The star

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Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Creator:
Star
Publisher:
Star
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Newspapers   ( lcsh )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
notis - ABZ6320
oclc - 33602057
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:00915


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YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR OVER 68 YEARS
68th Year, Number 44 Port St. Joe, FL 3 Sections 42 Pages


Scallop Festival Tab Inside


August 24, 2006


Building a Community, One



Home Renovation at a Time


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
On most any day of the week, you can
find Frankie Kelly cruising the streets of
Highland View on his three-wheeled bicycle in
search of discarded aluminum cans.
Kelly recycles the cans to supplement his
social security income, and also to buy pres-
ents for his nieces and nephews.
Kelly was born in Highland View on New
Year's Day in 1950, and until five years ago,
lived with his father, Loren, who had the
reputation of being Gulf County's strongest
man and a championship eater.
Loren Kelly earned a Florida Seafood
Festival oyster-eating contest record after
devouring 30 dozen oysters. When he was
finished, he asked for a bag of oysters to take
home.
The late Gene Raffield was the guardian
of both Loren and Frankie Kelly until his
death in 2000, when his son Eugene assumed
guardianship. Loren Kelly died a year later.
Though he misses his father deeply,
Frankie Kelly has done well on his own,
despite physical handicaps. He washes his
own clothes, cooks his own meals and keeps
his house clean.
"He's not someone to put in a corner and
leave alone," said Raffield. "He's got a lot of
talent."
For the past several years, Raffield unsuc-
cessfully lobbied the Gulf County's State
Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) pro-
gram to repair Kelly's home, which had badly
damaged floors and lacked insulation.
The SHIP program annually awards
rehabilitation loans to needy Gulf County
residents.
"They're aimed at keeping people in their
homes. in the coimnUnity. They're cormmiu-
nity-building loans rather thia destabiliz-
ing loans." said John Tremont. Affordable
Housing Projects Manager with the SHIP
program.
Ttus year. Kelly again failed to win the
SHIP lottery, but SHIP administrators pledged
their help.
Raffield was thrilled.
"It didn't fall on deaf ears. I felt this time.
there was some heart to it. some sincereness
about it," he said.
In an effort to help additional families


Highland View resident Frankie Kelly (shown on his trademark bicycle) recently had his home
renovated through a partnership between the Gulf County SHIP program, Christian Community
Development Foundation and Weatherization Assistance Program. The main players are (left to
right): CCDF project manager Fred Willis, CCDF director Diana Sealey, SHIP program administrator
Dannie Bolden and affordable housing projects manager John Tremont.


who were not chosen in the SHIP lottery held
each JuIly. SHIP administrators partnered
with the Christian Community Development
Foundation (CCDF). a volunteer-based reha-
bilitation program.
The SHIP program awarded Kelly a


Voting Season



has Arrived
By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Time now for the voters.
After being barraged for weeks by a flurry
of television and radio commercials, print ads
and visits from candidates, the voters are now
officially on the clock as the countdown to the
Sept. 5 primary reaches the final weeks.
Early voting started on Monday and will
continue through Saturday, Sept. 2.
Democratic and Republican voters have
the opportunity to begin casting votes in
races from governor to the Florida House of
Representatives District VI seat. And county
voters in Districts 1 and 5 have the chance to.
begin to decide who they want as a representa-
tive to the Gulf County School Board.
"We want them all to come out and vote
early so it won't be so hard for our poll workers
on. Election Day," said Supervisor of Elections
Linda Griffin.
Voters at each of the county will have a
convenient place for early voting.
Machines are set up at the Wewahitchka
Public Library as well as at Griffin's new offices
at 401 Long Avenue in Port St. Joe.
Voting times are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET
in Port St. -Joe and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. CT in
Wewahitchka.
Those tunes are valid. Monday through
Saturday yep, voters can fill out their ballots
on the weekend through Sept. 2.
The Monday prior to the Sept. 5 primary is
no longer available for early v oting to allow the
folks in Griffin's office to prepare for primary
Tuesday.
Voters should be aware the procedures for
early voting are identical to those when arriving
at their designated precinct on Election Day
you must present valid picture identification
when requesting a ballot.
Those wishing to vote in the primary by
absentee ballot must submit their requests for
a ballot to Griffin's office no later than 5 p.m.
on Aug. 30. The last day for Griffin's team to
mail out absentee ballots is Sept. 1.
For educational purposes, sample ballots
may be found on Page 13A of this week's news-
paper.


85.000 loan and the CCDF supplied a crew
of seven volunteers.
To help increase the energy efficiency -
of Kelly's home. SHIP enlisted the aid of the
(See COMMUNITY on Page 2A)


Tom Semmes, a Candidate for



District 2 Commissioner


Tom Semimes said he is running because
Gulf County deserves better government.
This is Semmes' second effort at the District
2 County Conunissioner seat, having nar-
rowly lost In 2002 by a mere 42 votes.
Semmes retired in 1989 with over 20 years
in the U.S. Army as a Chief Warrant Officer
3 In the Telecommunications-Electronics
Maintenance field. He retired again in 1996
as a Program Manager for a major tele-
communications firm in the Washington.
D.C. area, where he was responsible for the
installation and management of telecommu-
nications systems both in the United States
and overseas locations. He returned to Gulf
County In 1996 after a 28 year absence.
Semmes and his wife, Dianne. have two adult
daughters and five grandchildren.
Sernmes feels his past work experience
qualifies him for the County Commission
seat in District 2 as he has had substantial
work experience in the areas of financial,
contract. and personnel management. He
feels the Board of County Commissioners
needs more individuals representing the peo-
ple of Gulf County that have a business back-
ground. and can relate,to the problems cur-
rently facing the county. Semmes states you


can not just throw money at a problem and
expect it to fix Itself. Detailed analysis and
planning is required so the taxpayers only
pay o nce to solve problems. The citizens of
Gulf County are aware that tax revenues to
the county has increased enormously In the
past several years. yet the additional services
provided by the county have been negligible
to non-existent.
One of his major areas of concern is the
lack of industry to replace what was lost
when the paper mill closed. Gulf County
must recruit industry that will provide jobs
that pays a living wage for Gulf County
workers. We cannot depend on the tourist
industry to survive. Semmes said If elected
to the District 2 Commissioner seat. his past
management experience will be a plus for
the citizens of Gtlf County, as he will work
with the other commissioners to Improve the
operation and the direction of our county gov-
ernment. He feels Gulf County will continue
to see enormous growth as we have seen in
the past several years. However, without the
proper _planning and follow through by the
county, we will be taking steps backward
instead of moving forward.


Robert McCullar of Santa Rosa Beach was
visiting Cape San Bias this past week end and
snapped this impressive lightning strike at dawn
on Sunday morning.


1 0 The W reck of the Florida ................. 1B Kickoff Classics ....................... 10-11A


County ......................................... 6A Provisions Expands ........................ 1C


OA Freedom
News Paper

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Real Estaie Adverising Deadline
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Display Advertising Deadline
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Monday 5:00 pm :
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Beach Restoration Update ................1B


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Lelners IieEi~o & .Mot
Sports 101A

Weaibe[ 16A

Alnomrelneol.-.-i

Obi~luariM ___4B

(boit(h News .5B


Corillunly dleflddf ---6B

Tldiogs To Do & See-....B

Law Enoiremem l..8

School News ~il

Legdls 9

Tiades & Services IOC


INDEX


~CF 3 1 JILIIIIJ~LP 6111~21 -.b.CIIIL~IIILr.rll~PbrLl..


~-~I CT ~b-3C-WCI-- ~C ~1)~Ld_ ~-- -Laa~-~-.'L LIP ~-~IL~ Ist -sBI~ 3 ~ I


9






7AMTIn Stnr 1P.rl L-II in l* urdy.2 20s l e 9 S g l o y d r n g a r6 a


Community


Weatherization Assistance
Program and the program's
local contractor, Raymond
Driesbach.
The Weatherization
Assistance Program provides
grants for home improvements
that reduce monthly energy
bills. Preference is given to
the elderly, physically disabled
and families with small chil-
dren.
The CCDF, SHIP and
Weatherization Assistance pro-
grams combined their services
to make substantial changes
to Kelly's home.
In a span of only two-
and-a-half weeks, the small


crew insulated the attic,
replaced the doors, windows,
and floors, put new paneling
on several interior wall and
installed a new refrigerator in
the kitchen.
They also added a hand-
rail in the tub and a vanity
and cabinet in the bathroom.
Kelly was able to stay in his
home for the duration of the
project.
SHIP program administra-
tor Dannie Bolden called the
rehabilitation of future SHIP
partnerships."
SHIP and CCDF have
partnered for five rehabilita-
tion programs since March,


and plan to complete another
15 between now and July 1,
2006.
For CCDF director Diana
Sealey, the partnerships
between the CCDF, SHIP and
Weatherization programs pro-
vide more bang for the buck
when it comes to home reno-
vations.
"When you go in these
homes, you can see we can
only stretch that $5,000 so
far," said Sealey. "We can't do
this by ourselves."
Kelly is pleased with the
changes to his home. He no
longer stubs his toes on the
floor and his home is cooler


'~=5-


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'I .-~----
-~--
.~-.- --~- -

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Despina Williams/The Star
One of Frankie Kelly's bedrooms now has a new air conditioning window unit.


Despina Williams/The Star
Kelly can now bathe easier with the addition of a hand-rail on his tub.


with the addition of insulation
and a new air conditioning
window unit.
He can now settle 'in for
the night on his living room
couch and watch television, a
favorite pastime.
"He's got two beds, but
he likes that couch," joked
Raffield as Kelly offered an
explanation.
"Keep my eye on my bicy-
cle," grinned Kelly, gesturing
toward its front porch resting
place. "I hear somebody go in
that door because that door
makes a racket."
With his cheery disposi-
tion and sweet nature, Kelly
charmed everyone involved in


the renovation.
The man who has never
met a stranger now has a host
of new friends.
"Most of our jobs are very
straight forward, a handshake


Port St. Joe photographer
Tim Gussman, of Portside
Photography, won first prize
in the International Open
Amateur Photography contest
sponsored by The International
Library of Photography.
"It's the first competition
I've won," said Gussman. "It's
very exciting."
Gussman has worked
in the photography business
since 1984, the last five years
in Port St. Joe. He specializes


at the end and that's it, but
Frankie's a little special," said
Tremont.
Rehabbing arnd
Decorating
(See COMMUNITY on Page 3A)


in family beach portraits, wed-
dings, youth sports, portfolio
development, proms, and spe-
cial events.
He will be leaving in late
August for Mexico, where he
will participate in a week-long
photography competition spon-
sored by Ujena swimwear.
The International Library
of Photography bills itself as
the largest online photography
museum in the world, at www.
picture.com.


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I.











ii


Local Photographer



Wins Award


One

SLee's.
s^^iLtopr


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


2A The Star. Port St. oF hrdy uut2,20


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Despina Williams/The Star
Lowery's bedroom makeover includes a new popcorn ceiling, sheetrock and a bright blue color
scheme.


Communi

On Friday, Gwen
Lowery gave a walking tour
of the Apollo Street home
she shares with grand-
sons De'Shawntae, 11, and
Jaylan, 14.
She noted the refinished
cabinets with the sparkling
gold hardware, the new coun-
tertops and the two kitchen
windows where the sliding
doors used to be.
She flicked on the light
in the front bathroom to
show off the new sheetrock,
painted a vivid green, and
walked her visitors through
Sher bright blue bedroom.
As she quickened her
'step, Lowery rattled off other
changes: a new bedroom
ceiling, screen doors in the
front and back, hurricane
shutters, new heat pump,
new roof, an insulated water
heater.
Then there was the unex-
plained phenomenon.
"They made the house
look bigger, too, for some


- From Page 2A


reason," said Lowery. "I think
it grew two inches."
Like Kelly, Lowery failed
to win the SHIP lottery for
several years. This year, she
finally got her wish when she
was awarded an $18,096 loan
for home improvements.
Six additional fami-
lies qualified for large SHIP
loans this year, with 12 oth-
ers receiving medium-sized
loans to make needed repairs
on their homes.
Ten percent of the loan
is forgiven each year. In 10
years, SHIP recipients can
contact the clerk's office and
ask for a satisfaction of mort-
gage, which 'terminates the
promissory note and frees
them from any financial obli-
gation.
For smaller loan recip-
ients, the process is fast-
tracked, taking, only four
years.,'
Lowery, who is not one
to mess around, completed
her paperwork with unfail-


' .~


ing promptness and drafted
a home improvement wish
list.
The SHIP program allows
loan recipients to select their
own contractor, and Lowery
chose Driesbach, who com-
pleted the work in two
months' time.
Lowery moved in with
her mother while her home
was repaired, but kept a close
watch on Driesbach through-
out the project's duration.
"I was here everyday. I
was right in behind him,"
she said.
Though Lowery made
sure things were. done
according to her specifica-
tions, she was not prepared
for the results.
When the project
wrapped, her home was
more energy efficient and her
electricity bills dropped dra-
matically.
Lowery sang the SHIP
program's praises to her
coworkers at Port St. Joe
Elementary School.
"I tell. the ladies at work.
'Get on the SHIP program
because you never know how
much you'll really save,'" she
said.
Lowery has been con-
ducting guided tours for all
her Apollo Street neighbors.
The neighborhood has been
well-represented in the SHIP
lottery over the past two
years, with six Apollo Street


Despina Williams/The Star
Gwen Lowery, accompanied by grandson De'Shawntae Willis, CCDF project manager Fred Willis
and affordable housing projects manager John Tremont takes in the view from the front porch of her
newly renovated Apollo Street home.


houses either renovated or
awaiting renovation.
With her house look-
ing better than ever before,
Lowery has begun a full-
scale interior redesign, with
new furniture, bold colors
and decorative accents.
She has already changed
her kitchen wall color three
times and resolved a minor
wallpaper border crisis.
Lowery is currently fret-
ting over her new dining
room table, which she thinks
is too dark, and a living
room chandelier, which she
thinks is too green.
Though her family teas-
es her about the redesign's
extended tinmeframe. Lowery'
takes their criticisms in
stride.
She wants her design
choices to complement the
elegant renovation, and will
not rest until she's satisfied.
"They keep rushing me,
but I'n going to take my time
and do it just how I want to,"
Lowery said.


Refnanin0Opios

Chckwih s oratrctveprdut







SS Smooth Sailing.













RTAGEANAYI!'


De'Shawntae Willis shows off
Some decoration projects.





.|| -., ---

-I .^ BME


Wayne Rowlett, Realtor


MAKE IT LEGAL!

Millions of people each year
move from one state to an-
other. Reasons for relocating
range. from a new job to retir-
ing to simply better housing.
The financial and personal im-
pact of buying and/or selling a
home can be enormous. One
aspect you should fully un-
derstand before making, a big
move is the tax implications.

Real estate agents are not fi-
nancial advisors, but they do
know a thing or two about
what to do before relocating.
At the top of the list is to legally
change your state of residence
and determine how that affects
taxes on income, property, and
your estate.

Once you're a legal resident of
your new home' state, you can
apply for incentives like home-
stead exemptions (if available).


Despina Williams/The Star
one of his grandmother's latest








Real Estate Lifesr)les, LLC


Also make sure you've updat-
ed the address on your credit
report. Invesutgate how the
enforcement of certain legal
documents like wills and pow-
ers of attorney might change
because of the change in resi-
dence.

Rules are different from state
to state, and many experts
suggest trying to make your,
move as 'early in the year as
possible in order to minimize
the. impact. Tax returns can
be confusing when you're
claiming part-time residency
in two different states during
the year you move. Trust a
real estate professional to help
with selling, buying and mov-
ing, and seek advice from a tax
consultant about the financial
implications.



Thinking of selling? Call
for a free consultation.
Wayne Rowlett of Real Estate
Lifestyles, LLC, 2476 CR 30
A, Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(850) 229-5400 wr@gtcom.net
real-estate-lifestyles.com


'Ihese homes are located in the center of the proposed new phase of Windmark Beach. They sit on two of the last pri-
vately owned lots in that stretch of beach along.Highway 98 which is scheduled to be rerouted. With 4,191 heated and
cooled square footage, there are 4 Bedrooms and 4.5 Baths. Decks cover all three levels so the views from this property
are without comparison. The interior finishes include' all-wood semi custom cabinets, quartz countertops in kitchen,
upgraded appliance and lighting packages, tile and bamboo wood floors in common areas and bathrooms and carpet in
bedrooms and stairs. Some of the other features include an elevator to all floors, a master suite with jacuzzi tub, sitting
area, kitchenette, and a private entrance to a sun deck. These homes have been professionally decorated and are a beach
lover's dream. One with the coastal theme and the other with a rich West Indies feel. Turn key investments in one of
the most prime locations in Gulf County. For more information call Pristine Properties, LLC at 877-827-8751.

Special Open House Discount, Reduced From $2,800,000 to $2,299,000


PORT ST. JOE OFFICE, 317 Monument Avenue PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456
1.877.827.8751 OR 850.229.1700


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Established 7 93 7 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


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4A The Star. Port St. Joe. FL Thursday, August 24, 2006


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Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Bolstering Downtown


Six years ago, in the aftermath of the
closing of the paper mill, Reid Avenue more
closely resembled downtown Detroit than
Port St. Joe.
Empty storefronts, boarded up windows
and doors, they were the dominant architec-
tural themes of what could only be described
as an economically distressed area.
Over the ensuing five years, as rising
land values fed prosperity for many, that
stretch of Reid Avenue bustled again, stores
were remodeled and opened and boards
were removed as restaurants and a variety
of small businesses took root.
Now, a stunning combination of factors
- from land speculation which had investors
giddily pocketing profits as local business
owners foot the tab to tax bills wrought from
out-of-control government spending to oner-
ous property insurance rates borne from
hurricanes and the vagaries of the insurance
business have come to roost.
And they threaten to squeeze the very
lifeblood from the character of small-town
business, the costs already calculable in
layoffs, business closings and a seemingly
intractable path to a return of the dire
straits of six years' ago.
To harbor the perception that these
small business owners have the financial
stature, to easily absorb the slashes to the
bottom line they have sustained in the past
few years and still easily keep the doors
open is to ignore reality and the atmosphere
of downtown.
Businesses are wobbling along Reid
Avenue and relief is scarce.
Local answers for rising insurance pre-
miums or the rarity of available policies 'are
non-existent. Wind and storm insurance is
becoming a luxury businesses are increas-
ingly finding beyond their reach.
Prodding local governments about taxes
has brought only symbolic relief, with coun-
ty commissioners, for one example, declar-
ing that maintaining the unsustainable for
most of their constituents spending levels
of the previous few years is somehow a vic-
tory for taxpayers. '
While devoting little but hot air to the
concept of establishing policies, procedures
or even the ability to track spending .
An answer, maybe a band-aid but at least
an attempt to stanch the bleeding, might be


found in the ongoing tussle between the
Downtown Redevelopment Agency and city
commissioners.
At the root of much of the current ten-
sion is the decision a couple of years ago
by the DRA to secure the annual tax dollars
the organization was entitled to under the
Florida statutes that allowed its creation.
Those dollars, in the neighborhood of
$100,000 each from the county and the
city, transformed an organization that was
largely latent into one with significant finan-
cial wherewithal.
These were tax dollars
paid by those who lived The DRA cc
and conducted, business aside a poI
within the DRA bound-
aries, a portion of their a budget ti
bills directed for projects grown to I
aimed at enhancing and half a millil
growing downtown. to provide i
In this time of need to provide
for so many downtown assistance
businesses, there is now a all business:
golden opportunity to use individuals
those tax dollars, money DRA could
borne of the sweat and
long hours and stress of
keeping the doors open, to sow goodwill on
several fronts.
The DRA should explore establishing a
small grant-in-aid program to assist strug-
gling downtown businesses with their most
pressing concerns, tax and property insur-
ance bills.
A perfect template would be that used
by the Gulf County Education Foundation
for its grants to. educators in the public
schools, taking a portion of donations and
using them to promote the best efforts of
teachers, in all county public schools.
'The DRA could set aside a portion of a
budget that has grown to more than half a
million dollars to. provide immediate assis-
tance to which all businesses. and individu-
als within the DRA could apply.
For example, set aside $150,000 and
use it to pay tax bills, to pay property insur-
ance premiums and in doing so provide
significantbang for the buck'.
Earmark the money specifically to
address those unforeseen costs Wh1ich 'are
killing small businesses, including prop-
erty assessnmefits'which are the product of


speculation and not normal market fluctua-
tions.
Maybe the current bylaws of the orga-
nization inhibit such initiatives, but bylaws
can always be amended and it would be
hard to identify more of an emergency for
local businesses than the current climate.
And $25,000 here, $30,000 there,
$15,000 across the street could be the dif-
ference between "Open" and "Closed" signs
in the near future.
Consider it this way, no matter the
dreams or plans of the DRA, they will not
be of much use if the
would set downtown area is several
tion of blocks of empty store-
at has. front.
iat has Businesses need help
ore than now or the future will be
on dollars ; immaterial.
mmediate And in providing
immediate this assistance now, on
to which a one-time only basis,
ses and will engender goodwill
within the and support for the DRA
from businesses within
apply. its boundaries, including
among business owners
who have gained a sour taste from recent
events.
Such an effort would also mute any dis-
sent about the DRA and its action from city
commissioners.
Commissioners, regardless of their view-
point, would be hard-pressed to neutralize a
group which was trying to accomplish what
the city has not provide some relief from
the hefty financial burdens placed on busi-
nesses by spendthrift government.
Further, if the program is, successful
enough, and the DRA will collect these tax-
dollars for at least another decade, such a
grant effort could fuel rebirth of the busi-
ness area of North Port St. Joe, should it'
become part of an expanded DRA.
Maybe this is all pie-in-the-sky, a Hail
Mary given the constraints of the statutes
which govern a DRA or the personalities at
play in the ongoing pRA debate within the
city. Certainly it's not a permanent solution.
But it's an idea and from this corner
it seems small business owners need. and
should receive, all the ideas available to con-
tinue a positive march begun six years -ago.


c

I
I
r

I
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J


Hey, I've Got It Made!


It's just a little lie..
Folks ask me about the boys.,And I inmmedj-
ately say they are "doing fine". And they are!
That is not the lie.
Then they will ask how Cathy and I are
doing "by'ourselves". And let me hasten to point
out these questions come from good friends.
Our boys are 'community grown". These friends
aren'tt asking to pass the trunime of day. They had
a son m the little league program with one, or
both. of the boys. They had a daughter that
called our house from time to tune. They shared
a cold bleacher at a late night football game.
They taught a Sunday School class where Josh
asked all the questions....and Jesse caught the
essence.
They know our boys.
And the he is not to them!
I quickly say. "Cathy and I are doing great."'
And' we are! I will laugh with them that I now
have control of the t. v. flipper. I will explain
that a quiet evening alone with your wife is
a cherished moment. Arid it is! I can eat at a
nice restaurant and the bill is not eighty-five
dollars! Someone else has to listen to Josh's '
questions....and Jesse no longer comes into the
bedroom about the time I'm drifting off to sleep
and asks about the meaning of life. ,
Home alone---after twenty-five years of
revolving doors. late night snacks. girl friend
catastrophes, seventh inning losses, knock-
down-drag-outs over whose turn it is to mow the
lawn. mustard on the ceiling and run-a-way dogs
inthe house---is pretty darn'nice!
And I do mean that. And I have. enjoyed
many aspects of the less hectic pace and the ces-
sation of the life 'make or break" decisions that
two sons force you to agonize over on an hourly
basis. I-can actually do what I want to do. Life
is good.
But.....
I miss the late night patter of little feet com-
ing down the hall. I would, hear them from our
bedroom even before the door handle turned.
"Mommy. I can't sleep."
"Go back to bed, son. And close your eyes.


JIu STAR


USPHS 518-880
PublishedEvery Thursday at 135 West Highway 98
TPort St. Joe, Florida 32456

VP/Publisher: Karen Hones
General Manager: Krichelle McGhee
News Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: Kevin Burke
Creative Design Manager: Kathleen Smith

Florida Press National Newspaper
Association 'Association
V < f .^* ^ i


HUNKER DOWM


WITH KES

Kesley Colbert
Contributing Writer


And try not to move. And see if sleep doesn't slip
upon you." Cathy had read that book about not
letting them get used to sleeping with you after
a certain age. Some Freudian type had proposed
it could have a possible lingering effect on the
physical and neurological make-up of the indi-
vidual after they were grown.
They would come around to my side.
"Daddy. I can't sleep." And then they would
crawl up on top of me. I read "The Ted Williams
Story", "Touchdown Pass" and books by Louis
EAmour.
I've literally seen a young Josh trembling
with excitement at the mere prospects of open-
ing a Christmas gift. Jess would study the situ-
ation carefully, usually without a word and I've
wondered a million times what possibly could be
running through his little mind
Its strange. We've seen both hit homeruns
and score touchdowns. Win spelling bees and.
garner science fair awards. Tote home first place
trophies and be named .to all-star teams.. Make
honor rolls and win scholarships. But none of
those things cross my mind as I sit quietly and
peacefully and restfully and undisturbed in front
of the "all to my own" t. v. with flipper in hand.
I think of two boys hiding behind the couch,
lurking! As soon as I opened the door, returning
from another long work day, worn out and hun-
gry.....they spring! One would land on my back,
the other on the top of my.head! If I didn't grab
the little one, he would topple to the floor....
it never crossed his mind that I wouldn't catch


POSTMASTER:
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Post Office Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
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him -
Before supper, we'd float down the Cascacde'
River with Uncle Leon and Grover Cleveland
Alexander. We climbed a wind swept Pikes Peak.
And wrestled giant alligators. We'd swim the
Chattahoochee River. Rim barefooted across a'
bed of hot coals. See who could hug the tightest.
And be attacked by the tickling man!
AI would call time out and try to play the
quiet game". 'Just five minutes guys. Let's see
who can be the quietest for five minutes" It was
the only game they wouldn't play!
We ate supper in between riots.
Bassett. Lane. Broyhill and Tell Ciry couldn't
make furniture that we couldn't break!
As .they grew older, the games moved out-
side to the back yard. They usually involved
'a ball, of some kind. Listen, we lihad hockey
games and wrestling matches break out between1
innings or at half time! And they never stopped.
';Just one more pitch, Daddy. Run one more pass,
play, Daddy. Just one more at bat. Daddy. Throw"
-me one more, Daddy. Just one more..... Daddy.'
Daddy, Daddy....."
I remember years when I though I might
could "make it" if I could just get five minutes
alone. By myself No questions No inquisitive
looks! No science projects! No "How come you
are the only father in town not letting his' sons
go?"
Hey, listen, I've got that quiet now. And I'F
enjoying it! I can come through, the front door
without being attacked. I don't have to step over
Lincoln Logs, broken glass or Nintendo Play
Stations. I haven't had to glue the leg back on a
chair in years. I've got grass growing in my back
yard.
Our house doesn't tremble with noise,
white-water rafters, wild horses, wanderlust or
excitement. I've got my five minutes of quiet....
and then some. ,
And I like it. I'm making the most of it. If
you ask, "I'm doing just fine."
But....
The Silence Is .Deafening,
Kes


r


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$23,00 YEAR $15.00 SIX MONTHS
OUT OF COUNTY
$33.00 YEAR $20.00 SIX MONTHS
TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements the
publishers, do not hold themselves liable for damage
further than amount received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed
word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely
asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces.
The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


r". '
i ''


KEYBORRD


KLRLbERING

Tim Croft
Star News Editor


Helping Hands Apply

Now that Labor Day is on the horizon my
Friday nights are pretty well booked through
- oh, April or May.
When the calendar turns over a new school
year it's time for football and Friday nights strid-
ing the sidelines of Shark Field or Gator Field.
One gridiron or the other, this year I'll be
there taking in the action, and hopefully given
my rudimentary skills with the camera captur-
ing some of the plays for the next week's paper.
This is pretty serious business in this part
of the world, where sports are a way of life and
football is king at least unless the fish are bit-
ing.
And there is much to look forward to about
this football season.
Excitement surrounds the Port St. ,,Joe
program following a state championship and
the early returns from practice and last week's
exhibition with Vernon are positive.
Wewahitchka may have its fourth coach ih
as many seasons, but the atmosphere in the
weight room last week seemed electric, a new
coach and momentum from last season's playoff
season churning eagerness for. the start of the
new season.
But from this viewpoint, it's more than just
football.
volleyball golf and cross country also crank
up in the fall and behind them, as the calendar
turns, come soccer, boys and girls basketball,
baseball, softball, track and, field and weightlift-
ing.
If any sport was left off, call it athletic over-
load as we attempt to coordinate cameras aniI
schediiling Or rather I coordinate schedules arid
my shutter finger.
But we consider it all important.
As a high school athlete of middling success
in track and field, wrestling, football and base-"
Sball. there is an understanding from here as to
the sacrifice. dedication and discipline required
to play sports. especially so-called minor sports.
in high schools.
In fact. many researchers have decreed that
sports serve as -one of the last bastions of true
discipline for teenagers in today's schools.
And sports were the calling when these teeth
were first cut in this thing called journalism odr
reporting. -..
Much to my father's chagrin, my first full-
time job in newspapers was on the sports desk.
This was. in my mind at the timune, miny ultimate
dream come true, to cover and follow sports,
attend the games, report back on them and get
paid. though hardly a bounty, to boot.
My father believed my aim should be higher.
but I was a sports fanatic out of the womb and
have never fully sated my appetite for 'all things
sports in this world, not the fantasy ones cre-
ated by those with far too much time on their
hands.
In any case. at one point in time the transi-
tion was for reasons that still mystify. though
the passing of my father played a large role
from the sports desk to Tallahassee to cover
government and the state courts, but the heart
has never left athletics.
This is why, though the plate is loaded
down already, those Friday nights still serve as a
respite, a chance, if you will, to return to roots.
What I found last year, though, was that
my ability was constrained by time and dis-
tance. Covering scholastic athletics for two high
schools 24 miles apart. and touch on all girls
and boys varieties. is simply not possible for a
'lone wolf.
Arid for several reasons, that is precisely
what I am at this point, a one-man sports
department, with plenty of other responsibilities
tossed Into the mix.
This is why I once again shout HELP with
full-throat.
The reality is that I need the assistance cif
coaches, boosters, parents, sponsors, anybody'
as interested as I in ensuring that all those whp
compete on. the county's high school playing,
fields get a'shot at the spotlight.
Logistics dictate the impossibility of getting,
to every game, snapping pictures of every sport,
noting each and every athlete.
At the same time, the desire from this coi-
ner is to do just that, cram, as many pictures.
as many kids' names, as many notable achieve-
ments and even in defeat, there is much to be
noted as possible.
I try to make It to as many games as pos-
sible to at least snap a few pictures, but the gamn
action is typically something I must find, help
with. I am asking each principal, each athletic
,director to assist myself and the paper in mak-
ing the sports pages, a community diary every
week.
Readers expect it, students love it. I have a
passion for it.
So, coaches out there, please provide an
assist. ;
My work phone number is 227-7827 and
my .e-mail is timc@starfl.com and up until
Tuesday morning in a given week when we are
putting the final touches on the paper I'll gladly
take game results or any pictures you wish to
provide.
As with any page of this newspaper, I con-
sider it a community forum.
I humbly ask for any available help in ensur-
ing the sports pages remain that way. .


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Please Don't Pass the Fork... South Fork


By: Jamie Lester
As with certain profes-
sions, one has to take continu-
ing education every so often. In
my case, I ended up taking a
class in Dallas, Texas. By the
time I made it to the hotel, I did
not realize where I was in the
Dallas area or where Norma
Leaman, my office manager,
had me staying. When I arrived
I walked in the hotel and went
to the front desk. I looked up
and saw three large photo-
graphs hanging on the wall. I
said to myself, that house looks
familiar. I know I've seen that
house before. At that point, I
realized I was at the South
Fork Hotel which represented
the home place of JR Ewing,
Mrs. Ellie, and the whole Ewing
family from the former televi-
sion show Dallas. The hotel
was very nice and pictures of
the cast were everywhere in the
.restaurant area and around
the small gift shop.
When I called my office,
the drama Queen herself
answered the phone. It was
none other than my cousin
Wendy Roberson. When I told
her where I was and that I could
take a tour of the actual South
Fork Ranch that appeared in
the television show she went
-crazy. She immediately went
into making sure I took the tour
and to take plenty of pictures.
At that time I really had no
intention of going to the ranch,
especially taking an advanced
class entitled Highest & Best
,Use/Market Analysis. However,
since it was only a few minutes
away, my cousin talked me into
going after my exam and I am
glad I did.
I was shocked to see how
small the house as small as it
was. I thought it was very large
type house. I discovered later
the television show used wide
angled lenses to enhance the
structure to make it appear
larger than it actually was. In
addition, South Fork in the
television show represented a
100,000 acre ranch, not the
actual 200 acres it originally
sat on. Currently, it sits on


340 acres as the property has
expanded over the last several
years. This expansion was to
keep future housing develop-
ments from coming closer to
the ranch itself.
Many acres were planted
in corn and with a few live
stock animals around. I was
impressed with the number of
visitors the ranch has on a daily
basis. I thought there would be
a few people at the site and I
would be the only one around.
I was wrong. On the site you
had the main house, or as
they refer to it, "the mansion,"
a large gift shop, museum,
convention center, restaurant,
and western shop. They have
events regularly at the ranch
that range from small marriag-
es to an annual Dallas Cowboy
Cheerleaders sleepover at the
mansion. I think that would
be the night I would like to
stay at the house. I may need
some cheering. Well, back to
the article.
It was interesting to learn
about the ranch and how It
started. The mansion is a 5,900
square foot house that was built
in 1970 by J.R. Duncan. He
built the house for his wife and
three eenage sons. Originally,
it was called Duncan Acres and
it was one of the largest quar-
ter horse ranches in the state.
But in 1978, the Duncans'
lives would forever be changed
when Lorimar Productions
from California landed their
helicopter in their front yard


and a gentleman knocked on
the door. "We want to tape our
upcoming TV show, Dallas,
here," said the gentleman. The
Duncans were upset because
their front yard was a large
pasture for their horses and
the horses were upset because
the helicopter scared them
when they landed. Mr. Duncan
said no and sent them away. A
week later the same helicopter
arrived and this time they came
back with a checkbook and
wrote a very large check from
which changed Mr. Duncan's
mind and he then agreed to the
taping. However, Mr. Duncan
had two conditions. The first
being that taping could only
take place during the sum-
mer months of June, July, and
August so that Mr. Duncan's
sons schooling would not be
disturbed. I can imagine the
summer heat was strong for
them, especially in Texas. The
second stipulation was that
no camera was allowed inside
the house. This lead Lorimar
to build a 40,000 square foot
set in Culver, California where
all of the interior scenes were
shot. In the summer they came
to the Duncan home to film
the exterior shots. Hence forth,
South Fork was created.
The success 'of the show
took off quickly and in 1980
the cliffhanger of "Who Shot
J.R.?" premiered. It seemed
everyone was ivondering who
shot him and it was kept secret
until the time announced to
the world that South Fork was
a real ranch and that a fam-
ily lived at the ranch. It was
announced that year at that
year's Superbowl. Fans around
the world just assumed that
the Duncans were the Ewings.
In order to help J.R. recover
from his bullet wound, the fans
started knocking on the door,
bringing flowers and get well
cards. The heckling eventually
swelled to the point where fans
would start camping out on
the property; they would swim
in the Duncans' pool, take pic-
tures of the family during all
hours of the night and even


2. The City already has
approval and veto authority
over the activities of the DRA
- if the commissioners want to
exercise more influence over
these activities, why don't they
participate in the public meet-
ings of the DRA board? Does
anyone seriously think that the
DRA board would do some-
thing, or propose something,
that the City expressly did not
want? What specifically are the
problems that the 'City would
resolve that it thinks the cur-
rent board won't? Be specific in
your answers, Commissioners.
3. The change ot status of
sharing salary costs (i.e. to elim-
inate the sharing both between
the city and the DRA. but also
between the WaterFronts and
the DRA) almost certainly was
instrumental in preserving the
WateiFronts grant at the very
least, it prevented the potential
of being sanctioned by the DCA
/ state and ensured that this
year's reimbursables were not
borne as a DRA cost (a value of;
$25,000, per the DRA budget).
4. The desire by the DRA
to have it's accounts indepen-
dently audited by professionals
not associated with the City
seems also to be an ,issue.
Does the public actually know
where the TIF funds have gone.
since 2004? Should they? One
thing is for certain under the
current DRA board everyone
will know where every dollar


steal their mail as souvenirs.
The fans were claiming they
were waiting for the Ewings to
come home.
The Duncans got tired of
all this and sold the house and
property to a business man.
The new owner had a suc-
cessful tourist attraction until
1990. He then decided to put
the ranch up- for collateral in
a big business deal. This idea
didn't work and he went bank-
rupt and the house sat vacant
until 1992. It was in this year
the third and present owner,
Mr. Rex Maughan, bought the
house and 40 acres for $2.6
million cash in an auction. He
then expanded the 40 acres to
the 340 acres the ranch has
today. He also spent anoth-
er $500,000 redecorating the
inside of the house,, including
$30,000 alone in wall cover-
ings. He gave each room a ficti-
tious theme, as if the Ewing
family actually lived in the
mansion. You have J.R.'s den,
Bobby's boardroom, Ewing
dining room, Miss Ellie's kitch-
en, Jock's. living room, Miss
Lucy's Yellow Rose of Texas,
Bobby's bedroom, and the lux-
urious J.R. master suite. The
living room, named Jock's liv-
ing room, was the only room
where any filming ever took
place. In April 1998, the 20th
anniversary show, The War of
the Ewings premiered. They
used this room for Bobby's
Den Scene. After the movie
company replaced the exist-
ing furniture in this room, the
company left one thing and
that was a portrait of 'Jim
Davis. This room was dedi-
cated in memory of Jim Davis
who played Jock Ewing from
1978 until his death in, 1981.
There were many scenes
from the show shot at the cur-
rent South Fork ranch that
includes the balcony scenes
and pool scenes etc. It has cur-
rently been announced a new
Dallas movie is in the works.
The current cast that has been
announced is John Travolta
as J.R. Ewing and Jennifer
Lopez as Sue Ellen, J.R.'s wife.


has come from and gone in
2006 and after. Why would the
City want to prevent this posi-
tive (at least for the taxpayers)
development?
5. One proposal by the
City is that the current DRA
board would become an advi-
sory board or committee. What
advisory corninuttee to the City,
or the County, has ever received
even a partial affirmation of its
recommendations, much less
a whole-hearted endorsement?
Over 20 individual business
endorsed a statement of affir-
mation of the current board
(Iwhole-hearted" should be a
fair characterization) will the
City choose to ignore that col-
lective statement by the people
most affected, only to relegate
the business base's concerns to
the advisory board fate in the
ash heap of current events?
6, The more produc-
tu'e. transparent, accountable
and ethical that the DRA and
WaterFronts try to be (as evi-
denced by their progress and
activities in 2006), the less
comfortable the City seems to
be with its direction why else
would they be having problems
with where the money is being
spent? The Commissioners
have always approved the bud-
gets; any major moneys need
to be spent on projects that the
City must ultimately approve;
and the City always has cut the
checks. They have always been
an integral part of the process
of the DRA and WaterFronts.
Clearly, now they intend to
be obstructionist Why?
If, and when, the City dem-
onstrates that it actually has
the best interests of the tax-
payers at heart say, by low-
ering the total millage rates
(which would also decrease the
amount of funds dedicated to
the DRA) then, we would be
more tolerant of a concept of
absorption of the DRA; but not
until then.
Lowering the village rates
now would have the effect of
requiring the City to become
leaner and more efficient and
that would be a good model
for the DRA as well. But until
such a capability is demon-
strated, don't mess with some-
thing that looks like it's start-
ing to, work better than ever
for the taxpayers. As it stands,
it it appears ludicrous for the
Commissioners to suggest that
they can do any better with the
DRA.
What a unique concept...
More money to spend; more
money locally available for citi-
zens to spend at the local busi-
nesses.
Jim Garth


Uncommitted at this time is
Tommy Lee Jones as Jock
Ewing. The staff is in hopes
the new movie will be shot at
the site, but it is not confirmed
at this time.
One of the places I visited
at the ranch was the gift shop
where Jock Ewing's car is dis-
played. It was here that I met
a very nice lady. She offered
to take my picture and even
talked me into buying a cow-
boy hat. That was not hard to
do. Once I put that hat on I got
so many compliments from the
young ladies, I said to myself,
I need all the help I can get, if
I get this type of response from
the ladies I need to buy it, so I
did. Unfortunately that seemed
to only work in Texas.
The nice lady had many
interesting stories to concern-
ing the ranch and portrayed
herself as a genuine individual.
You could tell she liked her
job and her personality was as
wide as the state of Texas. It's
people like her that make you
want to go back.
One of the secrets of film-
ing at the ranch was the dust
flying behind Jock's car in the
early scenes. In order to por-
tray a very long driveway to
the main house, the film crew
put baby powder on top of the
asphalt driveway to create the


-. In re: current DRA/City
,absorption debates, it is clear
that there is missing an essen-
tial element of critical thinking
in the debates.
It is equally clear that it
is about much more than the
,current composition or actions
of the DRA. The, various,
overarching, hidden agendas
behind the resolution for the
City to absorb the DRA are not
being well articulated; these
agendas are being debated in
private (whatever they may be);
and these agendas have no
specific public champions (it
appears that, the entire City
Commission was ready to
effectuate an absorption with-
out public notice, disclosure
or debate).
All that we (citizens, busi-
nesspersons, taxpayers) are
Left with is a bewildering array
of questions not the least of
-Which is, "Why?"
There has been no coher-
'ent or -compelling response
to this straightforward and
simple question from any of
,the participants either for or
'against the absorption. The
-best that can be mustered by
the proponents of the absorp-


tion is, "Because we can!"
I'm sorry; but given the
potential for harm (the unin-
tended long term consequences
of significant radical changes),
this isn't good enough.
We are not "potted plants,"
passively dependent upon the
wisdom and beneficence of our
temporary representatives in
government elected only so
long as they can prove them-
selves as affirming statesmen;
and specifically not careless, or
worse, indifferent destroyers.
We deserve, and demand,
consideration in these delib--
erations. And we expect coher-
-ent answers from our elected
officials who are considering
this absorption to the following
questions:
1. Why exactly Is the cap-
ital moneys of the DRA (over
$350,000 per the publicly
released DRA budget) being
held in an account which earns
no interest? What benefits are
accruing to the City with this
arrangement? Why doesn't the
City want to grant the DRA the
ability to leverage this money
for additional funds (worth
anywhere from $1000 to $1500
per month currently)?


Question

S -Online Should the city of Port St. Joe rescind an ordinance pro-
O.line hibiting the Sunday sale of alcohol
S Opinion -
Pole Results .
Yes, in tough economic times, downtown business
would benefit. 40%

No, there are good reasons the ordinance is on
Visit The Star's webse to the books and it should remain 50%
Visit The Star's website to
weigh in on next week's Don't Know / Don't Care 10%
question: www.starfl.com



To Voice An Opinion


Write To:
P.O. Box 308
Port St Joe, FL 32457
Fax To:

(850) 227-7212
Email To:
tcroft@starfl.com
HI


Comments from our readers in the form ot letters
to the editor or a guet column are solicited and
encouraged. A newspaper's editorial page should
be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are
exchanged. All letters and guest columns must
be signed and should include the address and
phone number of the author. The street address
and phone number are for verification and will
not be published. Letters must be in good taste
and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for
correctness and style.


sense of dust. Mr. Davis had to
drive forward for awhile then
back up and keep doing this
until they had the effect they
needed. One individual made
a statement the car Jock drove
was not the actual car in the
retail shop area. Someone told
him to look underneath and
see for yourself. The gentleman
went underneath the car and
actually touched the bottom
of the car and when he pulled
his hand out from under it, his
hand came out with baby pow-
der on it, proving that it was
the actual car of Jock Ewing.
Thank you, Wendy, for
pushing me in the direction I
needed while in Dallas, because
I am glad I did not pass the
fork. Remember, if you are ever
in the Dallas area, please don't
pass up the fork, but make
sure you go to the fork, South
Fork. As to the cowboy hats,
I tried to purchase as many
hats as possible in the hopes
of building my reputation
with the ladies, unfortunately
after I called my office Norma
Leaman, my book-keeper froze
my credit card account before I
could purchase more hats. The
hat does not seem to have the
same reaction like in Texas,
you know what that means, I
now know where I need to take
all my classes form here on
out, the Lone Star state won't
be alone for long... Texas here I
come. It's only a business trip,
Norma...


Port St. Joe City Commissioners

Residents and taxpayers can contact City
Commissioners in the folio wing fashion.
By city cell phone:


Frank Pate
Mayor


John -Reeves
Group I


Rachel Crews
Group II


Mayor Frank Pate
can be contacted by
phone at 227-1696.













Commissioner '"'
Johni Reeves. ca ibe
contacted by phon
S at 229- 6374: .











Commissioner
Rachel Crews can
be contacted by:n
phone at 229-9291.











Commissioner
James "'Benny"
Roberts can be con-
'tacted by phone at
S' 227-9697._'


Benny zruuerts
.,WOup I


David Horton
Group IV .


Commissioner
David Horton can
be contacted by
,phone.at 229-8978.



Commissioners can also
be-reached by mail c/o
City Hall, 305 Cecil G.
Costin. Sr. Blvd., ,Pot St.
Joe, 32456.


~Pk- ',.


S Letters


to the Editor





ME Em


TheStr, or St Je, L ThrsayAuust24 206 5


Esabihe 13 -SevngGufcony ndsrrunig resfo,68yer


1.






6A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 24, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


County Commissioners Set to


Challenge


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
After a slide presenta-
tion showing increased prop-
erty values on just released
TRIM statements, County
Commission chair Carmen
McLemore called for the public
to file petitions with the prop-
erty assessor's office in order
to be placed on the docket of
the Value Adjustment Board
(VAB) to challenge newly-deliv-
ered property appraisals.
After showing a TRIM doc-
ument on screen, -and pointing
out one of the statements on
the reverse of the document,
McLemore said, "The only rea-
son for the tax increase is
the rising property value. It's
not an increase in the millage
rate."
"If people have a problem
with the property appraiser
and the way he appraised,
the first step is to call him
and discuss it," continued
McLemore. "The next step, if
the first doesn't work, is to go
before the Value Adjustment
Board."
Commissioner Bill
Williams interjected that prop-
er paperwork by each prop-
erty owner must be filed by
September 11 with the clerk in
the property appraiser's office
in order for a property owner
to have his petition heard by
the VAB.
Williams then said he and
commissioners Nathan Peters
and Jerry Barnes were the
three county commissioners
currently on the VAB, along
with two Gulf County school
Board members.
At that point, McLemore
asked Barnes if he [McLemore]
could sit in Barnes's place on
the VAB.
At direction from County
attorney Tim McFarland, the
request was posed as a motion,
and passed unanimously.
"We've done nothing to
cut taxes if property values go
up," said McLemore, who then
asked area appraiser Jamie
Lester to explain Florida stat-
utes and property appraisals
to the meeting.
According to Lester, the


Prop


property appraiser "is his own
man. He has the discretion to
raise or lower property values
at any time."
"What constitutes market
value and assessed value?"
asked Lester. "Does one sale
increase market value? What
constitutes the market, the
number of sales?
"We have no comparable,
especially at the coast. I see
foreclosures coming down the
line, countywide, especially
people on fixed incomes."
Lester continued by saying
that the only recourse property
owners had was to file by the
September 11 deadline.
He then said that, accord-
ing to state statutes, the VAB
can choose to hire a special
magistrate to hear arguments
from both the property owner
and the property appraiser.
The special magistrate
then takes all the information
to the VAB, which then decides
to raise, keep, lower, or make
no decision regarding taxes on
that property.
He added that the third
step for property owners, if
the VAB made no decision,
was to file a civil lawsuit.
Lester added that he is
the special magistrate for
Osceola County and was just
appointed special magistrate
for Bay County, which is hear-
ing an unprecedented number
of appeals.
Commissioner Billy
Traylor said that the com-
mission needed to run an
advertisement in the newspa-
per to alert the public to the
September 1 deadline, and all
the commissioners agreed.
However, Williams said,
people also needed to know
that they would bear the bur-
den of proof, and that any-
one who filed must show how
they reached the lower tax
figures. "They must show the
tax appraiser's formula flaw,"
he said.
McFarland pointed out
that there would be "a lot
of folks at a disadvantage
because they don't know how
to do this. They must prove
why [Gulf County property


erty App
appraiser] Kesley Colbert is
wrong," McFarland continued,
explaining that to be effective
a property owner must hire
his own appraiser to appear
in front of the VAB personally,
or bring an official explana-
tion from a property appraiser
stating the same.
The motion to place an
advertisement in the newspa-
per encouraging Gulf County
residents to file for an appear-
ance before the VAB passed
5-0.
In other business:
Commissioners voted 4-
1 to hire Port St. Joe accoun-
tant Keith Jones as the coun-
ty's new auditor, after hear-
ing recommendations from
Shirley Jenkins, on two larger
accounting firms vying for the
position.
All the commissioners
stated they wanted to give the
job to a Gulf County resident,
if possible, and after hearing
from Jones that he would uti-
lize the services of his former
Tallahassee firm that handles
governmental agencies, they
awarded him the job. Peters
voted no.
Pressed by Williams,
commissioners voted unani-
mously to set a task force to
meet with the heads of sev-
eral agencies receiving county
funds to "get a clearer picture
of what their plans are, where
they are going, and where their
money goes."
Groups specifically cited.
includedthe county's Economic
Development Council, Tourism
Development Council, and
Chamber of Commerce.
Commissioners then
assured Sandra Chafin,
Director of the Chamber, that
their earlier budget cuts were
"not intended to dismember
the Chamber," which in the
proposed budget saw its oper-
ating funds cut from nearly
$60,000 to $10,000.
The city and county pro-
vide matching funds for the
Chamber of about $30,000
each.
Chafin, who was in
the audience, was told that
although the commissioners


wraisals
wanted her to be part of the
task force presentation, they
would "rectify" the deep slash
to the Chamber's operating
funds and not to worry.
The motion to restore
some of the funding to the
Chamber at the September 5
county commission meeting
passed 5-0.
Barnes told the board
that county engineers decided
that a bridge at the Stump
Hole on Cape San Blas was
too expensive, and they were
looking at moving the existing
Cape road toward the bay, but
they needed more money than
allotted.
County administrator Don
Butler recommended that the
county recycle its Stump Hole
project application for addi-
tional government funds, but
in the meantime, the engineers
suggested more and bigger
rocks be added to the already
existing wall.
Traylor announced the
September14 grand opening
of the new Stone Mill Creek
fire department in the north-
west section of the county, and
that work on the Dead Lakes
Park was nearly completed,
with community enthusiasm
for the project running high.
Peters insisted the com-
mission deal with the issue
of increased commercial tip-
ping fees for the county land
fill, and made the motion to
increase only commercial fees
to $60.
The motion was passed
unanirhously, with discussion
by the board over whether
or not to institute residential
tipping fees. That issue was
tabled until more data could
be studied.
Clay Smallwood of the
St. Joe Company handed the
board the deed to a road at
the Honeyville Park area, near
Wewahitchka, in exchange for
the county paving the road and.
allowing -the company to con-
tinue hauling logs out of their
adjoining proper ty through the
road.
The commissioners agreed
unanimously and accepted the
deed.


Affordable Housing Steering
Committee Gives County
Commissioners Recommendations


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
In a workshop Tuesday evening,
the Gulf County Affordable Housing
Steering Committee presented its rec-
ommendations to the Board of County
Commissioners.
Committee spokesperson John
Hendry o tihe St. Joe Company, out-
lined specific steps for 1he commis-
sioners tc take to begin working on the
county's lack 01 affordable housing.
In 'is preliminary work, the com-
minee identiied specific county assets
in the battle for affordable housing,
including.
Base structures o0 a community
development corporation and a com-
munitv land trust,
A single large landowner (St.
Joe Companyi that acknowledges its
responsibility in the issue ol long term
housing affordability:
A group of local developers
committed 10 building aflordabl, in the
county;
County and city commissions
ihat have committed to partner with
ihe private sector in addressing the
problem
A number of issues that this pub-
lic-private partnership must address,
according 10 Hendry's presentation, it
lhe community as a whole wants to
solve the housing issue, include, among
others.
Lxnd use and density,
Ready availability of water, sewer
and roads:
Ad valorem taxes:
Tap fees and impact tees,
Rental accommodations;
Increased power of county
school boards in dealing with the afford-
able housing issue.
Included in the committee's rec-
ommendations to the commissioners
were:
Use of Ithe density incentive
outlined in Florida House Bill 1363,
which facilitates land donations to local
government by the St. Joe Company
throughout the county:
Nomination of the Gulf County
Community Development Council and
the Gulf County Communitry Land Trust
as managers of any donated land;
A, visioning process led by
Loretia Coslin and her strategic plan-
ning committee to ensure that future
development of donated land and land
under density incentives meets com-
munity aspirations.
A density bonus to developers
willing to include affordable lots and
houses in their smaller developments;
A partnership among Gull
County, Port St Joe and Wewahitchka.
to extend water, sewer and roads to


new neighborhoods that can, in return,
provide affordable homes for people in
the county;
Expediting the permit review
process;
S Abating ad valorem taxes on
land and lots under development until
sale to the end user is completed:
Providing breaks on ltap fees and
creating a tiered impact fee system for
lower priced development projects;
Convening a joint workshop of
the county and both municipalities to
study and refine these recommenda-
tions.
Hendry told the commissioners
that the St. Joe Company would bnng
them, within the next 30 to 60 days, the
necessary documentation on a tract of
land it proposed to donate, and called
for a workshop between the company
and the commissioners to draft a devel-
opment agreement and look at the pro-
posal in depth
Pori St. Joe developer Allen Cox
told commissioners that H.R. 1363
addressed surplus state, county and
municipal lands that can be used as
affordable housing lands.
He stated that the bill also allows
* cities and counties to amend their com-
prehensive land use plans, and encour-
aged the commissioners to "take a real
hard look at so much of the state land
that is owned in the county."
Cox also told the board that they
were "allowed by law to have tiered
impact fees," and asked the county to
look at this method instead of passing
one broad impact fee for all develop-
ments.
Gulf County attorney Tim
McFarland told the board that current
impact fees were already set and did
not include a tiered approach for lower
priced homes. It could be changed, he
continued but other steps needed to
precede it.
County commission chairman
Carmen McLemore said, 'We can do
this as a team, but it will take teamwork
on both sides. I'm for it."
Sheriff's Department Maj. Joe
Nugent spoke up, telling commissioners
that they must also address the issue of
homeowner's insurance in addressing
the affordable housing problem.
He cited an example of one,of,his
employees who lives in the Bridgeport
community in Port St. Joe, whose hom-
eowner's insurance has increased to
almost $4,000.
"Three hundred dollars a month
for insurance does not make that afford-
able housing," Nugent told them, refer-.
ring to the designation that Wa.s applied.
to the original development plans bir"ihie
Bridgeport community. '-


ThmkYo Thank


f lv


You


Thank


You


















d.















?=


Nathan


Peters, Jr.


I am Grateful


f I sincerely thank the citizens of Port St. Joe for the confidence

expressed in my unopposed election. Lets now get at the busi-

_ ness of progress for our city and county. My number one prior-

s ity for Gulf County is "Health Care." I will continue pursuing

^ funding and support of a kidney dialysis center in Gulf County.

'Thanks to St. Joe Co. and Sacred Heart Health Systems, Gulf

County will have a new "Hospital" within two years. A special

thanks to the Friends of the Library Building Fund Committee,

Z- and The Citizens for Reduced Taxes. We are one people with a


common cause to' better our living conditions and enrich the ..

spirit of our community. For all the good I do, give God the glory. ?-

t God Bless America. Commissioner: Nathan Peters, Jr.

Political Advertisement paid for and approved by:

Nathan Peters, Jr., County Commissioner, District 4 g


110-A 114Vio 14-VoI 14-ril- IIA 4VI


- '~n;


ME~elBIa__i~~ls--n---~~~if.~~


Estalisod 937 -Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


6A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAust2,06


_3







E.'tnbljshed 193 *_ Sevn Gul cont an urudn ra o 8yasTeSaPotS.Je L TusaAgs 4 06


A Young Woman's Death, A Year Later


. .',--
Ly>,


'.5-
,c.


By David Adlerstein
Florida Freedom
Newspapers
One year after the mysteri-
ous disappearance, death and
apparent homicide of 19-year-
old Pamela Kinney, local and
state officials are upping the
reward for information lead-
ing to catching the culprit of
what they believe to have been
a homicide.
At a press conference
Monday morning in the rotun-
da of the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement headquar-
ters in Tallahassee, Franklin
County Sheriff Mike Mock and
Special Agent Mike Devaney,
the state's chief investigator in
the case, announced a $10,000
reward for information leading
to the arrest and conviction of
the person or persons respon-
sible for Kinney's death. The
reward had been $6,000.
"We feel confident there is
information out there within
the community that can facili-
tate a successful conclusion of
this investigation," said FDLE
Special Agent-in-Charge Tom
McInerney. "We feel confident
that someone in the communi-
ty knows something that we're
just not aware of at this time.
The challenge would be to get
that information. Oftentimes,
that one little piece of informa-
tion, that piece of the puzzle
if you will, is enough to get
the ball rolling. The bottom
line is to help probable cause
to charge somebody with this
crime."
Kinney disappeared from
the Apalachicola neighbor-
hood where she was staying
for the summer sometime after
around 9 p.m. on Sunday,
Aug. 14, 2005. She had been
expected at her great-grand-
mother's house, but never
arrived.
Hunters found her
remains Sept. 5 in a wooded
area off Tiltonr Road near the


have been helpful, but to dif-
fering degrees.
"There are individuals
who possibly may have seen
our victim leave with individu-
als, and may have informa-
tion, very specific information,
as far as what happened to her
after she was killed," he said.
"Until those people come for-
ward, we don't exactly know
what happened but we feel it's
very substantial information.
It's just not rumor.
"Some of these folks have
been contacted in the past, and
we would like to contact them
in the future and sit down
with them for a long, long
conversation," said the detec-
tive. "That's something that we


definitely are pursuing. And
there may be other individuals
out there. That's one thing we
have found going through is
there are folks out there, they
don't realize they have infor-
mation. They may have heard
something, they may have seen
something. They don't think
there's a big deal to it.
"Two months ago, we
heard information that some-
body picked up. They didn't
think it was all that important
and it was relayed to a member
of the sheriff's department in
passing. And actually that was
a very, very important piece of
information," said Devaney.

(See KINNEY on Page 11A)


David Adlerstein/Florida Freedom
Sheriff Mike Mock speaks at a press conference Monday in Tallahassee to announce a $10,000
reward for help in apprehending Pamela Kinney's killer.


entrance to the Box-R Ranch
west of Apalachicola.
Mock declined to use
the term "suspects" in his
remarks, although he con-
firmed that Kinney's father,
Raymond Lockley, had been
investigated, along with sev-
eral others, for a possible con-
nection to the case.
"Yes, he would be a person
of interest," said the sheriff.
"There has been some talk
about suspects. I'm not will-
ing to name a suspect here
today."
Responding to a ques-
tion from a Tallahassee televi-
sion reporter, Mock said his
department was not subject to
any influence from the politi-


cal powers-that-be in the coun-
ty. Kinney's grandfather, Noah
Lockley, is a member of the
county commission.
"I will assure that (poli-
tics) has no bearing, if you
will, in this case. We are com-
mitted, but we have to have
everything in order before we
do anything," Mock said. "And
it has nothing to do with the
political side, I can assure you
and the community of that.
That's not the way we would
operate. We're committed to
solving this case."
Mock offered a plea for
the community's help, and
said there were "still some
persons of interest out there"
who the department wants to


hear from.
"The bottom line is we're
not going to let this go," said
Mock. "We're committed to
bring the light of justice. The
bottom line is we're going to
keep this case alive. It will be
actively worked between the
sheriff's office and FDLE.
"I emphasize again to
the community we need their
help. Somebody out there has
some information that would
be a big help to us in this case.
And we need them to come
forward," he said.
Devaney said investigators
have met with some resistance
from those who may know
about the case. He said the
two sides of Kinney's family


.HAVE YOU SEEN LEXI?..

LAST SEEN IN OVERSTREET *
'a, ON JUNE 29, 2006 AT 7 A.M. 1
'am, IF FOUND PLEASE CONTACT

CRYSTAL

227-5446
OR PRISTINE POOLS

2 229-7665


.' 4320 Cape San Bias Road

Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Local: 850.227.2160
Toll-free: 866.242.7291
Fax: 850.229.8783
Visit
www.CapeSanBlasRealty.com
and take a 360 virtual tour!









Wewahitchka- 159 Harden Circle
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,930sf, approx 1.9 acres
MLS # 200839. $259,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949








Port St. Joe 1314 McClelland Ave.
3 bedroom, I bath, lot size 62x155 approx
MLS # 200973. $195,000. Call Johnny Linton at 850-227-2160









Mexico Beach- 103 16th. Street
3BR/2BA, Plus a 2BR/ I BA Mother-in-Law suite. 2,790sf, lot size 75x 100.
MLS #110687. $450,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850.227.5949









Port St. Joe 608 17th Street
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2,424sf, lot size 95 x 126
MLS #106985. $385,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949

LOTS an
Port St. Joe Residential Lot 125 14th. Street Bay View,
I 112xl20 or .30acres approx. MLS# 200365. $239,000.
Port St. Joe Residential Lot 1310 Monument Ave. Lot size
approx. 120 x 105. MLS# 200355. $259,000.
C-30 Shallow Reed Subdivision we have released 6 Village lots
for $279,000 each.
Port St. Joe Commercial -Village at Marina Cove 171
Village Dr. Lot size 40x 98. MLS #105310. $389,000.
Overstreet- Pine Breeze SD 948 South Long St. Lot size 108
x 300. MLS # I I1065.$75,000
St. Joe Beach Interior 303 Nautilus Dr. Sea Shores SD.
approx. 80x140. MLS #110234.$270,000
Treasure Bay C-30 Bay View 5312 Sand Bar Dr. Lot size 103
x 220. MLS # 105578. $389,000.
..\Treasure Bay C-30 Bay View 5438 Sand Bar Dr. Lot size 103 x


'p.
*.,


1


St. Joe Beach 8113 Coquina Dr.
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,204st, 85x 50 corner lot.
MLS #111806. $365,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949










Cape San Bias SeaCliffs SD 632 SeaCliffs Dr.
4 bedroom, 4.5 bath, 1,944sf, elevator.
MLS #108476. $585,000. Call Johnny Linton at 850-227-2160.


d LAND
220. MLS #107974. $450,000
Cape San Bias Seagrass Sub. 120 Seagrass Circle 128 x
107 lot size. MLS # 108472. $649,000.
Port St. Joe Interior 144 Betty Dr.- irregular lot size. MLS
# 109390 $119,000
Treasure Bay C-30 5454 Sand Bar Drive -Approx .59 accre.
MLS # 106513 $307,000
Wewahitchka Seven Springs Subdivision 121 Little River
Circle. Approx .5 acre. MLS #109706. $75,000.
Cape San Bias Jubilation 122 Rosemary Ct. Approx..20
acre. MLS # 109793 $395,000
Overstreet-Wetappo Creek- 9959 Hwy.386 Creek Frontage
120ft, lot size approx 2.6 acres. MLS #200843. $450,000. /,~


-- -~ ~J'~~" ~e~Savan~Iff ',azz~ ~Jia n~ ~ ~ ~


TheStr, or S. JeFL- Turda, Agut 4, 00 7A


Establish 197 -Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


............ .... ... I i


"







uA I I Str. rh2SI -t ta I - r2a


Circuit judges sprint to finish


By David Angier
Florida Freedom
Newspapers
Both candidates for a
newly formed circuit judge's
position had to kick-start their
campaigns with their own
money.
Elijah Smiley has been
kicking like a Rockette.
With approval for the posi-
tion not coming until June, the
candidates did not have much
time to plan a campaign or
raise money.
Despite Chris Patterson
outgaining Smiley in contribu-
tions, receiving $31,350 from
supporters, Patterson has less
than half of Smiley's money in
his campaign. Patterson boost-
ed his campaign with $25,000
of his own money and has
spent $54,250.75 so far, leav-
ing himself about $3,300 in
his warchest.
Patterson said early on
that he would not take con-
tributions until after July 1,
when the position officially
was created by legislation.
"How do you ask for
money if a position doesn't yet
exist?" Patterson asked.
Since then, however,
"We've been in full sprint mode
since July 15. We had to make
some hard choices on where
to spend the money most
effectively."
The shortened time frame


also made it impossible for
Patterson to resolve or refer
his clients' cases, so he's had
to work his day job while cam-
paigning.
"I've enjoyed that," he said.
"Sometimes, while we're cam-
paigning we forget about what
matters, and that is the prac-
tice of law. It really brings me
back to reality when I come
in to the courthouse from the
campaign trail."
Smiley supplemented
$15,000 in contributions with
$104,000 of his own money
and has needed every penny.
He's spent $111,000, and with
about two weeks left until the
Sept. 5 election, he has about
$8,000 left to work with.
"I've got some small
expenditures left, but most of
the money has been paid in
advance," Smiley said, refer-
ring to television commercials
that will air later, but already
are paid for. "I expect to end
up spending $140,000."
Despite the dash to the
primary, Smiley said he has
been able to do everything he
set out to do.
"I think I've shaken about
10,000 hands," he said. "I've
been to all kind of fish fries.
That's very important, espe-
cially in the smaller commu-
nities where they want to see
you. The problem is, I don't
have enough time to see every-
body."


Christopher Patt
nonpartisan race
Contributions to
$57,513.23
Contributions
report: $6,600
Expenditures to
$54,250.75
Expenditures
report: $8,494.93
Contributions
$499: Robert Mc
retired; Buck Eti
retired; Mary Joe Swift,
Gerald Jowers, retired
Ethredge, retired; I
Hammond, engineer;
Harrison, lawyer; Jo
Dingus, lawyer; Dowc
real estate; Wade Talk
self-employed; Jerry
accountant; John D. Jo
accountant; William
retired; Johnnie
retired; Margaret
retired; Raymond P
retired; Manuel & Tho:
law firm; John C. Ne'
retired; Patrick Hazarc
management; Malinda
homemaker; J.D. H
hotelier; D.M. Hundley
her; J.M. Hundley, h
S.G. Hundley, hotelier
Ann Keltner, hotelier;
Keltner, hotelier; C.G. H
hotelier; F.D. Hundley, h
G. Hundley, hotelier;
Foster, retired; John A
retired; Mary Ann A
retired; Robert Hadley,


Nancy Hadley, retired; Beth
person, Hernandez, educator; Sara
Hildreth, business owner;
date: Bob Isola, business owner;
Stephanie Isola, homemak-
this er; Betsy Noethlick, retired;
Loella Patterson, retired;
date: Ann Waltman, retired; Lucille
Goodwin, retired; and Jean
this Quave, real estate.
Contributions $500:
$100- Laurence B. .Davis Jr., real
oravek, estate broker; Davis Properties
hredge, of Northwest Florida; Wave
retired; Construction Inc.; David Scott
; Wilda Henson, general contractor;
Michael John Daniel, lawyer; Barbara
William Daniel, homemaker; Reinhard
)nathan Hanselka,, engineer; Joanne
,o Inc., Patterson, retired; Marc
ington, Nolen, restaurant owner; Paul
Sowell, Sims, contractor; Linda Sim,
)hnson, retired; Earl Durden, trans-
West, portation; Michael Durden,
Railey, transportation; Karen Durden,
Easter, interior design; St. Andrews
'adgett, Bay Development; Paradise
mpson, Shores of Bay County, devel-
wsome, opment; Durden Leasing Inc.;
d, hotel Durden Enterprises LLC,
Bates, investments; PCB Leasing
undley, Inc.; Joseph Armstrong, self-
y, hote- employed; Rail Management
hotelier; Corp., transportation; James
; Mary Finch, business owner; Wesley
Kenny Burnham, business owner;
tundley, Tomi Warnick, administrative
hotelier; assistant; JDF Construction
Clinton Inc.; Phoenix Racing; Phoenix
Adams, Construction Services; Harry
Adams, B. Sipple III, real estate; ALF
retired; Associates Inc.; James Finch


& Associates; Robert Downing,
retired; Richard Whitsitt, self-
employed; Ralph Rish, engi-
neer; Juliann Talkington,
homemaker; Julie Hilton,
hotel operator; Holiday Golf
and Racquet Club; Hilton
Inc.; Derwin White, vice presi-
dent; Carol Atkinson, vice
president; Frank Atkinson,
self-employed; Three C's
Development LLC; Lela Hilton,
hotel owner; Charles Hilton,
lawyer; Hilton Self Insurance
Fund; The Glass Center, glass
company; Edwin Walborsky,
lawyer; Michael Reiter, retired;
Wade Mercer, lawyer; Cayla
Clark, education specialist;
and Vicky Patterson, construc-
tion.

Elijah Smiley, nonparti-
san race
Contributions to date:
$119,898
Contributions this
report: $22,040
Expenditures to date:
$111,716.27
Expenditures this
report: $28,453.15
Contributions $100-
$499: Quentin Broxton, law-
yer; E.F. San Juan, mound-
ing; Robert Cain, retired;
Duren & Associates, realtor;
Phillips Griffitts, hotel owner;
Carroll McNeil, engineer;
Mary Bruce, retired; Clarence
Monette, educator; Joel Ridge,
air conditioner contractor;


Avalon Real Estate; Lillile Lee,
retired; Evette Griffin, educa-
tor; NJJJ Marketing, restau-
rant; Paula and Boyd Pickett,
business owners; Dexter,
Stallworth, dentist; Curtis
Porter, real estate; Jimmie,
Hamilton; Columbus and
Bertha Smith; Valerie Mincey,.
executive director; Mary'
Hines; Lorenso Burroughs,
real estate; Cecille Scoon,
lawyer; Clint Mayo, manager;
Ted McKenzie; Jimmie Keys,'
retired; Dr. Burton Shuler;
Myrtle Rhodes, retired; Joyce
Ondrovich, retired; Barbara
Clemons, homemaker; The-
Clemons Company, financial,
services; George Duren, busi-
ness owner; Willie Pollard,'
insurance; Nathan Peter, busi-
nessman; Daniel Bontrager,'
medical; Alice Frye, retired;
Williams Cooper; George Core,
retired; Ronnie Adams, real
estate; Roger Gamad, doctor;
Tom Jackson, retired; and,
Tim McFarland.
Contributions $500:.
Whitehead Plumbing; Arthritis
& Sports Center; Signature.,
Properties, real estate; Pelican
Properties LLC, real estate;,,
Pelican Real Estate Inc.; South
Walton Properties Inc.; William,
Smith, real estate; Waylon
Graham Sr., retired; William,
Cramer Jr., self-employed;..
Marine Transportation; and'
Marwan Obid, doctor.


Awards and Events Surrounding Film on Apalachicola River


' ~


I


Sa k4



196 wy98Wet or S JeFL3257 (80)22- 6 1


The Apalachicola River: an
American Treasure film docu-
mentary received an honorable
mention at the Louis Wolfson
II Film & Video Awards in
Miami on July 28th.
At the ceremony in Miami
receiving the award, Elam
Stoltzfus and Clyde Butcher
The Apalachicola River: an
American Treasure film was
featured at the Wine County
Film Festival on August 13th
in Sonoma, CA as part of the


Chipola Regional Arts
Association are making
arrangements for the exhib-
it with 'help from the Artist
Guild of Nor thwest Florida.
For information, call Joan
Stadsklv\. Chipola Director of
Fine and Performing Arts, at
850-718-2301, or visit Apalac
hicolaAmericanTreasure.com.
Clyde Butcher, renowned
Florida Everglades photogra-
pher, traveled to Apalachicola
to train his gifted eye on the


scored the film, weaving in
sounds of Native and African-
American music, and using
natural instruments he fash--.
ioned from the Apalachicola ,
River including swamp reeds 4
forflutes and cypress logs for
percussion.
Inspired by the mighty .
Apalachicola, the exhibit,
records the history of Native
Americans and other settlers
whose descendants still live'
in northwest Florida. It is'








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..- .-~-.-
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weekly lineup of featured edu-
cational films.
The traveling museum
exhibit of the "Apalachicola
River: an American Treasure"
will open at the Chipola
College in Marianna, FL. on
September 141h, 6' to 9:00
CST. Please pass the word
along and invite your friends
to attend. This showing is
made possible by the Chipola
Area Board of REALTORS, The
Marianna Automobile Dealers
Association, and the Jackson
County Tourist Development
Council. Members of the


watershed; his still images
join those of photojournalist
Richard Bickel ofApalachicola.
Images from the two photogra-
phers also comprise a two-vol-
ume book set.
Headlining the exhibit is
the film. by documentary film
maker Elam Stoltzfus. For
ten years, Stoltzfus has cap-
tured rare images of natural
Florida, with his Living Waters
documentary recently winning
a coveted Crystal Reel award
for excellence.
Sammy Tedder, a Florida
Panhandle music legend,


"Student Essay Contest" Win $250.00!!!!


Winner will receive
$250.00 cash prize.
Free registration for
the essay contest will be on
Thursday September 21 at the
Carrabelle Christian Center on
River Road at 6:30 pm. To bet-
ter understand the meaning of
the theme, students entering
the contest will see the award
winningfilm: "TheApalachicola
River, an American Treasure."
This hour long documentary
truly explains what the term
"heritage" embraces. The
magnificent imagery of the
local waterways and the sto-
ries of people who have lived
and thrived here illustrates
why we should preserve this
special way of life for future
generations. Meet the producer
Elam Stoltzfus of Blountstown,
Florida and Sammy Tedder
who created the enchanting
i -_.-._-:-': - '- : j, 7,.T,;,; Lna -. _


music.
The public is also wel-
come to watch this beautiful
film.about the area that we are
so lucky to call "home". There
is no admission fee.
Information regarding this
project will also be distributed
via English and history teach-
ers at both Apalachicola and
Carrabelle High Schools. You
must be attending high school
in order to enter. Winner
will be announced at 12:00 at
the Crooked River Lighthouse
Family Fun Day on October
14th from 10-2 pm.
New information concern-
ing broadcast distribution,
schedules and future exhibit
dates will be released in the
near future.
www.ApalachicolaAmerica
nTreasure.com


the story of people who make
their living from the river; it"
is the story of politics and
water' wars between Georgia,;
Alabama, and Florida. It
showcases the haunting beau-:
ty of rarely seen places like
the River Styx, Dead Lakes,,'
Kennedy Creek, Chipola River ,
and Tate's Hell.
The traveling exhibit is:
managed by the Mary Brogan,
Museum of Art and Science '
in Tallahassee where it is cur-
rently on display. The exhibit
will travel from the Brogan to
Chipola and throughout the ,
American South.
FYI:
The Education Channel's
2006 Independents' Film'
Festival is pleased to announce.
that the entry of, "Apalachicola'

River: An American Treasure,"
is the recipient of a 2006'
Florida Choice Award! The:
Florida Choice Award is'
given to Florida filmmakers:
who demonstrate exceptional',
merit. The entries were viewed
by a panel of industry profes-'
sionals, and judged according:
to high standards for technical
quality, creativity and artistry.
An awards ceremony and
theatrical screening is sched-
uled for September 15, 2006,
7:00 p.m., at the beautiful,
historic Tampa Theatre in
downtown Tampa.
www.independentsfilm-
fest.com
TV for the Movie Minded


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 yearrs--


8Al The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAu st2,06


%I


~6.


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Builders Association Take on Apalachicola Impact Fees


By David Adlerstein
Florida Freedom
Newspapers
Assisted by the Florida
Home Builders Association,
the Forgotten Coast Builders
Association has challenged
Apalachicola's system of
impact fees in court.
At an executive session
held last week, members of
the Apalachicola city commis-
sion hashed out their defense
strategy against the suit, which
alleges that the city failed to do
the necessary number-crunch-
ing to arrive at the system of
fees.
Edie Ousley, a spokesman
for the state builders group,
said that the group does not
opposed impact fees on prin-
cipal, but feels that the city
enacted the fees "on a whim,"
without doing the quantifying
that is required by law.
The city is represented by
City Attorney Pat Floyd, while
the builders are represented
by William Hyde, of the law
firm of Fowler White.
In addition to the two
builders groups, the plaintiffs
include Rob Peterson, a local
builder.
The past president of
the Forgotten Coast Builders
Association, Bruce Sansom,
addressed city commissioners
at their meeting last month.
Floyd told him the city was
in the process of reaching a
settlement on the matter, but
did not elaborate.


"Members in Apalachicola
had brought concern about
why these impact fees had
been brought into effect and
where they were going," said
Dayle Flint, executive officer of
the Forgotten Coast Builders
Association. "It's like being
double taxed. That's how the
builders feel about this. We
don't mind paying for a certain
amount of growth and devel-
opment. But there has to be
come studies that justify the
numbers that people pick.
"In the case ofApalachicola
they could not provide us with
any kind of study," she said.
"They also could not provide
us with any type of plan for the
impact fees."
Mayor Sandy Howze said
that the city has collected more
than $116,000 in impact fees
since they were first enacted.
Floyd said the fees came
about based on a recom-
mendation from the Florida
Department of Community
Affairs.
"Based on the DCA's
recommendation, and our
research and investigation, we
began the process of getting an
ordinance together for impact
fees," said Floyd.
The attorney said the city
turned to work with the build-
ers' group but was unable to
work out an agreement prior
to the fees being enacted last
year.
"We did everything we
could to be fair to them," said
Howze. "(Without the fees, how


SDavid Adlerstein/The Times
Mayor Sandy Howze, left, and City Attorney Pat Floyd, discuss
business at a recent Apalachicola City Commission meeting.


would we have money to do
the things people are asking
for?"
Floyd said the affected
homeowners are the ones he is
most concerned about. "People
who actually pay these fees are
the people who own the prop-
erty," said Floyd. "What we're
doing now is looking at what
can be done to resolve the case
as quickly as possible."
The attorney noted that all


the money has been separated
from the rest of the operating
revenue, and that none of it
has been spent to date.
"This money is being
raised to address problems
and the problems continue to
exist," said Floyd.
"There isn't a builder in
this town that would operate
the way the city has," said the
mayor.
The local builders" asso-


citation recently voted in anew
president, Matthew Hubbard,
from Matthew Hubbard
Construction, out ofCarrabelle.
The group recently lost its pre-
vious vice-president, Charles
House, who passed away in
February.
"This is a groundbreaking
case for us," said Flint. "This
is going to let people know
that the organization is here
for builders.


Documents Show History of


By Dale Kingon
Florida Freedom Newspaper
Officials from the Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection have argued for
months that hunting has been
banned on Little St. George
Island since 1990. Documents
have now surfaced showing
that hunting on the island was
allowed as recently as 2001.
Hunters wishing to utilize
Little St. George Island, also
known as Cape St. George,
have taken on the DEP trying
to get the rules banning hunt-
ing on the island rescinded.
County Attorney Michael
Shuler has written at least
three letters to DEP trying to
get a written waiver of the
restriction for hunting on the
island. For months the agency
did not respond.
Finally, a letter written to
DEP Secretary Colleen Castille
from Marion Hammer, an
ex-National Rifle Association
president, produced results
prompting the agency to call
for a public workshop on the
matter.
In 1993 a letter addressed
to then-Apalachicola National
Estuarine Research Reserve
Manager Woody Miley from the
Bureau of Land Management
Services director David
Stevenson informed him that
the five-year management
plan he had submitted was
approved.
In January 2001, Miley
wrote a letter to Billy Sermons,
from the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Commission, inform-
ing him of ANERR's decision
to amend the management


plan to be consistent with legal
dove hunting.
The statement at the time
only authorized firearms and
hunting for predator or exotic
species control by the Reserve
Manager.
The 2001 amended state-
ment read, "Firearms and
hunting, except as authorized
for predator or exotic spe-
cies is prohibited except that
dove hunting is permitted as
authorize and enforced by the
FWC."
Sermons replied to the
letter in Feb. 2001. "It is my
understanding that the island
has historically been open to
the public for dove hunting,
in accordance with the FWC
code since its purchase by the
State of Florida and estab-
lishment as a Coastal Aquatic
Management Area."
Sermons also pointed out
that since the current language
in the plan was never sup-
ported by Florida statutes or
by FWC or DEP all hunting
opportunities should be avail-
able pursuant bag limits and
seasons.
'"Any intent to enforceably
restrict hunting or the posses-
sion; of firearms will require
rule promulgation via addition-
al administrative or legislative
processes," said Sermons.
Sermons also said that
he encourages Miley to seek
additional public comment
and input before taking action
to prohibit or restrict any form
of hunting.
"Regulatory action should
be reserved as a last resort
and taken only after other
measures have failed to resolve


problems. I
ing hunting
should be
tive than ti
address spe
the island,"
Sermon
ter by tellir
would only
involved if i
for the con
ing and it i,
opportunities
cantly enhar
ment.
The lett
clearly poin
DEP change
ing on the
should be a
.nity for inpi
Bobby l
actively figh
hunt doves


Bobby Mill
George Island.


"The builders are not
opposed to impact fees," she
said. "We do realize there's an
impact on the growth- that's
here but there needs to be a
set plan and a set study done
to justify the prices.
"It's not that we don't want
them, but what are we paying
for? Where is it going?" she
asked.


Hunting on Island
f regulations affect- he was never informed of a
are necessary, they rule change between 2001 and
no more restric- 2006.
hose necessary to "We were never given a
ecific problems on chance for public comment,"
said Sermons. said Miller, the man respon-
is finished his let- sible for contacting Hammer
ig Miley that FWC earlier this month.
become actively The department will hold
t became essential a public workshop in five to
tinuation of hunt- six weeks, "in order to make a
s clear that public balanced decision on hunting
es can be signifi- on the island," said Anthony
need by its involve- De Luise a DEP spokesman.
In response to questions
:er written in 2001 about DEP potentially relin-
its out that should quishing control of the island
its rules for hunt- to another agency that does
island, the public allow hunting, a spokesman
slowed an opportu- for the agency, Anthony De
ut. Luise said, "DEP will evaluate
/iller, who has been all of its options before mak-
ting for the right to ing a decision," he said.
on the island, said


er has been a proponent of hunting on Little St.


-HE


L ,L1


Celebration Announcements
Our policy regarding celebration announcements in the editorial society' section of our
papers is as follows:
Birthdays: 8yrs-old or younger and milestone birthdays (i.e.. 16. 18. 21, 80. 90, 100yrs
old) will be published at no cost in the society section. with no border. We will publish
one accompanying photo as space permits.
Engagements & Weddings: All engagements and weddings will be published at no
cost and without a border in the society section of our papers. We will publish one
accompanying photo as space permits.
Anniversaries: We will publish milestone anniversaries (i.e., 25, 40, 50) at no cost.
without a border, in the society section of our papers. We will publish one accompanying
photo as space permits.
All other celebration announcements must be in the "paid advertisement" section of
our papers. They will be charged by the size of the ad at the per column inch rate
stated on the current rate card.


To have your Wedding, Anniversary or

Birthday photo print in color

there will be a $10.00 Fee.

Deadline is Monday at 5:00pm for

Thursday paper.



To have your photo returned to you

please proved an self addressed

stamped envelope as pictured above.


Email: starnews@starl.com Mail to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St Joe, FL 32457 Or drop by the offie: at 135 W. Hwy 98 next to the Piggly Wiggly


p ,. i6~~~i~


~ ~.


I I -I


The tarPor St.Joe FL Thrsda, Agust24,2006- 9


Estabishe 793 Srving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


I


tlllf- 'N A lict- L
I
L_rctt _12AL


Ad,..MvzR











SAFE HOUSE

Don't panic! Simple steps can

ensure home is healthy place


By BILL REED
Freedom News Service
Feeling safe and comfort-
able in your home?
Well, don't! You're living in
a toxic wasteland, a poisonous
stew of chemicals and air pol-
lution.
OK, OK, let's start over
without the drama.
True, people are becom-
ing increasingly concerned with
the health and safety of their
homes, from the air quality to
the water. And some profiteers
have turned this trend into
scare messages, complete with
close-ups of dust mites lurking
in your pillow and killer mold
poised to attack your family.
But there are less hyper-
bolic resources available on
the subject. Two recent books
on creating a healthy home
are "Home Enlightenment" by
Annie B. Bond and "Creating a
Safe & Healthy Home" by Linda
Mason Hunter.
Although these authors
aren't looking to sell you partic-
ular products, they are on the
hypersensitive side. Bond, for
example, was hospitalized for
gas poisoning in her workplace
and is acutely aware of any
chemical exposure. She can
scare you silly with 400-plus
pages detailing the problems
with everything from tooth-
paste to tomatoes.
"Sometimes we're obsess-
ing, and sometimes maybe
we need more information,"
said Ron Schiller, indoor air
quality coordinator for the
Environmental Protection
Agency regional office in
Denver.
"Some people are just like
the hypochondriac they're
always worrying about their
health. Then again, some peo-
ple are chemically sensitive and
they react to many things."
Schiller is receiving more
and more calls from panicked
homeowners who read about
mold on the Internet or sud-


denly begin suffering from a
bizarre collection of symptoms
they blame on toxins.
"There's a buck to be
made, so if they can get people
in a panic, there's a benefit.
They have a financial stake in
making people afraid," Schiller
said. "If you believe everything
you read on the Internet, man,
you'd be scared to death."
The key is to become more
aware without getting pan-
icked, and to take simple and
practical steps to clean up your
home without shelling out hun-
dreds of dollars on needless
products.
Schiller highlighted the
first five steps he'd take in his
own home to make it health-
ier:
1. Test for radon gas (and
make sure you install carbon
monoxide detectors)
2. Reduce use of harsh
cleansers
3. Reduce use of pesticides
in the home and yard
4. Air out any new or
remodeled areas, being wary of
new drapes, furniture, panel-
ing and carpeting. "That 'new
house' smell is actually not
a good thing to be smelling,"
Schiller said. And look for
the Carpet and Rug Institute's
"green label" on any new car-
peting.
5. Be cautious when using
swamp coolers and wholehouse
humidifiers. "They can breed
bacteria and kick it through
the house," Schiller said, and
the pesticide used to kill bac-
teria can also be harmful. He
disabled the humidifier in his
home, and suggests homeown-
ers use portable humidifiers
that can be cleaned or replaced
periodically.
It doesn't hurt to be more
aware of what's floating around
your house. Just don't worry
about the toxic stuff so much
that you increase your stress
level that wouldn't be good
for you.


We've pared down the warnings
of author Annie B. Bond in "Home
Enlightenment" to 17 common offend-
ers, and placed an asterisk by the
items that the EPA's Ron Schiller also
singled out. And, because we don't
want to leave you in the lurch, we've
included some of the experts' solu-
tions to the problems.
1 Cleaning products
* "One of the biggest sources of
indoor air pollution is cleaning prod-
ucts," Bond writes. Opened bottles
can leach toxic chemicals into the air,
and most of us know the dizziness and
nausea that come with using cleaning
chemicals without ventilation (a risk
exacerbated by houses sealed up for
winter). The effect is especially danger-
ous when the chemicals are stored in


.


ovI


t


Sho%, that special grandparent
ho\\ much they are appreciated by
honoring them in the Thursday.
S7th f t 7 f h g S


~;~26~~-

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.t.pe nL- erl i. eu L i n U i I e 1 m1 ar or LL "l 1 ''
Apalachicola Times. Mail or drop / '. / ..
off the attached order form. photo ,
and check. It's that easy! -


S Deadline: Thursday, August 31st @ 11:00 a.m. :
Pubish date: Thursday. September 7th



'' ,
,. Grandparent's Namet si
4
Sl Message Na..: S

:- -' Saluation '

' : Amount Enclosed

Name of Person Placina Ad

Daytime Telephone Number
Circle One

2 column x 5 inch ad color $50

I or

1';^ I 3 column x 5 inch ad color $75



S THE STAR THE TIMEs lcarrael
," P.O. Box 308 129 Commerce St.

:*., Port St Joe, FL 32457 Apalachicola, FL 32329 '1

, 850-227-7212 850-653-8868



Pdd fl r4- -f
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Photo illustration by JODY CONDITT / Freedom News Servipe


TOXIC HOT SPOTS


the kitchen near food, she says.
Solution: Investigate "green" clean-
ing products such as the Seventh
Generation brand, or switch to cleaning
products such as baking soda and vin-
egar. If you can eat it, it's not toxic.
2 Water
* Municipal water is OK, but it's treated
with chlorine, which isn't the friendliest
substance around, she says.
Solution: Use a water filter for your
drinking water. Reverse-osmosis filters
are great (especially for well water),
but a replaceable carbon filter will do
the trick.
3 Markers/pens
* Felt-tipped markers and pens are
icky. The solvent-based gel pens
release chemical fumes that can make
kids goofy.
Solution: Trash the old ones and buy
water-based markers and pens.
4 Desk
a Particleboard, pressed wood, fiber
board it's that stuff at Target that
looks nice but i' r naae irom iin,, bit:
of wood smashed and glued together.
It's used in desks, bookshelves, coun-
tertops and cabinets. The trouble is,
there's a bunch of formaldehyde in the
glue that seeps into your house over
time, especially when the fake wood-
heats up in the sun or next to a vent.
Formaldehyde is a carcinogen, and,
worse, it's a horrible reminder of high
school biology.
Solution: Buy wood or metal instead of
particleboard. (Check out estate sales
and used stores for good prices on real
wood.)
5 Plastic furnishings, accessories
* You.know that "new" smell when
you open up a plastic gadget? Yeah,
well, that's the smell of chemicals flying
up your nose.
Solution: The "offgas" from plastics
isn't a huge deal, but you should venti-
late the room really well when you lug
in a new computer. At least until that
"new" smell is gone.

6 Wallpaper
* Wallpaper, popular in bedrooms
but used all over the house, is often
vinyl or plastic. Even natural fibers are
usually attached with glue containing
fungicides or mildewcides.
Solution: Tear it down.
7 Linens and mattress
* "Most mattresses are chemical


wastebaskets full of potentially health-
damaging material," Bond writes.
Pesticides, herbicides, fire retardants
and stain-resistant solvents are all
sleeping with you at night. The only
thing worse than that are polyester
sheets with a no-wrinkle coating all
aboard for Chemical City.
Solution: You can start with a cotton,
barrier cloth encasement to lock in
that nasty stuff in the mattress. Next
time around, look for an organic wool
mattress, she says. Buy some organic
wool, or cotton sheets while you're at
it. The "organic" is nice, because then
you know they didn't spray your cotton
fields or your sheep with pesticides.
8 Pillows
* Dust mites thrive in humidity. Also
dangerous are foam and other synthetic
pillows that waft gas into your face all
night.
Solution: Wrap your pillow with a cot-
ton (not polyester) barrier cloth, or buy
wool or cotton pillows. Buckwheat hull
pjllo,,i jre getting popular (look for
organic, U.S. grown), and down pillows
and comforters are heaven for those
who aren't allergic.
9 Dishwasher detergent
* Back to the chlorine. It kills nasty
germs in your drinking water, it kills the
black stuff in your bathtub and it kills
weeds. See a pattern here? Chlorine is
often found in dishwashing detergent.
Besides covering your eating surfaces
with chlorine, it also wafts into the air
whenever you open the dishwasher
after a load.
Solution. Look for dishwashing deter-
gents without chlorine.
10 Gas stove
* Good cooks swear by them, but gas
stoves emit nitrogen oxide and pollute
the indoor environment. Some studies
indicate that gas stoves worsen respira-
tory symptoms and asthma.
Solution: Upgrade to a gas stove with
an automatic pilot or, better yet, go
electric.
11 Garbage disposal
* Presenting the garbage disposal,
an all-natural source of ickiness. Mold
and bacteria fester in rotting food that's
trapped inside.
Solution: Run the garbage disposal
every day and deodorize weekly with
two cups of distilled vinegar.
12 Carpet
* In her cheery way, Bond writes that


t'~E. ~ ~ & 'J~~L ~~C~Jt&, :: ~C:.tiX~.; .7 -


carpets can be a "sinkhole of allergens
and toxins." Carpets are made using
dozens of chemicals. Carpeting can v
hold mold and mildew, fine particulates
and pet dander. The glues often have,.
antimicrobial and fungicidal pesticides.
There are no federal regulations on tlhe
chemicals that can be used in manu-
facturing carpet, and the fumes are
most intense the first few months after
installation.
Solution: Great news on this one, as'
the Carpet and Rug Institute recently
unveiled a testing program to obtain.
its "green label." If a carpet sample ,
has acceptable levels of various VOGs
(volatile organic compounds), it gets'
the CRI green label.
"They realize people are starting to get
concerned," Schiller said. "I think they
have the right idea with this program."
For existing carpets, get a vacuum with
a HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air)
filter, and investigate sealing agents'
from AFM Safecoat & Safechoice. If"'
you :ajn afr rd i[. gel vwood floOrs and
nalurail iwoOil :arpeting lhat is lacked .
dOi'r i jnlied :o1 glued.
13 Pesticide applications
* Spraying pesticides in your house i
garage, basement or yard could come
back to haunt you.
"Just remember you're going to be .'
breathing that later on," Schiller said
"Even in the lawn, people walk through
and track it in."
Solution: The best fix is to stop spray-
ing chemicals to kill mice, ants or ,
moths. Look for nontoxic bug-killing,
solutions if pests are a problem. Also,
if you've sprayed pesticides for several
years consider testing your house for
chlordahe. Now outlawed, chlordane'
was once commonly used and, accord-
ing to Bond, you don't want this stuff
near you. Get professional removal it'
residual chlordane is in your home. '[

14 Radon gas
* Not all problems Ore manmade.-:
Radon is a natural, odorless, radioac-
tive gas from the soil, and is the sec-,
ond-leading cause of lung cancer. '
Solution: Test your homes' radon lev-'
els. Call the nonprofit National Safety
Council (1-800-557-2366) to buy a
test kit.
15 Wall paint
* As we all know, lead paint is bad.
But even new paint can contain high .
levels of VOCs that spew chemicals into
the air.
Solution: If your house was built before
1978, check the walls for leadbased
paint before you rot your family's
brains. (Lead-testing kits are available
at most hardware stores.) If you've
gotten the lead out, then look for new
paints with low VOCs. Glidden even
makes a zero-VOC paint.
16 Furniture
* We've already covered the formalde-
hyde emitted from lots of new furniture.
You also should be wary of the offgas,
from synthetic upholstery, fire-retardant
chemicals, and stain protectors.
Solution: This idea could actually save
you money look for used or antique
furniture .that shed that "new" smell
long ago instead of buying new. And
just say no to stain-repellent sprays
(and the costly extended warranties that
come with them) on new furniture. Do
some research to find furniture com-
panies that use natural fiber upholstery
and avoid chemical sprays.
17 Furniture polish
* "We all know the smell that we
identify as commercial furniture clean-
ers or polishes lemon with a touch
of engine oil," writes Bond. If you didn't
guess, she doesn't like the petroleum
products in furniture polish, particularly
if you're going to spread it on a table
where you eat.
Solution: Make your own furniture
polish. Bond offers this recipe (among
others): three tablespoons of lemon
juice with a few drops of food-grade
linseed oil or jojoba oil. Soak your cloth
in the mixture and go to work.

*..


Residents of Gulf County,
Did you know for minor illness or injury...


You can see a doctor

without an appointment!


Walk-in patients

are welcome!

Evening and weekend hours are now available at
St. Joseph Care of Florida located at the
Gulf County Health Department
2475 Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe

New hours are:
Monday-Friday, 7:30 .am. 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Pediatrician also available for appointments.

Discount rates available based on income.
We look forward to serving you and your family.
For more information, call (850) 227-1276, ext. 100

This advertisement brought to you as a public service of
St. Joseph Care of FL, Inc/Gulf County Health Department 23725
-' =-" ; . -''*-"~, :.._ -_ .-_ .: ;'-. _,"'**. '-_. w.' ':'L ': ;? '* ,"--


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


IOA1 The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAust2,06


*m4"Om5b lp







Ecsroiisnea IY/ iervrrny uivr cuuniny ui, u surJii i u l, ....... ~ .--.


A view of the area
found last September.



Kinney

Law enforcement .of
said they believed Kin
death occurred at the S
Beach complex, a gated
munity on the eastern e
St. George Island, in a
that was being worked o
lowing damage from Hur
Dennis.
"Once we were al
'gain entry we found wh
believe was a scene and
to some folks who had
working there," said De
:"There were some very
cious things that were R
'things that should have
in this home that were
at the scene (on Tilton
We connected Pamela t
,particular location.
"When Hurricane I
went through there was
.df tidal damage in that
area, and there was a
different contractors d(
'lot of work. Most of the
places were closed, for
,siderable length of time,
to do cleanup and do rep
said Devaney.
Mock estimated tha
eight, ten" contractors w
on the unit in question, i
ing a member of Kinney'
ifly.
Devaney said that a
of the investigation,
done four search warra
vehicles and done two s
es on residences. We ha
vehicles impounded a
time. We've talked to a


near w


David Adlerstein/Florida Freedom
'here Pamela Kinney's body was


SF. Pw 7A

officials folks and re-interviewed and
nney's re-interviewed."
Sunset Despite the many inter-
com- views, Devaney said that he
end of remains frustrated at the level
a unit of cooperation from certain
on fol- individuals, although he did
ricane not specify names.
"I think what's been rather
ble to frustrating from the onset is
tat we that there has been informa-
talked tion out there that individuals
been do possess pertinent informa-
;vaney. tion, and for whatever reason
suspi- they have not come forward,"
found, he said. "We're hoping this
been ($10,000 reward) may be a
found little bit of a catalyst to let'
Road). them go ahead and basically
o that do what's right. It's been a
frustration from the beginning
Dennis and up to the information
a lot we've received just recently.
whole We're hoping that they'll come
lot of on in and dothe right thing."
going a Devaney said that some
rental of the people to whom law
a con- enforcement officials have spo-
trying ken have retained lawyers.
pairs," "If there's been continual
law enforcement contact with
it "six, somebody, people get wor-
rorked ried," he said. "We talk to the
nclud- lawyer, at least try to. If their
s fam- client is not a suspect, but
their client may know informa-
.s part tion, it's basically urging the
"we've attorney that their client is not
nts on a suspect, and if they're not a
earch- suspect, why don't they come
ave no forward? I think a lot of folks
t this that have been interviewed
lot of


I--

?


I,





'
.it


David Adlerstein/Florida Freedom
Pamela Kinney's mom, Lacha Kinney, talks last fall about the
frustration of waiting for her daughter's remains to be identified.


think they are a suspect, when
indeed they're not."
The detective said investi-
gators continue to baffled as .to
who was the last to see Kinney
on the night she disappeared.
"It is unclear who the last
person was to see here, and I
find that disturbing that that's
unclear. This is one of those
times I wish folks would come
forward," he said.
Devaney also suggested
law enforcement officials may
be willing to pay a lesser sum
for tips on the case, but did
not go into detail.
"I think every law enforce-
ment agency has something
set where monies can be pro-
vided to folks for informa-
tion," he said. "I think every
law enforcement agency has
that in place. So if somebody
wants to come forward, we'll
talk to them. Whether or not
they will receive monies from
that, we have no idea."
Both Mock and Devaney
said the sheriff's office
responded rightly in treating
the case as a missing per-
son when it first became clear
Kinney was missing.
"There was a lot of search-
ing done, even though we


treated it like a missing per-
son and that's what we wanted
it to be," said the sheriff. "The
ultimate goal was we find her
alive, That would have been
the best outcome to this case,
but it didn't happen. We done
many searches in that neigh-
borhood between the time she
went missing and the time she
was found. And the searches
were done more as hunting a
body than it was a person. We
done both.
Devaney said he was hand-
ed a case that already had a
lot of investigating done on it.
"This had been aggressively
worked," he said. "I've been
involved in situations where
somebody is reported missing
and sometimes there's not a
whole lot done until all of a
sudden it appears to be suspi-
cious.
"I know the sheriff's
office, with partial help from
the (Apalachicola) police
department, this was aggres-
sively worked, because a girl
just vanished," Devaney said.
"There was no indication she
was going to go visit with
somebody. She had belongings
that were left behind. So it was
suspicious from the get-go."


David Adlerstein/Florida Freedom
Mourners console each other at the memorial service for Pamela
Kinney held last fall at St. Patrick's Catholic Church.




Golf Cart


Sales/Services









0% Interest









St. Joe Rent-All
706 1.st. Street
Port St. Joe
227-2112


RED HILLS

2006 Southern Living and Progressive Farmer

IDEA HOUSE & FARMSTEAD


Ever imagined living on your own farm? Now you can, just
eight miles from downtown Tallahassee in a place where life
is not governed by a clock, but by the sun, the moon and the


Ds lu Cityea-h
WhIteFence Farms
rmp


changes in seasons.Visit the extraordinary Idea House & Farmstead and see
what it's like to live at WhiteFence Farms a Florida address for all seasons.

The Idea House & Farmstead is located at 3400 Williams Road,Tallahassee, FL 32311.


Open House June 10 October 1 I 11 am to 5 pm Wed. Sat. and 1 to 5 pm on Sun.
Admission is $5, children under 12 are admitted at no charge.
For more information call 1.888.253.3223 or visit JOE.com I Keyword: Idea House
For WhiteFence Farms Real Estate Information Call 866JOE.LAND.
.JL
"-"
Tallahassee Memorial A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Tallahassee Memorial Auxiliary.
Auxiliary

IF YOU DON'T KNOW JOE, YOU DON'T KNOW FLORIDA. STJOE'

1 @ 2006TThe St. Joe Company.'JOE,""St.Joe'"WhiteFence Farms" and the 'Taking Fight" designs are service marks ofThreSL Joe Company.rThe information
I shown, attached or contained herein is believed accurate but is not warranted or guaranteed, is subject to errors, omissions and changes without notice
and should be independently verified.The availability and pricing of St. Joe property (through any of its affiliates or subsidiaries) is also subject to change JOE
S without notice. Access to this property is prohibited without the express consent of St Joe or its agent Void where prohibited by law. Equal Housing Opportunity.
"Southern Living"is a registered trademark of Southern Living, Inc."Progressive Farmer" is a registered trademark of Progressive Farmer, Inc.Tour dates and hours
are subject to change without notice.


I 4 J*. '


L


4v


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 24, 2006 IIA


r III ':?7 e 4Z-inmriI rntinfv rind ,trrroundina areas for 618 years


b






12A The Sitar, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 24, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


A mother rendered unable T IFT
to communicate by I FT
Lou Gehrig's disease IAI \ T
inspires her son to invent OFU W U RDS
a life-changing device


YES


ALPHABET CARK


NEC"r.WORD UP DOMYN








~A&V


'Ft,,


"" r :.


IT'S OK TO POINT: A user who can't speak can point to pictures to express their needs and
thoughts. The book includes symbols for such things as bath, shave, scratch and move. Users can indi-
cate food desires or even favorite outfits.


EUGENE GARCIA / Freedom News
WITH MOM IN MIND: Roger Kerns demonstrates his laser pointer-based communication de
those who have lost the ability to speak. The device attaches to eyeglasses, a hat, a finger or
allowing a user to point at words and pictures in a graphical phrase book.


By BLYTHE BERNHARD
Freedom News Service

As the ant crawled up


Marlene Miller's leg, there
was nothing she could do
but moan.
Miller couldn't move,


August 24-27, 2006

r Central Panhandle Fair

In Bay County
Panama City's ONLY RV show!
Thur-Sat 9am-5pm Admission $4
Sun Noon-5pm Kids Under 16 FREE


HUNDREDS of
RVs on display

Locatned at223
Panama Cit


Thurs Seniors Day

$1 Off
Admission Thur Only


(I '""""7 Military/Firemen/Law Enforcement DAY-
www.frvta.org Friday August 25th $1 OFF Admission-with I.D.


imprisoned in a boc
was shutting down
result of amyotroph
eral sclerosis. The d
commonly known a
Gehrig's disease, als
,stolen her voice, b-
her mind.
"It took 35 m
before we found wh
wrong with her," sa
son, Roger Kerns, 5
stepfather fell to the g
crying because she t
go through that."
That ant gave
Kerns his mission: b
people their voices ba
Soon after the
Point, Calif., mainte
supervisor came up
an idea as he wa
his nephew play w
laser toy. Kerns' inv
MarVision (name
Marlene and Roger's
involves a laser,
er and a book filled
words and pictures.
People who have 1
ability to speak th
stroke, disease or
c- an wear the b
powered laser clipp
their finger, a hat o
glasses. With the sl:


c movement, they can focus
the red beam on words in
a book propped on a music
stand.
"I'm cold." "I'm happy."
"I'm angry." "I love you."
Service There are symbols
vice for for bath, shave, scratch,
an arm
move. Choices for break-
fast, lunch and dinner, even
ly that favorite outfits.
Las a It's a simple concept,
lic lat- and it costs just $225. But
disease, to people who can't talk, it
s Lou can restore their connec-
so had tion to the world.
ut not "If you can't commu-
nicate what your needs
minutes are, it's frightening," Kerns
at was said.
id her Kerns' stepfather, Russ
1. "My Miller, who is retired after
ground a career in electronics,
had to helped design the laser,
which can be adjusted for
Roger size and clarity. An aunt
to give put together the clip art
ack. and words for the 21-page
Dana book. It has an index at the
enhance front and commands for
p with flipping the pages.,
watched Soon Marlene Miller, a
ith a former executive vice presi-


mention
ed for
vision)
point-
d with

ost the
rough
injury
attery-
)ed to
>r eye-
ightest


When you open a free checking account we'll give you a free

gift. It's our way of saying "thanks" for your business. And... there's

more. You'll enjoy free online banking with bill payment, convenient

ATMs, and 24-hour automated phone banking. Call us to open

your I#REE checking account today!




PROSPERITY BANK


B uuSo Our Cosini0ty

Port St. Joe 528 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. 850-227-3370


Free gift offer is available for personal checking accounts only 5/2/06 7/31/06. Only one gift per household. Substitutes or rain checks on free gift will be
offered as needed. The free gift will be given at account opening.The following account opening deposits are required: $5,000 or greater, a highway
travel kit or a Prosperity Bank umbrella; $1,000.00 $4,999.99,,a 12-pack insulated cooler; $300.00 $999.99, a 100% cotton baseball cap. r=
This special offer is not available for IRAs, public funds, brokerages, or financial institutions. Member DIC -E


dent at Security Pacific
Bank, was talking to her
grandchildren about mov-
ies and school. She could
play checkers and tic-tac-
toe. When she died, in
1999, she could tell every-
one what she wanted to
leave them.
"It's a feeling like you're
still in the world," Kerns
said. "Even for her last days
it made everything more
enjoyable."
For the eight months
after his mother's death,
Kerns didn't have the heart
to turn MarVision into a
business.
Then, he says, his moth-
er came to him in a dream
and said, "Get off your duff
and get this finished."
The promise Kerns
made to his mother came
with startup costs of
$20,000, including lawyers'
fees, warranties and insur-
ance no easy feat for
the maintenance supervi-
sor. New to entrepreneur-
ship, Kerns was frustrated
by the slow process. For


JOB NOTICE

The Gulf Counly Board of County Commission-
ers is accepting applications for one full-time Me-,
chanic I at our Public Works Department. Starting-
salary is $14.06 per hour. This is a bargaining
unit (Union) position with full benefits. Applica-
tions and a complete job description are available
in our Human Resources Office (1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe), or at www.gulfcoun-
tygovernment.com

Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m., E.T.
on September 1, 2006 at the Gulf County Human
Resources Office. For more information, please
contact'Human Resources Director Denise Manuel
at (850) 229-5335.

Gulf County enforces a Diug-Free Workplace Poli-
cy and is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action
Employer.
/s/ Carmen McLemore, Chairman
Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk

Publlsh: Autlout 24,20 eandA st! 31,2008 A d:M #20-098




Our deferred annuity

plan will interest you.

R sf you're interested in earning high interest on your
savings, tax deferred and withl- ro-load,
then we have the plan for you with f
Auto-Owners Life Insurance Company. <
Contributions to the plan can
be made when it's convenient
for you. Stop in our agency -
and see us today!

qluto-Owners Isuratnce -
Life Home Car Business



Coastal Insurance Agency

312 REID AVE PORT ST JOE, FL
850-227-1900


r


AiNiLGR1


-t


~BB~essnlMmr~


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


12A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAu st2,06


:


four years, he waited to see
if MarVision's patent was
approved. His three daugh-
ters cried last year when
the official certificate finally
came in the mail.
So far, he's sold eight of
the devices through word
of mouth, helped along
by the Orange County,
Calif., chapter of the ALS
Association. One grateful
customer wrote in a letter
to Kerns: "Now that my
Dad is using your product
and can communicate lie
is getting more visitors. We
are getting to see his great
sense of humor again and
his spirits seem to be lift-
ing."
Kerns builds the porta-
ble devices in his condo. He
hopes to one day customize
the books by adding pages
and including different lan-
guages. So far, he does it all
with no employees and no
advertising.
"Ideally, I would love
to travel the country in a
motor home and show it
to people," Kerns said. "I
wish I was a millionaire so I
could give one to everybody
1who needed one."
1 ', Kerns hopes to link up
with an investor or manu-
facturer. as long as he can
keep the price low. Three
or four licensing agreement
companies contacted Kerns
after he got the paterit, but
his lawyer advised him t'o
wait.
"Everybody wants, tb
make it real expensive;"
Kerns said. "The whole
point is to get it to people
at cost."
There.are other hands-
free communication devid-
es on the market for ped-
ple with low mobility and
speech impairment but
computers that track eye
movements :can cost uP
to $10,000, and unlike
MarVision. 'you can't take
them to doctor's appoint-
mnents or carry them arounji
the house.
The neurology depart-
ment at Loma Lindca
Medical Center borrowedt
a MarVision device to dem-
onstrate to its patients with
ALS, Parkinson's disease
and strokes.
"The nice thing about
it is its so simple to use
compared to other speak-
ing devices," said Jule
Lacanlale, the neurol-
ogy department's support
group coordinator. "To be
able to communicate tob
their loved ones that they
love them, they appreci-
ate them, that they want a
drink of water or want to
move from one room to
another ... it almost makes
It kind of normal again."
For Kerns, the biggest
gift of all was helping his
mother say her last words.
"She told us exactly
what she wanted to tell us,"
he said. "She spelled out to
me, 'Keep this going.' "

FOR MORE INFO
For more information
on MarVision, call 949-
488-3084 or visit www.
marvision.com ',







+rdIisbhpir 1Q'I7 *u .'pvn Gulf county and r n aa fo 6


Wewa Search and Rescue Tournament


Cox Lands Big Fish and
Wewa Search and Rescue
Benefits
Wewahitchka Search
& Rescue held the
Second Annual Gaskin
Park Flathead Catfish
Tournament Friday and
Saturday, August 18 and
19. Seventy one fishermen,
in 43 boats, took part in
the angling.
Trophies were present-
ed as well as prize money
totaling $2,650.00 and the
winners were:
Ist Place J a m e s
Cox, Altha, 36.88 pounds,
$1,000.00;
2nd PlaceM i c h a e 1
Ross, Bristol. 33.85
pounds, $500.00;
3rd PlaceD a v i d
McDaniel, Wewahitchka,
31.41 pounds, $400.00;
49 Place C a r 1 to n
Champion, Hosford, 30.24
pounds, $300.00;
5th Place S t e r 1 i n g
Philips, Blountstown, 28.90


pounds, $200.00.
Most boat total pound-
age: Ken and Cynthia
Sumner, Bristol, 113.39
pounds, $250.00.
Twenty-two people
weighed in 69 flathead cat-
fish for a total tournament
weight of 902.52 pounds.
Funds raised at this tour-
nament will be used to
purchase equipment. The
tournament will be held
next year on August 17 and
18, 2007.
Wewahitchka Search
and Rescue would like to
thank all the fishermen and
fisherwomen who partici-
patedaswellas all the search
and rescue members who
manned stations for more
than 24 hours. Thanks also
to The Gulf County Tourist
Development Council who
assisted in the sponsorship
of the tournament and sup-
plied the winners trophies
as well as the ball caps
given to each registered


U ~. ~


James Cox holds the $1,000 first-place fish.X


fisherman.
W e w a
Search and
Rescue and
the Wewa City
Employees
Club will be
holding the 8th
Annual Florida
Catfish Classic
Tournament
Friday and-
Saturday,
October 6 and
7 at Gaskin
Park at the
end of Lake
Grove Road in
Wewahitchka.
Funds
raised by this


From left, James Cox, Michael Ross, David McDaniel, Carlton Champion,
Sterling Philips and Ken and Cynthia Sumner took home the hardware.


Power Wherever You Go
d ditional models of Honda Generators in Stock!


EU2000,
* 2000 Walls (16 7A) of Honda
Inverter 120V AC Power
* Super Quiet 53 to 59 dB(A'i
* Lightweight (less than 47 Ibs.)
*Eco-Throttle" Runs Up to
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* 7000 Wails (45.8/22.9 A) 120/240V
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* Powerful Honda Commercial
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* Standard Electnc Start with Remote
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efuis. w670-8100
131 Highway 98, Eastpoint
" T.lo',T,.U~eTUP)1,,,, = ,,,,m,,,-UGIII,,,,- *I, .wefings.com


ffO I.A


.I. H.:-l~ll]l~l l j~jb-jli .,...1.. Ii~l.P I,,,4.,? 1 .1~ ~i.t I, riOn.a......... I
1..'.1".,..: 1 ..O1 .r,1'-Or..r eS,.I- 7."rr ..- . ...I... 1r.T~~YU O .I. fO.H .


Visit Dr. May in the morrni* e
the "Mini-Implant Syster" ci' r less
than two hours, then go out qnd enjoy
your favorite lunch.


This is a one-stage procedure that involves minimally
invasive surgery, no sutures, nor the typical months
of healing. All for less than one-third the cost
of conventional implants.

Call for your complimentary consultation

850-227-1123


Frank D. May, DMD, PA

319 Williams Avenue
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


tournament are for schol-
arships for area students
for college or vocational
schools.
For more information,
registration or sponsor-
ship forms, call Dorothy
Alderman 850-639-3060,
Angie Minchew 850-639-
3474, or Don Minchew
850-639-2605.
Forms can be picked
up at Wewa City Hall and
various area businesses.
For details on becoming a
member of Wewa Search
and Rescue, please contact
any active member, or call
Don Minchew or Dorothy
Alderman.
The website is www.
floridacatfishclassic.com.


PUBLIC NOTICE


A Public Hearing will be held at the Plan-
ning and Development Review Board Meet-
ing on Thursday, August 31, 2006 at 6:00
RM. central time and at the Wewahitchka
Board of City Commission Meeting Sep-
tember 11, 2006 at 6:45 RM. central
time. Both Public Hearings will be held in
the Wewahitchka City Hall located at 109
South Second Street, Wewahitchka, FL
32465. The Public Hearings will be to dis-
cuss and act on the following, to wit:


Small Scale Land Use Change:
Charles Mayhann, Parcel #02388-
00OOOR, changing Lot No. 9 from
residential low density to mixed
commercial/residential. Subject
to all development regulations re-
quired by the City of Wewahitchka,
FL.


The public is encouraged to attend and be
heard on these matters. Information prior
to the hearings can be viewed at the City
Hall in Wewahitchka.

PROPERTY ID: 02388-0OOR

HWY 71 S

PROPERTY ID:
370 HARDEN CIRCLE
.28 ACRES
EXISTING RESIDENTIAL LD

PURPOSED MIXED COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL





JOHNSON LN








Gwen Exley, City Clerk
Publish August 17 & 24, 2006


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OFFICIAL PRIMARY BALLOT REPUBLICAN PARTY --
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA SEPTEMBER 5, 2006

TO VOTE. COMPLETELY FILL IN
THEOVAL 4p W NEXT TO YOUR

BALLPOINT PEN. (Vote For One)
IF YOU MAKE A MISTAKE,
DON'T HESITATETOASK FORA EgahSndey
NEW BALLOT. IF YOU ERASE .
OR MAKE OTHER MARKS,

UNITED STATES SENATOR SCHOOL BOARDMEBER
(VoteFOne) DITI CF 1
(PRECINCTS 1,3,15 ONLY)
Le RoyColmnsJ. REP C EEricBdl
KallenneHarris REP C= DannyUlle
%. WaTFMride REP
0: PolNont REP SCHOOL BOA IIDEI
DISTRICTS
(Vote For One)
(PRECINCTS 11 & 14 ONLY)
-- ChoeM Pi--
GOVEI R AND LEUTER C Ut JothnWWngt

0 wlanysetn REP
Nt YelDomegoed
C- TIm Gale REP
c Vernon Pamer REP
Not Ye tDesgmled


CHIEF FN L OFFICER
(VW for One)

G U. MtOBaugoes REP
S Randy Johnson REP
C Tom L Ue REP


STATE REPRESETATIVE
(Voe for One)
C,' WiamnEadFisieJr. REP
S fOdmyPaonis REP
Carnern SCinner REP
C- Lee Suliuan REP






OFFICIAL PRIMARY BALLOT DEMOCRATIC PARTY
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA SEPTEMBER 5,2006+
StI am I omI1
TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL
INTHEOVALi NETTO SCOOLBO IIMOBR
YOUR CHOICE. FDSTRICPT
(Voe For One)
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FOR A NEW BALLOT. IF YOU
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NOT COUNT.

GOVEMRORAMLIEUTENiT
GOVEMOR
(VOW for One)
C, Gleon Burke DEM
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Nol Yet DesIg.tned

ATTO4IIEYGENERAL
(Volte rOne)

CD Water'Stop'Camptel DEM01
Ma. OmdeeEhdich 11 DEN



,vw
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(Vone Fc OnLe)








SCSEPTMBER 0JUDE00



U C ,FLORIDA


TO VOTE. COMPLETELY FILL IN
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CHOICE.
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IF YOUMAKE A MISTAKE,
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YOUR VOTE MAY NOT COUNT.


DISRaC FOUEREEN GROUP EUVEN
(Vol For One)

> CtisopiON. Pattson

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DISTRIC1I
(Vole Fr one)
(PRECINCTS 1,3,15 ONLY)
Cu Erc Beld


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CihalEbMPIce
i' Jsn W"i


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7 a.m. ET 7 p.m. ET


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&=mow.


The tar Pot S. Je, L -Thusda, Agus 24 206 -13A1


Established 7 93 7 Servinq Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


I






I I - Th-- Star. PFd2t3ganr I St 2


Gators Start Slow, Finish Strong Versus FAMU


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Wewahitchka began last
Friday's Kickoff Classic as
might be expected for the first
football action of the season.
The Gators ended their
preseason game at Tallahassee
FAMU as if chomping at the
bit to get the 2006 schedule
going.
After a balky start which
was likely the product of
nerves and playing under the
fourth coach in as many years,
the Gators picked up the pace
and controlled the second half
of a game in which they would
ultimately end up on the short
end of a 19-12 score.
"They were a big team, a
fast team and the kids played
hard," said first-year Coach
Todd Lanter. "I told the team
at halftime that if they con-
tinued to play hard (FAMU)
would wear down. And that's
what happened."
The Gators started slow,
falling behind 13-0 in the first
half as FAMU, which features
a 6-foot-3, 235-pound fullback
which Lanter labeled a Division
I prospect, hammered away at
the Gators on the ground.


Bluewave
Builders, Inc.
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Lanter, who coached the
past eight years at Tallahassee
Godby, said this year's team
was the best he'd seen at
FAMU.
"They are a pretty good
team, the best I've seen there,"
Lanter said.
The Gator defense, Lanter
added, was placed further
behind the eight-ball in adapt-
ing on the fly to the schemes
Lanter and his assistants have
put in place since the spring.
"The kids did okay,"
Lanter said. "They have played
under four different systems
in four years. It will take a
little time to figure out what we
are trying to do."
After. falling behind 19-0
after FAMU scored on its sec-
ond possession of the second
half, the Gators found their
rhythm.
Senior quarterback Sean
Bierman capped a scor-
ing drive with a 12-yard run
and minutes later Dee Baker
turned a quick slant pass into
a 60-yard touchdown jaunt.
Wewahitchka stopped
FAMU repeatedly throughout
the second half and took over
after another stop with just


ST. JOSEPH BAY
Date Time Ht. Time Ht.
Aug24 11:28A 1.57 H 08:11P 0.48 L
Aug25 12:11P 1.33 H 07:45P 0.68 L
Aug 26 02:55A 1.04 H 07:10A 0.93 L
01:16P 1.10 H 06:59P 0.84 L
Aug 27 02:05A 1.21 H 09:04A 0.77 L


03:28P 0.92
Aug 28 01:52A 1.40


H 05:13P 0.91
H 10:22A 0.60


Aug 29 02:00A 1.56 H 11:38A 0.47


over 2:30 left in the game.
"They never quit, they
played hard, they were in good
physical condition, which
made a difference," Lanter
said. "(FAMU) was getting tired
and we were able to do some
things."
The Gators drove down
the field, Baker and Bierman
converting a first down from a


fourth-and-11 pass play, and
pushed inside the FAMU 5 in
the final minute of the game.
But on an off-tackle run
to the left, FAMU plugged the
lanes with four defenders
against three blockers and the
ultimate result was a fumble
recovered by the Rattlers.
"We were right there,
ready to score," Lanter said.


The 1971 State


"It wasn't any fault of our guys,
they just had more guys rush-
ing in than we had blockers."
Bierman turned in an
impressive performance, rush-
ing eight times for 46 yards
and hitting 13 of 20 passes for
190 yards without an intercep-
tion.
"Sean threw the ball well
and he ran the ball well,"


Lanter said.
Ryan Ranie, the Gators'
senior fullback, carried seven
times for 35 yards.
Baker had nine receptions
for 139 yards and a touchdown
and Clarence Gray caught two
passes for 19 yards.
The Gators registered
seven sacks on defense. J.J.
Roberts led all Gators with
15 tackles and Gray added 14
tackles.
"These games are not jam-
borees anymore, there is sop
much competition," Lanter
said. "The point of playing
these games is getting every-
body some playing time and
with the exception of a few
kids, we did that.
"The key thing is, every-
thing we are doing wrong We
can correct. That's the good
thing."
The Gators will have a
week off to work on some of
those corrections before the
2006 regular season begins
with South Walton visiting
Gator Field at 7 p.m. CT oh
Sept. 1.



Kingfish


S1Tournament
Championship Football Team Angles iament
HIa no vrun eoen theoe g _u.se???


,L.J.L t JL / vf W, .. V V*"C4, V^W ^ ,K ---u7 /
The Port St. Joe High School football team is looking for members from the 1971 State
Championship Football team. The team will be honored by the present football team on September
8, 2006 at the Chipley football game. We need your help in locating as many of the players as
possible. Please contact Traci Gaddis at 850-819-5128 or 850-648-5474, or you may also e-rnail
at ggaddis@gtcom.net.


;rapy
3oft Tissue Massage
bailey
option necessary


Therapeutic Massage
May Benefit:


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Reduce Blood Pressure, Relieve Arthritis Pain,
Headaches, Joint and Muscle aches. Relieve Carpal
Tunnel and other repetitive Stress Syndromes.
Additionally, massage enhances the body's
Immune Functions.


Please Phone: 850-209-2601 or 850-229-1900
For appointments in Mexico Beach, Beacon Hill,
Port Saint Joe and surrounding areas.
280 Four J's Road, Beacon Hill
S17352 Main Street North, Blountstown


I


No one thinks that a catastrophic injury
'or accidental death will strike them
until it happens.


We have been helping families facing
tragedy since 1973. We have offices
throughout NW Florida.


On the web at Kerrigan.com




Kerrigan,Estess,Rankin,

McLeod & Thompson
ATTORNEYS AT LAW



202 Marina Drive
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456


(850) 229-3333
The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based
solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written
information about our qualifications and experience.


Mexico

Beach

I The 10"- Annual MBARA
Kingfish Tournament, ben-
efiting the efforts of the
Mexico Beach Artificial Reef /
Association, arrives in town-"
this weekend. .
The' festivities kidc off
with "the opening of registra-
tion starting at 5' p.m. CT
on Friday, Aug. 25, at the El
Governor Motel. A Captain's
Party follows at 7 p.m. CT.
Registration fee is $150
per boat. You can pre-register
now at Marquardt's Marina,
Half Hitch and Bluewater
Outriggers in Port St. Joe.
According to tournament
organizers, a field of roughly
150 boats is expected to com-
pete in the tournament, weath-
er permitting.
More than 3,000 MBARA
T-shirts have already been
sold, a record for the event.
A Captain's breakfast and
late registration will take place
from 5-7 a.m. on Saturday,
Aug. 26, at Sharon's Caf6.
Fishing starts at 5 a.m.
CT. "
Weigh-ins will be hel6
from 1-5 p.m. CT on Saturday
at Marquardt's Marina. A fisp
fry will follow at 6 p.m. CT
at Toucan's followed by the
tournament dinner and ball
at 8 p.m.
Prize money will be dis-
tributed as follows: ',
First place King $3,000'
Second place King w-
$2,000
Third place King $1,000
The heaviest Wahoo will
net an angler $1,000 while
the top Spanish mackerel will
bring $500.
In addition to th'e
Budweiser Wagon and Toucan's
dance band,, identical twint
from Bainbridge, Ga., will
be on hand as Miss Kingfish
2006.


it / a nra


Integras The

Announces the addition of Deep S
Therapist- Teresa E

FL. Lic. #MA41804 No Prescr


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I., 11111'c'"':
1 -1, I I. I,-, .
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Established 7 93 7-SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


14A1 The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAu st2,06


I






The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 24, 2006 15A


Sharks Impressive in Kicking Off Season


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
The Vernon Yellow Jackets
could be forgiven for con-
sulting a calendar after last
Friday's Kickoff Classic with
visiting Port St. Joe.
Given the final tally of
40-12 on the scoreboard and
the way the Sharks shredded
their defense on the ground,
the Yellow Jackets could
sensed that this 2006 pre-
season game was a flashback
to Port St. Joe's state title run
of 2005.
The Sharks showed off
a deep and talented stable
of backs and played typically
stiff defense as they finally


had the opportunity to hit
players other than each other
in preparation to the opening
of the regular season.
Port St. Joe begins the
2006 campaign with a home
tilt against Blountstown.
Kickoff is scheduled for 7:30
p.m. this Friday at Shark
Field.
The Sharks certainly
have a start on the momen-
turn aspect after dismantling
Vernon.
"I thought we played pret-
ty hard on both sides of the
ball," said Shark coach John
Palmer. "We had some men-
tal mistakes. We had some
coverage busts and miscom-


munication on some blocking
assignments, but I thought we
played hard and that's what
you want to see."
Though Palmer and his
staff do not keep statistics for
what is essentially an exhibi-
tion game, Port St. Joe picked
up where it left off last season
as far as a ground attack.
Ashley Davis rushed
for nearly 100 yards and a
touchdown. Greg Farmer, a
sophomore, also had nearly
100 yards rushing and scored
twice. Chaz Byrd and Mike
Byrd added 80 to 100 yards
apiece and quarterback Mike
Quinn joined the Byrds in
reaching the end zone on the


ground.
The Sharks had some
missteps on extra points, but
Austin Peltier finished with
four extra-point conversion
kicks.
"We've got room to
improve," Palmer said. "But
our team was in good shape,
our conditioning was good. We
played hard and didn't have
anybody hurt, which is what
you hope for."
The Sharks even threw
in enough passing to keep
Vernon and future oppo-
nents viewing videotape hon-
est. Quinn was 2 for 4 in the
air with an interception and
newcomer wideout Jordan


McNair caught a pass and
turned a reverse into a 40-
yard gain.
The offensive line,
attempting to replace several
key contributors from last
year, consistently provided
the running backs and Quinn
room to operate.
"We blocked well," Palmer
said. "We can block better, but
for the first game I was happy
with the blocking."
The Shark junior varsity
played Vernon's to a 0-0 tie
in the opening quarter before
the team's varsity squads took
over for the final three quar-
ters.
"We got everybody in, we


got everybody in a lot, and
that's a good thing for a game
like this," Palmer said.
Defensively, Vernon
had little opportunity to get
untracked, managing a pair
of second half touchdowns as
the Sharks rotated players in
and out to gain precious play-
ing time and experience.
"I- thought our defense
played really hard," Palmer
said. "We had some problems
with techniques, but they
played very hard."
The Shark junior varsi-
ty begins its season at home
against Blountstown at 7 p.m.
on Thursday night.


Port St. Joe Volleyball'for the Week


The Port St. Joe High
School volleyball team
started its season last week
against the Rutherford Rams
gnd Blountstown Tigers on
Tuesday and Thursday nights
respectively.
Rutherford
The Port St. Joe Lady
Sharks lost their volleyball
match against Rutherford with
final scores for the three games
of 11-25, 15-25, and 10-25.
"In our play against
Rutherford, a 5A school, the
ladies played extremely well,"
commented Head Coach
Wayne Taylor.
With a roster of only nine
varsity players to assign) six


'a


(im
low^r


positions on the court, Coach
Taylor is especially proud of
the girls' ability to compete
with the bigger candidate pools
in both opposing schools.
Kate Shoaf contributed
one service ace, 4 kills, and
13 defensive digs. Heather
Brinkmeir also served an ace
and Kaelyn (Jo) Williams pro-
vided 11 defensive digs.
Blountstown
On Thursday, the Lady
Sharks gathered force during
their four-game match against
Blountstown, with closer
scores of 13-25, 9-25, 25-22,
and 19-25.
After losing the first and
second games to Blountstown


1,


and trailing 0-10 in the third,
Port St. Joe took control and
made an astonishing, upset
comeback to win the third
game. Kaelyn Williams and
Celeste Bryant dished out
a combined total of 18 ser-
vice points during that game.
The Lady Sharks' momen-
tum carried over into the next
game when, for the first time,
they led in scored points.
Continuous time-outs called
by- Blountstown threw Port St.
Joe's rhythm off and caused
them to relinquish and never
regain the lead.
"Blountstown was a tough
loss, however they will prob-
ably go on to win their district
this year," Coach Taylor said.
Williams bolstered the
team's season total record of
eight by providing 5 service
aces Thursday night. Kate
Shoaf and Samone Smiley
combined for 19 kills.
Shoaf and Williams com-
bined for 46 defensive digs in
the .7 games thus far. approxi-
mately half of the team total
of 91.
Hinting at his hopes for the
team's progression through-
out the season. Coach Taylor.
remarked, "They are now at
a point now where I feel they
were at mid-season last year."
The next volleyball game
will be held Thursday. August
24. varsity at 5:00pm and
junior varsity at 6:00pm. at
Liberty County. On Tuesday.
August 29. the Lady Sharks
head to Wewahitchka to face the
Gators starting at 4:30. Come
and support our Sharks!
Port St. Joe's' volley-
ball team won one game at
the tournament in Chipley on
Saturday.


St. Joe to Host 2006 Inshore


Fishing Association Redfish


Tour Championship
IgJOE&com


The St. Joe Company has
announced that RiverCamps
on Crooked Creek, a resi-
dential retreat set in a pri-
vate woodland preserve, will
host the 2006 Championship
for the Inshore Fishing
Association (IFA) Redfish Tour
on November 10-11, 2006.
The event will be presented
by Cabela's, one of the world's
foremost outfitters for hunt-
ing, fishing and outdoor gear.
RiverCamps on Crooked
Creek is a 1,500-acre water-'
front community set on
pristine estuaries and West
Bay, Crooked Creek and
Intracoastal Waterways, locat-
ed in Northwest Florida, just
six miles north of the Gulf of
Mexico in Western Bay County.
RiverCamps was designed
with the outdoors in mind and
with an,,opportunity to live
close to nature, surrounded
by some of the most beauti-
ful waterways in the world.
Nearly 1.000 acres of the total:
,site are planned for conserva-
uon of wetlands and upland
wildlife habitats.
"We are very excited to.;
host the IFA Redfish Tour
at RiverCamps on Crooked
Creek," said Bill Wier, vice
president of RiverCamps.
"This will be a great oppor-
tunity to showcase the won-
derful lifestyle and amenities
RlverCamps has to offer."
To qualify for the
IFA Redfish Tour 2006.
Championship, teams must


fish at least a minimum of
three events in any of the six
divisions. The first place prize
will be a Ranger 169 Ghost
with 90HP 4-stroke Yamaha
outboard, Loadmaster trailer,
Power Pole anchoring sys-
tem, Minn Kota trolling motor
and Humminbird electron-
ics valued at approximately
$30,000.
"We believe that
RiverCamps on Crooked Creek
will be an ideal location for this
year's Tour Championship.
Not only is it centrally locat-
ed for competitors from all
six divisions, but northwest
Florida is known for its excel-
lent fishing." said Barl Schad,
Marketing Representative for
IFA. "Also, since we didn't run
any IFA Redfish Tour events in
the Florida Panhandle Region
this season, one particular
division of anglers won't have
a larger home water advantage
over another division."
Tour sponsors include
Ranger Boats, Yamaha
Outboards. Cabela's, Minn
Kota. Hunmminblrd. Choice
Hotels International. Image
Graphics, : Loadmaster.
KeelShield, Power Pole,' Solar
Bat. Shimano, Power tex
Group. Florida Fishing Weekly.
Audubon Nature Institute and
Careco Multimedia.
For more information
on RiverCamps. please con-
tact a sales associate at the
RiverCamps' Preview Center at
1.866.FL.RIVER or visit


JOE.com
RiverCamps.


Keyword':


About RiverCamps on
Crooked Creek
RiverCamps on Crooked
Creek is situated at the center
of Florida's Northwest in Bay
County, just six miles from
the Gulf of Mexico. No more
than 450 homes are planned
for the 1,500-acre site. Nearly
1,000 acres of the total 'site are
planned for conservation of
wetlands and upland wildlife
habitats.
About St. Joe
The St. Joe Company, a
publicly held company based
*in Jacksonville. is one of
Florida's largest real estate
operating companies. It is
engaged in town, resort, com-
mercial and industrial devel-
opment and land sales. JOE
also has significant interests
intimber.
More information about
JOE can be found online at
JOE.com.,
About IFA
Now the strongest grass
roots inshore tournament
series dedicated to catch and
release in competitive .fishing,
the IFAs focus is centered on
competition, recognition and
education. For more informa-
tion, please contact Bart Schad
with Palmer Conrad Consulting
,bv calling 870-431-8495 of
e-mail info(-pahnerconrad.
com


SPORTS SCHEDULE


WEWAHITCHKA GATORS


2006 Varsity Football Schedule
Date Team
9/01 South Walton
9/08 Cottondale


9/15
9/22
9/29
10/06
10/13
10/20
10/27
11/3


Port St. Joe
Northview
West Gasden
Sneads
Freeport
Liberty County
Blountstown


EmeraIf Coast

k Federal Credit Union


PORT ST. JOE
530 Cecil G. Costin, Sr Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
emeraldcoastfcu.com
EMERALDCOAST@GTCOM.NET
850-227-1156


WEWAHITCHKA

101 East River Road
Wewahitchka, FL 32465
850-639-5024


o SPORTS SCHEDULE j,


PORT ST. JOE SHARKS


Game
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.


Place
(H)
(H)
(H)
(A)
(H)
(H)
(H)
(A)
(A)
(A)


2006 J.V. Football Schedule
Date Team Place
8/18 Vernon (A)
8/24 Blountstown (H)


9/7
'9/14
9/21


Wewahitchka
N.F.C.
Florida High


6. 10/5 Wewa


Time
8:00
7:00
7:00
7:00
7:00
7:00


2006 Varsity Football Schedule


Game
1.


Date
8/18


Team
Vernon


Place Time 11'


8.

9. ,


1i


9/8
9/15
9/22


Chipley
*Freeport
*Wewahitchka


9/29 *Sneads (H)
(Homecoming)
10/6 *Liberty County (A)
10/13 OPEN


10/20

10/27
11/3


2. 8/25 Blountstown (H)
3. 9/1 Marianna (H)


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and
Support Your Teami


Reeves Furniture &
Refinishing
234 Reid Ave. 229-6374
All Wood Furniture, Gifts,
Wicker, Kitchen Cabinets


The Star
Come Visit Us At Our New Location
135 W. Hwy. 98, Port
City Shopping Center
227-1278


*Jay
(Senior Night)
*West Gadsden
Apalachicola


8:00
8:00
8:00
8:00

7:30


(H) 8:00

(A) 8:00
(A) 7:30


* District 1 Games/Class A All times are Eastern.



Bayside Lumber
516 First Street
229-8232
Your Building
Materials Headquarters

Gulf Coast Real Estate Guide
Give Us A Call
To Place Your Ad Today

227-1278 or 653-8868


4 4NA-I PRO- IF- II


Game
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
-9.
10.


Esalshd73 --evtgu t cu~ aasrouu guiu u u ul


-


7


1 0'27 (' iil rniinfv nnd surrounding areas for 6T 8 years


E


- I


IP2









THE FORECAST


RECORD
High: 97 (1986)
Low: 68 (1981)


TODAY





Partly cloudy, chance
of P.M. t-storms
High: 88; Low: 740


TOMORROW

>'


F'jnPl cloudy, chance
of P.M. t-storms
High: 890; Low: 750


SATURDAY


Partly cloudy, chance
of P.M. t-storms
High: 880; Low: 770


SUNDAY
27




Partly cloudy, chance
of P.M. t-storms
High: 880; Low: 730


MONDAY



eA


Partly cloudy, chance
of P.M. t-storms
High: 890; Low: 730


TUESDAY






Partly cloudy, chance
of PM. t-storms
High: 860; Low: 70


WEDNESDAY
3

. ,


Partly cloudy, chance
of P.M. t-storms
High: 860; Low: 690


Today's high and tonight's low temperatures


t erpris-- .. Oothan
91 '

S- ,'L -- Bainbriiqop
.-7 -.. '. -- ' 90/75" --
; Dluniqk Springs ', / ,


k..Niceville _____
0-Cjystal Lake Bristol '


89 75 -! Wewahitchka Wilma\ r .
Panama City----90/ 90/740 . report
\ 91.78 \' 95
Pensacola I
90 76 ,
Port St. Joe' ,
s". 1 '-Ailachicola
89 75


LAST 7 DAYS
Monday 8/21 91/77/0.00
Sunday 8/20 93/74/0.00
Saturday 8/19 92/74/trace
Friday 8/18 90/76/0.00
Thursday 8/17 91/74/0.00
Wednesday 8/16.................90/75/trace
Tuesday 8/15 89/75/0.79

SUN & MOON
Sunrise Sunset.
Thursday 8/24....7:14 a.m.. .8:13 p.m.
Friday 8/25 ......7:15 a.m...8:12 p.m.
Saturday 8/26 .... 7:15 a.m.. .8:10 p.m.,
Sunday 8/27 .... .7:16 a.m.. .8:09 p.m.
Monday 8/28 .....7:16 a.m.. .8:08 p.m.
Tuesday 8/29.... .7:17 a.m.. .8:07 p.m.
Wednesday 8/30..7:17 a.m...8:06 p.m.

Moonrise Moonset
Thursday 8/24.. .7:53 a.m.. .8:50 p.m.
Friday 8/25 ......8:46 a.m.. .9:16 p.m.
Saturday 8/26... .9:38 a.m.. .9:41 p.m.
Sunday 8/27 ..... 10:31 a.m. 10:07 p.m.
Monday 8/28.....11:25 a.m. 10:35 p.m.
Tuesday 8/29.... .12:21 p.m. 11:06 p.m.'
Wednesday 8/30. .1:20 p.m.. .11:43 p.m.


APALACHICOLA RIVER
Site Flood Stg. Stage Chg.
Woodruff Tailwater 66.0 39.34 -0.01
Chattahoochee 39.35 0.0
Blountstown 15.0 0.72 -0.07
Wewahitchka 11.67 -0.04
OCHLOCKONEE RIVER
Thomasville 15.0 2.88 -0.08
Concord 25.06 0.22
Havana 25.0 12.39 0.02
Bloxham 22.0 2.96 -0.37


-11

Extreme


uMber It iti mr.?'I 7P ..I s
:uin-.EI- -tr jn


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Low Voa-jnit High VyTi Extreme


Full. Last


Sept 7 Sept. 14


New


Sepi 22


Friday
Hi Lo
Albany 93 74
Apalachicola 89 75
Bainbridge 92 74
Bristol 90 75
Columbus 91 74
Crystal Lake 90 74
Defuniak Sp. 89 77
Dothan 92 73
Enterprise 97 78
Ft. Walton Bch.88 75
Gainesville 89 73
Jacksonville 90 75
Marianna 90 75
Mobile 91 75
Montgomery 93 74
Newport 83 78
Niceville 85 77
Panama City 91 77
Pascagoula 90 72
Pensacola 90 76
Port St. Joe 89 75
Tallahassee 91 75
Valdosta 91 73
Wewahitchka 90 75
Wilma 90 75.


Thursday
High
Low
Friday
High
Low
Saturday
High
Low
Sunday
High
Low
Monday
High
Low
Tuesday
High
Low
Wed.
High
Low


ST. JOSEPH BAY


A.M.
10:53
8:24
A.M.
11:28
8:12
A.M.
12:10
7:45
A.M.
2:54
7:07
A.M.
2:03
9:02
A.M.
1:50
10:20
A.M.
1:59
11:36


All forecasts, maps and graphics
@2006 Weather Central, Inc.
For a personalized forecast,
go to:
www.premiumweather.com


Saturday
Hi Lo Otlk
92 74 t
90 75 t
91 74 t
90 74 c
90 74 pc
90 72 pc
90 72 pc
92 72 t
98 73 pc
89 75 t
89 73 pc
90 75 pc
91 74 t
92 75 t
93 73 pc
91 71 c
86 72 pc
92 78 pc
92 72 t
90 76 t
88 77 pc
92 75 t
91 74 t
89 74 pc
89 74 c


P.M. ft.

P.M. ft.


P.M. ft.


P.M. ft.
1:15 1.0
6:58 1.0
P.M. ft.
3:30 1.0
5:10 1.0
P.M. ft.


P.M. ft.


Scattered showers and thunderstorms will rumble along the a frontal boundary that will extend from the northern Plains east into
the northern sections of the mid-Atlantic states. Showers and thunderstorms will also be experienced through the southeastern
U.S. as a stationary front extends through the region. Monsoonal moisture will continue to produce showers and thunderstorms
through the central and southern Rockies.


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
BirminghiriT
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati,
Cleveland
Dayton
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit. ,



City
Acapulco,
Amsterdam
Athens
Baghd/)d
Bangkok.
Beijing
Berlin
Brussels
B' Aires
Cairo '
Calgary
Dublin


Today
Hi Lo
90 65
61 48
88 70
82 65
82 53
92 72
89 57
72 57
76 59
87 52
82 70
88 64
79 63
86 65
92 60
90 68
80 66


Today
Hi Lo
88 76
67 56
.94 72
11688,
92 82
90 71
72 54
69 55
73 54
97 73
78 57
64 53.


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otik
87 64 pc
60 47 sh
89 72 pc
85 68 pc
76 54 s
93 74 pc
87 58 s
75 64 pc
80 67 t
80 52 s
89 69 pc
93 65 s
87 68 t,
90 68 pc
84 56 pc
86 67 pc
85 67 pc


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
87 75 t
69 57 sh
90 73 s
11587 s
91 80 t
93 72 t
73 53 sh
71 54 sh
75 55 s
98 74 s
76 56 sh
67 54 sh


City
El Paso
Fairbanks
Honolulu
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Omaha
Orlando



City
Geneva
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Jerusalem
Kabul
Lima
London
Vlnriad
Mexico City
Montreal
Mocow
[lew Dcelr


Hi Lo
95 69
62 45
88 75
87 63
93 71
10582
94 71
78 65
94 74
90 77
78 6,7
82 62
92 68
91 78
78 63
93 69
91 75


Today
Hi Lo Otik
76 56 t
70 54 sh
90 75 t
94 75 s
92 65 s
69 59 pc
.65 53 sh,
88 58 s
75 56 t
66 45 pc
74 55 t.
93 73 t


91'78
Tomorrow
k Hi Lo Otlk
. 95 69 pc
60 44 sh
88 75 pc
88 66 pc
94 71 pc
10382 s
93 75 pc
74 65 s
94 76 pc
89 79 pc
86 68 pc
79 59 t
94.70 s
91 77 pc
83 69 pc'
87 65 pc
90 76 t


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
74 54 sh
69 52 sh
89 76 t
95 73 s
91 63 s
71 62 pc
67 54 sh
89 59 s
76 55 t
65 44 pc
76 56 pc
91 75 t


City
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lk City
San Diego
San Fran.
Seattle
Spokane
Tucson
Wash., D.C.
Wichita



City
Oslo
Paris
Rio
Rome
Seoul -
Singapore
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw


O. rlando
L91/75
Miami

Today
Hi Lo (
81 63 t
104 85 p
80 61 p
72 54 p
77 54 p
91, 54 s
89 66 p
94 62 s
92 71 s
89 60 p
75 66 p
67 54 p
73 53 p
81 54 p
97 74 p
84 68 p
96 73 s


Today
Hi Lo 0
74 55 st
71 54 st
78 68 pl
84 63 pl
84 68 t
88 78 t
69 50 pl
88 76 t
74 54 t
68 55 pc
73 53 t
71 52 sI


Tomorrow
< Hi Lo Otlk
85 68 pc
10485 pc
84 64 pc
70 58 pc
87 58 s
92 55 s
87 68 pc
95 60 s
93 74 s
86 61 s
75 66 pc
66 54 pc
75 54 s
84 54 s
95 73 pc
86 71 pc
98 71 pc


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
72 54 pc
73 55 sh
79 65 s
79 59 pc
85 64 pc
89 77 t
65 51 sh
87 75 t
72 50 pc
81 58 s
74 54 t
75 57 pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; fg=fog; i=ice; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; sf=snow flurries; t=thunderstorms; w=windy


WHAT IS THE NEW RATE?


HOW MANY DOLLARS DOES IT MEAN TO YOU?


HAVE WE MADE PROGRESS?


WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?


We are ready with the answers. Please attend our meeting this month!!!

Port St. Joe-Monday, August 28th at The Gulf County Senior Citizen Center at 7:00 p.m. ET.



Questions asked by and this ad paid for by:

CITIZENS FOR REDUCED TAXES (PAC)

P.O. BOX 1332 Port St. Joe, Florida 32457

www.CitizensForReducedTaxes.org


-~ 'U-I-- -1 -I -1 -- 1Na


WEATHER
Temps for August 24


NORMAL
High: 89
Low: 74


--~--3C -i-~IIC-- _IC IC~FI -_-l -C --1 ~ -- ~C11~ r r


Established 7937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


16A1 The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAu st2,06


OU.:N IT YI IT XES


:L -F






Pet of the Week 4B


Obituaries 4B


Law Enforcement 8B


IL7--


1 O'?7 r-,,ir,, 79.I7 -,-.,,nh, ,nnufI.v and urrouIinn nrpaes fnr t6R venrs


The Star. Port St. Joe, FL Thursday. Auaust 24. 2006 SECTION B


Cape San Bias Beach Renourishment Project Enters Second Phase


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
After the referendum votes were mailed
in and counted in July, the Cape San Blas
beach renourishment project entered its
next major phase.
With two of the three proposed munici-
pal services taxing units (MSTUs) approved
for peninsula properties, the next steps
involve setting millage rates for the two
approved sections, beginning the bond
process, initiating permitting applications,
and securing all necessary easements and
access points.
The proposed MSTUs were for gulf
front property, gulf interior, and bay-
side properties on St. Joseph Peninsula.
Registered property owners on the penin-
sula voted to levy taxes on gulf front and
gulf interior, but not on bayside property,
to help pay for the beach renourishment
project.
The referendum had to pass in order to
establish a funding plan, through MSTUs,
before work could continue.
According to information from the St.
Joseph Peninsula Beach Action Committee
(SJPBAC), the Gulf County taskforce
spearheading the beach renourishment
project, numerous advances have been
implemented since the July 6 vote:
Millage rates have been set at 4.4 for
gulf front, and 1.6 for gulf interior;
The bond process is underway;
The Ashwood Corporation, develop-
ers for the Ovation community adjacent to
Dunes Drive, and the county are working


together to finalize the Dunes Drive public
beach access;
The process of securing the public
beach walkover at the east end of Rish
Park is proceeding. Acquisition of this
beach walkway allows the entire segment
of beach renourishment along Rish Park's
gulf front to be paid for from state funds;
The 2006-07 county budget has been
set to include funds for the proposed pub-
lic beach accesses;
The permitting application process
is well underway, with SJPBAC report-
ing "favorable feedback" from both
Florida Department of Environmental
. Protection and United States Army Corp
of Engineers.
The SPJBAC will probably no longer
hold monthly meetings, but will hold them
as needed.
The next scheduled meeting will be
Friday, September 29, 2006, at 1 p.m. E.T.
at the County Commission Meeting Room.
On Thursday, September 28, the
Florida Department of Transportation
(FDOT) will hold meetings about the
Stump Hole, a pivotal point in the renour-
ishment project.
Gulf County attorney Tim McFarland
is currently reviewing the documents per-
taining to the project's construction ease-
ment.
Each gulf front property owner will
receive a packet of information containing
the construction easement paperwork and
instructions sometime this fall, accord-
ing to Paula Pickett, Director of the Gulf
County Tourism Development Committee


and one of the spokespersons for the
SJPBAC.
Picket said the SJPBAC will provide
frequently asked questions (FAQs) on the
group's website about the construction
easement, based on experience in other
communities that have also undertaken
beach renourishment projects.
The SJPBAC is still soliciting second-
ary public beach access points and related
private property easements from peninsu-
la property owners. According to Pickett, if
the group can obtain two secondary access
points, the costs to the property owners
would be reduced considerably.
Erosion Control Line (ECL) surveys
will be conducted in late fall, approximate-
ly November.
Public hearings will be held on the
ECL probably in January, according to
Pickett.
She said there will be another FAQ
online about the ECL and what it means
to gulf front property owners.
According to Pickett, the ECL will pro-
tect gulf front property owners by estab-:
lishing exactly where property boundaries
lie at the time of the survey.
Currently, the mean high water line is
the demarcation of where each property
owner's land legally ends. After the survey,
the ECL will replace the current mean high
water line. The ECL will determine where
the water is at that time in relation to the
houses. If water is already under a house,
the property owner is allowed seven feet
out from the last piling.
After the beach renourishment, any


beach area between the established ECL
and the water will become public beach,
but all land between the ECL and indi-
vidual houses remains the property of that
owner.
The ECL determination also allows
homeowners to rebuild after a devastat-
ing hurricane if the storm washes away
the house and the sand at the house site,
because the property boundaries are set.
Currently, if a storm destroys a house
and erodes a site, an owner cannot rebuild
the house because the beach is gone. The
ECL will allow the owner to bring in sand
to reestablish the house site.
According to Pickett, the SJPBAC can-
not begin talks with the handful of contrac-
tors who handle this type of project until
all required permits are in hand, maybe by
April of next year, she said.
"Construction may begin by July or
August," said Pickett, "but it will be entirely
contingent on the turtle nesting season. We
will literally work on a day-by-day basis."
She added that it might not be worth
starting, then stopping, construction of
the beach if many turtle nests are located.,
because of the environmental impact prot7
lems that would be encountered.
"It's going to be a wait-and-see situ-
ation," said Pickett. "We may have to get
through another hurricane season next
year before beach renourishment cori-
struction can begin, and just hope we don't
get hit."


The Wreck of the S.S. Florida:


i'~ Zr


, ,! . .,
'; ,' ,. !. ,," '''*


5 t h. .


L
', f"


her Demise


By Herman Jones
Contributing Writer
No one knows where the Great Storm
of 1856 was spawned. Chances are it
sprang to life over the Bahamas around
Aug. 25-26. On the 27th if entered the
Straits of Florida and both Fort Dallas
on Biscayne Bay and Key West reported
strong winds and gales. For the next four
days it would churn its way through the
Gulf before making landfall on Crooked
Island at Tyndall Air Force Base.
In what was to become Gulf County,


it beat the devil out of Cape San Blas and
destroyed the second lighthouse which
now lies about two-thirds of a mile off-
shore. Just -five years before, another
"Great Storm" had knocked down the first
Cape San Blas lighthouse along with the
ones on Cape St. George and Dog Island.
If people who want to "Save the Cape"
would study the old charts and see how
far the Cape once extended into the Gulf,
they would undoubtedly see the challenge
ahead.
To the north. on the peninsula, the


A recent photo showing the firebox of the boiler. The wreck is now completely covered by manatee
and turtle grass.


S.S. Florida would become the second
victim of the storm's fury.
The S.S. Florida departed the Pensacola
Navy Yard on Thursday morning, Aug. 28.
As the steamer crossed the Pensacola Bar
at 10 a.m. and entered the open Gulf, I'm
sure the seasoned Master of the Florida
felt a knot in his stomach.
The long ground swells that crashed
beneath Florida's bow meant only one
thing somewhere in the Gulf there was
a hurricane. Hopefully, the next day they
could reach Apalachicola, their next sched-
uled stop, and find safety in its protected
bay.
Friday morning, as they drew near
Cape San Blas, an ominous warning greet-
ed them. The great shoal of the Cape was
a seething, boiling cauldron of crashing
breakers, it would be impossible to round
the Cape and reach Apalachicola. The cap-
tain decided to put about and try to find a
protected anchorage westward.
There was no one to notice the sleek
side-wheeler as it rounded St. Joseph's
Point and entered the protection of St.
Joseph's Bay. There was an unusually
brisk northeast wind and only the numer-
ous seabirds to notice as the ship dropped
anchor and passengers began wading the
shallows to catch fish. The once famous
city of St. Joseph, located six miles to the
east, was already being smothered by vines
and palmettos. The once-thriving seaport
was now only occasionally visited by fish-
ermen who netted the enormous schools
of mullet and other fish that thrived in the
pristine bay.
The captain had planned to anchor in


the deep hole near the point until it was
safe to round the Cape. It seemed a wise
decision, but fate was to intervene and
in 48 hours, the Florida, the pride of the
New Orleans to Key' West run, would lij
splintered and broken upon the shore of
St. Joseph's Bay.
The Florida had been built in NeTy
York by Samuel Sneeden in 1851 for Capt.
Louis Coxetter of Jacksonville. The ship
was 147 feet long, 28 feet wide and had
44 berths in the staterooms. It had been
financed by the Florida Steam Packet
Company of Charleston, of which John Wi
Caldwell was principal stockholder. The
Florida had been built to provide transpor-
tation for winter visitors from Charleston
to Jacksonville and immediately became
a success. The ship was described by thp
Jacksonville News as "a splendid ney
boat, and a long way in advance, in every
respect, of any steamer that had hitherto
appeared in our waters."
Many of the crew were slaves, as
noted in the following advertisement in the
Florida News of March 19, 1853: "For sale,
a capable engineer of unexceptional char-
acter, a like Negro of 30, on liberal terms.
Information of which may be obtained
from Captain Willey's steamer Florida."
Willey had become Florida's captain in
January 1853. Coxetter became captain of
Florida's newer and larger sister ship, the,
S.S. Carolina.
Few steamships have the dubious dis-|
tinction of setting a city on fire, but this.
apparently happened to the Florida oin

(See 5.S. FLORIDA on Page 12B)


This map reflects the coastline of the area in 1856 when the S. S. Florida sailed upon her final
Voyage.
.. .... ~ .. .. ..-\ -. .


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Caroline Hysmith is Two a


Caroline celebrated her second birthday at the new Honeyville
Park on Saturday, July 15 with a Tea Party theme. All the kids
got to enjoy riding the two ponies Patty Cake and Zippie. There
to help her celebrate were her Mommy and Daddy, Big Sister
Brooke, and all her family and friends.


Country Club Closes
The St. Joseph Bay Country Club golf course and restaurant
will be closed on Monday, Aug. 28.
The club will reopen on Tuesday, Aug. 29 at 10:30 a.m.



To have your Wedding or
Birthday photo print in color
there will be a $10.00 Fee.
Deadline is Monday at 5:00pm
for Thursdays paper


Alcantara and P'resnel to Wed
Cecilla Alcantara and Keith Presnell announce their
approaching marriage on Saturday, September 9 at 2:00 PM at
First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe. All friends and family are
invited to attend.


Stucki Nominated

for Nurse of the Year
Barbara Sue Stucki, a nurse at St. Joseph's Hospital in
Phoenix, Arizona, has been nominated for "Nurse of the Year"
in her field. \
Stucki is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Neidhardt
of 9336 Auger Avenue in Port St. Joe.
Graduating from Gulf Coast Community College in 1979
as a registered nurse, Stucki specialized in neonatal care. She
worked at the University of Alabama, Birmingham about 10
years, and in Provo, Utah before moving to Phoenix.


"Higher Property Taxes are a huge

burden on our working families and

especially Seniors on fixed incomes.

Seniors need their retirement


Gulf County Democratic
Committee Invites
Candidates to Speak
The Gulf County
Democratic Executive
Committee will have a meeting
on 'August 24, 1006 at 6:30
'p.m. E.T.
The location of the meeting
will be the Gulf County Senior
Citizens and Community
Center at 120 Library Drive in
Port St. Joe.
We invite all Democratic
candidates to come, speak and
present your platform. We are
inviting local and state can-
didates. All interested voters
may come and hear the candi-
dates at this time.


Correction
In last week's article on the
Southern Accent Showhouse,
information given to The Star
about the proceeds from the
house tours was in error.
Proceeds from the tours are
being divided between the
Sacred Heart Hospital project
and Habitat For Humanity. The
Star regrets any confusion.


Muina and Ramsey Exchange Vows
On Saturday June 3, 2006 at 6:00pm Adria Lynn Muina
and Richard Lowery Ramsey were united in Holy Matrimony. at
the First United Methodist Church in Port St. Joe, Florida. The
bride is the daughter of Glenda Muina and the late Dr. Antoilio
N. Muina of Wewahitchka, Florida. The groom is the son of Helen
Carlsten and the late Paul Ramsey of Port St. Joe, Florida.
Reverend Michael Ramsey, cousin of the groom, performed
the double ring ceremony. Mrs. Phyllis Altstaetter served as the
wedding coordinator, Mrs. Mary Lou Cumbie was the vocalist,
and the organist was Mrs., Hilda Duren.
The matron of honor was Ingrid Muina Andrews, sister of
the bride. Bridesmaids were Leslie Cabezas, Candice Upchurch,
Stacie Smiley, Kelly Ramsey, and Kerigan Pickett. h ,
The best man was Robert Ramsey, brother of the groom.
Groomsmen were Boyd Pickett, Steve Kerigan, Wayne Andrews,
Clay Sasser, Jed Campbell, John Cannon, Lee Cannon, Warren
Renfro, Jimmy Jamison, Tommy Humphrey, and Keith Jones.
.The ring bearer was Nolan Muina.
Clay Sasser and Andrew Cabezas performed the early light-
ing of the candles. Candles were lit by Ingrid Muina Andrews
and Paula Ramsey Pickett in Honor and Memory of the late Dr.
Antonio N. Muina, father of the bride, and the late Paul Ramsey,
father of the groom. May Lou Cumbie beautifully preformed
"Nobody Loves Me like You Do," "To Me," and the Lord's Prayet."
The bride was escorted down the isle by her nephew Juan
Muina. She wore a beautiful white strapless corset back gown
with a chapel length train. The bodice and skirt were decorated
with Swarovski crystals. She carried a bouquet of solid red
roses.
Immediately following the ceremony the couple joined fam-
ily and friend for a lovely reception held in their honor at the
Centennial building.
Following a seven-day Caribbean cruise, the couple will
reside in Wewahitchka, Florida.


Do you know these kids?
Beverly Mount Douds is currently working on a pictorial
history of Gulf County. She acquired this photo from local his-
torian, Billy Howell, and is soliciting the help of the community
in identifying the teacher and students.
The photo was taken in 1934 at the north end of the Port St.
Joe school building, located where the nursing home is now. ,
If you can identify anyone in the picture, please contact
Douds at (850) 229-1094, or email bmdouds2002@yahoo.
com.


- fsre m.,.


.-,F OR


Vote Jimmy Now!... Early Voting Aug 21 Sept. 2.
Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Jimmy Patronis, Republican for State Representative, District 6.


Call Natalie Shoaf for more information or to view.

850-227-4355
Website www.Natalieshoaf.com
or email Natalie@c21gulfcoastrealty.com
Natalie Shoaf 5eGjUy
850-227-4355 -f a
Nshoaf(gtcom.net GulfCoastRealy Inc.


A A--W-%--AL ''


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


2B heStr, or S. JeFL- Turda, Agut 4,2006


-- 111 ;


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1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years
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The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 24, 2006 3B


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4B Th tr otS.Je L TusaAgs 4 06Etbihe 97 SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


Pt of thQ Wek

S'ir..' Available now for adop-
-, : / tion from the St. Joseph Bay
:' - / .'' Humane Society -
S. Bingo, a year old dachs-
Shund mix, (pictured); Boots -
S..a ten week old kitten, Jasper
a seven months old bulldog
pup; Hound pups six-and-
a-half months old (1st shots);
Molly, a nice white English
bulldog female; Rosco, choc-
late lab male pup about
seven months old, Betsy
..a six-and-a-half month, old
:;... hound mix, always kittens!
Come See.
.. Please visit Faith's Thrift
Hut, 1007 Tenth Street.


0 ,
'-.. ..'. .
'N ~*.*


_. Whether buying or selling, for the LI
S ., service you deserve, call
Linda L. Somero ABR, GRI,
Broker Associate
Phone:
.. (850) 866-1269

r

Sil's Home Center
1023 N. Tyndall Parkway
Panama City, FL 32404
1-800-239-4671

"Pa4f #n&ldle ti omeo.,l diwce 1t957"


Support the "Pet of the
Week" by advertising here. eA"7

Only $15 per week
Call advertising
227-1278
for more information


Guardian ad Litem Program Recruiting Volunteers ]fJi


Each week, child protec-
tive services agencies through-
out the United States recieve
more than 50,000 reports
of suspected child abuse or
neglect. In 2002, 2.6 million
reports concerning the wel-
fare of approximately 4.5 mil-
lion children were made.
In approximately 67% of
these cases, the information
provided in the report was
sufficient to prompt an inves-
tigation. As a result of these
investigations, approximately
900,000 children were found
to have been victims of neglect
or abuse-an average of more
than 2,450 children per day.
An average of nearly 4
children die every day as
a result of child abuse or
neglect.
You can make a difference
by becoming a Guardian ad
Litem Volunteer


. :, --4 .' se, Ch dren?


The Guardian ad Litem
Program (GAL) is a network
of trained volunteers that rep-
resent the best interests of
abused, neglected, or aban-
doned children in the com-
munity. GAEs work for and
become the eyes and ears of
the judge in these cases.
Guardian ad Litem is a
legal term meaning guardian
for the party or gurdians of
the law. The program was
established in Florida in 1980
as a court program to help
abused and neglected chil-
dren who become involved in.
court proceedings.
Children are totally depen-
dent on the adults around
them to make decisions that
affect their entire life. The pri-
mary' goal of the program is
to give the children their own
advocate to look out for their
best interests and to inform


the judge of their needs.
Jane Powell is the case
coordinator of the Marianna
office serving Jackson County.
The state-funded program
currently has only 43 volun-
teers representing 233 chil-
dren in Jackson County. In
the past 5 years, the caseload
in Jackson County alone has
gone from an average of 50
cases to the current caseload
of over 125 cases.
A GAL volunteer can take
one family case at a time or
several cases at a time if they
so desire. Many more volun-
teers are needed to handle the
current caseload. No special
education or skills are need-
ed. Classes are provided to
teach volunteers about their
responsibilities as Guardian
ad Litem.
Training for. the GAL pro-
gramwillbeginsoon. Training


are held in Marianna, Chipley,
and Panama City. Training is
fun and interesting and you
get the opportunity to meet
good people who really care
about children. Volunteers get
information about abuse and
neglect of children, the role of
a Guardian ad Litem, and the
judicial process.
The Marianna office of the
GAL Program is located on the
second floor of the Jackson
County Courthouse, 4445
Lafayette Street in Marianna.
Volunteers are needed
throughout the 14th Judicial
Circuit and the program
has offices in Blountstown,
Chipley. Marianna, and
Panama City. Interested par-
ties may obtain information
about the program by calling
9S50 1 638-6043 in Chipley,
or (850) 747-5180 in Panama
City.


TRICARE briefing
There will be a TRICARE
briefing for all active duty per-
sonnel, retirees and depen-
dents 1 p.m. today at the
Raptor Conference Room in
the Tyndall Clinic. This brief-
ing is open to all TRICARE
and TRICARE For Life benefi-
ciaries who are interested in
their health,care program. A
question and answer session
will follow a formal briefing
on health benefits and affairs.
For more information, call
283-7331.
Military World Softball
Tournament
Tyndall's men's and wom-
en's softball teams continue
to compete with military var-
sity teams at the 2006 Military
World Softball Championship.
Games started Thursday and
continue -through Sunday at
Frank Brown Park, Panama
City ,Beach. For 'more infor-
mation, call the park at (850)
-233-5045.


Commissary 'Dollar Days'
"Dollar Days" will continue
until Wednesday at the Tyndall
Commissary. Hundreds of
items throughout the store
will feature dollar pricing.
Customers should look for the
"Extra Savings" signs through-
out the Commissary to find
the best deals. For more infor-
mation, call 283-4285.
RAO here may close soon
The Retirees Activities
Office may close soon unless
more people volunteer to keep
it running. The RAO provides
a source of information for the
retiree community about pay
and entitlements, vehicle reg-
istration, identification cards
and more.
Office hours are 9 a.m.
to noon Tuesday, Wednesday,
and Thursday. Volunteers can
work: as many or as few hours
per week as they desire, For
more information or to. volun-
teer, call 283-2737, or e-mail
rao(atyndall.af.mil.


*


it


Evelyn D.


Maup'in

Mrs. Evelyn D. Maupin,
70, of St. Joe Beach, passed
away Thursday, August 17,
2006 in Panama City. Mrs.
Maupin was born and raised
in southern Ohio, had been a
visitor to this area for many
years, and was a resident for
the past eight years.
Survivors include her
husband, Richard K. Maupin;
four children, Deana Knowles
and husband Scott, Dennis
Maupin, David Maupin and
wife Faith,, and Dale Maupin
and wife Deborah; six grand-
children; four great-grand-
children; and a sister, JoAnn
Abrams..
A memorial service will be
held at 3:00 p.m. EDT Monday
at the John C. Gainous Post


10069 Veterans of Foreign
Wars, conducted by James
Kennedy.
Those who wish may
make donations to Covenant
Hospice of Panama City.
Services. are under the
direction of the Comforter
Funeral Home.


Forest Alfred.

Revell

Forest Alfred Revell of
Wewahitchka passed away at
his' home on Thursday, August
17, 2006 surrounded by his
family. He was born on July 5,
1922 to Ezra and Nina Revell
of Liberty County. He gradu-
ated from Liberty County High
School in Bristol, Florida
and attended the University
of Florida. Forest moved to
Port St. Joe and worked with


St. Joe Paper Company for
six years. Later he moved
to Wewahitchka and opened
Revell's IGA, which he ran
for 30 years. After retiring
from the grocery business, he
became a Park Ranger for the
Dead Lakes State Park. He
dedicated 18 years of service to
the Gulf County School Board
as a Bus Driver. Other areas of
service include the Gulf Coast
Electric Cooperative Board,
which he served as President
and Secretary; the Alabama
Cooperative board for four
years; the Rotary Club for 40
years; Wewahitchka Medical
Center Board Member; Charter
Member of the Wewahitchka
Fire Department; and a Board
Director of Citizens Federal
Savings and Loan for 44'
years. Forest was a member
of Westside Baptist Church
in Wewahitchka. He was pre-
ceded in death by his par-
ents, Ezra and Nina Revell;
six brothers: Clarence W.
Revell, John Mansel Revell,
Thurman E. Revell, O.Z.
Revell, Alva Lyn Revell, and
Wallace Culver Revell; two sis-


ters: Lillie Belle Worthington
and Mary Lavonna Larkins;
two nieces: Delores Parrish
and Gwendolyn Shuler; and
two nephews: Guy Revell and
Edward Revell. Forest is sur-
vived by his wife of 52 years,
Peggy Revell of Wewahitchka;
one son, Allen Revell of West
Palm Beach; one daughter,
Micah Peak (Dennis) and
three grandchildren, Megan,
Christopher, and Mallory Peak
all of Wewahitchka; one sister,
Mable Revell and one brother,
Melton Revell, both of Bristol,
Florida; and several nieces and
nephews. Services will held at
2:00 pm on Saturday, August
19, 2006 at Westside Baptist
Church' with Pastor Derrick
Gerber and Dr. Floyd Wright
officiating. Interment will fol-
low at Jehu Cemetery. Asked
to serve as active pallbearers
are Charles Mayhann, Benny
Pridgeon, Drexel Revell, Elton
Revell, Hall Summers, Phil
Summers, Jimmy Revell and
John Revell. Honorary pall-
bearers are Covenant Hospice
staff, David Carl Gaskin,.
Jerry Gaskin, Earl Peak,


Greg Johnson, John Hanlon,
Morris Shavers, David Causey,
and Bob Davis. The family
will receive friends at Westside
Baptist Church on Friday eve-
ning, August 18, 2006 from
5:00-7:00 'pm. Viewing will
also be one hour prior to the
service on Saturday. Flowers
will be appreciated or dona-
tions may be given in his mem-
ory to the Westside Baptist,
Church Building Fund @ PO.
Box 1145 Wewahitchka, FL
32465 or Covenant Hospice
of Bay County @ 107 19th St.
Panama City, FL 32905.
All services are under the
direction of the Comforter
Funeral Home, Wewahitchka
Branch Chapel.


Vincent


Zadusewski
Vincent Zadusewski, born
October 31, 1914, passed away
August 16, 2006 in Panama


City, FL. Born and raised in
Philadelphia, PA., he had 2
brothers and is survived by
3 nieces. He was in the army,
then traveled. with the circus
as a young man. He then went
on to become a business man.
He moved to Atlantic City
where he worked on and ser-
viced elevators. Then in 1979
he picked up and moved to
Mexico Beach, FL. where he
found work as a handy man
at Toucan's Restaurant. He
has lived in Mexico Beach for
27 years and loved everyday
there. For about the past 12-.
months he resided at Bay,St.
Joseph Care and Rehab. He
will be deeply missed. He was
a wonderful man who would
do anything for anyone.
Visitors may call Sunday
Aug. 20th from 3-5 p.m. at
Comforter Funeral Home, 601
Long Avenue, Port St. Joe.
Services & Burial on Monday
Aug. 21st at 10:30 a.m.: at
Holly Hill Cemetery.
All services are under .the
direction of the Comforter
Funeral Home.


Kensinger Housing
of Panama City Announces
"2006 Lot Model Closeout"
SALE
*All Homes Windzone 3
*Save up to $10,000 Now
*Drywall Overhead Vents and much more
*Prices will never be lower
*Financing Available with Low Down Payment
*Call Today & Save!!


Kensinger Housing Inc.
3424 E. 15th Street, Panama City, FL
850-785-0693


A9rd's Fflorist
S- .4etals by the Bay
andI.qifts



SOver 100 Combined gyars of

floral Design experiene.


208 Reid Avez.

port St. Joe,.f L 32456

227-1564

229-2737
J,^_^^_^_A ^


247 Tyndall Parkway, Callaway


785-1316
Joe D. Gainer, Justin M. Kent, Local Owners

"Serving Bay and Gulf Counties"


2006 United Way
Campaign to Kickoff
in Gulf County

The Annual Gulf County
United Way Community
Campaign will begin on
Thursday, August 3,1, with
a kickoff event at Bayside
Savings Bank at 202 Marina
Drive, Port St. Joe.
The kickoff activities will
be held from 7:30 to 9 a.mi-
Activities will include an auc-
tion for an Official Florida -
Gator helmet with proceeds -
benefiting United Way of
Northwest Florida agencies in
Gulf County.
The kickoff is being spon-
sored by Bayside Savings Bank
and Duren's Piggly Wiggly and
is open to the community.
For further information,
please contact Kim Stone at
(850) 832-2919.


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


4B he ta, PrtSt.Jo, F -Thursday, August 24, 2006








'hemIfe uaee invweo uwite you to umit the cluviwci of t w=o dc ice this, week

SOUTHERLAND FAMILY COMFORTER COSTIN & COSTIN Rish, Gibson, Scholz
FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL HOME LAW OFFICES & Groom, P.A.
FUNERAL HOME W. P. "Rocky" Comforter Charles A. Costin WlliamJ. Rish, Thomas S.Gibson,
507 10th Street Port St. Joe L.F.D. Personal Injury Real Estate RussellSchoz, Paul W.Groom II
Workers' Compensation
(850) 229-8111..... (850) 227-1818 (850) 227-1159 (850) 229-8211


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and Monument Port St. Joe
C (850) 227-1724


Have Bible,



Will Travel

Churches find short-term help
in interim pastors
By PAUL ASAY
Freedom News Service
They were hurting, these people in the
pews.
The Rev. Rod Wilmoth knew it when he
-stood in front of them for the first time in
January as their interim pastor. He heard
about it, he saw it he could almost feel it.
The church had said goodbye to three
pastors the last one leaving with a swift,
thudding suddenness. Membership was thin-
ning. As Wilmoth stood, ready to give his first
sermon, he knew what these people needed: a
'big hug.
"What I saw was that people here were just
wanting to be loved," Wilmoth said. "I think
I could've preached the multiplication tables,
.A and that would've been all right. I purpose-
fully contexted my first sermon'to just love 'em..
To let them know that it had to be scary, that
nobody likes to be in transition.
"It wasn't rocket science," he said. "It was
just being there for the people."
Wilmoth, interim pastor for First United
Methodist Church in Colorado Springs, Colo.,
-'is a Mary Poppins of pastors, a faith-based fix-
it man. He comes in, he patches things up, he
Leaves.
That's what interim pastors do.,
The retired 69-year-old minister is one
,of about 200 trained interim pastors in the
8-million member United Methodist Church
a denomination where interim ministries are
rare but growing.
"The mental attitude of an interim is differ-
'. ent than if you were coming in to be (a church's)
',,pastor for the next 10 to 15.years." Wilmoth
,,- said. "You have tO realize that you are an inter-
-,' You're not the answer to their prayers."
Yet interim pastors do more than just fill
-the pulpit on Sunday mornings. They help
JL, heal fractured, hurting churches: they become
sounding boards, grief counselors. financial
consultants and hatchet men. They must rix
and lead the congregation while smoothing the
.' way for their own replacement. Like a hired
gun from a spaghetu western. they travel from
pulpit to pulpit with nary a backward glance
"It's really. really important for them not
to assume it's "their' congregation." said the
Rev. Deborah Fortel, an associate for ministry
support for the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).
'"They really are there only for the short term,
and their responsibility is to prepare for some-
one else."
The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) has been
using interim pastors widely for at least 30
Sears. In mainline denominations that "call'
I pastors that is, denoinnauons that have the
T"-freedom to conduct wide-ranging searches for
-'- their future leaders interim pastors provide
t" both time and space: time for a congregation
to determine what kind of pastor fits its needs
"best; space for the new pastor to operate out-
-side the old pastor's shadow. Lutheran and
c,'United Church of Christ denominations also
( employ interun pastors.
C' United Methodist pastors are appointed
r .-V a Methodist bishop. Typically, senior-pastor
'r positions are vacant for a matter of weeks, not
months.
United Methodists are beginning to_ use
%'''interim pastors more often now when 'a
church needs some extra TLC, or to get rid of
some baggage, or if the vacancy time between
pastors is longer than anticipated. Or, in the
'case of First United Methodist Church, a little
of all three.
Wilmoth's last day at First United was July
30 the end of a seven-month stint at the
'2,500-member downtown church. He was the
bridge between the Rev. Randy Jessen, who
served the church 'for three-and-a-half years.
rand the Rev. Kent Ingram,. who started Aug.
1. .When church leaders announced Ingram's
-. appointment to the congregation, they also
-". showed hwnorous pictures of who they couldn't
select one being Superman, with Wilmoth's
head superimposed on the Man of Steel.
S- "People were saying (to Wdmoth i. 'Oh, gosh,
I' wish you could stay.'" said Harvey McAnulty,
S -the church's lay leader.
At First United Methodist, Wilmoth faced -
-several issues. One was pastoral turnover. In
:2002, the Rev. Gerald Trigg retired after 22
S, years at the church. An interim pastor filled
-the pulpit after Trigg, then Jessen was hired.
He left to take another job. A few congregants
were still mourning the loss of Trigg, and oth-
S- ers had clashed with Jessen, Wilmoth said. The
S.church staff was in turmoil. Finances were a
Snagging concern. Many congregants were frus-
S.trated withwhat they believed was a church in
S decline. : '
"I wanted to listen first, and if anybody had
anything they wanted to say a concern, a
S- grievance, a gripe, whatever I was here," he
S- said. "And people really made use of that. There
was kind of a line here for a while."
- '-" Interim pastors get training, but their
most valuable asset is experience. Presbyterian
Church (U.S.A.) encourages pastors to accept
permanent posts before becoming rterims in
Order to learn a church's day-to-day, year-to-
Syear cadence. In the United Methodist denoni-
*l.-*


Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Schoo: 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worshi: 11:00 a.m.
Methodist Youth Fellowship: 6:00p.m.
Evening Worship: 7:00 p.m.
All Times are EST


Rev. Malcolm "Mac" Fulcher
PASTOR
]eff&Wity
Minister of Music/Youth
Deborah Loyless
Director of ChildrenMinistris


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:.
$isdianb Thei ^apti.t' CtIurct
g 382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.


Mike Westbroo
Pastor


PASSING TIME: The Rev. Rod Wilmoth, left,
has been an interim pastor since January. Interim'
pastors can serve as temporary counselors, sound-
ing boards and decision makers while churches
are between permanent pastors. "You have to
realize that you are an interim," Wilmoth said.
"You're not the answer to their prayers."
HUNTER McRAE / Freedom News Service
nation, interim pastors are either retired senior,
pastors, like Wilmoth, or pastors nearing retire-
ment.
After .a month of gauging the culture of
First United Methodist and listening to its con-
gregants, Wilmoth started his work in earnest.
He spent more time with older congregants
and tried to make the church's traditional
worship services as energetic, in their own
way, as the church's fledgling contemporary
worship. He shook up the staff and instituted
'team-building exercises He helped guide some
organizational changes, at the church's, John
Wesley Ranch. ,
And then there's the advantage interim pas-
tots' universally enjoy: that they'll be gone in
months, giving them freedomni to make difficult.
even unpopular. decisions.
Wilmoth is preparing to retire, again, to his
summer home in the Colorado mountains.
When Ingrain's appointment was
announced, he acknowledged his knee-/erk
reaction was -"Now. wait a mnitite thil is my
church ,
"~ou have to be prepared for that," Wilnoth
said. "The loyalty is already shiting, and that's
what an interim is for: to affirm that shift."



The Potter's House
.3. I WHERE BROKEN VESSELS ARE MADE HjEW
Rodney G. Leaman. Pastor
850-639-5993- 850-639-4588
6,6 Second Streer* Post Offce Bo 631 Wewahitchla., FL 32465
SERVICE SCHEDULE
Sunday School 9:45 a.m
Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Evening Worship 7:00 p.m.
"YOU APE WELCOME AT THE POTTER S HOUSE

Ku're ,m n, Ftiend' r t
V Oak Grove Assembly of God
D. CrrJ. t Fernande ,r -rf
"('hi'Ae 227 18i., Par onaae aS02d?9-271
1i. fJadison SrTce'r Port St FL.
Schedule of Senretes
Sunday *. '-Wednesday
Sunday School 9:45am Xd Week Meal 5:00pm
.Motnn l, I'.'r-luF 10:45am. ld'Week Bible Study 6:15pm
lds oi ih, .' ior, 10:45am MinIstry In ,action. 6:15pm
Cross Training Youth 6:l1pm
MXen's Minidtry-M onday- 6:30pm
L Caddies Ministry- Tuesday- 7:00pm .
Dynamic raise tHWorship -Preaching the Pr.-riJ "r


4 .





Come into

The Star


today to let everyone in the
community know what's
happening in your church!


Morning Worship 1:00 a.m.
Evening Service 7:00 p.m.
Discipleship Training 6:00 p.m.
k, Wednesday Prayer 7:00 p.m.


24292


lbS Cathoic Chuch of Gulf County

St. Joseph Parish
20th & Monument, Port St Joe; FL, 227-1417
All Mass times EDT:
Saturday: 4:00 pm, Sunday: 9:30
Monday, Thursday, Friday: 9:30 am
Wednesday: 5:30 pm
En Espanol: 8:00 am, last Sunday of Month
St. Lawrence Mission
788 N Hwy 71 Wewahitchka, FL
Sunday: 11:00 am (CDT)


S 'Our Clinurch canl he your Ione

first ChUrch f the qa:i'ircnc
2420 l.itq r',u fort .t ,I flonl';i 324:56
(8501 229-9596


,urni,),/ 'L, r ni, 11 J m
Sufii a', M. niiii] Wi ;rii[ 11 j m
u dljv 'b.',i,- Viiii, Wir:.r i I ti p n
WHVlrie.d,; Ever -Q SEe ,unq 7 p vM




Sfi ch JI.xi&c each
111 North 22nd Street Me,.ico Beach, FL 32410
Soda Worship Senrvice: Q 00 a.m. CST
SundaySbilool: 10 15 a.m. CST ,
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexico Beach United Methodist (hurlh
NlunIt PROilDH D
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office. 648-8820


family fife (hunkt
"Touching Lives with the Love of Jesus"
Join us in worship . ,:
10:30 Sunday Morning ., oa
7:00 Wednesday Evening < >
Pastors Andrew -
Cathy Rutherford Reid Ave.
Rhema Bible Training Center graduates F. ,, L.I Church
Visit our website at:
familylifechurch.nei v.e .ahch.l
323 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe 229-LIFE (5433)


'"The Churches of Christ Salute You"
Romzans 16:16

The Wewahitchka Church of Christ
Meets At 2241 Hwy. 71 South, We\wahitchka
,(1/4 Mile North of the Overstreet Road)
(850) 639-5401
Sunday Bible Study 9:00 a.m. CT
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. & 5:00 p.m. CT
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. CT


church of Christ
at the Beaches
Established 33 AD in Jerusalem


We meet at ~ 314 Firehouse Road
Overstreet ~ 850.647.1622
Sunday Bible Study 100am EST
Sunday Worship 11:00am EST
Wednesday Bible Study 7:30pm EST
"We are about our Fathers business"




CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS


Singing:
Worship:


9 a.m. Sunday
9:30 a.m. Sunday
Call 229-8310


WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. 0. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32457
K Corner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue >



BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. Pil.k Sludi l ,Ac. 111 i.m.
Morning Worship 11 a.m.-* Evening Worship 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Choir Practice 6 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
70 taste and see that the Lord is good: blessed is the man that rusteth in Him.'
Please accept this invitation to join us in worship. God.bless you!
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-5026 Home 769-8725



1"'. first Baptist ChurchT
t 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE

Brent Vickery, Pastor
Buddy Caswell. Minister of Music & Education
Michael Rogers, Minister to Studens
Sunday School . . . . .. .... .9:45 am
Worship Service . .. . . .. 8:30 & 11.00 am
Disciple Training . .. . . . . . 6:00 pm
Evening Worship ..... . . . 7.00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting . ... .. 6:30 pm
Mon-Fri Devotion on 105 5 FM .... 7 49 am ET





First Baptist Church
MEXICO BEACH
Located at 823 N. 1:- .'i / ,i1.'L Beach
. .. ,2.,,* .....*/ 3 -," / .5 ,. 'i;,'' '..i a -
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Worship Surnd',s at 10.00 a m and 6 00 p m
Bible Study Surida, s ai 9-00 a m lall jgesi
Wednesday -' Prayer and Bible Study at 6 30 p m.
Please note, all times central
Al, l.. ,,'',..' /l l' t, / i.. 'll .ll'


"A Reformed Voice
W *I", 'in the Community"

'A ll ) McAd" .Dr. Bill Taylor, Pastor

Sunday School ............................. 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Fellowship.................. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Service ....... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service .............. 6:00 p.m.
Thursday Firehouse Fellowship .... 6:00 p.m.
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-670,7
Home of Faith Christian School


TO NOWI" CHRIST AND TO MAilK HbIl 1VOWlN

* '* ST, JAMES ,'

EPISCOPAL CHURCH

800 22nd STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sundaty School 9:45
Child Care Provided for at 11:00
www.stiamesepiscovalchurch.org 850-227-1845


Worship with us at '

Long Avenue Baptist Church ^


Where Fe


aith, Family &


Friendship are found
Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pm


Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm


1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL For More Information Call 229-8691
0 16:.7


__ __


-


I


___~l~y


TheStr, or St Je, L ThrsayAuust24 206 5


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


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Meeting Schedule for Local Government
Gulf County School Board
The School Board meets once a month,
typically the second Tuesday of the month, though
during the summer that schedule is subject to
change. Meetings are typically conducted at dis-
trict offices located on Middle School Drive in Port
St. Joe, though during the school year the board
conducts one monthly meeting at high schools at
each end of the county.
The next School Board workshop will be held
Aug. 28 at 1 p.m. in the board meeting room.
A public hearing on the budget will be held
Sept. 13 at 4:30 p.m., followed by the School
Board's regular meeting at 6 p.m.
Postings of all School Board regular and spe-
cial meetings and workshops can be found at the
district offices.


City of Port St. Joe
The Port St. Joe City Commission conducts
regular meetings twice a month, on the first and
third Tuesdays of the month at 6 p.m. ET in the
Commission meeting room on the second floor
of City Hall on Cecil G. Costin Blvd. near Reid
Avenue.
Postings of all City Commission regular and
special meetings and workshops can be found at
City Hall.
City of Wewahitchka
The Wewahitchka City Commission con-
ducts regular meetings twice a month, on the sec-
ond and fourth Mondays of each month at 6 p.m.
CT in the first floor meeting room at City Hall.
Postings of all City Commission regular and
special meetings and workshops can be found at
City Hall on Second Street.
Board of County Commissioners
The Board of County Commissioners con-


C4(endr


ducts regular meetings twice a month, at 6 p.m.
ET on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each
month in the Commission meeting room located
in the Robert Moore Administrative Building next
to the County Courthouse on Cecil G. Costin
Blvd.
Postings of all regular and special meetings
and workshops can be founrrd at the Robert Moore
Administrative Building.
City of Mexico Beach
The Mexico Beach City Council conducts
its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. CT on the
second Tuesday of each month in the Civic Center
located behind the business district on 30t and
31st Streets.
Postings of all regular and special meetings
and workshops can be found at City Hall, located
on 141' Street, or the Civic Center.
County Economic Development Council
The EDC conducts a monthly meeting, typi-


cally during the lunch hour of the first Tuesday
of the month at Sunset Coastal Grill. For more-
information contact the EDC at 229-1901.
Budget Hearings
Local residents and taxpayers should be'
aware that summertime brings the budget pro-.
cess to government entities around the area. All-
the listed governmental bodies will be conducting -
budget workshops and hearings throughout the
coming months.
We will post the times and places of all budget-
meetings, but the information will also be avail- -
able at the locations listed for finding meeting and. -
workshop agendas.
A note to civic organizations and other
groups in the area: submit meeting times'
and locations to the newspaper and we will.
publish them each week on this page.


Kiwanis Club
Farm Fall Day Pancake Breakfast Movie Night at the Park Brings Community Together


"Farm Fall Day"
October 14 & 15
1 lam-Dusk
I Can Grow will host a
"Farm Fall Day" fundraiser
at the Majestic Oak Farm in
Cottondale. A donation of $8
per person is accepted and
includes activities such as
pony rides, Amish buggy rides,


hay rides, wagon rides, animal
observation areas, corn maze,
and entertainment. All pro-
ceeds go towards I Can Grow,
Inc., a nonprofit organization
that provides individuals with
disabilities experience and
workplace skills in an agricul-
tural setting and profession.


Send Your Community Events to:
Write To: Be sure to put Community
The Star/Community Events News as the subject when
P.O. Box 308 e-mailing.
Port St Joe, FL 32457
Fax To: Announcements are limited
(850) 227-7212 to 50 words, and will run for a
E-mail To: maximum of 4 weeks.
starnews@starfl.com


Te BA3YOU ReSATAURANT

%-'k GAii fle 91NING IN fl UNIQUe 9TMOspiieRe J
specializing in authentic Cajun and Crgol cuisine
Comez try our very own'Shrimp Gumbo, Crawfish'etouffi and more
fis well as a full fl flAmerican line up of AStzaks, lizafood, Specialty Salads,
Gourmrt Sandwiches and a Child's menu.
Convrniezntly located on mainstreet in Wewahitehka. One block North of Hlwy
22. Call ahead for business hours and daily lunch and dinner specials.
850-659-9444


The Kiwanis Club of
Port St. Joe is hosting its
annual Pancake Breakfast
on Saturday, August 26 at
Dockside Caf6 from 6-10am.
Tickets are $5 per person.
Each year members of the
Kiwanis Club wake up early,
brew coffee, cook sausage and
flip pancakes for members of
the community. Come before
or after the sun rises. Enjoy
the morning at the marina, sit-
ting in the early light, listening
to the St. Joe Bay, as a Kiwanis
member pours fresh coffee
into your mug. There will be
plenty of syrup and stacks of
pancakes. All the proceeds go
to Kiwanis projects, including
scholarships for Gulf County
students, Christmas dinner
baskets, and improvements at
local parks.
For any information on
the event, please contact Linda
Griffin, President of the club.
Tickets may be purchased from
any Kiwanis member and also
Port St. Joe High School Key
Club and Keyette members.
Some of the proceeds will also
go to help the school clubs'
projects. Anyone interested
in joining the Kiwanis Club
should meet the members for
lunch on Tuesdays at the ARC
on Williams Avenue.


Gulf County and Mexico
Beach have come together to
celebrate families and friends
with the first-ever "Movie
Night under the Stars."
Everyone's favorite alien will
land in Beacon Hill Park on
Sunday, September 3, 2006,
at 9 PM ET for a showing of
"ET" to kick-off what will be
a series of events throughout
the year that will entertain
and are free to the public.
In another collaborative
effort to benefit local resi-
dents and visitors, the Gulf
County Tourist Development
Council and the Mexico Beach
Community Development
Council joined forces recent-
ly to purchase a 16-foot by
9-foot jumbo outdoor movie
screen and audio/video sys-
tem that will be the backdrop


Apalachicola, FL (August 7,
2006)- Sitting in on a meeting
with the Social Committee for
the Forgotten Coast Builders
Association, one can't help but
notice a buzz of excitement in
the air. They've been planning
the Forgotten Coast's first ever
Home and Garden Show for
the past several months. With
the event date of September
16 17,.2006 right around the
corner, they are finally begin-
ning to realize the rewards of


for numerous "Movie Nights"
in both communities. So as
the sun goes down, the lights
will go up and the fun will
begin.
"Having a movie night is
a great way for both commu-
nities to come together and
enjoy being outside around
friends, family and neigh-
bors," explained Gulf County
TDC executive director Paula
Ramsey Pickett. 'There is so
much to enjoy in our won-
derful parks and open areas
and bringing locals and visi-
tors together in a fun, fam-
ily atmosphere that everyone
can enjoy is what makes this
area so special."
So bring your blankets,
folding lounge chairs, pic-
nic baskets and coolers and
wind down the summer with


all their hard work.
"This event is going to be
like none the Forgotten Coast
has ever seen before,"' com-
mented Dayle Flint, Executive
Officer of the Forgotten Coast
Builders Association, "Our
team has been working dili-
gently to create an event that
the community will enjoy, hope-
fully for years to come." The
Home and Garden Show. will.
take place at the Constitution
Convention Museum and State


YOU WITH ALL YOUR


LET US HELP
CRIBS
HIGH CHAIRS
TENTS
DINNERWARE


i1U


TABLES
CHAIRS
LINENS
BEACH WHEEMHAIR
De Deluerrr


PARTY NEEDS!
WEDDING ARCHES
CANDLELABRAS
PUNCH BOWLS
CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN


a great movie and even better
company.
"This is just the begi-n-
ning," said Lynn Marshall,
president of the Mexico:
Beach CDC. "Our plan is to",
rotate 'Movie Night under the.
Stars' through both commu-
nities as often as possible.--
This will hopefully become'
an event that everyone will"
look forward to throughout
the area."
For more information orn
"Movie Night," contact the,
Gulf County TDC at 850-229-
7800 or MACROBUITON
H t m 1ResAnchor
info@visitgulf.com or the,
Mexico BeachCDCat850-648-
8196 or lynn@mexicobeach..-
com.


Park in Downtown Port St. Joe,
FL. Local and area vendors
will showcase their wares with
indoor and outdoor booths.,
"We will also have live music,
great food ,and some fun activ-
ities for the kids,"' said J'aime
Kent of Pure Design, a Social.
Committee Member .
The Home and Garden
Show will be a great way for
. the community to ge t mvooled ,
and .share the growth and
prosperity that our area is
experiencing. "It's going to be'
a great event for the whole'"
family," said Mary Seymour of
Alternative Electric LL.C, alsp,,
a Social Committee member,'
"It will be a great place to meet
other members of the cqmmu-
nity and see what they're doing
to make a difference."
If you are interested in
being. involved in the Home.
and Garden Show or learn-'
ing more about the weekend's:
planned activities, please co- '
tact Dayle Flint at the FCBA by
calling 850.653,1666.


WEDNESDAY 5 p.m. CT to Close/ lmNo


t1/2 off OYSTERS
On the Half Shell, Raw, Baked, Rockefeller, and Jalapenos

THURSDAY
All You Can Eat


SHRIMP
5 p.m. CT to Close

FRIDAYS

All You Can Eat

SNOWCRAB LEGS

Friday & Saturday

AugUst 25 & 26

Live-Music by

"Buddy Hamm "

5-9:00 pm CT



Wednesday & Thursday Nights .


KARAOKE 3 *

On The UPPER DECK LOUNGE :
: .*_7*


ventrs


First Ever Area Home and Garden Show to be Hosted,

by The Forgotten Coast Builders Association


ub~ ?Fed e %eSCW//4!


TOUCAN'S

SEAFOOD RESTAURANT ON THE BEACH
812 Highway 98
Mexico Beach

(850) 648-8207

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK for Lunch & Dinner


I (- w jrp -
ell fol Co 4 1
4as Pe I Rem m op


EaL 236 igMVNT98,
stpoint, FL 323281


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years'.,


6B heStr. or S. JeFL- Turda, Aqut 4,2006


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Eclihd197* evnaGlfcutyadsuruniaara fr6 yas h taPrtS. oFL Turdy Agst2,206 7


AUGUST
Wewa Search and Rescue Fishing Tournament,
Gaskin Park, Aug. 18-19.
MBARA Annual Kingfish Tournament, August 25-
26, Mexico Beach
WindMark Beach Showhouse: Through Sept. 10 at
WindMark Beach, near Port St. Joe, tours of Southern
Accents Showhouse are 10am to 5pm EDT Wednesday
through Saturday, 1 to 5 pm Sunday. Tickets are $12, $6
for ages 5 to 17. More information: 888-212-7050.
Annual Scallop Festival, Port St. Joe, August 26-27


SEPTEMBER
Music in the Park, Each Thursday night at 6 pm
(CT) in Sunset Park, Mexico Beach
Beach Blast Olympic Triathlon & Duathlon,
September 23, Beacon Hill Park, Great sports event
involving swimming, biking and running. More infor-
mation: www.TheBeachBlast.com.
The event will bring hundreds of visitors to the
area. Volunteers needed. Come support local athletes!
Annual Kingfish Shootout, Sept. 25-26, C-Quarters
Marina, Carrabelle


OCTOBER
Music by the Bay, Each Thursday in Frank Pate
Park, Port St. Joe
Annual Catfish Classic Fishing Tournament, October
6-7, Wewahitchka
Florida Panhandle Birding and Wildflower Festival,
October 6-8, St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserves, Port
St. Joe
Annual Art and Wine Festival, October 21, Driftwood
Inn, Mexico Beach
Downtown Trick or Treat, October 31, Reid Avenue,
Port St. Joe
The Oyster Spat Festival, Oct. 6- 8, St. George
Island


Apalachicola Community Yard Sale, Oct. 7,
Send Your Community Events to: Apalachicola
Write To: Fax To: Be sure to put Community News as the 3rd Annual Apalachicola Bay Chamber Golf
The Star/Community Events (850) 227-7212 subject when mailing. Tournament, Oct. 11, St. James Bay Golf Course,
P.O. Box 308 Email To: Lanark Village
Port St Joe, FL 32457 starnews@starfl.com Announcements are limited to 50 words, Dixie Does Nashville, Part Deux, Songwriters in
and will run for a maximum of 4 weeks. the Round, Oct. 13-14, Dixie Theatre, Apalachicola



Everything You Need To Know About The Area, But Didn't Know To Ask:


U a *


SSafety the Panhandle


No.


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
It is not just yourself and
your children you need to be
concerned about when you
visit the Forgotten Coast.
So many visitors are now
bringing their "other children"
with them on vacation their
pels, especially their dogs -
that they need to be aware of
the special conditions in this
area, along the beaches, along
the rivers, and in the forests
ard swamps that cover the
Fcrgotten Coast.

SIn the Heat of the Night...
Aid Day...
The "dog days of summer"
isnot just a cliche any more,
as so many people are vaca-
timing at the beach with the
family pets in tow.
But many visitors, espe-
cially those from urban and
northern areas, do not rec-
opqize the dangers .of heat,
humidity and reflection of
sailight off this area's sugar
vhite sands.
'The Panhandle's wonder-
fil geographic landscapes and
vedther create dangers for
pts as well as people. For
iisfance:
Pets need fresh water.
If you feel thirsty, then
pur pet already dehydrated.
le sure to bring water with
pu for your pet, anywhere you
;6, especially on the beach.
Do not let your pet drink
ialt'water. Some pets will drink
;alt water as if it were fresh
jvater while they are playing at
the -water's edge. It can make
him sick and dehydrates him
even more.
The most common effect
of drinking sat water is vomit-
ing and diarrhea. These symp-
toms usually last only a short
while, but if they continue, the
pet needs to be evaluated by a
veterinarian for dehydration.
'Severe dehydration has
thepotential to severely dam-
age their internal organs, so
be? mindful of their drinking
habits and make fresh water
available at all time when in
the-water.
The beach presents its
owvi hazards to pets.
,If you take your pet to
the'beach, try to get him in
thte water, if he likes water,
because being in the water will
help keep him cool.










BO KNOWS

PEST

CONTROL

227.9555
H>nest, Dependable Service
S 2)+ years experience
Sate Certified Since 1985


Once home, wash your pet
immediately with fresh, luke-
warm water to remove all salt
and any other possible irri-
tants from his fur and skin.
At the beach, have a blan-
ket for your pet to lie on.
The hot sand, especially this
area's white sand, reflects an
amazing amount of heat, and
the temperature of the sand
plus the sun and the humid-
ity will very quickly overheat
your pet.
Your pet also needs an
umbrella or other shade to
escape the direct force of the
sun on the sand.
Eye protection for pets is
the "in" thing now, and it is a
good idea. Goggles for dogs
are very useful if the dog is
riding in the car or boat with
his head in the wind, or walk-
ing along a windy beach to
keep sand out of his eyes. And
yes, dog goggles are available
as sunglasses, too, especial-
ly useful for small dogs like
Dachshunds that are close to
the reflective sand.
Also on the beach are
sharp shells, dead fish and
jelly fish washed up on shore.
After coming off the beach,
be sure to check your dog's feet
for signs of cuts and scrapes.
Clean and treat if necessary.
" Do not let pets play with,
paw at, or pick up any dead
animals on the beach. Dead,
fish present all sorts of dan-
gers, including disease, dan-
gerous bones, and even quills,
poisonous spines, and sharp
scales that can injure pets.
Sometimes storms blow
in schools of jellyfish and
Portuguese Men of War, and
they are in the shallow water
close to shore, or washed onto
the beach. Don't let dogs play
with them. Jellyfish can still
sting long after they have been
beached.
Pets get sunburned.
If your pet's nose has
more pink areas than black,
it is especially susceptible to


burning, and, over the long
term, even skin cancer.
Light colored pets and
pets with short, cropped fur
(including shaved pets), are
also at risk. Also at great-
er risk are hairless pets and
those with thin coats, like
whippets and Pugs.
Dogs that lie on their
backs in the sun can also
get painful sunburns on their
abdomens, but the areas most
prone to sunburn on dogs and
cats are the nose, face and ear
tips, so cover them well with
sunscreen.
Frequently apply a water-
proof, non-toxic sunscreen
with a maximum SPF of 15
to your pet's exposed areas.
Make sure to rub it in well.
Even if he licks it off, some
will have already penetrated to
protect him from the sun. You
can find sunscreen made spe-
cifically for pets at pet supply
stores, or you can apply zinc
oxide or PABA-free sunscreen.
Be careful not to get it in your
pet's eyes.
Pets suffer from heat
exhaustion and heat stroke
just like humans.
Animals that are outside
or enclosed in cars are most
at risk for heatstroke. If you
cannot take your pet inside
with you wherever you go, it is
better to leave the pet at home


or where you are staying, in
the air conditioning.
At only 80 degrees out-
side, the inside temperature
of a closed car reaches 100
degrees in less than 10 min-
utes. After 30 minutes the
temperature will have reached
or exceeded 120 degrees.
Dogs cannot perspire as
humans do, so they rely on
panting as the primary way to
dissipate heat from their bod-
ies. Heat .stroke in pets hap-
pens much more. quickly than
in humans; therefore, it is nec-
essary to always .have fresh
water available for them.
Stress in pets often causes
rapid heart rate, which com-
bined with heat can quickly
cause heat stroke. A stressful
situation could be a family trip
or an outdoor excursion with
lots of people and other pets
around.
Signs of heat exhaustion
and heatstroke include exces-
sive panting, fatigue, dizziness
(manifested by staggering and
drunk-like walking), vomiting,
grey-blue discoloration of the
tongue, and loss of conscious-
ness.
If your pet begins display-
ing signs of heat stroke, give
the pet .plenty of room tem-
perature water. Never give cold
water to a pet suffering from
heat problems it only makes


/










Vote John Wright on September 5th
for Gulf County School Board District 5

Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by John Wright for School Board District 5.
\I


KiwsaniCa k


the pet nauseous.
Use ice cubes, fans, spray
bottles and damp towels to
rub on the pet, cover him, and
cool him down. Make sure to
rub the water into the fur so
that it reaches the skin.
Loss of consciousness is
an emergency situation and
requires immediate veterinary
care. But, if your pet lapses
into unconsciousness, take
immediate action by hosing
him down or submersing him
in cool not cold water and
directing a fan onto him to
lower his body temperature as
quickly as possible.
Once your pet is stabi-
lized, call a vet, but it is impor-
tant to get the temperature
down before calling the vet
because if you wait too long, it
could be too late.
Exercise should be limited
to short intervals while con-
stantly monitor iig your pet's
breathing patterns. Remember
for both yourself and your pet,
even on overcast days dogs
can overheat in a short period
of time.
Breeds of dogs and cats
with' shorter snouts or flat
faces, like Pugs, Pekingese
and Persians, or breeds with
excessively- heavy coats, are
much more sensitive to heat
and humidity..
Surf and rip currents.


are dangerous to pets.
Waves breaking in the surf
can be dangerous to smaller
pets. Cresting waves can cause
your pet to develop muscu-
loskeletal injuries -or worse,
drown. It is important to watch
pets in the water at all times
and do not allow them to swim
too far from land.
Rip currents will pull dogs
out just like people, and dogs
will tire quickly if caught in a
rip current. Make it a habit to
know the current beach report
for your own safety as well as
that of your pet.
Wave-riding dogs, whether
they are body surfing or chas-
ing toys their owners throw
into the surf, can injure their
legs, especially their knees.
The jarring force of the waves
is hard on the ligaments.
.- Dogs in the surf are
even more susceptible to
shark attack than humans.
The erratic splashing of
dogs in the water can attract
sharks in the area because
the dog's movements mimic
the jerky motions of fish, the
shark's natural food.
It is unwise to allow dogs
to swim in any area waters
(gulf, bay, canals, rivers)
between dusk and dawn, in
murky water, or around peo-
ple surf fishing. While in any


(See TOURIST on Page 9B)


Live music Teturns to the
Thirsty Goat all summer long

6pm 'til they get tired of playing

Stop by after the Scallop Festival and hear
George and Cletus Aug. 26.


e~;~i~t~pf~ab~-~?lr-' -----HI~Fm~ ~c~;~-~~--~s;asrsrePra~Pglsrllr se 111


TheSta, ortSt Jo, L -Thusdy, ugst 4,200 -7B


Establish 197 -Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years










HMM PSJ Police Report


Gulf County Arrest Log


On 8-11-06 Christopher
Lloyd Swinney w/m of Bay
County was transported from
the Bay County Jail and arrest-
ed for Failure to Appear.
On 8-11-06 Deputies of the
Criminal Investigation Unit went
to a residence to serve warrants
on William Lee Robinson w/m
22 of Wewahitchka, out of Bay
County. When they arrived on
scene, Robinson fled on foot.
After a short chase, Robinson
was apprehended and arrested
on several Bay County Warrants
and charged with resisting
arrest in Gulf County.
On 8-12-06 a vehicle
was stopped on Highway 71
in Wewahitchka for speeding.
While talking with the driv-
er, permission was granted to
search the vehicle. K9 Sybil
was used to search the vehicle
and alerted on a Tupperware
container in the rear window.
A quantity of marijuana was
found in the container. Tristan
L Darna was arrested for pos-
session of marijuana. During
further interviews of the occu-
pants of the vehicle, a passen-
ger, Janie Amanda Clark, gave
deputies two bags of marijuana
she had hidden in her waist
band. Both Darna and Clark
were transported to the Gulf
County Jail.
On 9-12-06 James Derek
Ritchie w/m 31 was transport-
ed from Tennessee on charges
of Violation of Probation and
for Aggravated Assualt. He is
being held without bond.
On 8-13-06 Mandy A
Brown b/f 25, Christopher
D Maxwell w/m 28, Carlos
Quintalla h/m 29, and Antonio


Munos h/m 18 were arrested
in separate traffic stops and
all charged with Driving on
Suspended Driver Licenses.
On 8-13-06 deputies
responded to a domestic dis-
turbance in the Overstreet
area. After investigation they
arrested Terry Lee Brock w/m
43 for domestic battery and
transported him to the Gulf
County Jail.
On 8-14-06 members of
the narcotics unit observed
James A Fenn b/m 46 walk-
ing near Ave E. Knowing that
Franklin County Sheriff's Office
had warrants, they attempted
to arrest him but he fled. After
a short foot pursuit Fenn was
arrested and turned over to
Franklin Sheriff's Office on
charges of sexual battery and
false imprisonment.
On 8-14-06 Anessa Marie
Tanton w/f 27 Calhoun County
was arrested for violation of
probation and possession of a
controlled substance.
On 8-14-06 a deputy had
stopped to get a drink at a con-
venience store in St. Joe Beach.
,As he was sitting in his Patrol
Vehicle, a car parked next to
him and as the driver exited
his vehicle, he appeared to be
intoxicated. The deputy spoke
with Jonathan A Gay w/m 20,
and asked him to perform sev-
eral sobriety tests which Gay
failed. He was. arrested for
DUI.
During the early morning
hours of 8-15-06 deputies
responded to a woman walking
in the road on the Overstreet
Road near Highway 71. Upon
their arrival, they found Debra


Sue Johnson w/f 47 who
appeared to be extremely intox-
icated. Upon speaking to her, a
relative appeared on the scene
and claimed that Johnson
had struck her. Johnson was
arrested for battery and taken
to the Gulf County Jail.
On 8-15-06 corrections
officers found inmate Arlin
Brandon Coggins w/m 24 in
possession of tabacco. He was
charge with introduction of
contraband into a correctional
facility.
On 8-15-06 deputies
recieved a call that two white
males had stopped a citizen
of Wewahitchka and asked to
purchase some marijuana. A
short time later deputies found
a truck matching the descrip-
tion parked at a local conve-
nience store. They spoke to the
driver and found a pipe used
to smoke marijuana in his pos-
session. Justin Body w/m 20 of
Wewahitchka was arrested for
possession of marijuana.
On 8-16-06 a deputy
noticed a van on Highway 71
near West River Road driving in
an erratic manner. The vehicle
was stopped and ,after further
investigation Frederick Wayne
Baldwin w/m 43 of Maryland
was arrested for DUI.
On 8-16-06 deputies
responded to a physical distur-
bance in Wewahitchka. Upon
arrivals, they made contact
with the victim and found out
that Danny Keith Davis w/m
23 had struck him in the head.
Davis was found a short time
later and arrested for aggra-
vated battery.


On August 18, 2006
the Port St. Joe Police
Department attended a Law
Enforcement Challenge
Awards Conference. The Port
St. Joe Police Department
placed 3rd in Police Category
I in the State of Florida. With
the Police Department being
part of this statewide edu-
cation program, the Port St.
Joe Police Department has
received equipment awarded
by the State in the amount
of $8,000.00 dollars for the
year 2005. The Port St. Joe
Police Department-placed 3rd
in the State of Florida in the
year 2004. Since the Police
Department started participat-
ing in public safety through
traffic enforcement and educa-
tion with the Law Enforcement
Challenge Program, we have
been awarded approximately
$21,900.00 in equipment.
This equipment ranges from
vehicle cameras and radars
units, to a laptop computer
and A-frame traffic barricades.
It was brought to our attention
at this conference that we .have
a murder in the United States
every 32 minutes but there is
one person killed in a traffic
crash every 12 minutes. That
is about three times the fatal-
ity rate involving traffic crash-
es. If you hear about someone
getting killed in a traffic crash
on the news it does not affect
the public's view the same
as a reported homicide. The
Port St. Joe Police Department
believes that all lives matter
and will continue to educate
drivers on the rules of the road
to help prevent traffic related
deaths in Port St. Joe.
On August 14, 2006
around 9:54 a.m. Toriando
Laquan Russ, age 30, of Port
St. Joe was arrested for vio-
lation of probation for rob-
bery, warrants for aggravated
battery, felony drug charges'
and will be facing several new
charges locally. The arrest was
made possible -through com-
munity involvement; citizens
supplied the Port St. Joe Police
Department with information
of where Russ was staying.
The information also revealed
that he was at this location
on this date and time. The
Port St. Joe Police Department
surrounded 174 Ave. D, but
could not get Russ to answer
the door. Gulf County Sheriffs
Office K-9 Units were request-
ed. While awaiting the arrival
of the K-9 Units consent was
received from the. resident/


owner of the house for law
enforcement to enter. The
front door of this residence
had to be forced because Russ
had secured the door from
the inside. After the door was
opened K-9 Units entered the
residence and found Russ hid-
ing in the attic. Russ was
taken into custody without
incident and transported to
the Gulf County Jail. "
On August 13, 2006
around 12:18 a.m. Willie
Charles King Jr., age 27,
of Springfield, Florida was
arrested for obstructing justice
by giving Port St. Joe Police
Department Officers a false
name. King was stopped for a
traffic violation and during the
course of the stop the officer
conducting the traffic inves-
tigation found that King had
no valid drivers license. It was
later discovered that he was
Willie King Jr. and he did not
possess a valid drivers license.
King was transported to jail
without further incident.
On July 28, 2006 around
9:23 p.m. Carolyn Dawn Smith,
age 24, of White City, Florida
was arrested and charged for
retail theft. Smith entered a
local business and allegedly
changed a price tag from a
lesser item to a more expen-
sive item in order to purchase
the expensive item at the lower
price. Smith was transported
to the Gulf County Jail.
On August 13, 2006
around 3:54 p.m. Sidney
Harris, age 40, of Port St. Joe,
Florida was arrested on a Bay
County warrant for child sup-
port. Harris was transported
'to the Gulf County Jail to
await first appearance.
On August 13, 2006
around 11:08 p.m. Lustrein M.
Hernandez, age 28, of Tampa,
Florida was arrested for driv-
ing while license suspended or
revoked. Hernandez was taken
to the Gulf County Jail and
bond was set at $250.00.
On August 9, 2006 around
5:26 p.m. Anthony L. Skanes
of Port St. Joe was arrested
on several warrants. Warrants
were for burglary of structure,
possession of drug parapher-
nalia, resisting arrest without
violence and a warrant for
failure to appear. Skanes was
taken to the Gulf County Jail
to await first appearance.
On August 18, 2006
around' 10:18 a.m. Tannis
Jasmine Boykins, age 25, of
Port St. Joe wwas arrested for
burglary of unoccupied dwell-


ing, battery and possession of-
drug paraphernalia. Boykins
was taken to the Gulf County
Jail to await first appearance.
On August 19, 2006
around 12:28 p.m. Derek
Todd Olsen, age 34, of Tulsa,
Oklahoma was arrested on a-
warrant for failure to appear.'
Olsen was transported to. the
Gulf County Jail; bond was 8et"
at $5,000.00.
On August 20, 2006-
around 2:34 p.m. William-P..
Kilpatrick, age 51, of Port St.
Joe, Florida was arrested.on a.
warrant for violation of proba-
tion. Kilpatrick was taken to.
the Gulf County Jail; bond
was set at $1,000.00.

PORT ST. JOE POLICE
DEPARTMENT DUI
SOBRIETY CHECKPOINTS"

The Port St. Joe Police
Department is committed -to
promoting safety for all citi-
zens. The Port St. Joe Police
Departments goal is to ensure
everyone using the highway
and roadway system may do
so safely and to provide a
deterrent for those who violate
laws. Enforcement is a tool to
facilitate the achievement,,o!
this safety. Recognizing that
alcohol is consistently involved
in many crashes resulting in
a fatality mandates unwav-
ering attention. Reducing
death and injury associated
with impaired drivers is- one
of the most important objec-
tives. The State of Florida,
Gulf County and the City of
Port St. Joe provide the road-
way as a benefit to the pub-
Jic at large. Accordingly, these
agencies seek to safeguard all
drivers through the use.pf a
non-intrusive checkpoint to
detect and remove impaired
drivers from the road.
The use of .the Roadside
Sobriety Checkpoint, public.
education and enforcement
are combined to achieve and
enhance the reduction in
deaths and injuries caused
by impaired vehicle operabrs.
These law enforcement agen-
cies are dedicated to agges-
sive DUI law enforcement.
Zero tolerance of DUI conrin-
ues to be top priority in taf-
fic law enforcement. The fort
St. Joe Police Department illI
be conducting DUi Sobrty
Checkpoints on Highway 98
throughout this year in effort
to maintain a safe. driving
environment for all drivers.!


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Fblt llblidvprl 1937 GT


Tourist Tips-


From Page 7B


is vital that humans pay close
attention to the water if a pet
is playing in the surf or swim-
ming beside a boat.
Swimming pools and
- boats can be dangerous to
Spets.
St Problems occur when pets
fall into pools or off boats and
panic.
Pet experts say people
need to take (not throw) their
dog into the swimming pool at
S-home and show him how to
find the pool steps and climb
out. Repeat this until he can
consistently get out of the pool
o6n his own..
If you have a boat, put the
-dog in the water next to the
boat and then "rescue" him, so
he will be prepared if he falls
'off the boat. Repeat often until
the dog is comfortable in the
situation.
Some pet experts suggest
.purchasing and using a prod-
,uct such as a Skamper-Ramp
S,(www.skamper-ramp.com),
which can be used in pools
and on the swim board of
boats to help the animal get
out of the water.
Remember, not all dogs
,are natural swimmers or even
'enjoy being in the water.
If you take your dog to
the beach, to the river, or on
-a boat, consider getting him a
doggy personal flotation device
(PFD) or life vest. They are
'available in a variety of sizes
at pet stores, through catalogs,
a- nd through on-line pet supply
'outlets.
S. Rivers, lakes and
swamps can also be haz-
iardous to pets.
People rarely think about
the dangers to pets that riv-
ers in this area can pose. But
river environments are filled
with underwater snags that
can cause a pet, especially a
dog, to become tangled and
quickly drown.
Other dangers to pets in
this area include alligators
S.,and snakes lurking on the
,river banks or already in the
-water.
Dangers to pets in marshy
Sqr swampy areas include sink
,holes and quicksand, from
which pets cannot escape.
Again, the best prevent ion
is to keep all pets on a short
Sle 'sh at your side, or securely
"inside a boat. Do not let them
jnimp into the water and swim'
'- aroundn.
/ u Bees, wasps, other
stinging insects, fire ants,


OPEN HOUSE
Mexico Beach
Saturday, August 26
12-3 CDT
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and mosquitoes are other
problems for pets.
Reactions to insect bites
and stings range from slight
swelling and pain to anaphy-
laxis, a sudden, severe allergic
reaction that can be fatal if not
treated immediately (just like
in humans).
Mosquito bites do not pro-
voke a skin reaction in pets,
but they can transmit poten-
tially fatal heartworm disease.
While some flea control medi-
cations repel mosquitoes, it is
important to remember that
they do not prevent heartworm
disease if a mosquito does bite
your pet.
Fire ants, the bane of peo-
ple and pets everywhere in
the South, often crawl onto
the abdomen of a pet lying
outdoors. The ants then sting
the pet as a group, which can
be very painful. If your pet 'is


being stung by fire ants, or any
ants, hose them off and take
your pet to the vet.
In general, there are
over 700 types of plants that
may be poisonous to pets.
In addition, this area's
natural flora may also have
sharp barbs, spines, thorns,
etc. that can injure a curious
pet.
Symptoms of a pet hav-
ing eaten a poisonous plant
include vomiting, diarrhea,
loss of appetite, mouth swell-
ing and salivation. If you sus-
pect a poisonous plant prob-
lem, take your pet to a vet
along with several leaves or a
branch of the plant you sus-
pect. Treatment will be based
on the type of plant and the
amount ingested.
Snakes are a defi-
nite danger to pets in the
Panhandle.


- 3- .t. C22


--- ---
-., .Sib,


Florida has poison-
ous snakes, especially in
the Panhandle, with all our
swamps, wooded areas, dense
vegetation, and wilderness
areas, including local wilder-
ness state parks.
Avoid snake bite to pets
by keeping pets on a leash
and by your side while in the
woods, and staying on trails in
wilderness areas.
If your pet gets bitten, do
not panic. Try to determine
what kind of snake bit him,
taking care not to get bitten
yourself.
If you think the snake is
poisonous, check your pet for
signs of shock. Keep him calm
and still, and carry him to the
car, since any movement may
cause the venom to spread
faster.
Put on gloves and. wash
the wound with mild soap and
water, and immediately take
him to the near esi animal hos-
pital.
Even bites from,. non-
poisonous snakes should be
checked by a veterinarian for
allergic reaction or 'infection.
Wild animals are a dan-
ger to pets in this area.
As more of this undevel-
oped. region becomes cleared


So that %e may spend the
Labor Day Holiday with our
family & friends we will be
having early deadlines for all
advertising placed in
The Star & The Times ..

Early Deadlines for: Thurs~ia
Ad with Proof: Wednl0
Ad without proof: Thurs- a
Classified Line Ad: Frid WV
We will not accept any late ads f6

Please call with


The Star- 227-12718

. The Times 653-816
H L^'U


Took wid cpttef fek da l0eu

A\t Peoples First, it's al\a\s great to welcome e back a

member of our team.

Brigette Yeager has returned as a member of our residential

lending staff and is read\ to help \ou find the loan that is right

for \ou. If you'ree bu\ ing or building a new home, Brigette can

help make the loan process quick and eas\.

Visit or call Brigette at our Corporate Center today\ and ask

ho\\ she can help make vour dream home a reality. After all,

it s loan originators like Brigette \\ho make Peoples First the

best bank in the neighborhood.


Peoples First Corporate Center
1022 W 23rd Street 770-7375,



PeoptesFirst

The best bank in the neighborhood

1fiic1 r.'.... p roplJ-_'l rr iA


and urbanized, the native wild-
life is being chased into closer
proximity .with encroaching
humans and their pets.
In this area native wildlife
includes bears, bobcats, alli-
gators, snakes, coyotes, rac-





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For an appoint-i

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*Home Owner's

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Properties

*Windstorm

Flood

*Auto
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*Small Business
*Renters


coons, armadillos, opossums,
birds of all kinds, the list goes
on and on.
Feed pets indoors and
store their bags of food inside,
as well. Place trash in strong
(See TOURIST on Page 11 B)




in Treatments
ERiALANENT NLAKEUP
dermabrasion Chemical Peels
sized Facials Body'Treatments*
Skin Tag and Spider V'ein Removal
ical Grade Skincare Products
LED Light Therapy


lent, please call:

Licensed Aesthetician
Avenue Port St.Joe. Florida
ekincare.com


Hannon Insurance is
proud to be one of the
oldest, continuously
owned family businesses
in Gulf County. We pride
ourselves on providing the
best personal service pos-
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Take advantage 'of
our FREE quotes for any
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shop for insurance like
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DID YOU

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REMEMBER
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even make it easier for you with a free complete
exam and x-rays. That's right free for the entire
month of January and February. Now you have
one less excuse for avoiding the Dentist. Let the
staff at Dr. Lister's office keep your smile healthy
in a friendly, stress free environment that will
make you feel truly at home. So take a short drive
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Free exam and xrays for new patients only!

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lOB The~ Str PotS.Je L Tusa.Acut2.20 salse 97 evn ufcut n urudn ra o 8ye.


The 2006 Legislature's
posture was to strengthen cur-
riculum and requirements for
middle school students and
for high students electing the
18 credit college prep option.
Beginning with the 06-07 sixth
grade students, the academic
requirements for promotion to
the ninth grade are 3 English,
3 math, 3 science and 3 social
studies courses. In addition, a
course in career and education
planning must be completed
in the seventh or eighth grade.
This course may be a semester
or integrated into an existing
course.
Middle and high school
students who score Level 1 in
reading on the FCAT must be
enrolled in and complete an
-intensive reading course the
following year. Placement of
Level 2 readers will be based
on a diagnostic assessment of
student needs. Students scor-
ing Level 1 or 2 in math must
receive remediation the follow-
ing year which may be integrat-
ed into the student's required
math course. Students must
also complete an electronic per-
sonal education plan which is
to be signed by the student, par-
ent, and guidance counselor.
High school students may
receive "forgiveness" for a "D"
or "F" in a course with a grade
of "C" or higher earned in the
same course or a comparable
course. Students who partici-
pate in the ninth grade for one
school year, but do not earn
enough credits to be classified
as a sophomore, will be allowed
to take the tenth grade FCAT.
2006-07 ninth grade stu-
dents opting for the 18 Credit
Option for graduation MUST
meet the following require-
ments: Earn 6 of 18 credits
from dual enrollment, AE IB,
- or AICE;
score Level 3 on FCAT writ-
ing in grade 10; achieve a 3.5
GPA in the courses required
in the college prep track, and
must earn 5 credits by the end
of grade 9 and 11 credits by the


ISchool News. .


end of grade -10.
Students leaving school at
age 16 must complete an exit
interview to determine the rea-
son for the student's decision
to terminate school and actions
that were taken to keep the stu-
dent in school. In addition, the
student must be informed of
opportunities to continue edu-
cation in a different environ-
ment.
Progress monitoring
plans will replace Academic
Improvement Plans and will be
more reflective of the state's
school-wide monitoring of read-
ing. The monitoring of math
will be based primarily on
teacher assessments.
Beginning with the 2007-
08 ninth grade, an additional
credit in math is required mak-
ing a total of 4 needed for
graduation. Students will also
select majors and minors in
their high school curriculum.
FCAT reading data for
grades 3-10 is reported dis-
trict-wide by number and per-
cent for Levels 1 and 2: Grade
3 Level 1 16 (10%), Level
2 -13 (8%); Grade 4 Level 1
- 31 (22%), Level 2 24 (17%);
Grade 5 Level 1 34 {24%),
Level 2 30 (21%); Grade 6
Level 1 22 (13%), Level 2
- 42 (25%); Grade 7 Level 1
-29 (15%), Level 2 31 (16%);
Grade 8 Level 1 43 (23%),
Level 2 50 (27%); Grade 9
Level 1 49 (27%), Level 2 67
(37%); Grade 10 Level 1 65
(34%), Level 2 -65 (34%).
Students retained in grades
3-10 is also reported district-
wide: Grade 3 7 (5%); Grade
4 2 (1%); Grade 5 6 (4%);
Grade 6 -2 (1%); Grade 7 9
(5%); Grade 8 -4 (2%); Grade 9
- 10 (5%); Grade 10 5 (5%).
Third grade promotions
for good cause: 2 students #2
ESE and FCAT inappropriate;
2 students #4 Portfolio; 5 stu-
dents #5 ESE. and previously
retained.
For further information,
please contact the school of
your choice.


Parents: Mark your
Calendars
An "OPEN HOUSE" at Port
Saint Joe Middle School will be
held on Wednesday, September
6th from 5:30-6:30 and will
give parents the opportunity to
pickup progress reports, sign
up for Pinnacle passwords, and
vote for the School Advisory
Board. Also, there will be a
6th grade Parent Workshop on
Science Fair Projects. Please
Plan to attend!
Club sign-up was last
Friday and Clubs will meet
for the first time this Friday,
August 25th at 8:30am. If you
were absent on club sign-up
day please see Mrs. Nixon in
the front office before Friday
morning.
Port Saint Joe Middle
School is continuing to use
the Positive Behavior Support
Program that was implemented
last year in order to help reduce
the number of referrals every
month. The reward to students
with no discipline referrals for
the month of August will be an
Ice Cream Sundae Social held
on September 1st.
Does your student need
extra help with school work?
Tutoring is available on
Monday and Tuesdays from
3:00-6:30 in the Opportunity
Center Building #1 (located
behindthe PSJHSgym). Parents
may also use the Opportunity
Center to go online and view
your child's grades. For more
information call Gloria Gant at
229-9359.
Check out these free web-
sites for math practice for the
reluctant, disenchanted, or
struggling math student. It is
appropriate for all ages, even
pre-school, up through algebra.
http://www.coolmath4kids.com
and .http://coolmath.com/alge-


ARK


Does your child need
help with homework or find-
ing information on any topic?
"Ask a Librarian" can assist you
Sunday through Friday from
10:00 am to 10:00 pm and
Saturday from 10:00 am to
5:00 pm. Go to www.askali-
brarian.org and chat live with a
librarian from one of Florida's
public, school, or academic
libraries. Questions can also
be submitted vie e-mail at any
time.
Here is your link http:/
search.epnet.com/ to an online
library of full text articles and
other materials to be used
for research. The subscrip-
tion has been funded this year
by the Gulf County Education
Foundation to benefit students
and teachers. This resource is
available 24/7 from any com-
puter with internet access.
Port St. Joe Middle School
Username: psjms
Password : sharks

Parents,
You are able to monitor
your child's grades online. Go
to www.gulf.kl2.fl.us and click
on:
a. for the parents
b. view grades online
c. click here to begin

You will need to enter the
student ID and PIN Code and-
then select Port St. Joe Middle
School.
If you do not have, a PIN
Code, please call 227-3211 to
make an appointment. You will
need to sign a release and show
proof of identity.
All students have new
Pinnacle passwords this year,
not just those students new to
the school. Sorry for any incon-
venience this will cause.


Shark Talk
by Jera Ashabranner
School is back in progress
and at Port St. Joe High School
all of our activities are too. We
kicked off the beginning of the
year with a fun filled day. Our
SGA president, Leah Miniat,
along with the rest of the SGA
executive council had a great
day full of activities planned
to relax the nervousness of the
first day back.
Office
The office would like to
remind parents that all pentacle
passwords must be resubmit-
ted to the office. Please bring
identification between 7:30
a.m. and 3:00 p.m. (Monday-
Friday). There is also a School
Advisory Council sign-up sheet
available for parents in the
office.
Seniors
Getting our senior activities
started, Senior Class Officer
elections were held last week.
In an exciting election, Dusty
Alford (President), Hunter
Garth (Vice-President), Kurtis
Krum (Secretary), and Warren
Floyd (Treasurer) were named
this year's officers. They have
many activities to plan for this
year. The following activities are
coming up soon: September 15
all seniors will order senior
invitations and need to bring
$80. Also September 20 will
be ,the first payment of $50 for
anyone interested in going on
the Senior Trip.
Juniors
The Junior Class had a
very successful parent's meet-
ing on August 14, 2006. Among
the topics of discussion were
the events planned for the com-
ing year, staffing the conces-
sion stand at the home foot-
ball games being a priority.
.Shark coffee mugs are avail-


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Yachts: 30 65 feet
Larger Vessels: 1,000 ton
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Tohatsu outboard dealer


Port St Joe High Schood

Homecoming Parade :

The 2006 Port St Joe
SHigh School Homecoming
Parade will take place Friday.
September 29, 2006. Tfhe
Parade will begin at 3:30 p.='m>
eastern time and all floats, cars,
and marching units should be
Sin place by 2:,45. Anyone who
wishes to participate in the,
.parade please contact Wayne
Taylor at wtaylor(5gulf.kl2.
fl.us or I can be reached by
phone in the NJROTC Unit,
229-6177. Sorry, no political
campaign entries in the home-
coming parade. -
_B


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THE 4




CENTER
of North Florida


PANAMA CITY PC BEACH
784-3937 234-1829
TOLL FREE 1 -800-778-3937


CHIPLEY PORT ST. JOE
638-7333 227-7266
* www.eyecarenow.com


II 'ii I' III


W '


S PORT ST JOE
I Middle


a


SAt the junction of Gulf County Canal and
ICW near White City
,n Call first and ask for Red orTroy
E !.'' -'. '. X T'--, --, *..-...:.,


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years-


IOB The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAu st2,06


J.


i


able for only $6.00 in the high-
school office. All juniors will
be working September 25-2Q,-
Mon-Thurs, evening 6:00- 9:00
p.m.
Sports .
Football is building-
towards a new, exciting sea- -
son. With the first game out',f _
the way, they are getting ready -.
for this week's game against-
Blountstown. "We are excited-
to begin our season. I hope-
everyone will come and watch-
Friday night." Coach Palmer
stated. The Sharks game will
be Friday, August 25. Also the
cheerleaders will be having- a
car wash on August 26 and-
all are encouraged to come. It-
will be held at Advanced Auto-
Parts.
Clubs
At PSJHS, there are many
clubs the students can join.
A few' of these are Key Club,
Keyettes, and SGA. The Key
Club is accepting new memi-
bers and a packet with all th6ir
information is available in Mt.
Lamberson's room. Key Club
and Keyettes will be participat-
ing in the Pancake Breakfast
on August 26 at Dockside, and
would like to invite everyone
in the community to come and
enjoy. The SGA is accepting
applications for representatives
and will be through August 25.
The SGA also will be involved
in a conference in Gulf Shore~s
on the 26th.
We have an exciting year
ahead of us. Students, get.
involved this year.' Try.a new
activity that you have never
been apart of, or go out for. a
new sport. Take a risk that
you always thought you could
never do. As stated by Oprah,
"One of life's greatest risks is
never daring to take a risk."
Keep your grades up and have
a great year! *





F-nhIIlidN: 19 *701n G n---1 tY-1- d n


Tourist--


containers with tight-fitting
lids.
Clear brush and dense foli-
age from around your proper-
ty, and install durable fencing
to keep unwanted animals out,
especially if are staying near a
river or along a canal where
alligators are prevalent.
Keep your pets indoors
at night. This includes walk-
ing the beach at night along
St. Joseph Peninsula, where
black bears are commonly
found scavenging for garbage..
Never approach a wild animal
inder any circumstances.
Pets can fall from bal-
conies and windows just like
children.
So many people who come
t6 the beaches stay in houses
that are several stories tall, or
that have upper story balco-
nies, open windows and open
staircases.
Pets can fall just as easily
as children or adults from any
pf these locations. Terraces
and window ledges, in par-
.ticular, can be very dangerous,
especially in warm weather
,when doors and windows are
often left open.
Never leave an animal
unattended on a balcony, and
install tight-fitting screens on
all open windows. Even with
screens, windows should only
be left partially open in case

District Receives

DJJ Grant

Gulf School District has
been notified that it is the
recipient of a DJJ grant to
provide counseling services
for those students whose
behavior is causing them
to be suspended in or out:
of school thus preventing
academic success. The grant,
"Partners in Prevention,"
allows the counselor to serve
30 students in grades 5 9
.duringthe schoolyear. Weekly
sessions will be small group
as well as individual and will
focus on topics such as goal
setting, values clarification,
.anger management, self
,esteem, conflict resolution,
and developing positive
interpersonal relationships
with- peers. -In- addition,
.the counselor will provide
mentoring in academic
Seiindeavors and stress the
importance of reading to
promote academic excellence.
Parent permission
is required for students
to participate. On-going
communication by the
,,counselor with parents and
/' .. ,the school. will promote a
strong collaborative effort
that ensures students the
opportunity to be successful
at school and in life.


your pet manages to push


against the screen and knock
it out. Especially watch dogs
when they are climbing open
stairs, because they can easily
slip through.


KEITH L, JONES, CPA
AUDIT, ,CCOL.I'TIr JG. T C01.. "O'.LTING SRI'."c:S



L Anmerica Coui'it' on CPA's
411 Reid Avenue -Port St. Joe, FL 32 456
850-229-1040 PH 850-229-10 50 :,.
i h : ,,- com W W l' h,' "'!.'lp,-'-, C''
l.Et.Mi~E. AMERICAN AND FLORIDA INSTITUTES OF CPA'S


Keith "Duke" Jones VP/Business Development

I^L GullfCount Land 8
Abstract CompanU
Title Insurance Abstracts Escrows Real Estate Closings
411 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850) 229-9388 Fax: (850) 229-9398'
email: gulfabstract@yahoo.com


Cheerleading

Safety Class at

Gulf Coast
The Wellness & Athletics
Division of Gulf Coast
Community College, in.con-
junction with the American
Association of Cheerleading
Coaches and Administrators
will offer a Cheerleading
Safety class to be held on
August 26 from 10:30 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m. in the Wellness
and Athletics building, room
145 on campus.
The one day class offers
certification by the AACCA
issued following successful
completion of the course.
The cost of the course is
$25. For registration and
additional information,
email MACROBUTTON
HtmlResAnchor
Rose@cheercca.com or call
Rose Glevenger at 1-336-
983-3333.

Faculty Recital

at Gulf Coast

Community

College

The Visual and
Performing Arts Division
of Gulf Coast Community
College will host "Faculty
Recital" on August 25 from
7:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. in
the Amelia Center Theatre
on campus.
SThe "Faculty Recital" will
feature Ms. Kristen Johnson
and Dr. Hui-Ting Yang. Ms.
Johnson is a doctoral stu-
dent in vocal performance at
Florida State University and
teaches applied music voice
and musical theatre voice
at Gulf Coast. She will per-
form songs from Schubert,
Roussel,, Mollicone, and
Thomas. Dr. Yang teach-
es 'piano performance at
Florida State University and
at Gulf Coast.
The recital is free
and open to the public.
Donations for musical schol-
arships will be accepted at
the door. For more informa-
tion, call Rosie O'Bourke at,
872-3886.


Norris D. Langston Correctional


Scholarship
COME ONE, COME
ALL TO THE NORRIS
D. LANDGSTON YOUTH
SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION
AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAM.
Sponsored by: The Norris D.
Langston Youth Scholarship
Foundation, and 21st Century
Learning Centers. Start Date:
September 18, 2006, Times:
after-school until 5:30, This
after-school program is avail-
able for grades lst-5th, Parents
must provide transportation
home, Everyone must register
in advance, Please contact Mrs.
Jo Clements or Mrs. Rebecca
Pittman should you have any
questions. Please register early
to reserve your spot in the pro-
gram. We are looking forward
to another award-winning year.
Join us to achieve academic
excellence!!!


Officers Graduate

from GCCC
Correctional Officer
Basic Standards Graduation
Ceremony sponsored by the
Criminal Justice Training
Academy will be held August
28 from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00
p.m. in the Student Union
East Conference Center on
campus.
The guest speaker is
scheduled to be Mr. Richard
Thore, Assistant Warden of
the Bay County Jail.
For additional informa-
tion contact Mary Beth Wall
769-1551, ext. 5612.
-..


U Expand Your Views

XWtWIN-TECH
SHUTTERS
INTERIOR EXTERIOR
WE ALSO MANUFACTURE!
Vertical Blinds,
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We Also OfferMini Blinds, Silhouettes,
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DORIS WRAY & More!
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For allyour


Advertising needs...

Be Sure to

Contactyour


West Port St Joe
Account Executive


Rachel Browning


227-7856
E T135 W. Hwy 98
SHE STAR Port St Joe, Florida
TH7c)


Please visit The Star &


The Times at:

www.starfl.com


w w w.apalachtimes.comn
Also visit our affiliated panhandle

resource guide at:

www.emeraldcoast.com
*. ,-I -. .


DENTAL NEWS FROM THE OFFICE OF


FRANK D. MAY, DMD, PA

CROWN CONSIDERATION

A crown is often suggested as a restoration when a tooth is severely destroyed by dental decay,
a fracture, or has had root canal therapy. Crowns can be made of gold, porcelain or porcelain fused
to metal. PlaStics. or stainless steel are also used in special situations. Gold is an excellent restorative
material and is used where esthetics is not a strong consideration,- as in the back teeth. To obtain a
beautiful and natural look, the choice is either porcelain or porcelain fused to metal. The latter is strong
and attractive, and will give the very best results. It does not reflect light as well, however, therefore
giving a more opaque appearance. Because of its translucence, porcelain can be the most natural and
beautiful. It cannot always be used, however, because of thickness requirements.
The results achieved by this beautiful and functional restoration, depend on the condition your
mouth presents, the materials used in fabricating the crown, and the skill of your dentist. '


Come visit our new state of the art facility.
NEW PATIENTS WELCOME!


Advertising is 'now available on all our websites.

For more information call Katie at 596-7179

Here are a few business now advertising

with us online.


invisalign
start smiling more-


B Y C E R I N AT E


Rachel Browning,
Beach Realty of
Cape San Bias


Coastal


Guf Coast Realty, Inc.
Gulf Coast Realty, Inc.


Call(850 2271123Toda
frars k feecosulttio
31 ilam vne* PrtSt0Je6 w w Socorayco


w "a ? *.-1~?4 -i ----. - --------


TheSta, PrtSt.Joe FL- hurday Auus 24 206 -II


Establishedl 193?7 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas


F


for 68 years






12B The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 24, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


S.S. Florida --


April 5, 1854. Supposedly,
a spark from the Florida's
stack ignited a hay shed
on the Jacksonville wharf.
Pushed by a strong wester-
ly wind, the flames spread
rapidly, destroying 70
buildings, including Capt.
Willey's home. The Florida
drew away into the St.
Johns and was not dam-
aged. Possibly due to ill
will caused by the fire, in
August 1855 the ship was
sold to E.G. Rogers and
Company in New Orleans.
The Florida was enrolled in
that port on Jan. 23, 1856.
The ship's new master was
W.L. Cozzens. The Florida
replaced the Cornelius
Vanderbilt on the Key West
run.
The advertisement in
the New Orleans Picayune
read: "Excursions to Key
West via Pensacola Navy
Yard, Apalachicola, St.
Marks, Cedar Keys, and
Tampa Bay. Arriving at
each port in the morn-
ing and through the day,,
giving ample time to fish
and bathe at each place.
Through to Key West from
six to ten days and remain-
ing in Key West six days.
The U.S. mail steamship,
Florida, W.L. Cozzens com-
mander, will leave as above
on the 26th from the lake end
: of the Jefferson Railroad
at 8 o'clock A.M. carry-
ing the U.S. mails. Fare for
the excursion, going and
returning, $50, with privi-
lege of remaining on board
- while in port, having unsur-
passed stateroom, accom-
modations. Apply for freight
or passage to E.G. Rogers
: and Company, Agents, 72
Poydras Street."
When the Florida left
New Orleans on its last voy-
age on Aug. 26, it carried


162 barrels of flour, 60
loaves of bread, 12 bar-
rels and five hogsheads of
sugar, 200 sacks of corn,
150 sacks of oats, 250 coils
of rope, 12 casks of bacon
and 150 bails of hay. Also
aboard were five men, two
ladies, two children and the
crew.
Saturday, still at anchor
in St. Joseph's Bay, began
with fog and strong east-
northeast winds. At noon a
second anchor, with more
chain, was dropped. As
both anchors began to drag,
the engine was increased to
full power to keep the ship
in place.
At 7 p.m. the anchors,
even with the help of the
engine, began to drag. At
8:15 the ship struck a
shoal and the disintegration
began. Huge seas boiled
over the decks. The upper
saloon washed away at' 10
p.m. The occupants gath-
ered in the lower cabins
for safety. At 2:30 Sunday
morning the lower cabins
began, to everyone's hor-
ror, to wash away. Everyone
,then climbed to the high-
est part of the ship, the
gallow's frame, and lashed
.themselves to it. At 4 a.m.,
as the eye of the storm
began to pass to the north,
the wind came even harder
from the southwest. The
ship continued to break
apart.
At, daylight all that
was left was part of the
wheel house, the boiler and
engine, and the. hull. All
the decks, cabins and cargo
were strewn in the turtle
grass and pines.
Finally. by 9 a.m. the
wind subsided, the storm
tide began to fall and by 10
a.m. everyone was able to
walk to shore. Miraculously,


everyone survived.
They began the ordeal
of building shelters and sal-
vaging cargo. On Tuesday,
a husband of one of the
woman passengers came
from Apalachicola. His wife
and two of the men pas-
sengers returned with him.
On Wednesday, three boats
came from Apalachicola
to help salvage the wreck,
but soon left because terms
could not be reached with
the captain who decided to
save what was left himself.
On Saturday, Sept. 6,
Cozzens allowed the remain-
ing three passengers and
the ship's purser to take
a lifeboat and try to reach
Pensacola. They reached
that city on Tuesday, eat-
ing only raw bacon and
wet bread from the cargo
on their voyage. Catching
a ride on the schooner,
Diamond, they succeeded
in reaching New Orleans on
Sunday the 141, where they
told the news of the disas-
ter to the owners.
At this point the
Florida's salvage is lost
in the mists of history.
Apparently the machinery
and engine were saved and
it was officially listed as
abandoned in 1858.
Since this section of
Florida was uninhabited,
the old side-wheeler was
soon forgotten. Fishermen
and campers would occa-
sionally ,investigate the
hulk, but salvagers and
teredo worms soon caused
destruction of all the wood-
en parts exposed above the
sand. In a generation or
two, even the ship's name
was forgotten.
I first wrote the story
of the Florida in 1983 in
the old Star and the News
Herald. When the archae-


ologists, unaware of my
articles, came to the park
in 2000, they promptly
dubbed her as a "mystery
wreck." A graduate student
came the next year, did
some excavating, wrote his
thesis and proclaimed the
wreck as the Florida, some-
thing I and my earlier read-
ers had already known.


The Florida lies in the
boundaries of St. Joseph's
State Park and it is possi-
ble to wade or snorkel and
examine the remains of the
wreck. It lies buried under
the sands of the grass flats,
only the rusting remains
of the firebox rising above
the surface like a grotesque
tombstone, a silent warning


to the destructive power of
hurricanes and the fragility
of man's constructions.
(Thanks again to my-
longtime friend, Ed Mueller
of Jacksonville, author-
of numerous steamship/!
steamboat books, for his,
fathomless knowledge and,
help in gathering informa-'
tion on S.S. Florida.)


This broken plate found by a scalloper years ago shows the emblem of the ship a rattlesnake
circling a cabbage palm.


*Celery Grow ing..San ford. Fla.


1- '7


The S.S. Florida would have appeared much like the City of Jacksonville as she sailed in and out
of Florida ports.


Do wnto wn Redevelopment Agency



Community Forum &

Redevelopment Plan


Update Workshop


Existing DRA

North Port St. Joe

Waterfronts Partnership


The Gulf County Government, the City of Port St. Joe, and the Port St. Joe Downtown
Redevelopment Agency (DRA) invite you to participate in the updating of the DRA's
Community Redevelopment Plan. Attendees will be asked for their input regarding the
future development of PSJ and to help prioritize projects and programs identified in
previous vision workshops.


Your participation is welcomed and highly valued.


Date:
Time:
Where:
RSVP:


Thursday, August 31, 2006
5 PM (Dinner will be provided)
Senior Citizen's Center-120 Library Drive
Gail Alsobrook 850-229-6899
gailalsobrook@yahoo.com


Reservations are not required but will assist us in planning for the meals.

Downtown
Redevelopment Agency


101 Reid Avenue, Suite 109
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


"Planning is bringing the future into the
present so that you can do something
about it now" Alan Lakein


Ihone: 850-229-6899
Fax: 850-229-6898
E-mail: gailalsobrook@yahoo.com

.......... .


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


12BTheStr, ortSt Jo, F -Thursday, August 24, 2006






Fancy Doorknobs 2C


Legals


9C


Classifieds 11-12C


~i.."'~.,


atsE blissed 7 937 Serv years


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 24, 2006 SECTION C


A Tasty Convenience Expands In Port St. Joe


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
They've started basil and rosemary grow-
ing outside, and are planning a small garden
next spring along the side of the building front-
ing Third Street.
But Jodi and Antonio Perez, owners of
Provisions 3rd Street Grill, Catering and
Gourmet Take Away, are already reaping the
seeds they sowed.
A native of Atlanta, Jodi met husband
Antonio while both were working for a national
restaurant chain as trainers for new restau-
ratts and their employees.
Although each had planned for another
career, both recognized that they really wanted
to cook, and found themselves in the realm of
restaurants and food service.
Working together, they traveled the United


States extensively, eventually landing in Miami
for seven years.
Antonio, a native of Mexico City, became a
U.S. citizen last year.
They got tired of the traffic, the noise and
congestion, Jodi Perez said, and since her fam-
ily had always vacationed in the Port St. Joe
area, she told her husband, "I know this great
little place..."
"He's a city boy, so I had to talk him into
it," she laughed. "But we always knew we'd
open our own place," said Perez, "so this was
good timing as we watched the development
coming in."
They opened the business in the old sub
shop at the corner of 4th Street and U.S. 98 last
July, and were there just one year.
"We knew it wasn't the most ideal place
when we took it," said Jodi, "but it was right on


[U.S.] 98 and the price was right. It was a great
place for us to get started, introduce ourselves
to the community and get our name out in the
public.
"We just outgrew it faster than we had
planned," she added, laughing.
The old sub shop was not only cramped
during lunch, it also did not have enough room
for the amount of catering the business did.
"We just didn't have enough storage.
My house was already pretty much full," she
smiled, adding that everything now "is here and
in one place. It's so much easier for us."
The timing of the move was a "little awk-
ward," she admitted, since it came in the mid-
dle of wedding season, but with help from fam-
ily and dedicated staff, the business officially
opened in the new location last month.
Cool dark aqua punched with lime green














PV, ,'...


and white trim greets the customers inside the
cafe area, with sizable dark wood tables for four
and black metal two-tops. Wide-seated chairs
match the bar-height tables, with a couple of
bistro tables scattered across the room.
Perez described the menu as "eclectic
American, our twist on things."
Their Cuban sandwich is the top seller,
she said, and the lunch menu offers salads and
sandwiches, with daily dinner specials three
nights a week.
They will soon have a beer and wine
license, and will also focus more on desserts,
"so people can have more complete dinners,"
she said. "It will be a relaxing, casual dinner
spot with good music along with good food."
The move took them from about 400


(See TASTY on Page 14C)


~W, :~


Marie Logan/The Star
Provisions sits at the colorfully landscaped corner of Third Street and Williams Avenue.


Marie Logan/The Star
Color combines to create a cool, casual dining area in Provisions.


MEXICO BEACH OFFICE
1602 WV HIGHWAY 98
MEXICO BEACH FL
850 648-4400


PORT ST JOE OFFICE
155 WV HIGHWAY 98
(PORT CITY SHOPPING CENTER)
PORT ST JOE, FL
850 229-6100


H AI1"\.1NI Cr,)A. N i m'!C'o t.l s E



9! -'?q- A&A


MLS 111119.- i1,999.995. 3155 esi H%} 98 MLS 109318- 3.500.000. 3137 eest Hw 98 ; MLS 109317 -$1.400.000. 3119 ,\est HAy 98
Approximaiel 2 '. Acres 800'+/- Highwva. 98 Frontage Centrally Located to \indmark Beach Barefoot Cottages & Viento Des elopment This is a unique offering of


Owner Financing On44 Lots n'teekview Subdj- Mils 200371 72.6 Dahlia Street -- Must See! One
vision -- Terms: 'Price Perlioi -479,950.00. 10-( Owner %%ell Maintained. Property Offers Great
Doun ($7.995.001. $500.0t Per Monlh.To Balloon Location And Untliited Opportuniks For Evpan-
In Ifi 'ears Sile Built BomrnOnlv.'.No Penair) sion And Desel.1mel "
For Prepa.ment. L,ot Dinenions Are .pprovi-
matel. 104 X 106. 4 ,


MLS 111603 $ 795.000. 3151 West Hwy 98
VALUABLE DEVELOPMENT PROPERTY


Nils 201010-615 Sesame Street -- Home Has New .- -. ,* "-.
Carpel. And Is In Excellent Conditiod."This I .s-t .
MTut See Especially Foi ,oungJ.antiles'*: -. '' .-
Time Home Owners. -' *-


IELS Il111".- RU.LEiU'N IE.K L.LH.LL. -- Larfl- Nls 1.0P/IU 1IB ra n Breeze ee ay -- nreaKasi --
ingolder home on.landscaped lot. Fireplace, for- Bar. Fireplace. Floor: Hardsood And Carpet. wwi. r l" _
" al dining room,'hardwoo floors under carpet, Walk in Closet, Large Kitchen Pantry. This Is park. Has 2 large decks, nfrepd
built -in shelves and cabinet' - 4 .- nust See kitchen island. Excellent perm
.. . "" *-'7 -:-; ?.W -^ ........... _, .. _weekend retreat i


I~' ~~~------- )......- .'- ----i'-ja-


r~-i~I-."u


f-CA.-Z5,t -'&A& 4WSVW-- "I' X:Dl;.Itck t tZA UM










Robyn Rennick Joins Gulf to Bay


Robyn A. Rennick, a native
Floridian and a woman of many
hats will be relocating many
of her "hats" to Port St. Joe
after Labor Day. The wonders
of the Internet and technology
will allow her to fulfill a long-
time dream of doing her work
within view of the Gulf.
While many of the residents
of Cape San Blas and Port St.
Joe would associate Rennick
with shorts, tee shirts, and
the best scallop shucker and
cooker around, her largest and
longest worn hat is her asso-
ciation with Dyslexia Research
Institute in Tallahassee, FL.
The Hat of an Educator
and Advocate for Children
and Adults with Dyslexia and
ADHD
For 27 years, Rennick has
been teaching and training
teachers to educate children
and adults with dyslexia and
Attention Deficit Disorders.


* Facials
* Massages
* Microdermabrasion
* Complete Hair Salon
* Manicures & Pedicures
* Hair Removal
* Day Spa Packages
* Ear Piercing
* ek Design Jewelry & Gifts
i n c ..


She has developed programs
for both children and adults
and her adult program was
one of 4 national recognized
by the U.S. General Accounting
Office as one having the most
effective impact on adults.
Rennick will continue
teacher training and will be
developing teacher materials
to address the special way
that individuals with dyslexia
and diagnostic testing through
Hardman & Associates for
adults and children in the sur-
rounding areas.
Rennick is the president
of the Coalition of McKay
Scholarship Schools. The
McKay Scholarship is Florida's
scholarship for children with
disabilities. She is also the
president of the National
Association for Adults with
Special Learning Needs.
The Hat of a Developer
Rennick is a partner with


I eI i 4Wet
% sceT~a94 #


Gulf to Bay Construction and
Development, a local company
that has been building custom-
built homes in Gulf County for
the past four years. Rennick
has become expert at design-
ing custom built cabinets to fit
the desires and needs of hom-
eowners. "If you has told me 6
years ago, I would be a partner
in a construction company, I'd
have thought you were nuts. It
is like teaching in a lot of ways,
planning, organizing, and see-
ing dramatic changes happen
before your eyes."
The Hat of an Association
Manager
Rennick is donning a new
hat as she relocates to Port St.
Joe. She has helped to develop
the SouthBeach Homeowner's
Association and has served as
President, Vice President, and
Secretary. Using this experi-
ence, Rennick has developed
the Sunset Bay Management


Located at
304 Williams Avenue
Port St.Joe, FL 324567
850-227-9727


Group which will manage small
homeowner's association,
especially those that are just
developing in the Gulf County
area. Since many of the hom-
eowners do not live in Gulf
County year round, having a
resident to watch after their
properties and investments is
important.
A New Hat-A Port St. Joe
Community Hat
Rennick is excited about
the move to Port St. Joe. She
already feels at home in this
community and is eager to
become involved as a commu-
nity member.
Anyone interested in con-
tacting Robyn Rennick can call
the Gulf to Bay Construction
& Development Office at 229-
7799. Tell her what hat she
needs to wear. Do you need an
educator, a builder, an associa-
tion manager, or a storyteller?


,i Neubauer Real Estate, Inc.
ERA Always There For You. Each Office Independently Owned and Operated.
FEAT: UREi HIOM]E llEAT nURE H I:OMEi


671 Gulf Pines Dr.
5740.000 GULF ITE%% ClUS-
TOM BUILT C-30A HOME -
2BR/2BA home has glassed open
living, dining and kitchen areas.
ceramic tilefloors, spacious mas-
ler suite and large guest room.
Open deck, screened porch and
parking for 6 as well as home
warrant). #20113.14
Sl,499 -AniaingCape BasGulfFaixtHme-4BR/45BA-#111430
S775,-CanalFt roitnVcBeachToMwnHxme-3BR/3BA-......#20761
S725,0-VllaDdSo-NewGatedl Cmiy- ......#200597,#20598
9,M0-A-FrameBeatywithGulfViws-4- -........... #201261
S69,-S paciousMe&BeachHomeonCanal-4BR/2BA-......#201803
S599,(P)-BacdHillGulfView'IbwnHome-3BR/2BA-........... #111342
S4790-PortStJoeCommercialPrpeRy- #355711
S415,000-22earEdtsinBeaconHi- #201890
S399M-Great InLotwithCanalAccess- #201083
S395 -Sup- zBayRnLotonEastBay- #200757
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~xl nuMIi-Enj SncandS SpeinPnSJTt..--3BRWBA- .......... #111166
H 420 Reid Ave., Port St Jo
i/t.meralorilm (850)229-93
mai:I relocatiH@Brmaflrida.com loll Free 1-80110-476-6


1225 Cape San Bias
895.11UI) BAY FRONT GET-
SA-lWAA% ITH PRINACYAND
SECLUSION 3 BR1.2 BA with
panoramic %iets- of St. Joe Bay,
features family room. ceiling
fans, eat-in-kiichen and more!
Beautiful 'ooded lot with wind-
ing drieway... Approx 1.63 acres.
#111659

111 37th Street #44
$345.001) S fEPS AWlAY
FROM MEXICO BEACH
AND PIER 2BR/1.5BA iull.
furnished rownhouse /large
sunken family room. spacious
eat-in-kiclhen and large deck in
back hard. Perfect as weekend
elt-a-%'ia. or as, imestminen.
#10952'
S29500-COtebrtStJoeHomeCosetoTown-3BR/1BA-........#110492
S274,~0-BeautifuLotiuGreatSuxivision- #110700
S71,-Cust Builtw/WatMviewinanark-3BR/2BA-.........#201039
S26AM-Wa gDislancetoMexinBeach-2BR/I1BA-...........#109724
S245-)a- xMeioBeachHomi6nCota Lnt-3BR/2BA- #2I00661
S239,500- igHmeinPortStJoen2Lots-3BR/2BA-#110898
234,900-VacanLot inNewSublxivion-................ #110748
S199,000-BuildinBeatiflMexicoBeach-..................#200479
S15900-GreatMeficoBeachBuiklingIot-................#200480
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S5,750-FourCaryvilleWoodedLiosAvailable-............#...20026


S1-888-591-8751 .. 11., 11
r. ,. R
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auctions


NG 16 PRIME PROPERTIES


,; -:. '' "


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


2(The Star, Port St. Joe, rL-TusaAuut2,20


DOW~ S/ta em


-0Irrri4


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Species and Land Protected at Windmark Beach
St. Joe Staff Naturalist Preserves Nesting Habitats for Sea Turtles, Snowy Plovers at new Gulf Coast community


The St. Joe Company
is actively protecting
sea turtles- and other
endangered species in
their natural habitat at
WindMark Beach, a new
community located in
Port St. Joe on St. Joseph
Bay and the Gulf of
Mexico. Approximately
half, or 1,000 acres of
land, is set aside to
be preserved in this
growing community.


Regions Financial
Corporation (NYSE:
RF) and AmSouth Bank
(NYSE:ASO) announced
today their post merger
Florida leadership team
in North Florida. In
June, the new Regions
announced that Susan A.
Martinez would lead the
approximately $17 bil-
lion-asset Florida bank
at its Florida President
upon completion of the
merger.
Jim Schmitz,
AmSouth's North Florida
area executive and
Pensacola city president,
,vill continue in that role
with the new Regions


As stewards of the land
and its indigenous flora
and fauna, WindMark
Beach employs a full-
time, professional
Naturalist who is part of
a larger staff employed
by JOE. Working with
the State of Florida
and environmental
organizations such as
the Gulf and East Bay
Sea Turtle Patrol, Inc,
the WindMark Beach


upon completion of the
merger. He will report
directly to Martinez with
responsibility for all oper-
ations of the bank's 94
branches in Escambia,
Santa Rosa, Okaloosa,
Walton, Bay, Holmes,
Jackson, Calhoun, Leon,
Nassau, Duval, Clay, and
St. John's counties. He
joined AmSouth in 1995
in Commercial Real
Estate and was named
to his current position in
2002.
Reporting to Schmitz
will be: John Forrester,
AmSouth's Okaloosa/
Walton city president,
Rick Dye, Am South's


Naturalist monitors,
preserves and protects
a wide range of plant
and animal species
throughout Northwest
Florida.
In May, 97 eggs were
laid inWindMarkBeach's
first sea turtle nest,
which would have been
washed away by the surf
had the nest not been
skillfully relocated by
conservation volunteers.


Panama City area city
president, and Marty
Lanahan, AmSouth's
Jacksonville are city
president, all of whom
will continue in their
current roles with the
new Regions upon com-
pletion of the merger.
"The new Regions
will offer our customers
greatly increased bank-
ing convenience through-
out Florida and the other
15 states where the new
Regions does business,"
said Martinez. "We are
united in our commit-
ment to relationship
banking and ensuring
that customers are oui-


On July 31, WindMark
Beach had its first Sea
Turtle nest hatch with
96 hatchlings making it
into the Gulf of Mexico.
To date, a total of 6
sea turtle nests have
been laid at WindMark
Beach. In the same
area, eggs have hatched
from several snowy
plover shorebird nests.
"Throughout the Gulf
Coast region of Florida,


first priority."
The new Regions will
be one of the top 10
U.S. bank holding com-
panies and will operate
2,000 branches in, 16
states across the South,
Midwest, and Texas.
The bank will become
Florida's fourth largest
bank and will operate
approximately 400 offic-
es in 38 counties from
Miami to Pensacola, with,
its Florida headquar-
ters in Tampa. These
appointments are con-
tingent upon completion
.of the merger.


* *0


the growing public
use of beaches has
decreased the number
of locations available
for nesting shorebirds,
and other wildlife," says
Bill Lynn, WindMark
Beach Naturalist for
JOE. "At WindMark
Beach, we're trying to
help conserve these
habitats by striking a
happy balance, between
wildlife nesting areas
and public use of the
beach."
' An experienced
professional WindMark
Beach Naturalist, Mr.
Lynn monitors several
state- and federally-
listed animals and plants
at WindMark Beach and


the surrounding area.
Lynn also spearheads
seasonal surveys to
identify plant species
unique to the area.
"Increasingly, our
residents and visitors to
WindMark Beach want
to learn as much as
they can about the sea
turtles, gopher tortoises,
snowy plovers, rare
plants and other native
Florida wildlife that
share their environment.
JOE is committed
to the preservation
of its greatest assets
through conservation
and responsible
development," points
out Lynn.
* *


SLease is up!



We're moving &



everything must go



to the bare walls!



First come,



First serve!















TIFFIN'





'1 3Reid-Ave.

227-3667


> faster speed for searching and surfing.!
> toll-free technical support
> free installation
> free activation
> up to 7 email addresses and
6mb personal web space


* Offer available for a limited time only and subject to change without notice. DSL service not yet available in all areas. New customers only.
Other terms and conditions apply. Wire guard fee of $3.95 guarantees free replacement of your modem should you ever need one. Failure to
return the modem within 30 days of cancellation of service will result in a $90.00 charge for the retail value of the modem and a $10.00 charge
for the retail value of the power cord. Please call for details., 2006 GTC Communications, Inc., 502 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St Joe,
FL 32457. 1-800-772-7288.


Regions and Am South Announce


North Florida Leaders for the


Post Merger New Regions


For allyour Internet

Advertising needs...

Be Sure to

Contactyour

Internet Advertising
Account Executive

Katie Flament

596-7179
THE -* STAR T-lJ4fiSlA'-"rL
135 W.Hwy 98 129 Commerce Street
Port St Joe, Florida Apalachicola, Florida


TheSta, ortSt Jo, L -Thusdy, ugst 4,200 -3C


7 -R7-Srvn ufcunvadsroudn ra fr6 er


t











Caterpillars & Ornamentals


FORGOTTEN COAST REALTY
i i i"'ll -:,i-F I L- i I-FNi '.1TL' i'. NFF- \'d-NDOPFLRAl i-
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17



Mimosa Subdivision 1 of 30 quality built homes under development
in new Mimosa subdivision. All the homes in Mimosa offer spacious living and
quality construction at an affordable price. Conveniently located 19 miles North
of Port St Joe and a short driving distance from Mexico Beach and Panama City.
You are within minutes of the finest fresh and salt water fishing on the Chipola
and Apalachicola rivers, the Intercoastal waterway, St Joe Bay, and the Gulf of
Mexico. Great location for children with a new community park nearby. There
are currently six floor plans and many upgrades to choose from. Buy early and
pick your lot, house plan, and upgrades. Starting at $169,000


II- ---nft waaesl~PaIePr~-.... ~ 'av ~-_________________________"II


IN

Fl' a


By:Roy Lee Carter
County Extension Director
During summer months,
caterpillars cause problems
for gardeners all over our
state. As you know, caterpil-
lars are the larval stage of
butterflies and moths. While
many of the winged adults
area attractive, the damage
caused by the larvae certainly
is not. Because caterpillars
are ravenous feeders, they can
cause considerable damage in
a short time. So, early detec-
tion and prompt counter mea-
sure are very important.
There are many kinds of
pest caterpillars far too many
to cover in a single article. So,
I'll take about a few of the com-
mon ones you may encounter
and comment on some basic
control measures.
Sod webworms and fall
armyworms seriously damage
lawns. And, it's not unusu-
al for both to attack at the
same time. Webworms are
the smaller of the tow spe-
cies, reaching a length of only
about three-quarters of an
inch, compared to one-and-
a-lhalf inches for armyworms.
In general, both are greenish
in the young stage and turn
brown as they mature. Their
feeding is similar, resulting in
notched or ragged leaf edges.
However, webworms then feed
in patches, while armyworms
cause more scattered damage.
The orange dog caterpillar
is a common pest on citrus
trees. It's black with white
markings and slimy looking.
Its eggs, which look like yellow
beads, are laid on the newest
plant growth. At maturity, the
orange dog becomes a swal-
lowtail butterfly.
If you've every suddenly
felt a sharp, stinging sensation
while pruning a plant, you
may have come in contact with
an IO (EYE-ho) moth caterpil-
lar. This, caterpillar is pale


green, with two stripes -one
white and one maroon down
both sides of its body. It has
many clumps of stiff poison-
ous hairs. Touching these is
painful to most people. In
some cases, the reaction is
bad enough to require hospi-
talization. The 10 moth cat-
erpillar, which is only one of
several stinging varieties, is
found on such plants as hibis-
cus, poinsettias, palms, and
many others.
Caterpillars can be con-
trolled mechanically, or with
chemical sprays. If the cat-
erpillars are large, and few in
number, they can be removed
from plants by hand. Or, if egg
masses are recognized, these
can be destroyed before they
hatch. Chemical control mate-
rials include sevin, Malathion,
and bacillus thuringienses
(thur-ingee-ensis).
Sevin is
a stomach
poison, that's
good to use on
small caterpil-
lars that are
hard to find.
However, sevin
isn't a very
good contact
poison. So, it
can't be sued
against cater-
pillars that are
already quite
large.
Malathion
is a good con- .
tact poison, ,*
but a poor
stomach poi-
son. So, it's ,,
best for use .
on large cat-' ,
erpillars. .1'
Malathion ,I g
must be ,1') .
applied thor-'t,,l -
oughly, to
insure con- 7
tact with all
the caterpil-


Forgotten Gardening


B'
The G
cially ove:
wins. You
ing about.
going to ki
keep peeing
"No I'm not
you are," a
die but ei
peeing on
anyway, jus
Since
answered
outside, ai
flush plum
changed th
have I me
to be one
housebroken
searching
tion about
stumbled
about peei
one of my
dening foru
Four or fiv
they, or the
to provide
the compo
needs to be
Huh?
to come ul
sons this w
Disease. 0
And good
encourage
Males are h
tainn as it is
So I d
As it turns
world agree
is a clean,
in nitrogen
that is rea
plants. ML
have prove;
can be use
ing food cr
ably favor
more nitro
is, the bett
it grow. Bi
in nitrogen
diets are g
salt, dilution
at the rate
to between
water. Fo
on the com
urine can 1
In much
world, this
edge. Th
cycle is eat
grow, and
thought of'
and not re
ents to the
repugnant
as the thoi
watered wi
to us. In th
effort to ci


y: Kay Kelley poverty in Mexico City, an 'cleaners? drain cleaners?
reat Debate is offi- organization called Journey Municipal sewer systems add
r, and everybody to Forever experimented with to this mix medical and indus-
know.what I'm talk- ways to help the people grow trial wastes. No wonder we
She says, "You're fresh organic food in what- have to spend so much money
ill that plant if you ever space they had available. cleaning water to be able to
g on it," and he says Large, fifteen to twenty liter drink it.
," and she says "yes containers without drainage Out of all the 'research
nd the plant doesn't holes were packed almost full I did (and I spent days read-
ventually he starts of deciduous tree leaves and ing about this subject) there
a different plant grass clippings. A hole was were only a couple of caution-
st in case. drilled a few inches from the ary notes about using urine
Adam, men have bottom to provide drainage as fertilizer. One was that
the call of nature while maintaining a reservoir people with urinary tract infec-
nd today's modern of water. On top of this was tions should let their urine
bing hasn't entirely added a couple of inches of go through the compost pile
at fact. Never, ever, soil, and onto this soil, seeds instead of directly on food
t a man I believe were sown. The weight of the crops, and the other was that
hundred percent materials made these contain- today's highly processed foods
en. So when I was ers considerably lighter than contain large amounts of salt
for some informa- filling them with dirt, there- that could eventually build
t composting, and fore more suitable for balco- up to toxic levels in container
on a conversation nies and rooftops. Men were crops. Maybe we should all
ng on compost at encouraged to... you guessed have a potted plant to be our
favorite online gar- it... and by the end of a year canaries: if the plant dies
ims, I was intrigued, the contents of the containers from excess salt, we might
e people wrote that had composted down into a want to cut down our own
;ir spouses, did this rich, fertile humus. The con- consumption!
the nitrogen kick tents of one container provided All this really, really makes
)st pile sometimes enough soil to start ten more. me wish I were still coming up
begin heating up. The crops produced ranged with science fair projects for
i My mind raced from outstanding to so-so, with the kids. Just imagine the
p with all the rea- leafy crops and fruits doing display... "In this container of
vas a Very Bad Idea. best, and tomatoes, cucum- corn, I peed." "In this contain-
Odor. Indiscretion. bers, squash growing beauti- er I diluted my pee." "In this
gosh, just don't fully, but producing little fruit. container, I didn't pee at all."
this, I thought. All the plants did especially Talk about giving new meaning
hard enough to con- well in the early stages, and to the term 'whiz kid'.
,. all, intriguingly, proved very So, in the Great Debate,
id a little research. resistant to common insect the women win, because pee
s out, the scientific pests and diseases, contains a high level of nitro-
es that human urine In case you are wondering gen, which, applied to the same
sterile product rich (as I was) about the odor, there plant over and over, might be
in the form of urea isn't any as long as the urine too much of a good thing. This
adily accessible to is used on mulch, compost is also the reason we perceive
multiple experiments or well-aerated soil. When it dog urine as being bad: dogs
n that human urine hits impervious surfaces such tend to use the same spot over
d on crops, includ- as concrete or asphalt, that's and over, and other dogs come
rops, with remark- where the odor is created. along and add their offerings
able results. The The experiment in Mexico to the same spot. That causes
)gen-loving a plant City especially interested me, a buildup of salts and urea,
er the urine makes but I read about many such and that, too, is too much of
because it is so high examples of using this liquid a good thing. The men win,
i, and because our gold for fertilizer. It all makes because, well, now they have a
generallyy so high in me wonder who, really, has/ great reason to answer the call
n is recommended the more civilized society: the outdoors.
of one part urine, ones who 'close the loop' by In case you are interested,
one and ten parts recycling what their own bod- June 21st was Pee On Earth
r use as a kicker ies produce, or the ones who Day in the northern hemi-
ipost pile, however, flush away a cup of urine with sphere. If you are bummed
be applied straight. a gallon and a half of clean about missing the opportu-
of the rest of the water. Incidentally, since we nity to celebrate such a wor-
is common knowl- on the Forgotten Coast are thy even( head on down to
e human nutrient such big users of septic tanks, the southern hemisphere, and
, excrete, compost, you might want to know that catch it again on December
eat, so the very the word septic comes from 21st.
wasting a vital link, the Greek word 'septikos', And ladies, don't think
turning our nutri- which means 'to make putrid', you can't participate. Marine
soil, would be as and -that septic tanks are the suppliers can get potty lids
to some cultures biggest polluters of groundwa- for five gallon buckets. Mine's
ought of eating food ter in the United States. What been ordered.
ith urine might be goes through your system Questions? Comments?
ie mid 1990s, in an every day, other than personal Opinions? Email me at
combat the extreme waste: chlorine? toilet bowl kc.kelley@mchsi.com


Mexico'Beack pe-S, Was Carrabe I lie %j'-T'"4c'h mola
710 HWY 98 cam Rd. 603 Av6n'.ue A NW A93 AVOM E
(850)648-10-vw, (85,0)697-1010 TO)6534010
crb rnattencoast.tat"bi
Lai


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


TheSta, ortSt.Jo, F -Thursday, August 24, 2006


lars. And, this can sometimes
be hard to do especially on
large shrubs and trees.
Bacillus thuringienses
isn't a chemical. It's a bacte-
rial concentrate that's deadly
only to caterpillars. It's won't
harm any other insects. Other
chemicals that offer good con-
trol are: Bifenthrin (trade
name Talstar); Permethrin
(trade name -Astro); Acephate
(Trade name Orthene.
When apply pesticides,
you should always use caution
and common sense. Avoid
contact with the concentrate,
and stay out of the spray drift.
Read the product label care-
fully, and follow all directions
exactly.
If you have any questions
about controlling caterpil-
lars, please contact you local
Cooperative Extension Office
or Garden Center.


Roy Lee Carter







Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 24, 2006 SC


Qualifying a Real Estate Attorney


eSt


Dial *DEP to Report

Environmental Crimes


By: Charles J.
Kovaleski
Buying a house can be a
complicated process and for
most people it represents one
of the costliest investments
they will make in their life-
times. This is especially true
in Florida, where the median
home price is one of the high-
est in the country.
We often drive home the
point that using a qualified
real estate agent is critical to
the real estate process. Equally
important is using a qualified
and experienced real estate
attorney, someone who rep-
resents your interests and is
obligated to provide you with
competent legal advice.
Choosing the right real
estate attorney is probably one
of the most important steps in
,your home buying or selling
process.
You will be working close-
.' ly with this person throughout
your home sale or purchase,
sharing personal financial
data with him, and asking him
to negotiate on your behalf.
It's essential that you are com-
fortable with your choice, and
that you trust your attorney
completely.
Consider the following


when choosing your real estate
attorney:
Use trusted resources:
Get recommendations from
family, friends and real estate
professionals. Most real estate
attorneys are hired through
word of mouth, due to a solid
reputation in the community.
Ask your resources questions
that go beyond the attorneys'
legal expertise: Do they return
calls promptly? Can they
explain details in plain lan-
guage? You can also contact
the local bar association for
referrals in good standing and
with no complaints against
them.
Experience counts.
You'll want an attorney who
specializes in residential real
estate transactions, who prac-
tices in the area where the
house is being bought or sold
and is familiar with local and
regional laws. Ask about the
attorney's most recent real
estate experience, too. A good
rule of thumb is an attorney
who has'successfully complet-
ed at least 50 closings in the
past three years.
Ask for references.
Contact each one and inquire
as to their overall satisfaction
with the attorney. Specifically,


ask them to rate the attorney
and whether they would use
him or her again.
Get up close and per-
sonal. Once you've obtained
a list of referrals, take the time
to interview each candidate
before you make your deci-
sion. Not only will you get the
answers to some important
questions, but you'll also get an
idea about the kind of rapport
the two of you have-which
is an important consideration.
Among questions to ask:
Does your practice focus
primarily on real estate trans-
actions?
What is you direct experi-
ence in the real estate field?
How long have you been
practicing real estate law?
Are you familiar with clos-
ing practices in the geographic
area involved?
Can you represent the
lender that we are using for
our mortgage?
Will you provide a written
client agreement to establish
fees ?
Do you have any conflict
of interest in representing us?
What will it cost? Discuss
fees up front. Does the attor-
ney bill a flat fee or by the
hour? What, exactly does the,


fee cover? Ask for a detailed
description of what you are
paying for before agree to hire
the attorney. Also, whether
or not separate real estate
attorney fees will be charged
depends on the way the trans-
action is structured. Typically,
if your attorney acts as the clos-
ing agent and provides your
title insurance, no other fees
are involved. For more com-
plex circumstances, fees could
range from $350 to $600 for
an average-priced home. Keep
in mind that price shouldn't
be the deciding factor when
hiring an attorney; look for
quality, as well.
Finally, remember that the
advantage of hiring your own
real estate attorney is simple:
His job is to represent and
support your interests only,
protecting you from a range
of potential problems that
can range from the merely
annoying to the very costly.
The earlier in the process you
involve the attorney, the more
value you gain from him.. And
remember, don't sign any legal
documents before you hire a
real estate attorney.


Tourist Visited Florida in Second Quarter


Floridians now have a new
tool for protecting the state's nat-
ural resources. The Department
of Environmental Protection
(DEP) recently announced that
Sprint Nextel (NYSE: S) is the
newest partner to provide *DEP
service. Visitors and residents
can dial *DEP from their Nextel
and Sprint PCS cell phones to
report major environmental
crimes, including illegal dump-
ing of hazardous materials, con-
struction debris, oil drums and
biological waste.
"*DEP helps officers respond
quickly and efficiently to envi-
ronmental crimes and emergen-
cies," said DEP Division of Law
Enforcement Director Thomas
S. Tramel. "With this new part-
nership, law enforcement will
now have additional eyes on the
roadways to help spot and easily
report major crimes against the
environment."
The program will allow for
statewide consistency in the way
Floridians, particularly motor-
ists with cell phone only access,
report environmental crimes.
Environmental Crimes Hotline
staff will answer calls and for-
ward information to DEP law
enforcement officers for inves-
tigation.
"Wireless phones have
become essential communica-
tions tools for just about every-
one which is why Sprint Nextel
is pleased to beable to offer our
Sprint PCS and Nextel custom-
ers a way to alert authorities
to potentially environmentally
harmful acts," said Joel Garner,
Vice President, Public Sector


Sprint Nextel South Region.'
"Now, our customers can be
champions of the DEP's efforts
to protect Florida's unique and
sensitive environment."
*DEP is an emergency line
for reporting environmental
crimes only. BlackBerry users
may access this line by simply
dialing *337 or by dialing *
(ALT key) DEP Callers with-
out wireless access can report
environmental crimes to the
Environmental Crimes Hotline
by calling (877) 272-8335.
General environmental inqui-
ries should be directed to DEP
district offices during business
hours.
DEP's Division of Law
Enforcement is responsible
for statewide environmen-
tal resource law enforcement.
The division's Bureau of Park
Patrol provides law enforce-
ment services to Florida's state
parks and greenways and trails.
Agents within the Bureau of
Environmental Investigations
investigate major environmen-
tal crimes throughout the state.
The division also responds to
natural disasters, civil unrest,
hazardous material and chemi-
cal incidents and oil spills that
can threaten the environment.
In 2000, DEP launched the
'Environmental Crimes Strike
Force to combat major crimes
against the environment and
public health. Its first opera-
tion, Operation Green Lightning,
resulted in 156 arrests the larg-
est environmental law enforce-
ment sweep in U.S. history.


Preliminary estimates
of visitors to Florida for
the second quarter of
2006, released by VISIT
FLORIDA, the state's offi-
cial source for tourism
and marketing, show an
estimated 23 million peo-
ple visited the Sunshine
State.
"Tourism plays a criti-
"cal role in supporting
:-Florida's growing economy
and quality of life," said
Bud Nocera, President and
CEO of VISIT FLORIDA.


"This quarter is statisti-
cally equal to the second
quarter in 2005's record-
breaking year, the same
pattern we saw in the first
quarter."
VISIT FLORIDA also-
reports that data collected
at Florida's 14 largest air-
ports showed a 0.8 percent
increase in enplanements
in the second quarter this
year. Although hotel occu-
pancy is down 2.7 percent
in the first half of the cal-
endar year, the average


daily room rate for January
through June was up 9.4
percent, reflecting higher
lodging rates.,
The percentage of
Florida residents traveling
within Florida increased
12.7 percent as compared
to the same period in


2005.
Canadian travel to
Florida during second
quarter 2006 (April, May,
June) reflected a 2.5 per-
cent overall increase when
compared to the same time
in 2005.


While walking in the shallow waters of St. Joe Bay,
remember to do the "Stingray Shuffle" shuffle your
feet through the sandy bottom of the bay instead
of walking regularly. This shuffling gives the 'rays
ample warning of approaching humans and they
will swim out of your way.
/ '


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Apalachicola

.THE TIMESL.r&

timesads@starfl.com __ 653-8868


306 Williams Ae Porn St Joe
Thi recently remodeled 2,500 H.C SF
building include: new spacious modern
restrooms., electrical, A.C. IghTing and
tile flooring Iti unique interior and ex-
Ternor design makes adaptahon easy for
any bus-nessi $499 000 MLS #1 11046


Barefoot Contages Port St Joe
Exclusive 18 acre coastal communit-v
1,480 Sf 3BR 3 5B. 2 Ig pool hot tub
areas community coflagne, 75 mdle
to public beach Development adtomns
Windmark Beach Unit A5 sI lowest
priced 3BR unit on the markell
From $4395000 509 000 MLS#'s
110828 110950. 110951


ZuJ -4tn STreei Mexico Beacn
Experience the lifestyle of Fl mots
beautiful beaches This is a family-ori-
enmed beach retreat approx 900 ft
from public bch access boardwalk,
which overlooks over 1 3,8 mi of open
beach restricted from any bldg Home
is in good condition, and is priced well
below appraisal Seller motivated
$239.900 MLS# 201144


4258 County Rd 386 Overstreet
NEW I 512 H.C SF 4 bedroom.12 balh
is loc iuAt 4.5 miles to the Gulf and
public boa' ramp providing access, to
the ICW. East Bay, and St Joseph Bay is
only 5 mile awayl
$2*i-10 $ S219900 MLS#105200


Don't miss this 2,394 H/C SF 4BR/3B
home loc off W Rier Rd in the cit/ylim-
its, and situated on 5 acre in Circle J
Estates, a peaceful family community
Home includes exira large pool and
patio area.
$$IV-90a $235,000 MLS#111761
;.il l t~i99. -* ujs^i,.~lKW sAA


.6465 SR 30- C-30 Area
Beautiful home site: joins large.state
preservaTion acreage. giving total pri-
vacy and views of gorgeous pine and
magnolia savannahs. Only a short walk
to the Gulf..Views coan be had with el-
evated construction AdI lot also for
sale.
'M1-NQ0 $245,000 MLS# 111642


48 E. Avenue D Apalachicola
Location, location Prop is loc. in the center of the historic
.commercial district of Apalachicola, less than 1 block from
Market St. Zoned commercial/residential, this unique prop-
erty will make an exclusive office complex, bed and break-
fast, or home Virtual tour is available @ www.freehandme-
dia.com/vrtours/101590
$1,250,000 MLS# 102704


g




C

~.0


I uO IImaIIUIIWK F rive lSrillons' DUyou
3BR/2B double wide mobile home is
surrounded by lately oaks and state
preservation land providing privacy for
this home This 57 acres should divide
into tivo lois High and dry ground will
gve Bay/views w.th any future elevated
construction.
5199,900 MLSO 109428


6oy vicroria Ave Pron St Joe
Reidenal,a.Commercial property is loc.
.75 mile from Windmark Bch 1 block
oH Hwy. 98. and is less than a mile to
public beach and boar launch facilities.
V.es to the Bay can be had with el-
e'aled construction
$299 000 MLS# 201403







5290 Clipper Way Cape San Bias
Enjoy breathtaking views of FL most
amazing sunsets from 3 deck levels
This must see 4BR,3B, 1,917 SF home
will make a great vacation getaway or
rental property 1st tier lot is loc. in high
and dry X zone wth Bay and Gulf Views.
Priced to sell See virtual tour @ www
frehandmedia com/vrtours/1016605
Reduced to $825.0001 MLS# 106605


Bay Colors Simmons Bayou
Take a look at this peaceful 15 lot boyside development lo-
cated in sight of Saint Joseph Bay. From here, it is only a short
walk to the local marina. Bay breezes and. star-filled nights
awaits For more info, please visit www baycolorsosi com
Const. prices $196,000-$219,000 MLS # 201145-201149


:igi~s ees~ a8~ ~L-swn~l~n~~aranar IV


A-


Danny Raffield


PORT 258-6874

R. Office: 227-7979

401 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd


'Slow Down At
School Crossings!


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


il











Taxpayer Beware! 12 Tax Scams You May Encounter This Year!


By Becky Schmitz, EA,
CTRS
Have you ever noticed how
con artists never take time
off? They are constantly on
the lookout for ways to either
get away with something or
create havoc in people's lives.
And where better than in the
income tax arena? Because
fraudsters use tax situations
to hook individuals, they often
manage to trick people into
believing they are complying
with tax laws, when in fact
these lawbreakers are using
trickery.
Would you know what to
look for to avoid an abusive
tax scheme? Are you aware of
the tax scams that scam artists
utilize on a daily basis? For
example, if someone suggested
that income tax is unconsti-
tutional, would you believe
it? Hopefully, you would not,
because it isn't true. And for
that -reason, each year the
IRS reveals the newest scams
known as the Dirty Dozen,
which try to manipulate laws.
So taxpayers beware! The
Dirty Dozen reminds us that
tax scams take many forms.
To avoid getting caught up in
any one of these tax schemes,'
it is imperative to stay alert to
any scheme that can seriously
mess up your life and your
finances.


This year, the "Dirty
Dozen" includes the following:
1. Zero Wages: This is
a fairly new taxpayer scam
where the taxpayer attaches an
incorrect form known as Form
4852 (Substitute Form W-2) or
a corrected 1099 that shows
zero income or little income. It
probably includes a statement
indicating a rebuttal of infor-
mation that was previously
submitted to the IRS. Beware
anyone that encourages you to
declare zero wages.
2. Form 843 Tax
Abatement: This is also a new
scam in which filers use IRS
forms to claim their tax bills
have been wrongly inflated.
By misinterpreting the law, a
taxpayer will wrongly try to
get a refund of previous years'
taxes. Many using this scam
have not previously filed tax
returns.
3. Phishing: One of the
more common tax scams
these days is occurring on the
Internet. Known as 'Phishing,'
it is plainly an attempt at
identify theft. The unsuspect-
ing person receives an e-mail
claiming to be from the IRS
but it's actually linked to a fake
IRS website meant to solicit a
taxpayer's personal informa-
tion, such as Social Security
numbers. The con artist then
uses the information to file


for a fraudulent refund. If you
receive an e-mail claiming to
be from the IRS but you are
suspicious, call 1-800-829-
1040 to report it.
4. Zero Return:
,Fraudulent promoters instruct
taxpayers to enter all zeros on
their federal income tax fil-
ings. Naturally, returns with all
zeros are not valid. If a prepar-
er tells you to enter all zeros
on your federal tax return,
report him or her immedi-
ately.
5. Trust Misuse: The
IRS has become very aware
of Trust Misuse and is crack-
ing down on the practice.
Unscrupulous tax scheme
promoters urge taxpayers to
use offshore trusts to hide
assets. Taxpayers should be
very cautious about Trust
Misuse and.seek the advice of
a trusted professional before
entering into a trust. If any-
one encourages you to trans-
fer your assets into a trust to
reduce your amount of income
subject to tax, you should be
cautious. Several promoters
and their clients have been
prosecuted for this abuse.
S6. Frivolous Arguments:
Under this scam, various con-
stitutional arguments claim
that filing and paying taxes
is voluntary. The fraudulent
promoter will allege that the


Sixteenth Amendment con-
cerning Congressional power
to lay and collect income taxes
was never ratified, implying
that the IRS lacks authority
to collect taxes. This is abso-
lutely untrue.
7. Return Preparer
Fraud: If it sounds too good
to be true, it usually is. Return
Preparer Fraud usually consti-
tutes preparing and filing false
income tax returns by prepar-
ers who inflate personal or
business expenses, make false
deductions, include excessive
exemptions, and apply credits
that are not allowed. Taxpayers
are responsible for accurate
tax returns, so be aware of tax
return preparers who promise
big refunds. Make sure the
company or preparer you are
working with is credible. V
8. Credit Counseling
Agencies: Reputable credit
counseling agencies can advise
you in regard to managing
money and debts, but taxpay-
ers should use caution when
soliciting the help of credit
counseling organizations.
They may claim to fix credit
ratings but agencies that push
debt payment agreements
or charge high amounts for
their services could potentially
add to existing debt. The IRS
Tax Exempt and Government
Entities Division, is currently


in the process of revoking the
tax-exempt status of abusive
agencies.
9. Abuse of Charitable
Organizations and Deductions:
The IRS has observed
increased use of tax exempt
organizations that improperly
shield income or assets from
taxation. In this scam, a tax-
payer may try to move assets
or income to a tax-exempt
organization, but maintains
control over the income or
assets.
10. O f f s h o r e
Transactions: The IRS aggres-
sively pursues those who try
to avoid U.S taxes by illegal-
ly hiding income in offshore
banks and brokerage accounts
or uses offshore credit cards,
wire transfers, foreign trusts,
and employee leasing schemes
to hide money. The Internal
Revenue Service has beefed up
the money it will spend in the
next four years to investigate
these activities.
11. Employment Tax
Evasion: Some scam artists
encourage employers not to
withhold federal income tax
or other income taxes. This is
based on an incorrect inter-
pretation of the related tax
code and is repeatedly proven
false in court.
12. No Gain Deduction:
Under this scheme, some tax


filers try to eliminate their
entire adjusted gross income
by deducting it on Schedule
A with the words "No Gain
Realized." This deduction has
no basis in law, so if you
are confronted with this, take
heed. It won't fly with the IRS.
The IRS routinely pursues
and shuts down promoters of
these scams and is currently
investigating high wealth indci-
viduals and their associates. It
is hoping to boost government
coffers by $615 million over
the next four years. In fact,
the IRS recently announced
that it would spend $272,8
million over next four years
investigating and prosecuting
under Operation Wickenby,
which looks into alleged fraud
involving the use of offshore
entities. If you think you've
been a victim of tax fraud,
you may call the IRS at '1-
800-829-0433 to learn more.
The Internal Revenue Service
employees are looking out foI,
the best interest of the govern- '
ment.

Becky Schmitz, owner
of Centsable Accounting,
has recently been named the
2006 Top Practitioner from
The American Society of the
Tax Problem Solvers. Vist her
online at http://www.centsable-
accounting.com.


Florida Department Of Health (Doh) Participates In Southern Crossing Radiological Incident Drill


The Florida Department of radiological transportation
Health's Bureau of Radiation incident next week. The
Control (BRC) Radiological five-day exercise, named
Response Teams will be "Southern Crossing," will
participating in a multi- take place on August 14 -18,
state exercise 'simulating a near Dothan, Alabama.


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fPad y=aw eam 3&m!!!!


CHARMING 3BR/2BA home
with spacious kitchen/dining area,
quaint family room w/fireplace.
Ideal neighborhood located in
Apalachicola. Close to downtown
and schools.
MLS # 201380.............. $335,000


Pelican Real Estate
171 Highway 98, Suite D
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850)670-8886
vww.pelicanproperty.com









GREAT Ist ur, r l.i .rah .c.nder-
ful Gulfview located on St.. George
Island. Build your dream home
without the expense of clearing an
existing structure. Readi :,r con-
struction.
MLS # 108514.. ......... $925,000


Coordinated by the
Department of Energy's
National Nuclear Security
Administration (NNSA), this
event brings together county,
state and federal agencies
representing the states
of Alabama, Georgia and
Florida.
"This is an excellent
opportunity for the
department to evaluate its
response capabilities and
coordination activities- with
neighboring states and federal
partners," said DOH Secretary
M. Rony Frangois,. M.D.,
M.S.P.H., 'Ph.D. "The exercise
will also focus attention on


preparation, communication,
and management of multiple
agencies responding to
radiological threats."
The exercise also will
involve the activation
of various Emergency
Operations Centers to
evaluate the levels of
responsiveness, coordination
and support capabilities
.across multiple states and
jurisdictions. As part of
the event, field monitoring
teams from the various
organizations will collect
and analyze environmental
samples before coordinating
a decision-making process


throughout the various levels
of government involved in
emergency response.
During a radiological
accident, BRC provides
qualified radiological experts
along with the Mobile
Radiological Emergency
Laboratory (MERL), which is
.used to collect and assess
vital radiological conditions
during an emergency event. If
necessary, the BRC can also
request additional federal
aid from NNSA and from
adjoining states.
The BRC is responsible
for licensure o" radioactive
materials, registration


of x-ray equipment.
inspection of facilities
using radioactive materials,
^ radiological monitoring of the
environment, and emergency
response involving radioactive
materials. A -comprehensive
environmental monitoring
and emergency response
system is also maintained for
the three nuclear power plant
sites. For more information;,
visit www.myfloridaeh.coxn/
radiation/. For information
on. the Florida Department of
Health, please visit http:, 1
www.doh.state.fl.us/.
'


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PERFECT I., r,..I ,i:hcI re- irentral
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pyRiver at the end of road. MLS # 111645 ............ $189,000
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BE.AUTIFLIL IBRv2B.-XBetch~ie'
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MLS # 109995, 110002, 110003
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I Alltel Retail Stores I O These'Retail Stords Now Open Sunday.
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Bronson Announces Damage


Assistance For Aquaculture Industry


FSU Study: Hurricane

Preparedness Good For

Employee Morale


Florida Agriculture
and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson today announced that
the state is receiving nearly
$3.7 million in federal funds
to assist aquaculture opera-
tions that sustained damages
from the 2005 hurricanes.
The money, which is
Florida's share of a larger allo-
cation provided earlier this
year by the U.S. Department
of Agriculture for a number of
Gulf states, will be available to
aquaculture businesses in 36
counties that were impacted
by the storms.
"I'm encouraged by the
,rebuilding process that already
is under way in the industry,
and this assistance will pro-


vide additional momentum for
that effort," Bronson said.
Florida's nearly $100
million aquaculture industry
includes tropical fish, clams,
shrimp, food fish, alligators,
aquatic plants, live rock, bait
fish and other items. The hur-
ricanes' storm surge damaged
clam and live rock operations
while inland growers sustained
damages to greenhouses, fish
tanks and other infrastruc-
ture, as well as products, as a
result of high winds and loss
of electricity.
To qualify for assistance
under the program, affected
parties must meet the follow-
ing requirements:
-- Be an aquaculture facil-
ity in an eligible county.


-- Possess an Aquaculture
Certificate of Registration at
the time that disaster dec-
larations were issued for
Hurricanes Dennis, Katrina or
Wilma.
-- Have not received, and
will not receive, assistance
covered by other disaster pro-
grams for the same losses.
The program requires that
the assistance provided to an
aquaculture producer cannot
exceed the amount of loss-
es suffered from the storms,
and that no individual opera-
tion can receive more than
$80,000.
Eligible aquaculture oper-
ations located in the 36 coun-
ties will receive grant program
application packages begin-


ning on August 18. Damage
claims will be accepted for
losses involving production
replacement, physical proper-
ty repair/replacement, clean-
up costs and other document-
ed storm-related expenses.
The eligible counties are: Bay,
Brevard, Broward, Calhoun,
Charlotte, Collier, Dixie,
Escambia, Franklin, Gadsden,
Glades, Gulf, Hardee, Hendry,
Highlands, Holmes, Indian
River, Jackson, Jefferson,
Lee, Leon, Levy, Liberty,
Martin, Miami-Dade, Monroe,
Okaloosa, Okeechobee, Palm
Beach, Santa Rosa, Sarasota,
St. Lucie, Taylor, Wakulla,
Walton and Washington.


FEMA Launches Debris Contractor Registry To Assist Communities
Agency Offers Yet Another Pre-event Planning Tool To Florida Cities And Counties


A new Web-based regis-
-try developed by the Federal
Emergency Management Agency
-(FEMA) recently went live to
"assist state and local govern-
rnents plan for and manage
-debris operations in the event
of a disaster.
FEMA launched the new
Web site to facilitate sharing
resource information between
-local governments and debris
removal contractors through-
out the country. The site, which
can be accessed at http:/Avww.
fema.gov/business/contractor.
shtm and by clicking on the
link for the debris contractor
registry, is designed to facilitate
effective debris removal pre-
paredness planning by state
and local emergency managers,
and expedite the pace of debris
removal following disasters.
The timing of the online.
,resource coincides with some
50 workshops conducted
,throughout Florida by FEMA
debris specialists from the
Florida Long-Term Recovery
Office. Attended by city and
County finance and operations
officials, the sessions focus on
the importance of pre-event
debris removal plans and
contracting relationships and


include a review of FEMA reim-
bursement policies.
"We've been encourag-
ing local governments to set
up their contracts with debris
removal contractors before the
next storm hits in order to
speed recovery funds in the
event of a disaster declaration,"
Scott R. Morris, FEMAs Florida
long-term recovery director,
said. "In addition to the per-
sonal visits, local officials who
have not had the opportunity
to put contracts in place, now
will have help with their plan-
ning efforts through the Debris
Contractor Registry."
Although FEMA does not
contract for debris removal,
under a presidential disaster
declaration the FEMA Public
Assistance Program can reim-
burse a cost-share to state
and local governments, tribal
authorities and eligible private
nonprofit organizations for eli-
gible work done by contrac-
tors.
The 2004 and 2005 hur-
ricanes left behind tremendous
amounts of debris. Upwards of
82 million cubic yards of debris
were cleared after the storms
in Florida enough to fill tractor
trailers lined up from Key West


to Tallahassee and stacked 21
high. So far, FEMA reimbursed
public assistance applicants a
total of $991 million for debris
removal undertaken as a result
of the 2005 storms and $1.07
billion for debris removal after
the 2004 storms.
Another Web-based tool
for Florida applicants lets them
track the status of project work-
sheets and reimbursements
online at www.floridapa.org.
New to the site this hurricane
season is the Public Assistance
Playbook, a guidebook that
spells out what's eligible, what's
not and what documentation is
required. The Playbook gives
city-and county applicants clear
guidance on the policy FEMA
public assistance officers will
follow in Florida for reimburs-
ing local governments.
In addition, the Disaster
Contractors Network (DCN)
at www.dcnonline.org facili-
tates information-sharing and
resource-matching among the
government, construction com-
munity, businesses and home-
owners before, during and after
disasters strike.
The Debris Contractor
Registry is an element of the
U.S. Public Private Partnership


(USP3), which is administered
through the U.S. Department
of Homeland Security. It rep-
resents a pilot program of the
National Emergency Resource
Registry (NERR) that will
develop as the overall pro-
gram grows. The Disaster
Contractors Network is funded
by FEMA and hosted by the
Center for' Disaster Risk Policy
at Florida State University.
It is important to note that FEMA
does not endorse, approve or
recommend any contractors
listed in the databases.


Hurricanes have ravaged
the U.S. Gulf Coast for the
past three years a trend pre-
dicted to continue over the
next' decade. In response, a
number of companies in the
region have developed plans
to deal with hurricanes before,
during, and after their onset.
Now, a Florida State
University researcher has
studied how the development
of such plans affects employee
health, wellbeing and willing-
ness to participate at work.
Wayne A. Hochwarter, an
associate professor of man-
agement in FSU's College of
Business, conducted a study
one month prior to the 2006
hurricane season in which he
asked over 600 employees
from a variety of organizations
to discuss their organization's
hurricane-preparedness pro-
gram. He found that more
than one-half of employees
thought that their organiza-
tion was prepared and had a
plan in place if a hurricane
was to hit. Meanwhile, almost
40 percent indicated that their
organization would not suffer
much down time after a hur-
ricane, and approximately 45
percent knew their role in the
restoration process.
"Oftentimes, compa-
nies put plans in place with-
out communicating them to
employees, which is largely a
waste of time, energy and other
resources because employ-
ees simply don't know how
they should be implemented,"
Hochwarter said. "What was
striking in this research was


the influence that proactive
planning had on worker atti-
tudes and willingness to help
on a day-to-day basis."
The effects of hurricane
preparation on employee atti-
tudes were substantial, he
noted, including:
Significantly higher lev-
els of job satisfaction
Greater willingness to do
things beyond what is expected
by management
Perceptions of greater
control
More enthusiasm and
a greater willingness to work
harder than expected
More compassion for
others
Greater feelings of sup-
port from the organization
Lower levels of depressed
mood at work (i.e., sluggish-
ness, sadness)
"There is a misperception
that planning for a hurricane
has value only if one hits,"
Hochwarter said. "Certainly,
nobody wants a hurricane, but
I think it's important for com-
panies to know the benefits to
planning beyond simply deal-
ing with the traumatic event."
He suggested that plan-
ning is important because it
opens lines of communication,
increases employees' feelings of
importance, and builds cama-
raderie. Involving employees
in the process also goes a-long
way toward reducing the "us
versus them" mentality that
pervades many organizations,
Hochwarter said.
His research is being pre-
pared for publication.


Registration


PLEASE CALL


DAN VANVLETT


227-2584





FOR MORE INFORMATION


TEAMS:


dolphins (6-7-8 year olds)


Jaguars (9-10 year olds)

Buccaneers (11-12 year olds)



Equipment distribution will be done

immediately following registration. Please call

Dan VanVleet at 227-2584 with any questions

you may have about league registration.








Gv Yu MW nn _i


- -~~~""Ba~


REQUESTS FOR PROPOSAL

Gulf Countsy Conimunity Development Corporation on behalf of Gulf County
Board of County Commissioners announces funding availability for its State
Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Program for activities approved by the
Gulf County Board of County Commissioners and Florida Housing Finance
Corporation (FHFC) in the SHIP Local Housing Assistance Plan (LHAP) pursuant
to Florida Statutes Sections 420-907,420-9079: Administrative 'Code Rule Chapter
67-55, F.A.C.

The Gulf County Community Development Corporation is requesting proposals,
from qualified local organizations) interested in implementing the following SHIP
activity during all or a portion of the anticipated SHIP contract period (anticipated
to be 07/01/06-06/30/07)


Activity: Land Acquisition
The purpose of this strategy is to provide direct loans to eligible sponsors for the
purchase of land, which is pledged at the bank as security collateral for construction/
permanent financing for a new home. Pursuant to Rule 67-37.007 F.A.C., in order
to meet the 75% construction requirement for land acquisition, construction of the
homes must be completed within 24 months from the close of the. applicable fiscal
year. All eligible homebuyers must be at or below 120% of Area Median Income.
The terms of this award will be in the form of a deferred payment, loan. Loans
made to non-profits will be at a.0% interest and will be due when the homebuyer
secures permanent financing. All loans made under the program guidelines must
be paid off through purchase by a homebuyer within a 24 month period from initial
disbursement of SHIP funds and before the end of the expenditure deadline for the
fiscal year in which the award was made.

The successful proposal from eligible sponsors) will include past experience of the
organization in successfully developing this type of housing, have access to lenders
willing to participate in providing end loans, unit production goals for housing,
must have property selected in advance, including legal description and address,
must have an appraisal on property indicating current value, must show ability to
fund remaining purchase price, provide development cost pro forma indicating the
developer fee does not exceed 10% of the sales price, and documentation of the
organization's employment or planned employment of personnel from the WAGES
and Workforce Development Initiatives shall result in a priority award of SHIP funds
assuming the organization demonstrate capacity to implement the subject activity.
No housing can be built upon speculation

Proposals must be received by mail or hand delivery before 5:00 pm, Eastern Time,
September 24, 2006 at Gulf County Community Development Corporation, Gulf
County Florida, SHIP Program. Mail to Gulf County CDC, P.O. Box 837, Port St.
Joe, FL 32357-0837 or hand deliver to 301 st Street, Port St. Joe, F1 32456.

For further information, please contact Dannie Bolden, Gulf County CDC, 1-850-
229-7986.


I -I --~ -


TheSta, Prt t.Joe FL- Tursay Auust24,200 -7C


Establish 197 -Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years






u%. ine.)TOFrQ T3. FL Thijrsdnv Aut


FULL





TURN

Fancy doorknobs

are back in vogue,

from stylish glass

to fancy brass


ANTIQUE: Solid brass (J.
Nicolas, more than $500).


LION: A ferocious greet-
ing emanates from this classic
knob, center (J. Nicolas, more
than $500).


CRYSTAL: Victorian style from
Baldwin, above. (Home Expo, $60).
SIMPLE: Old classic made by
Heritage, below. (Home Expo, $40).


ORNATE: European style, above. (J. Nicolas, more than
5500).
OLD? Contemporary classic has style but not a hefty
price, from Gainsborough, below. (Home Expo, $20).


By NICK HARDER
Freedom News Service
Around the turn of the
century, doorknobs were
often made by craftsmen and
reflected the social status of
the homeowner.
Most of the early elegant
doorknobs were made of
brass, their ornate designs
reflecting the Victorian period.
Later, many doorknobs were
made of different types of glass
such as milk glass.
Over the years attention to
such detail waned, Doorknobs
became utilitarian and func-
tional, not decorative. But that
is changing back again.


These days you can find
doorknobs in many different
materials, with designs rang-
ing from plain brass to con-
temporary glass.
And today's doorknobs
can be referred to in almost
as many ways as there are
materials. If you were a home-
building contractor, you might
refer to them as locksets. If
referring to interior doors, a
contractor may call them pas-
sage locksets, interior knobs,
spring-latch locks or tubular
locks.
If it's an entry door, it
could be called a keyed lock,
entry lockset or even exterior


locks.
A doorknob may have a
lock built into it or have a
separate locking mechanism.
Some doorknobs called dum-
mies don't even turn. They're
just for pulling or pushing. -
You'll find these knobs mostly
on closet doors and doors for
which a locking mechanism is
not necessary.
Doorknobs are usually
located nearly midway up the
door on the side that swings
open. If you were some places
in France, however, you might
find doorknobs in the center
of the door.
When shopping for home


doorknobs, there are a few
things to keep in mind.
Rebecca Whiteleather,
owner of B&C Custom
Hardware and Bath in Laguna
Hills, Calif., says function is
the first consideration she
advises to clients.
"I ask them to consid-
er the function of the room
(where the doorknobs will be
located)," she said. "Is it for
privacy, in which case a lock
on the knob is needed? Is
it a passage (from one room'
to another), where a latch is
required? Or is it something
like a closet in which a dummy
is OK?"


No matter what the func-
tion, Whiteleather said, the
materials for the knobs are
also a consideration.
"Right now we're selling
a lot of stainless-steel door-
knobs," she said. "This mate-
rial is especially helpful if a
person lives near the water"
because the finish resists
damage from salty air. "But
it also goes along with a lot of
contemporary styles,"
On a practical basis, if you
have elderly people in your
home, you may want to con-
sider something other than a
round doorknob, Whiteleather
said. Doorknobs can be hard


to turn for people with arthri-
tis and similar ailments that
make twisting the arm and
wrist painful. Levers are often
recommended in such cases:;
What do special doo't-
knobs cost? You can find
them at. some stores, such
as Home Depot's Expo Desig'n
Center, for anywhere from $2i
to $95; from specialty outlets
and antique stores, don't be
surprised by prices topping
$500.


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Healthy Kids an, -

\ One less


. worry for

parents.


A brighter future for kids


SAffordableheealth insurance`

for newborns

through age 18.
Apply Now! It's easier!


_- -atio-

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>1


li

!MM aA S


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


91 heStr. or S. Je.FL- Turda, A qut 4,2006


~II


":;:;::


k









FIzfyhl,-J rl193'~7 *~- Servin ( Gulf -u~ntv and suirrnimndina areas for 68 years


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 24, 2006 9(


Public






Notices,


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
COASTAL TOWING AND
ROADSIDE SERVICE, INC. gives
Notice of Foreclosure of Lien
and intent to sell these vehicles
on 08/25/2006, on 08:30 a.m.
ET at 8082 W. Hwy 98, Port
St. Joe, FL 32456, pursuant to
subsection 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes, COASTAL TOWING
AND ROADSIDE SERVICE, INC.
reserves the right to accept or
reject any and/or all bids.
1989 Honda
#JHMED3550KS003776
1993 Chevrolet
# 1GNFK16K4PJ334515
1992 Honda
# 1HGCB7553NA220398
1993 Ford
#1FACP52U5PA294527
Publish August 17 & 24, 2006

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Storage Units 1249 Highway
22, Wewahitchka, FL
#82 Pam Diez
#17 Margaret Hightower
will be open August 31 and
merchandise removed if rent not
brought up to date.
Publish August 17 & 24, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO: 05-239DR

JOHN A. WEILAND, Petitioner
and
JACQUELYN GAYLE WEILAND,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: JACQUELYN GAYLE
' WEILAND,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action has been filed against
you and that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on John
Arthur Weiland whose address
is 2817 Indian Pass Rd., Port
St. Joe, FL 32456 on or before
9/14/06, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court
at 1000 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456, before
service on Petitioner or immedi-
ately thereafter. If you fail to
do so, default may be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court, docu-
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the Clerk
of the Circuit Court's office. You
may review these documents
upon request. ,
You must keep the Clerk
of the Court's office notified
of any current address. (You
must. file Notice of Current
Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerks
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanc-
tions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings. Dated
8/2,/06.
Clerk of Circuit Court.
By.Jasmine Hysmith, Deputy
Clerk.
Pubish: August 10 through
September 14

Request for Information (RFI)

The Area Agency on Aging
for North Florida, Inc. Nutrition ,
Program is seeking sources
interested in providing pre-plat-
ed frozen meals to senior citi-,
zens organizations in Calhoun,
Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf,
Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson,
Liberty, Madison, Taylor,
Wakulla arid Washington
Counties. Prospective sources
must be established and have
current or previous experience
in providing the pre-plated fro-
zen meals to public or private
entities. If a contract is awarded
for this effort, the Area Agency
on Aging for North Florida, Inc.
anticipates duration of not more
than one year with two, one-
year renewal options pending
continued funding availability.
Responsibilities include, but are
fiot limited to:
-utilization of approved
kitchen facilities
employment of qualified
itaff to oversee facility operation
and meal production
delivery of frozen pre-plat-
ed meals to individual sites in
the counties listed above
supplying meals which
comply with the u Dietary
SGuidelines for Americans and
provide 1/3 of the recommend-
ed dietary allowances (RDA)
for individuals 51 years and
older as established by Food
and Nutrition Board of National
Academy of Sciences
provision of disposable
supplies to delivery sites
Services must also adhere to
guidelines, set forth by the State
of Florida Department of Elder
Affairs Home and Community-
Based Services Draft Handbook,
dated January 2003, and con-
tracts between the Area Agency
on Aging for North Florida, Inc.
and State of Florida Department
of Elder Affairs.
Deadline: Written respons-
es to this RFI are due to the
Area Agency on Aging for North
Florida, Inc. on September
8, 2006 by 2:00 p.m., EST.
Only written responses will be
accepted.
Contact: Area Agency on
Aging for North Florida, Inc.
Attention: Lisa Bretz
2414 fahb-n Drive
Tl a-aha,-isee, FlI.rnda 32308
S The responses to this
SRequest for Information (RFI)
will be used to identify those
organizations that are quali-
fied and interested in provid-
ing pre-plated frozen meals for
the Area Agency' on Aging for
North Florida, Inc. Nutrition
Programs in Calhoun, Franklin,
Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes,
Jackson, Jefferson, Liberty,
Madison, Taylor, Wakulla and
Washington Counties. The
Area Agency on Aging for North
Florida, Inc. does not plan to
award a contract or pay for


information provided as a result
of this request. This RFI is a
preliminary step to the release
of an Invitation to Bid pack-
age on or around September 8,
2006. Failure to respond by the
deadline specified in this notice
shall constitute a "not inter-
ested" response.
Publish August 24, 2006

Legal Notice
Request for Information (RFI)

The Area Agency on Aging
for North Florida, Inc. is seeking
sources interested in providing
services to older adults under
the Federal Older Americans Act
Title III-B: supportive services,
and III-Cl & III-C2: nutritional
services in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf,
Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson,
Leon, Liberty, Madison, Wakulla
and Washington Counties.
Prospective sources must be
established and have current
or previous experience in pro-
viding services to older adults.
If a contract is awarded for
this effort, the Area Agency on
Aging for North Florida, Inc.
anticipates duration of not more
than one year with two, one-
year renewal options, pending
continued funding availability.
Responsibilities include, but are
not limited to: Coordination
of transportation to meal sites
and for recreational activities;
Provision of interactive recre-
ational activities; Assistance
in linking older adults to
appropriate aging resources;
Coordination and participa-
tion in on-going outreach and
public education activities;
Coordination and provision of
some in-home "services for frail
elders, based on needs identified
through formal needs assess-
ment activities; Coordination
and provision of nutrition edu-
cation and nutrition counseling;
Delivery of meals to eligible
clients in the counties listed
above; and Provision of meals to
at least one congregate meal site
five days per week in the coun-
ties listed above.
All services must be provided
in accordance with established
guidelines set forth by the State
of Florida Department of Elder
'Affairs Home and Community-
Based Services Draft Handbook,
dated January 2003, and con-
tracts between the Area Agency
on Aging for North Florida, Inc.
and State of Florida Department
of Elder Affairs..
This Request for Information
(RFI) is a preliminary step to
the release of a Request for
Proposals (RFP) package on or
around September 8, 2006.
Failure to respond by the dead-
line specified in this notice shall
constitute a "not interested"'
response. The responses to
this RFI will be used to identify
those organizations interested
in providing Older Americans
Act services for the Area Agency
on Aging for North Florida,
Inc. in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf,
Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson,
Leon, Liberty, Madison, Wakulla
and Washington Counties. A
response is required for each
county in which an organiza-
tion wishes to provide services.
In addition, individual RFP
responses will be required to be
submitted for each county. The
Area Agency on Aging for North
Florida, Inc. does not intend to
award a contract on the basis of
this request for information or
otherwise pay for the informa-
tion solicited.
Deadline: Written respons-
es to this RFI are due to the
Area Agency on Aging for North
Florida, Inc. no later; than
2:00 p.m., EST on September
8, 2006. Responses should
include the organization name,
contact person, address, and
phone number. Only written
responses will be accepted.
Contact: Area Agency on
Aging for North Florida, Inc.
Attention: Lisa Bretz
2414 Mahan Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
Publish August 24, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE:
ESTATE OF FLOYD CHARLES
AKE,
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 06-56PR
/
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The Administration of the
estate of FLOYD CHARLES
AKE, File Number 06-56PR, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Gulf County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address which is
533 East 11th Street.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below. I
All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate, including unmatured,
contingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of this
notice is served must file their
claims with this Court. WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON#THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other person hav-
ing claims or demands against
decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publi-
cation of this Notice is August
24, 2006.
SYFRET & DYKES LAW
OFFICES, P.A.
Attorneys at Law
Clayton R. Syfrett, Esq.
FL Bar No. 0054305
P.O. Box 1186
Panama City, FL 32402-1186
(850) 785-3400
ATTORNEYS FOR THE
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Publish August 24 & 31, 2006


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
MAY 23, 2006
REGULAR MEETING
continued

2006 HURRICANE SEASON

Emergency Management
Director Nelson discussed that
the 2006 Hurricane season will
begin on June 1st. He reported
that the National Weather Ser-
vice and the Hurricane Center
are predicting another season
like last year. He also stated that
after reviewing some of their per-
centages as to where the storms
will make landfall, the highest
percentage is on the Carolina
coast at (61%), and Gulf County
lies in the middle on the area
with the next highest percentage
(48%). Emergency Management
Director Nelson stated that the
key to preparation starts at
home with the family, and any-
one that needs information can
come by the E.O.C. He also stat-
ed that for the next two weeks
hurricane preparedness items
can be purchased tax free.

EMERGENCY MEDICAL
SERVICES

Emergency Management Di-
rector Nelson discussed that he
was the first person on the scene
at a wreck on his way to work,
and he discussed the quick re-
sponse and professionalism of
the Gulf County emergency ser-
vices during this' situation.

E.M.T. CLASSES

Gulf County E.M.S. Director
McGuffin reported that he has
been teaching an E.M.T. class
three nights per week, 3 hours
per night, and has graduated
the students from the E.M.T.
class. He stated that he had
people from Wewahitchka, How-
ard Creek, South Gulf Fire De-
partment, Mexico Beach, St. Joe
Beach and the City of Port St.
Joe attending the classes. Gulf
County E.M.S. Director McGuf-
fin stated that he will continue
to have these classes to build
our infrastructure. Commis-
sioner Traylor discussed that
Gulf County E.M.S. Director Mc-
Guffin is an outstanding person
in this community because he is
always where ever he is needed.


EDWARD BYRNE MEMORIAL
GRANT FUNDS

Sheriffs Office Major Nu-
gent requested that Chairman
McLemore execute the docu-
ments for the Edward Byrne
Memorial Grant awarded to the
Sheriff's Office. Commissioner
Peters motioned to approve this
request. Commissioner Barnes
seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously. Major,Nu-
gent then discussed the grant
evaluation for the Sheriffs De-
partment, stating that the plans
for the County did not meet the
standards for the Department of
Justice, and changes need to be
made before January, 2007 (the
"Seven Step Plan"). He stated
that if this plan is not complet-
ed, the Sheriffs Office will lose
the grant and have to repay the
funds.

PUBLIC WORKS / MOSQUITO
CONTROL BUILDING
MODIFICATION

Public Works Director
Shearer reported that he, has
received the final plans for the
Public Works/Mosquito Control
building modification. He re-
quested permission to advertise
to receive sealed bids on con-
struction of the new building.
Commissioner Traylor motioned
to approve this request. Com-
missioner Peters seconded the
motion, and it passed unani-
mously. Public Works Director
Shearer also stated that the
new building will be located
in the area where the Sheriffs
Department: previously had an
impound yard. Upon inquiry
by Commissioner Peters, Public
Works Director Shearer stated
that the soil has not been tested
in this area, but will be prior to
construction.

B.A.C. TOWN HALL MEETING

T.D.C. Director Pickett re-
ported that the Beach Advisory
.Committee held their first town
hall meeting on May 12th, and
there were 87 residents and
property owners in attendance.
She stated that 1,131 survey,
cards were mailed out, and they
have received 31% of the sur-
veys back which represents 47%
of all the properties in this area
(31 surveys were received back
for wrong addresses). She stated
that there are 577 parcels out of
1,600 in the project area, and of
the surveys returned 91% voted
yes for the project, and 9% vot-
ed no for the project.

GULF COUNTY EMERGENCY
SERVICES UNIT

On behalf of the Gulf County
E.S.U., Planner Richardson re-
quested permission to purchase
a 2006 Ford F-350 through
State Contract (specification
#30). He stated that this will
replace the present jaws of life
unit, and .the existing truck will
be transferred to Gulf County
E.M.S. to be used by the first
responders. Commissioner Pe-
ters motioned to approve this
request. Commissioner Williams
seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.

ABANDONMENT -


PLANTATION ROAD /
CRAWFISH CABIN ROAD

Commissioner Traylor dis-
cussed the abandonment of
Plantation Road that was ap-
proved at the May 9th meet-
ing, and withdrew his motion
approving the abandonment of
Plantation Road at the May 9th
meeting. Commissioner Peters
seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously. Commis-
sioner Traylor then motioned to
begin abandonment process on
the unpaved portion of Crawfish
Cabin Road. Commissioner Pe-
ters seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.


PORT ST. JOE LIBRARY
RENOVATION PROJECT /
BID #0405-03

Upon request by Commis-
sioner Peters, Interim Building
Official Colliisworth discussed
that he has met with Mr. Fisher
at the library regarding final
payment on the library addition.
Building Official Collinsworth
recommended that the Board ap-
prove final payment to be made
as soon as the approval paper-
work is received from the State
Fire Marshal. Commissioner
Peters motioned to approve this
request to make final payment
to Fisher Construction upon re-
ceiving the State Fire Marshal's
letter of approval on the Library
project. Commissioner Traylor
seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.
Commissioner Peters dis-
cussed that the fire alarm in
the new addition at the library
works great, but the fire alarm
system in the old section of the
library does not work. Commis-
sioner Peters then motioned for
Interim Building Official Collin-
sworth to assess the fire alarm
system in the old section of the
library, and report back to the
Board regarding repairs. Com-
missioner Williams seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imouisly.
Commissioner Peters also
discussed that the library com-
mittee is preparing a list with
a few more repairs that are
needed, and will present it to
the Board.

PORT ST. JOE SOCCER
FIELD

Commissioner Barnes dis-
cussed that he has received a
call regarding sand being hauled
to the soccer field, and he mo-
tioned to complete hauling the
sand to the soccer field. Com-
missioner Williams seconded
the motion for discussion. After
further discussion, the motion
passed unanimously.

SOUTH GULF COUNTY FIRE
DEPARTMENT

Commissioner Barnes re-
ported that eight of the members
from S.G.C.F.D. attended first
responder training. Upon mo-
tion by Commissioner Barnes,
second by Commissioner Peters,
and unanimous vote, the Board
approved the following Special
Projects payments:

Dist, 1 S.G.C.F.D. Dona-
tion $250.00

Dist. 2 S.G.C.F.D. Dona-
tion $250.00 /

Dist. 3 S.G.C.F.D. Dona-
tion $250.00

Dist. 4 S.G.C.F.D. Dona-
tion $250.00

Dist. 5 S.G.C.F.D. Dona-
tion $500.00

(End)

SENATE BILL 293

Commissioner Williams dis-
cussed a letter submitted to the
Governor by West Palm Beach
County requesting that he veto
S.B. 293, due to the fiscal ob-
ligations it places on Coun-
ties. Commissioner Williams
motioned to send a similar let-
ter to the Governor, because it
would place a fiscal mandate of
$209,000.00 on Gulf County.
Commissioner Peters seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Commissioner Williams
discussed affordable housing
for the County, and reported
that he received a packet from
St. Lucie County on affordable
housing. He requested that the
Board review this packet and
send a copy to the Affordable
Housing Commrittee and Gulf
County C.D.C. for their review.

PLANNING AND
DEVELOPMENT REVIEW
BOARD

Commissioner Williams
discussed the Planning & De-
'velopment Review Board, and
motioned to appoint Chair-
man McLemore to serve on this
Board. Commissioner Traylor
seconded the motion", and it
passed unanimously.

2006-2007 BDGET
PROCESS

Upon inquiry by Commis-
sioner Williams, County Attor-
ney McFarland stated that the
budget process is not at the
stage where the Board can begin
holding the regular workshops.
Commissioner Williams recom-
mended the Chairman sched-
ule a workshop before the next
Board meeting. After further dis-
cussion, Chairman McLemore
stated that he will schedule a
workshop at 5:00 p.m. E.T. on
June 13th to discuss issues re-
garding the Budget.

ZERO-BASED BUDGET
PROCESS

Commissioner Williams dis-
cussed the zero-based budget
process, and requested permis-
sion to review the work order/
billing system with the Clerk's
Office, and bring his findings
back before' the Board. Com-
missioner Williams motioned to
adopt a work order system for
the County, and allow him to
bring options on how it could
work back to the Board for final
approval. Commissioner Barnes
seconded the motion. Commis-
sioner Peters requested that
Chairman McLemore schedule
a workshop to discuss the work
order process. After further dis-
cussion, the motion passed 4-1,
with Chairman McLemore vot-
ing no.


Joe Beach and Windmark Phase
II. Commissioner Williams mo-
tioned for County Attorney Mc-
Farland to send a letter to the
City of Port St. Joe for breech of
contract. Commissioner Traylor
seconded the motion for discus-
sion, and County Attorney Mc-
Farland stated that there is a
30-day clause that states either
party can terminate the contract
based on a 30-day notice with-
out any cause for termination.
After further discussion, Com-
missioner Williams motioned to
send a letter to the City of Port
St. Joe stating that they have 10
days to appear before the Board
and respond to the correspon-
dence or the County will file a
breech of contract. Commission-
er Traylor seconded the motion,
and it passed 4-1, with Commis-
sioner Peters voting no.

FIRE DEPARTMENT
BUDGETS

Commissioner Williams
requested permission to meet
with the Board and fire chiefs to
discuss the budget process and
manpower for the fire depart-
ments.

EMERGENCY MEDICAL
SERVICES BUILDING

Chief Administrator Butler
discussed that he and and Gulf
County E.M.S. Director McGuf-
fin have made some changes
to the plans for the new Gulf
County E.M.S. building and
requested permission to receive
sealed bids on this project as
soon as the specifications are
ready. Commissioner Peters mo-
tioned to approve this request.
Commissioner Barnes seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously.

SAFETY HAZARD / BUILDING
REMOVAL

Chief Administrator But-
ler reported that he and Public
Works Director Shearer have
discussed a home in the Oak
Grove area that burned, stat-
ing that the owners do not have
the money to remove the burned
home. He recommended that
due to safety issues and hur-
ricane season approaching, the
County remove the structure.
County Attorney McFarland
stated that if this is a public
safety hazard, the County can
have the owner execute a re-
lease to allow workers to enter
the property and take down the
building. Commissioner'Barnes
motioned to have owners sign
a release to allow the County to
remove the building for public
safety. Commissioner Williams
seconded the motion,. and it
passed unanimously. County
Attorney McFarland stated that
this release will need to be ex-
ecuted before the County goes
on the property.

STORM SHELTER

Doug Kent, Health Depart-
ment Administrator, appeared
before the Board and reported
that the special needs shel-
ter has been initiated for Gulf
County, and it will be at Mari-
anna High School.

PAN FLU EPIDEMIC

Doug Kent, Health Depart-
ment Administrator, reported
that a Pan Flu Epidemic presen-
tation will be made at the Cen-
tennial Building on June 22nd.
He further reported that the
Health Department will have the
kits that: will be needed if this
epidemic occurs.

EXECUTIVE TRUST
COMMITTEE MEETING

Doug Kent, Health Depart-
ment Administrator, reported
that the Executive Trust Com-
mittee will hold a meeting to dis-
cuss the cent sales tax issue
on June 15th.

MENS' HEALTH MONTH


Doug Kent, Health Depart-
ment Administrator, appeared
before the Board and reported
that the month of June is Mens'
Health Month, and the Health
Department will be providing
free screens to all men in the
County to have a P.S.A. test, co-
-Ion & rectal checks, sugar check
and cholesterol check.

STRATEGIC PLANNING

Loretta Costin, Chairper-
son of the Strategic Planning
Committee, appeared before
the Board and discussed that
the Strategic Planning Com-
mittee has completed the plan.
Mrs. Costin requested that the'
Board schedule a workshop for
the committee to present the
plan. Upon inquiry by Chairman,
McLemore, Mrs. Costin suggest-
ed Thursday, May 25th at 9:00
a.m., E.T. for the workshop.

FILL DIRT EASEMENT

Lydia Burrows appeared
before the Board and inquired
about fill dirt being removed
from her property by the Coun-
ty. Commissioner Williams dis-
cussed that this is a priority
issue, and other jobs have had
priority over digging a pond.
Commissioner Peters discussed
that if the County started the
project, it needs to be finished.
Chairman McLemore stated if
the project is not completed
within two weeks, Mrs. Burrows
should call any of the other
Commissioners.


There being no further busi-
ness and upon motion by Com-
missioner Traylor, the meeting
did then adjourn at 7:40 p.m.,
E.T.

CARMEN L. MCLEMORE
CHAIRMAN
ATTEST:
REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK


CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
ANNEXATION AGREEMENT

Commissioner Williams re- PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
ported that the County has an MAY 23, 2006
annexation agreement with the WORKSHOP

City of Port St. Joe regarding St.


The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners met
this date in workshop session
with the following members
present: Chairman Carmen L.
McLemore, Vice Chairman Bill
Williams, and Commissioners
Billy E. Traylor, Nathan Peters,
Jr. (entered at 5:47), and Jerry
W. Barnes.
Others present were: Coun-
ty Attorney Timothy McFarland,
Deputy Clerk Kari Summers,
Chief Administrator Don Butler,
and Planner David Richardson.
Chairman McLemore called
the workshop to order at 5:30
p.m., E.T.

IMPACT FEE STUDY

Planner Richardson intro-
duced Melissa Proctor, from
G.S.G., Inc., and Mrs. Proctor
discussed the revised impact
study relating to Fire Safety,
stating that they have consoli-
dated all of the non-residential
categories which will provide a
nonresidential fire rate of four-
teen cents per square foot for
fire districts in unincorporated
areas. She also stated that the
residential rate would be $88.32
per residential unit. Mrs. Proc-
tor discussed that different
districts have different hous-
ing ratios than commercial or
nonresidential categories. Upon
inquiry by Commissioner Wil-
liams, Mrs. Proctor stated that
ad valorem taxes generated in,
fire districts will effect the credit
component. Upon inquiry by
Commissioner Traylor, about
the $88.32 per household, Mrs.
Proctor stated that $88.32 per
household would be for fire safe-
ty only. Upon further inquiry by
Commissioner Traylor, Commis-
* sioner Williams stated the funds
generated will be used for future
needs as the County grows. Mrs.
Proctor stated that this money
has to be in a :rstricted iand
for fire safety, ard for capital
contributed to ar,-.:in She also
stated that this is based oh rev-
enue that comes in, and how the
County currently pays for capi-
tal projects. Planner Richardson
discussed that if there is a defi-
cit in service these funds cannot
be applied to the deficit, but can
only be applied to the impact
for future development. Mrs.
Proctor then discussed the fire
component fee, stating that the
only thing that changed in'this
revision is the district. She also
stated that the figure for Parks
'& Recreation is high due to the.
value of the land on the beach.
the meeting at 5:47 p.m.> After
discussion by Commissioner
Williams about the areas that
are not paying fire taxes, Mrs.
Proctor discussed that there is
a proposed ordinance relating to
adoption of Impact Fees for the
Board to review.

SENATE BILL 360

Melissa Proctor, of G.S.G.
Inc., discussed S.B: 360, re-
lating to transportation, and
the County requirements. She
reported that G.S.G. Inc, does
not c':. ansp.:,ration srudiez
but thej a.:-rk l t h i:.nmeonre
who does. She &,a'e dhaL there
are special reqtLruemiroi a-Lnn
transportation, and there are
deadlines that have to be met.
Upon inquiry by Comm;ssiuner
Williams Mrs. Proctc-r stated
that every government needs to
have a transportation plan in..
place. Commissioner Williams
discussed that the County will
probably loose the fiscally con-
strained status for this County.

There being no further busi- -
ness, the workshop did then ad-
journ at 5:55 p.m., E.T.


CARMEN L. MCLEMORE
CHAIRMAN

ATTEST:
REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK


PORT ST. JOB, FLORIDA
MAY 25, 2006
SPECIAL MEETING


The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners met
this date in special session
with the following members
present: Chairman Carmen L.
McLemore, Vice Chairman Bill
Williams, and Commissioners
Billy E. Traylor, Nathan Peters,
Jr., and Jerry W. Barnes.

Others present were: Coun-
ty Attorney Timothy McFarland,
Deputy Clerk Kari Summers,
Chief Administrator Don Butler,
Administrator Staff Assistant
Lynn Stephens, Interim Build-
ing Official Lee Collinsworth,
Human Resources Director
Denise Manuel, Maintenance
Superintendent Steve Mork,
Mosquito Control Director Mark
Cothran, Public Works Director
Gerald Shearer, and Solid Waste
Director Joe Danford.

Chairman McLemore called
the meeting to order at 10:01
a.m., E.T.

EMPLOYEE MATTERS

Commissioner Williams
discussed that he has met with
Chief Administrator Butler re-
garding an incident he had with
an employee, and that ChiefAd-
ministrator Butler has followed
the policy, and handled the dis-
ciplinary action on this issue.
He also stated that if there are
anymore concerns or actions by
this employee, that the employ-
ee be terminated immediately.
Commissioner Peters discussed
that he did not like the action of
Commissioner Williams on this
issue, stating that it was unpro-
fessional. He also stated that
Commissioner Williams does not
have the authority to instruct
Chief Administrator Butler to
terminate any employee. Com-
missioner Peters stated that no
Board member has the right to
use profanity to any employee.
Upon inquiry by Commissioner
Williams, Commissioner Peters


stated that it is his understand-
ing that Commissioner Williams '
has used profanity when talking
to employees. Commissioner Wil-
liams stated that he has worked
with employees in a respectful
manner, and he explained that
this is not a personal issue, but
stated there will be a change in
how the business is run. Com-
missioner Peters informed Com-
missioner Williams to be careful
about using profanity towards
any employee.
There being no further
discussion, and upon motion
by Commissioner Barnes, the
meeting did adjourn at 10:07
a.m., E.T.

CARMEN L. MCLEMORE
CHAIRMAN

ATTEST:
REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
MAY 25, 2006
WORKSHOP
The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners met
this date in workshop session
with the following members
present: Chairman Carmen L.
McLemore, Vice Chairman Bill
Williams, and Commissioners
Billy E. Traylor, Nathan Peters,
Jr. (entered at 9:07 a.m.), and
Jerry W. Barnes.
Others present were: Coun-
ty Attorney Timothy McFarland,
Deputy Clerk Kari Summers,
Chief Administrator Don Butler,
Administrator Staff Assistant
Lynn Stephens, E.D.C. Director
Alan McNair, Human Resources
Director Denise Manuel, Main-
tenance Superintendent Steve
Mork, Planner David Richard-
son, and Solid Waste Director
Joe Danford.
Chairman McLemore called
the workshop to order at 9:00
a.m., E.T.

STRATEGIC PLANNING

Loretta Costin, of the Stra-
tegic Planning Committee, ap-
peared before the Board and
discussed the proposed strate-
gic plan for the County drafted
by the information received from -
the citizens through surveys,
town hall meetings, and inter-
views of key individuals in the
County. Mrs. Costin discussed
that this will be a five-year plan
for the County. Peters' entered the meeting at
9:07 a.m.> She then discussed
the eight strategic areas of
concern for "smart" growth in
the County, (1) Health Care,
(2) Economic Development, (3)
Education, (4) Public Safety, (5)
Housing, (6) Environment, (7)
Transportation, and (8) Recre-
ation and Culture. Mrs. Costin
also reported that they have
received a 'lot of comments on
Neighborhoods and Unincorpo--
rated areas from the surveys.
She discussed that there is a
lot of information on enabling
strategies to provide transpar-
ent, responsive, and account-
able budget and financial man-
agement based on the priorities
of the citizens of the, County.
Mrs. Costin discussed that this
is the plan that the committee
is presenting to the Board based
on the work of the committee,
input from the citizens, and
information gathered over the
last jea, She. also stated that
the committee feels that this is
the blueprint for Gulf County's
future. Mrs. Costin stated that
the committee is .recommend-
ing'that the .Board, adopt this
strategic plan, ihiplement of a
citizens task force, review op-
erational plans twice a year,
and make any strategic plan a
flexible document. After further
discussion, the Board thanked
Mrs. Costin, and the committee
for all the work put forth to cre-
ate this strategic plan. Commis-
sioner Williams suggested that
the Board review this plan, and
also present it to the Cities and
ask that they adopt it as well.



There being no further busi-
ness, the workshop did then ad-
journ at 9:38 a.m., E.T.
CARMEN L. MCLEMORE
CHAIRMAN

ATTEST:
REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
JUNE 12, 2006
EMERGENCY MEETING

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners met this
date in emergency session with
the following members present:
Acting Chairman Bill Williams,
and Commissioners Nathan
Peters, Jr., and Jerry Barnes.
McLemore, and Billy E. Traylor
were absent>.
Others present were: Coun-
ty Attorney Timothy McFarland,
Clerk Executive Administrator
- Towan Kopinsky, Deputy Clerk
Kari Summers, Chief Adminis-
trator Don Butler, Interim Build-
ing Official Lee Collinsworth,
Building Inspector George
Knight, Chamber of Commerce
Director Sandra Chafin, Emer-
gency Management Director
Marshall Nelson, Emergency
Management/911 Coordinator
Ben Guthrie, E.M.S. Director
Shane McGuffmin, G.I.S. Director
Larry Davis, Human Resources
Director Denise Manuel, Main-
tenance Superintendent Steve
Mork, Mosquito Control Director
Mark Cothran, Planner David
Richardson, Public Works Di-
rector Gerald Shearer, Assistant
Road Department Superinten-
dent Chris Wood, Solid Waste
Director Joe Danford, T.D.C.
Director Paula Pickett, Veterans
Service Officer James Kennedy,
Sheriffs Office Major Joe Nu-
gent, Sheriffs Office Major Mike
Harrison, and Sheriff Dalton
Upchurch.
Acting Chairman Williams
called the meeting to order at
3:15 p.m., E.T.

TROPICAL STORM ALBERTO


Emergency Management
Director Nelson reported that


as of the 2:00 p.m. National
Hurricane Center Advisory, a
Tropical Storm Watch/Warn-
ing extends to Indian Pass, and
we can expect a 4-6/8-10 foot
storm surge. Emergency Man-
agement Director Nelson dis-
cussed that the main concerns
are coastal flooding along the
Indian Lagoon area, Indian Pass
road and the Stump Hole area.
Emergency Management Direc-
tor Nelson reported that he is
not recommending evacuations,
but the County should advise all
residents in low-lying areas to
take protective -action (especially
in the Indian Pass area). Upon
recommendation by Emergency
Management Director Nelson,
Commissioner Peters motioned
to Declare a Local State of Emer-
gency for Gulf County, and acti-
vate the E.O.C. to a Level 2 (op-
erating from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00
p.m). Commissioner Barnes sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
unanimously (3-0).
Sheriff Upchurch reported
that they have requested signs
from Public Works, and will have
additional personnel on duty to-
night. Upon inquiry, it was re-
ported that the County Depart-
ments will be on standby.
Emergency Management
Director Nelson then presented
a slide presentation of T.S. Al-
berto, showing expected landfall
to be in the Steinhatchee area
at approximately 6:00 p.m. on
June 13th.
There being no further busi-
ness, and upon motion by Com-
missioner Peters, the meeting
did then adjourn at 3:30 p.m.,
E.T.
BILL WILLIAMS
ACTING CHAIRMAN.

ATTEST:
REBECCA L. NORRIS
CLERK

PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
JUNE 13, 2006
REGULAR MEETING

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners met
this date in regular session
with the following members
present: Chairman Carmen L.
McLemore, Vice Chairman Bill
Williams, and Commissioners
Billy E. Traylor, Nathan Peters,
Jr., and Jerry W. Barnes.
Others present were: Coun-
ty Attorney Timothy McFarland,
Clerk Becky Norris, Deputy
Clerk Kari Summers, Clerk Fi-
nance Officer Carla Hand, Chief
Administrator Don Butler, Ad-
ministrator Staff Assistant Lynn
Stephens, Interim Building Offi-
cial Lee Collinsworth, Chamber
of Commerce Director Sandra
Chafin, E,D.C. Director Alan
McNair, E.M.S. Director Shane
McGuffin, Extension Agent Roy
Lee Carter, Human Resources
Director Denise Manuel, Road
Department Superintendent
Bobby Knee, Planner David
Richardson, Solid Waste Direc-
tor Joe Danford, and T.D.C. Di-
rector Paula'Pickett, and Sher-
iff's, Office Major Joe Nugent.
.C r.aurm an McLemore called
the mear.g ito order at 6:00
p.m., E.T.
Commissioner Barnes
opened the meeting with prayer,
and Major Nugent led the Pledge
of Allegiance to the Flag.

CONSENT AGENDA

Commissioner Peters mo-
tioned to approve the following
Consent Agenda items after
correction to the minutes on
pages 8 & 9 regarding Final Plat
Approval Wimico Place. Com-
missioner Traylor seconded the
motion, and the motion passed
unanimously.
1. Minutes May 23,
2006 Workshop
-May 23, 2006 Rhgular
Meeting
May 25, 2006 Work-
shop
May 25, 2006 Special
Meeting'

2. Bid Advertisement
E.S.U. Department Rescue
Truck Financing
Bid Advertisement
Solid Waste Transport Truck
Financing

3. Grant E.M.P.G.
Agreement #06BG-04-02-33-
01-077 ($23,230.00)
Grant Application -
Solid Waste

4. Inventory
S.G.C.F.D. (Transfer #295-49 to
Gulf Co. Search & Rescue)
Inventory Supervi-"
sor of Elections (Junk #30-87,
#30-88)
Inventory Tax Col-
lector (Junk #40-121)

5. Invoice -- Ausley
& McMullen, P.A. Gulf Pines
Hospital Litigation/Tax
Collector (#47355
$180.00 to be paid from Ac-
count #21111-33000)
Bay Medical Center
H.C.R.A. (#0604400322 :*
$199.92 / #0534200726 *
$199.92 / #0536400497 *
$3,508.16 #0601000482 *
$899.64 / #0605500089 *
$99.96 / #0606100331 $99.96
/ #0608300127 $99.96 to
be paid from Account
#51462-31500
Coppins Monroe Adidns
Dincman & Spellman At-Large
County-
Wide Voting Litigation
($280.00 to be paid from
Account #21111-31200)
County Attorney
Timothy McFarland (May, 2006
$7,382.00 to be paid from Ac-
count #21314-31100)
G.A.C. Contrac-
tors Willis Landing Road (C.R.
381) S.C.O.P.
Project (#4139 *
$150,475.62 to be paid from
Account #40641-63000)
Preble-Rish, Inc.
Mosquito Control Building
Mod. (#64627 $1,500.00 to
be paid from Account #42834-
62100)
Preble-Rish, Inc,
Willis Landing Road (C.R. 381)
S.C.O.P.
Project (#64631 *
$8,046.00 to be paid from Ac-
count #40641-31000)

To be continued...


IC ----w IFL___--I~ -I-Il~


Gulf County Board of






County Commission Minutes


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Established 1991
Sprinkler Systems
Installed & Repaired


Licensed and Insured


Bayscapes...
Landscaping the yard of your
dreams!
Irrigation design & installation
Specializing in brick paver
driveways &
pool decks


j^ B .- c, 6.-e,_ Conteaitor-.
LLC
S50 92-4217
All l- o.k done in hou-e,
no 1subconhiactor:


CARPET AND UPHOLSTRY
STEAM CLEANING & RESTORATION SERVICE
24 Hour Water Extraction IICRC
Certified Technicians Mold and
Mildew Remediation Free Estimates
* Stain Protection Available
j -"j L 1 , S\a. -
l1 .__


LOCALLY OWNED AND -,, ', .'-
OPERATED BY MIKE MOCK
1ICRC Certified
CARPET CLEANING
CERAMIC TILE & GROUT
UPHOLSTERY CLEANING
24 HOUR WATER EXTRACTION
RV'S CARS TRUCKS VANS
LICENSED AND INSURED
RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL


STAR

* 227-1278


ONEAL SANDERS
APPLIANCE REPAIR
SERVICE
Repair all major brands
Home # 647-5113
Work #227-5112 20360


DRIESBACH CLEANERS
180 Avenue C
Pick-up and Delivery
850-227-1671


Wl"Shaklee- #Naul
Indepedent lwefltbtor Comnpansy in the US

1J~zfy Glen Wldo And Ag* ~Skin Caue
Pinty &Glen Wldo Enwisonamentally Safe
850-827-2510 CleanIng Products
www.*hald*eenet/Paffyffaldo Air .and Water
gpwafdb@giAeon~net Purffication


Don Dupree
President
1806 Garrison Ave.
Port St. Joe, Florida
32456


DUPREE'S
Custom Metal Roofs


(850) 527-5144 phone

"Professional Custom Meal Roofs, Reroofs and Shingles"



SUN C XST
Lawn Er Latdscaping LLC
"When Quality Counts"
Landscape Design & Installation
SFull Lawn Maintenance
Irrigation Installation & Repair
Commercial & Residential
Tractor Work, Rock Driveways, Water Features,
Sod & Palm Trees
Office: (850) 647-2522 18053

Landscape Design &
Consultation Services

Kay Kelley
*Florida Certified
Landscape Designer

850-927-4090
Plan It before you Plant It! 20752

ST. JOE
NURSERY & SUPPLY t|
706 First Srreer Port St. Joe

1 J 227-2112 .

St. Joe Rent-All" e^ 4.A i


Hardwood Flooring
Decorative Flooring 850-229-7720 offers professional
services for anyone who wants their floor completed
properly and with pride.
Exotic and Domestic wood Flooring
Inlays- Borders and Medallions
Installation Sanding and Refinishing Repair Custom
National Award winner for best floor in Nation
Largest.showroom in the State of Florida
Licensed Insured References
Unmatched Quality and Value for your money
www.decorativeflooring.com


CD Pressure Washing &
Handyman Services
For Free Estimates Call
229-1750 Owner Daniel Griffin
Cell 899-1684 Manager Cindy Griffin

Rod & Reel Repair
Bluewater Outriggers
Port City Shopping Center
229-1100


KNIGHT'S
TREE SERVICE, INC
*Hazardous Tree Removal
*Tree Trimming Stump Grinding

St. .TJoe Florida


850-762-2030 or 850-272-4197
Affordable, Hometown Quality!


i



9 .) T' r


COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL
INSULATION DONE RIGHT EVERYTIME
FIBERGLASS BATTS BLOWN CELLULOSE WALLS & ATTIC
OMFIC CELL
o -, co(?sca4a3 -ga as


St. foe



Wilik,4264 SUPI*


Locally
Owned
"10'

ow? Residential
Commercial
.Termite & Pest
Control
* Termite Treatmens Restaurant
* Motel Flea Control Condomisumsi
.Household PesIContral'enewTreatment
* Real Estate (WDOi Reports Consettolan Site
Specializing in Vocation Rental Properties
FAMILY OWNED
g PLEASANT A PROFESSIONAL
"Serving the Entire Area"
Free Estimates
Do.1t.Yourself Pest Control Products


DJ Fence & ETC
HandyMan
You Name It
I'll Fix It
850-648-9531
850-624-4182 cell
"Let the Beauty of our God be
upon us & establish the work
of'our hands"

(Ciui flBre ieze
Offl Ciario e -'"
Isn't it time for an oil change?
We Come To You! -
Call 850-227-1684
Ask for Julian
* Residential Custom Wood
* Commercial *Industrial
A & R Fence
10e20246iud C."e&ete Wo k
Albert Felschrnann FREE Estimates
ESN# 593115646 (850) 647-4047


NE OWNERS




-B h a a A cc r i n S u t r
Cl850-2,27-9200

AMEICA SCEE
" Scen omssaAot



U- Po Ecou res


- ..,,.* j ..


--p~~~1r -bCCE~sE---*~~l&C~IS~:~


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Coastal& Native

a--
Specializing in low, maintenancETcndsiapes and irrigation,
with a focus on native anit-nAMrWafized .p'ants. We offer
complete landscape services and our re's only Florida
Certified Landscape Designer. ..-j 16
=nedaay-Kelley anirooksade 7 ,


K


Established 1937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


IOC The Star. Port St oF TusaA qut2,20


I








EAtfblifhed 1978 S~rvino Gulf Counh, and surrounding areas for 67 vears


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 24, 2006 0 11C

-- ..


I F


-. '. '. .,
; .. & ; . ..


-3350


4W00 41


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..- ^ ) --.~~,*^

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AUTOMARINE,RV


3270


Io .- l


,, 4100 I



ao a1


,orS AlASl! ' 1Administrative
PETS & ANIMALS MERCHANDISE Custom Made Ladies Di- EMPLOYMENT
2 100-. tmond Necklace with 9 Dia- I Full-time
2100 Pets 3100 Antiques monds, 1 3/4 total weight, 4100 Help Wanted F u ime
2110 Pets: Free to 3110 Appliances 14K gold. Locally ap- 4110 Restaurant /Clubs Administrative
2120Good Hom- Pet Supplies 3120 Arts & Crafts praised at $2800 $3000. 4120 Sales/Telemarketing position open
2120 Pet Supplies 3130 Auctions Sale for $2750. Also a La- 4130 Employment
Supplies2130 Farm / 3140 -Baby te dies two tone Perpetual Information Position'requirements:
140 Pets/Lvestock 3150 Building Supplies Oyster quest Rolex. Ap- high school graduate or
aned 3160 Business praised at $5000. sale for equivalent, business
3170- ColEquipmetibles $3500. With all original school or college a plus,
3180 Computers papers & original presenta- -2 years admin experi-
3190- Electronics tion leather box. Call ence a must, strong
3L 3200 Firewoonid 850-653-4947 computer skills includ-
3210 Free Pass it On 41 ing Word, Excel,
3220 Furniture QuickBooks, internet
Dogs & Cats 3230 Garage/Yard Sales Jewelry- and email; ability to mul-
For Sale? 3240 Guns Wedding rings, watches, ti- task, good filing and
3250 Good Things to Eat tools, fishing gear, tele- organizational skills a
3260 Health & Fitness visions, electronics, must and the ability to
3270 Jewelry/Clothing bikes, and much more! work with a diversified
A -i 3280 Machinery/ Call or visit Roy at: Roy .. public' of contractors,
Equipment V's Pawn' Shop 201 W. Administrative professionals and own-
3290 Medical Equipment' Hwy. 98. in Port St Joe, ers. Excellent mes-
3300 Miscellaneous Florida 850-229-8304 sage-taking and phone
3310 Musical Instruments CLOSING skills a must; occasional
3320 Plants & Shrubs/ COORDINATOR overtime required.
Supplies
330 estaurat Goodsel WindMark Beach Sales Excellent benefit pack-
3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell) 3280 Center in. Port St Joe has 'age including 100%
specifict frot& Sen an immediate opening for company, paid health
There are specific Flori- Heavy & Small Equipment a Closing Coordinator. In- and dental insurance for
toa the sale ofadogsl and fIrFklift. Pettibone crane, hyster obs real estate closing and and sick leave, paid hol-
'ats within the state or forklift jack spends, an title work experience or idays; retirement IRA
iran .nats ied into the 3220 ders, compressors, drill mortgage experiengp. At- with employer contribu-
i i inorme press, tablesaw, much tention tq detail and the tion. Work days: Tues-
sle o Irne purpose of more Call 653-8801 for ability to handle multiple day through Saturday, 9
Selling. mnore information, tasks -in a fast-paced envi- to 5. Job location: St.,
Please research Flori- Blue &' Beige sofa & ronment required. We offer George Plantation Club-
da Statute 828.29 (Dogs loveseat, Blue La-Z-Boy Heavy & Small Equipment great pay and an excellent house.
and cats transported or Rocker recliner, $150 for for Boat yard 20 ton travel benefits package$14./hr Please fax re-
requirements; consumer forklift jack spends, san- Please submit Resume via sume and three refer-
guarantee) before ders, compressors, drill fax to 229-7952, email to ences from previous
you offer for sale a cat U 3 press, table saw, much rebecca.standigeijoe. work to (850) 927-3039.
or dog. 3230 more Call 653-8801 for com or visit careers.ice. We are a drug free work
or dog i oow r Av. more information. corn to submit an online place. For questions call
SKK 1017oowardAve application & resume 927-2312, Iv. msg and
8Fri, & Sat Aug 25th Equal Opportunity number for call back.
^SSSSC IQ"^ 8am-5pm & Sat. Aug 26th wEmloyer
S 8am-1pm. Bookcases, 0 Employer
Shelves, Yard Furn, and 1' 300 Pre-Employment Drug
Free Puppy other wood items Fishing Steel Buildings Screening Required. rivers
Needs a Home. Call for tackle, Household items, 5 ONLY- 25X30, 30x40,Drivers
more information and de- Lawn furniture, & misc 405NLY- 45x80, 50x100: AN
tails 850-229-8676 items, 22" self propelled Must Move No Selling EARN YOU
Lawn mower For Balance Owed. EARN AS YOU
1-800-211-9594 Ext 46 LEARN
SELL ALLYOUR Career!
WANTED TO BUY England Transport
SEM S I Old Guns, coins, guitars, now offers
I IEl and watches. Call Administrative On-the-job CDL Training
850-227-4122 No credit check
No co-signers
through classified. Wanted To Buy! PT Nodown-payment!
GOLD/SILVER COINS RECEPTIONIST 1-866-619-6081
CA L COMPLETE
C A L L COIN COLLECTIONS St Joe is currently search-
/ .Gold Jewelry in any, ing for a part-time recep-
Condition, Tools, Fishing tionist; hours are Sat 9-6 Drivers
7 47 -5 02 0 Gear & Many Other and Sun 12:30-6 in Port St
Things of Value. Joe. Qualified candidate
Call Roy@ will have 1-2 years work USA
Incorrect InsertionPolicy 850-2298304 experience and must be
professional and friendly! READY MIX
For Classified MS Office skills are also Now. hiring Class A&B
required. We offer great CDL Ready Mix drivers.
In-column Advertisers pay and an excellent ben- Excellent benefits and
3340 efits package wages. Apply in person
All ads placed by phone are read back to the adver- 1001 Cecil Costin-Blvd.
Stiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will as- j ll- Please submit Resume via Port St: Joe, FL
sume correctness at the time of the read-back proce- fax to 229-7952, email to 850-229-8858
.dure unless otherwise informed. rebecca.standigeojoe. USA EOE
!!1I!Attentionl!!! corn or visit careers.ioe.
Members needed for still com to submit an online
Please hunting lease. Gulf County application & resume
25,000 acres, Deers, hogs, Equal Opportunty Automotive
i1, & turkeys, 350 per year, ,Employer
Contact Carl at 850-827- PSr-Employment Drug Advance Auto Parts is
your ad 2328 after 5pm Leave mes Screening Required. currently accepting applica-
tions for full & part time
The Apalachicola Times Sales Associates positions.
SAdvertisers are requested to check the advertise- has an opening for an Advance offers competitive
.ment on the first Insertion for correctness. Errors Outside Sales Representative pay, flexible schedules and
-should be reportedibenefits programs. Suc-
'. ,should be reported immediately, cessful applicants will have
s immediately. Candidate must have an outgoing, goal oriented, de- te foloiabutesw re
"The News Herald will not be responsible for more tailed and aggressive personality. Great benefits: the following attbutes: are
'than -one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for 401k, retirement, health, life and dental insurance friendly, have parts knowl-riented
..any error in advertisements to a greater extent than Sick leave and vacation, team oriented change ori-
.the cost of the space occupied by the error. ente and deprie nda, change Bi-
If you are motivated by money and like working with n skills a plus Inter-
'Any copy change, during ordered schedule consti- people then email resume to khalualani@starfl.com lingual skills plus. shoulnter-
'tutes a new ad and new charges or fax resume to (850) 227-7212. tested applicants should
Or in person at the Star office apply at Advance Auto
The News Herald DOES NOT guarantee position of 135 W. Hwy 98, Port St Joe, Florida. Prts, 201 FL No Phnument Ave.,
ANY ad. under any classification. A Freedom Communication NewspaperPort St. Joe, L No Phone
Calls.


4100 |





Automotive
The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners is
accepting applications for
one full-time mechanic I at
our Public Works Depart-
ment. Starting salary is
$14.06 per hour. this is a
bargaining unit (union) po-
sition with full benefits. Ap-
plications and a complete.
job description are availa-
ble in our Human Re-
sources Office (1000 Cecil
'G., Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port
St. Joe), or at
www.gulfcountygovernmet
.com.
Applications will. be ac-
cepted until 5:00pm E.T on-
September 1,2006 at the
Gulf County. Human Re-
sources Office. For more
information, please con-
tact Human Director De-
nise Manuel at
850-229-5335.
Gulf County enforces a
Drug-Free work place Poli-
cy and is an Equal Oppor-
tunity/Affirmative Action
Employer.



How To Ma
Disap


Advertise it for
section of Clag
where auto bu
meet to aet thE


4100 | 4100 | 4100


Healthcare
Bay St. Joseph
Healthcare
Seeking a work place w/
a fun & fair culture? Our
'120-bed long- term care
facility is seeking indi-
viduals who have com-
passion for the elderly &
enjoy working to fill the
following positions:
*Director of Nursing
*Certified Nursing Assts
*Licensed Practical-
Nurses
Full-tine
Benefits Include:
Med/Dental/Vision Insur,
short/long term disabil-
ity company paid life In-
sur, paid time off, 401 K
retirement plan, uniform
allowance, referral bo-
nus, tuition reimburse-
ment, Shift Differential.
Please Contact:
Carrie Harrison, Director
Human Resources
220 9th Street
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(850) 229-8244 Ext 105
Fax: (850) 229-7129


ke Your Car
pear...


sale in the Auto
ssifieds! That's
yers and sellers
e best deals on


wheels!


The News Herald
747-5020




IMMEDIATE




Hiring!







Find out how enthusiasm and a |
customer-pleasing attitude can A E R
help you join the team of the G R 0 U P
world's largest food service retailer.
SGo to: McFLORIDA.COM to apply online








Fax nume tot S -2170or8nt 1 rqadaaasedper q up. attention Rly Garala.
Ca i e 85 78-3707 with questions

em ounit i 'm es kire M ana g intTa7 rc aining:astwos


General
Driggers, Nations &.Taun-
ton, LLC, A recently
opened professional engi-
neering, surveying and
mapping firm have imme-
diate needs for experi-
enced surveying person-
nel. If you have the experi-
ence and knowledge we
need, consider joining our
team! We offer excellent
salaries and. competitive
benefits for the following
positions:*Survey. Instru-
ment Operators' .*Survey
Cadd Technicians. Specif-
ic position information and
requirements are -available
by contacting Adam Taun-
ton at 850- 639-2337. You
may mail or fax your re-
sume to: RO. Box 630,
Wewahitchka, FL 32465,
Fax: 850-639-5599.

Turn to classified's
Merchandise
Columns Our
prices are on target
for you!


Healthcare

Q 2 Gulf Coast
communityc 0ge

Nursing Adjunct, Gulf/
Franklin Ctr. instruct in
an acute care facility to
practical nursing students
in pediatric or medical sur-
gical nursing. Clinical rota-
tions are in Panama City,
classroom in Port St. Joe.
Requires BSN (MSN pre-
ferred) with current FL RN.
license & 2 years clinical
exper. Contact Sharon@
850-227-9670. $30.r.r
Open Until Filled.
Additional info: http://
dept.gulfcoast.edu/jobs.
GCCC is an EA/EO/M/F/
Vet employer.

SELL ALL YOUR
ITEMS
through classified.
CALL 747-5020


$50Q 'Police Impounds! Beautiful Beachesl South
Cars from $500! Tax Re- Padre Island Beach Resort
pos, US Marshall and IRS p r niht
sales! Cars/Trucks/SUV's/ From $59 per night.
Tdyota's/Honda's/Chevy's/ w w 4Le COPAsp. cFo m
& More! For Listings, Call Breakfast, Free Happy
1-800-298-5414 Ext C171. Q BeachRe-
i sort, La Copa Inn Beach
CI A Resort..




Domestic Handyman
CHILDCARE Port St.Joe Area
*Plumbing
Opening available immedi- .Electrical
ately for your 2 or 3 year *Painting
old child. Registered Fami- .Light Framing
ly Childcare Home. Excel- .Yard Work
lent program with exper-,
enced teacher. References JOEY BARBEE
available Call Ms. Debbie 850-229-6147
At Croft Family' Childcare. Leave Message
at 229-7708. Please leave
message if no answer.



Openings for Karen Par- Airline Mechanic Rapid
ker & Tiffany Clark Child training for high paying
Care. Located at 133 Aviation. Career. FAA pre-
Bridgeport Ln, In Port St: dicts severe shortage. Fi-
Joe: 5 opening avail. Apply nancial aid if qualify job
now to save your spot or placement assistance. Call
call 227-3831 or 340-1883 AIM 888-349-5387
Quality Child Care in
clean, Christian home, Qui- Attend College Online
et neighborhood, care giv- from Home *Medical,
er is CPR certified nursing *Business, *Paralegal,
asst. Licensed with excel- *Computers, *Criminal
lent person references. Justice. Job placement as-
Contact Sherrie @ distance. Computer pro-
229-6827 vided. Financial Aid If qual-
ified. Call 866-858-2121.
www.OnlineTidewaterTech
^.com




Cleaning Service
Weekly or biweekly, Bushhogging
household or construction, Call Pat & Larry
850-639-9298 @648-6652


ANNOUNCEMENTS'


09-17


I


t


- p.'~L-


m


100 Sil

10


~C~asL'


. 4'i








49'f TUair-'TADn DToT r inc Cl n THUI IRCnrL Al II IRTA 9l 00


Drivers


DRIVER
TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!
Werner needs entry level
Semi drivers. No exp. re-
quired. Avg. $36K + 1st yr!
60% home nightly/weekly.
CDL training in your area.
1-866-280-5309



General
Come work with a grow-
ing business building and
installing hurricane shut-
ters. and other aluminum
construction. Call 850-
832-5362.



Healthcare
The Gulf County Health
Department has one
opening for a full-time:
Career Service
(benefits assigned)
Health Support
Technician.
Twelve Month per Year
Position based in the
Port St. Joe medical
clinic. Fingerprinting
and O/T due to Emer-
gency Duties Required.
Knowledge of ICD9 and.
CPT Codes, and medi-
cal clinic experience re-
quired. For information
pertaining to this posi-
tion, contact Lesia Hath-
away at (850) 227-1276,
ext. 149.
This Agency is ac-
cepting electronic appli-
cations only for this po-
sition. Refer to Requisi-
tion Number 64084154.
Closing date is Sep-
tember 1, 2006.
Apply at:
peoplefirst.
myflorida.com
for assistance, contact:
People First at
877-562-7287
Healthcare
The Gulf County Health
Department has one
opening for a full-time:
Career Service
(benefits assigned)
Fiscal Assistant
Based in the Port St.
Joe facility. Finger-
printing & 0/T Due To
Emergency Duties Re-
quired. Knowledge of
ICD9 and CPT Codes,
and medical clinic billing
required. Salary Range:
$16,422.90 -$18,720.00
(hiring is usually at
base). For information
pertaining to this posi-
tion, contact Lesia Hath-
away at (850) 227. 1_,.
ext. 149. Closing date is
September August 28,
2006.
This Agency is ac-
cepting electronic appli-
cations only for this po-
sition. Refer to Requisi-
tion Number 64081367.
Apply at:
peoplefirst.
myflorida.com
for assistance, contact:
People First at
877-562-7287


Healthcare

NHC
HomeCare
Quality Care Is Our Busi-
ness
Part Time Home Health
Aide
Are you looking for a fresh
start; something new?
If so, NHC HomeCare is
the place for You!
Our Port St. Joe
HomeCare Program is a
partner-friendly agency
seeking a Part Time HHA
to provide skilled care to
our homebound patients.
Mileage reimbursed. Inter-
ested parties may fax their
resume to: 850-229-2725
Attn: Gina Ferland, Admin-
istrator, or apply locally at
418 Reid Ave, in Port St.
Joe. EOE/DFWP



Hospitality

NOW HIRING

The new Mainstay Suites
Hotel in Port St. Joe is now
accepting applications for
front desk, room attend-
ants (housekeeping), laun-
dry personnel and run-
ners.. Several part time and
full time positions are
available. We are looking
for a few great people to
join our team! If you are
great with guests, have a
passion 'for superior serv-
ice and can play well with
others, we would love to
hear from you. As to be ex-
pected, a flexible schedule
is a must, weekends and
holidays will be required.
Benefits include health
insurance, aflac, tuition re-
imbursement, holiday pay,
vacation pay etc. E.O.E.
DFWR Apply in person at
the Port Inn, 501 ,Monu-
ment Ave. Port St. Joe





Real Estate

Sales Associate

St. Joe Towns & Resorts is
currently recruiting for
Sales Associates for their
Windmark Beach develop-
ment in Port St. Joe, FL.
This position requires a FL
real estate license, proven
history in selling and or
marketing coastal/resort
properties and computer
literacy in data base con-
tact management soft-
ware This i-ar,n uislard.
ng opponun-Ty 1:O become
5 pan r:.1 in JOE esrr, i-ha
..will develop 3.5 .miles of
beach front property on St.
Joseph Bay! This position
maintains weekend and
holiday office hours.
Please fax your resume to
850-229-7952 or email to
rebecca.standige()joe.
corn:
Equal Opportunity
Employer .
Pre-Employment Drug
Screening Required


General

Pest Control
Technician
Experience helpful but will
train the right person. Must
have a clean Florida Driv-
ers License. Must be avail-
able to work 40 hours a
week or more if needed.
Apply in person at 321 B
Reid Ave from 9:00-11:30
or 1:00-3:00
Trades
Concrete Laborers & Fin-
ishers needed call 229-
6525
Trades
Local manufacturer seek-
ing Asst. Laser operator,
will train skilled motivated
hard working individual.
Flexible hours a must,
hourly wage dependent on
exp. Call 850-227-2057 to
obtain application.
Trades
Plumbers Helper & experi-
ence plumbers, will train,
paid vacation & holidays,
Starting pay $9/hr, Drivers
license required, 639-5227
for application




*REMEMBER:*
Ads in this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire, an investment or
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend giv-
ing credit card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.

Advertising Sales Pro
Wanted. Top Commissions
experience required. For
phone interview, Mr.
Haggerty, 877- 665-6618.
Clerical
Administrative
Earn $12-$48/hour. Full
benefits. Paid training. Var-
ious Government Positions
Available. Homeland Secu-
rity, Law Enforcement,
Wildlife and more.
Call 7 days
1-800-320-9353, Ext 2139
Flexible Home Data Entry
Work $420/part time,
$800+-/full time per week.
No Experience Necessary.
Computer required. Call
1-800-360-1272.
Healthcare
Nursing: Travel RNs:'
CALIFORNIA. 13.26 Weela
As.ianrmr.ns. San Frmnci.-
co, Napa Valley, Los Ange-
les, San Diego, Palm
Springs, Sacramento sur-
rounding cities. Excellent
Wages/Benefits Up to
$100,000/year Paid
Housing or Subsidy -
Med/Dental Ins. & 401(k)
Completion Bonus Trav-
el Reimbursement Immi-
gration- Sponsorship *
24/7 Mgt Support UNI Call:
(877) 256-7497; Fax (916)
641-0727; Email: ztrefry@
unihcr.com


To Place Your Classified ad


l NwAPALACHIC NIo

S.& CARRABEL






Call Our New Numbers Now!


Call:


Toll Free:


Fax:


Email:


Email:


PLUS SMALL ENGINE
REPAIRS
NOW AVAILABLE
Climate Control

St. Joe
Rent-All, Inc.
706 First Street
Phone 227-2112
/ MINI-STORAGE \

HnHPF1F1
a5x10 10x10 10x20

On Site Rentals 6 Days
A Week

ASK ABOUT FREE
MONTH'S RENT!

MINI STORAGE

In Port St Joe


814-7400

BEACH

STORAGE
Day: 227-7200
Night: 647-3882
St. Joe Beach

America's
Mini Storage

(8501
229-8014
Climate and
Non-Climate
Control Storage
Units
Boat/RV storage &
office space


V


Port St Joe Warehouse
2700sf. large overhead
.door 210 Wiliams Ave,
$97.5mo lease 229 9662


Two Private 2nd Floor Of-
fices with shared reception
and kitchen. Beautiful view
overlooking St. Joe Bay at
Simmons Bayou. Perfect
for real estate office or
small business. $350.00
monthly per office. Utilities
included. First, last month
rent plus $150.00 deposit
per unit required. Call 850-
229-7799 M-F, 9-4pm.


PHONE CALL



AWAY


ES


Mexico Beach new TH's,
pool, starting at $208,900,
Pelican Walk Real Estate
850-647-2473


HELP ISONLYA


850-747-5020


800-345-8688'


850-747-5044


thestar@pcnh.com


thetimes@pcnh.com


..


12 H 6AFK b.Jt LW 11hOAMUO ,4U


I 44130 |
Now Hiring For 2006 Post-
al Jobs $18/hour. starting,
Avg. Pay $57K/ year Fed-
eral benefits, Paid Training
and Vacations. No Expe-
rience Needed! 1-800-
584-1775 Ref #P5101








BUSINESS FINANCIAL.
5100 Business
Opportunities
5110 Money to Lend
$We Pay Cash$
We Buy Antiques, Old Jewelry,
Old Toys, Old Anything
Call Monique
850-227-1684


*REMEMBER:*
Ads in this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire an investment or
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend giv-
ing credit card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.


VENDING ROUTE
All Snacks, All Drinks,
All Brands
Great Equipment /
Support Financing availa-
ble with $6K down
Call: 800-337-6590 local
#B02002-037









REAL ESTATE FOR RENT1

6100 Business/
Commercial
6110 Apartments
6120 Beach Rentals
6130 Condo/Townhouse
6140 House Rentals
6150 Roommate Wanted
6160- Rooms for Rent
6170- Mobile Home/Lot
6180 Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 Timeshare Rentals
6200 Vacation Rentals





CONTRACTOR'S
WAREHOUSE
unit 1250 SF/ office bath-
room 12x12 roll up door,
located at the corner of
Pondarosa Pines & Ruth-
erford in Jones Home-
stead. $650 a month in-,
cludes until. 1 year lease
+1 mo. rent dep. 647-2715
after 6pm.





New Metal
Building $1400/month.
2800sf has new office and
bathroom. Call
850-258-6139


Commercial Building for
lease with workshop and
office space. Approx.
3300sf. 201 Tarpon St.
Port St. Joe call
850-229-9400



1 br apartments, nicely fur-
nished w/beautiful views,
close to town, $550wk,
850-227-5989




s

Beachouse Trailer, com-
pletely renovated & im-
maculate 1 br. Does not
look like a trailer inside.
D/W, W/D. new stove, fur-
nished bedrm, Dinning rm,
close to Highland View
boat ramp. Perfect for one
non smoking person.
$700/mo. +1st, last dep +
ref's Call 229-6775


6130
Grand Lagoon-Thomas
Drive. One bedroom, one
bath, with loft. Fully fur-
nished with washer and
dryer. Bay view with deck
and pool. $925/mo. Call
Michelle at 850-265-9006
or 888-265-9006.
Grand Lagoon-Thomas
Drive. One bedroom, one
bath, with loft. Fully fur-
nished with washer and
dryer.. Bay view with deck
and pool. $925/mo. Call
Michelle at 850-265-9006
or 888-265-9006.
Mexico Beach 3 br, 2 ba,
1400 sqft. townhouse. Ful-
ly furnished, DISH, pool.
$1,200/month for year
lease. Call 850-624-9516 ,
Mexico Beach 4 br, 2.5 ba
Brand New TH. Upgrades
throughout, community
pool. Call 678-296-9639



Mexico Beach area, Sev-
eral Condos/Townhouses,
furnished & unfurn, Start-
ing at $750mo. Sundance
Realty 850-648-8700.



2 br, 1 ba, Highland View
area. Available 8/15/06.
W&D, DW incl,-$725 mo.,
(817) 789-3527.
2 br, 2 ba with loft/den or
3rd br, 1400sf, quiet area,
large yard, yard care in-
cluded. 1st last and securi-
ty deposit required.
$1085'mo 850-653-6792
3 br. 1 ba. 1601 M rvnr,
A,,-. PSJ remod.ele.a W'D
CH&.A ci,.nwa.r,.er 1850
mo+ utilities 651-325-7731
3 br, 2 ba CH/A 2 car car-
port and upper deck 6266
Hwy 98 and Pine St, PSJ
Beach 850-647-5004
3 br, 2 ba renovated home
with carport. Incl. W/D,
stove, D/W & Fridge. On
quiet street in Mexico
Beach. $1000 mo w/1 yr.
lease + 1 mo deep. Call
208-830-1412


Houses For Rent in Port
St. Joe. 3 br, 2 ba, Ig yard,
New carpet, CH&A, $650
mo., $400 dep. 2 br, 1 ba,
CH&A, $580 mo., $400
dep. Call 850-227-3511.
Lease with option 3 br, 2
ba on Lake Alice, Wewa.
$1000/month + deposit.
Call 864-921-4197
Mexico Beach 305 Fortner
Ave. 1 st block from gulf 3
br, 2 ba w/gulf view from
deck. Living, family & din-
ing rm. Sep. laundry W/D
incl. Lrg fenced yard,
porch & car port. Furn.
$1100mo. Util. not incl. No
pets. Call 772-781-7229 or
772-485-6684



Mexico Beach area 3 br, 2
full baths Dblwide, only 4
mi from beach, W/D hook-
ups, CH&A, pets nego.
$850 mo., 1st and last
month's rent. 647-5722
Mexico Beach, 3 br 2 ba,
walk to beach, $1150mo,
year lease + dep, 850-
647-5792
Mexico Beach,.Beachside
New 2 br, 3 ba, fully furn'd,
Non smokers, Long term,
$1100 mo. (770) 426-6896



Mexico Beach, Several
homes for rent, furnished
& unfurnished, starting at
$700mo, Call Sundance
Realty 850-648-8700
Port St. Joe bay view
1810sf 3 br, 2 ba. Ig. Flori-
da room, w/d, Fp, fenced
backyard -with lawn care
included. 2 car attached,
garage. 102 Sunset Circle.
$1575/mo. + dep. Avail.
Sept. 8. Call 850-774-6649
PSJ 510 Madison Ave. 2
br 1 ba, $600. + utilities &
$500. Security deposit.
850-251-2309. Avail imme-
diately
Pt. St. Joe Beach: 2 br, 2
ba furnished house across
the street from beach.
laundry, large deck w/gulf
views $1400 mo Some util.
incl www.freeplotting.com/
beach.htm. 678-643-1285



Several LONG TERM
RENTALS Available. Call
FORGOTTEN COAST
RENTALS, 850-648-1012.



St. Joe Beach, 3 br, 2 ba
encl.:osed garage, gullview.
Cra.i:n access. lurnisnea
112'00 mo., ,iii consider
lae2,e purchase. Call Bob-
ble@ 258-5261.



Waterfront 3 br, 2 ba lo-
cated in the Overstreet
area. Completely renovat-
ed with new kitchen &
bath, Irg back porch, over-
looking intercoastal water-
way. Short drive to the
beach.. Call 648-5865


St. Joe Beach, 3 br, 2 ba
across from beach pool,
$1100/mo. + utilities, Call
612-308-4110 or 832-5699.


6170



2 br, 2 ba, furnished, with
washer & dryer on 1 acre
in Carrabelle beach.
$700mo./$700 dep
850-697-8440 or
813-546-6987



3 br, 1 ba Mobile Home,
125 Woodley Dr. Wewa, FL
blocks from Chipola River,
$695 mo., (917) 650-6452.



Mexico Beach 3 br 2 ba
with deck & screen porch.
Less than 1 block to the
beach. Furnished or unfur-
nished, $850mo, Call
Sundance Realty 850-648-
8700



-Oak Grove, 2 br 1 ba,
fenced backyard, no inside
pets, $500mo+dep, ref,
ready Sept 1st, Call after
1pm: 227-3463

Air


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE-
7100 Homes
7110 Beach Home/
Property
7120 Commercial
7130 Condo/Townhouse
7140 Farms & Ranches
7150 Lots and Acreage
7160 Mobile Homes/Lots
7170 Waterfront
7180 Investment
Property
7190 Out-of-Town
Real Estate
7200 Timeshare



2 BR 1 BA Port St.Joe.
Corner lot with bay view,
REDUCED, $215K r850-
7 6 2 - 3 2 5 2
76 forsaiebyowvner com.
20569028
4 br, 2 ba PSJ 2200SF 314
acre FP, irrigation well;' Ig
screened 357SF porch, hot
tub, carport, all new kitch,
appli., sec. features,
FSBO. laundrviutlirty rm
$2651: Call 850-229-8754.
Iv rr"l1-

House only for 3ale' Must
.be moved 5746 Hwy 71 (6
miles N. of PSJ). Approx
1400 sf, 3 br,1 bahrdwd
floors, CIA, FP, stove,
refig, WiD DucKy Johnson
has moving cost info.
$18,000. Call Mary Lbu @
850-227-4625 y
Mexico Beach, 3 br 2 ba,
CH&A, screen room, close
to beach, possible view,
$169,000, Pelican Walk
Real Estate, 850-647-2473,



New Construction homes
3 br, 2 ba, in Port St. Joe,
Starting low at $200's.
In-house financing availa-
ble. 850-229-2560.



OPEN HOUSE
Port St Joe, 173 Barbara
Dr, 3 br 2 ta onr, 2 lots, in
quiet neignoorrood. Sat
Aug 26ih 9a-4p ET. Joan
Lovelace Mexico Beach
Harmon Realty, 850-648-
5767 or 850-527-2560
Backyard Log Cabin
Complete kit, mention this
ad for 20% off. Visit www.
europeanlogcabin.com or
call 1-800-923-9149
St Joe Beach, 3 br 2 ba, 1
story, pristine, tile & hard-
wood floor, partially fur-
nished, 1/2 block to dedi-
cated beach, Coldwell
Banker, Forgotten Coast,
Claude Brousseau, Owner/
Agent, MLS#111200
$474K, 850-625-6718






"Barefoot Cottages"-New
Homes next to WindMark
Beach. Community ameni-
ties Incl. pools, hot tubs,
playground, sidewalks.
Sellers offering 10% to-
ward closing costs. Buy
Now at Preconstruction
Prices and Savelil 2BR -
$414,900, 3BR $479,900.
Completion expected by
October. Call Diane Peevy,
Port Realty 850-527-2580



CAPE SAN BLAS High
Elevation, Flood insur. not
needed! Beach Erosion no
problem[ 4/4.5 Great Gulf
View I Beach Access in
front of house Like New
Custom Home, lots of up-
grades, nicely furnished.
Energy Efficient, PRICE
REDUCED Don't Miss this
Fabulous Buy@ $849,9001
owner/agent 850-527-2580


Mexico Beach, 1.5yr Old
TH, 4 br 2 ba, w/pool, rent
$1200mo, sale $234,900
850-229-8667 or 527-7525



S 7150



1 Acre +
in Wewa on Stone Mill
Creek $62K 850-227-1885




Cape San Bias quality
bayside lot. .6 acres near
State Park. Price to sell
$175K Call 513-697-1777

St Joe Beach, 2 1/2 lots,
steps to dedicated beach,
$510K, will divide, $10K
buyer rebate, Pelican Walk
Real Estate, 850-647-2473




Overstreet Area Mobile
home for 'sale. Asking
$109K. Some owner fi-
nancing avail. Call 478-
960-0800








AUTOMOTIVE MARINE
| RECREATIONAL!.
8100 Antique & Collectibles
8110 Cars
8120 Sports Utility Vehicles
8130 Trucks
8140-Vans
8150 Commercial
8160 Motorcycles
8170 Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210 Boats
8220 Personal Watercraft
8230 -Sailboats
8240 Boat & Marine
Supplies
8310 Aircraft/Aviation
8320 AW/Off Road Vehicles
8330 Campers & Trailers
8340 Motorhomes




To Place An Ad
in The Times'
Classifieds
... Call
(850) 747-5020
or
1 (800) 345-8688







Sienna Van' 06, 125.100
Take over pmts. $465mq.
Call 832-5699 or
612-308-4110.







AKM'05
200T under 1000 miles.
Asking $1200 or best offer.:
Call 850-227-3361




Suzuki
600XK '03 very fast, very
nice bike. First $5000
takes it. Call 850-258-6139 -




Prindle
Catamaran
16FT, trailer, all equipl
$70Q OBO 229-8334.







BOAT STORAGE
America's Mini Storage
850-229-8014 or
850-258-4691

Dry Boat Storage
FOR RENT Exclusive
Carrabelle Boat Club.
Safe, state-of-the-art mari-
na. Enjoy The Luxurious
clubhouse and facilities.
30'x10'x'10'...$280-$330.
Call Caryn 404-643-6971






,aip


1993 36ft. Fourwinds trail-
er. 2 br queen/bunkbedsr
with slide outs. Great deal
for $5500 or best offer,
Call 850-647-3679


I ~l~~sc---~bl~-e~e ~B~le -- --- b I- - s ~-- ~9~x--~-~-"~a41b


Established 1938 0 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years


'


T H E T





,IIZ d 1937 ei G fo nd re o -r6y sT Sa Pt St. o, FL Thrsda7Auust12,2


&i


tt114 14er


The Dixie Youth Girls Softball League had a great summer.




45 motel rooms in 2 city's............. $12,000


Uniforms, Food, gas, for 35 girls.


Winning:


3 District Championships

#1 State Runner ups (Angels 10-under Division)

#1 State Championship (Belles Division 15-under)

#1 World Series Appearance


All in one Summer


Tle pe(dyers,


m NUEEUs UEUU0m 00 00U0mE0m


4nd{ 9g4rent WPjcKtd


Priceless


(he ta t4#zn4 t4e gredt


atienS


4nH 6KShIeSseS


t44dt 4ielved


,ar r s


t4elr (relu11-s


$0 $50 Single
Stan & Trina Siprell
Douglas Pelt
Michael J Milton
Charles Carter III
Sara & Tommie Simmons
Christopher Varnes
Michelle Chambers
Sandra & Charles Mitchem
William & Teresa Thursby
Mark Howze
David White
J Cobb Realty, Inc
Harry & Annette Tison
Diane King
Twila Dawson
, Sandra Miles
Kevin & Charlene Burke
Capital City Bank
Dri Brite
Jim Bachrach
Anna Cannatella
Logan & Gail Johnson
Robert & Jean Faliski
Pristine Pools
JV Gander Distributors
Oil Change Express
Coastal Fitness & Wellness Center
Blooming Tails
Woods Fisheries
TP Fisher Insurance
Shaun S. Donahoe
Licensed Real Estate
TC Construction


Lisa Davis
Holly G Atkins
Rosa Feltrop
Costin Insurance
Donna Murray
The Grill

$50 $99 Double
Brenda & Mike Wood
Tallahassee Title Group
GT Com
$100 $249 Triple
Raffield Fisheries
GAC Contractors
Jerry Warren Framing Crew
Gulf County Land & Abstract
Hollis & J Dean Vail
Gulf County Realty, Inc
Metcalf Electric & AC
Tony Justice Lawn Service
John C Gainous VFW Post 10069
St Joe Shrimp
Emerson Cooling & Heating Inc
Water Street Seafood, Inc
Cox Transmission
St Joe Hardware
Prudential Resort Realty
Ralph Rish
Eric & Missy Ramsey
Samuel & Betty Wexler
Appalaco Tours, Inc
Chipola Turf Farm, LLC


Coastal Trust Management Corp
Indian Pass Marine Services
William Cary Williams, III

$250 499 Home Run
Resources of Eight, LLC
Kenner LA '
Emerald Coast FCU -
El Governor Moter & Campground e
NJJJ Marketing
Billy Traylor
Gulf County Commissioner ,

$500 & up Grand SI
Prosperity Bank
Preble Rish
Lions Club
Eddie Creamer, CEO Prosperity
City of Port St. Joe
Patricia Warinqr
Rustic Sands Resort Campground
Ramsey Printing
Oak Grove Assembly of God
Integras Therapy and Wellness Inc.
Gulf County Chamber of Commerce
Bill Williams,
County Commissioner
Carmen McLemore,
County Commissioner
Jerry Barnes
County Commissioner


Dixie softball is a nonprofit, all volunteer organization, which is supported by our local businesses and local
individuals. Our local business and individuals have really stepped up to the palte and provided the money
for our St. Joe girls to fulfill their dreams.


Thank You
to every person and business that contributed.

Donations can be mailed to P.O. Box 682, Port St. Joe, FL 32456


The tar Pot S. Je, L -Thusda, Agus 24 206 -13(


Established 1937-SrigGl out n urudngaesfr6 er


r


emd~es


ME im m$ 500


jttee~e





Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Tasty


'-- From Page IC


cramped square feet at the
first location to almost 1,700
spacious square-feet in the
current building.
The new space will allow
them to cater and still serve
lunch, according to Perez.
"Before, we had to shut
down at lunch whenever we
had a catering job," she said,
adding that it was not only
frustrating for her, but for cus-
tomers, too.
"We're really working hard
on the consistency of what
we do because the customers
expect it," she added. "We are
slowly building a great team to
do it all."
"We want to be able to
do both," said Jodi. "We've
got such a great local follow-
ing and we don't want to lose
that."
Her sister, Harkey Good,
has moved to town to work
with her, Perez said. With lots
of catering experience, Perez
noted that her sister is a great
help, especially with the cre-
ative and display sides of the
business.
According to Perez, most
of the business's advertising
has been word of mouth so


far, which has worked well for
them since they opened.
She thinks that will change
somewhat this year, because
they want to encourage people
to start thinking about holiday
plans.
"We will probably adver-
tise this fall to encourage peo-
ple to make earlier bookings
fro winter holiday plans, since
we had to turn away so many
people last year because of
prior bookings," said Perez.
"Catering can be afford-
able for everyone," noted
Perez, adding that they are
very happy to handle a full-
service event, but "if you are
having a small get-together
and don't have time to cook,
we can prepare the food and
you can pick it up and display
it yourself."
"I think most people
believe that catering is expen-
sive and must be full-service,"
she said. "That's not true. If
you want to come in and pick
up dinner, we can have it ready
to pick up at 5:30. It's just to
make your life easier, whatever
level of service that requires."


ance


Marie Logan/The Star Marie Logan/The Star
Unexpected touches add to the casually sophisticated ambi, Provisions sits at the colorfully landscaped corner of Third
e. Street and Williams Avenue.


Marie Logan/The Star
The inside dining area looks out on the small shaded sidewalk eating gal-
lery.


Marie Logan/The Star
The eye-catching display includes sweet potato plants, an exotic fruit basket,
and a homemade red velvet cake


301 II Avenue


and Th d S
Por St.LJoe



TuOsdays-Salurdays
11 a.m.-3 p.m.


Dinner:
Thursday s-Saturdays
5 .nm.- or 10 p.m.


Coastal Community Association (CCA) is
the only organization exclusively dedicated
to protecting the property and quality of
coastal living in South Gulf County. CCA's
goal is, to see our area develop in harmony
with the natural coastal environment
and be supported by essential services
and amenities. Since its orgin in 1992, the CCA has
championed a number of issues. They include:

Our Successes, Issues & Involvements
*Beach renourishment \


*Fire protection
* Law enforcement
* Beach driving rules & access
controls
*Bike walking path along Cape
San'Blas Road
SCo-Sponsor Coastal Clean up
*Information support for
property owners via our
website
* Emergency medical response


f L -S


South Gulf County


A Special Thank You to the following

associate members:


*Bayside Lumber
*Bayside Savings Bank
*One Source Mortgage
*Hannon Insurance
*Pristine Properties
*St. Joe Hardware
*Scallop Cove


* Rex and Anne Anderson
w/Coastal Realty Group
* Gulf to Bay Construction
* Loggerhead, Grill
*Gulf Pines Homeowners
Association
* Barefoot Properties


Visit us at www.ccawebsite.com
I' -. *" : i


' Subject to approval, $50 minimum opening deposit required. Applies to personal checking accounts only. The George Foreman" Grill will be provid-
ed at time that your account is opened. Quantities are limited. Superior Bank reserves the right to substitute an item of comparable value. Gifts will
- be subject to income tax reporting.
Some ATM owners may impose an equipment surcharge for use of their ATMs. Charges from other financial institutions may apply at nonproprietary
ATMs.


TheSta, ortSt.Jo, F -Thursday, August 24, 2006


: :




Full Text

PAGE 1

50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Star Staff Report A Wewahitchka man was arrested last week on charges stemming from a shooting last month. Dakota Floyd Ake, 21, of Wewahitchka was arrested by investigators with the Gulf County Sheriff’s Of ce, according to Sheriff Mike Harrison. Ake’s arrest follows the shooting of Peter Keukelaar, 28, of Bay County during a social gathering at Ake’s residence Sept. 22. Keukelaar suffered a gunshot wound to the chest with life-threatening injuries. When deputies arrived at the scene near Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative, they were told Keukelaar was being rushed to the hospital by a friend who witnessed the shooting. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Halloween looms and the supporters of the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society are ready to do the bash – the Bow Wow Bash. And, in its eighth year, the event has proven to be quite the smash. “The whole community has gotten behind this event,” said Sandi Christy, president of the board of directors for the SJBHS. “It has become a giant masquerade ball. “We have more sponsors this year than ever before. Attendance has grown every year. It’s the adult Halloween. It’s about raising money and goodwill.” The event began of humble beginnings. Part of a day-long celebration of pets and their owners, the Bow Wow Bash was the formal evening partner to Paws in the Park, an informal gathering of dogs, cats and the people that love them. As Paws in the Park was phased out, the Bow Wow Bash assumed a larger pro le, transforming into a Halloween ball – costumes optional but encouraged. Star Staff Report The date of the Walt Butler pre-trial date has been moved. During the original pre-trial hearing earlier this month, Butler’s public defender, Henry Sims, asked Judge John Fishel for an additional two to three hours so that new motions could be led. Fishel blocked out the hours across several days in October and November, but now the pre-trial has been condensed to 9 a.m. ET Tuesday, Nov. 5 at the Gulf County courthouse with the of cial trial set to begin two weeks later on Monday, Nov. 18. Butler pre-trial rescheduled for November By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Circuit Court Judge John Fishel has scheduled a January hearing for further presentations in a foreclosure case brought against the Port of Port St. Joe. Capital City Bank is attempting to foreclose on a port parcel that serves as the barge terminal off the Intracoastal Waterway that was secured with a loan of over $4 million. Because of a lack of revenue or tenants to drive revenue, the Port Authority has been unable to make payments on the loan for at least two years. Fishel, who just rotated into Gulf County in August, was surprised to have such a complex and important case fall into his lap with just a 30-minute hearing last month, port attorney Tom Gibson said, and stated a desire for a second hearing for additional presentations on the issues. Port foreclosure hearing rescheduled By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Taxpayers are now off the hook for the upkeep of the historic county courthouse in Wewahitchka. And the effort to save the building has an in-house champion. The Board of County Commissioners during its regular bi-monthly meeting on Tuesday gave nal approval to a lease agreement with North Florida Child Development Inc. that aims to maintain the building as a job-creator and historic treasure to the north end of the county. As the CEO of NFCD Sharon Gaskin of Wewahitchka said last month, the courthouse is, “Our lighthouse,” alluding to ongoing efforts to save the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Under the terms of the lease, NFCD will occupy more than 4,000 square feet on the rst oor of the courthouse, including the foyer but excluding the old of ces of the Gulf County Extension Service, more space than the operator of Early Head Start and Head Start programs in ve counties occupied previously. NFCD will assume all responsibilities for utilities, upkeep, maintenance and repairs. The lease is for 10 years at $1 per BOCC nalizes courthouse lease agreement Right to Speak ordinance receives public hearing of pets and their owners, the Bow DAKOTA AKE PHOTOS BY SANDI CHRISTY | Special to The Star Wylie Petty and his staff from the El Governor Motel decorate the Centennial Building each year at no charge. Bow Wow Bash St. Joseph Bay Human Society fundraiser is this Saturday PHOTOS BY SANDI CHRISTY | Special to The Star Thursday, OCTOBER 24, 2013 ABOVE: More than 200 items will be on the block during live and silent auctions. LEFT: The Bow Wow Bash is the major fundraiser each year for the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. Costumes are optional, but encouraged for the Bow Wow Bash. See BASH A2 See BOCC A8 YEAR 76, NUMBER 2 She sells sea shells B1 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . A4 Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . A7 Society . . . . . . . . . . . . B2 School News . . . . . . . . . . B3 Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Classi eds . . . . . . . . . B6-B8 Wewa man charged after shooting investigation See SHOOTING A8 See BUTLER A8 See PORT A8

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, October 24, 2013 The rst year, Christy said, they hoped to raise $20,000 toward an an nual budget that eclipses $200,000. The proceeds of the Bash, 100 percent of which go to the Humane Society each year, came in above expectations, providing fuel for the future. “Bolstered by the success of the rst year we thought we could do this every year,” Christy said. “The Humane Society would not be what it is without those 265 people who attended last year and those who attended every year.” As the Humane Society expanded its programs in the community – bringing dogs and cats to the nursing home, the DAWGS in Prison program – the community embraced the organiza tion’s biggest fundraiser of the year. “They have been such a great partner in (our com munity) for the quality of life programs we have here, the only way to give back is to support their big event,” said Ron Reid, director of the Bridge at St. Joe nurs ing home. “And it is also another opportunity for myself and my team who go to break the stereotype of a nursing home employee, to dress up in costumes and have fun. It’s a fantastic event and we can go out and be part of the community and have a ball.” Community is also the engine that drives the Hu mane Society, a largely volunteer organization, 365 days a year. The Humane Society’s facility on 10th Street is a mecca for volunteers of all ages and backgrounds that help clean cages, do laun dry, feed, walk and socialize with animals, make runs to the vet, animal transports, provide foster homes and animal adoption support. “We are so blessed at the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society for all the wonderful volunteers,” Christy said. One couple who live in Gulf County part-time spend much of their time here helping out with projects of all kinds around the facility. “The volunteers they have do an amazing job,” said Andy Smith, whose family company, Hannon In surance, has been a sponsor of the Bow Wow Bash from the outset. “The work they do makes it worthwhile to support them. The facility, which is great for anyone who hasn’t been out there, the board, they work hard and do a great job. “The event is a real blast.” As the blast has grown into a smash a network of locals providing essential support has expanded. Wylie Petty and his staff from the El Governor Motel “transform” the Centennial Building each year, decorat ing the building and donat ing every bit of sweat, time and dollars. Silent and live auctions offer an array of treats, all donated. “The donations and peo ple hearing about it have allowed the event to grow so much,” Christy said. “We have so much wonderful stuff. It is a challenge just setting it all up.” As in previous years, Jill and Mike Davis are donat ing a Murder Mystery Din ner for 10 at their house, this year’s theme, “Murder in Oz” based on the presump tion that the house falling on the Wicked Witch was no accident. Mary Conroy, the chef behind Gourmet Now, will serve dinner for 10 with wine and liquor provided by Les and Andrea Heard. Threeand four-night va cations to high-end resorts in Aruba, Curacao and San Juan, Puerto Rico will be on the block. Jan Sapte has created a lighthouse-themed quilt and Bobby Pollack donated a hand-turned pear wood bowl among the many hand crafted items by local arti sans, including local artists Elaine Lerch and Leslie Wentzell. There will also be jew elry, spa days and paintings among over 200 items that will be auctioned that night. “It is a great network that has grown,” Christy said. “We do solicit items but now I have people who call me. A lot of these people have ad opted animals or been to the shelter and they have seen we have a clean, well-man aged facility. “In their own way they want to give back and help. We have a lot of work to do but we are all proud of where we’ve come to.” In a county where there is a single animal control ofcer, the Humane Society houses, on average, over 50 dogs and 25-30 cats each day. “They never stop com ing,” Christy said. The Humane Society’s budget is quickly eaten up with a mortgage, utilities and the cost of upkeep. A food program is sup ported through grants and another grants subsidizes spay and neuter programs in the 32456 zip code, the fa cility receives donations and recoup adoption fees, but as Christy said, “The costs add up.” And given the con strained state of govern ment budgets, the cities of Port St. Joe and Wewahitch ka and the Board of County Commissioners combine to subsidize about one-quarter of the annual budget. “The Bow Wow Bash sup plies a signicant portion of our budget,” Christy said. BASH from page A1 1 3 5 A v e n u e G A p a l a c h i c o l a F L 8 5 0 6 5 3 8 8 5 3 G re a t t h i n g s a re b e i n g s a i d b y o ur P a t i e n t s W h a t w a s l i k ed m o s t a b o u t t he h o s p i t a l . T h e p e o pl e Sm al l a n d F r i e n d ly T he s t a f f v er y pr o f e s s si o na l T h e c a r e c o n c e rn a n d k i n d n e s s T h e p r o m p t a n d e x c e l l e n t tr e a t m e n t b y a l l s t a f f m e m b e r s S pe c i a l Me nt i o n s . T er r y P r i d g en a n d C our t n e y G i d den s Y e s D e b b i e G r e yn o l d s i s a v e r y s p e c i a l p e r s o n J i m B o o n e w a s e x c e l l e n t ; v e r y c o u r t e o u s a n d p r o f e s s i o n a l C a r o l Jo n e s m a d e m e f e e l r e a l l y r e l a x e d d u ri n g t r e a t m e n t s N u r s e s a n d D r C o n r a d w e r e g r e a t THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER S K I N C A N C E R c a n b e p r e s e n t w i t h o u t y o u k n o w i n g i t C A L L t o d a y f o r a s k i n c a n c e r s c r e e n i n g D I D Y OU K N O W t h a t s t u d i e s s h o w : # # ' # * # # ' ' % ' ! ' $ ' % &, ' % ' ! $ ' % & % ( ! # # # # ' ' # % % % # # ' % ' # # % ' ! ' N O W D I D Y OU K N O W ? # % ' ' & ' # ! ' + # % # & ' # ' % # . ' ) # + % ' # & ' % # ' # ' % % $ # ' VI N C E N T I VE R S M .D 3 0 1 T w e n t i e t h S t r e e t | P o r t S t J o e F L 3 2 4 5 6 8 5 0 2 2 7 7 0 7 0 | w w w i ve r s m d .c o m A L L M A J O R I N SUR A N C E A C C EP T ED 9 a m 6 p m 9 a m 2 p m NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. 4< 4 & # //>/ ; ) & 8 ww w .m ulli se y e.c om "$ # ''% 5 "$ ':; 24 ;6;2/ 4 ; 9 3 6 / 2>=4 4 Medical Ey e Exam with 33 $1;) / 3 4 ;6;43 4 #: ;2;/ /3 % 9 4 ':4 4/> ;2=34 / 42 ;; 6 4 4 9=/4 /3 4 f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases "$ "($ ##"'' 850-7 63-6666 ( % ;; 4 =;;9 ; :4 = ;3/ # /:/3=4) 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. ; 4 8!-! $ + # S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances (% % ''(' 0* * # ''% ) "$ "($ #$"$' ##"'' 0 / 4 # / 4) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 33 $1;) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 11-15-13 CODE: SJ00 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Last week Andy sniffed out a new path for the DAW GS in Prison program. One of the graduates from the program’s Class 29, Andy left last Wednesday for Arizona, making it 17 states and counting that have re ceived a newly-trained ca nine from the Developing Adoptable Dogs with Good Sociability (DAWGS) in Pris on program based at the Gulf Forestry Camp. The number of states will increase with the next grad uation in eight weeks when a dog will be adopted by a fam ily in Chicago, adding Illinois to the list. “We started this for the dogs but we continue this for the impact it also has on the inmates,” said Sandi Christy, with Judy Miick co-director of the DAWGS in Prison pro gram. “I feel a sense of peace about this program. It is like I was meant to do this.” DAWGS in Prison is one of the benchmark programs for the St. Joseph Bay Hu mane Society. The program was fea tured at the top of the list last week during a community partnership meeting hosted with Gulf Correctional Insti tute as an example of initia tives aimed at returning in mates to society as produc tive individuals. As of last week, the pro gram has graduated 308 dogs in four-plus years while more than 320 inmates have been accepted, after ap plying, into the program, moving up a ladder from caretaker to trainer to lead trainer. Inmates have gone on to use skills learned in DAWGS to work with animals in shel ters, humane societies and veterinarians from Florida to Oregon. “I cry a little at every graduation, but the inmates can change that,” Miick said. “They come up and tell me about all they have learned, about discipline, just caring about another being. That makes it all worthwhile.” For the dogs, many of them either abandoned or turned into the shelter, the program is, literally, a life-saver. Andy was given up by a family that grew impatient with him despite not pro viding the training, Christy said. Siri was abandoned in the woods and until DAWGS had never learned to trust humans. Paige was loved, Christy said, but never spayed and had produced too many pup pies, taxing her body. Ally was an admired gor geous dog, but never trained or socialized with people. “What we do know, if any of these dogs could talk, is that every dog here starts as a blank canvas,” Christy said. “His destiny is etched by the hands of a painter. Paint with hostility and a dog learns to ght. Paint with cruelty and he learns fear. “Paint with praise and a dog learns condence. Paint with boundaries and he learns respect. Paint with tenderness and a dog learns to bond. Paint with affection and he learns to love.” Each dog, Christy added, is therefore a product of environment. Bad dogs are not born – they are painted, Christy said. “Look to the artist and stop blaming the dog,” she added. “Here at DAWGS in Prison we take the awed portrait and paint over it.” And the painters at DAW GS in Prison, those inmates, learn tools while teaching the dogs. The inmates, just as with the dogs coming from the Humane Society, apply and are screened. They get with the program, provid ing round-the-clock care to the eight to 10 members of each class or they leave the program. They must keep meticu lous records on each dog’s care, from feeding to bath room breaks to teeth brush ing and grooming. Slack off and out of the program they go. But main tain focus and earning each step of the ladder of success in the program has its dis tinct dividends. Inmates, upon their own graduation, provide feed back to program coordina tors concerning what they got out of the program. Christy provided just a sampling last week. “These animals teach you a lot without saying a word; patience and peace of mind; spending your times caring for an animal so it can have a second chance,” one inmate wrote. “I like working with the dogs. It gives me gratica tion seeing a dog transform, knowing I had a part in it,” wrote another. “You are not just helping the dogs – the program helps you gain responsibility,” an other noted, while another wrote, “There is something new to learn every day.” Graduation day is bitter sweet as they say goodbye to the dog they have trained as another class enters the gates at the Forestry Camp. “So, in the end, who saves who, and who is the real art ist?” Christy asked. “We like to think it is both man and dog, each playing their vital part in helping each other to become productive mem bers of society.” DAWGS in Prison graduates Class 29 SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR Class 29 for the DAWGS in Prison program. The program has now saved more than 300 dogs while providing skills to more than 300 inmates.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, October 24, 2013 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com In a split vote, the Mexi co Beach city council may have violated an ordinance regarding competitive bidding. During a workshop three weeks ago the council agreed to have a third party evaluate the foundation slab beneath the historic Parker House which was deemed usable by the insurance company. At Tuesday’s workshop, it was noted that a formal written statement had been provided from the insurance company to say that the slab is in good condition but the council intends to show them another conicting analysis in an attempt to leverage ad ditional money. “The insurance compa ny is saying that the slab is ne,” said Councilman Jack Mullen before bringing up the analysis from Cathey Construction, which found issues with the existing foundation. “Obviously, we don’t agree.” After the council agreed to get a second opinion, city administrator Chris Hub bard solicited “informal bids” by phone for several engineering rms recom mended by the Bay County commissioners. The council received one bid from Nova Engineering and Environ mental out of Panama City. Before the council could accept the bid, Mullen read ordinance number 177 that states that expenditures over $3,000 require competi tive bids. Nova’s $3,500 bid for soil borings and structural anal ysis put the council in a bind since no other bids were received. According to an amend ment made in 1999 during a special meeting, the city could not hold a vote until they had “unsuccessfully attempted competitive bid ding.” Ordinance 177 also stated that there is an ex ception when the vote is in the best interest of the citi zens of the city. Hubbard told the coun cil that if it solicited sealed bids, it would take at least six more weeks before an analysis contract could be approved. “We can’t violate our own laws,” said Councilwoman Tanya Castro. The council tried to stay mindful that those in viola tion of the ordinance are considered guilty of a mis demeanor of the second degree. “You don’t get a speeding ticket for going 37 in a 35,” said Cathey. “We can violate or not violate.” Mullen interpreted the ordinance as though the council had the ability to change it based on need. Castro didn’t see a point in taking additional bids since Nova’s “informal bid” price of $3,500 was public knowledge. “We could make a case that we have complied,” said Mullen, referencing the fact that no other bids had been received. Councilman Lanny How ell made a motion to hire Nova for the analysis de spite the existing ordinance. It was put to vote and passed 3-2 with Howell, Cathey and Councilman Bobby Pollock in support. To date, the city has re ceived $660,000 for damages to the historic Parker House, purchased by the city in mid2011 with the intention of us ing it as a new city hall. The building caught re several months later and suffered massive damage though no additional insurance monies have been paid in the past year. During the meeting, new city clerk Adrian Welle was in attendance, having suc cessfully relocated from Minnesota to Mexico Beach to take up the tumultuous title. The council took a mo ment to check in with Welle about his experience to date. The clerk said that he’d been busy with a 277-page book of Florida ordinances and statutes, though he hadn’t been trained on the city’s ac counting software. “I can do things, but I don’t want to,” Welle joked, refer encing former clerk Sharon McGhee, who attempted to be proactive with the city’s accounting software, but struggled. McGhee resigned several days later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’S NEST FRID A Y & SA TURD A Y 9 PM K ARA OKE D J D ANCING RANDY ST ARK SOUTHERN SUND A Y K ONKRETE SOUL RANDY ST ARK HALLOWEEN PARTY SA TURD A Y OCT OBER 26TH COSTUME CONTEST W E HA VE MOVED T O: 327 REID A VE (CORN E R OF 4TH St & REID A VE.) 850-227-3472 HOU RS MONDA Y T O W EDN ESDA Y 8 AM T O 6 PM THU RSDA Y T O SA TU RDA Y 8 AM T O 8 PM SU NDA Y 11 AM T O 6 PM By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Though the Deepwater Horizon spill was long ago, it’s anything but forgotten. The county RESTORE Act Committee was back in session last week after a recess during which the U.S. Treasury issued draft rules for how to process applications for funding projects from counties affected by the 2010 spill that pumped more than 210 million gallons of oil into the Gulf. Previously, the RAC reviewed 86 applications over a six-month period for ways to use potential BP money to improve the community. The RAC ultimately whittled the projects down to 73 valid prospects that totaled over $113 million. Gulf County is expected to re ceive around $2.3 million dollars when the settlement is complete, a far cry from the original estimates when the committee formed. The Gulf Coast Ecosystem Res toration Council, a group made up of governors from Florida, Ala bama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas, released a document that provided the framework for a co ordinated region-wide restoration effort. The plan was sent to all 23 Florida counties eligible under RESTORE and feedback was wel comed for a nal draft that would ultimately be sent to the Gulf Consortium, which represents the counties at the state capital in Tallahassee. Though not all members of the RAC were present during the meeting, county attorney Jer emy Novak led the group through the provisions and noted their feedback. The available members of the RAC discussed the need for ad ditional clarications in the plan, especially when it came to the allowance of revised RESTORE plans to be submitted once a dol lar amount is assigned to each county. Committee member Pat Hard man wanted the Restoration Coun cil to push for money to be paid as Non-Federal Restitution Funds so that it couldn’t be taxed. Throughout the meeting the RAC often became frustrated with the Treasury’s lack of prog ress toward establishing rules on how projects would be awarded money. “We need good, clear guide lines,” said county administrator Don Butler. “We need a timeline. We need a process,” added Port St. Joe city manager Jim Anderson. Novak told the group that the process had become time con suming because it’s not a typical responsibility of the Treasury De partment and, just like the RAC, they were making it up as they went along. “It’s a unique piece of legisla tion,” said Novak. “This has never been done before.” Once the Treasury has decided on its rules and allocated funds, the RAC can focus on which of the 73 projects will be seen to completion. The RAC acts as an advisory committee for the Board of County Commissioners, which has the nal say on what projects would be funded. Barring any changes, the feed back was presented to the BOCC Tuesday and was to be sent on to the Gulf Consortium, of which County Commissioner Warren Yeager is a member. The Consortium is a public en tity created in 2012 by an Inter-lo cal Agreement among Florida’s 23 Gulf Coast counties. The RESTORE Act was passed by the Congress in June 2012 and signed into law by the President in of the same year. County RESTORE committee back in action MB council acknowledges possible violation in Parker House vote

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O PINION www.starfl.com A Section The red dress had black symbols of some sort splashed across it. The buttons were wooden, giving it an oriental look. It was not the prettiest out t I’d ever seen, but the girl in it was! Of course, she was not the girl I’d come to the dance with. Ain’t that the way life goes….. I managed to nd out her name. And, as the evening wore on, I summoned up the courage to ask her to dance. The music was a record player with a microphone laid in front of the speaker. As we rather awkwardly stepped out on the oor (I couldn’t dance a lick and I’d met this girl semi-of cially only seconds before), she smiled and Roy Orbison cut down on “Candy Man”. It was, as someone penned in another song, “A moment to remember”. A few weeks later I took her home to meet the family. She was extremely attractive. She was polite to a fault, fun to be around and one of the most humble and unassuming people I’d ever met. Did I mention that her father was a doctor? And, sure, she got me on the county club golf course for no charge. She put our meals on some tab her dad “kept open”. And, oh yeah, they owned about a thousand acres of rich bottom land….. Leon kept mouthing to me behind her back, “Marry her today.” “Don’t let this one get away.” “GET DOWN ON YOUR KNEE!” I was a junior in high school and not quite ready for the husband gig. But it is a wonderful memory that doesn’t come around very often. As a matter of fact, I don’t recall it at all unless I catch “Candy Man” on one of the oldie channels. And that is kinda the point of today’s epistle. We all have those special songs that re-connect us to a particular friend, place or situation. The catch here is they’ve about quit playing those old songs! “Dancing with the Stars”, “NCIS” and “Duck Dynasty” are not featuring Roy Orbison much these days. I can back up even earlier. I remember Leon bringing home that tiny 45 RPM record player in 1955. He paid something like fourteen dollars for it and the store “threw in” the hottest record out that year, Tennessee Ernie Ford’s version of “Sixteen Tons.” It was the rst song I learned from start to nish. We played it from morning till night. Leon could even sound like Ernie when he dropped down on that “I owe my soul to the company store” line. What a special memory! How long has it been since you’ve heard Tennessee Ernie sing? Listen, the Beatles recorded their last songs together over four decades ago! Fewer and fewer people are showing up at Graceland every year. Chuck Berry just turned 87 and Jerry Lee Lewis hasn’t been seen in years. If it keeps on going this away, I might not have had a childhood at all! I kissed Millicent Blackburn right on the mouth on her grandmother’s front porch over on Magnolia Avenue. I don’t remember if we were in the swing or on that big couch against the back wall. I do know it was a hot summer night. I don’t how I got to her house, how we ended up on the porch alone or how long I stayed. I do remember distinctly that Percy Faith and his Orchestra was in the living room playing, “Theme from a Summer Place.” It is amazing how one old song can de ne the time and the location, the situation and the moment for you. I hear Gene Autry sing “Back in the Saddle” and I can smell the popcorn from the old Park Theatre. Probably the song I remember from high school more than any other was “Rebel Rouser” by Duane Eddy. The basketball team used it as their theme song as they came on the court. It was a scintillating moment as everything in the gym paused, Duane hit the rst “twangy” notes on his ole Chet Atkins’ model Gretsch, the dressing room door ew open and Jackie Burns, Paul David Campbell, Jim Williams and the rest of the team poured out on the oor. I don’t see how we ever lost a game with that introduction! Not all the memories are so sweet. When the doctor’s daughter came out to the Twin Pools to tell me the free golf was over the Coasters were blasting out of those giant speakers under the high diving boards, “Fe-fe, fo-fo, fum, I smell smoke in the auditorium ...” When the ght broke out up at the Skyway Grill Bobby Brewer and I were minding our own business over Cherry Cokes and cheeseburgers. Rollin Trull threw some big guy from Huntingdon right slap-dap across our table! I did an immediate double back summersault to avoid the ying Cokes and body parts while the juke box was playing, “North to Alaska”. Prom night was moving kind of slow until the masked rider rode the horse through the side doors right out on to the dance oor. Everybody looked shocked except the masked rider and the big horse. They promenaded to Bo Diddley’s “You Can’t Judge a Book by Looking at the Cover” before ducking off into the darkness from whence they came. Ended up being the best dance I ever attended. You don’t suppose you can lose the memories if you can’t hear the music? Respectfully, Kes Play It Again, Sam! HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert The American public has lost patience with Washington. The question is, now what? Congress is unable to do its job. It displays neither competence nor responsibility. It lurches — reeling from crisis to crisis, each one selfmanufactured in an effort to postpone the reckoning from some earlier crisis. It shut the government down over a temporary budget. Now it’s threatening the nancial credibility of the U.S. government and the security and safety of the American people. Three years of last-minute spending decisions have culminated in a television standoff with no actual negotiations. Too many members of Congress reject the notion that accommodation and time-honored procedures allow them to ful ll their responsibilities to the American people. They use their legislative skill to engage in brinksmanship rather than address the country’s fundamental problems. Economic growth? Creating jobs? Putting the federal budget on a sustainable path? Don’t look to Congress. They’re too busy coming up with the next short-term tactic to confront the other side. Every day they dither, they keep the government from addressing the nation’s real problems. Even worse, they’ve managed to raise real questions in this country and abroad about whether our system of government can work. Are we saddled with a national legislature paralyzed by unending con ict? Are we capable of tackling our major problems? We are on the road to a government that cannot plan, a country shackled by perpetual uncertainty, and a loss of faith in our institutions both at home and abroad. We do not have to continue down that road, but we do have to confront a core problem. The political center in Congress has weakened to the point of ineffectiveness, if not near-irrelevance. That’s ne with some people in Washington, who are comfortable with gridlock and don’t think its consequences will be dire. Our government’s inability to deal with problems, they argue, is good — a government that’s able to act, they believe, creates more problems than it solves. Likewise, some people acknowledge polarization as a problem, but blame it on an electorate that prefers a divided government, split between the parties. All I can say is that divided government in the past — think Ronald Reagan and Tip O’Neill — didn’t keep Congress from creatively addressing national challenges. Divided government is not easy, but it is not unusual and it can work. Politicians don’t deserve all the blame. Voters share responsibility: more people have to turn out to vote. The more people who vote, the better the chances to strengthen the political center — that is, moderates and pragmatists. That’s because low turnout brings out the most ideologically intense voters, who in turn reward the most polarizing candidates. A Congress more representative of the American people rests on expanding efforts to convince people to vote, and beating back the barriers to voting. The second solution lies with members of Congress. Contemplating a government shutdown, a Kentucky congressman recently explained his stance by saying, “All that really matters is what my district wants.” This is not an uncommon view, but it’s a distressingly limited one. Our system depends on members who believe it’s also their responsibility to lead and inform voters, who are willing to weigh the national interest as well as parochial concerns and who have con dence in our system to resolve political differences. In other words, we need members of Congress devoted to making the system work. We need men and women in of ce who understand that when the voters give us a divided government, they have no choice but to accept the distribution of power and work with it, regardless of what they wish were the case. We need legislators who realize that those on the other side feel just as passionately and deserve their respect, and who are committed to nding a solution to our problems. We change laws in our democracy and solve our most dif cult issues in this country not by bringing government to a halt, but by ghting out the issues before the voters in an election. At the end of the day, we have to move the country forward — and we need to elect members of Congress who are willing and able to do that. Lee Hamilton is Director of the Center on Congress at Indiana University. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years. It’s time for an intervention If you’ve never heard of Southern Living, I would rst say that I don’t believe you, and then I would say, “Bless your heart.” That pretty much means, “You are so stupid, I feel sorry for you.” Let’s pretend you really don’t know about the Southern Living magazine. It was started back in the 1960’s by The Progressive Farmer Company which changed its name to Southern Progress Corporation. The Southern Living magazine made it really big telling folks about Southern cooking, nice homes in the South and gardening. In the mid 1980’s Time Inc. paid about a gazillion dollars for the company and Southern Living. The magazine is now the largest regional lifestyle publication in the United States. Women love it; men sneak and read it, particularly in doctors’ of ces. The bottom line is this; if you, your cooking, your house or your prized roses have been in Southern Living, you are a pretty big deal. My cousin Toni – her house has been in Southern Living. If I’m not mistaken, it’s been in there more than once. She lives in a small town in Randolph County, Alabama and everybody knows her. Her home with the wraparound porch to die for is kind of an area attraction. You should understand now… Cousin Toni has a nice home, is also a good cook and is second to none when it comes to entertaining. She is a sweet lady, but she is also on the list of relatives you call when all hell breaks loose. In other words, she’ll do a little more than “pray for you.” People make the mistake of thinking proper Southern women are all standing there waiting for you to throw your coat in the mud puddle for them to walk on. They are not. Cousin Toni would simply say “Bless your heart” if you decided to throw your coat in a mud puddle. Again meaning, “You are so stupid, I feel sorry for you.” She’s sweet when she needs to be, but she will not back down from a ght. She is my cousin; this makes good sense to me. Her Daddy was my Uncle Harold. Uncle Harold was a doggone good man. He and my Daddy raced cars and were more than brothers-inlaw – they were good friends. “You can depend on Harold,” my Daddy would always say. There was no greater compliment that my Daddy could give a person. Uncle Harold also taught me how to cut my toenails so as to never get an ingrown toenail. You don’t forget things like that. I’ve never had an ingrown toenail. My Daddy’s baby sister – my Aunt Ruby, had to call cousin Toni in the other day on an assault mission. Aunt Ruby has been visiting “the spa” quite a bit lately, so folks keep an eye on her and make sure she has everything she needs. She is a treasure and we protect her as such. By the way, “the spa” is what Aunt Ruby calls the hospital. Aunt Ruby has a cat, “Sister Sarah,” that is always trying to entertain her with tricks and various other good deeds. Sister Sarah and Aunt Ruby sit in her famous yellow porch swing a lot and enjoy “All of God’s gifts,” as my Aunt Ruby puts it. It seems Sister Sarah has a thing for chipmunks, or “ground squirrels” as folks down there call them. Sister Sarah wants to catch them and bring them in the house to play with for a while. You know where all this is going. Sister Sarah got the ground squirrel in the house, things got crazy. Sister Sarah brought it in the house and then she took it out. Then she brought it in again… The ground squirrel was loose and running around all over Aunt Ruby’s house. Knowing Aunt Ruby, I’m sure she didn’t worry too much about it. She just called Cousin Toni to come over and “save the ground squirrel” from Sister Sarah the cat. After a NASCAR like chase all around the house, Sister Sarah and Cousin Toni nally cornered the ground squirrel in a bathroom behind a cabinet. If I had been there, I would have advised Cousin Toni to just “Roll up a Southern Living and whack him in the head.” Cousin Toni is not that way – not unless she has to be. According to Aunt Ruby, Cousin Toni was taking more of a ladylike approach, talking really sweet to the ground squirrel cornered behind the bathroom cabinet. “I see your two pretty eyes shining.” “Come on out, I’ll help you.” At this point, Sister Sarah was also ready to “help.” Cousin Toni nally hemmed the ground squirrel up and gingerly took him outside. On the way out, the ground squirrel bit Cousin Toni. I cannot get a report on what happened to the ground squirrel once it got outside. I do know this ground squirrel didn’t know about Aunt Ruby being a treasure or Cousin Toni’s fame with Southern Living, he was more concerned with not getting his head bit off by Sister Sarah. Aunt Ruby says, “Sister Sarah just wants to play with the ground squirrels. However she usually plays with them until she harasses them to death.” Many a Southern man has died that same way… (At the hands of a Southern woman who just wanted to play with them and ended up harassing them to death). I suppose there are worse ways to leave this world. Find more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Roll up a southern living and whack him in the head LEE H. HAMILTON #!$ &# !&"!"%& "" "!$%$%# $.6-*--9.::,1*60.;7 %1.$;*9 "!7? "79;$;7. "176. "##% "!$%"% "!#%$%! ()"&$ $&#"%! $") @.*9A:2?576;1: @.*9A:2?576;1: 6,*:.7/.997979752::276:26*-=.9;2:.5.6;:;1.8<+42:1.9:-7 67;174-;1.5:.4=.:42*+4./79-*5*0./<9;1.9;1*6*57<6;9.,.2=.-/79 :<,1*-=.9;2:.5.6; %1.:873.6>79-2:02=.6:,*6;*;;.6;276;1.8926;.->79-2: ;17<01;/<44@>.201.-%1.:873.6>79-+*9.4@*::.9;:;1.8926;.->79;1797<014@,76=26,.:%1.:873.6>79-2:47:;;1.8926;.->79-9.5*26: USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Page 4 Thursday, October 24, 2013

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A s of No v emb er 1, 2013, w e will b e in our new lo c ation at: 310 Reid A v enue P or t S t Jo e 850-229-2999 C ome check out y our fa v orit es and the ne w it ems in st o ck! =V 9\ ] 9Q =9; LU UB b\ C oastal C abin... “ W her e the W a t er M eets the W oods ” F a BOO L ous Ha l l owe en P a r t y! T uesday October 29, 2013 5:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 28% OFF OBAGI PRODUCTS V aser Lipo & S mart Skin CO2 FREE Visia Skin Analysis / -2, ))2) / # ( & BEST COSTUME WINS 20 UNITS OF FREE BOO-TOX! LEARN ABOUT THE NEW PERMANENT LASER CELLULITE REDUCTION. y! t r a en P owe l l ous Ha a BOO L F y! t r a en P owe l l ous Ha a BOO L F October 29, 2013 uesday T October 29, 2013 uesday T October 29, 2013 uesday T October 29, 2013 uesday T October 29, 2013 uesday T Come dressed in your favorite costume & win 20 units of Boo-tox, PLUS, a Grand Prize worth $2,000 & many more! Ghost ing H ors d’ ouv r es & Dr ink s to En jo y! T r ick-or-T reat for e xtra discount s and FREE Giv ea w a y s I n S e r v i c e f o r O ve r 20 Y e a rs Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspaper’s editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y o O U r R OPINIONs S Local/Business The Star| A5 Thursday, October 24, 2013 Special to The Star P eE N sS AC olOL A — Sacred Heart Health System is now offering its patients an interest-free loan pro gram called ClearBalance, giving patients an affordable option to pay their out-of-pocket hospital expenses over an extended pe riod. The ClearBalance program has been made available to pa tients at Sacred Heart’s three hospitals in Pensacola, Miramar Beach and Port St. Joe. Benets of the ClearBalance payment plan include: low month ly payments with exible terms – up to 72 months; patient pays no interest; patient pays no late fees; and a dedicated customer service center focused on patient satisfaction “We know an increasing num ber of our patients are faced with high deductibles and higher copays on their insurance plans. So we were looking for a better way to help them afford the care they need,” said Susan Davis, presi dent and CEO of Sacred Heart Health System. “Our concern for the well-be ing of our patients does not end at the time of their discharge. We understand many people are fac ing nancial hardships and that health care is expensive. The ClearBalance program helps our patients meet their health care needs and deal with unexpected hospital bills, while making it eas ier for them to manage their outof-pocket expenses,” Davis said. ClearBalance CEO Mitch Pat ridge said the company’s cus tomer service center and exible patient-friendly loans are key in gredients to the program’s appeal to both health care providers and consumers. “Sacred Heart Health System is focused on delivering an ex ceptional patient experience and achieving the highest level of pa tient satisfaction throughout the continuum of care, including the billing process,” Patridge said. “We’re proud to have ClearBal ance selected as part of Sacred Heart’s commitment to patient satisfaction.” The ClearBalance program allows all patients, regardless of credit score, to easily and quickly qualify for a patient-friendly bank loan. Additional balances and family member accounts can be added, and the patient will receive only one easy-to-read monthly statement. Sacred Heart Hospital introduces interest-free payment plan Star Staff Report Port St. Joe resident Jeff Braun was recognized this month by his employer, Me diacom Communications, for earning top honors in the company’s national awards program that recognizes employees for exceptional customer service. Braun earned the region’s “Award for Excellence.” Braun is a Mediacom service technician in Gulf Breeze and the surround ing area. He was cited for earning high marks for pro fessionalism and customer satisfaction. Ceremonies were held in Mediacom’s Gulf Breeze ofce to celebrate Cus tomer Service Week and recognize employees who consistently deliver ex cellent customer service. Mediacom delivers cable television and broadband communication services to homes and businesses and employs more than 4,500 people companywide. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Ask anyone and they’ll tell you Port St. Joe resident Donny McArdle is one of kind. In September, McArdle received his master service technician certication from Yamaha, and because he’s the only boat tech in Bay and Gulf counties to have earned it, his “one of a kind” status has been truly solidied. McArdle is an employee of the Mexico Beach Ma rina, an authorized Yamaha dealer, and having a master tech on staff gives the shop added credibility and their customers peace of mind. “There’s some status in the fact that we’re able to of fer that level of talent,” said Nate Odum, co-owner of the Mexico Beach Marina. “Donny can x anything that breaks.” McArdle elected to take the certication program, held in Kennesaw, Ga., at Yamaha’s Southeastern headquarters. The pro gram covered the setup and troubleshooting of Yamaha outboard motors and had something of a reputation for being extremely difcult. Even someone as talented as McArdle didn’t expect for it to be a cakewalk. “The success rate on the rst attempt is not high,” McArdle said. “You can know your stuff and still stress yourself out about it.” The fact that McArdle took the nal exam on Fri day the 13th didn’t add to his condence. The exam included a written test that had to be completed within an hour-and-a-half followed by six practical application sta tions that had to be complet ed in 30-minutes each. The ve students who took the exam were under the gun, and it didn’t make McArdle feel any better when two of his classmates failed the written test and were sent home. As McArdle worked through his practical ex ams, another classmate was escorted from the room and upon completing his fth station McArdle was called into the hallway by his instructor. McArdle feared that he’d done something incorrectly on a previous station and reached the end of the line, but his instructor informed him that he’d performed awlessly on the rst ve stations, and it was unnec essary for him to complete the sixth. “I was relieved,” said McArdle, who had beaten the odds and passed the exam on his rst attempt. “It’s not a ‘gimme.’ You have to be on your A-game.” He received a plaque commemorating his certi cation which now hangs proudly in the Marina shop. Odum celebrated having the only master tech outside of Destin and Tallahassee. “His work ethic is incred ible,” Odum said of McArdle. “He won’t let the motor beat him. When other guys give up, he won’t.” For McArdle, diagnosing an engine problem is a pro cess of elimination, but he enjoys the problem-solving process. Before he was x ing boats, he spent quality time in his youth rebuilding car engines. “I like to understand what I’m doing, and I enjoy it,” McArdle said. Born and raised in Port St. Joe, McArdle has worked at the Marina for 28 years, getting his start as a ll-in forklift driver. In 1984, he was recommended to the previous owners, the Marquardts, by his thengirlfriend (now wife) Teresa, who worked in the shop. After driving the fork lift, he stayed on, helping to build structures on the prop erty and began assisting the shop mechanics with the boat engines. From there, he began taking classes to get familiar with the motors that were regularly being serviced. To-date, McArdle has completed hundreds of hours of training on both Johnson and Yamaha motors. As if being the go-to guy for technical problems wasn’t enough to keep him busy, McArdle has been a volunteer re ghter for Port St. Joe for the last six years. Prior to that, he volunteered with the Overstreet re de partment for nine years. He also is a part time EMT and plays bass guitar for the First Baptist Praise Team in Port St. Joe. Though he and his wife moved to Orange Park, near Jacksonville for two years when Teresa’s job was transferred, they were excited to return to Port St. Joe and McArdle was ready to return to the Marina. He watched his sons, Jarrod and Chaney, gradu ate from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School and his young est son Chaney was recently hired as the emergency services coordinator for the City of Mexico Beach. “This is home,” McArdle said. Mediacom honors PSJ man for customer serviceS pe PE C i I A l L toTO T he HE S t T A r R Jeff Braun of Port St. Joe, second from left, is recognized for outstanding customer service by Mediacom’s top corporate leaders. Left to right are John Pascarelli, executive vice president for operations; Braun; Larry Jackson, area supervisor; and Tapan Dandnaik, senior vice president for customer service. S pe PE C i I A l L toTO T he HE S t T A r R Port St. Joe resident Donny McArdle received his master service technician certication from Yamaha, making him the only master tech in Gulf and Bay counties. ‘ONE o O F A KIND’ PSJ’s McArdle earns Yamaha certication

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A By TOM BAIRD Special to The Star As the weather cools, the waters of the bay and Gulf will become clearer. This isn’t so much from a lack of suspended sediment, but from fewer microscopic life forms adrift in the water column. There exists in the oceans of the world, in bays, lakes, and in almost every other natural body of water, a population of organisms so immense that it de es counting. Everyone while swimming has brushed up against millions of these creatures without being aware of their presence. No doubt you swallowed a large number while learning to swim. Although limited studies of this population were made before 1887, it was not until that year oceanographer Victor Hensen rst proposed a name for this vast assemblage … plankton. The term refers to those plants and animals, mostly, but not entirely, microscopic in size, that are made “to wander or drift,” under the in uence of ocean currents. The same root word gives us the name planet, because to early astronomers the planets seemed to wander against the more xed background of the distant stars. Although most planktonic organisms have the ability to swim, their efforts are too feeble in the presence of oceanic water movements. One de nition of plankton is the inability to swim faster than one knot. Because of their vast numbers, wide distribution and bene cial biologic activities, plankton are considered the most important inhabitants of the marine world, with all forms of life directly or indirectly dependent on them. Planktonic creatures are basic to the food chains of all marine life. Sponges, tube worms, scallops, clams, oysters and sea squirts are just some of the animals that lter sea water to gather them. Herring sheries use plankton indicators to predict potential catch. Giant baleen whales, more than 100 feet in length and reaching fantastic weights of 150 tons, feed almost exclusively on plankton. Diatoms, one type of plant plankton, are a major source of vital oxygen in the atmosphere and for proteins that animal life cannot synthesize but require. Without plankton the seas would be a wet desert. Not all planktonic creatures are microscopic. Jelly sh, as large as cannon balls, are moved about the oceans by currents. Comb jellies (Ctenophora), depending on the species can range from the size of a hickory nut to 4-6 inches. Many plankters are visible to the naked eye. Copepods (crustaceans) are the insects of the sea, and are about the size of a lower case o on this page. They are the most abundant and universally distributed animals in the plankton. Phytoplankton is the name for the plant part of the whole plankton community and they are more numerous than their animal counterparts. Using dissolved chemicals in the ocean and the energy of the sun, phytoplankton produce energy-storing sugars and oils and provide most of the oxygen in our atmosphere. The most common members of the phytoplankton are diatoms. These are literally the pastures and forests of the sea. Immediately recognized because of their delicate geometric shapes – circles, triangles, rods – diatoms are encased in a glass-like silica capsule. Because of this diatoms are often referred to as nature’s aquatic gems, and they are among the most beautiful plants on earth, although one needs a microscope to appreciate their delicate beauty. The hard glass-like case often remains long after the inner cellular material dies. As these cases settle to the ocean bottom over eons, thick deposits build up. These deposits are called diatomaceous earth or diatomite. Uplifting of the sea oor has made this material available to humans, and it is added to many commercial products, including dynamite, detergents, polishes, paint removers, fertilizers, and toothpastes. Some swimming pools use diatomaceous earth lters. In addition, diatomaceous earth is frequently a component in insulation and sound-proo ng materials. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) BWO H unti ng H e a dq u a r ters : CAMO AR RIV ING DAIL Y Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-886 8 WEEKL Y ALM ANA C S T JO SE PH B A Y AP AL A C HI C O L A B A Y W EST P ASS T I DE T ABLES M O NT H L Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu O c t 24 74 55 4 % F ri, O c t 25 74 47 5 % S a t O c t 26 70 49 7 % Sun, O c t 27 73 53 10 % M on, O c t 28 76 56 12 % T ues O c t 29 76 53 16 % W ed O c t 30 78 55 16 % Thursday, October 24, 2013 Page 6 Special to The Star On Oct. 16, more than 125 anglers from around the Forgotten Coast attended a shing seminar, hosted and sponsored by Bluewater Outriggers (BWO), which is owned and operated by the Duren family. Bluewater Outriggers is a premier sporting goods superstore in the heart of Port St. Joe’s waterfront business district. The guest speakers were Capt. Rick Murphy and Capt. Jeff Page from the “Florida Chevy Insider Fishing Report” team out of Miami. Murphy produces the television show for 26 weeks of the year and is seen on Fox Sports and Sun Sports channels on stations all over Florida and beyond, with 800,000 to 1 million viewers per week. Their show consists of weekly shing reports from every coastal area in Florida, and the Port St. Joe to Pensacola area report is done by Capt. Pat Denien with Bluewater Outriggers the primary sponsor. Capt. Rick and Capt. Jeff also have a new show coming out on Destination America, which is part of the Discovery Channel network and will air on Saturday mornings. The seminar, “Fishing Arti cial Lures in the Fall”, was a success as evidenced by the attendance at the Bluewater Outriggers store with standing-room only. Food and refreshments were served, and Capt. Rick and his partner Capt. Jeff took turns speaking about various shing techniques they use every day that will improve your angling, especially during the next few fall and early winter months. They shared some of their secrets, like their favorite lures they use to catch different species of sh at various depths from 12 inches of water to eight feet of water. Capt. Rick Murphy discussed the best lures, such as the Rapala Skitterwalk, for “walking the dog” and when to “match the hatch,” with a black and silver lure, when shing clearer waters and to use chartreuse in dirty waters. Both Captains talked about how much more productive drift shing is through the grassy areas, in lieu of anchoring, and how to adjust for the wind. Try to have the wind at your back or shoulders. Capt. Rick also explained the differences in popping corks and clacking corks, both weighted and non-weighted. He also demonstrated how to tie a loop knot to your lures or jigs to give it more real life action. On his whiteboard, he diagramed how to sh the different water depths. For example, in 1 to three feet of water, he starts with the gold spoon. His “go-to” lure for all species of sh is the quarterto half-ounce gold weedless spoon (Johnson Silver Minnow) and is effective in all depths of water. He stressed that after you cast, immediately start reeling at a fast and steady rate with your rod tip down, and do not use any twitching techniques when using the spoon. He also likes to use a jighead with a soft plastic bait like a shad paddletail in these shallow depths. When shing in three to ve feet of water, he likes lip lures such as a Rapala BX Minnow (Balsa Xtreme), X-rap or Skitter Walk. In ve to eight feet of water, use half-ounce Gotcha Sea Striker jig or a halfto three-quarter-ounce bucktail jig head. Rick also shared his recent visit and experience to the factories in Finland and Estonia and explained how much detail work and testing that Rapala puts into their products. The attendees for this Bluewater event were both men and women anglers wanting to sharpen their skills and techniques to improve their chances out on the water. Hopefully, this is one of many seminars to come in the future from Bluewater Outriggers. Capt. Rick and Capt. Jeff emphasized how blessed we are to have such a beautiful area to sh in with our pristine bays and lagoons. They both spoke about how this is one of their favorite Florida destinations, especially with its Southern charm and friendly people. Bluewater Outriggers hosts shing seminar Capt. Rick Murphy speaks to more than 125 anglers SPECIAL TO THE STAR More than 125 anglers packed Bluewater Outriggers recently for a shing seminar put on by Capt. Rick Murphy and Capt. Jeff Paige. SPECIAL TO THE STAR LEFT: A crystal diatom rainbow. MIDDLE: Plankton are considered a window to the universe. RIGHT: Copepods Plankton: basic to marine life food chain SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Gag grouper and amberjack arebeing caught state waters. Trout and redfish are still active this week. Good reports from Pig Island and Eagle Harbor are on the rise and plenty of fish are in St. Joe Bay. Some flounder action is hot in 20+ feet of water on the outside near shore wrecks. This should stay hot for a while, so try and find a good weather day.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com A Section Special to The Star The third annual Silent Auction/Golf Tournament to bene t the Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum is Nov. 8-9 at the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. As part of a full weekend event, a reception is 6 p.m. ET Nov. 8, with hors d’oeuvres, beer and wine for a $10 entry fee. A cash bar for spirits will also be available and live music by The George Boyer Band. A silent auction will take place with auction items including limited edition prints of historic military and cultural events, gift baskets and stays at area hotel. Other items are requested. A variety or items will be available A bene t golf tournament is Nov. 9, with proceeds to support the Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum and the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. The club is open to the public, and the tournament will be a four-player, scramble format, kicking off at 12:30 p.m. ET with a short ceremony to honor America’s veterans and a 1 p.m. shotgun start. A meal and awards ceremony will follow. Cash prizes for the tournament include $400 to the rst place team, $350 for second place and $200 for third place. A Hole-In-One Challenge will offer a $10,000 cash prize. The Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum has been honored by Smithsonian Magazine for seven straight years and is dedicated to preserving the memories of the amphibious soldiers who trained at the camp, which is in Carrabelle. The museum houses more than 10,000 square feet of artifacts, vehicles, photos, memorabilia and memories of the soldiers, sailors and other military, as well as civilian personnel who trained at the camp during the WWII years. Hole sponsorships are available and tournament registration information can be found at www.stjoebaygolf.com or by calling 227-1751 or Dan Van Treese at 227-8138. Special Lodging Packages are available starting at $69.99/single, $89.99/double. Call Mainstay Suites at 2296246 for a reservation. The event is being supported by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. 2077822 Gun Show February 23rd & 24th Ft. W alton Beach Fairgr ounds FREE P ARKING Concealed W eapons Class Sat/Sun 1 1am or 2pm Floridagunshow s.com Sat 9-5 Sun 10-4 Oct ober 26th & 27th P anama C ity F airgr ounds A S a l u t e t o A m e r i c a s V e t e r a n s F R I D A Y NO V E M B E R 8 2 0 1 3 6 : 0 0 p m Ea st e r n S i l e n t A u c t i o n a n d h o r s d ’ o e u v r e s r e c e p t i o n w i t h c a s h b a r a t S t J o s e p h B a y G o l f C l u b C l u b h o u s e C o s t o f a d m i t t a n c e $ 1 0 0 0 (in cl u d e s t w o f r e e d rin k s ) S A T U R D A Y NO V E M B E R 9 2 0 1 3 1 2 : 3 0 p m Eas t e r n S al u t in g A me ri ca ’ s V e t er a n s C er e m o n y 1 : 0 0 p m Ea st e r n S h o t g u n St a r t 4 p la y e r b e s t -b a l l f o r mat ; $ 5 5 n on m e m b e r $ 4 5 m e m b e r i f r e g i s t e r i n g a t l e a s t 2 w e e k s p r i o r t o t h e e v e n t P l u s $ 5 a f t e r t h a t M e a l a n d a w a r d s c e r e m o n y t o f o l l o w C a s h pr i z e s inc lu d e : $ 4 0 0 : F i r s t P l a c e t e a m $ 3 5 0 : S e c o n d P l a c e t e a m $ 2 0 0 : T h i r d P l a c e t e a m “ H o l e in O ne ” Cha l l e n g e : C a s h p r i z e $ 1 0,0 0 0 S pons or s h i p L e v e ls $ 5 0 0 D i vis i on S pons o r $ 2 5 0 B r i g a d e S pons or $ 1 0 0 C o m p a n y S pons or $ 5 0 P lat o on S pons or H o l e s p o n s o r s h i p s a l s o a v a i l a b l e. S p o n s o r s ’ n a m e s w i l l b e p o s t e d o n a ll s i g ns a n d w e b s it e Co n t ac t Us D a n V a n T r e e s e : 8 5 0 2 2 7 8 1 3 8 T o n y M i ni c hie l l o : 8 5 0 5 2 8 2 1 2 5 S p e cia l L o d g i n g P a ck ag e : M ains t a y S u i t e s : $ 6 9 9 9 Q u e en S u i t e p e r n i g h t $ 8 9 9 9 K i n g D e l u x e S u i t e p e r n i g h t a n a t u r a l e s c a p e c o m T ou r ist D e v elopme n t C ouncil A t w o d a y e v e n t t o h o n o r o u r v e t e r a n s a n d b e n e t C a m p G or don J oh n s t on W o r l d Wa r I I M u s e u m ( C ar r ab e l l e F L ) an d S t J o s e p h B a y G o l f C l u b =t›{… 9‹‹ ›… Gt Œ ?t£ 9{›†  t› I9W Wf IV^[ E VER Y D A Y 3:30 pm 6:30 pm w w w .docksideseaf oodandra wbar .com Bring Y our F riends a nd Get Ho ok e d! Q {… ?†• \WB =L9 Q \ 9‹‹ b Š  • I? DQ 9 ] \= [ BB U \ U B b Star Staff Report For most of the rst half last Friday, host Wewahitchka Gators played backand-forth with the Sneads Pirates. But too many givebacks by the Gators proved their undoing. Turnovers, including a key interception and two fumbles, proved decisive as the Pirates pounded Wewahitchka 53-14, of cially eliminating the Gators (2-6 overall, 0-3 in District 4-1A) from playoff contention. The Gators host Vernon at 7 p.m. CT this Friday, have a bye week and nish the season on the road against West Gadsden. Sneads scored on a long run to nish the opening drive of the game, but the Gators answered, driving the length of the eld to set up junior quarterback Rashard Ranie’s 1-yard touchdown run. A failed extra point left the Gators behind 7-6. Sneads responded with another long drive punctuated by a rushing touchdown to take a 14-6 before things unraveled for Wewahitchka. Ranie was intercepted on the rst play of the ensuing drive, and the Pirates converted the turnover into points and a 21-6 lead. The Pirates added a pair of rushing touchdowns in the second quarter to enter halftime with a 33-6 lead. The Gators took the second half kickoff and marched down the eld, senior running back Jarvar Hill dashing 27 yards up the gut to score. An Irvin Maiben run on the two-point conversion pulled Wewahitchka within 33-14 and breathed life into the Gators. But Sneads quickly extinguished hope with two more rushing touchdowns, one following a Gator fumble and by the end of the third period it was 46-14. Ranie nished 4 for 9 passing for 53 yards with one interception. He added 18 yards rushing on two carries. Hill led the Gators with 104 yards rushing on 15 carries and caught two passes for 35 yards. Junior Tad Gaskin also caught two passes, totaling 18 yards and Maiben, just a sophomore, had something of a breakout game with 73 rushing yards on 11 carries. Jonathan Palmer, another sophomore, added three yards on ve carries for the Gators. Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School girls’ soccer team begins the 2013/2014 campaign with a Jamboree this Saturday at the Lamar Faison Soccer Complex in Port St. Joe. Also participating are Panama City Bay High, Panama City North Bay Haven and Lynn Haven Mosley. The action begins at 1 p.m. ET with Port St. Joe facing Bay High on Field One. At 2 p.m., on Field Two, North Bay Haven will square off with Mosley. Bay High and North Bay Haven will compete on Field 2 at 4:30 p.m. and Mosley will play Port St. Joe on Field One at 5 p.m. Silent auction, golf tournament to bene t Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum Sneads Pirates eliminates Gators from postseason PSJ girls’ soccer jamboree Saturday Thursday, October 24, 2013 Page 7 Star Staff Report In what Coach Wayne Taylor described as much a practice as game, the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School volleyball team easily swept West Gadsden in the quarter nals of the District 1-1A tournament. The Lady Tiger Sharks won in three sets, 25-6, 25-6 and 25-8. The team had 38 serving aces, but their season ended Tuesday night with a straight-set loss to Liberty County in the semi nals. In the nal game of the regular season, the program’s Dig Pink event, the Lady Tiger Sharks toppled Wewahitchka in three sets, 25-16, 25-9 and 25-20. “It was a great team effort, and we even had a couple of eighth-graders playing that we moved up from junior varsity a couple of weeks ago,” Taylor said., adding the match allowed Teiyahna Hutchinson and Celeste Chiles playing time to become accustomed to the varsity system The game also served as Senior Night, as the team recognized Nicole Endres and Brittany King. The Dig Pink event brought out the largest crowd of the season, and though totals were not complete, the program will donate at least $1,000 to the Side Out Foundation for Breast Cancer Research. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School football team hoped to be in this position as the season played out. The Tiger Sharks wanted to arrive at this week 1-0 in District 1-1A with back-toback home games against West Gadsden and Liberty County in the next two Fridays. Mission accomplished. Coming off a 21-12 road win against Tallahassee FAMU last Thursday, raising their record to 5-2 overall, the Tiger Sharks have destiny in their hands as they face the Panthers of West Gadsden 7:30 p.m. ET on Friday at Shark Field. Win, and Port St. Joe is assured of a playoff spot in the four-team district, which also includes a winless Franklin County. Lose, and the Tiger Sharks would have to beat visiting Liberty County next week to force a three-way tie for the district title and the two district playoff spots. Beat West Gadsden and Liberty County, and the district title belongs to Port St. Joe. “You never know how your season is going to start and how it is going to go, but this is where we wanted to be,” Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon said. “We have to take of West Gadsden. We win, and we are in. “We are focused on West Gadsden. We can not look ahead. We have to take care of things Friday night.” West Gadsden, Gannon said, will provide a similar look as the FAMU squad Port St. Joe beat last Thursday in Tallahassee. Behind Dwayne Griggs, who rushed 10 times for 135 yards, the Tiger Sharks pounded out 317 yards rushing. Cole Cryderman added 78 yards, Aaron Paul 45 and Jak Riley 32 as Port St. Joe averaged over 10 yards a carry. Paul scored from 22 yards and Griggs from 64 sandwiched around an 18yard pass from quarterback Drew Lacour to Griggs as Port St. Joe put up all its points in the opening half. Lacour converted all three extra-point kicks. FAMU added a touchdown, failing on the extra point, just before halftime and did the same early in the fourth quarter. “Offensively, I thought we did a good job in the rst half, but in the second half, I thought we bogged down a bit,” Gannon said. “The coaches did not feel we did a good job in the second half. “I thought overall we came out and gave a good effort. They are a very athletic team, and we swarmed around the ball and hit them, which I think was important. Overall we did a good job.” West Gadsden, Gannon said, will present similar problems exponentially enhanced. “They are a mirror of the team we played at FAMU,” Gannon said. “They are very athletic and maybe a little more athletic than FAMU. They have some big receivers and a good running back. “They are good and they are well-coached.” Gannon said that after a bye week the team was a bit sluggish in practice leading up to FAMU. With the two-day fall break for public schools to begin this week, Gannon said he was pleasantly surprised by the focus and attitude on Monday. “We had a good day of practice,” Gannon said. The keys, Gannon said, will be limiting big plays, an early lead and holding onto the football. “We have to take care of the football,” Gannon said. “We also would like to get up on them. A team like that, you let them stay around, they are going to become more con dent as the game goes along. Getting up a couple of touchdowns would help. “We also have to tackle them. They are good in space, and we can’t afford to give up the big plays. We have to make them drive to score.” Season within season begins Friday for PSJHS WAYNE TAYLOR | Special to The Star The Lady Tiger Sharks raised at least $1,000 for breast cancer research during last week’s Dig Pink event. Lady Tiger Sharks fall in district semi nals

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, October 24, 2013 $ S e e a T y n d a l l F e d e r a l C r e d i t U n i o n r e p r e s e n t a t i v e f o r c o m p l e t e d e t a i l s a n d d i s c l o s u r e s D e f e r r e d p a y m e n t o e r a v a i l a b l e o n a u t o l o a n s o p e n e d b e t w e e n O c t o b e r 7 2 0 1 3 a n d D e c e m b e r 3 1 2 0 1 3 A l l r a t e s a n d o e r s a r e s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e w i t h o u t n o t i c e M e m b e r e l i g i b i l i t y r e q u i r e d ; a n i n i t i a l $ 1 n o n r e f u n d a b l e m e m b e r s h i p f e e w i l l a p p l y % # % & # % + # # % % + % % + + % % % % % % % % % + % % % # & % % % ( % # ( % % # % % % % & ( % ( % % + (+ # # % % ) + % # The hearing is set for 1:30 p.m. ET Jan. 23. Each side is seeking sum mary judgment. Capital City Bank is argu ing the mortgage is enforce able and asking the foreclo sure be granted. The Port Authority is ar guing it lacked the authority to mortgage public property without a voter referendum on the issue. Gibson said the judge could rule one of three ways. A win for Capital City Bank would enforce the mortgage and lead to foreclosure on the parcel. A win for the Port Author ity would mean the mortgage was invalid on its face, Gibson said. The judge could also rule that the mortgage was un enforceable, but the note the Port Authority owes Capital City Bank remained a debt that must be paid. Capital City Bank has de clined late offers from the Port Authority under which the Port Authority would pro vide additional strength to its obligation to pay back the loan while securing from Capital City Bank time to allow for de velopment at the port. According to Sims and prosecutor Robert Sombathy, the trial is expected to last two to three days. Butler is charged with shooting and killing Everett Gant in July of last year in Port St. Joe. Gant approached Butler’s Pine Ridge apartment after Butler had been accused of using racial slurs directed at children in the apartment com plex. Butler shot Gant between the eyes with a .22 rie and left him bleeding on the doorstep before calling 911 and sitting back down to nish his dinner. He expressed inconve nience at being arrested for shooting a “(racial epithet),” according to the arresting afdavit. Six weeks after the shoot ing, Gant passed away from the injuries. He was transported to Bay Medical Center by EMS where he underwent surgery. Investigators learned Keu kelaar was shot with a shot gun by Ake. Based on witness accounts at the time, Ake acciden tally shot Keukelaar and no criminal charges were led at that time pending additional investigation. That investigation, includ ing the interview of numerous witnesses, determined that prior to the shooting Ake com mitted several weapons vio lations that led to Keukelaar being shot. Witnesses said Ake dis charged the shotgun into the air several times and pointed the shotgun at an individual in a threatening manner. While making that threat, which is considered felony assault, Ake discharged the weapon acci dently shooting Keukalaar. Investigators obtained ar rest warrants for Ake this week, charging him with im proper exhibition of a rearm, discharging a rearm while under the inuence, aggra vated assault with a rearm, aggravated battery with a re arm, tampering with physical evidence and possession of a rearm during the commis sion of a felony. Ake was arrested and re leased on a $27,000 bond. year and is to be renewed annu ally, said county attorney Jeremy Novak. “This is a win-win,” Commis sioner Warren Yeager said. “It is a win for North Florida Child De velopment in getting the lease for $1 per year, and it is a win for tax payers as it takes the burden off of them for upkeep of the building.” Under the lease terms, NFCD, which has been headquartered out of the courthouse for more than a decade, pledges to maintain a certain level of employees in Gulf County. Gaskin approached the BOCC after the county, citing costs, com pletely abandoned the building in recent months. The county moved the Exten sion Service and constitutional of ces from the courthouse to the old Health Department Building in Wewahitchka. The county must also abate issues in the back, upper oor and basement of the building, where leaks in walls and mold are problematic. The upper oor courtroom is particularly important for its his toric value and is a signicant part of the reason the building is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. Gaskin’s goal was two-fold; maintain operations in the NFCD’s Gulf County home and to save the building. Right to Speak With little debate and little in the way of public comment, com missioners moved ahead an ordi nance that puts into county law the public’s right to participate in pub lic meetings. Until the past year, when the Florida Legislature, after two years of delays, acted, the Florida Sunshine Law pertaining to pub lic meetings did not specically bestow on the public the right to speak. The county ordinance conforms to that new legislation, and Novak said is similar to policies already in place. The public must now be provided an opportunity to speak on board ac tion noticed in the meeting agenda after commissioners and staff have weighed in and discussed the issue. For action that was not noticed on the agenda, the ordinance also provides for public comment before any board vote. An individual will be given three minutes to speak, and additional time can be granted by majority vote of the board. An organization will be allowed ve minutes, but only one member of that organization may speak on the issue. All public comments must be di rected to the sitting chairman and not staff, another member of the pub lic or an individual commissioner. Public comments can be pro fane or vulgar, with commission ers changing initial language that included “insulting” with “abusive” on Tuesday. Commissioners also expanded the prohibition against such lan guage toward staff, commissioners or a member of the audience to in clude the “public” in total. Commissioner Carmen McLemore voted against any changes, saying he “was ne” with the attorney draft of the ordinance. The suggestions for changes were all brought forward by Commis sioner Joanna Bryan. Closure on the jail? Bryan sought to clarify the recent hubbub about the county jail and address a prepared written statement read by jail administra tor Michael Hammond at the previ ous meeting. Bryan said part of her job as com missioner was to examine all issues pertaining to the budget and that jail discussion was no different. Contrary to statements made by Hammond and her fellow com missioners during prior meetings, Bryan said her intent was not to take jobs away from anybody, but only examine how the county might be able to save money. Saying Hammond’s presenta tion was “inappropriate,” she said that contrary to his statement there is no law that requires each Florida county to have a jail. She said she would like to take a closer look at the move of probation services in-house to determine the impact of collecting fees and nes on the Clerk of Courts as well as the validity of Hammond’s statement that the county is making a prot. She said she was “abbergasted” that talk of having a jail inspection as an opening for litigation, as sug gested by Hammond, and said the Florida Sheriff’s Association – which has put the BOCC and each com missioner on notice about the lack of a jail inspection the previous two years – had the responsibility under law to maintain jail inspections. “My examination of the jail was a budget item,” Bryan said. “I will continue to look at expenses and I may touch on these items again. I will continue to ght for what I think is right for the county.” BOCC from page A1 SH ooOO TING from page A1 P oO RT from page A1 bB UTLER from page A1 “This is a win-win. It is a win for North Florida Child Development in getting the lease for $1 per year, and it is a win for taxpayers as it takes the burden off of them for upkeep of the building.” Warren Yeager Gulf County commissioner

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C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Artistic minds celebrated another success at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School last week. Teacher Julie Hodges of cially opened the school’s chapter of the National Art Honor Society, an organization that will allow creative students an alternative way to graduate with honors based on artistic pro ciency and merit. Membership in the organization signi es that through effort, positive attitude and sense of dedication in the study of art, these students have made valuable contributions to the school, community and society. By opening a chapter, Hodges will be informed of area art shows and will give the students a larger platform to showcase their work. “I’m trying to bring things in that bigger schools offer,” said Hodges, who will act as the faculty sponsor. “Port St. Joe may be a small school, but we have a big talent pool.” Hodges said her own high school had an NAHS chapter, and she believes it gave her an outlet to strive toward excelling in art. Hodges handpicked the students who would have the rst opportunity to join based on their passion and talent. “This is another way that students who are interested in pursuing art-related careers can build their applications for colleges,” Hodges said. Volunteer hours are required for members, Songwriters’ Fest attracts crowds to area By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com They came, they saw, they strummed. Over the weekend, 27 Nashville songwriters visited Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach for the annual Blast on the Bay Songwriters’ Festival. Three days of free concerts got locals and visitors up close and personal with the writers who penned No. 1 hits for country stars Faith Hill, Garth Brooks, George Strait, Alan Jackson, Reba McEntire and countless others. The festival kicked off with a sponsor’s party on Thursday, which took over the Indian Pass boat ramp and welcomed music from several of the performers along with free food and drink. The festival of cially started the next day with a lunchtime jam at Triple Tails Seafood and Raw Bar before expanding to nine venues across Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach. Each event featured four songwriters who performed in a “writer’s round” fashion with each writer playing a tune while the others joined in or simply sat back and enjoyed the song. On Saturday, those looking to break into the songwriting industry were treated to a two-hour question and answer workshop with writers Steve Leslie and Will Rambeaux, held at Dockside Seafood and Raw Bar. Despite an afternoon downpour, more than 30 attendees listened to stories, asked questions and learned about how the industry is changing for writers. “We had a great turnout,” Leslie said. “I’d say it was the best workshop we’ve ever done.” The event culminated on Sunday at the Indian Pass Raw Bar with an afternoon of By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Vivian Daniels could serve as inspiration for the famous tongue-twister about sea shells and seashores. The 72-year-old resident at Our Home at Beacon Hill has made a name for herself selling creations made from sea shells found on the nearby beach. Daniels collects anything she can nd in the sand and turns the items into works of art. Using shells of all types, she creates owers, turtles, bouquets, picture frames, pencil holders, soap dishes, ower pots and magnets. “Vivian collects shells, separates them and creates these amazing things,” said Rick Watkins, administrator at the facility. “She has an incredible creative ability,” To date, Daniels has arranged and put together hundreds of sea shell owers. “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) What’s basically a spork with a sharp edge like a knife called? Splade, Spoonsaw, Sporknife, Sploon 2) When were the rst Cadillacs produced that signaled the dawn of the tail n era? 1946, 1948, 1950, 1952 3) What was the Tower Commission established to investigate? Roswell incident, JFK death, Watergate, IranContra Affair 4) In the game of Monopoly there are how many properties that can be built upon? 22, 24, 26, 28 5) What is/was the Atkins diet mainly about watching? Red meat, Sweets, Carbohydrates, Liquids 6) During the original “Star Trek” series, what color shirt was worn by those most likely to die in an episode? Blue, Orange, Red, Green 7) In the 1950s who came out with “his and her” cars, the La Comte and La Comtesse? Chrysler, Hudson, Chevrolet, Packard 8) When did Michael Jordan take and make his last shot as a Chicago Bull? 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999 9) What country administers the colony of Gibraltar? USA, Great Britain, Spain, India 10) In medieval times what was commonly rolled in butter and swallowed to combat the plague? Pebble, Cockroach, Snail, Spider 11) Whose quotes included, “One may smile, and smile, and be a villain”? Shakespeare, Nixon, Aristotle, Mother Teresa 12) The late Johnny Cash said he dressed in black for those who did what? Suffered, Hungered, Worked, Hitchhiked 13) What are the freeroaming dogs found mainly in Australia? Rabbles, Dingos, Froggeries, Warrens 14) The original “Phantom of the Opera” was set in what city? New York, Paris, London, Rome ANSWERS 1) Splade. 2) 1948. 3) Iran-Contra Affair. 4) 22. 5) Carbohydrates. 6) Red. 7) Chrysler. 8) 1998. 9) Great Britain. 10) Spider. 11) Shakespeare. 12) Suffered. 13) Dingos. 14) Paris. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Vivian Daniels, a resident at Our Home at Beacon Hill, creates art out of shells found on the beach. She sells her art to raise money for additional activities for her fellow residents. WES LOCHER | The Star VIVIAN DANIELS She sells sea shells near the seashore Beacon Hill resident turns beach bits into art See SHELLS B5 PSJHS establishes National Art Honor Society chapter WES LOCHER | The Star The following students were invited to join the Port St. Joe chapter of the National Art Honor Society. Bottom, from left: are Abby Loden, Allie Stripling, Ana Paul, Brandon Hall. Second row: Emaly Hanson, Caitlin Godwin, Brooke Curcie. Third row: Kristen Dunham, Maddie Flanagan, Caroline Rish, Christina LaPlante, Kylie Skoda, Laura Sinor. Back row: Alayna Godwin, Jessie Eberhart, Morgan Butts, Janel Kerigan, Ilianna Maestri. See ART B5 ‘Hearing hit after hit’ DEBBIE HOOPER AT JOEBAY.COM Shane Hines, Brooke Eden, Sherrie Austin and Will Rambeaux share a round on Friday night. WES LOCHER | The Star At the sponsor’s kickoff party at Indian Pass, the Semper Fi Sisters enjoyed free grub and some country music. See ‘HIT AFTER HIT’ B5 Thursday, October 24, 2013

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B2 | The Star Thursday, October 24, 2013 M eet Christa, a beautiful y oung f o xhound She w alks v er y w ell on a leash and will sit with a tr ea t Christa has begun cr a t e tr aining t o mak e the tr ansition t o her new home easier She gets along w ell with other dogs and is v er y pla yful with k ids and adults I f y ou ar e unable t o adopt a t this time per haps y ou c ould f ost er or mak e a D ona tion. A ll pets adopt ed fr om SJBHS will be curr en t on v ac cina tions and spa y ed/neut er ed P lease do not hesita t e t o email t o wnsend .hsdir ec t or@g mail .c om or adoptba y stjoe@g mail .c om or call the S t Joseph B a y Humane S ociet y a t 850-227-1103 and ask f or M elody or D ebbie! A pplica tions ar e a v ailable a t w w w .sjbhumanesociet y .or g W e r equir e all pot en tial adopt ers t o c omplet e an applica tion f orm. A doption f ees include our c ost of spa y/ neut er and curr en t v ac cina tions O ur hours f or the shelt er ar e T uesda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-4 pm! F aith 's T hrif t Hut is alw a y s in need of dona tions also and all the pr oc eeds go dir ec tly t o suppor t the animals in our car e! T he hours f or the st or e ar e T hursda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-3 pm. V olun t eers ar e alw a y s w elc ome a t both our st or e and our shelt er! O ur st or e and shelt er loca tion is 1007 T en th S tr eet in P or t S t Joe! Hope t o see y ou all ther e soon! I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y w w w s jbh u ma n e so c i e t y o r g bB BO WB] 4514866 f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y 227 .7847 See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e Star Staff Reports Regular meeting of American Legion Post 116 to be Oct. 24 There will be a regular general meeting of American Legion Post 116 at 4 p.m. ET Thursday, Oct. 24, at VFW Post 10069, on Trout Avenue in Highland View. This will be a general business meeting. All members are urged to attend. Eligibility for membership and benets can be found on the American Legion Website, www.legion.org. We invite all eligible veterans to join our organization. For God and Country. Wewahitchka Woman’s Club coat drive coming up Wednesday The GFWC Wewahitchka Woman’s Club is preparing for a Coats for Kids event for children at Wewahitchka Elementary School on Oct. 30. Their goal is to give each child on the list a “gently” used coat, blanket, new toboggan and gloves. To donate, call Dianne Semmes at 639-5345. They will also accept gently used jeans, shirts and shoes for these children. The Bridge offers trick-or-treating Special to The Star The Bridge nursing facility will host a trick-ortreat event from 4:30-5:30 p.m. ET Oct. 31. Residents will be passing out candy to any children who visit. The Bridge is at 220 Ninth St. in Port St. Joe. Christmas Bazaar and Jingle Bell golf tourney offer shopping, sport Star Staff Report Wewahitchka Medical Center and Rich’s IGA con gratulate Tammy and Chris Ward, the September win ners of the monthly $50 gas card drawing. Everyone is encouraged to stop by Wewa hitchka Medical Center at 255 W. River Road in Wewahitch ka to register for the monthly drawing. S p P E c C I al AL T o O TT HE STar AR Chris Ward, $50 gas card winner, stands with Dave Rich of Rich’s IGA. Wards are September gas card winners Society B rR IEF sS Society O u r l o c a l r e a l e s t a t e e x p e r t s h a v e i d e n t i e d w h a t t h e y f e e l a r e t h e b e s t v a l u e s a r o u n d a n d a r e o e r i n g t h e m t o y o u i n R e a l E s t a t e P i c k s ( I n t h i s s e c t i o n ) D i s c o v e r t h e b e s t r e a l e s t a t e v a l u e s i n M e x i c o B e ac h, P o r t S t J o e A p a l ac h i c o l a C a p e S a n B l a s S t G e o r g e I s l a n d, C a r r a b e l l e a n d s u r r o u n d i n g a r e a s R eal E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LI S TI NG S HERE! $ % (850)22 7 -7847 | tgolden@pcnh com S O L D # # 850-227-8890 / 850-227-7770 www .co as tal r eal tyinf o .c o m G u l f f r o n t t o p o o r 2 B D / 2 B A c o n d o w i t h p a n o r a m i c v i e w s o f t h e g u l f L a r g e o p e n k i t c h e n l i v i n g a n d d i n i n g a r e a w i t h g r e a t v i e w s T h i s s p a c i o u s c o n d o m i n i u m f e a t u r e s g o r g e o u s h e a r t o f p i n e o o r s g r a n i t e c o u n t e r t o p s t h r o u g h o u t s t a i n l e s s k i t c h e n a p p l i a n c e s a n d 1 0 f o o t c e i l i n g s F u r n i s h e d a n d r e a d y f o r y o u # # MLS# 249620 $650,000 St. T er esa Beach $ ! $$ )$ ) "$ ,$ ,$ $ '$ "! '$ $ !, ,$ ", ,$ ,$ ,$ $! $" % % )$ !$$ !, % "$! "$ "" $, ,$ # "$ $ $$ Dan Ausley Broker www .tlgproperty .com # ,$ +) $ -" $" % & % $ $ $ $ ) $ )$ ) $ $ % ! ,$ $ ( )( " % ) $ $"% !!$ $ Dan Ausley Broker www .tlgproperty .com Star Staff Report The St. Joseph Bay Golf Club is proud to host the fourth annual Christmas Bazaar and Jingle Bell Golf Tournament Dec. 13-14. The bazaar will be 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET Dec. 13 and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET Dec. 14. Come by and do all your Christmas shopping in one place. Sale items include all handmade jewelry, water color and oil paintings, pottery, glass items, hand-stitched items, quilts, specialty breads, jams and jellies, hand-dyed clothing, notes cards, holiday decorations and much more. Again this year, fresh produce vendors from the Farmer’s Market will be present. The vendor’s table fees will go to the Children Christmas Wishes program by the Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce. The Golf Club will be the drop-off site for new toys and money donations to help the Christmas Wishes be a success. The Jingle Bell Golf Tournament will start at noon ET Dec. 14. The tournament format and cost will be announced soon. For more information or to register, call 227-1751. For more information on the bazaar, or to reserve a space for your table, call Barb Van Treese at 227-9837, or the Golf Club.

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The Star| B3 Thursday, October 24, 2013 O U R 8T H A N N U A L M A S Q U E R A D E P A R T Y 8 H R R H R 8 6 N @ ^ ; `] A ; h @ X ? X = D ] & K @ & / ˆ ˆ Y T h ˆ / ˆ ˆ Y T D ^ / ? D W D WWN ; S = ` NS A NW I @ Y X ] ^ | O X D + + + 3 + 0 2 0 + 0 ) ) 0 ( 2 ( 3 + / + 0 2 + 0 + ) 0 0 0 + 0 # + 2 ) 3 + S P E C I A L T H A N K S T O O U R S P O NS O R S 2 2 ) + + + + + / 3 + ) 0 + 1( / 3 + ) 0 + & % % T i c k e t s a r e a v ai l a b l e a t o ur w e b s i t e | w w w .b o w w o w ba s h o r g f r o m t he H u m a ne S o ci e t y o r f r o m v a r i o u s o u t l e t s a r o u n d t o w n F o r T i c k e t i n f o r m a t i o n c a l l B o w W o w B e ac h S h o p a t 8 5 0 2 2 9 6 1 6 1 o r e m a i l : i n f o @b o w w o w b a s h o r g J o e & L i nu s K u s c h J a me s & S a n d i C hr i s t y Special to The Star Friday, Oct. 11, was an extraordinary day on the campus of Faith Christian School. There were trucks galore! The Port St. Joe Police Department, Port St. Joe Fire Department, Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce, Florida Highway Patrol, Division of Forestry, Health Department and EMS were all in attendance. Students and parents enjoyed learning about the jobs and equipment of each department, and they learned some safety tips, too. This was an exciting event, and FCS is thankful to all of these departments for helping to keep our children safe. Students get pioneer day lessons Special to The Star Mrs. Heather Taylor’s fourthgrade class at Wewahitchka Elementary School recently enjoyed a reading lesson, “On the Banks of Plum Creek” by Laura Ingalls Wilder. After discussing the pioneer days and tasting Horehound candies, they made homemade butter and hay-stack treats. Front row from left are Jacob Holmes, Luke Hjort, Lee Holton, Wesley Hunt, Katie Shealy and Matthew Hall. Middle row from left are Destiny Palmer, Bailey Pitts, Dawson Gibbs and Alyssa Cadenhead. Back row from left are Mrs. Taylor, Taylor Roberts, Haley Guffey, Danielle Harrison, Jaiyden Scruggs and Caden Wooten. Not pictured are McKenzie Davis and Kaylee Easter. LEARNING ABOUT ENERGY SPECIAl L TO TT HE STAR Wewahitchka Elementary School third-grade students in Mrs. Bailey’s and Mr. Huft’s classes have been learning about various forms of energy in science class. Here the students are posing with their s’mores baked in their solar ovens. Though the partly cloudy skies kept the ovens from reaching their optimum temperatures, the students still enjoyed their treats. SPECIAl L TO TT HE STAR This week’s Dazzling Dolphins at Port St. Joe Elementary School are, front row, Haylen Cannon, Mackenzie Freisleben and Addison Hendricks. Back row: Fisher Vandertulip, MaLena Ramsey, Analisa Treglown, Madelyn Gortemoller and Madison Burkett. D AA ZZL INGING D OO L PHINPHIN S The Lion’s Tale School News

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F AITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com Nz’ ’ ¡ 9’ ~z …}z ’ T SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 & % # % % % % % $ qY l ¦ ¨ S’ ¦Š’ OSS (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) !!! !!! !!! !!! !!! ! !! Mor nin g Pra y er & Hol y Com mun ion Sun day ... ... ... ... ... 10: 00 A.M The Re v Lou Lit tle Pri est Ser vic es T emp ora ril y at Sen ior Cit ize ns Cen ter 120 Lib rar y Dri v e “An Unc han gin g F ait h In A Cha ngi ng W orl d” COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME e X ]†q~ 8†‚v†‹t‹ L>9 (850) 227-1818 +++&$%&!%& $†¢ † 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 Y• <}• u} usˆ tx ›Š• }Š†x B ’ <}• u} Šz ’}x Vsœs xˆx & % "" "# & (850) 229-9596 '" '" % "# '" '" $ '" Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. "#!" !& #' $# !! '$ # &!" &# $"0 $' 3073 $' # !'! 4 1 &&& 5 $! 5 # 727 % 6 &#& !# #5 6 ).3,22+ ,./77 T OUCHING LIVES WITH THE LO VE OF JESUS 6pm Thursday, October 24, 2013 Special to The Star Revival for Survival 2013 New Bethel A.M.E. Church, 146 Ave. C in Port St. Joe, will have a Revival for Survival 2013 at 7 p.m. ET nightly Oct. 23-25. Guest Evangelist will be Bishop Lonnie Mitchell from New Beginnings Assembly of Saints in Panama City. “Though I walk in the midst of trouble, You will revive me; You will stretch forth Your hand against the wrath of my enemies, and Your right hand will save me. The Lord will perfect that which concerns me; Your mercy and loving kindness, O Lord, endure forever – forsake not the works of Your own hands” (Psalms 138:7-8 (Ampli ed Bible). Are you trying to make sense of what is going on today? Are you wondering how will I survive and get through this? Then you don’t want to miss this revival. For more information, call Pastor L.E. Gantt at 271-9574. Fall Festival and Touch-A-Truck It’s time again for the ninth annual Fall Festival and TouchATruck at Long Avenue Baptist Church. The community is invited for an evening of fun and fellowship to bene t the children and the elderly of Gulf County during the Christmas season. The event will be 5-7 p.m. ET Sunday, Oct. 27, at Long Avenue Baptist Church, 1601 Long Ave. Admission is a bag of nonperishable food. There will be re trucks, police cars and more for kids of all ages to climb on, learn how they work, sound the horns and generally have some fun. The Fall Festival will feature a cake walk, games, hot dogs, a chili cookoff, popcorn, boiled peanuts, fall fun and prizes. For more information or to lend a vehicle, call the church of ce at 229-8691. Star Staff Report Supt. David Woods of the Port St. Joe Church of God in Christ will celebrate 25 years of ministry during Pastor’s Appreciation and Wife Celebration Oct. 26-27. The congregation invites the public to come and celebrate this monumental moment in the life of this man of God, his wife, Lady Danielle Woods, and family. The theme is “Matured for Kingdom Purpose.” “But the God of all grace, who hath called us unto his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after that ye have suffered a while, make you perfect, stablish, strengthen, settle you. To him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen” (1 Peter 5:10-11, KJV). The celebration begins 6 p.m. ET Saturday at the church with speaker Pastor Wilhelmina Williams from Body of Christ Church. At 4 p.m. ET Sunday, the speaker will be Bishop Titus Deas Jr. from Deliverance Temple Ministries in Hardaway. Jori Josie Rice, infant daughter of B.J. and Jamie Rice, passed away at birth Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013, at Gulf Coast Hospital. She was preceded in death by her maternal grandfather, Oliver C. “Bill” Besore. She is survived by her sisters Addison and Jada Rice; maternal grandmother, Edna Carol Besore; paternal grandparents, Bill and Joe Ann Rice, Moira and James Funk and many aunts, uncles, and cousins. A private graveside service was held Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, at Holy Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe, Florida. Jori Josie Rice Mrs. Mary Pergiovanni, 95, of Port St. Joe, passed away Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013. Memorial services will be held at 6 p.m. ET today, Oct. 24, 2013, at Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses, 335 Selma St., Port St. Joe Beach, FL 32456. Affordable Funeral Care by Yorkshire is entrusted with the arrangements. Mary Pergiovanni Special to The Star A team of paranormal investigators confronts the unknown in an exclusive lm at 7 p.m. CT Monday, Oct. 28, at Lifetree Caf. The Lifetree lm features an investigation conducted at a location long associated with unexplained happenings. The lm is part of an hour-long discussion on the plausibility of ghosts and other paranormal phenomena. According to Lifetree Caf representative Mikal Keefer, “This is a rare chance to join a paranormal investigation team on an actual case. We’ll see exactly what happened and hear investigators explain what it means. And we’ll share our own stories of the supernatural.” Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach, across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint.net. Who do you serve? If you’re living a new life in Christ, a new identity will be on hand. You will have the same body, but your actions will be God’s plan. A new life in Christ is what God wants others to see. If you’re truly saved, that’s the way it will be. We’re here to show this life in Christ and not like worldly men. When we do this the world with know, we serve God not sin. Billy Johnson Faith BRIEFS Obituaries Woods to celebrate 25 years of ministry Lifetree Caf to investigate ghost hunt Zion Fair family say thanks The Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church family would like to take this opportunity to express our sincere appreciation for your support of our “1st Unity Day Observance” that was held on Sept. 28. We realize that your inclusion of this event contributed signi cantly to the success of us meeting our goal of bringing the community together under one roof for Christian worship. We want you to know that your kindness did not go unrecognized. Sincerely, The Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church Family Rev. Wilson M. Hall, Pastor and First Lady Sister Margaret Hall Card of THANKS Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR SUBMISSIONS Submit faith news and obituaries to news@star .com. View obituaries and sign guestbooks at www. star .com.

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, October 24, 2013 e Gul / Fanin Cams Gul Coa Sate Co eg o a y quests e easu f ou endance A c ommunit y wide br e akf as t and c on v er s ation o f loc al ec onomic importanc e B U SINE S S R OUND T ABLE F OR UM G ULF C OA ST ST A TE CO LLEGE I tne hip ith T ue sda y O ctober 29 2 013 8:00 am 9:30 am ED T Gulf /F r anklin Campus Gulf C o as t State C olleg e !! ! # F or e v ent details and t o R S VP ple as e visit: www gulf c o as t edu/ smallbusine s s f orum Inquirie s: 850-22 7 -96 7 0 SHELLS from page B1 most of which will be completed during school. Upcoming projects include collaborations with the Bridges program, the Gulf County Health Department and celebrations in honor of Veteran’s Day. Hodges said the new chapter will be recognized in the monthly NAHS newsletter. NAHS was founded in 1978 and specically designed for high school students in grades 9-12. The program is meant to inspire and recognize students who have shown an outstanding ability and interest in art. The group strives to aid members in attaining the highest standards in art scholarship, character and service, and to bring art education to the attention of the school and community. Students gain peer recognition, leadership growth opportunities, college and career preparation, and an unmatched sense of camaraderie. Her regimen includes washing her ndings in a water/bleach mixture, giving them a coat of baby or mineral oil or spraying them with acrylic to prevent the shells from drying out or cracking. “Shells have more color than you see at the beach,” Daniels said. “After you rub a little oil on them, the color bounces out at you.” Daniels sells the items out of the activity room at Our Home at Beacon Hill, and prices range from $1 to $10 per item. She then puts the money right back into purchasing additional supplies that can be used for activities at the facility. She believes keeping busy is the key to a longer life. “The facility is doing wonderful work, but we need more activities to stay happy and keep the residents moving,” Daniels said. “I want to inspire the other residents. They can see that I have the determination to move and I can do things. I’m 72 years old, and if I can do it, they can, too.” Daniels didn’t always have the creative urge and said one day as she was walking the beach, the idea simply struck her and couldn’t be ignored. From that day on, she collected shells on each visit to the white sands of the Gulf and would work on her art at night after the rest of her family had gone to bed. Though shell art may occupy her days now, Daniels didn’t start crafting her creations until she was in her 30s. Prior creative activities included sewing clothes for her kids and teaching kindergarten for eight years at Faith Christian School in Port St. Joe. Daniels’ family moved to Gulf County when she was in the sixth grade, and she spent her youth in Port St. Joe. She later moved to Alabama in 1982, where she remarried and lived until July of this year. The sea shell seller is proud of her Gulf County heritage and said her father, Emery, had a machine shop on First Street and worked with the paper mill and railroads. Two of her brothers worked in the machine shop, and her brother Jimmy, a former police ofcer, still lives in Jones Homestead with his wife. Daniel’s mother, Jean, was known in the community as “Miss Jeanie.” Daniels said Port St. Joe isn’t exactly how she remembered it, and she was saddened to see that U.S. Highway 98 had been moved inland. She said the area now occupied by WindMark Beach was where she used to nd the best shells, especially because sea life would often be attracted to bits of asphalt that would fall into the water. “I love to walk on the beach and see God’s creations,” said Daniels, who spends an hour or more on the beach each day collecting materials. “Each ower is a different experiment. “It’s often a toss-up as to what a shell will become. Most of the time, I have no earthly idea what I’m going to do with them.” In addition to creating her random works of art, Daniels takes bulk orders and has been busy prepping shellbased Christmas ornaments for the holidays. The goal was never to make money until Daniels decided to help fund more activities for her fellow residents. If those activities come at the cost of Daniel’s art, she’s happy to help. She also praised activities director Tiffany Lee for the slew of Halloween-themed activities in recent weeks that included decorating pumpkins, masks and pennants. Lee also instituted a “learn something new” program for the facility that included a rst aid class and several sign language classes to help everyone communicate with one of the home’s deaf residents. She also has started a walking club and takes the residents out to eat and on shopping trips at least once a month. Daniels just hopes buyers will put her creations on their coffee table or book shelf to add a little bit of nature inside their home. “It’s not work — it’s a hobby and a pleasure,” Daniels said. “It’s a labor of love.” ART from page B1 performances and a late-night jam session. “It was great fun, and we had a lineup of great people,” said Rambeaux, who also helped select the participating artists. “I have my regulars in mind, but I also bring in new people and they had such a great response. “What’s cool is that listeners get to make a connection with country music. They hear songs that they’ve heard on the radio, as well as new songs that they’ll start to hear over the next year or two.” Case in point was participating songwriter Jessie Rice, who penned the song “Cruise,” which was recorded and released by the group Florida Georgia Line earlier this year. Though he performed the song at last year’s festival, Rice was able to play the hit single in his own style for an excited crowd during his set on Friday at The Thirsty Goat. “Cruise” went on to become the longest-running No. 1 country music song of all time and spent 25 weeks at the top of the Billboard charts. To date, “Cruise” has sold more than 6 million downloads, the second most ever by a country song. “It was awesome playing alongside great musicians and hearing hit after hit,” Leslie said. “Every year, the bar is raised.” Leslie said though songwriters appreciate ballads and the subtleties and nuances found within, more often than not, more time was dedicated to up-tempo songs to keep the energy levels high. He said highlights for him included the kickoff set at Triple Tails, though he also enjoyed his writer’s round at Toucan’s. “Triple Tails was the best,” Leslie said. “There were tons of people packed in there, and everyone was exceedingly cordial.” Presenting sponsors for the event included Visit Florida and the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association, two organizations with the goal of building and improving tourism in the Sunshine State. Carol Dover, president of the FRL in Tallahassee, actively works to promote tourism in the area, especially since the BP oil spill in 2010. Through funding from Gov. Rick Scott, the FRL was able to sponsor the Blast on the Bay Songwriters’ Festival and the Seafood Festival in Panama City, both of which took place over the weekend. The goal of the FRL is to bring people to the area and ll hotels, which means more visitors dining out, shopping, and supporting the local economy. “Port St. Joe is a great city, a hidden gem,” Dover said. The FRL marketing team promoted the Blast on the Bay in magazines throughout the panhandle, and Dover commended event organizer Jason Bogan for coordinating the annual festival. “It’s smart to capitalize on a weekend that could be a dead one,” Dover said. “The season trails off, and people don’t always have a reason to come here.” Dover said in past years, Florida was receiving about 82 million visitors a year, but as Scott pushed tourism, there was an increase to 90 million visitors last year. “No doubt, some of them are coming to Gulf County,” Dover said. “Governor Scott has been amazing to tourism.” ‘ hH I tT aA F terTER hH I tT ’ from page B1 Brett Jones and Jerry Salley participated in the rst writer’s round on Friday to a packed patio at The Thirsty Goat. WES LOCHER | The Star

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, October 24, 2013 By MELANIE TAYLOR Extension Agent II 4-H/Family & Consumer Sciences The fth-graders from Port St. Joe Elementary School participated in the 2013 annual 4-H Ag Adventures Field Day. Ag Adventures is an educational, agricultural awareness program which is held annually at the UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC) in Quincy. It is coordinated by extension agents in the participating counties (Gulf, Calhoun, Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla, and Jefferson) and the NFREC faculty and staff. The program is geared toward elementary school students, and approximately 1,000 students participate each year. Participants learned about pumpkins, soybeans, cotton, soil, corn, and peanuts and their economic importance in our local and national industries. In addition to learning about these commodities and concepts, youth enjoyed fresh boiled peanuts, roasted peanuts, and popcorn popped in a kettle right there in the eld, and more. Students explored the eld crops and a six foot deep soil pit. Leaving on a tractor-pulled-wagon with their own sugar pumpkin inhand, youth were encouraged to bake pumpkin pies and roast the seeds to share with their families. This eld day took youth on an agricultural journey from the seed to the consumer. Many thanks to the NFREC faculty and staff, participating schools, program volunteers, Farm Bureau, and Farm Credit of Northwest Florida for their continued support. The results of the combined contributions of these supporters are manifested in average student learning gains each year. Since 2010, evaluation results have shown that 67 percent (n3,484) of youth participants strongly agree that without agriculture, they would not be able to enjoy products such as popcorn, peanut butter, or denim and 81 percent (n4,212) strongly agreed that the program helped them understand and appreciate how agriculture affects their everyday lives. Additionally, 45 percent (n2,340) of participants reported that they planned on sharing with their parents why agriculture is important. 4-H is a youth development program for youth ages 5-18 that is assisted greatly by adult volunteers. If you are interested in participating as an adult volunteer please contact Melanie Taylor at the Gulf County Extension Of ce. Reach her at 6393200 or metaylor@u .edu. T r a d e s & S e rv i c e s 227-7847 CALL T OD A Y! GET Y OUR AD IN! T rades & Ser v ices 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction 4510158 Star Staff Report The University of Florida and its Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences is sponsoring the third annual Beekeepers Field Day and Trade Show Saturday, Nov. 2 at the Washington County Extension Of ce. The of ce is at 1424 Jackson Ave. in Chipley. The Field Day and Trade Show are part of the 2013 Florida State Beekeepers Association meeting in Chipley. The trade show provides educational opportunities through hands-on activities and interaction with expert beekeepers. The event begins at 8:30 a.m. CT with registration. Classes will include Splitting Beehives, What’s the Buzz about Honey and Products of the Hive. There will also be a smoker lighting competition, door prizes and lunch will be served beginning at 12:15 p.m. CT. Registration is $15 per four-person family and $10 for each additional family member; the registration fee includes refreshments and lunch. Those interested in attending should call the Gulf County Extension Ofce at 639-3200 to register no later than Oct. 25. Early registration is encouraged so organizers know how much food to prepare. Fertilizers are manufactured from a wide variety of materials to supply plant nutrients. Once these materials are mixed, it becomes dif cult to distinguish the materials present. In the past, a few unscrupulous manufacturers have taken advantage of this to increase their pro t. To protect consumers and legitimate manufacturers from such practices, The Florida legislature enacted the rst fertilizer law in 1889 and has amended it many times since enactment. These laws regulate the manufacture and sale of fertilizer in the state. The law requires that the manufacturer purchase and af x a label to each bag, package, container, or lot of fertilizer offered for sale in the state. The law requires that each label show speci c information about the analysis and composition of the mixture or material. The key information comes in the guaranteed analysis section of the label. It tells you which of the primary plant nutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium the fertilizer analysis numbers you’ve probably seen. For example an 8-8-8 fertilizer would be eight percent nitrogen compound, eight percent phosphorus compound and eight percent potassium compound. There’s some other information in this section of the label that may seem even more complicated but it’s also important. The label tells you how much chlorine the fertilizer can contain. Chlorine can reduce the quality of some vegetable and owers. It tells you what materials the primary plant nutrients are derived from. This can help you determine the quality of the fertilizer. Probably the most dif cult part of the label to read certainly the hardest part to describe is the information listed right after the total nitrogen gure in the guaranteed analysis section. In addition the total amount of nitrogen, the label gives the amount of each of several types of nitrogen present in the fertilizer. This information will seem confusing, but it also tells you a lot about how the fertilizer will work in your soil. You’ll see the terms nitrate nitrogen; ammoniacal nitrogen, water soluble organic nitrogen and/or urea nitrogen can be used by plants fairly quickly. You might look for these nitrogen forms in fertilizer for a vegetable garden. But nitrate and water soluble organic nitrogen are rapidly leached out of the soil so they don’t last very long. Ammonical and water insoluble nitrogen will stay longer in sandy soils. Fertilizer with a high percentage of natural organic nitrogen is used by the plants slowly over a fairly long period of time. This kind of slow release fertilizer would be good for lawns helping them stay green without causing spurts of extra fast growth. As I am sure you can tell by now, we can’t fully explain anything this complicated in one new article. But if you don’t remember anything else remember this; almost any fertilizer you buy in Florida is a good one if tit has the ingredients to do the job you want and if the price is fair in terms of the total amount of plant nutrients it contains. For more information on Florida fertilizer label contact the Gulf County Extension Service @ 639-3200 or visit gulf.ifas. u .edu or edis.ifas.u edu and see Publication SL-3/SS170. The Florida fertilizer law ROY LEE CARTER County extension director Beekeepers eld day and trade show coming Nov. 2 Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR ABOVE: Roy Carter, County Extension Director, teaches students about the large number of products we consume and use every day that are made from peanuts or parts of the peanut and plant. LEFT: The students enjoyed the “Gatorwagon” ride in and out of the eld. Students enjoyed walking through the cotton eld and observing the plants, owers, and cotton bolls. They enjoyed picking the cotton and were able to take it home for a keepsake. PSJ Elementary School students explore Florida agriculture AG ADVENTURES FIELD DAY PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR Melanie Taylor, 4-H Agent, taught students about peanuts. Each child was able to dig their own peanut plant and observe the different parts of the plant.

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, October 24, 2013 The Star | B7 92834S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 23-2008-CA -000597 CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC, Plaintiff; vs. JENNIFER LEE CALVARESE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JENNIFER LEE CALVARESE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT K. PITTS A/K/A KEVIN PITTS; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 8th day of October, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23-2008-CA000597, of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION is the Plaintiff and JENNIFER LEE CALVARESE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JENNIFER LEE CALVARESE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT K. PITTS A/K/A KEVIN PITTS and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1000 5Th STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, 11:00 AM on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, OF BRIDGEPORT WOODMERE PHASE II, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated this 16th day of October, 2013. REBECCA NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954) 453-0365 Fax: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 File No. 08-67523 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com October 24, 31, 2013 95951 PUBLIC NOTICE OF AUCTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ST. JOE RENT-ALL, INC intends to dispose of or offer for sale the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under The Florida Self Storage Facility Act Statues (Section 83.801-83.809). ST. JOE RENT-ALL, INC, will dispose of said property no later than October 26, 2013. Property is located at 706 First Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 the following: Latonya Bailey #33, Misc Furnishings Corey Bowers #43, Misc Furnishings Verline Franklin #55, Misc Furnishings Veronica Johnson #84, Misc Furnishings Shay Foxworth #44, Misc Furnishings October 17, 24, 2013 95821S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1381 Application No. 2013-39 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05793-000R Description of Property: Lot Ten (10), Block 1006, according to the Official map of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, as the same appears on file in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Being same property filed for record in Gulf County, October, 1959, 1:42 P.M. in Deed Book No. 36, Page No. 179, in Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Billy Charles Quinn All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95823S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 100 Application No. 2013-38 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 00517-002R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the NW. Corner of Original Government Lot 4, Section 16, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, and extend a line southerly along the western boundary of said Lot 4, for 420.3 feet; then turn 64 Degrees 21 Minutes left for 793.36 feet; then turn 67 Degrees 28 Minutes right for 542.23 feet, thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 35 feet; thence turn South 310 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, continue the line last above described for 75 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 125 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 75 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 125 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: John Whitehurse & Lori Adams (dec) All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95827S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Florida Tax Lien Assets IV, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1514 Application No. 2013-36 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06319-060R Description of Property: Lot 2, Block C, Marnie’s Island Preserve, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 22 and 23, and as amended in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Winston Williams All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95825S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1319 Application No. 2013-37 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05015-003R Description of Property: Lot 14, Block 45, of Re-subdivision of Block 45, in Unit Number Three of Saint Joseph’s Addition of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the Plat as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 34, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: C Q Developments, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95901S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS NO. 1314-02 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in performing the following service: MISCELLANEOUS ROAD REPAIR PROJECT (P.R.I. PROJECT #003.248) This project consists of approximately 715 SY of milling, 80 tons of asphalt overlay, and 960 LF of striping at three locations in Gulf County, Florida. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $25.00 per set and is non-refundable. Check should be made to PREBLE-RISH, INC. If you have any questions, please call Clay Smallwood at (850) 227-7200. All bidders shall be FDOT qualified in the following work classes: Flexible Paving and Hot Plant-Mixed Bituminous Courses. Completion date for this project will be 60 days from the date of bid award. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $100.00 per day. Please indicate on the envelope your COMPANY NAME, BID NUMBER, and that this is a sealed bid for the “Miscellaneous Road Repair Project”. Submit 1 original and 3 copies of the bid. Bids will be received until 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time, on November 1, 2013 at the Gulf County Clerk’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, and will be opened and read aloud at this same location on November 4, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., Eastern Time. All bids shall remain firm for a period of 60 days after the opening. All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of Gulf County. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ Tynalin Smiley Chairman October 17, 24, 2013 95973S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Case No.: 11-33 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. LITTLE RIVER CAMP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; MATTHEW D. BIRMINGHAM; PAUL W. GROOM, II; WILLIAM J. SMILEY; CLAYTON B. WOOTEN, And SEVEN SPRINGS LAKE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATTION, INC., A Florida not-for-profit corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 10th day of October, 2013, in Case Number 2011-33 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and LITTLE RIVER CAMP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, MATTHEW D. BIRMINGHAM, PAUL W. GROOM, II, WILLIAM J. SMILEY, CLAYTON B. WOOTEN and SEVEN SPRINGS LAKE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. Eastern Time on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lots One (1), Two (2), Six (6), Ten (10), Fourteen (14), Eighteen (18) and Nineteen (19), Block C, SEVEN SPRINGS LAKE SUBDIVISION according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page(s) 17-18 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE POLICIES OF THE GULF COUNTY CLERK OF COURT. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 11th day of October, 2013 REBECCA L. NORRIS, Gulf County Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk Octobre 17, 24, 2013 95975S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23 2011 CA 000074 VS. DIVISION: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF INDYMAC RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGEBACKED TRUST, SERIES 2006-L1, RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGEBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-L1, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTINE MULLININX, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 10, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23 2011 CA 000074 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as trustee of IndyMac Residential Mortgage-Backed Trust, Series 2006-L1, Residential MortgageBacked Certificates, Series 2006-L1, is the Plaintiff and James Coney Mullininx, Christine Mullininx, Gregory J. Scroggs, Jackie P. Scroggs, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 1923.07 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 30, SAID POINT LYING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH WITH A RADIUS OF 2346.20; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AND SAID RIGHT OF WAY FOR 329.02 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 06 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 74 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 328.75; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 392.39 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 394.62 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 107.41 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE EAST 61.01 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 228.21 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 14.00 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 325.96 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 75.56 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 0.25 ACRES MORE OR LESS, SUBJECT TO A 10 FOOT WIDE ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 1923.07 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 30, SAID POINT LYING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH WITH A RADIUS OF 2346.20; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AND SAID RIGHT OF WAY FOR 329.02 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 06 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 74 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 328.75 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 392.39 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 394.62 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 107.41 FEET; THENCE EAST 10.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 106.12 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 10.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 5 FOOT WIDE PEDESTRIAN ACCESS CASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 1923.07 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 30, SAID POINT LYING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH WITH A RADIUS OF 2346.20; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AND SAID RIGHT OF WAY FOR 329.02 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 06 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 74 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 328.75 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 75.56 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN, SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 325.96 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 186.60 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATERLINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID WATERLINE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 5.02 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID WATERLINE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 187.02 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 5.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A APN 3186-060R, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456

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B8 | The Star Thursday, October 24, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510160 4514327 OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 149B COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 3 OFFICE/KIT/BATH AND WAREHOUSE $ 675.00 PER MONTH/ 675.00 DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 4514326 OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 151A COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 12X12 OFFICE, BATH, STORAGE AND LARGE WAREHOUSE $ 550.00 PER MONTH/ 550.0O DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 4510161 4516924 Dockside Seafood & Raw Bar @ PSJ Marina NOW HIRING EXPERIENCED: € Manager € Servers/Bussers € Shuckers APPLY 3:00 PM5:00 PM ONLY MON. THRU FRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com 4516909 AVONThe company for WomenHIRING FOR THE HOLIDAYS!Part-time or Full-time! Call Ellen 850-763-7307 1119195 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: SHIPFITTERS € FLUXCORE WELDERS PIPE WELDERS € X-RAY WELDERS€ PIPEFITTERS Competitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace 4516876Annual Fall Auction St. Joe Rent-All 706 1st Street | Port St. Joe Saturday, October 26th 10 am EST Contents of 5 Mini-Storage Buildings Miscellaneous Items Belonging to St. Joe Rent-All Including, but not limited to: Golf Carts Misc. Electronics Lawn Mowers Misc. Rental Equipment Items, (Except Storage Buildings), may be viewed Friday, Oct. 25th, 1 -5 pm EST Sales Sales Reps Halifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience. Territories Available In:™ ™ Panama City™ ™ Chipley ™ ™ Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: z Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. z Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate —all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34269124 Text FL69124 to 56654 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 11th day of October, 2013. BILLKINSAUL Clerk of Circuit Court Gulf County, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com SL-10-55837 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. October 17, 24, 2013 95993S IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 23-2012-CA-000154 Division CENLAR FSB Plaintiff, vs. JON H. PIPPEN A/K/A JON HOWARD PIPPEN, DONNA L. PIPPEN A/K/A DONNA LYNN PIPPEN A/K/A DONNA LYNN LANIER AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on October 8, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida described as: LOT 3, AND THE SOUTH 10.00 FEET OF LOT 2 AND THE NORTH 10.00 FEET OF LOT 4, BLOCK 2 OF BRITT’S SUBDIVISION, UNIT 1, WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA. AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 14 IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 550 LAKE ALICE PARK DR, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales held in front lobby of courthouse, on November 14, 2013 at 11:00 am ET. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of he us pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 10th day of November, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 24, 31, 2013 96031S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 23-2010-CA-000281 SEC.:__________ CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. HERSHEL DEWAYNE ANDERSON A/K/A HERSHEL D. ANDERSON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FOR FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGPROPERTY TO: THE ESTATE OF HERSHEL DEWAYNE ANDERSON A/K/A HERSHEL D. ANDERSON, ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: UNKNOWN UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, LIENORS, AND OTHER PARTIES TAKING AN INTEREST UNDER HERSHEL DEWAYNE ANDERSON AKA HERSHEL D. ANDERSON, DECEASED ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: UNKNOWN Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendant(s) are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant(s) as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in GULF County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE (121), OF UNIT NO. NINE (9), ST. JOSEPH’S ADDITION TO CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 12 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1908 CYPRESS AVENUE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, such Morris Hardwick Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 302A, Tampa, FL 33634 on or before October 14, 2013 and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 3rd day of October, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; Phone: 850-718-0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771; Email: ADARequest@judl4.fl courts.org. October 24, 31, 2013 96055S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2010-CA-000508 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. VANCE MCGOUGH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 23, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23-2010CA-000508 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Vance McGough, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: COMMENCE AT A ST. JOSEPH PAPER CO. CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 9 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN N 00 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 57 SECONDS E ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 32 FOR 298.14 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 381-A AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE S 69 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 50 SECONDS W ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE FOR 138.0 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE RUN N 20 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 10 SECONDS W FOR 210.0 FEET; THENCE S 69 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 50 SECONDS W FOR 262.0 FEET; THENCE S 20 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 10 SECONDS E FOR 210.0 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 381-A; THENCE S 69 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 50 SECONDS W ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE FOR 222.40 FEET; THENCE N 00 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 28 SECONDS E FOR 666.74 FEET; THENCE S 89 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 35 SECONDS E FOR 587.44 FEET, SAID POINT BEING IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 9 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN S 00 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 57 SECONDS W FOR 438.02 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 381-A; THENCE S 69 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 50 SECONDS W ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR 6.98 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 32 AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL CONTAINS 6.18 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, LESS ONE ACRE DEEDED TO GRADY FRANKLIN. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MOBILE HOME ATTACHED TO AND MADE AN APPURTENANCE THERETO BEARING VIN NUMBER 0110682122607A AND 0110682122607B. A/K/A 901 COUNTY ROAD 381A, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465-5756 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 16th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 Fax: (813) 221-9171 eService: servealaw albertellilaw.com If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. 96105S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider adoption of the following Ordinance Amendment with the following title: AN ORDINANCE OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; WHEREBY AMENDING GULF COUNTY ORDINANCE NO. 97-02 TITLED IN PART “ALLOWING FOR VEHICULAR TRAFFIC ON CERTAIN COASTAL BEACHES WITHIN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA”; SPECIFICALLY AMENDING THE ORDINANCE PROVISION “PROVIDING FOR A PERMIT FEE”; PROVIDING FOR REPEALER, SEVERABILITY, MODIFICATIONS THAT MAY ARISE FROM CONSIDERATION AT PUBLIC HEARING; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. *Complete Ordinances on file in the Clerk’s Office* A public reading, introduction and public hearing will be held during the Gulf County Board of County Commissioner’s Regular Meeting on Tuesday, November 12th at 9:00 a.m. est. in the County Commissioner’s meeting room in the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex, Port St. Joe, Florida. All interested persons may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decisions made by the Gulf County Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings and that for such purpose he/she may need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings made and which would include any evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. A copy of the proposed Ordinance is available for inspection on weekdays between the hours of 9:00 a.m. est., and 5:00 p.m. est. at the Office of the Clerk of Court, Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 C.G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: TYNALIN SMILEY, CHAIRMAN October 24, 2013 j j ADOPTION: j j Affectionate Financially Secure College Sweethearts await your baby. j Carolyn & Chris j j 1-800-552-0045 j Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Cue Furniture Start your Christmas layaway now! Pickup as late as December 23rd. New mattresses: Twin sets, $99; Full sets, $139; Queen sets, $199. Quality used furniture. 1425 Hwy 71 S. Wewa. 850-639-2343 Text FL68236 to 56654 Furniture & Appliances: 52 in. RCA TV & VCR, Sofa and Love Seat, Dining Set w/ 4 chairs, Antique Dresser, Metal Desk. Too much to List, items are in storage and there is plenty more! 850-648-5844 txt FL69838 to 56654 Mexico Beach 42nd street Hwy 98 to 42nd St-watch for signs Oct. 26th 9 est-8 cstClassic yard sale Antiques, wicker, household, furniture, toys, decor, baby items, 3 families Text FL69840 to 56654 Port St. Joe, 608 17th St. next to 16th St.Park Sat. 10/26 7am EST Inside Moving Sale Rain or Shine Everything Must G o Text FL69807 to 56654 GUN SHOW Panama City FAIRGROUNDSOctober 26th & 27th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL62159 to 56654 Admin/Clerical JOB NOTICE The City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following position: Police Department Part Time Administrative Assistant Please submit an application to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website: cityofportstjoe.com If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The position will close on November 8, 2013. Beginning salary is $10 per hour and does not include benefits. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. Web ID#: 34269815 Text FL69815 to 56654 Install/Maint/Repair Mediacom Communications The 7th largest cable company in the United States and covering over 23 states, has an immediate opening in Mexico Beach, FL for: ENTRY LEVEL INST ALLER No technical experience necessary. Performs installs for cable and high speed internet. Must have a valid driver’s license. Mediacom offers competitive pay and great benefits along with advancement opportunities. For immediate consideration, visit our website at: www .mediacomcable.com/c areers Refer to Job 6169 Mediacom is an Equal Opportunity Employer Web ID#: 34268916 Text FL68916 to 56654 Logistics JOB NOTICE The Gulf County Sheriff’s Office is accepting applications for two Part Time Dispatchers. Applications and a complete job description are available at the Gulf County Sheriff’s Office or at www .gulfcounty fl.gov Application deadline is Friday, 11/01/13 5:00 pm EST. For more information, please contact Lt. Chris Buchanan at 850-227-1115. Gulf County Sheriff’s Office enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer. Web ID#: 34269145 Part Time Nursery AssistantFUMC is seeking a PT Nursery Assistant to care for children ages 0-5 during Sunday School, Sunday Worship Services and other church events as required. Please submit a resume, contact information, at least 2 references and a cover letter to: fumcp sj@gtcom.net Attention Nursery Position. Or P.O. Box 266, Port St. Joe, FL32547. Attn: Bobbi Lassiter. Web ID#: 34268269 Text FL68269 to 56654 Security/Prot. Serv.JOB NOTICE The City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following position: Full Time Police OfficerPlease submit an application to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website: cityofportstjoe.com If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The position will close on November 1, 2013. The entry level salary for a Police Officer will be $15.50 per hour not including benefits. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. Web ID#: 34269010 Text FL69010 to 56654 2 bedroom unfurnisted Apt. Dogwood Terrace Apts; 808 Woodward Ave, PSJ 850-227-7800 Efficiency Apartment 1 br efficiency apartment in PSJ, located in town off of Main St. All utilities included. $150/week or $550/month + $150 sec. deposit. 850-229-2706. Text FL69819 to 56654 Mexico Beach 2 Story duplex, bottom unit avail. 1/2 block off beach. Comp furn, 2br/1ba, $900/mo., util incl. 1st & last, min. 6 mo lease, small pets ok. (229) 322-5652. 2 Bdrm 1 Bath. Florida room in back Large yard. 3 blocks to the beach. 339 Selma St. $700 month. First/Last/ Security Deposit. Call 850-348-7774 Text FL69133 to 56654 3 bedroom house for rent; 417 Iola Street Port St. Joe, FL; Call 850-227-7800 Quality Long Term RentalsMexico Beach Call for more info 850-348-0262 WEWASmall cottage, great for 1 to 2 people. $390 per month + $390 security deposit. 850-639-5721 ******************* Small RV. $125 per wk. Includes Water Sewer, Elec, & Wi-Fi. Good for 1 person. 850-639-5721 Text FL66108 to 56654 Large 3 Br, 2 Bath with kitchen, living, dining, family room. New hardwood floors, heat pump, water system, washer & dryer. Riverview from front porch, park and boat ramp at the end of the road. W/S/G included. No pets. $700 per month. Call 352-232-5752 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Creamer’s Tree Service Call Jason @ (850)832-9343 Biker Consignment From bike parts to clothing, & anything to do w/ Bikers! Open Tue -Sat. 2001 Wilson Ave. P.C. 850-763-9009 Caregiver -Day/Night. PSJ/PSJ Beach/Wewa 20 years experience. References Available. Call 850-227-4578 Text FL69321 to 56654 Legion Fence Co. Wood Prvcy Vinyl & Almnm. Fence/Deck. Free Estimate 250-8275 Text FL68179 to 56654



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Star Staff ReportA Wewahitchka man was arrested last week on charges stemming from a shooting last month. Dakota Floyd Ake, 21, of Wewahitchka was arrested by investigators with the Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce, according to Sheriff Mike Harrison. Akes arrest follows the shooting of Peter Keukelaar, 28, of Bay County during a social gathering at Akes residence Sept. 22. Keukelaar suffered a gunshot wound to the chest with life-threatening injuries. When deputies arrived at the scene near Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative, they were told Keukelaar was being rushed to the hospital by a friend who witnessed the shooting. By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Halloween looms and the supporters of the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society are ready to do the bash the Bow Wow Bash. And, in its eighth year, the event has proven to be quite the smash. The whole community has gotten behind this event, said Sandi Christy, president of the board of directors for the SJBHS. It has become a giant masquerade ball. We have more sponsors this year than ever before. Attendance has grown every year. Its the adult Halloween. Its about raising money and goodwill. The event began of humble beginnings. Part of a day-long celebration of pets and their owners, the Bow Wow Bash was the formal evening partner to Paws in the Park, an informal gathering of dogs, cats and the people that love them. As Paws in the Park was phased out, the Bow Wow Bash assumed a larger pro le, transforming into a Halloween ball costumes optional but encouraged.Star Staff ReportThe date of the Walt Butler pre-trial date has been moved. During the original pre-trial hearing earlier this month, Butlers public defender, Henry Sims, asked Judge John Fishel for an additional two to three hours so that new motions could be led. Fishel blocked out the hours across several days in October and November, but now the pre-trial has been condensed to 9 a.m. ET Tuesday, Nov. 5 at the Gulf County courthouse with the of cial trial set to begin two weeks later on Monday, Nov. 18.Butler pre-trial rescheduled for NovemberBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Circuit Court Judge John Fishel has scheduled a January hearing for further presentations in a foreclosure case brought against the Port of Port St. Joe. Capital City Bank is attempting to foreclose on a port parcel that serves as the barge terminal off the Intracoastal Waterway that was secured with a loan of over $4 million. Because of a lack of revenue or tenants to drive revenue, the Port Authority has been unable to make payments on the loan for at least two years. Fishel, who just rotated into Gulf County in August, was surprised to have such a complex and important case fall into his lap with just a 30-minute hearing last month, port attorney Tom Gibson said, and stated a desire for a second hearing for additional presentations on the issues.Port foreclosure hearing rescheduled By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Taxpayers are now off the hook for the upkeep of the historic county courthouse in Wewahitchka. And the effort to save the building has an in-house champion. The Board of County Commissioners during its regular bi-monthly meeting on Tuesday gave nal approval to a lease agreement with North Florida Child Development Inc. that aims to maintain the building as a job-creator and historic treasure to the north end of the county. As the CEO of NFCD Sharon Gaskin of Wewahitchka said last month, the courthouse is, Our lighthouse, alluding to ongoing efforts to save the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Under the terms of the lease, NFCD will occupy more than 4,000 square feet on the rst oor of the courthouse, including the foyer but excluding the old of ces of the Gulf County Extension Service, more space than the operator of Early Head Start and Head Start programs in ve counties occupied previously. NFCD will assume all responsibilities for utilities, upkeep, maintenance and repairs. The lease is for 10 years at $1 per BOCC nalizes courthouse lease agreementRight to Speak ordinance receives public hearing of pets and their owners, the Bow DAKOTA AKEPHOTOS BY SANDI CHRISTY | Special to The StarWylie Petty and his staff from the El Governor Motel decorate the Centennial Building each year at no charge. Bow Wow BashSt. Joseph Bay Human Society fundraiser is this Saturday PHOTOS BY SANDI CHRISTY | Special to The Star Thursday, OCTOBER 24, 2013ABOVE: More than 200 items will be on the block during live and silent auctions. LEFT: The Bow Wow Bash is the major fundraiser each year for the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. Costumes are optional, but encouraged for the Bow Wow Bash. See BASH A2 See BOCC A8YEAR 76, NUMBER 2 She sells sea shells, B1Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . .A4Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . .A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . .A7Society . . . . . . . . . . . . B2 School News . . . . . . . . . . B3Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4Classi eds . . . . . . . . . .B6-B8Wewa man charged after shooting investigationSee SHOOTING A8 See BUTLER A8 See PORT A8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, October 24, 2013The rst year, Christy said, they hoped to raise $20,000 toward an annual budget that eclipses $200,000. The proceeds of the Bash, 100 percent of which go to the Humane Society each year, came in above expectations, providing fuel for the future. Bolstered by the success of the rst year we thought we could do this every year, Christy said. The Humane Society would not be what it is without those 265 people who attended last year and those who attended every year. As the Humane Society expanded its programs in the community bringing dogs and cats to the nursing home, the DAWGS in Prison program the community embraced the organizations biggest fundraiser of the year. They have been such a great partner in (our community) for the quality of life programs we have here, the only way to give back is to support their big event, said Ron Reid, director of the Bridge at St. Joe nursing home. And it is also another opportunity for myself and my team who go to break the stereotype of a nursing home employee, to dress up in costumes and have fun. Its a fantastic event and we can go out and be part of the community and have a ball. Community is also the engine that drives the Humane Society, a largely volunteer organization, 365 days a year. The Humane Societys facility on 10th Street is a mecca for volunteers of all ages and backgrounds that help clean cages, do laundry, feed, walk and socialize with animals, make runs to the vet, animal transports, provide foster homes and animal adoption support. We are so blessed at the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society for all the wonderful volunteers, Christy said. One couple who live in Gulf County part-time spend much of their time here helping out with projects of all kinds around the facility. The volunteers they have do an amazing job, said Andy Smith, whose family company, Hannon Insurance, has been a sponsor of the Bow Wow Bash from the outset. The work they do makes it worthwhile to support them. The facility, which is great for anyone who hasnt been out there, the board, they work hard and do a great job. The event is a real blast. As the blast has grown into a smash a network of locals providing essential support has expanded. Wylie Petty and his staff from the El Governor Motel transform the Centennial Building each year, decorating the building and donating every bit of sweat, time and dollars. Silent and live auctions offer an array of treats, all donated. The donations and people hearing about it have allowed the event to grow so much, Christy said. We have so much wonderful stuff. It is a challenge just setting it all up. As in previous years, Jill and Mike Davis are donating a Murder Mystery Dinner for 10 at their house, this years theme, Murder in Oz based on the presumption that the house falling on the Wicked Witch was no accident. Mary Conroy, the chef behind Gourmet Now, will serve dinner for 10 with wine and liquor provided by Les and Andrea Heard. Threeand four-night vacations to high-end resorts in Aruba, Curacao and San Juan, Puerto Rico will be on the block. Jan Sapte has created a lighthouse-themed quilt and Bobby Pollack donated a hand-turned pear wood bowl among the many handcrafted items by local artisans, including local artists Elaine Lerch and Leslie Wentzell. There will also be jewelry, spa days and paintings among over 200 items that will be auctioned that night. It is a great network that has grown, Christy said. We do solicit items but now I have people who call me. A lot of these people have adopted animals or been to the shelter and they have seen we have a clean, well-managed facility. In their own way they want to give back and help. We have a lot of work to do but we are all proud of where weve come to. In a county where there is a single animal control ofcer, the Humane Society houses, on average, over 50 dogs and 25-30 cats each day. They never stop coming, Christy said. The Humane Societys budget is quickly eaten up with a mortgage, utilities and the cost of upkeep. A food program is supported through grants and another grants subsidizes spay and neuter programs in the 32456 zip code, the facility receives donations and recoup adoption fees, but as Christy said, The costs add up. And given the constrained state of government budgets, the cities of Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka and the Board of County Commissioners combine to subsidize about one-quarter of the annual budget. The Bow Wow Bash supplies a signicant portion of our budget, Christy said. BASH from page A1 135AvenueG,Apalachicola,FL850-653-8853 GreatthingsarebeingsaidbyourPatients!Whatwaslikedmostaboutthehospital...Thepeople SmallandFriendly Thestaff-veryprofesssional Thecare,concern,andkindness ThepromptandexcellenttreatmentbyallstaffmembersSpecialMentions... TerryPridgenandCourtneyGiddens Yes,DebbieGreynoldsisaveryspecialperson JimBoonewasexcellent;verycourteousandprofessionalCarolJonesmademefeelreallyrelaxedduringtreatmentsNursesandDr.Conradweregreat! THESPECIALTYMEDICALCENTER SKINCANCERcanbepresentwithoutyouknowingit.CALLtodayforaskincancerscreening.DIDYOUKNOWthatstudiesshow: NOW,DIDYOUKNOW? VINCENTIVERS,M.D.301TwentiethStreet|PortSt.Joe,FL32456 850-227-7070|www.iversmd.com ALLMAJOR INSURANCE ACCEPTED9am-6pm 9am-2pm NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:11-15-13CODE:SJ00 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Last week Andy sniffed out a new path for the DAWGS in Prison program. One of the graduates from the programs Class 29, Andy left last Wednesday for Arizona, making it 17 states and counting that have received a newly-trained canine from the Developing Adoptable Dogs with Good Sociability (DAWGS) in Prison program based at the Gulf Forestry Camp. The number of states will increase with the next graduation in eight weeks when a dog will be adopted by a family in Chicago, adding Illinois to the list. We started this for the dogs but we continue this for the impact it also has on the inmates, said Sandi Christy, with Judy Miick co-director of the DAWGS in Prison program. I feel a sense of peace about this program. It is like I was meant to do this. DAWGS in Prison is one of the benchmark programs for the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. The program was featured at the top of the list last week during a community partnership meeting hosted with Gulf Correctional Institute as an example of initiatives aimed at returning inmates to society as productive individuals. As of last week, the program has graduated 308 dogs in four-plus years while more than 320 inmates have been accepted, after applying, into the program, moving up a ladder from caretaker to trainer to lead trainer. Inmates have gone on to use skills learned in DAWGS to work with animals in shelters, humane societies and veterinarians from Florida to Oregon. I cry a little at every graduation, but the inmates can change that, Miick said. They come up and tell me about all they have learned, about discipline, just caring about another being. That makes it all worthwhile. For the dogs, many of them either abandoned or turned into the shelter, the program is, literally, a life-saver. Andy was given up by a family that grew impatient with him despite not providing the training, Christy said. Siri was abandoned in the woods and until DAWGS had never learned to trust humans. Paige was loved, Christy said, but never spayed and had produced too many puppies, taxing her body. Ally was an admired gorgeous dog, but never trained or socialized with people. What we do know, if any of these dogs could talk, is that every dog here starts as a blank canvas, Christy said. His destiny is etched by the hands of a painter. Paint with hostility and a dog learns to ght. Paint with cruelty and he learns fear. Paint with praise and a dog learns condence. Paint with boundaries and he learns respect. Paint with tenderness and a dog learns to bond. Paint with affection and he learns to love. Each dog, Christy added, is therefore a product of environment. Bad dogs are not born they are painted, Christy said. Look to the artist and stop blaming the dog, she added. Here at DAWGS in Prison we take the awed portrait and paint over it. And the painters at DAWGS in Prison, those inmates, learn tools while teaching the dogs. The inmates, just as with the dogs coming from the Humane Society, apply and are screened. They get with the program, providing round-the-clock care to the eight to 10 members of each class or they leave the program. They must keep meticulous records on each dogs care, from feeding to bathroom breaks to teeth brushing and grooming. Slack off and out of the program they go. But maintain focus and earning each step of the ladder of success in the program has its distinct dividends. Inmates, upon their own graduation, provide feedback to program coordinators concerning what they got out of the program. Christy provided just a sampling last week. These animals teach you a lot without saying a word; patience and peace of mind; spending your times caring for an animal so it can have a second chance, one inmate wrote. I like working with the dogs. It gives me gratication seeing a dog transform, knowing I had a part in it, wrote another. You are not just helping the dogs the program helps you gain responsibility, another noted, while another wrote, There is something new to learn every day. Graduation day is bittersweet as they say goodbye to the dog they have trained as another class enters the gates at the Forestry Camp. So, in the end, who saves who, and who is the real artist? Christy asked. We like to think it is both man and dog, each playing their vital part in helping each other to become productive members of society.DAWGS in Prison graduates Class 29 SPECIAL TO TT HE STARClass 29 for the DAWGS in Prison program. The program has now saved more than 300 dogs while providing skills to more than 300 inmates.

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, October 24, 2013By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com In a split vote, the Mexico Beach city council may have violated an ordinance regarding competitive bidding. During a workshop three weeks ago the council agreed to have a third party evaluate the foundation slab beneath the historic Parker House which was deemed usable by the insurance company. At Tuesdays workshop, it was noted that a formal written statement had been provided from the insurance company to say that the slab is in good condition but the council intends to show them another conicting analysis in an attempt to leverage additional money. The insurance company is saying that the slab is ne, said Councilman Jack Mullen before bringing up the analysis from Cathey Construction, which found issues with the existing foundation. Obviously, we dont agree. After the council agreed to get a second opinion, city administrator Chris Hubbard solicited informal bids by phone for several engineering rms recommended by the Bay County commissioners. The council received one bid from Nova Engineering and Environmental out of Panama City. Before the council could accept the bid, Mullen read ordinance number 177 that states that expenditures over $3,000 require competitive bids. Novas $3,500 bid for soil borings and structural analysis put the council in a bind since no other bids were received. According to an amendment made in 1999 during a special meeting, the city could not hold a vote until they had unsuccessfully attempted competitive bidding. Ordinance 177 also stated that there is an exception when the vote is in the best interest of the citizens of the city. Hubbard told the council that if it solicited sealed bids, it would take at least six more weeks before an analysis contract could be approved. We cant violate our own laws, said Councilwoman Tanya Castro. The council tried to stay mindful that those in violation of the ordinance are considered guilty of a misdemeanor of the second degree. You dont get a speeding ticket for going 37 in a 35, said Cathey. We can violate or not violate. Mullen interpreted the ordinance as though the council had the ability to change it based on need. Castro didnt see a point in taking additional bids since Novas informal bid price of $3,500 was public knowledge. We could make a case that we have complied, said Mullen, referencing the fact that no other bids had been received. Councilman Lanny Howell made a motion to hire Nova for the analysis despite the existing ordinance. It was put to vote and passed 3-2 with Howell, Cathey and Councilman Bobby Pollock in support. To date, the city has received $660,000 for damages to the historic Parker House, purchased by the city in mid2011 with the intention of using it as a new city hall. The building caught re several months later and suffered massive damage though no additional insurance monies have been paid in the past year. During the meeting, new city clerk Adrian Welle was in attendance, having successfully relocated from Minnesota to Mexico Beach to take up the tumultuous title. The council took a moment to check in with Welle about his experience to date. The clerk said that hed been busy with a 277-page book of Florida ordinances and statutes, though he hadnt been trained on the citys accounting software. I can do things, but I dont want to, Welle joked, referencing former clerk Sharon McGhee, who attempted to be proactive with the citys accounting software, but struggled. McGhee resigned several days later. 9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310 GREATSELECTIONOFALLYOURFAVORITEBEER,WINE&SPIRITS S SPIRIT& WINE BEERVORITEA FOURY ALL OFTION SELECTGREA ONTHEPOOPDECK UPCOMINGEVENTS -INTHECROWSNESTFRIDAY&SATURDAY9PM KARAOKE DJ DANCING RANDYSTARK SOUTHERNSUNDAY KONKRETESOUL RANDYSTARK HALLOWEEN PARTY SATURDAY,OCTOBER26TH COSTUMECONTEST WEHAVEMOVEDTO: 327REIDAVE (CORNEROF4THSt&REIDAVE.) 850-227-3472 HOURS MONDAYTOWEDNESDAY8AMTO6PM THURSDAYTOSATURDAY8AMTO8PM SUNDAY11AMTO6PM By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Though the Deepwater Horizon spill was long ago, its anything but forgotten. The county RESTORE Act Committee was back in session last week after a recess during which the U.S. Treasury issued draft rules for how to process applications for funding projects from counties affected by the 2010 spill that pumped more than 210 million gallons of oil into the Gulf. Previously, the RAC reviewed 86 applications over a six-month period for ways to use potential BP money to improve the community. The RAC ultimately whittled the projects down to 73 valid prospects that totaled over $113 million. Gulf County is expected to receive around $2.3 million dollars when the settlement is complete, a far cry from the original estimates when the committee formed. The Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council, a group made up of governors from Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas, released a document that provided the framework for a coordinated region-wide restoration effort. The plan was sent to all 23 Florida counties eligible under RESTORE and feedback was welcomed for a nal draft that would ultimately be sent to the Gulf Consortium, which represents the counties at the state capital in Tallahassee. Though not all members of the RAC were present during the meeting, county attorney Jeremy Novak led the group through the provisions and noted their feedback. The available members of the RAC discussed the need for additional clarications in the plan, especially when it came to the allowance of revised RESTORE plans to be submitted once a dollar amount is assigned to each county. Committee member Pat Hardman wanted the Restoration Council to push for money to be paid as Non-Federal Restitution Funds so that it couldnt be taxed. Throughout the meeting the RAC often became frustrated with the Treasurys lack of progress toward establishing rules on how projects would be awarded money. We need good, clear guidelines, said county administrator Don Butler. We need a timeline. We need a process, added Port St. Joe city manager Jim Anderson. Novak told the group that the process had become time consuming because its not a typical responsibility of the Treasury Department and, just like the RAC, they were making it up as they went along. Its a unique piece of legislation, said Novak. This has never been done before. Once the Treasury has decided on its rules and allocated funds, the RAC can focus on which of the 73 projects will be seen to completion. The RAC acts as an advisory committee for the Board of County Commissioners, which has the nal say on what projects would be funded. Barring any changes, the feedback was presented to the BOCC Tuesday and was to be sent on to the Gulf Consortium, of which County Commissioner Warren Yeager is a member. The Consortium is a public entity created in 2012 by an Inter-local Agreement among Floridas 23 Gulf Coast counties. The RESTORE Act was passed by the Congress in June 2012 and signed into law by the President in of the same year.County RESTORE committee back in action MB council acknowledges possible violation in Parker House vote

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OPINION www.starfl.com ASectionThe red dress had black symbols of some sort splashed across it. The buttons were wooden, giving it an oriental look. It was not the prettiest out t Id ever seen, but the girl in it was! Of course, she was not the girl Id come to the dance with. Aint that the way life goes.. I managed to nd out her name. And, as the evening wore on, I summoned up the courage to ask her to dance. The music was a record player with a microphone laid in front of the speaker. As we rather awkwardly stepped out on the oor (I couldnt dance a lick and Id met this girl semi-of cially only seconds before), she smiled and Roy Orbison cut down on Candy Man. It was, as someone penned in another song, A moment to remember. A few weeks later I took her home to meet the family. She was extremely attractive. She was polite to a fault, fun to be around and one of the most humble and unassuming people Id ever met. Did I mention that her father was a doctor? And, sure, she got me on the county club golf course for no charge. She put our meals on some tab her dad kept open. And, oh yeah, they owned about a thousand acres of rich bottom land.. Leon kept mouthing to me behind her back, Marry her today. Dont let this one get away. GET DOWN ON YOUR KNEE! I was a junior in high school and not quite ready for the husband gig. But it is a wonderful memory that doesnt come around very often. As a matter of fact, I dont recall it at all unless I catch Candy Man on one of the oldie channels. And that is kinda the point of todays epistle. We all have those special songs that re-connect us to a particular friend, place or situation. The catch here is theyve about quit playing those old songs! Dancing with the Stars, NCIS and Duck Dynasty are not featuring Roy Orbison much these days. I can back up even earlier. I remember Leon bringing home that tiny 45 RPM record player in 1955. He paid something like fourteen dollars for it and the store threw in the hottest record out that year, Tennessee Ernie Fords version of Sixteen Tons. It was the rst song I learned from start to nish. We played it from morning till night. Leon could even sound like Ernie when he dropped down on that I owe my soul to the company store line. What a special memory! How long has it been since youve heard Tennessee Ernie sing? Listen, the Beatles recorded their last songs together over four decades ago! Fewer and fewer people are showing up at Graceland every year. Chuck Berry just turned 87 and Jerry Lee Lewis hasnt been seen in years. If it keeps on going this away, I might not have had a childhood at all! I kissed Millicent Blackburn right on the mouth on her grandmothers front porch over on Magnolia Avenue. I dont remember if we were in the swing or on that big couch against the back wall. I do know it was a hot summer night. I dont how I got to her house, how we ended up on the porch alone or how long I stayed. I do remember distinctly that Percy Faith and his Orchestra was in the living room playing, Theme from a Summer Place. It is amazing how one old song can de ne the time and the location, the situation and the moment for you. I hear Gene Autry sing Back in the Saddle and I can smell the popcorn from the old Park Theatre. Probably the song I remember from high school more than any other was Rebel Rouser by Duane Eddy. The basketball team used it as their theme song as they came on the court. It was a scintillating moment as everything in the gym paused, Duane hit the rst twangy notes on his ole Chet Atkins model Gretsch, the dressing room door ew open and Jackie Burns, Paul David Campbell, Jim Williams and the rest of the team poured out on the oor. I dont see how we ever lost a game with that introduction! Not all the memories are so sweet. When the doctors daughter came out to the Twin Pools to tell me the free golf was over the Coasters were blasting out of those giant speakers under the high diving boards, Fe-fe, fo-fo, fum, I smell smoke in the auditorium ... When the ght broke out up at the Skyway Grill Bobby Brewer and I were minding our own business over Cherry Cokes and cheeseburgers. Rollin Trull threw some big guy from Huntingdon right slap-dap across our table! I did an immediate double back summersault to avoid the ying Cokes and body parts while the juke box was playing, North to Alaska. Prom night was moving kind of slow until the masked rider rode the horse through the side doors right out on to the dance oor. Everybody looked shocked except the masked rider and the big horse. They promenaded to Bo Diddleys You Cant Judge a Book by Looking at the Cover before ducking off into the darkness from whence they came. Ended up being the best dance I ever attended. You dont suppose you can lose the memories if you cant hear the music? Respectfully,Kes Play It Again, Sam! HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert The American public has lost patience with Washington. The question is, now what? Congress is unable to do its job. It displays neither competence nor responsibility. It lurches reeling from crisis to crisis, each one selfmanufactured in an effort to postpone the reckoning from some earlier crisis. It shut the government down over a temporary budget. Now its threatening the nancial credibility of the U.S. government and the security and safety of the American people. Three years of last-minute spending decisions have culminated in a television standoff with no actual negotiations. Too many members of Congress reject the notion that accommodation and time-honored procedures allow them to ful ll their responsibilities to the American people. They use their legislative skill to engage in brinksmanship rather than address the countrys fundamental problems. Economic growth? Creating jobs? Putting the federal budget on a sustainable path? Dont look to Congress. Theyre too busy coming up with the next short-term tactic to confront the other side. Every day they dither, they keep the government from addressing the nations real problems. Even worse, theyve managed to raise real questions in this country and abroad about whether our system of government can work. Are we saddled with a national legislature paralyzed by unending con ict? Are we capable of tackling our major problems? We are on the road to a government that cannot plan, a country shackled by perpetual uncertainty, and a loss of faith in our institutions both at home and abroad. We do not have to continue down that road, but we do have to confront a core problem. The political center in Congress has weakened to the point of ineffectiveness, if not near-irrelevance. Thats ne with some people in Washington, who are comfortable with gridlock and dont think its consequences will be dire. Our governments inability to deal with problems, they argue, is good a government thats able to act, they believe, creates more problems than it solves. Likewise, some people acknowledge polarization as a problem, but blame it on an electorate that prefers a divided government, split between the parties. All I can say is that divided government in the past think Ronald Reagan and Tip ONeill didnt keep Congress from creatively addressing national challenges. Divided government is not easy, but it is not unusual and it can work. Politicians dont deserve all the blame. Voters share responsibility: more people have to turn out to vote. The more people who vote, the better the chances to strengthen the political center that is, moderates and pragmatists. Thats because low turnout brings out the most ideologically intense voters, who in turn reward the most polarizing candidates. A Congress more representative of the American people rests on expanding efforts to convince people to vote, and beating back the barriers to voting. The second solution lies with members of Congress. Contemplating a government shutdown, a Kentucky congressman recently explained his stance by saying, All that really matters is what my district wants. This is not an uncommon view, but its a distressingly limited one. Our system depends on members who believe its also their responsibility to lead and inform voters, who are willing to weigh the national interest as well as parochial concerns and who have con dence in our system to resolve political differences. In other words, we need members of Congress devoted to making the system work. We need men and women in of ce who understand that when the voters give us a divided government, they have no choice but to accept the distribution of power and work with it, regardless of what they wish were the case. We need legislators who realize that those on the other side feel just as passionately and deserve their respect, and who are committed to nding a solution to our problems. We change laws in our democracy and solve our most dif cult issues in this country not by bringing government to a halt, but by ghting out the issues before the voters in an election. At the end of the day, we have to move the country forward and we need to elect members of Congress who are willing and able to do that. Lee Hamilton is Director of the Center on Congress at Indiana University. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years.Its time for an intervention If youve never heard of Southern Living, I would rst say that I dont believe you, and then I would say, Bless your heart. That pretty much means, You are so stupid, I feel sorry for you. Lets pretend you really dont know about the Southern Living magazine. It was started back in the 1960s by The Progressive Farmer Company which changed its name to Southern Progress Corporation. The Southern Living magazine made it really big telling folks about Southern cooking, nice homes in the South and gardening. In the mid 1980s Time Inc. paid about a gazillion dollars for the company and Southern Living. The magazine is now the largest regional lifestyle publication in the United States. Women love it; men sneak and read it, particularly in doctors of ces. The bottom line is this; if you, your cooking, your house or your prized roses have been in Southern Living, you are a pretty big deal. My cousin Toni her house has been in Southern Living. If Im not mistaken, its been in there more than once. She lives in a small town in Randolph County, Alabama and everybody knows her. Her home with the wraparound porch to die for is kind of an area attraction. You should understand now Cousin Toni has a nice home, is also a good cook and is second to none when it comes to entertaining. She is a sweet lady, but she is also on the list of relatives you call when all hell breaks loose. In other words, shell do a little more than pray for you. People make the mistake of thinking proper Southern women are all standing there waiting for you to throw your coat in the mud puddle for them to walk on. They are not. Cousin Toni would simply say Bless your heart if you decided to throw your coat in a mud puddle. Again meaning, You are so stupid, I feel sorry for you. Shes sweet when she needs to be, but she will not back down from a ght. She is my cousin; this makes good sense to me. Her Daddy was my Uncle Harold. Uncle Harold was a doggone good man. He and my Daddy raced cars and were more than brothers-inlaw they were good friends. You can depend on Harold, my Daddy would always say. There was no greater compliment that my Daddy could give a person. Uncle Harold also taught me how to cut my toenails so as to never get an ingrown toenail. You dont forget things like that. Ive never had an ingrown toenail. My Daddys baby sister my Aunt Ruby, had to call cousin Toni in the other day on an assault mission. Aunt Ruby has been visiting the spa quite a bit lately, so folks keep an eye on her and make sure she has everything she needs. She is a treasure and we protect her as such. By the way, the spa is what Aunt Ruby calls the hospital. Aunt Ruby has a cat, Sister Sarah, that is always trying to entertain her with tricks and various other good deeds. Sister Sarah and Aunt Ruby sit in her famous yellow porch swing a lot and enjoy All of Gods gifts, as my Aunt Ruby puts it. It seems Sister Sarah has a thing for chipmunks, or ground squirrels as folks down there call them. Sister Sarah wants to catch them and bring them in the house to play with for a while. You know where all this is going. Sister Sarah got the ground squirrel in the house, things got crazy. Sister Sarah brought it in the house and then she took it out. Then she brought it in again The ground squirrel was loose and running around all over Aunt Rubys house. Knowing Aunt Ruby, Im sure she didnt worry too much about it. She just called Cousin Toni to come over and save the ground squirrel from Sister Sarah the cat. After a NASCAR like chase all around the house, Sister Sarah and Cousin Toni nally cornered the ground squirrel in a bathroom behind a cabinet. If I had been there, I would have advised Cousin Toni to just Roll up a Southern Living and whack him in the head. Cousin Toni is not that way not unless she has to be. According to Aunt Ruby, Cousin Toni was taking more of a ladylike approach, talking really sweet to the ground squirrel cornered behind the bathroom cabinet. I see your two pretty eyes shining. Come on out, Ill help you. At this point, Sister Sarah was also ready to help. Cousin Toni nally hemmed the ground squirrel up and gingerly took him outside. On the way out, the ground squirrel bit Cousin Toni. I cannot get a report on what happened to the ground squirrel once it got outside. I do know this ground squirrel didnt know about Aunt Ruby being a treasure or Cousin Tonis fame with Southern Living, he was more concerned with not getting his head bit off by Sister Sarah. Aunt Ruby says, Sister Sarah just wants to play with the ground squirrels. However she usually plays with them until she harasses them to death. Many a Southern man has died that same way (At the hands of a Southern woman who just wanted to play with them and ended up harassing them to death). I suppose there are worse ways to leave this world. Find more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. CRANKS MY TRACTORBN HeardRoll up a southern living and whack him in the head LEE H. HAMILTON USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Page 4 Thursday, October 24, 2013

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AsofNovember1,2013, wewillbeinournewlocationat: 310ReidAvenue PortSt.Joe 850-229-2999 Comecheckoutyourfavorites andthenewitemsinstock! CoastalCabin... W her e the W a t er M eets the W oods FaBOOLousHalloweenParty!! Tuesday,October29,2013 5:30p.m.-7:30p.m. 28%OFF OBAGI PRODUCTSVaserLipo&S martSkinCO2 FREEVisiaSkin Analysis BESTCOSTUME WINS20UNITSOF FREEBOO-TOX! LEARNABOUTTHE NEWPERMANENT LASERCELLULITE REDUCTION. y! !traen Powellous Ha a BOO LF y! !traen Powellous Ha a BOO LF October 29, 2013 uesdayT October 29, 2013 uesdayT October 29, 2013 uesdayT October 29, 2013 uesdayT October 29, 2013 uesdayT Comedressedinyourfavoritecostume&win20unitsof Boo-tox,PLUS,aGrandPrizeworth$2,000&manymore! GhostingHorsdouvres&DrinkstoEnjoy! Trick-or-Treatforextradiscounts andFREEGiveaways InServiceforOver20Years Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs S Local/BusinessThe Star| A5Thursday, October 24, 2013Special to The StarPeENsSAColOLA Sacred Heart Health System is now offering its patients an interest-free loan program called ClearBalance, giving patients an affordable option to pay their out-of-pocket hospital expenses over an extended period. The ClearBalance program has been made available to patients at Sacred Hearts three hospitals in Pensacola, Miramar Beach and Port St. Joe. Benets of the ClearBalance payment plan include: low monthly payments with exible terms up to 72 months; patient pays no interest; patient pays no late fees; and a dedicated customer service center focused on patient satisfaction We know an increasing number of our patients are faced with high deductibles and higher copays on their insurance plans. So we were looking for a better way to help them afford the care they need, said Susan Davis, president and CEO of Sacred Heart Health System. Our concern for the well-being of our patients does not end at the time of their discharge. We understand many people are facing nancial hardships and that health care is expensive. The ClearBalance program helps our patients meet their health care needs and deal with unexpected hospital bills, while making it easier for them to manage their outof-pocket expenses, Davis said. ClearBalance CEO Mitch Patridge said the companys customer service center and exible patient-friendly loans are key ingredients to the programs appeal to both health care providers and consumers. Sacred Heart Health System is focused on delivering an exceptional patient experience and achieving the highest level of patient satisfaction throughout the continuum of care, including the billing process, Patridge said. Were proud to have ClearBalance selected as part of Sacred Hearts commitment to patient satisfaction. The ClearBalance program allows all patients, regardless of credit score, to easily and quickly qualify for a patient-friendly bank loan. Additional balances and family member accounts can be added, and the patient will receive only one easy-to-read monthly statement.Sacred Heart Hospital introduces interest-free payment planStar Staff ReportPort St. Joe resident Jeff Braun was recognized this month by his employer, Mediacom Communications, for earning top honors in the companys national awards program that recognizes employees for exceptional customer service. Braun earned the regions Award for Excellence. Braun is a Mediacom service technician in Gulf Breeze and the surrounding area. He was cited for earning high marks for professionalism and customer satisfaction. Ceremonies were held in Mediacoms Gulf Breeze ofce to celebrate Customer Service Week and recognize employees who consistently deliver excellent customer service. Mediacom delivers cable television and broadband communication services to homes and businesses and employs more than 4,500 people companywide.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Ask anyone and theyll tell you Port St. Joe resident Donny McArdle is one of kind. In September, McArdle received his master service technician certication from Yamaha, and because hes the only boat tech in Bay and Gulf counties to have earned it, his one of a kind status has been truly solidied. McArdle is an employee of the Mexico Beach Marina, an authorized Yamaha dealer, and having a master tech on staff gives the shop added credibility and their customers peace of mind. Theres some status in the fact that were able to offer that level of talent, said Nate Odum, co-owner of the Mexico Beach Marina. Donny can x anything that breaks. McArdle elected to take the certication program, held in Kennesaw, Ga., at Yamahas Southeastern headquarters. The program covered the setup and troubleshooting of Yamaha outboard motors and had something of a reputation for being extremely difcult. Even someone as talented as McArdle didnt expect for it to be a cakewalk. The success rate on the rst attempt is not high, McArdle said. You can know your stuff and still stress yourself out about it. The fact that McArdle took the nal exam on Friday the 13th didnt add to his condence. The exam included a written test that had to be completed within an hour-and-a-half followed by six practical application stations that had to be completed in 30-minutes each. The ve students who took the exam were under the gun, and it didnt make McArdle feel any better when two of his classmates failed the written test and were sent home. As McArdle worked through his practical exams, another classmate was escorted from the room and upon completing his fth station McArdle was called into the hallway by his instructor. McArdle feared that hed done something incorrectly on a previous station and reached the end of the line, but his instructor informed him that hed performed awlessly on the rst ve stations, and it was unnecessary for him to complete the sixth. I was relieved, said McArdle, who had beaten the odds and passed the exam on his rst attempt. Its not a gimme. You have to be on your A-game. He received a plaque commemorating his certication which now hangs proudly in the Marina shop. Odum celebrated having the only master tech outside of Destin and Tallahassee. His work ethic is incredible, Odum said of McArdle. He wont let the motor beat him. When other guys give up, he wont. For McArdle, diagnosing an engine problem is a process of elimination, but he enjoys the problem-solving process. Before he was xing boats, he spent quality time in his youth rebuilding car engines. I like to understand what Im doing, and I enjoy it, McArdle said. Born and raised in Port St. Joe, McArdle has worked at the Marina for 28 years, getting his start as a ll-in forklift driver. In 1984, he was recommended to the previous owners, the Marquardts, by his thengirlfriend (now wife) Teresa, who worked in the shop. After driving the forklift, he stayed on, helping to build structures on the property and began assisting the shop mechanics with the boat engines. From there, he began taking classes to get familiar with the motors that were regularly being serviced. To-date, McArdle has completed hundreds of hours of training on both Johnson and Yamaha motors. As if being the go-to guy for technical problems wasnt enough to keep him busy, McArdle has been a volunteer re ghter for Port St. Joe for the last six years. Prior to that, he volunteered with the Overstreet re department for nine years. He also is a part time EMT and plays bass guitar for the First Baptist Praise Team in Port St. Joe. Though he and his wife moved to Orange Park, near Jacksonville for two years when Teresas job was transferred, they were excited to return to Port St. Joe and McArdle was ready to return to the Marina. He watched his sons, Jarrod and Chaney, graduate from Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School and his youngest son Chaney was recently hired as the emergency services coordinator for the City of Mexico Beach. This is home, McArdle said. Mediacom honors PSJ man for customer serviceSpe PE Ci I Al L toTO The HE St T Ar RJeff Braun of Port St. Joe, second from left, is recognized for outstanding customer service by Mediacoms top corporate leaders. Left to right are John Pascarelli, executive vice president for operations; Braun; Larry Jackson, area supervisor; and Tapan Dandnaik, senior vice president for customer service. Spe PE Ci I Al L toTO The HE St T Ar RPort St. Joe resident Donny McArdle received his master service technician certication from Yamaha, making him the only master tech in Gulf and Bay counties.ONE o OF A KINDPSJs McArdle earns Yamaha certication

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A By TOM BAIRDSpecial to The Star As the weather cools, the waters of the bay and Gulf will become clearer. This isnt so much from a lack of suspended sediment, but from fewer microscopic life forms adrift in the water column. There exists in the oceans of the world, in bays, lakes, and in almost every other natural body of water, a population of organisms so immense that it de es counting. Everyone while swimming has brushed up against millions of these creatures without being aware of their presence. No doubt you swallowed a large number while learning to swim. Although limited studies of this population were made before 1887, it was not until that year oceanographer Victor Hensen rst proposed a name for this vast assemblage plankton. The term refers to those plants and animals, mostly, but not entirely, microscopic in size, that are made to wander or drift, under the in uence of ocean currents. The same root word gives us the name planet, because to early astronomers the planets seemed to wander against the more xed background of the distant stars. Although most planktonic organisms have the ability to swim, their efforts are too feeble in the presence of oceanic water movements. One de nition of plankton is the inability to swim faster than one knot. Because of their vast numbers, wide distribution and bene cial biologic activities, plankton are considered the most important inhabitants of the marine world, with all forms of life directly or indirectly dependent on them. Planktonic creatures are basic to the food chains of all marine life. Sponges, tube worms, scallops, clams, oysters and sea squirts are just some of the animals that lter sea water to gather them. Herring sheries use plankton indicators to predict potential catch. Giant baleen whales, more than 100 feet in length and reaching fantastic weights of 150 tons, feed almost exclusively on plankton. Diatoms, one type of plant plankton, are a major source of vital oxygen in the atmosphere and for proteins that animal life cannot synthesize but require. Without plankton the seas would be a wet desert. Not all planktonic creatures are microscopic. Jelly sh, as large as cannon balls, are moved about the oceans by currents. Comb jellies (Ctenophora), depending on the species can range from the size of a hickory nut to 4-6 inches. Many plankters are visible to the naked eye. Copepods (crustaceans) are the insects of the sea, and are about the size of a lower case o on this page. They are the most abundant and universally distributed animals in the plankton. Phytoplankton is the name for the plant part of the whole plankton community and they are more numerous than their animal counterparts. Using dissolved chemicals in the ocean and the energy of the sun, phytoplankton produce energy-storing sugars and oils and provide most of the oxygen in our atmosphere. The most common members of the phytoplankton are diatoms. These are literally the pastures and forests of the sea. Immediately recognized because of their delicate geometric shapes circles, triangles, rods diatoms are encased in a glass-like silica capsule. Because of this diatoms are often referred to as natures aquatic gems, and they are among the most beautiful plants on earth, although one needs a microscope to appreciate their delicate beauty. The hard glass-like case often remains long after the inner cellular material dies. As these cases settle to the ocean bottom over eons, thick deposits build up. These deposits are called diatomaceous earth or diatomite. Uplifting of the sea oor has made this material available to humans, and it is added to many commercial products, including dynamite, detergents, polishes, paint removers, fertilizers, and toothpastes. Some swimming pools use diatomaceous earth lters. In addition, diatomaceous earth is frequently a component in insulation and sound-proo ng materials. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST) Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) BWOHuntingHeadquarters: CAMOARRIVINGDAILY SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 WEEKLYALMANAC ST.JOSEPHBAY APALACHICOLABAY,WESTPASS TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtracttheindicatedtimes fromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Oct.2474 55 4% Fri,Oct.2574 47 5% Sat,Oct.2670 49 7% Sun,Oct.2773 5310% Mon,Oct.2876 5612% Tues,Oct.2976 5316% Wed,Oct.3078 5516% Thursday, October 24, 2013 Page 6Special to The StarOn Oct. 16, more than 125 anglers from around the Forgotten Coast attended a shing seminar, hosted and sponsored by Bluewater Outriggers (BWO), which is owned and operated by the Duren family. Bluewater Outriggers is a premier sporting goods superstore in the heart of Port St. Joes waterfront business district. The guest speakers were Capt. Rick Murphy and Capt. Jeff Page from the Florida Chevy Insider Fishing Report team out of Miami. Murphy produces the television show for 26 weeks of the year and is seen on Fox Sports and Sun Sports channels on stations all over Florida and beyond, with 800,000 to 1 million viewers per week. Their show consists of weekly shing reports from every coastal area in Florida, and the Port St. Joe to Pensacola area report is done by Capt. Pat Denien with Bluewater Outriggers the primary sponsor. Capt. Rick and Capt. Jeff also have a new show coming out on Destination America, which is part of the Discovery Channel network and will air on Saturday mornings. The seminar, Fishing Arti cial Lures in the Fall, was a success as evidenced by the attendance at the Bluewater Outriggers store with standing-room only. Food and refreshments were served, and Capt. Rick and his partner Capt. Jeff took turns speaking about various shing techniques they use every day that will improve your angling, especially during the next few fall and early winter months. They shared some of their secrets, like their favorite lures they use to catch different species of sh at various depths from 12 inches of water to eight feet of water. Capt. Rick Murphy discussed the best lures, such as the Rapala Skitterwalk, for walking the dog and when to match the hatch, with a black and silver lure, when shing clearer waters and to use chartreuse in dirty waters. Both Captains talked about how much more productive drift shing is through the grassy areas, in lieu of anchoring, and how to adjust for the wind. Try to have the wind at your back or shoulders. Capt. Rick also explained the differences in popping corks and clacking corks, both weighted and non-weighted. He also demonstrated how to tie a loop knot to your lures or jigs to give it more real life action. On his whiteboard, he diagramed how to sh the different water depths. For example, in 1 to three feet of water, he starts with the gold spoon. His go-to lure for all species of sh is the quarterto half-ounce gold weedless spoon (Johnson Silver Minnow) and is effective in all depths of water. He stressed that after you cast, immediately start reeling at a fast and steady rate with your rod tip down, and do not use any twitching techniques when using the spoon. He also likes to use a jighead with a soft plastic bait like a shad paddletail in these shallow depths. When shing in three to ve feet of water, he likes lip lures such as a Rapala BX Minnow (Balsa Xtreme), X-rap or Skitter Walk. In ve to eight feet of water, use half-ounce Gotcha Sea Striker jig or a halfto three-quarter-ounce bucktail jig head. Rick also shared his recent visit and experience to the factories in Finland and Estonia and explained how much detail work and testing that Rapala puts into their products. The attendees for this Bluewater event were both men and women anglers wanting to sharpen their skills and techniques to improve their chances out on the water. Hopefully, this is one of many seminars to come in the future from Bluewater Outriggers. Capt. Rick and Capt. Jeff emphasized how blessed we are to have such a beautiful area to sh in with our pristine bays and lagoons. They both spoke about how this is one of their favorite Florida destinations, especially with its Southern charm and friendly people. Bluewater Outriggers hosts shing seminar Capt. Rick Murphy speaks to more than 125 anglers SPECIAL TO THE STARMore than 125 anglers packed Bluewater Outriggers recently for a shing seminar put on by Capt. Rick Murphy and Capt. Jeff Paige. SPECIAL TO THE STARLEFT: A crystal diatom rainbow. MIDDLE: Plankton are considered a window to the universe. RIGHT: CopepodsPlankton: basic to marine life food chain SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomGag grouper and amberjack arebeing caught state waters. Trout and redfish are still active this week. Good reports from Pig Island and Eagle Harbor are on the rise and plenty of fish are in St. Joe Bay. Some flounder action is hot in 20+ feet of water on the outside near shore wrecks. This should stay hot for a while, so try and find a good weather day.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASectionSpecial to The StarThe third annual Silent Auction/Golf Tournament to bene t the Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum is Nov. 8-9 at the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. As part of a full weekend event, a reception is 6 p.m. ET Nov. 8, with hors doeuvres, beer and wine for a $10 entry fee. A cash bar for spirits will also be available and live music by The George Boyer Band. A silent auction will take place with auction items including limited edition prints of historic military and cultural events, gift baskets and stays at area hotel. Other items are requested. A variety or items will be available A bene t golf tournament is Nov. 9, with proceeds to support the Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum and the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. The club is open to the public, and the tournament will be a four-player, scramble format, kicking off at 12:30 p.m. ET with a short ceremony to honor Americas veterans and a 1 p.m. shotgun start. A meal and awards ceremony will follow. Cash prizes for the tournament include $400 to the rst place team, $350 for second place and $200 for third place. A Hole-In-One Challenge will offer a $10,000 cash prize. The Camp Gordon Johnston WWII Museum has been honored by Smithsonian Magazine for seven straight years and is dedicated to preserving the memories of the amphibious soldiers who trained at the camp, which is in Carrabelle. The museum houses more than 10,000 square feet of artifacts, vehicles, photos, memorabilia and memories of the soldiers, sailors and other military, as well as civilian personnel who trained at the camp during the WWII years. Hole sponsorships are available and tournament registration information can be found at www.stjoebaygolf.com or by calling 227-1751 or Dan Van Treese at 227-8138. Special Lodging Packages are available starting at $69.99/single, $89.99/double. Call Mainstay Suites at 2296246 for a reservation. The event is being supported by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council. 2077822 Gun ShowFebruary 23rd&24thFt.WaltonBeach FairgroundsFREE PARKINGConcealed WeaponsClassSat/Sun11amor2pmFloridagunshows.comSat9-5Sun10-4 October 26th&27thPanamaCity Fairgrounds ASalutetoAmerica'sVeterans FRIDAY,NOVEMBER8,20136:00p.m. Eastern SilentAuctionandhorsdoeuvresreceptionwithcashbarat St.JosephBayGolfClubClubhouse.Costofadmittance,$10.00 (includestwofreedrinks).SATURDAYNOVEMBER9,201312:30p.m. Eastern SalutingAmericasVeteransCeremony 1:00p.m. Eastern ShotgunStart 4playerbest-ballformat;$55nonmember, $45memberifregisteringatleast2weeks priortotheevent.Plus$5afterthat. Mealandawardsceremonytofollow. Cashprizesinclude: $400:FirstPlaceteam $350:SecondPlaceteam $200:ThirdPlaceteam Hole-in-OneChallenge: Cashprize$10,000 SponsorshipLevels $500DivisionSponsor $250BrigadeSponsor $100CompanySponsor $50PlatoonSponsorHolesponsorshipsalsoavailable. Sponsorsnameswillbepostedon allsignsandwebsite.ContactUs DanVanTreese:850-227-8138 TonyMinichiello:850-528-2125 SpecialLodgingPackage: MainstaySuites:$69.99Queen Suitepernight,$89.99King DeluxeSuitepernight. anaturalescape.com TouristDevelopmentCouncil Atwo-dayeventtohonor ourveteransandbenet CampGordonJohnston WorldWarIIMuseum (Carrabelle,FL)and St.JosephBayGolfClub. EVERYDAY 3:30pm-6:30pmwww.docksideseafoodandrawbar.comBringYourFriendsandGetHooked! Star Staff ReportFor most of the rst half last Friday, host Wewahitchka Gators played backand-forth with the Sneads Pirates. But too many givebacks by the Gators proved their undoing. Turnovers, including a key interception and two fumbles, proved decisive as the Pirates pounded Wewahitchka 53-14, of cially eliminating the Gators (2-6 overall, 0-3 in District 4-1A) from playoff contention. The Gators host Vernon at 7 p.m. CT this Friday, have a bye week and nish the season on the road against West Gadsden. Sneads scored on a long run to nish the opening drive of the game, but the Gators answered, driving the length of the eld to set up junior quarterback Rashard Ranies 1-yard touchdown run. A failed extra point left the Gators behind 7-6. Sneads responded with another long drive punctuated by a rushing touchdown to take a 14-6 before things unraveled for Wewahitchka. Ranie was intercepted on the rst play of the ensuing drive, and the Pirates converted the turnover into points and a 21-6 lead. The Pirates added a pair of rushing touchdowns in the second quarter to enter halftime with a 33-6 lead. The Gators took the second half kickoff and marched down the eld, senior running back Jarvar Hill dashing 27 yards up the gut to score. An Irvin Maiben run on the two-point conversion pulled Wewahitchka within 33-14 and breathed life into the Gators. But Sneads quickly extinguished hope with two more rushing touchdowns, one following a Gator fumble and by the end of the third period it was 46-14. Ranie nished 4 for 9 passing for 53 yards with one interception. He added 18 yards rushing on two carries. Hill led the Gators with 104 yards rushing on 15 carries and caught two passes for 35 yards. Junior Tad Gaskin also caught two passes, totaling 18 yards and Maiben, just a sophomore, had something of a breakout game with 73 rushing yards on 11 carries. Jonathan Palmer, another sophomore, added three yards on ve carries for the Gators. Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School girls soccer team begins the 2013/2014 campaign with a Jamboree this Saturday at the Lamar Faison Soccer Complex in Port St. Joe. Also participating are Panama City Bay High, Panama City North Bay Haven and Lynn Haven Mosley. The action begins at 1 p.m. ET with Port St. Joe facing Bay High on Field One. At 2 p.m., on Field Two, North Bay Haven will square off with Mosley. Bay High and North Bay Haven will compete on Field 2 at 4:30 p.m. and Mosley will play Port St. Joe on Field One at 5 p.m.Silent auction, golf tournament to bene t Camp Gordon Johnston WWII MuseumSneads Pirates eliminates Gators from postseasonPSJ girls soccer jamboree Saturday Thursday, October 24, 2013 Page 7Star Staff ReportIn what Coach Wayne Taylor described as much a practice as game, the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School volleyball team easily swept West Gadsden in the quarter nals of the District 1-1A tournament. The Lady Tiger Sharks won in three sets, 25-6, 25-6 and 25-8. The team had 38 serving aces, but their season ended Tuesday night with a straight-set loss to Liberty County in the semi nals. In the nal game of the regular season, the programs Dig Pink event, the Lady Tiger Sharks toppled Wewahitchka in three sets, 25-16, 25-9 and 25-20. It was a great team effort, and we even had a couple of eighth-graders playing that we moved up from junior varsity a couple of weeks ago, Taylor said., adding the match allowed Teiyahna Hutchinson and Celeste Chiles playing time to become accustomed to the varsity system The game also served as Senior Night, as the team recognized Nicole Endres and Brittany King. The Dig Pink event brought out the largest crowd of the season, and though totals were not complete, the program will donate at least $1,000 to the Side Out Foundation for Breast Cancer Research. By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School football team hoped to be in this position as the season played out. The Tiger Sharks wanted to arrive at this week 1-0 in District 1-1A with back-toback home games against West Gadsden and Liberty County in the next two Fridays. Mission accomplished. Coming off a 21-12 road win against Tallahassee FAMU last Thursday, raising their record to 5-2 overall, the Tiger Sharks have destiny in their hands as they face the Panthers of West Gadsden 7:30 p.m. ET on Friday at Shark Field. Win, and Port St. Joe is assured of a playoff spot in the four-team district, which also includes a winless Franklin County. Lose, and the Tiger Sharks would have to beat visiting Liberty County next week to force a three-way tie for the district title and the two district playoff spots. Beat West Gadsden and Liberty County, and the district title belongs to Port St. Joe. You never know how your season is going to start and how it is going to go, but this is where we wanted to be, Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon said. We have to take of West Gadsden. We win, and we are in. We are focused on West Gadsden. We can not look ahead. We have to take care of things Friday night. West Gadsden, Gannon said, will provide a similar look as the FAMU squad Port St. Joe beat last Thursday in Tallahassee. Behind Dwayne Griggs, who rushed 10 times for 135 yards, the Tiger Sharks pounded out 317 yards rushing. Cole Cryderman added 78 yards, Aaron Paul 45 and Jak Riley 32 as Port St. Joe averaged over 10 yards a carry. Paul scored from 22 yards and Griggs from 64 sandwiched around an 18yard pass from quarterback Drew Lacour to Griggs as Port St. Joe put up all its points in the opening half. Lacour converted all three extra-point kicks. FAMU added a touchdown, failing on the extra point, just before halftime and did the same early in the fourth quarter. Offensively, I thought we did a good job in the rst half, but in the second half, I thought we bogged down a bit, Gannon said. The coaches did not feel we did a good job in the second half. I thought overall we came out and gave a good effort. They are a very athletic team, and we swarmed around the ball and hit them, which I think was important. Overall we did a good job. West Gadsden, Gannon said, will present similar problems exponentially enhanced. They are a mirror of the team we played at FAMU, Gannon said. They are very athletic and maybe a little more athletic than FAMU. They have some big receivers and a good running back. They are good and they are well-coached. Gannon said that after a bye week the team was a bit sluggish in practice leading up to FAMU. With the two-day fall break for public schools to begin this week, Gannon said he was pleasantly surprised by the focus and attitude on Monday. We had a good day of practice, Gannon said. The keys, Gannon said, will be limiting big plays, an early lead and holding onto the football. We have to take care of the football, Gannon said. We also would like to get up on them. A team like that, you let them stay around, they are going to become more con dent as the game goes along. Getting up a couple of touchdowns would help. We also have to tackle them. They are good in space, and we cant afford to give up the big plays. We have to make them drive to score. Season within season begins Friday for PSJHS WAYNE TAYLOR | Special to The StarThe Lady Tiger Sharks raised at least $1,000 for breast cancer research during last weeks Dig Pink event.Lady Tiger Sharks fall in district semi nals

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, October 24, 2013 SeeaTyndallFederalCreditUnionrepresentativeforcompletedetailsanddisclosures.DeferredpaymentoeravailableonautoloansopenedbetweenOctober7,2013andDecember31,2013. Allratesandoersaresubjecttochangewithoutnotice.Membereligibilityrequired;aninitial$1non-refundablemembershipfeewillapply. The hearing is set for 1:30 p.m. ET Jan. 23. Each side is seeking summary judgment. Capital City Bank is arguing the mortgage is enforceable and asking the foreclosure be granted. The Port Authority is arguing it lacked the authority to mortgage public property without a voter referendum on the issue. Gibson said the judge could rule one of three ways. A win for Capital City Bank would enforce the mortgage and lead to foreclosure on the parcel. A win for the Port Authority would mean the mortgage was invalid on its face, Gibson said. The judge could also rule that the mortgage was unenforceable, but the note the Port Authority owes Capital City Bank remained a debt that must be paid. Capital City Bank has declined late offers from the Port Authority under which the Port Authority would provide additional strength to its obligation to pay back the loan while securing from Capital City Bank time to allow for development at the port. According to Sims and prosecutor Robert Sombathy, the trial is expected to last two to three days. Butler is charged with shooting and killing Everett Gant in July of last year in Port St. Joe. Gant approached Butlers Pine Ridge apartment after Butler had been accused of using racial slurs directed at children in the apartment complex. Butler shot Gant between the eyes with a .22 rie and left him bleeding on the doorstep before calling 911 and sitting back down to nish his dinner. He expressed inconvenience at being arrested for shooting a (racial epithet), according to the arresting afdavit. Six weeks after the shooting, Gant passed away from the injuries. He was transported to Bay Medical Center by EMS where he underwent surgery. Investigators learned Keukelaar was shot with a shotgun by Ake. Based on witness accounts at the time, Ake accidentally shot Keukelaar and no criminal charges were led at that time pending additional investigation. That investigation, including the interview of numerous witnesses, determined that prior to the shooting Ake committed several weapons violations that led to Keukelaar being shot. Witnesses said Ake discharged the shotgun into the air several times and pointed the shotgun at an individual in a threatening manner. While making that threat, which is considered felony assault, Ake discharged the weapon accidently shooting Keukalaar. Investigators obtained arrest warrants for Ake this week, charging him with improper exhibition of a rearm, discharging a rearm while under the inuence, aggravated assault with a rearm, aggravated battery with a rearm, tampering with physical evidence and possession of a rearm during the commission of a felony. Ake was arrested and released on a $27,000 bond. year and is to be renewed annually, said county attorney Jeremy Novak. This is a win-win, Commissioner Warren Yeager said. It is a win for North Florida Child Development in getting the lease for $1 per year, and it is a win for taxpayers as it takes the burden off of them for upkeep of the building. Under the lease terms, NFCD, which has been headquartered out of the courthouse for more than a decade, pledges to maintain a certain level of employees in Gulf County. Gaskin approached the BOCC after the county, citing costs, completely abandoned the building in recent months. The county moved the Extension Service and constitutional ofces from the courthouse to the old Health Department Building in Wewahitchka. The county must also abate issues in the back, upper oor and basement of the building, where leaks in walls and mold are problematic. The upper oor courtroom is particularly important for its historic value and is a signicant part of the reason the building is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. Gaskins goal was two-fold; maintain operations in the NFCDs Gulf County home and to save the building.Right to SpeakWith little debate and little in the way of public comment, commissioners moved ahead an ordinance that puts into county law the publics right to participate in public meetings. Until the past year, when the Florida Legislature, after two years of delays, acted, the Florida Sunshine Law pertaining to public meetings did not specically bestow on the public the right to speak. The county ordinance conforms to that new legislation, and Novak said is similar to policies already in place. The public must now be provided an opportunity to speak on board action noticed in the meeting agenda after commissioners and staff have weighed in and discussed the issue. For action that was not noticed on the agenda, the ordinance also provides for public comment before any board vote. An individual will be given three minutes to speak, and additional time can be granted by majority vote of the board. An organization will be allowed ve minutes, but only one member of that organization may speak on the issue. All public comments must be directed to the sitting chairman and not staff, another member of the public or an individual commissioner. Public comments can be profane or vulgar, with commissioners changing initial language that included insulting with abusive on Tuesday. Commissioners also expanded the prohibition against such language toward staff, commissioners or a member of the audience to include the public in total. Commissioner Carmen McLemore voted against any changes, saying he was ne with the attorney draft of the ordinance. The suggestions for changes were all brought forward by Commissioner Joanna Bryan.Closure on the jail?Bryan sought to clarify the recent hubbub about the county jail and address a prepared written statement read by jail administrator Michael Hammond at the previous meeting. Bryan said part of her job as commissioner was to examine all issues pertaining to the budget and that jail discussion was no different. Contrary to statements made by Hammond and her fellow commissioners during prior meetings, Bryan said her intent was not to take jobs away from anybody, but only examine how the county might be able to save money. Saying Hammonds presentation was inappropriate, she said that contrary to his statement there is no law that requires each Florida county to have a jail. She said she would like to take a closer look at the move of probation services in-house to determine the impact of collecting fees and nes on the Clerk of Courts as well as the validity of Hammonds statement that the county is making a prot. She said she was abbergasted that talk of having a jail inspection as an opening for litigation, as suggested by Hammond, and said the Florida Sheriffs Association which has put the BOCC and each commissioner on notice about the lack of a jail inspection the previous two years had the responsibility under law to maintain jail inspections. My examination of the jail was a budget item, Bryan said. I will continue to look at expenses and I may touch on these items again. I will continue to ght for what I think is right for the county. BOCC from page A1 SHooOOTING from page A1 PoORT from page A1 bBUTLER from page A1This is a win-win. It is a win for North Florida Child Development in getting the lease for $1 per year, and it is a win for taxpayers as it takes the burden off of them for upkeep of the building.Warren Yeager Gulf County commissioner

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1SectionBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Artistic minds celebrated another success at Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School last week. Teacher Julie Hodges of cially opened the schools chapter of the National Art Honor Society, an organization that will allow creative students an alternative way to graduate with honors based on artistic pro ciency and merit. Membership in the organization signi es that through effort, positive attitude and sense of dedication in the study of art, these students have made valuable contributions to the school, community and society. By opening a chapter, Hodges will be informed of area art shows and will give the students a larger platform to showcase their work. Im trying to bring things in that bigger schools offer, said Hodges, who will act as the faculty sponsor. Port St. Joe may be a small school, but we have a big talent pool. Hodges said her own high school had an NAHS chapter, and she believes it gave her an outlet to strive toward excelling in art. Hodges handpicked the students who would have the rst opportunity to join based on their passion and talent. This is another way that students who are interested in pursuing art-related careers can build their applications for colleges, Hodges said. Volunteer hours are required for members, Songwriters Fest attracts crowds to areaBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com They came, they saw, they strummed. Over the weekend, 27 Nashville songwriters visited Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach for the annual Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival. Three days of free concerts got locals and visitors up close and personal with the writers who penned No. 1 hits for country stars Faith Hill, Garth Brooks, George Strait, Alan Jackson, Reba McEntire and countless others. The festival kicked off with a sponsors party on Thursday, which took over the Indian Pass boat ramp and welcomed music from several of the performers along with free food and drink. The festival of cially started the next day with a lunchtime jam at Triple Tails Seafood and Raw Bar before expanding to nine venues across Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach. Each event featured four songwriters who performed in a writers round fashion with each writer playing a tune while the others joined in or simply sat back and enjoyed the song. On Saturday, those looking to break into the songwriting industry were treated to a two-hour question and answer workshop with writers Steve Leslie and Will Rambeaux, held at Dockside Seafood and Raw Bar. Despite an afternoon downpour, more than 30 attendees listened to stories, asked questions and learned about how the industry is changing for writers. We had a great turnout, Leslie said. Id say it was the best workshop weve ever done. The event culminated on Sunday at the Indian Pass Raw Bar with an afternoon of By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Vivian Daniels could serve as inspiration for the famous tongue-twister about sea shells and seashores. The 72-year-old resident at Our Home at Beacon Hill has made a name for herself selling creations made from sea shells found on the nearby beach. Daniels collects anything she can nd in the sand and turns the items into works of art. Using shells of all types, she creates owers, turtles, bouquets, picture frames, pencil holders, soap dishes, ower pots and magnets. Vivian collects shells, separates them and creates these amazing things, said Rick Watkins, administrator at the facility. She has an incredible creative ability, To date, Daniels has arranged and put together hundreds of sea shell owers. Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Star. 1) Whats basically a spork with a sharp edge like a knife called? Splade, Spoonsaw, Sporknife, Sploon 2) When were the rst Cadillacs produced that signaled the dawn of the tail n era? 1946, 1948, 1950, 1952 3) What was the Tower Commission established to investigate? Roswell incident, JFK death, Watergate, IranContra Affair 4) In the game of Monopoly there are how many properties that can be built upon? 22, 24, 26, 28 5) What is/was the Atkins diet mainly about watching? Red meat, Sweets, Carbohydrates, Liquids 6) During the original Star Trek series, what color shirt was worn by those most likely to die in an episode? Blue, Orange, Red, Green 7) In the 1950s who came out with his and her cars, the La Comte and La Comtesse? Chrysler, Hudson, Chevrolet, Packard 8) When did Michael Jordan take and make his last shot as a Chicago Bull? 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999 9) What country administers the colony of Gibraltar? USA, Great Britain, Spain, India 10) In medieval times what was commonly rolled in butter and swallowed to combat the plague? Pebble, Cockroach, Snail, Spider 11) Whose quotes included, One may smile, and smile, and be a villain? Shakespeare, Nixon, Aristotle, Mother Teresa 12) The late Johnny Cash said he dressed in black for those who did what? Suffered, Hungered, Worked, Hitchhiked 13) What are the freeroaming dogs found mainly in Australia? Rabbles, Dingos, Froggeries, Warrens 14) The original Phantom of the Opera was set in what city? New York, Paris, London, Rome ANSWERS 1) Splade. 2) 1948. 3) Iran-Contra Affair. 4) 22. 5) Carbohydrates. 6) Red. 7) Chrysler. 8) 1998. 9) Great Britain. 10) Spider. 11) Shakespeare. 12) Suffered. 13) Dingos. 14) Paris. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Vivian Daniels, a resident at Our Home at Beacon Hill, creates art out of shells found on the beach. She sells her art to raise money for additional activities for her fellow residents.WES LOCHER | The Star VIVIAN DANIELSShe sells sea shells near the seashoreBeacon Hill resident turns beach bits into art See SHELLS B5PSJHS establishes National Art Honor Society chapterWES LOCHER | The StarThe following students were invited to join the Port St. Joe chapter of the National Art Honor Society. Bottom, from left: are Abby Loden, Allie Stripling, Ana Paul, Brandon Hall. Second row: Emaly Hanson, Caitlin Godwin, Brooke Curcie. Third row: Kristen Dunham, Maddie Flanagan, Caroline Rish, Christina LaPlante, Kylie Skoda, Laura Sinor. Back row: Alayna Godwin, Jessie Eberhart, Morgan Butts, Janel Kerigan, Ilianna Maestri.See ART B5 Hearing hit after hitDEBBIE HOOPER AT JOEBAY.COMShane Hines, Brooke Eden, Sherrie Austin and Will Rambeaux share a round on Friday night.WES LOCHER | The StarAt the sponsors kickoff party at Indian Pass, the Semper Fi Sisters enjoyed free grub and some country music.See HIT AFTER HIT B5Thursday, October 24, 2013

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B2 | The Star Thursday, October 24, 2013 MeetChrista,abeautifulyoungfoxhound.She walksverywellonaleashandwillsitwitha treat.Christahasbeguncratetrainingtomake thetransitiontohernewhomeeasier.Shegets alongwellwithotherdogsandisveryplayful withkidsandadults. Ifyouareunabletoadoptatthistime, perhapsyoucouldfosterormakeaDonation. AllpetsadoptedfromSJBHSwillbecurrent onvaccinationsandspayed/neutered. Pleasedonothesitatetoemailtownsend.hsdirector@gmail.comor adoptbaystjoe@gmail.comorcalltheSt.JosephBayHumaneSocietyat 850-227-1103andaskforMelodyorDebbie!Applicationsareavailable atwww.sjbhumanesociety.orgWerequireallpotentialadoptersto completeanapplicationform.Adoptionfeesincludeourcostofspay/ neuterandcurrentvaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4pm! Faith'sThriftHutisalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,andallthe proceedsgodirectlytosupporttheanimalsinourcare!Thehours forthestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3pm.Volunteersare alwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandourshelter!Ourstoreandshelter locationis1007TenthStreetinPortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyouallthere soon!Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet,pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyorShelter. FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSocietywww.sjbhumanesociety.org 4514866forONLY$15perweek $60permonth CallToday 227.7847SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHere Star Staff ReportsRegular meeting of American Legion Post 116 to be Oct. 24There will be a regular general meeting of American Legion Post 116 at 4 p.m. ET Thursday, Oct. 24, at VFW Post 10069, on Trout Avenue in Highland View. This will be a general business meeting. All members are urged to attend. Eligibility for membership and benets can be found on the American Legion Website, www.legion.org. We invite all eligible veterans to join our organization. For God and Country. Wewahitchka Womans Club coat drive coming up WednesdayThe GFWC Wewahitchka Womans Club is preparing for a Coats for Kids event for children at Wewahitchka Elementary School on Oct. 30. Their goal is to give each child on the list a gently used coat, blanket, new toboggan and gloves. To donate, call Dianne Semmes at 639-5345. They will also accept gently used jeans, shirts and shoes for these children.The Bridge offers trick-or-treatingSpecial to The StarThe Bridge nursing facility will host a trick-ortreat event from 4:30-5:30 p.m. ET Oct. 31. Residents will be passing out candy to any children who visit. The Bridge is at 220 Ninth St. in Port St. Joe.Christmas Bazaar and Jingle Bell golf tourney offer shopping, sportStar Staff ReportWewahitchka Medical Center and Richs IGA congratulate Tammy and Chris Ward, the September winners of the monthly $50 gas card drawing. Everyone is encouraged to stop by Wewahitchka Medical Center at 255 W. River Road in Wewahitchka to register for the monthly drawing. Sp P Ec C Ial AL To O TT HE STar ARChris Ward, $50 gas card winner, stands with Dave Rich of Richs IGA.Wards are September gas card winners Society BrRIEFsS Society Ourlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoering themtoyouinRealEstatePicks!(Inthissection),DiscoverthebestrealestatevaluesinMexicoBeach, PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas,St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. RealEstate Picks BestValuesontheForgottenCoast SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)227-7847|tgolden@pcnh.comSOLD 850-227-8890/850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com Gulffronttopoor2BD/2BAcondowithpanoramic viewsofthegulf.Largeopenkitchen,livinganddining areawithgreatviews.Thisspaciouscondominium featuresgorgeousheartofpineoors,granitecounter topsthroughout,stainlesskitchenappliancesand10 footceilings.Furnishedandreadyforyou. MLS#249620$650,000St.TeresaBeach DanAusley,Broker www.tlgproperty.com DanAusley,Broker www.tlgproperty.com Star Staff ReportThe St. Joseph Bay Golf Club is proud to host the fourth annual Christmas Bazaar and Jingle Bell Golf Tournament Dec. 13-14. The bazaar will be 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET Dec. 13 and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET Dec. 14. Come by and do all your Christmas shopping in one place. Sale items include all handmade jewelry, water color and oil paintings, pottery, glass items, hand-stitched items, quilts, specialty breads, jams and jellies, hand-dyed clothing, notes cards, holiday decorations and much more. Again this year, fresh produce vendors from the Farmers Market will be present. The vendors table fees will go to the Children Christmas Wishes program by the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce. The Golf Club will be the drop-off site for new toys and money donations to help the Christmas Wishes be a success. The Jingle Bell Golf Tournament will start at noon ET Dec. 14. The tournament format and cost will be announced soon. For more information or to register, call 227-1751. For more information on the bazaar, or to reserve a space for your table, call Barb Van Treese at 227-9837, or the Golf Club.

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The Star| B3Thursday, October 24, 2013 OUR8THANNUALMASQUERADEPARTY SPECIALTHANKSTOOURSPONSORS Ticketsareavailableatourwebsite|www.bowwowbash.org fromtheHumaneSociety,orfromvariousoutletsaroundtown. ForTicketinformation,callBowWowBeachShopat850-229-6161oremail:info@bowwowbash.org Joe&LinusKusch-James&SandiChristy Special to The StarFriday, Oct. 11, was an extraordinary day on the campus of Faith Christian School. There were trucks galore! The Port St. Joe Police Department, Port St. Joe Fire Department, Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce, Florida Highway Patrol, Division of Forestry, Health Department and EMS were all in attendance. Students and parents enjoyed learning about the jobs and equipment of each department, and they learned some safety tips, too. This was an exciting event, and FCS is thankful to all of these departments for helping to keep our children safe. Students get pioneer day lessonsSpecial to The StarMrs. Heather Taylors fourthgrade class at Wewahitchka Elementary School recently enjoyed a reading lesson, On the Banks of Plum Creek by Laura Ingalls Wilder. After discussing the pioneer days and tasting Horehound candies, they made homemade butter and hay-stack treats. Front row from left are Jacob Holmes, Luke Hjort, Lee Holton, Wesley Hunt, Katie Shealy and Matthew Hall. Middle row from left are Destiny Palmer, Bailey Pitts, Dawson Gibbs and Alyssa Cadenhead. Back row from left are Mrs. Taylor, Taylor Roberts, Haley Guffey, Danielle Harrison, Jaiyden Scruggs and Caden Wooten. Not pictured are McKenzie Davis and Kaylee Easter. LEARNING ABOUT ENERGYSPECIAl L TO TT HE STARWewahitchka Elementary School third-grade students in Mrs. Baileys and Mr. Hufts classes have been learning about various forms of energy in science class. Here the students are posing with their smores baked in their solar ovens. Though the partly cloudy skies kept the ovens from reaching their optimum temperatures, the students still enjoyed their treats. SPECIAl L TO TT HE STARThis weeks Dazzling Dolphins at Port St. Joe Elementary School are, front row, Haylen Cannon, Mackenzie Freisleben and Addison Hendricks. Back row: Fisher Vandertulip, MaLena Ramsey, Analisa Treglown, Madelyn Gortemoller and Madison Burkett. DAAZZLINGING DOOLPHINPHINS The Lions Tale School News

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FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) MorningPrayer&HolyCommunion Sunday...............10:00A.M.TheRev.LouLittle,PriestServicesTemporarilyatSeniorCitizensCenter, 120LibraryDrive AnUnchangingFaithInAChangingWorld COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. TOUCHINGLIVES WITHTHELOVE OFJESUS 6pm Thursday, October 24, 2013Special to The StarRevival for Survival 2013New Bethel A.M.E. Church, 146 Ave. C in Port St. Joe, will have a Revival for Survival 2013 at 7 p.m. ET nightly Oct. 23-25. Guest Evangelist will be Bishop Lonnie Mitchell from New Beginnings Assembly of Saints in Panama City. Though I walk in the midst of trouble, You will revive me; You will stretch forth Your hand against the wrath of my enemies, and Your right hand will save me. The Lord will perfect that which concerns me; Your mercy and loving kindness, O Lord, endure forever forsake not the works of Your own hands (Psalms 138:7-8 (Ampli ed Bible). Are you trying to make sense of what is going on today? Are you wondering how will I survive and get through this? Then you dont want to miss this revival. For more information, call Pastor L.E. Gantt at 271-9574.Fall Festival and Touch-A-TruckIts time again for the ninth annual Fall Festival and TouchATruck at Long Avenue Baptist Church. The community is invited for an evening of fun and fellowship to bene t the children and the elderly of Gulf County during the Christmas season. The event will be 5-7 p.m. ET Sunday, Oct. 27, at Long Avenue Baptist Church, 1601 Long Ave. Admission is a bag of nonperishable food. There will be re trucks, police cars and more for kids of all ages to climb on, learn how they work, sound the horns and generally have some fun. The Fall Festival will feature a cake walk, games, hot dogs, a chili cookoff, popcorn, boiled peanuts, fall fun and prizes. For more information or to lend a vehicle, call the church of ce at 229-8691. Star Staff ReportSupt. David Woods of the Port St. Joe Church of God in Christ will celebrate 25 years of ministry during Pastors Appreciation and Wife Celebration Oct. 26-27. The congregation invites the public to come and celebrate this monumental moment in the life of this man of God, his wife, Lady Danielle Woods, and family. The theme is Matured for Kingdom Purpose. But the God of all grace, who hath called us unto his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after that ye have suffered a while, make you perfect, stablish, strengthen, settle you. To him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen (1 Peter 5:10-11, KJV). The celebration begins 6 p.m. ET Saturday at the church with speaker Pastor Wilhelmina Williams from Body of Christ Church. At 4 p.m. ET Sunday, the speaker will be Bishop Titus Deas Jr. from Deliverance Temple Ministries in Hardaway. Jori Josie Rice, infant daughter of B.J. and Jamie Rice, passed away at birth Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013, at Gulf Coast Hospital. She was preceded in death by her maternal grandfather, Oliver C. Bill Besore. She is survived by her sisters Addison and Jada Rice; maternal grandmother, Edna Carol Besore; paternal grandparents, Bill and Joe Ann Rice, Moira and James Funk and many aunts, uncles, and cousins. A private graveside service was held Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, at Holy Hill Cemetery in Port St. Joe, Florida. Jori Josie RiceMrs. Mary Pergiovanni, 95, of Port St. Joe, passed away Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013. Memorial services will be held at 6 p.m. ET today, Oct. 24, 2013, at Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses, 335 Selma St., Port St. Joe Beach, FL 32456. Affordable Funeral Care by Yorkshire is entrusted with the arrangements. Mary PergiovanniSpecial to The StarA team of paranormal investigators confronts the unknown in an exclusive lm at 7 p.m. CT Monday, Oct. 28, at Lifetree Caf. The Lifetree lm features an investigation conducted at a location long associated with unexplained happenings. The lm is part of an hour-long discussion on the plausibility of ghosts and other paranormal phenomena. According to Lifetree Caf representative Mikal Keefer, This is a rare chance to join a paranormal investigation team on an actual case. Well see exactly what happened and hear investigators explain what it means. And well share our own stories of the supernatural. Admission to the 60-minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach, across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint.net.Who do you serve?If youre living a new life in Christ, a new identity will be on hand. You will have the same body, but your actions will be Gods plan. A new life in Christ is what God wants others to see. If youre truly saved, thats the way it will be. Were here to show this life in Christ and not like worldly men. When we do this the world with know, we serve God not sin. Billy Johnson Faith BRIEFS ObituariesWoods to celebrate 25 years of ministryLifetree Caf to investigate ghost hunt Zion Fair family say thanksThe Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church family would like to take this opportunity to express our sincere appreciation for your support of our st Unity Day Observance that was held on Sept. 28. We realize that your inclusion of this event contributed signi cantly to the success of us meeting our goal of bringing the community together under one roof for Christian worship. We want you to know that your kindness did not go unrecognized. Sincerely,The Zion Fair Missionary Baptist Church FamilyRev. Wilson M. Hall, Pastor and First Lady Sister Margaret Hall Card of THANKS Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR SUBMISSIONSSubmit faith news and obituaries to news@star .com. View obituaries and sign guestbooks at www. star .com.

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, October 24, 2013 eGul/FaninCamsGulCoaSateCoeg oayquestsrefeasunftoubendanceAcommunity-widebreakfastand conversationoflocaleconomicimportanceBUSINESSROUNDTABLEFORUM GULFCOAST STATECOLLEGE Itnehipith Tuesday,October29,20138:00am-9:30amEDTGulf/FranklinCampus,GulfCoastStateCollege ForeventdetailsandtoRSVP,pleasevisit: www.gulfcoast.edu/smallbusinessforum Inquiries:850-227-9670 SHELLS from page B1most of which will be completed during school. Upcoming projects include collaborations with the Bridges program, the Gulf County Health Department and celebrations in honor of Veterans Day. Hodges said the new chapter will be recognized in the monthly NAHS newsletter. NAHS was founded in 1978 and specically designed for high school students in grades 9-12. The program is meant to inspire and recognize students who have shown an outstanding ability and interest in art. The group strives to aid members in attaining the highest standards in art scholarship, character and service, and to bring art education to the attention of the school and community. Students gain peer recognition, leadership growth opportunities, college and career preparation, and an unmatched sense of camaraderie. Her regimen includes washing her ndings in a water/bleach mixture, giving them a coat of baby or mineral oil or spraying them with acrylic to prevent the shells from drying out or cracking. Shells have more color than you see at the beach, Daniels said. After you rub a little oil on them, the color bounces out at you. Daniels sells the items out of the activity room at Our Home at Beacon Hill, and prices range from $1 to $10 per item. She then puts the money right back into purchasing additional supplies that can be used for activities at the facility. She believes keeping busy is the key to a longer life. The facility is doing wonderful work, but we need more activities to stay happy and keep the residents moving, Daniels said. I want to inspire the other residents. They can see that I have the determination to move and I can do things. Im 72 years old, and if I can do it, they can, too. Daniels didnt always have the creative urge and said one day as she was walking the beach, the idea simply struck her and couldnt be ignored. From that day on, she collected shells on each visit to the white sands of the Gulf and would work on her art at night after the rest of her family had gone to bed. Though shell art may occupy her days now, Daniels didnt start crafting her creations until she was in her 30s. Prior creative activities included sewing clothes for her kids and teaching kindergarten for eight years at Faith Christian School in Port St. Joe. Daniels family moved to Gulf County when she was in the sixth grade, and she spent her youth in Port St. Joe. She later moved to Alabama in 1982, where she remarried and lived until July of this year. The sea shell seller is proud of her Gulf County heritage and said her father, Emery, had a machine shop on First Street and worked with the paper mill and railroads. Two of her brothers worked in the machine shop, and her brother Jimmy, a former police ofcer, still lives in Jones Homestead with his wife. Daniels mother, Jean, was known in the community as Miss Jeanie. Daniels said Port St. Joe isnt exactly how she remembered it, and she was saddened to see that U.S. Highway 98 had been moved inland. She said the area now occupied by WindMark Beach was where she used to nd the best shells, especially because sea life would often be attracted to bits of asphalt that would fall into the water. I love to walk on the beach and see Gods creations, said Daniels, who spends an hour or more on the beach each day collecting materials. Each ower is a different experiment. Its often a toss-up as to what a shell will become. Most of the time, I have no earthly idea what Im going to do with them. In addition to creating her random works of art, Daniels takes bulk orders and has been busy prepping shellbased Christmas ornaments for the holidays. The goal was never to make money until Daniels decided to help fund more activities for her fellow residents. If those activities come at the cost of Daniels art, shes happy to help. She also praised activities director Tiffany Lee for the slew of Halloween-themed activities in recent weeks that included decorating pumpkins, masks and pennants. Lee also instituted a learn something new program for the facility that included a rst aid class and several sign language classes to help everyone communicate with one of the homes deaf residents. She also has started a walking club and takes the residents out to eat and on shopping trips at least once a month. Daniels just hopes buyers will put her creations on their coffee table or book shelf to add a little bit of nature inside their home. Its not work its a hobby and a pleasure, Daniels said. Its a labor of love. ART from page B1performances and a late-night jam session. It was great fun, and we had a lineup of great people, said Rambeaux, who also helped select the participating artists. I have my regulars in mind, but I also bring in new people and they had such a great response. Whats cool is that listeners get to make a connection with country music. They hear songs that theyve heard on the radio, as well as new songs that theyll start to hear over the next year or two. Case in point was participating songwriter Jessie Rice, who penned the song Cruise, which was recorded and released by the group Florida Georgia Line earlier this year. Though he performed the song at last years festival, Rice was able to play the hit single in his own style for an excited crowd during his set on Friday at The Thirsty Goat. Cruise went on to become the longest-running No. 1 country music song of all time and spent 25 weeks at the top of the Billboard charts. To date, Cruise has sold more than 6 million downloads, the second most ever by a country song. It was awesome playing alongside great musicians and hearing hit after hit, Leslie said. Every year, the bar is raised. Leslie said though songwriters appreciate ballads and the subtleties and nuances found within, more often than not, more time was dedicated to up-tempo songs to keep the energy levels high. He said highlights for him included the kickoff set at Triple Tails, though he also enjoyed his writers round at Toucans. Triple Tails was the best, Leslie said. There were tons of people packed in there, and everyone was exceedingly cordial. Presenting sponsors for the event included Visit Florida and the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association, two organizations with the goal of building and improving tourism in the Sunshine State. Carol Dover, president of the FRL in Tallahassee, actively works to promote tourism in the area, especially since the BP oil spill in 2010. Through funding from Gov. Rick Scott, the FRL was able to sponsor the Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival and the Seafood Festival in Panama City, both of which took place over the weekend. The goal of the FRL is to bring people to the area and ll hotels, which means more visitors dining out, shopping, and supporting the local economy. Port St. Joe is a great city, a hidden gem, Dover said. The FRL marketing team promoted the Blast on the Bay in magazines throughout the panhandle, and Dover commended event organizer Jason Bogan for coordinating the annual festival. Its smart to capitalize on a weekend that could be a dead one, Dover said. The season trails off, and people dont always have a reason to come here. Dover said in past years, Florida was receiving about 82 million visitors a year, but as Scott pushed tourism, there was an increase to 90 million visitors last year. No doubt, some of them are coming to Gulf County, Dover said. Governor Scott has been amazing to tourism. hHItT aAFterTER hHItT from page B1 Brett Jones and Jerry Salley participated in the rst writers round on Friday to a packed patio at The Thirsty Goat.WES LOCHER | The Star

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, October 24, 2013By MELANIE TAYLORExtension Agent II 4-H/Family & Consumer Sciences The fth-graders from Port St. Joe Elementary School participated in the 2013 annual 4-H Ag Adventures Field Day. Ag Adventures is an educational, agricultural awareness program which is held annually at the UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC) in Quincy. It is coordinated by extension agents in the participating counties (Gulf, Calhoun, Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla, and Jefferson) and the NFREC faculty and staff. The program is geared toward elementary school students, and approximately 1,000 students participate each year. Participants learned about pumpkins, soybeans, cotton, soil, corn, and peanuts and their economic importance in our local and national industries. In addition to learning about these commodities and concepts, youth enjoyed fresh boiled peanuts, roasted peanuts, and popcorn popped in a kettle right there in the eld, and more. Students explored the eld crops and a six foot deep soil pit. Leaving on a tractor-pulled-wagon with their own sugar pumpkin inhand, youth were encouraged to bake pumpkin pies and roast the seeds to share with their families. This eld day took youth on an agricultural journey from the seed to the consumer. Many thanks to the NFREC faculty and staff, participating schools, program volunteers, Farm Bureau, and Farm Credit of Northwest Florida for their continued support. The results of the combined contributions of these supporters are manifested in average student learning gains each year. Since 2010, evaluation results have shown that 67 percent (n3,484) of youth participants strongly agree that without agriculture, they would not be able to enjoy products such as popcorn, peanut butter, or denim and 81 percent (n4,212) strongly agreed that the program helped them understand and appreciate how agriculture affects their everyday lives. Additionally, 45 percent (n2,340) of participants reported that they planned on sharing with their parents why agriculture is important. 4-H is a youth development program for youth ages 5-18 that is assisted greatly by adult volunteers. If you are interested in participating as an adult volunteer please contact Melanie Taylor at the Gulf County Extension Of ce. Reach her at 6393200 or metaylor@u .edu. Trades&Services227-7847CALLTODAY! GETYOURADIN! Trades&Services 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction4510158 Star Staff ReportThe University of Florida and its Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences is sponsoring the third annual Beekeepers Field Day and Trade Show Saturday, Nov. 2 at the Washington County Extension Of ce. The of ce is at 1424 Jackson Ave. in Chipley. The Field Day and Trade Show are part of the 2013 Florida State Beekeepers Association meeting in Chipley. The trade show provides educational opportunities through hands-on activities and interaction with expert beekeepers. The event begins at 8:30 a.m. CT with registration. Classes will include Splitting Beehives, Whats the Buzz about Honey and Products of the Hive. There will also be a smoker lighting competition, door prizes and lunch will be served beginning at 12:15 p.m. CT. Registration is $15 per four-person family and $10 for each additional family member; the registration fee includes refreshments and lunch. Those interested in attending should call the Gulf County Extension Ofce at 639-3200 to register no later than Oct. 25. Early registration is encouraged so organizers know how much food to prepare. Fertilizers are manufactured from a wide variety of materials to supply plant nutrients. Once these materials are mixed, it becomes dif cult to distinguish the materials present. In the past, a few unscrupulous manufacturers have taken advantage of this to increase their pro t. To protect consumers and legitimate manufacturers from such practices, The Florida legislature enacted the rst fertilizer law in 1889 and has amended it many times since enactment. These laws regulate the manufacture and sale of fertilizer in the state. The law requires that the manufacturer purchase and af x a label to each bag, package, container, or lot of fertilizer offered for sale in the state. The law requires that each label show speci c information about the analysis and composition of the mixture or material. The key information comes in the guaranteed analysis section of the label. It tells you which of the primary plant nutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium the fertilizer analysis numbers youve probably seen. For example an 8-8-8 fertilizer would be eight percent nitrogen compound, eight percent phosphorus compound and eight percent potassium compound. Theres some other information in this section of the label that may seem even more complicated but its also important. The label tells you how much chlorine the fertilizer can contain. Chlorine can reduce the quality of some vegetable and owers. It tells you what materials the primary plant nutrients are derived from. This can help you determine the quality of the fertilizer. Probably the most dif cult part of the label to read certainly the hardest part to describe is the information listed right after the total nitrogen gure in the guaranteed analysis section. In addition the total amount of nitrogen, the label gives the amount of each of several types of nitrogen present in the fertilizer. This information will seem confusing, but it also tells you a lot about how the fertilizer will work in your soil. Youll see the terms nitrate nitrogen; ammoniacal nitrogen, water soluble organic nitrogen and/or urea nitrogen can be used by plants fairly quickly. You might look for these nitrogen forms in fertilizer for a vegetable garden. But nitrate and water soluble organic nitrogen are rapidly leached out of the soil so they dont last very long. Ammonical and water insoluble nitrogen will stay longer in sandy soils. Fertilizer with a high percentage of natural organic nitrogen is used by the plants slowly over a fairly long period of time. This kind of slow release fertilizer would be good for lawns helping them stay green without causing spurts of extra fast growth. As I am sure you can tell by now, we cant fully explain anything this complicated in one new article. But if you dont remember anything else remember this; almost any fertilizer you buy in Florida is a good one if tit has the ingredients to do the job you want and if the price is fair in terms of the total amount of plant nutrients it contains. For more information on Florida fertilizer label contact the Gulf County Extension Service @ 639-3200 or visit gulf.ifas. u .edu or edis.ifas.u edu and see Publication SL-3/SS170. The Florida fertilizer law ROY LEE CARTERCounty extension directorBeekeepers eld day and trade show coming Nov. 2 Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR ABOVE: Roy Carter, County Extension Director, teaches students about the large number of products we consume and use every day that are made from peanuts or parts of the peanut and plant. LEFT: The students enjoyed the Gatorwagon ride in and out of the eld. Students enjoyed walking through the cotton eld and observing the plants, owers, and cotton bolls. They enjoyed picking the cotton and were able to take it home for a keepsake. PSJ Elementary School students explore Florida agricultureAG ADVENTURES FIELD DAYPHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STARMelanie Taylor, 4-H Agent, taught students about peanuts. Each child was able to dig their own peanut plant and observe the different parts of the plant.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 24, 2013 The Star | B7 92834S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 23-2008-CA -000597 CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC, Plaintiff; vs. JENNIFER LEE CALVARESE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JENNIFER LEE CALVARESE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT K. PITTS A/K/A KEVIN PITTS; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 8th day of October, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23-2008-CA000597, of the Circuit Court of the 14TH Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION is the Plaintiff and JENNIFER LEE CALVARESE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JENNIFER LEE CALVARESE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT K. PITTS A/K/A KEVIN PITTS and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT LOBBY OF THE GULF COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1000 5Th STREET, PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456, 11:00 AM on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, OF BRIDGEPORT WOODMERE PHASE II, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. Dated this 16th day of October, 2013. REBECCA NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Phone: (954) 453-0365 Fax: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-4412438 File No. 08-67523 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@ clegalgroup.com October 24, 31, 2013 95951 PUBLIC NOTICE OF AUCTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ST. JOE RENT-ALL, INC intends to dispose of or offer for sale the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under The Florida Self Storage Facility Act Statues (Section 83.801-83.809). ST. JOE RENT-ALL, INC, will dispose of said property no later than October 26, 2013. Property is located at 706 First Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 the following: Latonya Bailey #33, Misc Furnishings Corey Bowers #43, Misc Furnishings Verline Franklin #55, Misc Furnishings Veronica Johnson #84, Misc Furnishings Shay Foxworth #44, Misc Furnishings October 17, 24, 2013 95821S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1381 Application No. 2013-39 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05793-000R Description of Property: Lot Ten (10), Block 1006, according to the Official map of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, as the same appears on file in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Being same property filed for record in Gulf County, October, 1959, 1:42 P.M. in Deed Book No. 36, Page No. 179, in Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Billy Charles Quinn All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95823S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 100 Application No. 2013-38 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 00517-002R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the NW. Corner of Original Government Lot 4, Section 16, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, and extend a line southerly along the western boundary of said Lot 4, for 420.3 feet; then turn 64 Degrees 21 Minutes left for 793.36 feet; then turn 67 Degrees 28 Minutes right for 542.23 feet, thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 35 feet; thence turn South 310 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, continue the line last above described for 75 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 125 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 75 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 125 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: John Whitehurse & Lori Adams (dec) All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95827S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Florida Tax Lien Assets IV, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1514 Application No. 2013-36 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06319-060R Description of Property: Lot 2, Block C, Marnies Island Preserve, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 22 and 23, and as amended in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Winston Williams All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95825S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1319 Application No. 2013-37 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05015-003R Description of Property: Lot 14, Block 45, of Re-subdivision of Block 45, in Unit Number Three of Saint Josephs Addition of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the Plat as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 34, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: C Q Developments, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95901S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS NO. 1314-02 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in performing the following service: MISCELLANEOUS ROAD REPAIR PROJECT (P.R.I. PROJECT #003.248) This project consists of approximately 715 SY of milling, 80 tons of asphalt overlay, and 960 LF of striping at three locations in Gulf County, Florida. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $25.00 per set and is non-refundable. Check should be made to PREBLE-RISH, INC. If you have any questions, please call Clay Smallwood at (850) 227-7200. All bidders shall be FDOT qualified in the following work classes: Flexible Paving and Hot Plant-Mixed Bituminous Courses. Completion date for this project will be 60 days from the date of bid award. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $100.00 per day. Please indicate on the envelope your COMPANY NAME, BID NUMBER, and that this is a sealed bid for the Miscellaneous Road Repair Project. Submit 1 original and 3 copies of the bid. Bids will be received until 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time, on November 1, 2013 at the Gulf County Clerks Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, and will be opened and read aloud at this same location on November 4, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., Eastern Time. All bids shall remain firm for a period of 60 days after the opening. All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of Gulf County. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ Tynalin Smiley Chairman October 17, 24, 2013 95973S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Case No.: 11-33 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. LITTLE RIVER CAMP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; MATTHEW D. BIRMINGHAM; PAUL W. GROOM, II; WILLIAM J. SMILEY; CLAYTON B. WOOTEN, And SEVEN SPRINGS LAKE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATTION, INC., A Florida not-for-profit corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 10th day of October, 2013, in Case Number 2011-33 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and LITTLE RIVER CAMP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, MATTHEW D. BIRMINGHAM, PAUL W. GROOM, II, WILLIAM J. SMILEY, CLAYTON B. WOOTEN and SEVEN SPRINGS LAKE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. Eastern Time on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lots One (1), Two (2), Six (6), Ten (10), Fourteen (14), Eighteen (18) and Nineteen (19), Block C, SEVEN SPRINGS LAKE SUBDIVISION according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page(s) 17-18 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE POLICIES OF THE GULF COUNTY CLERK OF COURT. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 11th day of October, 2013 REBECCA L. NORRIS, Gulf County Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk Octobre 17, 24, 2013 95975S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23 2011 CA 000074 VS. DIVISION: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF INDYMAC RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGEBACKED TRUST, SERIES 2006-L1, RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGEBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-L1, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTINE MULLININX, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 10, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23 2011 CA 000074 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as trustee of IndyMac Residential Mortgage-Backed Trust, Series 2006-L1, Residential MortgageBacked Certificates, Series 2006-L1, is the Plaintiff and James Coney Mullininx, Christine Mullininx, Gregory J. Scroggs, Jackie P. Scroggs, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 1923.07 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 30, SAID POINT LYING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH WITH A RADIUS OF 2346.20; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AND SAID RIGHT OF WAY FOR 329.02 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 06 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 74 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 328.75; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 392.39 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 394.62 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 107.41 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE EAST 61.01 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 228.21 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 14.00 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 325.96 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 75.56 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 0.25 ACRES MORE OR LESS, SUBJECT TO A 10 FOOT WIDE ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 1923.07 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 30, SAID POINT LYING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH WITH A RADIUS OF 2346.20; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AND SAID RIGHT OF WAY FOR 329.02 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 06 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 74 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 328.75 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 392.39 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 394.62 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 107.41 FEET; THENCE EAST 10.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 106.12 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 10.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 5 FOOT WIDE PEDESTRIAN ACCESS CASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 1923.07 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 30, SAID POINT LYING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH WITH A RADIUS OF 2346.20; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AND SAID RIGHT OF WAY FOR 329.02 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 06 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 74 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 328.75 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 75.56 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN, SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 325.96 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 186.60 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATERLINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID WATERLINE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 5.02 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID WATERLINE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 187.02 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 5.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A APN 3186-060R, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456

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B8| The Star Thursday, October 24, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510160 4514327OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 149B COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 3 OFFICE/KIT/BATH AND WAREHOUSE $ 675.00 PER MONTH/ 675.00 DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 4514326OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 151A COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 12X12 OFFICE, BATH, STORAGE AND LARGE WAREHOUSE $ 550.00 PER MONTH/ 550.0O DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 4510161 4516924 Dockside Seafood & Raw Bar @ PSJ MarinaNOW HIRING EXPERIENCED: Manager Servers/Bussers ShuckersAPPLY 3:00 PM5:00 PM ONLY MON. THRU FRI.steamersdocksideseafood@yahoo.com 4516909AVONThe company for WomenHIRINGFOR THE HOLIDAYS!Part-time or Full-time! Call Ellen850-763-7307 1119195 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:SHIPFITTERS FLUXCORE WELDERS PIPE WELDERS X-RAY WELDERS PIPEFITTERS Competitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace 4516876Annual Fall Auction St. Joe Rent-All 706 1st Street | Port St. Joe Saturday, October 26th 10 am EST Contents of 5 Mini-Storage Buildings Miscellaneous Items Belonging to St. Joe Rent-All Including, but not limited to: Golf Carts Misc. Electronics Lawn Mowers Misc. Rental Equipment Items, (Except Storage Buildings), may be viewed Friday, Oct. 25th, 1 -5 pm EST SalesSales RepsHalifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience.Territories Available In: Panama City Chipley Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business Conducting our solutions based approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. Reviewing the days successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience Bachelors degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEOs Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34269124 Text FL69124 to 56654 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 11th day of October, 2013. BILLKINSAUL Clerk of Circuit Court Gulf County, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com SL-10-55837 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. October 17, 24, 2013 95993S IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 23-2012-CA-000154 Division CENLAR FSB Plaintiff, vs. JON H. PIPPEN A/K/A JON HOWARD PIPPEN, DONNA L. PIPPEN A/K/A DONNA LYNN PIPPEN A/K/A DONNA LYNN LANIER AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on October 8, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida described as: LOT 3, AND THE SOUTH 10.00 FEET OF LOT 2 AND THE NORTH 10.00 FEET OF LOT 4, BLOCK 2 OF BRITTS SUBDIVISION, UNIT 1, WEWAHITCHKA, FLORIDA. AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 14 IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 550 LAKE ALICE PARK DR, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales held in front lobby of courthouse, on November 14, 2013 at 11:00 am ET. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of he us pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 10th day of November, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 24, 31, 2013 96031S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 23-2010-CA-000281 SEC.:__________ CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. HERSHEL DEWAYNE ANDERSON A/K/A HERSHEL D. ANDERSON, et al Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FOR FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGPROPERTY TO: THE ESTATE OF HERSHEL DEWAYNE ANDERSON A/K/A HERSHEL D. ANDERSON, ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: UNKNOWN UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, LIENORS, AND OTHER PARTIES TAKING AN INTEREST UNDER HERSHEL DEWAYNE ANDERSON AKA HERSHEL D. ANDERSON, DECEASED ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: UNKNOWN Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendant(s) are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant(s) as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in GULF County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE (121), OF UNIT NO. NINE (9), ST. JOSEPHS ADDITION TO CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 12 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1908 CYPRESS AVENUE, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, such Morris Hardwick Schneider, LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd, Suite 302A, Tampa, FL 33634 on or before October 14, 2013 and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 3rd day of October, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to access court facilities or participate in a court proceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notice, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; Phone: 850-718-0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800-955-8771; Email: ADARequest@judl4.fl courts.org. October 24, 31, 2013 96055S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23-2010-CA-000508 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. VANCE MCGOUGH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 23, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23-2010CA-000508 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Vance McGough, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: COMMENCE AT A ST. JOSEPH PAPER CO. CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 9 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN N 00 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 57 SECONDS E ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 32 FOR 298.14 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 381-A AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE S 69 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 50 SECONDS W ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE FOR 138.0 FEET; THENCE DEPARTING SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE RUN N 20 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 10 SECONDS W FOR 210.0 FEET; THENCE S 69 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 50 SECONDS W FOR 262.0 FEET; THENCE S 20 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 10 SECONDS E FOR 210.0 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 381-A; THENCE S 69 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 50 SECONDS W ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE FOR 222.40 FEET; THENCE N 00 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 28 SECONDS E FOR 666.74 FEET; THENCE S 89 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 35 SECONDS E FOR 587.44 FEET, SAID POINT BEING IN SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 9 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN S 00 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 57 SECONDS W FOR 438.02 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 381-A; THENCE S 69 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 50 SECONDS W ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE FOR 6.98 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 32 AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL CONTAINS 6.18 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, LESS ONE ACRE DEEDED TO GRADY FRANKLIN. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MOBILE HOME ATTACHED TO AND MADE AN APPURTENANCE THERETO BEARING VIN NUMBER 0110682122607A AND 0110682122607B. A/K/A 901 COUNTY ROAD 381A, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465-5756 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 16th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 Fax: (813) 221-9171 eService: servealaw albertellilaw.com If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. 0. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. 96105S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider adoption of the following Ordinance Amendment with the following title: AN ORDINANCE OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; WHEREBY AMENDING GULF COUNTY ORDINANCE NO. 97-02 TITLED IN PART ALLOWING FOR VEHICULAR TRAFFIC ON CERTAIN COASTAL BEACHES WITHIN GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; SPECIFICALLY AMENDING THE ORDINANCE PROVISION PROVIDING FOR A PERMIT FEE; PROVIDING FOR REPEALER, SEVERABILITY, MODIFICATIONS THAT MAY ARISE FROM CONSIDERATION AT PUBLIC HEARING; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. *Complete Ordinances on file in the Clerks Office* A public reading, introduction and public hearing will be held during the Gulf County Board of County Commissioners Regular Meeting on Tuesday, November 12th at 9:00 a.m. est. in the County Commissioners meeting room in the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex, Port St. Joe, Florida. All interested persons may appear and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decisions made by the Gulf County Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, he/she will need a record of the proceedings and that for such purpose he/she may need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceedings made and which would include any evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. A copy of the proposed Ordinance is available for inspection on weekdays between the hours of 9:00 a.m. est., and 5:00 p.m. est. at the Office of the Clerk of Court, Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 C.G. Costin, Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: TYNALIN SMILEY, CHAIRMAN October 24, 2013 ADOPTION: Affectionate Financially Secure College Sweethearts await your baby. Carolyn & Chris 1-800-552-0045 Expenses Pd FLBar42311 Cue FurnitureStart your Christmas layaway now! Pickup as late as December 23rd. New mattresses: Twin sets, $99; Full sets, $139; Queen sets, $199. Quality used furniture. 1425 Hwy 71 S. Wewa. 850-639-2343 Text FL68236 to 56654 Furniture & Appliances: 52 in. RCA TV & VCR, Sofa and Love Seat, Dining Set w/ 4 chairs, Antique Dresser, Metal Desk. Too much to List, items are in storage and there is plenty more! 850-648-5844 txt FL69838 to 56654 Mexico Beach 42nd street Hwy 98 to 42nd St-watch for signs Oct. 26th 9 est-8 cstClassic yard saleAntiques, wicker, household, furniture, toys, decor, baby items, 3 families Text FL69840 to 56654 Port St. Joe, 608 17th St. next to 16th St.Park Sat. 10/26 7am ESTInside Moving SaleRain or Shine Everything Must G o Text FL69807 to 56654 GUN SHOW Panama City FAIRGROUNDSOctober 26th & 27th SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-4 FREE PARKING Info. (407) 275-7233 floridagunshows.com Text FL62159 to 56654 Admin/ClericalJOB NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following position:Police Department Part Time Administrative AssistantPlease submit an application to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website: cityofportstjoe.com If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The position will close on November 8, 2013. Beginning salary is $10 per hour and does not include benefits. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. Web ID#: 34269815 Text FL69815 to 56654 Install/Maint/RepairMediacomCommunicationsThe 7th largest cable company in the United States and covering over 23 states, has an immediate opening in Mexico Beach, FL for:ENTRY LEVEL INST ALLER No technical experience necessary. Performs installs for cable and high speed internet. Must have a valid drivers license. Mediacom offers competitive pay and great benefits along with advancement opportunities. For immediate consideration, visit our website at: www .mediacomcable.com/c areers Refer to Job 6169. Mediacom is an Equal Opportunity Employer Web ID#: 34268916 Text FL68916 to 56654 LogisticsJOB NOTICEThe Gulf County Sheriffs Office is accepting applications for two Part Time Dispatchers. Applications and a complete job description are available at the Gulf County Sheriffs Office or at www .gulfcounty fl.gov Application deadline is Friday, 11/01/13 5:00 pm EST. For more information, please contact Lt. Chris Buchanan at 850-227-1115. Gulf County Sheriffs Office enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer. Web ID#: 34269145 Part Time Nursery AssistantFUMC is seeking a PT Nursery Assistant to care for children ages 0-5 during Sunday School, Sunday Worship Services and other church events as required. Please submit a resume, contact information, at least 2 references and a cover letter to: fumcp sj@gtcom.net Attention Nursery Position. Or P.O. Box 266, Port St. Joe, FL32547. Attn: Bobbi Lassiter. Web ID#: 34268269 Text FL68269 to 56654 Security/Prot. Serv.JOB NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following position:Full Time Police OfficerPlease submit an application to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website: cityofportstjoe.com If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The position will close on November 1, 2013. The entry level salary for a Police Officer will be $15.50 per hour not including benefits. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. Web ID#: 34269010 Text FL69010 to 56654 2 bedroom unfurnisted Apt. Dogwood Terrace Apts; 808 Woodward Ave, PSJ 850-227-7800 Efficiency Apartment1 br efficiency apartment in PSJ, located in town off of Main St. All utilities included. $150/week or $550/month + $150 sec. deposit. 850-229-2706. Text FL69819 to 56654 Mexico Beach 2 Story duplex, bottom unit avail. 1/2 block off beach. Comp furn, 2br/1ba, $900/mo., util incl. 1st & last, min. 6 mo lease, small pets ok. (229) 322-5652. 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath. Florida room in back Large yard. 3 blocks to the beach. 339 Selma St. $700 month. First/Last/ Security Deposit. Call 850-348-7774 Text FL69133 to 56654 3 bedroom house for rent; 417 Iola Street Port St. Joe, FL; Call 850-227-7800 Quality Long Term RentalsMexico Beach Call for more info 850-348-0262 WEWASmall cottage, great for 1 to 2 people. $390 per month + $390 security deposit. 850-639-5721 ******************* Small RV. $125 per wk. Includes Water Sewer, Elec, & Wi-Fi. Good for 1 person. 850-639-5721 Text FL66108 to 56654 Large 3 Br, 2 Bath with kitchen, living, dining, family room. New hardwood floors, heat pump, water system, washer & dryer. Riverview from front porch, park and boat ramp at the end of the road. W/S/G included. No pets. $700 per month. Call 352-232-5752 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. Creamers Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Biker Consignment From bike parts to clothing, & anything to do w/ Bikers! Open Tue -Sat. 2001 Wilson Ave. P.C. 850-763-9009 Caregiver -Day/Night. PSJ/PSJ Beach/Wewa 20 years experience. References Available. Call 850-227-4578 Text FL69321 to 56654 Legion Fence Co. Wood Prvcy Vinyl & Almnm. Fence/Deck. Free Estimate 250-8275 Text FL68179 to 56654