :1 .r. 6228 500
137 Wnnle Blossom Trail St Joe Beacn-f.13 ..:i. 3 fl j ".uI :,3, 1:,. t
:,is I:.r S229 000
110 White Blossom Tiall SI Joe Beacn.':.,: ,..i.:r". i i 1:1..,r.
r,. :r,. -:..,. i :.: '1: 5229.000
121 White Blossom Trail St Joe Beacn-.-.E :i, -o l.:5. .:re: .i 1,n
r lo..r-.:11 ei.jTr *,j.i ..J, :.,.$229 000
132 Wnite Biossom frall St Joe Beach.r.l 1..r: I. elu, ucrr a.i.i-r. .:.?
A: 'J; -$229000
138 White Blossom Trail St Joe Beach i..: .i I J r, r 1 r .: i. ,jn
j ia1 i I.:.- $229 000
110 Windsong Ct Mexico Beach.L 3r iI'u .i_- : 5: 1:1 r i
+- r ,.-..- 'u C. Ik-r. 5 2 4 9 0 0 0
133 PineSI Mexico Beach-L: r i. I- II, .ji .rr .'. -,r.,I3i ri..el ,-
c :.rr,.:.: $269.000
213 Non Nook Rd. Mexico Beacn-L:r i, -.- ir, l-.. I'' r.3;i.
I. f f.: .-, i.: c ',-,.i.-$274 900
6108 Coquina St Joe Beacn-..-D..-D,. -: i J*.o i:.:.j.: i-: .ir.
,T,,hj.,- ,c,..- ,'-.-3.' iir."- r -:r.$275 000
200 SI Frances Mexico Beacn.rl i .-jC i i::. ...lr,,, '. r'.IIl rr:.,Y
C'- ,.:r, ". i'.:. .: ir.-' I.: 6. 289.900 ;
1452 Inaian Pass Rd.. Cape San Bias-L.:.r ..iir. D., ".:.: i.:. rr-.
Fi .:I ,. L .c -, .'ail... c.$-5295000


;i


areas for 68 years


Established 7937 Serving Guilf county and surrounding


12BTh Sor Pot t.Jo. F -ThrsayOcobr 6,2006


I


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Cl i 1 N --co


Accepting the award for the St. Joseph Historical Society are (L to R) Eda Ruth Taylor (historical'
society member), Dimitri Gioglis (who handled the restoration), Ann Yon (historical society member,
Randy Lewis (of Manusa, Lewis, Dodson Architects), and Jim Crawford (of Peter Brown Constructio6
Company).







:4 ~"'


Childhood Obesity 2C


Established 1937 Servina Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Legals


7C


Classifieds 9-10C


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, October 26, 2006 SECTION C


Survey Says ... County Has Housing Needs.


In May of 2006 the Gulf County Community
Development Corporation (GCCDC) distrib-
uted copies of the Gulf County Community
Development Corporation 2006 Community
Needs Survey.
The GCCDC staff distributed the' surveys
countywide to the following: local churches,
businesses, banks, the Gulf County School
District, local clubs (Rotary, Kwanis, Lions).
The survey was printed in the Star newspaper
and the GCCDC staff set up booths in front of
the IGA in Wewahitchka and the Piggly Wiggly
in Port St. Joe.
The GCCDC staff worked diligently to
ensure that everyone who wanted to participate
in the survey had the opportunity. The survey
was designed to provide the GCCDC and local
government entities with a better understand-
ing of housing community service needs, issues
and problems at the county and local levels.
The survey gave local officials and other
professionals, who are most familiar with the
unique characteristics of their community, a
voice in planning how Gulf County's affordable
housing and community service needs can be
most effectively addressed.
This report presents the results from
the Gulf County Community Development
Corporation 2006 Community Needs Survey.
This survey reveals and indication of attitudes
in Gulf County.
Response Rate
The Gulf County Community Development
Corporation 2006 Community Needs Survey
collected a total of 107 responses countywide.
Housing Activities /
The Housing Aetivities section of the survey
asks a series of questions about local affordable
housing need. The respondent was required to
rank items in order of importance with one
being the first in importance and the highest
number being the lowest in importance. On
most of the subsequent questions the respon-
dents were asked to select one answer.
1) General Need Rank your community's
need for the following types of general housing
assistance activities from the h highest to lowest
level of need (1 indicates the highest need.
Housing Assistance 1
Development of Apartments 2


Energy Assistance 3
Capacity Building Assistance 4
Assistance for Homeless Persons 5
2) Housing Assistance If there is a
need for direct housing assistance to house-
holds in your community, which has the great-
est need? (Select one)
67 percent Assistance to purchase a
home.
9 percent Home Repair Assistance.
5 percent Rental Payment Assistance.
8 percent There is a Minimal need for
Direct Housing Assistance in the community.
3) Development of Apartments With
regard to rental development in your area,
which activity is most needed? (Select one).
5 percent Rehabilitation of Existing Rental


Units.
50
Units.
26


percent Construction of New Rental

percent The need for both types of


Rental Housing is approximately the same.
8 percent There is a Minimal Need for
Rental Housing Development in the commu-
nity.

4) Energy Assistance With regard to
energy assistance, which activity is most need-
ed? (Select one).

8 percent Education Activities
14 percent Repair and Replacement of
HVAC equipment
21 percent Utility Payment Assistance
36 percent Weatherization and Minor
Home Repairs to Increase Energy Efficiency
6 percent There is a Minimal Need for
Energy Assistance in the county.

5) Capacity Building If local Housing
organizations need assistance to increase their
ability to apply for funding and develop afford-
able housing, which activity is most
needed? (Capacity building activi-
ties help to increase the ability of
,I local organizations to apply for"
S funding a develop affordable hous-
; ing.) (Select one).)
*21 percent Assistance with
Operating Costs.
30 percent Predevelopment
Loans
11 percent Training and
Technology
9 percent There is a Minimal
Need for Capacity Building
Assistance in my community.
19 percent No Opinion.


6) Assistance for Homeless
1 Persons If there is a Homeless
population in your community,
which activity is most needed to
,-...,.' address the population? (Select
.4 one).
S'' ,14 percent Creation or
Renovation of Short -Term,
-".. Emergency Shelters.
17 percent Essential Services
for the Homeless (Counseling, Job


Training, Assistance and Case Management).
10 percent Homeless Prevention
Services (Rent and Utility Assistance and Case
Management).
3 percent Maintenance and Operation
Costs for Homeless Facilities. < .
30 percent There is a Minimal Need for
Assistance for Homeless Persons in my com-
munity.
20 percent No Opinion.

7) Housing Price What Home Purchase
Price Range do you-consider Affordable?

39 percent $70,000 $90,000
23 percent $90,000 $110,000
17 percent $110,000 $120,000
10 percent $120,000 $150,000

8) Special Needs Population Which
low income population is. the most in need of
assistance in your community?
54 percent Poverty-Level Households
23 percent Elderly Households
4 percent Persons with Disabilities
0.9 percent Persons with HIV/AIDS
5 percent Homeless Persons
7 percent No Opinion

9) Migrant Farmers Is there a need foi
information and training on fair housing laws
to help mitigate housing discrimination occur-
ring in your community?
18 percent Yes
39 percent No
34 percent No Opinion

10) Community Development Rank
your community's need for the following types
of community development activities from high-,
est to lowest level of need (lindicates the highly
est need).


Housing
Economic Development
Public Infrasitrtlcture
CommuIitI Planing,
Disaster Recovery for


2
3
4
Damaged


(See SURVEY on Page 12C)


FOR SALE


"- F' '. .... : '" '-


MILS 111536 203 Louisiana Drise
3 BR,2 BA D%% Mobile Home in immalulale con-
dition. Ahoul a block from the beach in Mexico
Beach. Large building & office in back of prop-
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NILS 200371 7276 Dahlia Street
Must see! One owner. ell maintained. Property
comes fully furnished wilh plenty of storage space
in outside shed/work area. 4 year old metal roof
and new central H&A/C uniL $249.9001)


..- ? -,
NILS 108551 Make 1s an Offer on this Residen-
tial Lot. 141 Barbara Drine, Close to Schools and
Churches. This beautiful home sile is located
in an established neighborhood of Hell kept
homes. Perfect building lot for your dream home.
$119.5001


NMLS 106883 1752 Cobia Street
REDUCED!! 2- 2050 lot with Ba%\ iew. There
are 2 rental mobile homes on the property. Owner
will pay up to $5.000. to hase these mobile homes
removed from property after the sale. Close to
boat ramp and Intra Coastal %Vaterssai. Bring
all offers. $2.225.000


NtLS IW8425 18.48 acres of cleared land. About 1/2
mile from boat launch that will access 'ou 1o Chipo-
la Cut Off Ri er and from there you can gn into the
Apalachicola Riser which is the Inter Coastal Wa-
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Dead Lakes.. A perfect place to build that dream
home or condo.









INEWAHITCR-K. FL 32465
Perfect starter home. Tuo bedrooms one hath.
Inside cit) limits. Close to riser system and lakes.
$89.9110.00


42~~.
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-MLSi1O9318 111119 ML
ox 14at'el2/ ,'2 Acres 800'+/- iway 98 Frontage
^indmark Beach's Barefoo6tCottages & Viento Developjnalt
rffeiig of VALUABLE DEVELOPMENT PROPERTY W


ore informati of these or other ph


ase call one of erienced Sales


... -... ,-- .--- ,-:








SMEXICO BEACH OFFICE
1602 W HIGIHVAY 98
MEXICO BEACH FL
850 648-4400


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PORT ST JOE OFFICE
155 W HIGHWAY 98

Tl!TY SHOPPING CENTER)
2 91STJOE,-FL.
-229-6100..


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1t Thk tn,,- Port St Ino Fl Thursdav. October 26. 2006


Opportunity Florida Holds Day

Long Business Session With

Regional And State Partners':

Florida's Great Northwest &

Enterprise Florida


A day long business ses-
sion will be held in Bristol,
Florida on November 6 at the
Liberty County Community
Center. The sessions will
begin at 10:00 am EST with
discussions regarding future
Opportunity Florida and
Florida's Great Northwest
cooperative efforts to reach out
to the rural counties of north-
west Florida. Then at noon
Eastern Time, Opportunity
Florida will go into a gen-
eral Board Meeting, with a
special presentation by Bay
County International Airport
Executive Director Randy
Curtis, to discuss future plans
for the airport.
At 2:00 pm Eastern Time
Opportunity Florida, in part-
nership with the state's eco-
nomic development agency,
Enterprise Florida, will con-
duct another in a series of
meetings regarding the eight


rural counties' efforts to bring
a mega/catalyst site to the
region.
Gary Clark, Chairman of
Opportunity Florida states,
"This is probably one of the
most important days in the
history of our organization. We
hope that as many as possible
of the, eight counties' elected
officials will attend."
Opportunity Florida
Executive Director. Rick
Marcum added, "I am so
pleased to see that this region
is coming together to build
economic capacity. Between
2001 and 2005 our eight-
county region created 4,153
new jobs.. Further success will
only come from the continued
regional approach to economic
development."
For further information;
contact your local chamber of
commerce, or call Opportunity
Florida at 850-718-0453.


For allyour




... ..B e S u re to

-Contactyour

Downtown, Wewahitchka, -
Cape, Indian Pass
Account Executive


Iimberly Pickett


227-7851
-TFE STAR T HEff.Sa ''L
135 W. H v 98 12 9.otimetceStreei
P ort St Jd, Flor4 '- Apalacjcola, Flond'
0) -A ,, P C .. .I .e- ..l


Tiny Wasps Proving Helpful To Area Gardens In


Controlling Destructive Pink Hibiscus Mealybug


Florida Agriculture
Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson today announced that
biological control program
efforts under way in more than
30 Florida counties are prov-
ing successful in controlling
the destructive pink hibiscus
mealybug (PHM). PHM was
first discovered in the country
in Broward County four years
ago.
"Florida was ready for the
discovery of PHM, recognizing
that because of its prevalence
in the Caribbean, it was only a
matter of time before it arrived
in the United States," Bronson
said. "Florida is besieged with
invasive plant pests and dis-
eases because of our climate
and location, and finding natu-
ral solutions to these prob-
lems is a key component of the
Department's mission."
Fortunately, PHM has
some natural enemies --
two are' parasitic, gnat-sized
wasps (Anagyrus kamali and
Gyranusoidea indica) that
attack PHM but cause no
harm to other insects, plants
or animals. Another enemy
that is helping to control
PHM numbers is a lady beetle
(Qryptolaemus) that is a pred-
ator of PHM and already well
established in Florida.
PHM has spread to 34
Florida counties, including
Manatee, Sarasota, Pinellas
and Hillsborough. Most of the
infestations have been found
on hibiscus plants. Biological
control parasites are being
released in all counties with
current infestations. In the
last four years, more than 2
million have been released.
In addition to PHM par-
asite-rearing facilities in
California and Puerto Rico,
the parasites are now being
reared at the Department's
Division of Plant Industry in
Gainesville at a rate of 16,000
per week. Currently, two-thirds
of these are being released in
the Sarasota/Manatee county
area where some of the state's
newest infestations have been
identified.
Even though the biologi-


cal control program is helping
to suppress the population of
PHM, eradication is not feasi-
ble, and pest management is a
more realistic approach. After
the biological control para-
sites are released in an area,
in time, usually two or three
months, they will reproduce
and spread out miles from the
initial release site.
Biological control pro-
grams conducted in the


Caribbean have reported. 60-
80 percent reduction of PHM
within six months of parasite
releases at test sites, and 95-
98 percent after one year The
southeast Florida PHM bio-
logical control program has
been ongoing since the initial
outbreak in June 2002, and
results have been promising.


In Broward and Miami-Dade
counties, plant recovery is
excellent. Average decline in
the PHM adult female popula-
tion at study sites was 97.2
percent.
PHM occurs in most tropi-
cal areas of the world and


attacks more than 200
plant species, includ-
ing many found in
Florida, such as hibis-
cus, citrus, mango,
avocado, tomato,
cucumbers and oth-
ers. It is a tiny (3mm)
sap-sucking insect that
forms colonies on host
plants, which, if left
undisturbed, can grow
into large cotton-like
masses of white waxy
deposits on branches
and leaves. PHM feeds
on the sap of the plant
and releases toxic sub-
stances causing injury
and sometimes death
to the plant. PHM
infestations are spread
by wind, on infected plant
material, also by ants or other
small insects.
Although PHM is poten-
tially a very serious threat,
homeowners should not
become overly concerned
because Florida is home to
more than 200 species of rela-
tively harmless mealybugs,


all of which share a similar
appearance once they infest a
host plant. Only an entomolo-
gist can determine if a plant
has PHM. PHM can be distin-
guished from other mealybiiug
species by its reddish-brown,
smooth body and pink-to-red
body fluid.
If homeowners think their
plants may have PHM, they can
call the state helpline at 1-888-
397-1517. State plant inspec-
tors will check properties in
new areas suspected of having
PHM. If PHM has already
been detected in an area, and
the beneficial parasites have
been released, it may not be
necessary to check individual
yards. The Department is ask-
ing that homeowners and lawn -
maintenance .companies con-
trol PHM damage to plants by
cutting away damaged areas,
double- bagging plant debris
and disposing of it with their
household garbage, not their"
yard trash. Yard trash is often
composted and spread back
into the environment. The
state is also asking homeown-
ers in areas where the PHM
parasites are being released to
avoid using pesticides on their
landscape plants because the
insecticides will kill the ben-
eficial parasites that are being
released to control PHM.
More information about.
the pink hibiscus mealybug is
available on the Department's
web site at http://www.doacs.
state.fl.us/pi or call 1-888--
397-1517.


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It's been said that there
is a thin line between a
hobby, and mental illness.
I think a lot of people
who've learned the art of turn-
ing food scraps and leaves and
grass clippings into soil have
crossed that line.
These people get excited
about things like worms,
and army fly larvae. Perfectly
respectable ladies will crawl
into dumpsters just to collect
a supermarket's old produce.
They stuff their cars with bags
of leaves that they swipe from
the neighborhood curbs. They
pay good money to have steam-
ing, fragrant horse manure
dumped in their yards. They
cruise churches and parking
lots, wherever pumpkins are
sold at this time of year, just
waiting for broken or rotten
fruit to snatch. They wait
until the hay bales being used
for autumn displays get wet
and moldy, and then beg for
them. They plan their week
around coffee shops, all to col-
lect the used coffee grounds.
They drag all of this home
and stockpile it, neighbors be
damned, until there is enough
to build a proper compost pile.
And then they layer it, browns,
greens, browns, greens, until
it is all gone. Immediately they
start looking around for more
stuff to stockpile.
How do you spell cuckoo?
C-o-m-p-o-s-t-e-r-s.
Children refer to these
people as crazy, as in "that
crazy lady that stole the
leaves my Daddy raked up
last Saturday." Or, "that crazy
man that wants -me to bring
him the grass I bag up when
I mow the lawn." Other
adults just refer to them, a bit
enviously, by their gardening


scraps (no fat or animal prod-
ucts, though), old paper tow-
els, coffee grounds, egg shells,
whatever.
Layer enough material to
make the lasagna about 18
to 24 inches high. In the
spring, plant right into that
lovely mess, and mulch with
new material.
I also really like this meth-
od suggested by another lazy
gardener. She uses a 30 gal.
Tupperware container with
several large holes drilled in
the bottom, smaller holes in
the sides for drainage, and
four large holes drilled in the
lid. She pulls the container
to wherever she'll be plant-
ing next, and just lets it sit
there for a while. Into the
container she throws all her
kitchen scraps, weeds, coffee
grounds, and whatever organ-
ic refuse she wants to keep
out of the garbage. After a
couple of months the rainwa-
ter which has drained through
the lid has made a compost
'tea' which then drains out the
bottom. When she's ready to
plant, the ground underneath
the container is soft, loamy,
and full of earthworms which
have been attracted by this
moveable feast. She claims


accomplishments. As in
"my sister lives next door
to the house with the amaz-
ing flower garden." Or, "Mr.
Smith is the one who kept
leaving vegetables on the
doorstep last year."
There's something
about mixing up leaves and
manure, and having it turn
into dirt, that makes us
want to do it again and
again.
There are easier ways
to create compost. One
such method is called lasa-
gna composting, and since
I can't seem to get the old
compost pile to eat my blue
jeans, this is the method
that makes me feel more
competent.
It's pretty simple, and
this is a good time of year to
make a lasagna bed. First,
cover your area with several
layers of damp newspaper.
If you're making a new bed,
don't worry about the grass
(or weeds) underneath, just
cover it with enough mate-
rial and you'll never know
the grass was there by next
spring. Cover up all the
newspapers with a layer
of leaves, or pine straw,
or wood chips, and cover
that with a layer of grass
clippings, or seaweed, and
cover that with a layer of
stable manure, and cover
that with some cardboard,
and. cover that with... you
get the idea. Basically the
goal is making use of what-
ever you have available, and
the cheaper and easier it is
to come by, the better. Avid
composters make a sport
of collecting free material.
Into the mix can go kitchen


the container has only needed
to be emptied once iJn 'thle-
past two years, because what-
ever goes in breaks down and
tends to 'disappear' into the '
ground beneath. ,
Of course, she does have. ar
30 gallon Tupperware contaih- gjL
er in her landscape. I wonder ,
what her neighbors thiik:is in r
there? Whatever it is, she sure
feeds it a lot. Crazy lady.
Questions? Comments?' ,
Opinions? Email me at
kc.kelley@mchsi.com


2006 Hurricane
Names

Alberto Leslie
Beryl Michael "
Chris Nadine )o'
Debby Oscar oJ
Ernesto Patty "
Florence, Rael :'
Gordon Sandy.
Helene Tony
Isaac e' Valerie'
Joyce William a
Kirk ile
4-.

13


'En


Secretary Urges Floridians To Become i 1
P wF T ElectIf You See News Happening, Call...
Pollworkers For The Upcoming Election Y


Secretary of State Sue M.. trained individuals who
Cobb urges Florida voters to assist Florida's citizens in the
become pollworkers for the important process of casting
November 7th election. On their ballots.
Election Day, the Supernisors Across the state,
of Elections are among the Supervisors of Elections are
largest employers of their recruiting those who enjoy
cournuies. hiri-ng thousands of "-interacting with the public.
workers statewide to work To become a poll worker,
the polls. you must be an American
"Oneofthemostimport'ant citizen and registered voter.
roles on Election Day is filled These are paid positions and
by friendly, dedicated, front training is provided
line representatives of the To find out more about
Supervisors of Elections," said becoming a poll worker
Secretary Cobb. "Pollworker Floridians can contact, their
training is being conducted local Supervsor of Elections
state wide. I encourage all or call the Division of
registered voters to call your Elections at 850.245.6200 to
local Supervisor of Election's be conrfected with their local
office to receive information elections supervisor.
on working at the polls on In Florida., 61,657 citizens
Election Day." served as poll workers during
Poll workers are highly the 2004 election c\ cle.


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TheStrPot S. oe F -Thursday, October 26,' 2006 ;~Y


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years






##% Tine )T+, rFT aT. InnFL TIrdrv rtbe 6.206 stblsed197 erig ul cuny n srruninaes-or68yer


He is a member of the Emerald
Coast Association of Realtors,
the Florida .Association of
Realtors and the National
Association of Realtors. Prior
to joining Sterling Realty, he
worked in management for a
financial services company.
Dalmau attended Louisiana
State University.
"Raul exemplified excel-
lent sales and customer


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Charming cottage located on a beautiful wood-
ed lot in a well established neighborhood.
Completely renovated in 2004! MLS# 111660
ONLY $209,000







Large building lot in Palm Breeze subdivision,
close to town, bay and beaches. This is a beauti-
ful subdivision with underground utilities which
allows modular homes with covenants and re-
strictions. 103 X 190. Starting at $72,000.







'4 Commercial lots in located in a rapid devel-
oping coastal community. Highly visible and
high traffic volume in Port St Joe. Great Bay
views! Possibility to pick up two additional
adjacent lots for bigger space. MLS# 110987
$950,000.






Contemporary 3BR/2BA home. Close to bay
and across small city park, great for walking and
jogging. Large master bedroom, big closet. Central
fireplace in living room, formal dining room and
eat-in kitchen. MLS# 110119 $299,000


C








www.CoastalRe

8048 Cape San Bias Rd
Cape San Bias, FL

850-227-7770
800-584-1566


3 BR 2 BA House on quiet street with lots of
upgrades: granite countertops, fireplace, Pergo
wood floors, pool & hot tub, wonderful family
room. MLS# 110465 $299,000.


service abilities through-
out September," said Penny
Worley, vice president of sales
for Sterling Realty. "His dedi-
cation and hard work in serv-
ing the buyers and sellers of
Northwest Florida is one of
the many reasons why Sterling
Realty is a leading real estate
company on the Emerald
Coast."
For more information
on Sterling Realty, visit www.
SterlingRealtv.com.

ABOUT STERLING
REALTY: Sterling Realty
LLC www.sterliwwngrealty-
sales.com, formerly known
as Real Estate International,
Inc. (REII), is one of the old-
est real-estate companies
on Florida's Emerald Coast
and, having sold more than
$500 million in real estate
on the Gulf Coast in 2005, is
also among the largest. The
company oversees the sales
of commercial, residential
and general real-estate prop-
erties in Northwest Florida.
It also acts as a "real estate
sales arm" for its sister com-
pany, Sterling Development,
enabling Sterling Realty cus-
tomers to have the first oppor-
tunity to take advantage of pre-
construction resort real estate
opportunities.

ABOUT THE STERLING
COMPANIES: The Sterling
Companies, consisting of
Sterling Development, Sterling
Realty and Sterling Resorts, is
Northwest Florida's only fully
integrated, full-service resort
development, sales and man-
agement firm.
From resort development
and real estate sales to vacation
home rental and homeowner
association management, The
Sterling Companies provides
a full range of services for
luxury resorts, condominiums
and vacation homes located
throughout Northwest Florida,
Alabama and Mississippi.
Headquartered in Destin,
Fla., The Sterling Companies
employs more than 650 peo-
ple and is projecting com-
bined 2006 annual revenues
in excess of $600 million. For
more information, visit www.
TheSterlingCo.com.


Sterling Realty Names September Sales Leader


Lots in Southgaie. N..:e t.ildr.i g I.,-r Prir
college, schools and future site of hospital.
MLS# 107685 & MLS# 110794 Starting at
too ann


Gulf Front Gated Community with two swim-
ming pools, tennis courts and easy access to
America's Number One Beach (Selected by Dr.
Beach, 2002). 34 Barrier Dunes Townhouses
Available from $319,000 to $650,000.







Gulf Front townhouse. Seller recently added
third bedroom. This unit has been well main-
tained and would be an excellent rental unit.
Priced to sell MLS# 200304 $439,000.


H _t. .... ,



Great lot on canal that opens right into Intracoastal Bayfront Cot
Waterway. Easy boat access to East Bay, Intracoast- tifullyfurn
al Waterway and out to Gulf of Mexico. Possible to the bay. Brin
also buy the adjacent lot. Great Investment poten- income. MIi
tial! MI.S# 107621 $195,000
Preston Russ
s t 33 AVictor Ramos GRI
o a s | Scott Burkett
Debbe Wibberg
4 ,31 Betty Caughey
JA Paul Penn


altylnfo.com


Gretchen Upchurch
Brian Burkett
Rex Anderson
Ann Anderson
Chris Pierce


110 Barrier Dunes
Cape San Bias, FL

850-227-3200

800-713-9695


106 Reid.


106 Reid
Port St J

850-227

800-581


Volunteers Needed to Protect Rights of


Elders in Long-Term Care Facilities

The Panhandle Long-Term
Care Ombudsman Council, one
of 17 local consumer advocacy
councils of its kind throughout
Florida, is in need of volun-
teers to serve the residents of
nursing homes, assisted living
facilities and adult family care
homes in Franklin and Gulf
counties.
The Long-Term Care
Ombudsman Program is a
volunteer-based organization Y url ll e
seeking to ensure the health,
safety, welfare, and human so many dedicated volun- tial. A long-term care ombud
and civil rights of individuals teers throughout the state," man program exists in ea
living in long-term care facili- said State Long-Term Care state throughout the U.S.,
ties throughout Florida. The Ombudsman Brian Lee. "But mandated by the federal, Olc
program, administered by the with growing demands, our Americans Act. Long-term ca
Florida Department of Elder volunteers need help. By advo- facility residents, family me
Affairs, is one of the larg- eating for residents' rights, bers and Florida reside]
est long-term care ombuds- we ensure that they and their interested in volunteering w
man programs in the country families and loved ones have a local council, accessing
and currently has more than peace of mind and enjoy an program's services or learn'
300 volunteers; however, with acceptable quality of life." more about residents' rig]
more than 150,000 residents All program services, may call toll-free 1-888-83
in Florida's long-term care including individualized 0404 or visit http://ombud
facilities, the need for addi- response to residents' con- man.myflorida.com online.
tional volunteers is critical. cerns, are free and confiden-
"These volunteers are
vital to the care and protec-
tion of Florida's seniors," said
Department of Elder Affairs'
Secretary Carole Green. "It
is imperative that Floridians
continue to answer the call
and volunteer their time to
this exemplary program."
When an elder is admit-
ted to a long-term care facil-
ity, federal law mandates that
he or she is given a special
set of residents' rights cov-
ering issues ranging from .
dignity and respect to mea-
surable quality of life and
care. Volunteer ombudsmen
- who are trained by the pro-
gram and approved by the
Department of Elder Affairs
- each spend approximately
20 hours a month inspecting
local facilities and responding
to residents': individual com- .
plaints to ensure that their
rights are being maintained
and respected.
Residents, family mem-
bers, friends and concerned
citizens contact the program
for help in resolving the issues
they face at long-term care
facilities, and ombudsmen .
personally visit the residents
in their facilities to look into : '.-
their concerns and provide
empowerment and assistance
in resolving them.
"We are fortunate to have


Rt


Please visit The Star &


The Times at:


www.starfl.com


www.apalachtimes.com

Also visit our affiliated panhandle

resource guide at: -,


www.emeraldcoast.com
s.. .-


-/O1- 11-*r*-mr-r7r* r-i r" r- r" r" r" r- % r-N*^~* -a-r**-1m \
Advertising is now available on all our websites.

For more information call Katie at 596-7179

Here are a few business now advertising
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227-5543
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ith
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hts
31-
ds-


Sterling Realty, ( www.ster-
lingrealtysales.com ) one of the
Emerald Coast's largest real
estate agencies, has named
Raul Dalmau as sales 'leader
for the month of September.
Dalmau, who has been a
multi-million dollar produc-
ing realtor along the Emerald
Coast since 1999, specializes
in residential, condominium
and pre-construction sales.


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Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Thi Sar Prt t.Jo, L -Thrsav Ocobr 6,2006





The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, October 26, 2006 5(


EstaOishledl 9 I37 Serving Guir county urru oulwunu:.ng areas3 ya- '-----,


Early Voting Begins October 23
~Floridians have three ways to cast their ballots for the General Election-


Florida voters have three
ways to cast their ballots for
the fall elections, making it
easier than ever to participate
in the democratic process.
Floridians can vote by absentee
ballot, during the early voting
period, or at the polling place
on Election Day.
Beginning Monday,
October 23, early voting
begins at local Supervisor of
Elections main and full service
branch offices designated by
the Supervisor. In accordance
with Florida State Statute
101.657, supervisors may
also designate any city hall
or permanent public library
facility as an early voting site
if it is geographically located
providing all voters in the
county an equal opportunity
to cast a ballot. Early voting
will be conducted eight hours
each weekday and eight total
hours each weekend during
the early voting period. Voters
can contact their Supervisor of
Elections for locations, dates,
and times of early voting
places. Early voting ends
for the General Election on
Sunday, November 5. -
Floridians who choose


to vote early
will need to

and signature
identification i
to cast their
ballot. A photo .
and signature t i
identification has
been required to
vote in Florida
since 1998. Any
of the following
documents may
be presented to
fulfill the photo -'
and signature
requirements:
Florida
driver's license;
Florida identification
card issued by the
Department of Highway Safety
and Motor Vehicles;
United States passport;
Employee badge or
identification;
Buyer's club
identification;
Debit or credit card;
Military identification;
Student identification;
Retirement center
identification;
Neighborhood


J,9 ." -

association identification;
And public assistance
identification.
If the photo identification
presented does not have the
voter's signature, additional
identification with the voter's
signature is required.
During the November
2004 General Election, 1.4
million early voting ballots
were cast in Florida. For more
information on early voting,
or for early voting sites and
times, please visit the Division
of Elections online at http://
election.dos.state.fl.us


MusicCityFLA, a weekly
radio and web broadcast, has
made its debut as a major out-
let for Florida-based music.
The program will dedicate
more on-air time to Florida
musicians than any other pro-
gram in the nation.
MusicCityFLA is a two-
hour, call-in radio. show that
airs on WTAN 1340 AM in
Clearwater, St. Petersburg and
the Tampa area, and on music-
cityfla.com worldwide every
Thursday at midnight. The
program will feature music of
all genres as well as guest
appearances by artists, pro-
ducers, music journalists, and
others.
MusicCityFLA supports
all signed, unsigned and inac-


tive Florida musicians. Its
creators and on-air hosts,
Ivan Pena and Justin Vilardi
of Clearwater, encourage any
band to submit their music for
air play.
"I saw this as an opportu-
nity to unite the Florida music
scene and draw more atten-
tion to some very talented, yet
under appreciated bands out
there," Vilardi said. "We're
looking to meet new people
and bands, help them the best
we can, and listen to the some
of the best music in Florida
along the way."
Pena shared the vision.,
"We wanted to do this
show to get some radio play
for bands that we admire
and who may not have had


the chance on mainstream
radio," Pena said. "We hope
the artists playing shows every
weekend or even those in the
garage appreciate what we are
doing."
MusicCityFLA is also an
all-inclusive webzine featur-
ing Florida artist interviews,
photos, and live event cover-
age. The site will house each
week's broadcast for down-
load as well as links to the
artists featured.
If you find yourself frus-
trated with the unyielding play
of Green Day's "Boulevard of
Broken Dreams," flip your.
radio dial no further. For
more information visit:' music-
cityfla.com.


DEP Launches Mercury Switch




Recovery From Scrap Vehicles
j~


The Department of
Environmental Protection
(DEP) today announced a
statewide initiative to remove
mercury switches from vehi-
cles during automotive recy-
cling. Part of a national pro-
gram approved by the U.S.
Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) in August 2006,
the National Vehicle Mercury
Switch Recovery Program
(NVMSRP) is designed to
remove mercury-containing
light switches from scrap vehi-
cles before they're flattened,
shredded and melted to make
new steel.
"Vehicle recyclers and dis-
mantlers in Florida can play
a critical role in reducing a
significant source of mercu-
ry air emissions," said Mike
Sole, DEP Deputy Secretary
for Regulatory Programs and
Energy. "A potential environ-
mental hazard can be avoided


in the mere seconds it takes
to remove a convenience light-
ing switch from scrap vehicles
prior to recycling them."
This week, DEP sent let-
ters to Florida vehicle recy-
clers and dismantlers encour-
aging them to take part in
this important environmental
initiative. As part of the recov-
ery program, the End of Life
Vehicle Solutions Corporation
(ELVS), an organization cre-
ated by the auto industry, will
send collection buckets to
Florida vehicle recyclers and
dismantlers that participate in
the mercury switch collection
program. ELVS will arrange
for the mercury switches col-
lected at designated business-
es to be shipped and recycled
at no cost.
Pellet-sized mercury
switches can be found in con-
venience lights in trunks and
hoods, as well as some anti-


lock brakes of certain pre-
2002 vehicles. Nationally, it
is estimated that there are 35
million automotive mercury
switches currently in vehicles
today.
Recognizing the environ-
mental and health hazards of
mercury, DEP has conducted
extensive research into the
sources of mercury emissions
and instituted advanced tech-
nology controls, leading to. a
decrease in mercury emis-
sions from major emission
sources over the last ten years.
Removing mercury switches
from scrap vehicles prior to
recycling them can further
eliminate mercury from the
environment.
For more information
about the mercury switch
recovery program, visit http//
www.dep.state.fl.us/waste/cat-
egories/mercury/default.htm.


Massage Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony


The World Massage Festival
will take place Saturday,
November 4, 2006, from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m., at the Pensacola
Interstate Fairgrounds in
Pensacola, Florida. The Festival
is a job fair for those considering
massage therapyas a profession
and a showcase for the commu-
nity at large to see various types
of massage therapy.
There will be a timeline and
explanation of massage from
3000 BC to present. Some
of the giants in massage his-
tory, including Bonnie Prudden,
Sister Rosalind Gefre and
George Kousaleos will be among
those attending.
Therapists showcasing their
talents will choose clients from
the general public to receive a
free massage at the Festival. The
first 100 general admissions will
receive free massages.
The Massage Hall of Fame


get high

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/ .

- .,'i .
' ,, ; ... ,


has been created to honor those
having furthered the profes-
sion. This year the Hall of
Fame is sponsored by Massage
Magazine. The induction into
the Hall of Fame will start at


1:00 p.m..
Visit http://www.worldmas-
sagefestival.com for details about
the Festival and the inductees
into the Hall of Fame.


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Electricity powers our lives.
Every minute of every day we benefit from electricity. Considering
the high costs of gasoline and other fuels, electricity from your local
electric cooperative is a great value.



S' Gulf Coast

Electric Cooperative
S A Toudchstone Energy Cuoperative j
www.gcec.com
800-568-3667 or 800-333-9392


MusicCityFLA Aims to Give Florida Musicians a

Chance and Listeners Fresh Material


Gaskin-Graddy Insurance Agency, Inc.

~Homeowners Insurance
S* Mobile Home Insurance
Automotive Insurance
S-- Health'Insurance

GASKIN-GRADDY INSURANCE -YOUR FULL SERVICE INSURANCE AGENCY
156 2nd Ave, PO. Box 157 Wewahitchka F1 32465-0157
(850) 639-5077 (850) 639-2553 1-800-782-6802
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Know Your Macronutrients: Carbohydrates


Today's anti-carb diet hype
is really giving carbohydrates
a bad name when, actually, the
right type of carbs form the
backbone of good nutrition.
Sadly; the average
American eats way too much
of the wrong type'those sugars
and processed starches in
snack foods, most bakery
goods, beverages and
desserts'and not enough of the
high-nutrient carbohydrates
we find in vegetables, dairy and
whole grains, which provide
most of our essential vitamins
and minerals. But the current
hype villainizes the good with
the bad. This is why you need
to know your macronutrients.
If you're really curious
about the diet industry's latest
creations, you can blow your
money on the new no-carb,
low-carb products. But if what
you want is to eat better and
maybe even lose a few pounds,
a little understanding about
macronutrients will serve you
better.

Carb Structure and
Function


STARBUCKS' COFFEE
BREWERS POSE FIRE
HAZARD
Starbucks is recalling
Starbucks Barista AromaTM
Stainless Steel 8-Cup Coffee
Brewers sold nationwide from
March 2005 to September
2006. The coffee brewer has
defective electrical wiring that
can result in overheating,


Chemically, all carbs are
made up of sugar units. Nearly
all carbohydrates come from
plant sources, but they also
occur in dairy products, honey
and some seafood.
They are typically classed
as 'complex' carbs, which
include starches and fiber, and
'simple' carbs, which include
sugars and starches that have
been commercially processed
to the point that they've almost
been broken down into sugars
already.
Simple carbs contain just
one or two sugar units and
they taste sweet; they're rapidly
processed by your body and
they provide energy (calories),
but no nutrient value.
Complex carbs contain
long chains of sugar units.
They have a characteristically
starchy taste, and unlike
sugars, -they are typically found
in foods rich in vitamins,
minerals and fiber-like
vegetables, whole grains, dairy
foods, and even some protein.
Because of these additional
nutrients, the body takes a
longer time to digest them


smoking, burning and melting,
posing a possible fire hazard.
This recall includes the
Starbucks Barista Aroma
8-Cup Coffee Brewer only.
"Starbucks Barista Aroma" is
embossed on the front of the
brewer and the brewer has
silver control panel buttons
and a chrome finish.


A..


than it does simple carbs.
When you digest
carbohydrates, they are all
broken down into simple
sugars, which are converted
in the liver to one common
denominator: glucose. Also
known as blood sugar, glucose
is the body's basic fuel.
The main function of
carbohydrate in the diet is to
supply the body a ready source
of fuel for glucose production.
The trick is to determine how
much is really needed for that


Consumers should contact
Starbucks at (800) 453-1047
between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. MT
for a full refund. Consumers
can also visit www.starbucks.
com. More info at www.recalls.
org.
BICYCLE LIGHT
BATTERIES CAN
OVERHEAT


Light & Motion is recalling
ARC Lithium Ion Bicycle Light
Batteries sold nationwide
from November 2003 to
October 2004. The battery can
overheat, posing a fire or burn
hazard.
The recalled batteries
are found in Light & Motion
2004 ARC Li-Ion HID lighting
systems. The lights are black
with "ARC" and "LIGHT &
MOTION" written in yellow
letters. The recall includes only
batteries with a manufacturer
date code of 1003 or 1103.


'ready source,' based on how
much energy you burn up,
because excess glucose that
is not immediately needed for
energy is converted to glycogen
or fat.
Glycogen, a starch made
by your body, is stored in the
liver and muscle for the body
to draw on as a secondary
quick energy source. An
average 150-pound man can
store about 1750 calories this
way, but that's about it.
When glycogen stores
are full, any leftover glucose
is then changed to fat, and
unfortunately, there is no limit
to the amount of fat that can
be stored.

Simple Carb Complications
Recent research shows
that some Americans get up
to half of their calories today
from simple carbohydrates.
But eaten alone'as in a
breakfast of toast and juice,
or a snack of pretzels and
a soda'those simple carbs
will cause the blood sugar
to rise dramatically. This in
turn causes a spike in the


Consumers should return
the battery to Light & Motion
for a free replacement.
Consumers can contact
Light & Motion at (831) 645-
1538 between 8 a.m. and
6 p.m. PT Monday through
Friday, or visit http'://www.
bikelights.com/ Support/liion.
htm. More info at www.recalls.
org.

TENTS AND CANOPIES
POSE FIRE HAZARD
Decathlon USA is recalling
All 2006 Quechua Brand
Tents and Canopies sold
nationwide from January 2006
to September 2006. The tents
may fail to meet the industry's
flame resistant standard,
posing a fire.hazard.
All 2006 model Quechua
branded tents (2-Seconds, 2-
Seconds Air, 3-Seconds Air,
T2, T3 Air, T4 Air, T6.2XL Air,
T2 Ultralight Tents, TO and
TO+ canopies) sold in orange,
red, blue, camouflage, or beige.
with SKU numbers 350808,
65196, 86813 146552,
146548, 100986, 351219,
370833, 531980, 531989,
65024,90366,90428, 567008,
567009, 567036, 567032,
370973, 22611, 566985, and
566992 are included in this.
recall.
Consumers should call
Decathlon USA at (888) 446-
5147 anytime for information
on returning /these recalled
tents or visit http://www.
decathlon-usa. com/ recalls.
html. More info at www.
recalls.org.

CLIMBING EQUIPMENT
CAN UNLOCK
UNEXPECTEDLY
Petzl America is recalling


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production of insulin, the
hormone that carries glucose
into the body's cells.
Since the cells can only
take so much glucose at once,
insulin also aids the conversion
of the excess glucose into fat,
so it can be stored. Because
of this, people who eat a lot
of simple carbs have typically
higher insulin levels, and
produce and store fat more
quickly and efficiently.
And there's more bad
news. Another side effect of
that spike in blood sugar and
insulin is the inevitable crash
that follows. Once insulin is on
the job, it makes quick work
of cramming the glucose from
simple carbs into your body's
cells.
But as that task is suddenly
finished, you experience an
abrupt drop in blood sugar
that can be accompanied
by shaking, dizziness and
ravenous hunger'even though
you've actually eaten quite
recently.
And if you're one of those
people prone to eat simple
carbs, you'll probably grab for


More info at www.recalls.org.-
MATTRESS COVERS CAN"
CAUSE BURN INJURIES
Dux Interiors Inc. is
recalling Protective Mattress-
9overs (PMC) sold nationwide
from January 1999 to April.,
2006. The terry cloth PMCs,'
which were made to fit over
the Dux top pads, do -not
meet the federal standard
for flammability under the.
Flammable Fabrics Act. They,
pose a risk of burn injury-
to consumers if exposed
to smoldering or burning'
cigarettes.
The recalled PMCs are
natural-colored terry cloth
made of 100 percent cotton,'
and come in twin, full, queen,
and king sizes to cover top.
pads made by Dux.
Consumers should discard
the PMCs. Consumers can
also contact Dux Interiors Inc.
at (888) 836-7556 between 9
a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday
through Friday, or visit www,.
dux.com. More info at www.
recalls.org.


wx -000 --m- UI


Golf Cart SALE


Sale Discounts up to





Many Models to Choose from

1999-2004


Financing Available
(0% interest for one year Good through Nov. 5) '


St.Joe Rent-All

7061 st. Street Port St. Joe

227-2112


We customize to your specifications"


more of the same. See the
vicious cycle developing there.
You could be on that roller
coaster all day, and indeed,
many Americans are, without
even knowing it.
For instance, your
customary sourdough English
muffin and glass of juice may
be a quick breakfast, but it's
also a spike-and-crash recipe,
because the white flour in that
muffin is already so processed
it's nearly a sugar already.
The same is true for your
fruit juice. While it may have
the same nutrient value as
the whole fruit in terms of
vitamins, without the fiber,
that juice is basically liquid.
sugar pouring into your blood
stream.
Now, if you make that a
whole-grain muffin and a solid
piece of fruit, or couple it'
with a glass of skim milk,
that's another story. The extra.
nutrients and fiber slow down'
the digestion process, keep
your body feeling satisfied for.
longer, and hold off that next
wave of hunger for a while.


Carabiners used for climbing:
sold nationwide from March,
2006 to July 2006. These;
carabiners have a green button,
that acts as a safety mechanism,
to prevent unlocking. The'
recalled carabiners can unlock.
unexpectedly without pressing,
the green button, posing a fall-
hazard.
The recall involves the,
M34 BL Am'D Ball-Lock and
M36 BL William Ball Lock,
.carabiners with metal locking,
sleeves. Carabiners with batch,
number between 06076 and-
06178 are included in the.
recall.
Consumers should
contact Petzl America at (877) ,
807-3805 between 9 a.m. and'
5 p.m. MT Monday through
Friday, to have their carabiners
inspected and to receive a free
replacement. Consumers can,
, also visit www.petzl.com. More
info at www.recalls.org.

COOKIE MONSTER TOYS:,
SOLD AT WAL-MART POSE
CHOKING HAZARD .
The Betest Group of New
York is recalling Baby Cookie
Monster Plush Toys sold at
Wal-Mart nationwide from
March 2006 to July 2006. Th
small felt fabric cookie attached
to the plush toy's hand cap be
removed easily and ingested,
by yoing children, posing a
choking hazard.
This recall involves the
Baby Cookie Monster plush toy
packaged with certain Sesame
Beginnings Make Music
Together DVDs. The plush toy
and DVD are packaged in a
yellow and green box with the
words "Sesame Beginnings"
and "Make Music Together"
printed on the front. The
product is labeled for children
ages 6 months and up.
Using scissors, consumers
should immediately remove the.
felt cookie and its connecting
thread from the plush toy.
Consumers can also
contact Sesame Workshop
at (800) 986-1619 between 9
a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday
through Friday, or visit www.
sesameworkishon.org/ recall.


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years.


6( TheSar ot t oe L- hrdaOtoe 6,20


I nI M I I V 1 v / . .I .


I I AM
'413HM4








Ct,--i.-,I;Aord 7O7 onrvi (nc dulf rnarv and scrrniundinn areas for 68 ears


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, October 26, 2006 7C


Public





Notices


PUBLIC NOTICE
The Port St. Joe
Redevelopment Agency has
rescheduled the regular meet-
ing of the Board of Directors to
Thursday, October 26, starting
at 5 PM, at the Fire Station.
All persons are invited to
attend and participate. ANYONE
WISHING TO APPEAL AN
OFFICIAL DECISION made on
any subject at a DRA board
meeting must have a verba-
tim record of the meeting that
includes the testimony and evi-
dence on which the appeal is
based. The DRA does not pro-
vide verbatim records of their
meetings.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, persons
needing special accommodation
to participate in any meeting
should make arrangements for
accommodation no less than 24
hours prior to the meeting by
contacting the DRA offices: 101
Reid Avenue, Suite 109 or 850-
229-6899
Publish October 26, 2006

INVITATION TO BID
Bids will be received by Gulf
County Association for Retarded
Citizens, Port St. Joe, Florida,
until 2:00 p.m. EST, Friday,
December 1, 2006 at the Gulf
County Association for Retarded
Citizens located at 309 Williams
Street, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456, Florida for furnishing all
labor and materials for:
A NEW OFFICE AND
TRAINING FACILITY FOR THE
GULF COUNTY ASSOCIATION
FOR RETARDED CITIZENS
WATER PLANT ROAD PORT ST.
JOE, FLORIDA
All work shall be done
according to plans and speci-
fications prepared by Paul
A. Donofro and Associates,
Architects, 2910 Caledonia
Street, Marianna, Florida
32446. Plans are on file and
open to inspection in the office
of the Architect, 2910 Caledonia
Street, Marianna, Florida.
Drawings and specifications
may be obtained from the office
of the Architect at Post Office
Box 861, 2910 Caledonia Street,
Marianna, Florida 32446.
General Contractors may obtain
one (1) set of documents upon
$100.00 deposit, which will be
refunded only to those submit-
ting a bona fide bid and return-
ing said documents prepaid,
in good condition, within ten
(10) days after receipt of bids.
General Contractors requiring
more than one set, sub-contrac-
tors, suppliers, or others may
purchase a full set of docu-
ments for $50.00 per set, NON-
REFUNDABLE.
Partial sets will not be
sold to -major sub-contractors,
(mechanical, plumbing and
electrical). Suppliers and other
subcontractors may purchase
drawings and specifications at
the rate of $2.00/sheet of draw-
ings and $0.20/page of speci-
fications.
Bidding documents will be
sent UPS, collect, unless other-
wise specified.
S Each bid must be accompa-
nied by a bid ond, a certified or
cashier's check, made payable
to the Gulf County Association
for Retarded Citizens, Port St.
Joe, Florida in the sum of 5% of
the base bid as a guarantee and
with a .-,-:r. -- F dj.l h- bid- .
der v .. r,.r r ..1;- .r .: ir',:lI L.- :
bid or withdraw tr.- ,ie M :.I..1-u-
petition for a pe-i.:.-j :! uiiu I : ,.I
days after the :.p.- r.r., ,-[ t1id
and that in the vent the con-
tract is awarded to the bidder,
he,'will within ten(10) consecu-
tive days after it is submitted,
enter into written contract with
the Gulf County Association for
Retarded Citizens in accordance
with the accepted bid. Upon
award of contract a Performance
and Material and Payment Bond
will be required of the success-
ful bidder. The cost of the bond
will be included as part of the
bidder's base bid proposal.
Certified checks offered as bid
guarantees must have Florida
Documentary Stamps attached.
Bidder will be required to
execute Form FmHA 1924-
6, "Construction Contract,"
and must comply with the
"Notice of Affirmative Action
to Ensure Equal Employment
Opportunity," required by E.O.
11246 the "Equal Opportunity
Clause," published at 41 CFR to
-1:4 (a) and,(b) and the "Standard
Federal Equal Employment
Opportunity Construction
Contract Specifications,"
required by E.O. 11246, which
is included as part of these
"Instructions to Bid."
The Owner reserves, the
right to waive informalities in
any bid, and to reject any or
all bids, or to accept any bid
and any combination of alter-
nates or separate bid prices
that, in their judgement, will
,be to the best interest of Gulf
County Association for Retarded
Citizens. .
,-BY:/s/Melissa .Ramsey,
President
Gulf County Association for
Retarded Citizens
Port St. Joe
Publish October 26; 2006

OVERSTREET BOAT RAMP/
REST ROOMS PROJECT#
3.187

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED
BIDS
BID NO. 0607-02

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners will
receive sealed bids from any
*4'. elite. person, company or
corporation interested in con-
structing the following project:

OVERSTREET BOAT
RAMP/RESTROOMS

Plans and specifications can
be'obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc.,
324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200.
The bid must conform to Section
287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on
public entity crimes. Cost of
Plans and Specifications will
be $25.00 per set and is non-
refundable. Checks should be
made payable to Preble-Rish,
Inc.
The project consists of wid-
ening the existing boat ramp
and adding public restroom
facilities.
Completion date for this
project will be 120 days
from the date of the Notice to
Proceed presented to the suc-


cessful bidder.
Liquidated damages for fail-
ure to complete the project on
the specified date will be set at
$200.00 per day.
Please indicate on the enve-
lope YOUR COMPANY NAME,
that this is a SEALED BID, and
include the BID NUMBER.
Bids will be received until
5:00 p.m., Eastern Time on
October 27, 2006 at the Office of
the Clerk of Circuit Court, 1000
Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Room
148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456,
and the bids will be opened at
this location on October 30,
2006 at 10:00 a.m., Eastern
Time, The public is invited to
attend.

The Board reserves the right
to reject any and all bids.

BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CARMEN L. MCLEMORE,
CHAIRMAN
ATTEST: REBECCA L. NORRIS,
CLERK

AD #2006-115
Publish: October 19 & 26, 2006

PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners will hold
a public hearing to consider
adoption of an ordinance with
the following title:
AN ORDINANCE IMPOSING
AND LEVYING A TOURIST
DEVELOPMENT TAX IN
ADDITION TO THE TOURIST
DEVELOPMENT TAXES
IMPOSED AND LEVIED
PURSUANTTO GULFCOUNTY
ORDINANCE 98-14 AND 01-
16 AT THE RATE OF ONE
PERCENT (1%); APPROVING
THE AUTHORIZED USES
OF SUCH ADDITIONAL
TOURIST DEVELOPMENT
TAX; PROVIDING FOR
IMPLEMENTATION AND
COLLECTION OF THE
TAX; PROVIDING FOR
THE ADMINISTRATION OF
THE TAX; PROVIDING FOR
RECEIVING, KEEPING AND
COST OF ADMINISTRATION;
PROVIDING FOR
ENFORCEMENT OF
SUCH TAX; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY OF
ORDINANCE PROVISIONS;
AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.

*Complete Ordinance on file
in the Clerk's Office*

The public hearing will
be held at a special meet-
ing on October 30, 2006 at
4:00 p.m., est. in the County
Commissioner's meeting
room in the Robert M. Moore
Administration Building, Gulf
County Courthouse Complex, in
Port St. Joe, Florida.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA
BY: CARMEN L.
MCLEMORE, CHAIRMAN

ATTEST: REBECCA L.
NORRIS, CLERK

Ad #2006-116
Publish: October 19, & 26,
2006

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE '
Storage Units 1249 Highway
22, Wewahitchka, FL
#D & #G Tammy Melton
will be opened and sold as a
unit (or merchandise removed)
-if rent not brought up to date by
November 1, 2006 at 9 o'clock.
Publish October 19 & 26, 2006

Public.Meeting of the Gulf
County Canvassing Board

THE GULF COUNTY
CANVASSING BOARD WILL
MEET AT 2:00 P.M. ET. ON
NOVEMBER 7, 2006, AT THE
OFFICE OF THE GULF COUNTY
SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS,
401 LONG AVENUE, PORT ST.
JOE, FLORIDA. THIS MEETING
IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.
THE CANVASSING BOARD
WILL MEET TO CANVASS THE
ABSENTEE BALLOTS FOR
THE GENERAL ELECTION,
TO -RECEIVE QUERIES FROM
THE PUBLIC ABOUT THE
ABSENTEE BALLOTS AND
TO CANVASS ALL RETURNS
AS NECESSARY. ABSENTEE
BALLOTS FOR THE GENERAL
ELECTION RECEIVED PRIOR
TO 2:00 P.M. ET. NOVEMBER
7, 2006 WILL BE AVAILABLE
FOR PUBLIC INSPECTION
FROM 9:00 A.M. UNTIL 2:00
P.M. ET.ON NOVEMBER 7,
2006 AT THE OFFICE OF THE
GULF COUNTY SUPERVISOR
OF ELECTIONS. AFTER THAT
TIME, THOSE BALLOTS WILLBE
PROCESSED AND TABULATED.
THOSE ABSENTEE BALLOTS
RECEIVED AFTER 2:00 P.M.
ET. MAY BE EXAMINED FROM
2:00 P.M.ET. UNTIL 7:00 P.M.
ET. AS THEY, ARE RECEIVED
FOR PROCESSING. NO TOTALS
WILL BE PULLED UNTIL AFTER
7:00 P.M., ET. NOVEMBER 7.
THE CANVASSING BOARD
MAY NEED TO RECONVENE
DURING THE WEEK OF
NOVEMBER 7, 2006. THE
MEETING WILL BE AT THE
OFFICE OF THE GULF COUNTY
SUPERVISOR OF FIECTIONS
THE DATE AND TiME5 WILL
BE POSTED AT THE OFFICE,
OF THE SUPERVISOR OF
ELECTIONS AND ANNOUNCED
AT THE CONCLUSION OF THE
NOVEMBER 7 MEETING.
NOTE: SECTION 286.0105,
FLORIDA STATUTES, STATES
THAT IF A PERSON DECIDES
TO APPEAL ANY DECISION
BY A BOARD, AGENCY,
OR COMMISSION WITH
RESPECT TO ANY MATTER
CONSIDERED AT A MEETING'
OR HEARING, HE. OR SHE
WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE
PROCEEDINGS, AND THAT,
FOR SUCH PURPOSE, HE OR
SHE MAY NEED TO ENSURE
THAT A VERBATIM RECORD
OF THE PROCEEDINGS IS
MADE, WHICH RECORD
INCLUDES THE TESTIMONY
AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH
APPEAL IS TO BE BASED.

LINDA GRIFFIN
GULF COUNTY
SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS

Publish October 26, & November
2, 2006


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
AUGUST 2, 2006
SPECIAL BUDGET MEETING
continued

SHERIFF (#31123/#F3121 -
FINE & FORFEITURE FUND)

Jim Lloyd appeared before
the Board to discuss research
he has done by comparing the
Sheriffs Office with surround-
ing Counties (employees, equip-
ment, etc. based on population),
stating he feels that they could
operate on the same funding
they had last year. Commis-
sioner Williams discussed that
the Sheriff has agreed to as-
sist the County with the "after
hours" animal control issues (vi-
cious dogs/dog bites). After fur-
ther discussion by members of
the Board, Jim Garth inquired
about vehicles purchased dur-
ing the current year. Major
Nugent stated that the vehicles
were obtained through a lease
program (for which the payment
was already budgeted). Com-
missioner Williams stated that it
is critical that the Sheriff honor
his commitment to assist with
animal control.

ANIMAL CONTROL (#43062
- GENERAL FUND)

After discussion by Chief
Administrator Butler, Commis-
sioner Peters motioned to tenta-
tively increase this budget in the
amount of $13,203.00 for the
cost shift of insurance. Com-
missioner Barnes seconded the
motion, and it passed unani-
mously (4-0).

SHERIFF (#31123/#F3121 -
FINE & FORFEITURE FUND)

Upon inquiry by Jim Lloyd
regarding the Sheriffs budget,
Chairman McLemore stated that
there is a $90,000.00 increase
between the 2 budgets (Law En-
forcement and Detention & Cor-
rections).

ANIMAL CONTROL (#43062
- GENERAL FUND

Upon discussion by Clerk
Finance Officer Hand that the
benefits were budgeted when the
Board approved the $90,000.00
at the last meeting. The Board
agreed for the $13,203.00
increase to be placed in
equipment (for the lift station).

TAX COLLECTOR (#22213 -
GENERAL FUND)

After discussion, Commis-
sioner Williams motioned to
tentatively reduce this budget in
the amount of $16,219.00. The
motion then died for lack of a
second.

PROPERTY APPRAISER
(#22113 GENERAL FUND)

After discussion, the Board
took no further action on this
budget request.
Tom Graney discussed that
the Board has attempted to fund
all budgets at 0% increase over
Their 2005-06 .budget, and that
this should be the same for ev-
eryone.

WORK CREWS (#24523 -
GENERAL FUND)

Upon motion by Com-
missioner Peters, second by
Commissioner Barnes, and
unanimous (4-0) vote, the
Board tentatively reduced the
Equipment,. Dist. 1 line item by
$19,000.00 (Van).
Upon motion by Com-
missioner Barnes, second by.
Commissioner Peters, and
unanimous (4-0) vote, the
Board tentatively reduced the
Equipment, Dist. 5 line item by,
$19,000.00 (Van).
The meeting did then recess
at 10:18 a.m., E.D.T. ,
The meeting reconvened at
10:30 a.m., E.D.T.

2006-07 TENTATIVE BUDGET

Clerk Norris reported that
the tentative millage rate is now
at 4.8144 mills, and the Bpard
would need to reduce expendi-
tures by $325,600.00 to reach
the rolled-back rate. Commis-
sioner Williams requested that
Chief Administrator Butler as-
sist them with keeping a run-
ning total of expenditure reduc-
tions.

RISK MANAGEMENT/HUMAN
RESOURCES (#22513 -
GENERAL FUND)

Chief Administrator Butler
discussed the possibility of hir-
ing someone for Risk Manage-
ment/Human Resources on a
temporary basis (no benefits).

HEALTH DEPARTMENT -
COUNTY (#42562 GENERAL
FUND)

Health DepartmentAdminis-
trator Kent appeared before the
Board to discuss his proposed
budget and the reduction made
by the Board. He, stated that
the requested increase was for
the Wewahitchka facility to in-
crease the services in that area.
After further discussion, Chair-
man McLemore discussed .the
one-half cent sales tax and the
agreement by Sacred Heart for
a sub-station in Wewahitchka.
Commissioner Williams dis-
cussed that the sales tax is in
place and the Executive Com-
mittee could agree to fund this
program in Wewahitchka from
the trust funds because the
hospital will not be completed
anytime soon. Commissioner
Williams motioned for the Board
to submit a letter to the Execu-
tive Committee to request that
they consider using the sales tax
trust funds for the Wewahitchka
Health Department staffing
($30,000.00).
M eNiTAL. uAT.'1U / GIeLF.


COUNTY SENIOR CITIZENS


(#51363 GENERAL FUND)


Sandy Lieberman, of the Gulf
County Senior Citizens Associa-
tion, appeared before the Board
to discuss that she has reviewed
her budget request (presented a
handout), and can reduce it to
a $10,000.00 increase over the
2005-06 budget. After discus-
sion by members of the Board
regarding the proposed increase
and the Board's desire to reduce
taxes, the Board took no further
action regarding this budget.
Commissioners Peters and Wil-
liams stated that they could
would assist her using Special
Projects funds, if necessary.
(Total tentative budget for Se-
nior Citizens is $60,000.00)

FIRE DEPARTMENT -
OVERSTREET / HONEYVILLE
COMMUNITY EMERGENCY
CENTER (#02622/#31325 -
GENERAL FUND)

Upon discussion by Com-
missioner Peters, Commissioner
Williams, and Clerk Norris,
Commissioner Peters motioned
to tentatively reduce the Fire
Department Overstreet budget
by $70,000.00 and to tentatively
transfer $100,000.00 from the
Honeyville Community Emer-
gency Center budget to Fire De-
partment Overstreet. Commis-
sioner Williams seconded the
motion and, after discussion,
the motion passed unanimously
(4-0).
{Total tentative budget for
Fire Department Overstreet
is $100,000.00 / total tenta-
tive budget for Honeyville Com-
munity Emergency Center is
$400,000.00}

AFFORDABLE HOUSING
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS (#21111)

Commissioner Peters dis-
cussed the S.H.I.P. Program,
and motioned to tentatively
reduce the Board of County
Commissioners: Pay to Other
Governmental Agencies by
$30,000.00 (Affordable Hous-
ing). The motion then died for
lack of a second.

LANDFILL (#42634 -
GENERAL FUND)

Upon inquiry by Commis-
sioner Williams, Solid Waste
Director Danford reported that
his tentative budget for 2006-
07 does not include 2 new em-
ployees.

PUBLIC WORKS GULF '
COUNTY (#42834 GENERAL
FUND) / ROAD DEPARTMENT
(#41041 COUNTY ROAD &
BRIDGE FUND) / 2006-07
TENTATIVE BUDGET

Upon discussion by Com-
missioner Williams regarding the
possible savings in these depart-
ments by elimination of some
services, Chairman McLemore
discussed the. possibility that
fuel prices will increase and
the departments received no in-
creases in their budgets to allow
for the .r ce _r.:.,.ae Com-
missioner 'Aillai_: :t-uted that
the new work order system will
assist the Board in seeing any
savings.
County Attorney McFarland,
stated that the Board would
need to adopt their new policies
at a special meeting. Chairman
McLemorb scheduled a special
meeting on Tuesday, August 8,
2006 at 5:00 p.m., E.D.T. to dis-
cuss Board Policies.
Jim Garth discussed
the Road Department budget,
Spring Clean-up, Dirt-Hauling,
and Building Demolition, and
inquired about equipment that
will no longer be needed. Chair-
man McLemore stated that the
Departments may not be per-
forming the services that were
mentioned, but there are other
projects that they will be doing
so they will still be using their
equipment.
entered the meeting at 11:18
a.m.>
After discussion about fur-
ther reduction of the Public
Works and Road Department
budgets, -Chairman McLemore
stated he would rather'cut ev-
eryone 1% across the Board.
Upon further discussion about a
1% reduction, Clerk Norris stat-
ed that each line item will have
to be considered because some
are mandated, grant-related,
etc., and cannot be reduced.
Chief Administrator Butler
discussed that a 10% increase
was tentatively budgeted for the
health insurance premiums, but
they are now only expected to
increase by 4-5%, so the Board
could possibly reduce those line
items in September when they
know what the exact figures
will be.
Al Minzner discussed 'the
vacation and sick leave pay that
is in lieu of taking the time off,
stating that these line items
could be, reduced if'the Board
adopted a "use it or lose it" poli-
cy. County Attorney McFarland
stated that this could be done
with the non-Union employ-
ees, but the Union employees'
" benefits have already been es-
tablished through negotiations.
Chief Administrator Butler stat-
ed that the accrued sick leave
is.only paid when an employee
leaves in good standing (resigns,
retires, etc.). Upon discussion
by Mr. Minzner regarding the
work crew vans, Commissioner
Traylor requested that the pub
lic look at the vans that are be-
ing used for this program.
Commissioner Peters then
motioned to tentatively reduce
the Public Works Department
and Road Department budgets
by $25,000.00 each, and Com-
missioner Williams seconded
the motion. The motion then
passed 3 to 2, with Chairman
McLemore and Commissioner
Traylor voting no.
Commissioner Williams
discussed the possibility of re-


questing that the Clerk look at a
comprehensive 1% cut (exclud-
ing grants, mandates, etc.), so
the Board will have that option
to consider at the public hear-
ing.

2006-07 TENTATIVE BUDGET

Doug Kent appeared before
the Board to discuss the budget
process, stating that the depart-
ments that were reduced to a
0% increase are actually at a 6%
reduction because of the 3% re-
quired salary increases and the
3% cost of living increase. Com-
missioner Williams discussed
high taxes and what it is do-
ing to the. residents. Mr. Kent
stated that the Board has done
an excellent job. Commissioner
Traylor stated that he com-
mends the Board for what they
are doing, but he feels certain
that they will have to increase
taxes next year because they
have cut too much.
Clerk Norris reported that
the tentative millage rate is now
at 4.7709 mills, which exceeds
the rolled-back rate by 1.46%,
and they would need to reduce
the budget by $205,000.00 to
reach the rolled-back rate.

TIPPING FEES GARBAGE
(#00143 GENERAL FUND)

Commissioner Peters dis-
cussed adoption of a new tip-
ping fee policy, and motioned to
increase the Landfill tipping fees
revenue by $205,000.00. Af-
ter discussion that Solid Waste
Director Danford is preparing
a study on this entire process,
the motion died for lack of a
second.

RESOLUTION 2006-07
REVENUE

Upon motion by Commis-
sioner Barnes, second by Com-
missioner Peters, and unani-
mous vote, the Board adopted
the following resolution amend-
ing the 2006-07 tentative rev-
enue amounts:

RESOLUTION NO. 2006-25

WHEREAS, the Gulf County
Board of County Commissioners
of Gulf County, Florida, antici-
pates additional receipts for the
2006-2007 fiscal year that was
not included in the tentative
budget; and
WHEREAS, said receipts
are needed to help pay certain
expenditures to be incurred in
the 2006-2007' fiscal year as set
forth in the tentative budget;
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
RESOLVED as follows:
1. That the 2006-2007
tentative budget be increased as
follows:

GENERAL FUND
REVENUES:
Other Financing Sources:
00183-00000 I n s t-
mt/Lease Purchase Proceeds
$ 100,000
Other Miscellaneous Rev-

,,in.. *-".,u Mo w-
ing State Right of Ways
$ 42,000
State Shared Revenue:
00135-80000 Court-
house Facilities Approp.
$ 300,000

EXPENDITURES:
Overstreet Fire Department:
02622-62001 Build-
ings>$25,000
$ 100,000

THIS RESOLUTION ADOPT-
ED by the Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners, this the
2nd day of August, 2006.

(End)

COUNTY-WIDE MILLAGE
RATE

Upon motion by Commis-
sioner Peters, second by Com-
missioner Barnes, and unani-
mous vote, the Board tentatively
adopted a County-Wide millage
rate of 4.7709.

VILLAGE RATES SPECIAL
FIRE DISTRICTS

Upon motion by Commis-
sioner Peters, second by Com-
missioner Barnes, and unani-
mous vote, the Board adopted
tentatively adopted the following
village rates for the Dependent
Fire Control Districts:

St. Joseph Fire Control Dis-
trict .5000
Tupelo Fire Control District
.5000
Overstreet Fire Control Dis-
trict .5000
Howard Creek Fire Control
District .5000

VILLAGE RATE GULFSIDE
M.S.T.U.

Commissioner Barnes mo-
tioned to tentatively adopt a
millage rate of 4.4 mills for the
Gulfside M.S.T.U., and Com-
missioner Traylor seconded
the motion. County Attorney'
McFarland stated that this rate
will be for an 8-year bond. The
motion passed 4 to 1, with Com-
missioner Peters voting no.

MILLAGE RATE GULFSIDE
INTERIOR M.S.T.U.

Commissioner Barnes mo-
tioned to tentatively adopt a
millage rate of 1.6 mills for the
Gulfside Interior M.S.T.U., and
Commissioner Williams sec-
onded the motion. The motion
passed 4 to 1, with Commis-
sioner Peters voting no.

PUBLIC HEARING

Upon motion by Commis-
sioner Peters, second by Com-
missioner Traylor, and unani-
mous vote, the Board scheduled
the first public hearing on the
2006-07 Tentative Budget for


September 6, 2006 at 5:01 p.m.,
E.D.T. in the County Commis-
sioners' Meeting Room.

2006-07 TENTATIVE BUDGET

Jim Lloyd appeared before
the Board to discuss the 25%
increase last year and 32% the
year before, stating with this
much increase in a 2-year pe-
riod there should be enough
funds in the budgets to cover
expenses.
Upon discussion regard-
ing the meeting to discuss and
adopt County Policies, Com-
missioner Peters thanked the
Committee for Reduced Taxes
for their participation this year.
Chairman McLemore scheduled
the special meeting on Counties
Policies for August 8, 2006 at
4:30 p.m., E.D.T.
Jim Garth commended
the Board for their work on the
2006-07 budget.
Clerk Norris commended
her staff for preparation of the
budget packets, stating that Fi-
nance Officer Carla Hand and
Deputy Clerk Donna Ray work
long hours preparing the new
packets for the Board. She also
thanked the Board, County At-
torney McFarland, and Chief
Administrator Butler for their
assistance.
Chief Administrator Butler
reported that Property Apprais-
er employee Dale Hartzog has
put forth a great deal of effort
in preparing the new districts
for the M.S.T.U.s, and requested
that the Board recognize him
for what he has done. Commis-
sioner Williams stated that the
Board appreciates the efforts of
everyone who has contributed to
this process.
There being no further busi-
ness and upon motion by Com-
missioner Peters, the meeting
did then adjourn at 12:02 p.m.,
E.D.T. ../
CARMEN L. MCLEMORE
CHAIRMAN
ATTEST:

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
AUGUST 2, 2006
SPECIAL MEETING

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners met
this date in special session
with the following members
present: Chairman Carmen L.
McLemore, Vice Chairman Bill
Williams, and Commissioners
Nathan Peters, Jr. and Jerry W.
Barnes. Traylor was absent>.
Others present were: Coun-
ty Attorney Timothy McFarland,
Clerk Becky Norris, Clerk Ex-
ecutive Administrator Towan
Kopinsky, Clerk Finance Officer
Carla Hand, Chief Administrator
Don Butler, Administrator Staff
Assistant Lynn' Stephens, In-
terim Building Official Lee Col-
linsworth, Grant Writer Loretta
Costin, Planner David Richard-
son, Solid Waste Director Joe
Danford, T.D.C. Director Paula
Pickett, and Sheriffs Office Ma-
jor Joe Nugent.
Chairman McLemore called
the special meeting to order at
8:54 a.m., E.T.

GASKIN PARK

Chief Administrator Butler
discussed that the extension
for the Gaskin Park Phase II
F.R.D.A.P. Grant will expire in
September, and recommended
the Board piggy-back a recent
bid received for playground
equipment. Commissioner Wil-
liams motioned to approve this
recommendation. Commis-
sioner Barnes seconded the mo-
tion, and it passed unanimously
(4-0).
There being no further busi-
ness, and upon motion by Com-
missioner Barnes, second by
Commissioner Williams, and
unanimous (4-0) vote, the meet-
ing did then adjourn at 8:56
a.m., E.T.

CARMEN L. MCLEMORE
CHAIRMAN

ATTEST:

REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERKPORT ST. JOE, FLOR-
IDA

AUGUST 8; 2006
REGULAR MEETING

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners met
this date in regular session
with the following members
present: Chairman Carmen L.
McLemore, and Commissioners
Billy E. Traylor and Jerry W.
Barnes. Williams and Nathan Peters, Jr.
were absent>.
Others .present were: Coun-
ty Attorney Timothy McFarland,
Clerk Becky Norris, Deputy
Clerk Kari Summers, Clerk Fi-
nance Officer Carla Hand, Ad-
ministrator Staff Assistant Lynn
Stephens, Chamber of Com-
merce Director Sandra Chafin,
Code Enforcement Officer April
Hicks, E.D.C. Director Alan Mc-
Nair, Gulf County E.M.S. Direc-
tor Shane McGuffin,,Human Re-
source Director Denise Manuel,
Planner David Richardson, Solid
Waste Director Joe Danford,
and Sheriffs Office Major Joe
Nugent.
Chairman McLemore called
the meeting to order at 6:00
p.m., ET.
Commissioner Barnes
opened the meeting with prayer,
and Major Nugent led the Pledge
of Allegiance to the Flag.

CONSENT AGENDA

Commissioner Traylor mo-
tioned to approve the following
Consent Agenda items. Com-
missioner Barnes seconded the
motion, and it passed unani-
mously (3-0).
1. Minutes July 25,


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Gulf County Board of County





Commission Meeting Minutes
m m n n u -. ...-'*..i-'. ^


L:


2006 Regular Meeting
August 2, 2006 Special
Meeting
2. Agreement Dept.
of Highway Safety and Motor
Vehicles (Space for one 12' x 60'
Modular Office)
3. Agreement Kiddie
Fire Trainers (Confidentiality)
4. Application 2006-
07 Small County Technical As-
sistance Services (Special Proj-
ects Request)

5. Appointment Big
Bend Health Council (Doug
Kent)
6. B.C.C. Correspon-
dence Commissioner Peters to
Gulf County C.D.C.
(Ship Funds)

7. Grant Agreement
- Historic Preservation Grant
Award (Cape San Bias Light-
house Phase II)
8. Human Resources
Accident/Incident Report
Forms
9. Invoice Ausley
& McMullen, P.A. Gulf Pines
Hospital Litigation/Tax Collec-
tor (#47601 $360.00 to be paid
from Account #21111-33000)
- Bay Medical Center H.C.R.A.
(#0610900293 $302.13 /
#0604100135 $141.46 /
#0607400711 $199.92 /
#0611100672 $13,155.60 /
#0612000130 $877.04 to be
paid from Account #51462-
31500)
Coppins Monroe Adkins
Dincman & Spellman, P.A.
- At-Large Litigation (#18395
* $555.00 to be paid from Ac-
count #21111-31200)
County Attorney Timo-
thy McFarland (July, 2006 *
$10,106.00 to be paid from Ac-
count #21314-31100)
Preble-Rish, Inc. Dead
Lakes Park Project (#64746 *
$975.00 to be paid from Ac-
count #26472-31000)
Preble-Rish, Inc. Gulf
County E.M.S. Building (#64747
$4,000.00 to be paid from Ac-
count #51626-62001)
Preble-Rish, Inc. Wil-
lis Landing Road (C.R. 381)
S.C.O.P. Project (#64748 *
$3,218.29 to be paid from Ac-
count #40641-31000)
Prisoner/Inmate Medi-
cal Bills (Buy Rite Drugs -
$1,450.42 to be paid from Ac-
count #21111-31400)
Rumberger, Kirk &
Caldwell General Employment
Matters (File #G214-107990 *
Invoice #701660 $6,631.82 to
be paid from Account #21111-
31200)
10. Road Acceptance -
Borders Road (Overstreet Area)
11. S.H.IP. Purchase
Assistance ($10,115.00 Quinn)
S.H.I.P. Rehabilitation Assis-
tance ($5,000.00 Liles)
12. Utility Easement
Mariner Lane (Cape San Blas
Area)

(End)
PUBLIC HEARING /
PROPOSED ORDINANCE -
LOCAL OPTION GAS TAX

Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider adoption of a proposed
ordinance extending the term
of the levy of the Local Option
Gas Tax in Gulf County, County
Attorney McFarland read the
proposed ordinance by title.
Chairman McLemore called- for
public comment. There being no
public comment, Commissioner
. Traylor motioned to adopt the
following-titled ordinance., Com-
missioner Barnes seconded the
motion, and it passed unani-
mously (3-0).

ORDINANCE NO. 2006-18

AN ORDINANCE RELATING
TO THE LEVY OF A SIX CENT
PER GALLON GASOLINE AND
FUELS TAX, (THE "LOCAL OP-
TION GAS TAX"); AMENDING
ORDINANCE 89-4 BY EXTEND-
ING THE TERM OF THE LEVY
OF THE LOCAL OPTION GAS
TAX; AND PROVIDING AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE.

*Complete Ordinance on file
with Clerk*

BOND GAS FUEL TAX /
ROAD PAVING

County Attorney McFarland
read a proposed resolution au-
thorizing the issuance of a gas
tax revenue refunding bond by
title. Commissioner Traylor then
motioned to adopt the following-
titled resolution. Commissioner
Barnes seconded the motion,
and it passed unanimously (3-
0).

RESOLUTION NO. 2006-26

A RESOLUTION OF THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISSIONERS OF GULF COUN-
TY, FLORIDA AUTHORIZING
THE ISSUANCE OF NOT TO
EXCEED $16,000,000 GAS
TAX REVENUE REFUNDING
BONDS, SERIES 2006 TO PAY
THE COSTS OF CERTAIN CAPI-
TAL IMPROVEMENTS AND
THE REFUNDING OF THE RE-
FUNDED BONDS; .PROVIDING
FOR THE PAYMENT OF SAID
BONDS FROM THE LOCAL OP-
TION GAS TAX, THE COUNTY
GAS TAX AND THE CONSTI-
TUTIONAL GAS TAX; MAKING
CERTAIN COVENANTS AND
AGREEMENTS IN CONNEC-
TION THEREWITH; PROVIDING
FOR CONFLICTS; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PRO-
VIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.

*Complete Resolution of file
with Clerk*

County Attorney McFarland
then read a proposed resolution
authorizing the delegated sales
of a gas tax revenue refunding
bond by title. Commissioner
Barnes then motioned to adopt
the following-titled resolution.


Commissioner Traylor seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously (3-0).

RESOLUTION NO. 2006-27

A RESOLUTION OF THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA AUTHORIZING THE
DELEGATED SALE OF NOT TO
EXCEED $16,000,000 PRIN-
CIPAL AMOUNT OF ITS GAS
TAX REFUNDING REVENUE
BONDS, SERIES 2006; DEL-
EGATING THE AWARD OF
THE SALE OF THE SERIES
2006 BONDS TO THE CHAIR-
MAN; APPROVING THE FORM
OF A PRELIMINARY OFFICIAL
STATEMENT; APPROVING THE
FORM OF A CONTINUING DIS-
CLOSURE CERTIFICATE; AP-
POINTING A REGISTRAR AND
PAYING AGENT; APPOINTING
AN ESCROW HOLDER; AUTHO-
RIZING THE PURCHASE OF
BOND INSURANCE; PROVID-
ING FOR SECURITY FOR THE
HOLDERS OF SUCH BONDS;
MAKING CERTAIN COVENANTS
AND AGREEMENTS FOR THE
BENEFIT OF THE HOLDERS OF
SUCH SERIES 2006 BONDS;
AND PROVIDING AN EFFEC-
TIVE DATE.

*Complete Resolution of file
with Clerk*
BOND PRICING
AGREEMENT CONTRACT

County Attorney McFarland
recommended that the Board
enter into a pricing agreement
for the bond with Digital Assur-
ance Certification LLC, stating
it will help with how the bonds
are looked at. He stated that the
initial cost is $3,000.00, with a
$500.00 per year fee which is
payable from the bond proceeds.
Commissioner Traylor motioned
to approve this recommenda-
tion. Commissioner Barnes sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
unanimously (3-0).

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Dannie Bolden, Gulf County
C.D.C. Director, appeared be-
fore the Board. and discussed
a proposed affordable hous-
ing project for .the North end
of the County. He stated that
there would be approximately
forty-seven single-family homes;.
and fourteen town homes. Mr.
Bolden stated that the intent of
these homes is affordability, and
that the C.D.C. Board of Direc-
tor's baI requested a proposal
to the Counr,' .n -iic a.im junl
$200,000.00 to help with this
effort. After further discussion,
Commissioner Traylor motioned
to support C.D.C .,ri ''s issue
Commissioner B arn. :cco.ndcd
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously (3-0).

OVERSTREET WATER GRANT:

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J 'ng .r,-..: r 'rhe O.ertr eete
,\ -A:r 5>3[em C D G B to
Bailey, Bishop and Lane (sole
source) for the Overstreet wea-
ler arirat Cc.nm'us..:.rer Tray-
Ikr :eo-.cr, e.a d Le motion. and it
p i_ed urnarun-. u 13 :.). ,.

AWARD BID #0506-25 /
RESCUE TRUCK GULF
COUNTY E.S.U.

Upon recommendation by
Administrator Staff Assistant
Stephens, Commissioner Barnes
motioned to award bid #0506-
25 (for financing of a 2006 F 350
Rescue Truck for Gulf Count,
E.S.U.) to Hancock Bank, in the
amount of $43,376.00, at a rate
of 4.22% for five (5) years td' be
paid from their budget. Com-
missioner Traylor seconded the
motion, and it passed unani-
mously (3-0).
INVOICE G.A.C.
CONTRACTORS S.C.O.P.

Upon recommendation by
Administrator Staff Assistant
Stephens, Commissioner Tray-
lor motioned to pay invoice
#2 from G.A.C. (presented by
Preble-Rish), in the amount
of $630,984.73, for the Willis
Landing Road project. Commis-
sioner Barnes seconded the mo-
tion, and it passed unanimously
(3-0).
UNION CONTRACT
RATIFICATION

Upon request by Human Re-
sources Director Manuel, Comn-.'
missioner Traylor motioned for,
the Chairman to sign the Union'
Contract. Commissioner Barnes
seconded the' motion, and. it
pas:ed urnanimousl 13-0).

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

County Attorney McFarland."
repior-ed Lhat he has received
sert,:e ,I" process on a lar suit
filed by the Florida Department;
of Community Affairs. He stated
thai DCA suing Guli' Counr
(ir the Adminiitrarne prnceasj
indicating that the Comprehen-
. sive Plan is not in compliance.
County Attorney McFarland.:
stated that they are insisting:on
some substantial wetland set-
backs and buffers.
HOUSING STEERING
COMMITTEE WORKSHOP

Upon recommendation by
Planner Richardson, Chairman
McLemore stated that he will
schedule a workshop on Tues-
day, August 22nd at 5:30 p.m.,
E.T. for the Board to meet with
the House Steering Committee.



Planper Richardson report-
ed that the collection of Impact
Fees will begin on October 2,
2006.
Will Be Continued ...


j.





1 I he btar, Port TS. Joe, rL nursauy, coluue Lu, zuvu


Trades


&


Services


SCoastal & Native
Landscapes
COMPLETE LANDSCAPE SERVICES
850-927-4090


Clayton Concrete, Inc
Concrete Construction
House Fondations Driveways
Sidewalks Patios
Serving Gulf & Franklin Counties for 15 years
653-7352

229-6525



f. F f ri i

Major Appliance,
Parts, Repair, Sales
232 Reid Ave
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(850)229-8040
cell 850-527-8086

Remodeling & Additions
W WA', W 1A..


ri., Yral\u ,iiItlt'il '
Timely/Quality Work
Reasonable Prices

Cell (850) 814-0166
Home (850) 648-5397


CARPENTRY
PAINTING !:
*'" Home Repair Minor Renovations
Vinyl Siding & Gutters
Doors Windows Screen Porches
Deck Maintenance Handyman Services
*Plumbing Repair
All But 6, LLC Licensed/Insured
Charlie Poliski
850-545-1126 or 697-2668


g Ki Igore' s
4 BRICK PAVERS
& TILE

Driveways, Patios, Pool Decks,
Retaining Walls, Stonework &
Granite Countertops
Office: (850) 229-1980
Fax: (850) 229-1981
Free Estimates
Where top quality and customer
,, .. satisfaction meet!
2890 W. Highway 98 Port St. Joe


n THEJ. LESTER
COMPANY REAL
ESTATE APPRAISAL &
CONSULTING SERVICE
A Financial Service Institution
Residential *Vacant Land Commercial Appraisals

JAMES E. "JAMIE" LESTER

Real Estate Appraiser & Broker
Master Degree Business Administration
State Certified General Appraiser
License#RZ-2783
Broker License#BK532115
"PROVIDING A QUALITY SERVICE TO A
QUALITY COMMUNITY"
Including Consulting Assignments Market Analysis
S, Feasibility Studies Finances Investments
*. Eminent Domain Estates Tax Purposes

S850-639-4200
j. Fax 850-639-9756

Se ing Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun,
Liberty, &-Jackson Counties Specialty
Assignments _ate Wide


R n I i

BuldngClanig


( GETWERED
oXoronis & S
S' Michae..&Athony -
A 0 I, i, ..l..ll ....l. .........'l .4
850-229-6751 850-227-56666
11gusmimMarMr-.a u
Rod & Reel Repair
Bluewater Outriggers
Port City Shopping Center
229-1100


Clayton Concrete, Inc
Concrete Construction
House Fondations Driveways
Sidewalks Patios
Serving Gulf & Franklin Counties for 15 years
653-7352

229-6525.


Paradise Pressure Washing



N t

'6485934


Carpet Country
Highway 98 Highlanrd View Port St. Joe 850-227-7241 Fox 229-9405
I N#ow Owe' ...
Do-It-Yourself Professional Carpet Cleaning with

RINSE-N-VAC
Great for Cleaning All Carpet, Upholstery, and
Auto and Recreational Vehicle Interiors
TRY IT TODAY!

I TLC Lawn Service


"Every yard needs a little TLC"

229-6435
We now accept all major credit cards


Free estimates
Weed Round Up
Trimming, Fertilizing


Established 1991
Sprinkler Systems
Installed & Repaired


Licensed and Insured



CARPET AND UPHOLSTRY
STEAM CLEANING & RESTORATION SERVICE
24 Hour Water Extraction IICRC
Certified Technicians Mold and
Mildew Remediation Free Estimates
* Stain Protection Available



T




THE STAR


Place your ad today
135 Hwy 98
227-1278


ONEAL SANDERS
APPLIANCE REPAIR
SERVICE
Repair all major brands
Home # 647-5113
Work # 227-5112

I riveay


A & R Fence
Albeit Fleschmann FREE Esmatesg
EIN# 593115616 (850) 647-4047


Quality

Paperhanging

Installation Removal Repairs


(850)656-2917
Dennis Sittig
cl


(850)566-2297
Cellular rE


Residential Construction
^fS 1 4 New Cornstruction
4eW *Additions
Remodeling
S*Porches
V &':'Decks
?-* .<*-. *


SUN GOAST
Lawn Er Landscaping LLC
"When Quality Counts"
Landscape Design & Installation
Full Lawn Maintenance
Irrigation Installation & Repair
Conunercial & Residential
Tractor Work, Rock Driveways, Water Features,
Sod & Palm Trees
Office: (850) 647-2522


Bayscapes...
Landscaping the yard of your
dreams!
Irrigation design & installation
Specializing in brick paver
S driveways &
ool decks


Ba'.,scapes Coritactor.,
LLC
S50-927-4217
All ...oik done in house,
nro:l bc.oiiactor.S


Performance
PAINTING
OF GULF COUNTY, INC.
Licensed and Insured *
Residential, New or Existing Homes,
Small Commercial, Epoxy Floors, Metal Buildings
"Big jobs or small jobs."
"Let us bring your home to life."
OWNER: Paul Rushing
Mobile: 850-227-5910
Office: 850-827-1888
Lots of References
FREE ESTIMATES


DJ Fence & ETC
HandyMan
You Name It
I'll Fix It
850-648-9531
850-624-4182 cell
"Let the Beauty of our God be
upon us & establish the work
of our hands"




" 'melsl,


Locally
Owned )


.aol Residential
Commercial
Termite & Pest
Control
* Teririiit eT fllmo0is FlEilsal !
o Fl Ca nt[ ii Conidommnums
* Household Past Conirol. -e, Trealmerit
* Rel Estalte tW[l i Repits Co0sttin1 Sites
Specializing in Vaocation RenloJ Properties
] FAMILY OWNED
] PLEASANT & PROFESSIONAL
"Serving the Entire Area"
Free Estimates
Do1t.-Yourself Pest Control Products


Call Randy or Duane Cook ..
850-370-6896
or
850-370-6704
License# RR282811515 .
_. ;-,: ta,^q ;-: if; i


I COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL
INSULATION DONE RIGHT EVERYTIME
FIBEGLASS BATTS BLOWN CELLULOSE WALLS & ATTIC
OFFICE : : CELL
/


LOCALLY OWNED AND
OPERATED BY MIKE MOCK

CARPET CLEANING
CERAMIC TILE & GROUT
UPHOLSTERY CLEANING
24 HOUR WATER EXTRACTION
RV'S CARS TRUCKS VANS
LICENSED AND INSURED
RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL






Hardwood Floodrmng
Decorative Flooring 850-229-7720 offers professional
services for anyone who wants their floor completed
properly and with pride.
Exotic and Domestic wood Flooring
Inlays- Borders and Medallions
Installation Sanding and Refinishing Repair Custom
National Award winner for best floor in Nation
Largest showroom in the State of Florida
Licensed Insured References
Unmatched Quality and Value for your money
www.decorativeflooring.com


Del
& auin


SIMPLY HOQMS, LLC
LET US PROVE HOW INEXPENSIVE
YOUR NEW HOME CAN BE


UoceeCenn


ST. JOE
NURSERY & SUPPLY
706 First Street Port St. Joe
227-2112


I


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Of L-C -- C4 I- rl k.- -),k r ? ? n,


m


Am. A-








Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67years


LV^r ^ LK E r^
/~~ ~ / ~\^ "n ^


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2006 9C


ANNOUNCEMENTS


Nil

"A A:. .


a ,,.~. JEW


9r9PIfll9i9JLlJT~L*


I '


BUSINESS & FINANCIAL


.4
I I


44~-ir-)Svw-~ .u$4x1/FML


REAL ESTATE


AUTO,MARINE,RV


Chimney Cleaning
& Repairs.
32 yrs Exp. Call 785-3941


HELLO!
Looking for someone to
clean your house or your
office. Honest & Reliable.
Reasonable rates & good
references. See you Soonl
Dona 227-9363/ 527-7707






CLAYTON
CONCRETE, INC.,
Concrete Construction
House Foundations, Drive-
ways, Sidewalks, Patios
Serving Gulf and Franklin
Counties for 15 years
653-7352 or 229-6525


^I -,,F AA




iiii ii NN- *7 "a3'3 -;

-;. ..... E+. ..







FH '!- H .."-' ./ -- IL- -

WA NTED. .... AN... __.A _


2100 3230 3230 1 4100 4100 4100 4110
Pt. St. Joe: 1017 Wood- HHospitality
Faith Thrift Hut ward Ave. Fri, & Sat Health care
10ithSTrEEtH 8:30am-5pm & Sat..The Port Inn is now
OPEN THURS., FRI..& fishing tackle, tools, hshld Get paid for charitable A A c tin alto
Lab/Pitbull mix puppies SATURDAY, 10-2pm. items, and lots misc. General work: Now hiring in-home Ho eCare,Inc. Candidates must be
free to a good home also thes, housewares, fur-wrk: Nowahiringrilhe Ha
free to a good home also nature, appliances, sport- Yard Sale Sat. Oct. 28th Come and work along- workers to assist frail eld- A & A has an' immediate to work weekends
papers for $200. Call 850- ing goods. We Have It All- from 7am til lpm. 1407 side park staff at St Jo- early in Port St. Joe and the opening for a FT RN: Ben- holidays, dependability
648-2039 Come Check Us Out!! Long Ave. Treadmil, seph Peninsula State Park! beaches. efits available. Great work a must If you have an
-hT,-- rRI h -~. ,.T-ft l=- T ,tT Fl nli Park S., i Full time, Part time, Flex environment. Great hours, for detail and a passiorn


oU Support SJOD
HUMANE SOCIETY


.- "\ Finders Keepers
Thrift Store
Wewa, 149 Hwy 71 N,
across from Lake Alice
Park 639-5436 Antiques,
Thrift & Consignments, Gift
Certificates for every occa-
MERCHANDIISE sion. T-S 10:00-6:00 EST,
ISun. 1:00-5:00 EST
3100 Antiques
311.0 -Appliances
3120 Arts & Crafts
3130 Auctions' Huge Multi Family Sale!
3140 Baby Items Roberts Cemetery Rd. and
3150 Building Supplies Hwy. 71 Honeyville. Nov. 3
3160 Business & 4. 8am til ? Nov. 5 12 til ?
Equipment Weather permitting.
3170 Collectibles
3180 Computers
3190 Electronics
3200 Firewood KK: Pt. St Joe
3210 Free Pass it On 2001 Marvin Ave
3220 Furniture
3230 Garage/Yard Sales 3 Family Yard Sale
3240 Guns Sat 8am-?
3250 Good Things to Eat
3260 Health & Fitness
3270 Jewelry/Clothing
3280 Machinery/
Equipment Multi Family
3290 Medical Equipment Corner of Pine & Magnolia,
3300 Miscellaneous Mexico Beach Sat Oct
3310 Musical Instruments 28th, 7a-12p
3320 Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
3330 Restaurant/Hotel
3340 Sporting Goods Pt. St. Joe :108 Stone Dr.
3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell)
Moving Sale
Sat 7am-noon
Many misc. items

Pt. St. Joe 8504 Trade
Winds Dr. (Gulf Aire)
Frigidaire
Upright Freezer 13.7 cf, Garage Sale
Commercial unit, $200. Sat 8am-12noon
Call 827-2566 Books and Knick Knacks


bookshelf, craft table and
accessories and new mens
shirts.



TV for Your PC. $49
One-Time fee. Watch Sat-
ellite TV Anywhere, Any-
time, Legally! ESPN, CNN,
DISNEY, Sports, Music,
Clips, Radio, Movies. NO
ads! www.yoursatellitepc.
com 1-770-392-3997







Windsurfer
Cheap, make offer
850-229-9620

,*-. : \


AN
EARN AS YOU
LEARN
Career!
England Transport
nflw offers


Incorrect InsertionPolicy On-the-job CDL Training'
SNo credit check
For Classified No co-signers
German, Russian In-column Advertisers No down payment!
n tT oll-Free
!!!Sinsation!!!! 1-866-619-6081
850-785-0016 All ads placed by phone are read back to the adver-
tiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will as- Drivers
sume correctness at the time of the read-back proce-
FLOORIHTNGlT dure unless otherwise informed.
W Driver Trainees
Stack Stone, field stone, NEEDED NOW!
and landscaping stone- Please Werner needs entry level
plus a great selection of semi drivers. No exp. re-
lightweight, realistic syn- V quired. Avg $36K 1st yr!
thetic stone Now at Sell- 60% home nightly/weekly.
er's Tile in Eastpoint. Call your ad CDL training in your area.
670-4211 (ask for Darren). 1-866-280-5309

7 Advertisers are requested to check the advertise-
PH'NSRCTOrrient on the first insertion for correctness. Errors
should be reported immediately.
Attend College online General
from home *Medical, The News Herald will not be responsible for more
*Business, *Paralegal, 'than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for Collections/
*Computers, *Criminal any error in advertisements to a greater extent than Customer Svc.
Justice. Job placement as- the cost of the space occupied by the error. Great pay in exchange for
distance. Computer pro- hard work. Collection exp.
vided. Financial aid if qual- Any copy change, during ordered schedule consti- hard ueork. Col train
ified. Call 866-858-2121. tutes a new ad and new charges. a huge +, but will train
www.OnlineTidewaterTech. highly Fas motivated person.
com The News Herald DOES NOT guarantee position of as paced environmenteeded. -
IANY ad under any classification. Call 229-1520


has been awarded the
best park system in Amer-
ica twice, and is a re-
warding and fun place to
work! OPS Cabin cleaner
needed pay $10 per 40
hr. week, must have a
valid DL and good work
history. Apply in person
St. Joseph State
Park. 227-1327





General

JOB NOTICE

The City of Port St. Joe is
accepting applications for
the following positions:

Crew Leader,
Parks &
Cemeteries
Temporary Position @
$10.25 per hour
&

Grant Writer
Salary DOQ/E
Applications are available
at City Hall. Please return
applications to the Munici-
pal Building, 305 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456. Open
until filled. All applicants
must present a valid Flor-
ida Driver License and So-
cial Security Card at time
of application.
The City of Port St. Joe en-
forces a Drug-Free Work
place Policy and is an
Equal Opportunity/. Affirm-
ative Action Employer.


General

Volunteer Wanted
The Mexico Beach Tour-
ism Board is looking for a
part time volunteer to help
with the Mexico Beach Lo-
cal channel. Television
production assistance re-
quired. If interested,
please call the CDC office
at 648-8196

TAKE CHARGE
OF YOUR REAL
ESTATE CAREER:
Call today for a
confidential career
interview

850-229-9310.

Brian Neubauer
420 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe
g, Neubauer
ilA Real Estate, Inc.


time, Vacation & sick
leave. Perfect for mothers,
retirees, and/or students.
Background check and
drug screen required. Call
or see Clarissa at
850-229-8466,
Gulf County
Senior Citizens,
120 Library Dr. PSJ.




Health care

Health Services
Specialist
North Florida Child Devel-
opment, Inc.'s early child
development programs
needs a Health Services
Specialist responsible for
applying expertise in pedi-
atric health (medical, den-
tal, mental health, nutrition,
and pregnancy). Minimum
of Bachelor's degree in
Health, Nursing, or related
field. Must be willing to
travel and be a team
player. DFWP/EOE/MF/8-5
Send resumes to NFCD,
Inc., Attn: Sebrina McGill,
PO Box 38, Wewahitchka
FL 32465, (850) 639-5080,
Fax (850) 639-4173,
sebrina(iheadsta rtnf.org

Health care
Geri-Care Assisted Living
& Beacon Villa retirement
Center in Mexico Beach
Has the following job
openings, Hiring immedi-
ately. (1.) Part time resi-
dent care sitter, day shift. .
(2.) Part Time resident
cook sitter, day shift. Ideal
position for someone re-
tired or for anyone that de-
sires meaningful work. We
will train the right people.
Specialized training and
degrees not req. If inter-
ested please call Kim Mc-
Farlend, Administrator, at
647-4000. We are an EOE.


A & A is a DFWP and EOR
Apply in person at: 211 N
Hwy 71 in Wewahitchka or
Fax resume to: 639-3337.

Heathcare

The Gulf County
Health Dept.
has one opening for a Ca-
reer Serivice LPN based in
Port St. Joe. Annual salary
starts at: $23,645.18. Fin-
gerprinting and O/T Due
To Emergency Duties Re-
quired; must have comput-
er experience. For informa-
tion pertaining to this posi-
tion, contact Lesia Hatha-
way at (850) 227-1276,
Ext. 149.
This Agency is accepting
electronic applications
only for this position. Refer
to Requisition Number
64086312. Closing date is
October 31, 2006.
Apply at:
Peoplesfirst.myflorida.com
for assistance, contact:
People First at
877-562-7287

Trades
Ameri-Force NOW HIR-
ING!!! Welders, Ship Fit-
ters, Electronic Techni-
cians, Pipe Welders, Pipe
Fitters, Sheet metal Me-
chanics, Inside /Outside
Machinists Locations Avail-
able: Alabama Virginia
* Louisiana Indiana *
Mississippi California *
South Carolina *Ability to
earn up to $1,300.00 + a
week* *Must have 5+
years of Craft Experience*
*Benefits Available* CALL
NOW!! Contact: 888-
269-3381 (Operators avail-
able 24 hours) Email re-
sume to recruiter @ameri
force.com or fax resume
to: 904-798-1720 EOE/
DFWP Se Habla Espanol


'1





ac-
for
per.
able
and
y. is
eye
n for


service, we want Youl,
Please apply in person at
the address below. Make'
beds, make friends, make
money. Inquire about the
benefits package. E.O.E,
DFWP .
Port Inn
501 Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456



- 4120o -
Advertising Sales If you
have experience selling to,
small businesses, we offer
an outstanding opportu-
nity. Visit: www.blooming
tonprinting.com or phone'
interview Mr. Haggerty,
877- 665-6618



- 4130

*REMEMBER:*
Ads In this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire, an investment or
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend giv-
ing credit card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.

Clerical
Administrative
Earn $12-$48/hour. Full
benefits. Paid training. Var-
ious Government Positions
Available. Homeland Secu-
rity, Law Enforcement,
Wildlife and more.
Call 7 days
1-800-320-9353, Ext 2139

Earn Up To $550. Weekly
Working through the Gov-
ernment P/T. No experi-
ence needed. Call todaylli
1-800-488-2921, ask for
Department M-15

POSTAL & GOVT JOB
INFO FOR SALE?

caution

You NEVER have to pay
for information about
federal or postal jobs. If
you see a job
"guarantee", contact the
FTC.
The Federal Trade Com-
mission
is America's consumer
protection agency.
www.ftc.gov/jobscams
1-877-FTC-HELP
A public service
message from the FTC
and The News Herald
Classified Advertising
Department


MERCHANDISE


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11100 17


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10C THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2006



Commercial Building for
My name is Rhonda I work rent- 1500sf, $1500/mo.
20hrs a week taking in- Commercial Space for 324 Long Ave., PSJ, 850-
bound phone calls. I aver- Rent 600 sf. Mexico 340-1246.
age $600-800/wk. I need Beach on Hwy. 98. Center
help handling calls. There of town $850 mo. (850) Downtown Port St Joe
are other jobs available 647-2570 Newly Renovated office,
also. Call ERS 866- 2500+sf, $1800mo, 850-
311-0701 774-5400


Now Hiring FOR 2006
Postal Jobs $18/hour.
starting, Avg. Pay $57K/
year Federal benefits, Paid
Training & Vacations. No
Experience Needed! 1-800
-584-1775 Ref #P5101

Reliable Home Typist
Needed Immediately! $430
part time, $825+ full time.
Guaranteed! Simple Data
Entry. Make Own Sched-
ule. PC Required. Call
1-800- 360-1272.


BUSINESS & FINANCIAL
5100 Business
Opportunities
5110 Money to Lend


S Soo100
*REMEMBER:*
Ads In this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire an investment or
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend giv-
ing credit card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.


REALESTATE FOR RENT
6100 Business/
Commercial
6110 Apartments
6120 Beach Rentals
6130 Condo/Townhouse
6140 House Rentals
6150 Roommate Wanted
6160 Rooms for Rent
6170 Mobile Home/Lot
6180 Out-of-Town Rentals
6190- Timeshare Rentals
6200 Vacation Rentals


CONTRACTOR'S
WAREHOUSE
unit 1250 SF/ office bath-
room 12x12 roll up door,
located at the corner of
Pondarosa Pines & Ruth-
erford in Jones Home-
stead. $650 a month in-
cludes util. 1 year lease
+1 mo. rent dep. 647-2715
after 6pm.



Downtown
Port St. Joe
401 Reid Avenue. 2,200
sq. ft. of fully furnished,
newly painted commercial
office space located in the
heart of downtown Port St.
Joe. A multitude of possi-
bilities. Immediate availa-
bility.
For more information
call 850-229-1700.


BEACH
STORAGE
Day: 227-7200
Night: 647-3882
St. Joe Beach


MINI STORAGE

In Port St. Joe


814-7400


America's
Mini Storage

(8501
229-8014
258-4691
Climate and Non-Climate
Control Storage Units
Boat/RVstorage
& office space


Two Private 2nd floor of-
fices with shared reception
and kitchen. One 1st floor
private office. Beautiful
view overlooking St. Joe
Bay at Simmons Bayou.
$350 mo per office. Utilities
included. First, last month
rent plus $150 deposit per
unit required. Call 850-
229-7799, M-F, 9-4pm.



Furn 1 br newly redeco-
rate nice Spacious costin
Airport unit furn $250/wk or
850/mo. Call 229-4327



Port St. Joe 2 br, 1 ba,
long term. Very clean &
Nice. $700 mo. Plus 1 mo.
dep. (850) 647-2570



2 br 2 ba St Joe Beach,
across from beach, unob-
structed views, fully furn,.
1mo to 6mo lease. pets al-
lowed with dep $1375mo,
850-865-5333


-6130-


4 br 2 ba TH with pool lo-
cated in Mexico Beach,
$1200mo, 850-229-8667 or
850-527-7525


Mexico Beach 2 br, 2 ba
Furn'd TH, near Pier .&
beach. $750 mo incl.
W/S/G. 850-927-3115
Mexico Beach area, Sev-
eral Condos/Townhouses,
furnished & unfurn, Start-
ing at $750mo. Sundance
Realty 850-648-8700
Snow Bird Rental
TH @ Villages of PSJ.
Decorator furnished, and
will rent as a 2 or 3 bdrm.
Avail Nov 2006 -March
2007. Call 229-324-3109 or
229-891-6583


Spacious townhouse lo-
cated in the Village of Port
St. Joe Close proximity to
area shopping, downtown
and St. Joseph's Bay.
Monthly rental available at
$1000 per month, with
$1000 security /damage
deposit. Call 850-229-2706
or 850-229-4700 for more
information.


|- 6140



2 br 1 ba, 605 Marvin Ave,
large lot, Completley
renovated, no pets, Rent
or buy, 850-814-1040
2 br, 1 ba house for rent
furnished or unfurnished
312 Coronado St., Port St.
Joe Beach. 6 month lease
required. Call for price
850-814-7377



3 br house 432 Lola St.
Oak Grove. Large yard w/
storage sheds $725
month. Call 227-7800



3 br, 1.5 ba home on St.
Joe Beach w/unobstructed
Gulf view. Dishwasher,
stove and outside shower.
Sec. dep, application and
references req'd.' Call
850-227-5301 or 227-6297



3 br, 2 ba home on large
lot. Dishwasher, side by
side refrig, and stove.
security dep, application
and references req'd Call'
850-227-5301 or 227-6297

7W-
3 br, 2 ba large home
w/fenced yard. Dish-
washer, Re fridge,.built in
oven and stove top. High-
land View. Sec dep, ap-
plication and ref's req'd.
Call $50-227-5301 or
227-6297
1305 Woodward Ave.,
Port St. Joe, 3 br,.2 ba,
den, FP w/gas log, dbl
elecc oven, gas dryer, re-
frigerator, CH&A, New ce-
ramic tile, $850 mo.+ dep.
850- 653-6674 or 670-1403


6130


Available Nov. 1st. 2 or 3
br, 2 ba, office, FP304 6th
St. Pt. St. Joe. Walk to
dwntwn & bay. $1000/mo.
+ dep. 227-4358
Cape Bay Home, 4 br, 4
ba, dock, furn'd, Beautiful
bay views, beach access,
$1650 mo., 408-436-8293.



Gorgeous Bay Sunset
view on CR-30, 2 bed-
rooms, 2 '/2 baths, wood
floors, custom cabinets,
fully furnished, screened
porch and open deck. 6-9
month lease, $1150 mo.,
first, & last month rent,
$550 security deposit on
signing. No pets. Call
850-229-7799, M-F, 9-4pm.



House For Rent, in St.
Joe Beach, 3 BR, 2 BA,
large yard, $900 mo. Call
Gene at 850-830-9342.
Mexico Beach 3 br, 1.5 ba
house with spectacular
beach view on Hwy 98. Big
screened porch, remod-
eled kitchen w/ dishwash-
er. Central H/A, wash-
er/dryer, & big work-
shop-shed w/ elec. Mostly
furn. $995mo, 1st & last
mo rent + $350 sec dep
on signing, 6 or 12-mo.
lease. Small pet ok. Avail
Oct. 26. 850-899-3130
Mexico Beach 3 br, 2 ba
house on quiet street
across from boat canal.
w/dock access. Very clean
and fullu furnished. CH&A,
screen porch, 100 yards to
the beach covered carport,
dishwasher, W/D, fully fur-
nished. 3 or 6-mo lease.
Perfect for military or busi-
ness temporary living,.
$1,285 mo. includes all
utilities, cable and wi-fi in-'
ternet. Small pet ok.
850-899-3130
Mexico Beach area 3 br, 2
full baths 146 Pondview
Cir. Dblwide, only 4 mi
from beach, W/D hookups,
CH&A, pets nego. $850
mo., 1st and last month's
rent. 647-5722
Mexico Beach, Several
homes for rent, furnished
& unfurnished, starting
$900mo, Call Sundance
Realty 850-648-8700



Port St. Joe. 2 br, 1 ba,
CH&A, laundry room, nice
yard no pets, $580mo,
$400 dep. 850-227-3511


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
7100 Homes
7110 Beach Home/
Property
7120 Commercial
7130 Condo/Townhouse
7140 Farms & Ranches
7150 Lots and Acreage
7160 Mobile Homes/Lots
7170 Waterfront
7.180 Investment
Property
7190 Out-of-Town
Real Estate
7200 Timeshare


CO0NE NMES S


i i i i i ~ ~ ~i i i 'i


To Place Y








THE STAR
:" H --K r l^ K .4. .


HELPS ONLY A




PHONE CALL



AWAY






,our Classified ad


in


the

APALACHIC(

& CARRABE


Call Our New Numbers Now!


Call:


Toll Free:



Fax:


Email:


Email:


850-747-5020


800-345-8688


850-747-5044


thestar@pcnh.com


thetimes@pcnh.com


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TIMES


Port St. Joe Beach 4 br,
2 ba newly renovated. Un-
furn'd, 1 block off beach.
$1200/mo. 850-544-2218

-0
Port St. Joe. Furn'd 2 br,
2 ba, bick from bay.
Walk to downtown. 1st
/last /sec. $850mo
706-768-3239
Several LONG TERM
RENTALS Available. Call
FORGOTTEN COAST
RENTALS, @ Mexico
Beach 850-648-1012.



Small 2 br, 1 ba house on
large lot in Oak Grove.
Great for single or young
married couple. Washer
/dryer hookups. Sec. dep.
application and ref's req'd.
850-227-5301 or 227-6297


S 6170
Mexico Beach 2 MH walk-
ing distance to beach, furn
and/or unfurn, starting at
$750mo, Sundance Realty
850-648-8700
Wewa RV Lots
$200/mo.'+ $200 sec dep
Call 850-639-5721



Beautiful Beaches! South
Padre Island Beach Resort
From $59/night. www.en
joyspi.com 1-866-.
4LACOPA. Free Breakfast.
Free Happy Hour. La Quin-
ta Beach Resort. La Copa
Inn Beach Resort.
J --
eia .


~c~------ ~a-l.lu~B--..--L.----I~DbBSB"~fW~O


I Por St. oe, Forida3245


Established 1938 0 S erving Gult GountyII and s~UrrUunulng areas tor blV yevsJ


2 br 1 ba Port St.Joe. Cor- Historical District
ner lot with bay view. RE- of Apalachicola, $249,000,
DUCED $195K. Also ajoin- 850-774-5400
ing lot 3br /1ba $185K
(850) 762-3252 Mexico Beach Lot,
www.forsalebyowner. 75'x100', walk to bch.
com/20589028 Foreclosure. $150K obo.
For Sale By 596-2057 or 271-1453
Owners Walk to Beach- St. Joe
Owners Beach, cleared lot for sale.
3 br, 2 ba. 615 Marvin Ave. Located on Willow, across
Appraised @ $185K obo. from New round house
& 478 Santa Anna 3 br, 2 $199K. (305) 394-1212.
ba $219K obo Call
850-227-4486 or 647-9282 Wewahitchka
House only for Sale! Must Buckhorn Subdvsn 1/2
be moved. 5746 Hwy 71 (6 acre lots. Great location!
miles N. of PSJ). Approx $25K Call Billy Joe
1400 sf, 3 br,1 ba,hrdwd Smiley 850-340-1213 or
floors, C/A, FP, stove, Jessica Paterson
refig, W/D. Ducky Johnson 850-227-4183 at Port
has moving cost info. Realty Inc.
$18,000. Call Mary Lou @
850-227-4625
Income Property .
Port St. Joe 4 br, 2 ba
House & 2 Apts. 70% '
Remodeled. Income Po-
tential $2,000 /Month. 5
Blocks from New Ma-
rina. Pay balance due to -
bank. 850-227-5920 AUTOMOTIVE. MARINE
RECREATIONAL
PSJ: 111 Heritage Ln. in 8100 Antique & Collectibles
Heritage Plantation, 3 br, 2 8110 Cars
tiled ba, 2 car gar, 2200sf, 8120 Sports Utility Vehicles
Newer home w/ofc, huge 8130 Trucks
utility/craft room, custom 8140 Vans
tiled kitchen, Handicap 8150 Commercial
friendly, storage bldg, 8160 Motorcycles
sprinkler sys, beautifully 8170 Auto Parts
landscaped, Irg scrnd & Accessories
porch. Only $349,900! Call 8210 Boats
850-229-6622 8220 Personal Watercraft
8230 Sailboats
St. Joe Beach, close to 8240 Boat & Marine
Windmark, 3 br, 2 ba, gulf Supplies
view, 100 yds off beach, 8310 Aircraft/Aviation
fully furn'd house, 2 car 8320 ATV/Off Road Vehicles
garage, Beautiful house! 8330 Campers & Trailers
Sits on 2 lots, $1595 mo. 8340 Motorhomes
(770) 331-1989/ 331-8163.-

7110

FSBO/REDUCED
Below appraised value,
Port St Joe, Beacon Hill, 3 Honda Accord SE '02,
br 3 ba, elevator, custom immaculate, sunroof, air,
built, beautiful beach views power locks & windows,
$989K, 850-774-5400 41K miles, $14,400, 850-
FSBO/REDUCED 648 4671
Below appraised value, To Place An Ad
Port- St Joe Beach 3 br 3 in The Times
ba, beach views, $549K, a ifid
850-774-5400 Classifieds
Call
(850) 747-5020
S7150 orS
2 Lots on Tullip Ave. Bea- 1 (800) 345-8688
con Hill, Florida. $99K and
$95K. Best Buy on the
Beach! Call 706-333-0159
Mexico Beach Lot 1 8120 .
150x100, 1 block from Ford Bronco '84 4x4, 6-
beach, waterview, FORE- cylinders, new tires, runs
CLOSURE. $200K obo. excellent. $3000. Call
850-596-2057 or 271-1453 850-.527-7750


Ford 15' Box Truck '99,
diesel, new tires, $9800,
Call Phil in Port St Joe at
850-227-2112

Ford F150 XLT
Larriat '91
Automatic, loaded! 88,500
miles, 6 cylinder, $3000
call 827-2566




Harley FX DWG 2002, fac-
tory custom, bags, wind-
shield, many extras,
black, w/Red stripe, Pam-'
pered, 1 owner ride,
$14,500. 850-229-9022.



8210
26' Center Console-
Off-Shore Deep "V" Hull'
Like New (40 Hours),
Completely Refurbished,
SeaWolf with Twih
C/Rotating 140HP SUZUKI ',--
4/Stroke Engines. New '
Center Console, fully'
rigged, wiring, steering &
seats. New Aluminurh
Majic Tilt. New 160g Alumi-
num Gas Tank. Draws, -"
less than 2 feet, Great in
Bay or Gulf. Great Fishing'
Boat! Serious inquiries,
$49K obo Call 850-227-.-'
4256 or 706-628-4260
OCEAN KAYAKS, new &'
used sit-on-top kayaks for
sale at Happy Ours Kayak..
& Canoe Outpost. Call,,--
850-229-1991 ,or see us at-. -
775 Cape San Bias Road.
The City of Mexico Beach.",
selling 23ft. 1990 Sea Ray '
(Laguna Boat). This boat'.'"
will be advertised and bids
accepted starting Oct.. 8,.,
2006 on Ebay. Details, of
the boat can be found on
Ebay or a brochure-is"
available at Mexico Beach-,..
City Hall.



8240
BOAT STORAGE I-.,
America's Mini Storage '
850-229-8014 or '-"
850-258-4691 i -

Dry Boat Storage, ;
FOR RENT! Exclusive-
Carrabelle Boat Club.
Safe, state-of-the-art mari-
na. Enjoy The Luxurious'
clubhouse and facilities. '-,
30'x10'x10'...$280-$330.,'-
Call Caryn 404-643-6971 ,.


9NL 0'


redhe






L.SIUIhIIICsU rn .. '"'I'l'*'


AMERICA'S


BIG


PROBLEM


easy answer to complex is"


K)


obesity


By TERESA J. FARNEY
Freedom News Service
Ayear ago, at age 13, Nathan
Otey of Denver tipped the scale
at 197 pounds. Had he been,
say, 6 feet tall, that might not
have been an issue. But he was
only 5 feet 8 inches. In short, he
was overweight.
And he knew it.
"I had struggled with weight
since about the fifth grade,"
Nathan said.
But it took a serious talk
with his family doctor to make
him realize it was time to start
watching his calorie intake and
get moving.
"When Dr. Hudson said I
should think about not eating as
much sugary or fatty foods and
getting some exercise, I decided
to give it a try."
The first thing to go were
sugary drinks. Instead, he start-
ed reaching for fruit.
'"I made some quick chang-
es, and I lost 10 pounds pretty
fast," "he said. In the ensuing
year, he dropped 54 pounds and
grew 2 1/2 inches.
If only other kids were as
motivated. According to the
National Institute of Health,
childhood obesity has become
epidemic in the United States.
The number of overweight chil-
dren ages 6 to 19 has doubled
during the past two decades, to
the point that one child in five is
overweight.
What's so alarming is that
health experts have been sound-
ing a -warning about childhood
obesity for at least five years.
Hardly a week goes by without
some study on the topic, but not
enough parents seem to be get-
ting the message.
.Causes are numerous and
complex. Among them:
Too much sitting in front of
the TV and computer, and not
enough exercise.
Too much fast food and
sugary soft drinks, promoted by
savvy marketing.
The demise of the fami-
ly meal. Families are busy, so
dinners often become fast food
eaten on the go and washed
down with high-calorie sodas.
Poor role models parents
who themselves are overweight
couch potatoes with poor eat-
ing habits and no motivation to
Scliange
But change must come,
health experts say. According
to' the American Academy of
\Pediatrics, being overweight
causes pediatric hypertension,
increases the risk of coronary
heazt' disease, puts stress on
weiglg-bearing joints, can lead
to I ype\2 diabetes. mellitus,
lowers seK-esteem and affects
relationships\with peers. Some
experts believe social and psy-
chological problems to be the
most significant consequences
of childhood obesity.
'All these physical and
mental problems, in turn,
have financial consequences:
According to the Centers' for
Disease Control National Center


of Health Statistics,
hospital costs for dis-
eases related to child- .
hood obesity increased
from $35. million in
1979 to $127 million
in 1999, the latest year
such figures are avail-
able.
PERFECT STORM
Why are American
children gaining so
much weight?
"The causes are
complex," says Annette
Sorenson, well-
ness teacher at The
Academy at High Point
school in Denver. She I I
spent three summers II
as a director at Camp
La Jolla, a kids' fitness
and weight-loss camp
in California.
"People are quick
to point their fingers at
a single trend, whether
it be too much TV time,
too much exposure to
food advertising, the .
decrease In gym class-
es in schools, that kids
are spending less time '
playing outside, fewer
family dinners, the
prevalence of fast food,
etc.," Sorenson says.
"It's not that simple -
all of these and other
factors are contribut-
ing to the problem."
Some kids come
into the world with a
distinct disadvantage: They're
genetically predisposed to being
overweight. According to The
Center for Health and Health
Care in Schools, having over-
weight parents more than
doubles a child's risk of being
obese.
But it might not be all about
genetics. If parents eat junk food
and don't exercise, chances are
good the kids will follow. '
"Parents are the role models
for their children," says Ginny
Murphy, a registered dietitian
with the Women, Infants and
Children program in El Paso
County, Colo.
Also contributing to child-
hood obesity is the never-end-
ing supply of high-calorie, con-
venience, sugar- and fat-laden
foods and drinks marketed
and sold to kids. It was one of
Nathan's downfalls.'
"Around fifth grade, I really
started liking food," he says. "I
was losing control. Our school,
like other schools, served a lot
of high-calorie foods like Hot
Pockets and Gatorade."
Nutrltionally deficient foods
can also become a quick-fix for
families too busy for a sit-down
meal.
"Absence of family meals
is associated with lower fruit
and vegetable consumption, as
well as consumption of more
fried food and carbonated bev-
erages," the American Academy
of Pediatrics says.
Socioeconomic status also
appears to play a role in child-
hand. nhbeqitr lthnifAhi ie erts


-say the correlation neec
study. One 2001 stuck
that older, non-Hispa.
children from low-inco
lies were significantly m


body mass index," or
BMI.
But what if a par-
ent isn't willing or able
to lead the charge?
Perhaps recogniz-
ing the possibility, the
American Academy of
Pediatrics has put itself
on the front lines in the
....-- -.. fight against childhood
obesity.
"The intractable
nature of adult obesity is
well known," the acad-
emy says. "Therefore,
it is incumbent on the
pediatric community to
take a leadership role
in prevention and early
recognition of pediatric
obesity."
Delivering the mes-
sage that a child has
., weight issues can be
touchy, 'however, espe-
cially if the parent has
weight issues, too. And
parents can take offense
at being told their kid is
overweight. ,
And what about
families who can't
afford medical care?
.. "That's an unfor-
tunate situation," says*
..-- .. Sharon Jacob, regis-
tered dietitian for the
Health Learning Center
of Penrose-St. Francis
Health Systems. "The
low-income are a high-
risk population for
Is further overweight who could
dy found benefit from nutrition counsel-
nic white ing. However, insurance doesn't
)me fami- cover counseling for overweight
lore likely problems."


to be overweight than such chil-
dren from high-income families.
"Children and adolescents
of lower socioeconomic status
have been reported to be less
likely to eat fruits and vegetables
and to have a higher intake
of total and saturated fat," the
pediatrics group reports. "Other
barriers low-income families
may face are lack of safe places
for physical activity and lack of
consistent access to healthful
food choices, particularly fruits
and vegetables."
WHAT YOU CAN DO
Whatever the cause or
causes of childhood obesity,
the bottom line is that children
become overweight for the same
reasons adults do: eating too
much and moving around too
little. That's the simple part.
The hard part is how to
combat the problem, because It
won't go away on its own.
Parents are the most obvi-
ous generals m this war. and
experts recommend they get'
their child's doctor involved.
"If you're thinking, your
child is overweight, talk to
their pediatrician," says Rachel
Oys, program manager for obe-
sity for the Colorado Chronic
Disease division of the Colorado
Department of Public Health and
Environment. "They can mea-'
sure a child's height and weight
and calculate a ratio known as


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DON'T GO DRASTIC
Once a decision is made to
help a child lose weight, it's not
a matter of cutting the kid down
to 200 calories a day. In fact,
dientian Ginnmv Murphy recom-
mends that parents don't put
overweight childreqr on a diet.
per se
'Rather. we encourage
lifestyle changes like making
healthy food choices and getting
more physical acriitv It's a mat-
ter of slowing down weight gain
and allowing them to grow into
their proper weight "


It's nothing drastic, experts
say: It might be as simple as
substituting low-fat milk for
whole milk, eliminating sodas
(considered one of the prime
villains in the U.S. obesity epi-
demic) and keeping healthful
snacks on hand.
Murphy also advocates the
need for family meals.
"Eating a meal together is
huge," she says. "Parents can set
an example for young children
when making food selections at
the table, at the grocery store or
in restaurants."'
Jacob says it's crucial the
family be involved.
"When we have a child who
is overweight we counsel the
whole family," she says. "Often
the weight issue is a family prob-
lem, with parents overweight,
too. During the counseling ses-
sion we set goals, look at food-
portion sizes, keep food logs
and come up with ways to make
the weight-loss journey fun."
IT MIGHT TAKE A
VILLAGE
But that again raises the
question of what can be done if
the parents won't take charge.
The American Academy of
Pediatrics believes that more of
an "it takes a village" approach
might be needed. Its nutrition
committee report addresses
issues with the advertising of


SAorz


junk food; easy accessibility of
sodas, especially at school; and
lack of exercise.
"As leaders in their com-
munities, pediatricians can be
effective advocates for health-
and fitness-promoting programs
and policies," the report states.
For Nathan, it was the push
from his doctor that got-him to
address his weight issues.
"I had talked to him some
about the foods he was eat-
ing," says Kirsten Otey, Nathan's
mom, "but, I didn't want to nag
him."
It was a long, arduous pro-
cess for Nathan to take off the
50-plus pounds. "It was hard for
, him," his mom says. "He did it
very slowly a pound a week.
Somehow he found the self-dis-
cipline to stick with making bet-
ter food choices."
Part of his motivation came
from being harassed about his
weight. "Kids can be cruel at
that age," his mom says, "and
as he began to lose weight he"
admitted to us that kids had
poked fun at him."
Now that Nathan has a han-
dle on his weight and health,
his mother feels sure that he .
will keep an eye on his food and
lifestyle choices.
"He's educated himself
about what is the food he is eat-,
ing and has changed his mind
about what tastes good."


(car


^c^


Ir, ad-jiI or, Ic. ci as zii31tacelift surgery. Dr Kelley of
ire PI', -l'C So Las.r Surgary 1Ceriieis nnw providing
mromrratll., n'w Short Scar Facel'ih and
Er-,,:ijn~e ttidi.-, L-fI i:r,:wedurps Treso proxcedureso
r4,iucche IPi, e.ni of surgery and length
ot pOjL-o-p convale-seenl time.
No) S.53rIUpon rii re8razr Enhanceimen't aurg~ry is
aIA-; 5 6.3.Iat-IC 0 pc-vd"' a nnlij'iiappearing result
vyrhouc visble scar',


PATRICK M. KELLEY, M.D.,FA.C.S.
THE PLASTIC & LASER SURGERY CENTER
15 DOCTORS DRIVE 850-769-8991 (
www.drpatnckkelley.com r


Raise Your Expectations!



Education is the Foundation for Our Future

Our children shouldn't have to choose between moving
away after graduation or staying to work in a service
industry.
When education is a priority, it produces a capable
work force.
A capable work force draws better jobs.
Better jobs mean stronger communities and family.


Let's Get Taxes & Insurance Under Control

We can't allow small business and home ownership to be
crushed under the double burden of high property taxes
and outrageous insurance costs.
Bring the homestead exemption up to date.
Extend property tax relief to small businesses.
End the reign of Big Insurance calling the plays.


I

[ I We Can Expect
Better Government

When the people speak, Janice will
listen. Janice has a clear vision for
Florida's state government:
Pick the right priorities

Spend money wisely

Be responsive and honest.



Contact the Janice Lucas Campaign at
U victory@LucasForFloridaHouse.com




Janice Lucas


for STATE REPRESENTATIVE MIt


www.LucasForFloridaHouse.com

Political advertisement paid for and approved by Janice Lucas, Democrat, for State House District


ctuu L;CLL`tluc` v; I -v vw"


TheSta,- ortSt.Joe FL- hurday Ocobe 26 206 -II


F:+k~hpi7.7 evnaGl ont n uroniq ra or6 er


t


'41


i~aa ~





12( Th tr otS.Je L TusaOtbr2,20 salse 97 SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


Survey -


Infrastructure 5
Community Facilities 6

11) Working with the
GCCDC
Do you need more
detailed information on afford-
able housing and community
affairs programs offered by
the Gulf County Community
Development Corporation?
57 percent Yes
28 percent No
0.9 percent No Opinion
12) Where do you current-
ly reside?
44 percent Port St. Joe
18 percent Wewahitchka
0.5 .percent St. Joe
Beach
0.3 percent Highland
View
0.7 percent Cape San
Bias
0.5 percent Overstreet
0.09 percent Dalkeith
0.5 percent White City

General Housing Activities
Summary
Based on the responses,
housing assistance is the great-
est need of the general housing
activities listed. Sixty-seven
percent of respondents feel
assistance to purchase a home
is most needed. Nine percent
feel home repair ,assistance is
needed.
The second greatest need
is development of apartments.
Fifty percent of respondents
feel construction of new rental
units is needed. Twenty-six
percent expressed the need for
boti rehabilitation of existing
rental units and the construc-
tion of rici rental units are
needed.
Enerri assistance is
ranked the third of the hous-
inag actmult.:-c needed. Thirty-


six percent of respondents feel
that weatherization and minor
home repairs to increase ener-
gy efficiency is most needed.
Twenty-one percent feel utility
payment assistance is needed.
Fourteen percent responded
that repair and replacement of
HVAC equipment is needed.
Capacity building ranked
fourth among respondents.
Thirty percent feel that pre-
development loans are needed
to help increase the ability of
local organizations to -develop
affordable housing. Twenty-
one percent of respondents
expressed the need for qssis-
tance with operating costs.
Assistance for homeless
persons ranked fifth in hous-
ing activities. Thirty percent of
respondents fee there is a min-
imal need for 'assistance for
homeless persons in the com-
munity. Seventeen percent feel
essential service for the home-
less (counseling, job training,
assistance and case manage-
ment) is needed. Fourteen per-
cent expressed the need for
the creation of renovation of
short-term, emergency shel-
ters.
Housing Price
Thirty-nine percent of
respondents feel $70,000 -
$90.000 price range is afford-
able. Twenty-three percent
feel $90,000 $110,000 is
affordable. Seventeen percent
chose $110,000 $120,000
as affordable. While only
10 percent chose $120,000
- $150,0000 as an affordable
price range.


Special Needs Population
Fifty-four percent of
respondents feel poverty -level
tI-ouseholds. are in most need
of assistance in the communi-
ty. Tw'uir y-lthree,percent chose


Re-spondnt i-s i;-el hliousiug The major iiy ol the surveys
is the piii.irr need in con- were completed by Port St.
munity d:I.tIopirn:int a~:til\- Joe Residents: 44 percent of
ties. Econoitn Development the respondents Ilj\e in Port St.
ranked second followed by Joe, 18 percent Wewahitchka,
public' infrastructure, commu- 0.7. percent Cape San Blas,
nity planning, disaster recov- 0.5 percent St. Joe Beach, 0.5
ery for dainri.-l infr:,rsiruc- percent Overstreet, 0.5 per-
ture and I nadly cinlniinll.y cent W\1tte City, 0.3 percent
facilities. Highland View, 0.09 percent
Dalkeith,


FALL IS IN THE AIR


-. PSJES


Fall Festival


Slated for October 27

Port St.-Joe Elementary PTO is planning a Fall
Festival of food and fun! This year's event will be held
at the Centennial Building, and the vacant lot behind
the building, beginning at 4:00 p.m. and ending at 7:00.
p.m. on Friday, October 27.
Each classroom at the school will have a booth in
which you can play a game of chance for great prizes.
Some old, favorite booths will be back such as the treat
walk, dunking booth, fishing for prizes and the duck
pond.There will be manynew games and a hay ride, plus
blow ups for younger and older children, including the

adrenaline rush, sumo wrestling, bungee run, fly trap,
three bounces, and an under the sea maze."I The classes
will be able to retain a portion of their proceeds, so be
sure to attend and support your child's class.
The PTO will also be serving food, including hot
dogs, chips, drinks, candy and a delicious seafood
Cgumbo.
Everyone is welcome to join us for this great day


pi


ease call the fall festival chairman, Margie ,.
Raffield at 229-8667. We look forward to j
seeing you at the Fall Festival!


THE STAR


____GULF


.'\


v f


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


12( The Star, Port St. Joe, FL- hrca Otbr2,06


2


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