The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date:
August 10, 2006
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:00913


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



W


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer


Three more hours and another $765,000
was chopped from the proposed 06-07 county
budget. It was neither easy nor pretty, and
there still is a ways to go.
Beginning Wednesday at 9 a.m., county
commissioners and about 30 audience
members again set about discussing ways to
move the proposed,2006-07) budget back to
the 2005-06 level.
At the beginning of the meeting, $965,260
still needed to be chopped from the budget to
meet that goal. By the end of the meeting.
approximately $200,000 still remained to'
eliminate.
The proposed county millage rate was
set at 4.7709 mills, passed unanimously by'
the commissioners. Also passed 5-0 was a
.5 village rate for each of the volunteer fire
departments in the county.
The two municipal services taxing units
(MSTUs) approved by the special July 6
mail-in voting were set at 4.4 mills for gulf
front property, and 1.6 mills for interior gulf
property on St .Joseph Peninsula.
A mill equals $1 for every $1,000 in
taxable property.
Commissioner Nathan Peters again
continued his unbroken record of voting
against the entire MSTU issue by voting
against the proposed MSTU millage rates.
The MSTUs were voted, in to cover the
local cost of beach restoration over a 10-year


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR OVER 68 YEARS
68th Year, Number 42 Port St. Joe, FL 3 Sections 36 Pages


AM


period on the heavily eroded gulf side of the got other things to do."
-peninsula. Highlights of the meeting:
In opening the budget discussions, $8,000 was added to the budget to cover
commission chair Carmen McLemore said, mandated funding for Legal Services of North
"We really haven't reached the goals we Fhlonda, Inc.
wanted to, but I've worked this for two weeks. Resource developer Mary Dekle addressed
If we can cut anywhere else, y'all show me the board,. politely reminding them that they


where.
"Let's get done with this and move on. I've


Changes in Store for Scallop Festival

By Dspina Williams '
Star Staff Writer
Port St. Joe's' annual Scallop Festival
will get a makeover this year, with a, new
date, new location and new promotions team
committed to making the 2006 festival bigger, ..
and better than its previous incarnations.
Normally held, on Labor Day weekend,
the three-day festival will begin a week earlier
this year, on Aug. 25 at its new location in the
Village at Marina Cove.
To expand the festival's offerings, the
Gulf County Chamber of Commerce has
enlisted the aid of Hilltop Productions, a firm
that organizes more than 40 events annually
throughout the South.
Hilltop has corralled a long list of vendors,
including fine artists from a variety of mediums
such as sculpture, oil, watercolor, pottery, .: '.
(See SCALLOP FESTIVAL on Page 8A) ..-. .. .. .


~~Y nE LIB F'.
P F'DX 11700-l7
G-AINEEiSVILLE, F1L 326,1!


UGUST 10, 2006


Back to School, Not Back to the Books


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
Though Monday was the first day of
school, students at Port St. Joe High endured
a full day of lessons.
They
learned that
spray cheese
made a
surprisingly,
good fixative
w h e n
attaching
Sa 1 tine
crackers to a
rain slicker. *
They e
learned it
was not
easy keeping
a feather
in a paper
plate while
running
through the
gymnasium.
And they
learned that
the seniors
will employ
any amount
of subterfuge
- including
illegally
holding the
feather with
their, finger
- to ensure
victory
Call it
practical
wisdom, the
sort of which A sophomore duo competes
can only be on Monday in the gymnasium.
gained once
a year at the school's fun-filled First Day of
School Celebration.,
The event, hosted by the Student
Government Executive Board and sponsored
by local business people, playfully ushered
Students into the new school year- while
prominting school spirit and fellowisuhp.
"Nobody wants, to come back; but if you
make it fun, it's a little easier to deal with,"


said science teacher Scott Lamberson.
The executive board, led by Student
Government president Leah Miniat, worked
tirelessly for two months to prepare for this


to school T-Shirts to students, with the
colors denoting class standing.
The students spent the morning
participating in the various relays and


Despina Williams/The Star/

in .the sugar cube relay at Port St. Joe High School's First Day of School Celebration


year's celebration.
/ They chose games sucli as ithe crab race,
'hula hoop relay and sugar7-cube exchxa-ge.
and decided, upon a "Back to the FutLure"
theme.
...On Monday morniina. the executive
council distributed student handbooks and
custom purple, 'yellow, white and aray back


Savannah Bottkol wro
,tmne-travel adventure th


te
la't


chalking up
victories on
a scoreboard
fashioned by
the executive
council.
When
all the
points were
counted,
the seniors
proved
victorious.
S e nior
Hunter Garth
took the
news with a
shrug.
"We
always win
everything.
It's really not
a. surprise. I
did most of
the work, I'll
accept the
victory," said
Garth, before
rejoining his
classmates
for the
afternoon
skits.
I n
keeping with
the Back to
the Future
theme ,
executive
b board
m e :mb e r
an engaging
demonstrated,


vanous features of the high school's code of

Olivia Lambeison played 'protagonist
Marty' McFIy. a timid boy in the class of

(See BACK TO SCHOOL on Page 2A)


Shake Up at Mexico

Beach City Hall
By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
In a surprise move last Wednesday night,
the Mexico Beach city council, prompted by
Mayor Al Cathey, voted unanimously not
to renew the contract of city administrator
Henry Flack.
With the decision to pay him his remaining
two months salary as severance, Flack's
termination was effective immediately, and
Flack was instructed to remove his things
from city hall the following morning.
Flack joined the Mexico Beach city staff
in 2001 as the city clerk under then-Mayor
Kathy Kingsland, at a beginning salary of
approximately $34,000. His salary had
reached $40,000 when she left office -at the
end of May, 2005, according to Kingsland.
Chuck Risinger appointed Flack to the
position of city administrator, at a salary of
$60,000, when Risinger took the mayor's
office in June, 2005.
Paul Sabiston was hired by Kingsland
as the city administrator when Kingsland
took office in June, 2001. He stayed until
November of 2004, with a salary of $53,000
at the end of his tenure.
John Grantland, who left Mexico Beach
when Kingsland left office, was acting city
administrator between Sabiston's' departure
and Flack's appointment.
The decision to terminate Flack's
employment with the city took place at the
regular pre-agenda meeting Wednesday night,
with Cathey calling for a motion from council
to end Flack's employment with the city.
When asked Thursday why he wanted to
terminate Flack's contract, Cathey stated that
there were "a multitude of issues," including.
city morale and displeasure with Flack's
handling of numerous situations.
"I -was not pleased with his [Flack's]
management style, and I was very displeased
with his materials accounting," said. Cathey,
citing as one example the $9,000 penalty the
city incurred under Flack's management for
not pa-ine payroll taxes on time.
"There were a number of late fees and past
dues on city accounts," continued Cathey
'They just weren't taking care of business."
"Henry left this mnomnui,.(August 3) and
we are circling the wagons now," Cathey said.
"As you. knowt. we're in the middle of budget
issues-and we are trying to gather information
on new city administrators."
When asked if former Mexico Beach
city administrator John, Mclnnis had been
approached by the city to take over Flack's
position, *Cathey said only that McInnis had
already talked to Carrabelle mayor Mel Kelley.
about the situation. McInnis is currently
the city manager of Carrabelle, in Franklin
County.
,However, 'in an interview Thursday
afternoon, Mclnnis confirmed that he had
been approached by Mexico Beach about the
newly vacant position, and that his contract
with the ,city of Carrabelle expires September
14 of this year.
"I've been friends with the mayor of
Me.xco Beach [Cathey] about 30 years," said,
Mclnnis. adding' that if he were 'asked to
ret urn to Mexico Beach as city administrator,
he did not know if he would accept.
McInnis repeatedly stated that he "loves
Carrabelle,"' pointing out that he had a sign
on his door that declared Carrabelle 'the
"greatest small town in America."
And in a special meeting last Friday
afternoon in Mexico Beach, at which the city
council was to have talked with McInnis, he
sent word through Cathey that he [McInnis]
declined the position of Mexico Beach
city administrator, citing excessive media
coverage, specifically from Channel 13, the
ABC affiliate in Panama City.
At the short meeting, according to
Deborah, McLeod, Mexico Beach city clerk,
the city council voted to .go forward with
researching the procedure to use. to fill the
vacant position.

Dale Kingon, Apalachicola Times staff
writer, contributed to this story.


Habitat for Humanity Cookout .......... 1C


INDEX
Opinions- -..4A 4A Commuily Calenda 6B


Sheriff's Office Goes to the Dogs ....... 1B Mentoring Program ........................ 7A LeiierstoiheEdioi .....5 T sToDo&See B

So s1...... .11A Law Eiifo iemlenit -. 8B


O A Freedom
News Paper

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8:00 am 5:00 pm
Real Estate Advertising Deadline
Thursday 11:00 am
Display Advertising Deadline
Friday 11:00 am
Classified Advertising Deadline
Monday 5:00 pm ,
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County Commission Sets Final Millage


(See COUNTY MILLAGE on Page 6A)


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County......................3


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Jump-Start Breakfast 1 B


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4B f ades&~ Serviies----BC(









2A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 10, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Back to School From Page


1966 who helms-a time
machine .despite an
obviouslackofnavigational
expertise.
Before taking the stage,
Lamberson shook off her
pre-showjitters.
S "I'm excited. I'm kind of
Nervous though, because I
S have to be a guiy which is
Totally opposite of what I'
am,' said Lamberson, who
I '- ~borrowed her wardrobe
From junior Grant Glass,.
who played a nerdy


No More Towing
Pork It Here
Under The Bridge


1624 Grouper Avenue
Port St. Joe, Florida
eugene.Oraffieldfisheries.com


B l & nAV O.rc i. n jnoy S curiry -, Con.iu...c l io ..orc m h r. A.tn Rrfie.la F,1 nheri h* .4* IC-,r AcCE.s,
Sc E urd FnCe inaOr OuibOr St, ora, F .,ul-L-..
Outdoor Sorage Raleo Oier 28.000I q. h a prinklers Irailer, onl.i
(Bl's. A Hol B ) Indoor iSorage $50 per monalh Outside S
$ 1.00 per hi. a monih (Boais on Iraller Onh)
$7.00 per It. a month Beal
Length Onl)
SliL ITllrner .. i Boa .
Please Cail Mike 1830) 227-3357 t.L l.U oh One Month I ree lorage _
Located under thebridge in Highland View next to Port St. Joe & only minutes from St. Joseph Bay boat ramp


9' Erica Balogh Goes To


Washington, DC
Erica was selected to attend the
Congressional Youth Leadership Council.
She is excited to be meeting our
county's leaders and to learn about gov-
ernmental procedures.


Congratulations & We Are Proud Of You!
Love,
31 Mom, Dad, Ernie & Henry r


classmate in 1966.
The skit went off
without a hitch, and the
students returned to their
classrooms to finish the
day in abbreviated 15-
minute periods.
With his nerd duties
over, Glass removed
his black horn-rimmed
glasses and called the day
a success.
"It was a good time to
get together and have fun
and start off the year on a
good foot," he said.

In other county back
to school news:
*The First United
Methodist Church hosted a
back to school celebration
on Sunday.
*Wewahitchka Middle
School sixth graders began
classes in the Oscar D.
Redd, Sr. Middle School
Wing, named for the late
Wewahitchka school board
member.
*Wewahitchka High
School and Port St. Joe
Elementary; School both
have new parking lots.


I| .: 5TH MONTH: Do we need a bigger house?
8TH MONTH: How will we invest for the baby future?
It's nice to have a simple
answer for a change.
So here's one. Now the person you turn
to for your insurance needs is the per-
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Ask me about getting started with State
Farm MutualFunds for as little as
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m MUual

invest wath a Good Ndehbor
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Registered
Representative
850-229-6514
I" u t m amk, onfSw5 MatnWt
me-a' *i*- miumivshnetofevd isWqi rae
*" "'*" =isssasms.tssass


:~. ______________________~;~%~-~


2A he ta, PrtSt.Jo, F -Thursday, August 10, 2006


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 yea rs-











County Commission Take Up Policies


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
After canceling a late-
- afternoon special meeting
- on policies and special proj-
: ects for lack of a quorum,
- the regular county commis-
sion meeting scraped by the
quorum requirement when
Commissioner Jerry Barnes
walked in at precisely 6
p.m.
Chairman Carmen
McLemore, who was the only
commissioner at the earli-
er 4:30 p.m. meeting, was
already in his seat, as was
Commissioner Billy Traylor.
Commissioners Bill
Williams and Nathan Peters
, were absent.
County business only
Consumed 15 minutes of
time, with few highlights,
all unanimously passed or
agreed to table, including:
The county ordinance
relating to the six-cent-per-
gallon, local option gas tax
was extended another 25
years, until the end of 2031.
The tax, allowed by
Florida law, can be used
for road improvements and
to finance transportation
expenditures.
The county agreed to
allow Dannie Bolden, execu-
tive director of the Gulf County
Community Development
Corporation (CDC), to invest
approximately $200,000 in
recaptured S.H.I.P funds
from 2005 into a project in
the north end of the county.
Under the new project,
developer David Taunton
would work with the county
and the CDC to build 47 sin-
gle family homes and 14 town
homes with the funds, with a
price range of $100,000 to
$125,000 per home.
According to Bolden,
if the funds are approved,
the CDC can buy down the
cost of each home by about


2006 Hurricane
Names
Alberto Leslie
Beryl Michael
Chris Nadine
Debby Oscar
Ernesto Patty
Florence Rafael
Gordon Sandy
Helene Tony
Isaac Valerie
Joyce William
Kirk


Carmen McLemore


$25,000, bringing the pur-
chase price of the two-bed-
room, two-bath, single-fam-
ily home to $75,000, and
$93,750 for the largest of the
houses.
Depending on the size
of the house, the program
could also defray costs of
furnishings by $5,000 and
$7,000.
"The affordability is here.
This is real," Bolden told the
board.
McLemore asked coun-
ty attorney Tim McFarland
if something could be done
about the extremely high cost
of homeowners insurance in
the north end of the county,
based on the current wind
insurance prices.
"I can understand this
extreme price at the coast,"
said McLemore, "but not 25-
30 miles inland. Is there any-
thing we can do about this?"
McFarland suggested the
board approach the state
legislature and the state
Department of Insurance
through the county lobby-
ists, and the commissioners
voted to allow the lobbyists
to begin inuiridiately.
McLemore then decided
to hold the special meeting on
county policies after the brief
regular commission meeting,
and presented a list of eight'


policies he said needed to be
implemented immediately in
order to make the proposed
2006-07 budget work:
Implement a hiring
freeze:
McLemore stated that the
only problem would be with
Don Butler's office because
the board had already agreed
to let him hire one person.
After discussing wheth-
er a hiring freeze applied
only to new employees, or
included not filling positions
left vacant from retirement,
attrition, resignations, etc.,
McFarland suggested a com-
plete hiring freeze that could
be adjusted on a case-by-case
basis. Passed unanimously,
the freeze becomes effective
October 1.
'- After November 1, the
county will discontinue pro-
viding dirt: The three com-
missioners voted unanimous-
ly to honor only the existing
list of requests for dirt, and
not allow multiple deliveries
to anyone already on the list,
effective November 1.
Barnes suggested the
board advertise this policy
"to educate the people," and
if someone needed dirt to
cover something for safety's.
sake, the request would have
to come before the board.
"We, will continue to
maintain our right of ways
and driveways, but that's it,"
said Traylor;
Discontinue tearing
down and removing old
structures:
Commissioners agreed
to take the issue on a
,case-by-case basis, and all
requests must be presented
to the board in the future.
The policy becomes effective
August 15.
Policies dealing with
the proposed four-day
county work week and the
reduced operational hours


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Free gift offer is available for personal checking accounts only,5/2/06 7/31/06. Only one gift per household. Substitutes or rain checks on free gift will be
offered as needed. Thefree gift will be given at account opening.The following account opening deposits are required: $5,000 or greater, a highway
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This special offer Is not available for IRAs, public funds, brokerages, or financial institutions. Member FDIC Sea~-
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Billy Traylor

of the county landfill were
tabled by unanimous vote, at
the request of Joe Danford,
Solid Waste Manager.
Danford had an extensive
presentation on' the landfill
and the effect of the four-day'


work week on landfill opera-
tions, among other issues
involving the landfill, to give
the board, and he wanted to
present it to the full board.
"I think the numbers are
going to shock you," said
Danford. "I suggest holding
off changing the tipping fees
until the whole board can see
this. Our landfill is too small
to pay for itself."
Implement a freeze on
the purchase of new equip-
ment. The proposal was
passed unanimously and
becomes effective October 1.
No Spring Clean-up:
Saying they will have to edu-
cate the public, the com-
missioners passed the pol-
icy unanimously to become
.effective October 1.


Prioritize construction
of new buildings:
Stating that the storm
shelter, as the most impor-
tant building needed imme-
diately by the county, was
already locked into the 2006-
07 budget, McLemore told
the board and audience that
the county should get grants
in and get the shelter build
and paid for and then start
on the next building, which
was the new Public Works
facility.
McLemore reviewed, his
ranking of the five most vital
buildings the county need-
ed, in order:, county storm
shelter, Public Works facility,
EMS building, maintenance
building, and new county
jail.


Drug Price Website Expands


Potential for Consumer Savings


Attorney General Charlie
Crist today announced that
even more Floridians will
now be able to take advan-
tage of a website that helps
consumers comparison shop
to save money on: their pre-
scription drugs. Crist said
his office has doubled the
types of prescription medi-
cations, listed at the www.
,MyFloridaRx.com website,
enabling consumers to find
the best prices on the 100
most commonly prescribed
medications and their gener-
ic equivalents.
The searchable database
is updated monthly to help
Floridiuas find
the most current prices
on the top 100 prescription
drugs. With generic equiva-
lents and, different dosage
amounts included in the
database, the website now
allows consumers to price
some 600 different prescrip-


tion options. A few clicks at
the website makes it easy
for consumers to determine,
which pharmacies close to
their homes offer', the best
prices on the medications
they need.
Since it was launched
in June 2005, the website
has attracted an average of'
more than 4,100 visitors per
week for a total of 254,203
internet users as of midnight
Monday.
"We are pleased to offer
even more help to Floridians
to stretch their health care
dollars," said Crist. "More
products mean more savings
for those trying to hold down
bills for prescription drugs."
The website allows con-
sumrers to compare prices for
prescription drugs charged
by pharmacies in their city,
and even within their indi-'
vidual zip code., Helpful
information is available in,


both English and Spanish,
and the search results can
be easily viewed and even
downloaded to a spreadsheet
so consumers can review all
prices at their convenience.
MyFloridaRx.com is designed
to assist consumers of all age
groups.
Prices on MyFloridaRx.
com reflect what an unin-
sured consumer, with no
discount or supplemental
plan, would normally pay.
Because the information
on the website is based on
data provided to the state by
the pharmacies themselves,
prices shown on the website
are not guaranteed and are,
subject to change. The web-
,site was launched in June
2005 with the assistance of
the Agency for Health Care
Administration.
To access the website, go
to: http://wvw.MNy'FloridaRx.
com.


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PORT ST. JOE OFFICE, 317 Monument Avenue
PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456
1.877.827.8751 OR 850.229.1700
www.st joeb a y.com


TheStr, or S. JeFL- Turda, Agut 0, 00 -3A


Established 7937 Servina Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


r













I

I


4A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 10, 2006


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


DRA Amendment


That Port St. Joe city commissioners
would isolate an after-dinner mint such as
the Downtown Redevelopment Agency as a
priority from the smorgasbord of pressing
issues before them seems baffling.
Last week, commissioners appeared
poised to move ahead with an ordinance
which would effectively absorb the DRA
into city operations, where some com-
missioners mistakenly believe it already
resides, by bringing financial oversight
and control beneath the umbrella of the
Commission.
We will leave aside the legality of the
city assuming control over an independent
body. Attorneys are better suited for such
determinations, but even if it is not illegal,
the effort is, .as many of those there at the
beginning would attest, a violation of the
spirit in which the DRA was created.
Also left for another day is the. already
mentioned apparent belief of certain com-
missioners that somehow the DRA is a .city
department, beholden 'to the city and com-
missioners in the same manner as Public
Works and the Police Department.
It is not.
That said, if there was some concrete
reason, financial shenanigans or miscon-
duct, which necessitated the city to take
effective control of the DRA, the applause
would be ringing from this corner.
To date, though, no public-evidence, of,
such or even the whiff of wrongdoing and
impropriety has been revealed or alleged
during recent discussions over .operation
of the DRA.
Now, if this initiative had been under-
taken five or .six or seven years ago, when
the DRA was very much under the radar
screen, lacking in .substantive funds and
significant projects, maybe there could
have been a case for absorbing the quasi-
independent body in favor of more get-up
and go.
But at this particular time the DRA is
moving quickly on a number of fronts.
Finally. 'after leaving the money dor-
mant for years, ,the group has begun-col-:
lecting the county.and city tax dollars to
which it was long entitled under statute.


He Was Bi1

My. professional boxing career didn't last
long.
It was over, as, a matter of fact, before I
came to.
Of course, it had never entered my mind
to become a paid, professional boxer right up
until I took the .twenty .dollars and stepped
into -the ring. You might say it was kinda done
on a whim. On.an absolutely, idiotic, stupid
i'whim....
And'it naturally wasn't my fault. I was just
sitting in my dormitory room, reading a. John
.Milton poem, "On His 'Blindness", and most-
ly minding my own business when Paschall,
stuck his head in the door:."Lets ride down to
Sherwood,'they've got some gu,'s boxing down .
S' there."
David Hal Paschall was a couple of years'
older than me. But he wasn't any Wiserl He and
I went to the same high school and he was the
one who talked me into ft'ollong him to the
University of the South. I w%.as the one guy he
ran over every day in high school at football
practice. He wanted me to "come up to the col-
lege" so he could run over me some more!
I was a sophomore and--struggling with'
English literature-the afternoon he interrupted
i my studies. "David,I don't care an-thing about'
boxing l've got to pass this class."
"Heck. you've been cooped up in this room
all day It won't take us five minutes to get down
There. It might be a lot of fun. I'll tell you all
',you need to know about Milton and his ,razy
daughters on the way." '
Sher-Aood. Tennessee, is smaller than any
.place you've ever seen it was "'down the moun-
tain" just a few miles south of the campus.
But it was another world down there I prided
7 mysetl on being country. I could eat my.weight.
in greens, wear them Duck Head overalls, swing.
a lively-lad with either hand, lay off a perfectly
.straight row, squeal a raccoon down out of the
* tree, boil or fry chitlens. over an open fire, knew
every line of "The Washbash Cannon Ball" and
could get ole Bessie to give an extra helping of
milk just by talking to her.....but 'up side that
Sherwood crowd, I was an intellectual, cosmo-
*. ..


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A full-time executive director is on
board brimming with ideas.
A blueprint for renovating the old Dr.
Joe Hendrix property for a much-needed
downtown parking area and open space is
on the drawing board and nearer reality.
The group is undertaking the updating
of a vision plan first crafted in 1989 that
will provide the path to the future for the
downtown area.
So it is now, when the group has con-
crete' direction and plans, that the city
comes forward with calls to
absorb the group. The Ugi
Why?
Let's understand the cen- over thi
trial argument being offered. provide
The city, commissioners
seem to be saying, is better reason
equipped to determine how
DRA money is spent.
This money, we should remember, is
tax dollars paid to the city and county by
those who live and own businesses in the


downtown area.
The DRA membership wants to use
a small portion of their tax bills to focus
on bolstering downtown, aesthetically and
economically.
For perspective, we are talking about
some $200,000 that will soon by doubled
when new fiscal year budgets take effect,
or less than 5 percent of the difference
between the original estimate for the city's
new water plant and the actual costs upon
bidding.
Which pretty much flies in the face
of that we're-better-stewards-of-the-public-
dollar argument, already tipped on its ear
by a simple question who better to spend.
money on projects to benefit a specifically
defined area; government or those who live"
and work in \that area?
It would be hard to conjure a circum-
stance ,under which government would
come out on top in that poll.
Toss all that aside, though, and one is
still left with the underlying puzzle of how
commissioners expend their time, energy
and taxpayer money.
With the boatload of issues swamping'


over them, commissioners have already
spent an out-sized amount of time and
energy on the DRA.
Several years ago, it was about the con-
tinued umbilical linking the city and the
DRA in the form of employees operating
and being paid under both umbrellas. This
was a problem, an ongoing problem, for at
least one commissioner, who raised Cain
again and again over the arrangement.
Now, as the group realizes true operat-
ing and fiscal independence, commission-


ly skirmish
e DRA simply
s another
for fatigue.


ers want to rein in
the DRA.
There's been
no public hue
and cry about it,
not, certainly, for
example, on the
same level of those


pushing for a tighter garbage ordinance.
But where a trash ordinance required
more than a year to draft and approve -
though it still lacks teeth, as most any drive
through the city would underscore an
ordinance to undercut the DRA's autonomy
is a quick turnaround.
City commissioners simply have more
on their plate to waste time on something
such as the DRA.
We've talked extensively in this space
about the need for a broader vision in local
government and when the city has tens of
-millions of dollars in capital improvements
in the pipeline, growth across the map, eco-
nomic development and affordable housing
needs, it's hard to comprehend the sud-
denly pressing nature of neutralizing the
D)RA.
Unless one \ie\s it through'the prism
of standard issue Gulf County politics.
But we would counter that folks the
citizens, the voters have grown- tired of
politics and governance driven by personal-
ity and misplaced priorities and flip-flops.
They, have grown weary of elected offi-,
cials who perceive governing as a parochial
.venture. lacking in the long niew and wasting
tax dollars on narrowly focused agendas.
.The ugly skirmish over the DRA simply
; provides another reason for fatigue.


gger Than He Looked!


HUNKER DOWUN


WITH KES

i Kesley Colbert
Contributing Writer


politan, up tu\\n, city slicker!
it was asif the\ were stuck in some kind of
time warp.....'Paschall put it about the first'week
of'June, 1928. 'Course, I'm not being critical
here. On a good day back home we moved at a
pace reminiscent of a time somewhere between
Woodrow Wilson's second inaurLwration and the
deaths of Bonnie and Clvde. I understood them
a lot better than I did the students we had at
the university from New York City.,.. .
They wore their "country" with pride and
dignity. And anger if you crossed one of them.
We piled out.of Paschall's old Chevrolet and
marveled at the crowd. It had to be, every man,
woman and child in Sherwood, and then some!
I reckon a good boxing match was a great diver-
siori in these people's daily routine. David paid
two dollars for both of us and we shuffled in
amongst the throng like we were just a couple
of good ole down home boys....
They had staked out a square in the middle
of a field. Tied a couple of ropes around the
posts, and presto--we were transformed to
Madison Square Garden! The two guys up in
the ring were doing more dancing and grabbing
than boxing, and the frankness of this country
crowd compelled them to boo and hiss. They
had paid a dollar, they wanted to see some hon-
est to goodness boxing!
John Sahtangini' grabbed me by the arm,
"Kes, I need your help." Sweat was pouring
down his face, and it was a rather mild day.
"Santan, what are you doing down here?
And why do you have on those old britches and


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the cowboy shirt?" '
"Listen, one boxer didn't show up." Jbhn
\\as the Sgt. Bilko of our class He always had
,some enterprising scheme going on. "I've got to'
have someone for the next match!"
'It appears to me you didn't have any box-
ers show up for the fight going on right now."
"I'll,give you twenty bucks.""
Whew! That was hitting below the belt! I
was a hungry sophomore with no money. I'd
do about anything for twenty dollars., Plus,
as Paschal and Sanran pointed out as I was
takingoff my shirt; I was a two sport man at
the university. How difficult would it be? John'
assured me my opponent was very small, "he's
the littlest guy in all of Sherwood", and besides,
"he's got a lot less training than'you do in the
Spugilistic field." ,
I was trying to point out that NOBODY had,
less training here than me when the bell rang
The little fellow didn't even shake hands ..he
hit me right in the mouth And then he hit me
again. And again! I' was trying to get my hands
up but those gloves were heavy.- The little guy
hit me.again!
Maybe Paschall was wiser than me!
To heck with this boxin ,I went after the
little guy's throat, I'd choke him into submis-
sion! Before I could wrestle him to the ground
he hit me seventeen more times! Both eyes were
swelling, my nose had moved over close to' my
right'ear and I was drowning in my own blood
when something or somebody (I was seeing four
or five people in the ring by now) hit.me with a
sledge hammer! The last thing I heard before
1 went unconscious was the crowd booing me
and cheering the little guy.
I didn't last one round. Santan demanded
'half of his money back. Paschall was ,laughing
himself silly. The good country folks were vis-
ibly relieved when I didn't die. With both eyes
swollen shut for a week I understood John
Milton's poem a lot better. And I learned the
hard way that it is truly more blessed to give
than to receive....-
Respectfully,
Kes.


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KEYBOARD


KLAbbERING

Tim Croft
Star News Editor


Fishing with a Cause
Heaven knows that many folks around this
part of the world don't need an excuse to drown a
line and a worm in search of fish.
It's one of the reasons so many flock to this
area, and its bountiful resources of water and sun.
to take what they can from the waters of the bay,
rivers and gulf.
Some entrepreneurial individuals have taken
that passion to a level, creating a cause to go with
all that angling.
Take, for starters, the recent Bayou Bash at
St. Joe Shrimp on C.R. 30-A."
And leave aside how wildly successful this
tournament'was, drawing thousands to St. Joseph
Peninsula for two days of fun and fishing, with a
little mullet tossing thrown in for good measure.
This event was, by any yardstick, an astound-
ing, success, particularly given that the tourna-
ment is a'mere babe, just a few years old.
People swooped in from seven states and
the turnout during the weigh-in and mullet toss
recalled a block party on, steroids, the crowd,
swelling by the hour, eating, enjoying adult bever-
a-ges and soaking in fun times.
All of this excitement for a worthy cause.
The tournament raised more than .$10,000
for the Salvation Army's Domestic Violence Task
Force.
"It was just awesome," said Pam Martin, the
director of the task force.
The proceeds from the tournament repre-
sented just about the most significant bit of lar-
gesse this very noble cause has received, which is
a good and bad thing.
Good because the money will be put to use to
serve Gulf County families.
"It will all be used for Gulf County victims
,and their families," Martin.said.
The other side of the coin is that domestic
violence is one of those plagues which too often
infects under the radar, out of sight from the
general public.
Martin and her team step in during the most
trying of circumstances, when families are unrav-
eling and lives are potentially at peril, providing
assistance in the form of everything from a few
- dollars to pay a bill, to help securing an injunc-
tion against the abuser to just providing a shoul-
der of emotional and physical support
Martin and her team see more than 30 people
a month last month 12 of those cases involved
new individuals, those who have not been forced
before to tap into Martin and the services she can
providc.
"It is an ongoing problem," Martin said.
The dollars which were raised during the
Bayou Bash will provide operating capital for a
host of ic timn needs.
"It will buy a lot of groceries a lot of medi-
cine. utility assistance. Pas money to see doctors,
moving expenses, anything that will help," Martin
said.
No administration costs will be paid from
the tournament proceeds;,this will be all about
assisting victims in whatever way is possible and
feasible.
Martin and the rest of the task force, includ-
ing Port StJ, Joe. police chief James Hersey
and Judy Rinehart, work countless, hours, often
strange hours, beyond the spotlight, out of the
view of most of us.
,It is.the nature of their job, so much surround-
ing domestic violence being rightly obscured by.a
veil of privacy, but these are tireless folks whose
life is about helping others.
And in doing so. they provide a viable reason
to drown awormin, or two.
They' very humbly say thanks to Domna
Spears and her bash of'a tournament.,
Gaskin Park Fishing
Sticking with one theme this week, lets turn
to the Wewahitchka Search and Rescue group and
the tournament they have coming up next week-
end at Gaskin Park in Wewahitchka
It is almost a misnomer to identify this
particular Search and Rescue operation as.
Wewahitchka's,. because in the past few years it
has become a regional asset, called to searches or
recoveries throughout Northwest Florida.
From Walton to Wakulla counties, if a person
is lost in the woods, has disappeared into a body
of water. gerierally vanished without explanation,
the call typically goes out to the Wewahitchka
Search and Rescue. ;
A non-profit which is more than 100 strong
in volunteers, observing this group mobilize is to
understand community.
These men and women get it, they under-
stand what a village is about, what treating the
bereaved with humanity entails, what it means
to reach out for those experiencing the worst life
has to offer.
And last year they hit upon- a fishing tourna-
ment when they show up anywhere, they show
up with vessels, after all to help raise opera-
tional funds."
In its second year the tournament has joined
four others, including October's Florida Catfish
Classfi in Wewahitchka, to comprise the summer
fishing series on the Apalachicola Rivq.
This year's tournament will take place Aug.
18-19 at Gaskin Park. Registration begins at 9
a.m. CT on Aug. 18 and awards will be presented
at noon the next day.
The tournament serves a ,dual purpose in
that the prize fish are flathead catfish, a nuisance
predator 'that long ago invaded the Apalachicola
River system,
The entry fee is a mere $40 and as it has
joined the river series the prize money is greater
this year $1,000 for the largest flathead, $500
for second, $400 for third, $300 for fourth and
$200 for fifth.
The boat with the most pounds of flathead
brought to shore wins another $250 and the com-
bined poundage of each entrant will be counted
toward the $1,000 'prize to the angler who brings
in the most fish in the five Apalachicola River
tournaments.
The most important item, though, is the rea-
son for the fishing and it'& all about the cause.


__ I


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YOUR HOA/ETOlWN NEWSPAPER FOR 01 ER 68 YEARS


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,If u sa osP .TA 0


Davis Gives Hope During Insurance Crisis


Ten to twelve home and
business owners sat around
the table at the Panama Cafe,
sharing stories of cancelled
policies, increased ,rates and
unpaid claims. Jim Davis,
front running Democratic
candidate for Governor, was
holding his third roundtable
discussion, gathering infor-
mation and sharing ideas for
addressing the insurance cri-
ses affecting individuals and
families throughout the State.
Citizens from Bay, Gulf
and Walton Counties expressed
concerns that they seemed to
have noone "on their side",
Appalled that the 2005 state
legislature had inserted a
loophole in a 100-year-old law
that has now made it easier
for insurance companies to
avoid paying claims of Florida
property owners, participants
asked Davis how they could be
expected to fight the insurance
companies and Tallahassee
too.
Port St. Joe business
woman Jamie Smith told
Davis that, "insurance rate
increases are devastating small
businesses in Gulf County."
Smith said "with the continu-
ing increase in local taxes
and the cost of windstorm
insurance being prohibitive,
one major storm will put me
out of business". It was clear
that others were facing the
same situation. Jodi Perez,
co-owner with her husband
Antonio of Port St. Joe's new-
est restaurant,,.PROVISIONS,
had sent word to Davis that
they could not get Windstorm
insurance and even with a
$3000 a year 'premium, the
new building would notbe
covered for storm damage.


,The late Peter "'Lord",
Bauer devoted much of his
life to championing the politi-
cal economy of classical lib--
eralism for developing societ-
ies. This is what would bring
them out of their wretched
states, not a bunch of foreign
aid and intervention by the
World Bank, the International
Monetary Fund or the United
Nations.
His friend and pome-
time critic, Amartya Sen, a
Nobel Laureate who teach-'
es at Harvard, had a seri-
ous disagreement with Bauer.
Sen had been defending what
he, has dubbed the capabili-
ties approach whereby the
people in underdeveloped.
Third World countries must
be helped 'not only by remov-
ing all the terrible obstacles
placed before them by politi-
cians and bureaucrats but also
by' providing them with some
initial aid and with making
it possible for them to influ-
ence their governments. Such
influence, of course, would
direct public policies to gar-
ner resources via taxation and
then handing out subsidies


S Online .
: Opinion -.
- Pole Results




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question: www.starfl.com


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Davis' Gulf County cam-
paign manager Zebe Schmitt,
spoke of Port St. Joe churches
that could not buy windstorm
insurance at any cost. It is
not local insurance agencies
that are the problem", stat-
ed Schmitt, they can't find
a company that will sell the
policies." It is the Insurance
Companies who are reporting
the largest profits ever that
are raising the premiums, or
refusing to offer the policies.
Our churches are too close to
the Bay and the age of some
of the buildings are a prob-
lem. Strange they were not too
close to the bay during the last
20 years."
Lauren DeGeorge, Mayor
of Panama City and City
Commissioner Jonathan
Wilson both expressed con-
cerns for citizens whose
homes are on. the waters edge.
Wilson said, "we have so many,
residents whose -homes are
near the coast lines and yes,
their cost of coverage is going
up and I'm sad to say, even
being cancelled. But there are
lots of people who don't live
near the water who have been
affected. Hurricanes result in
high winds and heavy rains
for those who live inland too..
If people think the insurance
crisis is only affecting, those
residents who chose to live on
the beach or on the bays, they
are sadly mistaken. Inland tor-
nadoes seem to go right along
with the hurricanes." Wilson,
continued, ".that is why I am
impressed when. I hear you
(Congressman Davis) speak
about insurance being a State,
crisis and I'm glad to hear
your plans to get the insur-
ance companies to pay and not


and others forms of support
to special interest groups that
had helped vote in these mea-
sures. Sen's basic idea is that
once.this opportunity for mak-
ing an impact on politics has
been exploited, development
would commence, and most
often private individuals and
firms would start embarking
on various productive enter-
prises. But, argues Sen. first
they need a little help from
government and various inter-
national groups.
Bauer's and Sen's conflict-
ing approaches may best be
accounted for by reference to
what seems to be their respec-
tive views of human .nature
as well as of governments.
Bauer would seem to have


expect the taxpayers to be on
the hook for widespread hur-
ricane damage."
Former Lynnhaven Mayor,
Montel Johnson, spoke of
being flooded four times dur-
ing the last four years and
the frustration of dealing with
the increase in storm dam-
age. She said, one of the
problems was which carrier
would pay for what damage.
The wind insurance wanted
the flood insurance to pay and
vice versa." Johnson's home
is now up for sale due to her
fear that the policy will not
just increase in cost but will
be cancelled.
It was these stories about
individuals and churches and
physicians and businesses
both in the Panhandle and
throughout the State that led
Davis to believe that insur-
ance was one of the great-
est challenges facing Florida
today. And Davis is ready.
He told participants that, "as
Governor of Florida, I will use
the power and resources vest-
ed in my office to be an advo-
cate for hurricane insurance
policyholders across the state.
For too long, the politicians in
Tlahassee have been putting
the interests and profits of
insurance companies ahead of
the interests and security of
Florida policyholders". He
presented his Policyholder's
Bill of Rights, promising he
would make sure that, each
of the eight rights would be
protected in every decision he
makes, every executive order
he writes and every, law he
signs." Davis continued,
"FLORIDIANS HAVE THE
RIGHT


I freedom


been confident that free men,
and women will do well by
themselves, provided the legal
authorities uphold the regime
of private property rights and
the integrity of contracts. This
is the limited government idea,
one favored by the American
Founders in the Declaration of
Independence. This is the idea
that comes from John Locke,
who held that government is
but a way to secure our rights
and there is no other serious
business for It to carry out
for us. And this view rests on
the idea that humans are able
to fend for themselves, in vol-
untary cooperation, because
they. are Inventive and cre-
ative and productive once the
threat of criminal and foreign
invasion is dealt with in their
societies. Sure. there will be
some who lag behind, maybe
because they suffer from cer-
tain maladies or unusual natu-
ral impediments, but to help
them it Is enough for their to
be neighbors and relatives and
philanthropist to give them
support. Governments should
stay the course and secure
individual rights, period.
Another matter Sen,
appears to overlook is what,
public choice theorists have
taught us, namely that when


SQuestion

Ready for school to start


Yes, summer heat has us ready for the indoors.
0%

No, when did Labor Day stop being the
ceremonial end of summer 17%


Don't Know Don't Care, '83%


Comments from our readers in the form ot letters
to the editor or a'guet column are solicited and
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be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are
32457 exchanged. All letters and guest columns must
be signed and should include the address and
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2. and phone number are for verification and will
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correctness and style.
11m -, : -"-


*To stable insurance pre-
miums, and to be protected
by the Governor's Policyholder
Advocate General in the rate
approval process. .
*To have their hurricane
damage claims settled fairly
and quickly by their insurance
companies.
*To a strong Federal
Catastrophe Insurance Fund
in the event of widespread
storm damage.
*To an insurer of last
resort that provides quality
coverage without wasting tax-
payer dollars.
*To a fully-funded.
financially sound Hurricane
Catastrophe Fund
*To easily obtain low-inter-
est loans to "hurricane proof"
their property.
*To a Governor's
Policyholder Advocate General
who will hold insurance com-
panies accountable for pro-
cessing and paying out claims
in a fair and timely manner.
*To choose their insur-
ance carrier and not the other
way around." -
In closing the discus-
sion and thanking the par-




,government gets involved m
helping various groups in
need. those in government
pretty much manage to divert
this help to projects they them-
selves prefer. Bureaucrats and
politicians have' their own
agenda, and when they gain
power so as to help out, it
Sis their idea of what needs
to be helped they will follow.
not that of those who reached
out to them. Given that politi-
cians and bureaucrats lack
budgetary constrains like
normal businesses and fami-
lies do. they are also likely
to overspend and deplete the
resources of their treasuries.
Of course, those who are
eager for the unfortunate and
those left behind to get on
their -feet must also accept
an uncomfortable fact not
everyone is eager, to go along
with this objective even among
those who are in the worst
shape. It Is utopian to believe
that any kind of method for
development will be univer-
sally effective. When one does
hold that view, one is only like-
ly to throw good money after
bad and perpetrate serious
wastefulness. Some measure
of- poverty, for example; as
well as devastation from natu-
ral disasters will have to be
accepted. Humans, aren't per-
fect and to fall to realize this
leads to what Voltaire called
the perfect being the enemy
of the good. This applies to
efforts to ,facilitate develop-
ment across the globe.
It seems to me that Bauer
had it right, even though from
his perspective one must 'also
accept that some underdevel-
opment will remain in place
,here and there across the
globe. But the kind of efforts
urged on us by Sen and, espe-
cially, by the likes of Jeffrey
SSachs and Bono massive
transfers of wealth from devel-
oping to underdeveloped coun-
tries will only lead to disap-
pointment and frustration.

Tibor Machan holds the
R.C. Holes Professorship in
business ethics and free enter-
prise at Chapman University
in Orange, Calif, and is co-
author of "Libertarianism.
For and Against" (Rowman
& Littlefield). He advises
Freedom Communications,
parent company of this
newspaper. E-mail him at
TMachan@llnk.freedom.comrn


ticipants, Davis promised, "
to crack down on multi-billion
dollar insurance companies
who attempt to cherry-pick
the most lucrative insurance
investments, and leave thou-
sands of Florida policyhold-
ers without coverage." He said
he, "would require insurance
companies to give one year's,
notice before arbitrarily drop-
ping policyholders who have


paid their premiums for three
consecutive years and not filed
any claims."

further informa-
tion on Davis' Policyholders
Bill of Rights can be found
at www.jimdavis2006.com.
.To send your concerns to
or share your stories email
jimdavis(@jimdavis2006.com.


_Li ._In_ _1n_ _nnin,4_ 7r


Develo ment and
Commentary by TIBO .
Freedom News ServiceAN
Freedom News Service .


o Voice AnOpinion


--


The Star, Port St. Joe,'FL Thursday, August 10, 2006 SA


Establishedl 1937 Servinq Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


r


mm 111,Timwd-7_-z I







6 Th tr otS.Je L'TusaAgst10 06Etbihd13 evn uf onyadsronigaesfr6 er


County Millage


From Page 1A


were required to provide
funding by state law and that
last year the organization
was removed from the
county budget in violation of
state law. Of the 16 counties
in north Florida that the
organization serves, Gulf was
the only one reported as not
in compliance for funding,
said Dekle.
Legal Services of North
Florida is a non-profit agency
serving the legal needs of
low income people in the
16-county region, providing
free civil legal services for
domestic violence victims
and issues involving .seniors
and children, and to people
whose income falls below
125 percent of the poverty
level.
In 2005, LSNF spent
approximately $25,000
providing civil legal
representation to seniors,
children, domestic violence
victims and the poor in Gulf


County, yet was only able to
represent 11 percent of the
citizens who needed help in
the county in 2005.
Dekle urged the
commission to continue
considering passing an
ordinance that would
provide a continuous stream
of funding for legal aid
programs in the future.
The motion to provide
the required funding was
passed unanimously.
$300,000 was removed
from cash-carry-forward
and $200,000 from reserve
funds, with the caveat to re-
examine the decision at the
end of the budget process.
The motion to do so was
passed unanimously, after
discussion about the dangers
of reducing the reserve
funds when emergencies are
Inherent during hurricane
season, and the practice of
using reserve funds to pay
for budget items not covered


by other funds.
Landfill fees and use
were set aside to revisit after
more study, after arguments
among commissioners over
residential and commercial
tipping fees.
McLemore felt $50,000
could be cut from the budget
if commercial tipping fees
were significantly increased,
but was adamant that
county residents should not
pay more.
Peters insisted everyone
in the county should pay
to use the landfill, and
Joe Danford, Solid Waste
Director, told the board
that they had to "make a
solid policy," that they could
not divide commercial and
residential fees.
Human Resources'
request for $53.000 for an
additional fulltime employee
was kept in the budget,
over Williams's arguments
against it.
"If Denise [Manuel,
Director of Human Resources]
needs help, let's give it to her,
in contractual services," said
Williams. "But don't hire an
FTE with-all the benefits, etc.
We can't keep hiring staff,"
he continued, "It's killing
us."
The motion to remove
the money from the proposed
,budget died for lack of a
second.
The sheriff's
department was allowed its,
$90,000 increase;' even after
audience member Jim Lloyd,
a resident of Port St. Joe,
gave statistics he said he
had gathered comparing the
county's sheriffs department.
to 15 other law enforcement
agencies in the region.
Williams and Peters
both warned the board
about "cutting into the
sheriffs department too far,"*


Sa-P



497,w 8Ws otS oe L347(5)2966


'4"& gale4

196 w 9 Ws
PotSt oL325

(850 229696


with Williams stating that
"instead of buying those
vans, we should be adding
those funds to the sheriffs
department," referring to the
four vans the commissioners
voted to add to the budget in
the last meeting.
At McLemore's
insistence, the issue was
left alone, and the $90,000
combined increase, plus
benefits, was left in the
sheriffs department budget.
A motion to cut the
county tax collector's office
back to the previous year's
budget died for lack of a
second.
The four vans were
again brough-- up and Peters
immediately made the
motion to remove two of the
four Vans from the request
list, a motion that passed
unanimously
Williams', and
Traylor's requests for vans
remained because neither
commissioner had any
transportation available
to his district for work
crews, etc., as did the other
commissioners..
Doug Kent, Gulf
. County Heal-h Department
Director, was denied his
$30,000 funding increase
for medical personnel for the
Wewahitchka health clinic,
despite his impassioned
description of the need for
expanded s rvices in the
area.
"They've paid taxes all
these years." said Kent. "Now
it's time. TI at community
deserves it. We (the health
department| give the county
a great return for your
money."
"I support you and you do
a great job. but I have major
heartburn with what you
just sald." McLemore replied.
noting that the county had
already added a half-cent
sales tax to fund a health
department substation In
Wewahitchka.
"Now you're telling me
we have to hire a doctor and
a nurse something's wrong,
Doug."
McLemore suggested
that since the county' has
been stockpiling money for
a new county hospital, the
commissioners should use
funds from that trust fund
to pay for the requested


positions in Wewahitchka.
A motion passed 4-0 to
write a letter to the board of
directors of the trust fund
handling the new hospital
funds, discussing the use of
those funds.
Jim Garth,
spokesperson for Citizens for
Reduced Taxes, addressed
the board and told them
they really needed to look
more closely at the Roads
Department.
Garth said, "We feel
strongly there is room to cut
in there."
McLemore immediately
replied, "Show. me today
where we can cut in Roads,
Mosquito Control and Public
Works."
A heated discussion
ensued among the
commissioners, with
McLemore adamantly against
any further reduction in the
Road Department, telling
Williams, "If you really want
to cut, there is a $60,000
work order system [in the
budget] that could go. Show
me how that [system] will
save the county money."
Williams shot back, "You
just said it by saying you
don't have the figures under
the current system."
Williams also suggested
cutting one percent across
the boaid from, every,
department, saying "We are
now at $200,000 left to cut
- so close yet so far."
That idea was nixed, by
Becky Norris, Gulf County
Clerk of Circuit Court,
who told Williams that the
commissioners could not
make-across-the-board cuts
because some departments
were grant' funded or
mandated. and that
budget cuts must be made
department by department.
She also reminded the
commissioners that theyN
needed to set a village rate
at the meeting, and that
cutting S200,000 was going
to take a lot of work, that
they must go line by line.
-Oneaudience suggestion
for stripping 9100,000 from
the budget was to make
employees actually take
vacation instead of vacation
pay, but county attorney Tim
McFarland stated that that
option was only available
with non-union employees,


John cares about the youth of our community. He has been involved as
a volunteer with school related activities for over 20 years. He is very,
passionate abut each Gulf County student getting the best education
possible. John realizes that while many students in our area will attend
some type of college, others will pursue military or vocational paths
after graduation from high school. It is important that everyone has op-
portunities to advance.
*Graduated Smith Station High School-Smiths, AL 1971.
*Attended Columbus College and TheUniversity of West FL- Studied
Business Administration
:Employed- City of Port St. Joe. 28 years .
* Member First Baptist Church of Port St. Joe
*Married to Linda Rushing Wright- Registered Dental Hygienist
*One child- Matthew Wright, honor student at Port St.Joe High School.
*Established scholarship, in 1987. in memory of late wife, Linda Lewis'
Wright- a teacher at Highland View Elementary School; Preference is
given to students pursuing degree in elementary education
*Coached Little League Baseball- 10 years
*Coached Upward Basketball- 6 years; Helped establish program in
Port St. Joe
*Coached little League Football- 5 years
*Member- School Advisory Council at Port St. Joe Middle School- 2
years
*Volunteer- PTO
*Volunteer- Port St. Joe High School football "Chain Crew"- 20 years
*Volunteer- Port St. Joe High School Baseball- Food Prep- 6 years
Vote John Wright on September 5th for
Gulf County School Board District 5
Pol.tical ad m.erj:cmert paid 1r.- ar. 1appro. ~d b, jlor.r. .',ngI- i.:.r School Board DItn.a 5


and the policy was already
set with the unions.
Williams added that the
policy of taking vacation and
sick pay in lieu of vacation
or sick days had just been
negotiated and was good for
two or three years, suggesting
that the commissioners
needed to look at policies,
which could not be done this
year.
The motion to reduce
both the Road Department
and Public Works by $25,000
each was passed 3-2, with
Traylor and McLemore
dissenting.'
Traylor then asked to
verify that only $400,000
remained in the reserve
funds. "That's a scary, scary
scenario, right there," he
said. 'We are treading on
thin water. It's on the verge
of catastrophe."
* As a final discussion,
Peters wanted to set rates
for use of the county landfill,
claiming it would generate
$400,000 in fees, especially
if the county charged the city
to use the site.
A motion to increase
revenues for landfill use
to match the remaining -
$205,000 left to trim from
the budget died for lack of a
second because, as Williams
said, "We don't have the
numbers."
A special meeting to
discuss county policies,
including those governing the
landfill, was set for Tuesday
at 4:30 p.m. E.T.




Scallop



Festival


From Page 1A


hanid-blown glass and metal
:works.
A Patron's Art Preview
Party, a festival first, will
begin Friday. August 25 from
6-8 p.m. under a tent at the
Village at Marina Cove.
The Caribbean-themed
party' will, feature hors
d'oeuvres. wine and beer,
and live entertainment from
the Coconut Steel Drum
Band.
On Saturday and
Sunday, the gates open.at 10
a.m., and festival goers can
peruse the arts and crafts
booths and enjoy music from
a roster of bands versed in
genres such as Southern
:rock, jazz. reggae and folk.
The Kid's 'Zone will
entertain the kiddies with
pony and, train rides, rock
Climbing and moon jumps.
This year's food offerings
will be larger than ever
before, with vendors selling
hamburgers, seafoodbaskets,
chicken, pork, funnel cakes,
deep-fried desserts, and of
course, scallops.
Tickets for the Patron's
Art Preview Party are on sale
now for $30 per person and
$200 for a table of 10. For
tickets or other information,
contact the, Gulf County
Chamber of Commerce, (850)
227-1223.


Presented By Rex and Anne Anderson, REALTORS O. a
CAPE SAN BLAS X-FLOOD GULF FRONT LOT -



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S tild without DEP permit arid with no flood insurance required. Lo- Rex Cellular: 850-227-5416
i edm irSanDunes, great new beach community, with beautiful homes, Anne Cellular: 850-227-5432
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Account Executive


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227-1278

THE,* STAR T HE MES -"
135 \V. Hk N 98 129 CTorrmerce Sn-eet
Port St Joe. Florida Apalachicola. Flonda j


~IIIIC~Crrr~' --~--s~- :- _Ils41sll~r*l~lrrrrclll I~I~IB~LL~i~LYi~YI~ L ~e


Established 1937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


6A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAu st1,20


//I/[ Wkther






Fcrblu ic- 17 er--na Gf I--.-S.J,


Mentoring During the Transition to Adulthood


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
Diana Sealey succinctly captured her hopes for a youth men-
torship program which took root in Gulf County earlier this year.
"If the next 15 kids go as well as the first three, I'll be excited,"
Sealey said.
The first three, all falling within the age 16-21 target age
group, were Jennifer Johnson, Gabbie Whittington and Sandy
Hodges, who this summer completed their stint working for sev-
eral area organizations as part of a mentorship program Sealey
and her Christian Community Development Fund sponsored.
Johnson and Whittington, from Port St.'Joe High School, and
Hughes, a student at Faith Christian School, constitute the inau-
gural class in what Sealey hopes will become a permanent fixture
in the county, north and south, in the coming years.
"It was excellent," Hodges said of her work with the Supervisor
of Elections Office. "It taught me how to. be a professional. It defi-
nitely helped me for later in life."
And that, Sealey would say, was the point.
The mentorship program was made possible through a
three-year, one-time $35,000 grant from the William Culbert, Jr.
Foundation. Facilitated by Wachovia Bank of Orlando and passed
through Oak Grove Assembly of God Church, the dollars are spe-
cifically earmarked for a mentorship program, in this case one in
which Sealey is targeting students who might not see college on
the horizon.
"What we're trying to target are kids who are leaning toward
taking vocational courses or getting a job right after going through
*-. A-A:.- .* J "k,'


high school," Sealey said. "We try to place them somewhere their
personality and job skills would fit."
Johnson was partnered with the Community Development
Corporation, which is spearheading a variety of affordable hous-
ing initiatives in the county; Whittington worked in the office at
Oak Grove Assembly of God Church; and Hodges joined the team
at the Supervisor of Elections Office.
"We wanted them working at place that were good examples
for them and places that were professional, where they would
learn the work place," Sealey said. "It's a win-win for the employ-
ers because they get an extra hand and we pay them."
The grant monies pay the hourly wages of each student, who
must work at least 180 hours in the January to May cycle as
Johnson, Whittington and Hodges did or 168 hours between
August and December.
The total number of hours is based on the number of free
days and available non-school hours in each semester of the
school year.
A new set of three students begin their stint in the program
this month, the kids selected by Sealey from a list culled from
administrators at local high schools and churches.
After starting in Port St. Joe for. the first year, Sealey aims to
expand the program to include students from the north end of
the county
The kids and their parents or guardians must sign a con-
tract, agreeing to work the required hours, stay out of trouble at
school and avoid some of the behavioral pitfalls prevalent during
adolescence.


If they miss a day of work, the student must make up that day
as their school schedules allow.
"She was a lot of help," Supervisor of Elections Linda Griffin
said of Hodges. "We were just moving into new offices. She was
great. She came in after school, put her books down and went to
work."
Hodges said she felt welcomed by Griffin and her.team.
"I really got to know the people in the office, they are like
family now," Hodges said. "It was more formal, you can't wear just
anything. It was very professional. How you answer the phone is
important
"When most people think of the elections office, they don't
think about everything they do. They have stuff to do 24/7."
Sealey said she hoped to move 18 kids through the men-
torship program through 2008, three in each of the two annual
cycles. When the grant money runs out, she added, she hopes the
success of the program will attract a local sponsor to keep it active
beyond 2008.
"I just know from working with kids for 10 years that these
kids need to have some structure after school," Sealey said. "They
need some sense of responsibility and to feel they've accomplished
something.
"We hope to make a difference. And, at the least, we've given
job references for our kids."


Jennifer Johnson (front left), Gabbie Whittington (center) and Sandy Hughes received certifi-
cates as the first their participants in a mentorship program sponsored by the Christian Community
Development Fund. Diana Sealey, representing the Community Development Corporation, Catherine
Collier with Obk Grove Assembly of God Church. and Supervisor Elections Linda Griffin provided the
workplace mentorship.
," .. -





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Local: 850.227.2160
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Cape San Bias Barrier Dunes 273 Parkside Circle Weahitchka- 128 5th Street









Port St Joe- 1314 McClelland Ave. Port St.Joe- 1009 MonumentAve.
3 bedroom, I bath, lot size 62x155 approx 2 bedroom,2 bath, 1,636sf,90xI50 lot size
MLS# 200973.$195,000. Call Johnny Linton at 850-227-2160 MLS #108274.$299,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949








Mexico Beach- 03 16th.Street 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 204sf, 85x150 corner lot.
3BR/2BA, Plus a 2BR/IBA Mother-in-Law suite 2790sf,16t size 75x100. MLS #111806 $365,000Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949
MLS #1IJ0687. $450,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850.227.5949








CAPE SAN BLASI BARRIER DUNES #89 279 PARKSIDE CR. Cape San Bias SeaCliffs SD 632 SeaCliffs Dr.
3 bedroom, 3 bath, 1369 sfi towahome. 24 bedroom, 4.5bath, 1,944sf, elevator.
MLS #103858. $489,000. Call Ronald Picket at 850-227-2160. MLS #108476. $585,000. Call Johnny Linton at 850-227-2160.

LOTS and LAND
Port S. Joe Residential Lot 125 14th. Street Bay View, 220. MLS #107974. $450,000
I12x120 or.30acres approx. MLS# 200365. $239,000. Cape San Bias Seagrass Sub. 120 Seagrass Circle 128 x
Port'St. Joe Residential Lot 1310 Monument Ave. Lot size 07 lot size.MLS # 108472. $649,000.
Sapprox. 120 x 105. MLS# 200355. $259,000. .o ,
C-30 Shallow Reed Subdivision we have released 6Village lots Port St. Joe Interior 144 Betty Dr. irregular lot size. MLS
for $279,000 each. # 109390 $119,000
Port St. Joe Commercial Village at Marina Cove 171 Treasure Bay C-30 -5454 Sand Bar Drive -Approx.59 accre.
Village Dr.Lot size 40x 98. MLS #105310.$389,000. MLS # 106513 $307,000
Overstreet Pine Breeze SD -948 South Long St. Lot size 108 Wewahitchka Seven Springs Subdivision 121 Little River
x 300. MLS # 111065.$75,000 Circle. Approx .5 acre. MLS #109706. $75,000.
St. Joe Beach Interior 303 Nautilus Dr. Sea Shores SD.
approx. 80x140. ML S #10234. $270,0 00 Cape San Bias Jubilation 122 Rosemary Ct. Approx..20
Treasure Bay C-30 -Bay View -5312 Sand Bar Dr. Lot size 103 acre. MLS # 109793 $395,000
x 220. MLS # 105578. $389,000. Overstreet-Wetappo Creek--9959 Hwy.386-- Creek Frontage
PeaTreasure Bay C-30 Bay View 5438 Sand Bar Dr. Lot size 103 x 120ft,lot size approx 2.6 acres. MLS #200843. $450,000.


-IL


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BA II 0 Star. Port_-1_ S Je FL h


Know the Ps SUN


&QsofUV


Protection aA

Story by: Michael Grady
Illustration by: Gabriel Utasi
Freedom News Service

Sunblock can seem a little overcautious, especially to young people and those old enough to
predate it. That's what makes both groups most vulnerable to skin cancer.
"Few people realize how very common skin cancer is," says Dr. Steven. Stratton of the
University of Arizona. "There are as many skin cancer cases diagnosed each year as all other
cancers combined."
It is also one of the most easily preventable cancers, with protection a thin layer of sunblock
away. But rising skin cancer rates and declining sunblock usage suggest that Americans are still
baking in ignorance.
The good news: A sunscreen that offers more protection from harmful radiation will soon be
on store shelves. The Food'and Drug Administration in late July approved Anthelios SX. a sun-
screen whose active ingredient, ecamsule, blocks both ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B rays.
Anthelios is made by the French cosmetics company IOreal SA. It has a sun-protection factor
or SPF of 15. LaRoche-Posay will distribute the product, the FDA said.
The sunscreen contains three active ingredients, including ecanisule or Mexoryl SX. Mexoryl
has been included in the company's sunscreens sold in Canada and Europe since 1993.
Sunscreens currently sold in the United States only protect against UVB rays, The Associated
Press reports. UVA, which penetrates more deeply, is associated with long-term effects including
three types of skin cancer.


GULF COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
Announces its policy for Free and Reduced Price Meals for students under the


NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH AND BREAK-

FAST PROGRAMS.

Any interested person may review a copy of the policy by contact
Bill Carr
150 Middle School Road
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850-229-8256/639-2871

Household size and income criteria will be used to determine eligibility. These criteria can be found on the
chart below. Children from families'whose income is at or below the levels shown may be eligible for Free or
Reduced Price Meals. An application can not be approved unless it contains complete eligibility information.
Once approved, meal benefits are good for an entire year. You need not notify the organization of changes
in income and household size.
Application forms are being sent to all homes with a letter to parents or guardians. To apply for Free or Re-
duced Price Meals, households must complete the application and return it to school. Additional copies are
available at the principal's office in each school. The information provided on the application will be used
for the purpose of determining eligibility and may be verified at any time during the school year. Applications
may be submitted at any time during the year. ,
Households the receive Food Stamps .or TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families) are'requ;red to list
on the application only the child's name, Food Stamp TANF case number, and signature of adult household
member. '
Foster children may receive benefits based on the child's personal income regardless of the income of the
household.
Household with children who are.considered migrants, homeless, or.runaway should contact the district
liaison, Bill Carr at 850-229-8256/639-2871
For the purpose of determining household size deployed service members are considered a part of the
.household. Families should include the names of the deployed service members on their application Report
only that portion of the deployed service member's income made available to them or on their behalf to the
family. Additionally, a housing allowance that is part of the Military Housing Privatization Initiative is not to
be included as income.
All other households must provide the following Information listed on the application:
Total household income listed by amount received and type of income and how often the income is re-
ceived (wages, child support, etc.) received by each household member;
Names of all household., members;
Signature of an adult household member certifying the information provided is correct andl
Social Security number of the adult signing the application or the word "NONE" for this household member,
if he or she does not have a social security number.
If a household member becomes unemployed or if the household size changes, the school should be con-
tacted. Children of parents or guardians who become unemployed should also contact the school Such
changes may make the student eligible for reduced price or free meals if the household income Falls at or
below the levels shown below.
Under the provisions of the Free and Reduced Price meal policy
ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR BUSINESS SERVICES

will review applications and determine eligibilityIf a parent or guardian is dissatisfied with the ruling of the
official, he or'she may wish to discuss the decision with the determining official on an informal basis If the
parent wishes to make a formal appeal, he or she may make a request either orally or in .vriting to
'Tim Wilder
150 Middle School Road'
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850-229-8256/639-2871

Unless indicated otherwise on the application, the information on the Free and Reduced Price Meal applica-
tion may be used by the school system in determining eligibility for other educational programs.
M FLORIDA INCOME ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES
FOR FREE AND REDUCED PRICE MEALS},


E active from July 1. 2006, to June 30, 2007


Free Meal Scale Is 130% of Federal Poverty Level
Household Annual Monthly Twice Per Every Two Weekly
size Month Weeks
1 12,740 1,062 531 490 245
2 17,160 1,430 715 660 330
3 21,580 1,799 900 830 415
4 26,000 2,167 1,084 1,000 500
5 30,420 2,535 1,268 1,170 585
6 34,840 2,904 1,452 1,340 670
7 39,260 3,272 1,635 1,510 755
8 43,680 3,640 1,820 1,680 840
Each additional 4,420 369 185 170 85
family, member, ,
add
Reduced Meal Scale Is 185% of Federal Poverty Level
Household Annual Monthly Twice Per Every Two Weekly
size Month Weeks
1 18,130 1,511 755 698 349
2 24,420 2,035 1,018 940 470
3 30,710 2,660 1,280 1,182 591
4 37,000 3,084 1,542 1,424 712
5 43,290 3,608 1,804 1,665 833
6 49,580 4,132 2,066 1,907 954
7 55,870 4,656 2,328 2,149 1,07S
8 62,160 5,180 2,590 2,391 1,196
Each additional 6,290 525 263 242 121
family member,
add
To determine monthly income:,,
If you receive the income every week, multiply the total gross income by 4.33.
If you receive the income every two weeks, multiply the total gross income by 2.15
If you receive the income twice a month, multiply the total gross income by 2
Remember: The total income before taxes, social security, health benefits, union dues, or other deductions
mus t be reported.
'In accordance with Federal law, and US Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating
on the basis of race,, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To file a.complaint of discrimination write USDA, Director,
Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call 800-795-3272 or (202) 720-
6382 (TTY). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer."
:,, ,'- 'i' t


Whatever sunscreen you use. take this quiz
to see if you know the Ps and Qs of proper skin
protection? Hope this doesn't leave you red-.
laced.
1. Skin cancer rates are increasing most dramati-
ally among:
(a) People 65 to 80.
(b) People 20 to,30.
(c) People who resemble lerky.

2. One blistering sunburn ui childhood can.
(a) Label you "lobster boy" for life.
(b) Double your risk for skin cancer.
(c) Triple your risk for skin cancer.

3. On the average, children receive _as much
sun exposure as adults.
(a) One-half
(b) Twice
(c) Three times

4. It is estimated that percent of lifetime sun
exposure occurs before age 18.
(a) 33
(b) 62
(c) 80

5. The American Academy of Dermatologv recom-
mends that children-
(a) Wear a sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher.
,(b) Wear a sunscreen of SPF 45 or higher.
(c) Remain indoors until voting age.

6. Unprotec red skin can be damaged by LTV expo-
sure in as little as:
(a) The time it takes to go to the mailbox.
ibl The:time it takes to find your parked car.
(c) 10 to 15 minutes.

7. A generation ago. people rarely used sun-
screen. Why is it important now?'
(a) Many people from that generation are only
beginning to manifest skin cancer.
ib) Ultraviolet rays are more intense than they
:. were a generation ago.
(c) Both of the above.

8. Sunscreen with a 15 SPF or higher can:


(a)l reduce" you skin cancer risk by 78 percent.
(b)'Reduce.youir skin cancer risk by 45 percent.
..(C) Evaporate Within a four-hour period.

9. Ultraviolet rays can damage skin:
la) Only when you're in direct sun.
Ibl From direct exposure, or bouncing off water
(c) Direct exposure: bouncing off water. snow. or
concrete.
(dl Direct exposure: off water, snow, or concrete.
down hallways, through doors and runi

10. Sunscreen with an SPF as low as 4 can: ,
Ial Dramatically lower your cumulative exposure
to ultraviolet rays. ', -
(bi Leave you at risk unles..t'eappled frequergy.
Ic) Run onto your steering Wheel in'the .tim it
takes to fire up the air' conditioner. .

11. If your daily routine exposes you to thesun
for only a few moments at a.time, you: .
l a i Are pale.
Ibi Do not need sunscreen unless you're otitlong
enough to break a sweat.,, ,
(ci Still need sunscreen because'-you!r,e.at risk for
cumulative exposure.

12. If you use spray-oh tans,' do& you still need
sunscreen? ,.
(ai No. spray-on tails and some cosmetcs have
an SPF of 10.
(bl No. spray-on tans'add a.,darkerk lp"Ient that
blocks LA' rays. **" :i
Ic) Yes, spray-on tans are iimpl d ye sp.nd offer
no sun protection. -". '

ANSWERS "
1. B; 2. B; 3. C: 4. C; 5. A: 6. '7 d 8 A; 9. C:
10. A: 11. C: 12. C
10-12 correct: Good going Freckle p rudlyl .
7-9 correct: Spread a little more learn' on those
bare spots.
4-6 correct: Get a clue. and a broadbrimmed
hat.
1-3 correct: Saddlebag in training.

Sources: Dr. Steven Stratton; Sun, Safety
Alliance. ': .


REQUESTS FOR PROPOSAL

Gulf County Community Development Corporation on behalf of Gulf Count.
Board of County Commissioners announces funding availability for its State ,
Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Program for activities approved by the
Gulf County Board of CountN Commissioners and Florida Housing Finance
Corporation (FHFC) in the SHIP Local Hotsing Assistance Plan (LHL4P) pursuant,
to Florida Stanites Sections 420-907, 420-9079: Administrative Code Rule Chapter
67-55, F.A.C. ,: '


The Gulf County Community De\velopment Corporation is requesting proposals
from qualified local organizations) interested in implementing the following SHIP
activity during all or a portion of the anticipated SHIP contract period (anticipated
to be 07 01 06-06,30,07)


Activity: Land Acquisition
The purpose of this strategic is to provide direct loais to eligible sponsors for the
purchase of lald, which is pledged at the bank as security collateral for construction/
pe'rmiimientl'eiitancing for a newu home. Pursuant 'to Rule 67-37.007 F.A.C., in order
to meet the 75'% construction reIquirement for land acquisition, construction of the
homes must be completed within 24 months from the close of the applicable fiscal
ear. All eligible hlomebuier 1/ must be at or below 120% of Area Median IncomeL,
The terms of this award will be in the form of a deferred payment loan. Loans
made to non-profits will be at a 0% interest and will be due leti tize, hrOebuyer
secures permanent financing. All loans made under the program guidelines must
be paid off through purchase by a homebuyer within a 24 month period from initial:
disbursement of SHIP funds and before the end of the expenditure deadline for the
fiscal year in which the award'was made.

The successful proposal from eligible sponsors) will include past experience ofthe
organization in successfully developing this type of housing, have access to lenders
willing to participate in providing end loans, unit production goals for housing,
must have property selected in advance, including legal description and address,
must have an appraisal on property indicating current value, must show ability, to
fund remaining purchase price, provide development cost pro forma indicating the
developer fee does not exceed 10% of the sales price, and documentation'of the
organization's employment or planned employment of personnel from the WAGES'
and Workforce Development Initiatives shall result in a priority award of SHIP funds
assuming the organization demonstrate capacity to implement the subject activity.
No housing can be built upon speculation

Proposals must be received by mail or hand delivery before 5:00 pmn, Eastern Time,
September, 2006 at Gulf County Community Development Corporation, Gulf
County.Florida, SHIP Program. Mail to Gulf County CDC, P.O. Box 837, Port St.
Joe, FL 32357-0837 or hand deliver to 301 1st Street, Port St. Joe, FI 32456.

For further information, please contact-Dannie Bolden, Gulf County CDC, 1-850--
229-7986.


~i~l ~ s~llrsr srsr %~qgll~n P;IIlea~


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


8A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAu st1,20







FctblUfichp 1937 ___ n Gf a


Fire Department in Hot Water


- and Loving It


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
The South Gulf Volunteer
Fire Department has just
found itself in hot water,
thanks to the generosity of
two local businessmen, and
they are loving every drop
if it.
According to Lanny Blair,
fire chief for the volunteer
unit that serves Indian
Pass, Cape San Blas and
St. Joseph Peninsula, a hot
water tank and a commercial
washer and dryer were
recently donated to the fire
house on Cape San Bias
Road, between C30-A and
Salinas Park on C30-E.
Mark Costin, owner of
Costin's Ace Hardware in Port
St. Joe, donated a 40-gallon
electric hot water tank to
the department, one of many
such items he has given to


the city, county and humane
society, among many others,
over the years.
Stephen Shoaf, co-owner
along with his brother Stuart
Shoaf, of The Appliance
Solution in Port St. Joe,
donated a commercial
washing machine and
matching dryer to the fire
house.
"Our wives were tossing
all of us out of our houses
when we began bringing our
smoky, smelly clothes home
to wash," laughed Blair,
"Now we can wash things
before we go home."
But fighting fires for this
volunteer unit is no laughing
matter, especially during the
extended drought period that
has encompassed the entire
state this year.
The fires have been
primarily caused by lightning,


with three fires on Monday
alone during the day's severe
weather over Port St. Joe
and the peninsula.
A big fire in South Gulfs
area about three weeks ago
needed additional crews from
Port St. Joe and Highland
View.
It was an "all night
affair," said Blair, which re-
flared three or four times
after it was extinguished.
In the last three weeks
alone the department has
fought a dozen brush fires,
in addition to another half-
dozen calls for medical
emergencies.
The fire department is
also the first responder unit
for the area, providing basic
life support until the primary
emergency medical services
unit from Port St. Joe can
arrive.


"We have a pretty elderly
population coming to these
houses out here," said Blair,
describing emergency calls
to respond to seizures, heart
attacks, blackouts, a couple
of stingray stings, even
severe sunburn.
"They are out here
climbing steps, laying out
on the beach, it causes
problems. We're not really
here for treating sunburn,"
Blair grimaced, "but when
people call for help, we
go. That's what being first
responders means."
But one good thing to
come out of all these fires,
added Blair, "I now have lots
more people getting involved
as volunteers. People are
coming to the fire house
now, helping with all the
necessary jobs relaying
information, running hoses,


all sorts of things."
"We've picked up three
younger guys for the fire
force," said Blair, "with about
six other people for ancillary
work."
If the three younger men
decide to continue working
with the department and
are willing to undergo the
extensive training now
required for volunteer
firefighters, then the South
Gulf Fire Department will
spend the $4,000 to $5,000
to outfit each one in his
turnout gear, the personal
firefighting suit and
equipment each firefighter
needs.
"We have learned the
hard way that this is a young
man's game," sighed Blair.
"For me and the five or six
guys who always show up


[at fires], it is rough. I'm 54
and these other guys are
60-plus.
"When we finished this
last big fire, all the guys
needed oxygen," he said,
adding that Shane McGuffin,
supervisor of the Gulf County
Emergency Medical Services,
helped the South Gulf unit
get more oxygen bottles to
use for the firefighters.
The women who were
present at the fires also saw
the needs of the volunteers,
added Blair, and "now
the ladies have formed an
auxiliary group and supply
us with water and Gatorade
at the fire scenes.
"Now all we need is a
Dalmatian," he laughed. "Not
a live one, heavens no, but
maybe a concrete Dalmatian
in front of the firehouse."


District, Employees Approve Contract


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
The first day of the
new school year proved a
-productive one for the district
and its employees.
Following overwhelming
ratification by teachers and
Snon-instructional personnel,
the GulfCounty SchoolBoard,
during a special meeting on
Monday, approved a new
contract with its employees,
boosting salary and, benefits
by an average of 11 percent
across all pay grades.
"I think this ratification
could not have come
at a better time," said
.Superintendent Tim Wilder,
noting a motivated and
energized staff as schools
across the district welcomed
"'students back with fun and


celebration.
Ninety-six percent 'of
teachers and 100 percent of
non-instructional employees
voted to ratify the contracts
with the district last week.
The overall vote was 148-4,
said Tom Ramos, executive
director of the Gulf County
Education Association, the
union which represents
teachers and non-
instructional personnel.
"Teachers are
enthusiastic, happy and
motivated with the first
day of school," said Ramos.
'They feel valued, they feel
appreciated."
The contract approved
this week by the board calls
for a 6 percent pay increase
across the board as well as
the annual incremental step


increases going to employees
with three to 23 years of
experience.
Those step increases
average about 1.7 percent
across all pay scales.
In addition, the district
increased its monthly
contribution to employee
health insurance by $25 to
$350.
The salary increases
took effect as of Aug. 1. The
increase in health insurance
premiums kick in with the
new policy year on Jan. 1,
2007.
Negotiations were
remarkably smooth this year,
with the union opening the
first meeting by presenting
its proposal, which was met
by the district and agreed
upon by both sides of the


table during the second
meeting.
In part, Ramos noted
state funding sent to all
67 districts in Florida and
intended by lawmakers to be
used for teacher salaries and
benefits.
In other business taken
up during Monday's special
meeting:
The board approved the
hiring of Anthony Jones to
be the new band director at
Wewahitchka High School.
Jones will move to Gulf
County from Greentown,
Indiana. He has 20 years of
teaching experience and has
a master's degree.
He is expected to report
to Wewahitchka High on
Aug. 16.


Dan
Marino
Spokesperson


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TheSta, ortSt.Jo, F -Thursday, August 10, 2006 9A


Establish 797 -Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Lm


i










Port St. Joe High School Athletics Receive Uplift


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
An old adage says in for a
penny, in for a pound.
At Port St. Joe High School,
they are in for $100,000, in for
27,000 pounds.
The school year opens
with a new addition to the
upper level of the R. Marion
Craig Coliseum, a purple-and-
gold hued, Shark-bedecked
fitness room that would be
the envy of many Gold Gyms
around the country.
Seeded with a $100,000
federal grant, the high school
will leave the building sitting
at the end of the high school
parking lot which is known
affectionately or not as the
"Sweat Box" behind in favor of
a facility which offers a wide
range of resistance and aero-
bic training options.
The fitness area includes
free weights, several squat
racks, a multi-purpose resis-
tance machine and other
accoutrements not to men-
tion 27,000 pounds of weight
- which have become staples
of athletic training over recent
years.
The icing is found on the
other side of the room, where
two elliptical trainers, two
treadmills and two stationary,
bicycles the model that has
the exerciser sitting with the


pedals out in front for cardio
training.
"They are top of the line
machines, health club quality,"
said athletic director and foot-
ball coach John Palmer.
While Palmer acknowl-
edged some pangs of regret
for abandoning the sweat-and-
grunge feel of the "Sweat Box"
- part of the allure of lifting
if one is a football player or
other athlete the new fitness
center provides a platform for
the high school to address the
needs of the general student
population.
"I think it will give more
kids a chance to be more
physically fit," Palmer said.
"We will be able to do a better
job with the average student,
not just athletes.
"We will also be able to
offer more to female athletes.
We've got to do a better job
with female athletes."
In addition to providing
more options for students,
the fitness center will also be
available for faculty wanting to
get or stay in shape.
Palmer emphasized,
though, that the facility is not
a health club open to the com-
munity. The fitness center will
only be open during school
hours or for after-school
sports teams, with the facility
locked when the practice is


over for the day.
The fitness center is the
product of doggedness and
desire.
The school district had
been notified by the office of
Congressman Allen Boyd that
a dedicated pool of money
was available to schools seek-
ing to upgrade physical fitness
equipment and programs.
Port St. Joe-High School,
through the district, put in a
request for some $600,000
and the staff of Boyd's district
office made the grant request.
When Congress's Health
and Education budget was
finalized 18 months or so
ago, the district received grant
funding of $100,000, not the
original target but nothing to
sneeze at either.
District officials quickly
decided to spend the money
on fitness equipment to be
used in a new high school
exercise facility.
The next question was,
"Where?"
The open space on the
mezzanine level of "The Dome"
seemed a logical place school
officials wanted to move the
weight room from outside to
inside.- but engineers had to
first determine that the con-
crete flooring could sustain
the weight..
Once it was determined


Port St. Joe High School principal Duane McFarland (left), assistant principal Kenneth Monette and
football coach/athletic director John Palmer (right) pose in front of a weight rack in the.school's new
fitness facility. The facility became reality through a $100,000 federal grant secured by Congressman
Allen Boyd's office, an effort spearheaded by aide Bobby Pickels (center). Also pictured is Pickels'
brother, Josh Dailey, a graduate of Port St. Joe High.


that it could, the district's
maintenance team, led by
Greg Layfield and James
Daniels, went to work, laying
down water and stain resis-
tance sheeting over the floors,
constructing platforms for the
weight machines emblazoned
with the Shark logo and con-
structing the bricks and mor-


tar walls and doors to enclose
and secure the facility.
"They did an outstanding
job," Palmer said.
The grant money was
devoted entirely to equipment,
with nearly 40 percent of the
money used to purchase the
aerobic equipment alone.
In recent weeks, with the


completion of the facility
construction, inmate work
crews assisted in hauling in
the machines and weights and,
in time for the start of the new
school year, Palmer, Principal
Duane McFarland assistant
principal Kenneth Monette
were showing off their fitness
center with obvious pride.


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Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


IOA The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAu st1,20






The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 10, 2006 HA1


Established 793 7 ,ervrng .UIt county L uiJna surrounaing areCIS TyF 00 YUC


Gene Raffield Football


League Enters Eighth Year


Gene Raffield was a man who couldn't
say no. His legacy is well documented in this
community by the stories his friends tell. Walt
Wilder, his lifelong friend, said, "He was the
most decent, honorable guy I ever knew." Pat
Floyd relates the story of Gene taking brand
new ball gloves down to the Little League
Baseball games and giving them to children
who needed them.
Dan Van Vleet, Commissioner of the Gene
Raffield Football League, continues to sup-
port the values and integrity that Mr. Raffield
promoted. Last year, after hosting the Big
Bend Super Bowl here at Shark Stadium, Jay
McCorvey, the Big Bend President said to Dan,
"You have a first class operation here." The first
class operation developed from the teamwork
of dedicated coaches, parents, and community
support.
This year will mark the eighth year of the
league with a record number of youngsters
expected to participate. "Our coaches are not
just football coaches," Dan stated. "They love
these kids and teach them all the right things
related to life, along with football. If their
grades fall in school, they don't play. If they


miss practice, they don't play. We call it 'loving
discipline.'"
In 1998 League President, Pat Floyd, recalls
one team and four players in particular: Ash
Parker, Sidney Harris, Jordan Todd, and Zac
Norris who were members of the first 11- and
12-year-old Gene Raffield Buccaneers team.
These four, and their Shark teammates, won
the Big Bend regional championship in 2003
and a state championship in 2006. Ash, Sidney,
Jordan, and Zac were First Team All State and
will be inducted into the first GENE RAFFIELD
FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME this fall.
Last Year, a team pulled out of the Big
Bend Little League due to financial support.
"I couldn't believe a city could do that to their
youth," Van Vleet said. "In Port St. Joe, we have
the best equipment, a stadium prepared to
perfection for our games by Coach Palmer and
his staff, banners listing sponsors, announcers,
local television coverage, a great concession
stand, and even game programs."
Gene Raffleld's legacy will continue to live
on in Port St. Joe. It seems our community and
sponsors also have a hard time saying "no" to
our most precious commodity: our youth.


Port St, Joe Youth Soccer


Fall. Registration
Port St Joe Youth Soccer registration for the fall soccer season will be held on Saturday August
5th and August 12th from 9 am until noon, at the Stac House. The Stac House is located on 8th
street in Port St Joe. Boys and Girls ages 4 to 14 (8th grade) are invited to play soccer. Players
must be at least 4 years old before August 1 st in order to play. No experience iA necessary.
Last year we had over 250 soccer players from Port St Joe, Apalachicola, and Wewahitchka.
Practices will be held once or twice weekly, depending upon age group. Practice times and locations
will be arranged between coaches and parents. Teams based in Apalachicola and Wewahitchka
will practice in their "home" towns. Most games will be held in Port St. Joe on Saturday morn-
ings between 8 am and noon. Some games will be held on weekday evenings. Practices will begin
during the week of August 21st and game will begin in early September.
Coaches training and referee certification will be held in late August or early September. If you
iare interested in coaching or refereeing, please sign up at the time of registration. Team sponsors
are also needed. The registration fee is $45 per child. A parent or legal guardian will be required
to sign the paperwork at registration.
We are looking forward to another great season. Come join usl
Coaches, referrers and sponsors are needed. Please sign up at the time of registration!


Parker Sprints to Top



Eight in Three Events


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor


The exit from the blocks
undermined her at times and
the competition was stiff, but
there was still no denying
the disappointment in Kayla
Parker's voice. -
And this despite placing
among the top five in her age
group at the AAU National
Junior Olympic Track and
Field Meet in Hampton Road,
Va., last week.
"I could have done bet-
ter," summed up Parker.
This from a 14-year-old
who again demonstrated that
she runs in rarified air, fur-
ther signified by the fact that
in each of her events Parker
was the top athlete from
Florida by a long distance.
Parker's top finish last
week came in the long jump,
where she finished second
with a leap of 16-feet, 11 1/2
inches, a little more than


a foot behind the eventual
winner.
The sprints, where
Parker set a national age-
group record in the 100
meter hurdles and finished
first in the 100 meters last
year, were not so positive an
experience.
Parker finished fifth in
the 100 meter finals in a time
of 12.71 the winner dashed
to the tape in 12.19 and
eighth in the finals of the
100, meter hurdles, clock-
ing a time of 18.74 which
was more than three seconds
above the winner's time.
"I got a couple of bad
starts, in a couple of races,
which hurt," Parker said.
In the semifinals of the
200 meters another bad start
led to a time of 25.47 and
12th place-, out of the finals.
"I had run 25.09 in the
quarterfinals so I was sur-
prised by the 25.47,' Parker
said. "The competition was


really strong, but I don't
know what happened. I just
had a bad start."
As with most champions,
however, Parker wasn't so
much licking her wounds as
looking forward to the future
and a bit of redemption.
Having desired to run
on the high school varsity
track team for three years,
the Port St. Joe High School
freshman is anticipating a
season with the Shark track
team and authoring success
in scholastic competition.
And next summer, there
is another national track and
field meet to prepare for.
"I've got to go back next
year and get stronger, get
faster and make sure my
starts are better," Parker
said. "I could have done bet-
ter, but I just felt good repre-
senting my state."
Not to mention a small
town which sees big things
from a sprinting phenom.


Wewahitchka Warrior Football


Gator

Backers First

Annual Golf

Tournament

Friday August 18, 2006
at the Indian Springs Country
Club in Marianna, Florida.
The format is two-man best
ball. Entry is $55 per player.
Contact Kelly at (850) 227-
3150 or the Indian Springs
Country Club 'at (850) 482-
8787. All proceeds go to sup-
port Wewahitchka High School
Athletics.


Registration
Wewahitchka Warrior
Football registration will be
held every Saturday in August
at Lake Alice Park from 9 to
12. A birth certificate and cur-
rent picture required. -
The registration fee is
$55. For more information,
call Tonya Haddock, 227-4692
or Ben Rainie, 639-3783.



I Advertising Needs .

The Star

(850) 227-1278


or


A TASTEFUL
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30 seconds: count the seconds
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2. 9/08 Cottondale (H)
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5.. 9/29 Northview (H)
6. 10/06 West-Gasden (H)
7.. 10/13 Sneads (H)
8. 10/20 Freeport (A)
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10/5 Wewa


Place
(A)
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Time
8:00
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Date
8/18
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Team
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Blountstown


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Refinishing
234 Reid Ave. 229-6374
All Wood Furniture, Gifts,
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Place
(A)
(H)


Time
8:00
7:30


9/1 Marianna (H)
9/8 :Chipley (H)
,9/151 *Freeporl (A)
9/22 *Wewahitchka (H)
9/29 *Sneads (H)


8, 10/6
10/13
9. 10/20

10. 10/27
11. 11/3


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Muffler Service
210 Hwy 71

639-4175

The Star
Come Visit Us At Our New Location
135 W. Hwy. 98, Port
City Shopping Center
227-1278


(Homecoming)
*Liberty County (A)
OPEN
*Jay (H)
(Senior Night)
*West Gadsden (A)
Apalachicola (A)


* District 1 Games/Class A All times are

Bayside Lumber
516 First Street
229-8232
Your Building
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Give Us A Call
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Eastern.





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SPORTS SCHEDULE

PORT ST. JOE SHARKS


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,jjjjjjjjjjjjjjLjrA..,W---- wrw


--Ll:-L--J 10,77 4Z-,;- rZ-W --f nnr4 citrrmindinci oreas for 68 Years


E


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Fogg"


----~ ~


i;


-








12A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 10, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


WEATHER
Temps for August 10


RECORD
High: 98' (1987)
Low: 69' (1976)


TODAY

. .. ,


Partly cloudy with
scat. P.M. t-storms
High: 90; Low: 770


TOMORROW






Partly cloudy with
scat. P.M. t-storms
High: 890; Low: 770


THE FORECAST


SATURDAY
A. 12




Chance of scattered
thunderstorms
High: 900; Low: 760


SUNDAY






Chance of scattered
-uig: 90r; Low: 75r
High: 90; Low: 75


MONDAY






Partly sunny, warm
and humid
High: 890; Low: 740


TUESDAY






Cont. partly cloudy,
warm and humid
High: 900; Low: 740


WEDNESDAY






Partly cloudy with-
scat. PM. t-storms
High: 900; Low: 750


Today's high and tonight's low temperatures


'- Enlerprise Dothani
.-, 9' 7. "*'1 9- T41 ...... --
7 T -

-- Bainb(ldigp

DDein k Springs ... ,'


1' -' / ~ '



-5-
-,, 1, 51I "-.
*Niceville 1 M '. *. ."
*0, -- Crystal Lake a.ris I -
Fort-Wallnon._. i ,- -" 9T,76--.' -alla- s-ee
Beach I ',' 9". \ '
U|| -:"' W ewah'it'hka -'- '\ 't '-
C -t 91 1.; '' _W, I -ma ,

SPanama C g zq ,\ ., ,
\ '- V P r..

Pensacola ". '
9"I77 '. ,' I L., .
Pori St. Joe --
SApalachicola
90 17


LAST 7 DAYS
Monday 8/7 91/77/0.00
Sunday 8/6 90/73/0.00
Saturday 8/5, 89/73/0.00
Friday 8/4 89/75/1.46
Thursday 8/3 92/73/0.00
Wednesday 8/2.......................... 93/74/0.00
Tuesday 8/1 90/73/0.04


SUN & MOON
Sunrise Sunset
Thursday 8/10. 7:06 a.m.. .8:27 p.m.
Friday 8/11 .. ... .7:06 a.m.. .8:26 p.m.
Saturday 8/12 .... 7:07 a.m.. .8:25 p.m.
Sunday 8/13 ..... 7:08 a.m.. .8:24 p.m.
il, r ~8 11. .7 u.3 3.m .8:23 p.m.
Tuesday 8/15... 7:09 a.m.. .8:22 p.m.
Wednesday 8/1.6..7:09 a.m.. .8:21 p.m.

Moonrise Moonset
Thursday 8/10... .9:36 p.m.. .8:17 a.m.
Friday 8/11 .. 10:10 p.m. 9:27 a.m.
Saturday 8/12 ... .10:42 p.m. 10:35 a.m.
Sunday 8/13 :.. .11:16 p.m. 11:42 a.m.
Monday 8/14.....11:52 p.m. 12:49 p.m.
Tuesday 8/15 .....-- ...1:56 p.m.
Wednesday 8/16..12:31 a~m. 3:02 p.m.


APALACHICOLA RIVER
Site Flood Stg. Stage Chg.
Woodruff Tailwater 66.0 39.66 0.08
Chattahoochee 39.66 0.08
Blountstown 15.0 1.14 0.04
Wewahitchka 12.07 -0.06
OCHLOCKONEE RIVER
Thomasville 15.0 3.24 -0.33


Concord
Havana
Bloxham




11reme

Extreme


24.11
25.0 11.90
,22.0 3.49


The UV index forecasts the
ultraviolet radiation coming
from the sun. The higher the
number the more risk of sun
damage to your skin.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
L o W *.1 .., ri -Il nl'ni ,'I r H i,) h l I I n T n-


Friday
Hi Lo
Albany 91 75
Apalachicola 90 76
Bainbridge 93 74
Bristol 94 76
Columbus 91 75
Crystal Lake' 87 76
Defuniak Sp. 91 76
Dothan 90 74
Enterprise 98 77
Ft. Walton Bch.88 75


Gainesville
"Jacksonville
Marianna
Mobile
Montgomery
Newport
Niceville
Panama City
Pascagoula
Pensacola
Port St.-Joe
Tallahassee
Valdosta
Wewahitchka
Wilma


Thursday P
High 1
Low
Friday p
High 1
Low
Saturday P
High
Low
Sunday
High
Low
Monday p
High
Low
Tuesday P
High
Low 1
Wed. A
High
Low


74 pc
75 pc
75 t
75 t
74 pc
77 c
76 pc
78 t
73 t
77 t
77 c
76 t
75 t
76 c
76 c


ST. JOSEPH BAY


ft.
2.0
0.0
ft.
2.0
0.0
ft.
2.0
0.0
ft.
1.0
1.0
ft.
1.0
1.0
ft.
1.0
0.0
ft.
2.0
0.0


All forecasts, maps and graphics
2006 Weather Central, Inc.
Last New First Full For a personalized forecast,
to go to:
www.premiumweather.com
Aug. 15 Aug 23 Aug. 31 Sept. 7 '


Saturday
Hi Lo Otlk
92 75 t
90 76 t
88 74 t
91 72 c
92 75 t
88 72 c
91 72 c
91 74 t
98 76 c
88 75 t
91 74 pc
92 75 pc
91 76 t
91 75 pc
93 74 pc
89 73 c
88 72 c
90 78 t
90 73 t
91 77 t
90 76 c
91 76 t
91 75 t
86 73 c


Low pressure will move through the Upper Midwest Thursday and produce a good chance of showers and thunderstorms. A
cold front will also produce a few storms through New England. Little change for the Southeast as it will remain hot and humid
with scattered thunderstorms likely. While storms rumble through the southern Rockies, a cold front will produce a few showers
in the Northwest.

S0'.
P I
IN~~a


60 72 City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
P.M. ft. Billings
Birmingham
Boise
P.M. ft. Boston
Buffalo
Cheyenne
-- ~- Chicago
P.M. ft. Cincinnati
-- Cleveland
-- -- Dayton
P.M. ft. Denver
Des Moines
Detroit


P.M. ft.


P.M. ft.


P.M. ft.



PREIU
WEATHE


City
.Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Baghdad
Bangkok
Beijing
Berlin
Brussels
B' Aires
Cairo
Calgary
Dublin


Today
Hi Lo
90 67
65 53
91 74
87 69
95 60
95 74
91 63
87 62
,80 62
89 58
82 66
88 71
83 66
85 69
94 62
89 72
84 64


Today
Hi Lo
89 76
69 51
85 65
116 87
90 80
92 75
.71 53
69 52
63 16
92 il
79 59
68 53


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
90 68 pc
63 52 sh.
88 73 t
87 68 pc
91 59 s
91 75 t
86 57 pc
77 58 pc
75 58 pc
88 57 pc
81 64 pc
85 67 pc
80 64 pc
82 65 pc
92 60 pc
88 66 pc
81 63 pc


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
87 75 .1t
67 55 sh
86 66 s
11588 .s
91 79 t
91 76 t
72. 54 sh
68, 56 sh
68 149 .s
97 ,3
76 5.5 pc
66 51 pc


City
El Paso
Fairbanks
Honolulu
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York,
Omaha
Orlando



City
Geneva
Helsinki'
Hong Kong *
Jerusalem
Kabul
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
New Delhi


Today
Hi Lo Otlk
95 72 pc
70 50, pc
89 78 s
87 70 pc
101 74 t'
103 82 pc
98 76 pc
79 67 s
96 77 pc
92 79 pc
81 64 pc
81 67 t
92 75 pc
91 77 pc
86 71 s
91 69 pc
93 76 pc


Today
Hi Lo
76 54
72 54
87 75
89 71
95 64
68 59
69 51
87 66.
74 54
67 47
70 54
95 74


Tomorrow
k rHi Lo Otlk
96 73 pc
68 50 sh
89 77 s
85 64 pc
94 74 pc
10381 s
97 75 pc
77 67 s
95 75 pc
92 80 pc
79 62 pc
85 66 pc
93 72 -pc
91 77 pc
82 68 pc
89 68 pc
94 77 pc'


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
72 53 sh
73 53 pc
86 76 t
93 73 pc
93 63 s
69 57 pc
66 49 sh
88 55 s
71 54 t
66 47 pc
74 53 pc -
97 75 t,


S f Ianni



Today
City Hi Lo
Philadelphia 88 71
Phoenix 103 86
Pittsburgh 86 65
Portland, ME 81 56
Portland, OR 77 56
Reno 92 57
Richmond 89 71
Sacramento 93 59:
St. Louis 94 74
Salt Lk City 95 68
San Diego 77 70
San Fran. 69 ,56
Seattle 72 54
Spokane 86 55
Tucson 96 75
Wash., D.C. 87 71
Wichita 103 77


Today
City Hi Lo I
Oslo 69 51 i
Paris 72 53 I
Rio 80 67 i
Rome 81 61 p
Seoul 87 .68 I
Singapore 87 77 1
Sydney 63 44 .
Tokyo 89 72 t
Toronto 73,' 52 p
Vancouver 70 54 i
Vienna 77 55 p
Warsaw 74 54 s


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otik
87 68 pc
10386 pc
81 61 pc
73 57 s
78 56 pc
91 55 s
90 72 t
92 58 s
86 68 t
91 67 pc
75 68 pc
67 56 pc
75 54 pc
78 53 t
96 76 pc
87 70 s
99 74 pc


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
70 50 sh
69 52 pc
82 70 s
79 59 pc
85 66 .pc
88 76 t
60 42 pc
87 67 pc
69 50 s,
72 56 pc
73 55 sh
72 55 sh


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; fg=fog; i=ice; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; sf=snow flurries; t=thunderstorms: w=windy


NORMAL
High: 90
Low: 74


~CD"sl~~pl~FtB~;~SU`~eB~T1~B~I~,~?gC- .~L. Li~LCsr~j~~V Z3r--~Ji~-~:~S~r~:57C~=i~~-~i~i~i;


12A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 10, 2006


Established 1937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er






iPet of the Week 4B








Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Obituaries 4B


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL *


Law Enforcement 8B


Thursday, August 10, 2006 SECTION B


Sheriff's Department Going to the Dogs


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor
For a few of the newest deputies at the
Gulf County Sheriff's Office, bad guys are
little more than chew-toys on the path to
reward.
The end of the summer meant an
opportunity for the Lt. Greg Cole, supervi-
sor and instructor for the newly-reinvigo-
rated K-9 unit with the sheriff's office, and
his team to show off the latest edition to
the county',s law enforcement force.
Over the previous few weeks, Cole
and team, four-legged and two-legged, put
on demonstrations for kids participating
in this summer's Florida Sheriff's Youth
Ranch camps, unveiling the latest addi-
tions to the ranks, answering to the names
Zeus, Don, Hack and Sibal.
The four German shepherds comprise
the K-9 unit, with Maximus and Jacob,
Labradors being trained as rescue and
search dogs, on the way later this year.
'"A dog team is generally considered as
three men in their capabilities," Cole said.
"You can't replace men, but it's a large
advantage for the 'Sheriff's Office. (Dogs)
are a great deterrent and they have the
capability to find all sorts of drugs.
"We love our dogs, but they are still a
police tool. A canine is a perfect solution
for a lot of situations, but it's not the ideal


solution for everything."
The kids at the Florida Sheriff's camps
saw first-hand just what sort of tool a
canine can be.
The dogs were put through their paces
by the trainers, chasing Cole, playing the
bad guy, in several different scenarios,
from hiding drugs when the officer arrives
to fleeing a robbery armed with knife or
gun, taking a hostage along the way.
The dogs followed commands to the
tee, charging and latching onto Cole when
commanded, letting go to allow their two-
legged partner to take over when com-
manded.
They ran through an obstacle course,
heeled and dashed, constantly on-guard to
protect their trainer and partner.
One drill underscored the connection
between dog and handler: Cole, playing.
a suspect being taken into custody, sud-.
denly charges at the officer as the 'cuffs
come out.
It is the only instance when a com-
mand is unnecessary their masters
under attack, the dogs, sitting a few feet
away in rapt attention, -charge the second
their handler is vulnerable.
The kids cheered it all on from the
stands and had the opportunity, after the
dogs had cooled down and transformed to
play mode, to pet and hover around the


Tim Croft/The Star
Deputy James Newsome leads Zeus through the obstacle course during a recent demonstration for
kids attending the Florida Sheriff's Youth .camp in Port St. Joe.


animal which a few minutes before was far
from cuddly.
"Does every officer have to carry around
a dog?" one youngster asked.
"What if the bad guy has a dog?" anoth-
er wondered.


Tim CroftThe Star
Lt. Greg Cole asks who wants to, seethe K-9s and the kids jump up and shout their approval.


The firs
fpr Charles
He rose
morning, d
and fired ut
.Korner Sto:
'Martin Luti
Inside
Givens coo


Jump-Start for the

y Despina Williams of grits, eggs. bacon, sausage, waffles, and reached for the ,
Star Staff Writer toast and pancakes and awaited his early syrup.
st day of school was a busy one morning patrons. As the sun rose
Givens. At a little after 7 a.m., seven-year-old Joe, the store filled w
e promptly at 5 a.m. Monday Ziya Feed. wearing an oversized backpack Soft spoken s
descended his apartment stairs and an arm full of silver bangles, propelled Watkins took a seat
p the stove inside his Stop & Go herself onto a high barstool and placed her sampled crisp baco:
re & Restaurant, located at 202 order with Stop. & Go employee Freddie group of rowdy teena
her King Blvd. Taylor. from'behind the store
the store's vibrant blue walls, The diminutive second grader Givens surveyed
)ked up an elaborate breakfast requested waffles, grits, eggs and sausage, .front register. The kid


Despina Williams.'The Star
Stop & Go Korrier Store & Restaurant employee Freddie Taylbr chats with six-year-old Edrena
Watkins at the breakfast counter. Watkins was one of many children who enjoyed the store's free
breakfast on Monday morning.


The dogs and their trainers are
schooled to handle any situation, Cole
replied. It's all about getting the bad guy.
Sometimes they fail, more times they suc-
ceed.
"We love to make kids happy," Cole
explained about the demonstrations. "The
bigger reason is to develop better commu-
nication and understanding between the
Sheriff's Office and the youth, which is a
good thing.'"
The kids learned that the dogs are
police officers, just like those with badges,
and to say no to drugs and run and tell the
nearest adult if they are approached by a
stranger.
The lessons, on whole, seemed to
have found traction, particularly when
one young girl explained how she would
deal with an unwanted advance from a
stranger.
"If a bad.guy came after me,, I'd bite
and scratch and then Id'd kick him in the
privates," she explained matter-of-factly.
Cole could only laugh and applaud.
The new K-9 unit is a rebirth of the
unit which was created during the tenure
of former Sheriff Frank McKeithen. The
dogs used during those years were ulti-
mately retired as they aged and inturn the
unit languished.
But one of the first initiatives for cur-
rent Sheriff Dalton Upchurch upon taking

(SeeK9 on Page12B) "


School Day

jar of butter-flavored, three .waves, the first beginning at 6 a.m.
and the last ending when the school bus


higher over Port St.
rith children.
ix-year-old Edrena,
at the counter and
n and waffles as a
gers swapped stories
e's round tables.
the scene from the
ds, he noted, come in


rounds the corner at 7:30 a.m.
"Lot of times, they come in and go to
sleep," he said.
Givens began serving free breakfasts to
school children last year, when he noticed
that they invariably made poor choices in
their early nimorning shopping sprees.
"Kids would come in and get candy and
(See JUMP START on Page 2B)


Jaquan Lang applies some syrup.


SDespina Williams/The Star


-lBe ..,-..~8~a a






2B The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 10, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Jump Start


pop. I thought breakfast
would probably be better
for them," said Givens,
who decided to provide
a nutritional alternative.
He christened the venture
the Jump-Start Breakfast
Program.
Givens originally
conceived of the idea as a
means of boosting his shop
revenue, with kids paying
$1 a plate, but after a free
trial run left him with a
feeling of satisfaction, he
never made a move to
collect.
"We did it free and the
first day, it went real well,
and to be honest, it felt
good, and the next day, it
felt even better, so we said,


'Let's do it for free,'" Givens
recalled.
Givens recognizes the
importance of breakfast in
the learning process. He
believes his meals make
students "more aware" at
school, and take the burden
off their busy parents.
Though his own
children are grown, Givens
tends to his customers
with the care of a father.
When they run late in the
morning, he makes sure
they get to school on time.
"One of the rules is, if
you miss your bus, come
to the Korner Store," said
Givens.
Last year, Stop & Go
served a daily average of


45-55 kids who opted
not to participate in the
public school's breakfast
programs.
Givens said the children
preferred eating breakfast
closer to home, adding,
"Ours might be better,
too."
This summer, Stop & Go
continued serving breakfast
for $3 for children and
adults and $1 for seniors.
Accustomed as they
were to eating free, many
of the children found their
'way to the counter with
no money in their pockets,
and Givens did not have the
heart to turn them away. '
"If they came, we fed
them," he said.


Despina Williams/The Star
Second-grader Ziya Feed enjoys a breakfast of sausage, waffles, eggs and grits.


Givens' philanthropy
has recently garnered the
attention of North Port St.
Joe Community Advisory
Committee president
Dannie Bolden, who hopes
to secure grants to help
ease the Stop & Go owner's
$200-300 a week grocery


Despina Williams/The Star
Stop & Go Korner Store & Restaurant owner Charles Givens tends to a customer. Givens has
offered the Jump-Start Breakfast Program at his store since last year.


COLD eLL Rd FOIrOtei coaSt Lceast ;y -eNts




The orgotten-CoastOG

qo^jf4- ramilu Par"tuSeries,


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ridh Poirtr Vig

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bills.
Bolden imagines the
breakfast program as being
one component of a larger
neighborhood outreach
that will soon encompass
after- school programs
and parenting education
classes.


JOB NOTICE
The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners is accepting applications for
an Assistant Planner. Applications and a complete job description are avail-
able in our HR office or at www.gulfcountygovernment.com EOE Application
deadline is Friday, 8/04/06 5:00 pm EST. For more information, please contact
Denise Manuel, Human Resources Director at 850-229-5335. Gulf County en-
forces a Drug-Free Workplace Policy and is an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative
Action Employer.
/s/ Rebecca L. Norris
Carmen McLemore
Chairman
July 27, 2006 and August 03, 2006 Ad#2006-091

Cheer Dance for Kidz

Callingaall girls ages 3 to 6 years old. '
.t The Cheer Dance for Kidz cheerleading
program will open its first season in September 2006.

Registration will be held on Wednesday August 30, 2006
*Registration Fee-$60 (covers 2- Cheer shirts, 1-.-
Shorts, 2- socks, and hair ribbon)

Time: 3:00-5:00pm

Where: The Senior Citizen Center at 120 Library Drive
in Port St. Joe, FL

For More Information please contact:
Mrs. Farica Gant @ (850)229-9330


rf1V1M u


Live music returns to the
Thirsty Goat all summer long

6pm 'til they get tired of playing


August 4th-First Fridays
12th-John and Tom
26th George and Cletus


July 7th- First Fridays
15th-John and Tom
29th George and Cletus



September
George and Cletus -9th
John and Tom -16th.


Givens welcomes the
support and hopes to
continue his Jump-Start
Breakfast Program year
round.
A neighborhood
grocer in the truest since,
Givens enjoys his daily
interactions with his
young patrons, whom he
regards with patience anol
understanding.
In return, he has been
rewarded with the children's
thanks and patronage.
"They are my biggest
customers," laughed
Givens; "'Once they get off
the bus, this is where they
come right to the Korn:er
Store."












THE STAR

L, M ',


MLS 111753 106 HUNTER
CIRCLE -- Charming older
home on landscaped lot. Fire-
place, formal dining room,
hardwood floors under carpet,
built -in shelves and cabinets


MLS 200708 205 6TH
STREET -- Property is 1/10
mile from dedicated beach. Val-
ue is in the land, Mobile home
is being removed by seller
MEXICO BEACH OFFICE
1602 W HIGHWAY 98
MEXICO BEACH FL
850 648-4400
PORT ST JOE OFFICE
155 W HIGHWAY 98
(PORT CITY SHOPPING
CENTER)
PORT ST JOE, FL
850 229-6100


Permanent Address
St. Joe Beach 98 6 386

Every Friday until September 1, 2006


501 Monue Avw .9


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


2B he ta, PrtSt.Jo, F -Thursday, August 10, 2006


_4k
P75. j ,, ,:F '7 -'i --'
77'
zf


Evepm fpI'Day ROMldlle 5PMl EDTY till ..






Est.a b. eT IUUHAti U I -J ^c-ivm ^un CQUi "/ ^..w U.V... i. l .- -- I--.-


Tips to Get a Good Night's Sleep


Short on sleep? According
to sleep experts, people are
sleeping less than they used
to and the "sleep debt" can
take a toll on your health,
relationships, and work per-
formance.
Despite the popular
notion that you need less
sleep as you get older, sleep
generally remains constant
throughout adulthood. And
sleep loss can take a real
toll on your health. Lack
of sleep is implicated in a
host of conditions and dis-
eases from the common cold
and memory impairment to
high blood pressure. Lack
of, sleep has also been linked
to increased risk of some
cardiovascular diseases and
some types of cancer. And,
of course, if you're short on
sleep, chances are good that
you'll be irritable 4nd have
' low energy.
The August issue of Mayo
Clinic Health Letter offers
suggestions to improve your
sleep:
Make sleep a prior-
ity. Set aside adequate time
for sleep and only do what
tasks you can get done with
the time remaining, instead of
taking the reverse approach.
Go to bed and get up
at the same time every day,
even on weekends. Sticking
to a schedule helps re-enforce
your body's sleep-wake cycle
and can help you sleep better
at, night.
Avoid nicotine, caf-
feine, and alcohol. Nicotine
and caffeine are stimulants
that can keep you awake.
Although alcohol is a depres-
sant and may help you doze
off, it can cause restless
sleep.
Exercise regularly.
Regular exercise, especially
aerobic exercise, can help you
fall asleep faster and make
your sleep more restful.
S* Keep active. But being
top busy can keep you from


U I.' .


getting adequate sleep. Not
being busy enough can cause
boredom and an inability to
sleep.
Develop a relaxing
bedtime routine. Do the same
things each night to tell your
body it's time to wind down.
Avoid doing work activities
in bed, such as balancing a
checkbook or using a laptop
computer.
Make your bedroom
cool, dark, quiet, and com-
fortable. Adjust light, tem-
perature, humidity, and noise
levels to your preferences.
Pets 'often disturb sleep, even
if you are not aware of it. You
may need to set limits on pets
sharing your bedroom.
Go to bed when you
are sleepy. If you don't fall
asleep within 30 minutes, get
. up and do something else.
Go back to bed when you are
tired.
Don't put up. with
pain. If pain is keeping you
from sleeping, talk to your
doctor about drugs or thera-
pies to reduce pain.
Use sleeping pills
as a last resort. Check with
your doctor to make sure
pills won't interact with other
medications you are taking. If
you take a sleep medication,
reduce the dosage gradually
when you want to quit. Never
mix alcohol and sleeping
pills.
The bottom line is the
better you sleep, the better
you feel.

Turning Down the
Heat on Burning Mouth
Syndrome

A burning sensation that
seems to creep into your
tongue as the day progress-
es with persistence and help
from your doctor, symptoms
usually can .be improved,
according to the August issue
of Mayo Clinic Health Letter.


Burning mouth syndrome
may affect your tongue, lips,
gums, palate, or throat. Some
people experience tingling,
numbness, a sore mouth, or
a metallic, bitter taste. It can
last a few weeks or for years.
Despite the symptoms, there
are no abnormalities in your
mouth. It's not contagious or
infectious. It can affect any-
one, but it is more common
in people older than 60.
It's unusual for burn-
ing mouth syndrome to be.
attributed to just one cause.
Typically many factors play
a role. It may be linked to
several medical conditions
including hormonal imbal-
ances, gastric reflux, Sjogren's
syndrome, underactive thy-
roid, oral yeast infection, and
dry mouth. Other possible
contributors include medi-
cations, vitamin or mineral
deficiencies, allergies to foods
or food additives, oral irrita-
tion, or psychological factors
such as stress, depression,
or anxiety.
There are ways to man-
age discomfort and pain.
Your doctor may direct you to
change medications if they dry
out the mouth. Humidifying
you home, drinking more
water, and using medication
to stimulate saliva flow might
help.
Treatment for an under-
active thyroid may be initi-
ated. If underlying medical
conditions are a factor, treat-
ment of the condition may
help symptoms. Nutrient
deficiencies can be addressed
with supplements. Allergy
triggers can be determined
and avoided. If symptoms
persist, psychiatric therapy
or cognitive and behavioral
therapy may be helpful. Some
drugs used to treat psychiat-,
ric conditions also work well
in managing pain, including
certain antidepressants and
anticonvulsants.


Tyndall Eye

TRICARE briefing
There will be a TRICARE
briefing for all active duty
personnel, retirees and
dependents 1 p.m. Aug. 18 at
the Raptor Conference Room
in the Tyndall Clinic. This
briefing is open to all TRICARE
and TRICARE For Life
beneficiaries who are interested
in their health care program. A
question and answer session
will follow a formal briefing
on health benefits and affairs.
For more information, call 283-
7331.
Security Forces to step
up traffic enforcement
Due to an increasing
amount of complaints of
fast and dangerous driving
occurring on the base, Security
Forces will be increasing its
traffic enforcement throughout
Tyndall and would like to
remind everyone of the
following speed limits in place
on Tyndall.
Anywhere on Tyndall 30
mph (unless otherwise posted)
Housing areas 15 mph
(unless otherwise posted)
Any designated parking lot
- 10 mph
Installation gates (entry/
exit) 15 mph
Passing marching/running
formations 5 mph
U.S. Highway 98 as
posted
RAO here may close
soon
The Retirees Activities
Office may close soon unless
more people volunteer to keep
it running. The RAO provides
a source of information for
the retiree community about
pay and. entitlements, vehicle
registration, identification
cards and more.
Office hours are, 9 a.m.
to noon Tuesday, Wednesday,
and Thursday. Volunteers
can work as many or as few
hours per week as they desire.'
For more information or to
volunteer, call 283-2737, or e-
mail rao@tyndall.af.mil.


Notice to Beekeepers
The dogfly plane will be flying again soon. Your apiaries
within a mile of the beach could be affected by the spray. You
should take whatever precautions you deem necessary to protect
your apiaries. Should you have any questions, you can call Gulf
County Mosquito Control at 227-1401.


Annual Reunion Tour
The Annual Reunion Tour of the Fifth Army Veterans of
World War II Italian Campaign, their families and friends will
visit Rome, Anzio, Cassino, Nettuno, Pisa, Florence, Futa Pass,
Bologna, Venice, and American Military Cemeteries.
Veterans who battled Nazi forces from 1943 to 1945 will
visit Italy with their families and friends from May 7, 2007 to
May 18, 2007. It will be a nostalgic tour of cities, towns and
places where battles were fought and many died.
Those interested in joining this tour should call Sy Canton
at 561-865-8495 or write to him at 5121 B Nesting Way, Delray
Beach, FL 33484.

GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
PROPOSAL NO. 0506-30

Sealed proposals may be mailed or hand delivered to the
Clerk's Office located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd. Room
148, Port St. Joe, FL 32456. All proposals, with original sig-
nature and three (3) additional copies, must be received at the
Office of the Clerk by Friday August 18, 2006 at 5:00 p.m. EDT.
Proposals received after the closing time 'will be returned un-
opened.
Group Voluntary Vision Program
All interested insurance companies are invited to respond.
Each proposal document must be clearly marked "Proposal
'for Group Voluntary Vision Program"
Any questions concerning the proposal should be addressed
and submitted to the County's Agent-of-Record and Employee
Benefits C6nsultant, Todd Torgersen, at 850-433-9996, or FAX
(850-432-5726), or E-mail (todd@ciscompanies.com). Com-
bined Insurance Services' mailing address is: 2704 North .12th
Avenue, Pensacola, FL 32503. Proposals are not to be mailed to
Combined Insurance Services.
Gulf County reserves the right to accept or reject any or all
proposals, to award proposals by product, to waive any proposal
informalities and to re-advertise for proposals when deemed in
the best interest of the Gulf County Board of County Commis-
sioners.
GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION-
ERS .
Donald Butler, Chief Administrator ,

August 10, 2006 and August 16, 2006 Ad #2006-096


THAKYOU!

FIM THE Guif COUNTY DOMESTIC vIOfENCE TAuSK f E AND

SHERlff'SYUIITH CAMP TO PffSfNTING SPONSOR


Donna Spears Realty,


AlL TiESHltMEN, EfRYONE WIH SUPPORTED US AT

THf BASH, ANO THIE ffllWING SPONSORS:


Anderson Signworks


Howell Taddek


Bluewater Otriggers


I


Half-HitchTaddckle


St. Joe Shrimp Company Oyster Radio


Arctic Fblar Heating andAir Bayside Savings Bank Jeny's Framing Crew Kenny Strange Electric

Kilgore's Brick Pavers &6 Tile Kristy Dorman, Capital City Bank Loggerhead Grill and Dockside Caf

McDonald's of FbrtSt. Joe ParadiseCoast\ cation Rentals Fbrt St. Joe Realty Preble-Rish St. JoeAce Hardware
St. Joe Company Sun Coast Lawn 6 Landscaping The Star Newspaper Toucan's Restaurant




Bailey, Bishop 6 Lane Surveyors Beach Realtyof Cape San Blas Bo Knows Fst Control Coastal Community Bank
Doghouse Charters Edwin Brown Surveyors El Governor Motel and Campground Home Adventures Mel Magidson, Attorney-at-Law
Indian Pass Marine Scallop Cove BP Bait 6i cklde Watson Brothers Construction Wood Fisheries Benny Roberts & Crew




Accurate Tide Advance Auto Parts Bareiot Properties Bayside Lumber Burger King CabosTacos Restaurant Capital City Bank Clint Moore Outdoors
Cone Heads Restaurant 6 Ice Cream C.R. Smith 6 Son Decorative Flooring Emerald Coast Federal Credit Union Hannon Insurance Hippie John's CustomArtwear
Joseph's Cottage Kirk's Ice Lulu's Sweet Expectations Old Salt Works Cabins One Source Mortgage Prosperity Bank Provisions Restaurant & Catering
Sea-Towof fbrtSt. Joe Apalachicola SiprellConstruction Smiley's Detailing State Farm Insurance Steamer's Restaurant St. Joe Rent-All St. Joe Sod
Sunset Coastal Grill Superior Bank The Appliance Solution Thurman Roddenberry Surveyors Tyndall Federal Credit Union Vision Bank 5-Star Collision
Ground Level Services Gold Ring Gulf Distributors-Miller Lite Paradise Drafting Buffalo Rock Distributors- Pepsi DJ Jenny Gulf Diesel George Kelly


Col RngGuf ... ...t. .. *.... M- -._- '-- "u .' R k i b. -


TheStrPot S. oe F 1 Thrsay Agus 1, 00 -3B


191 pvn Gl onvad urudn resfr6 er


t







AR Th____ Stnr Port St. Jo.F hrdy uut1,20 salse 97 SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


Pzt of thz Wzzk

Available now for adop-
tion from the St. Joseph Bay
.Humane Society -
mBoots, an eight-week old
male kitty; (pictured), Rosco,
...a chocolate lab male pup about
seven months old, Jasper
a seven months old bulldog
-..,: pup, Hound pups six months
old (1st shots), Molly a nice
white pit bulldog female.Jeter
a grown black lab male,
,..- Betsy a six month old hound
mix, always kittens! Come
See.
S At Faith's Thrift Hut start-
ing Thursday August 3, dishes,
toys, and romance novels half
price. Clothes $2 per bag.


I- Whether buying or selling, for the L
S", service you deserve, call
:,-,- WLinda L. Somero
ABR, GRI, Broker
Associate
... (850) 866-1269



Sil's Home Center
1023 N. Tyndall Parkway
Panama City, FL 32404
1-800-239-4671

"Pa&4ff ^&am i#eA ieao #amef f4 ice 1957"


LOST DOG |
Slini Pin. Male
If found please call

'. 229-1036


The family of John Young would like to thank each and every one
of you four your prayers, visits, words of encouragement, and food during
his recent stay in the hospital and recovery at home. God bless each of you.
God is Good:.. all the time.
The John Young Family ,


Obitua5 esb----

William Lloyd Smithwick
William Lloyd Smithwick, 70, of Camilla died Wednesday,
August 2, 2006 at Archbold Memorial Hospital, in
Thomasville.
Graveside funeral services were 11:00am Friday, August
4, in Oakview Cemetery with Jimmy Stewart officiating.
Active pallbearers include Dicky Bullard, Guy Cochran,
John L. Shiver, Steve Singleton, Larry Wood, and B.W.
Hughes. Honorary pallbearers Bobby Dunn, John Schwartz,
Chuck Novota, Bill Arwood, and Hoyt Smithwick.
Born November 16, 1935 in Worth County, Mr. Smithwick
was a contractor and loving father and grandfather. "GaGa"
had lots of good stories to tell. He was a member of Camilla
United Methodist Church. Mr., Smithwick was the son of the
late Willie G. "Doc" and Mary Emma More Smithwick.
Survivors include Joan Smithwick of Port St. Joe, FL;
two daughters, Joanie Novota & husband, Chuck, of Stuart,
FL- and Robyn Schwartz & husband, John, of Clermont, GA;
one son, Chip Smithwick & wife, Marilena, of Camilla; eight
grandchildren, Deann Redmond, Piper Redmond, Jenna Capri,
Drew Haney, Alyssa Haney, Peyton Maloy, Ashton Smithwick,
and Grant Smithwick; and one grandson, Mason Maloy.
The family will receive friends at the residence of Chip and
Marilena Smithwick, 6141 Research Rd., Camilla, GA..
Memorials may be made to the American Cancer Society,
323 Pine Ave., Albany, GA 31701.
Parker-Bramlett, Funeral Home is in charge of
arrangements.

Marie Susan Anchors
Marie Susan Anchors ("Larrie"), 88, of Savrnnah Cove in
Maitland died Tuesday, August 8, 2006, after a lengthy illness.
Mrs. Anchors moved to Maitland in 1999 from Port St. Joe
where she had resided for more than 50 years. She came to
Port St. Joe as a young bride in 1947. She and her husband,
George Anchors, owned and operated a popular cafe for many
years in "downtown" Port St. Joe. Mrs. Anchors retired from
the Gulf County School System where she worked as a teacher's
aide at Highland View Elementary School. She was a member
, of St. Joseph's Catholic Church and a lifelong Catholic. She was
preceded in death by her husband in 1972. Survivors include
her daughter, Michele Anchors Cottrill of Ponte Vedra Beach, her
son George and his wife Carla of West Palm Beach, grandson
G. Todd Cottrill and wife Sara of Jacksonville, grandson Brad
Cottrill of Atlanta, grandson Christopher Anchors of West Palm
Beach and great granddaughter, Isabel Susan, of Jacksonville.
A graveside service will be held at 10:00 a.m. ET Friday, August
11, 2006 at Holly Hill Cemetery. Funeral arrangements are
being handled by Comforter Funeral Home.


24 HOUR/SAMEDAY SERVICE

850-785-5447 850-541-3308









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-Reasonable rates, 100% Financing
-Service and Maintenance Agreements Available
-Service ALL makes and models
-Honest, Reliable, Licensed, and Insured


Arctic Polar
Heating and Air LLC
.a1516 E. 11th St.
Panama City, FL 32401


U ;1


How to take the s
Story by BART MILLS
Illustration by NATE WARNECKE
Freedom News Service
It should surprise no one that it gets hot in the summer. But
as anticipated as the, high temperatures may be, many are still
caught .off guard by the dangers.
With the mercury breaking 100 in various regions in the
heat of summer, cases of heat exhaustion and and heat stroke
increase. That means more business for people at medical call
centers and emergency rooms.
Jane Engle, director of Call Center services for St. Rita's
Medical Center in Northwestern Ohio, and Rhonda Martz, the-
hospital's Call-A-Nurse supervisor, deal with dozens of calls
*through the summer from people who have been too long in the
heat.
"We get sunburns, dehydration and heat exhaustion," Martz
said. "People are out in the heat and the sun and they start to
present with symptoms."
Those symptoms change with the problem. It can start off as
simple as heat rash or sunburn. Stay out too long and it moves
into heat exhaustion. The final stage is heat stroke.
"Heat stroke is when the body temperature is well over 106.
That can cause death or permanent disability if it goes untreat-
ed," Rhonda Martz said.
The early signs of overexposure to the sun and heat include
red, hot skin and excessive sweating. Vomiting, nausea or a
sudden sense of lethargy could be a sign of more serious sun
exposure resulting in heat exhaustion. Exhaustion feels like a
viral infection. It can also include muscle spasms, a sign that
your body needs water.
"When you sweat a lot it depletes your body of moisture and
salt. That cause the muscles to spasm," Engle said. "bYou need
to drink more liquids than you thirst indicates. And it should
be alcohol-free drinks. Alcohol can actually cause you to loose
more fluid."
Left untreated, heat exhaustion can progress into heat
stroke, indicated by a higher body temperature, dizziness, head-
aches, nausea and, most of all, signs of altered mental status. If
you are with someone you think has heat stroke, get them out
of the hot environment, cool their body temperature and try to
get them rehydrated.
"Get the victim to a shady area. Cool them rapidly using
whatever methods you can. Put them in a tub of cool water, a
cool shower, you can even wrap them in wet sheets," Martz said.
"Of course, in the case of-stroke, get medical assistance."
The elderly and very young are at the greatest risk of heat-
related problems. But it's also important to keep an eye on teen-
agers this time of year, Engle said. Between sports practices and
county fairs, there are real dangers for young people.
"They go out to the fair and they traipse around, they get
sunburned and sometimes they drink something or sometimes
they don't. Or they are in the band show and have to wear long
pants and uniforms. They just don't get enough fluid intake,"
Engle said.
Of course, the best way to avoid heat-related illness is to
avoid the heat altogether. Using a fan is effective when it is warm
to moderately hot, and can be used as a substitute for air-condi-
tioning on some days. But once temperatures reach 90 degrees,
fans are of little help.
Air conditioning is the best way to protect yourself against
heat-related illness. If your home is not air-conditioned, spend
time in a public space that is air-conditioned, such as a local
museum, shopping mall, grocery, public library or movie theater.
Even a few hours a day of relief can be of enormous benefit.
"It's important that they get out of the heat and don't return
for a few hours," Martz said.




I Heritage Funeral


247 Tyndall Parkway, Callaway


785-1316
Joe D. Gainer, Justin M. Kent, Local Owners

."Serving Bay and Gulf Counties"


zleut of LL
>izzle out of summer


Bradley's

Ruto i itAlc GateS
GATED COMMUNITY SPECIALIST
Since 1982 Serving the Panhandle
COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL INDUSTRIAL
SWING & SLIDE GATE OPERATORS CCTV
PARKING SYSTEMS TELEPHONE ENTRY
SYSTEMS
KEY PAD & CARD ACCESS
(850) 227-9866
www.securitygates.com


. ..


STAY COOL
Drink cool, non-alcoholic
and non-caffeinated beverages
throughout the day. By the time you
feel thirsty, you are already dehy-
drated.
Take it easy. It is especially
important not to perform strenuous
activity when temperature changes
are extreme and/or if the heat is
coupled with humidity.
Seek shade and/or a cool
environment. Apply cold compress-
es to your skin for instant relief.
Open windows and doors to create
cross-ventilation.
Dress appropriately. Heat
is released through the skin. For.
this reason, it is important to wear
clothes that are breathable and do
not capture heat under layers.
Stay dry. Moisture that does
not readily evaporate prevents heat
from exiting the body and absorbs
heat from the atmosphere espe-
cially when directly exposed to the
sun.
Be aware of heat illness
symptoms and address them ASAP.
Treating symptoms of heat stress as
soon as possible will help prevent
them frorn progressing into a more
serious condition.


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 yebrs


4B The! Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAust1,20


I






,


Biblical Scholar has

Port St. Joe Connection


Dr. Carmen
-Acevedo Butcher
Port St. Joe resi-
dents John and Trixye
Rich's niece, Carmen
Acevedo Butcher, has
recently 'authored sev-
eral books of interest
to the Christian com-
munity of this area.
In March of this
year, Dr. Butcher wrote
Man of Blessing: A
Life of St. Benedict
(Paraclete Press). It
is: so popular that it
has already gone into
reprint, as has her
last year's devotional,
Incandescence: 365
Readings with Women
Mystics (Paraclete
Press).
Butcher, a scholar
of ancient and medi-
eval Christianity, relies
on the few printed
accounts of Benedict's
life and places his
actions within a histori-
cal context. She occa-
sionally delves into the
realm of fiction, recre-
ating dialogue between
Benedict and others.
The biography
comes at a time of
renewed interest in
St. Benedict, given the
Romani C'a thol ic pope's
choice of Benedict as'
his papal na11n ,
.Publisher's Weekly
had this' to say about
Man of Blessing:
"The author's
observation that
Benedict's story ,has
something to say to
those living in our
present age of instabil-
ity could generate inter-
est in this book among.
Christian readers,
especially those drawn
to monasticism."
Danielle Buckley,
of the University of
Exeter, praised Dr.
Butcher's work, citing
its honest voice and
simplicity of style..


"By defining
Benedict's rule as
'...a spiritual guide
designed not for mys-
tics or superhumans
but for the average
person wanting to com-
mune with God and
enjoy a more meaning-
ful life,' Butcher gives
,a picture of Benedict's
rule, while at the same
time defining her own
book as well," Buckley
wrote.
Butcher is the
daughter of Trixye
Rich's sister Doris,
and Incandescence
is dedicated' to, Doris
Acevedo.
Dr. Butcher has
spent the last 20 years
studying and teaching
the women mystics of
the Christian tradition
to. people of all back-
grounds.
She is Associate
Professor of Medieval


and Renaissance
Literature at Shorter
College in Rome,
Georgia and earned her
doctorate in Medieval
Studies from the
University of Georgia.
She lives in Rome,
Georlaia. with her hus-
band and two chil-
dren.
Dr. Butcher is cur-
rentlyworkingonabook
on Hildegard of Bingen,
a Benedictine nun who
lived in the twelfth-cen-
tury in Germany. This
Hildegard Reader is
due out from Paraclete
Press next year.
For more informa-
tion about her books,
see Dr. Butcher's web-
site, www.carmenbutch-
er.com, or visit www.
.amazon.com, and type
"Carmen Butcher."


Fear + Love = Wisdom:

It's not in a bottle, it's not in a pill'.
.For a weary traveler, it's not over the
next hill.
You can't buy it with silver, you can't buy.
it with gold.,
It's the only thing I know of, thatcan't.
be sold.'
Fear of the Lord is the beginning of wis-
dom, it tells us in the Word.
Many act as though they've never read
or even heard. '
Lord, I know you love me, Your Word
says this is true.
Fill me with wisdom, draw me closer,
Lord, to You. ,
Give me understanding, help me seek
S" Your Will each day.
When my footsteps start to wander,
S draw me back, Dear Lord, I pray.
For others who seek wisdom, here is
what we all must do.
Fear and love our Lord supremely, read
His Word, love others, too.
-Billy Johnson


The 23rd Psalm


The 23rd Psalm
has ministered to
believers for over
three thousand years.
This wonderful scrip-
ture speaks to us in
times when we need
comfort and hope.
Did you know that
it also addresses the
seven most stressful
things the people face
in life?
This Sunday join
us at First United
Methodist Church
of Port St. Joe for
a seven week series
as we go through the
23rd Psalm and look


how we can reduce
stress in our lives.
Our first week we
will look at "worry."
Then, in order, we will
address: our busi-
ness, healing dam-
aged emotions, deal-
ing with indecision,
going through, dark
valleys, handling hurts
and facing the future
without fear. Join us
at 9:00am for our
Contemporary Service
or 11:00 for our
Traditional Service as
we look at the 23rd
Psalm. For informa-
tion, call 227-1724.


Women's Conference
New Life Christian Center Church would
like to invite you to a WOMEN'S CONFERENCE
"Women Running with a Visipn" August 11
at 7:00 PM (gentlemen also welcome). Pastor
Debra Wooten of Marianna Florida will be the
guest speaker. Also, August 12 at 9:00 AM,
workshops will begin with speakers Minister
Betty, Winfield, Minister Linda Baker, Pastor
Sheranda Williams, Minister Stacey Byrd, and
Apostle Shirley White. Lunch will be served. A
registration fee of $10.00 on Saturday morn-
ing. So come out and be blesses by the word
of Cod.


Back to School Bash


The First United
Methodist Church of
Port St. Joe is spon-
soring a "Back to
School Bash" for mid-
dle school and highly
school students this
Sunday, August 13
from 4:00-7:00pm.
Big party inflat-
able games will, be
on hand, a dunking
booth, snow cones,


hamburgers, hot
dogs, drinks, snacks,
deserts, and much
more, including a DJ
who will serve up a
mix 'of contemporary
Christian music. The
event is free to all
middle school and
high school students
in Gulf County, and
they are encouraged
to bring a friend.


;,!u'ri, r mon, ? tFriendt ,it
SOak Grove Assembly of God
David A.. ernandez.Pastor
Office: 850-227-1837 Parsonage: ,850-229-6271
613 Madison Street Port St. Joe, fC
Schedule of Services .
Sunday 'Wednesday
Sunday School 9:45am MidWeek Meal 5:00pm
Mornlng Worship 10:45am MidWeektBible Study 6:15pm
Kids on the Move *10:45am Ministry In action 6:15pm
Cross Tralning Vouth 6:15pm
Men's Ministry-.Monday 6:30pm "
adles Ministry -Tuesday -o7:00pm
Dynamic 'raise Worship 'Preaching the Pure-Word '


C12 L 12


Come into


The Star

today to let everyone in the
community know what's
happening in your church!


' ^_ FIRST UNITED \
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and Monument Port St. Joe
(850) 227-1724
Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m. Rev. Malcolm "Mac" Fulcher
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. PASTOR

Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. rffW t
Methodist Youth Fellowship: 6:00 p.m. Minister. f Moii/Ystb
i ... :.,' 7:00 p.m.' Deborah Loylss
All Times are EST DirectorofChildrenMinistries


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting
FOR YOU AT:
ii4anb View aptigt e urrt
382 Ling Street Highland View
\ Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
'(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.


Mike Westbrook,
Pastor


Morning Worship 11:00a
Evening Service 7:00 p.
Discipleship Training 6:00 p.
Wednesday Prayer 7:00 p.


a.m.
m.
m.
m.
24292


Ih Cafh0ot Church of Gulf Counit
qvleomgs jfout
St. Joseph Parish
20th & Monument, Port St Joe, FL, 227-1417.
All Mass times EDT:
Saturday: 4:00 pm, Sunday: 9:30
Monday, Thursday, Friday: 9:30 am
Wednesday: 5:30 pm
En Espanol: 8:00 am, last Sunday of Month
St. Lawrence Mission
788 N Hwy 71 Wewahitchka, FL
Sunday: 11:00 am (CDT)



-r .: "Our Church can be your home"

F first Church of the Nazaiene
S2420 Long Avenue.* Port St. 'thrnd,. 324t'6
(850) 229-9596


Suid.i', ':. i .. .. ... .10 a;m .
'i.u-d.J ,. -iii 0 ) W ir : i ........ .. 11 a.m .
'i.uril... Ev. irw ) W ,:r hipi .. .. 6 p.m .
Wpdnesdav Evenin ,Servict 7 p.m;



f" J Aexim Jea&d

111 North 22nd Street Mexico Beach,,FL 32410

S SoqWorsipiService: 9-00 a m. CST
Sod SqSchool: 10:15 a.m. CST
Opern Hearts. Open' minds. Open doors.,
The people of Mexico leach United Methodist Chord
NHustIl POVIIIi'
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820


family Lie (huh
"Touching Lives with the Love of Jesus"
Join us in worship ... .0J" a .cy
Apolcrico ,n a tannnmo ly
10:30 Sunday Morning Hwy. 98
7:00 Wednesday Evening < >
Pastors Andrew -.
& ."
Cathy Ruthertord Reid Ave.
Rhema Bible'Training Center graduates Faamly Life Church
Visit our website at:
familylifechurch.net y Wewahitchka
323 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe 229-LIFE (5433)


"The Churches of Christ Salute You"
Romans.16:16 '

The Wewahitchka Church of Christ
Meets At 2241 Hwy. 71 South, Wewahitchka
(1/4 Mile North of the Overstreet Road)
(850) 639-5401
Sunday Bible Study 9:00 a.m. CT
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.min. & 5:00 p.m. CT
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. CT


1


Worship with us at


Long Avenue Baptist Church


Where Faith, Family '


Friendship are found


Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pm
Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm

1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL For More Information Call 229-8691


WORSHIP






AT THE CHURCH


OF YOUR CHOICE


m


=mom~


18571


~i~7~ic`'


~ip~PsrtrPi~ea~a~


TheStr, or S. JeFL- Turda, Agut 0, 00 -5B


,Esablshe 797 -Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


jhee u &swt&e it mate you to viit the cvLica of yw choice this, week

SOUTHERLAND FAMILY COMFORTER COSTING & COSTING Rish, Gibson, Scholz
FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL HOME LAW OFFICES & Groom, P.A.
FUNERALHOMW. P. "Rocky" Comforter Charles A. Costin William J. Rish, Thomas S.Gibson,
507 10th Street* Port St. Joe L.F.D. Personal Injury Real Estate Russell Schos Paul Groom il
(850) 227-1818 Workers' Compensation
(850) 229-8111 (850) 227-1818.... (850) 227-1159 (850) 229-8211


church of Christ
at the Beaches
Established 33 AD in Jerusalem



We meet at 314 Firehouse Road
Overstreet ~ 850.647.1622
Sunday Bible Study 10:00am EST
Sunday Worship 11:00am EST
Wednesday Bible Study 7:30pm EST
"We are about our Fathers business"





CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS
Singing: 9 a.m. Sunday
Worship: 9:30 a.m. Sunday
Call-229-8310
WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. 0. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32457
Corner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue



BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. Bible Study all ages 10 a.m.
Morning Worship 11 a.m.* Evening Worship 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Choir Practice 6 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"0 taste and see that the Lord is good: blessed is the man that trusteth in Him."
Please accept this invitation to join us in worship. God bless youl
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-5026 Home 769-8725



First Baptist Church
S- 102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE

Brent Vickery, Pastor
Buddy, Caswell, Minister of Music & Education
Michael Rogers, Minister to Students
Sunday School ... ....... ...... 9:45 am
Worship Service . . 8:30.& 11:00 am
Disciple Training .. . ... 6.00 pm
Evening Worship ... ....... ..7:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting ..". .,. .. 6.30 pm
Mon-Frii Devotionon105.5.FM . 7:49 am ET





First Baptist Churcht
MEXICO BEACH
Located at 823 N: 15thSt., Mexico Beach '

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Worship Suida, jiat 10 (0) a am .nrd 6:00 p m
Bible Study Sundays at 9:00 a.m. (all ages)
Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study at 6:30 p.m.
Please note, all times central
i,:' i rt",,'I t.s'j,, i .iFei.'s,,s',


SFctidk "'A Reformed Voice
11 L. in the Community"

'ilI) a...u'COr.r Bill Taylor, Pastor'..

i Sunday School ............................. 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Fellowship..................... 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Service ....... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service ....... 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday Night (Bay St. Joseph) 6:30 p.m.
Thursday Firehouse Fellowship ... 6:00 p.m.
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-6707
Home of Faith Christian School

TO KNOW CHRISTAND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN

+!. ., :AW S
ST. JAMES'

EPISCOPAL CHURCH

800 22nd STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:45
Child Care Provided for at 11:00
www.stiamesepiscopalchurch.org 850-227-1845






OD I he tar, rorn T. Joe, rL inrsuiay, Auyus tu, .uu -


-1pctsaunt


C (enA4r


Meeting Schedule for Local Government Ci
Gulf County School Board The Port
The School Board meets once a month, ducts regular i
typically the second Tuesday of the month, first and third
though during the summer that schedule is ET in the Con
subject to change. Meetings are typically con- second floor o
ducted at, district offices located on Middle Blvd. near Reic
School Drive in Port St. Joe, though during the Postings o
school year the board conducts one monthly and special m
meeting at high schools at each end of the found at City H
county. Cit
The School Board's next regularly sched- The Wew
uled meeting is at 2 p.m. ET on June 30 in the ducts regular n
board meeting room. This meeting will mark second and fou
the end of the fiscal year. The board's initial 6 p.m. CT in
budget meeting will be held 2 p.m. ET on July City Hall.
20. Postings o
Postings of all School Board regular and and special m
special meetings and workshops can be found found at City H
at the district offices. Board ol
The Boa


Covenant Hospice Offers

Volunteer Orientation

Covenant Hospice is offering a two-hour Volunteer
Orientation on Thursday, August 24 from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m., at
Covenant Hospice's Education Center, 107 West 19th Street,
Panama City.
This orientation provides an overview of hospice programs
and services and explains the role of the volunteer. After
completing the orientation and an application process,'
volunteers can indicate their placement choices. Volunteer
opportunities include administrative support in a Covenant
Hospice office or Community Support Center, special events
and fundraisers, or the Ambassador Community Outreach
program. This is a free program and open to the public.
Registration is requested and lunch is provided.
Please join us and see how your talents can best be used
to help others. The contributions made by volunteers allow
Covenant Hospice, a non-profit organization, to continue to
provide a very special kind of care for patients with life-limiting
illnesses. To register, call Shelley Frazier at 785-3040.


Send Your Community Events to:
Write To: Be sure to put Community
-The Star/Community Events News as the subject when
P.O. Box 308 e-mailing.
Port St Joe, FL 32457
Fax To: Announcements are limited
(850) 227-7212 to 50 words, and will run for i
E-mail To: maximum of 4 weeks.
starnews@starfl.com


ty of Port St. Joe
St. Joe City Commission con-
meetings twice a month, on the
Tuesday of the month at 6 p.m.
mission meeting room on the
f City Hall on Cecil G. Costin
I Avenue.
f all City Commission regular
meetings and workshops can be
[all.
ty of Wewahitchka
vahitchka City Commission con-
meetings twice a month, on the
urth Mondays of each month at
the first floor meeting room at
f all City Commission regular
meetings and workshops can be
[all on Second Street.
f County Commissioners
ard of County Commissioners


conducts regular meetings twice a month, at 6
p.m. ET on the second and fourth Tuesdays of
each month in the Commission meeting room
located in the Robert Moore Administrative
Building next to the County Courthouse on
Cecil G. Costin Blvd.
Postings of all regular and special meetings
and workshops can be found at the Robert
Moore Administrative Building. '
City of Mexico Beach
The Mexico Beach City Council conducts
its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. CT on
the second Tuesday of each month in the Civic
Center located behind the business district on
30' and 31st Streets.
Postings of all regular and special meet-
ings and workshops can be found at City Hall,
located on 14"' Street, or the Civic Center.
County Economic Development Council
The EDC conducts a monthly meeting, typ-
ically during the lunch hour of the first Tuesday


Special Tribute to The King of Rock & Roll
The Jordanaires performing with Todd Allen Harendeen

August 16 marks 29 years since Elvis Presley left the
building for the last time. On Wednesday, August 16, Gulf
World Marine Park in Panama City Beach, presents a
special tribute to the king of ro6k and roll. The world famous
Jordanaires, original back-up singers for Elvis, will be
preforming with Todd Allen Herendeen, award winning Elvis
preformer. The Grammy award-winning Jordanaires backed
Elvis on his greatest songs and appeared in all of his movies.
Ray walker, bass singer of the Jordanaires, says, "Miss
Todd's show and you will regret missing a part of your life's
experience, especially when friends tell you about Todd, the
Jordanaires, and the show." Get ready to rock and roll with
Todd Allen Hardendeen and the Jordanaires for one bg show
at 7:30pm..
Following a recording session in the mid-sixties, Elvis told
the Jordanaires, "Fellas, I really believe if there hadn't been a
you, there wouldn't be a me."
The group provided vocal and instrumental music for
Elvis on his first RCA recording sessions and continued
with him on every recording heralded through 1970. They
performed with Presley from 1956-70. They were featured on
28 movie soundtracks, appearing on-screen in several. Their
schedule of studio work in Nashville prevented the group from
continuing to work with Elvis after he resumed concert tours
in the early 70's.

For more information, please contact:
Pamela George
Gulf World Marine Park
15412 Front Beach Road, Panama City Beach, Florida
32456
850.234.5271x211 Office


I 2006 Southern Accents Showhouse at WindMark Beach
S The 2006 Southern AccentsShowhouse at WindNMark Beach was created to live up to its surroundings. It's packed with ideas to
make you wonder why vou'd ever want to go outside. In a setting that begs you never to go in. It's 'our-place along the unspoiled
|. shores of one of the last great beaches in Northwest Florida. Come back to WindMark Beach even if you'e never been.


wIanclilrk Beach I, loo


Dc doper Buadcrr. Tb- 5


i*-uII, i l I TiiI I=- --lillllilhillli ll-lilllli0'ill, liIi llltllli lltillllllilllllh I llll "IIII

Southern Accents. S..falcd h San $ Habitat for Humanity'
COMING SOON 10 GULF COUNTY
IF YOU DON T KNOW JOE, YOU DON'T KNOW FLORIDA ST. JOE
r,. .: -, .. ,- .. I. ..L -. ..l *: ,.'- -.. 1 .'... _- "- .
Obtain the Property ReporLrequired by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, d any, of this property.
SKS^ WaMi^ M<% ;S^-;^ a~a^ ^ .. .............**'........ ........ .


of the month at Sunset Coastal Grill. For more
information contact the EDC at 229-1901.
Budget Hearings
Local residents and taxpayers should be
aware that summertime brings the budget pro-
cess to government entities around the area. All
the listed governmental bodies will be conduct-
ing budget workshops and hearings throughout
the coming months.
We 'will post the times and places of all
budget meetings, but the information will also
be available at the locations listed for finding
meeting and workshop agendas.
A note to civic organizations and
other groups in the area: submit meet-
ing times and locations to the newspa-
per and we will publish them each week
on this page.


Meet the Artist!
Heather Parker is the featured artist of the month at
Joey's Java Juice.
Join us for a Meet the Artist reception on
Saturday, August 12 from 7p.m. to 9p.m.
Refreshments provided.
On exhibit is Heather's "Traveler" series (acrylic on wood)
that depicts life's journey in a day and one representational
painting from her "Light On" series- a journey away from
home comprised of two dimensional paintings, furniture, and
assemblage art.
Joey's Java juice is located at 9722A Front Beach Road,
Panama City Beach. 249-5282.
Heather can be reached at ArtCoop: creative cooperative
for visual, literary, and performing artists. 1416 Buena Vista
(just off 15th between Balboa and Lisenby) 767-0391


Kensinger Housing
of Panama City Announces
"2006 Lot Model Closeout"
SALE
*All Homes Windzone 3
*Save up to $10,000 Now
Drywall Overhead Vents and much more
*Prices will never be lower
*Financing Available with Low Down Payment
*Call Today & Save!!


Kensinger Housing Inc.
3424 E. 15th Street, Panama City, FL
S 850-785-0693






GEfCoast


Gulf/Franklin Center

Registration


August 10 9am-6pm
Classes Start August 16, 2006


Check out the following class:


Basic Spanish Conversation I
Introduction to Spanish sound system and
conversational emphasis on practical appli-
cations in daily, personal, and business life.
Culture based.


Call 227-9670 or 1-800-311-3685 ext 5501
Gulf Coast Community College
Start Here. Go Anywhere.

GCCC is an equal opportunity institution.

A -r


- (


i -I wcunsay .ituiruly, iUdini 1'pil iard-niiu L iguhl iii I _
..... Sunday, 1 pm 5pm Easterr Dhlight Tinme
,-"' I I. Closed Monday 6 Tuesday. I
Open Memorial Day, July Ist- 4th.
.. ..... 6 Labor Day, 10am 5prn Eastern Davighl Time.
., ,. TICKETS ..
I. ."' Adults: ({.ges 18 6 older) $12
Cluldren: (Ages 5- 17} $6 I {free for children under 5}


.led on ibe shores of Sl. Joseph Bay, 22 miles west of Ap ahchicoL and 39 miles east of Pananma Cirn in ihe E.iiern .time .one .

I For information on the 2006 Southern Accents Showbouse at WindMark Beach, ,all 888-212-7050
or visit wwwsoulhernaccents.com For information about WindNMark Beach. visil our sales center,
JOE.com or call 850-227-2400 or toU-free 866-227-9007.
I
- --- -- ---- PROJECT TEAMNI --- -- -- ---- ------
r 1.:.e C..mpnr' | Interiori. [lil p Jid..; | .i>..hitect. Co,:.p.'r R,.bert:..,n &. Purner; I LandJ.ape .Arhitec., EDA\. Ir.:


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


LD L- -A.C4 I-- rl T .. A m.cf n nn A


I


a


agents





The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 10, 2006 7B


Estabilie Ih ed 1 93 3 -ervingU Suit county auna surrounaing GreCIS TO[ 00 Y


AUGUST SEPTEMBER OC]


Wewa Search and Rescue Fishing Tournament,
Gaskin Park, Aug. 18-19.
MBARA Annual Kingfish Tournament, August 25-
26, Mexico Beach
WindMark Beach Showhouse: Through Sept. 10 at
WindMark Beach, near Port. St. Joe, tours of Southern
Accents Showhouse are 10am to 5pm EDT Wednesday
through Saturday, 1 to 5 pm Sunday. Tickets are $12, $6
for ages 5 to 17. More information: 888-212-7050.
Annual Scallop Festival, Port St. Joe, August 26-27


Music in the Park, Each Thursday night at 6 pm
(CT) in Sunset Park, Mexico Beach
Beach Blast Olympic Triathlon & Duathlon,
September 23, Beacon Hill Park, Great sports event
involving swimming, biking and running. More infor-
mation: www.TheBeachBlast.com.
The event will bring hundreds of visitors to the
area. Volunteers needed. Come support local athletes!
Annual Kingfish Shootout, Sept. 25-26, C-Quarters
Marina, Carrabelle


Send Your Community Events to:
Write To: Fax To: Be sure to put Community News as the
The Star/Community Events (850) 227-7212 subject when mailing.
P.O. Box 308 Email To:
Port St Joe, FL 32457 starnews@starfl.com Announcements are limited to 50 words,
and will run for a maximum of 4 weeks.
I


[OBER


Music by the Bay, Each Thursday in rrank rate
Park, Port St. Joe
Annual Catfish Classic Fishing Tournament, October
6-7, Wewahitchka
Florida Panhandle Birding and Wildflower Festival,
October 6-8, St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserves, Port
St. Joe
Annual Art and Wine Festival, October 21, Driftwood
Inn, Mexico Beach
Downtown Trick or Treat, October 31, Reid Avenue,
Port St. Joe
The Oyster Spat Festival, Oct. 6- 8, St. George
Island
Apalachicola Community Yard Sale, Oct. 7,
Apalachicola
3rd Annual Apalachicola Bay Chamber Golf
Tournament, Oct. 11, St. James Bay Golf Course,
Lanark Village
Dixie Does Nashville, Part Deux, Songwriters in
the Round, Oct. 13-14, Dixie Theatre, Apalachicola


Everything You Need to Know About the Area, but


Didn't Know To Ask:


Fearsome, Fascinating,


SBy Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer


Since alligator hunting sea,
officially opens August 15, conti
mg through November 1, visitors
Florida will be, hearing about gat
more than normally.
Everyone has seen pictures a
inovies with gators in them. So
may even remember the old Saturi
afternoon "Tarzan" movies, wh
Jo 11 n ny Weismueller wrestled "cro
diles" underwater.
Did you know that those
,'Tarzan" movies were filmed just a
miles from here, in Wakulla Spri
-, an area chock full of gators?
* Alligators are all over Flori
including the Panhandle. In rec
years, with the state's tremend
population growth and devel-
opment, many residents ware
building waterfront homes and
increasingly participating in
water-related activities. This
can result in more frequent
alligator-human interactions,
and a greater potential for con-
flict.
If you want to see alliga-
tors up close and personal, yet
safely, several charter compa-
nies will take you on alligator
tours.
Your chances of encounter-
i)tg a gator while playing on
tlle beaches or sightseeing are
pretty slim if you don't wan-
der off the beaten path. 'Here
are a few facts and tips about
'gators. ,-
Alligators and crocodiles
are "crocodilians." Two croco-
dilians are native to the United
States, the American alligator
And the American crocodile.
-'Alligators and crocodiles
are protected by state and fed-
eral laws; the alligator is listed
As "threatened" and the croco-
dile as "endangered" under the
federall Endangered Species
Act.
Alligators have a broad,
flat head and rounded snout,
their bottom teeth are not vis-
ible when the mouth is closed,
are generally gray or black in,
color, 'and are usually found in
fresh water.
The American alligator's







BO KNOWS
PEST
CONTROL

227-9555
Honest, Dependable Service
20+ years experience
State Certified Since 1985


broad, heavy head is an adaptation to
living in heavily vegetated swamps, a
heavy head has more momentum to
help catch prey by smashing through
thick vegetation.
Crocodiles are grayish-green,
have a longer, more tapered snout, an
exposed fourth tooth on, either side
of the lower jaw, and prefer coastal,
brackish or saltwater habitats.
The range of the alligator is
determined by cold temperatures
and the distribution of wetlands."
Their native habitat is the swamps,
ponds, lakes, sluggish rivers, and,
marshes of the southeastern U.S.,
from North Carolina to Texas.
Until the late 1800s, their native
habitat included dithe NlMissisippi River
and all its tributaries from the Gulf of
Mexico up river to the Tennessee-


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Golf Cart

Sales/Services

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1B^~>. ----,- --','-


St. Joe Rent-All
706 1 st. Street
Port St. Joe
227-2112


Summer Tourist Tips No. 8


Gators
cky border.
'he crocodile's range, mnclud-
e southern'tip of Florida. I ,
Alligators live in all Florida m ,
es, but are most coninon in
major river drainage basins and
makes in the central and south-
rtions of the state. They can
e found in marshes, swamp.
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it of poor
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I Driver License and


Vehicle Inspection


Gulf County Sheriff's Office Arrest Log Checkpoints


7/21/2006
James Richard Haney, w/m, 30,
Louisiana, Violation Probation
Donnie Roy Waters, w/m, 39


Wewahitchka,
Probation


James Edward Hamilton, b/m,
44, Port St. Joe, FTA
7/25/2006
C'rnt-hiqo Strimel w r/f A46


Violation Wewahitchka, Possession of
controlled substance DWLSR


Clarence Warren Whitfield II,
w/m, 2, Port St. Joe DUI 7/26/2006


Michael David Zinder, w/m,27,
Apalachicola, DWLSR
7/23/2006
Andy Lynn Stewart, w/m, 44
Wewahitchka, FTA
Michelle H. Harrell, w/f, 36


Wewahitchka,
Checks


Worthless


Rodney Damon Allen, w/m, 22,
Port St. Joe, DUI
7/24/2006
Random Matthew Jackson, w/
m, 19, Wewahitchka, Violation
Pretrial Release


Steven Edward Arthur, w/m,
35, Port St. Joe, Fleeing and
eluding
Billy Joe Whitehair, w/m, 41,
Brevard County, Uttering
Forged Instrument
7/28/2006


Loreen p. Leplant, w/f, 40,
Panama City, Introduction
Contraband Department cor-
rections
Johnny Charles Underwood,
b/m, 46, Wewahitchka,
Disorderly Intoxication


Timothy T. Watford, w/m, 19,
Port St. Joe, DWLSR
Leann Hinson, w/f, 18, Port
St. Joe, Allowing Unauthorized
Person to Operate Motor
Vehicle
Romey Monroe Slaten, w/m,
22, Panama City, Possession
Marijuana Possession Cocaine
Tommy Wayne Thomas, b/
m, 43, Port St. Joe, Child
Support
7/29/2006
Santos Gonzales, h/m, 44,
Texas, DUI
Lawrence Finley Cook, w/m,
42, Port St. Joe, DUI
Michael Wayne Sanders, w/m,
50, Panama City, DUI

7/30/2006
Lawrence Finley Cook, w/m,
42, Quincy, DUI


7/31/2006
Crystal Michelle Abernathy,
w/f, 26, Wewahitchka, VOP-
Worthless Checks
Gidget Oakley, w/f, 38,
Wewahitchka, DUI
8/01/2006
Curt Larson Johnson, w/m,
22, Wewahitchka, Battery
Donald Allen Beatty, w/m, 42
Wewahitchka, Possession of
Marijuana Epires D.L. more
than 6 months
8/02/2006
Rosylan Dion Beachum, b/f,
35, Port St. Joe, Contempt of
Court
8/03/2006
Sherry A. Floyd, w/f, 39, Port
St. Joe, DUI


The Florida Highway
Patrol will be conducting
driver license and vehicle
inspection checkpoints
during the month of August
2006, on the roadways
listed below in Holmes,
Jackson, and Washington
counties.
Recognizing the dan-
ger presented to the public
by defective vehicle equip-
ment, troopers will con-
centrate their efforts on
vehicles being operated
with defects such as bad
brakes, worn tires and
defective lighting equip-
ment. In addition, atten-
tion will be directed to
drivers who would violate
the driver license laws of
Florida.
The Patrol has found
these checkpoints to be an
effective means of enforcing
the equipment and driv-


er license laws of Florida
while ensuring the protec-
tion of all motorists.
State Road #10; State
Road # 71; State Road
#81; State Road #2; State
Road #277; State Road
#286; State Road #273;
State Road #79;- State
Road #276; State Road
#73; State Road #77;
State Road #69; County
Road #164; County Road
#177; County Road #179;
County Road #185; County
Road #169; County Road
#181; County Road #173;
County Road #284; County
Road #271; County Road
#69A; County Road #279;
County Road #276; County
Road #165; County Road
#165A; County Road
#280; County Road #167;
County Road #162; County
Road #177A; Snow Hill
Road.


FWC Division of Law Enforcement Field Operations Weekly Report


July 21-27, 2006
This report represents some significant events the FWC
handled over the past week; however, it does not include all
actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement.
BAY COUNTY
Officers Dennis Palmer and Mark Clements were on patrol
when they observed a subject crossing the highway carrying a
mesh bag and poke pole. Upon follow up, they discovered the
man had harvested 39 stone crab claws, some of which were
undersize. They issued citations and released the man on, his
own recognizance.
Officer Neal Goss was conducting fisheries inspections in
and around the Panama City Pass while on water patrol and
discovered an impaired operator during one of the inspections.
Field sobriety tests and a breath test indicated impairment and
the man was booked into the Bay County Jail.

Residents of Gulf County,
Did you know for minor illness or injury....


You can see a doctor

without an appointment!


Walk-in patients

are welcome!

Evening and weekend hours are now available at
St. Joseph Care of Florida located at the
Gulf County Health Department
2475 Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe

New hours are:
Monday-Friday, 7:30 .am. 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Pediatrician also available for appointments.

Discount rates available based on income.
We look forward to serving you and your family.
For more information, call (850) 227-1276, ext. 100


No one thinks that a catastrophic injury
or accidental: death will strike them
until it happens.


We have been helping families facing:
tragedy since 1973. We have offices
throughout NW Florida.


On the web at Kerrigan.com




Kerrigan,Estess,Rani

McLeod&Thompson
ATTORNEYS AT LAW



202 Marina Drive
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456


(850) 229-3333
The hiring of an attorney is an important decision that should not be based
solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written
information about our qualifications and experience.


Officer David Erdman was summoned to assist USCG
Marine Safety Office with the investigation of a collision at sea
between a foreign coastal freighter, approximately 285 feet long,
and a 39 foot Hatteras charter fishing boat. The Cyprus flagged
freighter "Kopersand" was entering the Panama City Pass just
southwest of the sea-buoy, when the commercial charter vessel
"Bandit" collided with the freighter. All persons were okay, how-
ever, extensive damage was sustained by the Hatteras. The cap-
tain of the vessel had set the autopilot and gone. down on deck
to assist the mate with bait preparation. They did not leave a
look-out and did not hear the warning blast of the freighter in
time, to avoid collision. Officer Erdman issued the applicable
notice to appear.
Officer Gary Tolbert responded to a commercial tour boat
that was experiencing problems with an unruly passenger.
Officer Tolbert found the passenger to have engaged in verbal
combat with the boat's bartender and the captain wished the



Auto Insurance


passenger to be removed from his vessel. Officer Tolbert trans-
ported the passenger to the docks.
Officers Dennis Palmer and Mark Clements were on water
patrol on Deer P oint Lake when they stopped a boat that was
short two personal flotation devices. As the operator was get-
ting his driver's license from a dry bag, Officer Palmer observed
a bag of brown leafy substance which later field tested positive
for cannabis. Citations were issued for the PFDs, possession of
less than 20 grams of cannabis (13.3 grams), and possession of
paraphernalia (glass pipe).
FRANKLIN COUNTY
Lt. Steve Thomas conducted a fisheries inspection on a
shark gill net boat in Apalachicola that resulted in federal
violations of no valid permit on board, improper vessel iden-
tification, improper gear identification, and state violations" of
no valid SPI,, unmarked gill net, and three boating safety vidla-'
tions. Appropriate paperwork was issued. I "
On July 24 and 25, Officer Percy Cook concentrated his
educational and enforcement efforts on St. George Island,
Officer Cook checked people fishing all over the island rind
issued eight citations and several written warnings for various
offenses.


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PUTTING IT IN.

REVERSE?
Reverse- mortgages have ex-
isted for nearly twenty years
now, but still' aren't well un-
derstood. Their complexity,
makes it difficult to separate
fact from fiction; and not every
person over 61 years old will
find a reverse mortgage to be
the best choice.
How does it work? It's still a
loan, but is not paid back until
,the last owner/co-owner dies,
or the home is sold or left unoc-
cupied for one year. You may
receive an equity line of credit,
borrowing money as needed,
or receive monthly checks for
the rest of your life, like an an-
nuity.
The loan amount is based on
your age and your home's val-
ue, among other factors. Lend-
ers don't loan the full value of


Barefooi Properties
your home. and there are fees.
whilee a reverse mortgage pro-
vides a low-risk option that aJ-
lo-.S ilnjois to remain in t-heir
home lor the ret ol their lives.
other investments should be
depleted before ai'rin it con-
sideration. Your home's eq-
uity should be tapped as a last
resource.
When the loan, becomes due
for any of the reasons stated
above, the home is sold and
you (or your heirs) would re-
ceive any money left over. ',If
the house sells for less than
the loan amount, the lender
eats the loss. Again, this is a
great option for many, but not
all, qualified borrowers. Give it
thorough investigation.



*************************
Thinking of selling? Call for
a free consultation. Wayne
Rowlett of Barefoot Properties,
1085 Cape San Blas Road,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456. (850)
227-8492 wr@gtcom.net"
www. Captwayne.nret


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IF Ilk-~rTJh~7.x..


This ad ertisemient hroughlt o c' u as a putic sen uce of
St. Joseph Care of FL, Inc/Gulf County Health Department


LY~


Established 1937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


8B The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAu st1,20


23725


i







UIn 11 VI i I due 68 ears The Star, Port St. Joe, FL ThrsdayAugust10


Propagatin

By: Roy Lee Carter
County Extension Agent
If you would like to
increase your number and
variety of houseplants, '
without having to go to the
expense of buying a lot of -
new plants, you can do it ,''
through plant propagation. l
Propagation simply means
getting new plants from old
ones, and there are several
IxnT f nrmliqhin


wdys usi UaccomLJii iiing
this.
The common method of
plant propagation is seeds,
cuttings, division and air
layering.
Seed propagation
is seldom used by
homeowners. It takes
much longer to grow a
plant from seed than it does
from the other methods*
of propagation, and many
plants do not come true
from seed. Seedlings from
the same plant may vary
greatly in shape color and
habit of growth. Another
disadvantage to the seed
:method is that many
houseplants, especially
foliage plants, do not flower
well indoors. Without
-flowers, the plant will not
produce viable seeds.
The most common
and satisfactory method
' of propagating must have
- House plants is by cuttings.
A cutting is a portion of a
plant taken from a parent
-plant and rooted in its own
,growing medium. Leaf
'and stem cuttings are used
most often in house plant
propagation.


Leaf cutting can be
used to propagate African
Violets, Begonias, Gloxinias,
Samsevierias (or snake
plant) and most succulents.
There are two types of leaf
cuttings, those where the
new plants arise from the
leaf tissue itself, and those
where the roots arise from
the base of the petiole.
To propagate snake
plants, cut the leaf into
sections about three or
four inches long, and place
the leaf piece about an
inch deep in the growing
.medium. Make sure that
you keep the leaf section
right side up. Roots and
shoots should form from
the leaf section, and a new
shoot will emerge from the
soil. When this shoot i s
three to four inches. long,
the parent leaf should be
cut off.-
Fibrous rooted and Rex
Begonias can be propagated
by laying a plant leaf right
side up on a growing
medium. Before placing
the leaf on the growing
surface, make small cuts
across the larger veins on
the underneath surface of


g House Plants


w


the leaf, and use hairpins
or wire to hold the leaf in
place on the soil surface.
Small plants will begin
to develop from these
primary veins in about
two weeks. When the new
shoots are two to three
inches high, they can be
transplanted into their own
growing containers.
To propagate African
Violets and Gloxinias, use
the entire leaf blade and
about an inch or two of the
leaf pedicle. The pedicle
should be planted into
the rooted mediums deep
enough so that the leaf can
stand upright, but try to
keep soil away from the
leaf itself. New growth will
develop at the base of the
leaf.
Almost all houseplants
root well from stem cuttings.
Make the cuttings four to
six inches long and only
take them from vigorously
growing plants. Place the
cuttings about an inch deep
in a sterile rooting medium.
Covering the containers
with plastic bags will allow
the plants to breathe, but it
prevents loss of moisturee.
The cuttings will need no.
more water 'until they're
well rooted.
Division is simply
pulling apart one large plant
into two or more separate
plants. This method of
propagation is often
.used for African Violets,
Sonsevierias, and other
plants that produce several
shoots off the control,
growing point. Division


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At the junction of Gulf County Canal and
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Call first and ask for Red or Troy



Home Ownership Pool [HOP) Program Funding
Housing Down Payment Assistance Opportunities

To all Gulf County Developers:

The Gulf County Community Development Corporation
(GCCDC) is conducting a workshop to introduce the Hom-
eownership Pool (HOP) Programto our local developers.,

Homeownership Pool Program

The Florida Housing Finance Corporation's Homeown-
ership Pool ("HOP") Program is designed to be a non
competitive and on-going program with non profits and
-for profit organizations, developers and Community Hous-,
ing Development Organizations (CHDO's), counties and
eligible municipalities that are' recipients of SHIP funding
and the United states Department of Agriculture Rural
Development (USDA-RD) to provide purchase assistance
on a first-come first serve basis.

Eligible homebuyers, whose adjusted income does not
exceed 80% AMI, receive a 0% deferred second mort-
gage loan for the lesser of 25% of the purchase price of
the home or $70,000 or the amount necessary to meet
underwriting criteria (with the exception of Eligible Home-
buyers with disabilities and Eligible Homebuyers at 50%
AMI, or below, which are limited to 35%of the purchase
price or $80,000).

WHAT; HOP Workshop

WHEN: August 23, 2006 at 12:00pm

WHERE: ST JOE Building 3rd Floor Conference Room

RSVP Required Please Contact Dannie E. Bolden or
,Lauren Massey 850 229-7986.


AlItel Retail Stores I These Retail Stores Now Open Sunday.
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Dothan Wireless Co. Bloulstown Obars Insurance
The Wireless Co. (334)774-9660 B&B Electronics (850) 263-4483
(334) 671A4736 Wreless Plus (850) 674-3711 Marianna
(334) 673-1501 (334) 774.0779 The Wireless Co.
1850) 482-6255


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Wireless Advantage Cell-n-Accessories
,(850) 763-8858 1850) 286.5488
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Proud Sponsor of:
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Federal, state & local taxes apply. In addition, Alltel charges a monthly connectivity, regulatory &administrative surcharge up to $1.70; federal & state Universal Service Fund fees (both vary by customer usage); & a
911 fee of up to $1.94 (where 911 service is available). These additional fees may not be taxes or government-required charges & are subject to change. My Circle: Available to new and existing customers on current
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the U.S. Program may be discontinued atthe discretion of Alitel. Phone Promotions: Phones available atsale prices to new customers & eligible existing customers. Qualifying AlItel rate plan required. t.,,a,,
Contact Alltel to determine if you are eligible. Phone Details: Phones & applicable rebates available for a limited time, while supplies last, with activation of a qualifying rate plan. Limit 1 rebate per /,- '" '
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available at any AIItel store or alltel.com. All product & service marks referenced are the names, trade names, trademarks & logos of their respective owners: Screen images are simulated. @2006
Alltel Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


can be done by hand or by
knife. But be very gentle.
You want to leave as many
roots as possible intact.
Layering is a method of
propagation, which induces
plant stems to root while
they're still attached to
the parent plant. Air, tip
mound, and trench are all
layering techniques, which
provide the new plants
nutrients and water from
the parent plant, until
their own roots begin to
develop.
Air and tip layering are
the methods used most
often by homeowners. For
air layering, select a young,
healthy, vigorously growing
branch; make sure its
leaves are exposed to light.
Branches from pencil size
to about three fourths of
an inch are best for air
layering.
Now you'll need a sharp
knife, a couple of handfuls
of sphagnum moss, a
six-by-eight-inch sheet'
of polyethylene film, and
rubber bands. You should
have all these materials
on hand before you begin,
because after the cut is
made, the stem will dry out
very quickly.
You first step is to
remove leaves and twigs
about four inches above
and below where you' 11
make the cut. Make a long
slanting cut upward about
a fourth or a half of the
way through the branch.
On large thick branches,
a small cut can be made
'on either side. Now insert


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B


a matchstick, or toothpick
to prevent new bark from
forming and healing the cut.
To speed up the rooting
process. You can use a
rooting hormone, available
from your garden center
operator.
After the cut is made
and opened, enclose
the area with the damp
sphagnum moss. Press
the moss firmly into the
area to insure good contact,
and then wrap to insure
good contact, then wrap the
moss with the polyethylene
film and tie the ends, above
and below the cut, with the
rubber bands.
Roots can take anywhere
from two weeks to several
months to form you can
observe their progress
through the plastic film.
When at least six roots are


present, cut off the layer
from the parent plant, just
below the root ball, and
pot it.
Tip layering is used for
drooping or vining plants.
Choose low branches,
which will bend to the
ground easily, and scrape
the bark from a small
area about six to twelve
inches back from the tip.
Bring the branches down
to the ground, and cover
the scraped area with soil.
The leafy tip of the branch
is left above the ground. It
is important the scraped
area be anchored in the
soil well, so that they stay
moist. When the layered
portions develop roots, they
can be 'cut from the parent
plant and placed in their
own growing container.
Jasmine, Primrose,
Climbing Rose, Oleanders,
and Pyrancantha are all
easily propagated by tip
layering.


For allyour


SAdvertising needs...





Contactyour

West Port St Joe
Account Executive


Rachel Browning


227-7856
135 W. Hwy98
T1HE STAR Port St Joe, Florida






IVu ine Z4T.P-,-T 3. I, FL I Thiirudnv Aiini 00ingtd 6


New Interactive Journal Simplifies



the College Admission Process!


It's better than a PDA and
makes the College Admission
process a cinch!
Students can't send
emails on it, but they can get
answers to their questions.
They can also use it to orga-
nize their approach to the
overwhelming task of select-
ing and applying to colleges
and increase their chances of
getting admitted to their ideal
institution! And better yet..it
costs a lot less than a digital
planner! The College Pursuit
Journal is a one-of-a-kind
interactive workbook, which
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they need to do from fresh-
man to senior years in high
school; all in a very orga-
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College Pursuit, a college
admission consulting compa-
ny, created the Journal. Tina
Gregor, co-founder/owner says
it is a natural extension of the
company's private counseling
and guidance business. "Our
highly experienced network
counselors have guided hun-


dreds of students and fami-
lies, supporting them through
this overwhelming process.
We utilized all of this tremen-
dous expertise and knowledge
and created the Journal. Now
students have the tool they
need to achieve college admis-
sion success," says Gregor.
The College Pursuit
Journal provides students
with a methodology outlining
the important tasks required
in each phase of the college
selection/admission process.
Topics include the impor-
tance of self-reflection, under-
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ing a 'smart' list of colleges
to apply, components of the
application and selecting the
right college for you. It also
allows students to analyze
important research and track
their findings, while includ-
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Journal is a way for them to,
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the ton of information that
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before arid the competition is


fierce, so superior planning
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ering students to take owner-
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them gain control".
In addition to serving as
an inexpensive ($20) virtual
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practical advice and best-
practice solutions from past
students, parents and top-
notch high school and college
admission counselors.
An example of a best
practice is, Chris Hooker-
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Don't eliminate colleges based
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Select. those you really want
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financial aid at the end of the
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The Journal serves as
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attending a College Pursuit
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hold up to 12 students and
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College essay, Bragsheet, The
Common Application) The
workshops are three 2-hour
sessions and are held at sev-
eral convenient locations.
College Pursuit, based
in the Philadelphia area, was
created 3 years ago by a hus-
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and Tina Gregor. The compa-
ny provides high school stu-
dents and families with per-
sonalized counseling services
to assist them throughout the
college search, admission and
selection process. In addi-
tion to private counseling, the
company also offers custom-
ized workshops for groups
of 10 -12 students.as well. as
specific hourly services, such
as interview skill training.
Tina Gregor holds a BA
in psychology from Moravian
College and a Master's degree
in Social Work from the
University of Pennsylvania.
She spent.years in family prac-
tice, working with adolescents
and families. Frank Gregor
previously owned a staffing/
consulting firm. He holds a
BA in Human Resources from
Salve Regina University.
www.collegepursuit.biz


Port St Joe


NJROTC Cadets


Attend Leadership


Academy


By: c/LCDR Molly Matty
"Reveille, reveille, rev-
eille!" is what was heard at
0500 every morning for three
local NJROTC cadets. These
cadets; Elijah Quaranta,
Melissia Deputy, and Molly
Matty underwent a grueling
week at Admiral Farragut
Leadership Academy. It was
here, in the 100 degree heat
of St. Petersburg, Florida
that we learned the art of
drill, swords, hospital cor-
ners, two minute showers,
sailing, orienteering, and
teamwork, teamwork, team-
work. The week began June
11th, a hot Sudnay morning
when we had absolutely no
clue what was going on at
the large, Spanish inspired
brick, building that would
soon become our home.
We checked in, and tried
desperately to find our appro-
priate rooms consisting of
two racks, a head, and a wall
locker. We learned what all
this meant later on (in the
form of dropping and doing,
,push ups). Rain could not
dampen our Drill Instructors'
spirits as, they instructed us
on how to properly make our
beds, after we found them
tossed throughout our room.
I thank God for fitted sheets,
now. Motivational runs began
as ,the rain ceased, work-


ing our way up to 2.5 miles
in the evening. As the week
progressed, our knowledge
grew as we could find our
way around the campus, and
exactly how to sit at chow
without looking around.
Classes were held everyday
with topics varying from
ettiquette to orienteering,
sailing to time management
skills. Evenings were spent
polishing shoes and brass
for personnel inspections,
and listening to jodies (mili-
tary chants) on a beat up CD-
player "on the line".
We started to have fun
towards the end of the week
and I even remember say-
ing once "Gosh, I wish this
week wouldn't end." But end
it did, in the form a gradua-
tion ceremony on June 17th.
Though we couldn't smile
because we had to maintain
military bearing, I'm sure -if
we could, we would hate
had the biggest smiles on
our faces. Though we. had
the same amount of lug-
gage coming and going, I-
believe we took home inuch
more than we came there
with. Friendships, memo
ries, chants, ideas, and the
skills to better our units. In.
a week, we went from inse-
cure, frightened cadets td
inspired,'motivated leaders'.,


Child Find
Pre-K-


NEW! See The Star On Line at
www.StarFL.com




IronnYourWater


Limited, Time Wl


Interiors


Etcetera

Must Move-

Clothing & Gifts

Take 60% off

to make room

for "new" items

arriving daily


Hours

10:00-5:30
Tuesday-Saturday


- I Screening
\ 'Gulf County School Board
| and FDLRS/PAEC will co-
sponsor a FREE Child Find ,
Pre-K Screenings for children
ages 3 and 4. Each child will
be screened in school readi-
ness, speaking/listening, social
skills, vision and hearing. The
screening will be,
August 23, 9:00arl-
12:00pm EST, at Port St. Joe
Elementary. Telephone 229,
.1492 for an appointment.
August' 29, 8:30amr
11:30am CST, at Wewahitchki
Elementary. Telephone 639*
3610 for an appointment.


Fall "

Registration

At Gulf Coasft


Community

College

Gulf Coast Community


College campus advising and
registration for fall 2006, is
as follows:
Late Fall Registration
August .14- 15
Classes Begin: August 16
Registration will occur'
from 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.,
Monday through Thursday
and from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
on Friday. Web registration is
also available.
Gulf/Franklin Center late
fall registration will take
place as follows:
Late Fall Registration.
August 10
Classes Begin: August 16
Tyndall Air Force Base
late fall registration will take
place as follows:
Late Fall Registration:
August 14- 15 -
Classes Begin: August 16:
Late registration and
drop/add for all facilities will
be held August 16 22.
Please note that these
dates exclude Saturdays;
Sunday and holidays.
For more information, call
(850) 872-3892 for the main
campus, (850) 227-9670.
For the Gulf/Franklin
Center (EST) and (850) 283-
4332 and for Tyndall Air Force
Base Education Office.
v -an m -lo


Iuj


T _* ."- -, -. .' ',, '.. ._ l


Fabric

lk

I I


Established 7937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


INn ThpSor or t Je F husav uus 0,20


!W, r 11






_ctnblL'"h- 193 *- Sevn ufcut n urudn ra o 8yasTeSaPr t oF hrdy uut1,20


Gators


- ~i
it~- -2Q Ix


the coast. A few even ven-
ture into salt water. Alligators
in north Florida are inactive
during the coldest winter
months.
Mature alligators seek
6pen water areas during the
April-May courtship and
breeding season. After mat-
infig, females move into marsh
areas to nest in June and
early July, remaining there
until the following spring.
Males generally prefer
open and deeper water year
round. Alligators less than
four feet long typically inhabit
the marshy areas of lakes
and rivers. Dense vegetation
in these habitats provides
protective cover and many of
the preferred foods of young
alligators.
- Alligators have a com-
plex system of social commu-
nication. This includes seven
different identified vocaliza-
tions, subsonic vibrations,
and a series of behaviors
such as jaw slapping on the
water's surface. These sounds
and actions can all combine
to communicate things like
territory between males, gen-
der in areas of poor visibility,
and alarm calls of hatchlings,
which will bring adults to the
rescue.
.When nesting, alligators.
lay 20-60 eggs:-in a mound of
inud, humus and rotting veg-
etation near the water's edge.
During the average 65-day
incubation period, females
temnain near the nests and
defend. them against preda-
tors.
Alligators have no chro-

[Cash Reward
,3 year old Brindle Boxer


Needs Meds; Missed by
Family 227-2576
Jenny or Randy


mosomes to' determine sex.
The sex of an alligator is
determined by the tempera-
ture at which the egg is incu-
bated. Eggs incubated at or
below 86 degrees F are all
female; at or above 93 degree
F, all male.
Young alligators hatch
mid-August through mid-
September, and may stay in
the vicinity of the nest for two
to three years.
The first two years are
the most critical in the life of
an alligator. Eighty percent or
more may fall victim to wad-
ing birds, raccoons, bobcats,
otters, snakes, large bass,
and larger alligators.
Once an alligator exceeds
four feet, it is relatively safe
from predators, but still may
be vulnerable to cannibal-
ism.
American alligators aver-
age six to 15 feet long. The
record American alligator was
over 19 feet long and. 1,043
pounds. The largest alligator
ever recorded in Florida was
17 feet, 5 inches long.
On average, American
alligators live about 50 years.
The record is 73 years.
An estimated 10 mil-
lion alligators were killed for
their skins between 1870 and
1970, when hunting became
controlled.
While the alligator has
,benefited from legal protec-
tion and is now abundant in
many areas, habitat loss and
conflicts over water manage-
ment continue to threaten the


St


alligator.
Crocodiles have always
been rare in Florida, but alli-
gators once dominated life
in Florida's freshwater wet-
lands.
By building and maintain-
ing ponds and nests, alliga-
tors create habitat that sup-
ports a-rich array of life in the
wetlands.
The decline of the alliga-
tor through most of the 20th
century has disrupted this
relationship and seriously
altered the ecology of Florida's
freshwater wetlands.
The ponds ("gator holes"),
dens, nests and trails of
alligators have shaped and
contoured the landscape of
Florida's Wetlands.
The compacted vegeta-
tion left in old nest mounds
and pond banks forms a peat
that is resistant to decay and
fire. In fact, much of the
high ground in the Florida
Everglades can be traced to,
the work of alligators.
Alligators are carni-
vores. They eat anything they
can catch: fish, turtles, rac-
coons, birds, dead animals,
even other gators.
. Young alligators eat
insects, snails and other inver-
tebrates, frogs and small fish.
At a length of about six feet,
they begin to feed predomi-
nately on fish, turtles, snakes,
water birds, and small mam-.
mals,.
Larger gators occasionally
take deer, hogs and domestic
calves. Alligators will readily


eat carrion and, in fact, may
prefer it to fresh meat.
They, are basically oppor-
tunistic feeders and will eat-
almost anything, including
sticks, stones, fishing lures
and aluminum cans.
"Caution: Alligator
Rules"
Under no circumstanc-
es should you approach an
alligator. They are very agile,
even on land. In fact, for short
bursts of speed and for short
distances on land, an alligator
can outrun a horse (about 35
miles per hour).
Be aware of the possibil-
ity of gator attacks when in or
near fresh or brackish water
(rivers, lakes, canals, etc.).
Attacks may occur when peo-
ple do not pay close enough
attention to their surround-
ings when working or playing
near water.
Closely supervise chil-
dren when they are playing in
or around water. Never allow
small children to play unsu-
pervised near water.
Even though the risk of a
person being injured or killed
by an alligator is very low, it
does exist;
Many tourists and
Florida residents think it is
fun to feed alligators. This
results in the reptiles over-
coming their natural shyness
and becoming accustomed to
humans.
Apart from the risk
people impose on themselves
by feeding alligators, they are
also conditioning the anunal.
to associate people with food.
For this reason, Florida law
prohibits feeding wild alliga-


tors.
Dispose of fish scraps in
garbage cans at boat ramps
and fish camps. Do not throw
them into the water. Although
you are not intentionally feed-
ing gators when you do this,
the end result can be the
same.
To limit the risk of alli-
gator attacks on humans, do
not swim outside of posted
swimming areas, or in areas
inhabited by large alligators,
especially at dusk or during


Bluewave

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the night, when gators like
to feed.
To prevent the loss of
pets, especially dogs, to alli-
gators, do not allow pets to
swim, exercise or drink in
or near waters that mdy be
occupied by alligators or in
designated swimming areas
with humans.
Dogs are more suscep-
tible to being attacked than
'humans, because dogs resem-
ble the natural prey of alliga-
tors.


ST. JOSEPH BAY
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Aug 10 12:04P 1.99 H 09:49P 0.04 L
Aug 11 01:09P 1.63 H 09:51 P 0.45 L
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Aug 15 03:11A 1.72 H 01:50P 0.09 L


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i,. ,_,. .. r /i _


DENTAL NEWS FROM THE OFFICE OF


FRANK D. MAY, DMD, PA


WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT PLAQUE
We hear a great deal about plaque these days in dental product advertising. Since its' elimination is so
important in controlling dental decay and periodontal disease, there are a few things you should know.
Your mouth normally contains large numbers of bacteria. Many of these bacteria digest sugar. Among the
byproducts of digested sugars are acids,- particularly lactic acid. If these bacteria remain undisturbed on your
teeth, they combine with food debris and their own digestive products to fqrm a sticky film called plaque.
Plaque hold the acids released by bacteria in firm, prolonged contact with the tooth. These acids react
chemically with the minerals in the enamel and dissolve them. Decay usually begins with a tiny pit on the surface,
which enlarges to become a cone-shaped "soft spot" of partially dissolved enamel. When more sugar is fed to the
bacteria, more acid will be produced, and the decay progresses faster.
Untreated, it will eventually destroy the tooth.,


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License#MV52258
Tune-Ups, Front End-
Alignment; Tires & Brakes
Give us a call and set up an appointment
to'getyour vehicle in top running condition.


Lee's One Stop Auto Care, Inc
274 Commerce Drive *Port St. Joe
227-9696


Call(85) 27-123 oday

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-


~.i-M-~F;P4~aFeRB$"~IPT"OB"~+-~~P'"~'r~ --~e~


TheSta, PrtSt.Joe FL- hurday Auus 10 206 -II


Establish 797 -Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years






12B The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 10, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


K9


-


office was to rededicate
resources to the K-9 unit.
"It's a tribute to our
sheriff that he got behind
us 100 percent," Cole said.
Maj.- Joe Nugent, who
owns and trained the
department's bloodhound,
secured a $68,000 federal
grant to help defray the
costs of purchasing and
i-


training the dogs as well as
the requisite equipment.
"That grant made the
whole thing work," Cole
said.
Cole and assis-
tant instructor Lt. Ricky
Tolbert traveled to dozens
of kennels throughout the
Southeast and examined
hundreds and hundreds of


Tim Croft/The Star
Don, the canine officer, finds the drug stash during a show for
kids in the Florida Sheriff's Youth camp in Port St. Joe.



For allyour Internet

Advertising needs...


Be Sure to


Contactpyur

Internet Advertising
Account Executive.

Katie Flament


596-7179


THE STAR
135 Hwy 98
P,-,n rit oIe. Florida


Tudif.Jnn-.L
129 C,,'-rrrnie rct Sireet


dogs in search of those who
would fit the profile they
had in mind.
Zeus was already on
board when they started
and the goal was three
more dogs.
They wanted younger
dogs which they could train
themselves, since Cole, who
has -worked with canines
since he was in the mili-
tary in the mid-1970s, was
a certified instructor and
would soon bring Tolbert
along as a certified trainer.
"I couldn't have done it
without Ricky," Cole said.
"That the dog team is so
successful so quickly is a
tribute to the trainers."
In addition to young
dogs less than two years
old and has it happened,
all male Cole and his team
were looking for dogs with
plenty of drive smart,
social, good hunt drive,
play drive, fight drive and
ball drive.
The dogs, in short
strokes, work for the
reward of love and affection


Lt. Greg Cole pretends
pounces as his master "fights


Tim Croft/The Star
The work done, Zeus becomes what is during his off-time kid-friendly.


from their trainers and to
play, whether chasing a ball
or a bit of tag and chase.
And they understand who


Tim Crot'ThE Star
to attack Lt. Ricky Tolbert and Hack
s" back.


is boss.
"The best dog is the dog
who knows where he is in
the social rung," Cole said.
The social skill set was
key because Cole was start-
ing out with new trainers
and he wanted dogs which
could live with their part-
ners and their families.
"We looked .for that,
we wanted a more sociable
dog," Tolbert said.
Selecting handlers was
the next key step, with a
general call for applicants
sounded at the S.O.
"We were looking for
handlers that have a love
fof animals, that the dog
will ,be part of their fami-
lies," Cole said. "The best
working dog is your best
friend."
Ultimately. Tolbert was
paired with Hack, Jake
Richards with Don, James
Newsome with Zeus and
Jerome Williams with
Sibal.
The teams trained
with an instructor from
the Florida Departmeht of
Law Enforcement through
a course offered at the Gulf'


Franklin Center
Training was conducted
on a host of skills, includ-
ing basic and advanced
obedience, evidence recov-
ery, scouring and tracking,
building searches, criminal
apprehension, recall and
obstacle course.
Training was complet-
ed in January' and FDLE
evaluators approved them
for state certification,
In May the teams trav-
eled to Perry for a national
conference during which'
the teims earned their
national certification.
"That was astounding
and pretty amazing consid-;
ering they were all young
dogs and new trainers;-,"
Cole said.
The K-9 units continue-
to train one day a week, for
eight hours a day. The work; *
is never done.
"It's an ongoing pro-i -
cess," Cole 'said. 'They get -
better and better and bet-
ter. We have a long way .to '
go." .
Not so long. the kids-.
from the Sheriff's Youth -
camp might contend.


P LE ..'.. .'.,FRIDAY, AUG
US- FOR OUR, lR J ND OPEM NGJ 6:00 PM











IIQUOMS *&6Fi










GRAND OPENING ATTENDEES OVER THE AGE OF 21 ARE ELIGIBLE FOR:
V.I.P. MEMBERSHIPS *'PRIZE GIVEAWAYS WINE & BEER TASTING LIVE MUSIC
Between Port St. Joe and Cape San Blas at Simmons Bayou 850.227.7337 2-113 Scenki Route 30A
^ 7 '


SUPER TUESDAY

1-DAY SPECIAL




Oops---
WAIVE THAT FEE FOR ME!


Free Cheec4/ngwi everydaq.

fF-E ATM frmaddlioe-
eve at amaetker ba#,ta A fM
Fj't-o ofChecax
rp~ffO0#11WM &RA1Ffli
f9lE& ATM dc Check Card,
Pl/As oil' w, 'ma TAey,
rFALL Oors 5;0,d


I


Stop by on SuperTuesday to open a Free Checking account at Superior Bank.
In addition to our every day free extras, you'll get a special Oops Card just in
case something unexpected happens in your life. We're willing to work with
you so your banking is flexible, even when oops happens.


ALTHA 25463 NoRTH MAIN STRE'r 850-762-3417
APAACHmcOIA 58 4TH STREET 850-653-9828
BLouNwrsowN 20455 CENTRAL AVENUE WEST 850-674-5900
BRISTOL 10956 NW STATE ROAD 20 850-643-2221
CARRAHELE 912 NORTHWESTr AVENUE A 850-697-5626
MEXICO BEACH 1202 HIGHWAY 98 850648-5060
PORT ST. JOE 418 CEcn. G.Cos-nN SR. BOULEVARD 850-227-1416


0Meb. FDIC


9UPERIOI
f BANKING MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS
www.superiorbank.com


.. .. ... "' A -vn "This card allows one: f tot-crdraft. nsop pavicn, chdiec rc-ordei. or tnoaelers/cashwn check) to be uaived
94: & e mu 04st oWmelliartsAvensew C a-ith Bouir uteom nIC Oops Card can be u .sed0o o allow one overdrat wid the 530 crdraf item ice waived. Following
r ** t L our lm" d policy w-hour an 'Oups Canr You will be charged 530 fu; each oerdrah itemn har i proarxssed through your Bounce
S... Joe.-. .FL -32456 Pro"semon plan. A ft-e may b; charged for overdrafts that ar created by check. r by wihdraals in-person. by ATM or by other electronic
Sw' means. We resene the rihir to require you to pay am overdraft on demand. Whether your overdrafts are paid is discretionary and we
'.:?&. ecr850-227 97. 7 re the n ghi nor no po For eamnple, we rpicall do not pay or drafu tifour accouni is nor in good standing, or you are noi making
reguaL deposits, or- pa uha wo many oedrafs.


1% =loop,


0111


OOPS CAIM

(,11()O"F, 0711- clict k
()N C,Ivltfl
j+ 111,cl,
HUT "I"i, pj 171
"I -11L 2L=Mwmpmkmdqmm Ul


Established 7 937 Serving Guff county and surrounding areas for 68 years.


12B The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAu st1,20


i'Coor;~E~er


I






Kids Crusader 11C


Legals


7C


Classifieds 9-10C


FfnthlichdR 7937 Servina Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Hamburgers


The Star, Port


for


St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 10, 2006 SECTION C


Houses


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
Two local businesses, 20 willing employees
and 600 hamburgers spelled a winning for-
mula last Friday, when a cookout benefiting the
Gulf County Habitat for Humanity raised over
$4,000 for the county's first Habitat family.
Vision Bank and Carpet Country employ-
ees mingled beneath a white tent in the bank
parking lot, where they packed hamburgers,
baked beans, coleslaw and cookies into 500
Styrofoam containers marked with the names
of local businesses.
The employees had spent the week pound-
ing the pavement and filling 500 lunch orders.
On Friday, they worked diligently to ensure that
all meals reached their customers on time.
Beneath the tent, Gulf County Habitat
for Humanity marveled at the employees' effi-
ciency.
"There was a commitment to deliver them
when they said," noted HOH President Tracy
Melvin. "You just don't find that kind of cus-
tomer service."


A steady stream of walk-in customers,
lured by the aroma of hamburgers simmering
on the nearby grill, also shelled out $6 a plate,
making the cookout more successful than
anticipated.
Vision Bank branch manager Joan Cleckly,
who organized the event along with assis-
tant branch manager Cheryl Peak and Carpet
County owner Kenny Peak, said the original
goal was to raise $2,000.
With Piggly Wiggly giving organizers a dis-
count on the beans and cole slaw and vendors
chipping in the buns and soda, all the money
raised was pure profit, and will go towards the
construction of the King family's home.
Becky King, who brought two-year-old
daughter, Allison, to the cookout, was pleas-
antly surprised by the turnout.
"I thought it was great. I didn't realize so
many people would come out and order food,"
said King.
Habitat is currently working to secure land
on which to build the Kings' home, and has
received commitments from numerous volun-


V 227-72411
2 96


A volunteer fires up the grill.


Gulf County Habitat for Humanity president Tracy Melvin (third from left) accepts a $250 check
from Vision Bank of Florida president Joey Ginn and Port St. Joe branch manager Joan Cleckly. The
check and the $3,600 raised at last Friday's cookout will help build a new home for the family of Becky
King, shown here with her youngest daughter, Allison.


teers eager to begin construction, including a
team from Vision Bank.
"We'll get out there with our Habitat shirts
and be ready to go," said Cleckly.
In addition to their fundraising efforts at
the cookout, Vision Bank chipped in, an addi-
tional $250 for the Habitat house.
Melvin applauded Vision Bank's continued
support of Gulf County Habitat for Humanity
and its willingness to address the community's
housing needs.
"What better way for Vision Bank to show
their commitment to the community than to
help in the housing arena," Melvin said.


,* :'.


Volunteers from Vision Bank ,and Carpet
Country man the assembly line.


MEXICO BEACH OFFICE
1602 WV HIGHWAY 98
MEXICO BEACH FL
850 648-4400


PORT ST JOE OFFICE
155 W HIGHWAY 98
(PORT CITY SHOPPING CENTER)
PORT ST JOE, FL
850 229-6100


k IHARP N( A NEW OAuS1N

-re





MLS llll9- 'I1l.9I'.995. 3155 .el H-w 98 MLS 1i9318 3.5i)0.10ll00. 31371 %est Hu. 98 MLS 1 W9317- $1.410.oif1j. 3119 \\eo H%) 93 MLS 111603- $ 795.000. 3151i \est H," 98
Approdimatel 2 I Acre 800"+/- H-lighba3 98 Frontage Cenirall) Located to e \indmark Beach Bareoot Cottlages & \ into Development This ik a unique otlering of \ALLIABLE DEVELOPMENT PROPERTY







O'1ner Financing On -I Lots In Creeksiev Subdi. Mils 20037) 7276 Dahlia Street -- MNust See! One Nils 111613 588 Ling Stree -- Onh BlocksFrom MNIs 201010 615 Sesame Street Home Has New
ision -- Terms: Price Per Lot 79.951.).i.t. 10i Osinir \%ell Maintained. Property Offers Great Ba) lntiercatal %aterway And Public Boal Carpet. nd IsIn Excellent Condition. This Is.
In In Year.- Site Built H,,mes Oun,. No Penalli ,- ion nd Deelopmnr. 'esment Propern. Tme Home Oners.
For Prepament.l o. Dimensions .%re \ppr. i-
matel 104 .1,..







911^ -_f., ,,LS t11536 203 LOUIS LNA DRI.E -Go 1.89 '. enue -- ood RenTtaf 1 s-
'- aoltAEme on am epth T o B tiful double wide home in immaculate condition Area Tha ill Be Deseloped In Future. are St-
n, aia g roori. hari B loo r oe-s Ounderl., a 'i-'"y Onl- about a block from the dedicated beich' n iicestment Propert ..
or Ppn-n.e1tes and cabins .SO. p mexco Beach. Large building and office n k
of property
x .,.





NILS 105904 404 NIONINENT AVE -- Ideal 4s ? .
commercial lot for high visibility, Is on the Aban- NIs 110970 178 Palm Breeze Wa -- Breakfai : N11109422 -66T ..0.8 -205 6TH STREET Property is
doned Tank Restoration Program and has a score Bar. Fireplace, Floor: Hardwood And Carpet. ti'e mobile on 2 lI rAu ttcmM dedicated beach. Value is in the
number 31 which makes it eligible for inspection Walk In Closet, Large Kitchen Pantry. This Is park. HaS 2 large deck fireplace. garden rub. ve is being removed by seller
for final designation of rNo further Action" ta- A kitchen island. Excellent permanent home or
tus. (IAl tanks and contamination hais already... '- '--.. *. ,. ..
been removed ,
-W..- .7 ..


1.


CSIUL)I,fIUU 1 701 1-11114 --1'-1- -1-- -. I- ,









SHome Ownership Pool



(HOP) Workshop


The Gulf County Community Development
Corporation (GCCDC) is conducting a
workshop for all developers to introduce the
Homeownership Pool (HOP) Program to our
local developers.
Homeownership Pool Program
The Florida Housing Finance Corporation's
Homeownership Pool ("HOP") Program is
designed to be a non-competitive and on-
going program with non profits and for profit
organizations, developers and Community
Housing Development Organizations (CHDO's),
counties and eligible municipalities that are
recipients of SHIP funding and the United
States Department of Agriculture Rural
Development (USDA-RD) to provide purchase


NJLS 040


I, I I I I..~. ,'','' I' TO .


E tl"'i .

Car blleS^

4 850I


NILS ~ 10770, ~ aI uh'
~ iithe C.jr d' II I.-cr,clr irh, Cull
r 1l W ifhI. I'rd,.'.d rz. i. I, !,, r '.c

CIL ck c cr i..' ~ c p....!1 1-1;Its. hi I, L I: Lk .
fu Ii,;hI d 2,1 i'000


assistance on a first-come first serve basis.
Eligible homebuyers, whose adjusted
income does not exceed 80 percent AMI,
receive a 0 percent deferred second mortgage
loan for the lesser of 25 percent of the purchase
price of the home or $70,000 or the amount
necessary to meet underwriting criteria (with
the exception of Eligible Homebuyers with
disabilities and Eligible Homebuyers at 50
percent AMI or below, which are limited to 35
percent. of the purchase price or $80,000)....:
The workshop will be held at noon at
Wednesday, Aug. 23, in the third floor
conference room of the St. Joe Building.
RSVP is required Please Contact Dannie
E. Bolden or Lawren Massey at 229-7986.


Road Trip for Waterfronts Florida


This is your chance to travel to a graduated
Waterfronts Partnership community and see
how they redeveloped their waterfront area.
We are putting together a group to tour
St. Andrews Bay Waterfronts area and we
thought you might want to jump in your car
and meet us there.
While we are there, St. Andrews Bay's
program manager, Nancy Wengel, will guide
us through the area, giving us a little history
on their revitalizing and showing us their
improvements.
After the tour and questions, we will
settle down and enjoy an old fashion picnic
sponsored by Waterfronts Partnership. This
event will be on Saturday, August 19th at
9:30am CST (that's 10:30am Port St. Joe
time).


Everyone that would like to join us needs
to RSVP Carol McLeod as soon as possible.
We need a count for the picnic. When I
receive your RSVP email, I will send you
a map of St. Andrew Bay and where we
will be meeting that morning. Everyone is
responsible for his or her own transportation
to St. Andrews Bay.
Please send your RSVP back to me ,by
August 7th. This way we can make sure we
have everyone's picnic lunch ready and we
can let our hostess know how many of us to
expect.
If you have any questions, feel free to email
or call McLeod. Our new phone number for
Port St. Joe Waterfronts Florida Partnership
is 850-229-7179. Hope to see you there.


Weather Radio

Weather radios, including special needs NOAA
Weather Radios, are available in a variety of models.


2006 Hurricane
Names
Alberto Leslie
Beryl Michael
Chris Nadine
Debby Oscar
Ernesto Patty
Florence Rafael'-
Gordon Sandy-"
Helene Tony
Isaac Valerie
Joyce Williamn
Kirk


NOTICE OF IMPOSITION OF IMPACT FEE

RATES

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners of Gulf County,
Florida, on June 13, 2006, in regular session, at a properly noticed Public Hearing,
adopted Gulf County Ordinance No. 2006-17, the "Gulf County Comprehensive
Impact Fee Ordinance" authorizing the imposition of impact fees to fund capital
improvements and additions to the County Park System (the "Park Impact Fee"), the
Emergency Medical System (the "EMS Impact Fee"), the County Fire Protection System
(the "Fire Impact Fee") and County Correctional Facilities (the "'Corrections Impact
Fee") necessitated by future growth.
The Parks Impact Fee rates shall be imposed upon all Residential Construction oc-
curring within the unincorporated area of the County and shall be collected prior to
issuance of a building permit for such construction. The Parks Impact Fee rates to be
imposed commencing October 2, 2006 are as follows:

Single-Family House $741.22 per Dwelling Unit
Multi-Family Dwelling Unit $610.06 per Dwelling Unit
Mobile Home $750.37 per Dwelling Unit
The EMS Impact Fee rates shall be imposed upon all Emergency Medical System
Impact Construction occurring within the County, including the unincorporated area
and the incorporated area of the municipalities therein, and shall be collected prior
to issuance of a building permit for such construction. The EMS Impact Fee rates to
be imposed commencing October 2, 2006 are as follows:
Residential $ 153.18 per Dwelling Unit
Commercial $ 0.39 per Square Foot
Industrial $ 0.39 per Square Foot
Institutional $ 0.78 per Square Foot
The Fire Impact Fee rates shall be imposed upon all Fire Protection Impact Construc-
tion occurring within the County, both within the unincorporated area and within the
municipal boundaries of any municipality that has consented to the imposition of Fire
Protection Impact Fees and which participates in the County Fire Protection System
and shall be collected prior to issuance of a building-permit for such construction.
The Fire Impact Fee rates to be imposed commencing October 2, 2006 are as fol-
lows:


Residential


Non-Residential


$88.32 Per Dwelling Unit

$ 0.14 Per Square Foot


The Corrections Impact Fee rates shall be imposed upon all Residential Construction
occurring within the County, including the unincorporated area and the incorporated
area of the municipalities therein, and shall be collected prior to issuance of a build-
ing permit for such construction. The Corrections Impact Fee rates to be imposed
commencing October 2, 2006 are as follows:


Single-Family House $134.38
Multi-Family Dwelling Unit $110.60
Mobile Home $136.04


DATED THIS 10th day of August, 2006.


Meic Bac CpeSan.Bia be*l- Apalahicol
71 iW 984hsq: *:~. 4288 Cpe Sn iasRd 63 veueA W-45Avn-
(80)4-11 (850)227-1010 (850)697-1010 (850)653-ll1010ii
1 w .cbogotec astcm


GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Carmen L. McLemore, Chair


Publish: August 10,2006 .Ad


per Dwelling Unit
per Dwelling Unit
per Dwelling Unit


- I-`~-~"--~ --- -~-~------~


~- ~ C~i~~~iS5 "~ PMi~' -


Established 7937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


2CTh Sar PrtS. oe F -Thrsa, ugst10 20


'J ,. .- I


Ad #2006-095


Publish: August 10, 2006


I-I-~ Ni






L.3IUUtJ(I1CeU I O',7 3 ,erin,-g OiT -C-rfil+ rindli ur U-.d r f 6 T- w r o t


Gallagher: Cabinet Vote Brings Much-needed Insurance Relief To Floridians


Tom Gallagher, Florida's
chief financial officer,
applauded today's decision
by the Governor and Cabinet
to approve reactivating
the Commercial Joint
Underwriting Association
(JUA). The JUA will provide
property insurance coverage
to Florida's business owners
who have been unable
to secure it from private
companies. Gallagher
recommended the JUA as a
short-term solution last week
in a letter to Governor Bush.
"Eight storms inflicting
$38 billion in insured losses
have created a crisis in
Florida's property insurance


market, and our state's
homeowners and business
owners are being held hostage
as a result," said Gallagher.
"The solution I recommended
and we approved today will
help provide basic coverage
to Florida employers who
employ thousands of
hardworking citizens and
serve as the backbone of our
economy. There are some
real opportunities to provide
further relief for Floridians,
and fighting for homeowners
remains my number one
priority."
Since the hurricanes of
2004,Tom Gallagherhas made
several recommendations to


the Cabinet and Legislature
which have provided relief
to Florida's homeowners,
including the elimination
of the double-deductible,
the creation of a simplified
insurance policy checklist,
and the approval of $715
million dollars in insurance
rate-relief to Floridians which
eliminated a 20% percent
surcharge on homeowners
insurance bills this summer.
Gallagher, who serves
on the Cabinet, also
recommended last week that
a working group comprised
of representatives from the
Governor's Office, Florida
Senate and House of


Representatives, Department
of Financial Services, State
Board of Administration
and the Office of Insurance
Regulation explore lowering
the threshold of the Florida
Hurricane Catastrophe (CAT)
Fund from $5.2 billion to
$3 billion. The Catastrophe
Fund provides reinsurance to
insurance companies.
Gallagher said the
Catastrophe Fund has proven
to be a critical tool to Florida's
economy and cited in today's
Cabinet meeting that the fund
saves homeowners living in
a $150,000 home in Miami
as much as $3,100 annually.
He said that for homeowners


VISIT FLORIDA unveils web site for Floridians


Tallahassee, Fla. VISIT
FLORIDA, the state's official
source for travel planning,
has launched a web site
dedicated to the unique
travel appetites of Florida
residents http://floridians.
VISITFLORIDA.com.
"Given this audience's
unique perspective on the
state, the content of the
web site is presented from a
Floridian's point of view," said
Dale Brill, chief marketing
officer for VISIT FLORIDA.


"The new web site enables
residents to consider their
Florida vacation options by
proximity to starting point,
by destination and activity/
interest."
Unlike Florida's many
visitors from other states or
overseas, Florida residents
take more frequent, albeit
shorter trips and can more
easily respond to quick
getaway ideas and short-
term deals. In 2005, 13.3
million Floridians took


an overnight person-trip
within the state. This web
site responds to their needs
with professionally written
getaway features offering
quick planning information
and short content. The
quick reads include top
area attractions, best kept
sightseeing secrets, shopping,
great places to stay, play and
eat whether a hotspot or off
the beaten path.
The web site deepens its
Florida "voice" by welcoming


the input, experiences
and ideas of the Florida
community and is currently
collecting responses through
Share Your Favorite Florida
Vacation Getaway Memory
section. Resident feedbackwill
continue to be incorporated
alongside the professionally-
written getaway ideas to help
residents "see the state they
are in."


Boyd Holds District Healthcare Council Meeting


Congressman Allen Boyd
(D.-North Florida) this week
.hosted a meeting with the
,District Healthcare Council
to discuss local healthcare
issues and concerns, including
federal appropriations
requests and rural
hospitals in North Florida.
The District Healthcare
Council is comprised of
24 representatives from
16 counties across North
Florida.
"Access to quality,
affordable healthcare is a
critical part of American life,"
said Congressman Boyd.
"Although much more needs


to be done in Washington,
there is more that we can
do at home as well. It is
my hope that the District
Healthcare Council will start
thinking regionally, so the
counties can come together
and pool their resources to
improve the overall quality of
healthcare in North Florida."
I At this week's meeting,
Congressman Boyd had two
main objectives for the District
Healthcare Council. The first
objective was for the council
to focus on regionalized
problem solving. Up to this
point, the Congressman
had asked the counties to


focus on their individual
concerns. However, at this
meeting, Congressman Boyd
encouraged members of the
District Healthcare Council
to consider the healthcare
concerns of surrounding
counties as well. The second
objective was to push the
counties to work more closely
with the business community
and state and local agencies
and make them active
participants in achieving the
healthcare goals of North
Florida.
Congressman Boyd
formed the District
Healthcare Council in 2005


to tackle healthcare issues
locally. Each county was
given the task of choosing a
representative to serve on the
District Healthcare Council.
Representing Gulf County are
County Commissioner Bill
Williams and Gulf County
Public Health Officer Doug
Kent.
"The District Healthcare
Council assembles people
from all different professions
and points of view so that the
discussions and solutions
will be comprehensive and
representative of our unique
district," Boyd stated. "By
bringing the district together,
we can better serve the
healthcare needs of North
Floridians."


in Hillsborough or Escambia
County, the savings are as
much as $500 a year.
Gallagher said these
savings are possible because
insurance companies 'pay
70 cents for every $1 of
reinsurance in the worldwide
market but pay less than a
dime for that same coverage
through our Catastrophe
Fund. In addition, Gallagher
said thatwhen Floridainsurers
purchase reinsurance on
the worldwide market, the
money is gone even when no
storms come. When those
same insurers buy it through


the Catastrophe Fund, that
money stays in Florida and
builds to pay future storm
claims.
Gallagher said if a
consensus is reached by
the working group making
changes to the CAT fund,
then he recommends that the
governor call for a special
session.
"The sooner we put
additional solutions in place,
the sooner we will be able to
stabilize insurance rates and
provide desperately needed
coverage to homeowners,"
Gallagher said.


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UNDER GOD'S CONTROL



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SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER, DISTRICT 5


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Port St. Joe
528 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd.
850-227-3370

Free gift offer good from 8/9/06-10/31/06. Free gift will be given out at account opening. Only one gift per household or business.
Substitutes'or rain checks on free gift will be offered as needed. To obtain the free gift, a $300 minimum opening deposit is required. A
choice of one of the following free gifts is available: a seat cushion, a 3-piece barbeque grilling set, or a 12-pack insulated cooler. For
account opening deposits greater than $5,000, a choice of 2 gifts will be offered. This special offer is not available for IRAs, public funds,
brokerages, or financial institutions.
Member FDIC


850-227-7770

800-584-1566


110 Barrier Dunes
Cape San Bias, FL

850-227-3200

800-713-9695


850-227-7775

800-581-2910


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TheSta, Prt t.Joe FL- Tursay Auust10,200 -3C


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Interview Opportunities Available




Top Ten Tips for Preparing Your Finances


As the hurricane season
heats up, many people are
preparing their homes and
businesses for potential dam-
age.
But are they also protect-
ing their finances and impor-
tant financial records?
Michael Gilreath, a mem-
ber of the National Society
of Accountants located in
Gulfport, Mississippi, who last
year lost his home and office
to Hurricane Katrina, offers
this advice:

1. Take all your insur-


ance policies, tax returns,
mortgage papers, and other
important documents with you
when you evacuate. If you stay,
be sure that they are water
proof.
2. Call your insurance
company and the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) before you
even see the damage and log a
claim and obtain a claim num-
ber. Also consider that phones
may not be working well in a
disaster area, so be prepared
to be on hold.
3. Back up all your com-


puter data and take your com-
puter hard drive with you in
an evacuation if at all possible.
(Gilreath did not take his last
year and it was a nightmare
to get a new computer and
restore all the data.)
4. Be sure you are set up
for Internet banking. You can
do your banking in another
city where you have Internet
access. When you return to
the disaster area,,all the banks
will have long waits and lim-
ited information.
5. You will need cash,
and banks will only allow a


limited amount of money to
be withdrawn per day, so plan
ahead.
6. Make sure you have
enough cash or money that is
easily accessible to last you for
at least 45 days.
7. Remember, everything
you do will take at least three
to four times longer. It is very
frustrating, you will not get
mail for days and then only a
little at a time.
8. Ask your mortgage
company for a moratorium
on your note payment. (Every
creditor Gilreath asked was


happy to work with him on
any kind of late charges and
late payments, but you have to
ask.)
9. Sign up for any assis-
tance that is being offered dur-
ing your "downtime," but ask
for it only if you sustained
substantial losses. A great
deal of fraud took place after
Katrina. Some people who got
FEMA checks only lost freezer
food and ,some people who
lost everything did not get a
cent. Even in a disaster, your
integrity should still matter.
10. Consider the conse-


quences of basic services in
your community being down
for an extended period of time.
Even if you can move back
into your house, you may not
be able to obtain necessary
services.
For more information
about the National Society of
Accountants and to find an
accountant who can assist
with financial issues, visit
www.nsacctg.org or call 800-
966-6679.


Hurricane Season 2006: Dry Ice A "Must Have" To Prevent Food Spoilage


Dry ice is an absolute
"must have" for keeping per-
ishable items cold for as long
as a week in the event of a
power outage caused by hurri-
canes and other major storms,
according to leading govern-
ment agencies.
The Federal Emergency
Management Agency (FEMA),
the U.S. Center for Disease
Control and Prevention, the
U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services, the U.S. Food
and Drug Administration,
and the U.S. Department of
Agriculture all cite dry ice as
a vital supply in the event of a
power outage.
Once only available direct-
ly from manufacturers, dry
ice is now readily available in
many grocery stores across
the country. Airgas Dry Ice,
the nation's largest manufac-
turer of dry ice, also sells its
Penguin Brand(r) Dry Ice in
over 4,500 stores nationwide
in convenient packages for


consumer use.
Dry ice, the solid form
of carbon dioxide, removes
almost twice as much heat
per pound as water ice and
has the added advantage of
changing directly from a solid
to a gas without ever becom-
ing a liquid hence the term
"dry ice."
In the aftermath of a
storm, dry ice is also one of
the first supplies that emer-
gency services organizations
distribute, along with food and
water.
"With our national net-
work of production plants, we
are able to send emergency
dry ice to areas affected by
hurricanes or severe storms,"
said Phil Filer, president of
Airgas Carbonic and Dry Ice,
based in Duluth, GA. "With
no electricity and no access
to fresh food, dry ice is a way
to keep foods from spoiling.
As we've all seen from last
year's hurricanes, getting food


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to hurricane victims is a huge
problem."
Filer added, "With Penguin
Brand Dry Ice available in
many grocery stores, families
can take the necessary steps to
insure that food is preserved
before the storm strikes, sim-
ply by going to the nearest
supermarket."
Airgas recommends pur-
chasing dry ice one day before
the storm arrives and stor-
ing the dry ice, wrapped in a
towel, in an insulated cooler
until ready to use. Do not
store dry ice in a working
mechanical freezer. During a
power outage, place approxi-
mately 25 lbs. of dry ice on
the top shelf of the freezer to
keep foods frozen for up to,
four days. Place the same
quantity of dry ice in the lower
part of the refrigerator to keep
foods cold. A list of locations
that. carry Penguin Brand Dry
Ice is available by calling 877-
PENGUIN or visiting www.pen-


guinbrand.com.
Filer added that having
dry ice on hand ahead of the
storm also might help during
mandatory evacuations. 'As
we saw in last year's hurri-
canes, streets and highways
can become virtual parking
lots. Evacuees can prepare by
packing a cooler with essential
food items and dry ice before
leaving their homes.".
In a cooler, wrap dry ice
in a towel or newspaper and
place on top of items to be
kept frozen and below items
to be kept cool. Do not allow
bottles or cans to come in
direct contact with dry ice.
Depending on how often the
cooler is opened, contents will
stay cold for three to four
days.
Airgas' Charlie Orr, direc-
tor of'sales for Penguin Brand
Dry Ice, offers these sugges-
tions and tips when using dry
ice:


S. ..


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S *.- Homeowners Insurance
Mobile Home Insurance
g Automotive Insurance
-- Health Insurance

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j2U


Always use gloves or a
towel to handle dry ice. Do
not touch dry ice as it may
cause severe burns.
Do not use in an operat-
ing refrigerator or freezer.
Never put a block of
dry ice on a glass shelf, the
cold might break or crack the
shelf.
When using dry ice in
a non-operating freezer, use
one-and-a-half pounds of dry
ice per cubic foot of space.
To prolong the life of dry
ice, do not open and close the
refrigerator door frequently.
When packing items with
dry ice, always keep frozen
items below the block of ice
and cold items on top.
Do not allow cans or
bottles to come in direct con-
tact with dry ice.
To dispose of unused dry
ice, use suitable hand protec-
tion, place unused dry ice into
an uncovered, durable plastic


or metal container, and allow
it to sublimate/evaporate in a
secure, well-ventilated area.
Do not use or store in
unventilated spaces. As dry
ice sublimates, it releases car-
bon dioxide gas, which may
cause suffocation.
KEEP OUT OF REACH
OF CHILDREN.
About Penguin Brand (r)
Dry Ice
Penguin Brand Dry Ice is
the largest retail dry ice pro-
gram in the U.S. and is sold
in over 4,500 grocery stores,
such as Albertson's, Publix,
Kroger, Winn Dixie, Harris
Teeter, Safeway, Wal-Mart and
more. Call 877-PENGUIN for
a store near you or visit www.
penguinbrand.com. Penguin
Brand Dry Ice is manufactured
and distributed by Airgas Dry
Ice, one of the operating com-
panies within Airgas.


1LrfJIrfi~bE1IT


FULxIm.1,


:J; ".1- ,M -.

,,,,.-***y -, y- ,

.n -'


Florist & Gift Shop

. (850) 227-3814 or (850) 209-2817
200-B Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe


Affordable homes built on your land.





.,1' '':-1



. 2 .. -', ,
;.".-;..': './:, I j


(old .Arrd's Building)
Hours:NIl-F 9:00() a.m. 5:00p.m. .
Saturday- 9:00 until
mida Harrison & Johanna flite


12IONX. AanzaPB-5BO~iS~:$~L~


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


dCThe Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAust1,20


.. .... .... I .......... I .. .... i#






The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 10, 2006 5(


Peer into most any wood- instant grn
land setting as you're whizzing visibly fror
by at highway speed, and one and flower
group of botanical marvels that they are pl
make themselves obvious are I don't
vines. We can replace that old to be low
saying "you can't see the forest are the C
for the trees" with "you can't see family: TI
the trees for the vines". Vines and pruned
are covering our world. Here on you want
the Forgotten Coast we see wild you prune
grapes, smilax, morning glory, grow. I wa
and poison ivy, all native to this of removing
area, as well as enough non- mine vines
native skunk vine, air potato, taken over
and Chinese wisteria. In the of a local
wild, these vines can provide plants turn
'fire ladders' up into the cano- down, s
pies of trees, many of which truck load
have already died because the day of lab
blanket of vines have suffocated cut it all a
them. These plan
Talk about survival of the under the
fittest. This, from a plant that windows,
can't even support itself with little tendr:
its own stem! Vines have all inside the
kinds of tricks to help them get over th
climb towards the sun. Some of those tv
have twining stems that wind in I caution
one direction, and one direction plant a Co:
only. Don't even bother trying any woody
to get them to wind in the other the structu
direction, it ain't gonna happen. not event
Others have tendrils that reach by the weigh
out and 'grab' whatever is close Decidi
by, whether it's the support of cut back
choice, another plant, or the they don't
tail of a sleeping cat. Still oth- dead stem
ers secrete a glue-like substance do this is
that sticks them to surfaces. next best t
These vines get a bad reputation get around
by marring painted surfaces. need to be
In the garden, though, take over
vines are our friends. They are and again
touted every month in garden- the neighbor
ing magazines as the perfect those of us
solution for providing vertical in the gard
interest to fences, walls, posts, the garden
-trellises, mailboxes, and .pretty which say"
'much any structure that will maintain f
,stand still long enough for us to growth". R
plant something next to it. For On the
,the most part, vines are hardy, hide things
rampant plants that provide us see junked


Sterling Realty Opens New Destin Office


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ification by growing down houses out in rural areas
one day to the next, anymore, we see nice smooth
ng the same season blankets of green kudzu cover-
nted. ing it all up.
consider many vines Studies suggest that the
maintenance. They problems associated with vines
tch-22 of the plant in our forests, problems such
y need to be trained as dead trees and fire hazards,
to keep them where are getting worse. One effect
hem, and the more of global warming has been to
hem, the more they increase the range of noxious
s once given the job vines. Kudzu, to speak of our
two confederate jas- ultimate noxious vine, has now
hat had pretty much grown all the way up into New
he second story deck York. Fifteen years ago, cold
beach house. Two winters kept it contained south
d into two stomped- of Washington, D.C. And poison
illing-out-the-sides ivy, my personal favorite, has
of vine. One full been discovered by one Duke
r for two people to University researcher to grow at
ay from the railings, two and a half times its normal
s were even growing rate when exposed to increased
molding around the levels of carbon dioxide. That
id I could see their increase was five times that of
s waving at me from the growth increase for the pine
house. I still can't trees the vines were growing
volume and weight on, and the exposed poison ivy
Plants. Therefore became 'far more' allergenic to
iyone who wants to humans. Great.
federate jasmine, or Will vines take over the
vine, to make sure world someday? It is a ques-
e will support it, and tion that is being asked and
lly be pulled down researched around the planet.
t. It conjures up images of the
)us vines need to be Audrey II in the movie Little
ard periodically so Shop of Horrors (Fee-e-e-ed
urn into masses of me, Seymour!) While I seri-
The best time to ously doubt it, the question does
ate winter, but the remind me of the responsibili-
me is whenever you ties we as gardeners have when
to it. Woody vines inviting new plants into the
-ut back before they garden. Thanks to the inter-
he neighbor's yard, net, and global shipping, we
before they take over now have access to new plants
's yard, and again... from all over the world. We
who work with vines need to remember to keep these
n snicker a little at within the boundaries of our
ig magazine articles own property, and if -we see a
rune occasionally to problem developing, we need to
Iness and compact mip it in the bud, so to speak.
Oht. Remember, once upon a time,
theirr hand, vines do someone thought kudzu was a
really well. We don't good idea!
out cars and falling


Community leaders and
top local real estate agents
attend as Sterling Realty
unveils their state-of-the-art
office
DESTIN, Fla. Aug. 3,
2006 More than 100 people
attended the grand opening
festivities and ribbon cutting
ceremony for the new Sterling
Realty (www.sterlingrealty-
sales.com) office on Tuesday,
August 1. The event took place
at the new 36086 Emerald
Coast Parkway location in
Destin. Attendees included
Destin Chamber of Commerce
President, Shane Moody,
Sterling Companies Founder
and Managing Partner, Buddy
Runnels, Sterling Companies
Chief Executive Officer, Jim
Olin and Sterling Companies
President and Chief Operating
Officer, Garrett McNeil.
The new Sterling Realty
office is the base of operations
for more than 50 agents serv-
ing buyers and sellers seeking
real estate across the Emerald
Coast. Additionally, the office
features many state-of-the-art
technologies, including a pre-
sentation suite that allows buy-
ers the opportunity to take vir-
tual tours of MLS listings and
Sterling Companies projects
without leaving the comfort of
the Sterling Realty office.
"We're extremely proud of
Sterling Realty's long-stand-
ing tradition as an industry
leader in the Emerald Coast
real estate community," said
Garrett McNeil, Sterling's
president and COO. "The
new office further enhances
our agents' ability to provide
the highest level of service for
those buying and selling real
estate in Northwest Florida."


L to R Sterling Companies CEO, Jim Olin, Sterling Companies
Founder and Managing Partner, Buddy Runnels, Sterling Companies
Chief Operating Officer, Garrett McNeil and Sterling Reality Vice
President of Sales, Penny Worley.


For more informa-
tion on Sterling Realty call
1.800.837.5080 or visit www.
sterlingrealtysales.com.

ABOUT STERLING
REALTY:
Sterling Realty LLC (www.
sterlingrealtysales.com), for-
merly known as Real Estate
International, Inc. (REII), is one
of the oldest real-estate com-
panies on Florida's Emerald
Coast, and having sold more
than $500 million in real estate
on the Gulf Coast in 2005,
also is among the largest. The
company oversees the sales
of commercial, residential
and general real-estate prop-
erties in Northwest Florida.
It also acts as a "real estate
sales arm" for its sister com-
pany, Sterling Development,
enabling Sterling Realty cus-
tomers to have the first oppor-
tunity to take advantage of pre-
construction resort real estate
opportunities.


ABOUT THE STERLING
COMPANIES:
The Sterling Companies,
consisting of Sterling
Development, Sterling Realty
and Sterling Resorts, is
Northwest Florida's only fully
integrated, full-service resort
development, sales and man-
agement firm.
From resort development
and real estate sales to vacation
home rental and homeowner
association management, The
Sterling Companies provide
a full range of services for
luxury resorts, condominiums
and vacation homes located
throughout Northwest Florida,
Alabama and Mississippi:
Headquartered in Destin,
Fla., The Sterling Companies
employ more than 650 people
and is projecting combined
2006 annual revenues in
excess of $600 million. For
more information, visit www.
TheSterlingCo.com.


1.-.....;-* *..* 6*-.. :t.- ...Y*.- '.. *

WEWA MEDICAL CENTER

Dr. Peter H. Obesso, VD

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Pelican Real Estate
171 Highway 98, Suite D
Eastpoint, FL 32328
rPelican'1 (850)670-8886
r, '.... II www.pelicanproperty.com


2006

Hurricane

Names

Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William



Lightning Kills!


When a storm ap-
proaches, and lightning
is present:

-Stay away from
open high ground and
isolated trees.
-Stay away from wa-
ter, including lakes and
-rivers. Stay off the beach
arid out of boats.
S- :-Do not seek shelter
,in a convertible car or"
golf cart. -
-Stay away from
doors, windows and all
metal objects. including
pipes and faucets.,
-Stay off codedd telIei
phones and a'iayifrom
all electric .-dices.


.\A"MUST SEE" 4BR. '.BA Be .I-:.
f, .- i r .:.n g. o.:,rie .r .:.,.il e s.. oftlie
Gulf of Mexico, completely land-
scaped and irrigated yard with 2
car garage and Golf cart garage.
MLS # 109905.......... $1,995,000


PICTURESQUE Lakefront lot
located in Carrabelle. Build your
dream home.
MLS # 111645............. $189,000


RED HILLS

2006 Southern Living and Progressive Farmer


IDEA HOUSE & FARMSTEAD


Ever imagined living on your own farm? Now you can, just
eight miles from downtown Tallahassee in a place where life:
is not governed by a clock, but by the sun, the moon and the


p,,,,, I Ck. ,,.Ii
Dst y CiyBa...h
WhiteFence Farms
O


changes in seasons.Visit the extraordinary Idea House & Farmstead and see
what it's like to live at WhiteFence Farms a Florida address for all seasons.

The Idea House & Farmstead is located at 3400 Williams Road, Tallahassee, FL 32311.


Open House June 10 October 1 | 11 am to 5 pm Wed. Sat. and 1 to 5 pm on Sun.
Admission is $5, children under 12 are admitted at no charge.
For more information call 1.888.253.3223 or visit JOE.com I Keyword: Idea House


For WhiteFence Farms Real Estate Information Call 866JOE.LAND.
.-J
Tallahassee Memorial A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Tallahassee MemorialAuxiliary.
Auxiliary

IF YOU DON'T KNOW JOE, YOU DON'T KNOW FLORIDA. STJOE

1__ I 2006The St Joe Company."JOE,""StJoe"'WhiteFence Farms" and the 'Taking eight" designs are service marks ofThe St Joe Company The information
shown, attached or contained herein is believed accurate but is not warranted or guaranteed, is subject to errors, omissions and changes without notice
and should be independently verified.The availability and pricing of St Joe property (through any of its affiliates or subsidiaries) is also subjectto change JOE
withoutnotice. Access to this property is prohibited without the express consent of St Joe or its agent. Void where prohibited by law. Equal Housing Opportunity.
"Southernm Living" is a registered trademark of Southern Living, Inc."Progressive Farmer' is a registered trademark of Progressive Farmer, Inc.Tour dates and hours
are subject to change without notice.


' TWnDma UIIJ Jl. lo ULlLcateu il ,
Carrabelle with partial bayview.
Close to boat launch.
MLS # 108803............ $95,000






*- .. _



QUIET well situated lot located in
new subdivision in Mexico Beach.
Close proximity to gorgeous beach.
Includes community pool & pool
house.
MLS #108537.......... $269,000



%rrM'


GREAT 1st tier lot with won-
derful Gulfview located on St.
George Island. Build your dream
home without the expense of
clearing an existing structure.
Ready for construction.
MLS # 108514......... $995,000









GORGEOUS Beachfront lot 16o- ,
cated in Indian Pass. Build your
dream home and enjoy the beauti-
ful sunsets. Lagoon access.
MLS #110685.............. $925,000









BEAUTIFUL 2BR/2BA Beachview
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This home has a wonderful view of
the Gulf of Mexico.
MLS # 109465............. $750,000


OJlJE'I AV5V.".X LU Ios15 Ut iULUI
4BR/3BA home located in Cape
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Mexico. Covered decks, access to
deeded beach.
MLS #110213........... $1,100,000


SPECTACULAR 5BR/5.5BA SENSATIONAL 2BR/2.5BA
Beachfront home located on St. Beachview home located in
George Island in the exclusive St. Money Bayou. Remarkable view
George Plantation. Two large cov- of the Gulf of Mexico with many
ered decks, private pool, outdoor amenities.
shower and many more amenities. MLS # 200569............. $750,000
MLS # 200909........... $2,249,000
r LEADING REAL ESTATE
C COMPANIES /-THE WORLD'


'1 c4. -.. At


KEITH L. JONES, CPA
-:- H] A( 'DI IACCCLINT[ING ITAX & ,DONSULIlI .G SEt,'/iCES




America Counts on CPAs

411 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850-229-1040 PH 850-229-1050 FX
keith@keithjonescpa.com r www.keithjonescpa.com
MEMBER: AMERICAN AND FLORIDA INSTITUTES OF CPA'S


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years






STL.- C-- D qf t 1 p FL- T rr A0Eaise 13 Srvn Guinnct 10a 006


FSU Professor Documents How Rising


Gas Prices Effect Wallets, Psyches


The price of gas has
doubled over the past three
years, hovering around $3
a gallon nationally. Wayne
Hochwarter, an associate pro-
fessor of management in the
College of Business at Florida
State University, recently con-
ducted research to determine
how increased gas prices have
affected personal finance, as
well as behavior at work. More
than 300 employees across a
wide range of occupations were
surveyed.
"I was surprised to see how
strongly gas prices affected per-
sonal finances," Hochwarter
said. "We casually talk about


the effects of gas prices but we
really haven't gotten a handle
on how it affects every spend-
ing. We also haven't determined
what role employers have in
terms of helping employees
manage the stress that comes
with spiraling gas prices."
Findings from Hochwarter's
study indicated that most peo-
ple have had to make drastic
changes in the way they spend
money. For example:
*60 percent of respon-
dents have to rethink the way
they spend money.
41 percent have paid off
debt more slowly.
*43 percent have cut back


on recreational activities.
*25 percent have gone
without basic necessities (food,
heat, etc.).
*44 percent are worried
about how they are going to
make ends meet.
"What was surprising
was how changes in personal
finance affected behavior at
work," Hochwarter said.
Changes in personal
finance were associated with
lower levels of job perfor-
mance, less enthusiasm, less
willingness to help others,
fewer positive feelings about
the organization, higher levels
of depression and an increased


. Neubauer Real Estate, Inc.
ERA Always There For You.s" Each Office Independently Owned and Operated.


-EENi


3557 Cape San Bias
$I1.4'l9. '11 AMAZING CAPE
B N BI \S GULF FRONT
H(RIE 4BR/4.5BA home fea-
L.lin.. in'.an and an eat-in-kitchen
I' 'ihrLl.kfa.1 bar. Covered park-
,lr> ... inu lur 4, heated pool, several
Iim i= h)al)c.nii(. 2 large covered decks
ugull it".. #1f1430

2911 Garrison Ave.
$310.l00) ENJOY STYLE
AND SPACE IN PORT ST.
JOE 3BR/2B\ home fea-
tures LIR'DR combination
i/rece-sed liIhtingh fam-
I room ,'huitt-ins, Florida
ro>m and large kitchen
t/breakra.t room. 2 car
garage, covered patio, irri-
galtion ,ell and fenced yard.
: Large lot. #111166
S1,099,000-GulfontBeachHouseC30-A-3BR/3BA.#200758
S895,000 BayGetw-awialwh iSedis n-3BR/2BA.#111659
S775,000-Canal tMexico BchH-3BR/3BA- #200761
S74000-GulfVwCustanC-30AHamce-2BR/2BA #201134
S725,000-VilaDdSol-New GatedCmmunity.#2597,#200598
S599,000-BeaonHilGulfViewTownHame-3BR2BA-#111342
S399,000-GiEatBuildingLotwithCanalA s- #201083
S395,000-SuperSieBayRT tLontaoEastBay- #200757
S345,000-CkotDMexicoBeachandPier-2BR/15BA-#109522
$295,000--ItStJoeHomeClsetoTown-3BR/1BA---#110492
1 420 Reid Ae., Port St. Ji
htopllwW.floridlcom (850,)29-92
e,iail relocifog@efaflorila.com T,, frr..s 1-1-476-


024,90-Beacadilotin(
S2(AOO0-W= JYm
S250,00- atkinB
S245,00-eBmdiHo
S234,90-VacantLotinNe
S199,000-BuigdinBeulif
S159,Ml-GC~atM&o"%
S74,90-[*AkieLotinN)
S5,750-FoirCacrMflWoo


8414 Tradewinds Dr
$hJ').nI' il FR \[E BEAUTY
\ ITH GLI.F VIEWS -
4HR 2.5B1\ linIm in desirable
Gull \iir ..bdi'i.ion has LR/DR
conibin.ili.i, kilih.hn w/breakfast
bar and rni-rt. Parking for 4, cov-
ered dtLk & hdklc.ny, hurricane
,hutk r"i. prinkltr system and
e r.ili iull', land.LJped. #201261

2150 Ma sachusetts Ave.
$271.1i.1Ti CSTORM BUILT
\\ ITH \\ATERVIEW IN
LAN RK 3BR,'2B\ has liv-
ing.'dining comhinatiion, laun-
dry room and uell-tquipped
kitchen. Privac Ifenced yard
landscaping, sprinkler system
and more. 20)103
3ratSubdMivcn .#110700
etoMexicoBeach-2BR/IBA-#10Y724
acaI-ll #16M,#1W4
Joe a2Lots-3BR/2BA #110898
mexin Cca' Lot-3BR/2BA #200661
wSubdiviacn #110748
lMeicoBeach #200479
achBuilingILt #200480
Vewahi tdka #111700
xdedisAvailable #200262



oe 32456 ,1-888-591-8751 I
10. ...
6382 .


sensitivity to minor irritants at
work.
"It is clear that the price
of gas has caused significantly
more stress at home which
is carried over to opinions of
work," Hochwarter said.
The stress caused by
increased gas prices may be
increased by employers' fail-
ure to recognize the problem.
The vast majority of employ-
ees (92 percent) indicated that
their company has failed to
even acknowledge that a prob-
lem exists, while 30 percent
of employees felt that employ-
ers should do something -to
help. When asked, employees
indicated that their company
should offer financial sup-
port. On average, employees
felt that a $30 a week sub-
sidy would reduce much of
the stress caused by high gas
prices.
Interestingly, more than
one-third (35 percent) of
employees indicated that they
would change jobs with com-
parable pay and responsibil-
ity if some form of assistance
was offered. Finally, only 15
percent of employees felt that
the price of gas would affect
company profitability.
"Certainly, there are
things that organizations can
do to help," Hochwarter noted.
"Subsidizing employees for
their travel is problematic for a
number of reasons. However,
companies can help by devel-
oping carpool programs and
offering tips on how to maxi-
mize gas mileage. Companies
may also find allowing employ-
ees to telecommute may alle-
viate much of the financial
strain."
Finally, Hochwarter found
that employees who were
affected the most were more
likely to report that their com-
pany was unsympathetic to
the problem.
"Acknowledging the diffi-
culties associated with high
gas prices is important," he
said. "So is communicating
how gas prices affect the com-
pany's bottom line."


Bronson Reminds


College-Bound


Students to Understand


Landlord-Tenant When


Obtaining Housing
Florida Agriculture However, tenants have
and Consumer Services responsibilities as well. The
Commissioner Charles H. law says they must also
Bronson is urging students, comply housing and health
their parents, and other who codes, keep the unit clean
may be renting apartments and sanitary, not destroy
or houses at the end of the or damage any part of the
summer to review their premises, not act in a man-
rights and responsibilities ner which disturbs the ten-
as tenants. Many college- ant's neighbors, and remove,
bound students will be rent- garbage from the dwelling.
ing for the first time this fall Bronson says one of th'
and Bronson says they can biggest problems involves'
avoid the pitfalls if they do multiple names on a lease,,
some research in advance, a common practice with col-
"Many college students lege students. If any of the,
and their parents are focus- tenants leave, the others will
ing on getting settled and be held liable for his or her'
may not pay enough atten- portion of the rent. In addi-,
tion to the details of the tion, if a renter has room-,
lease," Bronson said. "But mates who are not on the'
that may end up costing lease, the renter is liable for,
them and creating head- the entire amount.
aches down the road. It is Chapter 83 of the Florida'
much better to know exactly Statutes tells exactly what'
what you are getting into can be done if wither party,
before signing a lease." does not comply with the'
First and foremost, peo- requirements. The law spells
pie need to know there is out when rent can be with-'
no grace period for cancel- held, under what conditions:
ing a lease so they need a tenant can be evicted, aind
to understand all the terms requires that notices to and,
of the contract before they from a landlord must be in',
sign. A prospective renter writing. There are also spe-'
should walk through the cific time periods established
premises to identify any pre- to resolve complaints. 1
existing damages or prob- The Department has a
lems that should be fixed, detailed brochure on the
taking pictures and making landlord-tenant law on,
notes of any questionable its Division of Consumer'
conditions. They should be Services web site at,
sure an agreement to fix any www.800helpfla.com under
problems is spelled out in "Publications,", or consum-'
the lease. State law requires ers can request a brochure
that the landlord comply by calling the Department's,
with housing and health Consumer Hotline at 1 (800),
codes, keep the unit in good HELPFLA (1-800-435-7352),;,
repair, and keep the plumb-
ing in good working order.


wehaeth nse


:W/ Vith faster connections
;and downloads, the'-

/ studernit .iyour'house can,
Accelerate through sch'd61

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va ew*- .- .1-


Ot I he Mar, rorT w. joe, rL i nursauy, /-%Uyubl IV, VVV


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years'


c


, ../ '.







cF-,-.l.-,hI;e 7107 crnninn r, ,f r- 1nfv nnrl csrrninclinn nreas for 68 years


Public











Notices


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA

IN RE: The Estate of
FLORENCE WYNELL
PRITCHARD,
CASE NO.:06-53PR
Decedent.
/

NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
Estate of FLORENCE WYNELL
PRITCHARD, File No. 06-53PR
is pending in the Circuit Court
of Gulf County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 1000 Fifth Street, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456. The name and
address of the Co-Personal
Representatives and the Co-
Personal Representatives' attor-.
ney are as set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this
Notice is served who have
objections that challenge the
qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of this Court, are
required to file their objections
with this Court within the lat-
ter of three (3) months after the
date of the first publication of
this Notice or thirty (30) days
after the date of service of a copy
of the Notice on them.
All creditors of the Decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against Decedent's
Estate on whom a copy of this
Notice is served, within three
(3) months after the date of the
first publication of this Notice
must file their claims with this
Court within the latter of three
(3) months after the date of the
first publication of this Notice or
thirty (30) days after the date of
service of a copy of this Notice
on them.
All creditors of the Decedent
and persons having claims or
demands against Decedent's
Estate must file their claims
with this Court within three (3)
months after the date of the first
publication of this Notice.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of the first pub-
lication of this Notice is July
20, 2006.
Co-Personal Representative:
Karen Rollins
230 South Duck Avenue
Wewahitchka, FL 32465

Co-Personal Representative:
Sandra Oltz
6302 Boatrace-Road
Panama City, FL 32404

Tiniothy J. McFarland, Esquire
P.O. Box 202
326 Reid'Avenue
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
FL1Bar No.: 0984868
(850) 227-3113
Attorney for Co-Personal
Representatives
Publish July 13, 20, August 3,
& 10 2006.

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
BID NO. 0506-27

ARCHITECT'S PROJECT NO.
0514

Separate sealed bids for the
construction of "Re-Roofing
and Repairs to the Gulf
County Courthouse, Port St.
Joe, Florida" will be received by
the Gulf County Commission in
fthe Gulf County Clerk's Office,
Room 148, 1000 Cecil G. Costin
Sr., Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456 until 5:00 p.m. E.S.T.
on Friday, August 18, 2006
and opened on the following
Monday at 10:00 a.m. at the
same place.
, The information for Bidders,
Form of Bid, Form of Contract,
Plans, Specifications, and Form
of Bid Bond, Performance and
Payment Bond, and other con-
tract documents may be exam-
ined at the following:
Donofro and Associates,
Architects
188 N. Foster St.
Dothan, Alabama 36303
334/793-3333

Gulf County Clerk ,
1000 Cecil Costin Blvd.,
Room 148
Port St. Joe, Fl 32456
850/229-6112

Bid Documents may be
obtained at'the office of Donofro
and Associates, Architects
located at 188 N. Foster Street,
Dothan, Alabama 36303.
General Contractors may obtain
two (2) sets for $100.00 (refund-,
atle), upon returning such
sets within 7 days and in good
condition. Subcontractors and
Suppliers may purchase sets for
$50.00 non-refundable by con-
tacting Architect's office.
The Scope of Work includes
re-roofing the 22,114/SF
Courthouse and the 13,591/SF
Jail Facility with standing seam
metal retrofit systems. The
project also includes removal
of the .existing built up roof
system, installing new windows,
and new veneer on the exterior
walls.
Bids \ must be submitted
qn the proposal form furnished
vith the Bid Documents. All
Bidders must show evidence
of Florida State Contracting
License before bidding or the
bid will not be received or con-
sidered. The Bidders shall show
evidence by clearly displaying ,
his or her current license num-
ber on the outside of the sealed
envelope in which the proposal
is delivered.
The Owner reserves the
right to waive any informalities
or to reject any or all bids.
A Bid Bond payable to the
Owner in an amount not less
than five percent (5%) of the
amount of the bid, but in no
event more than $10,000.00
must accompany the Bidders'
proposal. Performance and
Payment Bonds, and evidence
of insurance required in the bid
documents will be required at
the signing of the contract.
Plans will be on file in
the Architect's office, the
Alabama AGC Internet Plan
Room, Montgomery, Alablama
(kdonaldson@isqft.com); F.
W. Dodge in Montgomery,
Alabama; Pensacola and
Tallahassee, Florida (McGraw-
Hill Construction Dodge Website
call 205/871-4772); and
Reed Construction Document


Processing Center, Norcross,
Georgia (www.reed bulletin.
comn).
No Bidder may withdraw
his bid within 30 days after
the actual date of the opening
thereof.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF.COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Carmen L. McLemore,
Chairman
Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris,
Clerk
Publish: August 3 & 10, 2006
Ad #2006-092

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED
BIDS
BID NO. 0506-28A & B

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners will
receive sealed bids from any
person, company or corpora-
tion interested in providing the
following:
A One (1) New V2 Ton Short
Wheel Base Pickup Truck
and
B One (1) New 2005 or 2006
Ford Supercab or Equivalent
4x4 Truck
Specifications may be
obtained from the Office of the
Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148,
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456,
(850) 229-6113. Any questions
regarding this bid should be
directed to Road Department
Superintendent Bobby Knee at
(850) 639-5068.
Please indicate on the enve-
lope YOUR COMPANY NAME,
that this is a SEALED BID, and
include the BID NUMBER.
Proposals must be submit-
ted to the Gulf County Clerk's
Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin,
Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456, by 5:00
p.m.,, E.T. on Friday, August
18,2006.
Bids will be opened at this
location on Monday, August
21,2006 at 10:00 a.m., E.T.
The Board reserves the right
to reject any and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: /s/ CARMEN L.
MCLEMORE, CHAIRMAN
ATTEST:
Isl REBECCA L. NORRIS,
CLERK
Publish: August 3 & 10, 2006
Ad #2006-093

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED
BIDS
BID NO. 0506-29A & B,

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners will
receive sealed bids from any
person, company or corpora-
tion interested in providing the,
following:
A One (1) 10' Single Wing
Mower
and
B One (1) 15' Double Wing
Moawer
Specifications may be
obtained from the Office of the
Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148,
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456,
(850) 229-6113. Any questions
regarding this bid should be
directed to Road Department
Superintendent Bobby Knee at
(850) 639-5068.
Please indicate on the enve-
lope YOUR COMPANY NAME,
that this is a SEALED BID, and
include the BID NUMBER.
Proposals must be submit-
ted to the Gulf, County Clerk's
Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin,
Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456, by 5:00
p.m., E.T. on Friday, August
18, 2006.
Bids will be opened at this
location on Monday, August 21,
2006 at 10:00 a.m., E.T.
The Board reserves the right'
to reject any and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA

BY: /s/ CARMEN L.
MCLEMORE, CHAIRMAN
ATTEST: .
Isl REBECCA L. NORRIS,.
CLERK
Publish: August 3 & 10, 2006
Ad #2006-094

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA ,

CASE NO.: 06-298-CA
GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA, a political subdivi-
sion of the State of Florida,

Plaintiff,
VALIDATION OF NOT
EXCEEDING $12,000,000
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
LIMITED AD VALOREM
TAXBONDS, SERIES 2006
(CAPE SAN BLAS BEACH
RENOURISHMENT
PROJECT-GULFSIDE
AND GULFSIDE
INTERIOR MSTUs

STATE OF FLORIDA and
the Taxpayers, Property
Owners and Citizens of Gulf
County, Florida, including
nonresidents owning prop- .
erty or subject to taxation
therein, and all others hav-
ing or claiming any right,
title or interest in prop-
erty to be affected by the
issuance by Plaintiff of the ,
Bonds, herein described, or
to be affected in any way .
thereby,
Defendants

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
TO THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
THROUGH THE STATE
ATTORNEY FOR THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
THE SEVERAL PROPERTY
OWNERS, .TAXPAYERS AND
CITIZENS OF GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA, INCLUDING
NONRESIDENTS OWNING
PROPERTY OR SUBJECT TO
TAXATION THEREIN, AND ;
ALL OTHERS HAVING OR
CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE
OR INTEREST IN PROPERTY
TO BE AFFECTED BY THE
ISSUANCE BY PLAINTIFF OF
BONDS HEREINAFTER MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED,
OR TO BE AFFECTED IN ANY
WAY THEREBY:
You and each of you are
hereby required to appear on'
the 29th day of August, 2006,
at Two o'clock p.m., before the
Circuit Court for the Fourteenth
Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf
County, Florida, at the Gulf


County Courthouse, in Port St.
Joe, Florida, and to show cause
why the Complaint filed in this
action should not be granted,
and the Bonds therein described
and the proceedings authorizing
the issuance thereof validated
and confirmed, said Bonds
being designated "Gulf County,
Florida Limited Ad Valorem
Tax Bonds, Series 2006 (Cape
San Blas Beach Renourishment
Project Gulfside and Gulfside
Interior MSTUs" in an aggregate
principal amount not to exceed
$12,000,000, a more particular
description of said Bonds being
contained in the Complaint filed
in this action.
This Order to Show Cause
shall be published in the man-
ner required by Section 75.06,
Florida Statutes, as amended,
in The Star, a newspaper pub-
lished and of general circula-
tions in Gulf County, Florida,
once each week for two con-
secutive weeks prior to the date
of the hearing set forth in the
preceding paragraph, the first
publication to be at least twenty
(20) days prior to said date.
DONE AND ORDERED
at Port St. Joe, Gulf County,
Florida, this 31st day of July,
2006.
/s/Fred N. Witten
Circuit Judge
Publish August 3 & 10, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY
CASE NO. 05-312CA
FREMONT INVESTMENT AND
LOAN,
Plaintiff, et. al.,
vs
ANTHONY LEE PETERSON
A/K/A ANTHONY LEE
PETERSON, JR., IF LIVING
AND IF DEAD, THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE, ET., AL.,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to a Final Judgement
of Foreclosure date February
7, 2006; and entered in Case
No. 05-321CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Fourteenth Judicial
Circuit in and for Gulf County,
Florida, wherein FREMONT
INVESTMENT AND LOAN, is'
a Plaintiff and ANTHONY LEE
PETERSON A/K/A ANTHONY
LEE PETERSON, JR., IF LIVING,
AND IF DEAD, THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER
PARTIES CLAIMING AN
INTEREST BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TANISHA
JAMES PETERSON; DAVID
TAUNTON; ABIGAIL TAUNTON;
UNKNOWN TENANT I1;
UNKNOWN TENANT 2 are the
Defendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
at 11:00 AM on August 24,
2006, the following described
property as set forth in said
Final Judgement, to wit:
LOT 25, OAK GARDENS
SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 21
PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk
As Clerk of the Court
/s/Jasmine Hysmith
As Deputy Clerk

August 10 & 17, 2006

LEGAL NOTICE
Public Meeting Notice and
Public Pre-election Test of
Vote Tabulating Equipment
The Gulf County Canvassing
Board will convene at the office
of The Gulf County Supervisor
of Elections located at 401 Long
Avenue, Port St. Joe, Florida at
10:00 a.m., Thursday, August
17, 2006. The board is conven-
ing for the pre-election testing
of tabulation equipment to be
used in the September 5, 2006,
Primary Election.
In accordance with the Sunshine.
Law of Florida, this meeting is
open to the public.
Ndce: Section 286.0105, Florida
Statutes, states that if a person
decides to appeal any decision
by a board, agency, or commis-
sion with respect to any mat-
ter considered at a meeting or
hearing, he or she will need a
record of the proceedings, and
that for such purpose, he or
she may need to ensure that
a verbatim record of the pro-
ceeding is made, which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is
to be based,
Linda Griffin
Gulf County Supervisor of
Elections
Publish August 10, 2006

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION
NOTICE OF APPLICATION

The Department announces
recept of an application for an
Joint Coastal Permit (File No.
0266819-001-JC), pursuant to
Chapter 373, Florida Statutes,
and if needed, for authoriza-
tion to use sovereigh submerged
lands, pursuant to Chapter 253
and 258, Florida Statutes. The
applicant is Gulf County, and
the proposed activity is located
in Gulf County Florida. The pro-
posed project is to construct
a 7.6 mile beach restoration
project between DEP R-67 south
to DEP R-105, using approxi-
matelu 3.6 Million Cubic Yards
of material obtained from an
offshore borrow area.
Copies of the application and
drawings which describe the
work in more detail may be
examined during normal work-
ing hours at the Department
of Environmental Protection,
Bureau of Beaches and Coastal
Systems, 5050 West Tennessee
Street, Building B, Tallahassee,
Florida 32304. If you have any
questions regarding this appli-
cation, you may contact Jamie
Christoff of the Department, at
(850) 414-7756. This informa-
tion can also be viewed at the
Department's Internet Web site
at:http://www.dep.state.fl.us/
beaches/permitting/permits.
htm
Comments should be
sent to the Department of
Environmental Protection,
Bureau of Beaches and Coastal
Systems, 3900 Commonwealth
Boulevard, Mail Station 300,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-


3000 within fourteen (14) cal-
endar days of the date of this
notice. Please refer to the file
number in your response.
Publish August 10, 2006

PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that
a meeting of The Northwest
Florida Transportation Corridor
Authority will be held on
Thursday, August 17, 2006 at
10:00 a.m. at the Panama City
Hall, Commission Meeting Room,
9 Harrison Avenue, Panama
City, FL Any person requiring
special accommodations to par-
ticipate in this meeting is asked
to advise the Corridor Authority
at least 48 hours before the
meeting by contacting JoAnn
Hofstad at 850-833-9328 or
joann.hofstad@myfloridahouse.
gov.
Publish August 10,'2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 14TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO: 05-239DR

JOHN A. WEILAND, Petitioner
and
JACQUELYN GAYLE WEILAND,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: JACQUELYN GAYLE
WEILAND,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action has been filed against
you and that you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on John
Arthur Weiland whose address
is 2817 Indian Pass Rd., Port
St. Joe, FL 32456 on or before
9/14/06, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court
at 1000 Cecil Costin Sr. Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456, before
service on Petitioner or immedi-
ately thereafter. If you fail to
do so, default may be entered
against' you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court docu-
ments in this case, including
orders, are available at the Clerk
of the Circuit Court's office. You
may review these documents
upon request.
You must keep the Clerk
of the Court's office notified
of any current address. (You
must file Notice of Current
Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the
address on record at the clerk's
office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285,
Florida Family Law Rules of
Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of docu-
ments and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanc-
tions, including dismissal or
striking of pleadings. Dated
8/2/06.
Clerk of Circuit Court.
By Jasmine Hysmith, Deputy
Clerk.
Pubish: August 10 through
September 14

CALL FOR BIDS

PROJECT: Gulf County Health
Department

LOCATION: Wewahitchka, FL

Peter R. Brown Construction,
Inc., will receive sealed bids from
pre-qualified Subcontractors in
accordance with the plans and
specifications prepared by Bar-
nett Fronczak Barlowe Archi-
tects and bid packages prepared
by Peter R. Brown Construction,
Inc., for the following work:

Bid Packages:

2A Sitework
3A Concrete
4A Masonry & Architectural
Pre-Cast Concrete
5A Steel
6A General Trades
6B Rough Carpentry & Wood
Trusses
6D Interior Architectural
Woodwork
7A Roofing, Flashing & Sheet
Metal
8A Glass and Glazing
9A Metal Stud Framing, Gyp-
sum Walls & Ceilings, Exterior
Insulation Finish System (EIFS)
& Acoustical
9B Floor Coverings & Tile
9C Painting
15A Plumbing
15B HVAC
15C Test & Balance
16A Electrical

PLANS & DEPOSIT: Bid docu-
ments will be available after
July 24, 2006, from Peter R.
Brown Construction, Inc., the
Construction Manager. The
bid documents may be reviewed
at the office of Peter R. Brown
Construction Inc., located at'
1424 Piedmont Drive East, Tal-
lahassee, Florida 32308. For
information about obtaining bid
documents call Peter R. Brown
Construction, Inc., at 850-668-
4498 or fax request to 850-668-
6790.

BOND REQUIREMENTS: 5%
bid bond and 100% labor and
material payment and perfor-
mance bonds are required on
certain bid packages. Refer to
bid packages for requirements.

PRE-BID CONFERENCE:
There will be a non-manda-
tory pre-bid meeting held by
Peter R. Brown Construction,
Inc. on behalf of Department
of Health Gulf County located
at Wewahitchka Public Li-
brary located at 314 North
2nd Street, Wewahitchka, FL
on August 10, 2006 at 10:00
a.m.CST for all Bid Packages.

BID OPENING: Sealed bids
for Bid Packages will be re-
ceived by Peter R. Brown Con-
struction, Inc. office located
Wewahitchka Public Library
located at 314 North 2nd
Street, Wewahitchka, FL until
2:00 p.m. CST, local time and
read aloud publicly on August
22, 2006 at 2:00 p.m CST. Pe-
ter R. Brown Construction, Inc.
reserves the right to reject any
and all bids and waive any ir-
regularities in any bid.
Publish August 10 & 17, 2006


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 10, 2006 7C


Gulf County Board of





County Commission





Minutes


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
MAY 9, 2006
REGULAR MEETING
continued

County Attorney McFarland
then read a proposed resolution
calling for a bond referendum
for the Cape San Blas Bayside
area. Commissioner Barnes
motioned to adopt the following
resolution, and Commissioner
Williams seconded the motion.
The motion then passed 4 to 1,
with Commissioner Peters vot-
ing no.

RESOLUTION NO. 2006-18

A RESOLUTION OF THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA, CALLING A BOND
REFERENDUM WITH RESPECT
TO THE CAPE SAN BLAS GULF-
SIDE MUNICIPAL SERVICES
TAXING UNIT FOR THE ISSU-
ANCE OF LIMITED GENERAL
OBLIGATION BONDS TO FI-
NANCE BEACH RENOURISH-
MENT; AND PROVIDING AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE.
WHEREAS, Gulf County's
beachfront is a County treasure
with tremendous economic, es-
thetic and environmental impor-
tance; and
WHEREAS, it is in the best
interest of the citizens of Gulf
County residing within the Cape
San Blas Gulfside Municipal
Services Taxing Unit (the "Gulf-
side MSTU") created by Ordi-
nance No. 2005-25 of the Board
of County Commissioners of
Gulf County, Florida, enacted
December 13, 2005 (the "Ordi-
nance") that all appropriate ac-
tions to maintain and renourish
such beachfront be undertaken;
and
WHEREAS, the enhance-
ment and renourishment of
such beachfront constitutes a
municipal service to residents
residing within the Gulfside
MSTU; and
WHEREAS, the Board of
County Commissioners of Gulf
County desires to submit to
the qualified electors of Gulf
County residing within the Gulf-
side MSTU the question as to
whether or not Limited General
Obligation Bonds should be is-
sued to fund the renourishment
of beachfront as described in the
Ordinance;,
BE IT RESOLVED BY THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF GULF COUNTY
FLORIDA:

Section 1. A u-
thority for this Resolution. This
Resolution is adopted pursuant
to Chapter 100, Florida Stat-
utes, as amended; Chapter 125,
Florida Statutes, as amended;
Art. VII, Section 12, Florida
Constitution, the Ordinance,
and other applicable provisions
of law.

Section 2. Bond
Referendum Election on Beach
Renourishment.

a. Bond. Referendum
Election. A bond referendum
election of the qualified electors
residing in the Gulfside MSTU
in Gulf County is hereby called
to be held on July 6, 2006 to
determine whether or not the
issuance of Limited General Ob-
ligation Bonds in an aggregate
principal amount not exceed-
ing $ 12,000,000.00, payable
from ad valorem taxes levied at
a rate not to exceed six mills (6
Skills) on all taxable property in
the Qulfside MSTU, shall be ap-
proved by such qualified elec-
tors to finance the cost of beach
renourishment.
b. Such purposes de-
scribed above shall also include
other purposes appurtenant,
and incidental thereto.
c. All qualified electors
residing in the MSTU shall be
entitled and permitted to vote in
such bond referendum election.
d. The polls will open
in accordance with law relat-
ing to general elections at the
various voting places from seven
(7) o'clock a.m. until seven (7)
o'clock p.m. on the same day.

Section 3. Autho-
rization of Bonds. Subject and
pursuant to the provisions here-
of, Limited General Obligation
Bonds of Gulf County, Florida
are authorized to be issued in
the aggregate principal amount
of not exceeding $ 12,000,000.00
to finance the cost of the pur-
poses generally described in
Section 2 of this Resolution,
including allocations for admin-
istrative costs, legal fees, fees of
fiscal agents and all other costs
associated with the issuance of
the Bonds. Such Limited Obli-
gation Bonds may- be issued in
one or more series and shall be
payable from ad valorem taxes
levied at a rate not exceeding
six mills (6 mills) on all taxable
property in the MSTU, maturing
not later than twenty (20) years.
Such Bonds shall bear interest
at such rate or rates not e ceed-
ing the maximum rate permitted
by law at the time of the sale of
the Bonds.

Section 4. Places
of Voting. The places of voting
and the Inspectors and Clerks
for the polling places for the
bond election shall be the same
places and .persons as for gener-
al elections within the County.

Section 5. Official
Ballot. The form of ballot to be
used shall be in substantially
the following:

OFFICIAL BALLOT
COUNTY OF GULF, FLORIDA
BOND REFERENDUM
ELECTION MUNICIPAL
SERVICES TAXING UNIT
July 6, 2006

APPROVAL OF "LIMITED
GENERAL OBLIGATIONS"
BONDS TO FINANCE BEACH
RENOURISHMENT.

Shall Gulf County be autho-
rized to issue bonds to finance
beach renourishment and en-


hancement in one or more series
not exceeding a total principal
amount of $ 12,000,000.00 pay-
able from an annual ad valorem
tax imposed within the Cape
San Bias Gulfside Municipal
Services Taxing Unit not exceed-
ing 6 mills maturing not later
than 20 years and bearing inter-
est at a rate not exceeding the
maximum legal rate.

For bonds
Against bonds

Section 6. Absen-
tee Voting. The form of ballot
to be used in the election for
absentee voters shall be sub-
stantially the form provided in
Section 5 above.
Section 7. Print-
ing of Ballots. The Supervisor
of Elections of Gulf County is
authorized and directed to have
printed on plain white paper a
sufficient number of the afore-
said ballots for use of absentee
electors entitled to cast such
ballots in such bond election
and shall also have printed
sample ballots and deliver them
to the Inspectors and Clerks
on or before, the date and time
for the opening of the polls for
such bond election for the vot-
ing places; and, further, is au-
thorized and directed to make
appropriate arrangements for
the conduct of the election at the
polling places specified.

Section 8. E 1 e c-
tion Procedure. The Supervisor
of Elections shall hold, adminis-
ter and conduct the bond refer-
endum election in the manner
prescribed by law for holding
elections in the County. Re-
turns shall show the number of
qualified electors who voted in
such bond election on the prop-
osition and the number of votes
cast respectively for and against
approval of the proposition. The
returns shall be canvassed in
accordance with law.

Section 9. Ele c-
tion Results. If a majority of the
votes cast at such election in
respect to the aforestated propo-
sition shall be "For Bonds,"
such proposition shall be ap-'
proved and then the particular
Bonds, the issuance of which
shall be thereby approved, shall
be issued as hereafter provided
by the County. If less than a
majority of the votes cast at
such referendum shall be "For
Bonds," such proposition shall
be defeated andtio Bonds may
be issued and no ad valorem tax
shall be levied therefore.

Section 10. Notice
of Bond Referendum Election.
Notice of the bond referendum
election shall be published in
the manner required by law.

Section 11. Sever-
ability. In the event that any
word, phrase, clause, sentence,
or paragraph hereof shall be
held invalid by any court of com-,
petent jurisdiction, such holding
shall not affect any other word,
phrase, sentence, or paragraph
hereof.

Section 12. Effec-
tive Date. This Resolution shall
take effect immediately upon
its adoption. The Clerk to the
Board of County Commissioners
shall provide the Supervisor of
Elections with a certified copy of
this Resoltution.

DULY adopted this 9th day
of May, 2006.

(End)

SMALL COUNTY OUTREACH
PROGRAM (S.C.O.P.)

Chief Administrator But-
ler discussed page 19 of the
Information Packet, stating
that D.O.T. has awarded the
County $901,342.00 to resur-
face the Stone Mill Creek Road
under the S.C.O.P. program,
and $883,163.00 to resurface
the Howard Creek Road under
the County Incentive Grant Pro-
gram. He stated that the C.I.G.P.
funds are 50%, and the S.C.O.P.
funds are 75%, and that the ad-
ditional funding for these proj-
ects needs to be addressed dur-
ing the Budget process.

HONEYVILLE STORM
SHELTER

Chief Administrator 43utler
discussed that the plans for the
storm shelter are near comple-
tion, and recommended the
Board start the bid process for
this project. Commissioner Wil-
liams motioned to advertise to
receive sealed bids for construc-
tion of the Honeyville Storm
Shelter. Commissioner Traylor
seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.

C.R.S. FLOOD RATING
PROGRAM

Chief Administrator Butler
reported that he has been the
County C.R.S. Coordinator since
December 15, 1992, and rec-
ommended that Planner David
Richardson be appointed to this
position, effective immediately.
Commissioner Traylor motioned
to approve this recommenda-
tion. Commissioner Barnes sec-
onded the motion, and it passed
unanimously.

SCHOOL SPORTS -
CHAMPIONSHIPS

Commissioner Barnes re-
ported that Zac Norris won 2
State Championships on the Port
St. Joe High School Track Team
in discus. Chairman McLemore
discussed the great athletic pro-
grams in Gulf County.

JOB OPENINGS

Human Resources Direc-
tor Manuel discussed several
job openings that are currently
available, and inquired if the
Board would like to amend the
personnel policy to allow posi-
tions to be filled from previ-


ously interviewed applicants.
Commissioner Traylor inquired
about advertising, and Human
Resources Director Manuel
stated that some positions are
not advertised because they hire
from the previously interviewed
applicants. After further discus-
sion, the Board agreed to con-
tinue with the current process.

UNION NEGOTIATIONS

Human Resource Director
Manuel reported that the Union
negotiations are tentatively
scheduled for May 15th through
May 27th, and recommended
that the Board schedule a closed
litigation meeting to discuss this
issue. After further discussion,
Chairman McLemore stated that
he will schedule this meeting.

AWARD BID #0506-22 TIRE
REMOVAL FIVE POINTS
LANDFILL

Upon recommendation by
Solid Waste Director Danford,
Commissioner Barnes motioned
to award Bid #0506-22 (for tire
removal at Five Points Landfill)
to Constant Velocity, Inc. (only
bidder) for tires up to "11R22.5
at $135.00 per ton, off-road tires
at $195.00 per ton, and a 5%
per load fuel surcharge, with a
10-ton minimum. Commission-
er Peters seconded the motion,
and it passed unanimously.


LANDFILL TIRES CHARGE

Solid Waste Director Dan-
ford recommended that the
Board increase the landfill
charge for tires to $135.00 per
ton, to equal what the County
has to pay for removal. Chair-
man McLemore inquired about
the current price, and Solid
Waste Director Danford stated
it is currently $110.00 per ton.
Commissioner Traylor motioned
to approve this recommenda-
tion. Commissioner Williams
seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.

LANDFILL FINES

Solid Waste Director Dan-
ford discussed the need for fines
for unacceptable debris brought
to the landfills (was tabled at the
last'Board meeting), and recom-
mended that -the Board impose
a $100.00 fine per incident.
County Attorney McFarland
stated that there would have
to be an ordinance adopted to
impose the fine for violations.
Upon inquiry by Commissioner
Traylor, Solid Waste Director
Danford discussed that there is
a problem with household gar-
bage coming in with the roll-off
containers. Commissioner Wil-
liams motioned to begin the or-
dinance process on this issue.
Commissioner Barnes seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously.

MOSQUITO CONTROL
POSITIONS

Solid Waste Director Dan-
ford discussed that there are
2 mosquito spray truck driver
positions open in the Mosquito
Control Department at this
time, and 'requested permission
to hire one full-time employee
and one part-time employee to
fill these vacancies. .Commis-
sioner Williams motioned to
approve this recommendation.
Commissioner Traylor seconded
the motion, and it passed unan-
imously.

IMPACT FEE STUDY
WORKSHOP

Planner Richardson recom-
mended that the Board sched-
ule a workshop on the Impact
Fee Study for May 23rd at 5:30
p.m., E.T. Commissioner Barnes
motioned to approve this recom-
mendation. Commissioner Tray-
lor seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.

SPECIAL PROJECTS
PAYMENTS

Upon motion by Commis-
sioner Traylor, second by Com-
missioner Peters, and unani-
mous vote, the Board approved
the following Special Projects
payments:

Dist.1 W.H.S. Girls Soft-
ball Donation
$250.00
W.H.S. Project
. Graduation Donation
$250.00
W.H.S. Gator Spring
Classic Donation
$100.00

Dist. 2 W.H.S.
Girls Softball Donation
$250.00
W.H.S. Project
Graduation Donation
$250.00
W.H.S. Gator Spring
Classic Donation
$100.00

Dist. 3 W.H.S.
Girls Softball Donation
$250.00

W.C.F.D. Donation
$500.00

H.V.F.D. Donation
$500.00

B.V.F.D. Donation
$500.00


Dist. 4 W.H.S.
Girls Softball Donation
$250.00

Dist. 5 W.H.S.

Girls Softball Donation
$250.00

(End)

AFFORDABLE HOUSING
COMMITTEE

Commissioner Traylor re-
quested that 5 members be
appointed to serve on a com-
mittee for affordable housing.


After discussion, Commissioner
Traylor motioned to appoint Da-
vid Taunton, Allen Cox, Lauren
Massey, John Hendry, and Greg
Johnson to the Affordable Hous-
ing Committee. Commissioner
Williams seconded the motion,
and it passed unanimously.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING
COMMITTEE

CommissionerTraylor stated
that he would like for the Afford-
able Housing Committee to re-
search to determine what afford-
able would be for Gulf County,
and present this information to
the Board. Commissioner Wil-
liams discussed that this com-
mittee should be informed that
they fall under the guidelines of
the Sunshine Law.

M.S.T.U. RESOLUTIONS

Upon inquiry by Commis-.
sioner Peters, regarding mail-
out of the straw ballot infor-
mation, T.D.C. Director Pickett
stated that 1,159 property
owner surveys were mailed. She
stated that 199 surveys have
been returned at this time, and
the deadline is May 22nd. Com-
missioner Peters discussed that
everyone cannot vote on this
issue', and he feels it is unfair.
Commissioner Traylor discussed
that he has received phone calls
from all over the United States,
but when you are not home-
steaded, you cannot vote.

EMERGENCY MEDICAL
SERVICES (E.M.S.)

Commissioner Barnes dis-
cussed that he has received
several calls on what a great
job that E.M.S. is providing on
both ends of the County, and
commended Gulf County E.M.S.
Director Shane McGuffin.

LEGISLATIVE ISSUES

Commissioner Williams dis-
cussed the funding issues as a
fiscally constrained County from
this legislative session, stating
that Gulf County will receive
$204,939.00, the City of Port
St. Joewill receive $200,00.00
.for centennial park improve-
ments, Gulf County will receive
$350,000.00 for Cape San Bias
Lighthouse Phase project II; the
Norris D. Langstqn Foundation
will receive $250,000.00, Gulf
County will receive $300,000.00
for Courthouse 'Facilities, and
the school system will receive
$98,927.00 for the district cost
differential and $42,236.00 for
adults with disabilities and vo-
cational rehabilitation. He also
stated that the County will re-
ceive $2 million for the Gulf.
Beaches Sewer expansion, Com-
missioner Williams motioned to
submit a letter to Senator Law-
son and Representative Bense in
appreciation of their support of
this funding. Commissioner Pe-
ters seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.

ZERO-BASED BUDGET
PROCESS

Commissioner Williams'
discussed the new zero-based
budget process and gave a pre-
sentation on how it will work.
Commissioner Williams also
commended Clerk Finance Of-
ficer Carla Hand and the Clerk's
Office for furnishing the budget
data in a working format.
C.D.B.G. FUNDING -
OVERSTREET WATER
SYSTEM

Commissioner Williams dis-
cussed the C.D.B.G. check that
was received in the amount of
$638,500.00, for the Overstreet
water and sewer system. He
stated that he has requested
Port St. Joe City Manager Lee
Vincent attend the next Board
meeting and give a presentation
on the time frames, survey and
permitting work for this project.

WHITE CITY TOWN HALL
MEETING FLOOD ZONES

Commissioner Williams re-
ported on the flood zone meet-
ing held at the White City Fire
Department. He thanked Plan-
ner Richardson for attending
the meeting, and stated that
there were representatives from
Congressman Boyd's Office,
F.E.M.A., National Flood Insur-
ance and North Florida Water
Management District. Commis-
sioner Williams stated that they
are working on the elevations
and digitalized maps before pro-
ceeding with the next process on
zone re-evaluation.

HIGHLAND VIEW AREA /
A.T.V.s

Commissioner Williams re-
quested that County Attorney
McFarland check into the pos-
sibility of a lease agreement with
St. Joe Company for property
behind Highland View. that could
be used as a recreation area for
four-wheelers and A.T.V.s.

REDFISH STREET PAVING

Commissioner Williams dis-
cussed that the paving on Red-
fish Street should begin in July,
2006.

UTILITY PERMIT/EASEMENT
WATER LINES

Commissioner Williams
discussed the utility permit/
easement request from the City
of Port St. Joe, stating that all
future annexed areas will be
under mutual agreement. He
stated that the Board needs to
closely monitor these agree-
ments. After further discussion,
Commissioner Peters motioned
to approve page 62 (Item # 10)
of the Agenda Packet, which
would allow the City of Port St.
Joe to run the water line down
the County right-of-way on Long
Avenue. Commissioner Barnes
seconded the motion, and it
passed unanimously.


nrn sn a iy5 eriq%-ui u myuiu:utu iuli u1a u w -


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BCTeSa.Pr t o. L*TusaAos 0 20 salse 97.Sevn ufcut n uronigaesfr6 er


Trades


&


Services


-- .


DL Drywall

& Painting LLC
Licensed & Insured


Cell(850)258-007 I
David Lee- Owner Home(850)229-2572



f rof rr2eiT i
Major Appliance,
Parts, Repair, Sales
232 Reid Ave
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
| (850)229-8040
cell 850-527-8086


%W Coastal & Native
Landscapes


IRRIGATION
INSTALLATION & REPAIR
OUR SPECIALTY
850-927-4090


CARPENTRY
PAINTING I?
Home Repair Minor Renovations
Vinyl Siding & Gutters
Doors Windows
Deck Maintenance
All But 6, LLC Licensed/Insured
Charlie Poliski
850-545-1126 or 697-2668


Kilgore's
S : BRICK PAVERS
& TILE

Driveways, Patios, Pooldecks,
Retaining Walls, Stonework &
Granite Countertops
Office: (850) 229-1980
Cell: (850) 258-4312
Free Estimates,
Where top quality and customer
satisfaction meet!
2890 W. Highway 98 --Port St. Joe


THE J. LESTER
COMPANY REAL
ESTATE APPRAISAL &


CONSULTING SERVICE
A Financial Service Institution
Residential Vacant Land Commercial Appraisals

JAMES E. "JAMIE" LESTER

Real Estate Appraiser & Broker
Master Degree Business Administration
State Certified General Appraiser
License#RZ-2783
Broker License#BK532115
"PROVIDING A QUALITY SERVICE TO A


Including Co
Feasibil
Emine


Faw
Serving Gulf
Liberty, & Ja
Assignments


QUALITY COMMUNITY"
insulting Assignments Market Analysis
lity Studies Finances Investments
nt Domain Estates Tax Purposes

850-639-4200
x 850-639-9756
, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun,
.ckson Counties Specialty
State Wide


CD Pressure Washing &
Handyman Services
For Free Estimates Call
229-1750 Owner Daniel Griffin
Cell 899-1684 Manager Cindy Griffin

GET WE ED
SMichael & Anihony '
O Sat Cer*ilied ( l:ct-lrich!i n I .SI20()21U4 4
* ^f & I'inish CaQiin lr- 'RGI10683 .
|850-229-6751 850-227-5666


Quality

Paperhanging

Installation Removal Repairs


656-2917
Dennis Sittig


566-2297
Cellular rf


Paradise Pressure Washing




S., .. 648 5934/




' Carpet Country
Highway 98 Highland View Port St. Joe 850-227-7241 Fax 229-9405

Do-It-Yourself Professional Carpet Cleaning with

RINSE-N-VAC
Great for Cleaning All Carpet, Upholstery, and
Auto and Recreational Vehicle Interiors
TRY IT TODAY!

TLC Lawn Service
.' [I "Every yard needs a little TLC"

S 229-6435
,..- We now accept all major credit cards
Free estimates Established 1991
Weed Round Up Sprinkler Systems
Trimming, Fertilizing Installed & Repaired
Licensed and Insured


Hardwood Flooring
Decorative Flooring 850-229-7720 offers professional
services for anyone who wants their floor completed
properly and with pride.
Exotic and Domestic wood Flooring
Inlays- Borders and Medallions
Installation Sanding and Refinishing Repair Custom
National Award winner for best floor in Nation
Largest showroom in the State of Florida
Licensed Insured References
Unmatched Quality and Val*e for your money
www.decorativeflooring.com






23702


fwShaklee# ,Na
creating H_,.M'I nv- Nutrition Supplement
independent Olstlbutor Company in the US

Pay & Glenn Waldo n Skin Care
850-& Gfn27-25Environmentally Safe
850-827-2510 Cleaning Product
www.shaklee.net/PattyWaldo Air and Water
gpuwaldo@gtcom.net Purification


Don Dupree
President
1806 Garrison Ave.
Port St. Joe, Florida
32456


DUPREE'S
Custom Metal Roofs


(850) 527-5144 phone

"Professional Custom Meal Roofs, Reroofs and Shingles"



SUN GC1AST
Lawn Er Larndscaping LLC
"When Quality Counts"
Landscape Design & Installation
Full Lawn Maintenance
Irrigation Installation & Repair
Commercial & Residential
Tractor Work, Rock Driveways, Water Features,
Sod & Palm Trees
Office: (850) 647-2522 18053

Landscape Design &
Consultation Services

Kay Kelley
Florida Certified
Landscape Designer

850-927-4090
Plan It before you Plant It! 20752

ST. JOE -
NURSERY & SUPPLY |i
706 First Street Port St. Joe

227-2112

St. Joe Rient-Air ll' e ,...


DRIESBACH CLEANERS
180 Avenue C
Pick-up and Delivery
850-227-1671
*Residential *Custom Wood
* Commercial *Industrial
A & R Fence
amem, anCeeetew "Ik
lb~ert Fleischmann FREE Estimates
EN# S93115646 (850) 647-4047.


N OW NE


NATIONALSHUTRS N


-RligSut-tes CerUae


Rod & Reel Repair
Bluewater Outriggers
Port City Shopping Center
229-1100







COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL
INSULATION DONE RIGHT EVERYTIME
FIBERGLASS BATTS BLOWN CELLULOSE WALLS & ATTIC
OFFICE CELL
Q0ga3 oGS3aeSGES


OP AMANW 4A0V
I, P54 -2w ffft5
r,'TO fr it1in; /' p 3
( mmkitr


Isn't it time for an oil change?
We Come To You!
Call 850-227-1684
Ask for Julian


\o ?'- Residential
Commercial
Termite & Pest
Control
* Termite Treatmentls iRestaurant
* Motel Flea Contrl Condominiums
* Household Pest Control el Treatment
* Real Estate (WO0) Reports Construotion Stes
Specializing inYacation Rental Properties
fg FAMILY OWNED
@ PLEASANT & PROFESSIONAL
"Serving the Entire Area"
Free Estimates
Do-lt-Yourself Pest Control Productds
22-82
32 BRi Aeu or t o, FL.


DJ Fence & ETC
HandyMan
You Name It
I'll Fix It
850-648-9531
850-624-4182 ceO
"Let the Beauty of our God be
upon us & establish the work
of our hands"


CARPET AND UPHOLSTERY
STEAM CLEANING & RESTORATION SERVICE
24 Hour Water Extraction IICRC
Certified Technicians Mold and
Mildew Remediation F{ee Estimates
* Stain Protection Available
.a i .. -


LOCALLY OWNED AND -D- ^ r"r,,.
OPERATED BY MIKE MOCK I .
IICRC Certified
Cleaning Specialist
CARPET CLEANING
3 CERAMIC TILE & GROUT
UPHOLSTERY CLEANING
24 HOUR WATER EXTRACTION
RV'S CARS TRUCKS VANS
LICENSED AND INSURED
RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL
(ALTDYFRA0 PONMN
229-132


THE
^'BTfIs' H^W F^(W^^^^^M^1


STA-R


135 Hwy 98


227-1278


I


r2;7-932 850227- 9!1


I


-B Coastal & Native


Specializing in low, maintenance landscapes and irrigation,
with a focus on native and- naturalized plants. We offer
complete landscape services and our area's only Florida
Certified Landscape Designer. '.
Owned by.Kay- Kelley and Brooaks Wade .........
850-927-4090 We Plant Paiilms, tool.
an ~ ,, ". ....... .......


..


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


8C he ta, PrtSt.Jo, F -Thursday, August 10, 2006








Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006 0 9C


ANNOUNCEMENTS


g PIPA.


MERCHANDISE


BUSINESS & FINANCIAL


REAL ESTATE






AUTO,MARINE,RV


4W'~tf


S SIW. .N


BEER


o.














Al-.. -0 k T-
~- -~r ^--=ri
4C .
a.e D *' ;r 4




I


VISA I :


S 1120




Meet and Greet
Candidate for State
Representative District 6
Jimmy Patronis
Monday, August 14, 2006
6 8pm est.
Indian Pass Raw Bar
on Hwy C-30
Paid political advertisement.
Paid for and approved by
Jimmy Patronis Republican
for State Representative
District 6.


Now Casting: AOL is
searching for talented
teenagers to create and
star in their own show. If u
know someoneage 13-17
who is ready to be a star,
go to www.BeaRED star.
corn


2100 Pets
2110 Pets: Free to
Good Home
2120 Pet Supplies
2130 Farm Animals/
Supplies
- 2140 Pets/Livestock
Wanted


2100






PETS & ANIMALS

Dogs & Cats
For-Sale?


2100 3210 I


Lost Dog Found near
Boat Ramp & Overstreet.
Call 850-648-2039 to claim
& identify.


Free Manure Compost
available for pickup at 775
'Cape San Bias Rd. You
load and haul. Call
227-2584 for directions, if
needed.


2110 Cherry entertainment cen-


There are specific Flori-
da Statutes applicable
to the sale of dogs and
cats within the state or
transportated into the
state for the purpose of
selling.
Please research Flori-
da Statute 828.29 (Dogs
and cats transported or
offered for. sale; health
requirements; consumer
guarantee) before
you offer for sale a cat
or dog.


I



I~'1~Y


Openings for Karen Parker
& Tiffany Clark Child Care.
Located at 133 Bridgeport
Ln, In Port St. Joe. 5 open-
ing avail.' Apply, now to
save your spot or call
227-3831 or 340-1883




X'.Clayton Concrete, Inc.
Concrete Construction
House Foundations
*Driveways
*Patios
'. Serving Franklin & Gulf
.: Counties fo'r 15 years.
Glen Clayton
229-6525/ 653-7352




SCarport Sale
The Best Carport, RV Ports
& Metal BIdgs at afforda-
Sble prices. Classic carport
12x20 $695. We have all
sizes Call 850-819-5093





Do you have
S"a love one in need of extra
,care. Private Duty LPN
-will take care of them, in
-.your home, Nursing home
or Hospital. Have good ref-
erences. Call
850-639-5030 for Brenda




'Government Homesi $0
down Tax repos, foreclo-
sures, noncredit okay. Call
for listing# 877-204-4394.


Handyman
Port St. Joe Area
-Plumbing
*Electrical
-Painting
*Light Framing
*Yard Work
JOEY BARBEE
850-229-6147
Leave Message

Storm Preparedness
Handyman Services, interi-
or/exterior maintenance &
repairs 850-229-3474 or
8 5 0 8 6 7-3 9 98
www.fishingportstjoe.com





Airline Mechanic Rapid
training for high paying'
Aviation Career. FAA pre-
dicts severe shortage. Fi-
nancial aid if qualify job
placement assistance. Call
AIM 888-349-5387.

Attend College Online
from Home *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Computers, *Criminal
Justice. Job placement as-
sistance. Computer pro-
vided. Financial Aid if qual-
ified. Call .866-858-2121.
www.OnlineTidewaterTech
cornn






Bushhogging
Call Pat & Larry
@648-6652


Daddy is moving into as-
sisted living & can't take
cats with him. Registered
Persian (9yrs old) & a
short hair silver gray do-
mestic (5yrs old). Both are
up to date on shots, neu-
tered, & declawed. Call
Barbie at 850-639-3601


I MERCHANDISE
3100 Antiques
3110 Appliances
3120 Arts & Crafts
3130 Auctions
3140 Baby Items
3150 Building Supplies
3160 Business
Equipment
3170 Collectibles
3180 Computers
3190 Electronics
3200 Firewood
3210 Free Pass it On'
3220 Furniture
3230 Garage/Yard Sales
3240 Guns
3250 Good Things to Eat
3260 Health & Fitness
3270 Jewelry/Clothing
3280 Machinery/
Equipment
3290 Medical Equipment
3300 Miscellaneous
3310 Musical Instruments
3320 Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
3330 Restaurant/Hotel
3340 Sporting Goods
3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell)


ter, 81in tall, 46on wide
$500. Oak 9 drawer dress-
er with 2 mirrors $200,
Must sell 850-229-7712






JJ: Pt. St. Joe 1916 Forest
Park Ave HUGE GARAGE
SALE Friday and Saturday,
8am-? Furniture, lamps,
pictures, Antiques, Wicker,
etc...







Family Healthcare with
prescription plan! $69
month includes dental, vi-
sion, hospital. All accept-
ed. Call 800-961-5236.




3280




33 FT. 12 volt Hydraulic
boom lift. Asking $3,700
Call 850-697-2703 or
850-566-4747



3280

Heavy & Small Equipment
for Boat yard 20 ton travel
lift. Pettibone crane, hyster
forklift jack spands, san-
ders, compressors, drill
press, table saw, much
more Call 653-8801 for
more information.


Incorrect InsertionPolicy
For Classified
In-column Advertisers

All ads placed by phone are read back to the adver-
tiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will as-
sume correctness at the time of the read-back proce-
dure unless otherwise informed.


Please


your ad

Advertisers are requested to check the advertise-
ment on the first insertion for correctness. Errors
should be reported immediately.
The News Herald will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for
any error in advertisements to a greater extent than
the cost of the space occupied by the error.
Any copy change, during ordered schedule consti-
tutes Ea new ad and new charges.
The News Herald DOES NOT guarantee position of
ANY ad under any classification.


3300

$We Pay Cash$
We Buy Antiques, Old Jewelry,
Old Toys, Old Anything
Call Monique
850-227-1684

REDUCED
Your Cable Bill!
Get a 4-Room All-Digital
Satellite System Installed
for FREE. Programming
starting under $20.00
FREE. Digital Video Re-
corders to new callers.
1-800-935-7785

WANTED TO BUY
Old Guns, coins, guitars,
and watches. Call
850-227-4122




Wanted To Buy!
GOLD/ SILVER COINS
COMPLETE
COIN COLLECTIONS
Gold Jewelry in any
condition, Tools, Fishing
Gear & Many Other
Things of Value.
Call Roy@
850-229-8304

"


EMPLOYMENT
4100- Help Wanted
4110 Restaurants/Clubs
4120 Sales/Telemarketing
4130 Employment
Information







Administrative

CLOSING
COORDINATOR

WindMark Beach Sales
'Center in Port St Joe, has
an immediate opening for
a Closing Coordinator. In-
dividual should have previ-
ous real estate closing and
title work experience or
mortgage experience. At-
tention to detail and the
ability to handle multiple
tasks in a fast-paced envi-
ronment required. We offer
great pay and an excellent
benefits package!
Please submit Resume via
fax to 229-7952, email to
rebecca.standige(5joe.
corn or visit careers.Joe.
corn to submit an online
application & resume
Equal Opportunity
Employer
Pre-Employment Drug
Screening Required.


I 4100 4100


Automotive
Advance Auto Parts is
currently accepting appli-
cations for full & part time
Sales Associates posi-
tions. Advance offers com-
petitive pay, flexible sched-
ules and benefits pro-
grams. Successful appli-
cants will have the follow-
ing attributes: are friendly,
have parts knowledge,
customer oriented, team
oriented, change oriented
and dependable. Bilingual
skills a plus. Interested ap-
plicants should apply at
Advance Auto Parts, 201
Monument Ave., Port St.
Joe, FL No Phone Calls.


Drivers
AmeriGas Propane- Ap-
alachicola, FL is cur-
rently accepting applica-
tions for:
Delivery
Representative
Candidate should be re-
sponsible for but not lim-
ited to delivering pro-
pane to our customers.
Requirements include
high school diploma(or
equivalent), a valid CDL
with hazmat and tanker
endorsements, a great
driving record and satis-
factory completion of a
DOT physical, drug test
and background check.
We offer competitive
wages, medical and
dental benefits, 401K,
savings plan and liberal
vacation & holiday poli-
cy.
DFWP/ EOE
May apply in person at
101 Ave.
Appalachicola, FL
or
Fax resumes:
Attn: SSM
850-653-8225.


Drivers

AN
EARN AS YOU
LEARN
Career!
England Transport
now offers
On-the-job CDL Training
No credit check
No co-signers
No down payment!
Toll-Free
1-866-619-6081


The Apalachicola Times
has an opening for an
Outside Sales Representative

Candidate must have an outgoing, goal oriented, de-
tailed and aggressive personality. Great benefits:
401k, retirement, health, life and dental insurance.
Sick leave and vacation.
If you are motivated by money and like working with
people then email resume to khalualani@starfl.com
or fax resume to (850) 227-7212.
Or in person at the Star office
135 W. Hwy 98, Port St Joe, Florida.
A Freedom Communication Newspaper


Drivers

DRIVER
TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!
Werner needs entry level
Semi drivers. No exp. re-
quired. Avg. $36K + 1st yr!
60% home nightly/weekly.
CDL training in your area.'
1-866-280-5309


Drivers

USA
READY MIX
Now hiring Class A&B
CDL Ready Mix drivers.
Excellent benefits and
wages. Apply in person
1001 Cecil Costin Blvd.
Port St. Joe, FL
850-229-8858
USA EOE


Drivers
Wanted for Local Compa-
ny Home every night. 1
year ex. Clean MVR. Class
A & B license. $300 Sign-
On -Bonus after 90 Days.
769-9136.





General
First Baptist Church of
-Port St. Joe, is now ac-
cepting resumes from in-
terested persons for the
full time position of Chil-
dren's Minister. You can
submit a resume by mail at
First Baptist Church 102
3rd St., Port St. Joe 32456
or email one to
fbepsj@gtcom.net. For
more information, or a
copy of the job description
call the church office at
850-227-1552


4100



General

FWC
Accepting applications
for Full Tinme OPS Re-
search Technician at
$10.50/hr. Duties in-
clude: fisheries field
sampling, assisting with
maintenance repair of
gear and vessels,, and
data processing. This
position requires exten-
sive Field work and the
ability to pull. and lift
heavy nets uhder ad-
verse conditions. Min.
Qualifications include:
HS diploma, relevant
field experience and a
valid FDL. This position
is located in East point
Florida. Contact person
is Richard Lehnert at
850-670-4045. State of
Florida application re-
quired.

General

IMMEDIATE
OPENING:
Part Time Mainjenance/
Handyman, Full and
Part time Housekeep-
ers, and cooks needed
for Geri-Care Assisted
Living and Beacon Villa
Retirement Center. Flex-
ible hours, great work
environment, rewarding
and meaningful job. We
are looking for a hard
working, committed per-
son who is comfortable
working with elders.
This employee will re-
port to our Assisted Liv-
ing Administrator. The
right candidate must
pass a background
check and drug screen-
ing. We are an equal
opportunity employer. If
interested, please call
Deborah at
850-647-4000 or Kim at
647-9170


I 4100



General
Now taking applications
for Pest Control Technician
Experience preferred at Bo
Knows Pest Control Inc.
Call 850-227-9555 Located
at 402 3rd Street PSJ

Healthcare

Bay St. Joseph
Healthcare

Seeking a work place w/
a fun & fair culture? Our
120-bed long- term care
facility is seeking indi-
viduals who have com-
passion for the elderly &
enjoy working to fill the
,following positions:
*Activity Director
*Director of Nursing
*Central Supply Clerk
*P/T. Transportation Aide
*F/T Rehabilitation Tech
*Certified Nursing Assts
*Licensed Practical
Nurses
Full-time
Benefits Include:
Med/Dental/Vision Insur,
short/long term disabil-
ity company paid life In-
sur, paid time off, 401K
retirement plan, uniform
allowance, referral bo-
nus, tuition reimburse-
ment, Shift Differential.
Please Contact:
Carrie Harrison, Director
Human Resources
220 9th Street
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(850) 229-8244 Ext 105
Fax:. (850) 229-7129


Turn to classified's
Merchandise
Columns Our
prices are on target
for you!


UP TO 6 LINES




FOR 15 DAYS

S.30 ea. additional line

J Price Includes


NEW FOR TODAY and features


your auto in our INTERNET TOP ADS!

CAR TRUCK 4 PERSONAL WATERCRAFT 4-WHEELER MOTOR HOMES

BOAT (W4HOUT MOTOR & TRAILR) SAILBOATS TRAVEL TRAILER 5TH WHEELS

MOTORCYCLE AIRPLANE
1 vehicle per ad
*Price of item must be included. Flat Rate, no refunds upon cancellation.
No commercial advertising. No abbreviations please. Must be paid in advance.


L ''C.1


THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006 0 9C


Established 1938 0 Serving Gulf County and surrounding, areas for 67years


PETS


FRE: PSS TO


WLELP
TED


HELP~F


t,-


igeP~








10C THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 10, 2006 Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67years


4100
Healthcare

CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Port St. Joe &
Mexico Beach Area
We need caring & compas-
sionate caregivers to work
in Mexico Beach & Port St.
Joe area. Work times are
based on your availability
and we need to fill 24/7
shifts. Benefits Offered.
Home Instead Senior Care
850-522-1920
or 1-866-575-1920

Healthcare
Nursing Travel RNs Cali-
fornia 13-26 Week Assign-
ments San Francisco,
Napa Valley, Los Angeles,
San Diego, Palm Springs,
Sacramento + 'surround-
ing cities. Excellent
Wages/Benefits Up to
$100,000/year Paid Hous-
ing or Subsidy Med/Dental
Ins. & 401(k) Completion
Bonus Travel Reim-
bursement Immigration
Sponsorship 24/7 Mgt
Support UNI Call: (877)
256-7497 Fax (916)
641-0727 Email: ztrefry@u
nihcr.com


4100
General
Laborers needed for
Landscaping Company.
323-1700




Hospitality

NOW HIRING

The new Mainstay Suites
Hotel in Port St. Joe is now
accepting applications for
front desk, room attend-
ants (housekeeping), laun-
dry personnel and run-
ners. Several part time and
full time positions are
available. We are looking
for a few great people to
join our team! If you are
great with guests, have a
passion for superior serv-
ice and can play well with
others, we would love to
hear from you. As to be ex-
pected, a flexible schedule
is a must, weekends and
holidays will be required.
Benefits include health
insurance, aflac, tuition re-
imbursement, holiday pay,
vacation pay etc. E.O.E.
DFWR Apply in person at
the Port Inn, 501 Monu-
ment Ave. Port St. Joe


ral esateTusa
autos:ug 2d~


,LYNN HAVEN, FL 2340 SEWANEE ST
3BR 2BA 2,1 50sf+.With pool. Built 1969.
Approx .52ac lot.Taxes $1750 ('05).
Opening bid: $50,000
Inspections: I-4pm Sunday August 13th & 20th
and 2 hours prior to sale time.
Sells: 12pmThu.,August 24th

williamsauction.com

(800) 801-8003.




WILLIAMS & WILLIAMS
SFL RE LIC 3003737 DEAN C. WILLIAMS BROKER, AUC LIC AU112
S THOMAS L. WILLIAMS AUCTIONEER, W&W AUC LIC AB-0000760


THEqSTAR


Applications are being taken at Franklin CIl, Gulf CI,
and other panhandle correctional institutions

Employment opportunities are available as soon as you
.tart training! Classes are offered in Port St Joe through the
Gulf.Franklin Center of Gulf Coast Community College.


CORRECTIONAL OFFICER BASIC STANDARDS CLASS

Begins August 17,2006
Graduates in December 2006

ALL CLASSES are Monday Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Financial aid isavailableforauolified applicants


lr CommunityCollege '


Call:

Toll Free:

Fax:

Email:

Email:


in


General

Pest Control
Technician
Experience helpful but will
train the right person. Must
have a clean Florida Driv-
ers License. Must be avail-
able to work 40 hours a
week or more if needed.
Apply in person at 321 B
Reid Ave from 9:00-11:30
or 1:00-3:00




Professional

DOGulfCoast
Community College


Counselor, Minority Svs.
- provide personal & aca-
demic counseling/advising
to new/current students;
lead minority recruitment &
retention efforts. Requires
MS in counseling/related
field; exper. in educational
guidance and counseling
preferred. Starts@ $29k/yr
Apply by 8/25/06.
Additional info: h//
dept.gulfcoast.ed u/jobs.
GCCC is an EA/EO/M/F/
Vet employer.




Real Estate

Sales Associate

St. Joe Towns & Resorts is
currently recruiting for
Sales Associates for their
Windmark Beach develop-
ment in Port St. Joe, FL.
This position requires a FL
real estate license, proven
history in selling and or
marketing coastal/resort
properties and .computer
literacy in data base con-
tact management soft-
ware. This is an outstand-
ing opportunity to become
a part of the JOE team that
will develop 3.5 miles of
beach front property on St.
Joseph Bay! This position
maintains weekend and
holiday office hours.
Please fax your resume to
850-229-7952 or email re-
becca.standige(ajoe.com.
Equal Opportunity
Employer
Pre-Employment Drug
Screening Reauired


HELP IS ONLY A


PHONE CALL

SAWAY


4


& CARRA.BE[1f0'I-IMES


850-747-5020

800-345-8688

850-747-5044

thestar@pcnh.com

thetimes@pcnh.com


Trades






ARCTIC POLAR
Heating & Air, LLC
Lic#RA-0067062
WANTED: Equipment/Duct
Work Installers, Service
Technicians Clean driving
record req.
Must pass background
check
Top Producers=Top Pay
Incentive Bonus Program.
Prior experience a PLUS!
Apply at:1516 E. 11th St
PC, FL
Call 850-785-5447 or
850-541-3308
Drug & Alcohol Free
Work Place. EOE
Trades
Concrete Laborers & Fin-
ishers needed call 229-
6525



Trades
Construction Laborers
needed. Transportation a
must. Call 850-527-6751
day or 229-7078 evenings.
Trades

HVAC Mechanics
& Helpers
(Experienced)
PANAMAA CITY &
MEXICO BEACH AREAS)
Top Pay, Excellent Bene-
fits, Vacation/Holiday Pay,
401K.
Keith Lawson Company
Kendall Clark
(850) 527-5439
KLC is an EOE/AAE/DFWP
Minority Applicants
encourage to apply
Trades

Marine Pipe Welders
Marine Pipe Fitters
Out of town work in
Virginia, Per Diem,
Overtime Job. Completion
Saftey Bonus.
Welco Craftsman,
Inc. 800-485-5221
Trades
Painters & Exper SPRAY-
ER Needed. Full time, long
term project, in Mexico
Beach/Port St Joe area,
pay DOE. Call Jeff 850-
258-3478.



Trades
Plumbers Helper & experi-
ence plumbers, will train,
paid vacation & holidays,
Starting pay $9/hr, Drivers
license required, 639-5227
for application



4110
General

Therapist Needed
The Port Inn/Thirsty Goat
is now, accepting applica-
tions for a part time bar-
tender. The ideal candi-
date will have a thorough
knowledge of liquors,
beers, wines, and mixolo-
gy techniques, but were
willing to train the right
person. If you have an eye
for detail, the highest de-
sire to deliver superior
service, and can play well
with others, we would love
to hear from you! The shift
is normally 4:30-10:30
Thursday-Saturday. Apply
in person at the address
below. EOE. DFWR
PORT INN
501 Monument Ave.
Dnrtt 0+ r In p 0A1 O


Hospitality

The Port Inn
Now accepting applica-
tions for a Front Desk
Sales Agent. Weekends
and holidays are required.
This is is a full time position.
The ideal candidate will
have previous computer
and guest service skills,
but we are willing to train
the right person. Health
Insurance is available after
90 days to all full time em-
ployees. If you are great
with guests, an excellent
problem solver and have a
desire to be the best, we
want you. Come join our
family! E.O.E. DFWP
Apply in person at:
PORT INN
501 Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456



S 4130
*REMEMBER:*
Ads in this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire an investment or
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend giv-
ing credit card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.

Clerical
Administrative
Earn $12-$48/hour. Full
benefits. Paid training. Var-
ious Government Positions
Available. Homeland Secu-
rity, Law Enforcement,
Wildlife and more.
Call 7 days
1-800-320-9353, Ext 2139

Clerical
Administrative
Earn $12-$48/hour. Full
benefits. Paid training. Var-
ious Government Positions
Available. Homeland Secu-
rity, Law Enforcement,
Wildlife and more.
Call 7 days
1-800-320-9353, Ext 2139
Guaranteed MLM Suc-
cess! Free. qualified leads
and 100 people placed to
kick start! Watch video on
line: www.thetruecode.
com
Now Hiring for 2006 Post-
al Jobs $18/hour. starting,
Avg. Pay $57K/ year Fed-'
eral benefits, Paid Training
and Vacations. No Expe-
rience Needed! 1-800-
584-1775 Ref #P5101



L I




BUSINESS & FINANCIAL
5100 Business
Opportunities
5110- Money to Lend




4COP Liquor
License for sale
Bay County Florida. Min-
imum bid $250K. Bids
accepted til 09-15-06 to
Alisa James, Esq., 921
Jenks Ave., .Panama
City, Florida 32401

*REMEMBER:*
Ads in this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire an investment or
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend giv-
ing credit card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.


REAL ESTATE FOR RENT]
6100 Business/
Commercial
6110 Apartments
6120 Beach Rentals
6130 Condo/Townhouse
6140 House Rentals
6150- Roommate Wanted
6160 Rooms for Rent
6170 Mobile Home/Lot
6180 Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 Timeshare Rentals
6200 Vacation Rentals


1 6100 --1



Commercial Building for
lease with workshop and
office space. Approx.
3300sf. 201 Tarpon St.
Port St. Joe call
850-229-9400
New Metal
Building $1650/month.
2800sf has new office and
bathroom. Call
850-258-6139
Two Private 2nd Floor Of-
fices with shared reception
and kitchen. Beautiful view
overlooking St. Joe Bay at
Simmons Bayou. Perfect
for real estate office or
small business. $350.00
monthly per office. Utilities
included. First, last month
rent plus $150.00 deposit
per unit required. Call 850-
229.7799 rd.F ?4pnr.

America's

Mini Storage


(8501229-8014

BEACH

STORAGE
Day: 227-7200
Night: 647-3882
SSt. Joe Beach

MINI STORAGE


In Port St. Joe

814-7400







PLUS SMALL ENGINE
REPAIRS
NOW AVAILABLE
Climate Control

St. Joe
Rent-All, Inc.
706 First Street
Phone 227-2112
/ MINI-STORAGE \



a5x10 10x10 10x20

On Site Rentals 6 Days
A Week

ASKABOUT FREE
MONTH'S RENT!





1 br apartments, nicely fur-
nished w/beautiful views,
close to town, $550wk,
850-227-5989



2 br, Close to Down town,
nice fenced in patio area.
$650 mo + Sec. dep. Avail
now. Call 850-527-7901



Grand Lagoon-Thomas
Drive. One bedroom, one
bath, with loft. Fully fur-
nished with washer and
dryer. Bay view with deck
and pool. $925/mo. Call
Michelle at 850-265-9006
or 888-265-9006.


To Place Your Classified ad


Call Our New Numbers Now!


---


5100
Awesome Opportunity.
New Fitness Company
seeking Business Builders.
$60K/six months. Kev/Jen
1-800-841-7906.
New Fitness Company
Zero Competition. Earn
$75K in 6 mos., will train.
Call Kev/Jen 800-641-7906
(24 hr msg).
Synergy Homecare is
awarding franchises na-
tionwide! MSNBC rates in-
home elder care as #1 on
list of '10 HOT BUSI-
NESSES TO START NOW!'
1-888-659-7771 www.syn
rgyhomecare.com

VENDING ROUTE
All Snacks, All Drinks,
All Brands
Great Equipment /
Support Financing availa-
ble with $6K down
Call: 800-337-6590 local
#B02002-037

C'


6130



Grand Lagoon-Thomas
Drive. One bedroom, one
bath, with loft. Fully fur-
nished with washer and
dryer. Bay view with deck
and pool. $925/mo. Call
Michelle at 850-265-9006
or 888-265-9006.
Mexico Beach 3 br, 2 ba,
1400 sqft. townhouse. Ful-
ly furnished, DISH, pool.
$1,200/month for year
lease. Call 850-624-9516



Two townhouses located
in gated community on
beautiful Cape San Bias.
.Two bedroom, two bath;
unfurnished. $950 month
with $950 security/damage
deposit. Call for more in-
formation. 229-2706 or
229-4700


| 6140
St. Joe Beach, 3 br, 2 ba,
enclosed garage, gulfview,
beach access, furnished,
$1200 mo., will consider
lease purchase. Call Bob-
bie@ 258-5261.






Doublewide MH 3 br, 2 ba
449 Pineda Street St. Joe
Beach. $900/mo + dep.
Call Mon thru Wed.
229-294-8197 or Thurs.
thru Sun. 850-647-3289








REAL ESTATE FORSALE
7100 Homes
7110 Beach Home/
Property
7120 Commercial
7130 Condo/Townhouse
7140 Farms & Ranches
7150 Lots and Acreage
7160 Mobile Homes/Lots
7170 Waterfront
7180 Investment
Property
7190 Out-of-Town
Real Estate
7200 Timeshare






2 BR 1 BA Port St.Joe.
Corner lot with bay view.
REDUCED $215K 850-
7 6 2 3 2 5 2
www.forsalebyowner.com/
20589028
4 br, 2 ba 2200SF 3/4 acre
FP, irrigation well, Ig
screened 357SF porch, hot
tub, carport, all new kitch.
appli., sec. features,
FSBO, laundry/utility rm.
Need To See! $265K Call
850-229-8754, Iv mess.



House only for Sale! Must
be moved. 5746 Hwy 71.(6
miles N. of PSJ). Approx
1400 sf, 3 br,1 ba,hrdwd
floors, C/A;, FP, stove,
refig, W/D. Ducky Johnson
has moving cost info.
$18,000. Call Mary Lou @
850-227-4625
MEXICO BEACH
-Best Deal on the Beach!
Beautiful 2 Br, 3 ba fully
furnished Gulf view
Townhome $389K
770-426-6896
Mexico Beach 3 br 2 ba,
garage, pool, fireplace,
new roof, carpet, fresh
paint, sprinkler system,.
$274.9K, Seller Finance
Pelican Walk Real Estate
850-647-2473
Rare Riverfront Lot for
Sale. Most beautiful lot on
Chipola River in City
Limits of Wewa. acre lot
$250,000. Call 639-5004,
Realtor, Broker/ Owner.
OAK GARDENS II NEW 3
br, 2 ba Homes for Sale,
only. a few left in .
$155,000. Call Gulf County
Realty, 639-5004, Broker
GASKIN SAWMILL SUB-
DIVISION NEW HOMES,
Beautiful wooded lots,
very nice homes. Two un-
der construction or will
build to suit. Come for a
look in Wewa.
Gulf County
Realty
639-5004.
Two new homes, 3 br, 2
ba Upscale subdivision,
paved streets and land-
scaped. Ready to move in.
Low $200's 229-672-1274



Wewa 619 Chipola Ave.
New 3 br, 2 ba, 1287sf, 1
car garage, master suite
with jucuzzi, large walk in
closet, stainless steel ap-
pli. For sale by owner
$159,900 850-832-0251




New Metal Building
2800sf includes new office
and bathroom. Priced at
$395,000 < Call
850-258-6139







Panama City
Laketown Wharf
investor must sell ASAP,
2004 price. 1681 sq ft.
Penthouse, $519,000. Call
(585) 943-5100


S 7150
Bayview Lot
in Highland View, on Pom-
pano Street. $129,500.
Call (706) 333-0159.



St Joe Beach, 2 1/2 lots,
steps to dedicated beach,
$510K, will divide, $10K
buyer rebate, Pelican Walk
Real Estate, 850-647-2473.




Overstreet Area Mobile
home for sale. Asking
$109K. Some owner fi-
nancing avail. Call 478-
960-0800



Residential Waterfront
and water view home sites
from $150,000. Coldwell
Banker Residential Real
Estate, Inc. Don Yarbrough
850-527-5887



2 ba 2 ba New 1st Tear
House for long term rental,
Near Indian Pass, no
smoking or pets, $1500
mo, 214-352-3147



2 br, 1 ba, Highland View
area. Available 8/15/06.
W&D, DW incl, $725 mo.,
(817) 789-3527.



2 br, 2 ba with loft/den or
3rd br, 1400sf, quiet area,
large yard, yard care in-
cluded. 1st last and securi-
ty deposit required.
$1085/mo. 850-653-6792



3 Bedroom home just
minutes from downtown
Port St. Joe and walking
distance to beautiful St. jo-
seph .bay. nice quaint
neighborhood. Perfect for
a small family. $1000 se-
curity/damage deposit.
Call 229-2706 or 229-4700
for details.



3 br, 2 ba CH/A 2 car car-
port and upper deck 6266
Hwy 98 and Pine St, PSJ
Beach 850-647-5004



3 br. 2 ba renovated home
.',ar carport. Incl. W/D,
.i,:,e D W & Frogge On
qui, l s.lreel i.n Me- .-
Beach. .$1000 n,:, r n 1 ,,r
lease + 1 mo deop Call
208-830-14.12
Cape San Bias : Board-
-walk Sub. 3 br, 2 ba, pool,
hot tub, fully furn. $1800
rn,:,. Call 850-229-8593
Cape San Bias Beach
Side Home, 2 br, 2 ba Gulf
v*e* r,:.me close -to St Jo-
-eprn' Sr ia i Par Broad-
walk to beach, Screened
Porch and two sun decks.
Unfurnished, available for
6 to, 12 month lease:
$1200 per month. Call
owner at 843-342-5983, or
a local friend at 850-340-
0628
Downtown Wewa. For
Rent. 2 br, 2 ba Duplex
Unit. $795/mo Nice neigh-
borhood. Call Gulf County
Realty, 639-5004, Broker
Gorgeous Bay Sunset
view on CR-30, 2 bdrms,
21/2 baths, wood floors,
custom cabinets, fully fur-
nished, screened porch &
open deck, 6-9 month
lease, $1295 mo, first, last
month tent & $650 security
deposit. on signing. No
pets. 850-229-7799.
Gulf Front, CR30-A, 3br, 3
ba C/HA, multiple decks,
beautiful beach, 'fully fur-
nished, no pets. $1650
mo/$750 dep call
850-648-5045
Gulfview on C-30
Treasure Shores west if
Indian Pass Raw Bar: 2 br
2 ba old FL. Classic.
Cottage, newly remodeled,
scrnd porch, non-smoking
& no pets. $900 per
month, minimum 6 months
lease. Owner is licensed
Realtor. Call Margaret
850-527-6517
Mexico Beach 3 br, 2 ba,
sun room, deck over-
looking canal, $1300/mo
+,dep. Call 850-647-3110
r.r 404-886-0578



Port St. Joe bay view
1810sf 3 br, 2 ba. Ig. Flori-
da room, w/d, Fp, fenced
backyard with lawn care
included. 2 car attached
garage. 102 Sunset Circle.
$1575/mo. + dep. Avail.
Sept. 8. Call 850-774-6649
St. Joe Beach cottage, 1.5
biks to Gulf. 3 br, 2 ba,
newly redecorated, new
appliances, Lg. screened
porch, shed for RV/Boat.
Pets maybe, No smoking.
227-3453



Waterfront 3 br, 2 ba lo-
cated in the Overstreet
area. Completely renovat-
ed with new kitchen &
bath, Irg back porch, over-
looking intercoastal water-
way. Short drive to the
beach.. Call 648-5865


1 Acre +
in Wewa on Stoneybrook,
$62K Call 850-227-1885
75x150 lot with util. 2nd
blk from gulf. MH,
front/back porches, w/2 util
bldgs. 24x36 carport New
AC, Roof, flooring & apple.
$250K Best $ on Beachi
850-647-9193


8100 Antique & Collectibles
8110- Cars
8120 Sports Utility Vehicles
8130 Trucks
8140 Vans
8150 Commercial
8160 Motorcycles
8170 Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210 Boats
8220 Personal Watercraft
8230 Sailboats
8240 Boat & Marine
Supplies
8310- Aircraft/Aviation
8320 ATV/Off Road Vehicles
8330 Campers & Trailers
8340 Motorhomes


--W8110 --I
Mazda RX8 '04, 8,500 mi-
les, 6 speed, Loadedlf
Lightning Yellow, CDW
leather call 653-6375
To Place An Ad
in The Times .
Classifieds
Call
(850) 747-5020 -
or
1 (800) 345-8688



Toyota Avalon '03 4 door;
XLS, 50,000 n-rri;les leaiher
seats, sun ,co. i,: led
$20,000 Call 850-832-3601


- 8120



Chrysler Pacifica '0e
40,000 miles, leather
seats, sun roof, DVD plays
er $20,000 850-527-8354.



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Children's Crusad

Compassion leader grew up among those he


Story by PAUL ASAY
Photos by HUNTER McRAE
Freedom News Service
The drums wept, low and
loud. As a child, Wesley Stafford
heard them as he lay on his cot,
sweating in the West African night.
He knew the drums' language:
Sometimes they warned when
strangers were coming, sometimes
they laughed during festivals.
On some nights, the drums
beat out obituaries: eulogies for
children who died from snake-
bites, from malaria, from measles.
The drums marked the passing of
Stafford's childhood friends.
And, on his cot, tears would
roll down his cheeks and into
his ears and, with the drums still
beating, he'd drift off to sleep.
"It kills me when leaders
of ministries who work among
the poor can tell you (how many
children die a day) and then get
right on with the next topic," said
Stafford, the 56-year-old presi-
dent of Compassion International,
a relief organization that helps
poverty-stricken children. "Those
are not numbers. I've got faces. I
not only know how many die I
now who dies.
"You know who dies?" he
asks. "The good ones die."
Stafford was the son of
Conservative Baptist missionar-
ies and was raised in the village
of Niell6 (pronounced Nee-el-A) in
the Ivory Coast. He moved to the
United States when he was 15,
joined Compassion International
at 27 and has been its president
since 1993. '
It's a job he believes he was
destined for; that those childhood
drums set the cadence for his life.
"I was Compassion's presi-
dent-in-training when I was, like, 5
years old," he said. "I can see that
now. (God) let me grow up among
fihe very kids that I now serve."
During its 2005 fiscal year,
the nonprofit group took in $217
million,. $80 million more than
Focus on the Family, another high-
profile ministry, earned in its 2005
fiscal year. I
Compassion is a middleman,
linking nearly 760,000 children
worldwide to 450,000 sponsors.
Sponsors pay $32 a month to
supply a child with food, cloth-
ing, education and an understand-
ing of Christianity. Sponsors also
exchange letters with the children
- the most important part of the
program, according to Stafford.
"Probably the single most
strategic thing that can be done
for a child in po er t i- to let then
kiow they are not alone." Stafford
said.
The person-to-person
Outreach has helped. make
Compassion the Starbucks of the
nonprofit world. Compassion's
revenue has more than quadru-
pled during Stafford'- presiden-
tial tenure, and its international
headquarters is undergoing a
$20.8 million expansion, which
will nearly double the size of the
154,000-square-foot building.
Because aid is funneled
through churches, a few critics
say Compassion makes its help
contingent on Christian faith.
Compassion officials respond by
saying that 'they want to help the
whole person body, mind and
spirit. They believe food is impor-
tant but faith is life-changing.
Compassion has largely
steered clear of controversy and
is .regularly ranked as one of the
country's most fiscally responsible
organizations. Charity Navigator
gave the ministry its top ranking
for the fifth straight year this past
spring.
Stafford has a low, rolling
ioice and a Mister Rogers smile.
Most days, he shuns the standard
executive coat and tie, preferring
a polo or open-collar shirt. Those
who work with him say it's hard
to picture him as chief of a world-
wide ministry.


"He's so down to earth," said
Eleanor Taggart, Compassion's
prayer-ministry manager who's
worked with Stafford for more
than eight years. "He conveys this
genuine interest in people."
Stafford's wife, Donna, said
that during one visit to Ecuador,
Stafford disappeared from a
tour of Compassion's programs.
"Eventually they spotted him, out
on the field, playing soccer with a
bunch of grinning and obviously
very delighted sponsored kids,"
Donna said via e-mail. "Tall and
American as he is, Wess is often
'invisible' in projects because he
is crouched down at the kids' eye
level, surrounded by a big crowd
of giggling children."
Stafford's more preacher than
businessman. His discussions are
expansive, more freeform poetry
than annual report. And when he
talks, especially about the chil-
dren, he sometimes cries.
"His emotions are just a
quarter of an inch below the sur-
face. It's not a schtick," said writer
Dean Merrill, who co-authored
Stafford's recently published
child-advocacy book, "Too Small
to Ignore."
Alemu Beeftu, head of the
Colorado Springs-based ministry
Gospel of Glory and a longtime
friend, said, "He is a visionary, a
very passionate type of person.
Wess is real."
Stafford's office is filled with-
childhood mementos: a picture
of him teaching his village friends
how to read; a slingshot he made
- a long, braided. string with
a pocket in the middle. It's the
kind of slingshot a biblical David
might've used to slay Goliath, and
a young Stafford used to kill far-
away baboons, whose hands were
dinnertime treats in Niell6. He
said he's still a pretty good shot.
There's a bell, too one that
sounds identical to one Stafford
heard often as a boy. For nine
months a year, he attended a
boarding school with dozens of
other missionary children, and
his abusive teachers would ring a
bell before they read the "bad" list
- the list of students about to be


beaten.
"The sound
e r^ churns my stom-
ach," he said. "To
this day."
serves The relics
remind Stafford
of where he came
from and why
he does what he does. When he
looks at the picture, he sees dead
friends, many killed by disease
and poverty before they reached
age 18. He sees a village that,
because of instability and a lack
of church partners in the Ivory
Coast, is still out of Compassion's
reach.
"I rejoice at what this place
has become," Stafford said of
Compassion. "But I am never
more than 10 seconds away from
tears when I consider that even
if we were 10 times our size,
we would still be nothing in this
world of hurting children."
Stafford has been helping
these children for most of his adult
life. He's worked for Compassion
since 1977, first as a relief worker
in Haiti. He married Donna there
and left Haiti in 1981 to join
Compassion's corporate office.
He earned degrees from
Christian institutions Wheaton
College, Biola University and the
Moody Bible Institute, as well as
a doctorate in philosophy from
Michigan State University.
"I'm uniquely qualified, I
think, to lead this place, but its
not because of any great qualities'
of mine, but because of God's path
God's ordination, if you will,"
Stafford said. "I've done what I
can to prepare myself, but more
than anything, God really put his
hand on me when I was small and
prepared me for this job."
Stafford grew up idolizing his
village friends and often prayed
that God would turn him black so
he could be more like them.
But the world around. them
was unforgiving. He knew pain,
too: At one point, he calculated
that his missionary teachers beat.
him an average of 17 times a
week, often using a sandal soled
with tire tread.
Though Stafford said he
"never dared question" God's
ultimate goodness, he knew that
goodness was often hidden by
life's vicious whimsy.
"I thought that's, how the
world was," Stafford said. "It's
cruel, and it's harsh and children


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pay the highest price."
When Stafford came to the
United States, he saw grocery
stores loaded with food, phar-
macies brimming with medicines
and people who didn't appreci-
ate all they had. His friends, it
seemed, needn't have died. He
went through what he calls "great
rage" toward Americans that last-
ed halfway through college.
But, as he learned more about
the United States, he had a change
of heart.
"I began to realize it's not
that they don't care," he said. "It's
that they don't know. If they knew,
they would care, because I saw
the goodness of American people
- like no nation in history."
Compassion International is
now involved in 24 countries, work-
ing through Christian churches to
supply aid. That church connec-
tion is crucial, in Stafford's mind:
The children need the Christian
message as much as food and
clothing.
They also need encourage-
ment. That's why Compassion
emphasizes sponsor-to-child con-
tact. During his tenure, Stafford
and his family .have sponsored
19 children, some of whom have
"graduated" from Compassion's 0-
to-18-year-old program and are
doctors, architects and business
owners. The entire Stafford fam-
ily, including his two daughters,
Jenny and Katie, write letters to
their sponsored children frequent-
ly, and Stafford ticks off their
names like a proud grandfather.
"I know their names because
we pray for them every day," he
said.
But Compassion's work isn't
just a feel-good crusade. It's stra-
tegic, Stafford says: Giving these
children food, education and
encouragement is actually the best,
way to help world stability and


Compassion International chief Wess Stafford has made ai
career out of helping children. Part of his motivation comes from
his own rocky childhood in the Ivory Coast village where his parents
were missionaries. Today, Stafford's office holds relics of his past;
such as the bell, above, which brings back painful memories of his
childhood school. His book "Too Small to Ignore" urges readers to
cherish children.


to help improve the United States'
standing in it.
"We don't have the luxury of
living here, (isolated) in our little
blessing," he said. "There's a hurt-
ing world out there, and some of it
doesn't like us." k
Through Compassion,
Stafford hopes American children
will learn to help others and for-
eign children will grow up appre-
ciating U.S. generosity. Many of
them, Stafford believes, can influ-
ence the direction of their country.
The ministry started a leadership
program to help that along, and
it's a ministry-wide hope that, one
day, a Compassion "graduate" will
become a national president.
"They're under construction,"
Stafford said. "You don't know
who's a president of the country
in the making. You've got to seize


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every moment."
It's a ministry goal in part
because Stafford saw so much
potential in his childhood friends
in the Ivory Coast. When he vas
a child, Stafford thought his job
would be to finish translatng the
Bible into their language, so they
could go on and do great things
Few of his friends, though.
ever had a chance, he said. He
said he's probably survived them
all: Life expectancy in the Ivory
Coast is around 45 11 years
younger than Stafford is now
"I know that heaven is a great
place, because people better tha.
us have already gone ahead o
us," Stafford said. "And us rascals
that have survived, we'll stagger id
when the trumpet sounds."


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12( The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 10, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


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Full Text

PAGE 1

50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Semper Fi Sisters bring Beach Blast, Boxes of Love next week By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com To understand the importance to a deployed soldier of receiving a touch of home, maybe we have to understand what brings that soldier to a far-off land. To put one’s body in harm’s way, to lose friends and loved ones on the battle eld and beyond. To volunteer to put life on line, to stand and be counted when the job is literally life and death and the bene ts less than ideal. Laura Williams resides at that particular nexus. She is an Army veteran with two tours in Afghanistan physically behind NFCD to operate within historic building By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Having worked since early last year to save the historic County Courthouse in Wewahitchka, Sharon Gaskin received a huge boost Tuesday. During their regular bimonthly meeting, members of the Board of County Commissioners approved conditionally a lease agreement with Gaskin and her company North Florida Child Development Inc. The lease will allow NFCD to maintain its operations within the courthouse, moving from the upper oor to a space yet to be formally mapped out toward the front of the rst oor. The BOCC still must decide how to remediate water leaking and mold issues in the rear, where a jail was later added to the original courthouse. The county would provide a 10-year lease at $1 per year, with an annual renewal of the lease coming before the BOCC each October, county attorney Jeremy Novak said. There is also an economic development component of the lease under which NFCD must maintain a speci cally identi ed number of full-time employees in Gulf County, Novak said. The courtroom and chambers on the upper oor, a signi cant part of the courthouse’s registry onto the National Register of Historic Places, will continue to be available for BOCC and public use. There will be a 90-day transition to nalize the lease as NFCD addresses required federal and state audits — the company operates Head Start, Early Head Start and other programs in ve counties — in the next few months. In return for the lease, NFCD already has transferred utilities into its name and has agreed to make certain improvements during the rst 90 days of the lease, Novak said. As the tenant, it would carry costs for maintenance and repairs to the portion of the courthouse it is leasing while county work crews would continue maintenance of the grounds. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The waiting game continues. Walt Butler stood silent but attentive during his pre-trial hearing on Tuesday as public defender Henry Sims told Judge John Fishel two more motions needed to be led. According to Sims, those motions were expected to take 2-3 hours to complete. Butler’s trial date is set for Nov. 18, and Fishel said he had limited availability before the trial is expected to take place. The judge booked three hours across three days to allow Sims to enter the motions. The hearings will take place from 3-4 p.m. ET Oct. 17, 11 a.m. to noon Oct. 29 and 11 a.m. to noon Nov. 14. Sims led a motion in September for Fishel to reconsider Butler’s bond status, but no decision had yet been reached. According to Sims and prosecutor Robert Sombathy, the trial next month is expected to last 2-3 days. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com It was a close encounter of the mono lament kind. Gulf World Marine Institute successfully rehabilitated a sub-adult loggerhead sea turtle, which was released at the Bay/ Gulf County line last Thursday. More than 50 attendees gathered to watch Taylor, named for the county in which it was rescued, head back out to sea. Boaters in Perry found Taylor entangled in shing gear. “The mono lament restricts their ippers and then constricts when they move,” said Stephanie Nagle, an Education Coordinator with GWMI. “If not treated, the line can cut off the turtle’s circulation.” Not expecting a crowd, Taylor appeared apprehensive about getting back in the water. After some encouragement from Nagle, the turtle headed out on its next adventure. Taylor was considered a teenager and thus the sex of the turtle was unknown. Loggerheads don’t typically reach maturity until age 30. Another turtle, an endangered juvenile green sea turtle found stranded on Panama City Beach, was scheduled to be released but hadn’t yet received the “all clear” from the GWMI veterinarian. The green sea turtle was also found tangled in mono laments. A release will be rescheduled once the turtle has been medically cleared to return to the water. According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, improperly discarded mono lament shing line can cause problems for marine life and the environment. Marine mammals, sea turtles, sh and birds become injured from entanglements or ingest the line, often dying as a result. The FWC started the Mono lament Recovery & Recycling Program now provides recycling bins to more than 40 Florida counties. WALT BUTLER BOCC conditionally OKs courthouse lease New motions delay Butler pre-trial hearing PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star After rehabilitating a sub-adult loggerhead sea turtle, employees of Gulf World Marine Institute released the turtle at Beacon Hill. Below, after some encouragement from the crowd of 50, Taylor the turtle headed back out to sea. Rehabilitated loggerhead sea turtle released at Beacon Hill TAR TAR Wewahitchka, Port St. Joe schools celebrate Homecoming B5 HOMEWARD BOUND Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . A4 Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . A7-8 Community . . . . . . . . . . B1 School News . . . . . . . . . . B3 Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Classi eds . . . . . . . . . . B7-8 ‘We love what is behind us’ TIM CROFT | The Star The Centennial Building will become a factory of love Oct. 19 for the annual Semper Fi Sisters Beach Blast Packing Party. See COUNTY A5 See BUTLER A5 See SEMPER FI A3 Thursday, OCTOBER 10, 2013 YEAR 75, NUMBER 52

PAGE 2

Local A2 | The Star Thursday, October 10, 2013 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Bed taxes are up and the Gulf County Tourist Devel opment Council advisory council was feeling good. During last Friday’s regular meeting the coun cil celebrated a bed tax revenue increase of 26.8 percent in August over the same month last year. The current 4 percent tax collected $747,254 year –to-date over the 2011-12 total of $661,372. Beach nourishment plans for the new scal year include signage for Indian Pass, Cape San Blas and St. Joe Beach to warn visitors and residents to not walk on the dunes, though coun cil chairman David Warri ner worried that too many signs may be unattractive to Gulf County visitors. “I have a problem with ‘don’t’ signs,” said Warri ner. “I don’t want to say no to everyone.” The council agreed to monitor the public’s re sponse to the signs and revisit the verbiage in the future if needed. TDC director Jennifer Jenkins mentioned that the budget had undergone a nal adjustment from $600,000 to $650,000 for the new scal year. Jenkins said that this number was still conservative. Jenkins reported on the TDC’s recently wrapped month-long Pinterest cam paign that had visitors and residents identifying places around Gulf County through photographs post ed online. The campaign raised awareness of the Forgotten Coast by spot lighting the beaches and other out-of-the-way gems. “It was a fabulous pro motion,” said Jenkins. “It’s all about getting the word out.” Jenkins reported that the campaign led to a 40 percent increase in website trafc and a 273 percent in crease in fans for the TDC’s Facebook page. So far this year, 54,557 visitor guides had been shipped or distributed and visitation to the Welcome Center was up 14 percent from last year. Jenkins said that she attributes the success of the campaign to showing potential visitors and resi dents the natural beauty that the area has to offer. “We really captured the essence of Gulf County,” she said. The marketing cam paign led to other media exposure from Panama City news stations and travel bloggers. A new TDC website is currently being developed and is scheduled to be live in mid-February of next year that will allow trafc to be directed to specic areas of the webpage that visitors may nd appealing or helpful. Another marketing en deavor saw eight wooden kiosks built around Gulf County to list upcoming TDC-sponsored events, important information and to invite guests to the Wel come Center. They were constructed by the county’s mainte nance team and have been erected at area parks that include Frank Pate, Indian Pass, Salinas, White City, Gaskin, Beacon Hill, High land View and the Dead Lakes (see related article). Scheduled appearances at the council meeting in cluded Brenda Garth of the Semper Fi Sisters. Garth asked the council for a special adjustment that would allow her to have $2,500 up-front for the ship ping of the “Boxes of Love” that will be put together during the group’s annual packing party at the Cen tennial Building, for which the city of Port St. Joe has waived its rental fee. The funds, allocated an nually, would allow the Sis ters to ship 200 packages. Pat Hardman, coordina tor of the Shells and Tales storytelling event, sought $1,600 to pay professionals to come in for the 2014 in stallment in February. At last year’s event, yarn spinners included Panama City humorist Pat Nease and Tallahassee’s Robyn A. Rennick. The council awarded the funds in hopes that the event could ulti mately rival the 10,000 per son events held in North Carolina and Tennessee. Patrick Jones appeared on behalf of the Port of Port St. Joe. He explained that until the Port is operation al, funds are not available for operating costs. In or der to raise money, the Gulf County Economic Develop ment Alliance, Inc. decided to host a golf tournament in December and sought $1,500-$2,000 to purchase signage, banners and yers to market the event. “Less than two months to pull off a golf tournament is a recipe for disaster,” said Warriner. The council agreed that they would help promote the event through their on line presence, but no mon ey was awarded and the request was tabled while Jones explored other av enues for funding. Prior to adjournment, Warriner revealed that County Commissioner War ren Yeager, also a member of the TDC council, would serve for the 2014 year. $ S e e a T y n d a l l F e d e r a l C r e d i t U n i o n r e p r e s e n t a t i v e f o r c o m p l e t e d e t a i l s a n d d i s c l o s u r e s D e f e r r e d p a y m e n t o e r a v a i l a b l e o n a u t o l o a n s o p e n e d b e t w e e n O c t o b e r 7 2 0 1 3 a n d D e c e m b e r 3 1 2 0 1 3 A l l r a t e s a n d o e r s a r e s u b j e c t t o c h a n g e w i t h o u t n o t i c e M e m b e r e l i g i b i l i t y r e q u i r e d ; a n i n i t i a l $ 1 n o n r e f u n d a b l e m e m b e r s h i p f e e w i l l a p p l y % # % & # % + # # % % + % % + + % % % % % % % % % + % % % # & % % % ( % # ( % % # % % % % & ( % ( % % + (+ # # % % ) + % # D A TE CHANGE ON SEALED BIDS Notice to Recei v e Sealed Bids October 1, 2013 The City of W e w ahitchka in Gulf County Florida will accept seal bids from certied asbestos remo v al companies that are appro v ed by the State of Florida to remo v e asbestos material from a b uilding. Bids must be sealed and mark ed Asbestos Remo v al. A scope of services can be pick ed up at the City Anne x located 318 South 7th St. All bids must be turned in to the City Clerk before 12 noon CT October 28, 2013 at 318 South 7th St. All bids will be opened on October 28, 2013 at 12:15 pm CT at the old City Hall located at 109 South 2nd St. The City of W e w ahitchka is an Equal Opportunity Emplo yer/ Handicapped Accessible/F air Housing Jurisdiction. The City of W e w ahitchka reserv es the right to reject an y and all bids. October 10, 2013 Connie P arrish City Clerk 1 1 13270 THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER V ince n t I v e rs, M.D B C I M C S S KIN CAN CER c a n b e p r es e n t w i tho u t y o u k no w in g i t CALL t o d a y f o r a s k in c a nce r s cr e e nin g. www .iv ersmd.com VINCENT IVERS, M.D 301 T w entieth Str eet P ort St. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 Mon T ue Thurs & Fri 9 am 6 pm W ed & Sat 9 am 2 pm ALL MAJOR INSURANCE A CCEPTED S ER VI CES 1 5 / *1, 4 4 1*, % ( +, ( ) ( (*1 41 1, ,( 4 ( 4 0 0 1* ( 4 ( 1 ( $ 3! ( +1/ ( 5 &" 4 1 1 / , 1 0 ( 1 0 4, 4 ,1 / / 1 ( 1/ 1 1 ( 05 ( ( + 1 1 ( 4 4, / 1 ( ) 1* ( ( / ,5 0 1 1 1 (+ (* 0 1/ ( 1 ) ,1 3 (* 3 2 1, 0 1* 1 ( ( ( / ,5 ,5 ( 4 $ ( 4," 3 1 ( /" ( 1 4 ,5 ( 4 11* ,( 1 / ( , ( 5 3 1 ( *, ( ( + 5 1* 5 ( 4/ ( 5 ,+ 4 41* 41 1 5 1* *, + , ( 5 ( 0 ( 1 ,5 ( 4 ( 1+, # ,1 ,5 ( 4 %" 1 4 4, 4 ( (+1, 1 1 11 (*, 1' $ 1 3 4, ( 5 ( / , ( 5 , +1* ( 4 3 1 ( ( + 0 5 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Building a brand is no easy feat. The Tourist Development Coun cil rolled out its new visitor’s guide in March, launching a new brand for Gulf County that focused on the natural beauty of the area. The lat est marketing strategy is a series of eight wooden kiosks stationed at area parks that will display in formation, important events and alerts for visitors and residents. TDC director Jennifer Jen kins approached the county com missioners with the idea for the kiosks. Jenkins was inspired by similar kiosks planned for Salinas Park that would be updated with water conditions and operated by the South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department. While the re department end ed up with a digital display, there was still value in setting up an in formation booth at the park. Joint Fire Chief Melissa Larsen said that there is regular commu nication between the re depart ment and the TDC. Any time Lars en changes the colored ags that signify water conditions the TDC updates the ags on the Welcome Center website. Larsen said that the TDC ki osks will add another form of com munication for visitors and should be very helpful. After Jenkins, with Larsen’s support, received approval from commissioners for the kiosks, stra tegic locations were chosen and the structures were built over the course of a month by the county maintenance team. “It’s another touch point for vis itors and they t our brand,” said Jenkins. The kiosks can be found at Frank Pate Park, Salinas Park, Gaskin Park, Highland View, In dian Pass, White City, the Dead Lakes and Beacon Hill. These kiosks are not for paid advertisers and will be used exclu sively for TDC-sponsored events and important information re garding seasonal shing or riptide advisories. Along with listing the “do’s and don’ts” for the area in which the kiosks sit, posted signage will en courage tourists to visit the Wel come Center in Port St. Joe. The kiosks will be actively updated once a month by TDC staff. “These kiosks will allow us to continually communicate with visi tors and relay the same message and same types of branding,” said Jenkins. “It’s been great working with the city and county and we’re very excited.” New kiosks add to Gulf County brand WES LOCHER | The Star The Tourist Development Council has created eight kiosks with area information at parks around Gulf County. TDC celebrates successful fall marketing campaign

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, October 10, 2013 e { p  ’ Œ | 8  – “ c € Š { Mexic Bac Anua Ar & W n F stiva Mexico Beach 5th Annual 2003 Wine & Art Festival { Š € – “ c  |8 ’Œ  p { e Mexic Bac Anua Ar & n W stiva F Mexico Beach 5th Annual Mexico Beach 5th Annual 2003 Wine & Art Festival 2003 Wine & Art Festival 1 5 T H AN N U AL A R T & W I N E F E S T I V A L S A T U R D A Y O C T O B E R 1 2 2 0 1 3 – 2 P M ( C D T ) D R I F T W O O D I N N – M E X I C O B EA C H F L A E N J O Y L I V E M U S I C F O O D B E E R W I N E L I V E AN D S I L E N T A U C T I O N S A N D O V E R 2 5 AR T I S T S D I SP L A YI NG T H E I R W OR K F O R M O R E I N F O R M A T I O N V I SI T M E X ICO BE A C H CO M $ 5 0 0 / P E R S O N A D M I S S I O N AL U N H AN T 5 1 L A V I T S E E F N I T & W R A ) T D C ( M 2 P 3 – 1 0 2 2 R 1 E B O T C O Y A D R U T A S A L F H C EA O B C I X E N – M N D I O O W T F I R D T N E L I D S E AN V I L E N I W R E E B D O O F C I S U E M V I Y L O J N E K OR R W I E H NG T YI A L SP I S D T S I T 5 AR R 2 E V D O N A S N O I T C U A T SI I V N O I T A M R O F N E I R O R M O F M CO H C A BE ICO X E M I O N S S I M D A O N S R E P / 0 0 5 $ her, and yet, she will say, not so much mentally and emotionally. She is also sister to a Marine with deployments in Afghanistan, prepar ing to re-enlist, as well as the wife of another soldier who, after surviving one IED attack with injuries considered “minor” only in the military, will also soon redeploy. She is the daughter of a Semper Fi Sister who against the most mortal of obstacles willed herself to last year’s Beach Blast, an event Williams’ mother missed three years running because of the deployment of her children and was not going to miss another, even in the face of grave illness. Why do young men and women volunteer to face death? “It is just one of those weird situations,” Williams said. “We don’t hate the en emy. We don’t hate what is in front of us; we just love what is behind us.” And with that, Williams, a resident of Freeport, took a moment to collect her emotions; to reclaim her voice, to ght off the tears. That love of what is be hind is behind the love that is packed together each year by the Semper Fi Sis ters — wives, daughters, sisters, grandmothers and aunts of deployed military personnel — during their Packing Party for Boxes of Love. The ultimate event dur ing the ultimate getaway for loved ones of those on the elds of battle will take place Oct. 19 at the Centen nial Building. The Sisters turn the building into a factory of love, parceling items from home, in variety that would make Target envi ous, into boxes to be sent to the deployed soldiers for whom those boxes mean so much. “It means a lot,” Wil liams said. “It’s a taste of home. It is a reminder that people remember why we are there and that we are there. “In particular the Army, which can be a refuge for many. They come from tough backgrounds, or they have no family. To have something come from home, from somebody they don’t even know, that will make their week.” There is also a bottomline admiration and grati tude from members of the military. “In the military, the pay isn’t what maybe it should be,” Williams said with tactfulness beyond her years. “When you take into account what all goes into those boxes and you know the funding that goes into those care packages and that people are willing to use their own hard-earned money; that is pretty humbling.” Now a “full-time vet” pursuing schooling for a criminology degree, Wil liams is among those pour ing her own, her friends’ and strangers’ now strang ers no more resources into the Boxes of Love. “My mom raised us right,” Williams said and we’ll return to mom, Sa mantha Cochrane, shortly. “She taught us if we have everything we need we don’t have to be frugal about helping others with out as much, who were not as fortunate. “With all the selsh things going on in Washing ton, watching money being spent in ways it should not be, there is still hope. That is what this is about, hope. People caring for other people.” As a volunteer for the Walton County Sheriff’s Ofce Auxiliary Posse, Wil liams established a couple of campaigns for goods and dollars within the Posse. Her captain found out, wondered about expand ing it department-wide and got the sheriff to sign off, and before long, Williams’ efforts garnered attention in local weekly and daily newspapers. She received emails from ofcers at the Walton County Correctional Fa cility with questions from inmates wondering what they might be able to do. This past weekend, she set up a donation table in front of a local Wal-Mart and collected almost $300 worth of items. One man asked, be cause he didn’t have goods to donate, would money be alright? Yes. He passed over $50. “You hear a lot of people say they support the mili tary, but when it comes to action, they aren’t so posi tive,” Williams. “I’ve met a lot of people who follow their words with action.” As the contact for her local campaigns, Williams also has received her share of calls that, she said, just took her aback. One woman called about her son, a 14-year-old. He was concerned about mem bers of the military having sufcient modes of enter tainment in far off lands. Could he donate his Xbox and games? “My goal is to get every thing collected and back home and know that I will have to go into my pocket for a U-Haul trailer,” Wil liams said with a chuckle. A couple of Posse mem bers without the nancial means to donate want to donate time to help load it all up. The fth of the Beach Blasts, the fth of the Pack ing Parties are imbued with particular importance, and particularly bittersweet emotions for Williams. By her estimation, she and her husband have lost four or ve dear friends in battle during the past year. “It takes its toll,” Wil liams said. “It is not some thing you can walk away from. Even though you get out you never get out, if you know what I mean. You still have friends who are deployed. You have loved ones that will deploy. In a way, I am still deployed.” In addition, her afore mentioned mother spent her nal days at last year’s Beach Blast. Determined to attend af ter missing the rst three, Cochrane had been ill — dealing in part with lupus and its wide spectrum of symptoms — but had only told her deployed children she had seen the doctor a few times. Not a word to worry the kids. But three days into last year’s Beach Blast, Co chrane suffered a massive heart attack and passed away. “When something like that happens, you reect on your own life and about getting things done be cause there might not be a tomorrow,” Williams said. “Some people regret things they didn’t do. Going to the Beach Blast was something she was going to do, not re gret. She was going to have a list of things like that.” In Cochrane’s honor, this year’s and future years’ Boxes of Love Pack ing Party will be dedicated to Cochrane. Williams cashed in some ier miles banked while in the military to ensure her mother’s two best friends among the Sisters attend the special Blast and Pack ing Party. “I am honored and I thank God mom could im pact somebody so much,” Williams said, adding that many of us fear death not so much for what is on the other side, but because, “We don’t want to be forgot ten. For my mom, that will never happen. “This has been an emo tional roller coaster. One minute I will be smiling and laughing, and the next thing something will get me off guard. It has been more of an anxious wanting to go. It was a group my mom re lied heavily on and a group she really believed in.” TIM CROFt T | The Star From Honolulu, Hawaii to Mullen, Neb., to Long Island, N.Y., packages have been arriving from around the country with items to be packed in the Boxes of Love for troops overseas. COURt T ESY OF LAURA WIll LL IAMS Walton County’s Laura Williams has several local campaigns to raise goods and shipping dollars for Boxes of Love. She set up a donation station, in the rain, in front of Wal-Mart this past weekend. SEMPER FI from page A1

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O PINION www.starfl.com A Section I near ’bout wrote the book on government shutdowns. I’ve seen the money ow slow to a trickle. And then dry up altogether! I’ve protested and moaned and got mad and blamed it on the hog market, them big shots out of Memphis and Jimmy Hoffa. I got so desperate in 1959 I took a job picking up Zag Nut and Moon Pie wrappers at Roe Alexander’s swimming pool. We didn’t have a clue back in the pre Beatle days about central government bellicose, trickle down economics or congressional stalemate. We were also not up to speed on White House bargaining, staged press conferences or beltway power brokering. We didn’t know that you could have “essential” jobs still funded right through a shutdown. When the spigot got turned off up above me, I didn’t get nothing! We all liked Ike but we didn’t depend on him. Daddy was the government as far as we were concerned in the fties and early sixties. Oh, we had heard of Sam Rayburn and Lyndon Johnson. But we didn’t know if the speaker of the house and the powerful senator from Texas liked each other or not. We were not privy to their private meetings or behind the scene negotiations. They acted stately enough and I’m fairly certain they passed some very important laws ... but none of them ever reached out to the end of Stonewall Street. Dad was our president, congress and Supreme Court all rolled into one. When he passed a law it wasn’t overruled, out voted, de ed or even debated. Me, Leon and David Mark might whisper about it very low, under our breath ... but really, they most always worked out to the good of all. Dad made the money so he also rightfully set the budget. And here’s where the government shutdown came in. Mom didn’t work. She would get up before daylight, cook breakfast, clean the house, make the beds, hang out a load of wash, get lunch started, dig a few Irish potatoes, make a dress or sew a shirt together, fry a chicken and take it to a sick neighbor, sweep off the porch, have dinner ready when we got in from football practice, go over our homework and keep the re going, but none of that brought any money into the house. If Dad didn’t work the soup got a little thinner. I remember one year the TriCounty Stockyards closed down for a spell. Dad’s work, trucking hogs and cattle down to Tupelo, came to a screeching halt. The rst thing that went was the quarter for the picture show. We lived without Roy, Hoppy and Gene until the crisis was over. We also ate a few more turnip greens and a tad less meat. Dessert became crumbled up cornbread in a glass of buttermilk. Somehow Mom just “categorized” things in their importance to the good will of the family and we all kept going. You could complain to the high heavens but it wouldn’t help. Folks had problems of their own. I understood from an early age that the universe didn’t revolve around me. And nobody expected something for nothing! Since I couldn’t go to the movie, I galloped down to the big ditch and fought the Indians single handed. Listen, life becomes a lot more colorful when you have to make up your own pictures! Somewhere in the mid fties a driver wrecked one of Dad’s trucks. And in the very same week another truck, due to some faulty wiring, caught re and burned. There was no insurance. You talk about a government shut down! I can’t remember any “woe is me”, lamentations or throwing up the hands. We also didn’t, and wouldn’t, take a handout from anybody. My Dad would have died rst! He just kept on working. I don’t know that we “circled the wagons” or had the ole “we’re all in it together” talk. We just kept on living. And sharing. And growing. And laughing. I look back on it from the vantage point of a lot of years and realize those tough times might have been the greatest days of all for us. Sometimes we had so little that a shutdown was hard to perceive. It got a little tougher in high school when the teamsters union went on strike and Dad couldn’t drive. Billie Jean wanted me to wear those Penguin shirts and take her to the Dairy Bar every night for hamburgers and cherry cokes. I was a little embarrassed for my situation. But I rightly gured dating was important, but it wasn’t essential! And I found a girl that liked to take long walks and swing on the porch. A shutdown by any government is a set back. I’ve been there. But it is not the end of the world. If we’ve got the wrong people in charge, let’s shut them down. It’s hard to follow OUR money because of all the nger pointing ... by guys that don’t own the money! And I can’t understand how you pay some folks during a shutdown and not pay others. That doesn’t sound like “we’re all in it together” to me. Who’s to say one job is more important than another? What’s happened to compromise, civility, leadership and “truth, justice and the American way”? Daddy would just work harder. That was always his answer to any problem. ’Course, people not working got us into this mess in the rst place. Respectfully, Kes HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert Dad Wasn’t Playing With Someone Else’s Money! I remember the box. There was a little boy and his father sitting at bluish green Formica topped table. The son had on a white shirt and blue sweater or perhaps it was a blue shirt with a white collar. One thing is for sure, the father was looking rather sporty in his bright red shirt topped with a white sweater vest. The walls of the room were covered with blondish colored wood paneling. The picture on the box tells you a lot. As the father and son sit playing “the game” at the table, the mother and daughter can be seen in the background standing and smiling in the kitchen. The girls were doing the dishes. It was the 1960’s, it was billed as “the game for men and boys.” In red letters you can see the words the son and father are saying… The little boy on the box calls “G-4” and his father) says, “It’s a hit.” The red-shirted, white sweater-vested man also has his hand behind his head and seems to have hit the right collar of his shirt on the way up because it’s trying to stand up, salute and help the Father Knows Best looking fellow ask his son, “It sure is good to be a man isn’t it son?” The son probably would respond, “It sure is dad, I wish mom and sis would hurry up and get those dishes nished, so they get started on the oors.” Goodness gracious, I’m a little scared about looking at the image of the box on the computer. The powers that be might keep a list of folks that look at this box. I may be asked at some time in my life, “Have you ever looked at the original 1967 Battleship game box?” As you would expect, the design of the box changed from its original 1967 version. The Milton Bradley Company would soon put a little girl on the cover playing with her brother. I’m just presuming they are sister and brother, maybe they are neighbors. One thing is for sure – the little girl is playing the game with the little boy and she is not holding a dish towel. I will note that there’s just something about that 1967 box that makes me want to nd a red shirt and a white sweater vest and put them on! Not to feel like a male chauvinist, but simply to be sporty and perhaps to put my hand behind my head and say, “It’s a hit.” Maybe I’ll even smoke a pipe and get some of those manly house slippers… Do you think that kids would be allowed to play the game Battleship at school? It’s doubtful. I still play by myself, against the computer; I enjoy it and it involves a little math and logic and it’s simple. Before the plastic game boards, little ships, pegs and box that featured the sporty fellow with his collar standing at attention, the game was played using grids on paper as you would imagine. Battleship is one of the simplest board games to learn and was a lot of fun for a little boy and still is for a grown man (who can wash dishes). You place your ve ships of various sizes on a grid and your opponent does the same. Players take turns calling out grid coordinates in an attempt to be the rst to sink all their opponents’ ships. The commercials for the game almost always had the game’s clever marketing line “You sank my battleship” integrated into their television spot. OK, when I put the red shirt and white sweater vest on, you know that phrase will be the rst thing out of my mouth. In my opinion, strategy games, whether having a military theme or not have a lot of value when approached with the right spirit. Now if the boats were catching on re and there was graphic violence or something, I could see how there might be a problem. However, what if the game sprayed water on you when someone sunk one of your ships? That would be pretty cool… We often lose sight of the value of some of the simplest games that children play. Whether it is a board game with a military theme like Battleship, or pretending to be a cowboy or soldier or reman or policeman, there are a lot of good things to be learned. If you want to complain about the box and the girls smiling and doing the dishes while the boys play the game, I will agree with you. However, if you want to keep everyone from playing the game or pretending to be a cowboy, I have a problem with that. In 2012, the board game gave birth to the movie, “Battleship.” As you would imagine, Hollywood messed it up with aliens and some NASA stuff. If you like NASA movies, watch “The Right Stuff,” “Apollo 13” or “October Sky.” They are the real deal. A simple game is sometimes best left a simple game and a child’s imagination should be a place where they can pretend a stick is a gun, a sword or a just a stick. Find more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com. White sweater vests and sticks that shoot CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard By KEVIN CARSON Special to The Star Cory Doctorow, guest of honor at the upcoming FenCon science ction convention in Dallas, notes (“During the shutdown, some scientists can’t talk about science,” Boing Boing, Oct. 4) that some of his fellow speakers will be unable to speak if the government shutdown continues. Because they’re government space scientists, they fall under the purview of the 19th century Antide ciency Act, which prohibits government workers from volunteering to do their own jobs — including talking about science to the public. The law “was aimed at stopping fraudsters who did ‘government’ business, then presented a bill for services that hadn’t been contracted but had nevertheless been performed — a kind of Civil War era version of red-light windscreen squeegeeing.” There’s a great deal of hostility toward government workers in some libertarian circles. And some of what government workers do — for example cops who enforce drug laws or brutally shut down Occupy protests — is illegitimate per se. But much of it is stuff — delivering mail, putting out res, protecting people from actual assaults on their persons and possessions — that there would be a need for even in a free society. In the end, what we call “the economy” is just people doing stuff, engaged in productive activity, providing goods and services for each other. Over the centuries, the state, along with the corporations and other rent-extracting economic institutions it upholds, have hijacked a major share of this productive activity and preempted the channels within which it takes place, so that many people produce goods and services for their fellows within an exploitative institutional framework. Their production of goods and services, which would naturally be governed by cooperative labor and peaceful exchange, is instead subject to the control of states and rentextracting institutions whose monopoly powers derive from state coercion. These people are not our enemies. Many of them are simply people who nd it ful lling to teach kids, save homes from res, and the like, and just take the existing system and its selfproclaimed naturalness and inevitability at face value. Corporate-state capitalism is in a terminal crisis. Subsidized production inputs cause corporate demand for such inputs to increase exponentially, and result in both natural resources and government scal resources becoming exhausted. The ever worsening boom-bust cycle requires ever-increasing government expenditure to utilize excess capacity and soak up excess investment capital. And the technologies of radical abundance are destroying the arti cial scarcity on which most pro t depends. The state, likewise, is just groups of people doing stuff. Some of what they’re doing is necessary and productive activity; they’re just doing it in a distorted, state-like way. Our goal, when the present system reaches its limits, is not for these people to stop doing what they’re doing. We want them to keep right on doing it as voluntary associations of producers. These individuals and groups of producers working within the bowels of state and corporation, as the long collapse proceeds, will increasingly respond to the exigencies of collapse by working around the rules of their nominal state and corporate bosses by using their own common sense. For example, the smarter police forces and sheriff’s of ces will — perhaps quietly and unof cially — stop expending resources on evicting mortgage defaulters and shutting down squats. This is all what Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, in “General Idea of the Revolution in the Nineteenth Century,” called “dissolving the state in the social body.” And dissolving the state in the social body will require them to disregard legal barriers like the Antide ciency Act. As the progressive hollowing-out of corporation and state continues, it’s likely that at some point people performing services for the public get fed up with rolling paycheck delays combined with bureaucratic interference, just ignore the authority of the government agencies or CEOs they’re supposedly taking orders from, reorganize themselves as p2p networks or cooperatives, and start performing services directly for the public in return for some informally negotiated form of compensation. That compensation may very well be some sort of commons-based support from a larger social unit that includes the people they’re providing services for. A decade ago, when the Argentinian economy collapsed and bankrupt capitalists tried to board up the factories, workers just showed up, unboarded the doors and kept right on producing under self-management. They kept right on what they’d been doing, right where they’d been doing it before — but their work took on a fundamentally different character. One of these days, government workers will respond to a government “shutdown” in the same way. Kevin Carson is a senior fellow of the Center for a Stateless Society and holds the Center’s Karl Hess Chair in Social Theory. Shutdown: Teachers keep on teachin’ Thursday, October 10, 2013 Page 4 #!$ &# !&"!"%& "" "!$%$%# $.6-*--9.::,1*60.;7 %1.$;*9 "!7? "79;$;7. "176. "##% "!$%"% "!#%$%! ()"&$ $&#"%! $") @.*9A:2?576;1: @.*9A:2?576;1: 6,*:.7/.997979752::276:26*-=.9;2:.5.6;:;1.8<+42:1.9:-7 67;174-;1.5:.4=.:42*+4./79-*5*0./<9;1.9;1*6*57<6;9.,.2=.-/79 :<,1*-=.9;2:.5.6; %1.:873.6>79-2:02=.6:,*6;*;;.6;276;1.8926;.->79-2: ;17<01;/<44@>.201.-%1.:873.6>79-+*9.4@*::.9;:;1.8926;.->79;1797<014@,76=26,.:%1.:873.6>79-2:47:;;1.8926;.->79-9.5*26: USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING Circulation:1-800-345-8688

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Local The Star| A5 Thursday, October 10, 2013 T h e F l o r i d a D e p ar t m e n t o f H e a l t h i n G u l f C o u n t y p r o m o t es T h e F l o r i d a D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h i n G u l f Co u n t y ’ s C l os i n g t h e G a p P r og r a m i n a n e f f o r t t o e n c o u r a g e s h o p p e r s t o s e l e c t an d p re p a re m o re f r u i t s a n d v e g e t a b l e s w i l l h os t h e a l t h y f o o d d e m ons t r at i ons s t a r i n g O c t ob e r 2 0 1 3 t h r u M a r c h 2 0 1 4 a t t h e l oc a l D o l l a r G en er al M a r k e t No te : A c c o rd i ng t o t he U S D e p a r t m e n t o f A g r ic u l t u r e on ly on e i n f o u r A me r ic a n s e a t t h e r e c omme nd e d a m o u n ts o f f r u i ts a nd v e ge t a bl e s d a i ly E a t i n g f r u i ts a nd v e ge t a bl e s a nd ge t t i n g p h y sic a l a c t i v i t y e v e r y d a y m a y r e d u ce t h e r i s k o f s e r i o us h e al t h pr o b l e m s l i k e o be s i t y t y pe 2 d i a be t e s h e a r t d i s e a s e s t r o k e a n d ce r tai n t y pe s o f c a n ce r F o r m o r e inf o r ma t i o n p l e ase c a l l : ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 2 1 1 1 e x t 1 0 2 y h t l a e t h os l h l i w s e l b a t e g e d v n s a t i u r f n tai r d ce n a e k o r t s e s a e s i t d r a e h s e t be a i d By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com St. Joe Beach property owner Bill Koran came to the Board of County Com missioners on Tuesday with more questions and infor mation about the Americus Ditch project. Commissioner Joanna Bryan said answers might be coming soon. The ditch, which ac cording to records from the Clerk of Courts, has cost county taxpayers more than $1.2 million to date, including more than 130 re pair jobs, including a recent lling in of dirt around an above-ground break in the pipe continues to be a prob lem, Koran said. The line, in some sec tions, is 20-24 inches out of grade, Koran said. At previous meetings commissioners have said a job bid out six years ago and nished more than ve years ago was in the past and of little interest to them, but Koran and Bryan have pushed back, saying the ditch continues to be an issue. “There are 40 or 50 homes out there that are af fected by that ditch,” Koran said. “So it is in the future. We could have had some homes washed out if that storm (Tropical Storm Kar en) had come this way last week.” Koran said commission ers had just raised taxes by more than $1 million, and he had been person ally attacked at meetings by members of the audience while trying to bring press ing county business to the BOCC. “I came here to discuss a real problem, and I have been personally attacked,” Koran said. “I am here to show the public the truth.” But, he said, his own research backed up funda mental assertions. First, the company that was contracted for the job was not, as required under bid specications, a Florida Department of Transporta tion pre-qualied contrac tor, contrary to statements made by Brad Bailey, owner of Bailey and Sons. According to correspon dence from Darlene Ander son, prequalication super visor of the FDOT, agency records do not show Bailey and Sons was prequalied to perform road or bridge work. Koran also noted that Bailey and Sons drew its nal payment for the job, indicating all had signed off on the job and “everyone was happy.” This was despite obvious problems from the outset on a job contracted for 120 days that took almost 10 months to complete and, most im portantly, without a nal inspection report, which should have been led. Those reports, he said, could not be located by the clerk’s ofce. “Either no reports were done or reports were re moved from the le,” Koran said. Koran also questioned discrepancies in billing for the job from Preble Rish Engineers, which designed and inspected the job. Under original invoices obtained from the clerk’s ofce, the job started as a $1 million project and was a $1.1 million job later in the year. He also noted that some $220,000 worth of pipe burned in 2008 and said pub lic records do not indicate who absorbed that cost. In an email between the clerk’s ofce and county administrative staff, Koran noted, two invoices from Bailey and Sons could not be located by the clerk’s of ce, and employees were told administrative staff would handle the issue. Koran also wondered how Bailey could have sub mitted an invoice in Janu ary 2008 before the com mencement of the project the following month and the securement of a construc tion bond by his company. “We have a building problem,” Koran said. “We could save the taxpayers money. We should look at all projects. The county needs to get what it paid for.” Bryan said that Ralph Rish, president of Preble Rish, had appeared before the BOCC and pledged to work with the county to x any problems. She said she had reached out to Rish and they were “working toward remedying problems with this ditch.” Commissioner Tan Smi ley, expressing an opinion diametrically opposed to prior meetings when Ameri cus Ditch was deemed old news, said the board would also assist. “If we do have a problem I know we can x it,” Smiley said. “That Americus Ditch, if we do have a problem, Ms. Bryan, if you need any thing let us board members know.” “We think it is a good lease,” said NFCD nancial ofcer Gerald Thompson. Given that the item was not on the agenda and she had not had time to fully review the lease, Commissioner Joanna Bryan suggested tabling the issue until the next regular meeting to ensure the process was “done right” and allow for any public input. “I am grateful that Ms. Gaskin and her company have agreed to take this on,” Bryan said. “This is a great way to save this building. I’d just like a little more time to review this and the public may want to weigh in.” Novak and Commissioner Warren Yeager said the nal lease would still need to come back to the full board, the footprint for NFCD had yet to be deter mined and in order to move ahead the BOCC should provide “conditional” ap proval of the lease pending a full vetting of the nal document. “I have been working 18 months on trying to save this building and take the burden off the taxpayer,” Commission er Ward McDaniel said. “It’s a historic building.” Novak said county and NFCD staff will undertake an air quality to ensure the safety of the NFCD footprint before the company signs the lease. The BOCC must still arrive at a plan and dollars to remediate issues in the back and upstairs of the courthouse, in cluding leaks in the walls and basement and mold, issues that led to the BOCC moving all county ofces in the court house into other facilities, particularly the old Health Department building. Another jail debate For the second time in as many months, Michael Hammond, administra tor of the Gulf County Jail and deputy county administrator, took strong issue with comments made about the jail by Bryan during a previous meeting, this one the BOCC’s nal budget hearing. Saying Bryan had provided faulty facts and acted “irrationally” about the jail and potential savings, or in Hammond’s view no savings in farming inmates to Bay County, Hammond took issue with Bryan’s description of the jail. Hammond said Bryan had never set foot in the jail and had no basis to label it a “disgrace” during the budget meeting. Bryan used the word in the context that it was a disgrace that county main tained a $1 million jail — Hammond said Bryan’s numbers change by the week and the jail budget is $1.1 million, not $1.2 million — that had not been inspected in several years. Each county commissioner was sent correspondence from the ofce of the Florida Sheriff’s Association, which over sees the Model Jail Standards program, that indicated the jail should be inspect ed annually. Gulf County’s had not been in two years and was out of compliance at that time. Hammond faulted the inspector at that time, called his report “bogus” and incorrect on a number of levels and that it had been a BOCC decision, years be fore, to not spend the money to maintain the jail to Model Jail Standards. He said having such an inspection was “asinine.” As he had the previous month, Ham mond also had Capt. Sonya Farmer on hand, and this meeting also brought along the bulk of the employees at the jail. Hammond said he and staff had been putting time into putting down rumors about the jail closing and probation ser vices returning to a private contractor while making the county money by taking over probation services. Hammond said Bryan was being per sonal about the issue and seeking to have 15 employees laid off. “I am proud of the jail, the people I work with, and the continued discussion of closing the jail has left a bitter taste,” Farmer said. Bryan said she had nothing against employees and did not wish to see jobs lost, but noted the issue is far broader. Florida Sheriff’s Association ofcials were asking the BOCC why the jail had not been inspected in several years and said the possibility existed for a circuit court to remove the inmates and close the jail if it was not in compliance. “I have no issues with the employees,” Bryan said. “My concern is not only safety for the inmates but (for the employees). That is our responsibility. I want them in a safe, clean jail. “What is a disgrace to me is this board does not want to look at this. We should operate within the law.” The discussion, growing ever more heated, veered into budgetary philoso phy and that the BOCC just raised taxes, continues to put more work on fewer em ployees and, as Bryan said, “We cut and cut without operating more efciently.” Yeager took exception, noting the cuts the BOCC has made to the budget in re cent years and saying proposals for al ternative sources of revenue gained “no traction.” “Let’s start moving forward,” he said. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.com Comments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspaper’s editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. S HARE Y o O U r R OPINIONs S COUNTY from page AA 1 “Sometimes they go faster than you think, some times slower,” Sims said. Butler is charged with shooting and killing Ever ett Gant in July of last year in Port St. Joe. Gant approached But ler’s Pine Ridge apartment after Butler had been ac cused of using racial slurs directed at children in the apartment complex. Butler shot Gant between the eyes with a .22 rie and left him bleeding on the doorstep before calling 911 and sit ting back down to nish his dinner. He expressed inconve nience at being arrested for shooting a “(racial epi thet),” according to the ar resting afdavit. Six weeks after the shooting, Gant died from the injuries. B UTUT LER from page AA 1 W es ES L o O C her HER | The Star County work crews recently placed ll dirt over this break in the Americus Ditch pipe that popped to the surface after heavy recent rains. “I came here to discuss a real problem, and I have been personally attacked,” Koran said. “I am here to show the public the truth.” Bill Koran, St. Joe Beach property owner Property owners seek answers on Americus Ditch

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com O UTDOORS www.starfl.com Section Section A By TOM BAIRD Special to The Star In 1955, Rachel Carson wrote, “The edge of the sea is a strange and beautiful place.” We all know this is true since this is a community by the sea and shaped by the sea, and the fall of the year is a perfect time to enjoy the magni cence of our shoreline. The air is getting cooler making it an ideal time to view life on the sand dunes that have built over the summer, and to enjoy the plants and animals typically found there. Cape San Blas boasts some of the nation’s highest coastal dunes and the last remaining habitat for coastal sand pine scrub, and the dune plants are ablaze with owers this time of year attracting their major pollinators – migrating butter ies. These shore communities exist in zones that one can readily observe. Each has its own distinct set of plants and animals. The most notable plants to greet the eye as you wander off the beach are, of course, the sea oats (Uniola paniculata), those tall, iconic grasses rustling in the wind that every photographer and painter includes in their images of panhandle seashores. Sea oats and bitter panicgrass, Panicum amarum, are the primary dune-building grasses. These pioneer grasses occupy the upper beach and rst dune, with sea oats occupying this zone on sandy coasts throughout the state. Sea oats are very drought tolerant and burial of the plant’s base by blowing sand actually stimulates plant growth and helps the plant spread via rhizomes. Since sea oats protect Florida’s coastline from erosion due to tides, storms and winds, they are legally protected. Although some like to use dried sea oats in decorative arrangements, it is unlawful to dig, cut or possess sea oats. They can be obtained for planting only from licensed nurserymen. Since the sea oats are our rst line of defense from coastal erosion, Florida takes protection of sea oats seriously. Also within this zone and easily noticed are shoreline sea purslane (Sesuvium portulacastrum), runners of railroad vine (Ipomoea pescaprae ssp brasiliensis), and beach morning glory (Ipomoea imperati). This is also the critical zone for nesting shore birds. Many of these birds build nests that are little more than depressions scraped out in the sand. These birds are particularly sensitive to disturbance. Hurricanes frequently destroy colonies, and coastal development has eliminated favorite nesting sites. Dogs and human traf c create problems each spring and summer. A dog running through a colony of nesting seabirds can cause all the birds to panic, consequently leaving their eggs or chicks dangerously exposed to the hot sun. We are lucky to have dog friendly beaches in Gulf County, but dogs should be kept on a leash and not allowed to run in the dunes. Behind the front dunes a coastal grassland community develops if it is protected from salt spray by the fore dunes. As the beach dunes build outward and higher, the pioneer grasses are replaced by other grasses in the coastal grassland community. These species do not range along the entire coast but change as one goes southward. The acid sugar sands of the panhandle coastal grasslands are dominated by Gulf bluestem (Schizachrium maritimum). This is a grass endemic to the northeast Gulf coast from Florida to Mississippi. Other grasses dominate the coastal grasslands of peninsular Florida. At Cape San Blas, this classic pattern occurs on the south facing beach from Money Beach westward to the tip of the Cape. The situation is different on the north-south arm of the peninsula (west-facing beach). There the beach dune community (sea oats, etc.) transitions straight to scrub, with scrub oaks, like myrtle oak, sand live oak, Chapman’s oak, and rosemary, smilax, etc. This is where people build their houses. There are a few isolated pockets of coastal grassland community plants here and there on the north-south arm, but by and large the transition is straight from dune to scrub habitat. The coastal grassland community and the beach dune community are unique habitats that harbor several endemic species, including an endemic mammal. Cape San Blas has the St. Andrews beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus peninsularis). Westward along the coast are populations of the Perdido Key beach mouse, Santa Rosa beach mouse, and the Choctawhatchee beach mouse. The pallid beach mouse on the Florida east coast is extinct and the Anastasia Island beach mouse survives only in a few places. These populations are descended from a land-based species. After the last ice age, as sea levels began to rise, populations of these mice became stranded on barrier islands and developed into distinct species. All are threatened by development, hurricanes, feral cats, and free-ranging domestic house cats. Increased traf c on sand dunes is also a threat for the beach mouse, since increased traf c damages vegetation on dunes that the beach mice depend on for food and shelter. All are listed as either threatened or endangered. As you walk to the beach this time of year, note the profusion of yellow asters in bloom in the coastal grasslands zone. The pink and pale rose petals of pursh (Sabatia stellaris) offer a visual delight from spring to fall in wetter areas of this zone. Two species of blazing star are showing off their maroon and lavender petals now, and in winter, seaside goldenrod will display its bright yellow owers. Behind the coastal grasslands community are the big relic dunes that took centuries to build. Because they are higher ground, this is where houses are built. These ancient dunes, besides offering protection from storm surge, support the rosemary scrub habitat. Rosemary Scrub is so named because it is dominated by Florida rosemary, Ceratiola ericoides. This dark green scrub is needle-leafed; an adaptation for dry soils, and is one of the rst shrubs to colonize coastal dunes in the panhandle. False Rosemary, Conradina sp., also an inhabitant of sand pine scrub, owers spring, summer, and fall, and is very aromatic. It’s pale lavender blossoms are a favorite of the migrating butter ies this time of year. Gulf coast lupine, Lupinus westianus, seems fairly inconspicuous until spring when it will then send up big sprays of purple owers. As we stroll to the shore and back, we are passing through distinct zones. Each zone contains plants and animals highly adapted to the conditions of that zone. Some of these plants and animals exist nowhere else in the world. We should take care to protect and appreciate these habitats. Cross only at designated points or on boardwalks to prevent damage to the dunes and the associated ora and fauna. Rachel Carson got it right; the edge of the sea is certainly a strange and beautiful place. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. $ ' $ Y ou'r e In vit ed T o J oin Us W ednesda y Oc t ob er 16, 2013, 5-7pm E T ) # .( %! ) .( %( ., ( "( ,, (! “ FISHING ARTIFICIAL L URES IN THE F ALL ” $& $ ) $+ + & -)$ $$ WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu Oc t 10 82 65 3 % F ri, Oc t 11 83 63 7 % S a t Oc t 12 84 65 8 % Sun, Oc t 13 83 63 10 % M on, Oc t 14 81 59 14 % T ues Oc t 15 81 62 3 % W ed Oc t 16 80 62 25 % Bedbugs are not a pleasant subject but they need to be discussed, especially by people who travel. Cleanliness and a high price tag provide no guarantee that a hotel room won’t come with unwanted occupants. Bedbugs are found in ve star resorts as well as cheap motels. At a recent convention of the national Pest Management Association in Hawaii, conventioneers were alarmed to discover wicker deck chairs in an ocean view bar were crawling with bedbugs. Just so you will know, bed bugs are not microscopic or invisible and you can save yourself a world of trouble by inspecting a room or shortterm rental house when you arrive. Thoroughly check the bed linens, seams, piping or ruf es, including the dust ruf e for the bugs or dark stains that indicate their presence. In hotels, the headboard is a popular hangout for these nasty critters. They are also frequently found between the corner of the box spring and its plastic guard and under the label of both the box spring and mattress. Inspect the rest of the furniture and other items close to the bed like pictures, and mirrors. Place luggage on the luggage rack or on the top of the dresser or table. Never put a suitcase on the bed, the oor or any piece of upholstered furniture. That’s like asking bedbugs to hitch a ride home with you. If you nd bed bugs in your room, immediately report it to the management and ask for another room. Make sure the new room is not adjacent to, above or below the infested room as bed bugs can travel through wall cavities and air ducts to infest other rooms. To ensure no bed bugs come home with you, bag all luggage in a large trash bag before being placed in your vehicle. This precaution will keep any infestation out of your car. Once you and your family arrive at home, visually inspect all items you plan to bring into the house. Place clothing and cloth material in the dryer on high for 20 minutes to kill any live bed bugs or eggs that may have traveled home with you. Items that cannot be placed in the dryer can go into the freezer for a period of 5 days to ensure there are no live bed bugs or hatchable eggs at the end of the 5-day period. Steam cleaning luggage provides an added measure of precaution. If you own rental property, can you take precautions to prevent bedbugs from making it home? Not really, but one precaution is to purchase moats for the legs of the beds. These are plastic cups that trap bedbugs when they crawl in. The moat will give your cleaner early warning that there is a problem; however, most are rather unattractive. One new brand, Blackout, is more discrete than earlier models. Bags are available for mattresses and box springs but these are more for use after the bed is infested. There are also monitors of various kinds that can be deployed around a bed. These range from simple sticky traps to complicated devices that use pheromone and carbon dioxide as lures. The downside is that most of the better monitors are expensive. They cost from $20 to $40 each and monthly recharging will run $30 per trap or more. Life on the beach dunes How to prevents bedbugs in your home BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Our 2013 fall red snapper fishing got off to a slow start last week with rough seas and high winds. We only have until Oct.14 in federal waters and fishing will continue in state waters until the Oct. 21. Good-sized snapper are still close to shore, and the MBARA sites in Mexico Beach are producing good numbers and size right now. Fall feeding patterns are starting to produce nice trout and redfish. With the rain from last week, sight fishing will be more challenging this week. Use darker colored jigs and grubs in deeper water this week to find the fish fast. WWW.KILLBEDBUGS.COM Thursday, October 10, 2013 Page 6

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com A Section $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL e ne w College of A pplied S tudies at FSU P anama City was appr o v ed b y the FSU Boar d of T r ustees in J une 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily r espond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. W e invite y ou to suppor t e Campaign for O ur Community ’ s U niv ersity b y helping us build an endo wment for tomorr o w ’ s jobs. O ur goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of A pplied S tudies b y 2017, which will allo w FSU P anama City to establish student scholarships, implement ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr o vide ne w equipment and technology T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community ’ s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR COMMUNIT Y ’S UNIVERSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w ’ s J obs SUPPOR T OUR C OMMUNIT Y ’ S UNIVERSIT Y Page 7 Thursday, October 10, 2013 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The host Tiger Sharks ensured last Friday that the Franklin County Seahawks’ two-week swing through Gulf County was a bumpy one. One week after losing at Wewahitchka, the Seahawks ran into a buzz saw at Shark Field, dominated in every phase in a 49-6 loss. The win improves Port St. Joe, which was celebrating Homecoming, to 4-2 overall and 1-0 in District 1-1A entering a bye week. The Tiger Sharks will face Tallahassee FAMU in two weeks then host consecutive district tilts against West Gadsden and Liberty County that likely will determine playoff positions. The Seahawks dipped to 0-6, 0-1. “We got to play everybody, get a lot of younger guys some action, which is a nice thing,” said Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon. “It may just be me, but I think a lot of coaches see the distractions of Homecoming as a necessary thing they would like to see get over. “But I think our kids were focused, though not as much as I would like them to be. It was a good ending to a nice Homecoming week.” The Tiger Sharks controlled every facet of the game and inserted the junior varsity en masse before the rst half ended 35-0. Port St. Joe chewed up 191 total yards in the rst half — 293 for the game — while limiting the Seahawks to 46. Franklin County only rst down against the Tiger Shark varsity came courtesy of a roughing the passer penalty. The Tiger Sharks also transformed a long punt return and a blocked punt into points and allowed Franklin County to score only on the nal play of the game, the second half played while the clock ran continuously. “We will keep working, and we’ll get better,” Franklin County coach Aaron York said. “I saw improvement tonight. “We are a young team, and we just need to keep working to get better every week, which we have since the season started.” The Tiger Sharks wasted little time getting on the scoreboard. Port St. Joe stopped the Seahawks on downs on the opening drive, took over at the Franklin County 34 after a punt and Dwayne Griggs did the rest in two carries, the touchdown coming from the 7. Drew Lacour nailed the rst of his six extra-point kicks. The roughing the passer penalty extended slightly the next Seahawk drive, with Port St. Joe taking over at its 24 after a punt. Three plays later Aaron Paul, on his only carry of the game, sprinted around right end and threaded through the defense on a 62-yard touchdown jaunt and Lacour made it 14-0. Franklin County went threeand-out again, and Griggs returned a rolling punt that got over his head 34 yards to the Seahawks 31. After an offside penalty against Franklin County, Lacour found Chad Quinn Jr. on a perfectly placed 26-yard pass to the right ag, and the extra point made it 21-0. The Tiger Shark defense stopped Franklin County in its tracks, and Umstead Sanders blocked a punt, Port St. Joe taking over at the Franklin County 27. Two plays later, John Simpson broke a trap play for a 19-yard touchdown, and Lacour again did his thing with his right foot. The Port St. Joe coaching staff at that point inserted the junior varsity — the team suited 40some players for Homecoming instead of the typical 23-25 — and Jak Riley scored from the 1 on the Tiger Sharks’ nal drive before intermission. Trey Sanders, a seventh-grader who despite not entering the game until the second half, was Port St. Joe’s leading rusher with 65 yards, scored from the 7 midway through the third period. After Jasmin Thomas recovered a fumble on the ensuing kickoff, Antonio Moree swept left end from the 12 for the nal Tiger Shark touchdown. The extra point came from Isaac Rocha, one of six seventhgraders the Tiger Sharks played. The Seahawks’ Cole Wheeler, the game’s leading rusher with 73 yards, scored from the 5 as the clock ran out. PHOTOS BY HEATHER LEIPHART | The News Herald Wewahitchka’s Jarvar Hill rushed for 211 yards and ve touchdowns in the Gators’ 34-13 win over North Bay Haven. Below, Rashard Ranie had 128 yards on the ground in Wewahitchka’s Homecoming triumph on Friday. Halifax Media Group Jarvar Hill and Wewahitchka were dangerous when holding on to the football Friday. The senior atoned for two fumbles by scoring ve touchdowns in leading the Gators past North Bay Haven 34-13. Hill nished with 211 yards rushing and Rashard Ranie added 128 on the ground in Wewahitchka’s second win in a row despite four turnovers. The Buccaneers couldn’t capitalize on early opportunities and dropped to 2-2. Wewahitchka scored 14 unanswered points to settle the outcome. The Gators scored 27 points in the second half after being stymied with three turnovers in the rst 24 minutes. “For us to turn the ball over like that and have a shutout in the rst half was big,” Wewahitchka assistant and head coach inwaiting David Barnes said. “In this offense we want to run the football and we did that well.” Hill scored all of Wewahitchka’s touchdowns. The Gators needed the last two to nally convince the Buccaneers. NBH pulled within a touchdown twice. The rst time came on a Braiden Hardesty touchdown grab COURTESY OF WAYNE TAYLOR Dwayne Griggs scored the game’s rst touchdown on a 7-yard run. Port St. Joe routs Franklin County Hill leads Wewahitchka past North Bay Haven past North Bay Haven See WEWA A8

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A8 | The Star Thursday, October 10, 2013 W e e m s M e d i c a l C e n t e r s E a s t a n d W e s t C l i n i c s w i l l c l o s e a t 3 p m o n M o n d a y O c t o b e r 1 4 t h NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. 4< 4 & # //>/ ; ) & 8 ww w .m ulli se y e.c om "$ # ''% 5 "$ ':; 24 ;6;2/ 4 ; 9 3 6 / 2>=4 4 Medical Ey e Exam with 33 $1;) / 3 4 ;6;43 4 #: ;2;/ /3 % 9 4 ':4 4/> ;2=34 / 42 ;; 6 4 4 9=/4 /3 4 f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases "$ "($ ##"'' 850-7 63-6666 ( % ;; 4 =;;9 ; :4 = ;3/ # /:/3=4) 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. ; 4 8!-! $ + # S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances (% % ''(' 0* * # ''% ) "$ "($ #$"$' ##"'' 0 / 4 # / 4) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 33 $1;) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 10-31-13 CODE: SJ00 B l u e s i n t h e L o t 2 0 1 3 W e w i s h t o t h a nk t h e s e g e n e r o u s s p o n so r s . .. .. # $ 8 0 / $ 5 0 0 6 0 # 5 , 3 $ 0 3 / 6 / & # 0 0 6 0 0 8 6 3& 8 , # 8 8 0 0 6 3 & 8 , # 8 6 7 6 9 0 8 & 8 5 6 8 # 8 5 0 & 8 5 6 8 # $ 5 0 0 8 8 0 & 8 5 6 8 # 8 20 & 8 $ 9 / 0 6 0 6 3 9 & 8 5 6 8 # 8 0 8 2 6 / 0 & 8 5 6 8 0 0 0 0 8 / 6 & 8 5 6 8 # 7 0 & 8 5 6 8 , 6 6 3 0 6 3 # 5 , 5 0 & 8 5 # 6 0 8 7 2) 8 5 6 8 # 0 / 6 0 & 8 5 6 8 # 0 8 8 5 6 8 # 6 8 5 6 8 # 0 0 0 & 8 5 # / & 6 # $ 5 0 $ 5 6 & 0 % $ 5 0 0 0 7 8 5 6 8 # 0 0 0 0 2 / & 8 5 6 8 # 0 6 & 0 # $ 9 9 , 2) / $ , & 8 5 # 8 0 & 8 5 6 8 0 0 0 / 8 5 6 8 3 0 9 S A T U R D A Y, O C T O B E R 1 2 2 0 1 3 B L U E S i n t h e L O T 20 1 3 6 B a n d s A l l D a y B l u e s T H E H A Y S H O U S E w w w A p a l a c h S p o ng eC om p a n y c om S p o n so r s N e e d e d C a l l : 8 5 0 6 5 3 5 5 6 4 S C H E D U LE 4 0 & ,8 5 6 8 & -0 5 6 / 6 & 2 9 5 0 9 + 1 2 1 p m 1 1 : 4 5 p m 1 : 4 5 2 : 4 5 p m 3 4 p m 4 4 : 4 5 p m 5 6 : 3 0 p m S m a c k w at e r Re tr ie v e r s A pa l a c hic o l a F L M a t t L a w P a n a ma Ci t y F L J o h n n y B a r b a t o & L u c k y D o g g s G u l f po r t M S E a s y S t r e e t B l u e s B a n d T a l l a h a s s e e F L S l i m F a t z P a n a ma Ci t y F L T h e J o h n B u l l B l u e s B a n d Mo n t g o m e r y A L Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School volleyball team traveled to South Wal ton High School last Thursday and the junior varsity and varsity each lost dis trict games. “The coaches don’t know if the fact that it was homecoming week in Port St. Joe or that they had a week between matches, but the teams came out at and just couldn’t handle the intensity level of the Lady Seahawks of South Walton,” said Port St. Joe coach Wayne Taylor. Tonight the team travels to Bay High. Dig Pink At 6 p.m. ET Oct. 17 the Lady Tiger Sharks will host their fth annual Dig Pink Event. The game will be the nal regularseason match of the season, pitting Port St. Joe against county rival Wewahitch ka Jr./Sr. High School. The game will also mark Port St. Joe’s Senior Night. The game is played to support the Side-Out Foundation’s Dig Pink Na tional Breast Cancer Awareness Rally to promote breast health information as well as raise funds to further research. Dig Pink events give spectators the opportunity to become involved by mak ing donations to the cause and by pink ing-out (i.e. donning pink in support) and event t-shirts will be sold. The proceeds from all donations, the gate and t-shirt sales will benet the Side-Out Foundation. The foundation is a non-prot estab lished in 2004 to unite volleyball players and coaches from across the country to work toward the goal of making a sig nicant and identiable difference in the lives of breast cancer patients and their families. The organization works to advance clinical trials, increase patient support services and educate communities. Port St. Joe volleyball falls to South Walton Special to The Star Ryan Teall memorial scholarship fundraiser to be Nov. 1 The Ryan Teall Memorial Scholarship fundraising event will be Friday, Nov. 1, at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School. The event will include a 3-on-3 basketball tournament, which will begin at 5 p.m. CT; a 3-point shooting contest between tournament games; Bunko and a concession stand. Cost of the 3-on-3 tournament is $20 per team; the 3-point shootout will be $5 to enter; and the Bunko will also be $5 per person. To register call Adele Paul at 639-2228 or Kerri Barlow at 832-8659. Dixie Youth Baseball board needs members We encourage everyone to participate in this organization to create a strong program that will directly benet children in our community. The following positions need to be lled and are very important for the success of our program: president; AAA vice president; Ozone vice president; secretary; equipment manager; and concession manager. The league returns three ofcers. The board meeting will be at 3 p.m. ET Sunday, Oct. 13 at the STAC House on Eighth Street in Port St. Joe. If you have any questions or would like to participate and cannot attend the meeting, please contact Bobby at 527-3707 or Carly at 481-6631 or Carly. Pickels@gmail.com. Sports Sports SHO rtsRTS R y Y A nN TEALL from David Smith in the third quarter to pull to 14-7. The Buccaneers also trailed 20-13 after Corey White’s 80-yard intercep tion return for a score early in the fourth. Hill answered the latter tally with a 6yard run to cap a 10-play drive and give Wewahitchka a 27-13 advantage. He broke free for 60 yards on Wewahitchka’s next possession to cap the scoring. Wewahitchka (2-4) led 7-0 at the half despite the three turnovers, including two lost fumbles by Hill. He had 59 yards rushing in the rst half and also grabbed a 66-yard scoring reception from Ranie mid way through the second quarter. Wewahitchka punted on two rst-half possessions and Ranie threw an intercep tion on its last. North Bay Haven also lost a fumble on its rst series and had the deepest penetration in the opening half. The Buc caneers drove to the 12 on their fourth possession, but the 16-play march stalled on fourth down. NBH also turned the ball over on downs at the Wewahitchka 23 on its nal possession of the second quarter. The Buccaneers had 60 yards of total offense on its rst two drives of the sec ond half after amassing 196 in the rst. The lack of execution and Wewahitchka wearing down the Buccaneers late was too much to overcome. “We were moving the ball up and down the eld,” NBH coach Jared Hale said. “We came out strong, but you need to come away with points and we didn’t.” Devante Garland led NBH with 73 yards rushing. Smith was 8 for 17 for 124 yards and two interceptions. Hardesty had four catches for 110 yards. Wewahitchka is at Tallahassee Maclay on Friday. NO rtRTH BA y Y HH AVEnN 0 0 7 6 13 WE wW AHI tT CHKA 0 7 13 14 34 Second quarter WHS Hill 66 pass from Ranie (Setterich kick) 5:52, 7-0 WHS Third quarter WHS Hill 3 run (Setterich kick) 9:59, 14-0 NBH Hardesty 37 pass from Smith (Bing ham kick) 7:32, 14-7 WHS Hill 6 run (kick failed) 3:25, 20-7 Fourth quarter NBH White 80 interception return (kick failed) 10:03, 20-13 WHS Hill 6 run (Setterich kick) 4:46, 27-13 WHS Hill 60 run (Setterich kick) 2:06, 34-13 WEWA from page A7 HEAHEA T HE HE R LEILEI P HA HA RT | The News Herald North Bay Haven’s David Smith passed for 124 yards, one touchdown and two interceptions.

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C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section Strung along “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) Who were the wisecracking robots on “Mystery Science Theater 3000”? Buck/Bucko, Crow/Servo, Salt/Sally, Jake/Snake 2) What was the rst hotel built on the now famous Las Vegas strip? Aladdin, Ritz, Sands, Flamingo 3) Which dog was originally bred in England to catch rabbits? Pit Bull, English Setter, Beagle, Dalmatian 4) What’s a rugged waterproof fuse used to light reworks? Brocade, Salute, Visco, Willow 5) From surveys what’s the most popular response to name a sport that’s graceful? Ice skating, Golf, Gymnastics, Swimming 6) The average fashion model weighs what percentage less than the typical American woman? 7%, 11%, 23%, 32% 7) Which Shakespearean play introduced, “It’s all Greek to me”? Othello, Julius Caesar, The Tempest, King Lear 8) What’s the poke in the saying “a pig in a poke”? Bag, Corn eld, Mud bed, Frying pan 9) Of these which has a town named Dif cult? Indiana, Oregon, Tennessee, Wisconsin 10) Generally speaking if you divide your weight by 3, you’ll nd out how much what weighs? Head, Arms, Legs, Organs 11) Of these which did Alexander the Great introduce to Europe? Dog ghting, Eggplant, Silverware, Pears 12) From surveys what’s the most popular response to name a word containing “play”? Playboy, Playdoh, Playground, Playtime 13) What year marked the births of Bob Hope, John Dillinger, and Red Grange? 1900, 1903, 1906, 1909 14) In Italy who’s known as “Mr. Kiss-Kiss-Bang-Bang”? Simon Cowell, James Bond, Harry Potter, Owen Wilson ANSWERS 1) Crow/Servo. 2) Flamingo. 3) Beagle. 4) Visco. 5) Gymnastics. 6) 23%. 7) Julius Caesar. 8) Bag. 9) Tennessee. 10) Legs. 11) Eggplant. 12) Playground. 13) 1903. 14) James Bond. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com Thursday, October 10, 2013 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Students at Port St. Joe Elementary might have told their parents this week their school was invaded by goats, trolls and puppets. Those weren’t Halloween decorations, but rather the Bits ‘N Pieces Puppet Theatre’s musical adaptation of the classic Norwegian folktale the Three Billy Goats Gruff. Bits ’N Pieces, a not-forpro t organization from Dover, doesn’t do typical puppet shows. Instead of socks and hands colliding for the sake of entertainment, the troupe uses 9-foot-tall homemade puppets and changing sets for its musical shows. The Monday morning presentation was brought to the school through grants from the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture and the National Endowment for the Arts. The grant was for underserved counties, eligible for those who don’t have fullscale art and music programs. The grant provided twothirds of the money to bring an approved company to the school, and a second grant from the Target Corporation was used to cover the remaining amount. “Structured art is not in our general curriculum,” Guidance Counselor DeEtta Smallwood said. “This is an opportunity to let kids be exposed to cultural activities.” Through their Arts in Education programs the Bits ’N Pieces Puppet Theatre players are dedicated to in uencing children through positivity. Each play contains its own unique life lesson and morals. Through the performance of the Three Billy Goats Gruff, Bits ’N Pieces reinforced the message that kids can do anything, even when there are obstacles in the way. Bits ’N Pieces artistic director and actress Holli Rubin makes the puppets and after the goats had successfully outsmarted the troll and crossed the bridge showed the students how the gigantic puppets worked and encouraged them to try to build their own puppets with bits and pieces that they have at home. “We’re limited on cultural exposure, but the students were very engaged,” Smallwood said. Ghosts on the Coast to haunt Reid Avenue By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com A classic Port St. Joe Halloween spooktacular is on the horizon. This year will mark the 13th anniversary of the Ghosts on the Coast celebration, which takes place on Oct. 31 all along Reid Avenue in Port St. Joe. Festivities will begin at 6 p.m. ET at City Commons Park with a scary costume contest. The contest is open to kids, adults, families and pets. Prizes will include gift cards from local merchants. During the costume contest, a sh fry to bene t the Gulf County Public Library will serve up fresh mullet. Once the contest is complete, live music acts will be stationed on each end of Reid Avenue. Freddie D and Lola will perform near Hannon Insurance while the Boyer Band will perform in the City Commons gazebo. Police sirens will give the goahead for eager trick-or-treaters to grab a bag and ll up on candy goodies from the businesses. “Street games” will be set up down the middle of Reid Avenue that will encourage kids to take a break from their sugar-induced dashing and enjoy some familyfriendly activities. “We want to slow kids down a little and engage them more,” said Chamber of Commerce director Paula Pickett, who organized this year’s event. “We’re amping it up this year and making it fun for the entire family.” Fall festivities will include hay bale bowling, ring toss and a cake walk, and Panama City storyteller Pat Nease will be on hand to share a round of scary stories. The cake walk is a fundraiser for the Merchant’s Association to purchase Christmas lights for the trees along Reid, and a surplus of 5,000 glow sticks left over from the Centennial Celebration in July will allow kids to build an interactive art installation. “We’re likening it to a family-friendly Bourbon Street atmosphere,” Pickett said. Area businesses and churches not directly on Reid won’t be left out and will have pavilions along the street so they can pass out candy. Restaurants along the street will be open and ready to feed hungry revelers. Pickett said there was a “major need” for candy donations from the community. Bags can be dropped off at any Reid-based business or at the Chamber for distribution. Donations from the private sector will ensure kids get suf ciently sugar-buzzed and businesses don’t have to come out of pocket. The chamber can be reached at 227-1223. “Ghosts on the Coast takes a lot of effort to put on, and the community always steps up to the plate,” Pickett said. WES LOCHER | The Star Bits ‘N Pieces Puppet Theatre players treat Port St. Joe Elementary students to a musical version of the Three Billy Goats Gruff. The troupe, which uses 9-foot-tall homemade puppets, was brought to the school with a culture and diversity grant. Bits ’N Pieces Puppet Theater visits PSJ Elementary

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B2 | The Star Thursday, October 10, 2013 M e e t D e n i s e a 4 0 l b 2 y r T e r r i e r / M i x S h e w a l k s v e r y w e l l o n h e r l e a s h a n d w i l l s i t w i t h s o m e t r e a t e n c o u r a g e m e n t D e n i s e i s v e r y a t t e n t i v e a n d w i l l i n g t o l e a r n S h e l o v e s t o p l a y k i d f r i e n d l y a n d l o o k s f o r w a r d t o v i s i t o r s D e n i s e i s l o o k i n g f o r a s a f e f o r e v e r h o m e w h e r e s h e w i l l h a v e t h e l o v e s h e d e s e r v e s T h i s g r e a t d o g l i k e s t h e c o m p a n y o f o t h e r d o g s a n d e v e n t o l e r a t e s c a t s D e n i s e q u a l i f i e s f o r a Pe t s f o r P a t r i o t s as s i s t e d a do pt i on I f y o u a r e u n a b l e t o a d o p t a t t h i s t i m e p e r h a p s y o u c o u l d f o s t e r o r m a k e a D o n a t i o n A l l p e t s a d o p t e d f r o m S J B H S w i l l b e c u r r e n t o n v a c c i n a t i o n s a n d s p a y e d / n e u t e r e d P l e a s e d o n o t h e s i t a t e t o e m a i l t o w n s e n d h s d i r e c t o r @ g m a i l .c o m o r a d o p t b a y s t j o e @ g m a i l .c o m o r c a l l t h e S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y a t 8 5 0 2 2 7 1 1 0 3 a n d a s k f o r M e l o d y o r D e b b i e A p p l i c a t i o n s a r e a v a i l a b l e a t w w w s j b h u m a n e s o c i e t y o r g W e r e q u i r e a l l p o t e n t i a l a d o p t e r s t o c o m p l e t e a n a p p l i c a t i o n f o r m A d o p t i o n f e e s i n c l u de o ur c o s t of s p a y / ne u t e r a n d c ur r e n t va c c i n a t i on s. O u r h o u r s f o r t h e s h e l t e r a r e T u e s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m 4 p m F a i t h s T h r i f t H u t i s a l w a y s i n n e e d o f d o n a t i o n s a l s o a n d a l l t h e p r o c e e d s g o d i r e c t l y t o s u p p o r t t h e a n i m a l s i n o u r c a r e T h e h o u r s f o r t h e s t o r e a r e T h u r s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m 3 p m V o l u n t e e r s a r e a l w a y s w e l c o m e a t b o t h o u r s t o r e a n d o u r s h e l t e r O u r s t o r e a n d s h e l t e r l o c a t i o n i s 1 0 0 7 T e n t h S t r e e t i n Po r t S t J o e H o p e t o s e e y o u a l l t he r e s o on I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y bBB O WB ] r e t l e h r S y o t e i c o e S n a m u l H a c o r l u o h y t i k w c e h e c s a e l p t e w p e t a n p o d o a t t n a r w t o e g a p n i s s i e m r u a o f y I 4514866 f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y 227 .7847 See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e 4516826 Our local real estate experts have identi ed what they feel are the best values around and are o ering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Real Estate Picks Best Values on the Forgotten Coast 4 51 6 8 3 1 Prest on Russ 850-227-8890 | 850-227-7770 www .coastalrealtyinfo.co m T h i s 3 B R / 3 B A h o m e h a s e v e r y t h i n g y o u n e e d t o e n j o y l i f e o n t h e b a y G r a n i t e c o u n t e r t o p s e l e v a t o r m e di a r o o m o f c e b a c k u p e m e r g e n c y g e n e r a t o r a n d a h o t t u b L a u n c h y o u r k a y a k r i g h t f r o m y o u r b a c k y a r d a n d e n j o y w h a t S t J o e B a y h a s t o o f f e r SELL YOUR LI S TI NG S HERE! $ # $ " (850)22 7-7847 | tgolden@pcnh. com SOLD Society Tips on growing strawberries in the home garden Strawberries can be grown in home gardens throughout the state. Temperatures between 50 to 80 F (10 and 27C) and day lengths 14 hours or fewer are required for the development of owers and fruit on most strawberry varieties. In the U.S. these conditions occur only for a short period in late summer or fall, and again briey in spring. In our area, however, this combination of day length and temperature exists for much of the fall, winter and spring. Singlecrown (stem) strawberry plants are planted in Florida during the fall, from late September to early November. Flowering and fruit production generally beings in November and continues into April or May. Fruit production over this period is not constant, but occurs in two or three cycles, and can be interrupted by freezing weather. Because the highest quality fruit are produced on relatively young plants with not more than four or ve branched crowns, plants are usually tilled under at the end of the fruiting season, and new plants are planted the following fall. Currently, we suggest three varieties for the Florida home garden: Camarosa, Sweet Charlie, and Festival, all three varieties produce attractive, avorful berries suitable for eating fresh or for freezing. Camarosa has been the most productive variety in North Florida, while Festival has been the most productive variety in Central Florida. These varieties are capable of producing 1 to 2 pints of fruit per plant over the season. Strawberries grow best in a location receiving at least 8 hours of direct sunlight per day. If a full sun location is not available, try to choose a spot that is sunny during the morning and early afternoon. The soil should be well drained and slightly acidic (pH 5.5 to 6.5). IFAS specialist recommends planting strawberries on raised bed which are two feet wide and spaced two feet apart. The beds should be mounded so they’re six inches high along the edges and about eight inches high in the middle. In preparing the beds you begin with fertilization. For a ten-by-ten foot strawberry patch, broadcast about two-and-a-half pounds of 8-8-8 fertilizer and till it into the soil. Then from the beds and apply another two-and-a-half pounds of fertilizer this time in a narrow band about six inches deep down the middle of the beds. If you’re just starting to grow strawberries you should also include a complete mixture of minor elements in the rst season fertilizer application. When the bed is properly formed, fertilized and moistened, cover with a sheet of landscaping mesh fabric which will block weeds and allow water to penetrate. The, cut slits in the fabric where the plants will be inserted. Plants should be set in double rows, one row on each side of the bed about six inches from the edge. Plants should be spaced 12 inches apart in the row. Be sure that no plants are set directly over the fertilizer band down the middle of the bed because this can lead to salt burn. Be sure to use certied, disease-free plants. Keep them moist before planting and plant in moist soil. Spread the roots in a fan shape, set the plant at the correct depth in the soil, and pack the soil rmly around the roots. For more information on growing strawberries contact the Gulf County Extension Service @ 639-3200 or visit our website: http://gulf.ifas.u.ed u or www.http:// edis.ifas.u.ed u and see Circular HS 1154. ROY LEE CA rR TE rR County extension director Special to The Star   Emerald Dance Academy   in Port St. Joe has launched a new ballet class specically aimed at the adult dancer.  The classes take place Saturday mornings from 9-10:30 a.m. ET at the studio at 317 Williams Avenue and are open to adults with all levels of experience — from beginner to advanced.   The classes are a great workout — with   movements utilizing body weight as resistance and building long and lean   muscles.    Practice  begins with small exercises of the feet, legs   and torso   at the barre and continues in the center with stretching, jumps and turns all set to classical piano music.   Class instructor, Erin Payner, is a former semi-professional ballet dancer who has trained with such notable companies as the American Ballet Theater in NYC, and the Boston and San Francisco Ballets and performed as a guest artist in numerous classical ballets such as the Nutcracker and Don Quixote.   Additionally,  in 1998 she   represented the US in what is often referred to as the “Olympics of Ballet” the International Ballet Competition and has over 10 years of teaching experience.    Erin and her husband   Major Joseph Payner relocated to the Port St. Joe area last fall from Atlanta.   Classes are $10 each and to keep this cost low, Erin is teaching on a volunteer-basis as a service to the Port St Joe community. Emerald Dance Academy is a premier dance studio with excellent dance facilities including sprung marley ooring  and an experienced   and   caring faculty offering classes in ballet, tumbling, lyrical, hip-hop, jazz and tap.   The performing company regularly competes across the Southern US in national competitions and has won many awards.   Be on the lookout for dancers around town over the next few weeks   at Saturday soccer games and bake sales,   fundraising for their   upcoming trip to   a dance convention for advanced training and performing opportunities.    The dancers very much appreciate your support.   Visit Emerald Dance Academy on Facebook or contact owner Barbie Sabins at 229-1413 for more details. Special to The Star On Oct. 17, Marsha Lindeman from the Gulf County Health System will be our guest and speaker. A discussion about the effects of Obamacare and lack of state and fed eral funding for the local healthcare system will be the topic. If you are in terested in hearing Mar sha speak, please contact Sunset Coastal Grill at 227-7900 to reserve a seat at lunchtime. The PSJ Rotary Club meets at noon on Thurs day at Sunset Coastal Grill. If you are interested in more information re garding service projects or membership, please contact Patti Blaylock at 227-7900 or Father Tommy Dwyer at 227-1845. Star Staff Report Gulf County Senior Citizens, located at 120 Li brary Drive in Port St. Joe, is asking for donations of non-perishable foods for our low-income seniors such as juice, canned tuna & chicken, soup or vege tables. Small inexpensive bingo prizes are always needed for our clients that love to play bingo several times a week. Also needed are donations of items for arts and crafts. We provide a hot nutri tious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and over. Transporta tion may be available to our meal sites. Anyone in terested in coming to our sites in Port St. Joe or We wahitchka for meals and activities or who would like to donate any of the items noted above may call Debbie at 229-8466. Star Staff Report The Food and Toys As sistance Program through the Salvation Army has announced is schedule for applications and dis tribution of gifts to the community. Application will be taken 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. ET on Monday, Oct. 21 in Port St. Joe at the STAC House lo cated on 610 Eighth Street. In Wewahitchka, ap plications will be taken 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. CT Thurs day, Oct. 24 at the Gulf County Public Library lo cated at 314 N. 2nd Street. All applicants must bring all identication cards for family members and copies of bills and proof of income. Senior citizens and adults single and married may apply. All applicants must meet income guidelines. Distribution of gifts in Port St. Joe will take place 2-5 p.m. ET Dec. 17 at the STAC House. Distribution of gifts in Wewahitchka will be 9 a.m. until 12 noon CT Dec. 17 at the Gulf County Pub lic Library. Wheeling around with Rotary Senior Citizens needs your help Salvation Army Christmas program schedule Calling all adult dancers, former dancers and wannabe dancers!

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The Star| B3 Thursday, October 10, 2013 Special to The Star Friday, Oct. 11, will be a big day on the campus of Faith Christian School. There will be trucks galore! The show begins at 9 a.m. ET and will include the PSJ City Police Dept., PSJ Fire Dept., Gulf County Sheriff’s Dept., Florida Highway Patrol, Division of Forestry and EMS Services. Students and parents will enjoy learning about the jobs, equipment, of each department, and learn some safety tips too. This will be an exciting event and FCS is thankful to all of these departments for helping to keep our children safe. Im p la nt s & C r o w ns Af f or da ble De ntu r es P ana ma Cit y P A W illia m C Kna pk e DDS G e ner a l D en t is t P ana ma City Squ ar e 6 1 7 W est 23r d Str eet, P ana ma City FL Cal l F or Inf or mat ion 188 833 616 15 F ees ef f ectiv e thr ough 1 1 / 2 2/ 1 3 Addi tiona l f ees ma y be incur r ed depe nding on indiv idua l case s Same -da y Cr o wn ser vice ma y not be a v ailab le in cer t ain case s Af f or dable Dentu r es P anam a City P .A. Of ce #: (850) 8726155. G r e a t v s ot he r D en t a l p r o vi d er s Sin gle T oo th Im pla nt $ 1 7 95 D e n tu r e Im p la n ts $ 1 49 5 $ 1 8 95 Sa m e Da y Cr o wn s $ 69 5 L o w er Ar c h Upp er Ar c h 20144-4-T4 111 4 4 1 3 9 4 5 4 HWY 9 8 BEA C ON HILL A T THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 5 0 6 4 7 8 3 1 0 GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL Y OUR F A VORITE BEER WINE & SPIRIT S SOUTHERN SUND A Y RANDY ST ARK FROM THE FL ORABAMA SPECIAL GUEST S : JOHNNY BARBA T O & THE L UCK Y DOGS RANDY ST ARK D OGS Y UCK L T HE & O T B ARBA J OHNNY : S G UEST SPECIAL S S PIRIT & WINE B EER VORITE A F OUR Y A LL O F TION S ELEC T GREA ON THE POOP DECK UPCOMING EVENTS IN THE CR O W’S NEST K ARA OKE Plea se call us toda y at 877 -231 -DE RM (337 6) to mak e an app oint men t and to learn mor e abo ut wha t our team can do for your skin Whe n was the last time you had your skin chec ked? W e’r e all at risk for skin canc er — r egar dles s of our skin colo r type or fami ly histo ry And with mor e than 1 milli on peo ple in the Unit ed Stat es diag nose d with skin canc er each year we wan t to take this time to r emin d you that the best way to pr even t skin canc er is to get r egu lar scr eeni ngs. So m e sp ot s ar e cu te So m e ar en ’ t. Do yo u kn ow the dif fer en ce ? We do T ricia Berr y ARN P | Adva nced Regi ster ed Nurs e Prac tition er Mich ael Stick ler MD | Boar d-Ce rti e d Derm atolo gist Jon W ar d, MD | Boar d-Ce rti e d Derm atolo gist POR T ST JOE | P ANA MA CITY gulf coas tder m.co m W E HA VE MOVED T O: 327 REID A VE (CORN E R OF 4TH St & REID A VE.) 850-227-3472 HOU RS MONDA Y T O W EDN ESDA Y 8 AM T O 6 PM THU RSDA Y T O SA TU RDA Y 8 AM T O 8 PM SU NDA Y 11 AM T O 6 PM The rst grade classes of Wewahitchka Elementary School participated in an afternoon of Johnny Appleseed Relays on Sept. 27. The event was formed around apple relays as students raced to the nish line competing in team events. This was a fun and exciting afternoon for the students, as one student mentioned, “This was the best day ever!” SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR Star Staff Report The Charles Whitehead Wewahitchka Public Library is celebrating Teen Read Week by hosting an all new Teen Book Club. The Teen Book Club will meet monthly beginning 4 p.m. CT on Tuesday, Oct. 15 at the Wewahitchka library branch. Why should teens join a book club? This is not your Mama’s book club and books are not just for AR points. Read independently and discuss with a group. Learn about careers in the writing and publishing industry. Our rst meeting will feature graphic design and a book cover art project. Celebrate teen book week and the freedom to read at your local library. Contact the library for more information at 6392419 or visit us online at www.nwrls.com.FRONT RR OW: Kyra Allen, Emily Warner, Travis Rhodes, Blake Childress BACK R R OW: Elliana Burkett, Joseph Farrell, Landon Miles, Jackson Vaughn, Gabriella Price SPECIAL TO TT HE STAR By JANICE EE VANsS Special to The Star Although everyone is not given the opportunity to have formal music lessons, they in some way are touched daily by music. Music comes to us in many forms: instruments, the voice, the rhythm of the rain, a bouncing ball, and clapping hands. Each sound presents its own rhythm. Children learn new information by adapting it to a familiar song. Toddlers learn to sing “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” and later learn the alphabet by singing the same tune. Formal music lesson, whether individually or in the classroom, teach many other concepts. Music includes math skills, handeye coordination, language skills, reasoning and reading skills, and develops memory. Learning to play an instrument helps a person to think creatively and solve problems. Music teaches discipline and requires focus. Hard work and perseverance are rewarded by an excellent performance. The excellent performance, in turn, brings about condence and builds self-esteem. Performances also help the student to conquer fear and take risks. When in a classroom, music students develop teamwork. They must use listening skills, cooperate, and communicate with one another. Playing together increases selfcontrol for the reason that everyone must play the same rhythm in order to bring synchronization and a pleasing sound to the listening ear. Music education is taught at Faith Christian School. Students in grades K3 through six are learning life skills through music that are benecial regardless of the career path each student chooses. The FCS staff believes that music theory is priceless. Call 229-6707 for more information about enrolling your little musician at Faith Christian School today! Special to The StarTT iger Shark Football: This is an Open Week for our Tiger Sharks, coming off a Homecoming victory over Franklin County. Our gridders next take the eld against FAMU High on at 7 p.m. ET Thursday, Oct. 17 in Tallahassee. The JV’s are pitted against host Riversprings in at 7 p.m. ET on Oct. 15. GO SHARKST T iger Shark Volleyball: The Lady Tiger Sharks are home next week with matches against Rutherford on Tuesday the 15th and the Dig Pink Game supporting Breast Cancer Research on Thursday the 17th. Both matches start with the JV’s at 6 p.m. ET. GO SHARKS : Beat Breast CancerC C ross C C ountry: Scheduled for a District Meet at Altha on Tuesday the 15th at 4:00 PM. GO SHARKSP P ort St Joe H H omecoming: Congratulations to all who made this year’s Homecoming a rousing success. The SGA and sponsors did a marvelous job making this past weekend a truly memorable time. Congratulations to Homecoming Queen Lexie McGhee and her Court including Shatiara Zaccaro, Dantasia Welch, Maya Robbins, Katerina Nelson, Cailyn LaPlante, Christian Laine, Anna Haynes, Lauren Costin, Amy Butler and Kristen Burkett. Congratulations also to the Senior Class for their winning oat. “They built a Time Machine out of a Sunbird?” Hello McFly! Junior C C lass News: Help support the Junior Class and their efforts to raise money for this year’s prom by visiting the concession stand at every JV and Varsity home game. P P ort St Joe Soccer: Girls soccer started practice this week with the boys starting on Oct. 14. The season kicks off with the Girls Jamboree at home on Saturday, Oct. 27. GO SHARKSE E nd of Quarter E E arly Dismissal and R R eport C C ards: Friday, Oct. 11 is the end of the 1st Quarter. Students will be released from school at 12 p.m. Lunch will be served in the Main Cafeteria Line. The Shark Hole will be closed. Report Cards will be distributed by 7th period teachers on Friday, Oct. 25. Fall Break: Gulf County Schools will be closed for Fall Break on Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 21-22. Classes will resume on Wednesday, Oct. 23. Wewa Library hosts Teen Book Club 4IBSL 5BML TT he value of music education TT he Lion’s TT ale • • • CELE bB RATInN G jJ OH nnNN Y APPLE sS EE dD School News dD AZZLI nN G d D OLPHI nsNS

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FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com CARD OF THANKS SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) Mor nin g Pra y er & Hol y Com mun ion Sun day ... ... ... ... ... 10: 00 A.M The Re v Lou Lit tle Pri est Ser vic es T emp ora ril y at Sen ior Cit ize ns Cen ter 120 Lib rar y Dri v e An Unc han gin g F ait h In A Cha ngi ng W orl d 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. T OUCHING LIVES WITH THE LO VE OF JESUS 6pm COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 Glynna K. Stitt of White City passed away accidentally at home on Oct. 4. Glynna leaves behind a loving husband, Derrick B. Stitt of 38 years, the two being sweethearts since their teens. Glynna leaves behind two brothers, one from Panama City, the other from Jacksonville, and two sisters, one from Port St. Joe, the other from Texas. Comforter Funeral Home in Port St. Joe will be in charge of the arrangements. Viewing will be held on Friday, Oct. 11 from 10 a.m. to noon ET at Hope Family Worship Center at 201 Garrison Ave. Interment will be at Pine Memorial Cemetery off of Highway 71, Blountstown at 2 p.m. ET. Glynna K. Stitt Billie Jean Snellgrove, 69, of Panama City, passed away Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013. Ms. Snellgroves wishes were to be cremated and a graveside service will be held at a later date. Wilson Funeral Home, Panama City, Fla., is in charge of arrangements. Billie Jean Snellgrove Randy Everett passed away on Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013, at the age of 62, after a courageous battle against pancreatic cancer. He is survived by his wife, companion and soul mate of 32 years, Barbie. After graduating from Leon High School in 1969, he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps. Upon completing his service, he spent time touring the United States on his chopper before returning to Tallahassee to attend and graduate from Florida State University. After retiring from the United States Post Of ce, Randy continued his love for education by becoming a Master Gardner, a substitute teacher and caregiver for his brother Jimmy Everett in his ght against ALS. Randys spirit in his ght against cancer did little to affect his positive approach to life. Always optimistic and caring, he never gave up his ght until the end. He died the way he lived, with dignity and grace. The things he enjoyed most were his friends, nature and family. He so enjoyed the fellowship of his comrades, from watching his beloved Florida State Seminoles to supporting local music in Tallahassee, Indian Pass and Port St. Joe, and he always did so in the company of his friends. In nature, he was passionate about the environment and its safe keeping. He enjoyed the outdoors, especially the waters of Cape San Blas and St. Joe Bay where he spent his life scalloping, spear shing mullet, and enjoying a life that can only be provided by the sea. Above all else, he loved his wife. Rarely would you see Randy without Barbie. They were inseparable, sharing the kind of partnership that clearly passed the test of time. In addition to his wife, Randy is survived by his stepson Nicholas Maxwell; granddaughter, Reagan Ella Maxwell, the love of his life, who affectionately called him Randaddy; his mother, Virginia Everett, Havana; sister Geni Everett, sisterin-law Sondra Everett, mother-in-law, Patt Jones, all of Tallahassee; sister, Nancy Everett Boettcher, Lilburn, Ga.; brother, John Everett, Jackson, Ga.; sister-in-law, Janet Jones Rogers, Mount Dora, Fla.; brother-in-law, Scott Jones, Ocoee, Fla.. He also leaves many cherished memories to his nieces, nephews and lifelong friends from Tallahassee and Cape San Blas who participated in his journey to ght cancer. Randy was predeceased by his father, Peter Everett; his brother, Jimmy Everett; and his niece, Jennifer Brown. Friends will be received on Thursday, October 10, 2013, at the home of Kenny and Erin Ayers, 6040 Pickwick Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32309, from 4-7 p.m. A celebration of life will be held at a later date, one in Tallahassee, Florida, and one at The Raw Bar in Indian Pass, Fla. His ashes will be released into nature and the estuary that he so compassionately loved. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308. Bevis Funeral Home (850-385-2193, www. bevisfh.com) is assisting the family with their arrangements. Randall Dean Everett RANDALL DEAN EVERETT Cora Lee Ayers was born in Beartown, W. Va., on Nov. 19, 1921. She moved to Mexico Beach in 1959 with her family. She passed away on Oct. 4, 2013, at the age of 91. She was preceded in death by her husband, John D. Ayers, Jr., and her daughter, Shirley A. Brogdon. She is survived by her three children, Ella Parson, John Ayers III and Bonnie Keigans, all from the Port St. Joe area. She lived to see and enjoy 13 grandchildren, 20 greatgrandchildren and nine great-great-grandchildren. She was a great mother and grandmother. She will always be remembered for homemade quilts, biscuits and gravy and her applesauce cake with peanut butter icing. No one will forget her love of coffee and family. She will forever be loved and missed. Funeral services were at 4 p.m. ET at Holly Hill Cemetery on Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013. Services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Cora Lee Ayers Special to The Star The consequences of being too quick to judge will be examined at 7 p.m. CT Monday at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Wrongly Accused: A Rush to Judgment Destroys a Life, features an exclusive lmed interview with Tim Masters, who spent 10 years in prison for a crime he didnt commit. Masters tells how he was targeted as a suspect, how the justice system failed him and what it was like to serve a life sentence as an innocent man. I was a law-abiding citizen. I gave up eight years of my life serving this country in the Navy. But there I was, locked up for something I didnt do, and people would shoot me if I tried to leave, Masters said. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. The family of the late Sister Gillie Lee McNair desires to extend their sincere appreciation to friends, neighbors (near and far), and New Bethel A.M.E. Church for various acts of kindness shown to the family. We pray Gods rich blessings upon you ALL. McNair family In loving MEMORY Love, Your wife, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren WOMEN AND MENS DAY New Bethel Baptist Church will host a women and mens day on Oct. 20. Sunday school will begin at 10 a.m. ET with a morning worship service to follow at 11:30 a.m. ET. Elder Donald Nickson will be the guest speaker, and everyone is invited to come and live up the colors; royal blue, silver and white in the name of Jesus Christ. REVIVAL FOR SURVIVAL 2013 New Bethel A.M.E. Church, 146 Ave. C in Port St. Joe, will hold a Revival for Survival 2013 at 7 p.m. ET nightly Oct. 23-25. Guest Evangelist will be Bishop Lonnie Mitchell from New Beginnings Assembly of Saints in Panama City. Psalms 138:7-8 (Ampli ed Bible): Though I walk in the midst of trouble, You will revive me; You will stretch forth Your hand against the wrath of my enemies, and Your right hand will save me. The Lord will perfect that which concerns me; Your mercy and loving kindness, O Lord, endure forever forsake not the works of Your own hands. Are you trying to make sense of what is going on today? Are you wondering how will I survive and get through this? Then you dont want to miss this revival. Please join us for a three-night revival. For more information, call Pastor L.E. Gantt at 271-9574. Obituaries Thursday, October 10, 2013 Faith BRIEFS Wrongful imprisonment explored at Lifetree Caf Bobby Lee Fields, Sr. 10-10-1947 10-12-1993 Gone But Not Forgotten! Do you criticize other Christians, yet do the same things too? Do you think this will draw us together in peace, by doing the things they do? Its very doubtful but its done somewhere every day. To promote peace within, we have to live a different way. Like when we want to speak our mind, rst, take a little time to pray. If you feel the same way after this, say what you have to say. In some cases, you can be quiet and thought a pretty good fellow. But remember this; silence is not always golden, sometime it is just plain yellow. Billy Johnson Silence is not always golden

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, October 10, 2013 Homecoming honors T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 Laban Bontrager DMD Monica Bontrager DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5 417 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines $ ' & & & ' ' $ # % $ ! $ % Vis a, Dis c o v e r and Ame r ic an Expr e s s H onor e d at P ar t ic i pat ing Ac e St or e s Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 W e Deli v er An ywhere Hardware and Paint Center Homecoming honors COURTESY OF MONICA EASTER | Special to The Star The Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School court senior representatives were Hunter Bailey, Jakob Bidwell, Braden Buckalew, Caitlin Burch, Morgan Fisher, Abriale Kemp, Issac Madrid, Josh Mayer, Nicole Morrill and Chandler Vines. Junior representatives were Rashard Ranie and McKenna Waters. Sophomore representatives were Hunter Hysmith and Tara Walding. Freshmen representatives were Alexis Brinkmeier and Adam Strange. TIM CROFT | The Star Members of the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Homecoming Court include, from top, Katerina Nelson, Cailyn LaPlante, Anna Haynes, Lexie McGhee and Christian Laine. Below, from top, Lauren Costin, Amy Butler, Maya Robbins, Kristen Burkett, Shatiara Zaccaro and Dantasia Welch. At left, Lexie McGhee was crowned Homecoming Queen for 2013. At right, homecoming royalty in Wewahitchka were King Seth Godwin and Queen Chelsea Cook. At top the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Homecoming Court and their escorts smile for the camera. TIM CROFT | The Star COURTESY OF MONICA EASTER | Special to The Star COURTESY OF ANELIA BUSH PHOTOGRAPHY

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Local B6 | The Star Thursday, October 10, 2013 B6 | The Star Thursday, October 10, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 92684S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 232012CA000138CAAXMX WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. SANDRA G. CORBIN A/K/A SANDRA G. BROXSON, ET AL; Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash beginning at 11:00 a.m., in the FRONT LOBBY of the Courthouse of Gulf County, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, on October 24, 2013, the following described property: LOT 15, BLOCK 6, LAKE ALICE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 9, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MANUFACTURED HOME, TRADE NAME-ANNIVERSARY, MODEL YEAR 2005, MODEL NO. 6763 AND MANUFACTURER’S ID NO. GAFL407A53417AV31. Property Address: 237 RHODES AVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465, Gulf ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR BY MAIL AT P.O. BOX 1089, PANAMA CITY, FL 32402 OR BY PHONE AT (850)747-5338 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED, PLEASE CALL 711. Dated: September 30, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 W. Cypress Rd, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)644-8704 Fax: (954)772-9601 ServiceFL@mlg-defaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlg-defaultlaw.com File No. 11-09236 October 10, 17, 2013 95597S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 232012CA 000188CAAXMX NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, vs. RICHARD D. BARFIELD, ET AL Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: Estate of Robert L. Holland and Unknown Heirs and/ or Beneficiaries of the Estate of Robert L. Holland RESIDENCE: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 447 Pineview Drive Wewahitchka, FL 32465 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Gulf County, Florida: Lot 8, in Block “A”, of Circle “J” Estates, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, at Page 10, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Gladstone Law Group, P.A., attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, either before, either before October 28, 2013 or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED: September 17, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk of Court If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator at 850747-5338, fax 850-7475717 or at ADA Request@jud14.fl courts.org, P O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. October 3, 10, 2013 95599S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13000064CAAXMX AMBERS BANK, A GEORGIA BANK, f/k/a CENTRAL BANK OF GEORGIA, 97 South Broad Street Butler, GA 31006 Plaintiff, vs. THE ESTATE OF JOHN CLAY SIMPSON, DECEASED; AND THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF WILLIAM A. SIMPSON, DECEASED, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF WILLIAM A. SIMPSON, DECEASED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: LOTS TWO AND FOUR, BLOCK SIXTEEN, BEACON HILL SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 2 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH THE 1983 MOBILE HOME WITH TITLE NUMBERS S/N HMST7309AGA AND S/N HMST309BGA LOCATED THEREON. Commonly known as: 9211 OLIVE AVENUE, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32458 You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, Florida 32312, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 17th day of September 2013. Rebecca Norris CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203 Tallahassee, FL 32313 Phone: (850) 422-2520 Fax: (850) 422-2567 October 3, 10, 2013 95671S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-25-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. NATHAN PETERS, III and CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure and Order on Report and Recommendation on Motion for Partial By THE STAFF AT MYGULFCARE Special to The Star In our busy world, we nd that just about any situation can cause stress. Whether it’s the back-to-school rush, everyday work, nances and family needs, or just nding time to walk the dog, we have stress waiting for us almost continually. How do we nd ways to cope with this stressful way of life, and what happens when we don’t? Stress is de ned as any situation that causes a negative impact on the recipient’s mental or physical well-being. There are two categories of stress, acute and chronic. Acute stress is related to a shocking, terrifying, or traumatic event. Acute stress is most frequently unavoidable. Sudden illness, accidents or frightening events are all examples of what creates stress or shock. Each event has its own negative impact and may ruin your day; although once the illness is treated, or the event is past, the stressful effect lessens immediately, fading completely in a relatively short period of time. Chronic stress is a state of prolonged tension from internal or external stressors, which might cause various physical manifestations. Chronic stress is an on-going negative event, physical or environmental occurrence that causes a negative impact on the mental or physical well-being of the recipient. Examples of chronic stress can be a dif cult job, a rocky relationship, a chronic illness. Chronic stress takes a more signi cant toll on your body than acute stress does. It can raise blood pressure, increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, increase vulnerability to anxiety and depression, contribute to infertility, and hasten the aging process. For example, results of one study from 2006 published in the Journal of Behavioral Medicine, demonstrated that “individuals who reported relationship con ict lasting one month or longer have a greater risk of developing illness and show slower wound healing. Similarly, the effects that acute stressors have on the immune system may be increased when there is perceived stress and/or anxiety due to other events. For example, students who are taking exams show weaker immune responses if they also report stress due to daily hassles.” Chronic stress can affect growth and development of children, wound healing, hormone and immune responses, as well as psychosocial well-being. Stress management is de ned as any event or activity that a person participates in as an attempt to reduce the mental or physical effects of stress. There are workshops, training events, classes, online courses and a library of articles that all claim to be the cure for stress. As you can see, there is no “one size ts all” cure for stress. What causes stress for someone else may not be so stressful for you. Some rules that will help, no matter what the cause of the stress is, include learning when to say “no”, and setting limits and sticking with them both at home and on the job. Find ways to keep your chronic conditions, such as blood pressure or blood sugar, under control, and make time to take care of yourself. Listening to music, reading a book, a walk by the water or in the woods or a hobby are all ways of relieving stress. Find one that works for you, and enjoy! Make plans now to attend the monthly coaching program, Knowledge, Nutrition, Exercise, and Wellness (K.N.E.W.) You! Each month, we will discuss a different wellness topic that will help you better manage your health. Our next class will be 5:15 until 6:15 p.m. ET Tuesday, Oct. 22 at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. We will have dinner and talk about Stress Management. Please let us know if you plan to attend. Call 227-1276, ext. 132. MyGulfCare can help you identify and manage your stress From staff reports Woman arrested for allegedly stealing from Thrift Hut A Panama City woman was arrested last week by the Gulf County Sheriff’s Of ce on allegations of stealing from the St. Joseph Humane Society’s Faith’s Thrift Hut. Carolyn Evon Evans, 55, turned herself into authorities last Friday. Investigators received a report regarding the theft of donated goods from the facility located on 10th Street in Port St. Joe. Faith’s Thrift Hut helps raise funds for the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. Surveillance equipment captured a white female, identi ed as Evans, stealing a ower pot from the donation drop area outside of the business. Investigators located Evans at her home in Bay County and recovered the ower pot. Evans admitted stealing donated goods from Faith’s Thrift Hut and told investigators she has been taking items from businesses with after-hour donation drops for quite some time. Evans turned herself into authorities on a charge of theft and was released the following day on her own recognizance. Wewahitchka men arrested on daytime burglary charges Two Wewahitchka men were arrested last week on burglary charges. Ellis Doyle Brogdon Jr., 48, and Arthur Lanier, 20 were arrested on one count of burglary of an unoccupied dwelling. Investigators began a residential burglary investigation Oct. 1 and during the course of the investigation images were captured on a surveillance camera of a vehicle. The passenger was positively identi ed as Art Lanier. Investigators conducted an interview with Lanier and he confessed to the burglary and identi ed his accomplice as Brogdon. Lanier was arrested and transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. Investigators obtained a search warrant for Brogdon’s residence and were able to recover most of the stolen property. Prior to executing the search warrant Brogdon ed the area. Investigators obtained an arrest warrant for Brogdon and he was apprehended the following day. Brogdon was interviewed by investigators and confessed to the burglary. Brogdon is being held on a $5,000 bond. Lanier is being held without bond. Man arrested for theft charges after 9-1-1 call A man with an active Bay County warrant was arrested on theft charges after a 9-1-1 caller alerted authorities to a theft from a residence on State 71 in Wewahitchka. Nicholas Andrew Pierce, 35, was arrested Sept. 28 after the Gulf County Sheriff’s Of ce received a 911 call in reference to a person stealing items from a residence. The caller was able to provide a detailed description of the vehicle and its occupant, which led Deputy Paul Williams to Pierce. During the investigation Pierce provided a false name and date of birth when asked to identify himself. It was later determined Pierce had an active warrant out of Bay County. He was placed under arrest for the out-of-county warrant and providing false information to a law enforcement of cer. As the investigation continued, Williams located the stolen property from the residence abandoned in a wooded area. Approximately $4,500 of stolen property was recovered, including two small boat motors. More charges are pending. GCSO BRIEFS Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR CAROLYN EVANS ARTHUR LANIER ELLIS BROGDON NICHOLAS PRICE

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 10, 2013 The Star | B7 Creamer’s Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Legion Fence Co. Wood Prvcy Vinyl & Almnm. Fence/Deck. Free Estimate 250-8275 Text FL68179 to 56654 Summary Judgment dated September 26, 2013, in Case No.: 13-25-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 a.m. EST on October 24, 2013 the following described property: Lots 14, 16, 18 and West 1/2 of Lot 20, Block 1005, City of Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida. DATED: September 27, 2013 REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Corut By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 3, 10, 2013 95679S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 13-62-CA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. BILLY ELLIS FORRESTER and MARION W. FORRESTER A/K/A MARION FORRESTER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, the Clerk of this Court shall sell the property at public sale at 11:00 A.M. Eastern Time, on the 7th day of November, 2013 at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, the following described real property lying and being in Gulf County, Florida, to-wit: EXHIBIT “A” LOTS 4 AND 5, BLOCK 7, DOUGLAS LANDING UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALONG WITH A 1988 MOBILE HOME ID# PSHGA3679 WHICH IS PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO SAID PROPERTY. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. This Notice dated this 27th day of September, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS, CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FL BY: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95673S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-86-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES E. NORRED, Defendant. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered September 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, the Clerk of Court for Gulf County, Florida will sell to the highest and best bidder at the Gulf County Courthouse Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, on October 24, 2013, at 11:00 AM, EST the following described property: Lots 5, 6, and 7, Block A of Chipola Landing, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 60, in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. The Real Property or its address is commonly known as Lots 5, 6 & 7, Block A, of Chipola Landing Subdivision, Wewahitchka, Florida 32465. Parcel ID Number 01041-125R; Parcel ID Number 01041130R; and Parcel ID Number 01041-135R ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@ judl4.flcourts.org. Dated: September 27, 2013. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk October 10, 24, 2013 95715S IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL, CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2012-CA-000068 Division WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. MARTHA J. TIDWELL, JAMES P. TIDWELL, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on August 7, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida described as: LOT 1, SAWMILL ESTATES UNIT NO. 1, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 108 CHARLIE GASKIN DRIVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465; including the building appurtenance and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales held in front lobby of courthouse, on October 24, 2013 at 11:00am ET. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 30th day of September, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95689S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE No.: 08-505-CA AMERIS BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MARILYN THEUS, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment entered in the above-styled cause on the 20th day of April, 2009, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 24th day of October, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time), at the courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard in Gulf County in Port St. Joe, Florida the following described real property and personal property situated in Gulf County, Florida, and set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Real Property: LOTS THREE (3), FOUR (4), AND FIVE (5), BLOCK C, FOREHAND’S SECOND ADDITION ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 50. Personal Property: That certain 2004 single wide mobile home located on said property having identification Number CJ83306GAJFBF0146 and Title Number 91134281. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Court, on this 30th day of September, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95707S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 2013-33CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. JAMES G. NORRIS, a/k/a JAMES G. NORRIS, SR., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013 and entered in Civil Case No. 2013-33-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and JAMES G. NORRIS, a/k/a JAMES G. NORRIS, SR., is Defendent, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 24th day of October, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment. Lot Seventeen (17) of Jonesville Subdivision of the SW of SW , Section 19, T8S, R10W, as per official plat on file in Plat Book 1 at Page 57, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED this 30th day of September, 2013. REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95811S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2013-09 Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe Phase II Water Bores will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 4:00 PM EST, Friday October 25, 2013. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday October 25, 2013, at 4:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidder’s name, address, date and time of opening, and bid number for “Phase II Water Bores”. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The City of Port St. Joe is accepting bids for underground bore work as part of our Phase II water line project. The work shall consist of six (6) inch, three (3) inch and one (1) inch bores. A complete bid package is available at www. cityofportstjoe.com For questions concerning this project, please contact John Grantland at 850-229-8247. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the City’s purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer October 10, 17, 2013 95799S PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf County Enterprise Zone Development Agency will meet Thursday, October 24, 2013, at 12:00 noon, E.T., 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., of the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex in Room 307. The public is welcome to attend. October 10, 2013 95801S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1314-01 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: Uniforms and cleaning of same for the Public Works Department Specifications may be obtained from the Clerk’s Office in the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. Interested parties should contact Lynn Lanier for additional information at (850) 229-6106. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Proposals must be submitted to the Gulf County Clerk’s Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, October 25, 2013. Bids will be opened at this location on Monday, October 28, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: TYNALIN SMILEY CHAIRMAN ATTEST: REBECCA NORRIS, CLERK October 10,17, 2013 95825S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1319 Application No. 2013-37 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05015-003R Description of Property: Lot 14, Block 45, of Re-subdivision of Block 45, in Unit Number Three of Saint Joseph’s Addition of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the Plat as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 34, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: C Q Developments, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95821S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1381 Application No. 2013-39 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05793-000R Description of Property: Lot Ten (10), Block 1006, according to the Official map of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, as the same appears on file in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Being same property filed for record in Gulf County, October, 1959, 1:42 P.M. in Deed Book No. 36, Page No. 179, in Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Billy Charles Quinn All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95823S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 100 Application No. 2013-38 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 00517-002R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the NW. Corner of Original Government Lot 4, Section 16, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, and extend a line southerly along the western boundary of said Lot 4, for 420.3 feet; then turn 64 Degrees 21 Minutes left for 793.36 feet; then turn 67 Degrees 28 Minutes right for 542.23 feet, thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 35 feet; thence turn South 310 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, continue the line last above described for 75 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 125 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 75 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 125 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: John Whitehurse & Lori Adams (dec) All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95827S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Florida Tax Lien Assets IV, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1514 Application No. 2013-36 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06319-060R Description of Property: Lot 2, Block C, Marnie’s Island Preserve, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 22 and 23, and as amended in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Winston Williams All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95829S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-000075-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Bayside Savings Bank, Plaintiffs, vs. ERIC B. RAMSEY and MELISSA N. RAMSEY, and The Owners Association of Southgate, Inc., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 at 11:00 a.m. EST on October 24, 2013 the following described property: Lot 29, Southgate Subdivision, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 17, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. AND Lot 25, Block 1, Ward Ridge Subdivision Unit 1, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 3, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Dated: October 1, 2013 Becky L. Norris Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10,17, 2013 Cue FurnitureStart your Christmas layaway now! Pickup as late as December 23rd. New mattresses: Twin sets, $99; Full sets, $139; Queen sets, $199. Quality used furniture. 1425 Hwy 71 S. Wewa. 850-639-2343 Text FL68236 to 56654 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard SaleCome one Come All, something for everyone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard SaleCome one Come All, something for evryone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 Mexico Beach 101 40th Street, Saturday, Oct. 12th, 8am central time Tools, toys, electronics, fishing equipment, etc. Text FL68292 to 56654 PSJ : 1018 McClelland Ave, Fri/Sat, Oct 11-12, 8:00am -until Furniture, clothes, toys, tools and more! All must go! Text FL68040 to 56654 St. Joe Beach 354 Ponce de Leon St. Saturday Oct. 19th 8am (est.) -???? No Early Birds!!Large Yard Sale2 elec. wheelchairs, lawn tractor, lrg. generator, power washer, lots of jewelry, clothing, furniture and much more! txt FL67561 to 56654 White City(PSJ) 125 Pridgeon Rd. Off of Hwy 71 at the ICW bridge. Sat., Sun, & Mon Oct. 12th, -14th 8:30(est.) -4pm (est)Gigantic 3 Family Yard SaleTools, bikes, furniture, housewares, clothes, and much much more! txt FL67513 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FLOctober 12th & 13th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-602-6572) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407Text FL63024 to 56654 WE PAY CASH JUNK OR TRASH!Jewelry, old or new, used or vintage collectibles. We come to you. Please call Monique 850-227-1668 or cell 850-254-3898 Admin/ClericalReceptionistNeeded for very busy medical practice is adding an additional position to our front office in Panama City. Ideal candidate will be fast paced, able to multitask and have a great personality to interact with our patients. Previous medical experience preferred but not required. If you are energetic, a quick learner and ready to join a great team with a company that offers competitive pay and benefits please send us your resume to: Jason Ragsdale at jragsdale@eyecent ersouth.net Web ID:34267903 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW

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B8 | The Star Thursday, October 10, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510160 4510161 If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! Inbound-Outbound Sales/ Call Center RepresentativePanama City, FLHalifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is growing. Want to join us? We are currently hiring for a Call Center Representative to work in our Panama City oce. We are seeking a fast paced individual who can communicate with customers via telephone and email. As a Call Center Representative, you will be responsible for maintaining and enhancing current customer accounts as well as contacting prospective clients to gain new business. Representatives are expected to maintain a working knowledge of all products, services, and promotions that Halifax Media Group oers. Experienced professionals are encouraged to apply. Job Requirements: € 2 years previous sales experience, preferably in a Call Center environment € Ability and desire to sell € Strong communication skills € Prociency with all Microso applications € Detail oriented team player with a passion for helping customers Halifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is a great place to work. All full-time employe es are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/AD&D/Long-term disability insurance, 401K plan, and paid time o. In addition, we oer: € Performance/ Incentive Based Pay Scale € Friendly Team Environment € Supportive & Motivating Sta to help you succeed € Positive, Professional and Upbeat work environment € We Promote from within! Please submit resume & cover letter to: lgrimes@pcnh.com 1113131 1119151 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: SHIPFITTERS € FLUXCORE WELDERS PIPE WELDERS € X-RAY WELDERS PIPEFITTERS € SAFETY REP Competitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace 1114776 Juvenile Care and Custody Officers and Supervisors Join us in Pensacola! Immediate positions are available at the Juvenile Assessment Center for qualified individuals with law enforcement and corrections experience as well as experience working with delinquent youth. We offer competitive compensation package including salary, comprehensive benefits, and opportunities for career advancement. To learn more and apply online, visit www.greatsecurityjobs.com EOE Panama City! 4514326 OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 151A COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 12X12 OFFICE, BATH, STORAGE AND LARGE WAREHOUSE $ 550.00 PER MONTH/ 550.0O DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 4514327 OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 149B COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 3 OFFICE/KIT/BATH AND WAREHOUSE $ 675.00 PER MONTH/ 675.00 DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experienced Sales Manager Who will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: z Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. z Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. z Communicates and advocates the company’s vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. z Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. z Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solution’s ROI for the client. Requirements: z Bachelor’s degree or comparable experience. z Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. z Successful record of team building and leadership. z Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. z Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. z A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition z Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. z Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. z Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. z Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. z Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. z Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations z Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266340 Text FL66340 to 56654 Sales Sales Reps Halifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience. Territories Available In:™ Panama City™ Chipley ™ Port St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: z Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. z Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate —all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266376 Text FL66376 to 56654 Logistics/TransportCIRCULATION District Manager The Panama City News Herald has an opening for a District Manager. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. No phone calls. Accepting applications until October 14, 2013. Web ID#: 34268014 IT/Software DevelopmentRegional Information Technology DirectorThe Panama City News Herald, Halifax Media is seeking an experienced ITDirector to manage systems for two daily, five semi-weekly, three weekly newspapers and an internet portal. The ideal candidate will have a Bachelor’s Degree in computer science or engineering and six to ten years progressive experience. Prior newspaper experience a plus. General areas of responsibility include: content, management and financial information systems, word processing and office automation, data and voice communications and subsystems particular to the newspaper industry, support for web-based graphics programs. Specific duties include: analyzes the organizations’information and telecommunications systems as a basis for recommendations to improve and enhance the systems’capabilities; coordinates with the enterprise ITteam to implement the selection, and completion of new IS and telecommunications systems to accommodate growing needs of the region; identifying priorities for development, enhancement and maintenance of application areas; developing and implementing a uniform region-wide strategy for equipment, operating systems and communications; developing annual budgets for hardware, software and any capital purchases region-wide; oversees maintenance of servers and computer hardware for the region. The Regional ITDirector hires and oversees system support specialists across the region to ensure they are up-to-date on latest ITdevelopments. Some travel is required. Halifax Media offers a competitive benefit plan including health, vision, dental, life insurance, medical and dependent care flexible spending accounts, 401(k) savings plan, paid vacation and sick leave and holidays. We will accept resumes until October 11, 2013. E-mail resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com Or mail to Lorraine Grimes: Panama City News Herald P. O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL32402. Drug-free workplace -EOE Web Id 34266822 Text FL66822 to 56654 Creative/Design The News Herald is looking for a: Graphic Artist Candidate must have experience in InDesign/Photoshop/Quark or Illustrator (PC Platform preferred) while being open to learning new programs. The ideal candidate should have a creative eye, attention to details, organized, able to meet deadlines, have good communications/ phone skills and be able to work with minimal supervisor. Experience working in or with marketing departments is a plus. A portfolio will be requested at the time of the interview. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package including vacation, sick leave, 401(k), medical, dental, vision, life insurance. Pick up an application at The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34265884 Text FL65884 to 56654 1bd/1ba fully furnished & equipped, utilities incld’d, in town in PSJ, $1000 mo. Active military 10% discount 850-867-3611 Text FL64207 to 56654 PSJ 116 Bellamy Circle 3br/1ba, fenced yard outside pets only $550 mo + $100 deposit option to buy. 850-643-5381 Stately historic PSJ home with great Bay View. 3 Br, 2.5 Baths. Elegant throughout. $1150/mo 850-227-7234 Bldg/Const/Skill TradeCarpet/Vinyl Installers Must be qualified. Call 850-670-4211 and ask for the Manager. Web Id 34265176 Text FL65176 to 56654 Part Time Nursery AssistantFUMC is seeking a PT Nursery Assistant to care for children ages 0-5 during Sunday School, Sunday Worship Services and other church events as required. Please submit a resume, contact information, at least 2 references and a cover letter to: fumcp sj@gtcom.net Attention Nursery Position. Or P.O. Box 266, Port St. Joe, FL32547. Attn: Bobbi Lassiter. Web ID#: 34268269 Text FL68269 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES Full Time Office Assistant Do you have office experience with good customer service & computer skills? Are you attentive to detail & have good follow-up skills? Do you enjoy the challenge of working in a fast paced office & available to work weekdays & weekends? If so, stop by 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island between 9-5 weekdays & complete an application. Great benefits. For questions, call Sandra at 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34268057 Medical/Health RN’s Join the rewarding field of correctional nursing! You’ll find autonomy, variety, stability and flexibility in this ambulatory setting. Corizon has positions available at Franklin Correctional Facility in Carrabelle, FL. We are currently looking for Full Time, Part Time and PRN RN’s. Call to learn why correctional nursing could be the refreshing change you need! We offer competitive pay plus an excellent benefit package that includes generous paid days off and so much more! For more info, contact: Tracy Mazuranic 1-800-222-8215 x9553 tracy .mazuranic@cori zonhealth.com or Quick Apply online (under the job opportunities link). www .corizonhealth.com EOE/AAP/DTR These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week. Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR Semper Fi Sisters bring Beach Blast, Boxes of Love next weekBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com To understand the importance to a deployed soldier of receiving a touch of home, maybe we have to understand what brings that soldier to a far-off land. To put ones body in harms way, to lose friends and loved ones on the battle eld and beyond. To volunteer to put life on line, to stand and be counted when the job is literally life and death and the bene ts less than ideal. Laura Williams resides at that particular nexus. She is an Army veteran with two tours in Afghanistan physically behind NFCD to operate within historic buildingBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Having worked since early last year to save the historic County Courthouse in Wewahitchka, Sharon Gaskin received a huge boost Tuesday. During their regular bimonthly meeting, members of the Board of County Commissioners approved conditionally a lease agreement with Gaskin and her company North Florida Child Development Inc. The lease will allow NFCD to maintain its operations within the courthouse, moving from the upper oor to a space yet to be formally mapped out toward the front of the rst oor. The BOCC still must decide how to remediate water leaking and mold issues in the rear, where a jail was later added to the original courthouse. The county would provide a 10-year lease at $1 per year, with an annual renewal of the lease coming before the BOCC each October, county attorney Jeremy Novak said. There is also an economic development component of the lease under which NFCD must maintain a speci cally identi ed number of full-time employees in Gulf County, Novak said. The courtroom and chambers on the upper oor, a signi cant part of the courthouses registry onto the National Register of Historic Places, will continue to be available for BOCC and public use. There will be a 90-day transition to nalize the lease as NFCD addresses required federal and state audits the company operates Head Start, Early Head Start and other programs in ve counties in the next few months. In return for the lease, NFCD already has transferred utilities into its name and has agreed to make certain improvements during the rst 90 days of the lease, Novak said. As the tenant, it would carry costs for maintenance and repairs to the portion of the courthouse it is leasing while county work crews would continue maintenance of the grounds.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com The waiting game continues. Walt Butler stood silent but attentive during his pre-trial hearing on Tuesday as public defender Henry Sims told Judge John Fishel two more motions needed to be led. According to Sims, those motions were expected to take 2-3 hours to complete. Butlers trial date is set for Nov. 18, and Fishel said he had limited availability before the trial is expected to take place. The judge booked three hours across three days to allow Sims to enter the motions. The hearings will take place from 3-4 p.m. ET Oct. 17, 11 a.m. to noon Oct. 29 and 11 a.m. to noon Nov. 14. Sims led a motion in September for Fishel to reconsider Butlers bond status, but no decision had yet been reached. According to Sims and prosecutor Robert Sombathy, the trial next month is expected to last 2-3 days.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com It was a close encounter of the mono lament kind. Gulf World Marine Institute successfully rehabilitated a sub-adult loggerhead sea turtle, which was released at the Bay/ Gulf County line last Thursday. More than 50 attendees gathered to watch Taylor, named for the county in which it was rescued, head back out to sea. Boaters in Perry found Taylor entangled in shing gear. The mono lament restricts their ippers and then constricts when they move, said Stephanie Nagle, an Education Coordinator with GWMI. If not treated, the line can cut off the turtles circulation. Not expecting a crowd, Taylor appeared apprehensive about getting back in the water. After some encouragement from Nagle, the turtle headed out on its next adventure. Taylor was considered a teenager and thus the sex of the turtle was unknown. Loggerheads dont typically reach maturity until age 30. Another turtle, an endangered juvenile green sea turtle found stranded on Panama City Beach, was scheduled to be released but hadnt yet received the all clear from the GWMI veterinarian. The green sea turtle was also found tangled in mono laments. A release will be rescheduled once the turtle has been medically cleared to return to the water. According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, improperly discarded mono lament shing line can cause problems for marine life and the environment. Marine mammals, sea turtles, sh and birds become injured from entanglements or ingest the line, often dying as a result. The FWC started the Mono lament Recovery & Recycling Program now provides recycling bins to more than 40 Florida counties. WALT BUTLER BOCC conditionally OKs courthouse leaseNew motions delay Butler pre-trial hearing PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarAfter rehabilitating a sub-adult loggerhead sea turtle, employees of Gulf World Marine Institute released the turtle at Beacon Hill. Below, after some encouragement from the crowd of 50, Taylor the turtle headed back out to sea.Rehabilitated loggerhead sea turtle released at Beacon Hill TAR TAR Wewahitchka, Port St. Joe schools celebrate Homecoming, B5 HOMEWARD BOUNDOpinion . . . . . . . . . . . .A4Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . .A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . .A7-8Community . . . . . . . . . . B1School News . . . . . . . . . . B3Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4Classi eds . . . . . . . . . .B7-8We love what is behind usTIM CROFT | The StarThe Centennial Building will become a factory of love Oct. 19 for the annual Semper Fi Sisters Beach Blast Packing Party. See COUNTY A5 See BUTLER A5 See SEMPER FI A3Thursday, OCTOBER 10, 2013 YEAR 75, NUMBER 52

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, October 10, 2013By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Bed taxes are up and the Gulf County Tourist Development Council advisory council was feeling good. During last Fridays regular meeting the council celebrated a bed tax revenue increase of 26.8 percent in August over the same month last year. The current 4 percent tax collected $747,254 year to-date over the 2011-12 total of $661,372. Beach nourishment plans for the new scal year include signage for Indian Pass, Cape San Blas and St. Joe Beach to warn visitors and residents to not walk on the dunes, though council chairman David Warriner worried that too many signs may be unattractive to Gulf County visitors. I have a problem with dont signs, said Warriner. I dont want to say no to everyone. The council agreed to monitor the publics response to the signs and revisit the verbiage in the future if needed. TDC director Jennifer Jenkins mentioned that the budget had undergone a nal adjustment from $600,000 to $650,000 for the new scal year. Jenkins said that this number was still conservative. Jenkins reported on the TDCs recently wrapped month-long Pinterest campaign that had visitors and residents identifying places around Gulf County through photographs posted online. The campaign raised awareness of the Forgotten Coast by spotlighting the beaches and other out-of-the-way gems. It was a fabulous promotion, said Jenkins. Its all about getting the word out. Jenkins reported that the campaign led to a 40 percent increase in website trafc and a 273 percent increase in fans for the TDCs Facebook page. So far this year, 54,557 visitor guides had been shipped or distributed and visitation to the Welcome Center was up 14 percent from last year. Jenkins said that she attributes the success of the campaign to showing potential visitors and residents the natural beauty that the area has to offer. We really captured the essence of Gulf County, she said. The marketing campaign led to other media exposure from Panama City news stations and travel bloggers. A new TDC website is currently being developed and is scheduled to be live in mid-February of next year that will allow trafc to be directed to specic areas of the webpage that visitors may nd appealing or helpful. Another marketing endeavor saw eight wooden kiosks built around Gulf County to list upcoming TDC-sponsored events, important information and to invite guests to the Welcome Center. They were constructed by the countys maintenance team and have been erected at area parks that include Frank Pate, Indian Pass, Salinas, White City, Gaskin, Beacon Hill, Highland View and the Dead Lakes (see related article). Scheduled appearances at the council meeting included Brenda Garth of the Semper Fi Sisters. Garth asked the council for a special adjustment that would allow her to have $2,500 up-front for the shipping of the Boxes of Love that will be put together during the groups annual packing party at the Centennial Building, for which the city of Port St. Joe has waived its rental fee. The funds, allocated annually, would allow the Sisters to ship 200 packages. Pat Hardman, coordinator of the Shells and Tales storytelling event, sought $1,600 to pay professionals to come in for the 2014 installment in February. At last years event, yarn spinners included Panama City humorist Pat Nease and Tallahassees Robyn A. Rennick. The council awarded the funds in hopes that the event could ultimately rival the 10,000 person events held in North Carolina and Tennessee. Patrick Jones appeared on behalf of the Port of Port St. Joe. He explained that until the Port is operational, funds are not available for operating costs. In order to raise money, the Gulf County Economic Development Alliance, Inc. decided to host a golf tournament in December and sought $1,500-$2,000 to purchase signage, banners and yers to market the event. Less than two months to pull off a golf tournament is a recipe for disaster, said Warriner. The council agreed that they would help promote the event through their online presence, but no money was awarded and the request was tabled while Jones explored other avenues for funding. Prior to adjournment, Warriner revealed that County Commissioner Warren Yeager, also a member of the TDC council, would serve for the 2014 year. SeeaTyndallFederalCreditUnionrepresentativeforcompletedetailsanddisclosures.DeferredpaymentoeravailableonautoloansopenedbetweenOctober7,2013andDecember31,2013. Allratesandoersaresubjecttochangewithoutnotice.Membereligibilityrequired;aninitial$1non-refundablemembershipfeewillapply. DATECHANGEONSEALEDBIDSNoticetoReceiveSealedBidsOctober1,2013 TheCityofWewahitchkainGulfCountyFloridawillacceptsealbids fromcertiedasbestosremovalcompaniesthatareapprovedbythe StateofFloridatoremoveasbestosmaterialfromabuilding. BidsmustbesealedandmarkedAsbestosRemoval. AscopeofservicescanbepickedupattheCityAnnexlocated318 South7thSt. AllbidsmustbeturnedintotheCityClerkbefore12noonCTOctober 28,2013at318South7thSt. AllbidswillbeopenedonOctober28,2013at12:15pmCTattheold CityHalllocatedat109South2ndSt. TheCityofWewahitchkaisanEqualOpportunityEmployer/ HandicappedAccessible/FairHousingJurisdiction. TheCityofWewahitchkareservestherighttorejectanyandallbids. October10,2013 ConnieParrish CityClerk 1113270 THESPECIALTYMEDICALCENTER VincentIvers,M.D.BCIM CSSKINCANCERcanbepresentwithoutyouknowingit. CALLtodayforaskincancerscreening. www.iversmd.com VINCENTIVERS,M.D.301TwentiethStreet PortSt.Joe,FL32456850-227-7070Mon-Tue-Thurs&Fri 9am-6pm Wed&Sat 9am-2pmALLMAJORINSURANCEACCEPTED SERVICES By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Building a brand is no easy feat. The Tourist Development Council rolled out its new visitors guide in March, launching a new brand for Gulf County that focused on the natural beauty of the area. The latest marketing strategy is a series of eight wooden kiosks stationed at area parks that will display information, important events and alerts for visitors and residents. TDC director Jennifer Jenkins approached the county commissioners with the idea for the kiosks. Jenkins was inspired by similar kiosks planned for Salinas Park that would be updated with water conditions and operated by the South Gulf County Volunteer Fire Department. While the re department ended up with a digital display, there was still value in setting up an information booth at the park. Joint Fire Chief Melissa Larsen said that there is regular communication between the re department and the TDC. Any time Larsen changes the colored ags that signify water conditions the TDC updates the ags on the Welcome Center website. Larsen said that the TDC kiosks will add another form of communication for visitors and should be very helpful. After Jenkins, with Larsens support, received approval from commissioners for the kiosks, strategic locations were chosen and the structures were built over the course of a month by the county maintenance team. Its another touch point for visitors and they t our brand, said Jenkins. The kiosks can be found at Frank Pate Park, Salinas Park, Gaskin Park, Highland View, Indian Pass, White City, the Dead Lakes and Beacon Hill. These kiosks are not for paid advertisers and will be used exclusively for TDC-sponsored events and important information regarding seasonal shing or riptide advisories. Along with listing the dos and donts for the area in which the kiosks sit, posted signage will encourage tourists to visit the Welcome Center in Port St. Joe. The kiosks will be actively updated once a month by TDC staff. These kiosks will allow us to continually communicate with visitors and relay the same message and same types of branding, said Jenkins. Its been great working with the city and county and were very excited.New kiosks add to Gulf County brandWES LOCHER | The StarThe Tourist Development Council has created eight kiosks with area information at parks around Gulf County. TDC celebrates successful fall marketing campaign

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, October 10, 2013 MexicBac Anua Ar & Wn Fstiva MexicoBeach5thAnnual 2003Wine&ArtFestival Mexic Bac Anua Ar & n W stiva F Mexico Beach 5th Annual Mexico Beach 5th Annual 2003 Wine & Art Festival 2003 Wine & Art Festival 15THANNUALART&WINEFESTIVALSATURDAY,OCTOBER12,20132P.M.(CDT)DRIFTWOODINNMEXICOBEACH,FLA.ENJOYLIVEMUSIC,FOOD,BEER,WINE,LIVEANDSILENTAUCTIONS,ANDOVER25ARTISTSDISPLAYINGTHEIRWORK!FORMOREINFORMATION,VISIT MEXICOBEACH.COM .$5.00/PERSONADMISSION AL UNH ANT51 LAVITSEE FNIT & WRA )TDC. (M.2 P3 10, 22R 1EBOTC, OYADRUTAS .AL, FHCEAO BCIXEN MND IOOWTFIRD T NELID SE ANVI, LENI, WREE, BDOO, FCISUE MVIY LOJNE !KORR WIEHNG TYIALSPIS DTSIT5 ARR 2EVD ON, ASNOITCUA T SII, VNOITAMROFNE IROR MOF MCO.HCABEICOXEM IONSSIMD AONSREP/00.5$ her, and yet, she will say, not so much mentally and emotionally. She is also sister to a Marine with deployments in Afghanistan, preparing to re-enlist, as well as the wife of another soldier who, after surviving one IED attack with injuries considered minor only in the military, will also soon redeploy. She is the daughter of a Semper Fi Sister who against the most mortal of obstacles willed herself to last years Beach Blast, an event Williams mother missed three years running because of the deployment of her children and was not going to miss another, even in the face of grave illness. Why do young men and women volunteer to face death? It is just one of those weird situations, Williams said. We dont hate the enemy. We dont hate what is in front of us; we just love what is behind us. And with that, Williams, a resident of Freeport, took a moment to collect her emotions; to reclaim her voice, to ght off the tears. That love of what is behind is behind the love that is packed together each year by the Semper Fi Sisters wives, daughters, sisters, grandmothers and aunts of deployed military personnel during their Packing Party for Boxes of Love. The ultimate event during the ultimate getaway for loved ones of those on the elds of battle will take place Oct. 19 at the Centennial Building. The Sisters turn the building into a factory of love, parceling items from home, in variety that would make Target envious, into boxes to be sent to the deployed soldiers for whom those boxes mean so much. It means a lot, Williams said. Its a taste of home. It is a reminder that people remember why we are there and that we are there. In particular the Army, which can be a refuge for many. They come from tough backgrounds, or they have no family. To have something come from home, from somebody they dont even know, that will make their week. There is also a bottomline admiration and gratitude from members of the military. In the military, the pay isnt what maybe it should be, Williams said with tactfulness beyond her years. When you take into account what all goes into those boxes and you know the funding that goes into those care packages and that people are willing to use their own hard-earned money; that is pretty humbling. Now a full-time vet pursuing schooling for a criminology degree, Williams is among those pouring her own, her friends and strangers now strangers no more resources into the Boxes of Love. My mom raised us right, Williams said and well return to mom, Samantha Cochrane, shortly. She taught us if we have everything we need we dont have to be frugal about helping others without as much, who were not as fortunate. With all the selsh things going on in Washington, watching money being spent in ways it should not be, there is still hope. That is what this is about, hope. People caring for other people. As a volunteer for the Walton County Sheriffs Ofce Auxiliary Posse, Williams established a couple of campaigns for goods and dollars within the Posse. Her captain found out, wondered about expanding it department-wide and got the sheriff to sign off, and before long, Williams efforts garnered attention in local weekly and daily newspapers. She received emails from ofcers at the Walton County Correctional Facility with questions from inmates wondering what they might be able to do. This past weekend, she set up a donation table in front of a local Wal-Mart and collected almost $300 worth of items. One man asked, because he didnt have goods to donate, would money be alright? Yes. He passed over $50. You hear a lot of people say they support the military, but when it comes to action, they arent so positive, Williams. Ive met a lot of people who follow their words with action. As the contact for her local campaigns, Williams also has received her share of calls that, she said, just took her aback. One woman called about her son, a 14-year-old. He was concerned about members of the military having sufcient modes of entertainment in far off lands. Could he donate his Xbox and games? My goal is to get everything collected and back home and know that I will have to go into my pocket for a U-Haul trailer, Williams said with a chuckle. A couple of Posse members without the nancial means to donate want to donate time to help load it all up. The fth of the Beach Blasts, the fth of the Packing Parties are imbued with particular importance, and particularly bittersweet emotions for Williams. By her estimation, she and her husband have lost four or ve dear friends in battle during the past year. It takes its toll, Williams said. It is not something you can walk away from. Even though you get out you never get out, if you know what I mean. You still have friends who are deployed. You have loved ones that will deploy. In a way, I am still deployed. In addition, her aforementioned mother spent her nal days at last years Beach Blast. Determined to attend after missing the rst three, Cochrane had been ill dealing in part with lupus and its wide spectrum of symptoms but had only told her deployed children she had seen the doctor a few times. Not a word to worry the kids. But three days into last years Beach Blast, Cochrane suffered a massive heart attack and passed away. When something like that happens, you reect on your own life and about getting things done because there might not be a tomorrow, Williams said. Some people regret things they didnt do. Going to the Beach Blast was something she was going to do, not regret. She was going to have a list of things like that. In Cochranes honor, this years and future years Boxes of Love Packing Party will be dedicated to Cochrane. Williams cashed in some ier miles banked while in the military to ensure her mothers two best friends among the Sisters attend the special Blast and Packing Party. I am honored and I thank God mom could impact somebody so much, Williams said, adding that many of us fear death not so much for what is on the other side, but because, We dont want to be forgotten. For my mom, that will never happen. This has been an emotional roller coaster. One minute I will be smiling and laughing, and the next thing something will get me off guard. It has been more of an anxious wanting to go. It was a group my mom relied heavily on and a group she really believed in. TIM CROFt T | The StarFrom Honolulu, Hawaii to Mullen, Neb., to Long Island, N.Y., packages have been arriving from around the country with items to be packed in the Boxes of Love for troops overseas.COURt T ESY OF LAURA WIll LL IAMSWalton Countys Laura Williams has several local campaigns to raise goods and shipping dollars for Boxes of Love. She set up a donation station, in the rain, in front of Wal-Mart this past weekend. SEMPER FI from page A1

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OPINION www.starfl.com ASectionI near bout wrote the book on government shutdowns. Ive seen the money ow slow to a trickle. And then dry up altogether! Ive protested and moaned and got mad and blamed it on the hog market, them big shots out of Memphis and Jimmy Hoffa. I got so desperate in 1959 I took a job picking up Zag Nut and Moon Pie wrappers at Roe Alexanders swimming pool. We didnt have a clue back in the pre Beatle days about central government bellicose, trickle down economics or congressional stalemate. We were also not up to speed on White House bargaining, staged press conferences or beltway power brokering. We didnt know that you could have essential jobs still funded right through a shutdown. When the spigot got turned off up above me, I didnt get nothing! We all liked Ike but we didnt depend on him. Daddy was the government as far as we were concerned in the fties and early sixties. Oh, we had heard of Sam Rayburn and Lyndon Johnson. But we didnt know if the speaker of the house and the powerful senator from Texas liked each other or not. We were not privy to their private meetings or behind the scene negotiations. They acted stately enough and Im fairly certain they passed some very important laws ... but none of them ever reached out to the end of Stonewall Street. Dad was our president, congress and Supreme Court all rolled into one. When he passed a law it wasnt overruled, out voted, de ed or even debated. Me, Leon and David Mark might whisper about it very low, under our breath ... but really, they most always worked out to the good of all. Dad made the money so he also rightfully set the budget. And heres where the government shutdown came in. Mom didnt work. She would get up before daylight, cook breakfast, clean the house, make the beds, hang out a load of wash, get lunch started, dig a few Irish potatoes, make a dress or sew a shirt together, fry a chicken and take it to a sick neighbor, sweep off the porch, have dinner ready when we got in from football practice, go over our homework and keep the re going, but none of that brought any money into the house. If Dad didnt work the soup got a little thinner. I remember one year the TriCounty Stockyards closed down for a spell. Dads work, trucking hogs and cattle down to Tupelo, came to a screeching halt. The rst thing that went was the quarter for the picture show. We lived without Roy, Hoppy and Gene until the crisis was over. We also ate a few more turnip greens and a tad less meat. Dessert became crumbled up cornbread in a glass of buttermilk. Somehow Mom just categorized things in their importance to the good will of the family and we all kept going. You could complain to the high heavens but it wouldnt help. Folks had problems of their own. I understood from an early age that the universe didnt revolve around me. And nobody expected something for nothing! Since I couldnt go to the movie, I galloped down to the big ditch and fought the Indians single handed. Listen, life becomes a lot more colorful when you have to make up your own pictures! Somewhere in the mid fties a driver wrecked one of Dads trucks. And in the very same week another truck, due to some faulty wiring, caught re and burned. There was no insurance. You talk about a government shut down! I cant remember any woe is me, lamentations or throwing up the hands. We also didnt, and wouldnt, take a handout from anybody. My Dad would have died rst! He just kept on working. I dont know that we circled the wagons or had the ole were all in it together talk. We just kept on living. And sharing. And growing. And laughing. I look back on it from the vantage point of a lot of years and realize those tough times might have been the greatest days of all for us. Sometimes we had so little that a shutdown was hard to perceive. It got a little tougher in high school when the teamsters union went on strike and Dad couldnt drive. Billie Jean wanted me to wear those Penguin shirts and take her to the Dairy Bar every night for hamburgers and cherry cokes. I was a little embarrassed for my situation. But I rightly gured dating was important, but it wasnt essential! And I found a girl that liked to take long walks and swing on the porch. A shutdown by any government is a set back. Ive been there. But it is not the end of the world. If weve got the wrong people in charge, lets shut them down. Its hard to follow OUR money because of all the nger pointing ... by guys that dont own the money! And I cant understand how you pay some folks during a shutdown and not pay others. That doesnt sound like were all in it together to me. Whos to say one job is more important than another? Whats happened to compromise, civility, leadership and truth, justice and the American way? Daddy would just work harder. That was always his answer to any problem. Course, people not working got us into this mess in the rst place.Respectfully,Kes HUNKER DOWNKesley ColbertDad Wasnt Playing With Someone Elses Money! I remember the box. There was a little boy and his father sitting at bluish green Formica topped table. The son had on a white shirt and blue sweater or perhaps it was a blue shirt with a white collar. One thing is for sure, the father was looking rather sporty in his bright red shirt topped with a white sweater vest. The walls of the room were covered with blondish colored wood paneling. The picture on the box tells you a lot. As the father and son sit playing the game at the table, the mother and daughter can be seen in the background standing and smiling in the kitchen. The girls were doing the dishes. It was the 1960s, it was billed as the game for men and boys. In red letters you can see the words the son and father are saying The little boy on the box calls G-4 and his father) says, Its a hit. The red-shirted, white sweater-vested man also has his hand behind his head and seems to have hit the right collar of his shirt on the way up because its trying to stand up, salute and help the Father Knows Best looking fellow ask his son, It sure is good to be a man isnt it son? The son probably would respond, It sure is dad, I wish mom and sis would hurry up and get those dishes nished, so they get started on the oors. Goodness gracious, Im a little scared about looking at the image of the box on the computer. The powers that be might keep a list of folks that look at this box. I may be asked at some time in my life, Have you ever looked at the original 1967 Battleship game box? As you would expect, the design of the box changed from its original 1967 version. The Milton Bradley Company would soon put a little girl on the cover playing with her brother. Im just presuming they are sister and brother, maybe they are neighbors. One thing is for sure the little girl is playing the game with the little boy and she is not holding a dish towel. I will note that theres just something about that 1967 box that makes me want to nd a red shirt and a white sweater vest and put them on! Not to feel like a male chauvinist, but simply to be sporty and perhaps to put my hand behind my head and say, Its a hit. Maybe Ill even smoke a pipe and get some of those manly house slippers Do you think that kids would be allowed to play the game Battleship at school? Its doubtful. I still play by myself, against the computer; I enjoy it and it involves a little math and logic and its simple. Before the plastic game boards, little ships, pegs and box that featured the sporty fellow with his collar standing at attention, the game was played using grids on paper as you would imagine. Battleship is one of the simplest board games to learn and was a lot of fun for a little boy and still is for a grown man (who can wash dishes). You place your ve ships of various sizes on a grid and your opponent does the same. Players take turns calling out grid coordinates in an attempt to be the rst to sink all their opponents ships. The commercials for the game almost always had the games clever marketing line You sank my battleship integrated into their television spot. OK, when I put the red shirt and white sweater vest on, you know that phrase will be the rst thing out of my mouth. In my opinion, strategy games, whether having a military theme or not have a lot of value when approached with the right spirit. Now if the boats were catching on re and there was graphic violence or something, I could see how there might be a problem. However, what if the game sprayed water on you when someone sunk one of your ships? That would be pretty cool We often lose sight of the value of some of the simplest games that children play. Whether it is a board game with a military theme like Battleship, or pretending to be a cowboy or soldier or reman or policeman, there are a lot of good things to be learned. If you want to complain about the box and the girls smiling and doing the dishes while the boys play the game, I will agree with you. However, if you want to keep everyone from playing the game or pretending to be a cowboy, I have a problem with that. In 2012, the board game gave birth to the movie, Battleship. As you would imagine, Hollywood messed it up with aliens and some NASA stuff. If you like NASA movies, watch The Right Stuff, Apollo 13 or October Sky. They are the real deal. A simple game is sometimes best left a simple game and a childs imagination should be a place where they can pretend a stick is a gun, a sword or a just a stick. Find more stories at www. CranksMyTractor.com.White sweater vests and sticks that shoot CRANKS MY TRACTORBN HeardBy KEVIN CARSONSpecial to The Star Cory Doctorow, guest of honor at the upcoming FenCon science ction convention in Dallas, notes (During the shutdown, some scientists cant talk about science, Boing Boing, Oct. 4) that some of his fellow speakers will be unable to speak if the government shutdown continues. Because theyre government space scientists, they fall under the purview of the 19th century Antide ciency Act, which prohibits government workers from volunteering to do their own jobs including talking about science to the public. The law was aimed at stopping fraudsters who did government business, then presented a bill for services that hadnt been contracted but had nevertheless been performed a kind of Civil War era version of red-light windscreen squeegeeing. Theres a great deal of hostility toward government workers in some libertarian circles. And some of what government workers do for example cops who enforce drug laws or brutally shut down Occupy protests is illegitimate per se. But much of it is stuff delivering mail, putting out res, protecting people from actual assaults on their persons and possessions that there would be a need for even in a free society. In the end, what we call the economy is just people doing stuff, engaged in productive activity, providing goods and services for each other. Over the centuries, the state, along with the corporations and other rent-extracting economic institutions it upholds, have hijacked a major share of this productive activity and preempted the channels within which it takes place, so that many people produce goods and services for their fellows within an exploitative institutional framework. Their production of goods and services, which would naturally be governed by cooperative labor and peaceful exchange, is instead subject to the control of states and rentextracting institutions whose monopoly powers derive from state coercion. These people are not our enemies. Many of them are simply people who nd it ful lling to teach kids, save homes from res, and the like, and just take the existing system and its selfproclaimed naturalness and inevitability at face value. Corporate-state capitalism is in a terminal crisis. Subsidized production inputs cause corporate demand for such inputs to increase exponentially, and result in both natural resources and government scal resources becoming exhausted. The ever worsening boom-bust cycle requires ever-increasing government expenditure to utilize excess capacity and soak up excess investment capital. And the technologies of radical abundance are destroying the arti cial scarcity on which most pro t depends. The state, likewise, is just groups of people doing stuff. Some of what theyre doing is necessary and productive activity; theyre just doing it in a distorted, state-like way. Our goal, when the present system reaches its limits, is not for these people to stop doing what theyre doing. We want them to keep right on doing it as voluntary associations of producers. These individuals and groups of producers working within the bowels of state and corporation, as the long collapse proceeds, will increasingly respond to the exigencies of collapse by working around the rules of their nominal state and corporate bosses by using their own common sense. For example, the smarter police forces and sheriffs of ces will perhaps quietly and unof cially stop expending resources on evicting mortgage defaulters and shutting down squats. This is all what Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, in General Idea of the Revolution in the Nineteenth Century, called dissolving the state in the social body. And dissolving the state in the social body will require them to disregard legal barriers like the Antide ciency Act. As the progressive hollowing-out of corporation and state continues, its likely that at some point people performing services for the public get fed up with rolling paycheck delays combined with bureaucratic interference, just ignore the authority of the government agencies or CEOs theyre supposedly taking orders from, reorganize themselves as p2p networks or cooperatives, and start performing services directly for the public in return for some informally negotiated form of compensation. That compensation may very well be some sort of commons-based support from a larger social unit that includes the people theyre providing services for. A decade ago, when the Argentinian economy collapsed and bankrupt capitalists tried to board up the factories, workers just showed up, unboarded the doors and kept right on producing under self-management. They kept right on what theyd been doing, right where theyd been doing it before but their work took on a fundamentally different character. One of these days, government workers will respond to a government shutdown in the same way. Kevin Carson is a senior fellow of the Center for a Stateless Society and holds the Centers Karl Hess Chair in Social Theory.Shutdown: Teachers keep on teachinThursday, October 10, 2013 Page 4 USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING Circulation:1-800-345-8688

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LocalThe Star| A5Thursday, October 10, 2013 TheFloridaDepartmentofHealthinGulf Countypromotes TheFloridaDepartmentofHealth inGulfCountysClosingtheGap Program,inanefforttoencourage shopperstoselectandpreparemore fruitsandvegetables,willhosthealthy fooddemonstrationsstaringOctober 2013thruMarch2014,atthelocal DollarGeneralMarket. Note: AccordingtotheUSDepartment ofAgriculture,onlyoneinfourAmericans eattherecommendedamountsoffruits, andvegetablesdaily.Eatingfruitsand vegetablesandgettingphysicalactivity everydaymayreducetheriskofserious healthproblemslikeobesity,type2 diabetes,heartdisease,stroke,andcertain typesofcancer.Formoreinformationpleasecall: (850)653-2111ext102. yhtlaet hosl hli, wselbateged vns atiurf ntaird cen, aekort, sesaesit drae, hsetbeaid By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com St. Joe Beach property owner Bill Koran came to the Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday with more questions and information about the Americus Ditch project. Commissioner Joanna Bryan said answers might be coming soon. The ditch, which according to records from the Clerk of Courts, has cost county taxpayers more than $1.2 million to date, including more than 130 repair jobs, including a recent lling in of dirt around an above-ground break in the pipe continues to be a problem, Koran said. The line, in some sections, is 20-24 inches out of grade, Koran said. At previous meetings commissioners have said a job bid out six years ago and nished more than ve years ago was in the past and of little interest to them, but Koran and Bryan have pushed back, saying the ditch continues to be an issue. There are 40 or 50 homes out there that are affected by that ditch, Koran said. So it is in the future. We could have had some homes washed out if that storm (Tropical Storm Karen) had come this way last week. Koran said commissioners had just raised taxes by more than $1 million, and he had been personally attacked at meetings by members of the audience while trying to bring pressing county business to the BOCC. I came here to discuss a real problem, and I have been personally attacked, Koran said. I am here to show the public the truth. But, he said, his own research backed up fundamental assertions. First, the company that was contracted for the job was not, as required under bid specications, a Florida Department of Transportation pre-qualied contractor, contrary to statements made by Brad Bailey, owner of Bailey and Sons. According to correspondence from Darlene Anderson, prequalication supervisor of the FDOT, agency records do not show Bailey and Sons was prequalied to perform road or bridge work. Koran also noted that Bailey and Sons drew its nal payment for the job, indicating all had signed off on the job and everyone was happy. This was despite obvious problems from the outset on a job contracted for 120 days that took almost 10 months to complete and, most importantly, without a nal inspection report, which should have been led. Those reports, he said, could not be located by the clerks ofce. Either no reports were done or reports were removed from the le, Koran said. Koran also questioned discrepancies in billing for the job from Preble Rish Engineers, which designed and inspected the job. Under original invoices obtained from the clerks ofce, the job started as a $1 million project and was a $1.1 million job later in the year. He also noted that some $220,000 worth of pipe burned in 2008 and said public records do not indicate who absorbed that cost. In an email between the clerks ofce and county administrative staff, Koran noted, two invoices from Bailey and Sons could not be located by the clerks ofce, and employees were told administrative staff would handle the issue. Koran also wondered how Bailey could have submitted an invoice in January 2008 before the commencement of the project the following month and the securement of a construction bond by his company. We have a building problem, Koran said. We could save the taxpayers money. We should look at all projects. The county needs to get what it paid for. Bryan said that Ralph Rish, president of Preble Rish, had appeared before the BOCC and pledged to work with the county to x any problems. She said she had reached out to Rish and they were working toward remedying problems with this ditch. Commissioner Tan Smiley, expressing an opinion diametrically opposed to prior meetings when Americus Ditch was deemed old news, said the board would also assist. If we do have a problem I know we can x it, Smiley said. That Americus Ditch, if we do have a problem, Ms. Bryan, if you need anything let us board members know. We think it is a good lease, said NFCD nancial ofcer Gerald Thompson. Given that the item was not on the agenda and she had not had time to fully review the lease, Commissioner Joanna Bryan suggested tabling the issue until the next regular meeting to ensure the process was done right and allow for any public input. I am grateful that Ms. Gaskin and her company have agreed to take this on, Bryan said. This is a great way to save this building. Id just like a little more time to review this and the public may want to weigh in. Novak and Commissioner Warren Yeager said the nal lease would still need to come back to the full board, the footprint for NFCD had yet to be determined and in order to move ahead the BOCC should provide conditional approval of the lease pending a full vetting of the nal document. I have been working 18 months on trying to save this building and take the burden off the taxpayer, Commissioner Ward McDaniel said. Its a historic building. Novak said county and NFCD staff will undertake an air quality to ensure the safety of the NFCD footprint before the company signs the lease. The BOCC must still arrive at a plan and dollars to remediate issues in the back and upstairs of the courthouse, including leaks in the walls and basement and mold, issues that led to the BOCC moving all county ofces in the courthouse into other facilities, particularly the old Health Department building.Another jail debateFor the second time in as many months, Michael Hammond, administrator of the Gulf County Jail and deputy county administrator, took strong issue with comments made about the jail by Bryan during a previous meeting, this one the BOCCs nal budget hearing. Saying Bryan had provided faulty facts and acted irrationally about the jail and potential savings, or in Hammonds view no savings in farming inmates to Bay County, Hammond took issue with Bryans description of the jail. Hammond said Bryan had never set foot in the jail and had no basis to label it a disgrace during the budget meeting. Bryan used the word in the context that it was a disgrace that county maintained a $1 million jail Hammond said Bryans numbers change by the week and the jail budget is $1.1 million, not $1.2 million that had not been inspected in several years. Each county commissioner was sent correspondence from the ofce of the Florida Sheriffs Association, which oversees the Model Jail Standards program, that indicated the jail should be inspected annually. Gulf Countys had not been in two years and was out of compliance at that time. Hammond faulted the inspector at that time, called his report bogus and incorrect on a number of levels and that it had been a BOCC decision, years before, to not spend the money to maintain the jail to Model Jail Standards. He said having such an inspection was asinine. As he had the previous month, Hammond also had Capt. Sonya Farmer on hand, and this meeting also brought along the bulk of the employees at the jail. Hammond said he and staff had been putting time into putting down rumors about the jail closing and probation services returning to a private contractor while making the county money by taking over probation services. Hammond said Bryan was being personal about the issue and seeking to have 15 employees laid off. I am proud of the jail, the people I work with, and the continued discussion of closing the jail has left a bitter taste, Farmer said. Bryan said she had nothing against employees and did not wish to see jobs lost, but noted the issue is far broader. Florida Sheriffs Association ofcials were asking the BOCC why the jail had not been inspected in several years and said the possibility existed for a circuit court to remove the inmates and close the jail if it was not in compliance. I have no issues with the employees, Bryan said. My concern is not only safety for the inmates but (for the employees). That is our responsibility. I want them in a safe, clean jail. What is a disgrace to me is this board does not want to look at this. We should operate within the law. The discussion, growing ever more heated, veered into budgetary philosophy and that the BOCC just raised taxes, continues to put more work on fewer employees and, as Bryan said, We cut and cut without operating more efciently. Yeager took exception, noting the cuts the BOCC has made to the budget in recent years and saying proposals for alternative sources of revenue gained no traction. Lets start moving forward, he said. Send your letters to : LETTERS TO THE EDITOR P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 Fax: 850-227-7212 Email: tcroft@star.comComments from our readers in the form of letters to the editor or a guest column are solicited and encouraged. A newspapers editorial page should be a forum where differing ideas and opinions are exchanged. All letters and guest columns must be signed and should include the address and phone number of the author. The street address and phone number are for verication and will not be published. Letters must be in good taste and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for correctness and style. SHARE Yo O Ur R OPINIONs S COUNTY from page AA1 Sometimes they go faster than you think, sometimes slower, Sims said. Butler is charged with shooting and killing Everett Gant in July of last year in Port St. Joe. Gant approached Butlers Pine Ridge apartment after Butler had been accused of using racial slurs directed at children in the apartment complex. Butler shot Gant between the eyes with a .22 rie and left him bleeding on the doorstep before calling 911 and sitting back down to nish his dinner. He expressed inconvenience at being arrested for shooting a (racial epithet), according to the arresting afdavit. Six weeks after the shooting, Gant died from the injuries. BUTUTLER from page A A1 Wes ES Lo O Cher HER | The StarCounty work crews recently placed ll dirt over this break in the Americus Ditch pipe that popped to the surface after heavy recent rains.I came here to discuss a real problem, and I have been personally attacked, Koran said. I am here to show the public the truth.Bill Koran, St. Joe Beach property ownerProperty owners seek answers on Americus Ditch

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com OUTDOORSwww.starfl.comSection Section A By TOM BAIRDSpecial to The Star In 1955, Rachel Carson wrote, The edge of the sea is a strange and beautiful place. We all know this is true since this is a community by the sea and shaped by the sea, and the fall of the year is a perfect time to enjoy the magni cence of our shoreline. The air is getting cooler making it an ideal time to view life on the sand dunes that have built over the summer, and to enjoy the plants and animals typically found there. Cape San Blas boasts some of the nations highest coastal dunes and the last remaining habitat for coastal sand pine scrub, and the dune plants are ablaze with owers this time of year attracting their major pollinators migrating butter ies. These shore communities exist in zones that one can readily observe. Each has its own distinct set of plants and animals. The most notable plants to greet the eye as you wander off the beach are, of course, the sea oats (Uniola paniculata), those tall, iconic grasses rustling in the wind that every photographer and painter includes in their images of panhandle seashores. Sea oats and bitter panicgrass, Panicum amarum, are the primary dune-building grasses. These pioneer grasses occupy the upper beach and rst dune, with sea oats occupying this zone on sandy coasts throughout the state. Sea oats are very drought tolerant and burial of the plants base by blowing sand actually stimulates plant growth and helps the plant spread via rhizomes. Since sea oats protect Floridas coastline from erosion due to tides, storms and winds, they are legally protected. Although some like to use dried sea oats in decorative arrangements, it is unlawful to dig, cut or possess sea oats. They can be obtained for planting only from licensed nurserymen. Since the sea oats are our rst line of defense from coastal erosion, Florida takes protection of sea oats seriously. Also within this zone and easily noticed are shoreline sea purslane (Sesuvium portulacastrum), runners of railroad vine (Ipomoea pescaprae ssp brasiliensis), and beach morning glory (Ipomoea imperati). This is also the critical zone for nesting shore birds. Many of these birds build nests that are little more than depressions scraped out in the sand. These birds are particularly sensitive to disturbance. Hurricanes frequently destroy colonies, and coastal development has eliminated favorite nesting sites. Dogs and human traf c create problems each spring and summer. A dog running through a colony of nesting seabirds can cause all the birds to panic, consequently leaving their eggs or chicks dangerously exposed to the hot sun. We are lucky to have dog friendly beaches in Gulf County, but dogs should be kept on a leash and not allowed to run in the dunes. Behind the front dunes a coastal grassland community develops if it is protected from salt spray by the fore dunes. As the beach dunes build outward and higher, the pioneer grasses are replaced by other grasses in the coastal grassland community. These species do not range along the entire coast but change as one goes southward. The acid sugar sands of the panhandle coastal grasslands are dominated by Gulf bluestem (Schizachrium maritimum). This is a grass endemic to the northeast Gulf coast from Florida to Mississippi. Other grasses dominate the coastal grasslands of peninsular Florida. At Cape San Blas, this classic pattern occurs on the south facing beach from Money Beach westward to the tip of the Cape. The situation is different on the north-south arm of the peninsula (west-facing beach). There the beach dune community (sea oats, etc.) transitions straight to scrub, with scrub oaks, like myrtle oak, sand live oak, Chapmans oak, and rosemary, smilax, etc. This is where people build their houses. There are a few isolated pockets of coastal grassland community plants here and there on the north-south arm, but by and large the transition is straight from dune to scrub habitat. The coastal grassland community and the beach dune community are unique habitats that harbor several endemic species, including an endemic mammal. Cape San Blas has the St. Andrews beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus peninsularis). Westward along the coast are populations of the Perdido Key beach mouse, Santa Rosa beach mouse, and the Choctawhatchee beach mouse. The pallid beach mouse on the Florida east coast is extinct and the Anastasia Island beach mouse survives only in a few places. These populations are descended from a land-based species. After the last ice age, as sea levels began to rise, populations of these mice became stranded on barrier islands and developed into distinct species. All are threatened by development, hurricanes, feral cats, and free-ranging domestic house cats. Increased traf c on sand dunes is also a threat for the beach mouse, since increased traf c damages vegetation on dunes that the beach mice depend on for food and shelter. All are listed as either threatened or endangered. As you walk to the beach this time of year, note the profusion of yellow asters in bloom in the coastal grasslands zone. The pink and pale rose petals of pursh (Sabatia stellaris) offer a visual delight from spring to fall in wetter areas of this zone. Two species of blazing star are showing off their maroon and lavender petals now, and in winter, seaside goldenrod will display its bright yellow owers. Behind the coastal grasslands community are the big relic dunes that took centuries to build. Because they are higher ground, this is where houses are built. These ancient dunes, besides offering protection from storm surge, support the rosemary scrub habitat. Rosemary Scrub is so named because it is dominated by Florida rosemary, Ceratiola ericoides. This dark green scrub is needle-leafed; an adaptation for dry soils, and is one of the rst shrubs to colonize coastal dunes in the panhandle. False Rosemary, Conradina sp., also an inhabitant of sand pine scrub, owers spring, summer, and fall, and is very aromatic. Its pale lavender blossoms are a favorite of the migrating butter ies this time of year. Gulf coast lupine, Lupinus westianus, seems fairly inconspicuous until spring when it will then send up big sprays of purple owers. As we stroll to the shore and back, we are passing through distinct zones. Each zone contains plants and animals highly adapted to the conditions of that zone. Some of these plants and animals exist nowhere else in the world. We should take care to protect and appreciate these habitats. Cross only at designated points or on boardwalks to prevent damage to the dunes and the associated ora and fauna. Rachel Carson got it right; the edge of the sea is certainly a strange and beautiful place. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. You'reInvitedToJoinUs Wednesday,October16,2013,5-7pmET FISHINGARTIFICIALLURESINTHEFALL WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Oct.1082 65 3% Fri,Oct.1183 63 7% Sat,Oct.1284 65 8% Sun,Oct.1383 6310% Mon,Oct.1481 5914% Tues,Oct.1581 62 3% Wed,Oct.1680 6225% Bedbugs are not a pleasant subject but they need to be discussed, especially by people who travel. Cleanliness and a high price tag provide no guarantee that a hotel room wont come with unwanted occupants. Bedbugs are found in ve star resorts as well as cheap motels. At a recent convention of the national Pest Management Association in Hawaii, conventioneers were alarmed to discover wicker deck chairs in an ocean view bar were crawling with bedbugs. Just so you will know, bed bugs are not microscopic or invisible and you can save yourself a world of trouble by inspecting a room or shortterm rental house when you arrive. Thoroughly check the bed linens, seams, piping or ruf es, including the dust ruf e for the bugs or dark stains that indicate their presence. In hotels, the headboard is a popular hangout for these nasty critters. They are also frequently found between the corner of the box spring and its plastic guard and under the label of both the box spring and mattress. Inspect the rest of the furniture and other items close to the bed like pictures, and mirrors. Place luggage on the luggage rack or on the top of the dresser or table. Never put a suitcase on the bed, the oor or any piece of upholstered furniture. Thats like asking bedbugs to hitch a ride home with you. If you nd bed bugs in your room, immediately report it to the management and ask for another room. Make sure the new room is not adjacent to, above or below the infested room as bed bugs can travel through wall cavities and air ducts to infest other rooms. To ensure no bed bugs come home with you, bag all luggage in a large trash bag before being placed in your vehicle. This precaution will keep any infestation out of your car. Once you and your family arrive at home, visually inspect all items you plan to bring into the house. Place clothing and cloth material in the dryer on high for 20 minutes to kill any live bed bugs or eggs that may have traveled home with you. Items that cannot be placed in the dryer can go into the freezer for a period of 5 days to ensure there are no live bed bugs or hatchable eggs at the end of the 5-day period. Steam cleaning luggage provides an added measure of precaution. If you own rental property, can you take precautions to prevent bedbugs from making it home? Not really, but one precaution is to purchase moats for the legs of the beds. These are plastic cups that trap bedbugs when they crawl in. The moat will give your cleaner early warning that there is a problem; however, most are rather unattractive. One new brand, Blackout, is more discrete than earlier models. Bags are available for mattresses and box springs but these are more for use after the bed is infested. There are also monitors of various kinds that can be deployed around a bed. These range from simple sticky traps to complicated devices that use pheromone and carbon dioxide as lures. The downside is that most of the better monitors are expensive. They cost from $20 to $40 each and monthly recharging will run $30 per trap or more.Life on the beach dunes How to prevents bedbugs in your home BUDS N BUGSLois Swoboda SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomOur 2013 fall red snapper fishing got off to a slow start last week with rough seas and high winds. We only have until Oct.14 in federal waters and fishing will continue in state waters until the Oct. 21. Good-sized snapper are still close to shore, and the MBARA sites in Mexico Beach are producing good numbers and size right now. Fall feeding patterns are starting to produce nice trout and redfish. With the rain from last week, sight fishing will be more challenging this week. Use darker colored jigs and grubs in deeper water this week to find the fish fast. WWW.KILLBEDBUGS.COMThursday, October 10, 2013 Page 6

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASection $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedby theFSUBoardofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomore easilyrespondtoworkforceneedsinourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversitybyhelpingusbuildan endowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallow FSUPanamaCitytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnew degreeprogramsandprovidenewequipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMary BethLovingoodat(850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs SUPPORTOUR COMMUNITYS UNIVERSITY Page 7 Thursday, October 10, 2013By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The host Tiger Sharks ensured last Friday that the Franklin County Seahawks two-week swing through Gulf County was a bumpy one. One week after losing at Wewahitchka, the Seahawks ran into a buzz saw at Shark Field, dominated in every phase in a 49-6 loss. The win improves Port St. Joe, which was celebrating Homecoming, to 4-2 overall and 1-0 in District 1-1A entering a bye week. The Tiger Sharks will face Tallahassee FAMU in two weeks then host consecutive district tilts against West Gadsden and Liberty County that likely will determine playoff positions. The Seahawks dipped to 0-6, 0-1. We got to play everybody, get a lot of younger guys some action, which is a nice thing, said Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon. It may just be me, but I think a lot of coaches see the distractions of Homecoming as a necessary thing they would like to see get over. But I think our kids were focused, though not as much as I would like them to be. It was a good ending to a nice Homecoming week. The Tiger Sharks controlled every facet of the game and inserted the junior varsity en masse before the rst half ended 35-0. Port St. Joe chewed up 191 total yards in the rst half 293 for the game while limiting the Seahawks to 46. Franklin County only rst down against the Tiger Shark varsity came courtesy of a roughing the passer penalty. The Tiger Sharks also transformed a long punt return and a blocked punt into points and allowed Franklin County to score only on the nal play of the game, the second half played while the clock ran continuously. We will keep working, and well get better, Franklin County coach Aaron York said. I saw improvement tonight. We are a young team, and we just need to keep working to get better every week, which we have since the season started. The Tiger Sharks wasted little time getting on the scoreboard. Port St. Joe stopped the Seahawks on downs on the opening drive, took over at the Franklin County 34 after a punt and Dwayne Griggs did the rest in two carries, the touchdown coming from the 7. Drew Lacour nailed the rst of his six extra-point kicks. The roughing the passer penalty extended slightly the next Seahawk drive, with Port St. Joe taking over at its 24 after a punt. Three plays later Aaron Paul, on his only carry of the game, sprinted around right end and threaded through the defense on a 62-yard touchdown jaunt and Lacour made it 14-0. Franklin County went threeand-out again, and Griggs returned a rolling punt that got over his head 34 yards to the Seahawks 31. After an offside penalty against Franklin County, Lacour found Chad Quinn Jr. on a perfectly placed 26-yard pass to the right ag, and the extra point made it 21-0. The Tiger Shark defense stopped Franklin County in its tracks, and Umstead Sanders blocked a punt, Port St. Joe taking over at the Franklin County 27. Two plays later, John Simpson broke a trap play for a 19-yard touchdown, and Lacour again did his thing with his right foot. The Port St. Joe coaching staff at that point inserted the junior varsity the team suited 40some players for Homecoming instead of the typical 23-25 and Jak Riley scored from the 1 on the Tiger Sharks nal drive before intermission. Trey Sanders, a seventh-grader who despite not entering the game until the second half, was Port St. Joes leading rusher with 65 yards, scored from the 7 midway through the third period. After Jasmin Thomas recovered a fumble on the ensuing kickoff, Antonio Moree swept left end from the 12 for the nal Tiger Shark touchdown. The extra point came from Isaac Rocha, one of six seventhgraders the Tiger Sharks played. The Seahawks Cole Wheeler, the games leading rusher with 73 yards, scored from the 5 as the clock ran out. PHOTOS BY HEATHER LEIPHART | The News HeraldWewahitchkas Jarvar Hill rushed for 211 yards and ve touchdowns in the Gators 34-13 win over North Bay Haven. Below, Rashard Ranie had 128 yards on the ground in Wewahitchkas Homecoming triumph on Friday.Halifax Media GroupJarvar Hill and Wewahitchka were dangerous when holding on to the football Friday. The senior atoned for two fumbles by scoring ve touchdowns in leading the Gators past North Bay Haven 34-13. Hill nished with 211 yards rushing and Rashard Ranie added 128 on the ground in Wewahitchkas second win in a row despite four turnovers. The Buccaneers couldnt capitalize on early opportunities and dropped to 2-2. Wewahitchka scored 14 unanswered points to settle the outcome. The Gators scored 27 points in the second half after being stymied with three turnovers in the rst 24 minutes. For us to turn the ball over like that and have a shutout in the rst half was big, Wewahitchka assistant and head coach inwaiting David Barnes said. In this offense we want to run the football and we did that well. Hill scored all of Wewahitchkas touchdowns. The Gators needed the last two to nally convince the Buccaneers. NBH pulled within a touchdown twice. The rst time came on a Braiden Hardesty touchdown grab COURTESY OF WAYNE TAYLORDwayne Griggs scored the games rst touchdown on a 7-yard run.Port St. Joe routs Franklin County Hill leads Wewahitchka past North Bay Haven past North Bay Haven See WEWA A8

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A8 | The Star Thursday, October 10, 2013 WeemsMedicalCentersEastandWestClinicswillcloseat3pmonMonday,October14th NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:10-31-13CODE:SJ00 BluesintheLot2013 Wewishtothankthese generoussponsors....... SATURDAY, OCTOBER12,2013 BLUESinthe LOT20136Bands!AllDayBlues!THEHAYSHOUSEwww.ApalachSpongeCompany.comSponsorsNeeded,Call:850-653-5564 SCHEDULE 12-1pm 1-1:45pm 1:45-2:45pm 3-4pm 4-4:45pm 5-6:30pm SmackwaterRetrievers,Apalachicola,FL MattLaw,PanamaCity,FL JohnnyBarbato&LuckyDoggs,Gulfport,MS EasyStreetBluesBand,Tallahassee,FL SlimFatz,PanamaCity,FL TheJohnBullBluesBand,Montgomery,AL Star Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School volleyball team traveled to South Walton High School last Thursday and the junior varsity and varsity each lost district games. The coaches dont know if the fact that it was homecoming week in Port St. Joe or that they had a week between matches, but the teams came out at and just couldnt handle the intensity level of the Lady Seahawks of South Walton, said Port St. Joe coach Wayne Taylor. Tonight the team travels to Bay High.Dig PinkAt 6 p.m. ET Oct. 17 the Lady Tiger Sharks will host their fth annual Dig Pink Event. The game will be the nal regularseason match of the season, pitting Port St. Joe against county rival Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School. The game will also mark Port St. Joes Senior Night. The game is played to support the Side-Out Foundations Dig Pink National Breast Cancer Awareness Rally to promote breast health information as well as raise funds to further research. Dig Pink events give spectators the opportunity to become involved by making donations to the cause and by pinking-out (i.e. donning pink in support) and event t-shirts will be sold. The proceeds from all donations, the gate and t-shirt sales will benet the Side-Out Foundation. The foundation is a non-prot established in 2004 to unite volleyball players and coaches from across the country to work toward the goal of making a signicant and identiable difference in the lives of breast cancer patients and their families. The organization works to advance clinical trials, increase patient support services and educate communities.Port St. Joe volleyball falls to South WaltonSpecial to The StarRyan Teall memorial scholarship fundraiser to be Nov. 1The Ryan Teall Memorial Scholarship fundraising event will be Friday, Nov. 1, at Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School. The event will include a 3-on-3 basketball tournament, which will begin at 5 p.m. CT; a 3-point shooting contest between tournament games; Bunko and a concession stand. Cost of the 3-on-3 tournament is $20 per team; the 3-point shootout will be $5 to enter; and the Bunko will also be $5 per person. To register call Adele Paul at 639-2228 or Kerri Barlow at 832-8659.Dixie Youth Baseball board needs membersWe encourage everyone to participate in this organization to create a strong program that will directly benet children in our community. The following positions need to be lled and are very important for the success of our program: president; AAA vice president; Ozone vice president; secretary; equipment manager; and concession manager. The league returns three ofcers. The board meeting will be at 3 p.m. ET Sunday, Oct. 13 at the STAC House on Eighth Street in Port St. Joe. If you have any questions or would like to participate and cannot attend the meeting, please contact Bobby at 527-3707 or Carly at 481-6631 or Carly. Pickels@gmail.com. Sports Sports SHOrtsRTS Ry Y AnN TEALL from David Smith in the third quarter to pull to 14-7. The Buccaneers also trailed 20-13 after Corey Whites 80-yard interception return for a score early in the fourth. Hill answered the latter tally with a 6yard run to cap a 10-play drive and give Wewahitchka a 27-13 advantage. He broke free for 60 yards on Wewahitchkas next possession to cap the scoring. Wewahitchka (2-4) led 7-0 at the half despite the three turnovers, including two lost fumbles by Hill. He had 59 yards rushing in the rst half and also grabbed a 66-yard scoring reception from Ranie midway through the second quarter. Wewahitchka punted on two rst-half possessions and Ranie threw an interception on its last. North Bay Haven also lost a fumble on its rst series and had the deepest penetration in the opening half. The Buccaneers drove to the 12 on their fourth possession, but the 16-play march stalled on fourth down. NBH also turned the ball over on downs at the Wewahitchka 23 on its nal possession of the second quarter. The Buccaneers had 60 yards of total offense on its rst two drives of the second half after amassing 196 in the rst. The lack of execution and Wewahitchka wearing down the Buccaneers late was too much to overcome. We were moving the ball up and down the eld, NBH coach Jared Hale said. We came out strong, but you need to come away with points and we didnt. Devante Garland led NBH with 73 yards rushing. Smith was 8 for 17 for 124 yards and two interceptions. Hardesty had four catches for 110 yards. Wewahitchka is at Tallahassee Maclay on Friday. NOrtRTH BAy Y HHAVEnN 0 0 7 6 13 WEwW AHItTCHKA 0 7 13 14 34Second quarterWHS Hill 66 pass from Ranie (Setterich kick) 5:52, 7-0 WHSThird quarterWHS Hill 3 run (Setterich kick) 9:59, 14-0 NBH Hardesty 37 pass from Smith (Bingham kick) 7:32, 14-7 WHS Hill 6 run (kick failed) 3:25, 20-7Fourth quarterNBH White 80 interception return (kick failed) 10:03, 20-13 WHS Hill 6 run (Setterich kick) 4:46, 27-13 WHS Hill 60 run (Setterich kick) 2:06, 34-13 WEWA from page A7 HEAHEA THE HE R LEILEI PHA HA RT | The News Herald North Bay Havens David Smith passed for 124 yards, one touchdown and two interceptions.

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1Section Strung alongTrivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) Who were the wisecracking robots on Mystery Science Theater 3000? Buck/Bucko, Crow/Servo, Salt/Sally, Jake/Snake 2) What was the rst hotel built on the now famous Las Vegas strip? Aladdin, Ritz, Sands, Flamingo 3) Which dog was originally bred in England to catch rabbits? Pit Bull, English Setter, Beagle, Dalmatian 4) Whats a rugged waterproof fuse used to light reworks? Brocade, Salute, Visco, Willow 5) From surveys whats the most popular response to name a sport thats graceful? Ice skating, Golf, Gymnastics, Swimming 6) The average fashion model weighs what percentage less than the typical American woman? 7%, 11%, 23%, 32% 7) Which Shakespearean play introduced, Its all Greek to me? Othello, Julius Caesar, The Tempest, King Lear 8) Whats the poke in the saying a pig in a poke? Bag, Corn eld, Mud bed, Frying pan 9) Of these which has a town named Dif cult? Indiana, Oregon, Tennessee, Wisconsin 10) Generally speaking if you divide your weight by 3, youll nd out how much what weighs? Head, Arms, Legs, Organs 11) Of these which did Alexander the Great introduce to Europe? Dog ghting, Eggplant, Silverware, Pears 12) From surveys whats the most popular response to name a word containing play? Playboy, Playdoh, Playground, Playtime 13) What year marked the births of Bob Hope, John Dillinger, and Red Grange? 1900, 1903, 1906, 1909 14) In Italy whos known as Mr. Kiss-Kiss-Bang-Bang? Simon Cowell, James Bond, Harry Potter, Owen Wilson ANSWERS 1) Crow/Servo. 2) Flamingo. 3) Beagle. 4) Visco. 5) Gymnastics. 6) 23%. 7) Julius Caesar. 8) Bag. 9) Tennessee. 10) Legs. 11) Eggplant. 12) Playground. 13) 1903. 14) James Bond. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com Thursday, October 10, 2013By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Students at Port St. Joe Elementary might have told their parents this week their school was invaded by goats, trolls and puppets. Those werent Halloween decorations, but rather the Bits N Pieces Puppet Theatres musical adaptation of the classic Norwegian folktale the Three Billy Goats Gruff. Bits N Pieces, a not-forpro t organization from Dover, doesnt do typical puppet shows. Instead of socks and hands colliding for the sake of entertainment, the troupe uses 9-foot-tall homemade puppets and changing sets for its musical shows. The Monday morning presentation was brought to the school through grants from the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture and the National Endowment for the Arts. The grant was for underserved counties, eligible for those who dont have fullscale art and music programs. The grant provided twothirds of the money to bring an approved company to the school, and a second grant from the Target Corporation was used to cover the remaining amount. Structured art is not in our general curriculum, Guidance Counselor DeEtta Smallwood said. This is an opportunity to let kids be exposed to cultural activities. Through their Arts in Education programs the Bits N Pieces Puppet Theatre players are dedicated to in uencing children through positivity. Each play contains its own unique life lesson and morals. Through the performance of the Three Billy Goats Gruff, Bits N Pieces reinforced the message that kids can do anything, even when there are obstacles in the way. Bits N Pieces artistic director and actress Holli Rubin makes the puppets and after the goats had successfully outsmarted the troll and crossed the bridge showed the students how the gigantic puppets worked and encouraged them to try to build their own puppets with bits and pieces that they have at home. Were limited on cultural exposure, but the students were very engaged, Smallwood said. Ghosts on the Coast to haunt Reid AvenueBy WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com A classic Port St. Joe Halloween spooktacular is on the horizon. This year will mark the 13th anniversary of the Ghosts on the Coast celebration, which takes place on Oct. 31 all along Reid Avenue in Port St. Joe. Festivities will begin at 6 p.m. ET at City Commons Park with a scary costume contest. The contest is open to kids, adults, families and pets. Prizes will include gift cards from local merchants. During the costume contest, a sh fry to bene t the Gulf County Public Library will serve up fresh mullet. Once the contest is complete, live music acts will be stationed on each end of Reid Avenue. Freddie D and Lola will perform near Hannon Insurance while the Boyer Band will perform in the City Commons gazebo. Police sirens will give the goahead for eager trick-or-treaters to grab a bag and ll up on candy goodies from the businesses. Street games will be set up down the middle of Reid Avenue that will encourage kids to take a break from their sugar-induced dashing and enjoy some familyfriendly activities. We want to slow kids down a little and engage them more, said Chamber of Commerce director Paula Pickett, who organized this years event. Were amping it up this year and making it fun for the entire family. Fall festivities will include hay bale bowling, ring toss and a cake walk, and Panama City storyteller Pat Nease will be on hand to share a round of scary stories. The cake walk is a fundraiser for the Merchants Association to purchase Christmas lights for the trees along Reid, and a surplus of 5,000 glow sticks left over from the Centennial Celebration in July will allow kids to build an interactive art installation. Were likening it to a family-friendly Bourbon Street atmosphere, Pickett said. Area businesses and churches not directly on Reid wont be left out and will have pavilions along the street so they can pass out candy. Restaurants along the street will be open and ready to feed hungry revelers. Pickett said there was a major need for candy donations from the community. Bags can be dropped off at any Reid-based business or at the Chamber for distribution. Donations from the private sector will ensure kids get suf ciently sugar-buzzed and businesses dont have to come out of pocket. The chamber can be reached at 227-1223. Ghosts on the Coast takes a lot of effort to put on, and the community always steps up to the plate, Pickett said. WES LOCHER | The StarBits N Pieces Puppet Theatre players treat Port St. Joe Elementary students to a musical version of the Three Billy Goats Gruff. The troupe, which uses 9-foot-tall homemade puppets, was brought to the school with a culture and diversity grant. Bits N Pieces Puppet Theater visits PSJ Elementary

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B2 | The Star Thursday, October 10, 2013 MeetDenise,a40lb2yrTerrier/Mix.She walksverywellonherleashandwillsit withsometreatencouragement.Denise isveryattentiveandwillingtolearn. Shelovestoplay,kidfriendlyandlooks forwardtovisitors.Deniseislookingfor asafe,foreverhomewhereshewillhave theloveshedeserves.Thisgreatdog likesthecompanyofotherdogsandeven toleratescats.DenisequalifiesforaPets forPatriotsassistedadoption. Ifyouareunabletoadoptatthistime, perhapsyoucouldfosterormakea Donation.AllpetsadoptedfromSJBHSwillbecurrentonvaccinationsandspayed/ neutered.Pleasedonothesitatetoemailtownsend.hsdirector@gmail.comor adoptbaystjoe@gmail.comorcalltheSt.JosephBayHumaneSocietyat850-227-1103 andaskforMelodyorDebbie!Applicationsareavailableatwww.sjbhumanesociety. orgWerequireallpotentialadopterstocompleteanapplicationform.Adoptionfees includeourcostofspay/neuterandcurrentvaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4pm! Faith'sThriftHutisalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,andalltheproceedsgodirectly tosupporttheanimalsinourcare!ThehoursforthestoreareThursday-Saturday from10am-3pm.Volunteersarealwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandourshelter! Ourstoreandshelterlocationis1007TenthStreetinPortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyouall theresoon!Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet,pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyorShelter. FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSociety .retlehr Sy oteicoe Snamul Hacor luoh ytik wcehe csael, ptew pet a npodo at tnar wt oeg a pnissie mru aof y I 4514866forONLY$15perweek $60permonth CallToday 227.7847SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHere 4516826 Our local real estate experts have identi ed what they feel are the best values around and are o ering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Real Estate Picks Best Values on the Forgotten Coast 4516831 PrestonRuss850-227-8890|850-227-7770 www.coastalrealtyinfo.com This3BR/3BAhomehaseverythingyouneedto enjoylifeonthebay.Granitecountertops,elevator, mediaroom,ofce,back-upemergencygenerator andahottub.Launchyourkayakrightfromyour backyardandenjoywhatSt.JoeBayhastooffer. SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)227-7847|tgolden@pcnh.comSOLD SocietyTips on growing strawberries in the home gardenStrawberries can be grown in home gardens throughout the state. Temperatures between 50 to 80 F (10 and 27C) and day lengths 14 hours or fewer are required for the development of owers and fruit on most strawberry varieties. In the U.S. these conditions occur only for a short period in late summer or fall, and again briey in spring. In our area, however, this combination of day length and temperature exists for much of the fall, winter and spring. Singlecrown (stem) strawberry plants are planted in Florida during the fall, from late September to early November. Flowering and fruit production generally beings in November and continues into April or May. Fruit production over this period is not constant, but occurs in two or three cycles, and can be interrupted by freezing weather. Because the highest quality fruit are produced on relatively young plants with not more than four or ve branched crowns, plants are usually tilled under at the end of the fruiting season, and new plants are planted the following fall. Currently, we suggest three varieties for the Florida home garden: Camarosa, Sweet Charlie, and Festival, all three varieties produce attractive, avorful berries suitable for eating fresh or for freezing. Camarosa has been the most productive variety in North Florida, while Festival has been the most productive variety in Central Florida. These varieties are capable of producing 1 to 2 pints of fruit per plant over the season. Strawberries grow best in a location receiving at least 8 hours of direct sunlight per day. If a full sun location is not available, try to choose a spot that is sunny during the morning and early afternoon. The soil should be well drained and slightly acidic (pH 5.5 to 6.5). IFAS specialist recommends planting strawberries on raised bed which are two feet wide and spaced two feet apart. The beds should be mounded so theyre six inches high along the edges and about eight inches high in the middle. In preparing the beds you begin with fertilization. For a ten-by-ten foot strawberry patch, broadcast about two-and-a-half pounds of 8-8-8 fertilizer and till it into the soil. Then from the beds and apply another two-and-a-half pounds of fertilizer this time in a narrow band about six inches deep down the middle of the beds. If youre just starting to grow strawberries you should also include a complete mixture of minor elements in the rst season fertilizer application. When the bed is properly formed, fertilized and moistened, cover with a sheet of landscaping mesh fabric which will block weeds and allow water to penetrate. The, cut slits in the fabric where the plants will be inserted. Plants should be set in double rows, one row on each side of the bed about six inches from the edge. Plants should be spaced 12 inches apart in the row. Be sure that no plants are set directly over the fertilizer band down the middle of the bed because this can lead to salt burn. Be sure to use certied, disease-free plants. Keep them moist before planting and plant in moist soil. Spread the roots in a fan shape, set the plant at the correct depth in the soil, and pack the soil rmly around the roots. For more information on growing strawberries contact the Gulf County Extension Service @ 639-3200 or visit our website: http://gulf.ifas.u.edu or www.http:// edis.ifas.u.edu and see Circular HS 1154. ROY LEE CArR TErRCounty extension director Special to The Star  Emerald Dance Academy  in Port St. Joe has launched a new ballet class specically aimed at the adult dancer .  The classes take place Saturday mornings from 9-10:30 a.m. ET at the studio at 317 Williams Avenue and are open to adults with all levels of experience from beginner to advanced.  The classes are a great workout with  movements utilizing body weight as resistance and building long and lean  muscles.   Practice  begins with small exercises of the feet, legs  and torso  at the barre and continues in the center with stretching, jumps and turns all set to classical piano music.  Class instructor, Erin Payner, is a former semi-professional ballet dancer who has trained with such notable companies as the American Ballet Theater in NYC, and the Boston and San Francisco Ballets and performed as a guest artist in numerous classical ballets such as the Nutcracker and Don Quixote.  Additionally,  in 1998 she  represented the US in what is often referred to as the Olympics of Ballet the International Ballet Competition and has over 10 years of teaching experience.   Erin and her husband  Major Joseph Payner relocated to the Port St. Joe area last fall from Atlanta.  Classes are $10 each and to keep this cost low, Erin is teaching on a volunteer-basis as a service to the Port St Joe community. Emerald Dance Academy is a premier dance studio with excellent dance facilities including spr ung marley ooring  and an experienced  and  caring faculty offering classes in ballet, tumbling, lyrical, hip-hop, jazz and tap.  The performing company regularly competes across the Southern US in national competitions and has won many awards.  Be on the lookout for dancers around town over the next few weeks  at Saturday soccer games and bake sales,  fundraising for their  upcoming trip to  a dance convention for advanced training and per forming opportunities.    The dancers very much appreciate your support.  Visit Emerald Dance Academy on Facebook or contact owner Barbie Sabins at 229-1413 for more details.Special to The StarOn Oct. 17, Marsha Lindeman from the Gulf County Health System will be our guest and speaker. A discussion about the effects of Obamacare and lack of state and federal funding for the local healthcare system will be the topic. If you are interested in hearing Marsha speak, please contact Sunset Coastal Grill at 227-7900 to reserve a seat at lunchtime. The PSJ Rotary Club meets at noon on Thursday at Sunset Coastal Grill. If you are interested in more information regarding service projects or membership, please contact Patti Blaylock at 227-7900 or Father Tommy Dwyer at 227-1845. Star Staff ReportGulf County Senior Citizens, located at 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, is asking for donations of non-perishable foods for our low-income seniors such as juice, canned tuna & chicken, soup or vegetables. Small inexpensive bingo prizes are always needed for our clients that love to play bingo several times a week. Also needed are donations of items for arts and crafts. We provide a hot nutritious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and over. Transportation may be available to our meal sites. Anyone interested in coming to our sites in Port St. Joe or Wewahitchka for meals and activities or who would like to donate any of the items noted above may call Debbie at 229-8466.Star Staff ReportThe Food and Toys Assistance Program through the Salvation Army has announced is schedule for applications and distribution of gifts to the community. Application will be taken 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. ET on Monday, Oct. 21 in Port St. Joe at the STAC House located on 610 Eighth Street. In Wewahitchka, applications will be taken 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. CT Thursday, Oct. 24 at the Gulf County Public Library located at 314 N. 2nd Street. All applicants must bring all identication cards for family members and copies of bills and proof of income. Senior citizens and adults single and married may apply. All applicants must meet income guidelines. Distribution of gifts in Port St. Joe will take place 2-5 p.m. ET Dec. 17 at the STAC House. Distribution of gifts in Wewahitchka will be 9 a.m. until 12 noon CT Dec. 17 at the Gulf County Public Library.Wheeling around with RotarySenior Citizens needs your help Salvation Army Christmas program schedule Calling all adult dancers, former dancers and wannabe dancers!

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The Star| B3Thursday, October 10, 2013Special to The StarFriday, Oct. 11, will be a big day on the campus of Faith Christian School. There will be trucks galore! The show begins at 9 a.m. ET and will include the PSJ City Police Dept., PSJ Fire Dept., Gulf County Sheriffs Dept., Florida Highway Patrol, Division of Forestry and EMS Services. Students and parents will enjoy learning about the jobs, equipment, of each department, and learn some safety tips too. This will be an exciting event and FCS is thankful to all of these departments for helping to keep our children safe. Implants&CrownsAffordableDentures-PanamaCity,P.A.WilliamC.Knapke,DDS,GeneralDentistPanamaCitySquare617West23rdStreet,PanamaCityFL CallForInformation1-888-336-1615 Feeseffectivethrough11/22/13.Additionalfeesmaybeincurred dependingonindividualcases.Same-dayCrownservicemaynot beavailableincertaincases.AffordableDentures-PanamaCity,P.A.Ofce#:(850)872-6155. Great vs.other Dental providersSingleToothImplant$1,795Denture Implants$1,495$1,895 Same-DayCrowns$695LowerArch UpperArch20144-4-T4 1114413 9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310 GREATSELECTIONOFALLYOURFAVORITEBEER,WINE&SPIRITS SOUTHERNSUNDAY RANDYSTARK FROMTHEFLORABAMASPECIALGUESTS:JOHNNYBARBATO&THELUCKYDOGS RANDYSTARK DOGSYUCK L THE& OT BARBA JOHNNY:S GUEST SPECIAL S SPIRIT& WINE BEERVORITEA FOURY ALL OFTION SELECTGREA ONTHEPOOPDECK UPCOMINGEVENTS -INTHECROWSNESTKARAOKE Pleasecallustodayat 877-231-DERM(3376) tomakeanappointmentandtolearnmore aboutwhatourteamcandoforyourskin. Whenwasthelasttimeyouhadyourskinchecked? Wereallatriskforskincancerregardlessofour skincolor,type,orfamilyhistory.Andwithmore than 1millionpeopleintheUnitedStates diagnosedwithskincancereachyear ,wewant totakethistimetoremindyouthatthebestway topreventskincanceristogetregularscreenings.Somespotsarecute. Somearent.Doyouknowthedifference? Wedo.TriciaBerry,ARNP| AdvancedRegisteredNursePractitioner MichaelStickler,MD| Board-CertiedDermatologist JonWard,MD| Board-CertiedDermatologistPORTST.JOE|PANAMACITYgulfcoastderm.com WEHAVEMOVEDTO: 327REIDAVE (CORNEROF4THSt&REIDAVE.) 850-227-3472 HOURS MONDAYTOWEDNESDAY8AMTO6PM THURSDAYTOSATURDAY8AMTO8PM SUNDAY11AMTO6PM The rst grade classes of Wewahitchka Elementary School participated in an afternoon of Johnny Appleseed Relays on Sept. 27. The event was formed around apple relays as students raced to the nish line competing in team events. This was a fun and exciting afternoon for the students, as one student mentioned, This was the best day ever! SPECIAL TO TT HE STARStar Staff ReportThe Charles Whitehead Wewahitchka Public Library is celebrating Teen Read Week by hosting an all new Teen Book Club. The Teen Book Club will meet monthly beginning 4 p.m. CT on Tuesday, Oct. 15 at the Wewahitchka library branch. Why should teens join a book club? This is not your Mamas book club and books are not just for AR points. Read independently and discuss with a group. Learn about careers in the writing and publishing industry. Our rst meeting will feature graphic design and a book cover art project. Celebrate teen book week and the freedom to read at your local library. Contact the library for more information at 6392419 or visit us online at www.nwrls.com.FRONT RROW: Kyra Allen, Emily Warner, Travis Rhodes, Blake Childress BACK R R OW: Elliana Burkett, Joseph Farrell, Landon Miles, Jackson Vaughn, Gabriella PriceSPECIAL TO TT HE STARBy JANICE EEVANsSSpecial to The Star Although everyone is not given the opportunity to have formal music lessons, they in some way are touched daily by music. Music comes to us in many forms: instruments, the voice, the rhythm of the rain, a bouncing ball, and clapping hands. Each sound presents its own rhythm. Children learn new information by adapting it to a familiar song. Toddlers learn to sing Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star and later learn the alphabet by singing the same tune. Formal music lesson, whether individually or in the classroom, teach many other concepts. Music includes math skills, handeye coordination, language skills, reasoning and reading skills, and develops memory. Learning to play an instrument helps a person to think creatively and solve problems. Music teaches discipline and requires focus. Hard work and perseverance are rewarded by an excellent performance. The excellent performance, in turn, brings about condence and builds self-esteem. Performances also help the student to conquer fear and take risks. When in a classroom, music students develop teamwork. They must use listening skills, cooperate, and communicate with one another. Playing together increases selfcontrol for the reason that everyone must play the same rhythm in order to bring synchronization and a pleasing sound to the listening ear. Music education is taught at Faith Christian School. Students in grades K3 through six are learning life skills through music that are benecial regardless of the career path each student chooses. The FCS staff believes that music theory is priceless. Call 229-6707 for more information about enrolling your little musician at Faith Christian School today! Special to The StarTT iger Shark Football: This is an Open Week for our Tiger Sharks, coming off a Homecoming victory over Franklin County. Our gridders next take the eld against FAMU High on at 7 p.m. ET Thursday, Oct. 17 in Tallahassee. The JVs are pitted against host Riversprings in at 7 p.m. ET on Oct. 15. GO SHARKST T i ger Shark Volleyball: The Lady Tiger Sharks are home next week with matches against Rutherford on Tuesday the 15th and the Dig Pink Game supporting Breast Cancer Research on Thursday the 17th. Both matches start with the JVs at 6 p.m. ET. GO SHARKS : Beat Breast CancerC C r oss C C ountry: Scheduled for a District Meet at Altha on Tuesday the 15th at 4:00 PM. GO SHARKSP P o rt St Joe H H omecoming: Congratulations to all who made this years Homecoming a rousing success. The SGA and sponsors did a marvelous job making this past weekend a truly memorable time. Congratulations to Homecoming Queen Lexie McGhee and her Court including Shatiara Zaccaro, Dantasia Welch, Maya Robbins, Katerina Nelson, Cailyn LaPlante, Christian Laine, Anna Haynes, Lauren Costin, Amy Butler and Kristen Burkett. Congratulations also to the Senior Class for their winning oat. They built a Time Machine out of a Sunbird? Hello McFly! J unior C C lass News: Help support the Junior Class and their efforts to raise money for this years prom by visiting the concession stand at every JV and Varsity home game. P P o rt St Joe Soccer: Girls soccer started practice this week with the boys starting on Oct. 14. The season kicks off with the Girls Jamboree at home on Saturday, Oct. 27. GO SHARKSE E n d of Quarter E E arly Dismissal and R R eport C C ards: Friday, Oct. 11 is the end of the 1st Quarter. Students will be released from school at 12 p.m. Lunch will be served in the Main Cafeteria Line. The Shark Hole will be closed. Report Cards will be distributed by 7th period teachers on Friday, Oct. 25. Fall Break: Gulf County Schools will be closed for Fall Break on Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 21-22. Classes will resume on Wednesday, Oct. 23.Wewa Library hosts Teen Book Club TThe value of music education TThe Lions TT ale CELEbBRATInNG jJOHnnNNY APPLEsSEEdD School News dDAZZLInNG d D OLPHInsNS

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FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com CARD OF THANKS SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) MorningPrayer&HolyCommunion Sunday...............10:00A.M.TheRev.LouLittle,PriestServicesTemporarilyatSeniorCitizensCenter, 120LibraryDrive AnUnchangingFaithInAChangingWorld 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. TOUCHINGLIVES WITHTHELOVE OFJESUS 6pm COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 Glynna K. Stitt of White City passed away accidentally at home on Oct. 4. Glynna leaves behind a loving husband, Derrick B. Stitt of 38 years, the two being sweethearts since their teens. Glynna leaves behind two brothers, one from Panama City, the other from Jacksonville, and two sisters, one from Port St. Joe, the other from Texas. Comforter Funeral Home in Port St. Joe will be in charge of the arrangements. Viewing will be held on Friday, Oct. 11 from 10 a.m. to noon ET at Hope Family Worship Center at 201 Garrison Ave. Interment will be at Pine Memorial Cemetery off of Highway 71, Blountstown at 2 p.m. ET.Glynna K. StittBillie Jean Snellgrove, 69, of Panama City, passed away Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013. Ms. Snellgroves wishes were to be cremated and a graveside service will be held at a later date. Wilson Funeral Home, Panama City, Fla., is in charge of arrangements.Billie Jean SnellgroveRandy Everett passed away on Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013, at the age of 62, after a courageous battle against pancreatic cancer. He is survived by his wife, companion and soul mate of 32 years, Barbie. After graduating from Leon High School in 1969, he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps. Upon completing his service, he spent time touring the United States on his chopper before returning to Tallahassee to attend and graduate from Florida State University. After retiring from the United States Post Of ce, Randy continued his love for education by becoming a Master Gardner, a substitute teacher and caregiver for his brother Jimmy Everett in his ght against ALS. Randys spirit in his ght against cancer did little to affect his positive approach to life. Always optimistic and caring, he never gave up his ght until the end. He died the way he lived, with dignity and grace. The things he enjoyed most were his friends, nature and family. He so enjoyed the fellowship of his comrades, from watching his beloved Florida State Seminoles to supporting local music in Tallahassee, Indian Pass and Port St. Joe, and he always did so in the company of his friends. In nature, he was passionate about the environment and its safe keeping. He enjoyed the outdoors, especially the waters of Cape San Blas and St. Joe Bay where he spent his life scalloping, spear shing mullet, and enjoying a life that can only be provided by the sea. Above all else, he loved his wife. Rarely would you see Randy without Barbie. They were inseparable, sharing the kind of partnership that clearly passed the test of time. In addition to his wife, Randy is survived by his stepson Nicholas Maxwell; granddaughter, Reagan Ella Maxwell, the love of his life, who affectionately called him Randaddy; his mother, Virginia Everett, Havana; sister Geni Everett, sisterin-law Sondra Everett, mother-in-law, Patt Jones, all of Tallahassee; sister, Nancy Everett Boettcher, Lilburn, Ga.; brother, John Everett, Jackson, Ga.; sister-in-law, Janet Jones Rogers, Mount Dora, Fla.; brother-in-law, Scott Jones, Ocoee, Fla.. He also leaves many cherished memories to his nieces, nephews and lifelong friends from Tallahassee and Cape San Blas who participated in his journey to ght cancer. Randy was predeceased by his father, Peter Everett; his brother, Jimmy Everett; and his niece, Jennifer Brown. Friends will be received on Thursday, October 10, 2013, at the home of Kenny and Erin Ayers, 6040 Pickwick Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32309, from 4-7 p.m. A celebration of life will be held at a later date, one in Tallahassee, Florida, and one at The Raw Bar in Indian Pass, Fla. His ashes will be released into nature and the estuary that he so compassionately loved. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308. Bevis Funeral Home (850-385-2193, www. bevisfh.com) is assisting the family with their arrangements.Randall Dean Everett RANDALL DEAN EVERETT Cora Lee Ayers was born in Beartown, W. Va., on Nov. 19, 1921. She moved to Mexico Beach in 1959 with her family. She passed away on Oct. 4, 2013, at the age of 91. She was preceded in death by her husband, John D. Ayers, Jr., and her daughter, Shirley A. Brogdon. She is survived by her three children, Ella Parson, John Ayers III and Bonnie Keigans, all from the Port St. Joe area. She lived to see and enjoy 13 grandchildren, 20 greatgrandchildren and nine great-great-grandchildren. She was a great mother and grandmother. She will always be remembered for homemade quilts, biscuits and gravy and her applesauce cake with peanut butter icing. No one will forget her love of coffee and family. She will forever be loved and missed. Funeral services were at 4 p.m. ET at Holly Hill Cemetery on Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013. Services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.Cora Lee AyersSpecial to The StarThe consequences of being too quick to judge will be examined at 7 p.m. CT Monday at Lifetree Caf. The program, titled Wrongly Accused: A Rush to Judgment Destroys a Life, features an exclusive lmed interview with Tim Masters, who spent 10 years in prison for a crime he didnt commit. Masters tells how he was targeted as a suspect, how the justice system failed him and what it was like to serve a life sentence as an innocent man. I was a law-abiding citizen. I gave up eight years of my life serving this country in the Navy. But there I was, locked up for something I didnt do, and people would shoot me if I tried to leave, Masters said. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehouse-type setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. The family of the late Sister Gillie Lee McNair desires to extend their sincere appreciation to friends, neighbors (near and far), and New Bethel A.M.E. Church for various acts of kindness shown to the family. We pray Gods rich blessings upon you ALL.McNair family In loving MEMORYLove,Your wife, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildrenWOMEN AND MENS DAYNew Bethel Baptist Church will host a women and mens day on Oct. 20. Sunday school will begin at 10 a.m. ET with a morning worship service to follow at 11:30 a.m. ET. Elder Donald Nickson will be the guest speaker, and everyone is invited to come and live up the colors; royal blue, silver and white in the name of Jesus Christ.REVIVAL FOR SURVIVAL 2013New Bethel A.M.E. Church, 146 Ave. C in Port St. Joe, will hold a Revival for Survival 2013 at 7 p.m. ET nightly Oct. 23-25. Guest Evangelist will be Bishop Lonnie Mitchell from New Beginnings Assembly of Saints in Panama City. Psalms 138:7-8 (Ampli ed Bible): Though I walk in the midst of trouble, You will revive me; You will stretch forth Your hand against the wrath of my enemies, and Your right hand will save me. The Lord will perfect that which concerns me; Your mercy and loving kindness, O Lord, endure forever forsake not the works of Your own hands. Are you trying to make sense of what is going on today? Are you wondering how will I survive and get through this? Then you dont want to miss this revival. Please join us for a three-night revival. For more information, call Pastor L.E. Gantt at 271-9574. ObituariesThursday, October 10, 2013 Faith BRIEFSWrongful imprisonment explored at Lifetree Caf Bobby Lee Fields, Sr.10-10-1947 10-12-1993Gone But Not Forgotten!Do you criticize other Christians, yet do the same things too? Do you think this will draw us together in peace, by doing the things they do? Its very doubtful but its done somewhere every day. To promote peace within, we have to live a different way. Like when we want to speak our mind, rst, take a little time to pray. If you feel the same way after this, say what you have to say. In some cases, you can be quiet and thought a pretty good fellow. But remember this; silence is not always golden, sometime it is just plain yellow.Billy JohnsonSilence is not always golden

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, October 10, 2013 Homecoming honors Trades&Services GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 LabanBontrager,DMD MonicaBontrager,DMD 12761PeaRidgeRoad-Bristol,Florida32321TELEPHONE(850)643-5417 DENTURE LABONPREMISESSameDayServiceonRepairsandRelines Visa,Discover,and AmericanExpress Honoredat ParticipatingAceStores BuildingSupplies &AutoRepair Carrabelle697-3333 WeDeliverAnywhereHardwareand PaintCenter Homecoming honors COURTESY OF MONICA EASTER | Special to The StarThe Wewahitchka Jr./Sr. High School court senior representatives were Hunter Bailey, Jakob Bidwell, Braden Buckalew, Caitlin Burch, Morgan Fisher, Abriale Kemp, Issac Madrid, Josh Mayer, Nicole Morrill and Chandler Vines. Junior representatives were Rashard Ranie and McKenna Waters. Sophomore representatives were Hunter Hysmith and Tara Walding. Freshmen representatives were Alexis Brinkmeier and Adam Strange. TIM CROFT | The StarMembers of the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Homecoming Court include, from top, Katerina Nelson, Cailyn LaPlante, Anna Haynes, Lexie McGhee and Christian Laine. Below, from top, Lauren Costin, Amy Butler, Maya Robbins, Kristen Burkett, Shatiara Zaccaro and Dantasia Welch. At left, Lexie McGhee was crowned Homecoming Queen for 2013. At right, homecoming royalty in Wewahitchka were King Seth Godwin and Queen Chelsea Cook. At top, the Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School Homecoming Court and their escorts smile for the camera.TIM CROFT | The Star COURTESY OF MONICA EASTER | Special to The Star COURTESY OF ANELIA BUSH PHOTOGRAPHY

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LocalB6 | The Star Thursday, October 10, 2013 B6| The Star Thursday, October 10, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 92684S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 232012CA000138CAAXMX WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. SANDRA G. CORBIN A/K/A SANDRA G. BROXSON, ET AL; Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash beginning at 11:00 a.m., in the FRONT LOBBY of the Courthouse of Gulf County, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL 32456, on October 24, 2013, the following described property: LOT 15, BLOCK 6, LAKE ALICE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 9, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MANUFACTURED HOME, TRADE NAME-ANNIVERSARY, MODEL YEAR 2005, MODEL NO. 6763 AND MANUFACTURERS ID NO. GAFL407A53417AV31. Property Address: 237 RHODES AVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465, Gulf ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE ADA COORDINATOR BY MAIL AT P.O. BOX 1089, PANAMA CITY, FL 32402 OR BY PHONE AT (850)747-5338 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS. IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED, PLEASE CALL 711. Dated: September 30, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorneys for Plaintiff Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 W. Cypress Rd, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954)644-8704 Fax: (954)772-9601 ServiceFL@mlg-defaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlg-defaultlaw.com File No. 11-09236 October 10, 17, 2013 95597S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 232012CA 000188CAAXMX NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, vs. RICHARD D. BARFIELD, ET AL Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: Estate of Robert L. Holland and Unknown Heirs and/ or Beneficiaries of the Estate of Robert L. Holland RESIDENCE: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 447 Pineview Drive Wewahitchka, FL 32465 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Gulf County, Florida: Lot 8, in Block A, of Circle J Estates, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, at Page 10, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Gladstone Law Group, P.A., attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, either before, either before October 28, 2013 or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED: September 17, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk of Court If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator at 850747-5338, fax 850-7475717 or at ADA Request@jud14.fl courts.org, P O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. October 3, 10, 2013 95599S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13000064CAAXMX AMBERS BANK, A GEORGIA BANK, f/k/a CENTRAL BANK OF GEORGIA, 97 South Broad Street Butler, GA 31006 Plaintiff, vs. THE ESTATE OF JOHN CLAY SIMPSON, DECEASED; AND THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF WILLIAM A. SIMPSON, DECEASED, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF WILLIAM A. SIMPSON, DECEASED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: LOTS TWO AND FOUR, BLOCK SIXTEEN, BEACON HILL SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 2 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH THE 1983 MOBILE HOME WITH TITLE NUMBERS S/N HMST7309AGA AND S /N HMST309BGA LOCATED THEREON. Commonly known as: 9211 OLIVE AVENUE, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32458 You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, Florida 32312, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 17th day of September 2013. Rebecca Norris CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203 Tallahassee, FL 32313 Phone: (850) 422-2520 Fax: (850) 422-2567 October 3, 10, 2013 95671S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-25-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. NATHAN PETERS, III and CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure and Order on Report and Recommendation on Motion for Partial By THE STAFF AT MYGULFCARESpecial to The Star In our busy world, we nd that just about any situation can cause stress. Whether its the back-to-school rush, everyday work, nances and family needs, or just nding time to walk the dog, we have stress waiting for us almost continually. How do we nd ways to cope with this stressful way of life, and what happens when we dont? Stress is de ned as any situation that causes a negative impact on the recipients mental or physical well-being. There are two categories of stress, acute and chronic. Acute stress is related to a shocking, terrifying, or traumatic event. Acute stress is most frequently unavoidable. Sudden illness, accidents or frightening events are all examples of what creates stress or shock. Each event has its own negative impact and may ruin your day; although once the illness is treated, or the event is past, the stressful effect lessens immediately, fading completely in a relatively short period of time. Chronic stress is a state of prolonged tension from internal or external stressors, which might cause various physical manifestations. Chronic stress is an on-going negative event, physical or environmental occurrence that causes a negative impact on the mental or physical well-being of the recipient. Examples of chronic stress can be a dif cult job, a rocky relationship, a chronic illness. Chronic stress takes a more signi cant toll on your body than acute stress does. It can raise blood pressure, increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, increase vulnerability to anxiety and depression, contribute to infertility, and hasten the aging process. For example, results of one study from 2006 published in the Journal of Behavioral Medicine, demonstrated that individuals who reported relationship con ict lasting one month or longer have a greater risk of developing illness and show slower wound healing. Similarly, the effects that acute stressors have on the immune system may be increased when there is perceived stress and/or anxiety due to other events. For example, students who are taking exams show weaker immune responses if they also report stress due to daily hassles. Chronic stress can affect growth and development of children, wound healing, hormone and immune responses, as well as psychosocial well-being. Stress management is de ned as any event or activity that a person participates in as an attempt to reduce the mental or physical effects of stress. There are workshops, training events, classes, online courses and a library of articles that all claim to be the cure for stress. As you can see, there is no one size ts all cure for stress. What causes stress for someone else may not be so stressful for you. Some rules that will help, no matter what the cause of the stress is, include learning when to say no, and setting limits and sticking with them both at home and on the job. Find ways to keep your chronic conditions, such as blood pressure or blood sugar, under control, and make time to take care of yourself. Listening to music, reading a book, a walk by the water or in the woods or a hobby are all ways of relieving stress. Find one that works for you, and enjoy! Make plans now to attend the monthly coaching program, Knowledge, Nutrition, Exercise, and Wellness (K.N.E.W.) You! Each month, we will discuss a different wellness topic that will help you better manage your health. Our next class will be 5:15 until 6:15 p.m. ET Tuesday, Oct. 22 at Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf. We will have dinner and talk about Stress Management. Please let us know if you plan to attend. Call 227-1276, ext. 132. MyGulfCare can help you identify and manage your stress From staff reportsWoman arrested for allegedly stealing from Thrift HutA Panama City woman was arrested last week by the Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce on allegations of stealing from the St. Joseph Humane Societys Faiths Thrift Hut. Carolyn Evon Evans, 55, turned herself into authorities last Friday. Investigators received a report regarding the theft of donated goods from the facility located on 10th Street in Port St. Joe. Faiths Thrift Hut helps raise funds for the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society. Surveillance equipment captured a white female, identi ed as Evans, stealing a ower pot from the donation drop area outside of the business. Investigators located Evans at her home in Bay County and recovered the ower pot. Evans admitted stealing donated goods from Faiths Thrift Hut and told investigators she has been taking items from businesses with after-hour donation drops for quite some time. Evans turned herself into authorities on a charge of theft and was released the following day on her own recognizance.Wewahitchka men arrested on daytime burglary chargesTwo Wewahitchka men were arrested last week on burglary charges. Ellis Doyle Brogdon Jr., 48, and Arthur Lanier, 20 were arrested on one count of burglary of an unoccupied dwelling. Investigators began a residential burglary investigation Oct. 1 and during the course of the investigation images were captured on a surveillance camera of a vehicle. The passenger was positively identi ed as Art Lanier. Investigators conducted an interview with Lanier and he confessed to the burglary and identi ed his accomplice as Brogdon. Lanier was arrested and transported to the Gulf County Detention Facility. Investigators obtained a search warrant for Brogdons residence and were able to recover most of the stolen property. Prior to executing the search warrant Brogdon ed the area. Investigators obtained an arrest warrant for Brogdon and he was apprehended the following day. Brogdon was interviewed by investigators and confessed to the burglary. Brogdon is being held on a $5,000 bond. Lanier is being held without bond. Man arrested for theft charges after 9-1-1 callA man with an active Bay County warrant was arrested on theft charges after a 9-1-1 caller alerted authorities to a theft from a residence on State 71 in Wewahitchka. Nicholas Andrew Pierce, 35, was arrested Sept. 28 after the Gulf County Sheriffs Of ce received a 911 call in reference to a person stealing items from a residence. The caller was able to provide a detailed description of the vehicle and its occupant, which led Deputy Paul Williams to Pierce. During the investigation Pierce provided a false name and date of birth when asked to identify himself. It was later determined Pierce had an active warrant out of Bay County. He was placed under arrest for the out-of-county warrant and providing false information to a law enforcement of cer. As the investigation continued, Williams located the stolen property from the residence abandoned in a wooded area. Approximately $4,500 of stolen property was recovered, including two small boat motors. More charges are pending. GCSO BRIEFS Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR THE PORT ST. JOE STAR CAROLYN EVANS ARTHUR LANIER ELLIS BROGDON NICHOLAS PRICE

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 10, 2013 The Star | B7 Creamers Tree ServiceCall Jason @ (850)832-9343 Legion Fence Co. Wood Prvcy Vinyl & Almnm. Fence/Deck. Free Estimate 250-8275 Text FL68179 to 56654 Summary Judgment dated September 26, 2013, in Case No.: 13-25-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 a.m. EST on October 24, 2013 the following described property: Lots 14, 16, 18 and West 1/2 of Lot 20, Block 1005, City of Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida. DATED: September 27, 2013 REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Corut By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 3, 10, 2013 95679S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 13-62-CA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. BILLY ELLIS FORRESTER and MARION W. FORRESTER A/K/A MARION FORRESTER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, the Clerk of this Court shall sell the property at public sale at 11:00 A.M. Eastern Time, on the 7th day of November, 2013 at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, the following described real property lying and being in Gulf County, Florida, to-wit: EXHIBIT A LOTS 4 AND 5, BLOCK 7, DOUGLAS LANDING UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALONG WITH A 1988 MOBILE HOME ID# PSHGA3679 WHICH IS PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO SAID PROPERTY. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. This Notice dated this 27th day of September, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS, CLERK, CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FL BY: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95673S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-86-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES E. NORRED, Defendant. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered September 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, the Clerk of Court for Gulf County, Florida will sell to the highest and best bidder at the Gulf County Courthouse Lobby, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456, on October 24, 2013, at 11:00 AM, EST the following described property: Lots 5, 6, and 7, Block A of Chipola Landing, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 60, in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. The Real Property or its address is commonly known as Lots 5, 6 & 7, Block A, of Chipola Landing Subdivision, Wewahitchka, Florida 32465. Parcel ID Number 01041-125R; Parcel ID Number 01041130R; and Parcel ID Number 01041-135R ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator by mail at P. O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 or by phone at (850) 747-5338 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing impaired, please call 711 or email ADARequest@ judl4.flcourts.org. Dated: September 27, 2013. Rebecca Norris As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk October 10, 24, 2013 95715S IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL, CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 23-2012-CA-000068 Division WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. MARTHA J. TIDWELL, JAMES P. TIDWELL, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on August 7, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida described as: LOT 1, SAWMILL ESTATES UNIT NO. 1, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 108 CHARLIE GASKIN DRIVE, WEWAHITCHKA, FL 32465; including the building appurtenance and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales held in front lobby of courthouse, on October 24, 2013 at 11:00am ET. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 30th day of September, 2013. Rebecca L. Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95689S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE No.: 08-505-CA AMERIS BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MARILYN THEUS, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment entered in the above-styled cause on the 20th day of April, 2009, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 24th day of October, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time), at the courthouse located at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard in Gulf County in Port St. Joe, Florida the following described real property and personal property situated in Gulf County, Florida, and set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Real Property: LOTS THREE (3), FOUR (4), AND FIVE (5), BLOCK C, FOREHANDS SECOND ADDITION ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT, GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 50. Personal Property: That certain 2004 single wide mobile home located on said property having identification Number CJ83306GAJFBF0146 and Title Number 91134281. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Court, on this 30th day of September, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95707S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY CASE NO.: 2013-33CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. JAMES G. NORRIS, a/k/a JAMES G. NORRIS, SR., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013 and entered in Civil Case No. 2013-33-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for GULF County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and JAMES G. NORRIS, a/k/a JAMES G. NORRIS, SR., is Defendent, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 24th day of October, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment. Lot Seventeen (17) of Jonesville Subdivision of the SW of SW Section 19, T8S, R10W, as per official plat on file in Plat Book 1 at Page 57, Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. DATED this 30th day of September, 2013. REBECCA NORRIS Circuit Court Clerk By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10, 17, 2013 95811S PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS RFP 2013-09 Sealed bids for City of Port St. Joe Phase II Water Bores will be received at City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456 up until 4:00 PM EST, Friday October 25, 2013. Bids will be publicly opened and acknowledged, Friday October 25, 2013, at 4:05 PM EST, in the City Commission Chambers. Bids shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked with bidders name, address, date and time of opening, and bid number for Phase II Water Bores. DESCRIPTION OF WORK: The City of Port St. Joe is accepting bids for underground bore work as part of our Phase II water line project. The work shall consist of six (6) inch, three (3) inch and one (1) inch bores. A complete bid package is available at www. cityofportstjoe.com For questions concerning this project, please contact John Grantland at 850-229-8247. The City of Port St. Joe reserves the right to accept or reject any and all Statements of Bids in whole or in part, to waive informalities in the process, to obtain new Statements of Bids, or to postpone the opening pursuant to the Citys purchasing policies. Each Statement of Bid shall be valid to the City of Port St. Joe for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening. The City of Port St. Joe is an Equal Opportunity Employer October 10, 17, 2013 95799S PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf County Enterprise Zone Development Agency will meet Thursday, October 24, 2013, at 12:00 noon, E.T., 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., of the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, Gulf County Courthouse Complex in Room 307. The public is welcome to attend. October 10, 2013 95801S NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS BID NO. 1314-01 The Gulf County Board of County Commissioners will receive bids from any person, company or corporation interested in providing the following: Uniforms and cleaning of same for the Public Works Department Specifications may be obtained from the Clerks Office in the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456. Interested parties should contact Lynn Lanier for additional information at (850) 229-6106. Please indicate on the envelope YOUR COMPANY NAME, that this is a SEALED BID and include the BID NUMBER. Proposals must be submitted to the Gulf County Clerks Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Blvd, Room 148, Port St. Joe, Florida, 32456, by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, October 25, 2013. Bids will be opened at this location on Monday, October 28, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., E.T. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: TYNALIN SMILEY CHAIRMAN ATTEST: REBECCA NORRIS, CLERK October 10,17, 2013 95825S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1319 Application No. 2013-37 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05015-003R Description of Property: Lot 14, Block 45, of Re-subdivision of Block 45, in Unit Number Three of Saint Josephs Addition of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, according to the Plat as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 34, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: C Q Developments, LLC All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95821S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1381 Application No. 2013-39 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 05793-000R Description of Property: Lot Ten (10), Block 1006, according to the Official map of the City of Port St. Joe, Florida, as the same appears on file in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida. Being same property filed for record in Gulf County, October, 1959, 1:42 P.M. in Deed Book No. 36, Page No. 179, in Clerk of Circuit Court, Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Billy Charles Quinn All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95823S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US Bank the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 100 Application No. 2013-38 Date of Issuance: May 28, 2010 R.E. No: 00517-002R Description of Property: COMMENCE at the NW. Corner of Original Government Lot 4, Section 16, Township 4 South, Range 9 West, and extend a line southerly along the western boundary of said Lot 4, for 420.3 feet; then turn 64 Degrees 21 Minutes left for 793.36 feet; then turn 67 Degrees 28 Minutes right for 542.23 feet, thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 35 feet; thence turn South 310 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From this POINT OF BEGINNING, continue the line last above described for 75 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 125 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 75 feet; thence turn 90 Degrees 00 Minutes left for 125 feet, to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Name in which assessed: John Whitehurse & Lori Adams (dec) All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95827S NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Florida Tax Lien Assets IV, LLC the holder of the following Tax Certificate, has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Tax Sale Certificate No. 1514 Application No. 2013-36 Date of Issuance: May 25, 2011 R.E. No: 06319-060R Description of Property: Lot 2, Block C, Marnies Island Preserve, as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 22 and 23, and as amended in the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Name in which assessed: Winston Williams All of said property being in Gulf County, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder in the front Lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 AM, E.T., Wednesday, the 13th day of November, 2013. Dated this 8th day of October, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Donna L. Ray, Deputy Clerk Oct10, 17, 24, 31, 2013 95829S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-000075-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Bayside Savings Bank, Plaintiffs, vs. ERIC B. RAMSEY and MELISSA N. RAMSEY, and The Owners Association of Southgate, Inc., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 24, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456 at 11:00 a.m. EST on October 24, 2013 the following described property: Lot 29, Southgate Subdivision, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 17, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. AND Lot 25, Block 1, Ward Ridge Subdivision Unit 1, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 3, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Dated: October 1, 2013 Becky L. Norris Clerk of Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 10,17, 2013 Cue FurnitureStart your Christmas layaway now! Pickup as late as December 23rd. New mattresses: Twin sets, $99; Full sets, $139; Queen sets, $199. Quality used furniture. 1425 Hwy 71 S. Wewa. 850-639-2343 Text FL68236 to 56654 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard SaleCome one Come All, something for everyone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard SaleCome one Come All, something for evryone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 Mexico Beach 101 40th Street, Saturday, Oct. 12th, 8am central time Tools, toys, electronics, fishing equipment, etc. Text FL68292 to 56654 PSJ: 1018 McClelland Ave, Fri/Sat, Oct 11-12, 8:00am -until Furniture, clothes, toys, tools and more! All must go! Text FL68040 to 56654 St. Joe Beach 354 Ponce de Leon St. Saturday Oct. 19th 8am (est.) -???? No Early Birds!!Large Yard Sale2 elec. wheelchairs, lawn tractor, lrg. generator, power washer, lots of jewelry, clothing, furniture and much more! txt FL67561 to 56654 White City(PSJ) 125 Pridgeon Rd. Off of Hwy 71 at the ICW bridge. Sat., Sun, & Mon Oct. 12th, -14th 8:30(est.) -4pm (est)Gigantic 3 Family Yard SaleTools, bikes, furniture, housewares, clothes, and much much more! txt FL67513 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FLOctober 12th & 13th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-602-6572) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407Text FL63024 to 56654 WE PAY CASH JUNK OR TRASH!Jewelry, old or new, used or vintage collectibles. We come to you. Please call Monique 850-227-1668 or cell 850-254-3898 Admin/ClericalReceptionistNeeded for very busy medical practice is adding an additional position to our front office in Panama City. Ideal candidate will be fast paced, able to multitask and have a great personality to interact with our patients. Previous medical experience preferred but not required. If you are energetic, a quick learner and ready to join a great team with a company that offers competitive pay and benefits please send us your resume to: Jason Ragsdale at jragsdale@eyecent ersouth.net Web ID:34267903 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW

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B8| The Star Thursday, October 10, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 4510160 4510161 If youre ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it! Inbound-Outbound Sales/ Call Center RepresentativePanama City, FLHalifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is growing. Want to join us? We are currently hiring for a Call Center Representative to work in our Panama City oce. We are seeking a fast paced individual who can communicate with customers via telephone and email. As a Call Center Representative, you will be responsible for maintaining and enhancing current customer accounts as well as contacting prospective clients to gain new business. Representatives are expected to maintain a working knowledge of all products, services, and promotions that Halifax Media Group oers. Experienced professionals are encouraged to apply. Job Requirements: 2 years previous sales experience, preferably in a Call Center environment Ability and desire to sell Strong communication skills Prociency with all Microso applications Detail oriented team player with a passion for helping customers Halifax Media Group of Northwest Florida is a great place to work. All full-time employe es are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/AD&D/Long-term disability insurance, 401K plan, and paid time o. In addition, we oer: Performance/ Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Sta to help you succeed Positive, Professional and Upbeat work environment We Promote from within! Please submit resume & cover letter to: lgrimes@pcnh.com 1113131 1119151 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:SHIPFITTERS FLUXCORE WELDERS PIPE WELDERS X-RAY WELDERS PIPEFITTERS SAFETY REPCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace 1114776 Juvenile Care and Custody Officers and Supervisors Join us in Pensacola! Immediate positions are available at the Juvenile Assessment Center for qualified individuals with law enforcement and corrections experience as well as experience working with delinquent youth. We offer competitive compensation package including salary, comprehensive benefits, and opportunities for career advancement. To learn more and apply online, visit www.greatsecurityjobs.com EOE Panama City! 4514326OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 151A COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 12X12 OFFICE, BATH, STORAGE AND LARGE WAREHOUSE $ 550.00 PER MONTH/ 550.0O DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 4514327OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 149B COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 3 OFFICE/KIT/BATH AND WAREHOUSE $ 675.00 PER MONTH/ 675.00 DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experiencedSales ManagerWho will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. Communicates and advocates the companys vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solutions ROI for the client. Requirements: Bachelors degree or comparable experience. Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. Successful record of team building and leadership. Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266340 Text FL66340 to 56654 SalesSales RepsHalifax Media Group is currently looking for outside sales representatives If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic Sales Executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience.Territories Available In:Panama CityChipleyPort St. JoeWe are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. Responsibilities: Prepare for appointments. All travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office. Meet daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing business Conducting our solutions based approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. Reviewing the days successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience Bachelors degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEOs Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266376 Text FL66376 to 56654 Logistics/TransportCIRCULATION District ManagerThe Panama City News Herald has an opening for a District Manager. The District Manager oversees independent distributors in the delivery of newspapers to subscribers within a defined geographical area. Individuals will handle route management aspects such as audits, analysis, and contract negotiations. The ideal candidate will have a focus on customer service. High school diploma or equivalent required. Prior newspaper experience in circulation as well as a management background is preferred. Must be able to evaluate current and prospective Independent Contractors and provide feedback and a course of action: Basic computer skills (Excel. Word) a must. Must own and operate a motor vehicle. Must have valid Florida Drivers License, proof of car insurance, and must successfully complete a background check. Must have ability to read and understand a road map. Must be able to work a very flexible schedule. Excellent benefits, drug-free workplace, EOE Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. No phone calls. Accepting applications until October 14, 2013. Web ID#: 34268014 IT/Software DevelopmentRegional Information Technology DirectorThe Panama City News Herald, Halifax Media is seeking an experienced ITDirector to manage systems for two daily, five semi-weekly, three weekly newspapers and an internet portal. The ideal candidate will have a Bachelors Degree in computer science or engineering and six to ten years progressive experience. Prior newspaper experience a plus. General areas of responsibility include: content, management and financial information systems, word processing and office automation, data and voice communications and subsystems particular to the newspaper industry, support for web-based graphics programs. Specific duties include: analyzes the organizationsinformation and telecommunications systems as a basis for recommendations to improve and enhance the systemscapabilities; coordinates with the enterprise ITteam to implement the selection, and completion of new IS and telecommunications systems to accommodate growing needs of the region; identifying priorities for development, enhancement and maintenance of application areas; developing and implementing a uniform region-wide strategy for equipment, operating systems and communications; developing annual budgets for hardware, software and any capital purchases region-wide; oversees maintenance of servers and computer hardware for the region. The Regional ITDirector hires and oversees system support specialists across the region to ensure they are up-to-date on latest ITdevelopments. Some travel is required. Halifax Media offers a competitive benefit plan including health, vision, dental, life insurance, medical and dependent care flexible spending accounts, 401(k) savings plan, paid vacation and sick leave and holidays. We will accept resumes until October 11, 2013. E-mail resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com Or mail to Lorraine Grimes: Panama City News Herald P. O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL32402. Drug-free workplace -EOE Web Id 34266822 Text FL66822 to 56654 Creative/Design The News Herald is looking for a:Graphic ArtistCandidate must have experience in InDesign/Photoshop/Quark or Illustrator (PC Platform preferred) while being open to learning new programs. The ideal candidate should have a creative eye, attention to details, organized, able to meet deadlines, have good communications/ phone skills and be able to work with minimal supervisor. Experience working in or with marketing departments is a plus. A portfolio will be requested at the time of the interview. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package including vacation, sick leave, 401(k), medical, dental, vision, life insurance. Pick up an application at The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34265884 Text FL65884 to 56654 1bd/1ba fully furnished & equipped, utilities incldd, in town in PSJ, $1000 mo. Active military 10% discount 850-867-3611 Text FL64207 to 56654 PSJ 116 Bellamy Circle 3br/1ba, fenced yard outside pets only $550 mo + $100 deposit option to buy. 850-643-5381 Stately historic PSJ home with great Bay View. 3 Br, 2.5 Baths. Elegant throughout. $1150/mo 850-227-7234 Bldg/Const/Skill TradeCarpet/Vinyl InstallersMust be qualified. Call 850-670-4211 and ask for the Manager. Web Id 34265176 Text FL65176 to 56654 Part Time Nursery AssistantFUMC is seeking a PT Nursery Assistant to care for children ages 0-5 during Sunday School, Sunday Worship Services and other church events as required. Please submit a resume, contact information, at least 2 references and a cover letter to: fumcp sj@gtcom.net Attention Nursery Position. Or P.O. Box 266, Port St. Joe, FL32547. Attn: Bobbi Lassiter. Web ID#: 34268269 Text FL68269 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESFull Time Office Assistant Do you have office experience with good customer service & computer skills? Are you attentive to detail & have good follow-up skills? Do you enjoy the challenge of working in a fast paced office & available to work weekdays & weekends? If so, stop by 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island between 9-5 weekdays & complete an application. Great benefits. For questions, call Sandra at 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34268057 Medical/HealthRNsJoin the rewarding field of correctional nursing! Youll find autonomy, variety, stability and flexibility in this ambulatory setting. Corizon has positions available at Franklin Correctional Facility in Carrabelle, FL. We are currently looking for Full Time, Part Time and PRN RNs. Call to learn why correctional nursing could be the refreshing change you need! We offer competitive pay plus an excellent benefit package that includes generous paid days off and so much more! For more info, contact: Tracy Mazuranic 1-800-222-8215 x9553 tracy .mazuranic@cori zonhealth.com or Quick Apply online (under the job opportunities link).www .corizonhealth.com EOE/AAP/DTR These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week. Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020