The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date:
August 17, 2006
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:00914


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



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PK Ii~ LIB FL
PO EIx 117007
G ,1! ': -iL L E 3 2 611


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR OVER 68 YEARS
68th Year, Number 43 Port St. Joe, FL 3 Sections 36 Pages


U5048-
USPS 518-880


Ernest Hand 1 B


August 17, 2006


Heat
By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
Amy and Brad Johnston and their
three young children were sound asleep at
3 a.m. on Aug. 2, when their 2000 Ford F-
150 truck spontaneously caught fire on the
outside driveway.
Fortunately, the Johnston's faithful
pooches, Labrador Ralph and Lab mix,
Bailey, roused by a soft popping noise and
the smell of smoke, woke from their slum-
ber on Amy and Brad's bedroom floor and
sounded a canine alarm.
Amy Johnston rose from bed and saw
a soft orange glow. At first, she wondered if
she'd failed to snuff out a candle the night
before.
Then she took a few more steps.
"By the time I got out to the living
room, the driveway was up in flames," Amy
recalled.
The truck had last been driven by Brad
Johnston, who ignored his wife's prefer-
ence for the garage and parked the truck
on the driveway at 6 p.m. the previous
evening.
What happened next can be gleaned
from a Ford recall notice issued the follow-
ing day, which identified a "rare interaction
between the speed control deactivation
switch and the brake system that could
cause the switch to overheat and ultimately
catch fire."
It did not matter that the Johnstons
never used their cruise control, the internal
defect still reared its ugly head.
When the Johnstons emerged from
their home that morning, they found the
truck's hood incinerated and the engine in
flames.
"If it would've been in the garage. iwe
probably would've lost our home." said
Amy


Awaiting help from the St. Joe Beach
volunteerr Fire Department. located two
blocks away, Brad grabbed a water hose
and began spraying.
The fire fighters completed the job. and
the Johnstons surveyed the wreckage.
The truck's front end was charred
beyond recognition and the inside dash was
a pile of ash. The rubber from the front tires
on the sidewalk.
Also sustaining injuries were the vnIyl si
which warped from the intense heat, and tI
loquat tree. which Amy had recently relocated
"I moved it to the front and pretty much


of


the


Night


Amy and Brad Johnston's Ford F-150 truck as it looked after an engine fire destroyed it in the
wee hours of the morning on August 2. The Johnstons' loquat tree, at right, was also a causality
of the blaze.


"By the time I got out to the

living room, the driveway was up

in flames."
Amy Johnston

melted and hardened lamented Amy.
That 'morning. Amy called Ford Motor Company to report the
ding above dite garage, blaze and was told she'd be getting a recall notice in the mail.
he Johnstons' beloved The Aug. 3 safety recall supplements an earlier recall issued
J from the backyard.
gave it a death wish." (See FLAMES on Page 6A)


I C--I~- ~ ~ __I~ -~ -_ I I 1I


Remembering Oscar Redd


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
A sacred place.
That's how principal Pam Lister described
the spot in front of the new wing at Wewahitchka
Middle School where a plaque honoring one of


the school's most passionate advocates now
sits.
During ceremonies on Tuesday afternoon.
that plaque, emblazoned with the image of
Oscar D. Redd, Sr., and marked by his favorite
phrase upon entering any room "All Rise"


- was unveiled before family, friends, students
and local officials.
Redd, who served 23 years on the Gulf
County School Board. passed away due to com-
plications from lung cancer uin June 2005. The
ceremony on Tuesday underscored the legacy
of this small man of immense heart.
Lister. before removing the sheet covering
the plaque. noted that five years ago the pro-


ponents for creating a separate middle school
in Wewabitchbka comprised a loose coalition of
the willing.
Redd was their champion in his role as
liaison to the School Board.
"He was here for almost every meeting."
Lister said. "He was right there every step see-
ing this school come to fruition.
(See REDD DEDICATION on Page 7A)


Changes in Store for Scallop Festival


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
Port St. -Joe's annual Scallop Festival will
get a makeover this year. with a new date.
new location and new promotions team com-
mitted to making the 2006 festival bigger and
better than its previous incarnations.
Normally held on Labor Day weekend,
the three-day festival will begin a week earlier
this year. on Aug. 25 at its new location in the
Village at Marina Cove.
To expand the festival's offerings, the
Gulf County' Chamber of Commerce has
enlisted the aid of Hilltop Productions, a firm
that organizes more than 40 events annually
throughout the South.
Hilltop has corralled a long list of ven-
dors, including fine artists from a variety. of
mediums such as sculpture, oil. watercolor.
pottery, hand-blown glass and metal works.
A Patron's Art Preview Party, a festival
first, will begin Friday. August 25 from 6-8
p.m. under a tent at the Village at Marina


Cove.
The Caribbean-themed party will fea-
ture hors d'oeuvres, wine and beer. and live
entertainment from the Coconut Steel Drum
Band.
On Saturday and Sunday. the gates open
at 10 a.m.. and festival goers can peruse the
arts and crafts booths and enjoy music from
a roster of bands versed in genres such as
Southern rock. jazz, reggae and folk.
The Kid's Zone will entertain the kiddies
with pony and train rides, rock climbing and
moon jumps.
This year's food offerings will be larger
than ever before, with vendors selling ham-
burgers, seafood baskets, chicken, pork. fun-
nel cakes, deep-fried desserts, and of course.
scallops.
Tickets for the Patron's Art Preview Party
are on sale now for 830 per person and S200
for a table of 10. For tickets or other infor-
mation. contact the Gulf County Chamber of
Conunmmerce. 18501 227-1223.


i. ors Football Previews ......................... 11A Showing Accents
A St. Joe City ............................. 2A Mexico Beach Ad
BPort St. Joe City ............................. 2A Mexico Beach Ad


moo.. v. I. B


INDEX
Opn.as4A Comm unilI yCleudaL.......6


ministrator ............ IB Leters to the Editor ...-.5 Things To Do & See_ 7B


A Freedom
New', Paper

Business Houn:
8:00 am 5:00 pm
Real Estale Advertising Deadline
Thursday 11:00 am'
Display Advertising Deadline
: Friday' tlO0 am
Classified Advertising Deadline
Monday 5:00 pm
872- 278


School Board






Navigate the Coast
wwn.emeraldcoasl.com


................................. 3A


Classified Line Ads
Deadline Monday
Spm ET 4pm CT

747-5020


Mexico Beach City Council .............. 3A


Y 'E"h tU Star


or- or ,. hometown, paper
deliver-ed to your home!


Sporls ... -..i-I
wealbe[ L iA

Announemenhi......2.B

Sodely News- 3

--4B

Chlll (hNews.. .. -5B


Ldw Enforteenl t ----8B

School News 10B
Ledals 7C
Tiddes & Servies__ _8C

Classilieds..__ 910C


Tracking Sexual

Offenders Easier After

Jessica Lunsford Act
By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
The tragic kidnapping, rape and murder of
9-year-old Homosassa resident Jessica Marie
Lunsford last year resulted. in the passing
of landmark legislation aimed at strengthen-
ing the punishment and monitoring of sexual
offenders and predators.
House Bill 1877, known as the Jessica
Lunsford Act, was signed into law by Governor
Jeb Bush on May 2, 2005 and provides a life
felony (and minimum 25-year sentence) for an
offender 18 years of age or older who commit-
ted lewd or lascivious molestation against a
victim younger than age 12.
Several other provisions are designed to
help local law enforcement agencies more effec-
tively identify sexual offenders and predators in
their communities.
A year after the passing of the Jessica
Lunsford Act, elected officials in Wewahitchka,
Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach have taken steps
to further ensure their communities' safety.
Ordinances now prohibit convicted, sexual
offenders and predators who commit crimes
against children under the age of 16 from living
within 2,500 feet from schools, bus stops, day
care centers, parks, playgrounds or other areas
where children congregate.
Persons who were minors when the sexual
offense was committed or sexual offenders/
predators who already live within the desig-
nated area are not affected by the ordinance.
Florida Statutes currently prohibit sexual
offenders'predators whose victims were under
age 16 and who were convicted on or after
October 1, 2004 from residing within 1,000
feet from any school, day care center, park, or
playground.
The Wewahitchka city commission was the
first to enact a sexual predator ordinance this
April. taking its cue fronim Bay Count munici-
palities with existing ordinances.
Port St. Joe and Mexico Beach officials fol-
lowed suit. adopting ordinances with similar
provisions.
But despite their best efforts, the county's
leadership cannot entirely eradicate the threat
posed by sexual offenders. At pres6ntL 28 reg-
istered sex offenders reside in Gulf County.
Since the passing of the Jessica Lunsford
Act. local law enforcement officers cahminett'er
keep track of these individuals' 'whereabouts
thanks to increased sexual predator 'offender

(See TRACKING PREDATORS on Page 8A)


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City Commission Still Dealing with Water-Related Issues


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
Water is still percolat-
ing through city meetings,
as the city commissioners
during their bi-monthly regu-
lar meeting on Tuesday, once
again addressed two wet
issues concerning city water.
The problem of inade-
quate to almost non-existent
drainage on Sunset Circle,
near the old Gulf Pines
Hospital site, is causing
concern for residents, one
household in particular.
Drainage problems there
have caused the yard of one
house to begin caving in, with
the house also in danger.
According to city com-
missioner Benny Roberts,
who addressed commission-
ers, city public works offi-
cials and engineers, years
ago when the houses on


Sunset Circle were built,
the city commission told
the home builders that city
drainage pipes and sewer
lines ran directly under their
proposed houses.
Everyone wanting to
build there said there would
be no problem.
Now, as the old system
is caving in and unable to
handle heavier loads from
storms and drainage use,
current home owners are
dealing with the problems.
After considerable dis-
cussion among themselves
and the audience, commis-
sioners passed a motion
unanimously to proceed with
a Preble-Rish engineering
proposal for Sunset Circle
and the surrounding area
storm drainage system.
According to city man-
ager Lee Vincent, commis-


sioners can use money from
this year's budget to begin
working on the problem.
In a different type of
water issue, residents of
White City presented the
commission with a petition
of 150 signatures from White
City residents, complaining
of the "boil water" notifica-
tion method currently used
by the city.
According to the group's
spokesperson, the city,
which supplies White City's
drinking water, does not do
enough to notify that area's
residents when the water is
unfit to drink.
Vincent stated that the
city had just entered into
a contract with a company
to build the city's data base
of city-supplied water users,
including those in Highland
View, White City, and the


Beaches areas, in order to
initiate prompt, comprehen-
sive "boil water" warnings
that will reach residents
more quickly and more con-
sistently.
Current city protocol
calls for the waterworks per-
sonnel to place "boil water"
notices in the Panama City
News Herald, and place
notices on local access tele-
vision channels and on local
radio stations.
A motion was passed
5-0 to send city employees
door to door in the commu-
nity and to drive through the
White City streets notifying
everyone by bull horn when-
ever a "boil water" notice is
issued.
The city will also look
immediately into purchasing
an additional lighted sign to
use for all types of com-


munity messages, including
"boil water" notices.
In other business taken
up Tuesday evening:
Sealed bids were opened
for two projects, one for the
parking lot at Fourth Street
and Williams, the other for
roofing two buildings at
Washington High School.
The commission passed
motions unanimously in
both cases to go with the
lowest and best bids, after a
review of the figures.
The issue of rezoning a
single residence or a portion
of the Millview neighborhood
in north Port St. Joe was
left unresolved after resident
Deborah Ward, who began
the drive for rezoning, was
unhappy with the commis-
sioners' decision.
City commissioner
Rachel Crews offered to


once more hold a meeting
in the neighborhood to try to
resolve the issue, and further
action was tabled pending
the attempt by Crews.
In keeping with Senate
Bill 360, governing city and
county comprehensive plans
statewide, Vincent asked for
a motion to allow Vincent and
city attorney Russell Scholz
to meet with county adminis-
trator Don Butler and county
attorney Tim McFarland to
draft an interlocal agreement
with a checklist for future
annexations.
According to Vincent, the
checklist will cover every-
thing from storm water
issues to water and sewer
requirements to transporta-
tion, "enabling us to proceed
forward with a spirit of coop-
eration."
The motion was passed
5-0.


NRA Joins St. George Hunting Fight


By Dale Kingon
Times Staff Writer

Those fightingfor hunting
rights on Little St. George
Island picked up a powerful
ally last week when Marion
Hammer, former National
Rife Association president,
fired off a sharp letter to
the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.
In March county
commissioners sounded
off their complaints about
hunting, or the lack of it,
provided by two government
agencies in the county. The
complaints against the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service
and DEP accused them of'
mismanaging land locals
were accustomed to hunting


The commissioners
accused Seth Blitch, manager
of the Apalachicola National
Estuarine Research Reserve
(ANERR), of leaving the
public out of the loop when it
came to hunting regulations
that apply to Little St. George'
Island.
Hunters like Bobby Miller
want to be able to dove hunt
on the island like they have
done for many years. But
because it is now managed
by DEP they are no longer
allowed to do so.
"We only want to hunt
for a short period of time
during the year, 45 days,"
said Miller.
The island comes under
Blitch's purview because it is


part of the Coastal Aquatic
Managed Areas, a DEP agency
responsible for running
all lands that are above
the mean high water line
adjacent to aquatic preserves
and natural barrier islands.
"Woody Miley promised
us that when CAMA took over,
Little St. George, we would
be able to continue hunting,"
said Commissioner Jimmy
Mosconis at the March
meeting. Blitch took over
from Miley in March 2003.
Miley served as ANERR
manager for 22 years before
retiring.
Little St. George Island
was purchased in 1977
under the Environmentally
Endangered Lands program
to protect it from development


and to contribute to the
protection of Apalachicola
Bay.
Blitch agreed that he had
heard the same statements
from people in his office and
as well as the public. "I
started working for CAMA
in 2003 and had nothing to
do with the letter that Miley
wrote concerning hunting on
the island," he said.
Blitch advised both the
commission and the public
to apply for an exception
to the prohibited activity of
hunting on Little St. George,
as state law allows.
"No one has ever applied
to have an exception made
to a prohibited activity on


Marion Hammer
any CAMA land," said Nikki
Pocock press secretary for
FDEP
The county continued to
pursue the issue and had
county attorney, Michael
Shuler, write more letters and
express interest in allowing


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hunting on the island.
At the beginning of August
Seth Blitch met with other
DEP officials in Tallahassee
to discuss the possibility of
allowing hunting on Little St.
George Island.
Some area hunters like
Miller heard that a decision
had been reached to not allow
hunting, though reports from
DEP press secretaries say no
decision was made at the
time.
In an effort to turn up the
pressure on DER Miller sent
a letter to the NRA informing
them of the situation in
Franklin County.
Hammer, who currently
serves on the board of
directors for the NRA,
responded by mailing
a, letter to DEP Secretary
Colleen Castille, and
copying it to everyone from
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
staff and Governor Jeb Bush.
Hammer has served as the
executive director of the
Unified Sportsman of Florida,
for the past 22 years.
"What on Earth is
Bob Ballard (DEP deputy
secretary) doing fighting
Franklin County sportsmen,
the Franklin County
Commission and FWC?"
said Hammer in her letter.
"Ballard apparently is telling
people that the Governor and
the Cabinet have authority
to ban guns and hunting
and that he is acting under
their authority and on their
behalf."
Hammer challenged
Castille by saying she
doesn't believe Bush, Florida
Department of Agriculture
Commissioner Charlie
Bronson, Florida Attorney
General Charlie Crist and
Florida Chief Financial
Officer Tom Gallagher want
to ban guns and hunting
anywhere, especially during
an election year.
Hammer's closing bears
the weight of the NRA. "We
need to get this fixed right
away. We don't need a
big war between DEP and
Franklin County hunters and
sportsmen," she said.
Whether directly in
response to Hammer's letter
or from the growing support
around the county for
hunting on the island, DEP
has decided to organize a
public workshop to address
the issue.
The department will
hold a public workshop in
five to six weeks, "in order to
make a balanced decision on
hunting on the island," said
Anthony De Luise, a DEP
spokesman.
If DEP reverses its policy
and allows hunting, it will
leave the door open for further
requests to allow hunting on
the land it manages.
In response to questions
about DEP potentially
relinquishing control of the
island to another agency that
does allow hunting, De Luise
said, "DEP will evaluate all
of its options before making
a decision."


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Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years











Change of City Staff, Parking Issues Top Agenda for Mexico Beach


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
Even though it was the
last item of business discussed
at the monthly city council
meeting, the appointment of
an interim city administrator
was of utmost importance last
Tuesday in Mexico Beach.
Mayor Al Cathey made
a motion to the council to
appoint Mexico Beach Director
of Public Safety Brad Hall as
interim city administrator.
Stating "the city employ-
ees desperately need some-
one they recognize and can
go to for their needs. We can-
not continue to have no sense
of direction for our employ-
ees and our citizens," Cathey
asked that Hall's appointment
be made effective that night.
Cathey also recommended
that Mexico Beach police cap-
tain John Murnan become act-
ing Director of Public Safety,
and that as soon as a new
city administrator was hired,
both Hall and Murnan would
resume their respective jobs in
public safety.
All the motions passed
unanimously.
An ordinance was passed
putting a 48-hour time limit
on parking on all right-of-ways
within the city.
Aimed at stopping people
from parking cars for sale on


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
Bill Carr is the Gulf
County school system's
assistant superintendent,
but lately he's been playing
border patrol after a number
of Franklin County students
enrolled in Port St. Joe
.public schools without the
Gulf County School Board's
authorization.
At a workshop held
prior to Tuesday's regular
School Board meeting,
Superintendent Tim Wilder


the city right-of-ways, especial-
ly along U.S. 98, the ordinance
authorizes the city to tow any
vehicle left on the right-of-way,
for any reason, more than 48
hours.
The ordinance also autho-
rized towing of any vehicle that
blocks any entrance or exit to
any city street.
Another parking issue
involved a convoluted process
of permits, variances, citizens'
complaints, and previous
administrative decisions that
seemed to contradict current
ordinances governing com-
mercial versus residential use
in neighborhoods.
Under former mayor
Chuck Risinger's adminis-
tration, along with decisions
by former city administrator
Henry Flack, Mexico Beach
businessman Paul Francis,
owner of Toucan's Restaurant
on U.S. 98, was given permits
to clear land and construct
commercial parking lots for
his restaurant in the residen-
tial neighborhood on the north
side of U.S. 98, along 8th
Street, Oleander and Fortner.
Several .citizens, whose
properties fronted the parking
lots, addressed the council,
describing their objections to
the permitted activities.
One property owner cited
several city ordinances that


briefed the board on Carr's
ongoing efforts to identify and
disenroll Franklin County
students currently in the
school system.
Wilder and School Board
members were made aware
of the problem by repeated
phone calls from concerned
parents.
Clark is currently
investigating eight students,
most of whom are registered
at Port St. Joe Elementary
School, and has been making
phone calls, conducting home


would each require a vari-
ance if Francis were allowed
to complete the work on the
parking lots, one of which has
been in operation for several
months.
In pointing out the ordi-
nances prohibiting the park-
ing lot, the resident asked the
council, "So the residents have
no rights? The people here
want everybody to be treated
the same."
Cathey reiterated several
times that "we must recognize
that the city had a hand in
what's been invested and done
up to this point," referring
to Risinger and Flack's prior
actions.
After several minutes of
discussion among all involved,
Cathey recommended that
Francis bring more detailed
plans of the proposed park-
ing lots and landscaping to a
Planning and Zoning Board
special meeting on August 22
at 4 p.m. C.T.
In other business:
Two representatives of
the Florida City and County
Management Association's
Range Rider Program
addressed the council, offer-
ing their free services to help
Mexico Beach find a new city
manager.
As one representative
described the program, "it


visits and checking tax rolls
to ensure that the students'
enrollment information is
accurate.
According to Wilder, a
Franklin County student can
legitimately enter the Gulf
County school system if he or
she meets one of the following
requirements:
if the Franklin County
School Board approves the
transfer and the Gulf County
School Board agrees to accept

(See COUNTY TRANSFERS on Page 7A)


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The other representative
likened Mexico Beach to the
town of Kissimmee, where he
was city manager when Disney
World moved next door.
"You're sitting on a powder
keg here," he told the council.
"You're going to need someone
professional for sure."
Cathey appointed coun-
cil member Jack Mullen to
act as liaison between the city
council and the Range Riders
Program.-
According to the associa-
tion website, Range Riders are
retired managers with exten-
sive experience in the pub-
lic management field, offering
free professional advice, coun-
seling and guidance to Florida
cities and counties and their
managers.
The service is available
to communities and counties
seeking: information on how
professional management can
assist local government, guid-
ance in advertising, screening
and securing professionals to
fill vacancies, and to adopt
or retain the council-manager
plan.
According to the repre-
sentatives at the meeting, they
also assisted the city of Port
St. Joe in hiring current city
manager Lee Vincent.
A lengthy discussion
took place between council
members and citizens, with
no action taken, on the merits
of employee contracts versus
letters of employment for city
clerk and director of public
safety positions.
Chris Forehand, vice
president of Preble-Rish
Engineers, reviewed the city's
ongoing engineering projects,
including the FEMA-approved
emergency beach berm,
the Florida Department of
Transportation (FDOT) side-


walk master plan, and a waste-
water capacity analysis.
The beach berm work,
including the relocation of
some of the berms as ordered
by the state after permits had
been issued, is almost com-
plete.
Forehand gave an estimate
of $550,000 to construct a
three-mile, five-foot wide con-
crete sidewalk along U.S.98,
in contrast to the previously
estimated $600,000-per-mile
bike path, originally proposed
by Mary Ann Koos, bicycle
and pedestrian coordinator
for FDOT.
According to city council
member Robert Ginsberg, the
project is ranked eighth for
projects in Bay County, and
108th in the state.
"We've finally gotten some


recognition that we're part of
Bay County," said Ginsberg,
"so we might get some fund-
ing."
Forehand told the council
he had requested additional
wastewater capacity from Bay
County and was still work-
ing on the analysis figures
from the county to finish his
report.
He then reminded the
council to reserve funds in the
upcoming budget for capital
improvements if the city want-
ed Preble-Rish to do anything.
"We can give you estimates and
a list of priorities," Forehand
told the council.
"Our enterprise funs are
somewhat depleted," respond-
ed Cathey. "We're looking at
not doing much until we get
our feet back under us."


JA~~'51 0 &vv.'. '


School Board Investigates


Unauthorized Franklin County Transfers


an youtell


I'm wearing Invisalign?


ST. JOE BEACH


Beautiful executive home in move-in condition that is situated on a magnificently landscaped lawn.
Located just blocks from the sugary white sand beaches of St. Joe Beach in the Seashores community, this
3 bedroom, 3.bath home is the perfect place to come home and relax in. Wi\th a 16 X 36 enclosed pool
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and out. It is truly a must-see. This is a perfect place to move you and your family:, It is very convenient
to both the beaches and downtown Port St. Joe. For more information call Jim Cook, 850-227-2290.
MLS # 201661 $519,000


ST. JAMES BAY
















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that could be used as a 4th bedroom. All the bells and whistles are included in this property. This brand
new beautifully constructed home is situated on the 18 hole Audubon rated golf course, St. James Bay ,
Golf Community. This community includes a community pool, fishing pier, and bay access with a full
course restaurant as well. Jenn Air stainless appliances, impact windows, whirlpool multi-jet Jicuzzi with
heater,. 31/4" Cherry wood floors, custom designed open view Cherry stairway, gas fireplace. granitc
countertops 6& cherry cabinetry are a sample of the upgraded amenities. For more on this luxurious
property please call Jim Cook 850-227-2290. MLS #200732 $890,000




*- T.. ', LT



PORT ST. JOE OFFICE, 317 Monument Avenue
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456
1.877.827.8751 OR 850.229.1700
wwnew beautifw.lly constructed home is situated on the 18 hoe Audubon rated golf course, St. James Bay








w w w stijo eb ay. c o rn


TheStr, or S. JeFL- Turda, Agut 7, 00 -3A


F-zfryhlizhpcl 7937 Servina Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


t


"I'11










7$


4A The Star. Port St. Joe. FL Thursday. Auaust 17, 2006


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Closer to


County commissioners deserve kudos for
the progress made thus far in the budget.
But before public hearings and final
votes close the cover on the document for
2006-07, there is distance to be covered
before reaching a spot closer to where we
believe the finish line to be.
In three crucial areas commissioners
have whiffed. They still have time for a few
more swings.
Spending
For all the discussion about shaving
$7 million from the tentative budget, the
reality is that commissioners pretty much
left things as they were save for an extra
$200,000.
Keep in mind, if the budget remains as
is through final public hearings, commis-
sioners will be spending more than one and
a half times what the county spent just six
years ago.
Given that the permanent population
has remained relatively flat during that same
period, according to the U.S. Census, and
that services have hardly ballooned, it is fair
to wonder just where all the money is going.
And one would not have to pull a muscle
to suggest that the past few weeks of long
workshop nights and moving of numbers
was little more than a rerun of the budget
dramas of previous years, albeit more costly,
in terms of man hours and overtime, for
taxpayers.
Department heads and county officers
pour money into the budget through their
requests; commissioners follow with a plug,
though allowing enough to dribble through.
Whether intended as a public politi-
cal show or a demonstration on how the
county's board of directors (commissioners)
is failed each year by upper management, it
is a process which instills scant confidence.
And beneath the bottom line is the fact
that so much outrage and dissent has flowed
from the public the past year about a budget
tied to what many contend are unsustain-
able spending levels.
An MBA is not required to understand
that businesses selling widgets along Hwy.
71 in Wewahitchka or Reid Avenue in Port
St. Joe have had to sell a whole lot more
widgets in order to keep up with, spiking
insurance and tax bills.
Local government can have little or no
impact on such things as sk-yrocketing prop-
erty insurance premiums or the spiraling
cost of health insurance for the employees


the


of small businesses, but it can on property
taxes.
And while the commissioners continue
to gorge and given the demographics and
numbers, it is gorging, whether $7 million
lighter than two weeks ago or not on the
public's dole, mom and pop businesses,
the backbone of economic development, are
transitioning from threatened to endangered
to extinct.
That commissioners could expend meet-
ing time debating the fair share of a van
pie while working folks and those on fixed
incomes are driven out by
SUV-sized tax bills is the
local equivalent of Nero's fid- That
dling in a burning Rome. sioners
Well say it once more -
those worried about a county expend
as gated community in the
future should focus more time deb
on commissioners and their fair share
spending than any single
developer., pie while
Policies and Procedures
When the concept was folks and
tossed around the past few fixed inc
weeks we doubt that pro-
ponents .of accountability driven ou
in county government were sized tax
considering a hiring freeze,
prioritizing of capital projects local equ
or the county getting out of
the dirt delivery business. Nero's fid
Those are band-aids. burning R
We are still left with a
bloated workforce, poor
money management in per,-
sonnel decisions and a fundamental ques-
tion of why the county was ever in the dirt
business.
This is about accountability, that mea-
suring stick against which state government
has applied to public schools since Jeb
Bush's arrival in the governor's mansion.
That buzzword of the private sector
denoting the prism through which business
practices and expense levels are viewed.
That government at any level, the evi-
dence indicates has hard-wired an attitude
that spending the public's money does not
require similar scrutiny is numbing.
The county must get its act together on
this point. .
Given the enormous amounts of money
spent in areas such as the Road Department
and Public Works without a clearly defined


Line


and uniform policy for tracking operations
is a recipe for many things but not efficiency,
and accountability.
This is where that much-hyped inde-
pendentaudit could come in handy, if it was
not appearing at this point to be a $45,000
taxpayer-funded mirage.
This is the other side of the spending
coin the public has a hard time rational-
izing spending levels when not even com-
missioners or staff members can provide a
cogent chart and explanation of where each
dollar goes.


CO


mmis-
could


meeting
eating the
a of a van
e working
those on
omes are
it by SUV-
bills is the
Livalent of
Idling in a
tome.


You can't truly bud-
get until the restraints on
spending are understood by
all, particularly those who
foot the bill.
County-wide Voting
Given the many millions
of dollars contained in the
county budget for 2006-
07 that commissioners
could not agree 'on spend-
ing $75,000 or for the legal
work to secure a return to
county-wide voting is a slap
in the face to the county's
voters.
No other explana-
tion suffices for continuing
- nearly two years after a
non-binding referendum
was overwhelmingly sup-
ported by voters to dodge
and dismiss the issue.
If it was not clear before,
it is painfully so now that


there never was much desire on the BCC to
address county-wide voting, that the refer-
endum vote was simply a waste of taxpayer
money in order to temporarily placate a rest-
less constituency.
At the same time, that the proposal to
implement a work order policy can't find
traction due to resistance by one commis-
sioner in seeing one department or fiefdom
- put under the microscope or that the even
distribution of vans becomes, a point of con-
tention underscores the pressing need for
elimination of single-member districts.
That need is translated: politics as
usual.
So for the, many positive steps which
have been taken during the budget process
thus far, commissioners have yet to reach
tle corner turned.


Cloyce Couldn't Hardly Win Either!


think our days are numbered in Iraq. And I
I don't think it matters much what we do as
to "winning" the war or "establishing" a local.
government or "appeasing" the radicals of any
domestic or foreign political party.
The tide of public opinion in America is turn-
ing against our entanglement in Iraq. We are an
impatient nation. We want our food fast. We want
mechanical tellers dropping twenty dollar bills on
us without delay. Instant grits. Overnight delivery.
SHigh speed internet. We forced our t. v. manufac-
turers years ago to put an "instant on" ;device in
every set because we couldn't take the half-minute
warm up period. We've got cell phones and text
messaging....all for immediate, right now, up to
the second, communication. We don't have time
to wait.....
a We want our.foreign entanglements to be just
Sas quick. ,
Maybe it's some lingering memories from Viet
Nam. Maybe the news media's fairly biased cover-
age has pushed us toward this decision. Maybe we;
.haven't seen enough head way. Maybe we've grown
.weary of the sameness of each report. And maybe
it's just taking too long.
But whatever the reason, I feel the ground
'swell rising: Public opinion is beginning to stir for
"the end of our "Iraqi Affair". You can see it in an
interview with various congressmen on Face, the
Nation. You can hear it in the applause on early
morning talk shows when an anti-war feminist
makes a point. You can evidence it in the recent
Joe Lieberman defeat in Connecticut. It is.pushed
:by featured U. S. Senators as they jockey for
national recognition as a prelude to "future politi-
cal considerations". I figure we'll be down to the
street demonstrations any day now.
Personally, I'm not so sure it's time. Patience
is usually a great virtue in a stand .off of universal
proportion: America's enemies have been known
to use our own impatience, our petulance and our
in-fighting against us. Something tells me they are
about to have a field day over this growing rift!
I voted against going over there in the first
'place. Nobody heard me. I subscribe to the Will
* Rogers philosophy of international affairs. Will
said, "When youi get in a fight five thousand miles
from the house, you went looking for it!"
But since we are there, another adage comes


j THE STAR
USPHS 518-880
Published Every Thursday at 135 West Highway 98
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
General Manager: Krichelle McGhee
News Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: Kevin Burke
Creative Design Manager: Kathleen Smith

Florida Press National Newspaper
Association Association
0.


HUNKER DOWn


WITH KES

] Kesley Colbert
L[ Contributing Writer


to mind. This one was from my Father. He pro-
claimed it loud and often, ."Once you start some-
thing, son, finish it!"
So there you are. It's the proverbial spot
between a rock and a hard place. We surely didn't
figure on the strength of the resistance in Iraq. I
can't envision that anyone realized the m',Triad of
.cultural, spiritual, economic and social problems
that has become inherit with this mission before
we jumped in. But we certainly can't give up the
"farm" after all the energy, effort, money and lives
we have invested in it.
If there, is an intelligent, sensible way out of all
of this, someone a lot smarter than me is going to
have to come up with it. You add oil, Israel, who-
ever took Yasser Arafat's place, Bin Laden and the
Mexican border patrol to the mix and America's
problems seem insurmountable
It all brings Cloyce Cunningham to mind.
Cloyce was the biggest guy in our elementary
school. And I'm not making light here. Nor am I
trying to make much of a point. I just write these
things..... you've got to determine if they make
any sense
I remember when Cloyce was in the sixth
grade. Most everyone was afraid of him. He laid
down the rules for the football games at recess
because his size dictated that he take charge.
He picked the teams because no matter how we
argued and gesticulated, we all couldn't be on his
side. He was also the referee because no one dared
to cross him....even if they didn't agree. We might
talk bad about him at lunch if he wasn't around.
Squeaky and LaRenda allowed that he was a bully.
But when he came by with his sack of biscuits and


POSTMASTER:
Send Address Change to:
THE STAR
Post Office Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
Phone (850) 227-1278

PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE
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ham, we nodded and changed the conversation to
Miss Mary Ann Jackson's new hair do.
If he picked me on his team and we won, I
thought he was great. When he picked Ricky Hale
for his side and put. me over on the other team
with all the pansy wanzies.... I went home from
school vowing to live long enough to get even with,
him!
When the fight broke out between Harley
Fitzgerald and Shags Underwood, Suzie Cozart
and Pam Collins jumped in to break it up. It was
no use. These guys'were slugging it out! Someone
ran and got Cloyce. I don't think he wanted to
come. He kinda as much as said the fight was
between Harley and Shags. Suzie had to near 'bout
become hysterical to spur Cloyce to action. He
stepped into the middle of it and grabbed Harley
by the shirt collar. While' he held Harley up in
the air Shags slugged Harley and kicked Cloycel
He sat Harley down and gently put his hands on
Shags' chest. Harley pulled out a knife and took a
swipe at both of them. Cloyce took the knife and,
in a moment of dismay and anger, shook Harley
something awful.
The fight stopped immediately.
The picture of big Cloyce shaking Harley
around like a rag doll was just too much! "He's
,just a big bully!" Someone .said.
"He ought to be ashamed of himself!"
"Why does he have to jump into everyone's
business?"
"Why can't he just leave us alone?"
"Who does he think he is?"
The biggest boy in our sixth grade had such
a burden to bear! He was danged if he did and
danged if he didn't! And we mostly just called on
him when we couldn't fig ure out no other answer.
And half the group criticized him no matter how
he handled the situation. No wonder Cloyce grew
up with such inner-conflicts and multiple com-
plexes.....
It is extremely difficult being the biggest kid
on the block.
Respectfully,
Kes


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$23.00 YEAR $15.00 SIX MONTHS
.OUT OF COUNTY
$33.00 YEAR $20.00 SIX MONTHS
TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements the
publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage
further than amount received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed
word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely
asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces.
The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


K-


'7 %-, Commentary by
L r .^ TIBOR R. MACHAN
Freedom News Service


Paternalism,

is it here to stay?
Is paternalism here to stay? Or maternal-
ism, if you wish. For what billions of people
across the globe appear to want from govern-
ment is to be treated like children, taken care
of by some elders. Yet this is an old story,
indeed.
Throughout the ancient world, including
in much of its political literature, the idea has
been dominant that government is our care-
taker. All the kings had been credited with the
role of "keepers of the realm," as if they were
the legitimate owners of the regions they ruled
and had the virtue and wisdom not to men-
tion authority to rule the rest of us.
It is only gradually, beginning with Magna
Carte in the 13th century, that the myth of
monarchical superiority came under serious
and widespread enough criticism. At first it
was only that perhaps some of the nobles in
the country ought to curb the king's absolute
sovereignty; in time, especially with the emer-
gence of the classical liberal social-political
idea, the very notion of the special status
of those in government started to be ques-
tioned.
With the American Founders, of course,
the. view that government held sovereignty
over us all lost some credibility. We all are
equal in having unalienable rights, to life, lib-
erty, the pursuit of happiness and any other
thing that doesn't violate the rights of others.
This truth took awhile to surface, but it finally
got on the agenda within the forums of politi-
cal disputation. And when Abraham Lincoln
said that "No man is good enough to govern
another man without that other's consent,"
the point was beginning to catch on, espe-
cially in light of the Draconian paternalism of
chattel slavery.
Yet, after its brief emergence, the idea of
a free society began to get lost in the shuffle.
The paternalists started to regain their appeal,
what with all the promises they offered to save
people from having to fend for themselves and
only with the voluntary cooperation of their
fellows..No, the temptation of taking shortcuts
by -w av of coercion, which is the prime motiva-
tion of criminal conduct, was beginning, once
again, to be yielded to and the old governmen-
tal habit reasserted itself.
By the time Americans encountered some
serious difficulties. in their country (due to
compromises on their commitment to full lib-
erty), via for example, the Great Depression,
they started to cave in to the notion that
some great savior is needed to take care of
us. FDR came charging in, claiming to have
the magic formula that none of the ola mon-
archs could deliver on, namely to provide us :
all with guarantees against life's uncertainties
and complications. Instead of keeping loyal to
the spirit of the American Founder's idea of
individual rights, FDR invented the so-called
"Second Bill of Rights'," with all of its prom-
ises to guard us against adversities of any
kind by way of wealth redistribution and the
conscription of all for the benefit of all. It is
from this attitude that millions of Americans,
began to look to government for protection
against' disease, ignorance, natural disaster
arid anything else they were worried about in
their lives.
Which brings up, year after it happened,,
the disaster that was hurricane Katrina.
Nearly e\ ernone knows by now that the disas-
ter wouldn't have been nearly so severe had
those levies been properly cared for, just to
mention one task the nanny state assumed
for us. But instead of learning from this that
government isn't the answer but the prob-
lem, in 99 percent of cases where it asserts
its powers for our good, the cheerleaders of
the paternalistic .state continue to drum up
support for getting it further involved in our
lives.
What Katrina taught these champions
of the all mighty government isn't that the
solving of our problems in virtually all cases
apart from abating of violent crimes and
foreign aggressions, perhaps should be
decoupled from government. No, like the pro-
verbial gambling addict, millions of Americans
and their academic leaders want, instead, to
go back to Uncle Sam for its useless "help."
As if government really were the source of
help for people. Never mind Hitler, never mind
Mussolini, never mind Stalin, never mind
Mao, and never mind all the lesser tyrants
and dictators and pretenders to serving the
public interest, these dreamers will not give
up. So even. while some around the globe
are experimenting, sometimes only as a last
resort, with privatization, others are clamor-
ing for more statism.
It is time, really, to give up the myth of
paternalism, of the nanny state, of the supe-
riority of those who have a monopoly on the
use of coercive force in society.
Tibor Machan holds the R.C. Hoiles
Professorship in business ethics and free enter-
prise at Chapman University in Orange, Calif,
and is co-author of "Libertarianism, For and
Against" (Rowman & Littlefield). He advises
Freedom Communications, parent company of
this newspaper. E-mail him at TMachan@link.
freedom.com


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Question
Online Shotld the city of Port St. Joe rescind an ordinance prohibiting the
Opinion Sunday sale of alcohol?
. Pole Results
___ OWN___,d .Yes, in tough economic times, downtown businesses would benefit. 40%
No. there are good reasons the ordinance is on the books and it should
Visit The Star's website to remain. 40%
weigh in on next week's Don't know, don't care.
question: www.starfl.com 20%

To Voice An Opinion


Write TO:-
P.O. Box 308
Port St Joe. FL 32457
Fax To:
(850) 227-7212
Email To:
lcrofl@sltarfl.comn


Comments from our readers in the form ot letters to the editor
or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspaper's
editorial page should be a forum. where differing ideas and opinions
are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and
should include the address and phone number of the author. The
street address and phone number are for Verification and will not
be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves
the right to edit letters for correctness and style.


vMtet yoIr Grvytrxx tx
Board of County Commissioner'
Residents and taxpayers can contact( Contqqy
Commissioners in the following fahion."
By county cell phone:: -'.
Commission
Chairman CarirenY j',
McLemore, can be.
reached. at 227- 4965.5"




Carmen McLemore ; ,
Commissioner

SBilly Traylor n, ...
reached at 227-.

q', ,
f,, ..- ,.. ',.: ...."


miy Trafor:'
Commissioner.'
o.. .- i' ss ".-. : '
Bill Willinab
reached at 2


... ',

Bill Williams .. ,
Commissioner :' '.. ,
C .; .. .. .. ,, -e-
,- '- ". ,
Nata -eors .% '--
Filwllas:' .. JE-,_- -, ,


reached

Co0mm.ss.ers,
M ail at 100o Cecil .
G 0.Costli Sr gBlvdt
SPot St. SJoe" 2S45
.'pribye-mail at -
Jerry Barnes. c foadnin@gtcom
Commissioner n,et.


' opyrihted-Materiafl-.t

nd .eatit-- -
~- -

S1rIdtaeOih1I ~-


TheStrPor S. oe FL- husda, ugst17,206 S


Establish 197 -Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


.MEN.


- qb.






un i n r Pr ralSt I FL *v1 2 6b e 7i l u ann a 6 a


Flames -- From Page 1A


Sept. 7, 2005 for 1994-2002
model F-150s, 1997-2002
Expeditions, 1998-2002
Navigators and 1994-96
Broncos equipped with fac-
tory-installed speed control.
The earlier recall, the fifth-
largest in U.S. auto industry
history, affected 3.8 million
pickup trucks and sport-utility
vehicles.
The recall came after a
National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration conducted
an investigation into 1,170
reports of engine fires tied to
the overheating of cruise-con-
trol deactivation switches.
Most of the fires occurred


hours after the vehicle's engine
was turned off and many
resulted in property damage.
In January of 2005, Ford
also issued a similar recall of
800,000 pickups and SUVS
with a 2000 model year.
The latest recall encom-
passes certain speed control-
equipped gas or natural gas
1994-2002 F-250 through
F-550 F-Super Duty trucks,
2000-2002 Excursions, 1994-
1996 Econoline vans, 1996-
2002 E-450 vans and 1998
Explorers and Mountaineers.
Ford dealers will repair
the affected vehicles by install-
ing a fused wiring harness at


the speed control deactivation
switch to eliminate the poten-
tial risk of fire if the switch
overheats.
The fused wiring harness
cuts off the electrical current
to the switch in the event there
is increased current due to a
leaking switch.
The Ford Motor Company
website urges owners of pre-
viously recalled vehicles who
have not already had them
repaired to contact their deal-
ers immediately.
For the Johnstons, the
warning was a day late and sev-
eral thousand dollars short.
They hope that other Gulf
County Ford owners will learn
a lesson from their tragedy
and not disregard their recall
notices.,
Amy, a Port St. Joe post


office employee, has been con-
ducting her own public service
campaign by showing her cus-
tomers photos of her charred
Ford.
"I think people need to


be aware, because I wouldn't
want it to happen to anyone
else," she said.
As for the silver lining
in the cloud of smoke, Amy
reports that her insurance


company payoff allowed her to
purchase another vehicle. This
time, she bought a Jeep.
"No more Fords," she
said.


A view of the engine after the fire. The blaze was caused by a defective cruise control switch which
overheated.


A view of the car's charred front interior.


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DE N TE



DENTAL NEWS FROM THE OFFICE OOF


FRANK D. MAY, DMD, PA
CONTOLLN ., DENTAL' ARS..' .

CONRTOLLING DENTAL FEARS


Controlling denil t fe u i, important to all of us if we expect to have attractive, healthy teeth which are free
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TRANSPORTATION PLANNING MEETINGS
(THE PUBLIC IS INVITED)

Bay County Transportation Planning Organization (TPO)
Wednesday, August 23, 2006 at 3:30 p.m.
Panama City City Hall-Commission Chambers

The agenda will include the following topics:
1. Authorization of Execution ofa'Joint Participation Agreement w ith FDOT for Public Transit
Block Grant Operating Assistance
2. Approval of Execution of a Joint Participation Agreement with FDOT for Transit Corridor
Project Funding
,3. Approval of Public Transit Third Party Agreement between TPO, FDOT and Mexico Beach
4. Approval of New Member of TPO Citizens' Advisory Committee (CAC)
5. Review of 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan D raft Cost Feasible Plan Alternatives
6. Distribution and Review of Draft TPO FY2008 Transportation Project Priorities
7. Review of-Draft TPO Title VI Complaint Procedures
-8. Distribution and Review of Draft TPO 2006 Congestion Management Process (CMP) Plan
9. Public Forum. This is an opportunity for the public to address the TPO regarding transport
tion issues.

The TPO's Advisory Committees will meet as shown below on Wednesday, August 23, 2006 in
thePanama City City Hall:
Technical Coordinating Committee (TCC) 10:30 a.m.
Citizens' Advisory Committee (CAC) 1:30 p.m.
Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Committee (BPAC) 12:00 p.m.

Agendas are available on the TPO's website at www.wfrpc.dst.fl.us/bctpo. direct questions or
comments to Mr. Nick Nickoloff at 1-800-226-8914, ext 212, or nickoloffn@wfrpc.dst.fl.us.

The TPO will make reasonable accommodations for access to the meetings in accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act and for language requirements other than English. Please notify Ms.
Ellie Roberts of access or language requirements at 1-800-226-8914, ext 218, at least 48 hours in
advance.

Announcement: The Bay County Intergovernmental Coordination Committee for Roadway
Concurrency Management will meet on Wednesday, August 23, 2006 at 9:00 a.m. in the Pan-
ama City City Hall Conference Room behind the Commission Chambers. Contact Mr. Jason
Pannanen at 784-4025 for additional information.


Established 1937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


6A TheSar or t Je F husay uus 7,20


t






Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 17, 2006 7A -


Redd Dedication


"There was always that
attitude that whatever it takes
we'll get it done. There is no
better tribute to Mr. Redd than
this plaque."
With the opening of the
middle school wing, which
includes six classrooms and
computer lab, and the arrival
this year of the sixth-graders
from Wewahitchka Elementary
School, the dream of a stand-
alone middle school became
a reality.
In no large measure, due
to the doggedness, good nature
and optimism of Redd, the
longest-serving elected official
in the county at the time of his
death.
While many of the assem-
bled students on Tuesday were
likely not familiar with the
smiling man behind the rec-
ognizable glasses, the plaque
and the words spoken by sev-
eral school district officials
provided a reminder of the
legacy.


"Oscar Redd was a fine
man," said Superintendent
Tim Wilder. "He was somebody
who as a new superintendent,
he was the chairman of the
board, I looked up to."
Capturing the man's spir-
it, Wilder continued.
"What you saw was what
you got," Wilder said. "If you
asked Mr. Redd a question you
wouldn't get a lot of fluff. He'd
tell you the answer."
Charlotte Pierce, who
succeeded Redd as the board
chair upon Redd's passing,
added, "To have served with
Mr. Redd was quite a treat.
Everyone knew Oscar and he
knew everybody."
There was the easy smile,
the kind words, the interest
in others families and lives
not to mention the hand ready
for shaking or the slap on
the back. He was, simply, the
genuine article and everybody
who came in contact with Redd
walked away with the feeling of


- From Page 3A

meeting an old friend, even if
it was the first time they'd ever
crossed paths.
And that his name is on
the new middle school wing
seemed only fitting, since he
had as much to do with its
creation as anybody in the
county.
It was always about the
kids and doing right by them.
Providing an educational out-
post for middle-schoolers and
the issues particular to adoles-
cence was a passion, a calling,
evidenced by the rows of folks
who came out on a blistering
afternoon to pay homage.
"This is a special day,"
Wilder said while speaking to
the gathering of middle school
students. "You are the very
first class to go through the
Oscar D. Redd middle school
wing. There is special reason
that building and the school
are there.
"It has a name as of today.
It will mean a lot (to his fam-


County Transfers


the transfer
if his or her guardian
has property in Gulf County
if Franklin- County
parents turn over their
guardianship to a family
member living in Gulf County.
Parents must sign a legally-
binding document drafted
by board attorney Charles
Costin.
Additionally, Franklin
County students who have
an Individual Education
Plan (IEP), have been at their
school for two consecutive
Full-time Equivalent (FTE)
counts and qualify for the
McKay Scholarship have a
legal right to relocate to a
neighboring school district if
they believe their needs are
not being met at their current
school.
Gulf County generally
accepts McKay transfers as
enrollment permits.
Despite the School
Board's enrollment policies,
Wilder noted that Franklin
County students have found
a way to bypass the system.
"We still think welve got
students coming over,. ,and
they can't do that. When we
find out who they are, we're
going to withdraw them from
school," said Wilder.
Wilder has reason to
suspect that more than eight
students are enrolled without
the 'board's permission.


He noted that the rapidly
increasing enrollments in
some classes have raised a
red flag.
A Port St. Joe High School
English class that began the
year with 24 students saw its
class roster increase to 29 a
week later.
The superintendent has
left a message with Franklin
County superintendent
Jo Ann Gander and has
discussed the matter with
her assistant superintendent,
Mikel Clark.
Wilder said the student
enrollment problem has
weighed heavily on the
Franklin County School
District as well.
"They're concerned.
They're losing students right
and left," he said.
In other business:
As it does once a year, the
School Board conductedtheir
regular meeting inside the Port
St. Joe Media Center before
an audience of American
history students, NJROTC
members and representatives
from the Student Government
Association (SGA).
The School 'Board
members, superintendent
and district staff took time
out from the meeting to
explain the inner-workings
of the Gulf County school
system, exploring such topics
as master board certification,


budgeting and student
enrollment.
During the meeting,
board members took up
several routine matters,
including finalizing the
dates for the 2006-7 school
year and approving the
Superintendent's annual
financial report, school
improvement plans and
administrative salary
schedules.
Fisher'b Construction of
Wewahitchka was awarded a
$17,900 bid to install a metal
roof on the old Wewahitchka
maintenance shop; ,
The maintenance shop
was built in the early 1950s
and was later used as a band
building and classroom.
The board also approved
a Port St. Joe High School
SGA trip to Knoxville, Tenn.
on Oct. 6-10.
Ir. his superintendent's
report, Wilder relayed some
unsettling statistics on
Florida public schools' failure
to maintain an adequate
teacher population.
. According to Wilder,
the state as a whole was
deficient 2,000 teachers at
the beginning of the school
year, with Broward County
beginning its school year
with 107 vacant teaching
positions.
Currently, the Gulf
County school district lacks


N.


U


Oscar Redd's children, David (front left) and Gloria (on left with sunglasses) take in the plaque
honoring their father which is now a part of the campus at Wewahitchka Middle School.


ily) to hear students talk about
the Oscar D. Redd wing ...
When you talk about going to
class in the Oscar D. Redd
wing they'll know what you
are talking about ... That word
will travel."
For Redd's family it was
bittersweet day, a reminder of
their loss, a reminder of their



From Page 3A

only a band instructor at
Wewahitchka High School.
Wilder took the
opportunity to encourage
the students in the audience
to become teachers, saying
he anticipated educational
careers becoming quite
lucrative in the near future.
"I think what you're going
to see with the education field
is the state's going to have
to put more money in the
budget for teachers," Wilder
said.
The next School Board
workshop will be held Aug.
28 at 1 p.m.
A public hearing on the
'budget will be held Sept. 13
at 4:30 p.m., followed by
the School Board's regular
meeting at 6 p.m.


gift. It was, overall, a day of
pride.
"It feels good," his daugh-
ter Gloria Wodd said. "He
wouldn't have wanted all the


.HAVE YOU

LAST SEEN I
ON JUNE 299
IF FOUND PL


CRK

227
-. OR PRIS'

" 229
*~~A ^ .


attention, but he'd be proud.
He worked so hard."
And lived so well. The
plaque provides a beacon, a
remembrance, of that life.


al,-

SEEN LEXI?,.

N OVERSTREET
,2006 AT 7 A.M. 1"
EASE CONTACT
YSTAL

L5446
FINE POOLS

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PANAMA CITY PC BEACH CHIPLEY PORT ST JOE
784-3937 234-1829 638-7333 227-7266
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Cape San Bias Gulf Front 117 Belize Dr.
t dr.-C.r.,. 5 tb I T 49. ,:1. .pprc, I 'IcrF lo.r.
MLS #11 150. 11,495.000.Cr II P3rr,,:,a -ap, 3t 85630 22' 5949


Port St. Joe Residential Lot 125 14th. Street Bay View,
112x120 or .30acres approx. MLS# 200365. $239,000.
Port St. joe Residential Lot 1310 MonumentAve. Lot size
approx. 120 x 105. MLS# 200355. $259,000.
C-30 Shallow Reed Subdivision -weahave released 6Village lots
for $279,000 each.
Port St. Joe Commercial -Village at Marina Cove 171
Village Dr. Lot size 40x 98. MLS #105310. $389,000.
Overstreet Pine Breeze SD- 948 South Long St. Lot size 108
x 300. MLS # I I 1065. $75,000
St. Joe Beach Interior 303 Nautilus Dr. Sea Shores SD.
approx. 80x140. MLS #110234.$270,000
Treasure Bay C-30 Bay View 5312 Sand Bar Dr. Lot size 103
x 220. MLS # 105578. $389,000.
'Treasure Bay C-30 BayView- 5438 Sand Bar Dr. Lot size '103 x


CAPE SAN BLASI GULF FRONT 4059 CAPE SAN BLAS RD.
4 tedrrc. t:..h. I.500'C,-i x 583 yrtrn I ., :,e
MLSf 107336.51,260,000. C-mI p .rn, Lr.r.Lor,! 850. 227-2160


Cape San Bias I Gulf Front 192 Cozumel Drive
3 bLsh Iei o.i 3 ,lrh 1O 87o.I 85 r x 250 [t '..!.
MLIS#108174.$1,080,000.C-lragr,, :r Duc, 1 85 2217 ;l60


Cape San Bias Gulf Front 191 Tiffany Beach Rd.
3 bMdrcom 9,0 .a2 l 1,670ii, 41 rryr
MLS #107726. $1,199,000. CaIll ,er, on DuLy wai;0227 '160


Overstreet -Waterfront 8895 CR 386
2 .idrc.rr. 2 bui loft. 2 876'1. I 9 acre
MLS #108856 $575,000.r III Patr.ca Raap at 227-5949


220 MLS #107974. $450,000
Cape San Bias Seagrass Sub. 120 Seagrass Circle 128 x
107 lot size. MLS # 108472. $649,000.
Port St. Joe Interior 144 Betty Dr. irregular lot size. MLS
#109390 $119,000
Treasure Bay C-30 5454 Sand Bar Drive -Approx .59 accre.
MLS # 106513 $307,000
Wewahitchka Seven Springs Subdivision 121 Little River
Circle. Approx .5 acre. MLS #109706, $75,000.
Cape San Bias Jubilation 122 Rosemary Ct. Approx..20
acre. MIS # 109793 $395,000
Overstreet-Wetappo Creek- 9959 Hwy.386 Creek Frontage
120ft, lot size approx 2.6 acres. MLS #200843. $450,000. /<


4320 Cape San Bias Road

Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
Local: 850.227.2160
Toll-free: 866.242.7291
Fax: 85022878


Visit Cape San Blas
www.CapeSanBlasRealty.com Realty, Inc
and take a 360 virtual tour!



Waterfront Homes for Sale


LOTS and LAND


w ft


~a r~ w r ~ r~e r~~~~n rW. --%WO W-1 9 A-~


TheSta, ortSt Jo, L -Thusdy, ugst 7,200 -7A


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


]

,]






UO Ith wIUIJ I /I .t 0. Joe I ,i y /Auyubi. /, -


Tracking Predators


registration and reporting
requirements.
Sexual predators and
offenders must report in
person twice a year (dur-
ing the month of his or her
birthday and six months


after) to the sheriff's office
in the county in which he
or she lives.
Florida Statutes also
require sexual offenders
and predators to notify
the local Sheriff's Office or


Ih^


T From Page ]A

Florida Department of Law
Enforcement (FDLE) Office
within 48 hours of estab-
lishing or reestablishing a
Florida residence.
They must also report
to the Department of


Medical Cosmetic Center
VINCENT IVERS, MD
American Society for Laser Medicine & Surgery


Uncompromising attention to detail distinguishes the best physicians and
now this highly respected practice features a combination of state-of-the-art
Lasers and the skills that only a highly trained physician can offer. The procedures Dr. Ivers
specializes in include: Laser Hair and Spider Vein Removal, Botox, Hylaform, Restylane,
ThreadliftTM Non-Surgical Face Lift, ThermageTM, LevulanTM Therapy AK's/Acne,
Collagen, Microdermabrasion, Scar Revision, Age Spots, Acne and Rosacea, Laser Skin
Rejuvenation and Obagi Skin Care. And, Laser technology allows Dr. Ivers to safely, easily
and effectively treat many kinds of benign skin conditions on an outpatient basis. The editors
of this Medical Review are proud to recommend Dr. Vincent Ivers and the staff at the Medical
Cosmetic Center for the quality of aesthetic health care they bring to their patients.
PORT ST. JOE 301 20TH STREET 227-7070
PANAMA CITY 2101 NORTHSIDE DRIVE 872-1777
TOLL FREE 800 665-3616


EUGENE EVANS, MD
American Board Certified
Gastroenterology, Liver Disease & Internal Medicine
Sd American Gastroenterology Associates
Committed to providing comprehensive care in the field of Gastroenterology this respected
practice has earned an excellent reputation in our area. Dr. Evans treats a wide range of
internal health problems including diseases of the: Stomach, Liver, Gallbladder, Pancreas,
Intestines and Rectum. He specializes in: Endoscopy, Colonoscopy, and ERCP. New
patients are welcome.
The editors of this Medical Review are proud to recommend Dr. Eugene Evans and
the staff at American Gastroenterology Associates for the quality healthcare they provide.
522-4848
2407 RUTH HENTZ AVENUE PANAMA CITY


A Special Kind of Caring











"If hen time matters mni,
we make the difference."

401-B Reid Avenue Port St. Joe
850-229-8188


'Emerald Coast

Skilled and Supportive Nursing Staff
Total Personal Care
Medical Social Services
Volunteers
Chaplain Services
Bereavement Support
Services Available Patients accepted
24 Hours A Day [rgaaton"" based on need,
7 Days A Week not ability to pay


EMERALD COAST
OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY
S MARK J. WOLF, MD MICHAEL A. INGRAM, MD
HENRY B. BRELAND, MD GEORGE B. RAMIE, DO
SAMUEL B. WOLF, DO SUSAN SIZEMORE, CNM
TAMMIE MOTT,'CNM DEBBIE IVEY, ARNP MICHELLE LANG, ARNP
Board Certified
As a woman you're unique! You have your own special health needs and personal concerns.
That's why we think you will appreciate the confidential and personal care this practice offers in
a comfortable and friendly environment. You may consult them for: Prenatal Care and
Delivery, Vaginal Birth after C Section, Birth Control, Tubal Ligation, Ultrasound, Laser
Surgery, Laparoscopy and Hysteroscopy, Laparoscopic Hysterectomy, Treatment of
Abnormal Pap Smears, Weight Management, and Well Woman Care. Office hours are by
appointment, new patients are welcomed and most health plans are accepted. The editors of
this Medical Review are pleased to feature Emerald Coast Obstetrics & Gynecology as our
OB/GYN Practice of Choice.
769-0338
2250 JENKS AVENUE PANAMA CITY
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This highly respected company, the world's largest and most trusted
employer of companion and homecare professionals, offers a complete range
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incidental transportation and medication reminders are provided by
carefully screened, trained, bonded and insured CAREGivers. Services can
be arranged from a minimum of 3 hours to a maximum of 24 hours seven
days a week, including weekends and holidays. The editors of this Medical
Review are pleased to, once again, recommend Home Instead Senior Care
for the quality service and compassionate, reliable care they bring to our seniors.
PANAMA CITY 850-522-1919 TOLL FREE 866-301-1919
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EK


Highway Safety and Motor
Vehicles to secure a valid
driver's license or identifi-
cation card.
If any changes of
address are made, he or
she must report the change
in person to the Sheriff's
or FDLE office within 48
hours as well.
During the twice-year-
ly re-registration, sexual
offenders or predators
must verify their current
permanent or temporary
address, report any vehi-
cle that they use or own,
including RVs, vessels or
houseboats, any employ-
ment information, and
whether they are enrolled,
employed or volunteer at a
college or university.
The sheriff's office
takes a new photo during
each re-registration ses-
sion and uploads all new
information to the FDLE
website (www.fdle.st.fl.us),
where law enforcement offi-
cials and private citizens
can view a complete profile
of convicted sexual offend-
ers and predators in their
area.
A new feature of the
website, added last month,
is a detailed listing of vehi-
cle and vessel information,
including vehicle year and
tag number.
Gulf County Sheriff's
Office investigator Chris
Buchanan said the re-reg-
istration requirements and


online database access
help sheriff departments
throughout the state more
effectively share informa-
tion about sexual offend-
ers and predators in their
areas.
"It makes it a lot easier
for law enforcement agen-
cies to keep track of the indi-
viduals," said Buchanan.
Buchanan noted that
the Gulf County Sheriff's
Office has recently arrested
two county sexual preda-
tors for failing to re-reg-
ister, a third degree felo-
ny that carries up to five
years in prison and up to a
$5,000 fine.
Ricky Lee Harrison was
arrested in Athens, Alabama
by the Limestone County
Sheriff's Department on a
warrant issued by the Gulf
County Sheriff's Office.
He was charged with
absconding from registra-
tion and is being held in
the Gulf County Sheriff's
Department, where he is
awaiting trial.
Kenneth Donald Weaver
was charged with failure to
report employment infor-
mation during re-regis-
tration after the Sheriff's
Office learned that he was
working at a family restau-
rant in Calhoun County. "
Though most employers
do not require applicants
to list their sexual preda-
tor/offender status on their
employment application,


employers may request
a criminal history report
from FDLE for a $23 fee.
The Jessica Lunsford
Act requires all schools to
conduct background checks
on all teachers, employees,
volunteers, construction
workers and others who
are permitted access on
school grounds. Schools
must. verify that these per-
sons have not been convict-
ed of a sexual offence.
Other highlights of the
Jessica Lunsford Act:
*Extends the period
for a petition to remove
a sexual predator designa-
tion from 20 to 30 years for
those designated after Sept.
1, 2005.
*Provides a criminal
offense for those who assist,
harbor or conceal a sexual
predator or sexual offender
in eluding law enforcement
or providing false informa-
tion
*Adds mandatory elec-
tronic monitoring for a
conditional release whose
crime was committed on,
or after 9/1/05 for certain
offenses where the victim
was 15 years or younger
and the offender is 18 years
or older
*Provides a criminal
offense for a person who
alters, tampers, damages
or destroys any court-
ordered electronic moni-
toring equipment.


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Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


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1.
"- .-.>~


Iiec Parker, Snict. Nixon, Stev e fIftt~ja--,Garv GColdi', Nfjr,,jn Ad-
kitt, 11,1111 M Bount, Steve ( c)ss ~,andt(oach (olhert. Fo urth I, 8v
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Anuotrnuug, ELdul ie Iifi, Robert Crc,, unrr"Stc`c lDavuis,,uXld(IJ
Ixwsvtr.


The 1971 State Championship Football Team

Have you seen these guys???

The Port St. Joe High School football team is looking for members from the 1971 State Championship Football team. The
team will be honored by the present football team on September 8, 2006 at the Chipley football game. We need your help in locat-
ing as many of the players as possible. Please contact Traci Gaddis at 850-819-5128 or 850-648-5474, or you may also e-mail at
ggaddis(,gtcom.net.

Gaskin Park Flathead Tournament This Weekend


The second annual
Gaskin Park Flathead Catfish
Tournament will be held Aug.
18-19 in Wewahitchka.
Registration begins at 9
a.m. CT on Friday, Aug. 18 at
Gaskin Park. The awards pre-
sentation will be at noon CT
the following day.
Entry fee for the tourna-
ment is $40 per person. Net
proceeds from the tournament
benefit the non-profit Wewa
Search and Rescue.
Entries can be mailed
to Wewa Search and Rescue,
RO. Box 555, Wewahitchka,
Florida 32465.
The tournament is for flat-
head catfish only and all cat-
fish must be at least 14 inches
long.
All boats must be checked
in and inspected at Gaskin
Park prior to fishing in the
tournament. Launch and
start for the tournament
from the following landings:
Gaskin Park, Bristol Landing,
Estiffanulga Landing and Owl


Creek/Hickory Landing. of flatheads will win $250.
Purse amounts are as fol- In addition, a prize of
lows: $1,000 will be awarded to the
Largest flathead $1,000 fisherman with the most com-
Second $500 bined poundage from the 2006
Third $400 Apalachicola River fishing
Fourth $300 series, including the Liberty
Fifth $200 County Senior Citizens, the 8th
Boat with most poundage Annual Florida Catfish Classic,


the Gaskin Park Flathead
Catfish Tournament, the
Annual Florida Championship
Flathead Catfish Tournament
and the Hosford-Telogia
Volunteer Fire Department
Flathead Tournament.


., '. t .
** : -5 : ,_ ,-*.a lt


Webb Wins Bodybuilding Title

Port St. Joe resident Hal Webb recently participated in the
Augusta Grand Prix of Bodybuilding held in Augusta, Ga., by the
International Natural Body Building Federation (INBF).
The INBF is the amateur affiliate of the World Natural
Bodybuilding Federation (WNBF), an organization that repre-
sents and promotes drug free athletes.
All participants must undergo extensive testing, including
drug tests and polygraphs.
Webb took first place in the novice heavyweight class and
also won the overall novice title.
Webb trains five days a week at Coastal Fitness and Wellness
and is already back to his intensive training regimen to prepare
for his next competition in Marietta, Ga.


MRS.





.4g. .........

R*M-.*
-All ~


Kingfish


Tournament


Angles into

Mexico

Beach

The 10t Annual MBARA
Kingfish Tournament, ben-
efiting the efforts of the
Mexico Beach Artificial Reef
Association arrives in town
next weekend.
The festivities kick off
with the opening of registra-
tion starting at 5 p.m. CT
on Friday, Aug. 25, at the El
Governor Motel. A Captain's
Party follows at 7 p.m. CT. 2-'
Registration fee is $150 --.--
per boat. You can pre-register -
now at Marquardt's Marina,
Half .Hitch and Bluewater~
Outriggers in Port St. Joe.
According to tournament
organizers, a field of roughly
150 boats is expected to com-
pete in the tournament, weath- -_
er permitting. Mm=______
More than 3,000 MBARA
T-shirts have already been .
sold, a record for the event.
A Captain's breakfast and ---"-' "
late registration will take place 64
from 5-7 a.m. on Saturday,
Aug. 26, at Sharon's Cafe.
Fishing starts at 5 a.m.
CT.
Weigh-ins will be held -r*n w
from 1-5 p.m. CT on Saturday
at Marquardt's Marina. A fish o oef h
fry will follow at 6 p.m. CT
at Toucan's followed by the
tournament dinner and ball
at 8 p.m.
Prize money will be dis-
tributed as follows:
First place King $3,000
Second place King -
$2,000
Third place King $1,000
The heaviest Wahoo will
net an angler $1,000 while
the top Spanish mackerel will
bring $500. -1#IMs
In addition to the
Budweiser Wagon and Toucan's
dance band, identical twins
from Bainbridge, Ga., will
be on hand as Miss Kingfish
2006.


i


-- L ik F, ;!.'y


M ql"


First Row: Archie Shackleford, Lawrence Bowen, Steve Atchison,
Bobby McKiernan, Barron Abrams, Mike White, Alan lammnock, Vic
Adkinson, Russell Chason, Jim Moore, and Chris Davis. Second Row:
Marv'in Adkins, Jim Faison,.joRSl, Eddic Sumners, Danny Ether-
idge, Ken ,\Vlittle, Mike I)ickey, Harold Hardy, Ronnie Kirkland,
Kennethi Weimorts, Ed ploore, aind Tyler Smith: Third Row: Coach
Tavior, Purry Adkin,u. Emit )Daniels, lamnis Danicls, Mum\r Smith,


TheStr, or S. JeFL- Turda, A gut 7, 00 -9A


Establishd797- evigG lfcunyan uronin resfo 8 er


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WATeStr or t Je L hrsaAgut17,20 Etbise 93 erigGlfculyadsurudigaea o 6 er


A New Era in Wewahitchka Will


Mean a Familiar Face with Ball


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Todd Lanter turns the
question on its head.
. Instead of focusing on
the reality that he is the
fourth football coach in as
many years at Wewahitchka,
Lanter instead noted that
the revolving door of coach-
es hasn't roiled the success
of the program.
"Even though they've
had a different coach every
year for the past four years
they win," Lanter said, not-
ing last season's 8-3 regu-
lar-season record and trip
to the state Class 1A play-
offs. "There's something
there."
Lanter intends to tap
.into that "something" and
,continue the momentum
*built last year as Greg


Jordan, who left after one
season to take his dream
job as head coach at
Blountstown, steered the
Gators to within four points
of the state quarterfinals.
"There's pride in the
town, there's pride in the
school, there's pride in the
football team," Lanter said.
"We've got a good group
of hard-working kids. The
kids have responded well
to everything I've asked
them to do."
Lanter comes to
Wewahitchka after spend-
ing five years as defensive
coordinator at Tallahassee
Godby High School. Prior
to that, Lanter served as an
assistant coach at Wakulla
High for eight years.
Wewahitchka, with
excellent facilities for a


small school and a history
of fielding competitive foot-
ball teams, was a perfect


"The biggest thing we've
done since I got here was
having a junior varsity


1,000 yards in 2005.
Operating from an I-
formation pro-set offense,
Wewahitchka will pound
the ball.
"We are going to give
(Ranie) the rock and let him
run," Lanter said. "Ryan
has a legitimate chance to
go on and do something.
He's a great kid, a great
player. He's special."
Bierman, like Ranie
a senior, brings his dual-
threat capabilities back
behind center and Dee
Baker and Clarence Gray,


Seniors Blaine Pitts
and Robert Brown provide
depth and will see signifi-
cant time on the field.
As with so many small
schools, most of those
names on offense will
remain on the field when
the other team has the
ball.
"We are going to play
ironman football," Lanter
said.
Pitts will be at nose-
guard in the Gators' 5-2
defensive scheme, with
Suber and Luckie at tackle.


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Gourmet Sandwiches and a Child's meznu.
C;...r.: i. located on mainstreet in Wewahitchka. One block North of lHwy
22. Gall aligad for business hours and daily lunch and dinnizr specials.
850-639-9444,



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WEDDING ARCHES
CANDLELABRAS
PUNCH BOWLS
CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN
-f .,lu,.;


Coach Todd Lanter talks X's and O's before practice on Tuesday.


fit, one of the few for which
Lanter said he'd have left
Godby.
And sensing the ques-
tions which might be
broached given the recent
changing of the guards
with the program, Lanter
emphasized that with a sonl
entering the ninth-grade
and a third-grade daughter.
he's not intending to go
anywhere anytime soon.
In addition to hard-won
stability, the prospects for
the program point up.
With nearly two dozen
ninth-graders out for foot-
ball, the Gators will field
a junior-varsity squad. If
results from recent seasons
of the Gene Raffield Football
League are any indication,
the talent pipeline is begin-
ning to bulge at the north
end of the county.


team," Lanter said. "We will
play a full schedule and the
varsity will play with 25 or
26 players. For a school of
300 kids. I feel real good
about that."
The schedule also
breaks nicely 'for the' first-
year coach. In contrast
to last season. wfien the
Gators were on the road
during six of the first seven
weeks the lone home game
corning against county rival
Port St. Joe Wewahitchka
stays in the county until an
Oct. 20 visit to Freeport.
Following a preseason
Kickoff Classic against
Tallahassee FAMLU start-
ing at 7 p.m. ET on Friday
in Tallahassee the Gators
play six of their first seven
games on their home turf.
The lone away game is
a trip down Hwy. 71 to play
Port St. Joe on Sept. 22.
"Six home game is a
bonus," Lanter said.
The Gators return the
bulk of their skilled ath-
letes on offense, particularly
quarterback Sean Bierman
and standout fullback Ryan
Ranie, who rushed over


both seniors, will be the
wide receivers, providing,
Bierman with dangerous
weapons on the perimeter.
"I'mn happy with Sean
and what he's going to allows
us to do." Lanter said. :"And
while we are going to give
the ball to Ryan, we have to
get Dee the ball.
"We are blessed with
some good athletes at the
skilled positions."
J.J. Roberts, a senior,
will start at tight eind with
Sam Adkison, also a senior,
and Joey Shipman, another
senior, providing depth at
tight end and wide receiver,
respectively.
Junior Ryan Myers and
sophomore Paul Myers,
along with Gray, will be part
of a rotation with Ranie in
the backfield.
The offensive line, where
the Gators lost key contrib-
utors such as Ben Holley,
will have junior Tyler Bush
back at center, with Roy
Suber and Alex Lewis, both
juniors, at guard, and Kyle
Luckie. and Cody Johnson,
both seniors, at tackle.


Bush and Chase Harvey,
.a sophomore. will be the ,
defensive ends/outside line-
backers with Roberts. who
topped 100 total tackles
last year. and Adkison at
inside linebacker.
- Shipman. Baker and
senior Logan Jamerson
will rotate at cornerback
and Ranie and Gray will
man the safeties.
"We had a great sum-
mer," Lanter said. "I believe
these kids are farther along
than they've ever been and
that's a credit to them. I
think we are where we need
to be at this point.
"The kids know what
I expect of them, to work
hard. We have goals and
we are going to do what
we need to get there. It's
important for the kids to
enjoy it. They need to enjoy
playing football to be good:
at it. We've done a lot of
what we've needed to do
already."
Yep, it's safe to say.
Todd Lanter -has found a
home.


They're Back!!!!!


hrins ion

U U u


CD


Robert SINGER SONGWRITER
`H u tt APPEARING NIGHTLY TUESDAY
u O THROUGH SATURDAY




yrsiday crab night


monday-friday HAPPY HOUR


ow Is


The


Time!


12


11 l

0 2
'I'
--7 6 ,,


Pam Nobles Studio is now holding
registration for the 2006-2007 dance year.
Classes for children from 3 years of age up to
adult in Ballet, Pointe, Lyrical, Tap, Jazz,
and combination classes.

Registration will be held on
August 19th from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00
and August 21st, from
5:00 to 7:00 P.M.


K


Pam Nobles Studio,
86 Market Street in Apalachicola.
For more information,
please contact the studio at

(850)653-8078


2006 .
Hurricane
Names


Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William


-


IOATheStr, ortSt Jo, F -Thursday, August 17, 2006


Established 7937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


,-~


51







I -tiUU.bll .Ua I /1J'/ ,.iOiy,- n ,u-n ,,nim/ nm,,nd rn. ..... ... ......r S. ....


Sharks Begin Defense of



State Class 1A Football Title


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Whatever pressure might
arrive with the encore, the Port
St. Joe Sharks are embracing
as part of a sterling main act.
With numbers and opti-
mism high, the Sharks open
the 2006 high school foot-
ball season in rarified air, as
the defending state Class 1A


replacing the 10 seniors who
provided many of the big plays
as the Sharks raced through
the state playoffs last year.
"Replacing some of those
guys will be incredibly tough
to do," Palmer said. "But (the
returning players) are aware
of that and they are working
hard."
The cupboard, however, is


at tight end, with freshman
Darrell Smith backing up
McNair and ITyrone Dawson,
a junior, backing up Quinn at
quarterback.
"We've got some kids we
have to mix in there and get
some playing time out of,"
Palmer said "particularly early
in the non-district games
because down the line they are
going to play for us."
The offensive line will be
deep and experienced.
Billy Martin, a sophomore,
and senior Patrick Bailey will
be at tackle, with senior Warren
Floyd and junior Grant Glass
at guard. Terry Thompson, a
senior, will start at center.
Senior Brian Lamboy
(tackle), juniors Bryce Nelson
(tackle) and Shane Duty (guard)
and sophomores Javon Davis
(guard) and Travis Dailey (cen-
ter) provide depth.
"We have a nice mix,"
Palmer said. "We've got to
get some guys ready for next
year." '
Many of those same play-
ers will see duty on both sides
of the line of scrimmage.
"For us to be successful
we've got to have our best
kids," Palmer said.
Dailey and Thompson will
man the inside of the defensive
line, with Javon Davis, Glass
.and Andy Cannington provid-
ing additional minutes.
Peters, Bailey, Billy Martin
and Fuze will rotate at defen-
sive end, with Ashley Davis,
Farmer, Robbie Martin and
Chaz Byrd doing the same at
outside linebacker.
Floyd and Duty .will start
at inside linebacker, backed
up by Farmer and Chaz Byrd.
The secondary will be
a five-man rotation between
Quinn, Mike Byrd, Dawson,
McNair and Smith in the mix.
Senior Austin Peltier, who
did not play football last sea-
son after playing as a sopho-
more, it back to capably han-
dle all kicking duties.
"He's done a heckuva job,"
Palmer said. "His punts have
been outstanding."
Fall practices have
revealed some weaknesses to
be addressed and strengths to
be honed. Primarily, though, it
has provided the preparation
for an encore the Sharks are
anxiously waiting to perform.
"I think we are happy with
the work ethic," Palmer said.
"We're pretty happy with where
we are, but we aren't satisfied.
We need to get mentally tough-
er and we have to improve on
,our assignments."
The Sharks first regular
season game will, kickoff at
7:30 p.m. on Aug. 25 at Shark
Field when Port St. Joe hosts
Blountstown.


champion, a product of their
stirring defeat of Fort Meade in
last year's title game.
The Sharks must replace
10 seniors including stand-
outs such as Sidney Harris,
Ash Parker,, Ash Larry, Zac
Norris and Quentin Jenkins
- but enough talent returns to
make a playoff rerun a distinct
possibility.
The early signs are posi-
tive, with 52 athletes on the
practice field this fall com-
pared to 37 this time last
year and a work ethic that
hasn't wilted with the heat and
humidity driving the Sharks
toward the season, which
begins with Thursday's Kickoff
Classic at Vernon.
"We had a really good sum-
mer and spring," said Coach
John Palmer. "Obviously the
kids are excited;
"Practice has come along.'
The attitude has been good.
They are working hard. That's
the most impressive thing for
us coaches."
The schedule also falls in
favor of the Sharks, who last
year opened with three straight
road trips and finished with
just four regular-season home
games.
After the exhibition at
Vernon, Port St. Joe plays five
of its first six games at home
with six games at Shark Field
scheduled for the 2006 season.
The Sharks must undertake
just one trip of real length, to
Freeport on Sept. 15.
"The six home games,
that's nice," Palmer said.
The most significant obsta:-
cle facing Port St. Joe might be


hardly bare and Port St. Joe
has players returning on both
sides of the ball who logged
significant playing time last
year.
Senior quarterback Mike
Quinn, who provided more
than 1,600 yards in total
offense last year, will become
more the focal point of the
offense which will remain cen-
tered around Palmer's version
of the Fling-T, a Wing-T hybrid
characterized by quick pitches
in 'either direction.
Quinn was supposed to.
platoon at quarterback last
year, but an early injury and
Quinn's accelerated growth on
the field from the first game
at Blountstown, he was mak-
ing plays, Palmer noted put
him firnly behind center.
"Last year we kind of tried
to protect Mike at times,"
Palmer said of Quinn, a dual-
threat. "This year Mike has to
be the one to make plays. We
are going to have to ask him to
throw a little bit more."
Ashley ,"Mudcat" Davis,
who rushed for more than
800 yards last year, returns
at fullback, with junior Chaz
Byrd and sophomore Robbie
Martin at halfback. Mike Byrd,
a senior, and Greg Farmer, a
sophomore, will man the wing-
back spot.
Jordan McNair, who
moved to Gulf County after
two years at Apalachicola High
School, takes over Larry's spot
at wide receiver, providing
Quinn with a 6-foot-3 target
with plenty of speed.
Senior Byron Peters and
junior Philip Fuze will rotate


Sharl

Building on last year's
Football State Championship,
the Port St. Joe SHARK
100 CLUB is gearing up for
another year of exciting boys
and girls Shark athletics.
The Sharks have one of the
most successful sports pro-
grams in Florida high school
history. Success begins with
community support, and the
Shark "100" Club members
have been the best in the
state in providing that sup-
port and being part of a
winning team. Let's keep the
tradition going.
This year, the Shark
"100" Club offers members
the opportunity to be a part
of the winning team at the
following levels:
(Listed as level, amount,
member benefits
*Sand Sharks, $50,
Parents of Athletes, 1


100


Shark "100" Hat, Program
Recognition
*Tiger Sharks, $100
Individuals, businesses, 1
Shark "100" hat and orga-
nizations 2 reserved seats to
home football games
*Bull Sharks, $500
Individuals, businesses, 2
Shark "100" hats and orga-
nizations 2 reserved
seats to regular season home
football games, 2 passes to
regular season home bas-
ketball games, special foot-
ball and basketball program
recognition, listed on sign
at baseball/softball fields,
reserved parking at football
games
Send Checks to:
Shark 100 Club
PO Box 524
Port St. Joe, FL 32457


Club

Greg Johnson
Bayside Savings Bank
(850) 229-7700
Willie Ramsey
Ramsey's Printing ard
Office Supplies
(850) 229-8997
Ralph C. Roberson
Roberson & Friedman,
PA
(850) 227-3838
You may pick up your
Shark "100" hat and parking
pass at Ramsey's Printing
and Office Supplies on Reid
Avenue.
Football tickets and bas-
ketball passes are available
at Port St. Joe High School
office.


Contacts:


4.

The Shark 100 Club: Willie Ramsey, Ramsey's Printing and Office Supplies; Jim McNeill, Indian
Pass Seafood Co, Inc.; Ronald Pickett, Cape San Bias Realty, Inc.; George Duren, Duren's Piggly Wiggly;
Ralph Roberson, Roberson & Friedman PA; Ed Creamer, Ed's Red Hot Sauce; Joe Dilorenzo; LLC; Aaron
Farnsley, Farnsley Financial Consultants, David Kennedy, Preble-Rish; Kenny Peak, Carpet Country; Pat
Floyd, Tarpon Title, Inc.; Trina Siprell, Siprell Construction, Inc.; Robert Boykins, Piggly Wiggly; Carolp
Dixon, Coastal Community Bank. :


You've Got It!
Somebody
Wants It!


STARa',P1BLICATIONS
THE STAR
lop%.4~*C2~U
*TWES


A TASTEFUL
BITE OF
INNO


4


VAT


Port St. Joe's Appliance Source Sin


I FREE DELIVERY TO PSI, APE& BEACHES.


'The Best Quality..
TION The Best Price.'
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KitchenAid.
Roper.
Estate.
St. Joe
Hardware.



ice 1960.
WE WILL HAUL THE OLD APPLIANCE OF.:


ACE 201 JOE HARDWARE CO.o
201 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe 229-8028
Hardware M-onj,-Fr.da, 8 00-:'.30 E~ Sarday 8 C10-1 3' EiT Co d n,'da'


W SPORTS SCHEDULE


WEWAHITCHKA GATORS


2006 Varsity Football Schedule
Date Team
9/01 South Walton
9/08 Cottondale


Jay
Port St. Joe
Northview
West Gasden
Sneads
Freeport
Liberty County
Blountstown


Emerald( Coast

- Federal Credit Union


PORT ST. JOE
530 Cecil G. Costin, Sr Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
emeraldcoastfcu.com
EMERALDGOAST@GTCOM.NET
850-227-1156


WEWAHITCHKA
101 East River Road
Wewahitchka, FL 32465
850-639-5024


SPORTS SCHEDULE


PORT ST. JOE SHARKS


2006 J.V. Football Schedule


Game
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.'


Place
(H)
(H)
(H)
(A)
(H)
(H)
(H)


Date
8/18
8/24
9/7
9/14
9/21


6. 10/5


Gam
1.
2.
3.


Team
Vernon
Blountstown
Wewahitchka
N.F.C.
Florida High
Wewa


Place
(A)
(H)
(A)
(A);
(H)


Time
8:00
7:00
7:00
7:00
7:00


(H) 7:00


2006 Varsity Football Schedule
ne Date Team Place Time
8/18 Vernon .(A) 8:00


8/25 Blountstown
9/1 Marianna


Advertise Here
and
Support Your Team!


Reeves Furniture &
Refinishing
234 Reid Ave. 229-6374
All Wood Furniture, Gifts,
Wicker, Kitchen Cabinets


7:30
7:30


4. 9/8 Chipley (H) 8:00..
5. 9/15 *Freeport (A) 8:00
6. 9/22 *Wewahitchka (H) 8:0)0-
7. 9/29 *Sneads (H) 8:00
(Homecoming)
8. 10/6 *Liberty County (A) 7:30
10/13 OPEN
9. 10/20 *Jay (H) 8:00
(Senior Night)
10. 10/27 *West Gadsden (A) 8:00
11. 11/3 Apalachicola (A) 7:30
District 1 Games/Class A All hirrme .~e E.tem.rn

A4


A-1 Oil &
Muffler Service
210 Hwy 71

639-4175

The Star
Come Visit Us At Our New Location
135 W. Hwy. 98, Port
City Shopping Center
227-1278


Bayside Lumber -
516 First Stredt
229-8232
Your Building
Materials Headquarters

Gulf Coast Real Estate Guide
Give Us A Call
To Place Your Ad Today "
227-1278 or 653-8868


p


The Sharks practice kickoff returns during practice last week.


Game
1.
2.


9/15
9/22
9/29
10/06
10/13
10/20
10/27
11/3


L or
Electric!

I


TheSta, Prt t. oeFL Thrsdy, ugut 1, 206 II


792 eriaG l cut n sronin ra or6 er


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tZ










THE FORECAST


WEATHER
Temps for August 17


RECORD
High: 96 (1998)
Low: 70" (1983)


TODAY


.1 A
Partly cloudy with
scattered t-storms
High: 870; Low: 750


TOMORROW
18




Partly sunny with scat-
tered thunderstorms
High: 880; Low: 740


SATURDAY
S 19




Partly sunny with a
few thunderstorms
High: 890; Low: 740


SUNDAY



'-


Partly sunny with a
few thunderstorms
High: 900; Low: 750


MONDAY
S21




Mostly cloudy with
scattered t-storms
High: 890; Low: 750


TUESDAY
22




Mostly cloudy with
scattered t-storms
High: 890; Low: 740


WEDNESDAY
2


Mostly cloudy with
scattered t-storms
High: 880; Low: 740


Today's nigh and tonight's low temperatures


Friday
Hi Lo
Albany 92 72
Apalachicola 90 74
Bainbridge 91 72
Bristol 93 73
Columbus 93 74
Crystal Lake 81 70
Defuniak Sp. 81 68
Dothan 91 72
Enterprise 93 67
Ft. Walton Bch.89 75
Gainesville 91 72
Jacksonville 91 73
Marianna 91 74
Mobile 90 74
Montgomery 93 74
Newport 89 70
Niceville 89 74
Panama City 89 76
Pascagoula 91 '72
Pensacola 89 76
Port Si Joe 88 74
Tallahassee 91 72
valdu1ia 92 72
Wewahitchka 92 71
SWilma. 92 71


LAST 7 DAYS
Monday 8/14 ...... 89,75'0 02
Sunday Z'.I3 .. 92 7 Irj:
Saturday .8/12.. ..94-77/0.00
Friday 8/11 ... 94.-77/0.00
Thursday 810 ...92'74/0.00
Wednesday 8/9...................... 92/72/0.00
Tuesday 8/8. .9374,'002

SUN & MOON
Sunrise Sunset
Thursday8,17 ...7:10 am 8-20p.m
Friday/8/18 ......7:11 a.m.. .8:19 p.m.
Saturday 8/19 ...7:11 am. 8 18 p.m.
Sunday 8 20 .. .7:12 a.m.. .8:17 p.m.
Monday 8.'21. 1.7:12a m. 8:16 p.m.
Tuesday 8 22 7:13 3m 8-15 pm
Wednesday 8'23. 7-13a 3m. 8-14 pm

Moor:'rise Moonsei
Thursday 17 .. 1 17am...406 pm
Friday 8 18 2.083 m 505 p.m
,Salurda 8,'19.. 303 am. 558pm
Sunday 8 20 403,am 643pm r
Monday8'21 ... 5:02 a.m. 7-21 p.m.
Tuiesdm' 8 22 6:01 a.m i-55 p rm.
Wednesday 8.23 .6:58 a.m.. .8.24 r m


APALACHICOLA RIVER
Site Flood Stg. Stage Chg.
Woodrul Talldifer 66.13 3969 6 002
Criariluori.ee 3969 .002
Blourininown 150 120 -002
WewM i-fl,:-3 12?9 il004
OCHLOCKONEE RIVER
Troiuraivile 15.0 3.29 -0:11
Concord 25.18 -0.30
Havana 25.0 12.91 -0.03
Bloxham 22.0 5.82 -1.05






Extreme 'i;'K' ''


L,:-w Ikqh "ul'rjji Vtrj. Hiri L* Tin-m


IrJew Fmre iull L3"I


Aua 23 Au, 31 SerI T Sew 14


Thursday
High
Low
Friday
Higri
Low
Saturday
High
Low
Sunday
High
Low
Monday
High
Low
Tuesday
High
Low
Wed.
Hi.]h
LOW


ST. JOSEPH BAY


Saturday
Hi Lo Otlk
92 72 pc
91 75 t
92 72 pc
92 68 pc
94 73 pc
85 69 pc
86 68 pc
93 72 pc
91 68 pc
90 75 t
90 72 pc
90 73 pc
92 73 pc
92 75 pc
94 73 pc.
91 68 pc
89 74 t
90 76 pc
91 72 t
90 76 pc
89 74 pc
91 72 pc
92 72 pc
91 72 pc
91 72 pc


P.M. ft.

P.M. ft.

P.M. ft.


P.M. ft.


P.M. ft.


P.M. ft.

P.M. ft.


.2~ci .V. rtr, Li '-rill A 1(i,,:


High pressure will keep the weather quite nice through the northeastern U.S., on Thursday, as skies will remain mostly sunny.
Scattered thunderstorms will continue to be found from the mid-Atlantic states south into the southeastern U.S. Moisture will
stream north through the U.S. and help produce scattered showers and thunderstorms from the Midwest to the southern High
Plains. The West Coast will remain dry as skies will be sunny to partly cloudy.


city
Albuquerque
Anchorjge
Aiianril
Bail-rrirre
Billingrs
Birmingrham
Boise
Boslonr
Buffalo
C heyenne
Chic rgo
CircinnArii
Cleveland
Dayiori
Denver
C'es Moines
Deiroil


Today
Hi LO
87 63
63 5?
90 72
86 65
86 58
90 74
85 57
78 64
81 61
89 57
84 62
87 65
82 63
86 65
92 60
84 67
84 63


Tomorrow
Hi Lr., Oi
86 64 pc
53 50 r,
89 72 pc
86 65 s
82 57b s .
92 74 pc
87 60 S
81 66 S
82 63 S
84. 54 pc
84 66 c
88 67 pc
83 64 pc
86 66 pc
85 60 pc
83 68 t
85 69 pc


Cir
El Paso
Fairbanks
Honolulu
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Linle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York'
Omana
Orlando


Today Tomorrow
Ct,' Hi LO Oink Hi LO Olik Ciry
Ac3pulco 87 76 r 88 75 1 Geneva
Amserrdam 77 58 sn 78 61 sh Helsinki
Ainens 95 74 s 96 73 s Hong Koi
Bahidad 114 87 s 115 88 s Jerusyien
Bangkok 91 78 I 92 80 t Kaoul
Beijing 92 71 s 93 72 5 Lim.)3
Berlin 76 57 c 83 62 1 Londonr
Brussels 77 56 sh 79 63 En Madria
B'Aires 58 41 pc 55 42 s Me..coC
Cair, 97 75 s 98 76 s Monireal
Caliarv 79 58 I 82 60 1 Moscow
Dublin 67 53 sh 70 56 sri New Delh


iouay
Hi Lo 011i.
88 70 pc
61 48 sh
88 76 s
86 66 pc
95 68 pc
10076 s
93 73 pc
75 66 pc
93 75 pc
90 78 pc
80 63 pc.
84 67 pc
92 71 pc
92 77 pc
83 66 s
88 68 pc
92 74 pc


Today
Hi Lo 01il'
78 57 t
72 56 sh
ng 87 77
I 92 73 s
93 66 s
68 62 pc
70 54 srh
79 61 sh,
ity 78 58 l
74 54 s
85 64 pc
I 94 77 1


Tomorrow
Hi Li:, OlEK
90 69 pc
58 45 sh
89 75 s
87 67 pc
93 70 pc
10479 s
96 75 pc
76 66 pc
96 77 pc
91 78 pc
81 68 t
81 63 pc
91 72 pc.
91 77 t
82 69 z
87 67 t
93 75 pc


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Oilk
79 59 I
75 55 pc
88 76 1
97 74
92 67 s
67 61 pc
71 55 cir
75 57 pC
77 59 I
76 56 s
31 63 pc
98 76 I


Cry
Pniladelpnia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
PorTand, ME
Portland. OR
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St Louis
Sail Lk City
San Diego
San Fran.
Seanile
Spokane
Tucson
Wasn, D G
Wichilla


Orlanorn

Miami
90/78
Today
Hi Lo
87 67
103 83
84 61
78 55
83 59
91 57
86 67
91 56
88 71
92 61
76 66
65 55
77 57
85 54
94 75
87 68
94 73


Today
:Crv Hi Li
Oslo 70 56
Paris 75 56
RiO 84 7
Rome 87 6
Seoul 87 6
Singapore 89 7
Syvdney 67 5
Tokyo 87 7
Toronto 76 5
V.r,icouver 75 5
Vienna 84 6
Warsaw 79 6


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
86 68 s
103 81 pc
84' 63 s
77 62 s
92 61 ,s
90 55 s
88 67 s
94 57 s
91 75 pc
85 62 s
74 68 pc
66 55 pc
80 57 s
88 56 s
95 74 pc
87 69 s
96 74 pC


Tomorrow
o 011k Hi Lo Ollk
6 sh 71 52 pc
6 sh 76 57 sr,
1 s 83 72 s
5 pc 93 72 s
7 pc 85 66 pr
8 1 88 79 1
2 sh 64 45 pc
7 i 86 76 t
7 s 78 56 s
7 F. 81 58 S
3 pc 87 64 pc
0 pc 82 62 pc


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I,




i


WHAT IS THE NEW RATE?


lOW MANY DOLLARS DOES IT MEAN TO YOU?


HAVE WE MADE PROGRESS?


WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?


We are ready with the answers. Please attend our meeting this month!!!

Port St. Joe-Monday, August 28th at The Gulf County Senior Citizen Center at 7:00 p.m. ET.



Questions asked by and this ad paid for by:

CITIZENS FOR REDUCED TAXES (PAC)

P.O. BOX 1332 Port St. Joe, Florida 32457


www.CitizensForReducedTaxes.org


m'S


NORMAL
High: 89
Low: 74


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- I r I 'EI


_ C1I~' I~ ~C ~IID~I~B~Y~L PqOll~-~~LL --- --L--45sBllLe~8sb~P~~


Established 7 937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas -for 68 years


12ATheStr, ortSt Jo, F -Thursday, August 17, 2006


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Pet of the Week 4B



.@ --I


Obitiuries 4B


Law Entorcement 8B


The Star Port St. Joe FL Thursday, August 17, 2006 SECTION B


Established IVy/ Serving GUITr country anu suruuus u un i ug a u 7,u-r ..



Southern Accents Windmark Beach Showhouse:


~r.~,Idnnovatdion,


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
Cliches are most often boring and speak
of an inability to think of something innova-
tive. Classics are things that reign on the
opposite end of cliches.
When the St. Joe Company set out to
build a show house at its Windmark Beach
development in Port St. Joe, it tapped an
architect and designer who took what could
have been a giant cliche, and turned it into a
new classic.
Architect John Kirk of Cooper, Robertson
and Partners of New York, designed the 4,000
square foot show house as a five-bedroom,
five-bath residence through a series of distinc-
tive building blocks, similar to a compound.
The individual components are knitted
together by breezeways and porches that
blend, wind, connect and pleasure on both
main floors.
The Low Country style of the house is a
long-time favorite of coastal communities, in
which houses are elevated to allow breezes to
flow beneath rooms, coupled with windows all
around to allow those same breezes to flush
through the house,


Marie Logan/The Star
The luxurious side porch frames the main entrance and offers a deep, shady overhang for relax-


Generous porches with wide overhangs
help protect from the hot Florida sun, and an
old Southern staple, the dogtrot, is updated
for the 21st century.
For the uninitiated, dogtrots are long cov-
ered breezeways that unify separate sections
of a house.
But in this case, the dogtrots become cov-
ered seating, dining and entertaining areas,
connected to, yet separate from, the enclosed
living areas, allowing almost as much outdoor
living space as interior space.
Actually, the architectural layout offers
more than 3,500 square feet of outdoor space
for either socializing or private enjoyment.
The footprint of the house had to match
the fairly small piece of property, adhere to
the county's height limits, and, ideally, blend
with the unimmediate environment and meet
hurricane standards.
Kirk achieved that by building distinct
sections for the main body of the house, a
separate guest suite, and a carriage house over
the garage.
The main part of the house is basically
one large "hall" serving as the central area for
cooking, dining and sitting. The design and the
decor encourage an informal atmosphere and
personal interaction, with the kitchen at one
end, a large sitting "room" at the other, and a
full dining space in between.
Almost every area of the house is essen-
tially one room deep, allowing an enormous


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
For a period of time, Mexico Beach Director
of Public Safety Brad Hall will serve as the act-
ing city administrator of Mexico Beach, filling
the position left vacant by the dismissal of
Henry Flack.
Flack was Mexico Beach city administrator
from June, 2005, until his early termination
August 2 at the regular pre-agenda city council
meeting..
Prompted by Mayor Al Cathey, the Mexico6
Beach city council voted unanimously not to
renew Flack's contract, and to pay him his
remaining six months' salary as severance.
Two days later, on Aug. 4, a special meeting
was held in Mexico Beach, ostensibly to coordi-
nate a meeting between the Mexico Beach city
council and former Mexico Beach city adminis-
trator John Mclnnis.
Mcnnis is currently the city administrator
of Carrabelle, in Franklin County, but his con-
tract with Carrabelle expires Sept. 14.
Mclnnis confirmed on Aug. 3 that he had
been approached by Mexico Beach officials
about the newly vacant position, but sent word


through Cathey to the special meeting that he
declined the position, citing excessive media
coverage of the situation.
At the Aug. 4 meeting, according to Deborah
McLeod, Mexico Beach city clerk, the city coun-.
cil voted to go forward with researching the
procedure to use to fill the vacant position.
In the meantime, Hall will sit as acting city
administrator "until they hire somebody, then I
will definitely be going back to the Department
of Public Safety," he said.
"I can best serve the citizens of Mexico
Beach as the Public Safety Director, Hall con-
tinued. '"As I see it, someone needs to be here,
in this position, to keep things moving forward.
But I definitely plan to return to Public Safety."
While Hall is acting city administrator, cur-
rent Mexico Beach police captain John Murnan
will step in as acting Public Safety Director.
Murnan has been on the Mexico Beach
police force since 2000, in addition to serving
two years on the force in the early 1990s.
"He has been my right-hand man since
2000," said Hall.
The personnel changes are effective imme-
diately.


amount of light and scenery inside through
French doors, windows and old-fashioned
transoms. Each of the bedroom suites, one
upstairs and one on the main level, has its
own roofline, giving the rooms amazingly high
ceilings.
In fact, the master bedroom on the main
floor, separated from the core area by a
breezeway, boasts an amazing 22-foot, pale
blue and white headboard ceiling, set off by a
10-foot tall four-poster dark wood bed.
The remaining spaces have 10 to 20 foot
ceilings themselves, giving an enormous sense
of airiness throughout the house, even in the
darker, more enclosed breezewavs.
Designer Phillip Sides. ASID, is the
Alabama-born interior designer who took the
house that John built and made of it an immi-
nently livable home.
It is topped with a shiny metal roof, and is
painted (outside) a yellow-green with oxblood
and white accents. White porch columns and
trim, and a white pool patio and pergola in
front of the house complete the package.
The entire design is casual, even beachy,
but decidedly sophisticated.
Yet with all its amenities, the house
remains intentionally simple. "It reminded me
of the farmhouses I grew up with," said Sides,
who used that influence as the overall theme
for his decorating scheme.

(See SHOWHOUSE on Page 12B)


Golf Carts in Mexico




Beach Now Legal


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
Drivers, start your engines. Mexico Beach
is poised to become the Beachfront Brickyard.
Exaggeration perhaps, but applications for
golf cart licenses are now being accepted at the
Department of Public Safety in Mexico Beach,
next to Mexico Beach City'Hall, said Laura
Metcalf, administrative assistant for the depart-
ment.
People wanting to apply for a license can go
to Metcalf's office in the department, fill out the
paperwork, pay a $15 yearly fee, and receive a
valid license and a copy of the rules and regu-
lations governing operation of golf carts within
the city limits of Mexico Beach.
Golf cart operation is regulated under
Florida State Statute 316, Uniform Traffic
Laws, and Mexico Beach City Ordinance 516.
The following are legal requirements in Mexico
Beach:
Golf carts cannot be modified in speed,
power, wheel base, or tires from a standard
manufactured gas or electric golf cart.
Golf carts can operate on all city streets
with a speed limit posted no more than 25
miles per hour.
Golf carts cannot operate on 15th Street
or U.S. 98.
Golf carts cannot cross over U.S. 98.
Operation of golf carts on the right of way of
U.S. 98 is strictly prohibited by the Florida
Department of Transportation.
Mexico Beach Chief of Public Safety Brad
Hall confirmed that it is illegal for golf carts to
cross U.S. 98 to park on the beach side of the
highway, and illegal for golf carts to travel along
the right of way on either side of U.S. 98.
Operation of golf carts on private prop-


erty, except by cart owner, is prohibited unless
written consent is on file with the registration.
If the property owner is present, verbal consent
may be given.
Golf carts are permitted to operate during
daylight hours only.
During low light conditions (fog, rain,
smoke, etc.), carts must be equipped with
headlights, brake lights, turn signals, and a
windshield.
All golf carts are motor vehicles and must
abide by all traffic laws. They must be operated
in the same manner as a car (stop signs, yield
right of way, etc.).
Drivers of golf carts must hold a valid
driver's license.
All golf carts must be registered.
Registrations are on an annual basis. All regis-
trations expire January of each year.
All registrations are expired/cancelled as
of January 31 of each year.
All golf cart violations shall result in a
minimum $50 fine. Registration violations can
result in a $250 fine if a golf cart is in operation
after its registration has been revoked.
The golf cart ordinance is effective imme-
diately.
There has also been a change in the
parking citations payment location in Mexico
Beach.
Effective immediately, people paying park-
ing tickets in person will pay them at Metcalf's
office, just inside the Department of Public
Safety, instead of at City Hall.
"We think this change will lessen confusion
for the public, and make it easier for citizens to
pay their parking fines," said Metcalf.


Marie Logan/The Star
A view of the private spa off the main floor master suite as seen from the second-floor walkway.





Hall Steps in as Mexico




Beach Administrator


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Stewarts Celebrate Birth
Alice and Dave Stewart proudly announce the birth of
their daughter, Shannon Caroline, born July 20, 2006 at Gulf
Coast Medical Center. Shannon weighed 8 lbs. 9.6 ounces and
was 19.5 inches long. Maternal grandparents are George and
Gayle Kennington of Port St. Joe. Paternal grandparents are
Mary Loflin of Panama City, and John and Phyllis Stewart of
Butte, Montana.


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-4..^


Happy 2nd Birthday
On July 30 Jacob Bailey Lynn celebrated his 2nd Birthday
with his cousins Trinitey Lynn, Shannon, Bridgett, Bret,
Garit, Jason, Amy, and Maggie Miller, Robie and Renee Lynn,
his brother Blake Lynn and grandparents John B. and Pam
Faircloth.


Welcome Home Jackson
Adam and Heather would like to announce the birth of their
son, Jackson Blake Taunton.


Matthews/Dykes


Final Wedding Plans
Final plans for the wedding of Christa Noel Dykes and
David Michael Matthews Jr. have been set. The wedding will
be held August 19, at the Constitution Park in Port St. Joe,
FL at 6:00pm ET. The reception will follow at the Centenial
Building. NO local invitations will be sent. All family and
friends are cordially invited to share this special occasion
With them.

2006 Annual Noma

Community Reunion Notice
The annual Noma Community Reunion will be held in
the Noma Town Hall building on Saturday, September 2,
2006. The town hall will open at 10:00am and lunch will be
served at 12:00 noon.
All past and present residents and their friends are
cordially invited to attend. People planning to attend ate
asked to bring a well-filled basket of their favorite dishes.
Also, please bring tea, if that is the beverage you prefer.
Soft drinks, ice, cups, plates, and eating utensils will 4e
furnished.
This gathering, held on Saturday before Labor Day,
strengthens the bonds of friendship and lets us relive
memories of the past, renew our ties with the land that
once nourished us and walk among the graves of our dear,
departed kinsmen.
Anyone desiring additional information is urged to
contact Nora Edgarton at (850) 263-3200.


Lov'e Vad4, Motr, fac"&o",



To have your Wedding or
Birthday photo print in color
there will be a $10.00 Fee.
Deadline is Monday at 5:00 p.m.
for Thursday's paper


Thanks for helping us help them

recognize their "VISION".


SOME MIGHT QUESTION WHAT 570 HAMBURGERS CAN DO TO HELP A COMMUNITY.
On Friday, August 4th, they helped Vision Bank and Carpet Country raise $4,200 for a family building a house
through the help of HABITAT FOR HUMANITY. Now, we want to THANK YOU, our community, for your
support of this fundraiser. Without the help of area businesses, friends, families and neighbors, we could not
have helped this family recognize their"vision".
""* N l-^ -- riiir1 1i ^ --


Vision Bank
"Your Community Bank"
Member
FDIC s a
www. visionbankfl.net


(ARPET(COUNTRY
STANDING ON OUR REPUTATION
SINCE 1986
www.carpetcountrypsj.com


Downtown Redevelopment Agency


4,,


Community Forum &

Redevelopment Plan

Update WorKshop


Existing DRA
North Port St. Joe
Waterfronts Partnership

The Gulf County Government, the City of Port St. Joe, and the Port St. Joe Downtown
Redevelopment Agency (DRA) invite you to participate in the updating of the DRA's
Community Redevelopment Plan, Attendees will be asked for their input regarding the
future development of PSJ and to help prioritize projects and programs identified in
previous vision workshops.


Your participation is welcomed and highly valued.
:" -._ -AA 4-a i.. ;.


Date:
Time:
Where:
RSVP:


Thursday, August 31, 2006
5 PM (Dinner will be provided)
Senior Citizen's Center-120 Library Drive
Gail Alsobrook 850-229-6899
gailalsobrook@yahoo.com


Reservations are not required but will assist us in planning for the meals.


Downtown
Redevelopment Agency

101 Reid Avenue, Suite 109
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


Phone:
Fax:
E-mail:


"Planning is bringing the future into the
present so that you can do something
about it now" Alan Lakein


850-229-6899
850-229-6898
gailalsobrook@yahoo.com


mmmumummod


.Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Established 1937


2B he ta, PrtSt.Jo, F -Thursday, August 17, 2006


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A Miracle At Bay St. Joe

Care & Rehabilitation Center
0 ited


Locks of Love Donations!


- This is the story of Noma
Armstrong and Rhetta Shirah
two resident's at Bay St.
Joe Care & Rehabilitation
Center.
At some point in time
we have all most likely lost
communication with a family
member or a loved one....
But, how often does it occur
that we are actually living
-right down the hall from
one another with no idea of
each others existence. By


chance this is exactly what
happened with two ladies
admitted to Bay St. Joe Care
& Rehabilitation Center.
The ladies were engaged
in therapy, when one asked
the other, after over hearing
a conversation between the
resident and therapist. "Noma,
is that you?" To her surprise
and joy, she replied Yes it's
me." "Who are you"? I'm
Rhett, your cousin." It seems
that in the realm of time they


had lost communication with
each other as it seems many
of us do at times.
If it was meant to be,
they were reunited just in the
nick of time, since one of the
ladies were to be discharged
from the facility thevery next
day. On a positive note: they
said they are planning to keep
in touch.
We wish them well.


Two young girls donated their hair over. the summer to
Locks of Love. Girls are Jaclyn Kerigan and Jena Hogan.
Kandi Rollins owner of Kandi's Kountry Kuts wanted to
thank these girls for their donations.


2, '


Gulf County Democratic Committee

Invites Candidates to Speak
The Gulf County Democratic Executive Committee will have a meeting on August 24,
1006 at 6:30 p.m. E.T.
The location of the meeting will be the Gulf County Senior Citizens and Community
Center at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe.
We invite all Democratic candidates to come, speak and present your platform. We are
inviting local and state candidates. All interested voters may come and hear the candidates
at'this time.



F Integras Therapy
Announces the addition of Deep Soft Tissue Massage
Therapist- Teresa Bailey
FL. Lic. #MA41804 No Prescription necessary


-T ~ I


-, .-
0 I. : g


$11,500
20,000 miles
Stock # UC 1020


2002 BuickLeSabre


S21,800
-. .. ." 24,500 miles
200 Stock # UC1078
2003 Nissan Exterra


$-- 18,900 1 $9,500
23,000 miles '_ 9110,000miles
Stock # PT9930 Stock #UT056
2005 Dodge Grand Caravan 2000 Ford Truck XLT




.L.. L.iL,- $15,900 $ 4 11,900
38,000 miles ~ ii.-..., 87,000 miles
Stock # UT0999 ,' 3 ,, Stock #UT1050
2004 Chevrolet 1500 Work Truck 2002 Chevy Astro Van


..$24,800
13,000 mile
-r -ii WARRANTY
Stock #
2005 Ford Explorer PT1020


2004Jee[Laredo


-$16,900
42,000 miles
Stock # UT052


c-u" 1k
196 w 9 Ws
Pot tJo, L325
(80)22-66


Therapeutic Massage
May Benefit:
Depression
Diabetes
Fibromyalgia
Multiple Sclerosis
Muscle Tension
Pregnancy
Sports Injuries
Stress
Whiplash
MANY MORE!!


w ".'


Massage has been shown to Increase Circulation,
Reduce Blood Pressure, Relieve Arthritis Pain,
Headaches, Joint and Muscle aches. Relieve Carpal
Tunnel and other repetitive Stress Syndromes.
Additionally, massage enhances the body's
Immune Functions.
Please Phone: 850-209-2601 or 850-229-1900
For appointments in Mexico Beach, Beacon Hill,
Port Saint Joe and surrounding areas.
280 Four J's Road, Beacon Hill
17352 Main Street North, Blountstown


TheStr, or S. JeFL- Turda, A gut 7, 00 -3B


Fqfnh/bchhed 1937 Servina Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


t






*R l lt; J1UI/I 1Il .I. J+ ; I I iir2 0l 1i, ng ,


t of thz Week

w l Available now for adop-
tion from the St. Joseph Bay
Humane Society -
SMolly, a nice white english
a. bulldog female; (pictured),
Rosco, a chocolate lab male
pup about seven months old,
,-..- Jasper a seven months old
S.-" bulldog pup, Hound pups six
months old (1st shots), Boots
... a ten week old kitten, Jeter -
a grown black lab male, Betsy
a six month old hound mix,
,. always kittens! Come See.
S' Please visit Faith's Thrift
: ., Hut, 1007 Tenth Street.


Vacation Home Raffle To Support Rob Bernal


Rob Bernal is well-
known member of the Port St.
Joe community who suffered
a serious spinal cord injury in
a recent swimming accident.
He is currently at the inten-
sive care unit in Bay Medical
Center recovering, and has
experienced significant medi-
cal expenses. Unfortunately,
Rob did not have health insur-
ance, and is in need of our
community's support.
To help raise money
for Rob, Pristine Properties
Vacation Rentals has donated
a one-week vacation at a beau-
tiful new Cape San Blas home
which sleeps 8, in Seagrass
subdivision. The one-week


vacation can be used anytime
before September 30, 2007,
and is a $2000 value. Tickets
at $10 each are being sold
in a raffle, with all proceeds
going to the Rob Bernal Fund,
established at Prosperity
Bank. The drawing will be
held on September 8t' during
halftime of the home football
game. The winner does not
have to be present to accept
their prize.
If you would like to pur-
chase raffle tickets to benefit
Rob and maybe win a free
vacation stay in a luxurious
beach home stop by any
of Pristine Properties three
offices:, Port St. Joe 317


Turtle Sighting at



Indian Pass


Even the Turtle Patrol
volunteer stopped to check out
the realistic looking sanrd turtle
sculpture recently at Indian
Pass, according to Indian Pass
resident Jim Lloyd.
The sand artist was Elaine
Miller, 17, of Spartenburg,
South Carolina, who spent
a good part of the summer
with her grandparents, Bob
and Dianne Grace, helping
with the construction of a
large concrete swimming pool


A happy sand turtle at Indian
Carolina visitor Elaine Miller.


-Interiors


and pool house at the Grace's
Indian Pass residence.
According to Lloyd, who
is Miller's uncle, Miller had
Sunday off from the pool
project and spent much of the
day enjoying the beach and
creating sand sculptures.
"Those who know Elaine's
grandmother and her great
aunt Daphne Lloyd, also of
Indian Pass, understand that
Elaine's artistic talent is 'in the
genes,'" said Lloyd.


Pass is the work of South


Etcetera<

Must Move-

iClothing & Gifts

Take 60% off

tn make room


Monument Avenue; Cape San
Blas 1250 Cape San Bias
Road; Mexico Beach 102 N.
3661 Street.
Special thanks goes to
Ramsey's Printing & Office


I Whether buying or selling, for the


', -. service you de
^ Linda L.


a


serve, call
Somero
ABR, GRI, Broker
Associate
(850) 866-1269
I-


Sil's Home Center
1023 N. Tyndall Parkway
Panama City, FL 32404
1-800-239-4671

"V&f, qaou'e4 d c l omeA J ce 1957"


LOST DOG
ini Pin. Male
If found please call
229-1036
...i rP^~i f' "


Bernal Benefit
An Aug. 5 barbecue
in Frank Pate Park raised
$11,300 for the medical care
of Rob Bernal, an employee
of Jerry's Framing in Port St.
Joe who was injured in a July
7 diving accident.
Bernal's friends and family
would like to thank the follow-
ing businesses and individuals
for their help in making the
fundraiser a success:
Walker's Dixie Dandy
Sisters Restaurant
George Duren, Piggly
Wiggly
VEW
Mark Moore
Prosperity Bank
Dockside
Raffield Fisheries
Woods Fisheries
Piggly Wiggly in
Apalachicola
Bayside
C.Q. Development
Bayside Cabinets
Lee's Auto
Gracie's ,
IGA in Apalachicola
Bernal is currently recov-
ering in Bay Medical Center.
An account has been set
up in his name at Prosperity
Bank, PO Drawer 609, 528
Cecil Costin, Sr. Blvd.
Please help.


Products for donating the raf-
fle tickets.
For more information
call Alyson Gerlach, 850-229-
1700.


"fil
sqI


i i_


You could win a week vacation in this home.


ITnn T_ Matlnek Geraldine


Mr. John L. Matlock, 69,
of Wewahitchka, passed away
Saturday, August 12, 2006
in Panama City, Florida. A
native of Texarkana, Ark., he
has been a resident of Gulf
County since 1958 and was
retired from, St. Joe Paper
Company.
Survivors include his
wife, Dorothy Matlock of
Wewahitchka; a son, Allen
Matlock of Stroud, OK; his
daughters, Edwina Matlock
(Bobby Johnson) of Port Saint
Joe, Cindy Ake (Timothy) of
Wewahitchka, and Julie Miller
(Stephen) of Wewahitchka; a
sister Jackie Fall (Mike) of
Texarkana, Ark., two broth-
ers, Charlie Matlock of Wake
Village, TX, and George

Please do not feed
the wild dolphins in
the bay. Remember to
stay at least 50 yards
away from wild dol-


phins. Use binoculars
to watch them play. V)


Matlock of Arkansas; a grand-
daughter, Carla Johnson;
and two grandsons, Dillion
Ake and Jacob Barlow.
The funeral service will
be held at 11:00 a.m. EDT
Tuesday at the Oak Grove
Assembly of God Church,
Conducted by the Rev. David
Fernandez. Interment will fol-
low in Pleasant Rest Cemetery
in Overstreet. He will lie in
state at the Comforter Funeral
Home in Port Saint Joe on
Monday evening from 6:00
until 8:00 p.m. EDT (5:00
until 7:00 p.m. CDT), and at
the church for an hour prior
to the Funeral.
All services are under the
direction of the Comforter
Funeral Home.


Mrs. Geraldine Ann Pauga
72, loving matriarch of her
family traveled on to a new
beginning August 9, 2006. She
leaves behind Roy, her husband
of 53 years; and four children
Deborah, Steven, Peter, and
John, along with their families.
Geraldine was blessed with
three grandchildren, Daniel,


I


Mrs. Evelyn Jean Dean
passed away from this life to
her eternal home Tuesday,
August 8, 2006 at 3:30 a.m.
CT at her home 1722 Highway
71 South Wewahitchka, FL.
Mrs. Dean had been
a lifelong resident of
Wewahitchka. She is sur-
vived by her beloved husband
of 44 years, Grady Dean and
three sons, Calvin G. Dean
and wife Jennifer, Danny
Dean and wife Michelle, and
Christopher Dean; grand-
children, Jacob Dean, Corey
Dean, Calvin Dean III, Phillip
Dean and Logan Dean; one
sister, Annie. Gibson; one
brother, Ruel Smith; numer-
ous nieces, nephews, and
cousins.


I


Ann Pauga
Nicole, and Johnathan, and
her first great granddaughter,
Adison, her "Sweet Pea". We all
wish Mom a speedy journey.
She will be so greatly missed
by all who knew and loved
her. Services were provided by
Comforter Funeral Home, 601
Long Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL.


Funeral services were
held Friday August 11, 2006
at 11:00 a.m. CDT at Glad
Tiding Assembly of God
Church in Wewahitchka with
the Rev. Carey Newton and
,-the Rev. Joey Smith officiat-
ing. The visitation was held
Thursday, August 10, 2006
from 6:00 until 8:00 p.m.
CDT at the Calvary Chapel
Church of God 119 Bay
Avenue, Wewahitchka, FL.
Those who would like
may make a donation to
Calvary Chapel Church of
God Building Fund in Mrs.
Dean's memory.
All services are under the
direction, of the Comforter
Funeral Home, Wewahitchka
Branch Chapel.


PSJ.9, 9


for "new" items

arriving daily ,% ci:
!arriving da iy "Because We Care" Yachts: 30 65 feet
247 Tyndall Parkway, Callaway Larger vessels: 1,000 ton
Touda78 C1316 a \Marine Rail
Hours j www.PSJBoatworks.com
10-00 5-1 www.GCShip.com
110:00-5:30 Tohatsu outboard dealer

Tuesday-Saturday Joe D. Gainer, Justin M. Kent, Local Owners At the junction of Gulf County Canal and
y an ,C a ICW nearWhite City
S "Serving Ba and Gulf Counties" Call first and ask for Red or Troy
% Jl xng. .ay andy G.#'',ounties".


Evelyn Jean Dean


Thank You


for Your


Support

I would like to extend my
appreciation to the following
sponsors who made my trip to
the 2006 AAU National Junior
Olympics in Hampton Roads,
VA possible:
Gold Sponsors: Big
Beast Entertainment, Pryor's
Mobile Detailing, Philip's Meat
& Seafood, Inc., Paul Gant's
BBQ, Daniel and Kimberly
Guettler, Emerald Coast
Credit Union, City of Port St.
Joe, Zion Fair Baptist Church,
Dwana Parker
Silver Sponsors:
Bayside Savings Bank,
Norris Langston Youth
Foundation, Williams
Plumbing, Inc., Mr. and Mrs.
Billy Quinn, Jr., Danny and
Nicki Little, New Life Christian
Center, New Covenant Outreach
Center, Sarah and Ed Franklin,
Dr. and Mrs. Raymond Gant,
Garry L Gaddis Construction,
LLC.
Bronze Sponsors:
Victory Temple, Pastor
Johnny and Shirley Jenkins,
Lena Morning, Linda Griffin,
George Cox, Raymond
Driesbach, Chester and
Maxine Gant. A specialthanks
to the citizens of Gulf County
who made donations, bought
raffle tickets and ate chicken
dinners. Without your support
and encouragement this trip
would not have been success-
ful. Congratulations to Dale
Marshall of Wewahitchka, win-
ner of two (2) hungry man
dinners from the raffle held on
July 28, 2006. To my Coaches,
Keion McNair and Zyrius Hill,
I would like to thank: you for
all the time you spent studying
tapes, researching techniques
on the internet and, yes, those
countless drills on the track.
Remember a TRACK coach,
parent, grandparent, and fan
NEVER stop RUNNING.
Thank you,
Kayla Parker


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county andl surrounding areas for 68 years


AR k, (fn Pnt t-lo F -ThrsavAuus 1, 006


Alll IIU O U /IU / ,J o I6 ,, V O u /" ./ .


I I


qLFAAAA JLA* LWAL %4&ILAFoA%






t


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and Monument Port St. Joe
(850) 227-1724


TRICARE briefing
There will be a TRICARE briefing for all
active duty personnel, retirees and dependents
1 p.m. Aug. 18 at the Raptor Conference Room
in the Tyndall Clinic. This briefing is open to
all TRICARE and TRICARE For Life benefi-
ciaries who are interested in their health care
program. A question and answer session will
follow a formal briefing on health benefits and
'affairs. For more information, call 283-7331.
Security Forces to step up traffic
enforcement
Due to an increasing amount of complaints
of fast and dangerous driving occurring on the
base, Security Forces will be increasing its traf-
fic enforcement throughout Tyndall and would
like to remind everyone of the following speed
limits in place on Tyndall.
Anywhere on Tyndall 30 mph (unless
otherwise posted)
Housing areas 15 mph (unless otherwise
posted)
Any designated parking lot 10 mph
Installation gates (entry/exit) 15 mph
Passing marching/running formations 5
rmph
U.S. Highway 98 as posted
RAO here may .close soon
The Retirees Activities Office may close
'soon unless more people volunteer to keep it
running. The RAO provides a source of infor-
mation for the retiree community about pay
and entitlements, vehicle registration, identifi-
cation cards and more.
Office hours are 9 a.m. to noon Tuesday,
Wednesday, and Thursday. Volunteers can
work as many or as few hours per week as they.
desire. For more information or to volunteer,
call 283-2737, or e-mail rao@tyndall.af.mil;
Commissary 'Dollar Days'
"Dollar Days" will continue .until Aug. 23
at the Tyndall Commissary. Hundreds of items
throughout the store \\ill feature dollar pricing.
Customers should look for the "Extra Sa\igs"-
signs, throughout the Commissary to find the
best deals. For more information, call 283-
4285.


Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m.
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m.

Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m,
Methodist Youth Fellowship: 6:00p.m.
Evening Worship: 7:00 p.m.
K All Times are EST


Rev. Malcolm "Mac" Fulcher
PASTOR
Jeff Withy
Minister ofMauicdYouth
Deborab Loyls
Director of Children Minitries


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
' g Ianb view 3aptigt Curb)
382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
3 r(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.


Happenings



at New Bethel

There will be a yard sale at New Bethel
A.M.E. Church, 146 Avenue C. Saturday August
19, 2006. Sale starts at 8 a.m.
New Bethel A.M.E. will be celebrating its
annual Women's Day Sunday August 20, 2006,
beginning with Sunday School at 9:30 a.m.
Ms. Barbara Lee, a member of Yes Lord
Church of God In Christ, Chipley Florida will
be the guest speaker for the 11 a.m. worship
service.
Everyone is invited to come and join us
in the celebration of this glorious occasion.
Dinner will be served.
The church is located at 146 Avenue C.
Rev. Jimmie L. Williams III, Pastor.



The Wrong Call
Do you have a perfect family?.
I haven't seen one yet.
In every family that ever lived, someone
had regret.
Parental favoritism has caused many prob-
lems in families through the years.
It has caused much dissension between
parents and kids, and they've shed many
tears.
Just like Jacob and Esau, with father lov-
ing one, and mother loving the other.
It caused Jacob to lie and steal, and turned
Esau against his brother.
His mother feared for his life, so she sent
him to live with her kin.
This is what being deceitful can do, for she
never saw him again.
Although 20 years later, God finally led hun
back home. /
He was welcomed back by Esau. so that he
never more wanted to roam.
Just think, this was 20 years wasted, it,
shouldn't have happened at all.
It happened because greed got in the way.
and a parent made the wrong call.
Billy Johniison


V o'r, ..mn,n Fr,'ndJ ,1t
Oak Grove .ssembl of God
12n'/iJ .1 *Frn. inda 'Pastor
Otfle: 502: 137 'Par.,oni. e 350-229 271
: 013 .-td n Strr "Poert 5r lob F

5und rla P,', aM II 45tm4 .'I6IM l-,'1' /, i rm
\j : 'n ri.1fi'"reI 1044am .ifinrr, in .Lro'n icfw
ri. .fnar I rL .irnm
i- L-4n i nier, T u.itn t, iV 1 m
0i~ri l," PrIM. i iS V'r;hir rt-I,'h4tl ?. Are1'1r73


Morning Worship
Evening Service
Discipleship Training
Wednesday Prayer


11:00 a.m.
7:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
24292


i Cathoic Church of GuNf Con

St. Joseph Parish
20th & Monument, Port St Joe, FL, 227-1417
All Mass times EDT:
Saturday: 4:00 pm, Sunday: 9:30
Monday, Thursday. Friday: 9:30 am
Wednesday: 5:30 pm
En Espanol: 8:00 am, last Sunday of Month
St. Lawrence Mission
788 N Hwy 71 Wewahitchka, FL
Sunday: 11:00 am (CDT)


S "O~iitr lOinrili can bi l-our Ihonme

S First Church of the :k a.arcnc
S :.20 ,Lo i '. nn, Port St 1, *Trl a;i d
(850) 229-9596


.u J r ,d .i y S i' h ,:i, i 1 l I i j i .
SurilSd, Moii W,', .ip 11 a m
isuril,h' t oriiin- ,r r0l mr. [) Ti
Vvdje', o.'dv bvinrie r Servie [ m.




N uch of Alexict Sea&
11 North 22nd Street Me.-ico Beach, FL 32410
SudoatWorshipStmice: 9:00 am. CST
S SuiySool: 10:15 a m. CST.
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexico Beach United Methodist (hurh
NUrSLI POVeIDD
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820


family Life o(huh
"Touching Lives with the Love of Jesus"


Join us in worship ... ..,,, .
10:30 Sunday Morning .. 98
7:00 Wednesday Evening < >
Pastors Andrew -
&
Cathy Rutherford Reid Ave.
Rhema Bible Training Center graduates Family, eci us h
Visit our websiie at:
familylifechurch.net v w-sh,'aehkl
323 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe 229-LIFE (5433)


Senior Airman Jennifer Dantzler, 28th Test
.'Squadron electronic warfare technician, hooks
up wires on to the electronic, warfare defense
pod used on Air Force fighter jets. The squadron,
one of Tyndall's tenant units, won the Air Force
Association's 2006 Theodore Von Karman Award
. for outstanding contributions to national defense
in the field of science and engineering related to
aerospace activities. Electronic warfare systems
like the one pictured here and its associated
capabilities are part of more than 400 test mis-
sions in support of 17 programs accomplished in,
2006 across the Combat Air Forces. Specifically,
the pod in the picture is an essential tool for test-
ing and training on F-15- ndF-16 aircraft radar
and avionics suites.


Come into


The Star

today to let everyone in the
community know what's
happening in your church!


"The Churches of Christ Salute You"
Romans 16:16

The Wewahitchka Church of Christ
Meets At 2241 Hwy. 71 South, Wewahitchka
(1/4 Mile North, of the Overstreet Road)
(850) 639-5401
Sunday Bible Study 9-00 a.m. CT
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. & 5:00 p.m. CT
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. CT


church of Christ
at the Beaches
Established 33 AD in Jerusalem


We meet at 314 Firehouse Road
Overstreet 850.647.1622
Sunday Bible Study 10:00am EST
Sunday Worship 11:00am EST
Wednesday Bible Study 7:30pm EST
"We are about our Fathers business"





CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS


Singing:
Worship:


9 a.m. Sunday
9:30 a.m. Sunday


Worship with us at

Long Avenue Baptist Church


Where Faith, Family &


Friendship are found 4
Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pm
Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm


[I 1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL For More Information Call 229-8691
' Ca--- ,'


WORSHIP





SAT THE CHURCH


OF YOUR CHOICE


A A A


TheStr, or St Je, L ThrsayAuust17 206 5


FEzmh~i--;hed 7937 Servina Gullf cournty and surrounding areas for 68 years


,hee m &mine6ew moite you to viwit Ue du&e c&"e of ywi cfu&ice thio week

SOUTHERLAND FAMILY COMFORTER COSTING & COSTING Rish, Gibson, Scholz
FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL HOME LAW OFFICES & Groom, P.A.
W. P. "Rocky" Comforter Charles A. Costin WilliamJ. Rish, Thomas S.Gibson,
507 10th Street* Port St Joe L.F.D. Personal Injury Real Estate Russell Scho Paul W. GroomnI
Workers' Compensation
(850) 229-8111... (850) 227-1818,, (850) 227-1159 (850) 229-8211


Mike Westbrook,
Pastor


Call 229-8310
WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. 0. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32457
K Corner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue j



iBEACHBAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDA : ,.:, ,i A.. ,Aintl, H' i a.m. Bible Study all ages 10 a.m.
D :.1 .:. i- r i i Evening Worship 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Choir Practice 6 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"0 t L..i I .. ... t v J'. .. .
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-5026 Home 769-8725



^ TFirst iBaptist Chufrch
.- 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE

:Brent Vickery. Pastor
Buddy Casavell, Ai,rnster of Aiusic & Educoafon
Michael Rogers, Mnoister to Students
Sunday School ... 9:45 am
Worship Service 8:30 & 11.00 am
Disciple Training ... 6:00 pm
Evening Worship ... 7:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..... 6.30 pm
Mon-Fri Devotion on 105 5 FM 7:49 am ET





First Baptist Church
MEXICO BEACH
-t /Sii C '.ii '. -
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Worship Sunda\s at 10 00 m and 6-00 p m.
Bible Study Sundas, ati 00 a m iall ageil
Wednesday Pra %er and Bible Study at 6 30 p m
Please note, all times central
'..! -, l...I Edih ; Latrhlr.7l


p ul "A Reformed Voice
1 3l'2.n, in the Community"

Ii)I .,fkAj ,,%- c Dr. Bill Taylor, Pastor
Sunday School .......................... 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Fellowship.................. 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Service". ......... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service ........... 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Night (Bay St. Joseph) 6:30 p.m.
Thursday Firehouse Fellowship .... 6:00 p.m.
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-6707
Home of Faith Christian School

TO KNOW CHRISTAND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN

r ST. JAMES

EPISCOPALCHURCH

800 22nd STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45
Child Care Provided for at 11:00
.www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org 850-227-1845


.- -


-t/.2 CO 12 i12,


I.


*I







it o .o Lru1 2 6b e 7g l u a r d r o y


events


Cd eun{r


Meeting Schedule for Local Government
Gulf County School Board
The School Board meets once a month,
typically the second Tuesday of the month,
though during the summer that schedule is
subject to change. Meetings are typically con-
ducted at district offices located on Middle
School Drive in Port St. Joe, though during the
school year the board conducts one monthly
meeting at high schools at each end of the
county.
The next School Board workshop will be
held Aug. 28 at 1 p.m. in the board meeting
room.
A public hearing on the budget will be held
Sept. 13 at 4:30 p.m., followed by the School
Board's regular meeting at 6 p.m.
Postings of all School Board regular and
special meetings and workshops can be found
at the district offices.


CPR




Classes

Your monthly CPR
reminder. Gulf County EMS is
teaching several CPR classes
a month.
August 15th 8-12 at the
PSJ Fire Department
September 5th 8-12 at the
Gulf County EOC
September 26th 8-12 at
the Gulf County EOC
If you wish to set up a
class at your facility the mini-
mum requirement is 6 people.
The cost is $35 per student.
If you have any questions
or wish to set up your own
class call Jarrod at 850-229-
8002.

Thank-you,
Shane McGuffin
Paramedic / EMS Director


City of Port St. Joe
The Port St. Joe City Commission con-
ducts regular meetings twice a month, on the
first and third Tuesdays of the month at 6 p.m.
ET in the Commission meeting room on the
second floor of City Hall on Cecil G. Costin
Blvd. near Reid Avenue.
Postings of all City Commission regular
ahd special meetings and workshops can be
found at City Hall.
City of Wewahitchka
The Wewahitchka City Commission con-
ducts regular. meetings twice a month, on the
second and fourth Mondays of each month at
6 p.m. CT in the first floor meeting room at
City Hall.
Postings of all City Commission regular
and special meetings and workshops can be
found at City Hall on Second Street.
Board of County Commissioners
The Board of County Commissioners


Labor Day


Pageant

Join Us...
August 26 at 3 pm
Labor Day Pageant
Eastpoint Vol. Fire
Dept.
Out of Town Judges
No Double Crowning
Deadline for Entries
Aug. 18
Contact Pam
670-8093 or 227-6619

30th Annual Boggy

Bayou Mullet Festival

The 30t Annual Boggy
Bayou Mullet Festival prom-
ises a great time for the
entire family, with enter-
tainment and the highest
quality fine arts and home
crafts.


Send Your Community Events to:
Write To: Be sure to put Community
The Star/Community Events News as the subject when
P.O. Box 308 e-mailing.
Port St Joe, FL 32457
FaxTo: .. Ann6dincements'are limited
(85 2^A# $ to0 ords0e0trfIndor a
E-mail To -" maximum of 4 weeks.
starnews@starfl.com


Bluewave ST. JOSEPH BAY,
Date Time Ht. Time Ht.
Builders In Aug 17 05 02A 2 00 H 04.44P -0 13 L
; CRC#1327M Aug 18 06:17A 2.04 H 05:57P -0.17 L

SS h47_--33US Aug 19 07:35A 2.06 H 06 56P -0.18 L


Aug 20 08:42A 2.07 H 07:39P -0.14 L
Aug 21 09:35A 2.03 H 08:08P -0.05 L
Aug 22 10:17A 1.93 H 08:23P 0.09 1L


blueWavebUilders~ry ahoo corn


Aug 23


10:52A 1.78 H 08:23P


0.28 L


Home Ownership Pool (HOP) Program Funding
Housing Down Payment Assistance Opportunities

To all Gulf County Developers:'

The Gulf County Community Development Corporation
(GCCDC) is conducting a workshop to introduce the Hom-
eownership Pool (HOP) Program to our local developers.

Homeownership Pool Program

The Florida Housing Finance Corporation's Homeown-
ership -Pool ("HOP") Program is designed to be a non
competitive and on-going program with non profits and
for profit organizations, developers and Community Hous-
ing Development Organizations (CHDO's), counties and
eligible municipalities that are recipients of SHIP funding
and the United States :Department of Agriculture Rural
Development (USDA-RD) to provide purchase assistance
on a first-come first serve basis.

Eligible homebuyers, whose adjusted income does not
exceed 80% AMI, receive a 0% deferred second mort-
gage loan for the lesser of 25% of the purchase price of
the home or $70,000 or the amount necessary to meet
underwriting criteria (with the exception of Eligible Home-
buyers with disabilities and Eligible Homebuyers at 50%
AMI or below, which are limited to 35%of the purchase
price or $80,000).

WHAT: HOP Workshop

WHEN: August 23, 2006 at 12:00pm

WHERE: ST JOE Building 3rd Floor Conference Room

RSVP Required Please Contact Dannie. E. Bolden or
Lawren Massey 850 229-7986.


conducts regular meetings twice a month, at 6
p.m. ET on the second and fourth Tuesdays of
each month in the Commission meeting room
located in the Robert Moore Administrative
Building next to the County Courthouse on
Cecil G. Costin Blvd.
Postings of all regular and special meetings
and workshops can be found at the Robert
Moore Administrative Building.
City of Mexico Beach
The Mexico Beach City Council conducts
its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. CT on
the second Tuesday of each month in the Civic
Center located behind the business district on
30th and 31st Streets.
Postings of all regular and special meet-
ings and workshops can be found at City Hall,
located on 141h Street, or the Civic Center.
County Economic Development Council
The EDC conducts a monthly meeting, typ-
ically during the lunch hour of the first Tuesday


Kiwanis Club



Pancake Breakfast

The Kiwanis Club of Port St. Joe is hosting its annual
Pancake Breakfast on Saturday, August 26 at Dockside Caf6
from 6-10 a.m. Tickets are $5 per person. Each year members.
of the Kiwanis Club wake up early, brew coffee, cook sausage and
flip pancakes for members of the community. Come before or
after the sun rises. Enjoy the morning at the marina, sitting in
the early light, listening to the St. Joe Bay, 'as a Kiwanis member
pours fresh coffee into your mug. There will be plenty of syrup
and stacks of pancakes. All the proceeds go to Kiwanis projects,,
including scholarships for Gulf County students, Christmas din-
ner baskets, and improvements at local parks.
For any information on the event, please contact Linda
Griffin, President of the club. Tickets may be purchased from
any Kiwanis member and also Port St. Joe High School Key
Club and Keyette members. Some of the proceeds will also go to
help the school clubs' projects. Anyone interested in joining the
Kiwanis Club should meet the members for lunch on Tuesdays
at the ARC on Williams Avenue.



Movie Night At The Park


Brings Community Together

Gulf County and Mexico Beach have come together to
celebrate families and friends with the first-ever "Movie Night
under the Stars." Everyone's favorite, alien will land in Beacon
Hill Park on Sunday, September 3, 2006, at 9 PM ET for a
showing of "ET" to kick-off what will be a series of events
throughout the year that \will entertain and are free to the
public ...
In another collaborative effort to benefit local residents
and visitors, the Gulf County Tourist Development Council
and the Mexico Beach Comnnunity Development Council joined
forces recently to purchase a 16-foot by 9-foot jumbo outdoor
movie screen and audio/video system that will be the backdrop
for numerous "Movie Nights" in both communities. So as the
sun goes down, the lights will go up and the fun will begin.
"Having a movie night is a great way for both commum-
ties to come together and enjoy being outside around friends,
family and neighbors," explained Gulf County TDC executive
director Paula Ramsey Pickett. "There is so much to enjoy in
our wonderful parks and open areas and bringing locals and
visitors together in a fun, family atmosphere that everyone can
enjoy is what makes this area so special."
So bring your blankets, folding lounge chairs, picnic
baskets and coolers and wind down the summer with a great
movie and even better company.
"This is just the beginning." said Lynn Marshall, president
of the Mexico Beach CDC. "Our plan is to rotate 'Movie Night
under the Stars' through both communities as often as pos-
sible. This will hopefully become an event that everyone will
look forward to throughout the area."
For more information on "Movie Night," contact the Gulf
County TDC at 850-,229-7800 or info(5)visitgulf.com or the
Mexico Beach CDC at 8150-648-8196 or lynn@mexicobeach.
com.


II A


Wayne Rowlen, Realtor

NO TIME FOR
MODESTY!
You've taken care of needed
repairs and cosmetic improve-
ments, and you're ready to list
your home for sale. A likely
next step is hosting an, Open
House, where buyers and
agents can check out your new
offering. Expect plenty of visi-
tors, and expect some of them
to be neighbors.
You might be concerned about
"tire kickers" or nosy neighbors
traipsing through your home,
but don't be too skeptical.
There are plenty of reasons
neighbors visit an Open House,
many of which are quite harm-
less and understandable.
They might simply be looking
for decorating ideas to imple-
ment in their similar homes.
True, in this case they are not
potential buyers, and are not


Barefoor Properties
looking on behalf of someone
else. But why would you want
to start quarreling with people
from whom you are soon mov-
Lng away?
Maybe they are interested in
the presentation of your home
because they are considering
. selling theirs. The point is, you
just never know. Frankly, that
is the work of the real estate
agent.
It's simply best for you to leave
your home during the showing,
and leave the "Lookie Lou's"
and genuine prospects to the
agent to handle. Sincere buy-
ers can be uncomfortable ask-
ing questions in front of the
owners, but the agent will have
all the knowledge and experi-
ence to separate the seed from
the chaff. Don't worry, start
packing!


Thinking of selling? Call for
a free consultation. Wayne
Rowlett of Barefoot Properties,
1085 Cape San Blas Road,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456. (850)
227-8492 wr@gtcom.net
www. Captwayne.net


of the month at Sunset Coastal Grill. For more
information contact the EDC at 229-1901.
Budget Hearings
Local residents and taxpayers should be
aware that summertime brings the budget pro-
cess to government entities around the area. All
the listed governmental bodies will be conduct-
ing budget workshops and hearings throughout
the coming months.
We will post the times and places of all
budget meetings, but the information will also
be available at the locations listed for finding
meeting and workshop agendas.

A note to civic organizations and
other groups in the area: submit meet-
ing times and locations to the newspa-
per and we will publish them each week
on this page.


Johnny Mack Brown Film

Festival Scheduled For September


Dothan, Alabama, the birth-
place and boyhood home of the
late Western movie star Johnny
Mack Brown is scheduling its
second film festival in his honor
September 8 & 9, 2006.
The two-day festival will
feature numerous Johnny
Mack Brown movies shown in
Dothan's historic Opera House,
a movie memorabilia show, lec-
tures and presentations on his
football & Hollywood career,
cowboy music, an outdoor west-
ern-themed BBQ, and a display
of one of the largest collections
of Johnny Mack Brownmemo-
rabilia you will see anywhere in
the country.
Special guests will include
two of Johnny Mack Brown's
children, his daughter Cynthia-
Brown Hale from Arizona and
son Lachlan from California will
both be in attendance. Other
family members are expected
to attend as well. Special times
have been scheduled during the
,two day festival for participants
to meet the family.
Johnny Mack Brown was
born in Dothan on Sept. 1, 1904
and excelled as an athlete at
Dothan High School and was-
an All-American halfback at the
tUniversity of Alabama. It was his
performance in Alabama's unex-
pected 1926 Rose Bowl victory
over the University'ofWashington
that propelled Alabama into the
football spotlight and Johnny
Mack into a Hollywood career.
Johnny Mack Brown made
his first film in 1927 and went
on to appear in over 165 movie
productions, including several
on television. He acted along-
side movie greats such as: Mary
Pickford, Mae West, Greta
Garbo, Marion Davies, Joan
Cra-ford. John Wayne and oth-
ers. However, it was his cast-
ing in the B-Westerns that drew
him fame. During the years
1940-1950, he was consistently
ranked in the Top 10 in popular-
ity of Hollywood movie stars.
Other featured guest during
the Festival include a Friday eve-
'nirig performance by: the multi
Graummy Award winning west-
ern music and comedy band
Riders in the Sky. Their music
is firmly grounded .in the rich
American music traditions of
such legendary cowboy singers
as Gene Autry, Roy Rogers. and
Sons of the Pioneers and whose
fun-filled performances have
enchanted audiences of all ages.
Among their long list of achieve-
ments is "Woody's Roundup fea-
turing Riders in the Sky", a com-
panion album for the soundtrack
of the, 1999 Walt Disney.'Plxar
animated classic Toy Story 2
which won the Grammy for Best
Musical Album for Children for
2001. Tickets for the concert
are $20 in advance or $24 at


the door.
Another special guest will
be John Wayne look-alike Erm4
Williamson from Branson, MO.
Williamson' is a former stunt-
man for Universal Studios in
Hollywood, California and
doubles for "The Duke" in the
Coors Light commercials. He
has been performing on Duke's
yacht, the "Wild Goose'" for sev-
eral years and often rides in
the Tournament of Roses Parade
as John Wayne. He has trav:-
eled half-way around the world
impersonating John Wayne ord
stage, at conventions, trade.-
shows and has emceed maiy
seminars. Mr. Williamson and
Paula Cravens, America's yodelk
ing sweetheart, will perform
in the Dothan Civic Center o:o
Saturday morning. In addition,
Mr. Williamson will introduce
the movie "Helltown", the only
movie in which John Wayne aid
Jdhnny Mack Brown appeared
together.
Another guest attending will
be "Cowboy" Bill Holden, a per;
former and former Hollvwo6d
stunt double who has worked
through many mediums of
preserve our cowboy heritage,
.including various radio and.
television programs. rodeos, rb.
enactments, concerts and leci
tures. Holden is currently coz
host, of "The Cowboy Way", a
weekly radio show on WIMO in
Winder, GA. He, along with sev-
eral other western re-enactors,
will role-play the "Dothan Riot",
an actual shootout that occurred
on the streets of Dothan in
1889.
The film festival will
end with an outdoor "BBQ on
Saturday evenmngat the 100 acre
Landmark Park. Activities will,
include food, cowboy music,
wagon rides for the kids, an out-
door movie and more. Tickets
for the BBQ are $20 for adults
and $10 for children.
Daily festival tickets are.$5
per person or $8 for both days
and includes admission to all
movies, lectures, memorabilia
show and exhibit. Children 12
and under will be admitted free.
Festival tickets do not include
admission to the Friday evening
concert or Saturday evening
cook-out. To order tickets, con-
tact the Dothan Cnic Center box
office at 334-615-3175.
The host hotel for the
Johnny Mack Brown Film
.Festival is The Comfort Inn of
Dothan. Special room rates will
be offered to those making res-
ervations for the festival. You
may contact The Comfort Inn at
1-800-474-7298 ext. 154.
Proceeds from the event will
benefit Landmark Park. a 100
*acre natural and cultural his-
tory museum located on the
-outskirts of Dothan.


_ Jim-NJ'N


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6B heStrPot t.Jo, F -Thrsay Agut 7,2006


I


"Pj:0144tn







Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 17, 2006 71


AUGUST
Wewa Search and Rescue Fishing Tournament,
Gaskin Park, Aug. 18-19.
MBARA Annual Kingfish Tournament, August 25-
26, Mexico Beach
WindMark Beach Showhouse: Through Sept. 10 at
WindMark Beach, near Port St. Joe, tours of Southern
Accents Showhouse are 10am to 5pm EDT Wednesday
through Saturday, 1 to 5 pm Sunday. Tickets are $12, $6
for ages 5 to 17. More information: 888-212-7050.
Annual Scallop Festival, Port St. Joe, August 26-27


Send Your Community Events to:


Write To:
The Star/Community Events
P.O. Box 308
Port St Joe, FL 32457


Fax To:
(850) 227-7212
Email To:
starnews@starfl.com


SEPTEMBER
Music in the Park, Each Thursday night at 6 pm
(CT) in Sunset Park, Mexico Beach
Beach Blast Olympic Triathlon & Duathlon,
September 23, Beacon Hill Park, Great sports event
involving swimming, biking and running. More infor-
mation: www.TheBeachBlast.com.
The event will bring hundreds of visitors to the
area. Volunteers needed. Come support local athletes!
Annual Kingfish Shootout, Sept. 25-26, C-Quarters
Marina, Carrabelle


Be sure to put Community News as the
subject when mailing.

Announcements are limited to 50 words,
and will run for a maximum of 4 weeks.


OCTOBER
Music by the Bay, Each Thursday in Frank Pate
Park, Port St. Joe
Annual Catfish Classic Fishing Tournament, October
6-7, Wewahitchka
Florida Panhandle Birding and Wildflower Festival,
October 6-8, St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserves, Port
St. Joe
Annual Art and Wine Festival, October 21, Driftwood
Inn, Mexico Beach
Downtown Trick or Treat, October 31, Reid Avenue,
Port St. Joe
The Oyster Spat Festival, Oct. 6- 8, St. George
Island
Apalachicola Community Yard Sale, Oct. 7,
Apalachicola
3rd Annual Apalachicola Bay Chamber Golf
Tournament, Oct. 11, St. James Bay Golf Course,
Lanark Village
Dixie Does Nashville, Part Deux, Songwriters in
the Round, Oct. 13-14, Dixie Theatre, Apalachicola


Eddie Burrous caught this bull shark at Indian Pass. The shark
was nine feet long and weighed 400 pounds.


SEverything You Need To Know About The Area, But Didn't Know To Ask:
~..- f.., T -T st '. Grandma! What Big Teeth You Have...


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
Last weekend a family was
shark fishing at the boat ramp
at Indian Pass. It was 3 a.m.
and several women were swim-
ming and playing in the water
beside the boat ramp when the
family hooked a nine-foot bull
shark cruising and feeding in
the waters of the pass.
This is a prime example of
"what you don't know, or what
you don't pay attention to, can
hurt you."
As much as some groups
in the area do not like to
talk about sharks, and almost
always downplay the fact
that sharks inhabit the Gulf
of Mexico waters, the fact
remains: sharks are here.
There have always been
sharks in Florida waters, and,
hopefully, there always will be.
Fossil records indicate that


ancestors of modern sharks
swam the seas of 400 million
years ago, and sharks have
changed very little during that
time.
According to, informa-
tion from the, University of
Florida's Florida Museum of
Natural History, Ichthyology
Department, there are current-
ly approximately 375 described
species of sharks, with new
species being described all the
time.
But with the enormous
influx of visitors and residents
ito Florida's coastal regions in
recent years, plus fewer sharks
being caught since the 1990s
net ban, basic math proves
that more frequent encounters
between sharks and humans
can be expected.
Get A Grip...
Among the earth's large


animals implicated in the
attack and consumption of
humans, only sharks have
not been "controlled" by man.
Even the fiercest of land-based
predators are extremely sus-
ceptible to a rifle, and, in the
past, "problem" animals have
simply been eliminated, leav-
ing many species endangered.
Sharks have been docu-
mented attackers of humans
around the world throughout
recorded history, and have
remained relatively immune
from human intervention.
Shark attacks did not
become a subject of particu-
lar public interest until the
20th century. According to the
Florida Museum of Natural
History, several factors have
contributed, to the upswing
in public awareness of shark
attack during the last 60
years.


First and foremost has
been the evolution of the press
into an instantaneous, world-
wide, comprehensive sys-
tem, plus increased competi-
tion and more emphasis on
"shock" value.
Another factor was World
War II, with a number of air
and sea disasters unprec-
edented in world history,
which created large numbers
of shark attacks and spurred
research to find an effective
shark repellent.
Third is the general
worldwide trend toward more
intense utilization of marine
waters for recreational activi-
ties during this time period,
thus increasing the chances
of shark-human interactions
with a resulting increase in the
total number of attacks.
(See TOURIST TIPS on Page 11 B)


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2006 Southern Accents Showhouse at WindMark Beach
The 2006 Southern Accents Showhouse at WindMark Beach was created to live up to its surroundings. It's packed with ideas to
..
- make vou wonder why you d ever want to go outside. In a setting that begs you ne'er to go in. It's your place along the unspoiled
shores of one of the last great beaches in Northwest Florida. Come back to WindMark Beach even if you've never been.











AN a
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OPEN HOUSE ..
Wednesday, May 24th Sunday. September 10th, 2006
HOURS -
Wednesday Saturday, 10am 5prm Easern Dahghl Tunie
Sunday, I pm 5pmn Eastern Daylighi Time
Closed Monday 6 Tuesday.
Open Memorial Day, July 1st 4th,
6 Labor Day, 10am 5pm Eastern Daylgtu Tune.
TICKETS
Adults: (Ages IS 6 older} $12 )
Children: {Ages 5 -17} $6.1 (free for children under 5}1.


I 9 0~


-- ---- -. -.-.- -.-.- -- -. -
WirdN~hrk Bcah is located on the shores ol St. Joseph Bj,, 22 male, wei ofl ,ApdahicoLi and 39 miles east of Pa, mrn. C in tbCe Emtern time zone.

For mformanon on the 2006 Southern Accents Showbhouse at WindMark Beach, call 888-212-7050
or visit wwwaouthernaccentl.corn. For information about WindMark Beach. visit our sales center, I
SJOE.com or call 850-227-2100 or toll-free 866-227-9007.
... .. .... -.- .-.--.-- PROJECT TEAM -.-- ----- ----- ---------- -- -
Deeloper. Budder, The St .I.c Co.mpany' |I Ineriors, Pl-alip Sid';: 1Architect, Cooper Roberuon .& P.a-mer | Landscape Architect, EDA\V, Irc
. .......... ..... .... .. ...... ... ... ...... .. ........ .. ... .


PUBLIC NOTICE

A Public Hearing will be held at the Plan-
ning and Development Review Board Meet-
ing on Thursday, August 31, 2006 at 6:00
RM. central time and at the Wewahitchka
Board of City Commission Meeting Sep-
tember 11, 2006 at 6:45 RM. central
time. Both Public Hearings will be held in
the Wewahitchka City Hall located at 109
South Second Street, Wewahitchka, FL
32465. The Public Hearings will be to dis-
cuss and act on the following, to wit:

Small Scale Land Use Change:
Charles Mayhann, Parcel #02388-
000R, changing Lot No. 9 from
residential low density to mixed
commercial/residential. Subject
to all development regulations re-
quired by the City of Wewahitchka,
FL.

The public is encouraged to attend and be
heard on these matters. Information prior
to the hearings can be viewed at the City
Hall in Wewahitchka.

PROPERTY ID: 02388-0OOR
HWY 71 S
PROPERTY ID:
370 HARDEN CIRCLE
.28 ACRES
EXISTING RESIDENTIAL LD
PURPOSED MIXED COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL_


Southern Accents. .rt.n, c ce Ee, .prcd E H Habitat for Humanity*
IF :Ou DON T KNOW JOE, YOU DON'T KNOW FLORIDA. 'STJOE

Obtain the Popert Report required b federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property.


Gwen Exley, City Clerk
Publish August 17 & 24, 2006


'I


11111111111 1 if III 11 1111111 11111 III1ILll I1III I1IIII -I 11111 Ili blifiislllUlllmIIII l


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TheStr, or St Je, L ThrsayAuust17 206 7


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


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8B The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 1 7, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Gulf County Sheriff's


Office Arrest Log


Port St.


Departm
The Port St. Joe Police
Department welcomes two
new employees to our agen-
cy. Officer Vince Everett and
Officer James T. Hallman.
These officers will be an asset
to this community bringing
* with them many years of law
enforcement experience. We
would like the citizens to join
us in welcoming these officers
to serve our community.
On August 09, 2006
at approximately 5:26 PM
Anthony L. Skanes, age 41,
of Port St. Joe, Florida was
arrested on warrants for bur-
glary of a structure, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia,
resisting arrest without vio-
lence and failing to appear
in court. Skanes was trans-
ported to Gulf County Sheriff
Department to await first


Joe Police


ent News Report


appearance.
On August 10, 2006
at approximately 11:36 PM
Robin Y. Corley, age 49, of
Barnesville, Georgia was
arrested for driving with a
suspended license and resist-
ing arrest. Corley vehicle was
stopped for a traffic viola-
tion on Industrial Road near
Arizona Chemical Plant Road.
Corley gave a false name of
Jewel Wilson in attempt to
elude arrest. After obtaining
the correct name and infor-
mation it was found that
Corley's driver license were
suspended. Corley was placed
under lawful arrest and also
charged with resisting arrest
by giving an incorrect name
to law enforcement. Corley
was transported to the Gulf
County Jail to await first


appearance.
On August 10, 2006
at approximately 1:38 PM
Lawrence Martin, age 53,
of Port St. Joe, Florida was
arrested for retail theft. An
officer was called to a local
business where Martin was
observed hiding objects
inside his clothing. Upon
Martin exiting this business
and attempting to ride away
on his bicycle, several large
cans of "Roach Spray" fell
from under his clothing to the
ground; this was witnessed
by store employee. The officer
took possession of the sto-
len items and placed Martin
under arrest for retail theft
and transported him to the
Gulf County Jail to await first
appearance.


Mexico

Beach


Department

of Public


Safety
On Sunday, August 13,
2006 at approximately 1:30AM
(CST) Carl D. Phelps, 22, of
Camilla, GA was arrested for
DUI Manslaughter in the death
of Reggie C. Bostick, 22, also
of Camilla. Upon Mr. Phelp's
return to the residence of 1003
Hwy 98, Mexico Beach, FL in a
Ford F-350, Mr. Phelps struck
and killed Mr. Bostick who
was in the driveway. This case
is currently under investiga-
tion by the Mexico Beach DPS,
Police Division, Mexico Beach.


Gallagher Files Charges Against Direct General Agents


For 'Sliding' Extra Charges
TALLAHASSEE-Tom follow an investigation b:
Gallagher, Florida's chief the department's Division o
financial officer, announced Agent and Agency Services
today that he has filed Bureau of Investigation, an(
administrative charges the Division of Legal Services
against 12 agents and Direct General operates monr
customer, representatives of than 100 agencies in Floridi
Direct General Iisurance doing business as Florida No
Agency for "sliding" ancillary Fault Insurance, Insurance
products into consumers' Options Plus, Friendly Auto
automobile insurance policies and Cash Register among
without their knowledge others. If the charges anr
or consent, a scheme that upheld, the licensees coul(
cost policyholders as much face revocation of thei:
as 44 percent extra on their licenses. Gallagher said he
premiums. will also seek restitution fo:
Gallagher oversees the affected consumers.
Department of Financial "Florida's insurance
Services, and the charges professionals should be


To Dozens Of Customers


driven by their clients' best
interests, not commissions,"
Gallagher said. "This
department will continue to
rigorously prosecute agents
who violate the law and
violate that trust."
Those agents charged are
Thomas Aquinas McCullom
of Gulf Breeze (12 counts);
Paula Beckett (four counts)
and Roger Dale Scites
(seven countss, both of St.
Petersburg; Kim Suzanne,
Velez of Ft. Myers (eight
counts); Radcliffe H. McKenzie
(12 counts) and Alberta
Mitchell (nine counts) both
of Sunrise; Katherine Anne


Fitzgerald of Zellwood (four
counts); Jenny R. Caddell
of Middleburg (five counts);
and Lekeisha Chavon Paige of
Jacksonville (three counts).
In addition to eight
counts of sliding, customer
representative Cecilia Maus,
of Cottondale, was charged
with three counts of sliding
products she was not licensed
to sell, and Marie B. Jean,
of Riviera Beach, another
customer representative, was
charged with eight counts of
sliding and two counts of
unlicensed activity. Earlier
this month, Direct General
customer representative
Denise D. Turnbull settled
sliding and unlicensed
activity charges leveled by the
department, by agreeing to
pay restitution and serving a
six-month suiLipenSionr of .her.
insurance licenses followed
by a year's probation.
To verify an agent's license
or file a complaint, consumers
should log on to www.fldfs.
com or call the department's
toll-free consumer helpline at
1-800-342-2762.


8/03/06
George Walton Simmons
III, w/m, 24, Port St. Joe,
Violation Probation
Devarian Martez Thomas
b/m, 18, Panama City, FTA
DWLSR
James E Hammond, w/m,
41, Wewahitchka, DWLSR
8/04/06
Jonathan D Tamez, w/m,
26, Panama City, Violation
Probation Grand Theft
8/05/06
Marcus A Fox, b/m, 18,
Wewahitchka, Marijuana
Robert D Reed, w/m,
22, Wewahitchka, DWLSR
8/06/06
Cirenio Cadenas, w/m,


OnAugust4,2006 around
4:10 p.m. Craig Allen Young,
age 37, of Mexico Beach was
arrested on a warrant for vio-
lating his probation. Young
was taken to the Gulf County
Jail without incident to await
first appearance.
On August 4, 2006
around 2:33 a.m. Nathaniel M.
Bolden, age 46, of Port St. Joe
was arrested on a warrant for
violating his pre-trial release
for sell of cocaine. During his
arrest Bolden resisted officers
and when arrested officers
discovered illegal drug para-
phernalia in his possession.
Bolden was transported to
the Gulf County Jail to await
first appearance on the war-
rant and additional charges
of resisting. without violence
and-possession of drug para-
phernalia.
On August 3, 2006
around 5:23 p.m. Jermale
Robert Keith, age 21, of Port
St. Joe was arrested for viola-
-tion of probautin. Keith ,was
taken to the Gulf County Jail
to await first appearance.
On August 6, 2006
around 4:32 a.m. Charles
Warren Risinger Jr.., age 41,
of Mexico Beach was arrested
for driving under the influ-
ence. Mr. Risinger was driv-
ing on Highway 98 in Port
St. Joe when a PD Officer


53, Panama City, DUI
Sheila Sue Roper, w/f, 37,
Wewahitchka, Uttering forged
instrument x19
8/08/06
Thomas Earl Causey, w/
m, 47, Panama City, FTA
Tonya Lebearen Baker, b/
m, 36, Wewahitchka, FTA
Bruce Lee Yand, w/m, 25,
Wewahitchka, DUI
8/09/06
Robert Alan Cue, w/m,
36, Port St. Joe, Sexual
Battery Iowa
Henry Harrison Watford,
w/m; 21, Port St. Joe,
Violation Probation


alerted on his erratic driving
though the city. Upon further
investigation of these- traf-
fic violations, it was discov-
ered that Risinger appeared
to be impaired. Risinger was
arrested and transported to
the Gulf County Jail to await
first appearance.
On July 28, 2006 around
9:23 p.m. Carolyn Dawn
Smith, age 24, of White City,
Florida was arrested for retail
theft. When officers made
contact with Smith she gave
them a false name and date
of birth. She was arrested
on the retail theft and also
charged with resisting an offi-
cer without violence for giv-
ing a false name. Smith was
taken to the Gulf County Jail
to await first appearance.

Lost and Found
The Port St. Joe Police
Department has received
found property. One item is a
ladies'silver ring with a sto4e.
The other iteni is a black cas-
sette case.
The owner of these items
can come to the Port St. Joe
Police Department at 410
Williams Ave. to claim them
or call (850) 229-8265 for
more information.


Ou/o INTEREST

FOR ONE YEAR


Port St. Joe Police


Department News Report


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Established 7937 Serving iGulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


S8B The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAu st1,20






CSTUODIIsrleU I 7 7 .*vi n l uII t. unTy.ll u nu o .,unwu uft v ,v -- -


DOH Recognizes August As National


Immunization Awareness Month


TALLAHASSEE
The Florida Department
of Health (DOH)
acknowledges the month
of August as National
Immunization Awareness
Month, stressing the
importance of receiving
routine, up-to-date
immunizations.
As the health care
* community prepares for
the start of a new school
year for students as well
as the upcoming influenza
season, individuals should
be equally aware of their
immunization status as
well as that of their loved
ones.
"Vaccines offer safe and
effective protection from


infectious diseases," said
Secretary of Health M. Rony
Francois, M.D., M.S.P.H.,
Ph.D. "By staying up-
to-date on recommended
vaccinations, individuals
can protect themselves,
their families and loved
ones from potentially
serious or life-threatening
diseases."
In August, and
throughout the year, the
Department encourages
citizens of all ages to verify
that all immunization
records are up-to-date. The
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC)
recommends that children
receive vaccines against
diphtheria, influenza,


tetanus, pertussis,
measles, mumps, rubella,
chickenpox, polio and
others. Adolescents
should be vaccinated
against influenza,
hepatitis A, hepatitis B and
meningococcal disease,
and other previously
missed vaccinations.
Those recommended for
adults include vaccines
against influenza,
pneumococcal disease,
tetanus and diphtheria.
DOH encourages
Floridians to contact
their local county health
department or primary
care physician to make
sure their immunizations
are up-to-date.


DOH promotes
and protects the health
and safety of all people
in Florida through the
delivery of quality public
health services and the
promotion of health care
standards. For more
information please visit
www.doh.state.fl.us or
contact your local county
health department. For
more information about
National Immunization
Awareness Month,
please visit the DOH
Web site at http://www.
immunizeflorida.com/
or the CDC Web site at
http: / /www.cdc.gov/niP/


Florida's Hometown


U.S.A. Pageant


A special invitation is
extended to all local girls
(Florida residents) to par-
ticipate in the 20th annual
FLORIDA'S HOMETOWN
U.S.A. PAGEANT to be held
November 17-19, 2006 in
Orlando, FL. The purpose
of Florida's Hometown
USA Program is to educate
the youth of Florida on the
values of volunteer work
and inspire them to make
a difference in the lives
of their neighbors through
volunteer commitment.
There are five age divi-
sions for ages 4-19. The
winners will have a busy


year of fun and excitement
representing their home-
town throughout the state.
For a brochure or addi-
tional information, please
call 352-326-4217 or go
to www.FLHometownUSA.
corn to print an applica-
tion. Deadline to enter is
November 10. The pageant
is a fundraiser for Florida's
Hometown USA Program,
Inc. a 501 (c)(3) non
profit educational youth
organization.
E m a i 1 -
ce@FLHometownUSA.com


events / niam/ default.htm


Grass roots Style Roller Derby


We are starting a grass-
roots style Roller Derby
league locally in Pensacola!.
Roller derby is making a
huge come-back across the
country with well over 100
'leagues. The Women's Flat
Track Derby Association
(wftda.com) is the "NFL' of
Derby Leagues across the
country, making standards
and regulations in order to
organize national tourna-
ments.
Besides the technical
stuff, it's tons of fun! We are
currently recruiting women
21 and older with health
insurance, the ability to
practice twice a week, and
'purchase skates & safety
gear. That's it! We welcome
ladies of all fitness and skat-
ing levels. Skaters are part
of a team that has a unique
theme (ie, waitresses, cops,


pirate wenches, car mechan-
ics, pilots, etc.) and some
even wear fishnets! Each
skater chooses her own
unique Roller Girl persona
(ie, "Helena Handbasket",
"Darth Skater", and 'Amelia
Scareheart" to name a few).
No two are alike! It's a
fun way to dress up, play
hard, have tons of fun, meet
friends, and get a super
workout. Roller derby builds
teamwork, self-esteem,
friendships, and especially
muscles!
Roller Derby is played
on an oval track with 5 play-
ers from each team. The
very front line is made up of
the Pivots, who set the pace
for the Pack. Behind them,
making up the rest of the
Pack, are 3 blockers from
each team. 20 ft behind
the Pack, and ,10 seconds


after the Pack has taken off,
the Jammers compete to
pass all the opposing team's
Blockers without going
out-of-bounds. The first
Jammer to do this gains
the coveted "Lead Jammer"
status. She has control of
the 'Jam" (the race that lasts
no more than two minutes
unless she calls it off soon-
er, thereby not allowing the
other team to score points.
If both Jammers go out-
of-bounds and there is no
Lead Jammer, the Jam lasts
the full two minute dura-
tion.) Points are scored after
the Jammer has lapped the
track once and then comes
through the pack again, a
point scored for each oppo-
nent's Blockers she got
past.
We are looking to
begin practices right, away


at Skateland in Milton FL.
(See skatelandmilton.com)
We have a sister league in
Mobile starting up that is
recruiting also. Leagues are
dotting the Gulf Coast from
the Hurricane Alley Roller
Derby girls in Texas, to Big
Easy Roller Girls in New
Orleans, the Mississippi
Roller Girls in Biloxi and
clear on to many leagues
in Florida. It's time to light
Pensacola on fire!
We have a website start-
ed for more information and
ways to join the league.
www.geocities .com/
GRRLsofPensacola/home
GRRLsofPensacola(&yahoo:
com
We are the Gulf Region
Roller League (G.R.R.Ls) of
Pensacola! If you feel the
need for .speed, come on
down and get your skate,
on!
Kat A. Lyst
G.R.R.Ls of Pensacola


We also insure Seasonal Properties, Small Businesses,
Boats & Autos. Coverage for Windstorm & Flood Available.


First ria Hannon
AfTravetersComp Insurance
850-227-1133

Roy Smith *Andy Smith*Karen Clark Laura Ramsey*Cindy Ward


.e.ase I- up!



We're moving &.




every thin must go



to the bare walls!



First come,




First serve

















TIFFIN






1 3ReidAve.


227-3667
iln.-----'. -- i


S REQUESTS FOR PROPOSAL

Gulf County Community Development Corporation on behalf of Gulf County
Board of County Commissioners announces finding availability for its State
Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Program for activities approved by the
Gulf'County Board of County Commissioners and Florida Housing Finance
Corporation (FHFC) in the SHIP Local Housing Assistance Plan (LHAP) pursuant
to, Florida Statutes Sections 420-907, 420-9079: Administrative Code Rule Chapter
67-55, F.A.C. : ,

The Gulf County Community Development Corporation is requesting proposals
from qualified local organizations) interested in implementing the following SHIP
activity during all or a portion of the anticipated SHIP contract period (anticipated
to be 07/01/06-06 '30 07)

Activity: Land Acquisition
The purpose of this strategy is to provide direct loans to eligible sponsors for the
purchase of land, which is pledged at the bank as security collateral for construction/
permanent financing for a new home. Pursuant to Rule 67-37.007 F.A.C., in order,
to meet the 75% construction requirement for land acquisition, construction of the
homes must be completed within 24 'months from the close of tli applicabh'fiscal
year. All eligible homebuuers must be at or below 1200' of Area Median Income.
The terms of this award will be in the form of a deferred payment loan. Loans
made to non-profits will be at a 0% interest and will be due when the homebuyer
secures permanent financing. All loans made under the program guidelines must
be paid off through purchase by a homebuyer within a 24 month period from initial
disbursement of SHIP, funds and before the end of the expenditure deadline for the
fiscal year in which the award was made.

The successful proposal from eligible sponsors) will include past experience of the
organization in successfully developing this type of housing, have access to lenders
willing to participate in providing end loans, unit production goals for housing,
must ha\e property selected in-advance, including legal description and address,
must have an appraisal on property indicating current value, must show ability to
fund remaining purchase price, provide development cost pro forma indicating the
developer fee does not exceed 10% of the sales price, and documentation of the
organization's employment or planned employment of personnel from the WAGES
and Workforce Development Initiatives shall result in a priority award of SHIP funds
assuming the organization demonstrate capacity to implement the subject activity.
No housing can be built upon speculation

Proposals must be received by mail or hand delivery before 5:00 pm, Eastern Time,
September 10, 2006 at Gulf County Community Development Corporation, Gulf
County Florida, SHIP Program. Mail to Gulf County CDC, P.O. Box 837, Port St.
Joe, FL 32357-0837 or hand deliver to 301 1st Street, Port St. Joe, F1 32456.

For further information, please contact Dannie Bolden, Gulf County CDC, 1-850-
229-7986.


.


ie""~C""L-~fPaj~ul-~lat~--~ I~PP- 1 Lq -qL IL lcl II~- -----9, ~aPr~s~ ----IY---~IIIP----Bs~-lIB~CI~S~C~-~~


TheStrPot S. oe F -ThusdyAuust17 206 .'9B


7QI7 ',-rvinrv (-,ijif rniinfv and surroundina areas for 68 Years


I







lB Th Str PotS.Je L TusaAgs 7 06Etbihd137.SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


News from Port St. Joe


Middle School


Port St Joe NJROTC Cadets


Attend Leadership Academy


By: c/LCDR Molly
Matty
"Reveille, reveille, rev-
-eille!" is what was heard at
0500 every morning for three
local NJROTC cadets. These
cadets: Elijah Quaranta,
Melissa Deputy, and Molly
Matty underwent a grueling
week at Admiral Farragut
Leadership Academy. It was
'here, in the 100 degree heat
of St. Petersburg, Florida that
we learned the art of drill,
swords, hospital corners,
two minute showers, sailing,
orienteering, and teamwork,
teamwork, teamwork. The
week began June 11th, a hot
Sunday morning when we
had absolutely no clue what
was going on at the large,
.Spanish inspired brick build-
ing that would soon become
our home.
We checked in, and tried
.desperately to find our appro-
'priate rooms consisting of two
.racks, a head, and a wall lock-


Covenant
Panama City, FL- Covenant
'Hospice recently raised more
.than $2,500 to purchase back-
packs and school uniforms for
:100 children at Patterson and
'Waller Elementary Schools.
The program, dubbed "Help a
Hundred Kidz," was created by
'Covenant Hospice volunteers
who raised funds through com-
munity donations and a yard
.sale. Covenant Hospice wishes
'to thank Wild Bill's Bingo for
.its generous $1,000 donation


er. We learned what all this
meant later on (in the form
of dropping and doing push
ups). Rain could not dampen
our Drill Instructors' spirits
as they instructed us on how
to properly make our beds,
after we found them tossed
throughout our room. I thank
God for fitted sheets, now.
Motivational runs began as
the rain ceased, working our
way up to 2.5 miles in the eve-
ning. As the week progressed,
our knowledge grew as we
could find our way around
the campus, and exactly how
to sit at chow without looking
around. Classes were held
everyday with topics varying
from etiquette to orienteer-
ing, sailing to time manage-
ment skills. Evenings were
spent polishing shoes and
brass for personnel inspec-
tions, and listening to jodies
militaryy chants) on a beat up
CD player "on the line".
We started to have fun


Hospice He
towards this project.
Covenant Hospice also
adopted a classroom at Port
St. Joe Elementary School for
the 2006-2007 school year by
donating $100. The donation to
adopt a classroom will help fill
in gaps that exist in funding for
children's school supplies and
classroom teaching aids.
For 'more information
about hospice services please
call 785-3040.


Covenant Hospice recently donated $100 to Port St. Joe
IElementary School. The. funds will help teachers buy additional
'classroom supplies and teaching materials for the 2006-2007
'school year.
Left to right: Covenant Hospice Community Educator Cynthia
Gardner, and Port St. Joe Elementary teachers Kaye Haddock and
Margie Raffield.



Port St. Joe Elementary


Launches Box Tops Fundraiser


Port St. Joe, Fl. August 9,
'2006-Port St. Joe Elementary
School has recently launched
their 2006-2007 Box Tops for
Education fundraising cam-
paign. This year the school
has set a goal of earning $500
through Box Tops to help
fund special projects.
Box Tops for Education.
a school fundraising program
sponsored by General Mills, is
now in its tenth big year. Box
Tops has helped America's
schools raise over $175 mil-
lion to buy the things they
need, such as library books,
school supplies, -and play-
ground equipment. The Box
Tops for Education program
offers school supporters three
easy ways to earn cash for
school through everyday
activities like buying grocer-
ies, shopping, online,- and
making purchases with a


credit card. Schools can earn
a total of up to $60,000 each
year.
If you'd like to help the
students at Port St. Joe
Elementary reach their goal,
there are several ways to get
involved. Collect Box Tops
from hundreds of familiar,
participating products and
send them to the school,
"Attention Mrs. Smallwood
- Box Tops Coordinator" at
2201 Long Avenue or sim-
ply drop them off at the
school. You can also sign
up on the Box Tops web-
site at boxtops4education.
com. Designate Port St. Joe
Elementary as the school you
wish to support. At the Box
Tops website, you'll learn
more. about all of the easy
ways you can choose to make
a difference-all at no addi-
tional cost to you.


JOB NOTICE
The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners is accepting applications for
an Assistant'Planner. Applications and a complete job description are avail-
able in our HR office or at www.gulfcountygovemment.com EOE Application
deadline is Friday, 8/04/06 5:00 pm EST. For more information, please contact
,Denise Manuel, Human Resources Director at 850-229-5335. Gulf County en-
forces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is anr Equal Opportunity / Affirmative
Action Employer.
/s/ Rebecca L. Norris
Carmen McLemore
Chairman
August10 & 17, 2006 Ad#2006-091
1'


towards the
end of the week
and I even
remember say-
ing once "Gosh, .
I wish this week -
wouldn't end." i'
But end it did,
in the form a
graduation cer-
emony on June
17th. Though
we couldn't
smile because
we had to
maintain mili-
tary bearing,
I'm sure if we
could, we would
have had the
biggest smiles
on our faces.
Though we had
the same amount
of luggage coming
and going, I believe we took
home much more than we
came -there with. Friendships,
memories, chants, ideas, and


I'
.1*


4 4


NJROTC Cadets
the skills to better our units.
In a week, we went from
insecure, frightened cadets to
inspired, motivated leaders.


lps Area Students


Ella Edwards (3rd grade) and her sister Katie (6th grade), were
two of 50 children at Patterson Elementary who received backpacks
and uniforms through the assistance of "Help a Hundred Kidz"
program created by Covenant Hospice volunteers. Fifty students
at Waller Elementary also received backpacks and uniforms from
funds raised through this program. Pictured with the Edwards
sisters are Alberta Black, ESE Clerk at Patterson (front left) and
Covenant Hospice employees Henre McGriff, Katie Dale and Candy
Welch (back row).



Port St. Joe Middle..


School Earns "A"


Port St. Joe Middle School
has once again earned an
"A" grade for the 2005-2006
school year. And thanks to
Pristine Properties, Allen and
Cathy Cox, Alyson Gerlach
and their staff, the Port St.
Joe Middle School faculty
and staff were treated to a
celebration fit for celebrities.
Following our first day at
work, faculty and staff gath-
ered at a gorgeous "Pristine
Properties" beach home to
partake of an array of foods


provided by the Pristine
Properties staff and enjoy the
breath taking view. It was
a great time for fellowship
and appreciation for all the
accomplishments during the
school year.
Port St. Joe Middle School
would like to thank Pristine
Properties for showing their
appreciation in such a grand,
way to a. school that has
proven they have the "right
stuff' to earn the grade.


Thank you students for
a great first week back to
school. It was a long week for
a first week but everything
went well and we started the
new school year on a good
foot.
Volleyball and Cross
Country sign-up sheets are
located in the front office, so
if your student is interested
in participating in either of
these sports please remind
them to sign up.
Football practice has
started. This year's team had
the opportunity to sign up
last year and only new 7th
and 8th grade students can
sign-up now.
The school lunch menu
for each month and school
calendar are located on the
Port St. Joe Middle School
web site. Go to www.gulf.
kl2.fl.us kl2.fl.us> click on PSJMS
(on the right hand side) and
check out the menu and
important dates.
The faculty and staff of
Port Saint Joe Middle School
would like to thank Pristine
Properties for, graciously









Welcome to a new year
at Faith Christian School. We
are excited to see- familiar
and unfamiliar faces on cam-
pus. We hope everyone had a
wonderfully blessed summer
and is charged and ready for
an exciting 2006-2007 school
year! It is wonderful to see
children who are eager to
learn, -and we are grateful to
our parents who allow us to
have input into these pre-
cious lives.
Faith Christian is blessed
to have quality men and
women whose genuine love
for children and deep concern
for each child's individual.
needs is expressed through
their sacrificial giving of time
and effort. We pray that our
'students will be impacted by
the love of God as they study
in a Christian environment.
We also pray that our work
here will be led by the Spirit
of God as we seek Jesus in
our daily lives.
In the coming weeks, we
will feature our ,new faculty
and staff. We welcome Mrs.
Linda Trauger from Eastpoint
as our new K-5 teacher. She
originally hails from northeast
Pennsylvania but has lived
in this area for the past 12
years. She has taught K-3, K-
4, and K-5 in the First Baptist
School in Apalachicola. Mrs.
Linda has an AA degree from
the Art Institute of Pittsburg
where she studied visual
communication. She was
a graphic designer and art
director at a printing com-
pany in Pennsylvania before
moving to Florida. Among


hosting a party for our fac-
ulty in recognition of the hard
work put forth by the faculty
to become an "A" school for
the 2005-2006 school year.
Thank you Pristine Properties,
we all had a wonderful time.
Parents,
You are able to monitor
your child's grades online.
Go to fl.us> and click on:
a. for the par-


ents


online


b. view grades

c. click here to


begin
You will need to enter
the student 'ID and PIN Code
and then select Port St. Joe
Middle School.
If you do not have a PIN
Code, please call 227-3211 to
make an appointment. You
will need to sign a release and
show proof of identity.
All students have new
Pinnacle passwords this
year, not just those students
new to the school. Sorry for
any inconvenience this will
cause.





News Column
faith Christian School
her hobbles and interests are
kayaking, horseback riding,
walking, calligraphy, and the
guitar. A lady of many talents,
Miss Linda and her daugh-
ter, Darcy, 14, attend the
Fellowship Baptist Church at
St. George .Island.
Our Christmas Card
Campaign kicked off and
was run through Wednesday,
August 13. Our fundraiser,
Mrs. Kathie Sarmiento, tells
us that the new catalogues
have great new items. These
include Christmas cards,
gifts, and wrapping paper,
of course, but also cards,,
wrappings, and gifts for other
varied purposes. As always,i
our hard working students
will receive rewards for their
labor. Please remember that
our fundraisers help to keep.
our tuition down so we great-
ly appreciate our commu-.
nity's support. Miss Kathie
also tells us that we will be
again collecting Box Tops for
Education, Campbell's Soup.
labels, and other items frori,
which we can receive cash.
to defray. Begin saving now
because we are having a con-.
test between the boys and'
the girls, and there will be
monthly awards. All right
girls, let's not let the boys
get an edge here. For more'
information, Miss Kathie can.
be reached at the school at
229-6707.
If you are interested iri
enrolling your child in Faith
Christian School, please call
Mazie Stone at 229-6707
as there are still some open
spaces open in some grades.:


No one thinks that a catastrophic injury
or accidental death will strike them
until it happens.,


We have been helping families facing
tragedy since 1973. We have offices
throughout NW Florida.


On the web at Kerrigan.com




Kerigan,Estess, Rankin,


McLeod & Thompson,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW



202 Marina Drive
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456


(850) 229-3333
The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based
solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written
information about our qualifications and experience.


GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
PROPOSAL NO. 0506-30

Sealed proposals may be mailed or hand delivered to the
Clerk's Office located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. Room
148; Port St. Joe, FL 32456. All proposals, with original sig-
nature and three (3) additional copies, must be received at the
Office of the Clerk by Friday August 18, 2006 at 5:00 p.m. EDT.
Proposals received after the closing time will be returned un-
opened.
Group Voluntary Vision Program
All interested insurance companies are invited to respond.
Each proposal document must be clearly marked "Proposal
for Group Voluntary Vision Program"
Any questions concerning the proposal should be addressed
and submitted to the County's Agent-of-Record and Employee
Benefits Consultant, Todd Torgersen, at 850-433-9996, or FAX
(850-432-5726), or E-mail (todd@ciscompanies.com). Com-
bined Insurance Services' mailing address is: 2704 North 12th
Avenue, Pensacola, FL 32503. Proposals are not to be mailed to
Combined Insurance Services.
Gulf County reserves the right to accept or reject any or all
proposals, to award proposals by product, to waive any proposal
informalities and to re-advertise for proposals when deemed in
the best interest of the Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners.
GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION-
ERS
Donald Butler, Chief Administrator

August 10, 2006 and August 17, 2006 Ad #2006-096


IOBTheStr, ortSt Jo, F -Thursday, August 17, 2006


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


:L:.







CSTUa 11IIY5l 1*U 1ev 7 027 ,., ,,,-, (,iT ,-,-fiii ,-,i 4 'z r)Ir7- -* r 6 T S S


Tourist Tips


Add popular press and
movie fictionalized shark
attacks, and things combined
to generate a morbid fear of the
toothy marine predators.
Shark attack is a potential
danger that must be acknowl-
edged by anyone frequenting
marine waters, states infor-
mation from the museum's
Ichthyology Department, but it
should be kept in perspective.
Bees, wasps, and snakes
are responsible for far more
fatalities each year than shark
attacks.
By contrast, in the U.S. the
annual risk of death by light-
ning strike is 30 times greater
than that from shark attack.
S For most people, any
shark-human interaction is
likely to occur while swimming
or surfing in near-shore waters.
From a statistical standpoint,
the chances of dying in this
area are markedly higher from
many other causes, such as
drowning and cardiac arrest,
than from shark attack.
Many more people are
injured and killed on land
while driving to and from the
beach than by sharks in the
water. Shark attack trauma is
also less common than such
beach-related injuries as spinal
damage, dehydration, jellyfish
and stingray stings, and sun-
burn.
Nevertheless, shark attack
is a hazard that must be con-
sidered by anyone entering the
marine environment. As in any
recreational activity, a partici-
pant must acknowledge that
certain risks are part of the
sport. Shark attack is sim-
ply one of many that must be
considered before entering the
water.

When You Least
Expect It...
According to the muse-
um, actual numbers of shark
attacks are rising each decade
because of increasing numbers
of people in the water, but there
is no indication that there is
any change in the per capital of
attack.
Most attacks occur in near-
shore waters, typically inshore
of a sandbar or between sand-
bars, where sharks feed and


can become trapped at low
tide. Areas with steep drop off,
such as the far side of the sec-
ond sandbar in this area, are
also likely attack sites. Sharks
congregate there because their
natural food also congregates
in these areas.
There are three major
types of unprovoked shark
attacks: hit and run, bump and
bite, and sneak attacks.
By far the most common,
hit and run attacks typically
occur in the surf zone with
swimmers and surfers the tar-
gets.
The victim seldom sees the
shark and the shark does not
return after inflicting a single
bite or slash wound.
In most instances, these
attacks are probably cases of
mistaken identity that occur
under poor water visibility and
breaking surf or strong water
currents. Add to the water con-
ditions splashing, shiny jew-
elry, contrasting colored swim-
suits, and contrasting tanning,
especially involving the soles of
the feet, and the shark misin-
terprets a human for its nor-
mal prey.
Injuries in hit and run
attacks are usually confined
to relatively small lacerations,
often on the leg below the knee,
and are seldom life-threaten-
ing.
Bump and bite attacks
and sneak attacks, while less
common, result in greater inju-
ries and most fatalities. These
types of attack usually involve
divers or swimmers in some-
what. deeper waters, but also
occur in near-shore shallows
as well.
Bump and bite attacks are
characterized by the shark ini-
tially circling and often bump-
ing the victim prior to the actu-
al attack.
Sneak attacks differ in
having the strike occur with-
out warning. In both cases,
unlike the pattern for hit and
run attacks, repeat attacks
are common and multiple or
sustained bites are the norm,
resulting in severe injuries, fre-
quently death.
According to experts at the
museum, they believe these
two types of attacks are the


result of feeding or antagonistic
behaviors rather than mistaken
identity.
Almost any large shark,
roughly six feet or more in
length, is a potential threat to
humans. Three species, howev-
er, have been repeatedly impli-
cated as the primary attackers
of man: white sharks, tiger
sharks, and bull sharks.
Other species, including
the great hammerhead, short-
fin mako, oceanic whitetip,
Galapagos, and certain reef
sharks such as the Caribbean
reef shark, have also been
implicated in these types of
attacks.
Evidence from Florida, say
the museum experts, which
has 20-30 of these types of
attacks each year, suggests that
the blacktip, possibly the spin-
ner, and the blacknose sharks
are the major culprits in this
region.

Hi, We're Your Neighbors
Shark species indigenous
or common to the Gulf of
Mexico include:
Bull, reaches about 10
feet
Thresher, reaches 13 to
20 feet
Nurse, reaches nine feet
Hammerhead, from
five feet to more than 17 feet,
including Great Hammerheads,
Scalloped Hammerheads,
Smooth Hammerheads
-Bonnethead, small, plen-
tiful, often seen in schools of
10-20
Oceanic White Tip
Blacktip, reaches six to
eight feet
'- Sandbar
Shortfin Mako, reaches
12 feet
Florida Smooth Hound
.- Blacknose, about four
feet
Finetooth
Lemon, reaches about
seven to 11 feet, common in
Gulf waters including bays and
salt creeks
White, longfin mako, silky,
dusky, Caribbean reef, tiger,
sandtiger, Atlantic sharpnose
Most sharks live only in
the marine environment in full-
strength saltwater. Some coast-
al shark species can survive in
brackish estuaries with mixed
fresh and saltwater, and many
juveniles use these brackish
areas as nursery grounds.,
Only two shark species are
capable of surviving in freshwa-
ter for any length of time, the
bull shark and the speartooth


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closer into shallow water. This
may account for recent sight-
ings and interactions in the


Gulf of Mexico over recent
years.


shark.
Bull sharks are among the
most prevalent species in this
area. They have been captured
1,700 miles up the Mississippi
River and are frequently caught
in the Port St. Joe freshwater
canal linking St. Joseph Bay
with the Intracoastal, in the
Intracoastal Waterway itself,
and in Lake Wimico in south-
eastern Gulf County.
According to many locals,
they often pull four to six foot
bull sharks from these loca-
tions.
Though these sharks are
capable of surviving in freshwa-
ter due to special physiological
adaptations, they always have a
route that will connect them to
the ocean.
According to the
International Shark Attack File
(ISAF), bull sharks are proba-
bly more likely responsible for
the majority of shark attacks
around the globe, and are con-
sidered by many experts to be
the most dangerous shark in
the world, surpassing the great
white in terms of aggression
and attack behavior.
Bull sharks prefer to live in
shallow coastal waters less than
100 feet deep, commonly enter-
ing estuaries, bays, harbors,
lagoons, and river mouths.
The bull shark is cur-
rently listed by the World
Conservation Union (IUCN) as
"near threatened," but does not
meet criteria to be considered
endangered or vulnerable at
this time.
Over the past 30 years,
according to numerous scien-
tific studies, the Gulf of Mexico
has been experiencing massive
algae blooms during the warm
summer months, caused by the
rising use of nitrate-based fer-
tilizers in the Mississippi River
watershed.
The area in which this sum-
mer phenomenon occurs has
been called "the dead zone,"
The size of the dead zone var-
ies year to year, depending on
weather conditions, but aver-
ages about 5,000 square miles
and remains in place until late
September or early October.
The nitrates in the fer-
tilizer feed the algae blooms
that use up oxygen in the Gulf
waters, and make -the water
uninhabitable to fish and wild-
life. This forces the fish to seek
higher dissolved oxygen in the
water close to the edge of the
dead zone and beyond, pos-
sibly increasing the number of
sharks found in the waters that
edge the dead zone.
The dead zone in the Gulf
-reduces the shark's natural
habitat, causing them to move


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St. Joe Rent-All
706 1st. Street
Port St. Joe
227-2112


John cares about the youth of our community. He has been involved as
a volunteer with school related activities for over 20 years. He is very
passionate abut each Gulf County student getting the best education
possible. John realizes that while many students in our area will attend
some type of college, others will pursue military or vocational paths
after graduation from high school. It is important that everyone has op-
portunities to advance. /
* Graduated Smith Station High School-Smiths, AL 1971
*Attended Columbus College and The University of West FL- Studied
Business Administration
* Employed- City of Port St. Joe, 28 years
* Member First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe
* Married to Linda Rushing Wright- Registered Dental Hygienist
*One child- Matthew Wright, honor student at Port St.oe High School
*Established scholarship, in 1987, in memory of late wife, Linda Lewis
Wright- a teacher at Highland View Elementary School; Preference is
given to students pursuing degree in elementary education
*Coached Little League Baseball- 10 years
*Coached Upward Basketball- 6 years; Helped establish program in
Port St. Joe
*Coached little League Football- 5 years
*Member- School Advisory Council at Port St. Joe Middle School- 2
years
-Volunteer- PTO
*Volunteer- Port St. Joe High School football "Chain Crew"- 20 years
*Volunteer- Port St. Joe High School Baseball- Food Prep- 6 years
Vote John Wright on September 5th for
Gulf County School Board District 5
Political advertisement paid for and approved by John Wright for School Board District 5


Water Safety Rules

The Gulf of Mexico isn't your neighborhood swimming
pool.
Surfers and swimmers off the peninsula and cape, in the
bay and along The Beaches, can expect, from time to time, to
encounter sharks and stingrays, and occasionally an alligator
in the surf. Be alert.
Do not swim alone. Swim, surf or dive with other people
and do not drift too far away from assistance.
All along the Emerald Coast and the Forgotten Coast, the
double sandbar feature that gives the area its famous beaches
provides a favored trolling ground for sharks.
The first sandbar is at the shoreline and the second one
is always easily visible in the water. The lighter the color of
the water, the more shallow it is, indicating the presence of a
sandbar. The sandbar usually runs in a visibly distinctive line for
extended distances near the water's edge.
While in the water, stay inside the second sandbar, because
on the other side is a deep drop-off, which is a favorite area
for sharks to hunt.
The depth of the water between the two sandbars fluctu-
ates widely in conjunction with tides, wave action, wind and,
storms. If the trough between the sandbars is deep, be particu-
larly alert, since sharks often swim in the trough after bait fish,
and sometimes become trapped in this trough during low tide.
If you want to surf or float on a raft, take a long board out,
not a boogie board or a plastic float. A long board gives you
better protection from curious sharks.
Avoid wearing shiny jewelry the reflected light resembles
the sheen of fish scales.
Avoid wearing brightly colored clothing in the water -
sharks see contrast particularly well.
Refrain from excessive splashing and don't allow pets,
which move and swim erratically, in the water. The erratic
movements remind sharks of their prey.
Do not enter the water at all if you have an open wound
or are bleeding in any way. Sharks can detect blood and body
fluids in very small concentrations.
Avoid murky waters, steep dropoffs, estuaries, artificial
canals, and mouths of streams and rivers, especially after heavy
rains, as these areas are known to be frequented by sharks.
Water is considered murky if you cannot see beyond two to
three feet.
Do not swim or play in the surf near anyone surf fish-
ing. Surf fishing attracts large fish.
Accordingly, do not swim around or under city piers, where
people also fish.
And if actually fishing while standing in the water, do not
have any bait or caught fish anywhere on your body, tied to
your body, or floating near your body on a line. Bait and fish
are great shark attractions.
Be alert to the activity of fish and turtles. If they start to
behave erratically, leave the water. This may be nature's signal
of the presence of a predator.
Look for signs of large fish in the area, indicated by jump-
ing, splashing swirls or fins cutting through the water. This could
indicate sharks or other potentially dangerous predators.
Look in the water for birds. Birds often eat the remains of
fish or live bait fish. Be aware of birds swooping down or dive-
bombing into the water.
Stay away from schools of bait fish, which can appear like
a dark moving cloud in the water. Groups of small fish are
naturally attractive to shark.
The presence of dolphins in the water, contrary to popular
belief, does not indicate the absence of sharks both often eat
the same food.
The primary feeding time for sharks (notice this says "pri-
mary," not "only) is from dusk until dawn. So it is in your best
interest not to take that moonlight swim in the Gulf or bay.
These are the times when sharks mover inshore to feed.
And it is true: the majority of shark attacks occur in shallow
water, knee to chest deep.
If you are interested in seeing sharks and/or fishing for
them, numerous fishing charters offer shark fishing tours, and
several other businesses offer shark sighting tours.


Residents of Gulf County,
Did you know for minor illness or injury...


You can see a doctor

without an appointment!


Walk-in patients

are welcome!

Evening and weekend hours are now available at
St. Joseph Care of Florida located at the
Gulf County Health Department
2475 Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe

New hours are:
Monday-Friday, 7:30 .am. 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Pediatrician also available for appointments.

Discount rates available based on income.
We look forward to serving you and your family.
For more information, call (850) 227-1276, ext. 100

This advertisement brought lI you as a putbhe service of
St. Joseph Care of FL, Inc/Gulf County Health Department 23725


MO P -=


TheSta, Prt t. oeFL Thrsdy, ugut 1, 206 I


7 9.17 -SprvinoGulf contv and surrounding areas for 6~8 years


t






MAW T S rP S. eI h-, S- 71. Por St. TI I 1


~ -



-.-
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S-.-- -'
K?


Marie Logan/The Star
The pool, patio and pergola seen from the second-story walk-
way, offers another way to relax.


Marie Logan/The Star
The three-room carriage house suite over the garage offers
total privacy.


Marie Logan/The Star
Classic, clean lines highlight the main floor master suite.


Showhouse -


"It's a really believable,
comfortable house," he con-
tinued. "People have continu-
ously said they love both the
segmented aspect and the
overall comfortable feel."
In decorating the interior,
Sides chose the flooring, wall
finishes, and appliances for
their fit with the beach loca-
tion. He chose white appli-
ances instead of the cur-
rently popular stainless steel
because "white is more indig-
enous to the house," he said.
Originally the interior
was paneled completely in
wood, but Sides brought in


pecky white cypress paneling
in main areas, to give it, as he
described, "a comfy, casual
background with a neutral
blond color."
In a surprising move,
Sides decorated the entire
house in shades of blue, but
in shades that seem natural
to the coastal setting: cobalt,
turquoise, sun-faded pastel,
nautical navy. And it seems to
have worked, if the comments
that he and the volunteers
who give tours of the house
carry any weight.
"It's been the most inter-
esting thing," said Sides, "how


---


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40 Met'MerAve. PC. _


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For NEW Customers ONLY!


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Half & Quarter pages, too!)


For a limited time only, you can run a fill page ad for 50% off. Schedule
as many as you need from now until September 28. 2006 at this great
low price... I [hat an opportunity to advertise that great sale you've been
thinking about having... With a circulation of over 0o.ooo
Between The Star and The Times. you can't beat this
one-time special offer to get your message out.


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Deadline: Thursday one week prior
,'.blish dates: E'uen/ Thursday t!ntl Sept. 2. 2006


Full Page Special
With Color $540
Black & While $450 Quarter Page Special
With Color $190
Half Page Special Black & White $99
With Color $3301
Black & White $240
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Call or email the Advertising Department to reserve your
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.THE STAR


starads@starfl.com


227-1278


so many men who have toured
the house have responded
positively to the colors and
decor."
It is a tribute to Sides'
ability that he could put
together a house that works
so well and to which so many
people respond positively.
The Windmark Beach
show house is his fourth show
house for Southern Accents
Magazine, the sponsor of the


Sto


Marie Logan/The Star
A classic front porch running the entire front length of the
house, invites socializing and daydreaming


house.
St. Joe Company part-
nered with Southern Accents
to help build awareness of the
new community being built,
and the show house is purely
an advertising project for the
magazine, said Sides.
The concept of the show
house, he said, is to produce
something that showcases
a multitude of products in
order to make the magazine's
advertisers happy.
"It's quite a jigsaw puzzle


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274 Commerce Drive Port St. Joe
227-9696


to make a cohesive package
with so many disparate prod-
ucts," laughed Sides, whose
job is to take. all the prod-
ucts that advertisers want to
display, and make them all
fit together inside the space
in a "believable way," as he
described it.
"Five years ago I went to
New York to meet the product
sponsors of the first show
house I decorated," he contin-
ued, "and they told me that all
they remembered from past
show houses is what they
didn't like. I've always remem-
bered that."
But people not liking
what they see in the Southern
Accents show house does
not seem to be a problem.
According to Tom Panaseny,
of the St. Joe Towns and
Resorts project team, 4,000
visitors have seen the house
since it opened for paid tours
on Memorial Day weekend. HeK,,
expects another thousand to
come through before the open
house tours end September
10.
All money collected from
ticket sales goes to the Gulf
County chapter of Habitat for
Humanity.


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Marie Logan/The Star
Top of the line appliances in traditional white compliment the
farmhouse ambiance.


-- I IC L


I L L-e,=


__~llMENEM W-2~~-r.Y~


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


12B The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAust1,20


I


J, -0-


"..o: ;. '. .i_ ,+ ,.'.'. : .


-






Debt Do Us Part


4C


atsE blushed 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding
g areas for 68 years


Legals


7C


Classifieds


9-10C


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 17, 2006 SECTION C


Gallery Moves to Downtown Wewahitchka


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
For 18 years, Earnest Hand, Sr. showcased


his wooden sculptures at numerous arts and
crafts fairs throughout Florida, Louisiana and
Mississippi.


Hand's home base was an abandoned
gas station along Hwy. 22 named the Wood
Sculpture Art Gallery, where he displayed


an eclectic mix of turtles, alligators, African
masks and sculptural vases carved from
native Wewahitchka cypress.
Though he quickly earned a reputation as
one of the area's foremost artists, Hand grew
weary of traveling and sought a gallery space
more befitting his remarkable art.
In February, Hand realized his dream
when he opened the Wood Sculpture Art
Gallery at its new location in downtown
Wewahitchka.
While the. renovated gas station housed
all of the sculptures in one large room, the
new gallery has multiple viewing spaces that
allow Hand to display his works by theme.
Large fish, turtles and other sea creatures
inhabit the spacious front room, while Hand's
sought-after reptiles reside in the. nearby
"Alligator Alley."
(See GALLERY on Page 2C)
.^*


SDespina Williams/The Star
Wewahitchka native Earnest Hand, Sr. poses by the sign to his new art gallery. Hand has made a career as a wood sculptor for the last 18 years.


Despina WilliamsThe Star
An African-inspired face takes a seat by the
window.


1',


I'


coastal rope rtycty'
,Aft Af.,t '." ....


S16 RIM.E R PIII. ..
U/NG 16 PRIME PROPERTY W


at.


SEPT. 2nd 11 a.m. EST


At SMx


L






2( The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 1 7, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


- .--.,1


The Wood Sculpture Gallery, featuring the art of
Earnest Hand, Sr., is located at 436 Hwy. 71 North in
Wewahitchka. Gallery hours are Monday Saturday,
9 a.m. 5 p.m. (CT).


~It


y. ,


Gallery
Other rooms reveal c
elephants and abstract f
some tight-lipped and o
with tongues defiantly o
Hand is a visic
artist who sees figure
rough pieces of cypress
reveals those images
several tool boxes wor
carving implements, e:
knives, files, sandpaper
chainsaws.
Hand describes his
as "visions in wood,"
believes that a higher p
guides his hand.
"Any artistic ability
I have I realize that it


g ....! :^y .... ..^^ .. ..:- ---60--






faces, gift," said Hand.. ..-









s. He source."
with Hand began draw ing in

Sth of the third grade, and carved
xacto his first sculpture, a bird
when he was a teenager. ..." .
work He gave the sculpture toDespia Williams/The Star
and his Wewa Lord tchka art teacher,nd it's a direct
power Jerry Kelley, who recognizedand.
the youngman's talent andlize
that potentis doing the visurpassing that
came of his other students. a bird
(See GALLERY on Pager. 11 i.
(See GALLERY on Page 11iC) r,-.*{


Despina Williams/The Star
Hand's cypress turtles are among the gallery's most popular items.


1624 Grouper Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida
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Despina Williams/The Star
Earnest Hand, Sr., stands in his gallery's main room, amid his large fish sculptures.


2006


FamiI~ P~



'PC

5-.
~
a ii


Je F r L rPPOM5iPM EDT ,,,

JI,', HOUH HO aywekIi


For allyour.

Advertising needs...

Be Sure to

Contactyour
Port St. Joe*Wewahitchka
Cape San Bias-Downtown Apalachicola
Account Executive

Kim Tharpe


227
THE STAR
135 W. wy 98
Port St Joe, Florida


-1278
THflE TIMESAI.
129 Commerce Street
Apalachicola, Florida


2006
Hurricane
Names

Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William


1bee Food (111(1 O~tofwVithk

@4e'ii kiufity FAl

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ait(I CoAh'e PuitIdiq Ooiftht


Mullef TofuCoitel t



l(Nft Net eiomaitiot/0







o Popi MPof(i ollou oot

Ete to u'iif a Peep Sea Rft'g Tip
...wd/ ifo


So that %%e may spend the
Labor Day Holida) with our
family & friends we will be
having early deadlines for all
advertising placed in
The Star & The Times
Early Deadlines for: Thu
Ad with Proof: We
Ad without proof: Thu
Classified Line Ad: Fril
W'e will not accept any late

Please call w

The Star 227-127

The Times 653-1


-~ '.-. -


No More Towing
Park It Here
Under The Bridge


Permanent Address
St. Joe Beach 98 6 386
Every Friday until September 1, 2006


MOOOV


2C he ta, PrtSt.Jo, F -Thursday, August 17, 2006


Established 7937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


tl


,,..,


.i.-.l






CST-,DII5d 13 -OrI CU 197 Stvinn Culf rnMnf nlu rr-unseatdt ,


Deadline For Torch Award


Applications
- The Better Business communical
.Bureau of Northwest practices, a
Florida is reminding local within indu
organizations there is still munity. Org
time to submit entries for also apply
the 2006 Torch Awards for being nomin
MIarketplace Ethics. The "Conduc
awards program honors in an ethic;
businesses and non-profit earning the
organizations in Northwest customers iE
Florida that have demon- organization:
strated high ethical stan- said Norma
dards and exemplify excel- dent of the
lence in business practices. Bureau c
The deadline for entries is Florida. "T
Friday, August 18. designed to
Once a business or char- companies
ity is nominated, they will and beyond
receive an entry packet with excellence
requirements to be submit- ethical busi
ted to the BBB by the brga- every day."
nization. A panel of judges The awa
will evaluate entries based ed in five ca
on four criteria including ing: 1-10 en
Management practices, employees,
customer/vendor relations, ees, 100 +


Is August 18


tions and sales
nd reputation
stry and com-
ganizations may
directly without
nated.
acting business
al manner and
trust of their
s critical to any
n's success,"
a Wright, presi-
Better Business
if Northwest
'his award is
reward those
that go above
1 to exemplify
and promote
ness each and

yards are select-
tegories includ-
nployees, 11-49
50-99 employ-
employees and


501 (c)(3) charity organiza-
tions.
Membership in the
Better Business Bureau is
not a requirement to win
or be nominated for the
Torch Award, however all
nominees must not have
an unsatisfactory rating
with the Better Business
Bureau.
Torch Award winners,
along with students receiv-
ing this year's Student
Ethics Scholarship, will be
recognized during a lun-
cheon October 24 at the
Holiday Inn Select. -
For more information
contact the Better Business
Bureau at (800) 729-9226
or visit www.nwfl.bbb.org
to download a nomination
or entry form.


Proper Care for Hardwood Floors


Proper Care of your
Hardwood Floor will aviod
costly repair and finishing
issues and insure that your
floor will last as long as it
should. With today's advanc-
es in wood flooring stains
and finishes, cleaning your
wood floors has never been
easier. Regular maintenance
requires little more than
sweeping with a soft bris-
tle broom, and vacuuming
with a soft floor attachment
if your wood floor includes a
beveled edge that could col-
lect debris. You also should
clean your floors periodical-
ly with a professional wood
floor cleaning product rec-
ommended by a wood floor-
ing professional.
Preventive Maintenance
There are other steps
you can take to minimize
maintenance and maintain
the beauty of your wood
floors as well.
1.. Do not use sheet vinyl
or tile floor,.care products on
wood floors. Self-polishing
acrylic waxes cause wood to'
become slippery and appear
dull quickly.
2.. Use throw rugs both
inside and outside door-
ways to help prevent grit,
dirt and other debris from
being tracked onto your
'wood floors. This will pre-
vent scratching.
3.. Do not wet-mop a
wood floor. Standing water
can dull the finish, damage
the wood and leave a discol-
or ig residue.
4.. Wipe up spills imme-
diately with a slightly damp-
ened towel.
5.. Do not over-wax a
wood floor. If the floor dulls,
try buffing instead. Avoid wax
buildup under furniture and
other light traffic areas by
applying wax in these spots
every other waxing session.
6.. Put soft plastic or
fabric-faced glides under the
legs of furniture to prevent
scuffing and scratching.
7.. Avoid walking on
your wood floors with cleats,


: -1
- .. T'-.. .--, .



sports shoes and high heels.
A 125-pound woman walking
in high heels has an impact
of 2,000 pounds per square
inch. An exposed heel nail
can eXert up to 8,000 pounds
per square inch. This kind of
impact can dent any floor
surface.
8.. When moving heavy
furniture, do not slide it on
wood flooring. It is best to
pick up the furniture com-
pletely to protect the wood
flooring. .
9.. For wood flooring in "
the kitchen, place an area
rug in front of the kitchen


sink.
10.. Use a humidi-
fier throughout the winter
months to keep wood move-
ment and shrinkage to a
minimum.
In summary, wood floors
are easy to maintain espe-
cially compared to the old
days but you need to do it
properly. Contact your Wood
flooring Professional for any
questions.
Jim Garth
TMlastercraftsman "
National Wood'd flooring
Association


NILJS I 071T138 Uul CA lroin [he nuinr-
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lCanii Daniel


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,M Neubauer Real Estate, Inc.
R R ,' A Always There For You.. Each Office independently Onned and Opeiated


2019 Water Dr.
S66%'fluf SP.NCI Jut' HOMKE
O-N 'THE C.ANALQ 4BR 2'B.
home has Ili, eI, qI~ I- r1rn.dinrg.

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,S775,0tX-CanaFrontMmwexw hfl-3BR/3BA.........#261,
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S0-q"A-1Fan=BefyiaGu~rimi-4BRa5BA-#20l26
S49,m0tSLJoe~minmsdaPr~etty #355711,
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9446 Hwv 98
..- .... f* ".111, 111 BEACON HILL GULF
S \'IE\\ TO\N iHOME 3BR 2BA
r- _- directly 3 ros from .xater ., !Ith
dedicated heach irn'il', roun.
,ell-equipped eal-irl-kitchen and
laurndr) room Double hidingg cla13
d, oor, con buth le-el, 'pat.o and
._' dpcI. .reened .:,rch and ,,.ork-
-hop #1 111342

219 9th Street
$295,000 CUTE PORT ST.
JOE HOME CLOSE TO TOWN
3BR/1BA home has living/
dining' combination, hardwood
floors, ceiling fans, remodeled
bathrooms, and a well-equipped
kitchen. Screened porch and
home warranty. Zoned commer-
cial/residential. #110492
S274,900-B a lotlinGretSubdiviamn #110700
S271,000-Custnm/Wa~nwmn.a k-3BR12BA #201039
S26000-Wamg DistmmetoMexioBah-2BR/IBA -#109724
5250,000- ICi tihBeacMnH-l- #109644,#109647
S245,000-MexicoBeachHmanCumerlot-3BRf2BA-..#200661
039,50-Hc aioRkirtStJoemn2Iis-3BRI2BA #110898
S23400-VacantLotinNewSubdivixm #11048
S199,000-BuildiBeaiflMcBeach #200479
S159o00-GEatMxicoBechBuildingIt #200480
S67,500-LakeviwLotinWewaihldika #111700
S5,750-FourCaryvilleWoodedI.isAvailale #200262


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For allyour Internet


Advertising needs.,.


Be Sureto


Contactyo0r

Internet Advertising
Account Executive

Katie Flament


596-7179

THE STAR TJE Tmj ,sa
135 W.wy 98 129 Commerce Street
Port St Joe, Florida Apalachicola, Florida


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BANIWAMM 0


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The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAust1,20--I


F-qtahlished 1937 Servinq Gurlf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


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4( Th tr otS.Je L TusaAcut17 06Etbihe 97*SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


Till


Story by BART MILLS
Freedom News Service
So it's the big day, that
most glorious of moments for
which you have waited all your
life and everything is perfect.
You have the perfect church,
the perfect gown and, heaven
help you, the perfect spouse.
And chances are you now
are facing a perfectly horrible
bill.
It's no surprise that wed-,
dings are pricey. But just how
expensive, well that might sur-
prise you. According to a 2005
survey by the Fairchild Bridal
Group, the average American
wedding costs $26,327.
And that doesn't include
the cost of the honeymoon
or engagement ring. All total,
Americans spent about $125
billion on weddings last year.
To put that another way, that's
roughly the Gross Domestic
Product of Ireland. If you're
telling your kids right now
that you never came close to
spending that for your wed-


ding, you're telling the truth.
That nearly $30,000 price
tag represents an increase of
more than 73 percent over the
past 15 years, according to the
study. It's the result of rising
costs and expectations.
"It's a two-edged sword.
People want more, they're older
when they get married than
they once were and they're
more sophisticated about what
they want. Add to that the
fact that things are just more
expensive and an increase in
the number of professional
people planning and coordi-
nating weddings and costs are
going to go up," said Cynthia
Bollock, vice president of the
National Coalition of Wedding
and Event Managers.
The good new is, at least
for parents, that it no longer
seems a requirement that the
bride's folks pick up the entire
tab. Only about a quarter of
the brides surveyed in the
Fairchild study had parents
pay for the wedding and one-
third actually paid the whole


For allyour


*Advertising needs...


Be Sure to


Contactyour

West Port St Joe
Account Executive


Rachel Browning


227-7856


THE STAR


Charming cottage located on a beautiful wood-
ed lot in a well established neighborhood.:
Completely renovated in 2004! MLS#: 111660
ONLY $209,000"







,L -I ld r :. ... -:r ._ "
close to town, bay and beaches. This is a beauti-
ful subdivision with underground utilities which
allows modular homes with covenants and re-
strictions. 103 X 190. Starting at $75,000.







4 Commit trcnal lots m I ..:a. i r. p. ,-j .:1.
oping coastal community. Highly visible and
hfh UdiJT,: volume'in Port St Joe. Great Bay
views! Possibility to pick up two additional
adjacent lots for bigger space. MLS 110987
$950,000.















www.CoastalRe"


135.W. Hwy 98
Port St Joe, Florida


3 BR 2 BA House on quiet street with lots of
upgrades: granite countertops, fireplace, Pergo
wood floors, pool & hot tub, wonderful family
room. MLS# 110465 $299,000.


Gulf front Gated Community niL c ,,o n-i
ming pools, tennis courts and easy access to
America's Number One Beach (Selected by Dr.
Beach, 2002). 34 Barrier Dunes Townhouses
Available from $325,000 to $650,000.


Beautiful home is located in the X Flood zone
in Seagrass subdivision. This luxury 3 BR- 3.5
BA home has ceramic tile & hard wood floors
and is completely furnished. Enjoy your private
pool, or the community pool. MLS# 201449
$899,750"






coastal



Group


iltylnfo.com


tab themselves.
"It's an issue of age.
Couples are marrying older,
they have money and they also
want things the way they want
it," Bollock said.
"If you want to control
the wedding, sometimes that
means you have to pay for it."
No matter who is picking
up the tab, it's expensive. So
we've done some legwork and
figured out some ways to cut
expenses. The goal was to cre-
ate a .nice wedding for about
250 guests and 10 members
in the party (five groomsmen
and five bridesmaids). And
while we know you can always
cut deeper we refused to go
too cheap. After all, it's your
special day. Here's the break-
down:
RINGS
National average: $1,722
Most men go with a simple
gold or platinum band running
$250 to $300. Women wind
up with something sparkly,
bumping the price to $1,200
and up. In both cases you can
go cheaper and you certainly
can go more expensive.
Money-saver idea:
Groom's bands can often be
found at pawn shops for bar-
gain prices.
ATTIRE
National average: $1,823
Attire includes the wedding
dress, tux and all the accesso-
ries. Wedding dresses can be
had for as little as $200 on
eBay. Custom dresses can eas-
ily top $10,000. The average
cost of tuxedo rental is about
$90, according to American
Commodore Tuxedo.
Money-saver idea: Many
tux rental places give the
groom his tux free if four or
more groomsmen rent from
the same place.
CEREMONY
National average :$3,439
As the real estate agents
say, the secret is location,
location, location. The family


- f.-n' "- '- :^

Gulf Front townhouse. Seller recently added
third bedroom. This unit has been well main-
tained and would be an excellent rental unit.
Priced to sell MLS# 200304 $439,000.







Charming 3 BR 2 BA House in Port St. Joe
built in 2004. Large kitchen and familyroom with
tile flooring and counter-tops. Whirlpool & sepa-
rate shower in master bath. In-ground sprinkler
system. MLS# 109637 $284,500






M oac) Ba)ou bF. 2 i '.,,ir
just two short blocks to public beach access.
Zoned commercial and would be a great loca-
tion for an office. MLS# 110825 $299,900
Preston Russ 227-8890
Broker
Victor Ramos GRI 340-1216
Broker Associate
Scott Burkett 899-5242
REALTOR
DebbeWibberg 227-6178
REALTOR
Betty Caughey 625-6197
REALTOR
Paul Penn 866-2853
REALTOR
Gretchen Upchurch 227-5543
REALTOR
Brian Burkett 227-8892
REALTOR
RexAnderson 227-5416
REALTOR
Ann Anderson 227-5432
REALTOR
Chris Pierce 340-0628
REALTOR


do


us


church is still the best deal in
town. Most churches charge a
nominal fee, $50 to $100, for
church members. Clergymen
charge between $50 and
$100 to officiate. The biggest
expense is decoration in the
form of flowers, candles and
velvet bows for the pew ends.
Money-saver idea:
Location weddings in which
the event is held at resort
hotel can save the wedding
couple money. Couples using
a resort's all inclusive wedding
package saved an average of
41 percent. Of course, guests
incur travel and hotel expens-
es, but they get a vacation out
of the deal not just a trip
back "home."
PHOTOGRAPHY
National average: $2,632
Prices vary dramatically
by photographer and wedding
package chosen. The more
expensive ones provide wed-
ding albums, multiple shots
and give you the rights to the
negatives. Some also offer vid-
eography at a price. Ask
your photographer if they have
a Web site. If they do, they
might put pictures online for
out-of-town relatives to see.
Some even do it that day.
MUSIC
National average: $913
Even using the church
organist will set you back $100
or so. Hire a decent harpist or
flute player and you're more
in the neighborhood of $200
to $300. A good wedding band
will cost about $1,000. Add
$500 for a DJ to keep the
music going during breaks.
Money-saver idea: Some
bands offer to spin disks dur-
ing band breaks and you get a
two-for-one. deal because they
already have the audio equip-
ment in place. .
PARTY FAVORS
National average: $1,125
Hard to save any money on
this one. The folks at Things
Remembered, pretty much the
kings of attendant gift retail-
ers, said flasks, mugs, pens'
and other popular attendant
gifts average between $30 and
$50. The bells, frames and
whatnot people put out for
favors run about $6 each.
Another option: The best sug-
gestion we heard was from a
couple who put signs on the
reception tables telling guests
they had made a donation to
charity in lieu of favors.


part


" -I-,


I


C-


RECEPTION
National average: $13,555
The big deli sandwich at
VFW Hall or surf and turf at
the country club are oppo-
site ends of the spectrum for
reception ideas. But there are
plenty in between. The recep-
tion is where the bulk of the
money goes and for good rea-
son.
Ifyou're aimingsomewhere
in the middle, look at commu-
nity centers, senior centers or
recreation halls. Often their
rentals include tables, chairs,
linens and everything else.
If you want an open bar,
expect to pay $2,000 or so,
depending upon what you
serve and how many drinkers
you have.
Meals start at $20 to $25
a person and the fancier the
food, the more it costs.
Decorating costs run from
$100 for streamers and glitter
to $2,500 to have the place
professionally decorated.
Wedding cakes start at


$300 and the sky's the limit.
Money-saving idea: Serve
a selection of wine and beer in
lieu of a full bar. Most guests
will be just as happy and it
could cut costs considerably.

EXTRAS
National average: $1,358
Wedding stationary is
an area where costs can get
away from you quickly. Basic
engraved invitations start at
$500 for 250 guests. Add cal-
ligraphy, hand-made paper or
even embossed programs and
'the cost rises quickly.
Limousines are a little
more straight-forward. For
example: A 14-person limo
costs about $400 for three
hours.. The bigger the limo, the
more it costs.
Money-saving idea: If
you're having a summer wed-
ding (or live in a warm cli-
mate); skip the limo and rent a
convertible for $100 a day.
+ + +


debt


Free


(hecking-



Firee gift!


When you open a free checking account we'll give you a free

gift. It's our way of saying "thanks" for your business. And... there's

more: You'll enjoy free online banking with bill payment, convenient

ATMs, and 24-hour automated phone banking. Call us to open

your FREE checking account today!




PROSPERITY BANK




Port St. Joe 528 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. 850-227-3370


Free gift offer is available for personal checking accounts only 5/2/06 7/31/06. Only one gift per household. Substitutes or rain checks on free gift will be
offered as needed. The free gift will be given at account opening. The following account opening deposits are required: $5,000 or greater, a highway
travel kit or a Prosperity Bank umbrella; $1,000.00 $4,999.99, a 12-pack insulated cooler; $300.00 $999.99, a 100% cotton baseball cap.
This special offer is not available for IRAs, public funds, brokerages, or financial institutions. Member FDIC 121is


8048 Cape San Bias Rd 110 Barrier Dunes 106 Reid Avenue
Cape San Bias. FL Cape San Bias. FL Port St Joe, FL

850-227-7770 850-227-3200 850-227-7775
800-584-1566 800-713-9695 800-581-2910


==MOO'


I


TheSta, ortSt.Jo, F -Thursday, Augrust 17, 2006


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


I if


ono". ma- cow,~;s







CST9D.'SFI&L 173 )VIIy Cy I ,n, v aI urU ndI r fr rsSr t e Ld -- f- a 't .J Fsd g t 72


Once, just once, I'd
like someone to ask me to
design a high maintenance
garden. That way maybe
I could include a Japanese
gravel garden that would
need to be carefully raked
into spirals every day, or a
perennial garden whose
-beauty would depend on
fastidious deadheading of the
spent flowers, or a shrubbery
maze that would require
regular grooming with sharp
hedge trimmers. But no, I get
requests for low maintenance,
and no maintenance, and
only rarely is this not the
most important consideration
of someone looking for a
niew landscape. Therefore
I specialize in knowing the
most drought-proof, heat-
proof, wind-proof plants that
thrive in our area without a
lot of pruning or fertilizing. I
also emphasize that no new
-landscape is maintenance
'free, and if basic maintenance
procedures aren't followed,
nature will quickly cover over
whatever we plant with her
own sharp, prickly, barbed
offerings.
Good thing for me that
quality gardens do need
.maintenance, since that is
how I earned my living for
many, many years prior to
moving on the cushier job
of landscape design. Ease
of maintenance is naturally
my first consideration in a
design, so it works well for my
-customers, many of whom are
absentee owners who really
do need low maintenance.
The principles of
xeriscaping are tuned toward
developing low maintenance
gardens that are conservative
in the use of -water and
chemicals. The seventh
(and last, finally!) principle
of xeriscape is appropriate
maintenance. How much
maintenance a garden
ultimately needs depends
on the kind of garden it is
and how it is designed, but
.if the other six principles of
xeriscape have been practiced
the ongoing work should be
minimal. Until the plants
'have grown together, there
will be weeds to pull. The
irrigation system will need
regular attention to keep the
filters clean and flowing, to
keep the water directed at the










-xeiene

Cetfe eiae


YorFHTm
BorIm e
Toita I VI 15MR1padf0 ada Iaedb

oain 1 pceifscongor eat isn ic5. o-ab


plants and off hard surfaces,
and the timer will need to
be adjusted seasonally to
give the plants more water
during the hot summer, and
less during cool weather.
Fresh mulch will need to
be added on a regular basis
to maintain a three or four
inch cover. Plants will need
to be monitored for insect
and disease problems, and if
problems occur, they will need
to be correctly identified in
order to be correctly treated.
Here's the payoff. A good
design that acknowledges
plants' growth habits and
mature sizes will result in a
full, but not crowded, garden.
As the plants grow together
they create their own shade,
and less and less weeding will
be required. The irrigation,
when used in a way to
promote a deep, strong root
system, will be used less and
less as the plants mature,
but will still be available to
help the garden through
periods of extended drought.
The mulch that is added on a
regular basis will break down
and add organic matter to the
soil, reducing the need for
both water and fertilizer, and
resulting in healthier plants
that are more resistant to
pests and diseases.
There is more than one
way to raise a garden. The
antithesis of xeriscaped
gardens are found everywhere.


They are lush and green, often
with large expanses of grass,
and often visited monthly by
big tanker trucks that spray
onto them a concoction of
fertilizer and pesticide. They
get plenty of water, and the
water and fertilizer makes
them grow, and grow, so
they have to be mowed and


pruned and mowed some
more. These gardens are
beautiful, too, and they create
lots of jobs within the green
industry. They keep people
like myself busy maintaining
the perfection, for a price.
Some of us are willing to pay
the price. Some of us aren't.


Please visit The Star &


The Times at:


www.starfl.com


www.apalachtimes.com

Also visit our affiliated panhandle

resource guide at:


www.emeraldcoast.com


/i -*r'/"r* -7r-/7r -7 i r7r--7 r--I r- n r --%r*-% r*-~"'r"
Advertising is now available on all our websites.

For more information call Katie at 596-7179

Here are a few business now advertising y

with us online.


Rachel Browning, 'Coasfal
Beach Realty of ._roup
Cape San Bias 2-r-
uui urI# .. 1-lyI, .


UNIQUE 3BR/2BA home located
.on 3.47 acres that adjoins Tate's
Hell National Forest. Only .02
miles from the Apalachicola Bay.
This property has many amenities
including a workshop. Ideal for
nature lovers.
MLS # 200021.............. $399,000
'":~ & ',0


A "MUST SEE" 4BR/4.5BABeach-
front home, gorgeous views, of the
Gulf of Mexico, completely land-
scaped and irrigated yard with 2
car garage and Golf cart garage.
MLS # 109905.......... $1,995,000
T 1.-ir, TW.6 it. ,: ';,",-.r. t, -! /.. :,.


EXQUISITE 4BR/4BA home in
the exclusive St. George Planta-
tion located on St. George Is-
land. This home features many
amenities and has been exten-
sively redecorated.
MLS # 110802...... $1,299,000


WONDERFUL Interior lot lo-
cated on St. George Island. Short
distance to beach access.$
MLS # 108570.............. $380,000


". _- .

MAGNIFICENT 1.32 acre wood-
ed lot across from the Apalachicola
Bay in Eastpoint. Enjoy wonder-
ful sunsets from an unobstructed
view.
MLS # 107581............. $440,000


FABULOUS GULFFRONT LOT
located on Cape San Blas. Fea-
tures gorgeous views of the Gulf of
Mexico.
MLS # 110419............. $999,000


THREE GREAT LOTS located in
Baywood Estates near Carrabelle
and river. (HOMES ONLY)
MLS # 109995, 110002, 110003
$95,000 $99,900


GKEAT location looking out oe-
tween St. George Island and Dog
Island. Older cottage great for
weekend getaways.
MLS # 110766 .............$798,000


GORGEOUS Gult front lot located WONDERFtUL lot located in
on Cape San Blas. This is a per- Carrabelle with partial bayview.
fect site to build your dream beach Close to boat launch.
home. MLS # 108803............ $95,000
MLS #110685............ $925,000


,;& LEADING REAL ESTATE
6c (COMPANIES -THE WORLD-'
GET FRE CRDITREPOT &MORTAGE-ANAYSI! I


r


'''~'


TheStr, or St Je, L ThrsayAuust17 206 S


Established 7937 Servina Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


r


Bronson To


Host First-ever


Alternative Fuel


Summit In Florida

Program to highlight ethanol, bio-diesel as alternative fuels
Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson today announced that he is taking steps to
pave the way for alternative fuel production and use in Florida.
He is hosting the first-ever Florida Farm to Fuel Summit, August
30 to September 1, at the Omni Orlando at Champions Gate.
The summit will cover current research initiatives, future
production and distribution of ethanol and bio-diesel in Florida,
and incentives/financing opportunities for the alternative or
renewable fuels industry.
It is attracting high-level participants from the federal and
state government, as well as representatives of private industry
who will be a driving force in achieving a major alternative fuels
program. Keynote speakers include Assistant Secretary for
Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alexander Karsner,
USDA Under Secretary for Research, Education and Economics
Gale Buchanan, State Senator Lee Constantine and State
Representative Adam Hasner. The program will also feature a
special presentation on Brazil's effort at achieving petroleum
independence.
The summit is a component of Bronson's ambitious "Farm
to Fuel" initiative, a comprehensive effort to promote alternative
energy and help position Florida as a leader in the production
of bio-fuels.
"Since the passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005,
announcement of the President's Advanced Energy Initiative
and passage of Florida's Energy Act, the interest in renewable
energy has never been greater," Bronson said. "Our Farm to Fuel
Summit is just one of many ways that we are trying to bring the
necessary parties and stakeholders together to discuss using the
state's renewable resources to reduce our dependency on foreign
oil and other non-renewable sources of energy. Our ultimate
goal is to enhance the market for, and promote the production
and distribution of renewable energy from Florida-grown crops,
agricultural wastes and-residues, and other biomass.
Bronson said that as fuel prices continue to skyrocket, all
Florida citizens should be taking an interest in and supporting
alternative fuels development.
For registration information and agenda, visit http://www.
florida-agriculture.com/farmtofuel summit.htm.



Let uw4 p~'w i ok d 6a &,team &e4p. YIu
find go t eam eiame!!!!

0 w** Pelican Real Estate
171 Highway 98, Suite D
Eastpoint, FL 32328
rPelican (850)670-8886
& vDaprn EntCopany t www.pelicanproperty.com


f luG Coast Realty, c.







U Ift:!raL ra s1 0a h 9 S g f ad r i e or


New Option for 1031 Exchanges


A 1031 exchange is a
transaction that allows a
taxpayer to sell one prop-
erty and buy another, while
deferring the tax on the
gains in value on the prop-
erty being sold. The trans-
action is appropriately
named after the section of
the Internal Revenue Code
permitting it, and is a very
effective strategy for the
deferral of capital gains and
depreciation recapture from
the sale of highly appreci-
ated property. Although
the local real estate market
may have slowed recently,
values are still substantial-
ly above where they were
a few years ago, and many
tax payers can still benefit
from this strategy.
There are 4 basic steps
to the 1031 exchange trans-
action. First, the seller
arranges for the sale of the
property with the appropri-
ate 1031 exchange wording
in the contract. Second,


at closing, the proceeds
are directed to a Qualified
Intermediary. Third, the
seller identifies a replace-
ment property within 45
days of closing. Fourth,
the seller completes the
purchase of a replacement
property within 180 days
of closing.
Historically, and still
most commonly, the replace-
ment property is local real
estate solely owned by
the taxpayer. However,
in recent years, there has
been the introduction of
an undivided Tennant In
Common (TIC) property as
a viable option for replace-
ment property eligible for
a 1031 exchange. These
are usually large apartment
complexes or office build-
ings located throughout the
United States where the
taxpayer would purchase
shares in an undivided
ownership interest in the
property.


As with all investments,
there are advantages and
disadvantages. The most
significant disadvantages
of TIC properties are that
the purchaser must be a
qualified investor (defined
as a net worth of at least
$1,000,000), and the lack
of liquidity. The lack of
liquidity means that once
the taxpayer invests in a
property, they have little
input into the exact tim-
ing of when the property
is sold.
There are also several
advantages to TIC proper-
ties as a 1031 exchange
option. First, the amount
of shares purchased can be
adjusted to exactly match
the amount of money the
taxpayer needs to rein-
vest. Second, there are a
variety of properties avail-
able throughout the United
States at any given time
to provide a wide selec-
tion of investment options.


Third, the properties are
professionally managed
and do not require "normal
landlord responsibilities."
Fourth, most TIC proper-
ties provide a positive cash
flow that is paid in monthly
distributions (particular-
ly beneficial to retirees).
Finally, TIC properties are
well suited for diversifica-
tion among several different
types of properties (office
or apartments) in different
geographic markets.

Aaron Farnsley is a
CertifiedFinancialPlanner,
a Chartered Financial
Consultant, and has an
MBA from Florida State
University. For questions
regarding this article, or
suggestions for topics of
future articles please e-
mail Aaron Farnsley at
Aaron.Farnsley@Farnsley.
corn, or call him at 227-
3336.


Southeast Builders, Designers


Receive Prestigious Aurora Awards


Debit card 101: what



they are, how they work


B builders and
d.e s i g n e r s
throughout the
Southeast received
prestigious Aurora Awards
during an industry gala
last Saturday. The awards
extravaganza coincided with
the 2006 Southeast Building
Conference (SEBC) tradeshow
and educational conference.
"For this special night of
the year, the spotlight is on
the Southeast's finest builders
and designers," -s.s Valerie
Cope, 2006 AURORA Award
Chair. "The prestigious event
creates lifetime recognition
for all winners."
The nationally recognized
AURORA A\wards honor
builders, designers. archi, tets.
and,' other -home' -"building
industry professionals in a
12-state southeast region
stretching from Texas to
Virginia.
The ,Golden AURORA
Award -and Best, in State
AURORA ,, Awards are
considered the premier
AURORAS. All xminniig photos
are posted on theauroras.
corn.


2006 GOLDEN AURORA
WINNER
Foley Design Associates,
Architects Inc., Wild Heron,
Panama City Beach, FL
Wild Heron is comprised
of numerous residential
opportunities including
home sites, bungalows,
custom-designed homes, and
condominium residences.
Wild Heron threads Coastal
Craftsman architecture
through each residence and
community structure. The
Coastal Craftsman style
is a genuine complement
to the natural landscape
surrounding it, using time
tested finishes like slate,
river rock, split stone, glass,
wood and historic metals. At
'the 'heart of Wild Heron is
the Greg Norman-designed
Shark's Tooth Golf Course,
an Audubon International
"Signature Sanctuary."
World-class community
amenities include a lakeside
fire-ring, pool, fitness center,
boardwalk and an oak-grove
park. Stocked with kayaks
and canoes, residents also
have access to the Boathouse.


A series of walkways for both
pedestrians and golf carts
link all amenities. Members
can enjoy a private beach
club with a pool, cabana, and
grill located minutes away on
the sugar sand coast of the
Gulf of Mexico.

2006 BEST IN STATE
AURORA WINNERS

STATE WINNER
Florida

Foley Design Associates,
Architects Inc.

Wild Heron;
Panama City Beach, FL,

This Coastal Craftsman
style home is designed by
Foley Design Associates,
Architects Inc. and is both the
2006 Golden AURORA Award
winner and the 2006 Best
in State AURORA winner for
Florida. Please see description
of this property above.


Dear Voter,
My name is Eric Bidwell and I would like to be your District One
Gulf County School Board member. Below: are just a few of the rea-
sons I am seeking your support in being elected to this position:

I am a lifelong resident of Gulf County, a graduate of Wewa High
School, Gulf Coast Community College, and the University of West
.. ... '.Florida, and I will be finishing my Master's Degree in Educational
Leadership in December of this year.

After receiving by Bachelor's Degree from UWF, I returned to
Wewa High School where I taught English, TV Productions, and
drama. Ftheti moved to Wewa Elementary School and taught P.E. before leaving school to
open my own business. I thoroughly, enjoyed teaching your children and teenagers at all levels.

I k% as honored to be selected by my peers at Wewa High School to represent them as the 2005
Teacher of the Year. There is no greater compliment than to be recognized by your fellow
teachers for our efforts in educating our youth.

Three. generations of my family have worked for the Gulf County School system. Many of
those de\ oted thirty or more years of their lives to Gulf County's boys and girls. I am proud of
my family's \ ork and I am proud of Gulf County Schools.

As a home-construction business owner for the past two years, I have seen the school system
From an outside perspecti\ e. I better understand the importance of fiscal responsibility, and the
needs of our students to prepare to enter the workforce as well as further their education.

My wife, Tammie, works at Gulf Correctional; our son, Kody, and daughter, Kory both work
in Gulf County and attend local community colleges, while our youngest daughter, Kalyn is a
sophomore at WeVe a High. There is no better reason to support Gulf County schools than the
education of its children, both yours and mine.

I ha\ e man\ ideas to continue improving our schools. As your board member, my priorities
will be: pro\ iding updated vocational programs; fiscal efficiency and responsibility; finding
andkeeping good teachers; ensuring that -we always have well-trained, motivated principals
and adtninitstrators: and providing all students, teachers, school personnel and parents safe
,'and pleasant schools in which to learn, work, or visit. I am an honest, dedicated worker, and
am ready to go to work for you and your children as your school board member. If you have
:questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me at home (639-2144) or work (639-6601).
" Thanks for your consideration and your many encouraging remarks.

Sincerely.


Eric Bidv\ell
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Eric Bidwell for Gulf County School board, District One, Nonpartisan.


By Jason Alderman
It's hard to fathom how
much the financial industry
has changed in the past
several decades. Before
the first charge card was
introduced in 1950, "cash
and carry" was pretty much
the rule for most purchases.
Prior to widespread use of
automated teller machines.
(ATMs) in the late 1970s,
many people wasted their
Friday lunch hour waiting in
long bank lines .to cash their
paychecks.
Another banking
innovation the debit card
- has had a major impact on
how many of us now manage
our finances and make
purchases.
Debit cards are enhanced
banking cards directly linked
to your bank account. Along
with making ATM withdrawals
from your checking or savings
account, you can also use
debit cards to purchase goods
at point-of-sale merchant
locations without having to
write a check. In either case,
the amount is automatically
deducted from your account,
just as though you had
written a check.
Key debit card benefits
include:
Can be used at ATMs,
24/7, to withdraw cash or
make deposits instead of
waiting for a teller during
regular banking hours.
Makes paying at a
checkout counter quicker
and more convenient-no need
to fill out a check or present


identification and wait while
it's written doyvn or verified.
Many merchants allow
you to withdraw additional
cash with your purchase,
saving a trip to the ATM.
Use it out of town or
at locations where personal
checks are not accepted.
Safer than carrying
checks or cash.
Whenever it comes to
your money, you always need
to keep a close eye on your
personal bottom line. With
debit cards, keep these points
in mind:
You should be certain
of your bank account balance
so you don't spend more than
your available funds.
Some debit cards have
monthly or, per-transaction'
fees, so it pays to comparison
shop when opening an
account.
Guard your card and
personal identification
number, closely never let
anyone borrow it.
Debit cards also carry an
added level of security not
available with cash or checks.
Most debit card transactions
made with a national network
like Visa receive 'zero liability'
fraud protection. This means
that if your debit card is
ever lost or stolen and you
report it promptly, you-
won't be responsible for any
fraudulent purchases or cash
withdrawals. The Federal
Trade Commission's web
site (www.ftc.gov) -and your
bank have more details. The
National Consumers League


I~~Li


~II~F\
/
I. ~.


'also has a helpful brochure
on debit cards at www,
practicalmoneyskills.com/
resources.
You'll need to keep track
of debit card transactions
in your check register along
with your written checks.' If
-you're withdrawing money
from an ATM outside your
bank's network, there may
be additional service charges,
so be sure to enter them in
your register as well, or your
account won't balance.
One last point: Remember
that debit card transactions'
just like checks, are drawn
against the money you already
have inyour checking account.
It's not a temporary loan from
the bank to be repaid later;
so it's a good reminder to live
within your means and spend
responsibly.
Jason Alderman direct
the Practical Money Skills for
Life program for Visa USA,
More information about
parent/children activities and
other personal finance, tips
can be found at http://www:
practicalmoneyskills.com.


Beautiful, livable homes at very affordable prices I High quality materials
Over 20 home plans and designs I Cost-effective, energy-saving features
Built on your land with solid board-by-board construction


Call for Current Promotions (334) 678-8401
jubileebuilders.com 6885 US Hwy 231 South I Dothan, Alabama 36301
Schedule a Free Consultation
Monday-Friday 8am-5pm, Saturday 9am-5pm


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


TheStrPor S. oeFL- hurda, ugut 7,2006


q


\" \


-- i .


1 1









Established 1937 Servina Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
COASTAL TOWING AND
ROADSIDE SERVICE, INC. gives
Notice of Foreclosure of Lien
and intent to sell these vehicles
bn 08/25/2006, on 08:30 a.m.
ET at 8082 W. Hwy 98, Port
St. Joe, FL 32456, pursuant to
subsection 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes, COASTAL TOWING
AND ROADSIDE SERVICE, INC.
reserves the right to accept or
reject any and/or all bids.
1989 Honda
#JHMED3550KS003776
1993 Chevrolet
#1GNFK16K4PJ334515
1992 Honda
# 1HGCB7553NA220398
1993 Ford
# 1FACP52U5PA294527
Publish August 17 & 24, 2006

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Storage Units 1249 Highway
22, Wewahitchka, FL
#82 Pam Diez
#17 Margaret Hightower
will be open August 31 and
merchandise removed if rent not
brought up to date.
Publish August 17 & 24, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 05-312CA
FREMONT INVESTMENT AND
LOAN,
Plaintiff, et. al.,
vs
ANTHONY LEE PETERSON
A/K/A ANTHONY LEE
PETERSON, JR., IF LIVING
AND IF DEAD, THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE, ET., AL.,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE

NOTICE IS.HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Judgement
of Foreclosure date February
7, 2006, and entered in Case
Nb. 05-321CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Judicial
Circuit in and for Gulf County,
Florida, wherein FREMONT
INVESTMENT AND LOAN, is
a Plaintiff and ANTHONY LEE
PETERSON A/K/A ANTHONY
LEE PETERSON, JR., IF LIVING,
AND IF DEAD, THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER
PARTIES CLAIMING AN
INTEREST BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TANISHA
JAMES PETERSON; DAVID .
TAUNTON; ABIGAIL TAUNTON;
UNKNOWN TENANT 1;
UNKNOWN TENANT 2 are the
Defendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
at 11:00 AM on August 24,
2006, the following described
property as set forth in said
Final Judgement, to wit:
. LOT 25, OAK GARDENS
SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED
IN-PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 21
PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY", FLORIDA
Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk
As Clerk of the Court
/s/Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk

August 10 & 17, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO: 05-239DR

JOHN A. WEILAND, Petitioner
and
JACQUELYN GAYLE WEILAND,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO': JACQUELYN GAYLE
WEILAND,
I YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action has been filed against
you and that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on John
Arthur Weiland whose address
is 2817 Indian Pass Rd., Port
St. Joe, FL 32456 on or before
9/14/06, and file the original
with -the clerk of this Court
at '1000 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456, before
service on Petitioner or immedi-
ately thereafter. If you fail to
do,so, default may be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court docu--
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the Clerk
of the Circuit Court's office. You
imay review these documents
upon request.
S You must keep the Clerk
of the Court's office notified
of any current address. (You
must file Notice of Current
Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law, Form
! 1, L;i Future papers in this
i-..-a' will be mailed to the
ddcIress on record at the clerk's
dffice..
' WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of docu-
thents and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanc-
tions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings. Dated
8/2/06.
Clerk of Circuit Court.
By Jasmine Hysmith, Deputy
Clerk.
Pubish: August 10 through
September 14'

CALL FOR BIDS

PROJECT: Gulf County Health
Department

*LOCATION: Wewahitchka, FL

Peter R. Brown Construction,
Inc., will receive sealed bids from
pre-qualified Subcontractors in
accordance with the plans and
specifications prepared by Bar-
nett Fronczak Barlowe Archi-
tects and bid packages prepared
l1y Peter R. Brown Construction,
Inc., for the following work:

Bid Packages:'

2A- Sitework
3A.- Concrete
4A,- Masonry & Architectural
Pre-Cast Concrete
5A Steel
6A General Trades
6B Rough Carpentry & Wood
Trusses
6D Interior Architectural
Woodwork
7,A Roofing, Flashing & Sheet
Metal"
SA Glass and Glazing
A Metal Stud Framing, Gyp-
sum Walls & Ceilings, Exterior
Insulation Finish System (EIFS)
8s Acoustical
B Floor Coverings & Tile
9C Painting
SISA Plumbing
15B HVAC


15C Test & Balance
l A


16A Electrical

PLANS & DEPOSIT: Bid docu-
ments will be available after
July 24, 2006, from Peter R.
Brown Construction, Inc., the
Construction Manager. The
bid documents may be reviewed
at the office of Peter R. Brown
Construction Inc., located at
1424 Piedmont Drive East, Tal-
lahassee, Florida 32308. For
information about obtaining bid
documents call Peter R. Brown
Construction, Inc., at 850-668-
4498 or fax request to 850-668-
6790.

BOND REQUIREMENTS: 5% bid
bond and 100% labor and mate-
rial payment and performance
bonds are required on certain
bid packages. Refer to bid pack-
ages for requirements.

PRE-BID CONFERENCE:
There will be a non-manda-
tory pre-bid meeting held by
Peter R. Brown Construction,
Inc. on behalf of Department of
Health Gulf County located at
Wewahitchka Public Library lo-
cated at 314 North 2nd Street,
Wewahitchka, FL on August
10, 2006 at 10:00 a.m.CST for
all Bid Packages.

BID OPENING: Sealed bids
for Bid Packages will be re-
ceived by Peter R. Brown Con-
struction, Inc. office located
Wewahitchka Public Library
located at 314 North 2nd
Street, Wewahitchka, FL until
2:00 p.m. CST, local time and
read aloud publicly on August
22, 2006 at 2:00 p.m CST. Pe-
ter R. Brown Construction, Inc.
reserves the right to reject any
and all bids and waive any ir-
regularities in any bid.
Publish August 10 & 17, 2006

PUBLIC IVIEETING NOTICE
OF THE GULF COUNTY
CANVASSING BOARD AND
CANVASSING OF THE
ABSENTEE BALLOTS FOR
THE SEPTEMBER 5, 2006
PRIMARY ELECTION
The Gulf County Canvassing
Board will meet at 2:00 p.m.
Eastern Time on September
5, 2006 at the Gulf County
Supervisor of Elections Office
located at 401 Long Avenue,
Port St. Joe, Florida. This meet-
ing is open to the public. The
Canvassing Board will meet to
canvass the absentee. ballots
for the Primary Election and to
receive queries from the public
about the absentee ballots. The
Canvassing Board will remain
in session at the Gulf County
Elections Office following the
canvassing of the absentee bal-
lots to canvass all other returns
as necessary.

Sealed absentee. ballots
received prior to 2:00 p.m.
Tuesday, September 5, 2006
for the Primary Election will
be available for public inspec-
tion from 9:00 a.m. until 2:00
p.m. on Tuesday, September
5, 2006. Immediately following,
those absentee. ballots -will be.
opened and processed, how-
ever not tabulated. Tabulation
of all absentee ballots will not
begin until after 7:00 p.m. on
Tuesday, September 5, 2006.
Any absentee bal-
lots received after 2:00 p.m.
Tuesday, September 5, 2006 will
be available for public inspec-
tion until ,opened. Those wish-
ing to inspect absentee ballots
received on September 5, 2006
must be present throughout the
time referenced. Shortly after
receipt, those ballots will be
opened and processed, however,
not tabulated.
Pursuant to Section
101.68(2)(c)2, Florida Statutes,
if any elector or candidate pres-
ent believes that an absentee
ballots is illegal due to a defect
apparent on the voter's certifi-
cate, he or she may, at any
time before the ballot is removed
from the envelope, file with the
canvassing board a protest
against the canvass of that bal-
lot, specifying the precinct, the
ballot, and the reason he or she
believes the ballot to be illegal.
A challenge based upon a defect

in the voter's certificate may not
be accepted after the ballot has
been removed from the mailing
envelope.
The Gulf County Canvassing
Board will reconvene on
Wednesday, September 6, 2006
at 10:00 a.m. to complete the
canvass of precinct returns and
canvass provisional ballots.
It may become neces-
sary for the Gulf County
Canvassing Board to recon-
vene after September 6,, 2006.
If so, the date and time will be
announced at the conclusion of
the September 6, 2006 meeting
and will be posted at the office of
the Supervisor of Elections and
the Gulf County Court Hopse.
In accordance with the
Sunshine Law of Florida, all
Canvassing Board meetings are
open to the public.
Note: Section 286.0105,
Florida Statutes, states that if
a person decides to appeal any
decision by the board, agency,
or commission with respect
to any matter considered at
a meeting or hearing, he or
she will need a record or the
proceedings, and that for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which
record includes the .testimony
and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
Linda Griffin
Gulf County Supervisor of
Elections
Publish August 17, 2006

INVITATION TO BID
Sealed proposals will be
received in the office of the City
Clerk, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr.
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida, until
4:00 p.m., September 5, 2006,
for furnishing and delivering
F.O.B., Port St. Joe, Florida, 4X4
Tractor as outlined in the speci-
fications pertaining thereto.
Specifications and bid docu-
ments may be obtained from the
City Clerk's Office, 305 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456, telephone (904)
229-8261, Monday through
Friday, between 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Bids will be publicly
opened and read 'at 6:00 p.m.,
September 5, 2006, in the City
Commission Chambers, City
Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin, Sr.
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The
City reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all bids; or to
select the Bid felt to be in the
best interest of the City.
/s/ Pauline Pendarvis
Pauline Pendarvis
City Clerk


Publish, August 17, 2006
U


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
MAY 9, 2006
REGULAR MEETING
continued

CRAWFISH CABIN ROAD
ABANDONMENT
Commissioner Traylor dis-
cussed abandonment of a por-
tion of Crawfish Cabin Road
that connects to Plantation
Road (Gene Hanlon's road),
stating that it is only a 12-foot
road. Commissioner Traylor
then motioned to begin the
abandonment process on Craw-
fish Cabin Road. Commissioner
Peters seconded the motion, and
it passed 4 to 1, with Chairman
McLemore voting no.

ANIMAL CONTROL
Commissioner Williams dis-
cussed animal control and the
challenges with this issue. He
inquired as to the ongoing issue
with animal control in the White
City area, and requested that
County Attorney McFarland
review the policy on nuisance.
Commissioner Williams also
discussed that Mr. & Mrs. Stitt
not be allowed to discuss these
issues with the County Staff,
only with the Board members.
Chairman. McLemore stated
that it is not fair for one person
to take up all the time of the
animal control officers. County
Attorney McFarland discussed
that the Board has the authority
to change the ordinance. He also
stated that the ordinance could
be amended to three complaints
on the barking dog portion of
the ordinance, but it would have
to be advertised and brought
before the Board for adoption.
County Attorney McFarland
stated that there would need to
be a vote of the Board to handle'
this issue.
Roy Lanier, of White City,
appeared before the Board and
requested that the Board re-
peal the dog barking ordinance.
He stated that this has been a
problem in White City for several
years, and stated that it is time
to fix this problem. Commis-
sioner Traylor discussed that
this is an issue throughout this
entire County. He' also stated
that he receives the same phone
calls from White City residents
wanting to know when it is go-
ing to stop. County Attorney Mc-
Farland stated that the portion
of the ordinance which deals
with barking dogs needs to be
repealed.
Mr. Bill Stitt, of White City,
appeared before the Board and
discussed that this problem
started about ten years ago with
his dog. He stated that if the
Board had done their job a long
time ago, this problem would
have stopped. Commissioner
Traylor discussed that the peo-
ple of White City nor the County
deserve this.
Commissioner Williams
motioned that the ordinance
be amended changing the dog
barking complaints to' three
complaints, and that the County
staff not be contacted or be re-
quired to meet with the Stitt's on
this issue. Commissioner Tray-
lor seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.
Mrs. Margie Stitt, of White
City, appeared before the Board
and discussed that she was not
aware that she has been taking
up Mr. Butler and Ms. Stephens
time on this issue. Commission-
er Williams discussed that Chief
Administrator Butler is the one
that indicated to him that he is
taking up enormous amounts of
time on this issue.

A.R.P.C. PROGRAM UPDATE
Bruce Ballister, of A.R.P.C.,
appeared before the Board and
discussed that he was here
last September and announced
the new policy that District III
D.O.T. has adopted. He also dis-
cussed that they have A.R.P.C
and West Florida Regional Plan-
ning Council providing input on
the small rural Counties to the
District III Office to help on a
work plan. Commissioner Wil-
liams inquired if, the County
,can assist in any way, and Mr.
Ballister stated that Steve Nor-*
ris has been appointed to serve
on the 98 Corridor Committee.
Commissioner Williams stated
that Steve Norris is doing a great
job representing the County on
this issue.

H.C.F.D. HEALTH FAIR
Billy Moore, Chief of the
Howard Creek Fire Department,
appeared before the Board and
invited everyone to attend the
Health Fair at Howard Creek.

U.S. HIGHWAY 98
Steve Norris appeared be-
fore the Board and discussed
that the 98 Corridor Committee
is studying the issues between
Franklin and Gulf Counties re-
garding U.S. Highway 98. Com-
missioner Williams inquired
about adding Franklin County
to the R.T.O., and Steve Norris
stated that Franklin County is
presently in.the group.

GARBAGE DUMPSTER
Steve Norris appeared before
the Board and discussed the is-
sue with unacceptable trash in
dumpsters, stating that tourists
will put household garbage in
the contractor's dumpsters.

MEETINGS REGIONAL
TRANSPORTATION PLANNING
COMMITTEE
Upon inquiry by Commis-
sioner Peters, Commissioner
Williams stated that he and
Commissioner Traylor have
been attending the meetings in
Ebro (both were appointed to the
committee), but do not ride to-
gether due to the Sunshine Law.
He also stated that the meetings
will be held in Lynn Haven in the
future. Upon further inquiry by
Commissioner Peters, County
Attorney McFarland stated that
these meetings are advertised.
There being no further busi-
ness and upon motion by Com-
missioner Peters, the meeting
did then adjourn at 7:22 p.m.,
E.D.T.

CARMEN L. MCLEMORE
CHAIRMAN
ATTEST:

REBECCA L. NORRIS


CLERK


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
MAY 23, 2006
REGULAR MEETING

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners met
this date in regular session
with the following members
present: Chairman Carmen L.
McLemore, Vice Chairman Bill
Williams, and Commissioners
Billy E. Traylor, Nathan Peters,
Jr., and Jerry W. Barnes.
Others present were: Coun-
ty Attorney Timothy McFarland,
Deputy Clerk Kari Summers,
Clerk Finance Officer Carla
Hand, Chief Administrator Don
Butler, Administrator Staff As-
sistant Lynn Stephens, Interim
Building Official Lee Collin-
sworth, E.D.C. Director Alan
McNair, Emergency Manage-
ment Director Marshall Nelson,
E.M.S. Director Shane McGuf-
fin, G.I.S. Director Larry Da-
vis, Planner David Richardson,
Public Works Director Gerald
Shearer, T.D.C. Director Paula
Pickett, and Sheriffs Office Ma-
jor Joe Nugent.
Major Nugent called the
meeting to order at 6:02 p.m.,
E.T.
Commissioner Barnes
opened the meeting with prayer,
and Major Nugent led the Pledge
of Allegiance to the Flag.

CONSENT AGENDA

Commissioner Peters mo-
tioned to approve the following
Consent Agenda items. Com-
missioner Barnes seconded the
motion, and it passed unani-
mously.

1. Minutes May ,9,
2006 Regular Meeting
2. Agreement Emer-
gency Watershed Protection
Program
3. Agreement Su-
pervisor of Elections (Matching
Funds for Poll Worker Training)
4. B.C.C. Correspon-
dence F.D.L.E. Edward Burns
Memorial Grant
5. Budget Amendment
#9 Grant Administration (Gen-
eral Fund $67,200.00 De-
tention & Corrections (General
Fund $25,000.00)

Budget Amendment
#9

General Fund

Grant Administration:
22313-31000 Professional
Services
Original Budget $ -0-
Increase $ 67,200
Decrease $ -0-
Amended Budget $ 67,200

Detention & Corrections
S3123-31100 Professional
Services
Original Budget $ -0-
Increase $25,000
Decrease $ -0-
Amended Budget $ 25,000

Reserves:
99984-95000 Reserve for Con-
tingencies
Original Budget $ 129,503
Increase $ -0-
Decrease $ 25,000
Amended Budget $ 104,503

99984-96000 Reserve for Cash
Carryover
Original Budget $ 798,556
Increase $ -0-
Decrease $ 67,200
Amended Budget $ 731,358

(End)

6. Invoice Preble-
Rish, Inc. Mosquito Control
Building Mod. (#64570 *
$4,800.00 to be.paid from Ac-
count #42834-62100)
-The Bank of New York
Trust Co. Gas Tax Improve-
ment Revenue Bond (#0971152
* $1,075.00 to be paid from Ac-
count #81341-73000)

7. Refunds Building
Permit Fees (Shirley Watson *
$25.00)
8. Refunds Building
Permit Fees (James Townsend *
$1,319.00)
8. Special Projects
Payments as follows:

Dist. 1 Rich's I.G.A. / Hon-
eyville Park Grand Opening
*$ 225.32
W.H.S. Track Team Dona-
tion
$250.00
Piggly Wiggly / Honeyville
Park Grand Opening
$158.77
Piggly Wiggly / Public Works
Dinner
$ 28.26
Paul's Fish Farm / Hon-
eyville Park ,
$160.00

Dist. 2 Piggly Wiggly /
Honeyville Park Grand Opening
$158.78
Piggly Wiggly / Public Works
Dinner
$ 28.27

(End)

PORT ST. JOE HIGH SCHOOL
ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT
John Palmer, Coach at
Port St. Joe High School, ap-
peared before the Board and
Commissioner Peters discussed
an article that was printed in
a newspaper in Georgia about
a football player that went into
cardiac arrest during practice.
He stated that he submitted a
letter to Coach Palmer at Port St.
Joe High School and to the Gulf
County School Board requesting
that E.M.S. Director McGuffin
be allowed to do some training
with the football staff and teach-
ers with a defibrillator. Com-
missioner Peters stated that the
training has been performed,
and that over twenty-five people
have been trained on how to
use this machine. E.M.S. Direc-
tor McGuffin stated that their
goal is to have one defibrillator
in every public building in Gulf
County. Commissioner Peters
thanked E.M.S. Director McGuf-
fin for getting the staff trained
at the Port St. Joe High School.
Coach Palmer thanked the
Board on behalf of all schools
in the County for their support.


Commissioner Peters also stated
that this same process will be
done at the Wewahitchka High
School.

SOUTH GULF COUNTY FIRE
DEPARTMENT
Lanny Blair, Chief of South
Gulf County Fire Department
appeared before the Board, and
Commissioner Barnes presented
a defibrillator to the fire depart-
ment.

PUBLIC HEARING -
PROPOSED ORDINANCE
IMPACT FEES
Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider adoption of a proposed
ordinance imposing impact
fees in Gulf County, County
Attorney McFarland read the
proposed ordinance by title.
Chairman McLemore. called for
public comment. There being no
public comment, and upon in-
quiry by Commissioner Williams
about exempting certain areas,
Melissa Proctor (of G.S.G. Inc.)
stated that these issues can be
handled on a case by case basis
after adoption of the ordinance.

OPPORTUNITY FLORIDA
PROGRAM UPDATE
Rick Marcum, of Opportu-
nity Florida, appeared before
the Board to report on a Cata-
lyst Mega-Site Study Meeting to
be held on May 31, 2006, at the
Panhandle Area Education Con-
sortium in Chipley from 9:00
a.m. to 12:00 p.m. He invited
everyone to attend this meeting,
and to get involved with the pro-
gram. Mr. Marcum discussed
that the second state-wide sum-
mit was held in Lake City, and
stated that they worked with
Florida U.S.A., and Tourism. He
further reported that Opportu-
nity Florida will be purchasing
new equipment to work with the
different T.D.C.s, Chambers of
Commerce, and E.D.C.s to bring
together and identify any new
sites and attractions. Mr. Mar-
cum stated that they have com-
pleted a broad-band study, and
this is a great step to bridge the
digital divide.

NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE
Bob Gorrie, of the National
Weather Service, appeared be-
fore the Board and discussed
educating the public on storm
readiness. Mr. Gorrie stated
that the National Weather Ser-
vice is honoring Gulf County
.as a storm-ready County, and
presented a "Storm Ready" sign
to be placed in the County for a
three-year period in recognition
of this issue.

PUBLIC HEARING -
ORDINANCE GULFSIDE
M.S.T.U.

Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider adoption of an amended
ordinance creating the Cape San
Blas Gulfside M.S.T.U., County
Attorney McFarland read the
proposed ordinance by title,
and called for public comment.
There being no public comment,
Commissioner Barnes motioned
to adopt the amended ordinance
establishing the M.S.T.U. for the
Gulfside of St. Joseph Penin-
sula. Commissioner Traylor sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
4-1, with Commissioner Peters
voting no.

ORDINANCE NO. 2006-11

AN ORDINANCE AMEND-
ING ORDINANCE NO. 2006-
11 CREATING THE CAPE SAN
BLAS GULFSIDE MUNICIPAL
SERVICE TAXING UNIT (THE
"MSTU"); DESCRIBING THE
BOUNDARIES OF THE MSTU;
AUTHORIZING THE MSTU TO
ANNUALLY LEVY AD VALOREM
TAXES WITHIN THE MSTU TO
PROVIDE BEACH EROSION
CONTROL AND RENOURISH-
MENT SERVICES, FACILITIES
AND PROGRAMS; AUTHORIZ-
ING A PLEDGE OF THE MSTU
AD VALOREM TAX REVENUES
TO THE RETIREMENT OF DEBT
WHEN APPROVED BY THE
ELECTORS OF THE MSTU AS
PROVIDED BY GENERAL LAW;
AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE
OF DEBT UPON REFERENDUM
APPROVAL; AND PROVIDING
AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

*Complete Ordinance on file
with Clerk*

PUBLIC HEARING -
ORDINANCE GULFSIDE
INTERIOR M.S.T.U.
Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider adoption of an amended
ordinance creating the Cape San
Blas Gulfside Interior M.S.T.U.,
County Attorney McFarland read
Sthe proposed ordinance by title
and called for public comment.
Mike Sebring appeared before
the Board and inquired about
the ordinance, and County At-
torney McFarland discussed
that this is a separate issue from
the money that is collected and
budgeted by the Board through
the normal ad valorem process.
SAfter further discussion, Com-
missioner Barnes motioned to
adopt the amended ordinance
establishing the M.S.T.U. for the
Gulfside Interior of St. Joseph
Peninsula. Commissioner Wil-
liams seconded the motion, and
it passed 4-1, with Commission-
er Peters voting no.

ORDINANCE NO. 2006-12

AN ORDINANCE AMEND-
ING ORDINANCE NO. 2006-
12 CREATING THE CAPE SAN
BLAS GULFSIDE INTERIOR
MUNICIPAL SERVICE TAXING
UNIT (THE "MSTU"); DESCRIB-
ING THE BOUNDARIES OF
THE MSTU; AUTHORIZING THE
MSTU TO ANNUALLY LEVY AD
VALOREM TAXES WITHIN THE
MSTU TO PROVIDE BEACH
EROSION CONTROL AND RE-
NOURISHMENT SERVICES, FA-
CILITIES AND PROGRAMS; AU-
THORIZING A PLEDGE OF THE
MSTU AD VALOREM TAX REV-
ENUES TO THE RETIREMENT
OF DEBT WHEN APPROVED BY
THE ELECTORS OF THE MSTU
AS PROVIDED BY GENERAL
LAW; AUTHORIZING THE ISSU-
ANCE OF DEBT UPON REFER-
ENDUM APPROVAL; AND PRO-


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 17, 2006 7


VIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

*Complete Ordinance on file
with Clerk*


PUBLIC HEARING -
ORDINANCE BAYSIDE
M.S.T.U.
Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider adoption of an amended
ordinance creating the Cape San
Bias Bayside M.S.T.U., County
Attorney McFarland read the
proposed ordinance by title
and called for public comment.
There being no public comment,
Commissioner Barnes motioned
to adopt the amended ordinance
establishing the M.S.T.U. for the
Bayside of St. Joseph Peninsula.
Commissioner Traylor seconded
the motion, and it passed 4-1,
with Commissioner Peters vot-
ing no.

ORDINANCE NO. 2006-13

AN ORDINANCE AMEND-
ING ORDINANCE NO. 2006-
13 CREATING THE CAPE SAN
BLAS BAYSIDE MUNICIPAL
SERVICE TAXING UNIT (THE
"MSTU"); DESCRIBING THE
BOUNDARIES OF THE MSTU;
AUTHORIZING THE MSTU TO
ANNUALLY LEVY AD VALOREM
TAXES WITHIN THE MSTU TO
PROVIDE BEACH EROSION
CONTROL AND RENOURISH-
MENT SERVICES, FACILITIES
AND PROGRAMS; AUTHORIZ-
ING A PLEDGE OF THE MSTU
AD VALOREM TAX REVENUES
TO THE RETIREMENT OF DEBT
WHEN APPROVED BY THE
ELECTORS OF THE MSTU AS
PROVIDED BY GENERAL LAW;
AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE
OF DEBT UPON REFERENDUM
APPROVAL; AND PROVIDING
AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

*Complete Ordinance on file
with Clerk*

P.D.R.B. RECOMMENDATIONS
- MAY 15. 2006

The Board then addressed
the following recommendations
from the May 15, 2006 meeting
of the Planning & Development
Review Board:

PRELIMINARY PLAT
APPROVAL SABAL ISLAND

Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider preliminary plat approval
for St. Joe Land Company (Par-
cel ID #06260-OOOR 45.3 acres
in S1, T9S, R11W 18 units),
County Attorney McFarland
read the public hearing notice
and called for public comment.
There being no public comment,
Commissioner Peters motioned
to approve the preliminary plat
of Sabal Island subdivision sub-
ject to all Federal, State and
Local development regulations.
Commissioner Williams second-
ed the motion, and it passed 3-2
with Commissioner Traylor and
Chairman McLemore voting no.

PRELIMINARY PLAT
APPROVAL OVERSTREET
PARTNERS

Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to
consider preliminary plat ap-
proval for Archie Barbee (Parcel
ID #03337-011R 4.63 acres
in S13, T5S, R11W 8 units),
County Attorney McFarland
read the public hearing notice
and called for public comment.
There being no public comment,
Commissioner Peters motioned
to approve the preliminary plat
of Overstreet Partners subdivi-
sion subject to all Federal, State
and Local development regula-
tions. Commissioner Williams
seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.

PRELIMINARY PLAT
APPROVAL JASMINE
HEIGHTS

Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider preliminary plat approval
for James Lester (Parcel ID
#01509-OOOR 10 acres in S2,
T4S, R10W 17 units), County
Attorney McFarland read the
public hearing notice and called
'for public comment. There be-
ing no public comment, Com-
missioner Traylor motioned to
approve the preliminary plat of
Jasmine Heights subdivision
subject to all Federal, State and
Local development regulations.
Commissioner Williams sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.

PRELIMINARY PLAT
APPROVAL WOODBROOKE
COVE
Pursuantto advertisementto
hold a public hearing to consider
preliminary plat approval for Va-
lencia Land Investments (Parcel
ID #03323-145R 40.09 acres
in S32, T7S, R10W 32 units),
County Attorney McFarland
read the public hearing notice
and called for public comment.
There being no public comment,
Commissioner Traylor motioned
to approve the preliminary plat
ofWoodbrooke Cove subdivision
subject to all Federal, State and
Local development regulations.
Commissioner Barnes seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously.

FINAL PLAT APPROVAL -
MILL RIDGE
Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider a final plat approval for
Gulf County, L.L.C. (Parcel ID
#01514-050R 9.63 acres in S2,
T4S, R10W 15 units), County
Attorney McFarland read the
public hearing notice and called
for public comment. There being
no public comment, Commis-
sioner Traylor motioned to ap-
prove the final plat of Mill Ridge
subdivision pending the bond-
ing, County Engineer approval,
County Attorney approval, and
subject to all Federal, State and
Local development regulations.
Commissioner Williams sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.

FINAL PLAT APPROVAL -
MIMOSA SUBDIVISION
Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-


sider a final plat approval for
Gulf To Bay Construction &
Development (Parcel ID #00713-
010R 10 acres in S18, T5S,
R9W 30 units), County Attor-
ney McFarland read the public
hearing notice and called for
public comment. There being no
public comment, Commissioner
Traylor motioned to approve the
final plat of Mimosa Subdivision
pending a subdivision analysis,
County Engineer approval, the
bonding,- the covenants and
restrictions, and subject to all
Federal, State and Local devel-
opment regulations. Commis-
sioner Williams seconded the
motion, and it passed unani-
mously.

FINAL PLAT APPROVAL -
WIMICO PLACE
Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider a final plat approval for
White City Partners (Parcel ID
#02852-OOOR 5.86 acres in
Sll, T7S, R10W 18 units),
County Attorney McFarland
read the public hearing notice
and called for public comment.
There being no public com-
ment, Commissioner Williams
motioned to approve. the final
plat of Wimico Place subdivision
pending County Engineer ap-
proval, County Attorney approv-
al, and revision of final plat, and
subject to all Federal, State and
Local development regulations.
Commissioner Traylor seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously.
FINAL PLAT APPROVAL -
HARBOR WALK

Pursuant to advertise-
ment to hold a public hearing
to consider final plat approval
for 7 Mile, L.L.C. (Parcel ID
#02798-035R, 4#02798-005R,
#02798-015R, #02798-050R,
#02798-001R, #02798-055R,
#02798-020R, #02798-060R *
11.62 acres in S32, T7S, R1OW
* 22 units), County Attorney
McFarland read the public hear-
ing notice and called for public
comment. There being no public
comment, Barnes motioned to
approve the final plat of Har-
bor Walk subdivision pending
the bonding, County Engineer
approval, acreage certification,
revision of final plat, and sub-
ject to all Federal, State and
Local development regulations.
Commissioner Traylor seconded
the motion, and it passed 4-0,
with Commissioner Williams
abstaining due to ownership in
development.

TABLE OF FINAL PLAT
APPROVAL BAYWOODS

Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider tabling final plat approval
for B.J. Heard and 'Chris King
(Parcel ID #06230-000R *: 4.5
acres in S25, T8S, R11W 10
units), County Attorney Mc-
Farlanid' read the public hear -
irig notice and called for" public
comment. There being no public
comment, Commissioner Tray-
lor motioned to table approval of
the final plat of Baywoods sub-
division subject to all Federal,
State and Local development
regulations. Commissioner
Barnes seconded the motion,
and it passed unanimously.

PRELIMINARY PLAT AP-
PROVAL CAPE DUNES

Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider preliminary plat approval
for Fred Frechette (Parcel ID
#06268-083R 1.74 acres in
S7, T9S, R11W 4 units), Coun-
ty Attorney McFarland read the
public hearing notice and called
for public comment. There be-
ing no public comment, Com-
missioner Barnes motioned to
approve the preliminary plat of
Cape Dunes subdivision pend-
ing acreage certification anid
subject to all Federal, State and
Local development regulations.
Commissioner Barnes seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously.

PRELIMINARY PLAT
APPROVAL BUCKHORN
RANCH 1

Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider preliminary plat approval
for William J. Smiley (Parcel ID
#01186-100R 10 acres in S3,
T6S, R11W 20 units), County
Attorney McFarland read the
public hearing notice and called
for public comment. There be-
ing no public comment, Com-
missioner Traylor motioned to
approve the preliminary plat of
Buckhorn Ranch 1 subdivision'
pending road dedication, acre-
age certification, and subject
to all Federal, State and Local
development regulations. Com-
missioner Williams seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously.

PRELIMINARY PLAT
APPROVAL BUCKHORN
RANCH 2
Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider preliminary plat approval
for William J. Smiley (Parcel ID
#01186-300 20 acres in S3,
T6S, R11IW 40 units), County
Attorney McFarland read the
public hearing notice and called
for public comment. There be-
ing no public comment, Com-
missioner Traylor motioned to
approve the preliminary plat of
Buckhornm Ranch 2 subdivision
subject to all Federal, State and
Local development regulations.
Commissioner Williams sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.

VARIANCE REQUEST
APPROVAL RADCLIFF
Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider a road-setback variance
for Charles Radcliff (Parcel ID
#03207-000R .18 acres in
S22, T9S, R10W), County Attor-
ney McFarland read the public
hearing notice and called for
public comment. There being no
public comment, Commissioner
Traylor motioned to approve
this variance request to build an
addition onto house that would
encroach into the rear setback.
Commissioner Barnes seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-


imously.

VARIANCE REQUEST
APPROVAL POMPILIO
Pursuant to advertisement
to hold a public hearing to con-
sider a variance for Dan Pom-
pilio (Parcel ID #06345-845R *
.39 acres in S25, T8S, R12W),
County Attorney McFarland
read the public hearing notice
and called for public comment.
There being no public comment,
Commissioner Traylor motioned
to approve this variance request
to move a house landward of the
Gulf. Commissioner Barnes sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.

D.E.P. IN KIND FUND
Chief Administrator Butler
reported that D.E.P. has ap-
proved for the County to provide
in-kind services in lieu of pay-
ing the $30,000.00 deductible
for the fuel spill clean up at
the Road Department. He also
recommended that the Board
approve for D.E.P. to select a
contractor and begin the clean-
up process on the fuel spill.
Commissioner Peters motioned
to approve this recommenda-
tion. Commissioner Barries sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.

WILLIS LANDING ROAD -
S.C.O.P.
Chief Administrator Butler
discussed a proposed change
order, deduction in the amount
of $283,169.25, to remove the
shoulder work and associated
fuel costs for the Willis Land-
ing Road project. Commissioner
Traylor motioned to approve
the change order which would
delete $283,169.25 from this
project. Commissioner Williams
seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.

AWARD BID #0506-21(E)
- OVERSTREET WATER
SYSTEM
Chief Administrator Butler
recommended that Bid #0506-
21(E), for Engineering Services
for C.D.B.G. contract #06DB-
89-09-32-01-N35, be awarded
to Bailey, Bishop & Lane, con-
tingent upon approval by D.C.A.
(sole-source waiver). Commis-
sioner Traylor motioned to ap-
prove this request. Commis-
sioner Williams seconded the
motion, and it passed unani-
mously.

AWARD BID #0506-21(A)
- OVERSTREET WATER
SYSTEM
Chief Administrator Butler
recommended that bid #0506-
21(A) for Administration Servic-
es for C.D.B.G. contract #06DB-
89-09-32-01-N35, be awarded
to Fred Fox Enterprises, Inc.,
contingent upon approval by
D.C.A. (sole-source waiver).
Commissioner Williams mo-
tioned to approve this request.
Commissioner Barnes seconded
the motion, and it passed.unan-
imously.

BEACH FEASIBILITY STUDY
Chief Administrator Butler
discussed the beach feasibil-
ity study along the coast line,
and recommended that MRD
Associates invoice #539 (in the
amount of $13,240.00), #538
(in the amount of $36,000.00)
and #537, (in the amount of
$24,342.93), be paid from grant
funds, and that MRD Associates
invoice #536 (in the amount of
$11,621.17) be paid from T.D.C.
and other funds. Commissioner
Traylor motioned to approve
payment of Invoices #539, #538,
and #537 as recommended.
Commissioner Barnes seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously. Commissioner Traylor
then motioned to approve pay-
ment of Invoice #536 as recom-
mended. Commissioner Barnes
seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.

SAND BERM PROJECT
Chief Administrator But-
ler discussed that the County
has received additional funds
for a Phase II Geotechnical
Sand Search (in the amount of
$193,980.00) to find sand closer
to the berm project site. He rec-
ommended that the Board ap-
prove a contract change order
with MRD Associates to provide
this service (County Attorney
McFarland to review and Chair-
man McLemore to execute the
change order). Commissioner
Williams motioned to approve
this request. Commissioner
Barnes seconded the motion,
and it passed unanimously.

GASKIN PARK PHASE II
Chief Administrator Butler
reported that he has received
the invoice from Townsend
Marine for the pile driving at
Gaskin Park, in the amount of
$38,400.00, and recommended
that the invoice be paid from
F.R.D.A.P. grant funds for the
Gaskin Park Phase II project.
Commissioner Traylor motioned
to approve this request. Com-
missioner Peters seconded the
motion, and it passed unani-
mously.

GOOD MORNING STREET
BRIDGE
Chief Administrator Butler
discussed the public dedication
of submerged land at the Good
Morning Street Bridge, and rec-
ommended that the Chairman
sign the document after review
and approval by County Attor-
ney McFarland. Commissioner
Peters motioned to approve this
recommendation. Commission-
er Traylor seconded the motion,
and it passed unanimously.

INVOICE CHIPOLA TURF
FARM HONEYVILLE PARK
Chief Administrator Butler
discussed an invoice from Chipo-
la Turf Farm, in the amount of
$3,150.00, (on page 29 of the
Information Packet) and recom-
mended that it be paid from the
Honeyville Park F.R.D.A.P. grant
funds. Commissioner Traylor
motioned to approve this recom-
mendation. Commissioner Wil-
liams seconded the motion, and
it passed unanimously.

Will be continued...


Public






Notices


Gulf County Board of






County Commission Minutes


____ V I


Etltigli~gBe4lfl~


- __ J L -


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Licensed and Insured


Hardwood Flooring
Decorative Flooring 850-229-7720 offers professional
services for anyone who wants their floor completed
properly and with pride.
Exotic and Domestic wood Flooring
Inlays- Borders and Medallions
Installation Sanding and Refinishing Repair Custom
National Award winner for best floor in Nation
Largest showroom in the State of Florida
Licensed Insured References
Unmatched Quality and Value for your money
www.decorativeflooring.com


vShaklee #1Natral
" Oeaeig ,ehe, L ve- Nutrition Supl ment
independent Disributor Company in the US

Paty & Genn Waldo Environmentally Safe
850-827-2510 Cleaning Products
www.shaddee.ne/PattyWaldo Air and Water
gpwaldo@gtco n.net Purification


Don Dupree
President
1806 Garrison Ave.
Port St. Joe, Florida
32456


DUPREE'S
Custom Metal Roofs


(850) 527-5144 phone

"Professional Custom Meal Roofs, Reroofs and Shingles"



SUN CgAST
Lawn Er Lan'dscaping LLC
"When Quality Counts"
Landscape Design & Installation
Full Lawn Maintenance
Irrigation Installation & Repair
Commercial & Residential
Tractor Work, Rock Driveways, Water Features,
Sod & Palm Trees
Office: (850) 647-2522 18053

Landscape Design &
Consultation Services

Kay Kelley
Florida Certified
Landscape Designer

850-927-4090
Plan It before you Plant It! 20752


(iJtllif II"irzee

Isn't it time f:.i .: .1 :'I- ,x,"
We Cong, T.:. 'tc.u'
Call 850-227-1684
Ask for Julian
* Residental Custom Wood
* Commercial *Industrial
A &6 R Fence
Albert Relsdmann FREE Esfmates
EBN# 59311566 (850) 647-4047


NAINL SHUTERS IN



BuyDiectFrm MnuacuerAn Sv

-RlinShtes- CerPnl


Rod & Reel Repair
Bluewater Outriggers
Port City Shopping Center
229-1100


KNIGHT'S
TREE SERVICE, INC
*Hazardous Tree Removal
*Tree Trimming Stump Grinding

St. Joe, Florida
850-762-2030 or 850-272-4197 .
Affordable, Hometown Quality!






COMMERCIAL.RESIDENTIAL
INSULATION DONE RIGHT EVERYTIME
FIBERGLASS BATTS BLOWN CELLULOSE WALLS & ATTIC
OFFICE CELL


Commercial
Termite & Pest
Control
*Termite Treamenls Restaurant
* Muale Flea Cotrol-.Ciondominiums
* Household Fest Cntmol New Tieatment
* Real Estaie ( 0) Reports Constxuction Sies
Specializing in Vacafion Rental Properties
- FAMILY OWNED
] PLEASANT & PROFESSIONAL
"Serving the Entire Area"
Free Estimates
Do-.lt.Yoursell Pest Control Products
22-82 ""


DJ Fence & ETC
HandyMan
You Name It
I'll Fix It
850-648-9531
850-624-4182 cell,
"Let the Beauty of our God'be
upon us & establish the work
of our hands"


CARPET AND UPHOLSTERY :
STEAM CLEANING & RESTORATION SERVICE
24 Hour Water Extraction I.ICRC
Certified Technicians Mold and
Mildew Remediation Free Estimates
* Stain Protection Available
,, ,L -i.


CARPET CLEANING
CERAMIC TILE & GROUT
UPHOLSTERY CLEANING
24 HOUR WATER EXTRACTION
RV'S CARS TRUCKS VANS
LICENSED AND INSURED
RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL -
( Y *

229132


HE


STAR


135 Hwy 98


227-1278


.L


SI Coastal & Native
A Landscapes
Specializing in low, maintenancif&andscapes and irrigation,
" with a focus on native and -natdralized'plants. We offer
complete landscape services and our area's only Florida s
Certified Landscape Designer.
SOwned by-Kay-Kelley andBrooks Wade ... ..
S85-927--49 VW Plant Pa ms, toot |
i '-i .l o .. n -


I


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


A( h. -qnrPr-rfSt op FL hurda. A aut 1, 00


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c;hlohaH iO.Q 8 c&rinn nIf ,,nh, and ec,,rrn,,nrinn arsc for R7 i/ors THE STAR. PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 17, 2006 9C


M~zLF


ANNOUNCEMENTS


VIil


w io- I


MERCHANDISE


A e


A".wftI


EMPLOYMENT


i


BUSINESS & FINANCIAL


II I


REAL ESTATE


MOD


.PLI


VISA


PETS & ANIMALS
2100 Pets
2110 Pets: Free to
Good Home
2120 Pet Supplies
2130 Farm Animals/
Supplies
2140 Pets/Livestock
Wanted





Dogs & Cats'
For Sale?











There are specific Flori-
da Statutes applicable
to the sale of dogs and
cats within the state or
transportated into the
state for the purpose of
selling.
Please research Flori-
da Statute 828.29 (Dogs
and cats transported or
offered for sale; health
requirements; consumer
guarantee) before
you offer for sale a cat
or dog.

Lost Dog Found near
Boat Ramp & Overstreet.
'Call 850-648-2039 to claim
& identify.



S 211o
Daddy is moving into as-
'"sisted living & can't take
"cats, with him. Registered
ersian (9yrs old) & a
short hair silver gray do-
-rnestic (5yrs old). Both are
-up to date on shots, neu-
-tered, & declawed. Call
Barbie at 850-639-3601

- Free Puppy
-Needs a Home. Call for
more information and de-.
- tails 850-229-8676


MERCHANDISE
3100 Antiques
3110 Appliances
3120 Arts & Crafts
3130,- Auctions
3140 Baby Items
3150 Building Supplies
3160 Business
Equipment
3170 Collectibles
3180 Computers
3190 Electronics
3200 Firewood
3210- Free Pass it On
3220 Furniture
3230 Garage/Yard Sales
3240 Guns
3250 Good Things to Eat
3260 Health & Fitness
3270 Jewelry/Clothing
3280 Machinery/
Equipment
3290 Medical Equipment,
3300 Miscellaneous
3310 Musical Instruments
3320 Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
3330 Restaurant/Hotel
3340 Sporting Goods
3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell)







Imw-
JJ: Wewahitchka 137
Knollwood Drive. Sat Aug
19th and Sun Aug 20. Es-
tate Sale managed by
Finder's Keepers Thrift
Store. For directions call
850-639-5436. This sale in-
cludeds beautiful furniture,
a Rest-A-Matic queen
sized bed, large chest
freezer, collectibles,, vin-
tage textiles, books, vin-
tage photography (imple-
ments and cameras),
tools,l sewing collectibles
and much morel


Moving Sale
2006 Juniper Ave, Sat
Aug 19th, 7am-2pm,
clothes (including kid's),
toys, freezer, furniture,
bedroom suite & more.

$We Pay Cash$

We Buy Antiques, Old Jewelry,
Old Toys, Old Anything
Call Monique
850-227-1684


Incorrect InsertionPolicy
For Classified
In-column Advertisers

All ads placed by phone are read back to the adver-
tiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will as-
sume correctness at the time of the read-back proce-
dure unless otherwise informed.


Please

V

your ad

Advertisers are requested to check the advertise-
ment on the first insertion for correctness. Errors
should be reported immediately.

The News Herald will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for
any error in advertisements to a greater extent than
the cost of the space occupied by the error.

Any copy change, 'during ordered schedule consti-
tutes a new ad and new charges.

The News Herald DOES NOT guarantee position of
ANY ad under any classification.


Port St. Joe 2109 Juniper
Ave. Sat 7am-11am. Piano,
furniture, hshld items, lots
of misc.



3270 -




Jewelry-
Wedding rings, watch-
es, tools, fishing gear,
televisions, electronics,
bikes, and much more!
Call or visit Roy at: Roy
V's Pawn Shop 201 W.
Hwy. 98 in Port St Joe,
Florida 850-229-8304



3280
33 FT. 12 volt Hydraulic
boom lift. Asking $3,700
Call 850-697-2703 or
850-566-4747
Heavy & Small Equipment
for Boat yard 20 ton travel
lift. Pettibone crane, hyster
forklift jack spands, san-
ders, compressors, drill
press, table saw, much
more Call 653-8801 for
more information:



3300
WANTED TO BUY
Old Guns, coins, guitars,
and watches. Call
850-227-4122

Wanted To Buy!
GOLD/I SILVER COINS
COMPLETE
COIN COLLECTIONS
Gold Jewelry in any
condition, Tools, Fishing
Gear & Many Other
Things of Value.
Call Roy@
850-229-8304


Ark 7 .


EMPLOYMENT
4100- Help Wanted
4110 Restaurants/Clubs
4120 Sales/Telemarketing
4130 Employment
Information




Administrative

CLOSING
COORDINATOR

WindMark Beach Sales
Center in Port St Joe has
an immediate opening for
a Closing Coordinator. In-
dividual should have previ-
ous real estate closing and
title work experience or
mortgage experience. At-
tention to detail and the
ability to handle multiple
tasks in a fast-paced envi-
ronment required. We offer
great pay and an excellent
benefits package!

Please submit Resume via
fax to 229-7952, email to
rebecca.standige(@joe.
com or visit careers.joe.
corn to submit an online
application & resume
Equal Opportunity
Employer
Pre-Employment Drug
Screening Required.


Administrative

PT
RECEPTIONIST

St Joe is currently search-
ing for a part-time recep-
tionist; hours are Sat 9-6
and Sun 12:30-6 in Port St
Joe. Qualified candidate
will have 1-2 years work
experience and must be
professional and friendly!
MS Office skills are also
required. We offer great
pay and an excellent ben-
efits package!

Please submit Resume via
fax to 229-7952, email to
rebecca.standige(@joe.
com or visit careers.joe.
com to submit an online
application & resume
Equal Opportunity
Employer
Pre-Employment Drug
Screening Required.


Administrative


State of Florida
Department of
Corrections
Gulf Correctional
Institution
JOB VACANCY: OFFICE
AND ADMINISTRATIVE
SUPPORT
OCCUPATION: SECRE-
TARY SPECIALIST F/C;
Requisition #700231012
This position is located at
Gulf Cl Assistant Ward-
en's Office. MINIMUM
QUALIFICATIONS: Two
years of secretarial or cleri-
cal work experience; or
Possession of a Certified
Professional Secretary
Certificate. College educa-
tion from an accredited in-
stitution can substitute at
the rate of 30 semester or
45 quarter hours for each
year of the required work
experience. Vocation-
al/technical training in an
area of secretarial science
or office/business studies
can substitute at the rate
of 720 classroom hours for
each year of the required
work experience. A high
school diploma or its
equivalent can substitute
for one year of the re-
quired work experience.
Applications must be sub-
mitted no later than 11:59
p.m. on the advertised
closing date directly to the
People First Staffing Ad-
ministration either online,
by mail or by fax. (Note:
The requisition number
must be included on your
application if it is being
faxed or mailed to ensure
it is attached to the correct
job vacancy). Use the fol-
lowing contact information
to mail or fax your appli-
cation: PeopleFirst Staffing
Administration Post Office
Box 44058, Jacksonville,
Florida 32231-4058.1f you
experience any, problems
applying online, please
call the PeopleFirst service
center at 1-877-562-7287
between 8:30 a.m. and
5:30 p.m. The State of
Florida is an AA/EEO em-
ployer.


Administrative


State of Florida
Department of
Corrections
Gulf Correctional
Institution
JOB VACANCY: OFFICE
AND ADMINISTRATIVE
SUPPORT
OCCUPATION: CLERK
TYPIST SPECIALIST F/C;
Requisition #70018872
This position is located at
Gulf Forestry Camp. MINI-
MUM QUALIFICATIONS;
One year of secretarial or
clerical work experience; or
Possession of a Certified
Professional Secretary Cer-
tificate. Vocational/technical
training in an area of secre-
tarial science or of-
fice/business studies can
substitute at the rate of 720
classroom hours for the re-
quired work experience. A
high school diploma or its
equivalent can substitute
for the required work expe-
rience. Applications must
be submitted no later than
11:59 p.m. on the adver-
tised closing date directly to
the PeopleFirst Staffing Ad-
ministration either online,
by mail or by fax. (Note:
The requisition number
must be included on your
application if it is being
faxed or mailed to ensure it
is attached to the correct
job vacancy). Use the fol-
lowing contact information
to mail or fax your applica-
tion: PeopleFirst Staffing
Administration Post Office
Box 44058, Jacksonville;
Florida 32231-4058. If you
experience any problems
applying online, please call
the PeopleFirst service cen-
ter at 1-877-562-7287 be-
tween 8:30 a.m. and 5:30
p.m. The State of Florida is
an AA/EEO employer.


Drivers

AmeriGas Propane- Ap-
alachicola, FL is cur-
rently accepting applica-
tions for:
Delivery
Representative
Candidate should be re-
sponsible for but not lim-
ited to delivering pro-
pane to our customers.
Requirements include
high school diploma(or
equivalent), a valid CDL
with hazmat and tanker
endorsements, a great
driving record and satis-
factory completion of a
DOT physical, drug test
and background check.
We offer competitive
wages, medical and
dental benefits, 401K,
savings plan and liberal
vacation & holiday poli-
cy.
DFWP/ EOE
May apply in person at
101 Ave.
Appalachicola, FL
or
Fax resumes:
Attn: SSM
850-653-8225.


4100

Automotive -

Advance Auto Parts is
currently accepting applica-
tions for full & part time
Sales Associates positions.
Advance offers competitive
pay, flexible schedules and
benefits programs. Suc-
cessful applicants will have
the following attributes: are
friendly, have parts knowl-
edge, customer oriented,
team oriented, change ori-
ented and dependable. Bi-
lingual skills a plus. Inter-
ested applicants should
apply at Advance Auto
Parts, 201 Monument Ave.',
Port St. Joe, FL No Phone
Calls.



Drivers


AN
EARN AS YOU
LEARN
Career!
England Transport
now offers
On-the-job CDL Training
No credit check
No co-signers
No down payment!
Toll-Free
1-866-619-6081



Drivers

DRIVER
TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!
Werner needs entry level
Semi drivers. No exp. re-
quired. Avg. $36K + 1st yrl
60% home nightly/weekly.
CDL training in your area.
1-866-280-5309



General

*Aluminum Tig
Welders
Pipewelders
*Shipfitters
Marine
Pipefitters
(Must pass Stick
Tack Test)
Flux-Core
Welders
*Yacht Quality
Jointers
*Marine Finish
Carpenters
(Must have exp. welding
w/ceramic tape back-
ing) ,
Also accepting resumes
for:
Heavy Wire
Welders
(must submit resume)
Worldwide
Labor Support
800-748-1395


| 4100
Drivers

USA
READY MIX
Now hiring Class A&B
CDL Ready Mix drivers.
Excellent benefits and
wages. Apply in person
1001 Cecil Costin Blvd.
Port St. Joe, FL
850-229-8858
USA EOE


General

First Baptist Church of
Port St. Joe, is now ac-
cepting resumes from .in-
terested persons for the
full time position of Chil-
dren's Minister. You can
submit a resume by mail at
First Baptist Church 102
3rd Sb., Port St. Joe 32456
or email one to
fbepsj@gtcom.net. For
more information, or a
copy of the job description
call the church office at
850-227-1552

General

FWC
Accepting applications
for Full Time OPS Re-
search Technician at
$10.50/hr. Duties in-
clude: fisheries field
sampling, assisting with
maintenance repair of
gear and vessels, and
data processing. This
position requires exten-
sive Field work and the
ability to pull and lift
heavy nets under ad-
verse conditions. Min.
Qualifications include:
HS diploma, relevant
field experience and a
valid FDL. This position
is located in East point
Florida. Contact person
is Richard Lehnert at
850-670-4045. State of
Florida application re-
quired.


General


IMMEDIATE
OPENING:
Part Time Maintenance/
Handyman, Full and
Part time Housekeep-
ers, and cooks needed
for Geri-Care Assisted
Living and Beacon Villa
Retirement Center. Flex-
ible hours, great work
environment, rewarding
and meaningful job. We
are looking for a hard
working, committed per-
son who is comfortable
working with elders.
This employee will re-
port to our Assisted Liv-
ing Administrator. The
right candidate must
pass a background
check and drug screen-
ing. We are an equal
opportunity employer. If
interested, please call
Deborah at
850-647-4000 or Kim at
647-9170


The Apalachicola Times
has an opening for an
Outside Sales Representative

Candidate must have an outgoing, goal oriented, de-
tailed and aggressive personality. Great benefits:
401k, retirement, health, life and dental insurance.
Sick leave and vacation.

If you are motivated by money and like working with
people then email resume to khalualani@starfl.com
or fax resume to (850) 227-7212.
Or in person at the Star office
135 W. Hwy 98, Port St Joe, Florida.
A Freedom Communication Newspaper


S 4100
General

Now taking applications
for Pest Control Technician-
Experience preferred at Bo
Knows Pest Control Inc.
Call 850-227-9555 Located
at 402 3rd Street PSJ

Healthcare

Bay St. Joseph
Healthcare

Seeking a work place w/
a fun & fair culture? Our
120-bed long- term care
facility is seeking indi-
viduals who: have com-
passion for the elderly &
enjoy working to fill the
following positions:

*Activity Director
*Director of Nursing
*Central Supply Clerk
*P/T Transportation Aide
*FIT Rehabilitation Tech
*Certified Nursing Assts
*Licensed Practical
Nurses
Full-time
Benefits Include:
Med/DentalVision Insur,
short/long term disabil-
ity company paid life In-
sur, paid time off, 401K
retirement plan, uniform
allowance, referral bo-
nus, tuition reimburse-
ment, Shift Differential.

Please Contact:
Carrie Harrison, Director
Human Resources
220 9th Street
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(850) 229-8244 Ext 105
Fax: (850) 229-7129


$500 Police Impounds!
Cars from $500! Tax Re-
pos, US Marshall and IRS
sales! Cars/Trucks/SUV's/
Toyota's/Honda's/Chevy's/
& More! For Listings, Call
1-800-298-5414 Ext C171.









Carport Sale
The Best Carport, RV Ports
& Metal Bldgs at afforda-
ble prices. Classic carport
12x20 $695. We have all
sizes Call 850-819-5093









Beautiful Beaches! South
Padre Island Beach Resort
From $59 per night.
www.enjoyspi.com
1-866-4LACOPA. Free
Breakfast, Free Happy
Hour, La Quinta Beach Re-
sort, La Copa Inn Beach
Resort..


I 4:100 I




General

Pest Control
Technician
Experience helpful but will
train the right person. Must
have a clean Florida Driv-
ers License. Must be avail-
able to work 40 hours a
week or more if needed.
Apply in person at 321 B
Reid Ave from 9:00-11:30
or 1:00-3:00

Hospitality

NOW HIRING
The hew Mainstay Suites
Hotel in Port St. Joe is now
accepting -applications for
front desk, room attend-
ants (housekeeping), laun-
dry personnel and run-
ners. Several part time and
full time positions are
available. We are looking
for a few great people to
join our team! If you are
great with guests, have a
passion for superior serv-
ice and can play well with
others, we would love to
hear from you. As to be ex-
pected, a flexible schedule
is a must, weekends and
holidays will be required.
Benefits include health
insurance, aflac, tuition re-
imbursement, holiday pay,
vacation pay etc. E.O.E.
DFWR Apply in person at
the Port Inn, 501 Monu-
ment Ave. Port St. Joe


Handyman
Port St. Joe Area
*Plumbing
*Electrical .
-Painting
*Light Framing
*Yard Work

JOEY BARBEE
850-229-6147
Leave Message




Attend College Online
from Home *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Computers, *Criminal
Justice. Job placement as-
sistance. Computer pro-
vided. Financial Aid if qual-
ified. Call 866-858-2121.
www.OnlineTidewaterTech
.com




Bushhogging
Call Pat & Larry
@648-6652




Bank
Foreclosures!
Homes from $10,000 1-3
bedrooms available! Re-
pos, REOs, HUD, etc. The-
se homes must sell. For
Listings. Call 1-800-
298-5507 Ext. H171.


4100 4100


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Gu


Service
Technician

GT Corn a rlal communi-
"5hi.'1iS c.,:nTpan t pr,-,.i,'er
r, Nonr.eNe F I,-,rl ,;ir.
.a.can.:,:, ,,r a '_ r.,,
Technician at their Port St.
Joe, Florida location. Re-
porting to the Local Man-
ager, successful candidate
will be responsible for the
installation, repair and
maintenance of. telecom-
munication equipment in-
cluding installation of DSL
at customer location. Must
be computer literate and
knowledgeable of internet
along with possessing ex-
cellent communication and
cufstomer oer,.e skills. A
two year degree or equiva-
lent years of related expe-
rience preferred.
We offer a competitive sal-
ary and benefits package
iipluding 401K. Please re-
spond in confidence to:
SSusan Machemer
SHuman Resources
S Manager
GT Com
SR 0. Box 220
Port St. Joe, FL 32457

smachemer(fairport.c6m
FAX: 850-229-8689
EOE/MFDV

Real Estate

B;Sales Associate

rt. Joe Towns & Resorts is
currently recruiting for
Saies As3ociates for, their
Wirdniar: Beach develop-
n-neri r. Port St. Joe, FL.
This position requires a FL
reai estate license, proven
hizi-ry in selling and or
marketing coastal/resort
properties and computer
.literacy in data base con-
tact management soft-
ware. This is an outstand-
ing opportunity to become
3 pan :of the JOE team that
AII dv-.elop 3.5 miles of
b-ac:r, tront property on St.
Joseph Bay! This position
'mtains weekend and
holiday office hours.
Please fax your resume to
850-229-7952 or email re-
becca.standice@joe.com.
Equal Opportunity
Employer
Pre-Employment Drug
Screening Required


Professional

DO Gulf Coast
Community College



Counselor
Minority Services
provide personal & aca-
demic counseling/advising
to new/current students;
lead minority recruitment &
retention efforts. Requires
MS in counseling/related
field; expert. in educational
guidance & counseling
preferred. Starts@ $29k/yr
Apply by 8/25/06.
Additional info: hto:ll
dept.gulfcoast.e du/jobs.
GCCC is an EA/EO/M/F/
Vet employer.
Trades
AmeriForce HIRING
NOW!!! *TOP PAY and
LONG TERM WORK in IN-
DIANA for Qualified Weld-
ers* Other locations avail-
able throughout the US:
AL, FL, VA, CA, MS '& LA
Positions Available: Electri-
cians, Pipe Welders, Elec-
tronic Technicians, Pipe
Fitters, Ship Fitters, Out-
side Machinists, Welders
(Fluxcore/Stick) Ability to
earn up to $1,400 a week
60+ Hours Available
**Must be eligible to work
in the U.S. plus have 3
YEARS SHIPYARD OR 5
YEARS INDUSTRIAL EX-
PERIENCE** PICK UP
THE PHONE AND CALL
NOW!!! Contact: 888-
269-3381 (Operators avail-
able 24 hours), rei-ru'ier.'
ameriforce.com EOE,
DFWP Se Habla Espanol
Trades
Concrete Laborers & Fin-
ishers needed call 229-
6525
Trades
Construction Laborers
needed. Transportation a
must. Call 850-527-6751
day or 229-7078 evenings.



Trades
Local manufacturer seek-
ing Asst. Laser operator,
will train skilled riotivated
hard working individual.
Flexible hours a must,
hourly wage dependent on
exp. Call 850-227-2057 to
obtain application.
Trades
Plumbers Helper & experi-
ence plumbers, will train,
paid vacation & holidays,
Starting pay $9/hr, Drivers
license required, 639-5227
icor appiicaion


*REMEMBER:*
Ads in this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire an investment or
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend giv-
ing credit card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.

Clerical
Administrative
Earn $12-$48/hour. Full
benefits. Paid training. Var-
ious Government Positions
Available. Homeland Secu-
rity, Law Enforcement,
Wildlife and more.
Call 7 days
1-800-320-9353, Ext 2139
Now Hiring for 2006 Post-
al Jobs $18 hour starting,
Average. Pay $57K year
Federal benefits, Paid
Training and Vacations.
No Experience needed
1-800-584-1775 Ref
#P5101

Work From Homel Seri-
ous Entrepenuer With De-
sire and Passion! Massive
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www.blessing4you.com
1-888-568-6735








BUSINESS & FINANCIAL
5100 Business
Opportunities
5110 Money to Lend


5100
*REMEMBER:*
Ads in this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire an investment or
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend giv-
ing credit card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.,

Wanted: $500K CASH in-
vestor. Low Risk, High Re-
ward. Pro Forma Shows
10 Fold Return.
614-572-9322. .
Earn $1000 to $5000 per
week. We'll Show You How
To/ No Cold Calling, No
Presentations, and No
Selling. Call Today!
1-800-378-1169 (1085ds)
i1995 Sian-Up


in


Commercial Building for
lease with workshop and
office space. Approx.
3300sf. 201 Tarpon St.
Port St. Joe call
850-229-9400


REAL ESTATE FOR RENT
6100 Business/
Commercial
6110 Apartments
6120 Beach Rentals
6130 Condo/Townhouse
6140 House Rentals
6150 Roommate Wanted
6160 Rooms for Rent
6170 Mobile Home/Lot
6180 Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 Timeshare Rentals
6200 Vacation Rentals






America's

Mini Storage


(850)229-8014


BEACH

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Day: 227-7200
Night: 647-3882
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MINI STORAGE

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706 First Street
Phone 227-2112
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LYNN HAVEN, FL 2340 SEWANEE ST
3BR 2BA 2,150sf+.With pool. Built 1969.
Approx .52ac lot.Taxes $1750 ('05).
Opening bid: $50,000
Inspections: I-4pm Sunday August 13th & 20th
and 2 hours prior to sale time.
Sells: 12pm Thu.,August 24th

williamsauction.com

(800) 801-8003




WILLIAMS & WILLIAMS


t FL RE LIC 3003737 DEAN C. WILLIAMS BROKER, AUC LIC AUl12
THOMAS L. WILLIAMS AUCTIONEER, W&W AUC LIC AB-0000760


i-. -(-,j ;;-. --- ---- *-^-- r ^iS s ^ a ^ a ^ fi K s ^ ..-*--.~


To Place Your Classified ad


THE 7rSTAR


Call Our New Numbers Now!





Call: 850-747-5020



Toll Free: 800-345-8688


Fax: 850-747-5044


Email: thestar@pcnh.com


Email: thetimes@pcnh.com


CONTRACTOR'S
WAREHOUSE
unit 1250 SF/ office bath-
room 12x12 roll up door,
located at the corner of
Pondarosa Pines & Ruth-
erford in Jones Home-
stead. $650 a month in-
cludes util. 1 year lease
+1 mo. rent dep. 647-2715
after 6pm.

New Metal
Building $1650/month.
2800sf has new office and
bathroom. Call
850-258-6139

Two Private 2nd Floor Of-
fices with shared reception
and kitchen. Beautiful view
overlooking St. Joe Bay at
Simmons Bayou. Perfect
for real estate office or
small business. $350.00
monthly per office. Utilities
included. First, last month
rent plus $150.00 deposit
per unit required. Call 850-
229-7799 M-F, 9-4pm.


-611o
1 br apartments, nicely fur-
nished w/beautiful views,
close to town, $550wk,
850-227-5989

2 br, Close to Down town,,
nice fenced in patio area.
$650 mo + Sec. dep. Avail
now. Call 850-527-7901




Grand Lagoon-Thomas
Drive. One bedroom, one
bath, with loft. Fully fur-
nished with washer and
dryer. Bay view with deck
and pool. $925/mo. Call
Michelle at 850-265-9006
or 888-265-9006.

Grand Lagoon-Thomas
Drive. One bedroom, one
bath, with loft. Fully fur-
nished with washer and
dryer. Bay view with deck
and pool. $925/mo. Call
Michelle at 850-265-9006
or 888-265-9006.



New Mexico Beach mari-
na Condo w/ gulf view.
Boat slip avail. Exclusive
and upscale, furnished
lbr+ bunk room, 2 ba, w/d,
stainless and granite.
}.145i0,nm. t,, I-e 2 l-II.111


Mexico Beach 3 br, 2 ba,
1400 sqft. townhouse. Ful-
ly furnished, DISH, pool.
$1,200/month for year
lease. Call 850-624-9516



Two townhouses located
in gated community on
beautiful Cape San Bias.
Two bedroom, two bath;
unfurnished. $950 month
with $950 security/damage
deposit. Call for more in-
formation. 229-2706 or
229-4700


6140 |-
2 ba 2 ba New 1st Tear
House for long term rental,
Near Indian Pass, no
smoking or pets, $1500
mo, 214-352-3147
2 br, 1 ba, Highland View
area. Available 8/15/06.
W&D, DW incl, $725 mo.,
(817) 789-3527.
2 br, 2 ba with loft/den or
3rd br, 1400sf, quiet area,
large yard, yard care in-
cluded. 1st last and securi-
ty deposit required.
$1085/mo. 850-653-6792



3 Bedroom home just
minutes from downtown
Port St. Joe and walking
distance to beautiful St. jo-
seph bay. nice quaint
neighborhood. Perfect for
a small family. $1000/ +
$1000 security/damage
deposit. Call 229-2706 or
229-4700 for details.



3 br, 1 ba, 1601 Marvin
Ave. PSJ remodeled, W/D
CH&A., dishwasher. $850/
mo+ utilities 651-325-7731
3 br, 2 ba renovated home
with carport. Incl. W/D,
stove, D/W & Fridge. On
quiet street in Mexico
Beach. $1000 mc w/1 yr.
lease + 1 mo deep. Call
208-830-1412
Gorgeous Bay Sunset
view on CR-30, 2 bdrms,
2V2 baths, wood floors,
custom cabinets, fully fur-
nished, screened porch &
open deck, 6-9 month
lease, $1295 mo, first, last
month rent & $650 security
deposit, on signing. No
pets. 850-229-7799.



Mexico Beach 305 Fortner
Ave. 1 st block from gulf 3
br, 2 ba w/gulf view from
deck. Living, family & din-
ing rm. Sep. laundry W/D
incl. Lrg fenced yard,
porch & car port. Furn.
$1100mo. Util. not incl. No
pets. Call 772-781-7229 or
72.1t85-E.84


3 br, 2 ba CH/A 2 car car-
port and upper deck 6266
Hwy 98 and Pine St, PSJ
Beach 850-647-5004
Lease with option 3 br, 2
ba on Lake Alice, Wewa.
$1000/month + deposit.
Call 864-921-4197



Mexico Beach, 3 br 2 ba,
walk to beach, $1150mo,
year lease + dep, 850-
647-5792



Mexico Beach, Beachside
New 2 br, 3 ba, fully furn'd,
Non smokers, Long term,
$1100 mo. (770) 426-6896
Port St. Joe bay view
1810sf 3 br, 2 ba. Ig. Flori-
da room, w/d, Fp, fenced
backyard with lawn care
included. 2 car attached
garage. 102 Sunset Circle.
$1575/mo. + dep. Avail.
Sept. 8. Call 850-774-6649



PSJ 510 Madison Ave. 2
br 1 ba, $600. + utilities &
$500. Security deposit.
850-251-2309. Avail imme-
diately



Pt. St. Joe Beach: 2 br, 2
ba furnished house across
the street from beach.
laundry, large deck w/gulf
views $1400 mo Some util.
incl www.freeplotting.com/
beach.htm. 678-643-1285
St. Joe Beach cottage, 1.5
blks to Gulf. 3 br, 2 ba,
newly redecorated new
appliances, Lg. Cre,.-ne
porch, shed for Rv Boar
Pets maybe, No smoking.
227-3453
St. Joe Beach, 3 br, 2 ba,
enclosed garage, gulfview,
beach access, furnished,
$1200 mo., will consider'
lease purchase. Call Bob-
bie@ 258-5261.
Waterfront 3 br, 2 ba lo-
cated in the Overstreet
area. Completely renovat-
ed with new kitchen &
bath, Irg back porch, over-
looking intercoastal water-
way. Short drive to the
beach.. Call 648-5865 .


| 6170 |I



Double wide MH 3 br. 2
ba furnished front porch
and large rear dae.: Out-
side shower 900i'rm.:.
dep. 449 Pineda St. St.
Joe Beach 850-647-3289.
L., mensage


8100 Antique & Collectibles,
8110- Cars
8120 Sports Utility Vehicles
8130 -Trucks
8140- Vans
8150 Commercial
8160 Motorcycles
8170 Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210 Boats
8220 Personal Watercraft
8230 Sailboats
8240 Boat & Marine
Supplies
8310 Aircraft/Aviation
8320 ATV/Off Road Vehicles
8330 Campers & Trailers.
8340 Motorhomes


8110
To Place An Ad
in The Times
Classifieds,
SCall
(850) 747-5020
or
1 (800) 345-8688



8120
Mitsubishi Outlander '03,
4 door, excellent condition,'
new tires, 50K miles,
$15,000 obo 850-387-4357

after 6 pm.




Suzuki
600XK '03 very fast, very'
nice bike. First $5000,
takes it. Call 850-258-6139'




Prindle
Catamaran
16FT, trailer, all equip.s
$700 OBO 229-8334.




Dry Boat Storage
FOR RENTI Exclusive.
Carrabelle Boat Club.'
Safe, state-of-the-art mari-
na. Enjoy The Luxurious'
clubhouse and facilities.
30'x10'x10'...$280-$330..
Call Caryn 404-643-6971


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
7100 Homes
7110 Beach Home/
Property
7120 Commercial
7130 Condo/Townhouse
7140 Farms & Ranches
7150 Lots and Acreage
7160 Mobile Homes/Lots
7170 Waterfront
7180 Investment
Property
7190 Out-of-Town
Real Estate
7200 Timeshare




2 BR 1 BA Port St.Joe.
Corner lot with bay view.
REDUCED $215K 850-
7 6 2 3 2 5 2
www.forsalebyowner.com/
20589028




4 br, 2 ba PSJ 2200SF 3/4
acre FP, irrigation well, Ig
screened 357SF porch, hot
tub, carport, all new kitch.
appli., sec. features,
FSBO, laundry/utility rm.
$265K Call 850-229-8754,
Iv mess.

House only for Sale! Must
be moved. 5746 Hwy 71 (6
miles N. of PSJ). Approx
1400 sf, 3 br,1 ba,hrdwd
floors, C/A, FP, stove,
refig, W/D. Ducky Johnson
has moving, cost info.
$18,000. Call Mary Lou @
850-227-4625




Mexico Beach, 3 br 2 ba,
CH&A, screen room, close
to beach, possible view,
$169,000, Pelican Walk
Real Estate, 850-647-2473


Mexico Beach new TH's,
pool, starting at $208,900,
Pelican Walk Real Estate
850-647-2473
Panama City
Laketown Wharf
Investor must sell ASAP,
2004 price. 1681 sq ft
Penthouse, $519,000. Call
(585) 943-5100


7150 S
1 Acre +
in Wewa on Stone Mill
Creek $62K 850-227-1885
Bayview Lot
in Highland View, on Porim-
pano Street. $129,500.
Call (706) 333-0159.
St Joe Beach, 2 1/2 lots,.
steps to dedicated beach,
$510K, will divide, $10K-
buyer rebate, Pelican Walk
Real Estate, 850-647-2473



7160
Overstreet Area Mobile
home for sale. Asking
$109K. Some owner fi-
nancing avail. Call 478-
960-0800



Residential Waterfront
and water view home sites'
from $150,000. Coldwell
Banker Residential Real.
Estate, Inc. Don Yarbrough
850-527-5887





AR~.r~TnrU~


Panama City
Beach, FL
$549,000, 3333sf 3 br 3.5
ba Gulf View, 3 blks from
bch, fncd crtyd, in-grnd
pool, detatched gar.
w/upstairs Private apt.
850-867-5222.

Panama City
Beach,
Florida
Investors -or Second
home buyers, we have
beautiful beach homes
or condos for sale!
SC all ICor deLllsil
Tr.: .h ~r, t *r
Direct Realty
850-527-2275

Rare Riverfront Lot for
Sale. Most beautiful lot on
Chipola River in City
Limits of Wewa. Y. acre lot
$250,000. Call 639-5004,
Realtor, Broker/ Owner.
OAK GARDENS II NEW 3
br, 2 ba Homes for Sale,
only a few left in .
$155,000. Call Gulf County
Realty, 639-5004, Broker
GASKIN SAWMILL SUB-
DIVISION NEW HOMES,
Beautiful wooded lots,
very nice homes. Two un-
der construction or will
build to suit. Come for a
look in Wewa.
Gulf County
Realty
639-5004.




St Joe Beach, 3 br 2 ba, 1
story, pristine, tile & hard-
wood floor, partially fur-
nished, 1/2 block to dedi-
cated beach, Coldwell
Banker, Forgotten Coast,
Claude Brousseau, Owner/
Agent, MLS#111200
$474K, 850-625-6718





New Metal Building
2800sf includes new office
and bathroom. Priced at
$395,000 Call
850-258-6139


Established 1938 0 Serving Guff County and surrounding areas for 67 years


i






FSf-d-lichp1-701-r a s r d areas f 6 r


Gallery -. 2

"You have one or two kids signs in the neighborhood and
in your lifetime, and Earnest increase print advertising.
was one of them,"remembered He has also hired his
Kelley, who helped Hand with daughter, Crystal, as the
his technique and stood out gallery's public relations
of the way. person, and hopes his
A first-year teacher at the admirers will find their way
start of Wewahitchka's public to the gallery's new address.
school integration, Kelley "I really wanted to show
recalled a day when Hand my artwork in my gallery and
mistook his confidence for hopefully inspire my patrons
disinterest. to come to me rather than
"You help all these white have to travel extensively,"
kids, why don't you help me?"' said Hand.
Hand asked. One of Hand's biggest
"Earnest, you're better fans has not yet made a visit
than me," Kelley replied. to the new Wood Sculpture
Hand did not further Art Gallery, but the trip is
his artistic education when high on Kelley's to-do list.
he graduated high school, Kelley has maintained a
instead taking a job as a friendship with Hand through
bus driver in Baltimore, the years. He still drops by
Maryland. his studio and talks about
- Hand said he returned art, though these days he
to Wewahitchka after being no longer gives his former
called by God to minister to student advice.
the city's residents. "He's the artist," said
"I do the work of an apostle Kelley. "I just kind of sit back
- that is to try to win souls for and listen."
Christ and helping churches.
I'm quite sure in the future it ,,
will be eventually helping to
establish churches, but I wait
on the Lord in those areas,"
he said.
In Wewahitchka, Hand
has pursued his twin callings,
ministry and art.
Though his work would-
gain greater exposure in a
larger city, Hand has no ..".
plans to leave his hometown,
where nearly all of his family i
sfill lives.
"It's my home, and, I
just feel more comfortable at
home," he said.
To generate interest in
his art, Hand plans to post '. ..


Despina WilliamsfThe Star
Hand's fish are among the gallery's best sellers.


Despina Williams/The Star
Two alligators take a stroll down "Alligator Alley."


Despina Williams/The Star
In addition to his sculptures of native fish and animals. Hand
also sculpts exotic animals (like this elephant) that are not found in
Wewahitchka.


Despina Williams The Star
One of Hand's faces shows some attitude.









New Yea Resolution?

DID YOU ..',
KNOW THAT 88% ,
OF ADULTS -
REMEMBER
SOMEONE WITH
AN ESPECIALLY .
ATTRACTIVE
SMILE?

-: Why not start with one of the first things most
people notice about you... your teeth? Heck, we'll
even make it easier for you with a free complete
exam and x-rays. That's right free for the entire
month of January and February. Now you have
one less excuse for avoiding the Dentist. Let the
staff at Dr. Lister's office keep your smile healthy
in a friendly, stress free environment that will
make you feel truly at home. So take a short drive
to Downtown Wewahitchka and let us share our
home'with you!

Free exam and xrays for new patients only!

Call today for an appointment.
Ask about our Specials.


License #15437
^^^H^H639-4565


PA fa
1r~,,71


A.G. EDWARD&S.
;tLlLLV IPI vE'.ESTED OLIN0 Cli NTS.

WE -MAKE HOUSE CALLS.

Personal service is hard to find these days but not at
A.G. Edwards. That's because we believe that putting your
interests first is just plain smart business. So we would
be happy to come directly to your home or business to
discuss your financial needs and goals.
Call today to enjoy personal consultation and guidance
from a trusted- leader in the financial services industry.
In serving you, we generally act as a broker-dealer but may act as an
investment advisor for certain accounts for which we are appointed as
investment advisor, and our obligations will vary with the role we play.
Unless we otherwise specifically indicate in writing, we are acting only
as a broker-dealer. Please cornsult impori3ra InfoTarjn About Your
Relationship With A.G t'nardv on agedwardz. corn ri scloures lor
a discussion of the difference. bl',eenr our nroierage .and vtisoit
services.
En L. Fella, AAMS
201 E. 19th Street
Panama City, FL 32405-4717
8501785-0273
800/234-0273
2005 AG. Edwards & Sons. Inc. Member SIPC


TheSta, Prt t. oeFL Thrsdy, ugut 1, 206 II


Establish 737 -Sering Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


~i~i~l~mmruMis 111i11':, 1 111,~i




Il 1ll lTull ,. TZ. +.1 IJ-/, I TI -iUr N I Aiv Is 1. I 2v


REAL ESI'1TE
(SA-IUCTIOlY
AUGUST 26
Parcel 6035

ST. GEORGE ISLAND


40 One-Eighth Share, Deeded Ownerships
* 2 and 3 bedroom residences with designer furnishings
* Panoramic gulf views from everi residence
* Indoor pool and fitness center
* HOA fees include taxes, insurance, housekeeping and amenities
* High-end appliances, plazma TVs, luxurious linens and much more


OCEAN FRONT HOIH
AND HOMESITES
For Viewings, Call for an Appointment


E


* 3 Bedroom 3.5 Bath
* Tastefully Furnished
* Viking, Dacor & Bosch Kitchen
* Private Pool
* Excellent Rental History


ORIGINALLY PRICED $1,395,000
SUGGESTED OPENING BID:
$425,000


ORIGINALLY PRICED $799,000
SUGGESTED OPENING BID:
$295,000


ORIGINALLY PRICED $699,000
SUGGESTED OPENING BID:
$195,000


For more information, please call:
800-315-2199
www. sheldongood.com


SIELDON GOOD & COIeANYN.
2006 Sheldon Good & Co. Inc. Michael Aaron Fine, Broker of Record, License # 573262


This advertising material is being used for the purpose of soliciting sales of timeshare interests.
This offer is not directed to residents in any state in which a registration of the timeshare plan is required but in which registration requirements have not yet been met.


CIPI~--- ~ r _I-- I -I I r I -II IC I I


.. `


I


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


17(Tk, 'fn Pot t- oe FL hurda, A aut 1, 00


BEACHFRON


CondoMod
Th els Open
ursday SaturdlaY 3-7pm
or callfor an Appointlnent




Full Text

PAGE 1

50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Emily Hansen found herself and she wasn’t even looking. She bestows full credit on the Semper Fi Sisters – “That sisterhood” – and the group’s annual Beach Blast, the fth edition of which began Wednesday with the rst arrivals of the women of loved ones in the military deployed overseas. Before she experienced her rst Beach Blast last year, Hansen was lost in a fog of medication and grief, two years lost after the death of her son, deployed with the U.S. Air Force, in Afghanistan Sept. 15, 2010. Hansen spent those two years following her son’s death on sleeping aids, anti-anxiety medication and anti-depressants. She had zero desire to travel from her Athens, Mich., home to Port St. Joe. She was in no mood for a getaway with other women, aunts, mothers, grandmothers and wives, most of By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com In uenza is popping up a bit early this year. Doctor’s of ces and clinics are reporting an increase in cases of In uenza A in Gulf County in recent weeks as the u season arrives in force, and a bit ahead of schedule. “Since we have been open, we have typically seen the u start to show up in November,” said Paulina Pendarvis with Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. “We have heard reports of in uenza in the area among pediatric patients which is a little early for this area.” Pendarvis noted that u season blossoms in the months from November to its peak in January and February. What doctors are currently seeing is Inuenza A H1N1, said Billy Spencer, Infection Control Practitioner at Sacred Heart on the Gulf. He said the best way to prevent the u is By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Port St. Joe Port Authority is seeking a little help from some friends. While the application process for a permit to dredge the shipping channel crawls forward, Port Authority board members, entering a scal year with scant funds dissipating, are trying to remain viable. The application for the permit process hit a major milestone last week with a preapplication meeting with state and federal agencies. Port director Tommy Pitts said that most importantly the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection were represented among more than two dozen staff members from various agencies. “On the regulatory side we got a positive response,” Pitts said. He said since a shipping channel has long existed in Port St. Joe and was operational and maintained until the 1980s, the dredging is seen as a “fairly straightforward dredging project” as there are a number of known factors to the area and channel. In addition, inland disposal sites are identi ed and there has been discussion that any suitable material would be used for beach nourishment on St. Joseph Peninsula. “The one hurdle that caused the greatest concern,” Pitts said, was whether a Corps of Engineers study might have to be undertaken. “We are addressing that aggressively,” Pitts said, noting it was largely a question of whether the process of permitting the project would be pushed through the “bureaucracy” or the application could be fast-tracked. Pitts said the intention was to engage Congressman Steve Southerland and Sen. Bill Nelson most prominently to work with and lobby the Corps to move the application process along. “We gained con dence from the environmental side, but the Corps bureaucratic By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com First there were eight, then two and now maybe none. Port St. Joe commissioners, particularly Mayor Mel Magidson, were questioning Tuesday their approach for bidding the relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Magidson said research he has been able to pursue in recent weeks raised doubts in his mind as to whether the relocation project as bid – to move the lighthouse, two keepers’ quarters and an oil house together – was the proper approach. “I personally have not much con dence on the winning bidder being able to do what they said they could do,” Magidson said. “I am not comfortable turning the project over to them. “I think we can save money doing it differently.” At a pre-bid conference outlining the project eight contractors picked up packets, showing at least some interest. However, just two turned in bids. While Magidson did not make a formal motion to toss out or rebid the project – on most construction projects of this type a bid is applicable for 60 days, said Clay Smallwood of Preble Rish Engineers, acting as project manager at no cost to the city – a new approach was on the board’s mind. Magidson said he had talked to a man whose company was involved in the restoration of the St. George Island Lighthouse and others with a lighthouse preservation group out of Key West. He found that most lighthouses are brick or masonry Doctors: Flu is here, so vaccinate Dredging permit process inches forward See FLU A3 See DREDGING A8 Commissioners rethink approach on lighthouse relocation PORT ST. JOE CITY COMMISSION See COMMISSION A8 BEACH BLAST Thursday, OCTOBER 17, 2013 Sisters and Songwriters pick and pack some love For complete schedule and more on Blast on the Beach Songwriters Festival see Page B1 PHOTOS BY CPL. ANDREW HOYLES, USMC | Special to the Star ABOVE: This unit was deep enough in country that ground routes for mail were impassable. So planes did the trick, with an air drop of Boxes of Love. RIGHT: A touch of love in the arms, it is back to the barracks. “We are pushing the peanut a little further down the road each day.” Mel Magidson Port St. Joe mayor FILE PHOTO The Semper Fi Sisters will hold its Boxes of Love Packing Party beginning at 10 a.m. ET in the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. See BLAST A5 YEAR 76, NUMBER 1 Songwriters’ Festival info, schedule B1 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . A4 Letters to the Editor . . . . . . . A4 Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . A7 School News . . . . . . . . . . B3 Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Classi eds . . . . . . . . . B6-B8

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Local A2 | The Star Thursday, October 17, 2013 4 51 6 8 4 6 F r i d a y O c t o b e r 1 8 t h T rip l e T ai l s S e a f o o d & R a w B a r 3 p m & 5 p m P ro vis i ons 6 p. m T h e T h i r s t y G o a t 6 :3 0 p m 8: 3 0 p m & 1 0 : 3 0 p m Ma n g o Ma r le y s ( c e n t r a l t i m e z o n e ) 7 p m & 9 p m Sa t urda y O c t o b e r 1 9 t h D o c k s i d e S e a f o o d a n d R a w B a r 1 1 :3 0 a m 1 2 : 4 5 p m 2 p m F r e e S o n g w r i t e r s W or k sh o p Loo k o u t Lo u n g e 5 p m & 7 p m To u c a n s ( c e n t r a l t i m e z o n e ) 6 p m 8 p m & 1 0 p m Ha u gh t y Her o n 7 p m & 9 p m S u n d a y O c t o b e r 2 0 t h I n d i a n P a s s R a w B a r 2 p m 3 :3 0 p m 5 p m 6 :3 0 p m 8 p m 1 0 p m L a t e N ig ht J a m S es s io n F o r f u l l e v e n t s c h e d u l e v is i t: Bla s t o n t h e B a y c o m T h i s P r o j e c t r e c e i v e d n a n c i a l a s s i s t a n c e f r o m t h e G u l f C o u n t y T D C T h i s P r o j e c t r e c e i v e d n a n c i a l a s s is t a n c e f r om V is it F l or i d a. NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. 4< 4 & # //>/ ; ) & 8 ww w .m ulli se y e.c om "$ # ''% 5 "$ ':; 24 ;6;2/ 4 ; 9 3 6 / 2>=4 4 Medical Ey e Exam with 33 $1;) / 3 4 ;6;43 4 #: ;2;/ /3 % 9 4 ':4 4/> ;2=34 / 42 ;; 6 4 4 9=/4 /3 4 f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases "$ "($ ##"'' 850-7 63-6666 ( % ;; 4 =;;9 ; :4 = ;3/ # /:/3=4) 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. ; 4 8!-! $ + # S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances (% % ''(' 0* * # ''% ) "$ "($ #$"$' ##"'' 0 / 4 # / 4) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 33 $1;) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 10-31-13 CODE: SJ00 THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER S K I N C A N C E R c a n b e p r e s e n t w i t h o u t y o u k n o w i n g i t C A L L t o d a y f o r a s k i n c a n c e r s c r e e n i n g D I D Y OU K N O W t h a t s t u d i e s s h o w : # # ' # * # # ' ' % ' ! ' $ ' % &, ' % ' ! $ ' % & % ( ! # # # # ' ' # % % % # # ' % ' # # % ' ! ' N O W D I D Y OU K N O W ? # % ' ' & ' # ! ' + # % # & ' # ' % # . ' ) # + % ' # & ' % # ' # ' % % $ # ' VI N C E N T I VE R S M .D 3 0 1 T w e n t i e t h S t r e e t | P o r t S t J o e F L 3 2 4 5 6 8 5 0 2 2 7 7 0 7 0 | w w w i ve r s m d .c o m A L L M A J O R I N SUR A N C E A C C EP T ED 9 a m 6 p m 9 a m 2 p m W e e m s M ed i cal C en t er W e s t 1 3 5 A v e n u e G A p a l a c h i c o l a F L 8 5 0 6 5 3 8 8 5 3 G o o d t h i n g s a re b e i n g s a i d a b o u t W ee m s H e re a re s o m e re c e n t c o mm e n t s f r o m o ur p a t i e n t s : ( # # # # # ( ( # # # ( # $ # ( # % ( # # # # # # % # ! ( # ( ( # # % % # # # % # # $ # # # # # $ # # % # % # # % # # # % # # # " # & # # ( # # W e e m s M ed i cal C en t er E a s t w i l l b e cl o s ed S a t u r d a y O c t o b e r 1 9 t h a n d w i l l r e o p e n o n M o n d a y O c t o b e r 2 1 s t By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com MEXICO BEACH — It may be a far cry from the Bay County’s booming tourism market west of the Hathaway Bridge, but Mexico Beach is carving out its own niche when it comes to visitors. “Mexico Beach is obviously a completely different place than Panama City Beach,” said Wylie Petty, who manages Mexico Beach’s El Governor Motel. “We see mainly fami lies with young people or older retired people. We’re a slower pace, without a doubt.” With only 600 vacation units, the inventory of the quiet coastal community is about 25 times smaller than the roughly 15,000-unit market in Panama City Beach, but it’s still mak ing strides with it comes to bed tax collections. This summer, bed tax col lections in Mexico Beach rose about 10 percent between May and August, contributing to a 7.5 percent increase for scal year 2013. Now, tourism ofcials are hoping a $300,000 marketing grant will help the destination further increase its exposure in the upcoming year. “Our budget is a little bit bigger for (scal year) 2014, and we’ll be able to do a little more,” said Kimberly Shoaf, director of the Mexico Beach Community Development Council (CDC). “We’re just go ing to continue to tell people about Mexico Beach.” The grant, secured from the BP-sponsored Gulf Seafood and Promotional Fund, will be used to promote the area through TV spots in areas the CDC has yet to tap into. “It will allow us to air into markets that we haven’t been able to afford before,” Shoaf said. New advertising in cities like New Orleans; Houston; Nashville, Tenn.; Baltimore and St. Louis will join the CDC’s existing marketing ef forts in areas like Atlanta and Birmingham, Ala. Shoaf said the CDC also will continue to promote events and festivals in Mexico Beach, with a big focus on shing tourna ments, including the annual Ling Ding Tournament, the Mexico Beach Offshore Classic and the Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association Kingsh Tour nament. Other CDC-sponsored events include the Plein Air Paint Out, the Mexico Beach Gumbo Cook-Off and the Mexi co Beach Art and Wine Festival. Shoaf said during the fall season, the CDC will shift mar keting efforts toward “empty nesters” and the rst ock of fall snowbirds. “We’re gearing forward and we’re letting people know that just because kids go back to school in August doesn’t mean the beach is dead,” she said. “We want them to know that it’s laid back and it’s probably what they’re looking for.” At the 124-room El Governor Motel, the largest bed tax col lector in Mexico Beach, Petty said fall has been busy so far. He said a wet summer kept the mo tel from breaking any records during the busy season, but he thinks fall numbers should beat last year. “I look forward to next year being an even busier year,” Petty said. “The sky’s the limit at this point.” Chef Ian Williams fixes a cup of gumbo for a patron at the Gumbo Cook-Off in Mexico Beach in February. Mexico Beach has seen an increase in bed tax collections. ANDREW P JOHNSON News Herald le photo Mexico Beach tourism grows By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Another week passes in Mexico Beach, and the Parker House still stands empty and charred. During a workshop two weeks ago, the city council agreed to have a third party evaluate the foundation slab beneath the Park er House. The city’s insurance company has insisted the slab is safe to build on but hasn’t provided the statement in writing. During the council’s regular meeting on Tuesday, city admin istrator Chris Hubbard said he contacted several structural engi neers in the surrounding area and is awaiting proposals to see how much it will cost to bring some one in to evaluate the existing foundation. Councilman Jack Mullen said he planned to meet with the insur ance company and to discuss the council’s desire to build an eleva tor in the existing Parker House in the event that repairs are made to the existing building. The city received an insurance payment of $660,000 but Mullen said he planned to ask why addi tional monies had not been paid in over a year. “We have some money, but we still have unanswered questions,” Mullen said. “Face-to-face contact is the way to get it done.” To avoid agitating the insur ance company, Councilwoman Tanya Castro suggested Mul len wait to speak with them until after the third-party evaluation was complete in order to present a counterpoint to their claim that the slab is safe to build on. Councilman Lanny Howell agreed with Mullen that going to see the company reps in person was the best course of action. “Go down there and talk to them and let’s get going,” Howell said. Mullen planned to travel to Orlando later in the week for the meeting. The historic Parker House was purchased by the city in mid-2011 with the intention of using it as a new city hall. The building caught re several months later and suf fered massive damage. Community garden In other business, the council approved allowing a community garden to be constructed at Palms Park off of Seventh Street. The project, spearheaded by April Wisdom, will see construc tion of 27 raised beds that will be rented to snowbirds who enjoy gardening or area residents who may not have room in their own yards. Wisdom’s goal is to connect gardeners in the area and sought approval from the council for the use of the land and to pay for the irrigation of the beds. Construction costs were esti mated at $90 a bed and $107 an nually for water. The council will allow use of the land and will pay up to $200 a year for water costs and Wisdom will pay for construc tion of the beds through fundrais ing events. Community gardens have prov en popular in Apalachicola and Destin among other areas, and Wisdom believes a similar area in Mexico Beach will encourage self-reliance and stimulate social interaction. “Studies have shown that com munity gardens can raise property value in the area,” Wisdom said. Those interested in renting a plot will need to le an application and pay a $50 fee that covers their gardening for a year. Wisdom plans for the garden to be self-sustaining through those fees. “It’s a great idea,” Mayor Al Cathy said. No timeframe was given for construction of the beds. Mexico Beach awaits 2nd opinion on Parker House

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, October 17, 2013 simple – get a shot. The vaccine is read ily available and in plentiful supply at pharmacies such as CVS and at local physi cian’s ofces. And while vac cines are aimed at particu lar strains of inuenza from year to year, this year’s vac cine has thus far proven to be effective to the strain in cubating in the population. “The vaccine is a good match for what we are seeing this year,” Spencer said. “And a vaccine should cover you all season. You do not need to have a booster later. “The best way to prevent the u is the vaccine.” Health ofcials encour age everybody to receive a vaccine, but in particular certain populations – those over 60 or babies, those with immune system problems – should receive the u vac cination regardless of gen eral health. According to the Cen ters for Disease Control, the vaccine is effective in preventing u in 60 percent of those who receive it, but most importantly, Spencer said, it will prevent severe complications, for instance pneumonia. “You will not end up in the hospital,” Spencer said. And lest one thinks a bout of the u will provide the same protection as a vac cine for the rest of the sea son, Spencer cautions, “You can still get sick again.” There are other lifestyle choices that will help pre vent the u from spreading, either to you or from you. Wash hands frequently and use the alcohol-based germ sanitizers where possible. Avoid large crowds and if sick, stay home; if your child is sick, keep them home. “If you believe you have the u, you want to see your doctor and if you are feeling ill, the best thing to keep the u from spreading is for you to stay home and take care of yourself,” Spencer said. “If you child is sick, don’t send them to school.” Keep hand-shaking to a minimum or don’t shake hands at all. “You still need to take precautions,” Spencer said. “I am not a fan of handshaking. That is how people can get the u. Keep your hands clean.” And living right, getting the proper rest, remaining hydrated by drinking plenty of uids, exercising will help boost immune systems and assist your body in ghting off inuenza. The primary message as the u season unfolds: take an illness that the CDC says kills more than 45,000 Amer icans each year seriously. “I don’t think people take it seriously, but I will tell you when I actually had a diag nosed case of the u, I was talking to my late grand mother about not going into the light,” Pendarvis said. “I was that sick. People need to take the u seriously.” $ S e e a T y n d a l l F e d e r a l C r e d i t U n i o n r e p r e s e n t a t i v e f o r c o m p l e t e d e t a i l s a n d d i s c l o s u r e s D e f e r r e d p a y m e n t o e r a v a i l a b l e o n a u t o l o a n s o p e n e d b e t w e e n O c t o b e r 7 2 0 1 3 a n d D e c e m b e r 3 1 2 0 1 3 A l l r a t e s a n d o e r s a r e s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e w i t h o u t n o t i c e M e m b e r e l i g i b i l i t y r e q u i r e d ; a n i n i t i a l $ 1 n o n r e f u n d a b l e m e m b e r s h i p f e e w i l l a p p l y % # % & # % + # # % % + % % + + % % % % % % % % % + % % % # & % % % ( % # ( % % # % % % % & ( % ( % % + (+ # # % % ) + % # W E HA VE MOVED T O: 327 REID A VE (CORN E R OF 4TH St & REID A VE.) 850-227-3472 HOU RS MONDA Y T O W EDN ESDA Y 8 AM T O 6 PM THU RSDA Y T O SA TU RDA Y 8 AM T O 8 PM SU NDA Y 11 AM T O 6 PM 2077822 Gun Show February 23rd & 24th Ft. W alton Beach Fairgr ounds FREE P ARKING Concealed W eapons Class Sat/Sun 1 1am or 2pm Floridagunshow s.com Sat 9-5 Sun 10-4 Oct ober 26th & 27th P anama C ity F airgr ounds By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m The courts have weighed in, the Florida Legislature followed and the Board of County Com missioners will follow suit. The BOCC on Tuesday will consider, during a public hearing, an ordinance codifying policy on public speaking during County Commission meetings. “This is not inconsistent with past policy,” said county attorney Jeremy Novak. “Now it will be county law.” The ordinance would dictate that any public comment on any concern or proposition taken up by the BOCC be heard immedi ately after comments from staff and commissioners on the issue. For any measure or action not on the printed agenda, public comment will be heard prior to board action and must be limited to the measure before the BOCC. Public comment must also be directed to the chairman presid ing over the BOCC meeting at the time and must not be directed at staff, individual commissioners or members of the audience. BOCC meetings over the past year have been marked by nu merous instances of individuals speaking about private citizens, in the audience and not, as well as comments directed at indi vidual commissioners. The ordi nance provides the chairman as the focal point for comment, but also provides the chairman the authority to tell violators of the policy to immediately take a seat. Vulgar, insulting or profane language directed at commission ers, staff or any member of the audience “shall not be tolerated” and the chairman can request, in the face of such behavior, to have law enforcement remove the per son from the meeting room. Commissioner Joanna Bryan suggested during the previous meeting that “insulting” language can be subjective and sought a clearer denition, which Novak said he would examine and bring back to the BOCC on Tuesday. All speakers will be required to ll out a speaker’s form: in the case of an item on the agenda the form should be lled out in advance, Novak said; in the case of an item not on the agenda the form must be lled out before the meeting is adjourned. All com ments must be made at the po dium after the speaker provides their name and address for the record. Individual speakers will have three minutes for comments. A representative of an organization will be granted ve minutes, but only one member of that organi zation will be allowed to speak. Current policy allows a speak er three minutes, with additional minutes coming only after a ma jority vote of approval from the board. Those seeking to be placed on the agenda to speak currently are provided six minutes to speak. Under the new ordinance, comments must be limited to the action or measure being taken up at that time by the board. BOCC meetings over the past year have also been highlighted by public comment that has fre quently not pertained to a specif ic issue before the board or about matters and issues that are not even within the authority of the BOCC. Public comment during pub lic hearings or workshops will be limited to the time period set aside for public comment. The provisions do not apply to meetings or issues taken up due to emergency situations; ofcial acts ministerial or ceremonial in nature; or meetings exempt from the provisions under Florida law. The ordinance follows action by the Florida Legislature this past spring which established citizen’s rights to speak. A Florida appellate court in 2010 ruled that while Florida’s Sunshine Law required public boards or commissions to meet in a public forum – save under specic circumstances, such as discussing litigation or union ne gotiating strategy – the law con tained no mandate on the public’s right to speak during such meet ings. There was no state law or constitutional guarantee of the public’s right to speak before a public board or commission votes on a specic issue. The remedy, the court ruled, would be a change in law. Beginning in 2011, State Sen. Joe Negron introduced a bill to correct that lack of “right to speak” and in 2013 Negron’s bill, including provisions in a Florida House of Representative com panion, was overwhelmingly passed. That law authorizes a board or commission to adopt “reason able” rules to ensure orderly con duct of the meeting, but prohibits a commission or board from de nying public comment on specic issues before the board during that session. “That is a monumental shift in state law,” Novak said. Special to The Star The Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College will host a Business Round Table Forum for the local business community.    The goal of the forum is to provide a viable means to drive conversation to identify local economic topics of real concern.  According to Loretta Costin, Director of the Gulf/Franklin Campus,  “Safeguarding the economic well-being of our local communities is the mission of Gulf Coast State College.   This breakfast is designed for us to learn, share, and engage in meaningful dialogue.” The forum is sponsored by the Small Business Development Center at Gulf Coast State College in partnership with the Gulf County Economic Development Alliance and the Gulf County Chamber.  It will be held 8 a.m. until 9:30 a.m. ET on Tuesday, Oct. 29 at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College, located at 3800 Garrison Avenue in Port St. Joe. This is open to the business community at no cost and a breakfast buffet will be provided.  Please RSVP no later than Oct. 26.  For event details and to RSVP, please visit www.gulfcoast. edu/smallbusinessforu m   All inquiries should be directed to the Gulf/ Franklin Campus at 227-9670. BOCC set to consider public speaking ordinance Special to The Star To make sure our ofce is aware of any issue or concerns Gulf County constitu ents may have, state Sen. Bill Montford’s ofce will be holding periodic meetings to gather your input.  Montford’s staff looks forward to see ing and hearing from you.   The next meeting will be 1-4 p.m. ET Tuesday, Oct. 22 in the second oor Law Library at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. in Port St. Joe. For more information, call the Capital District Ofce at (850) 487-5003. Sen. Montford to hold ofce hours in Gulf County Vulgar, insulting or profane language directed at commissioners, staff or any member of the audience “shall not be tolerated” and the chairman can request, in the face of such behavior, to have law enforcement remove the person from the meeting room. GCSC to host business forum FLU from page A1 “I don’t think people take is seriously, but I will tell you when I actually had a diagnosed case of the u, I was talking to my late grandmother about not going into the light,” Pendarvis said. “I was that sick. People need to take the u seriously.” Paulina Pendarvis Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. www.star.com

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Bass Weejuns Settled My Stomach The combination never worked for me. I don’t know if it was the hot dogs, the carnival smell drifting upwards from the damp sawdust mixed with tobacco juice, the heat from the lingering Indian summer, too much cotton candy or the second ride on the tilt-a-whirl. It could have been a combination of all of the above. Here’s what I know for sure: try as I might, I could never make it to the Ferris wheel. My stomach just couldn’t hold it all in. Shucks, I would be sick before we got over to the little ducks with the numbers on the bottom. The Carroll County Fair was one of the most anticipated weeks in our little world. We’d get excited the moment we spied those “ yers” stapled to every other telephone pole in town smartly announcing the fall return of the rides, eats, excitement, lighted mid-way and the skimpy clad exotic dancers. It was an escape from the mundane. A magical ride to another world! It was curly fries; bobbed up apples; loud circus like music; and Uncle Sam on stilts. Anticipation is often times better than the event. Me, Dennis Coleman and Graylene Lemonds would ride over early in the back of Mr. Coleman’s pickup. After the second or third year, I knew not to eat the corn dogs and/or the giant funnel cake…..and then ride the twister. But I was so hungry. And, listen, that twister looked like the ride of a lifetime! While Dennis and Graylene threw darts at the colored balloons, I was over behind the shrunken heads’ tent, doing a little hurling of my own! That loud music grew louder. The lights wouldn’t stop ashing. I could hear the guy in the red and white stripped coat yelling at the top of his lungs, “Step right up ladies and gentlemen and see the greatest show on the midway. She walks, she talks, she crawls on her belly like a reptile, see the incredible Dance of the Seven Veils! Hurry, Hurry, Hurry, one quarter gets you a front row seat!” My head was spinning faster than the tilt-a-whirl. I threw up a chocolate chip cookie, two pickled pigs’ feet and a slaw dog I’d eaten back in April. I promised myself a hundred times I wasn’t going to do this ever again! Of course, the next year I was right back in the same place, eating and riding and getting sick. Wasn’t it Einstein who said it was idiotic to repeat the same action over and over but somehow expect a different result? I thought I would outgrow the sickness. I never did. One year I concentrated on the side shows. I paid a dime to see a two headed calf. The picture outside showed a big cow with de nitely two heads looking in opposite directions. Inside, the actual calf was a miniature thing in a large jar of formaldehyde that could, if you looked closely, be a two headed calf. Of course, it could also just have been a miniature thing in a jar. I paid another dime to see the bearded lady. She had a big black beard all right. But she was up on this raised stage and I couldn’t get close enough to give it a yank. She might have been on the up and up……but I don’t know to this day if what I saw was what I saw. I had no luck pitching pennies into the shallow glass saucers. I threw softballs at stacked up bowling pins. I shot a BB gun at moving targets. If I did win a prize it was never the big teddy bear. I always got stuck with the psychedelic pencil with the feathers sticking out where the eraser ought to be or those Chinese handcuff things where you stuck a nger in each end. One year I went over to the livestock show. I walked around looking at chickens, pigs and cows for an hour before it dawned on me—we had chicken, pigs and cows at the house. What was I doing wasting my time here! I got so distraught I ate two foot longs, a fudge brownie and a green candied apple. And then I rode the scrambler. That machine was aptly named. It pushed my liver up beside my thorax, my left lung dropped below my right kidney, my esophagus was thrown plum out of my body and I didn’t nd my pituitary gland until years later when I took an army physical. It was the sickest I’ve ever been! I was surprised in high school when Billie Jean insisted that I take her to the fair. She was the rst girl I’d ever really dated. I bought a new pair of Bass Weejuns “penny loafers” to impress her. Of course, I was too cool for socks and my new Haggar pants really set those shoes off. We’d just started down the mid way when she suggested we get some food. “No” I stated rather emphatically. She steered us over to the tilt-awhirl. “I just loved this ride.” “No”. “Let’s get on the zipper.” “No”. “How about the—” “NO!” I liked her you understand, but I’d paid almost forty dollars for those new Weejuns. I wasn’t about to throw up on them the rst day I took them out of the box! Respectfully, Kes Patriotic support Dear Editor, Thanks, The Star, for the patriotism support in the area and especially to Tim Croft for his added help. Port St. Joe Chapter DAR Wake-up call Dear Editor, Thanks, Water Department, for the Sunday, 3:50 a.m. wake-up call to boil water. I jumped out of bed to take care of that. Colleen Burlingame Port St. Joe In 2002, Congress passed legislation to create an income tax credit designed to encourage lowerand middleincome people to save money for retirement. The saver’s credit, worth up to $1,000 a year for individuals ($2,000 for couples ling jointly), rewards people for contributing to an IRA or 401(k) plan. Regrettably, the people most likely to bene t from the saver’s credit are also those who can usually least afford to set aside money for retirement. It doesn’t help that only onequarter of people earning less than $50,000 even know the credit exists. But if you can squeeze a few dollars out of your budget, the saver’s credit is worth pursuing. Tax credits reduce the amount of income tax paid, dollar for dollar; so many low-income people can recoup the amount they contribute to retirement accounts by up to 50 percent through reduced taxes. And those whose employers match a portion of their 401(k) contributions reap even bigger rewards. Another good selling point: Parents or grandparents who want to jumpstart their lowincome kids’ retirement savings can fund their IRA or 401(k) contribution, thereby making them eligible for the saver’s credit even if they can’t afford to contribute on their own. Here’s the nitty-gritty on the saver’s credit: The saver’s credit is a “nonrefundable”tax credit, which means it reduces income taxes owed, dollar for dollar — although it won’t generate a tax refund if the credit is more than the taxes you owe. The saver’s credit helps offset part of the amount you voluntarily contribute to an IRA or 401(k) plan. Your credit amount is based on your tax ling status, adjusted gross income and the amount you contribute to qualifying retirement programs. It can be claimed by: Married couples ling jointly with adjusted gross income (AGI) of no more than $59,000. Heads of households with AGI up to $44,250. Singles (or married ling separately) with AGI up to $29,500. The credit rate is 10 percent, 20 percent or 50 percent of the rst $2,000 you contribute ($4,000 for married couples ling jointly), depending on your AGI; the lower your AGI the higher the percentage. For example: Single lers with an AGI up to $17,500 receive a 50 percent credit on the rst $2,000 they contribute (i.e., up to a $1,000 credit); 20 percent on AGI up to $19,250 ($200 credit); and 10 percent on AGI up to $29,500 ($100 credit). Anything over $29,500, you don’t qualify. For joint lers the credit amount limits are: 50 percent on up to $35,500 AGI (50% X $4,000 $2,000); 20 percent on up to $38,500 ($800); and 10 percent on up to $59,000 ($400). Other eligibility rules: You must be at least age 18. You can’t be claimed as a dependent on someone else’s return. You can’t have been a full-time student during any part of ve calendar months in 2013. You must contribute to a 401(k) by December 31, 2013, or to an IRA by April 15, 2014. Important Note: You cannot claim the credit using IRS Form 1040 EZ, the form many lowerincome people le. To claim it, you must submit IRS Form 8880 with Form 1040, 1040A or 1040NR. It’s a little extra bookkeeping, but could be worth the effort. Saving money for the future is never easy, especially when you’re struggling to pay daily bills. But if you can somehow manage to take advantage of the saver’s credit now, you’ll thank yourself at retirement. Jason Alderman directs Visa’s nancial education programs. Follow him on Twitter @PracticalMoney. Lower income? Don’t pass up the saver’s credit JASON ALDERMAN HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert Page 4 Thursday, October 17, 2013 Letter to the EDITOR It’s now been a few days since I have been out of work due to the government shutdown. I miss my job and hope that everything works out soon. Otherwise, I have no comment on the why’s and the how’s about things like this happening. I’ve given my life to science – not like the fellow who kept me from going to dental school, but to work on future cool things in space. It really wasn’t that fellow’s fault. He was just there when I visited the dental school in college with other students who were interested in becoming dentists. They pulled back the sheet, there he was… and I no longer had the desire to be a dentist. I guess it would be more appropriate to say this fellow had given his body to science. At work, I get to do math. I enjoy it. I miss it. I also miss my medical practice. My medical practice? Yes, my medical practice. It’s been doing very well. About a year ago, I had to change phone numbers at work. I kept getting these calls from people telling me not to call them anymore. They never believed me when I said I hadn’t called them. They were yelling and screaming at me and saying some pretty rough things. The best I could gure was that a collection company had either purposely or by mistake used my work phone number for what folks could see on their caller identi cation. They would call and leave folks who owed money threatening messages, and then the folks saw my number and called me back. I asked for a new number. It solved the problem. In the last few months, I have been getting a couple of calls a day for medical advice. It seems my new number was listed on a website for our clinic at work. For the rst week, I told folks that there was a mistake and I would see about getting the clinic to put the correct number on the website. Now please understand that what I’m about to tell you is true, but I let every person who called me my mistake off the hook pretty quickly and let them know that I was a mathematician, not a doctor or a nurse and any advice I was giving had a relative large probability of being useless. People continued to call. I answered the phone as I always do, “How can I help you?” If the person asked, “Is this the clinic?” I said, “No, they have listed my phone number somewhere by mistake and I’m trying to get someone to gure it out.” Not all folks asked if they had the right number for the clinic, some went right into telling me their ailments. What was I supposed to do? I like helping people. My Papa had all of the Fox re books. In addition to teaching you how to dress hogs, build log cabins, make cheese and hunt bears, the Fox re books contained medical advice including how herbs and other things could be used to treat various pains and injuries. I had watched my Papa spray Lysol on everything from dandruff to eas; I even assisted him on occasion. Papa also thought that “soda waters” were medicinal and you should drink at least one per day. He was partial to Nehi, but admitted Coca-Cola actually was the most potent. We weren’t “Coke People,” preferring an RC or a Double Cola to a Coke when we wanted something that wasn’t orange, red or purple. But when things got dicey and you had to go for a sure cure – you pulled the cap off of a bottle of Coca-Cola. It was more of a medicine that it was a soda water. The experience with my grandfather, as well as watching various movies and television shows, allows me to diagnose and treat a number of basic illnesses and other things that hinder people on the job. “Hello, how can I help you?” “Do you have anything for an upset stomach that I could stop by and pick up?” “You don’t need to stop by, just go get a Coke out of the machine and drink it. Don’t get a Pepsi; you have to drink a Coca-Cola. I’ve also heard that a rhubarb root worn on a string around your neck will also help. Oh, by the way, this is not the clinic.” “Hello, how can I help you?” “I’m having trouble with a tooth.” “Which side of your face is it on?” “The right side. Why?” “Well, you should take your shoe and sock off of your left foot and tie a string around the little toe on your left foot.” “Are you kidding?” “No, I am not.” “Do you have any other advice?” “Well yes, this is not the clinic and you should probably go to the dentist.” “What are you?” “I’m a mathematician who thumbed through my Papa’s Fox re books many years ago.” Laughter….. “Hello, how can I help you?” “I feel a sore throat coming on ‘Trying My Patients’ CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard See CRANKS A5 #!$ &# !&"!"%& "" "!$%$%# $.6-*--9.::,1*60.;7 %1.$;*9 "!7? "79;$;7. "176. "##% "!$%"% "!#%$%! ()"&$ $&#"%! $") @.*9A:2?576;1: @.*9A:2?576;1: 6,*:.7/.997979752::276:26*-=.9;2:.5.6;:;1.8<+42:1.9:-7 67;174-;1.5:.4=.:42*+4./79-*5*0./<9;1.9;1*6*57<6;9.,.2=.-/79 :<,1*-=.9;2:.5.6; %1.:873.6>79-2:02=.6:,*6;*;;.6;276;1.8926;.->79-2: ;17<01;/<44@>.201.-%1.:873.6>79-+*9.4@*::.9;:;1.8926;.->79;1797<014@,76=26,.:%1.:873.6>79-2:47:;;1.8926;.->79-9.5*26: USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 O PINION www.starfl.com A Section

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whom had not suffered the tragedy that made Hansen a Gold Star mom. She was “the elephant in the room” who some shun out of fear of reminder of the ultimate sacrice any of them might have to make. Further, Hansen didn’t want to hear stories from other mothers about the sons and daughters who had returned. Hansen’s had not. But a friend in an online support group for Gold Star moms suggested after two years of mourning, maybe Hansen could use the elixir of the sisterhood. “For me, the Beach Blast was lifechanging,” Hansen said. “Everybody was so kind and understanding. That sisterhood is the word; you never felt like a stranger. It made me realize I need to put everything aside and en joy my life. “I really came back a changed per son. For two years I was in a fog. I lost myself. I literally found myself at the Beach Blast, and I wasn’t even there to do that. I was there to escape, to get away. (The Beach Blast) made me re alize I could go on.” Four days of fun, laughter, tears and stories shared. Three nights of acting sometimes, Hansen said, like a 15-year-old girl again – complete with atulence seat cushion. Today, most of the medications are put away, and though she will never be the same after the death of her son, there will always be a hole, the Beach Blast has helped breathe life into Hansen’s life. “We had a blast, just a great time,” Hansen said. “The one thing I was concerned about being a Gold Star mom it was hard to be around people talking about their kids. But the ladies let me tell my story and they shared theirs. They changed my attitude; I can listen to other people now when they talk about their kids. “It felt good to be around Blue Star moms (those whose sons and daugh ters have returned safely). To me that is honoring my son. He would want me to honor him by listening to their stories and to have fun. That honors him and his brothers and sisters in arms.” Full circle For Paula Lowry of Georgia, the Beach Blast has been something of an arc. A “newbie” ve years ago when she was a co-founder of the Semper Fi Sisters, then a dozen or so Marine moms, formed around the common ality of sons and daughters deployed to a war zone. Now, a vice-president of the or ganization, Lowry, as with several of this week’s Beach Blast attendees, could be considered a “veteran” of the home front. As her son has completed his tour of duty and came home, she has also graduated. “It really has become a full circle,” Lowry said. “We are all on different levels in this ride we call a roller coaster. We have cooked, ate, cried, laughed. The compassion you feel, the empathy you feel. It is a sister hood, networking, giving back. “And now being able to reach down and lift someone up and say, ‘You’ll get through this.’ It has been such a fullling experience. And from that experience, it puts things in perspective.” The perspective comes in sig nicant layers via education, lessons the sisters have not only absorbed but disseminated, the ripples now spreading, literally, across the globe. “I felt very clueless. Newbie is ap propriate,” said Melanie Meadows of South Carolina, also one of the origi nal Semper Fi Sisters. “It is all totally new. It is not like sending your son off to college. “When I walked through the door (at the Beach Blast) I knew I was in the right place. Having the support of women … who speak the same lan guage, that was amazing. This year, being an ofcial veteran’s mom … I feel I have a lot to share. I want to get that out. I also feel I have more to learn.” That these women – 12 that rst year, more than 70 last year and num bers unknown at press time this year – would nd Port St. Joe was by hap penstance, a grain of conversation that became a getaway castle. But yet they have come to feel embraced by the community, by the kindness and kinship they feel in this bit of paradise. “I love Port St. Joe,” Lowry said. “It’s such a giving, caring community. From the beginning they have really embraced our mission. We travel at our own expense, but wherever we are we are there to serve our heroes. “That is our mission. To support those who protect us – our heroes. This is our way of giving back. And the women now go back to their com munities and pay it forward. It’s a great feeling to pay it forward.” 9 4 5 4 HWY 9 8 BEA C ON HILL A T THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 5 0 6 4 7 8 3 1 0 GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL Y OUR F A VORITE BEER WINE & SPIRIT S S S PIRIT & WINE B EER VORITE A F OUR Y A LL O F TION S ELEC T GREA ON THE POOP DECK UPCOMING EVENTS IN THE CR O W’S NEST FRID A Y & SA TURD A Y 9 PM K ARA OKE D ANCING UPCOMING EVENTS RANDY ST ARK UPCOMING EVENTS RANDY & ART W’S NEST O THE CR IN W’S NEST O THE CR IN T H E L P'S UPCOMING EVENTS W’S NEST O THE CR IN W’S NEST O THE CR IN W’S NEST O THE CR IN RANDY ST ARK BLAST ON THE BA Y SONGWRITER'S FESTIV AL IN THE CRO W S NEST 5 PM B RET T JONES JILLIA JA CKSON JESSEE RICE JERR Y SALLE Y 7 PM WILL RAMB EA UX SHERRIE A U STIN B ROOKE EDEN SHANE HINES SEAFOOD PL A T TER Choic e of side & salad bar 114 S ailors C o v e P or t S t Jo e FL 32456 850-227-1386 HOURS : Sunda y : 11 am t o 2 pm M onda y : Closed all da y T uesda y : 11 am t o 2 pm W ednesda y : 11 am t o 2 pm T hursda y : 11-2 pm, 4-9 pm F r ida y : 11-2 pm, 4-10 pm S a tur da y : 4 pm t o 10 pm w w w .r onniebs .c om Y our choic e of : S andwiches F ish, S hrimp C hick en T ender B ask ets or a x -it-y ourself S alad B ar $ 5 95 $ 7 Ronnie B’ s F amous PRIME RIB 12 o z. Mouth-w at ering P rime R ib y our choic e of side & salad bar $ 19 95 $ 18 95 $ 10 95 SUND A Y L UNCH SOUTHERN HOMEST Y LE C OOKING Choic e of meat, 2 v eg gies br ead & desser t THURSD A Y NIGHT FRID A Y & SA TURD A Y NIGHT SUND A Y L UNCH : e of our choic Y L UNCH : TUESFRI PHILL Y FRID A Y 11am 2pm Sig na tur e P hilly Cheese S t eak made fr om P rime R ib S tar ting at Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspaper’s editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y o O U r R OPINIONs S Local The Star| A5 Thursday, October 17, 2013 BLAST from page AA 1 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Paula Lowry surely possesses the DNA of a saleswoman. Get her talking about the Semper Fi Sisters, the non-prot’s mission and the Marketplace which is a key part of every Beach Blast Packing Party, and Lowry can’t contain the enthusiasm. “It feels so good to be part of an organization you feel so passionate about,” Lowry said of the Sem per Fi Sisters, for which she is co-founder and vice president. Lowry’s primary task in preparation for this year’s Beach Blast is the compo sition of the Marketplace, which will be open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET on Saturday at the Centennial Building while the sisters are pack ing Boxes of Love. The Marketplace is where locals and those join ing the Semper Fi Sisters on this Beach Blast can sell their wares in support of the mission the Semper Fi Sisters have carved out for themselves. “We are in the back ground, but we are here to support our troops who support us. They are our heroes,” Lowry said. The Marketplace is open to the public and many of the 6-foot tables the ladies reserve will be operated by the loved ones, wives, daughters, mothers, aunts, grandmothers, of deployed members of the military. “It is a nice way to get a chance to meet and talk to some of the ladies,” Lowry said. “And everything goes back into our mission, to support those who support us.” The Marketplace, Low ry said, will offer a vast array of homemade and handmade items, from crocheted slippers to zany scarves to candles, jewelry, quilts, blankets, cookbooks and more and more. “A lot of the ladies make their own,” Lowry said. “We just put the word out, and we got a great response this year. “This is a nice way to give back.” Marketplace supports SFS mission and I wanted to see if I can stop by.” “You can stop by if you need to, but I’ll tell you what you need to do.” “What?” “Well, I have heard that if you tie a dirty sock around your neck when you go to bed, it will cure a sore throat.” “You are kidding.” “No, I’ve really heard that. I’m from Alabama. I wish I could get you and this other fellow together who has a toothache.” “Why?” “He probably has a dirty sock available.” Silence… “You know this is not the clinic.” “Do you really think the sock will work?” “I’ve never tried it, but let me know if it does.” “Hello, how can I help you?” “My allergies are acting up.” “Have you tried going to the doctor?” “What are you?” “I calculate the probability of things going wrong and give free medical and legal advice with no guarantee of results.” “Well, what would you do?” “Have you tried Apple Cider Vinegar?” “That sounds nasty.” “It is used to treat all sorts of things including sinus infections, warts, acne, gout, sunburn and arthritis.” “Does it work?” “I really don’t know, but it can be used as aftershave if it doesn’t.” “Is this the clinic?” “No, it is not.” “Hello, how can I help you?” “I have a rash and I want someone to look at it.” “Have you tried spraying Lysol on it?” “No, why would I do that?” “It might work.” “I’m not spraying Lysol there…” “Stop – this is not the clinic. Try the Lysol at your own risk.” “Why did you tell me to use Lysol?” “You said you had a rash. Now if you told me you had eas or dandruff, I would have prescribed the same thing.” As you can see, I need to get back to work. The three to ve minutes I spend during the course of the day providing medical advice is very important to a lot of folks. Ok, maybe a few folks and maybe it’s not that important. I will note I have had two repeat customers/ patients. I’m not sure if they called back by mistake or if they value my opinion, it really doesn’t matter. I’m thinking about getting a new lab jacket that doesn’t have paint on it. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. CRANKS from page AA 4 The Semper Fi Sisters Beach Blast began Wednesday and continues through Saturday’s Packing Party for Boxes of Love to send to deployed troops. The Packing Party will be held 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. ET at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. SPe E C i I A l L toTO T he HE S t T A r R Boxes of love start as donations at dozens of locations set up by “Sisters” across the country. These from Walton County were loaded for transport to Port St. Joe and Saturday’s Packing Party. P hotos HOTOS BY CC P l L AA N dre DRE W H o O Y les LES UU SMC C | Special to the Star Boxes of Love are distributed to a Marine unit in Afghanistan.

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A Monda y T hursda y 7A M 6PM (EST ) F rida y S a tur da y 7A M 7PM (EST ) BWO H unti ng H e a dq u a r ters : CAMO AR RIV ING DAIL Y WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu Oc t 17 83 66 40 % F ri, Oc t 18 82 66 30 % S a t Oc t 19 81 67 30 % Sun, Oc t 20 80 66 30 % M on, Oc t 21 79 58 30 % T ues Oc t 22 79 69 60 % W ed Oc t 23 76 60 83 % SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Red snapper are still open for the taking in state waters this week. The closing day is set for Oct. 21 in state waters, so get them now! Good sized snapper are holding on just about any wreck or site you go to. Gag grouper and amberjack are also being caught on these same sites. Trout and red fish are still active this week. Good reports from Pig Island and Eagle Harbor are on the rise and plenty of fish are in St. Joe Bay. Some flounder action is hot in 20+ ft of water on the outside near shore wrecks. This should stay hot for a while, so try and find a good weather day. By DAVID DAMON Unit Commissioner, BSA Special to The Star Whatever Floats Your Boat is an annual “boat” race sponsored by the FSU Coastal & Marine Laboratory at Turkey Point. The rules are pretty simple, fabricate a boat out of recycled materialsand race it. Every part and every piece must be recycled or re-purposed and held together with used fasteners and hopefully oat long enough to get its crew around the race course. This past Saturday, the second annual WFYB regatta was held. The race course was laid out in a north/south con guration. Starting at an in atable killer whale, you paddle or sail downwind about a hundred yards, then make a 180 degree turn around in atable Nemo and head north against wind and tide to the nish line. Easy enough for a normal boat, but these boats were anything but normal. By mid-morning on Saturday, anticipation was mounting as entrants began pulling into the staging area across the basin from the marine lab. It was a buzz of last minute fabrication and modi cations along with crews making the rounds checking out their competition. One by one each of the craft was inspected by the team of three judges. Before the racing could begin, an inspection was required to con rm that the rules had been strictly adhered to, every part of each boat, down to the paddles must be recycled with only one exception, duct tape. Some boats had themes, some boats had never been tried or tested and at least one, would never hold together long enough to make it to the starting line. There were eleven “boats” in all. The intrepid crews came from all over north Florida. One boat, or raft might be a better description, came all the way from Jacksonville, built by a group of adventurous University of North Florida Marine Biology students. Our boat, Drumroll Please was built by the Boy Scouts from Troop 8 and Crew 8 in Wakulla County. These Scouts, also known as The Barrelheads, were the returning champions from the 2012 Regatta, back again with recycled 55 gallon drums. This year, instead of a catamaran style craft, we had fabricated a long center hull with two smaller drums as outrigger oats, or amas, to keep the long hull from rolling over. The six drums (donated by St. Marks Powder) were bolted together, end to end for a total length of just under 18’. It was designed for a four man crew to sit on top, with cut out sections or cockpit, for your legs. The cut out pieces were then used to form the blades for the paddles. Over the course of about three weeks, our Scouts built, tested and modi ed their craft. It was a marvel of low tech engineering and creativity. It would win no contest for beauty, but function it did, and it did it well. The crew of Drumroll Please and The Barrelheads was made up of two Eagle Scouts, Gil Damon and Zack Dunaway and two adult Scout Leaders, Al e Boone, and myself, David Damon. Over a twelve year period, this group of Scouts had been in many waterfront competitions, usually against other Scout troops. They have a long track record of winning anything water related, they were in their element. As the rst of two heats was held, the crew of Drumroll Please watched as the rst place craft crossed the nish line in around six minutes. We now knew that the six minutes was a time we had to beat, along with any boats in the second heat. As we lined up at the starting line, the horn blasted and we were off. It was a synchronized effort of paddling combined with the latest in recycled naval engineering as Drumroll Please quickly took the lead. The hard work and fun had paid off, the last minute untested changes to our craft proved to work out well. In a few short minutes after the blast of the horn, Drumroll Please crossed the nish line to the cheers of the spectators lining the seawall. Troop and Crew 8 would again take home the most amazing rst place trophy, itself built from recycled materials and spray painted gold! Along with the trophy, they received gift certi cates from the race sponsors Bay Leaf Market in Crawfordville and Sopchoppy Pizza. Three other trophies were also awarded in the spirit of the event, “Most creative use of materials”, “Titanic Award to the most spectacular failure”, and the “People’s Choice”. A special thanks goes out to the amazing staff at the FSU Coastal & Marine Lab for all their hard work and efforts! Whatever Floats Your Boat is a fun way to bring awareness to the importance of recycling. In Scouting, we have a program called Leave No Trace that encourages Scouts to be aware of their surroundings and to limit their impact on the environment, that also includes recycling. It had been a fun day for all, both spectators and participants! If you missed this years race, come out next year, Troop 8 and Crew 8 will be back with an all new craft. Better yet, get a group of friends together, build a recycled boat and show up next year the starting line. St. Joe Peninsula State Park explodes in color Special to The Star Summer comes to an end and fall explodes with color. Blazing Stars, False Foxglove and Goldenrod bloom throughout St. Joseph Peninsula State Park this time of year. As the cooler weather settles in, migrations of butter ies utter on and around the owers. Sulfur butter ies, swallowtails, and Gulf Fritillary are abundant all through the park. Climbing spinach Summer gardening on the coast can be a challenge. Climbing spinach is a new vegetable that repays a few square feet of garden space with delicious greens and a treat for the eye. Climbing spinach (Basella alba) also known as Malabar spinach, Ceylon spinach, Indian spinach, Saan Choy, Shan Tsoi, Luo Kai, Shu Chieh, Lo Kwai and “the red vine” is easy to grow and versatile in the kitchen. The beautiful vine is unrelated to true spinach but produces a bumper crop of large leaves that are remarkably similar in taste. Unlike spinach, this plant is heat-tolerant and thrives locally in full sun or light shade. Native to India and Indonesia, the plant is used in traditional cuisines from Japan to Africa. It has also been introduced to South America and the Caribbean. Common Malabar spinach has yellowish stems and green leaves and is a pleasing enough plant, but it’s the red-stemmed cultivar “rubra” that really catches the eye. Thick red stems contrast wonderfully with twoto four-inch-long dark green leaves mottled with red veins. Malabar spinach grows eight to 10 feet tall and wide and can easily grow a foot a day. Provide a fence or trellis for support. The vine produces tiny pink owers that develop into pretty little purple berries. The juice from the berries is a natural food coloring. Malabar spinach prefers a humus-rich, sandy loam. It may be a perennial here but, just in case, dry some of the berries and store them in a screwtop jar to plant in the early spring. Start seeds in pots and transplant established seedlings. This plant is insect and disease resistant. The succulent leaves and stem tips are rich in vitamins A and C and are a good source of iron and calcium. They may be eaten raw in salads, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, or added to soups, stews, tofu dishes, and curries. You can also add them to quiche, omelets, turnovers, and potpies. Use as a substitute for any leafy greens. The sprouted seeds are a tasty addition to salads and sandwiches. It has a thickening effect much like okra when added to soups and stews. Traditionally, the plant is chewed to relieve mouth ulcers. The cooked roots are thought to curb diarrhea, while the cooked leaves and stems are a mild, effective laxative. The sap is used to treat acne and soften the skin. Ongoing research is examining the traditional role of Malabar spinach as a remedy for infertility in men. BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda Malabar spinach thriving in Dan Sangaree’s garden. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Whatever oats your boat race Page 6 Thursday, October 17, 2013 A Gulf Fritillary alights on Blazing Stars. Goldenrod blooms.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com A Section Special to The Star The Franklin County Travel Ball team, which includes several boys from Gulf County, traveled to Marianna Saturday, Sept. 21 and competed in a Travel Ball USA Tournament. After four games of play the Angels pulled it off, winning the championship game against the Defuniak Springs Patriots 8-7. The team, for boys age 11 and younger, and coached by Rhett Butler, Buck Smith, and Justin Odom, opened the tourney with a loss to the Tallahassee Tomahawks 12-8. But they snapped back into winning form by downing Defuniak Springs 15-4, and then the Jackson County Bulldogs 14-5 to earn their way into the championship game. W A T E R P R O B L E M ??? CA L L P a nha n d le P u r e W a t e r I n c 8 5 0 7 6 3 -1 2 0 9 S A L E S R E NT A LS W e S e r v i c e K i n e t i co U n i t s E\JAB\ * Ž" 6 : 0 0 p. m E as t er n S il e n t A u c t i o n a n d h o r s d ’ o e u v r e s r e c e p t i o n w i t h c a s h b a r a t S t J o s e p h B a y G o l f Cl u b Cl u b h o u s e C o s t o f a d m i t t a n c e $ 1 0 0 0 ( i n cl u d e s t w o f r e e d r i nk s ) ^<_b\AB\ Ž" 12 : 3 0 p m E as t er n S a l u t i n g A m er i c a ’ s V e t er a n s C er em o n y 1: 0 0 p m E as t er n S ho t g u n S t ar t 4 p la y e r b e s t b a ll f o r m a t ; $ 5 5 n o nm e m b e r $ 4 5 m e m b e r i f r e g i s t e r i n g a t l e a s t 2 w e e k s p r i o r t o t h e e v e n t P l u s $ 5 a f t e r t h a t M e a l a n d a w a r ds c e r e m o n y t o f o ll o w C a s h p r i z e s i n c l u d e : $ 4 0 0 : Fi r s t P l a c e t e a m $ 3 5 0 : S e c o n d P l a c e t e a m $ 2 0 0 : T h i r d P l a c e t e a m “ H ole in O n e ” C h a l le n g e : Cas h p r iz e $ 1 0 0 0 0 ^•“•€‚ N} }ˆ• $ 5 0 0 D i v i s i on S p on s or $ 2 5 0 B r i g a d e S p o n s o r $ 1 0 0 C om p a n y S p on s or $ 5 0 P la t o o n S p o n s o r H ole s p on s or s h i p s a l s o a v a il a b le S p o n s o r s ’ n a m e s w i l l b e p os t e d o n a l l s i g n s a n d w e b s i t e A t w o d a y e v e n t t o h o n o r o u r v e te r a n s a n d b e n e t C a mp G or don J oh n s t on W o r l d W a r I I M u s e u m ( C a r r a b e l l e F L ) a n d S t J o s e p h B a y G o l f C l u b. @™qx™ b• D a n V a n T r e e s e : 8 5 0 2 2 7 8 1 3 8 T o n y M i n i ch i e ll o : 8 5 0 5 2 8 2 1 2 5 S p e c i al L o d gi n g P ac k ag e : M a i n s t a y S u i t e s : $ 6 9 9 9 Q u e e n S u i t e p e r n i g h t $ 8 9 9 9 K i n g D e l u x e S u i t e p e r n i g h t a n a t u r a l e s c a p e c o m T our ist D ev elopmen t C ouncil Wewa to hold Ryan Teall memorial scholarship fundraiser Nov. 1 Star Staff Report A Ryan Teall Memorial Scholarship fundraising event is Nov. 1 at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School. The event will include a 3-on-3 basketball tournament, which will begin at 5 p.m. CT; a 3-point shooting contest which will occur between tournament games; Bunko and a concession stand. Cost of the 3-on-3 tournament is $20 per team; the 3-point shootout will be $5 to enter; and the Bunko will also be $5 per person. To register call Adele Paul at 639-2228 or Kerri Barlow at 832-8659. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Star Staff Report Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School soccer coach Gary Hindley, along with Athletic Director Chuck Gannon and Principal Jeremy Knapp, released the 2013-14 schedule last week. Hindley, in his fth year at Port St. Joe, carries a 67-46-10 record at the school, 418291-26 overall. The girls’ and boys’ soccer squads move to an expanded 1-1A District that includes six schools and spans from Niceville to Tallahassee. Port St. Joe will face each district foe, Rocky Bayou, Tallahassee Maclay, Lafayette Mayo, Tallahassee John Paul II, West Gadsden, and Franklin once each in district play with a second non-district game versus local rival Franklin County. Port St. Joe, which began girls’ practices Oct. 7 with the boys starting up this past Monday, will host a girls Preseason Jamboree on Oct. 26. The Jamboree will feature the host school, Lynn Haven Mosley, Panama City Bay and Panama City North Bay Haven. A boys Preseason Jamboree, which will include Port St. Joe, Rocky Bayou and Tallahassee Godby, will be played Nov. 2. The regular season kicks off Nov. 12 when Port St. Joe hosts Malone, the girls beginning at 5 p.m. ET and the boys at 7 p.m. Currently, the girls’ pre-season roster numbers 23, once the volleyball season concludes, with 28 boys, once football wraps up play, on the roster. All home games are played at the Sam Cox Field at the Lamar Faison Soccer facility, adjacent to Port St. Joe’s Shark Stadium. Star Staff Report The nal full week of the regular season was symbolic of the entire slate for the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School volleyball team – some positives, some negatives. Port St. Joe (11-9 overall, 6-4 in district play) lost a close match with Liberty County but swamped Franklin County in the Lady Tiger Sharks’ nal two district matches of the year. Traveling to Liberty County last Monday, Port St. Joe fell in four close games, 18-25, 25-21, 17-25 and 20-25. Nicole Endres and Addison Rice each had six kills and Stephanie Brinkmeier had ve. The following night at home against Franklin County, the Lady Tiger Sharks won in three games, 25-14, 25-21 and 25-18. Haley Wood had a teamleading seven kills and Endres and Callie Fleshren had ve apiece. Fleshren added 11 assists and Daphne Baptista had eight. Last Thursday, Port St. Joe traveled to Bay High and were thumped 18-25, 20-25 and 18-25. “They had too much offense,” said Port St. Joe coach Wayne Taylor. “We played hard and stayed with the much bigger (Class) 5A school.” The junior varsity lost at Liberty County, 20-25 and 22-25, took three sets to beat Franklin County, 12-25, 25-13 and 15-6 and lost to Bay High 13-25 and 12-25. The Lady Tiger Sharks lost to Rutherford Tuesday evening in a tough, hardfought match, 25-20, 24-26, 25-22, 19-25 and 19-21. The Class 5A Lady Rams just proved too much for Class 1A Port St. Joe. Endres had eight kills and Fleshren seven. Shannon Pridgeon had four aces while Rice and Brinkmeier each had three. Pridgeon also had three blocks. The PSJ junior varsity lost in straight sets.” Tonight, the Lady Gator varsity hosts Wewahitchka at 6 p.m. ET for the annual Dig Pink event. Further, it is senior night and the team will recognize seniors Endres and Brittany King. Dig Pink Dig Pink is an event played to support the SideOut Foundation’s Dig Pink National Breast Cancer Awareness Rally to promote breast health information as well as raise funds to further research. Dig Pink events give spectators the opportunity to become involved by making donations to the cause and by pinking-out (i.e. donning pink in support) and event t-shirts will be sold. The proceeds from all donations, the gate and tshirt sales will bene t the Side-Out Foundation. The foundation is a nonpro t established in 2004 to unite volleyball players and coaches from across the country to work toward the goal of making a signi cant and identi able difference in the lives of breast cancer patients and their families. The organization works to advance clinical trials, increase patient support services and educate communities. PSJHS soccer schedule set *denotes District game; all times ET except where noted Oct. 26 (H): Girls Jamboree (PSJ, Mosley White, Bay, North Bay Haven) Nov. 2 (H): Boys Jamboree (PSJ Purple, Rocky Bayou Blue, Godby, PSJ Gold, Rocky Bayou White) Nov. 12 (H): Malone, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. Nov, 19 at North Bay Haven, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. CT Nov. 21 *(H): Franklin County, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. Nov. 23 at Tallahassee Godby, girls at 1 p.m.; boys at 3 p.m. Nov. 26 (H): Baker, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. Dec. 3 *(H): Lafayette Mayo, girls at 4 p.m.; boys at 6 p.m. Dec. 6 at Rocky Bayou, girls at 4 p.m.; boys at 6 p.m. CT Dec. 7 (H): Tallahassee Godby, girls at 1 p.m.; boys versus Mosley at 3 p.m. Dec. 10 *(H): West Gadsden, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. Dec. 12 *(H): Tallahassee John Paul II, girls at 4 p.m.; boys at 6 p.m. Dec. 14 at Franklin County, girls at 4 p.m.; boys at 6 p.m. Dec. 17 at Freeport, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. CT Dec. 20 *at Tallahassee Maclay, girls at 3 p.m.; boys at 5 p.m. Jan. 7 at Spring eld Rutherford, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. CT Jan. 9 at Marianna, girls at 4 p.m.; boys at 6 p.m. CT Jan. 10 (H): South Walton, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. Jan. 13 at Tallahassee Maclay in district tournament Jan. 14 (H): Wakulla, “B” at 5 p.m.; varsity at 7 p.m. (boys only) Jan. 15 at Tallahassee Maclay girls district semi nals Jan. 16 (H): Tallahassee Godby, 7 p.m. (boys only) Jan. 17 at Tallahassee Maclay girls district nals Jan. 20 at Tallahassee Maclay boys district quarter nals Jan. 21 at Tallahassee Maclay boys district semi nals Jan. 24 at Tallahassee Maclay boys district nals The 2013-14 Soccer Schedule Page 7 Thursday, October 17, 2013 Port St. Joe splits nal district volleyball matches Angels win gold in Travel Ball tourney CHALA PARISH | Special to The Star Smiles are all around after the Angels’ win. Sports SHORT RYAN TEALL COURTESY STEVE WHEALTON | Special to The Star As Addison Rice protects the new Callie Fleshren goes well out of bounds to return a South Walton volley earlier this season.

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, October 17, 2013 process was discouraging,” Pitts said. “Now the tasks have been dened (for the permit application) and they can be negotiated for completing those tasks (with the port’s engineers) and pursuing the permitting.” The source of the discour agement over the potential for the Corps’ bureaucracy to swallow the project comes from timing. A detailed study of the dredging project would re quire as much as a year, pos sibly more. The St. Joe Company, the Port Authority’s collabora tor on developing the Port of Port St. Joe, has two Letters of Intent with regional ener gy companies to ship wood pellets through the Port of Port St. Joe. Those LOIs hinge signi cantly on the dredging of the shipping channel by 2015. Ancillary to the dredging permit is seeking economic justication, based on return on investment, to help build the case for the dredging. The Port Authority has explored contracting for a study, but cost is prohibitive. The hope is to solicit assis tance from the Haas Center at the University of West Florida, which researches and analyzes economic trends in Northwest Florida. A representative from the Haas Center was due at last week’s meeting, but was unable to make the meeting to provide more details. If the Center is able to do the work, it could perform the study faster and at less expense, Pitts said. The cost of the study could come from the Florida Department of Transporta tion grant to the Port Au thority to pursue the dredge permit. “The cost (of the study), however, could be an issue,” Pitts said. Operational viability in question While the Port Authority pursues the dredging, con sidered the key to unlocking the port’s potential through development, board mem bers continued to wrestle with dwindling resources. As part of a community outreach campaign, board member Johanna White said she received positive response from the Board of County Commissioners and the St. Joe Company. She said Jorge Gonzalez, senior vice president for St. Joe, indicated the company “had the resources, talent and people” to become the point of contact for the Port Authority. The phones at the Port Authority ofce could be forwarded to St. Joe, which would screen prospects, send out marketing materi als and perform other ad ministration duties, White said. “Maybe just getting the phones forwarded and in formation to the appropri ate people will work,” White said. Further, county adminis trator Don Butler indicated county grant administra tor Towan Kopinsky could handle the administration of the FDOT grant the Port Authority received, and for which St. Joe is providing the local match, to pursue the permitting. White added that Barry Sellers, executive director of the Gulf County Economic Development Alliance, Inc., could continue to assist the Port Authority as an on-theground marketing point of contact for the port. “We are trying to cover all the bases,” said board chair Leonard Costin. “We appreciate what (Pitts is) doing and would love to keep (him), but we have no money.” Pitts has worked off and on this year for $1 per month, receiving a small stipend for a few months as part of a state grant to craft a Mas ter Plan update. It was dis cussed last week that Pitts may soon be in a position of accepting another job. Board member Eugene Rafeld, who has been speaking with state ofcials about identifying funding for Port Authority opera tions, said he had no news to report and he was making progress, but slowly. The consensus on the board was to reach out to the BOCC and city of Port St. Joe for potential assistance in meeting pressing expen ditures, particularly liability insurance for port ofcers and fees to the Florida Ports Council, which are critical to maintaining a place in the mix for state funding. “We need to focus on that,” said board member Jessica Rish. “The county doesn’t want us to not have a board. The county and the city, those two need to step up before we go to the neigh bors for that.” She said the Port Author ity board should sit down with county and city com missioners to “see if we can come up with a plan … If they want us to be here.” Also looming are legal expenses incurred from the Capital City Bank foreclo sure case and general liabil ity insurance for the Port of Port St. Joe. Resident Bill Koran said ofcials with the Genesse Wyoming Railroad, the for mer AN line, which is inex tricably linked to the suc cess of the port, would also have a stake in the future of the Port Authority. “We need to move for ward on the local level,” said Costin, who has for more than a month championed a local fundraising cam paign. “I don’t think we have an alternative in the short term than going to our citi zens. I think the last resort is here.” A s of No v emb er 1, 2013, w e will b e in our new lo c ation at: 310 Reid A v enue P or t S t Jo e 850-229-2999 C ome check out y our fa v orit es and the ne w it ems in st o ck! =V 9\ ] 9Q =9; LU UB b\ C oastal C abin... “ W her e the W a t er M eets the W oods ” $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL e ne w College of A pplied S tudies at FSU P anama City was appr o v ed b y the FSU Boar d of T r ustees in J une 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily r espond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. W e invite y ou to suppor t e Campaign for O ur Community ’ s U niv ersity b y helping us build an endo wment for tomorr o w ’ s jobs. O ur goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of A pplied S tudies b y 2017, which will allo w FSU P anama City to establish student scholarships, implement ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr o vide ne w equipment and technology T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community ’ s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR COMMUNIT Y ’S UNIVERSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w ’ s J obs SUPPOR T OUR C OMMUNIT Y ’ S UNIVERSIT Y over brick. The Cape San Blas Lighthouse is a cast iron skeleton. And though that struc ture was moved before 1900, no one nor any re cord survives to provide insight into how it was accomplished, Magidson said. “Obviously this is a unique project,” Magid son said. A uniqueness under scored by contractors who picked up bid packets but did not bid on the project, he added. “Some thought they would be shooting in the dark, that there were too many unknowns,” Magid son said. The approach sug gested by Magidson and to which board members agreed was to consider piecing the project for bid. Contract one company to take apart and move the lighthouse and re-erect it in George Core Park. “Someone with knowl edge of the structure to understand how to take it apart without damaging it,” Magidson said. He added commission ers could bid out the other pieces of the project, the keepers’ quarters and oil house. “We need someone just to move the lighthouse,” said Commissioner Wil liam Thursbay. Magidson said he would work with Small wood to consider bid pack ages and how the project could be segmented out. “We are pushing the peanut a little further down the road each day,” Magidson said. A complication is the time window commission ers are working under. The U.S. Air Force has granted one six-month time-extension until Jan uary 2014 for moving the lighthouse. Dialogue with the Air Force is complicat ed at this time by the shutdown of the federal government. On a positive note, Duke Energy has do nated $25,000 to the re location effort. Money raised from all sources, local and state now totals $400,000-$500,000, still short of the original bids for relocation. Commissioner Rex Buzzett said while he appreciated the dona tion he wished the utility would provide a break on the cost of bringing down power lines for ground moving of the lighthouse and ancillary buildings. Magidson said he was still considering options for transporting at least the lighthouse into the city by barge. Affordable housing Commissioners ap proved an amended Mem orandum of Understand ing with Paces Founda tion for the development of over 70 affordable hous ing units on the north end of the city. Commissioners made two concessions. One, to waive up to $2,500 in utility fees and second to eliminate a deed clause that would have reverted 46-plus acres earmarked for the development back to the city if the development did not bear fruit. City attorney Tom Gibson said he was com fortable with the revision since the city would not deed the land until there was a closing with nanc ing lined up by Paces. Gibson said the Florida Housing Finance Corpo ration, from which the Paces will be applying for tax credits it will leverage for investment in the de velopment, objected to the reversionary clause. DREDGING from page A1 COMMISSION from page A1

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C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) Researchers have discovered that doing what regularly can greatly improve your memory? Eating onions, Chewing gum, Reading upside down, Rubbing forehead 2) What are Siberian, South Chinese, Sumatran, Indochinese, and Indian types of? Elephants, Zebras, Tigers, Pandas 3) Where is the longest stretch of perfectly straight train track at 297 miles? Texas, Australia, Mexico, France 4) Demographers say what percent of engaged couples live together before the wedding? 9, 39, 62, 70 5) “The Silver Ghost” was one of the rst cars built by? Rolls Royce, Ford, Austin Seven, Daimler 6) Who consumes the most Coca:Cola per capita? Denmark, Iceland, Saudi Arabia, Canada 7) Of these which was not a dynasty of China? Xia, Ming, Tofu, Qing 8) What does a selenologist primarily study? Security, Earthquakes, Intersections, Moon 9) What’s considered as the youngest letter of the English alphabet? D, F, J, Q 10) Soup or “what” was the episode title when Wile E. Coyote nally caught the Road Runner? Stew, Sonic, Shaky, Steam 11) Who was rst to offer the record player as a factory:installed vehicle option? Cadillac, Ford, Chrysler, Buick 12) Because of its unique shape what’s the nickname of Galaxy M104? Sombrero, Egghead, Cigar, Rocking chair 13) Which U.S. president reportedly was a big fan of Mickey Mouse? FDR, JFK, LBJ, Nixon 14) Where was the rst test:tube baby born? India, Germany, USA, England ANSWERS 1) Chewing gum. 2) Tigers. 3) Australia. 4) 62. 5) Rolls Royce. 6) Iceland. 7) Tofu. 8) Moon. 9) J. 10) Sonic. 11) Chrysler. 12) Sombrero. 13) FDR. 14) England. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER 229:7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The downtown merchants have the perfect way to clear up your clutter. A community yard sale is from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET on Saturday along Reid Avenue. The yard sale is a fundraiser for members of the downtown merchants to purchase white Christmas lights that will hang in the trees planted along the street during the holidays. “We want to make as much happen downtown as possible,” said Guthrie Groh, event organizer and owner of Black Swan Antiques. The event is open to the public, and Groh will welcome churches, area shop owners, artists and craftsmen in hopes that participants can use the opportunity to sell their wares or host their own fundraisers or bake sales. Those who wish to sell their previously used household items are also welcome. Groh will also use the event to raise awareness for the Salt Air Farmer’s Market held bi:weekly in City Commons Park. “I love the Farmer’s Market and I want it to grow,” Groh said. Other festivities on Saturday will include live music on the porch of Provisions courtesy of Freddy D and Lola starting at 11 a.m. ET. Area restaurants will be open, offering food and drink specials. “It’s going to be a diverse crowd with big savings,” Groh said. “It’s going to be more of a yard sale, festival and city walk rolled into one.” Sister’s Restaurant will hold a pancake breakfast starting at 7 a.m. ET. Hungry shoppers will be able to get pancakes, sausage, orange juice and coffee in return for a donation. The money will bene t the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Art Club. More than 50 students in the group will travel to New York City next spring to tour area museums and art installations. There are currently 40 registrants with free space still available. The cost for a spot is $10, and those who register can request a particular area of Reid Avenue. Participants need to supply their own table and merchandise. Those interested in signing up should contact Groh in advance at 850-276-2901 or guthriegroh@gmail.com. The last day to register is Friday. “It will be a nice afternoon to listen to the music and there will be something for everyone,” Groh said. By WES LOCHER 229:7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Get ready for a weekend of Nashville: fueled tunes. The fth annual Blast on the Bay Songwriters’ Festival will come to life this weekend and host almost 30 Nashville songwriters across nine area music venues. This event has struck a chord for locals and offers attendees the opportunity to meet and enjoy performances by the songwriters who have penned hits for country stars Faith Hill, Garth Brooks, George Strait, Alan Jackson, Reba McEntire and others. The festival begins Friday with a lunchtime happy hour at Triple Tails restaurant and a songwriter’s workshop will be held on Saturday at Dockside Seafood and Raw Bar. The panel will be moderated by Steven Leslie, who has written tunes for Kenny Rogers, Mark Chesnutt and George Strait. Area writers will participate in an informal open discussion on SCHEDULE All times Eastern unless marked otherwise. FRIDAY, OCT 18 Triple Tails Seafood & Raw Bar 3 p.m.: Wil Nance, Alan Rhody, Bob Regan, Sonny Lemaire 5 p.m.: Lisa Shaffer, Steve Dean, Bill Whyte Provisions 6 p.m.: Bridgette Tatum and Aaron Barker The Thirsty Goat 6:30 p.m.: Brett Jones, Jillia Jackson, Jesse Rice, Jerry Salley 8:30 p.m.: Will Rambeaux, Sherrie’ Austin, Brooke Eden, Shane Hines 10:30 p.m.: Aaron Barker, Bridgette Tatum, Earl Bud Lee, Jim Parker Mango Marley’s (central time zone) 7 p.m.: Charlie Black, Dana Hunt Black, Tim Buppert, Steve Leslie 9 p.m. : Walt Aldridge, Sonny Lemaire, Riley Weston, Pete Sallis SATURDAY, OCT 19 Dockside Seafood and Raw Bar 11:30 a.m.: Lisa Shaffer, Steve Dean, Bill Whyte 12:45 p.m.: Wil Nance, Alan Rhody, Bob Regan 2 p.m.: Free Songwriters’ Workshop Lookout Lounge 5 p.m.: Brett Jones, Jillia Jackson, Jesse Rice, Jerry Salley 7 p.m.: Will Rambeaux, Sherrie’ Austin, Brooke Eden, Shane Hines Toucans (central time zone) 6 p.m.: Aaron Barker, Bridgette Tatum, Earl Bud Lee, Jim Parker 8 p.m.: Charlie Black, Dana Hunt Black, Tim Buppert, Steve Leslie 10 p.m.: Walt Aldridge, Sonny Lemaire, Riley Weston, Pete Sallis Haughty Heron 7 p.m.: Walt Aldridge, Sonny Lemaire, Riley Weston, Pete Sallis 9 p.m.: Brett Jones, Jillia Jackson, Jesse Rice SUNDAY, OCT 20 Indian Pass Raw Bar 2 p.m.: Lisa Shaffer, Steve Dean, Bill Whyte, Jerry Salley 3:30 p.m.: Wil Nance, Alan Rhody, Bob Regan, Walt Aldridge 5 p.m.: Will Rambeaux, Sherrie’ Austin, Brooke Eden, Shane Hines, Jillia Jackson 6:30 p.m.: Charlie Black, Dana Hunt Black, Tim Buppert, Steve Leslie 8 p.m.: Aaron Barker, Bridgette Tatum, Earl Bud Lee, Jim Parker 10 p.m.: Late Night Jam Session Special to The Star North Florida novelist Michael Lister is doing something he never thought he would. He’s publishing a sequel to his bestselling novel “Double Exposure.” “I never imagined I’d write a sequel to “Double Exposure,” Lister said. “Actually, I was pretty sure I wouldn’t. In fact, it was far more likely that Stephen King would write a sequel to “The Shining” some 36 years after the original book was rst released. “Books like ‘Double Exposure’ don’t get sequels. Or so I thought. But here I am witnessing the release of ‘Separation Anxiety,’ the spiritual sequel to ‘Double Exposure’ some four years after its initial release,” Lister said. In this follow-up to “Double Exposure,” award-winning author Michael Lister once again takes readers down the rural routes and river swamps of wild North Florida. Sixteen-year-old Shelby Emma Summers has disappeared on a late-August day from her famous artist mom’s lodge on the banks of the Apalachicola River, just outside the small town of Tupelo. Out in the Gulf, a savage hurricane projected to make landfall in the Panhandle intensi es and expands. Has Shelby been abducted or is she merely skipping school? Is she with her boyfriend, Julian, and if she is, does that make her more or less safe? A fast-paced twisting and turning mystery, a harrowing hurricanic adventure. Told in prose that is BOOK SIGNING Lister will be signing all his books, including his new ones at the No Name Cafe and bookshop 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET on Saturday. For more information, call 229-9277. Wewa’s Lister publishes ‘Separation Anxiety’ Book is sequel to ‘Double Exposure’ See LISTER B5 MICHAEL LISTER Community yard sale this Saturday Bay Songwriter’s Festival PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STAR The Blast on the Bay Songwriters’ Festival celebrates its fth year by bringing 27 Nashville songwriters to the Forgotten Coast. Port St. Joe becomes miniature Nashville during Songwriters’ Fest Writer’s will perform in a “writer’s round” format that will make attendees feel like they’re in Nashville. See SONGWRITER’S B5 Thursday, October 17, 2013

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B2 | The Star Thursday, October 17, 2013 bB BO WB] 4514866 f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y 227 .7847 See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e $0 DO WN, 0% FINANCING, NO P A Y MENT S O n all alt er ed c a ts 5 mon ths and older A c t fast! Onl y f or a limit ed time ( A ll applican ts must be pr e -appr o v ed) I f y ou ar e unable t o adopt a t this time per haps y ou c ould f ost er or mak e a D ona tion. A ll pets adopt ed fr om SJBHS will be curr en t on v ac cina tions and spa y ed/neut er ed P lease do not hesita t e t o email t o wnsend .hsdir ec t or@g mail .c om or adoptba y stjoe@g mail .c om or call the S t Joseph B a y Humane S ociet y a t 850-227-1103 and ask f or M elody or D ebbie! A pplica tions ar e a v ailable a t w w w .sjbhumanesociet y .or g W e r equir e all pot en tial adopt ers t o c omplet e an applica tion f orm. A doption f ees include our c ost of spa y/neut er and curr en t v ac cina tions O ur hours f or the shelt er ar e T uesda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-4 pm! F aith 's T hrif t Hut is alw a y s in need of dona tions also and all the pr oc eeds go dir ec tly t o suppor t the animals in our car e! T he hours f or the st or e ar e T hursda y -S a tur da y fr om 10 am-3 pm. V olun t eers ar e alw a y s w elc ome a t both our st or e and our shelt er! O ur st or e and shelt er loca tion is 1007 T en th S tr eet in P or t S t Joe! Hope t o see y ou all ther e soon! I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y w w w s jbh u ma n e so c i e t y o r g O ur local r eal esta t e e xper ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t they f eel ar e the best v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in R eal Esta t e P icks! (I n this sec tion), D isc o v er the best r eal esta t e v alues in M e xic o B each, P or t S t Joe A palachic ola, C ape S an Blas S t G eor ge Island C arr abelle and surr ounding ar eas Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast 850-227-8890 | 850-227-7770 www .co astalr ealtyinf o .co m T h i s 3 B R / 3 B A h o m e h a s e v e r y t h i n g y o u n e e d t o e n j o y l i f e o n t h e b a y G r a n i t e c o u n t e r t o p s e l e v a t o r m e di a r o o m o f c e b a c k u p e m e r g e n c y g e n e r a t o r a n d a h o t t u b L a u n c h y o u r k a y a k r i g h t f r o m y o u r b a c k y a r d a n d e n j o y w h a t S t J o e B a y h a s t o o f f e r DOG ISLAND BA YFRONT WITH DOCK % $" & # % % " % % "! Dan Ausley Broker www .tlgproperty .com Society Special to The Star The St. Joseph Bay Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will meet at noon ET Wednesday, Oct. 23, at the Sunset Coastal Grill for lunch and meeting. The birthday of the local chapter as well as the National DAR will be celebrated. Betty Ann Owens will present the program on genealogy and history. To attend, call Sherrill Russ, 229-8574. Happy 50th Birthday, Mary Lou Star Staff Reports Amateur radio license exams The Gulf Amateur Radio Society will sponsor amateur radio license exams at 10 a.m. ET Nov. 9 at the county EOC building in Port St. Joe, located behind the Robert Moore Annex. Get your license and get on the air or upgrade a present license. For registration or assistance, call C.H. Tillis, AJ4XJ at 648-8251. The Gulf Amateur Radio Society meets at 7 p.m. ET rst Thursdays at the EOC building. Visitors are welcome. Salvation Army Christmas program schedule The Food and Toys Assistance Program through the Salvation Army has announced its schedule for applications and distribution of gifts to the community. Application will be taken 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. ET Monday, Oct. 21, in Port St. Joe at the STAC House at 610 Eighth St. In Wewahitchka, applications will be taken 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. CT Thursday, Oct. 24, at the Gulf County Public Library, 314 N. Second St. All applicants must bring all identication cards for family members and copies of bills and proof of income. Senior citizens and single and married adults may apply. All applicants must meet income guidelines. Distribution of gifts in Port St. Joe will take place 2-5 p.m. ET Dec. 17 at the STAC House. Distribution of gifts in Wewahitchka will be 9 a.m. to noon CT Dec. 17 at the Gulf County Public Library. Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Quilt Guild, long known for its charitable acts and contributions to the veterans Wounded Warrior program, donations of quilts to area schools and agencies for children and seniors, had members participate in the Central Panhandle Fair in Bay County. They were big winners. Bonnie Wynne won six rst-place blue ribbons and ve second-place red ribbons for her 11 entries. June Davis, guild president, won second place, red ribbons, for her three entries, a quilt front, pillow and table runner. Nancy Davis, newest member of the guild, won four rst-place blue ribbons and Best in Show for her Christmas quilt. The guild is looking for new members and meets twice a month at St. James’ Episcopal Church. Call contact June Davis at 229-1089 to attend a meeting. Society BRIEF sS Happy B B IRTHDaA Y SPEc C I a A L TO TT HE STa A R Chaplain Shirley Kinsey and Regent Sherrill Russ presented a DAR Graveside Marker in memory of Nancy Howell to Nancy’s daughter, Midge Askew.SPEc C I a A L TO TT HE STa A R From left, Port St. Joe Quilt Guild members June Davis, Nancy Davis and Bonnie Wynne were winners at the Central Panhandle Fair. St. Joe Quilt Guild members are winners at fair DAR to meet Oct. 23

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The Star| B3 Thursday, October 17, 2013 A l l P r o ce e d s B en e t S t. J os ep h B a y H um a n e S o ciet y w w w .s jb h um a n es o ciet y .o r g ~ 850-227-1103 School News Special to The Star Faith Christian was founded 40 years ago by a group of people with a heart for Christian education. These visionaries had a passion for evangelizing and disciplining young children. They believed if they instilled God’s promises and precepts in these young hearts and minds every day, these children would grow up to be mighty men and women of God. They were right, and they are still right. Faith Christian School would like to say good-bye to one of these visionaries, a mighty woman of Christ. Mrs. Jaclyn Quarles fought the good ght, ran her race and fullled her calling on this earth. She was passionate, kind, joyful and loved children with a deep and fervent love, and she will be missed by the staff, parents and student body of FCS. In lieu of owers, the family has asked that all those wishing to extend their condolences make a donation to FCS. Special to The Star Tiger Shark football: Our gridders next take the eld against FAMU High at 7 p.m. ET today in Tallahassee. Next Friday, Oct. 25, is Senior Night against West Gadsden. Game time is 7:30 p.m. Come celebrate with us as we congratulate those seniors from football, cheerleading, band and NJROTC. Tiger Shark volleyball: The Lady Tiger Sharks are home tonight at 6 p.m. ET against Wewa for the annual Dig Pink Game supporting Breast Cancer Research. District play starts Monday the 21st at Franklin County at 5 p.m. GO SHARKS! Cross country: The District Championship Meet will be at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 23. GO SHARKS! Junior class news: Help support the junior class and their efforts to raise money for this year’s prom by visiting the concession stand at every JV and varsity home game. Port St. Joe soccer: Boys soccer started practice this week. The season kicks off with the Girls Jamboree at home on Saturday, Oct. 27 followed by the boys on Saturday, Nov. 3. GO SHARKS! Report cards: Firstquarter report cards will be distributed by seventhperiod teachers on Friday, Oct. 25. Fall Break: Gulf County School will be closed for Fall Break on Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 2122. Classes will resume Wednesday, Oct. 25. Special to The Star The following students were recognized by Gulf County School Board, Superintendent Jim Norton and Principal Debbie Baxley at a ceremony Oct. 8 at Wewahitchka Elementary School Media Center. These students were recognized for their achievement on the 2012-2013 FCAT. Congratulations, students! Taylor Roberts, Destiny Palmer, Morgan Mayhann, Bryanna Jones, Cole Price, Keegan Calhoun, Brandon Paul, Seth Clary, Tyler Stevens, Aleah Wooten, Lillian Dennison, Melody McLemore, Haley Guffey, Katie Shealy, Lee Holton, Cyrina Madrid (peeking out from back) and Jaiden Scruggs. Also pictured: Debbie Baxley, School Board member George Cox, Superintendent Jim Norton and School Board member Danny Little. 4IBSL 5BML SPECIAL TO THE sS TAR Front row: Daylin Byrd, Raegan Mathews, Elyse Williams, Lyriq Larry. Back row: Shadavia Hudgins, Sara Whiteld, Mattison Mills, Charlie Dennis, Skylar Clayton. DAZZLING dD OLPHIN sS The Lion’s Tale FCS says good-bye to founder BAN dD OF GG OL dD RATEdD ‘ sS UPERIOR’ S PECIAL PECIAL TOTO THETHE S TAR TAR The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Band of Gold traveled to Daleville, Ala., Sept. 28 to compete in the 28th annual Daleville High School Band Classic. The Band of Gold received “Superior” ratings in Flag Corps, Majorettes, Drum Major and Band overall. Congratulations to the Band of Gold! Students excel on FCAT Wewahitchka Elementary School

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FAITH Page B4 www.starfl.com SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) Mor nin g Pra y er & Hol y Com mun ion Sun day ... ... ... ... ... 10: 00 A.M The Re v Lou Lit tle Pri est Ser vic es T emp ora ril y at Sen ior Cit ize ns Cen ter 120 Lib rar y Dri v e An Unc han gin g F ait h In A Cha ngi ng W orl d 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. T OUCHING LIVES WITH THE LO VE OF JESUS 6pm COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 Lifetree Caf to explore making the most of life Sylvia Darlene Clayton, 64, of Wewahitchka died Monday, Oct. 7, 2013. She was born on April 30, 1949, in Starke, Fla. Darlene was a longtime resident of Stone Mill Creek in Wewahitchka, where she helped to raise many children, planted many gardens and had done lots of bird watching with Daddy. Darlene was preceded in death by her father, Edward Jackson; her brother Roger Jackson; and her life-long partner Fred Clayton. She leaves behind her Mother, Myrtle Jackson; three children, Candi Mills (Travis), Mandee Strange and Andy Clayton; two brothers, Junior Jackson (Geraldine) and Dell Jackson (Tammy); one sister, Diane Tucker; and one sister-in-law, Sharon Jackson. Darlene was known as Nana to six grandchildren, Emilee and Adam Strange, Cody and Connor Mills and Aubrey and Anthony Clayton. She was known as Aunt Doll to four nephews, Joe Tucker, Chuck Jackson, Random Jackson and Jacob Jackson; two nieces, Pam Burns and Kelli Jackson; and many greatnieces and nephews. Funeral services were at 3 p.m. CT Thursday, Oct. 10, at New Beginnings Church with interment following in Buckhorn Cemetery. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Sylvia Darlene Clayton Jacquelyn Logan Kenney Quarles went to be with the Lord on Oct. 8, 2013. She is survived by her husband of over 60 years, William Shelton Quarles, Jr. Her sister, Ann Clayton Kenney Roberts, and husband, Benny, also survive her. Jackie is rejoicing in heaven with her son, Robert Logan Quarles (Bob), who preceded her in death in 2010. She is survived by her son, William Shelton Quarles, III (Biff) and wife, Carol; daughter, Susan Quarles Harmon and husband, Craig; daughter, Anne Smith Quarles and partner Meg; and spiritually-adopted son, Michael Robert Chisholm. She was Grandma Jackie to her grandchildren, Jessica Anne Quarles and Kevin Landwehr, Molly Marie Quarles, William Logan Quarles, Caroline Ann Harmon, Ezra Palmer Harmon, Grace Elizabeth Logan Harmon, Ashley Meaghan Quarles and Benjamin Fisher Quarles. Jackies only greatgrandchild, Violet Logan Landwehr, was born on her birthday in 2012. She was Aunt Jackie to her niece Sarah Ann Roberts Abbott, husband, Frank, and children Christopher and Dabney; nephew James Bentley Roberts, Jr. (Jim), wife, Liz, and children Sarah Beth and Bentley; and nephew Thomas Edward Roberts and wife, Tomoko, and children Mari and June. Affectionately known by the community as Miss Jackie, she was instrumental in establishing Faith Christian School almost 40 years ago. A celebration of life service was at 2 p.m. ET Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013, at Faith Bible Church. In lieu of owers, please consider donations to Faith Christian School, 801 20th St., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Jacquelyn Logan Kenney Quarles JACQUELYN QUARLES From Staff Reports Women and mens day New Bethel Baptist Church will host a women and mens day on Oct. 20. Sunday school will begin at 10 a.m. ET with a morning worship service at 11:30 a.m. Elder Donald Nickson will be the guest speaker, and everyone is invited to come and lift up the colors royal blue, silver and white in the name of Jesus Christ. Victory Temple Holiness Harvest Day Victory Temple Holiness Church welcomes you to its annual Harvest Day at 11:30 a.m. ET Oct. 20. The speaker will be Lady Elect Sharon Hutchinson of Faith Temple Church of God in Christ in Panama City. Annual Holy Convocation Apostle Napoleon and Pastor Phyllis Ann Pittman and New Covenant Missionary World Outreach Center The Miracle Center in Port St. Joe will host the annual Holy Convocation Oct. 21-24. Services will begin at 7 p.m. ET nightly at the church, 252 Ave. E. The theme of this years convocation is We must follow those who through Faith and Patience inherit the Promises. The generals are coming. Everyone is welcome. For more information, call Deaconess Debbie Ward at 866-5205. Revival for Survival 2013 New Bethel A.M.E. Church, 146 Ave. C in Port St. Joe, will have a Revival for Survival 2013 at 7 p.m. ET nightly Oct. 23-25. Guest evangelist will be Bishop Lonnie Mitchell from New Beginnings Assembly of Saints in Panama City. Though I walk in the midst of trouble, You will revive me; You will stretch forth Your hand against the wrath of my enemies, and Your right hand will save me. The Lord will perfect that which concerns me; Your mercy and loving kindness, O Lord, endure forever forsake not the works of Your own hands (Psalms 138:7-8, Ampli ed Bible). Are you trying to make sense of what is going on today? Are you wondering how will I survive and get through this? Then you dont want to miss this revival. For more information, call Pastor L.E. Gantt at 271-9574. Fall Festival and Touch-A-Truck Its time again for the ninth annual Fall Festival and Touch-A-Truck at Long Avenue Baptist Church. The community is invited for an evening of fun and fellowship to bene t the children and the elderly of Gulf County during the Christmas season. The event will be 5-7 p.m. ET Oct. 27 at Long Avenue Baptist Church, 1601 Long Ave. Admission is a bag of nonperishable food. There will be re trucks, police cars and more for kids of all ages to climb on, learn how they work, sound the horns and generally have some fun. The Fall Festival will feature a cake walk, games, hot dogs, a chili cook-off, popcorn, boiled peanuts, fall fun and prizes. For more information or to lend a vehicle, call the church of ce at 229-8691. Sacred Harp sing Saturday Woods to celebrate 25 years of ministry Thursday, October 17, 2013 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. Obituaries Faith BRIEFS Special to The Star How to make the most out of life will be explored 7 p.m. CT Monday, Oct. 21, at Lifetree Caf. The program, Make the Most of Your Life: A Perspective That Will Change Your Life Forever, features the lmed story of professional guitarist Tony Melendez, who was born without arms. Melendez describes how his attitude has affected his ability to live a normal life and make a career in performing music. The people who make my heart hurt are those who say, I cant, Melendez said. I wish I could help them say, Ill try. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach, across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. Star Staff Report Supt. David Woods of the Port St. Joe Church of God in Christ will celebrate 25 years of ministry during Pastors Appreciation and Wife Celebration on Oct. 26-27. The congregation invites the public to come and celebrate this monumental moment in the life of this man of God, his wife, Lady Danielle Woods, and family. The theme is Matured for Kingdom Purpose. But the God of all grace, who hath called us unto his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after that ye have suffered a while, make you perfect, stablish, strengthen, settle you. To him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen (1 Peter 5:10-11, KJV). The celebration begins 6 p.m. ET Saturday, Oct. 26, at the church with speaker Pastor Wilhelmina Williams from Body of Christ Church. At 4 p.m. ET Sunday, Oct. 27, the speaker will be Bishop Titus Deas Jr. from Deliverance Temple Ministries in Hardaway. Special to The Star On Saturday, Oct. 19, First United Methodist Church of Port St. Joe is hosting the Southeast Sacred Harp Singing Convention at 10 a.m. ET in the Fellowship Hall, followed by dinner on the grounds. Sacred Harp is an American tradition that brings communities together to sing four-part hymns and anthems without any musical accompaniment. Newcomers are welcome, with no musical experience or religious af liation required in fact, the tradition was born from colonial singing schools whose purpose was to teach beginners to sing and methods continue to re ect this goal. Though Sacred Harp is not af liated with any denomination, it is a deeply spiritual experience for all involved and functions as a religious observance for many singers. The singers sit in a hollow square formation with one voice part on each side, all facing inward so they can see and hear each other. No instruments, other than voices, are used. Visitors are always welcome even if they participate just as listeners. Come and be a part of this great American tradition.

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, October 17, 2013 the art and business of song writing and topics will include the craft of songwriting, song writing as a career and music production. Panelists will also offer cri tiques for attendees who bring a sample along with them. “Attendees should have the enthusiasm to learn,” said Les lie, who will oversee the panel for the fourth year. “Songwriting is an investment in time. “A lot has changed in the in dustry and there’s a lot of listen ing and studying to be done.” Those who attend the free performances will be treated to the “writer’s round” format, commonly found in Nashville where three to four performers share the stage and trade off playing tunes. The festival is designed as a “listening event” for attendees to appreciate the songs and be respectful to the writers who have traveled from Nashville to perform. “It’s delightful and educa tional to listen to a song by the songwriter that you listened to in the car on the way in and make that connection,” Leslie said. “You see that the writer is really the artist.” On Saturday, the fth Semper Fi Sisters Beach Blast, an event that will welcome more than 60 women to Gulf County related by marriage or blood to mem bers of the military branches, will hold its annual packing par ty at the Centennial Building. During the party, care pack ages are created and sent around the globe to various mili tary units in need. Last year, the Sisters packed more than 1,200 “Boxes of Love” over the course of a day, a dramatic increase from the three dozen completed during the inaugural event. Each year, the packing party is serenaded by performers in town for the Blast on the Bay Songwriters’ Fest. “Our writers donate their time to play for the Semper Fi Sisters during their packing party,” Blast on the Bay orga nizer Jason Bogan said. “The events happened to begin on the same year and a certain synergy seemed to develop very organically. “The events have historically supported and fed off of one another. All of the ‘sisters’ are great friends of our event, and our writers are proud to be able to be a small part of their pack ing party.” Proceeds from the Blast on the Bay Songwriters’ Festival will benet the Coastal Song writers Education Coalition Inc., a 501c3 not for prot. The festival runs from Oct. 17:20. To register in advance for the song writer’s workshop, visit www. blastonthebay.com. e Gul / Fanin Cams Gul Coa Sate Co eg o a y quests e easu f ou endance A c ommunit y wide br e akf as t and c on v er s ation o f loc al ec onomic importanc e B U SINE S S R OUND T ABLE F OR UM G ULF C OA ST ST A TE CO LLEGE I tne hip ith T ue sda y O ctober 29 2 013 8:00 am 9:30 am ED T Gulf /F r anklin Campus Gulf C o as t State C olleg e !! ! # F or e v ent details and t o R S VP ple as e visit: www gulf c o as t edu/ smallbusine s s f orum Inquirie s: 850-22 7 -96 7 0 LISTER from page B1 poetic, evocative, and muscular, “Separation Anxiety” is a timeless, resonate literary thrill er of heartbreak and heroism. “‘Separation Anxi ety’ is a far more com plex novel than ‘Double Exposure,’” Lister said. “It has far more char acters, far more plot, and is a lot larger, but the two books share a lot in common. They denitely have the same DNA.” “Separation Anxiety” also in cludes the appearance of Sam Mi chaels and Daniel Davis from an other popular thriller of Lister’s, “Burnt Offerings.” “In a way, it’s a sequel to ‘Burnt Offerings’ too,” Lister said. “But more in a literal than spiritual sense. In fact, as I think about it, ‘Separation Anxiety’ is truly a mar riage of ‘Double Exposure’ and ‘Burnt Offerings.’ It’s funny, but I haven’t really thought of it that way until this moment, but that is exactly what it is.” The release of “Separation Anxiety” includes a new special edition release of “Double Exposure” with a new cover, lots of photographs and an introduction and signa ture by bestselling au thor Michael Connelly, who has championed the book since he rst sat down and read it cover to cover without getting up four years ago. “‘Double Exposure’ is absolute ly riveting. Elegiac prose, insightful characterization and a wonderfully ingenious plot,” Connelly said. “With the release of the new edition of ‘Double Exposure,’ the two books don’t just complement one another in terms of story but as art objects as well,” Lister said. “Double Exposure” was adapt ed into a stage play by Jason Hed den at Gulf Coast State College and is now being turned into a feature lm by director Jason Hreno. For more information or to or der the book, visit the author’s website at www.MichaelLister. com. SONGWRITER’S from page B1 Eight area venues will host the writers of some of country music’s biggest hits. PHOTOS SS PECIAL TO TT HE SS TAR A free workshop allows aspiring songwriters to interface with professionals. Special to The Star Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf will host a seminar on “Beat the Bug: Protect Your Patients and Family from the Flu” at 10 a.m. ET on Nov. 1 in the hospital’s confer ence room. This topic is sponsored by the hospital’s SeniorSpirit program. Led by Sarah Hutchison, Regis tered Nurse and Hospital Liaison for Covenant Hospice, the seminar will address common causes of the u and how to protect your patients and family members from getting sick. Sacred Heart Hospital requires u vaccinations or use of masks for all associates and volunteers. Addi tionally, Sacred Heart encourages all adults to consider u vaccina tions for their family members. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now recom mends a u vaccine for everyone six months of age and older (instead of just certain groups, as was recom mended before). But it’s especially important that those in higher-risk groups get vaccinated. Covenant Hospice is an ap proved provider for the Florida Board of Nursing; Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage and Family Therapy and Mental Health Counseling; Florida Board of Nursing Home Administrators; Alabama Board of Nursing and Ala bama State Board of Social Work Examiners. Covenant Hospice will offer CEUs at no charge for nurses, social workers and nursing home admin istrators that are in attendance. Learn how to protect your family from the u

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, October 17, 2013 Star Staff Report Blountstown lmmaker Elam Stoltzfus, known to locals for lms about the Apalachicola River and Florida’s Aquatic Preserves, including St. Joseph Bay, will co-emcee the rst annual Apalachicola Riverfront Film Festival Oct. 19. The festival will be held in Riverfront Park in downtown Apalachicola beneath a full moon. Along with founder Merrill Livingston, Stoltzfus will emcee the festival. For the past 25 years Stoltzfus has documented diverse aspects of Florida’s natural resources, which include estuaries, rivers, swamps, and aquatic preserves. Not only is he a gifted cinematographer; as executive producer of several documentaries, Stoltzfus combines his love of nature with his love of art. In celebration of its premier year, Stoltzfus has produced an introduction for the festival. This piece will feature distinct landmarks, iconic waterfronts, and colorful locals all highlighting the town of Apalachicola. Stoltzfus’ most recent documentary, the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition, will also be shown. The documentary features four explorers who hiked from the Everglades to the Okeefeenokee Swamp. In 2012, the group hiked 1,000 miles in 100 days to call attention to opportunities for a connected wildlife corridor in Florida’s heartland. The Apalachicola Riverfront Film Festival is an outdoor lm festival focused on showcasing independent short lms and documentaries from around the world. This lm festival will focus on entertaining the audience through thought provoking lms portraying today’s culture, art, our environment, local and global issues. For more information and tickets visit www.apalachriverlm.com B6 | The Star Thursday, October 17, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 95951 PUBLIC NOTICE OF AUCTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ST. JOE RENT-ALL, INC intends to dispose of or offer for sale the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under The Florida Self Storage Facility Act Statues (Section 83.801-83.809). ST. JOE RENT-ALL, INC, will dispose of said property no later than October 26, 2013. Property is located at 706 First Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 the following: Latonya Bailey #33, Misc Furnishings Corey Bowers #43, Misc Furnishings Verline Franklin #55, Misc Furnishings Veronica Johnson #84, Misc Furnishings Shay Foxworth #44, Misc Furnishings October 17, 24, 2013 92684S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 232012CA000138CAAXMX WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. SANDRA G. CORBIN A/K/A SANDRA G. BROXSON, ET AL; Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash beginning at 11:00 a.m., in the FRONT LOBBY of the Courthouse of Gulf County, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, on October 24, 2013, the following described property: LOT 15, BLOCK 6, LAKE ALICE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 9, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MANUFACTURED HOME, TRADE NAME-ANNIVERSARY, MODEL YEAR 2005, MODEL NO. 6763 AND MANUFACTURER’S ID NO. GAFL407A53417AV31. Property Address: 237 RHODES AVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465, Gulf ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR BY MAIL AT P.O. BOX 1089, PANAMA CITY, FL 32402 OR BY PHONE AT (850)747-5338 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED, PLEASE CALL 711. Dated: September 30, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 W. Cypress Rd, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)644-8704 Fax: (954)772-9601 ServiceFL@mlg-defaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlg-defaultlaw.com File No. 11-09236 October 10, 17, 2013 92770S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION THE GULF COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Gulf County School Board proposes to amend and adopt policies, as provided for in the Administrative Procedures Act, for the purpose of bringing said policies into compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of each proposal change. 2.22Board Meetings 3.40 Safe and Secure Schools 3.50P ublic Information and Inspection of Records 3.60 Flag Display and Pledge 3.68 Background Screening for Contractors 4.113Academic Acceleration 4.117Early High School Graduation 5.321Bullying and Harassment 5.62 Administration of Medication (Option 2) 6.173Responsibilities of School Bus Operators 6.27 Professional Ethics 6.29 Report of Misconduct 8.36Transporting Students in Private Vehicles 8.38Automotive Equipment 9.21School Reports 9.50Distribution of Literature and Materials of Students Economic Impact: These proposals will result in no direct costs associated with implementation. IF REQUESTED, A HEARING WILL BE HELD AT: Time: 10:00 a.m. ET Date: November 7, 2013 Place: Port St. Joe Elementary School 2201 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 The entire text of the proposed rules can be inspected during regular office hours at the Gulf County School Board Office, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL. Special legal authority under which the adoption is authorized and the law being implemented and interpreted are made specific. The addition and changes are proposed by Duane McFarland, Assistant Superintendent for Business Services and approved for consideration by Jim Norton, Superintendent. Amendments: See above October 17, 2013 95673S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-86-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES E. NORRED, Defendant. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered September 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, the Clerk of Court for Gulf County, Florida will sell to the highest and best bidder at the Gulf County Courthouse Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, on October 24, 2013, at 11:00 AM, EST the following described property: Lots 5, 6, and 7, Block A of Chipola Landing, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 60, in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. The Real Property or its address is commonly known as Lots 5, 6 & 7, Block A, of Chipola Landing Subdivision, Wewahitchka, Florida 32465. Parcel ID Number 01041-125R; Parcel ID Number 01041130R; and Parcel ID Number 01041-135R ANY PERSON CLAIMT r a d e s & S e rv i c e s 227-7847 CALL T OD A Y! GET Y OUR AD IN! T rades & Ser v ices 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction 4510158 S o u n d f a m i l i a r?... C a l l a b o u t a co n s u l t a t io n f o r : $ # S ometimes Lif e can seem a little sour M ar y Elizabeth V aughan L et ’ s make it L emon A id on the F r on t P or ch. 850-731-1268 Feast or famine? That’s a real problem for many house plants and others conned to small areas. Research has shown that plants do much better when their nutrient supplies don’t uctuate. Unfortunately, when using regular garden fertilizer, the nutrient level is high immediately after application, but can greatly diminish before fertilizer is applied again. Controlled release fertilizers have been used by commercial growers for many years. They are liquid fertilizer concentrated in to granules, and surrounded by multiple layers of polymeric plastic resin. This covering controls the release of the fertilizers over a long period of time. When these granules are placed in or on top of the soil, water from irrigation or rain penetrates the plastic shell and dissolves the nutrient care. The granules then become tiny reservoirs of liquid plant food, and these automatically add regular amounts of nutrients to the soil. Various formulations of controlled released fertilizers are available, designed to release nutrients for a specic period of time. A single application of a controlled release fertilizer to ower pots or small beds should be enough to keep the plants at the optimum fertility level throughout a normal growing season. Over very long periods, it may be necessary to make additional applications to keep the fertility level constant. These fertilizers have other advantages. They can be applied anytime of the year. They’re moisture dependent, rather than temperature dependent. With traditional fertilizer, nutrient uptake is slowed or stopped altogether, if the soil temperature drops too low. Controlled release fertilizer stop releasing nutrients only when the soil dries out. After irrigation or rain, they continue supplying their elements. With new plantings, controlled release fertilizers can be mixed into the soil. For established plants, surface application is most effective if the granules are tilled in lightly about a half-an-inch to an inch. Be careful not to damage plant roots when tilling. If the fertilizer is applied to the soil surface, and cannot be tilled in, you need to wet the granules frequently and thoroughly to insure release of their nutrients. Generally speaking, you need to use less of this kind of fertilizer if your plants are infrequently watered, have poor drainage, contain high salt levels, or grow in areas exposed to low light. For more information visit http://gulf. ifas.u.ed u or www.http://edis.ifas.u.ed u ROY LEE CA rR TE rR County extension director Try time-released fertilizerSPECIAL TO TT HE STAr R Area lmmaker to help lead lm festival

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CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, October 17, 2013 The Star | B7 ToPlace Your Classified ad in Call Our New Numbers Now! Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com the APALACHICOLA & CARRABELLE TIMES C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW C ALL O UR N EW N UMBERS N OW Logistics/TransportCIRCULATION District Manager The Panama City News Herald has an opening for a District Manager. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. No phone calls. Accepting applications until October 14, 2013. Web ID#: 34268014 ING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@ judl4.flcourts.org. Dated: September 27, 2013. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk October 10, 24, 2013 95679S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 13-62-CA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. BILLY ELLIS FORRESTER and MARION W. FORRESTER A/K/A MARION FORRESTER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, the Clerk of this Court shall sell the property at public sale at 11:00 A.M. Eastern Time, on the 7th day of November, 2013 at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, the following described real property lying and being in Gulf County, Florida, to-wit: EXHIBIT “A” LOTS 4 AND 5, BLOCK 7, DOUGLAS LANDING UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALONG WITH A 1988 MOBILE HOME ID# PSHGA3679 WHICH IS PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO SAID PROPERTY. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. This Notice dated this 27th day of September, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS, CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FL BY: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95707S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 2013-33CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. JAMES G. NORRIS, a/k/a JAMES G. NORRIS, SR., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013 and entered in Civil Case No. 2013-33-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and JAMES G. NORRIS, a/k/a JAMES G. NORRIS, SR., is Defendent, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 24th day of October, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment. Lot Seventeen (17) of Jonesville Subdivision of the SW of SW , Section 19, T8S, R10W, as per official plat on file in Plat Book 1 at Page 57, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED this 30th day of September, 2013. REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95689S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE No.: 08-505-CA AMERIS BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MARILYN THEUS, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment entered in the above-styled cause on the 20th day of April, 2009, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 24th day of October, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time), at the courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard in Gulf County in Port St. Joe, Florida the following described real property and personal property situated in Gulf County, Florida, and set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Real Property: LOTS THREE (3), FOUR (4), AND FIVE (5), BLOCK C, FOREHAND’S SECOND ADDITION ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 50. Personal Property: That certain 2004 single wide mobile home located on said property having identification Number CJ83306GAJFBF0146 and Title Number 91134281. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Court, on this 30th day of September, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95715S IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL, CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2012-CA-000068 Division WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. MARTHA J. TIDWELL, JAMES P. TIDWELL, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on August 7, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida described as: LOT 1, SAWMILL ESTATES UNIT NO. 1, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 108 CHARLIE GASKIN DRIVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465; including the building appurtenance and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales held in front lobby of courthouse, on October 24, 2013 at 11:00am ET. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 30th day of September, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95811S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2013-09 Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe Phase II Water Bores will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 4:00 PM EST, Friday October 25, 2013. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday October 25, 2013, at 4:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and bid number for “Phase II Water Bores”. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The City of Port St. Joe is accepting bids for underground bore work as part of our Phase II water line project. The work shall consist of six (6) inch, three (3) inch and one (1) inch bores. A complete bid package is available at www. cityofportstjoe.com For questions concerning this project, please contact John Grantland at 850-229-8247. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer October 10, 17, 2013 95801S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1314-01 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: Uniforms and cleaning of same for the Public Works Department Specifications may be obtained from the Clerk’s Office in the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. Interested parties should contact Lynn Lanier for additional information at (850) 229-6106. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Proposals must be submitted to the Gulf County Clerk’s Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, October 25, 2013. Bids will be opened at this location on Monday, October 28, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: TYNALIN SMILEY CHAIRMAN ATTEST: REBECCA NORRIS, CLERK October 10,17, 2013 95821S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1381 Application No. 2013-39 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05793-000R Description of Property: Lot Ten (10), Block 1006, according to the Official map of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, as the same appears on file in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Being same property filed for record in Gulf County, October, 1959, 1:42 P.M. in Deed Book No. 36, Page No. 179, in Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Billy Charles Quinn All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95825S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1319 Application No. 2013-37 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05015-003R Description of Property: Lot 14, Block 45, of Re-subdivision of Block 45, in Unit Number Three of Saint Joseph’s Addition of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the Plat as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 34, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: C Q Developments, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95823S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 100 Application No. 2013-38 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 00517-002R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the NW. Corner of Original Government Lot 4, Section 16, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, and extend a line southerly along the western boundary of said Lot 4, for 420.3 feet; then turn 64 Degrees 21 Minutes left for 793.36 feet; then turn 67 Degrees 28 Minutes right for 542.23 feet, thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 35 feet; thence turn South 310 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, continue the line last above described for 75 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 125 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 75 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 125 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: John Whitehurse & Lori Adams (dec) All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95829S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-000075-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Bayside Savings Bank, Plaintiffs, vs. ERIC B. RAMSEY and MELISSA N. RAMSEY, and The Owners Association of Southgate, Inc., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 at 11:00 a.m. EST on October 24, 2013 the following described property: Lot 29, Southgate Subdivision, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 17, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. AND Lot 25, Block 1, Ward Ridge Subdivision Unit 1, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 3, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Dated: October 1, 2013 Becky L. Norris Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10,17, 2013 95827S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Florida Tax Lien Assets IV, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1514 Application No. 2013-36 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06319-060R Description of Property: Lot 2, Block C, Marnie’s Island Preserve, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 22 and 23, and as amended in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Winston Williams All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95901S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS NO. 1314-02 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in performing the following service: MISCELLANEOUS ROAD REPAIR PROJECT (P.R.I. PROJECT #003.248) This project consists of approximately 715 SY of milling, 80 tons of asphalt overlay, and 960 LF of striping at three locations in Gulf County, Florida. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $25.00 per set and is non-refundable. Check should be made to PREBLE-RISH, INC. If you have any questions, please call Clay Smallwood at (850) 227-7200. All bidders shall be FDOT qualified in the following work classes: Flexible Paving and Hot Plant-Mixed Bituminous Courses. Completion date for this project will be 60 days from the date of bid award. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $100.00 per day. Please indicate on the envelope your COMPANY NAME, BID NUMBER, and that this is a sealed bid for the “Miscellaneous Road Repair Project”. Submit 1 original and 3 copies of the bid. Bids will be received until 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time, on November 1, 2013 at the Gulf County Clerk’s Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, and will be opened and read aloud at this same location on November 4, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., Eastern Time. All bids shall remain firm for a period of 60 days after the opening. All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of Gulf County. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ Tynalin Smiley Chairman October 17, 24, 2013 95973S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Case No.: 11-33 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. LITTLE RIVER CAMP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; MATTHEW D. BIRMINGHAM; PAUL W. GROOM, II; WILLIAM J. SMILEY; CLAYTON B. WOOTEN, And SEVEN SPRINGS LAKE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATTION, INC., A Florida not-for-profit corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 10th day of October, 2013, in Case Number 2011-33 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and LITTLE RIVER CAMP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, MATTHEW D. BIRMINGHAM, PAUL W. GROOM, II, WILLIAM J. SMILEY, CLAYTON B. WOOTEN and SEVEN SPRINGS LAKE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. Eastern Time on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lots One (1), Two (2), Six (6), Ten (10), Fourteen (14), Eighteen (18) and Nineteen (19), Block C, SEVEN Creamer’s Tree Service Call Jason @ (850)832-9343 Biker Consignment From bike parts to clothing, & anything to do w/ Bikers! Open Tue -Sat. 2001 Wilson Ave. P.C. 850-763-9009 Acree and Associates Drafting design, fencing and custom furniture. 850-691-8453 Legion Fence Co. Wood Prvcy Vinyl & Almnm. Fence/Deck. Free Estimate 250-8275 Text FL68179 to 56654 4516876Annual Fall Auction St. Joe Rent-All 706 1st Street | Port St. Joe Saturday, October 26th 10 am EST Contents of 5 Mini-Storage Buildings Miscellaneous Items Belonging to St. Joe Rent-All Including, but not limited to: Golf Carts Misc. Electronics Lawn Mowers Misc. Rental Equipment Items, (Except Storage Buildings), may be viewed Friday, Oct. 25th, 1 -5 pm EST

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B8 | The Star Thursday, October 17, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 4510160 4514327 OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 149B COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 3 OFFICE/KIT/BATH AND WAREHOUSE $ 675.00 PER MONTH/ 675.00 DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 4514326 OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 151A COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 12X12 OFFICE, BATH, STORAGE AND LARGE WAREHOUSE $ 550.00 PER MONTH/ 550.0O DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 1119173 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: SHIPFITTERS € FLUXCORE WELDERS PIPE WELDERS € X-RAY WELDERS PIPEFITTERS € SAFETY REP Competitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace OUTSIDE SALES TAP INTO YOUR CAREER POTENTIAL! We are an equal opportunity employer M/F/D/VDoes your job give you access to cutting edge training and opportunities for career growth?Deliver the future of communication as a FULL-TIME OUTSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE. We are looking for enthusiastic, self-starters to visit homes in local communities to establish new customer relationships by selling our cable, internet and phone services in Mexico Beach, FL. € Base salary of $24K plus commissions € Sales experience strongly preferred € Must be able to work independently and be able to conduct in homepresentations In addition to a superior bene“ts package, we oer gas incentives for quali“ed individuals and a company smart phone. For more information and to apply, please visit us online at: www.mediacomcable.com/careers and and search for Sales under FL. Choose Job ID 6181 1114791 www.mediacomcable.com/careers and search for Sales under FL. Choose Job ID 6181 p resentations Creative/Design The News Herald is looking for a: Graphic Artist Candidate must have experience in InDesign/Photoshop/Quark or Illustrator (PC Platform preferred) while being open to learning new programs. The ideal candidate should have a creative eye, attention to details, organized, able to meet deadlines, have good communications/ phone skills and be able to work with minimal supervisor. Experience working in or with marketing departments is a plus. A portfolio will be requested at the time of the interview. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package including vacation, sick leave, 401(k), medical, dental, vision, life insurance. Pick up an application at The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34265884 Text FL65884 to 56654 Sales Sales Reps Halifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience. Territories Available In:™ ™ Panama City™ ™ Chipley ™ ™ Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: z Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. z Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate —all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266376 Text FL66376 to 56654 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experienced Sales Manager Who will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: z Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. z Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. z Communicates and advocates the company’s vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. z Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. z Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solution’s ROI for the client. Requirements: z Bachelor’s degree or comparable experience. z Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. z Successful record of team building and leadership. z Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. z Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. z A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition z Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. z Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. z Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. z Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. z Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. z Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations z Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266340 Text FL66340 to 56654 SPRINGS LAKE SUBDIVISION according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page(s) 17-18 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE POLICIES OF THE GULF COUNTY CLERK OF COURT. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 11th day of October, 2013 REBECCA L. NORRIS, Gulf County Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk Octobre 17, 24, 2013 95975S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23 2011 CA 000074 VS. DIVISION: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF INDYMAC RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGEBACKED TRUST, SERIES 2006-L1, RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGEBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-L1, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTINE MULLININX, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 10, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23 2011 CA 000074 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as trustee of IndyMac Residential Mortgage-Backed Trust, Series 2006-L1, Residential MortgageBacked Certificates, Series 2006-L1, is the Plaintiff and James Coney Mullininx, Christine Mullininx, Gregory J. Scroggs, Jackie P. Scroggs, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 1923.07 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 30, SAID POINT LYING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH WITH A RADIUS OF 2346.20; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AND SAID RIGHT OF WAY FOR 329.02 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 06 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 74 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 328.75; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 392.39 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 394.62 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 107.41 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE EAST 61.01 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 228.21 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 14.00 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 325.96 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 75.56 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 0.25 ACRES MORE OR LESS, SUBJECT TO A 10 FOOT WIDE ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 1923.07 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 30, SAID POINT LYING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH WITH A RADIUS OF 2346.20; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AND SAID RIGHT OF WAY FOR 329.02 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 06 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 74 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 328.75 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 392.39 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 394.62 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 107.41 FEET; THENCE EAST 10.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 106.12 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 10.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 5 FOOT WIDE PEDESTRIAN ACCESS CASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 1923.07 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 30, SAID POINT LYING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH WITH A RADIUS OF 2346.20; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AND SAID RIGHT OF WAY FOR 329.02 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 06 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 74 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 328.75 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 75.56 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN, SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 325.96 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 186.60 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATERLINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID WATERLINE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 5.02 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID WATERLINE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 187.02 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 5.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A APN 3186-060R, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 11th day of October, 2013. BILLKINSAUL Clerk of Circuit Court Gulf County, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com SL-10-55837 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. October 17, 24, 2013 Cue Furniture Start your Christmas layaway now! Pickup as late as December 23rd. New mattresses: Twin sets, $99; Full sets, $139; Queen sets, $199. Quality used furniture. 1425 Hwy 71 S. Wewa. 850-639-2343 Text FL68236 to 56654 Port St. Joe:Historic Downtown Community Yard SaleReid Ave. October 19, 8:00am-3:00pm EST. Spaces available for rent, $10. Text FL69122 to 56654 Port St. Joe : 316-322 Beacon Rd. (Golf Aire) Sat, Oct 19th 8am -1pm ESTYard SalesEasy-Ups, Vintage China, Antique Storage Chest, RCA Surround Sound. Too much to list! Something for everyone. Text FL69053 to 56654 PSJ : 206 Coral Drive, St Joe Beach Sea Shores Subd Saturday, Oct.19th 8am-5pm EST Coffee and end tables, china cabinet, lg desk, chairs, housewares, sewing and craft items, garage cabinets and shelves, Christmas items and much more. 25% off purchases totaling $10 or more St. Joe Beach 354 Ponce de Leon St. Saturday Oct. 19th 8am (est.) -???? No Early Birds!! Large Yard Sale 2 elec. wheelchairs, lawn tractor, lrg. generator, power washer, lots of jewelry, clothing, furniture and much more! txt FL67561 to 56654 WE PAY CASH JUNK OR TRASH! Jewelry, old or new, used or vintage collectibles. We come to you. Please call Monique 850-227-1668 or cell 850-254-3898 Install/Maint/Repair Mediacom Communications The 7th largest cable company in the United States and covering over 23 states, has an immediate opening in Mexico Beach, FL for: ENTRY LEVEL INST ALLER No technical experience necessary. Performs installs for cable and high speed internet. Must have a valid driver’s license. Mediacom offers competitive pay and great benefits along with advancement opportunities. For immediate consideration, visit our website at: www .mediacomcable.com/c areers Refer to Job 6169 Mediacom is an Equal Opportunity Employer Web ID#: 34268916 Text FL68916 to 56654 Logistics JOB NOTICE The Gulf County Sheriff’s Office is accepting applications for two Part Time Dispatchers. Applications and a complete job description are available at the Gulf County Sheriff’s Office or at www .gulfcounty fl.gov Application deadline is Friday, 11/01/13 5:00 pm EST. For more information, please contact Lt. Chris Buchanan at 850-227-1115. Gulf County Sheriff’s Office enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer. Web ID#: 34269145 Part Time Nursery AssistantFUMC is seeking a PT Nursery Assistant to care for children ages 0-5 during Sunday School, Sunday Worship Services and other church events as required. Please submit a resume, contact information, at least 2 references and a cover letter to: fumcp sj@gtcom.net Attention Nursery Position. Or P.O. Box 266, Port St. Joe, FL32547. Attn: Bobbi Lassiter. Web ID#: 34268269 Text FL68269 to 56654 Security/Prot. Serv.JOB NOTICE The City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following position: Full Time Police OfficerPlease submit an application to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website: cityofportstjoe.com If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The position will close on November 1, 2013. The entry level salary for a Police Officer will be $15.50 per hour not including benefits. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. Web ID#: 34269010 Text FL69010 to 56654 2 bedroom unfurnisted Apt. Dogwood Terrace Apts; 808 Woodward Ave, PSJ 850-227-7800 Mexico Beach 2 Story duplex, bottom unit avail. 1/2 block off beach. Comp furn, 2br/1ba, $900/mo., util incl. 1st & last, min. 6 mo lease, small pets ok. (229) 322-5652. 2 Bdrm 1 Bath. Florida room in back Large yard. 3 blocks to the beach. 339 Selma St. $700 month. First/Last/ Security Deposit. Call 850-348-7774 Text FL69133 to 56654 3 bedroom house for rent; 417 Iola Street Port St. Joe, FL; Call 850-227-7800 PSJ 116 Bellamy Circle 3br/1ba, fenced yard outside pets only $550 mo + $100 deposit option to buy. 850-643-5381 Quality Long Term RentalsMexico Beach Call for more info 850-348-0262 WEWASmall cottage, great for 1 to 2 people. $390 per month + $390 security deposit. 850-639-5721 ******************* Small RV. $125 per wk. Includes Water Sewer, Elec, & Wi-Fi. Good for 1 person. 850-639-5721 Text FL66108 to 56654



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Emily Hansen found herself and she wasnt even looking. She bestows full credit on the Semper Fi Sisters That sisterhood and the groups annual Beach Blast, the fth edition of which began Wednesday with the rst arrivals of the women of loved ones in the military deployed overseas. Before she experienced her rst Beach Blast last year, Hansen was lost in a fog of medication and grief, two years lost after the death of her son, deployed with the U.S. Air Force, in Afghanistan Sept. 15, 2010. Hansen spent those two years following her sons death on sleeping aids, anti-anxiety medication and anti-depressants. She had zero desire to travel from her Athens, Mich., home to Port St. Joe. She was in no mood for a getaway with other women, aunts, mothers, grandmothers and wives, most of By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com In uenza is popping up a bit early this year. Doctors of ces and clinics are reporting an increase in cases of In uenza A in Gulf County in recent weeks as the u season arrives in force, and a bit ahead of schedule. Since we have been open, we have typically seen the u start to show up in November, said Paulina Pendarvis with Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. We have heard reports of in uenza in the area among pediatric patients which is a little early for this area. Pendarvis noted that u season blossoms in the months from November to its peak in January and February. What doctors are currently seeing is Inuenza A H1N1, said Billy Spencer, Infection Control Practitioner at Sacred Heart on the Gulf. He said the best way to prevent the u is By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Port St. Joe Port Authority is seeking a little help from some friends. While the application process for a permit to dredge the shipping channel crawls forward, Port Authority board members, entering a scal year with scant funds dissipating, are trying to remain viable. The application for the permit process hit a major milestone last week with a preapplication meeting with state and federal agencies. Port director Tommy Pitts said that most importantly the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection were represented among more than two dozen staff members from various agencies. On the regulatory side we got a positive response, Pitts said. He said since a shipping channel has long existed in Port St. Joe and was operational and maintained until the 1980s, the dredging is seen as a fairly straightforward dredging project as there are a number of known factors to the area and channel. In addition, inland disposal sites are identi ed and there has been discussion that any suitable material would be used for beach nourishment on St. Joseph Peninsula. The one hurdle that caused the greatest concern, Pitts said, was whether a Corps of Engineers study might have to be undertaken. We are addressing that aggressively, Pitts said, noting it was largely a question of whether the process of permitting the project would be pushed through the bureaucracy or the application could be fast-tracked. Pitts said the intention was to engage Congressman Steve Southerland and Sen. Bill Nelson most prominently to work with and lobby the Corps to move the application process along. We gained con dence from the environmental side, but the Corps bureaucratic By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com First there were eight, then two and now maybe none. Port St. Joe commissioners, particularly Mayor Mel Magidson, were questioning Tuesday their approach for bidding the relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Magidson said research he has been able to pursue in recent weeks raised doubts in his mind as to whether the relocation project as bid to move the lighthouse, two keepers quarters and an oil house together was the proper approach. I personally have not much con dence on the winning bidder being able to do what they said they could do, Magidson said. I am not comfortable turning the project over to them. I think we can save money doing it differently. At a pre-bid conference outlining the project eight contractors picked up packets, showing at least some interest. However, just two turned in bids. While Magidson did not make a formal motion to toss out or rebid the project on most construction projects of this type a bid is applicable for 60 days, said Clay Smallwood of Preble Rish Engineers, acting as project manager at no cost to the city a new approach was on the boards mind. Magidson said he had talked to a man whose company was involved in the restoration of the St. George Island Lighthouse and others with a lighthouse preservation group out of Key West. He found that most lighthouses are brick or masonry Doctors: Flu is here, so vaccinateDredging permit process inches forwardSee FLU A3 See DREDGING A8Commissioners rethink approach on lighthouse relocation PORT ST. JOE CITY COMMISSION See COMMISSION A8 BEACH BLASTThursday, OCTOBER 17, 2013Sisters and Songwriters pick and pack some love For complete schedule and more on Blast on the Beach Songwriters Festival see Page B1.PHOTOS BY CPL. ANDREW HOYLES, USMC | Special to the StarABOVE: This unit was deep enough in country that ground routes for mail were impassable. So planes did the trick, with an air drop of Boxes of Love. RIGHT: A touch of love in the arms, it is back to the barracks. We are pushing the peanut a little further down the road each day. Mel Magidson Port St. Joe mayor FILE PHOTOThe Semper Fi Sisters will hold its Boxes of Love Packing Party beginning at 10 a.m. ET in the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe.See BLAST A5 YEAR 76, NUMBER 1 Songwriters Festival info, schedule B1 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . .A4Letters to the Editor . . . . . . .A4Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . .A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . .A7School News . . . . . . . . . . B3Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4Classi eds . . . . . . . . . .B6-B8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, October 17, 2013 4516846 Friday,October18thTripleTailsSeafood &RawBar 3p.m.&5p.m. Provisions 6p.m. TheThirstyGoat 6:30p.m.,8:30p.m. &10:30p.m. MangoMarley's (centraltimezone) 7p.m.&9p.m.Saturday,October19thDocksideSeafoodandRawBar 11:30a.m.,12:45p.m. 2p.m.FreeSongwriters Workshop LookoutLounge 5p.m.&7p.m. Toucans (centraltimezone) 6p.m.,8p.m.,&10p.m. HaughtyHeron 7p.m.&9p.m.Sunday,October20thIndianPassRawBar 2p.m.,3:30p.m.,5p.m., 6:30p.m.,8p.m. 10p.m.LateNight JamSessionForfulleventschedule, visit:BlastontheBay.com ThisProjectreceivednancial assistancefromtheGulfCountyTDC. ThisProjectreceivednancial assistancefromVisitFlorida. NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:10-31-13CODE:SJ00 THESPECIALTYMEDICALCENTER SKINCANCERcanbepresentwithoutyouknowingit.CALLtodayforaskincancerscreening.DIDYOUKNOWthatstudiesshow: NOW,DIDYOUKNOW? VINCENTIVERS,M.D.301TwentiethStreet|PortSt.Joe,FL32456 850-227-7070|www.iversmd.com ALLMAJOR INSURANCE ACCEPTED9am-6pm 9am-2pm WeemsMedicalCenterWest 135AvenueG,Apalachicola,FL850-653-8853 GoodthingsarebeingsaidaboutWeems! Herearesomerecentcommentsfromourpatients: WeemsMedicalCenterEastwillbeclosed Saturday,October19thandwillreopenonMonday,October21st. By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @valeriegarman vgarman@pcnh.com MEXICO BEACH It may be a far cry from the Bay Countys booming tourism market west of the Hathaway Bridge, but Mexico Beach is carving out its own niche when it comes to visitors. Mexico Beach is obviously a completely different place than Panama City Beach, said Wylie Petty, who manages Mexico Beachs El Governor Motel. We see mainly families with young people or older retired people. Were a slower pace, without a doubt. With only 600 vacation units, the inventory of the quiet coastal community is about 25 times smaller than the roughly 15,000-unit market in Panama City Beach, but its still making strides with it comes to bed tax collections. This summer, bed tax collections in Mexico Beach rose about 10 percent between May and August, contributing to a 7.5 percent increase for scal year 2013. Now, tourism ofcials are hoping a $300,000 marketing grant will help the destination further increase its exposure in the upcoming year. Our budget is a little bit bigger for (scal year) 2014, and well be able to do a little more, said Kimberly Shoaf, director of the Mexico Beach Community Development Council (CDC). Were just going to continue to tell people about Mexico Beach. The grant, secured from the BP-sponsored Gulf Seafood and Promotional Fund, will be used to promote the area through TV spots in areas the CDC has yet to tap into. It will allow us to air into markets that we havent been able to afford before, Shoaf said. New advertising in cities like New Orleans; Houston; Nashville, Tenn.; Baltimore and St. Louis will join the CDCs existing marketing efforts in areas like Atlanta and Birmingham, Ala. Shoaf said the CDC also will continue to promote events and festivals in Mexico Beach, with a big focus on shing tournaments, including the annual Ling Ding Tournament, the Mexico Beach Offshore Classic and the Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association Kingsh Tournament. Other CDC-sponsored events include the Plein Air Paint Out, the Mexico Beach Gumbo Cook-Off and the Mexico Beach Art and Wine Festival. Shoaf said during the fall season, the CDC will shift marketing efforts toward empty nesters and the rst ock of fall snowbirds. Were gearing forward and were letting people know that just because kids go back to school in August doesnt mean the beach is dead, she said. We want them to know that its laid back and its probably what theyre looking for. At the 124-room El Governor Motel, the largest bed tax collector in Mexico Beach, Petty said fall has been busy so far. He said a wet summer kept the motel from breaking any records during the busy season, but he thinks fall numbers should beat last year. I look forward to next year being an even busier year, Petty said. The skys the limit at this point. Chef Ian Williams fixes a cup of gumbo for a patron at the Gumbo Cook-Off in Mexico Beach in February. Mexico Beach has seen an increase in bed tax collections.ANDREW P JOHNSON News Herald le photoMexico Beach tourism grows By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com Another week passes in Mexico Beach, and the Parker House still stands empty and charred. During a workshop two weeks ago, the city council agreed to have a third party evaluate the foundation slab beneath the Parker House. The citys insurance company has insisted the slab is safe to build on but hasnt provided the statement in writing. During the councils regular meeting on Tuesday, city administrator Chris Hubbard said he contacted several structural engineers in the surrounding area and is awaiting proposals to see how much it will cost to bring someone in to evaluate the existing foundation. Councilman Jack Mullen said he planned to meet with the insurance company and to discuss the councils desire to build an elevator in the existing Parker House in the event that repairs are made to the existing building. The city received an insurance payment of $660,000 but Mullen said he planned to ask why additional monies had not been paid in over a year. We have some money, but we still have unanswered questions, Mullen said. Face-to-face contact is the way to get it done. To avoid agitating the insurance company, Councilwoman Tanya Castro suggested Mullen wait to speak with them until after the third-party evaluation was complete in order to present a counterpoint to their claim that the slab is safe to build on. Councilman Lanny Howell agreed with Mullen that going to see the company reps in person was the best course of action. Go down there and talk to them and lets get going, Howell said. Mullen planned to travel to Orlando later in the week for the meeting. The historic Parker House was purchased by the city in mid-2011 with the intention of using it as a new city hall. The building caught re several months later and suffered massive damage.Community gardenIn other business, the council approved allowing a community garden to be constructed at Palms Park off of Seventh Street. The project, spearheaded by April Wisdom, will see construction of 27 raised beds that will be rented to snowbirds who enjoy gardening or area residents who may not have room in their own yards. Wisdoms goal is to connect gardeners in the area and sought approval from the council for the use of the land and to pay for the irrigation of the beds. Construction costs were estimated at $90 a bed and $107 annually for water. The council will allow use of the land and will pay up to $200 a year for water costs and Wisdom will pay for construction of the beds through fundraising events. Community gardens have proven popular in Apalachicola and Destin among other areas, and Wisdom believes a similar area in Mexico Beach will encourage self-reliance and stimulate social interaction. Studies have shown that community gardens can raise property value in the area, Wisdom said. Those interested in renting a plot will need to le an application and pay a $50 fee that covers their gardening for a year. Wisdom plans for the garden to be self-sustaining through those fees. Its a great idea, Mayor Al Cathy said. No timeframe was given for construction of the beds. Mexico Beach awaits 2nd opinion on Parker House

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, October 17, 2013simple get a shot. The vaccine is readily available and in plentiful supply at pharmacies such as CVS and at local physicians ofces. And while vaccines are aimed at particular strains of inuenza from year to year, this years vaccine has thus far proven to be effective to the strain incubating in the population. The vaccine is a good match for what we are seeing this year, Spencer said. And a vaccine should cover you all season. You do not need to have a booster later. The best way to prevent the u is the vaccine. Health ofcials encourage everybody to receive a vaccine, but in particular certain populations those over 60 or babies, those with immune system problems should receive the u vaccination regardless of general health. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the vaccine is effective in preventing u in 60 percent of those who receive it, but most importantly, Spencer said, it will prevent severe complications, for instance pneumonia. You will not end up in the hospital, Spencer said. And lest one thinks a bout of the u will provide the same protection as a vaccine for the rest of the season, Spencer cautions, You can still get sick again. There are other lifestyle choices that will help prevent the u from spreading, either to you or from you. Wash hands frequently and use the alcohol-based germ sanitizers where possible. Avoid large crowds and if sick, stay home; if your child is sick, keep them home. If you believe you have the u, you want to see your doctor and if you are feeling ill, the best thing to keep the u from spreading is for you to stay home and take care of yourself, Spencer said. If you child is sick, dont send them to school. Keep hand-shaking to a minimum or dont shake hands at all. You still need to take precautions, Spencer said. I am not a fan of handshaking. That is how people can get the u. Keep your hands clean. And living right, getting the proper rest, remaining hydrated by drinking plenty of uids, exercising will help boost immune systems and assist your body in ghting off inuenza. The primary message as the u season unfolds: take an illness that the CDC says kills more than 45,000 Americans each year seriously. I dont think people take it seriously, but I will tell you when I actually had a diagnosed case of the u, I was talking to my late grandmother about not going into the light, Pendarvis said. I was that sick. People need to take the u seriously. SeeaTyndallFederalCreditUnionrepresentativeforcompletedetailsanddisclosures.DeferredpaymentoeravailableonautoloansopenedbetweenOctober7,2013andDecember31,2013. Allratesandoersaresubjecttochangewithoutnotice.Membereligibilityrequired;aninitial$1non-refundablemembershipfeewillapply. WEHAVEMOVEDTO: 327REIDAVE (CORNEROF4THSt&REIDAVE.) 850-227-3472 HOURS MONDAYTOWEDNESDAY8AMTO6PM THURSDAYTOSATURDAY8AMTO8PM SUNDAY11AMTO6PM 2077822 Gun ShowFebruary 23rd&24thFt.WaltonBeach FairgroundsFREE PARKINGConcealed WeaponsClassSat/Sun11amor2pmFloridagunshows.comSat9-5Sun10-4 October 26th&27thPanamaCity Fairgrounds By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com The courts have weighed in, the Florida Legislature followed and the Board of County Commissioners will follow suit. The BOCC on Tuesday will consider, during a public hearing, an ordinance codifying policy on public speaking during County Commission meetings. This is not inconsistent with past policy, said county attorney Jeremy Novak. Now it will be county law. The ordinance would dictate that any public comment on any concern or proposition taken up by the BOCC be heard immediately after comments from staff and commissioners on the issue. For any measure or action not on the printed agenda, public comment will be heard prior to board action and must be limited to the measure before the BOCC. Public comment must also be directed to the chairman presiding over the BOCC meeting at the time and must not be directed at staff, individual commissioners or members of the audience. BOCC meetings over the past year have been marked by numerous instances of individuals speaking about private citizens, in the audience and not, as well as comments directed at individual commissioners. The ordinance provides the chairman as the focal point for comment, but also provides the chairman the authority to tell violators of the policy to immediately take a seat. Vulgar, insulting or profane language directed at commissioners, staff or any member of the audience shall not be tolerated and the chairman can request, in the face of such behavior, to have law enforcement remove the person from the meeting room. Commissioner Joanna Bryan suggested during the previous meeting that insulting language can be subjective and sought a clearer denition, which Novak said he would examine and bring back to the BOCC on Tuesday. All speakers will be required to ll out a speakers form: in the case of an item on the agenda the form should be lled out in advance, Novak said; in the case of an item not on the agenda the form must be lled out before the meeting is adjourned. All comments must be made at the podium after the speaker provides their name and address for the record. Individual speakers will have three minutes for comments. A representative of an organization will be granted ve minutes, but only one member of that organization will be allowed to speak. Current policy allows a speaker three minutes, with additional minutes coming only after a majority vote of approval from the board. Those seeking to be placed on the agenda to speak currently are provided six minutes to speak. Under the new ordinance, comments must be limited to the action or measure being taken up at that time by the board. BOCC meetings over the past year have also been highlighted by public comment that has frequently not pertained to a specific issue before the board or about matters and issues that are not even within the authority of the BOCC. Public comment during public hearings or workshops will be limited to the time period set aside for public comment. The provisions do not apply to meetings or issues taken up due to emergency situations; ofcial acts ministerial or ceremonial in nature; or meetings exempt from the provisions under Florida law. The ordinance follows action by the Florida Legislature this past spring which established citizens rights to speak. A Florida appellate court in 2010 ruled that while Floridas Sunshine Law required public boards or commissions to meet in a public forum save under specic circumstances, such as discussing litigation or union negotiating strategy the law contained no mandate on the publics right to speak during such meetings. There was no state law or constitutional guarantee of the publics right to speak before a public board or commission votes on a specic issue. The remedy, the court ruled, would be a change in law. Beginning in 2011, State Sen. Joe Negron introduced a bill to correct that lack of right to speak and in 2013 Negrons bill, including provisions in a Florida House of Representative companion, was overwhelmingly passed. That law authorizes a board or commission to adopt reasonable rules to ensure orderly conduct of the meeting, but prohibits a commission or board from denying public comment on specic issues before the board during that session. That is a monumental shift in state law, Novak said.Special to The StarThe Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College will host a Business Round Table Forum for the local b usiness community.    The goal of the forum is to provide a viable means to drive conversation to identify local economic t opics of real concern.  According to Loretta Costin, Director of the Gulf/Franklin C ampus,  Safeguarding the economic well-being of our local communities is the mission of Gulf C oast State College.   This breakfast is designed for us to learn, share, and engage in meaningful dialogue. The forum is sponsored by the Small Business Development Center at Gulf Coast State College in partnership with the Gulf County Economic Development Alliance and t he Gulf County Chamber.  It will be held 8 a.m. until 9:30 a.m. ET on Tuesday, Oct. 29 at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College, located at 3800 Garrison Avenue in Port St. Joe. This is open to the business community at no cost and a breakfast buffet w ill be provided.  Please RSVP no later than Oct. 2 6.  For event details and to RSVP, please visit www.gulfcoast. edu/smallbusinessforum .  All inquiries should be directed to the Gulf/ Franklin Campus at 227-9670.BOCC set to consider public speaking ordinance Special to The StarTo make sure our ofce is aware of any issue or concerns Gulf County constituents may have, state Sen. Bill Montfords ofce will be holding periodic meetings t o gather your input.  Montfords staff looks forward to seei ng and hearing from you.   The next meeting will be 1-4 p.m. ET Tuesday, Oct. 22 in the second oor Law Library at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. in Port St. Joe. For more information, call the Capital District Ofce at (850) 487-5003.Sen. Montford to hold ofce hours in Gulf CountyVulgar, insulting or profane language directed at commissioners, staff or any member of the audience shall not be tolerated and the chairman can request, in the face of such behavior, to have law enforcement remove the person from the meeting room.GCSC to host business forum FLU from page A1 I dont think people take is seriously, but I will tell you when I actually had a diagnosed case of the u, I was talking to my late grandmother about not going into the light, Pendarvis said. I was that sick. People need to take the u seriously.Paulina Pendarvis Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. www.star.com

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Bass Weejuns Settled My StomachThe combination never worked for me. I dont know if it was the hot dogs, the carnival smell drifting upwards from the damp sawdust mixed with tobacco juice, the heat from the lingering Indian summer, too much cotton candy or the second ride on the tilt-a-whirl. It could have been a combination of all of the above. Heres what I know for sure: try as I might, I could never make it to the Ferris wheel. My stomach just couldnt hold it all in. Shucks, I would be sick before we got over to the little ducks with the numbers on the bottom. The Carroll County Fair was one of the most anticipated weeks in our little world. Wed get excited the moment we spied those yers stapled to every other telephone pole in town smartly announcing the fall return of the rides, eats, excitement, lighted mid-way and the skimpy clad exotic dancers. It was an escape from the mundane. A magical ride to another world! It was curly fries; bobbed up apples; loud circus like music; and Uncle Sam on stilts. Anticipation is often times better than the event. Me, Dennis Coleman and Graylene Lemonds would ride over early in the back of Mr. Colemans pickup. After the second or third year, I knew not to eat the corn dogs and/or the giant funnel cake..and then ride the twister. But I was so hungry. And, listen, that twister looked like the ride of a lifetime! While Dennis and Graylene threw darts at the colored balloons, I was over behind the shrunken heads tent, doing a little hurling of my own! That loud music grew louder. The lights wouldnt stop ashing. I could hear the guy in the red and white stripped coat yelling at the top of his lungs, Step right up ladies and gentlemen and see the greatest show on the midway. She walks, she talks, she crawls on her belly like a reptile, see the incredible Dance of the Seven Veils! Hurry, Hurry, Hurry, one quarter gets you a front row seat! My head was spinning faster than the tilt-a-whirl. I threw up a chocolate chip cookie, two pickled pigs feet and a slaw dog Id eaten back in April. I promised myself a hundred times I wasnt going to do this ever again! Of course, the next year I was right back in the same place, eating and riding and getting sick. Wasnt it Einstein who said it was idiotic to repeat the same action over and over but somehow expect a different result? I thought I would outgrow the sickness. I never did. One year I concentrated on the side shows. I paid a dime to see a two headed calf. The picture outside showed a big cow with de nitely two heads looking in opposite directions. Inside, the actual calf was a miniature thing in a large jar of formaldehyde that could, if you looked closely, be a two headed calf. Of course, it could also just have been a miniature thing in a jar. I paid another dime to see the bearded lady. She had a big black beard all right. But she was up on this raised stage and I couldnt get close enough to give it a yank. She might have been on the up and upbut I dont know to this day if what I saw was what I saw. I had no luck pitching pennies into the shallow glass saucers. I threw softballs at stacked up bowling pins. I shot a BB gun at moving targets. If I did win a prize it was never the big teddy bear. I always got stuck with the psychedelic pencil with the feathers sticking out where the eraser ought to be or those Chinese handcuff things where you stuck a nger in each end. One year I went over to the livestock show. I walked around looking at chickens, pigs and cows for an hour before it dawned on mewe had chicken, pigs and cows at the house. What was I doing wasting my time here! I got so distraught I ate two foot longs, a fudge brownie and a green candied apple. And then I rode the scrambler. That machine was aptly named. It pushed my liver up beside my thorax, my left lung dropped below my right kidney, my esophagus was thrown plum out of my body and I didnt nd my pituitary gland until years later when I took an army physical. It was the sickest Ive ever been! I was surprised in high school when Billie Jean insisted that I take her to the fair. She was the rst girl Id ever really dated. I bought a new pair of Bass Weejuns penny loafers to impress her. Of course, I was too cool for socks and my new Haggar pants really set those shoes off. Wed just started down the mid way when she suggested we get some food. No I stated rather emphatically. She steered us over to the tilt-awhirl. I just loved this ride. No. Lets get on the zipper. No. How about the NO! I liked her you understand, but Id paid almost forty dollars for those new Weejuns. I wasnt about to throw up on them the rst day I took them out of the box!Respectfully,Kes Patriotic supportDear Editor, Thanks, The Star, for the patriotism support in the area and especially to Tim Croft for his added help.Port St. Joe ChapterDARWake-up callDear Editor, Thanks, Water Department, for the Sunday, 3:50 a.m. wake-up call to boil water. I jumped out of bed to take care of that.Colleen BurlingamePort St. Joe In 2002, Congress passed legislation to create an income tax credit designed to encourage lowerand middleincome people to save money for retirement. The savers credit, worth up to $1,000 a year for individuals ($2,000 for couples ling jointly), rewards people for contributing to an IRA or 401(k) plan. Regrettably, the people most likely to bene t from the savers credit are also those who can usually least afford to set aside money for retirement. It doesnt help that only onequarter of people earning less than $50,000 even know the credit exists. But if you can squeeze a few dollars out of your budget, the savers credit is worth pursuing. Tax credits reduce the amount of income tax paid, dollar for dollar; so many low-income people can recoup the amount they contribute to retirement accounts by up to 50 percent through reduced taxes. And those whose employers match a portion of their 401(k) contributions reap even bigger rewards. Another good selling point: Parents or grandparents who want to jumpstart their lowincome kids retirement savings can fund their IRA or 401(k) contribution, thereby making them eligible for the savers credit even if they cant afford to contribute on their own. Heres the nitty-gritty on the savers credit: The savers credit is a nonrefundabletax credit, which means it reduces income taxes owed, dollar for dollar although it wont generate a tax refund if the credit is more than the taxes you owe. The savers credit helps offset part of the amount you voluntarily contribute to an IRA or 401(k) plan. Your credit amount is based on your tax ling status, adjusted gross income and the amount you contribute to qualifying retirement programs. It can be claimed by: Married couples ling jointly with adjusted gross income (AGI) of no more than $59,000. Heads of households with AGI up to $44,250. Singles (or married ling separately) with AGI up to $29,500. The credit rate is 10 percent, 20 percent or 50 percent of the rst $2,000 you contribute ($4,000 for married couples ling jointly), depending on your AGI; the lower your AGI the higher the percentage. For example: Single lers with an AGI up to $17,500 receive a 50 percent credit on the rst $2,000 they contribute (i.e., up to a $1,000 credit); 20 percent on AGI up to $19,250 ($200 credit); and 10 percent on AGI up to $29,500 ($100 credit). Anything over $29,500, you dont qualify. For joint lers the credit amount limits are: 50 percent on up to $35,500 AGI (50% X $4,000 $2,000); 20 percent on up to $38,500 ($800); and 10 percent on up to $59,000 ($400). Other eligibility rules: You must be at least age 18. You cant be claimed as a dependent on someone elses return. You cant have been a full-time student during any part of ve calendar months in 2013. You must contribute to a 401(k) by December 31, 2013, or to an IRA by April 15, 2014. Important Note: You cannot claim the credit using IRS Form 1040 EZ, the form many lowerincome people le. To claim it, you must submit IRS Form 8880 with Form 1040, 1040A or 1040NR. Its a little extra bookkeeping, but could be worth the effort. Saving money for the future is never easy, especially when youre struggling to pay daily bills. But if you can somehow manage to take advantage of the savers credit now, youll thank yourself at retirement. Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. Follow him on Twitter @PracticalMoney.Lower income? Dont pass up the savers credit JASON ALDERMAN HUNKER DOWNKesley ColbertPage 4 Thursday, October 17, 2013 Letter to the EDITORIts now been a few days since I have been out of work due to the government shutdown. I miss my job and hope that everything works out soon. Otherwise, I have no comment on the whys and the hows about things like this happening. Ive given my life to science not like the fellow who kept me from going to dental school, but to work on future cool things in space. It really wasnt that fellows fault. He was just there when I visited the dental school in college with other students who were interested in becoming dentists. They pulled back the sheet, there he was and I no longer had the desire to be a dentist. I guess it would be more appropriate to say this fellow had given his body to science. At work, I get to do math. I enjoy it. I miss it. I also miss my medical practice. My medical practice? Yes, my medical practice. Its been doing very well. About a year ago, I had to change phone numbers at work. I kept getting these calls from people telling me not to call them anymore. They never believed me when I said I hadnt called them. They were yelling and screaming at me and saying some pretty rough things. The best I could gure was that a collection company had either purposely or by mistake used my work phone number for what folks could see on their caller identi cation. They would call and leave folks who owed money threatening messages, and then the folks saw my number and called me back. I asked for a new number. It solved the problem. In the last few months, I have been getting a couple of calls a day for medical advice. It seems my new number was listed on a website for our clinic at work. For the rst week, I told folks that there was a mistake and I would see about getting the clinic to put the correct number on the website. Now please understand that what Im about to tell you is true, but I let every person who called me my mistake off the hook pretty quickly and let them know that I was a mathematician, not a doctor or a nurse and any advice I was giving had a relative large probability of being useless. People continued to call. I answered the phone as I always do, How can I help you? If the person asked, Is this the clinic? I said, No, they have listed my phone number somewhere by mistake and Im trying to get someone to gure it out. Not all folks asked if they had the right number for the clinic, some went right into telling me their ailments. What was I supposed to do? I like helping people. My Papa had all of the Fox re books. In addition to teaching you how to dress hogs, build log cabins, make cheese and hunt bears, the Fox re books contained medical advice including how herbs and other things could be used to treat various pains and injuries. I had watched my Papa spray Lysol on everything from dandruff to eas; I even assisted him on occasion. Papa also thought that soda waters were medicinal and you should drink at least one per day. He was partial to Nehi, but admitted Coca-Cola actually was the most potent. We werent Coke People, preferring an RC or a Double Cola to a Coke when we wanted something that wasnt orange, red or purple. But when things got dicey and you had to go for a sure cure you pulled the cap off of a bottle of Coca-Cola. It was more of a medicine that it was a soda water. The experience with my grandfather, as well as watching various movies and television shows, allows me to diagnose and treat a number of basic illnesses and other things that hinder people on the job. Hello, how can I help you? Do you have anything for an upset stomach that I could stop by and pick up? You dont need to stop by, just go get a Coke out of the machine and drink it. Dont get a Pepsi; you have to drink a Coca-Cola. Ive also heard that a rhubarb root worn on a string around your neck will also help. Oh, by the way, this is not the clinic. Hello, how can I help you? Im having trouble with a tooth. Which side of your face is it on? The right side. Why? Well, you should take your shoe and sock off of your left foot and tie a string around the little toe on your left foot. Are you kidding? No, I am not. Do you have any other advice? Well yes, this is not the clinic and you should probably go to the dentist. What are you? Im a mathematician who thumbed through my Papas Fox re books many years ago. Laughter.. Hello, how can I help you? I feel a sore throat coming on Trying My Patients CRANKS MY TRACTORBN HeardSee CRANKS A5 USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 OPINION www.starfl.com ASection

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whom had not suffered the tragedy that made Hansen a Gold Star mom. She was the elephant in the room who some shun out of fear of reminder of the ultimate sacrice any of them might have to make. Further, Hansen didnt want to hear stories from other mothers about the sons and daughters who had returned. Hansens had not. But a friend in an online support group for Gold Star moms suggested after two years of mourning, maybe Hansen could use the elixir of the sisterhood. For me, the Beach Blast was lifechanging, Hansen said. Everybody was so kind and understanding. That sisterhood is the word; you never felt like a stranger. It made me realize I need to put everything aside and enjoy my life. I really came back a changed person. For two years I was in a fog. I lost myself. I literally found myself at the Beach Blast, and I wasnt even there to do that. I was there to escape, to get away. (The Beach Blast) made me realize I could go on. Four days of fun, laughter, tears and stories shared. Three nights of acting sometimes, Hansen said, like a 15-year-old girl again complete with atulence seat cushion. Today, most of the medications are put away, and though she will never be the same after the death of her son, there will always be a hole, the Beach Blast has helped breathe life into Hansens life. We had a blast, just a great time, Hansen said. The one thing I was concerned about being a Gold Star mom it was hard to be around people talking about their kids. But the ladies let me tell my story and they shared theirs. They changed my attitude; I can listen to other people now when they talk about their kids. It felt good to be around Blue Star moms (those whose sons and daughters have returned safely). To me that is honoring my son. He would want me to honor him by listening to their stories and to have fun. That honors him and his brothers and sisters in arms.Full circleFor Paula Lowry of Georgia, the Beach Blast has been something of an arc. A newbie ve years ago when she was a co-founder of the Semper Fi Sisters, then a dozen or so Marine moms, formed around the commonality of sons and daughters deployed to a war zone. Now, a vice-president of the organization, Lowry, as with several of this weeks Beach Blast attendees, could be considered a veteran of the home front. As her son has completed his tour of duty and came home, she has also graduated. It really has become a full circle, Lowry said. We are all on different levels in this ride we call a roller coaster. We have cooked, ate, cried, laughed. The compassion you feel, the empathy you feel. It is a sisterhood, networking, giving back. And now being able to reach down and lift someone up and say, Youll get through this. It has been such a fullling experience. And from that experience, it puts things in perspective. The perspective comes in signicant layers via education, lessons the sisters have not only absorbed but disseminated, the ripples now spreading, literally, across the globe. I felt very clueless. Newbie is appropriate, said Melanie Meadows of South Carolina, also one of the original Semper Fi Sisters. It is all totally new. It is not like sending your son off to college. When I walked through the door (at the Beach Blast) I knew I was in the right place. Having the support of women who speak the same language, that was amazing. This year, being an ofcial veterans mom I feel I have a lot to share. I want to get that out. I also feel I have more to learn. That these women 12 that rst year, more than 70 last year and numbers unknown at press time this year would nd Port St. Joe was by happenstance, a grain of conversation that became a getaway castle. But yet they have come to feel embraced by the community, by the kindness and kinship they feel in this bit of paradise. I love Port St. Joe, Lowry said. Its such a giving, caring community. From the beginning they have really embraced our mission. We travel at our own expense, but wherever we are we are there to serve our heroes. That is our mission. To support those who protect us our heroes. This is our way of giving back. And the women now go back to their communities and pay it forward. Its a great feeling to pay it forward. 9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310 GREATSELECTIONOFALLYOURFAVORITEBEER,WINE&SPIRITS S SPIRIT& WINE BEERVORITEA FOURY ALL OFTION SELECTGREA ONTHEPOOPDECK UPCOMINGEVENTS -INTHECROWSNESTFRIDAY&SATURDAY9PM KARAOKE DANCING UPCOMING EVENTS RANDYSTARK UPCOMING EVENTS RANDY&ART WS NEST OTHE CR IN WS NEST OTHE CR IN THELP'S UPCOMING EVENTS WS NEST OTHE CR IN WS NEST OTHE CR IN WS NEST OTHE CR IN RANDYSTARK BLASTONTHEBAY SONGWRITER'SFESTIVAL INTHECROW'SNEST5PMBRETTJONES,JILLIAJACKSON, JESSEERICE,JERRYSALLEY 7PMWILLRAMBEAUX,SHERRIEAUSTIN, BROOKEEDEN,SHANEHINES SEAFOOD PLATTERChoiceofside&saladbar 114SailorsCove PortSt.Joe,FL32456 850-227-1386HOURS: Sunday:11amto2pm Monday:Closedallday Tuesday:11amto2pm Wednesday:11amto2pm Thursday:11-2pm,4-9pm Friday:11-2pm,4-10pm Saturday:4pmto10pmwww.ronniebs.com Yourchoiceof:Sandwiches,Fish,Shrimp ChickenTenderBaskets orax-it-yourselfSaladBar$595 $7RonnieBsFamousPRIMERIB12oz.Mouth-wateringPrimeRib, yourchoiceofside&saladbar$1995 $1895 $1095SUNDAYLUNCHSOUTHERN HOMESTYLECOOKINGChoiceofmeat,2veggies,bread&dessert THURSDAYNIGHT FRIDAY&SATURDAYNIGHT SUNDAYLUNCH :e of our choicY LUNCH:TUESFRI. PHILLYFRIDAY11am-2pmSignature PhillyCheeseSteakmadefromPrimeRibStarting at Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs S LocalThe Star| A5Thursday, October 17, 2013 BLAST from page AA1By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Paula Lowry surely possesses the DNA of a saleswoman. Get her talking about the Semper Fi Sisters, the non-prots mission and the Marketplace which is a key part of every Beach Blast Packing Party, and Lowry cant contain the enthusiasm. It feels so good to be part of an organization you feel so passionate about, Lowry said of the Semper Fi Sisters, for which she is co-founder and vice president. Lowrys primary task in preparation for this years Beach Blast is the composition of the Marketplace, which will be open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET on Saturday at the Centennial Building while the sisters are packing Boxes of Love. The Marketplace is where locals and those joining the Semper Fi Sisters on this Beach Blast can sell their wares in support of the mission the Semper Fi Sisters have carved out for themselves. We are in the background, but we are here to support our troops who support us. They are our heroes, Lowry said. The Marketplace is open to the public and many of the 6-foot tables the ladies reserve will be operated by the loved ones, wives, daughters, mothers, aunts, grandmothers, of deployed members of the military. It is a nice way to get a chance to meet and talk to some of the ladies, Lowry said. And everything goes back into our mission, to support those who support us. The Marketplace, Lowry said, will offer a vast array of homemade and handmade items, from crocheted slippers to zany scarves to candles, jewelry, quilts, blankets, cookbooks and more and more. A lot of the ladies make their own, Lowry said. We just put the word out, and we got a great response this year. This is a nice way to give back.Marketplace supports SFS missionand I wanted to see if I can stop by. You can stop by if you need to, but Ill tell you what you need to do. What? Well, I have heard that if you tie a dirty sock around your neck when you go to bed, it will cure a sore throat. You are kidding. No, Ive really heard that. Im from Alabama. I wish I could get you and this other fellow together who has a toothache. Why? He probably has a dirty sock available. Silence You know this is not the clinic. Do you really think the sock will work? Ive never tried it, but let me know if it does. Hello, how can I help you? My allergies are acting up. Have you tried going to the doctor? What are you? I calculate the probability of things going wrong and give free medical and legal advice with no guarantee of results. Well, what would you do? Have you tried Apple Cider Vinegar? That sounds nasty. It is used to treat all sorts of things including sinus infections, warts, acne, gout, sunburn and arthritis. Does it work? I really dont know, but it can be used as aftershave if it doesnt. Is this the clinic? No, it is not. Hello, how can I help you? I have a rash and I want someone to look at it. Have you tried spraying Lysol on it? No, why would I do that? It might work. Im not spraying Lysol there Stop this is not the clinic. Try the Lysol at your own risk. Why did you tell me to use Lysol? You said you had a rash. Now if you told me you had eas or dandruff, I would have prescribed the same thing. As you can see, I need to get back to work. The three to ve minutes I spend during the course of the day providing medical advice is very important to a lot of folks. Ok, maybe a few folks and maybe its not that important. I will note I have had two repeat customers/ patients. Im not sure if they called back by mistake or if they value my opinion, it really doesnt matter. Im thinking about getting a new lab jacket that doesnt have paint on it. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor. com. CRANKS from page AA4 The Semper Fi Sisters Beach Blast began Wednesday and continues through Saturdays Packing Party for Boxes of Love to send to deployed troops. The Packing Party will be held 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. ET at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe.SPe E Ci I Al L toTO The HE St T Ar RBoxes of love start as donations at dozens of locations set up by Sisters across the country. These from Walton County were loaded for transport to Port St. Joe and Saturdays Packing Party. Photos HOTOS BY CC Pl L AA Ndre DRE W Ho O Yles LES UU SMC C | Special to the StarBoxes of Love are distributed to a Marine unit in Afghanistan.

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A Monday-Thursday7AM-6PM(EST) Friday-Saturday7AM-7PM(EST) BWOHuntingHeadquarters: CAMOARRIVINGDAILY WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Oct.1783 6640% Fri,Oct.1882 6630% Sat,Oct.1981 6730% Sun,Oct.2080 6630% Mon,Oct.2179 5830% Tues,Oct.2279 6960% Wed,Oct.2376 6083% SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomRed snapper are still open for the taking in state waters this week. The closing day is set for Oct. 21 in state waters, so get them now! Good sized snapper are holding on just about any wreck or site you go to. Gag grouper and amberjack are also being caught on these same sites. Trout and red fish are still active this week. Good reports from Pig Island and Eagle Harbor are on the rise and plenty of fish are in St. Joe Bay. Some flounder action is hot in 20+ ft of water on the outside near shore wrecks. This should stay hot for a while, so try and find a good weather day.By DAVID DAMONUnit Commissioner, BSA Special to The Star Whatever Floats Your Boat is an annual boat race sponsored by the FSU Coastal & Marine Laboratory at Turkey Point. The rules are pretty simple, fabricate a boat out of recycled materialsand race it. Every part and every piece must be recycled or re-purposed and held together with used fasteners and hopefully oat long enough to get its crew around the race course. This past Saturday, the second annual WFYB regatta was held. The race course was laid out in a north/south con guration. Starting at an in atable killer whale, you paddle or sail downwind about a hundred yards, then make a 180 degree turn around in atable Nemo and head north against wind and tide to the nish line. Easy enough for a normal boat, but these boats were anything but normal. By mid-morning on Saturday, anticipation was mounting as entrants began pulling into the staging area across the basin from the marine lab. It was a buzz of last minute fabrication and modi cations along with crews making the rounds checking out their competition. One by one each of the craft was inspected by the team of three judges. Before the racing could begin, an inspection was required to con rm that the rules had been strictly adhered to, every part of each boat, down to the paddles must be recycled with only one exception, duct tape. Some boats had themes, some boats had never been tried or tested and at least one, would never hold together long enough to make it to the starting line. There were eleven boats in all. The intrepid crews came from all over north Florida. One boat, or raft might be a better description, came all the way from Jacksonville, built by a group of adventurous University of North Florida Marine Biology students. Our boat, Drumroll Please was built by the Boy Scouts from Troop 8 and Crew 8 in Wakulla County. These Scouts, also known as The Barrelheads, were the returning champions from the 2012 Regatta, back again with recycled 55 gallon drums. This year, instead of a catamaran style craft, we had fabricated a long center hull with two smaller drums as outrigger oats, or amas, to keep the long hull from rolling over. The six drums (donated by St. Marks Powder) were bolted together, end to end for a total length of just under 18. It was designed for a four man crew to sit on top, with cut out sections or cockpit, for your legs. The cut out pieces were then used to form the blades for the paddles. Over the course of about three weeks, our Scouts built, tested and modi ed their craft. It was a marvel of low tech engineering and creativity. It would win no contest for beauty, but function it did, and it did it well. The crew of Drumroll Please and The Barrelheads was made up of two Eagle Scouts, Gil Damon and Zack Dunaway and two adult Scout Leaders, Al e Boone, and myself, David Damon. Over a twelve year period, this group of Scouts had been in many waterfront competitions, usually against other Scout troops. They have a long track record of winning anything water related, they were in their element. As the rst of two heats was held, the crew of Drumroll Please watched as the rst place craft crossed the nish line in around six minutes. We now knew that the six minutes was a time we had to beat, along with any boats in the second heat. As we lined up at the starting line, the horn blasted and we were off. It was a synchronized effort of paddling combined with the latest in recycled naval engineering as Drumroll Please quickly took the lead. The hard work and fun had paid off, the last minute untested changes to our craft proved to work out well. In a few short minutes after the blast of the horn, Drumroll Please crossed the nish line to the cheers of the spectators lining the seawall. Troop and Crew 8 would again take home the most amazing rst place trophy, itself built from recycled materials and spray painted gold! Along with the trophy, they received gift certi cates from the race sponsors Bay Leaf Market in Crawfordville and Sopchoppy Pizza. Three other trophies were also awarded in the spirit of the event, Most creative use of materials, Titanic Award to the most spectacular failure, and the Peoples Choice. A special thanks goes out to the amazing staff at the FSU Coastal & Marine Lab for all their hard work and efforts! Whatever Floats Your Boat is a fun way to bring awareness to the importance of recycling. In Scouting, we have a program called Leave No Trace that encourages Scouts to be aware of their surroundings and to limit their impact on the environment, that also includes recycling. It had been a fun day for all, both spectators and participants! If you missed this years race, come out next year, Troop 8 and Crew 8 will be back with an all new craft. Better yet, get a group of friends together, build a recycled boat and show up next year the starting line.St. Joe Peninsula State Park explodes in colorSpecial to The StarSummer comes to an end and fall explodes with color. Blazing Stars, False Foxglove and Goldenrod bloom throughout St. Joseph Peninsula State Park this time of year. As the cooler weather settles in, migrations of butter ies utter on and around the owers. Sulfur butter ies, swallowtails, and Gulf Fritillary are abundant all through the park.Climbing spinachSummer gardening on the coast can be a challenge. Climbing spinach is a new vegetable that repays a few square feet of garden space with delicious greens and a treat for the eye. Climbing spinach (Basella alba) also known as Malabar spinach, Ceylon spinach, Indian spinach, Saan Choy, Shan Tsoi, Luo Kai, Shu Chieh, Lo Kwai and the red vine is easy to grow and versatile in the kitchen. The beautiful vine is unrelated to true spinach but produces a bumper crop of large leaves that are remarkably similar in taste. Unlike spinach, this plant is heat-tolerant and thrives locally in full sun or light shade. Native to India and Indonesia, the plant is used in traditional cuisines from Japan to Africa. It has also been introduced to South America and the Caribbean. Common Malabar spinach has yellowish stems and green leaves and is a pleasing enough plant, but its the red-stemmed cultivar rubra that really catches the eye. Thick red stems contrast wonderfully with twoto four-inch-long dark green leaves mottled with red veins. Malabar spinach grows eight to 10 feet tall and wide and can easily grow a foot a day. Provide a fence or trellis for support. The vine produces tiny pink owers that develop into pretty little purple berries. The juice from the berries is a natural food coloring. Malabar spinach prefers a humus-rich, sandy loam. It may be a perennial here but, just in case, dry some of the berries and store them in a screwtop jar to plant in the early spring. Start seeds in pots and transplant established seedlings. This plant is insect and disease resistant. The succulent leaves and stem tips are rich in vitamins A and C and are a good source of iron and calcium. They may be eaten raw in salads, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, or added to soups, stews, tofu dishes, and curries. You can also add them to quiche, omelets, turnovers, and potpies. Use as a substitute for any leafy greens. The sprouted seeds are a tasty addition to salads and sandwiches. It has a thickening effect much like okra when added to soups and stews. Traditionally, the plant is chewed to relieve mouth ulcers. The cooked roots are thought to curb diarrhea, while the cooked leaves and stems are a mild, effective laxative. The sap is used to treat acne and soften the skin. Ongoing research is examining the traditional role of Malabar spinach as a remedy for infertility in men. BUDS N BUGSLois SwobodaMalabar spinach thriving in Dan Sangarees garden.LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Whatever oats your boat race Page 6 Thursday, October 17, 2013 A Gulf Fritillary alights on Blazing Stars. Goldenrod blooms.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASectionSpecial to The StarThe Franklin County Travel Ball team, which includes several boys from Gulf County, traveled to Marianna Saturday, Sept. 21 and competed in a Travel Ball USA Tournament. After four games of play the Angels pulled it off, winning the championship game against the Defuniak Springs Patriots 8-7. The team, for boys age 11 and younger, and coached by Rhett Butler, Buck Smith, and Justin Odom, opened the tourney with a loss to the Tallahassee Tomahawks 12-8. But they snapped back into winning form by downing Defuniak Springs 15-4, and then the Jackson County Bulldogs 14-5 to earn their way into the championship game. WATERPROBLEM???CALLPanhandlePureWater,Inc.850-763-1209SALESRENTALS WeServiceKineticoUnits! 6:00p.m. Eastern SilentAuctionandhorsdoeuvresreceptionwithcashbarat St.JosephBayGolfClubClubhouse.Costofadmittance,$10.00 (includestwofreedrinks).12:30p.m. Eastern SalutingAmericasVeteransCeremony 1:00p.m. Eastern ShotgunStart 4playerbest-ballformat;$55nonmember, $45memberifregisteringatleast2weeks priortotheevent.Plus$5afterthat. Mealandawardsceremonytofollow.Cashprizesinclude: $400:FirstPlaceteam $350:SecondPlaceteam $200:ThirdPlaceteam Hole-in-OneChallenge: Cashprize$10,000$500DivisionSponsor $250BrigadeSponsor $100CompanySponsor $50PlatoonSponsorHolesponsorshipsalsoavailable. Sponsorsnameswillbepostedon allsignsandwebsite.Atwo-dayeventtohonor ourveteransandbenet CampGordonJohnston WorldWarIIMuseum (Carrabelle,FL)andSt.JosephBayGolfClub. DanVanTreese:850-227-8138 TonyMinichiello:850-528-2125SpecialLodgingPackage: MainstaySuites:$69.99Queen Suitepernight,$89.99King DeluxeSuitepernight. anaturalescape.com TouristDevelopmentCouncil Wewa to hold Ryan Teall memorial scholarship fundraiser Nov. 1Star Staff ReportA Ryan Teall Memorial Scholarship fundraising event is Nov. 1 at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School. The event will include a 3-on-3 basketball tournament, which will begin at 5 p.m. CT; a 3-point shooting contest which will occur between tournament games; Bunko and a concession stand. Cost of the 3-on-3 tournament is $20 per team; the 3-point shootout will be $5 to enter; and the Bunko will also be $5 per person. To register call Adele Paul at 639-2228 or Kerri Barlow at 832-8659. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR Star Staff ReportPort St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School soccer coach Gary Hindley, along with Athletic Director Chuck Gannon and Principal Jeremy Knapp, released the 2013-14 schedule last week. Hindley, in his fth year at Port St. Joe, carries a 67-46-10 record at the school, 418291-26 overall. The girls and boys soccer squads move to an expanded 1-1A District that includes six schools and spans from Niceville to Tallahassee. Port St. Joe will face each district foe, Rocky Bayou, Tallahassee Maclay, Lafayette Mayo, Tallahassee John Paul II, West Gadsden, and Franklin once each in district play with a second non-district game versus local rival Franklin County. Port St. Joe, which began girls practices Oct. 7 with the boys starting up this past Monday, will host a girls Preseason Jamboree on Oct. 26. The Jamboree will feature the host school, Lynn Haven Mosley, Panama City Bay and Panama City North Bay Haven. A boys Preseason Jamboree, which will include Port St. Joe, Rocky Bayou and Tallahassee Godby, will be played Nov. 2. The regular season kicks off Nov. 12 when Port St. Joe hosts Malone, the girls beginning at 5 p.m. ET and the boys at 7 p.m. Currently, the girls pre-season roster numbers 23, once the volleyball season concludes, with 28 boys, once football wraps up play, on the roster. All home games are played at the Sam Cox Field at the Lamar Faison Soccer facility, adjacent to Port St. Joes Shark Stadium.Star Staff ReportThe nal full week of the regular season was symbolic of the entire slate for the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School volleyball team some positives, some negatives. Port St. Joe (11-9 overall, 6-4 in district play) lost a close match with Liberty County but swamped Franklin County in the Lady Tiger Sharks nal two district matches of the year. Traveling to Liberty County last Monday, Port St. Joe fell in four close games, 18-25, 25-21, 17-25 and 20-25. Nicole Endres and Addison Rice each had six kills and Stephanie Brinkmeier had ve. The following night at home against Franklin County, the Lady Tiger Sharks won in three games, 25-14, 25-21 and 25-18. Haley Wood had a teamleading seven kills and Endres and Callie Fleshren had ve apiece. Fleshren added 11 assists and Daphne Baptista had eight. Last Thursday, Port St. Joe traveled to Bay High and were thumped 18-25, 20-25 and 18-25. They had too much offense, said Port St. Joe coach Wayne Taylor. We played hard and stayed with the much bigger (Class) 5A school. The junior varsity lost at Liberty County, 20-25 and 22-25, took three sets to beat Franklin County, 12-25, 25-13 and 15-6 and lost to Bay High 13-25 and 12-25. The Lady Tiger Sharks lost to Rutherford Tuesday evening in a tough, hardfought match, 25-20, 24-26, 25-22, 19-25 and 19-21. The Class 5A Lady Rams just proved too much for Class 1A Port St. Joe. Endres had eight kills and Fleshren seven. Shannon Pridgeon had four aces while Rice and Brinkmeier each had three. Pridgeon also had three blocks. The PSJ junior varsity lost in straight sets. Tonight, the Lady Gator varsity hosts Wewahitchka at 6 p.m. ET for the annual Dig Pink event. Further, it is senior night and the team will recognize seniors Endres and Brittany King.Dig PinkDig Pink is an event played to support the SideOut Foundations Dig Pink National Breast Cancer Awareness Rally to promote breast health information as well as raise funds to further research. Dig Pink events give spectators the opportunity to become involved by making donations to the cause and by pinking-out (i.e. donning pink in support) and event t-shirts will be sold. The proceeds from all donations, the gate and tshirt sales will bene t the Side-Out Foundation. The foundation is a nonpro t established in 2004 to unite volleyball players and coaches from across the country to work toward the goal of making a signi cant and identi able difference in the lives of breast cancer patients and their families. The organization works to advance clinical trials, increase patient support services and educate communities.PSJHS soccer schedule set*denotes District game; all times ET except where noted Oct. 26 (H): Girls Jamboree (PSJ, Mosley White, Bay, North Bay Haven) Nov. 2 (H): Boys Jamboree (PSJ Purple, Rocky Bayou Blue, Godby, PSJ Gold, Rocky Bayou White) Nov. 12 (H): Malone, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. Nov, 19 at North Bay Haven, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. CT Nov. 21 *(H): Franklin County, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. Nov. 23 at Tallahassee Godby, girls at 1 p.m.; boys at 3 p.m. Nov. 26 (H): Baker, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. Dec. 3 *(H): Lafayette Mayo, girls at 4 p.m.; boys at 6 p.m. Dec. 6 at Rocky Bayou, girls at 4 p.m.; boys at 6 p.m. CT Dec. 7 (H): Tallahassee Godby, girls at 1 p.m.; boys versus Mosley at 3 p.m. Dec. 10 *(H): West Gadsden, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. Dec. 12 *(H): Tallahassee John Paul II, girls at 4 p.m.; boys at 6 p.m. Dec. 14 at Franklin County, girls at 4 p.m.; boys at 6 p.m. Dec. 17 at Freeport, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. CT Dec. 20 *at Tallahassee Maclay, girls at 3 p.m.; boys at 5 p.m. Jan. 7 at Spring eld Rutherford, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. CT Jan. 9 at Marianna, girls at 4 p.m.; boys at 6 p.m. CT Jan. 10 (H): South Walton, girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m. Jan. 13 at Tallahassee Maclay in district tournament Jan. 14 (H): Wakulla, B at 5 p.m.; varsity at 7 p.m. (boys only) Jan. 15 at Tallahassee Maclay girls district semi nals Jan. 16 (H): Tallahassee Godby, 7 p.m. (boys only) Jan. 17 at Tallahassee Maclay girls district nals Jan. 20 at Tallahassee Maclay boys district quarter nals Jan. 21 at Tallahassee Maclay boys district semi nals Jan. 24 at Tallahassee Maclay boys district nalsThe 2013-14 Soccer Schedule Page 7 Thursday, October 17, 2013 Port St. Joe splits nal district volleyball matchesAngels win gold in Travel Ball tourney CHALA PARISH | Special to The StarSmiles are all around after the Angels win. Sports SHORT RYAN TEALLCOURTESY STEVE WHEALTON | Special to The StarAs Addison Rice protects the new Callie Fleshren goes well out of bounds to return a South Walton volley earlier this season.

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, October 17, 2013process was discouraging, Pitts said. Now the tasks have been dened (for the permit application) and they can be negotiated for completing those tasks (with the ports engineers) and pursuing the permitting. The source of the discouragement over the potential for the Corps bureaucracy to swallow the project comes from timing. A detailed study of the dredging project would require as much as a year, possibly more. The St. Joe Company, the Port Authoritys collaborator on developing the Port of Port St. Joe, has two Letters of Intent with regional energy companies to ship wood pellets through the Port of Port St. Joe. Those LOIs hinge signicantly on the dredging of the shipping channel by 2015. Ancillary to the dredging permit is seeking economic justication, based on return on investment, to help build the case for the dredging. The Port Authority has explored contracting for a study, but cost is prohibitive. The hope is to solicit assistance from the Haas Center at the University of West Florida, which researches and analyzes economic trends in Northwest Florida. A representative from the Haas Center was due at last weeks meeting, but was unable to make the meeting to provide more details. If the Center is able to do the work, it could perform the study faster and at less expense, Pitts said. The cost of the study could come from the Florida Department of Transportation grant to the Port Authority to pursue the dredge permit. The cost (of the study), however, could be an issue, Pitts said.Operational viability in questionWhile the Port Authority pursues the dredging, considered the key to unlocking the ports potential through development, board members continued to wrestle with dwindling resources. As part of a community outreach campaign, board member Johanna White said she received positive response from the Board of County Commissioners and the St. Joe Company. She said Jorge Gonzalez, senior vice president for St. Joe, indicated the company had the resources, talent and people to become the point of contact for the Port Authority. The phones at the Port Authority ofce could be forwarded to St. Joe, which would screen prospects, send out marketing materials and perform other administration duties, White said. Maybe just getting the phones forwarded and information to the appropriate people will work, White said. Further, county administrator Don Butler indicated county grant administrator Towan Kopinsky could handle the administration of the FDOT grant the Port Authority received, and for which St. Joe is providing the local match, to pursue the permitting. White added that Barry Sellers, executive director of the Gulf County Economic Development Alliance, Inc., could continue to assist the Port Authority as an on-theground marketing point of contact for the port. We are trying to cover all the bases, said board chair Leonard Costin. We appreciate what (Pitts is) doing and would love to keep (him), but we have no money. Pitts has worked off and on this year for $1 per month, receiving a small stipend for a few months as part of a state grant to craft a Master Plan update. It was discussed last week that Pitts may soon be in a position of accepting another job. Board member Eugene Rafeld, who has been speaking with state ofcials about identifying funding for Port Authority operations, said he had no news to report and he was making progress, but slowly. The consensus on the board was to reach out to the BOCC and city of Port St. Joe for potential assistance in meeting pressing expenditures, particularly liability insurance for port ofcers and fees to the Florida Ports Council, which are critical to maintaining a place in the mix for state funding. We need to focus on that, said board member Jessica Rish. The county doesnt want us to not have a board. The county and the city, those two need to step up before we go to the neighbors for that. She said the Port Authority board should sit down with county and city commissioners to see if we can come up with a plan If they want us to be here. Also looming are legal expenses incurred from the Capital City Bank foreclosure case and general liability insurance for the Port of Port St. Joe. Resident Bill Koran said ofcials with the Genesse Wyoming Railroad, the former AN line, which is inextricably linked to the success of the port, would also have a stake in the future of the Port Authority. We need to move forward on the local level, said Costin, who has for more than a month championed a local fundraising campaign. I dont think we have an alternative in the short term than going to our citizens. I think the last resort is here. AsofNovember1,2013, wewillbeinournewlocationat: 310ReidAvenue PortSt.Joe 850-229-2999 Comecheckoutyourfavorites andthenewitemsinstock! CoastalCabin... W her e the W a t er M eets the W oods $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedby theFSUBoardofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomore easilyrespondtoworkforceneedsinourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversitybyhelpingusbuildan endowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallow FSUPanamaCitytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnew degreeprogramsandprovidenewequipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMary BethLovingoodat(850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs SUPPORTOUR COMMUNITYS UNIVERSITY over brick. The Cape San Blas Lighthouse is a cast iron skeleton. And though that structure was moved before 1900, no one nor any record survives to provide insight into how it was accomplished, Magidson said. Obviously this is a unique project, Magidson said. A uniqueness underscored by contractors who picked up bid packets but did not bid on the project, he added. Some thought they would be shooting in the dark, that there were too many unknowns, Magidson said. The approach suggested by Magidson and to which board members agreed was to consider piecing the project for bid. Contract one company to take apart and move the lighthouse and re-erect it in George Core Park. Someone with knowledge of the structure to understand how to take it apart without damaging it, Magidson said. He added commissioners could bid out the other pieces of the project, the keepers quarters and oil house. We need someone just to move the lighthouse, said Commissioner William Thursbay. Magidson said he would work with Smallwood to consider bid packages and how the project could be segmented out. We are pushing the peanut a little further down the road each day, Magidson said. A complication is the time window commissioners are working under. The U.S. Air Force has granted one six-month time-extension until January 2014 for moving the lighthouse. Dialogue with the Air Force is complicated at this time by the shutdown of the federal government. On a positive note, Duke Energy has donated $25,000 to the relocation effort. Money raised from all sources, local and state now totals $400,000-$500,000, still short of the original bids for relocation. Commissioner Rex Buzzett said while he appreciated the donation he wished the utility would provide a break on the cost of bringing down power lines for ground moving of the lighthouse and ancillary buildings. Magidson said he was still considering options for transporting at least the lighthouse into the city by barge.Affordable housingCommissioners approved an amended Memorandum of Understanding with Paces Foundation for the development of over 70 affordable housing units on the north end of the city. Commissioners made two concessions. One, to waive up to $2,500 in utility fees and second to eliminate a deed clause that would have reverted 46-plus acres earmarked for the development back to the city if the development did not bear fruit. City attorney Tom Gibson said he was comfortable with the revision since the city would not deed the land until there was a closing with nancing lined up by Paces. Gibson said the Florida Housing Finance Corporation, from which the Paces will be applying for tax credits it will leverage for investment in the development, objected to the reversionary clause. DREDGING from page A1 COMMISSION from page A1

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1Section Trivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) Researchers have discovered that doing what regularly can greatly improve your memory? Eating onions, Chewing gum, Reading upside down, Rubbing forehead 2) What are Siberian, South Chinese, Sumatran, Indochinese, and Indian types of? Elephants, Zebras, Tigers, Pandas 3) Where is the longest stretch of perfectly straight train track at 297 miles? Texas, Australia, Mexico, France 4) Demographers say what percent of engaged couples live together before the wedding? 9, 39, 62, 70 5) The Silver Ghost was one of the rst cars built by? Rolls Royce, Ford, Austin Seven, Daimler 6) Who consumes the most Coca:Cola per capita? Denmark, Iceland, Saudi Arabia, Canada 7) Of these which was not a dynasty of China? Xia, Ming, Tofu, Qing 8) What does a selenologist primarily study? Security, Earthquakes, Intersections, Moon 9) Whats considered as the youngest letter of the English alphabet? D, F, J, Q 10) Soup or what was the episode title when Wile E. Coyote nally caught the Road Runner? Stew, Sonic, Shaky, Steam 11) Who was rst to offer the record player as a factory:installed vehicle option? Cadillac, Ford, Chrysler, Buick 12) Because of its unique shape whats the nickname of Galaxy M104? Sombrero, Egghead, Cigar, Rocking chair 13) Which U.S. president reportedly was a big fan of Mickey Mouse? FDR, JFK, LBJ, Nixon 14) Where was the rst test:tube baby born? India, Germany, USA, England ANSWERS 1) Chewing gum. 2) Tigers. 3) Australia. 4) 62. 5) Rolls Royce. 6) Iceland. 7) Tofu. 8) Moon. 9) J. 10) Sonic. 11) Chrysler. 12) Sombrero. 13) FDR. 14) England. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com By WES LOCHER229:7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The downtown merchants have the perfect way to clear up your clutter. A community yard sale is from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET on Saturday along Reid Avenue. The yard sale is a fundraiser for members of the downtown merchants to purchase white Christmas lights that will hang in the trees planted along the street during the holidays. We want to make as much happen downtown as possible, said Guthrie Groh, event organizer and owner of Black Swan Antiques. The event is open to the public, and Groh will welcome churches, area shop owners, artists and craftsmen in hopes that participants can use the opportunity to sell their wares or host their own fundraisers or bake sales. Those who wish to sell their previously used household items are also welcome. Groh will also use the event to raise awareness for the Salt Air Farmers Market held bi:weekly in City Commons Park. I love the Farmers Market and I want it to grow, Groh said. Other festivities on Saturday will include live music on the porch of Provisions courtesy of Freddy D and Lola starting at 11 a.m. ET. Area restaurants will be open, offering food and drink specials. Its going to be a diverse crowd with big savings, Groh said. Its going to be more of a yard sale, festival and city walk rolled into one. Sisters Restaurant will hold a pancake breakfast starting at 7 a.m. ET. Hungry shoppers will be able to get pancakes, sausage, orange juice and coffee in return for a donation. The money will bene t the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Art Club. More than 50 students in the group will travel to New York City next spring to tour area museums and art installations. There are currently 40 registrants with free space still available. The cost for a spot is $10, and those who register can request a particular area of Reid Avenue. Participants need to supply their own table and merchandise. Those interested in signing up should contact Groh in advance at 850-276-2901 or guthriegroh@gmail.com. The last day to register is Friday. It will be a nice afternoon to listen to the music and there will be something for everyone, Groh said.By WES LOCHER229:7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Get ready for a weekend of Nashville: fueled tunes. The fth annual Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival will come to life this weekend and host almost 30 Nashville songwriters across nine area music venues. This event has struck a chord for locals and offers attendees the opportunity to meet and enjoy performances by the songwriters who have penned hits for country stars Faith Hill, Garth Brooks, George Strait, Alan Jackson, Reba McEntire and others. The festival begins Friday with a lunchtime happy hour at Triple Tails restaurant and a songwriters workshop will be held on Saturday at Dockside Seafood and Raw Bar. The panel will be moderated by Steven Leslie, who has written tunes for Kenny Rogers, Mark Chesnutt and George Strait. Area writers will participate in an informal open discussion on SCHEDULEAll times Eastern unless marked otherwise. FRIDAY, OCT 18 Triple Tails Seafood & Raw Bar 3 p.m.: Wil Nance, Alan Rhody, Bob Regan, Sonny Lemaire 5 p.m.: Lisa Shaffer, Steve Dean, Bill Whyte Provisions 6 p.m.: Bridgette Tatum and Aaron Barker The Thirsty Goat 6:30 p.m.: Brett Jones, Jillia Jackson, Jesse Rice, Jerry Salley 8:30 p.m.: Will Rambeaux, Sherrie Austin, Brooke Eden, Shane Hines 10:30 p.m.: Aaron Barker, Bridgette Tatum, Earl Bud Lee, Jim Parker Mango Marleys (central time zone) 7 p.m.: Charlie Black, Dana Hunt Black, Tim Buppert, Steve Leslie 9 p.m. : Walt Aldridge, Sonny Lemaire, Riley Weston, Pete Sallis SATURDAY, OCT 19 Dockside Seafood and Raw Bar 11:30 a.m.: Lisa Shaffer, Steve Dean, Bill Whyte 12:45 p.m.: Wil Nance, Alan Rhody, Bob Regan 2 p.m.: Free Songwriters Workshop Lookout Lounge 5 p.m.: Brett Jones, Jillia Jackson, Jesse Rice, Jerry Salley 7 p.m.: Will Rambeaux, Sherrie Austin, Brooke Eden, Shane Hines Toucans (central time zone) 6 p.m.: Aaron Barker, Bridgette Tatum, Earl Bud Lee, Jim Parker 8 p.m.: Charlie Black, Dana Hunt Black, Tim Buppert, Steve Leslie 10 p.m.: Walt Aldridge, Sonny Lemaire, Riley Weston, Pete Sallis Haughty Heron 7 p.m.: Walt Aldridge, Sonny Lemaire, Riley Weston, Pete Sallis 9 p.m.: Brett Jones, Jillia Jackson, Jesse Rice SUNDAY, OCT 20 Indian Pass Raw Bar 2 p.m.: Lisa Shaffer, Steve Dean, Bill Whyte, Jerry Salley 3:30 p.m.: Wil Nance, Alan Rhody, Bob Regan, Walt Aldridge 5 p.m.: Will Rambeaux, Sherrie Austin, Brooke Eden, Shane Hines, Jillia Jackson 6:30 p.m.: Charlie Black, Dana Hunt Black, Tim Buppert, Steve Leslie 8 p.m.: Aaron Barker, Bridgette Tatum, Earl Bud Lee, Jim Parker 10 p.m.: Late Night Jam Session Special to The Star North Florida novelist Michael Lister is doing something he never thought he would. Hes publishing a sequel to his bestselling novel Double Exposure. I never imagined Id write a sequel to Double Exposure, Lister said. Actually, I was pretty sure I wouldnt. In fact, it was far more likely that Stephen King would write a sequel to The Shining some 36 years after the original book was rst released. Books like Double Exposure dont get sequels. Or so I thought. But here I am witnessing the release of Separation Anxiety, the spiritual sequel to Double Exposure some four years after its initial release, Lister said. In this follow-up to Double Exposure, award-winning author Michael Lister once again takes readers down the rural routes and river swamps of wild North Florida. Sixteen-year-old Shelby Emma Summers has disappeared on a late-August day from her famous artist moms lodge on the banks of the Apalachicola River, just outside the small town of Tupelo. Out in the Gulf, a savage hurricane projected to make landfall in the Panhandle intensi es and expands. Has Shelby been abducted or is she merely skipping school? Is she with her boyfriend, Julian, and if she is, does that make her more or less safe? A fast-paced twisting and turning mystery, a harrowing hurricanic adventure. Told in prose that is BOOK SIGNINGLister will be signing all his books, including his new ones at the No Name Cafe and bookshop 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET on Saturday. For more information, call 229-9277.Wewas Lister publishes Separation Anxiety Book is sequel to Double ExposureSee LISTER B5 MICHAEL LISTERCommunity yard sale this Saturday Bay Songwriters Festival PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE STARThe Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival celebrates its fth year by bringing 27 Nashville songwriters to the Forgotten Coast.Port St. Joe becomes miniature Nashville during Songwriters FestWriters will perform in a writers round format that will make attendees feel like theyre in Nashville. See SONGWRITERS B5Thursday, October 17, 2013

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B2 | The Star Thursday, October 17, 2013 4514866forONLY$15perweek $60permonth CallToday 227.7847SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHere$0DOWN,0%FINANCING, NOPAYMENTS Onallalteredcats5 monthsandolder Actfast!Onlyforalimitedtime(Allapplicantsmustbepre-approved) Ifyouareunabletoadoptatthistime,perhapsyoucouldfosteror makeaDonation.AllpetsadoptedfromSJBHSwillbecurrenton vaccinationsandspayed/neutered.Pleasedonothesitatetoemail townsend.hsdirector@gmail.comoradoptbaystjoe@gmail.comorcall theSt.JosephBayHumaneSocietyat850-227-1103andaskforMelody orDebbie!Applicationsareavailableatwww.sjbhumanesociety.org Werequireallpotentialadopterstocompleteanapplicationform. Adoptionfeesincludeourcostofspay/neuterandcurrentvaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4pm! Faith'sThriftHutisalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,andallthe proceedsgodirectlytosupporttheanimalsinourcare!Thehours forthestoreareThursday-Saturdayfrom10am-3pm.Volunteersare alwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandourshelter!Ourstoreandshelter locationis1007TenthStreetinPortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyouallthere soon!Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet,pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyorShelter. FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSocietywww.sjbhumanesociety.org OurlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoeringthemtoyouinRealEstatePicks! (Inthissection),DiscoverthebestrealestatevaluesinMexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas, St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesonthe ForgottenCoast 850-227-8890|850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com This3BR/3BAhomehaseverythingyouneedto enjoylifeonthebay.Granitecountertops,elevator, mediaroom,ofce,back-upemergencygenerator andahottub.Launchyourkayakrightfromyour backyardandenjoywhatSt.JoeBayhastooffer. DOGISLANDBAYFRONTWITHDOCK DanAusley,Broker www.tlgproperty.com SocietySpecial to The StarThe St. Joseph Bay Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will meet at noon ET Wednesday, Oct. 23, at the Sunset Coastal Grill for lunch and meeting. The birthday of the local chapter as well as the National DAR will be celebrated. Betty Ann Owens will present the program on genealogy and history. To attend, call Sherrill Russ, 229-8574. Happy 50th Birthday, Mary Lou Star Staff Reports Amateur radio license examsThe Gulf Amateur Radio Society will sponsor amateur radio license exams at 10 a.m. ET Nov. 9 at the county EOC building in Port St. Joe, located behind the Robert Moore Annex. Get your license and get on the air or upgrade a present license. For registration or assistance, call C.H. Tillis, AJ4XJ at 648-8251. The Gulf Amateur Radio Society meets at 7 p.m. ET rst Thursdays at the EOC building. Visitors are welcome. Salvation Army Christmas program scheduleThe Food and Toys Assistance Program through the Salvation Army has announced its schedule for applications and distribution of gifts to the community. Application will be taken 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. ET Monday, Oct. 21, in Port St. Joe at the STAC House at 610 Eighth St. In Wewahitchka, applications will be taken 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. CT Thursday, Oct. 24, at the Gulf County Public Library, 314 N. Second St. All applicants must bring all identication cards for family members and copies of bills and proof of income. Senior citizens and single and married adults may apply. All applicants must meet income guidelines. Distribution of gifts in Port St. Joe will take place 2-5 p.m. ET Dec. 17 at the STAC House. Distribution of gifts in Wewahitchka will be 9 a.m. to noon CT Dec. 17 at the Gulf County Public Library.Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Quilt Guild, long known for its charitable acts and contributions to the veterans Wounded Warrior program, donations of quilts to area schools and agencies for children and seniors, had members participate in the Central Panhandle Fair in Bay County. They were big winners. Bonnie Wynne won six rst-place blue ribbons and ve second-place red ribbons for her 11 entries. June Davis, guild president, won second place, red ribbons, for her three entries, a quilt front, pillow and table runner. Nancy Davis, newest member of the guild, won four rst-place blue ribbons and Best in Show for her Christmas quilt. The guild is looking for new members and meets twice a month at St. James Episcopal Church. Call contact June Davis at 229-1089 to attend a meeting. Society BRIEFsS Happy B B IRTHDaA YSPEc C Ia A L TO TT HE STa A RChaplain Shirley Kinsey and Regent Sherrill Russ presented a DAR Graveside Marker in memory of Nancy Howell to Nancys daughter, Midge Askew.SPEc C Ia A L TO TT HE STa A RFrom left, Port St. Joe Quilt Guild members June Davis, Nancy Davis and Bonnie Wynne were winners at the Central Panhandle Fair.St. Joe Quilt Guild members are winners at fairDAR to meet Oct. 23

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The Star| B3Thursday, October 17, 2013 AllProceedsBenetSt.JosephBayHumaneSociety www.sjbhumanesociety.org~850-227-1103 School NewsSpecial to The StarFaith Christian was founded 40 years ago by a group of people with a heart for Christian education. These visionaries had a passion for evangelizing and disciplining young children. They believed if they instilled Gods promises and precepts in these young hearts and minds every day, these children would grow up to be mighty men and women of God. They were right, and they are still right. Faith Christian School would like to say good-bye to one of these visionaries, a mighty woman of Christ. Mrs. Jaclyn Quarles fought the good ght, ran her race and fullled her calling on this earth. She was passionate, kind, joyful and loved children with a deep and fervent love, and she will be missed by the staff, parents and student body of FCS. In lieu of owers, the family has asked that all those wishing to extend their condolences make a donation to FCS. Special to The StarTiger Shark football: Our gridders next take the eld against FAMU High at 7 p.m. ET today in Tallahassee. Next Friday, Oct. 25, is Senior Night against West Gadsden. Game time is 7:30 p.m. Come celebrate with us as we congratulate those seniors from football, cheerleading, band and NJROTC. Tiger Shark volleyball: The Lady Tiger Sharks are home tonight at 6 p.m. ET against Wewa for the annual Dig Pink Game supporting Breast Cancer Research. District play starts Monday the 21st at Franklin County at 5 p.m. GO SHARKS! Cross country: The District Championship Meet will be at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 23. GO SHARKS! Junior class news: Help support the junior class and their efforts to raise money for this years prom by visiting the concession stand at every JV and varsity home game. Port St. Joe soccer: Boys soccer started practice this week. The season kicks off with the Girls Jamboree at home on Saturday, Oct. 27 followed by the boys on Saturday, Nov. 3. GO SHARKS! Report cards: Firstquarter report cards will be distributed by seventhperiod teachers on Friday, Oct. 25. Fall Break: Gulf County School will be closed for Fall Break on Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 2122. Classes will resume Wednesday, Oct. 25.Special to The StarThe following students were recognized by Gulf County School Board, Superintendent Jim Norton and Principal Debbie Baxley at a ceremony Oct. 8 at Wewahitchka Elementary School Media Center. These students were recognized for their achievement on the 2012-2013 FCAT. Congratulations, students! Taylor Roberts, Destiny Palmer, Morgan Mayhann, Bryanna Jones, Cole Price, Keegan Calhoun, Brandon Paul, Seth Clary, Tyler Stevens, Aleah Wooten, Lillian Dennison, Melody McLemore, Haley Guffey, Katie Shealy, Lee Holton, Cyrina Madrid (peeking out from back) and Jaiden Scruggs. Also pictured: Debbie Baxley, School Board member George Cox, Superintendent Jim Norton and School Board member Danny Little. SPECIAL TO THE sS TARFront row: Daylin Byrd, Raegan Mathews, Elyse Williams, Lyriq Larry. Back row: Shadavia Hudgins, Sara Whiteld, Mattison Mills, Charlie Dennis, Skylar Clayton. DAZZLING dDOLPHINsS The Lions TaleFCS says good-bye to founder BANdD OF GGOLdD RATEdD sSUPERIOR SPECIAL PECIAL TOTO THETHE STAR TARThe Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Band of Gold traveled to Daleville, Ala., Sept. 28 to compete in the 28th annual Daleville High School Band Classic. The Band of Gold received Superior ratings in Flag Corps, Majorettes, Drum Major and Band overall. Congratulations to the Band of Gold! Students excel on FCAT WewahitchkaElementary School

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FAITHPage B4 www.starfl.com SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) MorningPrayer&HolyCommunion Sunday...............10:00A.M.TheRev.LouLittle,PriestServicesTemporarilyatSeniorCitizensCenter, 120LibraryDrive AnUnchangingFaithInAChangingWorld 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. TOUCHINGLIVES WITHTHELOVE OFJESUS 6pm COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 Lifetree Caf to explore making the most of lifeSylvia Darlene Clayton, 64, of Wewahitchka died Monday, Oct. 7, 2013. She was born on April 30, 1949, in Starke, Fla. Darlene was a longtime resident of Stone Mill Creek in Wewahitchka, where she helped to raise many children, planted many gardens and had done lots of bird watching with Daddy. Darlene was preceded in death by her father, Edward Jackson; her brother Roger Jackson; and her life-long partner Fred Clayton. She leaves behind her Mother, Myrtle Jackson; three children, Candi Mills (Travis), Mandee Strange and Andy Clayton; two brothers, Junior Jackson (Geraldine) and Dell Jackson (Tammy); one sister, Diane Tucker; and one sister-in-law, Sharon Jackson. Darlene was known as Nana to six grandchildren, Emilee and Adam Strange, Cody and Connor Mills and Aubrey and Anthony Clayton. She was known as Aunt Doll to four nephews, Joe Tucker, Chuck Jackson, Random Jackson and Jacob Jackson; two nieces, Pam Burns and Kelli Jackson; and many greatnieces and nephews. Funeral services were at 3 p.m. CT Thursday, Oct. 10, at New Beginnings Church with interment following in Buckhorn Cemetery. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Sylvia Darlene ClaytonJacquelyn Logan Kenney Quarles went to be with the Lord on Oct. 8, 2013. She is survived by her husband of over 60 years, William Shelton Quarles, Jr. Her sister, Ann Clayton Kenney Roberts, and husband, Benny, also survive her. Jackie is rejoicing in heaven with her son, Robert Logan Quarles (Bob), who preceded her in death in 2010. She is survived by her son, William Shelton Quarles, III (Biff) and wife, Carol; daughter, Susan Quarles Harmon and husband, Craig; daughter, Anne Smith Quarles and partner Meg; and spiritually-adopted son, Michael Robert Chisholm. She was Grandma Jackie to her grandchildren, Jessica Anne Quarles and Kevin Landwehr, Molly Marie Quarles, William Logan Quarles, Caroline Ann Harmon, Ezra Palmer Harmon, Grace Elizabeth Logan Harmon, Ashley Meaghan Quarles and Benjamin Fisher Quarles. Jackies only greatgrandchild, Violet Logan Landwehr, was born on her birthday in 2012. She was Aunt Jackie to her niece Sarah Ann Roberts Abbott, husband, Frank, and children Christopher and Dabney; nephew James Bentley Roberts, Jr. (Jim), wife, Liz, and children Sarah Beth and Bentley; and nephew Thomas Edward Roberts and wife, Tomoko, and children Mari and June. Affectionately known by the community as Miss Jackie, she was instrumental in establishing Faith Christian School almost 40 years ago. A celebration of life service was at 2 p.m. ET Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013, at Faith Bible Church. In lieu of owers, please consider donations to Faith Christian School, 801 20th St., Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Jacquelyn Logan Kenney Quarles JACQUELYN QUARLES From Staff ReportsWomen and mens dayNew Bethel Baptist Church will host a women and mens day on Oct. 20. Sunday school will begin at 10 a.m. ET with a morning worship service at 11:30 a.m. Elder Donald Nickson will be the guest speaker, and everyone is invited to come and lift up the colors royal blue, silver and white in the name of Jesus Christ.Victory Temple Holiness Harvest DayVictory Temple Holiness Church welcomes you to its annual Harvest Day at 11:30 a.m. ET Oct. 20. The speaker will be Lady Elect Sharon Hutchinson of Faith Temple Church of God in Christ in Panama City. Annual Holy ConvocationApostle Napoleon and Pastor Phyllis Ann Pittman and New Covenant Missionary World Outreach Center The Miracle Center in Port St. Joe will host the annual Holy Convocation Oct. 21-24. Services will begin at 7 p.m. ET nightly at the church, 252 Ave. E. The theme of this years convocation is We must follow those who through Faith and Patience inherit the Promises. The generals are coming. Everyone is welcome. For more information, call Deaconess Debbie Ward at 866-5205.Revival for Survival 2013New Bethel A.M.E. Church, 146 Ave. C in Port St. Joe, will have a Revival for Survival 2013 at 7 p.m. ET nightly Oct. 23-25. Guest evangelist will be Bishop Lonnie Mitchell from New Beginnings Assembly of Saints in Panama City. Though I walk in the midst of trouble, You will revive me; You will stretch forth Your hand against the wrath of my enemies, and Your right hand will save me. The Lord will perfect that which concerns me; Your mercy and loving kindness, O Lord, endure forever forsake not the works of Your own hands (Psalms 138:7-8, Ampli ed Bible). Are you trying to make sense of what is going on today? Are you wondering how will I survive and get through this? Then you dont want to miss this revival. For more information, call Pastor L.E. Gantt at 271-9574.Fall Festival and Touch-A-TruckIts time again for the ninth annual Fall Festival and Touch-A-Truck at Long Avenue Baptist Church. The community is invited for an evening of fun and fellowship to bene t the children and the elderly of Gulf County during the Christmas season. The event will be 5-7 p.m. ET Oct. 27 at Long Avenue Baptist Church, 1601 Long Ave. Admission is a bag of nonperishable food. There will be re trucks, police cars and more for kids of all ages to climb on, learn how they work, sound the horns and generally have some fun. The Fall Festival will feature a cake walk, games, hot dogs, a chili cook-off, popcorn, boiled peanuts, fall fun and prizes. For more information or to lend a vehicle, call the church of ce at 229-8691. Sacred Harp sing SaturdayWoods to celebrate 25 years of ministryThursday, October 17, 2013This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. Obituaries Faith BRIEFS Special to The StarHow to make the most out of life will be explored 7 p.m. CT Monday, Oct. 21, at Lifetree Caf. The program, Make the Most of Your Life: A Perspective That Will Change Your Life Forever, features the lmed story of professional guitarist Tony Melendez, who was born without arms. Melendez describes how his attitude has affected his ability to live a normal life and make a career in performing music. The people who make my heart hurt are those who say, I cant, Melendez said. I wish I could help them say, Ill try. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach, across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. Star Staff ReportSupt. David Woods of the Port St. Joe Church of God in Christ will celebrate 25 years of ministry during Pastors Appreciation and Wife Celebration on Oct. 26-27. The congregation invites the public to come and celebrate this monumental moment in the life of this man of God, his wife, Lady Danielle Woods, and family. The theme is Matured for Kingdom Purpose. But the God of all grace, who hath called us unto his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after that ye have suffered a while, make you perfect, stablish, strengthen, settle you. To him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen (1 Peter 5:10-11, KJV). The celebration begins 6 p.m. ET Saturday, Oct. 26, at the church with speaker Pastor Wilhelmina Williams from Body of Christ Church. At 4 p.m. ET Sunday, Oct. 27, the speaker will be Bishop Titus Deas Jr. from Deliverance Temple Ministries in Hardaway.Special to The StarOn Saturday, Oct. 19, First United Methodist Church of Port St. Joe is hosting the Southeast Sacred Harp Singing Convention at 10 a.m. ET in the Fellowship Hall, followed by dinner on the grounds. Sacred Harp is an American tradition that brings communities together to sing four-part hymns and anthems without any musical accompaniment. Newcomers are welcome, with no musical experience or religious af liation required in fact, the tradition was born from colonial singing schools whose purpose was to teach beginners to sing and methods continue to re ect this goal. Though Sacred Harp is not af liated with any denomination, it is a deeply spiritual experience for all involved and functions as a religious observance for many singers. The singers sit in a hollow square formation with one voice part on each side, all facing inward so they can see and hear each other. No instruments, other than voices, are used. Visitors are always welcome even if they participate just as listeners. Come and be a part of this great American tradition.

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, October 17, 2013the art and business of songwriting and topics will include the craft of songwriting, songwriting as a career and music production. Panelists will also offer critiques for attendees who bring a sample along with them. Attendees should have the enthusiasm to learn, said Leslie, who will oversee the panel for the fourth year. Songwriting is an investment in time. A lot has changed in the industry and theres a lot of listening and studying to be done. Those who attend the free performances will be treated to the writers round format, commonly found in Nashville where three to four performers share the stage and trade off playing tunes. The festival is designed as a listening event for attendees to appreciate the songs and be respectful to the writers who have traveled from Nashville to perform. Its delightful and educational to listen to a song by the songwriter that you listened to in the car on the way in and make that connection, Leslie said. You see that the writer is really the artist. On Saturday, the fth Semper Fi Sisters Beach Blast, an event that will welcome more than 60 women to Gulf County related by marriage or blood to members of the military branches, will hold its annual packing party at the Centennial Building. During the party, care packages are created and sent around the globe to various military units in need. Last year, the Sisters packed more than 1,200 Boxes of Love over the course of a day, a dramatic increase from the three dozen completed during the inaugural event. Each year, the packing party is serenaded by performers in town for the Blast on the Bay Songwriters Fest. Our writers donate their time to play for the Semper Fi Sisters during their packing party, Blast on the Bay organizer Jason Bogan said. The events happened to begin on the same year and a certain synergy seemed to develop very organically. The events have historically supported and fed off of one another. All of the sisters are great friends of our event, and our writers are proud to be able to be a small part of their packing party. Proceeds from the Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival will benet the Coastal Songwriters Education Coalition Inc., a 501c3 not for prot. The festival runs from Oct. 17:20. To register in advance for the songwriters workshop, visit www. blastonthebay.com. eGul/FaninCamsGulCoaSateCoeg oayquestsrefeasunftoubendanceAcommunity-widebreakfastand conversationoflocaleconomicimportanceBUSINESSROUNDTABLEFORUM GULFCOAST STATECOLLEGE Itnehipith Tuesday,October29,20138:00am-9:30amEDTGulf/FranklinCampus,GulfCoastStateCollege ForeventdetailsandtoRSVP,pleasevisit: www.gulfcoast.edu/smallbusinessforum Inquiries:850-227-9670 LISTER from page B1poetic, evocative, and muscular, Separation Anxiety is a timeless, resonate literary thriller of heartbreak and heroism. Separation Anxiety is a far more complex novel than Double Exposure, Lister said. It has far more characters, far more plot, and is a lot larger, but the two books share a lot in common. They denitely have the same DNA. Separation Anxiety also includes the appearance of Sam Michaels and Daniel Davis from another popular thriller of Listers, Burnt Offerings. In a way, its a sequel to Burnt Offerings too, Lister said. But more in a literal than spiritual sense. In fact, as I think about it, Separation Anxiety is truly a marriage of Double Exposure and Burnt Offerings. Its funny, but I havent really thought of it that way until this moment, but that is exactly what it is. The release of Separation Anxiety includes a new special edition release of Double Exposure with a new cover, lots of photographs and an introduction and signature by bestselling author Michael Connelly, who has championed the book since he rst sat down and read it cover to cover without getting up four years ago. Double Exposure is absolutely riveting. Elegiac prose, insightful characterization and a wonderfully ingenious plot, Connelly said. With the release of the new edition of Double Exposure, the two books dont just complement one another in terms of story but as art objects as well, Lister said. Double Exposure was adapted into a stage play by Jason Hedden at Gulf Coast State College and is now being turned into a feature lm by director Jason Hreno. For more information or to order the book, visit the authors website at www.MichaelLister. com. SONGWRITERS from page B1 Eight area venues will host the writers of some of country musics biggest hits. PHOTOS SS PECIAL TO TT HE SS TARA free workshop allows aspiring songwriters to interface with professionals. Special to The StarSacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf will host a seminar on Beat the Bug: Protect Your Patients and Family from the Flu at 10 a.m. ET on Nov. 1 in the hospitals conference room. This topic is sponsored by the hospitals SeniorSpirit program. Led by Sarah Hutchison, Registered Nurse and Hospital Liaison for Covenant Hospice, the seminar will address common causes of the u and how to protect your patients and family members from getting sick. Sacred Heart Hospital requires u vaccinations or use of masks for all associates and volunteers. Additionally, Sacred Heart encourages all adults to consider u vaccinations for their family members. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now recommends a u vaccine for everyone six months of age and older (instead of just certain groups, as was recommended before). But its especially important that those in higher-risk groups get vaccinated. Covenant Hospice is an approved provider for the Florida Board of Nursing; Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage and Family Therapy and Mental Health Counseling; Florida Board of Nursing Home Administrators; Alabama Board of Nursing and Alabama State Board of Social Work Examiners. Covenant Hospice will offer CEUs at no charge for nurses, social workers and nursing home administrators that are in attendance.Learn how to protect your family from the u

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, October 17, 2013Star Staff ReportBlountstown lmmaker Elam Stoltzfus, known to locals for lms about the Apalachicola River and Floridas Aquatic Preserves, including St. Joseph Bay, will co-emcee the rst annual Apalachicola Riverfront Film Festival Oct. 19. The festival will be held in Riverfront Park in downtown Apalachicola beneath a full moon. Along with founder Merrill Livingston, Stoltzfus will emcee the festival. For the past 25 years Stoltzfus has documented diverse aspects of Floridas natural resources, which include estuaries, rivers, swamps, and aquatic preserves. Not only is he a gifted cinematographer; as executive producer of several documentaries, Stoltzfus combines his love of nature with his love of art. In celebration of its premier year, Stoltzfus has produced an introduction for the festival. This piece will feature distinct landmarks, iconic waterfronts, and colorful locals all highlighting the town of Apalachicola. Stoltzfus most recent documentary, the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition, will also be shown. The documentary features four explorers who hiked from the Everglades to the Okeefeenokee Swamp. In 2012, the group hiked 1,000 miles in 100 days to call attention to opportunities for a connected wildlife corridor in Floridas heartland. The Apalachicola Riverfront Film Festival is an outdoor lm festival focused on showcasing independent short lms and documentaries from around the world. This lm festival will focus on entertaining the audience through thought provoking lms portraying todays culture, art, our environment, local and global issues. For more information and tickets visit www.apalachriverlm.com B6| The Star Thursday, October 17, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 95951 PUBLIC NOTICE OF AUCTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that ST. JOE RENT-ALL, INC intends to dispose of or offer for sale the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under The Florida Self Storage Facility Act Statues (Section 83.801-83.809). ST. JOE RENT-ALL, INC, will dispose of said property no later than October 26, 2013. Property is located at 706 First Street, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 the following: Latonya Bailey #33, Misc Furnishings Corey Bowers #43, Misc Furnishings Verline Franklin #55, Misc Furnishings Veronica Johnson #84, Misc Furnishings Shay Foxworth #44, Misc Furnishings October 17, 24, 2013 92684S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 232012CA000138CAAXMX WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. SANDRA G. CORBIN A/K/A SANDRA G. BROXSON, ET AL; Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash beginning at 11:00 a.m., in the FRONT LOBBY of the Courthouse of Gulf County, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, on October 24, 2013, the following described property: LOT 15, BLOCK 6, LAKE ALICE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 9, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MANUFACTURED HOME, TRADE NAME-ANNIVERSARY, MODEL YEAR 2005, MODEL NO. 6763 AND MANUFACTURERS ID NO. GAFL407A53417AV31. Property Address: 237 RHODES AVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465, Gulf ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR BY MAIL AT P.O. BOX 1089, PANAMA CITY, FL 32402 OR BY PHONE AT (850)747-5338 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED, PLEASE CALL 711. Dated: September 30, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 W. Cypress Rd, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)644-8704 Fax: (954)772-9601 ServiceFL@mlg-defaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlg-defaultlaw.com File No. 11-09236 October 10, 17, 2013 92770S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION THE GULF COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Gulf County School Board proposes to amend and adopt policies, as provided for in the Administrative Procedures Act, for the purpose of bringing said policies into compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of each proposal change. 2.22Board Meetings 3.40Safe and Secure Schools 3.50Public Information and Inspection of Records 3.60Flag Display and Pledge 3.68Background Screening for Contractors 4.113Academic Acceleration 4.117Early High School Graduation 5.321Bullying and Harassment 5.62Administration of Medication (Option 2) 6.173Responsibilities of School Bus Operators 6.27Professional Ethics 6.29Report of Misconduct 8.36Transporting Students in Private Vehicles 8.38Automotive Equipment 9.21School Reports 9.50Distribution of Literature and Materials of Students Economic Impact: These proposals will result in no direct costs associated with implementation. IF REQUESTED, A HEARING WILL BE HELD AT: Time: 10:00 a.m. ET Date: November 7, 2013 Place: Port St. Joe Elementary School 2201 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 The entire text of the proposed rules can be inspected during regular office hours at the Gulf County School Board Office, 150 Middle School Road, Port St. Joe, FL. Special legal authority under which the adoption is authorized and the law being implemented and interpreted are made specific. The addition and changes are proposed by Duane McFarland, Assistant Superintendent for Business Services and approved for consideration by Jim Norton, Superintendent. Amendments: See above October 17, 2013 95673S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-86-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES E. NORRED, Defendant. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered September 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, the Clerk of Court for Gulf County, Florida will sell to the highest and best bidder at the Gulf County Courthouse Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, on October 24, 2013, at 11:00 AM, EST the following described property: Lots 5, 6, and 7, Block A of Chipola Landing, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 60, in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. The Real Property or its address is commonly known as Lots 5, 6 & 7, Block A, of Chipola Landing Subdivision, Wewahitchka, Florida 32465. Parcel ID Number 01041-125R; Parcel ID Number 01041130R; and Parcel ID Number 01041-135R ANY PERSON CLAIMTrades&Services227-7847CALLTODAY! GETYOURADIN! Trades&Services 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction4510158 Soundfamiliar?...Callaboutaconsultationfor: Sometimes, Lifecanseemalittlesour. MaryElizabethVaughan LetsmakeitLemonAid ontheFrontPorch. 850-731-1268 Feast or famine? Thats a real problem for many house plants and others conned to small areas. Research has shown that plants do much better when their nutrient supplies dont uctuate. Unfortunately, when using regular garden fertilizer, the nutrient level is high immediately after application, but can greatly diminish before fertilizer is applied again. Controlled release fertilizers have been used by commercial growers for many years. They are liquid fertilizer concentrated in to granules, and surrounded by multiple layers of polymeric plastic resin. This covering controls the release of the fertilizers over a long period of time. When these granules are placed in or on top of the soil, water from irrigation or rain penetrates the plastic shell and dissolves the nutrient care. The granules then become tiny reservoirs of liquid plant food, and these automatically add regular amounts of nutrients to the soil. Various formulations of controlled released fertilizers are available, designed to release nutrients for a specic period of time. A single application of a controlled release fertilizer to ower pots or small beds should be enough to keep the plants at the optimum fertility level throughout a normal growing season. Over very long periods, it may be necessary to make additional applications to keep the fertility level constant. These fertilizers have other advantages. They can be applied anytime of the year. Theyre moisture dependent, rather than temperature dependent. With traditional fertilizer, nutrient uptake is slowed or stopped altogether, if the soil temperature drops too low. Controlled release fertilizer stop releasing nutrients only when the soil dries out. After irrigation or rain, they continue supplying their elements. With new plantings, controlled release fertilizers can be mixed into the soil. For established plants, surface application is most effective if the granules are tilled in lightly about a half-an-inch to an inch. Be careful not to damage plant roots when tilling. If the fertilizer is applied to the soil surface, and cannot be tilled in, you need to wet the granules frequently and thoroughly to insure release of their nutrients. Generally speaking, you need to use less of this kind of fertilizer if your plants are infrequently watered, have poor drainage, contain high salt levels, or grow in areas exposed to low light. For more information visit http://gulf. ifas.u.edu or www.http://edis.ifas.u.edu. ROY LEE CArR TErRCounty extension director Try time-released fertilizerSPECIAL TO TT HE STAr RArea lmmaker to help lead lm festival

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 17, 2013 The Star | B7 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Logistics/TransportCIRCULATION District ManagerThe Panama City News Herald has an opening for a District Manager. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. No phone calls. Accepting applications until October 14, 2013. Web ID#: 34268014 ING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@ judl4.flcourts.org. Dated: September 27, 2013. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk October 10, 24, 2013 95679S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 13-62-CA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. BILLY ELLIS FORRESTER and MARION W. FORRESTER A/K/A MARION FORRESTER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, the Clerk of this Court shall sell the property at public sale at 11:00 A.M. Eastern Time, on the 7th day of November, 2013 at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, the following described real property lying and being in Gulf County, Florida, to-wit: EXHIBIT A LOTS 4 AND 5, BLOCK 7, DOUGLAS LANDING UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALONG WITH A 1988 MOBILE HOME ID# PSHGA3679 WHICH IS PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO SAID PROPERTY. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. This Notice dated this 27th day of September, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS, CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FL BY: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95707S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 2013-33CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. JAMES G. NORRIS, a/k/a JAMES G. NORRIS, SR., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013 and entered in Civil Case No. 2013-33-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and JAMES G. NORRIS, a/k/a JAMES G. NORRIS, SR., is Defendent, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 24th day of October, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment. Lot Seventeen (17) of Jonesville Subdivision of the SW of SW Section 19, T8S, R10W, as per official plat on file in Plat Book 1 at Page 57, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED this 30th day of September, 2013. REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95689S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE No.: 08-505-CA AMERIS BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MARILYN THEUS, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment entered in the above-styled cause on the 20th day of April, 2009, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 24th day of October, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time), at the courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard in Gulf County in Port St. Joe, Florida the following described real property and personal property situated in Gulf County, Florida, and set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Real Property: LOTS THREE (3), FOUR (4), AND FIVE (5), BLOCK C, FOREHANDS SECOND ADDITION ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 50. Personal Property: That certain 2004 single wide mobile home located on said property having identification Number CJ83306GAJFBF0146 and Title Number 91134281. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Court, on this 30th day of September, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95715S IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL, CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2012-CA-000068 Division WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. MARTHA J. TIDWELL, JAMES P. TIDWELL, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on August 7, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida described as: LOT 1, SAWMILL ESTATES UNIT NO. 1, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 108 CHARLIE GASKIN DRIVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465; including the building appurtenance and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales held in front lobby of courthouse, on October 24, 2013 at 11:00am ET. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 30th day of September, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95811S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2013-09 Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe Phase II Water Bores will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 4:00 PM EST, Friday October 25, 2013. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday October 25, 2013, at 4:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidders name, address, date and time of opening, and bid number for Phase II Water Bores. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The City of Port St. Joe is accepting bids for underground bore work as part of our Phase II water line project. The work shall consist of six (6) inch, three (3) inch and one (1) inch bores. A complete bid package is available at www. cityofportstjoe.com For questions concerning this project, please contact John Grantland at 850-229-8247. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the Citys purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer October 10, 17, 2013 95801S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1314-01 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: Uniforms and cleaning of same for the Public Works Department Specifications may be obtained from the Clerks Office in the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. Interested parties should contact Lynn Lanier for additional information at (850) 229-6106. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Proposals must be submitted to the Gulf County Clerks Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, October 25, 2013. Bids will be opened at this location on Monday, October 28, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: TYNALIN SMILEY CHAIRMAN ATTEST: REBECCA NORRIS, CLERK October 10,17, 2013 95821S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1381 Application No. 2013-39 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05793-000R Description of Property: Lot Ten (10), Block 1006, according to the Official map of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, as the same appears on file in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Being same property filed for record in Gulf County, October, 1959, 1:42 P.M. in Deed Book No. 36, Page No. 179, in Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Billy Charles Quinn All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95825S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1319 Application No. 2013-37 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05015-003R Description of Property: Lot 14, Block 45, of Re-subdivision of Block 45, in Unit Number Three of Saint Josephs Addition of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the Plat as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 34, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: C Q Developments, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95823S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 100 Application No. 2013-38 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 00517-002R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the NW. Corner of Original Government Lot 4, Section 16, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, and extend a line southerly along the western boundary of said Lot 4, for 420.3 feet; then turn 64 Degrees 21 Minutes left for 793.36 feet; then turn 67 Degrees 28 Minutes right for 542.23 feet, thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 35 feet; thence turn South 310 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, continue the line last above described for 75 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 125 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 75 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 125 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: John Whitehurse & Lori Adams (dec) All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95829S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-000075-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Bayside Savings Bank, Plaintiffs, vs. ERIC B. RAMSEY and MELISSA N. RAMSEY, and The Owners Association of Southgate, Inc., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 at 11:00 a.m. EST on October 24, 2013 the following described property: Lot 29, Southgate Subdivision, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 17, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. AND Lot 25, Block 1, Ward Ridge Subdivision Unit 1, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 3, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Dated: October 1, 2013 Becky L. Norris Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10,17, 2013 95827S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Florida Tax Lien Assets IV, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1514 Application No. 2013-36 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06319-060R Description of Property: Lot 2, Block C, Marnies Island Preserve, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 22 and 23, and as amended in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Winston Williams All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95901S PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS NO. 1314-02 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation interested in performing the following service: MISCELLANEOUS ROAD REPAIR PROJECT (P.R.I. PROJECT #003.248) This project consists of approximately 715 SY of milling, 80 tons of asphalt overlay, and 960 LF of striping at three locations in Gulf County, Florida. Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity crimes. Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $25.00 per set and is non-refundable. Check should be made to PREBLE-RISH, INC. If you have any questions, please call Clay Smallwood at (850) 227-7200. All bidders shall be FDOT qualified in the following work classes: Flexible Paving and Hot Plant-Mixed Bituminous Courses. Completion date for this project will be 60 days from the date of bid award. Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified date will be set at $100.00 per day. Please indicate on the envelope your COMPANY NAME, BID NUMBER, and that this is a sealed bid for the Miscellaneous Road Repair Project. Submit 1 original and 3 copies of the bid. Bids will be received until 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time, on November 1, 2013 at the Gulf County Clerks Office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, and will be opened and read aloud at this same location on November 4, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., Eastern Time. All bids shall remain firm for a period of 60 days after the opening. All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing business to the State of Florida. The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of Gulf County. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA /s/ Tynalin Smiley Chairman October 17, 24, 2013 95973S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. Case No.: 11-33 CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. LITTLE RIVER CAMP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; MATTHEW D. BIRMINGHAM; PAUL W. GROOM, II; WILLIAM J. SMILEY; CLAYTON B. WOOTEN, And SEVEN SPRINGS LAKE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATTION, INC., A Florida not-for-profit corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 10th day of October, 2013, in Case Number 2011-33 CA, of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein CADENCE BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff, and LITTLE RIVER CAMP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, MATTHEW D. BIRMINGHAM, PAUL W. GROOM, II, WILLIAM J. SMILEY, CLAYTON B. WOOTEN and SEVEN SPRINGS LAKE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder at the front lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. Eastern Time on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described real property, as set forth in the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lots One (1), Two (2), Six (6), Ten (10), Fourteen (14), Eighteen (18) and Nineteen (19), Block C, SEVEN Creamers Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Biker Consignment From bike parts to clothing, & anything to do w/ Bikers! Open Tue -Sat. 2001 Wilson Ave. P.C. 850-763-9009 Acree and AssociatesDrafting design, fencing and custom furniture. 850-691-8453 Legion Fence Co. Wood Prvcy Vinyl & Almnm. Fence/Deck. Free Estimate 250-8275 Text FL68179 to 56654 4516876Annual Fall Auction St. Joe Rent-All 706 1st Street | Port St. Joe Saturday, October 26th 10 am EST Contents of 5 Mini-Storage Buildings Miscellaneous Items Belonging to St. Joe Rent-All Including, but not limited to: Golf Carts Misc. Electronics Lawn Mowers Misc. Rental Equipment Items, (Except Storage Buildings), may be viewed Friday, Oct. 25th, 1 -5 pm EST

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B8| The Star Thursday, October 17, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 4510160 4514327OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 149B COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 3 OFFICE/KIT/BATH AND WAREHOUSE $ 675.00 PER MONTH/ 675.00 DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 4514326OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 151A COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 12X12 OFFICE, BATH, STORAGE AND LARGE WAREHOUSE $ 550.00 PER MONTH/ 550.0O DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 1119173 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:SHIPFITTERS FLUXCORE WELDERS PIPE WELDERS X-RAY WELDERS PIPEFITTERS SAFETY REPCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace OUTSIDE SALES TAP INTO YOUR CAREER POTENTIAL! We are an equal opportunity employer M/F/D/VDoes your job give you access to cutting edge training and opportunities for career growth?Deliver the future of communication as a FULL-TIME OUTSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE. We are looking for enthusiastic, self-starters to visit homes in local communities to establish new customer relationships by selling our cable, internet and phone services in Mexico Beach, FL. Base salary of $24K plus commissions Sales experience strongly preferred Must be able to work independently and be able to conduct in homepresentations In addition to a superior benets package, we oer gas incentives for qualied individuals and a company smart phone. For more information and to apply, please visit us online at: www.mediacomcable.com/careers and and search for Sales under FL. Choose Job ID 6181 1114791 www.mediacomcable.com/careers and search for Sales under FL. Choose Job ID 6181 p resentations Creative/Design The News Herald is looking for a:Graphic ArtistCandidate must have experience in InDesign/Photoshop/Quark or Illustrator (PC Platform preferred) while being open to learning new programs. The ideal candidate should have a creative eye, attention to details, organized, able to meet deadlines, have good communications/ phone skills and be able to work with minimal supervisor. Experience working in or with marketing departments is a plus. A portfolio will be requested at the time of the interview. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package including vacation, sick leave, 401(k), medical, dental, vision, life insurance. Pick up an application at The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34265884 Text FL65884 to 56654 SalesSales RepsHalifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience.Territories Available In: Panama City Chipley Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business Conducting our solutions based approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. Reviewing the days successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience Bachelors degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEOs Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266376 Text FL66376 to 56654 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experiencedSales ManagerWho will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. Communicates and advocates the companys vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solutions ROI for the client. Requirements: Bachelors degree or comparable experience. Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. Successful record of team building and leadership. Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266340 Text FL66340 to 56654 SPRINGS LAKE SUBDIVISION according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page(s) 17-18 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUCCESSFUL HIGH BIDDER OR BIDDERS, AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID. THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED TO THE SALE PRICE AT THE TIME OF PAYMENT. THE SUM REMAINING DUE AND OWING AFTER APPLICATION OF THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE CLERK IN CERTIFIED FUNDS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE POLICIES OF THE GULF COUNTY CLERK OF COURT. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER, OR BIDDERS, AT THE SALE WILL BE REQUIRED TO PLACE THE REQUISITE STATE DOCUMENTARY STAMPS ON THE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record, as of the date of the lis pendens, may claim the surplus. DATED this 11th day of October, 2013 REBECCA L. NORRIS, Gulf County Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk Octobre 17, 24, 2013 95975S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 23 2011 CA 000074 VS. DIVISION: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF INDYMAC RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGEBACKED TRUST, SERIES 2006-L1, RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGEBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-L1, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTINE MULLININX, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 10, 2013, and entered in Case No. 23 2011 CA 000074 of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida in which Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as trustee of IndyMac Residential Mortgage-Backed Trust, Series 2006-L1, Residential MortgageBacked Certificates, Series 2006-L1, is the Plaintiff and James Coney Mullininx, Christine Mullininx, Gregory J. Scroggs, Jackie P. Scroggs, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby, Gulf County Clerk of Court office, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, Gulf County, Florida at 11:00 A.M. ET on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 1923.07 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 30, SAID POINT LYING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH WITH A RADIUS OF 2346.20; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AND SAID RIGHT OF WAY FOR 329.02 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 06 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 74 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 328.75; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 392.39 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 394.62 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 107.41 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE EAST 61.01 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 228.21 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 14.00 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 325.96 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 75.56 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 0.25 ACRES MORE OR LESS, SUBJECT TO A 10 FOOT WIDE ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 1923.07 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 30, SAID POINT LYING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH WITH A RADIUS OF 2346.20; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AND SAID RIGHT OF WAY FOR 329.02 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 06 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 74 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 328.75 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 392.39 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 394.62 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 107.41 FEET; THENCE EAST 10.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 106.12 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF CANOE LANE; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 10.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 5 FOOT WIDE PEDESTRIAN ACCESS CASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 10 WEST, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 1923.07 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 30, SAID POINT LYING IN A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH WITH A RADIUS OF 2346.20; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE AND SAID RIGHT OF WAY FOR 329.02 FEET, THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 06 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 74 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 328.75 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 82 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 75.56 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN, SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 325.96 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 186.60 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATERLINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID WATERLINE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 5.02 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID WATERLINE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 187.02 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 5.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A APN 3186-060R, PORT SAINT JOE, FL 32456 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Gulf County, Florida this 11th day of October, 2013. BILLKINSAUL Clerk of Circuit Court Gulf County, FL By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 eService: servealaw@ albertellilaw.com SL-10-55837 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711. October 17, 24, 2013 Cue FurnitureStart your Christmas layaway now! Pickup as late as December 23rd. New mattresses: Twin sets, $99; Full sets, $139; Queen sets, $199. Quality used furniture. 1425 Hwy 71 S. Wewa. 850-639-2343 Text FL68236 to 56654 Port St. Joe:Historic Downtown Community Yard SaleReid Ave. October 19, 8:00am-3:00pm EST. Spaces available for rent, $10. Text FL69122 to 56654 Port St. Joe: 316-322 Beacon Rd. (Golf Aire) Sat, Oct 19th 8am -1pm ESTYard SalesEasy-Ups, Vintage China, Antique Storage Chest, RCA Surround Sound. Too much to list! Something for everyone. Text FL69053 to 56654 PSJ: 206 Coral Drive, St Joe Beach Sea Shores Subd Saturday, Oct.19th 8am-5pm EST Coffee and end tables, china cabinet, lg desk, chairs, housewares, sewing and craft items, garage cabinets and shelves, Christmas items and much more. 25% off purchases totaling $10 or more St. Joe Beach 354 Ponce de Leon St. Saturday Oct. 19th 8am (est.) -???? No Early Birds!!Large Yard Sale2 elec. wheelchairs, lawn tractor, lrg. generator, power washer, lots of jewelry, clothing, furniture and much more! txt FL67561 to 56654 WE PAY CASH JUNK OR TRASH!Jewelry, old or new, used or vintage collectibles. We come to you. Please call Monique 850-227-1668 or cell 850-254-3898 Install/Maint/RepairMediacomCommunicationsThe 7th largest cable company in the United States and covering over 23 states, has an immediate opening in Mexico Beach, FL for:ENTRY LEVEL INST ALLER No technical experience necessary. Performs installs for cable and high speed internet. Must have a valid drivers license. Mediacom offers competitive pay and great benefits along with advancement opportunities. For immediate consideration, visit our website at: www .mediacomcable.com/c areers Refer to Job 6169. Mediacom is an Equal Opportunity Employer Web ID#: 34268916 Text FL68916 to 56654 LogisticsJOB NOTICEThe Gulf County Sheriffs Office is accepting applications for two Part Time Dispatchers. Applications and a complete job description are available at the Gulf County Sheriffs Office or at www .gulfcounty fl.gov Application deadline is Friday, 11/01/13 5:00 pm EST. For more information, please contact Lt. Chris Buchanan at 850-227-1115. Gulf County Sheriffs Office enforces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer. Web ID#: 34269145 Part Time Nursery AssistantFUMC is seeking a PT Nursery Assistant to care for children ages 0-5 during Sunday School, Sunday Worship Services and other church events as required. Please submit a resume, contact information, at least 2 references and a cover letter to: fumcp sj@gtcom.net Attention Nursery Position. Or P.O. Box 266, Port St. Joe, FL32547. Attn: Bobbi Lassiter. Web ID#: 34268269 Text FL68269 to 56654 Security/Prot. Serv.JOB NOTICEThe City of Port St. Joe (pop. 3445) is accepting applications for the following position:Full Time Police OfficerPlease submit an application to The City of Port St. Joe, Attn: Charlotte Pierce, POB 278, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. Applications and a full job description can be found on our website: cityofportstjoe.com If you have any questions, please contact Charlotte Pierce at (850)229-8261. The position will close on November 1, 2013. The entry level salary for a Police Officer will be $15.50 per hour not including benefits. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace. Web ID#: 34269010 Text FL69010 to 56654 2 bedroom unfurnisted Apt. Dogwood Terrace Apts; 808 Woodward Ave, PSJ 850-227-7800 Mexico Beach 2 Story duplex, bottom unit avail. 1/2 block off beach. Comp furn, 2br/1ba, $900/mo., util incl. 1st & last, min. 6 mo lease, small pets ok. (229) 322-5652. 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath. Florida room in back Large yard. 3 blocks to the beach. 339 Selma St. $700 month. First/Last/ Security Deposit. Call 850-348-7774 Text FL69133 to 56654 3 bedroom house for rent; 417 Iola Street Port St. Joe, FL; Call 850-227-7800 PSJ 116 Bellamy Circle 3br/1ba, fenced yard outside pets only $550 mo + $100 deposit option to buy. 850-643-5381 Quality Long Term RentalsMexico Beach Call for more info 850-348-0262 WEWASmall cottage, great for 1 to 2 people. $390 per month + $390 security deposit. 850-639-5721 ******************* Small RV. $125 per wk. Includes Water Sewer, Elec, & Wi-Fi. Good for 1 person. 850-639-5721 Text FL66108 to 56654