The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date:
September 7, 2006
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:00917


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text











USPS 518-880


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR OVER 68 YE
68th Year, Number 46 Port St. Joe, FL 3 Sections *
SEPTEMBER 7, 2004


B I-_


Dojo Mojo 1 B


6


Little, Wright Win Gulf



County School Board Seats


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
TheGulf County Elections Office expe-
rienced significant delays in announcing
the winners of the District One and Five
School Board races, due to difficulty
receiving voting information from pre-
cincts via computer modems.
At nearly 11 p.m. ET, the District
One incumbent Danny Little and District
Five candidate John Wright were tenta-
tively declared the winners.
Little, who was appointed to the
board last September to fill the District
One School Board seat vacated by the
late Oscar Redd, obtained 56 percent, or
284 votes, while opponent Eric Bidwell,
a former Wewahitchka educator, took 44
percent, or 226 votes.
Little left the election's office early
when initial tallies indicated a substan-
tial lead over Bidwell.
He said he looked forward to his next
term on the board.
"I'm very honored and pleased that
the voters in District 1 have given me the
opportunity to serve them for the next
four years and I pledge to the best pos-
sible job I can do for the school system
in Gulf County," Little said.
Wright, a city employee, defeated
incumbent Charlotte Pierce, who held
her seat on the board for 16 years. This)
was the first time she faced opposition.
Wright took 52 percent. or 280 votes,
while Pierce took 47 percent. or 255
votes.
Noticeably moved by his victory.
Wright called Pierce a "classy lady" and
honored her 16 years of distinguished
service on the school board.
Though new to the education field.
Wright said he will bring passion and


enthusiasm to his role as a board mem-
ber.
"I want to learn and figure out what
the parents' and kids' needs are and


John Wright, District 5


work hard," said Wright. "I feel just very
pleased and honored to be able to work
for this school system."
Of the 8.930 registered Gulf County'
voters, only 2.183 cast ballots.
In the circuit judge race. Gulf County
voters chose Elijah Smiley by a com-
fortable margin. Smiley earned 68 per-
cent. or 1,437 votes to his opponent,
Christopher Patterson's 32 percent. or
688 votes.
In the state races. Republican voters
favored District Six State Representative
candidate Lee Sullivan, who earned 44
percent of the votes. Jimmy Patronis


trailed Sullivan with 32 percent.
Democrat Janice Lucas defeated
opponent Ray Guillory with 62 percent
of the vote in the District Six race.


John Little, Distict 1


In the governor's race, Republicans
favored Tom Gallagher. who earned 50
percent of the vote over Charlie Christ,
who trailed with 47 percent. Democrats
selected Rod Smith (44 percent) over
Jim Davis 137 percent).
In the U.S. Senate race. Republicans
selected Katherine Harris as their win-
ner. with 60 percent of the total votes
cast.
The results will remain unofficial
until the county canvassing board has
the opportunity to review the results and
Supervisor of Elections Linda Griffin cer-
tifies the vote.


Sheriff's Office

Hosts Internet Safety

Nights for Parents

By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
Last year, Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka
Elementary School third, fourth and fifth-
graders were alerted to the dangers of
online predators during presentations
conducted 'by the Gulf County Sheriff's
Department.
Now, it's their parents' turn.
On Sept. 14, Investigator Chris
Buchanan will present Internet safety
materials to Wewahitchka parents, and
will conduct a second presentation for Port
St. Joe parents on Sept. 19.


Gulf County Sheriff's Office
Investigator Chris Buchanan will
present Internet safety material
geared specifically to parents at the
following times and locations:
Wewahitchka High School
commons area September 14 at
6:30 p.m. CT
Port St. Joe Elementary School
auditorium September 19 at
6:30 p.m. ET
Parents of children from
elementary to high school age are
encouraged to attend.

Topics to be discussed include the risks
children face online. the characteristics of
online predators and Internet safety tips.
A representative from GT Coin will be
on-hand at both presentations to teach
parents how to use online filters to block
sexually explicit, racially offensive or drug-
promoting websites.
(See PARENTS on Page 6A)


City Merchants Offer Two Sides to Tax and Insurance Issues


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
What a difference a year makes.
After asking merchants in town about
the impact of increased taxes on busi-
nesses last September. merchants were
again asked this September to compare
the tax topic from last year to this year.
and add another issue that has reared its
head since the 2005 hurricane season:,
insurance for commercial entities in the
city and county.
The results are not encouraging.
Since the beginning of last September,
almost a dozen businesses on and around
Reid Avenue have either closed their doors,
severely reduced staff and services, or see
themselves closing in just a few months.
At the same time. half a dozen new
businesses have just opened their doors in
the same area.
But with the statewide devastation by
last year's hurricanes and the massive
upheaval in statewide insurance coverage
for businesses. more commercial entities,
including many of long-established ones,
are being forced to seriously consider clos-
ing their doors.
New Businesses Not Concerned
Owners of new businesses, like Rhonda
Harrison of Expressions From the Heart,
Clay Keels of Petals By the Bay and adjoin-
ing gift shop Leap of Faith. Bill Quarantas.
Jr. of Philly's Finest deli. all feel that taxes
will not adversely affect them at this time,
because they rent their buildings and are,


as they described it. "locked into a con-
tract for rent prices."
And since they do not own the build-
ings. insurance does not factor in. again.
because of locked in rent prices.
Harrison. with 28 years of experience
in the flower business, believes that it is a
good business even in the downward slid-


Picture Perfect Frame Shop is one of the well
established businesses that is managing the
storm.


ing economy and rising costs atmosphere.
"In our local economy, people will
always buy flowers." she said. "There's
always going to be occasions for flow-
ers." and a large percentage of her busi-
ness comes from out-of-town and internet
orders.
However. Harrison admitted that even
though she has been in business in her
new location only one month, she had just
been notified by her landlord that begin-
ning January 1, her rent would increase
$700 per month. The landlord told her
the increase was to cover taxes and insur-
ance.
Quarantas admits that timing is what
had him opening at this particular point,
but feels that his choice of business is "a
good niche for Port St. Joe. There is a need
in the community for something different,"
lie said, adding that he had been working
on opening his deli for about a year.
Ted and Breck Lovelace, father and
son owners of Radio Shack, were not con-
cerned about either taxes or insurance.
"It's just real estate," said the younger
Lovelace, "it doesn't affect us as much."
They said they had not seen a signifi-
cant increase in their rent since the 2005
hurricane season, and attributed it to the
fact that they were locked into a lease.
New shop owner Clay Keels, of Petals
By the Bay. and Leap of Faith, also felt the
twin issues of taxes and insurance did not
really affect him that much.
"Since I didn't have a business before


this. I don't have a problem with the
amount of coverage I have or am paying."
he explained.
He did. however, say that having moved
from Atlanta to Port St. Joe. "it is cheaper
across the board to live in Atlanta than


(See MERCHANTS on Page 7A)


Beluga Cafe chef and owner Kathy Whittemore
believes taxes are running small businesses out of
town.


s Wfif E m DRA Workshop............................... 2A Handwriting Magic ......................... 8A


A *mI nut Spanning the Globe ....................... 1C Conserving at WindMark .................I I


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Business Hours:
8:00 am 5:00 pm
Real Estate Advertising Deadline
Thursday 11:00 am
Display Advertising Deadlint
Friday 11:00 am
Classified Advertising Deadline
Monday 5:00 pm
872-1278


Port St. Joe City .............................3A Gators Swamp South Walton.......... 12A


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INDEX
Opinions -------A Commlumll Calendart......60


Lellers Io Ihe Edilor ....... 5A
Spoils..... ... 1213A
Weaiher........... 14A

Announemiens ............-....2- B
Solely News ... .... ..

Obilualies ... .... 4B
Chu h News ....... .... 5B


Thifqs To Do &See........B
Law Enlor~emeol-.-..-.8
School News .. 9B
Legals.- -- --7C
Trades & Seruies 8C-- .
IasslhedS. 9-10C. IO


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Novigat a the o as t
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W AR






iI I, ,I I r l, l ,/I rLF r v I ,In, 2006 .Eb.....h / G. n-


Downtown Redevelopment Agency


Pushes Forward With Visioning


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
The Downtown
Redevelopment Agency
(DRA) of Port St. Joe is
pushing forward with its
vision and plans for an
expanded and more thriv-
ing downtown area.
In a meeting last week,
the DRA hosted a vision-
ing session, with input
from about 50 Port St. Joe
citizens. The session was
facilitated by Tracy Crowe,
principal planner for Land
Design Innovations, a com-
pany specializing in rede-
velopment and planning.
Crowe first gave a DRA
redevelopment plan update,
reviewing the history of the
organization, then outlined
similar and overlapping
growth plans from several
other city and county enti-
ties.
She cited the ben-
efit of combining all the
plans and different groups
and prioritizing one set of
plans, ostensibly under the
umbrella of the DRA.
Groups and their goals


that were highlighted includ-
ed Friends of North Port
St. Joe, Waterfront Florida
Partnership, Gulf County
Economic Development
Council and St. Joe Towns
and Resorts.
The results of a tour
and evaluation of Port St.
Joe by Robert Gibbs were
included in the update.
Gibbs, according to
Crowe, is a nationally rec-
ognized expert on town
centers brought in by the
St. Joe Company to evalu-
ate the downtown area of
the city.
He spent two days
touring Port St. Joe, com-
plimenting the city on its
unique "Old Florida" style
and the attractiveness of
Reid Avenue.
According to the pre-
sentation, he suggested that
the town needed to create
a sense of place and spe-
cific identity, recruit anchor
businesses for each end of
Reid Avenue, increase code
enforcement, and create
neighborhoods with distinc-
tive characteristics, such as


Reid Avenue, Martin Luther
King Boulevard, Williams
Avenue, and an artist's
incubator in the warehouse
area.
Gibbs also suggest-
ed that Port St. Joe cap-
ture more local spend-
ing dollars, enhance local
improvements, install
directional signage, evalu-
ate the efficiency of its one-
way streets, create support
programs for existing busi-
nesses, and perform mar-
ket studies to determine
what types of identification
and uses would be appro-
priate for both Reid Avenue
and north Port St. Joe.
Crowe's slide presenta-
tion offered information on
additional projects includ-
ing the DRA expanding to
include the north Port St.
Joe group Friends of North
Port St. Joe, creating a his-
tory campaign with ban-
ners, devising a city storm
water comprehensive plan,
and evaluating Williams
Avenue improvements and
corresponding side streets.
The remainder of the


Nt~


Hands busily record ideas on the redevelopment base map at one table.


meeting consisted of nine
groups of attendees dis-


cussing their ideas and
recording them on identi-


St. Joe city commissioners
Bennie Roberts and John


For ally0ur

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Account Executive


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135 W. Hwy 98
Port St Joe, Florida


Left; Representatives of north Port St. Joe discuss their priori-
ties for redevelopment at one of the tables.
Right; One table of attendees exchanging ideas included coun-
ty commissioner Nathan Peters, developers Allen and Cathy Cox,
city commissioner John Reeves, and David Warriner.


St


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cal large maps showing the
proposed redevelopment
'and improvement areas,
Reid Avenue, the waterfront
and north Port St. Joe.
Among the attendees
were Gulf County commis-
sioner Nathan Peters, Port


Reeves, city manager Lee
Vincent, developers Allen
and Cathy Cox, Trish and
David Warriner, Tom and
Marie Todd, Sandra and
Sonny Chafin, and about
a dozen representatives of
north Port St. Joe.


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IEslUUIIlbltU I7e / I J ijvinl ,7uwIs T ousn/ una burtv.i.my. .-*-* *- u -- -


-New U.S. 98 To Open Mid-Month, City




To Hire Building Inspector


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
On election night, the
city commissioners' meet-
ing handled two major items:
*the opening of the new leg of
JU.S. 98 through the St. Joe
Company's WindMark Beach
'development, and the quest
-for a city building inspector.
Tom Panaseny, proj-
-ect manager for WindMark
,Beach, gave detailed informa-
-tion on the new road opening,
scheduled for mid-morning
September 14, using multiple
maps to illustrate his report.
He said the Florida
-Department of Transportation
'(FDOT) had given its permis-
_sion for the road to be opened
-and used by traffic.
Panaseny is scheduled to
-give the same presentation to
,county commissioners next
week.
As soon as traffic is
rerouted to the new segment,
Panaseny told commissioners
that construction will begin on
a 60-space public parking lot
at the west end of the road,
just east of St. Joe Beach
and directly across from the
Sunset Village development.
According to Panaseny, it
will take 60-90 days to com-
plete and will include pub-
lic restrooms and showers,
all under the maintenance of
WindMark Beach.
Panaseny then pointed out
.on the maps the new access
road giving passageway to the
cluster of houses about one-
third of the way from Dixie
33elle curve, collectively called
'St .Joe Shores subdivision. It
,is a new half-mile long road
.ending in a cul-de-sac at the
'subdivision and will be their
'only access point accessible
by vehicle.
At the east end at Dxie
Belle curve, construction will
immediately begin on an addi-
tional 60-space parking lot.
located in the same area as the
.local pull-off point is now.
Temporary parking will be
.mmediatel v available in the
temporary parking lot on the
*north side of the hiIghway, cur-
rently used by construe( non
-workers.
At questioning by com-
missioners, Panaseny quickly
'pointed out that an additional
.120 parking spaces would be
added over time as the devel-
-opment grew, for the promised
.total of 300 public parking
spaces.
I Signage and beach access
signs will also be added to the
new parking lots..
Further elements of the
-.project will be the construc-
:tion of .20. to 25 permanent
.wooden beach dune walkovers
'along the four-mile stretch of
each between the'two par king
lots, many in. the same places
- is trails across the dunes are
now.
* After questioning by city
'commissioner John Reeves.
3\hlio reminded Panaseny that
:the St.- Joe Company had
promised public beach access
:in perpetuity, Panaseny agreed
Ihat a con-munity de elopment
district would be created next
spring to ensure the four-in le
b beach area would remain in
.public trust. e
Immediately after traffic


begins using the new segment
of highway, the beach area
from Dixie Belle curve to St.
Joe Shores will be complete-
ly closed for construction,
Panaseny told the meeting.
During that time, however,
the section of beach between
St. Joe Shores west for one
and one-half miles to St. Joe
Beach will continue to be open
to public access.
When questioned by Port
St. Joe mayor Frank Pate,
Panaseny said the design was
underway for the second phase
of the realignment of U.S. 98.
City manager Lee Vincent
read the only request for
proposal (ROP) received for
the position of city building
inspector, alter ROPs had been
advertised.-
Bo Creel, building inspec-
tor for several area munici-
palities, including Callaway,
Mexico Beach and Carrabelle,
was the sole applicant.
The position is to replace
the services previously filled
by the county building inspec-
tor.
Under his proposal,
Creel will provide full -service
inspection and reimburse the
city of Port St. Joe 18 percent
of all building inspection fees.
Reeves asked why the city
no longer wanted to contract
for the service with the county.
Vincent explained that after
having approached county
administrator Don Butler twice
about making some agreement
of reimbursing the city some
of the collected fees, the coun-
ty indicated it would not con-
sider Splitting an\ amount of
collected buildup inspection
fees.
Currently 100 percent of
all budding inspection fees go
to the county
The motion to hire Creel
for the city building inspector
passed unanimously. based on
the city connllJission sending
a letter to Butler making one
more request to the countyV
to split the fees. If he did not


92 E-Z
99 Clut
01 Clut
and
03 E-Z
Rea
06 Club
Fact


reply, it would be considered
a refusal to work with the city
arid Creel would be appointed
to the position.
In other business:
Gail .- sob rook. d ir ec tor of
the Dow-ntowii Redevelopment
Agency. told the (ommis-
sion that Waterfronts Florida
would now ma'nae their owni
funds through the citv and not
through the DRA: and as soon
as the DRA lease ran out the
organization had not problem
Inivineg into offices in city hall.
a reversal of her opinion of
several months ago.


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City attorney Russell
Scholz told Alsobrook he
needed to see the DRA con-
tract before an\ move.
The commissioners
approved a motion to place
a three-way stop sign at the
intersection of the Centeunnmal
Building and Allen Memorial
Way to help stop speeders on
Memorial Way.
The location of the stop
sign was determined by city
police d(ue Bill Hersey.
A motion passed unanm-
imously' to replace fencing at
the Washington High School
recreational center. Holly Hills


Cemetery and Forest Park
Cemetery.
The commissioners
voted unanimously to grant
a variance to businessman
Ralph Swatts, owner of St. Joe
Golf Carts. so he could buy a
dealer permit forhis business.
located on Fourth Street.
S According to Vincent. the
city golf cart coninuttee rec-
ommended Swatts be allowed
to purchase a transferable
dealer permit for S75 to allow
potential customers to "test
drive street legal carts short
distances on a city street.
After considerable dis-


ctission, commissioners
decided to hold a workshop
to: review and probably rewrite
an older ordinance prohibiting
music played by electronic or
mechanical means from mid-
night Saturday until eight a.m.
Monday.
Roberts suggested the city
police consider installing deci-
bel meters on the patrol cars.
a suggesuton favored by all
commissioners.
The police department
promised to have pricing on
the meters for the next com-
mission meeting.a


View of St. Joe Shores from the new access road lea from alternate U.S. 98 to the subdivision.
View of St. Joe Shores from the new access road leading from alternate U.S. 98 to the subdivision.


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"-]EAL ESTATE

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PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456
1.877.827.8751 OR 850.229.1700
w w w. st jo e b a y. co m


Contact Ron Baumgardner
Cell: 850-340-0634
Office: 850-227-1010
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4A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, September 7, 2006


i_ : ,_.STA R

K 2 .. '.Y' OUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR OVER 68, YEARS

Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Disinformation Campaign


Fall is always a season of transforma-
tion, of passage from days bathed in warm
sunlight to chillier and shorter days in which
darkness provides much of the backdrop..
The season has apparently arrived early
as attempts to eclipse reality seem as plenti-
ful as football games on Saturday afternoon.
And we are not referencing the deluge of
television commercials and telephone calls
telling us what kind of Democrat Jim Davis
is or proclaim Lee Sullivan as the second
coming of House Speaker Allan Bense.
Instead, we focus on the persistent and
often distasteful campaign of disinformation
aimed at deluding the public, the voters, in
this county as to where the blame lies for
taxes which have too many clinging for their
financial lives.
The mind-numbing drumbeat of out-
rage about property appraisals has suddenly
drowned out the noise coming from the
public about property taxes in what we can
only describe as a not-too-subtle attempt to
deflect blame in this election season.
As we have said for more than a year,
to assign blame about tax bills just direct
comments to the local taxing authorities, of
which the county has emerged as top dog
once again.
While the City of Port St. Joe reduced
taxes back to roughly the rollback rate and
the School Board shaved a quarter of a mill
from its levy, the county continues to hold
to the logic that trimming fat is for Jenny
Craig.
Consider that last week county commis-
sioners decided to compound and extend
long-term debt in the county. Two bond
'issues in the previous decade, which were to
be paid off near the end of the current one,
were paid off early and in their place a new
road bond was secured.
That bond extends long-term obligation
out for 25 years and brings roughly $9 mil-
lion in new dollars for road projects in the
county.
To receive that $9 million -in new money
while retiring $5-6 million of existing bond
debt, the county will pay some $11 million
in interest.'
Sounds like a great deal for the bond
agent and some.attorneys. but what precise
Value there is to the taxpayers footing that'
bill, beyond vague assertions of meeting road
paving needs, seems elusive.


Particularly when one considers that
much of that road money will, if history of
previous road bonds is a guide, be spent
on new roads which it could be argued are
more the responsibility of developers than
the county.
Additionally, each commissioner will
receive a lump sum of the money wasting
no time to spend these dollars, just as the
money from the two previous bonds has long
been expended for roads in their districts.
This $2.25 million set-aside provides
still another example of how commission-
ers continue to operate as
representatives of separate Spend $
fiefdoms as opposed to being on a pol
answerable and accountable
to the county as a whole. ploy? SL
Another bit of sleight
of hand could be gleaned Spend $
from an assertion from a less for
local businessman that the
Commission had estab- wide vo
lished a ,panel to exam- nore ef
ine budgets and expenses.
If memory serves, the governil
Commission embarked
down this road late last year Heck, no
when they decided to spend
at least $40,000 on an inde-
pendent audit of county operations and
spending to determine a path toward more
efficient government.
At the time, skepticism about the audit
as it pertained to election year politics was
greeted with an aggressive attack by commis-
sioners in what has become modus operandi
when it comes. to dissent besmirch the
messenger.
Of course, commissioners remain silent
on exactly what happened to this audit
which was supposed to provide some input
and guidance as budgets were crafted this
year and whether or not the audit was just
.another case of lackadaisical spending of
public money.
Spend $40,000 on a political ploy? Sure.
Spend $75,000 or less for county-wide vot-
ing and more efficient government? Heck,
no.
Commissioners have also remained
silent as a hiring freeze was thawed within
days of its implementation, with the county
having advertised for at least three positions
in the past four weeks alone.


Ii




it
ff

in


You Can Bank On It...


Fall and the football games sure seem to
have gotten upon us quicker than usual this
year, Of course, it didn't sneak up on us-ESPlN
.has been showing clips of Terrell Owens not
practicing. Brett Farve interviews defending
his not retiring and close ups of Bill Cowher
not smiling for weeks now. And, just so we
-won't forget, they keep. dropping little subtle
(like atomic bomibs)l hints that "Monday Night
Football" has inmo-ed to their network.
Shoot. I've never been. one not to jump
on the bandwagon.' I thought I would use my
"enlightened" and "inside information" to
give you ,some insightful and. highly accurate
predictions for the upcoming football season.
First off, I think some over zealous
Volunteer fan from Lenoir City, Tennessee, will
shave his head and have his whole upper body
painted over with that ridiculous orange' and
white checker board look that adorns either
end of Neyland 'Stadium... Oh, wait a minute,
too late for that prediction-- one hundred and.
nine thousand folks have already done it!
I predict before this season gets three weeks
old East Prairie View State will kick a field goal in
the wan ing seconds to beat Montclair University
by a single point. The entire' team and student
body for State will immediately throw up one
finger and began the obligatory "We're number
one" chant. I will. chuckle and surmise. "let
them beat Georgia. Florida, USC. Ohio State,
Auburn and Texas on successive weekends and
then we'll all fly out to East Prairie and,hold up
one finger with them."
I predict an "expert analyst" will be on the
air shortly explaining to us why the BCS is.not
giving Syracuse University a fair shot at the,
national championship. The same commentator
will explain that with three "deserving" teams in
the national championship picture, it's a shame
only two can play for the title. He will espouse a
system of playoff games -so no one is left out.
I won't disagree with him. Back home out in
the front yard we played until there was only one


9THE STAR
USPHS 518-880
Published Every Thursday at 135 West High. ay 98,
Port St.Joe, Florda 32456

VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
General Manager: Krichelle McGhee
News Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: Kevin Burke
Creative Design Manager: Kathleen Smith


Florida Press
Association


E ) National Newspaper
Association


HUNKER DOWMN


WITH KES

Kesley Colbert
Contributing Writer


guy left standing. Everybody, played everybody.
There wasn't no doubt who our winner was!
We could argue bad calls, complain about the
blindsides, whether the runner stepped out of
bounds (it was a pretty tough call as the side
lines were defined by far away trees and fence'
posts). dispute first downs and squabble over
ineligible receivers down field. But the winner
was quite easily picked out. He was the guy
with no broken bones, most of his teeth and the
blood running down his shirt was not his own!
Of course, our football year lasted until-
the first pitch !of the baseball season in April. I
reckon if the colleges and pros wanted to play
on till Easter,, they could really come up with
one "consensus" winner too!1
I predict this might possibly be the season
someone explains, to us what all the women
"sportscasters" are doing on the sidelines of
every football game with a microphone! It's an
epidemic!
I predict on the professional side someone
will recount the 1958 football title game between
the Baltimore Colts and the New York Giants
that "defined the modern era of pro football."
And some one will compare a hard nose player
to Bronko Nagurski. And if a big upset looms
on the horizon, it, will quickly be compared to
Super Bowl III when Joe Willie Namath led the
Jets over the highly favored Colts.
I predict before this season is over, in a post
game interview, a coach will glare at a reporter


POSTMASTER'
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Post Office Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
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PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


The campaign to push responsibility for
high taxes onto the property appraiser rep-
resents just the latest, and most insidious,
example of this campaign to dodge respon-
sibility.
Consider events in Bay County, where a
group of local leaders sought to travel to the
Florida Department of Revenue to protest
lofty appraisals and plead for lower taxes.
The response from DOR officials, to
paraphrase, was don't worry about the trip,
if you want lower taxes(, consult the taxing
authorities and their village rates.
The result heat
40,000 where it should be
Jitcal placed and significant
rollbacks in taxing levels
re. from the county.
It is one thing mis-
75,000 or leading as a political tele-
county- vision commercial to
tout that Gulf County's
ing and millage rate is among
I'cient the lowest in the region.'
It is ,another, and
ent? more accurate, effort to
examine how the budgets
). in those 20-odd coun-
ties. have grown in the
past five years against
the nearly 150 percent growth in spending
in Bay County, as well as exactly how many
dollars those mills bring.
That graph would turn upside down that
published by the county for millage rates
- Gulf County, in fact, resides right near'the
top. There are just a couple of counties on
that list even close.
The problem in Gulf County is not sin-
gularly a property assessment issue or sin-
gularly a millage rate issue.,
It is, instead, a government spending
issue. And the county government has spent
-money the past five years as if sailors- on
shore leave, gorging on the backdoor tax
increases which spiking property values
have provided.
That's the irony of this current property
appraisal debate no one benefited more
from ever-rising property values the previ-
ous five years than commissioners and their
budget.
And no amount of disinformation or
pointing fingers elsewhere will change that'
fac t.


who asked why he didn't kick the tying field goal
instead of going for the game winning T. D. The
coach will pause, angered that the pencil neck
Reporter might just possibly be right, and decry
about the hours of watching game film and they
had set up "S Y 48 all out, Z up" with the last
,two plays. "We had the game where we wanted
it. We just failed to execute."
I predict some ACC fan will make fun of the
SEC. And vice versal .. ,. d
T predict that we will have a televised game.
finish ii under three hours. Hey. I'm just kidding
here! We'd have a better chance of getting those
women reporters off the sidelines...
In various pre game interviews from UTEP
to Slippery Rock I predict a coach will say. in no
Particular order. "It will come down to the special
teams." "This game will be won up front in the
trenches." "Depth will be a problem; we're going
to have to play through some injuries." "He (the
undersized outside linebacker) is a gamer." "We
must eliminate the mental mistakes." "We've got
to protect the football."
This is too easy
I predict a fight will break out in the stands
at the Tennessee-Florida game.
.And here's a couple of things I like to see!
Wouldn't .it be neat if the Sooner Schooner
flipped over about the forty yard line on its pre
game race at Oklahoma? I'd love to see Bevo, the
beloved Texas Longhorn steer, that mascots the
defending national champions, break lose and
attack an unsuspecting Texas Tech Red Raider.
And how about a race between Renegade and
that Trojan horse
I predict we will all yell and cheer and act
like idiots "for our team".
And then we will lose one more American
soldier in Iraq. Or there will be another coal
mine disaster in West Virginia. A hurricane
will approach our neighbors in South Florida.
Or a son calls on the phone, his: voice tingling
with excitement, "Dad, you're going to-have a
granddaughter."
And we realize, for all our cheering, all our
urging, all our silliness, it is after all, just a
game....
Respectfully,
Kes


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$23.00 YEAR $15.00 SIX MONTHS
OUT OF COUNTY
$33.00 YEAR $20.00 SIX MONTHS
TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements the
publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage
further than amount received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed
word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely
asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces.
The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


K


Commentary by
TIBOR R. MACHAN
Freedom News Service


Demeaning work?

A CBS-TV morning news program report-
ed that Americans, on average, take 10 days
vacation per. year, whereas Germans,, French,
Italians and other Europeans are up there with
25 days or near it. OK, so what?
The report suggests one interpretation:
Americans cannot relax, while Europeans can.
Americans are workaholics, while Europeans
have a more sensible approach to work.
As usual with stories like this, CBS latched
on to one guy who works close to home and
spendsnearly all his time at his work station,
although he seems to involve his small child in
what he does (the kid was in nearly every clip
shown of him by his computer, for example).
This resonated with me because I, too, happen
to be fond of my work, to the point that if I go on
some kind of holiday or vacation, very quickly I
get bored with sunbathing or sauntering about
some old European city and its museums and
want to get back to writing and teaching. And
maybe, just maybe, the average American, who-
ever that might be, is more like that -- he or she
actually likes doing work and doesn't crave idle-
ness too much. Does this have to do with some
malady like workaholism? I seriously doubt it.
From when a child is born in America,
most parents try to learn what it is the child
likes to'do, what talents the child has, so the
child's education falls in line with these and he
or she will find the kind of work that is fulfilling,
satisfying. Let's assume there is a substantial.
culture following this pattern of child-raising. If
so, then would it be reasonable to expect grown
ups to crave going on vacation all the time?
Why? If they did indeed manage to find a. line of
work or career that is self-satisfying, that fulfills
their hopes for matching their preferences and
talents, why would they look for work that gives
them so much time off?
Some would say, well the only reason
American workers do not, on average, have a
good deal of actionn time is that labor unions
in America are relatively weak and aren't able
to bargain forcefully enough to give their mem-
bers the benefits they would really like. But this
begs the question -- why are labor unions so
weak'" Maybe it is because they cannot come
to American workers with a good deal, a bet-
ter one than they receive from their employ-
ers. Perhaps most American workers do not
.see the .employer-employee relationship along
adversarial dimensions but see it as more of a
win-win situation instead of a zero-sum game.
It may even be that those being hired by others
regard themselves as joining a company Instead
of being conscripted by some alien force.
There is in the wild a relationship between
animals that's called commensalism -- benefits
are reaped all around with no harm coming to
either side; no one is ripping anyone else off.
'There is, in short, no parasitism. It might be
best to start understanding the relationship
between various parties in the business world
along such lines, not the contorted idea propa-
gated by Marxists who see employers as exploit-
ers and employees as victims. That world new
emerged when some business worked along
those lines, yes, but even then it was exagger-
ated. The normal circumstances of business.
meaning those not contaminated by a bunch of
Marxian ideology, may well be cooperation and
friendly competition, not acrimony and hostility.
Just consider that in athletics there is a good
deal, of competition that's vigorous as well as
civlhzed, friendly even.
Indeed. if the socialist notion that people
who lure us must want to exploit us. take unfair
advantage of us. hadn't gained prominence over
the past two hundred years. it might well have
turned out that employees would have formed
companies. kind of like partnerships In the
professional world (law. engineering, medicine),
and instead of being employed by firms they
-would be hired as a team to:perform services.
the way a construction company is today. The
whole model of employer vs. employee would
then have been bypassed and the idea of work
being a chore from which one needs extended
relief might have been avoided. After all, many
who work, say, in the sciences, the arts, enter-
tainment; even farming see themselves as doing
what they want to do, and while taking a break
now and then could be beneficial, the notion
that they must get away from it all for as long as
possible would seem odd. It is difficult to think
of Chopin or Rembrandt or Einstein and their
less famous colleagues looking at their work
that way.
As with all generalizations about human
affairs, there are many exceptions here, but,
all in all, it seems more reasonable to see the
working habits of most Americans as character-
. ized by a kind of love of their work, thus their
vacation habits shaped by this rather than some
kind of conspiracy theory.
Tiber Machan isthe R.C. Holes Professor
of Business Ethics & Free Enterprise at ,
Chapman University's Argyros School of B&E
and is a research fellow at the Pacific Research'
Institute (San Francisco) and the Hoover
Institution (Stanford University). He advises
Freedom Communications, parent company
of this newspaper. His most recent book is
"Libertarianism Defended," (Ashgate, 2006).
E-mail him at TMachan@linkfreedom.com.


'4



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CSTOaOIISnedu 170/ I u 1 rving uu.It ucn tn uoua 'ii .v. IJ- 'u---.'


How are you retiring?


SLetter


Let me count the


By JANE GLENN HAAS
Freedom News Service
Ted sets the helicopter
down on Norris Glacier and
we all clamber out to gingerly
walk about and feel the crunch
underfoot.
This is a kick! My favorite
part of the Alaskan cruise.
Swooping low over glaciers,
actually landing on one, trying
to grasp the immensity and
power of these fissured rivers
of ice.
Ted is having a good time
too, grinning at some nervous
tourists when they board his
helicopter. Don't worry, he tells
them He spent 25 years fly-
ing military copters and now
he's retired, working the sum-
mer Alaska tourist season and
then relaxing in an RV near
Tucson for the winter.
Does he need to work?
Probably not. Neither does
the retired teacher who lives
in Florida but works as a
commentator on the White
Pass and Yukon Railway near
Skagway. Or the woman from
Seattle who taught herself to
be a naturalist so she can edu-
cate tourists about the beau-
ties of Glacier Bay.
These are the "working
'cause we want to, not because
we need to," retirees.
They are "purposed" retir-
ees, pursuing dreams, finding
a job or career path that fits
what they want to do at. the
time they want to do it.
Sylvia. and I met another
couple on the cruise. They
were celebrating their retire-
ment. He was 61 and she was






Crim

Crime, the violent type
that involves murder, assault,
robbery, kidnapping and other
violations of the rights of indi-
viduals, is said to be on the
rise again. After a few years of
decline, the figures for 2004
were up about 5 percent. And,
....of course, people across the,
country are up in arms about
this. Yet they have no explana-
tion. The economy is doing
reasonably well, so why the
rise in crime?
It is not my line of work
to pore over the statistics con-
cerning this topic, so I am
being trusting here of the
mainstream media where this
news has made the rounds.
However, I would like to sug-
' gest one possible cause for
why crime is on the increase:,
Couldn't it be how widespread
official coercion has become?
Our governments, what-
ever level you wish to include,
are more and more intrusive
in people's lives. And this is
so with the sanction of the
highest of courts in this coun-
try in the summer of 2005
the Supreme Court ruled
that cities may take property'
from people ii the city officials
believe they can make better
use of it than those who own
it. Right here we can see clearly
how the principle of criminal
behavior with regard to private
property has gained official
sanction. For surely the policy
of those who engage in robbery


SOnline 5
Opinion .
Pole Reults



Visit The Star's website to'
weigh in on next week's,
question: \vww.starfl.com


58. "No more bosses. No more
problems to be solved," he
said.
They are "players," insist-
ing they'll spend the rest of
their lives enjoying. They can't
understand why we're still
working, unless, of course, we
"have to."
"Oh, I'm sorry. You prob-
ably work to take these vaca-
tions," the wife said to me,
patting my hand.
No, I work because I have
purpose and that lets me "play"
without guilt.
Truth is, 68 percent of
workers age 50 to 70 have
told AARP pollsters they plan
to work in some capacity well
into their so-called retirement
years. Some say they will never
retire at all.
Yes, there are those who
have serious financial consid-
erations that block them from
retirement.
But more older workers
today expect to work beyond
to age 70 because they want
to stay connected to the work-
place, they feel they have
something to offer and they
need the physical and mental
activity, says Deborah Russell,
specialist in workplace issues
for AARP
A majority of aging boom-
ers "get it," Russell says. They
know chances are good they
will live to 85 or older. And
they are beginning to under-
stand there's more to retire-
ment planning than just
finances.
"We dream of throwing the
clock out the window and put-






e and

is to regard their purposes for
the use of what they take from
others as of greater impor-
tance than respecting the right
of the owners to make use of
their property as they see fit.
The criminal steals someone's
car or bicycle or money out of'
a bank with the belief that his.
Seeds supersede the rights of
the owners. Indeed, the crimi-
nal, like the Supreme. Court,
probably, doesn't. think the
owners really are the owners
the owners are we all. And
* we decide to what use the stuff
is to be put.
Generally, once the policy
of officialdom in a society is in
part to seriously, systematical-
ly undermine individual rights,
is it,a great surprise that ordi-
nary citizens turn to conduct
that echoes what these offi-
cials proclaim: if someone's
property is used in ways one
believes is not quite -fruitful,
not quite advantageous, well,,
let's take it from the person.
We can do with it as \we deem
,more worthwhile.
Even more violent crimes,
such as murder and assault,
receive encouragement from
the official attitude. Since
property'rights are tossed out
the window, why not toss other
rights as well? Why bother
respecting the rights to life and
liberty? After all, the criminal
may well have a strong con-
vittion that what he wants to
do with another person's life


Write To:
P.O. Box 308
Port St Joe, FL 32457
Fax To:
(850) 227-7212
Email To:
tcroft l('starfl.con


ways
ting the tie in the trash and
that's great for the first month,"
she says. "We've thought about
how we'll spend our money.
Now we need to teach retirees
how they're going to spend
that extra time."
The larger question is:
Are employers ready to accept
older workers? In just five
years, a third of the U.S. work-
force will be 50 or older.
How do these .folks keep
their jobs or find new ones?
And purpose-driven retir-
ees hoping to find work also
need to brush up their resume-
writing capabilities plus find
ways to leverage experience
and skills, Russell says.
AARP hopes to take a lead
in educating employers about
the benefits of older work-
ers while matching workers to
employment opportunities. To
find out more, go to www.aarp.
org/careers.
My goal is to be a "pur-
poseful player" a combinerr"
spending some time work-
ing, some time relaxing with
grandchildren, traveling, all
that good stuff. Please note: At
no time do I plan to clean out
my garage, create scrapbooks,
file photos or even tabulate my
geneology.
The joy of retirement, in
my mind, is to do as much of
it your way as possible.
Jane Glenn Haas writes
for The Orange County
(Calif.) Register. E-mail her at
jhaas@ocregister.com


- someone who may stand in
the way of the criminal's goals
somehow can be ignored.
If a majority of the people
have the authority to violate
individual rights, or if the rep-
resentatives of that majority
do, then what principle is to
stop anyone from doing.just
like the majority does? The
"people" bave decided to over-
ride individual rights, well, the
criminal is one ot the people,
so what's wrong with him or
her doing likewise?
Criminals are joined in
this attitude by some major
corporations where manage-
ment has decided that one
way to get ahead is to bar
other people from competing.
The way to do that is to go to
the Department of Justice and
sic them on others, claiming
they are in violation of anti-
trust laws, some of the most
coercive economic policies a
government can pursue. But
it is official policy, so why not
take advantage of it. Or to gain
subsidies from government
which entails robbing Peter
to help Paul. So when some
owner ofa small business sees
another getting ahead due to
business savvy, the thing to
do is to stop the competitor,
and since it is too complicated
for small businesses to seek
help from the Department of
Justice, perhaps It is OK to,
say, just burn down the conm-
-petitor's -establishment? Why


Question

* Should school officials deny entry for students transferring
over from Franklin County?


Yes, this county shouldn't add to Franklin
County's woes. 92%

No two words, school choice. 6%

Don't know or care. 2%


Comments from our readers in the form of letters
to the editor or a guest column are solicited and
encouraged. A newspaper's editorial page should
be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are
exchanged. All letters and guest columns must
be signed and should include the address and
phone number of the author. The street address
and phone number are for verification and will
not be published. Letters must be in good taste
and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for
correctness and style.


to the Editor


Taxing Authorities Responsible for High Taxes


Dear Editor:
I address this to the
three main taxing authori-
ties in the county
- the City of Port St.
Joe, the Gulf County
School Board and
the Gulf County
Commission.
Start with the
budgets. Each
entity submits its
budget, checks the
property valuations
and announces the
millage to bring in
that amount.
If the budget
is the same as the
year before and the
property values are
the same, the mill-
age should be the
same as the year
before. Result no
new taxes.
If the budgets are. up
and the property values
are the same, the millage
should go up. The result
taxes are up.
If the budgets are the
same as the year before.
values are up. the village
should go down. The result
taxes are the same.
If budgets are up. and
values are up, adjust the


millage to raise the amount
to cover the budget.
Taxes are high because
/


the budgets are high.
Budgets cause taxes to rise
or fall.
Example: if taxable


value in the county is
$10,000,000, then 10 mills
will be needed to cover the
budget. If prop-
erty values rise to
$20,000,000, 5

the same amount
of tax money.
At 10 mills,
the budget will
double.
The School
Board, the City
of Port St. Joe,
the County
Commission are
the elected offi-
cials who set
their budgets and
cause the taxes
to increase or
decrease.
SSimply put
.a budgets up,
taxes up; budgets
down, taxes down.
Robert E. King
Port St. Joe


~.-,


Commentary by TIBOR R.
MACHAN
Freedom News Service


not? Government is doing
what amounts to pretty much
the same thing by targeting
companies that are guilty of
no more than being more suc-
cessful than others with the
violence of anti-trust charges.
Crime is certainly not
something from which govern-
ments abstain not crunes
of corruption and similar mal-
practice but officially sanc-
tioned violent crimes similar
to those of the Third Reich. the
Soviet Union or South Africa.
to name just some obvious
cases. When our governments
ban medical marijuana, that
is a crime! When they forbid
the conduct of business at
certain times of the day or
week. that is a crime. When
they use the police with which
to enforce these policies, the
governments perpetrate vio-
lent crimes since, in fact. these
are all peaceful acUivities.
The challenge is for us
to figure out how to teach
our children and show our
fellow citizens that what gov-
ernments exemplify is quite
often improper. indeed crimi-
nal. practices no one ought to
emulate. Then maybe violent
crime will begin to subside.

TIbor Machan is the R.C.
Holles Professor of Business
Ethics & Free Enterprise at
Chapman University"s Argyros
School of B& E and is a research
fellow at the Pacific Research
Institute (San Francisco)
and the Hoover Institution
(Stanford University). He advis-
es Freedom Comrnmunications.
parent company of this news-
paper. His most recent book
is "Libertarianism Defended."
(Ashgate, 2006). E-mail him at
TMachan@ 1ink.freedom.com.


Coercion


STo Voice An Opinion


...~


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, September 7, 2006 SA


707 *r im(ifrinvnr vroniaaesfr6 er


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Parents -
Parents will also be able
to view clips of the videos
that Buchanan will present
to students later this year.
Buchanan, who is a
member of the Internet
Crimes Against Children
Task Force, hopes to
expand his outreach this
year to include middle and
high school students as
well as children in grades
K through three.
The videos are
tailored to the students'
comprehension levels,
and feature cartoons for
smaller children and real-
life situations for older


' From Page 1A
teens.
Last year, Buchanan
screened an animated video
developed by the National
Center for Missing and
Exploited Children and
the Boys and Girls Club
of America to grades three
through five.
The video featured
a nefarious group of
characters whose actions
accord with those of real-
life online predators, who
deploy various tricks to win
children's trust.
According to Buchanan,
99 percent of sexual
offenders are middle-class


males without prior criminal
offenses. Most either pose
online as young children
or use their authority as
adults to tighten their grips
on potential victims.
"Children are taught
to respect adults and they
know that adults are the
ones they need to survive.
An Internet offender can
use that as an outlet to gain
access and control them,"
said Buchanan, who was
pleased with the reaction
from students at last year's
school presentations.
"They were very
interested and seemed to
learn a lot and were able
to associate the dangers
online with the characters
shown to them in the


presentations," he said.
Buchanan hopes the
upcoming presentations
will generate a dialogue
between parents and their
children on the subject of
internet safety.
"Our goal is, when the
child comes home and
wants to talk about what
happened at school, they'll
know what they're talking
about," he said.
Buchanan encourages
parents to attend one of
the presentations and to be
mindful of their children's
behaviors online.
To reduce their
children's risk of being
harmed by an online
predator, parents should
placecomputers in common


areas, never in children's
bedrooms; learn their kids'
screen names, passwords
and e-mail addresses; and
limit young children's time
at the computer.
Online predators
pose a real risk, even in
small communities, and
Buchanan cautions parents
to be on the alert.
"What they see on
Dateline NBC is not just
happening in a large city, it's
happening in Gulf County,"
he said.
Since the creation of
the Internet Crimes Against
Children Task Force in
October 2004, the Sheriff's
Office. has arrested six
online offenders.
One was arrested for


transmission of harmful
materials and the remaining
five were arrested for sexual
solicitation of minors.
Buchanan notes that
the internet is a valuable
learning tool, with
applications for all age
groups.
But in the wrong
hands, it poses dangers
unimaginable even 20 years
ago.
"Used to, I remember
being told to watch out for
the old dirty man in the
black trench coat. Now the
old dirty man in the trench
coat is at his home on the
computer and talking to
children at their home," he
said.


NWFWMD Helps Riverkeeper Protect Apalachicola River and Bay


The Northwest Florida
Water Management District
has provided Apalachicola
Riverkeeper $10,000 to
assist the organization in
its public awareness efforts
to help protect Apalachicola
River and Bay.
Riverkeeper has
initiated efforts to improve
stormwater treatment
and encourage land use
practices which recognize
the need to carefully plan
for development near the
coast.
Joyce Estes, former
chair and current co-chair of
the districtboard, presented
the check Thursday to
Dan Tonsmeire, executive
director of Apalachicola
Riverkeeper.
"Working together hand-
in-hand with organizations,
government and
individuals we can make a
difference in protecting our


environment," said Estes.
"It is the vision and goal
of the Northwest Florida
Water Management District
governing board to work
and preserve our wonderful
northwest Florida for
generations to come. It
is our duty to protect this
land and we hope that is
the goal of every citizen
that lives here. The
Riverkeeper organization
has demonstrated their
determination and
ability to promote public
awareness and involvement
in protection of our natural
resources."
The district has
accomplished and
continues to promote
public awareness of
natural resources. It works
on numerous activities in
Franklin County to protect,
water quality, including
acquisition and restoration


of thousands of acres
in Tate's Hell swamp to
improve the water quality
in East Bay, stormwater
monitoring, planning and
on-the ground treatment
facilities, construction of
environmentally sensitive
shoreline ;stabilization
demonstrationprojects, and
works as a critical part of
the state of Florida technical
team in negotiations to
maintain sufficient flow
from the upstream states to
sustain Apalachicola River
and Bay.
The district was the
largest donor, joined by
Prudential Resort Realty,
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection,
Jelks Foundation and
Apalachicola Riverkeeper,
in sponsorship of the
acclaimed documentary
"Apalachicola River, An
American Treasure."


David Adlerstein/TLmes
Dan Tonsmeire, executive director of Apalachicola Riverkeeper, right, accepts a $10,000 check from
the Northwest Florida Water Management District presented by Joyce Estes, former chair and current
co-chair of the district board.














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r TIFFIN






1 3 ReidAve.


2 27-3667
k__,_____._____


Established 7937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


6A hpSta. ortSt Jo, L ThrsaySetemer7,2006


I







FctnhUL)JZ'Iclt 197 *Sv Gl on anod-aaf 6 eaTe t Po S.o -ro Se m r72 6


Merchants


here."
All five business owners
said they carried the stan-
dard business insurance
for fire, liability and equip-
ment, but left the concern
about wind insurance to
their respective landlords.
Insurance, howev-
er, is a problem for Jody
Perez, chef and owner of
Provisions Gourmet Take-
Out and Third Street Grill.
Perez, in business in
Port St. Joe for only one
year, just expanded her bis-
tro and catering service by
moving to a larger building,
and had difficulty getting
even basic insurance.
"Our [insurance] agent
had to search really hard to
get us just the basic cover-
age," she said, adding she
cannot get wind coverage,
like so many other busi-
ness and homeowners.
She said that basical-
ly no restaurant along the
coast can now get insur-
ance coverage, and she was
lucky to get what she did.
Longevity and
Experience
Long-time business
owners in Port St. Joe, on
the other hand, tell a differ-
ent story.
Shirley Ramsey, whose
family owns Ramsey's
Printing and Office Supplies
on Reid, equated taxes to
"having half an employee
you have to fund for one
year. You can't afford to give
other employees the raises
they deserve," she said.
Property values are also
a culprit, she added, with
"property values making
the square footage cost so
much more in this area."
Her business location
did not quite double in
valuation since last year,
she said, actually reducing
somewhat, but was affected
by being three lots in size.


When outside investors
paid $400,000 for a smaller
building across the street,
property valuations rose,
Ramsey said, but her busi-
ness did not sell any more
product and she still had to
keep prices competitive.
When figured that way,
she said, her costs increase
dramatically.
The insurance issue
is yet another problem,
according to Ramsey, not-
ing that her business has
not faced cancellation yet
because her renewal notice
comes in February.
"Business is slow all
over," Ramsey explained.
"Real estate affected every-
one. For instance, for us,
the contractors are not
making larger format cop-
ies, so we are losing that
business yet we are still
faced with increased prop-
erty taxes and insurance."
"We're fortunate,"
Ramsey added, "we've
been in this business long
enough to have reserves.
The new people don't have
any reserves. I don't see
how they will make it."
Ramsey said they have
reduced their in-store
inventory drastically in
the last two years, utiliz-
ing next-day delivery for
things they no longer keep
in stock. She said she sees
an increase in the cost per
carton of paper every two to
three weeks, just because
of the cost of fuel to deliver
paper.
Beluga Cafe chef and
owner Kathy Whittemore
has been in business in
Port St. Joe for the past six
years, four in her current
location.
"Taxes have increased
so much since I've been
here," she said, "that Port
St. Joe is going to tax the
small businessman out of


business.
"I don't see how they
justify raising taxes when
the people who work in
town aren't seeing their
wages increase. That means
they can't spend any more
money and locals can't go
out to eat because they can't
afford it."
Whittemore, who rents
her space, said last year
her rent increased 20 per-
cent because of taxes levied
on the building owner.
Insurance is also a
problem for Whittemore,
because of her location.
Since the 2005 hurricane
season, all of downtown
Port St. Joe is included in
the high risk category.
Terry and Jacque Staab,
owners of Picture Perfect
Frame Shop on Reid, have
been in their location 13
years. They have yet anoth-
er perspective on the issue.
"To have a frame shop
in Port St. Joe is not lucra-
tive," said Terry. It pays
the bills it has to but we
haven't drawn a paycheck
out of the business since
we've been here."
But it is their choice of
location, he added, saying
that they chose to be here
and have loved it.
At the same time he
called the current taxes
ridiculous, stating very
plainly that if they did not
already own their building,
they could not afford to be
in Port St. Joe.
He pointed out that he
could absorb taxes bet-
ter than some because he
did own his building, but
blames the system that
increases his taxes signifi-
cantly if the building next
door sells at current inflat-
ed prices.
Staab said five years
ago his taxes rose 52 per-
cent. Four years ago they


increased 15 percent, 12
percent three years ago,
62.5 percent just two years
ago, and last year "I didn't
even figure them.
"If someone were to
walk into our store today
and offer me the right price,
I'd hand him the keys and
not look back."
Staab believes the
tax situation is having an
adverse effect on small,
mom-and-pop businesses,
chasing all of them out of
town.
"All the mom-and-pops
are going, and none are
coming in [to town]. In the
new mill development I
guarantee you won't see any
mom-and-pop businesses,
he said, "People can't afford
it."
As for insurance, Staab
said he cannot afford insur-
ance.
Insurers Worried For
Customers
Local insurance agent
Andy Smith, of the long-
established local company
Hannon Insurance, had no
answers to either the tax or
insurance dilemmas.
"Several of our custom-
ers are going bare on wind
[insurance]," sighed Smith.
'"And on mortgages, banks
can't even find coverage
for customers. If you have
a frame building, forget
insurance. Only brick will
even be considered."
He saideven the major
insurance companies locat-
ed in Panama City, "who,
usually have 20 to 30 ave-
nues to go down," cannot
locate commercial insur-
ance for their clients.
He does feel that Gulf
County is better off than
the south Florida counties
like Dade, Broward and
Pinellas that are so heav-
ily populated and concen-
trated.


Roy Smith, owner of
the company, stressed that
established merchants
without a lot of debt load,
are faring well enough, but
new merchants are having
difficulties.
He believes the state
must take the lead and
become involved in reduc-
ing the cost of re-insurance
"We've just got to have
one or two years without
storms. We've got to have a
break in Florida."
The younger Smith said
he was advising his cus-
tomers to shop around,
but most were finding the
search difficult or futile.
According to Smith, com-
mercial carriers are drop-
ping his customers, and
both residential and com-
mercial carriers are not


Question:


rr I I I I I


408 Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe
(across from Post Office)
850-229-POOL (7665)
www.pristinepool.com


How can I keep my pool clean everyday
without having to do it my self?

Answer:
Cleaning's A Cinch.

Treatment:
Hang up those tools, there's an
easier way to clean your in-ground
pool.
The PoolShark automatic cleaner takes a big bite out of
maintenance and frees up more time for you to enjoy your pool.
The PoolShark dives in and. attacks dirt two ways: multiple rows
of squeegee-like fins dislodge stubborn dirt, while the oscillating
vortex action powerfully vacuums away debris. No other cleaner
scrubs and vacuums! Set-up is simple and in just minutes one of
these guys can be prowling your pool. Make it easy make it the
PoolShark by Sta-Rite. Rebate Available

r~


Model #GW7700
Regular $595.95
Sale price $479.95


Save
L .. .-


$120.00
- --..


X--STAl-E-"-,


'I.


Cape San Blas
Realty, Inc

4320 Cape San Bias Road
Port St. Joe, FL.
Local: 850.227.2160
Toll-free: 866.242.7291
Fax: 850.229.8783


LOTS and LAND
Port St. Joe
144 Betty Dr. irregular lot size MLS # 109390 -
$119,000
125 14th Street 112 x 120 MLS #200356 -
$239,000
1310 Monument Ave.- 120 x 105 -MLS #200355
$259,000
171 Village Dr. Marina Cove Commercial, 40 x 98
MLS # 105310 $389,000.

C-30
Shallow Reed Subdivision we have released 6Village
lots for $279,000 each
5454 Sandbar Dr. -Treasure Bay SD, .59 acre MLS' #
106513 $307,000
5312 Sandbar Dr. Treasure Bay SD 103 x 200 MLS
#105578 -$389,000

Cape San Bias
122 Rosemary Ct. Jubilation SD, .20 acre MLS
#109793 $319,000
120 Seagrass Cr.- Seagrass SD, 128 x 107 MLS #
108472 $649,000

St. Jod Beach
303 Nautilus Dr. Sea Shores SD, 80 x 140 MLS #
110234 $270,000
8011 Americus Ave.- Edgewater SD, 92 x 124 MLS
#201308 $432,000
7660 Hwy. 98 Gulf View, 50 x 140 MLS # 201604
$695,000

Wewahitchka / Overstreet
948 South Long St.- Pine Breeze SD, 108 x 300 MLS
# I I 1065 $75,000
9959 Hwy. 386 -Wetappo Creek, 2.6 acres, 120ft water
MLS # 200843 $450,000
121 Little River Cr. Seven Springs SD, .50 acre MLS #
109706 -$75,000
N


Visit
www.CapeSanBlasRealty.com
and take a 360 virtual tour! -: .


Oak Grove 2435 McKinnon St.
Mobile Home sold "AS IS", lot size 84 x 60.
MLS # 200159. $80,000. Call Johnny Linton at 850-227-2160


! ;.,a.J.5 ',? -.., a


"I-











M. ;:
,.I', .' .



Cape San Bias Barrier Dunes 273 Parkside Circle
bedroom, 2bath, 1,172sf,lot size 20 x 80
MLS #I I 11242. $365,000. Call Ronald Pickett at 227-2160


Port St.Joe 608 17th Street
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2,424sf, lot size 95 x 126
MLS #106985. $385,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949


Cape San Bias / Gulf Front 192 Cozumel Drive
3 bedroom, 3 bath, 1,817 sf,85.5 x 250 lot size.
MLS #108174.$1,080,000. Call Agent on Duty at 850.227.2160


Port St. Joe 1314 McClelland Ave.
ML R 200973 195.000 I IC [:.-. L.':. 850.2 7- 2160
MLS P 200973 S 195,000 .v .11 | ,r., L...I :... ir 850-227-2160


Port St. Joe 1009 MonumentAve.
2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,636sf, 90x ISO lot size
MLS #108274.$299,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949


St. Joe Beach 8113 Coquina Dr.
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,204sf, 85x 50 corner lot.
MLS #111806. $354,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949


* Cape San Bias 167 Jamaica Dr. Cabin #5
2 bedroom, I bath, 520sf,.
MLS #111320. $230,000. Call Johnny Linton at 850.227.2160


Overstreet -Waterfront- 8895 CK 386
2 bedroom, 2 bath, loft, 2,876sf, 1.9 acres.
MLS #108856. $575,00, Call Patricia Raap at 227-5949


Mexico Beach 103 16th. Street
3BR/2BAi Plus a 2BR/I BA Mlother-in-Law suite. 2,790sf, lot size 75x 100.
MLS #110687. $450,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850.227.5949


.-
__ l, 6...'1.' '-

CAPE SAN BLASI BARRIER DUNES #89 279 PARKSIDE CR.
3 bedroom, 3 bath, 1369 sf, townhome.
MLS #103858. $489,000. Call Ronald Pickett at 850-227-2160.


Cape San Bias SeaCliffs SD 632 SeaCliffs Dr.
4 bedroom, 4.5 bath, 1,944sf, elevator.
MLS #108476. $585,000. Call Johnny Linton at 850-227-2160.


Cape San Bias Gulf Front Condo 658 Seacliffs Dr.
3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 1,847sf, furnished w/fireplace
MLS #110288. $675,000. Call Patricia Raap at 227.5949


I' .-t e -
Wewahitchka 128 5th Street
4 bedroom, 3 bath, 1,525sf, 3/4acre
MLS # 200835. $199,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949


. ,:
Wewahitchka- 159 Harden Circle
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,930sf, approx 1.9 acres
MLS # 200839. $259,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949


F P7e 1A

writing any new business.
Insurance for older
homes is virtually impossi-
ble to obtain, he said, except
for insurance through the
state-owned Citizens, which
he calls "way worse."
He also said he did not
know what homeowners
were doing about carrying
mortgage insurance, which
so many can now longer
afford. Yet the banks, he
added, are mandated by
the federal government to
carry insurance on mort-
gages.
"I don't know what the
fix is," he admitted.
He did recommend
purchasing flood insurance
since it is easily attainable
and, in most cases, very
affordable.


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Th~ursday, September 7, 2006 7A


Establish 197 -Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years











1937 Star Touted the Magic of Handwriting Analysis


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
In 1937, The Star was
a newspaper with a small
readership and big ideas.
The Nov. 12, 1937 edition
marked the last free copy ever
printed, and The Star broke
the news in a front-page article
that announced a "special
inducement" to potential
subscribers.
With the purchase of a
one year, six month or three
month subscription to The
Star (prices were $2, $1.25
and $.65, respectively),
subscribers would get a
free handwriting analysis by
Professor H. L. Watling, a


Panama City graphologist who
claimed to possess the secrets
of success and happiness.
Watling's gift resided in
his ability to judge a person's
talents and character by the
form, style, shading and other
characteristics of his or her
handwriting.
The Star encouraged its
readers to take advantage of
Watling's services to discover
their true vocation, and
appealed directly to those who
were unhappy with their lots
in life.
"The tragedy of a 'square
peg trying to fit in a round
hole' is exemplified daily in the
lives of all of us. Opportunity


knocks at our door so many
times, but we fail to recognize
her because we are then
engaged in some distasteful
task that occupies our entire
attention," read the article.
With Watling's help,
subscribers would learn the
occupation best suited to
their unique talents and lead
happier, healthier lives.
The Star vouched for
Watling's method, calling the
hand the "instrument of the
brain" and handwriting an
outward indicator of native
character--"As you write, so
are you!"
To generate -buzz for
Watling's unique talents, The


BE i'?g or iCA This Coupo-. to THE STAR for -


Frec Analvsis ofI Your haiindwritig
i~tnldiolj v rU idil'^lll6


Whn ccmz?~?W\ith a tSt LC'scrpt-c-:L to


The Ja.


r c .


THE


STAR


"ORT ST JCiE* FLORIDA'

",ST FR F ~IE~~pY
- IS -.1


il A J .


I..''''
I''


~ r' ~, I in I linAc
in'!
I'* in: ,*'inI ''in:


I"'~% *4
l'1
int ml



'-in I','

'I, 'I''


* K ''*
I I*.
..l. 3





.1 I
'I I ~' '


The Star announced the last free copy of the paper in its Nov. 12, 1937 edition.


Ienclose


* .. for 1 year 6 months
Subscriptio-, to The Star


S3 months


THIS ANALYSIS ORDINARILY WOULD COST YOU

1,_ o-YOU GET IT FREE!


As an incentive for subscribing to the newspaper, The Star offered a free handwriting analysis
from Panama City graphologist, Prof. H. L. Watling. Those interested in the offer were asked to remit
a handwriting sample with payment.


Star arranged for the professor
to appear at the St. Joe Theater
two nights in a row to conduct
brief handwriting analyses of
theater patrons.
Located on Third Street,
the walled, open-air theater
was owned by the Martin Davis
Theater Chain in Georgia,
which opened the Port Theatre
on Reid Avenue the following
year.
To those who encountered
Watling at the theater, The Star
promised that the readings he
gave through the newspaper
would be of considerably
longer length.
Watling's services
ordinarily cost $1, nearly
the price of a six-month
subscription to The Star.
To take advantage of the
opportunity, subscribers were
instructed to remit with their.
payment a coupon printed on


page three, which featured
fields for the person's name,
birthday, address and a five-
line handwriting sample.
The Star assured that all
information would be kept
strictly confidential.
Graphology on the Web
It is impossible to tell how
many people took The Star
up on its offer. No records of
Watling's handwriting analyses
remain in the newspaper's
archives, and several in-the-
know Panama City residents
say they've never heard of the
"noted graphologist."
Though The Star no
longer offers free handwriting
samples, to its subscribers,
those seeking the services
of a handwriting expert can
find a host of listings on the
Internet.
At the Handwriting
University International


website (www.mvhandwriting.
corn), university president and
co-founder' Bart A. Baggett
offers an array of handwriting-
related services.
If you choose to have
your handwriting analyzed by
Baggett, you can discover your
true personahty traits, what
careers are best suited to your
talents, and unlock the hidden
fears that are "blocking self-
expression of your genius and
keeping you from fulfilhlng
your dreams."
' Baggett charges 8400 for a-
live analysis and consultauon
up to one hour via telephone
or in person. The fee is $150
per hour thereafter.
The Graphology Center,
founded by Anna Koren 'in
Haifa, Israel (www.annakoren.
com), touts itself as the "largest

(See GRAPHOLOGIST on Page 9A)


Gaskin-Graddy Insurance. Agency, Inc.
Homeowners Insurance
Mobile Home Insurance
Automotive Insurance
Health Insurance

GASKIN-GRADDY INSURANCE YOUR FULL SERVICE INSURANCE AGENCY
156 2nd Ave, RO. Box 157 Wewahitchka Fl 32465-0157
(850) 639-5077 (850) 639-2553* 1-800-782-6802
Fax (850) 639-5078

ggraddyins@gtcom.net

Serving the Panhandle Since 1931
U ~I.


-C r


302 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd.,:
Port St. Joe, FL

227-7099
Convenient Drive-Thru Window

Hours:
Monday-Friday: 9:00 -6:00
Saturday: 9:00 -1:00 Sunday: Closed


B~ilg~t,"~,~!~~'up----~l"h~-~"-*~a"""""


Established 1937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


RA Ti- fnrPor St.Joe FL- Tursav. e~fmbe 7,200


0


ISP nip Ie o- . . . . . . .~~~


r


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when vou Ba-mite10







Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, September 7, 2006 9A


A Nut

Filled with

Good Meat'

In its first year
of production, The
Star took great pride
in covering news that
spoke to the heart of a
growing community.
The 1937 Star
implored its readers to
take an active role in
shaping each week's
edition.
"If you have any
news-no matter how
trivial it may seem to
you-bring or send it
to The Star, it will be of
interest to our readers,"
read a sign that shared
space with The Star's
masthead.
To clarify its
point further, the
newspaper printed a
second reminder in the
subsequent pages:
If anybody has---
Eloped
Married
Divorced
Had a Fire
Sold a Farm
Been Arrested
Been Your Guest
Started in Business
Left You a Fortune
Bought a New Home
Swiped Your Chickens
Met With an Accident
Had a Visit From the
Stork
That's News
Tell the Editor
With its
commitment to printing
all the news of interest.
The Star quickly gained
a loyal readership.
Mrs. Phillip Lovett. a
Second Street resident.
sang the newspaper's
praises in a 1937 letter
to the editor, wherein
she called The Star
"the newsiest little
paper from front page
to last."
Lovett concluded:
"1 know of no better
way to describe it than
a 'nut just completely
filled with good meat.'"


Graphologist


graphological center in the
world."
Its clients include
government agencies,
defense industries, major
corporations, airlines and
psychiatric clinics.
The center's offerings
include a "pre-screening
method" for businesses
inundated with job
applications, which can
"quickly weed out undesirable
applicants, greatly reducing
time and effort by narrowing
down the field of possible
candidates."
The website features


an expansive sampling of
signature analyses and several
statements on methodology.
"While handwriting tells
us about the writer's inner
feelings, the signature tells
us what the writer wishes to
be, what image he wants to
convey. At times you can learn
from the signature about the
writer's past, his ambitions,
and his expectations," reads
one entry.
At The Graphology Center,
even a person's doodles are
given a rigorous analysis.
If a man draws faces with
open mouths, he is "talkative,


"7 ,, .-... -, r -

loves the sound of his own
voice."
Those in the habit of
drawing ugly faces are bad-
tempered, rebellious, lack self-
confidence and do not work
well with others.
Other websites offer
graphology correspondence
courses and detailed histories
of the practice.
Debunking Graphology
The Internet is not without
its graphology critics.
The Skeptic's Dictionary
by Robert Todd Carroll
(www.skepdic.com) offers
a blistering critique of the


study of handwriting in its
graphologyy" entry.
Carroll likens graphology
to astrology and palm reading
and sites blind studies to
debunk the graphologists'
methods.
"There is no evidence
that the unconscious mind
is a reservoir of truth about
a person, much less that
graphology provides a gateway
to that reservoir," notes
Carroll.
The writer shutters
at the use of graphology to
hire suitable employees and
determine potential mates.
"Graphology is another in
a long list of quack substitutes
for hard work. It is appealing


to those who are impatient
with such troublesome
matters as research, evidence
analysis, reasoning, logic and
hypothesis testing," writes
Carroll, who concludes with
a series of recommendations
tinged with skepticism.
"If you want results and
you want them now and you
want them stated in strong,
certain terms, graphology is
for you...
"If, on the other hand,
you don't mind discriminating
against people on the basis
of pseudoscientific nonsense,
then at least have the
consistency to use a Ouija
board to help you pick the
right graphologist."


The Graphology Center in Haifa, Israel, offers the following analyses of
handwriting, signatures and doodles on its website, www.annakoren.com:


The Graphology Center believes the size and placement of Bill Clinton's signature reveals modesty
and a tremendous sense of belonging to society.


I

~

~4Z. ~' Wd


%"4-$.P ci~i~;


/ t i^-h^k


Margaret Thatcher's enlarged first letter in her signature reveals a strong desire to appear in
public, assertiveness and a need to rule or dominate, according to the Graphology Center.


Dr. Brummett and Staff

Welcome Hygienist

Dana McGarry to

Pearl Dental












Call Today for an exam and cleaning!

Pearl Dental
111 4th Street

Downtown Apalachicola

850-653-8845
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someone who draws faces Drawing ugly faces indi-
with open mouths is talkative cates that a person is suspicious,
and loves the sound of his own bitter, dislikes people, is rebel-
voice. lions and lacks self-confidence.


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1. Auburn at Mississippi State
PI C K 2. UCF at Florida
Ift's fun and easy! Pick the winners in the games listed by the earn 3. Georgia at South Carolina
I you think will win. (One entry per person). 4. Ohio State at Texas I
I If more than one entry is entered,you will be disqualified. I
SMust be 18 or older to play. 5. East Carolina at UAB ,
Employees of Star Publications and 6. Troy University at Florida State I
theii family members are not eligible to
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I Bring, fax or mail your t
B entry to: 8. Penn State at Notre Dame I
I The Star 9. Arizona at LSU
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Gators Swamp South Walton


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
After the first 12 minutes
failed to dent the scoreboard
last Friday night, the second
12 minute period turned out
to be the difference.
Wewahitchka broke open
a scoreless game with 28-
straight points and played
near flawless defense the
rest of the way in subduing
South Walton 42-12 in-the
Gators' season-opener.
Paced by the running
and passing of quarterback


Sean Bierman and 166
yards rushing from Ryan
Ranie Wewahitchka over-
powered big but plodding
South Walton in what is the
first of three home games to
open the season.
"The kids played well,"
said Wewahitchka coach
Todd Lanter. "I was happy
wi their effort. The execut-
ed the game plan on both
sides of the ball."
The defense was out-
standing as well, allowing
115 yards rushing on 46


carries an average of just
2.5 per carry and 180
yards in total offense.
"The defense played
really well," Lanter said.
"The kids did a real good
job. They ran hard to the
ball and wrapped up when
they had their man."
The South Walton (0-2)
offensive unit managed just
one touchdown, a short run
which capped a drive which
started on the Gators' side
of the field.
The other South Walton


score came on a second-
quarter kickoff return.
By the time of those
special-teams heroics by
South Walton. however,
Wewahitchka was in full con-
trol.
Having been stopped on
downs deep in its territory
early in the second quarter,
South Walton punted away.
On the receiving end was
Dee Baker who sprinted 46
yards for a touchdown and
a 7-0 lead after Tyler Lewis's
extra point kick.
The Gators held South
Walton three-and-out and
two plays after taking over
following another punt
Bierman took an option
46 yards for a touchdown.
Lewis made it 14-0.
The defense repeated
its performance by holding
South Walton to three-and-
out on the next possession,
South Walton again punting
to Wewahitchka.
Three plays later


Bierman connected with
Clarence Gray on a 26-yard
touchdown pass and Lewis,
who was a perfect 6 for 6
on extra-point conversions,
made it 21-0.
Again, the Gators held
South Walton without a first
down and after Wewahitchka
took over following a punt,
the Gators drove down the
field to set up a 2-yard touch-
down run by Ranie.
In all, Wewahitchka
would run just 27 plays but
managed more than 200
yards in total offense.
A third quarter pass play
from Bierman to Baker cov-
ered 38 yards and provided
the Gators' fifth touchdown
of the night and a 35-6 lead.
Gray barged over from
the 4-yard line for a fourth
quarter score and securing
the final 42-12 margin.
Bierman was 5 for 6 for
91 yards passing with two
touchdowns. Chase Harvey
came on in relief and fin-


ished 1 for 1 for 10 yards.
Baker had three catches
for 57 yards and a touch-
down and Gray had two
receptions for 35 yards and
a touchdown.
Ranie caught one pass
for nine yards, to go with
166 rushing yards in 14 car-
ries.
"We are going to give him
the ball," Lanter said. "He's
special."
Bierman rushed twice
for 47 yards and Gray had
one rush for four yards.
Senior linebacker J.J.
Roberts had 19 total tackles
to lead the Gator defense.
Sam Adkison and Gray had
12 tackles apiece.
Tyler Bush had 11 tack-
les and a sack and Kyle
Luckie also had 11 tackles.
Lanter also noted the
special teams play of Lewis,
perfect on extra point tries
and solid on kickoffs, and
Baker for returning a puni
for a touchdown.


Shark Golfers Finish Second in First Match


By Jonathan
Davidson
Star Staff Writer

The Port St. Joe High
School boys' golf team
opened their season last
Tuesday, Aug. 29, in an 18-
hole, four team match at
Marianna's Indian Spring
Golf Club. The Sharks'
team score, compiled of
the top four golfers, was
399, earning them a close
second place to Rutherford.
Rutherford won the match
with 392, Blountstown fin-
ished third with 429, and
Wewahitchka pursued with
451.
Grant Rish possessed
the lowest individual score
of any school on Tuesday
with 84 shots, making him
the medalist.
Comparing Rish to
Brian Glass, the last Port
St. Joe golfer to attend a
regional championship,
boys' golf tournament Head
Coach Jim Belin strongly


believes in Rish's potential:
"Grant is close to where
[Glass] was, right now. If
he continues to improve...
he may even be there [at
regionals) this year."
The other scores used
to calculate the team score
included Sam, Ellmer,
a junior of Port St. Joe
High School who finished
the course with 101, Jacob
Combs, another fresh-
man with 105, and Hayes
Philyaw, a junior who shot
a 109. Mason Adkison
and Kevin Quanranta also
played for Port St. Joe, a
junior with 114 and a senior
with 118 respectively.
Conscious of the physi-
cal strain 18 holes place
on his players, Belin pro-
nounced his pleasure with
his team for not breaking
400.
Considering the size of
the school, Belin is proud
of how well Port St. Joe
High golfers compete every
year against the tough


Photo of Grant Rish


public and pri-
vate schools in
the district like
Wakulla and
North Florida
Christian.
"We have a
young team mix-
ing some very
good freshmen
with experi-
ence," says Belin
in optimism for
the potential
growth of his
team. "Next year,
we'll be one of
the better ones."


Port St. Joe High School Boys Golf Team


Volleyball for the:


Week


By Jonathan Davidson
Star Staff Writer
The Lady Sharks demon-
strated breakfast can be as
beneficial before sports as it is
before school Tuesday morn-
ing when they gathered for a
communal meal in the school
gymnasium. That night; Port
St. Joe's volleyball team won
their second match this sea-
son against Wewahitchka High
School in three straight games.
Sneads High School beat
the girls during their match
Thursday night.

Wewahitchka
On Aug. 29, Port St. Joe
competed fiercely with dis-
trict rivals Wewahitchka High
School during the first game.
Nearly victorious, the Lady
Gators scored 25 points first,
Lady Sharks trailing with
24, but were unable to break
ahead with the two-point lead-
requisite for the win. Port St.
Joe prevailed 28-26.
Port St. Joe concluded the
match in three games, scor-
ing 25-15 and 25-13 the sec-
ond and thud games. a feat
unaccomplished by the Lady
Sharks anytime last season.
"Pulling through inm the
first game really pumped them
up. They had three well-played
games Tuesday night," Taylor
commented.
Providing 16 of 17 total
kills for Port St. Joe was Kate
Shoaf (10) and Samone Smiley
(six). Erin Bailey supplied
the other kill along with two
service aces. Shoaf provided
four more service aces, Angela
Canington three, and Kaelyn
(Jo) Williams one;. the Sharks
accumulated 10 service aces.
Williams set 10 of the team's
11 assists, and the team evenly
spread all 14 defensive digs.
The Lady Sharks gave up
29 errors throughout the three
games.

Sneads
Losing the first and second


games decisively to Sneads
High School 12-25 and 13-
- 25, the Lady Sharks nearly
scraped a win 22-25 during.
the final game against the Lady
Pirates Thursday night, Aug.
31.
Coach Taylor suggests the
Lady Sharks served well in the
first game but could not han-
dle the ball, handled the ball
but could not serve in the sec-
ond, and found a way to work
both qualities in conjunction
during the third.
Indeed, during the first
game Smiley (two) and
Williams (one) combined for
three service aces and the team
as a whole committed only
two service errors. They made
thirteen errors, however.
The Lady Sharks remained
devoid of any attack errors
and made only four receiving
errors throughout the second
game but failed to deliver a
single service ace and doubled
their errors on a serve.
Through the third
game, Shoaf, Williams, and
Canmrigton each provided two
service aces. and the team
made errors on only three of
22 serves. Four attack errors
and three receiving errors
evenly divided the faults in
Port St. Joe's defense.
Sneads benefited from 36
Port St. Joe errors. Taylor
plans to work with his team to
reduce the "still high" amount
of errors.
"We don't like getting beat,
but we hate giving games away,"
stated Taylor of the Sharks'
philosophy.
Except for six immediate
points for the aces, Port St.
Joe only scored three times
on its own serves but 13 times
from Sneads' serves.
Defensive digs extended
fairly evenly across the team,
again. Smiley held the major-
ity of eight and Shoaf and
Heather Brinkmeier had .five
and four respectively.


STAR PLAYER OF THE WEEK

Wewahitchka High School


Ryan Ranie J.J. Roberts
Ranie, a senior tailback, rush Roberts, a senior linebacker,
14 times for 166 yards and a touch- had. 19 total tackles to pace a
down and caught one pass for nine defense which held South Walton
yards as the Gators downed South to an average of 2.5 yards per rush
Walton. and 180 yards.

SUPERIOR


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2006 J.V.


Ga
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.


SPORTS SCHEDULE


PORT ST. JOE SHARKS
Football Schedule 4. 9/8 Chipley


ame Date Team Place
8/18 Vernon (A)
8/24 Blountstown (H)
9/7 Wewahitchka (A)
9/14 N.F.C. (A)
9/21 Florida High (H)
10/5 Wewa (H)


Time 5.
8:00 6.
7:00 7.


9/15
9/22


*Freeport (A)
*Wewahitchka (H)


9/29 *Sneads (H)
(Homecoming)


8. 10/6
10/13
9. 10/20


2006 Varsity Football Schedule
Game Date Team Place Time
1. 8/18 Vernon (A) 8:00
2. 8/25 Blountstown (H) 7:30
3. 9/1 Marianna (H) 7:30


10/27
11/3


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135 W. Hwy. 98, Port
City Shopping Center
227-1278


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r
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today

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I






The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, September 7, 2006 13A


Port St. Joe Downs Marianna


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
At some point down the
road the Port St. Joe Sharks
may look back at the second
half of Friday's meeting with
visiting Marianna as the point
when the 2006 football season
arrived.
Port St. Joe overcame sev-
eral potentially game-changing


miscues with an overpower-
ing performance on offense,
running over and through the
Bulldogs for 364 yards on the
ground to come away with a
hard-earned 24-16 victory.
Both teams are 1-1 for the
season.
The difference could be
mined by comparing the back-
fields.


While Marianna stud run-
ning back Philip Sylvester had
over 100 yards from scrim-
mage the Sharks had three
backs fullback Ashley Davis
(90 yards) and halfbacks Chaz
Byrd (147) and Greg Farmer
(65) each flirt with 100 yards
rushing.
And the Sharks won
despite having three touch-


of scrimmage, drove to the
Marianna 46 before Rekus
Groomes stepped in front of a
Mike Quinn dump pass for an
interception.
Groomes' return, com-
bined with a personal foul on
Port St. Joe, put Marianna at
the Shark 18. Sylvester scored
four plays later and Groomes
barged over on the two-point


A. .*.. ..

low T.

.W


downs wiped out by penal-
ty, seeing another drive into
Bulldog territory end with an
interception and being forced
to come from behind after that
interception led to a touch-
down which put Marianna
up for the first time midway
through the third quarter.
"Our offensive line did
a great job all night long,"
said Port St. Joe coach John
Palmer. "Coming out in the
second half and taking con-'
trol, that was big."
The second half was dom-
inated by the Sharks though
they nearly found a way to
fumble the game away.
Up 10-8 at halftime, Port
St. Joe, which seemed to
be taking control at the line


Bluewave S.
Date
Builders. In S. Sept 7
CRC #1327 Sept 8
Sept 9

Sept 10

S -'c. Sept 12
Sept 12
rDIuewavebui~ders yah00.C0m Sept 13,


conversion and it was sud-
denly 16-10 Marianna.
The Sharks broke back
immediately, covering 64 yards
in four carries, Davis rushing
twice for 38 yards, including a
27-yard dash over right tack-
les which set up Byrd's 4-yard
touchdown run.
Austin Peltier's extra-point
kick made it 17-16 and Port
St. Joe was on its way.)
The teams exchanged
"punts which pinned the
Bulldogs deep in their terri-
tory from where they could not
advance past the 17. A punt
put Port St. Joe in business at
the Marianna 43.
It was Quinn, Farmer,
Byrd, Davis, Byrd and Farmer
for the final four yards and a


T. JOSEPH BAY
Time Ht. Time Ht.


11:26A 1.86
12:57P 1.54
12:36A 1.06
03:35P 1.25
12:13A 1.46
12:34A 1.79
01:14A 2.02
02:09A 2.12


H 08:13P 0.52 L
H 07:54P 0.94 L
H 06:53A. 0.64 L
H 05:56P 1.23 L
H 08:45A 0.39 L
H 10:21A 0.20 L
H 11:59A 0.10 L
H 01:42P 0.05,)


24-16 lead after Peltier's kick.
The Shark defense did the
rest.
"I thought our guys were
ready tonight," Palmer said.
"Mentally, for us, to see our
kids not quit and keep playing
when they could have hung
it up, keep fighting after we
made some mistakes, that was
very important."
The first tantalizing min-
utes of the game seemed to
presage a Shark rout as Port
St. Joe stopped the Bulldogs
on downs on the opening drive
and Quinn ran a sweep left for
a 59-yard touchdown on the
first play from scrimmage for
Port St. Joe.
The Sharks made it 10-0
after a punishing 13-play, 65-
yard drive which consumed
7:30 of the second quarter
clock and set up Peltier for a
32 yard field goal. Port St. Joe
padded its lead despite nearly
losing two fumbles and having
a Byrd touchdown run nulli-
fied by a holding penalty.
Marianna responded with
a five-play, 68-yard drive,'
spotlighted by a 41-yard dash


w


around left end by Sylvester,
who scored from the 1 the fol-
lowing play and crossed the
goal line again for a two-point
conversion.
"Speed was the differ-
ence," said Marianna coach
Don Dowling. "We can run.
They can run in more places.
You can't simulate that.
"The way we play defense,
we are going to give up a big
play or two. It's a credit to
our kids they didn't fold when
we were down 10-0 and kept
fighting back."


Marianna 0 88 0
Port St. Joe 7 3 7 7


First quarter
PSJ Quinn 59 run (Peltier kick)
Second quarter
PSJ Peltier FG 32
M Sylvester 1 run (Sylvester
run)
Third quarter
M Sylvester 1 run (Groomes
run)
PSJ Byrd 4 run (Peltier kick)
Fourth quarter
PSJ Farmer 4 run (Peltier kick).


STAR PLAYER OF THE WEEK

Port St. Joe High School


Chaz Byrd


Byrd, a junior halfback, led the
Sharks with 147 rushing yards
and one touchdown on 17 carries
as Port St. Joe beat Marianna.


Byron Peters


Peters, a senior defensive end,
had five solo tackles, four assists
and recorded one sack as the
Sharks downed Marianna 24-16.


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3 SPORTS SCHEDULE


WEWAHITCHKA GATORS

2006 Varsity Football Schedule
Game Date Team Place
1. 9/01 South Walton (H)
2. 9/08 Cottondale (H)
3. 9/15 Jay (H)
4. .9/22 Port St. Joe (A)
5. 9/29 Northview (H)
6. 10/06 West Gasden (H)
7. 10/13 Sneads (H)
8. 10/20 Freeport (A)
9. 10/27 Liberty County (A)
10. 11/3 Blountstown (A)


Emeraff Coast

Ik Federal Credit Union


PORT ST. JOE
530 Cecil G. Costin, Sr Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
emeraldcoastfcu.com
EMERALDCOAST@GTCOM.NET
850-227-1156


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Wewahitchka, FL 32465

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f









THE FORECAST


WEATHER
Temps for September 7


RECORD
High: 94' (1998)
Low: 64' (1950)


TODAY





Partly cloudy, warm
and humid
High: 880; Low: 70


TOMORROW





Partly cloudy, chc. of
P.M. t-storms
High: 850; Low: 700


SATURDAY

I-


Partly cloudy, chc. of
P.M. t-storms
High: 860; Low: 71


SUNDAY





Partly cloudy and
pleasant
High: 860; Low: 720


MONDAY





Partly cloudy and
warm
High: 870; Low: 720


TUESDAY
12




Partly sunny with scat-
tered t-storms
High: 870; Low: 730


WEDNESDAY
r- 13




Partly sunny with scat-
tered t-storms
High: 87; Low: 730


Today's high and tonight's low temperatures


-,~ ~ .. ote rp ris8.e- i Dothan.'
89167*-*e96


Buinbr~idge
go-?~


Deluimak Springs

Marian ~ -
NIceville 6' -
8968- Crystal Lake Bristol
D--Wa _. .bL | ,i-.- 90/9 7- Tallahadee
Beach ,'
89" F"loWewah'itchk' a W-lm ''


Pensacola I
5 69 .-
Port St. Joe '.
i-r. I- O- --o
..ifpalachicola
89 69


LAST 7 DAYS
Monday 9/4 88/71/0.00
Sunday 9/3 90/70/0.00
Saturday 9/2 91/72/0.01
Friday 9/1 91/74/0.00
Thursday 8/31 90/72/0.00
Wednesday 8/30....................91/73/0.11
Tuesday 8/29 91/76/0.02

SUN & MOON


Sunrise
Thursday 9/7... ..7:22 a.m..
,Friday 9/8 ....... 7:22 a.m..
Saturday 9/9 .... 7:23 a.m..
Sunday 9/10 .... 7:23 a.m..
Monday.9/11 .... 7:24 a.m..
Tuesday 9/12... ..7:24 a.m..
Wednesday 9/13..7:25 a.m..


Sunset
.7:56 p.m.
.7:55 p.m.
.7 54 pm
.7:53 p.m.
.7:51 p:.m.
.7:50 p.m.
.7:49 p.m.


Moonrise Moonset
Thursday 9 7.. 805 p.m .703 m
Friday 9'8 .. .8:38 p.m.. .8:13 a.m.
Saiurd a, 9 9 .., .9:12 p.r..,9:22 a.m.
Sunday 9/10 ..... 9:48 p.m.. .10:32 a.m.
Monda,. 911 10 2. pr m 11:41 a.m.
Tuesdj 9'12 ..11:12 p.m. 12:51 p.m.
Wednesday y9'13..--- ...158 p.m.


APALACHICOLA RIVER
Site Flood Stg. Stage Chg.
Woodruff Tailwater 66.0 39.66 0.04
Chattahoochee 39.72 0.04
Blountstown 15.0 1.09 0.06
Wewahitchka 12.06 0.04
OCHLOCKONEE RIVER
Thomasville 15.0 6.54 0.28


Concord
'Havana
Bloxham


25.27
25.0 12.22
22.0 3.26


ultraviolet radiation coming
Z". ,, fir T. T, I, ;un TiI ; ,rnji i.. th
ru ,i l lN-i T 'I ,ir,-i ,e i J u"l
Very high damage to your skin.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Low Moderavi H,r]l vr HIjr. E.iEiT. i


Full Last New


oepi Sept. 14 Sept 22


First


Sept. 30


Friday
Hi Lo OtRI
Albany 88 67 pc
Apalachicola 88 69 t
Bainbridge 88 67 t
Bristol 91 66 pc
Columbus 87 67 pc
Crystal Lake 85 67 pc
DefuniakSp. 88 67 pc
Dothan 87 67 pc
Enterprise 93 67 pc
Ft. Walton Bch.90 70 t
Gainesville 89 70 pc
Jacksonville 89 71 pc
Marianna 87 67 t
Mobile 87 69 t
Montgomery 88 64 pc
Newport 89 66 pc
Niceville 85 67 pc
Panama City 88 73 t
Pascagoula 91 69 t
Pensacola 85 71 t
Port St. Joe 85 70 pc
Tallahassee 89 69 t
Valdosta 89 68 t
Wewahitchka 85 68 pc
Wilma 85 67 pc


Thursday
High
Low
Friday
High
Low
Saturday
High
Low
Sunday
High
Low
Monday
High
Low
Tuesday
High
Low
Wed.
High
Low


TS .JOSEPH BAY


A.M.
10:14
7:57
A.M.
11:25
8:14
A.M.
12:55
7:55
A.M.
12:36
6:52
A.M.
12:13
8:46
A.M.
12:34
10:22
A.M.
1:15
11:59


All forecasts, maps and graphics
@2006 Weather Central, Inc.
For a personalized forecast,
go to:
www.premiumweather.com


Saturday
Hi Lo Otlk
89 67 pc.
87 70 t
88 68 pc
90 67 pc
89 68 pc
84 69 pc
87 69 pc
88 67 pc
92 68 pc
88 70 t
90 70 pc
88 71 pc
88 69 pc
88 70 t
90 67 pc
89 66 pc
84 69 pc
88 73 pc
90 70 t
87 71 t
86 71 pc
90 69 pc
88 68 pc
84 69 pc
85 68 pc


P.M. ft.

P.M. ft.


P.M. ft.


P.M. ft.
3:35 1.2
5:52 1.1
P.M. ft.


P.M. ft.

P.M. ft.





El
p eir- t1.-


High pressure will keep the weather dry through much of the central and eastern U.S. on Thursday. The exception may be a few
showers in New England. A frontal boundary will be the focus for more thunderstorms through Florida. Monsoonal moisture
will stream northward through the Rockies and produce scattered showers and thunderstorms through the central and southern
ranges.


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit



City .
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Baghdad
Bangkok
Beijing
Berlin
Brussels
B' Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Dublin


Today
Hi Lo
78 57,
60 45
81 62
83 59
86 55
85 63
91 59
79 58
72 60
77 48
79 60
78 59
76 59
78 57
81 53
82 59
79 62


Today
Hi Lo
88 76
78 59
86 66
111 86
97 80
88 71
78 56
79 61
66 47
91 71
80 53
66 52


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
77 57 pc
58 46 sh
83 66 pc
82 62 pc
83 55 pc
87 64 pc
89 60 s
78 63 s
76 59 pc
76 47 pc
76 60 pc
80 60 pc
75 58 pc
80 60 pc
80 54 pc
79 59 pc
82 62 pc


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
87 77 t
74 56 t
87 69 s
11385 s,
96 79 t
78 56 sh
82 60 pc
75 55 t
69 48 s
93 72 s
84 55 s
66 53 sh


City
El Paso
Fairbanks
Honolulu
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami '"
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Omaha
Orlando



City
Geneva
Helsinki
Hon'i 'ong
Jerusalem
Kabul
Lima
London
Madrid
Me',icoC dry
Monlre l
Moscow -
New Delhi


Lo Otlk
63 pc
40 c
75 pc
58 pc
63 pc
78 -pc
60 s
63 s
66 s
78 pc
60 pc
59 pc
59 pc
71 pc
66 pc
62 s
74 t


Today
Hi Lo Otlk
85 65 pc
68 53 sh
88 78 t
88 71 s
81 54 s
69 63 pc
71 55 sh
94 63 t
77 55 t
71 53 sh
65 49 sh
90 72 t


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
86 65 pc
65 41 pc
87 76 s
81 58 pc
83 61 pc
96 74 pc
87 64 pc
73 63 pc
88 67 s
91 79 pc
79 61 pc
73 54 pc
86 61 pc
88 72 pc
80 66 s
82 58 pc
91 74 t


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otik
78 57 t
65 51 sh
87 79 t
87 68 s
83 55 s
68 61 pc
69 56 pc
91 62 pc
76 54 t
73 54 pc
66 51 sh
93 75 t


"Today
City Hi Lo
Philadelphia 80 62
Phoenix 100 79
Pittsburgh 78 .54
Portland, ME 73 54
Portland, OR 80 53
Reno 90 55
Richmond 83 61
Sacramento 91 55
St. Louis 84 61
Salt Lk City 88 61
San Diego 78 68
San Fran. 62 54
Seattle 78 54
Spokane 89 54
Tucson '90 69
Wash., D.C. 84 62,
Wichita 85 60


Today
City Hi Lo
Oslo 69 54
Paris 80 60
Rio 73 66
Rome 87 69
Seoul 72 54
Singapore 88 77
Sydney 62 46
Tokyo 87 76
Toronto 72 52
Vancouver 77 51E
Vienna, 84 62
Warsaw. 77 56


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk.
79 65 pc
96 77 pc
78 59 pc
74 56 pc
77 54 pc
90 55 s
83 62 pc
90 55 s
85 64 pc
85 60 pc
78 67 pc
60 54 p:
71 54 c,
83 54 pc
89 69 pc
82 65 pc
83 60. pc


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otik
64 51 pc
70 54 pc
79 67 s
88 68 pc
73 53 pc
89 77 t
63 48 pc
87 75 t
72 53 pc
66 50 sh
85 65 pc
82 59 pc


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Low: 73'


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14ATheStr, ortSt Jo, F -Thursday, September 7, 2006


KEY TO CONDITIONS i=-, c -ni, v,






Pet of the Week 4B


Obituaries 4B


Law Enforcement 8B


I'


The Star, Port St.


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


WindMark Protection of Local



Environment Goes Past the Norm


Joe. FL Thursday, September 7, 2006 SECTION B


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
Change can be frightening to many, and the
specter of losing a life-long environment can
create a variety of feelings, as numerous resi-
dents of Gulf County can attest.
But Bill Lynn, WindMark Beach naturalist
for the St. Joe Company the major factor in
so many of the county's recent environmental
changes is determined to make sure those
changes are for the good.
His efforts are paying off.
Originally from Athens, Alabama, "a small
town like Port St. Joe," he said, Lynn earned his
wildlife biology degree from Auburn University
and worked for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service out of Panama City before joining the
St. Joe Company in 2004.
"This is definitely a unique job," said Lynn,
"and I have learned over the years that 90 per-


Marie Logan/The Star
An abundance of boardwalks throughout WindMark keep pedestrians out of fragile natural
areas.



Getting their Mojo
By Tim Croft and kick and some will teach you about
Star News Editor depth and soul," Cryderman said. "This is
Four-year-old Tristan Dorn, his feet about the depth of your soul. It's something
spread shoulder width, gashes the air with you can learn now and keep forever."
authority, a steely gaze signifying all busi- What students keep is a mixture of
ness. physical, spiritual and mental-health.
Two rows behind Dorn, 50-something Cryderman and his son, a hulking
Rocky Comforter displays a similar singu- testament to hard work and dedication to
lar focus as instructor Shawn Cryderman craft, provide a well-rounded :education
takes a class of about 25 people through that goes far beyond the ability to break
their katas, those rehearsed movements boards and bricks.
which represent basic martial arts move- That's the show of the martial arts,
ments. particularly the blend of karate and kung-
' Just another Monday night or fu and Tai Chi which Cryderman teaches.
Thursday evening at Marathon Martial Karate, Cryderman said in explaining
Arts in Port St. Joe, where regardless of some of the differences, is an art of rapid
age or gender, Curtis Cryderman, sense, and hard movements, while Tai Chi is
,or master, to. those who walk through more relaxed, with slower movements.
the front door. and his son, Shawn, offer All emphasize breathing, and through
immersion in the ancient, and often mis- the monitoring and focusing on breathing
understood, akt of self-defense. comes tools such as meditation and an
Listen to Cryderman. in fact, is to come ability to gaze inward.
away believing his instruction is far more In .time, Cryderman noted, it all
'than self-defense, far more than being able becomes a "way of life."
topunch or kick a threat into submission, "Karate is kind of main stream but
far more than the color of belt inching the the karate I do is not very main stream,"
gi; or white or black workout attire. Cryderman said, adding that, "It takes 18
"Some masters will teach you to punch months to learn the form, a lifetime to
learn the flow."


Father and son martial arts instructors, Curtis and Shawn Cryderman, lead a class at Marathon
Martial Arts in Port St. Joe.
" ,


cent of wildlife management is people manage-
ment" a skill that comes in handy when deal-
ing with a massive development like WindMark
Beach and the disparate people involved in its
construction and those eventually living there.
Going Native
Lynn's main duties are to tend to all
aspects of WindMark's environment, but, along
with the other five wildlife biologists on staff,
he helps wherever and in whatever capacity St.
Joe needs him, anywhere in the region.
One of the St. Joe Company's signatures in
its developments and the foremost purpose in
building WindMark, according to Lynn, was to
maintain as much of the natural environment
as possible through use of native vegetation.
A list of native plants used in the site was
reviewed by both U.S. Fish and Wildlife and

(See CONSERVING on Page 3B)


SMarie Logan/The Star
Godfrey's Golden Aster is native almost exclusively to Gulf County.


at the Dojo


Bryce Johnston practices the Kata.


There are demonstrations of strength
and focus, such are exercises and "bouts"
using sticks as offensive and defensive
weapons.
There are the katas which provide the
essential rhythms to a workout session,
a sort of choreographed warm-up which
become increasingly difficult depending on
the advancement of the students.
Consider these the physical fitness ele-
ments of Cryderman's instruction.
But this session is about far more than
being able to beat up the schoolyard bully
or fend off the attacker in the parking lot
at night.
"When you really train you exude confi-
dence and no one really messes with you,"
Cryderman said. "The big thing is attitude,
.confidence in your technique.
"But more importantly they're learn-
ing self-worth and self-discipline."
The indications of these fundamentals
are evident on a Monday evening.
Students, regardless of age, bow each
and every time they enter or leave the dojo,
regardless if anyone is looking or paying
attention. The bowing seemed as natural
and habitual as a handshake or wave.
When Cryderman or son bark "skeet'
&


all activity comes to a halt, students, toes
and heels together, poised in rows to
pounce or listen.
In the dojo, only the sense speaks.
"Its about discipline, about self-con-
trol," Cryderman said. "It's not forced
down anybody's throat. They are learning
discipline without knowing they are learn-
ing discipline."
Through that discipline, self-confidence
becomes a natural by-product. Parents can
see the difference, as Marathon is a family
affair, with brothers and sisters, mothers
and daughters side by side in class.
Amy Johnston's seven-year-old son
Bryce had a choice of baseball or karate;
he chose karate and five-year-old sister
Isabella tagged along for lessons.
Amy noted that lately she's only need-
ed to ask Isabella to do something once as
opposed to three or four or five times, a
result, Amy said, of karate instruction or
maturity or probably a combination.
"They are so proud of themselves,"
said Suzanne Dorn, whose son Tristan
and daughter Emma, 7, are in the same
class. "They have self-confidence because
it's something they've accomplished.

(See MOJO on Page 11 B)


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M- M WI .WM -A







. Th.. .. u Star. P Io I e


Muina-Ramsey Wedding Vilendrer
Vn4 a1 4-n


On Saturday June 3,
2006 at 6:00 p.m. Adria
Lynn Muina and Richard
Lowery Ramsey were unit-
ed in Holy Matrimony at
the First United Methodist
Church in Port St. Joe,
Florida. The bride is the
daughter of Glenda Muina
and the late Dr. Antonio
N. Muina of Wewahitchka,
Florida. The groom is the
son of Helen Carlsten and
the late Paul Ramsey of
Port St. Joe, Florida.
Reverend Michael
Ramsey, cousin of the
groom, performed the dou-
ble ring ceremony. Mrs.
Phyllis Altstaetter served as
the wedding coordinator,
Mrs. Mary Lou Cumbie was
the vocalist, and the organ-
ist was Mrs. Hilda Duren.
The matron of honor
was Ingrid Muina Andrews,
sister of the bride.
Bridesmaids were Leslie
Williams, sister of the
bride, Paula Pickett, sister
of the groom, Lilia Cabezas,
Candice Upchurch, Stacie
Smiley, Kelly Ramsey,
Brandi Sasser, Jamie Chase,
Nicki Holley, Stephanie
Davis, and Janna Traylor.
The flower girls were Eden
Muina, McKenzie Ramsey,
and Kerigan Pickett.
The best man was
Robert Ramsey, brother of
the groom. Groomsmen
were Boyd Pickett, Steve
Kerigan, Wayne Andrews,
Clay Sasser, Jed Campbell,
John Cannon, Lee


U rUuaiV5


Brian J. Vilendrer grad-
uated May 9. He is now
a non-commissioned offi-
cer in the Air Force. He
is stationed at Hurlburt
Field and is now again
over in Iraq. Before this,
he had been stationed in
Japan and Iceland. Brian
is the grandson of Hilly
and Marcia Cimpher of
Wewahitchka and the new-
phew of Beverley Matthews
of Wewahitchka. Brian
attended two years at the
high school in Wewahitchka
and graduated from high
school in Pardeeville, WI.


Cannon, Warren Renfro,
Jimmy Jamison, Tommy
Humphrey, and Keith
Jones. The ring bearer was
Nolan Muina.
Clay Sasser and Andrew
Cabezas performed the
early lighting of the candles.
Candles were lit by Ingrid
Muina Andrews and Paula
Ramsey Pickett, in Honor
and Memory of the late Dr.
Antonio N. Muina, father
of the bride, and the late
Paul Ramsey, father of the


Correction

In printing this wedding announcement
the past two weeks, several names were
left out. The Star regrets the errors.


groom. May Lou Cumbie
beautifully preformed
"Nobody Loves Me like You
Do," "To Me," and "The
Lord's Prayer." The bride
was escorted down the aisle
by her nephew Juan Muina.
She wore a beautiful white
strapless corset back gown
with a chapel length train.
The bodice and skirt were
decorated with swarovski
crystals. She carried a bou-
quet of solid red roses.
Immediately following
the ceremony the couple
joined family and friends
for a lovely reception held
in their honor at the cen-
tennial building.
Following a seven-
day Caribbean cruise,
the couple will reside in
Wewahitchka, Florida.


Carry The Title Mr. Of Miss Gulf County

Sept. 23, 2006
2:00 PM at the Port St. Joe Centennial Building
Out ,of Town Judges
NO Double Crowning
Every Contestant Receives a Trophy
*First 10 entries that enter all categories will receive a crown*
Deadlines for entries Sept. 15 ,
For more information, contact Pam @ 227-6619 or 670-8093


YO Kno,.


* 4


The Panma City News Herald offers home

delivery to Apalachicola, Eastpoint and

St. George IslandP



Daily

Monday thru Saturday

Saturday & Sunday


Call 850-747-5050

to Siubscrile Today!
PAN A N A C-1TY'

-. H-ER .LD


4z 7


zaae Segeet SNOW ee


Welcome Clara Brown

Jack & Anita (Wimberly), formerly of Port St. Joe,
Brown- of Chesterfield, Michigan welcome their first
grand-child
Clara Elise Brown 81bs 12oz. 21in on June 15th 2006
at Providence Hospital, Roseville, Mich. to the proud
parents Jacob & Jessica Brown of Harrison twsp Mich.
Just 9 weeks later we welcomed our second grand-child
Luke Frederick Brown 71bs 6oz 21 in. on August 18th
@ St. Joseph hospital Clinton twsp Mich. to the proud
parents Matt & Julie Brown of Chesterfield, Mich. Matt &
Jacob are the sons of Jack & Anita Brown of Michigan.
This making great grand parents (among 3 others) for my
beloved parents J.Y. & Delores Wimberly.


No More Towing
Park It Here
Under The Bridge


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Port St. Joe Flor,da
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Indoor Storage
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$7.00 per It. a month Bona
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' $50 per month OnuAlde


Phe.,e ( .all Mike a850| 227-3357 %.L ahoui One e..Mlo Ireme lorae i
Located under the bridge in Highladd View next to Port St. Joe & only minutes from St. Joseph Bay boat ramp


Celebration Announcements
Our policy regarding celebration announcements in lthe editorial
sociern' scuotrn uit our pape'ri is as io'llows:

Birthdays: Syrs-old or youngerr and milestone birthdays ii.e.,
16. 18, 21, 80, 90, 100\TS old) \\Ill be published at no cost in the
society\ section. \ th no border. We %ill publish one accompan\ ing
photo as space penruts. Photo punted in color with a $10.00 tee.

Engagements & \\eddings: All engagements and weddings \\ill
be published at no cost and without a border in the society section
of our papers. We will publish one accompanying photo as space
pernuts Photo printed in color with a S10.00 fee.

Anniversaries: We will publish rrulestone anniersaries (i.e..
25. 410, 50' at no cost, without a border, in the society section of
our papers. We will publish one accompanying photo as space
permits. Photo printed in color with a $ 10.00 fee.
A.1 have a 500 word limit!

All other celebration announcements must be in the "paid
advertisement" section of our papers. The) will be charged
b the size of the ad at the per column inch rate stated on the
current rate card. Color charges per rate card.


Hou'trs.
MnI tlTtli rs


Stunday 'Clos ied


112 Reid Avenue
Po.,t St Joe, FL

(.50)' 229.-9825


Finest
Pizza & Cheesesteaks


Hand Tossed Stone Oven Pizza
Cheesesteaks Calzones Hoagies
Meatball Subs Hot Subs Salads

*Pizza By The Slice*Daily Lunch Specials*We Deliver!*
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___________________________________________ 0' '- -~wL .I ,L ~ ra


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 ye~arss


2B heSta, ortSt Jo, L ThrsaySetemer7,2006


B., g & Rv O.-m ,. i., i-.j io, a ri or a awi pijc. ..rr, R irf.,.Ia F.:-nj N- 13 N., Acc
SEcwi a jinCk I njoor & %).Woor ji a jjQ, F ic. I. p 1


B


Model Railroad

Show and Sale
If you like model traits,
Dothan is where you'll want to be
Saturday, Sept. 16 and Sunday.
Sept. 17 for the annual Wiregrass
Model Railroad Show and Sale.~
The annual show is one of the
largest model railroading events
in the Southeast and model rail-
roading equipment dealers and
enthusiasts from throughout the
region will be attending the show
at the National Peanut Festival
Fairgrounds, three miles south of
Dothan on U.S. 231 South. ,
Show hours are 9 a.m. tor 5
p.m. CDT Saturday and 10 a.p1.
to 4 p.m. CDT Sunday. Admission -
is $5 each for adults and free for
children age 12 and under with
an adult.
"This show has grown every
year and is now among the better
attended and bigger model rail-
roading events in this region. We
often hear from our dealers that it
is the top show of its size nation-
ally," said Danny Lewis, president
of the Wiregrass Heritage Chapter
of the National Railway Historic-al
Society and show sponsor.
"Our group strives to make
the show bigger and better every
year and the fact that we continue
to have lots of dealers and a large
attendance every year shows. -us
that everyone likes what we, are
doing," Lewis says.
"Having a two-day show afs
provides a better opportunity, for
more people to attend the family-
oriented event," Lewis added. -
"This is our 16" annual show
and we have always focused ,on
holding entertaining family-orlent-
ed events that children and adults'
can enjoy," Lewis said.
"We have always kept .the-
admission price low enough that
entire families can come out and
spend as long as they want enjoy-
ing all the trains. We especially
encourage parents to bring their
children because the youngsters
represent the future of the model
railroading and we want them-to
learn about this very enjoyable
hobby."
The model railroad show will
be held in the 25,000-square-foqt
main exhibit building at the Peairut
Festival Fairgrounds, and Lewis
said the entire building will, )e
filled with more than 140 dealer
tables and operating model tail-
road layouts in Z, N, HO, 0, anld'
scales Some of the layouts .will e
as large as 40 by 50 feet.
"That big building will be
absolutely filled with just about
every kind of train imaginable and
almost anything else a model rail-
roading enthusiast could want. We
also will have plenty of room for
the public to check out the dealer
'tables and watch the trains run on
the layouts in operation," Lewis
said. "Whether you just like to
watch the trains run on the lay-
outs or need something special
for your own layout, you will likely
find something you will like at our
show."
Lewis said dealers at the shbw
will be happ\ to answer questtcns
about model railroading, and sgrxe
dealers are also interested In pir-
chasing older model trains.:' so
anyone who has a train they.'are
interested in selling is encouraged
to attend the show
Proceeds from the event' are
used by the Wireigrass Heritage.
Chapter ofl the National Rallway
Historical Society, a non-proflt
group to support various Chapter
projlcits in the Wiregrass area','
For more i nlormration about
the Wjreerass Model Railroad
Show and Sale. contact Lewi\' at.
13341 790.62,-4 or by e-mail at
dannlyi),i *cyahoao corn









BO KNOWS
PEST


CONTROL

227-9555
Honest, Dependable Service
20+ years experience
State Certified Since 1985 .


aid


40-l"I.A. 1 j

htfly






FCSIDiI-INIU 197,a/ !,-r)VIylljv (7uilf rnuuin ndi jrrovinfrsh a t o F h ae r 0


Conserving


Florida Fish and Wildlife to
insure the use of appropriate
.plants. '
With native vegetation,
said Lynn, there will be no
need or use of excess water
.and no need and use of fertil-
'izer on lawns and shrubbery.
"People who live will be
required to do native land-
scaping," said Lynn, explaining
that residents of the develop-
ment will be allowed to water
their vegetation for the first
year in order to let the plants
establish themselves.
"The entire development
will be required to use nature's
natural beauty for landscap-
ing," he added
The beginning stage of
WindMark Beach Phase II,
currently under construction
tm the north side of U.S. 98,
is a series of winding streets
surrounded by large sections
of natural vegetation that have
remained undisturbed, per-
-nanent wooden boardwalks
that direct all pedestrian traf-
,fic, through, but not on, the
'natural and wetland areas,
interspersed with large hold-
'tng and stormwater ponds, sit-
ting areas, and turtle-friendly
fighting.
The holding ponds are
lined with fish-friendly liners
-to prevent excessive drainage
of the surrounding wetlands
and already have some small
fish and tadpoles in them.
"We're very surprised at
this," said Lynn, noting that
-none of the wildlife biologists


he has talked to have ever seen
this happen so quickly.
"We have no idea how
the fish have gotten into the
ponds. But we're very excited
to see it."
Throughout the plantings,
especially along the sides of the
boardwalks, landscapers use
a combination of pine straw
and sand mulch, said Lynn,
"for a beachy community look,
and because the native plants
thrive better in this mix."
Learning from History
But Lynn is proudest of
the turtle-friendly turtle street
lights throughout the develop-
ment.
The street lighting plans
were reviewed by both U.S.
and Florida Fish and Wildlife
and Gulf County authorities
before being approved.
South of Flat Water Street,
the main avenue in the first
phase, the lights all have an
amber, long-wave shield on
them, to prevent nesting sea
turtles from orienting on the
lights.
North of Flat Water Street,
all the street lights are "dark-
skies friendly," meaning that
there is no excessive down
lighting or accumulation of
light from any outside light-
ing, again to make the area
both turtle-friendly and to pre-
vent obliteration of the natural
"dark skies" native to a rural
area.
In WindMark Beach Phase
I, the section south of U.S. 98,
the street lights were shielded


I I -- D,


S13


on the seaward side of each
light post, so were still con-
sidered turtle-friendly, but the
new lights in Phase II are much
better, explained Lynn.
'After building Phase I, we
learned so many things about
what to do and what not to do,
what worked and what needed
to be changed," he said. "It's a
constant learning process and
we've incorporated so many
changes into Phase II that we
didn't anticipate in Phase I."
Snowy plovers, and endan-
gered shorebird, were another
learning curve.
"When we were writing our
proposals for Phase I, we were
told that snowy plover couldn't
tolerate any disturbances,"
said Lynn, and described how
the company was set to sched-
ule construction of the first
houses around plover nests.
"Guess where this year's
hot spot for nesting was?"
smiled Lynn. "It was at the
main construction site of a
house near the entrance of
Phase I."
The construction and peo-
ple did not seem to bother the
plovers, contrary to all infor-
mation, because "We posted
and roped off the area, and
the nests this year went all the
way through hatchlings," said
Lynn.
The conservation chal-
lenge, he added, will be when
people begin living in the devel-
opment full-time and sheer
numbers, of humans increase
in the immediate area.



6 ". ,, .
- -. '. .



". : ,.,:^.*: .. :_'-.
,


r.
-c I

,~ *.''~'~~h.-. -* -


1.I I: I.. ., .I .H
Marie Logan/The Star
Wildlife biologist Bill Lynn surveys the land under his care at WindMark Beach.


He already has his plans
drawn, describing educational
kiosks that will be perma-
nently installed throughout
the development, and pub-
lic education meetings for all
homeowners about the native
plants and animals managed
by WindMark.
"We're working heavily
with Gulf County on beach rak-
ing and not raking over plover
nests," said Lynn, describing
how an area can have both
beach raking and environmen-
tal development by being very
careful about the intensity and
amount of raking and the spe-
cific areas raked.
Beach raking in the wrong
areas or in excess can not only
harm plover and sea turtle
nests, but can stop the for-
mation of vital dunes near
the water because piles of
undisturbed seaweed, which
is raked off the beach for the
tourists, is one of the founda-
tions for dunes.
Raking also destroys veg-
etation like the beach morning
glory which, with its extensive
root system, traps and holds
precious sand, which over
time forms dunes.
(See CONSERVING on Page 9B)


Auto Insurance I


isn't about insuring your car...It's about insuring your family!
The Best Coverage. The Best Price.
The Best Company. The Best Agent.



First Floridian Hannon-
ATraveersCompa Insurance
e850-227-1133

Roy Smith*Andy Smith*Karen Clark*Laura Ramsey*Cindy Ward


S,:'Marie'Logan/The Star
In the native plant nursery transplanted san live oaks await replanting.


DENTAL NEWS FROM THE OFFICE OF


FRANK D. MAY, DMD, PA


TOOTH GRINDING

Grinding your teeth (Bruxism) eventually can cause destruction to the supportive bone and gums
around the teeth. Eventually this can lead to TMJ (Tempromandibular Joint Syndrome), headaches, jaw
pain, worn teeth or other problems. Until told, many people do not even realize they grind while sleeping.
Bruxism is considered to be a stress related problem and effects upward of 30% of the adult population.
.It is a serious problem today. The noise developed by a sleeping grinder cannot be duplicated when the
grinder is awake. Although children brux (grind) as early as 3 years, they usually stop around 12. Adults
often stop when stress leaves their lives. Even some people who have no teeth grind their gums, so obviously
it isn't always just a tooth problem.
Although the dentist is a good place to start and much success has been realized by therapy such as
splints, don't be surprised if your dentist recommends other help directed toward teaching you to relax.


Come visit our new state of the art facility.
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME!


Golf Cart


Sales/Services.


Financing Available


We can sell you a cart


or customize your cart




St. Joe Rent-All


706 1st. Street


Port St. Joe


227-2112 2


.-. --- 21.
3_s_?L M.-E t *i; --" ;:: ..i^ .:., .. .:.. aL-:;BIt_ r: ._- ...... *;... ":, ...- ,d-:. L.;..^ ,": : ^ .A :L -.ig Y.E& B ^"


1IJ~I~I~


api~~mmmox Au~sar~i~i


TheStrPor S. oe FL- husda, epemer 00 -3B


Istablished 793R7 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


i


-.-i
~'f







4D The Star, Port St. JU, r.eS~y, .. 11 Tk,.-Au,7, a 4mrnk.. 7 ,~Ol salse 97 SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


I Whether buying or selling, for the


:2.


Pet of the Wek


'I
W/


Available now for adop-
tion from the St. Joseph
Bay Humane Society -
Buffy, a female poodle/
terrier mix, 8 months, old,
perfect pet. (Pictured);
Boots, a 12 weeks old male
kitty; Jasper, a 8 month
old bulldog pup; Hound
Pups, months old (1st
shots); Molly, a nice White
English bulldog female;
Always kittens! Come see.
Please visit Faith's Thrift
Hut, 1007 Tenth Street.
Bingo was in last week's
Star. He was adopted.
Thank you!


"America Goes to the Movies"


With the Tallahassee Symphony


Orchestra's Season Opening Concert


On Friday, September
15 enjoy your favorite
movie themes played live by
the Tallahassee Symphony
Orchestra. The concert,
presented at Ruby Diamond
Auditorium at 8:00 pm,
will feature Andre Raphel
Smith as guest conductor
/and Mindy Sax, mezzo-
soprano.
The audience will be
thrilled to hear many of
their favorite cinema
soundtracks, includ-
ing medleys from John
Williams' Star Wars and
Harry Potter. Other favor-
ites represented are Tara's
Theme from Gone with the
Wind and the main themes
from Out of Africa, Forrest
Gump, and Schindler's
List. Also included will
be the "Parade of the
Charioteers from Ben
Hur, the "Love Theme" from
Cinema Paradiso, a My
Fair Lady medley, a James
Bond medley, music from
Apollo 13, and "Morning on
the Ranch" from The Red
Pony.
Accompanied by the
TSO, Mindy. Sax will pro-
vide entertaining vocal
renditions of "Over the
Rainbow" from the Wizard
of Oz, "My Heart Will Go
On" from Titanic, and the
theme song from Where


the Boys Are.
One of the most exciting
African American artists
of his generation, Maestro
Smith began his career
as Assistant Conductor of
the Saint Louis Symphony
Orchestra, under the presti-
gious National Endowment
for the Arts Conductors pro-
gram. In 1994 he became
Assistant Conductor of the
Philadelphia Orchestra
and currently serves as
the Music Director of the
Wheeling Symphony. He
has appeared with many
of the nation's leading
orchestras, including the
New York Philharmonic,
Boston, Chicago, Pittsburgh
and Atlanta Symphony
Orchestras and the
Cleveland, Minnesota and
Philadelphia Orchestras. A
frequent guest conductor at
the major music festivals,
Smith has led programs
at the Blossom Music
Festival with The Cleveland.
Orchestra and at the Mann
Music Center with The
Philadelphia Orchestra.
During 2003. he led the
Kennedy Center/National
Symphony Orchestra
Summer Music Institute.
He has also conducted at the
Tanglewood Music Center,
Eastern Music Festival,
Topeka's Sunflower Music


Remember the 30-30 Rule
30 seconds: count the seconds :I
between seeing lightening and hearing
thunder. If it's less than 30 seconds,
lightening is still a danger. Seek Shelter!
30 minutes: After the last sound of
thunder, wait 30 minutes before leaving
shelter.


Festival and Chicago's
Grant Park Music Festival.
As a freelance artist,
Mindy Sax has performed
in numerous New York City
venues and in the original
cabaret shows of Eugene
O'Neill. Ms. Sax can be
heard on various recordings
including New York Hymns
and Christmas of Peace
and has sung background
vocals for a wide variety
of artists in a vast array of
styles. She has been seen
off-Broadway as Liz in the
controversial Living Proof
and in multiple roles in
the Lamb's Theater quirky
and hilarious production of
Hot Coffee. She has also
performed as Irene Malloy
in Hello Dolly!, Leslie Gore
in Beehive at Cincinnati's
Playhouse, Polly in Three
Penny Opera, Eliza in My
Fair Lady, Antonia in Man
of La Mancha, Lady Angela
in Patience, the Baker's
Wife in Into the Woods, and
Rosie in Bye, Bye Birdie.
During the month of
September, patrons of the
Tallahassee Film Society
will receive a $2.00 discount
on the price of the "America
Goes to the Movies" concert
by showing their member-
ship card at the box office.
TSO concertgoers can
exchange ticket stubs from
the concert for a $2.00 dis-
count at the Tallahassee
Film Society box office. TFS
events are listed at www.tal-
lahasseefilms.com.
'"America. Goes to the
Movies is sponsored by
Capital Eurocars and Leon
County. Tickets may be
purchased after September
5 through the Fine Arts Box
Office at 644-6500 or www.
tickets.fsu.edu, or after
August 31 at Beethoven
and Company at 1415
Timberlane Road. Seating
is limited. For more infor-
mation call the TSO office
at 224-0461.


service you deserve, call
Linda L. Somero ABR, GRI,
Broker Associate
(50 866-1Phone:
(850) 866-1269
-& 1 M-ALKW


Sil's Home Center
1023 N. Tyndall Parkway
Panama City, FL 32404
1-800-239-4671

P,1iw 4aouieA "i#a cowi amed ice 1957"


Support the "Pet of the
Week" by advertising here. Aj

Only $15 per week
Call advertising
227-1278
for more information


Lomax Receives Kentucky


Colonel Title


Mr. Larry Lomax ol the
Air Force Civil Engineer
Support Agency IAFCESAI
Expeditionary Engineering
Directorate. Tyndall AFB.
FL was recently com-
missioned a "Kentucky
Colonel" by the Honorable
Ernie Fletch, Governor
of the Commonwealth of
Kentucky.
Kentucky Colonel is
an honorary title bestowed
upon individuals by
approval of the governor of
Kentucky. The title has been
around since 1813. Early
colonels actually served mil-
itary roles. In the latter part
of the 1800s, the position
took on a more ceremonial
function; and by the late
1800's, the title had an hon-
orary one.
Award of the title
requires nomination from an
existing colonel. Nominators
are expected to consider
the nominee's service and
contributions -to the global
community before making
a nomination. Mr. Lomax,
who also serves as a Cheif
Master Sergeant in the Air
Force Reserve's Individual
Military Augmentation (IMA)
program, was recognized for
his support to the citizens
of the Commonwealth of
Kentucky and the Kentucky


NEW


Air National Guard (ANG)
for the past 12 years. His
contribution to ensuring
the Kentucky ANG's 123rd
Civil Engineer Squadron
was equipped and ready to
meet contingency operation
requirements for worldwide
deployment in support of
national security and home-
land defense is paramount.
Mr. Lomax's dedication and
commitment to support mil-
itary operations is reflect-
ed through the Kentucky
ANG and the citizens oi
Kentucky.
Other famous recipients
of the Kentucky Colonel
title are: Harland Sanders,
the founder of Kentucky
Fried Chicken; Sir Winston
Churchill, KG, British
Prime Minister; Bob Hope,
American entertainer;
and Ronald Reagan, U.S.
President.
Mr. Lomax, formerly of
Lexington, N.C., recently of
Port St. Joe, FL, now resides
in Lyrn Haven, FL with his
wife, Laura Ragan Lomax
formerly of Pelham. GA.'


?-P OQtiP _
II t


Betty Ward Clark
Betty Ward Clark, of
Littleton, Colorado, passed
away on August 29, 2006,
following a 14 year battle with
breast cancer. She was born
to the late Albert Ward and
Monica Stone, in Pensacola,
Florida. Betty grew up in Port
St. Joe, FL. She attended
1Stephens College, in Missouri,
and the University of Colorado,
earning a degree in Medical
Technology. Betty was very
active in many community orga-
nizations, including the Kappa
Kappa Gamma sorority, the
Junior League of Denver and
the Arapahoe County Multi-
Disciplinary Team. She also
helped in the establishment
of the Mile High transplant
Bank and Families First. Betty
is survived by her husband of
41 years, Dr. Donald Clark;


children. Daniel (Jeri) Clark'
and Monica (Peter) Jacobs;
mother, Monica Ward Stone;
and sisters Monica(Bud) Reed,
and Brenda Ward. A service
was held at St. Gabriel the
Archangel Episcopal Church
on Friday, September 1st. In
lieu of flowers, donations
can be made to the St. Gabriel
the Archangel Episcopal
Church, 6190 E. Quincy Ave.
Englewood, CO .80111;- Susan
G. Komen Breast Cancer
Foundation, 1835 Franklin
Street, Denver, CO 80218;
Bonfils Blood Center, Parkway
Center, Bldg. #2, 541 West
Highlands Ranch Parkway,
Highlands Ranch, CO 80129;
or Hospice of Metro Denver,
510 S. Cherry St., Denver, CO
80246
A Memorial Service will
be held in Port St. Joe, which
will be announced later.


I


National Arbor
Day foundation
Announces Ten Free"
Live Oak Trees -
Ten free lve oak trees will
be given to each person who
joins The National Arbor Day
Foundation during September
2006.
The free trees are part
of the nonprofit foundation's
Trees for America campaign. -
'"These magnificent wide-
spreading trees will be pictur-
esque additions to your land-
scape," John Rosenow, the
Foundation's president.' said.
"They were selected because of.
the shade and special beauty
they will give your home. Live
oaks grow rapidly when young
and may live ,to be centuries
old."
The trees will be shipped
postpaid at the right time
for planting between October
15 and December 10 with
enclosed planting instructions.
The six to twelve inch trees are
guaranteed to grow or they will
be replaced free of charge.
Members alsoreceive asub-
scription to the Foundation's
colorful bimonthly publica-
tion, Arbor Day, and The Tree
Book with information about
tree planting and care.
To receive the free trees,
send a $10 membership con-
tribution to TEN LIVE OAKS,
NationalArbor DayFoundation,
100 Arbor Avenue, Nebraska
City, NE 68410, by September
30, 2006. Or join online at
www.arborday.org.


King DDS


- GENERAL DENTISTRY-

Hygienist

Credit Cards Accepted

325 Long Avenue


227-1812


S rd-'sPe als by the Bay
andgifts *-


Over 100 Combined gYars of

floral Design experince. ).


208 Reid lve.

Port t. Joe, FL 32456


.227-1564,


Heritage Funeral


247 Tyndall Parkway, Callaway


785-1316
Joe D. Gainer, Justin M. Kent, Local Owners

"Serving Bay and Gulf Counties"


-z mw,


41,


Robert E.


$10,000 Cutest

Pet Photo

Contest Open

to Gulf County

Residents
The International Pet
Owners Club is proud to
announce that over $10,000 in
cash and prizes will be awarl-
ed in the 2006 Fall Cutest Pet
Photo Contest.
Pet owners from the Gulf
County area are welcome to
win their share of the prizes.
The deadline for the contest
is October 15. The contest' is
open to everyone and entry is
free. Dogs, cats, rabbits, etc. -
are welcome.
"Every pet owner has at
least one photo that shows how
cute their pet is," stated Rosa
Bonbeur, contest chairman.-
"When people learn about thee
contest, they get excited abofit
the chance at winning and the
potential for national attefn-
tion," continued Bonbeur. .
To enter, send one photo-
graph (full color or b/w) size.8"
x 10" or smaller.
All photo entries must -
include the photographers
name and address on the"
back.
Photographs should
be sent to: 2006 Fall Photo
Contest c/o The International '
Pet Owners Club, P.O. Box
1908, Pittsburg, KS 66762.. -
Entries must be post-
marked by October 15, 2006.
You may also submit your
photo directly online at www..
cutestpetcontest.com. .
The International Pet
Owners Club is an organiza-
tion dedicated to bringing pet
owners from around the world
together for fun and fellow-
ship. Membership in the club
, is not necessary to participate.
To receive a free copy of the
club newsletter via postal mail,
visit www.inpetclub.com or send
us a letter by mail.


I---~~-- "-L


Established 7937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er,


Ina I -Thir-,rnv.Senembe 7.200


A TL- 44^,_ r*- q C,


A






Fcl'u-umhluu 1 70/u -19f77 l o SprvinrW C,,slf county rt


SOUTHERLAD FAMILY COMFORTER COSTING & COSTING Rish, Gibson, Scholz
FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL HOME LAW OFFICES & Groom, P.A.
W. P. "Rocky" Comforter Charles A. Costin William J. Rish, Thomas S.Gibson,
507 10th Street' Port St. Joe L.F.D. Personal Injury Real Estate Russell Scho, Paul W. Groomn
Workers' Compensation
(850) 229-8111,, (850) 227-1818, (850) 227-1159 (850) 229-8211


7-ee



Six-week Grief Support


Group

, Panama City, FL- Covenan
Hospice invites adults who ar
grieving the loss of a loved
one to attend a six-week grie
support group. The group wi]
meet each Monday, on Sep1
-18, Sept. 25, Oct. 2, Oct. 9
Oct. 16, and Oct. 23 from
p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Covenan
-Hospice's Education Center
Participants will learn abou
-the grief process and have ai
"opportunity to explore their
grief and to share experiences
-in-a safe and caring environ
tnent.
'" This is a free service
with refreshments provide
-d. Registration is required
1Membership is closed to new


Offered
.t members after the September
e 25 meeting. To register, please
d call Sarah Jackson at 785-
-f 3040.
11
t. CALENDAR LISTING
2 WHO: Covenant Hospice
t WHAT: Six-Week Grief
. Support Group
t WHEN: Each Monday,
n Sept 18, Sept. 25, Oct. 2 Oct.
r 9, Oct. 16 and Oct. 23rd from
s 2 3:30 p.m.
- WHERE: Covenant
Hospice Education Center at
e 107 W. 19 St. in Panama City
I- WHY: This group fol-
. lows a structured outline that
v includes educational infor-


nation on the grief process
for adults and provides a
safe and caring environment
with opportunities to share
with others who have expe-
rienced the loss of a loved
one. Facilitated by a Covenant
Hospice bereavement special-
ist.
COST: Free and open
to the public with refresh-
ments provided. Registration
is required. Membership is
closed to new members after
the September 25 meeting.
CONTACT: To register
or for more information call
Sarah Jackson at 785-3040.


founder'ss Day Service
beginning at 11:30
-a.m. ET on Sept. 10.
TheChurchofGod
dna Christ Gulf Coast
District Missionary
Installation Service
installing Deborah
Crosby will take place
-at 3 p.m. ET on Sept.


contact Lois Byrd at
229-6092.
Your presence,
support and prayers
are greatly appreci-'
ated.
Thanks in
advance for your par-
ticipation. Come and
be blessed.


Highland View

Baptist Homecoming

Highland View Baptist Church,
located at 382 Ling Street, will celebrate
55 years of ministry with their 27th annual
Homecoming on Sunday. September 10,
2006. This special day will begin at;
10:30 a.m..; in the .Church Sanctuary
with several special music presentations.
-A' covered dish lunch will follow in the
Church-Fellowship Hall.


The Purpose


Sa Problem
;. The purpose of a problem many times
Is to see what we will do.'
SHow you see the problem
Is usually a problem, too.
Many times we make a problem
By looking at it in the-wrong way.
We ask God's help many times,
But don't listen to what He has to say.
Sometunes we don't even ask His help,
We rush right on through.
Times hke this we need to slow down.
And let God show us what to do.
I wish I had listened more over the years,
'It mrught have saved a few heartaches and.
tears.
I don't know what tomorrow holds,:
But I know who holds it through.
Problems we face help us mature,
Each one helps us grow.
He promises joy unspeakable.
If we do what we are told.
Let's face those problems with God,
*- It will be worth more than gold.
S -Billy Johnson


The Potter's House
WHERE BROKEN VESSELS ARE MADE NEW
Rodney G. Leaman, Pastor
850-639-5993 *. 850-639-4588
Sj6 Seci:nd Street Post Office Box 631 V Wewahiicha. FL 32465
SERVICE SCHEDULE
Sunday School 9:45 am.
Sunday Morning Worship 1030 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Worship 7:00 p.m.
YOQI.I PE' VELCFr.1E -.T THE PCiTTEP' HOCIi'E

y9,,''rf mona frind'a ,
Oak Grove Assembly of God
David. Fernawdz. rtwor
6)e 45022 isS2 : 'arsonage .S5 2S2c z.l
S 613 .faJion 5erect Tort St c. fi-
h 1 t ?lno/t s, .
'. *Sunday' .3 ~1\\dnc:Jhr
%idit f .t, ool 94 m id tllf .kfail 5L1'i
tlorninn }\1,rshfir 1,44am l ce & ,"i,-,ed i ; rd .rm
j od4 n ,l Ae./1f'. 1t04'an .'itnsim in. kr,,n iprn
-r0.'" T ta n. .. -.'u h t lsrn
I f 'n'! it m h n ,m i t a t o "'pr m
n nami. Trav.d l'jl h/nVtra 17n the f 7 lirt'o


Ci; IO&2


z(le127


Come into


The Star

today to let everyone in the
community know what's
happening in your church!


i


FIRST UNITED >
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and Monument Port St. Joe
(850) 227-1724


Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m.
11:00a.m.
Methodist Youth Pellsowhip:6:00 p.m.
Al Times are, ESTp.m.
K 'All Times are EST


Rev. Malcolm "Mac" Fulcher
PASTOR
JeiffWhitty
Minister ofMusic/Youth
Dieborah Loyless
Director of Children Ministries


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
7iglanub Vietw 3aptizt Iura
382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
Discipleship Training 6:00 p.m.
Mike Westbrook, Wednesday Prayer 7:00 p.m.
Pastor 24292


-hIoCattfc Church of GUfN Cvou
q 9iomes yBou
St. Joseph Parish
20*t & Monument, Port St Joe, FL, 227-1417
All Mass times EDT:
Saturday: 4:00 pm, Sunday: 9:30
Monday, Thursday, Friday: 9:30 am
Wednesday: 5:30 pm
En Espanol: 8:00 am, last Sunday of Month
St. Lawrence Mission
788 N Hwy 71 Wewahitchka, FL
Sunday: 11:00 am (CDT)


o 1"Olur lChurChli 7t 'in l our liome

First Church of tlic 'z.arcnc
242I inq ._ u.'l' *ort t .ir.'L h.',lritda '.;45'
(850) 229-9596


f rie. il> 11) IT,
Sijnid,i,1 Eveuiiil Wl lr liup p [ i
Wdrir,.di,, E.nir. Serve 7- Ir I


J it 'lUted ,,l fw iit
Sfu(th ti f A xi Seach
111 North 22nd Street Me-ico Beach. FL 32410
SoodayWolship Senice: 9:00 a.m CST ,
SuidaloyS ol: 10-15 am CST.,
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexico Beach United Methodist (Chgh ,
NuRSEcI PlOWlDID
Rev Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church!/Office: 648-8820


Family life (nhh
"Touching Lives with the Love of Jesus"
Join us in worship .. Apa..h o n,
10:30 Sunday Morning Hwy. 98
7:00 Wednesday Evening < >
Pastors Andrew -
Cathy Rutherford Rid Ave;
Rhema Bible Training Center graduates Famly Life Church
Visit our websile at:
familylifechurch.rnet y Wewahitchka
323 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe 229-LIFE (5433)

"The Churches of Christ Salute You"
SRomans 16:16 '

The Wewahitchka Church of Christ
Meet; At 2241 Hwy. 71 South, Wewahitchka
(1/4 Mile North of the Overstreet Road)
(850) 639-5401
Sunday Bilile Study 9:00 a1.m. CT
Sundiaut IVorship 10:00 a.m. & 5:00 p.m. CT
WVednesday Bible Sfturii 7:00 p.m. CT


church of Christ
at the Beaches
Established 33 AD in Jerusalem


We meet at 314 Firehouse Road
Overstreet 850.647.1622
Sunday Bible Study 10:00am EST
Sunday Worship 11:00am EST
Wednesday Bible Study 7:30pm EST
"We are about our Fathers business"




CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS


Singing:
Worship:


9 a.m. Sunday
9:30 a.m. Sunday


Call 229-8310
WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. 0. Box '758 Port St. Joe, FL 32457
, Corner of 20th Street & Marvin AvenueJ


A. BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. Bible Study all ages 10 a.m.
Morning Worship 11 a.m: Evening Worship 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Choir Practice 6 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"O taste 'and see that the Lord is good: blessed is the man that trusteth in Him.
Please accept this invitation to join us in worship. God bless you!
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-5026 Home 769-8725


^ [first 'Baptist Churchf
102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE

Brent Vickery, Pastor
Buddy Caswell, Ai nister of Music & Education
Michael Rogers. Alinister to Sludents
Sunday School .. . 9:45 am
Worship Service . 8:30 & 11:00 am
Disciple Training .. . .. ..... 6:00 pm
Evening Worship .. ... . ... 7-00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting .. ..... 6:30 pm
Mon-Fri: Devotion on 105 5 FM ... 7:49 am ET





First Baptist Church
MEXICO BEACH .V
I.; r `'3N. 5th S ,f.,i,,v B,.,,I .
i.., C .i/t "iii 648.5--.
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Worship Sundals at 10:00 a.rn. and 6 00 p rm
Bible Study Sund a 9 0 a a.m idll ages,
Wednesday Praer and Bible Study at 6 30 p m
Please note, all times central!
R.'',..t Etddi, L.t,.j nt.ari


u 1il W 'A Reformed Voice
W,. in the Community"

)1 6 A S Dr. Bill Taylor, Pastor

S unday School .............. 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Fellowship.................. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Service ........ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service .............. 6:00 p.m.
Thursday Firehouse Fellowship.... 6:00 p.m.
801 20th Street Port St. Joe.* 229-6707
Home of Faith Chris.an School

TO KNOW CHRIST.AND TO ALIKE HIM IVOiWN

ST. JAMES'

EPISCOPAL CHURCH
800 22nd STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m..(EST) Sudayi School 9:45
Child Care Provided for at 11:00
www'.stjamesepiscopalchurcli.org S50-227-1845


Worship with us at

Long Avenue Baptist Church

Where Faith, Family &


Friendship are found
Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pm
Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm


1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL For More Information Call 229-8691
18571


Church of God in


]Christ Founder's Day
. The Port St., 23. o The Port St. Joe. 1-63 Avenue D.
joe Church of God For additional Church of God in Elder David
in. Christ will hold a information please Christ is located at Woods, Jr. Pastor.


WORSHIP





AT THE CHURCH


OF YOUR CHOICE


TheSta, ortSt Jo, F -Thusdy, eptmbr 7 206 5


Established 7937 Servinq Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


H


'"








VD Ill he b I 1. .. 1 jo cinu isua .mmhu E /s e 1c-


events


C (enA4r


Meeting Schedule for Local Government
Gulf County School Board
The School Board meets once a month,
typically the second Tuesday of the month, though
during the summer that schedule is subject to
change. Meetings are typically conducted at dis-
trict offices located on Middle School Drive in Port
St. Joe, though during the school year the board
conducts one monthly meeting at high schools at
each end of the county.
A public hearing on the budget will be held
Sept. 13 at 4:30 p.m., followed by the School
Board's regular meeting at 6 p.m.
Postings of all School Board regular and spe-
cial meetings and workshops can be found at the
district offices.


City of Port St. Joe
The Port St. Joe City Commission conducts
regular meetings twice a month, on the first and
third Tuesdays of the month at 6 p.m. ET in the
Commission meeting room on the second floor
of City Hall on Cecil G. Costin Blvd. near Reid
Avenue.
Postings of all City Commission regular and
special meetings and workshops can be found at
City Hall.
City of Wewahitchka
The Wewahitchka City Commission con-
ducts regular meetings twice a month, on the sec-
ond and fourth Mondays of each month at 6 p.m.
CT in the first floor meeting room at City Hall.
Postings of all City Commission regular and
special meetings and workshops can be found at
City Hall on Second Street.
Board of County Commissioners
The Board of County Commissioners con-


ducts regular meetings twice a month, at 6 p.m.
ET on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each
month in the Commission meeting room located
in the Robert Moore Administrative Building next
to the County Courthouse on Cecil G. Costin
Blvd.
Postings of all regular and special meetings
and workshops can be found at the Robert Moore
Administrative Building.
City of Mexico Beach
The Mexico Beach City Council conducts
its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. CT on the
second Tuesday of each month in the Civic Center
located behind the business district on 30"h and
31st Streets.
Postings of all regular and special meetings
and workshops can be found at City Hall, located
on 141 Street, or the Civic Center.
County Economic Development Council
The EDC conducts a monthly meeting, typi-


Upc~c~6,


Forgotten GardHding


by Kay Kelley
Oh these weeds, they
are a-growing. The weather
is hot, the humidity is up,
and even the most dedicat-
ed gardeners would rath-
er clean their ovens than
patrol for crabgrass during
the dog days of summer.
This is the break the
weeds are looking for, you
know. Sure, you might have


weeded them all as recently
as July, but bits of root
were left behind, and little
bulblets broke off under-
ground, and new seeds were
pulled to the surface by the
very act of weeding. These
have sprouted new plants,
set seeds, and reproduced
themselves with an aggres-
sion and speed that puts
me in mind of the terrorist


Public Service Announcement

The Gulf County Transportation Disadvantaged
Coordinating Board announces a meeting to which all
persons are invited. The agenda will include the annual
operating report, the annual budget estimates, actual
expenditure reports and a staff report.
DATE: Wednesday, Sept 13, 2006
TIME: 2:00 PM EST
PLACE: Gulf County Transportation Office
309 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida
For more information, or if you require special accom-
modations at the meeting because of a disability or physi-
cal impairment, contact Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee
Regional Planning Council at (850) 674-4571 or by email
at arpc7(gtcom.net.


movement.
Maybe that's a little
harsh. Weeds are oppor-
tunists, for a fact, but if it
weren't for us disturbing
the soil and creating an
environment in which they,
thrive, there wouldn't be
nearly as many weeds to
deal with. A quote I've heard
all my life is "Nature abhors
a vacuum." Meaning, take
the vegetation off the soil,
and Mother Nature will put
it right back. Trouble is,
none of our pretty hybrid-
ized garden flowers jump
in to fill that void. On the
contrary, we get nutgrass,
sandspurs, and crabgrass.
Ragweed. Beggar's ticks.,
Briars. They may not be
terrorists, exactly, but they
are tenacious, resourceful,
and aggressive, and believe
me, they do have an agenda
for making our lives miser-
able.
It might surprise you,,
as it did me, to know that,


many of our most com-
mon weeds weren't here
at all before the arrival of
European colonists. The
colonists, those boorish
rascals, didn't stop to con-
sider that the dandelions
they brought with them
as a favorite salad green
would one day become the
scourge of suburban lawns
everywhere. In fact, dan-
delions established them-
selves and spread so quick-
ly across the New World
that they arrived on the
west coast well ahead of the
colonists themselves. And
then there is our ubiqui-
tous St. John' s wort, which
I have always thought to be
as native to this area as the
pine tree. Nope. St. John's
wort arrived in 1696, to
be exact, compliments of
the Rosicrucians who even
then used it to combat men-
tal illness. And tumble-
weed, that classic symbol of
the American west, was not
even in the country until the
1870's. Tumbleweed was
accidentally brought over
from the Ukraine steppes
by Russian immigrants
wishing to cultivate flax in


the New World. Hiding out
in the flax seed was tumble-
weed seed, which is said to
be able to germinate in 36
minutes. A single plant can
contain 250,000 seeds, and
when the seeds are ready,
the cells in the plant's stem
weaken and die, setting the
plant free from the soil,
and allowing it to release
its seeds wherever the wind
blows.
Like so many of the
weeds we battle today, culti-
vation of other crops helped
the tumbleweed prosper.
Native prairie grasses
which prevented the weeds
from moving freely were cut
down and plowed under for
crops,' giving the tumble-
weeds plenty of room to
roll and spread their seeds,.
Likewise, every time we
remove existing vegetation,
whether it be for power
lines, home sites, or new
gardens, we are creating an
environment for weeds to
thrive. Consider that the
soil acts as a 'seed bank',
and every square inch of it
contains seeds. Some may
be long buried, just wait-
ing for the chance to sur-
face when a hole is dug for
a newly, purchased plant,
some may have fallen from
the weed you missed back
in July, and others may
have blown in by the wind
just a minute ago. They


. ^ L -*. *! ,. .. ..... .... '"--"' ;,
.-,." .'. <" ,+, '.:' '," ..' : .. -.illici t-'
t. "' ,; :, I:_: "% "; "-" ; *:'"' ... ... .'oI" j '' % "" ... '1ij


Tfle 3A. 7Taste (frja'T-OdinST,

Cm&iaiv8 nmeiie timemN iwi. iioae Oimiostiepte*
':PAi' .niiir, in &.iIbI~cnhI Ca iur and Crclvcuis~ini
Comgtru Cour vic.,,r, 5hiirnr'dumbo. Cwib4Ih icuff a~nd morv
'j1s Well m afui 'llj i 'merican lingeUp'of6IcIs~b. xef.'Od. '!pCcIblI'445&leds,,
Gouimci -brndwi.-h:.i aend b Child'vIrnflu
k~.n)ciii~ifly l'oIcbi..d r n rrbeirr,?Irw Iin \ce~~~eOric blcL Morlh of ftIWLi
99 Cell bhcbd jc.r business hours and dbiliji lunch bnd dinner -.pcciEIeIk
850-639-94,44


are all waiting for you to let
your guard down, so they
can reproduce. That's a-
weed for you.
Oh, and then there',s-
dollar weed, that cussed
invader of our lawns that
we encourage with every. -
cycle of the irrigation sys-
tem. Turf experts agree -
that control of dollar wed -
is best accomplished by
watering grass only as-
needed, but we water aed-
water, and then curse the
resulting bountiful crop of
dollar weed and attack" it
with chemicals. Humans.
Sometimes, I admit, it's
all I can do not to laugh "at
the expressions of bewilder-
ment on the faces of absen-
tee homeowners who show
up after several months
and witness what's been
taking place in their yards.
In the absence of mainte-
nance, those little terrorists
have taken over the beds,
spreading themselves over
and around the landscape
plants with wild aban-
don, burying their roo-ts
and throwing around their
seeds and getting ready to
carry on their species, even
though they'll be weeded
out and the homeowners
will consider their yards
'safe' again. I ; 't "
One final note is how all
this look to visitors iniour
area. My partner noted the
other day that the Forgotfen
Coast is looking more like
the Abandoned Coast these
days. Subdivisions have
proliferated like weeds. each
with a nicely landscaped
entrance. Just because the
real estate market is taking
a breather doesn't mean
the weeds are. We don't
want to let these places, that
we've cultivated go back to
nature, do we? Okay, don't
answer that.


ATTENTION!!!!
TRANSPORTATION PLAN UPDATE
CITIZEN INPUT INVITED

We Need Your Help
The Bay County Transportation Planning Organization'is updating, its year 2030 Transportation Plan.
What roadway, bicycle/pedestrian, and publictransportation projects should be cost feasible in the year
2030? Come and let us know what you think.


Place
Callaway Assembly of God Family Center
5718 Cherry Street
Callaway, FL 32404
Mexico Beach Civic Center
105 N. 31st Street
Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Southport Elementary School Cafeteria
1839 Bridge Street
Southport, FL 32409
Central Baptist Church Athlea Class Room
1104 Balboa Avenue
Panama City, FL 32401
Gulf Beach Baptist Church Fellowship Hall
10620 Hutchison Boulevard
Panama City Beach, FL 32407
Purpose


September 12, 2006,


September 13, 2006


September 13, 2006


September 14, 2006


September 14, 2006


Time
6:00 p.m.


6:00 p.m.


6:00 p.m.


6:00 p.m.


6:00 p.m.


You will be asked to review and comment on three Cost Feasible Plan alternatives for the year 2030;
provide answers to the questions listed below; and complete a comment sheet.
Issues and topics to be discussed
Roadway Projects.
Public Transportation Projects.
Bicycle/Pedestrian Projects.
Intelligent Transportation System.
If you have questions about the 2030 Transportation Plan for the Bay Coupty Transportation Planning
Organization, please call:
Gary Kramer, Senior Transportation Planner
West Florida Regional Planning Council
3435 North 12th Avenue
Pensacola, Florida 32503
Ph. (850) 595-8910 Fax. (850) 595-8967 E-mail: kramerg(@.wfrpc.dst.fl.us
Web Site: www.wfrpc.dst.fl.us/bctpo

The Bay County TPO will make reasonable accommodations for access to this meeting in accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act and for language requirements other than English. Please/notify Ms. Ellie Roberts
of access or language requirements at (850) 595-8910 ext. 218 at least 48 hours in advance. ,
T T


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cally during the lunch hour of the first Tuesday
of the month at Sunset Coastal Grill. For more
information contact the EDC at 229-1901.
Budget Hearings
Local residents and taxpayers should be
aware that summertime brings the budget pro-
cess to government entities around the area. All-
the listed governmental bodies will be conducting,
budget workshops and hearings throughout thie-
coming months.
We will post the times and places of all budget
meetings, but the information will also be avail-
able at the locations listed for finding meeting and.
workshop agendas.
A note to civic organizations and other-
groups in the area: submit meeting times
and locations to the newspaper and we will
publish them each week on this page.







Estblihe 197*SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er h tr otS.Je L*TusaSpebr7 06 7


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SEPTEMBER
Music in the Park, Each Thursday night at 6 pm (CT)
in Sunset Park, Mexico Beach
Beach Blast Olympic Triathlon & Duathlon,
'September 23, Beacon Hill Park, Great sports event
'involving swimming, biking and running. More infor-
mation: www.TheBeachBlast.com.
The event will bring hundreds of visitors to the area.
'Volunteers needed. Come support local athletes!
Annual Kingfish Shootout, Sept. 25-26, C-Quarters
Marina, Carrabelle


OCTOBER
Music by the Bay, Each Thursday in Frank Pate Park,
Port St. Joe
Annual Catfish Classic Fishing Tournament, October
6-7, Wewahitchka
Florida Panhandle Birding and Wildflower Festival,
October 6-8, St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserves, Port
St. Joe
Annual Art and Wine Festival, October 21, Driftwood
Inn, Mexico Beach
Downtown Trick or Treat, October 31, Reid Avenue,


Send Your Community Events to:
Write To: Fax To: Be sure to put Community News as the
The Star/Community Events (850) 227-7212 subject when mailing.
P.O. Box 308 Email To:
Port St Joe, FL 32457 starnews@starfl.com Announcements are limited to 50 words,
and will run for a maximum of 4 weeks.


Seaside Rep's September Experiment

to feature Einstein's Dreams


Seaside Repertory
Theatre, Northwest Florida's
'premier professional the-
atre company, is excited to
announce the 2006 September
-Experiment, featuring the play
Einstein's Dreams, which will
run Wednesday, September 13
through Saturday, September
16 at 7:30 pm in the Meeting
'Hall Theatre in Seaside.
-All seats are $24 and may
'be purchased by calling
850.231.0733 or visiting www.
seasiderep.org.
Einstein's Dreams, adapt-
ed by David Alford and Brian
Niece from the novella by Alan
,Lightman, is a piece of cut-
Sing edge theatre that explores
the dreamscape of one of the
"world's most influential think-
ers. The show will star Dustin
'Brown, Shavon Wagner, and
LDustin Harding. Brown and
-Harding were most recently
-seen in the Rep's hit produc-
tion, Loot. Einstein's Dreams
,is directed by Rep Artistic
'Director Craige Hoover who
4ays the play will be unlike
'anything the Rep has done
-before. "We're incorporat-
'ing all sorts of sound effects,
,,music qnd other mixed media
into the production, including
Sa short film shot specifically
,for this show. The September
- Experiment is our opportu-
,nity to push the boundaries
6 of what people think of when
'they think of live theatre."
Einstein's Dreams
-explores a world in which
'cause and effect are erratic and
.explore a realm where time
flows freely back and forth
as Einstein dreams of worlds
where time has varying effects.
_In one place people know
of their own coming doom,
and in another they ,attempt
to escape aging by building
homes on mountaintops.
Interlaced throughout the show
are scenes of Einstein and his
real-life friend, Michele Besso,
discussing the development of
the single most important idea
of the twentieth century.
"I like to select shows
that have at least some, level
of topical relevance. I think


the recent debates over stem-
cell research and evolution-
ary teachings in school have
brought the science and
morality question back to the
foreground. This show doesn't
address those issues directly,
let alone take a particular side,
but hopefully it will inspire the
audience to consider history
as they ponder the pros and
cons of scientific discovery."
Hoover says, "Plus, it should
be quite a spectacle."
Please visit www.sea-
siderep.org for more informa-
tion on the Seaside Repertory
Theatre's entire 2006 sea-
son, which is sponsored by
Design and Design Services of
Florida.
About Seaside
Repertory Theatre
Dedicated to providing
unique entertainment in con-
junction with cultural expo-
sure to residents and guests,
Seaside Repertory Theatre has
been a mainstay of the Walton


County community for six
years. Seaside Rep produces an
annual summer stock season
consisting of three main stage
productions, and an outdoor
family production. Founded in
2000, Seaside Rep is also the.
producer of the Gulf Coast
Comedy Festival, an event
that brings together the come-
dic forms of stand-up comedy,
improve comedy, and sketch
with performers from across
the country and the Autumn
Playwright Festival, which
celebrates a unique playwright
each year with productions,
staged readings, panel discus-
sions, and more. Starting in
2005, Seaside Rep also pro-
duces an annual Christmas
show. Additional information
regarding show schedules,
tickets, and performance loca-
tions can be obtained by call-
ing 1 (850) 231-0733.


Port St. Joe
The Oyster Spat Festival, Oct. 6- 8, St. George
Island
Apalachicola Community Yard Sale, Oct. 7,
Apalachicola
3rd Annual Apalachicola Bay Chamber Golf
Tournament, Oct. 11, St. James Bay Golf Course,
Lanark Village
Dixie Does Nashville, Part Deux, Songwriters in the
Round, Oct. 13-14, Dixie Theatre, Apalachicola


NOVEMBER
43rd Annual Florida Seafood Festival, Nov. 3-5,
Battery Park, Apalachicola
4th Annual Jazz Festival, Nov. 10-11, Dixie Theatre,
Apalachicola
Annual Christmas Celebration, Nov. 24, Downtown
Historic Apalachicola


i Pay attention
Sea Oats and Dune's Ice Cream Social Ito the beach


The Sea Oats & Dunes
Garden Club will kick off the
2006/2007 season with an Ice
Cream Social to be held at
the Volunteer Fire Station on
Alabama Avenue in St. Joe
Beach on September 10 begin-
ning at 4 Eastern Time.
The Sea Oats and Dunes
Garden Club meets the sec-
ond Tuesday of each month
September through May at
10 Eastern Time and covers
St. Joe Beach, Mexico Beach,
Beacon Hill, and Overstreet.
Guest speakers, field trips,
good food, and friendship is
served at each meeting. The
Club is actively seeking new
members, so if you have an
interest in gardening, making
new friends, or just love ice
cream, please plan to attend
the Ice Cream Social.
The first meeting of the


Fall season will be held on
September 12 at 10 at the Fire
House in St. Joe Beach. The
scheduled speaker is Fire Chief
David Richardson, who will
discuss important information
regarding the Fire Department
and Safety.
Any questions regarding
the Ice Cream Social, gar-
den club meetings, or Club
membership can be directed.
to Sandie Yarbrough at 648-
4618.


flag system
and know surf
conditions
before yo 'g '
into the walte'W

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.


A. PURPLE


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Needls & TreadIn

21 WliasAvenePor S Je F A2469 2-98
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Andy Bryan in Concert and Revival

The first Baptist Church of Apalachicola, FL.,
invites everyone to hear evangelist and singer
Andy Bryan of Headland Alabama, beginning
Sunday Evening, September 10th through the .
13th. Services will be at 7PM each night in
the church sanctuary (46 Ninth Street). .


.Saved at the age of sixteen, Andy began preaching and has
preached crusades in Europe, Asia, and Central America as
well as the USA. He has taught at Several Bible colleges in
America, and is a member of the Southern Gospel Music As-
sociation. In May 2003 he sung for the national Day of prayer
at the Capital, in Montgomery, Alabama with Judge Roy Moore
*(Ten Commandments Rally). In October of 2003, Andy and
Shawn McDougal joined together to conduct soul winning cru-
sades around the country.

He Combines boldness, mixed with fun, laughter, music and
song to win hearts of the young and old alike.


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Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years







oD Tkn 3T*,-, ProrTa irI L Thije 7E he uroe 6


Gray Squirrels Aren't


Gulf County Sheriff's Office Arrest Log


The Gulf County Sheriff's by fraud.
Office will be conducting vehi- On 8-18 deputies res
cle safety inspections during ed to a domestic distur
the months of September and in the Beacon Hill area.
October. The safety inspec- they arrived they found
tion checkpoints will be at Paula Ann Inman had st
various locations throughout her boyfriend in the ches
the county; Highway 71 north ing a disturbance. The
of West Arm Creek Bridge, friend was transported 1
Highway 22 near the intersec- Medical Center and treaty
tion of Highway 22A, Highway released. Paula Ann In
71 near Honeyville, Highway 38, was arrested for
98 in St. Joe Beach, Highway vated battery and is bein
98 and Garrison Avenue, C-30 in the Gulf County Jail.
in Simmons Bayou. On 8-18 Timothy
On 8-18 deputies respond- Picaroon, 30, was a
ed to a group of people who ed at a convenience sti
had been involved in an alter- Wewahitchka for DWLSR
cation at a bar in Wewahitchka. On 8-22 several de
During their investigation they held a vehicle safety in
learned one of the complain- tion on Hwy. 98 west of
ants had an active warrant Belle Curve. Two hundred
for FTA on a DWLSR charge. nine vehicles were chi
Charles Mithias Hale, 31, was During the checkpoint
arrested and taken to the Gulf arrests were made. E:
County Jail. De Dios Contreras, .19
On 8-18 Catrina Eilleen arrested for possession
Hall, 41, was transported from fictitious Florida identify
Calhoun County and arrested card; Robert W. Dick'
on charges of FTA for violation 31, arrested for DWLS]
of probation for attempting to child support; Dustin T.
obtain a controlled substance 26, arrested for posse
.. ........ -'-.. .. .- -'-. '.- ,

WEWA MEDICAL CENTER

: Dr. Peter H. Obesso, 1iD


Echo Sa


pond-
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aggra-
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loum: Niondavt through Frida% 8:1-11 )3ni c'~lo P.M.

;Ntiv Patients' 1le'Itwnt *-PIi'aae'('aI63.9-5828fiv an .ppoinmotm n
Medicare, NMedicaid, BC-BS & SlidinR Fee


of marijuana; Charles Adams
Childs, 21, arrested for pos-
session of marijuana and
DWLSR; Raymundo B. Flores,
26, arrested for DWLSR; and
David Soto Vileda, 40, arrest-
ed for DWLSR.
On 8-24 deputies arrested
Miquel Enrique, 46, at his
residence in Highland View for
battery and it is alleged that
Enrique hit his roommate.
On 8-25 deputies trans-
ported Tony Joseph King, 40,
from Jackson County. King
was arrested for violation of
probation for possession of a
controlled substance.
On 8-26 deputies from the
Gulf County Sheriff's Office
arrested Clessie B. Babb, 76,
for DUI; Terry Wayne Kelly,
38, for DUI and possession of
marijuana; and Peter Eisert,
25, for possession of mari-
juana. All three were arrested
during a DUI roadblock.
On 8-26 deputies respond-
ed to a vehicle crash on the
Overstreet Highway south of
Hwy. 71. The deputies found
Ricky Lynn Clark,, 49, of
Highland View in the driver's
seat. After his investigation the
deputy arrested Clark for DUI.
Clark's breath test was .314
and .315, almost four times
the legal limit in Florida. He
was arrested and transported
to the Gulf County Jail.
On 8-27 a vehicle driven
by Kevin Frank Hunter was
stopped on Hwy. 22. The dep-
uty discovered that Hunter's
driver's license was suspended
and he was arrested for driv-
ing on a suspended driver's
license.


.DAESUNDANCER

ADVENTURE RACES TRIATHLON & BIATHLON


DATE: September 23rd 2006 TIME: 7am (staggered start times)
LOCATION: Gulf Place on scenic Hwy 30A

TRIATHLON
Formerly the Seaside Advenrure Triathlon, the SunDancer Advenrure Triathlon will take
place this year at Gulf Place in the Beaches of South Walton. This unique and challengt-
ing race consists of Individual or Relay Teams of 2-person or 4-person, competing:

* 9 mile Mountain Bike through the forest of Long Leaf Pine trail
and Gravton Beach State Park
*1.5 mile Kayak on coastal dune Western Lake
* 5.5 mile RUn both on scenic Hwy 30A and last half mile along the


beautiful Emerald Coast shoreline.


,J

BIATHLON _-
INDIVIDUALS ONLY U --
* 2.5 mile Mountain Bike through the forest of Long Leaf Pine trail
* 2 mile Run both on scenic Hwy 30A and last half mile along the
beautiful Emerald Coast shoreline


S | SUNDANCER ADVENTURE TRIATHLON
Registration Deadline, September 20, 2006


I Name


i Address
City State Zip-
I Phone /


Email
Date of Birth Age Male Female
Please check appropriate boxes
Triathlon Divisions
0Individual
ORelay Team 0DMale OCompetitive
0 2 person 0 Female 0 Corporate
0 4 person (co-ed only) Co-ed O Weekend Warrior
Which activities will you being participating in: 0 Mountain Bike
0 .K, .1
iI I, ,,,
Team Name
Team Mates


Registration Fee $35 per person Triathlon
No Refunds / No raceday registration
$25 per person Biathlon No Refunds
Biathlon Divisions
0 10-14yrs 0 30-39 yrs
0 15-19 yrs D40-49 yrs
020-29 yrs 050+ yrs


Make checks payable SunDancer Adventure Triathlon
and send to: 765 Sailfish Drive
I Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548
To pay by credit card register at www.active.com



CI ACE FREEDOM RE
SANTA ROSA BEACH NEWSPAPERS INTERACTIVE


DIVISIONS
* Competitive race regularly
or serious competitors
* Corporate represent your company
* Weekend Warrior jdu 6 .t for fun


Individual or Relay Tean, v' 2 n pc', ..".
Male/Female/Co-ed (at .,- v: f '~ cnci .. t
the opposite sex)


EVENT ACTIVITIES INCLUDE
* Health and Eco fair Fitness/Nature/
Eco-tourism
* Kid's Zone Climbing wall/Obstacle
course/Crafts
* Silent Auction Weekend getaways/
Golf/Bike/etc.
* Pre-race Meeting Food/Fun/
Information



Benefit forHabitat for
Humanity Of Walton County

For more information
Visit www.emeraldcoast.com
or call 850-217-5121


Sp~EST.


I~~~ ~ ~ ~ 'j ~~ .. _-~


Every year about this time
people call the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC), alarmed
about squirrels that seem to
be going crazy. They report
that they've seen squirrels roll-
ing on the ground, jumping
in the air and generally acting
as if something was disturbing
them.
But don't worry, they're not
crazy. They're likely hosting a
parasite that causes them some
temporary discomfort but gen-
erally is not fatal.
When the people call, they
describe the squirrels' unusual
antics, as well as large lumps
that appear to be cancerous
tumors on the squirrels' bod-
ies, according to FWC wildlife
biologist Paige Martin. However,
the lumps are, in fact, "sub-
cutaneous warbles" caused by
the larvae of insects commonly
known as bot flies.
In the southeast United
States, gray squirrels and
other rodents, and rabbits, are
common hosts to these larvae.
Adult female flies deposit eggs
in the immediate vicinity of the.


hosts' nests or dens where the
host comes into contact with
the eggs. The eggs hatch when
exposed to sudden increases in
temperature or moisture, such
as when the animal grooms
itself.
The larvae then enter the
mouth, nose or other body
opening and migrate to a loca-
tion just beneath the skin
where they cut a little hole so
they can breathe and continue
to develop. This development
takes three to seven weeks,
depending on the species of
fly and host, and causes itchy
swellings that range from half
an inch to one inch in diam-
eter.
After the larvae emerge
from the skin, the lesions may
become infected, but they nor-
mally heal without complica-
tion.
In gray squirrels, larvae
are most abundant in late sum-
mer and fall, which is why
people are seeing the lumps
right now, Martin said. She
said most of the squirrels will
suffer no permanent effects
from the parasites, however, a


Going Nuts
few may become debilitated by
heavy infestations.
There is no safety threat
to humans or pets from th'e
hosts or their larvae. The pres-
ence of the larvae, however,
often causes hunters to discard
squirrels with warbles. This
is an unfortunate waste of the
resource, according to game
managers since the edibility 6f
the squirrel meat generally is
unaffected because the lesions
are restricted to the skin. In
most areas, including Florida,
the small-game hunting season
(this year Nov. 11 March 4)'
occurs after the larvae have
emerged from the hosts.
The FWC said the best
thing to do if you see squir-
rels exhibiting these character-
istics is simply to leave, then
alone and let nature take its
course. Eventually the larvae
will emerge and the squirrels
will continue to go about the
business of being squirrels.
More information about
bot flies is available, at http://
botflv.ifas.ufl.edu/.


FWC Division Of Law Enforcement Weekly Report
August 25-31, 2006 The vessel was unregistered subjects with the breath test
This report represents and unnumbered, and upon machine. The weekend detail
some significant events the FWC inspection, the officers found netted numerous BUI cases.
handled over the past week; the HIN number concealed. Lt. Jay Chesser and Officer
however, it does not include all Further 'investigation estab- Jeff Gager were patrolling on
actions taken by the Division of lished that the owner/operator .Econfina Creek within i the
Law Enforcement. was impaired. During search Econfina Wildlife Management
WALTON COUNTY incident to arrest, a white pow- Area when a vessel was stopped
On August 29, Officers dery substance was discovered, for.an.inspectiori. The operator
Brian Parkton and Mike Guy The constructive seizure of the exhibited signs of impairment,
checked two subjects fishing vessel ended the voyage for the which was confirmed by failed
near the Highway 331 Bridge. owner and occupants. Officer field sobriety tasks. The opera-
A consensual search revealed Erdman conducted followup tor was later given a breath test
a small bag of cannabis and investigation on the suspected which resulted in a BAC of .123
rolling papers concealed in a narcotics, as well as the vessel. 'and was booked into the Bay
cigarette box. One citation was The results to date are arrest County Jail for operating a ves-
issued for possession of less for BUI, possession of a con- sel with an unlawful BAC.
than 20 grams of cannabis. trolled substance, and opera- Officer Gary Tolbert
BAY COUNTY tion of an unregistered vessel, responded to a disorderly con-
Officers David Erdman Officer Jim Moore assisted duct complaint and found that
and David Brady were on Okaloosa and Walton County a subject had stood on the
water patrol around the Grand units with a special detail in back of his boat and urinated-
Lagoon area in Bay County and around the Destin Pass/ as a tour boat with approxi-
when they conducted a ves- Crab Island vicinity. Officer mately 30 passengers of all
sel stop on a 25foot outboard Moore manned the BUI trailer ages passed within 20 yards of
powered tunnel hull vessel, and helped process incoming the offender. The subject con-
tinued his show even though
'.TH 1" JONES, C PA the tour boat's captain was
"K EITH'-,.. La JONES, CPA yelling at him. A -confession
S- .LIg !T .,JCOX.II Jil G. CAX f. CONSUwLING SERVICES was obtained and witness
statements were taken. Officer
Tolbert will seek an arrest war-
...II... ... rant later this week. '.` -
GULF COUNTY
America Counts on As GUfficerHal Webb appro-
Si i Pe!d Ave,-,,ue Porr St. Joe. FL 32456 ended a suspect that was I1
1-. -1 50 -29- ,.5rFX possession of seven undersize
S'- '-1 04 m 50-229-1050 FX redfish (over the bag limit), two
.llalll e-c.oa Co -n ww,,, keithjornescpa coin undersize black drum, and two
E.'BER '..'AE F-R.I AND FLOPICAI. riNLTITUTE- OF CPA 3 undersize flounder. The appro-
priate citations were issued.
Investigator Scott, Pearc
[ Ray Howell President and Officers Tony Lee, Scott
U Keith "Duke" Jones VP/Business Development Hoffman. and Shon Brower
Assisted the Gulf County
illI Poniit L.and U Sheriffs Office in serving d
Gufb U Lad U search warrant near Howard
Ab ta t o panl Creek. Th1e search of the prop-
A s c b uI auy erty revealed two. stolen wave
runners and their trailer and
Title Insurance Abstracts Escrows Real Estate Closings also possible alligator me
411 Rtid A.enue within a freezer. The investiga-
Port St. Joe. Florida 32456 ton is ongoing and charges are
k850i 229-9388 Fax: i850(i 229-9398 pending.
email: gulfabstract@yao.cESCAMBIA COUNTY-
email: gulfabstract@yahoo.com On August 24, Officer Keith
Clark was on patrol along the
inshore coastal area when he
stopped a vehicle for improper
safety equipment at night. The
Stop resulted in a felony arrest
when the operator attempted t9
hide his fictitious ID card.
New Ye ReSOUI On August 26-27, Officer
Clark worked an inshore JEA
detail in the Pensacola Pass
DID YOU 'area adjacent to the Gulf of
Oa Mexico. He 'checked 30 ves-
KNOW THAT 88% sells, made four king mackerel
S .arrests, three of which were
OF ADULTS undersize and one over the
REMEMBER bag limit, and an arrest for five
REMEMBER .-,....-. 'undersize gray snapper.
SOMEONE WITH ;. .. ;_ OKALOOSA COUNTY
"-. i'- On.August 24, Officer Steve
AN ESPECIALLY Bartlett inestgated a boating
AN,, .-' -- E Eaccident which involved a rental
ATTRACTIVE 'essel that was being operated
TT ". n The Sound. An occupant of
SMILE? he vessel, who was bow-riding,
l sustained lacerations from the
prop when she fell overboard.
The operator of the vessel waV
Why not start with one of the first things most issued a citation for reckless
people notice about you... your teeth? Heck, we'll operation.
even make it easier for you with a free complete Shelby Williams responded to
exam and x-rays. That's right free for the entire a search and rescue on The
month of January and February. Now you have Sound for three missing boat
ers. At approximately 3 a.m.
one less excuse for avoiding the Dentist. Let the all three of the subjects were
staff at Dr. Lister's office keep your smile healthy safely located.
On August 28, Officer
in a friendly, stress free environment that will Willie Mailoto was patrolling
make you feel truly at home. So take a short drive Rocky Bayou State Park when
he encountered a fisherman
to Downtown Wewahitchka and let us share our who had an undersized redflsh
home with you! and mangrove snapper in his
cooler. The man was cited for
Free exam and xrays for new patients only! the violations.t 28, Ocer Ste
On August 28, Officer Stev
Bartlett and Reserve Officer
Call today for an appointment. Tim Trepanier conducted fisl'-
o Spery ,inspections in the Gulf
Ask about our Specials. of Mexico. Two vessels were
found to have undersize red
4 wI' Fsnapper and undersize amber.-
jack on board.. The captains
of the vessels were issued cita-
tions for the undersize fish.


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years.


RB heStr.Por S. oe FL- husdy, epemer7,2006


4


_


11


iI


I


I






The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, September 7, 2006 9B


Conserving From Page 3B


"I have met with [Gulf
county commissioner] Bill
Williams already," said Lynn.
"Bill and Barbara Eells and I
want to hold education meet-
ings with the county beach
rakers to help them under-
stand what they need to do."
Eells is a long-time conser-
vationist and licensed wildlife
rehabilitator in the area, and
is also known as the "Turtle
Lady" for her years in working
with the area turtle patrol.
Right now, the WindMark
Beach is one of the main sea
turtle nesting grounds, and
protection of the nesting
habitat is one of the St. Joe
Company's primary concerns.
In May of this year, 97
eggs were laid in WindMark
Beach's first sea turtle nest,
which would have been washed


To date, according to com-
pany information, a total of six
sea turtle nests have been laid
at WindMark Beach. In the
same area, eggs have hatched
from several snowy plover
nests.
"We're trying to strike a'
happy balance between wild-
life habitat and public use of
the beach here at WindMark,"
said Lynn. "It takes constant
education and monitoring,
and that's my job."
Top Down Doesn't Mean
Convertible
The development's bloom
of boardwalks is another St.
Joe Company trademark.
Lynn described them as a
"top-down innovation," mean-
ing that the St. Joe Company
utilized a new and innovative
construction technique that


all across the dunes to con-
struct the boardwalk.
Instead, construction
begins at the end farthest from
the beach, and work progress-
es across the dunes only as far
as the last plank laid. All con-
struction workers and equip-
ment remain on and work
from the previously construct-
ed segment of the boardwalk,
without ever working out on
the sand.
The Good Morning Street
bridge, currently under con-
struction across the new
section of U.S. 98, is also
being built by the "top-down"
method. Construction equip-
ment remains on the high-
way instead of in the wetlands
beneath the bridge, thus pre-
serving the wetlands and all its
vegetation.


Marie Logan/The Star


Running perpendicular to
U.S. 98 but set back about
50 feet from the roadbed is a
continuous black plastic knee-
high barrier. This marks the


away without relocation by
turtle patrol volunteers. The
nest hatched July 31, with 96
hatchlings making it to safety
in the water.


allows each boardwalk to be
constructed, without the tra-
ditional style of bulldozing a
boardwalk path and running
heavy equipment and people


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Ih tie I Zi V a uruiviu Lj's. am

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'AfR =Auruji F~iL'r.1l e UP. OWi tn u: i..- I aup I,) S500 N.) aJ5 inn3fl3A iri-MM1ilflir, 5.MIT'a I 'i bt -T1Vi 4' I. fdmirl: Ula
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A~uiunr15 .11116aro vi, wNt'rter 31 2006 jh.-i sunet it)rnan,', w.rr,,ui rur, Mcrarellipsur, rajulred


coastal construction control
line, the boundary set by the
state that limits the proximity
of major construction to the
water's edge.
According to Lynn, no
main structures like houses,
can be built south of the line,
only minor uninhabited struc-
tures like swimming pools.
The Southern Accents
Showhouse and its swimming
pool are a prime example of
the coastal construction con-
trol line in action.
Home is Where the Turtles
Are
With Phase II has come
the new segment of U.S. 98,.
replacing the four miles of
road running parallel with
the beach between Dixie Belle
Curve and St. Joe Beach.
The majority of building
will be concentrated on the
south side of the new highway,
between the coastal construc-
tion control line and the new
road.
According to Lynn, lim-
ited development is planned
for the north side, leaving the
environment intact for the
Florida black bear population
that currently resides in the
timberland.
But wildlife south of the
new road has not been forgot-
ten.
Lynn has already begun
what he calls a "100 percent
survey," meaning that he will
personally walk the entire tract
of land, surveying all wildlife
and plant life in the section.
He looks for everything,
but especially rare plants and
gopher tortoises, determining
if they can be relocated.
The St. Joe Company has
already established a gopher
tortoise preserve on the south
side of the new road, and any
gopher tortoise that is found
.anywhere' in the area is placed
in this preserve.
The turtle compound is
fenced with galvanized wore
and treated wood modified
dune fencing, easily seen fro
the new road, and the preserve
spills into a natural wetland
that is, according to Lynn, evi-
dently their native habitat.
"If we need to fence the
other side, we will," he said,
explaining that he hopes the


Marie Logan/The Star
WindMark wildlife biologist Bill Lynn examins a joint weed
plant.
tortoises remain within the added Lynn. "They are also
wetland and do not wander within the gopher tortoise
out into the development, compound."
"We also have discovered
one of the largest box turtle
populations I've ever seen," (See CONSERVING on Page 12B)
populations I've ever seen,


PUBLIC NOTICE

Gulf County will hold a public meeting on September 7, 2006 at
5:30 p.m. EST. The sole purpose of this meeting will be to discuss
the County's application for a grant under the Florida Recreation
Development Assistance Program (FRDAP) during the 2007-08
funding cycle. The applications are due September 15, 2006. The
grant application includes improvements to the "Highland View/
Donnie Wayne Brake Park."

Gulf County will hold the meeting in the County Commission
Chambers which are located in the Robert Moore Administration
Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The
public is encouraged to attend. Individuals with disabilities wishing
to attend, who will need special accommodations, should contact
Lynn Stephens, Administration, Gulf County at (850) 229-6106.

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Bill Lynn showcases a rare wetland giant water drop wart.


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lOB~~ ~~ Th tr otS.Je L TusaSpebr7 06Etbihe 97 SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


SHtARK

AUK


by Jennifer Bland
As you walk down the
halls of Port St Joe High you
can hear the sounds of lock-
.ers slamming, doors creaking
as they are opened and shut,
and over 400 excited students
piling into classrooms. School
.spirit pours down the halls as
* signs and posters wishing the
football team good luck with
this Friday's game are hung on
-every post and wall. Along with
the new school year comes
many new attributes includ-
ing Football State Champs for
2005 and numerous new stu-
dents. School spirit is alive
and well for the 2006-2007
school year.
Parents and Students
There will be numerous
:schools and career oppor-
-tunities for each student to
take advantage of at College
-and Career Day on Friday,
:September 15from9:00-10:30.
-Students will be attending and
-parents are invited. It's here
'again! Progress reports will
:be going home on Thursday,
-September 7. Also parents, if
:you have not done so already
-you need to come by the high


school front office and sign up
for a new pinnacle password
as all passwords have been
changed.
Seniors
On Friday, September
8th, at 10:30 a.m., seniors
will be given graduation invita-
tion information packets. On
Friday, September 15th seniors
will be ordering invitations and
will need an $80 deposit. More
senior dates will be announced
as they approach.
Underclassmen
Juniors, your help is need-
ed in the concession stand at
football games! Please come by
Mrs. Taylor's office in the high
school front office to sign up
to work. There will be FCAT
retakes and FCAT for new stu-
dents on October 2nd and 3rd.
Senior and juniors! The dead-
line to sign up for the October
14th SAT is September 12th.
You will need to go online to
register at http://www.colleg-
eboard.com as guidance does
not have any mailing packets
at this time.
Sports
It's that time of year where
football season begins, volley-


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ball is in full swing and other
sports begin to start condition-
ing. The football team start-
ing off the season with 1-1,
has a home game on Friday,
September 8th against Chipley
beginning at 8:00.Come out and
help support the Sharks! The
Lady Sharks volleyball team
has had a victorious season so
far. Senior Courtney Craft had
this to say when asked about
this year's volleyball team- "We
are getting better with each
game and are becoming more
unified." The team won in
their game against Wewa, 3-0.
They will play on September
7th against Sneads and again
on September 12th against
Blountstown. Both games start
with Junior Varsity at 5:00 and
Varsity at 6:00. Come out and
support the Lady Sharks!
This school year prom-
ises to be the best one yet, not
only for me because I am a
senior but for all students at
PSJHS. As I wrap up this edi-
tion I'll leave you with one of
my favorite quotes by Eleanor
Roosevelt: "The future belongs
to those who believe in the
beauty of their dreams." Until
next time... Have a safe and
happy week and may God
bless!

Port St Joe High School

Homecoming Parade
The 2006 Port St Joe
High School Homecoming
Parade will take place Friday,
September 29, 2006. The,
parade will begin at 3:30 p.m.
eastern time and all floats,
cars, and marching units
should be in place by 2:45.
Anyone who wishes to par-
ticipate in the parade plase
contact Wayne Taylor. at
wtaylor(@gulf.k12.fl.us or by
phone in the NJROTC Unit,
229-6177. Sorry, no political
campaign entries in the home-
coming parade.


wehae heanwe


rK ~.


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CL 3O24'7 180n0-7-.72n8O


Life at Faith Christian is opening at Faith Christian
somewhat easier this year with School. Thanks to the par-
the parking situation a little ents, teachers, and faculty
less stressful. We are getting who attended this meeting and
used to the noises and activi- to all who have volunteered
ties of the construction and to make a difference in our
are grateful that every bang school! Volunteering is good
and bump means progress. for the heart and the soul!
Progress is also obvious on Our new teacher for this
the Marvin Street side due to week is Mrs. Judy Evans. She
the hard work of Catherine is originally from Oak Ridge,
Godwin and Tonya Costin. Tennessee. Miss Judy is mar-
Good job cleaning out last ried and has four children,
year's garden! ages 21 to 34. Her husband
Last Tuesday an orga- is in the Air Force and will
nizational meeting was held retire in September. Miss
in the library to discuss a Judy attended Western Kent
new approach to PTE Sandi University and Tennessee Tech
Kennedy led a discussion where she majored in Music.
about possible projects for She has taught flute since 1969,
this year. Each class will have and has played professionally
at least one or two classroom in Gulf Coast Symphony, Gulf
representatives to assist the Coast Band, and a Classical
teacher in making sure that Quartet. She was a music
the parents are aware of spe- director at a church in Biloxi
cific needs for the class and and has performed with the
school. Committees are being Air Force 604th and 502nd
formed to coordinate activi- Bands. She now attends Faith
ties, projects and events. A Bible Church where the Lord
monthly newsletter will keep is continuing to use her musi-
everyone informed as to the cal talents. Miss Judy teach-
new and exciting things hap- es Language Arts for the 5th


Warriors


in Flight!

By Kaitlynn Norris and
Brenda Brown
Today, August 31, is a
day we'll never forget Florida
State University's Science on
the Move came to Wewahitchka
Elementary School. Science
on the Move is an educational
program that brings physical
science activities to students
in the Big Bend area.
Our fourth grade partici-
pated in an amazing study of
rockets, angles and measur-
ing. We worked with a partner
to determine at what angle and
with what amount of air pres-
sure a rocket would soar the
A. -' -7.:Y3 ., / KILirl


through 8th grades at Faith
Christian.
For an update on our
Christmas Card fund raising,'
Miss Kathie Sarmiento informs
us that the top first day sellers
were Bethany Taylor, Rachel
Jones, Daniel Jones, Dell
Pickett, Kerigan Pickett, and
Lauren Costin. At the end.
of the first week, Jacquelirie
LaLuzerne topped the list with.
Bethany Taylor making the
second highest sales. There
were thirty "Early Bird" stw-
dents from grades 4 and up
who were qualified winners-
for the pizza party lunch.'
Twenty-seven students front
K-5 to 3rd grade were quali--
fied winners for a McDonald's
gift certificate. These students
worked very hard to make-
a given number of sales in
record time. Our congratula--
tions to all of you. We also-
are very grateful to all whp
have supported this effort to
raise money in order to defray
tuition costs. Sales ended
Thursday, August 31st.


greatest distance. We found nine meters.
out that at forty-five degrees The day was hot, but so
with a high pressure cap, the was what we learned. Out
rocket would fly over eighty- of all the days we spend in
school, we will never forget
.,.,: ',. E,,j. 0 this one. We wish every day
at school was this much funt
Thank you, FSU and Jonathan
SGroom for interest education.


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ATTORNEYS AT LAW



202 Marina Drive
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456


(850) 229-3333
The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based
solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written
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I New Online

Resources Benefit


i Students Statewide

Students at Florida's com-
munity colleges gained access
today to $3.9 million in addi-
tional electronic databases, e-
^ journals and eBooks to assist
in learning and research. The
new resources are available
via LINCCWeb (www.inccweb.
,org), the web-based library
information portal used by
more than 800,000 communi-
ty college students statewide.
LINCCWeb is operated by the
College Center for Library
Automation (CCLA), a pro-
gram of the state's Division
of Community Colleges and
Workforce Education.
The Florida Legislature
appropriated funding for the
new resources to be shared
by all community colleges.
Representatives from each
college collaborated to select
resources that meet the infor-
mation needs of today's stu-
dents.
"Until now, each college
used local funds to license
resources for its students;"
said CCLA Executive Director
J. Richard Madaus. "Because
of that, students at some col-
leges had access to significant-
ly more online resources than
others. This new statewide
approach guarantees that
every student has convenient
access to the same valuable
resources regardless of college
size or location. LINCCWeb is
available to students 24 hours
a day, whenever and wherever
they need it.
"This is a tremendous
leap forward and a continued
indication of Florida's support
for its community colleges,
their students and libraries,"
he added.


I


News Column

Faith Christian School


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


IOB The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdySetm r7,20


It-


i-







Esabised197 erin ul cuny ndsurondn aea fr 8 eas heSar PrtSt JeFL Thrda, epemer7,206 I


Mojo -
77- 7

"They get that yellow
belt and then they want
that orange belt. It's like a
train."
To Cryderman, many
of the ills diagnosed in
youngsters by the medical
community can be better
addressed through the mar-
tial arts and all the tools
they provide rather than
mood-altering drugs.
Dorn noted that one
local doctor encouraged
her youngsters' participa-
tion in karate.
Gage Blevins, a high
school senior, arrived at
Marathon Martial Arts while
taking medication for atten-
tion-deficit and hyperactiv-
ity issues. The prescription
drugs are history.
"I needed a workout
and I needed self-disci-
pline," Blevins said. "Self-
focus, self-discipline, it's all
here."
Cryderman said there
are certainly worse places
for children to be on a
weekday evening, noting
that, "We fill their heads,
hearts and minds with
nothing but good things.
"It's not really a pro-
gram, it goes on forever. It's
nice to be raised in a dojo
because there is nothing
but good stuff."
Comforter put his chil-
dren under Cryderman's
tutelage while they were in
elementary school and with
time it became a family
affair, a tradition Comforter
continues to uphold each
week.
"My kids started doing
this when they were nine or
10," Comforter said. "It's
done wonders for their self-
confidence."
That was roughly the
same age Cryderman was
hooked on martial arts.
He attended the World's
Fair in his native Canada
and observed a demonstra-
tion put on by two Japanese
martial arts experts, who
went through an elaborate
choreographed demonstra-
tion with Samurai swords.
As he watched the men
swoop and dodge each
other in spirited play, in
Cryderman a life-long pas-
sion was fired up.
"It totally captivated
me," Cryderman said. "It
was so impressive. Now I've
been doing this my whole
life."
The name for his dojo
"Marathon" comes from the
30 years he's taught mar-
tial arts and the fact that
he once lived and taught in
Marathon, in the Florida
Keys.
The distinctive black
and blue of the sign and
'emblem recognize that
more than a few bruises
'are the byproduct of sound
teaching and learning.
"We can get pretty black
and blue," Cryderman said
with a chuckle.
He studied under a
noted master, Qui Wong,
a Chinese sense whose
picture enjoys a place of
honor on the wall behind
Crydermans desk.
Wong's family,
Cryderman noted, were
neighbors of the Lees, and
the most famous son of
the martial arts, Bruce Lee,
whose kinetic energy, cha-
risma and talent turned
martial arts from a cottage
industry into a worldwide
phenomenon.
Cryderman established
'his school in Canada in
the 1980s and by the early
1990s was in Gulf County
teaching out of the old
Treasure Bay Lodge, where
he worked for a number of
years.
Three years ago the


school relocated to U.S.
-98 adjacent to. Hungry
'Howies.
Regardless of location
or number of students a
typical Monday, Cryderman
said, could find 40 students
or 10 at the dojo it has
never been about money or
business.


Bryce, 7, and Isabella, 5, Johnston perform their katas Monday evening at Marathon Martial Arts.
At right, four-year-old Tristan Dorn stretches his neck muscles and prepares for a workout.


The fee is $40 per
month, but seems almost
an afterthought when talk-
ing to Cryderman.
"If I was in it for the
money I would have got-
ten out of this long ago,"


Cryderman said. "That's
where I am thinking about
spirit. It's more about
respect between two peo-
ple than an exchange of
money.
"I think of it as a com-


munity service. If you bring
your child in here and you
can't pay, leave the child
and I'll teach them some
karate and pay me when
you are able."


To the Voters of District 2

Thank you for returning me to serve as your
representative for another term on the Gulf
County School Board.


I have spent all of my adult life working
with the young people in the Gulf County
school system. I will continue to give my full
time attention to the operation of the GulfI
County School Board and the schools in Gulf


County.


I promise to do my best to see that the Gulf
County School have what they need to
succeed.


George M. Cox
School Board Member -District 2

Political Advertisement paid for and approved by George M. Cox, nonpartisan, for School Board District 2.




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Port St Joe, Florida Apalachicola, Florida


Curtis (foreground) and Shawn Cryderman lead the class as sense of the Marathon dojo.


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~U/,UU/~/,//,U/I,,I//n,~/)~////r~/////~


---


~DL~~Plurmwil ~~ Fs~c~t~;-- ~35-'PST~~i~i~g%~~~rPss;~L~b3~X* ~ ~ Ir cL_~gjaaai! RONI~


TheSfa, PrfSf.Joe F hurda, Spfe be 7,200 11B


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years







IAP I f Re r Pcr t St icJ IL *T r y e


Conserving -


Planting Posterity
Working with native veg-
etation means not only leav-
ing much undisturbed, it also
means transplanting some,
placing some in a native plant
"nursery" until construction
is completed, and contracting


for some plants to be grown
elsewhere.
And, as Lynn has found,
much to his delight, it also
involves management of rare
plants that are thriving in the
development site.
St. Joe has contracted


to have some pitcher plants
grown and shipped to the
development, since there were
no pitcher plants in the area to
be moved.
Pitcher plants are native
to this region, and are consid-
ered both rare and protected.


Marie Logan/The Star
Rare narrow leaved phoebanthus grow outside the gopher tortoise,preserve bordering the new
segment of U.S. 98.


Can you tell


I'm wearing Invisalig i

Get the beautiful smile


ln. irnliI~gn I t iInvisiblek '.% ir to miriahten
teetii using a ai vle o ff H"tom.iadv,
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proven to he ef'fc[!'e InL both cllnknl
ru.ard'h iinJ in pr, eiikde nti onwlde.
So whether your teeth are crowded, too
far apart, or have shifted since wearing
braces, you'll have a new reason to smile.



invisalign
start sm li n g morel"


Frank D. May,

DMD, PA

319 Williams Ave.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456



(850) 227-1123


62WIA,gAvi~e 'oliw iIW,I' A O/IimooM lf41/llW r T1'ithJWOIk1I


* U.


Some of Lynn's fellow
workers have begun develop-
ment of a man-made bog just
east of the Southern Accents
Showhouse. It will be called
Billy Bog, in honor of Lynn,
and some plants from the
plant relocation program have
been ordered for transplanting
to the bog, which will be vis-
ible to the public but blocked
from public access.
North of the current con-
struction site of Phase II, along
the newly built alternate U.S.
98, Lynn has found numerous
patches of the rare narrow
leaved phoebanthus, a bright
yellow, stalky flower similar in
appearance to a coneflower.
It is a "disturbance related
plant," according to Lynn, that
appears in areas that have
been drastically disturbed.
"The disturbance that
brought this flower in used to
be fire," explained Lynn, "but
now it is construction sites,
like building this new segment
of highway, logging sites, and
major development sites.
Any areas disturbed along
the newly constructed high-
way segment are being allowed
to come back naturally, with
whatever native plants decide
to regrow.
Two other rare distur-
bance area plants Lynn has
discovered are the joint weed
plant and the rare wetland
giant water drop wort.
Godfrey's Golden Aster, in
a variety of forms and shapes,
is another rare plant native
only to this area, mainly in
Gulf County.
"I'm sort of like Johnny
Appleseed," laughed Lynn, "I'm
taking some of these .. plants
and moving them elsewhere
so they will seed and we don't
lose them."
Lynn is also working with
other wildlife biologists and
native plant specialists to
transplant the native coastal
trees, mostly sand-live oaks, so
the hardy, picturesque arbors
are not all lost to construction
To this end, the St. Joe
Company developed a native
plant nursery, located within
the-development area, where
the trees have been relocated
until replanting in the Village
area after construction is com-
plete.
Right now, according to
Lynn. ihey have 220 healthy.


thriving trees, that are con-
stantly being watered so "they
are concentrating on growing
roots now," said Lynn.
"We've already gathered
through seeds, cuttings and
plants that will eventually seed,
many of the native plants,"
said Lynn. "This allows us
to maintain the local DNA of
the native vegetation so it is
not lost. It is a very expensive
project, and St. Joe is a leader
in this type of commitment to
the environment."
"We will continue with the
nursery project as the devel-
opment grows," added Lynn,
"because it is one of the best,
most efficient things a devel-
opment could do."
By saving and using native
vegetation, there will be no
need to fertilize, water exces-
sively and constantly replace
non-native vegetation, Lynn
explained, all of which will
benefit the development, hom-
eowners, the bay, the water
table, wildlife, the entire area.
Lynn is also required to


give a yearly homeowner's
education seminar, "and I plan
to keep their mailboxes filled
with information," he said. "I
plan to make sure that every
homeowner knows in their
deeds and covenants that this'
area is managed naturally for
endangered species of plants
and animals."
Of the approximately
2,000 acres in the WindMark
Beach Phase II development.
approximately 1,000 will be
developed, according to Lynn,
but "the square footage and
footprints are quite small.
The U.S. Corps of Engineers
and the Florida Department
of Environmental Protectioni
are continuously checking on
wetlands impacts. St. Joe is
actually developing less wet-
lands than it holds develop-
ment permits for.
"If we develop the land-
carefully and manage it well.
we can have development and
healthy wildlife, too," said
Lynn. "That's my hope and
my job."


Marie Logan The Star
Amber long-wave shields on street lights give protection to sea
turtles.


The Times

One Year Subscription ............................ $23.00

Six Month Subscription ........................... $15.00



The Star Home Delivered

One Year Subscription ................... ....... $24.39

Six Month Subscription ...................* .... $15.90



The Panhandle B. con

Hook & Trigger ..... ...

One Year Subscription ........................... $


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years:


12B Then Star otS.Je L-Turdy etme ,20






Stone Steps


6C


Legals


7C


Classifieds 9-10C


k
- --

,~


I


atsE blushed 7 937 Serving Gulf years


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL *


Thursday, September


7, 2006 SECTION C


Metal Sculptor Finds New Spark in Port St. Joe


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
Before he turned 40, Alex Henderson was
living the American Dream.
He founded Blood, Sweat & Steel, a
lucrative metal fabrication business in his
native Atlanta, and received commissions
from some of the country's corporate giants.
He did jobs for Coca-Cola and Delta Air
Lines and crafted a 14-foot globe for Bass
Hotels and Resorts in Las Vegas.
His work soon became a part of the
Atlanta landscape. Stonehenge 2000, a


Metal sculptor Alex Henderson poses with two c
at this year's A Taste of the Coast festival.


striking water fountain formed of towering
monolithic shapes, created an oasis on the
bustling intersection of Sixth and Peach Tree
Streets.
In Woodruff Park, visitors strolled near the
16-foot Georgia State Seal cast in Henderson's
shop.
As Blood, Sweat & Steel gained exposure
- The Atlanta Business Chronicle profiled
the burgeoning three-year-old company in
December of 1996 Henderson expanded the
business to include architectural, ornamental
and sculptural divisions.
He soon had a fleet of trucks
i and an expansive crew of talented
employees.
But something was amiss.
"I had 25 guys working for
me before I turned my head
around and I said to hell with it,"
remembered Henderson.
Just shy of his 40th birthday,
Henderson liquidated his metal
fabrication shop.
S I Blood, Sweat & Steel was no
more.
A Change in Focus
Henderson had pursued a
career as a sculptor with singular
focus, studying eight years
at Ringling School of Art and
Design, Atlanta College of Art and
the University of Kentucky and
participating in apprenticeship
programs throughout the
country.
Some of his first jobs were
mailbox commissions from
Atlanta's wealthy residents.
In his initial consultations,
the young artist kept the
conversation, and the alcohol,
flowing.
"I would just kind of read
them the best I could and
of his pieces interpret them," remembered
Henderson, who observed his


Monumental Fabrication of America employees Mack Kent and Chris Turner work on a stainless
steel globe inside the Rutherford Road shop. Alex Henderson founded the Port St. Joe business in
2003.


clients' tastes in liquor, shoes and perfume.
He framed his unorthodox approach
around an overarching question.
"If you were a mailbox, what kind of
mailbox would you be?"
Henderson derived the name for his


business while working at a Kentucky metal
scrap yard, where he gained materials for his
sculptures and plotted his future success.
When blood from a cut on his forehead
(See SCULPTOR on Page 2C)


Bluewater Realty, with two locations to serve you, is a full
service real estate agency. Our agents are professionals
with many years of experience. We offer a wealth of experi-
ence in listing and selling your property to include a free,
no obligation CMA (Competitive Market Analysis) of your
property.

In our Port St Joe office, we have Linda Freeman, Heather
Harris, Carolyn Holman, Dale McPherson, and our newest
agent Leck Shannon. In our Mexico Beach office, we have
Melba Barbee and Margaret Presswood, and our Broker/
Owner is George W. Duren.

Bluewater Realty, also, has a sister company, Bluewater Va-
cation Rentals. Our rental department has a staff with over
20 years experience in-bandling not only short term vaca-
tion rentals, but long term rentals as well.


SOur professionals in bothof these companies are willing,
a.nd able to help you with listing, selling, or renting your
.operty. ,

r Call us today at Bluewater Realty or Bluewater Vacation'
Rental and let us take ihe guess work out of charting your
?. course.


Remember
We are dot ... net!
www.bluewaterrealtv.net


OWNER FINANCING ON 4 LOTS IN .,-. I \
CREEKVIEW SUBDIVISION WWW.L
PRICE PER LOT $79.950.00, 10% D .I ,
($7,995.00), $500.00 PER MONTH TO BAL- .. ..
LOON IN 10 YEARS SITE BUILT HOMES
ONLY, NO PENALTY FOR PREPAYMENT, -
LOT DIMENSIONS ARE APPROXIMATELY ,
104 X 106. AA_


ewatervacationrentals.net


-I-C' rj '7 .


- N*'. -"-


PORT ST JOE OFFICE
155 WV HIGHWAY 98
(PORT CITY SHOPPING CENTER)
PORT ST JOE, FL
850 229-6100




For Rent

Long Term







3 BEDROOM 2 BATH HOME ON 16TH HOLE
OF GOLF COURSE, UNDER HOME PARKING
FOR 2 VEHICLES. BEAUTIFULLY LAND-
SCAPED. STOVE, FRIDGE, DISHWASHER,
W/D HOOK UP






-I-
3 BLDROOMA lifN 4 GULF.
conNMrrt a at -
CLOSE TO BEACH. BONUS ROOM C.
BE USED FOR 4TH.BEDROOM. OFFICE OR


__~.'- _BEDROQM. 2 '; BATH DUPLEX, COM .
*.. .,.LE1cjj FURNISHED, ON THE WATER
-- AT. ST -J ORES. BOARDWALK TO t.
dTHEJI 0@AI EArTIfFULL SUNSETS VERY
---- !-"s


mt~;rksa~ur'L~ ~i~lzc'r~-;~s -w ~v' HEWr f-f r----'L-^-P aa I V LW


MEXICOBEACH OFFICE
1602 W HIGHWAY 98
MEXICO BEACH FL
850 648-4400


e


NLS 201089-161 AVENUE C -- Good rental in
area that will be developed in future


MLS 106882 221 ANGEL FISH -- Great Bay
view. Has above ground pool with decking. ,,
-" ,*. .


:;l.lr:.~Y1 ~~ ~OLl~ii;l~li~~.~;~L~Y~iEIBl~?rPII~BIB P~iiQ~Ja4l~,~di~Cii~jlllf~:ir4r'~l IY~R~T


*'-'r-ff.Sikl' P-*lUMtSMK.W5 R UiEgigtllliiifdll^lgl^IMMM


L


iT,~~i







A%. Tk 'ne ,, Pyr, rQUIal St lcis I ThIirdo.Setmbr7.206Esalihd 97 evig uf ontIndsrrunig-rasfr-8yer


~fzi~l


(Above) Alex Henderson poses with the finished globe at its new home on the New Life Ministries
International sound stage in Tallahassee. (Left) A look at the globe before it was mounted on its
base.


Sculptor -

mingled with sweat and
dripped onto a piece of hot
steel, Henderson had an
epiphany.-
"When I grow up, I'm
going to be a sculptor ,and
have a metal fabrication


F,. :


business called Blood, Sweat
& Steel," he pledged.
When he finally got his
wish, Henderson found it was
more than he'd bargained
for.
Increasingly frustrated


by his attempts to n


his roles as a businessman
and artist, Henderson opted
for a change in focus. -
"I got lost out there in
the fabrication field," said
Henderson. "I needed to get


back to my roots of being an
artist instead of a manager
with many hats."
A Monumental Decision
After closing his business
in 2003, Henderson decided
to enjoy life away from -the
hustle and bustle of Atlanta.
"I just wanted to do
the small-town thing," said
-Henderson, who relocated
to Port St. Joe, where most
of his immediate family now
lives.
Henderson opened a
sconci metal fabrication
shop, which he christened
Monumental Fabrication
of-America, _Inc., on the
industrial-zoned Rutherford
Road in Jones Homestead.
At Monumental
reconcile Fabrication, --Henderson


employs only a few workers
and is selective with his
commissions.
/ "I turn down a lot of
work. I don't want to go out
of town," he noted.
Henderson has received


steady work from the area's
largest developer, the St. Joe
Company, which is a fan of
his patented Coastal Dune
Fencing.
Seeking a creative
alternative to traditional
beach fencing, Henderson
pioneered the durable,
visually appealing fence,
which features aluminum or
exotic wood slats linked with
twisted aluminum connector
rods.
The fence, which staves
off erosion, follows the
contours of the landscape
and is featured in St. Joe
developments WaterSound,
WaterColor and WindMark
Beach.
To date, Henderson
has installed 5,000 feet of
the fence, which ranges in
price from $80-$128 per foot
installed.
Henderson described
business as fairly consistent,
but prone to slow times.
Recently. Henderson and


employees Chris Turner and
Mack Kent completed a five-
foot in diameter stainless
steel globe with aluminum
continents for New Life
Ministries International.
The globe, Henderson's
sixth, rotates on a base
with an armature and 'is
now featured in New Life's
Tallahassee headquarters
behind the pulpit of a
television evangelist.
Henderson is always up
for a creative challenge.
When Clay Williams, -of
Southern Water Properties
contracted Monumental
Fabrication to design Asian-
inspired staircases for two
homes in the Jubilation
development on Cape San
Blas, Henderson crafted
aluminum balisters using
custom bamboo-shaped
molds.
A mahogany top railwhich
blends with the homes' wood

(See SCULPTOR on Page 12C


Charming cottage located on a beautiful wood-
ed lot in a well established neighborhood.
Completely renovated in 2004! MLS#: 111660
ONLY $209,000

A-.


Lag'.: b..I.m;ng 1:. h n, ai'm Bice:..: ubdt ..:.
close to town, bay and beaches. This is a beauti-
ful subdivision with underground utilities which
allows modular homes with covenants' and re-
strictions. 103 X 190. Starting at $72,000.


4 Commercial lots in located in a rapid devel
oping coastal community. Highly visible and
high traffic volume in Port St Joe., Great Bay
views! Possibility to pick up two adgitiona
adjacent lots for bigger space. MLS 110987
$950,000.


. i ---- c -


-..._ ^-, -71_

3 BR 2 BA House on quiet street with lots of
upgrades: granite countertops, fireplace, Pergo
wood floors, pool & hot tub, wonderful 'family
room. MLS# 110465 $299,000.









Gulf Front Gated Community with two swim-
ming pools, tennis courts and easy access to
America's Number One Beach (Selected by Dr.
Beach, 2002). 34 Barrier Dunes Townhouses
Available from $319,000 to $650,000.


- Beautiful home is located in the X Flood zone
d in Seagrass subdivision. This luxury 3 BR 3.5
y BA home has ceramic tile & hard wood floors
al and is completely furnished. Enjoy your private
7 pool; or the community pool. MLS# 201449
$899,750"


Lots in Southgate. Nice building lot near
college, schools and future site of hospital.
MLS# 107685 & MLS# 110794 Starting at
$99,900.








Charming 3 BR 2 BA House in Port St. Joe
built in 2004. Large kitchen and family room with
tile flooring and counter-tops. Whirlpool & sepa-
rate shower in master bath. In-ground sprinkler
system. MLS# 201928 $295,000








Nation) Bayou bI 2 [A ir iJul IS.-:Jo
just two short blocks to public beach access.
Zoned commercial and would be a great loca-
tion for an office. MLS# 110825 $299,900


The Georgia Building Authority commissioned Henderson to create this 16-foot wide state seal for
inclusion in Atlanta's Woodruff Park.


Ron Baumgardner 850-340-0634

Representing Gulf to Bay Construction & Development, Inc:


and across small city park, great for walking and
jogging. Large master bedroom, big closet. Central
fireplace in living room, formal dining rooin and
eat-in kitchen. MLS# 110119, $339,000












www.CoastalRe


I,.. l. :.,... I.. .; r r,. : i,.r ::.:..r J Bayfront Cottage, totally renovated in 2003. Beau-
Waterway. Easy boat access to East Bay, Intracoast- tifully furnished. Come enjoy the sun rising over
al Waterway and out to Gulf of Mexico. Possible to the bay. Bring.your boat to the dock. Good rental
also buy the adjacent lot. Great Investment poten- income. MLS# 110584, $350,000
tial! MLS# 107621, $195,000
Preston Russ 227-8890
t a. l Victor Ramos GRI 340-1216
I a T a l Scott Burkett 899-5242
Debbe Wibberg 227-6178
Betty Caughey 625-6197
Paul Penn 866-2853
roup Gretchen Upchurch 227-5543
Brian Burkett 227-8892
Rex Anderson 227-5416
altylnfo om Ann Anderson 227-5432
Chris Pierce 34ty nfo.com0-0628
Chris Pierce 340-0628


8048 Cape San Bias Rd 110 Barrier Dunes 106 Reid Avenue
Cape San 'Bias. FL Cape San Bias, FL Port St Joe, FL

850-227-7770 850-227-3200 850-227-7775

800-584-1566 800-713-9695 800-581-2910
iniiiiii jiiiij l jiiiii LijijiiiiiL ruT c ,' h'. :-. 1?f [,-*i"* ,"* .,,'f !"* -! y = '.- "-* -- t z--~,- -. . '


Contact Ron Baumgardner
Cell: 850-340-0634
Office: 850-227-1010
Web: www.rbforgottencoast.com
E-mail: rbaumgardner@cbforgottencoast.com


FORGOT
RE!
Ea6 Omi Indep, a ded


FEN COAST
ALTY
ntly Owed and Op led


-99' ~


f


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


2C heSta. ortSt Jo, L -ThrsdySeptember 7,20


A






CSTUbil l eU 7J/ *3- t~l-ving u .l ,.uiiiy unu .ou n,,mu y irIy u n u- T*S -J .,Sr. --,


Wildfire


Threat:


'n -d Franklin County Community

61 d Residents plus Residents of

-rounding Counties Can Learn How

SPrtect Their Homes


The Florida Division of
Forestry, in conjunction with
the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
- Apalachicola National
Estuarine Research Reserve
and St. Joseph Bay State
Buffer Preserve, is present-
ing three Firewise Florida
workshops in September.
These workshops will focus
on how to live safely in the
wildland urban interface...
that fringe area of our com-
munities where homes are
frequently damaged or
destroyed by wildland fire.
The first workshop is
tailored specifically to the
needs of homeowners while
the other two are designed
for- community leaders and
decision makers.
The dates and times for
these workshops are:
1. Tuesday, September
12 (7 p.m. 8:30 p.m.) How
to Have a Firewise Home
Workshop for Homeowners
and Residents will be held
at the St. Joseph Bay State
Preserves Center onCounty
Rd 30A between Port St. Joe
and Indian Pass. This work-
shop is free and open to the
public.
2. Wednesday,
September 13 (8:45 a.m.
4:30 p.m.) Living on
the Edge Workshop for
Community Leaders will be
held at the St. Joseph Bay
State Preserves Center on
County Rd 30A between Port
St. Joe and Indian Pass.
Registration is required


and lunch will be provided.
Register at www.pandion-
svstems.com or call Peter
Colverson or Christine
Denny at (888) 372-4774.
3. T h u r s d ay,
September 21 (8:45 a.m.
- 3:30 p.m.) Living on
the Edge Workshop for
Community Leaders will
be held at the Apalachicola
Community Center, 1 Bay
Avenue (Battery Park) in
Apalachicola. Registration is
required and lunch will be
provided. Register at www.
pandionsystems.com or call
Peter Colverson or Christine
Denny at (888) 372-4774.
All workshops are free
and open to the public and
all participants will receive
free Firewise materials: t-
shirts, CDs and guide-
books.
These interactive work-
shops are a part of an ini-
tiative led by the Florida
Division of Forestry to
achieve fire safe planning
and development in the
wildland/urban interface. As
our Florida public continues
to build homes in areas that
have traditionally been for-
ests or wildlands, disastrous
wildfires occur more fre-
quently. More than 101,000
acres and over 200 struc-
tures have burned through-
out Florida this spring. Dry
weather combined with
hurricane debris has cre-
ated particularly dangerous
conditions in and around
many of our communities at


this time. We will likely con-
tinue to experience damag-
ing wildfires in the interface
until people begin to work
together to solve basic com-
munity planning issues at
the local level.
These unique work-
shops are designed to show
residents of the southeast-
ern Panhandle how to make
their homes and commu-
nities safer from wildfires.
How to Have a Firewise
Home for homeowners and
other residents will last 1 1/2
hours and will provide prac-
tical information on wildfire
risks and easy steps to take
to better protect homes in
the event of a wildfire. Living
on the Edge will be. full day
events for citizens, and busi-
ness and community lead-
ers involved in planning,
financing, building, sustain-
ing, and protecting commu-
nities in the wildland/urban
interface. Participants will
analyze wildfire hazards in
real-world situations and
collectively generate practi-
cal solutions to our wild-
land/urban interface fire
issues.
For more information,
please call Christine Denny
or Peter Colverson, Firewise
Workshop Coordinators
with Pandion Systems, at
(888) 372-4774 or email
fire()pandionsystems.com.


R"., I
(J/


M im osa Subdivision i t i. i. .-. j.- ,.,. i. ,-.r..- ,r
in new Mimosa subdivision. All the homes in Mimosa offer spacious living and
quality construction at an affordable price. Conveniently located 19 miles North
of Port St Joe and a short driving distance from Mexico Beach and Panama City.
You are within minutes of the finest fishing on the Chipola and Apalachicola
rivers, the Intercoastal waterway, St. Joe Bay, and the Gulf of Mexico. Great
location for children with a new community park nearby. There are currently
I,. .... i. ...... ,1 5169,000


Aio1 III





IS ~MLS 200528 i.1 [..cI...:ire-,Ain [ich ard
dx r a Ii a r d i. l .ro i r l c ir I .z Drarx r
topp'fT' .1Fr Ofir 11 f i.src h,.r, iuJ rrC [
'~ ~' mi rh, ~aii ~'5185,000


'7)4

A'.


-'6 *~'


V..
50.. -41
*qE2 -60

ar to


MLS 111601 G i~r. diipl.. 1. iur,,rig iba 'sui'Iii
'I -Alhi. ,C- Jfs ...Mrrplrere h bi.k 1 B N or, '.. c

Eni' -i ac.r, ., ir IsCr'$950,000


PUBLIC NOTICE

A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting
on Wednesday, September 20, 2006 at 8:45 a.m. EST, and at the Board of County Commission-
ers (BOCC) meeting on Tuesday, August 26, 2006 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will be
held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The public hearings will be to discuss and act on the follow-
ing:

1. Minutes for July 17, 2006 and August 10, 2006
2. Final Plat Approval Edward Bish Gulf Coast Ranches Parcel ID #03323-175R
40.84 acres in Section 32, Township 7 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida
a maximum 16 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development
regulations, stated and unstated.
3. Final Plat Approval Archie Barbee Overstreet Heights Parcel ID #03337- 011 R- 4.63
acres in Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida a maximum
8 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regulations,
stated and unstated.
4. Final Plat Approval for Scott Somero Cypress Creek Plantation Parcel ID #01050-
040R 29.52 acres in Section 11, Township 6 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida
a maximum 12 lot development subject to all Federal, State and Local development
regulations, stated and unstated.
5. Final Plat Approval Fred Frechette Cape Dunes Parcel ID #06268-083R 1.74 acres
in Section 7, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida a maximum 4 unit
development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regulations, stated and
unstated.
6. Variance Gregory Butts Parcel ID #03210-OOR .22 acre in Section 22, Township 9
South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida Permission to set house into side setback.
7. Variance Gulf to Bay Construction & Development Mimosa Subdivision Parcel ID
#00713-010R -Section 18, Township 5 South, Range 9 West, Gulf County, Florida
. Right-of-Way width.
8. Variance -Allen & Deborah Tice Parcel ID #00260-000R -Section 35, Township 3
South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida setback encroachment.
9. Ashwood Beach Parking proposal with Gulf County -Dunes Drive area
10. Public at Large
11. Comprehensive Plan/EAR Text
12. WindMark Beach DO/PDP
13. Parks and Grants
14. Staff

The public is encouraged to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the
meeting can be viewed at the Planning and Building Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr.
Blvd., Room 301.
? Gulf Cc..'t Ranches 3 Ow 3 nre Hdle a C)p rS Creek Plan ':ilri






5 Cape D-a,6 D n G rn rp ncsa ,arITbc M1m0sa






5 iaffn T TIce 9 Bech Pair







Ponlish Seplemner 7 and Se- lileibe 14. 2115 Ad 20065-102?


-089

-0jI
MLS 2071hRs,'ll ,s,.,itsfoie..l.


MLS 201751 7 fjn
I.l:xdif ,A u s]r. Ji o L-id ra L.-..: ,k,1 'ri'- if. a1h Jf bbIo.:.I-
ir, h,,, I-h, :.ltor.It s[c,r Fjm..5129,500


7


MLS 110510 Ml jc.:, Bech. Gulf \-.. Nice
1 I E- u. rhot a: ird coO:, .'.'rdh >CrLf ia.'. ind
le. rhn .,ine bl:.ck r,o :.unc picr Co(uJd cmc.-, tull-,
furr.,'hd J r,J risi,, mu' e in Ori, ni co.' rcrioneer
rer[>:d but gi'.it r.-rni p...ernt, 'i:ji'. m u Irr, i c thi
,ne' $405,000


Gufiew
Meic Beac


Meic Beach. Cae San Bis. Carr.ell-Apaachicol

710 WY 8 488 apeSan Us -Rd 63AeueANS 45Aeu


-rsl ~4 rfl~~s~


/
'vs, *


MLS 200645 -Thia ; Iledroom, 2 bth duplo. iqcone
hrius', as ay 1 Gulf Tb.Wingi.inata ic I 'cared 'on rte
'r~d loel and ha-.s a Sli-s-ed ir. Floridi rnsri, n a large
:'per, deck I:rmAk ih iocn)jo: Lt l ie, andbrueze from
U,.klt li Te nr ocuo dead-.er,,j .m bea,.h
a cc iris .ki'.p; .3'.~aThe xcanal14loca Ic-ud sen near it
,ne onc huse brr.' -n $5550,000


~3~ 1 ci


--


liteio


'---


. . -- r p -


-~ 11--3 -- ~ CI LmF-


~----- "~""llr ---~r--~L------


--


TheSta, PrtSt.Joe F hurda, Spte be 7,200 -3C


7Q4 ,rvny(,il nif adsrondn ra fr6 er


II'






4C Th Str Por St Joe FL*TusaSpebr7 06Etbihd13 erigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


Decline in Apalachicola River Levels


Greater than Previously


Thought


The report, "Water-Level
Decline in the Apalachicola
River, Florida, from 1954
to 2004, and Effects on
Floodplain Habitats," is
available at: http://pubs.
water.usas. ov/sir2 006-


plain streams, slou
lakes that are ess
maintain healthy
tions of fishes,
and other aquatic
"Unfortunately,
est drop in wati


5173 has occurred durii
Declines in water levels and summer, whi(
in the Apalachicola River most critical time
in Florida's panhandle for fish reproduct
occurred ovIer the past 50 land tree growth, a
years as a result of erosion other important L
of the river channel and processes," said U
decreased spring and sum- entist Helen Light,
mer flow from upstream, author of the.repoi
according to a report Erosion along
released today by the U.S. bed and banks
Geological Survey (USGS). first, and was ai
these declines are greater caused by cons
than previously thought of a dam at the
and have caused drier con- Florida border
dfitions in wetland habitats and by extensive
in the adjacent river flood- tion improvement,
?lain. Consequently, less straightening, d
water now moves into the and woody-debris
hundreds of miles of flood- al -- during the




Phisshing


ighs, and
sential to
popula-
mussels,
life.
, the larg-
er levels
ng spring
ch is the
of year
ion, wet-
nd many
biological
SGS sci-
the lead
rt.
the river
occurred
apparently
struction
Georgia-
in 1954
naviga-
s -- river
dredging,
remov-
next 2-3


decades.
"Previous studies sug-
gested that declines caused
by channel widening and
deepening were limited pri-
marily to the upper 30 miles
of the river," said Light, "but
we now know that nearly the
entire 86 miles of the non-
tidal Apalachicola River
and floodplain have been
substantially altered by
water-level declines caused
by channel erosion."
Channel erosion stabi-
lized after the late 1970s,
but spring and' summer
water levels continued to
decline in recent decades
because of seasonal
decreases in flow from the
upstream watershed. Less
flow during the spring and
summer is likely caused
by a combination of natu-
ral climatic changes and
a variety of human activi-




Llert:


ties in the Apalachicola-
Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF)
River Basin, including agri-
cultural irrigation, munici-
pal water use, flow regula-
tion, and reservoir evapo-
ration.
The ACF River Basin,
which covers one-quarter of
the state of Georgia, extends
from headwaters in north-
ern Georgia through south-
western Georgia and east-
ern Alabama to the Florida
panhandle, discharging into


the Gulf of Mexico at the
town of Apalachicola. The
area for this study included
the non-tidal portion of the
Apalachicola River from the
Georgia-Florida line down-
stream to the beginning
of the tidal reach about
20 miles upstream from
Apalachicola Bay.
This report is the result
of an interdisciplinary
study by USGS integrating
hydrology, geomorphology,
and biology.


The USGS serves the
nation by providing reli-
able scientific information
to describe and understand
the Earth; minimize loss
of life and property from
natural disasters; manage
water, biological, energy,
and mineral resources; and
enhance and protect our
quality of life.
To receive USGS news
releases go to www.usgs.
gov/public/list server.html
to subscribe.,


J/ '.,P


Emerald Coast Federal Credit Un.io.

embers Urged to Take Precauti on '


We have recently learned
that Emerald Coast Federal
Credit Union is the target
of a phishing scam, and we
Want you to be informed so
you don't become a victim.
Phishing refers to the
use of fraudulent e-mails
and look-alike Web pages
to trick, you in to giving a
crook your personal infor-
mation such as Social
Security numbers, account
numbers, credit or debit
card numbers, PINs, pass-
words. or login informa-
tion. Giving this informa-
hon can result in identity
theft, which can wreak
havoc with your credit
report.
j NOTE: Emerald
Coast Federal Credit Union
does not solicit personal
information by email. The
fraudulent e-mail being
circulated states that it
is from Emerald Coast
Federal Credit Union and
the subject refers to "Online
Banking Notice!" If you
receive an e-mail like this
and it asks you to verify
your account information,
do not give them any infor-
mation. Instead, immedi-
ately delete the e-mail and
contact the Credit Union.
Don't click on any links
within the e-mail message.
Educating our mem-


bers is the best defense
against phishing attacks.
And your best defense is
knowing how to protect,
yourself from becoming a
victim of a phishing scam:
Never respond to or
click on e-mail requests for
personal information, par-
ticularly if you are asked to
verify your account infor-
mation. Phishers copy
logos from financial institu-
tion Web sites and use the
look-alike headers to trick
victims into handing over
personal information a
common tactic of identity
thieves.
Be suspicious of any e-
mail that's not personalized
with your name; valid mes-
sages from Emerald Coast
Federal Credit Union are
personalized.
Be suspicious of any
urgent e-mail request that
claims to be from Emerald
Coast Federal Credit Union
or from any other financial
institution. Phishers typi-
cally include upsetting or
exciting,- but false state-
ments to get you to react
quickly.
* Never click on links
within an e-mail message to
get to a Web page. Instead,
call the company on the'
phone, or log onto the Web
site directly. by typing the.


:company's Web address in
your browser.
If you access your'
accounts online, regularly
log, into those accounts.
Don't ignore your accounts
for as long as a month
before you check them.
Regularly check all
credit union and credit
card statements to make
sure all transactions are
legitimate. If anything looks
suspicious, contact us or
the affected issuer imme-
diately.,
Use anti-virus software
and a firewall, and keep
them up to date. Download
updated security patches.
For example, if you use
Microsoft Internet Explorer,
go to wwwv.microsoft.comrn
security to download a
special patch relating to
certain phishing schemes.
If you ,have any ques-
tions about phishing,. or
about a suspicious e-mail
you receive please contact
April Redmond, Operations
Manager at (850) 227-1156,
toll-free' at 1-877-874-
0007 or send an e-mail to
emeraldcoast(agtcom.net.
We're dedicated to help you
stay safe and protect your
financial resources.


Please visit The Star &


The Times at:

www.starfl.com


www.apalachtimes.com
Also visit our affiliated panhandle


resource guide at:


www.emeraldcoast.com


Advertising is now available on all our websites.
For more information call Katie at. 596-7179 -
Here are a few business now advertising.
with us online. -

^ o tC.0astal ..
CapeSanBlas u 21
Rcalty / Gulf Coast Realty, Inc.


Paradise Pressure Washing, LLC.


* Exterior House Cleansing


* Roof Cleansing


* Decks, Driveways, Walkways


* Mold & Mildew Treatments


,,."I, ,.' t .3"



/,'.- 'C .
/ &.. ,.&:. '' ,S s I.
*,".- ,"'' -* "'.-' ,I'






648-5934
... "-m; pp",:


-


r:


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


4C he ta, PrtSt.Jo, F -Thursday, September 7, 2006


I . .f iI


aw~iSi


m






The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, September 7, 2006 5(


Sometimes 'Educational'


By Jason Alderman
Sometimes the easiest
way to interest your chil-
dren in something is to
turn it into a game wheth-
er it's getting a toddler to
eat breakfast or entertain-
ing a carload of third-grad-
ers. But when the topic is
even remotely "education-
al," you may face additional
.hurdles.
It's no secret that when
kids are interested in a sub-
ject, they'll pay more atten-
tion and probably learn
more. So why not look for
.creative ways to engage
your children in activities
you can do together that
will have long-term payoffs
- like teaching them how to
manage their money and
invest in their future?
Here are a couple of
*suggestions for engaging
your kids in activities that
:are fun, safe and instruc-
'five:
Educational fun and
Games for younger kids.
1MIany family friendly
Web sites feature interac-
ti4e games, projects and
'lrainteasers for children of


all ages. Some are activities
designed for parents and
kids to do together; others
are things they can safely
do by themselves. You'll
find suggestions for ways
kids can earn an allow-
ance, online resources to
help with homework, word
games, suggested read-
ing lists and much more.
Check out the American
Library Association's list of
safe, appropriate Web sites
(www.ala.org/greatsites).
Tap into sports mania.
If your kids go wild for
sports, visit Practical Money
Skills for Life (www.practi-
calmoneyskills.com), a free
personal financial manage-
ment site sponsored by
Visa USA. It features an
online computer game for
teenagers called "Financial
Football," which Visa devel-
oped with the cooperation
of the National Football
League..
Financial Football com-
bines the structure and
rules of the NFL with finan-
cial education questions of
varying difficulty. Playing
against the clock, teams.


* gain yards and score points
for answering questions
correctly, and lose yardage
for wrong answers. You can
play Financial Football with
your kids one-on-one or
by forming teams. See how
you do on these teasers:
1. Why is a dollar
called a buck? (a) first U.S.
currency had a picture of a
deer (b) named after Buck
Linser, first Secretary of the
Treasury (c) pioneers used
deerskins for currency (d)
"bucked" the trend of using
metal currency
2. The highest, loan
.rates usually come from
a: (a) bank (b) pawnshop
(c) credit card company (d)
credit union
3.. What's the easiest
way to fix a budget where
income is less than spend-
ing? (a) reduce spending,(b)
increase income (c) reduce
taxes (d) increase interest
4. The riskiest invest-
ment would be: (a) savings
account (b) U.S. Treasury
bonds (c) corporate stocks
(d) corporate bonds
5. 'Who is NOT allowed
access to your credit report?


(a) potential landlord (b)
your employer (c) financial
institutions (d) your rela-
tives
6. Which is true about
bankruptcy? (a) stays on
your credit report for 10
years (b) gets rid of all
debts (c) protects property
bankruptcy by hiding or
giving it away (d) all taxes
are discharged when you
file
7. Most negative infor-


equals 'Fun'


nation can stay on a credit
report for: (a) 0-5 years (b)
7-10 years (c) 15-20 years
(d) until you retire

Take the time to get
involved in educating
your children: You might
even learn a thing or two.
Speaking of which, here are
the correct quiz answers:
1(c), 2(b), 3(a), 4(c), 5(d),
6(a), 7(b).


Bet you didn't know
about the deerskins.
JasonAlderman directs
the Practical Money Skills
for Life program for Visa
USA. Financial Football
and other games, as well
as other personal finance
tips, can be found at www.
practicalmoneuskills.com.
As always, consult a finan-
cial professional regarding
your particular situation.


Farm To Fuel Summit Attendance Exceeds Expectations


Florida Agriculture
and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles
H. Bronson says the huge
attendance at the Farm to
Fuel Summit in Orlando is
indicative of the great inter-
est in agriculture's leading
role in, the development of
alternative fuels. More than
300 people from 10 states
and Brazil are in Orlando
to participate in the sum-
mit, which is fostering a
.dialogue on how to achieve
the goal of reducing the
,United States' dependence
on foreign oil and expand
the market for Florida's
crops-.
A broad coalition of


industry, academic and gov-
ernment leaders, includ-:
ing federal, state and local
representatives are exam-
ining the opportunities for
Florida to become a lead-
ing alternative fuel prod uc-
er. Currently, most ethanol
production in the United
States is made from corn.
However, new and emerg-
ing technologies -- some of
which are being developed
by Florida universities --
will enable production of
ethanol and other alterna-
tive fuels from many of the
crops grown in Florida.
These technologies will
also facilitate' the' use of
hurricane debris as a" fuel


source.
"I have long believed
that Florida agriculture
could play a major part
in meeting our nation's
fuel supply," Bronson said.
"Clearly, the overwhelm-
ing number of people who
have come to this summit
because they believe it as
well and want to do what is
necessary to achieve these
goals."
Dr. Gale Buchanan, U.S.
:Department of Agriculture
Under Secretary for
Research, Education and
Economics, told the crowd
he believes biofuel devel-
opment from agriculture
will impact the agriculture


industry more than any
other development over the
past 150 years..
Speakers .at the two-
day summit include rep-
resentatives from the U.S
Department of Energy,
USDA, University .of
Florida, General Motors,
the-petroleum industry and
agriculture. They all agree
that the potential for alter-
native fuel development in
Florida is unlimited.
Bronson is encourag-
ing participants to build
upon the new relationships
the summit is establish-


ini among all these diverse
entities.
"I am pleased to bring
together the various seg-
ments that will make this a
reality, providing a renew-
able source of energy from
Florida grown products,
giving farmers an addition-
al use for their crops and
providing economic devel-
opment opportunities."
The summit will con-
tinue through noon on
Friday. September l, at
the Omnni Orlando Hotel
at ChampionsGate. The
media is invited to attend.


Fresh





For more information and
a view the agenda. visit
http:.-'www.florida-agricul-
ture.com.farmtofuel sum-
mit.hltm.


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in paradise with

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STEP OUT


in style

Story and photos by
CINDY McNATT / Freedom
News Service

There are several reasons
you may want to spend a week-
end or two constructing stone
steps, such as I did with the
help of my husband, Vic, and
our friend Dan Eckle.
Stone steps are inviting.
They tame a gradual slope,
add structural interest and call
attention to grade changes.
But you won't want to
install your steps just any-
where. Because they serve as
a focal point, and garden visi-
tors often stop at them to have
a look around, make sure that
your steps lead to something


With a weekend or two of work,
you can add attractive functional
stone steps to your landscape

interesting.
In my back yard, natu-
ral stone steps serve as a
transition point between the
green and groomed area of
our landscape and the less
orderly vegetable and butterfly
garden. Choose any material
that appeals to your sense of
design.
More than anything,
though, steps must be safe.
Our brains are grooved to
expect a certain preciseness
in each footstep. Fiddle with
the math too much, the height
of the risers and the depth of
the treads, and your garden
visitors might stumble. Come
up with a formula that is con-


Sizing for steps
Landscape steps should enhance a leisurely stroll
through the garden. To slow down traffic you will
want fairly low risers and a deep tread. Here's how
to figure out how many steps to safely and
comfortably include in your slope:
Measure the vertical rise Determine the
between the top of the slope slope height by
using a level set
STape Carpenterleon a 2" by 4".
y Carpenter's (eve 2' X 4"
1r| [1 board .
J


v .



... .. .. .
Divide The vertical rise height by the
number of risers You will want to
experiment with 5, 6 and 7-inch risers
.............. .. .. to figure out what size riser best fiTS
your slope
Lets say 6-inch risers divide equally into
the height of your slope. To find out what --
size tread to plan for garden steps make -
the total equal 27 inches. r,-:r i r *
Here is the formula: 15 irea
Multiply a 6-inch riser by 2 to eqjal 12. > -
Subtract 12 from 27 to arrive at 15
Each riser will be 6-inches each. eacr, :-
tread will be 15-inches deep to equ l -
a total of 27 inches for each step .- ... .
A 7-inch riser would require a 1" .
13-inch tread: (7 x 2 = 14). 14 -
plus 13 equals 27. A 5-inch .
riser would require a 17-inch trea
(5 x 2 = 10). 10 plus 17 equals 27.
Source: "Hillside L s,-,,i ,: B i,-', c '.u, -ii Molly Zisk / Freedom News Service


sistent with the entire flight of
stairs. (See diagram)
If you have a very steep
grade or dangerous hillside,
you are better off hiring a
contractor. Because our steps
were planned for a slight
grade, and are more ornamen-
tal than functional, we decided
to build them ourselves.
We built these steps in
two weekends. We decided to
skip the mortar and use 4-
inch-thick flagstones so they
wouldn't wobble. It turned
out to be a tradeoff in labor
because each stone took two
people to place. Here is how
we did it.
STEP ONE
To get ideas for a design,
follow our lead and collect
books and magazines with
photo examples of appealing
steps. Once we had the design
in mind, we went straight to
the math. (To find out how to
measure the area and plan the
risers and treads, see graph-
ic.)
Brain-saving tip: Enlist
the help of a math wiz like our
friend Dan.
STEP TWO
We shopped for stone.
When you know the total area
you want to cover, the size
and length of your risers and
treads, and have chosen a
stone that you like, the sales-
man will determine how much
you need. While you shop,
don't hesitate to pepper these
experts with construction
questions. Stones are sold
by the pound. We chose flag-
stones that we could set firmly
on a 4-inch base without using
mortar.
Back-saving tip: Have your
stone and base (we used sand)
delivered as close to your con-
struction site as possible. You
want to lift each stone only
once, or twice at the most.
STEP THREE
Steps are built from the
bottom up with the front lip
of the riser resting firmly on
the step below it. This con-
struction detail is critical for
strength.
The first tier of treads
should be level with the sur-
rounding soil. We excavated
the soil to eight inches deep,
added about four inches of
sand and set the first tier in
place. We worked with a level
and a bucket of sand to make


PUBLIC SERVICE NOTICE
The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners would like to remind
property owners that there is,a filing deadline, per Florida Statute Chap-
ter 194.032, of September 11, 2006 for any property owner who would
like to petition a hearing on their property assessments for 2006.
The Board suggests that before a property owner files a petition, contact
the property appraiser to try to work out a solution. More information
may be obtained from the Property Appraiser, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr.,
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, (850) 229-6115.
For the information of the public, the Board is providing the chart of pro-
posed millage rates for the 33 small counties (counties with a population
of 75,000 or less) in Florida.


2005
Population

7,581
7,971


County

Liberty
Lafayette


2005-06
Operating,
Millage

10.0000
10.0000


2006-07
Proposed
Millage


10,729 Glades 10.0000 ?
13,945 Calhoun 10.0000
14,233 Jefferson 10.0000
14,315 Hamilton 10.0000
15,046 Union 10.0000 ^
15,377 Dixie 10.0000 ,
16,221 Gilchrist 10.0000 i
19,157 Holmes 10.0000 i
19,696 Madison 10.0000 -i
47,713 Gadsden 10.0000 I
38,174 Suwannee 9.7000 I


23,097


Washington


9.5000


28,118 Bradford 9.5000 6g-udr &',-9-.7000'Q
73,764 Putnam 9.2000 tPAdi~,.i : ;^ 9,2000
37,985 Levy 9.0000
23,953 Baker 8.8299
38,376 Hendry 8.7500 ...9..0000
61,466 Columbia 8.7260 IT.Colbiai .8.7260'i .
27,333 Hardee 8.7064 Washington 8.5000
49,691 Jackson 8.3439 Baker 8.4599
26,867 Wakulla 8.2500 jc. d ; 8.3439
32,606 DeSoto 8.1000 iif.j-:: -48.0760 .
21,310 Taylor 8.0760 DeSoto 8.0500
74,052 Sumter 7.7675 Sumter 6.4410
37,765 Okeechobee 7.1000 .i6 : 6.-2 :
65.759 Nassau 6.4321 Okeechobee 5.8468
f- 5,Q509,52j -- Gulf 4.7709
53,525 Walton 4.3302 Walton 4.2600
10,845 Franklin 4.0504 .. ',,4.05 4:'

S.: Decreased Proposed Millage for 2006-07
increased Proposed Millage for 2006-07
No Chanae in Prooosed Millaae for 2006-07


Publish August 31, 2006 & September 7, 2006


Ad #2006-100


adjustments, making sure
each stone was level with the
one next to it. When the entire
tier was level, we backfilled
with sand and went to the next
level.
Back-saving tip: Some
books will instruct you to exca-
vate deeper than eight inches.
You want to dig very deep
in areas where the ground
freezes, but in warm-weather
climates this is not necessary.
Consider the thickness of your
stone, allow room for your
base and dig only as deeply
as you need to set the stone
securely into the ground.
STEP FOUR
With the first tier laid in
place, we determined how
much soil to excavate for
the next tier, allowing for the
thickness of the stone and the
4-inch base. We laid the riser
stones to sit on the back lip
of the first tier of treads. We
added a second layer of risers
to achieve a total of six inches.
Because the risers turned out
to be wobbly, we decided to
mortar the bottom and top
layer in place using concrete
mix.
The rest of the tread area
was laid loosely in sand. To
prevent wobbles in the loose-
ly laid areas, we used small
stones from the pile as shims.
Again we made sure that
each stone was level with the
stone next to it. We backfilled
between the stones and began
the third tier.
Back-saving tip: Be the
one to run out for sandwiches
and sodas.


STEP FIVE
Because our stairs lead
to the lawn, we built our third
and last riser using mortar for
strength. The height of this
riser is 6 inches, consistent

with the first riser. There is no
tread area on the top tier.


I ordered 8
of sod to bring
around the top
tier of the riser.
I also planted
tiny crocus
bulbs, sedums,
veronica and
other ground-
hugging plants
between the
stones, even
though the
mow-and-blow
crew weed-
whack them
out.
Time-sav-
ing tip: Adjust
the sprinklers
to water your
stairs so you
won't have to
drag out the
hose.

LEARN
MORE
Step -by-,
step instruc-
tions can be
found in these
books. Order
at your local
bookstore or
go to www.
amazon.com:
"Garden
Stone" by


Barbara Pleasant (Storey
Books, $19.95)
"Stone in the Garden"
by Gordon Hayward (Norton
Press, $39.95)
"Landscaping for
Dummies" by Philip Giroux
(IDG Books, $16.99)


square feet
the lawn up


Sizing for steps
Landscape steps should enhance a leisurely stroll through the
garden. To slow down traffic you will want fairik low risers and
a deep tread. Here's how to hgure out hov, many steps to safety
and comfortably include in your slope:


Measure the vertical rise between
the top of the stope and the bottom.
Tape Carpenter's level
3.- K- U


Determine the slope
height by using a level
set on a 2 by 4".

- -i L.j n.


* d i i ,, i .,,,,- ,u -
-,,- to figure out what size
riser best fits your slope.


Lets say 6-inch risers divide equally into the
height of your slope. To find out what size
tread to plan for garden steps make the WttA
equal 27 inches.
Here Is the formula:
Multiply a 6-inch riser by 2 to equal 12.
Subtract 12 from 27 to arrive at 15.
Each riser will be 6-inches each, each t .
will be 15-inches deep to equal a total c i
27 inches for each step.
A 7-inch riser will require a 13-inch
tread: (7 x 2 = 14).14 plus 13 equals 27. ,
A 5-inch riser will require a 17-inch trea.1
(5 x 2 = 10). 10 plus I 1 equals 27.
Source: "Hillside Landscaping" by Sunset


Molly Zisk/The Register


--
7k -T, l 1-

"WNW0-1 W-


7 J. a.


PUBLIC NOTICE

Gulf County will hold a public meeting on September 7, 2006 at
5:30 p.m. EST. The sole purpose of this meeting will be to discuss
the County's application for a grant under the Florida Recreation
Development Assistance Program (FRDAP) during the 2007-08
funding cycle. The applications are due September 15, 2006. The
grant application includes improvements to the "Highland View/
Donnie Wayne Brake Park."

Gulf County will hold the meeting in the County Commission
Chambers which are located in the Robert Moore Administration
Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The
public is encouragedto attend. Individuals with disabilities wishing
to attend, who will need special accommodations, should contact
Lynn Stephens, Administration, Gulf County at (850) 229-6106.

Publish August 31 & September 7, 2006 Ad #2006-099






6..


Wayne Rowlett, Realtor


A TAXING
SITUATION!

No one likes thinking about
taxes, but when you do, you
probably don't think about
real estate agents. But they're
thinking about taxes and their
effect on buyers and sellers.
Most agents can't offer tax ad-
vice, but they are very attentive
to local and national develop-
ments that could positively or
adversely influence real estate
transactions.

You may not be buying or sell-
ing right now, but you should
be aware of the implications
of new tax legislation that
could possibly be enacted dur-
ing George W. Bush's second
term. -

President Bush wants to make
his tax cuts permanent and
he is pushing for tax simpli-
fication. That usually means


Real Estaie Lifesniles, LLC
bnnminea the old concepts of a
flat tax" or naUonal sales tax"
out of the closet for consider-
atLon again.

It's impossible to say if either
of those scenarios will play
out, but we should keep our
eye on popular tax deductions
like mortgage interest. Bush
clearly supports keeping that
deduction, but anything can
happen when the tax code is
rewritten.

Although it's unlikely, the pas-
sage of a national sales tax
could translate into taxation of
rent payments or on the sale
of real estate. This is why it's
important for you and for me
to educate ourselves and let
our local, state, and national
representatives know where
we stand. A little knowledge
could save you a lot of money!


Thinking of selling? Call
for a free consultation.
Wayne Rowlett of Real Estate
Lifestyles, LLC, 2476 CR 30
A, Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(850) 229-5400 wr@gtcom.net
real-estate-lifestyles.com


STEP THIS WAY: Two week-
ends' work created the stone
steps, above. The deep treads
invite visitors to pause and
enjoy. Right, 4-inch-thick flag-
stones were chosen because
they usually can be placed with-
out mortar. Below, Dan Eckle
uses spray paint to mark the
step placement. Bottom, Eckle
digs to ensure first treads will be
level with surrounding soil.


. Z.41"Xw -k I


- --bL -- ? :6.i


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


TheSta, ortSt.Jo, F -Thursday, September 7, 2006


I,








Fatahlished 7937 Servina Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, September 7, 2006 7C


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO: 05-239DR

JOHN A. WEILAND, Petitioner
and
JACQUELYN GAYLE WEILAND,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: JACQUELYN GAYLE
WEILAND,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action has been filed against
you and that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on John
Arthur Weiland whose address
is 2817 Indian Pass Rd., Port
St. Joe, FL 32456 on or before
9/14/06, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court
at 1000 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456, before
service on Petitioner or immedi-
ately thereafter. If you fail to
do so, default may be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the Clerk
of the Circuit Court's office. You
may review these documents
upon request.
You must keep the Clerk
of the Court's office notified
of any current address. (You
must file Notice of Current
Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanc-
tions, including dismissal or


striking of pleadings. Dated THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
8/2/06. THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
Clerk of Circuit Court. AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
By Jasmine Hysmith, Deputy OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
Clerk. ON THEM.
Pubish: August 10 through All other creditors of the
September 14 decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, estate of the decedent must file
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL their claims with this Court
CIRCUIT WITHIN THREE MONTHS
OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, AFTER THE DATE OF THE
IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY. FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
CASE NO. 06-61 PR ALL CLAIMS AND
IN PROBATE DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
IN RE: The Estate of BE FOREVER BARRED.
ALICE HODGES CORE, The date of the first publi-
deceased. cation of this Notice is August
/ 31, 2006

NOTICE TO CREDITORS /s/Thomas S. Gibson
THOMAS S. GIBSON
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING RISH, GIBSON, SCHOLZ &
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS GROOM, P.A.
AGAINST THE ABOVE 116 Sailor's Cove Drive
ESTATE: P. 0. Box 39
Port St. Joe, Florida 32457
The administration of (850) 229-8211
the estate of ALICE HODGES ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
CORE, deceased, File Number REPRESENTATIVE
06-61 PR FL BAR NO. 0350583
is pending in the Circuit
Court for Gulf County, Florida, /s/ George Y. Core
Probate Division, the address GEORGE Y. CORE
of which is Gulf County 202 8th Street
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Port St. Joe, FL 32456
Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Joe, FL 32456. The name and Publish August 31, &
address of the personal rep- September 7 2006
resentative and that personal
representative's attorney are set IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN
forth below. AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS FLORIDA
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent IN RE: The estate of
and other persons having claims Case No.: 06-63 PR
or demands, against decedent's RAY ELLISON STRIPLING, SR.,
estate on whom a copy of this IN PROBATE
notice is served within three Deceased.
months after the date of the first
publication of this notice must NOTICE TO CREDITORS
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF CLAIMS OR DEMANDS


AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:

The administration of the
estate of Ray Ellison Stripling,
Sr., deceased, File Number
06-63-PR, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Gulf County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456. The names and
addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and that personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is served within three
months after the date of the first
publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent must file
their claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND
DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publica-
tion of this Notice is August
31, 2006.

S/Paul W. Groom II
PAUL W. GROOM II
RISH, GIBSON, SCHOLZ &
GROOM, P.A.
116 Sailor's Cove Drive


P. 0. Box 39
Port St. Joe, Florida 32457
(850) 229-8211
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
FL BAR NO. 0037915

S/Cynthia S. Traylor
Cynthia S. Traylor
1004 Old Dairy Farm Road
Wewahitchka, Florida 32465
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Publish August 31 & September
7, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF
NELSON GREGORY WOODFile
No.: 06-66PR
Deceased.
/
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of Nelson Gregory Wood,
deceased, whose date of death
was July 8, 2006, is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for
Gulf County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
1000 Cecil Costin, Sr. Blvd. Port
St. Joe, FL 32456. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
'or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their


claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this notice is September
7, 2006.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Ginger Golson Florida Bar No.
16032
Attorney for William J. Wood,
Jr.
Mel Magidson, Jr. PA
528 Sixth St.
P.O. Box 340
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Telephone: (850) 227-7800

Personal Representative:
William J. Wood, Jr.
204 19th St.
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Publish September 7 & 14,
2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDAPROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF

BRANDON JAMES BROGDON
File No.: 06-67PR
Deceased.
/
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of
the estate of Brandon James
Brogdon, deceased, whose date
of death was June 28, 2006, is


pending in the Circuit Court for
Gulf County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 1000 Cecil Costin, Sr. Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA
PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO
(2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this notice is September
7, 2006.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Ginger Golson Florida Bar No.
16032
Attorney for Dianne E. Brogdon
Mel Magidson, Jr. PA
528 Sixth St.
P.O. Box 340
Port St. Joe, Florida
32456Telephone: (850) 227-


Personal Representative:
Dianne E. Brogdon
205 13th St.
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Publish September 7 & 14,
2006

PUBLIC NOTICE
The Port St. Joe Port
Authority will hold a meeting on
Monday, September 11, 2006,
at 5:00 p.m., E.D.T., at the Law
Office of Rish, Gibson, Scholz
& Groom, P.A., in the East
Conference Room, 116 Sailor's
Cove Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida.
All who wish may attend and
be heard.
If any person decides to
appeal any decision made with
respect to any matter consid-
ered at the meeting, he or she
will need a record of the pro-
ceedings, and, for such pur-
pose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which
record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
Publish September 7, 2006

PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given
that Bayou Storage, pursuant
to FS83.806 will dispose of or
offer for sell after September 22,
2006, the miscellaneous items
belonging to the following ten-
ant: Sheppard Gonzalez. Units
#214/308. Unit contents may
be redeemed by owner prior to
September 22, 2006 for cash
only.
Publish September 7 & 14,
2006


Gulf C unty Boa rd








Commission Meeti


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
JUNE 22, 2006
SPECIAL MEETING


The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners met
this date in special session
with the following members
present: Chairman Carmen L.
McLemore, Vice Chairman Bill
Williams, and Commissioners
Billy E. Traylor, Nathan Peters,
Jr. and Jerry W. Barnes.
Others present were: Coun-
ty Attorney Timothy McFarland,
Deputy Clerk Kari Summers,
Clerk Finance Officer Carla
Hand, Chief Administrator Don
Butler, Administrator Staff As-
sistant Lynn Stephens, E.D.C.
Director Alan McNair, Grant
Writer Loretta Costin, Mainte-
nance Superintendent Steve
Mork, Assistant Road Depart-
ment Superintendent Chris
Wood, Solid Waste Director Joe-
Danford, and Veterans Service
'Officer James Kennedy.

Chairman McLemore called
the meeting to order at 9:00
a.m., E.T.

LANDFILL

Chief Administrator But-
ler reported that funds have
been included in the proposed
budget for Solid Waste to pur-
chase a used trash compactor.
He stated that a used compac-
tor would cost approximately
$165,000.00, and a new com-
pactor would cost approximately
$290,000.00. Chief Administra-
tor Butler further stated that the
landfill costs are increasing this
year, and purchasing the com-
pactor would expand the "life" of
the landfill area.
Chief Administrator Butler
discussed that limited main-
tJenance has been performed
on Secluded Dunes Drive (the
County hauled lime), and in
exchange for hauling water to
Secluded Dunes Drive and Wil-
lis Landing Road for the County,
G.A.C. was allowed to unload
some materials at the landfill
for a flat rate. He also reported
that this project is complete at
this time. Upon inquiry by Com-
missioner Peters, Chief Admin-
istrator Butler stated that this
is a road that the Board agreed
to perform limited maintenance
,on. Commissioner Peters stated
that he is opposed to doing proj-
ects like this.

ROAD BOND

City of Port St. Joe Attorney
Billy Joe Rish appeared before
the Board and reported that the
City voted to join the County on'
refinancing the road bond issue.
CountyAttorney McFarland stat-
ed that the City of Wewahitchka
heeds to, be contacted regarding
this matter, and that he needs
to know if the Board would like
to' proceed on this issue. Mr.
Rish stated that the bond would
be $8.9 million for 25 years, and
would allow the City of Port St.
Joe to bid with the County or bid
their own projects. After further
discussion, Commissioner Tray-
lor motioned to proceed with
refinancing the road bond, and
Commissioner Williams second-
ed the motion. County Attorney
McFarland stated that the City's
portion would be set at twenty-
twvo percent (22%). The motion
then passed unanimously.

DEAD LAKES PARK

Commissioner Traylor dis-
cussed that the County received
. a $200,000.00 grant for the im-
provements at the Dead Lakes
Park. He also stated that the
plans are to bring Dead Lakes
Park back to the original status,
-and this would require clean-
ing out the ponds, but this was
hot included in the grant funds.
'Commissioner Traylor stated
that they are working with
Northwest Florida Water Man-
.agement District to help with


the funding to clean the ponds.
He stated that two ponds will re-
quire a large amount of water to
refill, and that Northwest Florida
Water Management District has
recommended that the water be
pumped from the Dead Lakes.
Commissioner Traylor motioned
to advertise to receive sealed bids
for a pump that can pump 400
- 800 hundred gallons of water
per minute. Commissioner Wil-
liams seconded the motion, and
it passed unanimously.

C.R. 387 S.C.O.P. GRANT

Chief Administrator 'Butier
reported that he has the agree-
ments and a resolution for the
S.C.O.P. Grant Project for the
Howard Creek Road, and recom-
mended that the Chairman sign
and send them back to F.D.O.T.
for execution. County Attorney
McFarland then read. the pro-
posed resolution for resurfacing
or reconstruction of C.R. 387.
Commissioner Peters motioned
to adopt the following resolu-
tion. Commissioner Barnes sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.

RESOLUTION NO. 2006-22

A RESOLUTION OF THE
GULF COUNTY BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
AUTHORIZING THE CHAIRMAN
OF THE BOARD TO ENTER
INTO. A JOINT PARTICIPATION
AGREEMENT WITH THE FLOR-
IDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANS-
PORTATION.

WHEREAS, the Small Coun-
ty Outreach Program has been
created by Section 339.2818,
Florida Statutes, to as assist
small county governments in
resurfacing or reconstruction of
county roads or in construction
of capacity or safety improve-
ments on county roads; and
WHEREAS, the Florida
Department of Transportation
(F.D.O.T.) ,has the authority
under Section 224,044, Florida
Statutes, to enter into an Agree-
ment with Gulf County; and
WHEREAS, Gulf County has
certified to F.D.O.T. that eligibil-
ity requirements have been met
of said Section 339.2818, Flori-'
da Statutes; and
WHEREAS, F.D.O.T. is will-
ing to provide Gulf County with
financial assistance under Fi-
nancial Management Number
41865115801 for costs directly
related to the resurfacing and
safety improvement on C.R. 387
(Doc Whitfield Road) from How-
ard Creek to S.R. 71;
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
RESOLVED by the Gulf County
Board of County Commissioners
that the Chairman of the Board
be authorized to sign the joint
Participation Agreement with
F.D.O.T. for resurfacing C.R.
387 Doc Whitfield Road from
Howard Creek to S.R. 71.
THIS RESOLUTION ADOPT-
ED THE 22ND DAY OF JUNE,
2006.

(End)

GULF COAST COMMUNITY
COLLEGE

Chief Administrator Butler
discussed a letter from G.C.C.C.
requesting support for the col-
lege to apply for E.D.A. grant
funds. Commissioner Peters
motioned to submit a letter
to G.C.C.C. in support of this
funding. Commissioner Barries
seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.

RALPH RISH / "THE
LANDINGS"

Ralph Rish appeared before
the Board to discuss a proposed
30-35 acre development on
the intracoastal waterway out-
side the City limits of Port St.
Joe on the Industrial Road. He
stated that the project calls for
approximately 200 units, and
they have met with staff about


a large-scale amendment to be
submitted to the State. He also
reported that the project would
have a 75-slip marina, 125-150
capacity boat storage, pools,
commercial and retail spaces,
150-seat restaurant, and (of the
200 units 150 would be low
rise condominiums and the re-
maining would be single-family
homes). Upon inquiry by Chair-
man McLemore, Mr. Rish stated
that it Will be a private commu-
nity, but the marina, boat slips
and restaurant will be available
to the public. Upon inquiry by
.Commissioner Traylor, Mr. Rish
stated that it would add ap-
proximately $100 to $120 mil-
lion to the tax roll. Upon inquiry
by Commissioner Williams, Mr.
Rish stated that they appeared
before the City of Port St. Joe,
and it was approved by the City
to provide water and sewer to
this location. Mr. Rish also
stated that he has not requested
for this location to be annexed.
into the City of Port St. Joe. Af-
ter further discussion, Commis-
sioner Williams motioned for the
Board 'to support this project.
Commissioner Traylor seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously.
There being no further busi-
ness, and upon motion by Com-
missioner Traylor, the meeting
did then adjourn at 9:27 a.nm.,
E.T.
CARMEN L. MCLEMORE
CHAIRMAN

ATTEST:
REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
JULY 7, 2006
SPECIAL MEETING


The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners met
this date in special session with
the following members present:
Chairman Carmen L. McLemore,
Vice Chairman Bill Williams,
and Commissioner Nathan Pe-
ters, Jr. E. Traylor and Jerry W. Barnes
were absent>.
Others present were: Coun-
ty Attorney Timothy McFarland,
Clerk Becky Norris, Deputy
Clerk Kari Summers, Chief Ad-
ministrator Don Butler, Grant
Writer Loretta Costin, Human
Resources Director Denise
Manuel, Mosquito Control Di-
rector Mark Cothran, Planner
David Richardson, Veterans'
Service Officer James Kennedy,
and Sheriffs Office Major Joe
Nugent.
Chairman McLemore called
the special meeting to order at
9:37 a.m., E.T.

SPECIAL PROJECTS/BUDGET
AMENDMENT

Commissioner Peters mo-
tioned for each Commissioner to
-pay $500.00 from their special
projects to help fund the "Wall
That Heals" for the Veterans.
Commissioner Williams sec-
onded the motion for discus-
sion. After further discussion,
Commissioner Peters withdrew
his motion, and then motioned,
for the Board to pay $5,000.00
for the "Wall That Heals" for the
Veterans. Commissioner Wil-
liams seconded the motion, and
it passed unanimously (3-0).
Commissioner Peters motioned"
to amend the General Fund bud-
get by reducing Reserves: Cash
Carry Forward in the amount of
$5,000.00, and increasing the
appropriate line item. Commis-
sioner Williams seconded the
motion, and it passed unani-
mously (3-0).
After further discussion, the
Board agreed to table the re-
quest for Special Project funds
from St. Joe Track Club until
the next regular meeting.
Upon motion by Pom-
missioner Williams, second
by Commissioner Peters, and
unanimous (3-0) vote, the Board
approved the following Special


Projects payments: Chairman McLemore dis-
cussed that the County will
Dist. 1 P.S.J. Dixie Youth have approximately $9 million
Boys Baseball 9 & 10 Year Olds to spend for road paving with
Donation $174.00 the new road bond, and the en-
gineers are proposing to charge
Dist. 2 P.S.J. Dixie Youth approximately ten-percent. He
Boys Baseball 9 & 10 Year Olds suggested cutting back on the
Donation $250.00 engineering services and apply-
ing that money to the road pay-
Dist. 3 P.S.J. Dixie Youth ing. Commissioner Peters stated
Boys Baseball -9 & 10 Year Olds that he agrees with Chairman
Donation $326.00 McLemore on this issue. Upon.
inquiry by Commissioner Wil-
Dist. 4 P.S.J. Dixie Youth liams, Michael Hammond of
Boys Baseball 9 & 10 Year Olds Preble-Rish, Inc. appeared be-
Donation $250.00 fore the Board and discussed
Dist. 5 P.S.J. Dixie Youth the different areas for which the
Boys Baseball 9 & 10 Year Olds County could cut back on engi-
Donation $250.00 neering services. Mr. Hammond
stated that they would have to
(End) survey Stone Mill Creek Road
and the Howard- Creek Road.
After further discussion, the After further discussion, Chair-
Board agreed to table the re- man McLemore suggested that a
quest for Special Project funds Board representative meet with
from Team North Florida until Preble-Rish, Irnc on the road
the next regular Board meeting. paving issues, and bring infor-
Commissioner Williams mation back to the Board. Comn-
then motioned for each Corn- missioner Williams suggested
missioner to donate $500.00 to that Chief Administrator Butler
the Dixie Youth Girls Softball and County Attorney McFar-
(10, 12 & 14 year olds) to be land meet with Mr. Hammond
split between the three teams. to discuss the different projects
Chairman McLemnore passed for road paving. Upon inquiry by
the Chair to Vice Chairman Wil- Chairman McLemore, Chief Ad-
liams, and seconded the mo- ministrator Butler discussed the
tion. The motion then passed possibility of the Board hiring a
2-1, with Commissioner Peters professional engineer for the
voting no. Chairman Williams County. Chairman McLemore
returned the Chair to Commis- discussed budgeting funds to
sioner McLemore. hire a professional engineer dur-
ing the budget session. Planner
Dist. 2 Richardson stated that S.B. 360
P.S.J. Dixie Youth Girls Soft- will require the County to sup-
ball Donation port infrastructure going to the
$500.00 schools, which includes trans-
portation.
Dist. 3 There being no further busi-
P.S.J. : Dixie Youth Girls Soft- ness, the workshop did then ad-
ball Donation journ at 9:37 a.m., E.T.
$1,000.00
CARMEN L. MCLEMORE
Dist. 4 CHAIRMAN
P.S.J. Dixie Youth Girls Soft-
ball Donation ATTEST:
$500.00 REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK
Dist. 5
P.S.J. Dixie Youth Girls Soft- PORT ST. JOE,.FLORIDA
ball Donation JULY 11, 2006
$500.00 REGULAR MEETING

(End) The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners met
Chairman McLemore dis- this date in regular session
cussed the increase in special with the following members'
projects requests, and suggested present: Chairman Carmen L.
that the Board either increase McLemore, Vice Chairman Bill
the special projects funds or Williams, and Commissioners
discontinue the special projects Billy E. Traylor, Nathan Peters,
program. Jr., and Jerry W. Barnes.
There being no further busi- Others present were: Coun-
ness, and upon motion by Corn- ty Attorney Timothy McFarland,
missioner Peters, the meeting Clerk Executive Administrator
did then adjourn at 9:52 a.m., Towan Kopinsky, Deputy Clerk
E.T. Kari Summers, Chief Adminis-
CARMEN L. MCLEMORE trator Don Butler, Administra-
CHAIRMAN tor Staff Assistant Lynn Ste-
ATTEST:. phens, Interim Building Official
REBECCA L. NORRIS Lee Colinsworth, Code Enforce-
CLERK ment Officer April Hicks, Exten-
sion Agent Roy Lee Carter, G.I.S.
PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA Director Larry Davis, Grant
JULY 7, 2006 Writer Loretta Costin, Human
WORKSHOP Resources Director Denise Man-
uel, Planner David Richardson,
The Gulf County Board of Assistant Planner Jayce Sellers,
County Commissioners met this Solid Waste Director Joe Dan-
date in workshop session with ford, T.D.C. Director Paula Pick-
the following members present: ett, and Sheriffs Office Major
Chairman Carmen L. McLemore, Joe Nugent.
Vice Chairman Bill Williams, Chairman McLemore called
and Commissioner Nathan Pe- the meeting to order at 6:00
ters, Jr. E. Traylor and Jerry W. Barnes Commissioner Barnes
were absent>. opened the meeting-with prayer,
Others present were: Coun- and Major Nugent led the Pledge
ty Attorney Timothy McFarland, of Allegiance to the Flag.
Clerk Becky Norris, Deputy
Clerk Kari Summers, Chief Ad- CONSENT AGENDA
ministrator Don Butler, Grant
Writer Loretta Costin, Human Commissioner Traylor mo-
Resources Director Denise tioned to approve the following
Manuel, Mosquito Control Di- Consent Agenda items, based
rector Mark Cothran, Planner on removal of pages 45-48 (item
David Richardson, Veterans' #4), pages 99-100 (item #7) and
Service Officer James Kennedy, page 126 (of item #12). Com-
and Sheriffs Office Major Joe missioner Peters seconded the
Nugent. motion, and it passed unani-
Chairman McLemore called mously.
the workshop to order at 9:15 1. Minutes June 12,
a.m., E.T. 2006 Emergency Meeting
Minutes June 13,
ROAD PAVING 2006 Workshop
Minutes June 13,


2006 Regular Meeting Services $50.00) SMITH
Minutes June 22,


2006 Special Meeting

2. Agreement FL
Div. of Emergency Management
Hazard Analysis (Contract
#07CP-11-02-33-01-XXX)

3. Budget Amendment
(Transfer funds from Road De-
partment to Maintenance De-
partment)

*"DELETE** 4.
Building Fees Waiver St. James
AME Church

5. Inventory Road
Department (Transfer #100-
410, #100-432, #100-530 to the
Maintenance Department)

6. Invoice Agency
for Health 'Care Administra-
tion -' Medicaid (March, 2006
$6,764.71 / April, 2006 *
$22,449.09 to be paid from Ac-
count #52264-34100)
Bay Medical Center *
H.C.R.A. (#0610000253 *
$1,754.08 / #0603100754
$99.96 / #0611500585'
$1,754.08 / #0534700296 *
$877.04 / #0609500625 $
1,400.04 / #0613800366 *
$300.48 .to be paid from Ac-
count #51462-31500)
Carr, Riggs & Ingram, LLC
2005-2006 County Audit (In-
voice #20063653 $2,000.00 to
be paid from Account #21f111-
32000)
County Attorney Timo-
thy McFarland (June, 2006 *
$7,390.00 to be paid from Ac-
count #21314-31100)
Preble-Rish, Inc. Dead
Lakes Project (#64673 *
$1,100.00 to be paid from Ac-
count #26472-31000)
Preble-Rish, Inc. Wil-
lis Landing Road (C.R. 381)
S.C.O.P. Project (#64674 *
$5,151.00 to be paid from Ac-
count #40641-31000)
Preble-Rish, Inc. Mos-
quito Control Building Mod.
(#64675 $4,500.00 to be paid
from Account #42834-62100)
Preble-Rish, Inc. Hon-
eyville Community Center
(#64676 $29,250.00 to be paid
from Account #26472-31000)
Preble-Rish, Inc.
Courthouse Roof (#64677 *
$13,537.50 to be paid from Ac-
count #71012-62100)
Preble-Rish, Inc. Land-
fill Evaluations ,#64698 *
$3,090.00 to be paid from Ac-
count #42634-31000)
Preble-Rish, Inc. E.M.S.
Building (#64699 $8,000.00 to
be paid from Account #51626-
62001)
Prisoner/Inmate Medical
Bills (Gulf County Health De-
partment $1,370.40*$864.02
/ Dr. Robert King $40.00 /
Gregory Grantham, DMD -
$260.00 to be paid from
Account #21111-31400)
Rumberger, Kirk &
Caldwell General Employment
Matters (File #0214-107990 *
Invoice #700763 $5,720.00 *
. to be paid from Account #21111-
31200)

7. Proposal V.M.S.
Grass Cutting Contract for State
Right-of Ways (County will re-
ceive $42,000.00)
**DELETE* Preble-Rish,
Inc. Howard Creek Road (C.R.
387) C.I.G.P. Project (10% of the
construction project cost)
"DELETE- Preble-Rish,
Inc. 2006 Road Bond Paving
Program (Per-
centage of construction costs
as follows: Resurface 5%, New
Construction 7%, Inspection -
3.5%)

8. Purchase Request -
Emergency Management Sam's
Club Credit Card
Beaches Fire Dept.(Request
to obtain quotes for Kitchen
Cabinets)

9. Refunds Build-
ing Permit Fees (Jim Emerson *
$36.00 / Home Depot at Home


10. S.H.I.P. Purchase
Assistance ($11,615.00 Filos,
Villasenor)

11. S.H.I.P. Rehabili-
tation. Assistance ($18,186.70
Davis / $5,000.00 Martin)

12. Special Projects
Payments, as follows:

Dist. 1 Boyer Signs River
Reading Gauge $125.20 '
Tri-State Pest Control &
Insulation Repair Ice 0 Ma-
tic Dalkeith Fire Department
$887.73
Tri-State Pest Control &
Insulation Repair Ice 0 Ma-
tic Dalkeith Fire Department
$135.07

-"DELETE" Dist. 3
C.W. Roberts Asphalt Beacon
Hill Park $1,500.00

Dist. 5 GulfAtlantic Culvert
Company Girls Softball Field
$133.00

(End)

13. Tax Roll Recapitu-
lation 2005

(End)

P.D.R.B. RECOMMENDA-
TIONS JUNE 19, 2006

The Board then addressed
the following recommendations
from the June 19, 2006 meeting
of ,the Planning & Development
Review Board:

PRELIMINARY PLAT
APPROVAL SCARLET'S
PLACE

Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider preliminary plat approval
for D.L. & Betty Owens (Parcel
I.D. #01359-365R & #01359-
370R 10 acres in S35, T3S,
R10W 28 units), County Attor-
ney McFarland read the public
hearing notice and called for
public comment. There being no
public comment, Commissioner
Williams motioned to approve
the preliminary plat of Scarlet's
Place subdivision, subject to all
Federal, State and Local devel-
opment regulations, both stated
and unstated. Commissioner
Barnes seconded the motion,
and it passed unanimously.

TABLE PRELIMINARY PLAT
APPROVAL STOCKARD

Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to
'consider tabling of preliminary
plat approval for Dennis Stock-
ard (Parcel I.D. #04250-OOOR *
1.24 acres in S16, T7S, R11W
3 units), County Attdkney Mc-
Farland read the public hear-
ing notice and called for public
comment. There being no public
comment, Commissioner Peters
motioned to table the prelimi-
nary plat of Dennis Stockard's,
subject to all Federal, State and
Local development regulations,
both stated and unstated. Com-
missioner Traylor seconded the
motion, and it passed unani-
mously.

VARIANCE REQUEST
APPROVAL MCNAIR

Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider a variance request from
Patricia McNair (Parcel I.D.
#06269-065R .5 acres in S19,
T9S, R11W 28 units), County i
Attorney McFarland read the
public hearing notice and called
for public comment. There be-
ing no public comment, Com-
missioner Traylor motioned to
approve a variance allowing per-
mission to encroach into a side
setback. Commissioner Wil-
liams seconded the motion, and
it passed unanimously.


Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to
consider a variance request de-
nial on Gary Smith (Parcel I.D.
#06269-029R .85 acres in S 18,
T9S, R11W), County Attorney
McFarland read the public hear-
ing notice and called for public
comment. There being no public
comment, Commissioner Tray-
lor motioned to deny the vari-
ance request for a minor replat.
Coia mi: tcr,er Baernc seconded
tn. mora.:,nr, anid a| paw.ed unar.-
imously.

LARGE SCALE MAP
AMENDMENT ST. JOHNS
VILLAGE

Pursuant to advertise-
ment to hold a public hearing
to consider a large scale map
amendment for St. Johns Vil-
lage (Parcel I.D. #01368-800R
& #01369-000R S35 & S36,
T3S, R10W .107.52 acres),
County Attorney McFarland
read the public hearing notice
and called for public comment.
There being no public comment,
Commissioner Traylor motioned
to approve this large scale map
amendment changing the land
use from agricultural to residen-
tial low density. Commissioner
Williams seconded the motion,
and it passed unanimously.

LARGE SCALE MAP
. 'AMENDMENT GASKIN

Pursuantto advertisementto
hold a public hearing to consid-'
er a large scale map amendment
for Jerald D. Gaskin (Parcel I.D.
#01570-000R & #01553-OOOR *
811,T4S, R10W 143.54 acres),
County Attorney McFarland
jead the public hearing notice
and called for public comment.
There being no public comment,
Commissioner Peters motioned
to approve this large scale map
amendment changing the land
use from agricultural to residen-
tial low density. Commissioner
Williams seconded the motion,
and it passed 4-0, with Commis-
sioner Traylor abstaining due to
family involvement.

N.R.C.S. EROSION
CONTROL

Chief Administrator Butler
presented amendment #3 to the
N.R.C.S. contract;, which will
delete Deep Siough on Old Bay
City Road and Saul's Creek Road
from the project, and the funds
will be reduced in the amount
$200,000.00. Chief Administra-
tor Butler stated that it will still
include Lockey Lake, Richard
Lake and Paige Branch projects.
Commissioner Peters motioned
to approve this recommenda-
tion. Commissioner Barnes-sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.

BEACH ADVISORY
COMMITTEE
RECOMMENDATIONS

Chief Administrator Butler
then presented the following
recommendations from the St.
Joseph's Peninsula B.A.C.:

BAYSIDE M.S.T.U.

B.A.C. recommends that
the M.S.T.U. for the bayside be
rescinded. County Attorney Mc-
Farland stated that termination
of the Bayside M.S.T.U. would
need to be handled through an
ordinance. Commissioner Tray-
lor motioned to start the process
to rescind the Bayside M.S.T.U.
ordinance. Commissioner
Barnes seconded the motion,
and it passed unanimously.

BEACH RESTORATION


B.A.C. recommends that the
County move forward with the
beach restoration project.

Continued on page 11C


___I____ ___ __ V I I


"cl""d"""""""""~"""l~II-'-





Ot. Ine 3TQar, rol a1. JUe, I iiuraouuy, emo erun /,.' > vv--


Trades


&


Services


DL Drywall

& Painting LLC
Licensed & Insured


David Lee- Owner


Cell(850)258-007 I
Home(850)229-2572


Michael & Anthony "

850-229-6751 850-227-56661


Quality

Paperhanging

Installation Removal Repairs


(850)656-2917
Dennis Sittig


F e-fr rz ^ 7Il7)'11
Major Appliance,
Parts, Repair, Sales
.7 232 Reid Ave
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(850)229-8040
A-as cell 850-527-8086


Coastal & Native'
Landscapes


IRRIGATION
INSTALLATION & REPAIR
OUR SPECIALTY
-: 850-927-4090



^ CARPENTRY
PAINTING "
Home Repair Minor Renovations
Vinyl Siding &t Gutters
Doors Windows
Deck Maintenance
All But 6, LLC Licensed/Insured
Charlie Poliski
850-545-1126 or 697-2668


K Kilgore's
BRICK PAVERS
& TILE

Driveways, Patios, Pooldecks,
Retaining Walls, Stonework &
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Office: (850) 229-1980
Cell: (850) 258-4312
Free Estimates
Where top quality and customer
satisfaction meet!
2890 W. Highway 98 Port St. Joe


THE J. LESTER
COMPANY REAL
ESTATE APPRAISAL &
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A Financial Service Institution
Residential Vacant Land Commercial Appraisals

JAMES E. "JAMIE" LESTER

Real Estate Appraiser & Broker
Master Degree Business Administration
State Certified General Appraiser
License#RZ-2783
Broker License#BK532115
"PROVIDING A QUALITY SERVICE TO A
QUALITY COMMUNITY"
Including Consulting Assignments Market Analysis
Feasibility Studies Finances Investments
Eminent Domain Estates Tax Purposes

850-639-4200
Fax 850-639-9756
Serving Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun,
Liberty, & Jackson Counties Specialty W Y
Assignments State Wide


THE

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Great for Cleaning All Carpet, Upholstery, and
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TRY IT TODAY!

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"Every yard needs d little TLC"

229-6435
We now accept all major credit cards


Free estimates
Weed Round Up
Trimming, Fertilizing


Established 1991
Sprinkler Systems
Installed & Repaired


Licensed and Insured


Landscaping the yard
dreams!
Irrigation design & in
Specializing in br


d of your

istallation
*ick paver


driveways &-
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B;a. cap. CL'r.ntactoi-.
LLC
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All --,:rk done r, l-,c.u- e.
rio 'u bUci i CI Cili .


CARPET AND UPHOLSTRY
STEAM CLEANING & RESTORATION SERVICE
24 Hour Water Extraction IICRC
Certified Technicians Mold and
Mildew Remediation Free-Estimates
* Stain Protection Available

L ,:_L 1' .....i.. -


I nf-Al i n1 n m


OPERATED
IICR
Clean
I


BY MIKE MOCK
IC Certified
ng Specialist
CARPET CLEANING
CERAMIC TILE & GROUT
UPHOLSTERY CLEANING
24 HOUR WATER EXTRACTION
RV'S CARS TRUCKS VANS


I


LICENSED AND INSURED
RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
-HLgOAYFR N APONMT


S-TAR

e 227-1278


ONEAL SANDERS
APPLIANCE REPAIR
SERVICE
Repair all major brands
Home #647-5113
Work #227-5112


DRIESBACH CLEANERS
180 Avenue C
Pick-up and Delivery
850-227-1671


o Shaklee, #1
S eai Lve- Narriton Supplementn
Ind.peei.nt lsbutor Company in the US

Anti Aging Skin Care
Patty & Glenn Waldo Environmentally Safe
850-827-2510 Cleaning Products
www.shaldee.net/PaUyWaldo Air and Water
gpwaldo@gtcom.net Purification


Don Dupree
President
1806 Garrison Ave.
Port St. Joe, Florida
32456


DUPREE'S
Custom Metal Roofs


(850) 527-5144 phone

"Professional Custom Meal Roofs, Reroofs and Shingles"



SUN WGAST
Lawn r Landscaping LLC
"When Quality Counts"
Landscape Design & Installation
Full Lawn Maintenance
Irrigation Installation & Repair
Commercial & Residential
Tractor Work, Rock Driveways, Water Features,
Sod & Palm Trees
Office: (850) 647-2522

Landscape Design &
Consultation Services

Kay Kelley
Florida Certified
Landscape Designer

850-927-4090
Plan It before you Plant It!

ST. JOE
NURSERY & SUPPLY '
706 First Street Port St. Joe f.

227-2112

St Joe Rent-All" .,.. j


iHrdwood Flooring
Decorative Flooring 850-229-7720 offers professional
services for anyone who wants their floor completed
properly and with pride.
Exotic and Domestic wood Flooring
Inlays- Borders and Medallions"
Installation Sanding and Refinishing Repair Custom
National Award winner for best floor in Nation
Largest showroom in the State of Florida
Licensed Insured References
Unmatched Quality and Value for your money
www.decorativeflooring.com


LA


CD Pressure Washing &
Handyman Services
For Free Estimates Call
229-1750 Owner Daniel Griffin
Cell 899-1 684 Manager Cindy Griffin

Rod & Reel Repair
Bluewater Outriggers
Port City Shopping Center
229-1100


KNIGHT'S
TREE SERVICE, INC
*Hazardous Tree Removal
*Tree Trimming Stump Grinding

St. Joe, Florida
850-762-2030 or 850-272-4197
I Affordable, Hometown Quality!







COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL
INIS ULATION DONE RIGHT EVER TIME
FIBERGLASS BATTS BLOWN CELLULOSE WALLS & ATTIC
OFFICE CELL
D-agD 3 (3-as6


Locally
Owned


, ide Residential
Commercial
Termite & Pest
Control
STermite TreatmetilsH. tiRestaurant
SMolel *Flea Controil Condominiums
* Houseiofid Pesi Cotarole ew Trealment
* Real Estate (WDO) Reprls Cosluctlion Sites
Specializing in Vocation Rental Properties
] FAMILY OWNED
PLEASANT& PROFESSIONAL
"Serving the Entire Area"
Free Estimates
Do-It-Yourself Pest Control Products


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HandyMan
You Name It
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850-648-9531
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"Let the Beauty of our God be
upon us & establish the work
of our hands"

(GtUlFlBnrelezze-.
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Isn't it time for an oil change
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NOWUNDR








NEW OWERSHIP





AMERCANSCREE
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C& ", _' M ,?_.



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Specializing in low, maintenance usaps and irrigation,
with a focus on native a snoad /falized iants. We offer \
complete landscape services and our ae's only Florida
. Certified Landscape Designer.
SQOwned-by.Kay-Kelley and Brooks Wade. ,.
o^~--~^ -l*--~~~~ ^''


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Rf Tk. r,+- P-+ r+ 1- F-I Tkiir-rlriv ';Pnfember 7. 2006


t







Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL S THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006 0 9C


=


4~a


ANNOUNCEMENTS


11 0- 17


I 413


0


-


II5 5


. 0II 7


AUTO,MARINE,RV 4


2100o

Dogs & Cats
For Sale?

MERCHANDISE


Toyota Avalon '03
XLS, Hands Free cell-
other extras, 1 owner witi
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& 7th St LH, Value $23,99i
sell price $22,500, no tc
bacco or alcohol ever, Ca
850-265-3430 or 381-420C
or 814-6235





*


Domestic

CHILDCARE
Opening available immedi-
ately for your 2 or 3 year
old child. Registered Fami-
ly Childcare Home. Excel-
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enced teacher. References
._available Call Ms. Debbie
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Quality Child Care in
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asst. Licensed with excel-
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Weekly or biweekly,
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850-639-9298



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S3210 3310 4
Free Manure Compost
available for pickup at 775
Cape San Bias Rd. You
load and haul. Call Professional
227-2584 for directions, if
nrdpd d


F


AN


+ I I .. Blue Grass, Gospel, Old North Florida Child EARN AS YOU
h 3100 -Antiques Time Country. Looking for Development, Inc. LEARN
7 3110-Appliances friends to play music. Eve- LEARN
0 3120 Arts & Crafts O ryone welcomed. C O nin areer!
0 3130 -Auctions 1 850-648-4831 Job Opening England Transport
3140 Baby Items now offers
3150-Building Supplies 32 Family Service On-the-job CDL Training
0 3160 Business Worker No credit check
Equipment Garage Sale WoNo co-signers
3170 Collectibles 111 Heritage Lane Sat. No down payment!
3180: Computers 8am-? baby clothes, furni- NFCD, Inc. is seeking a NoToll-Freent,
There are specific Flori- 3190- Electronics ture and more Family Service Worker for 66-619-6081
da Statutes applicable 3210 Free Pass it nod .. i
toteslefdFreedParinesW eitit y
to the sale of dogs and 3220 Furniture parents seeking child care
cats within the state or 3230- Garage/Yard Sales L services and maintains
transportated into the 3240 Guns.- records of family and chil-
state for the purpose of 3250 Good Things to Eat dren enrolled. Applicant
selling. 3260 Health & Fitness will maintain a client case-
3270 Jewelry/Clothing
Please research Flori- 3280-Machinery/ Healthcare organization and iexcnter-
da Statute 828.29 (Dogs Equipment Ath rgs Needed: EMPLOYMENT personal skills andsuperi-
and cats transported or 3290- Medical Equipment Asthma/Allergies Nnededa Drieoral lsdu er-
offered for sale; health 3300 Miscellaneous People who desire imme- 4100- Help Wanted or written and oral commu- Drivers
requirements; consumer 3310 Musical Instruments diate relief to Field test a 4110- Restaurants/Clubs nication. Establish mutual- Driver Trainees
guarantee) before 3320 Plants & Shrubs/ new Compact state- 4120 Sales/Telemarketing ly respectful partnerships Driver Trainees
you offer for sale a cat Supplies of-the-art home air purifi- 4130 Employment with families to enhance NEEDED NOW!
or dog. 3330 Restaurant/Hotel cation system. No cost or Information the quality of their lives Werner needs entry level
3340 Sporting Goods obligation. Contact Pure and communities. Support semi drivers. No exp. re-
3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell) Air. Effects.. 769-7127 families' efforts to reach quired. Avg $36K 1st yrl
www.freshairliving.com/AP their goals. Offer parents 60% home nightly/weekly.
age pass code: guest' E opportunities to be in- CDL training in your area.
ur^WANlTEMD '}' ^volved in-group activities 1-868-280-5309
and educational activities
2110 COMPUT-ERSL--4 0 based on their interest and
Fre p3180 needs. Support families in
Free Puppy 2 accessing other communi-
Needs a Home. Call for I 3270 ty resources., Assist fami-
more information and de- lies in crisis. Respect and
tails 850-229-8676 Jewelry- respond competently to Drivers
Wedding rings, watches, the culture, traditions,
,l. r tools, fishing gear, tele- Administative lifestyles, language, and USA.
Apple I-Mac \ visions, electronics, values of each family andEADY MI
Desk lamp model. $400 bikes, and much morel Accounting commNowhiring Class A&B
Call850-340-0702 Pawn Sho p 201 W. Roy aMana Rgery Must have an associate CDL Ready Mix drivers.
Vs Pawn Shop 201 W. Manager degree in human service Excellent benefits and
Hwy. 98 in Port St Joe, GT Com, a total communl- field or a high school di- wages. Apply in person
.1 ,; ^ ; ^': Florida850-229-8304 cations company provider ploma with a minimum of 1001CecilCostin Blvd.
in Northwest Florida with two years of successful Port St. Joe, FL
55,000 access lines, is work experience. Custom- 850-229-8858
.. seeking an Accounting er service skills a must. USA EOE
S cT VISav Manager to join their ac- Must maintain strict confi-
r ESWCORc counting staff in Port St. dentiality. Basic computer
L A 3190 ]63300 Joe. Reporting to the Re- literacy, database skills,
eful candidate will be re- d owsbased programs. --

Microwave convection preparation of monthly fi- Inc., Attn Sebrina McGill
Sony 19 color T Sam oven $50, Microwave oven nancial statements in PC Box 38, Wewahitchka, r
playmate sug r Emer-$25, an Upright Vacuum SEC public company envi- FL 32465, 850-639-5080
S n V Co TV cabinet on $15 A Bunn coffee maker ronment. Responsible for *10, fax 850-639-4173 e-
850-785-0016 wheels. Call 850-227-7077 r o5 thea e ren of ncial brinamoheadstartnf.org L- t!
30" gas stove $25. Call practices, procedures and
229-8427 control systems while
teaming with other depart-
^ments for financial perfor-
H adm a Incorrect InsertionPolicy Fmance analysis and budg- Buy it! Applications
FoNlasfideting. Knowledge of inter- Classified, and other
For Classified nalauditing procedures Classified. and other pr es
In-column Advertisers and financial accounting Make your Employmentopl
packages and applications r Empoymtr
All ads placed by phone are read back to the adver- required. Hands on experi- move to the start training! Cla
ence an attention to detail
tiser to insure correctness. Thenewspaper will as- required. Knowledge of medium that' Gulf/Franklin C
Handyman sume correctness at the time of the read-back proce- FCC telephone accounting ur numbe
dure unless otherwise informed methods and practices your number
Port St. Joe Area
Plumbing governing utility reporting
-Electrical requirements preferred one source of CORRECTIONA
Painting Please Position requires a Bache- information Begins Sept.
-Light Framing lord's degree in finance or
*Yard Work V accounting and three to about homes Gr,
six years of related experi-
JOEYBARBEE your ad ence, including at least for sale! A C AS
850-229-6147 one year in an accounting ALL CLASSES a
Leave Message supervisory role. For all your Financialai
Adv ertisers are requested to check tshe adverotise- r T i s- housing needs
ment on the first insertion for correctness. Errors We offer a competitive sal-ckageingcns
should be reported immediately, ary and benefits e p a e Sconsult
The News Herald will not be responsible for more spond in confidence to: Classified m
w than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for Susan Macheer whn it's time Co
.any error in advertisements to a greater extent than Susan Machems r when itcs time
the cost of the space occupied by the error. umanRager to 3L J
StManager to buy,
C PatBushhoggingarr Any copy change, during ordered schedule consti- P 0.Box220 it's the GCCC is an EA/EO instiu
Call Pat & Larry tutes a new ad and new charges. ort St. Joe, FL 32457 it t EOn
@648-6652 Port St. Joe, FIL 32457
SThe News Herald DOES NOT guarantee position of smachemerfairpoint.com resource on
'U S S i ANY ad under any classification. FAX: EoE/MFDV850-229-8689 which to rely.


Bay St. Joseph General
Healthcare
PHAT JOB
Seeking a work place w/ Wanna have fun traveling,
a fun & fair culture? Our and making money? Look-'
120-bed long- term care ing for 18-25 outgoing, fun
facility is seeking indi- loving people 2 weeks.
viduals who have com- pd. training. Return trip
passion for the elderly & guaranteed. Chaz at
enjoy working to fill the 678-994-2633
following positions:
*Registered Nurses General
Cerified Nursing Assts
*Licensed Practical PT help in Pro Shop at St.
Nurses Joseph's i Bay Country"
Club. Retirees, Welcome.
Full-time Call 227-1751 or apply at'
Benefits Include: 700 Country Club Rd. Pt.
Med/Dental/Vision Insur, St. Joe
short/long term disabil-
ity company paid life In-
sur, paid time off, 401K
retirement plan, uniform
allowance, referral bo-
nus, tuition reimburse- Health Care
ment, Shift Differential.
Home Health O.T. /COTA
Please Contact: for Bay and/or Gulf Co.
Carrie Harrison, Director Top $$ Paid. Call 814-8159'
Human Resources
220 9th Street
Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Real Estate
(850) 229-8244 Ext 1.05 Re/Max Southern Realty
Fax: (850) 229-7129 is looking for Licensed
Sales Agents and Adminis-
SELL ALL YOUR trative Assistants for
ITEMS on-site work at the Bare-
foot Cottages. Tremen-
through classified. dous opportunity with im-
-mediate inventory. Call
CALL Brad Shoults at
1-800-879-0309 or fax your
747-5020 resume to 1-850-837-8727

Avon
Earn 50%
Now Only $10 for KIT + Free Gift
Call Cheri Maxwell
850-653-2137










are being taken at Franklin Cl, Gulf Cl,
panhandle correctional institutions.
)portunities are available as soon as you
sses are offered in Port St. Joe through the
enter of Gulf Coast Community College.


L OFFICER BASIC STANDARDS CLASS
14, 2006 from 8 am to 3:45 pm
aduates in December 2006

are Mon-Thurs. 8 am to 5:15 pm
d is available for qualified applicants.


ulf Coast
mmunity College


ution


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Established 1938 0 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006 0 9C


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1160







Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67years


10C THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006


Trades
HVAC Mechanics
& Helpers
(Experienced)
PANAMAA CITY &
MEXICO BEACH AREAS)


$$ HIRING BONUS $$
Top Pay, Excellent Bene-
fits, Vacation/Holiday Pay,
401K.
Keith Lawson Company
Kendall Clark
(850) 527-5439 .f -
KLC is an EOE/AAE/DFWP
Minority Applicants
encourage to apply


S4130

*REMEMBER:*
Ads in this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire an investment or
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend giv-
ing credit' card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.


BUSINESS & FINANCIAL
5100 Business
Opportunities
5110 Money to Lend



| 5100

Gulf County 8COP Liquor
License. Full Liquor &
Package Rare chance to
own Asking $478K obo.
Send replies to: PO Box
1265, Port St. Joe, 32457.
Only Serious Inquires
Only Present inventory in-
cluded- No financing.


| 4130

Clerical
Administrative
Earn $12-$48/hour. Full
benefits. Paid training. Var-
ious Government Positions
Available. Homeland Secu-
rity, Law Enforcement,
Wildlife and more.
Call 7 days
1-800-320-9353, Ext 2139


REAL ESTATE FOR RENT
6100 Business/
Commercial
6110 Apartments
6120 Beach Rentals
6130 Condo/Townhouse
6140 House Rentals
6150 Roommate Wanted
6160- Rooms for Rent
6170- Mobile Home/Lot
6180 Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 Timeshare Rentals
6200 Vacation Rentals


Applications ate being taken at Franklin CI, Gulf Cl,
and other panhandle correctional institutions.
Employment opportunities are available as soon as you
start training! Classes are offered in Port St. Joe through the
Gulf/Franklin Center of Gulf Coast Community College.

CORRECTIONAL OFFICER BASIC STANDARDS CLASS-
Begins Sept. 14, 2006 from 8 am to 3:45 pm
Graduates in December 2006


S 1oo00


*REMEMBER:*
Ads in this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire an investment or
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend giv-
ing credit card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.


ALL CLASSES are Mon-Thurs. 8 am to 5:15 pm
Financial aid is available for qualified applicants.


a5xl0 10x10 10x20

On Site Rentals 6 Days
A Week
ASKABOUT FREE
MONTH'S RENT!


100 0 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2006


I 6100 ]




Commercial Building for
lease with workshop and
office space. Approx.
3300sf. 201 Tarpon St.
Port St. Joe call
850-229-9400



MINI STORAGE

In Port St. Joe

814-7400


BEACH

STORAGE
Day: 227-7200
Night: 647-3882
St. Joe Beach


America's
Mini Storage

(850)
229-8014
Climate and
Non-Climate
Control Storage
Units
Boat/RV storage &
office space








PLUS SMALL ENGINE
REPAIRS
NOW AVAILABLE
Climate Control

St. Joe
Rent-All, Inc.


| 6100 I
CONTRACTOR'S
WAREHOUSE
unit 1250 SF/ office bath-
room 12x12 roll up door,
located at the corner of
Pondarosa Pines & Ruth-
erford in Jones Home-
stead. $650 a month in-
cludes util. 1 year lease
+1 mo. rent dep. 647-2715
after 6pm.

New Metal
Building $1400/month.
2800sf has new office and
bathroom. Call
850-258-6139

Office space, approx
1200sf, $1200mo, located
on Long Ave, Port St Joe,
Some office furnishings
available, 850-229-1450




2 br, 1 ba in Port St. Joe,
CH&A. No pets, $650 +
Utilities and deposit. Call
850-229-1215

Liberty
Manor Apts
is now accepting applica-
tions for 1 br apts. These
units are for person 62
years of age or older,
handicapped/ disabled, re-
gardless of age. Applicants
must meet income require-
ment. located at 102 Liber-
ty Manor Circle, Port St
Joe, FL, 850-229- 6353,
TDD#850-955-8771. This
institution is an Equal Op-
portunity Provider

SMALL 1BR
Efficiency Apt, furnished or
unfurnished in Appala-
chicola. Convenient to
shopping. 850-653-6375



Upstairs 2 br, 1 ba apart-
ment $575/mo. + deposit.
Call 850-648-5052 or
478-983-2206


612o --I




Mexico Beach duplex 2
br, 1.5 ba across from
dedicated beach, unfurn. 1
yr. lease. $1000/mo. pet
allowed. 850-647-8259

Pt. St. Joe Beach: 2 br, 1
ba nicely furnished 150'
from the beach. laundry
room, Gulf view, $950
month. + dep. Some utili-
ties included. Pets OK.
www.freeplotting.com/
beach.htm. 678-643-1285


For more informationcal~lIBenaIurethai27-60,e.5
14r S h r n u r d s a w a 2 7 9 6 0 e t 01


I HELP IS ONLY A


1


To Place V







THErTAR A


9


PHONE CALL



AWAY


our Classified ad


in


the
APALACHIC(

& CARRABEI


Call Our New Numbers Now!


Call:


Toll Free:


Fax:


Email:


Email:


850-747-5020


800-345-8688


850-747-5044


thestar@pcnh.com


thetimes@pcnh.com


| 6130


4 br 2 ba TH with pool lo-
cated in Mexico Beach,
$1200mo, 850-229-8667 or
850-527-7525



Beautifully furnished 3
br, 3 ba TH located in The
Village at Port St. Joe.
Conveniently located near
shopping and schools. All
electric with gas heat. Im-
mediately available at
$1000 per month with one
months rent as deposit. A
must see! Call
850-229-2706 for more in-
formation.
Gulf Aire 3 br, 2 ba no
smoking/pets, approx.
1700sf, garage, 1000ft
from the beach.
$1100/month with lease +
dep. Call 850-866-0071
Mexico Beach 4 br, 2.5 ba
Brand New TH. Upgrades
throughout, community
pool. Call 678-296-9639
Mexico Beach area, Sev-
eral Condos/Townhouses,
furnished & unfurn, Start-
ing at $750mo. Sundance
Realty 850-648-8700



Mexico Beach 305 Fortner
Ave. 1 st block from gulf 3
br, 2 ba w/gulf view from
deck. Living, family & din-
ing rm. Sep. laundry W/D
incl. Lrg fenced yard,
porch & car port. Furn.
$1100mo. Util. not incl. No
pets. Call 772-781-7229 or
772-485-6684
Mexico Beach, Beachside
New 2 br, 3 ba, fully furn'd,
Non smokers, Long term,
$1100 mo. (770) 426-6896
Mexico Beach, Several
homes for rent, furnished
& unfurnished, starting at
$700mo, Call Sundance
Realty 850-648-8700
Overstreet, Beautiful 4 br,
2 ba Home, 1824sf, on 1
acre, $1195 mo.+dep. Call
(310) 755-8118 Iv msg.



Port St. Joe bay view
1810sf 3 br, 2 be. Ig. Flori-
da room, w/d, Fp, fenced
backyard w/ lawn care in-
cluded. 2 car attached gar.
102 Sunset Cir. $1575/mo.
+ dep. 774-6649
Pt. St. Joe Beach: 2 br, 1
ba nicely furnished 150'
from the beach. laundry
room, Gulf view, $950
month. + dep. Some utili-
ties included. Pets OK.
www.freeplotting.com/
beach.htm. 678-643-1285


0) Gulf Coast
CommCiunOitluolege

GCCCisanEA/oinstitution


TIMES


St. Joe Beach, 3 br, 2 ba
across from beach pool,
$1100/mo. + utilities, Call
612-308-4110 or 832-5699.
St. Joe Beach, 3 br, 2 ba,
enclosed garage, gulfview,
beach access, furnished,
$1200 mo., will consider
lease purchase. Call Bob-
bie@ 258-5261.
Waterfront 3 br, 2 ba lo-
cated in the Overstreet
area. Completely renovat-
ed with new kitchen &
bath, Irg back porch, over-
looking intercoastal water-
way. Short drive to the
beach.. Call 648-5865


| 6170


2 br, 2 ba, furnished, with
washer & dryer on 1 acre
in Carrabelle beach.
$700mo./$700 dep 850
697-8440 or 813-546-6987



Furnished 2 br, 1 ba sin-
gle wide trailer for rent.
$500/mo + $500 deposit.
Call 850-648-5306
Mexico Beach 3 br 2 ba
with deck & screen porch.
Less than 1 block to the
beach. Furnished or unfur-
nished, $850mo, Call
Sundance Realty 850-648-
8700
.


7100



3 br, 1 ba corner lot, High-
land view. Call for details
Across street form Park.
229-2919.
Golf Course Home. 3 br,
2 ba w/elevator and FP,
new carpet & ceramic tile.
Split flrpln with Open Great
Room. View of 16th Green.
$329K Call 352-622-7574



House only for Sale! Must
be moved. 5746 Hwy 71 (6
miles N. of PSJ). Approx
1400 sf, 3 br,1 ba,hrdwd
floors, C/A, FP, stove,
refig, W/D. Ducky Johnson
has moving cost info.
$18,000. Call Mary Lou @
850-227-4625

Mexico Beach 4 br, 2 ba
screened in rear porch,
front deck, 2 blocks to
beach. Price reduced
$205K. Call 478-954-2050
New Construction homes
3 br, 2 ba, in Port St. Joe,
Starting low at $200's.
In-house financing availa-
ble. 850-229-2560.
St Joe Beach, 3 br 2 ba, 1
story, pristine, tile & hard-
wood floor, partially fur-
nished, 1/2 block to dedi-
cated beach, Coldwell
Banker, Forgotten Coast,
Claude Brousseau, Owner/
Agent, MLS#111200
$474K, 850-625-6718


Mexico Beach, 1.5yr Old
TH, 4 br 2 ba, w/pool, rent
$1200mo, sale $234,900
850-229-8667 or 527-7525


S7150 .
Cape San Bias quality
bayside lot. .6 acres near
State Park. Price to sell
$175K Call 513-697-1777
MEXICO BEACH LOT,
150x100, 1 block from
beach, waterview, $250K.
OBO Owner Finance
850-596-2057 or 271-1453
'Mexico Beach Lot,
75'x100', walk to beach,
$169K OBO Owner fi-
nance. Motivated Seller
850-596-2057 or 271-1453
St Joe Beach, 2 1/2 lots,
steps to dedicated beach,
$510K, will divide, $10K
buyer rebate, Pelican Walk
Real Estate, 850-647-2473


7160


Nice 3 br MH on Large lot,
short walk to St. Joe
Beach. $225K Call
239-470-2573

/ -~-- \


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
7100 Homes
7110 Beach Home/
Property
7120 Commercial
7130 Condo/Townhouse
7140 -Farms & Ranches
7150 Lots and Acreage
7180 Mobile Homes/Lots
7170 Waterfroht
7180 Investment
Property
7190 Out-of-Town
Real Estate
7200 Timeshare


7100
!!!!Great Deal!!!
3 br 2.5 ba, brick/vinyl,
new Home just built,
2100+sf H/C, 2 car gar,
2/3 of an acre in White
city, w/lots of extras.
$275K, 850-227-4356



2 br 1 ba Port St.Joe. Cor-
ner lot with bay view. RE-
DUCED $215K 850-762-
3252 www.forsalebyowner.
com/20589028


St Joe Beach, Gulfaire, 4
br 2 ba, almost new roof,
AC, water heater, tile floor,
private beach, pool, tennis,
$249,900, Pelican Walk
Real Estate, 850-647-2473




"Barefoot Cottages"-New
Homes next to WindMark
Beach. Community ameni-
ties incl. pools, hot tubs,
playground, sidewalks.
Sellers offering 10% to-
ward closing costs. ,Buy
Now at Preconstruction
Prices and Save!!! 2BR -
$414,900, 3BR $479,900..
Completion expected by
October. Call Diane Peevy,
Port Realty 850-527-2580

CAPE SAN BLAS High
Elevation, Flood insur. not
needed! Beach Erosipn no
problem! 4/4,5 Great Gulf
Viewil Beach Access in
front of house! Like New
Custom Home, lots of up-
grades, nicely furnished.
Energy Efficient, PRICE
REDUCED Don't Miss this,
Fabulous Buy@ $849,900!
owner/agent 850-527-2580


8100 Antique & Collectibles
8110 Cars
8120 Sports Utility Vehicles
8130 Trucks
8140 Vans
8150 Commercial
8160 Motorcycles
8170 Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210 Boats
8220 Personal Watercraft
8230 Sailboats
8240 Boat & Marine
Supplies
8310 Aircraft/Aviation
8320 ATV/Off Road Vehicles
8330 Campers & Trailers
8340 Motorhomes


1 8 6110
To Place An Ad
in The Times
Classifieds
Call
(850) 747-5020
or
1 (800) 345-8688



Chevy Blazer '97 4x4 LT, 4
door, Leather seats, load-
ed, automatic, Tinted win-
dows, Hunter Green in col-
or. $3750 Call 227-9732
evenings.



Sienna Van' 06, $25,100
Take over pmts. $465mo.
Call 832-5699 or
612-308-4110.




Suzuki
600XK '03 very fast, very
nice bike. First $5000
takes it. Call 850-258-6139




Grady White 22' WAC,
200hp Johnson Ocean.
Runner w/ Grady Bracket.
25HP Johnson Kicker, very
low hrs on motor. King Lo-
ran, Raytheon Fish Finder,
VHS, Outriggers, Alum.
Magic Load Trailer, Asking
$15,500 Calt 850-653-8990




BOAT STORAGE
America's Mini Storage|
850-229-8014 or ,
850-258-4691

Dry Boat Storage
FOR RENT! Exclusive
Carrabelle Boat Club.
Safe, state-of-the-art mari-
na. Enjoy The Luxurious
clubhouse and facilities.
30'x10'x10'...$280-$330.
Call Caryn 404-643-6971



I 8330 8
1993 36ft. Fourwinds trail-
er. 2 br queen/bunkbeds,
with slide outs. Great deal
for $5500 or best offer.
Call 850-647-3679



Holiday Rambler Imperial
'96 34' "Wide body" Super
slides (4'x17'), Full kitchen
$17,500 firm. Call
648-8721.




Scottsdale Newmar '05
with 3 slide outs, oak interi-
or, gas model, has 4800
miles. Must sell! $96K Call
850-767-5981


,


Raw


I Part St. Joe, Florida 32456 1


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Fstai-jieI-,r7 937 -* rvinn (Gulf county rand surrounding areas for 68 years


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, September 7, 2006 I* 1(


GULF COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD
August 15, 2006
The Gulf County School
Board met in regular session
on August 15, 2006, at 10:00
A.M., E. T., at the Port St. Joe
-High School Media Center. The
following Board members were
present: Chairman Charlotte
Pierce, Vice-Chairman Billy
C. Quinn, Jr., George M. Cox,
Danny Little and Linda Wood.
Superintendent Tim Wilder and
Board Attorney Charles Costin
were also present.
I HEAR FROM PUB-
L IC: None

II. ADOPTION OF
AGENDA: On motion by Mr.
Cox and seconded by Mrs. Wood
the Board voted unanimously to
adopt the amended agenda to
.include the addition of pages 4a-
.g, 8c, 177a-f, page 24 of the fi-
nancial packet, removal of page
8, and replacement of pages 40,


41 and 56.

III. CONSENT ITEMS:
On motion by Mr. Little and sec-
onded by Mr. Quinn the Board
voted unanimously to take ac-
tion on the following:
Approved August 7, 2006,
Minutes.
Personnel:Approved
resignation letter from Laurie
Leonard from her Finance posi-
tion at the district office effective
September 1, 2006.Approved
leave of absence request from
Lena Weeks effective August 8,
2006. This leave is related to a
workers' compensation injury.
Approved recommendation to
temporarily assign Diana Dykes
to alternative transportation
duties effective immediately.Ap-
proved Ashley Woodson to fill
the Speech/Language position
in the Wewahitchka area for
school year 2006-2007 pending
successful completion of all pre-
employment qualifications.Ap-


proved Judith Owens to fill the
advertised aide position at Port
St. Joe Elementary School effec-
tive immediately.Approved John
Palmer to receive the Principal
Designee supplement at Port St.
Joe High School for school year
2006-2007.Approved Raymond
Atchison to be paid at an hourly
rate of $12.72 for school year
2006-2007. Mr. Atchison su-
pervises the inmate work crews.
Approved an additional hour per
day for Guidance Office Secre-
tary Stephanie Newsome at Port
St. Joe High School effective
August, 2006.Approved the fol-
lowing School Food Service sub-
stitutes: Donna Raker (Port St.
Joe area), and Treasure Waites
(Wewahitchka area).Approved
Mike Evans as a substitute
teacher.
Student Matters:Approved
the request of a Calhoun County
parent for their child to attend
Wewahitchka High School dur-
ing school year 2006-2007. Cal-


houn County School District has
approved this request.Approved
the request from a Bay County
parent for their three children
to attend school in Gulf County
for school year 2006-2007. Bay
County School District has ap-
proved this request.
Proposed Dates:
Approved the following dates
for school year 2006-2007:
Port St. Joe High School
Wewahitchka High School-
Homecoming:
September 29
October 13
Prom: April 21
March 31
Last Day for Seniors:
May 11 (Fri.)
May 11 (Fri.)Baccalaureate:
May 20 (Sun.) 6:00 P. M., E. T.
May 16 (Wed.) 7:00 P. M., C.
T.Graduation:
May 21 (Mon.) 7:00 P. M., E. T.
May 19 (Sat.) 7:00 P. M., C. T.

Correspondence:Acknowl-


edged thank you note from Ann
Six for the Gideon Bibles donat-
ed in memory of her father.

IV. CONTRACTORPRE-
QUALIFICATION MATTERS: On
motion by Mr. Quinn and sec-
onded by Mrs. Wood the Board
voted unanimously to approve
the pre-qualification packet
submitted by Fisher's Construc-
tion of Wewahitchka, Florida,
for school year 2006-2007.


V. SALARY SCHED-
ULES: On motion by Mr. Cox
and seconded by Mrs. Wood the
Board voted unanimously to
approve the 2006-2007 Salary
Schedules.

VI. ANNUAL FINAN-
CIAL STATEMENTS: On motion
by Mr. Quinn and seconded by
Mr. Little the Board voted unan-
imously to approve the Annual
Financial Report for the School


Year Ended June 30, 2006.


VII. SCHOOL IM-
PROVEMENT PLANS: On mo-
tion by Mrs. Wood and seconded
by Mr. Cox the Board voted
unanimously to approve 2006-
2007 School Improvement Plans
for Port St. Joe Middle School,
Wewahitchka Elementary
School and Wewahitchka Middle
School.

VIII. PROGRAM MAT-
TERS: On motion by Mr. Little
and seconded by Mrs. Wood the
Board voted unanimously to
take action on the following:
Approved the 2006-2007
North Florida Child Develop-
ment Contract of Services.
Approved the 2006-2007
Panhandle Management Devel-
opment Network (PMDN).
IX. BID MATTERS: On
motion by Mr. Cox and sec-
onded by Mr. Quinn the Board


voted unanimously to award the
bid for installation of a metal
roof on the old Wewahitchka
Maintenance Shop to Fisher's
Construction in the amount of
$17,900.00.

X. SUPERINTEN-
DENT'S REPORT: On motion by
Mr. Quinn and seconded by Mrs.
Wood the Board voted unani-
mously to take action on the
following:Approved request from
the Port St. Joe High School
Student Government Associa-
tion for 5 students to attend the
Annual Southern Association of
Student Councils Conference
in Knoxville, Tennessee, Octo-
ber 6 October 10.Acknowl-
, edged receipt of letter from
Wewahitchka High School Prin-
cipal Larry White informing the
Board that Mr. Anthony Jones
declined the employment offer
for the position of Band Direc-
tor at Wewahitchka High School
for school year 2006-2007. Mr.


Jones has accepted a new job
in Indiana.Approved Mr. Buck
Watford to receive the lunch
supplement for doing a super-
vised lunch period at Gulf Acad-
emy in Port St. Joe.
XI. BOARD MEMBER
CONCERNS: The Board sched-
uled a workshop for Monday,
August 28, 2006, at 1:00 P. M.,
E. T. Items to be included in the
workshop agenda will be Pu-
pil Progression, Requirements
for Red Cross certification to
utilize the new Oscar D. Redd,
Sr., Wewahitchka Middle School
Wing as a hurricane shelter, and
the process of placing comput-
ers and other equipment on a
cycling basis for replacement,
repairs and upgrades.

XII. ADJOURNMENT:
On motion by Mr. Quinn and
seconded by Mrs. Wood the
Board voted unanimously to
adjourn the meeting at 11:02 A.
M., E. T.


Gulf County Board of County





Commission Meeting Minutes Continued
i- ------ 1 -- t .t-I n ic. Commi ssiner Willia


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
JULY 11, 2006
REGULAR MEETING
Continued

MILLAGE RATES

B.A.C. recommends that the
village rates at .the projected
amounts of 4.4 mills for Gulf
Front properties and 1.6 mills
for Gulf Interior properties in
the current budget be assessed
on the October tax bills per
the Bondsman. Commissioner
Barnes motioned to approve this
recommendation. Commissioner
Williams seconded the motion,
and it passed 4-1, with Commis-
sioner Peters voting no.

BOND

B.A.C. recommends that
the Board take the necessary
steps to secure the bond at the
appropriate time in the amount
of $10.1 million. Commissioner
Barnes motioned to approve this
recommendation. Commissioner
Williams seconded the motion,
and it passed 4-1, with Commis-
sioner Peters voting no.

CONTRACTS

B.A.C. recommends that the
contracts with F.D.E.P. for per-
mitting, design and construction
be executed when presented.
Commissioner Barnes motioned
to approve this recommenda-
tion. Commissioner Traylor sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
4-1, with Commissioner Peters
voting no.

EROSION CONTROL L[NE

B.A.C. recommends to ,set
'the erosion control line accord-
ing to the recommended time
table from M.R.D. Associates.
Commissioner Barnes motioned
to approve this recommenda-
tion. Commissioner Williams
seconded the motion, and it
passed 4-1, with Commissioner
Peters voting no.

STONE MILL CREEK ROAD /
S.C.O.P.

Chief Administrator Butler
discussed that he has received
the grant agreement for the
Stone Mill Creek Road repay-
ing. County Attorney McFarland
then read a proposed resolution
authorizing the Chairman of the
Board to enter into a joint par-
ticipation agreement with the
F.D.O.T. Commissioner Traylor
motioned to adopt the following
resolution. Commissioner Wil-
liams seconded-the motion, and
it passed unanimously. .

RESOLUTION NO. 2006-23

A RESOLUTION OF THE
GULF COUNTY BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
AUTHORIZING THE CHAIRMAN
OF THE BOARD TO ENTER
INTO A JOINT PARTICIPATION
AGREEMENT WITH THE FLOR-
IbA DEPARTMENT OF TRANS-
PORTATION.
WHEREAS, the Small Coun-
ty Outreach Program has been
'created by Section 339.2818,
Florida Statutes, to assist small
county governments in resur-
facing or reconstruction of ca-


pacity or safety improvements
on county roads; and
WHEREAS, the Florida
Department of Transportation
(F.D.O.T.) has the authority
under Section 224.044, Florida
Statutes, to enter into an Agree-
ment with Gulf County; and
WHEREAS, Gulf County has
certified to F.D.O.T. that eligibil-
ity requirements have been met
of said Section 339.2818, Flori-
da Statutes; and
WHEREAS, F.D.O.T. is will-
ing to provide Gulf County with
financial assistance under Fi-
nancial Management Number
42009715801 for costs directly
related to the resurfacing and
safety improvement on the
Stone Mill Creek Road;
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
RESOLVED by the Gulf County
Board of County Commissioners
that the Chairman of the Board
be authorized to sign the Joint
Participation Agreement with
F.D.O.T. for resurfacing of the
Stone Mill Creek Road.

THIS RESOLUTION ADOPT-
ED THIS 11TH DAY OF JULY,
2006.

(End)

Chief Administrator Butler
reported that the State grant is
in the amount of $901,342.00,
with no match required.

CODE ENFORCEMENT

Code Enforcement Officer
Hicks appeared before the Board
and discussed complaints re-
ceived regarding. the .overflow
,of garbage, on the right-of-way
in Cape San Blas, Indian Pass,
and along Highway 98 at St. Joe
Beach. Mrs. Hicks suggested
that the Board require (1) twice
a week pickup in these areas, (2)
additional carts (receptacles) or
purchase one for $12.91 in ad-
dition to the current receptacle,
and (3) placement of receptacle
per Ordinance 2005-13 (she
stated that Waste Management
provides a back door service
for an additional' fee). Code
Enforcement Officer Hicks rec-
ommended that if the problem
is not eliminated, the County
establish mandatory pickup
in the areas of Cape San Blas,
Indian Pass and Highway 98.
Upon inquiry by Commissioner
Williams, Chief Administrator
Butler stated that an ordinance
was never adopted for the High-
way 98 corridor on this issue.
Upon inquiry by Commissioner
Traylor, Environmental Health
Specialist Jason Flowers, of
the Gulf County Health Depart-
ment, appeared and discussed
that there is a problem with too
many individuals staying in one
household. He stated that they
are filling their trash receptacle,
, the neighbors receptacle, and
placing trash on the ground be-
. side the receptacle. After further
discussion, Commissioner Wil-
liams recommended that Mrs.
Hicks and Mr. Flowers meet and
bring a recommendation back to'
the Board on this issue.

SECRETARY OF HEALTH
AWARD

Health Department Admin-
istrator Doug Kent appeared be-


fore the Board to present them
with a plaque from the Secre-
tary of State in appreciation of
the efforts they have made to
obtain quality healthcare in the
County.

APPRECIATION COUNTY
DEPARTMENTS

Health Department Admin-
istrator Doug Kent appeared
before the Board and presented
plaques to the Gulf County
Maintenance Department and
Public Works Department for
their outstanding work at the
Health Department.

HOSPITAL

Upon inquiry by Commis-
sioner Traylor, Health Depart-
ment Administrator Kent stated
that he attended a meeting with
The St. Joe Company and other
agencies that handle permitting
for the new hospital. He stated
that it would be approximately
ninety-days before the permits
are obtained and the work would
begin on the new hospital site.

BUDGET WORKSHOPS

Clerk Executive Adminis-
trator Kopinsky presented the
2006-07 proposed budget pack-
ets to the Board, and Chairman
McLemore reported that the
budget workshops have been
scheduled for July 24th, July
26th and July 27th at 5:00 p.m.
E.T.

SEXUAL PREDATOR
ORDINANCE

!Sheriffs Office Major Nu-
gent requested permission to
meet with County Attorney Mc-
Farland. to discuss a proposed
ordinance regarding sexual
predators in Gulf County. Com-
missioner Williams motioned to
approve this recommendation.
Commissioner Barnes seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously.

BEACH ADVISORY
COMMITTEE

T.D.C. Director Pickett re-
ported that the St. Joseph Pen-
insula B.A.C. met and requested
that the Board implement an
attendance policy for the com-
mittee, stating that any voter
missing two consecutive meet-
ings be removed from the com-
mittee. Commissioner Traylor
motioned to approve this recom-
mendation. Commissioner Wil-
liams seconded the motion, and
it passed unanimously.

BEACH ADVISORY
COMMITTEE

Upon inquiry by T.D.C. Di-
rector Pickett regarding the defit-
nition of a quorum and meeting
teleconferencing, County Attor-
ney McFarland stated that there
are substantial issues regard-
ing teleconference capabilities
at this time. County Attorney
McFarland stated that the meet-
ing can be monitored by tele-
conferencing, but the members
must be present at the meeting
to vote.

SENATE BILL 360 SCHOOL


INTERLOCUUAL AGREEMENT.f

Planner Richardson pre-
sented and discussed the school
interlocal agreement draft for
S.B. 360 that is going to be sub-
mitted to the State for review. He
also discussed the elements and
capital improvement schedule
that are being submitted to the
State for review.

OVERSTREET BOAT RAMP

Commissioner Traylor dis-
cussed the Overstreet boat ramp
facility, stating that Mr. David
Taunton would like to donate
approximately five acres around
the Overstreet boat ramp area.
Commissioner Traylor motioned
to accept the property from Da-
vid Taunton. Commissioner Wil-
liams seconded the motion, and
it passed unanimously.

FESTIVALS

Commissioner Tray-
lor reported that the Florida
League of Cities has recognized
Wewahitchka as one of the top
twenty-three Cities for having
the best festivals.

M.S.T.U.'S / BEACH
NOURISHMENT

Commissioner Traylor dis-
cussed the different individuals
that have put forth a great effort
to implement the M.S.T.U.'s for
the Cape San Blas area. Com-
missioner Williams discussed
the overall support of the Board
on this issue. Commissioner
.Traylor. also commended Comn.-
missioner Barnes for all his
work regarding beach nourish-
ment.

UNION NEGOTIATIONS

Upon inquiry by Commis-
sioner Peters, Human Resources
Director Manuel stated that the
Board needs to hold an attorney-
client meeting to discuss union
issues. The Board scheduled the
meeting for. Monday, July 17,
2006 at 9:00 a.m. E.T.



EMPLOYEE APPRECIATION
PICNIC

Upon inquiry by Commis-
sioner Peters, Human Resources
Director Manuel reported that
the first annual employee ap-
preciation picnic will be held on
Friday, July 14th, at 1:00 p.m.,
E.T. at Honeyville Park.'

PORT ST. JOE LIBRARY/
BUDGET AMENDMENTS

Commissioner Peters re-
ported that he has received a
quote from Jacksonville Sounds
Communication, in the amount
of $4,090.00, for repairs to the
fire alarm system in the old sec-
tion of the Port St. Joe library.
Commissioner Peters motioned
that the Board amend the Gen-
eral Fund budget in the amount
of $4,090.00 by reducing Re-
serves: Cash Carry Forward and
increasing the appropriate line
item to repair the fire alarm sys-
tem. Commissioner Traylor sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.


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10
382


SPECIAL PROJECTS
PAYMENTS

Upon motion by Commis-
sioner Peters, second by Com-
missioner Williams, and unani-
mous vote, the Board approved
the following Special Projects
payments:

Dist. 2 Wewahitchka Dixie
Youth Boys 12 and under Do-
nation $250.00

Wewahitchka Dixie Youth
Boys 8 and under Donation
$250.00

Dist. 3 Wewahitchka Dixie
Youth Boys 12 and under Do-
nation $250.00 '
Wewahitchka Dixie Youth
Boys 8 and under Donation
$250.00

Dist. 4 Gulf County Senior
Citizens Donation $500.00
Gulf County Association of
Retarded Citizens Donation
$500.00

Dist. 5 Port St. Joe Dixie
Youth Boys 11 & 12 year old -
Donation $250.00

(End)

SOUTH GULF FIRE
DEPARTMENT

Commissioner Barnes dis-
cussed that. Emerson Cooling
installed a new air conditioner
for South Gulf Fire Department,
and Lenox supplied the equip-
ment. Commissioner Barnes
motioned to submit a letter to
Emerson Cooling and Lenox to
thank them for suppling the air
conditioner and equipment for
this department. Commissioner
Peters seconded the motion, and,
it passed unanimously.

INDIAN PASS SUBSTATION

Upon inquiry by Commis-
sioner Barnes, County Attorney
McFarland stated that he has
met with Mr. Walker regarding
property for a South Gulf Coun-
ty Fire Department substation
at Indian Pass, and that-they are
working out 'the nature of the


lease., oHe stated that they are
working on the length of time for
the lease.

DIXIE YOUTH GIRLS
SOFTBALL

Commissioner Williams re-
ported on the Port St. Joe Dixie
Youth Girls Softball tournament
stating that the 10-year olds
placed second in the State, the
12-year olds lost, and the 14-
year olds won the State Cham-
pionship in Belleview.

EMERGENCY MEDICAL
SERVICES

Commissioner Williams dis-
cussed that he came up on an
accident on C.R. 386 (Overstreet
Road), and he discussed the
quick response and profession-
alism of Gulf County Emergen-
cy Medical Services and other
agencies during this situation.

HIGHLAND VIEW & WHITE
CITY FIRE DEPARTMENTS

Commissioner Williams re-
quested permission for the fire
chief at Highland View and the
fire chief at White City to start.
the engineering process for ad-
ditional building space, stating
they will use funds from their
budgets (no additional tax funds
will be required). Commissioner
Williams then motioned to ap-
prove this request. Commission-
er Traylor seconded the motion,
and it passed unanimously.

ECONOMIC IMPACTS

Commissioner Williams'
discussed' that he spoke with
C.R. Smith & Sons regard-
ing the economic impacts from
property values dropping, and
that small businesses are be-
ing affected. Commissioner Wil-
lians motioned for the Board
to request that E.D.C. Director
McNair work with the local busi-
nesses and to also help with the
employees that are losing their
jobs at Premier Chemical. Com-
missioner Barnes seconded the
motion, and it passed unani-
mously.

COMMUNITY WATCH


Commissioner Williams dis-
cussed the possibility of form-
ing community watch groups
through out his district, and
stated he will contact Sheriffs
Office Major Nugent on this is-
sue.

REDFISH STREET

Commissioner Williams re-
ported that he spoke with G.A.C.
regarding the paving on Redfish
Street, and this project will start
in July. He stated that there
will be an additional two-hun-
dred foot section paved in front
of the park.

AMERICUS AVENUE DITCH

Commissioner Williams dis-
cussed the back section of the
Americus Avenue ditch facing
Gulf Aire Subdivision (adjoin-
ing Panther Swamp and the St.
Joe property), stating that there
is a ditch in this area that the
County maintains and the hom-
eowners association has voted
to pay for the pipe to fill the
ditch. Commissioner' Williams
motioned to start the process
with D.E.P. on getting dredge
and fill permits for this project.
Commissioner Traylor seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously.

ST JOSEPH HUMANE
SOCIETY

Commissioner Williams mo-
tioned for Chief Administrator
Butler to contact the Humane
Society regarding the time frame
on construction of their new
building. After further discus-
sion, Commissioner Traylor sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.

OVERNIGHT CAMPING -
HIGHWAY 98

Commissioner Williams
discussed that he has received
numerous complaints regarding
people camping along Highway
98, and requested that County
Attorney McFarland review the
current issue for enforcement,
and contact D.O.T. or V.M.S.
so the County can implement a


then motioned to approve this
request. Commissioner Barnes
seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.

WHITE CITY AND HIGHLAND
VIEW BATH HOUSES

Commissioner Williams dis-
cussed that there is not water
service to the bath house facili-
ties at the White City park or the
Highland View park. He stated
that he spoke with the City of
Port St. Joe regarding water
service to the bath house facili-
ties. Commissioner Williams re-
quested permission to start the
process to install bath house
facilities at White City Park
and Highland View Park. Com-
missioner Traylor motioned to
approve this recommendation.
Commissioner Williams sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.

COMMUNITY CENTER

Commissioner Williams re-
quested permission to check
into utilizing the old Search and
Rescue building at White City
for a community center for the
youth.

PLANTATION DRIVE
(CRAWFISH CABIN ROAD)

Chairman McLemore dis-
cussed the issue with Gene
Hanlon regarding Plantation
Drive/Crawfish Cabin Road,
stating that Mr. Hanlon has had
the property surveyed *and the
County road i -.nr ra' fp.roperty.
Commissioner Tra., !or ,tated
that he has been contacted
by Mr. Hanlon n-Lrinrg t'rei
County would pay- him for the
property. After further discus-
sion, County Attorney McFar-
land advised the Board not to
take any action on this issue.
There being no further busi-
ness, and upon motion by Com-
missioner Traylor, the meeting
did then adjourn at 7:00 p.m.,
E.T.
CARMEN L. MCLEMORE
CHAIRMAN
ATTEST:
REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK


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Gulf County School Board Meeting Minutes


I


094 F.i:Pi:%a~~~~~b~~ ~~;-I; -I:.i;..js~l~?~;PJ;~;.i ~ ~ ;:%~Sc~~:;WBO


FT416,






17E ITneStar, PrtnSt. Joe, FL *iIlul day, /


(Above) Alex Henderson's Coastal Dune Fence features aluminum or exotic wood slats linked with twisted aluminum'connector rods.
The St. Joe Company has used the fence in its WaterSound, WaterColor and WindMark Beach developments.
(Below) Monumental Fabrication of America recently completed this aluminum and mahogany staircase in two homes in the Jubilation
development on Cape San Bias.


Sculptor
flooring, softened the loo]
provided an interesting r
materials.
"It was nice to be able t
creative job for someone a
here," Henderson said.
Making Time for Sculpt
Since opening Monun
Fabrication, Henderson hi
been able to focus as mu
he'd like on his sculptures.
After work, when things
down, he crafts small met
cardboard mock-ups whi
calls "mockettes."
The studies help him vis
sculptural components
cutting out shapes in metal
"I have a directory of


From Page 2C

k and in my head and my brain's
mix of constantly trying to assemble
them in such a way that they look
:o do a good," said Henderson. "When it
around comes together, I build them."
Henderson favors simple,
ture monolithic forms that are human- abstra
mental scale, rising no higher than eight "Y(
as not or nine feet. the S
ich as He also likes to build "bigger somet
' than life" sculptures in the 50- H
s calm 100-foot range, but said larger when
al and works require more money and visual
ch he backers willing to shell out the "I
cash. somet
sualize Though sculpting is his "Thin]
before passion, Henderson struggles posing
1. against what he describes as a posing
parts uniquely Southern distaste for the f


Henderson's striking water fountain, named Stonehenge 2000,
can be seen on the intersection of Sixth and Peach Tree Streets in
Atlanta.


act art.
ou can't sell sculptures in
outh. It's got to look like
hing," he said.
enderson employs trickery
he can, fooling the eye into
izing familiar forms.
make them think it looks like
hing," laughed Henderson.
k of it as a/sculpture that's
g as a bench or a bench
g as a sculpture. You take
unctional element out as


much as possible, as far as you
can stretch it."
Henderson has not yet staged
a showing of his work in Port St.
Joe, but hopes to be featured in a
future Gulf Alliance for the Local
Arts' First Friday's exhibition.
Southern prejudices asidd,
Henderson said he's not worried
about how his sculptures will be
received.
'There's enough people. here
who are art conscious." he said:.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m In November 2011 Greg Burkett came to fully grasp the lack of guarantees in life. On a night that November Burkett fell from his bed. His forehead struck a nightstand, hard. Burkett immediately knew it was bad. “I knew I couldn’t move my arms, my legs, anything,” Burkett said. “I knew it was serious, but I didn’t know how serious.” He laid there in his bedroom next to that nightstand for 10 hours, not moving. In hindsight, the willingness of Burkett’s brain to listen to the language from his body — don’t move — likely saved his life. A friend, concerned that Burkett did not show up for work the next day found him, or actually heard his cries for help, when checking Burkett’s Port St. Joe home. He was rushed to Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf where it was determined Burkett suffered a broken neck. He was quickly en route to Bay Medical Center. That day, after being prepped for surgery, Burkett’s doctor was stark with Burkett’s family — no guarantees Burkett would survive surgery. And if Burkett survived the surgery, there were no guarantees he would not be paralyzed, relegated to learning to live in a wheelchair. For more than a week, Burkett, heavily medicated had little clue about his condition or prognosis. When he was lucid enough, his doctor remained just as blunt as with his family. Veterans Day programs honor those who served By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Veteran’s Day arrives Monday, Nov. 11. The federal holiday will honor and celebrate those who served in the armed forces. Gulf County Schools, however, are among the few districts in the state that celebrate the holiday by keeping schools open to formally honor veterans. At Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, its 20th annual program will kick off 9 a.m. ET Monday. The NJROTC will welcome veterans as they enter the building and patriotic artwork prepared by students in grades kindergarten through 12. During the program, students who participate in the 21st Century after school enrichment program will perform a tribute that includes the songs, “You’re a Grand Old Flag,” “Yankee Doodle,” and “God Bless America.” The after school program is made up of students in grades kindergarten through third. The artwork displayed during the event comes from art classes taught by Julie Hodges. These works, crafted in mediums ranging from water colors to colored pencil, were created under the theme “Tour of America” and had to feature a place and incorporate an American ag. Hodges used the opportunity to expand the thinking of her students when choosing a location to draw or paint. “America’s not just about landmarks,” said Hodges. “We’re also representing small towns and everyday America life.” Several hundred pieces of art will line the hallways and serve as a salute to the veterans making their way to the gymnasium. While creating the artwork, it allowed elementary students to understand the signi cance of the stars and stripes on the American ag and the humble beginnings Butler pretrial delayed again By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m The Walt Butler murder trial looms, and the pretrial process remains incomplete. During Tuesday’s session at the Gulf County Courthouse, Judge John Fishel rescheduled the pretrial for 9 a.m. CT on Wednesday, Nov. 13 at the Bay County Courthouse. The pretrial was rescheduled after Butler’s public defender Mark Sims told Fishel that he was still waiting to review several items of discovery. Further, he had previously led a motion and was still awaiting a response. Additionally, Sims mentioned that he was unable to review a lab report/medical record that was listed on the docket but wasn’t available for review. Whether the medical record went missing or was simply not available to Sims is unknown. “We need that document made available, as it could affect my client’s trial,” said Sims. Assistant State Attorney Robert Sombathy said that he was aware of the record Sims sought and would ensure access was given. Fishel also noted that Butler was hard of hearing and asked Sims if he had requested a hearing aid be made available during the trial. Sims said that he looked into it, but reported that Gulf County courts do not provide hearing aids. Fishel insisted that a request could be made and both parties agreed to look into it further. Butler’s trial is scheduled for 9 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 18 at the Gulf County Courthouse, less than one week after the pretrial. Butler is charged with shooting and killing Everett Gant in July of last year in Port St. Joe. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Tommy Pitts is moving from port director to helping direct the port’s future. Pitts, who has worked much of the past year on a salary of $1 per month as the Port St. Joe Port Authority wrestled with scant revenues, has taken a position with the engineering rm spearheading the work on the Port of Port St. Joe’s application to dredge the shipping channel. Dredging the shipping channel, said Port Authority board member Eugene Raf eld, is the key to unlocking the port’s potential. Pitts will be the project manager on the dredge permit work for Hatch Mott MacDonald, formally contracted two weeks by the Port Authority to undertake the nearly $800,000 task of securing the dredge permit. “While this concludes my employment/volunteer status with the Port Authority I will obviously still be Pitts to lead dredge permit work See PITTS A2 TIM CROFT | The Star Two months ago Greg Burkett could not put a single weight on any machine. Here he has 90 pounds on a calf lift machine. See VETERANS A3 See PRETRIAL A2 Man ghting back after facing life in wheelchair ‘A walking miracle’ See MIRACLE A5 “When people started telling me what I couldn’t do, that is when I decided I could.” Greg Burkett Ghosts invade the Coast B1 Thursday, NOVEMBER 7, 2013 YEAR 76, NUMBER 4 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Port St. Joe city commissioners boarded the port bandwagon pushing forward for jobs Tuesday night. Commissioners unanimously approved a request from Commissioner Rex Buzzett to carve out $10,000 from the city’s settlement with BP — which totaled more than $500,000 — to provide operational funds for the Port St. Joe Port Authority. “If we get that port going… it will be all about jobs,” Buzzett said. “They need our help … I think it will come back to the city many times over if we get that port going.” Commissioners earmarked that the funds be spent on dues to the Florida Ports Council and to pay the liability insurance for the Port Authority board. The dues for the Florida Ports Council, the lobbying organization for state ports, are crucial, said Port Authority chairman Leonard Costin. The Port Authority still owes half its $13,000 in dues from the last scal year, and the key to being at the table for state funds, and in turn any federal funds those state dollars can leverage, is as a dues-paying member of the council. With a Ports Council meeting coming soon, Costin said, the Port of Port St. Joe was better positioned not going “hat in hand, so to speak.” “We are down to the point where we are trying to raise any money we can,” Costin said, speaking about a community outreach campaign to fund a barebones budget for the current scal year. “The only thing we have going right now in economic development is the port. “We have to stay the course, and any support you can offer is greatly appreciated.” Costin said there was a twoyear window during which the port will strive to accomplish dredging of the shipping channel to maximize some $17 million in infrastructure that exists along the 300 acres the Port Authority owns. “After that, I think you will see quite a bit of activity and exponential growth,” Costin said. Commissioners Phil McCroan and Bo Patterson expressed skepticism, noting the investment that has occurred at the port in the past decade without Commission joins port community campaign See PORT A5 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . A4 Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . A7-A8 Community . . . . . . . . . . B1 School News . . . . . . . . . . B3 Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Classi eds . . . . . . . . . B7-B8

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, November 7, 2013 company would not consider any decision until consulting with the Florida Department of Transportation, which provided the grant to fund the dredge permit application. “Ethically, Tommy is above reproach,” said Port Authority chair Leonard Costin. A review by Samuel J. Henderson, district chief counsel in the Of ce of the General Counsel for the FDOT, indicated that the Port Authority and Pitts would not violate any ethical state laws in his employment with Hatch Mott MacDonald. “From the information given to me, it appears that Mr. Pitts is not an of cer, partner, director or proprietor of Hatch Mott MacDonald at this time and does not now, nor is it contemplated that he, his spouse or his children will have a material interest in Hatch Mott MacDonald,” Henderson wrote Costin. Further, Pitts had never been employed previously by Hatch Mott and did not participate in the selection of the company on a continuing engineering contract in 2007 – a decision made by the Port Authority board. Therefore, Henderson concluded, there would be no violation of the grant agreement for the dredge application work by Pitts going to work for Hatch Mott MacDonald. Costin said if there was a person responsible for the Port of Port St. Joe being on the cusp of potential development it was Pitts and he added he was pleased that Pitts, in his new job, would still be an integral part of the port’s future. “Tommy has his heart in that port,” Costin said. “His leadership has gotten us to this critical stage. His hard work and dedication to making the Port of Port St. Joe a reality is now coming together. He will be greatly missed as our port director but I take comfort in knowing he will still be involved in making the dream a reality. “I also thank him for all the countless volunteer hours he contributed to the port’s efforts after our nancial status precluded further payment of salaries. He stayed the course and helped the port get through a very critical stage in the process that leads towards future dredging of the channel.” Gulf County Economic Development Alliance, Inc. executive director Barry Sellers will take a larger role in promoting the port and work with the Port Authority in administrative issues where possible. “Tommy is a class act and a man of integrity in a world where there are too few of them,” Sellers said. Guerry Magidson, president of the EDA, added, “Tommy is a tremendous asset to the community and has conducted himself as a true professional during trying times. I look forward to helping see the port succeed.” And as he departs one job aimed at that success, Pitts enters another aimed at bringing to fruition the commitments of two energy rms to ship wood pellets through the Port of Port St. Joe. “I am particularly pleased that I can stay involved with the port development project,” Pitts said. “In fact, I can now be more focused on the major task before us and that is the timely permitting of the maintenance dredging in order to secure the wood pellet commitments. “After many years of the port being a community and personal dream, I have gained con dence that it will become a reality in the foreseeable future.” involved in the effort to revitalize our seaport, a project that is important to all of us,” Pitts said. Pitts will continue to be a xture at Port Authority meetings, now in the role of updating the board on the progress of the permitting effort. Pitts will continue to live in Port St. Joe while his ofce with Hatch Mott is in Panama City. He said much of his work will be in Gulf County. “We will be assessing dredge material disposal sites, perform sediment sampling and coordinate with the county and (Tourist Development Council) on potential beach renourishment sites among other duties associated with the dredge permit work,” Pitts said. Hatch Mott approached Pitts some weeks ago, noting that Pitts’ extensive knowledge of the port and channel could be invaluable to the work on the dredge permit application. However, Pitts and the M o n d a y N o v e m b e r 1 1 2 0 1 3 9 a m E ST a t P o r t S t J o e H i g h Sc h o o l e p u b l i c i s c o r d i a l l y in v i t e d t o t h e a n n u a l c o m m u n i t y w i de V e t e r a n s D a y C e r e m o n i e s W e s in c e r e l y h o p e t h a t y o u w i l l b e ab l e t o a t t e n d a n d j o in u s in p a y in g t r i b u t e t o a n d g i v in g h o n o r t o o u r V e t e r a ns w h o h av e g i v e n s a c r i c i a l l y t o p r e s e r v e t h e e e d o m s t h a t w e e n j o y in Am e r i c a t o d ay V e t e r a n 's D ay C e l e br a t i o n -' + ', &'% %' + '% -' ) % '' % -' ' % ''% ' -' + + # -', !% '% # !$ '% -' + ', &'% %' ( -"+ !%' "( '' %', '' % %' '' % '"-, T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community ’ s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. FL ORIDA ST A TE UNIVERSIT Y P ANAMA CIT Y THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR COMMUNIT Y ’S UNIVERSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w ’ s J obs $% % # % $ % $ # % $ " " % $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Some new blood and a familiar face were Gov. Rick Scott’s choices for appointment to new terms on the Port St. Joe Port Authority. Last week Scott reappointed Carl “Eugene” Raf eld to the Port Authority while appointing Jason Shoaf to replace Patrick Jones. The terms of Jones and Raf eld expired more than two months ago and there was considerable interest in the appointments, with nearly a dozen applications. Raf eld, 51, returns for another four-year term which will end July 20, 2017. A vice president of Raf eld Fisheries, Inc. Raf eld brings a wealth of knowledge about maritime activity but also has deep, generational roots in the community. “I am glad the governor had the faith in me to put me back on the board,” Raf eld said. “I thank him for that. “I am very passionate about the county and the town I grew up in. When I am dead and gone I want them to remember my name as someone who helped bring jobs to this county.” Raf eld has been outspoken in his quest for dredging of the shipping channel to open up development of the Port of Port St. Joe. Having been among board members that unanimously approved contracts to move the dredge permit application forward two weeks ago, Raf eld reaf rmed that a dredged channel is critical. As a natural, deepwater channel, Raf eld noted that more than half of the channel is in good condition despite no maintenance dredging since the last 1980’s. “I do feel if we can get that channel dredged that will solve a lot of things and end the talk about this and that,” Raf eld said. “That is the heart line of the port. It is the deepest and most natural channel in Florida. The cost to maintain that channel will be very low compared to places like Miami.” Shoaf, 34, is vice president of St. Joe Natural Gas Company, Inc. and was appointed for a term ending July 27, 2017. He also brings deep community roots to his position on the Port Authority. “I’m excited about the opportunity to help bring jobs and development to Gulf County,” Shoaf said. “That is what gets me excited, to be able to work on behalf of the community to bring industry and jobs to the area.” Raf eld back, Shoaf appointed to Port Authority PITTS from page A1 Gant approached Butler’s Pine Ridge apartment after Butler had been accused of using racial slurs directed at children in the apartment complex. Butler shot Gant between the eyes with a .22 ri e and left him bleeding on the doorstep before calling 911 and sitting back down to nish his dinner. He expressed inconvenience at being arrested for shooting a “(racial epithet),” according to the arresting af davit. PRETRIAL from page A1 H o l l y H i l l F u n e r a l H o m e 2 7 7 5 G a rris o n A v e n u e P o r t S t J o e F l o r i d a 3 2 4 5 6 ( 8 5 0 ) 2 29 1 9 29 C r e ma ti o n S t a r tin g a t $ 7 9 5 WALT BUTLER Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, November 7, 2013 Juvenile justice establishes presence in PSJHS By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m When it comes to the juvenile justice system, prevention is the name of the game. The newest face at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School is Kelly Faircloth, Ju venile Probation Ofcer for Gulf County. The Florida Department of Juvenile Justice System aims to increase public safety by reducing juvenile delinquency through effec tive prevention, intervention and treatment services that strengthen families and turn around the lives of troubled youth. It’s not uncommon for youth to act out in school, but rather than have a stu dent face arrest, suspension or expulsion, Faircloth’s goal is to help kids on the front end by being able to address situations immediately, be fore they have the potential to get worse. Faircloth said that a stu dent acting out is typically an indicator of bigger prob lems at home. He said that often, students just need a friend and he’s happy to be there for them. While oc casionally there are bigger issues that may require law enforcement to get involved, the cause of the bad behav ior can be something as sim ple as a bad breakup. “These kids are teenag ers and they have different problems than adults,” said Faircloth. By being on campus, Faircloth can sit one-on-one with students and assess their needs and identify the source of the bad behavior. “Because I’m at the school, I can assess them quickly and help them make a better judgment call,” said Faircloth. “We can see what’s best for them.” When “bad kids” face expulsion, it affects the edu cational process. Faircloth would rather have students do community service, and work alongside them, to tru ly understand what’s caus ing the student to make poor choices. Though Faircloth has provided services for Gulf County since September 2012, he was stationed in Panama City and made the trek to Port St. Joe sev eral times a week in order to effectively interact with the kids. He knew that he wanted to be closer and kept looking for opportunities to do so. Eventually he decided to approach Superintendent of Schools, Jim Norton with his idea to be located where the juveniles were rather than miles from those who needed his help. “I wanted (Norton) to un derstand that we could work together on this for our kids,” said Faircloth. “He saw my vision and understood what I was looking for. I really wanted to be there with the children I worked with.” After receiving Norton’s blessing, high school Prin cipal Jeremy Knapp accom modated Faircloth with of ce space right next to the cafeteria, the biggest com mon area in the school. Prior, the space was called the “trophy room,” an area that hadn’t been used in the last decade. The move also put Faircloth right next to School Resource Ofcer Stacy Strickland, allowing them to work together for the safety and well-being of the student body. When the new school year began in August, Faircloth had an of ce and the students were pleased to see him. “We thought it would be a great idea, and it was perfect timing,” said Norton. “Kelly is a great resource to have right there and he’s able to see the kids during the school day, which is great since one-third of a student’s day is spent in school. “By being at the school, Kelly has unfettered access to answers to his immedi ate questions and we’re very happy to have this partnership.” To further build preven tion awareness, the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice held a road tour last week that visited various cities throughout the state and hosted an open dialogue for the public to inform the DJJ staff what resources and services were needed in their communities. The stop in Gulf County was held at Gulf Coast State College Gulf/Franklin Cam pus was open to the public and DJJ secretary Wansley Walters told attendees that a strong community can keep kids from ending up in the court system. She said that more than 100,000 kids go into the court system each year; though only a small number of those are serious or violent offend ers. With the DJJ’s new fo cus on prevention, there has been a 25 percent reduction in juvenile delinquency in the past two years for the state of Florida. “A vast majority of kids are troubled in some fash ion,” said Walters. “Inter vention at an early age is important.” In Gulf County, the DJJ works with the teen court and holds prevention-orient ed presentations in schools to discuss domestic violence with students and reinforce the importance of respect and the negative effects of bullying. Walters also discussed the addition of after-school programs which include Project Connect which works with youth who are exiting the court system to provide vocational and men torship services, help pro vide transportation, assist in locating employment and even help kids set goals. Wansley Walters is a na tionally recognized leader in juvenile justice. She pio neered juvenile justice ser vices in Miami-Dade County from 1995 until Gov. Rick Scott appointed her to lead the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) in January 2011. During her tenure, Miami-Dade not only had the lowest youth incar ceration rate in the state, but also boasted one of Florida’s lowest juvenile crime rates. “Our goal is to ensure that we have the right com bination of services and sanctions, in the right place, at the right time as we care for each youth and keep the public safe,” said Walters. Three arrested, charged with dealing drugs Star Staff Report Three Wewahitchka residents were arrested last week on charges re lated to the selling of marijuana and methamphetamine. Joshua Aaron Causey, 30, Shannon Dwayne Causey, 33, and Haylee Ferry Johnson, 26, were arrested after felony warrants were served on the three by investigators and deputies from the Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce. The three were subsequently ar rested, according to Sheriff Mike Harrison. All three were transported to the Gulf County Jail. Joshua Causey was charged with the sale of marijuana and is being held on $5,000 bond. Shannon Causey was charged with the sale of methamphetamine and is be ing held on $10,000 bond, according to Harrison. Johnson was also charged with the sale of methamphetamine and is also be ing held on a $10,000 bond. The arrests were part of an ongoing investigation leading to the issuing of the felony arrest warrants. SHANNON D. CAU sS EY HH AYLEE FERRY JOHN sS ON JO sS HUA AA CAU sS EY WEs S LL O c C HER | The Star Juvenile Probation Ofcer for Gulf County, Kelly Faircloth, will spend several days a week at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School with an eye toward prevention. Florida Department of Juvenile Justice Secretary, Wansley Walters, discussed the importance of community in preventing juvenile crime at a public meeting last week in Port St. Joe. FILE PHOTO Gulf County schools will hold programs to honor area veterans. All events will be open to the public. of our nation. “It makes the students feel important,” said Hodges. “They’re contributing some thing to honoring the veterans.” The program will cover the Revolution ary War as well as recognize the veterans of the Vietnam War, who were never of cially welcomed home. A reception will im mediately follow the program. Thank you letters written by elementary school stu dents and the patriotic artwork will later be sent to soldiers abroad. “We want to show the kids that the United States started with a major war that established a democratic country,” said event organizer, Linda Wood. “Now, we have soldiers policing countries all over the world. “We want kids to see the magnitude of what we require these men to do.” At last year’s event Kesley Colbert hon ored WWII veteran Howard Rogers, whose unit saved a group of POWs on the Island of Biak. Among the soldiers rescued was Colbert’s father. At Wewahitchka Elementary School, the 30th annual Veteran’s Day Celebration will take place inside the cafeteria. Third graders will pay tribute to past and present veterans with a program of poem readings and patriotic songs that in clude service hymns. This will mark the seventh year that the Veteran’s Day program was organized by third-grade teacher John Huft, Huft said that in a time of shrinking bud gets, the local veterans have been gracious in helping the school where they can. The annual program is his way of giving back to the men who not only served their coun tries, but serve their communities as well. “I want this to be something that stu dents can look back on and have positive memories,” said Huft. “It’s something that they’ve given to the veterans and bright ened their day.” The program will begin at 8:30 a.m. CT. A reception will immediately follow. Both events are free and open to veter ans, their families and the public. VETERANS from page A1

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#!$ &# !&"!"%& "" "!$%$%# $.6-*--9.::,1*60.;7 %1.$;*9 "!7? "79;$;7. "176. "##% "!$%"% "!#%$%! ()"&$ $&#"%! $") @.*9A:2?576;1: @.*9A:2?576;1: 6,*:.7/.997979752::276:26*-=.9;2:.5.6;:;1.8<+42:1.9:-7 67;174-;1.5:.4=.:42*+4./79-*5*0./<9;1.9;1*6*57<6;9.,.2=.-/79 :<,1*-=.9;2:.5.6; %1.:873.6>79-2:02=.6:,*6;*;;.6;276;1.8926;.->79-2: ;17<01;/<44@>.201.-%1.:873.6>79-+*9.4@*::.9;:;1.8926;.->79;1797<014@,76=26,.:%1.:873.6>79-2:47:;;1.8926;.->79-9.5*26: USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 O PINION www.starfl.com A Section By Alan Potts Special to The Star Editors Note: This article is for informational use only. Readers are advised to discuss this information with their legal and/or tax advisor in order to gain more knowledge on this topic. Like many Americans, you may have an IRA or 401(k) rollover account to make your retirement years more comfortable. Many consumers have grown tired of the daily nancial roller coaster ride and the general risk of the current market. Wild market swings have increased and tend to happen because of a combination of our inept government and the fact that major nancial institutions now use high speed computers to create the majority of transactions. The buying and selling strategy is generally based on price spreads, not long-term market value. This puts brokers and everyday IRA holders at a timing and knowledge disadvantage. This, in turn, leaves IRA holders feeling like their efforts are “too little too late” as they now nd that their accounts are nally back to where they were 10 years ago. Many IRA holders are asking, “Why can’t I take advantage of today’s real estate market and use my IRA to purchase real estate? The answer is – you can! In 1974, Congress passed a set of federal laws and regulations called the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). This act allowed IRA holders to invest their IRA accounts in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and other approved investments. Importantly, these approved investments included real estate. If you want to invest some or all of your IRA in real estate, you must rst be aware that Real Estate IRAs are an IRS approved investment alternative. Then, you must understand how Real Estate IRAs can provide you return and risk management possibilities. Once your decision is made, you will rollover some or all of your IRA account to a real estate friendly custodian. Since most IRA custodians are equity investment rms, they promote, sell and make commissions on these types of products. The new real estate friendly custodian will provide educational materials, the necessary paperwork, and guidance through the administrative process. Today, there are more Real Estate IRA custodians, but deciding which custodian is right for you will require some research. When you consider using your IRA to purchase real estate there are three major steps. First, determine the property you want to purchase. There is an old saying about the 3 most important things when buying property. They are “location, location, location.” You should also consider how the property will be used, how long the holding period is, and how this will affect your short and long-term objectives. These are critical to the enjoyment of your purchase and the nancial results that will occur when you sell your property. Second, decide how to structure the Real Estate IRA transaction. When someone structures their IRA to purchase real estate there are two different ways in which the IRA can be used. In Method #1, the real estate is titled so that the IRA owns the property. Because the IRA holds title, certain guidelines and rules apply as to how the property can be purchased and how the property can be used and not used. This approach is used when the IRA holder wants to invest for investment purposes only. With Method #2, the property is titled individually and is owned outright. When the individual holds title, If you are a college football fan, chances are you are familiar with the University of Alabama’s domination under Coach Nick Saban, having won three National Championships in the past four years. If you are not an Alabama or football fan, don’t stop reading, because this is not just about football. Talking heads on television, newspaper columnists and radio know-it-alls talk about “The Process” when referring to Nick Saban’s reason for success at the University of Alabama and Louisiana State University, having won four total National Championships for the two schools. Barrett Jones, a former All-American at Alabama who now plays for the St. Louis Rams in the NFL has been asked to describe The Process on several occasions. Jones usually notes something to the effect of, “The Process means not focusing on the results, but focusing on how you get there.” In other words, The Process is about doing the little things right and letting the big things take care of themselves. My understanding of the real meaning of The Process came as a result of the Alabama-Tennessee game that took place on Saturday, October 26, 2013. That being said, I would like to say that The Process does not belong to Nick Saban – he didn’t invent it. He seems to just do a good job of what his parents taught him to do. This “Process” is prevalent throughout the Southeastern United States and I’m pretty sure it is elsewhere because Coach Saban himself came from West Virginia. I don’t think West Virginia is in the South or the north; it’s in the mountains or something. Coach Saban learned under the legendary Coach Don James who recently passed away. Coach James coached for many years at the University of Washington and before that, Kent State University, in Ohio. Is The Process Coach James? No, Coach James was born in Ohio and I’m pretty sure he had good parents who taught him The Process. It’s common sense. Work hard, help people reach their goals, be kind and generous and raise a family that thinks the same way. That is what I think The Process really is. I’m willing to bet that Coach Saban would agree. My most recent experience with The Process was in Tuscaloosa, Alabama on the weekend of the Alabama-Tennessee game, but didn’t involve anything that Coach Saban did before or during the game. It involved me getting inside to see the game. Therefore, I’m very sure that it (The Process) was at the University of Alabama before Nick Saban was. Living out of state, I can generally get to one Alabama game each year. My main reason for going is not to see the game, but to see my oldest daughter who is a junior at the University of Alabama. (She presently has a 4.0 and I want to say “Summa Cum Laude Mercy” more than I want to say “Roll Tide.”) We paid too much for our four tickets back in July from one of those online ticket sales places. If you want to go to just one game, you almost have to do that. We paid about double what the tickets were worth. In other words, we invested somewhere around $600 just to be able to see the AlabamaTennessee game. A couple of nights before our ight South, we realized we could not nd the tickets. We were sick, there was yelling and there was crying. It was the AlabamaTennessee game and we did want to go and it was $600 down the drain. We came to the conclusion that the envelope containing the tickets had been thrown away by mistake. There was still sickness, yelling and crying. From the time we realized this to the time we were about to board the plane, I was on the telephone begging and trying to nd a way to have the tickets reissued. If I talked to the online ticket folks once, I talked to them at least twenty times (or more). The online ticket folks were just middlemen for the person who sold us the tickets. It turned out the person who sold us the tickets was just a middleman for the person who sold him the tickets. It didn’t stop there. There were a lot of “middlemen.” So many, the folks from the internet ticket place couldn’t get it gured it out. We were out of luck and it was our fault. Without the original purchaser’s permission, the University of Alabama ticket of ce couldn’t just reissue tickets. They were kind, but they had a policy that had to be followed. We were going to see our daughter and were just going to see what we could do when we got there. The Friday before the game, my second daughter had an of cial visit scheduled to tour the University of Alabama with her mother. She wants to study history and through her hard work and excellent test scores she has been offered a full academic scholarship to the University of Alabama. She loved her visit and the people there showed her The Process of working hard, helping people reach their goals, being kind and generous and exhibiting these qualities to others. After hearing our story, those folks at the Of ce of Admissions gave us four tickets. A fellow named Paul just put them in an envelope and gave them to us. The next day was game day and even though we had been given four tickets, the $600 still was eating at me. Tim, the fellow who runs the ticket of ce had told me to stop by and see him at “Gate 32” before the game and he would see what he could do. I did. Tim was kind and told me to wait for ten minutes. Tim went upstairs to talk to the Tennessee ticket fellow and they gured out that the tickets I had originally purchased were from a Tennessee fan who was unable to travel CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Use your IRA to purchase real estate I never served one day in the Armed Forces. It simply was not my destiny. Sometimes, even now, I lay awake long into the night and wonder what if ... And I have always, deep down, been just a little ashamed that someone else was sent off to do my ghting for me. Maybe that is why I so admire, appreciate and love, in the truest sense of that word, every single man and woman that ever suited up on my behalf! My rst encounter with veterans started way back in grade school. On the eleventh day of the eleventh month the whole school turned out by the ag pole to see these old men line up behind a little cannon they’d brought with them. Miss Carolyn said they were from World War I. They’d wait till exactly eleven o’clock, re off that cannon, and then step back, rather smartly I thought for old guys, and salute while the high school band played the Star Spangled Banner. Most of them would wear their uniform jacket or an old green army hat. Some were tall and skinny; others short and fat. They looked pretty ordinary to me. I couldn’t picture those old guys ghting anybody! We called it Armistice Day back then. Daddy was a veteran. He never said a word about World War II. And I mean not one word! Me and David Mark couldn’t believe it when we found that old uniform in the closet. We had never heard of the South Paci c, and had no clue where it was. Mother wouldn’t let us ask him hardly anything about the war. Dave and I did take those bright colored ribbons and arrowheads off that dress uniform and pinned them on our t-shirts. We promptly lost them playing army down at the big ditch. If Dad ever noticed the missing awards, he never said a word. You’d a’ thought the whole war was just something to forget about and move on. Dad was about as ordinary as anybody you’d ever seen. I knew Chandler King was at Pearl Harbor. I remember Peajacket Lawrence served in the Navy. Mr. Ben Gaines had fought in Italy. Anne Alexander’s father was in the service. As was Yogi’s and Ruth Ann’s. Almost all the merchants around town had served in one branch or the other. They seemed like such ordinary men to me. I was in the seventh grade before I realized there might be more to this veteran thing than meets the eye. You understand how silly and immature you can be at that age. I came home one day limping along and moving my head about, mocking an old man that lived just outside of town. In my own defense here, I knew nothing about shell shock or posttraumatic stress disorder. I made a couple of passes across the porch when it dawned on my Father who I was making fun of. Folks, he leaped across a rocker and two swings and lifted me off the concrete steps with one hand. He was literally shaking he was so mad! I could make fun of the ladies and their big hats at church and he never said a word. I could “preach” with my hand up in the air like Brother Hatcher and that was o.k. I picked on the wrong guy. “Son, you don’t know what that man has gone through. You have no idea of the nightmares he has seen. You don’t have a clue as to the sacri ces he has made. You wouldn’t know a real hero if he ran over you in a lighted hallway!” It was the only war related speech Dad ever gave. I think my youth and utter stupidity was all that kept me from being killed right there on the front porch! And, you’d better believe, I got the message loud and clear; a message of love, sacri ce and duty that knows no bounds or limits. By the ninth grade, I noticed half of the World War I guys that came out to celebrate the 11th with us were gone. I remembered Miss Belle telling us that every World War I veteran in town always participated in the event. What was left of them still red the cannon and stepped back as spritely as ever. I took notice for the rst time of those ordinary men around town. Come Fourth of July at the parade, when our small high school band struck up The National Anthem, those men came to a ram rod straight position. Their chins were up. Their moist eyes xed on the American ag. Undoubtedly, they were transported to another place and another time. And I can only imagine the horrors of war and the remembrances that must be streaming across their collective minds ... especially of the ones they personally knew that didn’t come back. Ordinary men, I don’t think so! We’ve sent the same caliber of people, including David Mark, to Viet Nam. We have them now in Korea, Iraq and Afghanistan. By November 11th, 1964, my senior year in high school, there were only four World War I veterans left. One was in a wheel chair. It had snowed and those men were standing in the freezing temperature to re that old cannon. As the band hit the rst note, the man in the wheel chair struggled to his feet. His lifelong friends got him erect. Everyone stood for the presentation of the colors! That was the day I shed my rst tears for an American veteran. Most Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert The Process Page 4 Thursday, November 7, 2013 Twenty-One Guns Ain’t Near Enough! See IRA A5 See CRANKS A5

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Local The Star| A5 Thursday, November 7, 2013 “He could not guarantee anything,” Burkett said. Over the span of 18 months there have been seven more surgeries and rehabilitation from each and every one. He was relegated fulltime to a wheelchair. He has, his doctor de scribed, a “condominium” for a neck. Much of it prosthesis with his upper vertebrae steadily growing around and to it. He spent months with a halo screwed into to his head, unable to move his head freely, unable to sleep other than upright. “That I wouldn’t wish on anyone,” Burkett said. His family, he said, “sac riced a lot.” Two brothers and two sisters helped transport Burkett to and from doc tor’s appointments in Bay County three to four times a week. They looked after him, took him in. With the help of a home nurse, who still comes three times a week, they helped Burkett as he regained con trol of his bodily functions. “It affects every part of your body,” Burkett said. “I didn’t realize how much.” In time, he moved onto HealthSouth in Bay County for rehabilitation. The staff at HealthSouth encountered a ghter. “They really tend to re habilitate you to acclimate you to be in a wheelchair because that’s where they think you are going to be,” Burkett said. “I wasn’t go ing to stay in no wheelchair. “When people started telling me what I couldn’t do, that is when I decided I could.” He drew inspiration from Wounded Warriors, such as those who visit Bay and Gulf counties. He listened to televised speeches and read written words from those warriors who had survived horric injuries and somehow found the purpose to rise above limitations. “I kept hearing, ‘You are as disabled as you want to be,’” Burkett said. He transitioned from HealthSouth to Sacred Heart on the Gulf to con tinue his rehab under the direction of Kimberly Thomas. “She would get me out of that wheelchair and we’d walk and walk,” Burkett said. “I came there in a wheelchair and I came out walking.” Thomas, Burkett said, is the reason he is now riding a bike ve miles a day, has whittled his daily medica tions from nine to two and is working with weights three days a week at One Way Fit ness Center. Burkett spent eight months under the care of Thomas, who pushed, ca joled and celebrated each milestone. Burkett said he also took inspiration from friends and neighbors, folks in the com munity who reached out and put him on so many prayer lists at churches. And two months ago, Burkett walked stify into One Way and began a work out routine. “I couldn’t put any weight on any of the machines,” Burkett said. “I used to be 275 pounds and I was down to 180. My legs, you could see the bones they were so skinny.” Now, they have the ap pearance of re plugs. From no weight on the leg press Burkett now pushes 300 pounds. He does a full circuit three days a week, working his arms, his legs, his core muscles. “I never would have thought I’d be doing this,” Burkett said. “But after the rst month I knew the sky was the limit. I don’t like anybody telling me what I can’t do. But I will tell you, this has been hard work. “There have been a lot of days I get out of bed and said no I ain’t going in there. But the improvement gives me encouragement. As long as you see improvement that keeps you going.” While he still has nerve issues with his hands – one operation at Shands was unsuccessful due to a staph infection and Burkett has another scheduled next year – he can open anything he wants. He is a “self-sufcient cook.” He has returned to one of his great loves shing. “They used to say I was the best at throwing a cast net in the county,” Burkett said, his face brightening when recalling the rst time he set a hook with a cricket. “I can still throw it, but I can’t turn it loose.” Burkett is philosophi cal about the journey of the past two years. There has been education. “I needed something like this before it happened,” Burkett said. “This was ab solutely a walk-up call for me.” And he is trying to nd sense for others from the tragedy of similar circumstances. There is the young man from the community who recently broke his neck in a freak accident. Asked by his father to speak to the young man, Burkett did, telling him nothing will hold him back but his own will. The father called last week to say the son had his best week of rehab – ever. “I’m trying to give back what the community gave me,” Burkett said. “I can tell people things nobody else can tell them because I have been there. “I am a walking miracle. You can’t give up and you can’t let people tell you what you can’t do. Every night I thank God I am laying down and every morning I am thanking God I am getting up.”TIM CROFt T | The Star Burkett does a full circuit of training with weights less than two years after suffering a broken neck and the prognosis of spending the rest of his life in a wheelchair. different guidelines and rules apply as to how the property is purchased and how the property can be used during the purchasing period. This approach is used when the IRA holder wants to invest for personal use. The pros and cons of each method should be carefully studied and understood before you make any changes to your IRA. Third, decide which custodian is best for you. Your custodian/advisor must be able to help you decide which purchasing approach is best for you and help structure your transaction so that you will use the proper documents and correctly purchase the property. In addition, your advisor/custodian should provide ongoing service and compliance reviews to keep you informed of any tax law changes. Real Estate IRAs are similar to 1031 Tax Deferred Exchanges; both have been around since the 1970’s and real estate investors must carefully learn about these nancial transactions before either can be used. Knowing that Real Estate IRAs are an option can help real estate investors / IRA holders take advantage of today’s buyer’s market, provide risk management opportunities and create something they did not previously know was possible. Alan N. Potts is a Chartered Financial Consultant. He can be reached at 1.800.525.1893 or alanpotts@pottsfinancial.co m For his free Question and Answer Guide, please go to his website: www.pottsfinancial.co m IRA from page A4 to Alabama for the game. They just printed me four new tickets. Please note that I had proof of paying for these and what the seat numbers were, etc. Tim handed them to me outside the ticket window. I hugged Tim. Good people in Alabama and Tennessee (and Ohio, West Virginia and Washington). When I say Washington, I am referring to the state where Don James was a college football coach. Now I had eight tickets and I felt a little bad. We decided the best thing to do was to nd someone who needed them. Folks were standing outside the stadium scalping tickets for a lot of money. We had no right to sell tickets that were given to us, thus I had to interview some folks. The rst fellow I met was there celebrating his 56th birthday, he was a minister of sorts who runs a program that uses sports for mission type work. His mother had given him the money to buy tickets for him and his wife for his birthday. I told him to just put the money in the collection plate at church, or use it for his mission work or give it back to his mama. He hugged me. The other two tickets were given to a man and his son from Daphne, Alabama. We watched folks walk up to them and the daddy just kept shaking his head “no.” I asked the little boy how old he was and he said, “Twelve.” I said, “Someday you are going to be old like me and I want you to do something nice for someone.” The little boy just smiled. The game was great. Well, if you were an Alabama fan, it was great. The Tennessee folks around us were nice, as were the Alabama fans. So, The Process does not belong to Nick Saban, it can and should belong to all of us. It involves working hard, helping people reach their goals (and nd their tickets), being kind and generous and raising a family that thinks the same way. Read more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. C raRA NKS from page A4 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m Janice Keeler remembers the black blouse. Keeler moved to Gulf County two years ago from Houston and in January 2012 she needed to re new her driver’s license. She put on one of her favorite black blouses and got in her car. She could barely breathe. “That blouse was so tight I had to unbutton the bottom few but tons so I could breathe,” Keeler said. “I decided right then I would go on a diet.” Keeler was 130 or so pounds when she was a young adult and did not put on weight until after having her children and her mar riage broke down. She was tipping 300 pounds. As a diabetic, that weight brought additional issues. And she had been down the dieting road before with little suc cess, even tried Weight Watchers for a time. “I would start out hot and heavy but I didn’t keep to it,” Kee ler said. “It is easy to fall off the wagon. This is hard. “But this time I needed to get off the 300 mark.” Her diet was dramatic. She counted calories and began to re strict herself to 700 a day. She eliminated the bread she loved so much, the pasta, the rolls – the carbohydrates that so easily turn to fat. “I concentrated on eating meat and fruits and vegetables,” Keeler said. The rst four months, she said, were hard. She found herself travel ing down the cookie and snack aisles of the grocery store. She would stare at what she knew she couldn’t and shouldn’t have. She visited the Health Depart ment who provided a coach, Deb bie, and doctor, Kevin Murphy to monitor Keeler’s progress and her health. The weight started melting off dramatically. Twenty, thirty, forty pounds slipped away. Today Keeler is 63 pounds lighter. “It really came off fast early but now every two weeks or so I am losing two to three pounds,” Keeler said. “That is not discour aging. I am still losing weight and feeling better. “I really feel good. I don’t huff and puff. I have energy. I can t into a lot of clothes I couldn’t before.” She joined One Way Fitness Center and spends each morning at the gym. She will ride a station ary bicycle for 45 minutes and perform some weight training. She is religious about her rou tine. If it is 10 a.m. ET during the week, Keeler is in the gym. “I am on a routine and I need to stick to it,” Keeler said. “I really want to get my weight down. I am never going to be 160 or 170 but I can lose more. The thin people at the gym don’t bother me. They are thin, I am heavy. It’s no big deal. “I am here to do what I need to do to lose weight. I just need to keep plugging along.” She has learned more about proper diet, trying to “buy right” and eat sugar free where possible. “I am 65 years old and I need to take care of myself,” Keeler said. “It is hard but I never thought I would lose 60 pounds. It’s a strug gle. You just need to set your mind to it. “I’m shocked by myself. When I try on my thin clothes I know this works. I just needed to learn that (the way I ate and lived) was not a good thing for me at this time.” By SH irIR LEY JENK iI N sS Tax Collector Notice is hereby given that the 2013 Tax Roll has been delivered by the Gulf County property apprais er to the Gulf County tax collector. The 2013 Tax Roll is open for collection begin ning Nov. 1. The tax collector’s ofce is located in the Gulf Coun ty courthouse, room 147 at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., in Port St. Joe. Ofce hours are from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday, except holidays. Real and personal property taxes will be col lected as levied by the following taxing authori ties: Gulf County Board of County Commissioners, Gulf County School Board, Northwest Florida Water Management District, City of Port St. Joe, City of We wahitchka, St. Joseph Fire Control District, Tupelo Fire Control District, How ard Creek Fire Control Dis trict and Overstreet Fire Control District. The discount schedule is as follows: 4 percent dis count if paid in November, 3 percent discount if paid in December, 2 percent dis count if paid in January, 1 percent discount if paid in February, payable without discount in March and tax es delinquent April 1. TIM CROFt T | The Star Janice Keeler works out at the gym religiously ve days a week. LL osing to live Tax Roll N OO T II CE much if any progress. “People just want to see some action,” Mc Croan said. Costin replied that the key difference now was the collaboration agreement with the St. Joe Company. Until the Port Authority and St. Joe signed a formal agreement, the company and Port Authority had butted heads on how the port and surrounding lands would be developed. St. Joe is now committed to developing the 5,000 acres it owns along the Intracoastal Ca nal as well as the old mill site and bulkhead, and is collaborating in the development of the 100 acres owned by the Port Authority. “St. Joe, that is the changing factor in what we are doing now,” Costin said. And as the government entity to which state and federal funding would ow, the Port Authority plays a pivotal role simply by re maining active. Costin noted that port director Tommy Pitts has taken other employment (see “Pitts to lead dredge permit work” on Page A1) and administrative assistant Nadine Lee was working strictly as a volunteer. “We (the Port Authority) are pitching in any way we can,” Costin said, adding the Port Authority was also receiving considerable inkind assistance from the Economic Develop ment Alliance. “They are helping us any way we can. “I just think we all need to think together on this, the city, the county and as a region.” PORT from page A1 M iraIRA CLE from page A1

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) BWO H unti ng H e a dq u a r ters : CAMO AR RIV ING DAIL Y Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-886 8 WEEKL Y ALM ANA C S T JO SE PH B A Y AP AL A C HI C O L A B A Y W EST P ASS T I DE T ABLES M O NT H L Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu N o v 7 81 53 67 % F ri, N o v 8 71 58 9 % S a t N o v 9 74 62 18 % Sun, N o v 10 78 58 23 % M on, N o v 11 75 50 17 % T ues N o v 12 75 52 0 % W ed N o v 13 77 55 1 % SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Good flounder are being caught around the old channel marker towers at the mouth of the bay. Most anglers are finding fish deeper this month due to the fall feeding patterns that are emerging. Local waters are coming back to life after the cold snap and the rain. Good reports from the Brothers and around Howard Creek are abuzz with good bream catches. Scipio Creek is also producing nice speckled trout since the cold snap. Special to The Star Florida manatees are beginning their annual migration to warmer waters, which is their instinctual response to winter’s approach and surviving the cold. As these slow-moving aquatic mammals migrate along rivers, canals, bays and coastlines, the FWC cautions boaters to slow down and watch out for manatees. The average adult manatee is 1,000 pounds and 10-feet long but may be dif cult to spot despite its size. “You can help manatees by slowing down and following posted speed zones when operating boats or personal watercraft. Manatees often feed in shallow seagrass beds adjacent to deeper waters,” said Carol Knox, the FWC’s Imperiled Species Management Section Leader. “Wearing polarized sunglasses helps you spot a manatee underwater. Also watch for circular wave patterns on the water’s surface, called manatee footprints, indicating a manatee’s presence below.” Throughout the state, many seasonal manatee protection zones go into effect Nov. 15. Look for signs posted on the water indicating boat speed zones. A “slow speed” zone means a boat should be completely settled in the water, not creating an excessive wake. Go to MyFWC.com/Manatee, and click on Data and Maps to see FWC manatee protection zones. November is also Manatee Awareness Month, a time to celebrate Florida’s of cial state marine mammal. The FWC asks people to report sick, injured, orphaned, entangled or dead manatees by calling the Wildlife Alert hotline at 888404-FWCC (3922), texting Tip@MyFWC.com or calling #FWC and *FWC via cellphone. Floridians can support manatee conservation efforts by purchasing a manatee license plate at BuyaPlate.com or through their local tax collector’s of ce when obtaining or renewing a vehicle tag. They also can get a manatee decal at those of ces or by visiting MyFWC.com/Manatee and clicking on “Decals.” For “A boater’s guide to living with Florida Manatees,” go to MyFWC. com/Wildlife. More manatee information is available at MyFWC. com/Manatee. By TOM BAIRD Special to The Star The seasons are turning, and while elsewhere people are enjoying the autumn foliage, we can witness impressive seasonal changes in the bay and gulf. Nowhere is this more dramatic than the plants of the upper salt marsh. The upper marsh responds to the seasons and the sea’s touch with varying colors. Seaside goldenrod displays bright bits of color and sea oxeye daisy (Borrichia frutescens) and salt marsh aster (Aster tenuifolius) create bands of color in the zones where they grow. The salt pannes or salt barrens now blaze red with glasswort and these same salt ats may have purslane in bloom. Sea lavender has sent up sprays of delicate purple owers that make the upper marsh look like it is covered by a lavender mist. The marsh plants tell the seasons as clearly as the trees in a forest. Irregularly ooded by the highest tides and visited by many terrestrial animals, the upper marsh is intimately linked to the regularly ooded lower marsh and eventually to the sea beyond. Plants of the upper marsh contend with extremes of salinity and drying. The majority are halophytes, salt tolerant plants that exhibit modi cations and adaptations to their habitat. Succulents and plants with a thick waxy cuticle keep water loss to a minimum. In some marsh plants, salt glands secrete the excess salt taken in from the soli and tides. Salt crystals sparkle from their leaves on dry sunny days. Other plants resolve the salt problem by preventing salt uptake by the roots. De nite zonation patterns based on their abilities to tolerate salt and drying characterize upper marsh plants. The plant dominating the irregularly ooded high marshes of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts is needle rush or black rush (Juncus roemerianus). Growing on higher ground and generally behind the more productive cord grass, this is the plant that often looks dead and brown. In some sections of the bay, the high marsh is characterized by salt-meadow hay (Spartina patens) and spike grass or salt grass (Distichlis spicata). More birds nest in this zone than anywhere else in the marsh. Growing mixed with the salt grass in the same zone is the more attractive, but less abundant plant, sea lavender (Limonium carolinianum). Salt glands on this perennial herb help it withstand submersion in seawater. During most of the year the plant is low growing and inconspicuous; then, in a period of less than a week, it ourishes into a showy, delicate, multi-branched spray of tiny lavender blossoms. The high marsh glows with purple owers, and the migrating butter ies love the nectar. Parts of the marsh receive such little tidal ooding or run-off from the land that evaporation causes the soil salinity to become excessively high. Only a select few plants are adapted to these harsh salt barrens. One of the few plants able to grow in the salt barrens is glasswort (Salicornia), found worldwide in tropical and temperate regions. The plant is composed largely of succulent, saltlled, oppositely branching, jointed stems. The genus name, Salicornia, is derived from the Latin sal, meaning “salt” and cornu, meaning “horn,” referring to the plant’s saltiness and hornshaped stems. Its reduced scaly leaves make the plant appear to the lea ess. Glasswort is edible – snap off some and try it – and is used for making pickles or in salads, but is also valuable simply for the variety it adds to the marsh with its re-red autumn coloration. Other plants often found on or near salt barrens are saltwort (Batis maritima), and sea purslane (Sesuvium portulacastrum). Saltwort may cover the ground almost exclusively in very saline areas, and can be found in profusion on some of the low islands in St. Joseph Bay. It owers from spring to late fall and produces a berry. Sea purslane, like glasswort, is edible. The pinks and purples of sea purslane owers add color to the browns and greens of marshes. Along the inland fringe of the salt marsh occur species of plants associated with coastlines but growing in areas that are ooded only during the extreme storm surges. This group includes sea myrtle (Baccharis halimifolia), marsh elder (Iva frutescens), seaside goldenrod (Solidago sempervirens) and Christmas berry (Lycium carolinianum), as well as various willows and sumac. It is the cottony owers of sea myrtle and the small blossoms of marsh elder that attract and feed so many migrating butter ies each fall. Both can be seen on US 98 just east of town and along the edge of the marsh. If you see a bush covered in butter ies during this time of year, it is likely either sea myrtle or marsh elder. Christmas berry brightens the high marsh with bluish owers and bright red fruit. Blending into upland hammocks is the beautiful and poisonous coral bean (Erythrina herbacea). In the spring, the bright red blossoms of this plant are conspicuous along the marsh edge, as well as, along the roads along St. Joseph Bay. Coastal Indians once made beads from its poisonous red and black seeds, and it is these red seeds that are visible now. Relatively few animals can endure the extremes of the upper marsh. The clapper rail both feeds and nests in the upper marsh. The diamondback terrapin, the only turtle in the world that lives in brackish and saltwater marshes, hibernates in the marsh muds, but lays its eggs in the sandy areas above the high tide mark. The rough green snake and the salt marsh snake (Nerodia clarkii) live in this zone. Rarely seen, the salt marsh snake is strictly nocturnal. Besides rails, marsh wrens and seaside sparrows are some of the birds that inhabit this zone. Scott’s seaside sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus peninsulae) is the race found locally and is picky in terms of habitat. It is a salt marsh obligate. Besides resident populations of ddler crabs, rails, wrens, and terrapins, the marsh vegetation supports many migrants. Raccoons, opossums, deer and mice visit the upper marsh for food. Considerable research has been conducted on the regularly ooded low marshes, where nutrients and metabolic wastes can be exchanged on each high tide. Only spring tides, storm tides, and winddriven tides ever cover the upper marshes, where nutrient exchanges are less well understood. Yet, the high marsh plants function as a buffer between polluted water run-off from land and the highly productive lower marsh. Construction set-backs are necessary to protect this critical transition zone, which is not only an important wildlife habitat but a protective buffer for the regularly ooded salt marsh. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. Watch out for manatees migrating to warmer waters Page 6 Thursday, November 7, 2013 LIKE US ON THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Life in the High Marsh SPECIAL TO THE STAR LEFT: Seaside goldenrod MIDDLE: Sea lavender RIGHT: Sea oxeye daisy

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com A Section =t›{… 9‹‹ ›… Gt Œ ?t£ 9{›†  t› I9W Wf IV^[ E VER Y D A Y 3:30 pm 6:30 pm w w w .docksideseaf oodandra wbar .com Bring Y our F riends a nd Get Ho ok e d! Q {… ?†• \WB =L9 Q \ 9‹‹ b Š  • I? DQ 9 ] \= [ BB U \ U B b By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com PORT ST. JOE — The team of scant chances when the 2013 football season began took full advantage of another one last Friday night. A Port St. Joe squad that has seemingly played against the odds each week dismantled Class 1A fourth-ranked Liberty County 24-7 at Shark Field to claim the District 4-1A title and a home game when the playoffs begin in two weeks. In a defensive struggle — the Bulldogs enjoyed a yardage advantage of 200-180 — Port St. Joe made the key defensive stops while Dwayne Griggs scored three touchdowns, including an electric kickoff return. The second half was emblematic of the whole. The Bulldogs marched 65 yards in six plays early in the fourth quarter to score, but surrounded the drive by giving up the ball on downs three times and having two other drives ended by the only turnovers of the game, a fumble and interception. “I thought we came ready to play,” said Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon. “We were really focused in all week in practice. The kids remembered last year when they came from 19 points down.” “You keep telling them they are playing the fourth-ranked team in the state. We have to make a statement. I thought our kids did that tonight.” With the district title within grasp the past two weeks, the Tiger Sharks (7-2 overall, 3-0 in district play) outscored West Gadsden and Liberty County 41-10. “They just outplayed us,” said Liberty County coach Grant Grantham. “They were the better team. We missed some things tonight offensively, but we also did not block well. I don’t know what we could have done differently, they just outplayed us.” The Tiger Sharks struck on their rst drive, taking advantage of a 4yard punt that gave them the ball at the Bulldog 41. Port St. Joe drove to a 6-yard touchdown run by Griggs in seven plays, punctuated by a 35-bolt from Jarkeice Davis (a game-high 75 yards rushing) on third-and-16 from the 45. Drew Lacour added the extra point for a 7-0 lead. Liberty County marched into Tiger Shark territory on its next drive but sputtered behind a holding call, and Port St. Joe took over at its 34 after stopping the Bulldogs on downs. Consuming 15 plays and more than 6:30 of the clock, the Tiger Sharks marched to the 1 before Griggs scored on a jet sweep, barely sneaking inside the pylon. Griggs fueled the drive with a seven-yard run on fourth-and-6 at the Bulldog 24, and Davis added spark when he weaved 13 yards through the middle of the Liberty County defense on a third-and-eight from the 15. Lacour’s extra point made it 140, and the teams traded punts before heading into the locker room at intermission. Gannon said after the game that Liberty County was a good comeback team, but the hill got much steeper on the second-half kickoff. Having deferred after winning the coin toss to open the game, the Tiger Sharks got rst crack in the third period, and in 13 seconds, Griggs turned the kickoff into a 86yard sprint to the end zone, breaking clean through the wedge before heading down the right sideline untouched. Lacour made it 21-0. “That return was big,” Gannon said. “We know they can come back, they did last year, and that allowed us to take a bit of wind out of their sails.” Liberty County pulled to 21-7 on a 9-yard run by William Hayes in the rst minute of the fourth period. But on the Bulldogs’ next drive, following a 50-yard punt by Griggs that pinned them at their 1, Hayes was stripped of the ball by Davis with T.J. Williams recovering to set up an 18-yard eld goal by Lacour. Marcell Johnson ended Liberty County’s nal possession when he intercepted Micah McCaskill (7 of 18 for 116 yards) near mid eld. Less than a minute later the Tiger Sharks were dancing as a group, celebrating a district championship. Port St. Joe nishes the regular season next Friday at Arnold and hosts South Walton next week in a region semi nal. Find ticket information on Page A8 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Sports fans will enjoy a bountiful feast next week. Two basketball tournaments, the opening of the regular season in soccer and a Class 1A regional football semi nal, are on tap during a week in which sports fans will have plenty to be thankful about. The week gets started with the Boutique By the Bay Tip-Off Classic, a varsity basketball tournament hosted over two nights by Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. On Tuesday, Port St. Joe will face Blountstown at 7:30 p.m. ET immediately after a contest between Tallahassee FAMU and Franklin County that tips off at 6 p.m. The teams will switch on Thursday, Nov. 14, when Franklin County faces Blountstown at 6 p.m. ET followed by Port St. Joe versus FAMU. Port St. Joe basketball coach Derek Kurnitsky noted that FAMU has a shooting guard who recently verbally committed to play next year at Ole Miss. “It has been six or seven years since we hosted a preseason tournament, and I was tired of going on the road,” Kurnitsky said. “We like basketball here, and we will have two nights of very good basketball. “It is preseason so the games don’t count, but we wanted to host a tournament. It should be some good basketball. And we have a Division I signee who will be playing.” The rst night of the Tip-Off Classic coincides with the opening regular season games in soccer as Port St. Joe hosts Malone. The Tip-Off Classic will lead into the opening of the Region 1-1A football playoffs, which will have the Tiger Sharks hosting South Walton. “It’s kind of neat,” Kurnitsky said. “Football gets the years started, and the way the football team has played, it feels like Port St. Joe is relevant again. We haven’t been down long, just two years, but this has worked out perfect. “When football wins it just starts the school year right, lifts the spirit and just gets everybody excited. I think it is pretty neat we are going to have a week of nothing but football and basketball.” The sweet sports week is iced Saturday by the annual Port St. Joe Hoopfest, which will bring 12 teams to town for a junior high boys’ and girls’ basketball tournament sponsored by Centennial Bank. “We are having teams from all over the Panhandle,” Kurnitsky said. “We have so many games and teams that some of the games will spill over to the Washington Gym, which I think is pretty special.” The Hoopfest gets started at 9 a.m. ET next Saturday. Entry to the Tip-Off Classic is $5 per night, the same for the all-day Hoopfest. The Florida High School Athletics Association requires ticket prices for playoff football to be $8. “A lot of people paid $200 to see Miami and Florida State this past weekend, and they are going to be able to see some good basketball and football for just $23,” Kurnitsky said. “That’s a pretty good deal.” Star Staff Report Given the mantra of “teamrst” that has fueled Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School the entire football season, it is tting that only a handful of Tiger Sharks were recognized on the Florida Athletic Coaches Association All-District 2Class 1A team. The FACA District 2 encompasses teams from Walton County to Jackson County. The 1A team represents the small schools within those boundaries. Port St. Joe placed just one player, sophomore linebacker Marcell Johnson, on the All-District team for players regardless of grade. State top-ranked Blountstown, represented by the Coach of the Year Greg Jordan and district Most Valuable Player Hunter Jordan, placed the most players on the team with eight. Chipley had ve and Sneads and Vernon four apiece. The district All-Senior squad included Drew Lacour, Jacobie Jones, Natron Lee and Dwayne Griggs from Port St. Joe. Griggs nished third in the MVP voting behind Hunter Jordan and running back Kobe McCrary from Chipley. All players selected to the all-District seniors team are eligible to play in an all-star game in late December. Nominations for those players will be made later by coaches from the district. SPECIAL TO THE STAR Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School will host varsity and junior high basketball tournaments this week sandwiched around the Tiger Sharks football playoff game against South Walton. Page 7 Thursday, November 7, 2013 FACA all-District 1A teams announced MARCELL JOHNSON NATRON LEE DEWAYNE GRIGGS JACOBIE JONES DREW LACOUR Sports fan nirvana next week SPECIAL TO THE STAR Dwayne Griggs, shown against Franklin County, scored three touchdowns, including an electrifying kickoff return, to help Port St. Joe clinch the district title. PSJ dominates Liberty County

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A8 | The Star Thursday, November 7, 2013 THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER S K I N C A N C E R c a n b e p r e s e n t w i t h o u t y o u k n o w i n g i t C A L L t o d a y f o r a s k i n c a n c e r s c r e e n i n g D I D Y OU K N O W t h a t s t u d i e s s h o w : # # ' # * # # ' ' % ' ! ' $ ' % &, ' % ' ! $ ' % & % ( ! # # # # ' ' # % % % # # ' % ' # # % ' ! ' N O W D I D Y OU K N O W ? # % ' ' & ' # ! ' + # % # & ' # ' % # . ' ) # + % ' # & ' % # ' # ' % % $ # ' VI N C E N T I VE R S M .D 3 0 1 T w e n t i e t h S t r e e t | P o r t S t J o e F L 3 2 4 5 6 8 5 0 2 2 7 7 0 7 0 | w w w i ve r s m d .c o m A L L M A J O R I N SUR A N C E A C C EP T ED 9 a m 6 p m 9 a m 2 p m The Panhandle Players Present “TWO HOOTS BY DUSK. TWO BODIES BY DA WN” November 15-16, 7:30 pm November 17, 3:00 pm At The Dixie Theatr e Tickets ar e $15 and may be pur chased at: Downtown Books in Apalachicola, The Butler Agency in Eastpoint, Carrabelle Junction, No Name Cafe Books & Mor e in Port St. Joe, and Caribbean Cof fee in Mexico Beach. Pr oduced in Special Arrangement with Samuel Fr ench, Inc. 9 4 5 4 HWY 9 8 BEA C ON HILL A T THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 5 0 6 4 7 8 3 1 0 GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL Y OUR F A VORITE BEER WINE & SPIRIT S SOUTHERN SUND A Y RANDY ST ARK FL AB B ERG ASTED BAND RANDY ST ARK S S PIRIT & WINE B EER VORITE A F OUR Y A LL O F TION S ELEC T GREA ON THE POOP DECK UPCOMING EVENTS IN THE CR O W’S NEST K ARA OKE W E HA VE MOVED T O: 327 REID A VE (CORN E R OF 4TH St & REID A VE.) 850-227-3472 HOU RS MONDA Y T O W EDN ESDA Y 8 AM T O 6 PM THU RSDA Y T O SA TU RDA Y 8 AM T O 8 PM SU NDA Y 11 AM T O 6 PM Star Staff Report With gorgeous weather and great competition, the boys’ soccer season got under way last Saturday as Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School hosted a preseason jamboree. The action opened with Port St. Joe beating Tallahassee Godby 3-1. Rocky Bayou Christian followed with a 5-0 win over Godby, and the day’s action was completed as Rocky Bayou and Port St. Joe battled to a 1-1 deadlock. With the jamborees behind both Port St. Joe squads, the 16-game regular season gets underway next Tuesday when Port St. Joe hosts Malone High School beginning at 5 p.m. ET. The teams will compete in what Coach Gary Hindley described as a “difcult” District 1-1A. District foes include Tallahassee Maclay, Tallahassee John Paul, II, Lafayette Mayo, East Gadsden, Rocky Bayou and Franklin County. Each district team will face every other squad once, and Port St. Joe and Franklin County will meet in out-ofdistrict competition. For the rst time, the program will host an in-school contest versus Baker on Tuesday, Nov. 26 with the girls starting at noon ET and the boys following at 2 p.m. Baker is off that entire week for Thanksgiving; Nov. 26 is the last day of classes for Gulf County schools before the break. The district tournaments will be hosted by Maclay, the girls Jan. 13-17 and the boys Jan. 20-24. Special to The Star The eighth annual Autumn Action Golf Tournament to raise funds for summer internships for students in High School High Tech of Port St. Joe had to be delayed because of stormy weather, but the golfers nally got off on a beautiful crisp fall Sunday afternoon and had a great time. Players came from as far away as Maine, Tallahassee and Panama City with many locals supporting the tournament and making it a success for the kids. The winning team was Andrew Rowell, Debbie Ashbrook, Tina LaCourse and Matt LaCourse from Panama City with a 60. Coming in close behind in second was a mixed team of visitors and locals, David Warriner, Gary Suttle, Kamen Woolery and William Woolery with a 62. Third was a local group, Andy Smith, Jay Rish, Bo Springs, and Michael Hammond with a 62. It was a close race with second and third decided by a tie breaker. Closest to the line for men was Andy Smith and for women was Penelope Evanoff. Closest to the pin for men was Kenny Wood and for women Tina LaCourse. Unfortunately, no one won the “Hole in One” prize of the Chevrolet from Bill Cramer Chevrolet but two players came within inches. The players feasted on Gant’s Barbecue while door prizes were being drawn. Everyone got a door prize because of the generosity of our local businesses many donations. Students from High School High Tech and some of their parents came out to register the players and meet and greet. They were John Keigans, Howard Townsend, Deontae George, Preston Burkett with the club’s sponsor Melissa Behee from Port St. Joe. Robyn Rennick from Dyslexia Research Institute in Tallahassee, the HSHT sponsor that administers the grant from the ABLE Trust helped out and Chandler Gilbert, a local St. Joe fellow who attends Woodland Hall Academy in Tallahassee came down to help out as well. Many thanks go to our major sponsors: Gulf County Tourist Development Council, Duke Energy, Gulf 2 Bay Construction, Drs. Anne and Fred Thomason, Main Stay Suites, Penelope’s Pet Stop, Dr. Michael and Wendy Saltzburg, Scallop Cove BP, Thirsty Goat, Coastal Community Association, Sandi and James Christy, Cape Trading Post and The Shrimp Company. Hole Sponsors were: Gulf Coast Real Estate Group, Mitch Burke, Sharon Grifth, Appliance Solution, Centennial Bank, Ed’s Red Hot Sauce, Sunset Bay Management Group, Judge Tim McFarland, El Governor Motel, Hannon Insurance, Gulf Coast Vacation Rentals, Big Fish Construction, Bo Knows Pest Control, Capital City Bank, Joseph Handman, Bayside Lumber & Building Supply, Coastal Properties, Carpet Country, Novak Law Group, Coastal Properties, Carpet Country, Cadence Bank, St Joe ACE Hardware, Beach Realty of Cape San Blas, Pridgeon-Rish Sunday School Class of FUMC and Fairpoint Communications. Many local businesses donated great door prizes for the tournament. Through the sponsors’ donations, at least 10 students will have paid summer internships. Auction, golf tourney to benet museum Boyer Band to perform during salute to veterans Special to The Star The third annual Silent Auction/Golf Tournament to benet the Camp Gor don Johnston WWII Muse um will be Nov. 8-9 at the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. As part of a full weekend event, a reception will be at 6 p.m. ET Friday, Nov. 8, with hors d’oeuvres, beer and wine, for a $10 entry fee. A cash bar for spirits will also be available and live music by The George Boyer Band. A silent auction will take place with auction items including limited edition prints of historic military and cultural events, gift baskets and area hotel stays. Other items are re quested. A variety or items will be available A benet golf tourna ment will be Saturday, with proceeds to support the Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum and the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. The club is open to the public, and the tourna ment will be a four-player, scramble format, kicking off at 12:30 p.m. ET with a short ceremony to honor America’s veterans and a 1 p.m. shotgun start. A meal and awards ceremony will follow. Cash prizes for the tournament will include $400 to the rst place team, $350 for second place and $200 for third place. A HoleIn-One Challenge will offer a $10,000 cash prize. The Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Muse um has been honored by Smithsonian Magazine for seven straight years and is dedicated to preserving the memories of the amphibi ous soldiers who trained at the camp, which is located in Carrabelle. The museum houses more than 10,000 square feet of artifacts, vehicles, photos, memora bilia and memories of the soldiers, sailors, and other military, as well as civilian personnel who trained at the camp during the WWII years. Hole sponsorships are available and tournament registration information can be found at www.stjo ebaygolf.com or by calling 227-1751 or Dan Van Treese at 227-8138. Special lodging packag es are available starting at $69.99/single, $89.99/double. Call the Mainstay Suites at 229-6246 for a reservation. The event is being sup ported by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. Sports REGIONAL FOOTBALL TICKET P rR ICES Star Staff Report The Nov. 15 home seminal regional game between the Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks and South Walton will begin at 7:30 p.m. ET. The Florida High School Athletics Association sets ticket prices for all State Series games. Prices for all fans will be $8 for all ages. No passes, No Gold Cards. The only passes than can be accepted are the FHSAA State Series pass. Port St. Joe soccer unbeaten in jamboreeAA utumn A A ction swinging success PP HOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAr R

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C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Which president said, “We cannot do everything at once, but we can do something at once”? Washington, Tyler, Coolidge, LBJ 2) What was the main surveillance plane used in the Persian Gulf War? E-3 AWAC, C-140, B-2 Spirit, RM-81 3) Where was America’s rst-ever opera performed in 1735? Boston, MA; Charleston, SC; Baltimore, MD; Albany, NY 4) What state is the “Toothpick Capital of the World”? Georgia, Montana, Oregon, Maine 5) A work published without a copyright is in “what”? Tort, Public domain, Encumbrance, Binder 6) What is caprock commonly found above? Artesian well, Talus, Glacier, Iceberg 7) What soldiers used “We’re Off to See the Wizard” as a marching song in WWII? British, Australian, Canadian, Brazilian 8) During the nal “Seinfeld” each 30second advertisement sold for an estimated how much? $100K, $500K, $800K, $1.5 million 9) What did the Austrian physicist Christian Johann Doppler study? Sound waves, Global warming, Einstein’s theory, Mothman 10) Which is in the same city as Dome of the Rock and Mount Zion? Stonehenge, Wailing Wall, Christ the Redeemer, Kremlin 11) What were 19th century Latin American dictators called? Cigarillos, Ocotillos, Caudillos, Bonillos 12) During the American Revolution many brides wore what color of wedding gowns as a sign of rebellion? Red, Blue, Green, Yellow 13) When Picasso died in 1973 what was the of cial appraised worth of his estate? $2,000; $135,000; $7 million; $250 million 14) According to the Wilson Sporting Goods Co., how many basketballs can be made from one cowhide? 2, 5, 11, 15 ANSWERS 1) Coolidge. 2) E-3 AWAC. 3) Charleston, SC. 4) Maine. 5) Public domain. 6) Artesian well. 7) Australian. 8) $1.5 million. 9) Sound waves. 10) Wailing Wall. 11) Caudillos. 12) Red. 13) $250 million. 14) 11. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Thursday, November 7, 2013 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Some believe music has healing abilities, and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf in Port St. Joe saw it rst-hand. Before this year’s Blast on the Bay songwriters’ festival even started lling Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach with songs straight out of Nashville, visiting writers Tim Buppert, Bob Regan and Wil Nance paid a visit to the hospital to perform for patients who wouldn’t be able to make it out to the weekend’s festivities. At a previous festival, Buppert told Paulina Pendarvis, Physician and Volunteers Services advocate for Sacred Heart, that he’d be interested in playing for the patients. This year, before the Blast could begin, Pendarvis reached out to take Buppert up on his offer. Buppert enlisted the help of some of his friends, and they arrived at the hospital with guitars and ddles in tow. “It was a great experience, and the people were wonderful,” said Bob Regan, a Grammy-nominated Nashville songwriter whose tunes have been recorded by Hank Williams Jr., Reba McEntire and Keith Urban. The festival brought Regan to Port St. Joe for the rst time, and he accompanied Buppert and Nance to the hospital, where they visited ve patients and played a mix of cover songs that included Motown hits and even some Western swing. Regan also wrote original one-verse songs for each patient. “I remember being in the hospital a few years back, and it can get a little boring,” Regan said. “Hopefully we broke it up.” In addition to being a fulltime songwriter and musician, Regan spends one day a week playing music for veterans in the Nashville area with PTSD and traumatic brain injuries. “I’ve seen rst-hand the therapeutic bene ts of music,” Regan said. “They spent about 20 minutes with each patient, making them forget about where they were, and making them feel so very special,” Pendarvis said. “It’s a testimony to the healing power of music.” Pendarvis praised the Blast on the Bay event and said she’s seen an increase in songwriters showing interest in giving back to the community while they are in town. One patient sang along with the writers while staff gathered outside the doors to listen in on the performances. “We were the rst ones to bene t from the songwriters’ amazing talent,” Pendarvis said. “How often do we get artists of their caliber in our area, more or less getting personal concerts with three of them?” Pendarvis is on the hunt for a musician to visit Sacred Heart to play music for patients on a regular basis. Those interested in volunteering can download an application online at www. sacred-heart.org or contact her at 229-5627. “Music has the power to help us forget our pain for the moment and to put us in a happier place,” she said. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Bridge at Bay St. Joe hosted a Hall of Fame Caf celebration to honor residents at the local nursing home. During the Friday ceremony, the Rev. Louie Jefferson Little Jr. was honored for distinguished military service and volunteerism, and former resident Ruth Schoelles was inducted for personal achievements, professional accomplishments and public service. Little is a member of the Ministerial Association and acts as a ll-in for the facility’s chaplain as needed. For the past six years, Little has volunteered at The Bridge every Saturday. He leads the facility’s 20-member congregation, where he conducts live music, provides gospel lessons and visits with residents. Raised in Troy, Ala., Little moved to Port St. Joe with his wife, Jean, who grew up in the area. He served in the National Guard for more than eight years and later worked in the Air National Guard as an air traf c controller. “It’s a great gesture,” Little said of the Hall of Fame recognition. “We get more out of it than we put in. It’s uplifting for us, and we feel blessed.” Little now serves as the Priest in Charge at the Church By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com T he 13th annual Ghosts on the Coast celebration packed Reid Avenue last Thursday for the biggest Halloween celebration in Gulf County. Hundreds of revelers in colorful costumes ranging from the classic ghosts and ghouls, to superheroes, to pirates and police of cers dotted Port St. Joe’s City Commons Park for costume contests, live music, a sh fry, street games, interactive art and of course, trick-or-treating. More than $2,000 worth of candy was donated to the Chamber of Commerce and distributed to 50 area businesses that participated in the event. Business owners handed out candy right from their doors or in the case of off-Reid businesses, the pavilions that were setup along the street. “Everyone one plays such an important role in making events like Ghosts on the Coast happen, and it truly is a community event,” Chamber director Paula Pickett said. Marketing for the event has handled by the Tourist Development Council, and Bridge at St. Joe honors residents, community members In a ceremony last week, Louie Jefferson Little Jr., right, was inducted into The Bridge at Bay St. Joe Hall of Fame for his years of military and community service. WES LOCHER | The Star Blast on the Bay songwriters Bob Regan, Wil Nance and Tim Buppert played for patients at Sacred Heart Hospital before their scheduled performances. SPECIAL TO THE STAR Nashville songwriters perform for Sacred Heart patients See BRIDGE B6 DEBBIE HOOPER AT JOEBAY.COM A little salt and pepper made Halloween better during the annual Ghosts on the Coast event. A Halloween spooktacular PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Above right, Mayor Mel Magidson takes part in the interactive art exhibit on Reid Avenue. At right, hundreds of contestants lined up for the chance to show off their duds on stage. See HALLOWEEN B6

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B2 | The Star Thursday, November 7, 2013 M eet Christa, a beautiful y oung f o xhound She w alks v er y w ell on a leash and will sit with a tr ea t Christa has begun cr a t e tr aining t o mak e the tr ansition t o her new home easier She gets along w ell with other dogs and is v er y pla yful with k ids and adults I f y ou ar e unable t o adopt a t this time per haps y ou c ould f ost er or mak e a D ona tion. A ll pets adopt ed fr om SJBHS will be curr en t on v ac cina tions and spa y ed/neut er ed P lease do not hesita t e t o email t o wnsend .hsdir ec t or@g mail .c om or adoptba y stjoe@g mail .c om or call the S t Joseph B a y Humane S ociet y a t 850-227-1103 and ask f or M elody or D ebbie! A pplica tions ar e a v ailable a t w w w .sjbhumanesociet y .or g W e r equir e all pot en tial adopt ers t o c omplet e an applica tion f orm. A doption f ees include our c ost of spa y/ neut er and curr en t v ac cina tions O ur hours f or the shelt er ar e T uesda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-4 pm! F aith 's T hrif t Hut is alw a y s in need of dona tions also and all the pr oc eeds go dir ec tly t o suppor t the animals in our car e! T he hours f or the st or e ar e T hursda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-3 pm. V olun t eers ar e alw a y s w elc ome a t both our st or e and our shelt er! O ur st or e and shelt er loca tion is 1007 T en th S tr eet in P or t S t Joe! Hope t o see y ou all ther e soon! I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y w w w s jbh u ma n e so c i e t y o r g bBBO WB ] 4514866 f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y 227 .7847 See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e $ ""/ &"/,( $ 0 + & /( ,& % + /. + & #& $ + (0 + #& ( / + 0 & /& ( 0 0& % $, 0" & #& %0 & ,+ & % $ & / + " , ( & ( % // & /, $& & $ " ,/" #/& + & & 0 & ( % $ & # # SELL YOUR LI S TI NG S HERE! $ % (850)22 7-7847 | tgolden@pcnh. com S O L D # O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e ac h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast Amateur radio license exams The Gulf Amateur Radio Society will sponsor amateur radio license exams at 10 a.m. ET on Saturday, Nov. 9. The location will be at the county EOC building in Port St. Joe, located behind the Robert Moore Annex. Get your license and get on the air or upgrade a present license. For registration and/or assistance contact C.H. Tillis, AJ4XJ at 648-8251. The Gulf Amateur Radio Society meets at 7 p.m. ET the rst Thursday of each month at the EOC building. Visitors are welcome. Sea Oats and Dunes Garden Club meeting Join the Sea Oats and Dunes Garden Club at its next monthly meeting at 11:30 a.m. ET o, Tuesday, Nov. 12. The meeting will take place at Beach Baptist Hall, 311 Columbus St., in St. Joe Beach. Senior Citizens needs your help Gulf County Senior Citizens, 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, is asking for donations of nonperishable foods for our low-income seniors such as juice, canned tuna and chicken, soup or vegetables. Small inexpensive bingo prizes are always needed for our clients who love to play bingo several times a week. Also needed are donations of items for arts and crafts. We provide a hot nutritious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and older. Transportation might be available to our meal sites. Anyone interested in coming to our sites in Port St. Joe or Wewahitchka for meals and activities or who would like to donate any of the items noted above can call Debbie at 229-8466. Star Staff Report The St. Joseph Bay Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will observe its Veterans Day Celebration and Patriotism Education on Monday, Nov. 11 at the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. Members will meet at the school at 9 a.m. EST for a Veterans program and move to the Sunset Coastal Grill for a business meeting and lunch. Anyone interested in more information on the DAR can call Sherrill Russ, 229-8574. Star Staff Report The Oak Grove Church at 613 Madison Ave. in Port St. Joe is again the proud host for this year’s annual dinner. We are asking for the wonderful volunteers that helped make this such a success in 2012 to help again this year. With the help of the men, women and children who helped, we were able to prepare, cook, package and deliver 800-plus meals to needy people in every area of Gulf County and Mexico Beach. We will be gathering to start preparing for the Thanksgiving dinner at noon ET on Nov. 27. We will need help putting boxes together, packaging cakes, slicing turkeys and setting up tables and supplies for Thanksgiving morning. An early crew and volunteers will be needed at 6 a.m. to warm up food and assist with other food preparation on Thanksgiving Day. There will be many positions to ll on Thanksgiving morning when the dinners are assembled, boxed and delivered. Anyone who would like additional information is asked to call Jerry Stokoe at 348-9108 or Jim Gainey at 227-1272. Special to The Star Do you love the garden and Christmas? Combine both on Nov. 16 at the Garden Club Center for Christmas in The Gar den. The address is 216 8th Street and the time is 1-3 p.m. ET. As a special guest, Da vid Goodson from Bay side Florist will present a program all about making your holiday center piece. All kinds of holiday good ies will be served, so you can start your Thanks giving and Christmas munching early. Tickets are $10 and are available from any Garden Club member, or you can call Betty Lewis at 229-6005. As more news, the Garden Club met for the regular meeting on Oct. 10 with decorations and center pieces with a fall theme. Hostesses Elaine Jackson and Lynda Bordelon treated all at tendees with soup and sandwiches. The outstanding pro gram was presented by David Goodson from the Bayside Florist. He dem onstrated all the details for making a burlap fall wreath. We welcome anyone interested in joining the club or just wanting to visit a meeting. Special to The Star Hometown lady Sharon Linda (Bunge) Skipper was not expected to live 41 years ago. Not only did she survive, but was named Ms. Guysie Mule Roundup Queen forever. Skipper is a resident of Twin Oaks Conva lescent Home at 301 S. Baker St. Alma, GA., 31510. A card or letter to her would be some thing she would cherish forever. Society Garden Club presents Christmas in the GardenSPEc C I a A L T o O TT HE STa A R David Goodson from Bayside Florist presented a program demonstrating how to make a fall wreath from burlap at the Garden Club October meeting. Society BRIEF sS DAR Veterans Day programSPEc C I a A L T o O TT HE STa A R DAR Charter Members Mazie Stone, Eda Ruth Taylor, Frann Smith and Bobbie Marshall were honored at the October meeting. Past Regents Betty Ann Owens and Virginia Harrison were recognized for their service to the chapter. Call for volunteers to annual Thanksgiving dinner SPEc C I a A L T o O TT HE STa A R Sharon Linda (Bunge) Skipper (standing) was named Ms. Guysie Mule Roundup Queen in Alma, Ga. Skipper named Ms. Guysie Mule Roundup Queen

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The Star| B3 Thursday, November 7, 2013 P r o f ess i o na l C o o k i e D e c o r a t o r o n S i t e w i th "ho w-t o" ins t r u c t i o ns. E v e r y thin g P r o v i d e d f o r Y o u T o D e c o r a t e Y o ur O w n C o o k i es!!! N O CH AR GE JUS T C O ME H A VE FUN! A s of No v emb er 1, 2013, w e will b e in our new lo c ation at: 310 Reid A v enue P or t S t Jo e 850-229-2999 C ome check out y our fa v orit es and the ne w it ems in st o ck! =V 9\ ] 9Q =9; LU UB b\ C oastal C abin... “ W her e the W a t er M eets the W oods ” School News By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com At long last, the Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks have a mascot. The as of yet unnamed shark mascot made its de but at the elementary school last week where it interact ed with students and then showed its dorsal n in pub lic at the football game last Friday. So what’s this shark’s name? That’s a question that can only be answered by a student at Port St. Joe Elementary or the high school. The student bodies of both Port St. Joe schools have been asked to play a vital role in naming the mas cot and will be encouraged to submit suggestions until Friday, Nov. 15, after which a group of faculty judges will narrow down the options to the best six. Once the nalist names are chosen, students will be able to vote for their favor ite during their lunches in return for a small donation that will go toward helping a school-afliated group to be determined. The mascot will ofcially be given its name at a future event. Special to The Star Gulf Coast State College’s Ca reer Development Center (CDC) is pleased to announce the launch of Career Coach, a free online tool de signed for students and community members to explore potential ca reers and career-oriented education al pathways. Through a simple key word search, students and visitors to the College’s website can learn about the employment prospects as sociated with any occupation. The real-time information is cus tomized to GCSC’s geographic region (Bay, Gulf and Franklin counties) and includes detailed wage estimates, projected annual job openings, upto-date local job postings and Gulf Coast’s corresponding programs and training for any specic career. For those who are unsure about careers they want to pursue, interest and personality tests are available through the CDC on campus, and based on the results of the tests, a list of potential jobs are provided. “Once I sit down with a student, Career Coach enables us to see the statistics for their results with one click,” said Denise Murks, Coordina tor of Career Development. “They can start by looking at a specic ca reer eld and Career Coach will take them right to our college catalog, showing what courses they would need to take to actually go into that eld of study.” If a career doesn’t look like the right t, individuals can view simi lar jobs. They can also search for careers based on the College’s top training programs — or the program or major they are interested in. Ca reer Coach also includes a built-in resume builder to help students and jobseekers quickly and efciently put together an updated resume with key skills and job experience highlighted. Career Coach can be ac cessed by visiting www.gulfcoast. edu/careercoach For more information, please con tact Denise Murks at (850) 872-3835 or email dmurks@gulfcoast.edu. Special to The Star The week of Nov. 11-15 Faith Christian School is hosting its annual Book Fair. There will be a wide variety of books to choose from ranging from preschool reading levels to advanced reading levels. Do you like crafts, cooking, mysteries, or jokes? This book fair will have it all! Thursday, Nov. 14, will be a special day for grandparents. A special grandparent breakfast is at 8 a.m. in the auditorium and each class will give a short exhibition. The students are so excited to show their grandparents what they have learned so far this year. Everyone is invited to visit the fair between the hours of 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Thank you to the Parent Teacher Organization (PTP) for sponsoring this week long event. Reading can take a child to all kids of places where he or she can meet all of characters, take countless adventures, and maybe even learn something. Special to The Star Flu season has arrived and the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County (DOH Gulf) has already made successful strides in providing inu enza (u) vaccinations to youth. Each year, the DOH-Gulf School Health Team partners with the Gulf County School District to kick off a u vac cination campaign. The campaign provides seasonal u vaccinations to students during regular school hours at each school location. “Each year, our student u vacci nation numbers continue to increase,” said Amy Driggers, School Health Coordinator for the Florida Depart ment of Health in Gulf County. “When more children are vaccinated against the u, u cannot as easily spread through the school system and into the community.” This year, the campaign began at the Wewahitchka Elementary School. Permission forms were sent home and returned, making this initiative convenient for parents and caregiv ers who are not able to take off work or schedule an appointment for their child. The school health team provid ed 107 u vaccinations to students in grades pre-k through 6, at the school. The school health team plans to con tinue the campaign, by offering vac cinations at Wewahitchka Junior and Senior High Schools and Port St. Joe schools. “The u is more dangerous than the common cold for children,” said Marsha Lindeman, Administrator for the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County. “The single best way to protect your children from the u is to get them vaccinated each year. Our School Health Program is committed to protecting the health of this com munity through prevention of commu nicable diseases in our children and their families.” DOH protects, promotes and im proves the health of all people in Flor ida through integrated state, county and community efforts. For more in formation, contact the Florida Depart ment of Health in Gulf County at 850227-1276 or visit www.gulfchd.com.SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR FRONT ROW : Ethan Thompson, Kiyleh Parker, Lily Wockenfuss, Hunter Ard. BACK ROW: Estevan Angel, DJ Davis, Ashley Eubanks, Celeste Hamm DAZZLING DOLPHIN sS TT he Lion’s TT ale SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR The Port St. Joe Tiger Shark mascot, seen with Dylan Harris, visited the elementary school last week. The mascot will be given a name by a lucky student. Name that shark DOH: School u vaccination campaign success GCSC launches online career coach tool Special to The Star The Visual and Performing Arts Division of Gulf Coast State College will present the Broadway musical “Les Misrables,” on Nov. 15, 16, 22 and 23 at 7:30 p.m. CT and on Nov. 17 and 24 at 2:30 p.m. CT in the Amelia Center Theatre. The musical is based on Victor Hugo’s 1862 novel and takes place 43 years after the French Revolution. It explores the themes of redemption, conscience, idealism, justice, pas sion, loss and love. The now legendary musical, writ ten by Alain Boublil and Claude-Mi chel Schnberg, rst opened in 1980 in Paris and since then, it has been performed in many different lan guages all over the world. The box ofce opens an hour and a half before each performance. Ad vanced ticket purchase is strongly recommended. Reservations can be made online at www.gulfcoast.edu/ arts. Adult tickets are $20 and tickets for anyone younger than 18 are $10. Because of the subject matter and length of the show, the production is recommended for mature middle school teens and older. For more information, visit the website or call Tiffany Fraioli at 872-3886 or email tfraioli@gulfcoast. edu. GCSC VPA presents ‘Les Misrables’

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FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) Mor nin g Pra y er & Hol y Com mun ion Sun day ... ... ... ... ... 10: 00 A.M The Re v Lou Lit tle Pri est Ser vic es T emp ora ril y at Sen ior Cit ize ns Cen ter 120 Lib rar y Dri v e An Unc han gin g F ait h In A Cha ngi ng W orl d COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. T OUCHING LIVES WITH THE LO VE OF JESUS 6pm C um b aa M o n ume n t s I nc S e r v i ng N W F lo r ida S i n c e 1963 J AMES ( JR) GR O VER P h: 850-674-8449 C e l l: 850-899-0979 jrg r o v@ms n.c o m B l o un ts t o w n, FL 32424 C o m p a r e O ur P rices F ind the One t o F i t Y o ur B ud g et Matthew L. Walker was born on Nov. 22, 1967, at Gulf Pines Hospital in Port St. Joe, Fla., and passed away suddenly in Texas on October 25, 2013, after a tragic accident while riding the motorcycle that he loved. Matt, as he was known to his family and friends, was a 1985 graduate of Port St. Joe High School and a member of the First Baptist Church in Port St. Joe. He also served brie y in the United States Air Force. Most recently, he was excelling as a supervisor at Motiva Bechtel, a worldwide energy company based in Texas. Matt is survived by his parents, Donna and Tommy Walker of Port St. Joe. He was a gift to them from God, and he is now at peace with his Heavenly Father. A graveside service was held at Holly Hill Cemetery on Monday, Nov. 4, 2013, under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home. The family wishes to express their sincere gratitude for all of the many prayers and acts of love and kindness during this dif cult time. Matthew L. Walker MATTHEW L. WALKER Obituaries Robert Clifton Clifford McCleary, 67, passed away on Oct. 29, 2013 in Miami. Born in Mobile, Ala., the son of Leola Elizabeth Gathers and Stephen Gathers, Jr., he was a former resident of Port Saint Joe, educated at George Washington High School and served his country in the Army in Vietnam during the Vietnam War. He now rests from the labor of the world. His dedication and genuine love of his family and friends will live forever in the hearts of those who know him best. Survivors include his loving wife, Doris Jean McCleary; two daughters, Angela Jackson and Latasha McCleary; siblings, Yvonne Landrine, Caroline Sims (Thomas), Doris (Pastor Morning), Gwen Dawson (Darion), Sandra Addison, Tressie Ross (Fred), Patricia Williams, Steve Gathers, III. Preceding Robert in death were his siblings: James Earl Gathers, Jimmy Gathers and Wanda Jean Gathers; and a host of other relatives and friends. The funeral service was held on Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, at New Bethel A.M.E. Church conducted by the Rev. Johnnie Jenkins. Interment followed in Forest Hill Cemetery. Services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Robert Clifton Clifford McCleary Special to The Star The life-long impact of a tumultuous past will be discussed at 7 p.m. CT Monday at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Getting Past Your Past: And Making the Most of Your Future, features a lmed interview with author and actor Michael Fosberg, creator of the oneman show, Incognito. At the age of 32, after growing up in a middle-class white family, Fosberg contacted his estranged birth father and discovered a fact that had been kept from him: Fosbergs father wasnt who he thought he was. Imagine discovering youre not the person you thought you were, says Fosberg. The discovery prompted Fosberg to consider how the past shapes us and what might allow us to change directions. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is located at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehousetype setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@ fairpoint.net. Personal histories explored at Lifetree Caf Thank you Lord for shedding the light, on one of our creatures, hidden in the night. After my name was written in the Book, within a year or so, you could nd me in a juke. At rst I ran around with the ones that did the drinking. I was going to witness to them, or at least thats what I was thinking. Little did I know then, it doesnt work that way. When you compromise with Satan, he has a real eld day. Satan did his thing, as he did with Adam and Eve. He sure is a hard worker, when he starts to deceive. I can just hear you now, I know what some are thinking. I would have been stronger than him, and not ever started drinking. Heres hoping you dont try to see, just how strong your will can be. I have the love of Jesus, and also a praying Mother. If it hadnt been for that, I wouldnt be here, brother. Billy Johnson St. Johns annual Bazaar St. Johns Episcopal Church of Wewahitchka will hold its annual Bazaar from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. CT on Saturday. Features include a homemade turkey-and-dressing dinner for only $7 (dine in or carry out); $100 VISA card tickets for $1 each; vintage and new jewelry; and, of course, the yearly favorites bake sale, craft sale and huge yard sale. The church is about six miles north of Wewahitchka at 4060 N. State 71. Proceeds go toward scholarships for needy students. Please come out lend us your support! First Baptist Church of Wewa fundraiser First Baptist Church of Wewahitchka fundraiser, yard sale, pancake breakfast, bake sale and chili cook-off will take place on Saturday at the Wewahitchka Gym. The yard sale will run from 7 a.m. until noon CT and the bake sale will begin at 8 a.m. CT. The chili cook-off will begin at 10:45 a.m. and run until noon CT. Attendees may sample, judge and vote on a winner for $1. Chili will be sold for $3 a bowl. The pancake breakfast will run from 7 a.m. to noon CT. Pancakes, sausage, orange juice, milk and coffee will be sold for $5 a plate. All proceeds will go toward the gymnasium building loan. Pastors Anniversary New Life Christian Center Church would like to invite everyone out to the anniversary of Pastors Johnny and Shirley Jenkins at 11 a.m. ET on Sunday. Even will be held at New Life Christian Center Church where the speaker of the hour will be Minister George (Toby) Thomas of New Life Christian Center East of Tallahassee. Come and experience the power of God. Food and fellowship to follow service. Theme: Keep on Working. Hebrews 6:10 Long Avenue Baptist sh fry/yard sale Long Avenue Baptist Church in Port St. Joe will hold a yard sale/ mullet sh fry from 7 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET on Nov. 16. The event is a fundraiser for the churchs mission trip to Guatemala. The church is at 1601 Long Ave. Fish fry tickets are available at the church of ce or walk up on Nov. 16. Dinners will be available from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. New Bethel Baptist Harvest Day New Bethel Baptist will observe Harvest Day at 11:30 a.m. ET on Nov. 17. Pastor Rev. Cyril Mills will oversee the festivities and Sister Lawanda Smiley will speak. Faith BRIEFS I look out my window A new day I see And only I can determine What kind of day it will be. It can be busy and sunny, Laughing a gay, Or it can be boring and cold, Unhappy and grey. My own state of mind Is the determining key, For I am the only person I let myself be. I can be thoughtful, And do what I can to help, Or I can be sel sh And think just of myself. I can enjoy what I do, And make it seem fun, Or gripe and complain And make it hard on someone. I can be patient with Those who may not understand, Or belittle and hurt them As much as I can. But I have faith in myself And believe what I say, And I personally intend to Make the best of TODAY Walking with My Lord! Jackie M. Hodge Dont compromise Today Thursday, November 7, 2013

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, November 7, 2013 PUB LI C N O TI CE A Pu b li c H e a rin g w i l l b e he l d a t the P l a nnin g a nd D e v e l o p me n t R e v i e w B o a r d (P D RB) me e t in g o n M o nd a y N o v e m b e r 11, 2013 a t 8:45 a.m. ES T a nd a t the B o a r d o f C o un t y C o mmiss i o ne rs (B O C C) me e t in g o n T u es d a y N o v e m b e rn12, 2013 a t 9:00 a.m. ES T B o th p u b li c he a rin gs w i l l b e he l d in the B O C C M e e t in g R o o m a t the R o b e r t M. M o o r e A dminis t r a t i o n B ui l din g, 1000 C e ci l G. C os t in S r B lv d ., P o r t S t J o e F l o ri d a. e p u b li c he a rin gs w i l l b e t o dis c uss a nd ac t o n the f o l l o w in g : 1. A p p r o va l o f O c t o b er 21, 2013 M in u t es 2. Fin a l P l a t A p p r o va l f o r a M in o r S u b di v i sio n T y ler W S mi t h f o r P a r ce l ID #06268-025R a n d #06268-022R (C a p e Sa n B l a s) L o c a t e d in S e c t io n 7, T o w n s hi p 9 S o u t h, R a n g e 11 W es t, G u lf C o un t y Flo r id a 2.22 A cr es A 6 uni t de v e lo p m en t w i t h n o r o ad inf ra s t r uc t ur e 3. S m a l l S c a le L a n d U s e C h a n g e C a r m en M cL em o r e f o r P a r ce l ID #01045-100R (C hi p o l a R i v er) L o c a t e d in S e c t io n 35, T o w n s hi p 5 S o u t h, R a n g e 9 W es t, G u lf C o un t y Flo r id a C h a n g in g 1 A cr e f r o m C o n s er va t io n t o R esiden t i a l 4. C o un t y D e v e lo p m en t R egu l a t io n s a n d P o licies (LD R) 5. S t a Pu b lic a n d O p en Di s c u s sio n e p u b lic i s en co ura g e d t o a t t en d a n d b e h e a r d o n t h es e m a t t er s. I nf o r m a t io n p r io r t o t h e m e et in g c a n b e v ie w e d a t t h e P l a nnin g D ep a r t m en t a t 1000 C e ci l G. C os t in S r B l v d ., R o o m 311. P U B L IC NO T IC E T h e C i t y o f P o r t S t J o e i s c o n s i de r i ng t he adop t io n o f a n E c o no m i c D e v e lop m e n t e le m e n t t o t h e C i t y o f P o r t S t J o e C o m pr e h e n s i v e P l an T h e C i t y C o m m i s s io n i n v i t e s a l l s t a k e hol de r s t o t h e s e co n d p u b l i c w o rk s h o p b e f o r e t h e C i t y C om m i s s i on on T h u r s d a y N o v e m b e r 2 1 2 0 1 3 a t 4 : 0 0 p m E S T a t t h e L o ca l C o l o r B u i l d i n g l o ca t e d a t 4 0 6 M a ri n a D ri v e P o r t S t J o e F l o ri d a A s p a r t o f t he m e e t i ng t he F lo r i da C ha mb e r F oun da t io n w i l l m a k e a p r e s e n t a t io n o n i t s n e w F l o ri d a T r a d e an d L o g i st i c s St udy A l l c i t i z e n s an d i n t e r e s t e d p a r t i e s a r e e n co u r a g e d t o a t t e n d t h e d i s c u s s i o n an d p u b l i c h e a ri n g an d t o pr o v i d e w ri t t e n an d / o r v e r b a l co m m e n t s o n t h e m a t t e r s u n d e r c ons i d e r a t i on I f a p e r s o n d e c i d e s t o a p p e a l an y d e c i s i o n s m a d e w i t h r e s p e c t t o an y m a t t e r co n s i d e r e d a t t h i s m e e t i n g s u c h p e r s o n w i l l n e e d t o r e co r d t h e pr o ce e d i n g an d f o r s u c h p u r p o s e s s u c h p e r s o n m a y n e e d t o e n s u r e t h a t a v e r b a t i m r e co r d o f t h e pr o ce e d i n g i s m a d e w h i c h r e co r d i n c l u d e s t h e t e s t i m o n y an d e v i d e n ce u p o n w h i c h t h e a p p e a l i s t o b e b a s e d A n y p e r s o n r e q u i ri n g a s p e c i a l ac c o m m o da t io n a t t h i s he a r i ng b e ca u s e o f a d i s a b i l i t y o r p h y s i ca l i mpa i r m e n t s hou l d c o n t ac t t he C i t y C l e rk a t ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 9 8 2 6 1 a t l e a s t v e ( 5 ) ca l e n d a r d a y s pri o r t o t h e he a r i ng !( )*&) % % % % *B O ARD CER TIFIED CIVIL TRI AL L A WYER O F CO UNS EL "!" " $"!() Star Staff Report Elders from six North Florida nursing homes, including The Bridge at Bay St. Joe, will gather on Nov. 7 for a heated competition in the Signature HealthCARE Inter generational Olympics games. The event will be hosted by Chautauqua Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in DeFuniak Springs. They include: Signature Health Care of North Florida in Graceville; Signature HealthCare at the Court yard in Marianna; Washington Care and Rehab in Chipley; Surrey Place Care in Live Oak and The Bridge at Bay St Joe in Port St. Joe. Each home will be holding try outs, from which ve elder-athletes will be chosen to compete. Along with the elders competing, students from Freeport Middle School will be joining the elders and competing in the events. The athletes will spend the weeks leading up to the event in training. Events include: a wheelchair race, bowling, basketball, shot put, golf and horseshoe. Gold, silver and bronze, and par ticipation medals will be awarded along with a trophy for the overall winning home and the students. “The competitive spirit is high among staff, elders, and students and we know the Intergenerational Olympics will be an exciting, fun lled day for all,” Regional Quality of Life Director Ellie Curry said. “This is our fourth annual event and this is the third year we will be inviting some of our special need children from the surrounding community to join us in the competitions.” For more information about The Bridge at Bay St Joe visit www. bridgeatbaystjoe.com or informa tion about Signature visit www.LT CRevolution.com. Local elders to compete in Intergenerational Olympic Games By THE sS TAFF AT MYGULFCArR E Special to The Star During the holiday season, much of our at tention is turned towards the table. At Halloween, it’s the treats, candied apples, popcorn balls and maybe a party or two. At Thanksgiving, we don’t just stuff a turkey; we tend to stuff ourselves as well. Then Christmas arrives with those pies and cakes, all the cookies and candy, and a big family dinner, as well. No wonder we ring in the New Year a few extra pounds that we just don’t need. First, think about peo ple, not food. Concentrate on making your celebra tion reect what you know and love about those you are sharing it with. Focus on what you are celebrat ing and what the holiday represents. Next, plan before you eat. When you arrive at a dinner party or celebra tion, take time to check out all the food options, and make a plan. If desserts are calling you and you plan to indulge, skip the rolls or potatoes. Develop a strategy that will allow you to enjoy a treat, and not abandon the healthy habits you have formed. Following are some quick tips that will help you stay on track when eating out or at a holiday party: Don’t arrive on an empty stomach. Offer to bring a dish, then you know at least one dish will be healthy. Avoid excessive drinking and the snacks that tend to go with that. Select small portions. Eat slowly. Relax, and enjoy the meal. And nally, leave the table when you are done! The longer you linger, the more you tend to eat. Special to TT he Star Creative lms from around the globe will be showcased at the Interna tional Lifetree Film Fest at 6 p.m. CT on Nov. 16. The event will take place at Sunset Park in Mexico Beach. The overarching theme of the festival’s short lms is people who are “doing life” or “doing good.” Ac cording to festival plan ners, audience members will have an opportunity to choose their favorite lm of the evening. A dessert re ception will follow. Sunset Park is located at the west end of the El Governor Motel. While the event is free, it is being held in support of the Beaches Commu nity Care food drive and donations of canned and dry goods are welcome. (In case of inclement weather, the Lifetree Film Fest will be held in Living Water’s facility at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach.) Please bring your own lawn chairs. Advance sponsors from the community providing door prizes include: Port Saint Joe Salt Air Farm ers Market, Cathey’s Ace Hardware, It’s All About the Oils, Mango Marley’s, and Melody’s Paintings. The event is sponsored by Lifetree Caf—a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual cof feehouse-type setting. Lifetree Caf is hosted weekly at Living Water’s facility at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach at 7 p.m. CT on Mondays. Questions about the Lifetree Film Fest can be directed to David Giesek ing at (850) 648-1151 or liv ingwater@fairpoint.net. International lms featured at local lm fest “SPAGHETTI FR ZWEI” (“SPAGHETTI FOR TT WO”) Directed by Matthias Rosenberger A likable but lonely man on his way to lunch encounters a world swarming with would-be crooks, hussies, and criminals. A whimsical portrayal of misperceptions meeting reality. (Germany, 19 min.) “ GG UANG” Directed by Quek Shio Chuan The moving story of Wen Guang, an autistic adult with an unusual obsession. See his challenging quest for a job, his daily routines, and his secret passion as he searches for what will bring him a simple, pure, hard-earned, eeting moment of joy. (Malaysia, 14 min.) “ TT ITANIC LOVE” Directed by Mark Pressdee Lucy wants a Titanic Love cruise to relive her Hollywood dream. Jack does not. He thinks they can’t afford it, and Lucy is furious. Their relationship hits rough waters, so Jack calls on his clever friends for a cheap alternative. (UK, 22 min.)THE LIFETREE FF I lL M FF E sS T FEATURED FF I lL M sS Special to TT he Star Do memories of holi days conjure up images of an idyllic painting or a nightmare wrapped in so cial demands, to-do lists, overeating, and guilt? Ex pectations and the pres sure to create the perfect holiday turn the season of goodwill into a marathon of survival. Have you considered a lighter, more exible, holiday with an attitude that can go the distance from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Day with your health and sanity intact? This holiday season give special foods and gifts a magical touch. Holiday Survival, a pro gram sponsored by the UF/IFAS Extension Gulf County ofce will show you how to make the holidays extra-special using a pinch of spirited imagination and a dash of creative ideas. Fill your kitchen with holiday cheer using a se lection of shopping tips and healthy, creative holi day dishes. Do It Yourself (DIY) gifts are a great way to personalize holiday gifts, you will learn to make gifts that will be cherished and enjoyed by all. And, plan to learn some ideas to creatively ad dress the stressors of the season. Come join us for a funlled evening of guiltless holiday cooking, DIY holi day gifts, and de-stressing strategies. The HOLIDAY SUR VIVAL program will be held from 6-8 p.m. CST on Tuesday, Nov. 19 at the Gulf County Extension of ce, 232 E. Lake Ave, We wahitchka, FL 32465 (Old Health Department). Cost for the program will be $12, which covers taste testing samples, DIY gift items, and handouts. Due to limited seating, please pre-register no later than Nov. 12 by calling the UF/IFAS Gulf County Ex tension ofce at 639-3200. Pre-registration is neces sary to make sure enough supplies, etc. are provided. Space is limited. First registered, rst served. Girls Night Out… holiday survival Celebrate healthy holidays

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, November 7, 2013 T r a d e s & S e rv i c e s 227-7847 CALL T OD A Y! GET Y OUR AD IN! T rades & Ser v ices 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction 4510158 of St. Peter in Port St. Joe and visits The Bridge as part of the church’s outreach program. He was surprised by the recog nition but was happy to have his hard work recognized by both the staff and directors at The Bridge. “I got suspicious when they wanted to take my picture,” he said with a laugh. Schoelles was born in Apala chicola and was named Miss Apalachicola in 1951 at the age of 17. She had a career in real estate and later was hired as the execu tive director of the Apalachicola Housing Authority, where she served for 26 years, meeting the needs of the community. Schoelles is perhaps best known for a calendar she created with her friends and sold to raise funds that allowed area women to get mammograms. The for mer resident passed away last month. Marketing director Terri Nel son has worked in the activities department at The Bridge for three years and spent a lot of time with Schoelles. “Ruth is being honored for what she gave to the community,” Nelson said. “She was amazing.” The Bridge at Bay St. Joe is one of 87 locations operated by Louis ville, Ky.-based Signature Health CARE. Hall of Fame inductees are voted on by the facility’s directors in the corporate ofce. Launched in 2003, the Hall of Fame event is hosted annually by each Signature home at different times throughout the year. This year, Signature took a different approach by having each center host its Hall of Fame ceremony on the same day, creating a synchro nized, company-wide event. Now in its 10th year, the Hall of Fame ceremonies have recog nized more than 2,000 residents and community members. BRIDGE from B1 Grow bean sprouts 1 of 3 ways Once thought of only as Chinese vegetables, bean sprouts are now widely used in a variety of dishes. Sprouts are easy to grow, and they’re a good source of protein, as well as many vitamins and minerals. In addition to being very nutritious, sprouts are inexpensive, costing only about 5 to 8 cents a serving. Many methods of sprouting beans seem to give good results. The three methods we’ll discuss in this article are very simple, because they make use of materials most of us already have around our homes. My information was provided by Emeritus Extension Vegetable Specialist Jim Stephens, of The University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The rst step in sprouting is the same for all three methods. After buying some beans or seeds sold specically for sprouting, sort them carefully, choosing only clean, whole specimens. Thoroughly wash about a quarter of a cup of those you select, place them in a bowl or jar, and cover them with lukewarm water. Let the beans stand overnight. By morning, they should have expanded to about three times their dry size. Rinse them well, and pour off all excess water. To use the rst sprouting method, place a couple of tablespoons of the soaked beans in a quart jar, and cover the top securely with nylon mesh or cheese cloth. Turn the jar on its side, so the beans form a thin layer, and place the jar in a warm, dark, humid location. The next step is very important. At least three times every day, until the sprouts are ready, put lukewarm warm water into the jar, swirl it around and drain it off. The seeds should be keep moist, but not wet. Depending on the beans or seeds you’re using, sprouts will develop in three to ve days. Rinse and drain the sprouts as soon as they reach optimum length, and before rootlets appear. If you’re geminating mung beans, the sprout should be 1 to 2 inches long when they’re harvested. Alfalfa sprouts are best when they’re about 1 inch long. Soybeans sprouts should be no longer than inch before they are harvested. And sesame and sunower sprouts should be used as soon as they’re visible. To employ the second method, spread a couple of tablespoons of soaked beans on several layers of dampened paper towels, tted into a colander or perforated plastic trap. Wrap the container in a block plastic bag, but leave the opening loose, to allow ventilation. As with the rst method, the seeds must be rinsed thoroughly, three times each day. When the sprouts rst appear, you can replace the black plastic bag with a clear one, so you’ll be able to tell when the sprouts have reached their proper length. To use the third method, just place a couple of tablespoons of soaked beans in the bottom of a new clay ower pot that’s been saturated with water. Place a cloth screen over the bottom hole, and cover the entire pot with a layer of muslin or cheese cloth. As previously described, the beans should be rinsed and drained three times a day, until the sprouts reach optimum length. Regardless of the method you choose, the sprouts must be used or stored as soon as they reach proper size. Place them in covered containers in the refrigerator. They’ll keep three to ve days. For more information, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, http://gulf.ifas.u.edu or www.http://edis. ifas.u.edu, and see Publication HS 557 & HS 555. Special to The Star The West Gadsden Histori cal Society will celebrate the grand opening of the recently restored historic Greensboro Depot at 3 p.m. ET Saturday, Nov. 9, beside the Apalachic ola Northern Railroad at 115 Dufe Ave., Greensboro. At the same time, the new ly constructed adjacent class room building that has been named the Patricia Fletcher Vice Meeting Facility will be dedicated in her memory. Trish was a co-founder and vice president of WGHS and was an ardent, vocal support er. She can never be replaced and will always be missed by the society. The Greensboro Depot was built in 1907, the year of the rst operation of the AN RR, and is the only remaining orig inal depot on the line that runs from River Junction (Chatta hoochee) in Gadsden County to Port St. Joe in Gulf County. About 40 years ago, the depot was moved from its original lo cation between the main track and the side track to a nearby lot. It was then remodeled by Nelson Clark and used as his barber shop as well as a thrift shop operated by area United Methodist Churches. Several years ago, Prog ress Energy built a transmis sion line through this area of Gadsden County, and many miles of the line follow the AN RR right-of-way. The old depot building site was in the direct path of the transmission line through the town of Greens boro. WGHS saw the need to advocate for the saving of this piece of history. After many discussions among WGHS, Progress En ergy and St. Joe Land Com pany, a nearby lot was donated by St. Joe Land Company, and Progress Energy contributed a grant defraying the cost of the relocation of the depot. The depot is once again on a lot adjacent to the tracks. The society is most appre ciative of this grant and the property on which to relocate the depot building. Without the cooperation of these two corporations working with WGHS, this saving of a piece of Florida’s history would not have been possible. West Gadsden Historical Society was fortunate to re ceive a grant through the U.S. Department of Transportation by which they restored the de pot and construct an adjoin ing classroom building. Con crete Services Inc. of Quincy did a wonderful job with this project. Now the work begins furnishing the depot in order for it to become a rst-class railroad museum. The muse um will not be only for items pertaining to the Apalachicola Northern Railroad, but will in clude any railroad items. The society encourages anyone with copies of old AN RR or any train and depot photos, documents, newspaper clip pings or other artifacts to con tact us about sharing these important pieces of railroad history. Any items you might have that you wish to donate or loan to this museum will be greatly appreciated. For more information, con tact WGHS at info@gadsden history.org, 442-6434 or P.O. Drawer D, Greensboro, FL 32330. the costume contest was sponsored by Duke Energy. Prizes for the contest, which awarded kids, adults, families and pets for best costume, were donated by No Name Cafe, Persnickety, Sunset Coastal Grill and Bluewater Outriggers. Barbara Radcliff, Brenda Miller and Ann Jarosz made the tough calls as judges for the competition. Coastal Design and Landscaping provided the decorated trailer that perched the 162 costumed contestants high above the crowd and the Gulf Alliance for Local Arts brought Panama City storyteller Pat Nease to town. The yarn-spinner had a nook full of hay bales where she told frightful stories to any children who were brave enough to take a seat. The street games, which gave kids a reprieve from the candy line that stretched the length of the avenue, consisted of a ring toss, hay bale bowling and a cake walk and was organized by the Merchant’s Association to raise additional funds for white Christmas lights that will hang in the trees along Reid during the upcoming holiday season. Glow sticks for the interactive art installation were donated by Dr. Tim Nelson, Patti Blaylock and Tommy Lake. Live music for the celebration was provided by the Boyer Band, stationed on one end of Reid, and Freddy D and Lola on the other. “The live music, sh fry, glow stick art project and cake walk were all new events that engaged the people more,” Pickett said. “I am inclined to believe that the crowds simply hung around longer because we provided other things for them to do. “I did hear from several people that they felt it was the largest crowd yet.” The Reid Avenue Bunco Babes held a sh fry fundraiser that served about 150 meals and raised $1,000 for the Friends of the Port St. Joe Public Library, a cause the group has donated almost $10,000 in the past three years. Those who wish to be on the committee for next year’s Ghosts on the Coast can contact the Chamber at 227-1223. PHOTOS BY DEBBIE HH OOp P ER AT JOEBAY.COM At left, Chamber of Commerce director Paula Pickett welcomed every costume contestant to the stage. Costumes packed the park and street. RR OY LEE CARTER County extension director SpSP ECIAL TO TT HE TT IMES The restored Greensboro Depot will be debuted at 3 p.m. ET Saturday at 115 Dufe Ave. in Greensboro. Greensboro Depot grand opening Saturday HALLOWEEN from B1

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, November 7, 2013 The Star | B7 92894S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Animal Hospital of Port St. Joe located at 300 Long Ave., in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at St. Joe, Florida, this 21st day of October, 2013. Coastal Veterinary Group 2, Inc. November 7, 2013 92990 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-17-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JUDY DARNA, HENRY DARNA, MARVIN DARNA, II, MELODY POWELL, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) I, and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) II, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure dated June 11, 2013 and an Order Reopening Case and Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered in Case No. 13-17-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and JUDY DARNA, HENRY DARNA, MARVIN DARNA, II, and MELODY POWELL are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on December 5, 2013, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of the intersection of Bonita Street and Trout Avenue for a Point of Beginning; thence proceed North along the East boundary line of Trout Avenue a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed 300 feet East to the East boundary line of Government Lot 14; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed South along the East boundary line of Government Lot 14 a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed West along the Northern boundary line of Bonita Street a distance of 300 feet to the Point of Beginning. This property being located in the South half of Government Lot 14 in Section 26, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: October 29, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Garvin B. Bowden, Esq Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr Tallahassee, FL 32308 November 7, 14, 2013 92962S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2011CA-000210 DIVISION: SENIOR JUDGE WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, CHARLOTTE ODOM A/K/A CHARLOTTE M. ODOM A/K/A CHARLOTTE MONIREA ODOM, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated, October 18, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23-2011-CA-000210 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., successor by merger to Wachovia Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and The Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Lienors, Creditors, Trustees, or other Claimants claiming by, through, under, or against, Charlotte Odom a/k/a Charlotte M. Odom a/k/a Charlotte Monirea Odom, deceased, Angel Monirea Sewell f/k/a Angel Monirea Thomas f/k/a Angel M. Thomas f/k/a Angel M. Earp, as an Heir of the Estate of Charlotte Odom a/k/a Charlotte M. Odom a/k/a Charlotte Monirea Odom, deceased, Kerry Monirea Odom a/k/a Kerry M. Odom a/k/a Kerry Odom a/k/a Kerry A. Odom, as an Heir of the Estate of Charlotte Odom a/k/a Charlotte M. Odom a/k/a Charlotte Monirea Odom, deceased, Any And All Unknown Parties Claiming by, Through, Under, And Against The Herein named Individual Defendant(s) Who are not Known To Be Dead Or Alive, Whether Said Unknown Parties May Claim An Interest in Spouses, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Or Other Claimants are defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 21st day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: THE WEST 60 FEET OF LOT 3 AND THE EAST 8 FEET OF LOT 2, BLOCK 6, C.L. MORGAN’S ADDITION TO WEWAHITCHKA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 33, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 2004 FLEETWOOD OAK KNOLL 28 X 52 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME, SERIAL NUMBERS: GAFL334A766710K31 AND GAFL334B766710K31, WHICH PERMANENTLY AFIXED AND LOCATED ON THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY. A/K/A 127 JM GRIFFIN DRIVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 25th day of October, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743 (813)221-9171 Fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com File No. KB -11-74953 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Oct 31, Nov 7, 2013 92916S THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2012CA-000003 DIVISION: PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs JACOB RICHARDS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 17, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23-2012-CA-000003 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which PNC Bank, National Association, is the Plaintiff and Jacob Richards, Capital City Bank, Michelle Richards, are defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 21st day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 4, BLOCK F, FOREHANDS SECOND ADDITION TO HIGHLAND VIEW SUBDIVISION, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME AS A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS: A 1995 SINGLEWIDE MOBILE HOME BEARING IDENTIFICATION NUMBER GAFLR39A01949VH AND TITLE NUMBER 0067967502 A/K/A 2481 PARKER AVE, PORT ST JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 21st day of October, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servelaw@ albertellilaw.com File No. KB-11-92633 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Oct 31, Nov 7, 2013 92964S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 23-2012-CA000230 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. SHANNON D. WHITFIELD; GARY A. WHITFIELD; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING BY AND THROUGH THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 18th, 2013 and entered in Case No. 23-2012CA-000230, of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and SHANNON D. WHITFIELD; GARY A. WHITFIELD; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING BY AND THROUGH THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at IN THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 1000 CECIL COSTIN BOULEVARD, PORT ST. JOE IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA 32456, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 21st day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 6 BLOCK “C” COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 8955’18” EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 3 FOR 1130.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 8955’18” EAST FOR 163.73 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0033’20” EAST FOR 254.65 FEET; THENCE NORTH 5825’12” WEST FOR 191.06 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0033’20” WEST FOR 354.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LAND LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING SUBJECT TO A 33.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY EASEMENT ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY THEREOF. ALSO BEING KNOWN AS LOT 6, BLOCK C, OF THE UNRECORDED PLAT OF STONEMILL CREEK ESTATES. TOGETHER WITH A 1989 FLEETWOOD EAGLE TRACE MANUFACTURED HOME — VIN #GAFLK35A01708ET & GAFLK35B01708ET; TITLE NUMBERS 47602846 & 47598114 A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this as 25th day of October, 2013. REBECCA NORRIS As Clerk of said Court By BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Provided pursuant to Administrative Order No 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate, in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least (7) seven days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired please call 711. Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Phone: (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No. 12-00932 BOA Oct 31, Nov 7, 2013 92966S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2009-491CA RESIDENTIAL FUNDING COMPANY LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TAMMY JEAN OWENS A/K/A TAMMY J. OWENS; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on October 18, 2013, in Civil Case No. 2009-491CA, of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, RESIDENTIAL FUNDING COMPANY LLC is the Plaintiff, and TAMMY JEAN OWENS A/K/A TAMMY J. OWENS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TAMMY JEAN OWENS A/K/A TAMMY J. OWENS; UNKNOWN TENANT N/K/A DAVID MCGHEE; JOHN WALTER OWENS A/K/A JOHN W. OWENS; GULF AIRE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. are Defendants. The clerk of the court, Rebecca L. Norris will sell to the highest bidder for cash At THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 21st day November, 2013 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 39, BLOCK C, GULF AIRE SUBDIVISION, PHASE II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 30 AND 31, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY. OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 25th day of October, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk, Gulf County, Florida, Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT PERSONS WITH A DISABILITY NEEDING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO ACCESS COURT FACILITIES OR PARTICIPATE IN A COURT PROCEEDING AT ANY COURTHOUSE OR COURT PROGRAM, SHOULD WITHIN TWO (2) DAYS OF RECEIPT OF NOTICE, CONTACT COURT ADMINISTRATION TO REQUEST SUCH AN ACCOMMODATION. PLEASE CONTACT THE FOLLOWING: COURT ADMINISTRATION, P.O. BOX 826, MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32447; PHONE: 850-718-0026; HEARING & VOICE IMPAIRED: 1-800-9558771; EMAIL: ADA REQUEST@JUD14.FLCO URTS.ORG File No. 1271-580B November 7, 14, 2013 93026S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2008CA-000001-CA DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. RACHEL L. BROWNING, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 28th, 2013, entered in Case No. 23-2008-CA-000001-CA-XXXX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage, LLC, is the Plaintiff and Rachel L. Browning, Tracy G. Browning, Jane Doe, John Doe, State of Florida Department of Revenue, Unknown Spouse of Rachel L. Browning, are defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 5th day of December, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT FIVE (5), IN BLOCK ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE (125) OF ST JOSEPH’S ADDITION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST JOE, FLORIDA, UNIT NUMBER 9, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2109 JUNIPER AVE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 31st day of October, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743 (813)221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com KB -10-63505 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. November 7, 14, 2013 93002S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Serendipity located at 2278 West Hwy 98, in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Mexico Beach, Florida, this 30th day of October, 2013. Crystal L. Lewis November 7, 2013 96119S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY Case No. 13-137-CA CAROL M. DOW Plaintiff, vs. ROBIN PERDOMO, Defendant. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ROBIN PERDOMO LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 277 SUNSHINE RD. WEWAHITCHICA, FL 32465 2913 KENTUCKY ST. WEST PALM BEACH, FL 33406 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property: Commence at the Northwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 6, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and run South 02’26’7” East for 1367.31 feet for the Point of Beginning; thence continue South 02’26’17” East for 706.29 feet thence South 89’15’03” East for 318.41 feet; thence North 02’29’05” West for 709.70 feet; thence North 89’51’33” West for 317.665 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands having an area of 5.16 acres, more or less, and being subject to a 30 foot wide roadway easement along the Southerly boundary thereof. LESS AND EXCEPT: Commence at the Northwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 6, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence along the West line of said Northeast Quarter, North 02’26’17” East for 1367.31 feet to a concrete monument; thence continue along said West line, South 02’26’17” East 412.03 feet for the Point of Beginning; thence South 89’13’31” East for 180.00 feet; thence South 04’39’57” West for 296.12 feet; thence North 89’15’03” West for 143.21 feet; thence along the West line of said Northeast Quarter, North 02’26’17” West for 296.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands containing 1.10 acres, more or less. TOGETHER WITH 1991 FLEE MOBILE HOME ID # FLFLL70A18789CM. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to CHARLES A. COSTIN, Attorney for the Plaintiff whose address is P.O. Box 98, Port St. Joe, Florida on or before November 20, 2013, a date which is within Thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice in The Star and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before and service on the Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief requested in the Complaint. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) disabled person who, because their disabilities need special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA coordinator at 300 E. 4th St., Panama City, Florida 32402 or telephone voice (850) 747-8141 not later than five (5) business prior to such proceeding. Witness my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 21st day of October, 2013 BECKY L. NORRIS, Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk November 7, 14, 2013 96165S IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 11-173-CC DUNES CLUB OF CAPE SAN BLAS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., Plaintiff vs. ABDEL RAOUF ARAFA, and JULIA ARAFA 2108 West 33rd Street Panama City, FL 32405 Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 22, 2013, and entered in Civil Case No. 11-173CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein DUNES CLUB OF CAPE SAN BLAS CONDOMINIUM, INC is the Plaintiff and ABDEL RAOUF ARAFA, and JULIA ARAFA are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., EST, on the 21st day of November, 2013, the following described property situated in Gulf County, Florida and set forth in the Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: Unit 17, of the Dunes Club of Cape San Blas together with an undivided Interest in the common elements per Declaration of Condominium as Recorded in Official Record Book 303, Page 283, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled persons who, because of their disabilities need special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 or Telephone (850)229-6113 prior to such proceedings. Witness my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 24th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: Wyvonne Pickett Deputy Clerk Costin & Costin Charles A. Costin 413 Williams Ave. P.O. Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-227-1159 email: ccostin@ costinlaw.com Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 2013 96171S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The 96167S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 946 Application No. 2013-44 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 03324-295R Description of Property: Lot 19, Tremont Estates, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 29 & 30, of Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Stephanie M & Charles A Davis All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 4th day of December, 2013. Dated this 28th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2013 96169S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1368 Application No. 2013-43 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05694-000R Description of Property: Lot Twenty-Two (22), in Block One Thousand, One (1001), City of Port St, Joe, Florida, according to the Official Plat thereof on file in the Office of Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Lena Dukes All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 4th day of December, 2013. Dated this 28th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2013

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B8 | The Star Thursday, November 7, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 4510160 4516909 AVONThe company for WomenHIRING FOR THE HOLIDAYS!Part-time or Full-time! Call Ellen 850-763-7307 4516610 HELP WANTEDComputer skills necessary to assist in managing shing & hunting ONLINE WEB STOREFull or Part Time Call George Duren at: 850-229-6031 or fax resume to: 850-229-9266 1118969 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: SHIPFITTERS € FLUXCORE WELDERS € CaRPEnTERS PIPE WELDERS € X-RaY WELDERS€ PIPEFITTERS € SHIPPInG/RECEIVInGCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1380 Application No. 2013-42 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05792-000R Description of Property: Lot Nine (9), in Block One Thousand, Six (1006), City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the Official Plat thereof on file in the Office of Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Denise Hall All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 4th day of December, 2013. Dated this 28th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2013 96191S PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf County Enterprise Zone Development Agency will meet Thursday, November 21, 2013, at 12:00 noon, E.T., 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., of the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex in Room 307. The only topic to be discussed will be the Enterprise Zone boundary changes. The public is welcome to attend. November 7, 2013 96173S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 658 Application No. 2013-41 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 02633-001R Description of Property: BEGIN at the Point of Intersection of the East boundary line of State Road No. 71, and the South boundary line of Land Drive for the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence run Easterly along the South boundary line of said Land Drive for 320 feet, more or less, to the East line of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence run South to the Northeast Corner of Lot Owned by Franklin D. Ward and wife, Hazel J. Ward, as recorded in Official Records Book 76, Page 509, in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, thence run West to the East Boundary line of State Road No. 71; thence run Northerly along the East boundary line of State Road No. 71, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. NOTE: The Legal Description shown in Tax Assessment is in error. The lands shown are completely different, but shows the Book and Page of said Deed taken from. The above lands are the lands shown for the Drawing Plat on said Assessment. Name in which assessed: Little River Camp, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 4th day of December, 2013. Dated this 28th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2013 96271S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 23 2013 CA 000073 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. RUTH R. DUMAS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RUTH R. DUMAS; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on October 28th, 2013, in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, the clerk shall sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida, described as: LOT 20, BLOCK 1002, CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO AN OFFICIAL MAP OR PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 254 AVENUE B, PORT ST JOE, FL 32456-1508 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the front lobby of the Gulf County Court, 1000 Cecil Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, on December 5, 2013, beginning at 11:00 AM, ET. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the us pendens may claim the surplus. Dated at Port St. Joe, Florida, this 30th day of October, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Douglas C. Zahm, P.A. 12425 28th St. North, Suite 200 St. Petersburg, FL 33716 Phone: (727)536-4911 Fax: (727) 539-1094 Attorney for the Plaintiff IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITY ACT ANY PERSONS NEEDING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS FUNCTION SHOULD CONTACT THE CLERK OF THE COURT NO LATER THAN ONE DAY PRIOR TO THAT DAY AT (850)229-6113. November 7, 14, 2013 96259S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2013-CA-000039 PHH Mortgage Corporation Plaintiff, vs. Richard A. Ramsey and Jean L. Ramsey, Husband and Wife; Dunes Club of Cape San Blas Condominium Association, Inc.; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated October 28, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 2013CA-000039 of the Circuit of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein PHH Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff and Richard A. Ramsey and Jean L. Ramsey, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Rebecca L. Norris, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED AT 1000 CECIL G. COSTIN SR. BLVD., PORT ST. JOE, FL at 11:00 A.M. on December 5, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: UNIT 10, THE DUNES CLUB OF CAPE SAN BLAS, ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM, RECORDED AT OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 303, PAGE 283, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850) 747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk of Court Submitted by: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE’, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 12-253077 FC01 PHH November 7, 14, 2013 96299S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that PPF Holdings III Ltd. the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 634 Application No. 2013-48 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 02808-000R Description of Property: Commence at the Southwest corner of Section 11, Township 7 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County Florida thence run North 85 degrees 58 minutes 13 seconds East 1492 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence run North 86 degrees 52 minutes 17 seconds East 131 feet; thence run North 02 degrees 33 minutes 39 seconds West 444.00 feet; thence run South 86 degrees 52 minutes 17 seconds West 131.00 feet; thence run South 02 degrees 33 minutes 39 seconds East 444.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Name in which assessed: Gredan Development, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of December, 2013. Dated this 5th day of November, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 96303S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 545 Application No. 2013-46 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 02285-001R Description of Property: Lots 6, 7, 8 and 9, in Block F, College Park Subdivision, to the City of Wewahitchka, Florida per Official Plat of same being recorded in the Office of Clerk of the Circuit Court,Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Roger & Janice Linton All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of December, 2013. Dated this 5th day of November, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 96301S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 727 Application No. 2013-47 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 03036-000R Description of Property: The North Half of Lot Number 24, according to an unrecorded plat of the Southwest Quarter of Section 17, Township 8 South, Range 10 West, also described by metes and bounds as follows: Begin at a pt. 50 feet South and 1,345.0 feet East of the NW Corner of the SW 1/4 of Section 17, Township 8 South, Range 10 West, and run East 622.50 feet, thence South 158.75 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence continue South 158.75 feet, thence run West 622.50 feet, thence North 158.75 feet, thence East 622.50 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 2.27 acres, more or less. NOTE: IT IS THE OPINION OF THE ABSTRACTOR THAT THE ABOVE METES AND BOUNDS COULD BE IN ERROR. THE DESCRIPTION TO THE PARCEL BEING the South Half of Lot Number 24, is the same metes and bounds description as above. Name in which assessed: Harry M. Murphy All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of December, 2013. Dated this 5th day of November, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 96331S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 23-2012-CA-000054 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR RASC 2007KS1, Plaintiff, vs. WAYNE E. BLEVINS, JR., ET AL., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 18, 2013 and entered in Case No. 23-2012-CA-000054 in the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein U.S. Bank National Association as Trustee for RASC 2007KS1 was the Plaintiff and WAYNE E. BLEVINS, JR. ET AL., the Defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 a.m. E.T. at the front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 on the 21st day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1, BLOCK “G”, CAPE PLANTATION PHASE II, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION FOR 1476.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY LINE OF THE ST. JOSEPH BAY COUNTRY CLUB GOLF COURSE; THENCE ALONG SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 18 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 240.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 9 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 955.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 4 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 522.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 265.28 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 336.71 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 36.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 137.63 FEET; THENCE, LEAVING SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY, SOUTH 66 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 75.55 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE EASTERLY SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 350.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 26 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 49 SECONDS FOR 163.18 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 6 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 18.5 SECONDS WEST 161.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 6 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 7.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 728.06 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 7 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 18 SECONDS FOR 91.34 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 3 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 91.28 FEET; THENCE, LEAVING SAID CURVE ON A NON-RADIAL LINE, NORTH 44 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 193.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LOT 1, BLOCK “G” IS SUBJECT TO COVENANTS AND RESTRICTIONS AS CONTAINED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 107, PAGES 1058-1072 AND AS AMENDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 125, PAGES 737-739 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND A PORTION OF LOT 2, BLOCK “G”, CAPE PLANTATION PHASE II, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT A SAINT JOE PAPER COMPANY MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION FOR 1476.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY LINE OF THE ST. JOSEPH BAY COUNTRY CLUB GOLF COURSE; THENCE ALONG SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 18 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 240.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 9 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 955.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 4 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 522.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 265.28 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 285.71 FEET TO AN IRON ROD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 51.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD; THENCE LEAVING SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY SOUTH 44 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ON A NON-RADIAL LINE FOR 193.33 FEET TO AN IRON ROD ON A CURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 728.06 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS FOR 26.17 FEET; SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 1 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST, 26.17 FEET TO AN IRON ROD MARKING THE POINT OF COMPOUND CURVE WITH A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, SAID CURVE HAVING A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 42 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 18 SECONDS AND THE RADIUS OF 25.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE FOR 18.59 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 23 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST, 18.16 FEET TO AN IRON ROD MARKING THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST, 15.13 FEET TO AN IRONROD; THENCE NORTH 44 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 218.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO: COVENANTS AND RESTRICTIONS AS CONTAINED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 107 AT PAGES 1058-1072 AND AS AMENDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 125, AT PAGES 737-739, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. MINERAL RIGHTS RESERVED BY PREVIOUS GRANTORS. THIS PROPERTY IS INTENDED TO BE INCLUDED IN AN BECOME PART OF LOT 1, BLOCK “G”, CAPE PLANTATION SUBDIVISION. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS OF THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER, AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. REBECCA NORRIS, Clerk, Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk November 7, 14, 2013 96305S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 974 Application No. 2013-45 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 03392-100R Description of Property: Begin at a point 1000 feet West and 1020 North of the Southeast Corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, thence continue North for 175 feet, thence run East 250 Feet, thence run South 175 feet, thence run West 250 feet, being in Section 31, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Tammy Miller and Regan Scholles All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of December, 2013. Dated this 5th day of November, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 Mexico Beach: 806 Georgia Ave. Sat, Nov 9th 8am-2pmYard SaleLadies plus clothes, lots of Christmas stuff, computer stand, custom mand TV stand, kitchen items, knickknacks, misc. Text FL71364 to 56654 PSJ 105 Mimosa Ave behind old hospital Sat Nov 9 7am-2pm Multi Family Yard SaleLOTS of misc items! PSJ: 304 20th Street at Saint Joseph Catholic Church at the Church Hall Saturday Nov 9th, 8am-1pm Yard & Bake Sale Everything from furniture to play things to clothing to yard & kitchen items. Text FL71030 to 56654 St. Joe Beach: 8005 Alabama Ave, Seashore Subd., Saturday, Nov 9th, 8am -12pmHuge 2 Family Yard SaleSomething for everyone, infants to adults. Priced to sell Text FL71031 to 56654 Lift Chair Almost New! $400 850-227-1477. Text FL71335 to 56654 Other The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners JOB NOTICE The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners is accepting applications for one full-time Laborer for our Public Works Department. Starting salary is $11.9391 per hour. This is a bargaining unit (Union) position with full benefits. Applications and a complete job description are available in our Human Resources Office (1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe), or at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m., E.T. on November 20, 2013 at the Gulf County Human Resources Office. For more information, please contact Brett Lowry, Deputy Administrator at (850) 229-5335 or Denise Manuel, Central Services Director at (850) 227-2384. Gulf County enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. Tynalin Smiley, Chairman Attest: Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk Web ID#: 34270703 Text FL70703 to 56654 Needs Sm Apartment I am looking for a small apartment, wheelchair Accessible. 227-9496 Text FL69842 to 56654 2 Bdrm 1 Bath. Florida room in back Large yard. 3 blocks to the beach. 339 Selma St. $700 month. First/Last/ Security Deposit. Call 850-348-7774 Text FL70604 to 56654 Quality Long Term RentalsMexico Beach Call for more info 850-348-0262 Beaver Laguana Monterey 06 40ft. diesel, quad, 53k miles, exc. cond. $126,000. See at 1216 Ohio Ave. PC. 850-819-0852 or 850-235-2599 Text 70915 to 56654 Biker Consignment From bike parts to clothing, & anything to do w/ Bikers! Open Tue -Sat. 2001 Wilson Ave. P.C. 850-763-9009 Holiday House Cleaning Holiday Rates! Call Sherry at 348-6851 or Dan at 227-8225 Text FL71234 to 56654



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com In November 2011 Greg Burkett came to fully grasp the lack of guarantees in life. On a night that November Burkett fell from his bed. His forehead struck a nightstand, hard. Burkett immediately knew it was bad. I knew I couldnt move my arms, my legs, anything, Burkett said. I knew it was serious, but I didnt know how serious. He laid there in his bedroom next to that nightstand for 10 hours, not moving. In hindsight, the willingness of Burketts brain to listen to the language from his body dont move likely saved his life. A friend, concerned that Burkett did not show up for work the next day found him, or actually heard his cries for help, when checking Burketts Port St. Joe home. He was rushed to Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf where it was determined Burkett suffered a broken neck. He was quickly en route to Bay Medical Center. That day, after being prepped for surgery, Burketts doctor was stark with Burketts family no guarantees Burkett would survive surgery. And if Burkett survived the surgery, there were no guarantees he would not be paralyzed, relegated to learning to live in a wheelchair. For more than a week, Burkett, heavily medicated had little clue about his condition or prognosis. When he was lucid enough, his doctor remained just as blunt as with his family.Veterans Day programs honor those who served By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Veterans Day arrives Monday, Nov. 11. The federal holiday will honor and celebrate those who served in the armed forces. Gulf County Schools, however, are among the few districts in the state that celebrate the holiday by keeping schools open to formally honor veterans. At Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School, its 20th annual program will kick off 9 a.m. ET Monday. The NJROTC will welcome veterans as they enter the building and patriotic artwork prepared by students in grades kindergarten through 12. During the program, students who participate in the 21st Century after school enrichment program will perform a tribute that includes the songs, Youre a Grand Old Flag, Yankee Doodle, and God Bless America. The after school program is made up of students in grades kindergarten through third. The artwork displayed during the event comes from art classes taught by Julie Hodges. These works, crafted in mediums ranging from water colors to colored pencil, were created under the theme Tour of America and had to feature a place and incorporate an American ag. Hodges used the opportunity to expand the thinking of her students when choosing a location to draw or paint. Americas not just about landmarks, said Hodges. Were also representing small towns and everyday America life. Several hundred pieces of art will line the hallways and serve as a salute to the veterans making their way to the gymnasium. While creating the artwork, it allowed elementary students to understand the signi cance of the stars and stripes on the American ag and the humble beginnings Butler pretrial delayed againBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com The Walt Butler murder trial looms, and the pretrial process remains incomplete. During Tuesdays session at the Gulf County Courthouse, Judge John Fishel rescheduled the pretrial for 9 a.m. CT on Wednesday, Nov. 13 at the Bay County Courthouse. The pretrial was rescheduled after Butlers public defender Mark Sims told Fishel that he was still waiting to review several items of discovery. Further, he had previously led a motion and was still awaiting a response. Additionally, Sims mentioned that he was unable to review a lab report/medical record that was listed on the docket but wasnt available for review. Whether the medical record went missing or was simply not available to Sims is unknown. We need that document made available, as it could affect my clients trial, said Sims. Assistant State Attorney Robert Sombathy said that he was aware of the record Sims sought and would ensure access was given. Fishel also noted that Butler was hard of hearing and asked Sims if he had requested a hearing aid be made available during the trial. Sims said that he looked into it, but reported that Gulf County courts do not provide hearing aids. Fishel insisted that a request could be made and both parties agreed to look into it further. Butlers trial is scheduled for 9 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 18 at the Gulf County Courthouse, less than one week after the pretrial. Butler is charged with shooting and killing Everett Gant in July of last year in Port St. Joe.By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com Tommy Pitts is moving from port director to helping direct the ports future. Pitts, who has worked much of the past year on a salary of $1 per month as the Port St. Joe Port Authority wrestled with scant revenues, has taken a position with the engineering rm spearheading the work on the Port of Port St. Joes application to dredge the shipping channel. Dredging the shipping channel, said Port Authority board member Eugene Raf eld, is the key to unlocking the ports potential. Pitts will be the project manager on the dredge permit work for Hatch Mott MacDonald, formally contracted two weeks by the Port Authority to undertake the nearly $800,000 task of securing the dredge permit. While this concludes my employment/volunteer status with the Port Authority I will obviously still be Pitts to lead dredge permit workSee PITTS A2 TIM CROFT | The StarTwo months ago Greg Burkett could not put a single weight on any machine. Here he has 90 pounds on a calf lift machine. See VETERANS A3 See PRETRIAL A2 Man ghting back after facing life in wheelchair A walking miracleSee MIRACLE A5When people started telling me what I couldnt do, that is when I decided I could.Greg Burkett Ghosts invade the Coast, B1Thursday, NOVEMBER 7, 2013 YEAR 76, NUMBER 4 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Port St. Joe city commissioners boarded the port bandwagon pushing forward for jobs Tuesday night. Commissioners unanimously approved a request from Commissioner Rex Buzzett to carve out $10,000 from the citys settlement with BP which totaled more than $500,000 to provide operational funds for the Port St. Joe Port Authority. If we get that port going it will be all about jobs, Buzzett said. They need our help I think it will come back to the city many times over if we get that port going. Commissioners earmarked that the funds be spent on dues to the Florida Ports Council and to pay the liability insurance for the Port Authority board. The dues for the Florida Ports Council, the lobbying organization for state ports, are crucial, said Port Authority chairman Leonard Costin. The Port Authority still owes half its $13,000 in dues from the last scal year, and the key to being at the table for state funds, and in turn any federal funds those state dollars can leverage, is as a dues-paying member of the council. With a Ports Council meeting coming soon, Costin said, the Port of Port St. Joe was better positioned not going hat in hand, so to speak. We are down to the point where we are trying to raise any money we can, Costin said, speaking about a community outreach campaign to fund a barebones budget for the current scal year. The only thing we have going right now in economic development is the port. We have to stay the course, and any support you can offer is greatly appreciated. Costin said there was a twoyear window during which the port will strive to accomplish dredging of the shipping channel to maximize some $17 million in infrastructure that exists along the 300 acres the Port Authority owns. After that, I think you will see quite a bit of activity and exponential growth, Costin said. Commissioners Phil McCroan and Bo Patterson expressed skepticism, noting the investment that has occurred at the port in the past decade without Commission joins port community campaignSee PORT A5Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . .A4Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . .A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . A7-A8Community . . . . . . . . . . B1School News . . . . . . . . . . B3Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4Classi eds . . . . . . . . . .B7-B8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, November 7, 2013 company would not consider any decision until consulting with the Florida Department of Transportation, which provided the grant to fund the dredge permit application. Ethically, Tommy is above reproach, said Port Authority chair Leonard Costin. A review by Samuel J. Henderson, district chief counsel in the Of ce of the General Counsel for the FDOT, indicated that the Port Authority and Pitts would not violate any ethical state laws in his employment with Hatch Mott MacDonald. From the information given to me, it appears that Mr. Pitts is not an of cer, partner, director or proprietor of Hatch Mott MacDonald at this time and does not now, nor is it contemplated that he, his spouse or his children will have a material interest in Hatch Mott MacDonald, Henderson wrote Costin. Further, Pitts had never been employed previously by Hatch Mott and did not participate in the selection of the company on a continuing engineering contract in 2007 a decision made by the Port Authority board. Therefore, Henderson concluded, there would be no violation of the grant agreement for the dredge application work by Pitts going to work for Hatch Mott MacDonald. Costin said if there was a person responsible for the Port of Port St. Joe being on the cusp of potential development it was Pitts and he added he was pleased that Pitts, in his new job, would still be an integral part of the ports future. Tommy has his heart in that port, Costin said. His leadership has gotten us to this critical stage. His hard work and dedication to making the Port of Port St. Joe a reality is now coming together. He will be greatly missed as our port director but I take comfort in knowing he will still be involved in making the dream a reality. I also thank him for all the countless volunteer hours he contributed to the ports efforts after our nancial status precluded further payment of salaries. He stayed the course and helped the port get through a very critical stage in the process that leads towards future dredging of the channel. Gulf County Economic Development Alliance, Inc. executive director Barry Sellers will take a larger role in promoting the port and work with the Port Authority in administrative issues where possible. Tommy is a class act and a man of integrity in a world where there are too few of them, Sellers said. Guerry Magidson, president of the EDA, added, Tommy is a tremendous asset to the community and has conducted himself as a true professional during trying times. I look forward to helping see the port succeed. And as he departs one job aimed at that success, Pitts enters another aimed at bringing to fruition the commitments of two energy rms to ship wood pellets through the Port of Port St. Joe. I am particularly pleased that I can stay involved with the port development project, Pitts said. In fact, I can now be more focused on the major task before us and that is the timely permitting of the maintenance dredging in order to secure the wood pellet commitments. After many years of the port being a community and personal dream, I have gained con dence that it will become a reality in the foreseeable future. involved in the effort to revitalize our seaport, a project that is important to all of us, Pitts said. Pitts will continue to be a xture at Port Authority meetings, now in the role of updating the board on the progress of the permitting effort. Pitts will continue to live in Port St. Joe while his ofce with Hatch Mott is in Panama City. He said much of his work will be in Gulf County. We will be assessing dredge material disposal sites, perform sediment sampling and coordinate with the county and (Tourist Development Council) on potential beach renourishment sites among other duties associated with the dredge permit work, Pitts said. Hatch Mott approached Pitts some weeks ago, noting that Pitts extensive knowledge of the port and channel could be invaluable to the work on the dredge permit application. However, Pitts and the Monday,November11,2013 9amESTatPortSt.JoeHighSchoolepubliciscordiallyinvitedtotheannual community-wideVeteran'sDayCeremonies. Wesincerelyhopethatyouwillbeabletoattendandjoinusin payingtributetoandgivinghonortoourVeteranswhohave givensacriciallytopreservetheeedomsthatweenjoyin Americatoday!Veteran'sDayCelebration Tolearnhowyoucansupportour communitysuniversity,contact MaryBethLovingoodat(850)770-2108 ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. FLORIDASTATEUNIVERSITY PANAMACITYTHECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com Some new blood and a familiar face were Gov. Rick Scotts choices for appointment to new terms on the Port St. Joe Port Authority. Last week Scott reappointed Carl Eugene Raf eld to the Port Authority while appointing Jason Shoaf to replace Patrick Jones. The terms of Jones and Raf eld expired more than two months ago and there was considerable interest in the appointments, with nearly a dozen applications. Raf eld, 51, returns for another four-year term which will end July 20, 2017. A vice president of Raf eld Fisheries, Inc. Raf eld brings a wealth of knowledge about maritime activity but also has deep, generational roots in the community. I am glad the governor had the faith in me to put me back on the board, Raf eld said. I thank him for that. I am very passionate about the county and the town I grew up in. When I am dead and gone I want them to remember my name as someone who helped bring jobs to this county. Raf eld has been outspoken in his quest for dredging of the shipping channel to open up development of the Port of Port St. Joe. Having been among board members that unanimously approved contracts to move the dredge permit application forward two weeks ago, Raf eld reaf rmed that a dredged channel is critical. As a natural, deepwater channel, Raf eld noted that more than half of the channel is in good condition despite no maintenance dredging since the last 1980s. I do feel if we can get that channel dredged that will solve a lot of things and end the talk about this and that, Raf eld said. That is the heart line of the port. It is the deepest and most natural channel in Florida. The cost to maintain that channel will be very low compared to places like Miami. Shoaf, 34, is vice president of St. Joe Natural Gas Company, Inc. and was appointed for a term ending July 27, 2017. He also brings deep community roots to his position on the Port Authority. Im excited about the opportunity to help bring jobs and development to Gulf County, Shoaf said. That is what gets me excited, to be able to work on behalf of the community to bring industry and jobs to the area.Raf eld back, Shoaf appointed to Port Authority PITTS from page A1Gant approached Butlers Pine Ridge apartment after Butler had been accused of using racial slurs directed at children in the apartment complex. Butler shot Gant between the eyes with a .22 ri e and left him bleeding on the doorstep before calling 911 and sitting back down to nish his dinner. He expressed inconvenience at being arrested for shooting a (racial epithet), according to the arresting af davit. PRETRIAL from page A1 HollyHillFuneralHome 2775GarrisonAvenue PortSt.Joe,Florida32456 (850)229-1929CremationStartingat$795 WALT BUTLER Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, November 7, 2013 Juvenile justice establishes presence in PSJHSBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com When it comes to the juvenile justice system, prevention is the name of the game. The newest face at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School is Kelly Faircloth, Juvenile Probation Ofcer for Gulf County. The Florida Department of Juvenile Justice System aims to increase public safety by reducing juvenile delinquency through effective prevention, intervention and treatment services that strengthen families and turn around the lives of troubled youth. Its not uncommon for youth to act out in school, but rather than have a student face arrest, suspension or expulsion, Faircloths goal is to help kids on the front end by being able to address situations immediately, before they have the potential to get worse. Faircloth said that a student acting out is typically an indicator of bigger problems at home. He said that often, students just need a friend and hes happy to be there for them. While occasionally there are bigger issues that may require law enforcement to get involved, the cause of the bad behavior can be something as simple as a bad breakup. These kids are teenagers and they have different problems than adults, said Faircloth. By being on campus, Faircloth can sit one-on-one with students and assess their needs and identify the source of the bad behavior. Because Im at the school, I can assess them quickly and help them make a better judgment call, said Faircloth. We can see whats best for them. When bad kids face expulsion, it affects the educational process. Faircloth would rather have students do community service, and work alongside them, to truly understand whats causing the student to make poor choices. Though Faircloth has provided services for Gulf County since September 2012, he was stationed in Panama City and made the trek to Port St. Joe several times a week in order to effectively interact with the kids. He knew that he wanted to be closer and kept looking for opportunities to do so. Eventually he decided to approach Superintendent of Schools, Jim Norton with his idea to be located where the juveniles were rather than miles from those who needed his help. I wanted (Norton) to understand that we could work together on this for our kids, said Faircloth. He saw my vision and understood what I was looking for. I really wanted to be there with the children I worked with. After receiving Nortons blessing, high school Principal Jeremy Knapp accommodated Faircloth with ofce space right next to the cafeteria, the biggest common area in the school. Prior, the space was called the trophy room, an area that hadnt been used in the last decade. The move also put Faircloth right next to School Resource Ofcer Stacy Strickland, allowing them to work together for the safety and well-being of the student body. When the new school year began in August, Faircloth had an ofce and the students were pleased to see him. We thought it would be a great idea, and it was perfect timing, said Norton. Kelly is a great resource to have right there and hes able to see the kids during the school day, which is great since one-third of a students day is spent in school. By being at the school, Kelly has unfettered access to answers to his immediate questions and were very happy to have this partnership. To further build prevention awareness, the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice held a road tour last week that visited various cities throughout the state and hosted an open dialogue for the public to inform the DJJ staff what resources and services were needed in their communities. The stop in Gulf County was held at Gulf Coast State College Gulf/Franklin Campus was open to the public and DJJ secretary Wansley Walters told attendees that a strong community can keep kids from ending up in the court system. She said that more than 100,000 kids go into the court system each year; though only a small number of those are serious or violent offenders. With the DJJs new focus on prevention, there has been a 25 percent reduction in juvenile delinquency in the past two years for the state of Florida. A vast majority of kids are troubled in some fashion, said Walters. Intervention at an early age is important. In Gulf County, the DJJ works with the teen court and holds prevention-oriented presentations in schools to discuss domestic violence with students and reinforce the importance of respect and the negative effects of bullying. Walters also discussed the addition of after-school programs which include Project Connect which works with youth who are exiting the court system to provide vocational and mentorship services, help provide transportation, assist in locating employment and even help kids set goals. Wansley Walters is a nationally recognized leader in juvenile justice. She pioneered juvenile justice services in Miami-Dade County from 1995 until Gov. Rick Scott appointed her to lead the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) in January 2011. During her tenure, Miami-Dade not only had the lowest youth incarceration rate in the state, but also boasted one of Floridas lowest juvenile crime rates. Our goal is to ensure that we have the right combination of services and sanctions, in the right place, at the right time as we care for each youth and keep the public safe, said Walters.Three arrested, charged with dealing drugsStar Staff ReportThree Wewahitchka residents were arrested last week on charges related to the selling of marijuana and methamphetamine. Joshua Aaron Causey, 30, Shannon Dwayne Causey, 33, and Haylee Ferry Johnson, 26, were arrested after felony warrants were served on the three by investigators and deputies from the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce. The three were subsequently arrested, according to Sheriff Mike Harrison. All three were transported to the Gulf County Jail. Joshua Causey was charged with the sale of marijuana and is being held on $5,000 bond. Shannon Causey was charged with the sale of methamphetamine and is being held on $10,000 bond, according to Harrison. Johnson was also charged with the sale of methamphetamine and is also being held on a $10,000 bond. The arrests were part of an ongoing investigation leading to the issuing of the felony arrest warrants. SHANNON D. CAUsSEY HHAYLEE FERRY JOHNsSON JOsSHUA AA. CAUsSEYWEs S LL Oc C HER | The StarJuvenile Probation Ofcer for Gulf County, Kelly Faircloth, will spend several days a week at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School with an eye toward prevention. Florida Department of Juvenile Justice Secretary, Wansley Walters, discussed the importance of community in preventing juvenile crime at a public meeting last week in Port St. Joe. FILE PHOTOGulf County schools will hold programs to honor area veterans. All events will be open to the public.of our nation. It makes the students feel important, said Hodges. Theyre contributing something to honoring the veterans. The program will cover the Revolutionary War as well as recognize the veterans of the Vietnam War, who were never ofcially welcomed home. A reception will immediately follow the program. Thank you letters written by elementary school students and the patriotic artwork will later be sent to soldiers abroad. We want to show the kids that the United States started with a major war that established a democratic country, said event organizer, Linda Wood. Now, we have soldiers policing countries all over the world. We want kids to see the magnitude of what we require these men to do. At last years event Kesley Colbert honored WWII veteran Howard Rogers, whose unit saved a group of POWs on the Island of Biak. Among the soldiers rescued was Colberts father. At Wewahitchka Elementary School, the 30th annual Veterans Day Celebration will take place inside the cafeteria. Third graders will pay tribute to past and present veterans with a program of poem readings and patriotic songs that include service hymns. This will mark the seventh year that the Veterans Day program was organized by third-grade teacher John Huft, Huft said that in a time of shrinking budgets, the local veterans have been gracious in helping the school where they can. The annual program is his way of giving back to the men who not only served their countries, but serve their communities as well. I want this to be something that students can look back on and have positive memories, said Huft. Its something that theyve given to the veterans and brightened their day. The program will begin at 8:30 a.m. CT. A reception will immediately follow. Both events are free and open to veterans, their families and the public. VETERANS from page A1

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USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 OPINION www.starfl.com ASectionBy Alan PottsSpecial to The Star Editors Note: This article is for informational use only. Readers are advised to discuss this information with their legal and/or tax advisor in order to gain more knowledge on this topic. Like many Americans, you may have an IRA or 401(k) rollover account to make your retirement years more comfortable. Many consumers have grown tired of the daily nancial roller coaster ride and the general risk of the current market. Wild market swings have increased and tend to happen because of a combination of our inept government and the fact that major nancial institutions now use high speed computers to create the majority of transactions. The buying and selling strategy is generally based on price spreads, not long-term market value. This puts brokers and everyday IRA holders at a timing and knowledge disadvantage. This, in turn, leaves IRA holders feeling like their efforts are too little too late as they now nd that their accounts are nally back to where they were 10 years ago. Many IRA holders are asking, Why cant I take advantage of todays real estate market and use my IRA to purchase real estate? The answer is you can! In 1974, Congress passed a set of federal laws and regulations called the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). This act allowed IRA holders to invest their IRA accounts in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and other approved investments. Importantly, these approved investments included real estate. If you want to invest some or all of your IRA in real estate, you must rst be aware that Real Estate IRAs are an IRS approved investment alternative. Then, you must understand how Real Estate IRAs can provide you return and risk management possibilities. Once your decision is made, you will rollover some or all of your IRA account to a real estate friendly custodian. Since most IRA custodians are equity investment rms, they promote, sell and make commissions on these types of products. The new real estate friendly custodian will provide educational materials, the necessary paperwork, and guidance through the administrative process. Today, there are more Real Estate IRA custodians, but deciding which custodian is right for you will require some research. When you consider using your IRA to purchase real estate there are three major steps. First, determine the property you want to purchase. There is an old saying about the 3 most important things when buying property. They are location, location, location. You should also consider how the property will be used, how long the holding period is, and how this will affect your short and long-term objectives. These are critical to the enjoyment of your purchase and the nancial results that will occur when you sell your property. Second, decide how to structure the Real Estate IRA transaction. When someone structures their IRA to purchase real estate there are two different ways in which the IRA can be used. In Method #1, the real estate is titled so that the IRA owns the property. Because the IRA holds title, certain guidelines and rules apply as to how the property can be purchased and how the property can be used and not used. This approach is used when the IRA holder wants to invest for investment purposes only. With Method #2, the property is titled individually and is owned outright. When the individual holds title, If you are a college football fan, chances are you are familiar with the University of Alabamas domination under Coach Nick Saban, having won three National Championships in the past four years. If you are not an Alabama or football fan, dont stop reading, because this is not just about football. Talking heads on television, newspaper columnists and radio know-it-alls talk about The Process when referring to Nick Sabans reason for success at the University of Alabama and Louisiana State University, having won four total National Championships for the two schools. Barrett Jones, a former All-American at Alabama who now plays for the St. Louis Rams in the NFL has been asked to describe The Process on several occasions. Jones usually notes something to the effect of, The Process means not focusing on the results, but focusing on how you get there. In other words, The Process is about doing the little things right and letting the big things take care of themselves. My understanding of the real meaning of The Process came as a result of the Alabama-Tennessee game that took place on Saturday, October 26, 2013. That being said, I would like to say that The Process does not belong to Nick Saban he didnt invent it. He seems to just do a good job of what his parents taught him to do. This Process is prevalent throughout the Southeastern United States and Im pretty sure it is elsewhere because Coach Saban himself came from West Virginia. I dont think West Virginia is in the South or the north; its in the mountains or something. Coach Saban learned under the legendary Coach Don James who recently passed away. Coach James coached for many years at the University of Washington and before that, Kent State University, in Ohio. Is The Process Coach James? No, Coach James was born in Ohio and Im pretty sure he had good parents who taught him The Process. Its common sense. Work hard, help people reach their goals, be kind and generous and raise a family that thinks the same way. That is what I think The Process really is. Im willing to bet that Coach Saban would agree. My most recent experience with The Process was in Tuscaloosa, Alabama on the weekend of the Alabama-Tennessee game, but didnt involve anything that Coach Saban did before or during the game. It involved me getting inside to see the game. Therefore, Im very sure that it (The Process) was at the University of Alabama before Nick Saban was. Living out of state, I can generally get to one Alabama game each year. My main reason for going is not to see the game, but to see my oldest daughter who is a junior at the University of Alabama. (She presently has a 4.0 and I want to say Summa Cum Laude Mercy more than I want to say Roll Tide.) We paid too much for our four tickets back in July from one of those online ticket sales places. If you want to go to just one game, you almost have to do that. We paid about double what the tickets were worth. In other words, we invested somewhere around $600 just to be able to see the AlabamaTennessee game. A couple of nights before our ight South, we realized we could not nd the tickets. We were sick, there was yelling and there was crying. It was the AlabamaTennessee game and we did want to go and it was $600 down the drain. We came to the conclusion that the envelope containing the tickets had been thrown away by mistake. There was still sickness, yelling and crying. From the time we realized this to the time we were about to board the plane, I was on the telephone begging and trying to nd a way to have the tickets reissued. If I talked to the online ticket folks once, I talked to them at least twenty times (or more). The online ticket folks were just middlemen for the person who sold us the tickets. It turned out the person who sold us the tickets was just a middleman for the person who sold him the tickets. It didnt stop there. There were a lot of middlemen. So many, the folks from the internet ticket place couldnt get it gured it out. We were out of luck and it was our fault. Without the original purchasers permission, the University of Alabama ticket of ce couldnt just reissue tickets. They were kind, but they had a policy that had to be followed. We were going to see our daughter and were just going to see what we could do when we got there. The Friday before the game, my second daughter had an of cial visit scheduled to tour the University of Alabama with her mother. She wants to study history and through her hard work and excellent test scores she has been offered a full academic scholarship to the University of Alabama. She loved her visit and the people there showed her The Process of working hard, helping people reach their goals, being kind and generous and exhibiting these qualities to others. After hearing our story, those folks at the Of ce of Admissions gave us four tickets. A fellow named Paul just put them in an envelope and gave them to us. The next day was game day and even though we had been given four tickets, the $600 still was eating at me. Tim, the fellow who runs the ticket of ce had told me to stop by and see him at Gate 32 before the game and he would see what he could do. I did. Tim was kind and told me to wait for ten minutes. Tim went upstairs to talk to the Tennessee ticket fellow and they gured out that the tickets I had originally purchased were from a Tennessee fan who was unable to travel CRANKS MY TRACTORBN HeardUse your IRA to purchase real estateI never served one day in the Armed Forces. It simply was not my destiny. Sometimes, even now, I lay awake long into the night and wonder what if ... And I have always, deep down, been just a little ashamed that someone else was sent off to do my ghting for me. Maybe that is why I so admire, appreciate and love, in the truest sense of that word, every single man and woman that ever suited up on my behalf! My rst encounter with veterans started way back in grade school. On the eleventh day of the eleventh month the whole school turned out by the ag pole to see these old men line up behind a little cannon theyd brought with them. Miss Carolyn said they were from World War I. Theyd wait till exactly eleven oclock, re off that cannon, and then step back, rather smartly I thought for old guys, and salute while the high school band played the Star Spangled Banner. Most of them would wear their uniform jacket or an old green army hat. Some were tall and skinny; others short and fat. They looked pretty ordinary to me. I couldnt picture those old guys ghting anybody! We called it Armistice Day back then. Daddy was a veteran. He never said a word about World War II. And I mean not one word! Me and David Mark couldnt believe it when we found that old uniform in the closet. We had never heard of the South Paci c, and had no clue where it was. Mother wouldnt let us ask him hardly anything about the war. Dave and I did take those bright colored ribbons and arrowheads off that dress uniform and pinned them on our t-shirts. We promptly lost them playing army down at the big ditch. If Dad ever noticed the missing awards, he never said a word. Youd a thought the whole war was just something to forget about and move on. Dad was about as ordinary as anybody youd ever seen. I knew Chandler King was at Pearl Harbor. I remember Peajacket Lawrence served in the Navy. Mr. Ben Gaines had fought in Italy. Anne Alexanders father was in the service. As was Yogis and Ruth Anns. Almost all the merchants around town had served in one branch or the other. They seemed like such ordinary men to me. I was in the seventh grade before I realized there might be more to this veteran thing than meets the eye. You understand how silly and immature you can be at that age. I came home one day limping along and moving my head about, mocking an old man that lived just outside of town. In my own defense here, I knew nothing about shell shock or posttraumatic stress disorder. I made a couple of passes across the porch when it dawned on my Father who I was making fun of. Folks, he leaped across a rocker and two swings and lifted me off the concrete steps with one hand. He was literally shaking he was so mad! I could make fun of the ladies and their big hats at church and he never said a word. I could preach with my hand up in the air like Brother Hatcher and that was o.k. I picked on the wrong guy. Son, you dont know what that man has gone through. You have no idea of the nightmares he has seen. You dont have a clue as to the sacri ces he has made. You wouldnt know a real hero if he ran over you in a lighted hallway! It was the only war related speech Dad ever gave. I think my youth and utter stupidity was all that kept me from being killed right there on the front porch! And, youd better believe, I got the message loud and clear; a message of love, sacri ce and duty that knows no bounds or limits. By the ninth grade, I noticed half of the World War I guys that came out to celebrate the 11th with us were gone. I remembered Miss Belle telling us that every World War I veteran in town always participated in the event. What was left of them still red the cannon and stepped back as spritely as ever. I took notice for the rst time of those ordinary men around town. Come Fourth of July at the parade, when our small high school band struck up The National Anthem, those men came to a ram rod straight position. Their chins were up. Their moist eyes xed on the American ag. Undoubtedly, they were transported to another place and another time. And I can only imagine the horrors of war and the remembrances that must be streaming across their collective minds ... especially of the ones they personally knew that didnt come back. Ordinary men, I dont think so! Weve sent the same caliber of people, including David Mark, to Viet Nam. We have them now in Korea, Iraq and Afghanistan. By November 11th, 1964, my senior year in high school, there were only four World War I veterans left. One was in a wheel chair. It had snowed and those men were standing in the freezing temperature to re that old cannon. As the band hit the rst note, the man in the wheel chair struggled to his feet. His lifelong friends got him erect. Everyone stood for the presentation of the colors! That was the day I shed my rst tears for an American veteran. Most Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWNKesley ColbertThe Process Page 4 Thursday, November 7, 2013Twenty-One Guns Aint Near Enough!See IRA A5 See CRANKS A5

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LocalThe Star| A5Thursday, November 7, 2013He could not guarantee anything, Burkett said. Over the span of 18 months there have been seven more surgeries and rehabilitation from each and every one. He was relegated fulltime to a wheelchair. He has, his doctor described, a condominium for a neck. Much of it prosthesis with his upper vertebrae steadily growing around and to it. He spent months with a halo screwed into to his head, unable to move his head freely, unable to sleep other than upright. That I wouldnt wish on anyone, Burkett said. His family, he said, sacriced a lot. Two brothers and two sisters helped transport Burkett to and from doctors appointments in Bay County three to four times a week. They looked after him, took him in. With the help of a home nurse, who still comes three times a week, they helped Burkett as he regained control of his bodily functions. It affects every part of your body, Burkett said. I didnt realize how much. In time, he moved onto HealthSouth in Bay County for rehabilitation. The staff at HealthSouth encountered a ghter. They really tend to rehabilitate you to acclimate you to be in a wheelchair because thats where they think you are going to be, Burkett said. I wasnt going to stay in no wheelchair. When people started telling me what I couldnt do, that is when I decided I could. He drew inspiration from Wounded Warriors, such as those who visit Bay and Gulf counties. He listened to televised speeches and read written words from those warriors who had survived horric injuries and somehow found the purpose to rise above limitations. I kept hearing, You are as disabled as you want to be, Burkett said. He transitioned from HealthSouth to Sacred Heart on the Gulf to continue his rehab under the direction of Kimberly Thomas. She would get me out of that wheelchair and wed walk and walk, Burkett said. I came there in a wheelchair and I came out walking. Thomas, Burkett said, is the reason he is now riding a bike ve miles a day, has whittled his daily medications from nine to two and is working with weights three days a week at One Way Fitness Center. Burkett spent eight months under the care of Thomas, who pushed, cajoled and celebrated each milestone. Burkett said he also took inspiration from friends and neighbors, folks in the community who reached out and put him on so many prayer lists at churches. And two months ago, Burkett walked stify into One Way and began a workout routine. I couldnt put any weight on any of the machines, Burkett said. I used to be 275 pounds and I was down to 180. My legs, you could see the bones they were so skinny. Now, they have the appearance of re plugs. From no weight on the leg press Burkett now pushes 300 pounds. He does a full circuit three days a week, working his arms, his legs, his core muscles. I never would have thought Id be doing this, Burkett said. But after the rst month I knew the sky was the limit. I dont like anybody telling me what I cant do. But I will tell you, this has been hard work. There have been a lot of days I get out of bed and said no I aint going in there. But the improvement gives me encouragement. As long as you see improvement that keeps you going. While he still has nerve issues with his hands one operation at Shands was unsuccessful due to a staph infection and Burkett has another scheduled next year he can open anything he wants. He is a self-sufcient cook. He has returned to one of his great loves shing. They used to say I was the best at throwing a cast net in the county, Burkett said, his face brightening when recalling the rst time he set a hook with a cricket. I can still throw it, but I cant turn it loose. Burkett is philosophical about the journey of the past two years. There has been education. I needed something like this before it happened, Burkett said. This was absolutely a walk-up call for me. And he is trying to nd sense for others from the tragedy of similar circumstances. There is the young man from the community who recently broke his neck in a freak accident. Asked by his father to speak to the young man, Burkett did, telling him nothing will hold him back but his own will. The father called last week to say the son had his best week of rehab ever. Im trying to give back what the community gave me, Burkett said. I can tell people things nobody else can tell them because I have been there. I am a walking miracle. You cant give up and you cant let people tell you what you cant do. Every night I thank God I am laying down and every morning I am thanking God I am getting up.TIM CROFt T | The StarBurkett does a full circuit of training with weights less than two years after suffering a broken neck and the prognosis of spending the rest of his life in a wheelchair. different guidelines and rules apply as to how the property is purchased and how the property can be used during the purchasing period. This approach is used when the IRA holder wants to invest for personal use. The pros and cons of each method should be carefully studied and understood before you make any changes to your IRA. Third, decide which custodian is best for you. Your custodian/advisor must be able to help you decide which purchasing approach is best for you and help structure your transaction so that you will use the proper documents and correctly purchase the property. In addition, your advisor/custodian should provide ongoing service and compliance reviews to keep you informed of any tax law changes. Real Estate IRAs are similar to 1031 Tax Deferred Exchanges; both have been around since the 1970s and real estate investors must carefully learn about these nancial transactions before either can be used. Knowing that Real Estate IRAs are an option can help real estate investors / IRA holders take advantage of todays buyers market, provide risk management opportunities and create something they did not previously know was possible. Alan N. Potts is a Chartered Financial Consultant. He can be reached at 1.800.525.1893 or alanpotts@pottsfinancial.com. For his free Question and Answer Guide, please go to his website: www.pottsfinancial.com. IRA from page A4to Alabama for the game. They just printed me four new tickets. Please note that I had proof of paying for these and what the seat numbers were, etc. Tim handed them to me outside the ticket window. I hugged Tim. Good people in Alabama and Tennessee (and Ohio, West Virginia and Washington). When I say Washington, I am referring to the state where Don James was a college football coach. Now I had eight tickets and I felt a little bad. We decided the best thing to do was to nd someone who needed them. Folks were standing outside the stadium scalping tickets for a lot of money. We had no right to sell tickets that were given to us, thus I had to interview some folks. The rst fellow I met was there celebrating his 56th birthday, he was a minister of sorts who runs a program that uses sports for mission type work. His mother had given him the money to buy tickets for him and his wife for his birthday. I told him to just put the money in the collection plate at church, or use it for his mission work or give it back to his mama. He hugged me. The other two tickets were given to a man and his son from Daphne, Alabama. We watched folks walk up to them and the daddy just kept shaking his head no. I asked the little boy how old he was and he said, Twelve. I said, Someday you are going to be old like me and I want you to do something nice for someone. The little boy just smiled. The game was great. Well, if you were an Alabama fan, it was great. The Tennessee folks around us were nice, as were the Alabama fans. So, The Process does not belong to Nick Saban, it can and should belong to all of us. It involves working hard, helping people reach their goals (and nd their tickets), being kind and generous and raising a family that thinks the same way. Read more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. CraRANKS from page A4 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Startcroft@starfl.comJanice Keeler remembers the black blouse. Keeler moved to Gulf County two years ago from Houston and in January 2012 she needed to renew her drivers license. She put on one of her favorite black blouses and got in her car. She could barely breathe. That blouse was so tight I had to unbutton the bottom few buttons so I could breathe, Keeler said. I decided right then I would go on a diet. Keeler was 130 or so pounds when she was a young adult and did not put on weight until after having her children and her marriage broke down. She was tipping 300 pounds. As a diabetic, that weight brought additional issues. And she had been down the dieting road before with little success, even tried Weight Watchers for a time. I would start out hot and heavy but I didnt keep to it, Keeler said. It is easy to fall off the wagon. This is hard. But this time I needed to get off the 300 mark. Her diet was dramatic. She counted calories and began to restrict herself to 700 a day. She eliminated the bread she loved so much, the pasta, the rolls the carbohydrates that so easily turn to fat. I concentrated on eating meat and fruits and vegetables, Keeler said. The rst four months, she said, were hard. She found herself traveling down the cookie and snack aisles of the grocery store. She would stare at what she knew she couldnt and shouldnt have. She visited the Health Department who provided a coach, Debbie, and doctor, Kevin Murphy to monitor Keelers progress and her health. The weight started melting off dramatically. Twenty, thirty, forty pounds slipped away. Today Keeler is 63 pounds lighter. It really came off fast early but now every two weeks or so I am losing two to three pounds, Keeler said. That is not discouraging. I am still losing weight and feeling better. I really feel good. I dont huff and puff. I have energy. I can t into a lot of clothes I couldnt before. She joined One Way Fitness Center and spends each morning at the gym. She will ride a stationary bicycle for 45 minutes and perform some weight training. She is religious about her routine. If it is 10 a.m. ET during the week, Keeler is in the gym. I am on a routine and I need to stick to it, Keeler said. I really want to get my weight down. I am never going to be 160 or 170 but I can lose more. The thin people at the gym dont bother me. They are thin, I am heavy. Its no big deal. I am here to do what I need to do to lose weight. I just need to keep plugging along. She has learned more about proper diet, trying to buy right and eat sugar free where possible. I am 65 years old and I need to take care of myself, Keeler said. It is hard but I never thought I would lose 60 pounds. Its a struggle. You just need to set your mind to it. Im shocked by myself. When I try on my thin clothes I know this works. I just needed to learn that (the way I ate and lived) was not a good thing for me at this time.By SHirIRLEY JENKiINsSTax Collector Notice is hereby given that the 2013 Tax Roll has been delivered by the Gulf County property appraiser to the Gulf County tax collector. The 2013 Tax Roll is open for collection beginning Nov. 1. The tax collectors ofce is located in the Gulf County courthouse, room 147 at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., in Port St. Joe. Ofce hours are from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday, except holidays. Real and personal property taxes will be collected as levied by the following taxing authorities: Gulf County Board of County Commissioners, Gulf County School Board, Northwest Florida Water Management District, City of Port St. Joe, City of Wewahitchka, St. Joseph Fire Control District, Tupelo Fire Control District, Howard Creek Fire Control District and Overstreet Fire Control District. The discount schedule is as follows: 4 percent discount if paid in November, 3 percent discount if paid in December, 2 percent discount if paid in January, 1 percent discount if paid in February, payable without discount in March and taxes delinquent April 1. TIM CROFt T | The StarJanice Keeler works out at the gym religiously ve days a week.LLosing to live Tax Roll NOOTIICEmuch if any progress. People just want to see some action, McCroan said. Costin replied that the key difference now was the collaboration agreement with the St. Joe Company. Until the Port Authority and St. Joe signed a formal agreement, the company and Port Authority had butted heads on how the port and surrounding lands would be developed. St. Joe is now committed to developing the 5,000 acres it owns along the Intracoastal Canal as well as the old mill site and bulkhead, and is collaborating in the development of the 100 acres owned by the Port Authority. St. Joe, that is the changing factor in what we are doing now, Costin said. And as the government entity to which state and federal funding would ow, the Port Authority plays a pivotal role simply by remaining active. Costin noted that port director Tommy Pitts has taken other employment (see Pitts to lead dredge permit work on Page A1) and administrative assistant Nadine Lee was working strictly as a volunteer. We (the Port Authority) are pitching in any way we can, Costin said, adding the Port Authority was also receiving considerable inkind assistance from the Economic Development Alliance. They are helping us any way we can. I just think we all need to think together on this, the city, the county and as a region. PORT from page A1 MiraIRACLE from page A1

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST) Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) BWOHuntingHeadquarters: CAMOARRIVINGDAILY SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Nov.781 5367% Fri,Nov.871 58 9% Sat,Nov.974 6218% Sun,Nov.1078 5823% Mon,Nov.1175 5017% Tues,Nov.1275 52 0% Wed,Nov.1377 55 1% SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomGood flounder are being caught around the old channel marker towers at the mouth of the bay. Most anglers are finding fish deeper this month due to the fall feeding patterns that are emerging. Local waters are coming back to life after the cold snap and the rain. Good reports from the Brothers and around Howard Creek are abuzz with good bream catches. Scipio Creek is also producing nice speckled trout since the cold snap.Special to The StarFlorida manatees are beginning their annual migration to warmer waters, which is their instinctual response to winters approach and surviving the cold. As these slow-moving aquatic mammals migrate along rivers, canals, bays and coastlines, the FWC cautions boaters to slow down and watch out for manatees. The average adult manatee is 1,000 pounds and 10-feet long but may be dif cult to spot despite its size. You can help manatees by slowing down and following posted speed zones when operating boats or personal watercraft. Manatees often feed in shallow seagrass beds adjacent to deeper waters, said Carol Knox, the FWCs Imperiled Species Management Section Leader. Wearing polarized sunglasses helps you spot a manatee underwater. Also watch for circular wave patterns on the waters surface, called manatee footprints, indicating a manatees presence below. Throughout the state, many seasonal manatee protection zones go into effect Nov. 15. Look for signs posted on the water indicating boat speed zones. A slow speed zone means a boat should be completely settled in the water, not creating an excessive wake. Go to MyFWC.com/Manatee, and click on Data and Maps to see FWC manatee protection zones. November is also Manatee Awareness Month, a time to celebrate Floridas of cial state marine mammal. The FWC asks people to report sick, injured, orphaned, entangled or dead manatees by calling the Wildlife Alert hotline at 888404-FWCC (3922), texting Tip@MyFWC.com or calling #FWC and *FWC via cellphone. Floridians can support manatee conservation efforts by purchasing a manatee license plate at BuyaPlate.com or through their local tax collectors of ce when obtaining or renewing a vehicle tag. They also can get a manatee decal at those of ces or by visiting MyFWC.com/Manatee and clicking on Decals. For A boaters guide to living with Florida Manatees, go to MyFWC. com/Wildlife. More manatee information is available at MyFWC. com/Manatee. By TOM BAIRDSpecial to The Star The seasons are turning, and while elsewhere people are enjoying the autumn foliage, we can witness impressive seasonal changes in the bay and gulf. Nowhere is this more dramatic than the plants of the upper salt marsh. The upper marsh responds to the seasons and the seas touch with varying colors. Seaside goldenrod displays bright bits of color and sea oxeye daisy (Borrichia frutescens) and salt marsh aster (Aster tenuifolius) create bands of color in the zones where they grow. The salt pannes or salt barrens now blaze red with glasswort and these same salt ats may have purslane in bloom. Sea lavender has sent up sprays of delicate purple owers that make the upper marsh look like it is covered by a lavender mist. The marsh plants tell the seasons as clearly as the trees in a forest. Irregularly ooded by the highest tides and visited by many terrestrial animals, the upper marsh is intimately linked to the regularly ooded lower marsh and eventually to the sea beyond. Plants of the upper marsh contend with extremes of salinity and drying. The majority are halophytes, salt tolerant plants that exhibit modi cations and adaptations to their habitat. Succulents and plants with a thick waxy cuticle keep water loss to a minimum. In some marsh plants, salt glands secrete the excess salt taken in from the soli and tides. Salt crystals sparkle from their leaves on dry sunny days. Other plants resolve the salt problem by preventing salt uptake by the roots. De nite zonation patterns based on their abilities to tolerate salt and drying characterize upper marsh plants. The plant dominating the irregularly ooded high marshes of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts is needle rush or black rush (Juncus roemerianus). Growing on higher ground and generally behind the more productive cord grass, this is the plant that often looks dead and brown. In some sections of the bay, the high marsh is characterized by salt-meadow hay (Spartina patens) and spike grass or salt grass (Distichlis spicata). More birds nest in this zone than anywhere else in the marsh. Growing mixed with the salt grass in the same zone is the more attractive, but less abundant plant, sea lavender (Limonium carolinianum). Salt glands on this perennial herb help it withstand submersion in seawater. During most of the year the plant is low growing and inconspicuous; then, in a period of less than a week, it ourishes into a showy, delicate, multi-branched spray of tiny lavender blossoms. The high marsh glows with purple owers, and the migrating butter ies love the nectar. Parts of the marsh receive such little tidal ooding or run-off from the land that evaporation causes the soil salinity to become excessively high. Only a select few plants are adapted to these harsh salt barrens. One of the few plants able to grow in the salt barrens is glasswort (Salicornia), found worldwide in tropical and temperate regions. The plant is composed largely of succulent, saltlled, oppositely branching, jointed stems. The genus name, Salicornia, is derived from the Latin sal, meaning salt and cornu, meaning horn, referring to the plants saltiness and hornshaped stems. Its reduced scaly leaves make the plant appear to the lea ess. Glasswort is edible snap off some and try it and is used for making pickles or in salads, but is also valuable simply for the variety it adds to the marsh with its re-red autumn coloration. Other plants often found on or near salt barrens are saltwort (Batis maritima), and sea purslane (Sesuvium portulacastrum). Saltwort may cover the ground almost exclusively in very saline areas, and can be found in profusion on some of the low islands in St. Joseph Bay. It owers from spring to late fall and produces a berry. Sea purslane, like glasswort, is edible. The pinks and purples of sea purslane owers add color to the browns and greens of marshes. Along the inland fringe of the salt marsh occur species of plants associated with coastlines but growing in areas that are ooded only during the extreme storm surges. This group includes sea myrtle (Baccharis halimifolia), marsh elder (Iva frutescens), seaside goldenrod (Solidago sempervirens) and Christmas berry (Lycium carolinianum), as well as various willows and sumac. It is the cottony owers of sea myrtle and the small blossoms of marsh elder that attract and feed so many migrating butter ies each fall. Both can be seen on US 98 just east of town and along the edge of the marsh. If you see a bush covered in butter ies during this time of year, it is likely either sea myrtle or marsh elder. Christmas berry brightens the high marsh with bluish owers and bright red fruit. Blending into upland hammocks is the beautiful and poisonous coral bean (Erythrina herbacea). In the spring, the bright red blossoms of this plant are conspicuous along the marsh edge, as well as, along the roads along St. Joseph Bay. Coastal Indians once made beads from its poisonous red and black seeds, and it is these red seeds that are visible now. Relatively few animals can endure the extremes of the upper marsh. The clapper rail both feeds and nests in the upper marsh. The diamondback terrapin, the only turtle in the world that lives in brackish and saltwater marshes, hibernates in the marsh muds, but lays its eggs in the sandy areas above the high tide mark. The rough green snake and the salt marsh snake (Nerodia clarkii) live in this zone. Rarely seen, the salt marsh snake is strictly nocturnal. Besides rails, marsh wrens and seaside sparrows are some of the birds that inhabit this zone. Scotts seaside sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus peninsulae) is the race found locally and is picky in terms of habitat. It is a salt marsh obligate. Besides resident populations of ddler crabs, rails, wrens, and terrapins, the marsh vegetation supports many migrants. Raccoons, opossums, deer and mice visit the upper marsh for food. Considerable research has been conducted on the regularly ooded low marshes, where nutrients and metabolic wastes can be exchanged on each high tide. Only spring tides, storm tides, and winddriven tides ever cover the upper marshes, where nutrient exchanges are less well understood. Yet, the high marsh plants function as a buffer between polluted water run-off from land and the highly productive lower marsh. Construction set-backs are necessary to protect this critical transition zone, which is not only an important wildlife habitat but a protective buffer for the regularly ooded salt marsh. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. Watch out for manatees migrating to warmer watersPage 6 Thursday, November 7, 2013 LIKE US ON THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Life in the High MarshSPECIAL TO THE STARLEFT: Seaside goldenrod MIDDLE: Sea lavender RIGHT: Sea oxeye daisy

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASection EVERYDAY 3:30pm-6:30pmwww.docksideseafoodandrawbar.comBringYourFriendsandGetHooked! By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com PORT ST. JOE The team of scant chances when the 2013 football season began took full advantage of another one last Friday night. A Port St. Joe squad that has seemingly played against the odds each week dismantled Class 1A fourth-ranked Liberty County 24-7 at Shark Field to claim the District 4-1A title and a home game when the playoffs begin in two weeks. In a defensive struggle the Bulldogs enjoyed a yardage advantage of 200-180 Port St. Joe made the key defensive stops while Dwayne Griggs scored three touchdowns, including an electric kickoff return. The second half was emblematic of the whole. The Bulldogs marched 65 yards in six plays early in the fourth quarter to score, but surrounded the drive by giving up the ball on downs three times and having two other drives ended by the only turnovers of the game, a fumble and interception. I thought we came ready to play, said Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon. We were really focused in all week in practice. The kids remembered last year when they came from 19 points down. You keep telling them they are playing the fourth-ranked team in the state. We have to make a statement. I thought our kids did that tonight. With the district title within grasp the past two weeks, the Tiger Sharks (7-2 overall, 3-0 in district play) outscored West Gadsden and Liberty County 41-10. They just outplayed us, said Liberty County coach Grant Grantham. They were the better team. We missed some things tonight offensively, but we also did not block well. I dont know what we could have done differently, they just outplayed us. The Tiger Sharks struck on their rst drive, taking advantage of a 4yard punt that gave them the ball at the Bulldog 41. Port St. Joe drove to a 6-yard touchdown run by Griggs in seven plays, punctuated by a 35-bolt from Jarkeice Davis (a game-high 75 yards rushing) on third-and-16 from the 45. Drew Lacour added the extra point for a 7-0 lead. Liberty County marched into Tiger Shark territory on its next drive but sputtered behind a holding call, and Port St. Joe took over at its 34 after stopping the Bulldogs on downs. Consuming 15 plays and more than 6:30 of the clock, the Tiger Sharks marched to the 1 before Griggs scored on a jet sweep, barely sneaking inside the pylon. Griggs fueled the drive with a seven-yard run on fourth-and-6 at the Bulldog 24, and Davis added spark when he weaved 13 yards through the middle of the Liberty County defense on a third-and-eight from the 15. Lacours extra point made it 140, and the teams traded punts before heading into the locker room at intermission. Gannon said after the game that Liberty County was a good comeback team, but the hill got much steeper on the second-half kickoff. Having deferred after winning the coin toss to open the game, the Tiger Sharks got rst crack in the third period, and in 13 seconds, Griggs turned the kickoff into a 86yard sprint to the end zone, breaking clean through the wedge before heading down the right sideline untouched. Lacour made it 21-0. That return was big, Gannon said. We know they can come back, they did last year, and that allowed us to take a bit of wind out of their sails. Liberty County pulled to 21-7 on a 9-yard run by William Hayes in the rst minute of the fourth period. But on the Bulldogs next drive, following a 50-yard punt by Griggs that pinned them at their 1, Hayes was stripped of the ball by Davis with T.J. Williams recovering to set up an 18-yard eld goal by Lacour. Marcell Johnson ended Liberty Countys nal possession when he intercepted Micah McCaskill (7 of 18 for 116 yards) near mid eld. Less than a minute later the Tiger Sharks were dancing as a group, celebrating a district championship. Port St. Joe nishes the regular season next Friday at Arnold and hosts South Walton next week in a region semi nal. Find ticket information on Page A8 .By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Sports fans will enjoy a bountiful feast next week. Two basketball tournaments, the opening of the regular season in soccer and a Class 1A regional football semi nal, are on tap during a week in which sports fans will have plenty to be thankful about. The week gets started with the Boutique By the Bay Tip-Off Classic, a varsity basketball tournament hosted over two nights by Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. On Tuesday, Port St. Joe will face Blountstown at 7:30 p.m. ET immediately after a contest between Tallahassee FAMU and Franklin County that tips off at 6 p.m. The teams will switch on Thursday, Nov. 14, when Franklin County faces Blountstown at 6 p.m. ET followed by Port St. Joe versus FAMU. Port St. Joe basketball coach Derek Kurnitsky noted that FAMU has a shooting guard who recently verbally committed to play next year at Ole Miss. It has been six or seven years since we hosted a preseason tournament, and I was tired of going on the road, Kurnitsky said. We like basketball here, and we will have two nights of very good basketball. It is preseason so the games dont count, but we wanted to host a tournament. It should be some good basketball. And we have a Division I signee who will be playing. The rst night of the Tip-Off Classic coincides with the opening regular season games in soccer as Port St. Joe hosts Malone. The Tip-Off Classic will lead into the opening of the Region 1-1A football playoffs, which will have the Tiger Sharks hosting South Walton. Its kind of neat, Kurnitsky said. Football gets the years started, and the way the football team has played, it feels like Port St. Joe is relevant again. We havent been down long, just two years, but this has worked out perfect. When football wins it just starts the school year right, lifts the spirit and just gets everybody excited. I think it is pretty neat we are going to have a week of nothing but football and basketball. The sweet sports week is iced Saturday by the annual Port St. Joe Hoopfest, which will bring 12 teams to town for a junior high boys and girls basketball tournament sponsored by Centennial Bank. We are having teams from all over the Panhandle, Kurnitsky said. We have so many games and teams that some of the games will spill over to the Washington Gym, which I think is pretty special. The Hoopfest gets started at 9 a.m. ET next Saturday. Entry to the Tip-Off Classic is $5 per night, the same for the all-day Hoopfest. The Florida High School Athletics Association requires ticket prices for playoff football to be $8. A lot of people paid $200 to see Miami and Florida State this past weekend, and they are going to be able to see some good basketball and football for just $23, Kurnitsky said. Thats a pretty good deal.Star Staff ReportGiven the mantra of teamrst that has fueled Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School the entire football season, it is tting that only a handful of Tiger Sharks were recognized on the Florida Athletic Coaches Association All-District 2Class 1A team. The FACA District 2 encompasses teams from Walton County to Jackson County. The 1A team represents the small schools within those boundaries. Port St. Joe placed just one player, sophomore linebacker Marcell Johnson, on the All-District team for players regardless of grade. State top-ranked Blountstown, represented by the Coach of the Year Greg Jordan and district Most Valuable Player Hunter Jordan, placed the most players on the team with eight. Chipley had ve and Sneads and Vernon four apiece. The district All-Senior squad included Drew Lacour, Jacobie Jones, Natron Lee and Dwayne Griggs from Port St. Joe. Griggs nished third in the MVP voting behind Hunter Jordan and running back Kobe McCrary from Chipley. All players selected to the all-District seniors team are eligible to play in an all-star game in late December. Nominations for those players will be made later by coaches from the district. SPECIAL TO THE STARPort St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School will host varsity and junior high basketball tournaments this week sandwiched around the Tiger Sharks football playoff game against South Walton.Page 7 Thursday, November 7, 2013 FACA all-District 1A teams announced MARCELL JOHNSON NATRON LEE DEWAYNE GRIGGS JACOBIE JONES DREW LACOUR Sports fan nirvana next weekSPECIAL TO THE STARDwayne Griggs, shown against Franklin County, scored three touchdowns, including an electrifying kickoff return, to help Port St. Joe clinch the district title.PSJ dominates Liberty County

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A8 | The Star Thursday, November 7, 2013 THESPECIALTYMEDICALCENTER SKINCANCERcanbepresentwithoutyouknowingit.CALLtodayforaskincancerscreening.DIDYOUKNOWthatstudiesshow: NOW,DIDYOUKNOW? VINCENTIVERS,M.D.301TwentiethStreet|PortSt.Joe,FL32456 850-227-7070|www.iversmd.com ALLMAJOR INSURANCE ACCEPTED9am-6pm 9am-2pm ThePanhandlePlayersPresent TWOHOOTSBYDUSK.TWOBODIESBYDAWN November15-16,7:30pm November17,3:00pm AtTheDixieTheatreTicketsare$15andmaybepurchasedat: DowntownBooksinApalachicola, TheButlerAgencyinEastpoint,CarrabelleJunction, NoNameCafeBooks&MoreinPortSt.Joe, andCaribbeanCoffeeinMexicoBeach.ProducedinSpecialArrangementwithSamuelFrench,Inc. 9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310 GREATSELECTIONOFALLYOURFAVORITEBEER,WINE&SPIRITS SOUTHERNSUNDAY RANDYSTARK FLABBERGASTEDBAND RANDYSTARK S SPIRIT& WINE BEERVORITEA FOURY ALL OFTION SELECTGREA ONTHEPOOPDECK UPCOMINGEVENTS -INTHECROWSNESTKARAOKE WEHAVEMOVEDTO: 327REIDAVE (CORNEROF4THSt&REIDAVE.) 850-227-3472 HOURS MONDAYTOWEDNESDAY8AMTO6PM THURSDAYTOSATURDAY8AMTO8PM SUNDAY11AMTO6PM Star Staff ReportWith gorgeous weather and great competition, the boys soccer season got under way last Saturday as Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School hosted a preseason jamboree. The action opened with Port St. Joe beating Tallahassee Godby 3-1. Rocky Bayou Christian followed with a 5-0 win over Godby, and the days action was completed as Rocky Bayou and Port St. Joe battled to a 1-1 deadlock. With the jamborees behind both Port St. Joe squads, the 16-game regular season gets underway next Tuesday when Port St. Joe hosts Malone High School beginning at 5 p.m. ET. The teams will compete in what Coach Gary Hindley described as a difcult District 1-1A. District foes include Tallahassee Maclay, Tallahassee John Paul, II, Lafayette Mayo, East Gadsden, Rocky Bayou and Franklin County. Each district team will face every other squad once, and Port St. Joe and Franklin County will meet in out-ofdistrict competition. For the rst time, the program will host an in-school contest versus Baker on Tuesday, Nov. 26 with the girls starting at noon ET and the boys following at 2 p.m. Baker is off that entire week for Thanksgiving; Nov. 26 is the last day of classes for Gulf County schools before the break. The district tournaments will be hosted by Maclay, the girls Jan. 13-17 and the boys Jan. 20-24.Special to The StarThe eighth annual Autumn Action Golf Tournament to raise funds for summer internships for students in High School High Tech of Port St. Joe had to be delayed because of stormy weather, but the golfers nally got off on a beautiful crisp fall Sunday afternoon and had a great time. Players came from as far away as Maine, Tallahassee and Panama City with many locals supporting the tournament and making it a success for the kids. The winning team was Andrew Rowell, Debbie Ashbrook, Tina LaCourse and Matt LaCourse from Panama City with a 60. Coming in close behind in second was a mixed team of visitors and locals, David Warriner, Gary Suttle, Kamen Woolery and William Woolery with a 62. Third was a local group, Andy Smith, Jay Rish, Bo Springs, and Michael Hammond with a 62. It was a close race with second and third decided by a tie breaker. Closest to the line for men was Andy Smith and for women was Penelope Evanoff. Closest to the pin for men was Kenny Wood and for women Tina LaCourse. Unfortunately, no one won the Hole in One prize of the Chevrolet from Bill Cramer Chevrolet but two players came within inches. The players feasted on Gants Barbecue while door prizes were being drawn. Everyone got a door prize because of the generosity of our local businesses many donations. Students from High School High Tech and some of their parents came out to register the players and meet and greet. They were John Keigans, Howard Townsend, Deontae George, Preston Burkett with the clubs sponsor Melissa Behee from Port St. Joe. Robyn Rennick from Dyslexia Research Institute in Tallahassee, the HSHT sponsor that administers the grant from the ABLE Trust helped out and Chandler Gilbert, a local St. Joe fellow who attends Woodland Hall Academy in Tallahassee came down to help out as well. Many thanks go to our major sponsors: Gulf County Tourist Development Council, Duke Energy, Gulf 2 Bay Construction, Drs. Anne and Fred Thomason, Main Stay Suites, Penelopes Pet Stop, Dr. Michael and Wendy Saltzburg, Scallop Cove BP, Thirsty Goat, Coastal Community Association, Sandi and James Christy, Cape Trading Post and The Shrimp Company. Hole Sponsors were: Gulf Coast Real Estate Group, Mitch Burke, Sharon Grifth, Appliance Solution, Centennial Bank, Eds Red Hot Sauce, Sunset Bay Management Group, Judge Tim McFarland, El Governor Motel, Hannon Insurance, Gulf Coast Vacation Rentals, Big Fish Construction, Bo Knows Pest Control, Capital City Bank, Joseph Handman, Bayside Lumber & Building Supply, Coastal Properties, Carpet Country, Novak Law Group, Coastal Properties, Carpet Country, Cadence Bank, St Joe ACE Hardware, Beach Realty of Cape San Blas, Pridgeon-Rish Sunday School Class of FUMC and Fairpoint Communications. Many local businesses donated great door prizes for the tournament. Through the sponsors donations, at least 10 students will have paid summer internships.Auction, golf tourney to benet museumBoyer Band to perform during salute to veteransSpecial to The StarThe third annual Silent Auction/Golf Tournament to benet the Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum will be Nov. 8-9 at the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. As part of a full weekend event, a reception will be at 6 p.m. ET Friday, Nov. 8, with hors doeuvres, beer and wine, for a $10 entry fee. A cash bar for spirits will also be available and live music by The George Boyer Band. A silent auction will take place with auction items including limited edition prints of historic military and cultural events, gift baskets and area hotel stays. Other items are requested. A variety or items will be available A benet golf tournament will be Saturday, with proceeds to support the Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum and the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. The club is open to the public, and the tournament will be a four-player, scramble format, kicking off at 12:30 p.m. ET with a short ceremony to honor Americas veterans and a 1 p.m. shotgun start. A meal and awards ceremony will follow. Cash prizes for the tournament will include $400 to the rst place team, $350 for second place and $200 for third place. A HoleIn-One Challenge will offer a $10,000 cash prize. The Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum has been honored by Smithsonian Magazine for seven straight years and is dedicated to preserving the memories of the amphibious soldiers who trained at the camp, which is located in Carrabelle. The museum houses more than 10,000 square feet of artifacts, vehicles, photos, memorabilia and memories of the soldiers, sailors, and other military, as well as civilian personnel who trained at the camp during the WWII years. Hole sponsorships are available and tournament registration information can be found at www.stjoebaygolf.com or by calling 227-1751 or Dan Van Treese at 227-8138. Special lodging packages are available starting at $69.99/single, $89.99/double. Call the Mainstay Suites at 229-6246 for a reservation. The event is being supported by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. Sports REGIONAL FOOTBALL TICKET Pr RICESStar Staff ReportThe Nov. 15 home seminal regional game between the Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks and South Walton will begin at 7:30 p.m. ET. The Florida High School Athletics Association sets ticket prices for all State Series games. Prices for all fans will be $8 for all ages. No passes, No Gold Cards. The only passes than can be accepted are the FHSAA State Series pass. Port St. Joe soccer unbeaten in jamboreeAAutumn A Action swinging success PP HOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAr R

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1SectionTrivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Which president said, We cannot do everything at once, but we can do something at once? Washington, Tyler, Coolidge, LBJ 2) What was the main surveillance plane used in the Persian Gulf War? E-3 AWAC, C-140, B-2 Spirit, RM-81 3) Where was Americas rst-ever opera performed in 1735? Boston, MA; Charleston, SC; Baltimore, MD; Albany, NY 4) What state is the Toothpick Capital of the World? Georgia, Montana, Oregon, Maine 5) A work published without a copyright is in what? Tort, Public domain, Encumbrance, Binder 6) What is caprock commonly found above? Artesian well, Talus, Glacier, Iceberg 7) What soldiers used Were Off to See the Wizard as a marching song in WWII? British, Australian, Canadian, Brazilian 8) During the nal Seinfeld each 30second advertisement sold for an estimated how much? $100K, $500K, $800K, $1.5 million 9) What did the Austrian physicist Christian Johann Doppler study? Sound waves, Global warming, Einsteins theory, Mothman 10) Which is in the same city as Dome of the Rock and Mount Zion? Stonehenge, Wailing Wall, Christ the Redeemer, Kremlin 11) What were 19th century Latin American dictators called? Cigarillos, Ocotillos, Caudillos, Bonillos 12) During the American Revolution many brides wore what color of wedding gowns as a sign of rebellion? Red, Blue, Green, Yellow 13) When Picasso died in 1973 what was the of cial appraised worth of his estate? $2,000; $135,000; $7 million; $250 million 14) According to the Wilson Sporting Goods Co., how many basketballs can be made from one cowhide? 2, 5, 11, 15 ANSWERS 1) Coolidge. 2) E-3 AWAC. 3) Charleston, SC. 4) Maine. 5) Public domain. 6) Artesian well. 7) Australian. 8) $1.5 million. 9) Sound waves. 10) Wailing Wall. 11) Caudillos. 12) Red. 13) $250 million. 14) 11.Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Thursday, November 7, 2013By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Some believe music has healing abilities, and Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf in Port St. Joe saw it rst-hand. Before this years Blast on the Bay songwriters festival even started lling Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach with songs straight out of Nashville, visiting writers Tim Buppert, Bob Regan and Wil Nance paid a visit to the hospital to perform for patients who wouldnt be able to make it out to the weekends festivities. At a previous festival, Buppert told Paulina Pendarvis, Physician and Volunteers Services advocate for Sacred Heart, that hed be interested in playing for the patients. This year, before the Blast could begin, Pendarvis reached out to take Buppert up on his offer. Buppert enlisted the help of some of his friends, and they arrived at the hospital with guitars and ddles in tow. It was a great experience, and the people were wonderful, said Bob Regan, a Grammy-nominated Nashville songwriter whose tunes have been recorded by Hank Williams Jr., Reba McEntire and Keith Urban. The festival brought Regan to Port St. Joe for the rst time, and he accompanied Buppert and Nance to the hospital, where they visited ve patients and played a mix of cover songs that included Motown hits and even some Western swing. Regan also wrote original one-verse songs for each patient. I remember being in the hospital a few years back, and it can get a little boring, Regan said. Hopefully we broke it up. In addition to being a fulltime songwriter and musician, Regan spends one day a week playing music for veterans in the Nashville area with PTSD and traumatic brain injuries. Ive seen rst-hand the therapeutic bene ts of music, Regan said. They spent about 20 minutes with each patient, making them forget about where they were, and making them feel so very special, Pendarvis said. Its a testimony to the healing power of music. Pendarvis praised the Blast on the Bay event and said shes seen an increase in songwriters showing interest in giving back to the community while they are in town. One patient sang along with the writers while staff gathered outside the doors to listen in on the performances. We were the rst ones to bene t from the songwriters amazing talent, Pendarvis said. How often do we get artists of their caliber in our area, more or less getting personal concerts with three of them? Pendarvis is on the hunt for a musician to visit Sacred Heart to play music for patients on a regular basis. Those interested in volunteering can download an application online at www. sacred-heart.org or contact her at 229-5627. Music has the power to help us forget our pain for the moment and to put us in a happier place, she said.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The Bridge at Bay St. Joe hosted a Hall of Fame Caf celebration to honor residents at the local nursing home. During the Friday ceremony, the Rev. Louie Jefferson Little Jr. was honored for distinguished military service and volunteerism, and former resident Ruth Schoelles was inducted for personal achievements, professional accomplishments and public service. Little is a member of the Ministerial Association and acts as a ll-in for the facilitys chaplain as needed. For the past six years, Little has volunteered at The Bridge every Saturday. He leads the facilitys 20-member congregation, where he conducts live music, provides gospel lessons and visits with residents. Raised in Troy, Ala., Little moved to Port St. Joe with his wife, Jean, who grew up in the area. He served in the National Guard for more than eight years and later worked in the Air National Guard as an air traf c controller. Its a great gesture, Little said of the Hall of Fame recognition. We get more out of it than we put in. Its uplifting for us, and we feel blessed. Little now serves as the Priest in Charge at the Church By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .comT he 13th annual Ghosts on the Coast celebration packed Reid Avenue last Thursday for the biggest Halloween celebration in Gulf County. Hundreds of revelers in colorful costumes ranging from the classic ghosts and ghouls, to superheroes, to pirates and police of cers dotted Port St. Joes City Commons Park for costume contests, live music, a sh fry, street games, interactive art and of course, trick-or-treating. More than $2,000 worth of candy was donated to the Chamber of Commerce and distributed to 50 area businesses that participated in the event. Business owners handed out candy right from their doors or in the case of off-Reid businesses, the pavilions that were setup along the street. Everyone one plays such an important role in making events like Ghosts on the Coast happen, and it truly is a community event, Chamber director Paula Pickett said. Marketing for the event has handled by the Tourist Development Council, and Bridge at St. Joe honors residents, community members In a ceremony last week, Louie Jefferson Little Jr., right, was inducted into The Bridge at Bay St. Joe Hall of Fame for his years of military and community service.WES LOCHER | The Star Blast on the Bay songwriters Bob Regan, Wil Nance and Tim Buppert played for patients at Sacred Heart Hospital before their scheduled performances.SPECIAL TO THE STARNashville songwriters perform for Sacred Heart patientsSee BRIDGE B6DEBBIE HOOPER AT JOEBAY.COMA little salt and pepper made Halloween better during the annual Ghosts on the Coast event. A Halloween spooktacularPHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarAbove right, Mayor Mel Magidson takes part in the interactive art exhibit on Reid Avenue. At right, hundreds of contestants lined up for the chance to show off their duds on stage. See HALLOWEEN B6

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B2 | The Star Thursday, November 7, 2013 MeetChrista,abeautifulyoungfoxhound.She walksverywellonaleashandwillsitwitha treat.Christahasbeguncratetrainingtomake thetransitiontohernewhomeeasier.Shegets alongwellwithotherdogsandisveryplayful withkidsandadults. Ifyouareunabletoadoptatthistime, perhapsyoucouldfosterormakeaDonation. AllpetsadoptedfromSJBHSwillbecurrent onvaccinationsandspayed/neutered. Pleasedonothesitatetoemailtownsend.hsdirector@gmail.comor adoptbaystjoe@gmail.comorcalltheSt.JosephBayHumaneSocietyat 850-227-1103andaskforMelodyorDebbie!Applicationsareavailable atwww.sjbhumanesociety.orgWerequireallpotentialadoptersto completeanapplicationform.Adoptionfeesincludeourcostofspay/ neuterandcurrentvaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4pm! Faith'sThriftHutisalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,andallthe proceedsgodirectlytosupporttheanimalsinourcare!Thehours forthestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3pm.Volunteersare alwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandourshelter!Ourstoreandshelter locationis1007TenthStreetinPortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyouallthere soon!Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet,pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyorShelter. FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSocietywww.sjbhumanesociety.org 4514866forONLY$15perweek $60permonth CallToday 227.7847SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHere SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)227-7847|tgolden@pcnh.comSOLDOurlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoering themtoyouinRealEstatePicks!(Inthissection),DiscoverthebestrealestatevaluesinMexicoBeach,Port St.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesontheForgottenCoast Amateur radio license examsThe Gulf Amateur Radio Society will sponsor amateur radio license exams at 10 a.m. ET on Saturday, Nov. 9. The location will be at the county EOC building in Port St. Joe, located behind the Robert Moore Annex. Get your license and get on the air or upgrade a present license. For registration and/or assistance contact C.H. Tillis, AJ4XJ at 648-8251. The Gulf Amateur Radio Society meets at 7 p.m. ET the rst Thursday of each month at the EOC building. Visitors are welcome.Sea Oats and Dunes Garden Club meetingJoin the Sea Oats and Dunes Garden Club at its next monthly meeting at 11:30 a.m. ET o, Tuesday, Nov. 12. The meeting will take place at Beach Baptist Hall, 311 Columbus St., in St. Joe Beach.Senior Citizens needs your helpGulf County Senior Citizens, 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, is asking for donations of nonperishable foods for our low-income seniors such as juice, canned tuna and chicken, soup or vegetables. Small inexpensive bingo prizes are always needed for our clients who love to play bingo several times a week. Also needed are donations of items for arts and crafts. We provide a hot nutritious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and older. Transportation might be available to our meal sites. Anyone interested in coming to our sites in Port St. Joe or Wewahitchka for meals and activities or who would like to donate any of the items noted above can call Debbie at 229-8466.Star Staff Report The St. Joseph Bay Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will observe its Veterans Day Celebration and Patriotism Education on Monday, Nov. 11 at the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School. Members will meet at the school at 9 a.m. EST for a Veterans program and move to the Sunset Coastal Grill for a business meeting and lunch. Anyone interested in more information on the DAR can call Sherrill Russ, 229-8574.Star Staff ReportThe Oak Grove Church at 613 Madison Ave. in Port St. Joe is again the proud host for this years annual dinner. We are asking for the wonderful volunteers that helped make this such a success in 2012 to help again this year. With the help of the men, women and children who helped, we were able to prepare, cook, package and deliver 800-plus meals to needy people in every area of Gulf County and Mexico Beach. We will be gathering to start preparing for the Thanksgiving dinner at noon ET on Nov. 27. We will need help putting boxes together, packaging cakes, slicing turkeys and setting up tables and supplies for Thanksgiving morning. An early crew and volunteers will be needed at 6 a.m. to warm up food and assist with other food preparation on Thanksgiving Day. There will be many positions to ll on Thanksgiving morning when the dinners are assembled, boxed and delivered. Anyone who would like additional information is asked to call Jerry Stokoe at 348-9108 or Jim Gainey at 227-1272. Special to The StarDo you love the garden and Christmas? Combine both on Nov. 16 at the Garden Club Center for Christmas in The Garden. The address is 216 8th Street and the time is 1-3 p.m. ET. As a special guest, David Goodson from Bayside Florist will present a program all about making your holiday center piece. All kinds of holiday goodies will be served, so you can start your Thanksgiving and Christmas munching early. Tickets are $10 and are available from any Garden Club member, or you can call Betty Lewis at 229-6005. As more news, the Garden Club met for the regular meeting on Oct. 10 with decorations and center pieces with a fall theme. Hostesses Elaine Jackson and Lynda Bordelon treated all attendees with soup and sandwiches. The outstanding program was presented by David Goodson from the Bayside Florist. He demonstrated all the details for making a burlap fall wreath. We welcome anyone interested in joining the club or just wanting to visit a meeting.Special to The StarHometown lady Sharon Linda (Bunge) Skipper was not expected to live 41 years ago. Not only did she survive, but was named Ms. Guysie Mule Roundup Queen forever. Skipper is a resident of Twin Oaks Convalescent Home at 301 S. Baker St. Alma, GA., 31510. A card or letter to her would be something she would cherish forever. SocietyGarden Club presents Christmas in the GardenSPEc C Ia A L To O TT HE STa A RDavid Goodson from Bayside Florist presented a program demonstrating how to make a fall wreath from burlap at the Garden Club October meeting. Society BRIEFsSDAR Veterans Day programSPEc C Ia A L To O TT HE STa A RDAR Charter Members Mazie Stone, Eda Ruth Taylor, Frann Smith and Bobbie Marshall were honored at the October meeting. Past Regents Betty Ann Owens and Virginia Harrison were recognized for their service to the chapter.Call for volunteers to annual Thanksgiving dinner SPEc C Ia A L To O TT HE STa A RSharon Linda (Bunge) Skipper (standing) was named Ms. Guysie Mule Roundup Queen in Alma, Ga.Skipper named Ms. Guysie Mule Roundup Queen

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The Star| B3Thursday, November 7, 2013 ProfessionalCookieDecoratoron Sitewith"how-to"instructions. EverythingProvidedfor YouToDecorateYourOwn Cookies!!! NOCHARGE-JUSTCOME HAVEFUN! AsofNovember1,2013, wewillbeinournewlocationat: 310ReidAvenue PortSt.Joe 850-229-2999 Comecheckoutyourfavorites andthenewitemsinstock! CoastalCabin... W her e the W a t er M eets the W oods School NewsBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com At long last, the Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks have a mascot. The as of yet unnamed shark mascot made its debut at the elementary school last week where it interacted with students and then showed its dorsal n in public at the football game last Friday. So whats this sharks name? Thats a question that can only be answered by a student at Port St. Joe Elementary or the high school. The student bodies of both Port St. Joe schools have been asked to play a vital role in naming the mascot and will be encouraged to submit suggestions until Friday, Nov. 15, after which a group of faculty judges will narrow down the options to the best six. Once the nalist names are chosen, students will be able to vote for their favorite during their lunches in return for a small donation that will go toward helping a school-afliated group to be determined. The mascot will ofcially be given its name at a future event.Special to The StarGulf Coast State Colleges Career Development Center (CDC) is pleased to announce the launch of Career Coach, a free online tool designed for students and community members to explore potential careers and career-oriented educational pathways. Through a simple keyword search, students and visitors to the Colleges website can learn about the employment prospects associated with any occupation. The real-time information is customized to GCSCs geographic region (Bay, Gulf and Franklin counties) and includes detailed wage estimates, projected annual job openings, upto-date local job postings and Gulf Coasts corresponding programs and training for any specic career. For those who are unsure about careers they want to pursue, interest and personality tests are available through the CDC on campus, and based on the results of the tests, a list of potential jobs are provided. Once I sit down with a student, Career Coach enables us to see the statistics for their results with one click, said Denise Murks, Coordinator of Career Development. They can start by looking at a specic career eld and Career Coach will take them right to our college catalog, showing what courses they would need to take to actually go into that eld of study. If a career doesnt look like the right t, individuals can view similar jobs. They can also search for careers based on the Colleges top training programs or the program or major they are interested in. Career Coach also includes a built-in resume builder to help students and jobseekers quickly and efciently put together an updated resume with key skills and job experience highlighted. Career Coach can be accessed by visiting www.gulfcoast. edu/careercoach For more information, please contact Denise Murks at (850) 872-3835 or email dmurks@gulfcoast.edu. Special to The StarThe week of Nov. 11-15 Faith Christian School is hosting its annual Book Fair. There will be a wide variety of books to choose from ranging from preschool reading levels to advanced reading levels. Do you like crafts, cooking, mysteries, or jokes? This book fair will have it all! Thursday, Nov. 14, will be a special day for grandparents. A special grandparent breakfast is at 8 a.m. in the auditorium and each class will give a short exhibition. The students are so excited to show their grandparents what they have learned so far this year. Everyone is invited to visit the fair between the hours of 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Thank you to the Parent Teacher Organization (PTP) for sponsoring this week long event. Reading can take a child to all kids of places where he or she can meet all of characters, take countless adventures, and maybe even learn something.Special to The StarFlu season has arrived and the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County (DOH Gulf) has already made successful strides in providing inuenza (u) vaccinations to youth. Each year, the DOH-Gulf School Health Team partners with the Gulf County School District to kick off a u vaccination campaign. The campaign provides seasonal u vaccinations to students during regular school hours at each school location. Each year, our student u vaccination numbers continue to increase, said Amy Driggers, School Health Coordinator for the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County. When more children are vaccinated against the u, u cannot as easily spread through the school system and into the community. This year, the campaign began at the Wewahitchka Elementary School. Permission forms were sent home and returned, making this initiative convenient for parents and caregivers who are not able to take off work or schedule an appointment for their child. The school health team provided 107 u vaccinations to students in grades pre-k through 6, at the school. The school health team plans to continue the campaign, by offering vaccinations at Wewahitchka Junior and Senior High Schools and Port St. Joe schools. The u is more dangerous than the common cold for children, said Marsha Lindeman, Administrator for the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County. The single best way to protect your children from the u is to get them vaccinated each year. Our School Health Program is committed to protecting the health of this community through prevention of communicable diseases in our children and their families. DOH protects, promotes and improves the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts. For more information, contact the Florida Department of Health in Gulf County at 850227-1276 or visit www.gulfchd.com.SPECIAL TO TT HE STARFRONT ROW: Ethan Thompson, Kiyleh Parker, Lily Wockenfuss, Hunter Ard. BACK ROW: Estevan Angel, DJ Davis, Ashley Eubanks, Celeste Hamm DAZZLING DOLPHINsS TThe Lions TT aleSPECIAL TO TT HE STARThe Port St. Joe Tiger Shark mascot, seen with Dylan Harris, visited the elementary school last week. The mascot will be given a name by a lucky student.Name that shark DOH: School u vaccination campaign successGCSC launches online career coach toolSpecial to The StarThe Visual and Performing Arts Division of Gulf Coast State College will present the Broadway musical Les Misrables, on Nov. 15, 16, 22 and 23 at 7:30 p.m. CT and on Nov. 17 and 24 at 2:30 p.m. CT in the Amelia Center Theatre. The musical is based on Victor Hugos 1862 novel and takes place 43 years after the French Revolution. It explores the themes of redemption, conscience, idealism, justice, passion, loss and love. The now legendary musical, written by Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schnberg, rst opened in 1980 in Paris and since then, it has been performed in many different languages all over the world. The box ofce opens an hour and a half before each performance. Advanced ticket purchase is strongly recommended. Reservations can be made online at www.gulfcoast.edu/ arts. Adult tickets are $20 and tickets for anyone younger than 18 are $10. Because of the subject matter and length of the show, the production is recommended for mature middle school teens and older. For more information, visit the website or call Tiffany Fraioli at 872-3886 or email tfraioli@gulfcoast. edu. GCSC VPA presents Les Misrables

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FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) MorningPrayer&HolyCommunion Sunday...............10:00A.M.TheRev.LouLittle,PriestServicesTemporarilyatSeniorCitizensCenter, 120LibraryDrive AnUnchangingFaithInAChangingWorld COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. TOUCHINGLIVES WITHTHELOVE OFJESUS 6pm CumbaaMonuments,Inc. Serving NWFlorida Since1963JAMES(JR)GROVERPh:850-674-8449 Cell:850-899-0979 jrgrov@msn.com Blountstown,FL32424 CompareOurPrices-FindtheOnetoFitYourBudget Matthew L. Walker was born on Nov. 22, 1967, at Gulf Pines Hospital in Port St. Joe, Fla., and passed away suddenly in Texas on October 25, 2013, after a tragic accident while riding the motorcycle that he loved. Matt, as he was known to his family and friends, was a 1985 graduate of Port St. Joe High School and a member of the First Baptist Church in Port St. Joe. He also served brie y in the United States Air Force. Most recently, he was excelling as a supervisor at Motiva Bechtel, a worldwide energy company based in Texas. Matt is survived by his parents, Donna and Tommy Walker of Port St. Joe. He was a gift to them from God, and he is now at peace with his Heavenly Father. A graveside service was held at Holly Hill Cemetery on Monday, Nov. 4, 2013, under the direction of Comforter Funeral Home. The family wishes to express their sincere gratitude for all of the many prayers and acts of love and kindness during this dif cult time. Matthew L. Walker MATTHEW L. WALKER ObituariesRobert Clifton Clifford McCleary, 67, passed away on Oct. 29, 2013 in Miami. Born in Mobile, Ala., the son of Leola Elizabeth Gathers and Stephen Gathers, Jr., he was a former resident of Port Saint Joe, educated at George Washington High School and served his country in the Army in Vietnam during the Vietnam War. He now rests from the labor of the world. His dedication and genuine love of his family and friends will live forever in the hearts of those who know him best. Survivors include his loving wife, Doris Jean McCleary; two daughters, Angela Jackson and Latasha McCleary; siblings, Yvonne Landrine, Caroline Sims (Thomas), Doris (Pastor Morning), Gwen Dawson (Darion), Sandra Addison, Tressie Ross (Fred), Patricia Williams, Steve Gathers, III. Preceding Robert in death were his siblings: James Earl Gathers, Jimmy Gathers and Wanda Jean Gathers; and a host of other relatives and friends. The funeral service was held on Saturday, Nov. 2, 2013, at New Bethel A.M.E. Church conducted by the Rev. Johnnie Jenkins. Interment followed in Forest Hill Cemetery. Services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Robert Clifton Clifford McClearySpecial to The StarThe life-long impact of a tumultuous past will be discussed at 7 p.m. CT Monday at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Getting Past Your Past: And Making the Most of Your Future, features a lmed interview with author and actor Michael Fosberg, creator of the oneman show, Incognito. At the age of 32, after growing up in a middle-class white family, Fosberg contacted his estranged birth father and discovered a fact that had been kept from him: Fosbergs father wasnt who he thought he was. Imagine discovering youre not the person you thought you were, says Fosberg. The discovery prompted Fosberg to consider how the past shapes us and what might allow us to change directions. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is located at 1602 U.S. Highway 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehousetype setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@ fairpoint.net. Personal histories explored at Lifetree CafThank you Lord for shedding the light, on one of our creatures, hidden in the night. After my name was written in the Book, within a year or so, you could nd me in a juke. At rst I ran around with the ones that did the drinking. I was going to witness to them, or at least thats what I was thinking. Little did I know then, it doesnt work that way. When you compromise with Satan, he has a real eld day. Satan did his thing, as he did with Adam and Eve. He sure is a hard worker, when he starts to deceive. I can just hear you now, I know what some are thinking. I would have been stronger than him, and not ever started drinking. Heres hoping you dont try to see, just how strong your will can be. I have the love of Jesus, and also a praying Mother. If it hadnt been for that, I wouldnt be here, brother.Billy JohnsonSt. Johns annual BazaarSt. Johns Episcopal Church of Wewahitchka will hold its annual Bazaar from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. CT on Saturday. Features include a homemade turkey-and-dressing dinner for only $7 (dine in or carry out); $100 VISA card tickets for $1 each; vintage and new jewelry; and, of course, the yearly favorites bake sale, craft sale and huge yard sale. The church is about six miles north of Wewahitchka at 4060 N. State 71. Proceeds go toward scholarships for needy students. Please come out lend us your support!First Baptist Church of Wewa fundraiserFirst Baptist Church of Wewahitchka fundraiser, yard sale, pancake breakfast, bake sale and chili cook-off will take place on Saturday at the Wewahitchka Gym. The yard sale will run from 7 a.m. until noon CT and the bake sale will begin at 8 a.m. CT. The chili cook-off will begin at 10:45 a.m. and run until noon CT. Attendees may sample, judge and vote on a winner for $1. Chili will be sold for $3 a bowl. The pancake breakfast will run from 7 a.m. to noon CT. Pancakes, sausage, orange juice, milk and coffee will be sold for $5 a plate. All proceeds will go toward the gymnasium building loan.Pastors AnniversaryNew Life Christian Center Church would like to invite everyone out to the anniversary of Pastors Johnny and Shirley Jenkins at 11 a.m. ET on Sunday. Even will be held at New Life Christian Center Church where the speaker of the hour will be Minister George (Toby) Thomas of New Life Christian Center East of Tallahassee. Come and experience the power of God. Food and fellowship to follow service. Theme: Keep on Working. Hebrews 6:10Long Avenue Baptist sh fry/yard saleLong Avenue Baptist Church in Port St. Joe will hold a yard sale/ mullet sh fry from 7 a.m. until 1 p.m. ET on Nov. 16. The event is a fundraiser for the churchs mission trip to Guatemala. The church is at 1601 Long Ave. Fish fry tickets are available at the church of ce or walk up on Nov. 16. Dinners will be available from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.New Bethel Baptist Harvest DayNew Bethel Baptist will observe Harvest Day at 11:30 a.m. ET on Nov. 17. Pastor Rev. Cyril Mills will oversee the festivities and Sister Lawanda Smiley will speak. Faith BRIEFSI look out my window A new day I see And only I can determine What kind of day it will be. It can be busy and sunny, Laughing a gay, Or it can be boring and cold, Unhappy and grey. My own state of mind Is the determining key, For I am the only person I let myself be. I can be thoughtful, And do what I can to help, Or I can be sel sh And think just of myself. I can enjoy what I do, And make it seem fun, Or gripe and complain And make it hard on someone. I can be patient with Those who may not understand, Or belittle and hurt them As much as I can. But I have faith in myself And believe what I say, And I personally intend to Make the best of TODAY Walking with My Lord!Jackie M. HodgeDont compromiseTodayThursday, November 7, 2013

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, November 7, 2013 PUBLICNOTICEAPublicHearingwillbeheldatthe PlanningandDevelopmentReviewBoard (PDRB)meetingonMonday,November11, 2013at8:45a.m.EST,andattheBoardof CountyCommissioners(BOCC)meeting onTuesday,Novembern12,2013at9:00 a.m.EST.Bothpublichearingswillbe heldintheBOCCMeetingRoomatthe RobertM.MooreAdministrationBuilding, 1000CecilG.CostinSr.Blvd.,PortSt. Joe,Florida.epublichearingswillbeto discussandactonthefollowing: 1.ApprovalofOctober21,2013Minutes 2.FinalPlatApprovalforaMinor Subdivision-TylerW.Smith-forParcel ID#06268-025Rand#06268-022R -(CapeSanBlas)LocatedinSection7, Township9South,Range11West, GulfCounty,Florida-2.22Acres -A6unitdevelopmentwithnoroad infrastructure. 3.SmallScaleLandUseChangeCarmenMcLemore-forParcelID #01045-100R-(ChipolaRiver) LocatedinSection35,Township5South, Range9West,GulfCounty,FloridaChanging1AcrefromConservation toResidential. 4.CountyDevelopmentRegulations andPolicies(LDR) 5.Sta,PublicandOpenDiscussion epublicisencouragedtoattend andbeheardonthesematters. Informationpriortothemeetingcan beviewedatthePlanningDepartmentat 1000CecilG.CostinSr.Blvd.,Room311. PUBLICNOTICETheCityofPortSt.Joeis consideringtheadoptionofan EconomicDevelopmentelement totheCityofPortSt.Joe ComprehensivePlan.TheCity Commissioninvitesallstakeholders tothesecondpublicworkshop beforetheCityCommissionon Thursday,November21,2013at 4:00p.m.,ESTattheLocalColor Buildinglocatedat406Marina Drive,PortSt.Joe,Florida.Aspart ofthemeeting,theFloridaChamber Foundationwillmakeapresentation onitsnewFloridaTradeand LogisticsStudy. Allcitizensandinterestedparties areencouragedtoattendthe discussionandpublichearingand toprovidewrittenand/orverbal commentsonthemattersunder consideration. Ifapersondecidestoappealany decisionsmadewithrespecttoany matterconsideredatthismeeting, suchpersonwillneedtorecordthe proceedingand,forsuchpurposes, suchpersonmayneedtoensurethat averbatimrecordoftheproceeding ismade,whichrecordincludesthe testimonyandevidenceuponwhich theappealistobebased. Anypersonrequiringaspecial accommodationatthishearing becauseofadisabilityorphysical impairmentshouldcontacttheCity Clerkat(850)229-8261atleast ve(5)calendardayspriortothe hearing. *BOARDCERTIFIEDCIVILTRIALLAWYER OFCOUNSEL Star Staff ReportElders from six North Florida nursing homes, including The Bridge at Bay St. Joe, will gather on Nov. 7 for a heated competition in the Signature HealthCARE Intergenerational Olympics games. The event will be hosted by Chautauqua Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in DeFuniak Springs. They include: Signature HealthCare of North Florida in Graceville; Signature HealthCare at the Courtyard in Marianna; Washington Care and Rehab in Chipley; Surrey Place Care in Live Oak and The Bridge at Bay St Joe in Port St. Joe. Each home will be holding tryouts, from which ve elder-athletes will be chosen to compete. Along with the elders competing, students from Freeport Middle School will be joining the elders and competing in the events. The athletes will spend the weeks leading up to the event in training. Events include: a wheelchair race, bowling, basketball, shot put, golf and horseshoe. Gold, silver and bronze, and participation medals will be awarded along with a trophy for the overall winning home and the students. The competitive spirit is high among staff, elders, and students and we know the Intergenerational Olympics will be an exciting, fun lled day for all, Regional Quality of Life Director Ellie Curry said. This is our fourth annual event and this is the third year we will be inviting some of our special need children from the surrounding community to join us in the competitions. For more information about The Bridge at Bay St Joe visit www. bridgeatbaystjoe.com or information about Signature visit www.LTCRevolution.com.Local elders to compete in Intergenerational Olympic GamesBy THE sSTAFF AT MYGULFCArRESpecial to The Star During the holiday season, much of our attention is turned towards the table. At Halloween, its the treats, candied apples, popcorn balls and maybe a party or two. At Thanksgiving, we dont just stuff a turkey; we tend to stuff ourselves as well. Then Christmas arrives with those pies and cakes, all the cookies and candy, and a big family dinner, as well. No wonder we ring in the New Year a few extra pounds that we just dont need. First, think about people, not food. Concentrate on making your celebration reect what you know and love about those you are sharing it with. Focus on what you are celebrating and what the holiday represents. Next, plan before you eat. When you arrive at a dinner party or celebration, take time to check out all the food options, and make a plan. If desserts are calling you and you plan to indulge, skip the rolls or potatoes. Develop a strategy that will allow you to enjoy a treat, and not abandon the healthy habits you have formed. Following are some quick tips that will help you stay on track when eating out or at a holiday party: Dont arrive on an empty stomach. Offer to bring a dish, then you know at least one dish will be healthy. Avoid excessive drinking and the snacks that tend to go with that. Select small portions. Eat slowly. Relax, and enjoy the meal. And nally, leave the table when you are done! The longer you linger, the more you tend to eat. Special to TThe StarCreative lms from around the globe will be showcased at the International Lifetree Film Fest at 6 p.m. CT on Nov. 16. The event will take place at Sunset Park in Mexico Beach. The overarching theme of the festivals short lms is people who are doing life or doing good. According to festival planners, audience members will have an opportunity to choose their favorite lm of the evening. A dessert reception will follow. Sunset Park is located at the west end of the El Governor Motel. While the event is free, it is being held in support of the Beaches Community Care food drive and donations of canned and dry goods are welcome. (In case of inclement weather, the Lifetree Film Fest will be held in Living Waters facility at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach.) Please bring your own lawn chairs. Advance sponsors from the community providing door prizes include: Port Saint Joe Salt Air Farmers Market, Catheys Ace Hardware, Its All About the Oils, Mango Marleys, and Melodys Paintings. The event is sponsored by Lifetree Cafa place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Lifetree Caf is hosted weekly at Living Waters facility at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach at 7 p.m. CT on Mondays. Questions about the Lifetree Film Fest can be directed to David Gieseking at (850) 648-1151 or livingwater@fairpoint.net. International lms featured at local lm fest SPAGHETTI FR ZWEI (SPAGHETTI FOR TTWO) Directed by Matthias Rosenberger A likable but lonely man on his way to lunch encounters a world swarming with would-be crooks, hussies, and criminals. A whimsical portrayal of misperceptions meeting reality. (Germany, 19 min.) G GUANG Directed by Quek Shio Chuan The moving story of Wen Guang, an autistic adult with an unusual obsession. See his challenging quest for a job, his daily routines, and his secret passion as he searches for what will bring him a simple, pure, hard-earned, eeting moment of joy. (Malaysia, 14 min.) T TITANIC LOVE Directed by Mark Pressdee Lucy wants a Titanic Love cruise to relive her Hollywood dream. Jack does not. He thinks they cant afford it, and Lucy is furious. Their relationship hits rough waters, so Jack calls on his clever friends for a cheap alternative. (UK, 22 min.)THE LIFETREE FFIlLM FFEsST FEATURED FFIlLMsSSpecial to TThe StarDo memories of holidays conjure up images of an idyllic painting or a nightmare wrapped in social demands, to-do lists, overeating, and guilt? Expectations and the pressure to create the perfect holiday turn the season of goodwill into a marathon of survival. Have you considered a lighter, more exible, holiday with an attitude that can go the distance from Thanksgiving to New Years Day with your health and sanity intact? This holiday season give special foods and gifts a magical touch. Holiday Survival, a program sponsored by the UF/IFAS Extension Gulf County ofce will show you how to make the holidays extra-special using a pinch of spirited imagination and a dash of creative ideas. Fill your kitchen with holiday cheer using a selection of shopping tips and healthy, creative holiday dishes. Do It Yourself (DIY) gifts are a great way to personalize holiday gifts, you will learn to make gifts that will be cherished and enjoyed by all. And, plan to learn some ideas to creatively address the stressors of the season. Come join us for a funlled evening of guiltless holiday cooking, DIY holiday gifts, and de-stressing strategies. The HOLIDAY SURVIVAL program will be held from 6-8 p.m. CST on Tuesday, Nov. 19 at the Gulf County Extension ofce, 232 E. Lake Ave, Wewahitchka, FL 32465 (Old Health Department). Cost for the program will be $12, which covers taste testing samples, DIY gift items, and handouts. Due to limited seating, please pre-register no later than Nov. 12 by calling the UF/IFAS Gulf County Extension ofce at 639-3200. Pre-registration is necessary to make sure enough supplies, etc. are provided. Space is limited. First registered, rst served. Girls Night Out holiday survivalCelebrate healthy holidays

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, November 7, 2013 Trades&Services227-7847CALLTODAY! GETYOURADIN! Trades&Services 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction4510158 of St. Peter in Port St. Joe and visits The Bridge as part of the churchs outreach program. He was surprised by the recognition but was happy to have his hard work recognized by both the staff and directors at The Bridge. I got suspicious when they wanted to take my picture, he said with a laugh. Schoelles was born in Apalachicola and was named Miss Apalachicola in 1951 at the age of 17. She had a career in real estate and later was hired as the executive director of the Apalachicola Housing Authority, where she served for 26 years, meeting the needs of the community. Schoelles is perhaps best known for a calendar she created with her friends and sold to raise funds that allowed area women to get mammograms. The former resident passed away last month. Marketing director Terri Nelson has worked in the activities department at The Bridge for three years and spent a lot of time with Schoelles. Ruth is being honored for what she gave to the community, Nelson said. She was amazing. The Bridge at Bay St. Joe is one of 87 locations operated by Louisville, Ky.-based Signature HealthCARE. Hall of Fame inductees are voted on by the facilitys directors in the corporate ofce. Launched in 2003, the Hall of Fame event is hosted annually by each Signature home at different times throughout the year. This year, Signature took a different approach by having each center host its Hall of Fame ceremony on the same day, creating a synchronized, company-wide event. Now in its 10th year, the Hall of Fame ceremonies have recognized more than 2,000 residents and community members. BRIDGE from B1Grow bean sprouts 1 of 3 waysOnce thought of only as Chinese vegetables, bean sprouts are now widely used in a variety of dishes. Sprouts are easy to grow, and theyre a good source of protein, as well as many vitamins and minerals. In addition to being very nutritious, sprouts are inexpensive, costing only about 5 to 8 cents a serving. Many methods of sprouting beans seem to give good results. The three methods well discuss in this article are very simple, because they make use of materials most of us already have around our homes. My information was provided by Emeritus Extension Vegetable Specialist Jim Stephens, of The University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The rst step in sprouting is the same for all three methods. After buying some beans or seeds sold specically for sprouting, sort them carefully, choosing only clean, whole specimens. Thoroughly wash about a quarter of a cup of those you select, place them in a bowl or jar, and cover them with lukewarm water. Let the beans stand overnight. By morning, they should have expanded to about three times their dry size. Rinse them well, and pour off all excess water. To use the rst sprouting method, place a couple of tablespoons of the soaked beans in a quart jar, and cover the top securely with nylon mesh or cheese cloth. Turn the jar on its side, so the beans form a thin layer, and place the jar in a warm, dark, humid location. The next step is very important. At least three times every day, until the sprouts are ready, put lukewarm warm water into the jar, swirl it around and drain it off. The seeds should be keep moist, but not wet. Depending on the beans or seeds youre using, sprouts will develop in three to ve days. Rinse and drain the sprouts as soon as they reach optimum length, and before rootlets appear. If youre geminating mung beans, the sprout should be 1 to 2 inches long when theyre harvested. Alfalfa sprouts are best when theyre about 1 inch long. Soybeans sprouts should be no longer than inch before they are harvested. And sesame and sunower sprouts should be used as soon as theyre visible. To employ the second method, spread a couple of tablespoons of soaked beans on several layers of dampened paper towels, tted into a colander or perforated plastic trap. Wrap the container in a block plastic bag, but leave the opening loose, to allow ventilation. As with the rst method, the seeds must be rinsed thoroughly, three times each day. When the sprouts rst appear, you can replace the black plastic bag with a clear one, so youll be able to tell when the sprouts have reached their proper length. To use the third method, just place a couple of tablespoons of soaked beans in the bottom of a new clay ower pot thats been saturated with water. Place a cloth screen over the bottom hole, and cover the entire pot with a layer of muslin or cheese cloth. As previously described, the beans should be rinsed and drained three times a day, until the sprouts reach optimum length. Regardless of the method you choose, the sprouts must be used or stored as soon as they reach proper size. Place them in covered containers in the refrigerator. Theyll keep three to ve days. For more information, contact the Gulf County Extension Service at 639-3200, http://gulf.ifas.u.edu or www.http://edis. ifas.u.edu, and see Publication HS 557 & HS 555. Special to The StarThe West Gadsden Historical Society will celebrate the grand opening of the recently restored historic Greensboro Depot at 3 p.m. ET Saturday, Nov. 9, beside the Apalachicola Northern Railroad at 115 Dufe Ave., Greensboro. At the same time, the newly constructed adjacent classroom building that has been named the Patricia Fletcher Vice Meeting Facility will be dedicated in her memory. Trish was a co-founder and vice president of WGHS and was an ardent, vocal supporter. She can never be replaced and will always be missed by the society. The Greensboro Depot was built in 1907, the year of the rst operation of the AN RR, and is the only remaining original depot on the line that runs from River Junction (Chattahoochee) in Gadsden County to Port St. Joe in Gulf County. About 40 years ago, the depot was moved from its original location between the main track and the side track to a nearby lot. It was then remodeled by Nelson Clark and used as his barber shop as well as a thrift shop operated by area United Methodist Churches. Several years ago, Progress Energy built a transmission line through this area of Gadsden County, and many miles of the line follow the AN RR right-of-way. The old depot building site was in the direct path of the transmission line through the town of Greensboro. WGHS saw the need to advocate for the saving of this piece of history. After many discussions among WGHS, Progress Energy and St. Joe Land Company, a nearby lot was donated by St. Joe Land Company, and Progress Energy contributed a grant defraying the cost of the relocation of the depot. The depot is once again on a lot adjacent to the tracks. The society is most appreciative of this grant and the property on which to relocate the depot building. Without the cooperation of these two corporations working with WGHS, this saving of a piece of Floridas history would not have been possible. West Gadsden Historical Society was fortunate to receive a grant through the U.S. Department of Transportation by which they restored the depot and construct an adjoining classroom building. Concrete Services Inc. of Quincy did a wonderful job with this project. Now the work begins furnishing the depot in order for it to become a rst-class railroad museum. The museum will not be only for items pertaining to the Apalachicola Northern Railroad, but will include any railroad items. The society encourages anyone with copies of old AN RR or any train and depot photos, documents, newspaper clippings or other artifacts to contact us about sharing these important pieces of railroad history. Any items you might have that you wish to donate or loan to this museum will be greatly appreciated. For more information, contact WGHS at info@gadsdenhistory.org, 442-6434 or P.O. Drawer D, Greensboro, FL 32330. the costume contest was sponsored by Duke Energy. Prizes for the contest, which awarded kids, adults, families and pets for best costume, were donated by No Name Cafe, Persnickety, Sunset Coastal Grill and Bluewater Outriggers. Barbara Radcliff, Brenda Miller and Ann Jarosz made the tough calls as judges for the competition. Coastal Design and Landscaping provided the decorated trailer that perched the 162 costumed contestants high above the crowd and the Gulf Alliance for Local Arts brought Panama City storyteller Pat Nease to town. The yarn-spinner had a nook full of hay bales where she told frightful stories to any children who were brave enough to take a seat. The street games, which gave kids a reprieve from the candy line that stretched the length of the avenue, consisted of a ring toss, hay bale bowling and a cake walk and was organized by the Merchants Association to raise additional funds for white Christmas lights that will hang in the trees along Reid during the upcoming holiday season. Glow sticks for the interactive art installation were donated by Dr. Tim Nelson, Patti Blaylock and Tommy Lake. Live music for the celebration was provided by the Boyer Band, stationed on one end of Reid, and Freddy D and Lola on the other. The live music, sh fry, glow stick art project and cake walk were all new events that engaged the people more, Pickett said. I am inclined to believe that the crowds simply hung around longer because we provided other things for them to do. I did hear from several people that they felt it was the largest crowd yet. The Reid Avenue Bunco Babes held a sh fry fundraiser that served about 150 meals and raised $1,000 for the Friends of the Port St. Joe Public Library, a cause the group has donated almost $10,000 in the past three years. Those who wish to be on the committee for next years Ghosts on the Coast can contact the Chamber at 227-1223. PHOTOS BY DEBBIE HH OOp P ER AT JOEBAY.COMAt left, Chamber of Commerce director Paula Pickett welcomed every costume contestant to the stage. Costumes packed the park and street. RROY LEE CARTERCounty extension director SpSP ECIAL TO TT HE TT IMESThe restored Greensboro Depot will be debuted at 3 p.m. ET Saturday at 115 Dufe Ave. in Greensboro.Greensboro Depot grand opening Saturday HALLOWEEN from B1

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 7, 2013 The Star | B7 92894S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Animal Hospital of Port St. Joe, located at 300 Long Ave., in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at St. Joe, Florida, this 21st day of October, 2013. Coastal Veterinary Group 2, Inc. November 7, 2013 92990 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-17-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JUDY DARNA, HENRY DARNA, MARVIN DARNA, II, MELODY POWELL, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) I, and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) II, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure dated June 11, 2013 and an Order Reopening Case and Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered in Case No. 13-17-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and JUDY DARNA, HENRY DARNA, MARVIN DARNA, II, and MELODY POWELL are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on December 5, 2013, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of the intersection of Bonita Street and Trout Avenue for a Point of Beginning; thence proceed North along the East boundary line of Trout Avenue a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed 300 feet East to the East boundary line of Government Lot 14; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed South along the East boundary line of Government Lot 14 a distance of 135 feet; thence make a 90 degree turn and proceed West along the Northern boundary line of Bonita Street a distance of 300 feet to the Point of Beginning. This property being located in the South half of Government Lot 14 in Section 26, Township 7 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: October 29, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Garvin B. Bowden, Esq Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr Tallahassee, FL 32308 November 7, 14, 2013 92962S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2011CA-000210 DIVISION: SENIOR JUDGE WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, CHARLOTTE ODOM A/K/A CHARLOTTE M. ODOM A/K/A CHARLOTTE MONIREA ODOM, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated, October 18, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23-2011-CA-000210 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., successor by merger to Wachovia Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and The Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Lienors, Creditors, Trustees, or other Claimants claiming by, through, under, or against, Charlotte Odom a/k/a Charlotte M. Odom a/k/a Charlotte Monirea Odom, deceased, Angel Monirea Sewell f/k/a Angel Monirea Thomas f/k/a Angel M. Thomas f/k/a Angel M. Earp, as an Heir of the Estate of Charlotte Odom a/k/a Charlotte M. Odom a/k/a Charlotte Monirea Odom, deceased, Kerry Monirea Odom a/k/a Kerry M. Odom a/k/a Kerry Odom a/k/a Kerry A. Odom, as an Heir of the Estate of Charlotte Odom a/k/a Charlotte M. Odom a/k/a Charlotte Monirea Odom, deceased, Any And All Unknown Parties Claiming by, Through, Under, And Against The Herein named Individual Defendant(s) Who are not Known To Be Dead Or Alive, Whether Said Unknown Parties May Claim An Interest in Spouses, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Or Other Claimants are defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 21st day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: THE WEST 60 FEET OF LOT 3 AND THE EAST 8 FEET OF LOT 2, BLOCK 6, C.L. MORGANS ADDITION TO WEWAHITCHKA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 33, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 2004 FLEETWOOD OAK KNOLL 28 X 52 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME, SERIAL NUMBERS: GAFL334A766710K31 AND GAFL334B766710K31, WHICH PERMANENTLY AFIXED AND LOCATED ON THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY. A/K/A 127 JM GRIFFIN DRIVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 25th day of October, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743 (813)221-9171 Fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com File No. KB -11-74953 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Oct 31, Nov 7, 2013 92916S THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2012CA-000003 DIVISION: PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs JACOB RICHARDS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 17, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23-2012-CA-000003 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which PNC Bank, National Association, is the Plaintiff and Jacob Richards, Capital City Bank, Michelle Richards, are defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 21st day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 4, BLOCK F, FOREHANDS SECOND ADDITION TO HIGHLAND VIEW SUBDIVISION, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME AS A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS: A 1995 SINGLEWIDE MOBILE HOME BEARING IDENTIFICATION NUMBER GAFLR39A01949VH AND TITLE NUMBER 0067967502 A/K/A 2481 PARKER AVE, PORT ST JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 21st day of October, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 fax eService: servelaw@ albertellilaw.com File No. KB-11-92633 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Oct 31, Nov 7, 2013 92964S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 23-2012-CA000230 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. SHANNON D. WHITFIELD; GARY A. WHITFIELD; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING BY AND THROUGH THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 18th, 2013 and entered in Case No. 23-2012CA-000230, of the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and SHANNON D. WHITFIELD; GARY A. WHITFIELD; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING BY AND THROUGH THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at IN THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 1000 CECIL COSTIN BOULEVARD, PORT ST. JOE IN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA 32456, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 21st day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 6 BLOCK C COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 3 FOR 1130.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89 EAST FOR 163.73 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 EAST FOR 254.65 FEET; THENCE NORTH 58 WEST FOR 191.06 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 WEST FOR 354.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LAND LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING SUBJECT TO A 33.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY EASEMENT ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY THEREOF. ALSO BEING KNOWN AS LOT 6, BLOCK C, OF THE UNRECORDED PLAT OF STONEMILL CREEK ESTATES. TOGETHER WITH A 1989 FLEETWOOD EAGLE TRACE MANUFACTURED HOME VIN #GAFLK35A01708ET & GAFLK35B01708ET; TITLE NUMBERS 47602846 & 47598114 A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this as 25th day of October, 2013. REBECCA NORRIS As Clerk of said Court By BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Provided pursuant to Administrative Order No 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate, in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, Florida 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least (7) seven days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired please call 711. Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Phone: (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahane andassociates.com File No. 12-00932 BOA Oct 31, Nov 7, 2013 92966S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2009-491CA RESIDENTIAL FUNDING COMPANY LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TAMMY JEAN OWENS A/K/A TAMMY J. OWENS; et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on October 18, 2013, in Civil Case No. 2009-491CA, of the Circuit Court of the FOURTEENTH Judicial Circuit in and for GULF County, Florida, wherein, RESIDENTIAL FUNDING COMPANY LLC is the Plaintiff, and TAMMY JEAN OWENS A/K/A TAMMY J. OWENS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TAMMY JEAN OWENS A/K/A TAMMY J. OWENS; UNKNOWN TENANT N/K/A DAVID MCGHEE; JOHN WALTER OWENS A/K/A JOHN W. OWENS; GULF AIRE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. are Defendants. The clerk of the court, Rebecca L. Norris will sell to the highest bidder for cash At THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE COURTHOUSE at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 21st day November, 2013 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 39, BLOCK C, GULF AIRE SUBDIVISION, PHASE II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 30 AND 31, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY. OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 25th day of October, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk, Gulf County, Florida, Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT PERSONS WITH A DISABILITY NEEDING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO ACCESS COURT FACILITIES OR PARTICIPATE IN A COURT PROCEEDING AT ANY COURTHOUSE OR COURT PROGRAM, SHOULD WITHIN TWO (2) DAYS OF RECEIPT OF NOTICE, CONTACT COURT ADMINISTRATION TO REQUEST SUCH AN ACCOMMODATION. PLEASE CONTACT THE FOLLOWING: COURT ADMINISTRATION, P.O. BOX 826, MARIANNA, FLORIDA 32447; PHONE: 850-718-0026; HEARING & VOICE IMPAIRED: 1-800-9558771; EMAIL: ADA REQUEST@JUD14.FLCO URTS.ORG File No. 1271-580B November 7, 14, 2013 93026S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2008CA-000001-CA DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. RACHEL L. BROWNING, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 28th, 2013, entered in Case No. 23-2008-CA-000001-CA-XXXX of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage, LLC, is the Plaintiff and Rachel L. Browning, Tracy G. Browning, Jane Doe, John Doe, State of Florida Department of Revenue, Unknown Spouse of Rachel L. Browning, are defendants, the Gulf County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 5th day of December, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT FIVE (5), IN BLOCK ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE (125) OF ST JOSEPHS ADDITION OF THE CITY OF PORT ST JOE, FLORIDA, UNIT NUMBER 9, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 2109 JUNIPER AVE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 31st day of October, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of the Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743 (813)221-9171 fax eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com KB -10-63505 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. November 7, 14, 2013 93002S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Serendipity located at 2278 West Hwy 98, in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Mexico Beach, Florida, this 30th day of October, 2013. Crystal L. Lewis November 7, 2013 96119S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY Case No. 13-137-CA CAROL M. DOW Plaintiff, vs. ROBIN PERDOMO, Defendant. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ROBIN PERDOMO LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 277 SUNSHINE RD. WEWAHITCHICA, FL 32465 2913 KENTUCKY ST. WEST PALM BEACH, FL 33406 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property: Commence at the Northwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 6, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida and run South 02 East for 1367.31 feet for the Point of Beginning; thence continue South 02 East for 706.29 feet thence South 89 East for 318.41 feet; thence North 02 West for 709.70 feet; thence North 89 West for 317.665 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands having an area of 5.16 acres, more or less, and being subject to a 30 foot wide roadway easement along the Southerly boundary thereof. LESS AND EXCEPT: Commence at the Northwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 6, Township 6 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence along the West line of said Northeast Quarter, North 02 East for 1367.31 feet to a concrete monument; thence continue along said West line, South 02 East 412.03 feet for the Point of Beginning; thence South 89 East for 180.00 feet; thence South 04 West for 296.12 feet; thence North 89 West for 143.21 feet; thence along the West line of said Northeast Quarter, North 02 West for 296.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said lands containing 1.10 acres, more or less. TOGETHER WITH 1991 FLEE MOBILE HOME ID # FLFLL70A18789CM. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to CHARLES A. COSTIN, Attorney for the Plaintiff whose address is P.O. Box 98, Port St. Joe, Florida on or before November 20, 2013, a date which is within Thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice in The Star and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before and service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief requested in the Complaint. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) disabled person who, because their disabilities need special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA coordinator at 300 E. 4th St., Panama City, Florida 32402 or telephone voice (850) 747-8141 not later than five (5) business prior to such proceeding. Witness my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 21st day of October, 2013 BECKY L. NORRIS, Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk November 7, 14, 2013 96165S IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 11-173-CC DUNES CLUB OF CAPE SAN BLAS CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., Plaintiff vs. ABDEL RAOUF ARAFA, and JULIA ARAFA 2108 West 33rd Street Panama City, FL 32405 Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 22, 2013, and entered in Civil Case No. 11-173CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein DUNES CLUB OF CAPE SAN BLAS CONDOMINIUM, INC is the Plaintiff and ABDEL RAOUF ARAFA, and JULIA ARAFA are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., EST, on the 21st day of November, 2013, the following described property situated in Gulf County, Florida and set forth in the Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: Unit 17, of the Dunes Club of Cape San Blas together with an undivided Interest in the common elements per Declaration of Condominium as Recorded in Official Record Book 303, Page 283, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), disabled persons who, because of their disabilities need special accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 or Telephone (850)229-6113 prior to such proceedings. Witness my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 24th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: Wyvonne Pickett Deputy Clerk Costin & Costin Charles A. Costin 413 Williams Ave. P.O. Box 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-227-1159 email: ccostin@ costinlaw.com Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 2013 96171S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The 96167S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 946 Application No. 2013-44 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 03324-295R Description of Property: Lot 19, Tremont Estates, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 29 & 30, of Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Stephanie M & Charles A Davis All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 4th day of December, 2013. Dated this 28th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2013 96169S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1368 Application No. 2013-43 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05694-000R Description of Property: Lot Twenty-Two (22), in Block One Thousand, One (1001), City of Port St, Joe, Florida, according to the Official Plat thereof on file in the Office of Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Lena Dukes All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 4th day of December, 2013. Dated this 28th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2013

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B8| The Star Thursday, November 7, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 4510160 4516909AVONThe company for WomenHIRINGFOR THE HOLIDAYS!Part-time or Full-time! Call Ellen850-763-7307 4516610HELP WANTEDComputer skills necessary to assist in managing shing & hunting ONLINE WEB STOREFull or Part Time Call George Duren at: 850-229-6031 or fax resume to: 850-229-9266 1118969 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:SHIPFITTERS FLUXCORE WELDERS CaRPEnTERS PIPE WELDERS X-RaY WELDERS PIPEFITTERS SHIPPInG/RECEIVInGCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1380 Application No. 2013-42 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05792-000R Description of Property: Lot Nine (9), in Block One Thousand, Six (1006), City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the Official Plat thereof on file in the Office of Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Denise Hall All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 4th day of December, 2013. Dated this 28th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2013 96191S PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf County Enterprise Zone Development Agency will meet Thursday, November 21, 2013, at 12:00 noon, E.T., 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., of the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex in Room 307. The only topic to be discussed will be the Enterprise Zone boundary changes. The public is welcome to attend. November 7, 2013 96173S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 658 Application No. 2013-41 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 02633-001R Description of Property: BEGIN at the Point of Intersection of the East boundary line of State Road No. 71, and the South boundary line of Land Drive for the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence run Easterly along the South boundary line of said Land Drive for 320 feet, more or less, to the East line of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 4 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, thence run South to the Northeast Corner of Lot Owned by Franklin D. Ward and wife, Hazel J. Ward, as recorded in Official Records Book 76, Page 509, in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, thence run West to the East Boundary line of State Road No. 71; thence run Northerly along the East boundary line of State Road No. 71, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. NOTE: The Legal Description shown in Tax Assessment is in error. The lands shown are completely different, but shows the Book and Page of said Deed taken from. The above lands are the lands shown for the Drawing Plat on said Assessment. Name in which assessed: Little River Camp, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 4th day of December, 2013. Dated this 28th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14, 21, 2013 96271S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 23 2013 CA 000073 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. RUTH R. DUMAS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RUTH R. DUMAS; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on October 28th, 2013, in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, the clerk shall sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida, described as: LOT 20, BLOCK 1002, CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO AN OFFICIAL MAP OR PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 254 AVENUE B, PORT ST JOE, FL 32456-1508 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the front lobby of the Gulf County Court, 1000 Cecil Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, on December 5, 2013, beginning at 11:00 AM, ET. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the us pendens may claim the surplus. Dated at Port St. Joe, Florida, this 30th day of October, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Douglas C. Zahm, P.A. 12425 28th St. North, Suite 200 St. Petersburg, FL 33716 Phone: (727)536-4911 Fax: (727) 539-1094 Attorney for the Plaintiff IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITY ACT ANY PERSONS NEEDING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS FUNCTION SHOULD CONTACT THE CLERK OF THE COURT NO LATER THAN ONE DAY PRIOR TO THAT DAY AT (850)229-6113. November 7, 14, 2013 96259S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2013-CA-000039 PHH Mortgage Corporation Plaintiff, vs. Richard A. Ramsey and Jean L. Ramsey, Husband and Wife; Dunes Club of Cape San Blas Condominium Association, Inc.; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated October 28, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 2013CA-000039 of the Circuit of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein PHH Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff and Richard A. Ramsey and Jean L. Ramsey, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Rebecca L. Norris, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED AT 1000 CECIL G. COSTIN SR. BLVD., PORT ST. JOE, FL at 11:00 A.M. on December 5, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: UNIT 10, THE DUNES CLUB OF CAPE SAN BLAS, ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM, RECORDED AT OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 303, PAGE 283, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P.O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at (850) 747-5338, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk of Court Submitted by: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 12-253077 FC01 PHH November 7, 14, 2013 96299S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that PPF Holdings III Ltd. the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 634 Application No. 2013-48 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 02808-000R Description of Property: Commence at the Southwest corner of Section 11, Township 7 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County Florida thence run North 85 degrees 58 minutes 13 seconds East 1492 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence run North 86 degrees 52 minutes 17 seconds East 131 feet; thence run North 02 degrees 33 minutes 39 seconds West 444.00 feet; thence run South 86 degrees 52 minutes 17 seconds West 131.00 feet; thence run South 02 degrees 33 minutes 39 seconds East 444.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Name in which assessed: Gredan Development, Inc. All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of December, 2013. Dated this 5th day of November, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 96303S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 545 Application No. 2013-46 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 02285-001R Description of Property: Lots 6, 7, 8 and 9, in Block F, College Park Subdivision, to the City of Wewahitchka, Florida per Official Plat of same being recorded in the Office of Clerk of the Circuit Court,Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Roger & Janice Linton All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of December, 2013. Dated this 5th day of November, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 96301S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 727 Application No. 2013-47 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 03036-000R Description of Property: The North Half of Lot Number 24, according to an unrecorded plat of the Southwest Quarter of Section 17, Township 8 South, Range 10 West, also described by metes and bounds as follows: Begin at a pt. 50 feet South and 1,345.0 feet East of the NW Corner of the SW 1/4 of Section 17, Township 8 South, Range 10 West, and run East 622.50 feet, thence South 158.75 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, thence continue South 158.75 feet, thence run West 622.50 feet, thence North 158.75 feet, thence East 622.50 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 2.27 acres, more or less. NOTE: IT IS THE OPINION OF THE ABSTRACTOR THAT THE ABOVE METES AND BOUNDS COULD BE IN ERROR. THE DESCRIPTION TO THE PARCEL BEING the South Half of Lot Number 24, is the same metes and bounds description as above. Name in which assessed: Harry M. Murphy All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of December, 2013. Dated this 5th day of November, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 96331S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14th JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 23-2012-CA-000054 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR RASC 2007KS1, Plaintiff, vs. WAYNE E. BLEVINS, JR., ET AL., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 18, 2013 and entered in Case No. 23-2012-CA-000054 in the Circuit Court of the 14th Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida wherein U.S. Bank National Association as Trustee for RASC 2007KS1 was the Plaintiff and WAYNE E. BLEVINS, JR. ET AL., the Defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 a.m. E.T. at the front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 on the 21st day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1, BLOCK G, CAPE PLANTATION PHASE II, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION FOR 1476.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY LINE OF THE ST. JOSEPH BAY COUNTRY CLUB GOLF COURSE; THENCE ALONG SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 18 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 240.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 9 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 955.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 4 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 522.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 265.28 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 336.71 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 36.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 137.63 FEET; THENCE, LEAVING SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY, SOUTH 66 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 75.55 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE CONCAVE EASTERLY SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 350.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 26 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 49 SECONDS FOR 163.18 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 6 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 18.5 SECONDS WEST 161.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 6 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 7.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF CURVATURE OF A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 728.06 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 7 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 18 SECONDS FOR 91.34 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 3 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 91.28 FEET; THENCE, LEAVING SAID CURVE ON A NON-RADIAL LINE, NORTH 44 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 193.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LOT 1, BLOCK G IS SUBJECT TO COVENANTS AND RESTRICTIONS AS CONTAINED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 107, PAGES 1058-1072 AND AS AMENDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 125, PAGES 737-739 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND A PORTION OF LOT 2, BLOCK G, CAPE PLANTATION PHASE II, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT A SAINT JOE PAPER COMPANY MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 11 WEST; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SECTION FOR 1476.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY LINE OF THE ST. JOSEPH BAY COUNTRY CLUB GOLF COURSE; THENCE ALONG SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 18 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 240.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 9 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 955.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 4 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 522.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 265.28 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 285.71 FEET TO AN IRON ROD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 51.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD; THENCE LEAVING SAID GOLF COURSE BOUNDARY SOUTH 44 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ON A NON-RADIAL LINE FOR 193.33 FEET TO AN IRON ROD ON A CURVE CONCAVE WESTERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 728.06 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS FOR 26.17 FEET; SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 1 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST, 26.17 FEET TO AN IRON ROD MARKING THE POINT OF COMPOUND CURVE WITH A CURVE TO THE RIGHT, SAID CURVE HAVING A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 42 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 18 SECONDS AND THE RADIUS OF 25.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE FOR 18.59 FEET, SAID ARC HAVING A CHORD BEARING AND DISTANCE OF SOUTH 23 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST, 18.16 FEET TO AN IRON ROD MARKING THE POINT OF TANGENCY OF SAID CURVE; THENCE SOUTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST, 15.13 FEET TO AN IRONROD; THENCE NORTH 44 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 218.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO: COVENANTS AND RESTRICTIONS AS CONTAINED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 107 AT PAGES 1058-1072 AND AS AMENDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 125, AT PAGES 737-739, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. MINERAL RIGHTS RESERVED BY PREVIOUS GRANTORS. THIS PROPERTY IS INTENDED TO BE INCLUDED IN AN BECOME PART OF LOT 1, BLOCK G, CAPE PLANTATION SUBDIVISION. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS OF THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER, AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. REBECCA NORRIS, Clerk, Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk November 7, 14, 2013 96305S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank as C/F FL Dundee Lien Inv, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 974 Application No. 2013-45 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 03392-100R Description of Property: Begin at a point 1000 feet West and 1020 North of the Southeast Corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, thence continue North for 175 feet, thence run East 250 Feet, thence run South 175 feet, thence run West 250 feet, being in Section 31, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Tammy Miller and Regan Scholles All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 11th day of December, 2013. Dated this 5th day of November, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 Mexico Beach: 806 Georgia Ave. Sat, Nov 9th 8am-2pmYard SaleLadies plus clothes, lots of Christmas stuff, computer stand, custom mand TV stand, kitchen items, knickknacks, misc. Text FL71364 to 56654 PSJ 105 Mimosa Ave behind old hospital Sat Nov 9 7am-2pmMulti Family Yard SaleLOTS of misc items! PSJ: 304 20th Street at Saint Joseph Catholic Church at the Church Hall Saturday Nov 9th, 8am-1pmYard & Bake SaleEverything from furniture to play things to clothing to yard & kitchen items. Text FL71030 to 56654 St. Joe Beach: 8005 Alabama Ave, Seashore Subd., Saturday, Nov 9th, 8am -12pmHuge 2 Family Yard SaleSomething for everyone, infants to adults. Priced to sell Text FL71031 to 56654 Lift ChairAlmost New! $400 850-227-1477. Text FL71335 to 56654 OtherThe Gulf County Board of County CommissionersJOB NOTICEThe Gulf County Board of County Commissioners is accepting applications for one full-timeLaborerfor our Public Works Department. Starting salary is $11.9391 per hour. This is a bargaining unit (Union) position with full benefits. Applications and a complete job description are available in our Human Resources Office (1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe), or at www.gulfcounty-fl.gov Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m., E.T. on November 20, 2013 at the Gulf County Human Resources Office. For more information, please contact Brett Lowry, Deputy Administrator at (850) 229-5335 or Denise Manuel, Central Services Director at (850) 227-2384. Gulf County enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. Tynalin Smiley, Chairman Attest: Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk Web ID#: 34270703 Text FL70703 to 56654 Needs Sm Apartment I am looking for a small apartment, wheelchair Accessible. 227-9496 Text FL69842 to 56654 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath. Florida room in back Large yard. 3 blocks to the beach. 339 Selma St. $700 month. First/Last/ Security Deposit. Call 850-348-7774 Text FL70604 to 56654 Quality Long Term RentalsMexico Beach Call for more info 850-348-0262 Beaver Laguana Monterey 06 40ft. diesel, quad, 53k miles, exc. cond. $126,000. See at 1216 Ohio Ave. PC. 850-819-0852 or 850-235-2599 Text 70915 to 56654 Biker Consignment From bike parts to clothing, & anything to do w/ Bikers! Open Tue -Sat. 2001 Wilson Ave. P.C. 850-763-9009 Holiday House CleaningHoliday Rates!Call Sherry at 348-6851 or Dan at 227-8225 Text FL71234 to 56654