The star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The star
Uniform Title:
Star (Port Saint Joe, Fla.)
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
W.S. Smith
Place of Publication:
Port St. Joe Fla
Creation Date:
August 3, 2006
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Port Saint Joe (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Gulf County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Gulf -- Port Saint Joe
Coordinates:
29.814722 x -85.297222 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1937.
General Note:
Editor: Wesley R. Ramsey, <1970>.
General Note:
Publisher: The Star Pub. Co., <1970>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7 (Dec. 2, 1938).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000358020
oclc - 33602057
notis - ABZ6320
lccn - sn 95047323
System ID:
UF00028419:00912


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MDA Summer Camp 1 B


August 3, 2006



County Commission Whittles Budget


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
Lastweek's Gulf County budget workshops
went down in the record books as two of the
longest meetings in county history, so far.
After an initial five-hour workshop last
Monday, Wednesday's second meeting lasted
eight hours, from 5 p.m. Wednesday night
until 1:00 a.m. Thursday morning.
The meeting began with a recap of
Monday night's proceedings, with each
county department working toward the
county commissioners' version of a zero-
based budget.
Monday night the road, maintenance,
public works, mosquito control, humane
society and sheriffs departments agreed to a
zero percent increase, excluding pay raises.
The workshop Wednesday was an effort
to bring the remaining county departments
into the same line, with no increase from their
last year's budgets.


Highlights of the marathon session:
Litigation appropriations for county-
wide voting were removed from the proposed
budget, even though county attorney Tim
McFarland warned the board that the county
would have to restart the process and that
any funds already spent would be lost.
The county's proposed storm shelter,
slated for construction in 2006-07, was
retained.
Although $400,000 is in the proposed
budget for the shelter, the county will still
have to borrow money to complete the project,
according to Gulf County Clerk of Courts
Becky Norris.
$45,000 was shifted from the special
projects fund to parks and recreation, leaving
$15,000 in the special projects general fund
to be used by all five county commissioners.
In the future, if special projects funds
are solicited, the group requesting the money
must submit a written request to the county


clerk and make a personal appearance before
the board.
Commissioners will make a majority vote
and the chair must then sign off on the
request.
A new, more stringent work order system
remained in the proposed budget, despite
strong opposition by several commissioners.
The new system will consist of a daily log
detailing all work orders, truck usage, labor
requests, man hours, etc.
Citizen input evidently turned the tide
of commissioners' thoughts, according to
Jim Garth, spokesperson for the local group
Citizens For Reduced Taxes,
"I was surprised when several citizens
went up and asked the right questions," said
Garth. "Then I told the board This is the pivot
point for everything we've been working on.'"
County Commissioner Bill Williams
added that there was no accountability and
no tracking system for the roads department.


"We have to have this system in order to make
operational decisions," he said.
Four newvans were added to the proposed
work crew budget, after commissioners
engaged in a round of "If he gets one, then I
get one, too," late in the waning hours of the
meeting.
"There is no fleet management program
at the county level, bar none," said Garth.
"Instead, it appears they replace vehicles
whenever they think it's needed."
According to Norris, the major result of
the workshop was that, with few exceptions,
all county departments went back to their
previous year's budgets, then added insurance
to that department budget.
In the past, she said, all county employee
insurance was listed together in the board of
county commissioners' budget.
This new shift of insurance allocations

(See COUNTY on Page 7A)


School Year Starts with New Contract


By Tim Croft
Star News Editor-
The new school year will be ushered in
with a new wrinkle for the Gulf County School
Board a new contract with teachers.
Requiring just two negotiating sessions,
representatives of the district and the union
representing teachers and non-instructional
employees struck a bargain early last week,
-ensuring that the school' year, which begins
Monday, opens with labor peace.
: Given the testy tenor of negotiations just
two, three and four years ago, that represents
a significant accomplishment for those on both
sides of the negotiating table.
"There is nothing like starting a year out
with a contract, a good one like (that agreed
upon)," said Superintendent of Schools Tim
Wilder. "They (school employees) deserve it, but
-it's a great way to start the year."
The contract will mean a 6 percent salary
increase for both teachers and non-instruc-
tional employees above the annual incremental
step creases which h go to employees who have
served between three and 2:3 years with the
district
Those step increases average about 1 7
percent across the salary scale, said district
financial officer Sissy Worley.
Those salary increases went into effect
Aug. 1.
In addition, the district will. with the begin-
nming of a new insurance contract in January,
ratchet up its monthly contribution to each
employee's health insurance by 825. bringing
the district's contribution to S350 per month.


That is up from the $225 the district paid just
five years ago, though Billy Hoover, president
of the Gulf County Education Association, the
union representing teachers and non-instruc-
tional personnel, noted that insurance prenu-
ums have risen-right along with the district's
contribution.
In all, the package represented .an aver-
age 11 percent increase for teachers and non-
instructional employees across all salary ranges
and job classifications.
"It was very good for us this year," Hoover
said. "I was happy. I'm excited. It was very
smooth this Year. And I think that's a good \\aY
to start the school year."
As compared to recent years, when negotia-
tions consistently dragged deep into the school
.year and festered with acrimony, this year just
two sessions were required. The union offered
its proposal in the first, the district respond-
ed during the second and the union quickly
accepted the district's offer.
"We don't hassle around." Wilder said.
"They ask for it. if we've got it. we'll give it to
them.
'It's for a good cause, we are going to do
it If they had asked for 20 percent, we'd have
worked our tail, off to find it, if we could.
because they are worth it."
Wilder noted that the district was able to
meet the proposal from the union while still
maintaining an unreserved fund balance of
roughly 4.5 percent of the budget.
Hoover and Wilder both cautioned about
the future. however, as districts across the
(See SCHOOL BOARD on Page 9A)


Jerry Pridgeon Seeks District 2


Commission Seat

Jerry Pridgeon has announced his
candidacy for the Gulf CouIt Comaussion
representing Distric t 2.
Pnidgeon. age 56. is a lifelong resident of
Wewalhitchka. He graduated fromlWewahitchka
High School in 1967 and attended Gulf Coast
,JuUior College and Troy State University.
In 1973 he went to work for St. Joe Paper
Company and was employed there until the
null closed in 1998. He is currently employed
at Hamey Technical Center as an electrician
instructor.
Jerry is a member of the First Uniruted
Methodist Church of W\Vewahitchka and
serves as Chairman of the Administrative
Board. He and lus wife. Rhonda. a teacher
at Wewahitchka Elementary School. have \
been married for 34 years miand they have two ,. .'
children. ,:
Pndgeon says. "I welcome the opportunity .
to represent the people of Distnct 2 and I will
listen to their concerns. Working together we ;
can help ensure that Gulf County remains a :- .- ,-
great place to live. work. and raise a famdly."


No Home for Linda Farmer


Despina Williams.The .Star
Linda Farmer sits with a box of her belongings outside her White City trailer on May 17. Farmer
was the subject of a failed Oak Grove Assembly of God initiative which would have provided a new
home for Farmer and her two daughters.


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
Last fall, the Gulf County State Housing
initiatives Partnership ISHIPI administrator
Dannie Bolden met with local ministers
to discuss a bold new alliance bet-ween
the SHIP program and area faith-based
organizations.
Receiving approval from the County
Commission, the SHIP program earlier
added a series of new strategies to. its Local
Housing Assistance Plan. enabling SHIP
funds to benefit faith-based rehabilitation
and building projects.
Oak Grove Assembly of God Church
in Port St. Joe was the first to respond to
Bolden's request for takers.
In initiating the Linda Farmer Project.
the church hoped to provide a new home for
a long-time parishioner who lived with her
family in a rundown White City trailer.
The project had all the makings of a
successful enterprise. It boasted a needy
recipient, a willing church and generous
community partners.
Those involved had high hopes for the
project.
The church hoped it would provide its
parishioner both a new home and a "life
changing experience."
Bolden hoped it would serve as a
"flagship" for future faith-based initiatives
in Gulf County.


Both were disappointed when the project
abruptly ended before the foundation for the
home was poured.
The Offer
Linda Farmer's life had not been easy.
Following the death of her husband,
Larry. in April 2005. she found herself the
sole supporter of two daughters, Angela. 26,
and Rebekah, 20.
Angela was severely handicapped from
birth, suffering from scoliosis and Rett
syndrome, a neurological disorder that
causes mental retardation and impaired
motor functioning.
Overwhelmed by the burden of being
the sole caregiver for her family, Farmer
turned to Oak Grove Assembly of God for
financial counseling.
Farmer had been a member of the
church for over 15 years, and had received
support in the past in the form of groceries
and Christmas gifts for her family.
Then-church secretary Catherine Collier
met with Farmer on a regular basis, and
helped her establish a budget, manage her
bills and balance her checkbook.
As Collier taught Farmer how to manage
her finances, the church looked for other
ways to help.
The condition of Farmer's trailer was an
immediate concern.

(See FARMER on Page 2A)


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2A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Despina Williams/The Star
Farmer and her daughters moved back into their trailer this weekend. It now lacks the above
wheelchair ramp, which once allowed for the easy transport of Farmer's wheelchair-bound daughter,


Angela.



Farmer
Built in 1989, the trailer
had fallen into disrepair.
The ground outside could be
seen through a grate in the
bathroom, and mold grew on
the walls.
The trailer was also
impossible to keep cool in
'the summertime. Farmer
estimated her power bills at

... .


$300 a month.
When then-pastor, Dave
Fernandez first approached
Bolden last fall, he intended to
use SHIP funds to rehabilitate
Farmer's trailer.
,After a housing inspector
deployed by the SHIP program
deemed the trailer beyond
rehabilitation, Oak Grove


From Page 1A

decided to build Farmer a
new home using $25,000 in
SHIP funds.
Having counseled Farmer
for months, Collier asked
Fernandez if she could be a
part of the newly christened
Linda Farmer Project, and-
quickly took a leading role.
The church enlisted the


Rachel Browning,
Beach Realty of
Cape San Bias


Coastal
Liroup


-2L
Gulf Coast Realty, Inc.


Despina Williams/The Star
Before relocating to Covenant House on May 17, Linda Farmer posed for a photograph with her
26-year-old daughter, Angela, who suffers from scoliosis and Retts Syndrome.


aid of several community
partners, who pledged their
time and services to the
project.
Seth Campbell and
Scooter Acree of Paradise
Drafting volunteered to draw
the house plans; Guilford,
Driggers and Associates
donated their engineering
services to review and
edit the plans; Phil Collier
Construction volunteered to
serve as project contractors;
Current Solutions of the Gulf
Coast volunteered to wire
the house; Jerry's Framing


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Crew agreed to frame the
house and All Phase Drywall
pledged both materials and
labor.
The Christian Community
Development Foundation also
agreed to donate $2,5000 for
construction costs.
In January, the church
approached Farmer with a
proposal.
Collier had contacted
Wilbur and Mary Linda Butts,
the founders of Covenant
House, a Christian ministry
located a few miles north of
Wewahitchka.


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Themselves members
of Oak Grove Assembly, the
Butts family offered Farmer
and her daughters a place to
live during the construction
of her home. They also offered
their labor force when the
building phase began.
When Collier presented
Farmer the offer, she made
clear that Farmer would have
to abide by certain rules at
Covenant House.
Founded in 1993,
Covenant House accepts
people from all walks of life,
including those struggling
with addictions and would-be
prisoners placed in Covenant
House by judges who support
the Butts' regimented
approach to living.
In Covenant House
promotional literature,
Wilbur and Mary Linda Butts
describe the house as "first
and foremost a Christian
home, a ministry of love to
the hurting."
Those in need are
welcomed at Covenant House,
but they must abide by what
Wilbur and Mary Linda Butts
'describe as a strict code of
behavior.
Residents are prohibited
from using drugs of any
kind, may not curse, fight or,
discuss inappropriate topics,
must keep their rooms clean,
help with household chores
and attend twice-daily Bible
study sessions.
Farmer told Collier that
she would abide by,Covenant
House rules. She wanted to
quit smoking, a habit she'd
taken up in her youth,
and was eager to embrace
Christian teachings.
"I wanted to learn how
to serve God the way you're
supposed to serve God,"
Farmer said.
The Terms
Oak Grove Assembly of
God's new pastor, James
Wiley, was not present
during the planning stages
of the Linda Farmer Project,
which was initiated by his
predecessor, Fernandez.
But as the new pastor,
Wiley provided the church's
official word on the project
during a July 21 interview.
Wiley described the
church's initial commitment
to Farmer as "more than a
few walls, a floor and a roof."
Beyond building a new
home for Farmer and her
family, the church, Wiley said,
had hoped to give Farmer an
"overall life improvement."
Part and parcel of the
deal was that Farmer live
at Covenant House and
abide by their rules, which
Wiley believed would provide
Farmer with the discipline he
felt she sorely needed.
"The opportunity for
her to live in a structured
environment, to take care
of herself, her home, her
business just the structure
and discipline she needed to
live a healthy, productive life
was part of the process," said
Wiley.
"It was setup as a package
thing," added Collier, "a life
changing experience, all the
way from beginning to end."
With Mary Linda and
Wilbur Butts agreeing to

(See FARMER on Page 3A)


Please visit The Star &


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2A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL -TusaAgs ,20







F.nIi'h-, 19711 S -.1aG 1-1un7an- ur1ndn ar s fr 68 yars


Farmer -
pay Farmer's utilities at to bui
Covenant House, the church church
also expected Farmer to to d
begin paying off some of her Farme
existing debts. in a se
According to Wiley, most TI
of the community partners to lau
who offered their volunteer fundra
services to the project project
understood that Farmer On
would be living at Covenant Coven
House and submitting herself loaded
to its demands. onto
"A lot of people were
excited about this project.
They saw it as an opportunity
for Linda to develop some
discipline in her life," Wiley
said.
Covenant House Rules
In soliciting their help
with the project, Collier
assured Mary Linda and
Wilbur Butts that Farmer was
eager to embrace, Covenant
House living.
To gauge Farmer's
commitment for themselves,
the couple called a meeting
at Covenant House shortly
before Farmer was slated to
move in.
When Mary Linda and
Wilbur Butts explained the
strict house rules, including
mandatory 6:30 a.m. Bible
study, Farmer offered several
complaints.
"I could tell she was not
interested in the advanced
course," said Wilbur Butts. Mo
"At the time, I just conceded rehabil
to that." tearful
Witnessing Farmer's gratitu
reluctance to immerse herself "G
in Covenant House life and prayer
acknowledging the limitations house
she had with Angela, Mary comin
Linda and Wilbur Butts A
offered Farmer a modified At
agreement. Linda
In exchange for living. willing
at Covenant House, Farmer violati,
would attend one of two daily Thi
Bible studies, quit smoking, home,
keep her house clean and to att
begin paying down some of they ti
her debts. smoki:
Mary Linda and Wilbur It
Butts allowed Farmer to Farme
live in a three bedroom, two Farme
bathroom house complete Coven
with a kitchen, provided that Knowi
she pay for her own meals. smoke
"We tried to grant, her Farme
total, independence," said for hqo
Wilbur Butts. Un
Farmer' agreed to the Farme
terms and began packing her Mary I
belongings, that s
Before Farmer vacated would
her trailer, Oak. Grove utilities
Assembly of God contacted Si:
The Star. about its mission *use of


,-- 2>

ld Farmer a home. The
h asked the newspaper
document the Linda
er Project's milestones
series of articles.
he church also planned
nch a community-wide
raising campaign as the
t gained momentum.
n May 17, as two
.ant House volunteers
d the last of her things
a flatbed trailer, a


couple also decided to move
her to the nearby Bank House
to make room for one of four
families who'd expressed an
interest in living at Covenant
House.
Originally a Blountstown
bank that was relocated in
pieces and reassembled at the
Covenant House compound,
the communal Bank House
offered several bedrooms and
bathrooms and housed the
Bible study sessions.
On July 13, Farmer
aired her dissatisfaction
with the Butts' new proposal


place to begin construction on
Farmer's new home, church
officials declared the Linda
Farmer Project finished.
Collier noted that the
church collected only two
financial contributions from
Oak Grove parishioners, and
she assured that the money
will be returned.
According to Wiley,
Farmer had forfeited her right
to a new home by not living at
Covenant House and paying
down her existing debts.
By refusing to make an
"overall life improvement,"


who have pledged to support
Farmer in any way they can,
including making renovations
to her trailer.
Farmer hopes that the
church will take up the
Linda Farmer Project again
and provide her temporary
housing in Port St. Joe or
White City.
She pledged to meet
all the church's demands,
including quitting smoking,
if Oak Grove Assembly would
agree to build her a home
without the condition that
she live at Covenant House.


-~ ~ a'4-
~ ~
~




~~~~1.~.


old grows on the ceiling
litation.
i Farmer expressed her
ide.
rod, he's answered my
rs. I've prayed for a
for years and now he's
g through," she said.
Broken Covenant
Covenant House, Mary
and Wilbur Butts were
g to overlook Farmer's
ons of house rules.
hey did not inspect her
they didn't compel her
end Bible Study and
turned a blind eye to her
ng.
t was easy to overlook
;r's behavior because
.r was scarcely seen on
ant House grounds.
ng that she could not
on the premises,
r left Covenant House
urs each day.
willing to support
her's smoking habit,
Linda Butts told Farmer
she and her husband
no longer pay for her
eS.
nce Farmer made little
f the private home, the
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inside Linda Farmer's White C


at a meeting at Oak Grove
Assembly, attended by two
social workers, Farmer's
daughter, Rebekah, Collier
and Wiley, who had been
named pastor only days
earlier.
Wiley reminded Farmer'
that her departure from
Covenant House would
amount to a breach in the
verbal agreement she made
to the church at the project's
inception.
Though Farmer began
the meeting by vehemently
defending her right to -smoke
and accusing Mary Linda
and Wilbur Butts of trying
to control her life, she later
reaffirmed her desire to live
ar Covenant House. '
Collier was, pleased to
see the change in' Farmer's
attitude. :
"Everything seemed to be
fine," recalled Collier. "I felt.
really good when I left that
meeting."
Three days later, Farmer
left Covenant House and
moved into her sister's home
in Wewahitchka.
Though everything was in


Despina Williams/The Star
ity trailer. A SHIP program inspector called the trailer beyond


Farmer had not held up her
end of the bargain.
Though Wiley
acknowledged that Angela's
quality of life would have
improved in a new, handicap-
accessible home, Wiley
said that Farmer, and not
the church, was ultimately
responsible for her daughter's
well-being.
"Linda carries a very
heavy responsibility in the
"decisions that she has made
and regrettably, for Angela's
sake, she's a victim of poor
choices on her mother's part,"
Wiley said.
Last- Thursday, Farmer
was willing to accept much
of the blame for the project's
failure. 'She acknowledged
that in leaving Covenant
House. she broke the promise
she made to the church.
"I know it's me. I just
wasn't happy up there. That's
w hy i stayed gone all the
time," Farmer said.
Though she once likened
her time at Covenant House
to a "prison," Farmer said she
was treated fairly by Mary*
Linda and Wilbur Butts,


"I would do anything they
asked me to do and it does
have something to do with
my smoking. I do have to
quit. It's not a good habit
to have with Angela, it's not
a good habit to show fellow:
Christians," Farmer said.
On Saturday, Farmer
moved out of her sister's
house and back into her
trailer, which now lacks a
wheelchair ramp. Most of
her belongings are still in
storage.
Though Wiley has no
immediate plans to revive the
Linda Farmer Project, he does
not discount the possibility
of giving Farmer a second
chance.
'There's always another
chance. That's what mercy is
about.'" Wile said.
When he considered the
matter further, Wiley placed
his previous statement in the


context of his faith.
"God is about mercy-and
understanding, but he's -also
about consequences for the
poor decisions that we make,"
Wiley said.
SHIP Funds
When Bolden first learned
of the Linda Farmer Project,
he did not know the nature
of the agreement between
Farmer and Oak Grove
Assembly of God.
"The understanding .that
we had was that they Wvere
going to build this lady a
home," said Bolden.
His main interaction'was
with Farmer, who was- the
sole recipient of the $25,000
in SHIP funds designated for
building materials, supplies
and related support items.
When he learned
that the project had been
terminated, Bolden -was
saddened by what he saw
as twin missed opportunities
- the opportunity to improve
Farmer and her handicapped
daughters' quality of life and
the opportunity to launch the.
SHIP program's faith-based
partnership with a successful
flagship project.
Bolden said he hoped
the county commission will
continue to support SHIP's
partnerships with churches
and other faith-based
organizations. He testified to
the success of such ventures
in recent years.
"Faith-based community
partnerships are working
around the country,"
said Bolden, who cited
the Salvation Army's relief
work in Hurricane Katrina's
aftermath as an example:
Though the Linda Farmer
Project did not end as he'd
hoped, Bolden applauded
Oak Grove Assembly of.God
for being the first church to
embrace the opportunities
provided by the HIP
program.
He called the 'last
few months "a learning
experience" that will inform
his future dealings with other
faith-based organization(.
As for Farmer, Bolden
noted that the SHIP funds are
still available, independent of
any dictates made by -,Oak
Grove Assembly of God. '
"The money is there for
her to build a home, if sht can
find another organization,"
Bolden said.


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privately owned lots in that stretch of beach along Highway 98 which is scheduled to be rerouted. With 4,191
heated and cooled square footage, there are 4 Bedrooms and 4.5 Baths. Decks cover all three levels so the views
from this property are w ithour comparison. The interior finishes include all-wood semi custom cabinets, quartz
countertops in kitchen, upgraded appliance and lighting packages, tile and bamboo wood floors in common areas
and bathrooms and carpet in bedrooms and stairs. Some of the other features include an elevator to all floors, a


-- IEAL ESTATE
PORT ST JOE OFFICE 317 Monument Avenue PORT ST JOE, FL 32456
1.877.827.8751 OR 850.229.1700
www. st joe ba y. com
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Establish 797 -Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


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4A The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006


E 3.. STAR
YOUR HOMETOVYWNEWSP.4PER FOR OVER 68 YEARS
Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


The Plan, the Plan


Last week's words by County
Commissioner Bill Williams regarding his
dismay with annexations by the City of Port
St. Joe and the potential for the county and
city to end up in court over the issue was
doused with irony.
The comments were rooted in legislation
passed last year by the Florida Legislature
which overhauled at hundreds of pages the
bill swept in broad changes growth man-
agement rules and regulations in the state.
A central component of that bill is a
mandate that local governments counties,
municipalities and School Board sit down
at the same table as they map out local
growth.
Planning by consensus, state lawmakers
sought.
That the bill would cause consternation
in Gulf County should not be a surprise,
particularly given that the most common
form of inter-governmental communication
is sniping.
But take, as one example, the agreement
between the county and the city over the
annexation of the second phase of WindMark
Beach into the city.
An opportunity, we would argue, to
'demonstrate collegial planning to deal with
the enormous growth that will accompany
the full build-out of a development which
will ultimately comprise more than 1,500
homes.
Instead, what emerged reads more like
a grab-bag of spoil-dividing, an agreement
which pins on the city the responsibility for
a variety of infrastructure projects for which
there is no clearly stated path to completion,
an absence of realistic timelines and accu-
rate cost estimates.
Leaving aside the questionable legal
foundation not to mention the wisdom of
employing tax dollars for the purpose for
a court fight with the city over annexation,
a voluntary process which centers on the
private property rights of landowners, we
would argue that the county stick to one
court fight at a time.
After all, commissioners continue to
waffle\on county-wide voting, the one tussle
for which the majority of citizens would wel-
come such a fighting legal spirit.
Well into the night during last week's
.second budget workshop, commissioners


once again flipped and flopped over county-
wide voting, approving the money for legal
fees in the budget before taking the money
back out prior to the pumpkins arriving at
1 a.m.
Clearly, Nathan Peters, Jr. intends to
continue his obstinacy, his having no oppo-
sition for re-election this year someone
will have to point out to us the gains he has
made for his district to deserve such char-
ity preventing a full debate on the subject
in the very district where that debate most
needs to be engaged.
We can't decide who Pare $7
should be more ashamed Pare $7
Mr. Peters for his dismissive COmmiSSi
disregard for the voters and last week
their tax bills or the rest of CURRENT
the Commission for allowing
this disingenuous dance to levels anc
continue, talking at
Somehow the apathy accomplish
indicates no real heartburn The status
about a system that rewards just that,
incumbency. just that,
As all issues ultimate- old, same
ly reside with the budget,
though, consider this year's currently fluid
document as another example of the coun-
ty's leadership on planning.
Given everything that has transpired
in the past year, all the debate and outcry
over property taxes, there is no other way
to describe the tentative budget on which
commissioners began work last week other
than as an abject failure on the part of the
Commission, as the board of directors of
the county, and the upper management team
they direct.
While it was heartening to see commis-
sioners dig deep and apply a scythe to the
requests of department heads, we can't help
but note that paring an outlandish $21 mil-
lion budget down to current spending levels
could have should have -been accom-
plished by staff.
This is the same exercise performed
every year, only on a grander stage.
Last week, instead, should have been an
initiative in carving fat from already bloated
spending levels. Budget workshops should
have started at zero and built from there.
Pare $7 million as commissioners did
last week from CURRENT spending levels


ni
io




Is


ti


p

.'-


and we'd be talking about real accomplish-
ment. The status quo is just that, the same-
old, same-old.
Williams, in his statements last week
about city annexation, was on point regard-
ing the apparent lack of a clear plan on the
part of the city has it grows by leaps and
bounds land-wise.
He echoed a concern heard in the com-
munity that as the city bulls forward in a
variety of directions with tens of millions
of dollars worth of infrastructure improve-
ments on the drawing table many don't
understand the plan, or if
million as there even is one.
)ners did However, that a county
- from commissioner would take
spending them to task falls into a pot-
calling-the-kettle-black kind
we'd be of conundrum, particularly
out real given that the county can't
hment. document what is happen-
quo is ing, operationally, today, let
t qu Sa e alone estimate workloads in
.he same- the future.
old. It's too early to deter-
mine whether the County
Commission's efforts to rein in spending
are too little too late they seem to have
the potential to be both at this juncture to
assist many residents and business owners
who are literally being taxed out of town.
Businesses are already wobbling from
the body blows taxes have inflicted to the
bottom line of the past few years. Balance
will only come with time and a lifeline from
commissioners.
What seems evident, however, is that
those most at risk in the community small
businesses, residents on fixed incomes and
blue collars folks have been badly bruised
by the lack of foresight and broader visions
in government.
There is palpable desperation for real
leadership from government, leadership
demonstrated not with words and another
round of the blame game, but actions, from
county-wide voting to curtailing spendthrift
ways.
Somebody needs to set the proper tone.
It has to start somewhere.
And there is no sense in raising the bar
for others when you demonstrate a halting
desire to stretch for those same heights.


Let's DON'T Get Ready To Rumble!


WVe had a boxing match at the local high
school gym recently. I didn't go. But when I read
the advertisement in the paper my legs turned to
rubber, my eyes watered up, my head began to
pound and my equilibrium became unequilibril-
ized.
I had an older brother......which meant that
I spent the first ten or twelve years of my life as
a punching bag. I think if we had had a t.v. in
those early days I might have escaped some of
the "rounds".
And Leon wasn't mean to me understand.
He was the greatest older brother in the world.
He showed me how to lower that old Revelation
glove on ground balls below my waist and how to
get my elbows in and hold the glove up for the fly
balls. He could get us in line ahead of most of the
grownups by "just looking hungry" at the church
picnic. He would "shepherd" me and David Mark
to the Park Theatre each and every Saturday
afternoon to see Roy, Hoppy or, Gene. He'd give
Sme frogs or a magnet to take to "show and tell" in
Miss Carolyn's class. He taught me how to swim
by tossing me out of the boat and driving off-it
was really quite easy after I got out of the gunny
sack and got the anchor untied. You couldn't ask
for a better friend.....
It was just that he bored easily. And I was
always there.
I remember when I was nine or ten, Leon
was five years older, they'd hold these Golden
Gloves boxing matches. It was quite a big deal
In our little town. They had gloves and the little
satin shorts with the stripes down the sides and
everything. Of course, we didn't know nothing
about bobbing and weaving, stick and jab......they
just mostly stood up there toe to toe and slugged
it out. To everyone's amazement, except mine,
Leon was the champion in his age division three
- years in a rowl
It seems like I would have learned a little
about the art just by the process of osmosis. I
didn't. When Leroy Cunningham sucker punched
me at junior high football practice, I jerked off
my helmet (which I have since learned was my
first mistake) and went after him. He was the
littlest one of them Cunningham boys and I fig-


-J


,A HE STAR
USPHS 518-880
Published Every Thursday at 135 West Highway 98
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
General Manager: Krichelle McGhee
News Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: Kevin Burke
Creative Design Manager: Kathleen Smith

Florida Press National Newspaper
Association Association
0


HUNKER DOWn


WITH KES

Kesley Colbert
Contributing Writer


ured I could whip him easy. People, my problem
was-he had a lot more older brothers than I did.
And he didn't take his helmet off!
He was mighty tough for a small guy. And I
forgot to stick and weave. I didn't think Coach
Campbell was ever going to get over there and get
between us! My right eye was near 'bout shut and
my lip was bleeding something awful. Dad took
one look at me that afternoon and asked with a
grin, "Son, did they have to carry the other fellow
home?"
I was sitting up at the Skyway Grill in the
fall of my senior year when Hulon Abernathy
came sliding across the floor and crashed into
our booth. Folks, my heart sank! For several
reasons!
The Skyway Grill was out on Highway 79,
about halfway between us and Henry, Tennessee.
It served cold beers. You see why I'm in trouble
already. I wasn't supposed to be here. Now, I
knew better than to order me one of those beers.
I was a big Dr. Pepper man back in those days.
But this place had the best cheeseburgers in the
world. And on Friday nights Spud Chandler and
the Ring Tones played live music. Spud was from
down around Big Sandy and he could sing just
like Jerry Lee Lewis. They had tables up front,
booths along two walls and a fair sized dance
floor in the back. You can readily see why it was
the happening place in our little corner of the
universe in 1964.
The problem was them Henry boys. They
didn't like us coming over and "invading" their
territory. Listen, I'd seen every one of those Henry
girls. The boys didn't need to worry! I sure liked


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Post Office Box 308
Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308
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girls back in those days, and was almighty inter-
ested in dating, but I wasn't desperate!
That's why I was a little surprised when the
fight broke out. Hulon, for some crazy unknown,
reason, had asked Patricia Updike to dance.
Hulon lived just down the street from me and
was fairly normal. Pat Updike wasn't the ugliest
girl in Henry....but she would have been in the
top three, easily! Ruth Ann Wiley said later she
had to be a first cousin to the Creature from the
Black Lagoon!
Well, I'm sitting there, munching on a cheese-
burger, sipping my Dr. Pepper, listening to "Great
Balls of Fire" and mostly minding my own busi-
ness when Hulon's head crashes into. Jane Hill's
leg. Jane, bless her heart, looks up at me like I'm
duty bound to defend Hulon's honor.
I look over toward the dance floor and there
stands Big Nose Lajoie. You've got to be kidding
me! Pam Collins, who is even less subtle than
Jane, says, "Well".
I get up but I'm thinking about all the fights
I haven't won as I move unsteadily toward Big
Nose. And I wishing I had my football helmet. I
glance around to see if any of my life long friends
are coming to my rescue. I pause a.minute, hop-
ing Hulon will rush by, attacking Big Nose.
I figured I might as well get in the first punch
but as I stepped in close a bottle crashed behind
the bandstand, someone yelled and, as they
would say at ringside, all bedlam broke loose.
Something or somebody hit me up side the head
and I don't. recall much after that. I remember
that Spud and the boys never stopped playing
through it all. I know Slick Tosh, the owner, was
one mad guy. I remember Patty Updike standing
over me when I came to. I remember the police
asking all sorts of questions about how it started.
I remember I couldn't see out of my-right eye for
a week. And Mom couldn't get the blood out of
my shirt.
And I remember Dad shaking his head and
saying, "Son, if fighting and bar hopping is what
you're inclined to....you'd better find another line
of work."
Respectfully,
Kes


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$23.00 YEAR $15.00 SIX MONTIH
OUT OF COUNTY
$33.00 YEAR $20.00 SIX MONTHS
TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements the
publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage
further than amount received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed
word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely
asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces.
The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


\


r


Tim Croft
Star News Editor


Closing the Books
As the election season heats, Supervisor
of Elections Linda Griffin is reminding voters
that the books for the Sept. 5 primary close
for new registrations and party changes as of
end of business on Aug. 7.
The books will, of course, reopen after the
primary in preparation of the November gen-
eral election, but given that party affiliation is
critical in a primary, now is the time to make
those changes in time for the primary.
And be kind to Griffin and her outstand-
ing team if you are a voter and have moved or
made other changes which could impact your
voting status, call the Supervisor of Elections'
office at 229-6117 as soon as possible.
It is much easier to make necessary
changes to the voter registration prior to vot-
ing day, as opposed to having the lines grow
behind you as those changes are made on
Election Day.
Be kind, plan ahead.
Another reminder, early voting will begin
Aug. 21 in the Wewahitchka Public Library
and at Griffin's new offices at 401 Long
Avenue in Port St. Joe.
Hours will be 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET, or 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. CT in Wewahitchka, Monday
through Saturday through Sept. 2.
Lawmakers changed the rules on early
voting to eliminate voting on the Monday
prior to Election Day to ease the workload on
already over-burdened election staff.
Vote early they all count.
Grandma's Cooking
Grandma is now coming to a spot near
you.
Grandma's Kitchen opened this summer,
serving hot delicious breakfast don't take my
word for it, check it out to anyone walking
in the Seniors Citizen Center in Port St. Joe
between the hours of 7-9 a.m.
For a mere fiver folks can get eggs, ham,
bacon, sausage, home fries, grits, biscuits and
more, served piping hot off the line by a dedi-
cated crew of volunteers, staff and friends of
the community's seniors.
The emergence of Grandma's filled a void
in a community where those who wanted
breakfast had to make due with the golden
arches or the king of flame-broiled.
The food is prepared and cooked fresh
every day, Southern home cooking served
with a smile and thanks.
Additional benefit is gleaned by the fact
that all monies netted each week go toward
funding a variety of programs for seniors in
the community.
Now Grandma is hoping to bring the food
to those who can't join a hardy group of regu-
lar who dot the tables at the Senior Citizens
Center nearly every morning.
The folks at Grandma's have initiated a
take-out or delivery service, featuring sau-
sage, ham, bacon and egg sandwiches and
bagels and cream cheese.
Just ring up the center at 229-8466 and
put your business on the delivery route or ask
for a faxed menu. They'll send one right over.
Construction crews and other businesses
can schedule daily breakfast breaks with a
simple phone call.
The center will also cater a club or busi-
ness meeting, either for breakfast or dinner.
The dining room seats up to 20 people or
the folks at Grandma's can bring it to you If
the favored place for breakfast is the office.
What they are trying to do at Grandma's
is build on the momentum of the early weeks
of summer by expanding their offerings, bol-
stering elderly programs seniors are the
fastest-growing segment of the county's popu-
lation, already comprising nearly one in four
residents while providing warm bellies for
anybody with $5.
Seems like a bargain.
Molding Young People
A tip of the hat this week to Maxine and
Chester Gant and their many supporters and
participants in their annual Mold A Male/
Female Youth Conference.
This was the first year since I came to
Gulf County that I was unable to attend the
annual conference, which always provides
a theme and a demand on young people to
devote one weekend each summer to learning
and substance.
For several years I've been listening to
the Gants say that they are getting old, a little
tired, and maybe running on empty. Howmuch
longer they would continue to spearhead the
conference, well, that was a question.
And every year there they are, providing
a moral compass and attitude check for the
young people of the community, at least for
one weekend a year.
They provide a template others, regard-
less of skin color, should emulate and a shin-
ing example of what serving the youth in the
community is really all about.
Here's hoping the tank never runs dry,
because folks like Maxine and Chester Gant
are resources no community could easily
replace.







Established 1937 Serving Gulf county ond surrounding oreos for 68 years The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006 SA


FWC E
"Fishing for Freedom"
(FFF), a statewide group of
1,600 citizens concerned
about Florida's environment,
economy, citizens and con-
stitution are planning a Key
West to Tallahassee march
in October to coincide with
the Florida Governor elec-
tion campaigns. The march
will be designed to expose
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission's
(FWC) refusal to provide
due process, obey any check
and balances in government,
and their intentional forc-
ing of commercial fishermen
to unnecessarily kill and
waste of the state's marine
resource. The march will
originate from the south-
ern tip of Key West and will
end at the Capital's steps,
where upon arrival, three
flags that will be carried
throughout Florida will be


exposure
delivered. One flag will sym-
bolize the U.S. and Florida
Constitutions requiring a
separation of powers in gov-
ernment, another flag will
symbolize the "Due Process"
guaranteed by both the U.S.
and Florida Constitutions,
and the third will symbolize
the millions of juvenile fish
that the FWC are intention-
ally forcing Florida commer-
cial fishermen to unneces-
sarily kill and waste in seine
nets each year in violation of
the constitution.

The March's major goals
include:
1) Educate the pub-
lic that an agency without
Separation of powers, such
as the FWC, acting alone with-
out ANY oversight, threatens
to destroy our constitution if
allowed to continue to exist


in its present form.
2) Share that all
Americans are guaranteed
"due process" and "equal
protection of the law," yet
the FWC have REFUSED to
allow ANY constitutional due
process for the citizens it
governs since 1999.
3) Expose the FWC's
gross and intentional mis-
management of our state's
resources using the court
proven example of 98 juve-
nile fish unnecessarily being
killed and wasted for every 7
million pounds of legal fish
brought to market.

Some of the other issues/
stories the march will
expose include:
*Documented horror
stories of how the FWC, an
unaccountable agency with
its own law enforcement


branch have destroyed inno-
cent lives.
*How the FWC have
"thumbed their nose" at the
legislature and refused to
obey our elected lawmakers
in an attempt to create their
own "communist" environ-
ment of tyranny.
*Expose that the head
of FWC Law Enforcement
admits to arresting citizens
under PROPOSED LAWS,
and show that the com-
mander had promised the
Legislature NOT to do so
just before the arrests were
made.
*And a lot more.

Fishing For Freedom is
in the early stages of setting
up this monumental event.
They are presently mapping
out a safe route which will
take place along the west
coast of Florida, planning


lodging, and working out the
fine details. FFF have already
started receiving pledges of
money, fish to be donated
to the cause, and volunteers
to either help along the way
or make a portion of the
walk. The organization is
also beginning to work with
law enforcement agencies to
assure compliance with state
and local laws.
The march's purpose is
not only to educate Florida's
citizens, but also to garner
national and local media
attention to the above list-
ed abuses and more. FFF
believes that if the Nation
is educated to what is hap-
pening in Florida, Floridians
and their Legislators will
either put enough pressure
on the commission to force
them to provide constitution-
ally guaranteed due process,
stop the unnecessary kill-


ing and waste of our sea-life
and fall under the author-
ity of the U.S. and Florida
Constitutions, or else be
abolished in the upcoming
Legislative Session.
All groups and concerned
citizens will be encouraged
to join in a portion of our
walk. Some of the commit-
ted walkers include environ-
mentalists, law enforcement
officers and veterans.
Fishing for Freedom is
also planning to take along
a large traveling cook wagon.
The cook wagon was donat-
ed by Savannah's Country
Buffets in Tallahassee. Fish
dinners will be served along
the Key West to Tallahassee
route. Donations will be
gladly accepted.
For more information
visit: http://fishingforfree-
dom.net.


--




.,.
~, '~ ~


Dear Editor,
If my thoughts are not
quite clear, it is because my
brain is still addled from the
two late night budget meet-
ings last week (5 to 6 hours
each).
More than one opinion
was voiced and I quote-
"This is a deliberate set up
to tire the people so most
will leave before the meet-
ing was over each night."
One must wonder since by
the second night coming into
the meeting, Commissioners
were ready to set a tenta-
tive budget and the third


Letters



to the Editor


night of budget meetings
were cancelled only to set
up the final budget hearing
one week later. Why then for
all the late night hours? Why
is the final budget hearing
set up on a Wednesday at
5:00 PM EST before the Star
paper comes out to notify
the citizens? If one doesn't
spend gas and time to go into
town to peer at the door of
the Commissioners building
for a bulletin, or keep calling
administrators' offices, they
do not know.
One must wonder!
I am, for one, (and I'm
sure there are others by


now) wondering why the
ways to decrease the bud-
get was to take away from
the taxpayers what little we
have given to us for service
now. Examples: stop hauling
dirt, no spring clean up, cut
out amnesty day, close the
landfill one day a week, etc.,
etc., etc. Prioritize construc-
tion of new buildings. Would
not the county's first priority
for its citizens be to build
the much needed and talked
about hurricane shelter? It
has been talked about for
two years and moneys have
been spent elsewhere.
One must wonder why


St. Joe Diary


A Cow in the Hoosegow


By Dave Maddox
Contributing Writer
Back before the days
of the paper mill, Port St.
Joe was a sleepy little town
without much trouble.
The City Hall was a
small wooden building with
a wooden calaboose behind
it located on the corner of
Clifford C. Simms Blvd.
and First Street, where the
Advance Auto Parts store is
today.
One night a prisoner in
the calaboose set his bed on
fire and burned the calaboose
down.
He'd set his bed on fire
before and they came and got
him out of the jail, but this
time they didn't get him out
in time and he suffocated.
After that, if someone
had to be locked up they were
transported to the county jail
in Wewa.
After the paper mill was
built and our town began to
grow, the city commissioners


decided a jail was needed.
A square concrete block
building was ; constructed
where the calaboose had
been, with four cells and an
open room between the cells.
The cells had windows with
bars over them.
At times, some friends
or relatives of the prisoners
would stand at the windows
and talk, give the prisoners
cigarettes and maybe a drink
to sober them up.
Then the city
commissioners decided to
build a wooden fence around
the jail to stop the visiting
and prisoners calling at
people passing by.
During this era, there
were many U.S. flag coastwise
ships calling at our port.
Naturally, some of the
seameni from the ships
would come to town and get
too much to drink and get
locked up.
One night, some milk
cows from Oak Grove came


into town. Since there wasn't
a pound to put them in, the
police decided to lock them
behind the fence around the
jail.
That night, some seamen
from one of the ships in port
were locked up in the jail. ,
During the night it rained,.
and the cows walked into the
open area between the cells
to get out'of the rain.
The next morning, when
the seamen began to wake up,
there stood the cows looking
at them. I can imagine what
the seamen began to wonder
when they woke up.
Not long after that, word
had spread to all the ports
from Brownsville, Texas to
Portland, Maine "Don't get
locked up in Port St. Joe.
They lock the cows, hogs and
,seamen all in the same jail."
.It took a while, but our
town finally outlived that
rumor.


Question

Almost two months into hurricane season and not much
Online activity. Are you nervous?
Opinion
SPole Results

XA-' W-11 Yes, the quiet before the storm 5%
No, Mother Nature is impossible to predict,
Visit The Star's website to even for Chicken Little. 14%
weigh in on next week's Don't Care, what comes, comes. 81%
question: www.starfl.com


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be signed and should include the address and
phone number of the author. The street address
and phone number, are for verification and will
not be published. Letters must be in good taste
and The Star reserves the right to edit letters for
correctness and style.


U-


May I offer my observa-
tion? We are fast becoming
a service community. We all
can remember the book or
movie "Gone with the Wind"
and a place called "Tara."
My anecdote if you will: Gulf
County will soon be one big


"Tara" and we the average
people will be serving .the
rich and famous their mint
juleps while they sit on their
veranda.
Makes one wonder!
Majorie Stitt '


Board of County Commissioners

Residents and taxpayers can contact Counby
Commissioners in the following fashion.'
By county cell phone:

Commission Chairman
Carmen McLemore can:
be reached at 227-4965


-





Carmen McLemore
Commissioner '

Commissioner Billy'
-,Traylor can be reached at
7221-7 603M


some of the budget cuts
were not considered in the
salaries or raises of Public
Works, Road Dept. or
Courthouse Maintainance
crew. Also consider the sala-
ries and increases for County
Commissioners and their
vacation pay plus the con-
ferences (another vacation?).
Do away with our taxpay-
ers' money going to THEIR
special projects. Another cut
could easily be made in coun-
ty employees' medical cover-
age. What other employer do
you know pays 100% cover-
age for its employee and all
family members?
Budget cuts WERE taken
from some of the Counties
most important people.
Sheriff Dept., EMS, Fire
Depts., health care, and
senior citizens. The Sheriff
Dept. Deputies put their
lives on the line 24/7 for our
county and the Sheriff has
to grovel for a penny to give
them a raise, or to operate
his office effectively.
When we need EMS
or the Fire Dept., we need
them to have the personnel
training and the equipment
needed to do their jobs as
professionals. While doing
their jobs, often times, they
too must put their lives on
the line.
All our Healthcare peo-
ple are responsible for our
everyday healthcare and cri-
sis. They are also responsi-
ble for gathering information
of epidemics such as (God
forbid) the bird flu.
Our county senior citi-
zens are an explodng popu-
lation. One wonders if the
county can do more to give
them better care so they
might be cared for at home,
or do we consider the nurs-
ing home just a stop before
the cemetery. One must won-
der!
Watching and listening to
these County Commissioners
these past few nights remind-
ed me of the old cop movies
where there was always one
to play the good cop, one to
play the bad cop in order to
get the desired information
from the suspect, but both
knew ahead of time what
role to play before entering
the. interrogation room for
the desired outcome. One
must Wonder!
It was mentioned by
three of the Commissioner
that they needed a new van
for their district. The fourth
Commissioner (Chairman
Lclemore) made the state-
ment he wasn't voting for it
unless he could have a new
van, too. He did not say he
needed a van, just that he
WANTED a new one. This so
reminded me of a bunch of
kids. One gets a new toy and
the other kicks and shouts,
"I want one, too!" One won-
ders what happened to the
zero based budget? Four
vans instead of three got the
vote!
During the last regular,
Tuesday night meeting of
Commissioners, one gentle-
man asked the Commisioners
where are the opportunities
for employment and where
will it be coming from when
home after home is continu-
ally being built, bringing in
more and more people, but
no means to earn a decent
living. The Commissioners
could not offer the gentle-
man an answer.


Billy Traylor
Commissioner


Bill Williams
Commissioner


SCommissioner. Bill -
Williams can be reached
at 227-6422.











* Commissioner BNathan,,


Peters, Jr. can
at 899-6454.


be reached


.' n. P e' J "

* Commissioner Jerry .
' Barnes can be reached at

340;0220.



Commissioners can also
be reached by mail at
1000 Cecil G. Costin,
Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe
32456 or by e-mail at
gulfcoadmn@gtcom.net.


Nathan Peters, Jr.
Commissioner


111; 1 Pill 1 -4 -mE#.w 1 r;-


March Planned for October


Port St Joe, FL 32457
Fax To:
(850) 227-7212
Email To:
tcroft@starfl.com
HI


/


7





* '


M M


--


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


TheSta, ortSt.Jo, F -Thusda, ugut 3 206 S


Z-I /-OUIJU. '






um T ne P, r+ It1Ion IL Th[Irsdov. Au .0i7gurea


Mexico Beach City Council Hashes Through



Numbers in Second Budget Workshop


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
It is a question of "money,
money, who's got the money,"
or maybe "do we have the
money'?" as Mexico Beach city
officials labor over the 2006-
07 proposed budget.
In the second sched-
uled budget workshop last
Thursday, Mayor Al Cathey
and city council members
Curtis Dale, Jack Mullen,
Gary Woodham and Robert
Ginsberg delved into the city's
general funds budget as they
worked to map out a financial
plan for the upcoming fiscal
year.


r ------------------
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I
Name:
I
Address:
I
City:

State: Zip:

I Phone Number:


The
October
30.


city's fiscal year runs
1 through September


Budget Overview
Some of the figures on the
worksheets used by the admin-
istration showed significant
drops in revenues in several
major categories, resulting in
proposed 2007 revenues com-
ing in $686,000 less than the
adopted 2005-06 budget.
As they began reviewing
the numbers, it did not take
elected officials long to realize
that the ending year and the
projected years' budgets were
miles apart.


Where Does The Money Go?
Mexico Beach has the second-highest millage rate of the
eight municipalities in Bay County:
Panama City = 5.0
Mexico Beach = 4.35
Lynnhaven = 4.0
Callaway = 2.0
Cedar Grove = 1.5
Parker = 0
Springfield = 0
PC Beach = 0, although PCB has a sales tax
instead.
Bay County has a 5.662 village rate, plus additional
taxes.
According to Deborah McLeod, Mexico Beach City
Clerk, the total millage rate that Mexico Beach residents pay
breaks down as follows:
5.203 = school RLE
2.'32 = school district (Bay County schools)
4.35 = Mexico Beach
.1852 = mosquito control
5.662 = Bay County'
.05 = Northwest Fla. Water Management District,
Making Mexico Beach's share 24 percent of the 18.1822
total millage rate assessed.
The third budget workshop to continue discussing the
remaining department budgets was held Tuesday, August
1. An additional workshop will be held to discuss capital
requests for fiscal year 2007, before final budget hearing are
held.


"Our 05-06 budget was
so overstated it's no wonder
we're so far behind," remarked
Cathey, with Dale adding,
"We've got a 26 percent error
factor on our budget. Is the
major problem we have grants
we didn't get?"
"These were the figures we
expected because building was
still moving," answered City
Administrator Henry Flack.
"You make your best guess
at what building is going to
do," he added, explaining the
giant gap in building permits
and fees revenues between the
two years.
"Why can't we work
with actual monies we know
we're going to get?" asked
Woodham.
"If you recall," said
Ginsburg, "Mayor Risinger
was very optimistic with the
building funds. That's one rea-
son we hired Bo [Creel), who
handles the city's building and
planning services through the
company EPCI]. Maybe we
won't need him so much with
less building [in the city]."
"We were $1 million off
in the budget estimates," said
Dale.
"The budget was skewed
and that's why we're sitting
here with 60 days left and no
money," said Cathey. "But are
we smarter today than last
year? Are the proposed num-
bers good, hard numbers?
Have we done our homework,
so we aren't sitting here mid-
year next year like this year?"
"I think this is the best
budget ever presented in
Mexico Beach," replied Flack.
"The only 'iffy' dollar amount I
see here is the $35,000 in the
building permits. I can prom-
ise you it will not be zero this
time next year."
"If we've truly put our
heads together and these are
our best estimates, then we've
done the best we can," con-
cluded Cathey.

Budget Comparisons
Major drops include:


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or money order and mail or bring by
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Port St Joe, FL 32457

(850) 227-1278


A reduction in build-
ing permits and fees from
$450,000 in 2005-06 to just
$35,000 in 2006-07.
According to Flack, Creel
expects much lower building
fees to come into the city's cof-
fers next year.
This brings revenues from
total licenses and permits to
$44,000 in 2006-07, down
from $458,500 in 2005-06.
A 50 percent drop in
state mobile home license
fees, from $1,500 in 2005-06
to $750 in 2006-07, as the
number of mobile homes in
the city declines.
A drop in FEMA monies
for beach re-nourishment and
beach berm reimbursement
of $1,350,000 ($1,800,000 in
2005-06, expecting $450,000
just for jetty repair and
improvements in 2006-07).
Because of this, intergov-
ernmental revenues are expect-
ed to drop from $2,109,100 in
2005-06 to $854,950.
$241,000 in impact
fees for parks and recreation,
that appeared in the 2005-06
adopted budget, but do not
play a role in the 2006-07
budget.
These are police and fire
impact fees assessed against
new development in the city,
and are restricted funds.
This drops the total
charges-for-services budget
from $317,005 in 2005-06 to
$80,505 in 2006-07.
In total miscellaneous
revenues, interest (revenues
earned on unrestricted cash
in the bank) dropped from
$18,000 in 2005-06 to a pro-
jected $12,000 in 2006-07,
Miscellaneous revenues
(any revenue collected that is
not received on a consistent
basis), dropped from $57,000
to $1,500, bringing the total
miscellaneous revenues for
2006-07 to $58,200, down
from $105,000 in 2005-06.
All totaled, the fiscal year


2007 budget is $3,808,668,
down from $4,494,727 in the
2005-06 adopted budget.
The only two increas-
es in the 2007 budget come
from city property rental, up
from $12,000 in 2005-06 to
$20,700 in 2006-07, and ad
valorem dollars, which were
$1,277,122 in 2005-06. and
projected as $2,915,679 in
2006-07.
According to Flack, Mexico
Beach property values rose
126 percent from last year to
this year.
The city's current millage
rate is 4.35.
Line By Line
After three hours, the
workshop had covered the
legislative (mayor, city coun-
cil members), legal counsel
(city attorney), executive (city
administrator), finance (city
clerk), general government
(the downstairs, front part of
city hall), planning and zon-
ing (building), police, and fire
departments.
The workshop on Tuesday,
Aug. 1, covered code enforce-
ment, emergency services, city
services, general maintenance,
canal, streets, vehicle mainte-
nance, and parks and recre-
ation.
As the mayor and council
members reviewed the bud-
get line by line, a number of
long-term practices were ques-
tioned.
Ongoing problems with the
city canal caused Woodham to
say, "We keep putting band-
aids on band-aids on band-
aids and not addressing the
problem."
Consensus was that first
the jetty, which is already
funded, must be repaired,
making it longer and stronger
to alleviate some of the canal
problems.
The issue of a new canal
dredge was also brought up,
pushing canal issues into the


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capital funds workshop.
Employee health insur-
ance was a major concern for
the council at the workshop.
The entire council was con-
cerned that many city employ-
ees would be financially dev-
astated trying to cover their
families if the city cut health
insurance.
They decided to take the
options presented in the work-
shop and look further at the
question of employee health
insurance.
By consensus, reviews
were ordered for services pro-
vided to the city by the city
attorney (Paul Komarek), the
city auditing company (Carr,
Ingram & Riggs), and the city
engineers (Preble-Rish).
"Who reviews their [Preble-
Rish] bills," asked Woodham.
"Are we getting our money's
worth from what< we put in
them? We have to take control
and question the engineers."
"It is very important to
give specific instructions to
engineers for each project,"
said Cathey. "It's our responsi-
bility and staff's responsibility "
to explain in detail what we -
want. We can't just say, 'Do
this.' That's been the problem -
in the past."
Ginsberg agreed, telling ,
Flack that he needed to review ,.
the engineers' work each
month, to "keep better control
on this."
The council agreed to
send requests, for proposals
to the entire legal, engineering ^
and building communities for
comparison information.
The question of uniforms i
for the entire city staff arose; '
the city currently spends
about. $18,000 for employee
uniforms. Personnel in the
department of public safety,
who were not included on
the previous budget, are now
included on the proposed bud-
get.
Flack noted that each
department will have its own
colored, embroidered shirts, "
with Mullen asking, "What's
the reason to have city hall .
workers in uniform? People'
know who they are when they ,
walk in to city hall."
Flack stated that uniforms
for'inside employees were for i'
"a sense of identity and to
remedy' some of the clothes
they wear. The staff thought t I
was a good idea."
But when Cathey ques- 2
tioned one city employee who i
was present, the answer was, 2
"I think it is a waste."
Cathey then asked Flack
to poll employees "because I'm I'
with Jack [Mullen] why need
them?".
At that point Flack stated 2'
that the decision had already .'
been made and that all employ-
ees would begin wearing uni- '
forms in about three weeks.
In discussions with chief
of public safety Brad Hall,
the council's general consen-
sus was that Hall needed to
present more compelling argu-
ments for the addition of an 2
additional fulltime police offi- "
cer and one fulltime fireman,
then present his arguments to
the council again. '
Hall presented the council '
with his figures showing that 2
the current police force oper-
ates "on a skeleton crew now," !
and can no longer rely on Gulf
County for backup, as in the
past. "
"At this time we [Mexico '
Beach police] must prioritize
calls, say answering a burglary
call versus a medical emer-
gency," said Hall, who also i-
showed that the Mexico Beach '
police currently average 200- '
300 arrests per year, all of :,
whom must be transported to' '
the Panama City jail at time of
arrest, leaving the city unpro- "
tected during that time.
Hall requested a fulltime '
fireman, citing new equip-,
ment, new training require-
ments, the new multi-storied
buildings that require so many
fire inspections.
Currently the city's fire i
department is a completely ;
volunteer unit.
"Volunteers can only.do so .
much," said Hall, "especially
with the 160 hours of training
now required for volunteers. It
would work if I had 20 or 30
volunteers, but in the last year
I've added only two new ones.
"The problem," said Hall, *.
"is that if I have 10 volunteers, .
I can only count on two show-
ing up at any one time."


L----------------------------- ---- -;. ---- ---------------- -
mm elkil


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850.227.1278

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Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


6A heStr.Por S. oe FL- husdy, uqst3,2006


c






C IS elm,-1 1Q 7 )/ rivinn 7l u C; l aIf r -raun- -nd ret ou


Association Wants Lighthouse Rebuilt at Island's Entrance


By David Adlerstein
Florida Freedom Newspapers
Backers of a plan to
reconstruct the fallen Cape St.
George Lighthouse are lining
up support to rebuild the 1852
structure on a state-owned
parcel of land at the entrance
to St. George Island.
At the July 5 meeting
of the County Commission,
Dennis Barnell, president of
the St. George Lighthouse
Association, secured
unanimous support from
the five commissioners for a
proposal to ask the Florida
Department of Transportation
for permission to rebuild the
lighthouse on a triangular piece
of FDOT-owned land where
Franklin Boulevard splits
as its approaches Bayshore
Drive.
FDOT has already said
no once to the lighthouse
enthusiasts' request to have
the department consider
transferring that parcel of
land to either the Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection or to the Florida
Park Service, Barnell said.
In a June 28 letter, FDOT
offered the --association two
reasons why the state agency
could not agree to the proposal.
They said the property was
conveyed to FDOT as a right-
of-way easement by the island's
original developers with the
stipulation that it always
remain in public hands, and


that the department was not in
a position to declare the land
parcel as surplus.
"We don't want to own
that thing, we want to be
the supporter of it, not the
owners," said Barnell. "We
intended to leave it in public
hands."
He said an alternate site
also has been considered.
"There a lot of people on the
island who want to see it by the
playground, which is the old
helicopter pad," said Barnell.
The association, which
bears no connection to the
now-defunct Cape St. George
Lighthouse Society, Inc.,
initially hoped to rescue the
standing lighthouse from
relentless erosion by relocating
it on the mainland after shifting
sands had gradually caused it
to stand several feet off the
shoreline.
But on Oct. 21, 2005, the
magnificent historic landmark
toppled into the sea, as the
effects of Hurricane Dennis
provided the final watery blows
to the 154-year-old structure.
Barnell said the association
is refusing to take FDOT's no
as the final answer, and has
appealed to State Senator Al
Lawson (D-Tallahassee), and
State Representatives Will
Kendrick (D- Carrabelle) and
Allan Bense (R-Panama City)
for help.
"We have not heard from
any of them but we have reason


/ 7/ 1L;


Photo courtesy of St. George Lighthouse Association
A metal plate identifying the fresnel lens manufacturer was
among artifacts recovered, along with iron scraps, soapstone
chunks, and pieces of glass. All are believed to be from the lantern
room.


to believe that they have been
acting on it," said Barnell,
adding that he has heard that
Colleen Castille, secretary
of Florida's DEE has been
approached by a lawmaker.
The association also
emailed Frederick Gaske,
director of the state's division
of historical resources, who
Barnell said indicated support
for the group's efforts. "He's
pretty well solidly behind us,"
he said.
Barnell said that the
state-funded salvage effort,
performed by Luberto's Sand
and Stone out of Eastpoint,
was completed May 15, with


think we have enough money
to pay to have those parts
made, possibly to have the
lantern room reassembled
and displayed to the public,
by February 2007.
"We fortunately have pretty
much one of everything that
went in to the lantern room,"
he said. "Being that it was an
octagon, there was eight of
everything."
Inlate June, the association
played host to historian
and retired Coast Guard
Commander Neil Hurley, the
author of several books on
Florida's lighthouses, who
examined the huge chunks of
the fallen lighthouse and the
different vintage bricks re-
used from the two previous
lighthouses on St. George
Island dating back to the early
19th century.
Hurley has identified


two possible sources of.
construction information on -
the Cape St. George Light, from
the National Archives' copies
of the original construction
contracts, and from the Historic
American Building Survey,
which features drawings and
photographs on file at the
Library of Congress.
Next on the agenda will
be an effort to shore up the
pile of bricks now secured
in Eastpoint. "We're waiting
for cooler weather to clean
bricks," said Barnell.
Others serving on the
association's board include
Terry Kemp, secretary; Jim .
Kemp, treasurer; and board
members Joe Bacher, Eric
Madinger, Eric Martin, and Ed -
Tiley. Bud Hayes remains as
legal counsel and Roy Ogles
continues as stewardship -
coordinator.


the bricks now being stored on
land owned by Oyster Radio in
Eastpoint.
"We probably salvaged
about 80 percent of it," he said.
"They (the missing pieces) are
either damaged beyond reuse
or buried in the sand still."
Unfortunately, most
of the cast iron and copper
lantern room was destroyed
and will have to be re-created,
Barnell said, noting that he is
negotiating with a foundry in
Talladega.
"He said he was willing to
work with us on re-creating
the parts that are damaged
beyond reuse," he said. "We


County From Page A


individual departments will
allow a more accurate look
at each department's actual
costs, said Norris.
She said departmental
pay raises were not discussed
in the workshop, and as a
result were not yet part of the
proposed budgets.
"We, the Citizens
for Reduced Taxes, feel
compelled to acknowledge the


efforts between the county
commissioners themselves
and between the general
public toward resolving
this continuously growing
budget," said Garth, "and we
appreciate the steps they're
trying to take.
"It's not an overnight
thing, and we all hope to
continue working to improve
it."


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Port St. Joe, FL
Local: 850.227.2160
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Fax: 850.229.8783


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or .30acres approx. MLS# 200365. $239,000.
Port St. Joe Residential Lot 1310 Monument Ave. Lot size
approx. 120 x 105. MLS# 200355. $259,000.
C-30 Shallow Reed Subdivision we have released 6 Village lots for
$279,000 each.
Port St.Joe Commercial -Village at Marina Cove 171 Village Dr.
Lot size 40x 98. MLS #105310.$389,000.
Overstreet Pine Breeze SD 948 South Long St. Lot size 108 x
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St. Joe Beach Interior 303 Nautilus Dr. Sea Shores SD.
- approx. 80xl40. MLS #110234. $270,000
Treasure Bay C-30 Bay View 5312 Sand Bar Dr. Lot size 103 x
220. MLS # 105578. $389,000.
Treasure Bay C-30 Bay View 5438 Sand Bar Dr. Lot size 103 x 220.
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Port St. Joe Interior 144 Betty Dr. irregular lot size. MLS #
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Treasure Bay C-30 5454 Sand Bar Drive Approx .59 accre.
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Wewahitchka- Seven Springs Subdivision 121 Little River Circle.
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Cape San Bias Jubilation 122 Rosemary Ct. Approx .20 acre.
MLS # 109793 $395,000 '
Overstreet Wetappo Creek 9959 Hwy. 386 Creek Frontage
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MLS #107726.$1,399,000. Call Agent on Duty at 850.227.2160


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3 bedrooms, 3.5 bath, 1,997sf, approx.l/2acre lot.
MI #Il I I3fl5 I 1. fAi0nn rCall Parriria Rn ar Rpa5 7 5949


Oak Grove 2435 McKinnon St.
Mobile Home sold "AS IS", lot size 84 x 60.
MLS # 200159. $95,000. Call Johnny Linton at 850-227-2160






| ... i ,'
'T

CAPE SAN BLAS/I GULF FRONT 4059 CAPE SAN BLAS RD.
4 bedroom, 3 bath, 1,500sf, 50 x 583 approx. lot size.
MLS # 107336. $1,260,000. Call Johnny Linton at 850- 227-2160


Cape San Bias I Gulf Front 192 Cozumel Drive
3 bedroom, 3 bath, 1,817 sf, 85.5 x 250 lot size.
MLS #108174. $1,080,000. Call Agent on Duty at 850.227.2160


Overstreet -Waterfront 8895 CR 386
2 bedroom, 2 bath, loft, 2,876sf, 1.9 acres.
MLS # 108856. $575,000. Call Patricia Raap at 227-5949


g-i






CAPE SAN BLAS/ BARRIER DUNES #89 279 PARKSIDE CR.
3 bedroom, 3 bath. 1369 sf,townhome.
MLS #103858. $489,000. Call Ronald Pickett at 850-227-2160.
ppo


Cape San Bias SeaCliffs SD 632 SeaCliffs Dr.
4 bedroom, 4.5 bath, 1,944sf, elevator.
MLS #108476. $585,000. Call Johnny Linton at 850-227-2160.


Port St. Joe 1314 McClelland Ave.
3 bedroom, I bath, lot size 62x 155 approx
MLS # 200973. $195,000. Call Johnny Linton at 850-227-2160


St. Joe Beach 8113 Coquina Dr.
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,204sf, 85x 150 corner lot.
MLS #\ 11806. $365,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949


Cape San Bias Gulf Front Condo 658 Seacliffs Dr.
3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 1,847sf, furnished w/fireplace
MLS #110288. $750,000. Call Patricia Raap at 227.5949


Wewahitchka 128 5th Street
4 bedroom, 3 bath, 1,525sf. 3/4acre
MLS # 200835. $199,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949


Wewahitchka- 159 Harden Circle
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,930sf, approx 1.9 acres
MLS # 200839. $259,000. Call Patricia Raap at 850-227-5949


ri-b TvI i i izu.:o ..aii rarricia Kaap at OW.A4/.-7


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006 7A


Estahlished~ 1937 Servina Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


r


,,. .-' h










Downtown Board Takes Stand with City


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
It was a meeting long
on discussions, with down-
town merchants making a
stand.
Trish Warriner, chair-
woman of the Port St. Joe
Downtown Redevelopment
Agency (DRA), addressed
the meeting, taking issue
with Port St. Joe Mayor
Frank Pate over the city's
push to relocate the DRA
into city hall and continue
handling the organization's
money.
City commissioner
Benny Roberts described
the situation as a commu-
nication problem, and sug-
gested a workshop, with
invitation by hand-deliv-
ered letter, to all city mer-
chants, to "get everyone on


the same page.
Warriner told the com-
mission "I just want the
DRA to be left alone. We're
doing a good job."
Jim Garth, owner of
Decorative Flooring and a
member of the DRA, then
addressed the commission-
ers, saying he held prox-
ies from several downtown
merchants to speak for
them.
"We all believe the DRA
has drastically improved
the downtown area with
Gail Alsobrook [DRA exec-
utive director]," said Garth.
"We want to work together
with the city, but we all
challenge the city's current
proposal to move the DRA
under the city."
He then read a list of
city merchants who sup-


ported Alsobrook and the
current status of the DRA.
The merchant list of about
20 businesses included
both well-established and
new businesses in the
downtown area.
Alsobrook had asked
that the DRA take control
of its finances in order to
fully invest funds coming
into the DRA and because
fiscal guidelines dictating
the operations of a DRA
are more stringent than for
the city.
City officials have
resisted ceding control of
the dollars and financial
oversight of the organiza-
tion to Alsobrook, Warriner
and their team.
A workshop was sched-
uled for Monday, August 14
at 6 p.m. E.T. at the Port


St. Joe fire station, with
Pate, the city commission-
ers, DRA representatives,
and all area merchants.
In other business:
Balloting received
from a poll of residents
of the Millview neighbor-
hood in north Port St. Joe
on a rezoning issue was
announced, with about
34 percent of the 108 bal-
lots sent to homeown-
ers returned to the City
Commission.
The question was
whether or not the resi-
dents of the area wished to
rezone their neighborhood
from R1 (residential single-
family) to R2B (multifamily
and some commercial).
Of those residents vot-
ing, a clear majority favored
a change in zoning for the


Water Supply Plan Initiated for Franklin and Gulf


The Northwest Florida
Water Management District
Governing Board on June
22 initiated a Regional
Water Supply Plan that
will help the two counties
access funds and employ
plans for meeting projected
drinking water demands.
The plan will per-
mit the district to initiate
alternative water supply
and water resource devel-
opment projects, funded
through the state legisla-
ture's Water Protection and
Sustainability Program.
"Our concern is
increased salinity in coastal
public supply wells, due
to continued and increased
withdrawals from the
Floridan Aquifer," said
Ron Bartel, director of
the NWFWMD's Division
of Resource Management.


"Plan implementation will
ensure that potable water
is available for generations
to come."
The district has already
assisted the city of Port
St. Joe with buying the
Gulf County Water Supply
Canal as a public surface
water source. The canal
is an existing diversion
that served a now defunct
pulp mill. The district also
drilled test wells in Franklin
County to assess whether
inland wells could be used
to serve the coastal area.
"Within three years,
we hope to develop a sus-
tainable and cost effec-
tive water supply that will
meet regional needs at
least through 2025," said
Joyce Estes, vice-chair
of the district governing
board. "The issue is that,


as you approach the Gulf
of Mexico less fresh water
is available, reducing the
long-term viability of public
wells for water supply. "
Population for Region V
of the District's seven water
supply planning regions is
projected to increase from
under 20,000 to almost
30,000 between 2005 and
2025. This would require
developing an additional
2.35 million gallons a day
for this area of special con-
cern.
The plan will iden-
tify preferred alterna-
tive water sources based
on quality, cost, feasibility
and resource protection.
Statutory responsibilities
require the district to devel-
op water resources, includ-
ing a regional perspective
and oversight. The plan


will also assist local gov-
ernments and utilities in
arranging for water supply,
including infrastructure
construction 'and facility
operations for distribution.
Thus far, the district has
conducted workshops with
water supply utilities and
other interested parties in
Franklin County and plans
to hold additional work-
shops later. Stakeholders
will receive advance drafts
of the Regional Water Supply
Plan, and at least one public
meeting will be conducted
with the Governing Board
before approval. Also, the
plan will be distributed*via
the District's website, www.
nwfwmd.state.fl.us by staff
and at public meetings.


area.
The zoning change was
first initiated by Millview
resident Deborah Ward,
who wanted to operate a
home-based business from
her residence in the neigh-
borhood.
City attorney Russell
Scholz was instructed
to contact the Florida
Department of Community
Affairs to see if they would
approve the rezoning of
just one lot under the city's
comprehensive plan, or if
DCA required other action,
after commissioners unani-
mously passed a motion to
rezone just her property.
Lee Vincent, Port St.
Joe city manager, recom-
mended the city commis-
sion pass the plans and
preliminary plat for the
Viento Beach development
in Highland View. Indicating
the enormous roll of archi-
tectural drawings, Vincent
told the commissioners
that city Public Works
Supervisor John Grantland
had reviewed the entire
set of plans in-depth and
assured him that the plans
met all the city's develop-
ment orders.
Under close question-
ing by commissioners
Rachel Crews and Roberts,
the development's repre-
sentative assured the com-
mission that the plans were
exactly the same as original-
ly presented to them, with
the exception of the county
road that runs through the
property.
The road used to lead
to Butler's Restaurant from
U.S. 98, and the develop-
ers had asked the county
to abandon the roadway,
but the county refused.
According to the repre-
sentative, the development


plans now do not utilize
the road.
Commissioner John
Reeves told the commis-
sion that he would vote
for the motion to approve
the plans, "because we told
these people we'd go with
it, so let's do it. But in
the future, we need to see
exactly what we're voting on
before we do it."
The other commis-
sioners agreed with Reeves
and the motion to approve
the preliminary plat was
passed unanimously. :
Two motions were
tabled because of the com-
missioners' opposition 'to
the engineering fees to be
charged by Preble-Rish
Engineering for designs
on how to accomplish the
projects.
One project, a drainage
problem on Sunset Circle,
was to cost $20,000 for
Preble-Rish to say how to
run the pipeline, which was
completely replaced by the
city two years ago.
The other project Was
for Preble-Rish to handle
a $200,000 grant for the
Centennial Building and to
design plans to improve the
park area behind the build-
ing. Commissioner David
Horton noted that "we need
landscape engineers 'for
this, not civil engineers.''
County commissioner
Bill Williams addressed the
city commissioners, sdig-
gesting they all schedule a
workshop with county and
city commissioners and
managers to "discuss many
joint ventures, and set- it
for the next week or tivo
when both budgets have
been finalized." '
All city commissioners
and Vincent agreed.


PUBLIC NOTICE

THE GULF COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
WOULD LIKE TO PROVIDE THE CITIZENS OF GULF COUNTY
WITH CONTACT INFORMATION FOR OUR NEW ANIMAL CON,
TROL OFFICERS.


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Established 1937 Servinq Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006 9A


Two Gulf County Leaders Tapped for Smith Campaign


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
Two Gulf County lead-
'ers, one from the politi-
cal-financial realm and the
other from the education
field, have been named
co-chairs to lead the Gulf
County campaign of Florida
Democratic gubernatorial
candidate Rod Smith.
Jim Norton, president
of Coastal Community
'Bank of Port St. Joe, and
Tim Wilder, Gulf County
school superintendent,
say they will work to raise
county residents' aware-
ness of Smith's stand on
issues "important to north
Florida," said Norton.
"Rod Smith is some-
body just like us. His party
Affiliation is not indicative
of who he is or isn't," con-
tinued Norton. "He's just a
good guy."
"He also wants to be the
"education governor," said
Wilder, "that's what he's
running on. And he's our
"best bet for the kids of this,
countyy"
Claiming to see Smith
,more as the "north Florida
-governor than the other
'three candidates," Norton
said Smith is "focused on
'Northwest Florida and on
nriorth Florida conservative


values."
"He's the first candidate
I've seen who says, 'I want
to hear what you have to
say,' said Norton.
Wilder explained why
he is so happy to contribute
to Smith's campaign.
"I love his views, espe-
cially on education, teacher
pay, and the FCAT exam,"
said Wilder. "Rod is a genu-
ine learner of issues. He has
no education background,
but he wants to learn. And
the education issues fac-
ing us right now set the
Republican and Democratic
candidates apart."
Norton and Wilder both
believe Smith focuses on
smaller Florida counties
and not just on the three
major counties of Broward,
Dade, and Palm Beach.
Both men agreed that
most candidates concen-
trate on "the big three and
about 10 to 15 of the larger
south Florida counties."
"But Smith focuses on
the other 57 smaller coun-
ties," said Norton. "That's
north Florida values to
me."
"As president of the
Gulf County Chamber of
Commerce, I'm convinced
that Rod Smith is pro-busi-
ness," Norton said. "Without


the support of business,
especially small business,
Gulf County doesn't func-
tion."
Describing Smith as not
only the education gover-
nor and pro-business, but
a fiscal conservative and
social moderate," Wilder
and Norton agreed that "we
both have a history with
Rod Smith, and people go
with the candidate they
know best."
"It's the little nuances
that stand out, that's what
Rod Smith has for me,"
explained Norton. "It's
chemistry that connects
people, just a little bit of
nuance that differentiates
a candidate for each per-
son. That's why I'm for Rod
Smith."
Norton and Wilder said
that they will have Smith
back at least one more time
to Gulf County before the
September 5 primary, for
some sort of "meet the can-
didate mixer."
"We want to raise the
awareness of people in
Gulf County about Rod
Smith and to direct peo-
ple to his website, where
all his issues and where
he stands are clearly out-
lined," said Wilder. "There
are four great guys running


School Board


,wrestle with the ramifica-
tions of Florida's Special
., Teachers Are Rewarded
,,(STAR) act approved by law-
makers this past spring.
"Both sides wanted to
settle quickly with STAR
coming up," Hoover said.
In short strokes, the
legislation aims to provide
incentive bonuses to the
.-top 25 percent of teachers,
.with assessing teachers
'lied to grade and Florida
'.ComprehensiveAssessment
r.Test results. .
The district and union
. -iust negotiate a plan for
:"Inpleinenting the measure
-'.in Gulf County and send
:2hat plan up to the Florida
*'-.Department of Education
,~or approval. The deadline
for having a plan submitted
,'to the state is December.
Among myriad items
the two sides will have to
broker is the creation of
another review rating cat-
egory to establish a param-
eter for identifying top-
rated teachers as well as
how reading teachers and
other instructors who do
not administer the FCAT
would be factored into the
reward equation.
"What we have to
remember is that the DOE
has the final decision so
'our hands are somewhat
tied," Wilder said. "We just
have to work together to
come up with a plan."
S Teachers and non-
instructional personnel
,began voting on ratifica-
tion of the new contract
terms this week. Hoover
said early results indicated
-overwhelming approval.
The School Board will
/take up the contract for
' approval as it is ratified
by the union rank-and-file,
; likely in a special meet-
ing in the next week or so,
; Wilder indicated, saying the
sqoner employees realized
f their raises on paychecks
Sthe better.
In business taken up
, during the School Board's
meeting on Tuesday after-
noon:
The School Board
held its first public hearing
and approved the tentative
Smillage rate and budget.
S The millage rate was
set at 4.41 mills, down a
f quarter of a mill from the
Current fiscal year's prop-
Serty tax levy.
S A mill equals $1 for
every $1,000 of taxable per-
i sonal property.
Of the four main colim-


ponents in the millage rate
for public schools, three
are set in Tallahassee by
the DOE.
The first, 3.419 mills in
Gulf County, is the amount
the district must levy to
secure the state share
of funding for schools.
Discretionary millage of
.51 is a set levy for each of
Florida's 67 districts and
.076 of supplemental dis-
cretionary millage is based
on student enrollment.
The one component
over which the district has
control,- that for capital'
projects, was reduced by
the School Board to .405,
or by roughly $350,000.
As noted byboard mem-
ber George Cox, districts


LET US HELP YOU W I H
CRIBS TABLES
HIGH CHAIRS CHAIRS
TENTS LINENS
DINNERWARE BEACH WV


Te De


are permitted by law to levy
as much as two mills for
capital expenditures Gulf
District Schools will levy
less than half a mill next
fiscal year.
"I think the department
heads have worked diligent-
ly to cut where they could
and do what we can to
help the tax situation in the
county," said board chair-
woman Charlotte Pierce.
Board member Linda
Wood added, "I thank Mr.
Wilder for everything he did
to keep the village rate
down. It makes it easier
on us."
The board approved
a recommendation from
Port St. Joe Elementary
School principal Melissa


Jim Norton and Tim Wilder have been chosen as co-chairs for Rod Smith's state gubernatorial
campaign.


for governor of the state,
but Rod Smith is the one
who stands out to us."



From Page 1B

Ramsey to have a uniform
dismissal time of 2:25 p.m.
The school has operated
with three dismissal times
for several years, a move
necessitated by bus routes
and traffic congestion along
Long Avenue.
Wilder indicated that
Ramsey would shift person-
nel around to accommo-
date the uniform dismissal
time and an additional bus
was added. The change will
allow an additional 15 min-
utes of instructional time.
The board approved
devoting an addition-
al $15,709 for School
Resource Officers after
Sheriff Dalton Upchurch
asked for more money due
to a shortfall between actual
costs and the money avail-
able in his budget.


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1OA ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~------ Th-trIo-S.-oF hrdyAgs ,20 Etbihd13 erigGl ony n urudnIaesfr6 er


Fourth Annual Bayou Bash Raises almost $11,000 for Charity


Alarm clocks went off
early. Fishermen swarmed out
of bed to prepare their boats
for the biggest day of Inshore
Fishing on Florida's Forgotten
Coast. Tackle stowed. Rods
loaded. Cast nets at the ready.
Sponsors and volunteers
scrambled around in the pre-


dawn light getting ready for
registration and check-in.
Forms, pens, and change at
hand. Rod & Reel combos for
the kids lined up. Goodie Bags
and T-shirts staged.
By Monday, after the
mess was cleaned up and
donations counted, due to


Photos contributed by Debbie Hooper
4th Annual Bayou Bash kid's division winners.


the incredible support from
the public and nearly three
hundred fishermen, the 2006
Bayou Bash Benefit Fishing
Tournament raised $10,203
for the Gulf County Domestic
Violence Task Force and $600
for the Sheriff's Youth Camp.
"We weren't really sure
we could do it," said Hostess
Donna Spears.
"Mark (Moore, of St.
Joe Shrimp Company), Dan
(Anderson, of Anderson
Signworks) and I set a goal
early on of $10,000. The
sponsors were unbelievable,
but for 283 fishermen to come
out and support this cause
- that is just awesome. The
fishermen are the ones who
put us over the top this year.
It really says a lot about our
community.
Great sportsmanship, a
lot of integrity, and big hearts.
I can't imagine this kind of
thing happening anywhere else.
The payout to the fishermen
exceeded 100 percent and we
still raised almost $11,000 for
charity. I am proud to be a
part of it."
Entries came from seven
different states, anglers
arriving from as far away as
Kansas City.
Shark was the mysterious
"MONSTER" category.
All told, 233 adults and 50
kids (shattering the previous
Tournament record of 131
fishermen by an amazing


152) signed up to test their
mettle against fish and each
other. The Kids tournament
winners:
TROUT:
1st Bobby Kopinsky, Jr.
- 3.08 lbs. $100 + trophy +
gold medal
2nd (tie) Sammy Buccieri
and Jenny McLemore 3.01
lbs. $62.50 + gold medal
4th Jesse Shanahan -
2.42 lbs. $25 + gold medal
REDFISH:
1st Jenny McLemore 4
spots 19.5 in. $75 + trophy
+ gold medal
2nd Sammy Buccieri 4
spots 19.0 in. $50 + gold
medal
3rd Cameron Dorman -
3 spots $25 + gold medal
SPANISH MACKEREL:
1st Jake Jeter 3.85 lbs.
- $75 + trophy + gold medal
2nd Katelyn Groome -
2.34 lbs. $50 + gold medal
3rd Michael Nelson -
2.32 lbs. $25 + gold medal
CATFISH:
1st Bobby Kopinsky, Jr.
- 11.82 lbs $50 + trophy +
gold medal
2nd Bryan Powell 8.65
lbs. $25 + gold medal
Honorable mention is
due Katelyn Groome, the only
fisherman (adults included).
to weigh a fish in every
category, including MONSTER
SHARK and Spencer Aycock,
who weighed in the largest
MONSTER SHARK caught by


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Photos contributed by Debbie Hooper
Robert Bass shows off the 95-spot Redfish that earned him
$1,000.00.0


Photos contributed by Debbie Hooper
Gary Messick of Panama City, winner of the adult's Speckled
Trout category, accepts his trophy and check for $1,500.


a kid, a Bonnethead weighing
over 4 lbs.
Mullet Toss results for
kids 13 and under: Sean
Moore tosses one to nine
inches. Cameron Dorman
squeezes one in to 2.5 inches,
but winner Tanner Whitkins's
mullet stops an incredible 1.5
inches from dead center.
Women's Mullet Toss:
Stephanie Davis tosses her
mullet the furthest, and wins
one for the home team.
Adult DiVision Fishing
Winners:
TROUT:
1st Gary Messick 5.55
lbs. $1,500 + trophy
2nd Chris Dorman 5.13
lbs. $700
3rd Travis Monroe 4.52
lbs. $400
4th Joe Myers 4.01 lbs.
- $250
5th Barry O'Brien 4.00
lbs. $150
6th Mike Perdue 3.90
lbs. $100
7th Clint Moore 3.82
lbs. $75
8th Steve Julian 3.66
lbs. $50
REDFISH:
1st Robert Bass 95
spots $1,000 + trophy
2nd Gus Sander 16
spots -$450


Photos contributed by
Debbie Hooper
Kevin Quaranta and -his
prize-winning "Monster Shark."
3rd Bo Rollins 15 spots
- $150
4th Luke Walker 8
spots $100
5th Mel Schott 7 spots
- 26 in. $75
6th George Kelly 7
spots 19 in. $50
SPANISH MACKEREL:
1st Travis Monroe 3.72


Registration


WHEN: Saturday, August 5 and 12,

from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM.

WHERE: Fire Station on Williams Avenue



WHAT TO BRING: Registration fee of

$50.00, evidence of health insurance, recent

photograph, and a copy of applicant's birth

certificate.


TEAMS:


Dolphins (6-7-8 year olds)


Jaguars (9-10 year olds)

Buccaneers (11-12 year olds)



Equipment distribution will be done immedi-

ately following registration. Please call Dan

VanVleet at 227-2584 with any questions you

may have about league registration.




I II



I /''


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savings, tax deferred and with no-load,.
then we have the plan for you with f
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312 REID AVE PORT ST JOE, FL
850-227-1900




Residents of Gulf County,
Did you know for minor illness or injury...


You can see a doctor

without an appointment!


Walk-in patients

are welcome!

Evening and weekend hours are now available at
St. Joseph Care of Florida located at the
Gulf County Health Department
2475 Garrison Avenue, Port St. Joe

New hours are:
Monday-Friday, 7:30 .am. 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Pediatrician also available for appointments.

Discount rates available based on income.
We look forward to serving you and your family.
For more information, call (850) 227-1276, ext. 100

This advertisement brought to you as a public service of
St. Joseph Care of FL, Inc/Gulf County Health Department 23725,


Photos contributed by
Debbie Hooper
Tanner Whitkins won 'the
kid's Mullet Toss by one inch
over Cameron Dorman.
Ibs. $750 + trophy
2nd Nick Jeter 3.59
Ibs. $350
3rd Kevin Quaranta -
3.49 lbs. $150
4th Pam Ard 3.12 lbs.
- $100
5th Jason Forston 3.01
lbs. $75
6th Shane Knox 2.87
Ibs. $50
CATFISH:
1st Brian Thomas 24.11
lbs. $200 + trophy
2nd Tyler Harris 20.41
lbs. $150
3rd Lou Hale -11.83 Ibs.
- $100
4th Dylan Jackson -3.36
lbs. $50
MONSTER SHARK::
1st Kevin Quaranta -
15.43 lbs. $250 + prize
package + trophy
Honorable mentions! to
Robert Bass, whose first place
Redfish, with 95 spots, was
"something special." Captan
Sam Buccieri aboard ,the
"Playin' Hooky" is the unofficial
2006 Bayou Bash Captain-of-
the-Year. Fishermen aboard
Capt. Sam's boat occupied
five places on the Bayou Bash
"Braggin' Rights Boards."
Grand Prize winners: The
Deluxe Pier Cart from Howell
Tackle of St. Joe Beach)
valued at over $400 went to
Frank Mercer of Crawfordville.
The Outdoor Fire Pit from
Kilgore's Brick Pavers and
Tile goes to LaDonna Price of
Wewahitchka, FL. The Deluxe
Boat Package from Half-Hitch
Tackle goes to the Shanahan
Family, also of Wewahitchka,
FL.
To view more pictures
from the 4th Annual Bayou
Bash, visit photographer
Debbie Hooper's web site at
www.joebay.com and click on
events.


I I I


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


IOA The Star, Port St. Joe, FL -TusaAgs ,20






E l 13 evin Gul c ond s


Gannon Le

Following
By Jonathan Davidson
Star Staff Writer
"o- Coach Chuck Gannon,
long-time "Voice of the Sharks,"
will never retire as Pride of the
Sharks.
-i Gannon relinquished his
title as head coach for the Port
St. Joe High School baseball
Steam at the season's conclusion
last spring.
Gannon served as head
coach for four years. He plans
on continuing to support
the baseball program, albeit
behind-the-scenes, and will
continue to coach defense on
the high school football team
and teach physical education at
the elementary school.
Gannon has been with the
baseball program eight sea-
sons, beginning under Coach
S- Duane McFarland for two years
when he moved to the Port St.
Joe area in 1994. After a five-
year hiatus spent as head coach
of the football team, Gannon
returned as assistant coach to
Buck Watford for an additional
-"two years before inheriting the
head position.
Gannon emphasizes to
players the importance of unity
and teamwork.
"Even though baseball
does have individual stats as
far as hitting and pitching go,"
he reflects, "it's a team game."
He realized long ago, and
remained consistent since, that
no individual carries an entire
team through and is proud how
far his teams got each year.
"I'm as proud of some of
the kids doing the little things,
moving a runner over or laying
down a bunt. They were part
of a team concept; that's the
important part," he confesses.
Hard work is rewarded
on the coach's teams, both by
c increased playing time and bet-
ter performance during the time
given. Gannon describes him-
Sself as "one of the old school,"


aves Baseball Program

8 Years Service


requiring players to come and
work hard both on the field
and in school. He insists play-
ers maintain respectable public
images by tucking T-shirts in,
wearing baseball caps only in a
forward fashion, and avoiding
all missteps with the law.
"Those are the values I
cherish... Hopefully that's
something we've instilled in
most of our players," he says.
Gannon wishes more base-
ball players received scholar-
ships to continue playing and
laments there aren't as many
opportunities as in football.
Demanding schedules have
always been part of Gannon's
policies. Gannon claims he
learned it from his predeces-
sors, McFarland and Watford.
Tougher opponents challenge
teams to perform better, help-
ing to strengthen them for the
district playoffs.
"Our record might not
be as good overall, but you're
going to be better off when you
get to the stretch down at the
end," he reasons. "You don't
get the satisfaction by beating
people 11-0 as compared to
3-2 or 1-0."
That the Shark teams have
been to the playoffs three times
in the last four years is testa-
ment to the coaching ability
of Gannon and his assistant
coaches, Mike Bullock and
Stacy Strickland.
Gannon received the All
Big Bend award and a nomi-
nation for the Florida Athletic
Coaches Association (FACA)
coach of the year award in
2004.
He humbly comments,
"I'm not one on awards for me
as an individual because it isn't
about me, really. It's about the
kids out there playing. They're
the ones that need the recogni-
tion... When you've done your
job, they're going to make you
look good."


4 aIIIh or


A TASTEFUL
BITE OF
INNOVATION


.- .- iU


Po St. Joe s Appliance Source Since 1960.
Port St. Joe's Appliance Source Since 1960.


The Best Quality.
The Best Price.
Whirlpool.
KitchenAid.
Roper.
Estate.
St. Joe
Hardware.


Gannon hopes by stepping
back, his assistant coaches will
be able to grow. Bullock has
been with Gannon three years
and will succeed him as head
coach. Strickland has been
with Gannon all four years of
his regime and will continue
working with the pitchers on
the junior-varsity and varsity
levels. Gannon has absolute
confidence the program is in
good hands.
Gannon's son, Matt
Gannon, currently plays pitch-
er and shortstop for the varsity
team and was a large factor
in his decision to step back.
Gannon wishes for his son
to relax and enjoy the game
and wants to relieve Matt of
any additional pressure a
father would add to a coach's
demands.
Gannon anticipates remain-
ing involved with the baseball
program, in the stands or any
other capacity. Understanding
firsthand the difficulties of
coaching, Gannon will help
Bullock to "learn the ropes"
and be there for the new head
coach in any way that he can,
be it scheduling for the season
or anything else.
"He'll be busy preparing
the team to play, so I'll help
where I can," Gannon prom-
ises.
Gannon plans to help
fundraise for baseball. He also
will spend more time working
in his yard and fishing. During
last season's baseball banquet,
Gannon received a gift certifi-
cate from his 2005-06 baseball
team for Bluewater Outrigger.


FREE DELIVERY TO PSJ, CAPE& BEACHES. WE Will HAUL THE OLD APPLIANCE OFF LIKE A GOOD NEIGHB

A tC E ST. JO HARDWARE (CO. .i Hme Offices:
201 Williams Avenue, Port St. Joe 229-8028 4203912/04 tat e Farm Life and Accidents:
Hardware Monday-Friday 8:00-5:30 EST Saturday 8:00-4:30 EST Closed Sundays



SSPORTS SCHEDULE


WEWAHITCHKA GATORS


Game
1.
2.
3.


9/22
9/29
10/06
10/13
10/20
10/27
11/3


Port St. Joe
Northview
West Gasden
Sneads
Freeport
Liberty County
Blountstown


- -,A2L I~r-!I -~~ IL
.1 1 a '80


w ,=
.~ Si
1 -,
MS
.1 -.


.1 i',Ii' i~e. 't~t~t 1 it


The 1971 State Championship Football Team

Have you seen these guys???
The Port St. Joe High School football team is looking for members from the 1971 State
Championship Football team. The team will be honored by the present football team on September
8, 2006 at the Chipley football game. We need your help in locating as many of the players as
possible. Please contact Traci Gaddis at 850-819-5128 or 850-648-5474, or you may also e-mail
at ggaddis(),gtcom.net.


PSJ Boys AAA All-Stars

The Coaches and Parents
would like to commend the
boys on their efforts, time
and talents. They have played
ball tirelessly since February.
"P"They dedicated themselves
and their summer to prac-
: tice, practice, practice so they
: would be ready to represent
our community down at State.
In addition to this, each one of
them worked extremely hard
selling raffle tickets and scal-
lops. Their hard work paid off
as they earned approximately
; $8,000 during a scallop fund-
raiser, which enabled them to
S be rewarded after State. WAY
.TO GO TEAM!II


SPORTS SCHEDULE


PORT ST. JOE SHARKS


3. 9/1 Marianna
4. 9/8 Chipley


8.

9.


Time
8:00
7,30
*


9/15 *Freeport
9/22 *Wewahitchka
9/29 *Sneads
(Homecoming)
10/6 *Liberty County
10/13 OPEN
10/20 *Jay
(Senior Night)
10/27 *West Gadsden
11/3 Apalachicola
District I Games/Class.


Baysid
516 Fin
229-
Your F
Materials I

Gulf Coast Re
Give L
To Place.Yo
227-1278


(H) 7:30
(H) 8:00
(A) 8:00
(H) 8:00
(H) 8:00

(A) 7:30

(H) 8:00

(A) 8:00
(A) 7:30
A All times are Eastern.

e Lumber
rst Street
-8232
Building
Headquarters

eal Estate Guide
Js A Call
)ur Ad Today
or 653-8868


Game
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.


Place
(H)
(H)
(H)
(A)
(H)
(H)
(H)
(A)
(A)
(A)


Emera& Coast

k Federal Credit Union


PORT ST. JOE
530 Cecil G. Costin, Sr Blvd.,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
emeraldcoastfcu.com
EMERALDCOAST@GTCOM.NET
850-227-1156


WEWAHITCHKA
101 East River Road
Wewahitchka, FL 32465
850-639-5024


Game
1.


Date
8/18
8/24
9/7
9/14
9/21


Team
Vernon
Blountstown
Wewahitchka
N.F.C.
Florida High


10/5 Wewa


Date Team
8/18 Vernon
8/25 Blountstown


Advertise Here
and
Support Your Team!


Reeves Furniture &
Refinishing
234 Reid Ave. 229-6374
All Wood Furniture, Gifts,
Wicker, Kitchen Cabinets


Place
(A)
(H)
(A)
(A)
(H)
(H)


Place
(A)
(H)


A-1 Oil &
Muffler Service
210 Hwy 71

639-4175

The Star
Come Visit Us At Our New Location
135 W. Hwy. 98, Port
City Shopping Center
227-1278


[Fit Ruw Archie Shackleford, Liwrencc Bowen, Steve Atchison,
BliItl McKienian, BilrrT Abiails, Mike White, Alia -Ilritmlock, Vie
Idkit -, iu'tt Cl(iiwt, ittMore, toml Clirw DAis. SSeuid How:
NMuvin, Adkins, lJir Fm Ior l.qir'.i i. Eddie Sumiers, DaOtny Etlcr-
idg., KeiN Witillle, Mikte ickel, Harold ltardy, ltnie Kirklnnd,
K- l. \Vainiorts, Id Fotre, otid Tyl er Smiilh. Third Ilor. Co-ch
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1516 E. 11th St.
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2006 Varsity Football Schedule
Date Team,
9/01 South Walton
9/08 Cottondale
9/15 Jay


2006 J.V. Football Schedule


2006 Varsity Football Schedule


or


L as
Ele ric!
ct I


TheSta, PrtSt.Joe F hurda, Agus 3 206 -II


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


- I ) --o I i I --i
'0 0 : 13 W 46 -, '
4.jigi .,to
f Jr


--'-"' "











THE FORECAST


WEATHER
Temps for August 3


RECORD
High: 97' (1990)
Low: 71 (1969)


TODAY


Partly cloudy, chance
of scattered storms
High: 910; Low: 750


TOMORROW





Partly cloudy, chance
of scattered storms ,
High: 89o; Low: 760


SATURDAY


Partly cloudy with a
few storms possible
High: 890; Low: 750


SUNDAY


Partly cloudy, chance
of scattered storms
High: 890; Low: 750


MONDAY


Partly cloudy, chance
of scattered storms
High: 90; Low: 760


TUESDAY


Partly cloudy, chance
of scattered storms
High: 900; Low: 750


WEDNESDAY





Mostly cloudy with
scattered storms
High: 890; Low: 750


Today's high and tonight's low temperatures


Eulerprise L -- Dothant ..
-?75 3- 'I -
i -- i

-- ". L. 95,75- -.
Dehuniqk Springs .
";--- I ....,.Man -

Niceville/ : '
915 -. < Crystal lake I rislQ
S...93-7j,
TorWelt ---_ 9676 -----" Tallahassee
Beach 93./a5.- ,
U1 -4 ,,,.. / Wewalitchka ,.Wlim .- ,
Panama City 9" NG 9porl
,9 5 ,
Pensacola v )
92 75 ', I c--
Port St. Joe .V "
-Kpalachicola
91 -6


LAST 7 DAYS
Monday 7/31 88/74/0.72
Sunday 7/30 88/73/0.17
Saturday 7/29 90/76/0.00
:riday 7/28 92/73/0.00
thursday 7/27 94/71/0.00
Wednesday 7/26.................... 92/72/0.00
tuesday 7/25 91/76/0.00

SUN & MOON
Sunrise Sunset
Thursday 8/3.... .7:02 a.m.. .8:33 p.m.
Friday 8/4 .7:02 a.m.. .8:32 p.m.
Saturday 8/5 .... .7:03 a.m.. .8:31 p.m.
Sunday 8/6 .. ...7:04 a.m.. .8:30 p.m.
Monday 8/7..... .7:04 a.m.. .8:29 p.m.
Tuesday 8/8 ...... 7:05 a.m.. .8:29 p.m.
Wednesday 8/9 .. .7:05 a.m.. .8:28 p.m.

Moonrise Moonset
Thursday 8/3.... .3:31 p.m.. .1:08 a.m.
Friday 8/4 4:34 p.m.. .1:48 a.m.
Saturday 8/5 .... 5:37 p.m.. .2:37 a.m.
Sunday 8/6 ......6:37 p.m.. .3:35 a.m.
Monday 8/7..... 7:32 p.m.. .4:41 a.m.
Tuesday 8/8... ..8:19 p.m.. .5:52 a.m.
NVednesday 8/9.. .9:00 p.m.. .7:05 a.m.


APALACH
Site Flood
Woodruff Tailwater
Chattahoochee
Blountstown
Wewahitchka
OCHLOCI
Thomasville
Concord
Havana
Bloxham


.11)

Extreme
1 2 3 4 5


Low Moderate I


IICOLA RIVER


Friday
Hi Lo Otlk
Albany 93 75 pc
Apalachicola 90 75 t
Bainbridge 91 75 t
Bristol 95 71 pc
Columbus 96 76 pc
Crystal Lake 88 71 pc
DefuniakSp. 91 71 pc
Dothan 92 73 pc
Enterprise 97 71 pc
Ft. Walton Bch.89 74 t
Gainesville 92 73 pc
Jacksonville 92 75 pc
Marianna 91 75 t
Mobile 90 74 pc
Montgomery 94 74 pc
Newport 93 71 pc
Niceville 90 71 pc
Panama City 91 77 pc
Pascagoula 90 72 t
Pensacola 89 75 pc
Port St. Joe 89 76 pc
Tallahassee 93 73 t
Valdosta 94 75 t
Wewahitchka 87 72 pc
Wilma 88 72 pc


TS JOSEPH BAY


d Stg. Stage Chg. Thursday
66.0 39.12 -0.09 High
39.13 -0.08 Low
15.0 0.60 -0.14 Friday
na High
KONEE RIVER Low
15.0 1.45 0.13 Saturday
23.41 -0.11 High
25.0 11.61 -0.29 Sunday
22.0 3.86 0.52 High
Low
Monday
The UV index forecasts the iLow
ultraviolet radiation coming Low
from the sun. The higher the Tuesday
number the more risk of sun High
damage to your skin. Low
Wed.
6 7 8 9, 10 11 12' High
High VeryHigh Extreme Low
High Very High Extreme Low


Full Last New First


Aug. 9 Aug. 15 Aug. 23 Aug. 31


All forecasts, maps and graphics
@2006 Weather Central, Inc.
For a personalized forecast,
go to:
www.premiumweather.com


Saturday
Hi Lo Otlk
94 75 pc
92 75 t
93 74 t
94 70 pc
94 76 pc
87 70 pc
89 69 pc
91 73 pc
96 70 pc
92 74 t
92 73 pc
93 75 t
92 75 t
91 76 pc
94 75 pc
93 70 pc
87 69 pc
92 77 t
96 71 t
90 76 pc
89 75 pc
92 74 pc
94 74 t
87 70 pc
88 70 pc


Hot and humid weather will contineu to be found through the eastern U.S. and much of the central part of the nation. Highs in
the 90s and 100s will be experienced from the the southern Plains to the mid-Atlantic states. A few thunderstorms will rumble
through the Southeast to bring some relief from the heat and humidity. A better chance of showers and thunderstorms will spread
from the southern High Plaisn north and east into northern sections of the mid-Atlantic states.
6 l-i'. 1 -3 1s


EXTREMES MONDAY:
Hottest: 112 Death Valle,, Calil
Coolest: 30 Meacrnan Ore


City
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore


P.M. ft. Billings
_____ Birmingham
Boise
P.M. ft. Boston
Buffalo
Cheyenne
Chicago
P.M. ft. Cincinnati
---- --- Cleveland
--- --Dayton
P.M. ft. Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
P.M. ft.


P.M. City
___ Acapulco
Amsterdam
P.M. ft. Atens
P. M. ft. Baghdad
Bangkok'
-.Beijing
Berlin
Brussels
Cairo
Calgary
Dublin


Today
Hi Lo Otlk
87 66 pc
59 51 r
93 75 pc'
99 74 pc
88 59 s
93 75 pc
90 62 s
90 66 t
78 60 sh
81 55 pc
81 65 pc
90 69 pc
85 62 sh
87 66 pc
84 60 pc
84 65 pc
82 65 pc


Today
Hi Lo
88 78
69 57
94 76
11486
93 79
91 73
70 53
71 54
58 42
98 74
75 54
71 53


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
83 65 t
61 52 sh
92 75 pc
89 71 t
90 60 t
94 74 pc
93 63 s
78 61 pc
82 63 pc
86 57 pc
82 66 pc
87 68 pc
80 63 pc
83 66 pc
87 61 pc
86 66 s
81 62 pc


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
89 77 .t'
70 53 sh
95 76 s
11587 s
92 80 t
92 74 t
71 54 sh
73 52 sh
65 44 pc
10075 s
76 55 pc
75 54 pc


City
El Paso
Fairbanks
Honolulu
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York
Omaha
Orlando



City
Geneva
Hellh '
Hong Kong
Jerusalem
Kabul
Lima
London
Madrid
Me'icorj Ci
Montreal
Moscow
New Delhi


Today Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk Hi Lo Otik
91 70 pc 92 70 pc
69 48 pc 72 49 c
88 75 s 90 77 s
86 68 pc 86 69 t
88 69 sh 90 72 pc
101 80 s 10080 s
97 73 pc 96 73 pc
75 63 s 75 63 s
98 78 pc 95 76 pc
90 77 pc 90 78 pc
77 63 pc 79 63 pc
83 62 pc 89 64 pc
95 75 pc 92 73 pc
94 78 pc 94 77 pc
97 72 t 83 69 pc
85 66 pc 89 69 pc
94 75 pc 92 76 pc


Today Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk Hi Lo Otlk
77 56 t 74 53 sh
72 54 pc 75 55 pc
89 76 t 88 77 t
94 72 s 99 75 s
97 68 s 96 67 s
70 62 pc 72 61 pc
71 55 pc 74 53 pc
96 66 pc 87 65 pc
79 58 t 77 57 t
82 62 t 78 58 pc
77 57 pc 78 56 sh"
94 68 t 93 71 t


City
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lk City
San Diego
San Fran.
Seattle
Spokane
Tucson
Wash., D.C.
Wichita



City
Oslo
Paris
Rio
Rome
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw


Miami
9077
Today
Hi Lo
98 74
10284
87 64
83 59
81 57
92 58
10476
95 60
90 70
90 67
76 68
65 54
75 58
86 55
94 74
10076
88 68


Today
Hi Lo
74 54
71 53
78 67
86 68
88 68
89 78
67 46
88 72
85 65
72 55
74 56
71 54


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otik
87 70 t
10383 s
82 62 pc
77 59 pc
80 56 pc
92 59 s
95 74 pc
90 57 s
86 71 t
92 69 s
78 67 pc
66 56 s
78 57 s
86 52 s
94 72 pc
88 73 c
93 70 pc


Tomorrow
Hi Lo Otlk
73 57 pc
72 54 sh
77 65 sh
79 63 pc
87 67 pc
88 77 t
65 47 sh
87 75 pc
77 57 pc
68 54 s
.72 57 t
77 58 t


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy; dr=drizzle; fg=fog; i=ice; pc=partly cloudy; r=rain; rs=rain/snow; s=sunny; sh=showers; sn=snow; sf=snow flurries; t=thunderstorms; w=windy


rV TO "a a month!' FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT PUBLIC NOTICE

... .- ~now you can save BIG
w y c hen ou Ch oose USDA Rural Development has received an application for financial assistance from.>
Gulf County Association for Retarded Citizens, Inc. for the construction of a new office
.-- one, two or three services! and training facility in Port St. Joe, Florida. An Environmental Assessment has been
d, .,l 4 completed by USDA Rural Development concerning the construction of this new office
oh wl '/. :. h and training facility.

SUSDA Rural Development has determined that the proposal will not significantly affect
all under one roof. the quality of the environment for the proposed new office and training facility to be
located on Water Plant Road in Port St. Joe, Florida. Therefore, USDA Rural Development
will not prepare an environmental impact statement for the proposed action.


Home High Copies of the Environmental Assessment can be reviewed or obtained at the USDA
Sp eed Marianna Area Office, 2741 Pennsylvania Avenue, Suite 5, Marianna, Florida 32448.
l44 p oso Phone is ev Poo
Internet Any person who feels this determination is in error should submit a written statement ,
outlining the specific environmental 'concerns to USDA Rural Development, 2741
includes: includes: Pennsylvania Avenue, Suite 5, Marianna, Florida 32448 within 15 days of the date of
> your home telephone line > always fast, always on this notice.
> unlimited local calls > free installation
> calling features > free activation A general location map of the proposed project is shown below.,
> long distance > toll-free 24/7 tech support
> free monthly eNewsletter 2
PROPOSED PROJECT SITE -g
> free email addresses and
personal web space \ -

DIRECTV A

Service



DIRECTV service includes: .

> 100%/o digital-quality picture and a LPp f tc e
sound BAVEtNUE CK XENN
> Access to over 250 of your r AVENUE
favorite channels HRE
>Access to over 30 s.oIr yoieHOW.. 1Rlt to \
premium channels DIRECTC V' r

fullhouse bundle is available to residential customers for a limited time and sub
ject to change without notification. Eligible customers must sign up for, or already have
Home Phone or a Clear Choice plan to participate in the fullhouse offer. Introductory pric-
ing of $99.95 per month for 6 months, After 6 months, rate increases to $119.95 per month.
Home Phone: Long distance minutes are for voice service only and apply to domestic United States
(excluding Alaska and Hawaii) and Canada. Additional minutes of long distance use beyond the allotted minutes of your plan are billed at 10 cents C JOSEPH
per minute. High Speed Internet Service: Free installation. S.e:..:.p,..:.n .. 1 '..r.1.,,:, :pr,. .1,..ln., ,. qu,.ad Wire guard fee of $3.95/mo. S'.JO H 9
guarantees free replacement of your modem should you ever rne.d .r.- AId.li,.ai 1,rn'.- rd .:r.o.1 .nj ppl Failure to return the modem
....n ir.30 C'.1 i...lc c-. :. .: e .e ..,11 ut na $90.00 charge for the retail value ofthe modem and a $10.00 charge forth retail value of
r. pos :. 200F GTC C..-...o.... 1 .-c 502 Cecil B. Costin Sr Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32457.




SCALE IN FEET
5 6o10o CIYHALL'5
PORT ST. JOE GULF COUNTY

Publish July 27, & August 3, 2006
mailresure

NORMAL
High: 90'
Low: 74


L~iilmihinn,~i~yy


____


._ ____


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


12ATheStr, ortSt Jo, F -Thursday, August 3, 2006


T)







Touring Greece 11 B


E t blushed 7937 Serv s


Obituaries 4B


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL *


Law Enforcement 8B









Thursday, August 3, 2006 SECTION B


MDA Summer Camp Offers Fun and Fellowship


By Despina Williams
Star Staff Writer
Last Wednesday, Antoinette Romano
was still keeping her options open for the
big dance on Thursday night at William J.
"Billy Joe" Rish Park on Cape San Bias.
She'd already refused one brave soul
after another, but the offers kept coming.
"She's turned three guys down," said
Christina Suarez, a Tampa high school
student and first-year camp counselor.
"She must be independent."
Romano looked up from her plate of
spicy Mexican fare and flashed a knowing
grin at Suarez.
"There you go," she said.
This was Romano's fourth year at
the annual Muscular Dystrophy Summer
Camp, and she had the air of a seasoned
veteran.
She knew all the lunchtime chants,
knew her way around the karaoke stage
and had made friends with many of the
campers.
Three chairs down, Romano's pal,
Katelyn Cross, who at age 11 boasted the


title of Junior Miss Springtime, sampled a
taco and contemplated the big day.
She had been practicing her moves for
the farewell dance, had already mastered
the electric slide on Tuesday.
Cross' counselor, Laura Dickman,
vouched for her camper's electric slide
prowess.
"She's pretty good at it," Dickman
said.
Together, Romano and Cross repre-
sented the diverse face of muscular dys-
trophy.
While Romano whizzed through the
lunchroom in a hand controlled wheel-
chair, Cross moved freely, feeling muscle
fatigue only after a long day of activity.
Founded in 1950, MDA is a voluntary
health organization whose mission is to
find cures for 43 neuro-muscular diseases
with a broad range of symptoms and life
expectancies.
The summer camp offers muscular
dystrophy sufferers from ages six to 21 in
northwest Florida and southern Georgia
a chance to participate in activities such


Despina Williams/Star
The campers are busily engaged in a video game tournament.


as kayak excursions, video game tourna-
ments, craft projects and casino nights


Despina Williams/Star
19-year-old Robert Heathcock of Port St. Joe relaxes by the Rish Park pool with his MDA summer camp counselor, Matthew Parnell.


Big Brother,


and forge life-long bonds with their fellow
campers.
Melissa D'Aurio, the MDA District
Director, described the weeklong gather-
ing as a "well-quipped summer camp,"
staffed by two nurses, three cooks, MDA
representatives and a counselor for each
camper.
The $600 per camper fee is covered
entirely by support from national and local
corporations, organizations and private
donors.
In her three years as District Director,
D'Aurio has learned many life lessons
from her campers.
"It has really helped me to take in life
as it comes rather than getting mad at the
little things." said D'Aurio.
D'Aurio's sentiment was echoed count-
less times by camp counselors, 'many of
whom were volunteering for the first, time.'
The campers' simple gestures often
made the most lasting impact on D'Aurio
and her counselors.
The campers all had neuro-muscular:
diseases, but they also loved to dance, sing'
and play as much as any other children.
"They have diseases that affect their
lives and they're dealing with it," said
D'Aurio. "They're definitely my heroes." '
While the counselors and MDA staff,
feel a connection with all of the campers,
the strongest and most lasting bonds are
forged between the campers themselves.
Jeff Benton, 19, has been coming to:
Rish Park every summer for the last 14:

(See SUMMER CAMP on Page 12B)


Where Art Thou?


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer
What started as a joke turned into the pro-
verbial 15 minutes of fame, with a chance for
30 minutes.
Port St. Joe resident Amy Ouellette was one
of the final four contestants on the third season
of the CBS hit reality show "Big Brother."
She was part of the show from July through
September, 2002.
At the time, Ouellette was living in Memphis,
Tennessee, and auditioned for the show "as a
joke," as she described it.
"I was the first person in reality TV history
to be voted off [a show] and two weeks later
voted back on. Then I made it to the final four,"
she smiled.
A video crew was in Port St. Joe Sunday
to film Ouellette's commentary on the series'
current All-Stars season, which brought back
players from the previous six seasons.
"I was really mean sometimes when I talk-
ed to the camera when I was on the show," she
said. "They wanted to know what I thought of
the people on it now."
Ouellette was invited to join the All-Star
cast for this summer. She .declined, however,
because she recently married and did not want
to be isolated from her new home and husband
for the three months the show requires.
"It [the show] is -what I imagine jail to be
like," said Ouellette, citing the very limited
music allowed, along with no media, no news,
no outside contact of any kind, and no privacy.
SOver the course of 90 days, houseguests
nominate each other for eviction, with one per-
son "evicted" from the house by a majority vote
bach week.
"With over 50 cameras in the house, there
is zero privacy, especially with the round-the-
clock live Internet feed,." said Ouellette. "You do
get used to it and sort of forget the cameras are
there, and there is a psychiatrist to talk to if it
becomes mentally overwhelming."


"I enjoyed it, but a lot of people don't," she
said, explaining .that after the show CBS pro-
vides free psychiatric services for one year if
any contestant needs it.
"I think of all the seasons, we had more
fun in the third season," said Ouellette, adding ..
that she had kept in touch with most of her
companions on the show.
In fact, two of her "showmates" came to
Port St. Joe for Ouellette's wedding.
One, who is on the current All Star show,
"talks about Port St. Joe all the time on the
live feed," said Ouellette. "And when I was
on the show, I wore lots of Gulf County and
Apalachicola tee shirts."
Known on the show as something of a
"cheese junkie," Ouellette received a one-year
supply of cheese from a store in Memphis after
her stint on the series.
She also played herself in a cameo spot on
the CBS sitcom "Yes, Dear."
Her parents watched "Big Brother" when
Ouellette was on it, and they also gave numer-
ous news interviews during Ouellette's run.
Her silky terrier Buckie also got his canine mug
on several episodes of the show during family
interviews.
Saying that she heard that "there are going
to be lots of twists and turns this year, and
rumors have it they [the show's producers]
may bring some former house,guests back,"
Ouellette has volunteered to appear mid-sea-
son, if they want her.
"I didn't want to be locked up for three
months again," she said, "but I wouldn't mind
a shorter period."
The interview with Ouellette filmed in Port
St. Joe will air as part of the "Big Brother"
episode on Thursday, August 3 at 8 p.m. E.T.
on CBS.
The show regularly airs live on Thursdays,
and again on Sundays and Tuesdays, all at 8
p.m. E.T; on CBS.


Marie Logan/Star'
"Big Brother" former house guest Amy Ouellette and Buckie, wearing his favorite Hawaiian shirt.


~MRS.- -T,







2B The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Project: Mold-a-Male/Female


17th Annual Youth Conference


Project: Mold-a-Male/
Female hosted its 17T'
Annual Youth Conference
about community concerns
July 20-22, 2006. It was
one of the best yet. The
focus was on "Challenges
and Survival" in the fol-
lowing categories: (1) Law
Smarts (2) Career Building
(3) Health Issues and (4)
Survival is Possible.
Each session was con-
ducted by an expert on
the topic being discussed.
Thursday evening the open-
ing session was devoted to
Law In Action with a mock
trial "Who Cut Down Mrs.
Benedict Arnold's Cherry
Tree?" The main suspect
was George Washington.
The trial was held in the
county courtroom with
Judge Hill presiding. Judge
Fred Witten prepared
15 young people for this
drama. Friday was filled
with workshops. The eve-
ning ended with everyone
celebrating his or her own
birthday party. As usual,
on Saturday the models
were center stage, showing
off this season's fashions.
Finally we got to the most
serious momeilt. It's time
to get the message and get
it good. The final challenge
was delivered by a person
who really shows concern
'for our community in the
person of Ms. Diana Sealy.
Her message was inclusive
of all that is required to
survive in today's world.
Other Speakers


Mr. Cory Bowers,
Military Enlistee; Mrs.
Louise Jones, Gulf Co.
Extension Agency; Mr.
David Langston, Ph.D.,
Founder of Langston
Scholarship Program; Ms.
Donna McCroan, Gulf Co.
Health Service; Mrs. Ann
Six, Retired Educator; Rev.
Hubert Six, Retired School
Social Worker; Mr. Michael
D. Simmons, Respiratory
Specialist; Rev. Ken Tellis,
Director of Academic
Service for Florida State
Univ.; Joe Charraia, Gulf
Coast Workforce Center.
Partners
Gulf Co. Chamber of
Commerce, Mrs. Sandra
Chafin, Executive Director;
Gulf Co. Extension
Services, Mr. Roy Carter,
Agency Director; Gulf
Coast Workforce Center,
Kimberly Bodine, Director;
Gulf Co. Health Clinic,
Mr. Doug Kent, Executive
Director; Gulf Co. Summer
Food Program, Mrs. Amy
Rogers, Coordinator; Oak
Grove Assembly of God;
Port St. Joe Police Dept.
Cheif James Hersey.
Sponsor Annual Fashion
Show
Goody's Family
Clothing, Inc. Panama City,
Mrs. Christine Sylvester,
Manager.
Sponsors for School
Supplies
Ace Hardware store;
Bayside, Century 21,


Coastal Community Bank;
Emerald Coast Federal;
Pristine Properties Vacation
Rentals.
Well Wishers
Bluewater Outrigger,
Buzz Leonard Jeep,
Chrysler, Mazola; Radio
Shack; Seybold Associates,
Sunset Grill; Peoples First
Bank; Tyndal Federal Credit
Union.
Annual Contributors
of Gifts, Food, and
Finances
Badcock Home
Furnishings; Bayside
Savings Bank; Church of
God in Christ; Priesbach
Cleaners and Laundry;
Duren's Piggly Wiggly
Supermarket; Emerald
Coast Federal Credit
Union; Paul Gant's Bar-B-
Que; Institute of Prosthetic
Advancement, Panama
City, FL; MacDonald's; Mt.
Carmel Baptist Church; Mr.
& Mrs. Damon and Jean
Peters, Jr.; Mr. Harry L.
Smith; Judge Fred Witten
A Special Thanks to All
of Our Volunteers
We really could not have
made it without
Mrs. Ida B. Bryant; Mrs.
Annie L. Baker; Mrs. Brenda
Fisher; Deacon Earnest
Gant; Mrs. Pam Harris;
Mrs. Minnie J, Likely; Mrs.
Mary P King; Mr. and Mrs.
Greg and Angel Julius;
Mr. Clarence Monette; Lt.
Shavon, Speights; Mrs.
Billie E Thomas


Covenant Hospice Offers Volunteer Orientation


Panama City, FL-
Covenant Hospice is offering a
two-hour Volunteer Orientation
'on Thursday, August 24 from
'12 p.m. to 2 p.m., at Covenant
Hospice's Education Center,
107 West 19th Street, Panama
City, Fl.
This orientation pro-
vides an overview of hospice
programs and services and
explains the role of the vol-



Paws in the

Park 5K Run


unteer. After completing the
orientation and an applica-
tion process, volunteers can
indicate their placement choic-
es. Volunteer opportunities
include administrative support
in a Covenant Hospice office or
Community Support-Center,
special events and fundraisers,
or the Ambassador Community
Outreach program. This is a
free program and open to the
public. Registration is request-


ed and lunch is provided.
Please join us and see how
your talents can best be used
to help others. The contribu-
tions made by volunteers allow
Covenant Hospice, a non-prof-
it organization, to continue to
-provide a very special kind of
care for patients with life-lim-
iting illnesses. To register, call
Shelley Frazier at 785-3040.


Health Center to Hold
*
h tlaeH Fair for National


and Walk ---, --
The St. Joe Bay Humane Health W
Society is sponsoring a 5K We Center
Run and Walk as part of its


"Paws in the Park" Festival on
September 30. The festival is
being held to raise funds for
the new animal shelter that
will serve Gulf County and'
surrounding areas.
The 5K run will start
and finish at the Centennial
Building. in Constitution
Convention Park. Walkers
are welcome and dogs may
participate as long as they are
on short, fixed-length leashes
and under control of their
owners at all times.
Entry forms will be
available in local businesses,,
including Uptempo Sports on
William Ave. and Port Realty
on Hwy 71 in downtown Port
St. Joe. More information and
a downloadable entry form
are available on the Humane
Society website: www.
sjbhumanesociety.org.
Volunteers are needed to
help prepare for the event and
to work the race. To volunteer
or for more information
contact Jennifer Mercuri,
Race Director, at 647-2504 or
by email at jmerigtcom.net.


swamps, ponds.
drainage canals and
ditches. Never approach
,a.a igator, never offer


Sm chii reea

tV^.f ^ '-- ."-. -' 'F ".'rV .; -*"


u *A1I


Wewahitchka Medical Center will hold a free health fair
performing medical screenings for all patients on Thursday,
August 10, 2006, from 2 to 5 PM. We wish to underscore the
vital role of Community, Migrant and Homeless Health Centers
all over the country, which are in their 40t' year of caring for
the nation's medically underserved and uninsured. The event
is part of a weeklong celebration of National Health Center
Week 2006 (August 6-12) to recognize the achievements if
health centers to fill the role of family doctor to 15 million
people in more than 3600 communities across the, nation.
Wewahitchka Medical Center is one of eight service sites
of North Florida Medical Centers, Inc., in the communities of
Eastpoint, Panacea, Wewahitchka, Quincy, Mayo, Cross City,
Greenville, and Perry. Wewahitchka Medical Center served
approximately 8400 patient visits last year. Most of these
patients rely on Medicaid, Medicare, or have no insurance at
all.

What: Health Fair
When: August 10, 2-5 PM
Where: Wewahitchka Medical Center
255. West River Road
Wewahitchka, FL


Watch out

for snakes in

grassy, wooded

or overgrown

areas. When

in uncleared

areas, stay on

well marked

paths and

trails.


The #1 Coldwell Banker Office internationally is ever grow-
ing. As we grow, we would love the opportunity to join with
new Realtors to make oyr company stronger. Our four con-
lenier office locations are always looking for smiling faces.
Whether you are a newcomer or a seasoned real estate veter-
an, Coldwell Banker Forgotten Coast Realty cannot wait to
work with you!


13ww .cb orotec as.co-


~AAA Ii -~~-~~;Zr '-~:~..:~ji -


Guf iew.


eLL


-~C~---- '~" ""'~"


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


2B The Star, Port St. Joe, FL -TusaAgs ,20


. .







CSTaDIISnelU / I0/ tJ* J viny uui .l.u naiil/ uIn u ou ri y u ,* M y "


Port St. Joe Garden Club News


The Port St. Joe Garden
Club will hold its August meet-
ing on August 10 at 6:00 PM
at the Club building on Eighth
Street. Members, you are
asked to please be present at
this last summer meeting. The
regular Garden Club Fall and
Winter meetings will resume in
September and there are lots
of items to be discussed and
decided upon.
Don't forget we plan
to have "Christmas in the
Gardens" again scheduled for
November 18 at the Garden
Center. We are doing some
renovation inside the building


and you will want to be sure to
check this out.
Please bring your recipes
for the following items to the
meeting: seafood, poultry, and
beef. We need to get these reci-
pes together to further plan for
the new cookbook.
The public is cordially
invited to attend any of our
meetings. If you need more
information or would like to
join the Garden Club, please
call the President Pauline
Pendarvis or anyone of the
members and they will be
happy to tell you all about it.


Port St. Joe has a Yacht Club


-


Andrew is One
Andrew White celebrated his first birthday Saturday, July
22. Andrew celebrated with family and friends at his home in
Lynn Haven. Andrew is the son of Jason and Jennifer White.
Paternal grandparents are Susie White and Dorothy White of Port
St. Joe. Maternal grandparents are Connie Rea of Highlands,
North Carolina and Chip Coogle of Perry, Georgia.


Public Service Announcement
The County Mediation Services program of the 1411 Judicial
Circuit is seeking volunteers to serve as county mediators in
Jackson, Calhoun, Washington, Holmes and/or Gulf counties.
If you have been searching for a unique way to volunteer in our
community, are interested in learning more about our court
system, and can volunteer a few hours a month, please contact
Diane L. Crawford at 850.914.6326, email crawfordd(@judl4.
flcourts.org or Sue Ann Murray at 850.914.6327, email
murrays(a)judl4.flcourts.org for an application. Completed
applications must be turned in no later than August 25, 2006.

Democratic Executive Committee Meeting,
The Democratic Executive Committee of Gulf County will
Imeet August 3, 2006 at 6:00 pm ET. The meeting will be held at
the Bayside Bank. The Bayside Bank is located at 202 Marina
Drive, Port St. Joe, and is located next to the marina.
We encourage all committee members to. attend. We also
encourage all Democratic county officials and all Democrats
to attend. Anyone interested in serving on the Democratic
Executive Committee for the comrni ig ear is especially encour-
aged to attend. "
Many important issues are facing the citizens of Gulf
County. The primary election is in September and the general
election is in November.
We invite Democratic candidates for the Florida House seat
and candidates for county election to this and future meetings.


To have your Wedding or
Birthday photo print in color
there will be a $10.00 Fee.
Deadline is Monday at 5:00 p.m.
for Thursday's paper


DID YOU
KNOW THAT 88%
OF ADULTS
REMEMBER
SOMEONE WITH
AN ESPECIALLY
ATTRACTIVE
SMILE?


OF .


.i;


Why not start with one of the first things most
people notice about you... your teeth? Heck, we'll
even make it easier for you with a free complete
exam and x-rays. That's right free for the entire
month of January and February. Now you have
one less excuse for avoiding the Dentist. Let the
staff at Dr. Lister's office keep your smile healthy
in a friendly, stress free environment that will
:make you feel truly at home. So take a short drive
to Downtown Wewahitchka and let us share our
home with you!
Free exam and xrays for new patients only!

SCall today for an appointment.
Ask about our Specials.
403 Hwy 71 S. Wewaiftchka, FBL B
^^^^H^^^^H^^^^^License #15437^^
D 639-4S565 ^^ H


A new yacht club has been
established at the Port St.
Joe Marina. According to Ray
Whitney, who organized the
club, it has more than forty
members, with boats from 19
to 55 feet in length. The only
requirement is the boat must
be kept at the St. Joe Marina.
The benefits for member-
ship include having raft-ups,
cookouts, and a host of activi-
ties with your fellow boaters.
Members also receive dis-
counts from local stores.
Many favorable comments

Panhandle

Piecemakers'

Quilt Club


were received after the club's
lighted boat parade in conjunc-
tion with the Fourth of July
fireworks. Some of the many
planned activities include a
Lighted Boat Christmas Parade
and a Blessing of the Fleets in
the spring. In the meantime
the members will enjoy many
cruises and meals together.
For more information,
contact Ray Whitney at 647-
6328.

If YOU See News Happening...
Callu The Stiar at 227-1278


Angel Turns Three
Angel Denise Brake will be celebrating her 3rd Birthday on
August 4 with a trip to Wild Adventures theme park. Her parents
are Larry and Patricia Brake of Hosford, FL. Her grandparents
are Donald and Elizabeth Brake of Overstreet, FL. Angel enjoys
visits from her big sister Sherry, talking on the phone to her big
brother Ricky, going to the store with her daddy and helping her
mom around the house.


The Panhandle
Piecemakers' Quilt Club will Homeowers Insurance
meet Thursday, August 10, Mobile Home Insurance
7:00 pm EST, at St James' 1 Mbeom e Insurance
Episcopal Church on 22nd Automotive Insurance
Street. S on
Joyce Sweasey will Health Insurance
present the program follow-
ing the business meeting. GASKIN-GRADDY INSURANCE YOUR FULL SERVICE INSURANCE AGE:
Refreshments will be served by 156 2nd Ave, PO. Box 157 Wewahitchka F1 32465-0157
Joyce Sweasey and Carol Jean (850) 639-5077 (850) 639-2553 1-800-782-6802
Burrows. Guests will be made Fax (850) 639-5078
most welcome by this group
of warm and friendly quilters. ggraddyins@gtcom.net
Please come and learn about
the club and some of its com- Serving the Panhandle Since 1931
uIiflitn projects.



F 2006 Southern Accents Showhouse at WindMark Beach
The 2006 Southern Accents Showhouse at WindMark Beach was created to live up to ils surroundings. It's packed with ideas to
make you wonder why you'd ever want to go outside. In a setting that begs you never to go in. It's your place along the unspoiled j
I shores of one of the last great beaches in Northwest Florida. Come back to WindMark Beach even if you've never been.
-.2 i t . |









Z-









-. H O U -S-- -----



S. : Wednesday Saturday,10arn 5pm Eastern Daylhghr Time.
S. Sunday, I pm-5pm Eastern Daylght Time.
I 1 &.^ I Closed Monday 6 Tuesday. .
Open Memorial Day, July Ist-4 th,
S6'- Labor Day, 10am 5pm Eastern Daylight Tim.
I .- ,' TICKETS
.. _. ..: <. '.'" Adults {Ages 186 & older) $12
S Children: Ages 5- 17 $6 I {free for children under 5)
I -.. "- ---- ---- -.- -- ---- -.-------"--- -
S WnmdNlrk Bech is lc,red on the shorea ot St. Joseph Bay. 22 rrae- 'rest ot Apalichiola and 39 miles east of Paiunu City in the Eastern time zone.

III :-. lFor information on the 2006SouthernAccents Showbouse at WindMark Beach, call 8S8-212-7050
t ~or visit wwwsoutenemaccenis.comrn. For information about WdndMark Beach, vista our sales center,
JOE com or call 850- 22-2400 or toll-free 866-227-9007."
I ----------- -----------PROJECTTEAM------------------------------ ---
Deleloper.Builder. Th, it .1:.. C.-rnpin I Intenors. Phllip Sides | Architect, C....,per R.-*crt, .n t. iPartner., I Lindscipe Achiitecit, EDA\V, Inc

Southern ACCentsI Sacred Hes m Habitat for Humanity'
COMING SOON TO GOLF COUN1TYr C.11 Cwrrr
f YOU DON'T KNOW JOE, YOU DON'T KNOW FLORIDA.' STJOE

Obtn he Property Report required b federal aw and read before signing anything No federal agency hs judged the merits or value, f any, of this property.


C- ~ H.- ...- ,*~C .-j:; *


Q... Gaskin-Graddy Insurance Agency, Inc.


MCY


TheStrPor S. oeFL- husda, ugst 00 -3B


7Qq7 q ;nri Cijif rr iinf and surrounding areas for 8 years


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jowl
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AR ineaTur,,- r-tI aI.J IL *-u .2s s 9r gnyo d e r e


Spt of the Wek


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Available now for adop-
tion from the St. Joseph Bay
Humane Society -
Boots, an eight-week old
male kitty; (pictured), Rosco,
a chocolate lab male pup about
seven months old, Jasper
a seven months old bulldog
pup, Hound pups six months
old (1st shots), Molly a nice
white pit bulldog female.Jeter
- a grown black lab male,
Betsy a six month old hound
mix, always kittens! Come
See.
At Faith's Thrift Hut start-
ing Thursday August 3, dishes,
toys, and romance novels half
price. Clothes $2 per bag.


St. Joseph Bay Humane Society is an Equal Opportunity
Employee. We are looking for part time help six days a
week.
3 hours in the morning and 2 hours in the afternoon.
Pay $7.00 an hour. For more information please contact
Carolyn Lee at 227-1103.
References must be provided



Sil's Home Center
1023 N. Tyndall Parkway
Panama City, FL 32404
1-800-239-4671

"P4tu 4a- ilie^ i&dca 4lomes 4i ce 1957"


Support the "Pet of the
Week" by advertising here.

Only $15 per week
Call advertising
227-1278 m
for more information


The family of Timothy Wayne Whitfield would like to express our The family of Bessie Goff would like to thank each and every one
"deepest gratitude for all of the food, flowers and donations during our of you for your thoughts, prayers, words of encouragement, flowers, and
.time of bereavement. A very special thank you to Rev. Tim Bailey & Rev. food during .her recent stay in the hospital. We appreciate everything and
,David Nichols for conducting the funeral services. may God bless you all.


May God Bless All of You,
The Tim Whitfield Family











Elizabeth Barron

Mrs. Elizabeth Barron,
affectionately known as "Lil
Mama", was borin December
:14, 1919 inConecuh County,
Evergreen, Alabama to Joe
Likely and Emma Williams
Likely. She accepted Christ
at an early age and was
raised in the Baptist faith.
As a young adult during the
early forties, Mrs. Barron
moved to Cincinnati, Ohio
where she joined the First
Baptist Church of College
Hill and served faithfully in
,the choir and the women's
auxiliary. Mrs. Barron later
met and married the late
Reverend Julius Barron,
Sr.
She was a licensed
beautician and practiced
her craft until 1998. She
was known among her fainm-
ily and friends for her cro-
cheted gifts. In 1999 Mrs.
Barron was moved to Port
;St. Joe, Fla. due to failing
health, and remained until
her demise.
Preceding her in death
was her parents, her hus-
band, one brother, and
three sisters. Mrs Barron
-leaves to mourn: her sons
- Ellis Likely (Lil) of North
Vernon, Indiana; James
iNearon of Las Vegas,
:Nevada; Ray Likely (wife
:Minnie) of Port St. Joe, FL;
Walter Likely (Alice) of Long
Beach, Calif.; her step-son
Julius Barron Jr. of Ohio;
one sister -Mrs. Rozener


The Goff Family


itu


Jones of Evergreen, Ala.;
eight grand children; twelve
great-grand children, two
special friends- Mrs.
Shelton and Mrs. Plear of
Cincinnati, Ohio and a host
of nieces, nephews, and
friends.

She will be taken to
Cincinnati, Ohio for funeral
services and interment.
Local services were pro-
vided by Comforter Funeral
Home.

George W. Brine, II
Mr. George W. Brine,
II, age 84 of Port St. Joe,
Fl, passed away Sunday,
July 30, 2006 at a local
hospital. He was born in
Atlanta, GA, and had lived
at the Beacon Villa Assisted
Living Facility for the last
four years. He retired after
23 years as the President
of the Sidney Community
Bank, Sydney, IL. Mr.
George loved golf, pho-
tography, and socializing
with his friends, and was a
member of the Port St. Joe
Country Club. Survivors
include a son, George W.
Brine, III, of Urbana, IL;
his grandchildren, Pamela
Parsons, Theresa Hoffman,
Vicki Stipp, Mark Parsons,
and Melanie Brine; his great
grand-children, Ashley
Parsons, Tyler Parsons,
Nicholas Hoffman, Cole
Hoffman, and Toby Stipp.
Memorial services will be


Brad ley's

Rutci ...-icLic Gates
GATED COMMUNITY SPECIALIST
Since 1982 Serving the Panhandle
COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL INDUSTRIAL
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PARKING SYSTEMS TELEPHONE ENTRY
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KEY PAD & CARD ACCESS
(850) 227-9866
www.securitygates.com


held in the spring at Mexico
Beach, FL at a time to be
announced. Kent-Forest
Lawn, 2403 Harrison
Avenue, Panama City, FL
32405.


*


church for an hour prior to
the funeral.
All services are under
the direction of the
Comforter ,Funeral Home,
Wewahitchka Branch
Chapel.


Wayne Campbell Robet Huhes
Robert Hughes


Mr., Wayne Campbell,
44, of Carrabelle, passed
away Friday, July 28,
2006 at the home of his
sister in Carrabelle. Mr.
Campbell grew up around
WewahitchkaandCarrabelle
and spent most of his
adult life in Carrabelle. He
worked as a carpenter, was
of the Assembly of God
faith, and loved hunting
and fishing.
Survivors include his
wife, Sandra Campbell,
his beloved stepson,
Charles Carpenter; his lov-
ing mother, Rena Glass of
Wewahitchka; and his loving
sisters, Linda Patterson of
Panama City, Lucille Walden
of Carrabelle, and Delois
Bailey of Wewahitchka. He
also was the loving uncle of
five nieces.
The funeral service will
be held at 4:00 p.m. CDT
(5:00 p.m. EDT) Monday,
July 31, 2006, at the Glad
Tidings Assembly of God
Church in Wewahitchka,
conducted by the Rev. Joey
Smith and the Rev. Larry
Hatfield. Interment will fol-
low in the family plot in
Jehu Cemetery. The family
will receive friends at the


Robert E.


Robert (Bob) Hughes,
66, of Howard Creek,
passed away Monday, July
24, 2006 to be with the
Lord after an illness of
lung cancer 5 years ago
and health problems this
past year.
He is survived by wife
Elizabeth (Liz); stepson
William (Helen) Lasko, Jr.,
children and grandchil-
dren of Jackson, Ms, Lynn
Haven, Fl and Canton, OH;
Stepdaughter Vicki (John)
LaGuardia, children and
grandchildren, of Stow,
OH.
He was a wonder-
ful husband, father, and
grandfather. He loved his
church, Howard Creek
Baptist Church, pastor
Henry Hester, church fam-
ily, and many friends.
No services will be held.
Cremation by Yorkshire
Crematory.

Phyllis Messina
Phyllis Messina, 67, of
Chamblee, GA, died July
16, 2006. She was a lov-
ing wife to Charles Messina


King DDS


- GENERAL DENTISTRY-

Hygienist

Credit Cards Accepted

325' Long Avenue


227-1812


Thank you so much
We would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone that brought
food, sent cards or flowers, or upheld us with your prayers during, the
loss of our loved one. Thank you for being supportive of us during this
sad and trying time. A special thanks to Brother Dave Fernandez, Brother
Nick Davis, Brother Joey Smith, Michael Lister and Commissioner Billy
Traylor Everyone's love and kindness was felt and appreciated.
Cod Bless You All and Thanks Again,
Ellis, Diane, Bryan and Brandi Brogdon.


for 46 years, also surviving
are her daughters, Cynthia
Weaver, and Sabrina Lee; 6
grandchildren 3 brothers,
Ronald Keel, Gary Keel, and
Terry Keel; sister, Sandra
Wright. Funeral services
were held Tuesday, July
18th at 3:00 p.m. at the
Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, Glenridge
Ward, 6449 Glenridge Dr.
NE, Sandy Springs, with
Bishop Stephan Van Sant
officiating. In lieu of flow-
ers, contributions may
be made to the charity of
your choice. The grave-
side service was held at
2:00 p.m. EDT Thursday,
July 20, 2006 in Magnolia
Cemetery.

Vance Rogers
Vance Rogers, 82 of Port
Saint Joe, Florida, passed
away on Tuesday, July 25,
2006. He was born in
Hot Springs, Arkansas on
December 27, 1923. -He
was Baptist by faith.'
Mr. Rogers is survived
by a loving wife of 59 years,
Elise Rogers; a daughter,.
Cynthia Rogers-Mullen;
and three beautiful grand-
children, Kesley Corbicz,
Amity Mullen, and William


Mullen; two nieces, Diane
Mayhann, Linda Fay Smith,
and Betty Jean Lance; three
nephews, Don Gardner,
Herbert Gardner, and Lloyd
Gardner. He was preceded
in death by two sisters, Fay
Gardner of Port Saint Joe
and Georgia Mae Miles of
Macon, GA.
Mr. Rogers was a World
War II veteran, serving in
the U. S. Navy on the USS
Fuller. He was awarded the
Silver Star twice and the
Bronze Star four times for
shooting down Japanese
Zeros in the South Pacific.
He served in the D-Day
Invasion at Normandy and
several other historic bat-
tles. After the War, he was
employed for 44 years buy
St. Joe Paper Company
as an Inventory Control
Clerk. Vance also served as
Quartermaster for the John
C. Gainous Post 10069,
Veterans of Foreign Wars.
Funeral services were
held at 1:00 p.m. EDT
Monday, July 31, 2006, at
the Oak Grove Assembly of
God Church, conducted by
the Rev. David Fernandez.
Interment followed in the
family plot in Holly Hill
Cemetery.


Heritage Funeral

l-S


247 Tyndall Parkway, Callaway


785-1316
Joe D. Gainer, Justin M. Kent, Local Owners

"Serving Bay and Gulf Counties"


t


I

I:


fr,~




Sf.


Need Extra Cash
Sell it with the
Classifieds
Call

747-5020
CIS liII


w


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


4B TheSar ot t oe L- hrsaAuut3,20


N


-- -7






Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Jheae fusineste, invite yut to wist the cfuwch of yout cwpice this week

SOUTHERLAND FAMILY COMFORTER COSTING & COSTING Rish, Gibson, School
FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL HOME LAW OFFICES & Groom, P.A.
W. P. "Rocky" Comforter Charles A. Costin i
507 th Street Port St. Joe L D. Personal lnjuryReal Estate ~lliam J. Rish, Thomas S. Gibson,
507 10th Street Port St. Joe L.FDWorkers'Compensation Russell Scholz, Paul W. Groom II
(850) 229-8111 ,. (850) 227-1818 (850) 227-1159 (850) 229-8211


Teacher Appreciation Day

Area Teachers invited for A g' t 6 Service r" r .; .


The First United Methodist Church
of Port St. Joe will be hosting Teacher
Appreciation Day at its 11:00 AM wor-
ship service Sunday, August 6, 2006.
Immediately following the special pro-
gram, teachers, and their families, will be
the honored guests at a luncheon in the
Fellowship Hall, at noon.
"We are inviting all the teachers from
our area schools to worship with us and
afterward join us for lunch, said pastor,
Mac Fulcher. "My wife, Beckie, has served
as an elementary school teacher for 19
years so I've seen first hand the work they
do. We celebrate sports and bless the fleets
as they go out fishing. I believe our teach-

Sunday Dinner
Dinner will be served at New Bethel
A.M.E. Church on Sunday, August 6 from
11:30 A.M. until 2:00 PM. for a donation
of $6.00.
The menu is Fried Chicken, Pork
Steak, Steamed Cabbage, Lima Beans,
Rice, Gravy, Cornbread, Cake, and Tea.
To place an order, please call 229-
6 179. You may eat-in or take-out. The
church is located at 146 Ave. C.

In Concert at New

Harvest Assembly of God
The Cobb Family from Cottondale,
Fla. August 6, 2006 at 5:00 PM. CST.
The church is located 1800 Hwy 71
North Wewahitchka, Fla. Come and enjoy
Bluegrass Gospel.
For more information, please call 639-
3716.



Lean on Jesus
Everybody has been lonely, at one time or
another.
Reading about David,. should help every
Christian brother,
Being popular for a while, then running for
his life.
David soon cried to God, to relieve him
from this strife.
We try to work it out many times before we
cry and groan. I
But giving it to Jesus first is best, He's the
only one to lean on.
Most of us have a friend to lean on, when
-things at times get rough.
I hope you have Jesus as your, friend,
humans aren't enough.
-Billy Johnson


Is Quiet Right?
As Satan did to Adam and Eve in the gar-
den, he does to us today.
He tempts us with things that really seem
'good, in the same enticing way.
Too. many time we seek popularity, over
someone who tells the truth.
That's why we have politicians, nowadays,
that are liars and a little uncouth.
Too many people today try to get rid of their
guilt, by pointing out the sins of others.
But God is going to, judge us by our own
sins, not by other sisters' and brothers'.
God is the same as he's always been; and
'will be the same tomorrow.
If we don't start speaking up for Jesus,
we're headed for much more sorrow.
, When one big mouth atheist woman can get
prayer Taken out of school,
I don't know about anyone else, but it
makes me feel like a fool.
It's good to be quiet sometimes, and thought
.a pretty good fellow.
But silence is not always golden, sometime
it's just plain yellow.


ers deserve our greatest appreciation and
we want to do something to honor and
bless them as they start the school year."
The First United Methodist Church
family will be bringing covered dishes and
delectable desserts, all teachers need to
bring is themselves and their families.
Rev. Fulcher added that reservations are
not required and that the service is casual
dress. Gulf County Superintendent Tim
Wilder will speak to the group as part of
the 11:00 service.
First United Methodist Church is locat-
ed at 1000 Monument Ave. For more infor-
mation contact the church at 227-1724.

Yard and Bake Sale
New Bethel A.M.E. Church is having
a giant Yard and Bake Sale on Saturday,
August 5, from 8:00 AM-1:00 PM. The
church is located at the corner of Highway
98 and Avenue C.
If it rains, the sale will be held in
Church Annex.


Announcement.
New Life Christian Center' Church
would like to invite you to a WOMEN'S
CONFERENCE "Women Running with a
Vision" August 11 at 7:00 PM (gentlemen
also welcome). Pastor Debra Wooten of
Marianna Florida will be the guest speak-
er. Also, August 12 at 9:00 AM, workshops
will begin with speakers Minister Betty
Winfield, Minister Linda Baker, Pastor
Sheranda Williams, Minister Stacey Byrd,
and Apostle Shirley White. Lunch will be
served. A registration fee of $10.00 on
Saturday morning. So come out and be
blesses by the word of God.


You're Among fiends at
Oak Grove Assembly aGod
David fernandez, Pastor
Office: 850-227-1837 Parsonage: 850-229-6271
613 Madison Street Fort St. Joe, fC
Schedule ofServices
Sunday l Wednesda
Sunday School 9:45am MildlWeek Meal 5:00pm
Morning Worship 10:45am Mid'Week Bible Study 6:15pm
Xids on theM osve 10:45am Ministry In actionn 6:15pm
Cross Training Youth 6:15pm
Men's Ministry Monday 6:30pm
Ladles Ministry- Tuesday- 7:00pm
Dynamic Praise i Worship Preaching the Pure Word ..


CUanin


1


FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Constitution and Monument Port St. Joe
(850) 227-1724


Contemporary Service 9:00 a.m,
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m.
Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m.
Methodist Youth Fellowship: 6:00 p.m.
Evening Worship: 7:00p.m,
AllTimes are EST


Rev. Malcolm "Mac" Fulcher
PASTOR
JeffMisy
Minister ofMusic/Youths
Deborah Loylss
Director of Children Ministries


Jesus is Lord and He is waiting


FOR YOU AT:
itofantb ieb aptist (urtc
S382 Ling Street Highland View
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456
(850)227-1306
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.


Mike Westbrook,
Pastor


Morning Worship 11:00
Evening Service 7:00 p
Discipleship Training 6:00 p
Wednesday Prayer 7:00 p


a.m.
.m.
.m.
.m.
24292


the Cadthotlo Church of Gulf Cowmy
9l/comi. g(ou
St. Joseph Parish
20th & Monument, Port St Joe, FL, 227-1417
All Mass times EDT:
Saturday: 4:00 pm, Sunday: 9:30
Monday, Thursday, Friday: 9:30 am
Wednesday: 5:30 pm
En Espanol: 8:00 am, last Sunday of Month
St. Lawrence Mission
788 N Hwy 71 Wewahitchka, FL
Sunday: 11:00 am (COT)


s"Our Church can be your home"

Sirst Church of the Nazarene
2420 Long qAvenue Port St. Joe, Florida 32456.
(850) 229-9596


Sunday School ..... ..... 10 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship .......... 11 a.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ........... 6 p.m.
Wednesday Evening Service .... 7 p.m.
23718


Jl United J'etiedt


11 North 22nd Street Mexico Beach, FL 32410
Sunday Worship SeriMe: 9:00 a.m. CST
Suday School: 10:15 a.m. CST
Open Hearts. Open minds. Open doors.
The people of Mexico Beach United Methodist Church
NuRSERY PROVIDED
Rev. Ted Lovelace, Pastor Church/Office: 648-8820


Family life (huh
"Todching Lives with the Love of Jesus"


Join us in worship aPen' ,'.
~ApalacIncola rana mna Ci ty
10:30 Sunday Morning Hwy. 98
7:00 Wednesday Evening < >
Pastors Andrew
& 7.
Cathy Rutherford Reid Ave.
Rherna Bible Training Center graduates ,Family Life Chunh
Visit our website at:
familylifechurch.net VWewahitchka
323 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe 229-LIFE (5433)


Come into


The Star

today to let everyone in the
community know what's
happening in your church!


"The Churches of Christ Salute You"
Romans 16:16 ,

The Wewahitchka Church of Christ
Meets At 2241 Hwy. 71 South, Wewahitchka
(1/4 Mile North of the Overstreet Road)
(850) 639-5401
Sunday Bible Study 9:00 a.m. CT
Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. & 5:00 p.m. CT
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 p.m. CT


church of Christ
at the Beaches
Established 33 AD in Jerusalem


We meet at 314 Firehouse Road
Overstreet 850.647.1622
Sunday Bible Study OiOOam EST
Sunday Worship 11:00am EST
Wednesday Bible Study 7:30pm Sr
"We are about our Fathers business"




CHURCH OF CHRIST
MEETS


Singing:
Worship:


9 a.m. Sunday :
9:30 a.m. Sunday.


Call 229-8310
WRITE FOR FREE EIGHT LESSON BIBLE STUDY
P. 0. Box 758 Port St. Joe, FL 32457
SCorner of 20th Street & Marvin Avenue.j



BEACH BAPTIST CHAPEL
311 Columbus St. St. Joe Beach, FL 32456
A LIGHTHOUSE FOR THE LORD:
SUNDAY: General Assembly 9:45 a.m. Bible Study all ages 10 a.m.
Morning Worship 11 a.m. Evening Worship 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY: Choir Practice 6 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Youth Group 7 p.m.
"0 taste and see that the Lord is good: blessed is the man that trusteth in Him."
Please accept this invitation to join us in worship. God bless you!
Pastor David Nichols
Church 647-5026 Home 769-8725



First Baptist Church
.102 THIRD STREET PORT ST. JOE

Brent Vickery, Pastor
Bbddy Caswell, Minister of Music & Education
Michael Rogers, Minister to Students
Sunday School . . 9:45 am
Worship Service . 8:30 & 11:00 am
Disciple Training . .... 6:00 pm
Evening Worship . . 7:00 pm
Wednesday Prayer Meeting .... ... 6.30 pm
Mon-Fri: Devotion on 105.5 FM 7:49 am ET





First Baptist Church -
MEXICO BEACH
I,. -. 15th St., ,. 1 h,,
r,,,., f, !; r ;, r
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
Worship Sundays at 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Bible Study Sundays at 9:00 a.m. (all ages),
Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study at 6:30 p.m "
Please note, all times central!
Reverend Eddie LaFountain '


F.i .+k "A Reformed Voice
Ih in the Community"

,t\k "1r1-In. Dr. Bill Taylor, Pastor ,
Sunday School ............................. 9:30 a.m.,
Sunday Fellowship............... ..... 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Service .......... 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Service .............. 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday rNighl (Bay St. Joseph) 6:30 p.m.
Thursday Firehouse Fellowship .... 6:00 p.m.
801 20th Street Port St. Joe 229-6707'q
Home of Faith Christian School

TO KNOW CHRISTAND TO MAKE HIM KNOWN

r ST. JAMES'

EPISCOPAL CHURCH
800 22nd STREET, PORT ST. JOE
8:00 and 11:00 a.m. (EST) Sunday School 9:459
Child Care Provided for at 11:00
www.stjamesepiscopalchurch.org 850-227-1845


Worship with us at

Long Avenue Baptist Church


Where Faith, Family d


Friendship are found
Bible Study Sunday: 9:15am
Worship: 10:30am and 7:00pm
Wednesday
A variety of ministries for all ages beginning at 6:30 pm

1601 Long Avenue Port St. Joe, FL For More Information Call 229-8691


WORSHIP





AT THE CHURCH


OF YOUR CHOICE


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL-ThrdyAu st3206* i





8 ~ --a-h---~-"""M""lleaaMp -aMk. U


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6BTh Sar PrtSt JeFL* hrsay Agut 00 Etalihd 93 *Sevig ul cun)'ad uroudig res or68yer


!vents


C (enA4r


Meeting Schedule for Local Government
Gulf County School Board
The School Board meets once a month,
typically the second Tuesday of the month,
though during the summer that schedule is
subject to change. Meetings are typically con-
ducted at district offices located on Middle
School Drive in Port St. Joe, though during the
school year the board conducts one monthly
meeting at high schools at each end of the
county.
The School Board's next regularly sched-
uled meeting is at 2 p.m. ET on June 30 in the
board meeting room. This meeting will mark
the end of the fiscal year. The board's initial
budget meeting will be held 2 p.m. ET on July
20.
Postings of all School Board regular and
special meetings and workshops can be found
at the district offices.


City of Port St. Joe
The Port St. Joe City Commission con-
ducts regular meetings twice a month, on the
first and third Tuesdays of the month at 6 p.m.
ET in the Commission meeting room on the
second floor of City Hall on Cecil G. Costin
Blvd. near Reid Avenue.
Postings of all City Commission regular
and special meetings and workshops can be
found at City Hall.
City of Wewahitchka
The Wewahitchka City Commission con-
ducts regular meetings twice a month, on the
second and fourth Mondays of each month at
6 p.m. CT in the first floor meeting room at
City Hall.
Postings of all City Commission regular
and special meetings and workshops can be
found at City Hall on Second Street.
Board of County Commissioners
The Board of County Commissioners


conducts regular meetings twice a month, at 6
p.m. ET on the second and fourth Tuesdays of
each month in the Commission meeting room
located in the Robert Moore Administrative
Building next to the County Courthouse on
Cecil G. Costin Blvd.
Postings of all regular and special meetings
and workshops can be found at the Robert
Moore Administrative Building.
City of Mexico Beach
The Mexico Beach City Council conducts
its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. CT on
the second Tuesday of each month in the Civic.
Center located behind the business district on
301h and 31st Streets.
Postings of all regular and special meet-
ings and workshops can be found at City Hall,
located on 14m Street, or the Civic Center.
County Economic Development Council
The EDC conducts a monthly meeting, typ-
ically during the lunch hour of the first Tuesday


of the month at Sunset Coastal Grill. For more
information contact the EDC at 229-1901.
Budget Hearings
Local residents and taxpayers should be
aware that summertime brings the budget pro-
cess to government entities around the area. All
the listed governmental bodies will be conduct-
ing budget workshops and hearings throughout
the coming months.
We will post the times and places of all
budget meetings, but the information will also
be available at the locations listed for finding
meeting and workshop agendas.

A note to civic organizations and
other groups in the area: submit meet-
ing times and locations to the newspa-
per and we will publish them each week
on this page.


Everything You Need To Know About The Area, But Didn't Know To Aski


Summer Tourist Tips No. 7 Area Rules and Beach Etiqe L :_Part II, Cape San Blas and Indian Pass


By Marie Logan
Star Staff Writer

General information
From St. Joe Beach, driv-
ing eastward about four miles
on U.S. 98, you reach the town
of Port St. Joe.
One-half mile on the other
side of Port St. Joe, U.S. 98
splits to the right as C.R. 30-
A. You can continue on U.S.
98 for about 30 or 40 minutes
to Apalachicola, or you can
take C.R. 30-A to Indian Pass,
Cape San Blas, and St. Joe
Peninsula.
The area is changing daily,
becoming more and more
developed with houses, gated
communities, and commercial
enterprises. For right now, you
can still see the pristine, raw
Cape and peninsula that are
so breathtaking. This foray
into the past is particularly evi-
dent at Salinas Park, along St.
Joseph Peninsula and in the
state park, and along Indian
Pass road.


If you choose C.R. 30-A,
it's a spectacular drive along a
winding, two-land road, twin-
ing among tiny communities,
amazing scenery, palms, pines,
magnolias, live oaks, unexpect-
ed pleasures, and jarring gaps
in the landscape.
After a six and one-half mile
run along the coastal marshes
of St. Joe Bay, C.R. 30-A splits
90 degrees to the right (at Dead
Man's Curve), and the road to
the right becomes C.R. 30-E
(also known as Cape San Blas
Road), the only road that leads
onto the Cape and the penin-
sula.
Continue about three
miles along C.R. 30-A and you
reach Indian Pass. You can go
straight, coming out about 10
miles later back on U.S. 98
in Franklin County just a few
miles west of Apalachicola.
This route is known as the
"scenic route."
Or you can turn right
at the Indian Pass. Raw Bar,
which reopened July 14 after


Send Your Community Events to:
Write To: Be sure to put Community
The Star/Community Events News as the subject when
.P Box308 ''. :,in"ailing.
Port St Joe, FL 32457
Fax To: Announcements are limited
(850).227-7212 to 50 words, and will run for a
E-mail To: maximum of 4 weeks.
starnews@starfi.com


being closed the past year, due
to damage from Hurricane
Dennis.
f you turn right at the Raw
Bar, you will get a rapidly dis-
appearing glimpse of the true
Old Florida. This road takes
you down a densely vegetated,
three and one-half mile long
peninsula that deadends at
"the pass," where the west-
ern end of Apalachicola Bay
empties into the Gulf, between
the tip of Indian Pass and St.
Vincent Island.
At the pass you'll find a
waterfront campground, supply
store, and public boat ramp.
Take the split back at C.R.
30-E/Cape San Blas Road and
you wind your way through
Cape San Blas onto St. Joseph
Peninsula. There is only one
road, so you. can't get lost.
Just follow C.R. 30-E past the
Stump Hole and the "Great
Wall," all the way to the end of
CR30E, to the entrance of St.
Joseph Peninsula State Park,
where you either enter the park
or turn around.
By the way, this entire area
of Cape San Blas and the pen-
insula is called simply "The
Cape."
The areas of Indian Pass,'
the Cape and the peninsula are
a little less developed, a little
more natural, considerably
more restricted, than Mexico
Beach, Beacon Hill and St. Joe
Beach.


Garry L

GADDIS CONSTRUCTION, LLC


Custom Home Builder

Air Conditioning & Electrical

Sales & Service ,"


850-648-5474

State Certified Lic. No.
CBC060213, CAC037596, ,
EC13002548




TRANSPORTATION PLANNING MEETING

(THE PUBLIC IS INVITED)

Bay, Gulf, Holmes, and Washington Regional Transportation Partnership
Executive Committee
Monday, August 7, 2006 at 1:00 p.m.
Lynn Haven City Library, 901 Ohio Avenue (SR77)

The agenda will include the following topics:
1. Approval of Resolution Requesting the Florida Legislature to Provide Increased
Transportation Regional Incentive Program (TRIP) Funding for FDOT District 3
2. Review of Regional Network Map and TRIP Application Process
3. Review of Travel Reimbursement Request for RTP Members
4. Public Forum. This is an opportunity for the public to address transportation
issues.

Direct questions or comments to Mr. Nick Nickoloff at 1-800-226-8914, ext 212, or
nickoloffn@wfrpc.dst.fl.us.

Staff will make reasonable accommodations for access to the meetings in accor-
dance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and for language requirements other
than English. Please notify Ms. Ellie Roberts of access or language requirements at
1-800-226-8914, ext 218, at least 48 hours in advance.


Along C.R. 30-A you pass:
Jones Homestead and
the Port St. Joe regional air-
port (or at least the road lead-
ing to them)
Country Club Road,
leading to St. Joseph's Bay
Country Club, the area's only
golf course, open to the public
Simmons Bayou
and Presnell's Marina and
Campground
St. Joseph Bay State
Buffer and Aquatic Preserve
Indian Pass, Indian
Pass Raw Bar, and Indian
Pass Road, leading to Indian
Pass Campground and the St.
Vincent Island Shuttle
Scenic overlook, near the
east end of .CR. 30-A

Along C.R. 30-E/Cape San
Blas Road you pass:
Salinas Park, a great
public beach park, also where
horseback riding treks origi-
nate
Cape San Blas lighthouse
cutoff
Cape Palms Park
Rish State Park
Cape San Blas Catholic
Mission Church, open limited
hours
St. Joe Peninsula State
Park
Time Zones
This entire area is in the
Eastern Time Zone.

Law Enforcement, Fire and
Medical Care
This area is serviced
by the Gulf County Sheriff's
Department, the South Gulf
Volunteer Fire Department,
and the Gulf County Emergency
Medical Services.
Again, like at The Beaches,
in the way of most small rural
areas, all the communities
from Mexico Beach, Overstreet,


St. Joe Beach, Port St. Joe,
White City, even Wewahitchka
and Dalkeith help each other
during emergencies.
The South Gulf Volunteer
Fire Department is also a water
rescue unit, and their service
abilities and physical plant
facilities are currently being
expanded.

Speed Limits, Highway
Safety
The speed limits along C.R.
30-A and 30-E change every
few miles. Top speed in some
places is 55 miles per hour,
but slows down frequently to
35 miles per hour, especially
around the tiny communities.
Please pay attention.
Slowing down in the
marked areas is especially
important while so many visi-
tors are using this very nar-
row road, and with the added
construction traffic and equip-
ment.
The majority of both roads
are marked as no-passing
zones. :7
That includes the state-
wide restriction of passing on
the right, along the shoulder of
the road, as well.
For those not familiar with
the law, it is illegal to pass any-
one on the right if there is not
a regulation second traffic lane
to the right. It is illegal to pass
on the right by crossing the
solid white line, which marks
the shoulder of the road, par-
ticularly while waiting for the
vehicle stopped in front of you
to turn left.

Long and Winding Road
In addition to watching
the speed limits carefully along
C.R. 30-A and 30-E, you need
to be aware of the very nar-
row and winding road, and
the absolute lack of shoulders


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along the road.
If you swerve off the road,
you will most likely land in
marsh, swamp or bay.

Critter Crossings
While you are driving along
this beautiful route, watch out
for wildlife crossing the road,
especially at night and in the
very early morning, about sun-
rise.
You might see alligator,
snakes, deer, raccoons, black
bear, vultures, eagles, red fox,
wild boar, even an armadillo or
two. (Armadillos have managed
to make their way from south
Texas into the state park on the
peninsula.)
You probably will not seb
anything, but you need to be
aware that the possibility does
exist This is also true alopg
U.S. 98 from Port St. Joe to
Apalachicola, and from Mexico
Beach through Tyndall Air
Force Base.

Public Beach Access, Gulf
Side
Be very careful to use pub-
lic beach accesses (many of
which are not clearly marked)
,and do not use private beach
walkovers connected to indi-
vidual houses.
- Public beach access to the
Gulf beaches are located at: .
Salinas Park on C.R. 30-
E, about one-half mile from
C.R. 30-A
Cape Palms Park, about
five miles down Cape San Bias.
Road. steps only to beach
Dunes Drive, to the water
side of Cape San Blas Road,
about three or four miles froin
the Stump Hole.
Vehicle beach access
point at Bay Street/Indian Pass,
just east of Dead Man's Curve
on C.R. 30-A
Vehicle beach access
point just west of Donna
Spears Realty on C.R. 30-A/
Indian Pass
Vehicle access point to
the west of the7 boat ramp at
Indian Pass
Vehicle access point at
;the Stump Hole
NOTE: For those of you
familiar with the area, the vehi-
cle beach access point at the
Stump Hole/Great Wall (at the
curve of C.R. 30-E going onto
the peninsula) has been closed

(See TOURIST TIPS on Page 7B)


U


IMMUNE aMR~wbwm


6B he ta, PrtSt.Jo, F -Thursday, August 3, 2006


.. .


Established 1937 Serving Gulf countX and surrounding areas for 68 years


"Pi0144tng







Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006 lB


'I


AUGUST
Third Annual Port St. Joe High School Athletic
'Department Golf Tournament, St. Joseph Bay Golf and
Country Club, Aug. 5
MBARA Annual Kingfish Tournament, August 25-
26, Mexico Beach
WindMark Beach Showhouse: Through Sept. 10 at
,WindMark Beach, near Port St. Joe, tours of Southern
Accents Showhouse are 10am to 5pm EDT Wednesday
through Saturday, 1 to 5 pm Sunday. Tickets are $12, $6
for ages 5 to 17. More information: 888-212-7050.
Annual Scallop Festival, Port St. Joe, August 26-27


Tourist Tips


to vehicle traffic due to major
beach erosion.
Public Beach Access,
Bay Side
There is only one public
beach access point to the bay
from Cape San Bias Road. At
the curve of the road going onto
the peninsula, across from the
Stump Hole and rock wall, on
the bay side is an open, marshy
area with limited parking.
A fairly clear path leads to
the bay. This is part of the St.
Joseph Bay State Buffer and
Aquatic Preserve, and is open
to canoe and kayak launch-
es. Please stay on the marked
pathway.
All other beach access on
the bay side is on private prop-
erty and is not open to the
public.
Beach Public Restrooms
There are fewer public
restrooms in this area than at
The Beaches.
At Indian Pass, there is
really no public restroom.
There is usually a port-a-potty
located at the boat ramp, and
the campground store has a
restroom.
On the Cape, public rest-
'rooms are located at:
the entrance to Salinas
Tark
S- Cape Palms Park
various locations within
-St. Joe State Park, at the end
of Cape San Blas Road
Handicap Facilities
The public facilities in the
!area are all handicap accessi-
ble to some extent. Wheelchair
ramps to the Gulf side beaches
-are available at Salinas Park
.and in various locations within
-the state park.
Cape Palm Parks is wheel-
-chair accessible along the first
half of the boardwalk and into
the covered pavilion, but not
down to the beach at this time.
Sections of the state park
are in various stages of acces-
sibility. If anyone needs assis-
tance to access the park, con-
-tact the park office as soon
as possible before your visit.
Sometimes it takes up to 10
working days to schedule a
particular accommodation.
Parks/Playgrounds
There are two public parks
,on the Cape: Salinas Park and
-Cape Palms Park.
Salinas Park is about
one-half mile past the split
of CR30A and E, on the left.
'ft is a large, beautiful beach-


front park with picnic areas
and public restrooms (neither
on the beach), and handicap
accessible boardwalks that give
access to a spectacular beach.
This is also where most of the
horseback rides on the beach
originate.
Cape Palms Park is about
five miles down Cape San Blas
Road, well past the Stump Hole
and Great Wall, on the Gulf
side of the road.
A new park, it gives public
access to the Gulf beach, and
offers covered pavilions, public
restrooms, showers, a couple
of outdoor grills, a playground
and covered deck. Needless, to
say, it is a very popular and
crowded spot in the summer.
The entrance to the park is
not very clearly marked, and it
is easy to drive right by, so look
carefully.
Bike Path
Thanks to the efforts of
many people, there is now a
bicycle path on the bayside
of CR30E, from just north of
Cape Palms Park to the state
park entrance.
This is the first of three
phases for an extended bike
path along the peninsula.
Please remember, this is a path
for pedestrians and bicycles
only, no golf carts are allowed.
Restricted Areas
You will notice a great deal
of the Cape and peninsula is
behind chain link and barbed
wire fencing. This is posted mil-
-itary property part of Tyndall
Air Force Base and Eglin Air
Force Base's active territory.
Do not trespass. They do not
have a sense of humor about
trespassers.
Also, you will notice on
the peninsula a fenced area
with lots of round cottages and
extensive boardwalks. This is
the state-owned, 100-acre Rish
Park and is not open, to the
public. It is a special park for
handicapped Florida residents
and their families.
There are also several
gated communities in the area,
and you will be stopped at
the entrances by the security
guards.

Historic Sites/State Park
There are a couple of his-
toric sites on the Cape: the
marker for the Confederate
Saltworks (located at Old
Saltworks Cabins) and the
Cape San Blas lighthouse, on
Air Force property.
The saltworks no longer


SEPTEMBER
Music in the Park, Each Thursday night at 6 pm
(CT) in Sunset Park, Mexico Beach
Beach Blast Olympic Triathlon & Duathlon,
September 23, Beacon Hill Park, Great sports event
involving swimming, biking and running. More infor-
mation: www.TheBeachBlast.com.
The event will bring hundreds of visitors to the
area. Volunteers needed. Come support local athletes!
Annual Kingfish Shootout, Sept. 25-26, C-Quarters
Marina, Carrabelle


exist; there is only an historical
marker on the grounds of Old
Saltwoks Cabins. But the area
itself is spectacular and worth
a trip.
Look for the unobtrusive
sign on the bayside of C.R.
30-E, about two or three miles
from the turnoff.
The Cape San Blas light-
house is located on Air Force
property about a mile before
the Stump Hole. The road to
the lighthouse is located in a
series of S-curves across from
an enclosed radar compound,
which is hard to miss. Turn
south (toward the water) and
go through a large gate and fol-
low the road to the lighthouse.
Pay attention to the signs and
do not wander onto restricted
property.
St. Joseph Peninsula State
Park, located at the north end
of the peninsula, is a 2,500
acre wildlife refuge and wilder-
ness park, with about 10 miles
of uninhabited beach and bay
shores, boat ramp, basin, RV
camp and tent sites, and cab-
ins.
The last seven miles of the
park (from the end of the paved
road and the cabins to the
northern point) are a 1,750-
acre wilderness preserve.
Activities include canoe-
ing and sea kayaking, biking,
walking (along designated trails
only), fishing, and wilderness
hiking and camping.
For more information
about the park and to make
reservations, contact St.
Joseph Peninsula State Park,
8899 Cape San Blas Road, Port
St. Joe, FL, 32456, or call
850/227-1327.
Dogs on the Beach.
In this area dogs are
allowed on the beaches, but
must be leashed at all times,
and you must pick up after
your dog.
The easiest thing to do is
to carry several plastic bags
(from grocery or variety stores)
with you when' you walk your
dog.
Place one corner of the bag
over your hand (the remainder
of the bag is covering your
arm), pick up the waste with
your covered hand and, while
holding the waste in your hand,
pull the rest of the bag over
your hand,- enveloping the
waste inside the bag. Then sim-
ply tie off the bag, trapping the
waste in that corner of the bag,
and you can use the bag for oie
more cleanup. When you get


OCTOBER
Music by the Bay, Each Thursday in Frank Pate Park, Port St. Joe
Annual Catfish Classic Fishing Tournament, October 6-7,
Wewahitchka
Florida Panhandle Birding and Wildflower Festival, October 6-8, St.
Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserves, Port St. Joe
Annual Art and Wine Festival, October 21, Driftwood Inn, Mexico
Beach
Downtown Trick or Treat, October 31, Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe
The Oyster Spat Festival, Oct. 6- 8, St. George Island
Apalachicola Community Yard Sale, Oct. 7, Apalachicola
3rd Annual Apalachicola Bay Chamber Golf Tournament, Oct. 11,
St. James Bay Golf Course, Lanark Village
Dixie Does Nashville, Part Deux, Songwriters in the Round, Oct.
13-14, Dixie Theatre, Apalachicola


Send Your Community Events to:
Write To: Fax To: Be sure to put Community News as the
The Star/Community Events (850) g27-7212 subject when mailing.
P.O. Box 308 Email To:
Port St Joe, FL 32457 starnews@starfl.com Announcements are limited to 50 words,
and will run for a maximum of 4 weeks.

back from your walk, toss the lic access to the beach, to the plastic rings holding six-
bag in the trash. Please remember to clean pack cans of beer, water and
The state park has its own up after yourself and your fam- soft drinks. If you absolutely
rules about pets. Pets are not fly. This includes taking with must take these six-pack rings
allowed in camping areas, on you any soiled baby diapers, onto the beach, cut the indi-
bathing beaches, in wilderness beer cans, especially any glass vidual rings in half. Otherwise,
areas, and may be restricted in containers, all food wrappings. seabirds, turtles and some fish
other designated areas of the This applies particularly (See TOURIST TIPS on Page 9B)
park.
Where pets are allowed
inside the state park, they must
be kept on a six-foot, hand-held
leash and well-behaved at all B a le
times. Service animals for visi-
tors with disabilities are wel-
come in all areas of the park
Beach Etiquette Lane, Inc.
There is a certain "beach | vn--neers
etiquette" pertaining to where h I Engineers Surveyors Planners
people should and should not (850) 227-9449
walk-on any beach.(850) 227-9449
Sea oats, sea grasses and
beach morning glories are the Now Offering:
first line of defense against .
beach erosion, and as such are Residential & Commercial Building
very important and protected. Design
It is illegal to remove any
sea oats from any section of Structural Engineering Services
any beach, or to harm the sea
oats in any way, including walk- Civil Engineering Services
ing on them. Surveying Services
It is also illegal in many
places to walk across the dunes Commercial Site Development
themselves.
Please use only the legiti- Residential And Commercial
mate dune walkovers and Subdivisions
marked public beach access
points, and the well-defined
trails in the more remote Your one-stop-shop for all of your design needs.
Please do not cut through 212 W. Hwy 98, Suite C
anyone's private yard or garage Port St. Joe, Florida
to use a beach walkover con-ort J ori
nected to a private dwelling.
This is trespassing. Find a pub-, ___ __ __ __ ___ __ __ _


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WE DELIVER $15 minimum plus delivery charge


- From Page 6B


TheStrPor S. oeFL- husda, ugst 00 7B


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


I


~YfiL~jf~ ~ ~ ~


C






ODU I ie JIUIt IUll I01. Joe, .L i IurIaAy/ -gU1T 0, 1wvZ-


PORT ST. JOE

POUCE REPORT

On July 3, at approxi-
mately 4:13 p.m. Jennifer
V Hill, age 42, of Doerun,
Georgia was arrested for
possession of marijuana.
Hill was a passenger inside
a vehicle stopped for a
traffic violation. The offi-
cer noticed an open con-
tainer of alcoholic beverage
in plain view and obtained
permission to search the
vehicle. Upon Hill stepping
from the vehicle an offi-
cer observed marijuana in
plain view between the pas-
senger door and seat area.'
Hill advised this belongs to
her and was arrested for
possession of marijuana.
Hill was transported to the
Gulf County Jail to await
first appearance.
On July 19, at approx-
imately 11:30 p.m. Gary
L. Hudson age 37 of
Wewahitchka, was arrested
for disorderly intoxication.
Hudson had entered a local
business several times in
an intoxicated state and
was asked to leave. Hudson
left this business and was
observed by officers yell-
ing on a pay phone outside


this business. Hudson was
arrested and transported
to the Gulf County Jail.
On July 19, at approx-
imately 2:55 pm officers
responded to Martin Luther
King Blvd. near Avenue C
in reference to gun shots
being fired. Upon arrival
in this area James Fenn
was observed shooting a
rifle into the air and was
quickly arrested. A 22-cali-
ber rifle and handgun were
recovered from Fenn. Fenn
was also carrying a large
knife inside his waistband
and was in possession of a
"crack pipe" commonly used
to smoke cocaine. Jarrod
L. Lenox was observed by
another officer fleeing the
area on foot where as he
was arrested after a brief
struggle. Lenox had been
ordered several times to
stop but ignored these law-
ful commands. Fenn was
charged with discharging a
firearm in a public place,
carrying a concealed weap-
on and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Lenox was
arrested and charged with
resisting arrest. Both Fenn
and Lenox were transport-
ed to the Gulf County Jail.
More arrests are expected
because this incident is still


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being investigated.
On July 23, around 4:30
p.m. Rodney D. Allen, age
22, of Wewahitchka, Florida
was arrest by the. Port St.
Joe Police Department for
violation of probation. Allen
was transported to the Gulf
County Jail.


DUI OBRIETY

CHECPOINMT
The Port St. Joe Police
Department is committed
to promoting safety for all
citizens. The Port St. Joe
Police Department's goal is
to ensure everyone using
the highway and roadway
system may do so safely
and to provide a deterrent
for those who violate laws.
Enforcement is a tool to
facilitate the achievement
of this safety. Recognizing
that alcohol is consistently
involved in many crashes
resulting in a fatality man-
dates unwavering atten-
tion. Reducing death and
injury associated with
impaired drivers is one of
the most important objec-
tives. The State of Florida,
Gulf County and the City
of Port St. Joe provide the
roadway as a benefit to the
public at large. Accordingly,
these agencies seek to safe-
guard all drivers through
the use of a n.on-intrusive
checkpoint to detect and
remove impaired drivers


from the road.
The use of the Roadside
Sobriety Checkpoint, public
education and enforcement
are combined to achieve
and enhance the reduc-
tion in deaths and injuries
caused by impaired vehi-
cle operators. These law


enforcement agencies are
dedicated to aggressive DUI
law enforcement. Zero tol-
erance of DUI continues to
be top priority in traffic law
enforcement. The Port St.
Joe Police Department will
be conducting DUI Sobriety
Checkpoints on Highway


98 throughout this year in
effort to maintain a safe
driving environment for all
drivers.


Gallagher: Families Will Have More

Information To Help Track Sexual Predators
CFO's call for better protections results in improved website.

TALLAHASSE E- children, our seniors and about sexual predators
Tom Gallagher, Florida's our loved ones can be and offenders is readily
chief financial officer, informed and protected," accessible," said FDbE
and Florida Department Gallagher said. Commissioner Baile.'
of Law Enforcement Gallagher today also "Florida's sexual predator/
Commissioner Gerald urged FDLE to pursue offender web site typically
Bailey today announced establishing a system that logs over half a million
that Florida's families for would allow Floridians, hits each month. Adding
the first time will have free of charge, to receive a vehicles and vessels to the
access to information to, notification when a sexual site is another valuable
help them identify sexual predator or offender tool for parents, families
predators' vehicles via the registers an. address and citizens to use to'be
state's sex offender web within a certain distance familiar with registered
site. The nearly 39,000 from their home or other offenders and predators m
offenders currently listed address such as their their area."
on the site have victimized child's college apartment Of the 39,000 offenders
children as well as adults or dormitory or a nursing listed on the web site
and the elderly. Gallagher home where a parent is currently about 25,000 are
suggested the enhanced receiving care. Gallagher still alive and living outside
search feature at a Cabinet said he is aware that some of prison, and about 18,000
meeting last June. private vendors provide a have registered vehicles
"This enhancement will similar service, but often or vessels, according. tq
empower Floridians with do so for a fee. FDLE.
greater information about "Florida especially The Web site can be
the people who live in their shines when it comes to accessed through the FDltE
neighborhoods so that our ensuring that information home page at www.fdle.
state.fl.us as well as on the
Department of Financial
Services' web site at www.
fldfs.com. These links also
lead to -information about
Florida sexual offender and
predator registration ladvs,
highlighted offenders wvho
........ "- are wanted, for failure 'to
_" -,'. register, and other related
"'4 informational links. A s
-of today, the updated
site will also include
$ a user-friendly tab that
gigives parents up-to-date
information on vehicles
and vessels registered to
,the listed offenders. The
information will inclidd
the make, tag number.
color, type and year of
vehicles and vessels.



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* Offer available for a limited time only and subject to change without notice. DSL service not yet available in all areas. New customers only.
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return the modem within 30 days of cancellation of service will result in a $90.00 charge for the retail value of the modem and a $10.00 charge
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Names

Alberto
Beryl _
Chris
Debby ,,
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce ,
Kirk
Leslie
Michael -.
Nadine
Oscar -
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie o,:
William


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Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 ydarg


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Tourist Tips


get these plastic rings trapped
around their beaks, heads,
bodies, etc., and ultimately die
a very horrible, slow death.
One of the great delights
of strolling along any beach is
looking for shells and other
"stuff."
All the area beaches have
an interesting assortment of
shells that wash up, but you
need to know which shells to
take, and which ones to leave
behind.
It is illegal to take any "live"
shells from any Florida beach.
"Live" shells are those in which
a creature lives, whether the
occupant is the original "owner"
or not. So if any critter is vis-
ible, gently place the shell back
on the sand.
This applies to sand dol-
lars and starfish, as well. If you
pick up either a sand dollar
or a starfish, turn it over and
very, very gently run your fin-
ger. across its alveolae, or tiny
"tentacles." If these "tentacles"
move at all on their own, the
starfish or sand dollar is still
alive, and you should gently
place it back in the surf.
Avoid jellyfish and
Portuguese men of war when
they have washed up on the
beach. Many types of jellyfish,
vlth or without tentacles, retain
their ability to sting long after
they have washed ashore. Do
not let children handle them
or (logs sniff and paw on them.
If you are stung, get medical
help.
Also be careful not to han-
dle any dead fish that wash
ashore, especially puffer fish
and baby sharks. Both types
of fish have either sharp quills
br sharp scales that can cause
nasty wounds, even if the fish
are dead.
It is actually illegal to
remove any part of migrato-
Fy water fowl from the beach,
including pelican feathers lying
in the sand. This is not strictly
enforced along The Beaches,
but be aware of removing sea
gtill and pelican quills from the
beach when you are in any state
park. The rangers may confis-
cate them and, while unusual,
could also fine you.

-Beach Fires, Other Lights
% On The Beach at Night
As far as enjoying bonfires
on the beach at night, fires
are allowed on these beach-
es, unless a burn ban is in
effect. Check with the Sheriff's
Department or.the South Gulf
Volunteer Fire Department
before making plans for a
beach bonfire.
Please be particularly care-
ful at this time when consider-
irg a fire on the beach because
of the extreme drought condi-
tibons in the entire Panhandle.
It- Is best not to start fires at
this time.
Beach fires are not allowed,
however, on the beaches inside
tile state park. The park has
its "own rules and regs that you
need to follow very carefully.
If you do have a beach bon-
fire, just use standard camp-
tire safety. Make sure you are
well down on the sand, near
the waterline and not near the
sea oats or vegetation. Keep
the fire size manageable, be
very aware of the wind, and be
absolutely sure that the fire is
completely extinguished when
you leave.
Do not burn wood that
contains nails, and do not take
wood, including pallets, from
any construction site and drag
them onto the beach to burn.
First, it is illegal to steal from
a construction site and sec-
ond, nails from burned wood
.become covered with sand and
,people step on the nails.
Please remove all cans,
bottles, garbage, etc. when you
leave. Again, trash containers
are placed at every beach walk-
over for your convenience.
While talking about remiov-
lng trash from the beach,
remember that it is turtle sea-
son through October 31, and
each piece of trash, plastic
rings, fishing tackle, whatever
is a huge problem for sea tur-
tles coming ashore to nest.
As for beach fires and
other lighting on the beach at
night, again, remember the
turtle rules: do not build fires
or use any lights of any kind,
including flashlights on the
beach anywhere near a marked
turtle nest.
Turn out any outdoor
lights that reflect in any way
on the beach, and tightly cover
all windows facing the beach.
These lights will attract turtles
,and put them in danger.


In fact, lights anywhere
on the beaches are a danger to
turtles and hatchlings. They
.will focus on your artificial
light and not move toward the
water, which they must do to
survive.


Turtle Nests
Please remember that you
must not engage in any activity
close to marked turtle nests.
This includes setting up camp,
placing and using chairs or
picnic tables, allowing children
to play or dogs to romp. Turtle
nests are strictly off-limits.
Marked turtle nests will be
surrounded by four stakes and
yellow 'crime scene" tape, and
covered with a piece of heavy
wire screening that cannot be
removed. Turtle nests are pro-
tected by federal law and any-
one interfering with the nest,
the adults or the hatchlings will
be prosecuted.
Beach Driving
Currently, beach driving is
permitted from Indian Pass to
the Stump Hole only. The pen-
insula is closed to vehicles on
the peninsula beach because of
severe erosion.
To drive on the beach in
Gulf County, you must pur-
chase a beach driving permit
from the Gulf County Tax
Collector's Office in the county
court house on Cecil Costin
Boulevard.
Currently, costs are $15
per year for Gulf County resi-
dents or Gulf County prop-
erty owners; $150 per year for
non-residents or non-property
owners.
At the time of permit pur-
chase, you are given a detailed
map of access points and driv-
ing areas. The access point at
the Stump Hole is now closed
to vehicle traffic after the 2004-
05 hurricane seasons.
Anyone driving on the
beach needs to be very aware of
turtle nests and stay far away
from them. Driving at night,


- e> 7B

especially during turtle season,
is strictly prohibited.
If driving on the beach,
watch closely for children, and
maintain a slow, rolling pace
- no speeding and no destruc-
tive driving that tears up the
beach.
Beach Flag Warning
System, Lifeguards, Rip
Tides
There are no lifeguards
anywhere along the beaches
of Indian Pass, the peninsula,
or Cape San Blas. Signs stat-
ing this are posted at most
municipal beach walkovers,
and swimmers enter the water
at their own risk.
This entire area does get
dangerous rip currents on
occasion, and sharks are com-
mon along both sides of the
peninsula, both in Gulf and bay
waters.
Everyone should watch the
weather reports or the "boat
and beach" forecasts on tele-
vision each morning to see
what the water conditions are
for the day. There is a sys-
tem of colored flags placed on
the Panama City beaches early
each morning to alert people of
wind and water conditions.
These flags and conditions
are discussed on both Channel
7 (WJHG-TV/NBC) and Channel
13 (WMBB/ABC) morning news
programs, as well as on local
access channels 4 (Mexico
Beach) and 12 (Port St. Joe/
Cape San Blas/Indian Pass).
It is in your best interest
and safety to watch for this
information. Even though the
forecasts are for the Panama
City area beaches, the same or
similar wind and water condi-
tions are probably going to be


present at The Beaches and
Cape San Blas.
The new-statewide beach
flag warning system is:
Green flag: Low hazard,
conditions are favorable for
swimming, swim at your own
risk;
Yellow flag: Medium haz-
ard, swim with caution;
Red flag: High hazard,
swimming not recommended;
Double red flag: Danger,
water closed to the public;
Purple flag: Caution,
marine pests present. Marine
"pests" can be anything from
jellyfish to sharks.
Boat Ramps
There are several public
boat ramps in the area, includ-
ing ones at Indian Pass and the
Cape:
Indian Pass boat ramp
- Located at the end of Indian
Pass Road, this ramp allows
access to the Gulf, Apalachicola
Bay and St. Vincent Island. It is
at Indian Pass Campground,
and is open to the public, but
with very limited parking.
St. Joseph Peninsula
State Park boat ramp Inside
the state park, it provides easy
access to both the bay and the
Gulf, and has a boat basin,
public restrooms, picnic areas
and more.
Port St. Joe boat ramp
Turn south at the intersection
of U.S. 98 and SR 71 (Cecil
G. Costin Boulevard), at the
corner of The Port Inn and
Frank Pate Park in Port St.
Joe. The ramp is at the end of
Fifth Street, past the park. This
ramp allows quick access to St.
Joe Bay. The park also offers
public restrooms, covered pic-
nic areas and a playground.
Highland View boat ramp
Off U.S. 98 on the west side
of Port St. Joe, Turn north
at Dolphin Street at the west


side of the Tapper Bridge (big
bridge over the canal), then
immediately right and go under
the Tapper Bridge for easy
access to St. Joe Bay and the
Intracoastal Waterway.
Fishing Regs/Surf Fishing
Anyone who is not a Florida
resident needs a non-resident
license to surf fish. Florida
residents do not need a license
to fish from land.
Caution: Be careful around
surf fisherpeople. They rarely
tag or mark their fishing lines
so passersby can see the actual
line running from the rod toe
the water.
If you are walking along
the beach, it is in your best
interest to walk behind any
surf fisherperson to avoid gar-
roting yourself on the invisible
fishing line.
Also be very aware of surf
fisherpeople who are casting
while you walk behind them.
Very few fisherpeople pay
attention to passersby and peo-
ple strolling by are frequently
hooked when the surf fisher-
people cast backward in prepa-
ration for the forward arc.
The money collected from
saltwater fishing licenses is
used to improve and restore
fish habitat, and for marine
fisheries research, law enforce-
ment, and public education on
marine resources.

Scallop Season/Regs
.Scalloping in St. Joe Bay
is very popular with locals and
visitors alike. But there are
strict regulations covering the
fragile, and often very limited,
scallop population.
Scalloping is permitted
only' in certain waters, includ-
ing St. Joseph Bay.
State waters in the Gulf
of Mexico open to scallop har-
vest extend from the Pasco-


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Hernando County line (near
Aripeka) to the west bank of
the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay
County.
Scallop season runs July
1-Sept 10 only. Harvesting scal-
lops at any other time is ille-
gal.
It is illegal to possess bay
scallops on water outside open
harvest areas. It is also illegal
to land scallops outside open
harvest areas. For example, it
would be legal to take scallops
from waters off the Hernando
County coast, but illegal to dock
your boat in Pasco County with
the scallop catch onboard.
People wading in shal-
low areas at low tide do not
need a license, but cannot use
dive masks or snorkels to help
them find scallops.
Bay scallops may be har-
vested only by hand, or with a
landing or dip net.
All scallopers operating
from any boat must have a
valid saltwater fishing license
from the state.
Each person is limited to
two gallons of whole scallops,
or one pint of meat per day.
A boatload of five or more
people can take no more than
10 gallons total of whole scal-
lops, or four pints of meat total
per day.
If taking a boat into the
shallow bay waters, be particu-
larly careful not to injure or rip
out the fragile sea grass with
the boat motor.
It takes literally years for
sea grass to rejuvenate after
such an injury, and destruction
of sea grass beds is extremely
detrimental to the bay's ecol-
ogy.
If your boat is too large
to safely navigate the shallows
and sea grass beds, either use
poles or paddles to exit the sea
grass, or use a different, more
shallow-draft boat.







lOB The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


School Supply List
We do not have a supply list for Port St. Joe Middle
School students. You will need notebook paper, pencils,
three prong notebooks, and a lock for your locker. You
may carry a backpack to school, but must leave it in
your locker during the school day. Those students who
have PE will need to purchase a PE uniform from Coach
Lacour when school begins.
On the first day of school your teachers will let you
know of other supplies you may need.





GulfCoet


Gulf/Franklin Center
Registration

August 10 9am-6pm
Classes Start August 16, 2006


Check out the following class:


Basic Spanish Conversation I
Introduction to Spanish sound system and
conversational emphasis on practical appli-
cations in daily, personal, and business life.
Culture based.


Call 227-9670 or 1-800-311-3685 ext 5501
Gulf Coast Community College
Start Here. Go Anywhere.

GCCC is an equal opportunity institution.


Port St. Joe Middle School will have an orientation for
all sixth graders, and parents, as well as all new seventh
and eight grade students and parents. The orientation
will be Friday, August 4. Students and parents should
report to the commons area at 9:00 am for an informa-
tive session.
The orientation will also give students and parents a
chance to meet their teachers, walk through their sched-
ules, and have questions and concerns, answered.
Students who attended Port St. Joe Middle School
last year will get their schedule on the first day of school,
August 7, 2006.
The faculty and staff at Port St. Joe Middle School look
forward to meeting our new middle schoolers on August
4 from 9:00-11:30, and seeing all students on Monday,
August 7 at 7:55 am. If you have any questions concern-
ing this orientation, call Cindy Belin at 227-3211.

Bully Advice
Before school begins please talk to your child about
bullying. Students who are being bullied or witness bul-
lying at our school should notify an adult. Bullying is not
tolerated at Port St. Joe Middle School.
What is "bullying" anyway? Bullying is another name
for harassment. Bullying can be physical one or more
students hurting another. More often, bullying is verbal
and includes persistent threatening, teasing, ridicule or
talking about another person.
Bullies don't pick on you because of something you
did. The bully is picking, on you because of the way he or
she feels. (Yes, girls are as likely to be bullies as boys.)
Some people bully others as a way of feeling popular,
showing off or making themselves look tough. Others
think that intimidation is the best way to handle prob-
lems. Often, they've been the victims of bullying them-
selves. So if someone is bullying you, don't think it's your
fault.
Parents may tell their children to strike back at bul-
lies. Usually, that creates more problems than it solves.
But if you're being bullied, you aren't helpless. You can do
some things that may stop bullying. Here are some things
you might try:
Tell a friend. Ask your friend to help you-it's tough to
pick on a person who has someone there for support.
Walk away. It's harder to bully someone who won't
stand still to listen.
Chill out. Bullies seem to target kids who respond to
their taunts-girls who cry easily or boys who have a ten-
dency to fly off the handle.
Try not to be alone in places where bullies pick on
you. This may mean you need to sit in a different place
on the bus or take a different way to school.
It's pretty tough to stop the bullying by yourself, or
even with the help of friends. So if you've tried some of
the things on the list and the bullying hasn't stopped, it's
time to tell an adult.
There are things the school can do to stop kids from
bullying-but they can't take action if they don't know
what's happening.


Eye Diseases Cause Blindness

7TI Mn TUTmT r ijifV


Macular Degeneration Diabetic Retinopathy
Disease of the Retina & Vitreous Eye Disease & Infection
Early detection and treatment of eye diseases are key to
maintaining your sight. Our eye disease team has been specifically
trained to detect and treat eye disease. We use the most modern
procedures, techniques and equipment. And offer patients the latest in
vision rehabilitation, occupational therapy and visual aids.

If you have or suspect you have an eye disease, don t
wait. Call today. Your sight may depend on it.


"dCCENTER
of North Florida
PANAMA CITY PC BEACH CHIPLEY PORT ST. JOE
784-3937 234-1829 638-7333 227-7266
TOLL FREE 1-800-778-3937 www.eyecarenow.corn


Open House

On Friday, August 4
from 1:00-2:00 ET, Port
St. Joe High School will
be hosting an Open House
for all 91t graders and new
students to welcome them
to Port St. Joe High School
for the 2006-07 school year.
Students will be able to pick
up their schedules during
this time. We look forward
to meeting all of you and
are looking forward to a
great school year.


Pre-K Round-up

The Voluntary Pre-
Kindergarten Program:
Round-up will be held ait
Wewahitchka Elementary
School on August 3, 2006 at
12:00pm-5:30pm CST. It is
open to children who will be,
four years old on or before
September 1, 2006. Parents-
will need to bring proof
of child's age and proof
of Gulf County residency.,
For further information call
Donna Whittaker @ 653-
4304 or Deborah Crosby @
229-6940.


Public Hearing for Presidential

Search Held at GCCC
The Gulf Coast Community College Presidential
Search Committee will hold a Public Hearing on August
3, 2006 in the Jules Sarzin Lecture Hall of the Russell
C. Holley and Herbert P Holley Language and Literature
Building on campus.
The purpose of the hearing is for the Presidential
Search Committee to receive public input regarding the
qualities the college should seek in its next president.
Following the hearing, the committee will begin developing
a presidential profile.
The Public Hearing is scheduled for Thursday, August
3, from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., and is open to the pub-
lic.
For additional information, contact Wanda Luckie at
(850) 872-3816, or email wluckie@gulfcoast.edu.





News Column :
"V Faith Christian School


Faith Christi" P iajri

For Orientation And For

Student's Return
The 2006-2007 school year is about to begin! The
summer staff has been busy preparing for the new year.
As a reminder, teachers return on Tuesday. August "l.
Orientation is Thursday, August 3rd. Pre-school sti-
dents will meet through the morning and afternoon (cal
the office for times and details). Parents of elementary,
middle, and high school grades will meet in the evening
at 7:00 p.m.
For a list of supplies, contact the school office at 229-
6707.
There are still positions available in many of our
classes. Feel free to stop by for registration and enroll-
ment papers. Faith Christian School is a ministry of Faithf
Bible Church. Both the church and school are located a;t
801 20th Street in Port St. Joe.


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Orientation


Gulf County's
#1 News Source
i':r' mrr>/^~inr>


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S -THC STAR
'997-1978 y


Established 1937 -SrigGl onyadsronigaesfr6 er


IOB The Star, Port St. Joe, FL -TusaAgs ,20






h 19 70 Srn G foIad ro dg rso6'a e tot .J,'h-, g t, 0


Local


Group


Visits


Greece


By Angel Barbee
Over twenty-four
hours of traveling was
worth the view of one
of the world's greatest
architectural feats, the
majestic Parthenon atop
the Acropolis in Athens.
Known as the Cradle
of Democracy, Athens,
named for the goddess
Athena, serves as the
capital of Greece with a
population of 4.5 mil-
lion.
The group, compiled
by local high school
teacher Angel Barbee,
then embarked on a
four-day cruise of the
beautiful Greek islands.
The first stop was
-Mykonos, a pirate haven
centuries ago, followed
by the Turkish village
of Kusadasi, where the
.group toured Ancient


Ephesus, visiting the
Great Theater where
Paul preached.
Sailing on to the
island of Patmos, the
group visited the cave
where an exiled John
received the divine
Revelation from Christ.
Docking next at the
island of Rhodes, many
spent the day shopping
or enjoying the beautiful
scenery of Greece.
The next stop was
Crete, the fabled birth-
place of Zeus, followed
by the gorgeous island of
Santorini, known for its
breathtaking beauty of
blue and white villages
as well as unique vol-
canic landscapes. Many
of the group enjoyed a
cruise around the active
crater of Nea Kameni
islet and swam in the


beautiful yet freezing
water, heated slightly by
the Hot Springs on the
sea floor.
Upon disembark-
ing in Athens, the group
journeyed through vine-
yards and orchards and
majestic mountains to
Delphi, the home of the
mystical oracle. Here
priests at the Temple
of Apollo would inter-
pret the cryptic prophe-
cies and ancient military
leaders would bring gifts
in hopes of good fortune
in battle.
After enjoying the
beauty and culture of
Greece, we were ready to
come home to the safety
of the United States and
our own piece of para-
dise right here in Port
St. Joe.


At the Temple of Poseidon built in 440 B.C. overlooking the Aegean Sea (at Cape Sounion near
Athens) From left to right: Front row: Amelia Warriner, Joe Rish, Lauren Costin, Kendall Hicks, Kate
Shoaf, Molly Matty, Natalie Shoaf, Tanya Costin Back row: Lewana Patterson, Angel Barbee, Heather
Rish, Samantha Plessinger, Linda Plessinger, Charles Costin


7 Rules for Parents of Teens


1. What You Do Matters
Many parents mistak-
enly believe that by the time
children have become teen-
agers, there's nothing more
a parent can do. Wrong.
Studies clearly show that
good parenting continues
to help teenagers develop
in healthy ways, stay out
of trouble and do well in
school.
2. You Can't Be Too
Loving
Don't hold back when
ft comes to pouring on the
praise and showing physi-
cal affection. There is no


evidence that adolescents
are harmed by having par-
ents who are unabashedly
loving--as long as you don't
embarrass them in front of
their friends.
3. Stay Involved
Many parents who are
involved in their child's
life during the early years
withdraw when their child
becomes a teenager. This is
a mistake. It's just as impor-
tant for you to be involved
now-maybe even more so.
Participate in school pro-
grams. Get to know your
child's friends. Spend time


together.
4. Adapt Your
Parenting
Many parenting strate-
gies that work at one age
stop working at the next
stage of development. As
children get older, for exam-
ple, their ability to reason
improves dramatically, and
they will challenge you if
what you are asking doesn't
make sense.
5. Set Limits
The most important
thing children need from
their parents is love, but a
close second is structure.


Vilendrer Graduates Public Service
Brian J. Vilendrer Announcement
graduated May 9. He
is now a non-commis- The Gulf Coas
sioned officer in the Air Workforce Board will hold
Force. He is stationed inits monthly executive an
Japan and Iceland. Brian general board meeting oi
... .. aTcln B Anr, ~os t S 11.11


to them, your rules and deci-
sions have to be clear and
appropriate. As your child
becomes more adept at rea-


soning, it's not longer good
enough to say, "Because I
said so."


Even teenagers need rules
and limits. Be firm but
fair. Relax your rules bit
by bit as your child dem-
onstrates more maturity. If
he or she can't handle the
freedom, tighten the reins
and try again.
6. Foster Independence
Many parents errone-
ously equate teenager's
drive for independence
with rebelliousness, disobe-
dience or disrespect. It's
healthy for adolescents to
push for autonomy. Give
your children the psycho-
logical space they need to
learn to be self-reliant, and
resist temptation to micro-
manage.
7. Explain You
Decisions
Good parents have
expectations, but in order
for your teenager to live up


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Free gift offer is available for personal checking accounts only 5/2/06 7/31/06. Only one gift per household. Substitutes or rain checks on free gift will be
offered as needed. The free gift will be given at account opening. The following account opening deposits are required: $5,000 or greater, a highway
travel kit or a Prosperity Bank umbrella; $1,000.00 $4,999.99, a 12-pack insulated cooler; $300.00 $999.99, a 100% cotton baseball cap. 1
This special offer is not available for IRAs, public funds, brokerages, or financial institutions. Member FDIC MLi


Therapeutic Skin Treatments
PERMANENT MAKEUP
Micodermabrasion Chemical Peels
sulw- Customized Facials Body Treatments *
Waxing Skin Tag and Spider Vein Removal
Medical Grade Skincare Products
LED Light Therapy


For an appointment, please call:

Melinda A. Dement. Licensed Aestherician
Aline'4 Salon 315 Williamn Avenue Port S. Joe, Florida
Mwvm.shore-ine.,kincare.com


The tar Pot S. Je, L -Thurday Auust3, 006- I


Estblihed1937-SrigG l out n urudngaesfr6 er


I







OADTkne Z-)Tar, r r+ I, FL *- I32 6a h 9e Gl u n r n g s 8 a


Summer


Camp


S' -age 1J

of muscular dystrophy that
has for years evaded diag-
nosis. Benton is thin but
walks with ease. He does
not rely on the help of his
counselor, Bo, who at age
18, is one year his junior.
Benton returns to the
MDA camp each summer to
enjoy the fellowship he feels
with the campers, many of
whom have been friends for
years.
"For most of the kids,
it's what they look forward
to every year. When they
leave they're counting down
the days to come back,"
said Benton, who counts
himself in that number.
"I love it. I wouldn't
miss it for the world."
With his 21st birthday
fast approaching, Benton
hopes that he can return
as a staff member of vol-
unteer.
Benton's friend, Austin,
18, is also one of the camp's
senior participants, having
attended for 13 years.
Austin suffers from
Duchenne muscular dys-
trophy and has been con-
I -! '- l


Antoinette Romano, Lauren Moxley, Laura Dickman, Katelyn Cross and Megan Carmichael enjoy a Mexican fiesta sponsored by ERA Neubauer Real Estate.


fined to a wheelchair since
he was seven.
In his Woodville home-
town, Austin does not have
any friends with muscular


dystrophy. He looks for-
ward each, year to being
around those who share
his disability and the volun-
teers who attend him with


such compassion.
"The people that come
here make you feel better.
They want to be here to
help and see what we're all


about," said Austin.
With only three years of
eligibility remaining, Austin
does not want his time at
camp to end.


Like Benton, he hopes
to return as a volunteer. .
"I've been coming here
so long, it wouldn't seem
right not to," Austin said.-


Trust Your Car to the Experts in
Diagnostic Service and Repair.
.'u'r *''r' .r- li, i r. : 1, i r a rpr -r .
[li-_ : ', r[ .:lI.:.,:- lin ur': : r.-unir r '. .
l':, I i- It,'l I r::, a r, -d I-.:irr.q :
and :l f- ,:.f rl i r f u ip, m .r r:. p rrf.:.rm
,and rpar :r qu, cll., :rd .-..rr.-._ ,.


Gulf County Sheriff's Office
K-9 instructor Greg Cole gives
camper Robert Heathcock a hug
following the Wednesday morn-
ing K-9 demonstration led by
Cole and his fellow officers.


License#ML 5.22S58
Tune-Ups, Front End
Alignment, Tires & Brakes




Lee's One Stop Auto Care, Inc
274 Commerce Drive Port St. Joe
227-9696


At a solemn ceremony
Wednesday afternoon, MDA
District Director Melissa D'Aurio
released this red balloon in
honor of the late MDA president
and CEO Robert Ross, who died
last Monday at age 86.


i August 4-6
Tickets: Civic Center Box Office *
marinaciviccenter.com *
ticketmaster locations *
'lme w Ticketmaster.com 850-434-7444


0


I ~


r~l~k-~uwr~--anaunaaaasaPi~B~Raaanam; ;


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


17BTh Sar Prt t.Jo. L Tursav A qut 006


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A Mul






Home Canning


2C


Legals


5C


Classifieds


4 -


pcnlischPdr 79.7 .Srvina Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


Waterfronts


On July 13 at 9:30 a.m., Port St. Joe
Waterfronts Florida Partnership (old city
visioning) held an open public meeting at the
City Fire Station facilitated by the Department
of Community Affairs from Tallahassee.
Among those in attendance were
Gail Alsobrook, Executive Director of
Downtown Redevelopment, Clay Kennedy,
Design Committee, Carol McLeod, Program
Coordinator, Brian Underwood and Jim
Garth, Executive Committee, of Waterfronts
Partnership.
Dr. Michael Conrad and Dr. Tom Taylor of
the D.C.A announced that Port St. Joe was "on
track" with its requirements and demonstrated
how to improve upon the organization and
its objectives. Encouragement was given to
continue with the progress, which included
applying for numerous grants related to public
access to the water and sites of significant or
historical interests.
The Port St. Joe Waterfronts Partnership
announced that it should have a "Master
Plan" for consideration and approval by the
first of the next year. The plan includes many
improvements and enhancements to our
community including several "Mini-Parks",
Boardwalk along the waterfront, underground


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL


Partnership


utilities and proper storm drainage.
The excitement of Waterfronts
Partnership moving forward with plans was


witnessed on the 4th of July by hundreds
of people visiting them in their booth at
Frank Pate Park. Numerous fellow citizens


* Thursday, August 3, 2006 SECTION C


Meeting

joined up to participate while enjoying free
watermelon, lemonade and are work supplied
by Waterfronts Partnership. "Improving Our
Community Your Way" is their slogan which
reflects their approach to the undertaking.
A new billboard sign is installed at the
waterfronts edge in Frank Pate Park to give
everyone an idea.
What we need are more people in our
community to become involved with whatever
time they have to offer. No one is asking
for money, simply a little time to insure
that we all have a hand in the future of our
community and not let others make the
decisions for. us. Some of our volunteers
work less than two hours per month but that
time is critical to us and we appreciate it. We
have numerous committees needing people
including Finance, Design/Planning, Special
Projects, and P/R.
"This must be a community effort that we
all can be proud of when completed. We don't
want to look like other communities that are
littered with tall condos blocking the view of
the water," says Jim Garth
The new web site is PSJWaterfrontsPartn
ership.com and their phone number is 850-
229-7197.


Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative Trustees Serve on FECA Board


Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative Trustees
Robert Byrd and Waylon Graham were
recently elected by theirfellow Board members
to serve on Florida Electric Cooperatives
Association's Board of Directors. GCEC
Secretary L. L. Lanier was elected to serve as
alternate. Byrd represents GCEC members
residing in the Allanton area of Bay County,
while Graham represents members of the
White City area of Gulf County. Lanier also
represents Gulf Coast Electric members
residing in Gulf County.
Florida Electric Cooperatives


FORGOTTEN COAST
REALTY


,." '.,
'. ', :...... -' ,.
,,, ..
Dougl.as,:,. :. 'Lan'din Ro.' ad ; .^
Douglas Landing Road


Hwy 386 40 Acres


21359 NW (CR 333
Bristol
MLS 201302 $100,000
5 Acres W/Barn


1913 Cypress Ave
Port St Joe
MLS 108329 $279,000


Association, Inc. is not-for-profit, statewide
trade association representing 15 electric
distribution cooperatives and two generation
and transmission cooperatives serving


710 Highway 98, Mexico Beach, FL 32456
Office: (85o)-648-1olo Ext 12a
Cell: 85o0819-1205
cerwin@ cbforgottencoast.com
vww.cerwin.net


Hwy 386 40 Acres 1534 Hwy 71 Wewahitchka


CAROL ER


6520 Farm Road -
Wewahitchka
MLS 200992 $91,000
5.28 Acres


807 Garrison Ave
Port St Joe
NILS 107544 $279,000


Corner Hwy 71 & Meyer
Road Wewahitchka
MLS 200192 8 Acres


220 Forrest St
Overstreet
MLS 200250 $249,000


S' more than 1.4 million
consumers in 58 of 67
-a -" Florida counties. Florida
electric cooperatives cover
more than 65 percent
of the state's land mass
while serving 10 percent
of Florida's entire
Robert Bryd population.
Members of FECA's 34-
person Board of Directors meet regularly to
take an active role in the committee process
through FECA's two standing committees:
Legislative and Public Affairs, and Finance
and Administration. These committees,
along with the Board's Executive Committee,
help achieve FECA's goals as set out in its


strategic plan by adopting policies and
positions.
Byrd will serve on the Legislative and
Public Affairs committee, and Graham will
serve on the Finance and Administration
committee.
Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative is
part of the Touchstone Energy national
alliance of local, consumer-owned electric
cooperatives providing high standards of
service to customers large and small. GCEC
serves approximately 20,000 consumers
in Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Walton
and Washington counties and in the
municipalities of Wewahitchka, Ebro, White
City, Fountain, Lynn Haven and Southport.


COLDWeL SBaN P ForGOttei coast Realt PpeseNtS


ries


EVERYONE IS INVITED!
EvePU FPiDay PPOM 5PM EDT tiLL...
JUNe 16tH tHPOUGH8 1aoP Dag WeeKeND
Mul'let A ,o' f


Fq'ee Food (hid offt PiluikA


Music

Volleyball
lloupe .Shoe
Fare &Frfnwt
gock Races
'owd Cos #p Ruidimg CoiftPA A


Mul let -on Co0t A
ite Fli Coifte0 t







Pow Fie Maleoko. oadt
[EteP to W a eOPP ea MFihiy TRip


* :,. ~f.J.j


7-8C


June 16 th St. Joe peach Hwy 98 3286 July 28th St. Joe Peach Hwy 98 9- 986
June 23rd Cape San Blas Salinas Park. August 4th Cape San Blas Salinas Park
June 90th St. Joe Peach Hwy 98 -6 86 August 11th St. Joe Peach Hwy 98 .& 386
July 7th Cape San Bias Salinas Park August 18th Cape San Blas Salinas Park
July 14th St. Joe Peach Hwy 98 -$386 August 25th St. Joe Peach Hwy 98 8$ 386
July 21st Cape San Blas Salinas Park September 1st Cape San Blas Salinas Park


CS C1 iblI 17 1 J I IIV 1 ily -- -/- '


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2( The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006 Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


CANIT!




Many still relish canning and freezing


Old-fashioned canning aficionados say the

fresh flavor can't be beat


By ELIZABETH YORK
Freedom News Service
Nancy Lovett keeps jars
of tomatoes, sweet pickles, fig
preserves, plum jelly and pear
mincemeat that she lovingly
canned in her kitchen.
Lovett, of Odessa, Texas,
popped open a jar of toma-
toes recently to get a taste of
the homemade flavor. She will
soon start her annual can-
ning.
Lovett grew up in Odessa,
watching her mother, Nelle
Lovett make jellies and freeze
produce.
"I got interested in it and
learned the advantage of the
flavor-it's much better," Nancy
Lovett said.
A teacher for 40 years,
Lovett carried on her mother's


tradition, winning blue rib-
bons at area fairs and giving
canned foods away to family,
friends and co-workers.
Lovett grows garlic, onions
and Swiss chard. She prefers
farm produce to the store-
bought variety.
"You have that fresh-picked
flavor," Lovett said. "You don't
have the additives, and if it's
done correctly, you don't have
to add anything at all."
Judy Quinn of Odessa is
famous for her picante sauce.
Quinn custom makes hot, hot
and sweet, not hot, and dia-
betic-friendly varieties of her
famous salsa.
She is also known for her
jalapeno-cauliflower-carrot
mixture and her pickled okra.
Quinn said her family and


friends like her fresh flavors.
Quinn began canning after
she retired from her job at the
Texas Workforce Commission
in 2001.
"I had to learn from
scratch," she said. "I'd never
canned before."
When she doesn't can,
Quinn freezes beans, eggplant,
okra and black-eyed peas.
"It's just real satisfying
to me," Quinn said. "You can
make it like you like it."
Lindy Tefteller, a Midland
County family consumer
science agent for the Texas
Cooperative Extension, said
home canning has its benefits.
Canning is a good way
to get fruits and vegetables
in your diet, and it's cheaper
than buying canned goods,


Presented By PRESTON RUSS, REALTOR u' coastal
Gulf County's Top Volume Sales Leader 2005* I e alt

.LJu 6iroup


www.Coast al Re altyIn fo .com

S, Contact Preston Russ at:
S' .M Office: (850) 227-7770
.- Mobile: (850) 227-8890
E-mail: homesbyruss@aol.com
'Website: Homesbyruss.com

Beautiful home is located in the X Flood zone in Seagrass subdivision. This luxury
3 BR 3.5 BA home is completely furnished, with ceramic tile, hardwood floors,
fenced in backyard. Enjoy your private pool, or the community pool. Just a short
walk to the beach. MLS# 201449 $899,750 Sales Information provided by MLS Association


Tefteller said.
Some popular foods for
canning include peaches, apri-
cots, persimmons, peppers,
tomatoes, squash and beans,
she said.
Tefteller said she sees few


'young people who can. More
people freeze food instead
because they don't have the
appropriate canning equip-
ment, she said.
"Sadly, it's an art that's
wasting away with our older


generation," Tefteller said.
"People are freezing more than
anything."
June Russell of Midland,
Texas, has canned vegetables,

(See CANNING on Page 11C)


7 1Z1 ~'~2 ~iI3~ 2 itT ~i2~'2 ~FZ'~'2 2. .


A
~ i,
.l4~
~1 ~


PORT ST JOE OFFICE
155 W HIGHWAY 98
(PORT CITY SHOPPING CENTER)
PORT ST JOE, FL
850 229-6100


MILS 111119- $1.999.995. 315 \estl Hvs 98 NILS 109318 $3.511?.01',l. 3137 resl Hui 98 NLS 109317 $1.l41h0.ultf. 3119 etsl H" 98 NIMS 111603 795.000. 3151 West H3
Approximately 2 Acres 8010'+/- Highsway 98 Fronltae Centrall) Located to M indmark Beach Barefoot Cottages & Viento Development This is a unique offering of VALUABLE DEVELOPMENT PROPERTY


S ... -: .....
M I, 110613 588 Ling Street -- Onl) Blocks from MIs 201(11 615 Sesame Sitrel -- Home Hai New -
Ba) Inlercoa.otal laterway And Public Boat CarpieL And Is In Excellent Condirion. Thi, Is A
Ramp.propert I. On High And Dr). Great In- ..Mlu(t SeeE yet'alyy Fo.omnglamiles And Isl
' ''-stmen, Proper, Time Home Owners.


,.i-..~.


copmmercialJotfopigh visibuit).Ison the Aan- Ui ~s 110970 178 Palm Breeze Aaj -- Breakfast MS 109422 -6708 -05 6 STREET Pr ty is
doned Tank Restoration Program ahd haga score .. Bar, Fireplace. Floor: Hardwood And Carpet, tie mobile on 2 Iot.-gon dedicated beach. Value is in the.-
number 31 which makes it eligible for inspection W'alk In Closet. Large Kitchen Pantry. This li park. Has 2 large decks fireplace. garden tub. me is being removed by seller
'for final designatio-'ofr"No further Actiob"-S- ..... ___ kitchen island. Excellent permanent home or *J -
, -lisll-taaks and contamination have already ". .-. ... .. .-- '.kB-- .- .., ..'-. '- ". .- ea.-, -....."-- ''
S been removedd "-'- "." .... -- "' ... -- ". '


~""4~ll~rr ~M FIMMM I'M -M N I-WINnnr


_-;,I~;~-~S~l~u~32~1F~~~Bi~a~G~BCCa~l~SP


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


2(The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006


.. .; T.-irL2. T'_ J2 2, ....... 5, ? :--' "






The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006 3(


Established 9yJ/ .7-erving .un county andI surroudI In a "


Bronson Announces Recall Of Washington State Oysters


TALLAHASSEE Florida
4Agriculture and Consumer
'Services Commissioner
.harles H. Bronson
:announced today that
,Florida is assisting the State
:of Washington with a pub-
-lic health and safety prod-
:uct recall. In-Shell Oysters
fj-om specific harvest areas
.n Washington State are being
recalledd by the Washington
I


Department of Health due to
reports of over 100 illnesses
from a naturally occurring
bacterium Vibrio parahaemo-
lyticus.
Symptoms of this bacteri-
al infection include diarrhea,
abdominal cramps, nausea,
vomiting, headache, fever, and
chills. The symptoms usually
appear about 12 hours after
eating infected shellfish but


can begin within two hours
or as late as 48 hours after
consumption. The illness is
usually mild to moderate and
lasts for two to seven days; it
can be life threatening to peo-
ple with immune dysfunction
or chronic liver disease.
This recall does not
involve Florida harvested
or processed oysters or any
other Florida harvested or


processed seafood in any
way. This recall also does
not involve seafood from any
State other than the State of
Washington.
Implicated are In-Shell
Washington State oysters har-
vested after July 13, 2006 and
labeled as harvested from:
Hood Canal 3, Hood Canal 4,
Hood Canal 5, Hood Canal 6,
Hood Canal 7, Hood Canal 8,


Totten Inlet, or Eld Inlet.
In-Shell oysters har-
vested and labeled as speci-
fied should not be consumed
and should be discarded or
returned to where they were
purchased.
Although thorough cook-
ing to an internal tempera-
ture of 1450 F will kill the
bacteria and leave the oys-
ters safe to eat, Florida food


safety officials are not advis-
ing this practice for recalled
products.
Bronson said that if any
such oysters were shipped to
Florida, they should already
have been removed from all
retail outlets. Nonetheless,
inspectors from his Food
Safety Division will be on
the lookout for any such
product that remains.


"Bronson Announces Assistance Program

:For Forest Landowners


- TALLAHASSEE Florida
:.kriculture and Consumer
- services Commissioner
:Gharles H. Bronson today
Announced a program that will
'assist forest landowners in the
managementt of their property.
'Fhe department's Division of
-Forestry will hold a sign-up
:for enrollment in the Forest
4;and Enhancement Program
;(FLEP) from August 4 through
-September 15.
, The program, authorized
,*inder the 2002 Farm Bill, is
,available to non-industrial
,-rivate forest landowners on
:,1 75-25 cost share basis for
c*iost practices. Eligible prac-
:ltces include, but are not lim-
4ied to: site preparation, tree
planting, and prescribed burn-
-'4ig activities. Landowners who
,own at least 10 acres but no
nipore that 10,000 acres of land
;who have a multiple-resource


practice plan will be eligible
to receive funding assistance
,under FLEP A maximum of
$10,000 will be available for
each qualifying landowner
over the life of the program as
reimbursement for incurred
expenses for approved prac-
tices.
Almost half of the state's
,14 million acres of forest-
land is owned by private non-
industrial forest landowners.
According to national, regional
and statewide landowner sur-
veys, most forest landowners
don't lihave a management plan
for their property. The state's
allocation under the program
will be used for implementa-
tion of forest practices pre-
scribed in existing or newly
developed management plans.
"It benefits everyone when
an approach stressing best
management practices is in


place for forested property,"
Bronson said. "The forests
are a critical natural resource
in Florida, and it is important
to preserve them as well as
mitigate any potential wildfire
danger."
Landowners can obtain
application forms from their
local Division of Forestry
office and from other cooper-
ating agencies. The Division of
Forestry's foresters will pro-
vide technical assistance to
landowners and will be the
local contact person for par-
ticipating landowners.
For more informa-
tion, contact David Smith,
Program Manager (850) 414-
9907 or Bonnie Stine, CFA
Supervisor, (850) 414-9912
(both in Tallahassee) or your
local County Forester who
can be located at http:/L
www.fl-dof.com.


ILife Management Center Names Ailes


-Executive Director

The Board of Directors Inc. as
of Life Management Center in 1976.
of NW Florida, Inc. has as an A(
-rinamed Edwin R. (Ned) Ailes, many yea
M.S., LMFT as its Executive teaching
'Director effective July 1, 2006 and fan
four months after appoint- skills prc
ing him as Interim Executive Commun
Director. Ailes replaces Peter "Ove
T. Hampton, Ph.D. who has the Boar
'retired after 31 years with reviewed
-the agency, 29 of which were didates
spent in the top leadership Executive


-role.
Ailes joined, Life
;Management Center in 1998
-when the agency acquired the
,Gulf County Guidance Clinic
-where he served as Executive
.Director. Prior to accepting
'the Interim Executive Director
,position, Ailes directed Bay
,County Adult Outpatient,
'Psychiatric Services, and
Case Management as well
-as Project H.O.RE., the
-Friendship Center, and the
;Florida Assertive Community
Treatment (FACT) programs
.of Life Management Center.
Additionally, he supervised
the agency's Gulf County and
,Calhoun County clinics. In
'this new role, he will oversee
the entire agency administra-
-tion, as well as Psychiatric
-Services, Crisis Stabilization,
and the FACT program.
Ailes began his career
as a Counselor with the Bay
County Guidance Clinic,
Inc. (now Life Management
Center) in 1975. He joined the
-Gulf County Guidance Clinic,


sive nati
most ap
was condo


Executive Director
Ailes also served
adjunct Professor for
Irs during his career,
Psychology courses
aily and parenting
grams at Gulf Coast
ity College.
r the past year,
rd of Directors has
many qualified can-
for the position of
e Director. An exten-
onal search for the
propriate individual
lucted.


The Board of Directors
recognizes Ned as the most
qualified applicant and is
pleased to have him continue
as Executive Director, states
Connie Rigby Leete, Board
President.
Life Management Center
of Northwest Florida, Inc.,
established in 1954, pro-
vides comprehensive, highly
skilled, affordable behavioral
health and family support
services for children, adults,
and families in the commu-
nities of Northwest Florida.


Citizens Property in Strong Financial


Position for Hurricane Season


TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -
Citizens Property Insurance
Corporation has $5 billion
in reserves to deal with
potential losses as the 2006
hurricane season moves into
the traditionally active month
of August, its president said
Thursday.
"We are in excellent shape
financially to deal with losses
this year," said Bob Ricker,
president of Citizens. "We have
taken several steps to keep
Citizens on a sound financial
footing."
Ricker said the sale in
early July of about $3.05
billion in revenue bonds
gave the state's not-for-profit
insurance company a total of
slightly more than $5 billion


available to pay storm-related
claims.
Citizens had about $2
billion available before the
bonds were sold. Another $5
billion is available through
the state's catastrophic fund,
which becomes available
after storm damage exceeds a
certain level.
In addition to the money
on hand, Citizens is receiving
a one-time, $715 million
appropriation from the
Legislature that will lower the
assessment Citizens made
on policy holders through
insurance companies to pay
off damages from the 2005
storm season.
The appropriation reduced
the regular assessment to 2


Watch out for alligators in river
floodplains, around lakes, marshes,
swamps, ponds, drainage canals and
ditches. Never approach an alligator, never
offer food to one, and keep all pets and
small children away from them.


percent of annual premium
for one year. A 10 percent
emergency assessment will be
spread over 10 years, Ricker
said.
Citizens' financial strength
is particularly importarrt
because of the issues facing
the private sector, he said.
"Until we can find a way
to limit the volatility in the
private market," Ricker said,
"Citizens is going to be the only
company writing insurance
policies in certain parts of the
state."
"Without Citizens,
property owners would be left
unprotected and that would
be devastating to, the state'p
economy if we have major
storms," Ricker said.

,Pay attention
to the beach "
"flag system
and know surf

'conditions
before you go "
into the awtelr.i



.- ..* .,. i'.

[::i
,..- .1


REDUCED!! Drop by on Sunday to see this charming 3 bedroom home
in Port St. Joe. It is located on a 90'X150' lot only three blocks from
St. Joe Bay. The formal living room and all bedrooms feature hardwood
floors and tongue-in groove walls and ceilings. The kitchen, dining room
and breakfast area all have new ceramic tile floors. The home also offers
a glassed family room off the eating areas for relaxing with the family.
The large lt in a'quiet neighborhood provides primac and chain link-
fencing for the kids or pets. New central heat and air 3.temn. All of this
plus a home warranty. Directions: East on Hwy 98 to 16th St. 3 blocks
to Palm Blvd. House on corner of 16th & Palm.


I. Neubauer Real Estate, Inc.
ERA Always There For You. __


6150 Ski Breeze Circle
$1,1(iJiJ .CHARMING
-;UI F I'ROT I HOME ON C-
30.\ 3BR'3B \ home has been
complrelsi updated and features
li-ing and dining rooms, open
4 -. kitchen, gulf' front master suite
n/read nl area and fabulous
vie lhnmi is full furnished
M and mnove-.in ready. #200758

9446 Hwy 98
$599.000 BEACON HILL
G LiL F VIEW TOWN HOME
3HR/2BA across from
Ss! niter w/dedicated beach.
So'r i FR.Is ell-equipped eat-in-
,S:w_,.g kitelii'n and laundry room.
SDl sliding glass doors/both
Sle els w/patio and deck,
t.crncd porch & workshop.
#111342 -
$49900-CapeSan BasGulfFrTtHome-4BP45BA-.#111430
S$895(0-Bay withPv1y/Si uion-3BR/2BA #111659
$775 -CanalFrontlMexicoBeachTH-3BR/3BA #2001761
S725,000-VilaDelSol-NewGatedCmmun.#200597,#200598
S6900-A-FraneBautywithGulfVews-4BR/25BA-#201261
00-GratBuilig withCanalA#cces #201083
3 9000- _SSiBaymrLotonEastBay '#200757
S45 00-N&MvdwoBeah&PIer-2B5BA ---#109522
S310j00-EnjoyStleandSpmeinPortStJoe-3BR/2BA.#111166
289p91) Cutomt iAaimieniL Lroi 3BR/2BA #-)Ili39
7-4I(i-- Biauitull.hinGreatSubdiLti,-_ #I llf4f1i)
4211 Reid Aie., Port St.
,rI/wwweralloridacom (850))29-9
.I I,, rolocation@erafllrilda.com Toll Free 1.s0m.-476


671 Guir Pines Dr.
CL".;T0NI BlAl I( -C3ox IIONIF
T ~i~ 21311/213A h'jmc ha% Ias
o~penii s ii,. diriiii anid Uch len
are'ac, ctramlL tilt IfloorN. Ipa-
cjous ma'.Cer suilt'and large' gur',I
aind parking Fujr 6 at. %ell a, Iiomi
'if, -o~ ran[~f2El3

219 9th Street
$295,000 CUTE PORT ST.
SJOE HOME CL OSE TO TOWN
IB F 3BR,'IBA humne ha.;s ig
diniing combhlifnation. hidwind'fd
flisir',. ceiling Ian,. rtrnii-jdrltd
hafhro'jnis and a %%AlI-cquipped
ILitchun. ireened i pirCh and
home %%Iarrant%. /nned omfi-
unerciai.rtsidenuial. I$l1i140)2
S260flW-W. s otMedoBa~h-2BR/1BA_4109724
S250,000- ~ a Hill #109644,#109647
S247,0-HorPinitStJoeon2Uos-3BRI2BA -#1108%
S245,000-MedoBdiHa n~aw~-3BRI2BA-#2006l
S234W0-Va~itLnthNew~bffiMsin #110Y748
S2000-SLW&~CmmmW 0 'kdinRt SLJoe -#200407
SlWPW-Bufldi1BmtuiHiMu"iBeAi1 #20M79
S74O,-L0kvim Lotin Wmaithka #111700
Each OfOice Indeperdently Owyned ano Operated


1-888-591-8751 ,F, ,
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4 CommerciJa lois in I.:.,:dr. ,,, d ci-.j d.. ..1- BR 2 BA home one block from SL Joe
oping coastal community. Highly visible and Bay. Nice yard, fireplace, large master and living
high traffic volume in Port St Joe. Great Bay room. MLS# 110119 $339,000.
views! Possibility to pick up two additional
adjacent lots for bigger space. MLS 110987 Preston
$950,000. "1
Victor


www.CoastalRealtylnfo.com


Money, Bayou PP. BA rmod.ul,' I'm:.c
-j t t7, .. h':', b 'i l ._[: publKc bcJ. i lC. .l
Zoned commercial and would be a great locat
rion. for an office. MIS# 110825 $299,900


n Russ
Broker
Ramos GRI
Broker Associate


Scott Burkett
REALTOR
DebbeWibberg
REALTOR
Betty Caughey
REALTOR
Paul Penn
REALTOR
Gretchen Upchurch
REALTOR
Brian Burkett
REALTOR
Rex Anderson
REALTOR
Ann Anderson
REALTOR-'
Chris Pierce
REACTOR


227-8890

340-1216

899-5242

227-6178

625-6197

866-2853

. 27-5543

227-8892

227-5416

227-5432

340-0628


* 8048 Cape San Bias Rd 110 Barrier Dunes 106 Reid Avenue
Cape San Blas, FL Cape San Bias, FL Port St Joe, FL

850-227-7770 850-227-3200 850-227-7775

800-584-1566 800-713-9695 800-581-2910


.1 ,a.


L I


ER Neubauer Real Estate, Inc.

IWLS-
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, August 611 2:00 4:00


.-. .


IC)137 --+x/ nnr4 -jrrn,,nrlinri nrpry,; for 68 vears


E


454 7:










Age 7y Fotr Health Care Administration Announces Addition Of


Pe dia i Care Information On Florida Compare Care Website


TALLAHASSEE
Agency for Health Care
Administration (AHCA)
Secretary Christa Calamas
today announced Florida
is first in the nation to
publicly report pediatric
care outcomes in health
facilities across the state.
Individuals and families
can now search for spe-
cific procedures unique to
pediatrics and adult care
offered at their local health
care facility using www.
FloridaCompareCare.gov.
A variety of new features
were also added to the
website, including age-spe-


cific search fields, help-
ful service information and
navigational tools.
"The Agency continues
to promote transparency
in Florida's health care
system, providing easy-to-
use online tools to help
Floridians find the best
care for themselves and
their loved ones," said
Secretary Calamas. "These
new features enhance
Florida Compare Care's
ability to serve our state's
families."
In addition to new
pediatric information, the
Florida Compare Care


website has added:
*Facility descriptions,
including components
such as:
*Rural Hospitals
*Critical Access
Hospitals
*Primary, Stroke
Centers /
*Organ/ transplant by
type
Comprehensive
Cancer Centers
*Reconfigured medical
conditions and procedures
methodology utilizing APR-
DRG versus the currently
methodology which utilizes
ICD9 and DRG codes


*Adult data previously
collected will be sub-cat-
egorized to include infor-
mation specific to seniors
age 65 and older
*More recent data from
July 2004 June 2005.
Previously, the site fea-
tured data from January
- December 2004
*Organizational and
navigational improvements
to assist users in readily
finding information regard-
ing Cesarean and vaginal
deliveries and newborns,
including babies born with
complications
*Updated informa-


tion on federal Agency for
Healthcare Research and
Quality (AHRQ) indicators,
which measure health per-
formance outcomes
*Updated informa-
tion on Surgical Infection
Prevention (SIP) measures
with CMS data -
*Ability of user to con-
duct a 200 mile radius
search
*Ability of user to down-
load results into a spread-
sheet such as Microsoft
Excel
AHCA collaborated with
the State Consumer Health
Information and Policy


Advisory Council (formally
the CHIS Advisory Council)
to create Florida Compare
Care. The website displays
the number of patients,
charges, length of stay,
readmission rates, mor-
tality rates, infection rates
and complication rates for
various medical conditions
and procedures in
Florida's short term
acute care hospitals.
For more informa-
tion on Florida Compare
Care, please visit www.
FloridaCompareCare.gov.


St. Joe's Watercolor Inn And Resort Tops


The Charts In The 2006 Travel + Leisure


"World's Best" Awards


Gulf Coast luxury
Inn named 7th in 'North
America 36th in the world
by readers of Travel +
Leisure Magazine
Santa Rosa Beach, FL
(July 24, 2006) The St.
Joe Company announced
today that WaterColor Inn,
a 60-room luxury beach-
front hotel part of a mag-
nificent 499-acre resort
community ranked 7th in
"*'North America and 36th in
the world by the readers of
Travel + Leisure magazine.
The 2006 "World's Best
Awards" will be announced
in the August issue, rep-
resenting the first rank-
ing for The WaterColor Inn
'and Resort since opening
four years ago.
"We are thrilled to
receive this prestigious


ranking. The WaterColor
Inn and Resort is the per-
fect combination of first-
class luxury and warm
Southern hospitality," says
Rod Wilson, President of
JOE's Northwest Florida
residential operations,
developer of WaterColor.
"We strive to make sure
each guest has a memora-
ble experience that is sec-
ond to none."
Each year, the editors at
Travel + Leisure poll their
subscribers, known as the
world's most sophisticated
and well-traveled people.
According to Editor-in-
Chief Nancy Novogrod,
T+L readers are right on
target: "Our readers' opin-
ions and travel choices so
often mirror the trends
that we report in the maga-


zine." In the survey for the
World's Best Awards, read-
ers are asked to rate hotels
in the following categories:
rooms/facilities, location,
service, restaurants/food
and value.
Set on more than a
quarter of a mile of sugar-
white sand beach, The
WaterColor Inn and Resort
tops all five categories,
offering Gulf views from
every room, the finest lin-
ens and furnishings, five
pools, sunset dining and
fresh seafood at the Fish
Out of Water restaurant
and the Baithouse res-
taurant, kayaking, nature
trails, biking, award-win-
ning tennis facilities, Camp
WaterColor, WaterColor
WorkOut, the InnSpa and
exclusive access to the pri-


vate Tom 'Fazio-designed
Camp Creek Golf Club
nearby. Sophisticated,
elegantly furnished, luxu-
ry beach cottages ranging
from one bedroom to six
bedrooms are also avail-
able for rent. Nearly half
of the guests are repeat vis-
itors, whether they return
for a quiet weekend get-
away or with the entire
family.
New for the 2006/2007
season, The WaterColor
Inn and Resort has
introduced Signature
Experiences which include
a Culinary Experience, a
Wellness Experience, a
Family Experience and
Women's Experience. For
more information visit
www.watercolorinn.com.


/
/
/



-K *,.
/
- I'
("'V
/
\ Sow~ RAFFIELD


Port St. Joe Office
252 Marinna Dr., Porl St. Joe, FL 32456
Mobile (850) 340-0900
Toll Free (800).451-2349
E-mail Sonjia,'c21gul'coastrealty.com
1Ai Lp_


Redj Eull i'iafl.-i


\'accar, Loi
Fjr-jnti L aridine


~Gu IfCoast A


LESTER APPRAISAL &

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

James E. "Jamie" Lester, Jr.
Broker


C.:,rner


N IL S, # ',11 Of


-.2 -\cr.
Sto'ne~ Mill Cieek Rojd


$'-1.900 $3I4u-;,IiIJ 'Adl Lc'r A,, ilible
M L S #C'21) 3154


A, -re Lot
Sione Mitll Creek Road
Adl Loc A~aiJnble
NIL s#200il)5'
$3~7.901)


5'54 S3rd Sreet

$ 2 2 .9 0 0 1


- -- ,


141 Hwy 71 S, Wewahitchka, FL
850-639-4200 Fax 850-639-9756
Email: tsasser@lestercompany.net


Division Of Emergency


Medical Operations


Selects John C. Bixler


As Bureau Chief For


Emergency Medical


Services


TALLAHASSEE
The Florida Division
of Emergency Medical
Operations (DEMO) has
selected John C. Bixler,
Paramedic, RN, BSN,
as the Bureau Chief for
Emergency -Medical
Services (EMS) for the
Florida Department of
Health (DOH).
"The extensive health
care experience of John
Bixler will be a great asset


Kensinger Housing
of Panama City Announces
"2006 Lot Model-Closeout"
SALE
.- *All Homes Windzone 3
*Save up to $10,000 Now
*Drywall Overhead Vents and much more
*Prices will never be lower
*Financing Available with Low Down Payment
*Call Today & Save!!


Kensinger Housing Inc.
3424 E. 15th Street, Panama City, FL
850-785-0693




Ca"ptain Wayne


wayne Kowlett, Kealtor


CREATING DEMAND!
You hear it everywhere, "It's
a seller's market." True, ho-
meowners in many parts of
the country haven't had to
wait long for offers, but let's
assume that the great times
won't last forever. Don't
worry about any "bubbles"
bursting, but take a smart ap-
proach if you're considering
selling your home soon.
You cannot control the laws of
supply and demand, but you
can control whether or not
your home sells. The two big-
gest factors you need to work
on are pricing the property
correctly and getting buyers
inside the door.
The best opportunity to sell
your home is immediately af-
ter it enters the market. Pric-
ing your home too high at the
start will result in few offers.


Baefooc Properties
Senous and qualified buyers
jump on brand new listings.
and Lf you wait too long to re-
duce your pnce back down to
market, it will simply be too
late to attract those buyers.
Worse, you'll only generate
interest again if you reduce to
below market, an unsatisfac-
tory option.
Now that the price is right,
the greatest challenge is get-
ting those buyers inside your
home. Create "curb appeal"
by mowing the grass, clean--
ing the windows, planting
flowers, and so on. If your
best features are inside or out
back, offer photos and "vir-
tual tours" online. Lure them
with price and wow them with
value, the solution for any
market.



Thinking of selling? Call for
a free consultation. Wayne
Rowlett of Barefoot Properties,
1085 Cape San Bias Road,
Port St. Joe, FL 32456. (850)
227-8492 wr@gtcom.net
www. Captwayne.net


to his newly-acquired posi-
tion," said Nancy Humbert,
A.R.N.R, M.S.N., Deputy
Secretary for Health
and State Public Health
Nursing Director. "His
well-rounded background
makes him the ideal advo-
cate for the Division."
Bixler has been a
Florida Paramedic since
1975 and served as a
Charge Paramedic and
Flight Nurse/Paramedic
on rotary and fixed-wing
aircraft for Tallahassee
MemorialRegionalMedical
Center for approximately
20 years. He then served
as a Clinical Registered
Nurse and Infection
Control Practitioner at
Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital for the next 10
years. Although Bixler
retired in June 2004, his
passion for emergency
medicine brought him
back to the workforce
in October 2004. Bixler
restarted his career with
the Bureau of EMS as the
manager of agency licen-
sure and inspections.
The Florida Bureau
of Emergency Medical
Services is responsible
for the statewide regula-
tion of emergency medi-
cal technicians (EMT)
and paramedics, EMT
and paramedic training
programs and air/ground
ambulance services and
their vehicles. The Bureau
establishes and reviews
the Florida EMS State
Plan to provide new strat-
egies to improve emergen-
cy services throughout the
State. The EMS Grants
Program distributes funds
from the EMS Trust Fund
to improve and expand
emergency medical servic-
es through county, match-
ing and rural grants. The
EMS Data Program col-
lects and analyzes data
from the EMS Service
providers to measures the
effectiveness of emergency
services.
DOH promotes and
protects the health and
safety of all people in
Florida through the
delivery of quality public
health services and the
promotion of health care
standards. For more infor-
mation about Emergency
Medical Services, please
visit the DOH Web site at
www.doh.state.fl.us and
select Emergency Medical
Operations from the drop
down box.


Buying or Selling?


CONTACT SONJIA RAFFIELD!
"Your Secure Line In Real Estate" '.,


.4PPIR41% .-11 S RE-IL EST4lTE SALES REJVTALS PROPERTY.IL-lNGEMENVT




REDCED ._.UNER,'CONTR'C
Bei.1..3'IB~hBdroomi I Bath -171117 ?iT TO"
r.s H,'-, ', I N: Hardon Rr~er Road I M, Pjtrcck Strcer


SBed u).lrri I Braih I41H',, ,
11 ,ufin,, BrooLk Roid St I*oe Beach


LOTS& LAND '''


~~\~\\\\\~ ~~\\\\ \\~ ~~~\ ~\ \ ~\~\\\~\\ \\\\ ~\\\\\ \\\\~\\I~


4( The Star, Pori St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006


Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


I








Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006 5(


PUBLIC NOTICES


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA

IN RE: The Estate of
FLORENCE WYNELL
PRITCHARD,
CASE NO.:06-53PR
Decedent.
/

NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
.Estate of FLORENCE WYNELL
PRITCHARD, File No. 06-53PR
is pending in the Circuit Court
of Gulf County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 1000 Fifth Street, Port St.
Joe, FL 32456. The name and
address of the Co-Personal
Representatives and the Co-
Personal Representatives' attor-
ney are as set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this
Notice is served who have
objections that challenge the
-qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of this Court, are
required to file their objections
with this Court within the lat-
ter of three (3) months after the
date of the first publication of
this Notice or thirty (30) days
after the date of service of a copy
of the Notice on them.
All creditors of the Decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against Decedent's
Estate on whom a copy of this
Notice is served, within three
(3) months after the date of the
first publication of this Notice
must file their claims with this
Court within the latter of three
(3) months after the date of the
first publication of this Notice or
thirty (30) days after the date of
service of a copy of this Notice
on them.
All creditors of the Decedent
and persons having claims or
demands against Decedent's
Estate must file their claims
with this Court within three (3)
months after the date of the first
publication of this Notice.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of the first pub-
lication of this Notice is July
20, 2006.
Co-Personal Representative:
Karen Rollins
'230 South Duck Avenue
Wewahitchka, FL 32465

Co-Personal Representative:
Sandra Oltz
6302 Boatrace Road
Panama City, FL 32404

Timothy J. McFarland, Esquire
P.O. Box 202
326 Reid Avenue
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
FL Bar No.: 0984868
(850) 227-3113
Attorney for Co-Personal
Representatives
Publish July 13, 20, August 3,
& 10 2006.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners will hold
a public hearing to consider
adoption-of an Ordinance with-
the following title:
AN ORDINANCE RELATING
TO THE LEVY OF A SIX CENT
PER GALLON GASOLINE AND
FUELS TAX, (THE "LOCAL
OPTION GAS TAX"); AMENDING
ORDINANCE 89-4 BY
EXTENDING THE TERM OFTHE
LEVY OF THE LOCAL OPTION
SGAS TAX; AND PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
The public hearing will be
held during the Gulf County
Board of County Commissioner's
meeting on Tuesday, August 8,
2006 at 6:00 p.m. est. in the
County Commissioner's meeting
room in the Robert M. Moore
Administration Building, Gulf
County Courthouse Complex,
Port St. Joe, Florida.
All interested persons
may appear and -be heard
with respect to the proposed.
Ordinance. If a person decides
to appeal any decisions made
by the Gulf County Commission
with respect to any matter
considered at this hearing, he/,
she will need a record of the
proceedings and that for such
purpose he/she may need to
ensure a verbatim record of the
proceedings made and which
would include any evidence
upon which the appeal is to


be based.
A copy of the proposed
Ordinance is available for
inspection on weekdays between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. est., and
5:00 p.m. est. at the Office of
the Clerk of Court, Gulf County
Courthouse, 1000 C.G. Costin,
Sr., Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida,
32456.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: CARMEN L. McLEMORE,
CHAIRMAN
Publish: July 27, 2006 and
August 3, 2006
Ad #2006-086

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED
BIDS
BID NO. 0506-25

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners will
receive bids from any person,
company or corporation inter-
ested in providing the following
service:
Financing of a 2006 Ford
F350 4x4 Rescue Truck
with Utility Body, in the
amount of $43,376.00.
Financing will be for a
term of five (5) years, with
first payment due one (1)
year after establishment of
loan.
Please indicate on the enve-
lope YOUR COMPANY NAME,
that this is a SEALED BID, and
include the BID NUMBER.
Bids will be received until
Friday, August 4, 2006 at 5:00
p.m. E.T., at the Office of the
Clerk of Circuit Court, 1000
Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Blvd.,
Room 148, Port St. Joe, FL
32456, and the bids will be
opened at this location on
Monday, August 7, 2006 at
10:00 a.m., E.T.
The Board reserves the right
to reject any and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Carmen L.
McLemore, Chairman
Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris,
Clerk
Ad #2006-087
Publish: July 27 & August
3, 2006

BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS

GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
for
AUDITING SERVICES

RFP NO: 0506-26

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners (the
"County") is requesting qualifi-
cations from
firms or individuals for the
provision of professional Audit
Services.
/
RFP DEADLINE: August 11,
2006
RFP OPENING: August
14, 2006

Late submittals received
after the fore mentioned dead-
line date, either by Mail, or oth-
erwise, will not be considered
and returned unopened. The
time of receipt will be deter-
mined by the time received
in the Clerk To The 3 a-.J :.f
County Commissioner :,tf.,:
It is the sole responsibility of the
firm for assuring that the RFP is
received in the clerk's office by
the designated date and time.
No faxed, electronic or oral RFP
will be accepted.
To be considered, Firm/
Team must submit an original
and ten (10) copies of RFP in
,a sealed envelope or package,
clearly marked with the Firm/
Team's name and address, and
the words "Audit Services: RFP
NO: "0506-26" addressed to:
Gulf County Board of County
Commissioners, Gulf County
Clerk of Court, Room 148, 1000
Cecil G. Costin Sr., Blvd., Port
St. Joe, FL 32456. RFP's'will be
received until 5:00 p.m., E.T.,
on Friday, August 11, 2006.
RFP's will be opened on Monday,
August 14, 2006 at 10:00 a.m.,
E.T. in the same office.
Copies of required infor- .
nation for the RFP, Financial
Statements and Budgets are
available in the Gulf County
Clerk of Court's office, Room
148, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr.,
Blvd., Port St. Joe, FL 32456,
Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m., E.T.
to 5:00 p.m., E.T.
The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners reserves


the right to reject any or all bids
deemed in the best interest of
the County.
GULF COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
By: /s/ Carmen L. McLemore,
Chairman
Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris,
Clerk
Publish: July 27 & August 3,
2006
Ad #2006-088

NOTICE OF INTENDED
ACTION THE GULF COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD
Purpose and Effect: The Gulf
County School Board propos-
es to amend and adopt pol-
icies, as provided for in the
Administrative Procedures Act,
for the purpose of .bring said
policies into compliance with
Florida Statures and State
Board of Education Rules.
Summary: The following is a
brief description of each pro-
posal change.
Code of Conduct
Student Progression Plan
Economic Impact: The pro-
posals will result in no direct
costs associated with implemen-
tation.
IF REQUESTED, A HEARING
WILL BE HELD AT:
Time: 10:00 a.m., ET
Date: August 15, 2006
Place: Port St. Joe High
School
100 Shark Drive
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
The entire text of the proposed
rules can be inspected during
regular office hours at the Office
of Instructional Services, 150
Middle School Road, Port St.
Joe, FL.
Special legal authority under
which the adoption is autho-
rized and the law being imple-
mented and interpreted are
made specific.
The addition and changes are
proposed by Sara Joe Wooten,
Assistant Superintendent of
Instruction and approved for
consideration by Tim Wilder,
Superintendent.
Amendments: See Above
Publish July 27, & August
3,2006

NOTICE OF INTENDED.
ACTION THE GULF COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD
Purpose and Effect: The Gulf
County School Board propos-
es to amend and adopt pol-
icies, as provided for in the
Administrative Procedures Act,
for the purpose of bringing
said policies into compliance
with Florida Statutes and State
Board of Education Rules.
Summary: The following is a
brief description of each pro-
posal change.
Table of Contents
2.11 Orientation of Board
Members
2.70 Prohibiting
Discrimination, Sexual and
Other Forms
2.80 Reporting Child Abuse
2.95 Wellness Policy
3.201 Performance Grade
Schools
3.40 Safe and Secure
Schools
3.51 Copying of Public
Records
3.60 Flag Display and
Pledge
3.68 Background Screening
for Contractors
3.80 School Volunteers
4.70 Home Education
Program
5.11 Admission to
Kindergarten
5.12 Admission to First-
Grade
5.13 Homeless Students
5.16 Foreign Exchange
Student Admission
5.20 Student Assignment
5.30 Student Control
5.31 Zero Tolerance For
School Related Crimes
5.62 Administration of
Medication
5.63 Students With AIDS or
lHIV Disease
5.70 Student Records
5.80 Athletics
5.81 Drug and Alcohol
Testing of Student Athletes
6.141 Employment of
Athletic Coaches Not Full Time
Employees
6.144 Educational
Paraprofessionals and Aides
6.145 Substitute Teachers
6.15, Assisting Teachers to
Become Highly Qualified
6.16 Appointment or
Employment Requirements
6.21 District Certificates
6.30 Violation of Local,
State, and/or Federal Laws
6.33 Alcohol and Drug-Free


Workplace
6.36 Complaints Against
Employees
6.502 Approval of Leaves
6.543 Illness or Injury-in-
Line-of-Duty Leave
6.61 Employees with HIV,
AIDS or Other Communicable
Diseases
6.75 Whistleblower
Protection
6.80 Name and Address of
Employee
6.914 Use of Sick Leave by
Family Members
7.36 Indebtedness Created
Against a School or the School
Board
7.60 Audits
7.65 Antifraud
7.70 Purchasing and
Bidding
7.701 Bid Protest
Resolution
7.71 Selecting Professional
Services
8.10 Safety
8.44 Summer Nutrition
Program
8.501 Protests of
Construction Contract Bids
8.51 Renovations or
Remodeling of Facilities
8.61 Telecommunications
Plan, FIRN2 and Internet Use
8.70 Management
Information System
8.80 Record Retention and
Disposal
9.21 School Reports
Economic Impact: These pro-
posals may result in direct costs
associated with implementa-
tion.
IF REQUESTED, A HEARING
WILL BE HELD AT:
Time: 10:00 AM EDT
Date: August 15, 2006
Place: Port St. Joe High
School
100 Shark Drive
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
The entire text of the proposed
rules can be inspected during
regular office hours at the Gulf
County School Board Office,
150 Middle School Road, Port
St. Joe, FL.
Special 'Legal authority under
which the adoption is autho-
rized and the law being imple-
mented and interpreted is made
specific.
The addition and changes are
proposed by Bill Carr, Assistant
Superintendent for Business
Services and approved for
consideration by Tim Wilder,
Superintendent.
Amendments: See above
Publish July 27, & August 3,
2006

GULF COUNTY SCHOOLS
NOTIFICATION OF RIGHTS
UNDER FERPA
FOR ELEMENTARY, MIDDLE
AND SECONDARY SCHOOL
The Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
affords parents and students
over 18 years of age ("eligible
students") certain rights with
respect to the student's educa-
tional records. These rights are:
(1) The right to inspect and
review the student's educa-
tion records within 45 days of
the day the School receives a
request for access.
Parents or eligible students
should submit to the School
principal or designee a writ-
ten request that identifies the
records) they wish to inspect.
The School official will make
-arrangements for. access and.
notify the parent or eligible stu-
dent of the time and place where
the records may be inspected.
(2) The right to request the
amendment of the student's
education records that the par-
ent or eligible student believes
are inaccurate.
Parents or eligible students
may ask the School to amend a
record that they believe is inac-
curate. They should write the
School principal or designee,
clearly identify the part of the
record they want changed, and
specify why it is inaccurate. If
the School decides not to amend
the record as requested by the
parent or eligible student, the
School will notify the parent or
eligible -student of the decision
and advise them of their right to
a hearing regarding the request
for amendment. Additional
information regarding the hear-
ing procedures will be provided
to the parent or eligible student
when notified of the right to a
hearing.
(3) The right to consent to
disclosures of personally iden-
tifiable information contained in
the student's education records,
except to the extent that FERPA
authorizes disclosure without
consent.


One exception, which per-
mits disclosure without con-
sent, is disclosure to school offi-
cials with legitimate educational
interest. A school official is a
person employed by the School
as an administrator, supervi-
sor, instructor, or support staff
member (including health or
medical staff and law enforce-
ment unit personnel); a person
serving on the School Board; a
person or company with whom
the School has contracted to
perform a special task (such
as an attorney, auditor, medi-
cal consultant, or therapist);
or a parent or student serving
on an official committee, such
as a disciplinary or grievance
committee, or assisting another
school official in performing his
or her tasks.
A school official has a legiti-
mate educational interest if the
official needs to review an edu-
cation record in order to fulfill
his or her professional respon-
sibility.
Upon request, the School
discloses education records
without consent to officials of
another school district in which
a student seeks or intends to
enroll.
(4) Parents or eligible stu-
dents have the right to file
a complaint with the U.S.
Department of Education con-
cerning alleged failures by the
School District to comply with
the requirements of FERPA The
name and address of the office
that administers FERPA are:
Family Policy Compliance
Office
U.S. Department of
Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-
4605
Publish July 27, & August 3,
2006

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
BID NO. 0506-27

ARCHITECT'S PROJECT NO.
0514

Separate sealed bids for the
construction of "Re-Roofing
and Repairs to the Gulf
County Courthouse, Port St.
Joe, Florida" will be received by
the Gulf County Commission in
the Gulf Coupty Clerk's Office,
Room 148, 1000 Cecil G. Costin
Sr., Blvd, Port St. Joe, Florida
32456 until 5:00 p.m. E.S.T.
on Friday, August .18, 2006
and opened on the following
Monday at 10:00 a.m. at the
same place.
The information for Bidders,
Form of Bid, Form of Contract,
Plans, Specifications, and Form
of Bid Bond, Performance and
Payment Bond, and other con-
tract documents may be exam-
ined at the following:
Donofro and Associates,
Architects
188 N. Foster St.
Dothan, Alabama 36303
334/793-3333

Gulf County Clerk
1000 Cecil Costin Blvd.,
Room 148
Port St. Joe, Fl 32456
850/229-6112

Bid Documents may be
obtained at the office of Donofro
and Associates, Architects
located at 188 N. Foster Street,
Dothan, Alabama 36303.
General Contractors may obtain
two (2) sets for $100.00 (refund-
able), upon returning such
sets within 7 days and in good
condition. Subcontractors and
Suppliers may purchase sets
for $50.00 non-refundable by
contacting Architect's office.
The Scope of Work includes
re-roofing the 22,114/SF
Courthouse and the ,13,591/SF
Jail Facility with standing seam
metal retrofit systems. The
project also includes removal
of the existing built up roof
system, installing new windows,
and new veneer on the exterior
walls.
Bids must be submitted
on the Cr. -[:--.: :.r- rim urnir..-.
with the B.d C.:.u.:,r'r,,: diJ
Bidders must show evidence
of Florida State Contracting
License before bidding or the
bid will not be received or con-
sidered. The Bidders shall show
evidence by clearly displaying
his or her current license num-
ber on the outside of the sealed
envelope in which the proposal
is delivered.
The Owner reserves the
right to waive any informalities
or to reject any or all bids.
A Bid Bond payable to the


Owner in an amount not less
than five percent (5%) of the
amount of the bid, but in no
event more than $10,000.00
must accompany the Bidders'
proposal. Performance and
Payment Bonds and evidence
of insurance required in the bid
documents will be required at
the signing of the contract.
Plans will be on file in
the Architect's office, the
Alabama AGC Internet Plan
Room, Montgomery, Alabama
(kdonaldson@isqft.com); F.
W. Dodge in Montgomery,
Alabama; Pensacola and
Tallahassee, Florida (McGraw-
Hill Construction Dodge Website
call 205/871-4772); and
Reed Construction Document
Processing Center, Norcross,
Georgia (www.reed bulletin.
com).
No Bidder may withdraw'
his bid within 30 days after
the actual date of the opening
thereof.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ Carmen L. McLemore,
Chairman
Attest: /s/ Rebecca L. Norris,
Clerk
Publish: August 3 & 10, 2006
Ad #2006-092

PUBLIC NOTICE
The Port St. Joe Port Authority
will hold its regular meeting on
Monday, August 14, 2006, at
5:00 p.m., E.S.T., at the Gulf
County Public Library, Library
Meeting Room, 110 Library
Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida. All
who wish may attend and be
heard.
If any person decides to appeal
any decision made with respect
to any matter considered at the
meeting, he or she will need a
record of the proceedings, and,
for such purpose, he or she
may need to-ensure that a ver-
batim record of the proceedings
is made, which record includes
the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to
be based.
Publish August 3, 2006

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED
BIDS
BID NO. 0506-28A & B

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners will
receive sealed bids from any
person, company or corpora-
tion interested in providing the
following:
A One (1) New V/ Ton Short
Wheel Base Pickup Truck
and
B One (1) New 2005 or 2006
Ford Supercab or Equivalent
4x4 Truck
Specifications may be
obtained from the Office of the
Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G.
Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148,
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456,
(850) 229-6113. Any questions
regarding this bid should be
directed to Road Department
Superintendent Bobby Knee at
(850) 639-5068.
Please indicate on the enve-
lope YOUR COMPANY NAME,
that this is a SEALED BID, and
include the BID NUMBER.
Proposals must be submit-
ted to the Gulf County Clerk's
Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin,
Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456, by 5:00
p.m., E.Tz on Friday, August
18,2006.
Bids will be opened at this
location on Monday, August
21,2006 at 10:00 a.m., E.T.
The Board reserves the right
to reject any and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY FLORIDA
BY: CARMEN L.
MCLEMORE, CHAIRMAN
ATTEST:
Isl REBECCA L. NORRIS,
CLERK
Publish: August 3 & 10, 2006
Ad #2006-093

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED
BIDS
BID NO. 0506-29A & B

The Gulf County Board of
County Commissioners will
receive sealed bids from any
person, company or corpora-
tion interested in providing the
following:
A One (1) 10' Single Wing
Mower
and ,
B One (1) 15' Double Wing
Mower
Specifications may be
obtained from the Office of the'
Clerk of Court, 1000 Cecil G.


Costin, Sr. Blvd., Room 148,
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456,
(850) 229-6113. Any questions
regarding this bid should be
directed to Road Department
Superintendent Bobby Knee at
(850) 639-5068.
Please indicate on the enve-
lope YOUR COMPANY NAME,
that this is a SEALED BID, and
include the BID NUMBER.
Proposals must be submit-
ted to the Gulf County Clerk's
Office at 1000 Cecil G. Costin,
Sr. Blvd., Room 148, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456, by 5:00
p.m., E.T. on Friday, August
18, 2006.
Bids will be opened at this
location on Monday, August 21,
2006 at 10:00 a.m., E.T.
The Board reserves the right
to reject any and all bids.
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA

BY: /s/ CARMEN L.
MCLEMORE, CHAIRMAN
ATTEST:
Isl REBECCA L. NORRIS,
CLERK
Publish: August 3 & 10, 2006
Ad #2006-094

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED
BIDS

The City of Port St. Joe will
receive sealed bids from any
qualified person, company or
corporation interested in con-
structing the following project:
FOURTH & WILLIAMS
PARKING LOT
WORK CONSIST OF:
Clearing and grubbing, approxi-
mately 650 L.F. of ribbon curb,
stabilizing and constructing two
parking areas, and stormwater
swales with balancing pipes.
Plans and specifications
may be obtained at Preble-
Rish, 324 Marina Drive, Port
St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850)
227-7200. Costs for Plans
and Specifications will be $50
per set and is non-refundable.
Checks should be made pay-
able to PREBLE-RISH, INC. The
bid must conform to Section
287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on
public entity crimes.
Completion date for this
project will be 60 days from the
date of the Notice to Proceed
presented to the successful bid-
der. Liquidated damages for
failure to complete the project
on the specified date will be set
at $100.
Please mark bids
"SEALED BID, BID NO.
2006-02, PARKING LOT" ON
ENVELOPE"
Bids will be received until
4:00 p.m. EDT, on August 15,
2006 at City Hall, P.O. Box 278;
305 Cecil G. Costin Blvd., Port
St. Joe, Florida 32456, and will
be opened and read aloud on
August 15, 2006 at 6:00 p.m.
EDT. The Board reserves the
right to reject any and all bids.

THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
Publish August 3, 2006

RFP FOR BUILDING OFFICIAL
OR FIRM

The City of Port St. Joe is
seeking a person or firm with a
Florida Building Official certifi-
cation to provide a c6mprehen-
sive proposal for a contract to
provide building inspection ser-
vices for the City. The proposal
should include a statement of
their qualifications and a list of
professional references. Also,
the proposal should provide the
City with proposed rates for
all residential and commercial
plan. reviews and inspections.
The City is willing to negoti-
ate all aspects of the submitted
proposal. Interested persons
may pick up a RFP package at
City Hall, 305 Cecil G. Costin
Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida
32456. Sealed proposals must
be returned before August 21,
2006 at 5:00 p.m. EDT. Bid
opening will be on Tuesday,
August 22, 2006 at 10:00 a.m.,
EDT. at City Hall.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
Publish August 3, 2006

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEAL
BIDS

The City of Port St. Joe
will receive sealed bids from
any qualified person, company
or corporation to provide the
following:
NEW ROOFS FOR 2
BUILDINGS
WORK CONSISTS OF:
Furnishing labor and materials
to remove entire roof system.


Replace all decking and fas-
cia with new wood, including
walkways. Install new single-
ply torch grade roofing system,
with minimum 10 years limited
warranty. All work must meet
Florida Building Code. The
removal of all roofing debris
shall be the responsibility of the
contractor.
Bid will be received and
must be plainly marked, "Bid
No. 2006-03" until 4:00 p.m.
EDT on August 15, 2006 at
City Hall, P.O. Box 278, 305
Cecil G. Costin Blvd., Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456 and will be
opened and read aloud at 6:00
p.m. EDT in the Commission
Chamber. The Board reserves
the right to reject any and all
bids.
THE CITY OF PORT ST. JOE
Publish August 3, 2006

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF
COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 06-298-CA
GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA, a political subdivi-
sion of the State of Florida,

Plaintiff,
VALIDATION OF NOT
EXCEEDING $12,000,000
GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA
LIMITED AD VALOREM.
TAXBONDS, SERIES 2006
(CAPE SAN BLAS BEACH
RENOURISHMENT
PROJECT-GULFSIDE
AND GULFSIDE
INTERIOR MSTUs

STATE OF FLORIDA and
the Taxpayers, Property
Owners and Citizens of Gulf
County, Florida, including
nonresidents owning prop-
erty or subject to taxation
therein, and all others hav-
ing or claiming any right,
title or interest 'in prop-
erty to be affected by the
issuance by Plaintiff of the
Bonds, herein described, or
to be affected in any way
thereby,
Defendants

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
TO THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
THROUGH THE STATE
ATTORNEY FOR THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
THE SEVERAL PROPERTY
OWNERS, TAXPAYERS AND
CITIZENS OF GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA, INCLUDING
NONRESIDENTS OWNING
PROPERTY OR SUBJECT TO
TAXATION THEREIN, AND
ALL OTHERS HAVING OR
CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TITLE
OR INTEREST IN PROPERTY
TO BE AFFECTED BY THE
ISSUANCE BY PLAINTIFF OF
BONDS HEREINAFTER MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED,
OR TO BE AFFECTED IN ANY
WAY THEREBY:
You and each of you are
hereby required to appear on
. the 29th day of August, 2006,
at Two o'clock p.m., before the
Circuit Court for the Fourteenth
Judicial Circuit, in and for Gulf
County, Florida, at the Gulf
County Courthouse, in Port St.
Joe, Florida, and to show cause
why the Complaint filed in this
action should not be granted.
and-J-..: E r. : r-i :..:.r. e: tnt-.i
and "J-,e pr.:-:eed.rri: aur..nz.rg
the issuance thereof validated
and confirmed, said Bonds
being designated "Gulf County,
Florida Limited Ad Valorem
Tax Bonds, Series 2006 (Cape
San Blas Beach Renourishment
Project Gulfside and Gulfside
Interior MSTUs" in an aggregate
principal amount not to exceed
$12,000,000, a more particular
description of said Bonds being
contained in the Complaint filed
in this action.
This Order to Show Cause
shall be published in the man-
ner required by Section 75.06,
Florida Statutes, as amended,
in The Star, a newspaper pub-
lished and of general circula-
tions in Gulf County, Florida,
once each week for twd con-
secutive weeks prior to the date
of the hearing set forth in the
preceding paragraph, the first
publication to be at least twenty
(20) days prior to said date.
DONE AND ORDERED
at Port St. Joe, Gulf County,
Florida, this 31st day of July,
2006.
i Fred i '.. itten
C ,r.:ujn Judge.
Publish August 3 & 10, 2006


Gulf County Board of







County Commission Minutes


PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA
MAY 9, 2006
REGULAR MEETING
I continued

OFFICIAL BALLOT
COUNTY OF GULF, FLORIDA
BOND REFERENDUM
ELECTION MUNICIPAL
SERVICES TAXING UNIT
July 6, 2006

APPROVAL OF "LIMITED
GENERAL OBLIGATIONS"
BONDS TO FINANCE BEACH
- RENOURISHMENT.

Shall Gulf County be autho-
-rized to issue bonds to finance
beach renourishment .and en-
hancement in one or more series
not exceeding a total principal
amount of $ 12,000,000.00 pay-
able from an annual ad valorem
tax imposed within the Cape
San Blas Bayside Municipal
Services Taxing Unit not exceed-
ing 6 mills maturing not later
than 20 years and bearing inter-
est at a rate not exceeding the
maximum legal rate.


For bonds
Against bonds ___

Section 6. Absen-
tee Voting. The form of ballot
to be used in the election for
absentee voters shall be sub-
stantially the form provided in
Section 5 above..
Section 7. Print-
ing of Ballots. The Supervisor
'of Elections of Gulf County is
authorized and directed to have
printed on plain white paper a
sufficient number of the afore-
said ballots for use of absentee
" electors entitled to cast such
ballots in such bond election


and. shall also have printed
sample ballotd and deliver them
to the Inspectors and Clerks
on or before the date.and time
for the opening of the polls for
such bond election for the vot-
ing places; and, further, is au-.
thorized and directed to make
appropriate arrangements for
the conduct of the election at
the polling places specified.
Section 8. E I e c-
tion Procedure. The Supervisor
of Elections shall hold, adminis-
ter and conduct the bond refer-
endum election in the manner
prescribed by law for holding
elections in the County. Re-
turns shall show the number of
qualified electors who voted in
such bond election on the prop-
osition and the number of votes
cast respectively for and against
approval of the proposition. The
returns shall be canvassed in
accordance with law.
Section 9. El e c-
tion Results. If a majority of the
votes cast at such election in
respect to the aforestated propo-
sition shall be "For Bonds,"
such proposition shall be ap-
proved and then the particular
Bonds, the issuance of which
shall be thereby approved, shall
be issued as hereafter provided
.by the County. If less than a
majority of the votes cast at
such referendum shall,be "For
Bonds," such proposition shall
be defeated and no Bonds may
be issued and no ad valorem tax
shall be levied therefore.
Section 10. Notice
of Bond Referendum Election.
Notice of the bond referendum
election shall be published in
the manner required by law.
Section 11. Sever-
.ability. In the event that any


w


word, phrase, clause, sentence,
or paragraph hereof shall be
held invalid by any court of com-
petent jurisdiction, such holding
shall not affect any other word,
phrase, sentence, or paragraph
hereof.
Section 12. Effec-
tive Date. This Resolution shall
take effect immediately upon
its adoption. The Clerk to the
Board of County Commissioners
shall provide the Supervisor of
Elections with a certified copy of
this Resolution.
DULY adopted this 9th day
of May, 2006.

(End)

County Attorney McFarland
then read a proposed resolution
calling for a bond referendum for
the-Cape San Blas Gulfside Inte-
rior area. Commissioner Barnes
motioned to adopt the following
resolution, and Commissioner
Williams seconded the motion.
The motion then passed 4 to 1,
with Commissioner Peters vot-
ing no.

RESOLUTION NO. 2006-17

A RESOLUTION OF THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF GULF COUNTY,
FLORIDA, CALLING A BOND
REFERENDUM WITH RESPECT
TO THE CAPE SAN BLAS GULF-
SIDE INTERIOR MUNICIPAL
SERVICES TAXING UNIT FOR
THE ISSUANCE OF LIMITED
GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS
TO FINANCE BEACH RENOUR-
ISHMENT; AND PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.
WHEREAS, Gulf County's
beachfront is a County treasure
with tremendous economic, es-


thetic and environmental impor-
tance; and
WHEREAS, it is in the best
interest of the citizens of Gulf
County residing within the Cape
San Blas Gulfside Interior Mu-
nicipal Services Taxing Unit (the
"Gulfside Interior MSTU") cre-
ated by Ordinance No. 2005-25
of the Board of County Commis-
sioners of Gulf County, Florida,'
enacted December 13, 2005 (the
"Ordinance") that all appropri-
ate actions to maintain and
renourish such beachfront be
undertaken; and
WHEREAS, the enhance-
ment and renourishment of
such beachfront constitutes a
municipal service to residents
residing within the Gulfside In-
terior MSTU; and
WHEREAS, the Board of
County Commissioners of Gulf
County desires to submit to the
qualified electors of Gulf County
residing within the Gulfside In-
terior MSTU the question as to
whether or not Limited General
Obligation Bonds should be is-
sued to fund the renourishment
of beachfront as described in the
Ordinance;
BE IT RESOLVED BY THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF GULF COUNTY
FLORIDA:


Referendum Election on Beach
Renourishment.

a. Bond Referendum
Election. A bond referendum
election of the qualified electors
residing in the Gulfside Interior
MSTU in Gulf County isghereby
called to be held on July 6, 2006
to determine whether or not the
issuance of Limited General Ob-
ligation Bonds in an aggregate
principal amount not exceeding
$ 12,000,000.00, payable from
ad valorem taxes levied at a rate
not to exceed six mills (6 mills)
on all taxable property in the
Gulfside Interior MSTU, shall be
approved by such qualified elec-
tors to finance the cost of beach
renourishment.

b. Such purposes de-
scribed above shall also include
other purposes appurtenant,
and incidental thereto.
c. All qualified elec-
tors residing in the MSTU shall
be entitled and permitted to vote
in such bond referendum elec-
tion.
d. The polls will open
in accordance with law relat-
ing to general elections at the
various voting places from seven
(7) o'clock a.m. until seven (7)
o'clock p.m. on the same day.


Section 1. A u- Section 3. Autho-
thority for this Resolution. This rization of Bonds. Subject and
Resolution is adopted pursuant pursuant to the provisions here-
to Chapter 100, Florida Stat- of, Limited General Obligation
utes, as amended; Chapter 125, Bonds of Gulf County, Florida
Florida Statutes, as amended; are authorized to be issued in
Art. VII, Section 12, Florida the aggregate principal amount
Constitution, the Ordinance, ofnot exceeding $ 12,000,000.00
and other applicable provisions to finance the cost of the pur-
of law. poses generally described in
Section 2 of this Resolution,
Section 2. B o n d including allocations for admin-


istrative costs, legal fees, fees of
fiscal agents and all other costs
associated with the issuance of
the Bonds. Such Limited Obli-
gation Bonds may be issued in
one or more series and shall be
payable from ad valorem taxes
levied at a rate not exceeding
six mills (6 mills) on all taxable
property in the MSTU, maturing
not later than twenty (20) years.
Such Bonds shall bear interest.
at such rate or rates not exceed-
ing the maximum rate permitted
by law at the time of the sale of
the Bonds.

Section 4. Places
of Voting. The places of voting
and the Inspectors and Clerks
for the polling places for the
bond election shall be the same
places and persons as for gener-
al elections within the County.

Section 5. Official
Ballot. The form of ballot to be
used shall be in substantially
the following:


OFFICIAL BALLOT
COUNTY OF GULF, FLORIDA
BOND REFERENDUM
ELECTION MUNICIPAL
SERVICES TAXING UNIT
July 6, 2006

APPROVAL OF "LIMITED
GENERAL OBLIGATIONS"
BONDS TO FINANCE BEACH
RENOURISHMENT.

Shall Gulf County be autho-
rized to issue bonds to finance
beach renourishment and en-
hancement in one or more series
not exceeding a total principal
amount of$ 12,000,000,00 pay-
able from an annual ad valorem
tax imposed within the Cape


San Blas Gulfside Interior Mu-
nicipal Services Taxing Unit not
exceeding 6 mills maturing not
later than 20 years and bearing
interest at a rate not exceeding
the maximum legal rate.

For bonds
Against bonds __
Section 6. Absen-
tee Voting. The form; of ballot
to be used in the election for
absentee voters shall be sub-
stantially the form provided in
Section 5 above.

Section 7. Print-
ing of Ballots. The Supervisor
of Elections of Gulf County is
authorized and directed to have
printed on plain white paper a
sufficient number of the afore-
said ballots for use of absentee
electors entitled to cast such
ballots in such bond election
and shall also have printed
sample ballots and deliver them
to the Inspectors and Clerks
on or before the date and time
for the opening of the polls for
such bond election for the vot-
ing places; and, further, is au-
thorized and directed to make
appropriate arrangements for
the conduct of the election at
the polling places specified.

Section 8. E 1 e c-
tion Procedure. The Supervisor
of Elections shall hold, adminis-
ter and conduct the bond refer-
endum election in the manner
prescribed by law for holding
elections in the County. Re-
turns shall show the number of
qualified electors who voted in
such bond election on the prop-
osition and the number of votes
cast respectively for and against
approval of the proposition. The


a


returns shall be canvassed in
accordance with law.

Section 9. E 1 e c-
tion Results. If a majority of the
votes cast at such election in
respect to the aforestated propo-
sition shall be "For Bonds,"
such proposition shall be ap-
proved and then the particular
Bonds, the issuance of which
shall be thereby approved, shall
be issued as hereafter provided
by the County. If less than a
majority of the votes cast at
such referendum shall be "For
Bonds," such proposition shall
be defeated and no Bonds may
be issued and no ad valorem tax
shall be levied therefore.

Section 10. Notice
of. Bond Referendum Election.
Notice of the bond referendum
election shall be published in
the manner required by law.

Section 11. Sever-
ability. In the event that any
word, phrase, clause, sentence,
or paragraph hereof shall be
held invalid by any court of com-
petent jurisdiction, such holding
shall not affect any other word,
phrase, sentence, or paragraph
hereof.

Section 12. Effec-
tive Date. This Resolution shall
take effect immediately upon
its adoption. The Clerk to the
Board of County Commissioners
shall provide the Supervisor of
Elections with a certified copy of
this Resolution.

DULY adopted this 9th day
of May, 2006.

(End)


- ':~ 4 -


sffra~Fls~s~a~PRi~





o Ine TOr, ror OT. Joet, iF iuU uu -y, AUuaST 5, /.vv


Trades


&


Services


-- 7 7 1 7)- ,
-- _-.. --- --
-- --






Major Appliance,
Parts, Repair, Sales
232 Reid Ave
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
(850)229-8040
cell 850-527-8086

0''*s 'W ^^SsKS S~~


Coast
Lane


IRRIGAI
INSTALLATION
OUR SPEC
S-850-927-


al & Native
Iscapes


TION
& REPAIR
IALTY
-4090


k CARPENTRY
PAINTING
Home Repair Minor Renovations
Vinyl Siding & Gutters
Doors Windows
Deck Maintenance
All But 6, LLC Licensed/Insured
Charlie Poliski
850-545-1126 or 697-2668


Kilgore's
BRICK PAVERS
& TILE

Driveways, Patios, Pooldecks,
Retaining Walls, Stonework &
Granite Countertops
Office: (850) 229-1980
Cell: (850) 258-4312
Free Estimates
Where top quality and customer
satisfaction meet!
2890 W. Highway 98 Port St. Joe


O THE J.LESTER
COMPANY REAL
ESTATE APPRAISAL &
CONSULTING SERVICE
A Financial Service Institution
Residential Vacant Land Commercial Appraisals

JAMES E. "JAMIE" LESTER

Real Estate Appraiser & Broker
Master Degree Business Administration
State Certified General Appraiser
License#RZ-2783
Broker License#BK532115
"PROVIDING A QUALITY SERVICE TO A
QUALITY COMMUNITY"
Including Consulting Assignments Market Analysis
Feasibility Studies Finances Investments
Eminent Domain Estates Tax Purposes

S850-639-4200
Fax 850-639-9756
'Serving Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun,
L ibe r ry.. & Jackson Counties Specialty
Assignments State Wide


CD Pressure Washing &
Handyman Services
For Free Estimates Call
229-1750 Owner Daniel Griffin
Cell 899-1684 Manager Cindy Griffin


o\otonis & So
SMichael & Anthony
0 StaleCenEil ctEIc lnES120020
& Finish Crpntl RGU06M3
85-229-6751: .. 850-227-56666


Quality

Paperhandling

Installation Removal Repairs


656-2917
1 Dennis Sittig


566-2297
Cellular rf


PARADISE PRESSURE WASHING


-Home Exterior
-Roofs
-Driveways/Walkways


Tr


-Decks
ALSO: Mold/Mildew treatments.


Carpet Country
Highway 98 Highland View Port St. Joe 850-227-7241 Fax 229-9405
4 ,w %WOP ..
Do-It-Yourself Professional Carpet Cleaning with

RINSE-N-VAC
Great for Cleaning All Carpet, Upholstery, and
Auto and Recreational Vehicle Interiors
TRY IT TODAY!

TLC Lawn Service
"Every yard needs a little TLC"

229-6435
We now accept all major credit cards


Free estimates
Weed Round Up
Trimming, Fertilizing


Established 1991
Sprinkler Systems
Installed &,Repaired


"', /' ', l '.' -r #1 Natural
Independent Ditrnbutor Company in the US

Patty & Glenn Wado A i Sn Cae
Environmentally Safe
850-827-2510 Cleaning Products
www.shaldee.net/PattyWaldo Air and Water
gpwMldo@gtcom.net Purification



Dupree's Custom Metal Roofs
Professional Custom Metal Roofs
Re-roof Shingles Metal Shingles Re-roof

Don Dupree
President .. -
1806 Garrison Ave I
Port St Joe, Florida 32456 ____ ;' ___

850-527-5144 -- -


SUN CdQST
Lawn Er Landscaping LLC
"When Quality Counts"
Landscape Design & Installation
Full Lawn Maintenance"
Irrigation Installation & Repair
Commercial & Residential
Tractor Work, Rock Driveways, Water Features,
Sod & Palm Trees
Office: (850) 647-2522 18053


Landscape Design &
Consultation Services

Kay Kelley
Florida Certified
Landscape Designer

850-927-4090
Plan It before you Plant It! 20752


Licensed and Insured j


t R Coastal & Native
L ca-peS
j Specializing in low, maintenance landscapes and irrigation,
with a focus on native and-.nafturalized .plants. We offer
e complete landscape services and our area's only Florida
Certified Landscape Designer.
*_ aedLbyJ.(a-Kelley and-Brooks Wade -
Mi 4 27-40 We- Plant Palms, too!
__, ____-_____________-__________'W a o ,


Hardwuood Flooring
Decorative Flooring 850-229-7720 offers professional
services for anyone who wants their floor completed
properly and with pride.
Exotic and Domestic wood Flooring
Inlays- Borders and Medallions
Installation Sanding and Refinishing Repair Custom
National Award winner for best floor in Nation
Largest showroom in the State of Florida
Licensed Insured References
Unmatched Quality and Value for your money
www.decorativeflooring.com


DRIESBACH CLEANERS
180 Avenue C
Pick-up and Delivery
850-227-1671
* Residential Custom Wood
* Commercial *Industrial -
A & R Fence
Albert Flelschmann FREE Estmates
EIN# 593115646' (850) 647-4047


NOW NDE

NE gONRSI

NAINLSUTES0N
Bu Dret ro MnfatuerAn -v










Au inum ailngFlrdaRom


(Guuil1Breeze
o0id (:l I L -I
Isn't it time for an oil change?
We Come To You!
Call 850-227-1684
Ask for Julian


Rod & Reel Repair
Bluewater Outriggers
Port City Shopping Center
229-1100







COMMERCIAL-RESIDENTIAL
INSULATION DONE RIGHT EVERYTIME
FIBERGLASS BATTS BLOWN CELLULOSE WALLS & ATTIC
OFFICE CELL


ONEAL SANDERS
APPLIANCE REPAIR
SERVICE
Repair all major brands
Home # 647-5113
Work # 227-5112 20002


Commercial
Termite & Pest
Control
*Termi Treatments -eslai rant
* Motel Flea Control Condominiums
* Household PestControl New Treatment
* eal Estate (W0O) Reports Construction Stes
Specializing in Vocation Rental Properties
] FAMILY OWNED
PLEASANT & PROFESSIONAL
"Serving the Entire Area"
Free Estimates
Do.I--Yourself Pest Control Products
. .. E. .


DJ Fence & ETC,
HandyMan,
You Name It
I'll Fix It
850-648-9531
850-624-4182 cell
"Let the Beauty of our God be'
upon us & establish the work
of our hands"


CARPET AND UPHOLSTRY
STEAM CLEANING & RESTORATION SERVICE
24 Hour Water Extraction IICRC
Certified Technicians Mold and
Mildew Remediation Free Estimates
* Stain Protection Available

SS1 '


IICRC Certified -.-
Cleaning Specialist
CARPET CLEANING

24 HOUR WATER EXTRACTION
RV'S CARS TRUCKS VANS
LICENSED AND INSURED
RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL


229.1 VWIfm-*

^^^227-5610


HE


ST AR


135 Hwy 98


227-1278


rF


Established 7937 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 68 years


A( l- -Z+ -, (Z 1 r kirrlri Ainilf3 00


a


I ~


r






Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 2006 7C


~7W 6~


ANNOUNCEMENTS




MERCHANDISE





EMPLOYMENT




BUSINESS & FINANCIAL


REAL ESTATE


No


a 11O


AUTO,MARINE,RV


Is :, I =-7-2m


0 ,- 3220 4100 4100 3 r 4100

2 BWanted for Local Compa- l
L h S a o a Sofa/Matching Loveseat, ny Home every night. 1 Pest Control Healthcare
Left handed person look- Condo quality sofa is year ex. Clean MVR. Class
ing for someone teach her PETS & ANIMALS MERCHANDISE queen sleeper, Ocean EMPLOYMENT A & B license. $300 Sign- Technician
how to Crochet. Please call scenery $600. New Cock- On -Bonus after 90 Days. Experience helpful but will CAREGIVERS
ANNOUNCEMENTS how to Crochet Please call 2100- Pets 3100 Antiques tailtable, solid wood, dark 4100-Help Wanted 769-9136. train the right person Must
ANNOUNCEME 541-3114 2110 Pets: Free to 3110 Appliancesoawt2d7 41.ReurnClshea ri da Drs v- NEEDED
IIGood Home 3120 Arts & Crafts oak with 2 drawers, $70 4120 SaRes/Telemara etin ts/clubs cense Mustb aval Port St Joe &
1100 Legal Advertising 2120 PetSupoCaAltlCraft850 h527- .4120 Sales/Telemarketing Trades s lea r i urM E ED ED ,
1140 Happy Advertising 2120- Pe Supplies3130- Auctions Fri 0 8/05 8-? 7426 Georgia tion rades er s License. Musted on yourbe availability- Port St. Joe
110 lassified Notices 210 FarmAnimals 3140 BabyItemswood St Gorg Bach Information currently ale to worand we need ta Mexic o Beachfill 24/7Area
1160- Lost 2 00 3210Free Pass it On Lots of miscAdSupplies 3150-items forotd SalBuilding Supplies shifts. Benefits Offered.
1120- FPublic tices/ 1 800345-8688in The Times 2140-Furniture Pets/Livestock 3160- Business TempresentativryPersonnel Reid Ave from 9:00-11:30 sionate a regivers to worker
Announcementsfemale, fawn AKC rWanted Equipments Dr. 4 Family 8am-? Furni- Drivers ing and COMPare interested in a Healthcare or 1-866-575-1920





Slopes people, great w/ 3260 Health & Fitness box collection lots of misc. AmeriGas Propane-Ap- nationwide leading coR- Bay St. Joseph
1130 Adptions Call Mostly house trained, 3180 JeweComputers Big Moving Sale achicola, FL is cur- pany, this ins a major op- Joe area Work times are
1150 Personals (850) 747-5020 3190 Electronics Fri 08/05 8-? 7426 Georgia based on your availability
kennel trained. $700 i 320 Firewood Ave. St. George Beach currently accepting re- and we need to fill 24/7
1160 Lost Or 21 3210- Freudes kennel Call Equipment y On Lots of misitemsions for sumes foroutside Salesshifts. Benefits Offered.
816-803-9189 3220 Furnitureal Equipment from 9am til 3pm. Estate Delive Representatives. If you are Homentkng a woreadSeniork place w/are-
(800) Boxer, 4 th old puppy, 3230- Garage/Yard Sales JJ: t. St Joe : Babara sales oriented, enjcommis- a fun & fair culture? Our The -f nt th
female, fawn AKC regis- 3240 Guns Dr. 4 Family 8am-? Furni- Drivers ing and are interested in a Healthcare or 1-866-575-1920




[d3310 Musical instrum nts ture, tools, small apps,- Representative ionsad Kand months 120-bed long-iterm care e o 1
Sedhas had 2 sets shots, 3250 Good Things to Eat ture, toys, clothes, must Candidate should be career with an established
loves people, great w/ 3260-uppHealth&Fitness box collection lots of misc. Amerias Propaneonsible for but not lim- nationwide leading cogram- Bay St. Joseph
kids. Mostly house trained, 3270 Jewelry/ot e 11 alachicola, FL is cur- pany, this is a major op- Healthcare
iA kennel trained. $700 in- 3280-Machinery! KK: Mexico Beach 311 rently accepting applica- portunity for you. Exten- ow r
cludes kennel. Call Equipment Hatley Dr. Sat. Aug. 5th tions for: sive employment package al
816803-9189. 3290-MedicalEquipment from 9am til 3pm. Estateindustry experience a based in the Port St. Joe
3300$500 Police Impou Miscellaneous Sale! House full of furni- Deliveryd CDL plus, but not mandataid training, ory. SeeActiving a work lace w/ ait e
Cars3310 Musical Instruments ture, tools, small appli- th hazmat and tanker petitive salary, commis- a fun & fair culture? Our The G To EmergencyHealth
3320- ans sRepresentative sins, 40,1K and monthly 120-bed long- term care D uatm Con ealth
pos US Marshall and IRS & Srubs anes, everything must Candidate should be re- gas allowance, compre- facility is seeking diupply Departm ent has one open-
Tyta's/Hnda's/Chevy'sDogs & Cats Supplies go! factsponsible for but not lim- hensive lead program, viduals who have com- indes, and full-time,
For Sale? 3330 Restaurant/Htel DOT physical, drug test Cerfed billing required. Salaryvice
1-800-2983340-5414ExtC171Sprtig Go4th ds Prt St Je 1101 Lng ted tobackg delivering prcheck.- health benefits andthe passion for the elderly
3350- Tickets (Buy & Sell) Ave. S05 Avenuguste A. Sat 5th from pane to our custompet highest commission avail- enjoy working to fill the (benefits assigned)
111W1, 08am til 11am Multifamily Requirements include able'in the industry. Sales following positions: Fiscal Assistant I
in1111iiiiL -, ISale. Furniture, clothes, high school diploma(or and industry experience a based in the Port St. Joe
Carsds fHo Refeare dishes,hhouseholdhitems.,e Cequivalent), a valid CDL plus, but not mandatory. *Activiiy Director facility. Fingerprinting and




$500 Police Impounds! 8a-? lots of goodies. Come wages, medical and ly at base) For information
Cars from $500 Tax Re- with References. Call 30 d eh with hazmat and tanker Please fax resumesto FuDiretorof Nursing pertaining/ Due To Emergency
pos, US Marshall and IRS 8 endorsements, a great 713-524-4454 Attn: Mr. *Central Supply Clerk. Duties Required. Knowl-




pos, US Marshall and IRS There are specific Flori- **AuCtons** savings plan and liberal OPENING: Benefits icude: contact Lesia Hathaway at
sales! Cars/Trucks/SUV's/ da Statutes applicable at the Port Theatre driving record and satis- Birenbaum aintenance/ Med/Densportal/Vsion nsuride edge of ICD9 and CPT 149
Toyota's/Honda's/Chevy's American Blondes to the sale of dogs and 314factoryReid completion of a FTFull and s Rehabilitation Tech Codes, and medical clinics August 10,
To ForaLstingallheWys/ Fri. nite DOT physical, drug test *Certified Nursing Assts billing required. Salary


& More For Listings, Call Bikini Beauties cats within the state or Port St. Joe | 3260 | DFWP/SaleEOE Part time Housekeep ity company paid life in- 2006.
1-6 00-2 1 Extn C171.al FS4th and background check. General -Licensed Practical Range: $16,422.90 -
1-800-298-5414 Ext C171. 850-785-0016t 505 Avenue A Sat 5th, We offer competitive Nurses $20,800.00 (hiring is usual- K
$500 Police Impoundse purpose of Consignment 8a- lots of goodies. Come wages, medical and for GeriCare Assisted retirement plainly at base). For information
Cars from $500 Tax Re- **WAB1239AU1737,deClark see what we have Retirementdental benefits, 401K,IMMEDIATFlex-titi mburse- o pertaining to this position, Refer





SPlease research Flori- 10% Buyer's Premium. Electric Treadmill bible hours, great work meant, Shift Differential, to .Requisition Number
pos,& Tiffany arsk Child Care. S There are specific Fori- **Auctions** meters savings plan nd liberal OPENING: Benefits Include: contact Lesia Hathaway at
sales! Cars/TruckseSUV's/ da Statutes applicable at the Port Theatre o vacation & holiday poll- Part Time Maintenance/ Med/Dentarrision Insur, (850) 227-1276, ext. 149.at:
noyot avail Apply now to's American Blondes to the sale of dogs and 314 ReidAve ARy. Handyman, Full and short/long term disbil- Closig date is August.myflor10da.com
& Morsave your Listings, Call o Bathing Bikini Beauties cats within the state or Port St. Joe st 3260 | DFWP/EE Part time Housekeep- ity326 for assistance, company paid life In- 2006.
1-800-298-5414Ext C0-1883 Port St. Joe Area transportate dog. available for pickup at 775into the 850-229-9282 Please fax resumes: ers, and cooks needed ur, paid time off, 401K05 People First at
Plumbinstate for the purpose of Consignments Rd Attn: SSM for Geri-Care Assisted retirement plan, uniform This Agency is accepting
C Cselling. welcome! 850-653-8225. Living and Beacon Villa allowance, referral bo- electronic applications
AB239, AU737 Retirement Center. ElectricalFlex- nus, tuition reimburse- only for this position. Referator. The
Please research Flri- 10% Buyers Premium Electric Treadmill ible hours, great work ment, Shift Differential. to Requisition Number
Openings for Karen Parker da Statute 828.29 (Dogs up to 8 HP loaded with Drivers environment, rewarding 64081367.
& Tiffany Clark Child Care and cats transported or meters $50 850-527-6883 and meaningful job. We Please Contact:r
Located at 133 Bridgeport al offered for sale; healthormation. Toll-Free interested, please call looking for a quality-driven professional to lead its
Ln, n Port Sthing. Call Leave Mopenrequirements; consumer Deborking, commi at team of Human Resourcesting consultants. The Odessa American
229-1654. Leave message. foreson who is comfor Kitable 22publishes the largest irst.myflorlda.comper in the re-
iav potoHandyman you offer for sale a cat Free Manure C mpostEARN AS YOU working with elPort St. Joe, FL 32456 for assistance, contact:




save y our spot orcall /exteor maintenance & y oo y will e:r (85 029-4 4 Ex 1
227-3831 or 340-1883 Port St Joe Area or dog. available for pickup at 77512 We're looking for an enthusiastic leader with a dedi
-Plumbing Cape San Bias Rd. You Heavy & Small Equipment Career' port to our Assisted Uv- Fax: (850) 229-7129 877-562-7287
S-Electrical load and haul. Call for Boat yard 20 ton travel England Transport ing Administrator. The
layonPainting227-2584 for directions, if lift. Petibone crane, hysternserionPoli now offers right candidate cust omer service to overtisee a team of marketing con-er
Concrete ConstrucingGermtion anShepherd needed forklift jack spends, san- On-theHealthcare-ob CDLTraining utants. Team-building and solid communications a background



*House Foundations For Classf d We stopped doing dinner NEEDED NOW! skills are a must. We want a leader who can work co-
*Driveways *Yard Work black and tan pup wk A parties Have ssome beauti- ll No credit check check and drug screen
OLD MAIDS BY THE BAY ol d S ts & woe press, table saw, much No co-signers ing. We are an equal The Odessa American, an award-winning,




*Patios old Shots & wormed.rSE l 17-piece sets left! Sem drives No exr GUfCOa creative solutions to problems as well as identify and
INC leanrving service. Re- JOEY BARBEE 850-227-9595 leave msg. 653-8801 for No down payment opportunity employer If 27,000-circulation new o opportunities. As a business, devel-
dential, vacation rental. 850-229-6147 o nu cocn The newspaper will as- Gmoreaseless bnformat on. Toll-Free interested, please call looking for a quality-driven professional to leadits
Pressure washing. Call Leave Message Cherry entertainment c n- $ 1-866-619-6081 Deborah at team of marketing consultants. The Odessa American
229-1654. Leave message. Lost Dog Found near ter, 81in tall, in 850-47-000 or Kim at publishes the largest circulated newspaper in the re-

Handman Services, interi- Call 850-648-2039 to claim er with 2 mirrors $200, 3300 Drivers newspaper and a host of specialty niche products.
or/exterior maintenance & & identify. Must sell 850-229-77128 $0
Carport Sal repairs 850-229-3474 or or New, $100 each; 2) USA t/cucum des We're looking for an enthusiasticleader with a dedi-
Clayton Concrete, Inc. wwwfishingportstjoe.com IncorrectK Pedestal sinks, New with R A MI Requres BSN & 2 yrs c customer s even res that are read to learn of marketing roon
Concrete Construction afforda- Cookware TEFLON out TRAINEES Healtharesutants Team-building and solid communication
CHouse Foundations o For Classified We stopped doing dinner NEEDED NOW! skills are a must. We want a leader who can work co-
Driveways Repos REO etc. These parties Have some beauti- Werner needs entry level isoperatively within an organizational structure to find
Patios In-column AdvertiSers ful 17-piece sets left! Semi drivers. No exp. re- Gulf CoaSt creative solutions to problems as well as identify and
.Serving Franklin & Gulf Heavy, 7 ply surgical stain- quired. Avg. $36K + 1st yr! r CommunityCollege capitalize on new opportunities. As a business devel-
Counties for 15 years. Bushho r in st- All ads placed by phone are read back to the adver- less steel Waterless & 60% home nightly/weeklyvd looking foper, this person would work with their sales team to
Glen Clayton Cal 1-800-298-5 tier to insure correctness The newspaper will as- Greaseless brand new CDL training in your area capt ure new business whpetiti co rensationg adv ertisingou
229-6525/ 653-7352 Call Pat & Larry sume correctness at the time of the read-back proce- Were $2000, first 7 buyers 1-866-280-5309 Faculty, with current clients. As a coach, this person would
@648-6652dure unless otherwise informed for $368 vapsealcom Gulf/Frankln trUSA teach help to develop individuals into a strong revenue
S hav BANK 1e ews Herad will not be responsible for more 850-43227-4122 EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer generating salesperson. As a manager this person
than one incorrect nsertion, nor will it be liable for Nursing would guide their direct report to perform at optimum
Enda love one in need of extra RECL2)! any error in advertiaksements to a greater extent than $We Pay Cash$ Drivers prgm; counsel/advise; as- capacity. The ability to build relationships with key
Pleawill take care of them, in bedrooms availableMissio Re- We Buy Antiques, dark oak in sJeelt with E arn 50% sales management personnel is a must. Bache retail advertis-
Carport Sale pos, REO, HUD, etc. The- Any copy change, during ordered schedule consti- color, New, $100 each; (2) USA tion/curriculum design in manager will be responsible for leading a staff of
The Best Carport, RV P se homes must se. For tutes a new ad andPedestal sinks, New with READY MIX Requires BSN & 2 yrs clin- seven reps that are ready to learn and grow.
&"Metal Bdg at afforda- FORECLOSES! adfaucet, $60 each; (1) Large Now hiring Class A&B cal exp. as registered
ble prices. Classic carport youraL-shaped desk, solidwood nurse; MSN preferred. The successful candidate should exhibit thorough
j9x20 $695. We have all be from $10,000 1-3 New, $700 obo. Call CDL Ready Mix drivers. Salary based on de- knowledge of the sales process and should have a
bedrooms available. HUD, 229-8142. Excellent benefits and gree/exp. Open Until history of successful sales experiences. If you're
sizerenesCall 850-819-5093 Repos, REO, etc. TheseCaMonique wages. Apply In Call Cperson eri Maxwell
homes must sell. For List- Advertisers are requested to check the advertise- WANTED TO BUY 1001 Cecil Costin Blvd. dilino: looking for a rewarding challenge look no further. We
030foBreda 8002985507 Ext. ment on the first insertion for correctness. Errors Additional info: offer a very competitive compensation and an out-
R.CY-2ANY Hshould ube reported immediately. Old Guns, coins, guitars, PortSt. Joe, FL http://dept.gulfcoast.edu/ standing benefits package with the opportunity for
6.- Ext. H171. and watches. Call 850-229-8858 lobs. GCCC is an professional growth and development, Benefits in-
Do you have BANK The News Herald will not be responsible for more 850-227-4122 USA EOE EANEO/M/F/Vet employer clude: Vacation, Sick Leave, Holiday Pay, an attrac-
than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for tive 401 (k) retirement savings program, medical, den-
a love one in need of extra FORECLOSES! any error in advertisements to a greater extent than $W e Pay Cash$ Avon tal, and much more. We prefer a candidate with at
care. Private Duty LPN Homes from $10,000 1-3 the cost of the space occupied by the error. least five years sales experience and would prefer
will take care of them, in bedrooms available Re- We BuyAntiques, Old jewel 'Eam 50snc
your home, Nursing homb pos, REO, HUD, etc. The- Any copy change, during ordered schedule consti- Old Toys, Old Anything NowOny$10forKIT+FreeGif preferred. The successful candidate should also have
or Hospital. Have good ref- se homes must sell. For tutes a new ad and new charges. insight and initiative.
erences. Call Listings. Call Call Monique Call Cheri Maxwell
850-639-5030 for Brenda 1-800-298-5507 Ext. H171. The News Herald DOES NOT guarantee position of If this sounds like the position for you, please
_- =_ANY ad under any classification. 850-2271684 850-653-2137 e-mail resume to: careers@link.freedom.com


-eopa~


MON.-

M)


- '47,


~t~--~ eP


5100-51,10


.1II


^








Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67 years


General
Laborers needed for
Landscaping Company.
323-1700

Oil-Related
Youngquist Brothers, Inc.
Excellent Job Opportunity
in South Florida! Positions
Available: *Drillers
*Derricks *Floor Hands
Excellent benefits package
available after 90 days.
Fax resume 239-489-4545
or contact Cliff at
239-489-4444. MUST Pass
PHYSICAL & DRUG TEST
Drug Free Workplace

Technical
Welders ASME Slingle
Hand Code Welders. Must
pass drug and 6G test. Ex-
perience in reading blue-
prints required. Good Pay
up to $21 an hour DOE.
Paid holidays & vacation.
50+ hours/week. Plus bo-
nuses based on number of
hours worked. Call 432-
381-5510 or apply in per-
son at: McKay Fabricators,
6337 W. Westmoor, Odes-
sa, TX

Trades






ARCTIC POLAR
Heating & Air, LLC
Lic#RA-0067062
WANTED: Equipment/Duct
Work Installers, Service
Technicians Clean driving
record req.
Must pass background
check
Top Producers=Top Pay
incentive Bonus Program.
Prior experience a PLUS!
Apply at:1516 E. 11th St
PC, FL
Call 850-785-5447 or
850-541-3308
Drug & Alcohol Free
Work Place. EOE.

Trades
Ameri-Force IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS FOR 1ST
CLASS SKILLED TRADES:
Pipe Welders, Electronic
Technicians, Pipe Fitters,
Ship Fitters, Welders
(FLUXCORE / Stick) Ability
to earn up to $1,400.00 a
week 60+ Hours Available
*TOP PAY and^ LONG
TERM WORK in INDIANA
for Qualified Welders* Oth-
er locations available
throughout the US: AL, FL,
VA, MS & LA **Must be el-,
igible T. w.:.rl in ihe L5 .:
lus'haJ.._- :3 'EARS SHP. '
S A'RD ;OR:"5b'YEARSN' '1
DUSTRIAL EXPERI- i
ENCE** DO NOT WAIT! -
CALL NOW! Contact: i
888-269-3381 (Operators I
available 24 hours) recruit-
er@ameriforce.com
EOE/DFWP Se_. Habia
, Espanol


| 4100
General:
Hiring Installers for flat
panel TV installations in
your area. Need vehicle &
tools. No experience nec-
essary. Earn great money.
Call for details. (888)
661-8661.



Trades
Concrete Laborers & Fin-
ishers needed call 229-
6525
Trades

HVAC Mechanics
& Helpers
(Experienced)
PANAMAA CITY &
MEXICO BEACH AREAS)
Top Pay, Excellent Bene-
fits, Vacation/Holiday Pay,
401K.
Keith Lawson Company
Kendall Clark
(850) 527-5439
KLC is an EOE/AAE/DFWP
Minority Applicants
encourage to apply
Trades

TRIM
CARPENTERS
NEEDED......
FOR PORT ST. JOE AND
MEXICO BEACH AREA.
APPLICANTS MUST PRO-
VIDE OWN TRANSPORTA-
TION, MUST HAVE EXPE-
RIENCE, MUST BE DE-
PENDABLE AND PROVIDE
QUALITY WORK.
GREAT PAY FOR THE
RIGHT APPLICANT.
CALL TRIMMASTERS LLC
LENNY COLLINS
850-814-0166 OR
850-648-5937



4110

General

Therapist Needed
The Port Inn/Thirsty Goat
is now accepting applica-
tions for a part time bar-
tender. The ideal candi-
date will have a thorough
knowledge of liquors,
beers, wines, and mixolo-
gy techniques, but we are
willing to train the right
person. If you have an eye
for detail, the highest de-
sire to deliver superior
:ser.,ice ard .,can play well
:lm h .1lher.. j .:oul' h.:',e
to' hear frorri you! The shift
s normally 4:30-10:30
Thursday-Saturday. Apply
n person at the address
below. EOE. DFWR
PORT INN
501 Monument Ave.
Port St.r Joe, FL 32456


4110



Hospitality

The Port Inn
Now accepting applica-
tions for a Front Desk
Sales Agent. Weekends
and holidays are required.
This is a full time position.
The ideal candidate will
have previous computer
and guest service skills,
but we are willing to train
the right person. Health
Insurance is available after
90 days to all full time em-
ployees. If you are great
with guests, an excellent
problem solver and have a
desire to be the best, we
want you. Come join our
family! E.O.E. DFWP
Apply in person at:
PORT INN
501 Monument Ave.
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


| 4130
*REMEMBER:*
Ads in this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire an investment o0
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend giv-
ing credit card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.
Now Hiring for 2006 Post-
al Jobs $18/hour. starting,
Avg. Pay $57K/ year Fed-
eral benefits, Paid Training
and Vacations. No Ex-
perience Needed! 1-800-
584-1775 Ref # P5101


BUSINESS & FINANCIM L
5100- Business
Opportunities
5110 Money to Lend


-- i1oo --
*REMEMBER:*
Ads in this classifica-
tion may or may not re-
quire an investment or
may be multi-level mar-
keting opportunities. We
do not recommend giv-
ing credit card or bank
account information out
over the phone. Always
research the company
you plan to do business
with BEFORE investing.
Save 19% Cash on Gas &
Diesel Fuels EPA USA
Government approved. In-
creases mileage & octane.
As seen on Fox & NBC
News. gasclubusa.
com/go/jleboulch


REAL ESTATE FOR RENT
6100 Business/
Commercial
6110 Apartments
6120 Beach Rentals
6130 Condo/Townhouse
6140 House Rentals
6150 Roommate Wanted
6160 Rooms for Rent
6170 Mobile Home/Lot
6180 Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 Timeshare Rentals
6200 Vacation Rentals





New Metal
Building $1650/month.
2800sf has new office and
bathroom. Call
850-258-6139


America's

Mini Storage


(8501229-8014

BEACH

STORAGE
Day: 227-7200
Night: 647-3882
St. Joe Beach

MINI STORAGE

In Port St. Joe


814-7400
.5


PLUS SMALL ENGINE
REPAIRS
NOW AVAILABLE
Climate Control

St. JoeL
Rent-All, Inc.
706 First Street
Phone 227-2112
/ MINI-STORAGE \


a5x10 10x10 10x20

On Site Rentals 6 Days
A Week

ASK ABOUT FREE
MONTH'S RENT!


in


Grand Lagoon-Thomas
Drive. One bedroom, one
bath, with loft. Fully fur-
nished with washer and
dryer. Bay view with deck
and pool. $925/mo. Call
Michelle at 850-265-9006
or 888-265-9006.

Mexico Beach 3 br, 2 ba,
1400 sqft. townhouse. Ful-
ly furnished; DISH, pool.
$1,200/month for year
lease. Call 850-624-9516








1 br furnished cozy cot-
tage, must have ref, &
good credit, $450mo +
utilities, no pets, 229-1215

2 ba 2 ba New 1st Tear
House for long term rental,
Near Indian Pass, no
smoking or pets, $1500
mo, 214-352-3147


Two Private 2nd Floor Of-
fices with shared reception
and kitchen. Beautiful view
overlooking St. Joe Bay at
Simmons Bayou. Perfect
for real estate office or
small business. $350.00
monthly per office. Utilities
included. First, last month
rent plus $150.00 deposit
per unit required. Call 850-
229-7799 M-F, 9-4pm.








1 br apartments, nicely fur-
nished w/beautiful views,
close to town, $550wk',
850-227-5989





Beach House for rent.
Across the street from des-
ignated beach, awesome
viewl 3 br, 1.5 ba front &
back screened porches.
C/HA, great place! $1500
mo. Call 850-227-5301 or
850-227-6297



| 6130 -
Mexico Bch 2 br, 2 ba
Avail 9/1. Waterfront w/
Oceanview, W/boatslips,
$1500mo. 352 636-8000.


HELP IS ONLY A


4


9


PHONE CALL



AWAY


the

APALACHICO

& CARRABELL' M I


Call Our New Numbers Now!


Call:


Toll Free:


Fax:


Email:


Email:


| 6140
Cape San Bias : Board-
walk Sub. 3 br, 2 ba, pool,
hot tub, fully furn. $1800
mo. Call 850-229-8593
Cape San Bias Beach
Side Home, 2 br, 2 ba Gulf
View home close to St Jo-
seph's State Park. Broad-
walk to beach, Screened
Porch and two sun decks.
Unfurnished, available for
6 to 12 month lease.
$1200 per month. Call
owner at 843-342-5983, or
a local friend at 850-340-
0628
Downtown Wewa. For
Rent. 2 br, 2 ba Duplex
Unit. $795/mo Nice neigh-
borhood. Call Gulf County
Realty, 639-5004, Broker



Gorgeous Bay Sunset
view on CR-30, 2 bdrms,
21/2 baths, wood floors,
custom cabinets, fully fur-
nished, screened porch &
open deck, 6-9 month
lease, $1295 mo, first, last
month rent & $650 security
deposit. on signing. No
pets. 850-229-7799.
Gulf Front, CR30-A, 3br, 3
ba C/HA, multiple decks,
beautiful beach, fully fur-
nished, no pets. $1650
mo/$750 dep call
850-648-5045
Gulfview on C-30
Treasure Shores west if
Indian Pass Raw Bar: 2 br
2 ba old FL. Classic
Cottage, newly remodeled,
scrnd porch, non-smoking
& no pets. $900 per
month, minimum 6 months
lease. Owner is licensed
Realtor. Call Margaret
850-527-6517
Large airy home in High-
land View area. 3 br, 2 ba,
large living/dining room &
huge Florida Room. Great
kitchen, carport, rear deck,
fenced yard. $1100 mo.
Call 850-227-5301 or
850-227-6297



Mexico Beach 3 br, 2 ba,
sun room, deck over-
looking canal, $1300/mo
+ dep. Call 850-647-3110
or 404-886-0578
Overstreet, Florida 3 br, 2
ba located 650 N. Canal
Dr. $1200/month + $1100(
deposit. Call 648-5865
Several Long Term Rent-
als Available, starting at
$750 mo. Call Sundance
Realty 850-648-8700.
St. Joe Beach cottage, 1.5
biks to Gulf. 3 br, 2 ba,
newly redecorated, new
appliances, Lg. ":r-rEO
porch,a shed for RV/Boat.
Pets maybe, No smoking.
227-3453
St. Joe Beach, 3 br, 2 ba,
enclosed garage, gulfview,
beach access, furnished,
$1200 mo., will consider
lease purchase. Call Bob-
bie@ 258-5261..


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
7100 Homes
7110 Beach Home/
Property
7120 Commercial
7130 Condo/Townhouse
7140 Farms & Ranches
7150 Lots and Acreage
7160 Mobile Homes/Lots
7170- Waterfront
7180 Investment
Property
7190 Out-of-Town
Real Estate
7200 Timeshare






4 br, 2 ba 2200SF 3/4 acre
FRP, irrigation well, Ig
screened 357SF porch,
hot tub, carport, all new
kitch. appli., sec. features,
FSBO, laundry/utility rm.
Need To Seel $265K Call
850-229-8754, Iv mess.
100 Sunset Cir. PSJ, This
luxurious home offers Bay
view, formal living/dining
rooms, breakfast room,
custom built kitchen
w/appliances, family room,
3 b r, 2 ba, .5 ba w/ mud
room, laundry room, secu-
rity, & sprinkler systems,
hurricane shutters, home
warranty, 2544 sf, $490K,
MLS# 108138 Call Gary
Poole Coldwell Banker
899-1134 or 769-8971
House only for Sale! Must
be moved. 5746 Hwy 71 (6
miles N. of PSJ). Approx
1400 s.f, 3 br,1 ba,hrdwd
floors, C/A, FP, stove,
refig, W/D. Ducky Johnson
has moving cost info.
$18,000. Call Mary Lou @'
850-227-4625
Rare Riverfront Lot for
Sale. Most beautiful lot on
Chipola River in City
Limits of Wewa. 1/ acre lot
$250,000. Call 639-5004,
Realtor, Broker/ Owner.
OAK GARDENS II NEW 3
br, 2 ba Homes for Sale,
only a few left in .
$155,000. Call Gulf County
Realty, 639-5004, Broker
GASKIN SAWMILL SUB-
DIVISION NEW HOMES,
Beautiful wooded lots,
very nice homes. Two un-
der construction or will
build to suit. Come for a
look in Wewa.
Gulf County
Realty
639-5004.


| 6170
Nice clean 2 br, 2 ba, large
shady yard with storage
building. 1 block from St.
Joe Bay. Highland View
area. $700 Call
850-227-5301 or
850-227-6297


nEuu uEu!: Drop by on Sunday to see this
charming 3 bedroom home in Port St. Joe. It is
located on a 90'X150' lot only three blocks from St.
Joe Bay. The formal living room and all bedrooms
feature hardwood floors and tongue-in groove walls
and ceilings. The kitchen, dining room and break-
fast area all have new ceramic tile floors. The home
also offers a glassed family room off the eating
areas for relaxing with the family. The large lot in.
a quiet neighborhood provides privacy and chain
link fencing for the kids or pets. New. central heat
and air system. All of this plus a home warranty.
Directions: East on Hwy 98 to 16th St. 3 blocks to
Palm Blvd. House on corner of 16th & Palm.


I., ~ ~ *... I'- W.7


To Place Your Classified ad


THEQ TAR


850-747-5020


800-345-8688


850-747-5044


thestar@pcnh.com


thetimes@pcnh.com


Established 1938 Serving Gulf County and surrounding areas for 67years


1 7100
2002 Modular home, 2500
+ sqft. 4 br, 3 ba, acre lot
with 5 sheds. Above
ground pool, $229,900

Call 639-5460.
MEXICO BEACH
Best Deal on the Beach!
Beautiful 2 Br, 3 ba fully
furnished Gulf view
Townhome $389K
770-426-6896
Mexico Beach 3 br 2 ba,
garage, pool, fireplace,
new roof, carpet, fresh
paint, sprinkler system,
$274.9K, Seller Finance
Pelican Walk Real Estate
850-647-2473



Two new homes, 3 br, 2
ba Upscale subdivision,
paved streets and land-
scaped. Ready to move in.
Low $200's 229-672-1274



PSJ Beach 115 Coranado
St. 50x125 Ft Lot with old-
er Mobile Home, view
steps to beach, will con-
sider owner finance or
property swap. Motivated,
$359K Call 850-647-9214.
Wewahitchka 3 br, 2 ba.
Just 2 blks from Lake Al-
ice. Approx 1/3 acre w/
fenced yard and a variety
of trees. Call Billy Joe
Smiley at Port Realty Inc.
850-340-1213


-- '7120
New Metal Building
2800sf includes new office
and bathroom. Priced at
$395,000 Call
850-258-6139






Panama City
Laketown Wharf
Investor must sell ASAP
2004 price. 1681 sq ft
Penthouse, $545,000. Call
(585) 943-5100


| 7150
75x150 lot .with util. 2nd
blk from gulf. MH,,
front/back porches, w/2 until
.bldgs. 24x36 carport New
AC, Roof, flooring & apple.
$250K Best $ on Beach!
85u -.47-i 'l
Bayview Lot
in Highland View,, on Pom-
pano Street. i, 129 500
Call (706) 333-0159.

Downtown
Hendersonville
North Carolina
Take advantage of
pre-.:ontlruc:ion prces.'
Lu.'ury condnorrinium ,
.priced from
$200's-$500's.
Downtown
Condominium Hotel
priced from $100's
-$700's. Visit:
www.hendersonvillenc
condos.com or call
828-697-3236 '
Mexico Beach Lot,
175x100, walk to beach,
$189K.* Motivated Seller
850-596-2057 or
850-271-1453

Lots For Sale
Southgate Lot Reduced
to $99,000 for quick
sale.
Barbara Drive Lot Only
$105,000.
Palin Breeze Lot 103' X
190' Only 75,000
Call Now!
Office 227-7770
Office 227-7775
Office 227-3200
Preston Russ
Mobile 227-8890

03- alt


8100 Antique & Collectibles
8110-Cars
8120 Sports Utility VeNicles
8130- Trucks
8140 Vans
8150 Commercial 4
8160- Motorcycles
8170 Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210 Boats
8220 Personal Watercraft
8230 Sailboats
8240 Boat & Marine -
Supplies
8310 Aircraft/Aviation
8320 ATV/Off Road Vehicles
8330 Campers & Trailers
8340 Motorhomes



Mazda RX8 '04, 8,500 mi-
les, 6 speed, Loaded!,
Lightning Yellow, CD,
leather call 653-6375

To Place An Ad
in The Times'
Classifieds -
Call i
(850) 747-502p
or .
1 (800) 345-8688



8120
Mitsubishi Outlander '03,
4 door, excellent cnrdilon
new tires, 50K mIles
$15,000 obo 850-387-4357
after 6 pm.







Dodge Pickup '79
green, drives good,
$600, 229-6769 '

Dodge Quad
Cab
'99 4wd, 86K miles. Asking
$8500. Call Eric at
229-6864 or 227-6079



8160o
Suzuki
600XK '03 very fast, very
nice bike. First $5000
takes it. Call 850-258-6139




Boat, Motor &
Trailer
648-4577
Key West 20' 2020WA
Blue Water. Excellent con-
dition 150 Suzuki Out-
board. Not many hours on
motor. Electronics includ-
ed. $16,800. For more info:
227-9325




Dry Boat Storage
FOR RENTI Exclusive
Carrabelle Boat Club.
Safe, state-of-the-art, mari-
na. Enjoy The Luxurious
clubhouse and facilities.
30'x10'x10'...$280-$330.
Call Caryn 404-643-6971


1 7160 J
Overstreet Area Mobile
home for sale. Asking
$109K. Some owner fi-
nancing avail. Call
478-960-0800
Wewahitchka 2003 MH on
180'x90' lot. 3 br, 2 ba
w/new carpet & metal roof.
Close to schools and boat
ramps. Call Heather Harris
850-227-6805 Blue Water
Realty



7170
Residential Waterfront
and water view home sites
from $150,000. Coldwell
Banker Residential Real
Estate, Inc. Don Yarbrough
850-527-5887


1. I


BC 0 THE STAR, PORT ST. JOE, FL 0 THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 2006


pepl






The Star, Port St. Joe, FL Thursday, August 3, 2006 9(


Entertainment geared for 9-to-14-year-olds has become a major cultural force, though unknown to most


Story by PETER LARSEN
Illustration by AMY NING
Freedom News Service
Nine-year-old Melissa
Langley made sure to catch
"High School Musical" when
the made-for-TV movie debuted
on the Disney Channel.
Since then, the fourth-
grader has watched it
numerous times, bought the
soundtrack and taught herself
a few dance numbers from the
movie.
"I just really like the
-,songs," Melissa says. "When I
fall to sleep, sometimes I listen
to the songs."
"High School Musical" is
pretty much her favorite thing
'on TV right now, along with
"Zoey 101," "Hannah Montana"
and "Tom and Jerry."
Melissa is a tween a kid
between ages 9 and 14 and
if the only one of her faves you
Knew was the classic cat-and-
mouse cartoon, well, you're
not a tween, and you probably
don't have one living under
.your roof.
And before you dismiss
all this as kids stuff, consider
This: Tweens are big business,
a powerful entertainment audi-
ence the soundtrack to "High
School Musical," for example,
hit No. 1 on the Billboard
album chart in March, topping
releasess by James Blunt, Mary
J. Blige, Barry Manilow and
Eminem.
The series and movies
they watch on networks such
as the Disney Channel and
Nickelodeon are among the
highest-rated on all of cable
TV
-- With roughly 25 million
-tweens in the United States,
the money they spend or
influence their families to
-spend totals more than $50
,billion a year, .by many indus-
try and media estimates.
Yet even as their viewer-
:ship makes hits of TV shows,
-movies and music, they remain
-a hidden- audience, one that
most outside the tween world
might not even know exists.
"When we won for Best
Kids Show, we wanted to go
out and celebrate," says Drake
Bell, 19, a star of "Drake and
Josh" on Nickelodeon, which
won several awards at the Kids
-Choice Awards in April.
"With the Oscars, you can
go out and celebrate and every-
body's, 'Woo hoo, the Oscar
winners!'" says Bell, who won
Best Actor at the awards show.
"With this, everyone who knew
who we were was in bed by 8
p.m."'

Filling A Void
To understand the cultur-
al phenomenon of tween TV
and increasingly, its spi-
noffs into music, the Internet
and shopping look to the
early 1990s, when kid-orient-
. ed cable channels started to
,fill a niche abandoned by the
broadcast networks.
"I think the networks used
So try to program for kids and
family,", says Dan Schneider,
-who acted on one such show
.-- "Head of the Class" in the
1980s before going on to cre-
-ate tween programs such as
S"The Amanda Show," "Drake
and Josh" and "Zoey 101."
"Sometime in the early
.to mid-'90s, 8 p.m. televi-
-sion went away from family to
being 'Friends' and you real-
ly don't want your 10-year-old
Watching 'Friends,'" Schneider
'i ;says.
" Nickelodeon had many.
,of the early tween shows
A "Clarissa Explains It All,"
Schneider's "All That," and
S"The Secret World of Alex
SMack," from Tommy Lynch,
like Schneider, a tween pro-
Sgramin[ng mogul.
What they discovered was
that kids in that age .range
.didn't want to watch shows for
little kids and they didn't want
to watch their parents' shows.
insteadd they wanted to see
themselves and their stories
on TV
t' They love stories about
( )themselves," says Lynch,
;whose other programs include
'"'Romeo!" and "Caitlin's Way."
S"Which is why you see a lot of
. school stories, a lot of get-in-
', trouble stories. And funny is a
' big part of it our audience
'flpves funny."
. Schneider says his main
goal is to create a world where
kids are king and queen, of


atmosphere, I'd have lost my
mind."
Yet despite all the content
that tweens consume, the hit
shows and stars they create
remain under the radar. "Zoey
101" is the third most-popular
show for all tweens after
'American Idol" and "Extreme
Makeover: Home Edition" yet
you'd be hard-pressed to find
an adult without kids who
knows it.
"I have friends who have
no idea what I do," says Lynch,
now working to create his 19th
series. "They've never seen any
of those shows."

The Kids' Perspective
The grown-ups who create


course.
"I create a world where
kids rule," he says. "If you
think about it, kids are always
being told what to do, what to
say, when to do it they're
very controlled. ... I give them
an escape, where the kids are
in charge."
He and others who create
programs for tweens say the
other common attribute of the
shows is honesty it has to
feel real to the audience.
"You're telling a story that's
relatable, that's accessible, and
particularly with 'High School
Musical,' a story with some
wish fulfillment attached,"
says Gary Marsh, the Disney
Channel's president for enter-
tainment.
"There's an adage out
there 'tween is not an age,
it's a stage,'" Marsh says.
"Kids are trapped between the
cocoon and comfort of being
a child, and the rebellion and
independence they want as a
teenager.
"So your goal is trying Ato
satisfy all those needs that
kids have."
With "High School
Musical," Marsh notes, the


Disney Channel did that and
then some.
The story of kids from
different cliques the bas-
ketball star and the brainy girl
- who fall for each other and
decide to try out for the school
musical attracted more than
34 million different viewers
over 10 showings after its Jan.
20 debut.
By the time a karaoke ver-
sion aired a day later, 1.2 mil-
lion fans downloaded lyrics
from the Disney Web site to
sing along. The soundtrack
CD has sold more than 2 mil-
lion copies and topped the
charts in online sales at the
iTunes store.
The strong iTunes sales
points to what show creators
say is the future, targeting
tech-savvy tweens with origi-
nal content online, like the
behind-the-scenes podcasts
Schneider does with the "Zoey
101" cast.
"When I was a kid, my
favorite show was 'Happy
Days,'" he says. "If I could
have heard a recording .of the
cast of 'Happy Days' just sit-
ting around having fun, talk-
ing about the show in a party


eat w'-iyo, a
,: ... ," t -

Visit Dr. May in the morning, have ..
the "Mini-Implant System" placed in' less
than two hours, then go out and enjoy
your favorite lunch.

This is a one-stage procedure that involves minimally
invasive surgery, rio sutures, nor the typical months
of healing. All for less than one-third the cost
of conventional implants.

Call for your complimentary consultation
850-227-1123


Frank D. May, DMD, PA

319 Williams Avenue
Port St. Joe, FL 32456


the shows make good points
on what makes them hits, but
then, too, so do their teen
stars.
On the orange carpet at
the Nickelodeon Kids Choice
Awards in Los Angeles, the
casts of many of the tween hits
had plenty to say from a kid's-
eye view on why their shows
are so popular.
"I think its the fact that
it's relatable to teens," says
Malese Jow, a 15-year-old
who plays Geena Fabiano on
Nickelodeon's "Unfabulous."
Fans of the show tend to
be "little kids who haven't gone
into middle school yet, and
they're using our show as a
steppingstone," she says.


"They want to relate to
things that bother them, like
body image and teen empower-
ment," says Jessica Williams,
16, one of the stars of "Just for
Kicks," a Nickelodeon series
about girl soccer players.
'"And boys!" chimes in
Francesca Catalano, 16, one
of her costars.
A few days after the Kids
Choice Awards, Drake Bell of
"Drake and Josh" and Miley
Cyrus of the Disney Channel's
new "Hannah Montana," said
much the same.
"What really appeals to
a lot of the girls is the bond
between (best-friend charac-

(See TWEEN on Page 10 OC)


GULF COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD

Announces its policy for Free and Reduced Price Meals for students under the


NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH AND BREAK-

FAST PROGRAMS.

Any interested person may review a copy of the policy by contact
Bill Carr
150 Middle School Road
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850-229-8256/639-2871

Household size and income criteria will be used to determine eligibility. These criteria can be found on the
chart below. Children from families whose income is at or below the levels shown may be eligible for Free or
Reduced Price Meals. An application can not be approved unless it contains complete eligibility information.
Once approved, meal benefits are good for an entire year. You need not notify the organization of changes
in income and household size.
Application forms are being sent to all homes with a letter to parents or guardians. To apply for Free or Re-
duced Price Meals, households must complete the application and return it to school. Additional copies are
available at the principal's office in each school. The information provided on the application will be used
for the purpose of determining eligibility and may be verified at any time during the school year. Applications
may be submitted at any time during the year.
Households the receive Food Stamps or TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families) are required to list
on the application only the child's name, Food Stamp/TANF case number, and signature of adult household
member.
Foster children may receive benefits based on the child's personal income regardless of the income of the
household
Household with children who are considered migrants, homeless, or runaway should contact the district
liaison, Bill Carr at 850-229-8256/639-2871
For the purpose of determining household size, deployed service members are considered a part of the
household. Families should include the names of the deployed service members on their application. Report
only that portion of the deployed service member's income made available to them or on their behalf to the
family. Additionally, a housing allowance that is part of the Military Housing Privanizaiion Initiative is nof to
be included as income.
All other households must provide the following information listed on the application:
* Total household income listed by amount received and type of income and how often the income is re-
ceived '(wages, child support, etc.) received by each household, member;
* Names of all household members;
* Signature of an adult household member certifying the information provided is correct and
* Social Security number of the adult signing the application or the word "NONE" for this household member
if he or she does not have a social security number.
If a household member becomes unemployed or if the household size changes, the school should be con-
tacted. Children of parents or guardians who become unemployed should also contact the school. Such
changes may make the student eligible for reduced price or free meals if the household income falls at or
, below the levels shown below.
Under the provisions of the Free and Reduced Price meal policy

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR BUSINESS SERVICES

will review applications and determine eligibility. If a parent or guardian is dissatisfied with the ruling of the
official, he or she may wish to discuss the decision with the determining official on an informal basis. If the
parent wishes to make a formal appeal, he or she may make a request either orally or in writing to

Tim Wilder
150 Middle School Road
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
850-229-8256/639-2871

Unless indicated otherwise on the application, the information on the Free and Reduced Price Meal applica-
tion may be used by the school system in determining eligibility for other educational programs.,

FLORIDA INCOME ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES
FOR FREE AND REDUCED PRICE MEALS]

Effective from July 1, 2006, to June 30, 2007
Free Meal Scale Is 130% of Federal Poverty Level
Household Annual Monthly Twice Per Every Two Weekly
size Month Weeks
1 12,740 1,062 531 490 245
2 17,160 1,430 715 660 330
3 21,580 1,799 900 830 415
4 26,000 2,167 1,084 1,000 .500
5 30,420 2,535 1,268 1,170 585
6 34,840 2,904 1,452 1,340 670
7 39,260 3,272 1,636 1,510 755
8 43,680 3,640 1,820 1,680 840
Each additional 4,420 369 185 170 85
family member,
add
Reduced Meal Scale is 185% of Federal Poverty Level
Household Annual Monthly Twice Per Every Two Weekly
size Month Weeks
1 18,130 1,511 756 698 349
2 24,420 2,035 1,018 940 470
3 30,710 2,560 1,280 1,182 591
4 37,000 3,084 1,542 1,424 712
5 43,290 3,608 1,804 1,665 833
6 49,580 4,132 2,066 1,907 954
7 55,870 4,656 2,328 2,149 1,075
8 62,160 5,180 2,590 2,391 1,198
Each additional 6,290 525 263 242 121
family member,
add

To determine monthly income:
* If you receive the income every week, multiply the total gross income by 4.33.
* If you receive the income every two weeks, multiply the total gross income by 2.15
S If you receive the income twice a month, multiply the total gross income by 2
Remember: The total income before taxes, social security, health benefits, union dues, or other deductions
must be reported.

"In accordance with Federal law, and US Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating
on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination write USDA, Director,
Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call 800-795-3272 or (202) 720-
6382 (TTY). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer."


,Established 7937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


\


;i i






inflt TI-... C... 0,.- C4 l In CL Thu,,rc-ln A''slct 3 .200


Tween


-" From Page 9C


ters) Lilly and Miley," says
13-year-old Miley, daughter of
country star Billy Ray Cyrus,
who plays her TV dad on the
show. "The best friend-sister-
type relationship.
"And to boys, there's my
brother on the show, who's
always getting into trouble
with money or cars or what-
ever, and the stunts and gags
that younger boys like," she
says.
Bell, who grew up on
Nickelodeon watching its
shows and then starring in
"The Amanda Show" and the
spinoff "Drake and Josh"
- said the shows succeed
because they show real kids
doing real things in humorous
settings.
"They're wholesome, and
really actually funny," says
Bell. "It's not like you turn it
on and it's kids throwing pies
in each other's faces. There's
actually validity to the work."
Not, of course, that there's
anything wrong with silly
stuff like pies in the face or
needy square-pantsed sponges
named Bob.
Because even with all
the tween programming
on the Disney Channel and
Nickelodeon, tweens still
watch a lot of animation on
those channels, as well as the
Cartoon Network.
Neighbors Nicholas
DeNuccio, 11, and Bree
LaBare, 13, rate "SpongeBob
SquarePants" as highly as they
do shows such as "Zoey 101"
- which stars Jamie Lynn
Spears, Britney's little sis -
and "Ned's Declassified School
Survival Guide."
"I have to say, I'm really
liking the 'Scooby Doo' right
now, too," says fifth-grader
Nicholas of Costa Mesa, Calif.
But what they say about
-the tween shows is right on
target with what their makers
say: They like the school set-
tings and stories, they like the
little lessons on how to navi-


gate that world, and they like
all the hijinks and humor that
come with each episode.
Dad Jim DeNuccio gives
them a thumbs-up, too, for
their safe content and rele-
vance to kids today.
"They're real scenarios,
real relationships," he says.
"What's on a 10- or 12-year-
old's mind these, days it's
all about girlfriends and boy-
friends and being aware of
yourself.
"From a father's point
of view, it's OK with me," he
says.
From show creator
Schneider's perspective, the
tween genre is a fine place for
him, too. Though he's made
movies he wrote "Big Fat
Liar," starring Paul Giamatti,
Frankie Muniz and Amanda
Bynes of "The Amanda Show"
- he's repeatedly turned down
offers to move into primetime
adult TV
One reason is the greater
control broadcast networks
exercise over their shows. The
main reason is that as net-
works have proliferated on
cable, the audience has splin-
tered, and hit shows seldom
become the water-cooler talk
they were in the old days.
"When I was on 'Head
of the Class,' 25 million, 30
million people would watch
that every night now a big
hit doesn't get a third of that
audience," Schneider says. "I
liked television in the old days.
I liked that everybody knew
every episode of 'The Brady
Bunch,' everybody knew every
episode of 'Cheers.'
"There's not a tween
in this country that doesn't
know 'Drake and Josh' well,"
Schneider says. "You can't
bring me a 12-year-old that
doesn't know 'Zoey.'
"Tween television is the
last area, the last audience,
where the whole nation knows
these shows."


To place a Classified ad call

747-5020





PUBLIC NOTICE


A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning
and Development Review Board Meeting
on' Monday, August 7, 2006 at 6:00 PM.
central time and at the Wewahitchka Board
of City Commission Meeting August 14,
2006 at 6:45 RM. central time. Both Public
Hearings will be held in the Wewahitchka
City Hall located at 109 South Second
Street, Wewahitchka, FL 32465. The Public
Hearings will be to discuss and act on the
following, to wit:


Small Scale Land Use Change:
Charles Mayhann, Parcel #02388-
OOOR, changing Lot No. 9 from
residential low density to mixed
commercial/residential. Subject
to all development regulations re-
quired by the City of Wewahitchka,
FL.


The public is encouraged to attend and be
hear on these matters. Information prior to
the hearings can be viewed at the City Hall
in Wewahitchka.

PROPERTY ID: 02388-0OOR

HWY 71 S

PROPERTY ID:
370 HARDEN CIRCLE
.28.ACRES
EXISTING RESIDENTIAL LD
PURPOSED MIXED COMMERCIAL/RESIDENTIAL *


Cleaning out teen's clos-
et? Valuable items may be
stored there.
By JENNIFER KELLAR
ERWIN
Freedom News Service
Photos courtesy of www.
antiquetoys.com





:L; f;




i 1

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So7. y'io r, feelII l ; lithl
dloo n1 Ilits sutiijiner a-s you help
\':ur coll-,e-l)c:.tiind t-cil rlean
S 111u lii r(iomi, prprl:iijiii 1 hll n
for Ilht iiext step in ls. edtica-
tioniil .drreer A. you rti-ioe dithe
cluttiered i iontieiits, .'you l x up
swealer-s and jeis. his favorite
t tenins shoe. and hikinL. hoots. a
_,ym bbag and .. what's this.'
Nc>,tled iiil the dust bunu-
nies in ilu haI).k of the closet is
a plaster container filled \ithl
old Matchbox cars, a GI Joe
liwchbox and a star Wars figtiu-
rine still in its original package.
Surely. he won't n,-ed all hiar
stuff right?
Experts say think twice:
before youi
In k e

t t l e
v "i u r t:


trash.
Terry Kovel, co-author of
Kovels' Antiques & Collectibles
Pricelist, says doing your home-
work might just undercover a
treasure or two.
"First of all, people always
throw out the wrong stulf first "
K'oel said. 'They trunk, W'ell.
we (le'iued r.eryvtiun up and
got rid :I: ,Ill ithe old toi-y. maga-
inmes.' Thalit's really not lie 'way
in do it "
Some toys that older kids
plhwed with a. chiJdren have a jlot
more value today. For in-.tane-e.
earl Sti-u Wars or Fisher Pnri
t,,s or the very earliest of the
handlield computer games canji
bring dlie owner hundreds of
dollars.
And thiM. G! Joe or Barbie
lnirhblioxcs you ilmay consider
thro'iring in -he ya.rd-sale pile
ima', desert'. a second look'
The ,.onditiont of the tenm 'is
everything." Koel sas. .aind
rhe Tihei mos inside wi I
incrca-.e the liinclh-
box's 'alue even\
nirr -.
Any "clas-
Sic" i, .\s, e.pe-- '
L ally video .
games such
as Pong .
SuI pe r

Brothers .-
o r Pa,:-
Man. and
ha nd held
el tron-
h s lihke the

Gam'eboyv are
wortli keeping
as these -arnes
mark ithe bemtui g of a new
type of toy. Though their tech-
nology is pruintive hby today's
standards. these earl games
are unportart artifacts u his-
tory and will be sought after by
Collectors. Novel says.


Old dolls can also bring
a pretty penny, she says
"Dolls used to be
the only valuable French
fashion from the 19th
century, and the
more elaborate
dolls were
sold only to
the rich."
she said. ,..


I









While walking in the shallow waters of St. Joe Bay,
remember to do the "Stingray Shuffle" shuffle your
feet through the sandy bottom of the bay instead
of walking regularly. This shuffling gives the 'rays
ample warning of approaching humans and they
will swim out of your way.

I,, "" ,


"Nowadays, collectors are,
looking for Chatty Cathy, Mrs.
Beasley. Barbie, Raggedy Ann
and Andy."
Dolls from the '80s and '90s
are not old enough to be collec-
tors' items yet, but some of their
small accessories have become
rare and, therefore, valuable.
Unusual Barbie accessories, like
the Barbie record
player or the
Barb.e denrsIt's
oftfie chair
m1iuht be -
torth hangi-
inil onto


However. --' ..."
it's OK to toss '
obsolete elect-ron-
its. such as old TVs.
stereos and computetrs. su':e
these- items aren't worth keepuig
Winless \ou keep them until there
become novelties Kovel suggests
selling or donating t-hse items if
they are in cood worlkiing condi-
tioin because they are iihdikely to
ever increase in :lutir
T-shirts generally rio not
become collectors' items lif
rare cases. shirts from a-
popular concert. protest
march. or other datable
event can be of value.
but thte item must
be in inunt :on-I
,'-"": dctiou
"-* Does your
teen have a
colI e ': t i 0 n
-". of Swatch
w. \atc hes'? The
popular '"Os
accessor y
nuglt seem to'
be worth s'ome
money. but ovel exbpluans that
dtiey were 'over-hyped' and are
unlikely to become collectors'
itellms.
Other "keepers' might
include Girl Boy Scout related
items, political buttons, char-
acter-theimed Christmas orna-
ments or Halloween costumes.
Disney memorabilia. fad jewelry.
cereal boxes featuring sports fig-
ures. anything Coca Cola, items.
that axe tied to a memorable
event or that are
lumted edition,"
a and movie- or T''-
themed glassware
dinnerware.
,, k ,Arid ido \.-)ur
own research
Koivel suggests
^^JS" toppna Q b%
S local antique
Shows to


ask questions. or even bringing
a picture of the item to see if
the dealer wants to buy it. The
Salvation Arinmy in also be a
good place to 'tart because you
can get in idea of how items
sdtiindar wt yolurs are priced .
if you do an online search
and don't find any informa- 7











ii-n boutt your item. chances
arr there's probably not a maur-
kx-t 'for it
'Sunte- the advent of onhlne
trading cod eBny. people have
found that sonir lthiui'is tJw'e
thouehit were valuablee aren't'."
.-he said "But some they didn't
Llink were valuable are And
when yun decide to sell it, don't
expect to get retail Expect to get
hall whale you sec it sold for."
Hovel says not to having onto
somietlung just because you
think it will be worth something
down the road Some Items are
iosta.jic. .and have more sen-
tinmet-rtal value than monetary
worth
U' you love the doll or the
luncbbox, keep it." she said
"It may be something you love
because a friend gave It to you.
Don't forget the emotional part
,of it; and be sure to keep your
laivorites Something you own
really means something to you.
and you can't put a
price on that







A N.'




".,k





S .a ^ "


Watch out
for snakes in


or overgrown

areas. When
in uncleared
areas, stay on
well marked
paths and
trails.


Publish July 27 and August 3, 2006


iu i IaroTZT o ,r in ra y Ay b 0 -v


Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


I


R .


.


-,-


I'-;


kc

Vz -lot


u


.






sa.. tict- \ 37 f .-,in, ( 4 ,-,-n + w n l I ,U Ut i[V fr 8vuT S rr. Joe, FL Tusa Auus 3, 2- -


Canning


fruit and preserves for the past 40 years.
Russell said that lately she has had a difficult
time finding canning ingredients like turmeric
and mustard seed.
"It's a disappearing art," Russell said. "You
don't find anyone (among) the young women


GIVE IT

A TRY

Here are some can-
ning and freezing tips cour-
tesy of the Texas Cooperative
Extension. For tips or recipes,
call the Ector County (Texas)
extension office at 432-498-
4071.


Canning

Use only fresh, tender
vegetables and fresh, ripe
fruit.
Boil produce such as
tomatoes and peaches for 30
to 60 seconds to easily peel off
the soft skin.
Use only standard jars
designed for home canning
and make sure the tops of the


that really cans."
Lovett said home-canned foods are worth
the effort.
"They're a little bit time-consuming, but
they're not difficult to make," Lovett said.


jars have a smooth edge to
make a seal.
Sterilize jars with hot,
soapy water before using and
keep jars hot while waiting to
fill them with food items.
Make the lids seal by
placing jars in a pressure can-
ner that boils jars at least 240
degrees.
The metal sealing disk
can be used only once, but
the jars and rings can be used
multiple times.
Store canned foods in
a cool, dry place for up to a
year.
When using canned
products, check for signs of
spoilage like spurting liquid,
pungent odor, mold or floating
bubbles.
Eat only unspoiled food
and refrigerate or freeze left-
over food.


Freezing

Use quality fruits and
vegetables; freezing will retain
their color and flavor.
Blanch vegetables in boil-
ing water to prevent enzyme
activity that could change color
and flavor.
Cool all foods and syr-
ups before packaging.
Freeze foods at 0 degrees
or lower as soon as possible
after packaging, making sure
that food will be frozen within
24 hours.
Use moisture-proof
packaging materials to prevent
evaporation and protect food.
Glass jars: Use wide-
mouth jars to lessen the chance
of the glass breaking.
Freezer bags: Twist out
excess air and tie. Place bags
in a cardboard container to
prevent them from falling out
or tearing.
Plastic containers:
Containers should be mod-
erately thick and sealed with
freezer tape.
The time that food will
retain its quality in a freezer
depends on the type of food,
freezing temperature and
proper storage technique.
Thaw food in the refrig-,
erator and use immediately
after thawing.


Life Lost to Obesity: Not Just Quality


by Caroline J.
Cederquist, M.D
With two out of three
Americans overweight today,
we're learning more and more
about the numerous ways that
carrying excess weight can
really affect our health and
diminish our quality of life.
But you may not have
heard the hard facts about
how overweight and obesity
can diminish your quantity of
life.
Simply put, overweight
people die younger. On aver-
age, they lose as many years to
their excess weight as smokers
lose to their cigarettes.
It stands to reason, doesn't
it? With all the health prob-
lems that we know are caused
or worsened by excess weight,
it is to be expected that those
who carry an excess would die
sooner than those who don't.
Still, we don?t often hear
the cost of our extra calo-
ries expressed in such stark
terms. In the popular media,
we?ve typically seen our weight
problems discussed as a func-
tion of appearance and appeal,
and feel the imperative to lose
weight in order to be more
attractive and more success-
ful.
The medical establish-
ment has been warning about
the risks of obesity and over-
weight in terms that address
their health consequences, but
early death is seldom men-
tioned among these.
Yet Dutch researchers
studying Americans found
that there's a lot to lose for
those who don't lose their
extra pounds. Published in the
Annals of Internal Medicine,
the data from the Dutch study
were gathered from more than
3,450 subjects between the


ages of 30 and 59.
The researchers catego-
rized people according to their
body mass index, or BMI. A
BMI of 19 to 24 is typically
considered healthy, while a
BMI of 25 to 29 is considered
overweight, and a BMI of 30 or
more is clinically obese.
Among those subjects who
were overweight but not actu-
ally obese, the study showed
that 40-year-old female non-
smokers lost 3.3 years of life
due to their excess weight.
In this weight class, the
40-year-old male nonsmokers
lost 3.1 years of life expec-
tancy.
For non-smokers who
were clinically obese, the news
only got worse for women,
who lost about seven years of
life because of their obesity,
while the men of this size lost
just under six years.
That's six Thanksgivings,
six New Year's Eves, and who
knows how many grand-
children born. That's six
Superbowls they'll miss, six
World Series they won't see.
Not surprisingly, the loss
is much greater for overweight
smokers. When we add the
strain and damage of ciga-
rettes to the body's burden of
obesity, the loss doubles, to
around 13 years for both men
and women.
That's 13 birthdays, 13
Independence Day fireworks
shows, 13 years of some spe-
cial child's school pictures
that will be missed. When you
think about it in such person-
al and specific terms, those
extra calories suddenly seem
so much more costly.
"Obesity and overweight
in adulthood are associated
with large decreases in life
expectancy and increases in


early mortality," the the jour-
nal reported. "Because of the
increasing prevalence of obe-
sity, more efficient prevention
and treatment should become
high priorities in public
health."
But what "prevention and
treatment" means depends
on who you talk to, and it's
becoming an increasingly con-
troversial issue, with some
saying that overweight is an
individual problem caused by
individual actions, and there-
fore one that should be dealt
with.
We face tremendous pres-
sure to eat often and eat poor-
ly, and there are consequenc-
es to that, for everyone, even
those who are not personally
overweight. American's weight-
related health expenses now
exceed $130 billion per year,
and that gets spread across
everyone's health costs.
And that says nothing of
the incalculable economic cost
to businesses and communi-
ties in lost human time and
potential.
And it says nothing of the
immeasurable loss to fami-
lies and individuals, of those
moments on birthdays and
holidays, of those stories, and
photographs that end: up miss-
ing someone, lost early to: a
preventable weight problem.,
Obese American!, males
lose and average of six years of
life expectancy to their excess
weight. Six birthdays, six fam-
ily ChrIstmases. six Super
Bowl Sundays. Thinkmnp about
the consequences of obesity
in such personal and specific
terms, can really drive home
the cost of those extra calo-
ries.


PUBLIC NOTICE

A Public Hearing will be held at the Planning and Development Review Board (PDRB) meeting on Thursday, August 10, 2006 at 8:45 a.m.
EST, and at the Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) meeting on Thursday, August 17, 2006 at 6:00 p.m. EST. Both public hearings will
be held in the BOCC Meeting Room at the Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida. The
public hearings will be to discuss and act on the following:

1. Continuance of the July 17, 2006
2. Final Plat Approval B.J. Heard & Chris King Baywoods Parcel ID #06230-00OR 4.5 acres in Section 25, Township 8 South, Range 11
West, Gulf County, Florida- a maximum 11 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regulations, state and
unstated.
3. Preliminary Plat Approval Edward Bish Gulf Coast Ranches Parcel ID #03323 -175R 40.84 acres in Section 32, Township 7 South,
Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida a maximum 16 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regulations,
stated and unstated.
4. Public Hearing Large Scale Land Use Change St. Johns Village of Gulf County, Inc. St Johns Village Parcel ID #01368-800R &
01369-000R 107.52 acres in Section 35 & 36, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida Changing Agricultural Land Use
to Residential Low Density.
5. Public Hearing Large Scale Land Use Change Jerald D. Gaskin Parcel ID# 143.54 in Section 11, Township 4 South, Range 10 West,
Gulf County, Florida Changing Agricultural Land Use to Residential Low Density.
6. Public Hearing Large Scale Land Use Change Buckhorn Development, LLC Buckhorn subdivisions Parcel ID# 01186-1 OOR& 01186-
300R 136.17 acres in Section 24 & 25, Township 3 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida Changing Agricultural Land Use to
Residential Low Density.
7. Adjourn the July 17, 2006 meeting and Call to Order the August 10, 2006
8. Final Plat Approval Hargraves Engineering Bay Colors Parcel ID #06245-OOOR 3.78 acres in Section 36, Township 8 South,.Range
11 West, Gulf County, Florida a maximum 15 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regulations, stated
and unstated.
9. Final Plat Approval Libby Owens Our Tara Estates Parcel ID# 01359-370R & 01359-365R 10 acres in Section 36, Township 3 South,
Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida a maximum 28 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regulations,
stated and unstated.
10. Final Plat Approval Coastal. Pines, LLC Cottages at Coastal Pines Parcel ID #03323-170R 40.07 acres in Section 32, Township 7
South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida a maximum 43 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regula-
tions, stated and unstated.
11. Preliminary Plat Approval William J. Rish a subdivision Parcel ID# 06268-750R 5.06 acres in Section 7, Township 9 South, Range
11 West, Gulf County, Florida a maximum 8 unit development subject to all Federal, State and Local development regulations state and
unstated.
12. Variance Steve Newman Parcel ID #06287-185R .10 acre in Section 22, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida
Permission to encroach into side setback 8 inches.
13. Variance Steve Newman Parcel ID #06287-295R .10 acre Section 22, Township 9 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida Per-
mission to encroach into side setback 2 inches.
14. Public Hearing Large Scale Land Use Change Ralph Rish Parcel ID#02977-050R& Parcel ID#02977-100R 26.05 acres in Com-
mercial/Residential.
15. Public Hearing Comprehensive Plan/EAR Text and Map Amendments
16. St. Joe/Arvida for WindMark Beach DO/PDP
17. Staff

The Public is encourage to attend and be heard on these matters. Information prior to the meeting can be viewed at the Planning and Building
Department at 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., 301.
2. Baywoods 3. Gulf Coast Ranches 8. Baycolors
10. Cottages atCoastal Pines



c -i






9. Our Tarm Estates 11. William J.."k 12. Variance Newman











13. Variance -Newman











*Ad #2006-090 Publish: July 27 and August 3, 2006


Leat "' p~wfr,3,ana 60140. team h4.yci

fI nd pm Dmutem J&tmel!!


P elican I
Rea l estate j|
|| Osv opment Company nc 11


CLEARED 1.11, acre lot located
in Fairway Park Subdivision, in
Carrabelle. New development
three blocks from bay and a short
distance to boat launch and golf
course.
MLS # 108377............. $139,500


Pelican Real Estate
171 Highway 98, Suite D
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850)670-8886
www.pelicanproperty.com


CHARMING 3BR/2BA home
with spacious, kitchen/dining
area, quaint Iajnlii, room ,n, ihr-,
place. Ide.il neighborhood lo-
cated in Apalachicola. Close to
downtown and schools.
MLS # 201380......... $335,000 '


-a -as


BEAUTIFUL Gulffront home-
site with FEMA located in Money
Bayou. Nice wide beach to enjoy
walking, shelling and horseback
riding.
MLS # 201081...........$1,300,000


EXQUISITE 4BR4Bi hi.,mc in
the exclusive St. George Plantation
located on St. George Island. This
hone features man', anmmenmes and
hasb.-rn extnri lh, redcrate-ld
MLS # 110802........... $1,299,000


SPACIOUS 3BR/2BA home lo- WONDERFUL I,:.[ located :.r., S
cated in Apalachicola. Wonderful George Island. Short distance to
landscaped property boasts the beach.
natural look. MLS #108570 .............. $380,000
MLS # 200076............. $329,000


PRETTY 1.32 acres with lots of
vegetation. Property has an unob-
structed view of the Apalachicola
Bay.
MLS # 107581............. $440,000


GREAT,lot one block off Highway
98 located in Lanark. Popular
area due to land elevation and its
close to boat launch and bay.
MLS #108411............. $125,000


NICE 1.09 acre lot with pines, UNIQUE 3BR/2BA home located
high elevation and dry. Located on 3.47 acres that adjoins Tate's
in new development in Carrabelle Hell National Forest. Only.02
only three blocks from bay and a miles from the Apalachicola Bay.
short distance to boat launch and This property has many amenities
golf course, including a workshop.
MLS # 107486.............. $144,900 MLS # 200021.............. $399,000
7 LEADING REAL ESTATE
C. COMPANIES /THE WORLDT"


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FU


CTIONAL


Story by KIMBERLY EDDS
Photos by NICK KOON
Freedom News Service
Generations of American
children have choked down
carrots and spinach, hoping
the temporary unpleasantness
would lead to superhero-type
eyesight or muscles Popeye
would envy just like Mom
promised.
And with veggies packing
everything from cancer-fight-
ing antioxidants to bone-bol-
stering vitamins, Mom clear-
ly was on to something. But
veggies aren't the only power
chow anymore. A host of new,
so-called functional foods -
processed foods that manu-
facturers say deliver a benefit
beyond basic nutrition are
popping up on supermarket
shelves, making claims that,
border on the medicinal.
The market for, the stuff
almost certainly is strong.
Nearly half of all Americans
(48.4 percent by one estimate)
suffers from at least one ongo-
ing illness or condition, such
as arthritis and diabetes. Many
view nutrition as a weapon in
tih-ir battle for e.;lth. .
-. : -' ii i-.ois at food com-
panies are turning foods that
Americans actually eat from
soda to chocolate -to yogurt
- into something resembling
health food.
Veer to the candy aisle.
There, among the many choco-
late bars, you'll find CocoaVia.
Like the others, it has some
sugar (9 grams) and fat (6
grams.) But unlike most,


C>'..i\ V. i: :ho 'ioi bars also
have 100 milligrams of fla-
vonoids, natural antioxidants
also found in red wine, and
1.5 grams of plant sterols,
which are touted as helping to
prevent heart attack-causing
blood clots.
Or take a detour by the
refrigerator case to pick up
a couple of cartons of orange
juice one fortified with extra
fiber to keep you regular and
another promising to maintain
a healthy immune system.
And Daiirlnon'-i Activia, a
probiotic yogurt that promises
to help reduce what is polite-
ly referred to as "digestional
transit time," hit American
shelves this year. Available in
six flavors including prune
- Activia contains a culture
called bifidus regulars, or
what scientists refer to as a
kind of healthy bacteria. It's
these "gut bugs" that people
who suffer from constipation
or other intestinal disorders
lack. Four company-spon-
sored clinical studies showed
that eating Activia daily for two
weeks can reduce by up to 40
percent the time it takes food
to leave the digestive system.
"In addition to being a
great-tasting yogurt and pro-
viding calcium and 5 grams
of protein in every serving,
Dannon's Activia helps to
naturally regulate your diges-
tive system," said Michael
Neuwirth, a Dannon spokes-
man.
PepsiCo has rolled out
a new version of Tropicana
orange juice, with 3 grams of
fiber per serving as much
as an entire orange. Part of
its Essentials line, Tropicana


Gll Y' V m S'i


Live music returns to the
Thirsty Goat all summer long


6pm 'Ii they get tired of playing


August 4th-First Fridays
12th-John and Tom
26th George and Cletus


July 7th- First Fridays
15th-John and Tom
29th George and Cletus



September
George and Cletus -9th
John and Tom -16th


50 Moum Aveue@ wy 9 &7

229-PRT (778)


now has seven different orange
juices with added vitamins
and antioxidants promising
to improve heart health and
build strong bones.
Food seems to be an effec-
tive place to put such health-
promoting additives. If it
tastes good, people will eat
it, said Stephanie Childs, a
spokeswoman for the Grocery
Manufacturers of America.
"Food science has evolved
to the point that we can have
palatable products that have
these health benefits," Childs
said.
"If I don't have to sacri-
fice flavor and preferences and
still get the additional health
benefits, that's great."
And food unlike vita-
mins is naturally self-lim-
iting. Consumers would be
hard-pressed to chow down on
enough fiber-enriched bread
to overdose on a particular
vitamin.
No one ever labeled soda
a health food, but many
Americans drink it gulping
down 10 billion cases of soda


a year. As part of a better-for-
you soda push, Mixed Berry
7Up Plus, a low-calorie fla-
vored drink with added fruit
juice and calcium, was intro-
duced by Cadbury Schweppes
in 2004. Providing 10 percent
of daily calcium per serving,
two more flavors were intro-
duced last year. The food tech-
nicians at Cadbury Schweppes
are looking into adding calci-
um to other products in their
drink line.
"We have a population
that is short on calcium,
not a population that drinks
a lot of milk," said Fergus
Clydesdale, a professor of
food science at the University
of Massachuisetts, Amherst. "If
they're not (drinking milk),
what do we do? Do we put it in
a thing they do eat or drink?"
But don't swap your pre-
scription coverage for a fre-
quent-supermarket-shopper
card just yet. The makers of
functional foods may pitch
their products as ways to help
,maintain overall good health
and reduce the risk of devel-


oping a chronic disease, but
the government isn't yet recog-
nizing all the claims.
"The FDA does not define
the term 'functional foods,'"
said Kimberly Rawlings, a
spokeswoman for the Food
and Drug Administration.
"The FDA regulates conven-
tional foods and dietary sup-
plements."
Just because the FDA
doesn't recognize functional
foods doesn't stop manufac-
turers from tossing around
the term or from tiptoeing
around the FDAs strict label-
ing regulations.
Claims that refer to the
"normal, healthy structures
and functions" of the body
don't require agency approv-
al. Packages of Quaker's Take
Heart instant oatmeal say one
bowl contains antioxidants
to "support healthy arteries,"
while offering low sodium as
a way to "help maintain a
healthy blood pressure." It's
up to the consumer to deter-
mine what healthy arteries or
healthy blood pressure can do
for overall health.
Despite the benefits prom-


ised from eating a functional
food or two doesn't mean you
have free rein to trade the
treadmill for the living-room
couch, Clydesdale said. "It's
one arrow in the quiver. But
there are a lot of other quivers
that need to be taken out."
And there is a danger
that Americans may forgo
other healthy foods in favor
of relying on functional foods,
Clydesdale said.
"The Western attitude is
that if one (serving) is better,
20 must be much, much bet-
ter," said Clydesdale. "I don't
think people should be drink-
ing these products just because
they contain calcium."
That being said, food sci-
entists are banking on the fact
that Americans might not be
listening to Mom's nutritional
advice anytime soon.
Scientists at the University
of Massachusetts, Amherst,
are working on an ice cream
infused with omega-3 fatty
acids, a property typically
'found in fish that could ward
off heart disease and arthritis
- and maybe even make you
smarter. Just in case.


t" ~L -W ~ffif~Ili.J~ ~ 2Y~
.... .~ ,~.:


Food companies are increasingly turning out products that promise health benefits.

But don't ditch your medicine for a frequent-supermarket-shopper card yet.


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Established 1937 Serving Gulf county and surrounding areas for 68 years


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Full Text

PAGE 1

50¢ For breaking news, visit www.starfl.com Subscribe to The Star 800-345-8688 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quote quote id quote name JUMP —— From Page 6A From page 6A Subscribe to The Star Call 227-1278 For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Opinions 4A Letters to the Editor 5A Sports 10A Society News 2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement 8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services 14B I NDEX A Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET 227-1278 Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET 747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1B V ISIT T HE S TAR ONLINE AT WWW STARFL COM XXXXX XXXXXX YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 75, NUMBER 51 Thursday, OCTOBER 3, 2013 BOCC approves millage, tax increase By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m As they put the nishing touches to next scal year’s budget last week county commissioners arrived at a bumping of the heads. With one commissioner, Warren Yeager, absent and two commissioners, Joanna Bryan and Ward McDaniel, refusing to cast a vote in support of a tax increase, the Board of County Commissioners spent nearly three hours in a stalemate. The deadlock was nally broken when Yeager was linked to the meeting, audibly and visually, by phone and cast the deciding vote to approve the budget as presented at the beginning of the night. That budget includes an aggregate millage rate, taking into account the general fund and re districts, of 6.8740, an increase from last year of 11.98 percent. The rollback rate, that millage at which the county would realize the same revenue as the current scal year, is 6.1408. A mill is equal to $1 for every $1,000 in taxable property value. The budget includes a property tax increase of $1.073 million. Clerk of Courts Becky Norris cited several reasons she said accounted for the increase. Those included $200,000 for a Public Works excavator; increases in Florida retirement system contributions over $200,000; pay raises pledged and budgeted last year and implemented this year on top of raises approved this year which combined for over $400,000; increased costs for land ll monitoring and more than $100,000 for new vehicles for the Gulf County Sheriff. Commissioners Tan Smiley, Yeager and Carmen McLemore voted to approve the budget; Bryan and McDaniel dissented. “It’s going to be hard to look people in the eye,” McDaniel said. “We’re just kicking (the issues) down the road.” The deadlock was evident early as commissioners debated what had and had not been done to cut the budget and, most prominently in the discussion, lessen the burden on property taxpayers in favor of user or service fees. “We need to shift some of the burden, the cost, from the taxpayer,” said Pat Hardman, president of the Coastal Community Association. Hardman noted that commissioners had taken up several measures to do that – including adding to the gas tax, an increase to the bed tax, mandatory garbage – and failed to ratify any. The gas tax died by deadline and the increase to the bed tax was found to not be the panacea for assisting the sheriff’s budget as it was proposed. Americus Ditch ongoing problem for county By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m The Board of County Commissioners, with one notable exception, has insisted that the Americus Ditch project is a thing of the past. To residents in the area, and the commissioner who serves them, it is an everpresent problem. Last week pipes were again exposed, as residents called this paper to express frustration, revealing issues with how the pipes are connected and highlighting that a signi cant portion of the water owing through the ditch is not reaching its proposed destination. “It is a mess,” resident Bill Koran told the BOCC during a meeting two months ago. “With heavy rains, my house has been ooded twice. I would like to know how this contract was awarded and how it was inspected. This project was not done correctly. “Was the contractor quali ed for this kind of project? And according to my research, Preble Rish designed and inspected the project and I think that is a bit like the fox guarding the hen house.” According to county staff, the county See BOCC A5 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m One longtime patient of nurse Nellie Wade said Wade had seen more backsides than most anyone in Wewahitchka. Wade basked in smiling faces last Saturday as the community gathered at the First Baptist Church Fellowship Hall to provide a healthy Happy Birthday to a woman who has helped keep them healthy for decades. Since the end of the Second World War and Harry Truman was President. Wade turned 90 this year, one week prior to last Saturday’s celebration. And she continues to show up for work every day, treating the patients of Dr. Michael Barnes, one of the last family physicians in the area. She does the weighing, the blood pressure checks, the checking of temperature and gauges what brings each patient in that day. And as another patient put it, she gives good shots. She is, by nine years, the oldest practicing nurse in Florida, according to research done by Barnes. WOW, NELLIE! TIM CROFT | The Star Somehow more than 100 residents of Wewahitchka surprised Nellie Wade for her birthday party. Wade was under the impression she was headed to Bay County to shop until the car she was riding in entered the First Baptist Church parking lot. Florida’s oldest practicing nurse and Wewa treasure turns 90 By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m MEXICO BEACH — Move over city clerk, the Parker house is the hot button topic in Mexico Beach. During the city council’s monthly workshop last Tuesday, Brian Cathey of Cathey Construction was invited to speak on the status of the historic building that was purchased by the city in mid-2011 with the intention of using it as a new city hall. The building caught re several months later and suffered massive damage. For the last two years the city has gone back and forth about whether it would be more frugal to tear down the re-damaged home and erect a new structure or attempt to rebuild what is left while also installing an elevator and other improvements that would bring the building up to commercial code. The city’s insurance company paid the city $660,000 for the damage and sent a representative to assess the existing foundation slab. The rep verbally told the council that is t to build upon but according to city administrator Chris Hubbard, the city has not received formal written documentation of the assessment. Engineers from Cathey Construction had conducted their own assessments of the building, Cathey said. Their results indicated that the foundation was not usable. “There’s no way we can reuse the foundation as it sits today,” said Cathey. “The foundation has problems that are impossible to overcome without dismantling the building.” Cathey explained that the bricks in the structure are cracking and shifting and that the ground beneath the current foundation may not support a new structure. Previously the area had Parker house discussion continues at a standstill Federal lawsuit against PSJ dismissed By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m A lawsuit led in federal court against the city of Port St. Joe, two police of cers and a local businessman was formally dismissed Monday in the U.S. Northern District Court of Florida. The lawsuit, brought by Lynne Carr, was dismissed with prejudice, meaning the same claims against the same people can not be brought again in litigation. The dismissal ling came from the Tallahassee of ce of Marie Mattox, who was handling Carr’s case. This is the second federal suit Mattox has led against local governments this year; one from a local political action committee against the Board of County Commissioners and several commissioners individually and the other against the city of Port St. Joe. See PARKER HOUSE A5 See LAWSUIT A5 See NELLIE A5 See DITCH A5 Annual Bay Day promotes buffer preserves B1 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . A4 Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . A7 Community . . . . . . . . . . B1 School News . . . . . . . . . . B3 Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Classi eds . . . . . . . . . B6-B8

PAGE 2

Local A2 | The Star Thursday, October 3, 2013 NO HIDDEN CHAR GES: It is our policy that the patient and an y other person r esponsible f or pa yments has the r ight t o r efuse t o pa y cancel pa yment or be r eimbursed b y pa yment or an y other service, examination or tr eatment whic h is perf or med as a r esult of and within 72 hours of r esponding t o the adv er tisement f or the fr ee, discount ed f ee or r educed f ee service, examination or tr eatment. 4< 4 & # //>/ ; ) & 8 ww w .m ulli se y e.c om "$ # ''% 5 "$ ':; 24 ;6;2/ 4 ; 9 3 6 / 2>=4 4 Medical Ey e Exam with 33 $1;) / 3 4 ;6;43 4 #: ;2;/ /3 % 9 4 ':4 4/> ;2=34 / 42 ;; 6 4 4 9=/4 /3 4 f or Glaucoma, Catar acts and other e y e diseases "$ "($ ##"'' 850-7 63-6666 ( % ;; 4 =;;9 ; :4 = ;3/ # /:/3=4) 59 y ears and older not pr esently under our car e. ; 4 8!-! $ + # S m ar t Le ns es SM Can pr oduce clear vision without glasses, at all distances (% % ''(' 0* * # ''% ) "$ "($ #$"$' ##"'' 0 / 4 # / 4) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 33 $1;) Boar d Cer tified 4 #: ;2;/ and Catar act Sur g eon 1 109456 Coupon Expir es: 10-15-13 CODE: Semper Fi Sisters collecting for Boxes of Love for soldiers By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The boxes are piling up and the love is pouring in. To understand, just browse through the conference room at the newspaper, which has been for the past few years a depository for all things Boxes of Love and Semper Fi Sisters. The Sisters, who will begin to arrive in two weeks, will nish their fth annual Beach Blast on Oct. 19 with a packing par ty for Boxes of Love. Those boxes, and the aim is to top last year’s 1,200, will be sent to deployed sol diers overseas, particularly Afghanistan and Iraq. And as happens as the weeks wind down, the UPS and Fed Ex delivery folks are carting in to these ofce boxes of in creasing size and quantity from Long Is land, N.Y., Mullen, Neb., Grand Rapids, Mich., with a bit of Easton, Pa., and Savan nah, Ga., among other locales. And those are the boxes among the stacks for which we can actually make out the labels. Locals are on board to as Centennial Bank branches put up donation boxes and the Piggly Wiggly and Harold’s Auto Parts become part of the drive. “We have received generous support and donations from the VFW and Ameri can Legion here in Port St. Joe,” Semper Fi Sisters president Brenda Garth said. The Sisters rafed a GPS sh nder at the Gulf County Sheriff’s Ofce Bass Tournament, the proceeds helping to ship as many as 50 boxes overseas. The local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution provided post age funds. Preston Russ with Coastal Realty and Brian and Scott of Coastal Joe Vacation Rentals joined to donate a welcome to Gulf County lunch and afternoon treats for the arriving Sisters on Oct. 16. And for the fth consecutive year, Smiley’s Beach Rentals will roll out the complementary beach chairs and umbrel las for the Sisters. “George Duren will continue to sup port our efforts and Forgotten Coast High way donated some bright beachwear and bags for our annual basket rafe, which helps raise funds for shipping the Boxes of Love,” Garth said. Laura Adams of Dog Grooming Plus is collecting funds for items specically requested for military working dogs and their handlers. As always, on packing day, the Semper Fi Sisters will host their Market Place at the Centennial Building offering a variety of crafts and wares for sale, assisting with postage. And, of course, the Basket Rafe. The city of Port St. Joe lends support with the use of the Centennial Building for the packing party and the Gulf County Tourist Development Council provided grant support. Lest any forget the impact of those Box es of Love on the troops, consider Sarah House, a Port St. Joe native soon to be de ployed to Afghanistan for the second time. “Like most care packages that are re ceived (Boxes of Love) are always shared,” House wrote in an email from California. “We’re all family. It is always a good day when we get mail. Everyone anticipates mail day, it is almost like Christmas. It is a huge morale booster. “Honestly, we appreciate anyone and everyone what supports us. Whether it is by sending packages, cards or just send ing up an extra prayer at night or during the day for us, it reminds what and who we ght for, why we wear this uniform and what makes our country so great. The big gest thing I can say to our supporters is thank you from the bottom of my heart.” By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The sound of music will soon encompass the beach as the fth annual Blast on the Bay Songwriters’ Festival kicks off Oct. 17. The free event sprawls across the Forgotten Coast from Mexico Beach to Indian Pass and welcomes Nashvilledwellin’, Grammy-winnin’ country songwriters who have penned tunes for the likes of superstars Faith Hill, Jason Aldean and Garth Brooks. Songwriter Charlie Black and his wife, Dana, who have written hits for George Strait, Alan Jackson, Reba McEntire and many other country crooners, will perform for the fourth time. Years ago the couple traded in the busy streets of Nashville for a relaxing life on the Forgotten Coast, and each and every year, the Songwriters’ Festival brings their friends to town. The festival will begin on Oct. 17 with a lunchtime happy hour at Triple Tails and the following day, a workshop will be held at Dockside Seafood and Raw Bar, where a panel of songwriters will participate in an informal open discussion on the art and business of songwriting. Topics will include the craft of songwriting, songwriting as a career and music production, followed by a critique for participants who bring a sample along with them. “Fellow writers will be able to get insight on the process,” event coordinator Jason Bogan said. “It’s a good place for both novices and seasoned writers to learn from the pros.” The festival utilizes a writer’s round format like those commonly found in Nashville. Each show consists of four performers who trade off playing songs while the other writers can choose to join in with harmonies, extra guitar riffs or rhythm or just sit back and enjoy the tune. Perhaps more fun than hearing these hit songs is learning the stories behind them. The writers are encouraged to offer up the inspiration behind their hits and discuss where they were and what was happening in their lives when they originally put pen to paper. “It’s the untold story,” Bogan said. “They share what they were feeling when they wrote it. “It’s all raw, live, unltered and unplugged, but it’s laid back and lowkey. It’s not just for fans of country music but fans of music and how it was created. It’s nice to see the writers of the hits get a little recognition.” “A lot of serious songs had goofy beginnings,” Black said. “You never know what you’re going to hear.” Black said he enjoys hearing and sharing the stories, but for him, the best moments are getting to hear a song the way it sounded right after the songwriter had completed the rst draft. While some of the hit songs are performed similarly to their wellknown counterparts, others might have completely different words, arrangements or be performed on a different instrument altogether. This year’s event will welcome 27 writers, a new record and a signicant increase from the ve who played the inaugural event in 2008. The rst festival was founded with the idea of keeping things quaint. According to Bogan it was never meant to be rival the size of similar festivals in bigger cities. “The rst couple of years, the writers were asking us, ‘Where’s Port St. Joe?’” laughed Bogan. The growth happened organically as word got around. More writers heard of the festival’s success and intimate setting and offered to share their stories. Bogan and fellow organizer Will Rambeaux seek out writers with great energy and an established hit on the radio to participate. Bogan encouraged musicians and music lovers to take advantage and experience the performances in such an intimate environment. He said that each show acts as its own meet-and-greet. “The writers are regular folks and they’re ridiculously talented,” he said. “Everyone is super accessible and they’re happy to come down and share.” Black said that he was looking forward to some great music and sharing lunch with old buddies that he’d written songs with over the years. “I’m looking forward to it and it’s going to be a lot of fun,” said Black. “The whole town should come out and have a blast.” Bogan noted that the festival was designed as a “listening event” for people to appreciate the songs and be respectful to the writers who in most cases have driven a minimum of nine hours to perform. Proceeds from the event will benet the Coastal Songwriters Education Coalition Inc., a 501(c)(3) not for prot. The Blast on the Bay Songwriter’s Festival runs from Oct. 17-20. To register in advance for the songwriter’s workshop, visit www.blastonthebay. com. WANT TO HELP? Donations for the Boxes of Love can be dropped off at any branch of Centennial Bank, Piggly Wiggly in Port St. Joe, Harold’s Auto Parts in Wewahitchka. An account to help defray shipping costs for the Boxes of Love has been set up at Centennial Bank. Packing local love W e E S L o O C he HE R | The Star The annual Blast on the Bay Songwriters’ Festival returns in October with Nashville talent who have written for country music stars George Strait, Faith Hill and Garth Brooks. Blast on the Bay songwriters’ fest returns to forgotten coast The festival celebrates the songwriters who normally nd themselves behind the scenes.

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Local The Star| A3 Thursday, October 3, 2013 D A V I D R IC H' S S U PE R S AT U R D A Y S ale 5 l b b a g G ol d M e da l Fl o u r $ 1 88 4 l b b a g D o m in o G r a n u l a t e d S u g a r $ 1 88 Bo n e l es s C h i c k e n Bre a st 1 98 lb FR E E 2 L i t e r S u p e r C h i l l S o d a w i t h $ 2 5 0 0 p u r c h a s e o r m o r e ( e c l u d i ng b e e r w i ne t obac c o l o t t e r y a n d W e s t e r n U n i o n ) 1 6 5 o z B o x S e l e c t e d V a r l et l e s D un c a n H i ne s C a k e M i x D oz e n F la v or i t e L a r ge E g gs 8 8 ¢ 3 0 oz S hop p e r s V a l u e M a y o nna i s e $ 1 98 B i g R o l l 6 4 4 s q f S hop p e r V a l u e P ape r T o w el 88 ¢ 1 6 o z s qu e ez e S hop p e r V a l u e M us ta r d 78 ¢ 1 6 oz p k g S hop p e r s V a l u e S a l t i ne C r ack e r s $ 1 18 $ Shoppers B 1 2 8 oz b l t S hop p e r s V a l u e V e ge t a bl e O i l $ 6 98 20 oz b t l S hop p e r V a l u e L iq u id D is h S o a p 88 ¢ 1 2 8 o z b t l S hop p e r s V a l u e B le ac h $ 1 38 4 R o l l P k g 8 8 s q f S hop p e r s V a l u e Bat h T i s s u e 88 ¢ S H O P P E RS V A L U E I T E M S 4 8 o z b t l W e s s o n V e g e t a b l e o r C a nola O i l $ 1 98 1 8 .5 l b ba g C o mp le t e B le n d P u r i na D o g Cho w $ 1 0 98 $ 5 98 1 4. 5 1 5 2 5 oz c a n S e l ec t ed V eg e t a b l e s D e l Mon t e V e ge t a bl e s 88 ¢ 2 7 8 3 3 9 oz c t n S e le c t e d V a r ie t ie s F ol g e r s G r oun d C o f fe e 88 ¢ H w y 7 1 W e w a h i t c h ka F L | 8 5 0 6 3 9 5 3 4 3 | H o u r s 6 a m 9 p m C S T Port St. Joe Commission nalizes scal budget By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The Port St. Joe City Commission put the final touches on the 2013-14 fis cal year budget during the final public hearing on Monday. The city, in a sense, stayed relative ly in place. For the third consecutive year com missioners set a tentative millage rate one mill higher than the current mill age to provide flexibility in planning, all the while pledging to return to the beginning. With Monday’s unanimous vote commissioners did just that, approv ing a budget that barely budges and to maintain the current millage rate, 3.5914 mills. A mill is equal to $1 per $1,000 worth of tangible taxable property. The city of Port St. Joe levies the lowest millage in the county. The millage does come with an ever-so slight tax increase. Due to an increase in property val ues in the city, largely due to the con struction and opening of the Dollar Market store on U.S. Highway 98, the millage is above the rollback rate of 3.5798. The rollback rate is that millage at which the identical amount of ad valor em revenue would be generated as the current fiscal year. The tax increase amounts to .32 percent. The city budget includes a 5 percent increase in water and sewer rates, a 3 percent pay increase for employees and a few necessary major capital expenditures. The city also has over $500,000 rep resenting its settlement with BP over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010. Commissioners intend to hold a workshop in the near future to consid er spending those funds. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Two weeks can not pass fast enough for Port St. Joe city commissioners. The board on Tuesday unanimously approved the most recent offer from Re gions Bank for renancing the city’s $15-plus million in long-term debt. But the interest rate com missioners must pay, 3.41, remains a oating one until the deal closes, which should come in the next two weeks. “We’ve reviewed this pro posal, and it is lowering the rate,” said Ralph Roberson of the city’s nancial committee. “We are locked in for 15 years. There is no penalty (for re nance) after seven years. “It’s as good a deal as we can get right now.” During a public budget hearing Monday commission ers tabled a proposal from Regions that included an interest rate of 3.47 percent with a 15-year amortization. That interest rate was above the 3.39 percent in the original offer for renancing the city’s long-term debt. “We can’t do that,” said Commissioner Rex Buzzett of the higher rate. Regions returned with a new offer in time for Tues day’s regular bi-monthly meeting with the lower inter est rate and the same 15-year term with no penalty for re nancing after seven years. “Interest rates are about as low as they are likely to be for a while,” said City Man ager Jim Anderson. Roberson noted that the margin between 3.47 percent and 3.41 percent would repre sent a roughly $10,000 a month savings for city taxpayers. In addition, Regions pro vided an index, a kind of slid ing scale for broader interest rates which could impact the rate paid by the City Commis sion, which provides commis sioners a cushion to work with if rates go up before closing. “The worst case scenario if something crazy happens in the bond market, we don’t close,” Roberson said. Commissioners have uni formly said if a deal with Re gions is not favorable they will shop the renancing in the market. Further, city staff built and commissioners approved Monday a budget that was based on a slightly higher in terest rate, allowing further cushion for commissioners in the next two weeks. Renancing the debt prior to December 2014 was critical. In 2015 commissioners faced a balloon payment – the entire $15 million – with the current loan and annual in terest rates would climb to over $1 million this year and next. The renancing will main tain the annual payments just above the current level. The annual payments will be $912,000. “It looks like we got a pret ty good deal provided we can get it done,” Buzzett said. Commissioners approved the deal, which should close in two weeks, Anderson said, pending legal review. Ghost on the Coast Commissioners jumped on board an effort by Reid Avenue merchants and the Chamber of Commerce for assistance with candy for the annual Ghost on the Coast Halloween celebration. At the request of the Cham ber, notices will be placed in monthly water bills to solicit donations of candy. City staff will also establish a drop-off point for donations. Downtown merchants spend hundreds of dollars on candy and other goodies for the annual celebration and have sought help the past sev eral years to make the event a success for the children. “We are trying to gure out how to help the people downtown and the commu nity,” Anderson said. Yard debris amnesty month Commissioners encourage citizens to take advantage of Road-Side Pick-up Amnesty Month during October as city staff will pick up larg er amounts of yard debris, couches, certain large appli ances and other items. In essence, the city is ex panding its yard debris pick up for October and doing so at no charge to citizens. The city can not collect potentially dangerous items such as treated wood, paint, batteries, etc. Residents are encouraged to visit www.cityofportstjoe. com for a complete list of items that will be collected. Cape San Blas Lighthouse Anderson said city staff and its engineers continue to review the two bids received for relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse into the city’s George Core Park with out a nal resolution. Under normal bid rules, bids are good for 60 days. Anderson said staff is try ing to determine if money can be saved through value engineering and other meth ods to bring down the bid prices, which were roughly $200,000 above what the city has banked thus far for the relocation. Anderson said he hoped to have a recommendation for commissioners at their next meeting in October. Boat launch fees Commissioners will hold a public workshop at 5 p.m. ET Oct. 15, prior to their next bimonthly meeting, to discuss charging fees for use of the city boat ramp. Commissioners encour aged all those who use the boat ramp and adjacent areas for trailer parking to attend and provide input. The goal would be to charge a fee which would be placed in a fund earmarked for improvements to the boat ramp. PSJ, Regions agree on terms for long-term debt “We’ve reviewed this proposal, and it is lowering the rate. We are locked in for 15 years. There is no penalty (for renance) after seven years. It’s as good a deal as we can get right now.” Ralph Roberson PSJ nancial committee “Interest rates are about as low as they are likely to be for a while.” Jim Anderson city manager

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O PINION www.starfl.com A Section When I was a kid I greatly feared an atomic attack. My feeling was enhanced by the seriousness with which every adult approached the “Cold War”. I was far too young to understand oxymoron, paradox or even onomatopoeia ... but something didn’t sound right here! All the ghting I’d ever heard tell of somebody got heated up! A “Cold War” didn’t seem like much of a con ict to me. I understood my age and my place so I didn’t say nothing, but that didn’t mean I couldn’t scratch my head and wonder. It became a little more unsettling when our fth grade teacher passed out the ugly yellow and black colored pamphlets entitled “What to do in case of a nuclear attack.” The rst thing we had to recognize was the Civil Defense signs that marked the nearest fallout shelter. Those signs were also yellow and black with triangles in the background. I think it was Ricky Hale who pointed out that not only did our little school not have a single fallout shelter, there was not one to be found in the whole town! Now, I’m telling this story with my hand up. I went to school one morning thinking I’m going to be asked to spell “article”, and maybe, “rari ed” and ended up under my desk with my head tucked between my legs. It was in the booklet! We had, as per instruction, air raid drills. We dived under our desks at different speeds depending on whether it was a “Red Alert”, “Blue Alert”, “Yellow Alert” and so on. It was also Ricky who took his life in his hands by leaning out from under his desk and asking, “Will this save us if the bomb lands anywhere close to us?” That atomic Cold War saber rattling could scar a guy for life! Me and David Mark went to building a fallout shelter just as soon as we got home. It was a good thing we were small. There wasn’t much crawl space beneath the oor joist. We pushed the excess dirt to the far reaches of the underpinning and hauled a few loads out to the eld beside Aunt Jessie’s house. It took us a month to get it where we could stand up in it. David found some old cans of Vienna sausage and I begged Mom for a sleeve of saltine crackers. We hauled in some black walnuts from Mrs. Boaz’s yard and gured we’d be set if this nuclear attack only lasted for a day or two. The very rst “Weekly Reader” we were exposed to in junior high had a map of Russia right on the front page. That danged country which had us ducking and digging for two years was on the other side of the world! Why would they want to bomb us? We must have really made them mad. And, maybe more to the point, how could they get over here to drop an atomic bomb on us? ’Course, those Civil Defense folks had done thought of that. We had NORAD, the DEW line across Canada and a Ballistic Missile Early Warning System to alert us to exactly when to sound the CD sirens. I scratched my head again. Why would we put in a Weekly Reader for the whole world to see detailed information about our nuclear missile defense system? Sometimes I think America is not the smartest country on earth. Daddy bought a TV a year or so later and Walter Cronkite kept a close eye on the commies for us. That Khrushchev guy never looked happy in black and white. We played ball, learned to drive, dated, spent some great afternoons out at the clay pits and made plans to graduate and move on, all under the specter of a nuclear attack from the Soviet Union. We raced them to outer space, cheered against them in the Olympics and faced off against them in Berlin, Korea and Cuba. Even Vietnam always seemed to be a pawn in a larger game. Old habits die hard. But the fear slowly left me as the passing years revealed a Russia that seemed more bent on threatening and posturing, than bombing. They toned down the rhetoric and tore down the Wall. “Red Alerts” and air raid drills drifted into obscurity. I turned my attention to making a living and raising children….. The fear for the safety and welfare of America has once again awakened in my heart. This time is has nothing to do with Russians, Taliban, foreign agents or intercontinental ballistic missiles. I am afraid that America is going to self destruct from the inside out! We rant and rave at each other on the Senate oor, “Meet the Press”, traf c jams and local get-togethers. “My way or no way” has become the national yell. We seem more angry and hostile than friendly and hospitable. It’s enough to make you re-read Edward Gibbon’s “Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire”. Leon was the only casualty I know of from the atomic threat in the 1950’s. Daddy whipped him when he couldn’t nd our hammer. Dad allowed that the oldest son was responsible for the tools. It didn’t dawn on Dave or me until it was too late that we had taken that hammer down to our fallout shelter to bust open those walnuts in case of an emergency. I’m not sure we can all come out with just a whipping if the “bomb” blows up from within. Respectfully, Kes Costing taxpayers dollars Dear Editor, “Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one” Thomas Paine, Common Sense 1776. “In Gulf County, the citizens must protect our Community by watching their government closely, insuring it does only the necessary; and identifying, exposing, and punishing the evil whenever and wherever they observe it. It is your Duty”Citizen T. Paine In case you missed it, at the last commission meeting the BOCC quickly and quietly reported that they owed their Insurance Company’s Attorney $10,000 of our hard-earned tax dollars to respond to a Citizen‘s PAC lawsuit. The suit stemmed from a “particularly disgraceful” as opposed to the “routinely ridiculous” BOCC meeting. This one dubbed the Bevy of Circus Clowns during the last election cycle. This $10,000 debacle Commission Meeting was the capstone of their ridiculous efforts (described by a resident in a letter to the editor titled “Cops Robbers and Cronies” see the “STAR” April 4, 2013). Simply told it was an attempt to silence the residents of the county by government intimidation that included, lying to or collusion with the State Attorney’s Of ce to unleash a bogus investigation of residents whose views they did not like. They hoped/intended to discredit them, intimidate voters, candidates, and The Citizens PAC. (think – Obama Abuse of Government Power -IRS). The effort resulted in harassment and slander. Oh by the way, it appears that one resident, Mr. Garth, is still waiting for clari cation or an apology from the SAO, Mr. Hess, resulting from a bogus nding/charge that he was a previously convicted felon. Maybe ole Glenn and his dunkin donut denizens should be the next target of a lawsuit, see “evil” above. However, not happy with their results they (the BOCC) and a citizen crony engaged in a disgraceful exhibition of dirty politics, slander, and intimidation. If you don’t remember it or missed it look it up and watch the County Commission Meeting Oct. 25, 2012. All ve Commissioners, including Bill Williams, who along with Yeager looked like the ring leaders, the County Staff and Attorney all participated either deliberately, or negligently, or just too mentally slow for the job. To paraphrase the crony (it is in the record). None of this activity was “necessary”; it was a dumb, malicious, dirty politics abuse of government power, not governance. It was “evil”; lies, conspiracy, cronyism and intimidation. It is time now for the vigilant citizens to do their duty, root it out; four of them are still there. Support Commissioner Bryan the “new one” who is working to make the Government transparent and only gets harassment and cover up from the Circus Clowns. Get rid of McDaniel and Smiley November 2014, and then get ready to dump the other two. It is “intolerable” all four owe us $10,000. It is your duty. Do it! Citizen T. Paine A 20 year resident/ Gulf County taxpayer HUNKER DOWN Kesley Colbert As fall knocks on our doors, we greet it by opening the windows and enjoying the cooler temperatures. There is nothing like being able to work with the windows open. I’m fortunate to have that luxury and I know it. So many new buildings have pretend windows or glass walls that won’t allow you to feel the breeze. Baseball season is winding down and the playoffs are getting ready to start. Again, it is my favorite time of year. In my of ce, sit two funny looking wood chairs with the legs sawed off at just below where the stretchers hit the legs. Most folks would have put them by the side of the road for trash. I could never do that… There are too many memories associated with those “short-legged chairs.” Please note that legged is pronounced “leg – id.” My earliest memories of the chairs were about 40 years ago as 10 or 11 year boy. When I would visit the newspaper, I knew where to nd “Reese,” as everyone called him. He would be over next to the window “taking a break” sitting in one of the chairs with his knees almost at the same level as his shoulders. One of the legs had broken on the chairs and Mr. Reese sawed the legs off so they could still be used. Mr. Reese was my friend and as I got older, he was the fellow who kept me from doing too many stupid things or getting hurt while I was working at the newspaper. I started working/ getting paid at the newspaper when I was 12, cutting the grass and moving things. As I got older, I got to clean the restrooms, move big rolls of paper and pretty much anything Mr. Reese wanted me to do. However, the best times, were those times sitting in those short-legged chairs “taking it easy,” as Mr. Reese would say. We would work for 30 minutes or so and Mr. Reese would proclaim, “We need to take a break.” And we would. Mr. Reese would always justify these breaks by saying my Daddy didn’t want me getting hurt or overdoing it. I’m pretty sure; especially as Mr. Reese got older that our breaks were because he enjoyed doing nothing and talking about life with me. So did I. Mr. Reese knew all about baseball and knew all about the stars of the old Negro Leagues. He taught me about Cool Papa Bell and Satchel Paige. He looked as if he would have been a good ballplayer in his younger years; he was probably about 60 years older than I. He loved the Atlanta Braves, although through the years that I worked at the newspaper, the Braves were never very good. But still, we talked baseball and about other topics a grandfather would talk to his grandson about. When I look at those chairs, I can almost hear Mr. Reese humming a little tune, “tat a tat tat tat.” He was a like a blues or jazz singer stuck on the same tune. His humming seemed to be loudest on Fridays, particularly paydays. As I got older and was allowed to drive the newspaper’s van, I would chauffeur Mr. Reese over to a house where they seemed to selling something in Dixie Cups out the backdoor. He seemed to hum a little louder when we would make those stops on Friday afternoons. That was ok. Mr. Reese didn’t even own a car or want one; he caught rides back and forth to work. He was a good man, who enjoyed life and took it easy, a lesson that we all need from time to time when we get in a hurry. Whatever was in the Dixie Cups seemed to get him in a little trouble at home though, because his wife, “Ms. Helen,” did not approve of it. Ms. Helen was a school teacher and one of the best cooks around. She made these pecan candy things that I was always happy to help eat when I would go over to Mr. Reese’s house, which was pristine. Mr. and Mrs. Reese never had children. They would have been good parents. To the day he died, Mr. Reese thought it was his fault that they lost the one child that she was carrying. He told me the story many times. Mrs. Reese was pregnant, he brought a frog home in a paper bag and opened the bag and showed it to her. Soon after, she lost the baby. It was heartbreaking, but he really thought “the frog scared the baby out of her.” Some folks might call that simple-minded. Mrs. Reese passed away and without her guidance and friendship, he didn’t last very long afterwards. I have the short-legged chairs, the memories and I don’t care what was in the Dixie Cups. Simple people make the best friends. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor.com. Short-legged chairs and Dixie cups CRANKS MY TRACTOR BN Heard Leon Victim Of Nuclear Fallout Page 4 Thursday, October 3, 2013 #!$ &# !&"!"%& "" "!$%$%# $.6-*--9.::,1*60.;7 %1.$;*9 "!7? "79;$;7. "176. "##% "!$%"% "!#%$%! ()"&$ $&#"%! $") @.*9A:2?576;1: @.*9A:2?576;1: 6,*:.7/.997979752::276:26*-=.9;2:.5.6;:;1.8<+42:1.9:-7 67;174-;1.5:.4=.:42*+4./79-*5*0./<9;1.9;1*6*57<6;9.,.2=.-/79 :<,1*-=.9;2:.5.6; %1.:873.6>79-2:02=.6:,*6;*;;.6;276;1.8926;.->79-2: ;17<01;/<44@>.201.-%1.:873.6>79-+*9.4@*::.9;:;1.8926;.->79;1797<014@,76=26,.:%1.:873.6>79-2:47:;;1.8926;.->79-9.5*26: USPS 518-880 Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year — $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year — $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 Disgraceful Dear Editor, Well I watched the televised BOCC meeting and I want to thank Commissioners Bryan and McDaniel for standing up for the minority of Gulf Countians who actually pay ad valorem taxes. As to the other three commissioners that was quite a display of Texas 2 stepping and socialism in action. Those of us who fund this county can only hope that county wide voting becomes a reality so as to achieve a more responsible BOCC. With all the constructive options that were presented to you, three of you chose to stick it to the few who pay the bills. Can’t wait for the day I can vote for or against all board members who decide how much to tax the few. Tom Knoche Gulf County resident and taxpayer Thanks for Mosquito Control Dear Editor, With all the emphasis on tourism and events to draw tourists to our area, some things are just taken for granted. This summer, once again, was a banner season for those who thrive on the tourist trade. We at Happy Ours Kayak & Bike Outpost, after 13 years of doing business in Gulf County, have learned that those summer months are crucial to our survival. This season we had a tremendous amount of rainfall, creating ideal breeding conditions, but the familiar hum of the mosquito truck making its nightly rounds assured us a bug-free morning. Let me backtrack about 10 years when we literally met our customers at their cars with a can of OFF so they could rent a kayak and escape the mosquitos in the safety of St. Joseph Bay. Imagine the effect on bed taxes if we had to hand out bug suits along with keys to the rental homes when visitors checked in. I dare not even mention the risk of illness from mosquitoborne disease. Each time Mosquito Control sprays our area, I make a note on my calendar. They are so diligent compared to the old days that I hear them spraying even during the dry periods. So I called one day to ask why they sprayed when there was no rain. Mark Cothran answered my question succinctly when he said, “We have traps at Dead Man’s Curve about mile from you and they are full, so we’re taking action.” Wow! I was impressed. Not only were they taking preventative measures, I got a straightforward response. It reminded me of what the great baseball player Willie Mays said when they asked him why he was so good. He replied, “They throw the ball. I hit it. They hit the ball. I catch it.” The purpose of this letter is to give praise to the Gulf County Mosquito Control for advances made by their research, technology and hard work. I’m sure their funding has been cut like most public projects, but they still get the job done. Just imagine what they could do about biting ies if given the responsibility. So next time you are sitting at the Scallop Festival or watching the sunset from your outdoor balcony or waiting for a table at the Raw Bar, take note of the absence of mosquitos that would normally drive you away. Even with all the rains of this summer, we can thank someone who was out there “throwing the ball” and hitting it ... with a big y swatter. Thank you Gulf County Mosquito Control, Dan VanVleet Happy Ours Letters to the EDITOR

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Local The Star| A5 Thursday, October 3, 2013 has undertaken repairs of the project that number in the hundreds, from xing pipes to, this week, placing ll dirt in areas where pipes have popped up, not fully connected, above ground. This beyond the original price tag, which Clerk of Courts Becky Norris said at a recent BOCC meeting was over $1 million. When he rst came before the BOCC Koran provided a list of questions he wanted answered by commission ers and got no response in a subsequent meeting. Commissioner Carmen McLemore suggested staff did not have time to re search the particulars of the project and said ques tions ought to be directed to the State Attorney. McLemore was the lone member of the current board who voted on the Americus Ditch project, casting a dissenting vote. When Koran initially approached the board, McLemore fundamentally agreed with the faults with the project. “That is our $1 million pipe that doesn’t work,” McLemore said. However, Commission er Joanna Bryan ran into a wall from fellow commis sioners when she pressed the subject. Commission ers said at the rst meeting in September they had no desire to look backward at a project bid and constructed more than six years ago. “I want to move this county forward,” said Com missioner Warren Yeager. Commissioners ap proved by a 4-1 vote, Bryan dissenting, to have county administrator Don Butler decide the legitimacy of requests for information; the jail and Americus Ditch were hot button topics as Bryan was seeking infor mation on those two in ad dition to how road bond money had been spent in the past. Commissioners also vot ed in the past two months to reafrm that contract negotiations be overseen by Butler and county attor ney Jeremy Novak. But Bryan noted last week that the Americus Ditch project remains a problem, with constituents calling her about the ongo ing issues with the project in St. Joe Beach. Bryan said her original questions about the project were as much centered on Americus Ditch as county policy for bidding and let ting contracts, particularly $1 million contracts. “This is a poster child for the wrong way to do business,” Bryan said. “It concerns me about how many other projects have been done this way and the exposure for liability.” Brad Bailey, whose com pany was the contractor on the project, and Ralph Rish from Preble Rish Engi neers appeared before the BOCC to clarify what they said were false statements made about the project. Rish acknowledged there were problems with the project and pledged that Preble Rish would as sist the county in address ing those problems. Bryan said she intended to hold Rish to that promise, noting that the problems, despite the comments from commissioners, continue with little relief for resi dents in the area. Local bankers who know business At Capital City Bank, we know running a business isn’t easy It takes drive dedication and har d work to keep the doors open. And while we offer plenty of innovative tools and services to help businesses like yours, we also know that it’ s our people who r eally make the differ ence Our bankers ar e your neighbors, customers and friends, with the experience that makes our business the right choice for yours Call or visit us online to learn mor e We’ll be her e with a familiar face and a helping hand when you’r e r eady to put us to work for you. 85 0 .2 2 9 .2 1 1 0 w w w c c b g c om / b u s i nes s Sandy Price | Community Banker been a swamp and for many years the spoils of canal dredging had been put in the area which ac cording to soil borings has made the ground unstable for the rst 15 feet below the surface. It’s been a year since the city has seen additional in surance money and Cathey insisted that the insurance adjustors were simply drag ging out the claim in hopes that the city would get frus trated and quit ghting for additional money. He told the council that his biggest fear was that if the Parker house was torn down, the insurance company would consider the claim closed and no ad ditional monies would be paid. “We have to dot our I’s and cross our T’s before we put that building in a dump ster,” said Cathey. Previously, Cathey had provided a bid that included the costs of improving the foundation and rebuilding on the existing structure, but Councilwoman Tanya Castro asked to see num bers on the cost of a new structure. “The insurance compa ny called the building a ‘to tal loss,’” said Castro. “We need to move forward.” Castro said that after comparing the bottom lines, she’d be better informed to make a nal decision on how to proceed. The project has been at a standstill for two years and Cathey was eager for the council to provide some direction. An executive meet ing to review the costs will be scheduled for early October. PARKER HOUSE from page A1 Both were ultimately dismissed with prejudice. In dismissing the case, the court left each side to bear their own legal costs. Carr sued the city, her estranged husband Billy Carr, Jr. and police ofcers Jake Richards and David Garner, accusing them of violating her constitutional right against illegal search and seizure as well as abuse of power and abuse of process. Lynne Carr also sued Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson, but he was dis missed from the case near ly two months ago. Another allegation against her husband, that he was carrying a gun at the time of the incident, had been disproved during discovery depositions. The allegations cen tered on an incident in December 2011 while the Carrs were separated and divorcing. The allegations detailed actions taken by the police ofcers and Billy Carr in removing Lynne Carr from the three businesses her husband owned and she managed, including a o rist, wedding planner and boutique. Lynne Carr was ter minated from the busi nesses by her husband and ordered to turn over all property belonging to the business. Lynne Carr alleged she was illegally forced to turn over “marital property” that was subject to the di vorce proceedings. “It is ridiculous the amount of money this cost the taxpayers of Port St. Joe and myself,” Billy Carr said. She also alleged the po lice ofcers illegally used a drug dog to sniff out any potential contraband on Lynne Carr’s person. She alleged that search, which followed a similar search of the businesses, lacked probable cause. “We knew it would end this way,” said Richards. “We did not do the things the afdavit stated and we would just like our reputa tions restored now that the case has been cleared. We were never under (con ducting) any investigation and did not violate any poli cy and surely did not violate the constitutional rights we are sworn to protect. “Frivolous lawsuits have become an every day part of law enforcement over the years. Most are led then dropped. Some are settled to save taxpay er’s money on attorney fees. I feel as though it was a personal attack to dimin ish our reputations.” L aA W suSU IT from page A1 “I am not doing anything but putting in my time,” Wade said with the Cheshire smile and gleaming eyes with which she greets every patient. “My kids are all grown. What else would I do?” she said with a shrug belying the boundless heart beneath. Therein lays the beauty, the grace of Nellie Ann Wade who came out of the military as a nurse and found her way to the small community of Wewahitchka, where what passed for major thoroughfares were dirt roads. “She came here out of the military and just t right in,” said Feraldine Greer. “Her energy level is just phenomenal.” Since 1946 or so, she has aided a lineage of medical professionals from Wewahitchka, named Anderson, Canning and, for the past 15 years, Barnes, who would attest he remains active in signicant part due to Wade. And through those decades, she has helped “raise” generations, knowing them by name just as they know her, especially for those shots which go in smooth as warm butter. “She is a legend,” said Christy Smith, receptionist at Barnes’ ofce. “Everybody knows her and she knows everybody. First thing when anybody in town feels bad, they call to see Ms. Nellie. “She’s a go-getter. She knows just what to tell people, how to make them feel better. She’s just Ms. Nellie. She is one of a kind. I tell her all the time when I grow up I want to be like her.” But as was clear last Saturday, there is really only one Nellie Wade. As Smith said, “They broke the mold.” And as the community gathered to feast, enjoy a birthday cake, hand out presents to their nurse, their neighbor, their loved one, they treasured that the mold wasn’t broken until Nellie Ann Wade arrived in Georgia some 90 years ago. “She has been a blessing to this community over the years,” said one speaker. “She has been a shining spirit for this community.” N eE LLI eE from page A1 “We are very restricted on how we could use those funds,” said Sheriff Mike Harrison. Mandatory garbage pickup was kicked down the road by commis sioners who set a referendum for No vember 2014 to consider a sales tax to fund mandatory garbage. “These are no-brainers to me,” Hardman said of the measures dis cussed and not implemented. She said she found “some bacon” but not “a lot of fat” in the budget but noted a reserve balance of nearly $5 million. “I nd that incompetent” that com missioners did not do more to ease the burden on property taxpayers, Hard man added. “You need to spread the cost of operating the county to those who use it and can afford it. You are going to have the exact same prob lems next year.” The budget vote had urgency as last week was the nal budget hearing and commissioners had to gavel the meeting with a budget formalized. McDaniel, echoing Hardman, said he wanted to dip into reserves to close the tax increase margin, but found early resistance from McLemore and Bryan. McDaniel and McLemore swapped gures, as if at a bargaining table, on how much would be palatable to take from reserves, but the numbers never narrowed sufciently. “I do not support going into re serves,” Bryan said. “I’m not in favor of a tax increase and I am not in favor of going into reserves.” After the board took two recesses in an attempt to calm emotions and arrive at a solution, McLemore chal lenged the dissenters, Bryan and Mc Daniel, for places to further cut the budget. Bryan said she had raised a num ber of issues, from considering the operational costs of a $1.2 million jail that was out of compliance with Model Jail Standards to mandatory garbage, and found herself roundly shut out by her fellow commissioners. “I have been told not to even discuss them,” Bryan said. “I’ve discussed (these) many times and you have no interest in supporting (them). “I am not in favor of raising taxes if we are not being good stewards of the taxpayers’ money.” McDaniel said he had suggested at the last public budget hearing that commissioners comb through depart ment budgets line by line but the sug gestion gained no traction. While the individual savings in a given department might not add up to much, McDaniel said, savings could be found, but commissioners squan dered the opportunity. “We had plenty of time to look at this stuff,” McDaniel said. County administrator Don Butler said he had a conference call with the county’s bond consultant and said the consultant would want to know if a tax increase was not passed would the county use reserves or cut expenditures. And, Butler said, would the county continue to spend more than is com ing in on the revenue side? Both questions, Butler said, could impact the county’s bond rating. “If we live above our means we have to pay the price someday,” But ler said. During an extended recess Mc Daniel thought he had brokered a deal by which the BOCC would dip into re serves, not purchase an excavator for Public Works and make other smaller cuts to arrive at a tax increase in the neighborhood of $100,000 or less. One by one commissioners, save Bryan, went into a back room with staff to discuss the parameters but as commissioners gathered back to gether, after nearly 40 minutes, But ler entered the meeting room with a phone. He said county attorney Jeremy Novak, also connected by phone, in dicated that if Yeager was linked by audio and video to the meeting, he could vote. “I felt blindsided,” McDaniel said later. Yeager, not present during any of the nearly three hours of discussion, cast the vote to approve the budget with tax increase. “We’ve got to show some leader ship,” Yeager said. “We have to move forward with the county’s business. This is a tough call. At the end of the day we are going to have to address a lot of this next year.” BOCC from page A1 WES LOCHER | The Star Pipes, unconnected, popping from the ground have been an ongoing problem since the Americus Ditch project was constructed more than six years ago. DIT chCH from page A1

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .com www.starfl.com Section Section A “I am the rose of Sharon, and the lily of the valleys. As the lily among thorns, so is my love among the daughters. As the apple tree among the trees of the wood, so is my beloved among the sons. I sat down under his shadow with great delight, and his fruit was sweet to my taste.” The Song of Songs The rose of Sharon is a common name used for several unrelated plants. In our area, it is commonly identi ed as althea, properly named Hibiscus syriacus. Althea is de nitely not the original rose of Sharon, since it is native to East Asia. Scholars think the plant in the poem was probably Pancratium maritimum, a lily commonly known as the sea daffodil. Nevertheless, our althea is worthy of use in local gardens because it produces abundant blooms and grows remarkably well here. An early introduction to American gardens, it was probably carried over by Dutch or English colonials. Although naturally a multi-stemmed shrub, this plant can be trained through pruning to a single trunked “tree.” It can also be trained for espalier and hedges. Other than regular pruning to prevent weediness, this plant requires little attention. Watering and fertilizer should be kept to a minimum. Althea prefers full to partial sun in our area, is heat and salt tolerant and likes dry feet. While it is deciduous, it remains green most of the year here and can bloom year round. It can be propagated by cuttings but be aware that it will grow from seed and can produce numerous volunteer shoots. Unfortunately, these are generally hybrids lacking the characteristics of the parent plant including ower color. The commonest criticism of althea is the color of the owers can be muddy, so be sure to choose your plant when it is in bloom. Flowers come in shades of red, pink, white and purple. Althea can reach 10 feet in height. Dwarf varieties, which only grow to six feet tall, are available. Although they are strong growers, especially older plants might experience a variety of problems, most of which can be solved by pruning or adjusting water and fertilizer. The commonest pest of althea is aphids, which accumulate at the tips of stems, causing new growth to be misshapen. Aphids may cover the leaves with sticky honeydew, which turns black when infected by sooty mildew. Aphids can be dislodged with highpressure water sprays or pruned off with infested foliage. Be sure to remove pruned greenery from the garden. Over-fertilizing increases aphid infestations. Japanese beetles are particularly fond of the owers. Leaf spot is a symptom of bacterial infection. Pick off and destroy the infected leaves. Canker can cause bright, reddishorange fruiting bodies to appear on the bark. Prune out infected branches. Flowers are subject to fungus. After pruning a diseased plant, always clean tools in bleach before using on another plant. Bud drop can be caused by too much or too little water or over fertilization. The owers of althea, both dried and fresh, were traditionally used as a winter tea and contain abundant antioxidants. “Urban Forager” a website produced by the University of Georgia wrote, “Besides the obvious use as a garnish, the owers of Rose of Sharon can be chopped and added to dishes, or left whole for salads. They make colorful, edible, presentation cups for dips. The leaves are edible when cooked, and can be added to quiche or greens.” Unripe seedpods are also edible. Flower buds contain mucilage, a gooey medicinal compound made of polysaccharides. This substance has been used to treat burns, wounds, gastric ulcers and internal and external in ammation and irritation, such as sore throats or urinary tract infections. The bark is being studied for cancer inhibiting properties. The Chinese use the root bark as an antifungal remedy. 4514339 8)XZt1PSU4U+PF] .PO5IVST".1.&45t'SJ4BU".1.&45 You're Invited To Join Us Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 5-7pm ET $BQU3JDL.VSQIZPGUIF'MPSJEB$IFWZ*OTJEFS'JTIJOH3FQPSU 5PHJWFBTFNJOBSPO “FISHING ARTIFICIAL LURES IN THE FALL” 3"''-&4/"$,"/%40'5%3*/,441&$*"-4"-&"-40 WEEKL Y ALM ANA C AP AL A CHIC OL A C ARR ABELLE TIDE T ABLES MONTHL Y A VER A GES T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om these g iv en f or AP ALA CHIC OLA: HIGH L OW C a t P oin t M inus 0:40 M inus 1:17 East P ass M inus 0:27 M inus 0:27 T o nd the tides of the f ollo wing ar eas subtr ac t the indica t ed times fr om those g iv en f or C ARR ABELLE: HIGH L OW B ald P oin t M inus 9:16 M inus 0:03 Sp onsor the WEEKL Y ALM ANA C C all T o da y! 653-8868 Da t e H igh L o w % P r ecip T hu Oc t 3 84 75 55 % F ri, Oc t 4 83 77 70 % S a t Oc t 5 81 72 82 % Sun, Oc t 6 86 72 55 % M on, Oc t 7 84 65 55 % T ues Oc t 8 83 63 11 % W ed Oc t 9 83 69 41 % O UTDOORS Page 6 Thursday, October 3, 2013 By Tom Baird The fringe of St. Joseph Bay and certain islands in the bay, St. Vincent Island, St. Vincent Sound, Apalachicola Bay, and numerous nearby coastal sites all contain the remains of Indian middens. The dictionary de nes a midden as “an area of an archaeological site that contains domestic refuse such as food waste, broken pottery, and pieces of other household artifacts, indicating long-term human occupation.” In other words, a midden was where the Native Americans discarded their trash. To the archaeologist and biologist these sites are a window into how early peoples lived and used the bay, and they are an encyclopedia of what creatures lived in St. Joseph Bay in the past and how people used them. For instance, oyster shells are not common in middens on St. Joseph Bay because the bay has a high salinity, very little freshwater ows into St. Joseph Bay, and oysters prefer estuarine conditions with a good mixing of salt and freshwater. If the Indians wanted oysters, they went to nearby St. Vincent Sound or Apalachicola Bay, and the midden sites there are mainly huge piles of oyster shells. Besides sh, here they mainly came for the big conchs and whelks. The prehistoric refuse piles around St. Joseph Bay (the earliest sites date to 1000 B.C.) are lled with the eroding shells of lightning whelks, horse conchs, and crown conchs, all of which still inhabit the bay. The most obvious of the three in middens is the lightning whelk or left-handed whelk, Busycon contrarium. This was valuable to the early peoples in several important ways. First, it was a source of meat, although to eat the esh of the lightning whelk is, as one archaeologist said, “like eating shoe leather.” Indeed the meat of the lightning whelk has the consistency of the soles of your sneakers. Properly prepared, queen conch fritters are delicious, and the meat of the related knobbed whelk or the cold-water channeled whelk, Busycotypus canaliculatus, is the basis of the Italian dish scungilli. How the Indians prepared lightning whelk meat isn’t known, but it might have been dried or smoked and eaten like jerky. The second use was for tools. This was especially necessary here because the nearest source of tool grade stone was up in present-day Calhoun or Jackson Counties, a 50-mile collecting trip or obtained by trade. Throughout Florida, the Indians would haft the shell onto a stick to use it as a hoe. Parts of the shell became scrappers, and the hard, massive central column of the shell (the columella) could be fashioned into hammers, punches and awls. The third use was for their ceremonial drinking cups for black drink. Black drink was and is made from brewing the lightly roasted leaves of yaupon holly, Ilex vomitoria, the only plant in North America to contain caffeine. Ilex grows in healthy profusion around the bay and in the gulf coastal zone. The use of black drink in ceremonies and its association with the lightening whelk shell was so common that the shells were traded as far away as present-day Wisconsin and Oklahoma. Inscribed with religious symbols, the shell drinking cups are often found in the graves of high-status individuals, sort of like being buried with your favorite coffee mug. This use of the Busycon shell in black drink ceremonies also meant it was in demand as a trade item, and doubtless many of the mollusk shells collected in our bay were collected to trade. If people were collecting the left-handed whelk here for thousands of years, it is a brief time compared to how long these mollusks have been around. Fossil shells of these whelks date back 60 million years. They are endemic to the southeastern United States, and range from New Jersey to Florida. They feed almost exclusively on clams, using their muscular foot to grasp the clam and using the lip of their shells to wedge the clam shells apart. The whelk then inserts its mouth and rasps the esh away with its radula — a le-like device with horny teeth possessed by many gastropod mollusks. These whelks can attain very large sizes, some over 16 inches long. The shells less than 7 inches often have axial brown streaks that sort of look like lightening bolts, hence one common name for the mollusks — lightning whelk. The larger shells are usually all white or cream-colored. The other common name, lefthanded whelk, derives from the fact that it is one of very few species of gastropods whose shell spirals to the left. Almost all snail shells spiral to the right. Pick up a univalve shell at the beach or in the bay and hold it so that the apex, the point of the shell, is facing toward you. The opening will always be on your right, unless you are holding a lightning whelk and the opening is on the left. If the shell is large enough, another way is to insert one hand and then the other hand in the shell. The hand that curls naturally in the same direction as the shell is coiled indicates the handedness. Many people nd the long, coiled egg cases of these whelks washed onto the beach or drifting on the bay bottom. The whelks lay their eggs in linearly attached disc-like capsules and the whole strand looks like a Hawaiian lei. There may be up to 200 eggs in each capsule, and 50 — 175 capsules in a string. The young pass through all of their larval stages within the capsule and emerge as miniature snails. While many people love to collect seashells, the left-handed whelk is an important component of the bay ecosystem, and one should never collect the live animal, no matter how pretty the shell is. Likewise, the smaller empty shells should be left in the bay also. They are homes to hermit crabs. Many a tourist has brought home a beautiful shell as a souvenir, only to have a smelly mess of a rotting hermit crab on their porch, and the shell is thrown out. St. Joseph Bay is a great place to see the large whelks as they feed in the clear shallow waters. Enjoy them, and re ect on how important this big whelk was to the early people who lived here. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas. Rose of Sharon remains traditional favorite BUDS ‘N’ BUGS Lois Swoboda Middens a window into how early people lived Special to the Star SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Gag grouper continue to show up in shallow water this week, especially around the Car Body site. Soaking pinfish is the best bet. Live pinfish are plentiful and great baits. Kingfish are still hanging around near-shore structures and in the channels. Flounder have slowed down but some continue to be caught at Jetty Park at the Port St. Joe Marina and under the George Tapper Bridge. The freshwater is moving out and the water is clearing up. Redfish are picking up and the trout have picked up as well in the bay. Many good slot-sized redfish have been caught under the George Tapper Bridge, along with flounder.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA S PORTS www.starfl.com A Section 850.229.5200 WWW .DOCKSIDESEAFOOD ANDRA WBAR.C OM CA TCH ALL THE GAMEDA Y ACTION A T DOCKSIDE! GAMED A Y & D AIL Y GAME SPECIALS M on-F ri: 11am 8:30pm S a t-Sun: 11am 9pm HAPP Y HOUR AND FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS 3:30 6:30 P M BRING YOUR FRIENDS & GET HOOKED $4 ,50 0, 000 $50 0, 000 $1,50 0, 000 $2,50 0, 000 $3 ,50 0, 000 $4 ,50 0, 000 $0 $1, 000 000 $2, 000 000 $3 00 0, 000 $4 00 0, 000 $5 00 0, 000 GO AL e ne w College of A pplied S tudies at FSU P anama City was appr o v ed b y the FSU Boar d of T r ustees in J une 2010 and allo ws the campus to mor e easily r espond to wor kfor ce needs in our ar ea. W e invite y ou to suppor t e Campaign for O ur Community ’ s U niv ersity b y helping us build an endo wment for tomorr o w ’ s jobs. O ur goal is to establish a $5 million endo wment for the College of A pplied S tudies b y 2017, which will allo w FSU P anama City to establish student scholarships, implement ne w degr ee pr ograms and pr o vide ne w equipment and technology T o learn ho w y ou can suppor t our community ’ s univ ersity contact M ar y B eth Lo vingood at (850) 770-2108 or mblo vingood@pc.fsu.edu. THE CAMP AIGN FOR OUR COMMUNIT Y ’S UNIVERSIT Y E ndo wment for T omorr o w ’ s J obs SUPPOR T OUR C OMMUNIT Y ’ S UNIVERSIT Y Thursday, October 3, 2013 Star Staff Report Wewahitchka managed just seven offensive plays from scrimmage in the rst half Friday night as the Gators hosted Franklin County. On the ip side, those seven plays helped produce a 26-0 halftime lead. The Gators (1-4) rushed for over 250 yards and dominated the winless Seahawks in a 40-14 contest decided by halftime. Wewahitchka had the ball for only seven offensive plays in the opening half, but Jonathan Palmer rushed 45 yards in the rst quarter to stake the Gators to an early lead. The lead bulged in the second period as Javar Hill scored on a runs of 15 and 25 yards and Willie Hill put the icing on an impressive rst half by scooping up a fumble at the Seahawks 35 and running in for the touchdown. Rashard Ranie continued the onslaught when he dashed 54 yards for a third-quarter touchdown and Shannon Jones, getting some varsity playing time, covered 16 yards on the ground for the Gators’ nal score. Peter Setterich was 4 for 6 on extra-point kicks for Wewahitchka. Ranie, who attempted just one pass which fell incomplete, rushed for 111 yards. Palmer added 53 rushing yards and Javar Hill 42. Burley Parker and Ervin Maiben each rushed for 31 yards and Jones added his 16-yard touchdown. Parker also had an interception to go with Willie Hill’s fumble recovery touchdown. The Gators host North Bay Haven for Homecoming at 7 p.m. CT this Friday. Special to The Star We encourage everyone to participate in this organization to create a strong program that will directly bene t children in our community. The following positions need to be lled and are very important for the success of our program: President; AAA vice president; Ozone vice president; secretary; equipment manager; and concession manager. The league returns three of cers. The board meeting will be 3 p.m. ET on Sunday, Oct. 13 at the STAC House on Eighth Street in Port St. Joe. If you have any questions or would like to participate and cannot attend the meeting, please contact Bobby at 527-3707 or Carly at 481-6631 or Carly.Pickels@gmail.com. By RANDAL SEYLER Halifax Media Group CHIPLEY — Chipley rushed for 368 yards to overcome Port St. Joe 28-16 Friday at Philip Rountree Stadium in a nondistrict Class 1A game between teams with playoff aspirations. Kobe McCrary rushed for 177 yards and two touchdowns on 23 carries and Darren Stewart added 165 yards and a TD on only seven attempts for the Tigers, 3-1. The Tiger Sharks dropped to 3-2. The victory wasn’t secured until Chipley rallied from a 16-14 de cit with the nal two touchdowns. The Tigers’ defense also played a major role, stopping Port St. Joe inside the Tigers’ 10 on the opening possession of the game. Port St. Joe’s Dewayne Griggs, Jasmin Thomas and Aaron Paul combined to roll up 45 yards following a 30-yard kickoff return by Griggs. But Chipley recovered a Port St. Joe fumble inside the 10. “We did a good job offensively,” said Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon of his Tiger Sharks who amassed 292 total yards. “But we had a couple of mistakes that hurt us.” A holding penalty negated a 60-yard run by McCrary and neither team was able to do much damage the remainder of the rst quarter. The second quarter began with Port St. Joe’s Thomas scrambling with a fake punt on fourth-and-5 to the Chipley 12. Again the Tigers’ defense held, and a eld goal by Port St. Joe’s Drew Lacour gave the Tiger Sharks a 3-0 edge. Stewart produced a 67-yard sprint on Chipley’s next series to the Port St. Joe 5. McCrary went up the middle for the touchdown and Chipley led 6-3 lead with 8:59 left in the half. “That’s a tough place to play,” Gannon said. “They use McCrary, who is a big back, and then they come back with a scat back. They are a tough team to defend. “But I thought we played hard all night. Overall we played well as a team, again.” Port St. Joe went threeand-out and punted the ball back to Chipley. The Tigers took over at their 47 and within six plays were threatening. McCrary had a key run inside the 20 and Zack Campbell went the nal 7 yards to score. McCrary’s conversion made it 14-3 with 4:23 left in the second quarter. The Sharks responded by driving 66 yards in eight plays, Griggs (a team-high 108 rushing yards and 16 total tackles) nding the end zone on a sweep from the 4. Lacour’s point-after was blocked and the Sharks had closed to 14-9. McCrary had a 42-yard run shortly before intermission, but Port St. Joe held him out of the end zone at the 2 on the nal play of the half. The Tigers Sharks reclaimed the lead on their rst possession of the third quarter. A nine-play, 50-yard drive culminated in Paul (98 rushing yards) scoring from the 5 and Lacour’s kick made it 16-14. The lead was short-lived. Twentyve seconds later Stewart ran 70 yards to put the Tigers back on top and McCrary’s second conversion made it 22-16. With 4:18 to play McCrary broke free from a swarm of Port St. Joe defenders at the 50 and went the distance to punctuate a hardfought triumph. Star News Editor Tim Croft contributed to this report Chipley runs past Port St. Joe Wewa routs Franklin for 1st victory Page 7 Dixie board members needed Star Staff Report The Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School volleyball team suffered two defeats against tough squads sandwiched around a win over West Gadsden. The Lady Tiger Sharks lost in straight sets to North Bay Haven and in four sets to Liberty County but swept West Gadsden. The Lady Tiger Sharks are 10-6 overall and 5-3 in the district. The week began with a visit from Liberty County and both varsity and junior varsity matches followed a similar theme: Port St. Joe winning the rst match and losing the next three. The junior varsity lost 25-12, 22-25, 21-25 and 18-25. The varsity fell by scores of 25-18, 23-25, 21-25 and 18-25. “They were both hardfought matches,” said Port St. Joe coach Wayne Taylor. For the JV, Halie Jasinski had eight kills and for the varsity Shannon Pridgeon had 10. The following night Port St. Joe traveled to West Gadsden and overwhelmed the far younger team in a varsity-only match. Port St. Joe had 44 service aces and 13 kills in sweeping the three games. On Thursday, North Bay Haven came calling for what Taylor called two more “hard-fought” matches. The junior varsity took the opening game but lost the next two and the match by scores of 25-14, 22-25 and 11-15. The junior varsity is 6-4 overall, 3-2 in the district. The varsity fell in straight sets 20-25, 23-25 and 21-25. “The close scores of the sets are indicative of how hard the ladies battled for the match,” Taylor said. “North Bay Haven played a very fundamentally sound match and we just never could really pull ahead.” Port St. Joe travels to South Walton tonight. On Monday the team will travel to Bristol for another district match at Liberty County. Tuesday night Port St Joe will play its nal district match at home against the Franklin County Lady Seahawks. PSJ volleyball endures dif cult stretch COURTESY OF STEVE WHEALTON Sophomore Callie Fleshren serves against Bozeman earlier this season. COURTESY OF STEVE WHEALTON Carter Thacker (21) and the Tiger Sharks rushed for 234 yards against Chipley. WANT TO GO? Port St. Joe hosts Franklin County 7:30 p.m. ET Friday for Homecoming. WANT TO GO? The Gators host North Bay Haven 7 p.m. CT Friday for Homecoming.

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Local A8 | The Star Thursday, October 3, 2013 1 1 13270 THE SPECIAL TY MEDICAL CENTER V ince n t I v e rs, M.D B C I M C S S KIN CAN CER c a n b e p r es e n t w i tho u t y o u k no w in g i t CALL t o d a y f o r a s k in c a nce r s cr e e nin g. www .iv ersmd.com VINCENT IVERS, M.D 301 T w entieth Str eet P ort St. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 Mon T ue Thurs & Fri 9 am 6 pm W ed & Sat 9 am 2 pm ALL MAJOR INSURANCE A CCEPTED S ER VI CES 1 5 / *1, 4 4 1*, % ( +, ( ) ( (*1 41 1, ,( 4 ( 4 0 0 1* ( 4 ( 1 ( $ 3! ( +1/ ( 5 &" 4 1 1 / , 1 0 ( 1 0 4, 4 ,1 / / 1 ( 1/ 1 1 ( 05 ( ( + 1 1 ( 4 4, / 1 ( ) 1* ( ( / ,5 0 1 1 1 (+ (* 0 1/ ( 1 ) ,1 3 (* 3 2 1, 0 1* 1 ( ( ( / ,5 ,5 ( 4 $ ( 4," 3 1 ( /" ( 1 4 ,5 ( 4 11* ,( 1 / ( , ( 5 3 1 ( *, ( ( + 5 1* 5 ( 4/ ( 5 ,+ 4 41* 41 1 5 1* *, + , ( 5 ( 0 ( 1 ,5 ( 4 ( 1+, # ,1 ,5 ( 4 %" 1 4 4, 4 ( (+1, 1 1 11 (*, 1' $ 1 3 4, ( 5 ( / , ( 5 , +1* ( 4 3 1 ( ( + 0 5 4 5 1 4 365 Special to The Star Tapper & Company Properties Management announces the hiring of Lynn Costin Marshall as the new General Manager of the historic, 100year-old Port Inn in Port St. Joe. As a graduate of Georgia State University with a degree in hotel and restaurant management and the past executive director of the Mexico Beach, Tourism and Visitors Bureau, Lynn brings her special talents to the established team known to deliver the best hospitality experience in the area. “We feel that Lynn is the perfect t for the Port Inn. Her lively personality and attention to detail will be a tremendous addition as we continue to ‘do our best for every guest, every day’; delivering a rst class hospitality experience here in Port Saint Joe.” Jason Bogan, vice president, said. February of this year marked the 10-year anniversary of the re-creation and re-opening of the Port Inn in the heart of downtown Port Saint Joe. With its growth and the success of the added amenities like its daily hot breakfast service and an expanded dinner menu and service hours, Tapper & Company wanted to re-af rm their commitment to the historic Inn and the guests they serve. It has been four years since the Port Inn has had a dedicated General Manager. “With Dave Ashbrook responsible for the Mainstay Suites and Jason concentrating on systems and processes at both properties, it has come time for someone to focus all their time and attention again on the Port Inn. I look forward to providing an exceptional experience for each and every guest that visits the Port Inn and the Thirsty Goat Bar and Grill,” Marshall said. This summer has seen many new additions, including the successful opening of the Port Cottages directly behind the Inn. These cozy cottages give families the opportunity to stay together with two bedrooms, 1.5 bathrooms, and a full kitchen. “The addition of the cottages to our inventory provides tremendous exibility to our guests. Sometimes it is nice to have a larger space to stay with your family and family pet,” Marshall said. Marshall will also be working on creating more events for the Thirsty Goat Bar and Grill. The Lounge currently has Martini Mondays and Wine-Down Wednesday’s and live music every Friday and Saturday evening. “I am excited about the energy Lynn brings to the Tapper team. I have asked her to develop new events that can take place at the Port Inn that will include more and varied live music, arts and events the entire family can enjoy. I believe Lynn will help us continue to make the Port Inn and the Thirsty Goat two of the most inviting and memorable locations in Gulf County and on the Forgotten Coast,” said David Warriner, President of Tapper & Company. For more information on the Port Inn, call 850-229-7678 or email Lynn directly at Lynn@ PortInnFL.com. By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com It’s safe to say that the T.H. Stone St. Joseph Peninsula State Park was fully appreciated last Saturday. The Friends of St Joseph State Park hosted its annual State Park Appreciation Day at Eagle Harbor on Cape San Blas. Held in conjunction with National Public Lands Day, the morning kicked off with a shoreline cleanup to keep the park pristine. Information booths and environment displays surrounded Eagle Harbor and shared information with the 300 attendees about wildlife, park history and sea turtles. A low-country shrimp boil fed hungry Friends and visitors alike, while Scallop Cove provided free ice cream for the kids. Friends president Dewey Blaylock estimated the event welcomed 70 percent more attendees than last year’s and had four times as many new members enroll. “We’re really pleased with the membership increase,” Blaylock said. “I think we accomplished what we set out to do.” A sandcastle competition took place on the beach while local band Sonic Tonic kept revelers entertained with a mix of cover songs from years past. “The park getting the stage was an incredible addition,” Blaylock said. Attendees were treated to ample seating or took in the festivities from the comfort of their boats. A volunteer staff of 25 kept the event running smoothly and beautiful weather kept spirits high. It was the rst time on the board for Friends marketing director and events coordinator, Crystal Follin. Given this was her rst time promoting the event through a website, social media and yers she said she was happy with the turnout for the event. “It was a great event and the weather was perfect,” Follin said. “There were so many families, and everyone was in a great mood.” The Friends of St Joseph State Park is a non-profit organization that provides support to missions at T. H. Stone St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. The park is home to a shoreline named in 2002 as the top beach in the world and last summer, destination website America’s Best Online, named St. Joseph Peninsula State Park the top state park in the country. SPECIAL TO THE STAR From left, Dave Ashbrook, Lynn Marshall, Jason Bogan. New faces, developments at the Port Inn PHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The Star Local band Sonic Tonic provided entertainment from Eagle Harbor’s new stage. State park appreciation day turns up the volume Showing gratitude Families headed out to Eagle Harbor on Cape San Blas for State Park Appreciation day. Attendees were treated to a low-country shrimp boil. F r i d a y O c t o b e r 1 8 t h T rip l e T ai l s S e a f o o d & R a w B a r 3 p m & 5 p m P ro vis i ons 6 p. m T h e T h i r s t y G o a t 6 :3 0 p m 8: 3 0 p m & 1 0 : 3 0 p m Ma n g o Ma r le y s ( c e n t r a l t i m e z o n e ) 7 p m & 9 p m Sa t urda y O c t o b e r 1 9 t h D o c k s i d e S e a f o o d a n d R a w B a r 1 1 :3 0 a m 1 2 : 4 5 p m 2 p m F r e e S o n g w r i t e r s W or k sh o p Loo k o u t Lo u n g e 5 p m & 7 p m To u c a n s ( c e n t r a l t i m e z o n e ) 6 p m 8 p m & 1 0 p m Ha u gh t y Her o n 7 p m & 9 p m S u n d a y O c t o b e r 2 0 t h I n d i a n P a s s R a w B a r 2 p m 3 :3 0 p m 5 p m 6 :3 0 p m 8 p m 1 0 p m L a t e N ig ht J a m S es s io n F o r f u l l e v e n t s c h e d u l e v is i t: Bla s t o n t h e B a y c o m T h i s P r o j e c t r e c e i v e d n a n c i a l a s s i s t a n c e f r o m t h e G u l f C o u n t y T D C T h i s P r o j e c t r e c e i v e d n a n c i a l a s s is t a n c e f r om V is it F l or i d a.

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C OMMUNITY www.starfl.com B Page 1 Section “Trivia Fun” with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) What would a cruciverbalist ordinarily be looking for in a newspaper? Sports, Weather, Headlines, Crosswords 2) Ataxia is a medical condition as a consequence of which organ? Liver, Heart, Brain, Kidneys 3) What was the rst name of Lear, founder of the Lear Jet? Joseph, Lawrence, William, Glenn 4) Since when have Girl Scouts been selling cookies? 1917, 1939, 1956, 1970 5) What is the most popular U.S. garden plant? Squash, Cucumber, Tomato, Carrot 6) Which decade saw Major League Baseball build a record 11 ballparks? 1930s, 1950s, 1970s, 1990s 7) Who hosts a yearly celebration to honor the blue-footed Bresse chicken? France, Spain, Brazil, India 8) What antacid gum did Wrigley release in 2001? Chaco, Surpass, Johnny, Steptoe 9) Whose name at birth was Issur Danielovitch? Kirk Douglas, Usher, Burt Reynolds, Sinbad 10) Which is a thief whose specialty is robbing women? Slibber, Scobberlotcher, Roddikin, Moll-buzzer 11) What’s the public name of Trevor Tahiem Smith? Busta Rhymes, E-40, Red Caf, Rockwilder 12) Where is the football stadium of Heinz Field? Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Denver, Miami 13) Who issued the rst presidential pardon? Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe 14) What means to pour a drink for someone? Yerd, Franch, Walm, Shench ANSWERS 1) Crosswords. 2) Brain. 3) William. 4) 1917. 5) Tomato. 6) 1990s. 7) France. 8) Surpass. 9) Kirk Douglas. 10) Moll-buzzer. 11) Busta Rhymes. 12) Pittsburgh. 13) Washington. 14) Shench. Trivia Fun Wilson Casey WC@Trivia Guy.com TIM CROFT | The Star The next Salt Air Farmers Market will be held on Saturday, Oct. 5 at City Commons Park in Port St. Joe. Farmers from around North Florida and Georgia will have fresh produce for purchase and vendors will sell homemade crafts and jewelry. The Salt Air Farmer’s Market promotes a sustainable food system on Florida’s Forgotten Coast. The Market runs from 9 a.m. ET until 1 p.m. SALT AIR FARMERS MARKET Thursday, October 3, 2013 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.co m From its creation in 2003, the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves has performed to a succinct motto. “People must be stakeholders in the land,” founding members said as a mission statement. To promote the Preserves, to create more stakeholders and increase membership the Friends will hold Bay Day this weekend, with the event kicking off Friday with an astronomy walk and continuing through Saturday with tours, music and food. Bay Day events begin 7 p.m. ET Oct. 4 with an Astronomy Walk & Talk led by Dr. Cliff Harris from Gulf Coast State College. Walking in the preserve you will get a feel for just how large the solar system is and have fun observing the stars and night sky. A Low Country Boil will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET and the menu includes boiled shrimp, sausage, potatoes, corn on the cob, Cole slaw, garlic bread and beverages. A $10 donation is asked per meal. During the February Bay Day 458 plates of shrimp boil were sold, representing a major fundraiser for the Friends. New this Bay Day is a Kayak Adventure led by Kim Wren, former Aquatic Preserve Manager and now Stewardship Manager at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in Eastpoint. There are a limited number of spaces available so come out on Oct. 5 and sign up for the adventure. Happy Ours Kayak and Kike Outpost is sponsoring the Kayak Adventures. Ten years after its creation, the Friends group remains a vibrant and active partner working with the preserve staff to keep St. Joseph Bay, one of Florida’s 41 aquatic preserves, pristine while assisting with work on the uplands when called. “If you are not familiar with the Buffer Preserve or the Aquatic Preserve stop in for a visit at the Preserve Welcome Center and learn how the Buffer Preserve helps to protect the bay through a natural ltration of the water as it descends to the bay via the watershed,” said Sandra Cha n, on staff at the Buffer Preserves. “St. Joseph Bay is one of the most pristine bays on the Gulf of Mexico and the goal is to keep it that way.” The Preserves Center is also a mecca for scientists and researchers. Since January there have been almost 20 groups of students and professors staying at the Preserve. They have come from South Dakota, Wayne State College in Nebraska, Creighton University in Omaha and colleges from Missouri and Illinois, as well as those close to home such as Florida, Louisiana and Tennessee. “A student from Puerto Rico and one from Nova Scotia have called the Buffer Preserve home in 2013,” Cha n noted. The Friends group, a nonpro t supporting the missions of the Preserves, has exploded since its creation. Membership is now over 200 and still growing, Cha n said. A new Preserve manager, Dylan Shoemaker, is also on board. “The Friends need your help and support in order to continue working to make the Preserves the best they can be and provide a place of enjoyment and learning for the public,” Cha n said. “Dylan arrived in January and has made a substantial impact at the Buffer Preserve. “A new Aquatic Preserve manager is expected to join the crew before long to further promote the ongoing positive relationship between the uplands and the bay.” St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve is located on State Road 30-A at Simmons Bayou. St. Joseph Bay Aquatic Preserve encompasses 73,000 submerged acres in the bay and gulf. The Friends group work to help both hence they are Friends of the Preserves while each of the preserve are a separate entity. The Aquatic Preserve has not been funded through the state so a group of dedicated volunteers sample the water and use a transect to observe the sea grass to ensure the pristine condition of the water and sea grass for all living in the bay. Plants are a major area of study on the Buffer Preserve. The preserve’s crop of Chapman’s rhododendrons is the largest population of its kind on public lands. Other federally or state threatened or endangered plant populations are observed and conditions created that encourage their growth. SCHEDULE OF EVENTS Friday Astronomy walk, 7 p.m. ET Saturday Tour the Preserves – 10-11:30 a.m.; 12-1:30 p.m.; 2-3:30 p.m. ET Enjoy a trip through the backwoods trails of the Buffer Preserve to nd rare and endangered plants, prescribed burn sites and various native plants. There will be trips to learn about shore birds, shoreline of the Bay, adventures with kayaks. Schedule and information at www. stjosephbaypreserves.or g Sunset cruise, 5 p.m. – tickets sold Oct. 1-5, rstcome, rst-served. Call 229-1787 to register. SPECIAL TO THE STAR Tram tours in search of wild owers and butter ies will be led by Bill Boothe (right). Bay Day will offer visitors a host of tours into the wilds of the 5,000-plus acre Buffer Preserve. Annual Bay Day promotes preserves former Aquatic Preserve Manager and now Stewardship Manager at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in Eastpoint. There are a limited number of spaces available so come out on Oct. 5 and sign up for the adventure. Happy Ours Kayak and Kike Outpost is sponsoring the Kayak Ten years after its creation, the Friends group remains a vibrant and active partner preserve staff to keep St. Joseph Bay, one of Florida’s 41 aquatic preserves, pristine not familiar with the Buffer Preserve or the Aquatic Preserve stop in for a visit at the Preserve Welcome Center and learn how the Buffer Preserve helps to protect the bay through a natural ltration of the water as it descends to the bay via the watershed,” said Sandra Cha n, on staff at the Buffer Preserves. “St. Joseph Bay is one of the most pristine bays on the Gulf of Mexico and the goal is to keep it that way.” The Preserves Center is also a mecca for scientists and researchers. Since January there have been almost 20 groups of students and professors staying at the Preserve. They have come from South Dakota, Wayne State College in Nebraska, Creighton University in Omaha and state so a group of dedicated volunteers sample the water and use a transect to observe the sea grass to ensure the pristine condition of the water and sea grass for all living in the bay. Plants are a major area of study on the Buffer Preserve. The preserve’s crop of Chapman’s rhododendrons is the largest population of its kind on public lands. Other federally or state threatened or endangered plant populations are observed and conditions created that encourage their growth. SCHEDULE OF EVENTS Astronomy walk, 7 p.m. ET Tour the Preserves – 10-11:30 a.m.; 12-1:30 p.m.; 2-3:30 p.m. ET Enjoy a trip through the backwoods trails of the Buffer Preserve to nd rare and endangered plants, prescribed burn sites and various native plants. There will be trips to learn about shore birds, shoreline of the Bay, adventures with kayaks. Schedule and information at www. stjosephbaypreserves.or g Sunset cruise, 5 p.m. – tickets sold Oct. 1-5, rstcome, rst-served. Call 229-1787 to register. SPECIAL TO THE STAR The Low Country Boil is a highlight of the annual Bay Day in support of the St. Joseph Bay Preserves.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, October 3, 2013 A n g e l i s a 4 5 # A m s t a f f T e r r i e r S h e i s p l a y f ul f r ien dly a n d o u t g oing A ng el w a l k s f a i r l y w e l l o n h e r l e a s h a n d k n o w s t h e c o m m a n o f s i t a n d d o w n S h e l o v e s t o c u d d l e w i t h e v e r y b o d y A n g e l g e t s a l o n g w e l l w i t h m o s t d o g s b u t d o e s n o t c a r e f o r t he c om p a n y of k i t t i e s. F R E E S P A Y O R N E U T E R F O R T H E D O G S O F 3 2 4 56 ZI P P l e a s e d o n o t h e s i t a t e t o e m a i l t o w n s e n d h s di r e c t o r @ gm a i l c om o r a do pt b a y s t j o e @ g m a i l .c o m o r c a l l t h e S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y a t 8 5 0 2 2 7 1 1 0 3 a n d a s k f o r M e l o d y o r D e b b i e A p p l i c a t i o n s a r e a v a i l a b l e a t w w w s j b h u m a n e s o c i e t y o r g W e r e q u i r e a l l p o t e n t i a l a d o p t e r s t o c o m p l e t e a n a p p l i c a t i o n f o r m A d o p t i o n f e e s i n c l u d e o u r c o s t o f s p a y / n e u t e r a n d c ur r e n t va c c i n a t i on s. O u r h o u r s f o r t h e s h e l t e r a r e T u e s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m 4 p m F a i t h s T h r i f t H u t i s a l w a y s i n n e e d o f d o n a t i o n s a l s o a n d a l l t h e p r o c e e d s g o d i r e c t l y t o s u p p o r t t h e a n i m a l s i n o u r c a r e T h e h o u r s f o r t h e s t o r e a r e T h u r s d a y S a t u r d a y f r o m 1 0 a m 3 p m V o l u n t e e r s a r e a l w a y s w e l c o m e a t b o t h o u r s t o r e a n d o u r s h e l t e r O u r s t o r e a n d s h e l t e r l o c a t i o n i s 1 0 0 7 T e n t h S t r e e t i n Po r t S t J o e H o p e t o s e e y o u a l l t he r e s o on I f y o u a r e m i s s i n g a p e t o r w a n t t o a d o p t a n e w p e t p l e a s e c h e c k w i t h y o u r l o c a l H u m a n e S o c i e t y o r S h e l t e r F o l l o w u s o n F a c e b o o k : S t J o s e p h B a y H u m a n e S o c i e t y w w w s j b h u m a n e s o c i e t y or g bBB O WB ] 4514866 f or ONL Y $1 5 per w eek $60 per month Call T oda y 227 .7847 See Y our Business Name and Inf o Her e W E HA VE MOVED T O: 327 REID A VE (CORN E R OF 4TH St & REID A VE.) 850-227-3472 HOU RS MONDA Y T O W EDN ESDA Y 8 AM T O 6 PM THU RSDA Y T O SA TU RDA Y 8 AM T O 8 PM SU NDA Y 11 AM T O 6 PM 9 4 5 4 HWY 9 8 BEA C ON HILL A T THE MEXIC O BEA CH CIT Y LIMIT S 8 5 0 6 4 7 8 3 1 0 GREA T SELEC TION OF ALL Y OUR F A VORITE BEER WINE & SPIRIT S RANDY & ART RANDY ST ARK RANDY & ART RANDY ST ARK S S PIRIT & WINE B EER VORITE A F OUR Y A LL O F TION S ELEC T GREA ON THE POOP DECK UPCOMING EVENTS IN THE CR O W’S NEST K ARA OKE Thoughts of insect infestations usually bring to mind attacks on outdoor ornamental planting and vegetable gardens, but houseplants are not immune to insect invasions. Of course, plants growing indoors are better protected than those exposed to outside conditions. However, a number of insects might in ltrate your home in search of a leafy meal. Major enemies of indoor plants include spider mites, mealy bugs, aphids and scales, all of which cause damage by sucking out plant juices. Spider mites, which may be green, yellow, red or almost colorless, are very small — only about 1/50 inch long. They’re dif cult to see without a magnifying glass. As the name implies, they look like tiny spiders and are usually found on the undersides of leaves. If your plants are heavily infested with spider mites, you’ll see ne webbing on the foliage. Mealy bugs are small, softbodied insects, about an eighth of an inch long, covered with a white powdery material. Some species have a long, waxy lament at the rear of the body. Aphids, which may be green, pink, brown, black, yellow or blue, are usually less than an eighth of an inch long. They are pearshaped and have long antennae and two short tubes that extend from the rear of the body. Scales, like aphids, are found in a wide range of colors. They range from an eight to a third of an inch in length, are covered with a waxy material and may be circular, oblong or pear-shaped. Scales are found on both sides of leaves, as well as on twigs and branches, where they hide in crevices. Although primarily an outdoor pest, white ies occasionally are found on houseplants. These pests, which resemble tiny moths, are about one-sixteenth of an inch long, and as you’d expect, they’re white. You can usually tell if you have a white y problem by gently shaking suspected plants. If the pests are present, they’ll swarm around the plants for a few seconds. They also can be found on the undersides of leaves. Like the other critters we’ve described, white ies injure plant by sucking out juices. They cause the most damage while feeding in their immature stage, when they look like tiny green to whitish sh scales. Other house plant pests include fungus gnat maggots, psocids (soe-dids) and springtails. These soil-borne pests cause little or no damage. However, large populations may become a nuisance. Fungus gnat maggots are white, worm-like and reach a length of about one-quarter of an inch at maturity. Psocids generally are six-tenths of an inch or less in length. They’re grayish in color and may or may not have wings. Springtails range in size from microscopic to as much as a fth of an inch long. They’re usually white, and they jump when disturbed. Bugs often invade out homes on new plants. It pays to give such introductions a close inspection, before placing them near established plant residents. For more information on houseplant pests, call the Gulf County Extension Service at 6393200, or visit http://gulf.ifas.u .edu and see Publication ENY 476, ENY 317 & ENY 320. Society Star Staff Reports New VSO, new of ce hours The new Gulf County Veterans Service Of cer is Joe Paul, who replaced the recently retired James Kennedy. The new of ce hours are 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET Tuesday and Wednesday. For appointments, call 229-6125. Senior citizens group needs your help Gulf County Senior Citizens, 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, is asking for donations of nonperishable foods such as juice, canned tuna and chicken, soup or vegetables for low-income seniors. Small, inexpensive bingo prizes are always needed for our clients who love to play bingo several times a week. Also needed are donations of items for arts and crafts. We provide a hot nutritious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and over. Transportation may be available to our meal sites. Anyone interested in coming to our sites in Port St. Joe or Wewahitchka for meals and activities or who would like to donate any of the items noted above may call Debbie at 229-8466. Star Staff Reports Sea Oats and Dunes club to meet Oct. 8 Please join the “Sea Oats and Dunes Garden Club” at its next monthly meeting at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8 at Beach Baptist Hall, 311 Columbus St. in St. Joe Beach. PSJ Garden Club to meet Oct. 10 The Port St Joe Garden Club will have its monthly meeting at noon Thursday, Oct. 10, at its garden center on Eighth Street. David Goodson of Bayside Florist & Gifts will present a program on oral design. Visitors are welcome. To attend, contact a garden club member or leave a message on our Facebook page. Our garden center is on both national and state historical site lists and available for rental. Marron Lance is born Bladen, Hailyn, Stratton, Stetson and Adley would like to announce the arrival of their baby brother, Marron Lance Moses! Marron was born at Bay Medical Center on Sept. 6 at 2:26 p.m. He weighed 8 pounds, 15 ounces and was 22.5 inches long. Proud parents are Marcus Moses and Stephanie Watson. Marron was welcomed by many family members. He is the grandson of Sandy and Jerry Mitchell and Geraldine Conlon of Howard Creek, Rhonda and Steve Smeby, March (Runt) and Deborah Moses, Glenda Newell and Geraldine Nash of Apalachicola, Charles and Donie Sasser and the late W.C. and Shirley Robinson of Wewahitchka. Proud aunts and uncles include Rhett and Brittnie Butler, Lance Watson, Jessica Chancey and Chandler and Tanner Moses. Marron has many other aunts, uncles and numerous cousins. Welcome to the world, little man. You are perfect in every way. We love you! Lily is 2! Our sweet baby is a big 2 years old! Lillian Alice Henderson celebrated her Sept. 9 birthday with her family and a Minnie Mouse party at the White City Fire Department. The celebration continued at her school with cupcakes and treats for all her friends. Lily is the daughter of Heather Henderson of Apalachicola. She is the granddaughter of Donnie and Donna Harcus of White City and Michael Henderson of Apalachicola. She is the greatgranddaughter of Bill and Edna Henderson of Eastpoint. Happy Birthday Lily! We love you so much! Birth Birthday Houseplant pests come in all shapes, sizes ROY LEE CARTER County extension director SPECIAL TO THE STAR Many kinds of pests attack indoor plants. Society BRIEFS Gardening BRIEFS Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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The Star| B3 Thursday, October 3, 2013 O ur local r eal esta t e e xper ts ha v e iden ti ed wha t they f eel ar e the best v alues ar ound and ar e o ering them t o y ou in R eal Esta t e P icks! (I n this sec tion), D isc o v er the best r eal esta t e v alues in M e xic o B each, P or t S t Joe A palachic ola, C ape S an Blas S t G eor ge Island C arr abelle and surr ounding ar eas Real E sta t e P icks Best V alues on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LI S T I NG S HERE! (850)22 7-7847 | tgold en@pcnh. com S O L D ## ## $ ( % % ) )$ * $ $ $ ) & )$ $ $ (( ) $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ " $ +$ $ $ $ + $ $ School News Star Staff Report Wewahitchka Elementary School is welcoming three new faces to the kindergarten classes this year. Ms. Ashley Taunton has taught second grade at WES for the past three years and is delighted to be with Kindergarten. Ms. Kayla Chumney Bailey comes from Blountstown Elementary. She is happy to return to WES are student teaching at the school. Ms. Julie McMillian is a local Gulf Countian and is excited to join the Kindergarten and re-join the WES family after also student teaching at WES. Special to The Star The third-grade reading class of Faith Christian School presented a “Living History” report for family and friends.   The children read a biography, collected information for a written report, produced a character newspaper and presented their information to a live audience while in costume.   Pictured left to right are: Harriet Tubman Jae Lennox; Pocahontas Eliza Bailey; Helen Keller Mazie Hodges; Abe Lincoln -Carter Costin; Ben Franklin Taylor Burkett; and friend of Helen Keller -Eddie LaFountain. Pictured separately is Karys Linton as Annie Oakley. SPECIAL TO THE STARPP ort St. Joe EE lementary School Front Row: Jasmine Sandoval, Karli Moore, Santana Causey, Kailah Thomas Back Row: Brandon Heckinlively,  Davis Varnes, Sean Farnsley, Alexis Gathers DAZZLING DOLPHIN sS By WES LOCHER 229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.co m Four was a charm for Port St. Joe Elementary School. The College for Every Student organization (CFES) honored Port St. Joe Elementary with its fourth-straight “School of Distinction” award in a ceremony held on Monday. The award recognized the school’s efforts to broaden horizons and raise expectations among students during the 2012-13 school year. Port St. Joe Elementary is one of just 25 schools nationwide to receive the “School of Distinction” award and one of four schools to receive it four years in a row. The award recognizes schools with exemplary programs that incorporate the three CFES core practices: Leadership through Service, Mentoring, and Pathways to College. These schools not only provide intensive exposure to the three practices for targeted students, known as CFES Scholars, but create a college-going culture that promotes college readiness and success for the entire student body. “The ‘School of Distinction’ program was created four years ago and Port St. Joe Elementary has received the honor all four years,” said CFES President and CEO Rick Dalton. “They have shown and continue to show their commitment to providing students with the tools and skills they need to be college-ready.” CFES school liaison and program director Carol Cathey was on-hand to present the award to Principal Sue Gannon along with guidance counselor DeEtta Smallwood and a handful of student Scholars. “We have a great school and a great program,” said Gannon. “We’ve had the CFES program since I was a teacher at the high school. “We’re continuing to implement these programs even though our funding has dwindled because they’re so benecial to students.” After presenting a new banner recognizing the school’s achievements, Cathey shook the hand of each of the students and congratulated them on their accomplishments so far. “The faculty and staff who implement the program do so as volunteers,” Cathey reminded the students. “They’re very good at it.” Cathey mentioned recent high school graduate Javarri Beachum who upon graduation, was accepted to the Naval Academy Prep School. Cathey reminded students that Beachum had been part of the CFES program, too. CFES has partnered with Gulf Coast State College to provide services to the school that include a two-year scholarship to an excelling student once they graduate. “Gulf Coast State College is actively involved in helping Gulf County students get ready to get to college and stay there,” said Cathey. To apply for the recognition, the school faculty and students created a submission portfolio to show that students could not only set goals, but reach them. A written plan for what the staff hoped to accomplish within the school year was also included in the portfolio. The CFES program aims to help schools with global awareness of what makes students successful and more aware of their futures. Students in the program will mentor others and raise college awareness through college T-shirt day and complete various other projects throughout the year both inside and outside the classroom. PSJ Elementary honored with ‘School of Distinction’ award for fourth yearWEs S LL OCHER | The Star The College for Every Student organization presented Port St. Joe Elementary with its fourth “School of Distinction” banner. Wewahitchka Elementary spotlights kindergarten The Lion’s Tale

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FAITH Page B4 This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SOUTHERLAND F AMIL Y FUNERAL HOME (850) 229-8111 (T rad iti ona l Ser vic es 192 8 BCP ) Mor nin g Pra y er & Hol y Com mun ion Sun day ... ... ... ... ... 10: 00 A.M The Re v Lou Lit tle Pri est Ser vic es T emp ora ril y at Sen ior Cit ize ns Cen ter 120 Lib rar y Dri v e An Unc han gin g F ait h In A Cha ngi ng W orl d COMFOR TER FUNERAL HOME (850) 227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850) 229-9596 Sunday School ............................ 10 a.m. Sunday Morning W orship ........... 11 a.m. Sunday Evening W orship .............. 6 p.m. W ednesday Evening Ser vice ....... 7 p.m. T OUCHING LIVES WITH THE LO VE OF JESUS 6pm Fred Freddy Flintstone White passed way in his Overstreet home on Sept. 25, 2013. A Floridian most of his life, he was an amazing husband, father, grandpa, son, brother, uncle and friend. He was a Master of Carpentry and was passionate about growing things and feeding his birds and squirrels. He is survived by the love of his life of 40 years, Debbie White; four children and 7 grandchildren. He is also survived by his father, two brothers and one sister and their families. He was a great teacher to all and will be dearly missed. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to El Governor Hotel, c/o Wylie Petty, Mexico Beach, Fla. Fred Freddy Flintstone White Obituaries Faith BRIEFS FUMC Mens Club BBQ Chicken Supper The First United Methodist Mens Club will host a BBQ Chicken Supper from 4-6 p.m. ET on Friday. Half chicken, beans, slaw, bread and tea will be served for $8 a plate. Carry-out or eat-in. The First United Methodist Womens Bake Sale will be happening simultaneously. St. James celebrates feast of St. Francis St. James Episcopal Church will celebrate the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi with a Blessing of the Animals on at 4 p.m. ET Saturday, Oct. 5. The blessing will be under the gazebo and any over ow will be in the adjacent parking lot. Pets are welcome! Father Tommy does expect leads or enclosures be utilized so as to avoid any undue over activity or anxiety. St. James Episcopal Church is at 800 22nd St. in Port St. Joe. Special to The Star Is there one true religion? Or many? These questions will be discussed at 7 p.m. CT on Monday at Lifetree Caf. The program, Only One Way to God? Can One Religion Really Have All the Answers? features the lmed story of Valerie Winn, an American whose spiritual journey led her to a Chinese village where she encountered an underground church. Winn describes her encounters with various religions and how they shaped her. I nally said, God, would you just show me if youre real? Winn said. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehousetype setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. Special to The Star Students from Gulf to Franklin county schools will be joining thousands of other youth on athletic elds all across the nation on Wednesday to share their Christian faith with fellow students during the seventh annual National Fields of Faith event. This rapidly-growing, interdenominational outreach event will be held at more than 475 locations throughout the nation on this same date. Though many Christian rallies are anchored to an entertainer or professional speaker that creates a spectator event, Fields of Faith is structured as a student-to-student ministry. Peers invite their own classmates and teammates to meet on their schools athletic eld to hear fellow students share their testimonies, challenge them to read the Bible and to come to faith in Jesus Christ. This will be the second Fields of Faith event for Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High. Last year, about 250 students and supporters attended at the Shark Stadium. The national growth of Fields of Faith has been remarkable. Since the beginning of Fields of Faith in 2004, more than 600,000 students have joined in the movement. In 2012 alone, more than 160,000 students gathered on 424 elds across 37 states to participate in the event. Its not just those numbers that have FCA organizers excited about Fields of Faith. Its the real-life impact these gatherings are having on young people. Last years series of events saw 3,710 students make rst-time faith commitments to follow Jesus Christ, 4,809 recommitted their life to Christ and 6,885 committed to reading the Bible daily. The impetus for Fields of Faith began with Jeff Martin, an FCA staff person, who conceived the idea from an Old Testament reference in 2 Chronicles 34 after searching how to help todays generation of students face spiritual battles and temptations. In the scripture, King Josiah, an in uential teenager very similar to Fields of Faith attendees today, gathered his people and challenged them to read the Bible. As a result, they changed their culture. In 2004, the Josiahin uenced dream came true when 6,000 students gathered on school athletic elds throughout three states for the rst Fields of Faith event. That was the beginning of what has become one of the most signi cant faith-related gathering of students in a single day. While Fields of Faith has its roots with FCA leadership, the event is designed to include multiple national Christian organizations, local churches and ministries. A local leadership team will determine the program of each Fields of Faith event. More information about Fields of Faith is available at FieldsofFaith.com. To learn more about the event in Port St. Joe, contact Dena Sapp (478) 957-4501 or email boxwoodhome@ yahoo.com. Theodore Daniels, son of the late Annie Bell Peterson and the late Adam Daniels, was born Aug. 11, 1921, in Vernon, Fla. He was educated through the Washington County School System. He was joined in holy matrimony to the late Hazel White, of Bonifay, Fla., from 19401965. Nine children were born to this union: Theodore Jr. (Ann, deceased) of St. Petersburg, Fla., Mary Helen Blanford (Raymond) of Elizabeth, Colo.; William Hard of St. Petersburg; the late Richard Ervin (Barbara) of St. Petersburg; The Rev. Linda Kilpatrick (Pat, deceased) of Kent, Wa..; Brenda Givens (Charles) of Port St. Joe; Velma Smith (Charles) of Orange City; Cary (Rosalyn) of St. Petersburg, and Ronald (Valerie) of Hinesville, Ga. Theodore was married to the former Olivia Seabrooks of Apalachicola from 1971 until his demise. He and Olivia have one son, Walter (Charlotte) of Port St. Joe and one daughter, Yolanda, of Pensacola. He also had a love for his special dog, Peppa. Beings the oldest of 15 children, he was preceded in death by nine of his siblings. He leaves behind two brothers and three sisters to cherish his memory: James Peterson of Green Cove Springs; Robert Peterson, Mae Bell (David) Vann, Annie K. Davis and the Rev. Savannah Frederick, all of Vernon. He also leaves to cherish two sister-in-laws; Rosa Lee Peterson of Vernon and Cheryl Peterson of Caryville, Fla. He will be greatly missed by his numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, greatgreat-grandchildren, nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Theodore was a Steward at New Bethel A.M.E. Church since the late 1960s. He was gainfully employed at the St. Joe Paper Company for over 30 years. He was an avid sherman, hunter and gardener. He loved nature and the outdoors. Funeral services for Theodore were held on Saturday, Sept. 28, at New Bethel A.M.E. Church in Port St. Joe. He is interred at Forest Hill Cemetery. The Daniels family would like to extend their sincere appreciation to friends and neighbors for the many kind and lovely expressions of sympathy. You were, and continue to be, a comfort in a time of need. May God forever bless you and keep you. Theodore Daniels Special to The Star Please join us under the sails at First United Methodist Church at 4 p.m. ET on Sunday for the Blessing of our Pets. If you dont have a pet to receive a blessing, the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society will have a few available for adoption. After the Blessing Ceremony we will head to the Humane Society on 10th Street to offer Blessing to those animals that remain at the shelter. Please join us for the service Under The Sails and, if you like, the service at the shelter. We will be collecting donations for the Humane Society. They dont need pet food, as Science Diet has a special program for the shelter, but they sure could use kitty litter, dog and cat toys and treats. And of course cash! Join us and see if its true, People look like their pets! Fields of Faith event to be held in Port St. Joe FUMC hosts Blessing of the Animals Key question about religion explored at Lifetree Caf Thursday, October 3, 2013

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Local The Star| B5 Thursday, October 3, 2013 T rades & Ser v ices GET Y OUR AD IN CALL T OD A Y! 227-7847 229-1324 PR OFESSION AL F LOOR CARE, I N C R esidential and Commercial Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning S erving the entire Gulf Coast area Ceramic T ile and Grout Cleaning R Vs Cars T rucks V ans 24 Hour E mer genc y W ater E xtraction 4510158 45 1 43 0 8 G u i t a r A m p S o u n d S y s t e m & I n s t r u m en t R epa i r S t J o e M u s i c C o & R S R R e c o rd i ng S t u d i o 21 0 W i l l i a m s A v e P o r t S t J o e ( 8 5 0 ) 2 2 7 7 2 2 4 s a l es @ s t j o e m u s i c com Jury scam reported Special to The Star The United States District Court for the Northern District of Florida has received several calls this week from concerned local citizens reporting a jury scam. According to the reports, the caller, who claims to represent the Court, tells the person that he/she has failed to report for federal jury duty and then states that the person will be arrested and jailed by the judge unless he/she appears at the courthouse with a MoneyPak card. Please be advised this is a scam. If you are a victim of this scam, please contact the FBI’s Internet Crimes Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov If you have any questions or concerns about federal jury service please contact the Of ce of the Clerk: District Jury Of ce at 850-521-3705 or by email at jury_ nd@ nd.uscourts. gov; Gainesville Division at 352-380-2400; Pensacola Division at 850-435-8440; Tallahassee Division at 850-521-3501; Panama City Division at 850-769-4556. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, October 3, 2103 The Star | B5 1010S STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, AND CIRCULATION Publication: The Star 135 W. Hwy 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publication Number: 518-880 Filing Date: October 4, 2012 Issue Frequency Weekly (Thursday Morning) Published Annually: 52 Weeks Annual Subscription Price: $24.15 In County $34.65 Out of County Contact Person: Rodney Menzel (850) 747-5042 Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication and General Business Office of Publisher: P.O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 Publisher: Roger Quinn P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Editor: Tim Croft 135 W. Hwy 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Managing Editor: N/A Owner: Halifax Media Holdings LLC (a Delaware Corporation) P. O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 Publication Title: The Star Issue Date for Circulation Data: August 30, 2012. Extent and Nature of Circulation; Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months; Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date. Total Number of Copies: Average: 2061 Actual: 2033 Paid Circulation Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: Average: 346 Actual: 344 Mailed In-County Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: Average: 65 Actual: 64 Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS: Average: 1278 Actual: 1130 Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS: Average: 0 Actual: 0 Total Paid Distribution: Average: 1689 Actual: 1538 Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution: Average: 49 Actual: 50 Total Distribution: Average: 1738 Actual: 1588 Copies not Distributed: Average: 323 Actual: 445 Total: Average: 2061 Actual: 2033 Percent Paid: Average: 99.2% Actual: 96.9% Publication of Statement of Ownership: October 3, 2013 Roger Quinn Regional Publisher September 27, 2012 I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties.) October 3, 2013 95527S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-29 CA PRI PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. GULF SUPPLY COMPANY OF PORT ST. JOE, INC., a Florida corporation, Defendant. RE-NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 12, 2013, and entered in Civil Action No. 13-29-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, PRI PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, and the Defendant, GULF SUPPLY COMPANY OF PORT ST. JOE, INC., a Florida corporation, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at 11:00 o’clock a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 10th day of October, 2013, at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure. Lot 3, of Port St. Joe, Commerce Park Phase II, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, at Page(s) 54 and 55 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 19th day of September, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Sept. 26, Oct. 3, 2013 92616S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Art By Catey located at 107 Reid Ave, in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port St Joe, Florida, 32456 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port St Joe, Florida, this 23rd day of September, 2013. Art By Catey LLC October 3, 2013 95597S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 232012CA 000188CAAXMX NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, vs. RICHARD D. BARFIELD, ET AL Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: Estate of Robert L. Holland and Unknown Heirs and/ or Beneficiaries of the Estate of Robert L. Holland RESIDENCE: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 447 Pineview Drive Wewahitchka, FL 32465 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Gulf County, Florida: Lot 8, in Block “A”, of Circle “J” Estates, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, at Page 10, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Gladstone Law Group, P.A., attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, either before, either be&UHDPHUV7UHH 6HUYLFH &DOO-DVRQ# 7H[W)/WR Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 St. Joseph Catholic Church Men’s Club to have Spaghetti Dinner Special to The Star Cannolis, tiramisu, ameretti, cioccolato and pizzelles are Italian desserts that will be served at the St. Joseph Catholic Church Men’s Club annual Spaghetti Dinner 5-7 p.m. ET on Saturday. This event will take place in the church hall, just east of the church on 20th Street in Port St. Joe. In addition to the great spaghetti, Italian beer and wine and the desserts, entertainment and door prizes are included. Tickets are limited to the rst 200 buyers, so get yours soon at the Church Hall (227-1417), Hannon Insurance, No Name Caf or call President Dan Van Treese at 227-8138.

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B6 | The Star Thursday, October 3, 2103 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 4510160 4514327 OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 149B COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 3 OFFICE/KIT/BATH AND WAREHOUSE $ 675.00 PER MONTH/ 675.00 DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 4514326 OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 151A COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 12X12 OFFICE, BATH, STORAGE AND LARGE WAREHOUSE $ 550.00 PER MONTH/ 550.0O DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 1114649 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen: SHIPFITTERS € FLUXCORE WELDERS PIPE WELDERS € X-RAY WELDERS PIPEFITTERS € SAFETY REP Competitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pm HUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208 EOE/Drug Free Workplace Creative/Design The News Herald is looking for a: Graphic Artist Candidate must have experience in InDesign/Photoshop/Quark or Illustrator (PC Platform preferred) while being open to learning new programs. The ideal candidate should have a creative eye, attention to details, organized, able to meet deadlines, have good communications/ phone skills and be able to work with minimal supervisor. Experience working in or with marketing departments is a plus. A portfolio will be requested at the time of the interview. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package including vacation, sick leave, 401(k), medical, dental, vision, life insurance. Pick up an application at The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34265884 Text FL65884 to 56654 IT/Software DevelopmentRegional Information Technology DirectorThe Panama City News Herald, Halifax Media is seeking an experienced ITDirector to manage systems for two daily, five semi-weekly, three weekly newspapers and an internet portal. The ideal candidate will have a Bachelor’s Degree in computer science or engineering and six to ten years progressive experience. Prior newspaper experience a plus. General areas of responsibility include: content, management and financial information systems, word processing and office automation, data and voice communications and subsystems particular to the newspaper industry, support for web-based graphics programs. Specific duties include: analyzes the organizations’information and telecommunications systems as a basis for recommendations to improve and enhance the systems’capabilities; coordinates with the enterprise ITteam to implement the selection, and completion of new IS and telecommunications systems to accommodate growing needs of the region; identifying priorities for development, enhancement and maintenance of application areas; developing and implementing a uniform region-wide strategy for equipment, operating systems and communications; developing annual budgets for hardware, software and any capital purchases region-wide; oversees maintenance of servers and computer hardware for the region. The Regional ITDirector hires and oversees system support specialists across the region to ensure they are up-to-date on latest ITdevelopments. Some travel is required. Halifax Media offers a competitive benefit plan including health, vision, dental, life insurance, medical and dependent care flexible spending accounts, 401(k) savings plan, paid vacation and sick leave and holidays. We will accept resumes until October 11, 2013. E-mail resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com Or mail to Lorraine Grimes: Panama City News Herald P. O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL32402. Drug-free workplace -EOE Web Id 34266822 Text FL66822 to 56654 Sales Advertising Sales Support Our fast-paced, innovative local media company has an immediate opportunity within our sales support team. This successful candidate will be a well-organized “take-charge” person who welcomes new challenges and enjoys helping other people. The Star News offers a wide variety of multi-media advertising solutions, ranging from traditional newspapers and direct mail to leading-edge digital advertising and social media. You will provide sales support to outside sales executives, who cater to the marketing needs of the small and medium-sized businesses we serve. We will consider individuals with a variety of experience, ranging from recent college graduates to individuals with experience in other industries or disciplines. Responsibilities include order entry, interacting with customers, supporting salespeople while they’re on the road and reviewing advertising materials. Scheduled workweek will be five days, Monday through Friday. Job requirements include computer skills, including the Microsoft Office suite of products, and the ability to work effectively in a team environment. Advertising, sales and/or customer service experience is a plus. Administrative skills and experience are also helpful. You will learn a lot For immediate consideration, submit a cover letter and resume to: lgrimes@pcnh.com An Equal Opportunity Employer Web ID#: 34267059 Sales Sales Reps The Panama City News Herald is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives who have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. Panama City is on the beautiful emerald coast of Northwest Florida recently named by CNN as one of America’s top 100 beaches. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: z Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office z Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate—all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266370 Text FL66340 to 56654 Sales Sales Reps The Star News is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives that have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: z Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office z Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business z Conducting our “solutions based” approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities z Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. z Reviewing the day’s successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriate—all administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: z At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience z Bachelor’s degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree z Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision z Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEO’s z Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266381 Text FL66381 to 56654 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experienced Sales Manager Who will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: z Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. z Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. z Communicates and advocates the company’s vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. z Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. z Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solution’s ROI for the client. Requirements: z Bachelor’s degree or comparable experience. z Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. z Successful record of team building and leadership. z Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. z Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. z A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition z Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. z Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. z Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. z Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. z Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. z Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations z Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266340 Text FL66340 to 56654 fore October 28, 2013 or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED: September 17, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk of Court If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator at 850747-5338, fax 850-7475717 or at ADA Request@jud14.fl courts.org, P O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. October 3, 10, 2013 95671S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-25-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. NATHAN PETERS, III and CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure and Order on Report and Recommendation on Motion for Partial Summary Judgment dated September 26, 2013, in Case No.: 13-25-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 a.m. EST on October 24, 2013 the following described property: Lots 14, 16, 18 and West 1/2 of Lot 20, Block 1005, City of Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida. DATED: September 27, 2013 REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Corut By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 3, 10, 2013 95599S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13000064CAAXMX AMBERS BANK, A GEORGIA BANK, f/k/a CENTRAL BANK OF GEORGIA, 97 South Broad Street Butler, GA 31006 Plaintiff, vs. THE ESTATE OF JOHN CLAY SIMPSON, DECEASED; AND THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF WILLIAM A. SIMPSON, DECEASED, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF WILLIAM A. SIMPSON, DECEASED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: LOTS TWO AND FOUR, BLOCK SIXTEEN, BEACON HILL SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 2 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH THE 1983 MOBILE HOME WITH TITLE NUMBERS S/N HMST7309AGA AND S/N HMST309BGA LOCATED THEREON. Commonly known as: 9211 OLIVE AVENUE, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32458 You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, Florida 32312, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 17th day of September 2013. Rebecca Norris CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203 Tallahassee, FL 32313 Phone: (850) 422-2520 Fax: (850) 422-2567 October 3, 10, 2013 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard Sale Come one Come All, something for everyone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard Sale Come one Come All, something for evryone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 Lanark Village Golf CourseRoute 98 Fri & Sat Oct. 4th & 5th Benefit Sale! Everything for the house plus antiques and collectibles! txt FL67276 to 56654 Port St. Joe: 121 Bellamy Cir. Saturday Oct. 5th 8am -1pmGarage Sale Electronics, furniture, clothing, household items, etc PSJ (Overstreet) Comming from HWY 98, turn on Co Rd 386, go 4 miles beyond Overstreet Bridge, take left on Pleasant Rest Cemetary Rd.. Go almost 2 miles, turn on Carr Rd. Look for signs Saturday Oct. 5th 8:30am (est) -untilBig Community Wide Yard Sale at Wetappo Creek 7 -8 families in yard sale! Rain cancels! txt FL67417 to 56654 St. Joe Beach 104 Bucaneer Dr. Saturday Oct. 5th 8am (est) -5pm (est)Gulf Aire Community Yard SaleEverything! txt FL67498 to 56654 St. Joe Beach 206 Coral Dr. Seashores Saturday Oct. 5th 8am (est.) -5pm(est) Bookcases, coffe & end tables, china cab., tools, garage cab., fishing and tackle, china, bakeware, glassware, and other household items, sewing and craft items and much more! txt FL67445 to 56654 Wewa: 191 Dove Lane down Over Street, turn left onto Pleasant Rest Road, go 1.5 miles to Cars Lane, turn left, 1/2 block, right on Dove Ln behind Wooden fence Saturday Oct. 5th and again on Saturday, Oct 12th. Both Days 8am Estate Sale Text FL67478 to 56654 White City(PSJ) 125 Pridgeon Rd. Off of Hwy 71 at the ICW bridge. Sat., Sun, & Mon Oct. 12th, -14th 8:30(est.) -4pm (est)Gigantic 3 Family Yard Sale Tools, bikes, furniture, housewares, clothes, and much much more! txt FL67513 to 56654 GUN SHOW Santa Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FL October 12th & 13th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-572-6611) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 Text FL63024 to 56654 WE PAY CASH JUNK OR TRASH! Jewelry, old or new, used or vintage collectibles. We come to you. Please call Monique 850-227-1668 or cell 850-254-3898 Bldg/Const/Skill TradeCarpet/Vinyl Installers Must be qualified. Call 850-670-4211 and ask for the Manager. Web Id 34265176 Text FL65176 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIES Full Time Office Assistant Do you have office experience with good customer service & computer skills? Are you attentive to detail & have good follow-up skills? Do you enjoy the challenge of working in a fast paced office & available to work weekdays & weekends? If so, stop by 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island between 9-5 weekdays & complete an application. Great benefits. For questions, call Sandra at 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34266116 Medical/Health Medical Billing Clerk For rheumatology practice. Needs to know ICD9 and CPT coding. Prefer Eclinical Works experience. Please fax resume to: 850-785-2100 or email to: adhalmd@yahoo.com Web ID#: 34267311 1bd/1ba fully furnished & equipped, utilities incld’d, in town in PSJ, $1000 mo. Active military 10% discount 850-867-3611 Text FL64207 to 56654 PSJ 116 Bellamy Circle 3br/1ba, fenced yard outside pets only $550 mo + $100 deposit option to buy. 850-643-5381 Stately historic PSJ home with great Bay View. 3 Br, 2.5 Baths. Elegant throughout. $1150/mo 850-227-7234 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. Classifieds work!



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50 For breaking news, visit www.starfl.comSubscribe to The Star800-345-8688For your hometown paper delivered to your home! Real Estate Ad deadline is Thursday 11 a.m. ET Legal ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET Display ad deadline is Friday 11 a.m. ET 227-1278 Classi ed deadline is Monday 5 p.m. ET 747-5020 TABLE OF CONTENTS quotequote id quote nameJUMP From Page 6AFrom page 6A Subscribe to The StarCall 227-1278For your hometown paper delivered to your home!Opinions4A Letters to the Editor5A Sports 10A Society News2-3B Obituaries 4B Church News 5B Law Enforcement8B School News 10B Legals 11B Classieds 12-13B Trades & Services14B INDEXA Freedom Newspaper Real Estate Advertising Deadline Thursday 11:00 am ET Display Advertising Deadline Friday 11:00 am ET227-1278Classified Line-Advertising Deadline Monday 5:00 pm ET747-5020 xxxx xxxxxxx 1BVISITTHESTARONLINEATWWW.STARFL.COM XXXXX XXXXXXYOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER SINCE 1937 THE S TAR YEAR 75, NUMBER 51 Thursday, OCTOBER 3, 2013BOCC approves millage, tax increaseBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com As they put the nishing touches to next scal years budget last week county commissioners arrived at a bumping of the heads. With one commissioner, Warren Yeager, absent and two commissioners, Joanna Bryan and Ward McDaniel, refusing to cast a vote in support of a tax increase, the Board of County Commissioners spent nearly three hours in a stalemate. The deadlock was nally broken when Yeager was linked to the meeting, audibly and visually, by phone and cast the deciding vote to approve the budget as presented at the beginning of the night. That budget includes an aggregate millage rate, taking into account the general fund and re districts, of 6.8740, an increase from last year of 11.98 percent. The rollback rate, that millage at which the county would realize the same revenue as the current scal year, is 6.1408. A mill is equal to $1 for every $1,000 in taxable property value. The budget includes a property tax increase of $1.073 million. Clerk of Courts Becky Norris cited several reasons she said accounted for the increase. Those included $200,000 for a Public Works excavator; increases in Florida retirement system contributions over $200,000; pay raises pledged and budgeted last year and implemented this year on top of raises approved this year which combined for over $400,000; increased costs for land ll monitoring and more than $100,000 for new vehicles for the Gulf County Sheriff. Commissioners Tan Smiley, Yeager and Carmen McLemore voted to approve the budget; Bryan and McDaniel dissented. Its going to be hard to look people in the eye, McDaniel said. Were just kicking (the issues) down the road. The deadlock was evident early as commissioners debated what had and had not been done to cut the budget and, most prominently in the discussion, lessen the burden on property taxpayers in favor of user or service fees. We need to shift some of the burden, the cost, from the taxpayer, said Pat Hardman, president of the Coastal Community Association. Hardman noted that commissioners had taken up several measures to do that including adding to the gas tax, an increase to the bed tax, mandatory garbage and failed to ratify any. The gas tax died by deadline and the increase to the bed tax was found to not be the panacea for assisting the sheriffs budget as it was proposed.Americus Ditch ongoing problem for countyBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com The Board of County Commissioners, with one notable exception, has insisted that the Americus Ditch project is a thing of the past. To residents in the area, and the commissioner who serves them, it is an everpresent problem. Last week pipes were again exposed, as residents called this paper to express frustration, revealing issues with how the pipes are connected and highlighting that a signi cant portion of the water owing through the ditch is not reaching its proposed destination. It is a mess, resident Bill Koran told the BOCC during a meeting two months ago. With heavy rains, my house has been ooded twice. I would like to know how this contract was awarded and how it was inspected. This project was not done correctly. Was the contractor quali ed for this kind of project? And according to my research, Preble Rish designed and inspected the project and I think that is a bit like the fox guarding the hen house. According to county staff, the county See BOCC A5 By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com One longtime patient of nurse Nellie Wade said Wade had seen more backsides than most anyone in Wewahitchka. Wade basked in smiling faces last Saturday as the community gathered at the First Baptist Church Fellowship Hall to provide a healthy Happy Birthday to a woman who has helped keep them healthy for decades. Since the end of the Second World War and Harry Truman was President. Wade turned 90 this year, one week prior to last Saturdays celebration. And she continues to show up for work every day, treating the patients of Dr. Michael Barnes, one of the last family physicians in the area. She does the weighing, the blood pressure checks, the checking of temperature and gauges what brings each patient in that day. And as another patient put it, she gives good shots. She is, by nine years, the oldest practicing nurse in Florida, according to research done by Barnes.WOW, NELLIE! TIM CROFT | The StarSomehow more than 100 residents of Wewahitchka surprised Nellie Wade for her birthday party. Wade was under the impression she was headed to Bay County to shop until the car she was riding in entered the First Baptist Church parking lot.Floridas oldest practicing nurse and Wewa treasure turns 90By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com MEXICO BEACH Move over city clerk, the Parker house is the hot button topic in Mexico Beach. During the city councils monthly workshop last Tuesday, Brian Cathey of Cathey Construction was invited to speak on the status of the historic building that was purchased by the city in mid-2011 with the intention of using it as a new city hall. The building caught re several months later and suffered massive damage. For the last two years the city has gone back and forth about whether it would be more frugal to tear down the re-damaged home and erect a new structure or attempt to rebuild what is left while also installing an elevator and other improvements that would bring the building up to commercial code. The citys insurance company paid the city $660,000 for the damage and sent a representative to assess the existing foundation slab. The rep verbally told the council that is t to build upon but according to city administrator Chris Hubbard, the city has not received formal written documentation of the assessment. Engineers from Cathey Construction had conducted their own assessments of the building, Cathey said. Their results indicated that the foundation was not usable. Theres no way we can reuse the foundation as it sits today, said Cathey. The foundation has problems that are impossible to overcome without dismantling the building. Cathey explained that the bricks in the structure are cracking and shifting and that the ground beneath the current foundation may not support a new structure. Previously the area had Parker house discussion continues at a standstillFederal lawsuit against PSJ dismissedBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com A lawsuit led in federal court against the city of Port St. Joe, two police of cers and a local businessman was formally dismissed Monday in the U.S. Northern District Court of Florida. The lawsuit, brought by Lynne Carr, was dismissed with prejudice, meaning the same claims against the same people can not be brought again in litigation. The dismissal ling came from the Tallahassee of ce of Marie Mattox, who was handling Carrs case. This is the second federal suit Mattox has led against local governments this year; one from a local political action committee against the Board of County Commissioners and several commissioners individually and the other against the city of Port St. Joe. See PARKER HOUSE A5 See LAWSUIT A5 See NELLIE A5 See DITCH A5 Annual Bay Day promotes buffer preserves, B1Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . .A4Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . .A6 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . .A7 Community . . . . . . . . . . B1School News . . . . . . . . . . B3Faith . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . B4Classi eds . . . . . . . . . .B6-B8

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LocalA2 | The Star Thursday, October 3, 2013 NOHIDDENCHARGES:Itisourpolicythatthepatientandanyotherpersonresponsibleforpaymentshastherighttorefusetopay, cancelpaymentorbereimbursedbypaymentoranyotherservice,examinationortreatmentwhichisperformedasaresultofand within72hoursofrespondingtotheadvertisementforthefree,discountedfeeorreducedfeeservice,examinationortreatment. www.mulliseye.com MedicalEyeExamwith forGlaucoma,Cataractsandothereyediseases. 850-763-6666 59yearsandolder,notpresentlyunderourcare. SmartLensesSMCanproduceclearvisionwithoutglasses, atalldistances BoardCertified andCataractSurgeonBoardCertified andCataractSurgeon 1109456 CouponExpires:10-15-13CODE: Semper Fi Sisters collecting for Boxes of Love for soldiersBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The boxes are piling up and the love is pouring in. To understand, just browse through the conference room at the newspaper, which has been for the past few years a depository for all things Boxes of Love and Semper Fi Sisters. The Sisters, who will begin to arrive in two weeks, will nish their fth annual Beach Blast on Oct. 19 with a packing party for Boxes of Love. Those boxes, and the aim is to top last years 1,200, will be sent to deployed soldiers overseas, particularly Afghanistan and Iraq. And as happens as the weeks wind down, the UPS and Fed Ex delivery folks are carting in to these ofce boxes of increasing size and quantity from Long Island, N.Y., Mullen, Neb., Grand Rapids, Mich., with a bit of Easton, Pa., and Savannah, Ga., among other locales. And those are the boxes among the stacks for which we can actually make out the labels. Locals are on board to as Centennial Bank branches put up donation boxes and the Piggly Wiggly and Harolds Auto Parts become part of the drive. We have received generous support and donations from the VFW and American Legion here in Port St. Joe, Semper Fi Sisters president Brenda Garth said. The Sisters rafed a GPS sh nder at the Gulf County Sheriffs Ofce Bass Tournament, the proceeds helping to ship as many as 50 boxes overseas. The local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution provided postage funds. Preston Russ with Coastal Realty and Brian and Scott of Coastal Joe Vacation Rentals joined to donate a welcome to Gulf County lunch and afternoon treats for the arriving Sisters on Oct. 16. And for the fth consecutive year, Smileys Beach Rentals will roll out the complementary beach chairs and umbrellas for the Sisters. George Duren will continue to support our efforts and Forgotten Coast Highway donated some bright beachwear and bags for our annual basket rafe, which helps raise funds for shipping the Boxes of Love, Garth said. Laura Adams of Dog Grooming Plus is collecting funds for items specically requested for military working dogs and their handlers. As always, on packing day, the Semper Fi Sisters will host their Market Place at the Centennial Building offering a variety of crafts and wares for sale, assisting with postage. And, of course, the Basket Rafe. The city of Port St. Joe lends support with the use of the Centennial Building for the packing party and the Gulf County Tourist Development Council provided grant support. Lest any forget the impact of those Boxes of Love on the troops, consider Sarah House, a Port St. Joe native soon to be deployed to Afghanistan for the second time. Like most care packages that are received (Boxes of Love) are always shared, House wrote in an email from California. Were all family. It is always a good day when we get mail. Everyone anticipates mail day, it is almost like Christmas. It is a huge morale booster. Honestly, we appreciate anyone and everyone what supports us. Whether it is by sending packages, cards or just sending up an extra prayer at night or during the day for us, it reminds what and who we ght for, why we wear this uniform and what makes our country so great. The biggest thing I can say to our supporters is thank you from the bottom of my heart.By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star.com The sound of music will soon encompass the beach as the fth annual Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival kicks off Oct. 17. The free event sprawls across the Forgotten Coast from Mexico Beach to Indian Pass and welcomes Nashvilledwellin, Grammy-winnin country songwriters who have penned tunes for the likes of superstars Faith Hill, Jason Aldean and Garth Brooks. Songwriter Charlie Black and his wife, Dana, who have written hits for George Strait, Alan Jackson, Reba McEntire and many other country crooners, will perform for the fourth time. Years ago the couple traded in the busy streets of Nashville for a relaxing life on the Forgotten Coast, and each and every year, the Songwriters Festival brings their friends to town. The festival will begin on Oct. 17 with a lunchtime happy hour at Triple Tails and the following day, a workshop will be held at Dockside Seafood and Raw Bar, where a panel of songwriters will participate in an informal open discussion on the art and business of songwriting. Topics will include the craft of songwriting, songwriting as a career and music production, followed by a critique for participants who bring a sample along with them. Fellow writers will be able to get insight on the process, event coordinator Jason Bogan said. Its a good place for both novices and seasoned writers to learn from the pros. The festival utilizes a writers round format like those commonly found in Nashville. Each show consists of four performers who trade off playing songs while the other writers can choose to join in with harmonies, extra guitar riffs or rhythm or just sit back and enjoy the tune. Perhaps more fun than hearing these hit songs is learning the stories behind them. The writers are encouraged to offer up the inspiration behind their hits and discuss where they were and what was happening in their lives when they originally put pen to paper. Its the untold story, Bogan said. They share what they were feeling when they wrote it. Its all raw, live, unltered and unplugged, but its laid back and lowkey. Its not just for fans of country music but fans of music and how it was created. Its nice to see the writers of the hits get a little recognition. A lot of serious songs had goofy beginnings, Black said. You never know what youre going to hear. Black said he enjoys hearing and sharing the stories, but for him, the best moments are getting to hear a song the way it sounded right after the songwriter had completed the rst draft. While some of the hit songs are performed similarly to their wellknown counterparts, others might have completely different words, arrangements or be performed on a different instrument altogether. This years event will welcome 27 writers, a new record and a signicant increase from the ve who played the inaugural event in 2008. The rst festival was founded with the idea of keeping things quaint. According to Bogan it was never meant to be rival the size of similar festivals in bigger cities. The rst couple of years, the writers were asking us, Wheres Port St. Joe? laughed Bogan. The growth happened organically as word got around. More writers heard of the festivals success and intimate setting and offered to share their stories. Bogan and fellow organizer Will Rambeaux seek out writers with great energy and an established hit on the radio to participate. Bogan encouraged musicians and music lovers to take advantage and experience the performances in such an intimate environment. He said that each show acts as its own meet-and-greet. The writers are regular folks and theyre ridiculously talented, he said. Everyone is super accessible and theyre happy to come down and share. Black said that he was looking forward to some great music and sharing lunch with old buddies that hed written songs with over the years. Im looking forward to it and its going to be a lot of fun, said Black. The whole town should come out and have a blast. Bogan noted that the festival was designed as a listening event for people to appreciate the songs and be respectful to the writers who in most cases have driven a minimum of nine hours to perform. Proceeds from the event will benet the Coastal Songwriters Education Coalition Inc., a 501(c)(3) not for prot. The Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival runs from Oct. 17-20. To register in advance for the songwriters workshop, visit www.blastonthebay. com. WANT TO HELP?Donations for the Boxes of Love can be dropped off at any branch of Centennial Bank, Piggly Wiggly in Port St. Joe, Harolds Auto Parts in Wewahitchka. An account to help defray shipping costs for the Boxes of Love has been set up at Centennial Bank.Packing local love We E S Lo O Che HE R | The StarThe annual Blast on the Bay Songwriters Festival returns in October with Nashville talent who have written for country music stars George Strait, Faith Hill and Garth Brooks.Blast on the Bay songwriters fest returns to forgotten coastThe festival celebrates the songwriters who normally nd themselves behind the scenes.

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LocalThe Star| A3Thursday, October 3, 2013 DAVIDRICH'S SUPER SATURDAYSale! 5lbbagGoldMedal Flour$188 4lbbagDomino GranulatedSugar$188 Boneless ChickenBreast198lb FREE2LiterSuperChillSodawith$25.00purchaseormore (ecludingbeer,wine,tobacco, lotteryandWesternUnion)16.5ozBoxSelectedVarletles DuncanHines CakeMix DozenFlavorite LargeEggs88 30ozShoppersValue Mayonnaise$198 BigRoll64.4sqfShopperValue PaperTowel88 16ozsqueezeShopperValue Mustard78 16ozpkgShoppersValue SaltineCrackers$118 $ Shoppers B 128ozbltShoppersValue VegetableOil$69820ozbtlShopperValue LiquidDishSoap88128ozbtlShoppersValue Bleach$1384RollPkg88sqfShoppersValue BathTissue88 SHOPPERSVALUEITEMS 48ozbtlWessonVegetable orCanolaOil$198 18.5lbbag,CompleteBlend PurinaDogChow$1098 $598 14.5-15.25ozcan,SelectedVegetablesDelMonte Vegetables8827.8-33.9ozctn,SelectedVarietiesFolgersGround Coffee 88 Hwy71,Wewahitchka,FL|850-639-5343|Hours6am-9pmCST Port St. Joe Commission nalizes scal budgetBy TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com The Port St. Joe City Commission put the final touches on the 2013-14 fiscal year budget during the final public hearing on Monday. The city, in a sense, stayed relatively in place. For the third consecutive year commissioners set a tentative millage rate one mill higher than the current millage to provide flexibility in planning, all the while pledging to return to the beginning. With Mondays unanimous vote commissioners did just that, approving a budget that barely budges and to maintain the current millage rate, 3.5914 mills. A mill is equal to $1 per $1,000 worth of tangible taxable property. The city of Port St. Joe levies the lowest millage in the county. The millage does come with an ever-so slight tax increase. Due to an increase in property values in the city, largely due to the construction and opening of the Dollar Market store on U.S. Highway 98, the millage is above the rollback rate of 3.5798. The rollback rate is that millage at which the identical amount of ad valorem revenue would be generated as the current fiscal year. The tax increase amounts to .32 percent. The city budget includes a 5 percent increase in water and sewer rates, a 3 percent pay increase for employees and a few necessary major capital expenditures. The city also has over $500,000 representing its settlement with BP over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010. Commissioners intend to hold a workshop in the near future to consider spending those funds.By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Two weeks can not pass fast enough for Port St. Joe city commissioners. The board on Tuesday unanimously approved the most recent offer from Regions Bank for renancing the citys $15-plus million in long-term debt. But the interest rate commissioners must pay, 3.41, remains a oating one until the deal closes, which should come in the next two weeks. Weve reviewed this proposal, and it is lowering the rate, said Ralph Roberson of the citys nancial committee. We are locked in for 15 years. There is no penalty (for renance) after seven years. Its as good a deal as we can get right now. During a public budget hearing Monday commissioners tabled a proposal from Regions that included an interest rate of 3.47 percent with a 15-year amortization. That interest rate was above the 3.39 percent in the original offer for renancing the citys long-term debt. We cant do that, said Commissioner Rex Buzzett of the higher rate. Regions returned with a new offer in time for Tuesdays regular bi-monthly meeting with the lower interest rate and the same 15-year term with no penalty for renancing after seven years. Interest rates are about as low as they are likely to be for a while, said City Manager Jim Anderson. Roberson noted that the margin between 3.47 percent and 3.41 percent would represent a roughly $10,000 a month savings for city taxpayers. In addition, Regions provided an index, a kind of sliding scale for broader interest rates which could impact the rate paid by the City Commission, which provides commissioners a cushion to work with if rates go up before closing. The worst case scenario if something crazy happens in the bond market, we dont close, Roberson said. Commissioners have uniformly said if a deal with Regions is not favorable they will shop the renancing in the market. Further, city staff built and commissioners approved Monday a budget that was based on a slightly higher interest rate, allowing further cushion for commissioners in the next two weeks. Renancing the debt prior to December 2014 was critical. In 2015 commissioners faced a balloon payment the entire $15 million with the current loan and annual interest rates would climb to over $1 million this year and next. The renancing will maintain the annual payments just above the current level. The annual payments will be $912,000. It looks like we got a pretty good deal provided we can get it done, Buzzett said. Commissioners approved the deal, which should close in two weeks, Anderson said, pending legal review.Ghost on the CoastCommissioners jumped on board an effort by Reid Avenue merchants and the Chamber of Commerce for assistance with candy for the annual Ghost on the Coast Halloween celebration. At the request of the Chamber, notices will be placed in monthly water bills to solicit donations of candy. City staff will also establish a drop-off point for donations. Downtown merchants spend hundreds of dollars on candy and other goodies for the annual celebration and have sought help the past several years to make the event a success for the children. We are trying to gure out how to help the people downtown and the community, Anderson said.Yard debris amnesty monthCommissioners encourage citizens to take advantage of Road-Side Pick-up Amnesty Month during October as city staff will pick up larger amounts of yard debris, couches, certain large appliances and other items. In essence, the city is expanding its yard debris pickup for October and doing so at no charge to citizens. The city can not collect potentially dangerous items such as treated wood, paint, batteries, etc. Residents are encouraged to visit www.cityofportstjoe. com for a complete list of items that will be collected.Cape San Blas LighthouseAnderson said city staff and its engineers continue to review the two bids received for relocation of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse into the citys George Core Park without a nal resolution. Under normal bid rules, bids are good for 60 days. Anderson said staff is trying to determine if money can be saved through value engineering and other methods to bring down the bid prices, which were roughly $200,000 above what the city has banked thus far for the relocation. Anderson said he hoped to have a recommendation for commissioners at their next meeting in October.Boat launch feesCommissioners will hold a public workshop at 5 p.m. ET Oct. 15, prior to their next bimonthly meeting, to discuss charging fees for use of the city boat ramp. Commissioners encouraged all those who use the boat ramp and adjacent areas for trailer parking to attend and provide input. The goal would be to charge a fee which would be placed in a fund earmarked for improvements to the boat ramp.PSJ, Regions agree on terms for long-term debt Weve reviewed this proposal, and it is lowering the rate. We are locked in for 15 years. There is no penalty (for renance) after seven years. Its as good a deal as we can get right now.Ralph Roberson PSJ nancial committeeInterest rates are about as low as they are likely to be for a while. Jim Anderson city manager

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OPINION www.starfl.com ASectionWhen I was a kid I greatly feared an atomic attack. My feeling was enhanced by the seriousness with which every adult approached the Cold War. I was far too young to understand oxymoron, paradox or even onomatopoeia ... but something didnt sound right here! All the ghting Id ever heard tell of somebody got heated up! A Cold War didnt seem like much of a con ict to me. I understood my age and my place so I didnt say nothing, but that didnt mean I couldnt scratch my head and wonder. It became a little more unsettling when our fth grade teacher passed out the ugly yellow and black colored pamphlets entitled What to do in case of a nuclear attack. The rst thing we had to recognize was the Civil Defense signs that marked the nearest fallout shelter. Those signs were also yellow and black with triangles in the background. I think it was Ricky Hale who pointed out that not only did our little school not have a single fallout shelter, there was not one to be found in the whole town! Now, Im telling this story with my hand up. I went to school one morning thinking Im going to be asked to spell article, and maybe, rari ed and ended up under my desk with my head tucked between my legs. It was in the booklet! We had, as per instruction, air raid drills. We dived under our desks at different speeds depending on whether it was a Red Alert, Blue Alert, Yellow Alert and so on. It was also Ricky who took his life in his hands by leaning out from under his desk and asking, Will this save us if the bomb lands anywhere close to us? That atomic Cold War saber rattling could scar a guy for life! Me and David Mark went to building a fallout shelter just as soon as we got home. It was a good thing we were small. There wasnt much crawl space beneath the oor joist. We pushed the excess dirt to the far reaches of the underpinning and hauled a few loads out to the eld beside Aunt Jessies house. It took us a month to get it where we could stand up in it. David found some old cans of Vienna sausage and I begged Mom for a sleeve of saltine crackers. We hauled in some black walnuts from Mrs. Boazs yard and gured wed be set if this nuclear attack only lasted for a day or two. The very rst Weekly Reader we were exposed to in junior high had a map of Russia right on the front page. That danged country which had us ducking and digging for two years was on the other side of the world! Why would they want to bomb us? We must have really made them mad. And, maybe more to the point, how could they get over here to drop an atomic bomb on us? Course, those Civil Defense folks had done thought of that. We had NORAD, the DEW line across Canada and a Ballistic Missile Early Warning System to alert us to exactly when to sound the CD sirens. I scratched my head again. Why would we put in a Weekly Reader for the whole world to see detailed information about our nuclear missile defense system? Sometimes I think America is not the smartest country on earth. Daddy bought a TV a year or so later and Walter Cronkite kept a close eye on the commies for us. That Khrushchev guy never looked happy in black and white. We played ball, learned to drive, dated, spent some great afternoons out at the clay pits and made plans to graduate and move on, all under the specter of a nuclear attack from the Soviet Union. We raced them to outer space, cheered against them in the Olympics and faced off against them in Berlin, Korea and Cuba. Even Vietnam always seemed to be a pawn in a larger game. Old habits die hard. But the fear slowly left me as the passing years revealed a Russia that seemed more bent on threatening and posturing, than bombing. They toned down the rhetoric and tore down the Wall. Red Alerts and air raid drills drifted into obscurity. I turned my attention to making a living and raising children.. The fear for the safety and welfare of America has once again awakened in my heart. This time is has nothing to do with Russians, Taliban, foreign agents or intercontinental ballistic missiles. I am afraid that America is going to self destruct from the inside out! We rant and rave at each other on the Senate oor, Meet the Press, traf c jams and local get-togethers. My way or no way has become the national yell. We seem more angry and hostile than friendly and hospitable. Its enough to make you re-read Edward Gibbons Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. Leon was the only casualty I know of from the atomic threat in the 1950s. Daddy whipped him when he couldnt nd our hammer. Dad allowed that the oldest son was responsible for the tools. It didnt dawn on Dave or me until it was too late that we had taken that hammer down to our fallout shelter to bust open those walnuts in case of an emergency. Im not sure we can all come out with just a whipping if the bomb blows up from within. Respectfully,Kes Costing taxpayers dollarsDear Editor, Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one Thomas Paine, Common Sense 1776. In Gulf County, the citizens must protect our Community by watching their government closely, insuring it does only the necessary; and identifying, exposing, and punishing the evil whenever and wherever they observe it. It is your DutyCitizen T. Paine In case you missed it, at the last commission meeting the BOCC quickly and quietly reported that they owed their Insurance Companys Attorney $10,000 of our hard-earned tax dollars to respond to a Citizens PAC lawsuit. The suit stemmed from a particularly disgraceful as opposed to the routinely ridiculous BOCC meeting. This one dubbed the Bevy of Circus Clowns during the last election cycle. This $10,000 debacle Commission Meeting was the capstone of their ridiculous efforts (described by a resident in a letter to the editor titled Cops Robbers and Cronies see the STAR April 4, 2013). Simply told it was an attempt to silence the residents of the county by government intimidation that included, lying to or collusion with the State Attorneys Of ce to unleash a bogus investigation of residents whose views they did not like. They hoped/intended to discredit them, intimidate voters, candidates, and The Citizens PAC. (think Obama Abuse of Government Power -IRS). The effort resulted in harassment and slander. Oh by the way, it appears that one resident, Mr. Garth, is still waiting for clari cation or an apology from the SAO, Mr. Hess, resulting from a bogus nding/charge that he was a previously convicted felon. Maybe ole Glenn and his dunkin donut denizens should be the next target of a lawsuit, see evil above. However, not happy with their results they (the BOCC) and a citizen crony engaged in a disgraceful exhibition of dirty politics, slander, and intimidation. If you dont remember it or missed it look it up and watch the County Commission Meeting Oct. 25, 2012. All ve Commissioners, including Bill Williams, who along with Yeager looked like the ring leaders, the County Staff and Attorney all participated either deliberately, or negligently, or just too mentally slow for the job. To paraphrase the crony (it is in the record). None of this activity was necessary; it was a dumb, malicious, dirty politics abuse of government power, not governance. It was evil; lies, conspiracy, cronyism and intimidation. It is time now for the vigilant citizens to do their duty, root it out; four of them are still there. Support Commissioner Bryan the new one who is working to make the Government transparent and only gets harassment and cover up from the Circus Clowns. Get rid of McDaniel and Smiley November 2014, and then get ready to dump the other two. It is intolerable all four owe us $10,000. It is your duty. Do it!Citizen T. Paine A 20 year resident/ Gulf County taxpayer HUNKER DOWNKesley Colbert As fall knocks on our doors, we greet it by opening the windows and enjoying the cooler temperatures. There is nothing like being able to work with the windows open. Im fortunate to have that luxury and I know it. So many new buildings have pretend windows or glass walls that wont allow you to feel the breeze. Baseball season is winding down and the playoffs are getting ready to start. Again, it is my favorite time of year. In my of ce, sit two funny looking wood chairs with the legs sawed off at just below where the stretchers hit the legs. Most folks would have put them by the side of the road for trash. I could never do that There are too many memories associated with those short-legged chairs. Please note that legged is pronounced leg id. My earliest memories of the chairs were about 40 years ago as 10 or 11 year boy. When I would visit the newspaper, I knew where to nd Reese, as everyone called him. He would be over next to the window taking a break sitting in one of the chairs with his knees almost at the same level as his shoulders. One of the legs had broken on the chairs and Mr. Reese sawed the legs off so they could still be used. Mr. Reese was my friend and as I got older, he was the fellow who kept me from doing too many stupid things or getting hurt while I was working at the newspaper. I started working/ getting paid at the newspaper when I was 12, cutting the grass and moving things. As I got older, I got to clean the restrooms, move big rolls of paper and pretty much anything Mr. Reese wanted me to do. However, the best times, were those times sitting in those short-legged chairs taking it easy, as Mr. Reese would say. We would work for 30 minutes or so and Mr. Reese would proclaim, We need to take a break. And we would. Mr. Reese would always justify these breaks by saying my Daddy didnt want me getting hurt or overdoing it. Im pretty sure; especially as Mr. Reese got older that our breaks were because he enjoyed doing nothing and talking about life with me. So did I. Mr. Reese knew all about baseball and knew all about the stars of the old Negro Leagues. He taught me about Cool Papa Bell and Satchel Paige. He looked as if he would have been a good ballplayer in his younger years; he was probably about 60 years older than I. He loved the Atlanta Braves, although through the years that I worked at the newspaper, the Braves were never very good. But still, we talked baseball and about other topics a grandfather would talk to his grandson about. When I look at those chairs, I can almost hear Mr. Reese humming a little tune, tat a tat tat tat. He was a like a blues or jazz singer stuck on the same tune. His humming seemed to be loudest on Fridays, particularly paydays. As I got older and was allowed to drive the newspapers van, I would chauffeur Mr. Reese over to a house where they seemed to selling something in Dixie Cups out the backdoor. He seemed to hum a little louder when we would make those stops on Friday afternoons. That was ok. Mr. Reese didnt even own a car or want one; he caught rides back and forth to work. He was a good man, who enjoyed life and took it easy, a lesson that we all need from time to time when we get in a hurry. Whatever was in the Dixie Cups seemed to get him in a little trouble at home though, because his wife, Ms. Helen, did not approve of it. Ms. Helen was a school teacher and one of the best cooks around. She made these pecan candy things that I was always happy to help eat when I would go over to Mr. Reeses house, which was pristine. Mr. and Mrs. Reese never had children. They would have been good parents. To the day he died, Mr. Reese thought it was his fault that they lost the one child that she was carrying. He told me the story many times. Mrs. Reese was pregnant, he brought a frog home in a paper bag and opened the bag and showed it to her. Soon after, she lost the baby. It was heartbreaking, but he really thought the frog scared the baby out of her. Some folks might call that simple-minded. Mrs. Reese passed away and without her guidance and friendship, he didnt last very long afterwards. I have the short-legged chairs, the memories and I dont care what was in the Dixie Cups. Simple people make the best friends. Find more stories at www.CranksMyTractor.com.Short-legged chairs and Dixie cups CRANKS MY TRACTORBN HeardLeon Victim Of Nuclear FalloutPage 4 Thursday, October 3, 2013 USPS 518-880Published every Thursday at 135 W. U.S. 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Star P.O. Box 308 Port St. Joe, FL 32457-0308 Phone 850-227-1278 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PORT ST. JOE, FL 32457 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editons. Circulation:1-800-345-8688 DisgracefulDear Editor, Well I watched the televised BOCC meeting and I want to thank Commissioners Bryan and McDaniel for standing up for the minority of Gulf Countians who actually pay ad valorem taxes. As to the other three commissioners that was quite a display of Texas 2 stepping and socialism in action. Those of us who fund this county can only hope that county wide voting becomes a reality so as to achieve a more responsible BOCC. With all the constructive options that were presented to you, three of you chose to stick it to the few who pay the bills. Cant wait for the day I can vote for or against all board members who decide how much to tax the few.Tom KnocheGulf County resident and taxpayerThanks for Mosquito ControlDear Editor, With all the emphasis on tourism and events to draw tourists to our area, some things are just taken for granted. This summer, once again, was a banner season for those who thrive on the tourist trade. We at Happy Ours Kayak & Bike Outpost, after 13 years of doing business in Gulf County, have learned that those summer months are crucial to our survival. This season we had a tremendous amount of rainfall, creating ideal breeding conditions, but the familiar hum of the mosquito truck making its nightly rounds assured us a bug-free morning. Let me backtrack about 10 years when we literally met our customers at their cars with a can of OFF so they could rent a kayak and escape the mosquitos in the safety of St. Joseph Bay. Imagine the effect on bed taxes if we had to hand out bug suits along with keys to the rental homes when visitors checked in. I dare not even mention the risk of illness from mosquitoborne disease. Each time Mosquito Control sprays our area, I make a note on my calendar. They are so diligent compared to the old days that I hear them spraying even during the dry periods. So I called one day to ask why they sprayed when there was no rain. Mark Cothran answered my question succinctly when he said, We have traps at Dead Mans Curve about mile from you and they are full, so were taking action. Wow! I was impressed. Not only were they taking preventative measures, I got a straightforward response. It reminded me of what the great baseball player Willie Mays said when they asked him why he was so good. He replied, They throw the ball. I hit it. They hit the ball. I catch it. The purpose of this letter is to give praise to the Gulf County Mosquito Control for advances made by their research, technology and hard work. Im sure their funding has been cut like most public projects, but they still get the job done. Just imagine what they could do about biting ies if given the responsibility. So next time you are sitting at the Scallop Festival or watching the sunset from your outdoor balcony or waiting for a table at the Raw Bar, take note of the absence of mosquitos that would normally drive you away. Even with all the rains of this summer, we can thank someone who was out there throwing the ball and hitting it ... with a big y swatter. Thank you Gulf County Mosquito Control,Dan VanVleetHappy Ours Letters to the EDITOR

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LocalThe Star| A5Thursday, October 3, 2013has undertaken repairs of the project that number in the hundreds, from xing pipes to, this week, placing ll dirt in areas where pipes have popped up, not fully connected, above ground. This beyond the original price tag, which Clerk of Courts Becky Norris said at a recent BOCC meeting was over $1 million. When he rst came before the BOCC Koran provided a list of questions he wanted answered by commissioners and got no response in a subsequent meeting. Commissioner Carmen McLemore suggested staff did not have time to research the particulars of the project and said questions ought to be directed to the State Attorney. McLemore was the lone member of the current board who voted on the Americus Ditch project, casting a dissenting vote. When Koran initially approached the board, McLemore fundamentally agreed with the faults with the project. That is our $1 million pipe that doesnt work, McLemore said. However, Commissioner Joanna Bryan ran into a wall from fellow commissioners when she pressed the subject. Commissioners said at the rst meeting in September they had no desire to look backward at a project bid and constructed more than six years ago. I want to move this county forward, said Commissioner Warren Yeager. Commissioners approved by a 4-1 vote, Bryan dissenting, to have county administrator Don Butler decide the legitimacy of requests for information; the jail and Americus Ditch were hot button topics as Bryan was seeking information on those two in addition to how road bond money had been spent in the past. Commissioners also voted in the past two months to reafrm that contract negotiations be overseen by Butler and county attorney Jeremy Novak. But Bryan noted last week that the Americus Ditch project remains a problem, with constituents calling her about the ongoing issues with the project in St. Joe Beach. Bryan said her original questions about the project were as much centered on Americus Ditch as county policy for bidding and letting contracts, particularly $1 million contracts. This is a poster child for the wrong way to do business, Bryan said. It concerns me about how many other projects have been done this way and the exposure for liability. Brad Bailey, whose company was the contractor on the project, and Ralph Rish from Preble Rish Engineers appeared before the BOCC to clarify what they said were false statements made about the project. Rish acknowledged there were problems with the project and pledged that Preble Rish would assist the county in addressing those problems. Bryan said she intended to hold Rish to that promise, noting that the problems, despite the comments from commissioners, continue with little relief for residents in the area. Localbankerswhoknowbusiness.AtCapitalCityBank,weknowrunningabusinessisnteasy.Ittakesdrive,dedication andhardworktokeepthedoorsopen.Andwhileweofferplentyofinnovativetools andservicestohelpbusinesseslikeyours,wealsoknowthatitsourpeoplewhoreally makethedifference. Ourbankersareyourneighbors,customersandfriends,withtheexperiencethatmakes ourbusinesstherightchoiceforyours.Callorvisitusonlinetolearnmore.Wellbehere withafamiliarfaceandahelpinghandwhenyourereadytoputustoworkforyou. 850.229.2110 www.ccbg.com/businessSandyPrice |CommunityBanker been a swamp and for many years the spoils of canal dredging had been put in the area which according to soil borings has made the ground unstable for the rst 15 feet below the surface. Its been a year since the city has seen additional insurance money and Cathey insisted that the insurance adjustors were simply dragging out the claim in hopes that the city would get frustrated and quit ghting for additional money. He told the council that his biggest fear was that if the Parker house was torn down, the insurance company would consider the claim closed and no additional monies would be paid. We have to dot our Is and cross our Ts before we put that building in a dumpster, said Cathey. Previously, Cathey had provided a bid that included the costs of improving the foundation and rebuilding on the existing structure, but Councilwoman Tanya Castro asked to see numbers on the cost of a new structure. The insurance company called the building a total loss, said Castro. We need to move forward. Castro said that after comparing the bottom lines, shed be better informed to make a nal decision on how to proceed. The project has been at a standstill for two years and Cathey was eager for the council to provide some direction. An executive meeting to review the costs will be scheduled for early October. PARKER HOUSE from page A1Both were ultimately dismissed with prejudice. In dismissing the case, the court left each side to bear their own legal costs. Carr sued the city, her estranged husband Billy Carr, Jr. and police ofcers Jake Richards and David Garner, accusing them of violating her constitutional right against illegal search and seizure as well as abuse of power and abuse of process. Lynne Carr also sued Port St. Joe Mayor Mel Magidson, but he was dismissed from the case nearly two months ago. Another allegation against her husband, that he was carrying a gun at the time of the incident, had been disproved during discovery depositions. The allegations centered on an incident in December 2011 while the Carrs were separated and divorcing. The allegations detailed actions taken by the police ofcers and Billy Carr in removing Lynne Carr from the three businesses her husband owned and she managed, including a orist, wedding planner and boutique. Lynne Carr was terminated from the businesses by her husband and ordered to turn over all property belonging to the business. Lynne Carr alleged she was illegally forced to turn over marital property that was subject to the divorce proceedings. It is ridiculous the amount of money this cost the taxpayers of Port St. Joe and myself, Billy Carr said. She also alleged the police ofcers illegally used a drug dog to sniff out any potential contraband on Lynne Carrs person. She alleged that search, which followed a similar search of the businesses, lacked probable cause. We knew it would end this way, said Richards. We did not do the things the afdavit stated and we would just like our reputations restored now that the case has been cleared. We were never under (conducting) any investigation and did not violate any policy and surely did not violate the constitutional rights we are sworn to protect. Frivolous lawsuits have become an every day part of law enforcement over the years. Most are led then dropped. Some are settled to save taxpayers money on attorney fees. I feel as though it was a personal attack to diminish our reputations. LaA WsuSUIT from page A1 I am not doing anything but putting in my time, Wade said with the Cheshire smile and gleaming eyes with which she greets every patient. My kids are all grown. What else would I do? she said with a shrug belying the boundless heart beneath. Therein lays the beauty, the grace of Nellie Ann Wade who came out of the military as a nurse and found her way to the small community of Wewahitchka, where what passed for major thoroughfares were dirt roads. She came here out of the military and just t right in, said Feraldine Greer. Her energy level is just phenomenal. Since 1946 or so, she has aided a lineage of medical professionals from Wewahitchka, named Anderson, Canning and, for the past 15 years, Barnes, who would attest he remains active in signicant part due to Wade. And through those decades, she has helped raise generations, knowing them by name just as they know her, especially for those shots which go in smooth as warm butter. She is a legend, said Christy Smith, receptionist at Barnes ofce. Everybody knows her and she knows everybody. First thing when anybody in town feels bad, they call to see Ms. Nellie. Shes a go-getter. She knows just what to tell people, how to make them feel better. Shes just Ms. Nellie. She is one of a kind. I tell her all the time when I grow up I want to be like her. But as was clear last Saturday, there is really only one Nellie Wade. As Smith said, They broke the mold. And as the community gathered to feast, enjoy a birthday cake, hand out presents to their nurse, their neighbor, their loved one, they treasured that the mold wasnt broken until Nellie Ann Wade arrived in Georgia some 90 years ago. She has been a blessing to this community over the years, said one speaker. She has been a shining spirit for this community. NeELLIeE from page A1We are very restricted on how we could use those funds, said Sheriff Mike Harrison. Mandatory garbage pickup was kicked down the road by commissioners who set a referendum for November 2014 to consider a sales tax to fund mandatory garbage. These are no-brainers to me, Hardman said of the measures discussed and not implemented. She said she found some bacon but not a lot of fat in the budget but noted a reserve balance of nearly $5 million. I nd that incompetent that commissioners did not do more to ease the burden on property taxpayers, Hardman added. You need to spread the cost of operating the county to those who use it and can afford it. You are going to have the exact same problems next year. The budget vote had urgency as last week was the nal budget hearing and commissioners had to gavel the meeting with a budget formalized. McDaniel, echoing Hardman, said he wanted to dip into reserves to close the tax increase margin, but found early resistance from McLemore and Bryan. McDaniel and McLemore swapped gures, as if at a bargaining table, on how much would be palatable to take from reserves, but the numbers never narrowed sufciently. I do not support going into reserves, Bryan said. Im not in favor of a tax increase and I am not in favor of going into reserves. After the board took two recesses in an attempt to calm emotions and arrive at a solution, McLemore challenged the dissenters, Bryan and McDaniel, for places to further cut the budget. Bryan said she had raised a number of issues, from considering the operational costs of a $1.2 million jail that was out of compliance with Model Jail Standards to mandatory garbage, and found herself roundly shut out by her fellow commissioners. I have been told not to even discuss them, Bryan said. Ive discussed (these) many times and you have no interest in supporting (them). I am not in favor of raising taxes if we are not being good stewards of the taxpayers money. McDaniel said he had suggested at the last public budget hearing that commissioners comb through department budgets line by line but the suggestion gained no traction. While the individual savings in a given department might not add up to much, McDaniel said, savings could be found, but commissioners squandered the opportunity. We had plenty of time to look at this stuff, McDaniel said. County administrator Don Butler said he had a conference call with the countys bond consultant and said the consultant would want to know if a tax increase was not passed would the county use reserves or cut expenditures. And, Butler said, would the county continue to spend more than is coming in on the revenue side? Both questions, Butler said, could impact the countys bond rating. If we live above our means we have to pay the price someday, Butler said. During an extended recess McDaniel thought he had brokered a deal by which the BOCC would dip into reserves, not purchase an excavator for Public Works and make other smaller cuts to arrive at a tax increase in the neighborhood of $100,000 or less. One by one commissioners, save Bryan, went into a back room with staff to discuss the parameters but as commissioners gathered back together, after nearly 40 minutes, Butler entered the meeting room with a phone. He said county attorney Jeremy Novak, also connected by phone, indicated that if Yeager was linked by audio and video to the meeting, he could vote. I felt blindsided, McDaniel said later. Yeager, not present during any of the nearly three hours of discussion, cast the vote to approve the budget with tax increase. Weve got to show some leadership, Yeager said. We have to move forward with the countys business. This is a tough call. At the end of the day we are going to have to address a lot of this next year. BOCC from page A1 WES LOCHER | The StarPipes, unconnected, popping from the ground have been an ongoing problem since the Americus Ditch project was constructed more than six years ago. DITchCH from page A1

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Email outdoors news to tcroft@ star .comwww.starfl.comSection Section A I am the rose of Sharon, and the lily of the valleys. As the lily among thorns, so is my love among the daughters. As the apple tree among the trees of the wood, so is my beloved among the sons. I sat down under his shadow with great delight, and his fruit was sweet to my taste. The Song of SongsThe rose of Sharon is a common name used for several unrelated plants. In our area, it is commonly identi ed as althea, properly named Hibiscus syriacus. Althea is de nitely not the original rose of Sharon, since it is native to East Asia. Scholars think the plant in the poem was probably Pancratium maritimum, a lily commonly known as the sea daffodil. Nevertheless, our althea is worthy of use in local gardens because it produces abundant blooms and grows remarkably well here. An early introduction to American gardens, it was probably carried over by Dutch or English colonials. Although naturally a multi-stemmed shrub, this plant can be trained through pruning to a single trunked tree. It can also be trained for espalier and hedges. Other than regular pruning to prevent weediness, this plant requires little attention. Watering and fertilizer should be kept to a minimum. Althea prefers full to partial sun in our area, is heat and salt tolerant and likes dry feet. While it is deciduous, it remains green most of the year here and can bloom year round. It can be propagated by cuttings but be aware that it will grow from seed and can produce numerous volunteer shoots. Unfortunately, these are generally hybrids lacking the characteristics of the parent plant including ower color. The commonest criticism of althea is the color of the owers can be muddy, so be sure to choose your plant when it is in bloom. Flowers come in shades of red, pink, white and purple. Althea can reach 10 feet in height. Dwarf varieties, which only grow to six feet tall, are available. Although they are strong growers, especially older plants might experience a variety of problems, most of which can be solved by pruning or adjusting water and fertilizer. The commonest pest of althea is aphids, which accumulate at the tips of stems, causing new growth to be misshapen. Aphids may cover the leaves with sticky honeydew, which turns black when infected by sooty mildew. Aphids can be dislodged with highpressure water sprays or pruned off with infested foliage. Be sure to remove pruned greenery from the garden. Over-fertilizing increases aphid infestations. Japanese beetles are particularly fond of the owers. Leaf spot is a symptom of bacterial infection. Pick off and destroy the infected leaves. Canker can cause bright, reddishorange fruiting bodies to appear on the bark. Prune out infected branches. Flowers are subject to fungus. After pruning a diseased plant, always clean tools in bleach before using on another plant. Bud drop can be caused by too much or too little water or over fertilization. The owers of althea, both dried and fresh, were traditionally used as a winter tea and contain abundant antioxidants. Urban Forager a website produced by the University of Georgia wrote, Besides the obvious use as a garnish, the owers of Rose of Sharon can be chopped and added to dishes, or left whole for salads. They make colorful, edible, presentation cups for dips. The leaves are edible when cooked, and can be added to quiche or greens. Unripe seedpods are also edible. Flower buds contain mucilage, a gooey medicinal compound made of polysaccharides. This substance has been used to treat burns, wounds, gastric ulcers and internal and external in ammation and irritation, such as sore throats or urinary tract infections. The bark is being studied for cancer inhibiting properties. The Chinese use the root bark as an antifungal remedy. 4514339 You're Invited To Join Us Wednesday, October 16, 2013, 5-7pm ET FISHING ARTIFICIAL LURES IN THE FALL WEEKLYALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDETABLESMONTHLYAVERAGESTondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthesegivenforAPALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17 EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27 Tondthetidesofthefollowingareas,subtractthe indicatedtimesfromthosegivenforCARRABELLE: HIGH LOW BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03 SponsortheWEEKLYALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow%Precip Thu,Oct.384 7555% Fri,Oct.483 7770% Sat,Oct.581 7282% Sun,Oct.686 7255% Mon,Oct.784 6555% Tues,Oct.883 6311% Wed,Oct.983 6941% OUTDOORSPage 6 Thursday, October 3, 2013By Tom Baird The fringe of St. Joseph Bay and certain islands in the bay, St. Vincent Island, St. Vincent Sound, Apalachicola Bay, and numerous nearby coastal sites all contain the remains of Indian middens. The dictionary de nes a midden as an area of an archaeological site that contains domestic refuse such as food waste, broken pottery, and pieces of other household artifacts, indicating long-term human occupation. In other words, a midden was where the Native Americans discarded their trash. To the archaeologist and biologist these sites are a window into how early peoples lived and used the bay, and they are an encyclopedia of what creatures lived in St. Joseph Bay in the past and how people used them. For instance, oyster shells are not common in middens on St. Joseph Bay because the bay has a high salinity, very little freshwater ows into St. Joseph Bay, and oysters prefer estuarine conditions with a good mixing of salt and freshwater. If the Indians wanted oysters, they went to nearby St. Vincent Sound or Apalachicola Bay, and the midden sites there are mainly huge piles of oyster shells. Besides sh, here they mainly came for the big conchs and whelks. The prehistoric refuse piles around St. Joseph Bay (the earliest sites date to 1000 B.C.) are lled with the eroding shells of lightning whelks, horse conchs, and crown conchs, all of which still inhabit the bay. The most obvious of the three in middens is the lightning whelk or left-handed whelk, Busycon contrarium. This was valuable to the early peoples in several important ways. First, it was a source of meat, although to eat the esh of the lightning whelk is, as one archaeologist said, like eating shoe leather. Indeed the meat of the lightning whelk has the consistency of the soles of your sneakers. Properly prepared, queen conch fritters are delicious, and the meat of the related knobbed whelk or the cold-water channeled whelk, Busycotypus canaliculatus, is the basis of the Italian dish scungilli. How the Indians prepared lightning whelk meat isnt known, but it might have been dried or smoked and eaten like jerky. The second use was for tools. This was especially necessary here because the nearest source of tool grade stone was up in present-day Calhoun or Jackson Counties, a 50-mile collecting trip or obtained by trade. Throughout Florida, the Indians would haft the shell onto a stick to use it as a hoe. Parts of the shell became scrappers, and the hard, massive central column of the shell (the columella) could be fashioned into hammers, punches and awls. The third use was for their ceremonial drinking cups for black drink. Black drink was and is made from brewing the lightly roasted leaves of yaupon holly, Ilex vomitoria, the only plant in North America to contain caffeine. Ilex grows in healthy profusion around the bay and in the gulf coastal zone. The use of black drink in ceremonies and its association with the lightening whelk shell was so common that the shells were traded as far away as present-day Wisconsin and Oklahoma. Inscribed with religious symbols, the shell drinking cups are often found in the graves of high-status individuals, sort of like being buried with your favorite coffee mug. This use of the Busycon shell in black drink ceremonies also meant it was in demand as a trade item, and doubtless many of the mollusk shells collected in our bay were collected to trade. If people were collecting the left-handed whelk here for thousands of years, it is a brief time compared to how long these mollusks have been around. Fossil shells of these whelks date back 60 million years. They are endemic to the southeastern United States, and range from New Jersey to Florida. They feed almost exclusively on clams, using their muscular foot to grasp the clam and using the lip of their shells to wedge the clam shells apart. The whelk then inserts its mouth and rasps the esh away with its radula a le-like device with horny teeth possessed by many gastropod mollusks. These whelks can attain very large sizes, some over 16 inches long. The shells less than 7 inches often have axial brown streaks that sort of look like lightening bolts, hence one common name for the mollusks lightning whelk. The larger shells are usually all white or cream-colored. The other common name, lefthanded whelk, derives from the fact that it is one of very few species of gastropods whose shell spirals to the left. Almost all snail shells spiral to the right. Pick up a univalve shell at the beach or in the bay and hold it so that the apex, the point of the shell, is facing toward you. The opening will always be on your right, unless you are holding a lightning whelk and the opening is on the left. If the shell is large enough, another way is to insert one hand and then the other hand in the shell. The hand that curls naturally in the same direction as the shell is coiled indicates the handedness. Many people nd the long, coiled egg cases of these whelks washed onto the beach or drifting on the bay bottom. The whelks lay their eggs in linearly attached disc-like capsules and the whole strand looks like a Hawaiian lei. There may be up to 200 eggs in each capsule, and 50 175 capsules in a string. The young pass through all of their larval stages within the capsule and emerge as miniature snails. While many people love to collect seashells, the left-handed whelk is an important component of the bay ecosystem, and one should never collect the live animal, no matter how pretty the shell is. Likewise, the smaller empty shells should be left in the bay also. They are homes to hermit crabs. Many a tourist has brought home a beautiful shell as a souvenir, only to have a smelly mess of a rotting hermit crab on their porch, and the shell is thrown out. St. Joseph Bay is a great place to see the large whelks as they feed in the clear shallow waters. Enjoy them, and re ect on how important this big whelk was to the early people who lived here. Tom Baird has been a sheries biologist, high school and community college teacher (oceanography and microbiology), director of a science and environmental center, teacher of science and principal in Pinellas County as well as an educational consultant. He retired from the Florida Department of Education and he and his wife divide their time between Tallahassee and Cape San Blas.Rose of Sharon remains traditional favorite BUDS N BUGSLois Swoboda Middens a window into how early people livedSpecial to the Star SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomGag grouper continue to show up in shallow water this week, especially around the Car Body site. Soaking pinfish is the best bet. Live pinfish are plentiful and great baits. Kingfish are still hanging around near-shore structures and in the channels. Flounder have slowed down but some continue to be caught at Jetty Park at the Port St. Joe Marina and under the George Tapper Bridge. The freshwater is moving out and the water is clearing up. Redfish are picking up and the trout have picked up as well in the bay. Many good slot-sized redfish have been caught under the George Tapper Bridge, along with flounder.

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PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA PORT ST. JOE WEWAHITCHKA SPORTS www.starfl.com ASection 850.229.5200WWW.DOCKSIDESEAFOODANDRAWBAR.COM CATCHALLTHEGAMEDAYACTION ATDOCKSIDE! GAMEDAY &DAILYGAME SPECIALSMon-Fri:11am-8:30pm Sat-Sun:11am-9pm HAPPYHOUR ANDFOOD&DRINKSPECIALS 3:306:30PM BRINGYOURFRIENDS&GETHOOKED! $4,500,000 $500,000 $1,500,000 $2,500,000 $3,500,000 $4,500,000 $0 $1,000,000 $2,000,000 $3,000,000 $4,000,000 $5,000,000 GOAL enewCollegeofAppliedStudiesatFSUPanamaCitywasapprovedby theFSUBoardofTrusteesinJune2010andallowsthecampustomore easilyrespondtoworkforceneedsinourarea.WeinviteyoutosupporteCampaignforOurCommunitysUniversitybyhelpingusbuildan endowmentfortomorrowsjobs.Ourgoalistoestablisha$5million endowmentfortheCollegeofAppliedStudiesby2017,whichwillallow FSUPanamaCitytoestablishstudentscholarships,implementnew degreeprogramsandprovidenewequipmentandtechnology. Tolearnhowyoucansupportourcommunitysuniversity,contactMary BethLovingoodat(850)770-2108ormblovingood@pc.fsu.edu. THECAMPAIGNFOROURCOMMUNITYSUNIVERSITYEndowmentforTomorrowsJobs SUPPORTOUR COMMUNITYS UNIVERSITY Thursday, October 3, 2013Star Staff ReportWewahitchka managed just seven offensive plays from scrimmage in the rst half Friday night as the Gators hosted Franklin County. On the ip side, those seven plays helped produce a 26-0 halftime lead. The Gators (1-4) rushed for over 250 yards and dominated the winless Seahawks in a 40-14 contest decided by halftime. Wewahitchka had the ball for only seven offensive plays in the opening half, but Jonathan Palmer rushed 45 yards in the rst quarter to stake the Gators to an early lead. The lead bulged in the second period as Javar Hill scored on a runs of 15 and 25 yards and Willie Hill put the icing on an impressive rst half by scooping up a fumble at the Seahawks 35 and running in for the touchdown. Rashard Ranie continued the onslaught when he dashed 54 yards for a third-quarter touchdown and Shannon Jones, getting some varsity playing time, covered 16 yards on the ground for the Gators nal score. Peter Setterich was 4 for 6 on extra-point kicks for Wewahitchka. Ranie, who attempted just one pass which fell incomplete, rushed for 111 yards. Palmer added 53 rushing yards and Javar Hill 42. Burley Parker and Ervin Maiben each rushed for 31 yards and Jones added his 16-yard touchdown. Parker also had an interception to go with Willie Hills fumble recovery touchdown. The Gators host North Bay Haven for Homecoming at 7 p.m. CT this Friday. Special to The StarWe encourage everyone to participate in this organization to create a strong program that will directly bene t children in our community. The following positions need to be lled and are very important for the success of our program: President; AAA vice president; Ozone vice president; secretary; equipment manager; and concession manager. The league returns three of cers. The board meeting will be 3 p.m. ET on Sunday, Oct. 13 at the STAC House on Eighth Street in Port St. Joe. If you have any questions or would like to participate and cannot attend the meeting, please contact Bobby at 527-3707 or Carly at 481-6631 or Carly.Pickels@gmail.com. By RANDAL SEYLER Halifax Media Group CHIPLEY Chipley rushed for 368 yards to overcome Port St. Joe 28-16 Friday at Philip Rountree Stadium in a nondistrict Class 1A game between teams with playoff aspirations. Kobe McCrary rushed for 177 yards and two touchdowns on 23 carries and Darren Stewart added 165 yards and a TD on only seven attempts for the Tigers, 3-1. The Tiger Sharks dropped to 3-2. The victory wasnt secured until Chipley rallied from a 16-14 de cit with the nal two touchdowns. The Tigers defense also played a major role, stopping Port St. Joe inside the Tigers 10 on the opening possession of the game. Port St. Joes Dewayne Griggs, Jasmin Thomas and Aaron Paul combined to roll up 45 yards following a 30-yard kickoff return by Griggs. But Chipley recovered a Port St. Joe fumble inside the 10. We did a good job offensively, said Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon of his Tiger Sharks who amassed 292 total yards. But we had a couple of mistakes that hurt us. A holding penalty negated a 60-yard run by McCrary and neither team was able to do much damage the remainder of the rst quarter. The second quarter began with Port St. Joes Thomas scrambling with a fake punt on fourth-and-5 to the Chipley 12. Again the Tigers defense held, and a eld goal by Port St. Joes Drew Lacour gave the Tiger Sharks a 3-0 edge. Stewart produced a 67-yard sprint on Chipleys next series to the Port St. Joe 5. McCrary went up the middle for the touchdown and Chipley led 6-3 lead with 8:59 left in the half. Thats a tough place to play, Gannon said. They use McCrary, who is a big back, and then they come back with a scat back. They are a tough team to defend. But I thought we played hard all night. Overall we played well as a team, again. Port St. Joe went threeand-out and punted the ball back to Chipley. The Tigers took over at their 47 and within six plays were threatening. McCrary had a key run inside the 20 and Zack Campbell went the nal 7 yards to score. McCrarys conversion made it 14-3 with 4:23 left in the second quarter. The Sharks responded by driving 66 yards in eight plays, Griggs (a team-high 108 rushing yards and 16 total tackles) nding the end zone on a sweep from the 4. Lacours point-after was blocked and the Sharks had closed to 14-9. McCrary had a 42-yard run shortly before intermission, but Port St. Joe held him out of the end zone at the 2 on the nal play of the half. The Tigers Sharks reclaimed the lead on their rst possession of the third quarter. A nine-play, 50-yard drive culminated in Paul (98 rushing yards) scoring from the 5 and Lacours kick made it 16-14. The lead was short-lived. Twentyve seconds later Stewart ran 70 yards to put the Tigers back on top and McCrarys second conversion made it 22-16. With 4:18 to play McCrary broke free from a swarm of Port St. Joe defenders at the 50 and went the distance to punctuate a hardfought triumph. Star News Editor Tim Croft contributed to this reportChipley runs past Port St. Joe Wewa routs Franklin for 1st victory Page 7Dixie board members neededStar Staff ReportThe Port St. Joe Jr./Sr. High School volleyball team suffered two defeats against tough squads sandwiched around a win over West Gadsden. The Lady Tiger Sharks lost in straight sets to North Bay Haven and in four sets to Liberty County but swept West Gadsden. The Lady Tiger Sharks are 10-6 overall and 5-3 in the district. The week began with a visit from Liberty County and both varsity and junior varsity matches followed a similar theme: Port St. Joe winning the rst match and losing the next three. The junior varsity lost 25-12, 22-25, 21-25 and 18-25. The varsity fell by scores of 25-18, 23-25, 21-25 and 18-25. They were both hardfought matches, said Port St. Joe coach Wayne Taylor. For the JV, Halie Jasinski had eight kills and for the varsity Shannon Pridgeon had 10. The following night Port St. Joe traveled to West Gadsden and overwhelmed the far younger team in a varsity-only match. Port St. Joe had 44 service aces and 13 kills in sweeping the three games. On Thursday, North Bay Haven came calling for what Taylor called two more hard-fought matches. The junior varsity took the opening game but lost the next two and the match by scores of 25-14, 22-25 and 11-15. The junior varsity is 6-4 overall, 3-2 in the district. The varsity fell in straight sets 20-25, 23-25 and 21-25. The close scores of the sets are indicative of how hard the ladies battled for the match, Taylor said. North Bay Haven played a very fundamentally sound match and we just never could really pull ahead. Port St. Joe travels to South Walton tonight. On Monday the team will travel to Bristol for another district match at Liberty County. Tuesday night Port St Joe will play its nal district match at home against the Franklin County Lady Seahawks. PSJ volleyball endures dif cult stretch COURTESY OF STEVE WHEALTONSophomore Callie Fleshren serves against Bozeman earlier this season.COURTESY OF STEVE WHEALTONCarter Thacker (21) and the Tiger Sharks rushed for 234 yards against Chipley. WANT TO GO?Port St. Joe hosts Franklin County 7:30 p.m. ET Friday for Homecoming. WANT TO GO?The Gators host North Bay Haven 7 p.m. CT Friday for Homecoming.

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LocalA8 | The Star Thursday, October 3, 2013 1113270 THESPECIALTYMEDICALCENTER VincentIvers,M.D.BCIM CSSKINCANCERcanbepresentwithoutyouknowingit. CALLtodayforaskincancerscreening. www.iversmd.com VINCENTIVERS,M.D.301TwentiethStreet PortSt.Joe,FL32456850-227-7070Mon-Tue-Thurs&Fri 9am-6pm Wed&Sat 9am-2pmALLMAJORINSURANCEACCEPTED SERVICES 4514365 Special to The StarTapper & Company Properties Management announces the hiring of Lynn Costin Marshall as the new General Manager of the historic, 100year-old Port Inn in Port St. Joe. As a graduate of Georgia State University with a degree in hotel and restaurant management and the past executive director of the Mexico Beach, Tourism and Visitors Bureau, Lynn brings her special talents to the established team known to deliver the best hospitality experience in the area. We feel that Lynn is the perfect t for the Port Inn. Her lively personality and attention to detail will be a tremendous addition as we continue to do our best for every guest, every day; delivering a rst class hospitality experience here in Port Saint Joe. Jason Bogan, vice president, said. February of this year marked the 10-year anniversary of the re-creation and re-opening of the Port Inn in the heart of downtown Port Saint Joe. With its growth and the success of the added amenities like its daily hot breakfast service and an expanded dinner menu and service hours, Tapper & Company wanted to re-af rm their commitment to the historic Inn and the guests they serve. It has been four years since the Port Inn has had a dedicated General Manager. With Dave Ashbrook responsible for the Mainstay Suites and Jason concentrating on systems and processes at both properties, it has come time for someone to focus all their time and attention again on the Port Inn. I look forward to providing an exceptional experience for each and every guest that visits the Port Inn and the Thirsty Goat Bar and Grill, Marshall said. This summer has seen many new additions, including the successful opening of the Port Cottages directly behind the Inn. These cozy cottages give families the opportunity to stay together with two bedrooms, 1.5 bathrooms, and a full kitchen. The addition of the cottages to our inventory provides tremendous exibility to our guests. Sometimes it is nice to have a larger space to stay with your family and family pet, Marshall said. Marshall will also be working on creating more events for the Thirsty Goat Bar and Grill. The Lounge currently has Martini Mondays and Wine-Down Wednesdays and live music every Friday and Saturday evening. I am excited about the energy Lynn brings to the Tapper team. I have asked her to develop new events that can take place at the Port Inn that will include more and varied live music, arts and events the entire family can enjoy. I believe Lynn will help us continue to make the Port Inn and the Thirsty Goat two of the most inviting and memorable locations in Gulf County and on the Forgotten Coast, said David Warriner, President of Tapper & Company. For more information on the Port Inn, call 850-229-7678 or email Lynn directly at Lynn@ PortInnFL.com. By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@star .com Its safe to say that the T.H. Stone St. Joseph Peninsula State Park was fully appreciated last Saturday. The Friends of St Joseph State Park hosted its annual State Park Appreciation Day at Eagle Harbor on Cape San Blas. Held in conjunction with National Public Lands Day, the morning kicked off with a shoreline cleanup to keep the park pristine. Information booths and environment displays surrounded Eagle Harbor and shared information with the 300 attendees about wildlife, park history and sea turtles. A low-country shrimp boil fed hungry Friends and visitors alike, while Scallop Cove provided free ice cream for the kids. Friends president Dewey Blaylock estimated the event welcomed 70 percent more attendees than last years and had four times as many new members enroll. Were really pleased with the membership increase, Blaylock said. I think we accomplished what we set out to do. A sandcastle competition took place on the beach while local band Sonic Tonic kept revelers entertained with a mix of cover songs from years past. The park getting the stage was an incredible addition, Blaylock said. Attendees were treated to ample seating or took in the festivities from the comfort of their boats. A volunteer staff of 25 kept the event running smoothly and beautiful weather kept spirits high. It was the rst time on the board for Friends marketing director and events coordinator, Crystal Follin. Given this was her rst time promoting the event through a website, social media and yers she said she was happy with the turnout for the event. It was a great event and the weather was perfect, Follin said. There were so many families, and everyone was in a great mood. The Friends of St Joseph State Park is a non-profit organization that provides support to missions at T. H. Stone St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. The park is home to a shoreline named in 2002 as the top beach in the world and last summer, destination website Americas Best Online, named St. Joseph Peninsula State Park the top state park in the country. SPECIAL TO THE STARFrom left, Dave Ashbrook, Lynn Marshall, Jason Bogan.New faces, developments at the Port InnPHOTOS BY WES LOCHER | The StarLocal band Sonic Tonic provided entertainment from Eagle Harbors new stage.State park appreciation day turns up the volumeShowing gratitudeFamilies headed out to Eagle Harbor on Cape San Blas for State Park Appreciation day. Attendees were treated to a low-country shrimp boil. Friday,October18thTripleTailsSeafood &RawBar 3p.m.&5p.m. Provisions 6p.m. TheThirstyGoat 6:30p.m.,8:30p.m. &10:30p.m. MangoMarley's (centraltimezone) 7p.m.&9p.m.Saturday,October19thDocksideSeafoodandRawBar 11:30a.m.,12:45p.m. 2p.m.FreeSongwriters Workshop LookoutLounge 5p.m.&7p.m. Toucans (centraltimezone) 6p.m.,8p.m.,&10p.m. HaughtyHeron 7p.m.&9p.m.Sunday,October20thIndianPassRawBar 2p.m.,3:30p.m.,5p.m., 6:30p.m.,8p.m. 10p.m.LateNight JamSessionForfulleventschedule, visit:BlastontheBay.com ThisProjectreceivednancial assistancefromtheGulfCountyTDC. ThisProjectreceivednancial assistancefromVisitFlorida.

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COMMUNITY www.starfl.com BPage 1SectionTrivia Fun with Wilson Casey, Guinness World Record Holder from Woodruff, S.C., is published in more than 500 newspapers across the country and is a weekly feature in The Port St. Joe Star. 1) What would a cruciverbalist ordinarily be looking for in a newspaper? Sports, Weather, Headlines, Crosswords 2) Ataxia is a medical condition as a consequence of which organ? Liver, Heart, Brain, Kidneys 3) What was the rst name of Lear, founder of the Lear Jet? Joseph, Lawrence, William, Glenn 4) Since when have Girl Scouts been selling cookies? 1917, 1939, 1956, 1970 5) What is the most popular U.S. garden plant? Squash, Cucumber, Tomato, Carrot 6) Which decade saw Major League Baseball build a record 11 ballparks? 1930s, 1950s, 1970s, 1990s 7) Who hosts a yearly celebration to honor the blue-footed Bresse chicken? France, Spain, Brazil, India 8) What antacid gum did Wrigley release in 2001? Chaco, Surpass, Johnny, Steptoe 9) Whose name at birth was Issur Danielovitch? Kirk Douglas, Usher, Burt Reynolds, Sinbad 10) Which is a thief whose specialty is robbing women? Slibber, Scobberlotcher, Roddikin, Moll-buzzer 11) Whats the public name of Trevor Tahiem Smith? Busta Rhymes, E-40, Red Caf, Rockwilder 12) Where is the football stadium of Heinz Field? Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Denver, Miami 13) Who issued the rst presidential pardon? Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe 14) What means to pour a drink for someone? Yerd, Franch, Walm, Shench ANSWERS 1) Crosswords. 2) Brain. 3) William. 4) 1917. 5) Tomato. 6) 1990s. 7) France. 8) Surpass. 9) Kirk Douglas. 10) Moll-buzzer. 11) Busta Rhymes. 12) Pittsburgh. 13) Washington. 14) Shench. Trivia FunWilson CaseyWC@Trivia Guy.com TIM CROFT | The StarThe next Salt Air Farmers Market will be held on Saturday, Oct. 5 at City Commons Park in Port St. Joe. Farmers from around North Florida and Georgia will have fresh produce for purchase and vendors will sell homemade crafts and jewelry. The Salt Air Farmers Market promotes a sustainable food system on Floridas Forgotten Coast. The Market runs from 9 a.m. ET until 1 p.m. SALT AIR FARMERS MARKET Thursday, October 3, 2013By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@starfl.com From its creation in 2003, the Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves has performed to a succinct motto. People must be stakeholders in the land, founding members said as a mission statement. To promote the Preserves, to create more stakeholders and increase membership the Friends will hold Bay Day this weekend, with the event kicking off Friday with an astronomy walk and continuing through Saturday with tours, music and food. Bay Day events begin 7 p.m. ET Oct. 4 with an Astronomy Walk & Talk led by Dr. Cliff Harris from Gulf Coast State College. Walking in the preserve you will get a feel for just how large the solar system is and have fun observing the stars and night sky. A Low Country Boil will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET and the menu includes boiled shrimp, sausage, potatoes, corn on the cob, Cole slaw, garlic bread and beverages. A $10 donation is asked per meal. During the February Bay Day 458 plates of shrimp boil were sold, representing a major fundraiser for the Friends. New this Bay Day is a Kayak Adventure led by Kim Wren, former Aquatic Preserve Manager and now Stewardship Manager at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in Eastpoint. There are a limited number of spaces available so come out on Oct. 5 and sign up for the adventure. Happy Ours Kayak and Kike Outpost is sponsoring the Kayak Adventures. Ten years after its creation, the Friends group remains a vibrant and active partner working with the preserve staff to keep St. Joseph Bay, one of Floridas 41 aquatic preserves, pristine while assisting with work on the uplands when called. If you are not familiar with the Buffer Preserve or the Aquatic Preserve stop in for a visit at the Preserve Welcome Center and learn how the Buffer Preserve helps to protect the bay through a natural ltration of the water as it descends to the bay via the watershed, said Sandra Cha n, on staff at the Buffer Preserves. St. Joseph Bay is one of the most pristine bays on the Gulf of Mexico and the goal is to keep it that way. The Preserves Center is also a mecca for scientists and researchers. Since January there have been almost 20 groups of students and professors staying at the Preserve. They have come from South Dakota, Wayne State College in Nebraska, Creighton University in Omaha and colleges from Missouri and Illinois, as well as those close to home such as Florida, Louisiana and Tennessee. A student from Puerto Rico and one from Nova Scotia have called the Buffer Preserve home in 2013, Cha n noted. The Friends group, a nonpro t supporting the missions of the Preserves, has exploded since its creation. Membership is now over 200 and still growing, Cha n said. A new Preserve manager, Dylan Shoemaker, is also on board. The Friends need your help and support in order to continue working to make the Preserves the best they can be and provide a place of enjoyment and learning for the public, Cha n said. Dylan arrived in January and has made a substantial impact at the Buffer Preserve. A new Aquatic Preserve manager is expected to join the crew before long to further promote the ongoing positive relationship between the uplands and the bay. St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve is located on State Road 30-A at Simmons Bayou. St. Joseph Bay Aquatic Preserve encompasses 73,000 submerged acres in the bay and gulf. The Friends group work to help both hence they are Friends of the Preserves while each of the preserve are a separate entity. The Aquatic Preserve has not been funded through the state so a group of dedicated volunteers sample the water and use a transect to observe the sea grass to ensure the pristine condition of the water and sea grass for all living in the bay. Plants are a major area of study on the Buffer Preserve. The preserves crop of Chapmans rhododendrons is the largest population of its kind on public lands. Other federally or state threatened or endangered plant populations are observed and conditions created that encourage their growth. SCHEDULE OF EVENTSFriday Astronomy walk, 7 p.m. ET Saturday Tour the Preserves 10-11:30 a.m.; 12-1:30 p.m.; 2-3:30 p.m. ET Enjoy a trip through the backwoods trails of the Buffer Preserve to nd rare and endangered plants, prescribed burn sites and various native plants. There will be trips to learn about shore birds, shoreline of the Bay, adventures with kayaks. Schedule and information at www. stjosephbaypreserves.org. Sunset cruise, 5 p.m. tickets sold Oct. 1-5, rstcome, rst-served. Call 229-1787 to register. SPECIAL TO THE STARTram tours in search of wild owers and butter ies will be led by Bill Boothe (right). Bay Day will offer visitors a host of tours into the wilds of the 5,000-plus acre Buffer Preserve.Annual Bay Day promotes preserves former Aquatic Preserve Manager and now Stewardship Manager at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in Eastpoint. There are a limited number of spaces available so come out on Oct. 5 and sign up for the adventure. Happy Ours Kayak and Kike Outpost is sponsoring the Kayak Ten years after its creation, the Friends group remains a vibrant and active partner preserve staff to keep St. Joseph Bay, one of Floridas 41 aquatic preserves, pristine not familiar with the Buffer Preserve or the Aquatic Preserve stop in for a visit at the Preserve Welcome Center and learn how the Buffer Preserve helps to protect the bay through a natural ltration of the water as it descends to the bay via the watershed, said Sandra Cha n, on staff at the Buffer Preserves. St. Joseph Bay is one of the most pristine bays on the Gulf of Mexico and the goal is to keep it that way. The Preserves Center is also a mecca for scientists and researchers. Since January there have been almost 20 groups of students and professors staying at the Preserve. They have come from South Dakota, Wayne State College in Nebraska, Creighton University in Omaha and state so a group of dedicated volunteers sample the water and use a transect to observe the sea grass to ensure the pristine condition of the water and sea grass for all living in the bay. Plants are a major area of study on the Buffer Preserve. The preserves crop of Chapmans rhododendrons is the largest population of its kind on public lands. Other federally or state threatened or endangered plant populations are observed and conditions created that encourage their growth. SCHEDULE OF EVENTS Astronomy walk, 7 p.m. ET Tour the Preserves 10-11:30 a.m.; 12-1:30 p.m.; 2-3:30 p.m. ET Enjoy a trip through the backwoods trails of the Buffer Preserve to nd rare and endangered plants, prescribed burn sites and various native plants. There will be trips to learn about shore birds, shoreline of the Bay, adventures with kayaks. Schedule and information at www. stjosephbaypreserves.or g Sunset cruise, 5 p.m. tickets sold Oct. 1-5, rstcome, rst-served. Call 229-1787 to register. SPECIAL TO THE STARThe Low Country Boil is a highlight of the annual Bay Day in support of the St. Joseph Bay Preserves.

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B2 | The Star Thursday, October 3, 2013 Angelisa45#AmstaffTerrier.Sheis playful,friendlyandoutgoing.Angel walksfairlywellonherleashandknows thecommanofsitanddown.Shelovesto cuddlewitheverybody.Angelgetsalong wellwithmostdogsbutdoesnotcarefor thecompanyofkitties. FREESPAYORNEUTERFORTHEDOGSOF 32456ZIP Pleasedonothesitatetoemailtownsend. hsdirector@gmail.comoradoptbaystjoe@ gmail.comorcalltheSt.JosephBay HumaneSocietyat850-227-1103andaskforMelodyorDebbie!Applicationsare availableatwww.sjbhumanesociety.orgWerequireallpotentialadoptersto completeanapplicationform.Adoptionfeesincludeourcostofspay/neuterand currentvaccinations. OurhoursfortheshelterareTuesday-Saturdayfrom10am-4pm! Faith'sThriftHutisalwaysinneedofdonationsalso,andalltheproceedsgodirectly tosupporttheanimalsinourcare!ThehoursforthestoreareThursday-Saturday from10am-3pm.Volunteersarealwayswelcomeatbothourstoreandourshelter! Ourstoreandshelterlocationis1007TenthStreetinPortSt.Joe!Hopetoseeyouall theresoon!Ifyouaremissingapetorwanttoadoptanewpet,pleasecheckwithyourlocalHumaneSocietyorShelter. FollowusonFacebook:St.JosephBayHumaneSocietywww.sjbhumanesociety.org 4514866forONLY$15perweek $60permonth CallToday 227.7847SeeYourBusinessNameandInfoHere WEHAVEMOVEDTO: 327REIDAVE (CORNEROF4THSt&REIDAVE.) 850-227-3472 HOURS MONDAYTOWEDNESDAY8AMTO6PM THURSDAYTOSATURDAY8AMTO8PM SUNDAY11AMTO6PM 9454HWY98BEACONHILLATTHE MEXICOBEACHCITYLIMITS8506478310 GREATSELECTIONOFALLYOURFAVORITEBEER,WINE&SPIRITS RANDY&ART RANDYSTARK RANDY&ART RANDYSTARK S SPIRIT& WINE BEERVORITEA FOURY ALL OFTION SELECTGREA ONTHEPOOPDECK UPCOMINGEVENTS -INTHECROWSNESTKARAOKE Thoughts of insect infestations usually bring to mind attacks on outdoor ornamental planting and vegetable gardens, but houseplants are not immune to insect invasions. Of course, plants growing indoors are better protected than those exposed to outside conditions. However, a number of insects might in ltrate your home in search of a leafy meal. Major enemies of indoor plants include spider mites, mealy bugs, aphids and scales, all of which cause damage by sucking out plant juices. Spider mites, which may be green, yellow, red or almost colorless, are very small only about 1/50 inch long. Theyre dif cult to see without a magnifying glass. As the name implies, they look like tiny spiders and are usually found on the undersides of leaves. If your plants are heavily infested with spider mites, youll see ne webbing on the foliage. Mealy bugs are small, softbodied insects, about an eighth of an inch long, covered with a white powdery material. Some species have a long, waxy lament at the rear of the body. Aphids, which may be green, pink, brown, black, yellow or blue, are usually less than an eighth of an inch long. They are pearshaped and have long antennae and two short tubes that extend from the rear of the body. Scales, like aphids, are found in a wide range of colors. They range from an eight to a third of an inch in length, are covered with a waxy material and may be circular, oblong or pear-shaped. Scales are found on both sides of leaves, as well as on twigs and branches, where they hide in crevices. Although primarily an outdoor pest, white ies occasionally are found on houseplants. These pests, which resemble tiny moths, are about one-sixteenth of an inch long, and as youd expect, theyre white. You can usually tell if you have a white y problem by gently shaking suspected plants. If the pests are present, theyll swarm around the plants for a few seconds. They also can be found on the undersides of leaves. Like the other critters weve described, white ies injure plant by sucking out juices. They cause the most damage while feeding in their immature stage, when they look like tiny green to whitish sh scales. Other house plant pests include fungus gnat maggots, psocids (soe-dids) and springtails. These soil-borne pests cause little or no damage. However, large populations may become a nuisance. Fungus gnat maggots are white, worm-like and reach a length of about one-quarter of an inch at maturity. Psocids generally are six-tenths of an inch or less in length. Theyre grayish in color and may or may not have wings. Springtails range in size from microscopic to as much as a fth of an inch long. Theyre usually white, and they jump when disturbed. Bugs often invade out homes on new plants. It pays to give such introductions a close inspection, before placing them near established plant residents. For more information on houseplant pests, call the Gulf County Extension Service at 6393200, or visit http://gulf.ifas.u .edu and see Publication ENY 476, ENY 317 & ENY 320. SocietyStar Staff ReportsNew VSO, new of ce hoursThe new Gulf County Veterans Service Of cer is Joe Paul, who replaced the recently retired James Kennedy. The new of ce hours are 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. ET Tuesday and Wednesday. For appointments, call 229-6125.Senior citizens group needs your helpGulf County Senior Citizens, 120 Library Drive in Port St. Joe, is asking for donations of nonperishable foods such as juice, canned tuna and chicken, soup or vegetables for low-income seniors. Small, inexpensive bingo prizes are always needed for our clients who love to play bingo several times a week. Also needed are donations of items for arts and crafts. We provide a hot nutritious noon meal Monday through Friday to seniors 60 and over. Transportation may be available to our meal sites. Anyone interested in coming to our sites in Port St. Joe or Wewahitchka for meals and activities or who would like to donate any of the items noted above may call Debbie at 229-8466.Star Staff ReportsSea Oats and Dunes club to meet Oct. 8Please join the Sea Oats and Dunes Garden Club at its next monthly meeting at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8 at Beach Baptist Hall, 311 Columbus St. in St. Joe Beach. PSJ Garden Club to meet Oct. 10The Port St Joe Garden Club will have its monthly meeting at noon Thursday, Oct. 10, at its garden center on Eighth Street. David Goodson of Bayside Florist & Gifts will present a program on oral design. Visitors are welcome. To attend, contact a garden club member or leave a message on our Facebook page. Our garden center is on both national and state historical site lists and available for rental. Marron Lance is bornBladen, Hailyn, Stratton, Stetson and Adley would like to announce the arrival of their baby brother, Marron Lance Moses! Marron was born at Bay Medical Center on Sept. 6 at 2:26 p.m. He weighed 8 pounds, 15 ounces and was 22.5 inches long. Proud parents are Marcus Moses and Stephanie Watson. Marron was welcomed by many family members. He is the grandson of Sandy and Jerry Mitchell and Geraldine Conlon of Howard Creek, Rhonda and Steve Smeby, March (Runt) and Deborah Moses, Glenda Newell and Geraldine Nash of Apalachicola, Charles and Donie Sasser and the late W.C. and Shirley Robinson of Wewahitchka. Proud aunts and uncles include Rhett and Brittnie Butler, Lance Watson, Jessica Chancey and Chandler and Tanner Moses. Marron has many other aunts, uncles and numerous cousins. Welcome to the world, little man. You are perfect in every way. We love you!Lily is 2!Our sweet baby is a big 2 years old! Lillian Alice Henderson celebrated her Sept. 9 birthday with her family and a Minnie Mouse party at the White City Fire Department. The celebration continued at her school with cupcakes and treats for all her friends. Lily is the daughter of Heather Henderson of Apalachicola. She is the granddaughter of Donnie and Donna Harcus of White City and Michael Henderson of Apalachicola. She is the greatgranddaughter of Bill and Edna Henderson of Eastpoint. Happy Birthday Lily! We love you so much! Birth Birthday Houseplant pests come in all shapes, sizes ROY LEE CARTERCounty extension directorSPECIAL TO THE STARMany kinds of pests attack indoor plants. Society BRIEFS Gardening BRIEFS Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR

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The Star| B3Thursday, October 3, 2013 OurlocalrealestateexpertshaveidentiedwhattheyfeelarethebestvaluesaroundandareoeringthemtoyouinRealEstatePicks! (Inthissection),DiscoverthebestrealestatevaluesinMexicoBeach,PortSt.Joe,Apalachicola,CapeSanBlas, St.GeorgeIsland,Carrabelleandsurroundingareas. RealEstatePicks BestValuesonthe ForgottenCoast SELLYOURLISTINGSHERE! (850)227-7847|tgolden@pcnh.comSOLD School NewsStar Staff ReportWewahitchka Elementary School is welcoming three new faces to the kindergarten classes this year. Ms. Ashley Taunton has taught second grade at WES for the past three years and is delighted to be with Kindergarten. Ms. Kayla Chumney Bailey comes from Blountstown Elementary. She is happy to return to WES are student teaching at the school. Ms. Julie McMillian is a local Gulf Countian and is excited to join the Kindergarten and re-join the WES family after also student teaching at WES.Special to The StarThe third-grade reading class of Faith Christian School presented a Living History report for family and friends.  The children read a biography, collected information for a written report, produced a character newspaper and presented their information to a live audience while in costume.  Pictured left to right are: Harriet Tubman Jae Lennox; Pocahontas Eliza Bailey; Helen Keller Mazie Hodges; Abe Lincoln -Carter Costin; Ben Franklin Taylor Burkett; and friend of Helen Keller -Eddie LaFountain. Pictured separately is Karys Linton as Annie Oakley. SPECIAL TO THE STARPPort St. Joe EElementary SchoolFront Row: Jasmine Sandoval, Karli Moore, Santana Causey, Kailah Thomas Back Row: Brandon Heckinlively ,  Davis Varnes, Sean Farnsley, Alexis Gathers DAZZLING DOLPHINsS By WES LOCHER229-7843 |@PSJ_Star wlocher@starfl.com Four was a charm for Port St. Joe Elementary School. The College for Every Student organization (CFES) honored Port St. Joe Elementary with its fourth-straight School of Distinction award in a ceremony held on Monday. The award recognized the schools efforts to broaden horizons and raise expectations among students during the 2012-13 school year. Port St. Joe Elementary is one of just 25 schools nationwide to receive the School of Distinction award and one of four schools to receive it four years in a row. The award recognizes schools with exemplary programs that incorporate the three CFES core practices: Leadership through Service, Mentoring, and Pathways to College. These schools not only provide intensive exposure to the three practices for targeted students, known as CFES Scholars, but create a college-going culture that promotes college readiness and success for the entire student body. The School of Distinction program was created four years ago and Port St. Joe Elementary has received the honor all four years, said CFES President and CEO Rick Dalton. They have shown and continue to show their commitment to providing students with the tools and skills they need to be college-ready. CFES school liaison and program director Carol Cathey was on-hand to present the award to Principal Sue Gannon along with guidance counselor DeEtta Smallwood and a handful of student Scholars. We have a great school and a great program, said Gannon. Weve had the CFES program since I was a teacher at the high school. Were continuing to implement these programs even though our funding has dwindled because theyre so benecial to students. After presenting a new banner recognizing the schools achievements, Cathey shook the hand of each of the students and congratulated them on their accomplishments so far. The faculty and staff who implement the program do so as volunteers, Cathey reminded the students. Theyre very good at it. Cathey mentioned recent high school graduate Javarri Beachum who upon graduation, was accepted to the Naval Academy Prep School. Cathey reminded students that Beachum had been part of the CFES program, too. CFES has partnered with Gulf Coast State College to provide services to the school that include a two-year scholarship to an excelling student once they graduate. Gulf Coast State College is actively involved in helping Gulf County students get ready to get to college and stay there, said Cathey. To apply for the recognition, the school faculty and students created a submission portfolio to show that students could not only set goals, but reach them. A written plan for what the staff hoped to accomplish within the school year was also included in the portfolio. The CFES program aims to help schools with global awareness of what makes students successful and more aware of their futures. Students in the program will mentor others and raise college awareness through college T-shirt day and complete various other projects throughout the year both inside and outside the classroom.PSJ Elementary honored with School of Distinction award for fourth yearWEs S LL OCHER | The StarThe College for Every Student organization presented Port St. Joe Elementary with its fourth School of Distinction banner. Wewahitchka Elementary spotlights kindergarten The Lions Tale

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FAITHPage B4This business invites you to visit the church of your choice this week. www.starfl.com SOUTHERLANDFAMILY FUNERALHOME(850)229-8111 (TraditionalServices1928BCP) MorningPrayer&HolyCommunion Sunday...............10:00A.M.TheRev.LouLittle,PriestServicesTemporarilyatSeniorCitizensCenter, 120LibraryDrive AnUnchangingFaithInAChangingWorld COMFORTER FUNERALHOME (850)227-1818 9:45 10:30 10:45 6:00 (850)229-9596 SundaySchool............................10a.m. SundayMorningWorship...........11a.m. SundayEveningWorship..............6p.m. WednesdayEveningService.......7p.m. TOUCHINGLIVES WITHTHELOVE OFJESUS 6pm Fred Freddy Flintstone White passed way in his Overstreet home on Sept. 25, 2013. A Floridian most of his life, he was an amazing husband, father, grandpa, son, brother, uncle and friend. He was a Master of Carpentry and was passionate about growing things and feeding his birds and squirrels. He is survived by the love of his life of 40 years, Debbie White; four children and 7 grandchildren. He is also survived by his father, two brothers and one sister and their families. He was a great teacher to all and will be dearly missed. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to El Governor Hotel, c/o Wylie Petty, Mexico Beach, Fla.Fred Freddy Flintstone White Obituaries Faith BRIEFSFUMC Mens Club BBQ Chicken SupperThe First United Methodist Mens Club will host a BBQ Chicken Supper from 4-6 p.m. ET on Friday. Half chicken, beans, slaw, bread and tea will be served for $8 a plate. Carry-out or eat-in. The First United Methodist Womens Bake Sale will be happening simultaneously.St. James celebrates feast of St. FrancisSt. James Episcopal Church will celebrate the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi with a Blessing of the Animals on at 4 p.m. ET Saturday, Oct. 5. The blessing will be under the gazebo and any over ow will be in the adjacent parking lot. Pets are welcome! Father Tommy does expect leads or enclosures be utilized so as to avoid any undue over activity or anxiety. St. James Episcopal Church is at 800 22nd St. in Port St. Joe.Special to The StarIs there one true religion? Or many? These questions will be discussed at 7 p.m. CT on Monday at Lifetree Caf. The program, Only One Way to God? Can One Religion Really Have All the Answers? features the lmed story of Valerie Winn, an American whose spiritual journey led her to a Chinese village where she encountered an underground church. Winn describes her encounters with various religions and how they shaped her. I nally said, God, would you just show me if youre real? Winn said. Admission to the 60minute event is free. Snacks and beverages are available. Lifetree Caf is at 1602 U.S. 98 in Mexico Beach across from El Governor Motel. Lifetree Caf is a place where people gather for conversation about life and faith in a casual coffeehousetype setting. Questions about Lifetree may be directed to Gary Grubb at 334-806-5667 or lwclifetreecafe@fairpoint. net. Special to The StarStudents from Gulf to Franklin county schools will be joining thousands of other youth on athletic elds all across the nation on Wednesday to share their Christian faith with fellow students during the seventh annual National Fields of Faith event. This rapidly-growing, interdenominational outreach event will be held at more than 475 locations throughout the nation on this same date. Though many Christian rallies are anchored to an entertainer or professional speaker that creates a spectator event, Fields of Faith is structured as a student-to-student ministry. Peers invite their own classmates and teammates to meet on their schools athletic eld to hear fellow students share their testimonies, challenge them to read the Bible and to come to faith in Jesus Christ. This will be the second Fields of Faith event for Port St. Joe Junior/Senior High. Last year, about 250 students and supporters attended at the Shark Stadium. The national growth of Fields of Faith has been remarkable. Since the beginning of Fields of Faith in 2004, more than 600,000 students have joined in the movement. In 2012 alone, more than 160,000 students gathered on 424 elds across 37 states to participate in the event. Its not just those numbers that have FCA organizers excited about Fields of Faith. Its the real-life impact these gatherings are having on young people. Last years series of events saw 3,710 students make rst-time faith commitments to follow Jesus Christ, 4,809 recommitted their life to Christ and 6,885 committed to reading the Bible daily. The impetus for Fields of Faith began with Jeff Martin, an FCA staff person, who conceived the idea from an Old Testament reference in 2 Chronicles 34 after searching how to help todays generation of students face spiritual battles and temptations. In the scripture, King Josiah, an in uential teenager very similar to Fields of Faith attendees today, gathered his people and challenged them to read the Bible. As a result, they changed their culture. In 2004, the Josiahin uenced dream came true when 6,000 students gathered on school athletic elds throughout three states for the rst Fields of Faith event. That was the beginning of what has become one of the most signi cant faith-related gathering of students in a single day. While Fields of Faith has its roots with FCA leadership, the event is designed to include multiple national Christian organizations, local churches and ministries. A local leadership team will determine the program of each Fields of Faith event. More information about Fields of Faith is available at FieldsofFaith.com. To learn more about the event in Port St. Joe, contact Dena Sapp (478) 957-4501 or email boxwoodhome@ yahoo.com. Theodore Daniels, son of the late Annie Bell Peterson and the late Adam Daniels, was born Aug. 11, 1921, in Vernon, Fla. He was educated through the Washington County School System. He was joined in holy matrimony to the late Hazel White, of Bonifay, Fla., from 19401965. Nine children were born to this union: Theodore Jr. (Ann, deceased) of St. Petersburg, Fla., Mary Helen Blanford (Raymond) of Elizabeth, Colo.; William Hard of St. Petersburg; the late Richard Ervin (Barbara) of St. Petersburg; The Rev. Linda Kilpatrick (Pat, deceased) of Kent, Wa..; Brenda Givens (Charles) of Port St. Joe; Velma Smith (Charles) of Orange City; Cary (Rosalyn) of St. Petersburg, and Ronald (Valerie) of Hinesville, Ga. Theodore was married to the former Olivia Seabrooks of Apalachicola from 1971 until his demise. He and Olivia have one son, Walter (Charlotte) of Port St. Joe and one daughter, Yolanda, of Pensacola. He also had a love for his special dog, Peppa. Beings the oldest of 15 children, he was preceded in death by nine of his siblings. He leaves behind two brothers and three sisters to cherish his memory: James Peterson of Green Cove Springs; Robert Peterson, Mae Bell (David) Vann, Annie K. Davis and the Rev. Savannah Frederick, all of Vernon. He also leaves to cherish two sister-in-laws; Rosa Lee Peterson of Vernon and Cheryl Peterson of Caryville, Fla. He will be greatly missed by his numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, greatgreat-grandchildren, nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Theodore was a Steward at New Bethel A.M.E. Church since the late 1960s. He was gainfully employed at the St. Joe Paper Company for over 30 years. He was an avid sherman, hunter and gardener. He loved nature and the outdoors. Funeral services for Theodore were held on Saturday, Sept. 28, at New Bethel A.M.E. Church in Port St. Joe. He is interred at Forest Hill Cemetery. The Daniels family would like to extend their sincere appreciation to friends and neighbors for the many kind and lovely expressions of sympathy. You were, and continue to be, a comfort in a time of need. May God forever bless you and keep you.Theodore DanielsSpecial to The StarPlease join us under the sails at First United Methodist Church at 4 p.m. ET on Sunday for the Blessing of our Pets. If you dont have a pet to receive a blessing, the St. Joseph Bay Humane Society will have a few available for adoption. After the Blessing Ceremony we will head to the Humane Society on 10th Street to offer Blessing to those animals that remain at the shelter. Please join us for the service Under The Sails and, if you like, the service at the shelter. We will be collecting donations for the Humane Society. They dont need pet food, as Science Diet has a special program for the shelter, but they sure could use kitty litter, dog and cat toys and treats. And of course cash! Join us and see if its true, People look like their pets! Fields of Faith event to be held in Port St. JoeFUMC hosts Blessing of the Animals Key question about religion explored at Lifetree Caf Thursday, October 3, 2013

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LocalThe Star| B5Thursday, October 3, 2013 Trades&Services GETYOURADIN CALLTODAY! 227-7847 229-1324 PROFESSIONALFLOORCARE,INC.ResidentialandCommercialCarpetandUpholsteryCleaningServingtheentireGulfCoastarea CeramicTileandGroutCleaning RVs-Cars-Trucks-Vans 24HourEmergencyWaterExtraction4510158 4514308Guitar,Amp,SoundSystem &InstrumentRepairSt.JoeMusicCo&RSRRecordingStudio210WilliamsAve,PortSt.Joe(850)227.7224 sales@stjoemusic.com Jury scam reportedSpecial to The StarThe United States District Court for the Northern District of Florida has received several calls this week from concerned local citizens reporting a jury scam. According to the reports, the caller, who claims to represent the Court, tells the person that he/she has failed to report for federal jury duty and then states that the person will be arrested and jailed by the judge unless he/she appears at the courthouse with a MoneyPak card. Please be advised this is a scam. If you are a victim of this scam, please contact the FBIs Internet Crimes Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov. If you have any questions or concerns about federal jury service please contact the Of ce of the Clerk: District Jury Of ce at 850-521-3705 or by email at jury_ nd@ nd.uscourts. gov; Gainesville Division at 352-380-2400; Pensacola Division at 850-435-8440; Tallahassee Division at 850-521-3501; Panama City Division at 850-769-4556. Like us on THE PORT ST. JOE STAR CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 3, 2103 The Star | B5 1010S STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, AND CIRCULATION Publication: The Star 135 W. Hwy 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Publication Number: 518-880 Filing Date: October 4, 2012 Issue Frequency Weekly (Thursday Morning) Published Annually: 52 Weeks Annual Subscription Price: $24.15 In County $34.65 Out of County Contact Person: Rodney Menzel (850) 747-5042 Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication and General Business Office of Publisher: P.O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 Publisher: Roger Quinn P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Editor: Tim Croft 135 W. Hwy 98 Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Managing Editor: N/A Owner: Halifax Media Holdings LLC (a Delaware Corporation) P. O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 Publication Title: The Star Issue Date for Circulation Data: August 30, 2012. Extent and Nature of Circulation; Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months; Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date. Total Number of Copies: Average: 2061 Actual: 2033 Paid Circulation Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: Average: 346 Actual: 344 Mailed In-County Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: Average: 65 Actual: 64 Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS: Average: 1278 Actual: 1130 Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS: Average: 0 Actual: 0 Total Paid Distribution: Average: 1689 Actual: 1538 Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution: Average: 49 Actual: 50 Total Distribution: Average: 1738 Actual: 1588 Copies not Distributed: Average: 323 Actual: 445 Total: Average: 2061 Actual: 2033 Percent Paid: Average: 99.2% Actual: 96.9% Publication of Statement of Ownership: October 3, 2013 Roger Quinn Regional Publisher September 27, 2012 I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties.) October 3, 2013 95527S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 13-29 CA PRI PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. GULF SUPPLY COMPANY OF PORT ST. JOE, INC., a Florida corporation, Defendant. RE-NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 12, 2013, and entered in Civil Action No. 13-29-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, PRI PROPERTIES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, and the Defendant, GULF SUPPLY COMPANY OF PORT ST. JOE, INC., a Florida corporation, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at 11:00 oclock a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 10th day of October, 2013, at the front door of the Gulf County Courthouse, Port St. Joe, Florida, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure. Lot 3, of Port St. Joe, Commerce Park Phase II, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 5, at Page(s) 54 and 55 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 19th day of September, 2013. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Court Gulf County, Florida By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Sept. 26, Oct. 3, 2013 92616S NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Art By Catey located at 107 Reid Ave, in the County of Gulf, in the City of Port St Joe, Florida, 32456 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Port St Joe, Florida, this 23rd day of September, 2013. Art By Catey LLC October 3, 2013 95597S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 232012CA 000188CAAXMX NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, vs. RICHARD D. BARFIELD, ET AL Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: Estate of Robert L. Holland and Unknown Heirs and/ or Beneficiaries of the Estate of Robert L. Holland RESIDENCE: Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 447 Pineview Drive Wewahitchka, FL 32465 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Gulf County, Florida: Lot 8, in Block A, of Circle J Estates, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, at Page 10, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Gladstone Law Group, P.A., attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, either before, either beNeed a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club to have Spaghetti DinnerSpecial to The StarCannolis, tiramisu, ameretti, cioccolato and pizzelles are Italian desserts that will be served at the St. Joseph Catholic Church Mens Club annual Spaghetti Dinner 5-7 p.m. ET on Saturday. This event will take place in the church hall, just east of the church on 20th Street in Port St. Joe. In addition to the great spaghetti, Italian beer and wine and the desserts, entertainment and door prizes are included. Tickets are limited to the rst 200 buyers, so get yours soon at the Church Hall (227-1417), Hannon Insurance, No Name Caf or call President Dan Van Treese at 227-8138.

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B6| The Star Thursday, October 3, 2103 CLASSIFIEDS 4510161 4510160 4514327OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 149B COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 3 OFFICE/KIT/BATH AND WAREHOUSE $ 675.00 PER MONTH/ 675.00 DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 4514326OFFICE/WAREHOUSE SPACE AVAILABLE NOW 151A COMMERCE BLVD ST. JOE COMMERCE PARK 12X12 OFFICE, BATH, STORAGE AND LARGE WAREHOUSE $ 550.00 PER MONTH/ 550.0O DEP ONE YEAR LEASE CALL 850-229-8014 1114649 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:SHIPFITTERS FLUXCORE WELDERS PIPE WELDERS X-RAY WELDERS PIPEFITTERS SAFETY REPCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive benets package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Qualied craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401 (850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace Creative/Design The News Herald is looking for a:Graphic ArtistCandidate must have experience in InDesign/Photoshop/Quark or Illustrator (PC Platform preferred) while being open to learning new programs. The ideal candidate should have a creative eye, attention to details, organized, able to meet deadlines, have good communications/ phone skills and be able to work with minimal supervisor. Experience working in or with marketing departments is a plus. A portfolio will be requested at the time of the interview. The News Herald offers an excellent benefit package including vacation, sick leave, 401(k), medical, dental, vision, life insurance. Pick up an application at The News Herald, 501 W. 11th Street, or send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com. EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34265884 Text FL65884 to 56654 IT/Software DevelopmentRegional Information Technology DirectorThe Panama City News Herald, Halifax Media is seeking an experienced ITDirector to manage systems for two daily, five semi-weekly, three weekly newspapers and an internet portal. The ideal candidate will have a Bachelors Degree in computer science or engineering and six to ten years progressive experience. Prior newspaper experience a plus. General areas of responsibility include: content, management and financial information systems, word processing and office automation, data and voice communications and subsystems particular to the newspaper industry, support for web-based graphics programs. Specific duties include: analyzes the organizationsinformation and telecommunications systems as a basis for recommendations to improve and enhance the systemscapabilities; coordinates with the enterprise ITteam to implement the selection, and completion of new IS and telecommunications systems to accommodate growing needs of the region; identifying priorities for development, enhancement and maintenance of application areas; developing and implementing a uniform region-wide strategy for equipment, operating systems and communications; developing annual budgets for hardware, software and any capital purchases region-wide; oversees maintenance of servers and computer hardware for the region. The Regional ITDirector hires and oversees system support specialists across the region to ensure they are up-to-date on latest ITdevelopments. Some travel is required. Halifax Media offers a competitive benefit plan including health, vision, dental, life insurance, medical and dependent care flexible spending accounts, 401(k) savings plan, paid vacation and sick leave and holidays. We will accept resumes until October 11, 2013. E-mail resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com Or mail to Lorraine Grimes: Panama City News Herald P. O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL32402. Drug-free workplace -EOE Web Id 34266822 Text FL66822 to 56654 SalesAdvertising Sales SupportOur fast-paced, innovative local media company has an immediate opportunity within our sales support team. This successful candidate will be a well-organized take-charge person who welcomes new challenges and enjoys helping other people. The Star News offers a wide variety of multi-media advertising solutions, ranging from traditional newspapers and direct mail to leading-edge digital advertising and social media. You will provide sales support to outside sales executives, who cater to the marketing needs of the small and medium-sized businesses we serve. We will consider individuals with a variety of experience, ranging from recent college graduates to individuals with experience in other industries or disciplines. Responsibilities include order entry, interacting with customers, supporting salespeople while theyre on the road and reviewing advertising materials. Scheduled workweek will be five days, Monday through Friday. Job requirements include computer skills, including the Microsoft Office suite of products, and the ability to work effectively in a team environment. Advertising, sales and/or customer service experience is a plus. Administrative skills and experience are also helpful. You will learn a lot For immediate consideration, submit a cover letter and resume to: lgrimes@pcnh.com An Equal Opportunity Employer Web ID#: 34267059 SalesSales RepsThe Panama City News Herald is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives who have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. Panama City is on the beautiful emerald coast of Northwest Florida recently named by CNN as one of Americas top 100 beaches. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business Conducting our solutions based approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. Reviewing the days successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriateall administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience Bachelors degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEOs Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266370 Text FL66340 to 56654 SalesSales RepsThe Star News is currently looking for outside sales representatives and account executives that have a background in outside sales, B2B, and business development. If you are in sales and are confident in your sales abilities, then this opportunity may be for you. We are looking for energetic sales reps and account executives with 2+ years of B2B outside sales and business development experience who would like an opportunity as an Outside Sales Rep with our company. We are only seeking passionate, positive, driven outside sales professionals. As an outside sales rep, you will be working as a business development manager selling Business to Business. Responsibilities: Preparing for appointments all travel is local and typically within a 50 mile radius of your office Meeting daily with owners of small to medium sized businesses with the goal of marketing and securing Business Conducting our solutions based approach to qualifying potential business for new sales leads in between appointments and during networking opportunities Contacting Sales Coordinator with feedback from appointments and sharing new business lead opportunities. Reviewing the days successes and challenges with your Sales Manager, gaining sales support as appropriateall administrative support people have a vested interest in your success In our organization, we offer the following to our outside sales -Account Executives: Fantastic Benefits and Compensation Program Commissions and Bonus New hire and ongoing training and development Requirements: At least two years of face-to-face direct sales, outside sales, B2B, Business Development experience Bachelors degree preferred but not necessary. We will consider the right experience over a degree Highly self-motivated and self-disciplined with ability to work effectively with little or no supervision Outgoing personality with expertise at developing relationships, particularly with business owners, presidents and CEOs Good communicator-excellent listening skills and ability to offer solutions. To apply: Send resume to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug Free Workplace Web ID#: 34266381 Text FL66381 to 56654 Sales The News Herald is seeking an innovative and experiencedSales ManagerWho will be responsible for leading and creating integrated multi-media sales strategies to drive revenue across multiple platforms. We are seeking a passionate, highly organized team player who will effectively train and motivate the sales team, using sales planners, the 5-step sales process and consistent accountability to drive their success. The Sales Manager will be creative, yet analytical. Responsibilities: Meets or exceeds sales and revenue goals. Advocates the methodical & standardized 5-step sales approach to buyers. This approach includes planning & preparing for the call, needs analyses, building a compelling solution, developing and closing an effective sales presentation, and following up to ensure client satisfaction. Communicates and advocates the companys vision for a world class sales team, excelling at building active accounts with solutions from a diverse product and services portfolio. Develops and consistently supports staff development by providing clear expectations, tools and training, sales goals, accountability and frequent feedback. Collaborates with other managers to generate new sales ideas and stays abreast of product and platformchanges. Develops sales team, striving for world class execution and results. This includes training/coaching, use of data in sales presentations, creating a vision and integrated sales campaigns for the client, producing sales presentations, and using analytics to measure the solutions ROI for the client. Requirements: Bachelors degree or comparable experience. Proven record of successful leadership in a goal-oriented, highly accountable environment. Successful record of team building and leadership. Excellent organizational and analytical skills. The ability to multi-task and manage competing priorities is essential. Digital sales experience. Proven digital sales management experiences. A deep and broad understanding of the market and competition Strong communication, negotiation and influencing skills. Proficient PC skills including Microsoft applications Excel and Word. In addition, must be well versed in digital sales tools, including job boards, search, email, social marketing and analytics. Demonstrated innovation, leadership, communication, and staff development skills. Possesses ability to coach and be coached. Strong ethical standards and integrity are a must. Understanding of research tools is a huge plus. Ensures that the business unit meets and/or exceeds revenue expectations Proven sales management experience All full-time employees are eligible for health & dental insurance, Life/ AD&D/Long-term disability Insurance, 401k plan, and paid time off. In addition, we offer: Performance/Incentive Based Pay Scale Friendly Team Environment Supportive & Motivating Staff to help you succeed Positive, Professional, and Upbeat work environment We promote from within! Please submit resume and cover letter to lgrimes@pcnh.com EOE, Drug-free workplace Web ID#: 34266340 Text FL66340 to 56654 fore October 28, 2013 or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED: September 17, 2013. Rebecca Norris Clerk of Circuit Court By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk of Court If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact ADA Coordinator at 850747-5338, fax 850-7475717 or at ADA Request@jud14.fl courts.org, P O. Box 1089, Panama City, FL 32402 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. October 3, 10, 2013 95671S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-25-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. NATHAN PETERS, III and CITY OF PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure and Order on Report and Recommendation on Motion for Partial Summary Judgment dated September 26, 2013, in Case No.: 13-25-CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit in and for Gulf County, Florida, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Gulf County Courthouse in Port St. Joe, Florida at 11:00 a.m. EST on October 24, 2013 the following described property: Lots 14, 16, 18 and West 1/2 of Lot 20, Block 1005, City of Port St. Joe, Gulf County, Florida. DATED: September 27, 2013 REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of Circuit Corut By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk October 3, 10, 2013 95599S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13000064CAAXMX AMBERS BANK, A GEORGIA BANK, f/k/a CENTRAL BANK OF GEORGIA, 97 South Broad Street Butler, GA 31006 Plaintiff, vs. THE ESTATE OF JOHN CLAY SIMPSON, DECEASED; AND THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF WILLIAM A. SIMPSON, DECEASED, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS AND TRUSTEES OF WILLIAM A. SIMPSON, DECEASED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court for Gulf County, Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: LOTS TWO AND FOUR, BLOCK SIXTEEN, BEACON HILL SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 2 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH THE 1983 MOBILE HOME WITH TITLE NUMBERS S/N HMST7309AGA AND S/N HMST309BGA LOCATED THEREON. Commonly known as: 9211 OLIVE AVENUE, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA 32458 You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, Florida 32312, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 17th day of September 2013. Rebecca Norris CLERK OF COURT By: BA Baxter Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203 Tallahassee, FL 32313 Phone: (850) 422-2520 Fax: (850) 422-2567 October 3, 10, 2013 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard SaleCome one Come All, something for everyone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 1536 Pleasant Rest Rd. 11 miles north of Hwy 98 up Co Rd. 386. Oct. 4th & 5th Also Oct. 11th & 12th 8am (est) -?????Huge Yard SaleCome one Come All, something for evryone! No early sales. txt FL67490 to 56654 Lanark Village Golf CourseRoute 98 Fri & Sat Oct. 4th & 5thBenefit Sale!Everything for the house plus antiques and collectibles! txt FL67276 to 56654 Port St. Joe: 121 Bellamy Cir. Saturday Oct. 5th 8am -1pmGarage SaleElectronics, furniture, clothing, household items, etc PSJ (Overstreet) Comming from HWY 98, turn on Co Rd 386, go 4 miles beyond Overstreet Bridge, take left on Pleasant Rest Cemetary Rd.. Go almost 2 miles, turn on Carr Rd. Look for signs Saturday Oct. 5th 8:30am (est) -untilBig Community Wide Yard Sale at Wetappo Creek7 -8 families in yard sale! Rain cancels! txt FL67417 to 56654 St. Joe Beach 104 Bucaneer Dr. Saturday Oct. 5th 8am (est) -5pm (est)Gulf Aire Community Yard SaleEverything! txt FL67498 to 56654 St. Joe Beach 206 Coral Dr. Seashores Saturday Oct. 5th 8am (est.) -5pm(est) Bookcases, coffe & end tables, china cab., tools, garage cab., fishing and tackle, china, bakeware, glassware, and other household items, sewing and craft items and much more! txt FL67445 to 56654 Wewa: 191 Dove Lane down Over Street, turn left onto Pleasant Rest Road, go 1.5 miles to Cars Lane, turn left, 1/2 block, right on Dove Ln behind Wooden fence Saturday Oct. 5th and again on Saturday, Oct 12th. Both Days 8amEstate SaleText FL67478 to 56654 White City(PSJ) 125 Pridgeon Rd. Off of Hwy 71 at the ICW bridge. Sat., Sun, & Mon Oct. 12th, -14th 8:30(est.) -4pm (est)Gigantic 3 Family Yard SaleTools, bikes, furniture, housewares, clothes, and much much more! txt FL67513 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium: Milton, FLOctober 12th & 13th 9:00 am -5:00 pm. (Concealed Weapons ClassesCall: 850-572-6611) General Admission: $6 (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407Text FL63024 to 56654 WE PAY CASH JUNK OR TRASH!Jewelry, old or new, used or vintage collectibles. We come to you. Please call Monique 850-227-1668 or cell 850-254-3898 Bldg/Const/Skill TradeCarpet/Vinyl InstallersMust be qualified. Call 850-670-4211 and ask for the Manager. Web Id 34265176 Text FL65176 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESFull Time Office Assistant Do you have office experience with good customer service & computer skills? Are you attentive to detail & have good follow-up skills? Do you enjoy the challenge of working in a fast paced office & available to work weekdays & weekends? If so, stop by 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island between 9-5 weekdays & complete an application. Great benefits. For questions, call Sandra at 850-927-7601. Web ID#: 34266116 Medical/HealthMedical Billing ClerkFor rheumatology practice. Needs to know ICD9 and CPT coding. Prefer Eclinical Works experience. Please fax resume to: 850-785-2100 or email to: adhalmd@yahoo.com Web ID#: 34267311 1bd/1ba fully furnished & equipped, utilities incldd, in town in PSJ, $1000 mo. Active military 10% discount 850-867-3611 Text FL64207 to 56654 PSJ 116 Bellamy Circle 3br/1ba, fenced yard outside pets only $550 mo + $100 deposit option to buy. 850-643-5381 Stately historic PSJ home with great Bay View. 3 Br, 2.5 Baths. Elegant throughout. $1150/mo 850-227-7234 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. Classifieds work!